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Full text of "University of Maryland men's football media guides"

1962 



ARYLAND 




F 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

FA( TS AB< )I T MARY! AND 2 

MEMO TO Tl IE PRESSOR \l >I< UTV 3 

THE SCHEDULE, LAST YEAR'S RESULTS, 

'62 ITINERARY 4 

Tl IE I OSflVERSITY 6-8 

THE ATHLETIC DEPARTMENT 1020 

THE 1962 TERRAPINS 22-30 

/ he rosier, pronunciation chart, tentative depth chart, 
numerical rosier, player sketches. 

THE COMING SEASON 52-53 

Facts about opponents, opponents outlook. 

FRESHMAN SCHEDULE 

WITH EAST YEARS SCORES 

THE TERR PRESS 54 

1961 TERRAPIN STATISTICS 56-58 

TERP ALL-AMERICANS 59-63 

Awards, etc. 

MARYLAND FOOTBALL RECORDS 64-71 

YESTERYEARS 72 -73 

1962-63 VARSITY BASKETBALL SCHEDULE 76 



FACTS ABOUT MARYLAND 

NAME University of Maryland 

FOUNDED 1807 

LOCATION College Park, Md. 

ENROLLMENT 15,500 (Approx.) 

PRESIDENT Dr. Wilson H. Elkins 

ATHLETIC DIRECTOR _ William W. Coney 

INFORMATION DIRECTOR Neil L. LaBar 

CONFERENCE Atlantic Coast 

NICKNAME Terrapins (Terps) 

COLORS Red and White; Black and Gold 

MASCOT A Terrapin 

STADIUM Byrd (35,000) 

HEAD COACH: Tom Nugent (Ithaca '36) — Fourth season at Maryland— 
1959: 5-5-0—1960: 6-4-0—1961: 7-3-0— Overall 13-year coaching 
record: 71-57-3. 

ASSISTANTS: Bill Dovell (Maryland '53); Frank Toomey (Ithaca '47;; 
Lee Corso (Florida State '57); Alf Satterfield (Vanderbilt '47); 
Bcrnie Reid (Georgia '49); Roland Arrigoni (New Mexico '56); 
Carroll Huntress (New Hampshire '49). 

TRAINER Alfred J. (Duke) Wyre 

SYSTEM "I" Formation and "T" 

CAPTAINS To be selected 

LETTERMEN RETURNING FROM 1961 SQUAD (NINETEEN) 

ENDS: Harry Butsko, John Hannigan, Joe Mona, Tom Rae. 

TACKLES: Dave Crossan. Roger Shoals. 

GUARDS: Chester Detko, Joe Ferrante, Gary Jankowski, Walter Rock. 

CENTER: Gen: Feher. 

QUARTERBACK: Dick Shiner. 

HALFBACKS: Ernie Arizzi, Murnis Banner, Tom Brown, Dan Piper, 

Kenny Smith. 
FULLBACKS: Bob Burton, Joe Hrezo. 

LETTERMEN LOST FROM 1961 SQUAD (TWELVE) 

ENDS: Dick Barlund, Gary Collins, Henry Poniatowski, Dick Sukeena. 

TACKLE: Gary Wikander. 

GUARDS: Bill Kirchiro, Tom Sankovich. 

CENTER: Bob Hacker. 

QUARTERBACK: Dick Novak. 

HALFBACKS: Dennis Condie, Jim Davidson. 

FULLBACK: Pat Drass. 



FOR PRESS, RADIO and TELEVISION 

The L962 I Diversity of Maryland Football 
Handbook has been published Cor your con- 
venience in finding Information aboail the 
L962 Terrapin eleven. If this handbook does 
mil fulfill your Information needs, plea i 
write or oall me al UNion 4-4076 al any time. 

I welcome ;i visil from you any time in 

ii 211 of the Code Field House and in 

turn I will try to visil you as often as possible. 

Applications for tickets should be mad'' the 
first pari of the week of the game to allow 
time for mailing. Wire and telephone re- 
quiremi nts should be made through your local 
Westei n i mion offii e. 

Naturally there w4U be changes in posi- 
tions, etc. between now and the end of the season. Changes that occur 
will be reported in subsequent releases. 

I would like to take this opportunity to express my thanks to each one 
of you that has offered assistance to me my first year at Mary- 
land. Words cannot express how much it has helped. I hope I can re- 
pay you by supplying you with the information you need for covering 
the Terps in A-l fashion for your readers, listeners and viewers. 

NEIL L. LaBAR 
Sports Information Director 
University of Maryland 
College Park, Md. 




THE COVER: Photographer Al Danegger captures the anticipation of 
four top Terrapins during the 1961 Syracuse game, won by the Terps, 
22-21. Left to right are John Hannigan (87), one of the top place-kicking 
specialists in collegiate football; senior fullback Joe Hrezo (30) of the 
"Hustlers" (offensive) unit: senior halfback Tom Brown '43) ACC 
record holder in pass interceptions (8) for one season; Junior quarter- 
back Dick Shiner, one of the top collegiate signal-callers in the country. 
At the extreme right is quarterback Cliff Melton. Danegger also focuses 
assistant coach Roland Arrigoni into view as he talks to the coaches in 
the press box over the "phones". 



1962 SCHEDULE 



Sept. 


22 


Sept. 


29 


Oct. 


6 


Oct. 


13 


Oct. 


19 


Oct. 


27 


Nov. 


3 


Nov. 


10 


Nov. 


17 


Nov. 


24 



Southern Methodist at College Pk., Md. 
Wake Forest at Winston Salem, N.C. 
North Carolina State at Raleigh, N.C. 
North Carolina at Chapel Hill, N.C. 
Miami at Miami, Fla. 
South Carolina at College Park, Md. 
Perm State at University Park, Pa. 
Duke at Durham, N.C. 
Clemson at College Park, Md. 
Virginia at College Park, Md. 



KICKOFF PRICE 


2:00 P.M. EDT 


$4.00 


S:00 P.M. EST 


$4.00 


1:30 P.M. EST 


$4.00 


2:00 P.M. EST 


$4.50 


3:15 P.M. EST 


$4.50 


2:00 P.M. EDT 


$4.00 


1:30 1P.M. EST 


$4.00 


2:00 P.M. EST 


$4.50 


1:30 P.M. EST 


$4.00 


1:30 P.M. EST 


$4.00 



MARYLAND'S BOWL RECORD 



1948 


Gator Bowl 


Maryland 


20 


Georgia 


20 


1950 


Gator Bowl 


Maryland 


20 


Missouri 


7 


1952 


Sugar Bowl 


Maryland 


28 


Tennessee 


13 


1954 


Orange Bowl 


Maryland 





Oklahoma 


7 


1956 


Orange Bowl 


Maryland 


6 


Oklahoma 


20 



Won: 2 -- Lost: 2 — Tied: 1 



1961 RESULTS 



Maryland Opponent 


M 


aryland 


Opponent 


14 Southern Methodist 6 




10 South Carolina 


20 


24 Clemson 21 




21 Reran State 


17 


22 Syracuse 21 




10 N.C. State 


7 


8 North Carolina 14 




10 Wake Forest 


7 


21 Air Force 




16 Virginia 


28 



MARYLAND'S ITINERARY FOR 1962 SEASON 



HEADQUARTERS 

Hotel Robert E. Lee, Winston-Salem, N.C. 

Hotel Sir Walter, Raleigh, N.C. 

Hotel Jack Tar Durham, Durham, N.C. 

Monte Carlo Hotel, Miami Beach, Fla. 

Holiday Inn, State College, Pa. 

Hotel Jack Tar Durham, Durham, N.C. 



DATE 


OPPONENT 


Sept. 29 


Wake Forest 


Oct. 6 


N.C. State 


Oct. 13 


North Carolina 


Oct. 19 


Miami 


Nov. 3 


Penn State 


Nov. 10 


Duke 



5?U> 












v 



V 







. * * ■■ - 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

For more than 155 years the University of Maryland has been one of 
the leading schools of the nation. And as each year goes by the univer- 
sity continues to grow in size, stature, and prominence. 

Today the University of Maryland has nine colleges and seven schools 
which offer an outstanding variety of education to 25,000 students who 
attend its classes en four continents. The university now ranks as the 
thirteenth largest university in the United States. 

On the sprawling 1,100-acre College Park campus there are more than 
80 main buildings constructed in the brick Georgian-Colonial style. 
About 15,500 students attend classes on the College Park campus. 
Thirty-five miles away in Baltimore another 1,500 students attend the 
five professional schools (medicine, dentistry, nursing, pharmacy, and 
law). About 500 foreign students go to school on the College Park and 
Baltimore campuses. 

The oldest division of the university is the College of Agriculture which 
was born in 1856. In that year the state legislature created the Mary- 
land Agricultural College on 428 acres of land purchased from the 
Charles Calvert estate eight miles northeast of Washington, D.C. There 
at College Park the first classes were held in October, 1859. 

At Thanksgiving, 1912, fire destroyed the two main buildings and gave 
Marylanders a chance to re-plan and expand the college. In 1916 the 
institution was re-named the Maryland State College of Agriculture. In 
1920 the college merged with the University of Maryland (then located 
at Baltimore) and the two campuses became known as the University of 
Maryland. 

As the years passed the university steadily erected new buildings, cre- 
ated new educational branches, and installed almost every known modern 
teaching device. 

One of the most advanced sections of the university is the science and 
technology portion of the College Park campus where students delve 
into agriculture, chemistry, physics, biology, and engineering. With the 
aid of famed airplane manufacturer Glenn L. Martin, the modern Col- 
lege of Engineering's four structures were built. 

The Theodore McKeldin Library, which dominates the west end of 
the university's College Park mall, has space enough to shelve more than 
a million books, pamphlets, and research materials. 

The Cole Activities Building, located near Byrd Stadium, was complet- 
ed in 1955 and is one of the finest examples of American engineering and 
architectural ability. The huge indoor amphitheater seats more than 
15,000 people for athletic, social, and educational events. The Cole audi- 
torium is the second largest auditorium in the eastern part of the nation. 

Jutting high above all ictther campus buildings is the Memorial Chapel. 
The structure actually is composed of three chapels — one for general 
Christian services, one especially for Roman Catholics, and one for non- 
Christians. The main chapel seats 1,350 persons. To the rear of it is a 
smaller chapel which seats 122 people. The tiny Reman Catholic chapel 
is designed to seat 44 people. Associated with the Memorial Chapel are 
chaplains of almost every major religious denomination. 

Every hour from the steeple of the chapel the strains of "Maryland. 
My Maryland" chime across the campus. Flemish and English carillon- 
type bells hang in the steeple to furnish the hourly chimes and special 
seasonal refrains. 

Almost every young man who attends the University of Maryland is 
required to take several years of Air Force R.O.T.C. training. With 
this requirement, the Maryland A.F.R.O.T.C. unit is reported to be the 
second largest such unit in the country- 




DR. WILSON H. ELKINS 



PRESIDENT, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Dr. Wilson Homer Elkins assumed the presidency of the University 
of Maryland on September 1, 1954. His formal inauguration as the 
twenty-first head of the institution took place on January 20, 1955. 

He has brought to the University of Maryland an outstanding pro- 
fessional record of proven leadership in educational administration, and 
an unusual background of high scholastic achievement and demon- 
strated athletic ability during his undergraduate and graduate career. 

At Maryland, he has stressed the obligation of the state to provide a 
quality education for all Maryland youth who demonstrate their ca- 
pacity to learn. On the subject of sports, he has said that values and 
attitudes developed in activities outside of the classroom, including foot- 
ball, are important elements of a liberal education. 

Dr. Elkins is a native Texan. He was a Rhodes Scholar from 1933 
to 1936. He received the B. Litt. and D. Phil, degrees from Oxford Uni- 
versity, England, in 1936. He received his undergraduate education at 
the University of Texas from 1928 to 1932. At Texas he earned eight 
varsity letters in football, basketball and track. He was elected presi- 
dent of the Student Association and captain of the basketball team in 



his senior year. He is a member of Phi Beta Kappa and of Omicron 
Delta Kappa. He was graduated from the University of Texas in 1932 
with B.A. and M.A. degrees. 

Dr. Elkins began his professional career in education as an instructor 
in history at the University of Texas in 1936. He held two presidencies 
prior to assuming this office at the University of Maryland. 'From 1938 
to 1949, he was President of San Angelo Junior College, San Angelo, 
Texas; and he was president of Texas Western College, a branch of 
the University of Texas, from 1949 to 1954. 

In 1937, Dr. Elkins was married to the former Dorothy Blackburn 
of Berclair, Tex. They have two daughters, Carole Ann and Margaret 
Elise. 



8 



THE 
ATHLETIC COUNCIL 



Mr. Geary F. Eppley 
Chairman 

Mr. William W. Cobey 
Director of AtlAetics 



Dean Eppley 

Mr. Harry Hasslingeir President, Alumni Association 

Dr. Francis C. Stark Professor in Horticulture 

Dr. Jack Faber .. Head, Bacteriology Department 

Dr. Allan J. Fisher College of Business and Public Administration 

Dr. Walter B. Waetjen - College of Education 

Mr. Charles Hayleck College of Engineering 

Mr. Philip Rever President, Student Government Association 

Mr. William A. Wockenfuss .... Associate Prof, in Mechanical Engineering 

Department of Intercollegiate Athletics 

Equipment Manager — Kermiit "Chief" Cissell 

Assistant Equipment Manager Don Hutchison 

Head of Facilities — Charles "Lindy" Kehoe 

Ticket Manager Eddie Bean 

Office Secretary to Mr. Cobey Mrs. Dorothy Hunt 

Office Secretary to Mr. Nugent ..... Mrs. Frances Henry 

Office Secretary to Mr. Millikan Mrs. Theresa Ryan 

Head Trainer Alfred "Duke" Wyre 

Basketball Coach - H. A. "Bud" Millikan 

Assistant Basketball Coach Frank Fellows 

Baseball Coach Elton S. "Jack" Jackson 

Lacrosse Co-Coaches Jack Faber and Al Heagy 

Track, Cross-Country Coach Jim Kehoe 

Soccer, Tennis Coach Doyle Royal 

Swimming Coach — • Bill Campbell 

Wrestling Coach William E. "Sully" Krouse 

Golf Coach - Frank Cronin 

Rifle Coach Airman John Blackard 

Sports Information Director Neil LaBar 

Office Secretary to Mr. LaBar Mrs. Betty Francis 

The Football Coaches 

Head Football Coach Tom Nugent 

Assistant Football Coach Roland Arrigoni 

Assistant Football Coach Lee Corso 

Assistant Football Coach Bill Dovell 

Assistant Football Coach Carroll Huntrcs- 

Assistant Football Coach Bernie Roid 

Assistant Football Coach Alf Satterfield 

Assistant Football Coach Frank Toomey 

10 




WILLIAM W. COBEY 



DIRECTOR OF ATHLETICS 



Bill Cobey start-- his seventh year as Director of Athletics in directing 
the vast Maryland athletic program. Cne of the mosl popular anrl most 
outstanding in the field, Cobey directs his every effort to give the Terra- 
pins one of the finest programs in the country. 

During the six yea's he has headed the program. Cobey has seen the 
Terrapins dominate the Atlantic Coast Conference championships in the 
twelve recognized conference championship sports. 

Prior to his appointment in February of 1956, Cobey was Graduate 
Manager of Athletics for nine years. It was he who administered and 
handled the overall athletic program. 

Long devotion to the University wasn't new to the affable Cobey. 
He came to the Athletic Department after having served 17 years 
as Cashier of the University. 

The Cobey name is not new, even to old-time University graduates. 
Bill's father, W. W. Cobey, was a 1901 graduate and a letterman in 
track and manager of the baseball team. He became a famous agri- 
cultural scientist and while in Florida, he was one of the pioneers in 
the discovery of leaf tobacco. Cobey also had two uncles graduate from 
the University. 

Bill, as he is known to the many friends he has made around home 
and throughout the athletic fraternity, came to Maryland in the fall of 

11 



1926 following graduation from Fcirt Myers, Fla. High School. Born 
and raised in Quincy, sitili ihis native home, Cobey attended Quincy 
schools through eleventh grade before the family moved to Fort Myers. 

After playing freshman lacrosse, Cobey had to cast aside any athletic 
team participation in order that he might get a job to help him through 
school. This employment was in the Cashier's office where he worked 
until his graduation in 1930. He belonged to the Kappa Alpha Fra- 
ternity while an undergraduate. 

Following graduation, he returned to Quincy, 'Fla., and worked with 
his uncle on a truck farm. He returned to the University to accept the 
job as Cashier of the University. It was this job he held for 17 years, 
until 1948 when he accepted the position of Graduate Manager of Ath- 
letics. Then came the appointment as Director of Athletics, February 
1, 1956. 

Cobey is active in community affairs, having been a past president 
of University Park PTA; councilman for University Park two years; 
first president of the University branch of the Maryland Classified 
Employee's Assn.; and is active in the College Park Rotary Club. 

Cobey married the former Mary Gray Munroe, also of Quincy, Fla.. 
in 1935. They have six children, three daughters and three sons. Mary 
Patricia and Julia Ann are giaduates of the University, while Betty is a 
Sophomore. William is a graduate of Emory Medical School, Elwood 
is in the eleventh grade while the baby of the family, Munroe, is in the 
fifth grade. 

The Cobeys are members of the University Methodist Church, College 
Park. 



12 




TOM NUGENT 



HEAD FOOTBALL COACH 



In his three years as Head Coach of the Terrapins, Tom Nugent has 
had increasingly better records (5-5, 6-4, 7-3), without a losing season. 
And the optimistic mentor will tell you that this year's Terrapin squad 
should be even better. 

The big job of rebuilding the Maryland football program was given to 
the effervescent Nugent after many top men in his profession had been 
screened for the position. The popular young master of one of football's 
most imaginative and successful offensive formations, the "I", Nugent is 
considered by his fellow coaches to have one of the game's finest football 
minds. His play each Saturday is original and with an interesting style 
of play. 

It has been a brilliant and most successful three years for Maryland 
football since Nugent and his staff arrived on the scene. It is definite 
that Terp grid fortunes are on the upswing and to the point that they 
will be watched closely across the country again this year. 

The 1961 team came through with seven wins and three losses, Nu- 
gent's second winning season in a row. In 1959. the Terps defeated 
Atlantic Coast Conference 1-2 finishers, Clemson and North Carolina. In 
1960 the only two ACC losses for the Terrapins came at the hands of 
Duke and North Carolina State, 1-2 finishers in the league that year. 
Included in last season's seven wins were victories over highly-rated 

13 



Penn State and Syracuse, a feat not often achieved in one season by any 
collegiate football team in the country. 

Nugent has given Maryland and its fans the most interesting and 
exciting football it has seen in a long time. As a reward for this and 
his outlook for the future, President Elkins and the University Board 
of Regents gave him an additional three years to his original four-year 
contract. 

Nugent gathered together an outstanding staff that had many years 
of coaching experience. He also brought his own organizational and in- 
spirational genius that is his trademark. With him and his staff is their 
outstanding student recruitment also. Nugent's freshman teams of the 
past three years have been outstanding, with last year's fresihmen going 
undefeated in five outings. It was only the second time in the school's 
history that a freshman football team went undefeated. With another 
top class promised for this fall, Nugent's plans to furnish bis every effort 
to bring Maryland back has a fine nucleus. The molding of the teams 
for the new era has been f iirmly laid. 

The thoughts are that Nugent will do the job. He often is referred 
to as the "magician" of football in the South. He has had two former 
assignments, V.M.I. and Florida State and brought both from obscurity 
to success, through winning records. There is little reason to believe 
the same won't be accomplished here, for he and his staff have access 
to a much better area for recruiting through the excellent geographic 
location of the University. 

The sharp-nvnded Terrapm mentor has become known nationally 
for his bright innovations. It was Nugent who presented to football 
the now famous "I" formation, the typewriter huddle, and the double 
quarterback. Just last year, he added the "V" huddle — V for Victory. 
The coaching fraternity considers his new football wrinkles the finest 
and most exciting. 

In 1954, he started the Florida State Football Clinic and saw it de- 
velop to be considered the top football clinic in the country. The 1958 
clinic atracted nearly 1000 coaches from all parts of the country. His 
program was headlined by a "Who's Who" of big name coaches each 
year. At Maryland he has given several outside clinics. 

Nugent's first nead coaching job was at Virginia Military Academy. 
In four years, 1949-52, he compiled a 19-18-2 record. The 1951 season 
found the Keydets tied with Maryland for the Southern Conference 
championship. Both bad 5-0 marks in the league. It was during this 
season, his team scored a mighty upset over Georgia Tech in Atlanta. 

The affable Nugent moved to Florida State for the season of 1953 
and in six years his Seminoles had been brought out of the football 
doldrums and became known to all as he guided his teams to 34 vic- 
tories, 27 defeats, and one tie. His ten-year record before coming to 
Maryland was 53 wins, 45 losses, and three ties. His three-year record at 
Maryland is 18-12-0. 

A native of Lawrence, Mass., he attended and graduated from Ithaca 
College in 1936. 

He married the former Peg Foley, and they have nine children, four 
girls and five boys — Tommy, 19; Kerry, 18; Peggy, 16; T. D., 14; Patty, 
12; Timmy, 8 Mary Ann, 7; Jerry, 6; and John Michael, 4. 



14 



ASSISTANT COACHES 



BILL "WHITEV DOVELL 

The 1953 graduate from the School of 
1 hvsieal Education, Recreation, and Health, 
is starting his ninth year as a member of 
the Terp coaching staff. Dovell has been a 
line coach since 1955 after serving three 
years as freshman coach. 

When coach Tom Nugent came to Mary- 
land in 1959, he retained (he popular Dov- 
ell a.s a member of his staff. 

Following graduation, the former Terp 
guard was appointed freshman coach and 
also assisted the varsity and scouted future 
Terp opponents. As freshman coach, he 
led the Terp yearlings to three winning sea- 
sons, highlighted by the 1955 undefeated 
team. The big game was the final one of 
the season It was the much publicized 
"international" grid attraction between the 
Terp frosh and Mexico Polytechnic Institute, 
in Mexico City, DovelTs team Won 26-13. 

Dovell is a tireless worker. Along with his coaching duties, he han- 
dles the film library for the staff. Those in the coaching fraternity com- 
pliment Dovell as ( ne of its finest young members, as having a fine foot- 
ball mind. 

He married the former Clair Benson. They have three daughters. 




Playing across the border 



. ■ ■ ■■ ^g^ LEE CORSO 

JgSk ^L Until someone comes along in future 

g! years, the name of Dee Corso will continue 

to head the list as the all-time quarterback 
at his Florida State alma mater. And it 
was under the coaching hand of Tom Nu- 
gent that Corso helped bring Florida State 
and Nugent into national prominence. 

Following graduation in 1957, Nugent re- 
tained his brilliant quarterback as an as- 
sistant and brought him to Maryland. This 
season Corso will work with the offensive 
backs, specializing with the quarterbacks. 
Along with his varsity coaching duties, the 
popular young assistant led the Terp fresh- 
men to an undefeated season last year. 

A native of Miami, Fla., Corso had a 
brilliant career in football, baseball, and 
basketball. He was selected first team all- 
State in each sport his senior year. He win the honor in basketball also 
his junior year. Also, he was named "Athletic-Scholar of the Year" his 
final term and was on the all-Southern all-American football team. Too, 
he was named to the Wigwam All-America team his senior year. He 
was a member of the National Honor Society. 

Following graduation, he entered Florida State in the fall of 1953. 




15 



He won letters in football and baseball four years, with freshmen eligi- 
ble to play then. 

For his brilliant play, honors were many. He was on the all-State 
Florida colleges team his junior and senior year. He was named as 
all-America honorable mention his senior year, a most cherished honor 
inasmuch as Corso was the first Florida State football player to re- 
ceive that high rating in the history of the school. He was voted 
the National Player of the Week by INS for his sterling performance 
in guiding the upset over N.C. State. He was voted the "Back of the 
Week" honors among Florida schools several times. His grid career 
was capped by his winning the Athlete of the Year award at Florida 
State. The 26 year-old Corso also played in the annual Blue-Gray game 
in Montgomery as quarterback. At FSU, he set the total rushing 
record; most pass interceptions one game, 3; pass receiving record for 
one game, 8, as he played halfback part of his second season; and has 
the high mark for kickoff return average for a season, 35 yards. 

On the diamond, Corso was an all-State and all-District 3 out- 
fielder. With the Seminoles, he played in the District 3 playoffs two 
years. He hit .400 as a freshman. 

Corso was voted a member of Omicron Delta Kappa (ODK), national 
men's honorary leadership fraternity and Phi Delta Kappa, national 
education honorary. He graduated in June '57 with a Bachelor of 
Science Degree in Education. 

Nugent appointed him assistant coach following graduation. He pur- 
sued his Master's Degree and received it in August 1958 in Education 
and Administration. 

He married the former Betsy Youngblood, Tampa, Fla. They have 
two children. Steven Lee, 4, and David, 1. 



BERNIE REID 

One of the most popular and most suc- 
cessful high school coaches during a long 
tenure in the South, Reid accepted the call 
of Nugent to come to Maryland with him 
as assistant line coach. 

Reid had great success at Albany, Ga., 
High School and established an outstand- 
ing reputation as one of the best in coach- 
ing. He had sent many star players on to 
the large colleges and universities in the 
South. 

The 36 -year old Held is a native of Ham- 
ilton, Ohio. He graduated from Hamilton 
High in 1942 where he was a three year 
star and a weight man on the track team. 
Following his high school graduation, he 
entered the University of Cincinnati that 
fall. He stayed long enough to play the 
freshman grid schedule, then enlisted in the Merchant Marine where he 
stayed 18 months. 

Discharged in January of 1944, he entered the University of Georgia 
in the spring semester. He played the fall of '44 for Coach Wally Butts 
as a guard but the Army then called him into the service, in December. 
He served in Germany 22 months with the 78th Infantry. He was dis- 
charged in January of 1947. 
He returned to Georgia and completed his studies and played his 




16 




junior and senior seasons. He graduated in June of 1949. Reid was 
Captain of the team his senior year and was Biirsl team all-Southeastern 
Conference and was named to the ali-SourtiheiPh team. He was pre Ldenil 
of the varsity letterman "G" Club and of the Studenl Athletic Council. 
ilis teammates voted him Che mtosl valuable lineman troplvy for his out- 
stand&ng plaj hie senior year. 

Following graduation, he went to Fitzgerald High School, Ga., as 
line coach. He was there one year before moving on bo the line coaching 
job at Albany High in 1950. In 1951, he was appointed head coach, and 
held thai position until Nugent brought him to Maryland. At Albany, 
he compiled the enviable record of 57 wins, 20 losses, and three ties in a 
Triple-A league. His teams -.von the Region 1, AAA crown three years 
and was runnerup to the state championship in 1952. He was voted 
region Coach of the Year twice. He points with justified pride to the 
great number of his boys that have gone on to college and done ex- 
ceptionally well. 

Reid married the former Kathryn Herold of Hamilton. They have 
two daughters, Karolyn, 13, Paula, 10, and a son, Jeff, 1%. 

ALF SATTERFIELD 

One of the most familiar names in coach- 
ing circles, Satterfield joined Nugent's 
staff following a brilliant reputation he 
made while line coach at V.P.I. As the 
Gobblers built fine teams, much of the 
credit was given the team's outstanding 
line play under the guidance of Satterfield. 
He handles the same line coaching chores 
for the Terps. 

The 40-year old Satterfield came to 
Maryland after eight years at V.P.I, as 
their line coach and after helping develop 
their grid fortunes back to the winning 
ledger. 

A native of Russelville, Ark., he attended 
that high school and graduated in 1940. 
There he was a three-sport star in football, 
basketball and baseball. He lettered all 

three years in each sport. A center in football, he was named to the all- 
State first team his senior year. He also was chosen to play in the first 
high school ail-American game in Memphis, Term. 

Following graduation, he entered Vanderbilt University and played 
tackle as a freshman and two varsity seasons prior to his entering the 
Army in February, 1943. While in the service, he served with the 90th 
Infantry Division in the European Theater of Operations. He was dis- 
charged in January of 1946. 

He returned to Vanderbilt for the spring term of '46. He was elected 
Captain of the team for his senior year. He won third team all-America 
honors and first team all-Southeastern Conference. He graduated in 
June of '47 with a Bachelor of Science in History. 

Satterfield then went to the San Francisco 49'ers and played tackle 
for one year. 

In 1948. he coached at Little Rock Catholic High School. The fall of 
1949 he got the cail to be an assistant coach at Louisiana State and 
stayed two years. It was in the spring of 1951 that he went to V.P.I, 
and stayed until the call to College Park in 1959. 

He married the former Bobbie Sue Wright of Forest City. Ark. They 
have a daughter, Susan, age 10. 




ROLAND ARRIGONI 

Again this fall, the big and all-important 
job of tutoring the scout team will be 
handled by Arrigoni. 

Nugent brought the 29-year old New 
Mexico University graduate with him after 
he had served a year under him at Florida 
State. 

Arrigoni is a native of Chicago, but 
moved to AJbuquerque, New Mexico at a 
young age and received his early school- 
ing there. He attended Albuquerque High 
School, graduating in June of 1951. There 
he lettered three years in football as a 
tackle and three years as a catcher in 
baseball. 

He entered the University of New Mex- 
ico in the fall of 1951. He graduated in 
1956 with a Bachelor of Science degree in 

Physical Education. While at New Mexico, he was a star tackle for three 
years and again lettered three years in baseball as a catcher. He was of- 
fered a chance to enter the New York Yankee farm system, but his ser- 
vice obligation prevented his signing a contract. 

He was drafted into the service in August of 1956. He was assigned to 
Fort Bliss, Tex., and put in his two years of duty theire. He played base- 
ball for the base team and was an assistant football coach and scout 
for the Ft. Bliss grid teams. 

Following his discharge he joined Nugent and his staff at Florida 
State where he was the 1958 freshman coach. Then came the move to 
Maryland with Nugent. 




FRANK TOOMEY 

When Tom Nugent came to Maryland, 
he brought with him his top coach and 
strategist, Toomey, to continue his fine 
work with the backfield. The serious, hard- 
working Toomey, who works as a perfec- 
tionist with precision, is a most highly re- 
garded and respected backfield teacher. 

Toomey attended his native Niagara 
Falls St. Mary's High School then went to 
Canisius Prep in Buffalo where he lettered 
three years in football, baseball, and bas- 
ketball. Following graduation from Canis- 
ius, he enrolled at Ithaca College in 1941. 
Before going into the Marines in June of 
1943, he played two years at Ithaca in all 
three sports. He was Captain of the foot- 
ball team, playing tailback, as a sophomore 
and was captain of the basketball team as 
a freshman. He was a center fielder in baseball. 

His early Marine career sent him to Parris Island, Camp Lejeune, and 
in January 1944 he went to Officers' School at Quantico, and received his 
commission. He was assigned to Maui, Hawaii as Company Commander 
then led his unit in a first wave frontal assault at Iwo Jima in Febru- 




18 



ary of L945. It was during this operation bhal he received i.h« - Purple 
Heart, a Presidential Oiitation, and the Navy Commendation. 

He was returned to the States and assigned as Athletic Officer at 
Pensacola Niavafl Air station. Here \w help. -(I coach the base football 
ami basketball and baseball] teams. 

Following discharge, he returned to Ithaca in the spring of 1946 to 
resume his studies and assist coaching the varsity football and baseball! 
beams and coacfh of the Freshman basketball and baseball teams. He 
graduated with a B.S. in Physical Education in June of 1947. He be- 
came backfdeld coach at Ithaca and freshman basketball and baseball 
ooaoh, During this time, he was with the Utica baseball team, a Phil 1 1-- 
farm. He received his Masters Degree in PE in June of 1948. He played 
pro baseball for a Niagara team in Canada. He has worked as a scout 
Cor the Phillies. 

In the Fall of 1948 he went to Waverly, N.Y. High School as head 
football and baseball coach. His grid teams of six years had the One 
record of 39 wins against, eight losses. His teams won the Southern 
Counties League Championship the last four years he coached. 

He went to Florida State as Nugent's assistant in 1954 and has been 
»v it li him since. 

A high honor came to him in 1959 when he was -elected into the Hall 
of Fame at Canisius Prep School. 

He is married and has a son, Michael, 10. 



CARROLL HUNTRESS 

The newest addition to Nugent's staff 
is the popular and hard working Carroll 
Huntress, a University of New Hampshire 
graduate. 

lie is working secretary of the Terrapin 
Club and head of concessions. 

Following graduation from New Hamp- 
shire, Huntress coached Football, Basket- 
ball and Baseball at Mechanic Falls, Maine 
High School for a year and a half. He then 
went to Portland High where he coached 
Football for ten years, six years as an as- 
sistant and four as H-ead Coach. He led the 
Portland team to the South West Maine 
Conference title in 1959 and was runner-up 
three years. 

He attended High School at Thornton 
Academy in his home town, Saco, Maine. 

Following graduation from Thornton he entered the Marine Corps in 
1942 and was discharged in November of 1945. In February he entered 
the University of New Hampshire where he received his Bachelor of 
Science degree in June of 1949, as a Biology major. 

While at New Hampshire, Huntress was a three sport letter-man, 
playing Varsity Football and Lacrosse three years and running the 
hurdles and dash events on the track team as a sophomore. 

He played both halfback and fullback while on the football squad and 
in his Senior year played in the Glass Bowl at Toledo, Ohio. He was a 
midfielder on the Lacrosse team and captained the squad in his Senior 
year. 

The 38-year old native of Saco marri-ed the former Betty Curran of 
Portland, Maine. They have three daughters. Judy, 14; Sharon. 10, and 
Pamela. S. 




19 




ALFRED J. "Duke" WYRE 

One of the most popular and considered 
by the training fraternity as one of its best, 
the Terps' "Duke" Wyre starts his 16th year 
as head trainer at Maryland. 

Duke came to Maryland in 1947 under 
the reorganization plan of the department 
and has added to his reputation as a leading 
authority in the all-impoirtant field of train- 
ing athletic teams. He heads two of the best 
equipped and most modern training rooms in 
the country. 

Many honors have come to Duke in his 
many years with the training association. The 
fitting climax came in 1960 as he was selected 

as one of the eight United States trainers for the Olympic games in 
Rome. Duke's primary assignment was to train the United States Olym- 
pic Crew, and happily the winning crew was that of the Terps' neigh- 
bors, Navy. His appointment was the culmination of the many years as 
a trainer. 

In 1956, hie was elected Chairman of the Board of Directors of the 
National Trainers' Association, a position which he still holds. 

He has authored many articles and manuals on training methods, and 
is always in demand to give lectures on athletic training methods at 
numerous clinics. He also has devised various equipment pieces that are 
used for athletic injuries and prevention of injuries. 

Wyre was trainer at Yale for 15 years before he moved to Holy 
Cross for another year. Then in '47 he came to Maryland and has been 
head trainer ever since. 



COACHES THROUGH THE YEARS 



1892— W. W. Skinner 
189b— S. H. Harding 
1894— J. G. Bannon 
1895— G. M. Harris 
1896 — Grenville Lewis 
1897 — John Lillibridge 
1898— J. F. Kenly 
1899— S. M. Cooke 
1900— F. H. Peters 
1901— E. B. Dunbar 
*Above Teams Coached by 

Captains 
1902— D. John Markey 

(Western Md.) 
1903— Markey 



1904— Markey 

1905— Fred Nielsen (Neb.) 

1906 — Nielsen 

1907— C. G. Church (Va.) 

and C. W. Melick (Neb.> 
1908 — Bill Lang (Delaware) 
1909 — Barney Cooper 

(Md. '08) and E. P. 

Larkin (Cornell) 
1910— R. Alston (G.W.) 
1911— C. F. Donnelly 

(Trinity) and H. C. Byrd 

(Maryland '08) 
1912-34— H. C. Byrd 

(Md '08) 



1935-39— Frank Dobson 

(Princeton) 
1940-41— Jack Faber C26). 

Al Heagy. C30), and Al 

Woods C33) all of Md. 
1942 — Clark Shaughnessy 

(Minnesota) 
1943-44 — Clarence Spears 

(Dartmouth^ 
1945— Paul Bryant (Ala.) 
1947-55— Jim Tatum (N.C.^ 
1956-58— Tommy Mont (Md.> 
1959-61 — Tom Nugent 

(Ithaca) 



20 




MAJITiAND U MMWM I ! 

iOOWM TMTOtO li 
lOUMTCJI 



M* ****»' m i urn i k i i w w i frh' i 




! «->- 



v' 'f»*A , >>»'**<i 




1962 MARYLAND VARSITY 



ENDS 



No. Name 


Ht. 


Wt. AgeCi 


. High School 


Hometown 


85 John Boinis 


6-5 


210 20 Jr. 


St. Petersburg 


Washington, D.C. 


82 *Harry Butsko 


6-2 


210 20 Jr. 


Cass Township 


Pottsville, Pa. 


87 *John Hannigan 


6-0 


190 21 Sr. 


Collingswood 


Oaklyn, N.J. 


— Selden Harris 


5-11 


185 20 So. 


Allegany 


Cumberland 


88 Nick Karas 


6-1 


195 19 So. 


South Hills 


Pittsburgh, Pa. 


36 John Kenny 


6-1 


185 19 So. 


Steubenville Cath. 


Steubenville, O. 


80 Andy Martin 


6-0 


205 20 So. 


Ridley Twp. 


Swart hmore, Pa. 


— Jess McLain 


6-3 


185 20 Jr. 


Surrattsville 


Clinton 


81 *Joe Mona 


6-1 


180 21 Sr. 


St. Johns 


Hillcrest Heights 


83 Dave Nardo 


6-1 


195 20 So. 


St. John Central 


Belair, O. 


84 Jerry Osier 


6-3 


210 19 So. 


Audubon 


Mt. Ephriam, N.J 


89 *Tom Rae 


6-3 


215 21 Sr. 


South Union 


Uniontown, Pa. 


- Ed Rog 


6-0 


185 21 Jr. 


Chenango Valley 


Bingharnton, N.Y. 



76 Larry Bagranoff 
72 *Dave Crossan 

77 Mike Flarnili 
79 Joe Frattaroli 
71 Norm Hatfield 
75 Roger Howell 
70 Frank Metzger 

78 *Roger Shoals 
74 Robert Stolick 





TACKLES 




6-2 


215 18 So. Walter Johnson 


Bethesda 


6-2 


215 22 Sr. Collingswood 


Collingswood, N.J 


6-4 


255 19 So. St. Johns 


Washington, D.C. 


6-2 


220 19 So. Stamford 


Stamford, Conn. 


6-3 


210 22 Jr. Altoona 


Altoona, Pa. 


6-1 


210 19 So. Montgomery Blair 


Silver Spring 


6-2 


225 18 So. McCaskey 


Lancaster, Pa. 


5-4 


240 22 Sr. Norwalk 


Norwalk. Conn. 


6-2 


210 19 So. Sewickley Area 


Herminie, Pa. 







GUARDS 




64 Louis Bury 


6-2 


210 20 Jr. 


Calvert Hall 


Baltimore 


— Art Carney 


5-11 


195 18 So. 


Newark 


Newark, Del. 


69 Bob Conte 


6-0 


200 19 So. 


New Rochelle 


New Rochelle, N.Y. 


67 Dick Corbin 


6-1 


200 22 Jr. 


Natick 


Natick, Mass. 


60 *Chester Detko 


6-2 


215 22 Sr. 


East Rutherford 


East Rutherford, N.J 


63 Olaf Drozdov 


6-0 


210 19 So. 


Pennsville 


Pennsville, N.J. 


61 *Joe Ferrante 


6-0 


200 20 Jr. 


Portland 


Portland, Me. 


65 Ray Gibson 


6-0 


200 20 So. 


Lewes 


Lewes, Del. 


66 *Gary Jankowski 


5-11 


190 22 Sr. 


Burlington 


Burlington, N.J. 


68 Fred Joyce 


5-11 


200 19 So. 


Fort Hill 


Cumberland 


— John Langton 


5-11 


205 20 So. 


Pleasantville 


Pleasantville, N.J. 


62 Charles Martin 


5-11 


200 19 So. 


Father Judge 


Philadelphia, Pa. 


- Martin McAlwee 


6-0 


185 18 So. 


St. Johns 


Deer Park Heights 


- Ed Reynolds 


5-11 


200 19 So. 


Montgomery Blair 


Silver Spring 


73 *Walter Rock 


6-5 


225 20 Sr. 


Elyria 


Elyria, O. 



22 



FOOTBALL ROSTER 



No. Name 

53 Gaj tan Ciccone 

54 Tom Fantaskd 
52 K3ene Feher 
50 Ed Gilmore 

.">] Kon Lewis 



CENTERS 

Ht. Wt. AgeCi. High School 

5-10 210 20 So. Set on Hall Prep 

6-0 180 21 Jr. Scufi 

c-i 200 19 Jr. Aliquippa 

5-11 L90 21 Jr. Ml. St. Michael 

6-0 205 19 So. Ridley Park 



Hometown 
Newark, N.J. 
North Braddock, Pa. 
Wisi AMqvrippa, Pa. 
North Bergen, N.J. 
Ridley Park, Pa. 



L5 Jim Corocxran 6-0 

10 Mike Funk 6-0 

1 1 *Dick Shiner 6-0 

13 Bruce Springer 6-4 

12 Don White 5-11 



QUARTERBACKS 

185 20 So. Dickin-on 

185 18 So. Bishop McDevitt 

195 20 Jr. Lebanon 

190 18 So. Scotch Plains 

180 21 Sr. Downington 



rersey City, N.J. 
Harrisburg, Pa. 
Lebanon, Pa. 
Fanwood, N.J. 
Downington, Pa. 



HALFBACKS 



27 Jay Adams 


5-11 


185 


21 


So. 


Westwood 


21 Ronnie Adams 


5-10 


175 


19 


So. 


Irvington 


20 Ken Ambrusko 


6-0 


ISO 


19 


So. 


Chaney 


44 *Ernie Arizzi 


6-0 


180 


20 


Jr. 


H addon Heights 


40 *Murnis Banner 


5-10 


170 


21 


Sr. 


German Township 


43 *Tom Brown 


6-0 


185 


21 


Sr. 


Montgomery Blair 


33 Len Chiaverini 


5-11 


180 


19 


So. 


Amb ridge 


12 Steve Glas-er 


6-0 


185 


20 


Jr. 


Woodrow Wilson 


- Phil Kershaw 


5-9 


170 


20 


So. 


John F. Deering 


- Doug Klingerman 


6-1 


170 


19 


So. 


Bloomsburg 


26 Joe Kresovieh 


6-0 


190 


19 


So. 


Bellefonte 


35 Ronnie Mace 


5-11 


L80 


21 


Sr. 


Williams town 


25 *Dan Piper 


5-10 


170 


20 


Sr. 


Oxon Hill 


23 Mike Simpson 


5-9 


170 


21 


So. 


Deering 


22 * Kenny Smith 


5-10 


185 


22 


Sr. 


Beth. Chevy Chase 



Westwood, N.J. 
Irvington, N.J. 
Youngstown, O. 
Barrington, N.J. 
New Salem, Pa. 
Silver Spring 
Ambridge, Pa. 
Washington, D.C. 
West Warick, R.I. 
Bloomsburg, Pa. 
Bellefonte, Pa. 
Williamstown, Pa. 
Forest Heights 
Portland, Me. 
Bethesda 



FULLBACKS 



29 *Bob Burton 


6-0 


190 21 Jr. 


Newark 


Newark, Del. 


41 Jerry Fishman 


6-1 


220 19 So. 


Norwalk 


East Norwalk, Conn 


24 Jim Girardi 


5-10 


190 21 Jr. 


Williamsport 


Williamsport, Pa. 


John Heist er 


5-10 


175 22 Sr. 


St. Johns 


Bethesda 


30 *Joe Hrezo 


5-10 


190 20 Sr. 


Union I own 


New Salem, Pa. 


Ron Janovec 


6-2 


215 19 So. 


Salem 


Salem, O. 


31 John Kahl 


6-0 


200 19 So. 


Farrell 


Farrell. Pa. 


- Carl Pikus 


5-11 


185 20 So. 


Cathedral Latin 


Cleveland. O. 



23 



THE TENTATIVE DEPTH CHART 

(Based on Early Summer Estimates) 



LE - - Rae 


Boinis 


Osier 


LT — Crossan 


Fornili 


Hatfield 


LG - Detko 


Ferrante 


Jankowski 


C - - Feher 


Gilmore 


Lewis 


RG - - Rock 


Drozdov 


Conte 


RT - - Shoals 


Frattaroli 


Bagranoff 


RE - - Butsko 


Nardo 


Martin 


QB — Shiner 


Corcoran 


Funk 


*UB — Arizzi 


Burton 


Hrezo 


**TB - Banner 


R. Adams 


Fishman 


***WB - - Brown 


Mace 


Ambrusko 


* — Up Back 






** - - Tail Back 






*** — Wing Back 







NUMERICAL ROSTER 



Heister 




40 Banner 




70 


Metzger 


10 (Funk 




41 Fishman 




71 


Hatfield 


12 White 




42 Glaser 




72 


Crossan 


13 Springer 




43 Brown 




73 


Rock 


14 Shiner 




44 Arizzi 




74 


Stolick 


15 Corcoran 




50 Gilmore 




75 


Howell 


20 Ambrusko 




51 Lewis 




76 


Bagranoff 


21 R. Adams 




52 Feher 




77 


Fornili 


22 Smith 




53 Ciccone 




78 


Shoals 


23 Simpson 




54 Fantaski 




79 


Frattaroli 


24 Girardi 




60 Detko 




80 


Martin 


25 Piper 




61 Ferrante 




81 


Mona 


26 Kresovich 




62 Martin 




82 


Butsko 


27 J. Adams 




63 Drozdov 




83 


Nardo 


29 Burton 




64 Bury 




84 


Osier 


30 Hrezo 




65 Gibson 




85 


Boinis 


31 Kahl 




66 Jankows^ 


:i 


86 


Kenny 


33 Chiaverini 




67 Corbin 




87 


Hannigan 


34 Janovec 




68 Joyce 




88 


Karas 


35 Mace 




69 Conte 




89 


Rae 




PRONUNCIATION CHART 




Arizzi 


— a-RIZ-ee 


Fornili 




- for-NEE-lee 


Bagranoff 


— ba-GRA-noff 


Girardi 




- ja-RAR-dee 


Bury 


- BUR-ee 




Heister 




- HIGH-ster 


Chiaverini 


— sbiv-REE-nee 


Hrezo 




- RAY-zo 


Ciccone 


— Si-cone 




Janovec 




- JAN-o-vek 


Conte 


— CON-tee 


Kahl 




- KAL 


Crossan 


- KRAW- 


sun 


Kresovich 




- KRES-a-vich 


Drozdov 


— DROZ-doff 


McAlwee 




- MAC-a-wee 


Feher 


— FAIR 




Rae 




- RAY 


Ferrante 


fa-RAN-tee 


Stolick 




- sto-LIK 



24 



TOP TERPS 

ENDS 

85 JOHN BOINIS, Junior. 20, 6-5, 210, Washington, D.C.— After a 
slow start in collegiate football, Boiniis had a greal spring and looks like 
he's read} to oame Into his own . . . has a fine pair of hands and will 
specialize on the "Hustler," (offensive) unit . . . is the tali. I end om the 
squad and has the size and range to be one of the finest ends in collegiate 
football . . . starred at si. Petersburg, Fla. High Schoo] ... is in School 
of Physical Education, Recreation .and Health. 

82 HARRY BUTSKO. Junior, 20, 6-2, 210, Pottsville, Pa is the type of 
football player that can play most an> position and do an outstanding job 

. . . switched from fullback and has made the transition with case . . . 
is big and strong and moves exceptionally well for a big man ... is a 
good blocker, rough and tough type player . . . could be the bright spot 
of the end corps . . . was all-State, all-County and all-American in high 
school . . . was a member of the "Big 33" in Pennsylvania. Probably 
will start with the "M-Squad" (two-way unit) ... is in School of Phys- 
ical Education. Recreation and Health. 

80 ANDY MARTIN, Sophomore, 20, 6-0, 205, Swarthmore, Pa.— Martin 
has good hands and excellent speed. The 205-pounder is good defensively 
... a hard-nose type player . . . needs game experience but could play 
a lot of football for the Terrapins this season ... is a hard worker, 
showing plenty of determination . . . was on the all-section team -n hisjh 
school. 

83 DAVE NARDO, Sophomore, 20, 6-1, 195, Bellair, O — After laying 
out a year, this clean cut prospect could be one of the best defensive ends 
in the school's history . . . One of the hardest workers on the squad 
. . . has tremendous "heart" ... is very intelligent ... an honor 
student . . . needs game experience . . . tremendous all-round athlete 
was all-conference in football, basketball and honorable mention all- 
conference in track at St. John Central in Bellaire. Also president of 
student council. 

84 JERRY OSLER. Sophomore, 19. 6-3, 210, Mt. Ephriam, N.J.— The 
top end prospect up from the undefeated freshman team . . . has great 
potential . . . good moves . . . great hands and the size to be one of the 
best in the land . . . caught 15 passes for 405 yards and four TD's in last 
four games of freshman schedule . . . averaging 27 yards a catch. Osier 
caught five against Navy for 161 yards and five against Virginia for 125 
yards. Could become Terps next all-American end . . . needs game experi- 
ence. 

89 TOM RAE, Senior, 21, 6-3, 215, Uniontown, Pa.— 
Could be the top end for the Terps this season . . . 
had a great spring . . . has good hands along with 
d moves. Rae is sneaky fast and deceptive ... is 
also tough on defense . . big, strong . . . runs hard 
after a pass reception . . . will be counted on heavily to 
bolster young end corps . . . only senior end on first 
three squads. Tom was honorable mention all-Ameri- 
can at South Union High . . . also honorable mention 
all-State . . . all-County for two years . . . lettered in 
basketball, track and baseball also ... is in School of Physical Educa- 
tion, Recreation and Health. 

25 




TACKLES 

76 LARRY BAGRANOFF, Sophomore, 18, 6-2, 215, Bethesda— -Young 
and inexperienced but could develop into top-notch lineman. Needs 
game experience but has the "tools" . . . was all-Metropolitan while play- 
ing for Walter Johnson High School in Rockville . . . will probably start 
witlh the "Hustler" unit. The young sophomore will be counted on heav- 
ily to bolster the Terp tackle corps. 



72 DAVE CROSSAN, Senior, 22, 6-2, 215, Collings- 
wood, N.J. — One of the Terps top linemen and very 
possibly one of the top linemen in collegiate football 
. . . exceptionally aggressive . . . agile . . . rough, tough 
. . . one of the hardest workers on squad . . . has good 
speed . . . wants to play pro football. Crossan has been 
an outstanding lineman during his entire career at 
Maryland . . . has played guard. The aggressive senior 
stands out both offensively and defensively ... a hard, 
sure tackier . . . was honorable mention all-America, 
all-State, AP and Newark News and all-South Jersey 
. . . is in School of Business and Public Administration. 




77 MIKE FORNILI, Sophomore, 19, 6-4, 255, Washington, D.C.— Will 
probably start with the "Gangbusters" (defensive) unit . . . has the size 
and potential to become a top defensive specialist . . will be counted on 
heavily to stop opponents' attacks. iFornili was second team all-Catholic 
at St. Johns in Washington . . . hard work and game experience should 
make Mike a top collegiate lineman. 

79 JOE FRATTAROLI, Sophomore, 19, 6-2, 220, Stanford, Conn.— Pos- 
sibly a starter on the "Gangbusters" unit opposite Fornili . . . Frattaroli 
is developing fast . . . is a serious, hard worker . . . was 1st team all- 
State at Stamford High School . . . helped lead his team to an undefeated 
season and the state championship . . . had offers from Duke, Syracuse 
and West Point and was considered by scouts as the top collegiate pros- 
pect on his undefeated high school team because of his size and speed 
... is in School of Engineering. 

71 NORM HATFIELD, Junior, 22, 6-3, 210, Altoona, Pa.— Had a fine 
spring after a slow collegiate start because of illness . . . moves well . . . 
is smart on the football field and is an excellent student ... is counted 
on heavily to bolster young tackle corps . . . only junior among tackles 
... a top notch competitor . . . was honorable mention all-State and a 
member of the "Big 33" team in high school . . . was class president for 
three years in high school ... is in School of Physical Education, Rec- 
reation and Health. 




7S ROGER SHOALS, Senior, 22, 6-4, 240, Norwalk, 
Conn.— Already drafted by the Cleveland Browns . . . 
is an excellent student ... is rugged, strong and tough 
. . . good lateral movement . . . excellent blocker and 
tackier ... is quick, good reaction . . . when linemen 
plaudits are given out this season Shoals should be 
among the receivers . . . has the speed to go with his 
agile movements . . .is in School of Physicial Education, 
Recreation and Health. 



26 



GUARDS 

69 BOB CG'NTE, Sophomore, 10. 6-0, 200, New Rochelle, N.Y. A fine 
prospecl . . . was outstanding in spring drills . . . an excellem blocker 

. . has 

. . will 
one "i 



and is ,-i tremendous defensive u r uanl . . . diagnoses plays well 
good reactions . . , one of the besl young players on the squad 
probably specialize with the "Gangbusters" (defensive) u-nil . . 

the besl students on the squad. 

60 CHESTER DETKO, Senior, 22, 6-2, 215, East Ruth- 
erford, N.J.- One <> ! " the Teops top Linemen . . . < 
trong . . . moves well laterally . . . has the experience 
and know-how ... is an excellent tackier . . . has basic 
Fundamentals of a lineman down pal . . . was all-Stat< 
a1 Easl Rutherford High . . . all-Metropolitan, all-Coun- 



ty, and all-l'assaii -I! 



lei tered three :■ i ars in 



is in School of Business and Public Adminis- 



> 



t l'ack 
I rat ion, 

63 OLAF DROZDOV, Sophomore, 19, 6-0, 210, Penn.sville, N.J.— Prob- 
ably the top sophomore guard on the squad . . . really came into his own 
in spring drills ... a defensive specialist during the spring . . . probably 
will start with the "Gangbusters" unit ... is aggressive and rough . . . 
one of the hardest workers on the squad ... a stockily built type playei 
thai is hard to move . . . needs game experience. 

61 JOE FERRANTE, Junior, 20, 6-0, 200, Portland, Me.— Is exception- 
ally quick . . . diagnoses plays well . . . is an excellent blocker . . . very 
aggressive ... is a heads-up player . . not great size for a collegiate 
guard but makes up for it with great determination. 

66 GARY JANKOWSKI, Senior, 22, 5-11, 190, Bur- 
lington, N.J. — Has the experience to lend to a good 
corps of guards ... is hard-nose type player . . . loves 
contact ... an excellent blocker . . . has good straight- 
away speed . . . moves well laterally . . . was highly 
sought after by college scouts ... a fine two-way play- 
er .. . hustles every minute . . . was a fullback for a 
short time as a sophomore . . . was all-Burlington 
County . . . honorable mention all-State, Group III . . . 
on South Jersey first team . . . lettered in track . . . 
class officer ... is in School of Physical Education, 
Recreation and Health. 

73 WALTER ROCK, Senior, 20, 6-5, 225, Elyria, O.— 
The Rock of the Maryland line is one of collegiate 
football's finest linemen . . . big, strong ... an excel- 
lent blocker . . . aggressive . . . moves exceptionally 
well for his size . . . one of the best for sure tackling 
. . . can play where needed in the line . . . was an end 
as a sophomore and a tackle last season ... is out- 
standing wherever he plays . . . was all-State in Ohio 
as soiocted by AP, UPI and the Jay-Cee Polls . . . 
selected to the Cle\ eland News and Press all-Dream 
team . . . was all-Buckeye Conference, offense and defence . outstand- 
ing basketball player . . . was all-State court star as well as all-Buck' 
Conference and again on the all-Dream team . . . lettered in track . . . 
was voted the outstanding male student award his senior year ... a good 
student . . . fine pro prospect ... is in School of Business and Public 
Administration. 





27 



CENTERS 

52 GENE FEHER, Junior, 19, 6-1, 200, West Aliquippa, Pa.— Excellent 
defensive signal-caller . . . hard hitting tackier . . . has the knack for 
jarring the ball loose from ball carriers . . . one of the top centers in the 
ACC ... is tops in centering the ball ... an excellent blocker . . . was 
first team all-State, first team all-WPIAL, first team all-County and first 
team all-Mid-Western Conference . . . also lettered and starred in backet- 
ball and baseball . . . was honorable mention all-State in basketball and 
all-Section in baseball ... is in School of Business and Public Adminis- 
tration. 

50 ED GILMORE, Junior, 21, 5-11, 190, North Bergen, N.J.— An excel- 
lent offensive blocker . . . will probably start with the "Hustlers" unit 
... is very strong, making up for lack of size . . . prepped at Mount St. 
Michael Academy . . . was all-City and all-Metropolitan selection . . . 
lettered in basketball and track ... is in School of Business and Public 
Administration. 

51 :RON LEWIS, Sophomore, 19, 6-0, 205, Ridley Park, Pa.— Is a top 
prospect . . . has good lateral movement ... a fine tackier . . . looks like 
one of the top linebackers to come along at Maryland in some time . . . 
probably see most of his action with the "Gangbusters". 



QUARTERBACKS 

15 JIM CORCORAN, Sophomore, 20, 6-0, 185, Jersey City, N.J.— Has 
the poise and leadership of a veteran signal-caller ... an outstanding 
athlete . . . led the 1961 Terp freshmen to an undefeated season ... is 
not a "picture" thrower but gets the job done ... is a good runner . . . 
carried 50 times for 273 yards and 5.4 average . . . threw seven TD passes 
and two conversions . . . scored five TD's by running . . . completed 40 of 
72 passes for 828 yards . . . connected on 12 of 26 for 332 yards and two 
TD's against Navy . . . with game experience this youngster could be one 
of the great ones. 

10 MIKE FUNK, Sophomore, 18. 6-0, 185, Harrisburg, Pa.— An excel- 
lent runner who will keep you honest with throwing ability ... a great 
competitor ... a good athlete who can play most any position . . . had an 
outstanding spring and was pushing Shiner until injured ... is back after 
laying out a year . . . all-State and "Big 33". 

14 DICK SHINER, Junior, 20, 6-0, 195, Lebanon, Pa.— This is a field 
general who doesn't come along veiy often . . . the type of player you're 
glad is on your side ... he makes the big play when it's needed ... a 
great leader ... a strong resemblance to Mickey Mantle (see cover) . . . 
he's as important to the Terps as Mantle is to the Yankees . . . one of the 
outstanding passers in collegiate football . . . although Shiner doesn't 
have blinding speed, he is a strong, hard runner . . . the finest compli- 
ments that could be paid any collegiate football performer have been said 
about Dick by veteran and rookie observers alike . . . can throw long or 
short passes with amazing accuracy . . . could be the best quarterback in 
Terrapin history . . . had the longest run from scrimmage for the Terps 
last year . . . combined with Tom Brown for the longest scoring pass and 
run in '61 for the Terrapins . . . threw for 196 yards against Air Force 
threw three TD passes against Penn State to tie an ACC record for one 
game . . . completed six out of seven against Clemson . . . was all-America 

28 



(in the Wigwam Wiseman team in hdgh school . . . honorable mention all- 
America, IM'I high school team . . . quarterbacked ihe "BLg 33" team . . . 
was honorable mention all-State, AP and I'iM . . . lettered in basketball 

and baseball . . . was class president in junioi and senior years ... a good 

student ... a Marketing major in School of Business and Public Admin- 
istration ... a star shines bright In shiner. 

HALFBACKS 

21 RONNIE ADAMS, Sophomore, 19, 5-10, L75, Irvington, N.J.— Prob- 
ably is the finest sophomore halfback or the -<i u ad . . . has great speed 
. . . hard runner . . . can break game wide open al any time ... is a good 
receiver . . . will see plenty of action in '62 . . . can give you the wrinkle 
when given ;i tittle daylight . . . needs game experience . . . all-County, 
1st team Group IV, 3rd team all-State. 

20 KEN AMBRUSKO, Sophomore, 19. 6-0 L80, Youngstown, O— Good 

offensively hut is outstanding on defense , ■ . will probably start with the 
"Gangbusters" unit . . . has good speed . . . hits hard . . . is a "hungry" 
type ballplayer . . . reactions are good, a necessity for above average de- 
fensive backs. 

44 ERNIE ARIZZI, Junior, 20, 6-0, 180, Barrington, N.J.— has all Iho 
moves of a great back ... is deceptively fast . . . good hands . . . excellent 
blocker ... a hard-nosed defensive back ... is quick starter . . . led the 
Terrapins in rushing (369 yards) and average yards per rush last sea- 
son as a soph . . . was 5th in pass receiving in '61 with 103 yards and 
'lid in number of receptions with 12 . . . 4th in kickoff returns ... is in 
School of Education. 

40 MURNIS BANNER, Senior, 21, 5-10, 170, New 
Salem, Pa. — The fastest back on squad ... is explo- 
sive type runner . . . threat either inside or outside . . 
great hands . . . tremendous desire . . . one of the 
hardest workers on the squad . . . was 4th in rushing 
(106 yards) in '61 . . . 4th in pass receiving (123 yards) 
with seven receptions . . . was all-County and on the 
all-WPIAL squad . . . lettered in baseball, track and 
basketball ... is in School of Physical Education, Rec- 
reation and Health. 

43 TOM BROWN, Senior. 21, 6-0, 185, Silver Spring— 
Probably the finest all-around athlete on the squad . . . 
di eW broke ACC record with eight interceptions last season 

/^^^^» ■ • • intercepted three against Air Force to tie an ACC 

V mark . . . ran 52 yards for ID against Air Force, after 

<*► * c * V catching an 11-yard Shiner pass . . . returned a punt 

.~ ^^ S3 yards against Wake Forest for a TD in '61 . . . 
^M gained 97 yards against Air Force with pass receptions 

-4fl . . . averaged 24.5 yards per punt return for a new 

- ^^^* school mark in one season . . . probably best defensive 
back in ACC . . . led in punt returns (194 yards) and 
was 2nd in kickoff returns (138 yards) . . . 3rd in scoring (24 point- 1 
. . . 2nd in pass receptions (232 yards) . . . has fine speed . . . was 1st 
team all-America in baseball this season ... is all-America caliber in 
football also . . . was all-Metropolitan in baseball and basketball . . . 
was all-State in fo ;tball ... is in School of Physical Education. Recrea- 
tion and Health. 

29 






35 RONNIE MACE, Senior, 21, 5-11, 180, Williams- 
town, Pa. — Has the experience and know-how that 
makes him one of tihe top Terp backs . . . has excellent 
speed . . . good hands . . . used mostly as defensive 
safetyman and Is outstanding at that position ... an 
excellent student . . . probably will see most of his ac- 
tion with the "Ganigbusters" unit. 



FULLBACKS 

29 BOB BURTON, Junior, 21, 6-0, 190, Newark, Del.— Is one of the 
best defensive linebackers on the squad ... an excellent tackier ... a 
fine blocker ... a hard worker that will battle you all the way . . . lacks 
the size to be a bruising type runner but his determination makes him 
enough of a running threat to keep the opposition honest up the middle. 

41 JERRY FISHMAN, Sophomore, 19, 6-1, 220, East Norwalk, Conn.- 
A top prospect that starred as a Terp freshman ... a punishing type run- 
ner . . . has the -size . . . runs over people . . . excellent speed for his size 
. . . good balance . . . carried 141 times for 593 yards as a freshman . . . 
scored six touchdowns in five games . . . made runs of 34, 54 and 69 
yards against GeOirge Washington for TD's . . . carried 22 times for 292 
yards against GW. 

30 JOE HREZO, Senior, 20, 5-10, 190, New Salem, Pa. 
— An excellent linebacker . . . had a tremendous spring 
. . . excels in blocking . . . started out as a guard and 
did a fine job but was switched to fullback because of 
lack of depth and Hrezo responded by performing 
equally as well at the fullback slot . . . has better than 
average speed . . . was all-State, all-County and all- 
Conference in high school . . . lettered in wrestling and 
track, a member of the national honor society . . . was 
class president ... a good student ... is in School of 
Business and Public Administration. 




30 



THE OUTLOOK IN '62 

For University of Maryland Football, progress is the most important 
product, and since Head Football Coach Tom Nugent has been on the 
Terrapin scene, The Terps have progressed. 

From a 5-5 season in 1959 to 6-4 in '60 and 7-3 last year the Terrapins 
have been on the rise. There is reason to believe the steady climb will 
continue this season under the colorful Nugent. 

Nineteen (19) lettermen return to the "62 Terrapin squad with the 
best Sophomore group in Coach Nugent's tenure at Maryland. Last 
year's Freshman team was unbeaten and veteran Terrapin observers 
think the youngsters will fill the spots needed most. 

The Terps are going to the three-team system this season for the first 
time. Coach Nugent and his staff toyed with the idea a couple of years 
back but felt as though the thinness of the ranks prevented the use of 
such a system. That fact in itself may be the tipoff on tlhe strength of 
the '62 Maryland squad. 

The "M-Squad" will be the first unit or two-way squad (offense and 
defense). The "Gangbusters" will be the defensive unit and the "Hust- 
lers" will be the offensive unit. 

At Quarterback the Terrapins only have one letterman back but he 
should fill the bill more than adequately at that vital position. His name 
is Dick Shiner, a Junior from Lebanon, Pa. Shiner has all the tools of 
becoming Maryland's best Quarterback of all time. 

Shiner has the command and poise of a Senior, plus he is a strong, 
hard runner and to top it all, he is a passer deluxe. The 6-0, 195 pound 
Junior tied an ACC record last year by tossing three touchdown passes 
in the Penn State game. 

Backing Shiner at the signal-calling post are three promising Sopho- 
mores, Jim Corcoran, Mike Funk and Bruce Springer. Don White, 
carrying the best grade average (3.67) on the squad, is a punting special- 
ist. 

Tom Brown, probably the finest all-around athlete ion the Terp roster, 
leads the halfback corps. The 185-pound Senior broke the ACC record 
for interceptions (8) last year, intercepting three against the Air Force, 
to tie another ACC mark. Brown has uncanny ability in returning punts 
and kickoffs. The Silver Spring product averaged 24.5 yards in punt re- 
turns last year for a new Terrapin record. Tommy is a fine receiver as 
evidenced by his eleven (11) receptions last season for 232 yards. 

Other halfback lettermen to watch are Ernie Arizzi, Murnis Banner, 
Dan Piper and Kenny Smith. Senior John Hannigan is a place-kicking 
specialist that kicked 17 extra points last season in 17 attempts. The 
Oaklyn, N.J. youngster only missed one field goal in six tries. 

At fullback the Terrapins have two lettermen. Bob Burton and Joe 
Hrezo provide the experience needed at fullback. Neither Burton or 
Hrezo have great size but they have the running ability to keep the de- 
fense "honest" up the middle. Backing up the veterans is a bright 
prospect with size. Jerry Fishman, 6-1, 220-pounds, the top runner on 
last year's freshman team, could work into a starting role. The hard- 
running Sophomore gained 593 yards last season for the Freshman team, 
while scoring six touchdowns. Three of the six TD's came against 
George Washington, on runs of 34, 54 and 69 yards. 

The Terps only have one letterman at center but the vital position is 
not figured to be a trouble spot. Gene Feher, a 200-pound Junior, is the 
lone letterman. Feher is a smart defensive signal caller that has the 

32 



ability bo jar the ball loose from opposing runners. Bolstering the centej 
corps i.s Ed Gilmorc and Ron Lewis. Gllmore is a fine offensive blocker 
and will probably specialize with the "Hustlers" (offensive unit). Lewis 
is a Sophomore i hat has good latnai movement. Ron Is young bul I * 
like a top prospect. 

The Terrapin End corps could be the weakesl spot on the team with 
the loss oi' All-American Gary Collins, Dick Barlund and I lank Ponial w- 
Ski. However, lettermen Harry I'.ulsko, Joe Mona and Tom Rae should 
give the Elankmen expedience enough to blend wtiith a good Looking young 
prospect, Jerry Osier. Butsko is big (210) and strong and move;: well. 
Mona was injured in the spring bul should be ready in the fall for ex- 
tensive duty. Rae has good hands plus good size (215) and could be the 
top Terrapin End this fall. 

The Terp tackle slot could be another trouble spot with only two let- 
term. n returning. The youngsters will have to come through to bolster 
such top performers as Dave Crossan and Roger Shoals. Crossan (215) 
and Shoals <L'40) are top pro prospects and are among the top college 
linemen in the country. Crossan is exceptionally aggressive, agile. 
strong and has good speed. Dave is one of the hardest workers on the 
squad. Shoals has the size (240), good lateral movement and is a good 
blocker and tackier. He has the ability to become a top pro lineman. 
Probably the best youngster in the group is Mike Fornili (6-4, 255). The 
Washington, D.C. Sophomore could develop into one of the best nil-time 
Maryland tackles. 

The guard position appears to be the Strongest Terp line spot. Four 
lettermen return at guard. Chet Detko (215), Joe Ferrante (200), Gary 
.lankowski (190) and Walter Rock (225) make up the guard veterans. 
Olaf Drozdov (210) seems to be the Sophomore with the best chance of 
cracking the veteran lineup. Detko is strong and one of the top Terp 
linemen. Ferrante seems to diagnose plays well and is aggressive. Jan- 
kowski is a hard-nose ballplayer that has good speed. Rock is a fine pro 
prospect and is a smart, heady type player. Drozdov came into his own 
this spring and could move one of the veterans out. 

Whether the Terrapins progress to an 8-2 or better season of course 
depends on many factors. One thing for sure, it will be an interesting 
challenge. 



1962 MARYLAND 
FRESHMAN FOOTBALL SCHEDULE 

(Last year's scores in parenthesis) 

Sept. 28 George Washington home '26-22) 

Oct. 19 Virginia away (35-18) 

Oct. 26 Buliis Prep away (21- 6) 

Nov. 2 North Carolina away 

Nov. 10 Navy away <29-27) 

(Won 5 — Lost — 1961) 

(The 5th Terrapin freshman win in '61 was against South Carolina in 
their season opener. 26-22.) 

33 



TERP OPPONENTS 
The Mustangs' 1962 Outlook 

The coaching staff was well-pleased with the desire to hit and the 
enthusiasm for work shown during the spring workouts by the men who 
will do most of the playing for SMU next fall. 

Our system was entirely new to the players but they gave 110 per 
cent effort in an attempt to master it. We plan to combine the Split T, 
the wing T, and the Sprint-out T. We believe we must make opponents 
respect our running attack before our passing offensive can reach its 
maximum effectiveness. For this reason we concentrated upon finding 
backs who could advance the ball on the ground. We tried to convince 
our quarterbacks that on option plays we want them to give priority 
to carrying the ball and not passing it. We will do our share of pass- 
ing, however. 

We want to have our 11 best football players in the line-up at the 
same time. Consequently we shifted the positions played by some of the 
men. Max Derden, a sophomore with fine potential at quarterback, has 
been converted into a fullback. Don Campbell, who played mostly at 
halfback on defense last year, became our No. 1 quarterback. Billy Gan- 
non, the team's leading ground-gainer last year while operating from a 
left half-back position, may be used some at quarterback next fall. Over- 
all our backfield is light and does not have the speed so essential for a 
winning combination. 

At the close of spring drills it looked as if our No. 1 line will include 
two starters from lost year's team. Norman Nelson, a starter last year 
at right end, has been shifted to left end, and Raymond Schoenke, who 
was regular center in 1960 and No. 1 right guard last year, is now at 
right tackle. Mike Kelsey at center, Jack Rhoads at right guard, and 
Less Stewart at left guard moved up from ithe No. 2 unit of last year. 
John Graves at right end was on the third team last fall, and John 
Knee at left tackle is a fine prospect from the 1961 freshman team. 



34 



MARYLAND vs SOUTHERN METHODIST 22 SEPTEMBER 



BAND DAY 

2:00 P.M. (E.D.T.) 

at Byrd Sl.idium 135,000) 
College Park, Md. 

FACTS ABOUT THE MUSTANGS 

CONFERENCE: Southwesl 
LOCATION: Dallas, Texa 
IIKAD COACH: llnvdrn Kr\ 
COLORS: Red and Blur 
ENROLLMENT: 5,800 
PYPE OFFENSE: Split-T wnh variation* 
L963 RECORD: Won 2, Lost 7, Tied 1 
PUBLICITY DIRECTOR: Lester Jordan 




Hayden Fry 



TERPS - RECORD AGAINST THE MUSTANGS 
(Mai. viand: Won 1. Lost 0, Tied 0) 



1961 



Maryland 
14 



SMU 
6 



1962 CAPTAINS: To be appointed for each game 
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 24— Lost 10 







1962 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


22 


at Maryland 


Sept. 


29 


University of 

Southern California (night) 


Oct. 


G 


Air Force Academy 


Oct. 


20 


Rice University 


Oct. 


27 


at Texas Tech 


Nov. 


3 


at University of Texas 


Nov. 


10 


Texas Ai-M 


Nov. 


17 


Arkansas at Little Rock 


Nov. 


24 


Baylor University 


Dec. 


1 


Texas Christian University 



1961 YARDSTICK 

Maryland SMU 

First Downs 11 9 

Rushing Yardage 196 147 

Passing Yardage 83 81 

Passes _... 6-11 6-17 

Passes intercepted by .... 1 1 

Punts 7-32 6-44 

Fumbles Lost 2 2 

Yards Penalized 25 35 

Marvland 7 7 0—14 

SMU 6 0—6 

SCORING: Maryland: Novak 5, run 
(Hannigan kick) : Davidson 18. pass 
from Novak (Hannigan kickK 

SMU: Sherwin 30. run 'kick failed). 



35 



The Deacons' 1962 Outlook 

A quick glance at the 1962 Wake Forest spring football roster will 
clearly point up the many problems facing Billy Hildebrand as he em- 
barks on his third season as head coach of the Demon Deacons. 

Of the 54 boys expected back this fall only eight will be seniors next 
fall, 10 will be juniors and 36 will be sophomores. Twenty-eight of the 
rising sophs are up from last year's freshman club. 

"We are definitely hurting for lack of experience at every position 
except guard and center," Hildebrand said. "We will have to rely on 
young players to carry most of the load." 

There are only 14 lettermen returning and four of those are guards 
and two are centers. Fullback is the only position without a letter 
wearer. Only four of the lettermen were starters last season. They are 
guards Bill Shendow and Bob Irwin, center Farrell Egge and halfback 
Donnie Frederick. 

Of the returnees only nine were listed on the first two units at the 
close of the 1961 campaign and 15 out of the first 33. 

Only one sophomore — Richard Cameron, a red-shirt end last fall — 
was listed on the starting unit at the close of spring work. Two other 
non-lettermen listed are senior Bruce McLean, who played 22 minutes 
last year, at fullback and junior Jimmy Bedgood, who saw only four 
minutes of action at right halfback. 

The lettermen listed on the No. 1 unit includes Jim Tejeck at RE, 
Wesley Cox at LT, Irwin at LG. Egge at center, Shendow at RG. Kent 
Martin at RT, Wally Bridwell at QB and Frederick at LH. 

Frederick, who saw more playing time <365 minutes) than any other 
player on last year's club, is the most experienced back. He finished 
second to All-ACC halfback Alan White, who led the league in rushing 
with 586 yards. Frederick gained 254 yards and was the club's top 
scorer with 32 points. 

Bridwell saw 204 minutes of action, but most of it was spent on de- 
fense. He and rising soph Ralph Brandewiede are expected to handle 
most of the quarterbacking. Mickey Walker, who kicked five field goals, 
may also see some work at QB. 

Fullback Brian Piccolo and halfback Wayne Welborn are two soph 
backs capable of breaking into the starting backfield. Other first-year 
varsity men figuring largely in the plans include end John Grimes, tackle 
Tommy Brawley, center Bill Hopkins and guard James Mayo. 



36 



MARYLAND vs WAKE FOREST 29 SEPTEMBER 



piedmont BOWL 

8:00 P.M. (E.S.T. » 

al Bow man I fcraj Stadium i ifi.s 1 1 i 

Winston-Salem, N.C. 

FACTS ABOUT THE DEACONS 

CONFERENCE: Atlantic Ooasl 

l.( >( '.VI K »\: Winston-Salem. N.C. 
HEAD COACH: Billv Hiildebrand 
COLORS: Old Gold and Black 
ENl;< (LLMENT: 2,869 
TYPE OFFENSE: Split-T 
L961 OVERALL RECORD: Won 1. Losl 6 
Midi A(V KEOOKD: Won 3, Lost 4 
PUBLICITY DIRECTOR: Marvin Francis 




Billy Hildebrand 



TERPS - RECORD AGAINST THE DEACONS 

(Maryland: Won 7. Losl 3, Tied 1) 



Marylana Wake Forest 

1917 29 13 

1943 13 7 

1944 39 

1954 13 13 

1955 28 7 

i<>..t; 6 o 



Maryland Wake Forest 

1957 27 

1958 34 

1959 7 10 

1960 14 13 

1961 10 7 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 147, Wake Forest 143 
1962 CAPTAIN: To be select-cd 
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 14— Lost 17 







1962 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


22 


at Army 


Sept. 




Maryland (night) 


Oct. 


6 


Clemson 


Oct. 


13 


at South Carolina (night) 


Oct. 


20 


at Virginia 


Oct. 


27 


at North Carolina 


Nov. 


3 


at Tennessee 


Nov. 


10 


at Virginia Tech 


Nov. 


17 


Duke 


Npv. 


oo 


N.C. Stal • 



1961 YARDSTICK 

Maryland W. F. 

First Downs 13 9 

Rushing Yardage 104 

Passing Yardage 98 133 

Passes 9-21 6-18 

Passes intercepted by .... 2 1 

Punts 4-40 5-41 

Fumbles Lost .... 1 1 

Yards Penalized 21 25 

Maryland , 7 0: 

Wake Forest .700 — 7 

SCORING: Maryland: Brown 83. 
punt return CHannigan kick': Hanni- 
gan 22, field goal. 

Wake Forest : Frederick 2. run 
• Walker kick). 



37 



The Wolfpacks' 1962 Outlook 

North Carolina State will open the 1962 football season without an 
experienced quarterback and only one letterman end. How the Wolf- 
pack adjusts to this lack of experience will more than likely decide how 
Earle Edwards' team does in his ninth season in Raleigh. 

Roman Gabriel's departure leaves a decided hole to fill, especially 
since the all-America quarterback had been over 50 per cent of the 
Wolf pack's offense in each of the past two seasons, and had called offen- 
sive signals on all but 23 plays in 1960 and 1961. Top candidates to re- 
place Gabriel are senior Bill Kriger and junior Jim Rossi, two complete 
opposites in size and style of play from the 6'4", 225-pound, Gabriel. Rossi 
(5-10, 165), and Kriger (5-9, 160) are the option-type runners, necessi- 
tating Edwards to make adjustments in the Wolf pack's offense to fit 
these two skillful signal callers. These spunky youngsters are capable of 
doing a fine job, but their inexperience could be a drawback, and neither 
possesses the standout passing abilities of Gabriel. 

How does Edwards look at his 1962 team? "We are going to try to 
put to best use the personnel we have. We want to block and run better 
offensively, something that we didn't do too well last year. We are not 
as set as we generally are after a (Spring practice, and we will still be 
doing some juggling after we get back in September." 

Anybody playing end will be new. Don Montgomery played three 
games last year as a sophomore before breaking his leg in the Alabama 
game. He represents the most experienced performer at end and is the 
only letterman. Ron Krall, John Golden, Bob Faircloth, and sophomores 
Bill Hall, Ray Barlow and James Martin make up the end corps. 

G"f the 15 lettermen returning, three each are at tackle, center, guard 
and halfback, with two at the fullback position. 

A lot of newcomers will have prominent spots in the Wolfpank's line- 
up, with sophomore Steve Parker right now the number one man at 
right tackle. Bert Wilder, recalled into the Army after the third 1961 
game, will be a big help at tackle and will rank as one of the Atlantic 
Coast Conference's top linemen. Chuck Wachtel and Fred Bernhard are 
the other tackle lettermen, who will be pushed by sophomores Genn 
Sasser and Bob Cooch. 

Right guard should be strong with lettermen Skip Matthews and Bill 
Sullivan, an excellent blocker, there. Harry Puckett is backed by soph- 
omores Bob Bussard, Silas Snow and Bennett. Williams at left guard. 
Experienced gained by Oscar Overcash, Bob Royer and Walt Kudryan 
at center last year should make that position better. All are lettermen, 
but the best linebacker may well be sophomore Lou DeAngelis. 

There is a good corps of fullbacks with Roger Moore and Dave Houtz, 
both lettermen, running ahead of sophomore Pete Falzarano. Houtz did 
almost all the Pack's punting in 1960, averaging 38.9 yards per try. 

Joe Scarpati, one of the finest all-around backfield performers in the 
ACC, heads the three lettermen halfbacks. Joe, a top receiver and an 
outstanding defensive performer, will be at wingback, while Tony Kos- 
zarsky and Mike Clark will be at left halfback. Clark may be used at 
wingback also. Top sophomore halfbacks include Jimmy Guin, a fine de- 
fensive back; Mike Malone, a quick youngster; and hard-running Shelby 
Mansfield. 

Top personnel missing from last year's 16 graduated lettermen are 
Gabriel, who has signed with vhe Los Angeles Rams; Tom Del linger, 
defensive' secondary specialist who was signed by Buffalo; all-confer- 
ence end Johnny Morris; Bill Harden at end; guard Joe Bushofsky; full- 
back Jim D'Antonio, the leading rusher with a 4.9 per carry average, 
and halfback Al Taylor. 

38 



MARYLAND vs NORTH CAROLINA STATE 6 OCTOBER 



1:30 P.M. (E.S.T.) 

al Riddlck Stadium (21,000) 

Raleigh, N.C. 

FACTS ABOUT THE WOLFPACK 

CONFERENCE: Atlantic Coasl 

LOCATION: Raleigh, N.C. 
HEAD COACH: Earle Edwards 
COLORS: Rod and White 
ENROLLMENT: 7,200 
TYPE OFFENSE: Winged-T, Slotbarik 
1901 OVERALL RECORD: Won 4, Dost 6 
1961 ACC RECORD: W on 3, Lost I 
PUBLICITY DIRECTOR: Frank Wccdon 




Earle Edwards 



TERPS' RFCORD AGAINST THE WOLFPACK 
(Maryland: Won 9. Lost 6, Tied 3) 





Maryland 


N.C. 


State 




Maryland 


N.C. 


State 


1909 







33 


1950 


IS 




16 


1917 


6 




10 


1951 


53 







1921 


6 




6 


1954 


42 




14 


1922 


7 




6 


1956 


25 




14 


1923 


26 




12 


1957 


13 




48 


1924 










1958 


21 




6 


1946 


7 




28 


1959 


33 




28 


1947 










1960 


10 




13 


1949 


14 




6 


1961 


10 




7 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 292, N.C. Stale 247 
1962 CAPTAIN: Skip Matthews 
Lettermen RETURNING: 15— Lost 16 







1962 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


22 


at North Carolina 


Sept. 


29 


Clemson 


Oct. 


6 


Maryland 


Oct. 


13 


at Nebraska 


Oct. 


20 


Mississippi Southern at 
Mobile. Ala. 


Oct. 


27 


at Duke 


Nov. 


3 


at Georgia 


Nov. 


10 


at South Carolina 


Nov. 


IT 


Virginia 


Nov. 


22 


at Wake Forest 



1961 YARDSTICK 

Maryland N.C.S. 

Kirst Downs 14 11 

Rushing Yardage 146 125 

Passing Yardage 105 62 

Passes 10-17 7-16 

Passes intercepted by .... 1 1 

Punts 6-38 6-43 

Fumbles Lost 

Yards Penalized 30 40 

Maryland 7 3 0—10 

N.C. State 7—7 

SCORING: Maryland: Collins 8. pass 

from Shiner (Hannigan kicki; Hanni- 
gan 21. field goal. 

N.C. State: Scarpati 5. run (Shaffer 
kick". 



39 



The Tar Heels' 1962 Outlook 

University of North Carolina football supporter's arte excited about 
their 1962 team because of the inauguration of the three-platoon sys- 
tem and the prospects of a much speedier contingent than has been 
fielded at Chapel Hill in a long time. 

The three-platoon plan frankly is similar to that used by L. S. U., im- 
pressive conqueror of the Tar Heels last season. Thirty-three players 
will carry the load and operate as alternating units. 

One of the calculated merits of the system is that it boosts squad 
morale and this was borne out when a big lift in spirit was in evidence 
in off-season practice. 

Only 14 lettermen were available for spring work and the squad has 
suffered some severe losses of key men such as backs Ray Farris, Gib 
Carson, Joe Davies and Bob Elliott and lineman Jim LeCompte, but 
Coach Jim Hickey thinks the 1962 personnel ; 'will be as good if not 
better" than in 1961. 

The squad fell heir to an excellent group of rising sophomores who 
will help supply the more bountiful speed. 

Backfield speedsters include Joe McLamb, Dave Braine, Ronnie Jack- 
son, Tom Brook, Ward Marslender, Roger Smith, Tommy Ward and 
Dave Henry. All are breakaway runners of varying degrees, with Jack- 
son, at 168 weighing ten pounds more than he did as a freshman, a real 
sensation. Jackson, from Rocky Mount, N. C, turned in many dazzling 
runs on the 1961 freshman team. 

Big Ken Willard, another rising sophomore, picked up in the spring 
where he left off as a freshman and stamped himself as potentially one 
of North Carolina's great all-time fullbacks. 

There had been some concern about the quarterback position where 
varsity experience is lacking, but Hickey is highly pleased with the 
promise of Gary Black, Sandy Kinney, George Boutselis and Jim Galla- 
gher. Charlie Shaffer, brilliant until he was injured as a freshman, plans 
to join the squad in the fall.. 

John Flournoy is a letter-man defensive quarterback. 

Center-linebacker Joe Craver is tops among the linemen and the team's 
leader for all-star honors. Eleven other lettermen are available for line 
duties. Tackle Vic Esposito was one of the great stars of the spring. 
A happy shift saw Bruce Greene moved from guard to end and he wound 
up on the second unit in spring work Another non-letterman, tackle 
Gene Sigrnon, is especially promising, along with rising sophs Clint Eudy 
(guard) and John Hill (tackle). 

There is plenty of weight on this squad but it's the improved speed 
that has impressed most. The team promises to have sound kicking and 
passing. Four lettermen pass-catching ends are John Runco, Steve 
Yates, Bob Lacey and John Hammett. 

The three platoons will not be firmed up until pre-season fall practice 
but at spring practice end Hickey had spotted 56 players from whom the 
33 likely will be chosen. 

North Carolina will play a rough but exciting schedule with Ohio 
State, Michigan State and Notre Dame replacing L. S. U., Tennessee and 
Miami. Others are the usual Atlantic Coast Conference foes. The Ohio- 
State-Michigan State Games are back-to-back, the second and third en- 
gagements of the season, both away. 

40 



MARYLAND vs NORTH CAROLINA 13 OCTOBER 



2:00 P.M. I E.S.T.) 

al Ki nan Memorial Stadium I 13,971 i 

Ohapel Hill, N.C. 

FACTS ABOUT THE TAR HEELS 

CONFERENCK : Atlantic Coast 

l.i >CA TION: Chapel Hill. N.C. 

HEAD COACH: Jim Hickey 

('(>!,( )i;S: I : h i , - .- ii i< I White 

KN'Rf •! LMKNT: 9.082 

TYPE OFFKNSK: Wingcd-T 

1961 OVERALL RECORD: Won 5, Losl 5 

l'.'Cl ACC RECORD: Won 4, Lost ■ 

PUBLICITY DIRECTOR: Bob Quim\ 




Jim Hickey 



TERPS' RECORD AGAINST THE TAR HEELS 
(Maryland: Won 11, Lost 16, Tied J) 



Maryland North Car. 



Maryland North Car. Maryland North Car. 



1020 


13 





1929 





43 


1953 


26 





1921 


7 


16 


1930 


21 


2S 


1954 


33 





1922 


3 


27 


1935 





33 


1955 


25 


7 


1923 


14 





1336 





14 


1956 


6 


34 


1924 


6 





1946 







1957 


21 


7 


1925 





16 


1947 





19 


1958 





27 


1926 


14 


6 


194S 


20 


49 


1959 


14 


7 


1927 


6 


7 


1950 


7 


7 


1960 


22 


19 


192S 


19 


26 


1951 


14 


7 


1961 


8 


14 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 299, North Carolina 446 

1962 CO-CAPTAINS: Center, Joe Craver; Halfback. Ward Marslend 

LETTERMEN RETURNING: 16— Lost 22 







1962 SCHEDULE 


Sep! 


22 


North Carolina State 


Sept. 


29 


at Ohio State 


Oct. 


6 


at Michigan State 


Oct. 


13 


Maryland 


Oct. 


20 


South Carolina 


Oct. 


27 


Wake Forest 


Nov. 


3 


at Clemson 


Nov. 


10 


at Virginia 


Nov. 


IT 


at Notre Dame 


Nov. 


24 


Duke 



1961 YARDSTICK 

Maryland N.C. 

First Downs 7 15 

Rushing Yardage 62 

Passing Yardage 106 46 

Passes o-17 4-16 

Passes intercepted bv .... 3 3 

Punt.- 5-33 7-23 

Fumbles Lost 2 1 

"lards Penalized 55 55 

Maryland 8 0—8 

North Carolina 14 — 14 

SCORING: Maryland: Burton 3. run 
i Collins, pass from Novak'. 

North Carolina: Beck. recovered 
fumble in end zone (Elliott kick': 
Ferris, recovered fumble in end zone 
(Elliott kick' 



41 



The Hurricanes' 1962 Outlook 

Obstacles of major proportions stand between University of Miami 
and a 1962 football season being as successful as the 1961 campaign 
which carried the team into the Liberty Bowl. 

Probably biggest is the gigantic schedule sending the Hurricanes 
against the best in the nation. The slate includes the awesome likes of 
Alabama, national and Cotton Bowl champions of 1961 . . . Louisiana 
State, Orange Bowl titlist and member of '61's first five . . . North- 
western of the Big Ten . . . Texas Christian, the team which spoiled a 
perfect Ohio State season last year with a tie and knocked University 
of Texas out of a possible No. 1 national rating by upsetting the Long- 
horns . . . Maryland, ranked among the first 10 during one period in 
1961 . . . Kentucky . . . powerhouse Pittsburgh . . . Florida . . . Air 
Force Academy . . . and rising 'Florida State. 

Miami could easily as not wind up playing not one, but several teams 
capable of climbing into the elite first 10. 

The Hurricanes must face these giants with a team surrounded by 
several question marks — 'major of which is pass receiving. While the 
talented George Mira is expected to be improved over his 1961 brilliance 
as a passer, Miami must go with a whole new corps of pass receivers. 
On the gone-but-not-soom-to be-forgotten list are two of the greatest re- 
reivers in 37 years of University of Miami football, All-America Bill 
Miller and Larry Wilson. Miller was third best in the nation as a catcher 
last year. 

Lettermen Ben Rizzo and James Simon have moved in to take over 
the jobs of Miller and Wilson, but hold little experience as receivers — 
their past work was virtually all defense. Newcomers Bob Werl, Bill 
Spear and Bill Sparks all displayed potentials as receivers in the spring, 
but nobody dare forecast what's ahead for them until it can be seen 
what they can do under fire. 

Fullback, where Miami lost its two best (James Vollenweider and Sam 
Fernandez) is another of the chief positions under construction. 

Other problems confronting Andy Gustafson and his coaching staff as 
they go into this most powerful and colorful schedule since the found- 
ing of the school, are developing depth at center and fashioning line- 
backers, breaking in all new men at right halfback and finding men to 
replace graduating stalwarts o>f the first and alternate teams — tackle 
Bill Watts, guards Bob Eggert and Bill Diamond, and center Charley 
Livingston. 

To achieve these objectives there have been shifts in personnel. Nick 
Ryder has been converted from halfback to fullback, and Leo Lillimagi 
is now a middle linebacking guard instead of a center-linebacker. John 
Bennett has been moved from the backfield to end where it's believed 
he will help in pass receiving. Ryder, coaches feel, could become Miami's 
strongest runner at fullback since Don Bosseler, but depth looms a prob- 
lem at the line plunging post. 

Twenty-two lettermen in all who helped UM sweep its last five regu- 
lar-season games for a 7-3 record and earn the Liberty Bowl bid last 
fall form the backbone of the 1962 Hurricanes. 

In all, the Miami squad includes 13 seniors, 21 juniors and 24 sopho- 
mores bubbling with enthusiasm. 

More team speed is anticipated in 1962 . . . punting should be good 
again with Harvey Foster returning and getting added help from new- 
comer Mark Panther. 

42 



MARYLAND vs MIAMI 19 OCTOBER 



8:15 P.M. (E.S.T.) 
;u Orange Bowl stadium <72,8S0) 

Miami, Fla. 

FACTS ABOUT THE HURRICANES 

CONFERENCE: [ndependenl 

LOCATION: Coral Gables. Fla. 

HEAD COACH: Andy Gust a Ism; 

( •( M ■( >KS: ( .-ran-,'. ( Iiccn, Whit 

ENROLLMENT: 14,500 

TYPE OFFENSE: Multiple I 

1961 OVERALL RECORD: Won 7. Lost 1 

PUBLICITY DIRECTOR: George Gallet 



-' \ 




Andy Gustafson 



TERPS' RECORD AGAINST THE HURRICANES 
(Maryland: Won 5, Lost 2) 





Mary Is 


nri 


M 


iami 




Maryland 


Miami 


1948 


27 






13 


1956 


6 


13 


1949 


13 









1957 


16 


6 


1953 


30 









1958 


26 


14 


1954 


7 






9 









TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 125. Miami 55 
1962 CAPTAIN: To be appointed 
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 22— Lost 12 



1962 SCHEDULE 

Sept. 15 at Pittsburgh 

Sept. 29 Texas Christian University 

Oct. 5 Florida State 

Oct. 13 at LSU 

Oct. 19 Maryland 

Oct. 27 at Air Force 

Nov. 2 Kentucky 

Nov. 10 at Alabama 

Nov. 23 Northwestern 

Dec. 1 Florida 



43 



The Gamecocks' 1962 Outlook 

The Gamecocks have 23 lettermen returning plus some promising ris- 
ing sophomores from last year's outstanding freshman team and pros- 
pects are for improvement over the 1961 team which had a 4-6-0 record. 

Whether this improvement can be translated into more wins remains 
to be seen as the schedule includes all seven Other Atlantic Coast Con- 
ference members plus Northwestern of the Big Ten, Georgia and Detroit. 

The Gamecocks lack experience at the vital quarterback slot where 
six of seven candidates are sophomores. Only 152^pound senior specialist 
Tommy Pile her has lettered at the position. 

However, Coach Marvin Bass doesn't consider quarterback a trouble 
spot, saying "in sophomores Dan Reeves and Jack McCathern we feel 
we have two quarterbacks with outstanding potential and despite their 
inexperience they should be able to do the job. 

The guard position was weakened somewhat by the academic loss of 
lettermen Mike Kirkpatrick and Howard Sohm but there are four other 
lettermen available and tackles Paul Kilzer and Steve (Lil' Abner) Cox, 
both sophomores, will likely be iswitched to guard. 

Center is solid with tri-captain Richard Lomas and Everett Crafts 
providing experience and 225 pound sophomore Jim Johnson a bright 
newcomer. 

At tackle, the Gamecocks have All-America candidate Jim Moss, who 
was All-AOC, All-State and National Lineman of the Week in 1961, and 
Joel Goodrich, a 235 pounder, heading a list of five lettermen. 

End its the Gamecocks' strongest position with five lettermen and four 
or five other good prospects. Tri-captain John Caskey, who caught 15 
passes in '61, and Ken Lester, who caught eight, will be the senior 
starters. 

Ail-America candidate Billy Gambrell heads the halfback corps. As 
a junior he made All-ACC and All-State last year while leading the 
Gamecocks in scoring, pass receiving and rushing average. He was sec- 
ond to Dick Day in rushing yardage and also punted, passed, returned 
punts and kickoffs and played defense. Junior Sammy Anderson will 
switch to right halfback to start opposite Gambrell and bright sopho- 
mores Marty Rosen and Larry Gill will back them up. 

Day, who gained 400 yards in 1961, heads the fullbacks, backed up by 
sophomore Pete DiVenere and defensive linebacking specialist Ed Holler. 

The Gamecocks go to the three unit system this fall with each team 
named for a particular breed of fighting Gamecock. The two way team 
will be the "Warhorses," the offensive specialists will be the "Bush- 
whackers" and the defensive specialists the "Stonewalls." 

"Barring injuries and other factors we cannot anticipate," says Bass, 
"we should be considerably stronger than we were last year." 



44 



MARYLAND vs SOUTH CAROLINA 27 OCTOBER 



2:00 P.M. (E.S.T.) 

ai Byrd Stadiu n (35,000) 

College Park. Md. 

FACTS ABOUT THE GAMECOCKS 

CONFERENCE: Atlantic Coasl 
LOCATION: Colunil)ia, S.C. 
HEAD COACH: Marvin Bass 
i •( >i.< >i:s; Garnel and Black 
ENROLLMENT: 7,500 (including Ext. Div.» 
TYPE OFFENSE: Slot-T 
1961 OVERALL RECORD: Won 4, Lost 6 
l'.Mil ACC KI-:CORD: Won 3. Losl I 
PUBLICITY DIRECTOR: Tom Price 




Marvin Bass 



TERPS' RECORD AGAINST THE GAMECOCKS 
I Maryland Won 11, Lost 7. Tied 0) 





Maryland 


S. Car. 




Maryland 


S. Car 


1926 





12 


1953 


24 


6 


1927 


26 





1954 


20 





1928 


7 


21 


1955 


27 





1929 


6 


26 


1956 





13 


1945 


19 


13 


1957 


10 


6 


1946 


17 


21 


1958 


10 


6 


1947 


19 


13 


1959 


6 


22 


1948 


19 


7 


1960 


15 





1949 


14 


7 


1961 


10 


20 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 279, South Carolina 193. 

1962 TRI-CAPTAINS: End John Caskey, Center Richard Lomas, Full- 
back Dick Day. 

LETTERMEN RETURNING: 23— Lost 13. 







1962 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


22 


at Northwestern 


Sept. 


29 


at Duke 


Oct. 


6 


Georgia (night" 


Oct. 


13 


Wake Forest (night) 


Oct. 


20 


at North Carolina 


Oct. 


27 


at Maryland 


Nov. 


3 


Virginia 


Nov. 


10 


N.C. State 


Nov. 


17 


at Detroit (night' 


Nov. 


24 


at Clemson 



1961 YARDSTICK 

Maryland S. C. 

First Downs 13 16 

Rushing Yardage 70 242 

Passing Yardage 194 72 

Passes 16-33 5-U 

Passes intercepted bv .... 1 3 

Punts 5-35.4 5-32.4 

Fumbles Lost 1 

Yards Penalized 25 35 

South Carolina 6 7 7—20 

Maryland 3 7 0—10 

SCORING: Maryland: Hannigan FG 
_'ti: Collins 9, pass from Shiner 
(Hannigan kick'. 

;th Carolina: Gambrell. 12 run 
i kick failed'; Gambrell 4. pass from 
Costen i Findley kick': Caskey 5. pass 
from Costen (Findley kick'. 



45 



The Nittany Lions' 1962 Outlook 

Coach Rip Engle, who'll be seeking his 13th straight winning season 
at Penn State, is neither over-optimistic nor over-pessimistic concern- 
ing next fall. Well aware that last year's strong finish and Gator Bowl 
triumph presages a high pre-season rating for his Nittany Lions, Engle 
is treading the middle of the road, and apparently with reason. 

With 20 lettermen returning, a first eleven on a par with any in the 
East, and players like end Dave Robinson, halfback Roger Kochman, and 
tackle Charlie Sieminski on hand, Penn State appears fairly well 
equipped to make a worthy defense of its Lambert Trophy. 

On the other hand, there are potential danger spots, and trouble oould 
lie ahead if fall practice fails to produce depth on the line and if new or 
relatively untested players on the second and third units fail to develop 
quickly in the face of a schedule that calls for games against Navy, Air 
Force, Rice, Army, and Syracuse in the first five weeks of the campaign. 

Spring drills ended much as they began — with Engle still looking for 
enough talented performers to man his second and third units and for 
a quarterback who stood out above all others as the replacement for 
Galen Hall. Generally, this year's spring practice was below par, partly 
because only five lettermen participated (15 others were engaged in 
baseball or track or excused by Engle), and partly because most of the 
newcomers and inexperienced holdovers simply failed to take charge of 
open positions. 

Engle is convinced that his quarterback job will be in capable hands 
by the opening game, but he's a coach grown accustomed to better than 
"capable" quarterbacks (Hall, Richie Lucas, Milt Plum, etc.). "We have 
four pretty good quarterbacks right now, and Liske should give us five," 
he said, "but we still don't have a great one. Perhaps a great one will 
emerge in September." 

There is depth, experience, and improved speed among running backs. 
Of the top six rushers on last years' squad, the first five will return — 
Roger Kochman, Ruddy Torris, Dave Hayes, Junior Powell, and Ai Gur- 
sky. Penn State ranked sixth nationally in total offense last year, and 
if the line produces adequate blocking the backs eertainly are on hand 
for another top offensive effort. Kochman (666 yards rushing and a 5.2 
average, 9 TDs, 10 pass catches for 226 yards) is Penn State's best run- 
ning back since Lenny Moore and should have a banner year. He and 
Gursky (who might be switched to right half) skipped spring drills for 
baseball. Bud Yost looks like the best of the freshman backs. 

Says Engle: "W T e have five returning players of potential All-American 
caliber in Robinson, Kochman, Sieminski, Blasenstein, and Rosdahl. We 
should have a strong first unit, adquate size, good backs, more back- 
field speed, adequate running and passing, and capable defenders in the 
secondary. Our line will lack good speed and we must improve our pass 
receiving. Line depth, especially at end, center, and guard, is our chief 
concern because we proved by our recent success with alternating units 
that it takes 25 or 30 good players to succeed on our level of competi- 
tion. A great deal depends on how quickly replacements or players in 
new positions can develop in the face of our tough early games. The 
depth potential is here, but spring practice didn't prove it." 



46 



MARYLAND vs PENN STATE 3 NOVEMBER 

1:30 P.M. (E.S.T.) 

al Beaver Stadium < 16,000) 

University Park, Pa. 



FACTS ABOUT THE NITTANY LIONS 

CONFERENCE: Independent 
i.( NATION: University Park, I 
HEAD COACH: Charles A. < Kip) Engle 
C( ;).( HIS: Blue and w hite 
ENROLLMENT: 16,000 
OFFENSE: Multlple-T 
L961 RECORD: Won 7, Losl 3, Defeated 
Georgia Teoh in Gator Bowl, 30- 1 . » 
ITBLIcTTY DIRECTOR: Jim Tarman 



«• 4R^ , 




TERPS - RECORD AGAINST THE NITTANY LIONS 
(Maryland: Won 1, Lost 7, Tied 0) 



Maryland Penn State 

1917 57 

1937 14 21 

1938 33 

1939 12 



Maryland Penn Statt 

1943 -15 

1944 19 34 

1960 9 28 

1961 21 17 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 63, Penn State 247 
1962 CAPTAIN: Center, Joe Galardi 
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 20— Lost 10 







1962 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


22 


Navy 


Sept. 


29 


Air F 


i h • 


6 


at Rice 


( ta1 . 


13 


at Army 


Oct. 


20 


Syracuse 


Oct. 


27 


at California 


Nov. 


3 


Maryland 


Nov. 


10 


Virginia 


Nov. 


17 


at Holy Cross 


Nov. 


24 


at Pittsburgh 



1961 YARDSTICK 

Maryland 
First Downs 1 1 


P. S. 

18 

269 

151 

9-22 

2 

4-39 

1 

85 

0—21 
5—17 

nd 7. 

kirk' : 
Hanni- 

Shiner 

(pass 

n Hall 

goal : 


yards Rushing 128 

Yards Passing 165 

Passes 1 

Pass intercepted by .... 1 
Punts 6-47 


Fumbles Lost 2 

Yards Penalized 31 


Marvland 14 7 

Perm State 6 6 

SCORING: Maryland: Barlu 
pass from Shiner (Harmigan 
Brown 9, pass from Shiner « 
gan kick); Collins 8. pass from 
(Hannigan kirk'. 

Penn State: Kochman 2. run 
incomplete >: Gursky 1, pass froi 
(run failed': Jones 28. field 
Safety intentional ■ . 



47 



The Blue Devils' 1962 Outlook 

Duke's linemen are small in comparison with other college teams in 
the land and last year they had trouble with the heftier boys of Georgia 
Tech, Clemson and Michigan but they ended up the season with a roar- 
ing win over giants of Notre Dame and perhaps have learned that the 
"bigger they come the harder they fall." 

They are all hard-hitters, full of fight and with Ball Murray's amaz- 
ingly varied offense should be able to do the job. 

In Walt Rappold and Gil Garner, Duke is blessed with two of the great 
quarterbacks of the nation, either of which could be the No. 1 man on 
any team. 

Mark Leggett is a great right halfback and late in the season Billy 
Futrell showed the signs expected of him and he should make a great 
running mate with Leggett. Both are terrific runners. 

The big problem is at fullback where all the lettermen are gone and 
Duke will have to depend on new players at that important post. How- 
ever, there are some likely looking candidates for the job. 

Pete Widener, Ed Chesnutt and Stan Crisson give Duke three of the 
finest pass-snagging ends in football. They play the "lonesome end" spot. 
Zo Potts is a veteran strong-side end. Art Gregory and Dick Havens, 
tackles, John Markas and Jean Berry, guards, and Paul Bengel, center 
are all veterans at their posts. 

The "darkhioirse" of the Duke team is Jay Wilkinson, son of the famed 
Oklahoma football coach. As a sophomore last year this boy was used 
as a swing end and as safety man. He is a great pass receiver and as a 
punt returner he just barely missed breaking the all-time records for 
punt returns last season. 

He was shifted to left halfback in spring drills and was a sensation 
at his new position. This boy does everything well and may well end up 
with a lot of honors at the close of the 1962 season. 

Coach Murray says: 

"The 1962 football team has more veterans returning than has been 
the case in many years. Six of the starting linemen and two starters 
from the backfield of the first unit will be available as well as five line- 
men and one back from the alternate unit. 

"As can be easily seen, the Duke problem for 1962 lies in the back- 
field where replacements at the fullback and halfback spots must be 
found. 

"In a nutshell, we are optimistic over the prospects of having a sea- 
soned football team. Since football is a game of spirit, the won and lost 
record will depend directly on the aggressive attitude of the boys who 
form this 1962 squad. We think they have the spirit that is necessary." 



48 



MARYLAND vs DUKE 10 NOVEMBER 



2:<>0 I'.M. (K.S.T.) 

.ii Duke Stadium (57,500) 

Durham, N.C. 

FACTS ABOUT THE BLUE DEVILS 

CONFERENCE: Atlantic Coasl 

location: Duo ham, N.C. 

HEAD COACH: William D. (Bill) Murraj 

c H.OIIS: Royal Blue and While 

ENROLLMENT: 6,100 

TYPE OFFENSE: Duke-T 

L963 OVERALL RECORD: Won 7, Lost 3 

L961 AOC RECORD: Won 5. Losl 1 

1M15LICITY DIRECTOR: Glenn E. (Ted) Mann 




William D. 
(Bill) Murray 



TERPS" RECORD AGAINST THE BLUE DEVILS 

i Maryland Won 1, Lo-i 8) 





Maryl 


and 


Duke 




M 


aryland 


Duke 


1932 


ii 




34 


1948 




12 


13 


1933 


7 




38 


1950 




26 


14 


1!)11 







50 


1957 







11 


1942 

1DI7 



7 




42 
19 


I960 




7 


20 



TOTAL POINTS: Duke 244, Maryland 59 

1962 CAPTAIN: Johnny Markas, Guard; Alternate Captain Walt 
Rappold, quarterback 

LETTERMEN RETURNING: 24— Lost 12 







1962 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


22 


at Southern California 


Sept. 


29 


at South Carolina 


Oct. 


6 


Florida at Jacksonville 


Oct. 


13 


California 


Oct. 


20 


at CI ems on 


Oct. 


27 


N.C. State 


Nov. 


3 


Georgia Tech 


Nov. 


10 


Maryland 


Nov. 


17 


at Wake Forest 


Nov. 


24 


at North Carolina 



49 



The Tigers' 1962 Outlook 

Nearly half of the first three teams will be missing this fall when the 
Clemson Tigers open their schedule against Georgia Tech, and Coach 
Frank Howard, starting his 23rd season as head coach, faces the task 
of filling these spots with adequate replacements. 

Four starting linemen and three from the backfield are missing from 
the first team while five have vacated spots on the alternate unit. Clem- 
son's mid-line was left especially bare with both right guards and three 
centers having finished. These five men also serve as linebackers. 

There are 22 lettermen returning with center the only position with 
no letter wearer. One non-lettering- junior and three sophomores are 
vieing for the center spot with sophomores Ted Bunton, Dave Haladay 
and Bruce McClure the top candidates right now. 

End and quarterback appear to be the strongest positions. Five vet- 
eran flankmen return and three signal callers from last year are back. 
Guard has three lettermen, tackle has four, halfback four and fullback 
two. And punter Eddie Werntz has another year. 

Dave Hynes, next year's captain and a regular right tackle last year, 
has switched to the left side; ends Bob Poole and Coleman Glaze and 
quarterback Joe Anderson make up the quartet of returnees from the 
first team. 

Lettermen Howard is counting on heavily are guards Walter Cox, 
Jack Aaron and Clark Gaston; tackles Don Chuy, Joseph Balles and 
Wade Hall; ends Oscar Thorsland, Lou Fogle and Johnny Case; quar- 
terbacks Jim Parker and Tommy Black; halfbacks Mack Matthews, Jerry 
Taylor and Elmo Lam; fullbacks Bill McGuirt and Jimmy Howard; and 
defensive specialist Rodney Rogers. 

Lam did not participate in spring practice due to baseball and Mat- 
thews was not in school last year but expects to re-enter in September. 
Matthews did, however, participate in spring practice. Lam has been 
elected alternate captain for next year. 

Parker - , as a sophomore, led the team in total offense with 975 yards 
while Anderson was a close second with 841. Lam was the leading pass 
receiver a year ago with 237 yards on 17 snags and one touchdown. Last 
year's leading rusher and scorer (Ron Scrudato) is missing but Ander- 
son, Lam, Parker and McGuirt ranked behind Scrudato in the rushing 
department. 

Quite a few players from last year's 3-2 freshman team are advanc- 
ing to the varsity and Howard has these sprinkled among his second, 
third and fourth units. Only one rising sophomore was listed on the first 
team after spring practice (Center Ted Bunton.'; and on the alternate 
unit were center Dave Haladay, tackle Johnny Boyette and halfback 
Jim Skiffey; and on the third team were center Bruce McClure, guard 
Carew Alvarez, and Dave Brown, quarterback Jimmy Bell, halfbacks 
Billy Ward and Hal Davis and fullback Pat Crain. 



50 



MARYLAND vs CLEMSON 17 NOVEMBER 



1 :30 P.M. (E.S.T.) 

al Byrd Stadium (35,000) 

College Park, M<i. 

FACTS ABOUT THE TIGERS 

CONFERENCE: Atlantic Coast 
LOCATION: Clemson, S.C. 
HEAD COACH: Frank Howard 
COLORS: Purple and Orange 

ENROLLMENT: 4,300 

TYPE OFFENSE: T and Split-']' 

L961 OVERALL RECORD: Won 5, Lost 5 

1961 CONFERENCE RECORD: Won 3, Losl 3 

PUBLICITY DIRECTOR: Bob Bradley 




Frank 1 1 •- ai 'I 



TERPS' RECORD AGAINST THE TlGERS 
(Mai viand: Won 6, Lost 2, Tied 1) 





Mary 


and 


CI 


emson 




Maryland 


CI 


emson 


1952 


28 









1957 


7 




26 


1953 


20 









1958 







8 


1954 


16 









1959 


28 




25 


1955 


25 






12 


1960 


19 




17 


1956 


6 






6 


1961 


24 




21 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 173, Clemson 115 

1962 CO-CAPTAINS: Tackle, Dave Hynes; Halfback, Elmo Lam 

LETTERMEN RETURNING: 22— Lost 17 







1962 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


22 


at Georgia Tech 


Sept. 


29 


at N.C. State 


Oct. 


6 


at Wake Forest 


Oct. 


13 


Georgia 


Oct. 


20 


Duke 


Oct. 


27 


Auburn 


Nov. 


3 


North Carolina 


Nov. 


10 


at Furman 


Nov. 


17 


at Maryland 


Ni >\ . 


21 


South Carolina 



1961 YARDSTICK 

Maryland Clemson 

First Downs 18 16 

Rushing Yardage 99 177 

Passing Yardage 219 

Passes 19-26 9-19 

Passes intercepted bv ... 1 

Punts 6-37 4-36 

Fumbles Lost 3 -1 

Yards Penalized 20 25 

Maryland 7 7 7 3—24 

Clemson 14 7—21 

SCORING: Maryland: Davidson 3, 
p SS from Novak (Hannigan kick': 
Birlund 6. pass from Novak (Hanni- 
gan kicki : Banner 46. pass from Shin- 
er (Hannigan kick>: Hannigan 23. field 

Clemson: Scrudato 1. run (Arm- 
strong kick': King 34. pass from 
Parker (Armstrong kick': McGuirt 11. 
run 'Armstrong kick'. 



51 



The Cavaliers' 1962 Outlook 

All indications are that the University of Virginia will be moving 
faster on the road back in football in '62. 

Bill Ellas, who won wide recognition for his coaching accomplish- 
ments in his first season at Virginia last year, and his staff and the 
Cavalier squad have had their get-acquainted year. It was a good one 
for all hands. 

Offense was the main order of instruction during spring practice and 
results were generally good, (although very little new was seen in the 
spring game because of a washout. 

This year's squad gives the appearance of having more strength and 
depth in most positions. Twenty-one well distributed lettermen include 
nine who usually appeared witih the first unit last season. Several soph- 
omores will be heard from. 

Gary Cuozzo, the stylish senior who finished the '61 season as No. 1 
quarterback, is again top ranked. Pushing Cuozzo will be Carl Kuhn, 
also a senior, who is a left handed passer of note and one of the best 
ball-carriers on the squad. Pushing Kuhn will be Tom Hodges, 190-pound 
sophomore, who is also a fine runner and passer. Kuhn was a first unit 
halfback last year. 

Returning to left halfback, rated as the strongest backfield position, 
will be seniors Ted Rzempoluch and Bobby Freeman and juniors John 
Hepler and Henry Massie. Rzempoluch was the first unit left half last 
year. Hepler, who caught three touchdown passes for a single game 
school record last year, is the fastest back on the squad. 

Right halfback was left vacant by the Kuhn shift and the departure 
of Tony Ulehla, but Terry Sieg, a swift junior letterman, is considered 
to be a good replacement. Behind Sieg will be juniors Dick Lee and 
Walter Roll, and possibly Ralph Corley, of the new sophomore class. 

Returning to fullback will be senior Tom Griggs, the team's punter. 

There will be little change at the ends. The '61 regulars, Dennis An- 
drews and Myron McWilliams, are returning, along with previous squad 
members Joe Kehoe, Jim Hoffarth and Stuart Christhilf. Kenneth 
Reutlinger, 200, and Larry Dicky, 190, move up from the freshman team. 

Big Dave Graham, 6-4 and 240 and headed for another season of 
stardom, will be back at tackle, but Ronald Gassert, a three-year first 
line fixture will be missing. Replacing Gassert with no loss of strength 
wili be Dick Myers, 230 -pound transfer student going into his first var- 
sity season. Sophomore additions are Bob Kowalkowski, Ted Torok, Pat 
McFalls and John Lilly. 

Forming a strong corps of guards will be Turnley Todd, Bob Rowley, 
first unit; Duane Bickers and Bill Mason, second, and Bill Marko and 
Leonard Hrica, third. Rowley and Bickers were first last year. Todd re- 
turns after missing the '61 season because of illness. Hrica is the only 
sophomore in the group. 

The centers will be the same with the return of seniors Andy Moran 
and Bill Lang except for the addition of sophomore Chip Longley. 



52 



MARYLAND vs VIRGINIA 24 NOVEMBER 



1 :30 P.M. (E.S.T.) 

al Byrd stadium (35,000) 

College Park, Md. 

FACTS ABOUT THE CAVALIERS 

CONFERENCE: Atlantic Coast 
LOCATION: Charlottesville, Va. 
HEAD COACH: William T. Mm 
COL< >RS: < (rangi and Blue 
ENROLLMENT: 1,950 
TYPE OFFENSE: Split-! 
L961 OVERALL RECORD: Won I. Lost (', 
l!ii;i ACC RECORD: Won 2, Lost 1 
PUBLICITY DIRECTOR: Dick Turner 




Bill Ellas 



TERPS' RECORD AGAINST THE CAVALIERS 
(Maryland: Won 14, Lost 10, Tied 2) 



Maryland Virginia 



Maryland Virginia 



Maryland Virginia 



i:M!» 


13 





1933 





6 


1943 





39 


1925 





6 


19.; i 


20 





1944 


7 


18 


1IILV 


6 


6 


1935 


14 


7 


1945 


19 


1", 


1927 





21 


1936 


21 





1957 


12 





1928 


IS 


2 


1937 


3 





1958 


44 


6 




13 


13 


1938 


19 


27 


1959 


55 


L2 


L93I 


14 


6 


1939 


7 


12 


1960 


44 


L2 


1931 


7 


6 


1940 


6 


19 


1961 


16 


28 




6 


7 


1942 


27 


12 









TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 391, Virginia 278 
1962 CAPTAIN: To be selected 
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 21— Lost 10 







1962 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


22 


at William and Mary 


Oct. 


6 


Virginia Tech at Roanoke 


Oct. 


13 


V.MI 


Oct. 


20 


Wake Forest 


Oct. 


27 


Davidson 


Nov. 


3 


at South Carolina 


Nov. 


10 


North Carolina 


Nov. 


17 


at N.C. State 


N.>v. 


24 


at Maryland 


Dec. 


1 


at Rutgers 



1961 YARDSTICK 

Maryland Virginia 

First Downs 15 20 

Rushing Yardage 120 

Passing Yardage IT, 160 

Passes 15-26 13-29 

Passes intercepted by .... 1 3 

Punts 2-38 4-31 

Fumbles Lost 1 

Yards Penalized 58 59 

Maryland 7 3 6—16 

Virginia 8 7 13—28 

SCORING: Maryland: Brown 60. run 
'Hannigan kick > : Hannigan 20. field 
goal; Banner 8. run (pass failed >. 

Virginia: Heplcr 10. pass from 
Cuozzo (Kuhn pass from Cuoz: 
Hepler 9. pass from Cuozzo 'Rowley 
kick); Hepler 10. pass from Ci. 
(Rowley kick': Rzempoluch 97. pass 
interception ikick failed'. 



THE TERP PRESS 

-GEORGE BOWEN, The Associated Press (Baltimore) 
MAX FULLERTON, The Associated Press (Baltimore) 
GORDON, BEARD, The Associated Press (Baltimore) 
SAM FOGG, The United Press International (Baltimore) 

: BOB SERLING, The United Press Internationa! (Baltimore) 
EV GARDNER, Sports Editor, The Daily News (Washington) 

-HENRY FANKHAUSER, The Dc.ily News (Washington) 
MORRIS SIEGEL, Sports Department, The Evening Star (Washington) 
BILL PEELER, Sports Editor, The Evening Star (Washington) 
FRANCIS STANN, Columnist, The Evening Star (Washington) 

-STEVE GUBACK, Sports Department, The Evening Star (Washington) 
GEORGE HUBER, Sports Department, The Evening Star (Washington) 
DICK SLAY, Sports Department, The Evening Star (Washington) 
BUS HAM, Sports Editor, The Post and Times-Herald (Washington) 
SHIRLEY POVICH, Columnist, The Post and Times-Herald (Wash.) 
BOB ADDIE, Columnist, The Post and Times-Herald (Washington) 

: MARTI E ZAD, Sports Department, The Post and Times-Herald (Wash.) 
PAUL MENTON, Sports Editor, The Evening Sun (Baltimore) 

-BILL TANTON, Sports Department, The Evening Sun (Baltimore) 
RANDALL CASSELL, Columnist, The Evening Sun (Baltimore) 

-JIM WALKER, Sports Department, The Evening Sun (Baltimore) 
BOB MAISEL, Sports Editor, The Morning Sun (Baltimore) 

-LARRY NULL, Sports Department, The Morning Sun (Baltimore) 
AL FISCHER, Sports Department, The Morning Sun (Baltimore) 

-ED ATWATER, Sports Department, The Morning Sun (Baltimore) 
JOHN STEADMAN, Sports Editor, The News-Post (Baltimore) 
KARL FELDNER, Sports Department, The News-Post (Baltimore) 

'STEVE O'NEIL, Sports Department, The News-Post (Baltimore) 
J. SUTER KEGG, Sports Editor, The Evening Time s (Cumberland) 
C. V. BURNS, Sports Editor, The Morning News (Cumberland) 
DICK KELLY, Sports Editor, The Mail (Hagerstown) 
FRANK COLLEY, Sports Editor, The Herald (Hagerstown) 
ED NICHOLS, Sports Editor, The Times (Salisbury) 
J. R. CASTLEMAN, Sports Editor, The Post (Frederick) 
BOB LAYTON, Sports Editor, The Banner (Cambridge) 
BOB WATCHER, Sports Editor, The Evening Capital (Annapolis) 

"C >ver Da \y 



RADIO and TELEVISION 

BALTIMORE WASHINGTON 

John Jeppi, WAQE Bill Malone. Morris Siegel. WMAL-TV 

Larry Harrison, WAYE Sam Kaufman, WOL 

Joe Croghan, WBAL-TV and Radio Jim Gibbons, Ray Michael. Jim Simpson, 

Roger Grisv.'sld, WBMD WRC-TV, WOL 

Frank Luber, WCAO Dan Daniels. Bill McColgan. WTOP-TV 

Ecfdie Fenton, Fred Neil, WCBM 

Harry Shriver, WFBR 

Jim West, WITH 

Mel Bernstein, WJZ-TV 

Bill Boiling, Don Bruchey, Jack Dawson. 

WMAR-TV 
Jack Gale. WWIN 



m 





i 



m 



1961 TEAM STATISTICS 



FIRST DOWNS 

Rushing 

Passing 

Penalties 

TOTAL YARDS RUSHING 

Yards lost rushing 

NET YARDS RUSHING 

FORWARD PASSES ATTEMPTED 

FORWARD PASSES COMPLETED 

NET YARDS PASSING 

TOTAL YARDS GAINED (rush & pass) 

PASSES INTERCEPTED BY 

YARDS INTERCEPTIONS RETURNED 

TOTAL NUMBER PLAYS (rush) 

TOTAL NUMBER PUNTS 

PUNTING AVERAGE 

TOTAL NO. KICKOFFS RETURNED .... 

TOTAL NO. PUNTS RETURNED 

PENALTIES 

OWN FUMBLES 

OWN FUMBLES RECOVERED 

TOTAL POINTS SCORED 

Touchdowns 

Field Goals 

Safety 

Extra-Points — Kick 

Run 

Pass 



MARYLAND 


OPPONENTS 


140 


139 


65 


88 


69 


47 


6 


4 


1495 


1820 


264 


205 


1231 


1615 


214 


184 


115 


71 


1464 


972 


2695 


2587 


18 


17 


164 


228 


387 


460 


51/1896 


51/1848 


37.2 


36.2 


31/599 


31/617 


25/292 


18/131 


33/330 


45/377 


29 


23 


12 


13 


156 


141 


20 


20 


5-6 


1-4 





1 


17-17 


12-16 


0-0 


1-2 


2-3 


1-2 



1961 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS 



Arizzi 

Shiner 

Condie 

Novak 

Banner 

Burton 

Drass 

Hrezo 

VanReenan 

Girardi 

Davidson . 

Butsko 

Melton 

Brown . .... 

Smith 

Collins 



RUSHING 








rries 


Gain 


Lost 


Net 


Avg. 


78 


384 


15 


369 


4.7 


73 


234 


133 


101 


1.4 


68 


252 


16 


236 


3.5 


50 


248 


61 


187 


3.7 


25 


106 





106 


4.2 


23 


84 


12 


72 


3.1 


19 


56 


2 


54 


2.9 


16 


38 


7 


31 


1.9 


11 


52 


1 


51 


4.6 


7 


4 


10 


-6 


-0.9 


5 


8 


1 


7 


1.4 


4 


11 





11 


2.8 


3 


5 


6 


-1 


-0.3 


2 


9 





9 


4.5 


2 


3 





3 


1.5 


1 


1 





1 


1.0 



56 



TOTAL OFFENSE 

Total Plays Net Gain Avg. 

Shiner 184 1022 

Novak L49 674 1. 

Melt. in . 5 35 7.0 

Brown t 29 7.2 

.ill others same as above rushing 

PUNTING 

No. Yards Avg. 

Collins 48 1788 37.3 

White 3 108 36.0 

PUNT RETURNS 

No. Yards Avg. 

Davidson 14 84 6.0 

Brown 8 194 24.5 

YanRoenan 1 13 1.3.0 

Piper 1 1 1.0 

Hacker 1 

Backer credited with return on blocked punt against North Carolina 

KICKOFF RETURNS 

No. 

Condie 9 

Brown 7 

Davidson 6 

Arizzi 4 

Banner 2 

Smith 1 

Collins 1 

Barlund 1 



PASS INTERCEPTIONS 

No. Yards Returned 

Brown 8 95 

Davidson 5 20 

Hacker 2 3 

Hrezo 1 24 

Condie 1 22 

Collins 1 

PASSING 

Had. 

Att. Comp. Pet. Yards Int. TDs 

Shiner Ill 58 .523 921 11 7 

Novak 99 55 .555 487 6 5 

Melton 2 1 .500 36 

Brown 2 1 .500 20 

57 



Yards 


Avg. 


120 


13.3 


138 


19.7 


161 


26.8 


93 


23.3 


40 


20.0 


22 


22.C 


16 


16.0 


9 


9.0 



PASS RECEIVING 



No. Caught 

Collins 30 

Poniatowski 15 

Arizzi 12 

Brown 11 

Banner 7 

Barlund 7 

Davidson 7 

Drass 5 

Sukeena 4 

Condie - 4 

Rao 3 

Mace 2 

Burton 2 

Smith _ 2 

VanReenan 1 

Hrezo .... 1 

Piper 1 

Sankovich 1 



Yards 

428 

212 

103 

232 

123 

74 

55 

41 

49 

21 

18 

35 

13 

7 

44 

11 

6 

-8 



TDs 

4 

1 

2 
1 
2 
2 



CONVERSION PASSES ATTEMPTED 
Novak 3 

CONVERSION PASSES COMPLETED 
Novak 2 

CONVERSION PASSES CAUGHT 
Collins 2 

OPPONENTS FUMBLES RECOVERED 

Collin? 2 Shoals 1 Hacker ... 

Condie 1 Crossan 1 Kirchiro 

Butsko 1 Hrezo 1 Sankovich 

MARYLAND FUMBLES RECOVERED 

Novak 3 Condie 3 Collins . - 

Hrezo 1 Shiner 1 Kirchiro 

Shoals 1 Burton 1 



1 
1 
1 



1 
1 



SCORING 



Hannigan 



TDs 
RPR 



Collins 4 

Brown 2 2 

Davidson 2 

Barlund 2 

Banner 110 

Novak 10 

Condie 10 

Shiner 10 

Burton 10 

VanReenan 10 

Arizzi 10 

TOTALS 8 12 



Conversions 



FG Points 



P 


2 










2 



Kick 

17—17 
0—0 
0—0 
0—0 

0—0 
0—0 
0—0 
0—0 
0—0 
0—0 
0—0 
0—0 
17—17 



5—6 

0—0 
0—0 
0—0 
0—0 
0—0 
0—0 
0—0 
0—0 
0—0 
0—0 
0—0 
5—6 



32 

28 

24 

12 

12 

12 

16 

6 

6 

6 

6 

6 

156 



NOTE: Brown's tds running were on Punt returns. 



TERP ALL-AMERICA PLAYERS 

1923 — W. Supplee, End — Second Team, AP 

1928 Gerald Snyder, Fullback — Second Team, AP 

1931 — Jess Krajcovic, Guard Honorable Mention, AP 

1934 Norwood Sothoron, Fullback — Honorable Mention, AP 

Vic Willis, End Honorable Mention, AP 

Bill Guckeyson, Halfback — Honorable Mention, AP 

Ed Minion, Tackle Honorable Mention, AP 
1935 — Bill Guckeyson, Halfback — Honorable Mention, AP 

Vic Willis, End Honorable Mention, AP 
1936 — Bill Guckeyson — Halfback — Honorable Mention, AP 
1937 Jim Meade, Halfback Honorable Mention, AP 
1940 — Bob Smith, Center — Honorable Mention, AP 
1942 — Tommy Mont, Quarterback, Honorable Mention, AP 

Paul Flick Center Honorable Mention, AP 
1947 -Lou Gambino, Halfback — Honorable Mention, AP 

Gene Kinney, Center Honorable Mention, AP 
1948 — Ray Krouse, Tackle Honorable Mention, AP, UP 

Elmer Wingate, End — Honorable Mention, UP 

1949 Ray Krouse, Tackle -Second Team, AP 

1950 Bob Ward, Guard — First Team, AP, Look, NEA, Gridiron, All- 

Players, Colliers 
Second Team, UP, INS, The Quarterback 
Ed Mod2elewski, Fullback Honorable Mention, AP, UP 
1951— Bob Ward, Guard UNANIMOUS First Teams 

Dick Modzelewski, Tackle — First Team, All Players; Second 

Team, AP; Third Team, UP 
Ed Modzelewski, Fullback First and Second Teams 
Jack Scarbath, Quarterback — Honorable Mention, AP, All-Players 
Tom Cosgrove, Center — Honorable Mention, AP, All Players 
Dave Cianelli, Fullback — Honorable Mention, AP 
Joe Petruzzo Halfback — Honorable Mention, AP 
1952 Jack Scarbath, Quarterback— UN AN I MOUS First Teams 
Dick Modelewski. Tackle- UNANIMOUS First Teams 
Tom Cosgrove, Center Second Team, All-Players 
Stan Jones, Tackle — Honorable Mention, All-Players 
1953 — Stan Jones. Tackle — UNANIMOUS First Teams 

Bernie Faloney, Quarterback — Eight First Teams, All Second 

Teams 
Chester Hanulak, Halfback Second Team, INS; Honorable Men- 
tion, AP, UP, NEA 
Ralph Felton, Fullback Honorable Mention, AP, UP. NEA 
Bill Walker, End — Honorable Mention. UP 
John Irvine, Center — Honorable Mention, UP 
Bob Morgan, Tackle — Honorable Mention, UP 
1954 — Dick Bielski, Fullback — Third Team, All-Players; Honorable Men- 
tion, AP, UP 
Ronnie Waller. Halfback — Honorable Mention, AP, UP 
Jack Bowersox. Guard — First Team, Gridiron Index: Honorable 

Mention, AP, UP 
John Irvine, Center Honorable Mention, UP 
Bill Walker, End — Second Team, AP; Honorable Mention. UP 
Bob Pellegrini. Guard — Honorable Mention. UP 
George Palahunik. Guard — Honorable Mention. UP 



1955 — Bob Pellegrini — Center — UNANIMOUS First Teams 

Ed Vereb, Halfback — First Team, Movietone News, N. Y. Daily 
News, Extension; Second Team, INS; Third Team, AP, UP, 
Sporting News 

Mike Sandusky, Tackle — First Team, Sporting News, Extension; 
Second Team, UP, NEA, N. Y. Daily News; Honorable Men- 
tion, AP 

Jack Davis, Guard — Honorable Mention, AP, UP, NEA 

Frank Tamburello, Quarterback — First Team, Movietone News; 
Honorable Mention, AP, UP, NEA 

Bill Walker, End — Second Team, UP, Sporting News; Honorable 
Mention, NEA 

Russell Dennis, End — First Team, N. Y. Daily News 

Ed Heuring, Tackle — Honorable Mention, AP, UP 
1956 — Mike Sandusky, Tackle — Honorable Mention, AP, UP, INS, NEA 

Jack Davis, Guard — Honorable Mention, AP, UP, INS, NEA 

Gene Alderton, Center — Honorable Mention, AP, UP 
1957 — Rod Breedlove, Guard — Honorable Mention, AP, UP, NEA, Sport- 
ing News 

Ed Cooke, End — Honorable Mention, AP, UP, NEA 

Gene Alderton, Center — Honorable Mention, AP, NEA 
1958 — Rod Breedlove, Guard, Honorable Mention, AP, UPI, NEA, Sport- 
ing News 

Fred Cole, Tackle — Honorable Mention, AP, UPI 
1959 — Rod Breedlove, Guard — Honorable Mention, AP, UPI, NEA 

Jim Joyce, Fullback — Honorable Mention, AP, NEA 

Gary Collins, End — Honorable Mention, AP, UPI 

Tom Gunderman, Guard — Honorable Mention, AP, UPI 

Kurt Schwarz, Tackle — Honorable Mention, UPI 
1960 — Gary Collins, End — Honorable Mention, AP, UPI 

Dale Betty, Quarterback — Honorable Mention, AP 
1961 — Gary Collins, End — First Team, UPI, NEA, American Football 

Coaches Association, Football Writers Association, Pro Football 

Scouts; Second Team, AP. 

Bob Hacker, Center — Honorable Mention, AP, UPI. 



60 



SPECIAL TERRAPIN AWARDS 



The Maryland Ring offered in memory of Charles L. Linhardt to the 
Maryland man who is adjudged the besl athlete of the year. 
1952- Dave Cianelli— Back l%0— Rod Breedlove — Guard 

1953 — John Alderton — End 

The Silvester Watch foi excellence in athletics to the man who typi- 
ed the besl In college athletics: 

1948 — Vic Turyn-^Back 1954 — Marty Crytzer — End 

1949— Joe Tucker— Back 1958— Ed Cooke— End 

I960— Elmer Win gate — End 1960— Jim Joyce — Back 

1953— Paul Nester— End 1961- Dale Betty— Back 

The Teke Trophy to the .student who during his four years at the 
University has rendered the greatest service to football: 

1950— John Id/.ik— Back 1956 — Mike Sandusky— Tackle 

1951— Bob Ward— Guard 1957— Gene Alderton— Center 

1952— Ed Fullerton— Back 1958— Bob Rusevlyan— Back 

1953— Bernie Faloney— Back 1959— Kurt Schwarz— Tackle 

1954— ^lohn Irvine — Center 1960 Vincent Scott— End 

1955— Bob Pellegrini— Center 1961-Gary Collins— End 

The Alvln L. Auhinoe Trophy, for the "Unsung Hero" of the current 
season: 

1956— Al Wharton Tackle 1959— Joe Gardi— Tackle 

1957 — Wilbur Main — Center 1960 — Leroy Dietrich— Center 

1958— Ted Kershner— Back 1961— Dick Barlund— End 

Th-e Anthony C. Nardo Memorial Trophy to the best Football lineman 
of the year: 

1950— Bob Ward— Guard 
1 95 1 —Bob Ward— Guard 
1952— William Maletzky— Guard 
1953— Stan Jones— Tackle 
1954 — Bob Pellegrini — Guard 
1955— Mike Sandusky— Tackle 



1956— Al Wharton— Tackle 
1957— Don Healy— Tackle 
1958— Fred Cole — Tackle 
1959— Tom Gunderman — Guard 
1960— Gary Collins— End 
1961— Bill Kirchiro— Tackle 

The Jim Tatum Memorial Trophy to the "Outstanding Tackle": 

1959— Kurt Schwarz 
1960 — Tom Sankovich 
1961— Bill Kirchiro 
The A. V. Williams award for the Outstanding Scholar and Athlete: 
1954— Ron Waller— Back 1960— Dale Betty— Back 

1957— Howard Dare — Back 



BEST OFFENSIVE BACK 

1952— Chester Hanulak— Halfback 
1953— Ralph Felton— Fullback 
1954— Ron Waller— Halfback 
1955— Ed Vereb— Halfback 
1956 — Fred Hamilton — Halfback 
1957 — Bob Rusevlyan — Quarter- 
back 
1958 — -Bob Rusevlyan — Quarter- 
back 
1959 — Jim Joyce— Fullback 
1960— Dale Betty— Quarterback 
1961 — Dick Shiner — Quarterback 



BEST DEFENSIVE BACK 

1952— Ed Fullerton— Halfback 
1953— Dick Nolan— Halfback 
1954 — Joe Horning — Halfback 
1955 — Lynn Beightol — Quarter- 
back 
1956 — Bob Rusevlyan — Quarter- 
back 
1957 — Bob Layman — Halfback 
1958 — Jim Joyce — Fullback 
1959 — Dwayne Fletcher — Quarter- 
back 
1960 — Jim Davidson — Quarterback 
2961— Tom Brown— Halfback 



61 



BEST OFFENSIVE LINEMAN 

1952 — Tom Cosgrove — Center 
1953— Marty Crytzer — End 
1954 — Jack Bowersox — Guard 
1955 — Russell Dennis — End 
1956— Al Wharton— Tackle 
1957 — Tom Gunderman — Guard 
1958 — Fred Cole— Tackle 
1959 — Tom Gunderman — Guard 
1960 — Bob Hacker — Center 
.1961— Roger Shoals— Tackle 



BEST DEFENSIVE LINEMAN 

1952 — John Alderton — End 
1953— Bob Morgan— Tackle 
1954 — Tom McLuckie — Guard 
1955— Mike Sandusky— Tackle 
1956— Mike Sandusky— Tackle 
1957— Rod Breedlove— Guard 
1958— Ben Scotti— End 
1959— Rod Breedlove — Guard 
1960— Tom Sankovich— Tackle 
a 961 — Dave Crossan — Tackle 



TERPS ON ALL-CONFERENCE TEAMS 

"ATLANTIC COAST SPORTS-WRITERS ASSOCIATION" 

1953— FIRST TEAM PLAYER OF YEAR 

Bob Pellegrini — Center 



Stan Jones — Tackle 
Jack Bowersox — Guard 
Bernie Falon-ey — Back 
Chester Hanulak — Back 

SECOND TEAM 

Bill Walker— End 
Bob Morgan — Tackle 
Ralph Felton— Back 

THIRD TEAM 

John Irvine — Center 
Marly Crytzer — End 

PLAYER OF YEAR 

Bernie Faloney — Back 
COACH OF YEAR 

Jim Tatum 



1954— FiRST TEAM 

Bill Walker— End 
Dick Bielski — Back 
Ronnie Waller — Back 

SECOND TEAM 

Bob Pellegrini — Guard 
John Irvine — Center 

THIRD TEAM 

Jack Bowersox — Guard 

1955— FIRST TEAM 

Mike Sandusky— Tackle 
Jack Davis — Guard 
Bob Pellegrini — Center 
Ed Vereb— Back 

SECOND TEAM 

Bill Walker— End 
Russell Dennis — End 
Frank Tamburello— Back 



COACH OF YEAR 

Jim Tatum 

JACOBS BLOCKING TROPHY 

Bob Pellegrini 

1956— FIRST TEAM 

Mike Sandusky— Tackle 
Jack Davis — Guard 

THIRD TEAM 

Gene Alderton — Center 

1957_FIRST TEAM 

Ed Cooke— End 

Rod Breedlove — Guard 

SECOND TEAM 

Gene Alderton — Center 

1958— SECOND TEAM 

Fred Cole— Tackle 
Rod Breedlove — Guard 

1959— SECOND TEAM 

Tom Gunderman — Guard 
Jim Joyce — Back 

1960— FIRST TEAM 

Gary Collins — End 

1961 FIRST TEAM 

Gary Collins — End 
Bob Hacker — Center 

SECOND TEAM 

Rogei Shoals — Tackle 
Bill Kirchiro— Tackle 



C2 



"ASSO 

1953 FIRST TEAM 

stan Jones Tackle 
Bcrnic Faloney — Back 
Chester Hanulak Back 
Ralph Fellon Back 

SECOND TEAM 
Jack Bowersox- -Guard 
BUI Walker End 
Boh Morgan Tackle 
John Irvine Center 

THIRD TEAM 

Dick Nolan Back 
Mart\ Crytzer End 

1954— FIRST TEAM 

Dick Biclski— Back 
Ronnie Waller — Back 
Bill Walker— End 

SECOND TEAM 

John Irvine — Center 

Bob Pellegrini — Guard 
.lack Bowersox — Guard 

1955 FIRST TEAM 

Bob Pellegrini — Center 
Ed Vereb — Back 
Mike Sandusky — Tackle 
Jack Davis — Guard 
Frank Tamburello — Back 

SECOND TEAM 

Bill Walker— End 
Russell Dennis — End 

PLAYER OF YEAR 
Bob Pellegrini — Center 

"UNITED PR 

1955— FIRST TEAM 

Bill Walker— End 
Bob Pellegrini — Center 
Ed Vereb— Back 
Mike Sandusky — Tackle 

SECOND TEAM 

Jack Davis — Guard 
Frank Tamburello — -Back 
Russell Dennis — End 

1956 -FIRST TEAM 

Mike Sandusky — Tackle 
Jack Davis — Guard 

1957— FIRST TEAM 
Ed Cooke — End 



CIATED PRESS" 

1956— FIRST TEAM 

Mike Sandusky Tackle 
Jack Davis — Guan! 
Gene Aldcrton — Centei 

1957— FIRST TEAM 

Rod Breedlove Guard 

Ed Cooke End 

SECOND TEAM 
Gene Alderlon Cent< i 

1958— FIRST TEAM 

Rod Breedlove — Guard 

SECOND TEAM 
Fred Cole— Tackle 

1959 FIRST TEAM 

Jim Joyce — Back 
Tom Gunderman — Guard 
SECOND TEAM 

Rod Breedlove Guard 

Gary Collins — End 

1960— FIRST TEAM 
Gary Collin.s— End 

SECOND TEAM 
Dale Betty— Back 

1961 FIRST TEAM 
Gary Collins — End 
Bob Hacker- Center 

SECOND TEAM 
Roger Shoals— Tackle 

THIRD TEAM 
Dick Shiner — Quarterback 

ESS INTERNATIONAL" 

SECOND TEAM 

Rod Breedlove — Guard 
Gene Alderton — Center 

1958— FIRST TEAM 

Rod Breedlove — Guard 

SECOND TEAM 

Tom Gunderman — Guard 
Ben Scotti— End 

1959 SECOND TEAM 

Rod Breedlove — Guard 

1960— FIRST TEAM 
Gary Collins — End 

1961 — FIRST TEAM 
Gary Collins— End 
63 



MARYLAND FOOTBALL RECORDS 

SINGLE GAME RECORDS, Individual 

MOST POINTS SCORED: 31 by Bob Shemonski against VPI, 1950 
(5 td's, 1 Pat). 

MOST TD'S SCORED: 5 by Bob Shemonski against VPI, 1950. 

MOST PAT SCORED: 6 by Bob Dean against South Carolina, 1949; 
6 by Don Decker against West Virginia, 1951. 6 by Vincent Scott 
against Virginia, 1960. 

MOST TD PASSES CAUGHT: 2 by Don Gleasner against Virginia, 
1945; 2 by Leroy Mortor against Michigan State, 1946; 2 by Lou 
Gambino against West Virginia, 1947; 2 by Elmer Wingate against 
George Washington, 1948; 2 by Stan Karnash against George Wash- 
ington, 1949; 2 by Pete Augsburger against South Carolina, 1949; 2 
by Henry Fox against Georgetown, 1949; 2 by Lloyd Colteryahn 
against LSU, 1952; 2 by Bill Walker against Alabama, 1953; 2 by 
Gary Collins against Clemson, 1959. 

MOST TD PASSES THROWN: 3 by Tommy Mont against Connecticut. 
1942; 3 by Vic Turyn against George Washington, 1948; 3 by Stan 
Lavine against George Washington, 1949; 3 by Jack Scarbath against 
West Virginia, 1951; 3 by Jack Scarbath against LSU, 1952, 3 by Dale 
Betty against North Carolina State, 1959; 3 by Dale Betty against 
Clemson, 1959; 3 by Dick Novak against West Virginia, 1959; 3 by 
Dick Shiner against Penn State, 1961. 

MOST TD RESPONSIBILITY: 5 by Bob Shemonski against VPI, 1950. 

MOST FIELD GOALS: 3 by Vincent Scott against West Virginia, 1959. 

LONGEST SCORING RUN FROM SCRIMMAGE: 90 yards by Dick 
Burgee against Missouri. 1954. 

LONGEST SCORING PASS: 40 yards by Dick Novak to Jim David- 
son against West Virginia, 1959. 

LONGEST SCORING PASS AND RUN: 92 yards by Stan Lavine to 
Ed Bolton against South Carolina, 1949 (pass 15 yards, run 77 
yards). 

LONGEST SCORING RUN AFTER PASS: 77 yards by Ed Bolton on 
pass from Stan Lavine against South Carolina, 1949. (Pass 15 yds). 

LONGEST FIELD GOAL: 48 yards by Vincent Scott against West Vir- 
ginia, 1959. 

LONGEST SCORING RETURN OF INTERCEPTED PASS: 100 yards 
(105 actual) by Joe Horning against Missouri, 1951; 100 yards (103 
actual) by Dickie Lewis against North Carolina State, 1956. 

LONGEST SCORING RETURN OF INTERCEPTED PASS BY OP- 
PONENT: 93 yards by Walter Matson of Pennsylvania, 1941. 

LONGEST PUNT RETURN FOR TD: 90 yards by Dick Nolan against 
Clemson, 1953. 

LONGEST PUNT RETURN FOR TD BY OPPONENT: 100 yards by 
Frank Brady of Navy, 1951. 

LONGEST KICKOFF RETURN FOR TD: 100 yards (102 actual) by 
Dick Novak and Dennis Condie against Virginia, 1960 (Novak re- 
turned to nine yard line then lateraled to Condie who returned 91 
yards). 

LONGEST KICKOFF RETURN FOR TD BY OPPONENT: 93 yards 
by Jim McPherson of North Carolina, 1926. 

LONGEST SCORING RUN WITH RECOVERED FUMBLE: 23 yards by 
Howie Dare against North Carolina, State, 1954. 

64 



LONGEST NON SCORING RUN FROM SCRIMMAGE: 76 yards by 
Harry Bonk againsl North Carolina, 1948. 

LONGEST NON SCORING PASS: 47 yards by Dale Betty to Ron 

Shaffer againsl Clemson, l'.i.v.i. 
LONGEST NON SCORING RUN WITH RECOVERED FUMBLE BY 

OPPONENT. 75 yards by Daw Russell of Washington & Lee, L942. 
LONGEST NON SCORING PASS AND RUN: 73 yards b\ Tom Mon1 

to Hubie Werner againsl Lakehurst, L942 <!'■' '■'•- yards run 
n yards). 
LONGEST NGN SCORIN<; IMN AFTER PASS: 11 yards by Hubie 

Werner againsl Lakehurst, L942 on 32 yard pass from Tommy 

Mont. 
LONG ESI' NON SCORING RUN OF INTERCEPTED PASS: 74 yard 

1a Bernie Faloney againsl LSU, 1952. 
LONGEST NON SCORING KK'KoFF RETURN: 76 yards by Howie 

Dare againsl Miami, 1957. 
LONGEST NON SCORING PUNT RETURN: 67 yards by John Mc- 

Vicker againsl Syraeuso, 1956. 
MOST RUSHES: 28 by Jim Joyce against Texas, 1959; 28 by Ed 

Mod/.elewski against Tennes-er in 1!).".!' Sugar Howl. 
MOST YARDS GAINED RUSHING: (NET): 193 yards by Ray Popple- 
man against Western Maryland, 1931 (24 carries). 
BEST HUSHING AVERAGE: 24.0 by Ernie Arizzi against Syracuse, 1961 

1 -airiest. 
MOST PASSES ATTEMPTED: 30 by Jack Scarbath against North 

Carolina State, 1950. (completed 11). 
MOST PASSES COMPLETED: 17 by Tommy Mont against North 

Carolina, 1946, (25 attempts). 
BEST COMPLETION PERCENTAGE: (minimum of 10 attempts): 

.800 by Tommy Mont against Bainbridge, 1946 (8 completions, 

10 attempts!. 
MOST YARDS GAINED PASSING: 243 by Jack Scarbath against 

Navy, 1951 (14 completions, 23 attempts). 
MOST PASSES HAD INTERCEPTED: 3 by Vic Turyn against North 

Carolina, 1948. 3 by Charles Boxold against Wake Forest, 1954. 3 by 

Bob Rusevlyn against North Carolina, 1958. 3 by Dale Betty against 

Texas ,1960. 3 by Dick Novak against Duke, 1960. 3 by Dick Shiner 

against Air Force, 1961. 
MOST TOTAL PLAYS (rush and pass): 40 by Jack Scarbath against 

North Carolina State, 1950 (30 passes, 10 rushes). 
MOST NET YARDS GAINED (rushing and passing): 251 by Jack 

Scarbath against Navy. 1951 (243 passing — 8 rushing). 
BEST OFFENSIVE AVERAGE (rushing and passing): (minimum J 

plays. 24.0 by Ernie Arizzi against Syracuse, 1961 (4 plays, 96 

yards) . 
MOST PASSES CAUGHT: 8 by Lou Weidensaul against Navy, 1951 

(95 yards). 8 by Lloyd Colteryahn against Alabama, 1952 (131 

yards). 
MOST YARDS GAINED ON PASS RECEPTIONS: 131 yards by Lloyd 

Colteryahn against Alabama, 1952 (8 receptions). 
MOST PASSES INTERCEPTED: 3 by Bob Shemonski against Geor- 
gia. 1951. 3 by Tom Brown against Air Force, 1961. 
MOST YARDS GAINED ON INTERCEPTION RUNBACKS: 111 yards 

by Dickie Lewis against North Carolina State, 1956. 
MOST PUNTS: 10 by Bill Guckeyson against Syracuse, 1936. 10 by 

Jack Targarona against West Virginia, 1950. 



MOST TOTAL YARDS PUNTING: 510 by Bill Guckeyson against 
Syracuse, 1936. 

BEST PUNTING AVERAGE: 53 yards by Lynn Beightol against Okla- 
homa, 1956 Orange Bowl (3 punts). 

LONGEST PUNT WITH ROLL: 88 yards by John Fritsch against 
Miami, 1956. (Note) "Untz" Brooke Brewer had a 93 yard punt 
against VMI, 1916. 

LONGEST PUNT WITH ROLL BY OPPONENT: 84 yards by Charlie 
Justice of North Carolina, 1948. 

MOST PUNTS RETURNED: 6 by Joe Petruzzo against LSU, 1951 
(67 yards). 

MOST YARDS GAINED RETURNING PUNTS: 146 by Bob Shemonski 
against North Carolina State, 1950 (5 returns). 

MOST PUNTS BLOCKED: 1 by several men. 

MOST KICKOFFS RETURNED: 3 by Bob Shemonski against Geor- 
gia, 1950. 3 by Ted Kershner against North Carolina State, 1957. 
3 by Howie Dare against North Carolina State, 1957. 3 by Dwayne 
Fletcher against South Carolina, 1959. 3 by Jim Davidson against 
Wake Forest, 1960. 3 by Dennis Condie against Penn State, 1960. 

3 by Dennis Condie against North Carolina, 1960. 3 by Dennis 
Condie against Syracuse, 1961. 3 by Tom Brown against Virginia, 
1961. 

MOST YARDS RETURNING KICKOFFS: 146 by Howie Dare against 

North Carolina State, 1957 (3 returns). 
MOST OPPONENTS' FUMBLES RECOVERED: 3 by Tom Gunderman 

against Miami, 1957. 

SINGLE GAME RECORDS, Team 

HIGHEST SCORE: Maryland 80 Washington College 0, 1927. 

MOST TOTAL POINTS SCORED BY BOTH TEAMS: 87, 1954 (Mary- 
land 74, Missouri 13). 

HIGHEST SCORE BY OPPONENT: Navy 76, Maryland 0, 1913. 

MOST TD'S SCORED: 12 against Washington College, 1927. 

MOST PAT SCORED: 8 against Washington College, 1927; 8 against 
Missouri, 1954. 

MOST SAFETIES SCORED: 2 against Delaware, 1947, 2 against 
Georgetown, 1950. 

MOST FIELD GOALS SCORED: 3 against West Virginia, 1959. 

MOST TD'S SCORED PASSING: 4 against George Washington, 1948 
(3 by Vic Turyn, 1 by John Idzik); 4 against Navy, 1952 (2 by 
Jack Scarbath, 1 by Lloyd Colteryahn, 1 by Bernie Faloney) ; 

4 against George Washington, 1954 (2 by Frank Tamburello, 1 by 
Charles Boxold, 1 by Lynn Beightol. 

MOST OPPONENTS TD'S SCORED PASSING: 4 by Wake Forest. 
1958 (3 by Norman Snead, 1 by Charlie Parker). 

MOST TOTAL PLAYS: 92 against Texas, 1959. 

MOST RUSHES: 76 against Miami, 1958. 

FEWEST RUSHES: 27 against West, Virginia, 1959. 

MOST NET YARDS GAINED RUSHING: 577 against VPI, 1950. 

FFWEST NET YARDS GAINED RUSHING: Minus 17 against George- 
town, 1939. 

FEWEST NET YARDS GAINED RUSHING BY OPPONENTS: Minus 
21 by West Virginia, 1951, Minus 21 by UCLA, 1955. 

BEST AVERAGE PER RUSH: 10.5 yards against VPI, 1950 (577 yds. 
in 55 rushes). 

MOST PASSES ATTEMPTED: 40 against Virginia, 1958 (IS comple- 
tions for 330 yds.) 

66 



MOST PASSES COMPLETED: 21 against North Carolina, 1958 (35 

at tempts). 
FEWEST PASSES COMPLETED: against Michigan State, 1944 (1 

attempt); against Vanderbilt, 1948 (12 attempts); n again ! 

Missouri, 1951 (3 attempts). 

FEWEST PASSES ATTEMPTED: 1 against Michigan State, 1944. 

MOST PASSES ATTEMPTED BY OPPONENTS: 57 by West Virginia, 
I'.i.m < 19 completions). 

FEWEST PASSES COMPLETED BY OPPONENTS: by Syracuse. 
1939 (5 attempts); bj Michigan state, mil <o attempts); b: 
Delaware, 1948 (3 attempts); by Boston University, 1952 (6 at- 
tempts); by Kentucky, 1956 <3 attempts). 

FEWEST YARDS GAINED PASSING BY OPPONENTS: Minus 1 I, 
Clemson, 1956. 

MOST YARDS GAINED PASSING: 330 against Virginia, 1958 (1! 
completions, 40 attempts). 

FEWEST YARDS GAINED PASSING: against Michigan State, 1944; 
Vanderbilt, 1948; Missouri, 1951. 

BEST COMPLETION PERCENTAGE: (min. 10 attempts) .800 again ^ 
Georgia, 1952 (8 completions, 10 attempts). 

MOST PASSES INTERCEPTED: 7 against Georgia, 1951. 

MOST PASSES HAD INTERCEPTED: 6 by Pennsylvania, 1941. 

MOST TCTAL YARDS GAINED (rush and pass): 602 against West 
Virginia, 1951 (523 rushing, 79 passing). 

FEWEST TOTAL YARDS GAINED (rush and pass): 29 against Syra- 
cuse, 1959. 

MOST TOTAL FIRST DOWNS: 27 against Washington & Lee, 1951. 
27 against LSU, 1952. 

FEWEST TOTAL FIRST DOWNS: 1 against Michigan State, 1944. 

MOST FIRST DOWNS RUSHING: 24 against Washington & Lee, 1951. 

FEWEST FIRST DOWNS RUSHING: 1 against Michigan State, 1944, 
1 against Syracuse, 1959. 

MOST FIRST DOWNS PASSING: 12 against Air Force, 1961. 

FEWEST FIRST DOWNS PASSING: against 12 teams (last one 
South Carolina 1958). 

MOST FUMBLES: 8 against Georgia, 1952 (lost 2). 

FEWEST FUMBLES: against VMI, 1945; against Kentucky, 1954; 
against South Carolina, 1958; against South Carolina, 1959; 
against West Virginia. 1960; against Virginia, 1960. 

MOST FUMBLES BY OPPONENTS: 8 by South Carolina, 1948; 8 by 
Mississippi, 1953. 

MOST FUMBLES LOST: 6 against North Carolina. 1947. 

MOST OPPONENTS FUMBLES RECOVERED: 5 against West Virginia, 
1950: 5 against Missouri in 1950 Gator Bowl; 5 against North Caro- 
lina, 1960. 

MOST PENALTIES: 18 against VPI, 1950. 

MOST PENALTIES BY OPPONENTS: 15 by Miami, 1957. 

MOST YARDS FKXALIZED: 130 against VPI, 1948; 130 against VPI, 
1950. 

MOST YARDS OPPONENTS PENALIZED; 135 by North Carolina. 
1953. 

FEWEST PENALTIES: against Duke, 1941. 

FEWEST PENALTIES BY OPPONENTS: by Western Maryland, 
1937; by Western Maryland, 1939; by Florida, 1939; by Wash- 
ington & Lee, 1941; by W'illiam & Mary, 1945; by South Caro- 
lina, 1953. 

67 



MOST PUNTS: 14 against Virginia, 1937; 14 against Western Mary- 
land, 1940. 

FEWEST PUNTS: 1 against Washington & Lee, 1953; 1 against Geor- 
gia, 1953; 1 against Syracuse, 1955; 1 against North Carolina 
State, 1954. 

MOST TOTAL YARDS PUNTING: 510 against Syracuse, 1936 (10 
punts). 

BEST PUNTING AVERAGE: 51.7 yards against Washington & Lee 

1951 (155 yds. on 3 punts). 

SEASON RECORDS, Individual 

MOST POINTS SCORED: 97 by Bob Shemonski in 10 games, 1950; 
96 by Lou Gambino in 10 games, 1947; 96 by Ed Vereb in 10 
games, 1955; Gambino added 3 td's in the 20-20 1948 Gator Bowl 
tie with Georgia for 11 game total of 114 points; Vereb scored 1 
td. in the 20-6 loss to Oklahoma in the 1956 Orange Bowl for a 
11 game total of 102 points. 

MOST TOUCHDOWNS SCORED: 16 by Lou Gambino, 1947; 16 by Bob 
Shemonski, 1950; 16 by Ed Vereb, 1955; all in 10 games. Gambino 
added 3 in the 1948 Gator Bowl for 11 game total of 19 and Vereb 
1 in the 1956 Orange Bowl for 11 game total of 17. 

MOST PAT SCORED: 41 by Don Decker in 10 games, 1951, including 
4 for 4 in 28-13 victory over Tennessee in the 1952 Sugar Bowl. 
(55 attempts). 

MOST FIELD GOALS SCORED: 5 by John HANNIGAN, 1961. (NOTE) 
"Untz" Brooke Brewer kicked 7 in 1916 and 6 in 1921 employing both 
the drop kick and placement. 

MOST TD PASSES THROWN: 12 by Tommy Mont in 9 games, 1942. 

MOST PASSES ATTEMPTED: 132 by Dale Betty, 1960 (10 games) com- 
pleted 82. 

MOST PASSES COMPLETED: 82 by Dale Betty, 1960 (10 games) 132 
attempts. 

BEST PASSING PERCENTAGE: .621 by Dale Betty, 1960 (10 games) 
completed 82 of 132. 

MOST YARDS GAINED PASSING: 1049 by Jack Scarbath, in 9 games. 

1952 (59 completions in 113 attempts). 

MOST PASSES CAUGHT: 32 by Lloyd Colteryahn in 9 games, 1952, 
(593 yards). 

MOST PASSES INTERCEPTED: 6 by Joe Horning in 9 games, 1951; 
6 by Bernie Faloney in 10 games, 1953; 5 by Ed Fullerton in 9 
games, 1951. Fullerton added 2 in the 28-13 win over Tennessee 
in the 1952 Sugar Bowl for a 10 game total of 7. 

MOST YARDS RETURNING INTERCEPTED PASSES: 147 by Joe 
Horning on 6 interceptions in 9 games, 1951. 

MOST RUSHES: 137 by Jim Joyce in 10 games, 1959; 125 by Lou 
Gambino in 10 games, 1947; 113 by Ed Modzelewski in 9 games, 
1951; Modzelewski added 28 in the 28-13 victory over Tennessee in 
the 1952 Sugar Bowl for 10 game total of 141. Gambino added 
22 in the 20-20 tie with Georgia in the 1948 Gator Bowl for 11 
game total of 147. 

BEST RUSHING AVERAGE PER CARRY: 9.8 yards by Chet Hanu- 
lak, 1953. 

MOST NET YARDS RUSHING: 904 by Lou Gambino in 10 games. 
1947; 834 by Ed Modzelewski in 9 games, 1951; Gambino added 151 
yds. in 1948 Gator Bowl for 10 game total of 1069 yards; 
Modzelewski added 153 yds. in 1952, Sugar Bowl for 10 game total 

68 



of 9S7 yards. (Note) Ra\ Poppleman gained 1350 yards, 1931 bul 

his total was not NET total and is believed I > be total off en 
MOST AVKKACK NET YARDS RUSHING PER DAM?:: 92.7 by 

Modzelewski In !> games, L9S1; 90.4 by Lou Gambino in in garni 

L947; Modzelewski added I.Y", yds. in 1952 Sugar Howl for 10 game 

avg. of 98.7 yds. per game. Gambino added I>1 yds. in 1948 Gator 

Bowl for 11 game average of 97.2 yds. 
MOST TOTAL YARDS (Rushing and Passing) 1286 by Jack Scarbath 

in '.) games, L952. 
most PUNTS: 61 by Jack Targarona In L0 games, L950 
BEST PUNTING AVERAGE: 43.7 by Bill Walk r in L0 games, 1955 

(15 punts); Walker .idded 4 punts In the 1956 Orange Bowl for a 

ll game average of 41.2 (19 punts). 
MOST PUNTS RETURNED: 28 by Bob Shemonski in 10 games, 1950. 
Mosr YARDS GAINED ON PUNT RETURNS: 505 by Bob Shemonski 

in lu games, 1950. 
BEST PUNT RETURN AVERAGE: (More than 3): 24.5 by Tom Brown 

on 8 returns, L961. 
MOST KICKOFFS RETURNED: 10 by Bob Shemonski, 1950 for 259 

yards: K) by Dennis Condie, 1960 for 352 yards. 
MOST YARDS GAINED ON KICKOFF RETURNS: 264 by Howie 

1 (are on 6 rel urns. 1957. 
BEST KICKOFF RETURN AVERAGE 'more than 3): 44 yards by 

Howie D.ue, 1957 (6 returns for 264 yds.) 

SEASON RECORDS, Team 

MOST POINTS SCORED: 353 in 9 games, 1951; 381 in 10 games, 1951 
including 28-13 victory over Tennessee in the 1952 Sugar Bowl. 

FEWEST POINTS SCORED: 39 in 9 games, 1940. 

MOST OPPONENTS POINTS SCORED: 235 in 9 games, 1938. 

FEWEST OPPONENTS POINTS SCORED: 31 in 10 games, 1953; 38 
in 11 games including the 7-0 loss to Oklahoma in the 1954 
Orange Howl. 

MOST TD'S SCORED: 52 in 9 games, 1951; 56 in 10 games, including 
the 28-13 victory over Tennessee in the 1952 Sugar Bowl. 

MOST FIELD GOALS: 5 in 1961. (NOTE) 7 in 1916 and 6 in 1921 em- 
ploying both the dropkick and placement. 

MOST PAT'S SCORED: 38 in 9 games. 1951; 42 in 10 games in- 
cluding the 28-13 victory over Tennessee in the 1952 Sugar Bowl. 

BEST PERCENTAGE KICKING PAT'S: .1000 on 17 of 17 kicks. 1961. 

BEST SEASON: 1951— Won 10 Lost (includes 28-13 win over Tennessee 
in Sugar Bowl). 1953— Won 10 Lost (10-1 including 7-0 loss to 
Oklahoma in 1954 Orange Bowl). 1955— Won 10 Lost Q0-1 includ- 
ing 20-6 loss to Oklahoma in 1956 Orange Bowl). 

WORST SEASON: 1944: Won 1— Lost 7— Tied 1. 

MOST FIRST DOWNS: 167 in 9 games, 1952; 173 in 10 games in 1951 
including the IS in the 28-13 victory over Tennessee in the 1952 
Sugar Bowl. 

MOST FIRST DOWNS BY OPPONENTS: 182 in 1960. 

MOST Y T ARDS GAINED RUSHING: 2921 in 9 games, 1951; 3210 in 
10 games. 1951 including 2S-13 victory over Tennessee in 1952 
Sugar Bowl. 

MOST YARDS GAINED RUSHING BY OPPONENTS: 2022 in 10 
games, 1956. 

MOST YARDS GAINED PASSING: 1464 in 10 games, 1961. 

MOST Y'ARDS GAINED PASSING BY OPPONENTS: 1391 in 9 games. 

69 



1951; 1466 in 10 games including 28-13 victory over Tennessee in 

1952 Sugar Bowl. 
MOST NET YARDS GAINED (rushing and passing): 3822 in 9 games, 

1951 (2921 rushing and 901 passing) ; 4174 in 10 games including 

the 28-13 victory over Tennessee in the 1952 Sugar Bowl (3210 

rushing, 964 passing). 
MOST NET YARDS GAINED BY OPPONENTS (rushing & passing). 

2929 in 1960 (1822 rushing 1107 passing). 
FEWEST NET YARDS GAINED (rushing and passing) BY OPPON- 
ENTS: 1961 in 10 games, 1955 (761 yards rushing, 930 passing); 

Oklahoma gained 202 rushing, 53 passing in 1956 Orange Bowl for 

11 game total of 1946. 
MOST PASSES ATTEMPTED: 214 in 10 games, 1961 (115 completions). 
MOST PASSES COMPLETED: 105 in 10 games, 1960 (182 attempts). 
BEST PASSING PERCENTAGE: .577 in 10 games, 1960 (105 of 182). 
BEST PASSING PERCENTAGE BY OPPONENTS: .517 in 10 games, 

1959 (90 completions in 174 attempts). 
MOST PASS INTERCEPTIONS: 34 in 9 games, 1951, 38 in 10 games 

including the 28-13 victory over Tennessee in the 1952 Sugar Bowl. 
MOST PASS INTERCEPTIONS BY OPPONENTS: 23 in 10 games, 

1948. 
MOST FUMBLES: 44 in 10 games, 1950. 

MOST OPPONENTS FUMBLES: 40 in 10 games, 1960. (Lost 19). 
FEWEST FUMBLES: 17 in 10 games, 1960 (lost 7). 
MOST PENALTIES: 78 in 11 games, 1953 (492.5 yards). 
MOST YARDAGE LOST PENALTIES: 694 in 10 games, 1956 (72 

penalties). 
MOST PUNTS: 63 in 10 games, 1957. 
MOST PUNTS BY OPPONENTS: 85 in 10 games, 1950. 
MOST YARDS ALL PUNTS: 2251 in 10 games, 1950 (62 punts). 
BEST PUNTING AVERAGE: 41.5 yards in 10 games, 1953 (37 punts). 



CAREER RECORDS, Individual 

MOST POINTS SCORED REGULAR SEASON: 126 by Ed Modzelewski, 

28 games, 1949-51 (21 td's) (note) he added 1 td in 1950 Gator 
Bowl for total of 132). 

MOST POINTS SCORED ALL GAMES: 133 by Bob Shemonski, 30 

games, 1949-51 ( 22 td's, 1 pat). Includes 2 td's in 1950, Gator Bowl, 

1 td in 1952 Sugar Bowl. 
MOST POINTS BY PLACEKICKER REGULAR SEASON: 69 by Don 

Decker, 18 games, 1951-52 (63 pat, 82 att. 2 field goals). 
MOST POINTS BY PLACEKICKER ALL GAMES: 73 by Don Decker, 

19 games, includes 4 pat in 4 attempts in 1952 Sugar Bowl. (Total 

of 67 pat in 86 att., 2 field goals). 
MOST FIELD GOALS REGULAR SEASON GAMES: 7 by Vincent Scott, 

30 games, 1958-60 (NOTE) "Untz" Brooke Brewer kicked 14, 1916-21 

employing both drop kick and placement. 
MOST TD PASSES CAUGHT REGULAR SEASON: 12 by Gary Collins, 

1959-61 (30 games). 
MOST TOUCHDOWN PASSES THROWN REGULAR SEASON: 22 by 

Jack Scarbath, 28 games, 1950-52. 
MOST PASSES ATTEMPTED REGULAR SEASON: 260 by Jack 

Scarbath, 28 games, 1950-52. 
MOST PASSES ATTEMPTED ALL GAMES: 269 by Jack Scarbath, 

29 games, includes 9 in 1952 Sugar Bowl. 

70 



MOST PASSES COMPLETED REGULAR SEASON: 127 by Dale Betty. 

1958-60 (218 attempts), 30 games. 
MOST PASSES COMPLETED ALL GAMES: l.'.l by .lack Scarbath, 29 

games, includes 6 in L952 Sugar Bowl. (269 att.) 
BEST COMPLETION PERCENTAGE REGULAR SEASON: .583 by Dale 

Belly 1958-60, 30 games. (127 for 218). 
MOST YARDS GAINED PASSING, REGULAR SEASON: 2187 by Jack 

Scarbath, 2S games, 1950-52. 
MOST YARDS GAINED PASSING ALL GAMES: 2244 by Jack 

Scarbath, 29 games, includes 57 yds. in L952 Sugar Bowl. (269 att.. 

i.".i comp.) 
MOST PASSES CAUGHT REGULAR SEASON: 74 by Gary Collins, 1959- 

61, 30 games. 
MOST YARDAGE GAINED BY PASSES REGULAR SEASON: 1182 by 

Garj Collins, 30 games, L959-61. 
MOST PASSES INTERCEPTED: :i by Tom Brown, 20 games, i:>60-61. 
MOST TOTAL YARDS GAINED RUSHING REGULAR SEASON: 1913 

by Ed Modzelewski, 28 games, 1949-51. 
MOST TOTAL YARDS GAINED RUSHING ALL GAMES: 2102 by Ed 

Modzelewski, 30 games, includes 36 yards in 1950 Gator Bowl and 

153 yds. in 1952 Sugar Bowl. 
MOST RUSHES REGULAR SEASON: 340 by Ed Modzelewski, 28 

games, 1949-51. 
MOST RUSHES ALL GAMES: 380 by Ed Modzelewski, 30 games, In- 
cludes 12 in 1950 Gator Bowl and 28 in 1952 Sugar Bowl. 
BEST RUSHING AVERAGE REGULAR SEASON: 8:1 yds. by Chet 

Hanulak, 28 games, 1951-53, (1544 yds., 190 carries). 
BEST RUSHING AVERAGE ALL GAMES: 7.9 yds. by Chet Hanulak. 

30 games, includes 35 yds. on 4 carries in 1952 Sugar Bowl and 39 

yds. on 12 carries in 1954 Orange Bowl. 
MOST TOTAL PLAYS (rush and pass) REGULAR SEASON: 499 by 

Jack Scarbath, 28 games, 1950-52. 
MOST TOTAL PLAYS (rush and pass) ALL GAMES: 514 by Jack 

Scarbath, 29 games, includes 15 in 1952 Sugar Bowl. (Avg. gain per 

play 5.7 yds.) 
MOST TOTAL YARDS GAINED (rush and pass) REGULAR SEASON: 

2838 by Jack Scarbath, 28 games, 1950-52. 
MOST TOTAL YARDS GAINED (rush and pass) ALL GAMES: 2909 

by Jack Scarbath, includes 71 yds. in 1952 Sugar Bowl. (avg. 5.7 

yds. per play.) 



71 



YEAR BY YEAR RECORDS 



MARYLAND 
AGGIES 

1892 (0-3-0) 

St. Johns 50 

Johns Hop 62 

Episcopal Hi. -16 

1893 (6-0-0) 

36 Eastern Hi 

10 Central Hi 

18 Bait. City Col... 

6 St. Johns Col... 

18 W. Md. Col ....10 

16 Orient Ath. CI. 6 

1894 (3-3-0) 

52 W. Md. Col 

12 Wash. Col 

6 St. Johns 22 

6 Georgetown .... 4 
Col. Ath. CI. ..26 
Mt. St. Marys ..24 

1895— No team 
No Games 

1896 (6-2-2) 

Eastern Hi 6 

Gallaudet 

34 Business Hi .... 

10 Central Hi 6 

18 Alexandria Hi.. 
20 Bethel Mil Ac -10 

Episcopal Hi. .. 6 

16 West. Md 6 

14 Central Hi 

U. of Md 

1897 (2-4-0) 

24 Central Hi 6 

4 Eastern Hi 

J. Hopkins 30 

4 St. Johns 6 

6 Gallaudet 16 

Bait. Med Col...l0 

1898 (2-5-0) 

5 Columbian U. ..17 
West. Md 32 

36 Eastern Hi 

Gallaudet 33 

Johns Hop 16 

Episcopal Hi —37 

27 Rock Hill Col... 

1899 (1-4-0) 

West Md 21 

26 Eastern Hi 

Johns. Hop 40 

Delaware Col. 34 
St. Johns 62 

1900 (3-4-1) 

Western Hi .... 

Gib. Ath. CI 17 

G'town Prep .. 5 

6 Episcopal Hi —34 



5 Gonzaga Hi 11 

15 G'town Prep .. 
21 Gonzaga Hi .... 
21 Char Hall Ac .. 

1901 (1-7-0) 

6 Del. Col 24 

10 Gallaudet Re. ..11 

Johns Hop 6 

6 Rock Hill Col-11 
Central Hi 11 

27 U.S. Marines .. 
Wal'k Ath CI ..36 
West. Md 30 

1902 (3-5-2) 

Georgetown —27 

5 Mt. St. Jos 

11 Columbian U. ..10 

6 Olympia Ath. .. 

Wash. Col 

Mt. St. Marys .. 5 

6 West. Md 26 

U. of Md 5 

Johns Hop 17 

Del. Col 

1903 (7-4-0) 

Georgetown —28 

5 Clifton Ath 

21 Gunton Tern. .. 
St. Johns 18 

28 Wash. Col 

27 Tech Hi 

Mt. St. Mar .... 2 

6 West. Md 

11 U. of Md 

Dela. Col 16 

6 Columbian U. .. 

1904 (2-4-2) 

Georgetown —22 
Ran. Macon .... 
Ftress Monroe 

11 Mt. St. Mar 6 

West. Md 5 

22 Gallaudet 5 

U. of Md 6 

Dela. Col 18 

1905 (6-4-0) 

20 BaUt Poly In .... 

16 Gallaudet 

West. Md 10 

Navy 17 

17 Wm. & Mary .. 

28 Mt. St. Josephs 
27 St. Johns 5 

Wash. Col 17 

23 U. of Md 5 

Dela. Col 12 

1906 (5-3-0) 

5 Tech Hi « 

22 Bait City Col .. 

72 



Navy 12 

Georgetown —28 
Mt. Wash. CI. ..29 

20 St. Johns 4 

16 Rock Hill Col. 
35 Wash. Col 

1907 (3-6-0) 

13 Tech High 

Georgetown —10 

5 Richmond Col-11 
Navy 12 

6 Mt.St. Mar 12 

10 Geo. Wash 

10 Wash. Col 5 

St. Johns 16 

Gallaudet 5 

1908 (3-8-0) 

5 Central Hi 

5 Tech High 6 

Richmond Col..22 

Johns Hop 10 

Navy 57 

5 Gallaudet 

Fred'bg Col 10 

12 Balto Poly 6 

St. Johns 31 

Wash. Col 11 

Geo. Wash 57 

1909 (2-5-0) 

Richmond Col. 12 
Johns Hopkins 9 
Tech High 11 

5 Rock Hill 

George Wash. 26 
N. C. State .... 33 

14 Gallaudet 12 

1910 (4-3-1) 

12 Central Hi 

20 Richmond Col. 
11 Johns Hop 11 

21 Catholic U 

11 Gao. Wash 

V.M.I 8 

St. Johns 6 

3 West. Md 17 

1911 (4-4-2) 

6 Tech Hi 

Richmond 

5 Fred'bg Col 

Central Hi 14 

3 Johns Hop 6 

6 Catholic U 6 

St. Johns 27 

5 Wash. Col 17 

6 West Md 

6 Gallaudet 2 

1912 (6-1-1) 

31 Tech Hi 6 

46 Richmond Col. 
58 U. of Md 



13 Johns Hop 

St. Johns 27 

13 Gallaudot 6 

17 West Md 7 

13 Penn Mil. Col. 13 

1913 (6-3-0) 

27 Balto City LO 

45 Richmond Col. 
26 Johns Hop 

46 West Md 

Navv 76 

13 St. Johns 

26 Wash. Col () 

o GaBaudel .... 13 
7 Penn Mil 27 

1914 (5-3-0) 

Balto. Poly 6 

6 Catholic U 

13 West Md 20 

14 Johns Hop 

10 St. Johns 

3 Wash. Col 

Gallaudot 23 

26 Penn Mil 

1915 (6-3-0) 

31 Balto Poly 

Haverford 7 

Catholic U 16 

10 Gallaudet 3 

14 Penn Mil 13 

27 St. Johns 14 

28 Wash Col 13 

51 West Md 

Johns Hop 3 

MARYLAND 
STATE 

1916 (6-2-0) 

6 Dickinson 

7 Navy 14 

15 V.M'.1 9 

6 Haverford 7 

31 St. Johns 6 

10 N.Y.U 7 

13 Catholic U 9 

54 Johns Hop 

1917 (4-3-1) 

20 Dela. Col 

Navy 62 

14 V.M.I 14 

29 Wake Forest ..13 

6 N.C. State 10 

13 St. Johns 3 

Penn State 57 

7 Johns Hop 

1918 (4-1-1) 

6 American U 13 

7 V.M.I 6 

19 West Md 

6 New York U. .. 2 

19 St. Johns 14 

Johns Hop 



1919 (5-4-0) 

6 Swarthmore ....10 
13 Virginia 

West Va 27 

Va. Poly 6 

(I Yale .' 31 

27 St. Johns n 

13 Catholic U 

20 West Md 

14 Johns Hop 

UNIVERSITY 
OF MARYLAND 

1920 (7-2-0) 

54 Randolph Ma .. 

Rutgers 6 

Princeton 35 

14 Catholic U 

27 Wash. Col 

7 Va. Poly 

13 North Car o 

10 Syracuse 7 

24 Johns Hop 7 

1921 (3-5-1) 

3 Rutgers 

Syracuse 42 

3 St. Johns 7 

10 Va. Polv 7 

7 North Car 16 

Yale 28 

16 Catholic U 

Carnegie Tech 21 

6 N. C. State 6 

1922 (4-5-1) 

7 Third Army .... 

Richmond 

Pennsylvania ..12 

Princeton 26 

3 North Car 27 

Va. Poly 21 

3 Yale 45 

3 Johns Hop 

54 Catholic U 

7 N. C. State 6 

1923 (7-2-1) 

53 Randolph Ma... 
3 Pennsylvania .. 

23 Richmond 

7 Va. Poly 16 

14 North Car 

26 St. Johns 

14 Yale 16 

26 N.C. State 12 

40 Catholic U 6 

6 Johns Hop 6 

1924 (3-3-3) 

23 Wash. Col 

7 Wash. & Lee ..19 
38 Richmond 

Va. Polv 12 

6 North Car 

Catholic U 

Yale 47 

73 



N.C. State 

Johns Hop 

1925 (2-5-1) 

13 Wash. Col 

16 Rutgers 

Va. Poly ■'. 

Virginia 6 

North Car. ... L6 

14 Yale 13 

3 W. & L 7 

7 Johns Hop 7 

1926 (5-4-1) 

63 Wash. Col 

South Car 12 

Chicago 21 

8 Va. Polv 24 

14 North Car 6 

38 Gallaudet 7 

15 Yale 

6 Virginia 6 

W. & L 3 

17 Johns Hop 14 

1927 (4-7-0) 

80 Wash. Col 

26 South Car 

6 North Car 7 

13 Va. Poly 7 

10 V. M. 1 6 

6 W. & L 13 

6 Yale 30 

Virginia 21 

20 Vanderbilt 39 

13 Johns Hop 14 

6 Florida 7 

1928 (6-3-1) 

31 Wash. Col 

19 North Car 26 

7 South Car 21 

13 West Md 6 

V. M. 1 

6 Va. Poly 9 

6 Yale 

18 Virginia 2 

6 W. & L 

26 Johns Hop 6 

1929 (4-4-2) 

34 Wash. Col 7 

North Car 43 

6 South Car. .... 26 

13 Gallaudet 6 

6 V. M. 1 7 

13 Virginia 13 

13 Yale 13 

24 Va. Polv 

39 Johns Hop 6 

West Md 12 

1930 (7-5-0) 

60 Wash. Col 6 

13 Yale 40 

21 North Car 28 

21 St. Johns 13 



20 V. M. 1 

14 Virginia 6 

41 W. & L 7 

13 V. Poly 7 

Navy 6 

21 Johns Hop 

7 Vanderbilt 22 

West Md 7 

1931 (8-1-1) 

13 Wash. Col 

7 Virginia 6 

6 Navy 

Kentucky 6 

41 V. M. 1 20 

20 Va. Poly 

12 Vanderbilt 39 

13 W. & L 7 

35 Johns Hop 14 

41 West Md 6 

1932 (5-6-0) 

63 Wash. Col 

6 Virginia 7 

6 Va. Poly 23 

Duke 34 

24 St. Johns 7 

12 V. M. 1 7 

Vanderbilt 13 

7 Navy 28 

6 W. & L 

23 Johns Hop 

7 West Md 39 

1933 (3-7-0) 

20 St. Johns 

Va. Poly 14 

Tulan.o 20 

13 V. M. 1 19 

7 West Md 13 

Virginia 6 

7 Duke 38 

27 Johns Hop 7 

33 W. & L 13 

Florida 19 

1934 (7-3-0) 

13 St. Johns 

W. & L 7 

13 Navy 16 

14 Va. Poly 9 

21 Florida 

20 Virginia 

23 V. M. 1 

14 Indiana 17 

6 Georgetown .... 

19 Johns Hop 

1935 (7-2-2) 

39 St. Johns 6 

7 Va. Poly 

North Car 33 

6 V. M. 1 

20 Florida 6 

14 Virginia 7 

7 Indiana 13 



W. & L 

12 Georgetown .... 6 

Syracuse 

22 West Md 7 

1936 (6-5-0) 

20 St. Johns 

6 Va. Poly 

North Car 14 

21 Virginia 

20 Syracuse 

6 Florida 7 

12 Richmond 

7 V. M. I ..13 

6 Georgetown .... 7 

19 W. & L 6 

West Md 12 

1937 (8-2-0) 

28 St. Johns 

21 Pennsylvania ..28 

6 West Md 

3 Virginia 

13 Syracuse 

13 Florida 7 

9 V. M. 1 7 

14 Penn State 21 

12 Georgetown .... 2 

8 W. & L 

1938 (2-7-0) 

6 Richmond 19 

Penn State 33 

Syracuse 53 

14 West Md 8 

19 Virginia 27 

14 V. M. 1 47 

7 Florida 21 

7 Georgetown —.14 

19 W. & L 13 

1939 (2-7-0) 

26 Hamp.-Syd 

12 West Md 

7 Virginia 12 

12 Rutgers 25 

Florida 14 

Georgetown ....20 

Penn State 12 

V. M. 1 13 

7 Syracuse 10 

1940 (2-6-1) 

6 Hamp.-Syd 7 

Pennsylvania ..51 

6 Virginia 19 

Florida 19 

6 West Md 

Georgetown ....41 
V. M. 1 20 

14 Rutgers 7 

7 W. & L 7 

1941 (3-5-1) 

18 Hamp.-Syd 

6 West Md 6 

74 



Duke 50 

13 Florida 12 

6 Pennsylvania ..55 
Georgetown ....26 

Rutgers 20 

V. M. 1 27 

6 W. & L 

1942 (7-2-0) 

34 Connecticut .... 

14 Lake NAS 

27 Rutgers 13 

V. M. 1 29 

51 West Md 

13 Florida 

Duke 42 

27 Virginia 12 

32 W. & L 28 

1943 (4-5-0) 

7 Curtis B. CG ..13 
13 Wake Forest .. 7 
19 Rich. AAB 6 

2 West Va 6 

Penn State 45 

43 Greenv. AAB ..18 

Virginia 39 

Bainbridge 46 

21 V. M. 1 14 

1944 (1-7-1) 

Hamp.-Syd 12 

Wake Forest -39 

6 West Va 6 

Mich. State .... 8 

6 Florida 14 

7 Virginia 18 

Mich. State ....33 

19 Penn State 34 

8 V. M. 1 6 

1945 (6-2-1) 

60 Guilford Col. .. 6 

21 Richmond 

22 Merch. M. A 6 

13 Va. Poly 21 

13 West Va 13 

14 W. & M 33 

38 V. M. 1 

19 Virginia 13 

19 S. Car 13 

1946 (3-6-0) 

54 Bainbridge 

7 Richmond 37 

North Car 33 

6 Va. Poly 

7 W. & M 41 

17 South Car 21 

24 W. & L 7 

14 Mich. State 26 

7 N. C. State 28 



1947 (7-2-2) 

19 South Car 13 

43 Delaware 19 

18 Richmond 6 

7 Duke 19 

21 Va. Poly 19 

27 West Va 

32 Duquesne 

North Car 19 

20 Vanderbilt 6 

N. C. State .... 

(Gator Bowl, 
.1 hi. 1, 1948) 

20 Georgia 20 

1948 (6-4-0) 

19 Richmond 

21 Delaware 

28 Va. Polv 

12 Duke 13 

47 Geo. Wash 

27 Miami 13 

19 South Car 7 

20 North Car 49 

Vanderbilt 34 

14 West Va 16 

1949 (9-1-0) 

34 Va. Poly 7 

33 Georgetown .... 7 
7 Mich. State -.14 

14 N. C. State 6 

44 South Car 7 

40 Geo. Wash 14 

14 Boston U 13 

47 West Va 7 

13 Miami 

(Gator Bowl, 

Jan. 1, 1950) 
20 Missouri 7 

1950 (7-2-1) 

7 Georgia 27 

35 Navy 21 

34 Mich. State .... 7 

25 Georgetown ....14 

13 N. C. State 16 

26 Duke 14 

23 Geo. Wash 7 

7 North Car 7 

41 West Va 

63 V. P. 1 7 

1951 (10-0-0) 

54 W. & L. 14 

33 Geo. Wash 6 

43 Georgia 7 

14 North Car 7 

27 L. S. U 

35 Missouri 

40 Navy 21 

53 N. C. State 

54 West Va 7 

(Sugar Bowl. 

Jan. 1, 1952) 

28 Tennessee 13 



1952 (7-2-0) 
13 Missouri 10 

13 Auburn 7 

28 Clemson 

37 Georgia 

38 Navy 7 

34 L. S. U 6 

34 Boston U 7 

14 Mississippi 21 

7 Alabama 27 

1953 (10-1-0) 

20 Missouri 6 

52 W. & L 

20 Clemson 

40 Georgia 13 

26 North Car 

30 Miami (Fla.) .. 

24 South Car 6 

27 Geo. Wash 6 

38 Mississippi 

21 Alabama 

*0 Oklahoma 7 

♦(Orange Bowl) 

1954 (7-2-1) 

20 Kentucky 

7 U. C. L.A 12 

13 Wake Forest....l3 

33 North Car 

7 Miami, Fla 9 

20 South Car 

42 N. C. State 14 

16 Clemson 

48 Geo. Wash 6 

74 Missouri 13 

1955 (10-1-0) 

13 Missouri 12 

7 U. C. L. A 

20 Bavlor 6 

28 Wake Forest .. 7 

25 North Car 7 

34 Syracuse 13 

27 South Car 

13 L. S. U 

25 Clemson 12 

19 Geo. Wash 

*6 Oklahoma 20 

*Orange Bowl 

1956 (2-7-1) 

12 Syracuse 26 

6 Wake Forest.. 

Baylor 14 

6 Miami, Fla. __13 

6 N. Carolina __34 

7 Tennessee 34 

Kentucky 14 

6 Clemson 6 

S. Carolina ___13 

25 N. C. State ___14 

75 



1957 (5-5-0) 
13 Texas A&M___21 
L3 N. C. State __ 48 

Duke 14 

27 Wake Forest__ 
21 N. Carolina..- 7 

Tennessee 16 

10 South Carolina 6 

7 Clemson 26 

16 Miami, Fla 6 

12 Virginia . 

1958 (4-6-0) 

Wake Forest _34 

21 N. C. State __. 6 
Clemson 8 

10 Texas A&M ___14 
N. Carolina —27 

7 Auburn 20 

10 S. Carolina ___ 6 
14 Navy 40 

26 Miami, Fla. -14 
44 Virginia 6 

1959 (5-5-0) 

27 West Va. 7 

Texas 26 

Syracuse 29 

7 Wake Fore t 10 

14 N. Carolina __ 7 

6 S. Carolina __22 
14 Navy 22 

28 Clemson 25 

55 Virginia 12 

33 N. C. State ___28 

1960 (6-4-0) 

31 West Va 8 

Texas 34 

7 Duke 20 

10 N.C. State .... 13 
19 Clemson 17 

14 Wake Forest .. 13 

15 S. Carolina 

9 Penn State .... 28 

22 N. Carolina .... 19 
44 Virginia 12 

1961 (7-3-0) 

14 SMU 6 

24 Clemson 21 

22 Syracuse 21 

8 N. Carolina ....14 
21 Air Force ...- 
10 S. Carolina ....20 
21 Penn State ....17 

10 N.C. State 7 

10 Wake Forest .. 7 

16 Virginia 28 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



1962-63 Basketball Schedule 



DATE 




OPPONENT 




LOCATION 


December 


1 


Penn State 




Home 


December 


4 


Georgetown 




Away 


December 


8 


*Duke 




Away 


December 


11 


v North Carolina 


State 


Home 


December 


15 


^Virginia 




Away 


December 


19 


*Wake Forest 




Home 


January 


5 


*South Carolina 




Home 


January 


8 


George Wasnin 


gton 


Home 


January 


12 


Navy 




Home 


January 


14 


*North Carolina 




Home 


January 


19 


^North Carolina 


State 


Away 


February 


1 


George Wasnin 


igton 


Away 


February 


4 


Georgetown 




Home 


February 


7 


' ,: North Carolina 




Away 


February 


9 


:: CI em son 




Away 


February 


11 


^South Carolina 




Away 


February 


14 


*Wake Forest 




Away 


February 


16 


*Virginia 




Home 


February 


19 


*Duke 




Home 


February 


25 


:: Clemson 




Home 


February 


28- 


-March 1-2 ACC Tournament 


Raleigh, N.C 



" : Atlantic Coast Conference Game 

HEAD COACH: H. A. "Bud" Millikan 

ASSISTANT COACH: Frank Fellows 



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