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Full text of "University of Maryland men's football media guides"

THE 1961 MARYLAND 



4 4 



50-YA 




Here 
Is 

GARY 
COLLINS 

All -America 
End Candidate 







COLLINS shows why he is called M<> in- 
land's all-time BEST END. Here he leaps 
high for a pass reception among three 
pass defenders. He catches well with a 
"ciowd'' around him. This is a typical 
COLLINS catch. He has made numerous 
others lilce it and some more difficult. 



Gary Collins. University of Maryland's magnificent end, has to be con- 
sidered the most brilliant end e\er to play for any Maryland team. 
There has never been a greater all-around performer at end nor one 
who does so much as Collins. For the past two years and again in spring 
practice, he continued to amaze those who watched him day in and day 
out. Those who watched him this spring were his Coach Tom Nugent and 
IT and a host of visiting college coaches and professional coaches and 
uts. They all had the same words of admiration. It was unanimously 
said thai he could be the best of them all seen around the spring prac- 
tice circuits. 

The 6-3, 205-pounder from Williamstown, Pa., does everything, and 
dees it lie; ten- than anybody else. He catches the ball sensationally and 
effortles ly; he blocks brilliantly; he tackles superbly; he punts excep- 
tionally well; he WINS football games for you. 

In the modern era of Terp football, that has been abundant with out- 
standing individuals, undefeated teams, and national championships, 
there has been none that oould be elevated to exceed the magnificence 
of Collins. The Terps have had many great national gridiron figures, 
whose names will remain as those that helped to build Maryland foot- 
hall. These have been quarterbacks Jack Scarbath and Bernie Faloney; 
halfbacks Chet Hanulak, Ed Vereb, and Ron Waller; fullbacks Ed 
"Big Mo" Modzelewski. R,alph Felton and Dick Bielski: tackles Ray 
Krouse, Dick "Little Mo" Modzelewski, and Stan Jones; guard Bob 




Here COLLINS is streaking into the end zone 
for the winning touchdown against a Terp opponent 
last season. He had taken u screen pass on the 12 
yard line and made an unbelievable run to score, 
as he knocked down, stepped around and over de- 
fenders and his own men, as can be seen in the 
picture. 



Ward; and center Bob Pellegrini that have carved their names into the 
Maryland Hall of Fame, but never an end. Collins should join them. 

In the two great years Nugent has brought Maryland back again to 
the typewriters of the experts and the talk of the fans, it has been 
the assignments he has entrusted to Collins that have helped him in 
bringing Maryland back. 

Collins has the finest pair of hands for catching the football ever 
seen at College Park. He has the finest pair of hands seen in most any 
stadium. As Nugent points out, "Some teams are famous for their lone- 
some ends, but not Maryland with our great end, Collins. We have in 
Collins, the 'crowded end.' Gary has the outstanding faculties and in- 
stinct to go up for a pass with a crowd around him and come down with 
the ball. He likes a crowd." This was proved many times the past two 
seasons as he would time after time leap into the air with defenders 
hanging all over and around him and come down with the ball. He has 
been double and triple-teamed nearly all the time, and he likes it. He 
has fine speed and •exceptional maneuverability that makes the defend- 
er's flood to his area to cover him. This makes him most valuable as a 
decoy also, as it leaves other receivers open. 

Nugent says Collins is the best end he has coached and one of the fin- 
est he ever has seen. He agrees with the Terp opponents that he is one 
of the best in college football, in recent if not in many years. "He is in 




a class all by himself," is 
I he way Nugent puis it. "Ho 
del initvU is the besl end 
in our league and should 
prove to be one of the nest 
in the nation, again this 
year," Nugent added. 

Excelling brilliantly on of- 
fense, topped by his spectac- 
ular pass catching ability, it 
is on defense also that Col- 
lins catches the eye of 
everybody. lie is a fine di- 
agnostician of plays and 
comes up with a superb de- 
fensive effort each game. He 
is a haul and sine tackier 
and the opponenl has a 
tough t ime gel t :ng ar lornd 
his end. He has fine block 
protection thai enables him 
to break through to make 
many tackles. In a league 
that had many fine passers 
last year, he was called on 
to be one of the main "rush 
men" which resulted in the 
continuous harrassing and 
tackling of the quarterback 
and punter. He blocked 
three punts and partially 
blocked a field goal of Wake 
Forests' Norman Snead that 
preserved a Terp half-time 

lead and ultimate victory. It was in this same Wake Forest game that 
Nugent sent Collins into the game with little time left and the Deacons 
driving for a score. It appeared certain to be a pass call for a score on 
fourth down. That it was, but Collins streaked in front of the intended 
receiver in the end zone and intercepted the ba!l to preserve a Terp 
win. He had done what he was sent into the game to do. 

Collins excelled in every game, but as always there were some that 
wj re more vivid. Against North Carolina State he was a star in defeat. 
Besides his pass receiving, he made tackles all over the field and put 
on a brilliant punting exhibition. One of his punts put Maryland ahead 
until Roman Gabriel personally led the Pack upheld for their winning 
score. Collins punted 45 yards to the State one yard Hire. On the first 
Sta'e play, punt formation, he blasted through to block the kick and 
have a teammate recover it in the end zone for the go-ahead touch- 
down. 

For the second year in a row, Clemson coach 
Collins credit for the Terps' win over his Tigers, 
standing pass receiving that won for Maryland 
2S-25. Playing while very sick, he caught two touchdown passes, the 
second a magnificent catch in the end zone with time about run out. 
Then again last year. Collins was having physical trouble. He had a bad 



At the close of the season, the bril- 
liant COLLINS was rewarded for his 
outstanding />'"// as he was voted to 
receive the trophy as the teams' "Line- 
man of the Year." 



Frank Howard gave 

It was Collins' out- 

his sophomore year. 



ankle and hadn't practiced all week and didn't start the game. But 
when the Terps were driving for a score, Nugent put Collins into the 
game and he caught a pass and went 32 yards to the one yard line from 
where the Terps scored on the next play. In the victory drive, he caught 
a key pass for a first down that set up the winning score that he tallied 
after a great catch and an almost unbelievable run into the end zone. 
For the 2-3 minutes he played, he was given credit for the damaging 
blows. 

His performance against South Carolina was another superior exhi- 
bition as he caught five passes with a "crowd" around him, one a sen- 
sational fourth-down catch that kept a subsequent TD drive goiing. 

At Penn State, he plaj-ed what might have been his best all-around 
game. Cnce again, he caugbl the ball, blocked, tackled and did every- 
thing. After the game, he was voted the "outstanding lineman" of the 
game. In the balloting for the top back and lineman of the game, he 
received the most votes of all, which could mean the press thought him 
to be the best player on the field. 

It was at North Carolina that he gave a repeat performance of the 
weeks before. And it was here that he came up with his most crucial 
touchdown pass reception of the season. With fourth down and three 
for a score late in the game, he coyly maneuvered himself into isola- 
tion in the Tar H'eel end zone and unerringly took the pass from quar- 
terback Dale Betty for the winning score. His overall standout game 
wen him "National Lineman of the Week" honors. 

COLLINS, along with his "National Lineman of the Week" award 
was honored by the Atlantic Coast Conference and the Associated Press 
as "Lineman of the Week" three times. He was runnerup to National 
Lineman of the Week honors once and was mentioned in the balloting 
three other times. All his honors are listed here on pages 5 and 6. 

Here Is What Last Year's Opponents' Coaches Said About Collins: 

GENE CORUM: West Virginia University — "Gary Collins is a very 
fine all-around football player with exceptional pass receiving ability. 
His tremendous offensive play will certainly make him a number one 
prospect for professional football." 

DARRELL ROYAL: University of Texas— "I thought Gary Collins was 
a tremendous athlete, not only as a spectacular pass receiver, but as a 
defensive end, and is most valuable as a kicker. We felt he was one of 
the better ones we saw last year." 

BILL MURRAY: Duke University— "Our coaching staff thinks that 
Gary Collins is a very outstanding football player with perhaps as much 
versatility for all phases of play as anybody that we have seen in his 
position." 

EARLE EDWARDS: North Carolina State College— "I think Gary 
Collins is without a doubt the top offensive end in the Atlantic Coast 
Conference. As a pass receiver, lie has good speed, a fine pair of hands, 
a knack for getting into the clear, and even more important, he is a 
fine competitor. He was particularly outstanding in our game last year 
and nearly took it away from us with his individual effort." 

FRANK HOWARD: Clemson College— "In my opinion. Gary Collins 
is one of the finest ends playing college football. For the past two years, 
he has made remarkable catches of forward passes agains! us and he 
is also a good defensive end and dees a mighty fine job with his punt- 



Ing. 1 don't believe there are anj better all around ends playing college 

football today." 

BILL HILDEBRAND: Wake Fores! College "1 think h< is one ol 
ihr finest cud pi epects In this section of the country. He is an excel- 
lent pass receiver and a Lremendous defensive player. I am not sure ol 
his blocking ability as i quite possibly could be, it he is anywhere neaa 
as good in his blocking as he is in the other two areas that I ha\ ■ 
mentioned, he is an all- American." 

WARREN GIESE: University ol South Carolina— "It isn't difflcull to 
saj fine things about Gary Collins for we considered him the verj finest 
end we played against last year. There are many attributes which make 
a tin • football player. Among them, physical ability, desire, competitive 
spirit and the abilitj to do one's best at all times. Collins personifies all 
of these abilities but he has thai something extra which makes him 
trulj outstanding. Collins has the innate ability to come up with the 
"big play" time aftei time in crucial situations. His fantastic recep- 
tion near our goal line, which kept your first drive going, is an exam- 
ple of this somel hing exl ra." 

RIP ENGLE: Perm State University- "I liked Collins as a high school 
player. He is a brilliant all-around end. He was voted the outstanding 
lineman of our game and was just one vole back of Pitt's Ditka for 
our all-opponenl team. He is a great football player." 

MM HICKEY: Universitj of North Carolina — "We said before our 
game, thai Gar\ Collins was the best player on the Maryland team. 
We told oui team that he had to be watched every second. They losl 
him for a second in our end zone and lie caught the touchdown pass 
that beat us. He is a tremendous offensive end as well as an excellent 
defensive football player." 

DICK VORIS: University of Virginia (now Director of Personnel for 
Green Bay Pack< rs) "Gary Collins in my opinion, has the uncanny way 
of placing himself in the right position when in a group of pass defend- 
ers and going up and coming down with the football. He without ques- 
tion, is a big play maker in a crucial situation which is often the differ- 
ence in winning or losing. He is tough on defense and a tenacious 
blocker. A real pro prospect " 

This is GARY COLLINS, University of Maryland's all-America END 
candidate for 1961. 

COLLINS' 2-YEAR TOTALS 

PASSING 

Yds. 
Caught Yds. TD's Att. Comp. Int. Int. Ret. 

SOPHOMORE 1959 14 350 4 2 2 

JUNIOR 1960 30 lot 4 2 12 5 

TOTALS 44 754 8 4 3 2 5 



SOPHOMORE 
JUNIOR 


1959 
1960 


Punts 

.... 32 
... 33 

65 


KIC 

Yds Avg. 

1259 39.4 
1156 35.0 

2415 37.2 
5 


KING 

KO Rtns. 

1-10 yds 

1-30 yds 


SCORING 

Punt Ex. 
Rtns. TD's. Pts. Tot. 

1-4 yds 4 1 26 
1-1 yds 4 1 26 


TOTALS 


2-40 yds 


2-5 yds S 2 52 



MARYLAND RECORDS HELD BY COLLINS 
Career 

MOST PASSES CAUGHT: 44 by Gary Collins 20 games 1959-60. 
MOST TD PASSES CAUGHT: 8 by Gary Collins, 20 games 1959-60; 8 by 
: Lou Weidensaul, 18 games 1951-52. 

Single Game 

MOST TD PASSES CAUGHT: 2 by Gary Collins against Gtemson, 1959 
(shared with nine others). 

MARYLAND RECORDS THREATENED 
Career 

MOST YARDS GAINED BY PASSES: 761 by Lloyd Colteryahn in 28 
games, 1950-52. (Collins has 754 in 20 games, needs 7 yards to tie). 

CONFERENCE RECORDS THREATENED 
Career 

MOST TD PASSES CAUGHT: 9 by John Collar, N.C. State, 1953-57. 

(Collins needs 1 to tie). 
MOST PASSES CAUGHT: 68 by Ulmo Randle, Virginia, 1956-58 (Collins 

needs 24 to tie). 
MOST YARDS GAINED BY PASSES: 987 by Ulmo Randle, Virginia, 

1956-57. (Collins needs 233 to tie). 

HONORARY SELECTIONS AS A SOPHOMORE 

Honorable Mention All-Americe — AP, UPI. 

SECOND TEAM ALL-CONFERENCE— Associated Press. 

SECOND TEAM ALL-AREA, - selected by the Washington Post and 

Times Herald. 
"Sophomore of the Week'' in ACC following the Clemson game. 
Runner-up for "National Lineman of the Week" following the Clemson 

game. 

HONORARY SELECTIONS AS A JUNIOR 

Honorable M-ention All-America — AP, UPI. 

FIRST TEAM Ail-Conference— AP, UPI, Atlantic Coast Sportswriters 

Association. 
FIRST TEAM All-Area— selected by the Washington Post and Times 

Herald. 
"National Lineman of the Week" following the North Carolina game. 
Atlantic Coast Conference "Lineman of the Week" following the North 

Carolina State game. 
Atlantic Coast Conference "Lineman of the Week" following the Wake 

Forest game. 
"Area College Player of the Year" selected by the Touchdown Club of 

Washington. 
"College Player of the Week" selected by Washington Post following the 

N.C. State game. 
Voted the Anthony C. Nardo Memorial Trophy as "Lineman of the 

Year". 



Cover Picture: DICK DARCEY, Washington Post and Times Herald 

6 



■«r> 




FOR PRESS, RADIO and TELEVISION 

This is your L961 Maryland football brochure 
"The 50-Yard Line." li is published in hope 

thai it offers you helpful information for your 
coverage of Terp games t his .season. With this 
hook goes an imitation to you to visit us as 
often as possible in our offices in Cole Field 
House in return, I will try to visit you as 
often as I can and extend every assistance 
possible. For any Information, you can reach 
me day and nighl at UNion 4-4076. 

Applications for tickets should be made the 
firs! part of the week of the game to allow 
tune for mailing. Wire and telephone require- 
ments should be made through your local 
Western Union office. 

Every effort will be made to furnish all the services in the press box 
available, so that your accounts of the game can be most adequate 
for your readers. Statistics, both half-time and final figures; a quarter 
play-by-play; game leaders in all departments; substitutions, etc. will 
be ready a few minutes after the game. 

Many thanks for all your cooperation and favors of the past. 

JOE F. BLAIR 
Sports Publicity Direclor 
University of Maryland, 
College Park, Maryland. 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

"Here Is Gary Collins" 1-6 

'61 Schedule; Bowl Record: '59 Results; Itinerary 8 

Athletic Council; Dept. of Intercollegiate Athletics 9 

The Terp Press 10 

President Wilson H. Elkins 11-12 

Director of Athletics William W. Cobey 13-14 

Coach Tom Nugent 15-16 

Assistant Coaches and Trainers 17-21 

Coaches Through the Yeiirs 20 

Facts About Maryand 22 

Terp Opponents 23-3^ 

Opponents' Outlook 33-42 

'53 National Champions (Photo) - ... 4" 

1961 Squad Roster 44-45 

Terp Thumbnail Sketches 46-56 

'60 Terp Honorary Selections; Ail-Americans 57-65 

Terps on All-Conference Teams 65-67 

1960 Statistical Summary 6S-70 

Maryland Football Records 71-79 

Returning Lettermen 78 

Year by Year Records 80-82 

'61 Freshman Football Schedule; '60 Results 83 

Returning Lettermen 84 

Brief History of the Universitv 87 

1961-62 Varsity Basketball Schedule 88 

7 



1961 SCHEDULE 



Sept. 


23 


Sept. 


30 


Oct. 


7 


Oct. 


14 


Oct. 


21 


Oct. 


28 


Nov. 


4 


Nov. 


11 


Nov. 


18 


Nov. 


25 



Southern Methodist at Dallas, Texas 
Clemson al Clemson, South Carolina 
Syracuse at College Park, Maryland 
North Carolina at College Park, Md. 
A : ,r Force Academy at Denver. Colo. 
South Carolina at Columbia, S.C. 
Penn State at College Park, Md. 
North Carolina State at College Pk., 
Wake Forest at College Park, Md. 
Virginia at Charlottesville, Va. 



KICKOFF PRICE 


8:00 P.M. 


CST 


$4.00 


2:00 P.M. 


EST 


$4.50 


2:00 P.M. 


EDT 


$4.00 


2:00 P.M. 


EDT 


$4.00 


1:30 P.M. 


MST 


$4.00 


2:00 P.M. 


EST 


$4.65 


2:00 P.M. 


EST 


$4.00 


Md.2:00 P.M. 


EST 


$4.00 


2:00 P.M. 


EST 


$4.00 


1:30 P.M. 


EST 


$4.00 



MARYLAND'S BOWL RECORD 



194S 


Gator Bowl 


Maryland 


20 


Georgia 


20 


1950 


Gator Bowl 


Maryland 


20 


Missouri 


7 


1952 


Sugar Bowl 


Maryland 


28 


Tennessee 


13 


1954 


Orange Bowl 


Maryland 





Oklahoma 


7 


1956 


Orange Bowl 


Maryland 


6 


Oklahoma 


20 



Won: 2 -- Lost: 2 -- Tied: 1 
Coach of All Bowl Teams — Jim Tatum 



1960 RESULTS 



Maryland Opponent 

31 West Virginia 8 

Texas 34 

7 Duke 20 

10 N. C. Slate 13 

19 Clemson 17 



Maryland 


Opponent 


14 


Wake Forest 


13 


15 


South Carolina 


b 


9 


Penn State 


28 


22 


North Carolina 


19 


44 


Virginia 


12 



MARYLANDS ITINERARY FOR 1961 SEASON 



HEADQUARTERS 

Sheraton-Dallas Hotel, Dallas, Texas 
Hotel Greenville, Greenville, S. Carolina 
Denver-Hilton, Denver, Colorado 
Ildiel Columbia, Columbia, S. Carolina 
M nlicello Hotel, Charlottesville, Va. 

S 



DATE OPPONENT 

Sept. 23 Southern Methodisl 
Sept. 30 Clemson 
Oct. 21 Air Force Academy 
Oct. 28 South Carolina 
Nov. 25 Virginia 




THE 
ATHLETIC COUNCIL 

Mr. ( rl AKV F. Eppley 
Chairman 

Mr. William W. Couly 
Director oj Athletics 

Mr. I I. A. (Bud) Millikan 
Ass't. Director oj Athletics 

Dr. R. V. I mill President, Alumni Association 

Dr. lames II. Rcicl. Ass t. Dean, College oj Business & Pub. Adm. 

Dr. lack Faber I lead. Bacteriology Department 

Dr. Allan I. Fisher College oj Business and l } nl>. Adm. 

I )r. Walter B. Waetjen College oj Education 

Mr. Charles Haylecl< ... College <>j Engineering 

Mr. Pete Wasmer President, Student Government Assn. 

Department of Intercollegiate Athletics 

Sports Publicity Director Joe F. Blair 

Assistant Sports Publicity Director jack Zane 

Equipment Manager ICermit "Chiej Cissell 

Assistant Equipment Manager Don Hutchison 

I lead ol Facilities Charles "Lindy Kehoe 

1 ickel Manager Eddie Bean 

Oltice Secretary to Mr. Cobey Mrs. Dorothy Hunt 

Office Secretary to Mr. Nugent Mrs. frames Henry 

Oflhe Secretary to Basketball Coaches Mrs. Theresa Ryan 

Office Secretary to Mr. Blair Mrs. Betty Francis 

Head Trainer Alfred "Duke Wyre 

Assistant Trainer Bill "Spider Fry 

Head Football Coach Tom Nugent 

Basketball Coach //. A. Bud" Millikan 

Assistant Basketball Coach Frank Fellows 

Baseball Coach Elton S. "Jack Jackson 

Lacrosse Co-Coaches Jack Faber and Al Heagy 

I rack, Cross-Country Coach Jim K.ehoe 

Soccer. Tennis ( oach Doyle Royal 

Swimming C oach Bill Campbell 

Wrestling Coach William /".. >>ui'.\- Kiou.se 

Goll Coach Frank Cronin 

Rifle Coach S/Sut. William A. Holland 



THE TERP PRESS 

*GEORGE BOWEN, The Associated Press 
MAX FULLERTON, The Associated Press 
GORDON BEARD, The Associated Press 
ERNIE BARCELLA, The United Press 

-BOB SERLING, The United Press 
EV GARDNER, Sports Editor, The Washington Daily News 

*HENRY FANKHAUSER, The Daily News 
MORRIS SIEGEL, Columnist, The Daily News 
BILL PEELER, Sports Editor, The Washington Evening Star 
FRANCIS STANN, Columnist, The Evening Star 

*MERRELL WHITTLESEY, Sports Department, The Evening Star 
GEORGE HUBER, Sports Department, The Evening Star 
DICK SLAY, Sports Department, The Evening Star 
BUS HAM, Sports Editor, The Washington Post and Times-Herald 
SHIRLEY POVICH, Columnist, The Post and Times-Herald 
BOB ADDIE, Columnist, The Post and Times-Herald 

*MARTIE ZAD, The Post and Times-Herald 
PAUL MENTON, Sports Editor, The Baltimore Evening Sun 

: BILL TANTON, Sports Department, The Evening Sun 
RANDALL CASSELL, Columnist, The Evening Sun 
BOB MAISEL, Sports Editor, The Morning Sun 

*LARRY NULL, Sports Department, The Morning Sun 
AL FISCHER, Sports Department, The Morning Sun 

*ED ATWATER, Sports Department, The Morning Sun 
JOHN STEADMAN, Sports Editor, The News-Post 
KARL FELDNER, Sports Department, The News-Post 

*STEVE O'NEIL, Sports Department, The News-Post 
J. SUTER KEGG, Sports Editor, The Cumberland Evening Times 
C. V. BURNS, Sports Editor, The Cumberland Morning New.' 
DICK KELLY, Sports Editor, The Hagerstown Mail 
FRANK COLLEY, Sports Editor, The Hagerstown Herald 
ED NICHOLS. Sports Editor, The Salisbury Times 
J. R. CASTLEMAN, Sports Editor, The Frederick Post 
BOB LAYTON, Sports Editor, The Cambridge Banner 
BOB WACHTER, Sports Editor, The Annapolis Evening Capital 

'Cover Da ly 



RADIO and TELEVISION 



BALTIMORE 



WASHINGTON 



George Rogers, Don Bruchey, WMAR-TV 
Nelson Baker, Tommy Dukehart, Keith 

McBee. WJZ-TV 
Joe Croghan, WBAL-TV and Radio 
Eddie Fenton, Fred Neil, WCBM 
Jim West. WITH 
Roge.' Griswold, WBMD 
Bob Hilber, WAYE 
Harry Shriver, WFBR 
Bill Shriver, WTOW 
Frank Luber, WCAO 
Vince Bagli, WWIN 



Jimmy Gibbons. WRC-TV. WOL-Radio 
Bill Malone. WMAL-TV and Radio 
Jim Simpson, WRC-TV and Radio 
Ray Michael. WRC-TV and Radio 
Bill McColgan, WTOP-TV and Radio 
Dan Daniels. WTOP-TV and Radio 
Sam Kaufman, WOL-Radio 
Morris Siegel, WMAL-TV 
Ron Menchine. WNAV 



10 




DR. WILSON H. ELKINS 



PRESIDENT, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



Dr. Wilson Homer Elkins assumed the presidency of the University 
of Maryland on September 1, 1954. His formal inauguration as the 
twenty-firs! head of the In; tution look place on January 20, 1955. 

He has brought to the University of Maryland an outstanding pro- 
fessional record of proven leadership in educational administration, and 
an unusual background of high scholastic achievement and demon- 
strated athletic ability during his undergraduate and graduate career. 

A: Maryland, he has stressed the obligation of the state to provide a 
quality education for all Maryland youth who de lonstrate their ca- 
pacity to learn. On the subject of sports, he has said that values and 
attitudes developed in activities ru.side of the classroom, including foot- 
ball, are important elements of a liberal education. 

Dr. Elkins is a native Texan. He was a Rhodes Scholar from 1033 
t<> 1936. He received the B. Litt. and D. Phil, degrees from Oxford Uni- 
versity, England, in 1936. He received his undergraduate education at 
the University of Texas from 1928 to 1932. At Texas he earned eight 
varsity letters in f otbcll, basketball and track. He was elected presi- 
dent of the Student Association and cap; a in of the basketball team in 
his senior year. He is a memberof Phi Beta Kappa and of Omicron 

11 



Delta Kappa. He was graduated from the University of Texas in 1932 
with B.A. and M.A. degrees. 

Dr. Elkins began his professional career in education as an instructor 
in history at the University of Texas in 1936. He held two presidencies 
prior to assuming this office at the University of Maryland. From 1938 
to 1949, he was President of San Angela Junior College, San Angelo, 
Texas; and h-e was president of Texas Western College, a branch of 
the University of Texas, from 1949 to 1954. 

In 1937, Dr. Elkins was married to the former Dorothy Blackburn 
of Berclair, Tex. They have two daughters, Carole Ann and Margaret 
ElLse. 



12 




WILLIAM W. COBEY 



DIRECTOR OF ATHLETICS 



Bill Cobey starts his sixth year as Director of Athletics in directing the 
vast Maryland athletic program. One of the most popular and most 
outstanding in the field, Cobey directs his every effort to give the Terra- 
pins one of the finest programs in the country. 

During the five years he has headed the program, Cobey has seen the 
Terrapins dominate the Atlantic Coast Conference championships in the 
twelve recognized conference championship sports. 

Prior to his appointment in February- of 1956, Cobey was Graduate 
Manager of Athletics for nine years. It was he who administered and 
handled the overall athletic program. 

Long devotion to the University wasn't new to the affable Cobey. 
He came to the Athletic Department after having served 17 years 
as Cashier of the University. 

The Cobey name is not new, even to old-time University graduates. 
Bill's father, W. W. Cobey, was a 1901 graduate and a letterman in 
track and manager of the baseball team. He became a famous agri- 
cultural scientist and while in Florida, he was one of the pioneers in 
the discovery of leaf tobacco. Cobey also had two uncles graduate from 
the University. 

Bill, as he is known to the many friends he has made around home 

13 



and throughout the athletic fraternity, came to Maryland in the fall of 
1926 following graduation from Fort Meyer, Fla. High School. Born 
and raised in Quincy, still his native home, Cobey attended Quincy 
schools through eleventh grade before the family moved to Fort Meyer. 
After playing freshman lacrosse, Cobey had to cast aside any athletic 
team participation in order that he might get a job to help him through 
school. This employment was in the Cashier's office where he worked 
until his graduation in 1930. He belonged to the Kappa Alpha Fra- 
ternity while an undergraduate. 

Following graduation, he returned to Quincy, Fla., and worked with 
his uncle en a truck farm. He returned to the University to accept the 
job as Cashier of the University. It was this job he held for 17 years, 
until 1948 when he accepted the position of Graduate Manager of Ath- 
letics. Then came the appointment as Director of Athletics, February 
1, 1956. 

Cobey is active in community affairs, having been a past president 
of University Park PTA; councilman for University Park two years; 
first president of the University branch of the Maryland Classified 
Employee's Assn.; and is active in the College Park Rotary Club. 

Cobey married the former Mary Gray Munroe, also of Quincy, Fla., 
in 1935. They have six children, three daughters and three sons. Their 
oldest daughter, Mary Patricia, is a graduate of the University; William 
is in Medical School at Emory College; Julia Ann is a Senior at the 
University, while Betty is a freshman. A son, Elwcod, is in tenth grade 
while the baby of the family, Munroe, is in fourth grade. 

The Cobeys are members of the University Methodist Church, College 
Park. 



14 




TOM NUGENT 



HEAD FOOTBALL COACH 

Tom Nugent. University of Maryland's head football coach, who al- 
ready has accompMs led much more in two years than expected, read:'- 
the 1961 edition of the Terrapins as his best since he assumed the head 
coaching job in the spring of 1959. 

The big job of rebuilding the football program was given to Nugent 
after many top men in his profession had been screened for th-3 position. 
The popular young master of one of football's most imaginative and 
successful offensive formations, the "I," Nugent is considered by his 
fellow coaches to have one of the game's finest football minds. His play 
each Saturday is original and with an interesting style of play. 

It has been a brilliant and most successful two years 1 u Maryland 
football since Nugent and his staff arrived on the scene. It is definite 
that Terp grid fortunes are on the upswing and to the point that they 
will be watched closely across the country. 

The 1960 team came through with six wins and four losses, the first 
winning season at Maryland since the undefeated 1955 team. The '60 
edition won five of its lasl six games. This followed the outstanding de- 
but of Nugent in 1959 as the Terrapins split even their ten game sched- 
ule. Both years the Terps finished third in the Atlantic Coast Confer- 
ence after being picked by the pollsters to finLsh seventh. In 1959. they 
defeated 1-2 finishers. Clemson and North Carolina. Last season their 

15 



only two losses in the league were to the 1-2 finishers, Duke and North 
Carolina State, the latter by a late fourth period touchdown. 

Nugent has given Maryland and its fans the most interesting and 
exciting football it has seen in a long time. As a reward for this and 
his outlook for the future, President Elkins and the University Board 
of Regents this spring gave him an additional three years to his original 
four-year contract. 

Nugent gathered together an outstanding staff that had many years 
of coaching experience. He also brought his own organizational and in- 
spirational genius that is his trademark. With him and his staff is their 
outstanding student recruitment also. Nugent's freshman classes of the 
past two years have been outstanding. With another top class promised 
for this fall, Nugent s plans to furnish his every effort to bring Mary- 
land back has a fine nucleus. The molding of the teams for the new era 
has been firmly laid. 

The thoughts are that Nugent will do the job. He often is referred 
to as the "magician" of football in the South. He has had two former 
assignments, V.M.I, and Florida State and brought both from obscurity 
to success, through winning records. There is little reason to believe 
th3 same won't be accomplished here, for he and his staff have access 
to a much belter area for recruiting through the excellent geographic 
location of the University. 

The sharp-minded new Terrapin mentor has become known nationally 
for his bright innovations. It was Nugent who presented to football 
the now famous "I" formation, the typewriter huddle, and the double 
quarterback. Just this spring, he added the "V" huddle — V for Victory. 
The coaching fraternity considers his new football wrinkles the finest 
and most exciting. 

In 1954, he started the Florida State Football Clinic and saw it de- 
velop to be considered the tap football clinic in the country. The 1958 
clinic atracted nearly 1000 coaches from all parts of the country. His 
program was Headlined by a "Who's Who" of big name coaches each 
year. At Maryland he has given several outside clinics. 

Nugent's first head coaching job was at Virginia Military Academy. 
In four years. 1949-52, he compiled a 19-18-2 record. The 1951 season 
found the Keydets tied with Maryland for the Southern Conference 
championship. Both had 5-0 marks in the league. It was during this 
season, his team scored a mighty upset over Georgia Tech in Atlanta. 

The affable Nugent moved to Florida State for the season of 1953 
and in six years his Seminoles had been brought out of the football 
doldrums and became known to all as he guided his teams to 34 vic- 
tories, 27 defeats, and one tie. His ten-year record before coming to 
Maryland was 53 wins, 45 losses, and three ties. His two-year record at 
Maryland is 11-9-0. 

A native of Lawrence, Mass., he attended and graduated from Ithaca 
College in 1936. 

He married the former Peg Foley, and they have nine children, four 
girls and five boys — Tommy, 18; Kerry, 17; Peggy, 15; T. D., 13; Patty, 
11; Timmy, 7; Mary Ann, 6; Jerry, 5; and John Michael, 3. 



16 



ASSISTANT COACHES 



BILL "WHITEV DOVELL 
Thr 1 ' (.">.'■; graduate from the School of 



' 



„ 



> 



\ 



I hysical Kdural ion, Reereat ion, and Healt h. 
is starting his ninth year as a member of 
ll. ■ Terp i laching stall. Dovell has been a 
line coach since 1955 after serving three 
years as freshman coach. 

When coach Tom Nugent came to Mary- 
land in 1959, he retained the popular Dov- 
ell as a member of his staff. 

Following gradual inn, I he former Terp 
guard was appointed freshman coach and 
also assisted the varsity and scouted future 
Terp opponents. As freshman coach, he 
led i lie I'm]) yearlings to three winning sea- 
sons, highlighted by the 1955 undefeated 
team. The '55 frosh team represents the 
first and only freshman team to win all its 
games. The big game was the final one of 

the season. It was the much publicized "international" grid attraction 
between the Terp frosh and Mexico Polytechnic Institute. Playing across 
the bonier in Mexico City, Dovell's team won 26-13. 

Dovell is a tireless worker. Along with his coaching duties, he han- 
dles the film library fa ihe staif. Those in the coaching Maternity com- 
pliment Dovell as one of its finest young members as having a fine foot- 
hall mind. 

Hi- married the former Clair Benson. They have two daughters. 




LEE CORSO 
Until someone comes along in future 
years, the name of Lee Corso will continue 
to head the list as the all-time quarterback 
at his Florida State alma mater. And it 
was under the coaching hand of Tom Nu- 
gent that Corso helped bring Florida State 
and Nugent into national prominence. 

Following graduation in 1957, Nugent re- 
tained his brilliant quarterback as an as- 
sistant and brought him to Maryland. His 
work coaching the defensive backs has 
m been outstanding. 

k^Jst""'^ A native of Miami, Fla., Corso had a 

^ ^^T ^Bfc^». brilliant career in football, baseball, and 

basketball. He was selected first, team all- 
State in each sport his senior year. He won 
the honor in basketball also his junior year. 
Also, he was named "Athletic-Scholar of 
the Year' his final term and was on the all-Southern all-American foot- 
ball team. Too, he was named to the Wigwam All-America team his 
senior year. He was a member of the National Honor Society. 

Following graduation, he entered Florida State in the fall of 1953. 

(Continued on page 85) 




17 




.:*,*£ 



BERNIE REID 

One of the most popular and most suc- 
cessful high school coaches during a long 
tenure in the South, Reid accepted the call 
of Nugent to com-? to Maryland with him 
as assistant line coach. 

Reid had great success at Albany, Ga., 
High School and established an outstand- 
ing reputation as one of the best in coach- 
ing. He had sent many star players on to 
the large colleges and universities in the 
South, 
^g^ffl \ life The 35-year old Red is a native of Ham- 

ilton, Ohio. He graduated from Hamilton 
jfl High in W-Vl where he was a three year 

|SBp> Mt star and a weight man on the track team. 

JS M, Following his high school graduation, he 

^^^^ ^^ f'^^^^^^B entered the University of Cincinnati that 

fall. He stayed long enough to play the 
freshman grid schedule, then enlisted in the Merchant Marine where he 
stayed 18 months. 

Discharged in January of 1944, he entered the University of Georgia 
in the spring semester, He played the fall of '44 for Coach Wally Butts 
as a guard but the Army then called him into the service, in December. 
He served in Germany 22 months with the 78th Infantry. He was dis- 
charged in January of 1947. 
Pie returned to Georgia and completed his studies and played his 

(Continued on page 85) 



ALF SATTERFIELD 

One of the mosi familiar names in coach- 
ing circles, Satterfield joined Nugent's 
staff following a brilliant reputation he 
made while line coach at V.P.I. As the 
Gobblers built fine teams, much of the 
credit was given the team's outstanding 
line play under the guidance of Satterfield. 
He handles the same line coaching chores 
for the Terps. 

The 39-year old Satterfield came to 
Maryland after eight years at V.P.I, as 
their line coach and after helping develop 
their grid fortunes back to the winning 
ledger. 

A native of Russelville, Ark., he attended 
that high school and graduated in 1910. 
There he was a three-sport star in football 
basketball and baseball. He lettered all 

three years in each sport. A center in football, he was named to the all- 
State first team his senior year He also was chosen to play in the first 
high school ail-American game in Memphis, Tenn. 

Following graduation, he entered Vanderbilt University and played 
tackle as a freshman and two varsity sea-mis prior to his entering the 

(Continued on page 67) 




18 




ROLAND ARRIGONI 

Again this fall, bihe big and all-dmportainl 
job tit tutoring the freshman team will be 
handled by Arrigoni. 

Nugem bnoughl the 28-year old New 
Mexico Universitj graduate with nun after 
he had served a year under him al Florida 
State 

Arrigoni is a native of Chicago, bul 
moved to Albuquerque, New Mexico ai a 

young age and leceived his eai Iy school- 
ing there. He attended Albuquerque High 
Scho I, graduating in June of 1951. There 
he lettered three years in football as a 
tackle and three years as a catcher in 
baseball. 

He entered the University of New Mex- 
ico in the fall of 1951. He graduated in 
L956 with a Bachelor of Science degree in 

Physical Education. While at Xew Mexico, he was a star tackle for three 
years and again l< ttered three \ears in baseball as a catcher. II i was of- 
fered a chance to enter the New York Yankee farm system, bul his ser- 
vice obligation prevented has signing a contract. 

He was drafted into the service in August of 1956. Ho was assigned to 
Fort Bliss, Tex., and put in his two years ol dutj there. He played base- 
ball for the base team and was an assistant football coach and scout 
for the Ft. Bliss grid teams. 

Following his discharge he joined Nugent and his staff at Florida 
Stale where he was the 195S freshman coach. Then came the move to 
Maryland with Nugent. 





FRANK TOOMEY 
When Tom Nugent came to Maryland, 
he brought with him his top coach and 
strategist, Toomey, to continue his fine 
week with the backfield. The serious, hard- 
working Tcomey, who works as a perfec- 
tionist with precision, is a most highly re- 
garded and respected backfield teacher. 
Toomey attended his native Niagara 
•^j Falls St. Mary's High School then went to 

P^jj -^ Canisius Prep in Buffal > where he lettered 

three years in football, baseball, and bas- 
ketball. Following graduation from Canis- 
•—•--_. ^L ius, he enrolled at Ithaca College in 1941. 

Mk Before going into the Marines in June of 

^3f 1943, he played two years at Ithaca in all 

I t^- jK three sports. He was Captain of the foot- 

ball team, playing tailback, as a sophomore 
and was captain of the basketball team as 
a freshman. He was a center fielder in baseball. 

His early Marine career sent him to Parris Island, Camp Lejeune. and 
in January 1944 he went to Officers' School at Quantico, and received his 

(Continued on page 83) 




19 



CARROLL HUNTRESS 

The newest addition to Nugent's staff 
is the popular and hard working Carroll 
Huntress, a University of New Hampshire 
graduate. 

Huntress joins the staff on a full time 
basis after assisting with last year's fresh- 
man squad while working on his Master's 
Degree, He also will be working secretary 
of the Terrapin Club and head of con- 
cessions. 

Following graduation from New Hamp- 
shire, Huntress coached Football, Basket- 
ball and Baseball at Mechanic Falls, Maine 
High School for a year and a half. He then 
went to Portland High where he coached 
Football for ten years, six years as an as- 
sistant and four as Head Coach. He led the 
Portland team to the South West Maine 
Conference title in 1959 and was runner-up three years. 

He attended High School at Thornton Academy in his home town, 
Saco, Maine. Following graduation from Thornton he entered the Marine 
Corps in 1942 and was discharged in November of 1945. In February he 
entered the University of New Hampshire where he received his Bache- 
lor of Science degree in June of 1949, as a Biology major. 

While at New Hampshire, Huntress was a three sport letter-man, 
playing Varsity Football and Lacrosse three years and running the 
hurdle? and dash events on the track team as a sophomore. 

He played both halfback and fullback while on the football squad and 
in his Senior year played in the Glass Bowl at Toledo, Ohio. He was a 
midfielder on the Lacrosse team and captained the squad in his Senior 
year. 

The 37-year old native of Saco married the former Betty Curran of 
Portland, Maine. They have three daughters Judy 13, Sharon 9, and 
Pamela 7. 




COACHES THROUGH THE YEARS 



1892— W. W. Skinner 
1893— S. H. Harding 
1894 — J. G. Bannon 
1895— G. M. Harris 
1896 — Grenville Lewis 
1897— John Lillibridge 
1898— J. F. Kenly 
1899— S. M. Cooke 
1900— F. H. Peters 
1901— E. B. Dunbar 
*Above Teams Coached by 

Captains 
1902 — D. John Markey 

(Western Md.) 
1903— Markey 



1904— Markey 

1903 — Fred Nielsen (Neb.) 

1906 — Nielsen 

1907— C. G. Church (Va.) 

and C. W. Melick (Neb.) 
1908 — Bill Lang (Delaware) 
1909 — Barney Cooper 

(Md. '08) and E. P. 

Larkin (Cornell) 
1910— R. Alston (G.W.) 
1911— C. F. Donnelly 

(Trinity) and H. C. Byrd 

(Maryland '08) 
1912-34— H. C. Byrd 

(Md. '08) 



1935-39— Frank Dobson 

(Princeton) 
1940-41— Jack Faber C26), 

Al Heagv, C30), and Al 

Woods C33> all of Md. 
1942— Clark Shaughnessy 

(Minnesota) 
1943-44— Clarence Spears 

(Dartmouth'* 
1915— Paul Bryant (Ala.) 
1947-55 — Tim Tatnm (N.C.i 
1956-58— Tommy Mont (Md.l 
1959-60 — Tom Nugent 

( Ithaca ) 



20 




ALFRED J. "Duke" WYRE 

( ;■ i' the ni ist popular and considered 

bj the training Eraternity as one of its best, 
the rerps' "Duke" Wyre starts his L5th yeai 
as bead i r idnei art Marj land. 

Duk( cam.' bo Maryland in L947 under 
the reorganization plan of the department 
and lias added to his reputation as a Leading 
authority in the all-importanl Held of train- 
ing athletic teams. He heads two of the best 
equipped and mosl modern training rooms in 
the country. 

Mans In inns have conic to Duke in his 
many years with the (raining ition. The 

titling climax came las] year as he was selected 

as on ■ of the eight United States trainers for the Olympic games in 
Rome. Duke's primary assignment was to train the United Stales Olym- 
pic Crew, and happily the winning crew was that of the Terps' rieigh- 
b( cs, Navy. His appointment! was the culmination of the many years as 
a trainer. 

in 1956. hie was elected Chairman of the Board of Directors of the 
National Trainers' Association, a position which he still holds. 

He has authored many articles and manuals on training methods, and 
is always in demand to give lectures on athletic training methods at 
numerous clinics. He also has devised various equipment pieces that are 
used loi athletic injuries and prevention of injuries. 

Wyre was trainier at Yale for 15 years before he moved to Holy 
Cross for an thor year. Then in '47 he came to Maryland and has been 
head trainer ever sine.'. 

(Continual on i <ige lf2) 



*>?*» ->*$*■ 



BILL "Spider" FRY 
Jm wS^l Starting his sixth year as Wyre's full-time 

^^ ^ assistant, Bill "Spider" Fry returned to his 

alma mater in 1956 following his service hitch 
with the Air Force. 

Fry worked four years as a student assistant 
for Wyre in the Terp training room while at- 
tending the University. Following his discharge 
in June 1955, he returned to Maryland and en- 
tered Graduate School. When the opening oc- 
curred for an assistant trainer, he was ap- 
pointed. 

A native of Norristown, Pa., Fry attended 
Elkton High School, Md., where he lettered for 
three years in soccer and basketball. 
He entered the University in the fall of 1946 and graduated with a 
B.S. Degree from the School of Physical Education. 

Following graduation in June of 1950, he went into the Air Force 
and was assigned to Jet Engine- training. During his four years, he was 
stationed at Davis-Monthan Air Base in Tucson and Great Falls Air 
Ba.se, Montana, assigned to jet duty. He also was trainer for the base 
athletic teams. 




jL 



21 



FACTS ABOUT MARYLAND 

NAME University of Maryland 

FOUNDED 1807 

LOCATION College Park, Md. 

ENROLLMENT 12,500 (Approx.) 

PRESIDENT Dr. Wilson H. Biking 

ATHLETIC DIRECTOR William W. Cobey 

PUBLICITY DIRECTOR Joe F. Blair 

CONFERENCE Atlantic Coast 

NICKNAME Terrapins (Terps) 

COLORS Red and White; Black and Gold 

MASCOT A Terrapin 

STADIUM Byrd (35,000) 

HEAD COACH: Tom Nugent (Ithaca '36)— Third season at Maryland— 

1959: 5-5-0—1960: 6-4-0— Overall 12-year coaching record: 64-54-3. 
ASSISTANTS: Bill Dovetl (Maryland '53); Frank Toomey athaca '47); 

Lee Corso (Florida State '56); Alf Satterfield (Vanderbilt '47): 

Bernie Reid (Georgia '49); Roland Arrigoni (New Mexico '56); 

Dutch Craumer (State U. of New York (Cortland) '49); Carroll 

Huntress (New Hampshire '49). 

TRAINER Alfred J. (Duke) Wyre 

ASSISTANT TRAINER Bill (Spider) Fry 

SYSTEM "I" Formation and "T" 

CAPTAINS: To be selected 



LETTERMEN RETURNING FROM 1960 SQUAD (TWENTY-SEVEN) 

ENDS: Gary Collins, Hank Poniatowski, Tom Rae, Dick Barlund, (T in 
1960) 

TACKLES: Bill Kirchiro, Dave Crossan, Gordon Bennett, Roger Shoals, 
Chester Detko, Walter Rock ( E in 1960 ) 

GUARDS: Tom Sankovich, Gary Jankowski, Tom Broumel, Jack Reilly. 
Don Trust 

CENTERS: Bob Hacker 

QUARTERBACKS: Dick Novak, Ken Psira 

HALFBACKS: Dennis Condie, Tom Brown, Jim Davidson, Murnis Ban- 
ner, Dan Pipeir, Kenny Smith, Don VanReenan 

FULLBACKS: Pat Drass, Joe Hrezo (Guard in 1960) 



LETTERMEN LOST FROM 1960 SQUAD (SEVEN) 

ENDS: Vincent Seott, Norman Kaufman 
GUARDS: Pete Boinis 
CENTERS: Leroy Dietrich 
QUARTERBACKS: Dale Betty 
HALFBACKS: Everett Cloud, Dwayne Fletcher 

22 



TERP OPPONENTS 

MARYLAND vs SOUTHERN MFTHODIST 23 SEPTEMBER 

al ('niton l;.\vl i7:...")04) -Sdi 

Dallas, Texas 

FACTS ABOUT THE MUSTANGS 

CONFERENCE: Southwesl 
LOCATION: Dallas, Texas 

HEAD COACH: Bill Mcvk 

I :i iLC'RS: Red and Blue 

ENROLLMENT: 5,600 

TYPE OFFENSE: Split-T 

1960 RECORD: Won 0, Los1 9. Tied 1 

PUBLICITY DIRECTOR: Lester Jordan 

Bill Meek 



TERPS" RECORD AGAINST THE MUSTANGS 
(This is first meeting between the two schools* 

1961 CAPTAINS: Guard, Bobby Hunt; Center, Max Christian; Fullback, 
Mike Rice. 




LETTERMEN RETURNING: 23— Lost 14 



1961 SCHEDULE 



Sept. 23 Maryland (night) 

Sept. 29 at Southern California (night* 

Oct. 7 Air Force Academy 

Oct. 14 Open Date 

Oct. 21 at Rice (night) 

Oct. 2S Texas Tech 

Nov. 4 Texas 

Nov. 11 at Texas A & M 

Nov. IS Arkansas 

Nov. 25 at Baylor 

Dec. 2 at Texas Christian 
23 



MARYLAND vs GLEMSON 30 SEPTEMBER 




Frank Howard 



2:00 P.M. (E.S.T.) 

at Memorial Stadium (43,309) 

Clemson, South Carolina 

FACTS ABOUT THE TIGERS 

CONFERENCE: Atlantic Coast 
LOCATION. Clemson, South Carolina 
HEAD COACH: Frank Howard 
COIORS: Purple and Orange 
ENROLLMENT: 4,100 
T5TPE OFFENSE : T and Split-T 
1960 OVERALL RECORD: Won 6, Lost 
1960 ACC RECORD: Won 4, Lost 2 
PUBLICITY DIRECTOR: Bob Bradley 



TERPS' RECORD AGAINST THE TIGERS 

(Maryland: Won 6, Lost 2, Tied 1) 



Maryland Clemson 

1952 28 

1953 20 

1954 16 

1955 25 12 

1956 6 6 



Maryland Clemson 

1957 7 26 

1958 8 

1959 28 25 

1960 19 17 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 14<9, Clemson 94 

1961 CO-CAPTAINS: Center, Ron Andreo; Guard, Calvin West 

LETTERMEN RETURNING: 24— Lost 7 







1961 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


23 


at Florida 


Sept. 


30 


Maryland 


Oct. 


7 


at North Carolina 


Oct. 


14 


Wake Forest 


Oct. 


21 


at Duke 


Oct. 


28 


at Auburn 


Nov. 


4 


Tulane 


Nov. 


11 


at South Carolina 


Nov. 


18 


Furman 


Nov. 


25 


North Carolina State 



1960 YARDSTICK 

Maryland Clemson 

First Downs 9 20 

Rushing Yardage 34 134 

Passing Yardage 162 149 

Passes 13-18 12-29 

Passes Intercepted by .. 

Punts 8-31 4-32 

Fumbles Lost 1 2 

Yards Penalized 35 10 

Clemson 10 7 0—17 

Maryland 12 7—19 

SCORING: Maryland: R. Collins 1. 
run (run failed*: Brown 25, pass 
from Betty (kick failed"; G. Collins 
7. pass from Betty (Scott kick), 

Clemson: McGuirt 1. run (Arm- 
strong kick); Shingler 1. run (Arm- 
strong kick i Armstrong 27, Field 
Goal. 



24 



MARYLAND vs SYRACUSE 



2:00 P.M. (E.D.T.) 
al ByiTd .stadium (35,000) 

College Park. Maryland 

FACTS ABOUT THE ORANGEMEN 

CONFERENCE. Eastern College Athletic 
LOCATION: Syracuse, New York 
HEAD COACH: Floyd (Bon) Sehwarl/.vvaldci 
COLORS: Orange 

ENROLLMENT: 12,189 

TYPE OFFENSE: Unbalanced T -- Slot T. 
1960 RECORD: Won 7, Lo.sl 2. 
PUBLICITY DIRECTOR: Val Pinchbeck Jr. 




Floyd 
Sen wart zwalder 



TERPS' RECORD AGAINST THE ORANGE 
(Maryland: Won 4, Lost 5, Tied 1.) 

Maryland Syracuse Maryland Syracuse 

1920 10 7 1938 53 

1921 42 1939 7 10 

1935 1955 34 13 

1936 20 1956 12 26 

1937 13 lf959 29 

TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 96, Syracuse 180 
1961 CAPTAIN: To be selected 
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 19— Lost 19. 



1961 SCHEDULE 

Sept. 23 at Oregon State 

Sept. 30 West Virginia 

Oct. 7 at Maryland 

Oct. 14 at Nebraska 

Oct. 21 at Penn State 

Oct. 2S Holy Cross 

Nov. 4 Pittsburgh 

Nov. 11 Colgatt 

Nov. IS at Notre Dame 

Nov. 25 at Boston College 
25 



MARYLAND vs NORTH CAROLINA 14 OCTOBER 

PARENTS DAY 

2:00 P.M. (E.D.T.) 

at Byrd Stadium (35,000) 

College Park, Maryland 

FACTS ABOUT THE TAR HEELS 

CONFERENCE. Atlantic Coast 
LOCATION: Chapel Hill. N.C. 
HEAD COACH: Jim Hickey 
COLORS: Blue and White 
ENROLLMENT: 8,592 
TYPE OFFENSE: Split-T 
I960 OVERALL RECORD: Won 3, Lost 7 
1960 ACC RECORD: Won 2, Lost 5 
PUBLICITY DIRECTOR: Jake Wade 
Jim Hickey 




TERPS' RECORD AGAINST THE TAR HEELS 

(Maryland: Won 11, Lost 14, Tied 1) 



Maryland N. Car. 



Maryland N. Car. 



Maryland N. Car. 



1920 


13 





1929 





43 


1953 


26 





1921 


7 


16 


1930 


21 


28 


1954 


33 





1922 


3 


27 


1935 





33 


1955 


25 


7 


1923 


14 





1936 





14 


1956 


6 


34 


1924 


6 





1946 





33 


1957 


21 


7 


1'925 





16 


1947 





19 


1958 





27 


1926 


14 


6 


1948 


20 


4'9 


1959 


14 


7 


1927 


6 


7 


1950 


7 


7 


1960 


22 


19 


1928 


19 


26 


1951 


14 


7 









TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 291, North Carolina 432 

1S61 CO-CAPTAINS: Fullback, Bob Elliott; Guard Jim LeCompte 

LETTERMEN RETURNING: 21— Lost 11 







1961 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


30 


North Carolina State 


Oct. 


7 


Clemson 


Oct. 


14 


at Maryland 


Oct. 


21 


at South Carolina 


Oct. 


27 


at Miami 


N.ov. 


4 


Tennessee 


Nov. 


11 


L.S.U. 


Nov. 


18 


at Duke 


Dec. 


2 


Virginia 



1960 YARDSTICK 

Maryland 
First Downs 10 


N. C. 
21 


Rushing Yardage 
Passing Yardage 
Passes 


90 

91 

8-21 


256 

159 

13-21 


Passes intercepted 

Punts 

Fumbles Lost 

Yards Penalized 

Maryland 


by .. 2 

8-36 

1 

90 

7 7 
6 7 6 

land: Piper 5 

kick) ; Cond 

:ott kick) ; G. 

Betty (Browr 

Farris 1, run 
un (Elliott kic 
-k failed). 


1 

4-40 

5 

87 

8—22 


N. Carolina 


0—19 


SCORING: Marj 

from Betty ( Scott 

! kickoff return (S< 

lins 3, pass from 

from Novak i. 

North Carolina: 
f niled) Farris 1. r 
Smith 26, run (ki 


pass 
ie 90. 
Col- 
pass 

(kick 

ki M. 



26 



MARYLAND vs AIR FORCE ACADEMY 21 OCTOBER 

1.30 P.M. (M.S.T.) 

at Hill' Top Stadium (27,500) 

i >envi r. Colorado 

FACTS ABOUT THE FALCONS 

CONFERENCE: None 

LOCATION: Colorado Springs, Colo. 

HEAD COACH: Ben Martin 

COLORS: Blue and Silver 

ENROLLMENT: 1,900 

TYPE OFFENSE: Flexible T 

I960 RECORD: Wen 1. Losl 6 

PUBLICITY DIRECTOR: Warren Goodrich 

Ben Martin 




TERPS - RECORD AGAINST THE FALCONS 

(This is first meeting between the two schools) 

1961 CAPTAIN: to be selected 
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 14— Lost 17 



1961 SCHEDULE 

Sept. 23 U.C.L.A. (at Denver) 

Sept. 30 Kansas State (at Denvi i i 

Oct. 7 at S. M. U. 

Oct. 14 at Cincinnati 

Oct. 21 Maryland (at Denver) 

Oct. 2S at New Mexico 

Nov. 4 C" !■ rado Slate (at Den\ 

Nov. 11 at California 

Nov. IS at Baylor 

Dec. 2 Colorado (at Boulder) 
27 



MARYLAND vs SOUTH CAROLINA 28 OCTOBER 




Marvin Bass 



2:00 P.M. (E.S.T.) 

at Carolina Stadium (43,099) 

Columbia, South Carolina 

FACTS ABOUT THE GAMECOCKS 

CONFERENCE: Atlantic Coast 
LOCATION. Columbia, South Carolina 
HEAD COACH: Marvin Bass 
COLORS: Garnet and Black 
ENROLLMENT: 5,557 
TYPE OFFENSE: Split -T 
1960 OVERALL REC. : Won 3, Lost 6, Tied 1 
1960 ACC RECORD: Won 3 Lost 3 Tied 1 
PUBLICITY DIRECTOR: Red Canup 



TERPS' RECORD AGAINST THE GAMECOCKS 

(Maryland: Won 11, Lost 6, Tied 0) 





Maryland 


S. Car. 




Maryland 


S. Car 


1926 





12 


1949 


44 


7 


1927 


26 





1953 


24 


6 


192S 


7 


21 


1954 


20 





1929 


6 


26 


1955 


27 





1945 


19 


13 


1956 





13 


1946 


17 


21 


1^957 


10 


6 


1947 


19 


13 


1958 


10 


6 


1948 


19 


7 


1959 


6 


22 








1960 


15 






TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 269, South Carolina 173. 
1961 CO-CAPTAINS: Game Captains appointed. 
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 27— Lost 19. 







1961 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


23 


Duke (nights 


Sept. 


30 


at Wake Forest (night) 


Oct. 


7 


at Georgia 


Oct. 


14 


Louisiana State 


Oct. 


21 


North Carolina 


Oct. 


28 


Maryland 


Nov. 


4 


at Virginia 


N,ov. 


11 


Clemson 


Nov. 


18 


at North Carolina State 


Nov. 


25 


at Vanderbilt 



1960 YARDSTICK 

Maryland S. C. 

First Downs 14 12 

Rushing Yardage 183 138 

Passing Yardage 126 75 

Passes 13-20 9-17 

Passes Intercepted by .. O 1 

Punts 7-31 6-40 

Fumbles Lost 4 

Yards Penalized 80 25 

South Carolina .... O— 

Maryland 8 7 0—15 

SCORING: Maryland: R. Collins 3. 
run (G. Collins pass from Novak); 

Poniatowski 28. pass from Betty 
(Ilannigan kick I 



28 



MARYLAND vs PENN STATE 4 NOVEMBER 



HOMECOMING 

2:00 P.M. (E.S.T.) 

;ii Bj rd Stadium (35,000) 

i ' dilege Park, Maryland 

FACTS ABOUT THE NITTANY LIONS 

C( INFERENCE: Eastern tnten ollegiate 
LOCATION: Undversitj Park, Pa. 
I IK AD COACH: Charles A. (Rip) Engle 
COLORS. Blue and White 

ENROLLMENT: 1 1,786 

TVI'K < iKFEXSE: Multiple - T 

I960 RECORD: Won 6, Losl 3 

PUBLICITY DIRECTOR: James Tarman 







TERPS' RECORD AGAINST THE NITTANY LIONS 
(Maryland: Won 0, Lost 7, Tied 0) 





M. 


aryland 


Penn 


State 


1917 









57 


1937 




14 




21 


L938 









33 


1939 









12 


1943 









45 


l f 944 




19 




34 


1960 




9 




28 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 42, Penn Slate 230 
1961 CAPTAIN: Tackle, Jim Smith 
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 15— Lost 16 







1961 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


23 


Navy 


Sept. 


29 


at Miami Cnighl i 


Oct. 


6 


at Boston University (night') 


Oct. 


14 


Army 


Oct. 


21 


Sj i .huso 


Oct. 


28 


California 


Nov. 


4 


at Maryland 


Nov. 


11 


at West Virginia 


Nov. 


18 


Holy Cross 


Nov. 


25 


at Pittsburgh 



1960 YARDSTICK 

Maryland 

First Downs 17 


P. S. 
22 

51 

1-1 1 



3 

29 

2 

30 

0— 9 

0—28 

30 yard 

Penn 
ass in- 
let urn 
(Opper- 
ass in- 
perman 


Yards Rushing 

Yards Passing 

Passes completed 
Passes intercepted . 
Punts 


105 

181 

16-28 

2 

4 


Punting Average ... 

Fumbles Lost 
Yards Penalized 


28 

1 
20 


.Marvland: 


3 6 

7 8 13 

nd: Scott. 
recovered 

d zone < p 

- ' S . punt 
1 plunge. 
6. run <p 
run (Op 


Penn State: 


S( i (RING: Maryl) 
field goal. Mona 
State fumble in en 
complete ' 

Penn State: Jona 
< Kerr run i . Kerr, 
man kick), Torris, 

complete i : Kei 
kick i 



29 



MARYLAND vs NORTH CAROLINA STATE II NOVEMBER 




2:00 P.M. (E.S.T.) 

at Byrd Stadium (35,000) 

College Park, Maryland 

FACTS ABOUT THE WOLFPACK 

CONFERENCE: Atlantic Coast 
LOCATION: Raleigh, North Carolina 
HEAD COACH: Earle Edwards 
COLORS. Red and White 
ENROLLMENT: 6,300 
TYPE OFFENSE: Winged-T, Slotback 
1960 OVERALL REC. : Won 6, Lost 3, Tied 1 
1960 ACC RECORD: Won 4, Lost 1, Tied 1 
PUBLICITY DIRECTOR: Frank Weedon 



Earle Edwards 



TERPS RECORD AGAINST THE WOLFPACK 

(Maryland: Won 8, Lost 6, Tied 3) 





Maryland 


N.C. 


State 




Maryland 


N.C. 


State 


1909 







33 


1950 


13 




16 


1917 


6 




10 


1951 


53 







1921 


6 




6 


1954 


42 




14 


1922 


7 




6 


1956 


25 




14 


1923 


26 




12 


1957 


13 




48 


1924 










1958 


21 




6 


1946 


7 




28 


1959 


33 




28 


T947 










1960 


10 




13 


1949 


14 




6 











TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 282, N.C. State 240. 
1961 CAPTAIN: Quarterback, Roman Gabriel 
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 16— Lost 13 







1961 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


23 


at Wyoming 


Sept. 


30 


at North Carolina 


Oct. 


7 


at Virginia 


Oct. 


14 


at Alabama 


Oct. 


21 


Wake Forest (night) 


Oct. 


28 


Duke 


Nov. 


4 


at Miss. Southern 


Nov. 


4 


at Miss. Southern 


Nov. 


11 


at Maryland 


Nov. 


18 


South Carolina 


Nov. 


23 


at Clemson 



1960 YARDSTICK 




Ma 


ryland N 


c. s. 


First Downs 


11 

.. 127 


16 
US 


Yards gained rushing . 


Passes attempted 


8 


16 


Passes completed 


4 


9 


Passes intercepted 


2 


1 


Yards gained passing .. 


.. 23 


114 


Total yards gained .... 


.. 15(1 


232 


Punting average 


. 6-35 


7-39 


Net yards punts ret 


26 





Yards penalized 


80 


71 


Maryland 


3 

7 
Scott 33 


7—10 
6—13 

field 


N. C. State 


SCORING: Maryland: 


goal; Bennett, recover© 


1 blocked 


punt 


in end zone. 






N. C. State: Morris. 


1) pass 


from 


Gabriel (Shaffer kick). 


Gabriel 


2 run 


(kick failed i 







MARYLAND vs WAKE FOREST 18 NOVEMBER 

BAND DAY 

2:00 P.M. (E.S.T.) 

at Byrd Stadium (35,000) 

College Park, Maryland 

FACTS ABOUT THE DEACONS 

CONFERENCE: Atlantic Coasl 
LOCATION: Winston-Salem, N. C. 
HEAD COACH. Billv Haldebrand 
COLORS: Old Gold and Bla< k 

i:\i;< iLLMKNT: 2,449 

TYPE OFFENSE: Wdng-1 

1960 OVERALL RECORD: Won 2, Lost S 

1960 ACC RECORD: Won 2, Losl 5 

PUBLICITY DIRECTOR: Marvin Francis 

Billy Hildebrand 

TERRS' RECORD AGAINST THE DEACONS 
(Maryland: Wen 6, Lost 3, Tied 1> 




Maryland Wake Forest 

1917 29 13 

L943 13 7 

15)11 39 

1 M.-.J 13 13 

1955 28 7 

TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 137, Wake Forest 136 

1961 CO-CAPTAINS: To be selected 

LETTERMEN RETURNING: 19— Lost 12 



Maryland Wake Forest 



1956 


6 





1957 


27 





1958 





34 


195'9 


7 


10 


I960 


14 


13 



1 




1961 SCHEDULE 


s ■ 


23 


tylor in:: ' 






South Car »lina I night » 


I 


7 


at Duke 


< 


1 I 


at Clemson 


I 


21 


at X. C. State (night < 


i 


28 


Virginia 


Nov. 


1 


Auburn 


Nov. 


11 


nia Tech 


Xc>\ . 


18 


at Maryland 


N 


■s, 


North Carolina 







1960 YARDSTICK 




Maryland 
First Downs 13 


W. F. 

21 

169 

181 
1 1-3 

1 
3- 13 

ii 

. i 


Rushing yard ige 152 
Passing yardage 

Passes 4-ln 


es intercepted by 1 
Punt- 7-37 


Fumbles lost 
Yards penalized 5 


land 8 6 


n 1 ! 
13 


Forest 7 6 


RING: M ryl md: R. Coll 

in. run i Pi ii rom No- 
v. k > : Betty 5, run (pass failed) 


it: Hull 32, pass 
Snead. (Sneid kick); Robinson 

1 p ^s tailed i 


from 
3. run 



31 



MARYLAND vs VIRGINIA 25 NOVEMBER 

1:30 P.M. (E.S.T.) 

at Scott Stadium, (26,500) 

Charlottesville, Virginia 

FACTS ABOUT THE CAVALIERS 

CONFERENCE: Atlantic Coast 
LOCATION. Chanlottesvile, Virginia 
HEAD COACH: William T. Elias 
COLORS: Orange and Blue 
ENROLLMENT: 5,400 
TYPE OFFENSE: Split T 

1960 OVERALL REC: Won 0, Lost 10, Tied 
1960 ACC RECORD: Won 0, Lost 6, Tied 0. 
PUBLICITY DIRECTOR: Dick Turner. 
Ball Elias 




TERRS' RECORD AGAINST THE CAVALIERS 

(Maryland: Won 14, Lost 9, Tied 2) 



Maryland Virginia 



Maryland Virginia 



Maryland Virginia 



1919 


13 





1933 





6 


1942 


27 


12 


1925 





6 


1934 


20 





1943 





39 


1926 


6 


6 


1935 


14 


7 


1944 


7 


18 


1927 





21 


1936 


21 





1945 


19 


13 


1928 


18 


2 


1937 


3 





1957 


12 





1'929 


13 


13 


1938 


19 


27 


1958 


44 


6 


1930 


14 


6 


1939 


7 


12 


1959 


55 


12 


1931 


7 


6 


1940 


6 


1'9 


1960 


44 


12 


1932 


6 


7 















TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 375, Virginia 250. 
1'961 CAPTAIN: To be selected 
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 27— Lost 10 







1961 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


23 


William and Mary 


Sept. 


30 


Duke (at Richmond) 


Oct. 


7 


North Carolina State 


Oct. 


14 


V. M. I. (at Norfolk) 


Oct. 


21 


Virginia Tech (at Roanoke) 


Oct. 


28 


at Wake Forest 


Nov. 


4 


South Carolina 


Nov. 


18 


at Navy 


Nov. 


23 


Maryland 


Dec. 


2 


at North Carolina 



1960 YARDSTICK 

Maryland Virginia 

First Downs 17 25 

Rushing yardage 227 205 

Passing Yardage 109 192 

Passes 13-20 17-33 

Passes intercepted by .... 1 

Punts 3-30 2-19 

Fumbles lost 2 

Yards penalized 85 70 

Maryland 23 7 7 7—44 

Virginia: 6 6—12 

SCORING: Maryland: Poniatmvski. 
Safety (tackled Fischer in end zone. 
Condie 24. run (Scott kicki. Hetty 1, 
run (Scott kick). Condie 5, run (Scott 
kick). Condie 91. lateral of klckofi 
fn>m Novak after he returned n 
yards to 9-yard line (Scott kick). 
Brown 89. kickoff return (Scott 
kick). C< ill ins 16, pass from Betty 
i Scott kick) 

Virginia: Shepherd 1. run (pass 
failed). Shepherd 2. run (pass failed) 



32 



OPPONENTS' OUTLOOK 
Southern Methodist University 

B] LESTER JORDAN 

"SMU's first team should hav< the size, expenlenci and desire bo com- 
pete "i) even terms with mosl of the teams on our schedule, bul our al- 
ternate unit will consist largely od players who are getting their first ex- 
perience as varsity players," Coach Bull Meek said m evaluating grid 
prospects for 1961. 

"The rapiditj with which these sophomores develop will be a majoi 
factor in determining the degrei of success the Mustangs enjoy," Coach 
Meek continued. 

The Mustang Mentor will use the split T as his basic weapon of attack 
and thinks he has several tough-running backs around whom to build 
his offensh e weapons. 

"We will use Rankers and men in motion to open up our attack and 
probably will throw mon than we did last year," he said. "We expect 
to have better passing and improved pass receiving." 

Coach Meek thinks the 1961 team will be stronger up the middle than 
was the 1960 club. He continued: 

"The return of Max Christian, who was an all-Conference center as 
a sophomore bul who missed lasl season because of an injury, and the 
fine performance during the spring of Mike Kelsey, a 1960 freshman 
star, indicate thai center should be one of our strong spots. Mike R 
a 196(1 starter at tackle and Allan Flake, a regular defensive halfback 
last year have been shifted to fullback and have strengthened that posi- 
tion. These foui ohm: should give us adequate linebackdng. 

"Harold Morgan, a letterman who was ineligible last season, was im- 
pressive at quarterback in our final spring game. Roger Braugh, another 
letterman, and sophomore Jerry Rhome give necessary depth at the po- 
sition and a pair of lettermen, Jerry Scbek and Bobby Reed will be 
available foi spot duty." 

Starting halfbacks will be select d from a list including Doyce Walker 
and Tommy Brennan, junioi lettermen, and Lewis Albright, Tom Sh- 
win and Billy Gannon, sophomores. John Richey, a first-year varsity 
man, should see some action at fullback. 

In the line Raymond Schoenke, who was named the outstanding soph- 
omore lineman in the Southwest Conference last year, and Bobby Hunt, 
a 235-pound senior, likely will be stationed at the guards with Jim Hunt 
and Guy Reese, a pair of rangy seniors, at the tackles. Top understudies 
will probably be Jim Crowe and Jim Freeman at the tackles and Jack 
Rhoad- and Les -Stewart at the guards. Crowe and Rhoads are letter- 
men, Stewart is a squadman, and Freeman is a sophomore. 

The Mustangs have four lettermen ends in Norman (Happy) Nelson. 
Rene Medellin, Gordon (Buddy) Nichols, and Ray Green, but Sopho- 
mores Richard Harrison and John Graves indicated by their work in 
the spring that they desire to be admitted to the Top Four Club. 

"Although I think SMU will be improved, I realize that all other 
Southwest Conference teams should have their best clubs of recent 
years as practically all of their stars return." Coach Meek said. "Our 
competition within the Conference will be the toughest we have faced." 

33 



Clemson College 

BY BOB BRADLEY 

Coach Frank Howard apparently will have 23 lettermen back for his 
22nd Clemson team along with a fine group of sophomores up from the 
4-1 freshman squad of a year ago. 

The Tigers were not hit too hard by graduation from the 1960 team 
that was 6-4. Ends Sam Anderson and Emil Zager, guards Dave Lynn 
and Dave Olson and quarterbacks Lowndes Shingler, Don Heilig and 
Johnnie MacGoff are the only lettermen with no eligibility left. 

Six of the '60 starters are back and lettermen have taken over every 
position except two. Right end sophomore Johnny Case made a photo 
finish bid in spring drills for an opening spot, and Don Chuy has appar- 
ently recovered sufficiently from a knee operation to take over at right 
tackle. 

Senior Ron Andreo returns at center, Tommy Gue moved up one 
notch at right guard and Calvin West is back at his old left guard po- 
sition. Andreio and West are co-captains while Gue and Andreo double 
as linebackers on the 5-4 defense. 

Huge (278) Ronnie Osborne is in his same spot at left tackle and 
joining Case at end is Coleman Glaze who lettered at fullback as a 
sophomore a year ago. 

Joe Anderson has the only •experience at quarterback after a year of 
understudy with Shingler. Anderson has an all-senior backfield to work 
with. 

Howard shifted all-conference end Gary Barnes to right halfback dur- 
ing the off-season drills and the change pleased the "Poppa Tiger." 
With Barnes in the game, it will give the Tigers "three ends" playing 
"to keep 'em a little more honest up the middle." Joining Barnes at 
the other halfback is Wendall Black and the fullback is expected to be 
Ron Scrudato. 

Andreo, Gue, West, Osborne, Barnes, Black and Scrudato are the sen- 
iors on this first unit, Chuy. Glaze and Andersen the juniors and Case 
the sophomore. 

Looking at the alternate unit, there are two seniors — guard Lon Arm- 
strong and right halfback Harry Pavilack; four juniors — center Pet-e 
Morrison, tackle Dave Hynes, left halfback Mack Matthews and full- 
back Bill McGuirt; and five sophomores — guard Clark Gaston, tackle 
Vic Aliffi, ends Bob Poole and Lou Fogle and quarterback Jim Parker. 
Armstrong, Hynes, Pavilack, Matthews and McGuirt are all lettermen. 
McGuirt, as a sophomore last year, led the Atlantic Coast Conference 
in scoring with 54 podnts while Armstrong accounted for 33 points on 
extra point.'; and held goals. 

The third team is a sophomore-laden group with no less than seven 
first-year men. Junior halfback Elmo Lam, junior tackle Karl Engel 
and senior ends Tommy King and Ed Bost lend the only varsity know- 
how to this group. Other than this quartet the third unit is sans experi- 
ence but full of potential. 

Counted on for early varsity action is center Ted Bunton, guards 
Walter Cox and Jack Aaron, tackle Fred WMttemore, quarterback 
Tommy Black, halfback Bill Miller and fullback Jimmy Howard. 

Other lettermen who are expected lo figure heavily in the picture 
are center Jack Veronee, tackle Jimmy King, ends Ronnie Crolley, Os- 

34 



car Thorsland and halfback Bob Coleman; also, junior rion-lettermen 
Rodney Rogers and Harvej Haynie; and sophomores Billy Weaver, 
Tracy Childers, Mac Renwick, Jerry Taylor and Bob Fritz. 

And back to handle the kicking chores is Kddic WerntZ, whose boom- 
ing punts as a sophomore in '60 put several opponents in non-recoverj 
hole 

Howard figures his strongest position is end with center and fullback 
next In line. Tackle, guard and quarterback have some experience but 
10 of the is sophomores on the tost four Learns are at these three po- 
sit ions. 

Halfback caused the mctsl worrj during the spring drills and could 
be the sore spot during the season. This was the main reason for the 
Barnes shifl and only a game or two will tell if this will] remain the 
weak posit inn. Lack of a good break away runner among the halfbacks 
is the main entry on the debit side. 

And main believe that AD Howard has arranged the toughest sched- 
ule in Clemson history for the coach, Howard. This prompted Howard 
(the coach) to remark after the spring game that "we'll win our share 
next year, but right now I don't know what that will be." 

Syracuse University 

BY VAL PINCHBECK JR. 

Coach Floyd (Ben) Schwartzwalder says: "Our running game should 
be solid this year. Ernie Davis is as fine a running back as any coach 
could ask for, and fellows like Pete Brokaw, Dick Easterly and Gary 
Fallon can also carry the ball. Davis looks ready for a brilliant senior 
season. 

"Quarterback Da\e Sarette looked good in the spring, so we hope 
that Dave, rookie Walt Sofsian and Bob Lilli will provide us with im- 
proved passing. 

"Our defense held up pretty well last year, and on paper, we should 
be respectable again in 1961. 

"We were just about wiped out at right guard and fullback by gradu- 
ation, but we have been able to juggle to patch things up pretty well 
at both spots. 

"Our biggest problem right now is at the ends. John Mackey, moved 
from halfback, has looked good, but we are short a man or two at the 
flanks. We could also use one more halfback. 

"We did a lot of experimenting during spring practice, shifting per- 
sonnel and adding some new wrinkles to our offense. Generally, I'd say 
that the pi act ice period was successful. 

"I don't care to make any pin dictions about 1961, but I do know that 
our kids plan to give the other fellows a real battle each and ev< 
Saturday afternoon." 

University of North Carolina 

BY JAKE WADE 

Twenty-one lettermen, including fifteen who played pretty regularly 
on the first two units last season, are on the University of North Caro- 
lina's 1961 fool ball squad. 

This group will be supported b\ a half dozen very promising "red- 

35 



shirts" of last year and a few sophomores who appear capable of break- 
ing in the lineup during their first season. All told, Coach Jim Hickey 
figures that "we are about as well off player-wise as last season. We 
have no quarrel with the personnel. We simply have to eliminate mis- 
takes." 

The Tar Heels of 1960 did not succeed in doing that except in three 
memorable games. They played magnificently to beat Notre Dame, the 
first time a Carolina team had done that in a long series. They were 
superb in upsetting highly favored Duke. And they carried on in the 
season's finale to wallop Virginia. The Tar Heels lost their other seven 
games, often with spotty performances. 

Coach Hickey and his staff certainly do not expect a repetition of that 
season of "frustrations" during which the Tar Heels were so inconsist- 
ent, usually turning in one good half and a frightful other half. This 
is the third season for Hickey as head coach. He has aimed for hard- 
nosed, sound football. His admirers believe he is capable of getting it. 

First team losses from 1960 were great canter-linebacker Rip Hawk- 
ins, who was an All-America candidate and might have made it, had 
the team fared better; ends John Schroeder and Mike Greenday; guards 
Fred Mueller and Frank Riggs; tackle John Stunda; and halfbacks 
Milam Wall and Moyer Smith. It seemed logical that Hawkins would be 
hardest to replace but the Tar Heels have in lettermen Joe Craver and 
Gary Truver two fellows who should take care of the job well. 

Ends seemed to be a doubtful position before spring practice. But the 
current crop, headed by John Runco and Conrad Sloop, came around 
nicely in the spring. Guards are still questionable, but Jim LeCompte 
and Duff Greene, the first stringers are tops. "I think LeCompte is a real 
great lineman," says Hickey. 

The team's strongest position is considered to be the tackles. There 
are four lettermen and a non-lettermen, Steve Serenko, held out last 
year, "who may be the finest in the lot." 

"Much of the success of this year's team depends on the quarter- 
backing," says Hickey. He was pleased with the work and improvement 
of smooth operating Ray Farris in spring practice. And Ray will be 
backed up by a likely looking newcomer. Junior Edge, held out in 1960. 
Farris will be a senior. John Flournoy is an able returning letterman 
defensive quarterback. 

The Tar Heels may come closer to having explosive halfbacks than in 
recent seasons. Letterman Jimmy Addison, Ward Marslender and Lenny 
Beck, along with "redshirt" Waliy Dunham, have all shown flashes of 
"breakaway" ability. Soundest of the halfbacks, however, is Gib Carson, 
a fine, competent, all-around halfback. 

Fullback is a strong position with the two top men the same as last 
year. They are Bob Elliott and Joe Davies, potent on both offense and 
defense. Elliott, who will co-captain the 1961 team along with Jim Le- 
Compte, last season was the team's finest ground gainer, never lost a 
yard in compiling a 4.0 average. 

The weight is adequate. There is no tremendous speed, but more of 
it than on recent editions. Fari.s, Edge and Dunham are excellent kick- 
ers. Much of the attack is sure to be in the airlancs. Powerful L. S. U., 
a team to be played at Chapel Hill, replaces Noire Dame on the 
schedule. 

36 



Air Force Academy 

BY MARTIN REISCH 

Coach Ben Martin's evaluation ol the team: "The personnel problem 
dI" trying to find a replacement for Rich Mayo al quarterback has been 
narrowed down to three men, representing the three uppei classes al 
the Academy. Junior Jerrj Tnies 1 all-around skills proved to be valu- 
able during the spring practice sessions and he passed well in the intra- 
squad game. He is being pressed hard by Sophomon Joi Eledwell, a 
strong runner and potentially fine passer. Sendoi Bob McNaughton, a 
veteran of many JV games, rounds out the trio of ball handlers. 

"Terry bsaacson, sophomore, was shifted to halfback despite the need 
Box quarterbacks. Has defensive skills make him a prime candidate as 
a nalfback and his running ability has developed rapidly. He may be 
the replacement >a mighty big order) for -Mike Quinlan. Terry is also 
an excellent punter. 

"Ii appeals thai the line will be fairly strong, but will rely on un- 
tested players for reserve strength and depth. It does not appear thai 
unit system will be practical for substitutions and some players will be 
called on for maximum time on the field during games." 



University of South Carolina 

BY RED CANUP 

The 1961 model of Gamecock football will carry some of the features 
that are emphasized by Detroit manufacturers: 1. The team will be 
lighter, more compact. 2. The team will have more overall speed. 
3. The team will have more maneuverability. 4. The team will dash out 
in fresh, new colors. 

But how many games will the 1961 Gamecocks win? 

"I wish I knew." says Coach Marvin Bass. But he adds quickly: "On 
the other hand, I am not so sure I would really like to know what our 
record will be at the end of November. It might make me want to vol- 
unteer for the first trip to the moon." 

But not even the "Moose" believes the 1961 outlook for the Gamecocks 
is dark. To the contrary, Marvin can see a "pretty good year'' if two 
or three players would suddenly blossom out into the stars they indi- 
cated they could be when they were recruited following brilliant high 
school careers. 

"We've got two lines," sa\s Bass, "that should stack up with any of 
our opponents. Our backfi'eld is fast, but, for the most part, too much 
on the light side to give us well-rounded balance both on offense and 
defense. However. I think if we can substitute properly, and get the lit- 
tle boys out of action on defense, nobody will embarrass us." 

Our offense will operate mainly with a wide end and a slot back — an 
attack designed to gel the most football out of the speedy but compact 
halfbacks. Naturally, there will be passes, but the ball won't be thrown 
just for the heck of it. "We'll pass enough to keep the defense honest," 
says Bass, "but how much we pass will be governed by game conditions 
and our personnel. Right now it looks like we'll have a pretty fair pass- 
ing attack." 

The biggest problem facing the Bass staff at the end of spring prac- 
tice was not the size of the halfbacks, but the lack of a man to take 

37 



Doug Hatcher's place. In short, the Gamecocks do not have an ade- 
quate punter. That is their main weakness. 

The Gamecocks' chief strength lies in strong ends and tackles, and a 
combination or speed and power at fullback. 

A probable starting lineup could read something like ihis: John Cas- 
key and Ken Lester at ends, Joel Goodrich and Jim Moss at tackles, 
John Jones or Dave Adam and Harold Jones at guards, with either 
Richard Lomas or Clark Waring at center. In the backfield would be 
Jim Costen or Dave Sowell at quarterback, Jack Morris or Dean Fowble 
at left half, and either Billy Gambrell or Ken Baity at right half. The 
fullback position battle for starting honors will be a joy to watch- 
between elusive Dick Day and powerful Carl Huggins. 

The first unit could conceivably be made up of seven or eight jun- 
iors and three or four seniors depending on how the "eitrrer" positions 
stack up. Although there are 52 sophomores listed on the football schol- 
arship rolls, 17 of them redshirts, not a one is expected to break through 
the junior-senior class barrier. Fixe sophomores are en the pre-season 
three-deep list. The sophomore conceded the best chance of playing on 
the first unit is Sammy Anderson, and his experience might be too 
much of a handicap. 

But there again, Marvin points out that "we are working on the un- 
known quantity ihis season, because any success we have will depend 
on how several boys come through at the wide open halfback positions." 

He sounds an optimistic note on that theme with this statement: "I 
have seen mediocre players come through in splendid style once they 
'found' themselves. 1 think maybe we will see such transformations on 
our squad this year." 

Should a few of these boys come through, giving the Gamecocks a 
better team than even the coaches expect, there's still that schedule— 
the toughest and the oest in the University's history. We could have a 
very fine team, but only a mediocre record. 

Only thing for sure is that with this schedule it will be an exciting 
season — a fight for survival. 

i Penn State University 

BY J'lM T ARM AN 

From all indications, Penn State will be picked one-two in the East 
by most of the pre-season analysts. 

Following a somewhat disappointing spring practice (caused mostly 
by terrible weather and a rash of injuries) coach Rip Engle and his 
staff prefer to adopt a "wait and see" attitude. 

One thing, however, is certain: if Penn State's opponents are hoping 
that the 1961 Nittany Lions will be any less tough and rugged, they can 
forget it. The blocking, tackling, and overall hitting ability displayed 
this spring was the equal of last year when the Lions simply over- 
whelmed most opponents with their sheer physical power. Engle 
summed it up this way following the final spring scrimmage: "The 
blocking and tackling were hard and sharp. We were really taking off 
against people out there." 

Penn State, primarily a running team the past few seasons, hoped to 
do more passing in 1961, but the passing this spring was a disappoint- 
ment to Engle . . . both from the throwing and receiving standpoints. 

With No. 1 quarterback Galen Hall off playing baseball, Engle had 

38 



plenty <>l time in concentrate on a worthy replacement for Dick Iloak, 
who guided State's "Keddv" (second) unit to considerable fame la i 
year. The candidates were numerous, but no one nailed down the job 
for keeps, and the scramble will continue next fall. Pete Liske, Don 
Caum, and Gary Wydman emerged as the top contenders. Liske, a var- 
sity holdover wlio didn't play last year, was hot and cold offensively 
hut Looked good on defense. Caum, up from the frosh squad, came on 
Strong toward the end of spring drills. He capped his surge by leading 
the Whites to an 18-12 victory over the Blues in the final game, pass- 
ing for one touchdown and running for another himself. 

Spring drills proved one thing that Engle has suspected all along— 
that Bob Mitanger and Dave Robinson are two of the finest end-, on 
any one team in the country. But spring drills also proved something 
else that Engle suspected there's still quite a rebuilding job to do be- 
hind them. Dick Anderson, a varsity holdover with no 1960 playing 
time, apparent h has won the right side berth behind Mitinger. Varsitj 
holdover Jim Schwab, who failed to win a letter in two previous sea- 
s us, probablj will have to man the other post. 

The halfback corps wasn't especially impressive during spring prac- 
tice, but two veterans Don Jones and Al Gursky — were playing base- 
ball. Engle was pleased with the work of Roger Kochman, the cele- 
brated halfback who averaged 11 yards P'sr carry and scored on runs 
of 100 and 17 yards against national champ Syracuse in 1959 — but sal 
out last year because of knee surgery. Kochman emerged without fur- 
ther injury to the knee, and, says Engle "is now doing more things 
better than he ever d'd." Kochman's defensive work, especially his 
tackling under punts, was a high point of the final scrimmage. Al- 
though a tough, steady runner, Kochman wasn't the break-away threat 
this spring that he was in 1959. However, he has had a serious injurj 
and a year's layoff, and as Engle explains "he may never regain that 
extra something and that timing he had before — and if he does, it may 
take considerable time." If Kochman doesn't regain that ability, Penn 
State again will lack the thing which kept a real good football team 
from becoming a great one the past few seasons — the break-away back 
who can go all the way. Until (and if) Kochman recaptures his old 
form, the Lions' running attack again will be of the grind-it-out type. 

Despite the loss of starter Sam Sobczak (No. 2 rusher last year), the 
fullback position is strong. Lettermen Dave Hayes and Buddy Torrds 
turned in impressive spring performances, as did hard-running fresh- 
man Tom Urbanik. 

The line should be strong and will have good size. Ron Tietjens, who 
played only 18 minutes last year, improved greatly this spring and joins 
lettermen Jim Smith, Charlie Sieminski, and Gerry Farkas to give State 
four strong tackles. Joe Blasenstein returns as the top left guard, and 
will be backed by newcomer Lou Shimoski and two-time letterman 
Dick Wilson. Letterman Bob Hart and varsity holdover Harrison Ros- 
dahl (didn't play last year) make right guard strong. Center is a car- 
bon copy of last year, with Jay Huffman, Bill Saul (who played baseball 
this spring), and Joe Galardi returning. Galardi was named the player 
who showed most, improvement during spring drills. 

Rip Engle says. "We hope to use two units equal time and with equal 
effectiveness as we did last year, and spring drills gave us a good line 
on some of the boys who'll move into our top 22 — kids like Rosdahl, 
Tietjens, Anderson. We think they can do the job. We could have two 
pretty good lines with adequate size. I look for us to be hard hitting, 

39 



tough, rugged, and physically strong. We should block and tackle hard. 
Again we lack overall team speed, especially among running backs, and 
unless Kochman regains his old form, we'll lack the break-away run- 
ner. Our passing left something to be desired this spring. Our offense 
wasn't real sharp but we don't really work for offensive sharpness and 
polish in the spring. We'll have two fine ends in Mitinger and Robinson, 
good fullbacks, and an adequate interior line. We must find some more 
ends next fall." 



North Carolina State College 

BY FRANK WEEDON 

With all-America quarterback Roman Gabriel returning for the 1961 
season, the North Carolina State football outlook has to be considered 
encouraging. Offensively the Wolfpack should be better, but the loss 
of important defensive personnel off the 1960 team, which finished 6-3-1, 
renders a "wait and see" verdict in the overall analysis of the Wolf- 
pack's chances in lf961. 

"I honestly don't know what kind of season to expect next year," 
said Earle Edwards who starts his eighth season as head Wolfpack 
coach. "We have prospects of having a team comparable in strength to 
last year's team. How well we come through defensively and fare in 
our early games will set the pattern for the season," added the cautious 
but hopeful Edwards. 

Besides Gabriel, whom Edwards calls the finest passer in College foot- 
ball, backfield standouts should be Jim D'Antonio and Roger Moore at 
fullback; Carson Bosher and Tony Koszarsky, up from the undefeated 
freshman team, and Al Taylor, last year's leading ground-gainer, at half- 
back. 

There will be three fine tackles in Nick Maravich and Fran Palan- 
drani, both already drafted by professional teams, and Bert Wilder. 
Lettermen guards Harry Puckett, Graham Singleton, Joe Bushofsky 
and Skip Matthews, give experience and size. Ends John Morris and 
Don Montgomery are capable receivers, white Dennis Kroll shines de- 
fensively, i 

The biggest problem will be in the defensive secondary where the 
graduated Claude Gibson and Jack Stanton played so well last year. 
Only returnee from the secondary, which intercepted 18 opponent passes 
last year, is Tom Dellinger. New men will have to take over here, and 
at center, where the top men have also graduated. Sam Raneri, who 
lettered at fullback, and Walt Kudryan will handle the center duties. 

Overall most of the experienced performers will be at fullback, tackle, 
guard, and quarterback. The running attack should be perked up with 
the addition of Bosher and Koszarsky. More speed to the outside and 
O'Antonio and Moore rushes up the middle should make the running 
attack more productive. 

The Wolfpack will play all seven of its Atlantic Coast Conference 
rivals, plus intersectional foes Wyoming, Alabama and Mississippi 
Southern. 

40 



Wake Forest College 

BY MARVIN FRANCIS 

Billy Hildebrand, starting oul on his second season as head coach of 

the Wake Forest Dm Deacons, has made it pretty clear that this 

year's club will be built around a running attack instead of the passing 
game, which has been a Wake 'Forest trademark the past few seasons. 

"We have abandoned the 'lonesome end' style we employed the past 
couple of years, Largelj because we don't have anyone who can throw 
the ball the way Norman Snead could," Hildebrand says. "Of course, 
that doesn't mean we won't throw the football. We'll still employ split 
ends and Hankers, but we won't be throwing as much as in the past." 

Despite the loss of an even dozen lettermen off the 1960 squad, includ- 
ing seven who were considered starters, Hildebrand is optimistic over 
the 1961 outlook, "Frankly, I feel we are going to be a much better 
team than last year, because we will have a much better balanced 
attack." 

The Deacon coach cites the lack of depth and experience as the big 
problems with the main source of trouble being at tackle and center. 

Nineteen let lei men, including two who did not play at all last year 
and one who did not see action after the opening game, are on the 1961 
squad. The four returning starters are ends Bill Hull and Bill Ruby, 
Paul Martineau and right halfback Alan White. 

Halfback Winston Futch, who ran into scholastic difficulties, and 
guard Bob Irwin, who underwent an appendectomy shortly before the 
season opened and remained out all year, are the lettermen who did 
not play last fall. Halfback Johnny Morris, little 150-pound speedster 
who was hurt in the opener against Clemson and stayed on the side- 
lines the rest of the year, is the other letterman. 

Hildebrand knows that much of the success of this year's team de- 
pends on the quarterbacking, and he is pleased with the way veteran 
Chuck Reiley and three newcomers have been improving in spring prac- 
tice. Reiley, understudy to the brilliant Snead the past two years, should 
get the starting call. Reiley is capable of directing the running attack 
and is a fine defensive periormer. Sophs Wally Bridwell and Ronnie 
Smith, and Walt Schairer, who was not in school last fall, are all fine 
prospects but need experience. Bridwell and Schairer are both fine run- 
ners while Smith possesses the best passing arm. 

Jack Tesh, Donnie Frederick. White and Futch are all experienced 
halfbacks, and all are rated good runners and fine pass receivers. Futch 
could be the most explosive of the bunch. He had a 5.9 rushing average 
for the 1959 club with 183 yards on 31 carries. He also caught six 
passes for 131 yards and scored three touchdowns. Frederick was a real 
surprise as a soph last year when he scored four touchdowns. 

Fullback, a weak spot last year, should be much stronger largely due 
to the presence of Gerald Rudelitsch, rated as one of the top players on 
the I960 freshman club. At 6-2 and 198 pounds, Rudelitsch is a strong 
runner and a good defensive performer. Bruce McDonnell, a 1960 let- 
terman. and Craven Williams are the other top boys with McDonnell 
rated as the likely starter. 

Ends are rated by Hildebrand as the strongest position on the squad. 
Hull, No. 5 pass receiver in the ACC last fall. Ruby and Henry Newton 
are all top-notch performers. Hull, rated a good pro prospect at 6-6 

41 



and 220 pounds, could be one of the standout linemen in the league. 

The entire interior line is still questionable, but Hildebrand feels that 
the situation will be straightened out for the rough 10-game schedule 
which opens against Baylor at Waco, Tex., on Sept. 23. 

University of Virginia 

BY DICK TURNER 

The University of Virgina football team will have a different look in 
'61 under Bill Elias and his nearly all new coaching staff. About prog- 
ress to date, Elias says: 

"We were well satisfied with spring practice results, having accom- 
plished most of our objectives. Enthusiasm ran high and there were 
many indications that a large measure of confidence had been restored. 

"The physical appearance of the Virginia squad has impressed us 
from the beginning and if things go well we will have two well organ- 
ized units ready for action in September." 

Showing poise offensively and defensively, the Cavaliers won the Var- 
sity-Alumni spring game by their biggest score in the series, 29-6. The 
Varsity gained nearly 300 yards rushing, while the Alumni had a net of 
nine. Cited for individual performances were Stanford Fischer, 190- 
pound Senior quarterback; Ronald Gassert, 230-pound Senior tackle, and 
Ted Rzempoluch, 195-pound Junior halfback who gained 126 yards. 

Nine of last year's regulars who won first unit positions in spring prac- 
tice are Joe Kehoe, junior end; Gassert and Bill Kanto, senior tackles; 
Bob Rowley and Turnley Todd, junior guards; Andy Moran, junior cen- 
ter; Fischer and Cary Kuhn and Rzempoluch, junior halfbacks. They 
had the sophomore company of Myron McWilliams, 200-pound end from 
Blades, Del., and Bruce Perry, 197 pound fullback from Guilford, Conn. 

The ball-carrying halfbacks will emerge as Virginia's main offensive 
strength, Elias has said. Returning with Rzempoluch and Kuhn will be 
Tony Ulehla and Bobby Freeman, who had good rushing averages last 
season. 

There will be more defensive power at end if David Graham makes it 
back in summer school. He was outstanding as an 18-year-old 220-pound 
sophomore in '57 and has grown some since then while in military serv- 
ice. Graham is the All-America type. The only loss of note is Fred Shep- 
herd, fullback who was the ACC's rushing leader for last season. 



Duke Wyre 

(Continued from page 2 1 > 

A Navy veteran, Wyre served as physical education instructor in the 
V-12 program. 

He was the first president of the Southern Conference Traiiners' Assn. 
He previously has been en the board of the National Trainers' Assn. 
and now his most recent appointment, Chairman of the Board. In '49, 
he was named the top trainer in the East. 

42 




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TERP THUMBNAIL SKETCHES 



ENDS 



HENRY PONIATOWSKI. 27, 6-0. 195, 
Senior from Syracuse. N. Y. — one of 
Maryland's finest all-around ends . . . 
will team with all-America Gary Collins 
to give Terps .outstanding end play . . . 
pair could be tops in the league . . . has 
had two fine years . . . came up with 
another exceptional showing in the spring 
to set him up for an even better senior 
year . . . plays sound defensive ball . . . 
is a defensive stalwart . . . makes many 
standout tackles . . . hard to get around 
. . . fine blocking end ... is an out- 
standing receiver . . . has deceptive speed 
which helps him get open . . . serious and 
one of hardest workers on the team . . . 
as a soph, he caught eignt passes for 102 
yards and 2 scores . . . last year he 
snagged eight for 37 yards and one td 
. . . "Hank" is the "Dad" of the Terp 
team ... he served four years in the 
Army at nearby Fort Lee following his 
graduation from Eastwood High ... he 
came to Maryland from the service . . . 
his visits to the campus were many while 
in the service ... he was first team all- 
Army as an end and on the Washington 
Post first All-Service team . . . should 
have a fine season ... in School of 
Physical Education. Recreation. and 
Health. 

DICK BARLUND. 21, 6-4. 215, Senior 
from Woodbridge, N. J after two out- 
standing years as a tackle, the big like- 
able "Moose" as his teammates call him. 
was moved to end this spring . . . from 
his performances during spring practice, 
the move looked real good . . . Nugent 
and his staff decided that with his size, 
speed, and maneuverability he could be- 
come a standout pass receiver . . . his 
play and pass catching ability was one 
of the highlights of the spring drills . . . 
he gives another outstanding target for 
the Terp passing attack ... he makes 
a fine effort in catching passes thrown 
him and his size offers an additional as- 
set . . . his tackle play was stellar each 
game for two years . . . was on the 
first unit most of the 1960 season . . . 
will be pushing hard for the starting as- 
signment as an end . . . the rangy Bar- 
lund an exceptional blocker and his ex- 
ceptional strength makes him a strong 
defensive standout . . . wants to excel 
and can . . . also a top place-kicker 
. . . will handle a lot of the kicking-off 
chores this fall ... is the son of the 
famous boxer, Gunnar Barlund . . . was 
all-County at Woodbridge . . . also let- 
tered in basketball and baseball, making 
the all-County selection in basketball . . . 
could be a candidate for the Terp bas- 
ket h->n team this winter ... in School 
of Business and Public Administration. 

TOM RAE, 20, 6-3. 210. Junior from 
Uniontown, Pa. — one of the five Union- 



town area boys on the Terp team . . . 
he along with quarterback Novak, half- 
back Banner, fullback Hrezo. and guard 
Sankovich all lettered last fall and all 
played a big part in the team's success 
. . . they will be counted on even more 
this year . . . Rae another fine prospect 
and his size makes him another fine 
target as a pass receiver . . . has a fine 
pair of hands . . . big and aggressive 
. . . has good speed . . . runs hard and 
has fine balance and does a good job 
after a pass reception . . . blocks well 
. . . good defensive player also . . . 
will be vying for a lot of action this fall 
. . . could be a big help . . . has lot 
of desire to play . . . caught one pass 
for 15 yards as a soph . . . injury held 
him out for a while . . . was honorable 
mention all-America at South Union High 
. . . also honorable mention all-State . . . 
was on the highly regarded WPIAL team 
and was all-County for two years . . . let- 
tered in basketball, track, and baseball 
. . . in School of Physical Education. 
Recreation, and Health. 

JOHN HANNIGAN. 20, 6-0. 190, Junior 
from Oaklyn, N. J. — now that star 
p'ace-kicker Vinnie Scott has graduated. 
Hannigan will inherit the kicking duties 
. . . does a fine and consistent job with 
his extra-point kicking . . . also accu- 
rate and long with field goals and will 
be top kick-off man for Terps . . . con- 
centrated all spring on his kicking and 
is sure bet to have fine record . . . made 
his only try last season . . . has a 
strong foot and enjoys the assignment 
. . . with additional work and experience, 
he could help the end position . . . hard 
worker . . . was a three-sport star at 
Collingswood High ... in School of 
Business and Public Administration. 

DAVE NARDO, 18, 6-1, 195, Sopho- 
more from Bellaire, Ohio — one of the 
really outstanding newcomers up from 
the freshman team . . . highly rated as 
a future star who promises to come 
through as one of the big names in Terp 
football . . . had an indelible freshman 
year and starred . . . after watching him 
perform as a frosh and in spring drills. 
Nardo seems certain to inscribe his name 
into the select long list of former Terp 
greats ... he has all the equipment, 
mental and physical to assist his goal 
. . . he is a terrific pass receiver . . . 
m-kes fine effort for the ball . . . has 
good speed and power . . . strong defen- 
sively also . . . had a fine spring prac- 
tice and received many notices for his 
outstanding play . . . the highly regarded 
Nardo will bear Close watching this fall 
in making his mark for the future . . • 
was all-Conference in football and bas 
ketball at st. John Central High School 
. . . also lettered in baseball and track 



46 



. . . line basketball player also . . wai 
a member ol the National Elonor Society 
and President ol the Studenl Council , . . 
a close Criend ol writer and author Fran- 
cs Wallace "I liellaii '. I >i mei Pigskin 

Preview author tor COLLIER'S Maga- 
ine . . . besl studenl on the football 

team . . . had near an A average lasl 
ear ... in School of Arts and Science, 

majoring In Governmenl and Politics. 

DICK SUKEENA, 19. 6-1. 195. Sopho- 
more from Minersville, Pa. — another of 
the real top stars coming up from the 
freshman team . . . Nugent and staff 
counting heavily on Sukeena to come 
through with some outstanding end play 

. . looks like an excellent prospi Ct . . . 

if hard work and desire were the pay- 
ofl ingredients to play, Sukeena would be 

a super star . . . his determination makes 
him easy to coach . . . has good speed 
blocks well, and has exceptional pass 
catching abilities ... a fine runner with 
his speed which makes him a more dan- 
gerous threat after a pass reception . . . 
is quick and has fine reactions . . . strong 
defensively . . . could be one of the real 
big "finds" . . . had an impressive spring 
practice . . . another to watch . . 
was all-County at Minersville High and 
Honorable Mention. Big 33 . . . also was 
all-County two years in baseball and bas- 
, dl .' . .in School of Physical Edu- 
<■ ;t ion. Recreation, and Health. 

STEVE GLASER. 19. 6-0. 185. Sopho- 
more from Washington, D. C. — a >'eal 
"prize" was won by Maryland when they 
Finally landed Glaser to enroll at College 
Park ... he is one of the finest foot- 
ball players to come out of the Wash- 
ington area in a long time ... he is 



i n sidered as one oi i he all I Ime be I 
backs from the area . . . his exceptio 
talents prompeted Nugent to move him to 
end where t he Terps need i he hi Ip 

itandout depth . . . his excellent running 
■•kills that accompany his fine pa 
ceiving ability could make him one of the 

i ii top newcomers for the Terps this 

:c son . . . runs hard and has line 

i nee and change of pace . . . starred for 

I'rosh at hall back . . . could bi 

i 111 I on to play halfback . . . while 

attaining stardom at Woodrow Wilson 
High. Glaser was named to the all-High 
and all-Metropolitan flrsl teams by the 
Washington Post and Star and was hon- 
ored by the Pigskin Club of Washington 
as the Outstanding High School back his 
senior year ... in School of Business 
.' nd Public Administration. 

JOHN BOINIS. 19. 6-5, 210. Sophomore 
from Washington, D. C. — came to Mary- 
land after starring at St. Petersburg, 
Fla., High School . . . brother of Pi 
Boinis. star guard for the Terps the past 
three .sears . . . has outstanding poten- 
tial to be one of the very best pass re- 
ceivers in the game ... at 6-5, he is 
i e tallest end on the squad . . . was 
on the B squad last year . . . Nugent 
and staff looking to him to come through 
. . . if his abilities and potential real- 
ized, he could be a tremendous asset to 
the pass conscious Terps . . . has long 
arm reach and fine pair of hands . . . 
a good receiver and could be one of the 
best ... is hoped that experience gained 
with year's seasoning on B squad will 
make the difference . . . had a good 
spring practice ... a star basketball 
player also ... in School of Physical 
Education, Recreation, and Health. 



TACKLES 



DAVE CROSSAN. 21, 6-2, 215, Junior 
from Collingswood. N. J. — following an 
outstanding debut last fall as a sopho- 
more, the brilliant play of Crossan is 
expected to be much more noticeable this 
season as he will be one of the league's 
best tackles . . . came up with one of 
the finest first years seen at Maryland 
in a long time . . . came fast, too . . . 
by mid-season he had won a starting as- 
signment at the guard position . . . can 
play either spot and plays both well . . . 
has all the potential to be another of 
the real top Maryland linemen ... an 
outstanding football player with excep- 
tional ability both offensively and defen- 
sively . . . has skilled blocking habits 
... is also most noticeable defensively 
... a hard and sure tackier . . . should 
have a big year . . . was a star athlete 
at Collingswood High . . . was honorable 
mention all-America. all-State. AP and 
Newark News, and all-South Jersey . . . 
also lettered in basketball, baseball, and 
track ... in School of Business and 
Public Administration. 



ROGER SHOALS. 21, 6-4. 240. Junior 
from Norwalk, Conn — one of the game's 
most brilliant players . . . has all the 
physical potential to become a great fu- 
ture star . . . came to Maryland in I 
and after an exceptional freshman year 
went into the Army . . . returned to 
school and played his rookie season last 
fall and came through with eye-catching 
performances . . . for his star play, he 
won the first team spot and should be 
able to keep it ... an injury in the 
N. C. State game kept him out for a 
while but he was in the iineup for the 
close of the season . . . always high on 
the tackle chart . . . has fine speed and 
strength . . . moves well for his size 
. . . quick, with good reactions . . . 
outstanding tackier . . . one of the top 
blocking tackles around in a long time 
. . . will be one to watch for top per- 
formances . . . already drafted by the 
Cleveland Browns . . . scout Lou Groza 
greatly impressed with the big tackle . . . 
was a star athlete at Norwalk High . . . 
married ... in School of Physical Edu- 



47 



cation, Recreation, and Plealth. 

GORDON BENNETT, 21, 6-3, 215, Jun- 
ior from Vienna. Va. — definitely one of 
the most valuable and finest tackles to 
play at Maryland . . . before he finishes 
for the Terps, he should easily aud his 
name to the all-star list of great tackles 
here . . . tackles like Bennett are few 
and far between in any league, . . . 
with continued fabulous games Bennett 
will be one of the pros' top prospects 
. . . following a fine freshman season 
when he made his mark, Bennett came 
up with a remarkable rookie performance 
last fall ... a strong candidate to but- 
tle it out for a starting assignment, which 
he could get . . . has exceptional strength 
. . . uses his size to great advantage, 
both offensively and defensively ... a 
picturesque blocker . . . top defensive 
player . . . for his size, he is quick and 
agile . . . moves very well for a big man 
. . . serious and a hard worker . . . 
one to watch closely . . . was all-Northern 
Virginia at Fairfax High and honorable 
mention all-State . . . lettered in track 
also ... in School of Arts and Sciences. 

TOM BROUMEL, 22. 5-9, 205. Junior 
from Bel Air, Md. — came up last year 
with some fine football playing at guard 
. . . switched to tackle during spring 
practice . . . can play either spot . . . 
has plenty of power that he displays 
well both offensively and defensively . . . 
good blocker and strong tackier . . . likes 
to mix it up . . . fine competitor . . . 
his potential and output on the field 
will be watched closely . . . could be a 
great help to either position for the 
Terps this fall . . . was all--Bi-County 
at Be! Air High . . . honorable mention 
all-State . . . also lettered in lacrosse 
. . . in School of Physical Education, 
Recreation, and Health. 

WALTER ROCK, 19, 6-5, 220. Junior 
from Elyria, Ohio — one of the most 
promising and outstanding prospects to 
hit the College Park campus in a long 
time ... a brilliant prospect who 
brought with him from Elyria High a 
brilliant past . . . prospects and hopes 
for his continuing his stardom for the 
Terps look excellent . . . played end last 
fall and did a real fine job . . . was 
quite a target for passes . . . caught 
three for 24 yards and caught one extra 
point pass . . . recovered 3 fumbles . . . 
was moved to tackle this spring to help 
give the Terps some of the best tal- 
ent at this position in football today 
. . . the move there greatly strengthened 
the position . . . Rock's size and over- 
all abilities make him a top candidate 
for a great deal of help this fall . . . 
will be working hard for the top job . . . 
has fine potential which should be exhib- 
ited on the field . . . moves well for his 
size . . . fine blocker and a demon on 
defense . . . will be out to have out- 



standing year, which he could easily . . . 
was all-State in Ohio as selected by AP, 
UPI and the Jay-Cee polls . . . selected 
to the Cleveland News and Press all- 
Dream team . . . was all-Buckeye Con- 
ference, offense and defense . . . out- 
standing basketball player . . . was all- 
State court star as well as all-Buckeye 
Conference and again on the all-Dream 
team . . . also lettered in track . . . was 
voted the outstanding male student award 
his senior year ... in School of Busi- 
ness and Public Administration. 



GARY WIKANDER, 19, 6-3, 225, Sopho- 
more from Morris Plains, N. J an- 
other of the real fine big tackles who 
gives every promise to be a real good 
one. not only this year, but for the fu- 
ture . . . did an outstanding job for the 
baby Terps and continued to impress dur- 
ing spring practice, turning in one of the 
best jobs of all in the spring drills . . . 
his play as a frosh gave every indica- 
tion that he was a good one and carried 
it on through to get high on Nugent's list 
. . . will strive with every effort to 
make veterans hustle for he could take 
over a top job ... his fine overall play 
earned him the second unit job at the 
close of spring practice . . . will be out 
to keep that spot in the lineup . . . he's 
a fine competitor and does a good job 
both ways . . . has good speed and re- 
actions for his size . . . tough defensively 
. . . hard to move out of the way . . . 
one of the future stars for the Terps 
. . . will be a candidate for wrestling 
team after football season . . . was New 
Jersey heavyweight state champ . . . also 
county shot put champion ... in School 
of Physical Education. Recreation and 
Health. 

NORMAN HATFIELD. 21 6-3. 210. 

Sophomore from Altoona, Pa the rangy 

Hatfield, after a year's work with the 
B squad, should be ready to begin what 
could be a fine grid career for the Terps 
. . came to Maryland as one of the 
finest prospects his freshman year . . . 
was highly touted and sought after fol- 
lowing stardom at Altoona High . . . did 
an outstanding job for the frosh . . . 
was held out last year to give his fine 
potential extra work and maturity . . . 
came up with a good showing in spring 
practice and appears ready to give a lot 
of help to the tackle corps . . . fine com- 
petitor who likes to play football and 
wants to . . . has good speed and re- 
acts well to play situations . . . tough 
on defense . . . will be watched closely 
for he cooild be the one to add fine tackle 
depth . . . was honorable mention all- 
State . . . was a member of the "Big 
33" teim, Pennsylvania's high school best 
... a member of Who's Who in Amer- 
ican High Schools and was class presi- 
dent three years . . . married ... in 
School of Physical Education. Recreation, 
and Health. 



48 



GUARDS 



TOM SANKOVICH, 21. 6-0. 200, Senior 
from Uniontown. Pa. — In Snnkiivirh. the 

Terps are extremely fortunate bo have a 
football player "i the brilliance <>f 
"Sank" . . . one ol the finest Interior 
linemen ever to play for Maryland . . . 
excels In every departmenl of the game 
... is considered to have no equal al 
his position on any team In the league 
. . . opposing coaches and players laud 
him Cor his excellence ami his standout 
play ... a line hard-nosed player who 
likes it rough and would like to play 60 
minutes each game . • . has tremendous 
Strength and stamina ... a spectacular 
lineman . . . played 8 lot Ot tackle also 
last year and can be called on for the 
same this fall . . . has uncanny foot- 
ball knowledge . . . follows flow of plays 
. . . makes main solo tackles and is in 
on numerous others . . . strong and 
quick . . . hard to nunc out or around 
. . . has viciously quick and hard charge 
which allows him to he excellent blocker 
. . . can move most anybody back as far 
as he has to . . . has had two real im- 
pressive seasons for the Terps and this 
oould he one that will bring deserved 
honors . . . came highly touted as a 
freshman and continued to improve and 
be better each game . . . more all-star 
honors should come his way this fall . . . 
for his brilliant play last year, "SanK" 
won several high honors ... he was the 
Conference "Lineman of the Week" fol- 
lowing his brilliant play against Clemson 
. . . also was runner-up to "National 
Lineman of the Week" after same game 
. . . was highly honored when he was 
Voted the recipient of the .lim Tatum Me- 
morial Trophy as the outstanding tackle 
on the team, an "M" Club award . . . 
was voted the best defensive lineman by 
the squad and was second team all-Area 
as selected by the Washington Post . . . 
at North Union High, he was first team 
all-County . . . second team all-West- 
ern Pennsylvania ... an all-State hon- 
orable mention . . . class officer . . . 
was most valuable football and baseball 
player his senior year . . . also lettered 
in track ... in School of Physical Kdu- 
cation. Recreation, and Health. 

BILL KIRCHIRO. 21, 6-1. 215. Senior 
from Basking Ridge, N. J. — after two 
fabulous seasons as a first team and top 
tackle. Kirchiro moves to the guard po- 
sition to give it excellence and the over- 
all best type of play . . . with the Terps' 
tackle corps solidified with an abundance 
of rangy talent. Nugent and staff have 
given the big and important assignment 
of "guard duty" to Bill and Sankovich. 
their two exceptional all-around football 
players . . . Kirchiro also represents one 
of the very top interior linemen to play 
for the Red and White . . . gives supe- 
rior effort each play and excels in every 
department of the play ... he is one 
of the strongest linemen in years at 



Maryland and he uses this facility with 
exceptional finesse and know-how . . . 
those who have played against him 

past two seasons all agree that he is 
one of the best . . . an outstanding loot 

hiii player with exceptional abllitj both 
offensive!} and defensively . . . has fine 
reactions which help him pursue trie play 
so well, allowing him to come through 
for so many tackles, mans- id' which are 
key tackles . . . one oi the besl bl ick 
ing linemen seen in these parts for a 
long time . . . many plays arc se1 up to 
tie run behind Kirchiro as he is so i 
cient clearing the way . . . definitely 
good pro prospect . . . will be in line 
for all-star- honors, which should come 
his way . . . serious and hard worker 
. . . desire and determination arc top 
assets that accompany his ability . . . 
was picked as a first team tackle on the 
Washington Post all-Area team last yeai 
. . . was all-Counts' and on all-Sectional 
state championship team at Bernards 
High . . . lettered four years in track 
. . . holds high school shot put record 
. . . in School of Arts and Science. 

GARY JANKOWSKI, 21. 5-11, 190. Jun- 
ior from Burlington, N. J. — another ol 
the Terps' better football stars . . 
highly touted and sought after . . . came 
up with a tine sophomore year following 
a season on the B squad . . . seasoning 
helped and the experience gained last fall 
will lend a great deal of help from him 
at the guard spot ... a serious and 
competent two-way player . . . one of the 
belter competitors on the team . . . has 
intense desire to play . . . likes to mix- 
it up .. . strong and aggressive for his 
size ... a real tough ball player . . . 
gives it thi' real try all the way . . . 
spectacular- defensive play . . . sharp of- 
fensively . . . has real good speed and 
quickness . . . pursues well defensively 
. . . will work hard for a top job . . . 
a good year will help insure Terps 
adequate depth . . . will bear watching 
. . . his speed and power prompted the 
move to fullback for a spell last season 
. . . carried the ball 8 Hmes for 2s yards 
for a 3.5 yard average ... he could 
be seen there again this year . . . was 
all-Burlington Counts- at Burlington High 
School . . . honorable mention all-State. 
Group III . . . on the South Jersey first 
team . . . class officer . . . also lettered 
in track . . . took first place in counts- 
pole vault at county meet and third in 
discus ... in School of Physical Educa- 
tion. Recreation, and Health. 

JACK REILLY. 21. 6-0, 195. Junior from 
Philadelphia, Pa. — Reilly represents the 
trait all coaches svant in a player, tre- 
mendous zeal and desire and exception- 
ally coachable — a serious, hard svorker 
who ssants to play . . . did a fine job 
last year as a soph ... an explosive 
tough competitor . . . likes contact . . . 



49 



strong tackier . . . has good speed to 
accompany his zealous all-around ability 
. . . had an excellent spring practice . . . 
was in and out of the first unit during 
the spring . . . with the same type of 
play, Terps will be assured of top per- 
formance from him and will solidify the 
guard spot . . . was all-Catholic at Fa- 
ther Judge High . . . captain of the 
football team his senior year . . . class 
officer . . . also lettered in track ... in 
School of Education. 

CHESTER DETKO, 21, 6-2, 215, Junio;- 

from East Rutherford, N. J another of 

the highly thought of linemen . . . the 
rangy Detko gave an excellent account 
of himself last fall as a rookie and 
gained a world of experience and know 
how that will help him become one of 
the better linemen this fall . . . Terps 
will need for him to come through for 
that add'ed depth with experience . . . 
should be a top candidate to play a lot 
of real fine ball . . . staff hopeful of this 
. . . has the physical potential to be 
outstanding . . . does a good job defen- 
sively . . . fine tackier . . . has real 
good blocking ability . . . will see a lot 
of action and could come up with the ex- 
cellent type play when needed . . . was 
all-State at East Rutherford High . . . 



All-Metropolitan, all-County, and all Pas- 
saic-Bergen . . . also lettered three years 
in track ... in School of Business and 
Public Administration. 

DON TRUST, 20, 6-0, 190, Junior from 
Bel Air, Md. — serious and hard-working 
at all times . . . always gives every bit 
of effort . . . has fine attitude . . . let- 
tered last fall as a soph as he came 
through with fine consistent performances 
. . . plays well both offensively and de- 
fensively . . . has good reactions . . . 
gives a good account of himself each 
game . . . will be a big help this fall 
if injury from spring practice doesn't 
hold him back ... an outstanding stu- 
dent in Chemical Engineering with nearly 
an A average . . . was Valedictorian of 
his class at Bel Air High and a mem- 
ber of the National Honor Society . . . 
also was President of the Senior Class 
and Captain of the football team his sen- 
ior year ... in School of Engineering. 

OTHER TOP GUARD CANDIDATES 
DICK CORBIN. 22, 6-1. 200, Sophomore 
from Natick, Mass. — JOE FERRANTE, 
19, 6-0, 200, Sophomore from Portland, 
Me. — MIKE LAPRIOLA, 21, 5-8, 200, 
Sophomore from Lock Haven Pa. 



CENTERS 



BOB HACKER, 21, 6-0, 200, Senior from 
New Brighton, Pa. — indicative of the 
brilliant play and outstanding skill of 
Hacker is evidenced when the Penn State 
football team voted the blonde-haired 
Pennsylvanian to their all-opponent team 
. . . this was quite an honor for the pop- 
ular and top-flight center since the Nit- 
tany Lions meet the top opponents of an 
intersectional schedule . . . also, the 
Lions beat the Terps 2S-9 which makes 
the honor more distinctive ... it was 
proof to the conviction that Hacker is 
one of the finest players on the team and 
one of the best in the league and in the 
game today . . . the big raw-boner pivot- 
man is sure to inscribe his name as one 
of the very best in Terp annals . . . 
Hacker gave notice that he would be 
heard from as a sophomore reserve cen- 
ter ... he gave his competition fits for 
the starting job. then last season won 
the first team berth as early as spring 
practice . . . there was no relinquishing 
it and he came up with an. exceptional 
year . . . during this spring's sessions 
the rugged center never let up a second 
and gave his every effort each and every 
play ... a most outstanding football 
player . . . has a sound football mind 
. . . has real good size and ranginess for 
a center . . . has real good speed, quick 
reactions and does a excellent job with 
his blocking assignments after lie ex- 
changes the ball with the qb . . . tine 
offensive center . . . snaps the ball eas- 
ily and accurately for punts also ... a 
standout defensive player . . . makes nu- 
merous tackles and leads to many others 



. . . roams around carelessly but pur- 
posely as he follows the play to make 
tackles ... a tireless and efficient work- 
er at all times ... is als,o high on the 
tackle chart list . . . his hustle and all- 
out effort enabled him to recover four 
fumbles and intercept one pass . . . 
has top offensive grades also . . . has 
uncanny stability and endurance . . . 
wants to play pro ball and is being 
watched by the "pay" boys . . . for his 
fine play last season, he was voted the 
best offensive lineman and also was hon- 
orable mention all-Conference, AP . . . 
should have an excellent senior year . . . 
was all-County at Freedom High School 
. . . married . . . a B student in the 
School of Physical Education, Recreation, 
and Health. 

GENE FEHER. 18, 6-1, 200, Sophomore 
from West Aliquippa, Pa.— one of the 
really finest prospects to hit the Terp 
campus last fall . . . early predictions 
are that the skilled grid talents of Feher 
will bring him high honors as a Terp 
center in future years ... it is expected 
that he will make his mark this fall as 
a sophomore ... he came to Maryland 
willi the finest credentials and recom- 
mendations ... his play as a freshman 
bore out his fabulous high school repu- 
tation and is being counted on heavily 
tn produce to even greater heights now 
that he enters his rookie year on the 
varsity ... he was brilliant as a frosh 
as he played first team and looked ex- 
ceptional in spring practice . . . does a 
veteran job centering the ball . . . blocks 



50 



with skill and precision, a trademark 
with him . . . also plays an excellent de- 
tensive game as he is fine and sure 
tackier . . . fine diagnostician of plays 
. . . ims a lot of football skin to ac 
company his excellent physical faculties 
. . . played In one of the best high school 
lc gues in the business at Western Penn- 
sylvania's Aliqulppa High . . . here he 
made the first team all-State, first team 
all-WPIAL, first team all-County; and 
t "ust team all-Mid-Western Conference 
. . . also lettered and starred In basket- 
bill and baseball was honorable 
mention all-State in basketball and all- 
Section in baseball . . . will bear close 
watching for future stardom ... in 
School of Business and Public Adminis- 
tration. 

ED GILMORE. 22. 5-11. 190, Sophomore 
from North Bergen. N. J. — now that the 
serious hard-working Gilmore has had a 
year's tine work on the B squad, he be- 



comes q top candidate to play s great 
deal of varsity ball this season . . . 
worked haul last year and did a good 
Job In spring drills . . . Nugent and 
staff counting on him to give much 

needed help for depth at the pivot spot 

. . . has all the physical abilities which 
he will utilize with every effort . . . 
does a good job offensively and his de- 
fensive play win come with game experi- 
ence . . . strong boy with a lot of desin 
. . . prepped at Mount St, Michael Acad- 
emy . . . was all-City and all-Metro- 
politan selection that included the New 
York City. Long Island, and New J< | i 
areas . . . also lettered in basketball and 
track ... in School of Business and 
Public Administration. 

OTHER TOP CENTER CANDIDATES: 
CHARLES MARTIN, 18, 5-11, 200, Soph- 
omore from Philadelphia: JACK CLEM- 
INSON, 23. 5-10, 185. Sophomore from 
Aiiquippa. Pa. 



QUARTERBACKS 



DICK NOVAK. 20. 5-10, 170, Senior 
from Uniontown, Pa — this little magician 
with the football represents the only let- 
ter-man returning at quarterback as a 
Terp signal caller . . . the brilliant triple- 
threat type quarterback will be given the 
big task of taking over the reins for Nu- 
gent this fall in the Terps' bid for na- 
tional recognition . . . with one like 
Novak guiding the fortunes, there is con- 
fidence galore that the job will be w-ell 
done . . . experience and excellence are 
his main weapons ... he should come 
out with a magnificent rating in the 
league . . . only Novak and State's Ga- 
briel go into the season with as much 
game experience, both are seniors and 
have been instrumental in their teams' 
success as they were sophs and juniors 
. . . Novak has all the physical and men- 
tal requirements to lead the team to an 
outstanding mark ... he has shone with 
brilliance in games of the past . . . by 
putting them together for a season. 
which he can do, he could make an in- 
delible mark for himself ... he has 
been outstanding in many games and has 
had singular greatness the two years in 
loading the Terps to wins over West Vir- 
virua. only 29 miles from his home town 
of Uniontown . . . Novak is a fine Held 
general ... is a fine student of the 
game as he continuously studies the in- 
tricate maneuvers and plays that he can 
use to bring success to the team's ef- 
forts . . . Richie is an excellent runner 
and a fine passer ... he excels with the 
running pass ... he is a definite threat 
when he runs with the ball with his ex- 
cellent speed, quickness. balance, and 
shiftiness ... he calls a smart sequence 
of plays . . . his type play fits the Terps 
offense well . . . had a fine soph year 
as he hit 32 of 72 passes for 486 yards 
and four td's. three of which were 
thrown in his first game and the open- 
ing game against the Mountaineers . . . 



had a 3:8 rushing mark and a 5.7 total 
Offense average . . . last year as a jun- 
ior he hit on 22 of 46 for 289 yards and 
one td . . . threw four conversion passes 
. . . had a 1.6 rushing mark in 38 car- 
ries . . . had a 4.2 total offense average 
. . . was honorable mention all-Confer- 
ence. UPI . . . came to Maryland with 
a brilliant record out of South Union 
High . . . was selected to the all-Class 
A team of Pa., and the all-County eleven 
that claims so many star players . . . 
was honorable mention all-State and 
honorable mention all-America on the 
Wigwam-Wiseman selection . . . was 
named most valuable football player at 
South Union . . . was vice-president of 
junior and senior class . . . also starred 
in basketball, baseball, and track . . . 
was voted the most valuable in his bas- 
ketball section . . . honorable mention 
all-State in basketball . . . holds the 
record of scoring the most points in one 
game, an amazing 54 . . . holds the 
school and County record for the broad 
jump. 21' 8%" . . . was the WPIAL 
broad jump champion . . . received the 
scholarship award as the most valuable 
athlete in Fayette County . . . fine stu- 
dent ... in School of Business and 
Public Administration. 

KEN PSIRA. 25, 5-9, 175. Junior from 
Silver Spring, Md. — a quarterback let- 
terman who has been a defensive special- 
ist . . . didn't play last fall after earn- 
ing a letter as a soph . . . played some 
offense then . . . Nugent and staff 
worked hard with him this spring in an 
effort to bring him along offensively . . . 
looked fine in spring drills, so could be 
counted on to give some added help . . . 
most accurate with the short passes . . . 
has good speed which makes him a pretty 
good running threat . . . does a good 
job defensively . . . with additional game 
experience, he could provide adequate 



51 



depth . . . attended Roosevelt and Mont- 
gomery Blair High, graduating from 
Blair . . . was all Bi-County at Blair 
in 1954 and '55 . . . also lettered in 
baseball and basketball ... an adver- 
tising major. 

DICK SHINER, 19, 6-0, 190, Sophomore 
from Lebanon, Pa. — it easily could date 
back to a decade or so, for there hasn't 
been a quarterback to hit the College Park 
campus with such fury and create as 
much excitement so early as the Terps' 
seemingly brilliant rookie quarterback, 
Shiner . . . there hasn't been as much 
enthusiastic expectancy created this s,oon 
in one's career as to the possible great- 
ness in the future for a Maryland quar- 
terback . . . this early evaluation isn't 
based on hearsay or reputation — it is 
based on Shiner's own performance on 
the gridiron as he starred for the fresh- 
man team and during spring practice 
. . . then in the annual varsity-alumni 
game, he put on a personal magnificent 
performance that hasn't been seen in Byrd 
Stadium in a long time as he led the '61 
Varsity to a big win over the star- 
studded alumni team ... it was one of 
the most exciting individual efforts seen 
given by any player of any team in a 
long while . . . this gives cause to be- 
lieve that Shiner could be the m?n Mary- 
land and Nugent has been waiting for 
to assist in their climb back to the top 
. . . veteran press box observers and 
metropolitan newsmen, hardened to cover- 
ing thrilling exploits of many greats of 
the past, all expressed their finest super- 
latives t,o Shiner for his exceptional show- 
ing ... he hit on 12 of 17 passes for 
141 yards and two touchdowns and cilled 
a masterful and heartening game under 
extremely difficult weather conditions 
... it was near perfect as he se'ected 
his plays, passed so accurately and ran 
with authority ... his name was on the 
lips of everybody as they left the sta- 
dium and for long after ... he had been 
given the starting assignment as regular 
Dick Novak injured his hand the week 
before and couldn't play ... he reacted 
like a veteran and passed like a pro . . . 
Shiner is an excellent passer, both long 
and short . . . his long passes are a 
beauty as he pinpoints to his target . . . 
he is a big strong boy and effervesces 
with poise and confidence . . . this one 
of his biggest mental facilities . . . Nu- 
gent particularly pleased with this along 
with his fine passing, running, and play 
calling ... he is a definite strong candi- 
date to give the quarterback position a 
great one-two punch with Novak ... he 
came to Maryland a much sought after 
prospect ... he was a prize catch for 
the Terps and now is exceptionally valu- 
able property . . . with a good first 
year, he could set himself up for future 
greatness . . . with standout team suc- 
cess he will be a sure bet . . . Shiner 
established himself immediately as he led 
the freshmen to a fine season . . . he 
hit on 32 passes out of 54 attempts for 



384 yards and two td's . . . this is a 
fine 59.2% ... he ran for 263 yards 
on 52 carries for a 5.1 rushing mark 
... for the season, he passed for 2 td's, 
ran for three ... he also ran over two 
conversions and passed for three . . 
his best single game was against Virginia 
as the completed 10 of 18 aerials for 116 
yards, ran for 73 yards for 12 carries, 
and scored three touchdowns and passed 
for a fourth along with passing for the 
three conversions ... at Lebanon High, 
the wiry Shiner was a three-sport star 
. . he was all-America on the Wigwam 
Wiseman selection . . . honorable men- 
tion all-America, UPI ... the quarter- 
back for the "Big 33" team, Pennsyl- 
vania's best . . . was honorable mention 
all-State, AP and UPI . . . also lettered 
in basketball and baseball . . . was class 
president his junior and senior years . . . 
a good student ... a Marketing major 
in School of Business and Public Admin- 
istration. 

DON WHITE, 20, 5-11, 175, Junior from 
Downington, Pa. — with a fine year's ex- 
perience behind him, the Terps could get 
a big hand from the serious hard-work- 
ing White . . . was highly touted out of 
Downington High and had an outstanding 
debut as a freshman . . . play was lim- 
ited last year playing behind Dale Betty 
and Dick Novak . . . did some outstand- 
ing punting when called in for that job 
. . . had a 32.7 yard average for 22 
punts ... a fine long high punter . . . 
can pass exceptionally well, both short 
and long . . . could see a lot more duty 
this fall . . . was honorable mention all- 
State at Downington as well as all-league 
two years . . . also was all-Scholastic for 
the Philadelphia area . . . lettered also 
in basketball and baseball . . . was a 
member of the national honor society 
. . . in School of Physical Education, 
Recreation, and Health. 

CLIFF MELTON, 19, 6-1, 180, Sopho- 
more from Baltimore, Md. — came to 
Maryland last fall as one of the finest 
quarterbacks to come out of Baltimore 
in a long time . . . had exceptional back- 
ground and outstanding record at Balti- 
more City College . . . highly touted and 
highly sought after . . . was a good 
catch for Nugent who believes he will 
develop into one of the games' better 
signal callers . . . with Dick Shiner, the 
frosh were led by two fine ones and both 
are expected to give the Terps some real 
fine quarterbacking in the future . . . 
Melton son of the former great New 
York Giant pitcher, Cliff Melton, Sr., is 
expected to get a lot of work early for 
use with the Varsity this fall ... he 
already has made an indelible impression 
as a defensive stalwart and his poten- 
tial offensively will be exploited early 
. . . could come up fast once the poten- 
tial realized . . . for the frosh, he hit 
on 15 of 25 pass attempts for 202 yards 
for a fabulous 60% . . . ran for 155 
yards for 20 carries for a 7.1 yard aver- 



52 



age . . . against Bullis he passed for 
two id's .• i n 1 1 ;i conversion and ran tor 
2 extra points . . . was all-Maryland 
quarterback his junior and senior yeai 
;:nd all-Maryland baseball ins junior yi 



. . . captained the Football, basketball, 

and baseball trams . . . won the alumni 
award as top athlete . . . excellent stu- 
dent ... in ScIhh,i dt Business and Pub- 
lic Administration 



HALFBACKS 



DENNIS CONDIE. 21. 5-10, 160, Senior 
from Madison, Pa "could be the besl 

running back In the Atlantic Coast Con- 
ference and then some," predicts Terp 
coach Tom Nugent of this thimble-sized 

little halfback . . . after about mid-sea- 
son, Condle became the flying little 
comet for the Terps as he wiggled and 
dashed up to the starting left halfback 

spot . . . he is the Terps' leading ball 
carrier returning this fall with a 5.7 yar-d 
average ... it was predicted last fall 
thai he could be the "big" surprise pack- 
age of the Terp running attack and he 
bore out the thoughts ... is exception- 
alls' fast and an exciting type ball car- 
rier as he throws his frail frame around 
the field ... is a slick little runner with 
his speed . . . has fine knack of picking 
a hole and taking off . . . once he sees 
and gets daylight, he's oil to the races 
... as Nugent kiddingly says, he's only 
got one bad habit . . . that's going all 
the way when he gets the ball . . . Con- 
die is very elusive and quick . . . hard 
to bring down since he is so hard to 
gel to. built so close to the ground . . . 
has fine balance which is another worry 
for the opponents . . . doesn't shy away 
from contact . . . likes to mix it up . . . 
getting clobbered by tacklers doesn't 
minimize his excellence . . . one of the 
Terps best threats as a break-away run- 
ner in a while . . . also a fine pass re- 
ceiver . . . plays an outstanding defen- 
sive game . . . hard and crisp tackier 
. . . with end Gary Collins, he topped 
scoring touchdowns with four last fall 
. . . led the team in kickoff returns with 
ten for 352 yards for 35.2 average . . . 
caught four passes for 49 yards . . . 
along with qb Dick Novak. Condie set 
a new kickoff return record for a touch- 
down as he went 91 yards against Vir- 
ginia to complete a 100-yard return — 
Novak had taken the ball two yards in 
the end zone and ran to the nine where 
he threw it latterally to Condie who 
went the rest of the way . . . had a 90- 
yard kickoff return for touchdown against 
North Carolina which had tied the old 
mark . . . also tied the mark of three 
kickoffs returned in single game as he 
brought three back in Virginia and Penn 
State games . . . his top rushing average 
came with 195 yards for 34 carries . . . 
his ten kickoff returns won for him the 
A.CC kick-off return title . . . was named 
the ACC "Player of the Week" after 
the North Carolina game . . . was the 
"College Player of the Week" as se- 
lected by the Washington Post after the 
Virginia game in which he scored three 
times . . . should have an outstanding 
year . . . will be watched closely . . . 
in School of Engineering. 



JIM DAVIDSON. 21, 5-11, 170, Senior 
from Marlton, N. J. — one of the most 
outstanding all-around backs to play for 
the Terps . . . excels playing offense 
and defense and can play either or both 
in a game ... as a sophomore, he 
-tarred at left halfback on offense as 
he played on the first unit most oi 
season . . . last year, as a junior he 
was brilliant as a defensive back .' . . 
his overall talents at running the ball. 
catching passes and his great and un- 
touchable skill playing as a defensive 
back, prompted his move this spring to 
offense again on the right side . . . with 
his duties offensively, he will turn to de- 
fense as the ball changes over to the 
opponent to do his masterful job in the 
secondary . . . Davidson is one of the 
finest defensive backs in the game today 
... he has excellent speed and tremen- 
dously quick movements and reactions 
... he was credited with knr>cking down 
many passes last season although he 
picked off only one ... he is ore 
the finest tacklers on the team . . . this 
makes him a most valuable football 
player . . . his speed and hard running 
abilities contribute greatly to his fine 
offensive capabilities . . . also has a fine 
attitude toward the game . . . with his 
chance at offense again during spring 
drills. Davidson came through with fix- 
ing colors . . . his fine speed makes him 
a threat to go all the way or for long 
gainers . . . good open field runner . . . 
had a 3.9 rushing mark his soph year 
when he played offense . . . caught four 
passes for 65 yards and one touchdown 
. . . had a 36.3 punting average for 11 
kicks and intercepted 2 passes . . . tied 
for punt return leadership with 7 . . . 
last fall he led the team in and won 
the Atlantic Coast Conference punt re- 
turning title as he gathered in 16 for 
169 yards and a 10.6 yard return average 
... he was second to Condie in kickoff 
returns with 8 for 157 yards for a 19.6 
return average . . . recovered two fum- 
bles . . . did carry the ball four times 
for 15 yards ... a spectacular football 
player whose defensive brilliance with 
such fine speed and maneuverability 
should put him high on the pro draft 
list . . . was a big star at Mt. Holly 
High ... he is the only five-sport let- 
terman in the history of the school . . . 
lettered in football, baseball, basketball. 
track, and tennis . . . was all-South Jer- 
sey in football and honorable mention all- 
State . . . was all-Delaware County and 
all-Burlington County . . . was voted the 
best football player two years; best bas- 
ketball player, three years and was voted 
the best athlete award his senior year 



53 



. . in School of Physical Education, 
Recreation, and Health. 

TOM BROWN, 20. 6-0, 185, Junior from 
Silver Spring, Wd. — brought' to Maryland 
one of the top schoolboy reputations fol- 
lowing his stardom at nearby Montgom- 
ery Blair High and Bullis Prep . . . 
highly sought after, but Nugent liked 
whit he saw in recruiting Brown soon 
after he got to Ci'lege Park and con- 
vinced him on his Terps ... is one of 
the area's all-time top backs . . . many 
great things were predicted for Brown 
and his sophomore year's performance 
wis extreme'y outstanding ... he lived 
up to his advance billing . . . now with 
that rookie year behind him, his rise to 
the top is even closer . . . his sopho- 
more success followed a most impressive 
debut as a freshman when stardom could 
be seen ... an exciting speedster who 
knows how to run with the football . . . 
h-as blazing speed and can be the break- 
away running type also . . . h->s the 
quickness and sharpness to do a fine job 
cutting pnd faking . . . does a fine job 
running both inside and .outside . . . his 
fine speed makes him a good target for 
passes also ... he has great ability to 
get behind secondary to haul in passes 
. . . it t^kes an exceptionally fast de- 
fensive b-^ck to follow the path of Brown 
. . . specializes in the long run for once 
he's sprung, he's good for a lot of yard- 
age . . . plays a brilliant defensive back 
also . . . led the team in pass intercep- 
tions with 3 . . . scored twice, one a 
thrilling 25-yard scoring pass against 
Clemson and the other an 89-yard kickoff 
return against Virginia . . . h?d 3 kick- 
off returns for 129 yards and 43 yard 
average . . . h"d a 3-yard punt return 
. . . carried the ball 42 times for 165 
yards and a 3.9 average . . . recovered 
one enemy fumble . . . caught 11 passe", 
for 120 yards and the 1 score ... all 
this meant a busy year . . . didn't take 
part in spring practice so he could play 
baseb-11 . . . was the Terps' best all- 
around player . . . was selected to the 
all-Conference first team as a center 
fielder, the only soph to make the team 
. . . led the regulars in hitting as he 
swatted .325 for the year and led in 
rbi's . . . pro scouts watched him daily 
and want him . . . football pro scouts 
watching him too . . . was all-Metropoli- 
tan on all DC selections in baseball and 
basketball . . . was all-State football 
first team ... a brother, Dick was .in 
out standing basketball and baseball star 
at Navy ... in School of Physical Edu- 
ction, Recreation, and Health. 
MURNIS BANNER, 20, 5-10. 170, Jun- 
ior from Uniontown. Pa. — a real fine two- 
way halfback . . . played a great deal 
last fall as a soph and came through 
with flying colors ... a standout pros- 
pect who c>n really run with the foot- 
ball . . . his offensive output last fall 
brought only S carries for 63 yards but 
the German Twp. High alum has the 
equipment to move when called upon . . . 



played both left and right halfback last 
fall and can be called on for the same 
rssignments this year . . . plays both 
well . . . does a good defensive job in 
the secondary also . . . fine blocking 
back, which is utilized a lot from the 
rightside ... is one of the real fast 
running backs on the squad ... a real 
hard and deceptive type runner . . . has 
outstanding potential and promises to be 
one of the real good ones for two more 
years ... a serious, quiet hard-worker 
. . . had one kickoff return for 18 yards 
and one pass reception for 12 yards . . . 
had a fine freshman year . . . looked 
real good again in spring drills . . . 
could have a big year . . . was all- 
County and on the all-WPIAL squad . . . 
also lettered in baseball, track, and bas- 
ketball ... in School of Physical Edu- 
cation, Recreation, and Health. 

DON VanREENAN, 23. 5-9, 180, Senior 
from Marlinton, W. Va. — getting ready 
for his final season for the Terps is a 
"sound" VanReenan ... if he can keep 
well for ten weeks, Nugent and Terp fans 
will be happy and the opponents will 
wonder what went by them . . . this is 
how fast the former Eastern Airline? 
employee is . . . came to Maryland after 
Coach Dovell brought the unknown out 
to school . . . with his blazing speed, 
he created a sensation at the start . . . 
he has more speed than any back that 
preceded him here . . . evidence of his 
fleetness was his breaking Olympic sprint- 
er Dave Sime's freshman record for the 
60-yard dash ... in a Conference In- 
door meet as a frosh, he ran the 60 in 
6.3 seconds, breaking Sime's mark of 6.4 
seconds . . . last winter he ran a 9.6 
hundred yard dash . . . with this great 
"jet" like explosiveness. VanReenan 
could be the big ace in the hole this fall 
. . . as a soph, he suffered a back in- 
jury the first time he put his hands on 
the ball in the opening game and was 
lost for the season . . . last fall, he was 
in and out of the lineup because of in- 
juries . . . had another fine spring prac- 
tice and got away on numerous long 
runs, which he is patented for . 
what is waited and hoped for is this 
complete and uninterupted year ... it 
could be a good one for him then . . . 
a powerfully built boy with skilled ini- 
tial speed that picks up as he goes alon<r 
. . . carried the ball 29 times for 101 
yards and a 3.5 average last year . . . 
returned one kickoff for 21 yards . . . 
ws on the all-State Class B first team 
selection, at Marlinton High . . . also 
lettered in baseball three years ... in 
School of Physical Education, Recrea- 
tion, and Health. 

DAN PIPER. 19, 5-10, 165, Junior from 
Forest Heights. Md. — here's a little guy 
who is one of the real hard workers on 
the team with a tremendous desire In 
play . . . came up witli an excellent 
year last season as a soph . . . was used 
particularly as a defensive specialist and 



54 



in- responded iikr a veteran . . . turned 
■ •lit in give outstanding PlW '" the sec- 
ondary every game ... .1 read hard no ed 
competitor who likes if rough . . . ex- 
cels al hard shocking tackling which he 
did with regularity and a lot of know- 
how . . . covered iiis territory well . . . 
should rutin- up with an even better jun- 
ior year . . . was put In on offense 
al the right halfback spol on occasion 
. . . tine blocker also . . . came up with 
a hit,' play in the North Carolina game 
when <|i> Hale Betty Ripped him a 5-yard 
scoring pass . . . he had maneuvered 
himsell hi alone In the end zone . . . 
was a staf al Qxon Hill High. 

KENNY SMITH. 21, 5-10. 185. Junior 
from Bethesda, Md. — another of the real 
tine Terp backs on whom a great deal 
can be looked forward to tins fall . . . 
coming to Maryland with a fabulous 
seholastic career behind him at Bcthesda- 
Chevy Chase ami Bullis Prep, the hat I 
working Smith did a line job for the 
Terps last fall . . . his soph indoctrina- 
tion followed a brilliant freshman year 
when he led the baby Terp ball carriers 
. . . Nugent and staff expecting the hard- 
running local boy to come up with a 
real big year . . . lias outstanding poten- 
tial . . . has tremendous power and out- 
standing speed . this combination 
makes him hard to bring down if he gets 
rambling in the open . . . also a tough 
line plunger . . . carried '_'o limes last 
year for 75 yards and a 3-yard average 
. . . caught i pass and intercepted one 
. . . had lour klckoff returns for 60 
yards, a 15-yard mark per return . . . 
played fullback last fall and was used 
also at right halfback this spring . . . 
can play both. . . . was all-America in 
high school . . . also all-State and all- 



Metropolitan on ail i). c. sei<i tton ... 
also lettered In baseball . . was .second 

learn all-Metropolitan In baseball ... in 

School of Business and Public Adminis- 
tration. 

ERNIE ARIZZI, 19, 6-0, 180, Sophomore 
from Bnrrington, N. J. — one of the I 
and unquestionably one of the most 
citing running backs in Terpville In 
. . . this boy showed enough as .1 fn 
man last fall and again this sp.-in;- In 
tab him -is one oi the game's top bacl 
[01 the future ... a line looking pro 
peel with exceptional potential . . . has 
blinding speed with brilliant running abil- 
ities . . . has a real quick start and once 
he gets into the open, he can really pull 
away ... is the true type break-away 
runner and long distance man . . . this 
he did frequently In spring drills to make 
an indelible impression on Nugent 
staff . . . with his fine speed and agility 
1 nd expertness at getting into the open, 
he is a fine pass receiver . . . also a 
threat returning punts and kickoffs . . . 
is an outstanding defensive back also 
... he will get chance to show his abili- 
ties early for he is well thought of and 
has shown on the field that he is a good 
one . . . bears watching . . . was a 
star at Haddon Heights High ... in 
School of Education. 

OTHER TOP HALFBACK CANDIDATES: 
RON ADAMS. 18, 5-10, 175, Sophomore 
from Irvington, N. J.: LEONARD 
CHIAVERINI. 19, 5-11. 180. Sophomore 
from Ambridge, P.: JIM GIRARDI. 20. 
5-10. 190. Sophomore from Williamsport, 
Pa.: RONALD MACE, 20, 5-11, 180. 
Junior from Williamstown. Pa.: GEORGE 
MORRIS. 19, 5-11, 185, Sophomore from 
East Palestine. Ohio. 



FULLBACKS 



PAT DRASS. 20. 5-10. 185. Senior from 
Chester. Pa. — this brilliant hard-knock- 
ing and hard running football player is 
the lone returning experienced fullback 
this fall for Nugent ... it is expected 
he will take over from where he left off 
as the starting fullback for the second 
consecutive year ... as he did as a 
sophomore as number two fullback, Dims-- 
came in again last fall with one of the 
most exciting and most successful per- 
formances given by any other Terp in 
recent years . . . his games were great 
ones and left little to be desired . . . 
he is a most conspicuous crushing, bull- 
dozing type runner . . . the rock-like 
Hrass h s excellent speed for his power- 
fully built frame . . . with his power, 
he has outstanding speed ... he is a 
murderous line plunger ... a crack at 
the line always means at least the im- 
portant three yards or more ... he 
batters the line with reckless abandon 
. . . likes it rough . . . also a vicious 
blocker which adds to his laurels as one 
of the best fullbacks in the league . . . 
could give it a tussle with the others as 



the best ... a brilliant defensive back 
. . . one of the hardest nosed tacklers 
in the game . . . likes to crack and 
hits hard, a trait he possesses on offense 
as well as defense . . . missed spring 
drills to have a shoulder operation which 
will be ok for fall drills ... as a soph, 
he carried 77 times for 264 yards and 
a 3.4 average . . . last year he carried 
76 times for 297 yards and a 3.9 mark 
. . . caught three passes last year for 
12 yards . . . scored once . . . was sec- 
ond team all-Area in '60 selected by 
Washington Post . . . was all-Am' 
honorable mention at Bishop Neumann 
High . . . also honorable mention all- 
Scholastic and was an all-Catholic si 
tion. ... an honor student . . . class 
officer . . . married ... in School of 
Business and Public Administration. 

JOE HREZO. 19. 5-10. 190. Junior from 
New Salem. Pa. — here is a boy who hit 
the Maryland campus two years ago with 
unquestionably the hottest reputation of 
any in many years . . . was first team 
guard all-everything in the tough W< 



55 



ern Pa. football country ... he made 
this magnificent reputation stand up as 
a freshman with great performances and 
was set up as one of the great rookie 
candidates for last fall as a first team 
guard . . . Hrezo responded by having 
an exceptional year and gained the praise 
of everybody as a truly outstanding guard 
for his small but powerful frame . . . 
when the fullback spot became critical 
this spring. Nugent and his staff moved 
the gallant little man to the backfield 
. . . this was prompted by their great 
faith and satisfaction that Hrezo is a 
great football player and could do the 
job ... he is known for his great speed 
since he has been the fastest lineman on 
the team and 1 can beat many backs . . . 
so the move to fullback and not only 
for offensive purposes . . . Joe is a mag- 
nificent defensive football player and this 
skill could be used at a linebacking spot, 
so sorely needed . . . defensively, he im- 
presses with every play ... he puts on 
exciting exhibitions on defense as he 
roves, knocking down passes, making 
tackles, and chasing the opponent . . . 
is most zealous and features intense anx- 
iety toward his opponent . . . his great 
speed and maneuverability are big assets 
for his defensive work ... in carrying 
the ball, Hrezo did a bang-up job in the 
spring and can easily carry on in this 
capacity ... he is a real fine runner 
. . . could be the big help needed here 
... as a good all-around football player, 
he can do the job ... a fine athlete at 
Uniontown . . . was all-State first team 
. . . was first team all-County and all- 
Conference . . . also lettered in wrestling 
and track, as a dash man ... a mem- 
ber of the national honor society . . . 
was class president, a member of the 
student senate and homeroom president, 
three years ... a good student . . . 
in School of Business and Public Admin- 
istration. 

HARRY BUTSKO. 20. 6-2. 210. Sopho- 
more from Pottsville, Pa. — here is a boy, 
a real fine football player, who could 
come in for a great season ... he has 
outstanding potential which could be 
readily realized by the move Nugent and 
staff made at the close of spring prac- 



tice . . . that move was to put Butsko 
at fullback after playing center last year 
on the B squad and playing second to 
Bob Hacker during the spring . . . every 
day in spring practice, Butsko continued 
to impress with his outstanding play, both 
offensively and defensively ... it was 
on defense that this big fellow was sen- 
sational ... in each scrimmage, his play 
was without a doubt way above others 
. . . with his exceptional defensive tal- 
ents, and with his strength and size, he 
has developed into a very effective iine- 
backer . . . this is the spot where good 
ones are needed, so the switch to full- 
back . . . he is a fine diagnostician of 
plays and pursues well . . . has real 
good speed and quickness . . . his re- 
actions are excellent . . . very quick . . . 
from his fullback spot, he can utilize his 
great blocking ability . . . with work 
and experience, his ball handling and his 
ball carrying will take care of itself . . . 
could develop into a real devastating run- 
ning fullback . . . came to Maryland as 
a brilliant prospect and seems now ready 
to carve a niche onto the roster of fu- 
ture stars . . . was all-State. all-County, 
and on the ail-American prep team . . . 
was a member of the "Big 33," Penn- 
sylvania's "cream of the crop" . . . his 
brother Frank graduated from the Naval 
Academy where he starred in football and 
lacrosse ... in School of Physical Edu- 
catino. Recreation, and Health. 

OTHER TOP FULLBACK CANDIDATES: 
BOB BURTON, 20, 5-11, 190. Sophomore 
from Newark, Del.; RONALD ALEXAN- 
DER, 19, 5-10, 190, Sophomore from New 
Castle, Pa. — BURTON was third team 
all-State and was voted the outstanding 
player award in the Delaware High 
School all-star game . . . was state 
wrestling champion three years and was 
given the state outstanding wrestling 
award his senior year. ALEXANDER 
starred at fullback last year for the frosh 
. . . carried 26 times for 99 yards against 
Navy . . . had nearly a four-yard rush- 
ing average for the year . . . was all- 
State honorable mention . . . all-Confer- 
ence team, and a member of the "Big 
33" team, the tops in Pennsylvania. 



56 



TERPS ON HONORARY SELECTIONS — 1960 

GARY COLLINS 

Honorable Mention All-America— AP, UPI 

First Team All-Conference — AP, UPI, Atlantic Coast, Sports writers As- 
sociation 

First Team All-Area — Washington Post 

"National Lineman of the Week" following the North Carolina game 

Atlantic Coast Conference "Lineman of the Week" following hhe North 
Carolina State game 

Atlantic Coast Conference "Lineman of the Week" following the Wake 
iForest game 

"Area College Player of the Year" selected by the Touchdown Club of 
Washington 

"College Player of Week" — Washington Post, following the North Caro- 
lina State game 

Voted the Anthony C. Nardo Memorial Trophy as "Liineman of the 
Year" 

One of five receiving votes for Atlantic Coast Sportswriters player of 
year award 

DALE BETTY 

Honorable Mention All-America — AP 

Second Team All-Conference — AP 

Honorable Mention All-Conference — UPI 

First Team All-Area — Washington Post 

Atlantic Coast Conference "Back of the Week" following the South 

Carolina game 
Atlantic Coast Conference "Back of the Week" following the Clemson 

game 
Voted the Silvester Watch for excellence in athletics as the man who 

typified the best in college athletics 
Voted "Best Offensive Back" by squad 
Played in Blue Gray All-Star game 
Voted A. V. Williams Award as Maryland's outstanding back by "M" 

club 

VINCENT SCOTT 

Second Team All-Area — Washington Post 

Honorable Mention All-Conference — UPI 

Played in North-South Shrine game 

Played in Senior Bowl game 

Voted the Teke Trophy as the student who during his four years at the 

University has rendered the greatest service to football 
Drafted by Buffalo 
Signed with Colts 
Voted Co-Captain by squad 

EVERETT CLOUD 
Played in Blue-Gray game 
Played in Senior Bowl game 
Voted Co-Captain by squad 
Drafted by Dallas 
Signed with Dallas 

57 



DENNIS CONDIE 

Atlantic Coast Conference "Back of the Week" following the North 
Carolina game 

"College Player of the Week" — Washington Post, following the Vir- 
ginia game 

Won Atlantic Coast Conference Kick-off-returning crown 

TOM SANKOVICH 

Atlantic Coast Conference "Lineman of the Week" following the Clem- 
son game 

Runner-up for National "Lineman of the Week" following the Clemson 
game 

Voted the Jim Tatum Memorial Trophy as the outstanding tackle by 
the "M" club 

Second Team All-Area — Washington Post 

Voted best defensive lineman by squad 

BOB HACKER 

Honorable Mention All-Conference, AP 
Voted best offensive lineman by squad 

RICHARD NOVAK 

Honorable Mention All-Conference, UPI 

LEROY DIETRICH 

Voted the Alvin L. Aubinoe Trophy for the team's unsung hero of the 

'60 season 
Voted the "Outstanding Male Senior" by the Men's League 

JIM DAVIDSON 

Voted best defensive back by squad 
Won ACC punt returning crown. 

BILL KIRCHIRO 

First Team All-Area — Washington Post 

PAT DRASS 

Second Team All-Area — Washington Post 

REX COLLINS 

"College Player of the Week" — Washington Post, following the Wake 
Forest game 



58 



TERP ALL-AMERICA PLAYERS 

1923 — W. Supplee, End — Second Team, AP 

1928 Gerald Snyder, Fullback — Second Team, AP 

1931 — Jess Krajcovic, Guard Honorable Mention, AP 

1934 Norwood Sothoron, Fullback — Honorable Mention, AP 

Vic Willis, End Honorable Mention, AP 

Bill Guckeyson, Halfback — Honorable Mention, AP 

Ed Minion, Tackle Honorable Mention, AP 
1935 — Bill Guckeyson, Halfback — Honorable Mention, AP 

Vic Willis, End Honorable Mention, AP 
1936 — Bill Guckeyson — Halfback — Honorable Mention, AP 
1937 Jim Meade, Halfback Honorable Mention, AP 
1940 — Bob Smith, Center — Honorable Mention, AP 
1942 — Tommy Mont, Quarterback, Honorable Mention, AP 

Paul Flick Center Honorable Mention, AP 
1947 Lou Gambino, Halfback — Honorable Mention, AP 

Gene Kinney, Center Honorable Mention, AP 
1948 — Ray Krouse. Tackle Honorable Mention, AP, UP 

Elmer Wingate, End — Honorable Mention. UP 
1949 — -Ray Krouse, Tackle Second Team, AP 

1950 Bob Ward, Guard — First Team, AP, Look, NEA, Gridiron, All- 

Players, Colliers 
Second Team, UP, INS, The Quarterback 
Ed Modzelewski, Fullback —Honorable Mention, AP, UP 

1951 — Bob Ward, Guard UNANIMOUS First Teams 

Dick Modzelewski, Tackle — First Team, All Players; Second 

Team, AP: Third Team, UP 
Ed Modzelewski, Fullback — First and Second Teams 
Jack Scarbath, Quarterback — Honorable Mention, AP, All-Players 
Tom Cosgrove, Center — Honorable Mention. AP, All Players 
Dave Cianelli, Fullback — Honorable Mention, AP 
Joe Petruzzo Halfback — Honorable Mention, AP 

1952 — Jack Scarbath, Quarterback — UNANIMOUS First Teams 
Dick Modelewski. Tackle — UNANIMOUS First Teams 
Tom Cosgrove, Center -Second Team, All-Players 
Stan Jones, Tackle — Honorable Mention, All-Players 

1953— Stan Jones, Tackle— UN AN I MOUS First Teams 

Bernie Faloney, Quarterback — Eight First Teams, All Second 
Teams 

Chester Hanulak, Halfback— Second Team, INS; Honorable Men- 
tion, AP, UP, NEA 

Ralph Felton. Fullback- Honorable Mention, AP, UP, NEA 

Bill Walker, End — Honorable Mention. UP 

John Irvine, Center — Honorable Mention, UP 

Bob Morgan, Tackle — Honorable Mention, UP 
1954 — Dick Bielski. Fullback — Third Team, All-Players: Honorable Men- 
tion, AP, UP 

Ronnie Waller. Halfback— Honorable Mention. AP, UP 

Jack Bowersox. Guard — First Team, Gridiron Index; Honorable 
Mention, AP. UP 

59 



John Irvine, Center — Honorable Mention, UP 

Bill Walker, End — Second Team, AP; Honorable Mention, UP 

Bob Pellegrini, Guard — Honorable Mention, UP 

George Palahunik, Guard — Honorable Mention, UP 

1955 — Bob Pellegrini — Center — UNANIMOUS First Teams 

Ed Vereb, Halfback — First Team, Movietone News, N. Y. Daily 
News, Extension; Second Team, INS; Third Team, AP, UP, 
Sporting News 
Mike Sandusky, Tackle — First Team, Sporting News, Extension; 
Second Team, UP, NEA, N. Y. Daily News; Honorable Men- 
tion, AP 
Jack Davis, Guard — Honorable Mention, AP, UP, NEA 
Frank Tamburello, Quarterback — First Team, Movietone News; 

Honorable Mention, AP, UP, NEA 
Bill Walker, End — Second Team, UP, Sporting News; Honorable 

Mention, NEA 
Russell Dennis, End — First Team, N. Y. Daily News 
Ed Heuring, Tackle — Honorable Mention, AP, UP 
1956 — Mike Sandusky, Tackle — Honorable Mention, AP, UP, INS, NEA 
Jack Davis, Guard — Honorable Mention, AP, UP, INS, NEA 
Gene Alderton, Center —Honorable Mention, AP, UP 
1957 — Rod Breedlove, Guard — Honorable Mention, AP, UP, NEA, Sport- 
ing News 
Ed Cooke, End — Honorable Mention, AP, UP, NEA 
Gene Alderton, Center — Honorable Mention, AP, NEA 
1958 — Rod Breedlove, Guard, Honorable Mention, AP, UPI, NEA, Sport- 
ing News 
Fred Cole, Tackle — Honorable Mention, AP, UPI 
1959 — Rod Breedlove, Guard — Honorable Mention, AP, UPI, NEA 
Jim Joyce, Fullback — Honorable Mention, AP, NEA 
Gary Collins, End — Honorable Mention, AP, UPI 
Tom Gunderman, Guard — Honorable Mention, AP, UPI 
Kurt Scbwarz, Tackle — Honorable Mention, UPI 
1960— Gary Collins, End — Honorable Mention, AP, UPI 
Dale Betty, Quarterback — Honorable Mention, AP 



60 



Additional Honors for Terp All-Americas 

BOB WARD— 1951 
1949 — As a Sophomore- Mosl Valuable Player of '50 Gator Bowl. 

Sophomore "Lineman of Year" in Southern Conference. 

Voted Mosl Valuable Player on team by squad. 
11950 — Awarded the Robert Smith Trophy as "Outstanding Collegiate 

Player of lh< Year" in the area— by the Touchdown Club of 

Washington. 

Awarded the Leigh Williams Memorial Trophy by the Norfolk 

Sports Club as the Outstanding Collegiate Player within the 

bounds of the Southern Conference. 

Voted Most Valuable Player on the team by squad for third 

straight year. 
1951 — "Lineman of Year" as selected by Washington Touchdown Club; 

received the Knute Rockne Memorial Trophy. 

"Lineman of Year" as selected by Philadelphia Sportswriters As- 
sociation. 

Runner-Up to Stanford's Bill McColl as Associated Press Lineman 

of year. 

Voted Most Valuable Player on team by squad for fourth straight 

year. 

JACK SCARBATH— 1952 

1952 — Runner-Up to Billy Vessels, Oklahoma, for Heisman Memorial 
Trophy as nation's outstanding football player. 
"Back of the Year" selected by Collier's Magazine. 
"Sportsman of the Year" selected by Sport Magazine. 
Second high vote getter in United Press "Player of Year" poll. 
Third high vote getter in Associated Press "Player of Year" poll. 
"Player of Year" in Southern Conference. 

"Soulh's Mosl Valuable Player" in North-South Shrine game, 
Miami, Fla. 
First draft choice of Washington Redskins. 

DICK "Little Mo" MODZELEWSKI— 1952 

1951 — Named Co-Captain of the "All-Conference" squad. 

Named on the United Press All-Bowl team. 
1952 — "Lineman of Year" — Look Magazine as selected by Grantland Rice 

and Football Writer's Association of America. Received the John 

B. Outland Memorial Trophy for this selection. 

"Lineman of Year"- — Washington Touchdown Club; received the 

Knute Rockne Memorial Trophy. 

Second high vote getter in United Press "Lineman of Year" poll. 

Second high vote getter in Sporting News "Lineman of Year" poll. 

Fourth high vote getter in Associated Press "Lineman of Year" 

poll. 

Second draft choice of Washington Redskins. 

STANLEY JONES— 1953 
1953 — "Lineman of Year" — Collier's Magazine. 

"Lineman of Year" — Washington Touchdown Club: received the 

Knute Rockne Memorial Trophy. 

Runner-Up to J. D. Roberts, Oklahoma for Associated Press 

61 



"Lineman of Year" award. 

Fifth draft choice of Chicago Bears as a junior. 

BERNIE FALONEY— 1953 

1953 — "Player of Year" in the Atlantic Coast Conference. 

Named to the "All-America Backfield" selected by the Washing- 
ton Touchdown Club. 
First Team ACADEMIC Ail-American. 
Fifth highest vote getter in AP "Back of the Year" poll. 
First draft choice of San Francisco Forty-Niners. 

DICK BIELSKI— 1954 

1954 — Voted "Most Valuable Player" in North-South Shrine game. 
First draft choice of Philadelphia Eagles. 

BOB PELLEGRINI— 1955 

1955 — "Football Player of the Year" and winner of the Walter Camp 
Memorial Trophy as selected by Collier's Magazine and the Amer- 
ican Football Coaches Association. 

"Lineman of the Year" as selected by Collier's Magazine and the 
American Football Coaches Association. 

"Lineman of the Year" as selected by the Washington Touchdown 
Club: received the Knute Rockne Memorial Trophy. 
"Lineman of the Year" as selected by the United Press. 
"Lineman of the Year" as selected by the Philadelphia Sports- 
Writer:; Association 

Top Lineman in Heisman Trophy balloting. 

"Player of the Year" of the Atlantic Coast Conference as selected 
by the Associated Press. 

"Player of the Year" of the Atlantic Coast Conference as selected 
by the Atlantic Coast Sports-Writers Association. 
Winner of Jacobs Blocking Trophy as best blocker in Atlantic 
Coast Conference. 

First Draft choice of the Philadelphia Eagles. 
Played in North-South All-Star Game. 

Co-Captain of All-Star Squad for Chicago All-Star-Pro Game in 
August. 
Voted the "Outstanding Player" Award for All-Star-Pro Game. 

ED VEREB— 1955 

1955 — Runner-Up to Pellegrini as Conference "Player of the Year." 
First Draft choice of the Washington Redskins. 
Played in North-South All-Star Game. 
Set Conference scoring record with his 102 points. 

BILL WALKER— 1955 

1953 — "National Lineman of the Week" following the Alabama game. 
1955 — All-Conference in Baseball also. 
1956 — All-Ccnference in Baseball also. 

MIKE SANDUSKY— 1956 

1955— Ccni'ercnce Wrestling champion. 
1956 — Conference Wrestling champion. 

Played in Ea^t-West Shrine game. 

Played in Chicago Tribune All-Star game. 

Fifth draft choice of San Francisco 49'ers. 

62 



JACK DAVIS 1956 

1956 — Played in East-West Shrine game. 

Runner-Up to Bill Barnes as top Vole getter in ALL-Conference 

Polls. 

Drafted by Washington Redskins. 

ED COOKE— 1957 

1956 Conference Shot-Pul Champion. 

1957 -Conference Shot-Put and Discus Champion, holds conferenci 

Shot -Put record 

Atlantic Coasl Conference "Lineman of the Year" selected by the 
ACC Club of Washington. 
Played in Blue-Gray All-Star game. 
Played in Chicago All-Star game. 
Third draft choice of Chicago Bears. 
1958 — Conference Shot-Put and Discus champion. 

GENE ALDERTON— 1957 

1957— Played in North-South Shrine game. 
Drafted by Detroit Lions. 

FRED COLE— 1958 

1958 — Played in Blue-Gray All-Slar game. 
Drafted by Chicago Bears. 

RODNEY BREEDLOVE— 1959 

1957— National "Lineman of the Week" Runner-up after North Carolina 

game. 

"Sophomore of the Week" in Conference after North Carolina 

game. 

Won "Dapper Dan" award as the one who did most to publicize 

the city of Cumberland during the year of 1957. 
195'9 — Played in North-South Shrine game. 

Played in Senior Bowl All-Star game. 

Played in All-American Bowl game. 

Third draft choice of San Francisco 49'ers.. 

JIM JOYCE— 1959 
1959 — Played in Blue-Gray All-Star game. 

Played in Senior Bowl All-Star game. 

Voted Most Valuable Offensive Player in Blue-Gray game. 
Voted Most Valuable Offensive Player in Senior Bowl game. 
Led the Conference in Rushing. 

TOM GUNDERMAN— 1959 
1959— Played in North-South All-Star game. 

Voted Best Offensive Lineman by squad in Sophomore and Sen- 
ior year. 

DALE BETTY— 1960 

I960 — Atlantic Coast Conference "Back of the Week" following the 
South Carolina game. 

Atlantic Coast Conference "Back of the Week" following the 
Clemson game. 
Played in Blue-Gray All-Star game. 

63 



GARY COLLINS 

1959 — "Sophomore of the Week" in ACC following the Clemson game. 

Runner-Up for "National Lineman of the Week" following the 

Clemson game. 
1960 — "National Lineman of the Week" following the North Carolina 

game. 

"Lineman of the Week" in ACC following the North Carolina 

State game. 

"Lineman of the Week" in ACC following the Wake Forest game. 

"Area College Player of the Year" selected by the Touchdown 

Club of Washington. 

One of five receiving votes for Atlantic Coast Sportswriters 

"Player of Year" award. 



SPECIAL TERRAPIN AWARDS 

The Maryland Ring offered in memory of Charles L. Linhardt to the 
Maryland man who is adjudged the best athlete of the year. 



1952— Dave Cianelli— Back 
1953— John Alderton— End 



1960— Rod Breedlove— Guard 



The Silvester Watch for excellence in athletics to the man who typi- 
ed the best in college athletics: 



1948— Vic Turyn— Back 
1949— Joe Tucker— Back 
1950 — Elmer Wingate — End 
1953— Paul Nester— End 



1954 — Marty Crytzer — End 
1958— Ed Cooke— End 
1960 — Jim Joyce — Back 
1961— Dale Betty— Back 



The Teke Trophy to the student who during his four years at the 
University ha? rendered the greatest service to football: 



1950— John Idzik — Back 
1951— Bob Ward— Cuard 
1952— Ed Fullerton— Back 
1953 — Bernie Faloney— Back 
1954 — John Irvine — Center 
1955 — Bob Pellegrini — Center 



1956— Mike Sandusky— Tackle 
1957 — Gene Alderton — Center 
1958 — Bob Ruseviyan— Back 
1959— Kurt Schwarz — Tackle 
1960— Vincent Scott— End 



The Alvin L. Aubinoe Trophy, for the "Unsung Hero" of the current 
season : 



1956— Al Wharton— Tackle 
1957— Wilbur Main— Center 
1958— Ted Kershner— Back 



1959— Joe Gardi— Tackle 
1960 — Leroy Dietrich — Center 



The Anthony C. Nardo Memorial Trophy to the best Football lineman 
of the year: 



1950— Bob Ward— Guard 
1951— Bob Ward— Guard 
1952— William Maletzky— Guard 
1953— Stan Jones— Tackle 
1954 — Bob Pellegrini — Guard 
1955— Mike Sandusky— Tackle 



1956— Al Wharton— Tackle 
1957— Don Healy— Tackle 
195S— Fred Cole— Tackle 
1959— Tom Gunderman — Guard 
I960— Gary Collins— End 



64 



The Jim Tatum Memorial Trophy to the "Outstanding Tackle": 



1959— Kurt Sehwarz 
1960— Tom Sankovich 

Th ■ A. V. Williams award for the Outstanding Scholar and Athlete: 

1954 Ron Waller— Back 1960— Dale Betty— Back 

1957 Howard Dare — Back 



BEST OFFENSIVE BACK 

1952— Chester Hanulak— Halfback 
1953 Ralph Felton— Fullback 
1954— Ron Waller— Halfback 
1955— Ed Vereb— Halfback 
1956— Fred Hamilton— Halfback 
1957 — Bob Rusevlyan — Quarter- 
back 
1958 — Bob Rusevlyan— Quarter- 
back 
1959— Jim Joyce — Fullback 
1960 Dale Betty — Quarterback 



BEST OFFENSIVE LINEMAN 

1952— Tom Cosgrove— Center 
1953— Marty Crytzer — End 
1954 — Jack Bowersox — Guard 
1955 Russell Dennis— End 
1956— Al Wharton— Tackle 
1957 — Tom Gunderman — Guard 
1958— Fred Cole— Tackle 
1959- -Tom Gunderman — Guard 
1960— Bob Hacker Center 



BEST DEFENSIVE BACK 

1952— Ed Fullerton— Halfback 
1953— Dick Nolan— Halfback 
1954 — Joe Horning — Halfback 
1955 — Lynn Beightol — Quarter- 
back 
1956— Bob Rusevlyan — Quarter- 
back 
1957 — Bob Layman — Halfback 
1958 -Jim Joyce — Fullback 
1959 — Dwayne Fletcher— Quarter- 
back 
1960 — Jim Davidson — Quarterback 

BEST DEFENSIVE LINEMAN 

1952 — John Alderton — End 
1953— Bob Morgan— Tackle 
1954— Tom McLuckie — Guard 
1955 — Mike Sandusky — Tackle 
1956— Mike Sandusky— Tackle 
1957 — Rod Breedlove— Guard 
195S— Ben Scotti— End 
1959— Rod Breedlove — Guard 
I960- Tom Sankovich— Tackle 



TERPS ON ALL-CONFERENCE TEAMS 



"ATLANTIC COAST SPORT! 

1953 FIRST TEAM 

Stan Jones — Tackle 
Jack Bowersox — Guard 
Bernie Faloney — Back 
Chester Hanulak — Back 

SECOND TEAM 

Bill Walker— End 
Bob Morgan — Tackle 
Ralph Felton— Back 

THIRD TEAM 

John Irvine — Center 
Marty Crytzer— End 

PLAYER OF YEAR 
Bernie Falonev — Back 



WRITERS ASSOCIATION" 

COACH OF YEAR 

Jim Tatum 

1954 — FIRST TEAM 

Bill Walker— End 
Dick Bielski— Back 
Ronnie Waller — Back 

SECOND TEAM 
Bob Pellegrini — Guard 
John Irvine — Center 

THIRD TEAM 
Jack Bowersox — Guard 



65 



1955 FIRST TEAM 

Mike Sandusky — Tackle 
Jack Davis — Guard 
Bob Pellegrini — Center 
Ed Vereb — Back 

SECOND TEAM 

Bill Walker— End 
Russell Dennis — End 
Frank Tamburello — Back 

PLAYER OF YEAR 

Bcb Pellegrini — Center 
COACH OF YEAR 
Jim Tatum 
JACOBS BLOCKING TROPHY 

Bob Pellegrini 

1956 FIRST TEAM 

Mike Sandusky — Tackle 
Jack Davis — Guard 



THIRD TEAM 

Gene Alderton — Center 

1957— FIRST TEAM 

Ed Cooke— End 

Rod Breedlove — Guard 

SECOND TEAM 

Gene Alderton — Center 

1958— SECOND TEAM 

Fred Cole— Tackle 
Rod Breedlove — Guard 

1959— SECOND TEAM 

Tom Gunderman — Guard 
Jim Joyce — Back 

1960— FIRST TEAM 
Gary Collins — End 



"ASSOCIATED PRESS" 



1953— FIRST TEAM 
Stan Jones — Tackle 
Eernie Faloney — Back 
Chester Hanulak — Back 
Ralph Felton — Back 

SECOND TEAM 

Jack Bowersox — Guard 
Bill Walker— End 
Bob Morgan — Tackle 
John Irvine — Center 

THIRD TEAM 

Dick Nolan — Back 
Marty Crytzer — End 

1954— FIRST TEAM 

Dick Bielski — Back 
Ronnie Waller — Back 
Bill Walker— End 

SECOND TEAM 

John Irvine — Center 
Bob Pellegrini — Guard 
Jack Bowersox — Guard 



Ed Vereb — Back 
Mike Sandusky — Tackle 
Jack Davis — Guard 
Frank Tamburello — Back 

SECOND TEAM 

BUI Walker— End 
Russell Dennis — End 

PLAYER OF YEAR 

Bob Pellegrini — Center 

1956— FIRST TEAM 

Mike Sandusky— Tackle 
Jack Davis — Guard 
Gene Alderton — Center 

1957— FIRST TEAM 

Rod Breedlove — Guard 
Ed Cooke— End 

SECOND TEAM 
Gene Alderton — Center 



1955 FIRST TEAM 

Bob Pellegrini — Center 



1958 — FIRST TEAM 

Rod Breedlove — Guard 



G6 



SECOND TEAM 
Fird Cole Tackle 

1959 FIRST TEAM 

Jim Joyce Back 

Tom < iiindoi man Guard 

SECOND TEAM 

Rod Breedlove Guard 

Gan Collins End 



1960 — FIRST TEAM 
Gary Collins End 

SECOND TEAM 

Dale Belly Back 



'UNITED PRESS INTERNATIONAL" 



1955 FIRST TEAM 
Bill Walker-End 

Bob Pellegrini Center 

Ed Vereb Back 

Mike Sandusky Tackle 

SECOND TEAM 

Jack Davis— Guard 
Frank Tamburello-Back 
Russell Dennis — End 

1956 FIRST TEAM 

Mike Sandusky— Tackle 
Jack Davis — Guard 



SECOND TEAM 

Rod Breedlove — Guard 
Gene Alderton Center 

1958 -FIRST TEAM 

Rod Breedlove — Guard 

SECOND TEAM 

Tom Gunderman — Guard 
Ben Scotti— End 

1959 SECOND TEAM 
Rod Breedlove — Guard 



1P57_„FIRST TEAM 
Ed Cooke— End 



1960 FIRST TEAM 
Gary Collins— End 



Alf Satterfield 

(Continued from page 18) 

Army in February, 1943. While in the service, he served with the 90th 
Infantry Division in the European Theater of Operations. He was dis- 
charged in January of 1946. 

He i< turned to Vanderbilt for the spring term of '46. He was elected 
Captain of the team for his senior year. He won third team all-America 
honors and first team all-Southeast Conference. He graduated in June 
of '47 with a Bachelor of Science in History. 

Satterfield then went to the San Francisco 49'ers and play?d tackle 
for one year. 

In 1948. he coached at Little Rock Caholic High School. The fall of 
1949 he got the call to be an assistant coach at Louisiana State and 
stayed two years. It was in the spring of 1951 that he went to V.P.I. 
and stayed until the call to College Park in 1959. 

He married the former Bobbie Sue Wright of Forest City, Ark. They 
have a daughter, Susan, age 9. 

67 



1960 TEAM STATISTICS 



FIRST DOWNS 

Rushing 

Passing 

Penalties 

TOTAL YARDS RUSHING 

Yards lost rushing 

NET YARDS RUSHING 

FORWARD PASSES ATTEMPTED 

FORWARD PASSES COMPLETED 

NET YARDS PASSING ._. 

TOTAL YARDS GAINED (rush & pass) 

PASSES INTERCEPTED BY 

YARDS INTERCEPTIONS RETURNED 

TOTAL NUMBER PLAYS (rush) 

TOTAL NUMBER PUNTS -- 

PUNTING AVERAGE 

TOTAL NO. KICKOFFS RETURNED .... 

TOTAL NO. PUNTS RETURNED 

PENALTIES 

OWN FUMBLES 

OWN FUMBLES RECOVERED 

TOTAL POINTS SCORED 

Touchdowns 

Extra Points — Kick ... 

Run 

Pass 

Field Goals 

Safety 



MARYLAND 


OPPONENTS 


141 


182 


80 


113 


49 


60 


12 


9 


1581 


2053 


204 


231 


1377 


1822 


182 


192 


105 


92 


1078 


1107 


2455 


2929 


8 


14 


109 


94 


392 


502 


56/1902 


48/1627 


34.0 


33.9 


37/1014 


33/645 


21/197 


27/252 


47/478 


43/492 


17 


40 


10 


21 


171 


164 


23 


24 


14-16 


11-17 


0-1 


2-2 


4-5 


1-5 


3-6 


1-4 


1 






1960 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS 



Carries 

Drass 76 

R. Collins 48 

Betty 47 

Brown 42 

Novak 38 

Condie _ 34 

Van Reenan 29 

Fletcher 26 

K. Smith 25 

Banner 8 

Jankowski 8 

Cloud 5 

Davidson 4 

Mona 1 

White 1 



RUSHING 








Gain 


Lost 


Net 


Avg. 


301 


4 


297 


3.9 


205 


4 


201 


4.2 


119 


83 


36 


0.8 


175 


10 


165 


3.9 


126 


76 


60 


1.6 


197 


2 


195 


5.7 


110 


9 


101 


3.5 


118 


13 


105 


4.0 


76 


1 


75 


3.0 


63 





63 


7.9 


28 





28 


3.5 


20 


2 


18 


3.6 


15 





15 


3.8 


3 





3 


3.0 


15 





15 


15.0 



68 



TOTAL OFFENSE 

Total Plays Net Gain 

Betty 179 832 

Novak 84 353 

Banner 9 63 

Cloud 6 18 

G. Collins 2 -7 

all others sami as above rushing 

PUNTING 

No. Yards 

G. Collins 33 1156 

White 22 719 

Betty 1 27 

PUNT RETURNS 

No. Yards Returned 

Davidson 16 169 

Fletcher 2 13 

Brown 1 3 

G. Collins 1 1 

Hacker 1 11 

♦Collins & Hacker credited with returns on blocked kicks. 

KICKOFF RETURNS 

No. Yards Returned 

Condie 10 352 

Davidson 8 157 

Fletcher 5 86 

K. Smith 4 60 

Brown 3 129 

G. Collins 1 30 

Cloud 1 27 

Van Reenan 1 21 

Banner 1 18 

Mona 1 17 

Poniatowski 1 17 

Drass 1 11 

PASS INTERCEPTIONS 

No. Yards Returned 

Brown 3 58 

G. Collins 2 5 

Davidson 1 26 

Hacker 1 20 

K. Smith 1 

PASSING 

Att. Comp. Yds. Int. 

Betty _ 132 82 796 8 

Novak 46 22 289 5 

G. Collins _ 2 1-7 

Cloud 1 — 1 

Banner 1 — 

69 



Avg. 
4.6 
4.2 
7.0 
3.0 
-3.5 



Avg. 

:;:».o 
32.7 
27.( 



Avg. 

10.6 
6.5 
3.0 
1.0 

11.0 



Avg. 

35.2 
19.6 
17.2 
15.0 
43.0 
30.0 
27.0 
21.0 
18.0 
17.0 
17.0 
11.0 



TDs 
6 
1 






Yards 


TD 


404 


4 


102 





120 


1 


91 





87 


1 


63 





85 





49 





24 





12 





17 





15 





12 





6 





2 


1 


-11 






PASS RECEIVING 

No. Caught 

G. Collins 30 

Mona 14 

Brown 11 

Fletcher 10 

Poniatowski 8 

Cloud 8 

Scott 7 

Con die 4 

Rock 3 

Drass 3 

Kaufman 2 

Rae 1 

Banner 1 

K. Smith 1 

Piper __ 1 

Van Reenan 1 

TD PASS THROWN 

Betty— 6; Novak— 1 

TD PASS CAUGHT 

G. Collins— 4 ; Poniatowski — 1 
Brown — 1; Piper — 1 

CONVERSION PASSES THROWN 

Novak — 4 

CONVERSION PASSES CAUGHT 

G. Collins — 1; Foniatowski — 1 
Brown — 1 ; Rock — 1 

OPPONENTS FUMBLES RECOVERED 

Hacker— 4 Mcna— 3 Reck— 3 

R. Collins— 2 Davidson— 2 G. Collins— 1 

Crcssan — 1 Barlund — 1 Kirchirc — 1 

Brown — 1 

SCORING 

TDs R P K FG PTS 

G. Collins 4 1 0—0 0—0 26 

Betty 4 0—0 0—0 24 

Condie 4 0—0 0—0 24 

Scott 13—15 3—5 22 

R. Collins 3 0—0 0—0 IS 

Brown 2 1 0—0 0—0 14 

Poniatowski 10 1 0—0 0—0 8 

Drass 10 0—3 0—0 6 

K. Smith 10 0—0 0—0 6 

Mona 10 0—0 0—0 6 

Bennett 10 0-0 0—0 6 

Piper 10 0—0 0—0 6 

Rock 1 C— 0—0 2 

Hannigan 1—1 0—0 1 

Team— Safety 2 

70 



MARYLAND FOOTBALL RECORDS 

SINGLE GAME RECORDS, Individual 

MOST POINTS SCORED: 31 by Bob Shemonski against VPI, 1950 
(5 td's, 1 Pat ). 

MOST TD'S SCORED: 5 by Bob Shcnu.nski against VPI, 1950. 

MOST PAT SCORED: 6 by Bob Dean against South Carolina. 1949; 
6 by Don Docker against West Virginia, 1951. 6 by Vincent Scott 
against Virginia, 1960. 

MOST TD PASSES CAUGHT: 2 by Don Gleasner against Virginia, 
1945; 2 by Leroy Mortor against Michigan State, 1946; 2 by Lou 
Gambino against West Virginia, 1947; 2 by Elmer Wingate against 
George Washington, 1948; 2 by Stan Karnash against George Wash- 
ington, 1949; 2 by Pete Augsburger against South Carolina, 1949; 2 
by Henry Fox against Georgetown, 1949; 2 by Lloyd Colteryahn 
against LSU, 1952; 2 by Bill Walker against Alabama, 1953; 2 by 
Gary Collins against Clemson, 1959. 

MOST TD PASSES THROWN: 3 by Dick Novak against West Vir- 
ginia, 1959; 3 by Dale Betty Against Clemson, 1959; 3 by Dale 
Betty against North Carolina State, 1959; 3 by Jack Scarbath 
against LSU, 1952; 3 by Jack Scarbath against West Virginia, 
1951; 3 by Stan Lavine against George Washington, 1949; 3 by Vic 
Turyn against George Washington, 1948; 3 by Tommy Mont against 
Connecticut, 1942. 

MOST TD RESPONSIBILITY: 5 by Bob Shemonski against VPI, 1950. 

MOST FIELD GOALS: 3 by Vincent Scott against West Virginia, 1959. 

LONGEST SCORING RUN FROM SCRIMMAGE: 90 yards by Dick 
Burgee against Missouri. 1954. 

LONGEST SCORING PASS: 40 yards by Dick Novak to Jim David- 
son against West Virginia, 1959. 

LONGEST SCORING PASS AND RUN: 92 yards by Stan Lavine to 
Ed Bolton against South Carolina, 1949 (pass 15 yards, run 77 
yards). 

LONGEST SCORING RUN AFTER PASS: 77 yards by Ed Bolton on 
pass from Stan Lavine against South Carolina, 1949. (Pass 15 yds). 

LONGEST FIELD GOAL: 48 yards by Vincent Scott against West Vir- 
ginia, 1959. 

LONGEST SCORING RETURN OF INTERCEPTED PASS: 100 yards 
(105 actual) by Joe Horning against Missouri, 1951; 100 yards (103 
actual) by Dickie Lewis against North Carolina State, 1956. 

LONGEST SCORING RETURN OF INTERCEPTED PASS BY OP- 
PONENT: 93 yards by Walter Matson of Pennsylvania, 1941. 

LONGEST PUNT RETURN FOR TD: 90 yards by Dick Nolan against 
Clemson, 1953. 

LONGEST PUNT RETURN FOR TD BY OPPONENT: 100 vards by 
Frank Brady of Navy, 1951. 

LONGEST KICKOFF RETURN FOR TD: 100 yards (102 actual) by 
Dick Novak and Dennis Condio against Virginia, 1960 'Novak re- 
turned to nine yard line then lateraled to Condie who returned 91 
yards). 

LONGEST KICKOFF RETURN FOR TD BY OPPONENT: 93 yards 
by Jim McPherson of North Carolina, 1926. 

LONGEST SCORING RUN WITH RECOVERED FUMBLE: 23 yards by 
Howie Dare against North Carolina, State, 1954. 

71 



LONGEST NON SCORING RUN FROM SCRIMMAGE: 76 yards by 
Harry Bonk against North Carolina, 1948. 

LONGEST NON SCORING PASS: 47 yards by Dale Betty to Ron 
Shaffer against Clemson, 1959. 

LONGEST NON SCORING RUN WITH RECOVERED FUMBLE BY 
OPPONENT. 75 yards by Dave Russell of Washington & Lee, 1942. 

LONGEST NON SCORING PASS AND RUN: 73 yards by Tom Mont 
to Hubie Werner against Lakehurst, 1942 (pass 32 yards run 
41 yards). 

LONGEST NON SCORING RUN AFTER PASS: 41 yards by Hubie 
Werner against Lakehurst, 1942 on 32 yard pass from Tommy 
Mont. 

LONGEST NON SCORING RUN OF INTERCEPTED PASS: 74 yards 
by Bernie Faloney against LSU, 1952. 

LONGEST NON SCORING KICKOFF RETURN: 76 yards by Howie 
Dare against Miami, 1957. 

LONGEST NON SCORING PUNT RETURN: 67 yards by John Mc- 
Vicker against Syracuse, 1956. 

MOST RUSHES: 28 by Jim Joyce against Texas, 1959; 28 by Ed 
Modzelewski against Tennessee in 1952 Sugar Bowl. 

MOST YARDS GAINED RUSHING: (NET): 193 yards by Ray Popple- 
man against Western Maryland, 1931 (24 carries). 

BEST RUSHING AVERAGE: 18.7 by Joe Horning against West Vir- 
ginia, 1951 (4 carries) 18.7 by Joe Horning against George Wash- 
ington, 1954 (4 carries). 

MOST PASSES ATTEMPTED: 30 by Jack Scarbath against North 
Carolina Slate, 1950. (completed 11). 

MOST PASSES COMPLETED: 17 by Tommy Mont against North 
Carolina, 1946, (25 attempts). 

BEST COMPLETION PERCENTAGE: (minimum of 10 attempts): 
.800 by Tommy Mont against Bainbridge, 1946 (8 completions, 
10 attempts). 

MOST YARDS GAINED PASSING: 243 by Jack Scarbath against 
Navy, 1951 (14 completions, 23 attempts). 

MOST PASSES HAD INTERCEPTED: 3 by Vic Turyn against North 
Carolina, 1948. 3 by Charles Boxold against Wake Forest, 1954. 3 by 
Bob Rusevlyn against North Carolina, 1958. 3 by Dale Betty against 
Texas, 1960. 3 by Dick Novak against Duke, 1960. 

MOST TOTAL PLAYS (rush and pass): 40 by Jack Scarbath against 
North Carolina State, 1950 (30 passes, 10 rushes). 

MOST NET YARDS GAINED (rushing and passing): 251 by Jack 
Scarbath against Navy, 1951 (243 passing — 8 rushing). 

BEST OFFENSIVE AVERAGE (rushing and passing): (minimum 4 
plays) 19.0 by Dale Betty against Clemson, 1959 (8 plays, 152 
yards). 

MOST PASSES CAUGHT: 8 by Lou Weidensaul against Navy, 1951 
(95 yards). 8 by Lloyd Colteryahn against Alabama, 1952 (131 
yards). 

MOST YARDS GAINED ON PASS RECEPTIONS: 131 yards by Lloyd 
Colteryahn against Alabama, 1952 (8 receptions). 

MOST PASSES INTERCEPTED: 3 by Bob Shemonski against Geor- 
gia, 1951. 

MOST YARDS GAINED ON INTERCEPTION RUNBACKS: 111 yards 
by Dickie Lewis against North Carolina State, 1956). 

MOST PUNTS: 10 by Bill Guckeyson against Syracuse, 1936. 10 by 
Jack Targarona against West Virginia, 1950. 

72 



MOST TOTAL YARDS PUNTING: 510 by Bill Guckeyson again 1 
Syracuse, 1936. 

BEST PUNTING AVERAGE: 53 yards by Lynn Beightol against Okla- 
homa. 1956 Orange Bowl (3 punts). 

LONGEST PUNT WITH ROLL: 88 yards by John Fritsch against 
Miami, 1956. (Note) "Untz" Brooke Brewer had a 93 yard punt 
against VMI. 1916. 

LONGEST PUNT WITH ROLL HV OPPONENT: SI yards by Charlie 
Justice of North Carolina, 1948. 

MOST PUNTS RETURNED: 6 by Joe Fetruzzo against LSU, 1951 
(67 yards). 

MOST YARDS GAINED RETURNING PUNTS: 146 by Bob Shemonski 
against North Carolina State, 1950 (5 returns). 

MOST PUNTS BLOCKED: 1 by several men. 

MOST KICKOFFS RETURNED: 3 by Bob Shemonski against Geor- 
gia, 1950. 3 by Ted Kershner against North Carolina State, 1957. 
3 by Howie Dare against North Carolina State, 1957. 3 by Dwayne 
Fletcher against South Carolina, 1959. 3 by Jim Davidson against 
Wake Forest, 1960. 3 by Dennis Condie against Penn State, 1960. 
3 by Dennis Condie against North Carolina, 1960 

MOST YARDS RETURNING KICKOFFS: 146 by Howie Dare against 
North Carolina State, 1957 (3 returns). 

MOST OPPONENTS' FUMBLES RECOVERED: 3 by Tom Gunderman 
against Miami, 1957. 



'o 1 



SINGLE GAME RECORDS, Team 

HIGHEST SCORE: Maryland 80 Washington College 0, 1927. 

MOST TOTAL POINTS SCORED BY BOTH TEAMS: 87, 1954 (Mary- 
land 74, Missouri 13). 

HIGHEST SCORE BY OPPONENT: Navy 76, Maryland 0, 1913. 

MOST TD'S SCORED: 12 against Washington College, 1927. 

MOST PAT SCORED: 8 against Washington College, 1927; 8 against 
Missouri, 1954. 

MOST SAFETIES SCORED: 2 against Delaware, 1947, 2 against 
Georgetown, 1950. 

MOST FIELD GOALS SCO-RED: 3 against West Virginia, 1959. 

MOST TD'S SCORED PASSING: 4 against George Washington, 1948 
(3 by Vic Turyn, 1 by John Idzik); 4 against Navy, 1952 (2 by 
Jack Scarbath, 1 by Lloyd Colteryahn, 1 by Bernie Faloney) ; 
4 against George Washington, 1954 (2 by Frank Tamburello, 1 by 
Charles Boxold, 1 by Lynn Beightol. 

MOST OPPONENTS TD'S SCORED PASSING: 4 by Wake Forest, 
1958 (3 by Norman Snead, 1 by Charlie Parker). 

MOST TOTAL PLAYS: 92 against Texas, 1959. 

MOST RUSHES: 76 against Miami, 1958. 

FEWEST RUSHES: 27 against West Virginia, 1959. 

MOST NET YARDS GAINED RUSHING: 577 against VPI, 1950. 

FEWEST NET YARDS GAINED RUSHING: Minus 17 against George- 
town, 1939. 

FEWEST NET YARDS GAINED RUSHING BY OPPONENTS: Minus 
21 by West Virginia, 1951, Minus 21 by UCLA, 1955. 

BEST AVERAGE PER RUSH: 10.5 yards against VPI, 1950 (577 yds. 
in 55 rushes). 

MOST PASSES ATTEMPTED: 40 against Virginia, 1958 (18 comple- 



tions for 330 yds.) 



73 



MOST PASSES COMPLETED: 21 against North Carolina, 1958 (35 

attempts). 
FEWEST PASSES COMPLETED: against Michigan State, 1944 (1 

attempt); against Vanderbilt, 1948 (12 attempts); against 

Missouri, 1951 (3 attempts). 
FEWEST PASSES ATTEMPTED: 1 against Michigan State, 1944. 
MOST PASSES ATTEMPTED BY OPPONENTS: 57 by West Virginia, 

1951 (19 completions). 
FEWEST PASSES COMPLETED BY OPPONENTS: by Syracuse, 

1939 (5 attempts); by Michigan State, 1944 (0 attempts); by 

Delaware, 1948 (3 attempts); by Boston University, 1952 (6 at- 
tempts); by Kentucky, 1956 (3 attempts). 
FEWEST YARDS GAINED PASSING BY OPPONENTS: Minus 1 by 

Clemson, 1956. 
MOST YARDS GAINED PASSING: 330 against Virginia, 1958 (18 

completions, 40 attempts). 
FEWEST YARDS GAINED PASSING: against Michigan State, 1944; 

Vanderbilt, 1948; Missouri, 1951. 
BEST COMPLETION PERCENTAGE: (min. 10 attempts) .800 against 

Georgia, 1952 (8 completions, 10 attempts). 
MOST PASSES INTERCEPTED: 7 against Georgia, 1951. 
MOST PASSES HAD INTERCEPTED: 6 by Pennsylvania, 1941. 
MOST TOTAL YARDS GAINED (rush and pass): 602 against West 

Virginia, 1951 (523 rushing, 79 passing). 
FEWEST TOTAL YARDS GAINED (rush and pass): 29 against Syra- 
cuse, 1959. 
MOST TOTAL FIRST DOWNS: 27 against Washington & Lee, 1951, 

27 against LSU, 1952. 
FEWEST TOTAL FIRST DOWNS: 1 against Michigan State, 1944. 
MOST FIRST DOWNS RUSHING: 24 against Washington & Lee, 1951. 
FEWEST FIRST DOWNS RUSHING: 1 against Michigan State, 1944, 

1 against Syracuse, 1959. 
MOST FIRST DOWNS PASSING: 11 against George Washington, 1949. 
FEWEST FIRST DOWNS PASSING: against 12 teams (last one 

South Carolina 1958). 
MOST FUMBLES: 8 against Georgia, 1952 (lost 2). 
FEWEST FUMBLES: against South Carolina, 1958; against VMI, 

1945; against Kentucky, 1954; against South Carolina, 1958; 

against South Carolina, 1959; agair.st West Virginia, 1960; against 

Virginia, 1960. 
MOST FUMBLES BY OPPONENTS: 8 by South Carolina, 1948; 8 by 

Mississippi, 1953. 
MOST FUMBLES LOST: 6 against North Carolina. 1947. 
MOST OPPONENTS FUMBLES RECOVERED: 5 against West Virginia. 

1950; 5 against Missouri in 1950 Gator Bowl; 5 against North Caro- 
lina, 1960. 
MOST PENALTIES: 18 against VPI, 1950. 
MOST PENALTIES BY OPPONENTS: 15 by Miami, 1957. 
MOST YARDS PENAL'ZED: 130 against VPI, 1948; 130 against VPI, 

1950. 
MOST YARDS OPPONENTS PENALIZED: 135 by North Carolina, 

1953. 
FEWEST PENALTIES: against Duke, 1941. 
FEWEST PENALTIES BY OPPONENTS: by Western Maryland, 

1937; by Western Maryland, 1939; by Florida, 1939; by Wash- 

74 



ington & Lee, L941; by William & Mary, 1945; by South Caro- 
lina, 1953. 

MOST PUNTS: 14 against Virginia, 1937; 14 againsl Western Mary- 
land, 1940. 

FEWEST PUNTS: 1 against Washington & Leo, 1953; 1 against Geor- 
gia, 1953; 1 againsl Syracuse, 1955; 1 against North Carolina 
State, 1954. 

MOST TOTAL YARDS PUNTING: 510 against Syracuse, 1936 (10 
punts >, 

BEST PUNTING AVERAGE: 51.7 yards against Washington & Lee 

1951 (155 yds. on 3 punts). 

SEASON RECORDS, Individual 

MOST POINTS SCORED: 97 by Bob Shemonski in 10 games, 1950; 
96 by Lou Gambino in 10 game, 1947; 96 by Ed Vereb in 10 
games, 1955; Gambino added 3 td's in the 20-20 1948 Gator Bowl 
tie with Georgia for 11 game total of 114 points; Vereb scored 1 
td. in the 20-6 loss to Oklahoma in the 1936 Orange Bowl for a 
11 game total of 102 points. 

MOST TOUCHDOWNS SCORED: 16 by Lou Gambino, 1947; 16 by Bob 
Shemonski, 1950; 16 by Ed Vereb, 1955; all in 10 games. Gambino 
added 3 in the 1948 Gator Bowl for 11 game total of 19 and Vereb 
1 in the 1956 Orange Bowl for 11 game total of 17. 

MOST PAT SCORED: 41 by Don Decker in 10 games, 1951, including 
4 for 4 in 28-13 victory over Tennessee in the 1952 Sugar Bowi. 
(55 attempts). 

MOST FIELD GOALS SCORED: 3 by Dick Bielski. 1953; 3 by Vincent 
Scott, 1939; 3 by Vincent Scott, 1960, (NOTE) "Untz" Brooke Brew- 
er kicked 7 in 1916 and 6 in 1921 employing both the drop kick and 
placement. 

MOST TD PASSES THROWN: 12 by Tommy Mcnt in 9 games, 1942. 

MOST PASSES ATTEMPTED: 132 by Dale Betty, 1960 (10 games) com- 
pleted 82. 

MOST PASSES COMPLETED: 82 by Dale Betty, 1960 (10 games) 132 
attomps. 

BEST PASSING PERCENTAGE: .621 by Dale Betty, I960 (10 games) 
comDleted 82 of 132. 

MOST YARDS GAINEtJ PASSING: 1049 by Jack Scarbath, in 9 games. 

1952 (59 completions in 113 attempts). 

MOST PASSES CAUGHT: 32 by Lloyd Colteryahn in 9 game;, 1952. 
(593 yards). 

MOST PASSES INTERCEPTED: 6 by Joe Horning in 9 games, 1951; 
6 by Bernie Faloney in 10 games, 1953; 5 by Ed Fullerton in 9 
games, 1951. Fullerton added 2 in the 28-13 win over Tennessee 
in the 1952 Sugar Bowl for a 10 game total of 7. 

MOST YARDS RETURNING INTERCEPTED PASSES: 147 by Joe 
Horning on 6 interceptions in 9 games, 1951. 

MOST RUSHES: 137 by Jim Joyce in 10 games, 1959; 125 by Lou 
Gambino in 10 games, 1947; 113 by Ed Modzelewski in 9 games. 
1951; Modzelewski added 28 in the 28-13 victory over Tennessee in 
the 1952 Sugar Bowl for 10 game total of 141. Gambino added 
22 in the 20-20 tie with Georgia in the 1948 Gator Bowl for 11 
game total of 147. 

BEST RUSHING AVERAGE PER CARRY: 9.S vards by Che: Hanu- 
lak, 1953. 

75 



MOST NET YARDS RUSHING: 904 by Lou Gambino in 10 games, 
1947; 834 by Ed Modzelewski in 9 games, 1951; Gambino added 151 
yds. in 1948 Gator Bowl for 10 game total of 1069 yards; 
Modzelewski added 153 yds. in 1952, Sugar Bowl for 10 game total 
of 987 yards. (Note) Ray Poppleman gained 1350 yards, 1931 but 
his total was not NET total and is believed to be total offense. 

MOST AVERAGE NET YARDS RUSHING PER GAME: 92.7 by 
Modzelewski in 9 games, 1951; 90.4 by Lou Gambino in 10 games 
1947; Modzelewski added 153 yds. in 1952 Sugar Bowl for 10 game 
avg. of 98.7 yds. per game. Gambino added 151 yds. in 1948 Gator 
Bowl for 11 game average of 97.2 yds. 

MOST TOTAL YARDS (Rushing and Passing) 1286 by Jack Scarbath 
in 9 games, 1952. 

MOST PUNTS: 61 by Jack Targarona in 10 games, 1950. 

BEST PUNTING AVERAGE: 43.7 by Bill Walker in 10 games, 1955 
(15 punts); Walker added 4 punts in the 1956 Orange Bowl for a 
11 game average of 41.2 (19 punts). 

MOST PUNTS RETURNED: 28 by Bob Shemonski in 10 games, 1950. 

MOST YARDS GAINED ON PUNT RETURNS: 505 by Bob Shemonski 
in 10 games, 1950. 

BEST PUNT RETURN AVERAGE: (More than 3): 19.7 by Hubie 
Werner on 6 returns, 1947. 

MOST KICKOFFS RETURNED: 10 by Bob Shemonski, 1950 for 259 
yards: 10 by Dennis Condie, 1960 for 352 yards. 

MOST YARDS GAINED ON KICKOFF RETURNS: 264 by Howie 
Dare on 6 returns, 1957. 

BEST KICK OFF RETURN AVERAGE (more than 3): 44 yards by 
Howie Daie, 1957 (6 returns for 264 yds.) 

SEASON RECORDS, Team 

MOST POINTS SCORED: 353 in 9 games, 1951; 381 in 10 games, 1951 
including 28-13 victory over Tennessee in the 1952 Sugar Bowl. 

FEWEST POINTS SCORED: 39 in 9 games, 1940. 

MOST OPPONENTS POINTS SCORED: 235 in 9 games, 1938. 

FEWEST OPPONENTS POINTS SCORED: 31 in 10 games, 1953; 38 
in 11 games including the 7-0 loss to Oklahoma in the 1954 
Orange Bowl. 

MOST TD'S SCORED: 52 in 9 gameB, 1951; 56 in 10 games, including 
the 28-13 victory over Tennessee in the 1952 Sugar Bowl. 

MOST FIELD GOALS: 3 in 1953; 3 in 1959; 3 in 1960, (NOTE) 7 in 
1916 and 6 in 1921 employing both the dropkick and placement. 

MOST PAT'S SCORED: 38 in 9 games, 1951; 42 in 10 games in- 
cluding the 28-13 victory over Tennessee in the 1952 Sugar Bowl. 

BEST PERCENTAGE KICKING PAT'S: .931 on 13 of 14 kicks, 1958. 

BEST SEASON: 1951— Won 10 Lost (includes 28-13 win over Tennessee 
in Sugar Bowl). 1953— Won 10 Lost (10-1 including 7-0 loss to 
Oklahoma in 1954 Orange Bowl). 1955 — Won 10 Lost (10-1 includ- 
ing 20-6 loss to Oklahoma in 1956 Orange Bowl). 

WORST SEASON: 1944: Won 1— Lost 7— Tied 1. 

MOST FIRST DOWNS: 167 in 9 games, 1952; 173 in 10 games in 1951 
including the 18 in the 28-13 victory over Tennessee in the 1952 
Sugar Bowl. 

MOST FIRST DOWNS BY OPPONENTS: 182 in 1960. 

MOST YARDS GAINED RUSHING: 2921 in 9 games, 1951; 3210 in 

76 



in games, 1951 including 28-13 victory over Tennessee in 1952 

Sugar Bowl. 
MOST YARDS GAINED RUSHING BY OPPONENTS: 2022 in 10 

games, 1956. 
MOST YARDS GAINED PASSING: 1366 in 9 games, 1942. 
MOST YARDS GAINED PASSING BY OPPONENTS: 1391 in 9 games, 

1931; 1466 in io games including 28-13 victory over Tennessee in 

1952 Sugar Bowl. 
MOST NET YARDS GAINED (rushing and passing): 3822 in 9 games, 

1951 (2921 rushing and 901 passing); 4174 in 10 games including 

the 28-13 victory over Tennessee in the 1952 Sugar Bowl (3210 

rushing, 964 passing). 
MOST NET YARDS GAINED BY OPPONENTS (rushing & passing). 

2929 in 1960 (1822 rushing 1107 passing). 
FEWEST NET YARDS GAINED (rushing and passing) BY OPPON- 
ENTS): 1691 in 10 games, 1955 (761 yards rushing, 932 passing); 

Oklahoma gained 202 rushing, 53 passing in 1956 Orange Bowl I 

11 game total of 1946. 
MOST PASSES ATTEMPTED: 204 in 10 games, 1958 (103 completions). 
MOST PASSES COMPLETED: 105 in 10 games, 1960 (182 attempts). 
BEST PASSING PERCENTAGE: .577 in 10 games, 1960 (105 of 182). 
BEST PASSING PERCENTAGE BY OPPONENTS: .517 in 10 games, 

1959 (90 completions in 174 attempts). 
MOST PASS INTERCEPTIONS: 34 in 9 games, 1951, 38 in 10 game- 
including the 28-13 victory over Tennessee in the 1952 Sugar Bowl. 
MOST PASS INTERCEPTIO*NS BY OPPONENTS: 23 in 10 games, 

194S. 
MOST FUMBLES: 44 in 10 games, 1950. 

MOST OPPONENTS FUMBLES: 40 in 10 games, 1960. (Lost 19). 
FEWEST FUMBLES: 17 in 10 games, I960 (lost 7). 
MOST PENALTIES: 78 in 11 games, 1953 (492.5 yards). 
MOST YARDAGE LOST PENALTIES: 694 in 10 games, 1956 (72 

penalties). 
MOST PUNTS: 63 in 10 games, 1957. 
MOST PUNTS BY OPPONENTS: 85 in 10 games, 1950. 
MOST YARDS ALL PUNTS: 2251 in 10 games, 1950 (62 punts). 
BEST PUNTING AVERAGE: 41.5 yards in 10 games, 1953 (37 punts) 

CAREER RECORDS, individual 

MOST POINTS SCORED REGULAR SEASON: 126 by Ed Modzelewski, 

28 games, 1949-51 (21 td's) (note) he added 1 td in 1950 Gator 

Bowl for total of 132). 
MOST POINTS SCORED ALL GAMES: 133 by Bob Shemonski, 30 

games. 19 19-51 ( 22 td's, 1 pat). Includes 2 td's in 1950, Gator Bowl. 

1 td in 1952 Sugar Bowl. 
MOST POINTS BY PLACEKICKER REGULAR SEASON: 69 by Don 

Decker, 18 games, 1951-52 (63 pat, 82 att. 2 field goals). 
MOST POINTS BY PLACEKICKER ALL GAMES: 73 by Don Decker. 

19 games, includes 4 pat in 4 attempts in 1952 Sugar Bowl. (Total 

of 67 pat in F6 att.. 2 field goals). 
MOST FIELD GOALS REGULAR SEASON GAMES: 7 bv Vincent Scott. 

30 games, 1958-60 (NOTE) "Untz" Brooke Brewer kicked 14, 1916-21 

employing both drop kick and placement. 
MOST TD' PASSES CAUGHT REGULAR SEASON: S by Lou Weidensaul. 

77 



OUTSTANDING VETERANS RETURNING FOR '61 




ROGER SHOALS 
Tackle 



DAVE CROSSAN 
Tackle 



MURNIS BANNER 
Halfback 






HENRY- 

PONIATOWSKi 

End 




* 



V\ 



JACK REILLY 
Guard 




' -■''{ 





GORDON BENNETT 
Tackle 





| DICK BARLUNI 

*jf » End 



^ : " : nnMii>' '■•'llillr ' 



TOM SANKOVICH 
Guard 



'■ :^ ' 



tt 



k 



JOE HREZO, Fullback 



BILL KIRCHIRO,Guard 



1951-52 (IS games). 8 by Gary Collins, 1959-60 (20 games). 
MOST TOUCHDOWN PASSES THROWN REGULAR SEASON: 22 by 

Jack Scarbath, 28 games, 1950-52. 
MOST PASSES ATTEMPTED REGULAR SEASON: 260 by Jack 

Scarbath, 28 games, 1950-52. 
MOST PASSES ATTEMPTED ALL GAMES: 269 by Jack Scarbath, 

29 games, includes 9 in 1952 Sugar Bowl. 

MOST PASSES COMPLETED REGULAR SEASON: 127 by Dale Betty, 

1958-60 (218 attempts), 30 games. 
MOST PASSES COMPLETED ALL GAMES: 131 by Jack Scarbath, 29 

games, includes 6 in 1952 Sugar Bowl. (269 att.) 
BEST COMPLETION PERCENTAGE REGULAR SEASON: .583 by Dale 

Betty 1958-60, 30 games. (127 for 218). 
MOST YARDS GAINED PASSING, REGULAR SEASON: 2187 by Jack 

Scarbath, 28 games, 1950-52. 
MOST YARDS GAINED PASSING ALL GAMES: 2244 by Jack 

Scarbath, 29 games, includes 57 yds. in 1952 Sugar Bowl. (269 at!.. 

131 comp.) 
MOST PASSES CAUGHT REGULAR SEASON: 44 by Gary Collins, 1959- 

60, 20 games. 
MOST YARDAGE GAINED BY PASSES REGULAR SEASON: 761 

by Lloyd Colteryahn, 28 games, 1950-52. 
MOST TOTAL YARDS GAINED RUSHING REGULAR SEASON: 1913 

by Ed Modzelewski, 28 games, 1949-51. 
MOST TOTAL YARDS GAINED RUSHING ALL GAMES: 2102 by Ed 

Modzelewski, 30 games, includes 36 yards in 1950 Gator Bowl and 

153 yds. in 1952 Sugar Bowl. 
YOST RUSHES REGULAR SEASON: 340 by Ed Modzelewski, 28 

games, 1949-51. 
MOST RUSHES ALL GAMES: 380 by Ed Modzelewski, 30 games, in- 
cludes 12 in 1950 Gator Bowl and 28 in 1952 Sugar Bowl. 
BEST RUSHING AVERAGE REGULAR SEASON: 8:1 yds. by Chet 

Hanulak, 28 games, 1951-53, (1544 yds., 190 carries). 
BEST RUSHING AVERAGE ALL GAMES: 7.9 yds. by Chet Hanulak, 

30 games, includes 35 yds. on 4 carries in 1952 Sugar Bowl and 39 
yds. on 12 carries in 1954 Orange Bowl. 

MOST TOTAL PLAYS (rush and pass) REGULAR SEASON: 499 by 

Jack Scarbath, 28 games, 1950-52. 
MOST TOTAL PLAYS (rush and pass) ALL GAMES: 514 by Jack 

Scarbath, 29 games, includes 15 in 1952 Sugar Bowl. (Avg. gain per 

play 5.7 yds.) 
MOST TOTAL YARDS GAINED (rush and pass) REGULAR SEASON: 

2838 by Jack Scarbath, 28 games, 1950-52. 
MOST TOTAL YARDS GAINED (rush and pass) ALL GAMES: 2909 

by Jack Scarbath, includes 71 yds. in 1952 Sugar Bowl. <avg. 5.7 

yds. per play.) 



79 



YEAR BY YEAR RECORDS 



MARYLAND 
AGGIES 

1892 (0-3-0) 

St. Johns 50 

Johns Hop 62 

Episcopal Hi. -16 

1893 (6-0-0) 

36 Eastern Hi 

10 Central Hi 

18 Bait. City Col... 
6 St. Johns Col... 

15 W. Md. Col ....10 

16 Orient Ath. CI. 6 

1894 (3-3-0) 

52 W. Md. Col 

12 Wash. Col 

6 St. Johns 22 

6 Georgetown .... 4 
Col. Ath. CI. -26 
Mt. St. Marys ..24 

1895 — No team 
No Games 

1896 (6-2-2) 

Eastern Hi 6 

Gallaudet 

34 Business Hi — . 

10 Central Hi 6 

18 Alexandria Hi.. 
20 Bethel Mil Ac ..10 

Episcopal Hi. .. 6 

16 West. Md 6 

14 Central Hi 

U. of Md 

1897 (2-4-0) 

24 Central Hi 6 

4 Eastern Hi 

J. Hopkins 30 

4 St. Johns 6 

6 Gallaudet 16 

Bait. Med Col.,,10 

1898 (2-5-0) 

5 Columbian U. -17 
West. Md 32 

36 Eastern Hi 

Gallaudet 33 

Johns Hop 16 

Episcopal Hi ....37 

27 Rock Hill Col... 

1899 (1-4-0) 

West Md 21 

26 Eastern Hi 

Johns. Hop 40 

Delaware Col. 34 
St. Johns 62 

1900 (3-4-1) 

Western Hi — 
Gib. Ath. CI 17 



G'town Prep .. 5 
6 Episcopal Hi —31 

5 Gonzaga Hi 11 

15 G'town Prep .. 
21 Gonzaga Hi — 
21 Char Hall Ac .. 

1901 (1-7-0) 

6 Del. Col 24 

10 Gallaudet Re. ..11 

Johns Hop 6 

6 Rock Hill Col-11 
Central Hi 11 

27 U.S. Marines .. 
Wal'k Ath CI -36 
West. Md 30 

1902 (3-5-2) 

Georgetown —27 

5 Mt. St. Jos 

11 Columbian U. ..10 

6 Olympia Ath. .. 

Wash. Col 

Mt. St. Marys .. 5 

6 West. Md 26 

U. of Md 5 

Johns Hop 17 

Del. Col 

1903 (7-4-0) 

Georgetown .—28 

5 Clifton Ath 

21 Gunton Tern. .. 
St. Johns 18 

28 Wash. Col 

27 Tech Hi 

Mt. St. Mar .... 2 

6 West. Md 

11 U. of Md 

Dela. Col 16 

6 Columbian U. .. 

1904 (2-4-2) 

Georgetown ....22 
Ran. Macon — 
Ftress Monroe 

11 Mt. St. Mar 6 

West. Md 5 

22 Gallaudet 5 

U. of Md 6 

Dela. Col 18 

1905 (6-4-0) 

20 Bait Poly In — 

16 Gallaudet 

West. Md 10 

Navy 17 

17 Wm. & Mary .. 

28 Mt. St. Josephs 
27 St. Johns 5 

Wash. Col 17 

23 U. of Md 5 

Dela. Col 12 

80 



1906 (5-3-0) 

5 Tech Hi 

22 Bait City Col .. 
Navy 12 

Georgetown —28 
Mt. Wash. CI. -29 

20 St. Johns 4 

16 Rock Hill Col. 
35 Wash. Col 

1907 (3-6-0) 

13 Tech High 

Georgetown —10 

5 Richmond Col-11 
Navy 12 

6 Mt. St. Mar 12 

10 Geo. Wash 

10 Wash. Col 5 

St. Johns 16 

Gallaudet 5 

1908 (3-8-0) 

5 Central Hi 

5 Tech High 6 

Richmond Col..22 

Johns Hop 10 

Navy 57 

5 Gallaudet 

Fred'bg Col 10 

12 Balto Poly 8 

St. Johns 31 

Wash. Col 11 

Geo. Wash 57 

1909 (2-5-0) 

Richmond Col. 12 
Johns Hopkins 9 
Tech High -11 

5 Rock Hill 

George Wash. 26 
N. C. State .... 33 

14 Gallaudet 12 

1910 (4-3-1) 

12 Central Hi 

20 Richmond Col. 

11 Johns Hop 11 

21 Catholic U 

11 Geo. Wash 

V.M.I 8 

St. Johns 6 

3 West. Md 17 

1911 (4-4-2) 

6 Tech Hi 

Richmond 

5 Fred'bg Col 

Central Hi 14 

3 Johns Hop 6 

6 Catholic U 6 

St. Johns 27 

5 Wash. Col 17 

6 West Md 

6 Gallaudet 2 



1912 (6-1-1) 

31 Tech Hi 6 

46 Richmond Col. 

58 U. of Md 

L3 Johns Hop 

St. Johns 27 

13 Gallaudel 6 

17 West Md 7 

13 Penn Mil. Col. 13 

1913 (6-3-0) 

27 Balto Citv 10 

45 Richmond Col. 
26 Johns Hop. .... 

46 West Md 

Navy 76 

13 St. Johns 

26 Wash. Col 

Gallaudel 13 

7 Ponn Mil 27 

1914 (5-3-0) 

Balto. Polv 6 

6 Catholic U 

13 West Md 20 

14 Johns Hop 

10 St. Johns 

3 Wash. Col 

Gallaudet 23 

26 Penn Mil 

1915 (6-3-0) 

31 Balto Polv 

Haverford 7 

Catholic U 16 

10 Gallaudet 3 

14 Penn Mil 13 

27 St. Johns 14 

28 Wash Col 13 

51 West Md 

Johns Hop 3 

MARYLAND 
STATE 

1916 (6-2-0) 

6 Dickinson 

7 Naw 14 

15 V.M.I 9 

6 Haverford 7 

31 St. Johns 6 

10 N.Y.U 7 

13 Catholic U 9 

Tohns Hop 

1917 (4-3-1) 

20 Dela. Col 

Naw 62 

14 V.M.I 14 

29 Wake Forest ..13 

6 N.C. State 10 

13 St. Johns 3 

Penn State 57 

7 Johns Hop 

1918 (4-1-1) 

6 American U l n . 

7 Y.M.T fi 



19 West Md ii 

6 New York U. .. 2 

19 St. Johns 1 I 

Johns Hop 

1919 (5-4-0) 

6 Swarthmore ....10 
13 Virginia 

West Va 27 

Va. Polv 6 

Yale ...." 31 

27 St. Johns 

13 Catholic U o 

20 West Md 

14 Johns Hop 

UNIVERSITY 
OF MARYLAND 

1920 (7-2-0) 

54 Randolph Ma .. 

Rutgers 6 

Princeton 35 

14 Catholic U 

27 Wash. Col 

7 Va. Poly 

13 North Car 

10 Syracuse 7 

24 Johns Hop 7 

1921 (3-5-1) 

3 Rutgers 

Syracuse 42 

3 St. Johns 7 

10 Va. Polv 7 

7 North Car 16 

Yale 28 

16 Catholic U 

Carnegie Tech 21 

6 N. C. State 6 

1922 (4-5-1) 

7 Third Army .... 

Richmond 

Pennsylvania ..12 

Princeton 26 

3 North Car 27 

Va. Polv 21 

3 Yale 45 

3 Johns Hop 

54 Catholic U 

7 N. C. State 6 

1923 (7-2-1) 

53 Randolph Ma... 
3 Pennsylvania .. 

23 Richmond 

7 Va. Poly 16 

14 North Car 

26 St. Johns 

14 Yale 16 

26 N. C. State 12 

40 Catholic U 6 

6 Johns Hod 6 

1924 (3-3-3) 

23 Wash. Col 

7 Wash. & Lee ..19 

81 



38 Richmond 

Va. Polv 12 

6 North Car 

Catholic U 

I) Yale 47 

N.C. State 

Johns Hop 

1925 (2-5-1) 

13 Wash. Col 

16 Rutgers 

Va. Poly 3 

Virginia 6 

North Car 16 

14 Yak? 43 

3 W. & L 7 

7 Johns Hop 7 

1926 (5-4-1) 

63 Wash. Col 

South Car 12 

Chicago 21 

8 Va. Poly 24 

14 North Car 6 

38 Gallaudet 7 

15 Yale 

6 Virginia 6 

W. & L 3 

17 Johns Hop 14 

1927 (4-7-0) 

80 Wash. Col 

26 South Car 

6 North Car 7 

13 Va. Poly 7 

10 V. M. 1 6 

6 W. & L 13 

6 Yale 30 

Virginia 21 

20 Vanderbilt 39 

13 Johns Hop 14 

6 Florida 7 

1928 (6-3-1) 

31 Wash. Col 

19 North Car 26 

7 South Car 21 

13 West Md 6 

V. M. 1 

6 Va. Polv 9 

6 Yale 

18 Virginia 2 

6 W. & L 

26 Johns Hop 6 

1929 (4-4-2) 

34 Wash. Col 7 

North Car 43 

6 South Car 26 

13 Gallaudet 6 

6 V. M. 1 7 

13 Virginia 13 

13 Yale 13 

24 Va. Polv 

39 Johns Hop 6 

West Md 12 



1930 (7-5-0) 

60 Wash. Col 6 

13 Yale 40 

21 North Car 28 

21 St. Johns 13 

20 V. M. 1 

14 Virginia 6 

41 W. & L 7 

13 V. Poly 7 

Navy 6 

21 Johns Hop 

7 Vanderbilt 22 

West Md 7 

1931 (8-1-1) 

13 Wash. Col 

7 Virginia 6 

(3 Navy 

(> Kentucky 6 

41 V. M. 1 20 

20 Va. Poly 

12 Vanderbilt 39 

13 W. & L 7 

35 Johns Hop 14 

41 West Md 6 

1932 (5-6-0) 

63 Wash. Col 

6 Virginia 7 

6 Va. Poly 23 

Duke 34 

24 St. Johns 7 

12 V. M. 1 7 

Vanderbilt 13 

7 Navv 28 

6 W. & L 

23 Johns Hop 

7 West Md 39 

1933 (3-7-0) 

20 St. Johns 

Va. Poly 14 

Tulan.-^ 20 

13 V. M. 1 19 

7 West Md 13 

Virginia 6 

7 Duke 38 

27 Johns Hop 7 

33 W. & L 13 

Florida 19 

1934 (7-3-0) 

13 St. Johns 

W. & L 7 

13 Navv 16 

14 Va. Poly 9 

21 Florida 

20 Virginia 

23 V. M. 1 

14 Indiana 17 

6 Georgetown .... 
19 Johns Hop 



1935 (7-2-2) 

39 St. Johns 6 

7 Va. Polv 

North Car 33 

6 V. M. 1 

20 Florida 6 

14 Virginia 7 

7 Indiana 13 

W. & L 

12 Georgetown .... 6 

Syracuse 

22 West Md 7 

1936 (6-5-0) 

20 St. Johns 

6 Va. Polv 

North Car 14 

21 Virginia 

20 Syracuse 

6 Florida 7 

12 Richmond 

7 V. M. 1 13 

6 Georgetown ... . 7 

19 W. & L 6 

West Md 12 

1937 (8-2-0) 

28 St. Johns 

21 Pennsylvania ..28 

6 West Md 

3 Virginia 

13 Syracuse 

13 Florida 7 

9 V. M. 1 7 

14 Penn State 21 

12 Georgetown .... 2 

8 W. & L 

1938 (2-7-0) 

6 Richmond 19 

Penn State 33 

Syracuse 53 

14 West Md 8 

19 Virginia 27 

14 V. M. 1 47 

7 Florida 21 

7 Georgetown ....14 

39 W. & L 13 

1939 (2-7-0) 

26 Hamp.-Svd 

12 West Md 

7 Virginia 12 

12 Rutgers 25 

Florida 14 

Georgetown ....20 

Penn State 12 

V. M. 1 13 

7 Syracuse 10 

1940 (2-6-1) 

6 Hamp.-Syd 7 

Pennsylvania ..51 
(Continued on page 86) 

82 



6 Virginia 19 

Florida 19 

6 West Md 

Georgetown ....41 
V. M. 1 20 

14 Rutgers 7 

7 W. & L 7 

1941 (3-5-1) 

18 Hamp.-Svd 

6 West Md 6 

Duke 50 

13 Florida 12 

6 Pennsylvania ..55 
Georgetown ....26 

Rutgers 20 

V. M. 1 27 

6 W. & L 

1942 (7-2-0) 

34 Connecticut .... 

14 Lake NAS 

27 Rutgers 13 

V. M. 1 29 

51 West Md 

13 Florida 

Duke 42 

27 Virginia 12 

32 W. & L 28 

1943 (4-5-0) 

7 Curtis B. CG ..13 
13 Wake Forest .. 7 

19 Rich. AAB 6 

2 West Va 6 

Penn State 45 

43 Greenv. AAB ..18 

Virginia 39 

Bainbridge 43 

21 V. M. 1 14 

1944 (1-7-1) 

Hamp.-Svd 12 

Wake Forest -39 

6 West Va. 6 

Mich. State .... 8 

6 Florida 14 

7 Virginia 18 

Mich. State ....33 

19 Penn State 34 

8 V. M. 1 6 

1945 (6-2-1) 

60 Guilford Col. .. 6 

21 Richmond 

22 Merch. M. A 6 

13 Va. Poly 21 

13 West Va 13 

14 W. & M 33 

38 V. M. 1 

19 Virginia 13 

19 S. Car 13 



FRESHMAN FOOTBALL SCHEDULE FOR 1961 



DATE 




OPPONENT 


LOCATION 


September 


29 


South Carolina 


College Park, M<l. 


October 


13 


Virginia 


College Park, Mrl. 


October 


27 


Bullis Prep 


Silver Spring, Md. 


November 


3 


George Washington 


College. Park, Md 


November 


10 


Navy 


Annapolis, Md. 



1960 FRESHMAN RESULTS 



MARYLAND 




OPPONENT 


22 


South Carolina 


6 


22 


George Washington 





50 


Virginia 


8 


34 


Bullis Prep 


14 


22 


Navy 


24 



MARYLAND FRESHMEN: Won 4, - - Lost 1 



Frank Toomey 

(Continued from page 19) 

commission. He was assigned to Maui, Hawaii as Company Commander 
then led his unit in a first wave frontal assault at Iwo Jima in Febru- 
ary of 1945. It was during this operation that he received the Purple 
Heart, a Presidential Citation, and the Navy Commendation. 

He was returned to the States and assigned as Athletic Officer at 
Pensacola Naval Air Station. Here he helped coach the base football 
and basketball and baseball teams. 

Following discharge, he returned to Ithaca in the spring of 1946 to 
resume his studies and assist coaching the varsity football and baseball 
teams and coach of the freshman basketball and baseball teams. He 
graduated with a B.S. in Physical Education in June of 1947. He be- 
came backfield coach at Ithaca and freshman basketball and baseball 
c aeh. During this time, he was with the Utica baseball team, a Phillie 
farm. He received his Masters Degree in PE in June of 1948. He played 
pro baseball for a Niagara team in Canada. He has worked as a scout 
for the Phillies. 

In the Fall of 1948 he went to Waverly, N.Y. High School as head 
football and baseball coach. His grid teams of six years had the fine 
record of 39 wins against eight losses. His teams won the Southern 
Counties League Championship the last four years he coached. 

He went to Florida State as Nugent's assistant in 1954 and has been 
with him since. 

A high honor came to him in 1959 when he was elected into the Hall 
of Fame at Canisius Prep School. 

He is married and has a son, Michael, 9. 

83 



OUTSTANDING VETERANS RETURNING FOR '61 




1 I 



%. * 



I ^wbsj 



GARY JAN KOWSKI, Guard 



/ 






j 



WALTER ROCK 
Tackle 




:::■■ i ■:-.«: 



1 



DAN PIPER 
Halfback 




>5& 



KEN PSIRA 
Quarterback 




BOB HACKER 
Center 




If 



: \ ,i 



CHESTER DETKO, Guard 




TOM RAE 

~4flfc End 






/fi-C 






KENNY SMITH 
Halfback 



\ 



/ 



» SJ 


1 
1 


j 


& 


1 


\ 


TOM BROUMEL 


DON VanREENAN 
Halfback 


DON TRUST 


Tackle 




Guard 



Lee Corso 

(Continued from page 11) 

He v.nii letters in football and baseball four years, with freshmen eligi- 
ble to play then. 

For his brilliant play, honors were many. He was on the all-State 
Florida colleges beam his junior and senior year. He was named as 
all-America honorable mention his senior year, a most cherished honor 
inasmuch as Corso was the first Florida State football player to re- 
ceive thai high rating in the history of the school. He was voted 
the National Player of the Week by INS for his sterling performance 
in guiding the upset over N.C. State. He was voted the "Back of the 
Week'' honors among Florida schools several times. His grid career 
was capped by his winning the Athlete of the Year award at Florida 
State. The 24 year-old Corso also played in the annual Blue-Gray game 
in Montgomery as quarterback. At FSU, he set the total rushing 
record; most pass interceptions one game, 3; pass receiving record for 
one game, S, as he played halfback part of his second season; and has 
the high mark for kickoff return average for a season, 35 yards. 

On the diamond, Corso was an all-State and all-District 3 out- 
fielder. With the Seminoles, he played in the District 3 playoffs two 
years. He hit .400 as a freshman. 

Corso was voted a member of Omicron Delta Kappa (ODK), national 
men's honorary leadership fraternity and Phi Delta Kappa, national 
education honorary. He graduated in June '57 with a Bachelor of 
Science Degree in Education. 

Nugent appointed him assistant coach following graduation. He pur- 
sued his Master's Degree and received it in August 195S in Education 
and Administration. 

He married the former Betsy Youngblood, Tampa, Fla. They have 
two children, Stephen Lee, 3, and a new son, David. 



Bernie Reid 

(Continued from page 18) 

junior and senior seasons. He graduated in June of 1949. Reid was 
Captain of the team his senior year and was first team all-Southeast 
Conference and the all-Southern team. He was president of the varsity 
letterman "G" Club and of the Student Athletic Council. His team- 
mates voted him the most valuable lineman trophy for his outstanding 
play his senior year. 

Following graduation, he went to Fitzgerald High School, Ga., as 
line coach. He was there one year before moving on to the line coaching 
job at Albrny High in 1950. In 1951, he was appointed head coach, and 
held that position until Nugent brought him to Maryland. At Albany, 
he compiled the enviable record of 57 wins, 20 losses, and three ties in a 
Triple-A league. His teams won the Region 1, AAA crown three years 
and was runnerup to the state championship in 1952. He was voted 
region Coach of the Year twice. He points with justified pride to the 
great number of his boys that have gone on to college and done ex- 
ceptionally well. 

Reid married the former Kathryn Herold of Hamilton. They have 
two daughters, Karolyn, 12, Paula, 9, and a new son, Jeff. 

85 



1946 (3-6-0) 

54 Bainbridge 

7 Richmond 37 

North Car 33 

6 Va. Poly 

7 W. & M 41 

17 South Car 21 

24 W. & L 7 

14 Mich. State 26 

7 N. C. State 28 

1947 (7-2-2) 

19 South Car 13 

43 Delaware 19 

18 Richmond 6 

7 Duke - 19 

21 Va. Poly 19 

27 West Va 

32 Duquesne 

North Car 19 

20 Vanderbilt 6 

N. C. State .... 

(Gator Bowl, 
Jan. 1, 1948) 

20 Georgia 20 

1948 (6-4-0) 

19 Richmond 

21 Delaware 

28 Va. Poly 

12 Duke -' 13 

47 Geo. Wash 

27 Miami 13 

19 South Car 7 

20 North Car 49 

Vanderbilt 34 

14 West Va 16 

1949 (9-1-0) 

34 Va. Poly 7 

33 Georgetown .... 7 
7 Mich. State --14 

14 N. C. State 6 

44 South Car 7 

40 Geo. Wash 14 

14 Boston U 13 

47 West Va 7 

13 Miami 

(Gator Bowl, 

Jan. 1, 1950) 
20 Missouri 7 

1950 (7-2-1) 

7 Georgia 27 

35 Navy 21 

34 Mich. State — 7 

25 Georgetown —14 
13 N. C. State 16 

26 Duke 14 

23 Geo. Wash 7 

7 North Car 7 

41 West Va 

63 V. P. 1 7 

1951 (10-0-0) 
54 W. & L 14 



(Continued from page 82) 

33 Geo. Wash 6 

43 Georgia 7 

14 North Car 7 

27 L. S. U 

35 Missouri 

40 Navy 21 

53 N. C. State 

54 West Va 7 

(Sugar Bowl, 

Jan. 1, 1952) 

28 Tennessee 13 

1952 (7-2-0) 

13 Missouri 10 

13 Auburn 7 

28 Clemson 

37 Georgia 

38 Navy 7 

34 L. S. U 6 

34 Boston U 7 

14 Mississippi 21 

7 Alabama 27 

1953 (10-1-0) 

20 Missouri 6 

52 W. & L 

20 Clemson 

40 Georgia 13 

26 North Car 

30 Miami (Fla.) .. 

24 South Car 6 

27 Geo. Wash 6 

38 Mississippi 

21 Alabama 

*0 Oklahoma 7 

* (Orange Bowl) 

1954 (7-2-1) 

20 Kentucky 

7 U. C. L.'A 12 

13 Wake Forest— 13 

33 North Car 

7 Miami, Fla 9 

20 South Car 

42 N. C. State 14 

16 Clemson 

48 Geo. Wash 6 

74 Missouri 13 

1955 (10-1-0) 
13 Missouri 12 

7 U. C. L. A 

20 Baylor 6 

28 Wake Forest .. 7 

25 North Car 7 

34 Syracuse 13 

27 South Car 

13 L. S. U 

25 Clemson 12 

19 Geo. Wash 

*6 Oklahoma 20 

*Orange Bowl 

1956 (2-7-1) 
12 Syracuse 26 

86 



6 Wake Forest. 


_ 


Baylor 


14 


6 Miami, Fla. . 


_13 


6 N. Carolina . 


_34 


7 Tennessee 


_34 


Kentucky 


_14 


6 Clemson 


6 


S. Carolina _. 


_13 


25 N. C. State _- 


_14 


1957 (5-5-0) 




13 Texas A&M_. 


,_21 


13 N. C. State . 


._48 


Duke 


14 


27 Wake Forest. 


._ 


21 N. Carolina-. 


._ 7 


Tennessee 


_16 


10 South Carolina 6 


7 Clemson 


26 


16 Miami, Fla.— 


._ 6 


12 Virginia 





1958 (4-6-0) 




Wake Forest 


_34 


21 N. C. State — 


_ 6 


Clemson 


8 


10 Texas A&M __ 


_14 


N. Carolina -- 


_27 


7 Auburn 


20 


10 S. Carolina __ 


_ 6 


14 Navy 


40 


26 Miami, Fla. _ 


_14 


44 Virginia 


6 


1959 (5-5-0) 




27 West Va. ___ 


_ 7 


Texas 


26 


Svracuse 


29 


7 Wake Forest 


_10 


14 N. Carolina _ 


_ 7 


6 S. Carolina _ 


_22 


14 Navy 


22 


28 Clemson 


25 


55 Virginia 


1? 


33 N. C. State _. 


_28 


1960 (6-4-0) 




31 West Va 


8 


Texas 


34 


7 Duke 


20 


10 N.C. State — 


13 


19 Clemson 


17 


14 Wake Forest . 


.. 13 


15 S. Carolina ... 





9 Penn State ... 


. 28 


22 N. Carolina ... 


. 19 


44 Virginia 


12 



BRIEF HISTORY OF THE UNIVERSITY 



The history of (he present University is the history of two institutions: 
the old privately-owned and operated University of Maryland in Balti- 
more and the Maryland State College (formerly Maryland Agricultural 
College) at College Park. These institutions were merged in 1920. 

In 1807, the College of Medicine of Maryland was organized, the fifth 

medical school in the United States. The first class was graduated in 1810. 
A permanent home was established in 1814-1815 by the erection of the 
building al Lombard and Green Streets in Baltimore, the oldest structure 
in America devoted to medical teaching. Here was founded one of the 
first medical libraries (and the first medical school library) in the United 
States. In 1812 the General Assembly of Maryland authorized the College 
of Medicine of Maryland to "annex or constitute facilities of divinity, 
law. and arts and science," and by the same act declared that the "col- 
leges or faculties thus united should be constituted an university by the 
name and under the title of the University of Maryland." By authority 
of this act, steps were taken in 1813 to establish "a faculty of law," and 
in 1S23 a regular school of instruction in law was opened. Subsequently 
there were added: in 1882 a Department of Dentistry which was absorbed 
in 1923 by the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery (founded in 1840, 
the first dental school in the world); in 1889 a School of Nursing; and 
in 1904 the Maryland College of Pharmacy (founded in 1841, the third 
oldest pharmacy college in the United States). 

The Maryland State College was chartered in 1856 under the name of 
the Maryland Agricultural College, the second agricultural college in the 
Western Hemisphere. For three years the College was under private 
management. In 1862 the Congress of the United States passed the Land 
Grant Act. This act granted each State and Territory that should claim 
its benefits an appropriate amount of unclaimed western lands, in place 
of scrip, the proceeds from the sale of which should apply under certain 
conditions to the "endowment, support, and maintenance of at least one 
college where the leading object shall be, without excluding other scien- 
tific and classical studies, and including military tactics, to teach such 
branches of learning as are related to agriculture and the mechanic arts, 
in such a manner as the Legislatures of the States may respectively pre- 
scribe, in order to promote the liberal and practical education of the in- 
dustrial classes in the several pursuits and professions of life." This grant 
was accepted by the General Assembly of Maryland, and the Maryland 
Agricultural College was named as the beneficiary of the grant. Thus 
the College became, at least in part, a State institution. In the fall of 
1914 control was taken over entirely by the State. In 1916 the General 
Assembly granted a new charter to the College, and made it the Mary- 
land State College. 

In 1920, by an act of the State Legislature, the University of Maryland 
was merged with the Maryland State College, and the resultant institu- 
tion was given the name University of Maryland. 

87 



December 


2 


December 


6 


December 


12 


December 


15 


December 


16 


December 


18 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

1961-62 Varsity Basketball Schedule 

Perm State Away 

Georgetown Home 

*Nortn Carolina State Home 

Minnesota Home 

"Wake Forest Home 

:: Virginia Away 



December 29-50 



Sugar Bowl Tournament 

(LSU, Louisville, Miss. State) New Orleans 



January 




George Washington 


Away 


January 


6 


"South Carolina 


Home 


January 


10 


Georgetown 


Away 


January 


15 


''Duke 


Away 


January 


16 


George Washington 


Home 


January 


20 


*North Carolina State 


Away 


January 


22 


Miami 


Away 


February 




Navy 


Away 


February 


6 


"North Carolina 


Home 


February 


9 


''South Carolina 


Away 


February 


10 


*Clemson 


Away 


February 


15 


*Duke 


Home 


February 


17 


''Wake Forest 


Away 


February 


19 


North Carolina 


Away 


February 


21 


"Virginia 


Home 


February 


24 


; C lemson 


Home 


Man li 


1-5 


ACC Tournament 


Raleigh. N.C 


*AtIanli( 


Coast C 


onference Game 




HEAD COACH.- 


H. A. "Bud" Millikan 




ASSISTANT COACH: Frank Fellows 








88 





STAR BACKS RETURNING FOR '61 




DENNIS CONDIE 
Halfback 




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DICK NOVAK 
Quarterback 



p0» 




%. 



JIM DAVIDSON 
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o 



PAT DRASS 
Fullback 



* 



0>- 



TOM BROWN 
Halfback