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Full text of "University of Maryland men's football media guides"

** FOOTBALL 



RESS . RADIO • 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/universityofmary1966univ 



1966 

MARYLAND 
FOOTBALL GUIDE 



• Press • Radio • TV 



Front Cover — Lou Saban, who relinquished his post as 
the American Football League's coach-of- 
the-year after leading the Buffalo Bills 
to their second successive championship 
in 1965 to come to Maryland last Janu- 
ary. If Lou looks a bit solemn, it's prob- 
ably because he's thinking of the start of 
this year's schedule which calls for him 
to face Penn State, Syracuse and Duke 
in three of his first four games. Maryland 
has yet to beat Penn State or Duke a 
second time, both of the old rivals hold- 
ing 11-1 edges in their series with the 
Terps. 



INDEX 

Page 

All-Americas of Maryland - - 67-68 

All-Conference Selections -- - - ~-~ - 70-72 

All-Time Records - -- - - -- 72-79 

(Individual and Team — Game, Season, Career) 

Alphabetical Roster - 26-27 

Athletic Council 10 

Athletic Director Cobey 11-12 

Basketball Schedule for 1966-67 86 

Bowl Records of Maryland Teams - - — 4 

Coach Saban - 13-14 

Assistant Coaches: 

Dovell — Massey 15 

MacPherson — Reid 16 

Rutigliano — Wade 17 

Jerasa . 18 

Trainers Wyre and Mettler 19 

Coaches Thru The Years - 20 

Coaches' Records — - - 84-85 

Depth Chart for 1966 28 

Facts About Maryland 2 

Freshmen (1965) Stats - 41 

Freshman Roster, Schedule - - - 40 

Interpreting The Terps (Thumbnails) 29-39 

Itinerary for 1966 ~ 4 

Numerical Roster 28 

Opponents for 1966 

Clemson 56-57 

Duke 48-49 

Florida State 60-61 

N. C. State 54-55 

Penn State -- ~ 42-43 

South Carolina '.... 52-53 

Syracuse 46-47 

Virginia 58-59 

Wake Forest 44-45 

West Virginia 50-51 

Outlook for 1966 24-25 

President Elkins 7-8 

Press, Memo To 3 

Press, The Terp 62 

Pronunciation Chart 28 

Results of 1965 4 

Roster for 1966 22-23 

Schedule, Varsity 4 

Special Terp Awards - 69-70 

Stats for 1965 64-66 

The University 6 

Year-By-Year Records 80-84 

1 



FACTS ABOUT MARYLAND 



NAME University of Maryland 

FOU N D E D 1807 

LOCATION College Park, Md. 

PRESIDENT Dr. Wilson H. Elkins 

ENROLLMENT 27,000 

ATHLETIC DIRECTOR William W. Cobey 

SPORTS INFORMATION DIRECTOR Bill Dismer 

CONFERENCE Atlantic Coast 

NICKNAME Terrapins (Terps) 

COLORS Red and White, Black and Gold 

MASCOT A Motorized Terrapin ("Testudo") 

STA D I U M Byrd (35,000 ) 

HEAD COACH: Lou Saban (Baldwin Wallace '48), First Season at Mary- 
land — ■ 

His Record 
College: Year W-L-T Professional Year W-L-T 

Case Tech: 1950 4-4-0 Boston Patriots 1960 5-9-0 

1951 3-5-1 1961 2-3-0 

1952 3-5-0 Buffalo Bills 1962 7-6-1 
Northwestern: 1955 0-8-1 1963 7-7-0* 

Western Illinois: 1957 5-4-0 1964 13-2-0** 

1958 6-1-1 1965 11-3-1** 

1959 9-0-0 

Seven-year record (.500) 30-27-3 Six-year record (.577) 45-30-3 

*Eastern Champion 
**AFL champion, coach-of-the-year 
Overall coaching record (13 years): 75-57-6 (.543) 

ASSISTANTS: Whitey Dovell (Maryland '53), Dick MacPherson (Spring- 
field '58), Paul Massey (Maryland '48), Bernie Reid 
(Georgia '49), Sam Rutigliano (Tulsa '56), Dewey Wade 
(Houston '58), Charles Jerasa (Northwestern '58). 

SYSTEM : Pro-Type T 

TRAINER: Alfred J. "Duke" Wyre 

ASSISTANT TRAINER: Kenneth Mettler 

MOVIE PHOTOGRAPHER Eddie Killian 

LETTERMEN RETURNING: (30) 

ENDS: Dick Absher, Karl Bell, Bert Bilancioni, Chip Myrtle 

TACKLES: Tom Cichowski, Chris Dill, Fred Gawlick, John Trachy, Bob 
York 

GUARDS: Chuck Tine, Milan Vucin 

CENTERS: Ed Gunderman, Joe Simoldoni 

OFFENSIVE BACKS: Bobby Collins, Wymard McQuown, Walt Mar- 
ciniak, Alan Pastrana, Phil Petry, Billy Van Heusen, Ernie 
Torain 

LINEBACKERS: Pat Baker, Art Brzostowski, Jim Lavrusky, Lorie Mc- 
Queen, Tom Myslinski, Ron Nalewak 

SAFETY BACKS: Fred Cooper, Tony Santy, Lou Stickel 

KICKING SPECIALIST: Bernardo Bramson 

LETTERMEN LOST FROM 1965 SQUAD (14) 
ENDS: Howard Humphries, John Kenny, Mickey Melcher 
TACKLES: Matt Arbutina, Larry Bagranoff, Ed Johnson 
GUARD: Dick Melcher 
CENTER: Chick Krahling 

BACKS: Kenny Ambrusko, Jim Corcoran, Doug Klingerman, Bruce 
Springer, George Stem, Bob Sullivan 

2 




MEMO TO THE PRESS 
AND RADIO-TV SPORTSCASTERS 

Maryland's weekly press luncheons during 
the football season will be moved up a day, 
to Monday, this season, but outside of that we 
anticipate no changes in our relationships with 
the Press-Radio-TV fraternity. The locale will 
be the same — the Terrapin Room of the 
Park University Motel, 7200 Baltimore Bou- 
levard in College Park, and they start at noon. 
Of course all area media are always welcome 
as are any visiting firemen who might be in 
the vicinity. 

As during the past two years, we'll try to 
have the opposing SID in town on Wednesdays 
of weeks of our home games and he'll make 
the rounds in Washington that day and night 
and visit Baltimore on Thursday. 

Requests for working space in the Byrd Stadium press box and photo- 
graphers' credentials! should be made to the undersigned. Tickets will be 
distributed the first of the week of each game. Orders received too late 
for mailing will be held at Booth No. 6 (to the right of the stadium's 
main entrance). Wire and telephone requirements should be handled 
through your local Western Union office. 

A radio booth is reserved for the visiting team's official station and 
located on the lower level of the press box, to the right as you enter. 

Scouts of the next immediate opponent of each team are assigned seats 
in the upper (working) press box; all other scouts are given seats in 
the lower box. 

Parking permits are assigned to those covering the game. They per- 
mit parking in Z Lot, immediately in front of the main entrance and 
the area adjacent to the Cole Field House. 

Coach Saban will be available for post-game interviews in the room 
to the right as you pass completely through the center entrance of the 
building with the scoreboard. For those writing on deadlines, a trans- 
cript of his remarks will be typed and distributed in the press box. 

This office will mail out current stats each Monday. It also has an 
ample supply of photographs of Maryland's top players. Please do not 
hesitate to call us for any assistance we might offer. 

TELEPHONES: Day— Area Code 301, UNion 4-4076 

Night— Area Code 202, WOodley 6-6244 

BILL DISMER 

Sports Information Director 

University of Maryland 



1966 SCHEDULE 



Sept. 


17 


Sept. 


24 


Oct. 


1 


Oct. 


8 


Oct. 


15 


Oct. 


22 


Oct. 


29 


Nov. 


5 


Nov. 


12 


Nov. 


19 


Nov. 


26 



Penn State at University Park, Pa. 
Wake Forest at College Park, Md. 
Syracuse at Syracuse, N.Y. 
Duke at College Park 
West Virginia at College Park 
Open Date 

South Carolina at College Park, 
North Carolina State at Raleigh, 
Clemson at College Park, Md. 
Virginia at Charlottesville, Va. 
Florida State at Tallahassee, Fla. 





KICKOFF PRICE 




1:30 P.M. 


EDT 


$5.00 


1. 


2:00 P.M. 


EDT 


$4.00 




1:30 P.M. 


EDT 


$5.00 




2:00 P.M. 


EDT 


$4.00 




2:00 P.M. 


EDT 


$4.00 


Md. 


2:00 P.M. 


EDT 


$4.00 


N.C. 


1:30 P.M. 


EST 


$5.00 




1:30 P.M. 


EST 


$4.00 




1:30 P.M. 


EST 


$5.00 




8:00 P.M. 


EST 


$5.00 



MARYLAND'S BOWL RECORD 

Won: 2 — Lost: 2 — Tied:l 



1948 


Gator Bowl 


Maryland 


20 


Georgia 


20 


1950 


Gator Bowl 


Maryland 


20 


Missouri 


7 


1952 


Sugar Bowl 


Maryland 


28 


Tennessee 


13 


1954 


Orange Bowl 


Maryland 





Oklahoma 


7 


1956 


Orange Bowl 


Maryland 


6 


Oklahoma 


20 



Maryland 



1965 RESULTS 

Won 4, Lost 6 
Opponent Maryland 



24 Ohio University 7 (Home) 

7 Syracuse 24 (Home) 

10 Wake Forest 7 (Away) 

10 North Carolina 12 (Away) 

7 N.C. State 29 (Home) 



Opponent 

27 South Carolina 14 (Away) 
7 Navy 19 (Away) 

6 Clemson (Away) 
27 Virginia 33 (Home) 

7 Penn State 19 (Home) 



MARYLANDS ITINERARY FOR 1966 SEASON 

HEADQUARTERS 

Holiday Inn, University Park, Pa. 

Hotel Syracuse, Syracuse, N.Y. 

College Inn, Raleigh, N.C. 

Mt. Vernon Motel, Charlottesville, Va. 

Holiday Inn, Tallahassee, Fla. 

Squad will arrive at game headquarters the day before each game 

4 



Date 


Opponent 


Sept. 17 


Penn State 


Oct. 1 


Syracuse 


Nov. 5 


N.C. State 


Nov. 19 


Virginia 


Nov. 26 


Florida State 




^ 



1 



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i## 



THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

For 158 years the University of Maryland has been one of the leading 
schools of the nation. And as each year goes by the university continues 
to grow in size, stature, and prominence. 

Today the University of Maryland has eight colleges and eight schools 
which offer an outstanding variety of education to more than 60,000 stu- 
dents who attend its classes on four continents. The university now 
ranks as the tenth largest university in the United States. Enrollment 
at College Park and Baltimore is approximately 33,000. 

On the sprawling 1,100-acre College Park campus there are more than 
90 main buildings constructed in the brick Georgian-Colonial style. 
Thirty-five miles away in Baltimore 1,500 students attend the six profes- 
sional schools (medicine, dentistry, nursing, pharmacy, social work, and 
law). 

The oldest division of the University is the College of Agriculture which 
was founded in 1856. In that year the state legislature created the Mary- 
land Agricultural College on 428 acres of land purchased from the 
Charles Calvert estate eight miles northeast of Washington, D.C. There 
at College Park the first classes were held in October, 1859. 

On Thanksgiving, 1912, fire destroyed the two main buildings and gave 
Marylanders a chance to re-plan and expand the college. In 1916 the 
institution was re-named the Maryland State College of Agriculture. In 
1920 the college merged with the University of Maryland (then located 
at Baltimore) and the two campuses became known as the University of 
Maryland. 

As the years passed the University steadily erected new buildings, cre- 
ated new educational branches, and installed modern teaching devices 
and systems. 

The Theodore McKeldin Library, which dominates the west end of 
the university's College Park mall, has space enough to shelve more than 
a million books, pamphlets, and research materials. 

The Cole Activities Building, located near Byrd Stadium, was complet- 
ed in 1955 and is one of the finest examples of American engineering and 
architecture. The huge indoor amphitheater seats more than 15,000 
people for athletic, social, and educational events. The Cole auditorium 
is the second largest auditorium in the eastern part of the nation. 

Rising above all other campus buildings is the Memorial Chapel. 
The structure actually is composed of three chapels — one for Protestant 
services, one for Roman Catholics, and one for non-Christians. The main 
chapel seats 1,350 persons. To the rear of it is a smaller chapel which 
seats 122 people. The tiny Roman Catholic chapel is designed to seat 44 
people. Associated with the Memorial Chapel are chaplains of almost 
every major religious denomination. 

Every hour from the steeple of the chapel the strains of "My Mary- 
land" chime across the campus. Flemish and English carillon-type bells 
hang in the steeple to furnish the hourly chimes and special seasonal 
refrains. 




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DR. WILSON H. ELKINS 

PRESIDENT, UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 

Dr. Wilson H. Elkins, president of the University of Maryland since 
September 1, 1954, has a background of outstanding achievement in 
scholarship, student leadership and athletics. 

Born in Medina, Texas, in 1908, he attended the public schools of San 
Antonio and was graduated from the University of Texas in 1932 with 
both the B. A. and M. A. degrees. While at the university, he also' earn- 
ed eight varsity letters in football, basketball and track and was elected 
president of the Student Association and captain of the basketball team 
in his senior year. 

A Rhodes Scholar from 1933 to 1936, he received the B. Litt. and Doc- 
tor of Philosophy degree from Oxford University in 1936. That same 
year, he began his professional career in education as a history instruc- 
tor at the University of Texas. 

Two years later, he was named president of San Angelo (Texas) Jun- 
ior College. In 1949, he was appointed president of Texas Western Col- 
lege, a branch of the University of Texas. He remained there until 
1954, when he took over as the 21st president of the University of Mary- 
land. 

His administration at Maryland has been marked by a strengthening 



of academic standards along with equally high teaching performance. 
Faced with skyrocketing student enrollment, the University under his 
leadership has consistently sought to provide quality education for an 
increasing number. Culminating this effort was the authorization in Sep- 
tember, 1964, to establish a chapter of Phi Beta Kappa, honorary acad- 
emic fraternity, of which Dr. Elkins is a member. 

He also is a member of Omicron Delta Kappa (honorary leadership), 
Phi Alpha Theta (honorary history), Tau Kappa Alpha (honorary for- 
ensic), Alpha Phi Omega (honorary service) and Sigma Nu (social). He 
is listed in Who's Who in America and Who's Who in American Ed- 
ucation. 

He is a member of the Southern Regional Education Board, the Execu- 
tive Committee of the Middle States Association of Colleges and Sec- 
ondary Schools, the Board of Trustees of the Washington Center for 
Metropolitan Studies, and a member of the Board of Directors of the 
Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond. Dr. Elkins is also a member of the 
Board of Visitors of the U.S. Naval Academy and the Maryland Delega- 
tion to the Education Commission of the States. This past year he was 
named vice president of the Middle States Association of Colleges and 
Schools. 

On the subjects of sports, he has said that values and attitudes de- 
veloped in activities outside of the classroom, including football, are im- 
portant elements of a liberal education. 

He is married to the former Dorothy Blackburn of Berclair, Texas and 
has two daughters, Mrs. Edward G. Neal and Margaret Elise. 




THE 
ATHLETIC COUNCIL 

Dr. John E. Faber 
Chairman 

Mr. William W. Cobey 
Director of Athletics 



Miller Hudson President, Student Government Association 

Dr. J. Allan Cook College of Business and Public Administration 

Dr. Robert C. Wiley Associate Professor in Horticulture 

Mr. Mylo S. Downey President, Alumni Association 

Mr. Warren L. Strausbaugh, Head, Department of Speech, Dramatic Art 

Dr. Robert G. Risinger College of Education 

Dr. Henry A. Lepper Professor of Civil Engineering 

Department of Intercollegiate Athletics 

Sports Information Director Bill Dismer 

Ticket Manager Eddie Bean 

Secretary to Mr. Cobey Mrs. Betty Francis 

Secretary to Mr. Bean Mrs. Helen Ball 

Secretary to Mr. Dismer Mrs. Frances Sydnor 

Secretary to Coach Saban Miss Eleanor Peddicord 

Secretary to Coach Millikan Mrs. Cerne Redd 

Baseball Coach Elton S. "Jack" Jackson 

Assistant Baseball Coach H. L. "Whitey" Stevens 

Basketball Coach H. A. "Bud" Millikan 

Assistant Basketball Coach Frank Fellows 

Golf Coach Frank Cronin 

Lacrosse Coach John D. Howard 

Assistant Lacrosse Coach C. Rennie Smith 

Soccer, Tennis Coach Doyle Royal 

Swimming Coach Bill Campbell 

Track, Cross-Country Coach : Jim Kehoe 

Wrestling Coach William E. "Sully" Krouse 

Head Trainer, Ass't. Trainer Alfred J. "Duke" Wyre, Kenny Mettler 

Equipment Managers Kermit "Chief" Cissell, Don Hutchison 

Head of Facilities Charles "Lindy" Kehoe 

Student Assistants to the S.I.D Doug Patton, Bob Stumpff 

The Football Coaches 

Head Coach Lou Saban 

Assistant Coach (Offensive Line) William "Whitey" Dovell 

Assistant Coach (Offensive Backs) Paul Massey 

Assistant Coach (Pass Receivers) Sam Rutigliano 

Assistant Coach (Defensive line) Bernie Reid 

Assistant Coach (Defensive Backs) Dick MacPherson 

Assistant Coach (Linebackers) Dewey Wade 

Assistant Coach (Freshman) Charley Jerasa 

10 




WILLIAM W. COBEY 

DIRECTOR OF ATHLETICS 

One of the most personable guys in the business, or any business for 
that matter, is ready for his eleventh year as director of athletics at his 
alma mater. Bill Cobey's roots in Maryland go back a long way — back 
to the days of his father who graduated from Maryland in 1901 after 
lettering in track and managing the baseball team. He subsequently be- 
came a famous agricultural scientist. Cobey's mother, a native Floridian, 
has been a resident of College Park since 1933. She has consistently sus- 
tained her loyalty to the University of Maryland, and is one of Mary- 
land's most enthusiastic football fans. 

Overseer of one of the finest athletic set-ups in the country, Bill Cobey 
has seen Maryland win the Carmichael Cup, symbolic of excellence in 
Atlantic Coast Conference athletics, three of the five years it has been 
in existence. 

11 



Of this particular feat Smith Barrier, sports editor of the Greensboro 
Daily News and director of the Atlantic Coast Conference's nonpareil 
Service Bureau, recently wrote: 

"Bill Cobey's athletic department at the University of Maryland can 
certainly go to the head of the class. The first two years of the Car- 
michael Cup, an award from the Carmichael family to honor the ACC 
school with the best all-around sports program, Maryland claimed the 
top honor, and then Carolina edged the Terps by a half-point last year 
(in 1964). But during the past school year Maryland almost had the 
Justice Department from nearby Washington at their doorsteps. Mary- 
land had a monopoly going, almost. Of 12 titles the Terps won eight, 
tied for second in one, finished third in two, fourth in another. Football 
and basketball, the money games, are important at the spreading College 
Park campus, but they do not completely dominate. Cobey's well- 
planned program takes in every sport, and the job done by the Terps 
during the past two semesters rank with the outstanding ones in ACC 
history. Undoubtedly No. 1." 

Although he played freshman lacrosse, Cobey devoted the rest of the 
spare time of his college days to working in the cashier's office and it 
was to that office that he returned in 1931, one year after graduating, 
to begin his long and esteemed career with the University. He held the 
position of Cashier of the University for 17 years or until 1948 when he 
was appointed Graduate Manager of Athletics. In 1956 he was named 
Director of Athletics, succeeding the late Jim Tatum. 

A member of Kappa Alpha (Southern) Order during his college days, 
Cobey continued active in community and civic affairs after graduation. 
He has been president of the University Park PTA. councilman for Uni- 
versity Park, and president of the University branch of the Maryland 
Classified Employee's Association. He is still active in the College Park 
Rotary Club. 

A native of Quincy, Fla., Cobey married Mary Gray Munroe of that 
city in 1935. They have six children, three daughters (all married) and 
^hree sons, and three granddaughters. The daughters are Mary Patricia 
(Mrs. Fred Martin, Jr.), Julia Ann (Mrs. John Gluck) and Betty (Mrs. 
Walter Brown). The sons are William; Elwood, who is in his third 
year at West Point, and Munroe, in his first year of high school. 

The Cobeys are members of the University Methodist Church m College 
Park. And it would be hard to find a more popular couple in the state 
of Maryland! 



12 




LOU SABAN 

HEAD FOOTBALL COACH 

The man who left pro football when he was at the top of the heap 
did so because the college game will enable him to contribute more to 
life, in general, and to his family in particular. 

That's what Lou Saban, pronounced SAY-bin, told the press conference 
at which he was introduced to Terrapinland back in January. 

Coach-of-the-year for the past two seasons during which he led the 
Buffalo Bills to the American Football League championship, Saban be- 
lieves there is more to life than drawing circles and squares. "In pro 
ranks, winning is everything", he commented. "I'm sure that's not com- 
pletely true on the college level. I enjoy life. This is what I want to do, 
for my sake and my family's. We're going to enjoy campus life". 

Lou should know the difference; he's had experience as a college coach 
as well as in professional ranks and his overall winning percentage for 
the 13 years he's been at it is a creditable .543. During eight years at 
three colleges, from 1950 through 1959, his record was 30 victories, 27 
defeats and 3 ties, for an even .500 percentage. For the six years he spent 
in the AFL with the Boston Patriots and Buffalo Bills his record was 
45-30-3, for a .577 mark. His lifetime record is 75-57-6— .543. 

Although nearly 100 coaches applied for the Maryland job which be- 

13 



came vacant last December, Saban had the inside track all along. In- 
troduced to him several years ago, Athletic Director Bill Cobey had kept 
his eyes on Lou ever since. 

The four-year contract under which Saban began work last spring was 
President Elkins' idea. A three-sport star at the University of Texas, Dr. 
Elkins appreciates a football coach's situation better than the average 
college prexy. "I figure that (four years) is enough time for Lou to 
prove to us that Maryland is capable of playing winning football again. 
We wanted a man who was a winner and whom we could trust in mak- 
ing our team a winner." 

Saban has an interesting background. Born in Brookfield, Illinois 45 
years ago this October, Lou was one of four brothers who played out- 
standing football for Brookfield High. Following graduation from high 
school in 1940, Lou entered the University of Indiana to play under the 
famed Bo McMillin as a single wing quarterback. He went on to become 
the Hoosiers' captain and most valuable player in 1942 when he made 
the all-Big Ten team. He might have been all-America the following 
year except that he entered the Army as a first lieutenant in the Office 
of Strategic Services and served in the China-Burma-India theater of 
operations. During the three and one-half years he spent in the Service, 
Saban became a student of the Chinese language (Mandarin dialect), 
which he still speaks fluently. 

During his time in service he was signed by the Cleveland Browns of 
the new all-America Conference. Playing under another illustrious coach, 
Paul Brown who, he declares, "taught me what it takes to be a good 
football player", Saban captained the Browns for four seasons. Twice, in 
1948 and '49, he was an all-league linebacker. When the AAC folded at 
the end of the '49 campaign Saban retired as a player not, he points 
out, because of the conference's demise. "It was merely time for me to 
quit as a player and start on the coaching career which always had 
been my goal". 

His year-by-year coaching record will be found on Page 2 ("Facts 
About Maryland"). Sufficient to say that from 1950 through '52 he was 
head coach at Case Tech; in '53 and '54 an assistant on the staff at 
the University of Washington, and an assistant and then head coach 
at Northwestern in '55. During the school year 1955-'56 he devoted 
himself to the insurance business but, like many others, found the lure 
of football too strong to resist and returned to the game at Western 
Illinois in 1957. For the next three years he established a 20-5-1 record 
with the Leathernecks, his 1959 team (his last college squad until this 
fall) going undefeated and untied in nine games. 

With the formation of the American Football League, Saban returned 
to the pro game in 1960 as coach of the Boston Patriots, the last club 
to be organized. His team won four of five pre-season games to establish 
pro football on a solid foundation in Beantown. Although a succession 
of injuries knocked the Patriots out of contention late in the season, they 
earned a reputation as a colorful, high-scoring team that was exciting 
to watch. Saban continued to direct the Patriots through the first four 
games of the '61 season before switching to the Buffalo Bills as director 
of player personnel. His work in this field was in a large measure res- 
ponsible for the fine draft the Bills enjoyed in 1961 and when a coach- 
ing change was in order, Saban was the first name mentioned and only 
one seriously considered. He became the Bills' coach in January of 1962. 

Married in 1947 at the height of his playing career with the Browns, 
Lou and his wife, Lorraine, an alumna of Northwestern, have four chil- 
dren: Tom, 11; Barbara, 8; Patricia, 5, and Christine, 3. 

In his "spare time", Lou does a little generalized cooking and things 
around the house. "I also read anything I can get my hands on", he 
says. "Reading helps me relax". 

14 




THE ASSISTANT COACHES 

WILLIAM H. "Whitey" DOVELL — Joined Maryland Staff in 1952 
Primary responsibility — Offensive line coach 

Background 

Date and place of birth — Newark, N.J., Feb- 
ruary 11, 1927 

High School — St. Benedict's 

College — University of Maryland, BS degree 
('51) 

Varsity Sport — Football (guard) 

Letters won. — 3 

Previous coaching experience (all at Mary- 
land) 
Freshman line coach, 1952 
Head freshman coach, 1953-'55* 
Line coach, 1955-'63 

*(Dovell's 1955 freshman team was un- 
defeated and defeated Mexico Poly in 
an international game in Mexico City, 
26-13) 

Married to the former Claire Benson. 3 chil- 
dren — Audrey (9), Patricia (7) and Lisa 
(4) 

Hobbies — Fishing and camping 



PAUL MASSEY — Joined Maryland Staff March 1, 1965 

Primary responsibility — Offensive backs 

(Also serves as secretary of the Ter- 
rapin Club) 

Background 
Date and place of birth — Beaver Falls, 

Pennsylvania. April 24, 1926 
High School — Beaver Falls 
College — University of Maryland (B.S. de- 
gree in Phys. Ed. in '48) 
Temple University (M.A. in Counseling 
and Guidance '54) 
Varsity sport — Football (Halfback and end) 
Letters won — 2 
Previous coaching experience: 
Montgomery College 1948-'49 
Charlotte Hall Prep 1949-'52 
Palmyra (N.J.) High 1952-'54 
Raleigh (N.C.) High 1954-'55 
Bridgeton (N.J.) High 1955-'56 
Haddon Heights (N.J.) High 1956-'63 
Cherry Hill (N.J.) High 1963-'65 
Married to the former Marjorie Wells. Two 

children: Paul (13) and Gail (4) 
Hobby: Photography, writing 

15 




RICHARD FREDERICK "Dick" MacPHERSON— Joined Maryland staff 
January 16, 1966 

Primary responsibility — Defensive backs 
Background 

Date and place of birth — Old Town, Maine, 
November 4, 1930 

High School— Old Town High 

College — Springfield College, BS degree 
Physical Education 1958. University of 
Illinois, MS degree, Physical Education 
1963. 

Varsity Sports — Football, wrestling 

Letters won — 4 (3 football, 1 wrestling) 

Honors — Captain and most valuable player, 
1957 

Previous coaching experience: 

University of Illinois, assistant fresh- 
man coach, 1958. 

University of Massachusetts, 1959-'60 
freshman, offensive line 
University of Cincinnati, 1961-'65, line 
coach, defensive coordinator 

Married to the former Sandra Jean Mof- 
fitt. Two children — Maureen Ann, 5%; 
Ruth, 3. 

Hobbies — Golf, water sports, skiing. 




BERNIE REID — Joined Maryland Staff, February 1959 
Primary responsibility — Defensive line 

Background 
Date and place of birth — Hamilton, Ohio, 

October 5, 1924 
High School — Hamilton High 
College — University of Georgia, BS Degree 

in Education '49 
Varsity sports participated in — 

Football (guard) 
Letters won — 3 
Highest honors won — All-Southern 

All-Southeastern 

Most valuable lineman 

President, Student Council 
Previous coaching experience — 

High School coach, Fitzgerald, Georgia, 
1949 

High School coach, Albany, Georgia, 
1950-'58 
Married to the former Kathryn Herold. 3 

children: Karolyn (17), Paula (15), 

Bernard Jeffery (5). 
Hobbies: Hunting, fishing 




16 



SAM RUTIGLIANO— Joined Maryland staff, February 1966 

Primary responsibility — Pass-receivers 

Background 
Place and date of birth — Brooklyn, N.Y., 

July 1, 1932 
High School — Erasmus Hall 
College — Tulsa University, AB Degree 1956 

Columbia University, MA Degree 
Varsity Sport — Football 
Letters won — 3 
Highest honor won — All-Metropolitan, New 

York City 
Previous coaching experience — 
Head coach, Lafayette High School, New 

York City 1956-'59 
Head Coach, Greenwich (Conn) High 

School, 1959-'62 
Head Coach, Chappaaua (NY) High School, 

1959-'64 
Backfield Coach, University of Connecticut, 

1964-'66 
Married to the former Barbara Abe. 2 chil- 
dren: Paul (10), Alison (1) 
Hobbies — Skiing, tennis 




DEWEY WADE— Joined Maryland staff, January 1966 




Primary responsibility — Linebackers 

Background 
Place and date of birth — Omaha Nebraska 

August 12, 1931 
High School — North High (Omaha, Neb) 
Colleges — Kansas State (1951-'52) Univer- 
sity of Huston (1956-'58) 
Varsity sports participated in Football — 

Defensive end, fullback at Kansas State 

Guard, fullback at Houston 
Letters won — 4 

Previous coaching experience — 
Line Coach, South High (Omaha) 
Freshman Coach, University of Buffalo, 

1960-'64 
Offensive line coach, University of Buffalo, 

1965 
Married to Shirley Marie Stanwood. Three 

children — Dickie Paul (6), Deborah 

Ann (4), Dawn Marie (1) 



17 



CHARLES "Chuck" J ERASA— Joined Maryland staff July 1, 1966 



Primary responsibility — Freshman coach 
Background 

Date and place of birth — Johnstown, Pa., 
August 26, 1935 

High School — Ferndale 

College — Northwestern, BS Degree in Ed- 
ucation 1958 

Varsity Sports — Football 

Letters won — 3 

Highest honor won — MVP, Fort Knox Ser- 
vice Team, 1959 

Previous coaching experience — 

Fort Knox, Kentucky— 1959-'60 
Bedford High (Bedford, Ohio) 1961-'65 

Married to the former Evelyn Picklo. Two 
children — Chuckie, 5, and Chris Anne, 
2. 

Hobbies: Fishing, golf, reading 







KERMIT "Chief" CISSELL 
Equipment Manager 



DON HUTCHISON 
Ass't. Equipment Manager 



18 



TRAINERS: DUKE WYRE AND KENNY METTLER 

"Duke" Wyre's been taping 
and looking after Maryland 
athletes for 18 years and it's 
doubtful if anyone on the 
campus has as many friends 
among the participants of 
Maryland's 12 sports than 
this former Olympic trainer. 
Possessing the highest pro- 
fessional skill, "Duke" ad- 
ministers to the boys with a 
warm, but strict manner 
which includes admiration 
and respect from all who 
contact him. 

"Duke" was at Yale for 15 
years before coming to Mary- 
land in 1947 (with a year at 
Holy Cross in between). He 
has a wide acquaintance 
among the country's trainers 
and his own reputation is na- 
tionwide. He is considered a 
leading authority in the field 
of training athletic teams, 
and has written many arti- 
cles and manuals on training 
methods. He also has lectured 
at various training clinics 
from time to time. In 1956 
he served as chairman of the 
Board of Directors of the Na- 
tional Trainers' Association of which he was one of the founders. 

Probably the pinnacle of his career came in 1960 when he was selected 
as one of the eight United States trainers for the Olympics in Rome. 
Duke's special assignment was the handling of the U.S. crew, singularly 
enough, the Navy eight from neighboring Annapolis. 

Duke is rather inconspicuous on the sidelines until a Maryland player 
gets hurt when he dashes on the field with his little black bag. During 
basketball season though, he adds color to' the Maryland bench with his 
flaming red vest which lets all and sundry know "The Duke" is on the 
job. 

"Duke" is married to the former Maryan Conroy, like himself, a native 
New Englander. During the summer they're usually to be found up in 
that section of the country. 

Duke reached a milestone in his life just last June when he was elected 
to the Helms' Hall Athletic Trainers Hall of Fame. 

If Duke seems to be smiling more this fall it's because Kenny Mettler, 
one of his student assistants from 1960 to 1965, has "come home" after 
a year as Lehigh's head trainer. Kenny, who received a BS degree in 
Physical Education from Maryland in '65, will be Duke's right-hand man 
and that pair should keep the Terps in the best possible physical condi- 
tion. 

Kenny is a member of the National Athletic Trainers Association, a 
member of the national ethics committee of that organization and the 
editor and publisher of the District Three Trainers' newsletter. 
He is married to the former Diane Euker of Towson. 




19 



HEAD COACHES THROUGH THE YEARS 



1892— W. W. Skinner 
1893— S. H. Harding 
1894 — J. G. Bannon 
1895— G. M. Harris 
1896 — Grenville Lewis 
1897 — John Lillibridge 
1898— J. F. Kenly 
1899— S. M. Cooke 
1900— F. H. Peters 
1901— E. B. Dunbar 
*Above Teams Coached by 

Captains 
1902 — D. John Markey 

(Western Md.) 
1903 — Markey 
1904— Markey 



1905 — Fred Nielsen (Neb.) 

1906 — Nielsen 

1907— C. G. Church (Va.) 

and C. W. Melick (Neb.) 
1908— Bill Lang (Delaware) 
1909 — Barney Cooper 

(Md. '08) and E. P. 

Larkin (Cornell) 
1910— R. Alston (G.W.) 
1911— C. F. Donnelly 

(Trinity) and H. C. Byrd 

(Maryland '08) 
1912-34— H. C. Byrd 

(Md. '08) 
1935-39— Frank Dobson 

(Princeton) 



1940-41— Jack Faber ('26), 
Al Heagy, C30), and Al 
Woods C33) all of Md. 
1942— Clark Shaughnessy 

(Minnesota) 
1943-44 — Clarence Spears 

(Dartmouth) 
1945— Paul Bryant (Ala.) 
1946 — Clark Shaughnessy 
1947-55— Jim Tatum (N.C. ) 
1956-58 — Tommy Mont (Md.) 
1959-65— Tom Nugent 

(Ithaca) 
1966 — Lou Saban 
(Baldwin Wallace) 



20 



s to be watched: Fullback Walt "Whitey" 
with ball) and End Dick Absher. Both are 
'HffNts and all-America candidates. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLANU 

OFFENSIVE SQUAD 

Lettermen in CAPS ("designates letters won) 

First four linemen and first two backs listed were on first two 
units at spring's end. 



QUARTERBACKS 
No. Name Hgt Mt Age CI Hometown 

12 *ALAN PASTRANA 6-1 190 21 Jr. Annapolis, Md. 

Sr. Hagerstown, Md. 
So. Johnstown, Pa. 
So. Lancaster, Pa. 
So. Glenolden, Pa. 
So. Harrison, NY. 
So. Redstone, Pa. 

HALFBACKS 
45 *BILLY VAN HEUSEN 6-1 198 20 Jr. Mamaroneck, N.Y. 
22 *ERNIE TORAIN 5-9 200 20 Jr. Baltimore, Md. 

33 Alvin Lee 5-10 190 19 Jr. Baltimore, Md. 



16**PHIL PETRY 


6-0 


198 


20 


17 Dave Stofa 


6-2 


197 


20 


Tom Burger 


5-10 


175 


19 


10 Bob Faries 


6-0 


183 


19 


Ralph Friedgen 


5-11 


198 


19 


Ron Maleta 


6-1 


194 


19 



29**BOBBY COLLINS 
86 Ron Pearson 



FLANKER BACKS 

5-10 175 21 Sr. Willingboro, N.J. 
6-3 212 19 So. Rockville, Md. 



34** WALTER 

MARCINIAK 
20 Bill Lovett 
37**WYMARD McQUOWN 5-11 200 



82**DICK ABSHER 
81**CHIP MYRTLE 
87 *KARL BELL 
83 Rick Carlson 
89 Lou Bracken 
58 BERT BILANCIONI 
Dave Hilsinger 



78**TOM CICHOWSKI 
71 Ben Aquilina 
62 Ed Kane 

74 Sam Battaglia 
65 John Miloszewski 
73 *CHRIS DILL 

Mike Galloway 
76 Jim Rannels 



63 *CHUCK TINE 

64 *ED GUNDERMAN 
68 Bob Leckie 

79 *FRED GAWLICK 







FULLBACKS 


5-11 


220 


21 


Sr. Old Forge, Pa. 


5-10 


200 


19 


So. Cherry Hill, N.Y. 


5-11 


200 


21 


Sr. Bethesda, Md. 






ENDS 


6-5 


230 


21 


Sr. Camp Springs, Md. 


6-3 


205 


21 


Sr. Hyattsville, Md. 


6-4 


230 


19 


Jr. Easton, Pa. 


6-2 


205 


19 


So. Willingboro, N.J. 


6-1 


196 


19 


So. Atloona, Pa. 


6-0 


210 


21 


Sr. Wilmington, Del. 


6-0 


210 


19 


So. Harrisburg, Pa. 






TACKLES 


6-4 


230 


22 


Sr. Southington, Conn. 


6-3 


235 


21 


Jr. Roselle Park. N.J. 


6-2 


200 


19 


So. Levittown, N.Y. 


6-3 


224 


21 


Jr. Nutley, N.J. 


6-2 


228 


19 


So. Beaver Falls, Pa. 


6-1 


215 


21 


Jr. Washington, D.C. 


6-1 


208 


19 


So. Finksburg, Md. 


6-0 


210 


21 


Sr. Elicott City, Md. 






GUARDS 


6-1 


220 


20 


Jr. Belair, Md. 


5-11 


215 


19 


Jr. Franklin, N.J. 


6-1 


210 


21 


Jr. Hasbrouck Hts., N.J 


6-3 


235 


19 


Jr. Irvington, N.J. 



High School 

Annapolis 
Hagerstown 
Bishop McCort 
Lancaster Catholic 
St. James (Chest.) 
Harrison 
Redstone 



Mamaroneck 
Baltimore Poly 
Baltimore Poly 



John F. Kenned} 
Gaithersburg 



Old Forge 
Cherry Hill 
Bethesda-Chevy 
Chase 



Bullis 

John Carroll 

Easton 

John F. Kennedy 

Bishop Gullfoyle 

Salesianum 

Bishop McDevitt 



Southington 
Roselle Park 
Levittown 

Memorial 
Nutley 
Beaver Falls 
St. John's 
Westminster 
Howard County 



Bel Air 
So. Franklin 
So. Hasbrouck 
So. Irvington 



22 



1%6 FOOTBALL ROSTER 



67**MILAN VUCIN 


5-10 200 


21 


66 Mike Grace 


5-10 215 


19 


69 Don Brady 


6-0 215 


19 



50 *JOE SIMOLDONI 

51 Larry Vince 

69 Harold Teubner 



3**BERNARDO 
BRAMSON 



Sr. Morrisville, Pa. 
So. Laurel, Md. 
So. Hyattsville, Md. 

CENTERS 

5-11 215 21 Sr. Garfield, N.J. 
6-0 210 19 So. Brownsville, Pa. 
6-1 210 20 Jr. Washington, D.C. 

KICKING SPECIALIST 



Pennsbury 



Bullis 

Brownsville 

Surrattsville 



5-9 195 21 Sr. Santiago, Chile* The Grange 

*Born in Washington, D.C. 

DEFENSIVE SQUAD 

Letter-men in CAPS ("designates letters won) 

First four ends, tackles, corner backs and safeties and first six linebackers 
were on first two units at spring's end. 



No. Name 

77 *TOM MYSLINSKI. 

84 Bill Bach 

85 Charles Hoffman 
80 Tom Plevin 



70** JOHN TRACHY 
76**BOB YORK 
72 Don Defino 
61 Ned Chappell 



ENDS 
Hgt Wt Age CI Hometown 
6-1 230 20 Jr. Rome, N.Y. 
6-4 235 19 So. Larchmont, N.Y. 
6-3 245 19 So. Mamaroneck, N.Y. 
6-1 205 19 So. Uniontown, Pa. 



TACKLES 

6-1 230 21 Sr. Sparta, N.J. 
6-0 225 21 Sr. Silver Springs, Md. 
6-0 225 20 Jr. Grindstown, Pa. 
6-0 230 20 So. Salem, Ohio 

LINEBACKERS 



60* 


*LORIE McQUEEN 


6-0 


215 


23 


Sr. Weirton, W. Va. 


57 


*ART BRZOSTOWSKI 


6-0 


215 


21 


Sr. Bayonne, N.J. 


52 


*JIM LAVRUSKY 


6-0 


210 


19 


Jr. Monaca, Pa. 


54 


Mike Hoch 


5-11 


205 


20 


Jr. Salisbury, Md. 


36* 


*RON NALEWAK 


6-1 


215 


21 


Sr. Shamokin, Pa. 


53 


*PAT BAKER 


5-11 


195 


21 


Jr. Altoona, Pa. 




Joe Longo 


6-3 


210 


19 


So. Canonsburg, Pa. 








CORNER BACKS 


21**FRED COOPER 


6-0 


187 


21 


Sr. Carnegie, Pa. 


19 


*TONY SANTY 


6-2 


200 


22 


Jr. Plainfield, N.J. 


27 


Carl Mortensen 


5-11 


192 


20 


Jr. Lodi, N.J. 


44 


Ralph Donofrio 


5-11 


193 


20 


Jr. Wilmington, Del 


48 


Bob Colbert 


5-10 


184 


19 


So. Pittsburg, Pa. 


24 


Bob Haley 


5-9 


184 


19 


So. Midway, Pa. 










SAFETIES 


41 


*LOU STICKEL 


5-11 


195 


19 


Jr. Riverside, N.J. 


26 


John Hetrick 


5-11 


193 


19 


So. Hershey, Pa. 


40 


Jim Acton 


5-11 


185 


20 


Jr. Hyattsville, Md. 


26 


Mike Brant 


5-10 


186 




So: Avondale, Md. 


25 


Gary Swartz 


5-9 


179 


20 


So. Hagerstown, Md 



High School 
Rome Acad. 
Mamaroneck 
Mamaroneck 
Fairchance- 
Georges 



Sparta 
St. John's 
Redstone 



Bordentown, M.A. 

Bayonne 

Monaca 

Wicomico 

Shamokin 

Bishop Guilfoyle 

Canonsburg 



Chartiers Valley 

Plainfield 

Lodi 

Archmere Acad. 

North Catholic 

Fort Cherry 



Riverside 
Hershey 
DeMatha 
St. John's 
South 



23 



THE OUTLOOK 



Offensively 

The realization that he is the only experienced quarterback on the 
squad and that the success or failure of Lou Saban's first Maryland team 
largely depend upon him could make Phil Petry into a top-flight signal- 
caller in this, his senior season. 

Last year Phil was one of five alternated at this key position and the 
uncertainty of his status wasn't conducive to his confidence. As the 
campaign begins, he will have no illusions as to the identity of the No. 

1 QB and should "take charge" accordingly. 

Petry will be one of six seniors on the first offensive unit, the other 
five posts to be filled by juniors. All but one are lettermen. In the back- 
field with him Petry will find Walt "Whitey" Marciniak, the team's No. 

2 ground-gainer the past two seasons with an overall average of nearly 
four yards a carry; Bobby Collins, the team's leading pass-receiver last 
year with 25 catches for 462 yards, three touchdowns, and Billy Van 
Heusen, a junior who should come into his own as a ball-carrier after 
an ill-fated attempt to make a quarterback out of him as a sophomore. 

A line which averages 220 with four seniors and three juniors has 
standouts in Dick Absher, 6-5, 235-pound tight end; Chip Myrtle, 6-3, 
205-pound split end, and Tom Cichowski, 6-4, 230-pound senior tackle. 
Absher, who kicks off and could be called upon for some punting, is the 
guy the pros have been smacking their lips over for three years. He 
actually caught more passes than last year's leader, Collins, although his 
yardage wasn't as great. In addition, he is a tremendous blocker. 

Cichowski, at tackle, will have Ben Aquilina, an unlettered senior who 
stands 6-5, weighs 235, as his running mate. Keeping his fingers crossed 
against the series of injuries which have deprived him of letters as a 
soph and junior, Aquilina has hope of justifying the confidence the line 
coaches have had in him all along. 

Charley "Chuck" Tine and Ed Gunderman will be the first unit's 
guards. Both are being hailed among the area's top men in this posi- 
tion, with one Maryland coach calling Tine one of the best in the 
country. Gunderman was a linebacker last year but developed swiftly 
during spring drills and should more than hold his own after a couple 
of games. Joe Simoldoni, at center, is most dependable and could bid for 
the "unsung hero" of the year honors. 

Only one senior was listed on the second offensive unit at spring's 
end, with three sophs cracking an otherwise all-junior team. Rick Carl- 
son, 6-2, split end who also punts; Sam Battaglia, 6-3, 225, tackle, and 
Ron Pearson, 6-3, 212-pound flanker back are the first-year men listed 
as first-line reserves. 

The No. 2 quarterback is Alan Pastrana, a fine all-around athlete who 
made the all-America lacrosse team last spring as a soph. Pastrana was 
a defensive back in 1965 but converted into a QB when the need for 
manpower at that position became apparent. With Pastrana in the sec- 
ond unit's backfield are Ernie Torain, the team's leading ground-gainer 
last year (370 yards, 4-yard average); Wymard "Butch" McQuown, the 
senior and two-year letterman from nearby Bethesda, and Ron Pearson, 
the aforementioned soph from another area school, Gaithersburg. 



24 



FOR 1966 



Defensively 



Two sophomores seem destined to be on the first unit which other- 
wise will have four seniors and five juniors, eight of them lettermen. 
Bill Bach, a 6-4, 235-pound sophomore, apparently won the right end 
spot as a result of his work this spring while John Hetrick, a real fine 
athlete and a fresh convert from offense to defense, will be one of the 
two safety men. 

There will be plenty of beef on the four-man line. Tom Myslinski, a 
junior letterman, will have his 6-1, 230-pound frame at the opposite end 
from Bach, while a couple of 225-pound-plus boys, senior John Trachy 
and junior Don Defino will be at the tackles. The latter returned to 
school after a year's absence to take the job away from a senior letter- 
man last spring. 

The linebackers on the first unit are Lorie McQueen, a senior (6-0, 
215) and a pair of juniors, Art Brozostowski (6-0, 215) and Jim Lavrusky 
(6-0, 210). Manning the corners will be Fred Cooper and Tony Santy, 
a pair of veteran defensive backs. Cooper, a senior, was given a brief 
trial at quarterback last year but returns to his original position from 
which he intercepted four passes last year, second highest on the team. 
He is considered the squad's best all-around defensive back. Santy, a 
year younger, can. play either corner or safety and lettered as a soph. 

In the safety positions will be found Lou Stickel, a junior letterman, 
one of the surest tacklers on the squad, and John Hetrick, who made a 
real sacrifice when he switched over to the defense from offense. Last 
fall Hetrick, a well-built lad from Hershey, Pa., led the frosh in rushing 
(528 yards, 5.4 avg.), scoring (56 points) and punt returns. But the coach- 
ing staff considered him one of the more pleasing developments of the 
spring when he proved himself a fine safety man. 

Several lettermen found themselves on the second defensive unit at 
spring's end but it's certain they'll see plenty of action. Ron Nalewak, 
a senior linebacker who weighs 215; Bob York, senior 225-pound tackle, 
and Pat Baker, junior linebacker, could step into first unit jobs and per- 
form creditably. Among the more outstanding sophs are both ends of 
the second unit; Charley Hoffman, 6-3, 245, who appears tall enough to 
carry all that weight, and Tom Plevin, 6-1, 205. A third soph, Bob Col- 
bert, a corner back, showed potential with above-average speed and 
agility. He covers receivers extremely well. 

One thing is certain: the defensive unit will be tested early. In 11 pre- 
vious games with Penn State and Duke, each has averaged four touch- 
downs a game against Maryland in beating the Terps 11 times in 12 
starts. And they're the first and fourth opponents on the schedule. 



25 



1966 ALPHABETICAL ROSTER 

("D" Before Position Denotes Defensive) 



No, 


Name 


Pos. 


Hgt 


Wt 


Age 


CI 


Hometown 


82 


Absher, Dick 


E 


6-4 


235 


21 


Sr. 


Camp Springs, Md 


40 


Acton, James 


DHB 


5-11 


185 


20 


So. 


Hyattsville, Md. 


71 


Aquilina, Ben 


T 


6-3 


235 


21 


Sr. 


Roselle Park, N.J. 


84 


Bach, Bill 


DE 


6-4 


235 


19 


So. 


Mamaroneck, N.Y. 


53 


Baker, Pat 


LB 


5-11 


195 


21 


Jr. 


Altoona, Pa. 


74 


Battaglia, Sam 


T 


6-3 


225 


21 


Jr. 


Nutley, N.J. 


87 


Bell, Karl 


E 


6-4 


230 


19 


Jr. 


Easton, Pa. 


58 


Bilancioni, Bert 


E 


6-0 


210 


21 


Sr. 


Wilmington, Del. 


89 


Bracken, Lou 


E 


6-1 


196 


19 


So. 


Atloona, Pa. 


69 


Brady, Don 


G 


6-0 


215 


19 


So. 


Hyattsville, Md. 


3 


Bramson, Bernardo 


KS 


5-9 


195 


21 


Sr. 


Santiago, Chile 


28 


Brant, Mike 


DB 


5-10 


186 


19 


So. 


Avondale, Md. 


57 


Brzostowski, Art 


LB 


6-0 


215 


21 


Sr. 


Bayonne, N.J. 




Burger, Tom 


QB 


5-10 


175 


19 


So. 


Lancaster, Pa. 


S3 


Carlson, Rick 


E 


6-2 


205 


19 


So. 


Willingboro, N.J. 


61 


Chappell, Ned 


T 


6-0 


230 


20 


So. 


Salem, Ohio 


78 


Cichowski, Tom 


T 


6-4 


230 


22 


Sr. 


Southington, Conn, 


48 


Colbert, Bob 


DB 


5-10 


180 


19 


So. 


Pittsburgh, Pa. 


29 


Collins, Bobby 


HB 


5-10 


175 


21 


Sr. 


Willingboro, N.J. 


21 


Cooper, Fred 


DB 


6-0 


187 


21 


Sr. 


Carnegie, Pa. 


72 


Defino, Don 


DT 


6-0 


225 


20 


Jr. 


Grindstone, Pa. 


73 


Dill, Chris 


T 


6-1 


215 


21 


Jr. 


Washington, D.C. 


44 


Donofrio, Ralph 


DHB 


5-11 


193 


20 


Jr. 


Wilmington, Del. 


10 


Faries, Bob 


QB 


6-0 


183 


19 


So. 


Glenolden, Pa. 




Friedgen, Ralph 


QB 


5-11 


198 


19 


So. 


Harrison, N.Y. 




Galloway, Mike 


T 


6-1 


208 


19 


So. 


Finksburg, Md. 


79 


Gawlick, Fred 


T 


6-3 


235 


20 


Jr. 


Irvington, N.J. 


66 


Grace, Mike 


G 


5-10 


215 


19 


So. 


Laurel, Md. 


64 


Gunderman, Ed 


G 


5-11 


184 


19 


Jr. 


Midway, Pa. 


24 


Haley, Bob 


DB 


6-1 


190 


20 


Jr. 


Port Chester, N.Y. 


26 


Hetrick, John 


DB 


5-11 


193 


19 


So. 


Hershey, Pa. 




Hilsinger, 


E 


6-0 


210 


19 


So. 


Harrisburg, Pa 


54 


Hoch, Mike 


LB 


5-11 


205 


20 


Jr. 


Salisbury, Md. 


85 


Hoffman, Charles 


DE 


6-3 


245 


19 


So. 


Mamaroneck, N.Y. 



26 



1966 ALPHABETICAL ROSTER 

(Continued) 



No 


Name 


Pos. 


Hgt 


Wt 


Age 


CI 


Hometown 


62 


Kane, Ed 


T 


6-2 


200 


18 


So. 


Levittown, N.Y. 


52 


Lavrusky, Jim 


LB 


5-11 


210 


19 


Jr. 


Monaca, Pa. 


68 


Leckie, Bob 


G 


6-1 


210 


21 


Jr. 


Hasbrouck Heights, N.J. 


33 


Lee, Alvin 


HB 


5-10 


190 


19 


Jr. 


Baltimore, Md. 




Dongo, Joe 


LB 


6-3 


210 


19 


So. 


Canonsburg, Pa. 


20 


Lovett, Bill 


HB 


5-10 


200 


19 


So. 


Cherry Hill, N.Y. 


60 


McQueen, Lorie 


LB 


6-0 


215 


23 


Sr. 


Weirton, W. Va. 


37 


McQuown, Wymard 


FB 


5-11 


200 


21 


Sr. 


Bethesda, Md. 




Maleta, Ron 


QB 


6-1 


194 


19 


So. 


Redstone, Pa. 


34 


Marciniak, Walt 


-FB 


5-11 


220 


21 


Sr. 


Old Forge, Pa. 


65 


Miloszewski, John 


T 


6-2 


228 


19 


So. 


Beaver Falls, Pa. 


27 


Mortensen, Carl 


DB 


5-11 


192 


20 


Jr. 


Lodi, N.J. 


81 


Myrtle, Chip. 


E 


6-3 


205 


21 


Sr. 


Hyattsville, Md. 


77 


Myslinski, Tom 


DE 


6-1 


230 


20 


Jr. 


Rome, N.Y. 


36 


Nalewak, Ron 


LB 


6-1 


215 


21 


Sr. 


Shamokin, Pa. 


12 


Pastrana, Alan 


QB 


6-1 


190 


21 


Jr. 


Annapolis, Md. 


86 


Pearson, Ron 


E 


6-3 


212 


19 


So. 


Rockville, Md. 


80 


Plevin, Torn 


DE 


6-1 


205 


19 


So. 


Uniontown, Pa. 


16 


Petry, Phil 


QB 


6-0 


198 


20 


Sr. 


Hagerstown, Md. 


76 


Rannels, James 


T 


6-0 


210 


21 


Sr. 


Elicott City, Md. 


19 


Santy, Tony 


DB 


6-2 


200 


22 


Jr. 


Plainfield, N.J. 


50 


Simoldoni, Joe 


C 


5-11 


215 


21 


Sr. 


Garfield, N.J. 




Sinibaldi, Tom 




5-10 


215 


19 


So. 


Bound Brook, N.J. 


41 


Stickel, Lou 


S 


5-11 


195 


19 


Jr. 


Riverdale, N.J. 


17 


Stofa, Dave 


QB 


6-2 


197 


20 


So. 


Johnstown, Pa. 


25 


Swartz, Gary 


DHB 


5-9 


179 


20 


So. 


Hagerstown, Md. 


55 


Teubner, Harold 


C 6-2 


210 


20 


Jr. 


Washington, D.C. 


63 


Tine, Chuck 


G 6-1 


220 


20 


Jr. 


Belair, Md. 


22 


Torain, Ernie 


FB 


5-9 


200 


20 


Jr. 


Baltimore, Md. 


70 


Trachy, John 


DT 


6-1 


230 


21 


Sr. 


Sparta, N.J. 


45 


Van Heusen, Billy 


HB 


6-1 


198 


20 


Jr. 


Mamaroneck, N.Y. 


51 


Vince, Larry 


C 


6-0 


210 


19 


So. 


Brownsville, Pa. 


67 


Vucin, Milan 


G 5-10 


200 


21 


Sr. 


Pennsbury, Pa. 


75 


York, Bob 


DT 


6-0 


225 


21 


Sr. 


Silver Springs, Md. 



27 



PROBABLE DEPTH CHART 



(Lettermen in CAPS) 



OFFENSIVE 



SE— MYRTLE, Carlson 

LT— CICHOWSKI, Kane 

LG— TINE, Leckie 

C— SIMOLDONI, Vince 

RG — GUNDERMAN, GAWLICK 

RT — Aquilina, Battaglia 

RE— ABSHER, BELL 

QB— PETRY, PASTRANA 

HB— VAN HEUSEN, TORAIN 

FLA— COLLINS, Pearson 

FB— MARCINIAK, LOVETT 



DEFENSIVE 



LE— MYSLINSKI, Hoffman 

LLB— McQUEEN, Hoch 

LT— TRACHY, Chappell 

RLB— BRZOSTOWSKI, NALEWAK 

RT— Defino, YORK 

RE— Bach, Plevin 

MLB— LAVRUSKY, BAKER 

LCB— COOPER, Mortensen 

RCB— SANTY, Colbert 

S— STICKEL, Acton 

S — Hetrick, Brant 



NUMERICAL ROSTER 



3 Bramson, Bernardo 


39 




68 


Leckie, Bob 


10 Faries, Bob 


40 


Acton, Jim 


69 


Brady, Don 


12 Pastrana, Alan 


41 


Stickel, Lou 


70 


Trachy, John 


16 Petry, Phil 


44 


Donofrio, Ralph 


71 


Aquilina, Ben 


17 Stofa, Dave 


45 


Van Heusen, Billy 


72 


Defino, Don 


19 Santy, Tony 


47 




73 


Chris Dill 


20 Lovett, Bill 


48 


Colbert, Bob 


74 


Battaglia, Sam 


21 Cooper, Fred 


49 




75 


York, Bob 


22 Torain, Ernie 


50 


Simoldoni, Joe 


76 


Rannels, Jim 


24 Haley, Bob 


51 


Vince, Larry 


77 


Myslinski, Tom 


25 Swartz, Gary 


52 


Lavrusky, Jim 


78 


Cichowski, Tom 


26 Hetrick, John 


53 


Baker, Pat 


79 


Gawlick, Fred 


27 Mortensen, Carl 


54 


Hoch, Mike 


80 


Plevin, Tom 


28 Brant, Mike 


55 


Teubner, Harold 


81 


Myrtle, Chip 


29 Collins, Bobby 


57 


Brzostowski, Art 


82 


Absher, Dick 


30 


58 


Bilancioni, Bert 


83 


Carlson, Rick 


31 


59 




84 


Bach, Bill 


32 


60 


McQueen, Lorie 


85 


Hoffman, Charles 


33 Lee, Alvin 


62 


Kane, Ed 


86 


Pearson, Ron 


34 Marciniak, Walt 


63 


Tine, Chuck 


87 


Bell, Karl 


35 


64 


Gunderman, Ed 


89 


Bracken, Lou 


36 Nalewak, Ron 


65 


Miloszewski, John 






37 McQuown, Wymard 


66 


Grace, Mike 






38 


67 


Vucin, Milan 







PRONUNCIATION CHART 



Aquilina — Ak-WA-LEEN-a 
Battaglia — Ba-TAG-li-a 
Bilancioni — Ba-LANCE-e-oni 
Brzostowski — Bra-TOW-ski 
Cichowski — Sh-KOW-ski 
Defino — Da-FEEN-o 
Donofrio — Don-AH-free-o 
Friedgen — FRIDG-en 
McQuown — Mack-YOU-an 
Marciniak — MAR-SIN-i-ak 



Miloszewski — MILLO-SHEW-ski 
Myslinski — Miss-lin-ski 
Pastrana — ■ Pas-tran-a 
Petry — PEE-tree 
Simoldoni — SIM-ol-doan-i 
Sinibaldi — SIN-a-bal-di 
Stofa — STO-fa 
Trachy — TRASH-y 
Vucin — VU-sin 



28 



INTERPRETING THE TERPS 
Offensive Squad 

The Quarterbacks 

Overall: Two lettermen, but only one with QB experience. Five soph 
hopefuls, none of whom were too impressive during spring workouts. 
Team's chances depend on the one veteran (a senior) regaining his 
sophomore form. 



NO. 16 PHIL PETRY (PEA-tree), 20, Sen- 
ior, 6-0, 198, Hagerstown, Md. — The only ex- 
perienced passer on the squad . . . was best 
of five quarterbacks used last season, but was 
inconsistent . . . could be the difference be- 
tween a winning and so-so season . . . earned 
letters as soph and junior . . . can throw the 
"bomb" as well as the short ones. His two- 
year record: 

Rushing Passing 

Att. Gain Avg. Att. Comp. int. Yds TD Avg 

1964 93 233 2.5 162 73 7 809 5 45.0 

1965 43 71 1.6 135 65 9 763 3 48.1 



Totals 136 304 2.2 297 138 16 1572 8 46.4 





NO. 12 ALAN PASTRANA, 21, Junior, 5-11, 
190, Annapolis, Md. — A fine all-around athlete 
and student . . . was a high school quarterback 
but played on Maryland's defensive unit as a 
soph and lettered . . . necessity forced his 
transfer to offense and he was No. 1 QB at 
end of spring drills . . . untried and inexperi- 
enced, but a gutty player with a lot of heart 
... a good runner but only adequate passer 
. . . played and lettered in lacrosse after spring 
drills, making the all-America stick team. 



NO. 17 DAVE STOFA, 20, Junior, 6-2, 197, Johnstown, Pa. — Although 
tried as quarterback during last half of 1965 season, did not see action 
. . . was a great high school quarterback and played in Pennsylvania's 
Big 33 game . . . has strong arm but needs experience. 



Other QBS: No. 10 Bob Faries, 19, Soph, 6-0, 183, Glenolden, Pa. 
Tom Burger, 20, Soph, 5-10, 175, Lancaster, Pa. 
Ralph Friedgen, 19, 5-11, 198, Harrison, N.Y. 
Ron Maleta, 19, Soph, 6-1, 194, Redstone, Pa. 



29 



The Halfbacks 

Overall: Three lettermen including the team's leading pass-receiver 
last year. Good reserve strength. 




NO. 22 ERNIE TORAIN, 20, Junior, 5-9, 200, 
Baltimore, Md. — was Maryland's leading 
ground-gainer last year as soph with 370 yards 
(4.0 avg.) . . . assumed No. 1 halfback spot in 
spring drills when Van Heusen was hurt and 
could open at that spot ... a strong runner 
with good speed and agility to go with his 
strength . . . has good hands and was on re- 
ceiving end of eight passes last year . . . was 
one of four who scored two touchdowns. 



NO. 29 BOBBY COLLINS, 21, Senior, 5-9, 
175, Willingboro, N.J. — ■ Last year's leading 
touchdown-maker (4) and pass-receiver (25 
for 462 yards, three touchdowns — second best 
in ACC) . . . will be the No. 1 flanker as sea- 
son opens and should be an outstanding re- 
ceiver under new coach's pro-style attack . . . 
hampered by injuries most of spring but ex- 
pected to be sound in September . . . one of 
smallest, but most valuable members of squad. 





NO. 45 BILLY VAN HEUSEN, 20, Junior, 
6-0, 200, Mamaroneck, N.Y. — Relieved of the 
quarterbacking duties saddled on him as a 
soph, this young man could develop into the 
No. 1 ballcarrier providing his knee, operated 
on last spring, holds up . . . could also be used 
as flanker or split end . . . has the size, speed 
and good hands necessary. 



NO. 20 BILL LOVETT, 19, Soph, 5-10, 200, 
Cherry Hill, N.J. — Next to Marciniak, the 
best blocker on the squad and could move to 
fullback ... a most promising soph who is a 
good runner, shifty and strong . . . was the 
frosh's second leading ball-carrier last year 
(328 yards on 67 carries, 4.9 avg.), third lead- 
ing pass-receiver (9 for 91 yards), punted 
three times for 33.3 yard average and scored 
five touchdowns. 




30 



Other Halfbacks: 

No. 33 ALVIN "SKIP" LEE, 20, Junior, 5-10, 190, Baltimore, Md. 

No. 42 BILL DORSETT, 20, Junior, 6-1, 190, Port Chester, N.Y. 



The Fullbacks 

Overall: Two lettermen, one of whom has been team's No. 2 ground- 
gainer the last two years. Not much depth here. 



No, 34 WALTER "WHITEY" MARCINIAK 
(MAR-SIN-e-ak), 21, 5-11, 220, Old Forge, Pa. 
— One of Maryland's finest all-around backs 
... as good a pass-protector as you'll find and 
an excellent blocker on all occasions . . . can 
also carry the mail as well and shared the bulk 
of the ball-carrying last' year with Torain, 
finishing with 310 yards (4-yard average) . . . 
it was the second year he finished as the 
team's No. 2 ground-gainer (had 440 yards as 
soph for same average). 




No. 37 WYMARD "BUTCH" McQUOWN (Mack-YOU-an), 21, Senior, 
6-0, 205, Bethesda, Md. — Undoubtedly will alternate with Marciniak as 
ball-carrier . . . gained 70 yards on 30 rushes last year and could come 
into his own as a senior. 




The Kicking Specialist 

No. 3 BERNARDO BRAMSON, 21, Senior 
5-8, 195, Santiago, Chile — "The toe" who has 
established career scoring records for Mary- 
land kickers during his first two years . . . 
his 80 points (via PATs and FGs) exceeds by 
seven the all-time mark formerly held by Don 
Decker of the 1951-'52 teams . . . his nine field 
goals of 1964 stand as an ACC record . . . Bern- 
ardo's 16 field goals in two seasons also is a 
record for Maryland boosters. One big change 
for Bernardo this year: he will NOT change 
his jersey number with every point he kicks, 
but wear the same jersey (with shoulder and 
hip pads!) throughout the season . . . Born in 
Washington, D.C. His longest field goal: 43 
yds. against Ohio U. Sept. 25, 1965. 



31 



The Ends 

Overall: Two fine seniors, a big letterman junior and a promising soph. 




NO. 82 DICK ABSHER, 21, Senior, 6-5, 230, 
Camp Springs, Md. — One of Maryland's fin- 
est ends in years who undoubtedly will be high 
in the pro draft . . . also one of finest tight 
ends in the conference . . . led team in pass- 
receiving as soph (22 for 268 yards, 1 TD) and 
was second only to Bobby Collins last year (33 
for 382, 1 TD) ... in addition, is a strong 
blocker . . . although completing his junior 
year, went through spring drills with all the 
enthusiasm of a rookie ... an outstanding boy 
personally. His 2-year record: 





Pass-Receiving 




Avg. 






No. 


Yds. 


Gain 


TDs 


1964 


22 


268 


12.2 


1 


1965 


33 


382 


11.6 


1 


Totals 


55 


650 


12.0 


2 



NO. 81 CHIP MYRTLE, 21, Senior, 6-3, 205, 
Hyattsville, Md. — Maryland's split end who, 
like his classmate Absher, has held the position 
ever since his sophomore year (although often 
used as a wingback as a soph) . . . has the size, 
moves and speed of a fine split end and al- 
though hampered by injuries last spring, the 
coaches know what he can do. His 2-year rec- 
ord: 

Pass-Receiving Avg. 

No. Yds. Gain TDs 

1964 13 190 14.6 1 

1965 3 31 10.3 
Totals 16 221 13.8 1 





NO. 83 RICK CARLSON, 19, Soph, 6-2, 205, 
Willingboro, N.J. — Another nicely-built lad 
who had a good spring after leading the fresh- 
men in pass-receiving last fall (14 caught for 
210 yards, 1 touchdown) ... a strong conten- 
der for the team's No. 1 punter (averaged 36.6 
yards as a Baby Terp) . . . also a fine kickoff 
booter . . . reminds many of Gary Collins, the 
Terps' all-America now with the Cleveland 
Browns. 



32 




NO. 87 KARL BELL, 19, Junior, 6-4, 230, 
Eastern, Pa. — The Absher type — big, strong, 
with exceptional speed ... an above-average 
receiver who moves well for a man of his size 
. . . will be more than a capable replacement 
although he could play another position . . . 
coaches anxious to capitalize on his versatile 
talents. 



Other ends: 

No. 89 LOU BRACKEN, 19, Soph, 6-1, Altoona, Pa. 

No. 58 BERT BILANCIONI, 21, Senior, 6-0, 210, Wilmington, Del 

DAVE HILSINGER, 20, Soph, 6-0, 210, Harrisburg, Pa. 

The Tackles 

Overall: Senior letterman, non-lettering junior on first unit; junior 
letterman and soph on second. Plenty of size, some development neces- 
sary. 



NO. 78 TOM CICHOWSKI (Sh-KOW-ski), 
22, Senior, 6-4, 230, Southington, Conn. — The 
second draft choice of the Green Bay Packers 
last Winter . . . big and strong ... a fine 
college tackle with great potential for the pro 
ranks . . . another Walter Rock, Roger Shoals 
type. 




NO. 71 BEN AQUILINA (Ak-WA-LEEN-a), 
21, Senior, 6-3, 235, Roselle Park, N.J. — 
Plagued by injuries his first two years, just 
began to show the ability during spring drills 
that the coaches always had suspected . . . 
should develop into real outstanding lineman, 
one of the best in the conference . . . has the 
size, speed and everything it takes. 



NO. 79 FRED GAWLICK, 19, Junior, 6-3, 235, Irvington, N.J. — A 
former fullback and linebacker, moved to offensive tackle only the last 
week of spring practice . . . fine potential, needs only to acclimate him- 
self to job . . . has the size but must develop. 

NO. 74 SAM BATTAGLIA (Ba-TAG-li-a), 19, Soph, 6-3, 225, Nutley, 
N.J. — Injuries forced his red-shirting last year . . . started to come into 
his own during spring drills . . . should develop into a good college tackle. 




NO. 65 JOHN MILOSZEWSKI (MILLO-shev-ski), 19, Soph, 6-2, 228, 
Beaver Falls, Pa. — Can play either offensive or defensive tackle . . . 
an all Big 33 performer . . . tremendous potential and an outstanding 
career is anticipated for him ... if knee is completely healed from spring 
operation will play a lot of football. 

NO. 73 CHRIS DILL, 21, Junior, 6-1, 215, Washington, D.C. — Earned 
letter as soph, good, hard worker who always gives his best ... a bit 
small for this conference. 

Other tackles: 

JAMES RANNELS, NO. 76, 21, Senior, 6-0, 210, Ellicott City, Md. 

MIKE GALLOWAY, 19, Soph, 6-1, 208, Finksburg, Md. 

The Guards 

Overall: Three lettermen, one non-lettering junior on first two units. 




NO. 63 CHARLES "CHUCK" TINE, 20, Jun- 
ior, 6-1, 220, Belair, Md. — Just coming into 
his own . . . could be one of the outstanding 
linemen of the East as well as the ACC . . . 
one Maryland line coach calls him one of best 
in country . . . has size, speed and great de- 
sire. 



NO. 64 ED GUNDERMAN, 19, Junior, 5-11, 
215, Franklin, N.J. — Although spent only last 
two weeks of spring drills at guard, shows, 
like Tine, a lot of potential and could be one 
of the top-flight guards of the area ... a for- 
mer linebacker, has to learn new position but 
should be a fine one by the end of the first 
third of the season. 




NO. 68 BOB LECKIE, 21, Junior, 6-1, 210, Hasbrouck Heights, N.J.— 
Gives 100 percent all the time although ability is limited ... a good, 
steady hard worker . . . reliable. 



34 



NO. 67 MILAN VUCIN (VU-sin), 21, 5-10, 
200, Pennsbury, Pa. — Another hard-nosed hard 
worker who makes up in spirit what he lacks 
in ability . . . earned letters as soph and jun- 
ior and can be relied upon to do good job. 




NO. 62 ED KANE, 18, Soph, 6-2, 200, Levittown, N.Y. — Recruited as 
a defensive tackle, could be moved to this position ... a youngster who 
shows signs of playing a lot of football . . . should develop into a fine 
lineman . . . was High School all-America selection. 



The Centers 

Overall: One letterman (a senior), one non-lettering junior, one soph. 



NO. 50 JOE SIMOLDONI, 21, Senior, 5-11, 
215, Garfield, N.J. — A good average college 
center . . . steady, dependable in playing an 
important job . . . probably will be the least- 
recognized of any lineman, but reliable and 
gets the job done. 



NO. 51 LARRY VINCE, 19, Soph, 6-0, 210, Brownsville, Pa. — Mech- 
anically, looks like fine center, which he was in high school . . . needs 
experience and could develop into a good one. 

NO. 69 HAROLD TEUBNER, 20, Junior, 6-2, 210, Washington, D.C. — 
An all-county, all-suburban all-metropolitan center with Surrattsville 
(Md.) High. 




35 




Defensive Squad 

The Ends 

Overall: Only one letterman, but good size among upcoming sophs, 
three of whom were on first two units during spring drills. Oddity: Three 
of four from N.Y. State. 



NO. 77 TOM MYSLINSKI (Miss-lin-ski) 20, 
Junior, 6-1, 230, Rome, N.Y. — A tough aggres- 
sive and promising junior . . . rough on oppos- 
ing passers whom he likes to rush ... a na- 
tural leader, highly-respected by his team- 
mates ... a first team offensive guard last 
year but moved to defensive line which need- 
ed help. 



NO. 84 BILL BACH, 19, Soph, 6-4, 235, Mam- 
arcneck, N.Y. — Young and inexperienced but 
very aggressive and eager to learn . . . should 
develop into one of the best with his size . . . 
was best of three sophs after first unit post. 



NO. 85 CHARLES HOFFMAN, 19, Soph, 6-3, 245, Mamaroneck, N.Y. 
- Tall enough to carry all that weight . . . another promising first-year 
man who could develop into one of the fine ones. 

NO. 80 TOM PLEVIN, 19, Soph, 6-1, 2-5, Uniontown, Pa. — Tough and 
aggressive but lack of speed could hinder him. 

Other ends: 

NO. 62 ED KANE, 6-2, 200, Soph, Levittown, N.Y. 

The Tackles 

Overall: Two seniors and two juniors, three of whom have lettered. 
Average weight between 225-230. Few reserves. 





NO. 70 JOHN TRACHY (TRASH-y), 21, 
Senior, 6-1, 230, Sparta, N.J. — The most ex- 
perienced man on the defensive line . . . espe- 
cially tough, likes to mix it . . . experience 
will carry him a long way . . . will be after his 
third letter. 



36 



NO. 72 DON DEFINO (Da-FEEN-o), 20, 
Junior, 6-0, 225, Grindstone, Pa. — Out of 
school last year but showed enough in spring 
drills to oust a senior letterman from first- 
string berth . . . big, strong and tough . . . 
follows in footsteps of other Western Pennsyl- 
vania linemen. 





NO. 76 BOB YORK, 21, Senior, 6-0, 225, Sil- 
ver Spring, Md. — Can play either tackle and 
probably will be used as first-string reserve 
... a real fireball, holler-type guy who was 
going well last year until hurt in mid-season. 



The Linebackers 

Overall: Seven lettermen, two non-lettering juniors and a soph com- 
prise the first two units of linebackers. Speed and coverage only fair. 



NO. 60 LOME McQUEEN, 23, Senior, 6-0, 
215, Weirton, W. Va. — A two-letterman who 
has been a bulwark as linebacker the past two 
years . . . hampered by injuries during spring 
but expected to be ready. 





NO. 57 ART BRZOSTOWSKI (Bra-TOW- 
ski), 20, Junior, 6-0, 215, Bayonne, N.J. — An 
outstanding tackle with good speed . . . showed 
more improvement than anyone in spring drills 
and beat out a two-letterman senior for first- 
team berth. 



37 




NO. 52 JIM LAVRUSKY, 19, Junior, 6-0, 
210, Monaca, Pa. — The No. 1 linebacker . . . 
although blessed with only average speed, uses 
his head and does a fine job on pass defense 
... a real leader who calls the defensive 
signals. 



NO. 21 FRED COOPER, 21, Senior, 6-0, 180, 
Carnegie, Pa. -- Considered the squad's best 
overall defensive back . . . has excellent speed 
and covers enemy receivers well . . . looked 
to for leadership by the deep defensive backs. 
Used briefly as quarterback last season, but 
returns to his first love — defense. 





NO. 19, TONY SANTY, 22, Junior, 6-3, 195, 
Plainfield, N.J. — His work during spring drills 
won him starting role ... a dedicated player 
with height and speed . . . has wide range of 
coverage in defensive secondary . . . aggres- 
sive and versatile, can play corner or safety 



NO. 54 MIKE HOCH, 20, Junior, 5-11, 205, Salisbury, Md. — Does good 
job on pass defense . . . has improved consistently and will see a lot of 
action. 

NO. 36 RON NALEWAK, (NAL-i-wok), 21, 
Senior, 6-1, 215, Shamokin, Pa. — Injuries 
hampered him during spring and cost him job 
on No. 1 unit ... if he recovers last year's 
year's form could regain a starting berth . . . 
big and rough and extremely valuable. 






NO. 53 PAT BAKER, 21, Junior, 5-11, 195, 
Altoona, Pa. — A great hustler and good hit- 
ter . . . small, but tough . . . lettered last year 
as a soph. 

38 



NO. 44 RALPH DONOFRIO (Da-NOFF-ree-o), 20, Junior, 5-11, 
193, Wilmington, Del. — An experienced defensive back whose only weak- 
ness is lack of speed . . . should play a lot this fall because of his alert- 
ness and mental discipline. 

NO. 58 BOB COLBERT, 19, Soph, 180, Pittsburgh, Pa. — Has good 
speed and agility, enabling him to cover wide receivers well . . . needs 
work on keying and reading . . . eventually should become a fine de- 
fensive back. 

Safeties 

Overall: Three juniors and a most promising soph. Only one of juniors 
lettered in '65. 



NO. 41 — LOU STICKEL, 19, Junior, 5-11, 
195, Riverdale, N.J. — A good, hard-nosed foot- 
ball player who is one of -most vicious and sure 
tackles on the squad . . . real strong . . . did 
fine job in adapting to onside safety in spring 
drills. 





NO. 26 JOHN HETRICK, 19, Soph, 5-11, 
195, Hershey, Pa. -- The real "find" of the 
spring . . . converted from an offensive full- 
back who had led last year's frosh with 528 
yards rushing, eight touchdowns into a safety 
back and was on the No. 1 unit at end of the 
spring ... a fine, all-around athlete who 
should become one of the best. 



NO. 40, JIM ACTON, 19, Junior, 5-11, 185, 
Hyattsville, Md. — Was pushing Stickel for a 
starting berth as spring drills ended ... a solid 
defensive safety, although lacking speed neces- 
sary for a corner back . . . another hard-nosed 
player. 



NO. 27 CARL MORTENSON, 20, Junior, 5-11, 192, Lodi, N.J. — Can 
play either corner back or safety . . . the fifth man of the defensive 
perimeter and probably the first reserve who will see action. 




39 



1966 FRESHMEN DATA 
Schedule and Roster 

COACH: CHUCK JERASA (Northwestern '58) 
The Schedule 



Date 


Opponent 




Site 


Time 


September 30 Geor 


ge Washington 




Home 3 p.m. 


October 14 Ba 


inbridge Naval 




Home 3 p.m. 


October 21 


Virginia Tech 




Home 3 p.m. 


October 28 


Virginia 




Charlottesville, Va. 




The Roster 








ENDS 








Hgt 


Wgt 




Hometown 


Benedetti, John 


61 


195 




Hudson, Pa. 


Brannon, James 


6-4 


200 




Cumberland, Md. 


Gareis, Henry 


6-2 


205 




Baltimore, Md. 


Grant, William 


6-2 


180 




Brooklawn, N.J. 


Kirschensteiner, Bill 


6-3 


230 




Willowick, Ohio 


Kubany, Glenn 


6-4 


215 




Natrona Heights, Pa. 




TACKLES 






Hennessy, James 


6-3 


215 




New Rochelle, N.Y. 


Marsch, John 


6-3 


205 




Gahanna, Ohio 


Mitchell, Franklin 


6-4 


255 




Baltimore, Md. 


Olecki, Bruce 


6-2 


245 




Lakewood, Ohio 


Sabol, John 


6-4 


230 




Monessen, Pa. 


Somaine, Joseph 


6-4 


245 




Willingboro, N.J. 


Sonntag, Ralph 


6-4 


245 




Hicksville, L.I., N.Y. 


Stec, Blase 


6-1 


230 




Pennville, N.J. 




CENTERS 






Newby, Tom 


6-2 


220 




Mercersburg, Pa. 


Stubljar, Mike 


6-0 


215 




Steelton, Pa. 


Stull, James 


6-3 


220 




Mechanicsburg, Pa. 




QUARTERBACKS 




Drimal, Charles 


6-2 


190 




Valley Stream, N.Y. 


Gough, Mike 


6-1 


180 




Gaithersburg, Md. 


Sniscak, James 


6-1 


185 




Middletown, Pa. 


Tomcho, Joe 


6-1 


190 




Allentown, Pa. 




HALFBACKS 






Ciambor, Stephen 


5-11 


190 




Buffalo, N.Y. 


Dorsett, William 


6-1 


195 




Port Chester, N.Y. 


Dutton, Kenneth 


5-10 


180 




Baltimore, Md. 


Gillespie, William 


5-9 


170 




Maple Heights, Ohio 


Pancza, Joe 


5-10 


175 




Highland Park, N.Y. 


Sauritch, John 


5-10 


190 




Charleroi, Pa. 




FULLBACKS 






Gebhardt, John 


5-11 


215 




Lancaster, N.Y. 


Labetz, Joesph 


6-0 


215 




Manville, N.J. 




LINEBACKERS 




Bowman, Charles 


6-2 


220 




No. Babylon, N.Y. 


Kecman, Dan 


6-0 


210 




W. Mifflin, Pa. 


MacBride, Bob 


6-1 


210 




Oaklyn, N.J. 


Swan, Donald 


6-1 


210 




Ocean City, N.J. 


Thieme, Richard 


6-2 


215 




Stamford, Conn. 


Yakapovich, Paul 


5-11 


200 




Kenmore, N.Y. 



40 



FRESHMAN FOOTBALL STATISTICS FOR 1965 



RECORD: 3-1-1 



TEAM STATISTICS 



RESULTS 



Md. 






Opp. 


Tied 8 


V.P.I. 


Frosh 8 (Away) 










Won 43 


G.W. ] 


FYosh 14 (Home) 


115 


Total Points 




58 


Won 40 


Bainbridge 7 (Away) 


87 


Total first downs 




59 


Won 16 


Virginia Frosh 7 (Home) 


49 


Rushing 




31 


Lost 8 


Navy Plebes 21 (Away) 


31 


Passing 




24 










7 


Penalties 




4 










1066 


Net Yds. Rushing 




459 


INDIVIDUAL PASSING 




673 


Net Yds. Passing 




603 




Att. 


Comp. Int. Yds. Pet. 


TD 


1739 


Total Yds. Offense 




1062 


















Faries 


79 


47 5 605 59.5 


1 


87 


Passes Attempted 




107 


Friedgen 


7 


3 1 68 42.7 


1 


51 


Passes Completed 




44 


Hetrick 


1 


1 11 100.0 





6 


Passes had Intcptd. 




12 










58.5 


Passing Percentage 




41.2 










21 


Number of Punts 




26 




PASS 


RECEIVING 




36.3 


Avg. Yd. of Punts 




34.9 










10 


Own Fumbles lost 




7 




No 


Yds. Avg. Gain 


TD 


36-383 


Penalties-Yds. lost 




26-280 


Carlson 


14 


210 16.0 


1 










Renzi 


12 


245 20.4 













Lovett 


9 


91 10.1 













Hetrick 


9 


52 4.7 













Pearson 


4 


25 6 2 













Demczuk 


1 


26 26.0 





INDIVIDUAL RUSHING 




Robinson 
Faries 


1 
1 


13 13.0 
11 11.0 












Avg. 












Att. 


Yds. 


Gain 










Hetrick 


98 


528 


5.4 




INTERCE i 




L&vett 


67 


328 


4.9 










Fa ries 


41 


156 


3.8 






No. 




Friedgen 10 


19 


1.9 










Haley 


13 


21 


16 


Haley 




3 




Renzi 


4 


9 


2.2i 


Colbert 




3 




Sullivan 


L 4 


8 


2.0 


Sullivan 




2 




Robinson 1 


-3 


-3.0 


Robinson 




1 





Carlson 
Lovett 



PUNTING 

No. 

18 

3 



Yds. 

662 

101 



Avg. 
36.6 
33.3 



KICKOFF RETURNS 





No. 


Yds. 


Avg. 


Colbert 


5 


47 


9.4 


Renzi 


3 


55 


18.3 


Carlson 


1 


8 


8.0 


Hetrick 


3 


22 


7.3 





SCORING 








PUNT RETURNS 




Hetrick 
Lovett 
Carlson 
Faries 


TD's 

8 
5 

1 
2 


PAT's 

8 

9 

2 


Points 
56 
30 
15 

14 


Hetrick 

Renzi 

Haley 


No. Yds. 

10 66 

1 12 

1 4 


Avg. 

6.6 
12.0 

4.0 



41 



TERP OPPONENTS 
The Nittany Lions' 1966 Outlook 

By JIM TARMAN 
Sports Information Director 

1966 could be called the year of the sophomore at Perm State. 

The Nittany Lions' two-deep at the end of spring practice listed 17 
sophomores — 11 on offense and six on defense — with at last six of this 
number slated for starting assignments. Despite the fact that these are 
sophomores with unusual ability, it's understandable that Joe Paterno 
is apprehensive, especially about his offense, as he faces a rugged sched- 
ule in his first season as head coach. 

"From the standpoint of enthusiasm and morale we had a fine spring 
practice", Paterno said. "Our players were spirited, aggressive and really- 
wanted to hit. They believe in themselves. But we're playing so many 
inexperienced people against tough opponents that I just don't see how 
we can be really outstanding offensively — at least early in the season. 
No matter how willing and able sophomores are, they do make mistakes. 
Defensively, we hope to be strong right from the start". 

The defense, the first unit defense, was the strong point of spring 
drills. Only end remains a question mark where Paterno will go with 
non-lettered senior Bill Morgan and sophomore Tim Horst. Both had 
good springs. Sophomore middle guard Mike Reid and tackles Dave Rowe 
and Mike McBalh should be the equal of any middle-three anywhere. 
Two pre-spring problems — linebacking and the defensive secondary — 
appear to be solved. Jim McCormick, the most improved player in spring 
drills, teams up with veterans John Runnells and Jim Litterelle in the 
linebacking department. Paterno rebuilt his entire secondary, moving 
versatile Mike Irwin and Tom Sherman to the halfback positions and 
installing erstwhile offensive halfback Tim Montgomery at safety. The 
big worry on defense is depth. In the spring Paterno's second string backs 
ran and scored almost at will against the defensive reserves. 

Offensively, spring drills ended as they began — "pretty much up in the 
air". The quarter-backing should be adequate, although Jack White, last 
year's No. 1 man, did not have an impressive spring. Perhaps it was be- 
cause this was his fourth spring practice and after a while spring prac- 
tices can become pretty deadly, perhaps it was because he was hamper- 
ed part of the time by leg muscle problems, or perhaps it was because 
he missed time taking dental school exams. Paterno hopes so. Paterno's 
big worry is the offensive line where center Bill Lenkaitis is the only 
blocker who compares with any of the graduated standouts from last 
year's excellent line. Depth is even a bigger problem here than on de- 
fense. "We're struggling right now just to put together one offensive 
line", Paterno says, "so it's obvious we don't have any depth". 

Summed up: Until (and if) the offensive line shapes up, until the new 
halfbacks gain experience and learn how to block, until (and if) tailback 
Roger Grimes recovers completely from knee surgery which forced him 
to miss spring drills, it looks as though State will have to depend on its 
defense to keep it close in early season games. 



42 



MARYLAND vs. PENK STATE September 17 

1:30 P.M. (EDT) 

At Beaver Stadium (46,284) 

University Park, Pa. 

FACTS ABOUT THE NITTANY LIONS 

CONFERENCE: Independent 

LOCATION: University Park, Pa. 

ATHLETIC DIRECTOR: Ernest B. McCoy 

HEAD COACH: Joseph V. Paterno (Brown '50) 

ASSISTANT COACHES: Earl Bruce, Frank Pat- 
rick, George Welsh, Bob Phillips, J. T. White, 
Dan Radakovich, Joe McMullen, Jim O'Hora 

COLORS: Blue and White 

ENROLLMENT: 20,000 

TYPE OFFENSE: I with variations 

1965 OVERALL RECORDS: Won 5, Lost 5 

SPORTS INFORMATION DIRECTOR: James I. Tarman 

Telephones: Office — Area 814, 865-7517. Home — Area 814, 466-6852 

LETTERMEN RETURNING: 14, Lost 20 




Joseph V. Paterno 



TERPS' RECORD AGAINST THE LIONS 

(Maryland: Won 1, Lost 11) 



1965— Penn State, 19; Md. 7 
1964— Penn State, 17; Md., 9 
1963— Penn State, 17; Md., 15 
1962— Penn State, 23; Md., 7 
1961— Md., 21; Penn State, 17 
1960— Penn State, 28; Md., 9 



1944— Penn State, 34; Md., 19 
1943— Penn State, 45; Md., 
1939— Penn State, 12; Md., 
1938— Penn State, 33; Md., 
1937— Penn State, 21; Md., 14 
1917— Penn State, 57; Md.. 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 86, Penn State 323 
1966 CAPTAIN: (To Be Named) 
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 15. Lost 22 





1966 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


17 


MARYLAND 


Sept. 


24 


At Michigan State 


Oct. 


1 


At Army 


Oct. 


8 


Boston College 


Oct. 


15 


U.C.L.A. 


Oct. 


22 


At West Virginia 


Oct. 


29 


California 


Nov. 


5 


Syracuse 


Nov. 


12 


At Georgia Tech 


Nov. 


19 


At Pittsburgh 



1965 YARDSTICK 

(At College Park, Md. — 24,000) 

Md. Penn St. 

First downs 17 16 

Rushing yardage 100 352 

Passing yardage 165 33 

Passes 18-35 3-13 

Passes intercepted by .... 1 2 

Punts-avg. yardage 4-33.0 6-38.1 

Own fumbles lost 3 1 

Yards penalized 8 82.5 

Penn State 7 6 6 — 19 

Maryland 7—7 

SCORING: PS — McNaughton, 5 
run (Sherman PAT), Irwin, 65 run 
with recovered fumble; Nye, 8 run 
Md. — Springer, 29, pass from Cor- 
coran (Bramson PAT). 



43 



The Deacons' 1966 Outlook 

By MARVIN "SKEETER" FRANCIS 
Sports Information Director 

All indications are that Wake Forest will have a much improved foot- 
ball squad for the 1966 campaign. There appears to be a little more of 
everything. More individual size, better depth and strength at nearly 
every position and better overall speed and quickness. 

The rising group of sophomores is one of the best Deacons have had 
in quite some time, and Coach Bill Tate, in his third season, figures a 
first division berth in the ACC is a realistic goal. The Deacs were last 
in 1965 with a 1-5 record (3-7 overall) after going 5-5 in 1964. 

There are 19 lettermen available, but two of those were moved to new 
positions in spring drills. Lynn Nesbitt, a good lineman who should have 
a great year, was moved from guard to tackle while last year's starting 
quarterback, Kenny Hausewald, looks like the starter at fullback. 

Jon Wilson, who replaced Hausewald midway last season and guided 
the Deacs to two of their three wins, was battling Ken Erickson and Ed 
Atkinson for the signal-calling assignment throughout spring drills. Tate 
says the competition was so close that it will be difficult to select the 
starter until the pre-season fall practices. 

Andy Heck, last year's top ground-gainer as a fullback and halfback, 
and soph Jimmy (The Jet) Johnson, who packs good speed and power, 
appear to be the starting halfbacks. 

The forward wall will be better both offensively and defensively. There 
are 14 lettermen in the line, including five ends, three tackles, two 
guards, two centers and two linebackers. 

"If our young players do the job we expect of them it could be an 
interesting season", Tate says. 



44 



MARYLAND vs. WAKE FOREST September 24 



2:00 P.M. (EDT) 

At Byrd Stadium (35,000) 

College Park, Md. 

FACTS ABOUT THE DEACONS 

CONFERENCE: Atlantic Coast 
LOCATION: Winston-Salem, N.C. 
ATHLETIC DIRECTOR: Dr. Gene Hooks 
HEAD COACH: Bill Tate (Illinois '53) 
ASSISTANT COACHES: Dick Anderson, Bill 

Davis, Beattie Feathers, Ken Karr, Bob Lord, 

Joe Madden, Joe Popp 
COLORS: Old Gold and Black 
ENROLLMENT: 2,996 
TYPE OFFENSE: Lonesome End with variations of "I" 
1965 OVERALL RECORD: Won 3, Lost 7 
1965 ACC RECORD: Won 1, Lost 5 

SPORTS INFORMATION DIRECTOR: Marvin (Skeeter) Francis 
Telephones: Office 919 — 725-9711, Ext. 412. Home 919 — 724-2585 




Bill Tate 



TERPS' RECORD AGAINST THE DEACONS 

(Maryland: Won 10, Lost 4, Tied 1) 



1965— Md., 10; Wake Forest, 7 
1964— Wake Forest 21; Md., 17 
1963— Md., 32; Wake Forest, 
1962— Md., 13; Wake Forest, 2 
1961— Md., 10; Wake Forest, 7 
1960— Md., 14; Wake Forest, 13 
1959— Wake Forest, 10; Md., 7 
1958— Wake Forest, 34; Md., 



1957— Md., 27; Wake Forest, 
1956— Md., 6; Wake Forest, 
1955— Md., 28; Wake Forest, 7 
1954— TIE, 13-13 
1944— Wake Forest, 39; Md., 
1943— Md., 13; Wake Forest, 7 
1917— Md., 29; Wake Forest, 13 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 219; Wake Forest 173 
1965 CAPTAINS : Will use game captains 
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 19, Lost 10 





1966 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


17 


At Virginia 


Sept. 


24 


AT MARYLAND 


Oct. 


1 


At N.C. State 


Oct. 


8 


At Auburn 


Oct. 


15 


At South Carolina 


Oct. 


22 


At North Carolina 


Oct. 


29 


Clemson 


Nov. 


5 


Virginia Tech 


Nov. 


12 


Memphis State 


Nov. 


19 


At Fla. State 



1965 YARDSTICK 

At Winstom-Salem (18,000) 

Maryland Wake 

First downs 15 12 

Rushing yardage 160 95 

Passing yardage 149 79 

Passes 8-21 6-17 

Passes intercepted by .... 2 2 

Punts-avg. yardage 5-38.0 9-34.0 

Own fumbles lost 2 

Yards penalized 45 25 

Wake Forest 7 — 7 

Maryland 3 7 — 10 

SCORING: WF — Heck, 8 run (Mc- 
Kinney kick) ; Md. — Bramson, 30 FG. 
Md. — Torain. 16 run (Bramson kick). 



45 



The Orangemen's 1966 Outlook 

(As at the end of spring drills) 
(Note: Larry Kimball, SID, was not appointed at time this was written) 

Syracuse's football fortunes for 1966 are likely to hinge on Coach 
Schwartzwalder's ability to refurbish the offensive line and to toughen 
up the defense. All-America halfback Floyd Little and powerful fullback 
Larry Csonka head a cast of 23 returning lettermen that includes 15 who 
were offensive or defensive starters for a major portion of the '65 cam- 
paign. Some 20 lettermen were lost, including 10 who played leading 
roles last year. 

The Orange should be in good shape in the offensive backfield with 
Little, Csonka, quarterback Rick Cassata and right half Tom Coughlin, 
the quartet that started against Boston College in the '65 finale, all re- 
turning. Cassata finished the spring drills just about even with rookie 
Jim Del Gaizo, a southpaw who was the star of the varsity's 32-7 win 
over the alumns in their annual spring game, so there will be a real 
battle for the quarterback job. 

Up front, the losses are heavy: all-America center Pat Killorin, guards 
Howie McCard and Tony Scibelli and tackle Ray Paglio. The first three 
were two-year regulars. Rookie Dave Johnson, a 250-pounder, was shifted 
to left guard from defense and is the best bet to replace Paglio at out- 
side tackle. Inside tackle Harris Wienke returns as do ends Dick Towne 
and Ed Schreck. How well the new line does will be a key to SU success. 

Defensively, Schwartzwalder hopes Syracuse will be tougher. A 
healthy Herb Stecker, who missed most of '65 with a broken arm, will 
team with former linebacker Dave Casmay, former starter Bill Wosilius 
or retread Murray Johnson at the ends. Junior Dennis Fitzgibbons re- 
turns for one tackle and service returnee Dennis Meggyesy could be the 
other tackle. Middle guards John Krok and Chuck Light return. Terry 
Roe, the best linebacker, returns. Ditto Paul Nettelbladt and Jim Chey- 
unski, the other two starters at the end of '65. A strong spring practice 
hiked rookie Jerry Ruccio ahead of Nettelbladt while still another soph, 
Steve Zegalia, could be heard from. 

The defensive secondary could pose a problem. One starter, Ed Man- 
tie, a good one, returns. Juniors Bill Zanieski and Frank Parrish are 
the early bets to round out the three-deep but faster soph Tony Kyasky 
and rookie Cliff Ensley could be heard from. 

If Syracuse gets the blocking up front, a strong running game should 
be generated from the unbalanced line I-formation. Del Gaizo should 
help the passing attack which was lacking a year ago. Defensively, Steck- 
er's return should help, but there are many question marks. Defense 
looks like the major key. 



46 



MARYLAND vs. SYRACUSE October I 



1:30 P.M. (EDT) 

At Archbold Stadium (40,696) 

Syracuse, N.Y. 

FACTS ABOUT THE ORANGEMEN 

CONFERENCE: Independent 

LOCATION: Syracuse, N.Y. 

ATHLETIC DIRECTOR: James H. Decker 

HEAD COACH: Floyd (Ben) Schwartzwalder 

(West Virginia '33) 
ASSISTANT COACHES: Bill Bell, Roy Simmons, 

Rocco Pirro, Ted Dailey, Joe Szombathy, Jim 

Ridlon, Jim Shereve 
COLORS: Orange 
ENROLLMENT: 15,300 
TYPE OFFENSE: I and Wing-T 
1965 OVERALL RECORD: Won 7, Lost 3 
SPORTS INFORMATION DIRECTOR: Larry Kimball 
Telephone: Area Code 315, GRanite 6-5571, Ext. 2608 
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 23, Lost 20 
CAPTAIN: Floyd Little 




Floyd (Ben) 
Schwartzwalder 



TERPS' RECORD AGAINST THE ORANGE 

(Maryland Won 5, Lost 6, Tied 1) 



1965— Syracuse, 24; 
1961— Maryland, 22; 
1959— Syracuse, 29; 
1956— Syracuse, 26; 
1955— Maryland, 34; 
1939— Syracuse, 10; 



Maryland, 7 1938— Syracuse, 53; Maryland, 

Syracuse, 21 1937 — Maryland, 13; Syracuse, 

Maryland, 1936— Maryland, 20; Syracuse, 

Maryland, 12 1935— TIE, 0-0 

Syracuse, 13 1921 — Syracuse, 42; Maryland, 

Maryland, 7 1920 — Maryland, 10; Syracuse, 7 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 125, Syracuse 225 





1966 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


10 


At Baylor 


Sept. 


17 


Open date 


Sept. 


24 


U.C.L.A. 


Oct. 


1 


MARYLAND 


Oct. 


8 


Navy 


Oct. 


15 


At Boston College 


Oct. 


22 


At Holy Cross 


Oct. 


29 


Pittsburgh 


Nov. 


5 


At Penn State 


Nov. 


12 


Florida State 


Nov. 


19 


At West Virginia 



1965 YARDSTICK 

(At College Park, Md. — 35,000) 

Md. Syracuse 

First downs 14 14 

Rushing yardage 91 211 

Passing yardage 61 26 

Passes 9-25 5-8 

Passes intercepted by 2 

Punts-ave. yardage 8-40.1 8-36.5 

Own fumbles lost 1 1 

Yards penalized 76.5 87 

Syracuse 7 17 7 — 24 

Maryland 7 0—7 

SCORING: Syracuse-Little, 72 run 
(Holman PAT) ; Md-Torain, 19 run 
(Bramson PAT), Syracuse- Little, 2 run 
(Holman PAT); Holman, 24 FG; Little, 
9 run (Holman PAT). 



47 



The Blue Devils' 1966 Outlook 

By DICK BRUSIE 
Sports Information Director 

There will be a young, eager and bright newness about Duke football 
in 1966. This "new look" extends from the coaching staff, where en- 
ergetic Tom Harp is beginning his first season here, to the new multiple 
offensive formations featuring the Wing-T attack which proved to be so 
successful for Harp during his five seasons at Cornell. 

The second straight season of two-platoon football at Duke finds 33 
lettermen returning with veterans manning every key position except in 
the offensive line. Most of the players were trained during spring prac- 
tice to be skilled on both offense and defense. While Harp may use 
additional players both ways, at this writing only swift Andy Beath and 
rock-hard co-captain Bob Matheson are being groomed at two-way jobs. 
Beath, who earned his sophomore letter as a defensive halfback, may see 
action as a wing back or split end. Matheson, 6-3, 245-pound linebacker, 
has a brilliant two-year career — the first as a halfback — behind as 
he prepares for what should be his finest season. He's a solid bet for 
all-conference honors in addition to all-America plaudits. And the pros 
are mighty interested in him. 

The offense again will call on the power running of all-ACC fullback 
Jay Calabrese and halfbacks Jake Devonshire, Frank Ryan, Ken Chat- 
ham and Beath who impressed the coaches during spring drills. Ryan 
blossomed into a nifty runner late in the season while consistency mark- 
ed Chatham's performances. Devonshire was a regular until injured in 
the Rice game and sidelined for the season. 

Defensively, there are such familiar names as all-ACC defensive tackle 
Chuck Stevins ends Bruce Wissley and Roger Hayes, co-captain and 
safetyman Mike Shasby, middle guard Bob Foyle, defensive Robin Bod- 
kin and halfback Art Vann. 

Promising newcomers who crack the lineup include linebacker Glenn 
Newman, halfbacks Henley Carter and Ed Hicklin, middle guard J. B. 
Edwards, safety Larry Davis and halfback Mark Telge. 

Already the 1966 Blue Devils have become known as a team of "de- 
sire". And with multiple offensive formations planned to befuddle un- 
wary defenses, Harp's first Duke team may also become known as a 
team of "surprise". 



48 



MARYLAND vs. DUKE October 8 



2:00 P.M. (EDT) 

Byrd Stadium (35,000) 

College Park, Md. 

FACTS ABOUT THE BLUE DEVILS 

CONFERENCE: Atlantic Coast 

LOCATION: Durham, N.C. 

ATHLETIC DIRECTOR: Edmund M. Cameron 

HEAD COACH: Tom Harp (Muskingum '51) 

ASSISTANT COACHES: Herschel Caldwell, Bob 
Cox, Carmen Falcone, Harold McElhaney, 
George Hill. Jacque Hetrick, Sam Timer, Hal 
Hunter, Stan Crisson 

COLORS: Royal Blue and White 

ENROLLMENT: 6,400 

TYPE OFFENSE: Wing-T 

1965 OVERALL RECORD: Won 6, Lost 4 

1965 ACC RECORD: Won 4, Lost 2 

SPORTS INFORMATION DIRECTOR: Dick Brusie 

Telephones: Office, Area Code 919, 684-8111, Ext. 2633 

Code 919, 489-2122 




Tom Harp 



Home, Area 



TERPS' RECORD AGAINST THE BLUE DEVILS 

(Maryland Won 1, Lost 11) 



1964— Duke, 24; Maryland, 17 
1963— Duke, 30; Maryland, 12 
1962— Duke, 10; Maryland, 7 
1960— Duke, 20; Maryland, 7 
1957— Duke, 14; Maryland, 
1950— Maryland, 26; Duke, 14 



1948— Duke, 13; Maryland, 12 
1947— Duke, 19; Maryland, 7 
1942— Duke, 42; Maryland, 
1941— Duke, 50; Maryland, 
1933— Duke, 38; Maryland, 7 
1932— Duke, 34; Maryland, 



TOTAL POINTS: Duke, 301; Maryland, 95 

1966 CO-CAPTAINS: Bob Matheson, Mike Shasby 

LETTERMEN RETURNING: 34; Lost 17 





1966 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


17 


West Virginia 


Sept. 


24 


At Pittsburgh 


Oct. 


1 


Virginia 


Oct. 


8 


AT MARYLAND 


Oct. 


15 


At Clemson 


Oct. 


22 


N.C. State 


Oct. 


29 


Georgia Tech 


Nov. 


5 


At Navy 


Nov. 


12 


At Notre Dame 


Nov. 


19 


At North Carolina 




The Mountaineers' 1966 Outlook 

By EDGAR BARRETT 
Sports Information Director 

A new coach, bringing a new spirit of enthusiasm, tackles a tougher 
than usual West Virginia football schedule with one really outstanding 
player, a handful of returning regulars and a number of sophomores and 
other untried players. 

Jim Carlen, appointed Jan. 14 from Georgia Tech where he was head 
defensive coach, put the accent on quickness, self-discipline, weight re- 
duction and related aspects in the making of the "whole man". The 
young Mountaineer squad responded by shedding more than 700 pounds 
(it will be 1,030 before the season begins) and attacking spring practice 
with an enthusiasm Carlen said he'd never seen before. "They are the 
most dedicated group of youngsters I have ever been associated with", he 
said. 

Carlen was attracted to West Virginia in part by the rugged type of 
athlete, unafraid of hard work, who comes from this area. "But they 
need to develop their agility". Carlen and his all-new coaching staff 
turned the squad inside-out trying to place the right men in the right 
position. As a result, about half will play different positions from last 
year. Many will learn more than one position. The best may play both 
ways, offensively and defensively. 

Assets are: (1) a trimmed-down squad with enthusiasm; (2) junior 
tailback Garrett Ford who rushed 894 yards as a sophomore, one of the 
nation's finest running backs. 

On the debit side: (1) a mass of inexperience, total at quarterback 
and nearly so in the defensive secondary; (2) thinness in the reserve 
ranks, and (3) players learning strange positions. 

Among the leading holdovers are Ford, tight end Larry Canterbury 
and tackle Dave Stortz on offense; tackles Richie Rodes and Don Cook- 
man and linebacker Doug Hoover on defense. The best sophomores 
seem to be Baker Brown, linebacker; Bob Cummings, middle guard; Bob 
Zambo, quarterback; Steve Edwards, wingback, and Charles Wood, 
safety. 

Carlen has given the Mountaineers new everything. They will run 
basically from the I formation with a flanker. The defense will be a 
"5-4" with a five-man front, two linebackers and a four-man, umbrella- 
like secondary. There also will be bright uniforms: white helmets and 
white pants; striped in gold and blue; blue jerseys for home games and 
gold for the road. 



50 



MARYLAND vs. WEST VIRGINIA October 15 

2:00 P.M. (EDT) 

At Byrd Stadius (35,000) 

College Park, Md. 

FACTS ABOUT THE MOUNTAINEERS 

CONFERENCE: Southern 

LOCATION: Morgantown, W. Va. 

ATHLETIC DIRECTOR: Robert N. "Red" Brown 

HEAD COACH: Jim Carlen (Georgia Tech '55) 

ASSISTANT COACHES: Bobby Bowden, Dick In- 
man, Hayden Buckley, Jack Fligg, Bill Hicks, 
Marshall Taylor, Howard Tippett 

COLORS: Old Gold and Blue 

ENROLLMENT: 11,514 

OFFENSE: I formation, with flanker 

1965 OVERALL RECORD: Won 6, Lost 4 
1965 SC RECORD : Won 4, Lost 

SPORTS INFORMATION DIRECTOR: Edgar Barrett 
Telephones: Office, Area Code 304, 293-2821, Home, 292-1306 



TERPS' RECORD AGAINST THE MOUNTAINEERS 

(Maryland: Won 6, Lost 3, Tied 2) 



1960— Md., 31; West Va., 8 
1959— Md., 27; West Va., 7 
1951— Md., 54; West Va., 7 
1950— Md., 41; West Va., 
1949— Md., 47; West Va., 7 
1948— West Va., 16; Md., 14 



1947— Md., 27; West Va., 
1945— TIE, 13-13 
1944— TIE, 6-6 
1943— West Va., 6; Md., 2 
1919— West Va., 27; Md. 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland, 262; West Virginia, 97 
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 22, LETTERMEN LOST, 
1966 CAPTAINS : Game co-Captains 



19 





1966 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


17 


At Duke 


Sept. 


24 


William & Mary 


Oct. 


1 


At Virginia Tech 


Oct. 


8 


At Pitt 


Oct. 


15 


AT MARYLAND 


Oct. 


22 


Perm State 


Oct. 


29 


Kentucky 


Nov. 


5 


The Citadel 


Nov. 


12 


At George Washington 


Nov. 


19 


Syracuse 



1960 YARDSTICK 

(At College Park, Md) 

Maryland W. Va. 

First downs 23 14 

Rushing yardage 239 126 

Passing yardage 100 97 

Passes 7-11 7-17 

Passes intercepted by .... 1 

Punts 4-34.8 5-35.4 

Own fumbles lost 2 

Yards penalized 20 67 

West Virginia 8 0—8 

Maryland 14 3 14—31 

SCORING: Md. — Collins 19 (pass 
from Novak) Md. — Smith 1 (Rock, 
pass from Novak) Md. — Scott, 30 
FG; West Va. — Benke 3 (Kasanovich, 
pass from Evans) Md — Drass, 2 run 
(Scott PAT) Md. — Betty, 2 run 
(Scott PAT). 



51 



The Gamecocks' 1966 Outlook 

By TOM PRICE 
Sports Information Director 

Coach Paul Dietzel had less than half a spring practice to become fami- 
liar with Gamecock personnel and install "the Dietzel System" last spring 
at the University of South Carolina. 

Following the resignation of Marvin Bass midway through spring prac- 
tice, Dietzel — along with five of his Army assistants — came to South 
Carolina from the U.S. Military Academy. The Dietzel System was in- 
stalled during the remaining nine spring practice sessions. 

The defense, basically a 5-4, was similar in many ways to what the 
Gamecocks had been doing, but the "Power I" offense was radically dif- 
ferent. Near the end of spring drills, however, Dietzel said the offense 
"seemed to be getting the hang of it". 

Just how well the Gamecocks have adjusted will be tested early, as 
South Carolina opens with Dietzel's former team, Cotton Bowl champion 
Louisiana State, and plays two other members of last year's top ten, 
including defending nation champion and Orange Bowl winner Alabama, 
and Bluebonnet Bowl champion Tennessee. The remainder of the sched- 
ule is no slouch either, with Maryland ranking prominently among the 
likes of Georgia, Memphis State, N.C. State, Wake Forest, Florida State 
and Clemson. 

South Carolina has a large squad, numerically, with 35 returning let- 
termen. Of these, 32 lettered with last year's squad, and three returned 
who lettered previously. Seventeen lettermen were lost and eight of 
these signed pro contracts in the NFL or AFL. 

Despite the large crop of lettermen, there is considerable inexperience 
in certain areas, notably weak side guard in the offensive line and left 
halfback and safety in the defensive secondary. The only letterman listed 
at split-end — Roy Don Reeves — earned his monogram last year as a 
defensive back and one of the biggest problems is finding a pass-receiver 
to replace all ACC J. R. Wilburn. 

Although there isn't much experience at fullback, the offensive back- 
field should be strong with Mike Fair at quarterback, Benny Galloway 
at tailback, and Ben Garnto set at wingback. Fair set school records as 
a sophomore with 175 pass attempts, 89 completions and 1,049 yards. 
Galloway was an all-ACC defensive back in addition to playing some on 
offense as a soph, and Garnto, also a rising junior, led the 1965 team in 
rushing 437 yards as a tailback. 

The Gamecocks have two of the ACC's finest defensive backs in corner 
man Bobby Bryant and rover Stan Juk. 

Following the spring intrasquad game, Dietzel said: "I am impressed 
with the hustle and desire of this squad. I think they want to be good 
football players. However, we have a lot of work to do." 



52 



MARYLAND vs. SOUTH CAROLINA October 29 

HOMECOMING 

2:00 P.M. (EDT) 

Byrd Stadium (35,000) 

College Park, Md. 

FACTS ABOUT THE GAMECOCKS 

CONFERENCE: Atlantic Coast 

LOCATION: Columbia, S.C. 

ATHLETIC DIRECTOR: Paul Dietzel 

HEAD COACH: Paul Dietzel (Miami of Ohio '48) 

ASSISTANTS: George Terry, Larry Jones, Bill 

Shalosky, Jim Valek, Bill Rowe, Jimmy Vic- 

kers, Johnny Menger, Lou Holtz, Pride Rat- 

terree, Bob Patton 
COLORS: Garnet and Black 
ENROLLMENT: 10,500 
TYPE OFFENSE: Power I 
1965 OVERALL RECORD : 5-5 
1965 ACC RECORD: 4-2. 

SPORTS INFORMATION DIRECTOR: Tom Price 
Telephones: Area 803, Office: 765-4277, Home: 787-2395 




Paul Dietzel 



TERPS' 



RECORD AGAINST THE GAMECOCKS 

(Maryland: Won 14, Lost 8) 



1965— Maryland, 27; S.C, 14 

1964— Maryland, 24; S.C, 6 

1963— S.C, 21; Maryland, 13 

1962— Maryland, 13; S.C, 11 

1961— S.C, 20; Maryland, 10 

I960— Maryland, 15; S.C, 

1959— S.C, 22; Maryland, 6 

1958— Maryland, 10; S.C, 6 

1957— Maryland, 10; S.C, 6 

1956— S.C, 13; Maryland, 

1955— Maryland, 27; S.C, 
TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 356, Southern Carolina 245 
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 35, Lost 17 
1966 CAPTAINS — All Seniors 



1954— Maryland, 20; S.C, 
1953— Maryland, 24; S.C, 6 
1949— Maryland, 4.4; S.C, 7 
1948— Maryland, 19; S.C, 7 
1947— Maryland, 19; S.C, 13 
1946— S.C, 21; Maryland, 17 
1945— Maryland, 19; S.C, 13 
1929— S.C, 26; Maryland, 6 
1928— S.C, 21; Maryland, 7 
1927— Maryland, 26; S.C, 
1926— S.C, 12; Maryland, 





1966 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


17 


At Louisiana State 


Sept. 


24 


Memphis State 


Oct. 


1 


Georgia 


Oct. 


8 


At N.C. State 


Oct. 


15 


Wake Forest 


Oct. 


22 


At Tennessee 


Oct. 


29 


AT MARYLAND 


Nov. 


5 


Florida State 


Nov. 


12 


At Alabama 


Nov. 


19 


Open Date 


Nov. 


26 


At Clemson 



1965 YARDSTICK 




(At Columbia, 


S.C., 30,000) 




Marylan 


d S.C. 




12 


20 

74 

190 

12-30 



4-35.7 

3 

26 


Rushing yardage 


196 

.. .. 6 


Passes 

Passes intercepted by 
Punts-avg. yardage 
Own fumbles lost ... 
Yards penalized 


3-7 

4 

6-34.8 

1 

77 


South Carolina 

Maryland 


6 8 
. 14 3 


0—14 
10—27 


SCORING: CS — Branson, 1 (kick 
failed) ; Md. — Collins, 91 KO return 
(Bramson PAT) ; Md. — Cooper, 1 
(Bramson PAT) ; SC — Fair, 5 (Tuck- 
er, pass from Fair) ; Md. — ■ Bramson, 
26 FG; Md. — Marciniak 1 (Bromson 
PAT). 



53 



The Wolf packs' 1966 Outlook 

By FRANK WEEDON 
Sports Information Director 

North Carolina State's young football squad of 1965 matured at mid- 
season and won its last five games. Thirty-one lettermen return for 
1966 from that team which finished with a 6-4 overall record and one- 
half game out of first place in the Atlantic Coast Conference race. 

"I have a lot of respect for experience and I am hopeful that it will 
help us in 1966", declares Wolfpack Coach Earle Edwards. "Experience 
generally reduces the number of errors, and that generally decides foot- 
ball games. If we can continue to eliminate mistakes, this could be an 
exciting year for us. We move into our new Carter Stadium. This is 
a big important step and I know the boys will be anxious to do well". 

Experience will be one of the Pack's strongest assets with a letterman 
back to fill all but two starting positions, offensive center and one of 
the cornerback spots in the defensive secondary. Edwards lists three 
areas where the Wolfpack will have some concern this fall — the de- 
fensive center and overall kicking game. The Pack lost all-ACC Tony 
Golmont and three-year veteran Larry Brown from the secondary which 
set a new school record of 23 pass interceptions and, as Edwards put it: 
"We found it hard to get organized in the secondary this spring with 
Art McMahon the only veteran available for full-time duty". Safety Bill 
James, elected defensive captain, missed the drills because of an opera- 
tion, while Fred Combs, the other safety, was excused to play baseball. 
Sophomore Dick Idol, a good prospect, was forced out with an injury. 
Greg Williams and Billy Morrow, two sparsely-used juniors, and sophs 
Gary Yount and Paul Reid will have to come through to alleviate the 
secondary problem. 

The Pack should have a solid defensive front, headed by all-America 
candidates Dennis Byrd (6-4, 250) at tackle and Pete Sokalsky (6-1, 215) 
at end. Both gained all-ACC honors in exceptional sophomore years in 
'65. 

Offensively, the Wolfpack has as much depth and size in the back- 
field as it has had in Edwards' 13 years here. He says: "Fullback is one 
of our strongest positions while we could be as well off at quarterback 
as we were last year. We must fill holes in the secondary and eliminate 
critical mistakes if we are to be a solid team this fall. The work of our 
freshmen in spring drills was most encouraging, although very few are 
likely to break in right away. 

"I think there are more bonafide teams regarded as conference con- 
tenders than at any time in the ACC's history. Just throw the names in 
a hat and draw them out. As the number of upsets increase, I don't see 
how you can make any pre-season choice". 



54 



MARYLAND vs. NORTH CAROLINA STATE November 5 



1:30 P.M. (EST) 

At Carter Stadium (41,000) 

Raleigh, N. C. 

FACTS ABOUT THE WOLFPACK 

CONFERENCE: Atlantic Coast 

LOCATION: Raleigh, N.C. 

ATHLETIC DIRECTOR: Roy B. Clogston 

HEAD COACH: Earle Edwards (Penn State '3D 

ASSISTANT COACHES: Al Michaels, Carey 

Brewbaker, Bill Smaltz, Ernie Driscoll, 

Johnny Clements, Jim Tapp 
COLORS: Red and White 
ENROLLMENT: 10,200 
TYPE OFFENSE: Winged-T, slotback 
1965 OVERALL RECORD: Won 6, Lost 4 
1965 ACC REOORD: Won 4, Lost 3 
SPORTS INFORMATION DIRECTOR: Frank Weedon 
Telephones: Area Code 919, Office— 755-2102, Home— 828-5070 

TERPS' RECORD AGAINST THE WOLFPACK 

(Maryland: Won 10, Lost 9, Tied 3) 




Earle Edwards 



1965- 
1964- 
1963- 
1962- 
1961- 
1960- 
1959- 
1958- 
1957- 
1956- 
1954- 



-State, 29; 

-State, 14; 

-State, 30; 

-Maryland, 

-Maryland, 

-State, 13; 

-Maryland, 

-Maryland, 

-State, 48; 

-Maryland, 

-Maryland, 



Maryland, 7 
Maryland 13 
Maryland, 14 
14; State, 6 
10; State, 7 
Maryland, 10 
33; State, 28 
21; State, 6 
Maryland, 13 
25; State. 14 
42; State, 14 



1951— Maryland 

1950— State, 16; 

1949— Maryland 

1947— TIE, 0-0 

1946— State, 28; Maryland, 7 

1924— TIE, 0-0 

1923— Maryland, 

1922— Maryland, 

1921— TIE, 6-6 

1917— State, 10; 

1909— State, 33; 



53; State, 

Maryland 13 

14; State, 6 



26; State, 12 
7; State, 6 

Maryland, 6 
Maryland, 



1966 CO-CAPTAINS: Wingback Gary Rowe and Defensive Back Bill 

James 
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 31, Lost 9 
TOTAL POINTS: Maryland: 340; North Carolina State: 326 



1965 YARDSTICK 

(At College Park, 30,000) 

Md. N.C. St. 

First clowns 14 21 

Rushing yardage 104 160 

Passing yardage 206 147 

Passes 16-37 13-21 

Punts-avg. yardage 4-33 5-30.6 

Own fumbles lost 2 2 

Yards penalized 66 30 

N.C. State 12 17 0—29 

Maryland 7 — 7 

SCORING: NCS — Deter, 38 FG; 
NCS — Martell, 4 pass from Ashby 
(Deters PAT) ; NCS — Safety, blocked 
punt rolled through end zone; NCS; 
— Wyland 1 (Deters PAT) ; NCS — 
Deter, 39 FG; NCS — Noggles, 3 
(Deters kick) Maryland — Collins, 77 
Pass from Petry (Bramson PAT). 





1966 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


17 


At Michigan State 


Sept. 


24 


At North Carolina 


Oct. 


1 


At Wake Forest 


Oct. 


1 


South Carolina 


Oct. 


15 


Florida 


Oct. 


22 


At Duke 


Oct. 


29 


Virginia 


Nov. 


5 


MARYLAND 


Nov. 


12 


Southern Mississippi At 
Norfolk, Va. 


Nov. 


19 


Clemson 



55 



The Tigers' 1966 Outlook 

By BOB BRADLEY 
Sports Information Director 

Coach Frank Howard, starting his 27th season as head coach, counts 
31 lettermen returning including eight starters from the offensive unit 
and seven from the defensive squad. He has 10 lettermen (three seniors 
and seven juniors) on the starting offensive team, the lone sophomore 
being Buddy Gore who is slated to fill Hugh Mauldin's shoes. Gore, the 
fastest back at Clenson in over a decade, was a freshman standout two 
years age, but a broken hand kept him inactive all of last year. 

Howard's first defensive team has four seniors, six juniors and a soph. 
One junior, left safety Kit Jackson, skipped spring drills to allow a 
broken arm suffered in the North Carolina game last year, to heal. 
Flanker Freddy Kelly also sat out spring practice to allow the healing 
of a shoulder operation. 

Much of the alternate unit strength will come from the undefeated 
(4-0-1) freshman team of last fall. Of the first 33 on offense, 16 are 
sophomores. On defense, there is an even more sophomorish flavor, 16 
of the top 33 having played freshman ball last year. 

The Tigers will go along with virtually their same offensive sets of 
last season, mainly the "I" and pro type patterns. There is the possibi- 
lity that Phil Rogers, used chiefly as a pass-receiver last season, will be 
utilized more as a runner. On 13 rushes last fall, Rogers averaged 9.8 
yards a try. He also caught 36 passes for 466 yards. 

Clemson's four leading pass-receivers return. Besides Rogers, there are 
end Wayne Bell (25 for 377 yards), Edgar McGee (15 for 184) and 
Freddy Kelley (4 for 28). The Tigers tied a school record last year for 
the most completions in a single season — 91. 

Clemson has another tough schedule in line, maybe the toughest in 
its history. Besides the seven Atlantic Coast Conference opponents, it 
will play Georgia Tech, Alabama and Southern California — all away. 



56 



MARYLAND vs. CLEMSON November 12 



1:30 P.M. (EST) 

At Byrd Stadium (35,000) 

College Park, Md. 

FACTS ABOUT THE TIGERS 

CONFERENCE: Atlantic Coast 
LOCATION: Clemson, South Carolina 
ATHLETIC DIRECTOR: Frank Howard 
HEAD COACH: Frank Howard (Alabama '3D 
ASSISTANT COACHES: Art Baker, Fred Cone, 

Bob Jones, Whitey Jordan, Banks McFadden, 

Bill McLellan, Bob Smith, Don Wade 
COLORS: Purple and Orange 
ENROLLMENT: 5,046 

TYPE OFFENSE: I, with flanker and split end 
1965 OVERALL RECORD: Won 5, Lost 5 
ACC RECORD: Won 4, Lost 3 

SPORTS INFORMATION DIRECTOR: Bob Bradley 
Telephones: Office, Area 803, 654-4111 Home, Area 803, 654 




Frank Howard 



-5419 



TERPS' RECORD AGAINST THE TIGERS 

Maryland: Won 9, Lost 4, Tied 1 



1965— Maryland, 6; 
1964— Maryland, 34 
1963— Clemson, 21; 
1962— Clemson, 17; 
1961— Maryland, 24 
I960— Maryland, 19 
1959— Maryland, 28 



Clemson, 1958 — Clemson, 8; Maryland, 

; Clemson, 1957— Clemson, 26; Maryland, 7 

Maryland, 6 1956— TIE, 6-6 

Maryland, 14 1955 — Maryland, 25; Clemson, 12 

Clemson, 21 1954 — Maryland, 16; Clemson, 

Clemson, 17 1953— Maryland, 20; Clemson, 

: Clemson, 25 1952— Marvland, 28; Clemson, 



TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 233, Clemson 153 
1966 CAPTAIN, Game Captain 
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 31, Lost 19 





1966 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


24 


Virginia 


Oct. 


1 


At Georgia Tech 


Oct. 


8 


Alabama 


Oct. 


15 


Duke 


Oct. 


22 


At Southern California 


Oct. 


29 


At Wake Forest 


Nov. 


5 


North Carolina 


Nov. 


12 


AT MARYLAND 


Nov. 


19 


At N.C. State 


Nov. 


26 


South Carolina 



1965 YARDSTICK 

(At Clemson 26,000) 

Md. Clemson 

First downs 18 10 

Rushing yardage 186 65 

Passing yardage 105 131 

Passes 10-18 7-22 

Passes intercepted by .. 4 

Punts-ave. yardage 5-42.4 7-45.0 

Own fumbles lost 4 

Yards penalized 34 8 

Clemson — 

Maryland 3 3—6 

SCORING: Md. — Bramson, FG 33; 
Bramson FG, 39. 



57 



The Cavaliers' 1966 Outlook 

By GENE CORRIGAN 
Acting Sports Information Director 

A decided lack of depth at most positions makes the 1966 outlook 
somewhat clouded. Coach George Blackburn, entering his second year 
as head coach, did express satisfaction with the spring drills. "We were 
able to achieve a good deal more this year as our staff is now familiar 
with the personnel. The players were in excellent physical condition 
and they put forth a fine effort over the 20-day period". 

Quarterback appears to be a solid position with returning Bob Davis 
the incumbent. A scintillating record-setting performer for the past two 
seasons, Davis may be ready to settle down to a fine over-all season. His 
back-up men are Stan Kemp and Gene Arnette, neither tested under fire. 
Ken Poates moves from split end to wingback and is the only letterman 
at offensive halfback. Carroll Jarvis returns at fullback with two good 
seasons under his belt. The tailback position is in the hands of Frank 
Quayle, a soph with great ability but a poor academic average. 

The offensive line will have only three lettermen as starters. Ed 
Harrington is one of the nation's best tight ends and Jeff Anderson, a 
soph, is the split end. Jim Copeland and John Naponick are the tackles 
with Paul Rogers and Paul Lockwood. Bob Buchanan and Mike Jarvis 
are the guards while soph David McWilliams and letterman Fred Jones 
hold forth at center. 

The defensive line has more experience and is anchored at end by 
another all-star candidate, Don Parker. Paul Yewisiak is a returning let- 
terman at the other end. Tackles are veteran Randall Harris and 1965's 
middle guard Tony Popeck. Larry Wood, who started on offense is the 
back-up. Rick Constantine, a quick-striking soph, is the middle guard. 

All four of the '65 secondary starters return, headed by George Stetter, 
a solid and often sparkling safety. Jim Morgan is the other deep back 
and rates just a shade behind Stetter. The cornerback starters appear 
to be Dennis Borchers and either Bill Lockwood, a soph, or Paul Kling- 
ensmith. There is very little true depth at this position. 

The trainers and doctors may be the most valuable members of the 
Cavalier staff this season. This is a good team — one capable of break- 
ing .500 — ■ but only if all hands stay healthy. 



58 



MARYLAND vs. VIRGINIA November 19 




1:30 P.M. (EST) 

At Scott Stadium (24,000) 

Charlottesville, Va. 

FACTS ABOUT THE CAVALIERS 

CONFERENCE: Atlantic Coast 

LOCATION: Charlottesville, Va, 

ATHLETIC DIRECTOR: Steve Sebo 

HEAD COACH: George Blackburn (Findlay Col- 
lege '37) 

ASSISTANT COACHES: Ken Campbell, Bob 
Marich, Ned McDonald, Bob Tate, Ben Wil- 
son, Zeke Fantino 

COLORS: Orange and Blue 

ENROLLMENT: 7,200 George Blackburn 

TYPE OFFENSE: Split-T 

1965 OVERALL RECORD: Won 4, Lost 6 

1965 ACC RECORD: Won 2, Lost 4 

SPORTS INFORMATION DIRECTOR (Acting): Gene Corrigan 

Telephone: Area Code 703, 295-2166 Ext. 3011 



TERPS' RECORD AGAINST THE CAVALI 

(Maryland: Won 17, Lost 11, Tied 2) 

1965— Va., 33; Md., 27 1944— Va., 18; Md., 7 1933- 

1964— Md., 10; Va. 1943— Va., 39; Md., 1932- 

1963— Md., 21; Va., 6 1942— Md., 27; Va., 12 1931- 

1962— Md., 40; Va., 18 1940— Va., 19; Md., 6 1930- 

1961— Va., 28; Md., 16 1939— Va., 12; Md., 7 1929- 

1960— Md., 44; Va., 12 1938— Va., 27; Md., 19 1928- 

1959— Md., 55; Va., 12 1937— Md., 3; Va., 1927- 

1958— Md., 44; Va., 6 1936— Md., 21; Va., 1926- 

1957— Md., 12; Va., 1935— Md., 14; Va., 7 1925- 

1945— Md., 19; Va., 13 1934— Md., 20; Va., 1919- 
TOTAL POINTS: Maryland 489, Virginia 335 
LETTERMEN RETURNING: 21, Lost 17 



ERS 

-Va., 6; Md., 
-Va., 7; Md., 6 
-Md., 7; Va., 6 
-Md., 14; Va., 6 
-TIE, 13-13 
-Md., 18; Va., 2 
-Va., 21; Md., 
-TIE, 6-6 
-Va., 6; Md., 
-Md., 13; Va., 





1966 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


17 


Wake Forest 


Sept. 


24 


At Clemson 


Oct. 


1 


At Duke 


Oct. 


8 


Tulane 


Oct. 


15 


V.M.I. 


Oct. 


22 


Virginia Tech 


Oct. 


29 


At N.C. State 


Nov. 


5 


At Georgia Tech 


Nov. 


12 


Open Date 


Nov. 


19 


MARYLAND 


Nov. 


26 


At North Carolina 



1965 YARDSTICK 
At College Park (21,000) 

Maryland Va. 

First Downs 16 21 

Rushing yardage 81 192 

Passing yardage 185 171 

Passes 13-24 11-17 

Passes intercepted by .... 2 1 

Punts-ave. yardage 6-36.5 3-32.3 

Own fumbles lost 2 1 

Yards penalized 27 27 

Virginia 14 13 6 0—33 

Maryland 14 13—27 

SCORING: Va. — Carrington 19, 
pass from Davis (Hill PAT) ; Md. — 
Ambrusko 1 (Brams,on PAT) ; Md. — 
Ambrusko 10 (Bramson PAT) ; Va. — 
Carrington 16, pass from Davis (Hill 
PAT), Va. — Carrington 53, pass 
from Davis (Hill PAT), Carrington 
15, pass from Davis (Pass failed) ; 
Va. — Davis 2 (pass failed) ; Md. — 
Springer 6, pass from Corcoran (Pass 
failed), Md. — Collins 49, pass from 
Corcoran (Bramson PAT) 



59 



The Seminoles' 1966 Outlook 

By BILL BUNKER 
Sports Information Director 

The odds are stacked against the Seminoles in 1966, but if some key 
pieces fall into place. Coach Bill Peterson may not be too unhappy with 
the solution of the puzzle that was spring practice, 1966. Youth will be the 
byword of the '66 Seminoles, but there's enough experience present to 
flavor next fall's squad and present a slightly better than pessimistic 
outlook. The major stumbling block will be the schedule which ranks 
as the toughest ever played by a Florida State team. 

Losses through graduation were considerable, particularly on defense, 
but the ranks are filled with young, eager and fierce sophomores. The 
highlight of spring practice was the attitude of these youngsters. "It 
was really the most exciting spring we've ever had", Peterson said. 
"Every position was wide open. The attitude of the squad was tremend- 
ous and these boys like to hit". 

The biggest question in the spring revolved around the quarterback 
slot. Of 13 candidates, the struggle narrowed to three: Kim Hammond, 
a little-used reserve last year as a sophomore who has the edge; Bill 
Cappleman and Gary Pajcic, both sophs. Hammond has the all-around 
skills, Cappleman the best arm and Pajcic those undefined, but neces- 
sary traits of a great athlete — poise, leadership and the ability to win. 
Whoever winds up with the job in FSU's pro-type offense will find one 
of the finest groups of receivers in the land awaiting his passes. None 
of the ends and flanker backs had a particular edge at spring's end but 
this should be Florida State's strongest position in both ability and depth. 
Flanker Bill Cox, end Lane Fenner and tight end Thurston Taylor were 
the leaders as spring drills ended, just ahead of such outstanding re- 
ceivers as Jerry Jones, Donovan Jones, Chip Glass, Ron Sellers and T. 
K. Wetherell. 

The running game should be adequate. Bill Moreman should continue 
to improve after an outstanding sophomore year at left half and bruis- 
ing Jim Mankins should have the fullback spot all to himself after a 
good spring. Johnny Hurst is a good sophomore at left half and letter- 
man Larry Green should add excitement if he can shake an injury jinx. 

Summary: Young, but eager. Strong pass receivers. Untried defense. 
Thin in the offensive line. Capable running backs. Inexperienced but 
talented secondary. 



60 



MARYLAND vs. FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY November 26 



8:00 P.M. (EST) 

At Doak S. Campbell Stadium (40,500) 

Tallahassee, Florida 

FACTS ABOUT THE SEMINOLES 

CONFERENCE: Independent 

LOCATION: Tallahassee, Fla. 

ATHLETIC DIRECTOR: Vaughn Mancha 

HEAD COACH: Bill Peterson (Ohio Northern 

'46) 

ASSISTANT COACHES: Bob Harbison, Neil 
Schmidt, Bill Crutchfield, Ken MacLean, Don 
Powell, Don Breaux, Gary Wyant, Bobby 
Jackson, Gene McDowell 

COLORS: Garnet and Gold 

ENROLLMENT: 14,500 

TYPE OFFENSE: Pro-T 

1965 OVERALL RECORD: Won 4, Lost 5, Tied 1 

SPORTS INFORMATION- DIRECTOR: Bill Bunker 

Telephones: (Area Code 904) Office 599-2095; Home 




Bill Peterson 



385-3180 



LETTERMEN RETURNING: 22; Lost 18 

THIS IS THE FIRST GAME BETWEEN MARYLAND AND FLORIDA 
STATE 





1966 SCHEDULE 


Sept. 


17 


Houston (N) 


Sept. 


24 


At Miami (N) 


Oct. 


1 


Open date 


Oct. 


8 


Florida 


Oct. 


15 


At Texas Tech (N) 


Oct. 


22 


Mississippi State (N) 


Oct. 


29 


At Virginia Tech 


Nov. 


5 


At South Carolina 


Nov. 


12 


At Syracuse 


Nov. 


19 


Wake Forest 


Nov. 


26 


MARYLAND (N) 



1965 RESULTS 

4-5-1 
Texas Christian, 7; Florida State, 3 
Florida State, 9; Baylor, 7 
Kentucky, 26; Florida State, 24 
Florida State, 10; Georgia, 3 
Alabama, 21; Florida State, 
Florida State, 7; Virginia Tech, 6 
Florida State, 35; Wake Forest, 
N.C. State, 3; Florida State, 
Florida State, 16; Houston, 16 (TIE) 
Florida, 30; Florida State, 17 



61 



THE TERP PRESS 

MARVIN BEARD, Bureau Chief, The Associated Press (Baltimore) 
GORDON BEARD, The Associated Press (Baltimore) 

*GEORGE BOWEN, The Associated Press (Baltimore) 
SAM FOGG, The United Press International (Washington) 

-BOB SERLING, The United Press International (Washington) 
EV GARDNER, Sports Editor, The Daily News (Washington) 
HENRY FANKHAUSER, The Daily News (Washington) 
TOM YORKE, The Daily News (Washington) 
RUSS WHITE, The Daily News (Washington) 
BILL PEELER, Sports Editor, The Evening Star (Washington) 
FRANCIS STANN, Columnist, The Evening Star (Washington) 
STEVE GUBACK, The Evening Star (Washington) 

*CARL SELL, The Evening Star (Washington) 
MORRIS SIEGEL, Columnist, The Evening Star (Washington) 

•GEORGE Ml NOT, The Post (Washington) 
SHIRLEY POVICH, Columnist, The Post (Washington) 
BOB ADDIE, Columnist, The Post (Washington) 
MARTI E ZAD, Sports Editor, The Post (Washington) 
PAUL MENTON, Sports Editor, The Evening Sun (Baltimore) 
BILL TANTON, The Evening Sun (Baltimore) 
RANDALL CASSELL, Columnist, The Evening Sun (Baltimore) 

-PHIL JACKMAN, The Evening Sun (Baltimore 
BOB MAISEL, Sports Editor, The Morning Sun (Baltimore) 

:: ALAN GOLDSTEIN, The Morning Sun (Baltimore) 

*JOHN STEWART, The Morning Sun (Baltimore) 

*ED ATWATER, The Morning Sun (Baltimore) 

JOHN STEDMAN, Sports Editor, The News American (Baltimore) 
BILL CHRISTINE, The News-American (Baltimore) 
J. SUTER KEGG, Sports Editor, The Evening Time s (Cumberland) 
C. V. BURNS, Sports Editor, The Morning News (Cumberland) 
DICK KELLY, Sports Editor, The Mail (Hagerstown) 
JOE SNYDER, Sports Editor, The Herald (Hagerstown) 
ED NICHOLS, Sports Editor, The Times (Salisbury) 
BUCKY SUMMERS, Sports Editor, The Post (Frederick) 
BOB LAYTON, Sports Editor, The Banner (Cambridge) 
BOB WATCHER, Sports Editor, The Evening Capital (Annapolis) 

*Cover Daily 



RADIO and TELEVISION 



BALTIMORE 

Sid McClain, WAYE 

Carl Brenner, WBMD 

Frank Luber, WCAO 

Charley Eckman, Fred Neil, WCBM 

Ron Weber, WFBR 

Jim West, WBAL 

John Kennelly, WJZ-TV 

Bill Boiling, Don Bruchey, Jack Dawson, 

WMAR-TV 
Buddy Young, WWIN 
Wade Utay, WNAV (Annapolis) 



WASHINGTON 

-Bill McColgan, Warner Wolf, WTOP-TV 

Dan Daniels, WTOP-TV 

Steve Gilmartin, Mai Campbell, WMAL 

Jim Gibbons, Joe Pellegrino, WRC-TV 

Maury Povich, WWDC 

Bob Bowers, WOL 

Jim Gibbons, Jay Perri, WIPK 



■Broadcast all of Terps' 
and away. 



games, home 



62 





Warner Wolf (left) and Bill McColgan, sportscasters for Washington 
Station WTOP and WTOP-TV (CBS) who will be at the mikes for each 
of Maryland's games this fall. 



BILL McCOLGAN has been doing 
sports for WTOP since March of 
1961. He is seen Monday through 
Saturday on the sports portion of 
WTOP-TV's "11 p.m. Report" and 
heard on the sports portion of 
WTOP Radio's "The World To- 
night". He's been doing play-by- 
play since 1951 including an eight 
year stint as the play-by-play 
broadcaster for the Cleveland 
Browns. Locally he's done play-by- 
play for the Redskins and the Uni- 
versity of Maryland teams. In 1962 
and in 1964 he was named out- 
standing sportscaster of the year 
in the District of Columbia by the 
National Sportscasters and Sports- 
writers Awards Committee. 



WARNER WOLF joined WTOP 
RADIO in April of 1965. As sports 
director of WTOP Radio he has a 
show three times a day: Sports 
Line, 8:50 a.m.; Sports Report, 
6:30 p.m.; and Sports Call, 7:30 
p.m. He also serves as the sports 
authority on Newsline AM and 
PM. Warner has been color man 
for Maryland football and done 
play-by-play of professional basket- 
ball. 



63 



1965 STATISTICS 







RECORD: 


4-6 








ACC 


RECORD: 3-3 








At Home: 1-4 A 


way: 3-2 




MD. 






Opp. 


Site 


Attendance 


24 


Ohio U. 




7 


Home 


28,000 


7 


Syracuse 




24 


Home 


35,000 


10 


Wake Forest 




7 


Away 


18,000 


10 


North Carolina 




12 


Away 


30,000 


7 


N.C. State 




29 


Home 


30,000 


27 


South Carolina 




14 


Away 


30,000 


7 


Navy 




19 


Away 


28,000 


6 


Clemson 







Away 


26,000 


27 


Virginia 




33 


Home 


21,000 


7 


Penn State 




19 


Home 


24,000 



132 



164 



270,000 



TEAM STATISTICS 

MD. 

Total Plays 645 

Times Carried 410 

Total First Downs 142 

Rushing 66 

Passing 65 

Penalties 11 

Yards gained rushing 1435 

Yards lost rushing 283 

Net Yards rushing 1152 

Yards gained passing , 1283 

Total yards offense 2435 

Passes attempted 235 

Passes completed 119 

Passes had intercepted 16 

Passing percentage 50.6 

Number of punts 53 

Avg. yardage of punts 38.4 

Own fumbles lost 21 

Yards lost penalties 453 

Total points ~~~ - 132 

Touchdowns 16 

Field goals - 7 

Safeties 

64 



OPP. 

689 

488 

167 

93 

63 

11 

1923 

288 

1635 

1156 

2791 

201 

94 

23 

46.8 

54 

37.9 

10 

343 

164 

22 

4 

2 



1965 INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS 

(Returning Players in CAPS) 

TOTAL OFFENSE 

Plays Yardage 

PETRY 178 834 

Corcoran - 82 354 

Ambrusko - - 37 132 

VAN HEUSEN 31 115 

COOPER 58 72 

INDIVIDUAL RUSHING 

Att. Gained Lost Net 

TORAIN 93 384 14 370 

MARCINIAK 78 314 4 310 

Ambrusko 32 128 28 100 

Klingerman 27 89 2 87 

PETRY 43 147 76 71 

McQUOWN 30 71 1 70 

COLLINS 17 47 10 37 

VAN HEUSEN ' 19 48 19 29 

Stem 6 27 27 

COOPER 36 97 74 23 

MYRTLE 4 19 19 

Springer 16 6 

Martin 12 2 

Corcoran 21 54 53 1 

Humphries 2 2 2 

INDIVIDUAL PASSING 
Att. Comp. Yds. Int. TDP 

PETRY 135 65 763 9 3 

Corcoran 61 34 353 4 3 

COOPER 22 10 49 1 

VAN HEUSEN 12 7 86 2 

Ambrusko 5 3 32 

PASS RECEIVING 

Avg. 

Caught Yardage Yds. 

COLLINS 25 462 18.5 

ABSHER 33 382 11.6 

Springer 10 132 13.2 

Klingerman 12 60 5.0 

MARCINIAK 8 53 5.9 

TORAIN __ _. 8 33 4.1 

MYRTLE 3 31 10.3 

Martin 2 30 15.0 

Ambrusko - - - 6 29 4.8 

Stem 3 23 7.7 

McQUOWN 3 21 7.0 

BELL __ 2 17 8.5 

Kenny _ _ 2 13 6.5 

Humphries 1 4 4.0 

VAN HEUSEN 1 -7 -7.0 

PUNTING 

No. Yds. 

Humphries 53 2037 

65 



Avg. 
Gain 

4.6 
4.3 
3.6 
3.7 
1.2 

Avg. 
Gain 

4.0 
4.0 
3.1 
3.3 
1.6 
2.3 
2.2 
1.5 
4.5 
.6 
4.7 
6.0 
2.0 
.05 
.0 



Pet. 

48.1 
55.7 
45.4 
58.3 
60.0 



TD 
Passes 

3 
1 
2 















Kick 

38.4 



SCORING 
TDs 

BRAMSON 

COLLINS 4 

Ambrusko 2 

PETRY 2 

Springer 2 

TORAIN 2 

ABSHER 1 

COOPER 1 

MARCINIAK 1 

MYRTLE 1 



PATs FGM-FGA* PTS 



15-15 


7-13 


36 








24 








12 








12 








12 








12 








6 








6 








6 








6 



f Longest-43 Yards 



INTERCEPTION RETURNS 

No. Yds. Avg. 

Sullivan 10* 61 6.1 

COOPER 4 26 6.5 

Stem 2 37 18.5 

VAN HEUSEN 1 9 9.0 

GAWLICK 1 5 5.0 

SANTY 1 5 5.0 

NALEWAK 1 5 5.0 

mcqueen 1 4 4.0 

lavrusky 1 .0 

stickell 1 .0 

*— Maryland and ACC Record 

KICKOFF RETURNS 
No. 

COLLINS 10 

COOPER 10 

Ambrusko 9 

TORAIN 2 

ABSHER 1 

VICIN 1 

PUNT RETURNS 
No. 

COOPER 16 

COLLINS 12 

Ambrusko 2 

Sullivan 2 

VAN HEUSEN 1 



Yds. 


Avg. 


270 


27.0 


128 


12.8 


117 


13.0 


38 


19.0 


11 


11.0 





.0 


Yds. 


Avg. 


148 


9.2 


76 


6.8 


27 


13.5 


18 


9.0 


6 


6.0 



NEW MARYLAND RECORDS ESTABLISHED DURING 1965 

Career: 80 points by placekicker — Bramson (44 pts. in 1964, 36 in 65) 

—Old record — 73 
Season: 10 interceptions by Sullivan (Old record — 8 by Tom Brown, 

1961) 
Game: 35 passes attempted, by Jim Corcoran vs. Penn State (Old-33, 

by Dick Shiner) 
18 passes completed, by Jim Corcoran vs. Penn State (Old-17, 

by Dick Shiner, Tom Mont) 
45 most plays, by Jim Corcoran vs. Penn State (Old-44 by 

Shiner) 



66 



TERP ALL-AMERICA PLAYERS 

1923 — W. Supplee, End — Second Team, AP 

1928 — Gerald Snyder, Fullback — Second Team, AP 

1931 — Jess Krajcovic, Guard — Honorable Mention, AP 

1934 — Norwood Sothoron, Fullback — Honorable Mention, AP 
Vic Willis, End— Honorable Mention, AP 
Bill Guckeyson, Halfback — Honorable Mention, AP 
Ed Minion, Tackle — Honorable Mention, AP 

1935 — Bill Guckeyson, Halfback — Honorable Mention, AP 
Vic Willis, End — Honorable Mention, AP 

1936 — Bill Guckeyson — Halfback — Honorable Mention, AP 

1937 — Jim Meade, Halfback — Honorable Mention, AP 

1940 — Bob Smith, Center — Honorable Mention, AP 

Ralph Albarano, Tackle — Honorable Mention, AP 

1942 — Tommy Mont, Quarterback, Honorable Mention, AP 
Paul Flick — Center — Honorable Mention, AP 

1947 — Lou Gambino, Halfback — Honorable Mention, AP 
Gene Kinney, Center — Honorable Mention, AP 

1948 — Ray Krouse, Tackle — Honorable Mention, AP, UP 
Elmer Wingate, End — Honorable Mention, UP 

1949 — iRay Krouse, Tackle — Second Team, AP 

1950— Bob Ward, Guard— First Team, AP, Look, NEA, Gridiron, All- 
Players, Colliers 
Second Team, UP, INS, The Quarterback 
Ed Modzelewski, Fullback — Honorable Mention, AP, UP 

1951— Bob Ward, Guard— UNANIMOUS First Teams 

Dick Modzelewski, Tackle — First Team, All Players; Second 

Team, AP; Third Team, UP 
Ed Modzelewski, Fullback — First and Second Teams 
Jack Scarbath, Quarterback — Honorable Mention, AP, All-Players 
Tom Cosgrove, Center — Honorable Mention, AP, All Players 
Dave Cianelli, Fullback — Honorable Mention, AP 
Joe Petruzzo — Halfback — Honorable Mention, AP 

1952 — Jack Scarbath, Quarterback — UNANIMOUS First Teams 
Dick Modzelewski, Tackle — UNANIMOUS First Teams 
Tom Cosgrove, Center — Second Team, All-Players 
Stan Jones, Tackle — Honorable Mention, All-Players 

1953 — Stan Jones, Tackle — UNANIMOUS First Teams 

Bernie Faloney, Quarterback — Eight First Teams, All Second 

Teams 
Chester Hanulak, Halfback — Second Team, INS; Honorable Men- 
tion, AP, UP, NEA 
Ralph Felton, Fullback — Honorable Mention, AP, UP, NEA 
Bill Walker, End — Honorable Mention, UP 
John Irvine, Center — Honorable Mention, UP 
Bob Morgan, Tackle — Honorable Mention, UP 

1954 — Dick Bielski, Fullback — Third Team, All-Players; Honorable Men- 
tion, AP, UP 
Ronnie Waller, Halfback — Honorable Mention, AP, UP 
Jack Bowersox, Guard — First Team, Gridiron Index; Honorable 

Mention, AP, UP 
John Irvine, Center — Honorable Mention, UP 
Bill Walker, End — Second Team, AP; Honorable Mention, UP 
Bob Pellegrini, Guard — Honorable Mention, UP 
George Palahunik, Guard — Honorable Mention, UP 

67 



1955 — Bob Pellegrini — Center — UNANIMOUS First Teams 

Ed Vereb, Halfback — First Team, Movietone News, N. Y. Daily 
News, Extension; Second Team, INS; Third Team, AP, UP, 
Sporting News 
Mike Sandusky, Tackle — First Team, Sporting News, Extension; 
Second Team, UP, NEA, N. Y. Daily News; Honorable Men- 
tion, AP 
Jack Davis, Guard — Honorable Mention, AP, UP, NEA 
Frank Tamburello, Quarterback — First Team, Movietone News; 

Honorable Mention, AP, UP, NEA 
Bill Walker, End — Second Team, UP, Sporting News; Honorable 

Mention, NEA 
Russell Dennis, End — First Team, N. Y. Daily News 
Ed Heuring, Tackle — Honorable Mention, AP, UP 
I956 — Mike Sandusky, Tackle — Honorable Mention, AP, UP, INS, NEA 
Jack Davis, Guard — Honorable Mention, AP, UP, INS, NEA 
Gene Alderton, Center — Honorable Mention, AP, UP 
1957 — Rod Breedlove, Guard — Honorable Mention, AP, UP, NEA, Sport- 
ing News 
Ed Cooke, End — Honorable Mention, AP, UP, NEA 
Gene Alderton, Center — Honorable Mention, AP, NEA 
1958 — Rod Breedlove, Guard, Honorable Mention, AP, UPI, NEA, Sport- 
ing News 
Fred Cole, Tackle — Honorable Mention, AP, UPI 
1959 — Rod Breedlove, Guard — Honorable Mention, AP, UPI, NEA 
Jim Joyce, Fullback — Honorable Mention, AP, NEA 
Gary Collins, End — Honorable Mention, AP, UPI 
Tom Gunderman, Guard — Honorable Mention, AP, UPI 
Kurt Schwarz, Tackle — Honorable Mention, UPI 
1960 — Gary Collins, End — Honorable Mention, AP, UPI 

Dale Betty, Quarterback — Honorable Mention, AP 
1961 — Gary Collins, End — First Team, UPI, NEA, American Football 
Coaches Association, Football Writers Association, Pro Football 
Scouts; Second Team, AP. 

Bob Hacker, Center — Honorable Mention, AP, UPI. 
1962 — Dick Shiner, Quarterback — Honorable Mention. AP, UPI 
Walter Rock, Guard — Honorable Mention, AP, UPI 
Roger Shoals, Tackle — Honorable Mention, UPI 
Tom Brown, Halfback — Honorable Mention, AP 



68 



SPECIAL TERRAPIN AWARDS 

The Maryland Ring offered in memory of Charles L. Linhardt to the 
Maryland man who is adjudged the best athlete of the year. 
1952— Dave Cianelli — Back 1960— Rod Breedlove — Guard 

1953 — John Alderton — End 1965 — George Stem — Back 

The Silvester Watch for excellence in athletics to the man who typi- 
ed the best in college athletics: 

1948 — Vic Turyn— Back 1958— Ed Cooke— End 

1949— Joe Tucker — Back 1960 — Jim Joyce — Back 

1950— Elmer Wingate — End 1961— Dale Betty— Back 

1953— Paul Nester— End 1963— Dick Shiner— Back 

1954— Marty Crytzer— End 1966— Neil Bray ton 

The Teke Trophy to the student who during his four years at the 
University has rendered the greatest service to football: 
1950— John Idzik — Back 1958 — Bob Rusevlyan— Back 

1951— Bob Ward— Guard 1959— Kurt Schwarz— Tackle 

1952— Ed Fullerton— Back 1960— Vincent Scott— End 

1953 — Bernie Faloney— Back 1961— Gary Collins— End 

1954 — John Irvine — Center 1962 — Tom Brown — Halfback 

1955— J3ob Pellegrini— Center 1963— Bob Burton— Halfback 

1956— Mike Sandusky— Tackle 1964— Olaf Drozdov— Tackle 

1957— Gene Alderton— Center 1965— George Stem— Back 

The Alvln L. Aubinoe Trophy, for the "Unsung Hero" of the current 
season: 

1956— Al Wharton— Tackle 1961— Dick Barlund— End 

1957 — Wilbur Main — Center 1962— Murnis Banner— Halfback 

1958— Ted Kershner— Back 1963— George Stem— Halfback 

1959— Joe Gardi— Tackle 1964— John Kenny— End 

1960 — Leroy Dietrich — Center 1965 — Charles Krahling — Center 

The Anthony C. Nardo Memorial Trophy to the best Football lineman 
of the year: 

1950— Bob Ward— Guard 1958-^Fred Cole— Tackle 

1951— Bob Ward — Guard 1959— Tom Gunderman— Guard 

1952— William Maletzky— Guard 1960— Gary Collins— End 

1953— Stan Jones— Tackle 1961— Bill Kirchiro— Tackle 

1954 — Bob Pellegrini — Guard 1962 — Dave Crossan — Tackle 

1955— Mike Sandusky— Tackle 1963— Olaf Drozdov— Tackle 

1956— Al Wharton — Tackle 1964 — Fred Joyce — Guard 

1957— Don Healy— Tackle 1965— Dick Absher— End 

The Jim Tatum Memorial Trophy to the "Outstanding Tackle": 
1959— Kurt Schwarz 1963 — Olaf Drozdov 

I960 — Tom Sankovich 1964— Larry Bagranoff 

1961— Bill Kirchiro 1965— Larry Bagranoff 

1962 — Dave Crossan 

The A. V. Williams award for the Outstanding Scholar and Athlete: 
1954— Ron Waller— Back 1960— Dale Betty— Back 

1957— Howard Dare — Back 

The George C. Cook Memorial Scholarship Trophy to the member of 
the team with the highest scholastic average: 

1962 — Don White — Quarterback 1964 — Bruce Springer — Back 

1963 — Dave Nardo — End 1965— Bruce Springer— Back 

The Geary F. Eppley Award to the graduating male senior athlete 
who during his 3 years of varsity competition lettered at least once and 
attained the highest overall scholastic average. 
1963— Dave Nardo— End 

69 



BEST OFFENSIVE BACK 

1952— Chester Hanulak— Halfback 
1953— Ralph Felton— Fullback 
1954— Ron Waller— Halfback 
1955— Ed Vereb— Halfback 
1956— Fred Hamilton— Halfback 
1957 — Bob Rusevlyan — Quarter- 
1958 — Bob Rusevlyan— Quarter- 
back 
back 
1959 — Jim Joyce — Fullback 
1960— Dale Betty— Quarterback 
1961 — Dick Shiner — Quarterback 
1962— Tom Brown— Halfback 
1963 — Dick Shiner — Quarterback 
1964— Tom Hickey— Tailback 
1965— Walt Marciniak— Fullback 

BEST OFFENSIVE LINEMAN 
1952 — Tom Cosgrove — Center 
1953— Marty Crytzer — End 
1954 — Jack Bowersox — Guard 
1955 — Russell Dennis — End 
1956 — Al Wharton— Tackle 
1957 — Tom Gunderman — Guard 
1958— Fred Cole— Tackle 
1959 — Tom Gunderman — Guard 
1960 — Bob Hacker — Center 
1961— Roger Shoals— Tackle 
1962— Roger Shoals— Tackle 
1963— Gene Feher— Center 
1964— Joe Frattaroli— Guard 
1965— Matt Arbutina— Tackle 



BEST DEFENSIVE BACK 

1962— Ed Fullerton— Halfback 
1953— Dick Nolan— Halfback 
1954 — Joe Horning — Halfback 
1955 — Lynn Beightol — Quarter- 
back 
1956— Bob Rusevlyan — Quarter- 
back 
1957 — Bob Layman — Halfback 
1958 — Jim Joyce — Fullback 
1959 — Dwayne Fletcher — Quarter- 
back 
1960 — Jim Davidson — Quarterback 
1961— Tom Brown— Halfback 
1962— Joe Hrezo— Fullback 
1963 — Ernie Arizzi — Halfback 
1964— Bob Sullivan— Halfback 
1965— Fred Cooper— Halfback 

BEST DEFENSIVE LINEMAN 

1952— John Alderton— End 
1953— Bob Morgan— Tackle 
1954 — Tom McDuckie — Guard 
1955— Mike Sandusky— Tackle 
1956— Mike Sandusky— Tackle 
1957 — Rod Breedlove — Guard 
1958— Ben Scotti— End 
1959— Rod Breedlove — Guard 
1960— Tom Sankovich— Tackle 
1961 — Dave Crossan — Tackle 
1962— Walter Rock 
1963 — Joe Ferrante — Guard 
1964— Olaf Drozdov— Tackle 
1965 — Larry Bagranoff — Tackle 



TERPS ON ALL-CONFERENCE TEAMS 
"ATLANTIC COAST SPORTS-WRITERS ASSOCIATION" 



1953— FIRST TEAM 

Stan Jones — Tackle 
Jack Bowersox — Guard 
Bernie Faloney — Back 
Chester Hanulak — Back 

SECOND TEAM 

Bill Walker— End 
Bob Morgan — Tackle 
Ralph Felton— Back 

THIRD TEAM 

John Irvine — Center 
Marty Crytzer — End 

PLAYER OF YEAR 

Bernie Faloney — Back 
COACH OF YEAR 
Jim Tatum 



1954— FIRST TEAM 
Bill Walker— End 
Dick Bielski — Back 
Ronnie Waller — Back 

SECOND TEAM 

Bob Pellegrini — Guard 
John Irvine — Center 

THIRD TEAM 
Jack Bowersox — Guard 

1955— FIRST TEAM 

Mike Sandusky — Tackle 
Jack Davis — Guard 
Bob Pellegrini — Center 
Ed Vereb— Back 

SECOND TEAM 
Bill Walker— End 
Russell Dennis — End 
Frank Tamburello — Back 



70 



PLAYER OF YEAR 

Bob Pellegrini — Center 
COACH OF YEAR 
Jim Tatum 
JACOBS BLOCKING TROPHY 

Bob Pellegrini 
1956— FIRST TEAM 

Mike Sandusky — Tackle 

Jack Davis — Guard 
THIRD TEAM 

Gene Alderton — Center 
1957— FIRST TEAM 

Ed Cooke— End 

Rod Breedlove — Guard 
SECOND TEAM 

Gene Alderton — Center 
1958— SECOND TEAM 

Fred Cole— Tackle 

Rod Breedlove — Guard 
1959— SECOND TEAM 

Tom Gunderman — Guard 

Jim Joyce — Back 

"ASSOCIATED PRESS" 



1960— FIRST TEAM 

Gary Collins — End 

1961— FIRST TEAM 

Gary Collins — End 
Bob Hacker — Center 

SECOND TEAM 

Roger Shoals — Tackle 
Bill Kirchiro — Tackle 

1962— FIRST TEAM 

Walter Rock — Guard 
Dick Shiner — Back 
Tom Brown — Back 

1963— SECOND TEAM 

Dick Shiner — Back 

1964 — FIRST TEAM 

Jerry Fishman — Guard 
1964 — SECOND TEAM 

Olaf Drozdov — Tackle 

Tom Hickey — Back 
1965— DEFENSE TEAM 

Bob Sullivan— Back 



1953— FIRST TEAM 

Stan Jones — Tackle 
Bernie Faloney — Back 
Chester Hanulak — Back 
Ralph Felton — Back 

SECOND TEAM 

Jack Bowersox — Guard 
Bill Walker— End 
Bob Morgan — Tackle 
John Irvine — Center 

1958— FIRST TEAM 

Rod Breedlove — Guard 

SECOND TEAM 
Fred Cole— Tackle 

1959— FIRST TEAM 

Jim Joyce — Back 

Tom Gunderman — Guard 

THIRD TEAM 

Dick Nolan — Back 
Marty Crytzer — End 

1954— FIRST TEAM 
Dick Bielski — Back 
Ronnie Waller — Back 
Bill Walker— End 

SECOND TEAM 

John Irvine — Center 
Bob Pellegrini — Guard 
Jack Bowersox — Guard 



71 



1955— FIRST TEAM 

Bob Pellegrini— Center 
Ed Vereb — Back 
Mike Sandusky — Tackle 
Jack Davis — Guard 
Frank Tamburello — Back 

SECOND TEAM 

Bill Walker— End 
Russell Dennis — End 

PLAYER OF YEAR 

Bob Pellegrini — Center 

1956— FIRST TEAM 

Mike Sandusky — Tackle 
Jack Davis — Guard 
Gene Alderton — Center 

1957— FIRST TEAM 

Rod Breedlove — Guard 
Ed Cooke— End 

SECOND TEAM 
Gene Alderton — Center 

SECOND TEAM 
Rod Breedlove— Guard 
Gary Collins — End 

1960— FIRST TEAM 

Gary Collins — Enid 

SECOND TEAM 
Dale Betty — Back 



1961— FIRST TEAM 

Gary Collins — End 

Bob Hacker — Center 
SECOND TEAM 

Roger Shoals — Tackle 

THIRD TEAM 
Dick Shiner — Quarterback 

1962— FIRST TEAM 

Dick Shiner — Quarterback 



Tom Brown- 
Walter Rock- 



Halfback 
-Guard 



SECOND TEAM 
Roger Shoals — Tackle 
Len Chiaverini — Fullback 

HONORABLE MENTION 
Dave Crossan — Tackle 
Olaf Drosdov — Tackle 



"UNITED PRESS 

1955— FIRST TEAM 

Bill Walker— End 
Bob Pellegrini — Center 
Ed Vereb — Back 
Mike Sandusky — Tackle 

SECOND TEAM 
Jack Davis — Guard 
Frank Tamburello — Back 
Russell Dennis — End 

1956— FIRST TEAM 

Mike Sandusky — Tackle 
Jack Davis — Guard 

1957— FIRST TEAM 
Ed Cooke — End 

SECOND TEAM 
Rod Breedlove — Guard 
Gene Alderton — Center 



INTERNATIONAL" 

1958— FIRST TEAM 

Rod Breedlove — Guard 

SECOND TEAM 
Tom Gunderman — Guard 
Ben Scotti— End 

1959— SECOND TEAM 

Rod Breedlove — Guard 

1960— FIRST TEAM 
Gary Collins — End 

1961— FIRST TEAM 

Gary Collins — End 

1962— FIRST TEAM 

Dick Shiner — Quarterback 
Walter Rock — Guard 



MARYLAND FOOTBALL RECORDS 

SINGLE GAME RECORDS, Individual 

MOST POINTS SCORED: 31 by Bob Shemonski against VPI, 1950 
(5 td's, 1 Pat). 

MOST TD'S SCORED: 5 by Bob Shemonski against VPI, 1950. 

MOST PAT SCORED: 6 by Bob Dean against South Carolina, 1949; 
6 by Don Decker against West Virginia, 1951. 6 by Vincent Scott 
against Virginia, 1960. 

MOST TD PASSES CAUGHT: 2 by Don Gleasner against Virginia, 
1945; 2 by Leroy Mortor against Michigan State, 1946; 2 by Lou 
Gambino against West Virginia, 1947; 2 by Elmer Wingate against 
George Washington, 1948; 2 by Stan Karnash against George Wash- 
ington, 1949; 2 by Pete Augsburger against South Carolina, 1949; 2 
by Henry Fox against Georgetown, 1949; 2 by Lloyd Colteryahn 
against LSU, 1952; 2 by Bill Walker against Alabama, 1953; 2 by 
Gary Collins against Clemson, 1959. 

72 



MOST TD PASSES THROWN: 3 by Tommy Mont against Connecticut 
1942; 3 by Vic Turyn against George Washington, 1948; 3 by Stan 
Lavine against George Washington, 1949; 3 by Jack Scarbath against 
West Virginia, 1951 ; 3 by Jack Scarbath against LSU, 1952, 3 by Dale 
Betty against North Carolina State, 1959; 3 by Dale Betty against 
Clemson, 1959; 3 by Dick Novak against West Virginia, 1959; 3 b> 
Dick Shiner against Penn State, 1961. 

MOST TD RESPONSIBILITY: 5 by Bob Shemonski against VPI, 1950 

MOST FIELD GOALS: 3 by Vincent Scott against West Virginia, 1959 

LONGEST SCORING RUN FROM SCRIMMAGE: 90 yards by Dick 
Burgee against Missouri, 1954. 

LONGEST SCORING PASS: 40 yards by Dick Novak to Jim David- 
son against West Virginia, 1959. 

LONGEST SCORING PASS AND RUN: 92 yards by Stan Lavine to 
Ed Bolton against South Carolina, 1949 (pass 15 yards, run Ti 
yards). 

LONGEST SCORING RUN AFTER PASS: 77 yards by Ed Bolton on 
pass from Stan Lavine against South Carolina, 1949. (Pass 15 yds) 

LONGEST FIELD GOAL: 48 yards by Vincent Scott against West Vir- 
ginia, 1959. 

LONGEST SCORING RETURN OF INTERCEPTED PASS: 100 yards 
(105 actual) by Joe Horning against Missouri, 1951; 100 yards (103 
actual) by Dickie Lewis against North Carolina State, 1956; 100 
yards by Tom Brown against Virginia, 1962. 

LONGEST SCORING RETURN OF INTERCEPTED PASS BY OP- 
PONENT: 93 yards by Walter Matson of Pennsylvania, 1941. 

LONGEST PUNT RETURN FOR TD: 90 yards by Dick Nolan against 
Clemson, 1953. 

LONGEST PUNT RETURN FOR TD BY OPPONENT: 100 yards by 
Frank Brady of Navy, 1951. 

LONGEST KICKOFF RETURN FOR TD: 100 yards (102 actual) by 
Dick Novak and Dennis Condie against Virginia, 1960 (Novak re- 
turned to nine yard line then lateraled to Condie who returned 91 
yards). (101 actual) by Kenny Ambrusko against Navy, 1964. 

LONGEST KICKOFF RETURN FOR TD BY OPPONENT: 93 yards 
by Jim McPherson of North Carolina, 1926. 

LONGEST SCORING RUN WITH RECOVERED FUMBLE: 23 yards by 
Howie Dare against North Carolina, State, 1954. 

LONGEST NON SCORING RUN FROM SCRIMMAGE: 76 yards by 
Harry Bonk against North Carolina, 1948. 

LONGEST NON SCORING PASS: 47 yards by Dale Betty to Ron 
Shaffer against Clemson, 1959. 

LONGEST NON SCORING RUN WITH RECOVERED FUMBLE BY 
OPPONENT. 75 yards by Dave Russell of Washington & Lee, 1942. 

LONGEST NON' SCORING PASS AND RUN: 73 yards by Tom Mont 
to Hubie Werner against Lakehurst, 1942 (pass 32 yards run 
41 yards). 

LONGEST NON SCORING RUN AFTER PASS: 41 yards by Hubie 
Werner against Lakehurst, 1942 on 32 yard pass from Tommy 
Mont. 

LONGEST NON SCORING RUN OF INTERCEPTED PASS: 74 yards 
by Bernie Faloney against LSU, 1952. 

LONGEST NON SCORING KICKOFF RETURN: 76 yards by Howie 
Dare against Miami, 1957. 

LONGEST NON SCORING PUNT RETURN: 67 yards by John Mc- 
Vicker against Syracuse, 1956. 

MOST RUSHES: 33 by Len Chiaverini against South Carolina, 1962. 

73 



MOST YARDS GAINED RUSHING: (NET): 193 yards by Ray Popple- 
man against Western Maryland, 1931 (24 carries). 

BEST RUSHING AVERAGE: 24.0 by Ernie Arizzi against Syracuse, 1961 
4 carries). 

MOST PASSES ATTEMPTED: 35 by Jim Corcoran against Penn State 
1965. (completed 18). 

MOST PASSES COMPLETED: 18 by Jim Corcoran against Penn State 
1965. (35 attempts). 

BEST COMPLETION PERCENTAGE: (minimum of 10 attempts): 
.800 by Tommy Mont against Bainbridge, 1946 (8 completions, 
10 attempts). 

MOST YARDS GAINED PASSING: 243 by Jack Scarbath against 
Navy, 1951 (14 completions, 23 attempts). 

MOST PASSES HAD INTERCEPTED: 4 by Dick Shiner vs. Navy, 1963. 

MOST TOTAL PLAYS (rush and pass): 45 by Jim Corcoran against 
Penn State, 1965. (35 passes, 10 rushes). 

MOST NET YARDS GAINED (rushing and passing) : 272 by Dick Shiner 
against SMU, 1962 (238 passing — 34 rushing). 

BEST OFFENSIVE AVERAGE (rushing and passing): (minimum 4 
plays. 24.0 by Ernie Arizzi against Syracuse, 1961 (4 plays, 96 
yards). 

MOST PASSES CAUGHT: 10 by Darryl Hill against Clemson, 1963. 

MOST YARDS GAINED ON PASS RECEPTIONS: 131 yards by Lloyd 
Colteryahn against Alabama, 1952 (8 receptions). 

MOST PASSES INTERCEPTED: 3 by Bob Shemonski against Geor- 
gia, 1951. 3 by Tom Brown against Air Force, 1961. 

MOST YARDS GAINED ON INTERCEPTION RUNBACKS: 111 yards 

by Dickie Lewis against North Carolina State, 1956. 
MOST PUNTS: 10 by Bill Guckeyson against Syracuse, 1936. 10 by 

Jack Targarona against West Virginia, 1950. 

MOST TOTAL YARDS PUNTING: 510 by Bill Guckeyson against 

Syracuse, 1936. 
BEST PUNTING AVERAGE: 53 yards by Lynn Beightol against Okla- 
homa, 1956 Orange Bowl (3 punts). 
LONGEST PUNT WITH ROLL: 88 yards by John Fritsch against 

Miami, 1956. (Note) "Untz" Brooke Brewer had a 93 yard punt 

against VMI, 1916. 
LONGEST PUNT WITH ROLL BY OPPONENT: 84 yards by Charlie 

Justice of North Carolina, 1948. 
MOST PUNTS RETURNED: 6 by Joe Petruzzo against LSU, 1951 

(67 yards). 6 by Bobby Collins vs. Syracuse 1965 (41 yards). 
MOST YARDS GAINED RETURNING PUNTS: 146 by Bob Shemonski 

against North Carolina State, 1950 (5 returns). 
MOST PUNTS BLOCKED: 1 by several men. 

MOST KICKOFFS RETURNED: 5 by Tom Brown against Miami, 1962. 
MOST YARDS RETURNING KICKOFFS: 153 by Tom Brown against 

Miami, 1962, (5 returns). 
MOST OPPONENTS' FUMBLES RECOVERED: 3 by Tom Gnnderman 

against Miami, 1957. 

74 



SINGLE GAME RECORDS, Team 

HIGHEST SCORE: Maryland 80 Washington College 0, 1927. 

MOST TOTAL POINTS SCORED BY BOTH TEAMS: 87, 1954 (Mary- 
land 74, Missouri 13). 

HIGHEST SCORE BY OPPONENT: Navy 76, Maryland 0, 1913. 

MOST TD'S SCORED: 12 against Washington College, 1927. 

MOST PAT SCORED: 8 against Washington College, 1927; 8 against 
Missouri, 1954. 

MOST SAFETIES SCORED: 2 against Delaware, 1947, 2 against 
Georgetown, 1950. 

MOST FIELD GOALS SCORED: 3 against West Virginia, 1959. 

MOST TD'S SCORED PASSING: 4 against George Washington, 1948 
(3 by Vic Turyn, 1 by John Idzik); 4 against Navy, 1952 (2 by 
Jack Scarbath, 1 by Lloyd Colteryahn, 1 by Bernie Faloney); 
4 against George Washington, 1954 (2 by Frank Tamburello, 1 by 
Charles Boxold, 1 by Lynn Beightol. 

MOST OPPONENTS TD'S SCORED PASSING: 4 by Wake Forest 
1958 (3 by Norman Snead, 1 by Charlie Parker). 

MOST TOTAL PLAYS: 92 against Texas, 1959. 

MOST RUSHES: 76 against Miami, 1958. 

FEWEST RUSHES: 24 against N.C. State 1965. 

MOST NET YARDS GAINED RUSHING: 577 against VPI, 1950. 

FEWEST NET YARDS GAINED RUSHING: Minus 58 against Navy 
1965. 

FEWEST NET YARDS GAINED RUSHING BY OPPONENTS: Minus 
21 by West Virginia, 1951, Minus 21 by UCLA, 1955. 

BEST AVERAGE PER RUSH: 10.5 yards against VPI, 1950 (577 yds. 
in 55 rushes). 

Mr 1ST PASSES ATTEMPTED: 40 against Virginia, 1958 (18 comple- 
tions for 330 yds.) 

MOST PASSES COMPLETED: 21 against North Carolina, 1958 (35 
attempts). 

FEWEST PASSES COMPLETED: against Michigan State, 1944 (1 
attempt) ; against Vanderbilt, 1948 (12 attempts) ; against 
Missouri, 1951 (3 attempts). 

FEWEST PASSES ATTEMPTED: 1 against Michigan State, 1944. 

MOST PASSES ATTEMPTED BY OPPONENTS: 57 by West Virginia, 
1951 (19 completions). 

FEWEST PASSES COMPLETED BY OPPONENTS: by Syracuse, 
1939 (5 attempts); by Michigan State, 1944 (0 attempts); by 
Delaware, 1948 (3 attempts); by Boston University, 1952 (6 at- 
tempts); by Kentucky, 1956 (3 attempts). 

FEWEST YARDS GAINED PASSING BY OPPONENTS: Minus 1 by 
Clemson, 1956. 

MOST YARDS GAINED PASSING: 330 against Virginia, 1958 (18 
completions, 40 attempts). 

FEWEST YARDS GAINED PASSING: against Michigan State, 1944; 
Vanderbilt, 1948; Missouri, 1951. 

BEST COMPLETION PERCENTAGE: (min. 10 attempts) .800 against 
Georgia, 1952 (8 completions, 10 attempts). 

MOST PASSES INTERCEPTED: 7 against Georgia, 1951. 

MOST PASSES HAD INTERCEPTED: 6 by Pennsylvania, 1941. 

MOST TOTAL YARDS GAINED (rush and pass): 602 against West 
Virginia, 1951 (523 rushing, 79 passing). 

FEWEST TOTAL YARDS GAINED (rush and pass): 29 against Syra- 
cuse, 1959. 

MOST TOTAL FIRST DOWNS: 29 against Wake Forest, 1963. 

75 



FEWEST TOTAL FIRST DOWNS: 1 against Michigan State, 1944. 

MOST FIRST DOWNS RUSHING: 24 against Washington & Lee, 1951. 

FEWEST FIRST DOWNS RUSHING: 1 against Michigan State, 1944, 
1 against Syracuse, 1959. 

MOST FIRST DOWNS PASSING: 13 against SMU, 1962. 

FEWEST FIRST DOWNS PASSING: against 12 teams (last one 
South Carolina 1958). 

MOST FUMBLES: 8 against Georgia, 1952 (lost 2). 

FEWEST FUMBLES: against VMI, 1945; against Kentucky, 1954; 
against South Carolina, 1958; against South Carolina, 1959; 
against West Virginia, 1960; against Virginia, 1960. 

MOST FUMBLES BY OPPONENTS: 8 by South Carolina, 1948; 8 by 
Mississippi, 1953. 

MOST FUMBLES LOST: 6 against North Carolina. 1947. 

MOST OPPONENTS FUMBLES RECOVERED: 5 against West Virginia, 
1950; 5 against Missouri in 1950 Gator Bowl; 5 against North Caro- 
lina, 1960. 

MOST PENALTIES: 18 against VPI, 1950. 

MOST PENALTIES BY OPPONENTS: 15 by Miami, 1957. 

MOST YARDS PENALIZED: 130 against VPI, 1948; 130 against VPI, 
1950. 

MOST YARDS OPPONENTS PENALIZED; 135 by North Carolina, 
1953. 

FEWEST PENALTIES: against Duke, 1941. 

FEWEST PENALTIES BY OPPONENTS: by Western Maryland, 
1937; by Western Maryland, 1939; by Florida, 1939; by Wash- 
ington & Lee, 1941; by William & Mary, 1945; by South Caro- 
lina, 1953. 

MOST PUNTS: 14 against Virginia, 1937; 14 against Western Mary- 
land, 1940. 

FEWEST PUNTS: 1 against Washington & Lee, 1953; 1 against Geor- 
gia, 1953; 1 against Syracuse, 1955; 1 against North Carolina 
State, 1954; 1 against South Carolina, 1962. 

MOST TOTAL YARDS PUNTING: 510 against Syracuse, 1936 (10 
punts). 

BEST PUNTING AVERAGE: 51.7 yards against Washington & Lee 
1951 (155 yds. on 3 punts). 



SEASON RECORDS, Individual 

MOST POINTS SCORED: 97 by Bob Shemonski in 10 games, 1950; 
96 by Lou Gambino in 10 games, 1947; 96 by Ed Vereb in 10 
games, 1955; Gambino added 3 td's in the 20-20 1948 Gator Bowl 
tie with Georgia for 11 game total of 114 points; Vereb scored i 
td. in the 20-6 loss to Oklahoma in the 1956 Orange Bowl for a 
11 game total of 102 points. 

MOST TOUCHDOWNS SCORED: 16 by Lou Gambino, 1947; 16 by Bob 
Shemonski, 1950; 16 by Ed Vereb, 1955; all in 10 games. Gambinc 
added 3 in the 1948 Gator Bowl for 11 game total of 19 and Vereb 
1 in the 1956 Orange Bowl for 11 game total of 17. 

MOST PAT SCORED: 41 by Don Decker in 10 games, 1951, including 
4 for 4 in 28-13 victory over Tennessee in the 1952 Sugar Bowl. 
(55 attempts). 

MOST FIELD GOALS SCORED: 9 by Bernardo Bramson, 1964. 

MOST TD r ASSES THROWN: 12 by Tommy Mont in 9 games, 1942. 

MOST TD PASSES CAUGHT: 7 by Darryl Hill, 10 games, 1964. 

76 



MOST PASSES ATTEMPTED: 222 by Dick Shiner, 1963 (10 games), 

completed 108. 
MOST PASSES COMPLETED: 121 by Dick Shiner, 1962, (10 games), 203 

attempts. 
BEST PASSING PERCENTAGE: .621 by Dale Betty, 1960 (10 games) 

completed 82 of 132. 
MOST YARDS GAINED PASSING: 1324 by Dick Shiner in 10 games, 

1962, (121 completions in 203 attempts). 
MOST PASSES CAUGHT: 47 by Tom Brown in 10 games, 1962, (557 

yards). 
MOST PASSES INTERCEPTED: 10 by Bob Sullivan in 10 games, 1965. 
MOST YARDS RETURNING INTERCEPTED PASSES: 147 by Joe 

Horning on 6 interceptions in 9 games, 1951. 
MOST RUSHES: 182 by Tom Hickey in 10 games, 1964. 
BEST RUSHING AVERAGE PER CARRY: 9.8 yards by Chet Hanu- 

lak, 1953. 
MOST NET YARDS RUSHING: 904 by Lou Gambino in 10 games. 

1947; 834 by Ed Modzelewski in 9 games, 1951; Gambino added 151 

yds. in 1948 Gator Bowl for 10 game total of 1069 yards; 

Modzelewski added 153 yds. in 1952, Sugar Bowl for 10 game total 

of 987 yards. (Note) Ray Poppleman gained 1350 yards, 1931 but 

his total was not NET total and is believed to be total offense. 
MOST AVERAGE NET YARDS RUSHING PER GAME: 92.7 by 

Modzelewski in 9 games, 1951; 90.4 by Lou Gambino in 10 games 

1947; Modzelewski added 153 yds. in 1952 Sugar Bowl for 10 game 

avg. of 98.7 yds. per game. Gambino added 151 yds. in 1948 Gator 

Bowl for 11 game average of 97.2 yds. 
MOST TOTAL YARDS (Rushing and Passing): 1426 by Dick Shiner 

in 10 games, 1962. 
MOST PUNTS: 61 by Jack Targarona in 10 games, 1950. 
BEST PUNTING AVERAGE: 43.7 by Bill Walker in 10 games, 1955 

(15 punts); Walker added 4 punts in the 1956 Orange Bowl for a 

11 game average of 41.2 (19 punts). 
MOST PUNTS RETURNED: 28 by Bob Shemonski in 10 games, 1950. 
MOST YARDS GAINED ON PUNT RETURNS: 505 by Bob Shemonski 

in 10 games, 1950. 
BEST PUNT RETURN AVERAGE: (More than 3): 24.5 by Tom Brown 

on 8 returns, 1961. 
MOST KICKOFFS RETURNED: 13 by Darryl Hill, 1963 for 317 yards. 
MOST YARDS GAINED ON KICKOFF RETURNS: 352 by Dennis Con- 
die on 10 returns, 1960. 
BEST KICKOFF RETURN AVERAGE (more than 3): 44 yards by 

Howie Dare, 1957 (6 returns for 264 yds.) 

SEASON RECORDS, Team 

MOST POINTS SCORED: 353 in 9 games, 1951; 381 in 10 games, 1951 

including 28-13 victory over Tennessee in the 1952 Sugar Bowl. 
FEWEST POINTS SCORED: 39 in 9 games, 1940. 
MOST OPPONENTS POINTS SCORED: 235 in 9 games, 1938. 
FEWEST OPPONENTS POINTS SCORED: 31 in 10 games, 1953; 38 

in 11 games including the 7-0 loss to Oklahoma in the 1954 

Orange Bowl. 
MOST TD'S SCORED: 52 in 9 games, 1951; 56 in 10 games, including 

the 28-13 victory over Tennessee in the 1952 Sugar Bowl. 
MOST FIELD GOALS: 9 in 1964 (all by Bernardo Bramson). 

77 



MOST PAT'S SCORED: 38 in 9 games, 1951; 42 in 10 games in- 
cluding the 28-13 victory over Tennessee in the 1952 Sugar Bowl. 

BEST PERCENTAGE KICKING PAT'S: .1000 on 17 of 17 kicks, 1961. 

BEST SEASON: 1951— Won 10 Lost (includes 28-13 win over Tennessee 
in Sugar Bowl). 1953— Won 10 Lost (10-1 including 7-0 loss to 
Oklahoma in 1954 Orange Bowl). 1955 — Won 10 Lost (10-1 includ- 
ing 20-6 loss to Oklahoma in 1956 Orange Bowl). 

WORST SEASON: 1944: Won 1— Lost 7— Tied 1. 

MOST FIRST DOWNS : 183 in 10 games, 1962. 

MOST FIRST DOWNS BY OPPONENTS: 182 in 1960. 

MOST YARDS GAINED RUSHING: 2921 in 9 games, 1951; 3210 in 

10 games, 1951 including 28-13 victory over Tennessee in 1952 
Sugar Bowl. 

MOST YARDS GAINED RUSHING BY OPPONENTS: 2022 in 10 
games, 1956. 

MOST YARDS GAINED PASSING: 1480 in 10 games, 1962. 

MOST YARDS GAINED PASSING BY OPPONENTS: 1391 in 9 games, 
1951; 1466 in 10 games including 28-13 victory over Tennessee in 
1952 Sugar Bowl. 

MOST NET YARDS GAINED (rushing and passing): 3S22 in 9 games, 
1951 (2921 rushing and 901 passing) ; 4174 in 10 games including 
the 28-13 victory over Tennessee in the 1952 Sugar Bowl (3210 
rushing, 964 passing). 

MOST NET YARDS GAINED BY OPPONENTS (rushing & passing). 
2929 in 1960 (1822 rushing 1107 passing). 

FEWEST NET YARDS GAINED (rushing and passing) BY OPPON- 
ENTS: 1961 in 10 games, 1955 (761 yards rushing, 930 passing); 
Oklahoma gained 202 rushing, 53 passing in 1956 Orange Bowl for 

11 game total of 1946. 

MOST PASSES ATTEMPTED: 249 in 10 games, 1963 (113 completions). 
MOST PASSES COMPLETED: 135 in 10 games, 1962 (244 attempts). 
BEST PASSING PERCENTAGE: .577 in 10 games, 1960 (105 of 182). 
BEST PASSING PERCENTAGE BY OPPONENTS: .517 in 10 games, 

1959 (90 completions in 174 attempts). 
MOST PASS INTERCEPTIONS: 34 in 9 games, 1951, 38 in 10 games 

including the 28-13 victory over Tennessee in the 1952 Sugar Bowl. 
MOST PASS INTERCEPTIONS BY OPPONENTS: 23 in 10 games, 

1948. 
MOST FUMBLES: 44 in 10 games, 1950. 

MOST OPPONENTS FUMBLES: 40 in 10 games, I960. (Lost 19). 
FEWEST FUMBLES: 17 in 10 games, 1960 (lost 7). 
MOST PENALTIES: 78 in 11 games, 1953 (492.5 yards). 
MOST YARDAGE LOST PENALTIES: 694 in 10 games, 1956 (72 

penalties). 
MOST PUNTS: 63 in 10 games, 1957. 
MOST PUNTS BY OPPONENTS: 85 in 10 games, 1950. 
MOST YARDS ALL PUNTS: 2251 in 10 games, 1950 (62 punts). 
BEST PUNTING AVERAGE: 41.5 yards in 10 games, 1953 (37 punts). 

CAREER RECORDS, Individual 

MOST POINTS SCORED REGULAR SEASON: 126 by Ed Modzelewski, 
28 games, 1949-51 (21 td's) (note) he added 1 td in 1950 Gator 
Bowl for total of 132). 

MOST POINTS SCORED ALL GAMES: 133 by Bob Shemonski, 30 
games, 1949-51 ( 22 td's, 1 pat). Includes 2 td's in 1950, Gator Bowl, 
1 td in 1952 Sugar Bowl. 

MOST POINTS BY PLACEKICKER REGULAR SEASON: 80 by Bern- 
ardo Bramson, 20 games, 1964-65 (32 pat, 33 att. 16 field goals). 

78 



MOST POINTS BY PLACEKICKER ALL GAMES: 80 by Bernardo 
Bramson, 20 games. (Total of 32 pat in 33 att., 16 field goals). 
MOST FIELD GOALS REGULAR SEASON GAMES: 16 by Bernardo 
Bramson, 20 games, 1964-65. (NOTE) "Untz" Brooke Brewer kicked 14, 

1916-21 employing both drop kick and placement. 
MOST TD PASSES CAUGHT REGULAR SEASON: 12 by Gary Collins, 

1959-61 (30 games). 
MOST TOUCHDOWN PASSES THROWN REGULAR SEASON: 22 by 

Jack Scarbath, 28 games, 1950-52. 
MOST PASSES ATTEMPTED: 536 by Dick Shiner, 30 games, 1961-63. 
MOST PASSES COMPLETED: 287 by Dick Shiner, 1961-63, (536 at- 
tempts), 20 games. 
BEST COMPLETION PERCENTAGE REGULAR SEASON: .583 by Dale 

Betty 1958-60, 30 games. (127 for 218). 
MOST YARDS GAINED PASSING: 3410 by Dick Shiner, 30 games, 

1961-63. 
MOST PASSES CAUGHT REGULAR SEASON: 74 by Gary Collins, 1959- 

61, 30 games. 
MOST YARDAGE GAINED BY PASSES REGULAR SEASON: 1182 by 

Gary Collins, 30 games, 1959-61. 
MOST PASSES INTERCEPTED: 17 by Tom Brown, 30 games, 1960-62. 
MOST TOTAL YARDS GAINED RUSHING REGULAR SEASON: 1913 

by Ed Modzelewski, 28 games, 1949-51. 
MOST TOTAL YARDS GAINED RUSHING ALL GAMES: 2102 by Ed 

Modzelewski, 30 games, includes 36 yards in 1950 Gator Bowl and 

153 yds. in 1952 Sugar Bowl. 
MOST RUSHES REGULAR SEASON: 340 by Ed Modzelewski, 28 

games, 1949-51. 
MOST RUSHES ALL GAMES: 380 by Ed Modzelewski, 30 games, in- 
cludes 12 in 1950 Gator Bowl and 28 in 1952 Sugar Bowl. 
BEST RUSHING AVERAGE REGULAR SEASON: 8:1 yds. by Chet 

Hanulak, 28 games, 1951-53, (1544 yds., 190 carries). 
BEST RUSHING AVERAGE ALL GAMES: 7.9 yds. by Chet Hanulak, 

30 games, includes 35 yds. on 4 carries in 1952 Sugar Bowl and 39 

yds. on 12 carries in 1954 Orange Bowl. 
MOST TOTAL PLAYS (rush and pass) REGULAR SEASON: 790 by 

Dick Shiner, 30 games, 1961-63. 
MOST TOTAL PLAYS (rush and pass) ALL GAMES: 790 by Dick 

Shiner, 30 games. (Avg. gain per play 3.0 yds.). 
MOST TOTAL YARDS GAINED (rush and pass) REGULAR SEASON: 

2838 by Jack Scarbath, 28 games, 1950-52. 
MOST TOTAL YARDS GAINED (rush and pass) ALL GAMES: 2909 

by Jack Scarbath, includes 71 yds. in 1952 Sugar Bowl. (avg. 5.7 

yds. per play.) 



79 



YEAR BY YEAR RECORDS 



MARYLAND 
AGGIES 

1892 (0-3-0) 

St. Johns 50 

Johns Hop 62 

Episcopal Hi. -16 

1893 (6-0-0) 

36 Eastern Hi 

10 Central Hi 

18 Bait. City Col... 

6 St. Johns Col... 

18 W. Md. Col ....10 

16 Orient Ath. CI. 6 

1894 (3-3-0) 

52 W. Md. Col 

12 Wash. Col 

6 St. Johns 22 

6 Georgetown .... 4 

Col. Ath. CI. -26 

Mt. St. Marys „24 

1895 — No team 
No Games 

1896 (6-2-2) 

Eastern Hi 6 

Gallaudet 

34 Business Hi .— 

10 Central Hi 6 

18 Alexandria Hi.. 
20 Bethel Mil Ac ..10 

Episcopal Hi. .. 6 

16 West. Md 6 

14 Central Hi 

U. of Md 

1897 (2-4-0) 

24 Central Hi 6 

4 Eastern Hi 

J. Hopkins 30 

4 St. Johns 6 

6 Gallaudet 16 

Bait. Med Col.-lO 

1898 (2-5-0) 

5 Columbian U. ..17 
West. Md 32 

36 Eastern Hi 

Gallaudet 33 

Johns Hop 16 

Episcopal Hi —37 

27 Rock Hill Col... 

1899 (1-4-0) 

West Md 21 

26 Eastern Hi 

Johns. Hop 40 

Delaware Col. 34 
St. Johns 62 

1900 (3-4-1) 

Western Hi — 

Gib. Ath. CI 17 

G'town Prep .. 5 

6 Episcopal Hi —34 
5 Gonzaga Hi 11 



15 G'town Prep .. 
21 Gonzaga Hi — 
21 Char Hall Ac .. 

1901 (1-7-0) 

6 Del. Col 24 

10 Gallaudet Re. „11 

Johns Hop 6 

6 Rock Hill Col-11 
Central Hi 11 

27 U.S. Marines .. 
Wal'k Ath CI -36 
West. Md 30 

1902 (3-5-2) 

Georgetown —27 

5 Mt. St. Jos 

11 Columbian U. „10 

6 Olvmpia Ath. .. 

Wash. Col 

Mt. St. Marys .. 5 

6 West. Md 26 

U. of Md 5 

Johns Hop 17 

Del. Col 

1903 (7-4-0) 

Georgetown —28 

5 Clifton Ath 

21 Gunton Tern. „ 
St. Johns 18 

28 Wash. Col 

27 Tech Hi 

Mt. St. Mar .... 2 

6 West. Md 

11 U. of Md 

Dela. Col 16 

6 Columbian U. .. 

1904 (-2-4-2) 

Georgetown —22 
Ran. Macon — 
Ftress Monroe 

11 Mt. St. Mar 6 

West. Md 5 

22 Gallaudet 5 

U. of Md 6 

Dela. Col 18 

1905 C6-4-0) 

20 Bait Poly In — 

16 Gallaudet 

West. Md 10 

Navy 17 

17 Wm. & Mary .. 

28 Mt. St. Josephs 
27 St. Johns 5 

Wash. Col 17 

23 XT. of Md 5 

Dela. Col 12 

1906 (5-3-0) 

5 Tech Hi ° 

22 Bait City Col .. 

Navy 12 

Georgetown —28 
80 



Mt. Wash. CI. -29 

20 St. Johns 4 

16 Rock Hill Col. 
35 Wash. Col 

1907 (3-6-0) 

13 Tech High 

Georgetown —10 

5 Richmond Col..ll 
Naw 12 

6 Mt. St. Mar 12 

10 Geo. Wash 

10 Wash. Col 5 

St. Johns 16 

Gallaudet 5 

1908 (3-8-0) 

5 Central Hi 

5 Tech High 6 

Richmond Col..22 

Johns Hop 10 

Navy 57 

5 Gallaudet 

Fred'bg Col 10 

12 Balto Poly 6 

St. Johns 31 

Wash. Col 11 

Geo. Wash 57 

1909 (2-5-0) 

Richmond Col. 12 
Johns Hopkins 9 
Tech High 11 

5 Rock Hill 

George Wash. 26 
N C. State — 33 

14 Gallaudet 12 

1910 (4-3-1) 

12 Central Hi 

20 Richmond Col. 

11 Johns Hop 11 

21 Catholic U 

11 Geo. Wash 

V.M.I 8 

St. Johns 6 

3 West. Md 17 

1911 (4-4-2) 

6 Tech Hi 

Richmond 

5 Fred'bfr Col 

Central Hi 14 

3 Johns Hon 6 

6 Catholic U R 

St. Johns 27 

R Wash. Col 17 

6 West Md 

6 Gallaudet 2 

1912 (6-1-1) 

31 Tech Hi 6 

46 Richmond Col. 
58 U. of Md 

13 Johns Hop 

St. Johns 27 

13 Gallaudet 6 



17 West Md 7 

13 Perm Mil. Col. 13 

1913 (6-3-0) 

27 Balto City 10 

45 Richmond Col. 
26 Johns Hop 

46 West Md 

Navy 76 

13 St. Johns 

26 Wash. Col 

Gallaudet .... 13 
7 Penn Mil 27 

1914 (5-3-0) 

Balto. Poly 6 

6 Catholic U 

13 West Md 20 

14 Johns Hop 

10 St. Johns 

3 Wash. Col 

Gallaudet 23 

26 Penn Mil 

1915 (6-3-0) 

31 Balto Poly 

Haverford 7 

Catholic U 16 

10 Gallaudet 3 

14 Penn Mil 13 

27 St. Johns 14 

28 Wash Col 13 

51 West Md 

Johns Hop 3 

MARYLAND 
STATE 

1916 (6-2-0) 

6 Dickinson 

7 Navy 14 

15 V.M.I 9 

6 Haverford 7 

31 St. Johns 6 

10 N.Y.U 7 

13 Catholic U 9 

54 Johns Hop 

1917 (4-3-1) 

20 Dela. Col 

Navy 62 

14 V.M.I 14 

29 Wake Forest ..13 

6 N.C. State 10 

13 St. Johns 3 

Penn State 57 

7 Johns Hop 

1918 (4-1-1) 

6 American U 13 

7 V.M.I 6 

19 West Md 

6 New York U. .. 2 

19 St. Johns 14 

Johns Hop 

1919 (5-4-0) 

6 Swarthmore ....10 

13 Virginia 

West Va 27 



Va. Poly 6 

Yale 31 

27 St. Johns 

13 Catholic U 

20 West Md 

14 Johns Hop 

UNIVERSITY 
OF MARYLAND 

1920 (7-2-0) 

54 Randolph Ma .. 

Rutgers ..._ 6 

Princeton 35 

14 Catholic U 

27 Wash. Col 

7 Va. Poly 

13 North Car 

10 Syracuse 7 

24 Johns Hop 7 

1921 (3-5-1) 

3 Rutgers 

Syracuse 42 

3 St. Johns 7 

10 Va. Poly 7 

7 North Car 16 

Yale 28 

16 Catholic U 

Carnegie Tech 21 

6 N. C. State 6 

1922 (4-5-1) 

7 Third Army .... 

Richmond 

Pennsylvania ..12 

Princeton 26 

3 North Car 27 

Va. Poly 21 

3 Yale 45 

3 Johns Hop 

54 Catholic U 

7 N. C. State 6 

1923 (7-2-1) 

53 Randolph Ma... 
3 Pennsylvania .. 

23 Richmond 

7 Va. Poly 16 

14 North Car 

26 St. Johns 

14 Yale 16 

26 N. C. State 12 

40 Catholic U 6 

6 Johns Hop 6 

1924 (3-3-3) 

23 Wash. Col 

7 Wash. & Lee -19 
38 Richmond 

Va. Poly J.2 

6 North Car 

Catholic U 

Yale 47 

N. C. State 

Johns Hop 

1925 (2-5-1) 

13 Wash. Col 

16 Rutgers 

81 



Va. Poly 3 

Virginia 6 

North Car 16 

14 YaLe 43 

3 W. & L 7 

7 Johns Hop 7 

1926 (5-4-1) 

63 Wash. Col 

South Car 12 

Chicago 21 

8 Va. Poly 24 

14 North Car 6 

38 Gallaudet 7 

15 Yale 

6 Virginia 6 

W. & L 3 

17 Johns Hop 14 

1927 (4-7-0) 

80 Wash. Col 

26 South Car 

6 North Car 7 

13 Va. Poly 7 

10 V. M. I." 6 

6 W. & L 13 

6 Yale 30 

Virginia 21 

20 Vanderbilt ...-39 
13 Johns Hop 14 

6 Florida 7 

1928 (6-3-1) 

31 Wash. Col 

19 North Car 26 

7 South Car 21 

13 West Md 6 

V. M. 1 

6 Va. Poly 9 

6 Yale 

18 Virginia 2 

6 W. & L 

26 Johns Hop 6 

1929 (4-4-2) 

34 Wash. Col 7 

North Car 43 

6 South Car 26 

13 Gallaudet 6 

6 V. M. 1 7 

13 Virginia 13 

13 Yale 13 

24 Va. Poly 

39 Johns Hop 6 

West Md 12 

1930 (7-5-0) 

60 Wash. Col 6 

13 Yale 40 

21 North Car 28 

21 St. Johns 13 

20 V. M. 1 

14 Virginia 6 

41 W. & L 7 

13 V. Poly 7 

Navy 6 

21 Johns Hop 

7 Vanderbilt 22 

West Md 7 



1931 (8-1-1) 

13 Wash. Col 

7 Virginia 6 

6 Navy _... 

G Kentucky 6 

41 V. M. 1 20 

20 Va. Poly 

12 Vanderbilt 39 

13 W. & L 7 

35 Johns Hop 14 

41 West Md 6 

1932 (5-6-0) 

63 Wash. Col 

6 Virginia 7 

6 Va. Poly 23 

Duke 34 

24 St. Johns 7 

12 V. M. 1 7 

Vanderbilt 13 

7 Navy 28 

6 W. & L 

23 Johns Hop 

7 West Md 39 

1933 (3-7-0) 

20 St. Johns 

Va. Poly 14 

Tulane 20 

13 V. M. 1 19 

7 West Md 13 

Virginia 6 

7 Duke 38 

27 Johns Hop 7 

33 W. & L 13 

Florida 19 

1934 (7-3-0) 

13 St. Johns 

W. & L 7 

13 Navy 16 

14 Va. Poly 9 

21 Florida 

20 Virginia 

23 V. M. 1 

14 Indiana 17 

6 Georgetown .... 

19 Johns Hop 

1935 (7-2-2) 

39 St. Johns 6 

7 Va. Poly 

North Car 33 

6 V. M. 1 

20 Florida 6 

14 Virginia 7 

7 Indiana J.3 

W. & L 

12 Georgetown .... 6 
Syracuse 

22 West Md 7 

1936 (6-5-0) 

20 St. Johns 

6 Va. Poly 

North Car 14 

21 Virginia 



12 Richmond 

20 Syracuse 

6 Florida 7 

7 V. M. 1 13 

6 Georgetown .... 7 

19 W. & L 6 

West Md 12 

1937 (8-2-0) 

28 St. Johns 

21 Pennsylvania ..28 

6 West Md 

3 Virginia 

13 Syracuse 

13 Florida 7 

9 V. M. 1 7 

14 Penn State 21 

12 Georgetown ... . 2 

8 W. & L 

1938 (2-7-0) 

6 Richmond 19 

Penn State 33 

Syracuse 53 

14 West Md 8 

19 Virginia 27 

14 V. M. 1 47 

7 Florida 21 

7 Georgetown .—14 

19 W. & L 13 

1939 (2-7-0) 

26 Hamp.-Syd 

12 West Md 

7 Virginia 12 

12 Rutgers 25 

Florida 14 

Georgetown ....20 

Penn State 12 

V. M. 1 13 

7 Syracuse 10 

1940 (2-6-1) 

6 Hamp.-Syd 7 

Pennsylvania ..51 

6 Virginia 19 

Florida 19 

6 West Md 

Georgetown ....41 
V. M. 1 20 

14 Rutgers 7 

7 W. & L. 7 

1941 (3-5-1) 

18 Hamp.-Syd 

6 West Md 6 

Duke 50 

13 Florida 12 

6 Pennsylvania ..55 
Georgetown ....26 

Rutgers 20 

V. M. 1 27 

6 W. & L 

1942 (7-2-0) 

34 Connecticut .... 

14 Lake NAS 

82 



27 Rutgers 13 

V. M. 1 29 

51 West Md 

13 Florida 

Duke 42 

27 Virginia 12 

32 W. & L 28 

1943 (4-5-0) 

7 Curtis B. CG ..13 
13 Wake Forest .. 7 

19 Rich. AAB 6 

2 West Va 6 

Penn State 45 

43 Greenv. AAB ..18 

Virginia 39 

Bainbridge 46 

21 V. M. 1 14 

1944 (1-7-1) 

Hamp.-Syd 12 

Wake Forest ..39 

6 West Va 6 

Mich. State .... 8 

6 Florida 14 

7 Virginia 18 

Mich. State ....33 

19 Penn State 34 

8 V. M. 1 6 

1945 (6-2-1) 

60 Guilford Col. .. 6 

21 Richmond 

22 Merch. M. A 6 

13 Va. Poly 21 

13 West Va 13 

14 W. & M 33 

38 V. M. 1 

19 Virginia 13 

19 S. Car 13 

1946 (3-6-0) 

54 Bainbridge 

7 Richmond 37 

North Car 33 

6 Va. Poly 

7 W. & M 41 

17 South Car 21 

24 W. & L 7 

14 Mich. State 26 

7 N. C. State 28 

1947 (7-2-2) 

19 South Car 13 

43 Delaware 19 

18 Richmond 6 

7 Duke 19 

21 Va. Poly 19 

27 West Va 

32 Duquesne 

North Car 19 

20 Vanderbilt 6 

N. C. State .... 

(Gator Bowl, 
Jan. 1, 1948) 
20 Georgia ..._ 20 



1948 (6-4-0) 

19 Richmond 

21 Delaware 

28 Va. Poly 

12 Duke 13 

47 Geo. Wash 

27 Miami 13 

19 South Car 7 

20 North Car. 49 

Vanderbilt 34 

14 West Va 16 

1949 (9-1-0) 

34 Va. Poly 7 

33 Georgetown .... 7 
7 Mich. State -.14 

14 N. C. State 6 

44 South Car 7 

40 Geo. Wash 14 

14 Boston U 13 

47 West Va 7 

13 Miami 

(Gator Bowl, 

Jan. 1, 1950) 
20 Missouri 7 

1950 (7-2-1) 

7 Georgia 27 

35 Navy 21 

34 Mich. State .... 7 

25 Georgetown —14 

13 N. C. State 16 

26 Duke 14 

23 Geo. Wash 7 

7 North Car 7 

41 West Va 

63 V. P. 1 7 

1951 (10-0-0) 
54 W. & L 14 

33 Geo. Wash 6 

43 Georgia 7 

14 North Car 7 

27 L. S. U 

35 Missouri 

40 Navy 21 

53 N. C. State 

54 West Va 7 

(Sugar Bowl, 

Jan. 1, 1952) 

28 Tennessee 13 

1952 (7-2-0) 

13 Missouri 10 

13 Auburn 7 

28 Clemson 

37 Georgia 

38 Navy 7 

34 L. S". U 6 

34 Boston U 7 

14 Mississippi 21 

7 Alabama 27 

1953 (10-1-0) 
National Champions 

20 Missouri 6 

52 W. & L 



20 Clemson 

40 Georgia 13 

26 North Car 

30 Miami (Fla.) .. 

24 South Car. ...... 6 

27 Geo. Wash 6 

38 Mississippi 

21 Alabama 

*0 Oklahoma 7 

*( Orange Bowl) 

1954 (7-2-1) 

20 Kentucky 

7 U. C. L.'A 12 

13 Wake Forest— 13 

33 North Car 

7 Miami, Fla 9 

20 South Car 

42 N. C. State 14 

16 Clemson 

48 Geo. Wash 6 

74 Missouri 13 

1955 (10-1-0) 

13 Missouri 12 

7 U. C. L. A 

20 Baylor 6 

28 Wake Forest .. 7 

25 North Car 7 

34 Syracuse 13 

27 South Car 

13 L. S. U 

25 Clemson 12 

19 Geo. Wash 

*6 Oklahoma 20 

*Orange Bowl 

1956 (2-7-1) 

12 Syracuse 26 

6 Wake Forest-- 

Baylor 14 

6 Miami, Fla. —13 

6 N. Carolina —34 

7 Tennessee 34 

Kentucky 14 

6 Clemson 6 

S. Carolina —13 

25 N. C. State —14 

1957 (5-5-0) 

13 Texas A&M— 21 
13 N. C. State —48 

Duke 14 

27 Wake Forest— 

21 N. Carolina— 7 
Tennessee 16 

10 South Carolina 6 

7 Clemson 26 

16 Miami, Fla 6 

12 Virginia 

1958 (4-6-0) 

Wake Forest _34 

83 



21 N. C. State _._ 6 
Clemson 8 

10 Texas A&M —14 
N. Carolina —27 

7 Auburn 20 

10 S. Carolina — 6 
14 Navy 40 

26 Miami, Fla. —14 
44 Virginia 6 

1959 (5-5-0) 

27 West Va. 7 

Texas 26 

Syracuse 29 

7 Wake Forest -10 

14 N. Carolina __ 7 

6 S. Carolina __ 22 
14 Navy 22 

28 Clemson 25 

55 Virginia 12 

33 N. C. State —28 

1960 (6-4-0) 

31 West Va 8 

Texas 34 

7 Duke 20 

10 N.C. State .... 13 
19 Clemson 17 

14 Wake Forest .. 13 

15 S. Carolina 

9 Penn State .... 28 

22 N. Carolina .... 19 
44 Virginia 12 

1961 (7-3-0) 

14 SMU 6 

24 Clemson 21 

22 Syracuse 21 

8 N. Carolina ....14 

21 Air Force 

10 S. Carolina ....20 

21 Penn State -.17 

10 N.C. State 7 

10 Wake Forest .. 7 

16 Virginia 28 

1962 (6-4-0) 

7 SMU 

13 Wake Forest .. 2 

14 N.C. State 6 

31 N. Carolina —13 
24 Miami 28 

13 S. Carolina 11 

7 Penn State 23 

7 Duke 10 

14 Clemson 17 

40 Virginia 18 



1963 (3-7-0) 

14 N.C. State 36 

13 S. Carolina 21 

12 Duke 30 

7 N. Carolina —.14 

21 Air Force 14 

32 Wake Forest .. 

15 Penn State 17 

7 Navy 42 

6 Clemson 21 

21 Virginia 6 



1964 (5-5) 

3 Oklahoma 13 

24 South Car. ...... 6 

13 N.C. State 14 

17 Duke 24 

10 North Car. 9 

17 Wake Forest -.21 

9 Penn State 17 

27 Navy 22 

34 Clemson 

10 Virginia 



1965 (4-6) 
24 Ohio U 7 

7 Syracuse 24 

10 Wake Forest - 7 
10 N. Carolina -.12 

7 N.C. State 29 

27 S. Carolina 14 

7 Navy 19 

6 Clemson 

27 Virginia - 33 

7 Penn State 19 



COACHES' RECORDS 



Year 
Maryland Aggies — 1892 
1893 
1894 
1895 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1905 
1906 
1907 
1908 
1909 
1910 
1911 
1912 
1913 
1914 
1915 
Maryland State — 1916 
1917 
1918 
1919 
Univ. of Maryland —1920 
1921 
1922 
1923 
1924 
1925 
1926 
1927 
1928 
1929 
1930 
1931 



Head Coach 


W 


L 


1 


*W. W. Skinner 





3 





*S. H. Harding 
*J. G. Bannon 


6 
3 



3 






No Team 








Grenville Lewis 


6 


2 


2 


*John Lillibridge 
*J. F. Kenly 
*S. M. Cooke 


2 
2 
1 


4 
5 

4 







*F. H. Peters 


3 


4 


1 


*E. B. Dunbar 


1 


7 





D. John Markey 
D. John Markey 
D. John Markey 
Fred Nielsen 


3 

7 
2 
6 


5 

4 
4 
4 


2 


2 



Fred Nielsen 


5 


3 





C. G. Church & C. W. Melick 


3 


6 





Bill Lang 

Barney Cooper & E. P. Larkin 

R. Alston 


3 
2 

4 


8 
5 
3 





1 


C. F. Donnelly & H. C. Byrd 
H. C. Byrd 


4 
6 
6 


4 
1 
3 


2 
1 



" 


5 


3 





" 


6 


3 





" 


6 


2 





" 


4 


3 


1 


" 


4 


1 


1 


" 


5 


4 





" 


7 


2 





" 


3 


5 


1 


" 


4 


5 


1 


" 


7 


2 


1 


" 


3 


3 


3 


" 


2 


5 


1 


" 


5 


4 


1 


" 


4 


7 





" 


6 


3 


1 


" 


4 


4 


2 


>» 


7 


5 





i» 


8 


1 


1 



84 



1932 


" 


1933 


" 


1934 


" 


1935 


Frank M. Dobson 


1936 


" 


1937 


" 


1938 


" 


1939 


" 


1940 


Jack Faber — Al He; 


1941 


" " 


1942 


Clark Shaughnessy 


1943 


Clarence Spears 


1944 


" 


1945 


Paul Bear Bryant 


1946 


Clark Shaughnessy 


a-1947 


Jim Tatum 


1948 


" 


b-1949 


tt 


1950 


" 


c-1951 


" 


1952 


" 


d-1953 


" 


1954 


" 


e-1955 


" 


1956 


Tommy Mont 


1957 


" 


1958 


" 


1959 


Tom Nugent 


1960 


j) 


1961 


" 


1962 


" 


1963 


" 


1964 


" 


1965 


" 



5 


6 





3 


7 





7 


3 





7 


2 


2 


6 


5 





8 


2 





2 


7 





2 


7 





s 2 


6 


1 


3 


5 


1 


7 


2 





4 


5 





1 


7 


1 


6 


2 


1 


3 


6 





7 


2 


2 


6 


4 





9 


1 





7 


2 


1 


10 








7 


2 





10 


1 





7 


2 


1 


10 


1 





2 


7 


1 


5 


5 





4 


6 





5 


5 





6 


4 





7 


3 





6 


4 





3 


7 





5 


5 





4 


6 





351 283 


36 



73-Year TOTALS 

a-Gator Bowl Co-Champion, Tied Georgia, 20-20 
b-Gator Bowl Champion, Defeated Missouri, 20-7 
c-Sugar Bowl Champion, Defeated Tennessee, 28-13 
d-National Champion, Orange Bowl runnerup, Lost 

to Oklahoma, 0-7 
e-Orange Bowl runnerup, Lost to Oklahoma, 6-20 
*Captains who coached. 



85 



BASKETBALL SCHEDULE — 1966-'67 



DATE 

December 1 
December 7 

December 10 

December 15 

December 16-17 

December 20 

December 29"50 

January 7 



January 


11 


January 


14 


January 


16 


January 


18 


January 


28 


January 


30 


February 


4 


February 


9 


February- 


11 


February 


15 


February 


18 


February 


22 


February 


25 


March 


4 


March 9-10-11 



(Home Games in CAPS) 

OPPONENT LOCATION 

PENN STATE Home 

N.C. Stale Away 

SOUTH CAROLINA Home 

Virginia Away 

Memphis (Tenn.) Invitational 
(Other teams: Arkansas, Memphis 
State, Oklahoma State) 

WAKE FOREST Home 

Charlotte (N.C.) Invitational 
(Other teams: Army, Davidson, 
Forclham) 

N.C. STATE Home 

West Virginia Away 

DUKE Home 

CLEMSON Home 

Navy Away 

WEST VIRGINIA Home 

South Carolina Away 

North Carolina Away 

GEORGE WASHINGTON Home 

Georgetown (D.C.) Away 

VIRGINIA Away 

Duke Away 

NORTH CAROLINA Home 

Clemson Away 

Wake Forest Away 

ACC Tournament 
Greensboro, N.C. 



HEAD COACH: H. A. "Bud" Millikan 
ASSISTANT COACH: Frank Fellows 



86 



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