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Full text of "University of Maryland men's football media guides"




RA 






1 96 1 

MARYLAND 
FOOTBALL GUIDE 



• Press • Radio • TV 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/universityofmary1964univ 



INDEX 

Page 

All-Americas of Maryland 59 60 

All-Conference Select ions 62-64 

All-Time Records 64-71 

(Individual and Team — ■ Game, Season, Career) 

Athletic Council 10 

Athletic Director Cobey 11-12 

Basket hall Schedule for 1964-"65 78 

Bowl Records of Maryland Teams 4 

Coach Nugent 13-14 

Assistant Coaches: 

Arrigoni — ■ Corso 15 

Dovell — ■ Hunter 16 

Huntress — Reid 17 

Toomey 18 

Wyre (Trainer) 19 

Coaches Thru The Years 20 

Coaches' Records 76-77 

Depth Chart for 1964 26 

Facts About Maryland 2 

Freshman Roster, Schedule 32 

Interpreting The Terps (Thumbnails) 27-31 

Itinerary for 1964 4 

Numerical Roster 26 

Opponents for 1964: 

Air Force 42-43 

Clemson 50-51 

Duke 40-41 

Navy 48-49 

North Carolina 42^3 

N.C State 38-39 

Oklahoma 34-35 

Perm State 46^17 

South Carolina 36-37 

Virginia 52-53 

Wake Forest 44-45 

Outlook for 1964 24-25 

President Elkins 7-8 

Press, Memo To 3 

Press, The Terp 54 

Pronunciation Chart 26 

Results of 1963 4 

Roster for 1964 22-23 

Freshman Prospects for 1964 32 

Schedule, Varsity 4 

Special Terp Awards 61-62 

Stats for 1963 56-58 

The University 6 

Year-By-Year Records 72-76 

1 



FACTS ABOUT MARYLAND 

NAME University of Maryland 

FOUNDED 1807 

LOCATION College Park, Md. 

PRESIDENT Dr. Wilson H. Elkins 

ATHLETIC DIRECTOR William W. Cobey 

SPORTS INFORMATION DIRECTOR Bill Dismer 

CONFERENCE Atlantic Coast 

NICKNAME Terrapins (Terps) 

COLORS Red and White; Black and Gold 

MASCOT A Terrapin 

STADIUM Byrd (35,000) 

HEAD COACH: Tom Nugent (Ithaca '36) Sixth season at Maryland— 

1959: 5-5-0 1961: 7-3-0 

1960: 6-4-0 1962: 6-4-0 

1963: 3-7-0 

Maryland record (4 years): 27-23-0 
Overall record (14 years): 80-68-3 

ASSISTANTS: Roland Arrigoni (New Mexico, '56); Lee Corso (Florida 
State '57); Bill "Whitey" Dovell (Maryland '53); Hal Hunter 
(Pitt '56); Carroll Huntress (New Hampshire '49); Bernie Reid 
(Georgia '49); Frank Toomey (Ithaca '47). 

TRAINER Alfred J. "Duke" Wyre 

ASSISTANT TRAINER Dick Mann 

SYSTEM "I" and "T" Formations 

LETTERMEN RETURNING (Eighteen) 

END: Howard Humphries 

TACKLES: Larry Bagranoff, Olaf Drozdov, Rich Schaefer 
GUARDS: Matt Arbutina, Joe Frattaroli *, Fred Joyce 
CENTERS: Lou Bury, Charley Martin 

QUARTERBACKS: Kenny Ambrusko*, Jim Corcoran*, Bob Sullivan 
WINGBACK: Mike Funk*, Darryl Hill 

TAILBACKS: Ron Adams, Len Chiaverini, Jerry Fishman, George Stem 
* Earned letters in 1962 

LETTERMEN LOST FROM 1963 SQUAD (Fifteen) 

ENDS: Andy Martin, Mick Melcher, Dave Nardo 
TACKLES: Tom Cichowski, Norm Hatfield 
GUARDS: Joe Ferrante, Dick Melcher 
CENTERS: Gene Feher, Ed Gilmore, Ron Lewis 
QUARTERBACKS: Hank Lilly, Dick Shiner 
WINGBACKS: Ernie Arizzi, Gary Miller 
TAILBACKS: Bob Burton 

2 




MEMO TO THE PRESS 
AND RADIO-TV SPORTSCASTERS 

Maryland's press box maj be taxed to ca- 
pacity "ii two afternoons this fall Septembei 
1!) when we open with Oklahoma, and No\ tm- 
ber T, date of the Navy game. But there's 
always room for our regular correspondents as 
well as those who follow our opponents. 

For those unacquainted with press facilities 
at Byrd Stadium, the working press box is on 
Hie upper level. Whenever possible, scouts 
given si .its in this section with any overflow 
assigned to the lower floor. 

Working press and photographers' credentials 
are distributed each Tuesday during the season. 
for the mosl pari at the press luncheons to 
which interested media always are welcome. If 
not picked up there, they are mailed that after- 
noon. Last-minute requests received too late for mailing will be held at 
Booth No. 6. to the right of the stadium's main 'south) entrance. Wire 
and telephone service requirements should be handled through your local 
Western Union office. 

Parking permits, entitling holders to park in Z Lot, immediately in 
front of the main entrance and in the area adjacent to Cole Field House, 
also will be available. 

Radio booths for visiting teams as well as the University of Maryland 
football network are located on the lower level of the press box. Pho- 
tographers receive credentials entitling them to work either from the 
roof of the press box or on the field. 

Of course the routine services will be continued - - play-by-play, half- 
time "quickie", and final team and individual stats, coaches' comments, 
lineups and scoring summaries. Coach Nugent is always available for 
post-game interviews in the room to the right as you pass completely 
through the center entrance of the building with the scoreboard. Lat> ~i 
stats will be mailed each Sunday night throughout the season. An advance 
release of the game immediately ahead should reach you on Thursdays. 

Please do not hesitate to phone me at any time for any assistance, at 
the numbers listed below. 

TELEPHONES: Day— Area Code 301. UNion 4-4076 

Night— Area Code 202, WOodley 6-6244 

BILL DISMER 

Sports Information Director 

University of Maryland 



1964 SCHEDULE 



Sept. 19 Oklahoma at College Park, Md.. 

Sept. 26 South Carolina at College Park, Md. 

Oct. 3 North Carolina State, Raleigh, N.C. 

Oct. 10 Duke, at Durham, N.C. 

Oct. 17 North Carolina at Norfolk, Va. 
(Oyster Bowl Game) 

Oct. 24 Wake Forest at College Park, Md. 

Oct. 31 Penn State at University Park, Pa. 

Nov. 7 Navy at College Park, Md. 

Nov. 14 Clemson at College Park, Md. 

Nov. 21 Virginia at Charlottesville, Va. 



KICKOFF PRICE 

2:00 P.M. EDT $5.00 

2:00 P.M. EDT $4.00 

1:30 P.M. EST $4.50 

2:00 P.M. EST $4.50 

2:15 P.M. EST $5.00 

2:00 P.M. EDT $4.00 

1:30 P.M. EST $4.00 

1:30 P.M. EST $5.00 

1:30 P.M. EST $4.00 

1:30 P.M. EST $4.50 



MARYLAND'S BOWL RECORD 



1948 


Gator Bowl 


Maryland 


20 


Georgia 


20 


1950 


Gator Bowl 


Maryland 


20 


Missouri 


7 


1952 


Sugar Bowl 


Maryland 


28 


Tennessee 


13 


1954 


Orange Bowl 


Maryland 





Oklahoma 


7 


1956 


Orange Bowl 


Maryland 


6 


Oklahoma 


20 



Won: 2 — Lost: 2 — Tied: 1 



1963 RESULTS 







(Won 3, 


Lost 7) 






aryl 


and 


Opponent 


Maryland 


O 


pponent 


14 


N.C. State 


36 


32 Wake Forest 







13 


South Carolina 


21 


15 Penn State 




17 


12 


Duke 


30 


7 Navy 




42 


7 


North Carolina 


14 


6 Clemson 




21 


21 


Air 'Force 


14 


21 Virginia 




6 



MARYLAND'S ITINERARY FOR 1964 SEASON 



HEADQUARTERS 

College Inn, Raleigh, N.C. 
Jack Tar Hotel, Durham, N.C. 
Mariner Motel, Virginia Beach, Va. 
Holiday Inn, University Park, Pa. 
Mt. Vernon Motel, Charlottesville, Va. 



Date Opponent 

Oct. 3 N.C. State 

Oct. 10 Duke 

Oct. 17 North Carolina 

Oct. 31 Penn State 

Nov. 21 Vireinia 



Squad will arive at game headquarters the day before each game. 

4 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

For 157 years the University of Maryland has been one of the leading 
schools of the nation. And as each year goes by the university continues 
to grow in size, stature, and prominence. 

Today the University of Maryland has eight colleges and eight schools 
which offer an outstanding variety of education to more than 71,600 stu- 
dents who attend its classes on four continents. The university now 
ranks as the thirteenth largest university in the United States. Enroll- 
ment at College Park and Baltimore is 25,581. 

On the sprawling 1,100-acre College Park campus there are more than 
90 main buildings constructed in the brick Georgian-Colonial style. 
Thirty-five miles away in Baltimore 1,600 students attend the six profes- 
sional schools (medicine, dentistry, nursing, pharmacy, social work, and 
law). 

The oldest division of the university is the College of Agriculture which 
was founded in 1856. In that year the state legislature created the Mary- 
land Agricultural College on 428 acres of land purchased from the 
Charles Calvert estate eight miles northeast of Washington, D.C. There 
at College Park the first classes were held in October, 1859. 

At Thanksgiving, 1912, fire destroyed the two main buildings and gave 
Marylanders a chance to re^plan and expand the college. Tn 1916 the 
institution was re-named the Maryland State College of Agriculture. In 
1920 the college merged with the University of Maryland (then located 
at Baltimore) and the two campuses became known as the University of 
Maryland. 

As the years passed the University steadily erected new buildings, cre- 
ated new educational branches, and installed modern teaching devices and 
systems. 

The Theodore McKeldin Library, which dominates the west end of 
the university's College Park mall, has space enough to shelve more than 
a million books, pamphlets, and research materials. 

The Cole Activities Building, located near Byrd Stadium, was complet- 
ed in 1955 and is one of the finest examples of American engineering and 
architecture. The huge indoor amphitheater seats more than 15,000 
people for athletic, social, and educational events. The Cole audi- 
torium is the second largest auditorium in the eastern part of the nation. 

Rising above all other campus buildings is the Memorial Chapel. 
The structure actually is composed of three chapels — one for Christian 
services, one for Roman Catholics, and one for non-Christians. The main 
chapel seats 1,350 persons. To the rear of it is a smaller chapel which 
seats 122 people. The tiny Roman Catholic chapel is designed to seat 44 
people. Associated with the Memorial Chapel are chaplains of almost 
every major religious denomination. 

Every hour from the steeple of the chapel the strains of "My Mary- 
land" chime across the campus. Flemish and English carillon-type bells 
hang in the steeple to furnish the hourly chimes and special seasonal 
refrains. 




DR. WILSON H. ELKINS 



PRESIDENT, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Dr. Wilson Homer Elkins assumed the presidency of the University 
of Maryland on September 1, 1954. His formal inauguration as the 
twenty-first head of the institution took place on January 20, 1955. 

He has brought to the University of Maryland an outstanding pro- 
fessional record of proven leadership in educational administration, and 
an unusual background of high scholastic achievement and demon- 
strated athletic ability during his undergraduate and graduate career. 

At Maryland, he has stressed the obligation of the state to provide a 
quality education for all Maryland youth who demonstrate their ca- 
pacity to learn. On the subject of sports, he has said that values and 
attitudes developed in activities outside of the classroom, including foot- 
ball, are important elements of a liberal education. 

Dr. Elkins is a native Texan. He was a Rhodes Scholar from 1933 
to 1936. He received the B. Litt. and D. Phil, degrees from Oxford Uni- 
versity, England, in 1936. He received his undergraduate education at 
the University of Texas from 1928 to 1932. At Texas he earned eight 
varsity letters in football, basketball and track. He was elected presi- 
dent of the Student Association and captain of the basketball team in 



iiis senior year. He is a member of Phi Beta Kappa and of Omicron 
Delta Kappa. He was graduated from the University of Texas in 1932 
with B.A. and M.A. degrees. 

Dr. Elkins began his professional career in education as an instructor 
in history at the University of Texas in 1936. He held two presidencies 
prior to assuming this office at the University of Maryland. From 1938 
to 1949, he was President of San Angelo Junior College, San Angelo, 
Texas; and h-e was president of Texas Western College, a branch of 
the University of Texas, from 1949 to 1954. 

In 1937, Dr. Elkins was married to the former Dorothy Blackburn 
of Berclair, Tex. They have two daughters, Mrs. Edward G. Neal (the 
former Carole Ann) and Margaret Elise. 



THE 
ATHLETIC COUNC5L 

Dr. John E. Faber 
% "^^ Chairman 







Mr. William W. Cobey 

Director of Athletics 

M 
Dr. Faber 

Mr. Michael Mendelson President, Student Government Association 

Dr. J. Allan Cook College of Business and Public Administration 

Dr. Francis C. Stark Professor in Horticulture 

Mrs. Erna R. Chapman President, Alumni Association 

Dr. Fletcher P. Vietch Professor in Chemistry 

Dr. Robert G. Risinger College of Education 

Dr. William A. Wockenfuss .... Associate Prof, in Mechanical Engineering 

Department of Intercollegiate Athletics 

Sports Information Director Bill Dismer 

Ticket Manager Eddie Bear, 

Secretary to Mr. Cobey Mrs. Dorothy Hunt 

Secretary to Mr. Nugent Miss Eleanor Peddicord 

Secretary to Mr. Millikan Mrs. Theresa Ryan 

Secretary to Mr. Dismer Mrs. Frances Sydnor 

Secretary to Mr. Bean Mrs. Helen Ball 

Baseball Coach Elton S. "Jack" Jackson 

Basketball Coach H. A. "Bud" Millikan 

Assistant Basketball Coach Frank Fellows 

Golf Coach Frank Cronin 

Lacrosse Coach Al Heagy 

Assistant Lacrosse Coaches John D. Howard, C. Rennie Smith 

Rifle Coach Arthur Cook 

Soccer, Tennis Coach Doyle Royal 

Swimming Coach Bill Campbell 

Track, Cross-Country Coach Jim Kehoe 

Wrestling Coach William E. "Sully" Krouse 

Head Trainer Alfred "Duke" Wyre 

Assistant Trainer Dick Mann 

Equipment Manager Kermit "Chief" Cissell 

Assistant Equipment Manager Don Hutchison 

Head of Facilities Charles "Lindy" Kehoe 

The Football Coaches 

Head Football Coach Tom Nugent 

Assistant Football Coach Roland Arrigoni 

Assistant Football Coach Lee Corso 

Assistant Football Coach Bill "Whitey" Dovell 

Assistant Football Coach Bernie Reid 

Assistant Football Coach Hal Hunter 

Assistant Football Coach Frank Toomey 

Assistant Football Coach and 

Freshman Football Coach Carroll Huntress 

10 




WILLIAM W. COBEY 



DIRECTOR OF ATHLETICS 

One of the most personable guys in the business, or any business for 
that matter, is ready for his ninth year as director of athletics at his 
alma mater. Bill Cobey's roots in Maryland go back a long way — back 
to the days of his father who graduated from Maryland in 1901 after 
lettering in track and managing the baseball team. He subsequently be- 
came a famous agricultural scientist. Cobey's mother, a native Floridian, 
has been a resident of College Park since 1933. She has consistently sus- 
tained her loyalty to the University of Maryland, and is one of Mary- 
land's most enthusiastic football fans. 

Overseer of one of the finest athletic set-ups in the country, Bill Cobey 
has seen Maryland win the Carmichael Cup, symbolic of excellence in 
Atlantic Coast Conference athletics, two of the three years it has been 
in existence and lost, last year — by one-half a point — to North Carolina. 

Despite the departure of the cup, Cobey could reflect upon many happy 
moments for Maryland during the 1963-64 school year in which Terp 
teams won six of the 12 conference titles outright and shared in a seventh. 
Prior to this past year, Maryland had dominated the conference to such 
an extent that its 58 titles since 1953 were twice as many as won by the 
school with the second highest number of crowns. 

Although he played freshman lacrosse, Cobey devoted the rest of the 
spare time of his college days to working in the cashier's office and it 
was to that office that he returned in 1931, one year after graduating, 
to begin his long and esteemed career with the University. He held the 

11 



position of Cashier of the University for 17 years or until 1948 when he 
was appointed Graduate Manager of Athletics. In 1956 he was named 
Director of Athletics, succeeding the late Jim Tatum. 

A member of Kappa Alpha (Southern) Order during his college days, 
Cobey continued active in community and civic affairs after graduation. 
He has been president of the University Park PTA, councilman for Uni- 
versity Park, and president of the University branch of the Maryland 
Classified Employee's Association. He is still active in the College Park 
Rotary Club. 

A native of Quincy, Fla., Cobey married Mary Gray Munroe of that 
city in 1935. They have six children, three daughters (all married) and 
three sons, and three granddaughters. The daughters are Mary Patricia 
(Mrs. Fred Martin, Jr.), Julia Ann (Mrs. John Gluck) and Betty (Mrs. 
Walter Brown). The sons are William, recent graduate of the Wharton 
School of Finance of the University of Pennsylvania; Elwood, who is in 
his first year at. West Point, and Munroe, entering junior high school 
this fall. 

The Cobeys are members of the University Methodist Church in College 
Park. And it would be hard to find a more popular couple in the state 
of Maryland! 



1L> 




TOM NUGENT 



HEAD FOOTBALL COACH 

Tom Nugent has a zest for life. Despite his only losing season at 
Maryland in five years, he is as full of enthusiasm as ever. And, despite 
a schedule which calls for him to face Oklahoma in the opener and Penn 
State and Navy on successive Saturdays this fall, the inventor of the "I" 
formation apparently can't wait for the '64 campaign to begin. 

Never before had a Nugent-coached team lost its first four games as 
did the 1963 Maryland eleven, but just when it seemed Air Force was 
going to make it five in a row Nugent's Terps of yesteryear produced one 
of the most scintillating finishes ever seen at College Park to snap the 
slump. 

The Terps' head football coach could talk football 24 hours a day. 365 
days a year, including the month he takes his lovely wife, Peg, and their 
nine children on their July vacation together. There and then, he claims, 
he thinks about football but devotes his time to catching game fish with 
his gang. 

Originator of the "I" formation which Southern California used to 
win the national championship in 1962 and thereby focus national atten- 
tion on the unusual offense, Nugent has built his attack around the "I" 
for 15 years, or ever since he introduced it at Virginia Military Institute 
in 1949. That was the year Nugent's VMI team used it effectively lo upset 
Georgia Tech, 14-13. at Atlanta. Nugent won a Southern Conference 
championship at VMI before becoming head coach at Florida State in 
1953. His 10-year record at those two schools was 53 victories, 45 defeats 

13 



and 3 ties. Combined with his five-year mark of 27-23 at Maryland, his 
career coaching record stands at 80-68-3. 

Something Nugent started at Florida State ten years ago is still going 
strong: the Florida State Football clinic which annually attracts more 
than 1,000 coaches from all over the country. This year Nugent served 
on clinics at Canton, Ohio, Oklahoma City, Concord, N.H., and at Kutshers 
in Monticello, New York. 

Last year's last-second 21-14 victory over the Air Force wasn't the first 
time one of Nugent's Maryland teams have provided major thrills for 
College Park crowds. In 1961 his team upset Syracuse, 22-21, at a time 
when the Big Orange was riding high with the late Ernie Davis, and a 
month later followed with a 21-17 conquest of Penn State — ■ the only 
time Maryland ever has beaten that team. During Tom's first year at 
Maryland, the Terps defeated both Clemson and North Carolina, the 
ACC's top teams, enroute to their 5-5 record. The following year Mary- 
land's only conference defeats came at the hands of the teams which 
finished 1-2: Duke and N.C. State. Maryland's overall record was 6-4. 
In '61, Nugent's team finished with a 7-3 record and only a last-game 
upset at the hands of Virginia kept it out of the Orange Bowl. It was 
6-4 in '62 and 3-7 last year. 

When the Nugents moved to College Park, living quarters — for 11 ■ — 
were something of a problem. But when a sorority left its house vacant 
smack in the middle of the campus, the Nugents moved in, and that's 
where you'll find them all today: John Michael, 6; Jerry, 8; Mary Ann, 9; 
Timmy, 10; Patty, 14; T.D., 16; Peggy, 18; Kerry, 20, and Tommy, 21. 



14 



THE ASSISTANT COACHES 



ROLAND ARRIGONI 



Joined Man land Staff, February L959 



Primarj responsibility Seoul Team Leader 

Background 

Date and place of birth Chicago, 111., April 
29, 1935 

High School Albuquerque High School, 
Albuquerque, New Mexico 

College — University of New Mexico (BS De- 
gree '56) 

Varsity sports participated in — Footba'l 
(tackle) Baseball (catcher) 

Letters won — 6 (3 in each) 

Previous coaching experience — 

Assistant coach, Ft. Bliss, Texas, 1956-'57 
Freshman coach, Florida State, 1958 
Freshman coach, Maryland, 1959-'62 
Scout team coach, Maryland, 1963 

Unmarried. 

Hobby — golf. 

LEE CORSO - Joined Maryland Staff, January 1959 






"<8^ 4B& 




Primary responsibility — Offensive leader 
(quarterbacks, offensive backs). 
Also heads recruiting program 

Background 
Date and place of birth — Oak Park, Illinois, 

August 7, 1935 
High School — Miami Jackson, Miami, Flor- 
ida 
College— Florida State University (BS, '57, 

MS '58) 
Varsity sports participated in — Football 

(quarterback), Baseball (centerfielder) 
Letters won — 8 (4 in football, 4 in baseball) 
Highest honors won — 3rd ail-American foot- 
ball team, 1956 
National player-of-the-week, 1956 
Ail-Time Florida State QB 
All-State (Florida) QB, 2 years 
All-Southern centerfielder 
Captain, FSU baseball team (1956). Led 
in hitting 2 years. 
Previous coaching experience — 

Assistant coach, Florida State. 1957-'58 
Backfield coach. Maryland, 1959-'60 
Varsity backfield and Freshman coach. 

Maryland, 1961 (team undefeated) 
Offensive and backfield coach. Marv- 
land, 1962-'63 
Married to the former Mary "Betsy" Young- 
blood (Florida State). 2 children— Steve 
(S 1 -;) and Dave (2%). 
Hobbies — Public speaking, golf, music 



15 



WILLIAM H. "Whitey" DOVELL — Joined Maryland Staff in 1952 

Primary responsibility — Defensive line coach 

Background 

Date and place of birth — Newark, N.J., Feb- 
ruary 11, 1927 

High School— St. Benedict's 

College — University of Maryland, BS degree 
('51 ) 

Varsity Spont — Football (guard) 

Letters won — 3 

Previous coaching experience (all at Mary- 
land) 
Freshman line coach, 1952 
Head freshman coach, 1953-'55* 
Line coach, 1955-'63 

*( Do veil's 1955 freshman team was un- 
defeated and defeated Mexico Poly in 
an international game in Mexico City, 
26-13) 

Married to the former Claire Benson. 3 chil- 
dren — Audry (7), Patricia (5) and Lisa 
(2) 

Hobbies — Fishing and camping 




HAROLD T. "Hal" HUNTER — Joined Maryland Staff February 1964 

Primary responsibility — Offensive line coach 

Background 
Date and place of birth — Canonsburg, Penn- 
sylvania, June 3, 1932 
High School — Canonsburg 
College — University of Pittsburgh (AB De- 
gree '55) 

West Virginia University (MS Degree 
'62) 
Varsity sports participated in — Football 

(guard, linebacker) Wrestling 
Letters won — 6 (3 in each) 
Highest honors won — Honorable mention, 
All-America AP, UPI 

Lineman-of-the-week, 1954 

Unsung hero-of-the-week, 1954 

All-State tackle (high school) 
Previous coaching experience: 

High School coach, Avella, Pa., 1956 

High School coach, Berlin, Pa., 1957 

Washington & Jefferson College, 1958 

University of Richmond, 1959-'61 

West Virginia University, 1962-'63 
Married to the former Eileen M. Gall. 3 

children — Heidi Lynn (10), Heather 

Doreen (8), Hal (5). 
Hobbies — Swimming, all water sports 




16 



CARROLL P. HUNTRESS — Joined Maryland Staff, September I'.KKl 




Falls High 



Primary responsibility — Freshman Coach, 
(also serves as secretary of The Ter- 
rapin Club) 

Background 
I "ate and place of birth — Saco, Maine, Janu- 
ary 4, 1924 
High School — Thornton Academy, Saco, 

Maine 
College — University of New Hampshire (BS 

Degree in '49) 
Varsity sports participated in 
Football (fullback) 
Track (dashes, hurdles) 
Lacrosse (midfielder) 
Letters won — 8 

Highest honors won — All-America la- 
crosse midfielder 

Previous coaching experience: 
Head coach, Mechanic 
School, Maine, 1948-'50 
Head coach, Portland High School, 

Maine, 1951V59 
Assistant Freshman Coach, Maryland, 

1960 
End coach, 1961-62 
Head Freshman Coach, 1963 
Married to the former Betty Curran (New 
Hampshire '46). 3 children — Judy (16), 
Sharon (12), Pam (10). 
Hobbies — Hunting and fishing 

BERNIE REID — Joined Maryland Staff, February 1959 

Primary responsibility — Defensive line 

Background 
Date and place of birth — Hamilton, Ohio, 

October 5, 1924 
High School — Hamilton High 
College — University of Georgia, BS Degree 

in Education '49 
Varsity sports participated in— 

Football (guard) 
Letters won — 3 
Highest honors won — All-Southern 

All-Southeastern 

Most valuable lineman 

President, Student Council 
Previous coaching experience — 

High School coach, Fitzgerald, Georgia. 
1949 

High School coach, Albanv, Georgia, 
1950-'58 
Married to the former Kathryn Herold. 3 

children: Karolyn (15). Paula (13), 

Bernard Jeffery (3). 
Hobbies: Hunting, fishing 




17 



FRANK TOOMEY — Joined Maryland Staff, February 1959 

Primary responsibility — Defensive leader 

Background 

Date and place of birth — Niagara Falls, 

N.Y., August 28, 1924 
High School — Canisius Prep, Buffalo, N.Y. 
College— Ithaca (BS '47), (MA '48), (Guid- 
ance Certificate '49) 
Varsity sports participated in — 
Football (tailback) 
Basketball (forward) 
Baseball (centerfielder) 
Letters won — 9 

Highest honors won — Hall of Fame, Canisius 
Prep 
Captain, Ithaca Football team 
Previous coaching experience — 

U.S. Marine team, Pensacola Naval Air 

Station, Florida, 1945 
Assistant varsity coach, Ithaca College, 

1946 
Backfield coach, Ithaca College, 1947 
High School coach, Waverly, N.Y., 1947- 

'53 
Assistant varsity coach, Florida State, 

1954-'58 
Offensive backfield coach, Maryland, 

1959-'61 
Defensive backfield coach, Maryland, 
1962-'63 
Married to the former Rita Sullivan (Mans- 
field College). 1 son, Mike (12) 
Hobbies — Golf and swimming 




IS 



ALFRED J "Duke" WYRE 

"Duke" Wyre's I n taping and looking a£t< r 

Maryland athletes for 17 years and it's doubt- 
ful if anyone on the campus has as many 
friends among the participants of Maryland's 
12 sports than this former Olympic trainer 
Possessing the highesl professional skill, "Dul 
administers lo the boys with a warm, but strict 
manner which induces admiration and respect 
from all who contact him. 

"Duke" was at Yale for 15 years before com- 
ing to Maryland in 1947 (with a year at Holy 
Cross in between). He has a wide acquain- 
tance among the country's trainers and his own 
reputation is nationwide. He is considered a 
Leading authority in the field of training ath- 
letic teams, and has written many articles and 
manuals on training methods. He also has 
lectured at various training clinics from time 

to time. In 1956 he served as chairman of the Board of Directors of the 
National Trainers' Association of which he was one of the founders. 

Probably the pinnacle of his career came in 1960 when he was selected 
as one of the eight United States trainers for the Olympics in Rome. 
Duke's special assignment was the handling of the U.S. crew, singularly 
enough, the Navy eight from neighboring Annapolis. 

Duke is rather inconspicuous on the sidelines until a Maryland player 
gets hurt when he dashes on the field with his little black bag. During 
basketball season though, he adds color to the Maryland bench with his 
flaming red vest which lets all and sundry know "The Duke" is on the 
job. 

"Duke" is married to the former Maryan Conroy, like himself, a native 
New Englander. During the summer they're usually to be found up 
in that section of the country. 




19 



HEAD COACHES THROUGH THE YEARS 



1892— W. VV. Skinner 
1895— S. H. Harding 
1894— J. G. Bannon 
1895— G. M. Harris 
1896 — Grenville Lewis 
1897 — John Lillibridge 
1898— J. F. Kenly 
1899— S. M. Cooke 
1900— F. H. Peters 
1901— E. B. Dunbar 
♦Above Teams Coached by 

Captains 
1902— D. John Markey 

(Western Md.) 
1903— Markey 



1904— Markey 

1905— Fred Nielsen (Neb.) 

1906 — Nielsen 

1907— C. G. Church (Va.) 

and C. W. Melick (Neb.) 
1908 — Bill Lang (Delaware) 
1909 — Barney Cooper 

(Md. '08) and E. P. 

Larkin (Cornell) 
1910— R. Alston (G.W.) 
1911— C. F. Donnelly 

(Trinity) and H. C. Byid 

(Maryland '08) 
1912-34— H. C. Byrd 

(Md '08) 



1935-39— Frank Dobson 

(Princeton) 
1940-41— Jack Faber C26), 

Al Heagy. C30), and Al 

Woods C33) all of Md. 
1942— Clark Shaughnessy 

(Minnesota) 
1943-44 — Clarence Spears 

(Dartmouth) 
1945— Paul Bryant (Ala.) 
1947-55 — Jim Tatum (N.C. > 
1956-58 — Tommy Mont (Md.) 
1959-63 — Tom Nugent 

(Ithaca) 



20 



FOP BACKS OF '64 




GEORGE STEM 
Tailback 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



QUARTERBACKS 

Name Ht. Wt. Age CI. High School 

*KENNETH AMBRUSKO 6-0 185 20 Jr. Chaney 

Fred Cooper 6-1 180 18 So. Chartiers Val. 

*JAMES CORCORAN 6-0 190 21 Jr. Dickinson 

John Gibson 6-1 185 18 So. Norwin 



Hometown 

Youngstown, Ohio 
Carnegie, Pa. 
Jersey City, N.J. 
Irwin, Pa. 



Phil Petry 



6-1 195 18 So. S. Hagerstown Hagerstown, Md. 



♦ROBERT SULLIVAN 6-0 180 20 Jr. Wilmington 



Wilmington, N.C. 



WI 

Bobby Collins 5-10 160 

William Dorn 5-11 180 

*MICHAEL FUNK 6-0 188 

*DARRYL HILL 6-0 160 

Walter Hill 5-11 180 

Joseph Keveryn 5-11 165 

Tom Lalli 5-11 175 

Richard Nye 5-9 170 

Taze Proffitt 6-2 183 

Del Proudfoot 6-0 165 

Bruce Springer 6-4 190 



NGBACKS 

18 So. Levittown 
22 Sr. Mt. Holly 

20 Sr. Bishop McDevitt 

21 Sr. Gonzaga 

19 So. Peabody 

19 So. Three Rivers 

18 So. Red Bank 

19 So. Chambersburg 

20 So. Wm. Penn 
18 So. Fort Hill 

20 Jr. Scotch Plains 



Levittown, N.J. 
Mt. Holly, N.J. 
Harrisburg, Pa. 
Washington, D.C. 
Petersburg, Va. 
Three Riv. Texas 
Red Bank, N.J. 
Chambersburg, Pa. 
Newcastle, Del. 
Cumberland, Md. 
Fanwood, N.J. 



*RON ADAMS 
Robert Bauer 
Tony Cerra 
**LEN CHIAVERINI 

*JERRY FISHMAN 
Tom Hickey 
Curtis Hotze 
Doug Klingerman 
Walt Marcindak 
Wymand McQuown 
Ron Nalewak 
John O'Brien 
Michael Patryn 
Terry Pezzula 
John Spangler 

*GEORGE STEM 
George Viereck 
Chet Wolford 



TAILBACKS - 

5-10 175 20 

6-0 195 18 

5-11 175 19 

5-11 180 21 

6-1 220 21 

5-11 210 18 

5-9 185 19 

6-1 190 21 

5-10 210 19 

6-0 193 19 

6-2 205 19 

5-9 177 19 

5-8 175 19 

5-9 180 19 

5-10 190 IS 

5-10 180 20 

5-10 175 19 

6-0 188 20 



- FULLBACKS 

Sr. Irvington 
So. Boyertown 
Jr. Farrell 
Sr. Ambridge 
Jr. Norwalk 
So. Stamford 
So. Mt. St. Joseph 
Jr. Bloomsburg 
So. Old Forge 
So. Bethesda C.C. 
So. Coal Township 
So. Paterson 
So. Calvert Hall 
So. Bishop Egan 
So. Baltimore Poly 
Jr. Westminster 
So. McLean 
So. Tyrone 



Irvington, N.J. 
N. Berlinville, Pa. 
Farrell, Pa. 
Ambridge, Pa. 
E. Norwalk, Conn. 
Stamford, Conn. 
Richmond, Va. 
Bloomsburg, Pa. 
Old Forge, Pa. 
Bethesda, Md. 
Shamokin, Pa. 
Paterson, N.J. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Bristol, Pa. 
Baltimore, Md. 
Westminster, Md. 
McLean, Va. 
Tyrone, Pa. 



22 



1964 FOOTBALL ROSTER 







GUARDS 




Name 


Ht. 


wt. 


Age 


CI. High School 


Hometown 


Patrick Baker 


5-10 


185 


19 


So. Bishop Guilfoyle 


Altoona, Pa. 


Charles Ca\ e 


6-0 


210 


21 


Jr. St. Johns 


Bethe da, Md, 


Gayton Cicooone 


:.-Hi 


205 


22 


Jr. Scton Hall 


Newark, N.J. 


Donald Fotan 


5-9 


195 


19 


So. DeMatha 


Hyattsville, M.d 


Brian Hunt 


5-11 


190 


19 


So. Seton Hall 


S. Orange, N.J. 


**FRED JOYCE 


5-11 


200 


21 


Sr. Fort Hill 


Cumberland, Md. 


Charles Krahling 


6-1 


200 


20 


Jr. John Carroll 


Hyattsville, Md. 


David Markoe 


5-10 


210 


21 


Jr. Frederick 


Frederick, Md. 


Lorie McQueen 


6-2 


215 


21 


So. Bordentown 


Bordentown, N.J. 


Milan Vucin 


5-11 


195 


19 


So. Pennsbury 


Pennsbury, Pa. 






TACKLES 




Ben Aquilina 


6-3 


220 


19 


So. Roselle Park 


Roselle Park, N.J. 


*MATT ARBUTINA 


6-1 


215 


22 


Jr. Aliquippa 


Aliquippa, Pa. 


*LARRY BAGRANOFF 


6-2 


210 


20 


Jr. Walter Johnson 


Bethesda, Md. 


David Delmer 


6-0 


205 


19 


So. Sherwood 


Rockville, Md. 


William Donaldson 


6-0 


200 


20 


So. Rancocas Valley 


Mt. Holly, N.J. 


♦♦OLAF DROZDOV 


6-0 


215 


21 


Sr. Pennsville 


Pennsville, N.J. 


*JOE FRATTAROLI 


6-2 


220 


21 


Sr. Stamford 


Stamford, Conn. 


♦RICHARD SCHAEFER 


6-1 


215 


20 


Jr. Williamstown 


Williamstown, Pa 


Robert Stolick 


6-2 


220 


21 


Jr. Sewickley Area 


Herminie, Pa. 


John Trachy 


6-2 


215 


19 


So. Sparta 


Sparta, N.J. 


Mel Yacamelli 


6-4 


220 


19 


So. Clalrton 


Clairton, Pa. 


Robert York 


6-1 


212 


19 


So. St. Johns 


Silver Spring, Md. 






CENTERS 





**LOU BURY 

Thomas Kennedy 
♦CHARLES MARTIN 
Jos. Simoldoni 



6-2 210 22 Sr. Calvert Hall 

6-1 205 19 So. Indiana Joint 

5-11 196 21 Sr. Father Judge 

6-0 205 19 So. Bullis Prep 



Baltimore, Md. 
Indiana. Pa. 
Phila. Pa. 
Garfield, N.J. 



ENDS 



Richard Absher 




6-4 


230 


19 


So. 


Bullis Prep 


Bert Bilancioni 




6-0 


200 


19 


So. 


Salesianum 


Julian Boryczew 


ski 


6-0 


215 


19 


So. 


Garfield 


Tom Bresnahan 




6-0 


185 


20 


Jr. 


DeMatha 


♦HOWARD HUMPHRI1 


195 


23 


Jr. 


Western 


John Kenny 




6-1 


195 


21 


Jr. 


Steubenville 


Robert Leckie 




6-3 


200 


19 


So. 


Hasbrouck 


Charles Myrtle 




6-2 


200 


19 


So. 


Archbishop Car 


Ed Pyne 




6-2 


220 


20 


So. 


Camden Cath. 


Ma»-k Rankin 




6-0 


180 


18 


So. 


Annapolis 



Wilmington, Del. 
Camp Springs, Md. 
Garfield, N.J. 
Landover, Md. 
Washington, D.C. 
Steubenville, O. 
Hasbrouck. N.J. 
Hyattsville. Md. 
Marlton, N.J. 
Annapolis. Md. 



-indicates number of letters won. 



23 



THE OUTLOOK FOR '64 

With its best offensive players on one unit and the outstanding de- 
fense men on another, Maryland will revert to its 1962 practice of field- 
ing specialized elevens as the 1964 campaign gets under way September 
19 against mighty Oklahoma. 

Although he didn't tab them as "Hustlers" or "Gangbusters" as they 
were named two years ago, Coach Tom Nugent substituted a two-team 
set-up in place of the usual depth chart as the accomplishments of spring 
drills were analyzed. It appears on Page 26. This was a very thorough 
analysis, with each of his assistants submitting individual ratings of every 
player based upon personal observation and a review of the movies of 
the four Saturday scrimmages and the spring game. Each player had 
been equally drilled in the offensive, defensive and kicking games 
throughout the spring. 

As a result, Nugent is satisfied that he has assembled his best offensive 
players on a "Go" team and his best defenders on a "Stop" unit. In ex- 
perience the units are about equal, with four seniors, four juniors and 
three sophs on the offensive eleven; three seniors, four juniors and four 
sophs on the defensive unit. The offensive line averages 210, the de- 
fensive a bit over 200. 

Set to direct the offensive team is Kenny Ambrusko. a daring, take-a- 
chance, "let's-go-all-the-way-on-this-one" junior quarterback who can 
run and throw. Ambrusko was a letter-winner with the 1962 team with 
a rushing average of 5.8. Because of the presence of Dick Shiner, he was 
not called upon to pass. But Kenny was sensational throughout the 
spring, breaking loose for long runs every Saturday and connecting on 
long and short passes. With him in the backfield will be Darryl Hill, 
the slender but hardy senior wingback who set an ACC record by catch- 
ing seven touchdown passes last year and came within four of equalling 
Tom Brown's all-time Maryland record of 47 catches within a single 
season; Len Chiaverini, another senior, who led the conference in rushing 
in 1962 and was Maryland's second leading ground-gainer last year, and 
Walt Marciniak, a 210-pound hard-nosed sophomore with possibilities of 
developing into one of Maryland's better fullbacks. 

Backing up that first-string offensive backfield are Jim Corcoran — 
like Ambrusko, a letterman of the '62 squad — who is a picture-type 
passer; Ron Nalewak, recovered after a 1962 injury and being groomed 
as an important factor of the offense, and Bo Hickey, another soph who 
could step in the tail-back sopt and do a fine job. 

On the offensive line Maryland will have the junior Howard Humphries, 
who handled all the punting last year and was the team's third leading 
pass-receiver, at left end, and Dick Absher, an outstanding soph, at the 
other flank. Absher, a 6-4, 230-pounder who also punts, could be another 
Gary Collins (Maryland's all-America of 1961). Absher also kicks off 
and produces PATs. 

At tackle the senior Joe Frattaroli (220) and the junior Matt Arbutina 
(215) afford adequate weight and mobility. Frattaroli, an experienced 
reserve tackle the past two years, had a fine Spring to win his berth, 
while Arbutina is a good offensive blocker. At guards it will be Lorie 
McQueen, a converted fullback who showed unusual promise in the 
Spring, and Chick Krahling, a former center who was one of the most 
improved players at the close of Spring drills. 

Four sophomores are listed on the defensive team but only one of 

24 



them in the line. Thai would be Charley Myrtle, like Absher, an end. 
Myrtle .'111(1 Absher are rated the two besl ends ever to enter Maryland 
at the same time and both hail from this area. Myrtle is designated a 
the righl end of the defensive unil with John Kenny, a junior, at the 

other end. 

Tin- interior of the defensive line is the big smile-producer for Mary- 
land coaches whose consensus resulted in Olaf Drozdov, 215-pound senior, 
and Larry Bagranoff, 210-pound junior, being listed as its tackles; 200- 
pound senior Fred Joyce and 220-pound junior Jerry Fishman the guard 

and all-around player 210-pound Lou Bury as the center'. 

Drozdov, one of Maryland's firsl three-sports letter-winners in a long 
while, definitely is all-conference material. He's a six-footer who can 
play both ways, if necessary. That he has the muscle and physique is 
attested by his feats as a wrestler, shot-putter and discus thrower. 
Bagranoff, his running-mate at tackle, earned a regular job early as 
a sophomore last year and no one ever took it away from him. 

The guards rate a special mention, for one of the big surprise develop- 
ments of the Spring was the conversion of Jerry Fishman, the team's 
leading ground-gainer in '63, to a guard. An outstanding linebacker, 
Fishman is the kind who likes it when the going is toughest and can 
rove from end to end to stop plays. Although injury-prone ever since 
he enrolled at Maryland, Fishman never has been hurt on defense . . . 
another factor in influencing the change. At the other guard is Freddy 
Joyce, one of the toughest linemen to play at Maryland in years. Like 
Bagranoff, Joyce won a regular spot early in his sophomore year and 
continued his fine play last season. Although rated the No. 1 offensive 
lineman after Spring drills, Joyce should be of even greater value on 
defense. Already they're comparing him with Bobby Ward, another 
Maryland all-America of the past. 

At center will be found Lou Bury, a 210-pound senior who has played 
five different positions, all excellently, during his first two years. Another 
great line-backer, Bury should pair with Fishman in giving Maryland 
superior protection in this respect. 

In the secondary, it'll be up to youngsters — three sophs and a junior. 
Based on their work during the Spring, first-year men Fred Cooper, Tom 
Lalli and Taze Proffitt will be the deep backs with the junior Bob Sulli- 
van rounding out the defensive backfield. Lalli, the leading kickoff 
returner for the frosh last year, is extremely fast and has good hands. 
Cooper is a good, all-around athlete with plenty of promise while Proffitt, 
a tall, rangy ex-quarterback, came out of nowhere to earn a spot. Sulli- 
van, who had a bit of experience as a signal-caller with the varsity last 
yer.a developed into an A-l defensive line-backer during the Spring, 
showing special talent in defense against passes. 

No run-down of the squad would be complete without a mention of 
George Stem, the junior who won the Alvin Aubinoe Trophy as the 
unsung hero of the 1963 season. A terrific competitor and continual 
hustler, Stem is an excellent tackier and blocker who plays with great 
authority for his size (5-10, 180). He's also a good receiver with a great 
pair of hands. He's listed as the back-up man for Hill on offense and 
for Cooper on defense. 

Maryland's opener, with Oklahoma, is its biggest inaugural since the 
1956 game with Syracuse. Navy, with Roger Staubach et al, visits College 
Park in November while the Terps will visit Penn State, their third 
non-conference foe the week before the Navy game. 

25 



OFFENSIVE, DEFENSIVE LINEUPS 

(As at End of Spring Drills) 





OFFENSIVE 






DEFENSIVE 






LE- 


-Humphries (Jr.) 


6-4 


195 


Kenny (Jr.) 


6-0 


215 


LT- 


-Frattaroli (Sr.) 


6-2 


220 


Drozdov (Sr.) 


6-0 


215 


LG — McQueen (Soph.) 


6-2 


215 


Joyce (Sr.) 


5-11 


200 


C- 


-Martin (Sr.) 


5-11 


195 


Bury (Sr.) 


6-2 


210 


RG — Krahling (Jr.) 


6-1 


200 


Fishman (Jr.) 


6-1 


220 


RT- 


-Arbutina (Jr.) 


6-1 


215 


Bagranoff (Jr.) 


6-2 


210 


RE- 


-Absher (Soph.) 


6-4 


230 


Myrtle (Soph.) 


6-2 


200 


QB-- 


-Ambrusko (Jr.) 


6-0 


185 


*Lalli (Soph.) 


5-11 


175 


WB- 


-Hill (Sr.) 


6-0 


160 


*Proffitt (Soph.) 


6-2 


185 


TB- 


-Chiaverini (Sr.) 


5-11 


180 


*Sullivan (Jr.) 


6-0 


180 


FB- 


-Marciniak (Soph.) 


5-10 


210 


*Cooper (Soph.) 
* — Deep backs 


6-1 


180 



NUMERICAL FOOTBALL ROSTER 



1964 



10 Cooper, Fred 

11 Sullivan, Bob 

12 Ambrusko, Kenny 

13 Gibson, John 

14 Funk, Mike 

15 Corcoran, Jim 

16 Petry, Phil 

20 Proffitt, Taze 

21 Adams, Ron 

22 Springer, Bruce 

23 Keveryn, Joe 

24 Nye, Dick 

25 Hill, Darryl 

26 Dorn, Bill 

27 Proudfoot, Del 

28 Lalli, Tom 

29 Collins, Bobby 

30 Stem, George 

31 Fishman, Jerry 

32 Spangler, John 

33 Chiaverini, Len 

34 Marciniak, Walt 

35 Hickey, Tom 

36 Nalewak, Ron 



AS OF SEPTEMBER 1 

37 McQuown, Wymand 

40 Cerra, Tony 

41 O'Brien, John 

42 Hotze, Curtis 

43 Klingerman, Doug 

44 Pezzula, Terry 

45 Wolford, Chet 

46 Patryn, Mike 

47 Bauer, Bob 

48 Viereck, George 

49 Hill, Walter 

50 Simoldoni, Joe 

52 Bury, Lou 

53 Baker, Pat 

54 Kennedy, Tom 

55 Martin, Charley 

56 Bramson, Bernard 

57 Cave, Charley 

58 Rankin, Mark 

60 McQueen, Lorie 

61 Krahling, Charles 

62 Hunt, Brian 

63 Markoe, David 

64 Ciccone, Gayton 



65 Foran, Don 

66 Arbutina, Matt 

67 Vucin, Milan 

68 Joyce, Fred 

70 Tracy, John 

71 Aquilina, Ben 

72 Donaldson, Bill 

73 Drozdov, Olaf 

74 Stolick, Bob 

75 York, Bob 

76 Schaefer, Rich 

77 Bagranoff, Larry 

78 Yacamelli, Mel 

79 Frattaroli, Joe 

80 Kenny, John 

81 Myrtle, Charley 

82 Absher, Dick 

83 Bresnahan, Tom 

84 Bisbano, Tony 

85 Bilancioni, Bert 

86 Humphries, Howard 

87 Pyne, Ed 

89 Boryczewski, Julian 



PRONUNCIATION CHART 



Aquilina 

Arbutina 

Bagranoff 

Bilancioni 

Boryczewski 

Cerra 

Chiaverini 

Ciccone 

Drozdov 

Hotze 



Ak-WA-LEEN-a 

R-ba-TEEN-a 

Ba-GRAN-off 

Ba-LANCE-e-oni 

BORA-SHEV-ski 

"C" (as "s" in sell) 

Shiv-REEN-ee 

Si-KONE 

DROZ-doff 

Hotes (rhymes 

with coats) 



Keveryn 


— KEV-rin 


McQuown 


— MACK-ewan 


Nalewak 


- NAL-i-wok 


Patryn 


— PAY-trin 


Petry 


— PEET-ry 


Pezzula 


— Pa-ZOO-la 


Simoldoni 


— SIM-ol-DON-i 


Stolick 


— STOW-lik 


Trachy 


— TRASH-y 


Vucin 


— VU-sin 



26 



INTERPRETING THE TERPS 

The Ends 

Overall: Nol much experience here. Nol a enioj in the lot and only 
one junior, Humphries, played any appreciable time lasl year, ["wo out- 
standing sophs afford cause for optimism, however. 

82 DICK ABSHER, Soph, L9, 6-4, 230, Camp Springs, Md. The young- 
ster who lias the pros drooling already . . . possesses the talent to go 
with thai ideal size . . . Coaches couldn't say enough nice things about 
him after spring practice . . . Also a kicker and could handle all KO duties. 

85 BERT BILANCIONI (Ba-LANCE-e-oni), Soph, 19, 6-0, 200, Wil- 
mington. Del.— A good defensive end . . . showed promise in spring and 
has a chance to make the squad. . . . 

86 HOWARD HUMPHRIES, Junior, 23, 6-4, 195, Washington, D.C.— 
\\ a team's third leading pass-receivi r as soph last year and handled all 
the punting . . . caught 12 passes for 116 yards . . . undiscouraged by an 
unfortunate start in the opening minutes of the first game when he 
couldn't get a punt off, came back to punt 43 times for a 35.3 average 
yardage. 

80 JOHN KENNY. Junior, 21, 6-1, 195, Steubenville, Ohio— Another 
good defensive end prospect . . . saw only limited action last year as re- 
serve but could plaj considerably more in '64. 

81 CHARLEY MYRTLE, Soph, 19, 6-2, 190, Hyattsville, Md.- Along 
with Absher rated one of two top sophomore ends to hit Maryland scene 
simultaneously . . . had an outstanding spring ... a product of Archbishop 
Carroll High in nearby Hyattsville, within 10 minutes' drive of the Mary- 
land campus ... he and Absher could be Maryland's "big" men for the 
next three years. 

Other ends: 

84 BISBANO, TONY, JR., 21, 6-1, 215, Harrison, New York 
89 JULIAN BORYCZEWSKI (Bora-SHEV-ski), Soph, 19, 6-0, 215, Gar- 
field, New Jersey 

83 TOM BRESNAHAN. Junior, 20, 6-0, 185, Landover, Maryland 

87 ED PYNE, Soph, 20, 6-2, 220, Marlton, New Jersey 

58 MARK RANKIN, Soph, 18, 6-0, 180, Annapolis, Maryland 

The Tackles 

Overall: The end situation reversed; plenty of experience. Four let- 
termen, two seniors and two juniors, averaging 215. A strong spot on the 
line. 

71 BEN AQUILINA fAk-WA-LEEN-a), Soph, 19, 6-3, 220, Roselle 
Park, New Jersey — A No. 2 defensive tackle whose talent should comple- 
ment his ideal build with experience. 

66 MATT ARBUTINA (R-ba-TEEN-a), Junior, 22, 6-1, 215, Aliquippa, 
Pa. — A big, strong offensive blocker who also is a tower of strength on 
defense . . . play as a sophomore earned him a letter. 

77 LARRY BAGRANOFF fBa-GRAN-off). Junior. 20, 6-2, 210, Be- 
thesda, Maryland — Another of last year's sophs who came through in a 
big way . . . Extremely fast and agile for his size . . . another area prod- 
uct, hailing from nearby Bethesda. 

73 OLAF DROZDOV (DROZ-doff). Senior, 21, 6-0, 215, Pennsville, 
New Jersey — Maryland's first three-sports letterman in quite some time 
. . . wrestles and handles the shot-put and discus . . . can go both ways 
. . . definitely all-conference material . . . won the Anthony C. Nardo me- 
morial trophy as Maryland's best lineman last vear. 

79 JOE FRATTAROLI (FRAT-a-roll-i). Senior, 21, 6-2, 220. Stamford, 

27 



Connecticut — Earned letter as soph, although missed it last year, playing 
as a reserve . . . has the experience and had a good spring . . . can be 
counted on for a lot of action this year, especially offensive. 

76 RICH SCHAEFER, Junior, 20, 6-1, 215, Williamstown, Pa.— A con- 
verted fullback who showed excellent promise toward the end of spring 
drills . . . could break into lineup either on offensive or defensive unit. 

74 BOB STOLICK (STOW-lik), Junior, 21, 6-2, 220, Sparta, New Jer- 
sey — A very capable replacement for either of the top offensive tackles 
. . . another with ideal size. 

78 MEL YACAMELLI (YAK-a-MELL-i), Soph, 19, 6-4, 220, Clairton, 
Pennsylvania — Like Aquilina, a back-up defensive tackles who lacks only 
experience. 

75 BOB YORK, Soph, 19, 6-1, 212, Silver Spring, Md.— A tremendous 
competitor who has the ability to play regularly as a soph . . . had a fine 
spring . . . another from the local area. 

72 BILL DONALDSON, Soph, 20, 6-0, 200, Mt. Holly, New Jersey 
70 JOHN TRACHY (Trashy), 19, Soph, 215, Sparta, New Jersey 

The Guards 

Overall: A couple of standouts in this position, but sophs will see a lot 
of service. Two genuine all-conference nominees bulwarking this spot. 

31 JERRY FISHMAN, Junior, 21, 6-1, 220, East Norwalk, Connecticut 
— Maryland's leading ground-gainer as a tailback last year and best line- 
backer who is being called upon to sacrifice personal glory for the good of 
the line ... a guy who likes it when the play is roughest and toughest 
. . . when he tackles 'em, they stay tackled . . . could, of course, be re- 
drafted to the backfield if the need arises. 

68 FRED JOYCE, Senior, 21, 5-11, 200, Cumberland, Md.— Here's the 
guy who brings memories of Bob Ward, Maryland's all-America of the 
early '50s . . . probably the toughest lineman to play here since . . . left 
little doubt he was No. 1 by his play throughout spring practice . . . one 
of four on squad who could wind up with three football letters. 

61 CHARLES "CHICK" KRAHLING (KRA-ling), Junior, 20, 6-1, 200, 
Hyattsville, Md. — Converted from a center during spring, emerged as one 
of the most improved linemen on the squad . . . should start as the right 
guard on the offensive unit. 

60 LORIE McQUEEN, Soph, 21, 6-2, 215, Bordentown, New Jersey— 
This lad not only regained his eligibility this year but probably won the 
guard spot on the other side of the center of the offensive team . . . 
showed unusual promise during spring drills ... is another converted 
fullback who could use his size to advantage up front. 

63 DAVE MARKOE, Junior, 21, 5-10, 210, Frederick, Md.,— A state 
product who played well during spring workouts . . . very strong and ag- 
gressive ... a good back-up man in reserve. 

67 MILAN VUCIN (VU-sin), Soph, 19, 5-11, 195, Pennsbury, Pennsyl- 
vania — Extremely tough and can move . . . another ex-fullback . . . 
could be an outstanding lineman because of his speed and desire. 

Other guards: 

53 PAT BAKER, Soph, 19, 5-10, 185, Altoona, Penna. 

57 CHARLEY CAVE, Junior, 21, 6-0, 210, Bethesda, Md. 

64 GAYTON CICCONE (Si-Kone), Junior, 22, 5-10, 205, Newark, New 
Jersey 

65 DON FORAN, Soph, 19, 5-9, 195, Hyattsville, Md. 

62 BRIAN HUNT, 19, Soph, 5-11, 190, South Orange, New Jersey 

28 



The Centers 

Overall: Two returning senior lettermen should eliminate worry 
here. One of them earned letter as center his soph .'111(1 junior years, an- 
other as a back who Is being converted to the pivol post. 

52 LOU BURY, Senior, 22, 6-2, 210, Baltimore, Md. An excellenl all- 
around player who has appeared in five differenl position al Maryland 
. . . an Inspirational-type who arouses his males to their best efforts . . . 
definitely all-conference material as a line-backer. 

55 CHARLEY MARTIN. Senior, 21, 5-11, 105, Philadelphia, Pa.— A 
good, lill-'ni center who pi'ubahly has I lie best snap to a punter or PAT 
kicker . . . earned his lettei as a junior. 

Other centers: 

54 TOM KENNEDY, Soph, 19, 6-1, 205, Indiana, Pennsylvania 

50 JOE SIMOLDONI, Soph, 19, 6-0, 205, Garfield, New Jersey 

The Quarterbacks 

Overall: Three lettermen in this spot, although two of them did not 
plaj last year. Enough talent among them to make less severe the loss 
of Dick Shiner, the passer who broke records right and left the last three 
vears. 

12 KENNY AMBRUSKO. Junior, 20, 6-0, 185, Youngstown, Ohio— The 
key to the offense this year ... an exciting, daring rollout passer who 
likes to run and pass equally well . . . disappointed whenever his plays 
don't go "all the way" . . . first experience as quarterback but was sen- 
sational in spring practices, tossing a dozen or more long scoring passes 

. . . had 5.8 yard average as runner in sophomore year two seasons ago. 

15 JIM (or JIMMY) CORCORAN, Junior, 21, 6-0, 190, Jersey City, 
New Jersey — Probably a better passer than Ambrusko . . . throws the 
artistic spiral-type pass, easy to catch . . . led Maryland frosh to an un- 
defeated season in 1961 . . . will be Ambrusko's No. 1 relief who could 
carry the team just as far. 

16 PHIL PETRY, Soph, 18, 6-1, 195, Hagerstown, Maryland— A fine, 
all around athlete who looked good in the spring game as well as previ- 
ous Saturday games-condition scrimmages . . . has great promise as a 
future No. 1 quarterback . . . was leading passer for last year's frosh 
completing 15 of 42 for 163 yards ... a good passer with a strong arm. 

11 BOB SULLIVAN, Junior, 20. 6-0, 180. Wilmington, North Carolina 
— Although used offensively as back-up for Shiner last year, now is con- 
centrating on defense . . . emerged from the spring practice as the No. 1 
defensive line-backer and is listed on the No. 1 defensive unit . . . espe- 
cially good against passes . . . won letter as a soph. 

10 FRED COOPER, Soph, 18, 6-1, 180, Carnegie, Pennsylvania— An 
excellent defensive man slated to start in No. 1 defensive backfield ... a 
good all-around athlete. 

13 JOHN GIBSON, Soph. 18. 6-1. 185, Irwin, Pennsylvania 

The Tailbacks 

Overall: Two veterans and two promising sophs leave little to be 
desired. Two vets are seniors, one of whom earned letter in two previous 
years and the other in his first war at Maryland, as a junior. 

33 LEN CHIAVERINI (Shiv-REEN-ee). Senior, 21, 5-11, 180, Am- 
bridge, Penna. — A fine running back ... led the ACC in rushing in 1962 
and was Maryland's second leading ground-gainer last year . . . has ac- 
counted for 914 yards and seven touchdowns in two years . . . listed as 
the No. 1 tailback at spring's end. 

33 TOM HICNEY. Soph. 18. 5-11, 210. Stamford, Conn.— Second lead- 
ing ground-gainer for last year's frosh with 159 yards in 42 rushes 

29 



(3.8 avg.) . . . extremely fast for size . . . showed great promise during 
spring and could give Chiaverini a run for the starting berth. 

36 RON NALEWAK (NAL-i-wok), Soph, 19, 6-2, 205, Shamokin, 
Penna. — The big, fast back Maryland's been looking for . . . during spring 
practice showed no effects of the 1962 pre-season injury which kept him 
out of action for a year. 

43 DOUG KLINGERMAN, Junior, 21, 6-1, 190, Bloomsburg, Penna. 
— Had an excellent spring . . . showed definite promise as a runner and 
could be one of the best on the squad as he matures. 

30 GEORGE STEM, Junior, 20, 5-10, 180, Westminster, Maryland- 
One of the finest hustlers and hitters on the squad ... an excellent 
tackier and blocker . . . good hands make him an excellent receiver . . . 
won the Alvin Aubinoe trophy last year as the unsung hero of the 1963 
season . . . runs with great authority for his size. 

Other tailbacks: 

47 BOB BAUER, Soph, 18, 6-0, 195, N. Berlinville, Penna. 

40 TONY CERRA, Junior, 19, 5-11, 175, Farrell, Penna. 

41 JOHN O'BRIEN, Soph, 19, 5-9, 177, Paterson, New Jersey 
46 MIKE PATRYN, Soph, 19, 5-8, 175, Baltimore, Maryland 

44 TERRY PEZZULA, Soph, 19, 5-9, 180, Bristol, Penna. 

48 GEORGE VIERECK, Soph, 19, 5-10, 175, McLean, Virginia 

The Wingbacks 

Overall: Two lettermen return here including one who set a new 
Atlantic Coast Conference record for catching touchdown passes in his 
first year of play. 

14 MIKE FUNK, Senior, 20, 6-0, 188, Harrisburg, Penna.— An excel- 
lent all-around athlete who has played three positions — quarterback, 
wingback and end . . . early-season injury prevented him from playing 
enough to win a letter last year after earning one as a soph ... a 
top-receiver and a good runner ... a fine competitor. 

25 DARRYL HILL, Senior, 21, 6-0, 160, Washington, D.C.— The scourge 
of all Atlantic Coast Conference pass-defense men last year as he caught 
seven touchdown passes — two more than the former record held by six 
players ... a veritable will-o'-the-wisp as he eludes the opposition to 
snag 'em . . . his catch of Shiner's pass in the last 3 seconds of the Air 
Forcegame when surrounded by Falcons and running between them for 
the touchdown which won the game, 21-14, stands as one of the all-time 
top thrills for Maryland football fans . . . his 43 receptions for 516 yards 
throughout the season were just 4 passes and 41 yards short of the all- 
time record for Maryland receivers . . . also returned 13 kickoffs for 317 
yards and 16 punts for 115. 

28 TOM LALLI, Soph, 18, 5-11, 175, Red Bank, New Jersey— Fast, 
with good hands . . . tentatively listed as starter in No. 1 defensive back- 
field . . . leading kickoff returner for freshmen last year (averaged better 
than 67 yards) . . . lacks only experience. 

24 DICK NYE, Soph, 19, 5-9, 170, Chambersburg, Penna.— A good 
hustling back with excellent speed and hands . . . could be a capable re- 
placement for Hill. 

20 TAZE PROFFITT, Soph, 20, 6-2, 185, Newcastle, Delaware— Came 
out of nowhere during spring drills to earn spot in No. 1 defensive back- 
field . . . tall and rangy ... is an ex-quarterback . . . first name rhymes 
with "jazz". 

Other wingbacks: 

29 BOBBY COLLINS, Soph, 18, 5-10, 160, Levittown, New Jersey 

26 BILL DORN, Senior, 22, 5-11, 180, Mt. Holly, New Jersey 
DWIGHT GUYTON, Soph, 18, 5-11, 170, Hagerstown, Maryland 

49 WALTER HILL, 19, Soph, 5-11, 180, Petersburg, Virginia 

23 JOE KEVERYN (KEV-rin), Soph, 19, 5-11, 165, Three Rivers, Texas 

30 



27 DEL PROUDFOOT, Soph, is, 6-0, L65, Cumberland, Maryland 

22 HIIUCE S'.'KINGER, Junior. 20, 6-4, 190, Fanwood, New Jersey 

The Fullbacks 

Overall: Two big sophomores arouse hopes of Maryland fulli 
power-houses of yore. 

34 WALT MARCINIAK (Mar-SIN-i-ak), Soph, 19, 5-10, 210, Old 
Forge, Penna. A real hard-nosed player who led the Ero h in ground- 

dnlng Last year . . . definitely tabbed as the starting FB aga n I Okla- 
home . . ■ arouses memories of "Big Mo" (Modzelewski), one of Mary- 
Land's all-i ime great fullbacks. 

21 RON ADAMS, Senior, 20, 5-10, 175, Irvington, New Jersey An 
jressive runner for his size who will play a lot of football in his last 
year . . . has been a capable reserve the pasi two easons. 

Othea fullbacks: 

12 cruris HOTZE (rhymes with coats), Soph, 19, 5-9, 185, Richmond, 
Virginia 

37 WYMAN McQUOWN (Mack-YOU-an), Soph, 19, 6-0, 193, Be- 
thesfla. Maryland 

32 JOHN SPANGLER, Soph, 18, 5-10, 190, Baltimore, Maryland 

45 CHET WOLFORD, Soph, 20, 6-0, 188, Tyrone, Penna. 

Kicking Specialist 

56 BERNARD BRAMSON, Soph, 19, 5-10, 180, Santiago, Chile— A 
soccer player who has a powerful left foot and who could come in handy 
for field goals and PATs. Could divide his playing between the two fall 

-ports. 



31 



1964 FRESHMAN PROSPECTS 
Schedule and Roster 



The Schedule 

September 25 — North Carolina, away 
October 2 — Villanova, 2 p.m. 

October 9 — George Washington, 2 p.m. 

October 23 — Virginia, away 
November 6 — Navy, away 

The Roster 

ENDS 

Name Height Weight Hometown 

Vincent DeLagrange 6-3 210 Cumberland, Md. 

Jim Foran 6-1 200 Washington, D.C. 

John Foran 6-1 200 Washington, D.C. 

Ed Gunderman 6-0 200 Franklin, N.J. 

Tom Myslinski 6-3 225 Rome, N.Y. 

Tony Santy 6-4 190 Dunmore, Pa. 

Charley Tine 6-2 222 Belair, Md. 

TACKLES 

Sam Battaglia 6-4 240 Nutley, N.J. 

Don Defino 6-1 230 Grindstone, Pa. 

Chris Dill 6-3 225 Washington, D.C. 

Mike Galloway 6-2 215 Westminster, Md. 

Dana Tilley 6-1 220 Pennsville, N.J. 

GUARDS 

Don Brady 6-1 217 Hyattsville, Md. 

Mike McCall 5-10 205 Silver Spring, Md. 

Doug Macey 5-10 230 Annapolis, Md. 

CENTERS 

Jack Holloway 6-2 215 Wilmington, Del. 

Jim Lavrusky 6-1 210 Monaco, Pa. 

John McCluskey 6-3 230 Pittsburgh, Pa. 

BACKS 

Jim Acton 6-0 185 Washington, D.C. 

Tom Burger 6-0 175 Lancaster, Pa. 

Art Brzostowski 6-1 210 Bayonne, N.J. 

John DiJosie 6-0 175 Pennsville, N.J. 

Fred Gawlick 6-3 210 Irvington, N.J. 

Mike Hoch 6-0 190 Salisbury, Md. 

Alvin Lee 6-0 198 Baltimore, Md. 

Mario Macri 5-11 195 Bayonne, N.J. 

Dennis Manzini 5-11 180 Belle Vernon, Pa. 

Frank O'Brien 5-11 225 Cranford, N.J. 

Charley Pastrana 6-0 195 Annapolis, Md. 

Lou Stickel 6-0 190 Riverside, N.J. 

Allan Sutyak 6-3 195 Phoenixville, Pa. 

Gary Swartz 5-11 180 Hagerstown, Md. 

Ernie Torain 5-10 200 Baltimore, Md. 

Bill Van Heusen 6-1 205 Mamaroneck, N.Y. 

32 



STANDOUTS OF THE LINE 






LARRY BACRANOF 
Tackle 



DICK ABSHER 
End 




*1 I 



/ 



JERRY FISHMAN 
Linebacker 



$ 



■w 



TERP OPPONENTS 
The Sooners' 1964 Outlook 

By Harold Keith 

Gomer Jones, Oklahoma's new head coach, summed up the Sooners' 
1964 chances as well as anybody when he said recently: 

"I think we'll have a good team, barring injuries. Of course, a football 
isn't round. You can't tell how it'll bounce. I don't know how many 
we'll win and lose but we should have a good team." 

It will be the first time in 19 years that Bud Wilkinson is out of the 
football picture at Norman. Wilkinson resigned last year to run for the 
United States Senate on the Republican ticket. He was nominated over- 
whelmingly in May. 

Wilkinson was the nation's finest coach over his period. His Sooner 
teams of 1950, 1955 and 1956 won national championships. His 1953-57 
teams won 47 straight games, an all-time national record. His 1947-57 
teams scored in 112 straight to complete a string of 123, also an all-time 
national record. 

His 1947-59 Oklahoma teams bypassed 74 consecutive Big Six, Big 
Seven and Big Eight games (72 wins, 2 ties) before losing. After tying 
for the 1947 conference title, they won 12 conference championships in 
a row. 

Jones was Wilkinson's line coach during this entire period. Together, 
they coached Sooner teams that won 139, lost 27 and tied 4 regular 
season games for .837 percent and won 6 of 8 bowl appearances. 

Now Jones is going it alone. But he's got a good squad to go with, 
27 seniors among others. Among them are four strong players. Jim 
Grisham was the consensus All-America fullback last year. Left Tackle 
Ralph Neely made the AP and UPI second All-America. Right Guard 
Newt Burton was a unanimous all-Big Eight choice and also made the 
All-America academic eleven. Left Guard Ed McQuarters, a 225-pound 
Negro senior, can play as well as any of the others when he wants to. 

Oklahoma returns eight starters from last year, LE John Flynn, LT 
Neely, LG McQuarters, C John Garrett, RG Burton, RE Rick McCurdy, 
QB Bobby Page and FB Grisham. 

The Sooners bring back nine second-teamers, LT Jerry Goldsby, LG 
Carl Schreiner, C Carl McAdams, RT Glen Condren, RE Allen Bumgard- 
ner, QB Tommy Pannell, LH Larry Shields, RH Lance Rentzel and FB 
Larry Brown. 

They also return Charley Mayhue, left half on defense and Linebacker 
David Voiles. Also Mike Ringer, young quarterback who drove them to 
all their points in the first two games last year, the 31-14 win over 
Clemson and the 17-12 upset of Southern California's defending NCAA 
champions. Ringer backed into an electric fan, had his elbow operated 
and played no more. He was still out in the Spring of 1964 as the elbow 
had to be re-operated. 



34 



MARYLAND vs OKLAHOMA September 13 



2:00 P.M. (EDT) 
at Byrd Stadium, < .T>.0<)0 ) 
College Park, Maryland 
FACTS ABOUT THE SOONERS 
CONFERENCE Hi« Eighl 
LOCATION: Norman, Oklahoma 
ATI II .i:iIC DIRF:CTOR: Ken Fanis 
HEAD COACH: Gomer Jones (Ohio State '35) 
assistant C( )Acni-:s: ,ia\ n'Wal, Bob Cor- 
nell, Drake Keith, Jerry Thompson, Dick 
Heath, Carl Allison, Joe Rector 
COLORS: Crimson and Cream 
KNK< iLLMENT: 13.567 
TYPE OFFENSE: Win, slot and split-T 
1963 OVERALL RECORD: Won 8, Lost 2 
PUBLICITY DIRECTOR: Harold Keith 




Gomer Jones 



TERPS' RECORD AGAINST THE SOONERS 

Maryland: Won 0, Lost 2 

(Both Orange Bowl Games) 

1954— Oklahoma, 7; Maryland, 1956— Oklahoma, 20; Md., 6 

TOTAL POINTS: Maryland, 6; Oklahoma, 27 

1964 CO-CAPTAINS: Center John Garrett and Guard Newt Burton 

LETTERMEN RETURNING: 27— Lost 13 







1964 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


19 


at Maryland 


Sept. 


26 


Southern California 


Oct. 


3 


Open 


Oct. 


10 


Texas, at Dallas 


Oct. 


17 


at Kansas 


Oct. 


24 


Kansas State 




31 


at Colorado 


Nov. 


1 


Iowa State 


Nov. 


14 


Missouri 


Nov. 


21 


Nebraska 


Nov. 


28 


at Okla. State 





1963 RESULTS 


Oklahoma, 


31; Clemson, 13 


Oklahoma 


17; Southern California, 12 


Texas, 28 


Oklahoma. 7 


Oklahoma, 


34; Kansas, 18 


( Oklahoma, 


34; Kansas State. 9 


Oklahoma, 


35; Colorado, 


( Oklahoma, 


24; Iowa State, 14 


Oklahoma, 


13; Missouri, 3 


Nebraska, 


29; Oklahoma, 20 


Oklahoma. 


34; Okla. State. 10 



35 



The Gamecocks' 1964 Outlook 

By Tom Price 

South Carolina will have 24 lettermen plus prospects up from an 
unbeaten freshman team with which to rebuild its football fortunes 
after the disastrous 1-8-1 season posted in 1963. Eye and knee injuries 
suffered early in the campaign by ace quarterback Dan Reeves wrecked 
his chances for all-America recognition as a junior following a great 
sophomore year and as Reeves went, so went the Gamecocks. "Deacon 
Dan" from Andersonville, Georgia, survived Spring practice without 
injury for the first time in his career, gaining 168 yards in the Spring 
intrasquad game, to give every indication that he is ready to return to 
the form that netted him 1,401 yards total offense as a sophomore. 

While Reeves was the Gamecocks' only experienced quarterback in 
1963, Jim Rogers now has a year's experience and Ted Wingard, who 
led the freshman team to a 4-0-1 record, adds depth to a position where 
it is always necessary for success. 

The Gamecocks should start an all-senior backfield with Reeves at 
quarter, Marty Rosen and Larry Gill at halfbacks, and co-captain Pete 
DiVenere at full. Phil Branson, a hard-running junior transfer from 
Kentucky, is also in the fullback picture, as is soph Bob Cole, 6-3, 231. 
Junior Ronnie Lamb, 6-2, 215, is a big strong boy at right halfback behind 
Gill but his roommate and scheduled second unit running mate at left 
half, Jeff Jowers, suffered a broken leg in the Spring game. If he is not 
recovered, the position will likely go to a soph, either Buster Kimbrell or 
Bobby Bryant. 

Up front the Gamecocks have 6-4, 250-pound Steve (Lil' Abner) Cox 
at tackle and 6-3, 230, Jim Johnson at guard. They, along with DiVenere, 
will serve as tri-captains. Cox, especially, is a top pro prospect and candi- 
date for all-star honors. The ends will be smaller with junior J. R. Wil- 
burn heading up three returning lettermen. Bill Dickens, son of Indiana 
University coach Phil Dickens, is the best of several good rising sophs. 
Joe Komoroski is a fine, 6-1, 225, soph prospect at tackle where Len 
Sears, 6-5, 235, will team with Cox to give the Gamecocks two big strong 
starters. Seniors Johnson and Ed Hertwig give experience at guard where 
junior Jim Martin is the only other letterman. David Berry is a fine 
rising soph. Joe Liner, a junior, is the best center at present but rising 
soph Mike Johnson, a big (6-3, 220) readhead, has a bright future. 

Overall, the Gamecocks should have more experience with 24 lettermen, 
plus better sophomores, and should be stronger. 



36 



MARYLAND vs SOUTH CAROLINA September 26 

2:00 P.M. (EDT) 
Byrcl Stadium (35,000) 
College Park, Md. 
ABOUT THE GAMECOCKS 
CONFERENCE: Allan tic Coast 
LOCATION: Columbia, S.C. 
ATHLETIC DIRECTOR: Marvin Bass 
HEAD COACH: Marvin Bass 

(William & Mary '43) 
ASSISTANT COACHES: Hank BartOS, Weems 
I... l in i l;,l. • Bird's, Ralph Floyd, Walt 
Hambrick, Ed Pitts, W. L. Strickland, Don 
Watson 
COLORS: Garnet and Black 
ENROLLMENT: 7,800 
TYPE OFFENSE: Slot-T 

1963 OVERALL RECORD: Won 1, Lost 8, Tied 1 
1963 ACC RECORD: Won 1, Lost 5, Tied 1 
PUBLICITY DIRECTOR: Tom Price 




Marvin Bass 



TERPS' 



RECORD AG 

< Maryland: 



1963— S.C, 21; Maryland, 13 
1962— Maryland, 13; S.C, 11 
1961— S.C. 20; Maryland, 10 
1960— Maryland, 15; S.C, 
I .' ".9— S.C, 22; Maryland, 6 
l"'S Maryland, 10; S.C, 6 
1957— Maryland, 10; S.C, 6 
1956— S.C, 13; Maryland, 
1955— Maryland, 27; S.C, 
1954— Maryland, 20; S.C, 



AINST THE GAMECOCKS 

Won 12, Lost 8) 

1953— Maryland, 24; S.C, 6 
1949— Maryland, 44; S.C, 7 
1948— Maryland, 19; S.C, 7 
1947— Maryland, 19; S.C, 13 
1946— S.C, 21; Marvland, 17 
1945— Maryland, 19; S.C, 13 
1929— S.C, 26; Maryland, 6 
1928— S.C, 21; Maryland, 7 
1927— Maryland, 26; S.C, 
1926— S.C, 12; Maryland 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 305; South Carolina 225 

1964 TRI-CAPTAINS: Tackles Steve Cox and Jim Johnson and Fullback 

Pete DiVenere 
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 24— Lost 11 







1964 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


19 


Duke (night) 


Sept. 


26 


at Maryland 


Oct. 


3 


Georgia 


Oct. 


10 


at Nebraska 


Oct. 


17 


at Florida 


Oct. 


24 


at North Carolina 


Oct. 


31 


at X.C. State 


Nov. 


The Citadel 


Nov. 


11 


Wake Forest 


Nov. 


28 


at Clemson 



1963 YARDSTICK 
(At Columbia. S.C.) 

Maryland S.C. 

First Downs 10 12 

Rushing yardage 139 142 

Passing yardage 49 47 

Passes 7-15 7-lo 

Passes intercepted by .. 

Punts 6-37 7-31 

Fumbles lost 3 1 

Yards penalized 37 10 

.Maryland 7 6 — 13 

South Carolina 7 14 0—21 

SCORING: Maryland: Chiaverini. 2, 
pass from Shiner (Carney Kick i : Hill. 
19. South Carolina: Rosen. 25 (McCath- 
em kick » : Sears (recovered Huggins' 
fumble in end zone (McCathern kick); 
Anderson. 19 « McCathern kick). 



37 



The Wolfpack's 1964 Outlook 

By Frank Weedon 

N.C. State should field a sound first unit, but depth could cause some 
concern in 1964. There are 13 lettermen returning from the Wolfpack's 
Liberty Bowl and co-championship Atlantic Coast Conference team. 
Sixteen lettermen will be missing. 

The lack of an experienced quarterback and an experience-shy second- 
ary will be major problems to be overcome. Ron Skosnik, a senior who has. 
seen limited service, and sophomore holdout Charlie Noggle, are the top 
two candidates for the quarterback spot. How well they take over will 
have a lot to do with the Wolfpack's final 1964 record. Also available at 
quarterback will be junior Page Ashby and sophomore Bill James, a 
defensive specialist. 

The Pack will be strong at fullback with two-time lettermen Pete 
Falzarano and junior letterman Gus Andrews available. But senior Jimmy 
Guin, at wingback, is the only other back who has played enough to win 
a letter. Junior Shelby Mansfield will run with the first unit at diveback, 
with sophomores Don DeArment, Gale Tart, and Jimmy Cutchins backing 
him up. Larry Brown, a junior who has not seen game action, and sopho- 
mores Gary Rowe and Wendell Coleman back up Guin at wingback. 

Strong tackles, with good size and speed, are the assets to a front line 
that is expected to have experienced personnel at each number one posi- 
tion, but only two lettermen on the second unit. Ray Barlow, at right 
end, is one of the ACC's top players. He caught four passes last year, 
three of them going for touchdowns. He also caught three passes in the 
Liberty Bowl, one for a TD. There isn't a better defensive end in the 
ACC than Barlow. Two non-lettered juniors, Tony Golmont and Will 
Mann, give Barlow support at right end, along with sophomore Gary 
Whitman. Letterman Bill Hall gets backing from three sophomores: Bill 
Gentry, Charles Tayloe and John Stec, at left end. 

Glenn Sasser (220) and Rosie Amato (225) both regulars last year, 
are one-two at left tackle, with promising Leland Hughes (240) behind 
them. The right side tackle is hefty with senior letterman Steve Parker 
(245) and juniors Dave Ellis (230) and Dave Carter (215) the top men. 

Co-captain Bennett Williams, Silas Snow, Whitey Martin, an end last 
year, and Golden Simpson are all senior lettermen at guard, with sopho- 
mores Bobby Smith and Terry Jenkins pushing them. Lou DeAngelis, a 
demon linebacker, is the number 1 center, with junior college transfer 
Jack Thomas expected to play a good bit of offensive center. DeAngelis 
is all-star calibre. 

The coaching staff still will be looking for a consistent punter to 
replace Dave Houtz who did almost all the punting the last three years, 
when practice opens September 1. Sophomore Harold Deters could solve 
the Pack's field goal problem. 

The Pack lost five all-ACC players off last year's team. Replacing them 
will be difficult. So will the '64 schedule which finds the Pack chal- 
lenging North Carolina, Clemson, Maryland, Alabama and Duke in the 
first, five games. 



38 



MARYLAND vs NORTH CAROLINA STATE October 3 



L:30 P.M. (EST) 

ai Riddiek Stadium (21,000) 

Raleigh, N.C. 

FACTS ABOUT THE WOLFPACK 
CONFERENCE: Atlantic Coast 
LOCATK IN: Raleigh, N.C. 
ATHLETIC DIRECTOR: Roy B. Clogston 
HEAD coach: Earle Edwards 

i Penn stale '3D 
ASSISTANT COACHES: AI 

Brewbaker, Bill Small/, 

Johnny Clements. 
COLORS: Red and While 
ENROLLMENT: 7,524 
TYPE OFKKNSE: Winped-T, slotback 
L963 OVERALL RECORD: Won 8, Lost 3 
1963 ACC RECORD: Won 6, Lost 1 (Co-champs) 
PUBLICITY DIRECTOR: Frank Weedon 



Michaels, Carey 
Ernie Driscoll, 




Earle Edwards 



TERPS' RECORD AGAINST THE WOLFPACK 

'Maryland: Won 10, Lost 7, Tied 3) 



1963 

15)62 

1961 

1960 

19.19 

1958 

1957 

1956 

L95 

1951 



State, 30; 
Maryland, 

Maryland, 
State, 13; 

Mai \ land, 

Maryland, 

State, 48; 
Maryland, 

Maryland, 
Maryland, 



Maryland, 14 
14; State, 6 
10; State, 7 
Maryland, 10 
33; State, 28 
21; State, 6 
Maryland, 13 
25; State, 14 
42; State, 14 
53; State, 



1950— State, 16; Maryland, 13 

1949— Maryland, 14; State, 6 

1947— TIE, 0-0 

1946— State, 28; Maryland, 7 

1924— TIE, 0-0 

1923— Maryland, 26; State, 12 

1922— Maryland, 7; State, 6 

1921— TIE, 6-6 

1917— State, 10; Maryland, 6 

1909— State, 33; Maryland, 



TOTAL POINTS : Maryland 320, State 283 

1964 CO-CAPTAINS: Bennett Williams (G) and Lou DeAngelis (C) 

LETTERMEN RETURNING: 13— Lost 16 







1964 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


19 


at North Carolina 


Sept. 


26 


I lemson 


Oct. 


2 


Maryland 


Oct. 


10 


at Alabama 


Oct. 


17 


at Duke 


Oct. 


24 


at Virginia 


Oct. 


31 


South Carolina 


Nov. 


7 


at Va. Tech. 


Nov. 


14 


at Florida State 


Nov. 


20 


at Wake Forest 



1963 YARDSTICK 
(At College Park. Md.) 

Maryland N.C.S. 

First Downs 16 20 

Rushing yardage 63 246 

Passing vardage 189 94 

Passes 17-30 8-11 

Pi sses intercepted by .. 1 

Punting average 35.3 39.0 

Fumbles lost 1 1 

Is penalized 36 10 

Maryland 8 6—14 

N.C. State 14 8 7 7—30 

SCORING: NCS: Koszarsky. 6 rush 
i Andrews kick': Clark, 3 rush (An- 
drews kick i ; Ross. 11 rush (Guin pass 
from Rossi i : Scarpali. 6 rush (Andrews 
kick': Faircloth, pass from Rossi (An- 
drews kickt. 

Maryland: Martin. 13. pass from 
Shiner < Burton, pass from Shiner); 
Shiner. 6 rush. 



39 



The Blue Devils' 1964 Outlook 

By Glenn E. "Ted" Mann 

The Blue Devils of 1963 were "young, willing and eager". Their youth 
and eagerness cost them some games. 

The Blue Devils of 1964 will be more experienced, bigger, stronger and 
also willing and eager. 

One of Duke's most exciting players of recent years, all-America half- 
back Jay Wilkinson, is gone along with the exciting pass-receiver Stan 
Crisson, but the explosive, hell-for-leather, free-lancing quarterback 
Scotty Glacken, now a junior, will be back as anxious as ever. 

There are two other backs who are explosive but who were dogged 
with injuries last season. Fullback Mike Curtis was never completely 
ready last year and missed many games. Halfback Biff Bracy did not 
play regularly until the final two games due to a pre-season injury. 
Those boys could be GREAT, indeed. 

Coach Bill Murray had a lot of veterans linemen available but only a 
few of them won letters at the guard spots. So he did some shifting around 
and moved a letterman end, tackle and center to the guard spots. Now 
the line is full of lettermen from end to end, but not so in the backfield 
except at fullback where three lettermen and a sharp-looking sophomore 
are available. 

Glacken is the only experienced quarterback; Bracy and John 
Gutekunst, the only experienced halfbacks. 

It looks like a good year to the sideline quarterbacks and now let's 
listen to Coach Murray: 

"The 1964 squad should show a vast improvement in defensive play. 
We will have a more experienced squad as a whole and, too, we have 
placed greater emphasis in this direction. This improved defense may 
be necessary because we cannot count on scoring as quickly and easily 
as we did in many games in 1963. While it will be difficult to find as 
sensational a performer as Jay Wilkinson, we will have some exciting 
players on this year's team." 



40 



MARYLAND vs DUKE October 10 



2:00 P.M. (EST) 
Duke Stadium (57,500) 
Durham, N.C. 
FACTS ABOUT THE BLUE DEVILS 
CONFERENCE: Atlantic Coasl 
l.i (CATION: Durham, N.C. 
ATHLETIC DIRKCTOR: Edmund M. Cameron 
HEAD COACH: William D. "Bill" Murray 

(Duke '3D 
ASSISTANT COACHES: Herschel Caldwell, 
Clarence "Ace" Parker, Marty Pierson, 
Carmen Falcone, Doug Knotts, Bob Cos, 
Harold "Hal" McElhaney and Mike McGee 
COLORS: Roval Blue and White 
ENROLLMENT: 6,400 
TYPE OFFENSE: Duke-T 

1963 OVERALL RECORD: Won 5, Lost 4, Tied 1 
1963 ACC RECORD : Won 5, Lost 2 
PUBLICITY DIRECTOR: Glenn E. "Ted" Mann 




William D. 
(Bill) Murray 



TERPS' RECORD AGAINST THE BLUE DEVILS 
(Maryland Won 1, Lost 10) 



1963— Duke, 30; Maryland, 12 
1962— Duke, 10; Maryland, 7 
1960— Duke, 20; Maryland, 7 
1957— Duke, 14; Maryland, 
1950— Maryland, 26; Duke, 14 



1932— Duke, 34; Maryland, 



1948— Duke, 13; Maryland, 12 
1947— Duke, 19; Maryland, 7 
1942— Duke, 42; Maryland, 
1941— Duke, 50; Maryland, 
1933— Duke, 38; Maryland, 7 



TOTAL POINTS: Duke 284, Maryland 78 

1964 CAPTAIN: Danny Lonon. (Alternate captain 

LETTERMEN RETURNING: 22— Lost 11 



J. V. McCarthy) 







1964 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


19 


at South Carolina 


Sept. 


26 


Virginia 


Oct. 


3 


at Tulane 


Oct. 


10 


Maryland 


Oct. 


17 


N.C. State 


Oct. 


2 4 


at Army 


Oct. 


31 


Georgia Tech (homecoming) 


Nov. 


7 


at Wake Forest 


Nov. 


14 


at Navy 


Nov. 


21 


at North Carolina 



1963 YARDSTICK 
At Richmond. Va.. Tobacco BowO 

Maryland Duke 

First Downs 16 13 

Rushing yardage 171 145 

Passing yardage 73 140 

Passes intercepted by ..0 

Punts 6-40.5 5-48.4 

Fumbles lost 2 1 

Yards penalized 25 40 

Maryland 6 6 0—12 

Duke 10 20—30 

SCORING: Maryland: Hill, 10, pass 
from Shiner. Shiner. 3 run. 

Duke: Glacken, 6. run (Curtis kick); 
Curtis, field goal. 26; Crisson. 60 (pass 
from Glacken (Curtis kick); Wilkinson. 
5 run: Gutekunst. 76. punt return 
(Curtis kick i. 



41 



The Tar Heels' 1964 Outlook 

By Bob Quincy 

The University of North Carolina had one of its finest football seasons 
in history last year, winning nine of eleven contests and earning a Gator 
Bowl championship with a 35-0 victory over Air Force. 

What for 1964? 

"There are some excellent football players available," comments Coach 
Jim Hickey. "We have 23 lettermen returning, spirited morale and a host 
of promising newcomers. However, we are not without problems." 

The one bare spot in the Tar Heels cubboard is at tackle, where only 
veteran John Hill returns. Hill can be a good one, but he must rely on 
inexperienced men to scrap beside him. 

"When last season began," injects Coach Hickey, "I made the statement 
that we had four fine tackles, best in my term as head coach at Chapel 
Hill. They gave a superb account of themselves, were steady workmen 
in every game. 

"In looking at the current crop, I can say they have good size. They 
are willing. In time, they will be sound performers. The question is: how 
long will it take them to develop into the kind of tackles it takes to win?" 

If the tackles perform brightly, there is reason to feel Carolina will 
field another flashy team, a team adept on offense and rugged on defense. 
Certainly there are some stickout performers among the returnees. 

Heading the monogram winners are Center Chris Hanburger and 
Halfback Ken Willard. Both were All-Atlantic Coast Conference choices 
for their 1963 deeds and they should once again be among the nation's 
elite. 

Willard, a bruising runner of 220 pounds, nosed out Duke's Jay Wilkin- 
son in the final game of the season to bag the ACC rushing crown. It 
was the second year in succession Ken had led Carolina hoofers. The 
Richmond, Va., hoss ranks with the best in collegiate football. 

Hanburger, a Virginian from Hampton, defends each yard of turf as 
if it is his personal beachhead. Converted from end last season, Chris 
took to his new post with vigor. As a linebacker, he's vicious. His moves 
and size (195) are reminiscent of Alabama's great pivotman of several 
years ago, Leroy Jordan. 

"Willard has the strength and drive to run over people," notes Hickey. 
"What made him so effective last season was his natural ability, plus 
some dynamic blocking from Fullback Eddie Kesler. It made our running 
game explosive." 

Kesler, a 215-pounder with immense athletic talent, once more will be 
the vanguard for Willard's attacks. Eddie is one of several talented 
players at full. 

Guard, center, fullback and halfback are deep in manpower. The ends, 
too, have strength, headed by Frank Gallagher and John Atherton. 

The motor of any team, quarterback, has promise of being revved to 
exciting speeds. A trio of youngsters, Gary Black, Jeff Beaver and Danny 
Talbott, key the spot. 

Black, a senior, was excellent in the No. 2 role last season behind the 
dependable Junior Edge. Now Gary, an improved passer and a skilled 
runner, lines up for the top post with Beaver and Talbott in close 
contention. 

Black and Talbott are seen as "runner-passer" types with their big 
play the roll-out option. Beaver threads needles with his aerial precision. 
Jeff and Danny are the brightest pair of sophs here in some time. 

42 



MARYLAND vs NORTH CAROLINA October 17 



2:15 P.M. (EST) 

al < >yster Bowl (26,000) 

Norfolk, Virginia 

FACTS ABOUT THE TAR HEELS 
CONFERENCE: Atlantic Coasl 

LOCATION: Chapel Hill, North Carolina 
ATHLETIC DIRECTOR: Charles P. Erickson 
HEAD COACH: Jim Hickey 

(William & Marv '42) 
ASSISTANT COACHES: George Barclay, Bud 

Carson, Emmett Cheek, Joe Mark, Vito 

Ragazzo, Bob Thalman, Ernie Williamson, 

( leorge Bout sol is 

COLORS: Blue and White 

ENROLLMENT: 11,000 

TYPE OFFENSE: Winged-T 

1963 OVERALL RECORD: Won 9, Lost 2 

1963 ACC RECORD: Won 6, Lost 1 

PUBLICITY DIRECTOR: Bob Quincy 




Jim Hickey 



TERPS' RECORD AGAINST THE TAR HEELS 
i Maryland: Won 12, Lost 17, Tied 1) 



l'.u;:: 


-N.C. 


, 14 


Md. 


7 


1953- 


-Md., 


26; 


N.C. 


, o 


1928- 


-N.C. 


26; 


Md., 


19 


1962- 


-Md., 


31; 


N.C, 


13 


1951- 


-Md., 


14; 


N.C. 


, 7 


1927- 


-N.C. 


7; 


Md.. 


6 


1961- 


-N.C. 


, 14 


Md. 


8 


1950- 


-TIE, 


7-7 






1926- 


-Md., 


14; 


N.C 


, 6 


1960- 


Md.. 


22; 


N.C, 


19 


1948- 


-N.C. 


49; 


Md., 


20 


1925- 


-N.C. 


16 


Md. 


, o 


L959 


-Md., 


14; 


N.C. 


7 


L947 


-N.C. 


19; 


Md. 


, o 


1924- 


Md., 


6; 


N.C, 





L958 


N.C. 


, 27 


Md. 





1946- 


-N.C. 


33; 


Md. 


, o 


1923- 


-Md., 


14; 


N.C. 


, o 


1957 


Md.. 


21; 


N.C. 


7 


1936- 


-N.C. 


14; 


Md. 


, o 


1922- 


-N.C 


27 


Md. 


3 


1956 


-N.C. 


34; 


Md., 


6 


1935 


-N.C. 


33; 


Md. 


, o 


1921- 


-N.C. 


16 


Md. 


, 7 


1955 


Md., 


25; 


N.C. 


,7 


1930- 


-N.C 


28; 


Md., 


21 


1920- 


-Md., 


13; 


N.C. 


, o 


1954 


Md.. 


33; 


N.C. 





1929- 


-N.C, 


43; 


Md., 





1899- 


-N.C. 


6; 


Md., 






TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 337,Carolina 363 

1964 CO-CAPTAINS: Halfback Ron Tuthill, Center Chris Hanburger 

LETTERMEN RETURNING: 23— Lost 18 







1964 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


19 


N.C. State 


Sept. 


26 


Mich. State 


Oct. 


3 


Wake Forest 


Oct. 


10 


at L.S.U. 


Oct. 


IT 


.Maryland* 


Oct. 


24 


South Carolina 


Oct. 


31 


at Georgia 


N ■•• 


7 


at Clemson. 


Nov. 


14 


at Virginia 


Nov. 


21 


Duke 


•Oyster 


Bowl. Norfolk. Va. 



1963 YARDSTICK 
(Aat College Park) 

Maryland No. Car. 

First Downs 14 19 

Rushing yardage 126 208 

Passing yardage 91 93 

Passes intercepted by ..0 6 

Punts 5-37 5-33 

Fumbles lost 1 

Yards penalized 35 30 

Maryland 7 0— 7 

No. Carolina 7 7 — 14 

SCORING: Maryland: Fishman. re- 
covered .fumble in end zone (Carney 
kick). 

North Carolina: Edge. 8 run (Braine 
kirk'. Lacey, 7-yd. pass from Black 
(Braino kick'. 



43 



The Deacons' 1964 Outlook 

By Marvin "Skeeter" Francis 

According to new head football coach Bill Tate, "a lot of good things 
came out of Spring practice". Tate, an assistant coach at the University 
of Illinois for eight years, inherited a Wake Forest team which won only 
one game last Fall after going through a winless season in 1962. 

"We have forgotten the past," he said. "The football picture is not all 
black. There is a gold side to it. The boys worked exceptionally hard 
throughout the Spring and if they have the same spirit and hustle next 
Fall we should win some games." 

The Deacons should field a sound first unit with lettermen at all but 
two starting spots, but the lack of depth will cause some concern. Full- 
back and end appear to be the strongest positions while the tackle post 
is the most questionable. 

There are 23 lettermen available, including tackles Tommy Brawley 
who was not eligible last Fall. Also on hand are eight varsity players 
who did not letter last season and seven who were on the squad but did 
not play. The other 23 are up from the freshman ranks. 

"Reserve strength at most positions is a big problem," Tate says. "Much 
will depend on the results of a vigorous conditioning program we gave 
the players to follow during the Summer. If nothing else, we wanted to 
be in fine physical shape as a team when Fall practice started." 

Tate appeared to be much encouraged with his starting backfield. 
Senior John Mackovic who saw only 70 minutes of action last season 
after playing 134 as a sophomore, did an excellent job throughout Spring 
at quarterback as did halfbacks Wayne Welborn and Joe Carazo and 
fullback Brian Piccolo. Mackovic was a pleasant surprise, running and 
passing well, and directing the offense in fine fashion. Piccolo, the leading 
groundgainer and top scorer the past two seasons, and Welborn were 
very impressive throughout the Spring. In the intrasquad game Piccolo 
gained 199 yards on 19 carries while Welborn had 116 in 17. 

Richard Cameron at wide end and John Grimes at the solid end are 
both senior lettermen. Ralph Brandewiede, a letterman quarterback, was 
moved to end, and will work behind Grimes. Tate says his first team ends 
will stand up with any in the conference. 

Tackle caused the greatest concern during the Spring. Jim Beaudoin, 
who opened last season as the starting center, was moved to tackle to 
help the situation there. Werer Hauer and Jim Mayo, both lettermen, 
occupied the starting jobs at the close of Spring practice. 

Bill Hopkins and Lewis Duncan, who split most the time at center 
in '63, are now guards. Frank Russell and Marks are the other lettermen. 
Soph Lynn Nesbitt was a standout in the Spring and appears to have 
nailed down a starting job at left guard. 

Bob Oplinger and Dick Penn, two sophs, are rated the top center 
candidates. With Hopkins and Duncan moved to guard there are no 
lettermen available at this position. 

The Deacons will present a variable offense. Tate says the system will 
combine the features of the split-T and will include options, traps, sweeps, 
motion and wide slot. 



44 



MARYLAND vs WAKE FOREST October 24 



2:00 P.M. (EOT) 

at Byrd stadium (35,000) 

College Park, Md. 

FACTS ABOUT THE DEACONS 

('( iNFKHKNCK: Atlantic Coast 
LOCATION: Winston-Salem, N.C. 
ATHLETIC DIRECTOR: Dr. Genp Hooks 
IIKAH COACH: Bill Tate (Illinois '53) 
ASSISTANT COACHES: Dick Anderson, Bill 

Davis, Beat tie Feathers, Bill Sexton, Ken 

Karr, Joe Madden 
COLORS: Old Cold and Black 
KNROLLMKNT: 2,058 
TYPE OFFENSE: Variable-T 
1963 OVERALL RECORD: Won 1, Lost 9 
1963 ACC RECORD: Won 1, Lost 5 
IM'BLKTTY DIRECT! >R: Man in "Skeeter" Franri 




Bill Tate 



TERPS - RECORD AGAINST THE DEACONS 
(Maryland: Won 9, Lost 3, Tied 1) 



1963- Md., 32; Wake Forest, 
1962— Md., 13; Wake Forest, 2 
1961— Md., 10; Wake Forest, 7 
I960— Md., 14; Wake Forest, 13 
1959— Wake Forest, 10; Md., 7 
1958 Wake Forest, 34; Md., 



1017— Md., 29; Wake Forest, 13 



1057 Md., 27; Wake Forest, 
1956— Md., 6; Wake Forest, 
1955— Md., 28; Wake Forest. 7 
1954— TIE, 13-13 
1944— Wake Forest, 39; Md.. 
1943 Md., 13; Wake Forest. 7 



TOTAL POINTS : Maryland 192, Wake Forest 145 
1964 CAPTAIN: Will use game captains 
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 23— Lost 9 







1964 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


19 


at Virginia 


Sept. 


26 


Va. Tech, Roanoke 


Oct. 


3 


at North Carolina 


Oct. 


10 


at Vanderbilt (N) 


Oct. 


IT 


Clemson 


Oct. 


24 


at Maryland 


Oct. 


31 


at Memphis State (N) 


Nov. 


7 


Duke 


Nov. 


14 


at South Carolina 


Nov. 


20 


N.C. State (N) 



1963 YARDSTICK 
(At Winston-Salem) 

Maryland Wake 

First Downs 29 10 

Rushing yardage 344 22 

Passing yardage 154 76 

Passe5 12-26 11-28 

Passes intercepted bv ..1 1 

Punts 3-34.7 8-36.0 

Fumbles lost 

Yards penalized 65 32 

Maryland 6 13 13 0—32 

Wake Forest — 

SCORING: Fishman. 1 run; Hill, 13, 
pass from Shiner; Hill. 17, pass from 
Shiner r Hill kick i ; Fishman. l run (Hill 
kick i ; Arizzi. 31 run. 



45 



The Nittany Lions' 1964 Outlook 

By Jim Tarman 

Penn State is going into the 1964 campaign with uncertainties at 
quarterback, end and guard. 

"The problem at quarterback," says Rip Engle, "is lack of experience, 
not lack of potential. For the most part Gary Wydman, Jack White and 
Dick Gingrich had good Springs. They worked hard and there were many 
encouraging signs that things could be OK next Fall. But the fact remains 
there is an almost total lack of varsity experience at this position and 
we really won't know where we stand until they've had game experience." 

An even bigger problem might exist at end where Spring drills did 
little to overcome a lack of speed, depth and good size. Captain-elect Bill 
Bowes and Gerry Sandusky will move up from the second unit to starting 
roles but the second team berths are up for grabs among letterman Bud 
Yost, Don Steinbacher, Jim McLean, Bill Morgan, John Thompson and 
Ed Gabriel. 

Engel went into Spring practice with question marks at guard and 
linebacker. Admitting progress, the veteran coach declared there was 
still plenty of ground to cover in the Fall. 

Barring unforeseen mishaps before September 19, halfback looks deep 
and secure with better overall speed than in recent seasons. The position 
was the biggest and most pleasant surprise of the Spring, better-than- 
hoped-for performances being produced by Tim Montgomery, Don Kunit, 
Mike Irwin and Joe Vargo. 

Gary Klingensmith, 1963's leading rusher, missed most of Spring prac- 
tice because of a knee injury but remains as the man to beat for the 
No. 1 LHB job. He should have ample help in rookie Irwin, Kunit and 
ex-quarterback Frank Potter. Also on hand will be defensive back Tom 
Bedick and punting and defensive specialist Frank Hershey. 

Fullback figures to be strong with veterans Ed Stuckrath and Tom 
Urbankik. Although both were excused from Spring drills, Engle had a 
chance to develop more power at this spot with non-lettered holdover 
Dave McNaughton, the Spring's most consistent runner, appearing a sure 
shot for the No. 2 job. 

On the line, center is strong, mostly because of Glen Ressler, an all- 
Eastern selection last year. He'll play middle guard on defense and is 
called by Engle as the finest interior lineman he ever coached. Tackle 
should be fairly strong with three returning lettermen: John Simko, John 
Deibert and Sandy Buchan. 

Looking ahead to next Fall, Engle says: "I believe we'll have a more 
balanced team on offense, one that should be able to move the ball on 
the ground or in the air. It should be a more exciting team than some 
we've had, capable of coming up with the long play, the exciting play 
more often. We'll have adequate mobility and about the same amount 
of overall speed as last year, although the backfield will be faster. Penn 
State teams traditionally are rugged and hard hitting with players who 
like to block and tackle and I see no reason for this to change. The 
hitting was excellent for the most part this Spring . . . we have boys 
who'll stay in there; you can bet on that.They won't run from anyone. 
We need a little more consistency among some key players, but generally 
we have an aggressive group of willing athletes." 



46 



MARYLAND vs PENN STATE October 31 

L:30 P.M. i KSTi 

al lii'iiwi- Stadium Md.L'N 1 i 

University Park, Pa. 

FACTS ABOUT THE NITTANY LIONS 

C( INFERENCE: [ndependenl 
LOCATION: University Park, Pa 
ATHLETIC DIRECT! >R: Erne I B Mc< !o 
HEAD COACH: Charles A. "Rip" Engle 

(Western Maryland '30) 
ASSOCIATE COACH: Joe Paterno 
ASSISTANT COACHES: Earl Bruce, Joe 

MeMullen. Jim O'Hora, Frank Pal rick. 

Dan Radakovich, George Welsh, J. T. 

While 
COLORS: Blue and White 
ENROLLMENT: 18,000 
OFFENSK: Multiple-T 
1963 RECORD: Won 7, Lost 3 
PUBLICITY DIRECTOR: Jim Tarman 

TERPS" RECORD AGAINST THE LIONS 
(Maryland: Won 1, Lost 9) 




Rip Engle 



1963— Penn State, 17; Md., 15 
1962--Penn State, 23; Md., 7 
1961— Md., 21; Penn State, 17 
I960— Penn State, 28; Md., 9 
1944— Penn State, 34; Md., 19 



1943— Penn State, 45; Md.. 
1939— Penn State, 12; Md., 
1938— Penn State, 33; Md., 
1937— Penn State, 21; Md., 14 
1917— Penn State, 57; Md., 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 70, Penn State 287 
1964 CAPTAIN: Bill Bowes (End) 
LETTERMEN RETURNING : 17— Lost 23 







1964 SCHEDULE 


Sejt. 


19 


Navy 


Sept 


26 


at UCLA (night) 


Oct. 


3 


Oregon 


Oct. 


10 


at Army 


Oct. 


17 


Syracuse 


Oct. 


24 


al West Virginia 


Oct. 


13 


Maryland 


Nov. 


7 


at Ohio State 


Nov. 


14 


at Houston (night > 


Nov. 


21 


Pittsburgh 



1963 YARDSTICK 

(At Maryland) 

Maryland P.S. 

First Downs 19 15 

Yards Rushing 112 212 

Yards Passing 176 115 

Passes 14-28 6-10 

Passes intercepted by 

Fumbles lost 2 4 

Yards penalized 8 20 

Maryland 7 8 — 15 

Penn State 10 7—17 

SCORING: Maryland: Shiner, 5 run 
(Hill kick': Hill. 22 pass from Shiner. 
(Burton, pass from Shiner). 

Penn State: Safety: Fishman recov- 
ered Shiner's fumble in end zone; An- 
derson. 14 pass from Coates (Bowes 
pass from Coates i : Klingensmith. 66 
pass from Liske ■ Coates kick;. 



47 



The Midshipmen's 1964 Outlook 

By L. Budd Thalman 

It will be our good fortune this season to have some of the finest indi- 
vidual talent ever to play for Navy. A few key men, however, do not 
make a team and before our Penn State opener, we must count on the 
rapid development and early maturity of the various newcomers dotting 
our second and third units. 

We have a total of 13 lettermen returning from last year's second- 
ranked squad. Four are backs and the other nine are linemen. Most of 
them will be filling roles on our first unit. 

Quarterback Roger Staubach, already a national hero, is our most 
brilliant performer. We feel, hard as it may seem to believe, that Roger 
will be better this year than he was last. An additional season's experi- 
ence will make him an improved passer, a wiser play-caller, a smoother 
ball handler and a smarter runner. 

Fullback Pat Donnelly ideally complements Roger. This twosome is as 
awesome a land-air punch as has played college football in some years. 
We have to go back to the mid-'40 glory days of Blanchard and Davis 
for a parallel. Donnelly is an outstanding runner, a talented pass receiver, 
an accomplished quick kicker and a standout defensive player. We even 
called on him twice as a passer last season and he completed both tosses 
(to Staubach). 

Halfback Ed Orr and Tackle Jim Freeman are two other talented ball 
players. Orr is possessed of one of the finest pair of hands around. As a 
receiver, he must rank with Ron Beagle and Pete Jokanovich, two of 
Navy's greatest. Freeman consistently comes up with the key play. He 
has lightning reactions and works with equal effectiveness on both offense 
and defense. 

Guard Fred Marlin, our captain; Tackle Pat Philbin, Center Bruce 
Kenton, and Guard Larry Kocisko won spots on the two-way team during 
the Spring. The other monogram winners ■ — Guards John Connolly and 
Gene Hardman and Tackle Bob Wittenberg — will have key parts to play 
on the offensive and defensive teams. 

Halfback Wayne Hanson is typical of the type player that must come 
through for us next season. Wayne edged injured letterman Kip Paske- 
wich for the starting post at left half during the Spring. He was used 
only sparingly in 1963 and carried the ball but three times all year. 

Spring practice revealed that our weaknesses are pretty much as we 
anticipated — inexperience at end and questionable overall depth. Three 
of our four letterman ends graduated and Neil Henderson, the lone 
returnee, was handicapped by injuries all Spring. We're counting heavily 
on Henderson's recovery and the availability of Phil Norton, who under- 
went knee surgery in March, at this position. 

The two-way team, which includes six starters from last year, is cur- 
rently comprised of all seniors and mostly experienced hands. After that, 
however, the outlook is muddled. Of the varsity candidates from the '63 
plebe team the most promising is Don Downing, a 215- pound center 
from Lorrain, Ohio. Don is the caliber of prospect that comes along once 
in a great while. 

We plan to again employ the three-unit system with one adaptation. 
We expect to use our best athletes within this framework and, thus, may 
end up playing fewer than 33 men. The keys to 1964 are emergence of 
enough solid ends and quick maturity of our untested talent. 

48 



MARYLAND vs NAVY November 7 



1 ::'.() P.M. I EST) 
;il livid Stadium (35,000) 

College Park, Mil. 

FACTS ABOUT THE MIDSHIPMEN 

C( (NFERENCE: [ndependenl 

LOCATION: Annapolis. Md. 

ATHLETIC DIRECTOR: Capt. William S. 

Busik 
HEAD OoACH: Wayne Hardin 

(College of the Pacific) 
ASSISTANT COACHES: Dave Hart, Hugh 

McWilliams, Ernie Jorge, Carl Schuette, 

Doug Scovil, Steve Belichick, Dick Duden 
COLORS: Navy Blue and Gold 
ENROLLMENT: 4,100 
OFFENSE: Diversified-T 
1963 OVERALL RECORD: Won 9, Lost 1 
PUBLICITY DIRECTOR: L. Budd Thalman 




Wayne Hardin 



TERPS' RECORD AGAINST THE MIDDIES 
(Maryland: Won 4, Lost 13, Tied 1) 

1963— Navv. 42; Md., 7 1950— Md. ( 35; Navy, 21 1913— Navy, 76: Md. 

1961— Naw, 14; Md., 7 1934— Navy, 16; Md., 13 1908— Navy, 57; Md., 

11)39— Navy, 22; Md., 14 1932— Navy, 28; Md., 7 1907— Navy, 12; Md., 

1958— Navy, 40; Md., 14 1931— Md., 6; Navy, 1906— TIE, 12-12 

1952— Md., 38; Navy, 7 1930— Navy, 6; Md., 1905— Navy, 17; Md., 

1951— Md., 40; Navy, 21 1917— Navy, 62; Md., 1897— Navy, 38; Md.. 

TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 193, Navy 491 
1964 CAPTAIN: Fred Marlin (Guard) 
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 13— Lost 18 







1964 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


19 


at Perm State 


Sept. 


26 


William & Mary 


Oct. 


3 


at Michigan 


Oct. 


9 


Georgia Tech (night)* 


Oct. 


17 


at California 




24 


at Pittsburgh 


Oct. 


13 


Notre Dame • 


Nov. 


7 


at Maryland 


Nov. 


14 


Duke 


Nov. 


28 


Army" 


•Jacksonville. Fla. 


"Philadelphia. Pa. 



1963 YARDSTICK 
(At Annapolis) 

Maryland Navy 

First Dnwns 14 17 

Rushing yardage 123 11 

Passing yardage 101 161 

Passes 9-24 11-19 

Passes intercepted bv .. 1 I 

Punts 4-26.5 4-30.6 

Fumbles lost 3 2 

Yards penalized 70 80 

Maryland 7—7 

Navy 6 22 7 7—42 

SCORING: Maryland: Hill. 23. pass 
from Shiner (Hill kick). 

Navy: Staubach. 2, run ( kick .failed ) ; 
Sai. 2 run (Teall. pass from Staubach); 
Paskewich. 76. pass interception <. Mar- 
lin kick': Staubach. 1. run (Marlin 
kit k i : Sjuggerud. 11. pass from Stau- 
bach (Marlin kick i : Ounsworth. S. run 
i Marlin kick). 



49 



The Tigers' 1964 Outlook 

By Bob Bradley 

Coach Frank Howard, getting ready to field his 25th Clemson team, 
has probably his biggest rebuilding job in a decade, as he lost 13 men 
off the first 22 from last year's team which won 5, lost 4 and tied 1. 
After failing to gain a victory in the first half of the season, the Tigers 
finished strong, winning the final five, scoring 127 points in the latter 
half of the season while holding the opposition to 33. 

Howard has been able to move lettermen into every first team slot, 
but there are seven sophomores on the alternate unit. 

Probably the weakest position will be end. Not only are four lettermen 
gone from this spot, but the replacements are not the largest ends ever at 
Clemson. In fact, Howard says the humane society might get onto him 
when some of his ends trot on the field. 

Tackle also lost four lettermen, but Ricky Johnson returns as a junior 
after playing alternate as a sophomore and Johnny Boyette returns as a 
junior after sitting out last year because of a pre-season injury. Joe 
Blackwell, who made a fine late showing at guard, is back and to take 
up some of the slack from four missing lettermen, Howard moved Richard 
Cooper from No. 2 center to No. 1 right guard. Center (and captain) Ted 
Bunton is back for his third year as a starter and look for sophomore 
red shirt Joe Waldrep to be a star backing up Bunton. He has all the 
tools. 

Clemson is blessed with outstanding backfield talent this year, and 
even though the line was riddled from graduation, Howard has been 
noted down through the years for his outstanding forward walls. 

Jimmy Bell and Thomas Ray are lettermen quarterbacks and Jim 
Ruffner, also a pre-season injury victim last fall, is expected to run the 
alternate unit behind Bell — or Ray. The Tigers have no less than six 
lettermen halfbacks, all of whom can carry the mail. Best bets here are 
Hugh Mauldin and Billy Ward, but Hal Davis could return to his sopho- 
more form as a senior. 

Fullbacks are the aces. Pat Crain, Bob Swift, Bob Baldwin and Charlie 
Dumas all swing past the 220 mark and look for Crain to be probably 
the outstanding back in the conference. An All-ACC selectee last Fall, 
blocker deluxe and No. 2 draft choice of the Chicago Bears, this Latrobe, 
Pa., senior has all-America written all over him. There's no question 
about his ability. He also excels on defense. Crain is a complete player 
in all respects. 



50 



MARYLAND vs CLEMSON November 14 



1 :30 P.M. (EST) 

at Byrd Stadium (35,000) 

College Park, Md. 

FACTS ABOUT THE TIGERS 

C( INFERENCE: Atlantic Coasl 
L( ICATK >.\ : Clemson, South I larolina 
ATHLETIC DIRECTOR: Frank Howard 
IIKAD C( ).\('II : Frank Howard (Alabama) 



ASSISTANT COACHES: Kred 

Jones, Whitey Jordan, Banks 

"Goat" McMillan, Bob Smith, 

Charlie Wi r 

('( >L< )RS: Purple and Orange 
ENROLLMENT: 4,400 
TYPE OFFENSE: T and Split-T 
L963 OVERALL RECORD: Won 

Tied 1 
1963 ACC RECORD : Won 5, Lost 2 
PUBLICITY DIRECTOR: Bob Bradley 



Cone, Bob 
McFadden, 
Don Wade, 



5, Lost 4, 




Frank Howard 



TERPS' RECORD AGAINST THE TIGERS 
(Maryland: Won 7, Lost 4, Tied 1) 



1963- Clemson, 21; Maryland, 6 
1962 -Clemson, 17; Maryland, 14 
1961— Maryland, 24; Clemson, 21 
1960— Maryland, 19; Clemson, 17 
1959— Maryland, 28; Clemson, 25 
1958 -Clemson, 8; Maryland, 



1957 — Clemson, 26; Maryland, 

1956— TIE, 6-6 

1955 — Maryland, 

1954 — Maryland, 

1953— Maryland, 

1952— Marvland, 28; Clemson, 



25; Clemson, 12 
16; Clemson, 
20; Clemson, 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 193, Clemson 153 

1964 CAPTAIN: Ted Bunton (Center). Alternate Captain: Jimmy Bell 
(Quarterback) 

LETTERMEN RETURNING: 25— Lost 15 







1964 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


19 


Furman 


Sept. 


26 


at N.C. State 


Oct. 


3 


at Georgia Tech 


Oct. 


10 


at Georgia 


Oct. 


17 


at Wake Forest 


Oct. 


24 


at Texas Christian 


Oct. 


31 


Virginia 


Nov. 


7 


North Carolina 


Nov. 


11 


at Maryland 


Nov. 


21 


Open 


Nov. 


2S 


South Carolina 



1963 YARDSTICK 
(At Clemson) 

Maryland Clemson 
First Downs 13 


Rushing yardage 
Passing yardage .. 
Passes intercepted 
Punts 


46 309 

114 56 

by .. 3 

6-37.8 5-25.2 


Yards penalized .... 


29 34 


Passes 


15-30 5-14 


Marvland 6— ^ 

Clemson 7 14—21 

SCORING: Maryland: Arizzi, 83, 
pass interception. 

Clemson: Swift. 2 run (Pearce kick); 
Ray 1. run (Pearce kick); Meadow- 
croft. 8. pass from Ray (Pearce kick). 



51 



The Cavaliers' 1964 Outlook 

By Dick Turner 

A little more of nearly everything is the prospect for football at the 
University of Virginia in '64. 

More individual size, increased backfield depth and strength, and more 
backfield speed will especially be noted. Says Bill Elias, going into his 
fourth season as coach of the Cavaliers: 

"With 20 lettermen returning and some outstanding players moving 
up from our '63 first team, the outlook is good and looking better all 
the time. 

"The addition of offensive coaches George Blackburn, backfield, and 
Ned McDonald, line, gives the youthful Cavaliers the benefit of three 
decades of collegiate coaching experience. 

"Prominent returning lettermen include junior tackle Bob Kowalkow- 
ski, an honorable mention All-American after his first varsity season 
last year; halfbacks Tom Krebs, John Pincavage and Terry Sieg; full- 
backs Bob Dunphey and Bob Prusmack, and quarterback Tom Hodges. 

"Of the rising sophomores, the most impressive have been quarterback 
Bob Davis, halfback Carroll Jarvis, and linemen Paul Lockwood and 
Randall Harris, tackles Big John Naponick, middle defensive guard, and 
Don Parker, end-linebacker. 

"Looming largest by weights are Kowalkowski, who will be playing 
his second varsity season at 235, up about 15 pounds; Parker, 265, and 
Naponick, height 6-10, weight 290." 

Other line lettermen who will be heard from again include Pat 
Vaughan, 200-pound senior end; Pat McFalls, 220, and Dick Myers, 230, 
senior tackles; Jim Donley, 205, and Douglas Wood, 195, junior centers- 
linebackers, and defensive backfield lettermen John Depenbrock, Gene 
Angle and Dallas Gwynn. 

With only about five or six senior lettermen returning to the first 
offensive-defensive units, Virginia will have a youthful '64 football team. 

Ned McDonald rejoined Virginia's football staff last Spring after an 
absence of nine years. He was formerly line coach for seven years and 
head coach of the Cavaliers for three more. 

George Blackburn also came out of football retirement last Spring. 
He was formerly head coach at Miami of Ohio and the University of 
Cincinnati. 

Both had been in private business in recent years. 



:>l> 



MARYLAND vs VIRGINIA November 21 



1:30 P.M. I EST) 

at Scot I Stadium < 26,000) 

Charlottesville, Va. 

FACTS ABOUT THE CAVALIERS 

CONFERENCE: Atlantic Coai I 

I.oi'ATK >N: (Charlottesville, Va. 

ATHLETIC 1 »IK1 :< TOU: Stew Sel.o 

HEAD COACH: William T. Elias 

ASSISTANT COACHES: George Blackburn, 
Anthony "Zeke" Fantino, Ralph Humph- 
ries, Ned McDonald, Bill Neal, Louis 
( )nesty 

COLORS: Orange and Blue 

ENROLLMENT: 6,000 

TYPE OFFENSE: Split -T 

1963 OVERALL RECORD: Won 2, Lost 7, 

Tied 1 

1963 ACC RECORD: Won 0, Lost 5, Tied 1 

ITI'.I.K'ITY DIRECT! >R: Dick Turner 




Bill Elias 



TERPS' RECORD AGAINST THE CAVALIERS 
(Maryland: Won 16, Lost 10, Tied 2) 



1963— Md, 21; 
1962— Md., 40; 
1961— Va., 28; 
1960— Md., 44; 
1959— Md., 55; 
1958— Md., 44; 
1957— Md., 12; 
1945— Md., 19; 
1944— Va., 18; 
1943— Va., 39; 



Va., 6 1942— Md., 27; Va., 12 

Va., 18 1940— Va., 19; Md., 6 

Md., 16 1939— Va., 12; Md., 7 

Va., 12 1938— Va., 27; Md., 19 

Va., 12 1937— Md., 3; Va., 

Va., 6 1936— Md., 21; Va., 

Va., 1935— Md., 14; Va., 7 

Va., 13 1934— Md., 20; Va., 

Md., 7 1933— Va., 6; Md., 

Md., 1932— Va., 7; Md., 6 



1931— Md., 7; Va., 6 
1930— Md., 14; Va., 6 
1929— TIE, 13-13 
1928— Md., 18; Va., 2 
1927— Va., 21; Md., 
1926— TIE, 6-6 
1925— Va., 6; Md., 
1919— Md., 13; Va., 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 452, Virginia 302 
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 20— Lost 11 







1964 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


19 


Wake Forest 


Sept. 


26 


at Duke 


Oct. 


3 


Virginia Tech 


Oct. 


10 


VMI. at Richmond 


Oct. 


17 


Army 


Oct. 


21 


X.C. State 


Oct. 


31 


At Clem&on 


Nov. 


7 


at William & Mary 


Nov. 


14 


North Carolina 


Nov. 


21 


Maryland 



1963 YARDSTICK 




(At College Park) 




Marylan 

First Downs 19 

Rushing yardage 174 

Passing yardage 81 

Passes 6-13 


i Va. 

9 

80 

104 

7-20 



6-39.3 

3 

17 

6— 5 

0—21 


Passes intercepted by .. 
Punts 5-33.2 


Fumbles lost 1 

Y ircls penalized 70 


Virginia 

Maryland 7 7 7 


SCORING: Maryland: Shiner. 
(I till kick); Martin, 16, pass 


8 run 
from 


Shiner (Hill kick) Fishman. 3 rush (Hill 
kick). 


Virginia: Ridgely, 36 (pass 
Hodges). 


from 



53 



THE TERP PRESS 

FRANK WETZEL, Bureau Chief, The Associated Press (Baltimore) 

*GEORGE BOWEN, The Associated Press (Baltimore) 
GORDON, BEARD, The Associated Press (Baltimore) 
SAM FOGG, The United Press International (Baltimore) 

*BOB SERLING, The United Press International (Washington) 
EV GARDNER, Sports Editor, The Daily News (Washington) 
HENRY FANKHAUSER, The Daily News (Washington) 
GEORGE CLIFFORD, Columnist, The Daily News (Washington) 
TOM YORKE, The Daily News (Washington) 

::: RUSS WHITE, The Daily News (Washington) 
MORRIS SIEGEL, The Evening Star (Washington) 
BILL PEELER, Sports Editor, The Evening Star (Washington) 
FRANCIS STANN, Columnist, The Evening Star (Washington) 

*STEVE GUBACK, The Evening Star (Washington) 
GEORGE HUBER, The Evening Star (Washington) 
DICK SLAY, The Evening Star (Washington) 
BUS HAM, The Post and Times-Herald (Washington) 
SHIRLEY POVICH, Columnist, The Post and Times-Herald (Wash.) 
BOB ADDIE, Columnist, The Post and Times-Herald (Washington) 

*MARTIE ZAD, Sports Editor, The Post and Times-Herald (Washington) 
PAUL MENTON, Sports Editor, The Evening Sun (Baltimore) 

*BILL TANTON, The Evening Sun (Baltimore) 
RANDALL CASSELL, Columnist, The Evening Sun (Baltimore) 

*JIM WALKER, The Evening Sun (Baltimore) 
BOB MAISEL, Sports Editor, The Morning Sun (Baltimore) 

*ALAN GOLDSTEIN, The Morning Sun (Baltimore) 
AL FISCHER, The Morning Sun (Baltimore) 

*ED ATWATER, The Morning Sun (Baltimore) 
JOHN STEADMAN, Sports Editor, The News-Post (Baltimore) 
KARL FELDNER, The News-Post (Baltimore) 

*STEVE O'NEILL, The News-Post (Baltimore) 

J. SUTER KEGG, Sports Editor, The Evening Times (Cumberland) 
C. V. BURNS, Sports Editor, The Morning News (Cumberland) 
DICK KELLY, Sports Editor, The Mail (Hagerstown) 
FRANK COLLEY, Sports Editor, The Herald (Hagerstown) 
ED NICHOLS, Sports Editor, The Times (Salisbury - ) 
BUCKY SUMMERS, Sports Editor, The Post (Frederick) 
BOB LAYTON, Sports Editor, The Banner (Cambridge) 
BOB WATCHER, Sports Editor, The Evening Capital (Annapolis) 

*C iver Da \y 

RADIO and TELEVISION 

BALTIMORE WASHINGTON 

John Jeppi, WAQE *Dan Daniels, John McLean, WTOP-TV 

Larry Harrison, WAYE Steve Gilmartin, WMAL-TV 

Joe Croghan, WBAL-TV and Radio Sain Kaufman, WOL 

Ron Menchine, WBAL Jim Gibbons, Ray Michael, Jim Simpson, 

Roger Grisv\«old, WBMD WRC-TV 

Frank Luber, WCAO Maury Povich, WWDC 

Eddie Fenton, Fred Neil, WCBM 

Harry Shriver. WFBR ''Broadcast all of Terps' games, home 

Jim West, WITH and away. 

Mel Bernstein, WJZ-TV 

Bill Boiling, Don Bruchey, Jack Dawson, 

WMAR-TV 
Jack Gale, WWIN 
Wade Utay, WNAV (Annapolis) 
Fred Neil, WCBM 

54 



\ 




\m.\ ' **► 






1963 STATISTICS 

RECORD: 7-3 

MD. OPP. Site Attendance 

14 N.C. State 36 Home 28,550 

13 South Carolina 21 Away 13,550 

12 Duke 30 'Richmond) 20,000 

7 North Carolina 14 Home 21,000 

21 Air Force 14 Home 32,000 

32 Wake Forest Away 5,000 

15 Penn State 17 Home 35,550 

7 Navy 42 Away 30,000 

6 Clemson 21 Away 30,000 

21 Virginia 6 Home 15,000 



148 201 230,600 



TEAM STATISTICS 

MD. OPP. 

TOTAL PLAYS 704 628 

TIMES CARRIED 455 456 

FIRST DOWNS RUSHING 95 94 

FIRST DOWNS PASSING 65 45 

FIRST DOWNS PENALTIES . 9 9 

NET YARDS RUSHING - 1405 1635 

NET YARDS PASSING 1246 997 

TOTAL YARDS OFFENSE 2651 2632 

PASSES ATTEMPTED 249 172 

PASSES COMPLETED 113 80 

PASSES HAD INTERCEPTED 12 7 

PASSING PERCENTAGE 45.4 46.5 

NUMBER OF PUNTS 46 53 

AVG. YARDAGE OF PUNTS 34.6 35.6 

OWN FUMBLES LOST 15 13 

PENALTIES, YARDS LOST 45-405 35-328 

TOTAL POINTS 148 201 



56 





Avg. 




Net 


Gain 


TD 


480 


1.1 


4 


312 


3.4 


2 


116 


5.3 


2 


110 


4.0 





108 


5.1 


8 


74 


3.2 





72 


4.0 





47 


5.8 





28 


2.8 





21 


.2 


4 


20 


2.5 





9 


3.0 





9 


2.5 





4 


4.0 





11 


2.5 








.0 






1963 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS 

RUSHING 

Att. Gain Lost 

Fishman L16 487 7 

ChiaverinJ !>:< 314 2 

Arizzi 22 116 

Burton 27 118 8 

Hill 21 119 11 

Klingerman 23 78 4 

Sullivan 18 74 2 

Funk 8 48 1 

Adams 10 30 2 

Shiner 92 250 229 

Stem 8 21 1 

Girardi 3 9 

Bury 4 11 2 

Springer 1 4 

Lilly 5 12 1 

Cerra 2 11 

Humphries 2 4 20 -16 -8.0 

INTERCEPTION RETURNS 

No. Yards TD 

Arizzi 4 98 1 

Adams 1 24 

Burton 10 

Miller 10 

PUNTING 

Avg. 
No. Yards Blocked Kick 

Humphries 43 1517 35.3 

Burkhardt 2 56 28.0 

Burton 1 22 22.0 

INDIVIDUAL PASSING 

TD 
Att. Comp. Int. Pet. Yds. Passes 

Shiner 222 108 8 48.6 1165 10 

Sullivan 18 3 3 16.7 55 

Hill 1 10 100.0 14 

Funk 5 10 20.0 12 

Lilly 2 .0 

Springer 1 1 .0 

57 



Avg. 


TD 


Gain 


Passes 


12.0 


7 


12.5 


2 


9.9 





8.0 





8.2 





13.6 





12.5 





12.0 





10.0 





16.0 





6.0 





2.0 


1 



Yds. 


Avg. 


115 


7.2 


25 


12.5 


18 


6.0 


14 


14.0 


10 


10.0 


3 


3.0 



PASS RECEIVING 

Caught Yardage 

Hill - 43 516 

Martin 19 238 

Humphries 12 116 

Burton 12 96 

Stem 10 82 

Melcher 5 68 

Arizzi 4 50 

Nardo 3 36 

Funk 2 20 

Fishman 1 16 

Simpson 1 6 

Chiaverini 1 2 



PUNT RETURNS 

No. 

Hill 16 

Miller 2 

Arizzi 3 

Cerra 1 

Simpson 1 

Sullivan 1 



KICKOFF RETURNS 

No. Yds. Avg. 

Hill 13 317 24.4 

Simpson 7 138 19.3 

Arizzi 3 48 16.0 

Cerra 2 46 23.0 

Funk 2 37 18.5 

Stem 1 25 25.0 

Melcher 2 21 10.5 

Adams 1 15 15.0 

Humphries 1 10 10.0 

Chiaverini 2 15 17.5 

Bagranoff 1 .0 



TD 

Hill 8 

Shiner 4 

Fishman 4 

Arizzi 2 

Chiaverini 2 

Martin 2 

Burton 

Carney 



SCORING 








PAT-k 


PAT-r 


PAT-p 


PTS 


7—8 


0—0 


0—0 


55 


0—0 


1—1 


0—0 


26 


0—0 


0—0 


0—0 


24 


0—0 


0—0 


0—0 


12 


0—0 


0-0 


0—0 


12 


0—0 


0—0 


0—0 


12 


0—0 


0—0 


2—2 


4 


3—5 


0—0 


0—0 


3 



58 



TERP ALL-AMERICA PLAYERS 

1923 — W. Supplee, End — Second Team, AP 

1928 -Gerald Snyder, Fullback — Second Team, AP 

1931 — Jess Krajcovic, Guard Honorable Mention, AP 

1934 Norwood Sothoron, Fullback — Honorable Mention, AP 
Vic Willis, End Honorable Mention, AP 
Bill Guckeyson, Halfback — Honorable Mention, AP 
Ed Minion, Tackle Honorable Mention, AP 

1935 — Bill Guckeyson, Halfback — Honorable Mention. AP 
Vic Willis, End — Honorable Mention, AP 

1936 — Bill Guckeyson — Halfback — Honorable Mention, AP 

1937 Jim Meade, Halfback — Honorable Mention, AP 

1940 — Bob Smith, Center — Honorable Mention, AP 

1942 — Tommy Mont, Quarterback, Honorable Mention, AP 
Paul Flick Center — Honorable Mention, AP 

1947 — Lou Gambino, Halfback — Honorable Mention, AP 
Gene Kinney, Center — Honorable Mention, AP 

1948 — Ray Krouse, Tackle -Honorable Mention, AP, UP 
Elmer Wingate, End — Honorable Mention, UP 

1949 — 'Ray Krouse, Tackle — Second Team, AP 

1950 Bob Ward, Guard — First Team, AP, Look, NEA, Gridiron, All- 
Players, Colliers 
Second Team, UP, INS, The Quarterback 
Ed Modzelewski, Fullback — Honorable Mention, AP, UP 

1951— Bob Ward, Guard— UN AN I MOUS First Teams 

Dick Modzelewski, Tackle — First Team, All Players; Second 

Team, AP; Third Team, UP 
Ed Modzelewski, Fullback — First and Second Teams 
Jack Scarbath, Quarterback — Honorable Mention, AP, All-Players 
Tom Cosgrove, Center — Honorable Mention, AP, All Players 
Dave Cianelli, Fullback — Honorable Mention, AP 
Joe Petruzzo — Halfback — Honorable Mention, AP 

1952— Jack Scarbath, Quarterback — UNANIMOUS First Teams 
Dick Modelewski. Tackle — UNANIMOUS First Teams 
Tom Cosgrove, Center — Second Team, All-Players 
Stan Jones, Tackle — Honorable Mention, All-Players 

1953— Stan Jones, Tackle — UNANIMOUS First Teams 

Bernie Faloney, Quarterback — Eight First Teams, All Second 

Teams 
Chester Hanulak, Halfback — Second Team, INS; Honorable Men- 
tion, AP, UP, NEA 
Ralph Felton, Fullback — Honorable Mention, AP, UP, NEA 
Bill Walker, End — Honorable Mention, UP 
John Irvine, Center — Honorable Mention, UP 
Bob Morgan, Tackle — Honorable Mention, UP 

1954 — Dick Bielski, Fullback — Third Team, All-Players; Honorable Men- 
tion, AP, UP 
Ronnie Waller. Halfback — Honorable Mention, AP, UP 
Jack Bowersox, Guard — First Team, Gridiron Index; Honorable 

Mention, AP, UP 
John Irvine, Center — Honorable Mention, UP 
Bill Walker, End — Second Team, AP; Honorable Mention. UP 
Bob Pellegrini. Guard — Honorable Mention, UP 
George Palahunik, Guard — Honorable Mention. UP 

59 



1955— Bob Pellegrini — Center — UNANIMOUS First Teams 

Ed Vereb, Halfback — First Team, Movietone News, N. Y. Daily 
News, Extension; Second Team, INS; Third Team, AP, UP, 
Sporting News 
Mike Sandusky, Tackle — First Team, Sporting News, Extension; 
Second Team, UP, NEA, N. Y. Daily News; Honorable Men- 
tion, AP 
Jack Davis, Guard — Honorable Mention, AP, UP, NEA 
Frank Tamburello, Quarterback — First Team, Movietone News; 

Honorable Mention, AP, UP, NEA 
Bill Walker, End — Second Team, UP, Sporting News; Honorable 

Mention, NEA 
Russell Dennis, End — First Team, N. Y. Daily News 
Ed Heuring, Tackle — Honorable Mention, AP, UP 
1956 — Mike Sandusky, Tackle — Honorable Mention, AP, UP, INS, NEA 
Jack Davis, Guard — Honorable Mention, AP, UP, INS, NEA 
Gene Alderton, Center — Honorable Mention, AP, UP 
1957 — Rod Breedlove, Guard — Honorable Mention, AP, UP, NEA, Sport- 
ing News 
Ed Cooke, End — Honorable Mention, AP, UP, NEA 
Gene Alderton, Center — Honorable Mention, AP, NEA 
1958 — Rod Breedlove, Guard, Honorable Mention, AP, UPI, NEA, Sport- 
ing News 
Fred Cole, Tackle — Honorable Mention, AP, UPI 
1959 — Rod Breedlove, Guard — Honorable Mention, AP, UPI, NEA 
Jim Joyce, Fullback — Honorable Mention, AP, NEA 
Gary Collins, End — Honorable Mention, AP, UPI 
Tom Gunderman, Guard — Honorable Mention, AP, UPI 
Kurt Schwarz, Tackle — Honorable Mention, UPI 
1960 — Gary Collins, End — Honorable Mention, AP, UPI 

Dale Betty, Quarterback — Honorable Mention, AP 
1961 — Gary Collins, End — First Team, UPI, NEA, American Football 
Coaches Association, Football Writers Association, Pro Football 
Scouts; Second Team, AP. 

Bob Hacker, Center — Honorable Mention, AP, UPI. 
1962 — Dick Shiner, Quarterback — Honorable Mention. AP, UPI 
Walter Rock, Guard — Honorable Mention, AP, UPI 
Roger Shoals, Tackle — Honorable Mention, UPI 
Tom Brown, Halfback — Honorable Mention, AP 



60 



SPECIAL TERRAPIN AWARDS 

The Maryland Ring offered In memory of Charles L. Linhardt to the 
Maryland man win) is adjudged ihc best athlete of the year. 
1952— Dave Cianelli— Back 1960— Rod Breedlove — Guard 

1953 — John Alderton— End 

The Silvester Watch for excellence in athletics to the man who typi- 
ed the best in college athletics: 

1948— Vic Turyn— Back 1958— Ed Cooke— End 

1949— Joe Tucker — Back 1960— Jim Joyce — Back 

1950— Elmer Wingate— End 1961— Dale Betty— Back 

1953— Paul Nester— End 1 ■»('..', Dick Shiner Haek 
1954 — Marty Crytzer — End 

The Teke Trophy to the student who during his four years at the 
University has rendered the greatest service to football: 
1950— John Idzik — Back 1957 — Gene Alderton — Center 

1951— Bob Ward— Guard 1958 — Bob Rusevlyan— Back 

1952— Ed Fullerton— Back 1959— Kurt Schwarz— Tackle 

1953— Bernie Faloney— Back 1960— Vincent Scott— End 

1954— John Irvine— Center 1961— Gary Collins— End 

1955— Bob Pellegrini— Center 15)62 — Tom Brown Halfback 

1956— Mike Sandusky— Tackle 1963— Bob Burton— Halfback 

The Al\1n L. Aubinoe Trophy, for the "Unsung Hero" of the current 
season : 

1956— Al Wharton— Tackle 1960— Leroy Dietrich — Center 

1957— Wilbur Main— Center 1961— Dick Barlund— End 

1958— Ted Kershner — Back 1962 — Murnis Banner Halfback 

1959— Joe Gardi— Tackle 1963— George Stem— Halfback 

The Anthony C. Nardo Memorial Trophy to the best Football lineman 
of the year: 

1950— Bob Ward— Guard 1957— Don Healy— Tackle 

1951— Bob Ward— Guard 1958— Fred Cole— Tackle 

1952— William Maletzky— Guard 1959— Tom Gunderman — Guard 

1953— Stan Jones— Tackle 1960 — Gary Collins— End 

1954— Bob Pellegrini— Guard 1961— Bill Kirchiro— Tackle 

1955— Mike Sanduskv— Tackle 1962— Dave Crossan— Tackle 

1956— Al Wharton— Tackle 1963— Olaf Drozdov— Tackle 

The Jim Tatum Memorial Trophy to the "Outstanding Tackle": 

1959 — Kurt Schwarz 
1960 — Tom Sankovich 
1961— Bill Kirchiro 
1962 — Dave Crossan 
1963— Olaf Drozdov 

The A. V. Williams award for the Outstanding Scholar and Athlete: 
1954— Ron Waller— Back 1960— Dale Betty— Back 

1957— Howard Dare— Back 

The George C. Cook Memorial Scholarship Trophy to the member of 
the team with the highest scholastic average: 

1962— Don White— Quarterback 1963— Dave Nardo— End 

The Geary F. Eppley Award to the graduating male senior athlete 
who during his 3 years of varsity competition lettered at least once and 
attained the highest overall scholastic average. 
1963— Dave Nardo— End 

61 



BEST OFFENSIVE BACK 

1952— Chester Hanulak— Halfback 
1953— Ralph Felton— Fullback 
1954— Ron Waller— Halfback 
1955— Ed Vereb— Halfback 
1956— Fred Hamilton— Halfback 
1957 — Bob Rusevlyan — Quarter- 
1958 — Bob Rusevlyan — Quarter- 
back 
back 
1959 — Jim Joyce — Fullback 
1960— Dale Betty— Quarterback 
1961 — Dick Shiner — Quarterback 
1962— Tom Brown— Halfback 
1963 — Dick Shiner — Quarterback 



BEST OFFENSIVE LINEMAN 



1952 

1953 

195 

1955 

1956- 

1957 

1958 

1959 

1960 

1961- 

1962- 

1963- 



Tom Cosgrove — Center 
Marty Crytzer — End 
Jack Bowersox — Guard 
Russell Dennis — -End 
-Al Wharton— Tackle 
-Tom Gunderman — Guard 
-Fred Cole— Tackle 
-Tom Gunderman — Guard 
Bob Hacker — Center 
Roger Shoals — Tackle 
Roger Shoals — Tackle 
Gene Feher — Center 



BEST DEFENSIVE BACK 

1962— Ed Fullerton— Halfback 
1953— Dick Nolan— Halfback 
1954 — Joe Horning — Halfback 
1955 — Lynn Beightol — Quarter- 
back 
1956 — Bob Rusevlyan — Quarter- 
back 
1957 — Bob Layman— Halfback 
1958 — Jim Joyce — Fullback 
1959 — Dwayne Fletcher — Quarter- 
back 
1960 — Jim Davidson — Quarterback 
1961— Tom Brown — Halfback 
1962— Joe Hrezo— Fullback 
1963 — Ernie Arizzi — Halfback 

BEST DEFENSIVE LINEMAN 

1952— John Alderton— End 
1953— Bob Morgan— Tackle 
1954— Tom McLiuckie — Guard 
1955 — Mike Sandusky— Tackle 
1956— Mike Sandusky— Tackle 
1957 — Rod Breedlove— Guard 
1958— Ben Scotti— End 
1959— Rod Breedlove— Guard 
1960— Tom Sankovich — Tackle 
1961 — Dave Crossan — Tackle 
19G2— Walter Rock 
1963 — Joe Ferrante — Guard 



TERPS ON ALL-CONFERENCE TEAMS 



"ATLANTIC COAST SPORTS-WRITERS ASSOCIATION" 



1953— FIRST TEAM 

Stan Jones — Tackle 
Jack Bowersox — Guard 
Bernie Faloney — Back 
Chester Hanulak — Back 

SECOND TEAM 

Bill Walker— End 
Bob Morgan — Tackle 
Ralph Felton— Back 

THIRD TEAM 

John Irvine — Center 
Marty Crytzer — End 

PLAYER OF YEAR 

Bernie Faloney — Back 

COACH OF YEAR 

Jim Tatum 



1954 — FIRST TEAM 
BUI Walker— End 
Dick Bielski — Rack 
Ronnie Waller — Back 

SECOND TEAM 
Bob Pellegrini — Guard 
John Irvine — Center 

THIRD TEAM 
Jack Bowersox — Guard 

1955— FIRST TEAM 

Mike Sandusky — -Tackle 
Jack Davis — Guard 
Bob Pellegrini — Center 
Ed Vereb— Back 

SECOND TEAM 

Bill Walker— End 
Russell Dennis — End 
Frank Tamburello — Back 



62 



PLAYER OF YEAR 

Bob Pellegrini — Center 
COACH OF YEAR 

Jim Tatuxn 

JACOBS BLOCKING TROPHY 
Bob Pellegrini 

1956 FIRST TEAM 

Mike Sandusky — Tackle 
Jack Davis — Guard 

THIRD TEAM 
Gene Alderton — Center 

1957 FIRST TEAM 
Ed Cooke— End 

Rod Brcedlove — Guard 

SECOND TEAM 
Gene Alderton — Center 

1958 — SECOND TEAM 
Fred Cole— Tackle 
Rod Brcedlove— Guard 



1959 SECOND TEAM 

Tom Gunderman — Guard 
Jim Joyce— Back 

1960 FIRST TEAM 
Gary Collins -End 

1961 FIRST TEAM 
Gary Collins — End 
Bob Hacker — Center 

SECOND TEAM 
Roger Shoals — Tackle 
Bill Kirchiro -Tackle 

1962— FIRST TEAM 

Walter Rock — Guard 
Dick Shiner — Back 
Tom Brown Back 

1963— SECOND TEAM 
Dick Shiner Back 



"ASSOCIATED PRESS' 



1953 FIRST TEAM 

Stan Jones — Tackle 
Bernie Faloney — Back 
Chester Hanulak — -Back 
Ralph Felton— Back 

SECOND TEAM 

Jack Bowersox — Guard 
Bill Walker— End 
Bob Morgan — Tackle 
John Irvine — Center 

1958— FIRST TEAM 

Rod Breedlove — Guard 

SECOND TEAM 

Fred Cole — Tackle 

1959— FIRST TEAM 
Jim Joyce— Back 
Tom Gunderman — Guard 

THIRD TEAM 

Dick Nolan — Back 
Marty Crytzer — End 

1954 — FIRST TEAM 

Dick Bielski— Back 
Ronnie Waller — Back 
Bill Walker— End 

SECOND TEAM 

John Irvine — Center 
Bob Pellegrini — Guard 
Jack Bowersox — Guard 



1955 FIRST TEAM 

Bob Pellegrini — Center 
Ed Vereb — Back 
Mike Sandusky — Tackle 
Jack Davis — Guard 
Frank Tamburello — Back 

SECOND TEAM 

Bill Walker— End 
Russell Dennis — End 

PLAYER OF YEAR 

Bob Pellegrini — Center 

1956— FIRST TEAM 

Mike Sandusky — Tackle 
Jack Davis — Guard 
Gene Alderton — Center 

1957— FIRST TEAM 

Rod Breedlove— Guard 
Ed Cooke— End 

SECOND TEAM 

Gene Alderton — Center 

SECOND TEAM 

Rod Breedlove — Guard 
Gary Collins — End 

1960— FIRST TEAM 

Gary Collins — End 

SECOND TEAM 

Dale Betty— Back 



63 



1961— FIRST TEAM 

Gary Collins — End 
Bob Hacker — Center 

SECOND TEAM 
Roger Shoals— Tackle 

THIRD TEAM 

Dick Shiner — Quarterback 

1962— FIRST TEAM 

Dick Shiner — Quarterback 
Tom Brown — Halfback 
Walter Rock — Guard 



SECOND TEAM 

Roger Shoals — Tackle 
Len Chiaverini — Fullback 

HONORABLE MENTION 

Dave Crossan — Tackle 
Olaf Drosdov — Tackle 



"UNITED PRESS 

1955— FIRST TEAM 

Bill Walker— End 
Bob Pellegrini — Center 
Ed Vereb — Back 
Mike Sandusky— Tackle 

SECOND TEAM 

Jack Davis — Guard 
Frank Tamburello — Back 
Russell Dennis — End 

1956— FIRST TEAM 

Mike Sandusky — Tackle 
Jack Davis — Guard 

1957— FIRST TEAM 

Ed Cooke— End 

SECOND TEAM 

Rod Breedlove — Guard 
Gene Alderton — Center 



INTERNATIONAL" 

1958— FIRST TEAM 

Rod Breedlove — Guard 

SECOND TEAM 
Tom Gunderman — Guard 
Ben Scotti — End 

1959— SECOND TEAM 

Rod Breedlove — Guard 

1960— FIRST TEAM 
Gary Collins — End 

1961— FIRST TEAM 
Gary Collins — End 

1962— FIRST TEAM 

Dick Shiner — Quarterback 
Walter Rock — Guard 



MARYLAND FOOTBALL RECORDS 

SINGLE GAME RECORDS, Individual 

MOST PO'NTS SCORED: 31 by Bob Shemonski against VPI, 1950 

(5 td's, 1 Pat). 
MOST TD'S SCORED: 5 by Bob Shemonski against VPI, 1950. 

MOST PAT SCORED: 6 by Bob Dean against South Carolina, 1949; 
6 by Don Decker against West Virginia, 1951. 6 by Vincent Scott 
against Virginia, 1960. 

MOST TD PASSES CAUGHT: 2 by Don Gleasner against Virginia, 
1945; 2 by Leroy Mortor against Michigan State, 1946; 2 by Lou 
Gambino against West Virginia, 1947; 2 by Elmer Wingate against 
George Washington, 1948; 2 by Stan Karnash against George Wash- 
ington, 1949; 2 by Pete Augsburger against South Carolina, 1949; 2 
by Henry Fox against Georgetown, 1949; 2 by Lloyd Colteryahn 
against LSU, 1952; 2 by Bill Walker against Alabama, 1953; 2 by 
Gary Collins against Clemson, 1959. 



64 



MOST TD PASSES THROWN: 3 by Tommy Muni against Connecticut, 
1942; 3 by Vic Turyn against George Washington, 1948; 3 by Stan 
Lavine againsl George Washington, 1949; 3 by .lack Scarbath against 
West Virginia, 1951; 3 by -lack Scarbaflh againsl LSU, 1952, 3 by Dale 
Betty against North Carolina State, 1959; 3 by Dale Betty again -i 
Clemson, 1959; 3 by Dick Novak against. West Virginia, 1959; 3 by 
Dick Shiner against Penn State, 1961. 

MOST TD RESPONSIBILITY: 5 by Bob Shemonski against VPI, 1950. 

MOST FIELD COALS: 3 by Vincent Scott againsl Wesl Virginia, 1959. 

LONGEST SCORING KIN FROM SCRIMMAGE: 90 yards by Dick 
Burgee against Missouri, 1954. 

LONGEST SCORING PASS: 40 yards by Dick Novak to Jim David- 
son against West Virginia, 1959. 

LONGEST SCORING PASS AND RUN: 92 yards by Stan Lavine to 
Ed Bolton against South Carolina, 1949 (pass 15 yards, run 77 
j ards >. 

LONGEST SCORING RUN AFTER PASS: 77 yards by Ed Bolton on 
pass IK mi Stan Lavine against South Carolina, 1949. (Pass 15 yds). 

LONGEST FIELD GOAL: 48 yards by Vincent Scott against West Vir- 
ginia, 1959. 

LONGEST SCORING RETURN OF INTERCEPTED PASS: 100 yards 
(105 actual) by Joe Horning against Missouri, 1951; 100 yards (103 
actual) by Dickie Lewis against North Carolina State, 1956; 100 
yards by Tom Brown against Virginia, 1962. 

LONGEST SCORING RETURN OF INTERCEPTED PASS BY OP- 
PONENT: 93 yards by Walter Matson of Pennsylvania, 1941. 

LONGEST PUNT RETURN FOR TD: 90 yards by Dick Nolan against 
Clemson, 1953. 

LONGEST PUNT RETURN FOR TD BY OPPONENT: 100 yards by 
Frank Bradv of Navy, 1951. 

LONGEST KICKOFF RETURN FOR TD: 100 yards (102 actual) by 
Dick Novak and Dennis Condie against Virginia, 1960 (Novak re- 
turned to nine yard line then lateraled to Condie who returned 91 
yards). 

LONGEST KICKOFF RETURN FOR TD BY OPPONENT: 93 yards 
by Jim MePherson of North Carolina, 1926. 

LONGEST SCORING RUN WITH RECOVERED FUMBLE: 23 yards by 
Howie Dare against North Carolina, State, 1954. 

LONGEST NON SCORING RUN FROM SCRIMMAGE: 76 yards by 
Harry Bonk against North Carolina, 1948. 

LONGEST NON SCORING PASS: 47 yards by Dale Betty to Ron 
Shaffer against Clemson, 1959. 

LONGEST NON SCORING RUN WITH RECOVERED FUMBLE BY 
OPPONENT. 75 yards by Dave Russell of Washington & Lee, 1942. 

LONGEST NON SCORING PASS AND RUN: 73 yards by Tom Mont 
to Hubie Werner against Lakehurst, 1942 (pass 32 yards run 
41 vards). 

LONGEST NON SCORING RUN AFTER PASS: 41 yards by Hubie 
Werner against Lakehurst, 1942 on 32 yard pass from Tommy 
Mont. 

LONGEST NON SCORING RUN OF INTERCEPTED PASS: 74 yards 
by Bernie Faloney against LSU, 1952. 

LONGEST NON SCORING KICKOFF RETURN: 76 yards by Howie 
Dare against Miami, 1957. 

LONGEST NON SCORING PUNT RETURN: 67 yards by John Mc- 
Vicker against Svracuse, 1956. 

MOST RUSHES: 33 by Len Chiaverini against South Carolina, 1962. 

65 



MOST YARDS GAINED RUSHING: (NET): 193 yards by Ray Popple- 
man against Western Maryland, 1931 (24 carries). 

BEST RUSHING AVERAGE : 24.0 by Ernie Arizzi against Syracuse, 1961 
4 carries). 

MOST PASSES ATTEMPTED: 33 by Dick Shiner against Air Force. 
1963. (completed 17). 

MOST PASSES COMPLETED: 17 by Tommy Mont against North 
Carolina, 1946, (25 attempts); 17 by Dick Shiner against South 
Carolina, 1962, (26 attempts); N.C. State, 1963, (30 attempts); Air 
Force, 1963, (33 attempts). 

BEST COMPLETION PERCENTAGE: (minimum of 10 attempts): 
.800 by Tommy Mont against Bainbridge, 1946 (8 completions, 
10 attempts). 

MOST YARDS GAINED PASSING: 243 by Jack Scarbath against 
Navy, 1951 (14 completions, 23 attempts). 

MOST PASSES HAD INTERCEPTED: 4 by Dick Shiner vs. Navy, 1963. 
MOST TOTAL PLAYS (rush and pass): 44 by Dick Shiner against 
North Carolina State, 1963 (30 passes, 14 rushes). 

MOST NET YARDS GAINED (rushing and passing): 272 by Dick Shiner 
against SMU, 1962 (238 passing — 34 rushing). 

BEST OFFENSIVE AVERAGE (rushing and passing): (minimum 4 
plays. 24.0 by Ernie Arizzi against Syracuse, 1961 (4 plays, 96 
yards) . 

MOST PASSES CAUGHT: 10 by Darryl Hill against Clemson, 1963. 

MOST YARDS GAINED ON PASS RECEPTIONS: 131 yards by Lloyd 
Colteryahn against Alabama, 1952 (8 receptions). 

MOST PASSES INTERCEPTED: 3 by Bob Shemonski against Geor- 
gia, 1951. 3 by Tom Brown against Air Force, 1961. 

MOST YARDS GAINED ON INTERCEPTION RUNBACKS: 111 yards 

by Dickie Lewis against North Carolina State, 1956. 
MOST PUNTS: 10 by Bill Guckeyson against Syracuse, 1936. 10 by 

Jack Targarona against West Virginia, 1950. 

MOST TOTAL YARDS PUNTING: 510 by Bill Guckeyson against 
Syracuse, 1936. 

BEST PUNTING AVERAGE: 53 yards by Lynn Beightol against Okla- 
homa, 1956 Orange Bowl (3 punts). 

LONGEST PUNT WITH ROLL: 88 yards by John Fritsch against 
Miami, 1956. (Note) "Untz" Brooke Brewer had a 93 yard punt 
against VMI, 1916. 

LONGEST PUNT WITH ROLL BY OPPONENT: 84 yards by Charlie 
Justice of North Carolina, 1948. 

MOST PUNTS RETURNED: 6 by Joe Petruzzo against LSU, 1951 
(67 yards). 

MOST YARDS GAINED RETURNING PUNTS: 146 by Bob Shemonski 
against North Carolina State, 1950 (5 returns). 

MOST PUNTS BLOCKED: 1 by several men. 

MOST KICKOFFS RETURNED: 5 by Tom Brown against Miami, 1962. 

MOST YARDS RETURNING KICKOFFS: 153 by Tom Brown against 
Miami, 1962, (5 returns). 

MOST OPPONENTS' FUMBLES RECOVERED: 3 by Tom Gunderman 
against Miami, 1957. 

66 



SINGLE GAME RECORDS, Team 

HIGHEST SCORE: Maryland 80 Washington College 0, 1927. 

most total points scouki) my moth teams: s7, 1 951 (Mary- 
Land 74, Missouri 13). 

HIGHEST SCORE BY OPPONENT: Navy 76, Maryland 0, L913. 

MOST TD'S SCORED: 12 against Washington College, 1927. 

MOST PAT SCORED: 8 against Washington College, 1927; 8 against 
Missouri. L954, 

MOST SAFETIES SCORED: 2 against Delaware, 1947, 2 against 
( feorgetown, 1950. 

Mosr FIELD GOALS SCORED: 3 against West Virginia, 1959. 

MOST TD'S SCORED PASSING: 4 against George Washington, 1948 
(3 bj Vic Tm \ ii, 1 by John Idzik); 4 against Navy, 1952 (2 bj 
Jack Scarbath, 1 by Lloyd Colteryahn, 1 by Bernie Faloney); 
4 against George Washington, 1954 (2 by Frank Tamburello, 1 by 
Charles Boxold, 1 by Lynn Beighlnl. 

MOST OPPONENTS TD'S SCORED PASSING: 4 by Wake Forest. 
1958 (3 by Norman Snead, 1 by Charlie Parker). 

MOST TOTAL PLAYS: 92 against Texas, 1959. 

MOST RUSHES: 76 against Miami, 1958. 

FEWEST RUSHES: 26 against Clemson, 1963. 

MOST NET YARDS GAINED RUSHING: 577 against VPI, 1950. 

FFWEST NET YARDS GAINED RUSHING: Minus 17 against George- 
town, 1939. 

FEWEST NET YARDS GAINED RUSHING BY OPPONENTS: Minus 
21 by West Virginia, 1951, Minus 21 by UCLA, 1955. 

BEST AVERAGE PER RUSH: 10.5 yards against VPI, 1950 (577 yds. 
in 55 rushes). 

MOST PASSES ATTEMPTED: 40 against Virginia, 1958 (18 comple- 
tions for 330 yds.) 

MOST PASSES COMPLETED: 21 against North Carolina, 195S (35 
attempts). 

FEWEST PASSES COMPLETED: against Michigan State, 1944 (1 
attempt); against Vanderbilt, 1948 (12 attempts); against 
Missouri. 1951 (3 attempts). 

FEWEST PASSES ATTEMPTED: 1 against Michigan State, 1944. 

MOST PASSES ATTEMPTED BY OPPONENTS: 57 by West Virginia. 
1951 (19 completions). 

FEWEST PASSES COMPLETED BY OPPONENTS: by Syracuse. 
1939 (5 attempts); by Michigan State, 1944 (0 attempts); b> 
Delaware, 1948 (3 attempts) ; by Boston University, 1952 (6 at- 
tempts) ; by Kentucky, 1956 (3 attempts). 

FEWEST YARDS GAINED PASSING BY OPPONENTS: Minus 1 by 
Clemson, 1956. 

MOST YARDS GAINED PASSING: 330 against Virginia, 1953 (13 
completions. 40 attempts). 

FEWEST Y r ARDS GAINED PASSING: against Michigan State, 1944; 
Vanderbilt, 1948; Missouri, 1951. 

BEST COMPLETION PERCENTAGE: (min. 10 attempts) .800 again-- 
Georgia, 1952 (8 completions, 10 attempts). 

MOST PASSES INTERCEPTED: 7 against Georgia, 1951. 

MOST PASSES HAD INTERCEPTED: 6 by Pennsylvania, 1941. 

MOST TOTAL YARDS GAINED (rush and pass): 602 against West 
Virginia, 1951 (523 rushing, 79 passing). 

FEWEST TOTAL YARDS GAINED (rush and pass): 29 against Syra- 
cuse, 1959. 

MOST TOTAL FIRST DOWNS: 29 against Wake Forest, 1963. 



FEWEST TOTAL FIRST DOWNS: 1 against Michigan State, 1944. 
MOST FIRST DOWNS RUSHING: 24 against Washington & Lee, 1951. 
FEWEST FIRST DOWNS RUSHING: 1 against Michigan State, 1944, 

I against Syracuse, 1959. 

MOST FIRST DOWNS PASSING: 13 against SMU, 1962. 

FEWEST FIRST DOWNS PASSING: against 12 teams (last one 
South Carolina 1958). 

MOST FUMBLES: 8 against Georgia, 1952 (lost 2). 

FEWEST FUMBLES: against VMI, 1945; against Kentucky, 1954; 
against South Carolina, 1958; against South Carolina, 1959; 
against West Virginia, 1960; against Virginia, 1960. 

MOST FUMBLES BY OPPONENTS: 8 by South Carolina, 1948; 8 by 
Mississippi, 1953. 

MOST FUMBLES LOST: 6 against North Carolina. 1947. 

MOST OPPONENTS FUMBLES RECOVERED: 5 against West Virginia, 
1950; 5 against Missouri in 1950 Gator Bowl; 5 against North Caro- 
lina, I960. 

MOST PENALTIES: 18 against VPI, 1950. 

MOST PENALTIES BY OPPONENTS: 15 by Miami, 1957. 

MOST YARDS PENALIZED: 130 against VPI, 1948; 130 against VPI, 
1950. 

MOST YARDS OPPONENTS PENALIZED: 135 by North Carolina, 
1953. 

FEWEST PENALTIES: against Duke, 1941. 

FEWEST PENALTIES BY OPPONENTS: by Western Maryland, 
1937; by Western Maryland, 1939; by Florida, 1939; by Wash- 
ington & Lee, 1941; by William & Mary, 1945; by South Caro- 
lina, 1953. 

MOST PUNTS: 14 against Virginia, 1937; 14 against Western Mary- 
land, 1940. 

FEWEST PUNTS: 1 against Washington & Lee, 1953; 1 against Geor- 
gia, 1953; 1 against Syracuse, 1955; 1 against North Carolina 
State, 1954; 1 against South Carolina, 1962. 

MOST TOTAL YARDS PUNTING: 510 against Syracuse, 1936 (10 
punts). 

BEST PUNTING AVERAGE: 51.7 yards against Washington & Lee 
1951 (155 yds. on 3 punts). 

SEASON RECORDS, Individual 

MOST POINTS SCORED: 97 by Bob Shemonski in 10 games, 1950; 
96 by Lou Gambino in 10 games, 1947; 96 by Ed Vereb in 10 
games, 1955; Gambino added 3 td's in the 20-20 1948 Gator Bowl 
tie with Georgia for 11 game total of 114 points; Vereb scored 1 
td. in the 20-6 loss to Oklahoma in the 1956 Orange Bowl for a 

II game total of 102 points. 

MOST TOUCHDOWNS SCORED: 16 by Lou Gambino, 1947; 16 by Bob 
Shemonski, 1950; 16 by Ed Vereb, 1955; all in 10 games. Gambino 
added 3 in the 1948 Gator Bowl for 11 game total of 19 and Vereb 
1 in the 1956 Orange Bowl for 11 game total of 17. 

MOST PAT SCORED: 41 by Don Decker in 10 games, 1951, including 
4 for 4 in 28-13 victory over Tennessee in the 1952 Sugar Bowl. 
(55 attempts). 

MOST FIELD GOALS SCORED: 5 by John Hannigan, 1961, 1962. 
(NOTE) "Untz" Brooke Brewer kicked 7 in 1916 and 6 in 1921 em- 
ploying both the drop kick and placement. 

MOST TD PASSES THROWN: 12 by Tommy Mont in 9 games, 1942. 

MOST TD PASSES CAUGHT: 7 by Darryl Hill, 10 games, 1964. 

68 



MOST PASSES ATTEMPTED: 222 by Dick Shiner, L963 (10 ga 

completed in.'-;. 
MOST PASSKS COMPLETED: 121 by Dick Shiner, l ( .)(i2, < 10 names), 203 

.-ii tempts. 
BEST PASSING PERCENTAGE: .621 by Dale Betty, 1960 (10 ganc 

completed 82 of 132. 
Most YARDS GAINED PASSING: 1324 by Dick Shiner in 10 gam 

L962, I 121 f<iitipl.-i i.ms in 2(i.", attempt '. 
MOST PASSES CAUGHT: 47 by Tom Brown in 10 games, L962, (55* 

j ards i. 
MOST PASSES INTERCEPTED: 8 by Tom Brown in 10 gam< 161 

MOST YARDS RETURNING INTERCEPTED PASSES: 147 by Joe 

Horning on 6 interceptions in 9 games, 1951. 
MOST RUSHES: 156 l.v Len Chiaverini in 10 games, L962. 
BEST RUSHING AVERAGE PER CARRY: 9.8 yards by Chet Hanu- 

lak, L953. 
MOST NET YARDS RUSHING: 904 by Lou Gambino in 10 games. 

1947; s.". I l>\ Ed Modzelewski in 9 games, 1951; Gambino added 151 

yds. in L948 Gator Bowl for 10 game total of 1069 yards; 

Modzelewski added 153 yds. in 1952, Sugar Bowl for 10 game total 

of 987 yards. (Note) Ray Poppleman gained 1350 yards, 1931 but 

his total was not NET total and is believed to be total offense. 
MOST AVERAGE NET YARDS RUSHING PER GAME: 92.7 by 

Modzelewski in 9 games, 1951; 90.4 by Lou Gambino in 10 games 

1947; Modzelewski added 153 yds. in 1952 Sugar Bowl for 10 game 

avg. of 98.7 yds. per game. Gambino added 151 yds. in 1948 Gator 

Bowl for 11 game average of 97.2 yds. 
MOST TOTAL YARDS (Rushing and Passing): 1426 by Dick Shiner 

in 10 games, 1962. 
MOST PUNTS: 61 by Jack Targarona in 10 games, 1950. 
BEST PUNTING AVERAGE: 43.7 by Bill Walker in 10 games, 1955 

(15 punts* ; Walker added 4 punts in the 1956 Orange Bowl for a 

11 game average of 41.2 (19 punts). 
MOST PUNTS RETURNED: 28 by Bob Shemonski in 10 games, 1950. 
MOST YARDS GAINED ON PUNT RETURNS: 505 by Bob Shemonski 

in 10 games, 1950. 
BEST PUNT RETURN AVERAGE: (More than 3) : 24.5 by Tom Brown 

on 8 returns, 1961. 
MOST KICKOFFS RETURNED: 13 by Darrvl Hill, 1963 for 317 yards. 
MOST YARDS GAINED ON KICKOFF RETURNS: 352 by Dennis Con- 
die on 10 returns. 1960. 
BEST KICKOFF RETURN AVERAGE (more than 3): 44 yards by 

Howie Dare, 1957 (6 returns for 264 yds.) 

SEASON RECORDS, Team 

MOST POINTS SCORED: 353 in 9 games, 1951; 381 in 10 games, 1951 

including 28-13 victory over Tennessee in the 1952 Sugar Bowl. 
FEWEST POINTS SCORED: 39 in 9 games, 1940. 
MOST OPPONENTS POINTS SCORED: 235 in 9 games, 1938. 
FEWEST OPPONENTS POINTS SCORED: 31 in 10 games, 1953; 38 

in 11 games including the 7-0 loss to Oklahoma in the 19 

Orange Bowl. 
MOST TD'S SCORED: 52 in 9 games, 1951; 56 in 10 games, including 

the 28-13 victory over Tennessee in the 1952 Sugar Bowl. 
MOST FIELD GOALS: 5 in 1961 and 1962. (NOTE) 7 in 1916 and 6 in 

1921 employing both the dropkick and placement. 

69 



MOST PAT'S SCORED: 38 in 9 games, 1951; 42 in 10 games in- 
cluding the 28-13 victory over Tennessee in the 1952 Sugar Bowl. 

BEST PERCENTAGE KICKING PAT'S: .1000 on 17 .of 17 kicks, 1961. 

BEST SEASON: 1951— Won 10 Lost (includes 28-13 win over Tennessee 
in Sugar Bowl). 1953 — Won 10 Lost (10-1 including 7-0 loss to 
Oklahoma in 1954 Orange Bowl). 1955 — Won 10 Lost (10-1 includ- 
ing 20-6 loss to Oklahoma in 1956 Orange Bowl). 

WORST SEASON: 1944: Won 1— Lost 7— Tied 1. 

MOST FIRST DOWNS: 183 in 10 games, 1962. 

MOST FIRST DOWNS BY OPPONENTS: 182 in 1960. 

MOST YARDS GAINED RUSHING: 2921 in 9 games, 1951; 3210 in 

10 games, 1951 including 28-13 victory over Tennessee in 1952 
Sugar Bowl. 

MOST YARDS GAINED RUSHING BY OPPONENTS: 2022 in 10 
games, 1956. 

MOST YARDS GAINED PASSING: 1480 in 10 games, 1962. 

MOST YARDS GAINED PASSING BY OPPONENTS: 1391 in 9 games, 
1951; 1466 in 10 games including 28-13 victory over Tennessee in 
1952 Sugar Bowl. 

MOST NET YARDS GAINED (rushing and passing): 3822 in 9 games, 
1951 (2921 rushing and 901 passing) ; 4174 in 10 games including 
the 28-13 victory over Tennessee in the 1952 Sugar Bowl (3210 
rushing, 964 passing). 

MOST NET YARDS GAINED BY OPPONENTS (rushing & passing). 
2929 in 1960 (1822 rushing 1107 passing). 

FEWEST NET YARDS GAINED (rushing and passing) BY OPPON- 
ENTS: 1961 in 10 games, 1955 (761 yards rushing, 930 passing); 
Oklahoma gained 202 rushing, 53 passing in 1956 Orange Bowl for 

11 game total of 1946. 

MOST PASSES ATTEMPTED: 249 in 10 games, 1963 (113 completions). 
MOST PASSES COMPLETED: 135 in 10 games, 1962 (244 attempts). 
BEST PASSING PERCENTAGE: .577 in 10 games, 1960 (105 of 182). 
BEST PASSING PERCENTAGE BY OPPONENTS: .517 in 10 games, 

1959 (90 completions in 174 attempts). 
MOST PASS INTERCEPTIONS: 34 in 9 games, 1951, 38 in 10 games 

including the 28-13 victory over Tennessee in the 1952 Sugar Bowl. 
MOST PASS INTERCEPTIONS BY OPPONENTS: 23 in 10 games, 

1948. 
MOST FUMBLES: 44 in 10 games, 1950. 

MOST OPPONENTS FUMBLES: 40 in 10 games, 1960. (Lost 19). 
FEWEST FUMBLES: 17 in 10 games, 1960 (lost 7). 
MOST PENALTIES: 78 in 11 games, 1953 (492.5 yards). 
MOST YARDAGE LOST PENALTIES: 694 in 10 games, 1956 (72 

penalties). 
MOST PUNTS: 63 in 10 games, 1957. 
MOST PUNTS BY OPPONENTS: 85 in 10 games, 1950. 
MOST YARDS ALL PUNTS: 2251 in 10 games, 1950 (62 punts). 
BEST PUNTING AVERAGE: 41.5 yards in 10 games, 1953 (37 punts). 

CAREER RECORDS, Individual 

MOST POINTS SCORED REGULAR SEASON: 126 by Ed Modzelewski, 

28 games, 1949-51 (21 td's) (note) he added 1 td in 1950 Gator 

Bowl for total of 132). 
MOST POINTS SCORED ALL GAMES: 133 by Bob Shemonski, 30 

games, 1949-51 ( 22 td's, 1 pat). Includes 2 td's in 1950, Gator Bowl, 

1 td in 1952 Sugar Bowl. 
MOST POINTS BY PLACEKICKER REGULAR SEASON: 69 by Don 

Decker, 18 games, 1951-52 (63 pat, S2 att. 2 field goals). 

70 



MOST POINTS BY PLACEKICKER ALL GAMES: 73 by Don Deckn 
L9 games, includes I pal in I attempts in L952 Sugar Bowl. (Tola' 

of 67 pal in 86 att., 2 field goals*. 
MOST FIELD GOALS REGULAR SEASON GAMES: LO by John I! 

nigan, 30 games, L960-62. (NOTE) "Untz" Brooke Brewei kicked M 

1916-21 employing both drop kick and placement. 
MOST TD PASSES CAUGHT REGULAR SEASON: L2 by Gary Collins, 

L959-61 (30 games). 
MOST TOUCHDOWN PASSES THROWN REGULAR SEASON- 22 by 

.lack Scaihalli. 2S -nines, 1950-52. 
MOST PASSES ATTEMPTED: 5.36 by Dick Shiner, 30 games, L961-63. 
MOST PASSES COMPLETED: 287 by Dick Shiner, 1961-63, (5.36 at- 
tempts), 20 games. 
BEST COMPLETION PERCENTAGE REGULAR SEASON: .583 by Dale 

Betty 1958-60, 30 games. (127 for 218). 
MOST YARDS GAINED PASSING: 3410 by Dick Shiner, 30 game 

1D61-63. 
MOST PASSES CAUGHT REGULAR SEASON: 74 by Gary Collins, 1959- 

61, 30 games. 
MOST YARDAGE GAINED BY PASSES REGULAR SEASON: 1182 by 

Gary Collins, 30 games, 1959-61. 
MOST PASSES INTERCEPTED: 17 by Tom Brown, 30 games, 1960-62. 
MOST TOTAL YARDS GAINED RUSHING REGULAR SEASON: 1913 

by Ed Modzelewski, 28 games, 1949-51. 
MOST TOTAL YARDS GAINED RUSHING ALL GAMES: 2102 by Ed 

Modzelewski, 30 games, includes 36 yards in 1950 Gator Bowl an i 

153 yds. in 1952 Sugar Bowl. 
MOST RUSHES REGULAR SEASON: 340 by Ed Modzelewski, 23 

games, 1949-51. 
MOST RUSHES ALL GAMES: 380 by Ed Modzelewski, 30 games, in- 
cludes L2 in 1950 Gator Bowl and 28 in 1952 Sugar Bowl. 
BEST RUSHING AVERAGE REGULAR SEASON: 8:1 yds. bv Chet 

Hanulak. 28 games, 1951-53, (1544 yds., 190 carries). 
BEST RUSHING AVERAGE ALL GAMES: 7.9 yds. by Chet Hanulak. 

30 games, includes 35 yds. on 4 carries in 1952 Sugar Bowl and 39 

yds. on 12 carries in 1954 Orange Bowl. 
MOST TOTAL PLAYS (rush and pass) REGULAR SEASON: 790 by 

Dick Shiner, 30 games, 1961-63. 
MOST TOTAL PLAYS (rush and pass) ALL GAMES: 790 by Dick 

Shiner, 30 games. (Avg. gain per play 3.0 yds.). 
MOST TOTAL YARDS GAINED (rush and pass) REGULAR SEASON: 

2838 by Jack Scarbath, 28 games, 1950-52. 
MOST TOTAL YARDS GAINED (rush and pass) ALL GAMES: 2909 

by Jack Scarbath, includes 71 yds. in 1952 Sugar Bowl. (avg. 5.7 

yds. per play.) 



YEAR 

MARYLAND 
AGGIES 

1892 (0-3-0) 

St. Johns 50 

Johns Hop 62 

Episcopal Hi. -16 

1893 (6-0-0) 

36 Eastern Hi 

10 Central Hi 

18 Bait. City Col... 

6 St. Johns Col... 

18 W. Md. Col ....10 

16 Orient Ath. CI. 6 

1894 (3-3-0) 

52 W. Md. Col 

12 Wash. Col 

6 St. Johns 22 

6 Georgetown .... 4 
Col. Ath. CI. -26 
Mt. St. Marys ..24 

1895 — No team 
No Games 

1896 (6-2-2) 

Eastern Hi 6 

Gallaudet 

34 Business Hi — 

10 Central Hi 6 

18 Alexandria Hi.. 
20 Bethel Mil Ac -10 

Episcopal Hi. ~ 6 

16 West. Md 6 

14 Central Hi 

U. of Md 

1897 (2-4-0) 

24 Central Hi 6 

4 Eastern Hi 

J. Hopkins 30 

4 St. Johns 6 

6 Gallaudet 16 

Bait. Med Col...l0 

1898 (2-5-0) 

5 Columbian U. ..17 
West. Md 32 

36 Eastern Hi 

Gallaudet 33 

Johns Hop 16 

Episcopal Hi —37 

27 Rock Hill Col... 

1899 (1-4-0) 

West Md 21 

26 Eastern Hi 

Johns. Hop 40 

Delaware Col. 34 
St. Johns 62 

1900 (3-4-1) 

Western Hi — 

Gib. Ath. CI 17 

G'town Prep .. 5 

6 Episcopal Hi —34 
5 Gonzaga Hi 11 



BY YEAR RECORDS 



15 G'town Prep .. 
21 Gonzaga Hi — 
21 Char Hall Ac .. 

1901 (1-7-0) 

6 Del. Col 24 

10 Gallaudet Re. ..11 

Johns Hop 6 

6 Rock Hill Col.-ll 
Central Hi 11 

27 U.S. Marines .. 
Wal'k Ath CI -36 
West. Md 30 

1902 (3-5-2) 

Georgetown —27 

5 Mt. St. Jos 

11 Columbian U. ..10 

6 Olympia Ath. .. 

Wash. Col 

Mt. St. Marys .. 5 

6 West. Md 26 

U. of Md 5 

Johns Hop 17 

Del. Col 

1903 (7-4-0) 

Georgetown —28 

5 Clifton Ath 

21 Gunton Tern. .. 
St. Johns 18 

28 Wash. Col 

27 Tech Hi 

Mt. St. Mar .... 2 

6 West. Md 

11 U. of Md 

Dela. Col 16 

6 Columbian U. .. 

1904 (2-4-2) 

Georgetown —22 
Ran. Macon .... 
Ftress Monroe 

11 Mt. St. Mar 6 

West. Md 5 

22 Gallaudet 5 

U. of Md 6 

Dela. Col 18 

1905 (6-4-0) 

20 Bait Poly In — 

16 Gallaudet 

West. Md 10 

Navy 17 

17 Wm. & Mary .. 

28 Mt. St. Josephs 
27 St. Johns 5 

Wash. Col 17 

23 U. of Md 5 

Dela. Col 12 

1906 (5-3-0) 

5 Tech Hi ^ 

22 Bait City Col .. 

Navy 12 

Georgetown —28 
72 



Mt. Wash. CI. -.29 

20 St. Johns 4 

16 Rock Hill Col. 
35 Wash. Col 

1907 (3-6-0) 

13 Tech High 

Georgetown —10 

5 Richmond Col..ll 
Navy 12 

6 Mt. St. Mar 12 

10 Geo. Wash 

10 Wash. Col 5 

St. Johns 16 

Gallaudet 5 

1908 (3-8-0) 

5 Central Hi 

5 Tech High 6 

Richmond Col..22 

Johns Hop 10 

Navy 57 

5 Gallaudet 

Fred'bg Col 10 

12 Balto Poly 6 

St. Johns 31 

Wash. Col 11 

Geo. Wash 57 

1909 (2-5-0) 

Richmond Col. 12 
Johns Hopkins 9 
Tech High 11 

5 Rock Hill 

George Wash. 26 
N. C. State .... 33 

14 Gallaudet 12 

1910 (4-3-1) 

12 Central Hi 

20 Richmond Col. 

11 Johns Hop 11 

21 Catholic U 

11 Geo. Wash 

V.M.I 8 

St. Johns 6 

3 West. Md 17 

1911 (4-4-2) 

6 Tech Hi 

Richmond 

5 Fred'bg Col 

Central Hi 14 

3 Johns Hop 6 

6 Catholic U 6 

St. Johns 27 

5 Wash. Col 17 

6 West Md 

6 Gallaudet 2 

1912 (6-1-1) 

31 Tech Hi 6 

46 Richmond Col. 
58 U. of Md 

13 Johns Hop 

St. Johns 27 

13 Gallaudet 6 



17 West Md 7 

L3 Ponn Mil. Col. 13 

1913 (6-3-0) 

27 Balto City 10 

i:> Richmond Col. 

26 Johns Hop 

46 West Md 

Navv 76 

13 St. Johns 

26 Wash. Col 

Gallaudet .... 13 
7 Ponn Mil 27 

1914 (5-3-0) 

Balto. Poly 6 

6 Catholic U 

13 West Md 20 

14 Johns Hop 

10 St. Johns 

3 Wash. Col 

Gallaudet 23 

26 Penn Mil 

1915 (6-3-0) 

31 Balto Poly 

Haverford 7 

Catholic U 16 

10 Gallaudet 3 

14 Ponn Mil 13 

27 St. Johns 14 

28 Wash Col 13 

51 West Md 

Johns Hop 3 

MARYLAND 
STATE 

1916 (6-2-0) 

6 Dickinson 

7 Navv 14 

15 V.M'.1 9 

6 Haverford 7 

31 St. Johns 6 

10 N.Y.U 7 

13 Catholic U 9 

54 Johns Hop 

1917 (4-3-1) 

20 Dela. Col 

Navy 62 

14 V.MJ 14 

29 Wake Forest ..13 

6 N.C. State 10 

13 St. Johns 3 

Penn State 57 

7 Johns Hop 

1918 (4-1-1) 

6 American U 13 

7 V.M.I 6 

19 West Md 

6 New York U. .. 2 

19 St. Johns 14 

Johns Hop 

1919 (5-4-0) 

6 Swarthmore ....10 

13 Virginia 

West Va 27 



Va. Poly 6 

o Yale 31 

27 St. Johns 

L3 Catholic U 

20 West Md 

14 Johns Hop 

UNIVERSITY 
OF MARYLAND 

1920 (7-2-0) 

54 Randolph Ma .. 

Rutgers ... _ 6 

Princeton 35 

14 Catholic U 

27 Wash. Col 

7 Va. Poly 

13 North Car 

10 Syracuse 7 

24 Johns Hop 7 

1921 (3-5-1) 

3 Rutgers 

Syracuse 42 

3 St. Johns 7 

10 Va. Polv 7 

7 North Car 16 

Yale 28 

16 Catholic U 

Carnegie Tech 21 

6 N. C. State 6 

1922 (4-5-1) 

7 Third Army .... 

Richmond 

Pennsylvania ..12 

Princeton 26 

3 North Car 27 

Va. Poly 21 

3 Yale 45 

3 Johns Hop 

54 Catholic U 

7 N. C. State 6 

1923 (7-2-1) 

53 RandolDh Ma... 
3 Pennsvlvania .. 

23 Richmond 

7 Va. Poly 16 

14 North Car 

26 St. Johns 

14 Yale 16 

26 N.C. State 12 

40 Catholic U 6 

6 Johns Hod 6 

1924 (3-3-3) 

23 Wash. Col 

7 Wash. & Lee ..19 
38 Richmond 

Va. Polv 12 

6 North Car 

Catholic U 

Yale 47 

N.C. State 

Johns Hop 

1925 (2-5-1) 

13 Wash. Col 

16 Rutgers 

73 



Va. Poly 3 

Virginia 6 

ii North Car. ... 16 

14 Yale 

3 W. & L 7 

7 Johns Hop 7 

1926 (5-4-1) 

63 Wash. Col 

South Car 12 

Chicago 21 

8 Va. Poly 24 

14 North Car 6 

38 Gallaudet 7 

L5 Yale 

6 Virginia 6 

W. & L 3 

17 Johns Hop 11 

1927 (4-7-0) 

80 Wash. Col 

26 South Car 

6 North Car 7 

13 Va. Poly 7 

10 V. M. 1 6 

6 W. & L 13 

6 Yale 30 

Virginia 21 

20 Vanderbilt ... 39 
13 Johns Hop 14 

6 Florida 7 

1928 (6-3-1) 

31 Wash. Col 

19 North Car 26 

7 South Car 21 

13 West Md 6 

V. M. 1 

6 Va. Poly 9 

6 Yale 

18 Virginia 2 

6 W. & L 

26 Johns Hop 6 

1929 (4-4-2) 

34 Wash. Col 7 

North Car 43 

6 South Car 26 

13 Gallaudet 6 

6 V. M. 1 7 

13 Virginia 13 

13 Yale 13 

24 Va. Polv 

39 Johns Hop 6 

West Md 12 

1930 (7-5-0) 

60 Wash. Col 6 

13 Yale 40 

21 North Car 28 

21 St. Johns 13 

20 V. M. 1 

14 Virginia 6 

41 W. & L 7 

13 V. Poly 7 

Navv 6 

21 Johns Hop 

7 Vanderbilt 22 

West Md 7 



1931 (8-1-1) 

13 Wash. Col 

7 Virginia 6 

6 Navy 

6 Kentucky 6 

41 V. M. 1 20 

20 Va. Poly 

12 Vanderbilt 39 

13 W. & L 7 

35 Johns Hop 14 

41 West Md 6 

1932 (5-6-0) 

63 Wash. Col 

6 Virginia 7 

6 Va. Poly 23 

Duke 34 

24 St. Johns 7 

12 V. M. 1 7 

Vanderbilt 13 

7 Navy 28 

6 W. & L 

23 Johns Hop 

7 West Md 39 

1933 (3-7-0) 

20 St. Johns 

Va. Poly 14 

Tulane 20 

13 V. M. 1 19 

7 West Md 13 

Virginia 6 

7 Duke 38 

27 Johns Hop 7 

33 W. & L 13 

Florida - 19 

1934 (7-3-0) 

13 St. Johns 

W. & L 7 

13 Naw 16 

14 Va. Poly 9 

21 Florida 

20 Virginia 

23 V. M. 1 

14 Indiana 17 

6 Georgetown .... 

19 Johns Hop 

1935 (7-2-2) 

39 St. Johns 6 

7 Va. Polv 

North Car 33 

6 V. M. 1 

20 Florida 6 

14 Virginia 7 

7 Indiana 13 

W. & L 

12 Georgetown .... 6 
Syracuse 

22 West Md 7 

1936 (6-5-0) 

20 St. Johns 

6 Va. Poly 

North Car 14 

21 Virginia 



20 Syracuse 

6 Florida 7 

12 Richmond 

7 V. M. 1 13 

6 Georgetown .... 7 

19 W. & L 6 

West Md 12 

1937 (8-2-0) 

28 St. Johns 

21 Pennsylvania ..28 

6 West Md 

3 Virginia 

13 Syracuse 

13 Florida 7 

9 V. M. I - 7 

14 Penn State 21 

12 Georgetown .... 2 

8 W. & L 

1938 (2-7-0) 

6 Richmond 19 

Penn State 33 

Syracuse 53 

14 West Md 8 

19 Virginia 27 

14 V. M. 1 47 

7 Florida 21 

7 Georgetown .—14 

3 9 W. & L 13 

1939 (2-7-0) 

26 Hamp.-Syd 

12 West Md 

7 Virginia 12 

12 Rutgers 25 

Florida 14 

Georgetown .—20 

Penn State 12 

V. M. 1 13 

7 Syracuse 10 

1940 (2-6-1) 

6 Hamp.-Syd 7 

Pennsylvania ..51 

6 Virginia 19 

Florida 19 

6 Wast Md 

Georgetown .—41 
V. M. 1 20 

14 Rutgers 7 

7 W. & L 7 

1941 (3-5-1) 

18 Hamp.-Syd 

6 West Md 6 

Duke 50 

13 Florida 12 

6 Pennsylvania ..55 
Georgetown ....26 

Rutgers 20 

V. M. 1 27 

6 W. & L 

1942 (7-2-0) 

34 Connecticut .... 

14 Lake NAS 

74 



27 Rutgers 13 

V. M. 1 29 

51 West Md 

13 Florida 

Duke 42 

27 Virginia 12 

32 W. & L 28 

1943 (4-5-0) 

7 Curtis B. CG ..13 
13 Wake Forest .. 7 

19 Rich. AAB 6 

2 West Va 6 

Penn State 45 

43 Greenv. AAB ..18 

Virginia 39 

Bainbridge 45 

21 V. M. I. 14 

1944 (1-7-1) 

Hamp.-Syd 12 

Wake Forest -39 

6 West Va 6 

Mich. State .... 8 

6 Florida 14 

7 Virginia 18 

Mich. State— 33 

19 Penn State 34 

8 V. M. 1 6 

1945 (6-2-1) 

60 Guilford Col. .. 6 

21 Richmond 

22 Merch. M. A 6 

13 Va. Poly 21 

13 West Va 13 

14 W. & M 33 

38 V. M. 1 

19 Virginia 13 

19 S. Car 13 

1946 (3-6-0) 

54 Bainbridge 

7 Richmond 37 

North Car 33 

6 Va. Poly 

7 W. & M 41 

17 South Car 21 

24 W. & L 7 

14 Mich. State 26 

7 N. C. State 28 

1947 (7-2-2) 

19 South Car 13 

43 Delaware 19 

18 Richmond 6 

7 Duke 19 

21 Va. Poly 19 

27 West Va 

32 Duquesne 

North Car 19 

20 Vanderbilt 6 

N. C. State .... 

(Gator Bowl, 
Jan. 1, 1948) 
20 Georgia 20 



1948 (6-4-0) 

19 Richmond 

21 Delaware (I 

28 Va. Poly 

L2 Duke ..' L3 

47 Geo. Wash 

27 Miami L3 

L9 South Car 7 

20 North Car. ... 19 
Vanderbilt 34 

14 West Va 16 

1949 (9-1-0) 

34 Va. Poly 7 

33 Georgetown .... 7 
7 Mich. State 14 

14 N. C. State 6 

II South Car 7 

H» Geo. Wash 14 

14 Boston U 13 

IT Wesl Va 7 

13 Miami 

(Gator Bowl. 
Jan. 1, 1950) 
20 Missouri 7 

1950 (7-2-1) 

7 Georgia 27 

35 Navy 21 

34 Mich. State .... 7 

25 Georgetown ....14 

13 N. C. Stats 16 

26 Duke 14 

23 Geo. Wash 7 

7 North Car 7 

41 West Va 

63 V. P. 1 7 

1951 (10-0-0) 

54 W. & L 14 

33 Geo. Wash 6 

43 Georgia 7 

14 North Car 7 

27 L. S. U 

35 Missouri 

40 Navy 21 

53 N. C. State 

54 West Va 7 

(Sugar Bowl, 

Jan. 1, 1952) 

28 Tennessee 13 

1952 (7-2-0) 

13 Missouri 10 

13 Auburn 7 

28 Clemson 

37 Georgia 

38 Naw 7 

34 L. S. U 6 

34 Boston U 7 

14 Mississippi 21 

7 Alabama 27 

1953 (10-1-0) 

20 Missouri 6 

52 W. & L 

20 Clemson 



II) Georgia 1.". 

26 North Car 

30 Miami (Fla.) .. 

24 South Car 6 

27 Goo. Wash 6 

38 Mississippi 

21 Alabama 

*0 Oklahoma 7 

♦(Orange Bowl) 

1954 (7-2-1) 

20 Kentucky 

7 U. C. L.'A 12 

13 Wake Forest. ..13 

33 North Car 

7 Miami, Fla 9 

20 South Car 

42 N. C. State 14 

16 Clemson 

48 Geo. Wash 6 

74 Missouri 13 

1955 (10-1-0) 

13 Missouri 12 

7 U. C. L. A 

20 Bavlor 6 

28 Wake Forest .. 7 

25 North Car 7 

34 Syracuse 13 

27 South Car 

13 L. S. U 

25 Clemson 12 

19 Geo. Wash 

*6 Oklahoma 20 

*Orange Bowl 

1956 (2-7-1) 

12 Syracuse 26 

6 Wake Forest-- 

Baylor 14 

6 Miami, Fla. __13 

6 N. Carolina __34 

7 Tennessee 34 

Kentucky 14 

6 Clemson 6 

S. Carolina —13 

25 N. C. State —14 

1957 (5-5-0) 

13 Texas A&M___21 
13 N. C. State __48 

Duke 14 

27 Wake Forest__ 
21 N. Carolina-.- 7 

Tennessee 16 

10 South Carolina 6 

7 Clemson 26 

16 Miami, Fla 6 

12 Virginia 

1958 (4-6-0) 

Wake Forest _34 
21 N. C. State _._ 6 

75 



Clem on d 

10 Texas A&M ___14 
N. Carolina _._27 

7 Auburn 20 

10 S. Carolina ___ 6 
14 Navy 40 

26 Miami, Fla. __14 
44 Virginia 6 

1959 (5-5-0) 

27 West Va. 7 

Texas .-26 

Syracuse 29 

7 Wake Fore -i in 

14 N. Carolina __ 7 

6 S. Carolina _-22 
14 Navy 22 

28 Clemson 25 

55 Virginia 12 

33 N. C. State ___28 

1960 (6-4-0) 

31 West Va 8 

Texas 34 

7 Duke 20 

10 N.C. State .... 13 
19 Clemson 17 

14 Wake Forest .. 13 

15 S. Carolina 

9 Penn State .... 28 

22 N. Carolina .... 19 
44 Virginia 12 

1961 (7-3-0) 

14 SMU 6 

24 Clemson 21 

22 Syracuse 21 

8 N. Carolina ....14 

21 Air Force 

10 S. Carolina ....20 
21 Penn State ....17 

10 N.C. State 7 

10 Wake Forest .. 7 

16 Virginia 28 

1962 (6-4-0) 

7 SMU 

13 Wake Forest .. 2 

1 I N.C. State 6 

31 N. Carolina ....13 
24 Miami 28 

13 S. Carolina 11 

7 Penn State 23 

7 Duke 10 

14 Clemson 17 

40 Virginia 18 



1963 (3-7-0) 

14 N.C. State 36 

13 S. Carolina 21 

12 Duke 30 

7 N. Carolina —.14 

21 Air Force 14 

32 Wake Forest .. 

15 Penn State 17 

7 Navy 42 

6 Clemson 21 

21 Virginia 6 



COACHES' RECORDS 



Maryland Aggies 



Maryland State 



Univ. of Maryland 



Year 


Head 


Coach 


W 


L 


T 


1892 


*W 


. W. Skinner 





3 





1893 


*S. 


H. Harding 


6 








1894 


*J. 


G. Bannon 


3 


3 





1895 


No Team 








1896 


Grenville Lewis 


6 


2 


2 


1897 


*John Lillibridge 


2 


4 





1898 


*J. 


F. Kenly 


2 


5 





1899 


*S. 


M. Cooke 


1 


4 





1900 


*F. 


H. Peters 


3 


4 


1 


1901 


*E. 


B. Dunbar 


1 


7 





1902 


D. 


John Markey 


3 


5 


2 


1903 


D. 


John Markey 


7 


4 





1904 


D. 


John Markey 


2 


4 


2 


1905 


Fred Nielsen 


6 


4 





1906 


Fred Nielsen 


5 


3 





1907 


C. 


G. Church & C. W. Melick 


3 


6 





1908 


Bill Lang 


3 


8 





1909 


Ba 


rney Cooper & E. P. Larkin 


2 


5 





1910 


R. 


Alston 


4 


3 


1 


1911 


C. 


F. Donnelly & H. C. Byrd 


4 


4 


2 


1912 


H. 


C. Byrd 


6 


1 


1 


1913 








6 


3 





1914 








5 


3 





1915 








6 


3 





1916 








6 


2 





1917 








4 


3 


1 


1918 








4 


1 


1 


1919 








5 


4 





1920 








7 


2 





1921 








3 


5 


1 


1922 








4 


5 


1 


1923 








7 


2 


1 


1924 








3 


3 


3 


1925 








2 


5 


1 


1926 








5 


4 


1 


1927 








4 


7 


(i 


1928 








6 


3 


1 


1929 








4 


4 


2 


1930 








7 


5 





1931 








8 


1 


1 



76 



L932 


• • 


L933 


»» 


L934 


• • 


L935 


Frank M. Dob on 


L936 


•• 


L937 


♦» 


L938 


'• 


L939 


• • 


L940 


Jack Faber Al He 


194] 


it » t 


1942 


Clark Shaughrn-ssy 


L943 


Clarence Spears 


L944 


' 1 


1945 


Paul Bear Bryant 


1946 


" 


a-1947 


Jim Tatum 


L948 


1 1 


b-1949 


»» 


1950 


»» 


c-1951 


»» 


1952 


»* 


d-1953 


tt 


1954 


»» 


e-1955 


»* 


1956 


Tommy Mont 


1957 


tt 


1958 


tt 


1959 


Tom Nugent 


1960 


)» 


1961 


tt 


1962 


tt 


1963 


l» 



5 


6 





3 


7 





7 


.", 





7 


2 


2 


6 


5 





8 


2 





2 


7 





2 


7 





2 


6 


I 


3 


5 


1 


7 


2 





4 


5 





1 


7 


1 


6 


2 


1 


3 


6 





7 


2 


2 


6 


4 





9 


1 





7 


2 


1 


10 








7 


2 





10 


1 





7 


2 


1 


10 


1 





2 


7 


1 


5 


5 





4 


6 





5 


5 





6 


4 





7 


3 





6 


4 





3 


7 






a-Gator Bowl Co-Champion, Tied Georgia, 20-20 
b-Gator Bowl Champion, Defeated Missouri, 20-7 
c-Sugar Bowl Champion, Defeated Tennessee, 28-13 
d-Orange Bowl runnerup, Lost to Oklahoma, 0-7 
e-Orange Bowl runnerup, Lost to Oklahoma, 6-20 

♦Captains who coached. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

1964-65 BASKETBALL SCHEDULE 

(Home Games in CAPS) 



DATE 




OPPONENT 


LOCATION 


December 


2 


PENN STATE 


Home 


December 


3 


GEO. WASHINGTON 


Home 


December 


5 


Virginia 


Away 


December- 


8 


N.C. STATE 


Home 


December 


12 


WEST VIRGINIA 


Home 


December 


18 


WAKE FOREST 


Home 


December 


19 


KANSAS 


Home 


December 


28-29 


Hurricane Classic 





Tournament, Miami, Fla. 
(Other teams: Miami, 
Tulsa, Yale) 



January 


4 


NORTH CAROLINA 


Home 


January 


8 


Clemson 


Away 


January 


9 


South Carolina 


Away 


January 


15 


NAVY 


Home 


January 


14 


Wake Forest 


Away 


January 


16 


North Carolina State 


Away 


January 


50 


North Carolina 


Away 


February 


1 


Duke 


Away 


February 


10 


West Virginia 


Away 


February 


15 


Georgetown (D.C.) 


Away 


February 


17 


VIRGINIA 


Home 


February 


20 


Navy 


Away 


February 


25 


DUKE 


Home 


February 


26 


CLEMSON 


Home 


February 


27 


SOUTH CAROLINA 


Home 


March 


4-5-6 


A.C.C. Tournament 





HEAD COACH: H. A. "Bud" Millikan 

ASSISTANT COACH: Frank Fellows 



78 





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