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Full text of "University of Maryland men's football media guides"

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Kicking Off a New Century 




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The future of Maryland foot- 
ball can be seen from any van- 
tage point in Byrd Stadium, but 
especially from Mark Duffner's. 

The new coach, who won 
92% of his games the past six 
years at Holy Cross, will prowl 
the sideline and Byrd's lush Ber- 
muda grass for the first time in 
1992. What he sees will be his 
new offense, the Run-and-Shoot, 
and a new defensive concept 
with a Hit-and-Ruin philosophy. 

His office desk sits on the 
second floor of a recently con- 
structed Football Complex at 
the foot of the east end zone. 
What Duffner sees from his 
perch looking west is a Byrd 
Stadium that had its concrete 
bowl repaired last year, new 
seating installed, new rest 
rooms and concession stands 
built, and a towering 90-foot 
high press box, the Tyser 
Tower, constructed. 

When Duffner descends the 
stairs from his office he finds 
himself in a strength and condi- 
tioning area and among medical 
training facilities that are the 
equal of any. His football team 
takes to the field from a new 
suite of lockers, out through an 
archway surrounded by bronzed 
markers of a distinguished past. 
Maryland's mascot, Testudo, 
bom nearly a half -century ago, 
for the first time oversees his 
men at play. The surroundings 
are new, but their presence is 
designed to take Duffner and 
his team where his predeces- 
sors roamed. 

The Predecessors 

College Football Hall of Fame 
member Bear Bryant awoke 
Maryland football from a slum- 
bering state m 1945 at the end 
of World War D. He walked 
sidelines m the original Byrd 



Stadium along U.S. 1 in his first 
head coaching job, and before 
his walks were done he would 
become the all-time leader in 
college football victories. A suc- 
cessor, Hall of Fame member 
Jim Tatum, continued his work 
from 1947 to 1955, producing a 
national championship in 1953 
in what was then the new turf 
of the second and present Byrd 
Stadium. Head coaches Jerry 
Claiborne and Bobby Ross won 
six Atlantic Coast Conference 
football championships from 
1972 to 1986, and took Maryland 
to 11 bowl games. 

Overseeing the success of 
Bryant and Tatum was Harry 
Clifton "Curley" Byrd. Star ath- 
lete as an undergraduate, head 
coach from 1911 to 1934, Uni- 
versity President from 1934 to 
1954. The current Byrd Stadium 
construction is the first major 
athletic renovation done without 
Byrd's direction since the Uni- 
versity of Maryland at College 
Park was formed in 1920. 

The University 

The University grew from a 
small agricultural college at the 
tum-of-the century, to one of 
the largest state universities 
following World War II, to its 
flagship status in the Maryland 
higher education system in 
1988. 

If the university has followed 
distinctive historic paths, so, 
too, has its football team. The 
sport in College Park had 
wended its way through a maze 
of trails -school names, school 
nicknames, school colors — in 
its 100 years. A tour awaits on 
pages four, five, and six that is 
designed to both make sense of 
our past, and in the retelling 
express fondness for those who 
came before. 





Portraits of a Century 

One hundred years of Maryland football produced many more outstanding 
individuals than those featured on the nine watercolor paintings on the 
covers. But the paintings do give a colorful flavor to a colorful history. 
Some collages feature war heroes and courageous competitors, others 
19th century teams. Some others highlight those who gamed miles of 
yards through the air, others feature stars from gnnd-it-out eras. But 
they're all a part of us at Maryland, along with the thousands of others 
who have worn the colors. 

(continued on page 80) 



1 



Welcome to Maryland 




A Welcome to Maryland 
from Mark Duffner 



"Becoming football coach at Maryland 
was a natural thing for me. Growing-up 
just across the Potomac from College 
Park I early-on got involved in reading 
and hearing about the Terps. Maryland's 
tradition was exciting to me, so as coach 
years later, I'm delighted to kick-off this 
year's media guide with a few thoughts. 

"Our football squad is being billed 
this year as a new ball game. And 
rightfully so. We'll be dressing in a new 
quarters in a new uniform, competing in a newly refurbished stadium, and a 
new coaching staff is on hand to direct things. 

"But I can only speak about Maryland's great tradition because of those 
who went before us. Football at Maryland is a long-time success because of a 
lot of hard work by a lot of people. They worked like crazy to make success 
happen, and this book reminds us of them, and of their great imagination, 
commitment, and foresight. I can tell you I'm going to work as hard to make 
similar things happen. 

"As you read about us you'll notice that each time the Terp was knocked 
down, he got up. We're dusting ourselves off a little bit now, but our future 
will have more of the success you'll read about in this book. I invite you to 
become a part of that future, and to enjoy a visit to our past." 



Terrapin Game Days 

September 5 Virginia 

7 p.m. Scott Stadium 

1991: Maryland 17, Virginia 6 

September 12 N.C. State JPTV 

12:10 p.m. Byrd Stadium 

1991: N.C. State 20, Maryland 17 

September 19 West Virginia 

1 p.m. Mountaineer Stadium 

1991: West Virginia 37, Maryland 7 

September 26 Penn State 

1 p.m. Beaver Stadium 

1991: Penn State 47, Maryland 7 

October 3 Pittsburgh 

7 p.m. Byrd Stadium 

1991: Pittsburgh 24, Maryland 20 

October 10 Georgia Tech 

4 p.m. Byrd Stadium 

1991: Georgia Tech 34, Maryland 10 

October 17 Wake Forest 

Homecoming 

1:30 p.m. Byrd Stadium 

1991: Maryland 23, Wake Forest 22 

October 24 Duke 

1:30 p.m. Wade Stadium 

1991: Duke 17, Maryland 13 

October 31 North Carolina 

1:30 p.m. Byrd Stadium 

1991: North Carolina 24, Maryland 

November 7 Florida State JPTV 

12:10 p.m. Doak Campbell Stadium 

November 14 Clemson JPTV 

12:10 p.m. Byrd Stadium 

1991: Clemson 40, Maryland 7 




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Terparade of Pages 








Terrapin Heroes: A Dedication 

The Maryland Media Guide, Portraits of a Century, is dedicated 
to Linda Kubany, the football secretary for the past 26 years. Her 
first day of work was August 1, 1966; soon after her arrival she 
met a football player, Glenn Kubany, Class of 1970, who would 
become her husband. Linda is what Maryland football is about; 
she has proved more resilient, more courageous than any 
linebacker as she fights a disease that blocks her way to the 
football office, and to the men in her life (other than Glenn)-the 
players and the coaches. The painting depicts Coach Bobby Ross, 
and two of his men of courage - John Maarleveld and Michael 
Anderson - who overcame cancer to play football. The third 
player, Bill Guckeyson, graduated from both Maryland and West 
Point, and was shot down in the European Theatre in World War II. 



Maryland Sports Information 

Herb Hartnett 

Director 

Home 410-730-8824 

joe f. blair, 

Football Publicist Emeritus 
Home 301-589-6883 

Chuck Walsh 

Home 301-890-9671 

Ivan Meltzer 

Home 301-935-5267 

Sports Information Office 
University of Maryland 
Room 1112 Cole Field House 
Campus Drive 
P.O. Box 295 
College Park, MD 20741 
301-314-7064 Office 
301-405-7810 Press Box 
301-314-TERP Latest Terp Scores 
301-314-9094 FAX 



The Maryland Football Press Guide 

was designed by Herb Hartnett and 
Charlie Guillette. Written and edited 
by Hartnett and Chuck Walsh with 
help from joe f. blair, Ivan Meltzer 
and Dave Gell. Dee Stough, Neal 
Eskin, Rose Pietrzak, Sean Manion, 
Tim Dennis, Dave Kushner, and Drew 
Kubovcik were also contributors. 
Photographs are by Katie Zernhelt, 
Lisa Helfert and Ed Mahan. Also by 
John Consoli of the University's 
Creative Services; Larry Crouse, 
Brian Lewis, Lars Gelfan, Dave 
Froelich, and Mitchell Leyton. Cover 
art by Mark Mancim. Art advice from 
Dave Pferffer of Presstar Printing, 
Silver Spring. Md. This book was 
printed by Colonial Lithograph, 
Attleboro, Mass. Charlie Guillette. 
Cathy La Salandra, Dave Redding 
and staff. It was accomplished with 
the considerable help of the 
University's Paul Mandelman. Look 
Magazine contributed by Jeff Jackel. 



Maryland 

Terplace 

The University 

at College Park 69-73 

Terpark 
Byrd Stadium 8, 9 

Terparagon 
Testudo, himself 6 

Terprism 
Colors 7 

Terpresident 
Campus Administration, 
Regents 74 

Terpilot 
Athletic Director 75 

Terpcare 
Medical Support 80 

Terprominent 
Athletic Department Directory 76 

Terpscholar 
Academic Support 78-79 

Terpflex 
Strength & Conditioning 77 

Terpads 
Equipment 81 

Terphilanthrophy 
Clubs 83 

Terpundits 
Television, Radio 167 

Terp Watchers 
The Media 168 

Terpike 

Directions, Hotels .... inside back 
cover 

1992 
The Terps 

Terportraits 

MarkDuffner 12-15 

Assistants, Staff 16-21 

Terplayers 

Alphabetical Roster 22-23 

Recruits Roster 23 

Numerical Roster 24 

Terphonics 
Pronunciation 26 

Terprofiles 

Player's bios 25-57 

Depth 26 

Honors Candidates 26-32 

Terprospects 
Freshman players 58-61 

Terpcare 
Medical Staff 80 

The Dpponents 

Terprotagonists 

Virginia 63 

N.C. State 63 

West Virginia 64 

Perm State 64 

Pittsburgh 65 

Georgia Tech 65 

Wake Forest 66 

Duke 66 

North Carolina 67 

Flonda State 67 

Clemson 68 



1991 

Terplayback 

Virginia 92 

Syracuse 93 

West Virginia 94 

Pittsburgh 95 

Georgia Tech 96 

Wake Forest 97 

Duke 98 

North Carolina 99 

Penn State 100 

Clemson 101 

N.C. State 102 

Season Stats 103-104 

1993, 1994, 1995 

Terpreview 

Future Schedules 10 

1892-1992 

Terplayers 

Letterwinners 1 06- 1 1 1 

Terpassages 
35 Coaches and Their 

Records 112 

Year-by-Year Record 112 

Won-Loss With Opponents ..112 
Results of 981 Games.... 113-121 

Terpacesetters 

Last Time In A Game 122 

Season Rushing, Scoring 

Leaders 124 

Season K/P Return Leaders . . 125 

Season Passing Leaders 126 

Season Receiving Leaders ... 127 

Season Tackles, 

Interceptions 128 

Terprolific 

Team Records 130-131 

Individual Records 132-134 

TopSingleGame Efforts. . 135-136 

Top Season Efforts 137-138 

Top Career Efforts 139-140 

Terprizes 

Team Awards 142 

Coaches Awards 143 

All-America 144-145 

Terpros 
Pro Football Alumni 146-147 

Terparadigms 

JimTatum 149 

Bob Ward 150 

Jack Scarbath 151 

Dick Modzelewski 152 

Randy Wmte 153 

Stan Jones 154 

HaUof Fame 155 

Terprecision 

Bowls 156-165 

Ranked Terps 165-166 

Atlantic Coast Conference 

Terps in the ACC 

A history, bowl alliance, 

superlatives 84-85 

1953 and 1955 Champions.... 86 
1974 and 1975 Champions .... 87 
1976 and 1983 Champions.... 88 
1984 and 1985 Champions.... 89 







*£<H 



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A quick-hitter through 100 years 



A quick tour of 100 years, 
through the maze of paths Mary- 
land and its football teams have 
traveled. Coach Duffner's prede- 
cessors are highlighted in bold 
face. 

'From 1892 to 1916 the campus 
at College Park was called Mary- 
land Agricultural College. After 
the tiny campus's prime building 
burned down, the state started a 
new campus and named it Mary- 
land State College from 1916 to 
1920, before naming the school 
at College Park the University of 
Maryland in 1920. 

'First the nicknames were the 
Aggies, Farmers, State, and Old 
Liners, and then the Terrapin 
arrived in 1933. The school col- 
ors were pearl gray and maroon, 
then cherry and white, then 
black and gold, then red and 
white, then black and gold, then 
red and white, and now black- 
gold-red-white. 

'Because of the name changes 
the present University of Mary- 
land's prime tum-of-the-century 
rivalry was with none other than 
the University of Maryland. Be- 
fore 1920 that label meant the 
university in Baltimore. 

'State rivalries were the most 
important for decades to the Col- 
lege Park football competitor. 
The idea of a national champion- 
ship was far removed from any- 
one's mind who wore pearl gray 
and maroon. A rivalry that pro- 
voked fists as well as forward 
runs was with St. Johns of An- 
napolis, an unlikely object of 
athletic venom. M.A.C. and St. 



Johns were worlds apart: A 
school for future farmers vs. a 
school of letters whose educa- 
tion consisted of reading the 
world's 100 greatest books. 
Their commonality was 
Maryland. 

'Johns Hopkins, Washington 
College and Western Maryland 
provoked animosity freely given 
later to Mountaineers and Tar 
Heels. All of Maryland's schools 
competed beneath the marquee 
of another school in the state, 
however. The Naval Academy 
was a national powerhouse 
competing against its 
powerhouse peers. Army-Navy 
was the college rivalry. Navy 
outscored M.A.C, 98-0, in 
games played from 1905 to 1908. 

'Duffner's predecessors included 
D. John Markey, who purchased 
the school's first tackling 
dummy in 1902, and who had 
the luxury of officiating some of 
his own games, and Charley 
Donnelly, a clerk in the Census 
Bureau who coached eight 
games in 1911. Donnelly's ten- 
ure was brief, although he did 
have the first great player in 
school history, Burton Shipley, 
playing for him. Riding to the 
rescue to win the last two 
games of the year was the man 
who changed College Park for- 
ever — football and otherwise 
— the ubiquitous Harry Clifton 
Byrd of Cnsfield, Md. 

'Byrd enrolled at College Park 
as a 16 year-old in 1905; he was 
a very good football player, who 
quarterbacked Georgetown 



when his College Park eligibility 
was done. When he arrived Col- 
lege Park was a tiny campus, 
and its football team had no sta- 
tus outside of Maryland; by the 
time he left five decades later 
Maryland was among the na- 
tion's largest universities, and it 
had won the national football 
championship. He nicknamed 
Maryland the Terrapins in 1933, 
was the head coach from 1911 
to 1934, the president from 1936 
to 1954. 



'In 1915 Byrd suggested an ath- 
letic complex be built. He got 
his wish in 1923 when Byrd 
Field was dedicated. The only 
two football stadiums built un- 
der the banner of the University 
of Maryland in College Park 
were named after the man who 
raised the money to build them: 
Curley Byrd. The dedication of 
the second and present Byrd 
Stadium in 1950 came at the 
first game in 16 years with The 
Naval Academy. Maryland won. 




The Blair/Zane Media Work 
Area. When Jim Tatum decided 
to leave Maryland in 1955, he 
cried when he told his sports 
information director, Joe Blair. 
When the Queen's Game took 
place in 1957 (pictured above), 
and Tatum was defeated on his 
return as coach of his alma 
mater, North Carolina, Blair was 
the SID at Maryland. When head 
coaches Jerry Claiborne and 



Bobby Ross guided the Terra- 
pins to six ACC Championships 
and to 11 bowl games from 1972 
to 1985, Jack Zane was Mary- 
land's publicist. Good friends, 
Blair (left) and Zane (right) had 
the media level of the new Ty- 
ser Tower named after them at 
the start of the 1991 season. 
Blair is now Football Publicist 
Emeritus at Maryland, Zane the 
ticket manager. 



Terpcentennial, Traditions 




'The first victory over a national 
power came in 1923 when 
Johnny "Boots" Grove kicked a 
field goal at Philadelphia's Fran- 
klin Field to provide the 3-0 up- 
set over Pennsylvania. It was 
also the year Bill Supplee 
became the school's first true 
All-America. 

"The big pre-World War II vic- 
tory came in 1926 when Byrd 
beat Yale in New Haven. Yale's 
coach thought so little of Mary- 
land he sat in the stands at the 
game's start. Tad Jones soon 
moved to the bench where he 
watched 10 Old Line ironmen 
play the whole game, and win. 

'Since Byrd Field could only ac- 
comodate 20,000 spectators, 
most of them standing, tracking 



Maryland's home field before 
1950 could lead to Baltimore's 
Municipal Stadium, Orioles Park 
or to Washington's Griffith Sta- 
dium, home of Walter "Big 
Train" Johnson and the Sena- 
tors. Big moments tended to 
happen on the road, such as 
Maryland's first victory over 
Navy, 6-0, at Griffith Stadium in 
1931, and the 6-6 tie with Yale 
and Albie Booth in New Haven 
in 1932. 

'One of the great lacrosse 
coaches, Jack Faber, was part 
of two hybrid coaching staffs 
created by Byrd, who did not 
easily give up his interest in 
football. Faber was the interme- 
diary and "Head Coach" 
between Acting President Byrd 



Centennial Notes 

The Centennial of Football at 
Maryland is marked through- 
out this media guide. Notes 
from all 100 years appear in 
an effort to tell something of 
what makes football in Col- 
lege Park unique and grand. 
Two books -Kings of Ameri- 
can Football, The Story of 
Football at Maryland Agricul- 
tural College. Maryland State 
College and the University of 
Maryland, 1890 to 1952, by 
Morris A. Bealle; and The Ter- 
rapins, Maryland Football, by 
Paul Attner, published in 1975 
— served as the base for the 
historical notes. David Gell, 
Maryland '93, accumulated the 
notes, and also used the 
records of the many sports 
information directors who have 
served the University well. 



Centennial Portraits 

Mark Mancini of Production 
Group, Croydon, Pa. accom- 
plished the watercolor paint- 
ings that serve as the theme 
for this media guide. Mark is 
a University of Pennsylvania 
alumnus (Class of 79). His 
work includes painting the 
posters for movies in the 
Lucas Film's Star Wars and 
the Indiana Jones series. 
The editor publicized Mark's 
athletic accomplishments 
as a Pennsylvania 
undergraduate: He was 
Heptagonal Games 
intermediate hurdles 
champion, and NCAA 
Championship qualifier. 



and "Field Coach" Frank 
Dobson, who was hired to suc- 
ceed Byrd in 1935. Faber, who 
won 249 lacrosse games and 
lost but 57 from 1928 to 1963, 
was part of what he termed 
"the first three-headed coaching 
monster in the history of college 
football," when Byrd fired 
Dobson in 1940. Faber, a Micro- 
biology Professor, Al Heagy, a 
Chemist and faculty member, 
and Al Woods, on the faculty in 
physical education, coached the 
team in 1940 and 1941 as co- 
head coaches. 

* Faber, who did the paperwork 
for the 1936 team, was a travel 
agent in disguise. The schedule 
reflected the far-flung Southern 
Conference Maryland competed 
in, and the lack of a large, home 
field. The travel itinerary: Oct. 
3, Virginia Polytechinic in 
Blacksburg; Oct. 10, North 
Carolina in Chapel Hill; Oct. 17, 
Virginia in Charlottesville; Oct. 
24, Syracuse at New York City's 
Polo Grounds; Oct. 31, Florida in 
Gainesville; Nov. 7, Richmond in 
Richmond. Of the 1 1 games on 
the schedule, six were road 
games, and two others were 
played in Baltimore, against 
Washington and Lee and West- 
ern Maryland. 

*In a fair trade of sorts, all of 
the 1942 team was drafted by 
Uncle Sam, while three years 
later the 1945 team was sup- 
plied by the same uncle. Bear 
Bryant's one and only Maryland 
team consisted largely of 
recruits from his North Carolina 
Pre-Flight service juggernaut. 

'In an unfair trade, nine Mary- 
land players lost their lives in 



World War II. The names of Dick 
Alexander, Bill Birnbaum, Bruce 
Davis, Bill Guckeyson, Ed Lloyd, 
Larry McKenzie, Tony Nardo, 
John Simpson and Charlie 
Zulick live because they contin- 
ued the tradition of the coura- 
geous Old Liners, the name of a 
Revolutionary War troop that 
was the nickname at College 
Park until 1932. Army Aviator 
Bill Guckeyson was considered 
the best football player in school 
history, and while at West Point 
following graduation from 
Maryland "Guke" became one 
of West Pomt's best. 

'College Football Hall of Famer 
to-be Bryant was followed for a 
year by Hall of Famer to-be 
Clark Shaughnessy (his second 
tour as Terrapin head coach) 
and then m 1947 by Hall of 
Famer to-be Jim Tatum. Only 
Byrd overshadows Tatum in 
Maryland lore. Byrd's genius 
built the stadium, and Tatum's 
genius coached the national 
champions of 1953. 

'Shaughnessy's legacy in Col- 
lege Park includes re-introducing 
the Red-and-White uniform mo- 
tif after decades of College Park 
Black and Gold. Shaugnessy 
came from Stanford, whose col- 
ors are Red-and-White but 1910 
newspaper accounts refer to 
Maryland Agriculture College 
as the Cherry-and-White. Just 
what were the colors? Shaug- 
nessy's greatest contribution to 
Washington athletics was his 
part in the Chicago Bears 73-0 
victory m Griffith Stadium over 
the Redskins in the 1940 NFL 
Championship. Shaugnessy 
taught the Bears his T-Formation. 



Terparagon, Testudo 




The University of Notre Dame Monogram Club presented the 
national championship trophy to Curley Byrd (center) and Jim 
Tatum (right) in 1953. The trophy now resides in Norman, 
Oklahoma, because the Sooners retired it in 1956 after having won 
three national titles over six years. In 1957 the trophy became the 
Associated Press national championship trophy, which today is 
still the most coveted team trophy in college football. 



'College Park's post World War 
n building boom not only 
included Byrd Stadium, but the 
campus itself was transformed. 
The Southern architectural 
theme continued with its tall, 
prominent Georgian columns 
reflecting Byrd's genius to create 
on a grand scale. Maryland's rise 
in the academic world took flight 
with the improved campus 
facilities, and a 1950's reform 
movement implemented by new 
presdient Wilson Elkins, who 
succeeded Byrd in 1954. 

•Tatum's presence (1947-1955, 
five bowl games, two ACC 
championships) forever signalled 
the end to Maryland's vision as 
sleepy Southern Conference 
competitor. Tatum won the At- 
lantic Coast Conference's first 
football championship in 1953, 
and as a charter member of the 
new conference Maryland was 
equipped to rise through the 
second half of the century to the 
upper reaches of the NCAA's 
Division I. 

•Tatum's teams produced con- 
sensus All-Americas Bob Ward 
and Jack Scarbath, and Outland 



Trophy winner Dick 
Modzewleski. There have been 
six First Team Associated Press 
All- Americas in school history; 
five of them played between 
1950 and 1955 for Tatum. 

'Tom Nugent fathered the I- 
Formation as head coach at 
Maryland and Florida State, but 
his big day came when he pro- 
duced a victory over Perm State, 
21-17, m 1961. No other Mary- 
land coach has accomplished 
the same. 

•Jerry Claiborne (1972-1981, 
seven bowl games, three ACC 
championships) and Bobby Ross 
(1982-1986, four bowl games, 
three ACC championshps) 
eclipsed even Tatum's produc- 
tion of league championships, 
and continued his effectiveness 
at earning bowl berths. 
Claiborne produced one of the 
great linemen in history, Randy 
White; Ross produced one of 
the great quarterbacks in 
history, Boomer Esiason. 

•Maryland enters the Mark 
Duffner era. 



Tale of the Top Shell 

Testudo is a Diamondback 
turtle. Like some other famous 
personages born into the De- 
pression of the 1930s, the deri- 
vation of his name is cloudy. 
But it is likely that his monicker 
is derived from the scientific 
classification for turtle 
(testudmes). Or the top turtle 
could be named after testudo 
gigantia, a species native to the 
Ancan nation of Syechelles and 
one of its remote islands, Al- 
dabra. Or the name could have 
come from a dictionary defini- 
tion that says the word, testudo, 
was derived from the Latin and 
meant a shelter held over Ro- 
man soldiers heads -like a tor- 
toise shell. These explanations 
are a long way from the Chesa- 
peake Bay where the Diamond- 
back lives. 

When Testudo had his com- 
ing out on May 23, 1933, he was 
thrown into a world filled with 
intimidating mascots-Wildcats, 
Tigers, Devils, Wolves, 
Bears -thought up over a half- 
century of intercollegiate com- 
petition. Maryland College Park 
was consolidated from different 
state schools in 1920 to form the 
base of today's wide-ranging 
state system, and the remod- 
eled Maryland needed a flagcar- 
rier to do battle with Wahoos, 
Lions and Generals. 

Dr. H.C. Byrd, a football 
coach who later became Univer- 
sity President, recommended 
the Diamondback as mascot in 
1932 in response to the student 
newspaper's search for an "offi- 
cial" leader. Byrd's childhood in 
Cnsfield, Md., apparently in- 
cluded skirmishes with this 
brand of snapping turtle, indige- 
nous to the Bay. The school pa- 
per was in fact already called 
The Diamondback, and when 
the Class of 1933 stepped for- 
ward with the idea of giving the 
University a permanent bronzed 
version as its graduation gift, 
Testudo's family was in to stay. 

Maryland had been referring 
to itslelf as Old Liners, yet an- 
other name whose derivation no 
one seems sure of. Historians 
are in a scrimmage over 
whether the nickname is a ref- 
erence to a Revolutionary War 
Troop of Maryland soldiers who 
distinguished themselves on the 
field of battle, or they feel it 
could refer to a squabble with 



Pennsylvanians over just where 
the border beteween the two 
states should be. 

The Class of '33 raised 
money for casting a Diamond- 
back by holding its Senior Prom 
on campus to save money on 
expenses. And the yearbook 
and Student Government Asso- 
ciation chipped-m. Edwm C. 
Mayo, Class of '04 and a former 
quarterback, donated at cost the 
300 pound bronzed beauty as 
President of Gorham Maufactur- 
mg in Providence, RI. Robert J. 
Hill cast the inspired sculpture 
accomplished by company artist 
Anstide Cianfrani. Further tur- 
tleization came when the stu- 
dent yearbook, The Remlle, be- 
came The Terrapin in 1935. 
Newspapers, even then explor- 
ing every angle, shortened Ter- 
rapin to Terp for headline writ- 
ing ease when it wasn't trying 
to cram Old Liner into a single 
column head. The name was m 
place; now came the stuff of 
legend. 

The Stuff of Legend 

The nicely thought out plans 
that made Testudo an instant 
hit did have a flaw. Putting Mr. 
T in front of the campus gym, 
Ritchie Coliseum, exposed Tes- 
tudo to every road agent wear- 
ing enemy colors. Ritichie was 
right on U.S. Route 1, then the 
principal North-South highway 
along the Eastern Seaboard. 
When a less dignified opponent 
needed something extra against 
the turtle and his tropps, they 
practiced emotional blackmail, 
and kidnapped him. 

That was not the worst of it. 
They painted his golden skin 
enemy colors, and defaced his 
pedestal which was only to 
have the block M on it. Instead, 
opponents painted lllegitmate 
JH's or GW's or V's or NC's on 
his nest. A riot took place when 
Johns Hopkins students 
kidnapped the handsome reptile 
in 1947; 200 police were called 
to the Baltimore campus to con- 
trol the justified anger of Col- 
lege Park students. Two years 
later, the nifty shelled crusader 
was found on the lawn of a Vir- 
ginia (The University) fraternity 
house, whose occupants smugly 
called President Byrd with the 
message to get Tesudo off their 
lawn. Of course Byrd obliged, 
and soon after Testudo was 



Terpnsm, Colors 




hidden in the campus carpentry 
shop where he was less lnsprira- 
tional, but a whole lot safer. 

The second stadium bearing 
Byrd's name was built m 1950, 
and in 1951 Testudo, sans coats 
of rivals' paint, took his perch m 
front of the Byrd Stadium football 
team house. He had beaten back 
all who would wrong him, and to 
make sure he would not travel 
again, he was fed 700 pounds of 
cement and had his body 
attached to a new pedestal by 
long steel rods. 

With his permanent nesting 
came success for Maryland. Act- 
ing as guardian to waves of Terp 
competitors, the national football 
championship came, as did sev- 
eral ACC titles in the 1950s. His 
populanty among the students 
might have been the undomg of 
success, however. When McKel- 
din Libary was constructed in 
the middle of campus, the stu- 
dent body demanded Testudo's 
fulltime presence m the center of 
day-to-day activities. Testudo 
had gone far beyond being just a 
symbol for athletics. He was a 
campus symbol. Students care- 
fully carried him up the hill to 
the main College Green and the 
library, and he was bolted to a 
new bed of stone m the early 
1960s. 

Coincidence or not, football 
did have a downturn in the 
1960s with Testudo absent. In 
the 1970s, when a costumed Tes- 
tudo started to roam the sideline, 
success was returning. Testudo 
reigned over unrivaled ACC foot- 



ball prowess, and sent Terps 
out to the four comers of the 
football world for bowls and 
intersectional clashes. 

Fifty-nine years ago, the 
Diamondback Turtle Gorham 
used as a model for the shelled 
wonder had a ribbon attached 
to it at the dedication. The 
ribbon was tied to the canvas 
covering the statue. The 
Diamondback moved forward, 
and revealed the splendor of his 
larger, bronzed brother. But no 
one rushed the smaller 
Diamondback in his duties. All 



in attendance were true believ- 
ers who knew what many un- 
faithful have discovered about 
Terrapins. They bite. 

Colors 

The colors of the University 
of Maryland are those of the 
state flag -gold, red, black and 
white. 

Maryland's flag bears the 
arms of the Calvert and Cross- 
land families. Calvert was the 
family name of the Lords Balti- 
more, who founded Maryland, 
and their colors of gold and 
black appear in the first and 
fourth quarters of the flag. 
Crossland was the family of the 
mother of George Calvert, first 
Lord Baltimore. The red and 
white Crossland colors, with a 
Greek cross terminating in the 
foils, appears m the second and 
third quarters. The flag was 
first flown in its present form on 
October 25, 1888, at Gettysburg 
Battlefield for ceremonies dedi- 
cating monuments to Maryland 
regiments of the Army of the 
Potomac. It was officially 
adopted in 1904. Maryland law 
requires that if any ornament is 
affixed to the top of a flagstaff 
carrying the Maryland flag, the 
ornament must be a gold cross 
bottony. 

Like the long trek of Testudo 
to become mascot, the trip for 
red, white, black and gold to 
arrive as "official" was marked 



by factionalism. And no won- 
der: Maryland played football 
under three names in its first 28 
years of the sport, and its uni- 
form colors ranged from pearl 
gray and maroon to cherry and 
white to black and gold. From 
1892 to 1915 pearl gray and ma- 
roon, and black and gold, or 
white with black and gold trim 
were the norm; from 1912 to 
1935, with Curley Byrd in 
charge, any color in the state 
flag was deemed official 
although black and gold pre- 
dominated; m 1942, Football 
Coach Clark Shaughnessy, ar- 
rived from Stanford, and 
deemed red and white the offi- 
cial colors; and after a 1946 
spent in black and gold that 
made players' numbers illegible, 
red and white became the pre- 
dominant colors under Jim Ta- 
tum. And in domg research for 
the 100th anniversary evidence 
was uncovered that M.A.C. was 
dressed in cherry and white 80 
years ago. 

For roughly the past half- 
century, red and white have 
been mixed with black and gold 
for a distinctive College Park 
look. For the first time in 1990, 
Maryland's away football uni- 
forms had the state flag promi- 
nately displayed on the upper 
sleeve. In 1992, the uniform will 
have a 100th anniversary patch 
that will include the state flag. 





Byrd Stadium 

A new Byrd 

Born in 1950, Byrd Stadium is 
being reborn in the 1990s. 

*Since November of 1991, a 
Football Complex was 
constructed just beyond the east 
End Zone. Costing $6.1 million, 
the Complex contains football 
offices, locker rooms, equipment 
and medical support areas, and 
a weight room. The new build- 
ing's presence changes the at- 
mosphere for games. Formerly 
the buildings that enclosed the 
open end of the horseshoe were 
well back from the playing area. 
They have been torn down, and 
the new building is just under 
40 feet from the east end line. 

* The concrete bowl, erected 
on the wetlands of an orchard, 
had decades of water damage 
repaired above and below its 
surface between October of 1990 
and August of 1991. The 10 
miles of redwood plank seats 
that held millions were replaced 
by environmentally less costly 
alumninum sheathed benches. 

* Sitting on the south rim of 
the stadium bowl is a new press 
box, The Tyser Tower, also 
constructed in the spring and 
summer of 1991. Containing five 
tiers, it is a 90-foot high, 160- 
foot long, mostly-enclosed 
structure. The total spent on the 
1990-1991 construction was 
$13.2 million; $3.4 million was 
spent on The Tyser Tower. 

The first level contains en- 
trances at opposite ends for two 
elevators that service the build- 
ing; sitting between these sup- 
port areas are 300 exterior lux- 



ury seats. Occupants will enjoy 
the electric air of the crowd, but 
inherit the benefits of heated 
seating and a roof to ward off 
inclement weather. 

The second level contains 
The Hospitality Suite with 
theater-type seating, and a large 
hospitality and food preparation 
area. Both sides of the press 
box, facing the field and facing 
the campus, have glass walls 
allowing for a bright interior and 
spacious feeling. The weekly 
football press luncheon is held 
here. 

The third level is the working 
press area, containing 200 seats 
for the working media, and an 
additional closed area seating 20 
for statistical work. There is also 
a hospitality area with food 
preparation services. 

The fourth level is a mix of 
television and radio booths, 
coaches booths, and rooms for 
game management and invited 
guests. 

The fifth level is a photo deck 
that has on its exterior a repre- 
sentation of the ubiquitous 
Testudo looking down on the 
field of play. 

* The old concession stands 
on the south side, a slice of sta- 
dium architecture sentimentally 
pleasing to those who remem- 
ber their first visit to a football 
game, but prone to long lines on 
hot days, are now state-of-the- 
art palate pleasers designed for 
efficient service. They are joined 
by new rest rooms and the sta- 
dium's first formal entranceway 
off of Stadium Drive. 

The new Byrd Box, conces- 
sion stands, rest rooms, stadium 
portals and football complex, 




Byrd Stadium in 1950 was a classic design. Its lines have not been 
altered by refurbishment. 



designed by H-O-K Architects of 
Kansas City, are enclosed in 
sand-moulded Calvert # 103 
brick that matches the 
Williamsburg-style brick used 
on most of College Park's build- 
ings. The brick gives the con- 
temporary architecture a time- 
less veneer, and unity with 
College Park's traditional 
Georgian look. 

The Maryland Partnership 

The $19.3 million spent thus 
far will be followed by funding 
to complete new concession 
stands and rest rooms on the 
west and north ends of the sta- 
dium, and the double-decking of 
the stadium's north Stands. 

Maryland's architectural 
athletic revival is funded by the 
Maryland Partnership, a 
matching-gift program between 
the State and friends of 
Maryland Athletics. 



The historic Byrd 

Byrd Stadium has been home 
to national championship football 
and men's and women's lacrosse 
teams (the Terps won the Wom- 
en's NCAA Lacrosse Champion- 
ship in 1992), and to 56 Atlantic 
Coast Conference Track and 
Field team champions. It hosted 
the Queen of England at a foot- 
ball game in 1957, and was the 
stage where the greatest high 
hurdler in history, Renaldo 
Nehemiah, performed his 
wonders. 

In 1993, Byrd will host the 
Atlantic Coast Conference Men's 
Lacrosse Championship, the 
NCAA Women's Lacrosse Cham- 
pionship and the Men's NCAA 
Lacrosse Championship. In May, 
1989, every attendance record in 
lacrosse was broken when over 
44,000 watched the NCAA Final 
Four of men's lacrosse. 



8 




Many of the great moments in 
Maryland prep shcool history 
happened there, as well as the 
Special Olympics and the Mary- 
land State Games. Byrd Stadium 
is a Maryland tradition for the 
high school football coaches of 
the state who regularly hold 
their coaching clinic at College 
Park. 

The stadium is named after 
Dr. H.C. Byrd, who was a multi- 
sport athlete as an undergradu- 
ate, later the head football 
coach, and later still the Mary- 
land president. His vision gave 
College Park preeminence among 
Eastern campus sports facilities 
for decades, and the impetus for 
the Terrapin to win more ACC 
championships than any league 
school. 

Even with on-going refurbish- 
ment of the stadium, capacity 
remains at 45,000. Eventually all 
bleachers at the top of the sta- 
dium bowl will be removed, and 
the North Side will have an 
upper-deck. When these projects 
are complete the seating will be 
48,000. 

When built 41 years ago, the 
stadium was thought to be in a 
"first phase" of construction. 
Plans called for the eventual 
seating of 92,000 and the 
double-decking of the entire 
stadium. 

1890 and 1891: Games were 
played before the formal start 
of football on a field where 
McKeldin Library now stands. 
1915: H.C. Byrd, the football 
coach, presents a plan to the 
Athletic Association to obtam a 
modem athletic field and train- 
ing quarters for the athletes of 
several teams. 



1922: Because of construction of 
the stadium complex Byrd ap- 
pealed for, only one of 10 games 
is played at home. Road trips by 
rail included New Haven, 
Phildelphia, Chapel Hill, and 
Raleigh. 

1923: Maryland's new stadium 
complex is completed. The field 
covered seven acres, seated 
5,000, and cost $69,500. Harry 
Watts, construction engineer of 
the stadium, played football for 
Maryland from 1900 to 1903. 
Named Byrd Stadium, the first 
game was a shutout victory over 
Randolph-Macon. 
1923: Byrd Field is offically dedi- 
cated at the season's ninth 
game against traditional foe 
Catholic U. Maryland won. 
1933: Coed cheerleaders appear 
for the first time at Byrd Stadium. 
1944: Maryland has its first night 
game, a victory over Hampden- 
Sydney on September 29. All 
four home games during this 
war year were played at night, a 
reversal of earlier blackout rules. 



1950: Byrd Stadium, at the foot 
of the campus's North Hill is 
completed. A home field school 
record 43,836 fans witnessed a 
victory over traditional rival 
Navy in the opening game, Sep- 
tember 30. The original capacity 
was 34,680. Putting temporary 
bleachers around the top nm of 
the stadium and in the end zone 
boosted the capacity to 50,000. 
The Cost: $1 million. 

1952: Maryland had but three 
home games; the cost of season 
tickets ranges from $11.25 to 
$35.75. 

1953: Byrd hosts the National 
Championship Team. 

1957: Queen Elizabeth II visited 
for the North Carolina game, 
and Jim Tatum returned to the 
scene of his coaching triumphs. 
The Royal Visit produced an up- 
set 21-7 victory by Maryland. 
Coach Tommy Mont said later 
that this was his finest moment 
as coach. 




Byrd Stadium filled for the Virginia game of a year ago, with the 
Tysei Tower sitting atop the south side. 



1974: Bear Bryant returned to 
College Park with his Number 
Three ranked Alabama Crimson 
Tide on September 14. Tempo- 
rary bleachers were installed for 
the second time in stadium his- 
tory to accomodate 54,412, the 
largest crowd until that time at 
Byrd. Alabama won, 21-16. 
Later in the season on October 
11, the second largest crowd 
(49,674) in Byrd history watched 
the Number 15 ranked Terps 
defeat Number 17 ranked N.C. 
State, 20-10. The home team 
was mspired by film clips of 
Wolfpack taunting following 
1973's encounter. Maryland 
averaged 37,995 fans per game. 

1975: On November 1, the at- 
tendance record was set at Byrd 
as Number 9 ranked Perm State 
defeated the Number 14 ranked 
Terps, 15-13. The crowd was 
58,973. Maryland's average 
attendance was a record 42,359. 

1983: The second largest crowd 
m Byrd Stadium, 54,715, wit- 
nessed the Number 17 Ranked 
Terps lose to West Virginia, 
31-21 on September 17. 

1985: The Terps, who were 
ranked Number One in the pre- 
season by Sport Magazine, set 
the all-time high attendance 
record, averaging 51,546 for six 
home games. 

1990: Construction was begun 
following the last home football 
game of the season against 
Wake Forest (Oct. 13) on the 
first major athletic construction 
on campus in 35 years. The 
Byrd Stadium refurbishment is 
the first major construction done 
at Maryland College Park with- 
out the oversight of Curley Byid. 



Terp Directory 













1992 Maryland r ootoan siaii 


• 






Head Coach: Mark Duffner 
Office Phone: (301) 314-7096 
Secretary: Linda Kubany 
Secretary: Melissa Whisnant 
Secretary: Jane Steel 

Cerne Lung, Betty Francis 


1 






Staff 


1 




Assistant Position Office 
Coach Responsibility Number 

John Baxter Tight Ends/Special Teams (301) 314-7108 

Clyde Christensen Quarterbacks 314-7107 

Dan Dorazio (OC) Offensive Line 314-7102 

Mel Foels Inside Linebackers 314-7105 

Peter McCarty Outside Linebackers 314-7106 

Cliff Schwenke Defensive Line 314-7101 

John Shannon Outside Receivers 314-9674 

Larry Slade (DC) Defensive Backs 314-7104 

Rob Spence Inside Receivers 314-7109 

J.J. Bush Head Football Trainer 314-7340 

Kyle Lingerfelt Recruiting Coordinator 314-7098 

Ron Ohringer Equipment Manager 314-7331 

Dave Ungerer Strength & Conditioning 314-7099 

Bruce Warwick Administrative Assistant 314-9642 

Daryl Jones Graduate Assistant 314-7095 

Todd Hobin Video Coordinator 314-9950 




^Mj 




"^ 


lLJ~iJij4ti 










Future Schedules 


1993 




1994 


1995 


September 4 


Virginia 


September 3 at Virginia 


September 2 at Tulane 


September 18 


West Virginia 


September 17 at West Virginia 


September 9 Virginia 


September 25 


at Virginia Tech 


September 24 at Duke 


September 16 West Virginia 


October 2 


Penn State 


October 1 Florida State 


September 23 Duke 


October 9 


at Georgia Tech 


October 8 Wake Forest 


September 30 at Florida State 


October 16 


at Wake Forest 


October 15 at Clemson 


October 7 at Wake Forest 


October 23 


Duke 


October 22 at North Carolina 


October 14 Clemson 


October 30 


at North Carolina 


October 29 Tulane 


October 21 North Carolina 


November 6 


Florida State 


November 5 N.C. State 


October 28 at Louisville 


November 13 


at Clemson 


November 12 Georgia Tech 


November 4 at N.C. State 


November 20 


at N.C. State 


November 19 Syracuse 


November 11 at Georgia Tech 


Home games in bold 









10 



Terportraits, The Coaches 



\ 



"% & 



i 





Bear Bryant, whose first head coaching job was at Maryland in 1945, is painted above with two other Terrapin coaches, 
Clark Shaugnessy (1942, 1946), and Tommy Mont (arms raised). Both Bryant, who won more games than anyone at 
Maryland, Kentucky, Texas A & M and Alabama, and Shaugnessy, who was bead coach twice, are in the College Football 
Hall of Fame. Mont earned 12 letters as an undergraduate (1941, 1942, 1946), and was bead coach from 1956 to 1958. Lu 
Gambino (running with ball) was Coach Jim Tatum's first great back; he still holds the record for points in a season (114, 
1947) and most touchdowns (16, 1947) in a season. Harry Bonk (1945, 1946, 1947, 1948), tying his football shoes, was one of 
19 North Carolina Pre-Fligbt cadets to make their way with their coach. Bear Bryant, to College Park for the 1945 season. 
He stayed to star for Coach Jim Tatum. Lineman Ray Krouse, brother of another Terrapin legend. Sully Krouse, was only 
the third Terrapin in history to be an Associated Press All-America in 1948. 



11 



ortraits, Mark Dufffner 




Symbols of a new day 
abounded at the press confer- 
ence announcing Mark Duffner's 
appointment. 

It came on New Year's Eve, 
just as Maryland was entering 
1992 and its second century of 
football. 

The press conference was 
held in the new $3.4 million 
dollar, five-tiered press box. 

A new $6.1 million football 
team center was being 
constructed in the east end 
zone of a just refurbished Byrd 
Stadium that had all new seat- 
ing, new luxury boxes, and new 
concession buildings. 

The athletic director who ap- 
pointed Duffner, Andy Geiger, 
had come to Maryland just over 
a year before having rebuilt 
Stanford football to bowl 
respectability. It was time to 
steer Maryland in a new 
direction. 

Duffner's enthusiasm punctu- 
ated the new day. He spoke of 
the trip to success being more 
like a mile run than a 40 yard 
dash, but the mile would be run 
at full throttle: He likes the run- 
and-shoot offense, an attacking 
defense. His teams know one 
gear, and it's fast forward. 

The search for Duffner was 
no 40 yard dash, either, but 
compared to other typical head 
football coach searches it was a 
mile run at a fast pace. Joe Kri- 
vak, who coached Maryland for 
five seasons, resigned on 
December 6. Three weeks later 
Duffner was agreeing to be the 
36th head coach at College 
Park. 



Coming back to the 
Washington-area intrigued the 
new coach. "I grew up in the 
shadow of College Park," he 
said. "I appreciate the great 
athletic and academic traditions. 
To have an opportunity to re- 
store the effectiveness of 
Maryland football is a dream 
come true." 

If Duffner's dream proves as 
successful as his football head 
coaching reality, the new day 
will be a bright one. Duffner's 
appointment was announced in 
a sentence that also contained 
the phrase " ... holds the best 
winning percentage among ac- 
tive college football coaches." 

The kind of winning percent- 
age Duffner earned at Holy 
Cross typically attracts head- 
hunters from every corner of 
NCAA football. Leaving Worces- 
ter was a possibility before for 
Duffner, but Maryland was 
right. He was coming home. 

Born in Washington, D.C., he 
grew up in Annandale, Va., just 
a football throw from College 
Park. A graduate of Annandale 
High School, he matriculated at 
William and Mary where he 
earned three letters as a defen- 
sive tackle, and was named 
Southern Conference All- 
Academic. 

He wasted no time in pursu- 
ing a football career. He was a 
graduate assistant at Ohio State 
for two years under Woody 
Hayes, defensive coordinator 
at the University of Cincinnati 
for four seasons, and went to 
Holy Cross in 1981 as defensive 
coordinator and recruiting 
coordinator. 



He was appointed head 
coach at Holy Cross on February 
8, 1986, in a mid-winter of cold 
and dark emotions in Worcester. 
Duffner's predecessor died a 
tragic death, and the team's de- 
fensive coordinator started his 
school on the road to recovery 
and ultimately to success by an- 
nouncing Rick Carter's death to 
the team. 

What Mark Duffner did at 
Holy Cross would require Pat 
O'Brien to make a comeback at 
Warner Brothers to play the 
coach. He elevated not only a 
sport but an entire campus in 
an old fashioned way, on both 
spiritual and competitive levels. 
The coach closest to his career 
winning percentage: Knute 
Rockne, Notre Dame, 1918-1930, 
.881 to Duffner's .916. 

Duffner's Crusade at 
Holy Cross 

Mark Duffner's impact on col- 
lege football came with the 
swiftness of a blitzkreig, but left 
a permanent mark in Worcester. 
One day an assistant coach at 
Holy Cross in 1986, the next a 
head coach inheriting a 4-6-1 
team, he flashed across the foot- 
ball landscape gathering a 60- 
5-1 record in six seasons, and 
accumulating 17 separate 
coach-of-the-year awards. 

But like most "swift" suc- 
cesses Duffner's accomplish- 
ments were based on the solid- 
ity of self-discipline, the work 
ethic, and experiences derived 
from playing for and working 
with some of football's best. His 
first contact with college foot- 
ball was his recruitiment by 
Bobby Ross for William & Mary; 
while in Williamsburg he played 
for Lou Holtz. His first coaching 
job was under Woody Hayes at 
Ohio State. By the time he as- 
sumed control at Holy Cross, 
succeeding another professional 
role model, Rick Carter, he was 
ready to extend the bounds of 
what was expected of a 32-year 
old coach. 

His first season resulted in a 
10-1 record and Holy Cross's 
selection as the top Division 
I-AA program in the East. As 
the years went by, his numbers 
defied grid reality: 



* His 60-5-1 record at HC is 
the best in all of college football 
(.916 winning percentage) for 
that time. 

*His 11-0 1987 squad was 
declared national I-AA champi- 
ons by the NCAA, and the team 
led the NCAA statistics in pass- 
ing offense, total offense, scor- 
ing offense and scoring defense. 

* Three times he was national 
coach of the year. 

And with the numbers come 
legend. 

* There was a litany of im- 
probable successes— such as 
Holy Cross winning after it had 
lost. It defeated Princeton in 
1988 by returning a kickoff for a 
TD with no time left on the 
clock. 

* Gordie Lockbaum's assault 
on the Heisman Trophy was 
American folklore, an all-around 
athlete from a small liberal arts 
school taking on the hype of 
high profile national programs. 
Lockbaum's 1987 assault pro- 
duced the highest finish ever in 
the balloting (third) by a non- 
Division I-A player. 

* The Duffner leadership that 
took the Crusaders from despair 
to constructive euphoria in the 
wake of Head Coach Rick 
Carter's tragic mid-winter death 
contained some unique charac- 
teristics. If an opposing team 
can be featured in a zany way 
at practice, if a way can be 
found to have fun in the midst 
of football star wars, Duffner has 
pulled the stunt. 

* With Duffner winning 
streaks were as natural as the 
snap of the ball, enthusiasm and 
competence taking Holy Cross 
to high emotional ground above 
the opposition. A defeat was a 
challenge, not a lifestyle. It took 
three years for him to lose a I- 
AA game; he did lose one 
again. When he left following 
last season, the Crusaders had 
won 20 straight-the nation's 
longest winning streak. 

* The Mr. Chips side of major 
college coaches is not 
completely dormant. Duffner 
athletes go to school majoring in 
a wide variety of majors, do 
well, and graduate. Ninety-one 
of 95 seniors he coached sur- 
vived the rigors of Jesuit educa- 
tion to earn degrees in four 
years. 



12 



Terportraits, Mark Duffner 




Energy for People 



A Conversation with 
Mark Duffner 

What is unique about the run 
and shoot offense? 

It's a new scheme that uses 
new terminology, new plays, 
new formations, new routes in 
terms of the passing game. So 
it's really a ground floor installa- 
tion we did last spring. And 
also shaping the attack to the 
personnel we have and their 
physcial skills makes it unique, 
too. We're evolving to see how 
the run-and-shoot will fit the 
Maryland football team m 1992 
in the best possible way. 

How do you get so much into a 
day (A Duffner day is some- 
where beyond 24 hours)? 

I just thmk that if you enjoy 
what you do, you can do a lot. I 
love dealing with people, and 
this is a great people job— I've 
just got energy for people. I 
couldn't stand bemg alone. So 
getting it done is trying to be as 
organized as you can be, and 
the Good Lord gave me an en- 
ergy that has a good pace. We 
just try to get it all done. 



How long did you want to 
coach at Maryland? 

Maryland has always been an 
attractive place, because of the 
locale, the tradition, because of 
opportunities available to 
student-athletes it kind of ran 
through my mind years ago. 

Growing up in the area, and 
having the chance to watch the 
basketball team perform, the 
football team perform, reading 
about the teams as a youngster, 
to have the opportunity to come 
back to the place where you ob- 
served great accomplishments 
by people -that is a dream 
come true. 

When did you determine that a 
family atmosphere was so im- 
portant in building a football 
program? 

I sensed way back when I was 
playing that for an athlete m 
any team sport to be successful 
everybody has to contribute, 
and to care about one another. 
There couldn't be a selfish atti- 
tude because that detracted 
from the effort. So as a player in 
athletics I know that when we 
had our best teams people were 
committed to one another and 
to the goal of the team. Our 



best teams were those that 
were very, very close knit, and 
cared about one another. I was 
fortunate to be on some teams 
that were that way and always 
thought if I had the chance to 
develop a program that would 
be the foundation. 

What are the pleasant 
surprises you have encountered? 

The pleasant surprises are the 
people I've met, and I've met a 
bunch -whether they be fac- 
ulty, staff, alumni, boosters. 
There is a sense of a drive to 
excellence at the University; it's 
something I would like to be a 
part of, and we all have the 
chance to build that situation in 
terms of attitude and physically. 

Who is the most intense rooter 
in your family? 

There are a couple. My mom is 
extremely mtense and she al- 
most can't bear ... let's just say 
she's very intense. If my wife is 
listening to an away game she 
has to turn the radio off she 
gets so emotionally involved. 
But everyone in my family, my 
sister, Susan— all my brothers 
and sisters— are very intense 
about our program. 



Who led you into football? 

Bob Hardage, my high school 
football coach, and his staff led 
me into football. I grew up read- 
ing about his successful teams, 
and what I read made me want 
to be a part of the Annandale 
program. There was tremendous 
pride, there was success, there 
was team work, there was disci- 
pline you saw from the teams 
he had. I was very much 
attracted to that. There was 
prestige, there was recognition, 
there was attention afforded his 
successful program. I always 
wanted to be a part of 
Annandale football. 

What is the most important as- 
pect of turning football around 
at Maryland? 

I think there is one key word, 
"attitude." It is the component 
that drives everything. We want 
to be positive, we want to be 
productive, we want to be team- 
oriented. The greatest power we 
have is the power to choose. We 
all have the right to choose to 
have a good attitude or a bad 
attitude, and we need to have a 
lot of great attitudes, very, very 
positive in terms of our program 
at Maryland. 



13 



Terportraits, Mark Duffner 




After family and coaching foot- 
ball, what is most important to 
you? 

Those are the two most impor- 
tant things to me. My spiritual 
life has to be integral to how I 
am with my family, and how I 
am with this football team. To 
be honest my spiritual life is the 
top thing, but they are all kind 
of intertwined— my family is 
number one, and next comes 
what I do with the football fam- 
ily at Maryland. After that comes 
people. I love to be around peo- 
ple. I like to golf, jog, go to the 
beach with family and friends, 
go to the ball games at Camden 
Yards. No matter what, it's best 
with people around. 

What did your dad do for a liv- • 
ing. Was he a football player, a 
fan? 

My father was an attorney for 
the Department of Justice in 
Washington. He graduated from 
Georgetown Law School and the 
University of Illinois as an un- 
dergraduate. He was a 12 sport 
letterman at Rout High School in 
Jacksonville, Illinois, and in col- 
lege played freshman basketball 
at the University of Illinois, and 
he was a starter in baseball for 
four years. In fact, he was cap- 
tain his senior year. He led the 
Big 10 in hitting as a sophomore, 
won the Big 10 title with a home 
run. He was an outstanding 
baseball player, but not a foot- 
ball person. But doing what I'm 
doing -my dad influenced me 
greatly. 

What family members know 
what the Run-and-Shoot is? 

My mom and dad know; in fact 
my mom can just about call the 
plays she is that m-tune with it. 
My brothers and sisters are tre- 
mendously keen and rabid fans; 



my wife knows it. My kids don't 
know it that much but they en- 
joy seeing the team play hard, 
play with high emotion, exciting 
football. Enthusiasm is a family 
thing. 

Beyond the results on the 
scoreboard, what is the most 
rewarding athletic experience 
for you? 

To see our players play hard, 
and to utilize their abilities to 
the fullest. When you see kids 
improve, when you see them 
know they have had success on 
individual plays, or they know 
they have worked hard and are 
able to make big plays -again 
utilizing their potential to its 
highest as athletes. It is very 
enjoyable for me to see them 
enjoy success, to become confi- 
dent people, to become aggres- 
sive with confidence— I don't 
mean aggressive in terms of 
hurting people, but being able to 
let it fly in terms of playing as 
hard as they can. 

If you could change a piece of 
football equipment for safety 
sake, it would be what? 

It would have to do with protec- 
tion for the knee joint. It contin- 
ues to be the one (place) where 
most injuries occur. I think the 
helmets now are pretty doggone 
safe; you don't hear about as 
many neck injuries -obviously 
neck injury is what you're al- 
ways most worried about. But 
still the most common is the 
knee injury, and I would still like 
to see if we could eliminate that 
as a problem for participation in 
football. 

What do we need to reform 
first in college athletics? 

There are too many rules, and 
we have lost our sense of hu- 
manity in applying them. 



A glossary of Duffner 
achievement 

1986: 10-1; Patriot League 
Champions; New York Times 
I-AA National Champions; win- 
ners of Lambert-Meadowlands 
Cup as premier Eastern I-AA 
team; winners of ECAC Team of 
the Year honors; Patriot League 
Coach of the Year; New 
England Football Writers Coach 
of the year; Boston Gridiron 
Club New England Coach of the 
Year; Kodak American Football 
Coaches Association I-AA Dis- 
trict Coach of the Year; USA 
Today Massachusetts All-Sports 
Coach of the Year. 
1987: 11-0, the most wins in a 
year at Holy Cross; NCAA I-AA 
National Champion in poll; 
Patriot League Champions; win- 
ners of Lambert-Meadowlands 
Cup; ECAC Team of the Year; 
Kodak American Football 
Coaches Divsion I-AA National 
Coach of the Year; The Sports 
Network's Eddie Robinson I-AA 
National Coach of the Year; 
New York Football Writers I-AA 
Coach of the Year; Patriot 
League Coach of the Year; 
Boston Gridiron Club New 
England Coach of the Year; 
United Press International New 
England Coach of the Year; 
Kodak American Football 
Coaches Association I-AA 
District Coachof the Year. 
1988: 9-2-0, Lambert/Meadow- 
lands Cup winner as premier 
Eastern I-AA team. 
1989: 10-1; Patriot League 
Champions; ranked number four 
nationally; Lambert/Meadow- 
lands Cup winner; ECAC Team 
of the Year; Patriot League 
Coach of the Year; Boston 
Gridiron Club New England 
Coach of the Year. 
1990: 9-1-1; Patriot League 
Champions; ranked number 
eight nationally; New York 
Football Writers I-AA Coach of 
the Year. 

1991: 11-0; Patriot League 
Champions; longest Division 
I-A/AA winning streak (20 
games); ranked number three 
nationally; ECAC Team of the 
Year; Chevrolet National Coach 
of the Year (as selected by the 
National Football Foundation 
and the College Football Hall of 
Fame). 



Specifics 

Born July 19, 1953, Washington, 

D.C. 

Hometown: Annandale, Va. 

Present residence: Silver 

Spring, Md. 

High School: Annandale 

College: College of William & 

Mary 

Coaching Career: Graduate 
assistant, College of William & 
Mary (Spring 1975); Graduate 
assistant, Ohio State University 
(1975-1976); Defensive Coordi- 
nator, University of Cincinnati 
(1977-1980); Defensive Coordi- 
nator, Recruiting Coordinator, 
Holy Cross (1981-1985); Head 
Coach, Holy Cross (1986-1991); 
Head Coach, University of Mary- 
land, 1992. 

Coaching Honors: Kodak AFCA 
Division IAA Coach of the Year 
(1987); Chevrolet IAA Coach of 
the Year (1991); Sports 
Network's Eddie Robinson IAA 
Coach of the Year (1987); New 
York Football Writers IAA Coach 
of the Year (1987, 1990); Patriot 
League Coach of the Year (1986, 
1987, 1989, 1991); New England 
Football Writers Association 
Coach of the Year (1986); Boston 
Gridiron Club New England 
Coach of the Year (1986, 1987, 
1989); United Press 
International New England 
Coach of the Year (1987); Kodak 
AFCA IAA District Coach of the 
Year (1986, 1987); USA Today 
Massachusetts All-Sports Coach 
of the Year (1986). 

Family: Wife, Kathy; daughters, 
Christina Marie (12) and Carolyn 
Elizabeth (10); and a son, John 
David (7). 




14 



Terportraits, Mark Duffner 



Noting Terrapin Coaching 
History 

*1892-The first official team was 
organized in 1892 by a student 
in in the junior class, Sothoron 
Key. 

*1895-Lieutenant Clough 
Overton, Commandent of 
Cadets, suspended football be- 
cause he insisted that every stu- 
dent be bathed, shaved, and in 
uniform by the 6 o'clock dinner. 
The players wanted supper de- 
layed because they would have 
been able to practice for only 45 
minutes. 

*1896-Football captain Grenville 
Lewis banned pie eating, smok- 
ing and drinking during the 
season. 

*1899- Sam Harding, a former 
player and captain in 1893, 
served as a volunteer coach. He 
came to College Park in the 
afternoons from his U.S. govern- 
ment job. 

'1902- The dean of athletics, 
Professor Richardson, hired the 
first official coach, D. John 
Markey. Markey, a young busi- 
nessman from Frederick, was 
paid $300 for the season. He 
also officiated and played in 
games outside of Maryland. 

•1904- To protest his salary, 
Coach Markey commuted to the 
campus only two days a week 
to coach the team. "Buck" 
Wharton filled in when Markey 
was absent. 

M905- Fred K. Nielsen, a young 
lawyer from the State Depart- 
ment in Washington, was hired 
as new coach. He took off from 
work two hours a day and com- 
muted to College Park to fulfill 
his coaching obligations. 

M905- Coach Nielsen didn't 
award 16-year-old Harry Clifton 
Byrd a uniform at the beginning 
of the season, but he allowed 
Byrd to participate in practice 
on the second team. 

'1911- Western High Coach 
Curley Byrd came back to 
College Park to scrimmage the 
Aggies the week before the 
game against Western Mary- 
land. Byrd's tactics were so 
impressive that he was hired on 
the spot to replace Coach 
Donnelly, who was originally 
acquired from Holy Cross. 




Curley Byrd (kneeling in front at left) and the 1913 Maryland 
State Champions. 



•1926- The highlight of Curley 
Byrd's 14-year coaching career 
occurred against Yale, as heavy 
underdog Maryland defeated 
the mighty Bulldogs, 15-0, at 
New Haven. The victory was 
Maryland's biggest upset in 
school history. 

*1936- The Board of Regents 
promoted Byrd to full President, 
making him the only person to 
play for, coach, and govern the 
same university. 
*1937- Dissatisfied President 
Byrd signs Frank Dobson to a 
3-year contract to do nothing 
besides coach football. The posi- 
tion was only a part-time one 
before Dobson's appointment. 
'1940- Prof. Al Heagy and Prof. 
Al Woods took time off from 
their teaching duties to serve as 
line coach and backfield coach, 
respectively, with old friend, Dr. 
Jack Faber. 

*1942- A superstitious Coach 
Shaughnessy, coming off two 
successful years at Stanford, 
brought the Cardinal's colors 
with him and changed Mary- 
land's uniforms from black and 
gold to red and white. 
*1942- Coach Shaughnessy's 
coaching debut ended in a 34-0 
rout over Connecticut. In this 
game he unveiled the "T" for- 
mation, the first ever used by a 
Maryland team. 

*1943- Dr. Clarence Spears was 
named new coach on the recom- 
mendation of Washington Red- 
skin's owner George Marshall. 
He also headed the health pro- 
gram and was in charge of the 
Infirmary. 



*1943- Along with his coaching 
duties Spears was also 
appointed to run the universi- 
ty's Department of Physical 
Education, where he was to get 
every man in shape and ready 
for the draft. 

*1945- Paul "Bear" Bryant re- 
placed Spears as head coach, 
signing a three-year contract 
worth $9,000 per year. Byrd 
signed Bryant immediately after 
the war was over, encouraging 
Bryant to leave his coaching 
post at the Navy pre-flight 
teams. 

*1946- Clark Shaughnessy, who 
originally vacated a five year 
contract with Maryland, signed 
on with a new one-year con- 
tract. 

*1947- This year proved to be a 
pivotal one as Dr. Byrd signed 
James Moore Tatum to a five- 
year contract. Tatum was an 
assistant coach under Bryant at 
North Carolina Navy Pre-flight 
Training School and played 
tackle at the University of North 
Carolina form 1932-34. 

*1947- Coach Tatum 
implemented his version of the 
"T" formation, called the "Split- 
T." 

*1951- Coach Tatum's team 
finished undefeated and untied, 
the second time in school 
history, capping the season with 
a 28-13 upset over No. 1 ranked 
Tennessee in the Sugar Bowl. 

M953- Coach Tatum won the 
first ever ACC football 
Championship. 



•1953- Coach Tatum earned na- 
tional Coach of the Year honors 
as selected by his coaching 
peers, as well as Atlantic Coast 
Conference Coach of the Year. 

*1956- Assistant Tommy Mont, 
recommended heavily by Tatum, 
took over the caoching reigns. 
Mont graduated from Maryland 
with 12 varsity letters. 

*1959- Tom Nugent was hired 
away form Florida State as new 
Maryland coach. Nugent was 
known as the Magician for his 
reputation to use trick plays. He 
was also credited with inventing 
the I formation. 

*1967- Former two-time All- 
America Bob Ward signed a 
five-year, $100,000 contract as 
new coach. Unfortunately, Ward 
experienced only his second los- 
ing season (as a player, assis- 
tant coach and coach) as Mary- 
land went winless. 

*1972- Jerry Claiborne replaced 
Roy Lester as head coach. Clai- 
borne spent ten years at Vir- 
ginia Tech, leadmg the Hokies 
to two Liberty Bowls and six 
winning seasons. Claiborne 
learned his x's and o's under 
Bear Bryant as a player at 
Kentucky and as a coach at 
Texas A&M and Alabama. 

*1978- Every player recruited by 
Coach Claiborne played m a 
bowl game with the invitation 
to the Sun Bowl. 

*1982- Maryland signed Bobby 
Ross on January 14. 

*1982- Coach Ross was named 
ACC and District UJ Coach of 
the Year after leadmg the Terps 
to the Aloha Bowl in his first 
season. 

•1984- The late James Tatum 
was selected into the National 
Football Foundation College Hall 
of Fame for his nme years of 
coaching excellence at Maryland. 

•1985- Coach Ross led Maryland 
to their fourth bowl appearance 
and third ACC Championship m 
four years. 

*1986- Joe Krivak named head 
coach on Dec. 10. Before this 
appointment he served as coach 
of quarterbacks and receivers 
for the previous five years at 
Maryland. 

*1990- Coach Krivak took Mary- 
land to their first bowl game in 
five years, tying Louisiana Tech 
34-34 in the Independence Bowl 
in Shreveport, La. 



15 



Terportraits, The Coordinators 



Larry Slade 




Assistant Coach 
Defensive Backs 
Defensive Coordinator 

In Lairy Slade' s six years as sec- 
ondary coach at the University of 
Washington, live ot his players were 
drafted into the NFL, including Dana 
Hall who was the Hist round pick of 
the San Francisco 49ers m the 1992 
Draft. 

Larry Slade comes to Maryland 
after six immensely-successful 
seasons as the secondary coach at 
defending Co-National Champion 
University of Washington. Slade will 
coach the Terp defensive backs and 
will serve as the coordinator for 
Maryland's new attacking defense. 

Slade has a reputation as an 
outstanding technician, who consis- 
tently gets the utmost from 
his players. He certainly did at 
Washington, where six years of 
coaching defensive backs resulted in 
five players bemg drafted into the 
NFL. This past season, on way to an 
11-0 record and a share of the na- 
tional title with Miami, the Huskies' 



Specifics: 41 (4-6-51) 

Education: B.S. in biology, 
Shepherd College, 1973 

Coaching: Offensive Lme 
Coach, Shepherd College, 
1973-78; Defensive Line Coach, 
Shepherd College, 1978-81; 
Defensive Coordinator, 
Shepherd College, 1980-81; 
Tight End Coach, University of 
Richmond, 1982; Secondary 
Coach, Recruiting Coordinator, 
Howard University, 1983; Sec- 
ondary Coach, Southern Illinois, 
1984-85; Secondary Coach, 
University of Washington, 
1986-91; Defensive Coordinator, 
Secondary Coach, University of 
Maryland, 1992. 



defense was ranked second in the 
country in total defense and scoring 
defense. Slade's secondary was a 
major reason why UWs passing effi- 
ciency defense was third-best in the 
nation. 

In 1990, Slade coached All-Pac-10 
cornerback Charles Mincy and last 
year Dana Hall was an All-Pac-10 
pick and a first round selection in 
the NFL Draft. 

The move to Maryland represents 
a return to the East Coast for Slade, 
who graduated from Shepherd Col- 
lege in West Virginia and coached in 
the mid-1980s at Howard University 
in the District of Columbia. 

A 1973 graduate of Shepherd, 
Slade earned his bachelor of science 
m biology with a concentrated minor 
in English. He was a two-time All- 
West Virginia offensive guard at 
Shepherd in 1970-71 and earned 
honorable mention Little All- America 
honors in 1971. He was the Most 
Valuable Lineman of the 1971 C 
lvitan Bowl and led Shepherd to 
league titles in 1972 and 1973. He 
went on to begm his coaching career 
at Shepard and was a part of the 
football staff there for the next 10 
years. 

Slade, 41, is married to the former 
Izetta Owens. The couple has two 
children, Herbie, 22, who serves in 
the U.S. Marine Corps, and Lyndsey, 
2, and are legal guardian to a third, 
Roshawn, 5. 



Dan Dorazio 





Assistant Coach 
Offensive Line 
Offensive Coordinator 

As the offensive coordinator at 
Holy Cross last year. Dorazio 
directed an offense that totaled 
almost three miles of total offense 
(5.138 yards) and ranked in the 
national top 10 in three offensive 
categories: total offense (4th). scor- 
ing offense (9th) and passing offense 
(9th). 

The man who called the offensive 
shots for Holy Cross to the tune of 
5,138 yards last season, will direct 
the Terps' offensive signal calling 
this year. Dan Dorazio, who for the 
past three years has been an inter- 
gal part of Mark Duffner's Holy 
Cross staffs, joms the Maryland staff 
this year as the offensive line coach 
and offensive coordinator. 



Dorazio is one of the most 
respected mentors of offensive line- 
man in the country. He coached that 
position at several schools, including 
the University of Washington, where 
he oversaw the progress of All- 
America Mike Zandofsky. At Holy 
Cross, Dorazio's linemen routinely 
dominated the All-Patriot League 
listings. 

Last year, after fellow Terp assis- 
tant Clyde Christensen left Holy 
Cross for South Carolina, Duffner 
handed Dorazio the offensive coordi- 
nator's position as well. In his year 
of calling the plays, HC averaged 
467.1 yards per game of total 
offense, 33.8 points per game and 
had a perfect 11-0 record. 

Prior to movmg to Holy Cross, 
Dorazio was at Washington for five 
years, during which time he coached 
teams in four Bowl games. Dorazio 
also has some experience in the 
Atlantic Coast Conference, having 
coached at Georgia Tech from 1982- 
83. He got his coaching start at Kent 
State, his alma mater, where he be- 
gan coaching as an undergraduate 
after playing football for the Golden 
Flashes for two years. 

A native of Stow, Ohio, Dorazio 
graduated from Kent State in 1974 
with a degree in Education. He has 
done significant post-graduate 
work toward a master's degree in 
sports administration. Dorazio has a 
son, Daniel, 13, and a daughter, 
Mansa, 11. 




Specifics: 40 (1-22-52) 

Education: B.S. in education, Kent State, 1974 

Coaching: Undergraduate Assistant Coach, Kent State, 1972-73; Graduate 
Assistant, Kent State, 1974; Offensive Line and Receivers Coach, Hawaii, 
1975-77; Offensive Line Coach, San Jose State, 1978; Part-Time Assistant, 
University of Washington, 1979; Offensive Coordinator, Offensive Line 
and Kickers Coach, Northern Iowa, 1980-81; Offensive Line Coach, 
Georgia Tech, 1982-83; Offensive Line Coach, Washington, 1984-88; Of- 
fensive Lme Coach, Holy Cross, 1989-91; Offensive Coordinator, Holy 
Cross, 1991; Offensive Coordinator. Offensive Line Coach, Umversity of 
Maryland, 1992. 



16 



Terportraits, Baxter and Christensen 



John Baxter 




Assistant Coach 

Tight Ends/Special Teams 

As special teams coach at 
Arizona last year. Baxter oversaw 
the development of Terry Vaughn, 
who, ironically, recorded the Pac-10's 
longest punt return (83 yards) and 
longest punt (60 yards). 

Coaching the special teams and 
tight ends is John Baxter, entering 
his first season at Maryland. 

Baxter joins the Terps' staff after 
a successful two-year stint at 
Arizona, where his special teams 
were consistently ranked among the 
Pac-10's best. In 1991, Arizona led 
the Pac-10 in kickoff returns, averag- 
ing 22.8 yards a return, and was 
second in the league in kickoff re- 
turn coverage (17.1 ypr) and punt 
returns (11.2 ypr). In 1990, UA led 
the conference in kickoff coverage 
and was second in kickoff returns. 

At Maryland, Baxter will be work- 
ing with several highly-touted 
student-athletes. Freshman kicker 



Specifics: 29 (6-28-63) 

Education: B.S. m physical 
education. Loras College. 1985; 
M.S. in higher education, Iowa 
State, 1987 

Coaching: Undergraduate 
Assistant Coach. Loras College, 
1981-85; Graduate Assistant 
Defensive Lme Coach, Iowa 
State. 1986-87; Graduate Assis- 
tant Special Teams Coach. Ari- 
zona, 1988; Outside Linebackers 
Coach, Special Teams Coach 
and Recruiting Coordmator, 
University of Maine, 1989; 
Special Teams Coach and Tight 
Ends Coach. Arizona, 1990-91; 
Special Teams Coach and Tight 
Ends Coach. University of 
Maryland, 1992 



Dave DeArmas was the top prep 
place kicker and punter in the nation 
two years ago. Playing behind his 
brother, Dan, last year, DeArmas 
redshirted and enters the 1992 
season as the kicker of the future for 
the Terps. Baxter also is expected to 
have the services of freshman speed- 
ster Jermaine Lewis, who is 
nationally-ranked in the 100- and 
200-meters, as a kick and punt re- 
turner. 

A native of Chicago, Baxter was 
an undergraduate coach for four 
years at Loras (Iowa) College. He 
coached running backs from 1981-83 
and quarterbacks and receivers in 
1984-85. After earning his bachelor's 
degree in physical education from 
Loras in 1985. he moved on to Iowa 
State, where he earned his master's 
degree while serving as a graduate 
assistant under Jim Cnner in 1986 
and Jim Walden in 1987. 

Prior to going to Arizona in 1990. 
Baxter was for one year the recruit- 
ing coordinator, outside linebackers 
coach and special teams coach at the 
University of Maine. The Black Bears 
won the Yankee Conference title 
that season, compiled a 9-3 overall 
record and advanced to the NCAA 
Division I-AA playoffs. 

Baxter, 29, was married this past 
spring to the former Jill McBnde. 
who is the daughter of University of 
Utah Football Coach Ron McBnde. 



Clyde Christensen 




Assistant Coach 
Quarterbacks 

Clyde Christensen inherits the 
position of quarterbacks coach this 
season. He will direct the position 
that has seen live recent Terps go 
on to successful professional careers. 

Making a return to the Atlantic 
Coast Conference is Clyde 
Christensen, who will direct the de- 
velopment of the Maryland quarter- 
backs a dozen years after playing 
the position for the North Carolina 
Tar Heels. 

Christensen comes to Maryland 
after one season as the running 
backs coach at South Carolina, but is 
familiar with Terp Coach Mark 
Duffner and the Run and Shoot of- 
fense. Christensen was on Duffner's 




Holy Cross staff in 1989 and 1990, 
calling the offensive shots for teams 
that had a combined record of 19-2-1. 
Christensen coached receivers and 
tight ends in his first year at Holy 
Cross, before being promoted to of- 
fensive coordinator for the 1990 
campaign. 

A native of Corvma. Calif . 
Christensen is a 1979 graduate of 
North Carolina. He saw playing time 
at quarterback on two of the Tar 
Heels most successful teams, partici- 
pating in the 1976 Peach Bowl and 
the 1977 Liberty Bowl. He was a 
junior college All-America quarter- 
back at Fresno City College before 
enrolling at UNC. 

He began is coaching career as a 
graduate assistant at Mississippi in 
1979 and moved on to become 
offensive coordmator and 
quarterbacks/running backs coach at 
East Tennessee State in 1980-82. He 
coached at Temple from 1983-85 and 
at East Carolina from 1986-88 before 
joining Duffner's Crusaders' staff. 
At ECU, Christensen coached on 
both sides of the ball - working 
with the quarterbacks and outside 
linebackers. 

Christensen, 36, and his wife, 
Debbie, have three children: Rachel, 
9, Rebecca, 7 and Ruth, 2. 



Specifics: 36 (1-28-58) 

Education: B.S. in industrial 
relations, North Carolina, 1979 

Coaching: Graduate Assistant, 
Mississippi. 1979; Offensive 
Coordmator, East Tennessee 
State, 1980-82; Quarterbacks 
and Wide Receivers Coach, 
Temple, 1983-85; Offensive 
Coordmator and Recruiting 
Coordmator, East Carolina. 
1986-88; Receivers and Tight 
Ends Coach. Holy Cross. 1989; 
Offensive Coordinator, Holy 
Cross, 1990: Running Backs 
Coach. South Carolina, 1991; 
Quarterbacks Coach. University 
of Maryland. 1992. 



17 



Terportraits, Foels and McCarty 



Mel Foels 




Assistant Coach 
Inside Linebackers 

Mel Foels has worked with a 
number of outstanding linebackers 
during his career. While an assistant 
at North Carolina, Foels guided the 
development ot Lawrence Taylor, 
one of the best linebackers the 
league has ever seen. 

After two seasons as defensive 
coordinator at Arizona State, Mel 
Foels joins the Maryland staff this 
season as inside linebackers coach, 
Foels is one of three assistants, join- 
ing John Baxter from Arizona and 
Larry Slade from Washington, to 
come to Maryland from the Pac-10 
Conference. 

Foels will orchestrate the most 
active segment of the Terps' defen- 




sive scheme, Maryland returns much 
of its successful inside linebacking 
corps of a year ago, including All- 
Atlantic Coast Conference performer 
Mike Jarmolowich, the ACC's lead- 
ing tackier a year ago. 

Entering his 24th year in coach- 
ing, Foels lists many of the country's 
historical football powers on his 
impressive professional resume. At 
Arizona State, he guided the Pac- 
10's second-leading defense m 1991. 
From 1984-89, he coached outside 
linebackers at Tennessee, and before 
that he was the lmebackers coach at 
North Carolma, where Lawrence 
Taylor was his star pupil. In Foels' 
four years at UNC, the Tar Heels 
compiled a 37-11 record and won 
four consecutive bowl games. 

A native of Toledo, Ohio, Foels 
graduated from Bowling Green in 
1965 and received his master's 
degree from the school in 1966. He 
played guard and linebacker for the 
Falcons from 1961-64. 

Foels began his coaching career 
as an assistant at Iowa Wesleyan 
College in 1966. He took over the 
head coaching position the next year 
and guided IWC to four Prairie 
Conference titles. He was the league 
Coach of the Year three times. 

Foels and his wife, Dawn, have 
two daughters, Tracie, 22. and 
Shellie, 20. 



Specifics: 49 (8-3-43) 

Education: B.S. in biology and 
physical education, Bowling 
Green State, 1965; M.S. in edu- 
cation, Bowling Green State, 
1966 

Coaching: Assistant Coach, 
Iowa Wesleyan College, 1966: 
Head Coach, Iowa Wesleyan 
College, 1967-72; Defensive Line 
Coach, University of Iowa, 1973; 
Defensive Line Coach, Eastern 
Kentucky, 1974-76; Defensive 
Line Coach, Tulsa, 1977-79; 
Linebackers Coach, University of 
North Carolina. 1980-83; Out- 
side Lmebackers Coach, 
University of Tennessee, 1984- 
89; Defensive Coordinator, 
Arizona State, 1990-91; Inside 
Linebackers Coach, University of 
Maryland, 1992. 



Peter McCarty 




Assistant Coach 
Outside Linebackers 

As coach of Holy Cross' defensive 
ends last year, Peter McCarty 
directed a unit that helped the 
Crusaders to 45 sacks. 

In the Terps' new attacking style 
of defense, the outside linebackers 
may end up being the most active 
players on the field. And that is just 
the way outside linebacker coach 
Peter McCarty wants it. 

One of five imports from Mark 
Duffner's final Holy Cross staff to 
come with the head coach to Mary- 
land, McCarty seems to revel in a 
state of constant motion. His energy 
certainly was evident during the first 
spring drills of the Duffner era. 
McCarty's corps of linebackers were 
among the most active of any unit 
on defense. 



Specifics: 36 (1-12-56) 

Education: B.S. in education, 
Massachusetts, 1978; M.S. in 
physical education, Syracuse, 
1983 

Coaching: Assistant Coach, 
Bangor (Maine) High School, 
1978-79; Defensive Coordinator, 
Maine Central Institute, 1979-81; 
Graduate Assistant. Syracuse 
University. 1981-83, Defensive 
Coordinator, American 
International College, 1983-85; 
Defensive Ends Coach, Holy 
Cross College, 1986-91; Outside 
Linebacker Coach, University 
of Maryland, 1992. 



Certainly, McCarty knows some- 
thing of activity. At Holy Cross, he 
held three distict positions - coach- 
ing the Crusader's defensive ends, 
acting as the professional scout liai- 
son and serving as the team's aca- 
demic coordinator. On the field, he 
oversaw the development of a group 
of ends that included Tom Smith, a 
1988 All-America and the Crusader's 
single-season sack co-record holder 
with 16. In fact, in the last two years, 
McCarty's defensive ends combined 
to register 38 sacks. 

A Bangor. Me. native, McCarty 
was an All-East, All-New England 
and All-Yankee Conference 
lmebacker at Massachusetts. He was 
the 1977 UMass co-captain for a 
team that advanced to the NCAA 
Division I-AA playoffs. 

After graduating from Massachu- 
setts in 1978, he returned to his 
hometown to coach and teach spe- 
cial education at Bangor High School. 
He then moved to Mame Central In- 
stitute in nearby Pittsfield, Me. 

In 1981, McCarty joined the staff 
at Syracuse as a graduate assistant. 
While earning his master's degree in 
physical education, McCarty was a 
defensive coach and chief scout for 
the Orangemen. From Syracuse, 
McCarty went to American Interna- 
tional College, where he served as 
defensive coordinator from 1983 to 
1986, when he joined Duffner's Holy 
Cross staff. 

McCarty, 36, is single. 




18 



Terportraits, Schwenke and Shannon 



Cliff Schwenke 




Assistant Coach 
Defensive Line 

His defensive front at Holy Cross 
was the foundation of a unit that led 
the Patriot League in rushing 
defense, scoring defense and total 
defense in each of the last live 
years. 

Upon accepting the head coach- 
ing position at Maryland, Mark 
Duffner, known as one of the coun- 
try's most innovative offensive 
coaches, first laid the ground work 
for a successful Terrapin defense. 

In selecting numerous members 
of his Holy Cross staff to join him in 
College Park, Duffner made sure that 
defensive line coach Cliff Schwenke 
made the move south. After all. 
Schwenke, as interior defensive line 
coach for the Crusaders, oversaw a 
unit that led the Patriot League in 
rushing defense, sconng defense 



Specifics: 41 (6-21-51) 

Edcuation: B.S. m physical 
education, University of 
Bridgeport, 1972. 

Coaching: Graduate Assistant, 
Albany State, 1975; Part-time 
Assistant, Bngham Young 
Umversity, 1976; Part-time As- 
sistant, Boston College, 1977; 
Defensive Assistant and Head 
Freshman Coach, Columbia 
University, 1978; Defensive Line 
Coach and Recruiting Coordina- 
tor, Holy Cross College, 1979-80; 
Defensive Line Coach, William & 
Mary. 1981; Part-time Assistant, 
Holy Cross College, 1983-84; 
Offensive Coordinator, Worces- 
ter Polytechnic Institute. 1985; 
Defensive Lme Coach, Recruit- 
ing Coordinator. Holy Cross 
College, 1986-91; Defensive Lme 
Coach, University of Maryland, 
1992. 



and total defense each of the last 
five years. Schwenke's prize pupil 
last year, middle guard Pete Dankert, 
totaled 16 sacks for 118 yards in 
losses. 

Duffner and Schwenke agree the 
Terps' defensive front can become 
as strong a feature of the Maryland 
defense as the line was for Holy 
Cross. 

Schwenke served the Crusaders 
in a dual role. As defensive line 
coach, he developed a unit that pro- 
duced two All-Amencans - middle 
guard Steve Southard (second team, 
1986) and tackle Andy Martin (third 
team, 1987) - and several All-Patriot 
League performers. He also doubled 
as the HC recruiting coordinator. In 
that position, he oversaw the recruit- 
ment of six seasons worth of student 
athletes that helped the Crusaders 
to a 60-5-1 overall won-loss record. 

Prior to joining on for his second 
stint at Holy Cross in 1986 - he also 
coached there from 1978-81 - 
Schwenke served m various coach- 
ing capacities at Bngham Young, 
William & Mary, Worcester Polytech- 
nic Institute, Columbia University 
and Boston College. 

A 1973 graduate of the University 
of Bridgeport, Schwenke was an All- 
East lmebacker and captain of the 
UB team that went 11-0 and won the 
1972 Knute Rockne Bowl. A native of 
Amsterdam, NY., Schwenke has two 
children: David, 10, and Anne, 3. 



John Shannon 





WuM 



Assistant Coach 
Outside Receivers 

In his last two years as offensive 
coordinator at the University of 
Pacific (1990 & 1991), Shannon 
directed an offense that set 10 
NCAA records and combined for 82 
touchdown passes, including a 
national-best 42 last season. 

In his first season on the Mary- 
land staff, John Shannon brmgs 
coaching ability honed while calling 
plays for the University of Pacific's 
record-setting offense. 

In 1991, under Shannon's play 
calling, UOP ranked first in the coun- 
try in touchdown passes (42), second 
in total offense (511.25 yards per 
game), third in passing offense 
(342.8 yards per game) and seventh 
m scormg (36.3 pomts per game). It 
was an offense that led Pacific to its 
best conference finish ever. 



Specifics: 38 (8-5-54) 

Education: B.A. in physical 
education and health, Eastern 
Illinois, 1976; MA. in education, 
Western Kentucky, 1977 

Coaching: Tight End Coach, 
Western Kentucky, 1977; 
Assistant Head Coach, Defen- 
sive Coordinator, Recruiting 
Coordmator, Maryville College, 
1978-79; Assistant Head Coach, 
Defensive Coordinator, Recruit- 
ing Coordinator, Wayne State, 
1980-81; Offensive Coordinator, 
Morehead State, 1982-83; Offen- 
sive Passing Game Coordinator, 
Umversity of Richmond, 1984-88; 
Offensive Coordmator, Umver- 
sity of Pacific, 1989-91; Outside 
Receivers Coach, University of 
Maryland, 1992. 



Shannon directed an offense that, 
for the first time in NCAA history, 
produced a 3,500-yard passer (Troy 
Kopp), a 1,500-yard receiver (Aaron 
Turner) and a 1,500-yard rusher 
(Ryan Benjamin) in a single season. 
Benjamin, in fact, was the first player 
in NCAA history to rush for 1,500 
yards and catch at least 50 passes. 

At Maryland, Shannon's high- 
octane experience will be directed 
toward the outside receivers - a 
group he has had considerable suc- 
cess directing in the past. During his 
coaching tenure at Pacific and at the 
University of Richmond before that, 
five of Shannon's wideouts earned 
All- America honors. 

A native of Bowling Green, Ky., 
Shannon attended Eastern Illinois 
University. He played defensive back 
for the Panthers and graduated in 
1976 with a bachelor's degree in 
physical education. He began his 
coaching career in 1977 as the tight 
end coach at Western Kentucky, from 
which he earned his master's degree 
in education in 1978. 

In 1978, he was named defensive 
coordinator at Maryville College. He 
stayed on that side of the ball for 
two years at Maryville and two sea- 
sons as defensive coordinator at 
Wayne State. In 1982, he was named 
offensive coordmator at Morehead 
State, where in two years his teams 
set 14 game passing records, and his 
reputation as one of the bright, 
young offensive minds m the game 
was established. 

Shannon, 38, is married to the 
former Sally Partain, and the couple 
has three sons, Justm, 12, Benjamin, 
11, and Colby, 7. 




19 



Terportraits, Spence, Football Administrative 



Rob Spence 




Assistant Coach 
Inside Receivers 

In 1990 Rob Spence was the of- 
fensive coordinator for the nation's 
top offensive team, Holstra, which 
led NCAA Division HI in total 
offense, averaging more than 505 
yards per game. 

Overseeing the development of 
the Terrapin inside or slot receivers 
is Rob Spence, one of five coaches 
who came to Maryland from Mark 
Duffner's final Holy Cross staff. 

At HC, Spence spent last season 
guiding record-setting quarterback 
Tom Ciacco, the MVP of the Patriot 
League. As quarterbacks coach, 
Spence molded the trigger men for 
the Crusaders, the only unbeaten 
team in I-AA in 1991. Holy Cross fin- 
ished fourth in the country in total 
offense (467 yards per game) and 



ninth in passing offense (292 yards 
per game) under Spence' s guidance. 

At Maryland, Spence will oversee 
the future development of the most 
prolific receiver in Maryland history. 
Frank Wycheck, who has moved to 
slot receiver in the newly-instituted 
run and shoot, has more receptions 
than any player in ACC history at 
this juncture of his career. Wycheck 
begins his junior season just six 
receptions from breaking the 
Maryland career record, 108. 

Before going to Holy Cross in 
1991, Spence was the offensive 
coordinator and receivers coach at 
Hofstra University, where he kept 
the Flying Dutchmen in flight. 
Hofstra led Division III in points 
(472), passmg (343.2 yards per 
game) and total offense (505.7 yards 
per game) and set the Division III 
record for scoring margin at 38.2 
points a game. 

A 1981 graduate of Iona College, 
Spence played tight end for the 
Gaels. He began his coaching career 
at Iona Prep, where he was offensive 
coordinator from 1982-84, before 
being named head coach. He spent 
five years as head coach, compiling 
29-19-1 record, before moving on to 
become offensive coordinator at his 
alma mater in 1989. 

Spence, 34, and his wife, Susan, 
celebrated the birth of their first 
child, Samantha, in February. 




Specifics: 34 (10-10-58) 

Education: B.S. in social work, Iona College, 1981; M.S. in education, Iona 
College, 1990 

Coaching: Offensive Coordinator, Iona Prep, 1982-84; Head Coach, Iona 
Prep, 1984-88; Offensive Coordinator and Receivers Coach, Hofstra 
University, 1990; Quarterbacks Coach, Holy Cross College, 1991; Inside 
Receivers Coach, University of Maryland, 1992. 



Kyle Lingerfelt 



•" f. *,- * 



/ \ 



Recruiting Coordinator 



Handling the increasingly com- 
plex, year-around duties of coordi- 
nating Maryland's recruiting efforts 
is Kyle Lingerfelt, who is in his first 
year on the Maryland staff. 

Lingerfelt oversees all areas of 
Maryland's recruiting efforts, from 
sorting through the miles of video 
tape that high school coaches send 
his way to organizing on-campus 
visits. He also is the chief liaison be- 
tween the football program and sev- 
eral administrative departments on 
the University of Maryland campus. 

A native of Tallahassee, Fla., 
Lingerfelt has strong ties in the Sun- 
shine State. Certainly, he had con- 
siderable influence in structuring 
Coach Mark Duffner's first recruiting 
class this winter, which included 10 
players from Florida. 

Lingerfelt came to Maryland after 
one successful season as recruiting 
coordinator at East Carolina in 1991. 
From 1989-90, he served as assistant 
recruiting coordinator at the Univer- 
sity of Florida. 

He served in the dual role of re- 
cruiting coordinator and outside line- 
backers coach at Northeast Louisi- 
ana in 1988. Prior to that stop, he 
had been the recruiting coordinator 
at Western Kentucky for two years 
(1986 & 1987) and the Delta State 
strength coach in 1985. 

Lingerfelt was born in Tallahas- 
see, Dec. 4, 1958. He was a three- 
time letterman as a prep quarterback 
and shortstop at Tallahassee Leon 
High School. He went on to play 
three seasons of baseball at Florida 
State. 

Lingerfelt. 33, graduated from 
Florida State with a bachelor of 
science in mathematics in 1983. He 
earned his master's degree in 
educational administration from FSU 
in 1984. 



Bruce Warwick 



o 



<m n*^ 



Administrative Assistant 



Handling the day-to-day, non- 
football operations for Coach Mark 
Duffner's staff is administrative as- 
sistant Bruce Warwick, who begins 
his first season with the Maryland 
program. 

The administrative assistant over- 
sees a variety of duties, including 
organizing all team travel, serving as 
the football staff coordinator 
between the University's academic 
community and the student-athletes, 
and administering all special events 
hosted by the football staff, including 
clinics, summer camps, and the like. 

Warwick comes to Maryland after 
one season as the administrative as- 
sistant and assistant recruiting coor- 
dinator at Syracuse University, where 
he worked under Head Coach Paul 
Pasqualoni. In that capacity, he kept 
the Orangemen staff updated on all 
NCAA rules changes, maintained all 
student-athlete eligibility paperwork, 
coordinated Coach Pasqualom's 
schedule, assisted with facilities 
arrangements, recruiting and many 
other essential football-related 
operations. 

A 1989 graduate of Columbia 
College in Syracuse, Warwick was 
awarded a Bachelor of Arts in Busi- 
ness Administration. He recently 
completed a master's program in 
sports management from the United 
States Sports Academy. 

While an undergraduate student, 
prior to getting involved with athlet- 
ics, Warwick served in various ca- 
pacities for the MONY Federal Credit 
Union in Syracuse, eventually reach- 
ing the position of staff auditor in 
1989. In 1990, he was elected to the 
Board of Directors of the Credit 
Union. 

A native of Baldwinsville, NY, 
Warwick, 25, is engaged to Cynthia 
DeBlaay. The couple plan to marry 
next year. 



20 



Terportraits, Those who stayed 




Those who stayed - the 1948 staff: (Sitting) Flucie Stewart, Jim Meade, Bill Cobey (Athletic Director), Head Coach Jim Tatum, George 
Carroll (Sports Information Director), George Barclay, Houston Elder, (Standing) William "Sully" Krouse, Bill Meek, John Cudmore, Al 
Woods, Duke Wyre (Head Trainer), Warren Giese. This staff has as much pure Maryland history as any in 100 years. Krouse won 20 
straight ACC wrestling championships as its coach; Meade was the big star a decade before as player; Cobey formed the administration 
for the most successful era in Maryland athletics; and Tatum was the most successful head coach. But epitomizing Maryland best might 
be Al Woods, who stayed 41 years. A three-time football letterwinner as an undergraduate, he assisted four head coaches at Maryland, 
and in 1940, he was one of three co-head coaches. 




Those who stayed — the 1961 staff: (Kneeling)— Bemie Reid, Head Coach Tom Nugent, Lee Corso. (Standing) Frank Toomey, Roland 
Arrigoni, Carroll Huntress, All Satterfield, and Bill Dovell. Nicknamed "Whitey", Dovell served several Maryland head coaches over a 15 
year period as an assistant (Tatum, Mont, Nugent and Saban), and he spent the last 27 years in professional football. He was offensive 
line coach for the Baltimore Colts, and later became the director of player personnel for the Kansas City Chiefs. He fought cancer for two 
years, guiding the Chiefs through their spring 1992 draft. He died May 11, 1992, and the Chiefs have set up a scholarship fund at 
Maryland in his name. 

21 



ayers, Alphabetical 



No 


Name 


Pos. 


Ht. 


Wt. 


Ag« 


> Yr 


Hometown 


High School 


Major 


5 


ANNAN Nick 


WR 


6-0 


181 


21 


Sr* 


Gaithersburg, MD 


Gaithersburg 


Agnc-Rec. Economics 


71 


ARLINE, Kevin 


OG 


6-2 


263 


22 


Sr* 


Somerset, NJ 


Franklin 


Criminal Justice 


88 


BADGETT, Marcus 


WR 


6-1 


185 


22 


Sr* 


Elizabeth, NJ 


Elizabeth 


Sociology 


13 


BARTLEY, Shawn 


WR 


6-2 


200 


21 


Jr* 


Moreno Valley, CA 


Moreno Valley 


Speech Communications 


51 


BERGSTROM, Joe 


DT 


6-3 


270 


21 


Jr* 


Malvern, PA 


Archbishop Carroll 


Speech Communications 


12 


BERTHA, Brandon 


DB 


5-11 


177 


21 


Sr 


Virginia Beach, VA 


Bayside 


Criminal Justice 


47 


BEVERIDGE, Ryan 


RB 


5-8 


180 


20 


So 


Baltimore, MD 


City 


Kinesiological Sciences 


61 


BRADLEY, Madison 


NG 


6-3 


287 


23 


Sr 


Buffalo, NY 


Cleveland Hill/Nassau C.C. 


Art Studio 


92 


BRAGG, Jamie 


NG 


6-1 


271 


22 


So* 


Severna Park, MD 


Severna Park 


Agric-Rec. Economics 


35 


BROWN, Brian 


ILB 


6-0 


227 


21 


So* 


Beltsville, MD 


High Point 


Criminal Justice 


43 


BUDD, Richard 


RB 


6-2 


222 


19 


Fr* 


Cumberland, MD 


Fort Hill 


Horticulture-Landsacpe 


1 


BURNETT, Doug 


SU-B 


5-8 


188 


20 


So* 


Laurel Springs, NJ 


Highland Mills 


Criminal Justice 


16 


CARLTON, Chad 


WR 


5-9 


160 


21 


Jr* 


Clinton, MD 


St. John's Col/Norwich 


Radio, TV & Film 


90 


CATHERMAN, Doug 


NG 


6-4 


260 


21 


Jr* 


Mifflinburg, PA 


Mifflinburg 


Criminology 


66 


CHARLAND, Doug 


C 


6-4 


259 


22 


Sr* 


Steubenville, OH 


Steubenville 


Speech Communications 


33 


COLVIN, Darren 


DT 


6-1 


253 


22 


Sr* 


Belcamp, MD 


Aberdeen 


Kinesiological Sciences 


80 


COOPER, Joseph 


OLB 


6-6 


258 


22 


Sr* 


Lykens, PA 


Upper Dauphin 


Speech Communications 


17 


DeARMAS, David 


K-P 


5-10 


195 


21 


Fr* 


Adelphi, MD 


DeMatha 


Letters & Sciences 


55 


deBRUIN, Dave 


OG 


6-5 


275 


23 


Sr* 


Akron, OH 


Copley 


Criminal Justice 


91 


DROZDOV, Darren 


NG 


6-3 


280 


23 


Sr* 


Mays Landing, NJ 


Oak Crest/Fork Union Military 


Criminal Justice 


53 


DUBIS, Jade 


OG 


6-1 


274 


21 


So* 


Asheboro, NC 


Asheboro/Fork Union Military 


Pre-Business 


78 


DUNNE, David 


C 


6-5 


280 


22 


Sr* 


Burbank, IL 


Reavis 


Art Studio 


30 


ENSIGN, Fred 


K 


6-2 


182 


22 


Sr* 


Fairfax, VA 


Bishop O'Connell 


Economics 


46 


FLOOD, John 


K/P 


5-10 


184 


21 


Jr* 


Buffalo, NY 


St. Joseph's 


Government & Politics 


49 


FLORES, Jaime 


DT 


6-2 


229 


22 


Jr* 


Baltimore, MD 


Poly 


Kinesiological Sciences 


50 


FOSQUE, Tim 


OLB 


6-0 


229 


21 


So 


Neptune, NJ 


Asbury Park 


International Education 


59 


GILLESPIE, Joe 


LB 


6-1 


227 


19 


Fr* 


Summit Hill, PA 


Marion Catholic 


Letters & Sciences 


36 


GRANT, Jonathan 


ILB 


6-0 


227 


21 


Jr 


Rockville, MD 


Rockville 


Mathematics 


41 


GRAY, Gene 


ILB 


6-1 


204 


20 


Fr* 


Washington, DC 


Archbishop Carroll/Valley Forge Mi 


Criminal Justice 


9 


GREEN, Gene 


DB 


5-9 


172 


19 


So* 


Yeadon, PA 


Penwood 


Economics 


56 


GREEN, Ken 


ILB 


6-1 


229 


19 


Fr* 


Norfolk, VA 


Lake Taylor 


Letters & Sciences 


42 


GUERRA, Angel 


DB 


6-2 


198 


20 


So 


Manassas, VA 


George Washington 


Economics 


64 


GUNSSER, Paul 


OL 


6-5 


279 


20 


So* 


Philadelphia, PA 


Archbishop Ryan 


Criminal Justice 


74 


HACK, Dave 


OT 


6-6 


268 


20 


So* 


Holland, NY 


St. Francis 


Civil Engineering 


2 


HARRIS, Richie 


SL-R 


5-10 


151 


21 


Sr* 


Columbia, MD 


Mt. St. Joseph's 


Afro-American Studies 


85 


HOLOBETZ, Corey 


DL 


6-4 


231 


20 


Fr* 


Pottsville, PA 


Pottsville 


Business 


15 


INGE, Bill 


SS 


5-11 


193 


21 


Sr 


Lindenwold, NJ 


Overbrook Regional 


Criminal Justice 


54 


INGRAM, Steve 


OT 


6-5 


290 


21 


So* 


Seat Pleasant, MD 


DuVal 


Criminal Justice 


40 


JARMOLOWICH, Mike 


ILB 


6-2 


238 


22 


Sr* 


Union, N.J. 


Union/Fork Union Military 


Speech Communications 


3 


KALEO, John 


QB 


5-10 


202 


21 


Sr 


Davidsonville, MD 


Bowie/Mont-Rockville C.C. 


Criminal Justice 


81 


KREMUS, Jason 


WR 


6-1 


197 


21 


Jr* 


Northampton, PA 


Northampton 


Recreation 


27 


LACY, Mike 


DB 


5-9 


173 


19 


Fr* 


Burke, VA 


Lake Braddock 


Business 


6 


LAWRENCE, Doug 


DB 


5-9 


192 


22 


Sr* 


Harnsburg, PA 


Susquehanna Twp. 


Criminal Justice 


57 


LAWRYNAS, Ben 


C 


6-2 


267 


23 


Sr* 


Fredericksburg, VA 


Monroe/James Madison 


Criminal Justice 


99 


MACK, Sharrod 


DT 


6-3 


281 


19 


Fr* 


Bronx, NY 


Cardinal Spellman 


Letters & Sciences 


11 


MARCHESE, Tom 


QB 


6-2 


214 


20 


Fr* 


Dunmore, PA 


Dunmore 


Business 


48 


MARRONE, Dave 


ILB 


6-3 


242 


21 


Sr 


North Babylon, NY 


St. John Baptist 


Criminal Justice 


21 


MASON, Mark 


SU-B 


5-8 


191 


20 


Jr 


Potomac, MD 


Churchill 


Mgmt & Consumer Studies 


8 


MIKE, David 


QB 


6-2 


204 


21 


Jr* 


Aliquippa, PA 


Aliquippa 


Finance 


7 


MILANOVICH, Scott 


QB 


6-4 


220 


19 


Fr* 


Butler, PA 


Bulter 


Letters & Sciences 


72 


NORTON, Pat 


OG 


6-4 


255 


22 


Sr* 


Sterling, VA 


Parkview 


Economics 


10 


OLAVARRIA, Luis 


DB 


6-1 


192 


19 


Fr* 


West Haverstraw, N\ 


North Rockland 


Government & Politics 


95 


PANAGOS, Jim 


NG 


6-2 


250 


21 


Jr* 


Islip Terrace, NY 


East Islip 


Criminal Justice 


93 


PHOENIX, Rich 


DL 


6-4 


252 


21 


Sr* 


Williamsport, PA 


Williamsport 


Urban Studies 


23 


PRUNZIK, Dan 


SL-R 


5-11 


179 


22 


Sr* 


Pittsburgh, PA 


Mt. Lebanon 


Urban Studies 





22 



Terplayers, Alphabetical, List off Recruits 



4 


REAGAN, Ron 


SS 


6-0 


194 


22 


Sr' 


Berwick, PA 


Berwick 


Recreation 


79 


REGAN, Ed 


OT 


6-5 


268 


21 


Jr' 


Cherry Hill, NJ 


Cherry Hill East 


History 


25 


RIGBY, Cornel 


OLB 


6-0 


200 


22 


Sr* 


Casselberry, FL 


Lake Howell 


English 


| 58 


RODGERS, Mike 


OLB 


6-3 


225 


19 


Fr* 


Drexel Hill, PA 


Haverford 


Finance 


24 


ROSEN, Scott 


FS 


5 11 


190 


22 


Sr* 


Philadelphia, PA 


George Washington 


Recreation 


67 


ROSEWAG, Andy 


OT 


6-4 


260 


19 


So* 


Crownsville, MD 


Old Mill 


Agro-Conservation 


19 


SCARPINO, Tony 


OB 


6-4 


213 


20 


So* 


Monroeville, PA 


Gateway 


Pre-Business 


97 


SMITH, Rudy 


DT 


6-5 


217 


19 


Fr* 


Stoney Point, NY 


Don Bosco 


Business 


68 


STAFFILENO, Ron 


OG 


6-3 


267 


21 


Sr' 


Wellsburg, WV 


Brooke 


Speech Communications 


87 


STEVENSON, Brett 


LB 


6-5 


240 


22 


Sr* 


Thornton, PA 


West Chester East 


Speech Communications 


89 


STREMMEL, David 


WR 


5-11 


161 


21 


Jr* 


Johnstown, PA 


Bishop McCort 


Speech Communications 


31 


STURDIVANT, Mark 


OLB 


6-4 


244 


21 


Jr* 


Silver Spring, MD 


Sprmgbrook 


Family Studies 


65 


TERRANOVA, David 


OT 


6-5 


262 


22 


Sr* 


Marlton, NJ 


Cherry Hill East 


Speech Communications 


76 


TETER, John 


C 


6-6 


261 


19 


Fr' 


College Park, MD 


DeMatha 


Aero-Space Engineering 


82 


THORNTON, Keith 


TE 


5-8 


168 


20 


So 


Clinton, MD 


Bishop McNamara 


Criminal Justice 


44 


VAUGHN, Andre 


DB 


6-2 


197 


22 


Sr* 


Columbia, MD 


Oakland Mills 


Afro-American Studies 


29 


WALL, Raphael 


SU-B 


5-11 


202 


19 


So 


Columbia, MD 


Wilde Lake 


Business 


32 


WASHINGTON, Larry 


RB 


5-10 


215 


20 


So 


Randallstown, MD 


RandaDstown 


Letters & Sciences 


18 


WASHINGTON, Kevin 


SL-R 


6-3 


233 


20 


Fr* 


Baltimore, MD 


Dunbar 


Accounting 


86 


WEAVER, Russ 


WR 


6-3 


213 


20 


So 


Monroeville, PA 


Mt. Lebanon 


Business 



52 WEBSTER, Jahmal 

26 WIESTLING, Chad 

34 WILLIAMS, Kameron 

38 WOOD, Enck 

84 WOODESHICK, Kevin 

22 WYCHECK, Frank 
'Redshirt season 



OLB 

OLB 

SU-B 

ILB 

WR 

SL-R 



6-1 203 20 So* North Braddock, PA 

6-2 220 20 Jr Greencastle, PA 

5-8 183 21 Jr Garnerville, NY 

6-1 222 20 So* Medford, NJ 

6-3 222 20 So* Berwick, PA 

6-3 234 20 Jr* Philadelphia, PA 



Woodland HiUs 
Greencastle-Antnum 
North Rockland 
Shawnee 
Berwick 
Archbishop Ryan 



Kinesiologies Sciences 
Physical Education 
Criminal Justice 
Criminal Justice 
Civil Engineering 
Criminal Justice 



INCOMING FRESHMEN 



Name 


Pos 


Ht 


Wt 


Tim Brown 


LB 


6-1 


205 


Mario Chavez 


LB 


6-2 


220 


Matt Davenport 


OT 


6-5 


270 


Kenyon Drayton 


DB 


6-0 


180 


Kevin Foley 


OB 


6-2 


185 


Erik Greenstein 


OG 


6-2 


270 


Farad Hall 


DT 


6-2 


265 


Aaron Henne 


DT 


6-5 


250 


Erik Henry 


TE 


6-4 


225 


Wade Inge 


WR 


6-1 


180 


Jermaine Lewis 


WR 


5-9 


170 


Andre Martin 


DB 


5-10 


190 


Dee Reed 


QB 


6-2 


205 


Brent Schrode 


OT 


6-6 


250 


Jonathan Simmons 


DB 


5-9 


170 


Orlando Strozier 


QB 


6-2 


190 


Billy Thompson 


DT 


6-5 


240 


Al Wallace 


WR/LB 


6-4 


210 


Walt Williams 


WR 


6-0 


170 


Jason Wmn 


K/P 


5-11 


170 



Hometown/High School 

Statesvule, NC/Statesville/Fork Union Military Academy 

North Miami Beach, FL/Monsignor Pace 

Tallahassee, FL/North Florida Christian 

St. Petersburg, FL/Boca Ciega 

Cherry Hill, NJ/Cherry Hill East 

Andover, MA/Andover 

Carol City, FL/Monsignor Pace 

Allison Park, PA/Shaler Area 

Cherry Hill, NJ/Cherry Hill East 

Lindenwold, NJ/Overbrook 

Lanham, MD/Eleanor Roosevelt 

Columbia, MD/Wilde Lake 

Dade City, FL/Pasco County 

Apopka, FL/Apopka 

Miami, FL/Miami Central 

Augusta, GA/Hephzibah 

Dun woody, GA/Dunwoody 

Del Ray Beach, FL/Spanish River 

Miami, FL/Killian 

Tallahassee, FL/Leon 



23 



al, Pronunciations 




Pronunciation Guide 



Nick Annan A - nun 

Kevin Arline ARE - lean 

Doug Burnett bur - NETT 

Darren Colvin CALL - vm 

Dave DeArmas dee • ARE • mus 

Dave deBruin dee - Brew - in 

Angel Guerra goo - AIR ■ ah 

Corey Holobetz HOLE - o - betz 

Bill Inge INJH 

Mike Jarmolowich jar • MAUL • o - witch 



John Kaleo 

Jason Kremus . . 
Tom Marchese . . 
Scot Milanovich . 
Tony Scarpino... 
Ron Staffileno . . . 

John Teter 

Chad Wiesthng . 
Frank Wycheck . 



kuh - LAY • o 

KRAY - mus 

mar - KAYS 

. muh - LAWN • o • vitch 

scar - PEAN • o 

. . . . staff • uh • LEAN - o 

TEA-ter 

WEEST - ling 

WHY-check 



Numerical Roster 



1 


BURNETT, Doug 


.... SU-B 


23 


PRUNZIK, Dan 


SL-R 


47 


BEVERIDGE, Ryan 


RB 


72 


2 


HARRIS, Richie 


SL-R 


24 


ROSEN, Scott 


FS 


48 


MARRONE, Dave 


ILB 


74 


3 


KALEO, John 


QB 


25 


RIGBY, Cornel 


OLB 


49 


FLORES, Jaime 


DT 


76 


4 


REAGAN, Ron 


SS 


26 


WIESTLING, Chad 


OLB 


50 


FOSQUE, Tim 


OLB 


78 


5 


ANNAN Nick 


WR 


27 


LACY, Mike 


DB 


51 


BERGSTROM, Joe 


DT 


79 


6 


LAWRENCE, Doug 


DB 


29 


WALL, Raphael 


.... SU-B 


52 


WEBSTER, Jahmal 


OLB 


80 


7 


MILANOVICH, Scott 


QB 


30 


ENSIGN, Fred 


K 


53 


DUBIS, Jade 


OG 


81 


8 


MIKE. David 


QB 


31 


STURDIVANT, Mark 


OLB 


54 


INGRAM, Steve 


OT 


82 


9 


GREEN, Gene 


... DB 


32 


WASHINGTON, Larry 


RB 


55 


deBRUIN, Dave 


OG 


84 
85 
86 
87 
88 
89 


10 


OLAVARR1A, Luis 


DB 


33 


COLVIN, Darren 


DT 


56 


GREEN, Ken 


ILB 


11 


MARCHESE, Tom 


QB 


34 


WILLIAMS, Kameron 


... SU-B 


57 


LAWRYNAS, Ben 


C 


12 


BERTHA, Brandon 


DB 


35 


BROWN, Brian 


ILB 


58 


RODGERS, Mike 


OLB 


13 


BARTLEY, Shawn 


. WR 


36 


GRANT, Jonathan 


ILB 


59 


GILLESPIE, Joe 


LB 


15 


INGE, Bui 


SS 


38 


WOOD, Erick 


ILB 


61 


BRADLEY, Madison 


NG 


90 


16 


CARLTON, Chad 


WR 


40 


JARMOLOWICH, Mike 


ILB 


64 


GUNSSER, Paul 


OL 


91 


17 


DeARMAS, David 


K-P 


41 


GRAY, Gene 


ILB 


65 


TERRANOVA, David 


OT 


92 


18 


WASHINGTON, Kevin , 


SL-R 


42 


GUERRA, Angel 


DB 


66 


CHARLAND, Doug 


C 


93 


19 


SCARPINO, Tony 


QB 


43 


BUDD, Richard 


RB 


67 


ROSEWAG, Andy 


OT 


95 


21 


MASON, Mark 


.... SUB 


44 


VAUGHN, Andre 


DB 


68 


STAFFILENO, Ron 


OG 


97 


22 


WYCHECK, Frank 


SL-R 


46 


FLOOD, John 


.... K/P 


71 


ARLINE, Kevin 


OG 


99 



NORTON, Pat OG 

HACK, Dave OT 

TETER, John C 

DUNNE, David C 

REGAN, Ed OT 

COOPER, Joseph OLB 

KREMUS, Jason WR 

THORNTON, Keith TE 

WOODESHICK, Kevin WR 

HOLOBETZ, Corey DL 

WEAVER. Russ WR 

STEVENSON, Brett LB 

BADGETT, Marcus WR 

STREMMEL, David WR 

CATHERMAN, Doug NG 

DROZDOV, Darren NG 

BRAGG, Jamie NG 

PHOENIX, Rich DL 

PANAGOS. Jim NG 

SMITH, Rudy DT 

MACK, Sharrod DT 



24 



Terprofiles 





sum 



fl 



iijii 




Frank Wycheck returns in 1992 as the most prolific freshman-sophomore pass catcher in Atlantic Coast Conference 
history. He has 103 catches in his two seasons, and owns a sizeable chunk of the receiving recordbook. Mike Jarmolowich 
is the ACC's leading returning tackier, and at linebacker the heart of the Terrapin defense. Both he and Wycheck were 
second team A1I-ACC selections as voted by Atlantic Coast Sportwriters Association. Mark Mason (21) is a dart who has 
only been slowed by injury in his two years. A healthy Mason would likely have been at the top of ACC all-purpose 
running a year ago. 



25 



Offensive Depth, Defensive Depth Following Spring Practice 




Offense 








Returning starters in bold face 






Wide Receiver 


Wide Receiver 


Slot Receiver 


Slot Receiver 


Marcus Badgett 


Jason Kremus 


Frank Wycheck 


Richie Harris 


(Sr. 6-1 185) 


(Jr. 6-1 197) 


(Jr. 6-3 234) 


(Sr. 5-10 150) 


Russ Weaver 


Shawn Bartley 


Dan Prunzik 


Dan Prunzik 


(So. 6-3 213) 


(Jr. 6-2 200) 


(Sr. 5-11 179) 


(Sr. 5-11 179) 


Tackle 


Guard 


Guard 


Tackle 


Steve Ingram 


Kevin Arlme/or 


Jade Dubis/or 


David Hack 


(So. 6-5 283) 


(Jr. 6-2 263) 


(So. 6-2 274) 


(So. 6-6 268) 




Dave deBruin 


Ron Staffileno 






(Sr. 6-5 275) 


(Sr. 6-3 267) 




Dave Terranova 






Ed Regan 


(Sr. 6-5 262) 






(Jr. 6-5 268) 


Center 


Quarterback 


Superback 




David Dunne 


John Kaleo/or 


Mark Mason 




(Sr. 6-5 280) 


(Sr. 5-10 202) 


(Jr. 5-8 191) 






Scott Milanovich 


Kameron Williams 






(Fr. 6-4 220) 


(Jr. 5-8 183) 




John Teter 


Tony Scarpmo 


Raphael Wall 




(Fr. 6-6 261) 


(So. 6-4 213) 


(So. 5-11 202) 
Doug Burneit 
(So. 5-8 197) 




Defense 








End 


Inside Linebacker 


Inside Linebacker 


End 


Chad Wiestling 


Mike Jarmolowich 


Ken Green 


Mark Sturdivant 


(Jr. 6-2 220) 


(Sr. 6-2 238) 


(Fr. 6-1 229) 


(Jr. 6-4 242) 


Cornel Rigby 


Dave Marrone 


Brian Brown 


Jamie Bragg 


(Sr. 6-2 200) 


(Sr. 6-3 242) 


(So. 6-0 227) 


(So. 6-1 271) 


Jahmal Webster 


Erick Wood 


Gene Gray 


Joe Cooper 


(Jr. 6-1 203) 


(So. 6-2 220) 


(Fr. 6-1 204) 


(Sr. 6-6 258) 

Mike Rodgers 

(Fr. 6-3 225) 


Tackle 


Nose Guard 


Tackle 




Darren Drozdov 


Jim Panagos 


Darren Colvin 




(Sr. 6-3 280) 


(Jr. 6-2 250) 


(Sr. 6-1 253) 




Rich Phoenix 


Madison Bradley 


Jaime Flores 




(Sr. 6-4 252) 


(Sr. 6-3 287) 


(Jr. 6-2 229) 




Joe Bergstrom 


Doug Catherman 


Rudy Smith 




(Jr. 6-3 270) 


(Jr. 6-4 260) 


(Fr. 6-5, 217) 




Left Corner 


Free Safety 


Roverback 


Right Corner 


Gene Green 


Scott Rosen 


Bill Inge 


Andre Vaughn/or 


(So. 5-9 172) 


(Sr. 5-11 190) 


(Sr. 5-11 193) 


(Sr. 6-2 197) 

Brandon Bertha 

(Sr. 5-11 177) 


Doug Lawrence 


Angel Guena 


Ron Reagan 




(Sr. 5-9 192) 


(So. 6-2 198) 


(Sr. 6-0 194) 




Placekicker 


Punter 






Dave DeArmas 


Dave DeArmas 






(Fr. 5-10 195) 


(Fr. 5-10 195) 






Fred Ensign 


John Flood 






(Sr. 6-2 182) 


(Jr. 5-10 184) 







26 



Terpacesetters, larmolowich 



Mike larmolowich 

Inside Linebacker 

Sr. 6-2 235 

Union, NJ 

Major: Speech Communications 

High School: Union 

At Maryland: A team co-captain ... 
Maryland's top candidate for All- 
America honors ... Returns as the 
nation's fifth leading tackier ... His 
153 tackles, 77 unassisted, 76 as- 
sisted, was the nation's eighth best 
total last season ... The 153 tackles 
led the Atlantic Coast Conference ... 
His season total was 39 more than 
the ACC's second leading tackier ... 
His 304 total tackles in just three 
years puts him on track to be among 
Maryland's all-time leaders at sea- 
son's end ... Won two awards at the 
annual football banquet in February 
... Selected by the coaches for his 
outstanding team contributions, he 
received the coveted Silver Helmet 
Award, the top trophy given: he also 
was selected as the teams outstand- 
ing defensive back 



1991: Second team All-Atlantic Coast 
Conference as voted by ACSWA ... 
the ACC's leading tackier by a wide 
margin ... Voted ACC Defensive Back 
of the Week for his Virginia, Syra- 
cuse, Wake Forest, and North Caro- 
lina games, the most selections by 
any player ... Virginia: Became the 
first Maryland player in four years to 
recover two fumbles in a game when 
he snatched a deuce Syracuse: 
Registered then career high 16 tack- 
les against the Orange ... Sore but 
unbowed against West Virginia 
with eight tackles made ... Earned 
praise from coaches after 12 tackle 
day at Pitt that included nine initial 
hits ... Strong game at Georgia Tech 
as he recorded his first tackle for a 
loss, broke-up a pass ... Monster 
game at Wake Forest; netted 18 
tackles ... Recorded 15 tackles 
against Duke and a hurry of Devil 
QB ... Recorded career high 19 tack- 
les at North Carolina, and had first 
interception since freshman year ... 
Led team in tackles for Virginia, 
Syracuse, Pitt (tied), Georgia Tech, 
Wake Forest, Duke, North Carolina, 
Penn State (tied) and Clemson 
games. 



1990: A busy sophomore linebacker, 
rotating with seniors Glenn Page 
and Scott Whittier ... Used the time 
well, recording 82 tackles, third best 
on the team ... Best game of the year 
was at Virginia; had 12 tackles in- 
cluding three solo stops on special 
teams and two tackles for no gain ... 
Tied the team best with 10 initial 
hits at North Carolina on Oct 27 
At Penn State (Nov 10) he recovered 
a fumble and had eight tackles ... 
Started the season with eight tackles 
against Virginia Tech that included 
typical sterling special teams work ... 
Other high tackle totals came 
against Clemson (8) and Georgia 
Tech (9). 

1989: A solid player who played m 
all 1 1 Terp games while registering 
69 stops (40 unassisted - 29 
assisted) ... His total tied him for 
fifth with defensive back Scott Rosen 
... Intercepted two passes over the 
course of the season and had three 



tackles behind the line of scrimmage 
... His best game came against 
Michigan when he recorded seven 
unassisted and seven assistedtackles 
... A week later, he made six unas- 
sisted and four assisted tackles 
against Clemson Duplicated that 
feat two weeks later against Georgia 
Tech Achieved his numbers de- 
spite not starting a game. 

1988: A redshirt year. 

At Union: A two-sport star, earning 
all-county honors m football and 
baseball ... He led Union to the 1986 
North Jersey Section n, Group IV 
state championship ..He was a 
member of the honor roll and was a 
high school scholar-athlete selection 
... Jarmolowich attended Fork Union 
Military Academy for one year, letter- 
ing in football. 

Personal: Bom 12/24/69. Mike is 
the son of Maryann and Alex 
Jarmolowich. 




Jarmolowich' s 1991 Statistics 



Tackles 



Virginia* 

Syracuse* 

West Virginia 

Pitt* 

GaTech' 

Wake Forest* 

Duke* 

N. Carolina* 

Penn State' 

Clemson* 

N.C. State 



4- 8 

7-10 
3- 5 



9- 3 

10- 4 

9- 9 

8- 7 
4-15 

9- 3 
9- 6 
3- 8 

77-76 



(12) 
(17) 
(8) 
(12) 
(14) 
(18) 
(15) 
(19) 
(12) 
(15) 
(11) 
(153) 



FR 

2 

1 



PD 
2 



TL 

1NG 



K-2) 
K-l) 
3 (-3) 



•Led team in tackles 
1991: 153 tackles (77-76) - 3 tackles for loss (-3) 
1990: 82 tackles (50-32) - 1 tackle for loss (-2) 
1989: 69 tackles (40-29) - 2 interceptions 
Totals: 304 tackles (165-139) 

Top Terp Tacklers 

Jarmolowich, a junior is on course to match the numbers recorded by the all-time 
tackling leaders at Maryland. 

The top of the Terp tackling charts: 

1. Eric Wilson (1981-1984) 481 (280-201) 

2. Chuck Faucette (1983-1986) 466 (266-200) 

Records for tackles made were started in the late 1960s 



1890 

'M.A.C. did not officially authorize, nor recognize, students that played 
football. It did let them participate under the college's name. 



1891 

' MAC'S first victory came in their third and final game on Thanksgiving 
Day against Sandy Spring, 10-0. Football laid the groundwork for the 
foundation of an Athletic Association the next year. 

'Letterwinner Steve Gambrill later became Congressman in the Fifth 
Maryland District from 1924-1938. 



27 



acesetters, Mason, Wycheck 




Mark Mason 

Superback 

Jr. 5-8 180 

Potomac, Md. 

Major: Management & Consumer 

Studies 
High School: Churchill 

At Maryland: Before breaking the 
tibia m his right leg vs. Georgia 
Tech in last season's fifth game, 
Mason was the mercurial future of 
Maryland running ... At that time he 



led the ACC in all-purpose running 
... Set team vertical jump record of 
39" in pre-season of 1991 ... Also 
runs 4.3 40 yard dash. 

1991: ACC leader in all-purpose 
yardage (452 ground yards + 76 
yards receivmg + 67 yards on kickoff 
returns) before injury ... Third in the 
ACC in rushing when mjured ... Not 
since Charlie Wysocki in 1979 had a 
sophomore runner gamed that kind 
of ground yardage through five 



Mason's Statistics 










1991 


Rush 


Yards 


TD 


Long 


Rec 


Vuginia 


21 


96 


1 


27 


3 


Syracuse 


10 


96 


1 


71 


4 


W. Virginia 


17 


68 





15 


2 


Pittsburgh 


17 


118 


1 


22 


3 


Ga Tech 


17 


74 





13 


1 


Totals 


82 


452 


3 


71 


13 


Kickoff returns: 3 for 67 










All-purpose running 


596 yds (119.0 


avg.) 








1990 


Rush 


Yards 


TD 


KOR 


Yards 


VA Tech 


1 


2 











W Virginia 


4 


13 











Clemson 


2 


1 











Michigan 


3 


10 











Ga Tech 











4 


103 


Wake Forest 


7 


52 





1 


28 


Duke 











3 


63 


North Carolma 











1 


11 


Perm State 











1 


16 


Vuginia 


18 


116 


2 


1 


33 


Totals 


35 


194 


2 


11 


254 


2-Year Totals: 117 carries, 646 yards 


, 5.5 average 


5TDs 


Long of 71 - 


20 receptions, 


127 yards, 6.4 average - 14 kickoff returns. 321 yards, 22.3 average 





games (Wysocki had 478 ground 
yards) ... Seventy-one yard TD 
against Syracuse career long ... 
Longest TD run in three seasons 
(Michael Beasley ran for 75 yard TD 
at West Virginia in 1988) ... Good 
receiver, second on team with 13 
receptions for 76 yards when his 
season ended ... No one shut him 
down, even though he split playing 
time with several other backs ... 
Without injury, on track to become 
first sophomore to lead Maryland in 
rushing since Wysocki ... Broke right 
tibia early m third quarter of Tech 
game: if healthy would have sur- 
passed personal record for yards in a 
game. 



1990: Was not used extensively until 
last game of season vs. Virginia. 

At Churchill: An All-Montgomery 
County selection his senior season ... 
broke all Churchill records that were 
formerly held by Paul Palmer, former 
NFL running back ... Rushed for 
2,961 yards during his three year 
career at Churchill ... Ran for 400 
yards in a three-game span his 
senior season ... Gamed 1,313 yards 
and 17 TD's during his junior season 
... Represented Maryland in Big 33 
game ... runs a 4.4 in the 40-yard 
dash. 

Personal: Bom 4/25/72. Mark 

is the son of Wendy and Mark Mason. 




Frank Wycheck 

Slot Receiver 
Jr. 6-3 234 
Philadelphia, PA 
Major: Criminal Justice 
High School: Archbishop Ryan 

At Maryland: The most prolific 
sophomore pass catcher m ACC his- 
tory, he enters his junior season as 
part of the run and shoot offense ... 
Led the ACC in receptions, 58, and 
set an all-time Maryland single sea- 
son mark as a freshman ... Very first 
game against Virginia Tech m Byrd 
Stadium he set a Terrapin record for 
receptions in a single game with 14 
... Needs six catches to become all- 
time Terrapin reception leader ,.. His 



103 receptions are five shy of record 
of 108 by Azizuddm Abdur-Ra'oof ... 
Has outstanding catchmg abilities 
with the surest hands seen m a long 
time ... His future stardom should 
lead him to become one of the all- 
time great Maryland receivers ... 
Long time observers compare him to 
the Terps all-time great receiver, 
Gary Collins, a 1961 unanimous first 
team All-Amencan and All-Pro re- 
ceiver for the Cleveland Browns. 

1991: Second team All-ACC ... Has 
caught more passes m first two 
seasons than any player in league 
history ... First or second in ACC re- 
ceiving stats for most of year, fin- 
ished with second most receptions, 
45 ... 35 yard TD catch at Wake For- 



28 



Terpacesetters, Wycheck, Inge 



est won the game, 23-22 ... Voted 
ACC Offensive Lineman of the Week 
against Virginia .. At Clemson Nov. 
16 he made two acrobatic catches, 
and four in all, to lead team in recep- 
tions an eighth time ... Finished year 
at N.C. State Nov. 23 by catching a 
half-dozen passes to net 100th catch 
and later in game moved to number 
three all-time on Terp receiving list ... 
Played some tight end, allowing him 
and other exceptional H-Back, Chad 
Wiestling, on the field at the same 
time ... He has accomplished his stats 
catching passes from three quarter- 
backs. 

1990: Led ACC in receptions, 58 ... 
All-time Terp single season receiving 
leader, 58 ... Game record holder (14 
vs Virginia Tech) .. Played H-Back 
only. 

1989: A redshirt year. 

At Archbishop Ryan: Wycheck is a 
two-time All-Catholic and All-City 
first team selection in 1987 and 1988 
... Honored as All-Scholastic First 
Team as a junior and senior ... 
Helped lead Archbishop Ryan to the 
1988 Philadelphia Catholic League 
championship with a 10-2 record ... 
He earned three letters in football 
and one each m basketball and base- 
ball ... Wycheck was elected team 
captain for the 1988 football team ... 
He joined former opponent Joe 
Bergstrom at Maryland. 

Personal: Born 10/14/71. Frank is the 
son of Rosemary and Theodore 
Wycheck. 



Wycheck's Statistics 




1991 


Rec Yards 


TD Long 


Virginia' 


5 61 





22 


Syracuse' 


7 61 





15 


West Virginia 


' 4 21 





11 


Pittsburgh' 


4 24 





9 


GaTech 


1 9 





9 


Wake Forest 


3 83 


1 


35 


Duke' 


6 50 





16 


N. Carolina' 


3 15 





9 


Penn State' 


2 19 





11 


Clemson' 


4 42 





24 


NCS' 


6 53 





13 


Totals 


45 438 


1 


35 


'Led team in 


eceptions 






1990 


Rec Yards TD Long 


Virginia Tech 


14# 106 


1 


16 


West Virginia 


5 69 





29 


Clemson 


7 46 





20 


N.C. State 


12 96 





20 


Michigan 


4 27 





9 


Ga Tech 


3 53 





31 


Wake Forest 


4 51 





29 


Duke 


5 26 





10 


UNC 


injured 






Penn State 


4 35 





12 


Virginia 


injured 






Totals 


58# 509 


1 


31 


# School record 






Top Terp Receivers 






1. 108 AzizuddinAbdurRa'oof (1984-1987) 


2. 106 Barry Johnson (1987-1990) 




3. 103 Frank Wycheck (1990- 


947 yards 


4. 101 Feriell Edmunds (1984-1987 




5. 100 Frank Russell (1972-1974) 




6. 97 Greg Hill (1982-1984) 






7 86 Bren Lowery (1986-1989) 




8 83 Vernon Joines (1986-1988) 




9. 83 John Tice (1979-1982) 






10. 82 Russell Davis (1981-1983) 




11. 80 James Muling (1984-1987) 




12 79 Gary Collins (1969-1961) 





1892 

' First official game was a 50-0 loss against St. John's on October 15 at 
Annapolis. 

'Each of the 80 students at College Park were assessed a $10 athletic fee 
that helped pay for football and baseball. 

'Uniforms were purchased, but not headgear. The players actually let 
their hair grow long for protection. 

'Halfback Pearse "Shorty" Prough picked up a M.A.C. fumble and ran the 
wrong way with the ball for 30 yards, reversed the field and turned his 
mistake into a 35-yard net gain. He is the first player credited with a 
wrong way run. 



1893 

'Undefeated season (6-0), won first State Champronsnip. 

'First official victory was a 36-0 victory over Episcopal High School. 

'After playing 20 minutes of the second half against M.A.C, St. John's 
walked off the Geld, and did not return to protest the officiating. 



Bill Inge 



Roverback 

Sr. 5-11 193 

Lindenwold, NJ 

Major: Criminal Justice 

High School: Overbrook Regional 

At Maryland: Will begin fall practice 
as the starting roverback . His 4.57 
speed in the 40-yard dash places him 
among the quickest of the Terps A 
great competitor who exhibits hard 
work and consistency allowing him 
to grade out extremely high each 
game ... The coaching staff is looking 
forward to big things from Inge. 

1991: Starting free safety, replacing 
Mike Thomas, who moved to corner 
back ... Intelligent, sees the whole 
field ... Tied for ACC lead in passes 
broken-up for much of the season ... 
Was fourth on the team in total tack- 
les, 72, as a junior ... Registered the 
second highest number of unassisted 
tackles, 53, during the season 
... Had two games of double digit 
tackles, 10 vs Pittsburgh and Wake 
Forest ... Credited with a career high 
eight unassisted tackles versus 
Pittsburgh ... A total of seven solo 
stops came against Wake Forest and 
Penn State Finished the season 
with a team leading eight pass 
deflections ... A season high three 
break-ups came in the season opener 
against Virginia Played well 



against Virginia with six total tack- 
les, three pass break-ups and one 
forced fumble ... Against N.C. State 
in the season finale, he recorded 
nine total tackles; six of those were 
unassisted ... Against Syracuse, he 
registered five unassisted tackles ... 
Had pass break-ups in six of Mary- 
land's 11 games ... Played special 
teams once again against Penn 
State, had an initial hit. 

1990: Played in the Terps nickle and 
dime defensive packages. Played in 
10 games, recording 21 tackles, 16 
unassisted ... He also had two 
passes broken up - fifth most on the 
team ... Earned more playing time as 
the season went on and became 
more consistent. 

1989: Played as a true freshman. 

At Overbrook: Bill came to Mary- 
land having been a three-year letter- 
winner in football ... As a senior, he 
was all-South Jersey and second 
team all-State ... He was selected to 
play in the North-South Game ... Was 
an all-Conference and all-Group IV 
selection his junior year ... Elected 
team captain for football ... Inge 
earned varsity letters in basketball 
and track as well. 

Personal: Born 1/2/71 Bill is the son 
of Donna and William Inge. 




Bill Inge: When he sticks a t 



29 



Terpacesetters, Drozdov, Rosen 



Darren Drozdov 

Defensive Tackle 
Sr. 6-3 280 
Mays Landing, NJ 
Major: Criminal Justice 
High School: Oakcrest 
Fork Union Military Academy 



Is 



At Maryland: A team co-captain 
listed first at left defensive tackle 
entering pre-season practice ... 
Earned the Top Terp Award as the 
top defensive player in spring drills 
... Played 10 games last season after 
recovering from back surgery in 1990 
... Had surgery to remove a ruptured 
disk in his lower back that caused 
numbness in his left leg. 



1991: The Terps starting right tackle 
by the end of the season ... Fought 
for the position the entire year ... Fin- 
ished with 45 tackles, seventh 
among returnees to the 1992 season 
... Also had three pass deflections, 
two tackles for loss and a forced 
fumble ... Led all Terp down linemen 
in tackles during four games ... Best 
day came m Raleigh against N.C. 
State as he recorded 10 total tackles 
(six unassisted and four assisted) ... 
Had eight tackles and two pass de- 
flections versus Clemson ... Opened 
season with two solo tackles and 
three assists in victory over Virginia 
... Led all down lmemen in tackles 
against Georgia Tech with six total 
tackles, a hurry of the Jacket QB and 
pass break up ... Had at least two 
tackles in all 10 games he played ... 
Missed the West Virginia game be- 
cause of torn rib cartridge. 

1990: A redshirt year 

1989: Played in all 11 games, split- 
ting time between nose guard and 
defensive tackle ... He never missed 
a game despite painful back problem 
... He finished the season as the 
team's seventh leading tackier with 
65 stops (39 unassisted, 26 assisted) 
... He totaled three sacks - second 
best on the team ... Totaled a season 
high 10 tackles against Penn State 
and had nine stops against Clemson 
and Georgia Tech ... He graded at 
91% against PSU and in the 80% 
in four other games ... He finished 
the year with 13 RBI's (the coaches' 
terminology for big plays), including 
three against Western Michigan - a 
sack, a tackle for loss and a quarter- 
back hurry. 

1988: As a true freshman, he split 
time at nose guard with Rick Fleece 
... He played in all 11 games, making 
20 tackles, 12 unassisted ... He 
showed his mettle right from the 




Darren Drozdov: He's worn 
Maryland well for four years. 

start, recording 12 coaches' special 
team tackling pomts in the first game 
of the season against Louisville ... 
Against Duke, he had three unas- 
sisted tackles on special teams - the 
best single-game special teams per- 
formance of any Terp that season ... 
He had two unassisted tackles, in- 
cluding one for a loss, against Wake 
Forest. 

At Oakcrest: He led his high school 
team to league titles m 1986 and 
1987, quarterbacking the '86 squad to 
an 8-0 record and leadmg the '87 unit 
to the same undefeated mark from 
his defensive end position ... He was 
all-South Jersey at defensive end in 
1987, after earning all-Conference 
honors at quarterback in 1985 and 
1986 ... He also was a standout per- 
former m basketball and in track as a 
shot putter. 

Personal: Born 4/7/69. Darren is the 
son of Cynthia and Olaf Drozdov ... 
Olaf was a standout defensive line- 
man for the Terps m the early 1960's, 
lettering from 1962-64 ... Olaf was a 
second team All-ACC selection in 
1964 and the Terps Outstanding 
Defensive Lineman that season. 

Scott Rosen 

Free Safety 

Sr. 5-11 188 

Philadelphia, PA 

Major: Recreation 

High School: George Washington 

At Maryland: A co-captain ... Returns 
to the team after a back injury ended 
his 1991 season after season opener 
versus Virginia ... Injury eventually 
proved to be sciatica ... Has started 
two years and was a 1991 team co- 
captain before injury forced him to 



withdraw from school ... An intense 
performer who plays at full speed at 
all times ... Coaches see him as the 
quarterback of the secondary. 

1991: Injury limited him to one game 
... Did start season opener against 
Virginia ... Did not play after that ... 
Exxon Supreme Team nommee ... 
Injured with a nagging hamstring 
injury in pre-season ... In limited ac- 
tion he had two tackles and one 
pass break-up. 

1990: Playing with an injured shoul- 
der all year, he nonetheless led the 
team's defensive backs in tackles, 
and capped his regular season with 
a five tackle day at Virginia that in- 
cluded an interception and a pass 
break-up against the Cavalier's 
vaunted passing offense ... Fmished 
the year strongly ... Had season 
tackle high of 10 (eight initial hits) at 
North Carolina Oct. 27 that included 
a sack and two pass deflections ... 
At Penn State Nov. 3 he had a 
strong six tackle day ... Had 15 tack- 
les in the first two games of the sea- 
son agamst Virginia Tech and West 
Virginia, including 11 solos ... His 
two years of starting have been 
marked by tremendous courage ... 18 
passes broken-up in his first two 
years of play, by far the high total 
for the Terps; he led the team with 
seven in 1990. 

1989: The young sophomore, as a 
starter in all eleven games, had 69 
tackles, 53 unassisted and 16 
assisted, fifth highest on the team ... 
The 53 unassisted stops was the 



teams' second high to linebacker 
Glenn Page's 67 ... The total tackles 
were the most by a secondary 
player ... Three tackles were for mi- 
nus yards ... Played one of the all- 
time super games against Penn 
State as he had the season high ten 
assisted and two unassisted tackles, 
12 total ... Many of them, "big 
plays" ... But his really "big plays" 
were the seven passes that he bat- 
ted down ... For his outstandmg per- 
formance, Scott was selected as the 
ACC Defensive Back of the Week ... 
He had three other games that he 
had three pass deflections, NC 
State, Western Michigan and North 
Carolina He had a total of 20 for 
the season ... He had one intercep- 
tion for the year against Western 
Michigan. 

1988: Saw action in five games ... 
Recorded two unassisted and one 
assisted tackle ... He suffered broken 
nbs agamst Georgia Tech and 
missed three games as a result. 

1987: A redshirt season. 

At George Washington: He was an 

all-Public and all-City selection in 
football as a senior ... Rosen earned 
three letters in football and two in 
baseball ... He was elected football 
team captain in 1987 ... Named all- 
Public and all-City in baseball as a 
senior ... He helped lead his baseball 
team to the 1987 city championship 
... He was an Honor Roll student and 
chosen as George Washington's 
Scholar Athlete of the Year for 1987. 

Personal: Born 9/19/69. Scott is the 
son of Levem and Al Rosen. 




Scott Rosen: He picked the whole team up by returning for 
another year. 



30 



Terprofiles 




Nick Annan 

5 Wide Receiver 



Kevin Arline 

71 Offensive Guard 



Marcus Badgett 
88 Wide Receiver 



Shawn Bartley 
13 Wide Reciever 



Joe Bergstrom 

51 Defensive Tackle 




Brandon Bertha 
12 Defensive Back 




Q 




Ryan Beveridge Madison Bradley Jamie Bragg 

47 Running Back 61 Nose Guard 92 Nose Guard 



Brian Brown 
35 Linebacker 




Richard Budd 
43 Running Back 



Doug Burnett 
1 Super Back 



Doug Catherman 
90 Nose Guard 



Doug Charland 
66 Center 



Darren Colvin 

33 Defensive Tackle 




Joe Cooper 
80 Linebacker 



David DeArmas 

17 Punter, Placekicker 



Dave deBruin 

55 Offensive Guard 



Darren Drozdov 
91 Nose Guard 



Jade Dubis 

53 Offensive Guard 



31 



acesetters, Bradgett, Ingram 




Marcus Badgett: High, low and in-between, he makes the catch. 



Marcus Badgett 

Wide Receiver 
Sr. 6-1 185 
Elizabeth, NJ 
Major: Sociology 
High School: Elizabeth 

At Maryland: A team co-captain ... 
Led the Terps with a 21 yards per 
reception average in 1991 ... Is fast 
with 4.55 speed in the 40 and has a 
32" vertical jump ... Coaches expect 
him to make major contributions to 
the offense ... Has a career average 
of 21 yards per catch on 21 
receptions. 

1991: Maryland's highlight film ... His 
speed allowed him to catch the long- 
est pass of the season, 58 yards, ver- 
sus Pittsburgh ... Reception versus 
the Panthers came late in the fourth 
quarter and brought the Terps 
within four points, at 24-20 ... Caught 
two passes for 70 yards that day ... 
Caught a career high five passes for 
94 yards as Terps won at Wake For- 
est ... His clutch 20 yard reception on 
a fourth down and eight at Wake set- 
up winning TD ... Named Offensive 
Lineman/Receiver of the Week in the 
ACC for Wake performance ... Four 
catches for a career best 96 yards 
including a 46 yard completion at 
Georgia Tech ... One catch for 29 
yards versus Syracuse ... Against 
Duke he caught two passes for a 14 
yard average. 



1990: Had one of the Terps' most 
televised highlight plays, the big 
bomb in the upset of Virginia ... Per- 
haps the most important offensive 
play of the season ... He streaked 
down the left sideline in Scott Sta- 
dium to catch a long pass from Scott 
Zolak and raced towards the goal lme 
... Run down before he scored, the 
play netted 71 yards and turned the 
momentum to Maryland ... Mark 
Mason scored on the next play from 
the eight to give Maryland its first 
lead and account for the final score of 
35-30 ... Season high in catches came 
against North Carolina when he had 
three for 34 yards with a long of 12 ... 
Had two catches for 22 yards against 
Clemson. 

1989: Played but did not earn a letter. 

1988: A redshirt year. 

At Elizabeth: A three sport letter- 
man, three years as basketball guard; 
two letters as wide receiver; and two 
as a dash man on the track team ... 
Captained the basketball and track 
teams his senior year ... Was first 
team All-Union County receiver his 
senior year, '88 ... He was MVP of the 
state championship basketball team 
as he led the team to a season 27-2 
record ... The track team won the 
state title, as well ... His track coach 
was Dave Costello, brother of Terps' 
strength and conditioning coach 
Frank Costello. 

Personal: Born 2/9/70. Marcus is the 
son of Maylene and Lendsey Badgett. 



Steve Ingram 

Offensive Tackle 
So. 6-5 290 
Seat Pleasant, MD 
Major: Criminal Justice 
High School: DuVal 

At Maryland: Considered the best 
offensive lineman in recent years at 
Maryland ... An injury cost him last 
season ... Was granted a medical 
redshirt thus giving him an added 
year of eligibility ... Eligibility wise, 
he is considered a sophomore ... He 
returns full of potential ... He is part 
of a superior tackle tandom with 
David Hack 

1991: Suffered a spiral fracture of the 
right fibula and a sprain of his right 
ankle in the season opener against 
Virginia ... Missed the remainder of 
the season. 

1990: Smart player who played four 
offensive line positions - both guards 
and both tackles - as a freshman ... 
Did not start ... Moved to offensive 
lme in pre-season camp. 



1989: Spent redshirt season playing 
defensive tackle. 

At DuVal: A three-time all-League 
selection ... Following his senior sea- 
son, he was named first team all- 
County and second team all-Met ... 
He represented Maryland in the Big 
33 game this past July against a 
group of Pennsylvania All-Stars ... 
His team voted him 1988 Defensive 
Lineman of the Year ... Ingram was 
named Honorable Mention all- 
County after his junior year and area 
coaches named him to their Coaches 
Ail-Star Team ... As 1988 team 
captain, he helped lead DuVal to 
county and state championships ... 
He was selected to the Who's Who 
in High School Football ... A two- 
sport standout in high school, he 
earned three letters in football and 
two in basketball ... Was also team 
captain in basketball his senior year 
... He was a two-time all-League 
selection in basketball and following 
his senior year was named Honor- 
able Mention All-County in basket- 
ball ... Member of the Honor Roll. 

Personal: Born 5/8/71. Steve is the 
son of Cynthia and Kirk Ingram. 




Steve Ingram: A wall of young talent: he played four positions as 
a freshman. 



1894 

'Johns Hopkins cancelled a scheduled game against M.A.C. at National 
Park in Washington because its captain was ill, but they neglected to 
tell Maryland. A large crowd and the Aggies showed up, but Hopkins 
didn't. A second team from Georgetown was sent over as a replacement 
and played tough in a 6-4 M.A.C. victory. 



32 



Nick Annan 

Wide Receiver 

Sr. 6-0 181 

Gaithersburg. MD 

Major: Agriculture and Research 

Economics 
High School: Seneca Valley 

At Maryland: Made the move to 
wide receiver from defensive back 
this spring ... Coaches wanted to 
make use of his speed and good 
hands ... Joined the team during the 
spring of 1990. 

1991: Played in all 11 games, but did 
not start any ... Was the first action 
of his Terp career ... Registered two 
tackles against Penn State, one as- 
sisted and one unassisted ... Had one 
tackle for a loss of three yards vs. the 
Nittany Lions ... Also had one pass 
deflection vs. Penn State. 

1990: Did not play. 

At Seneca Valley: Achieved the aca- 
demic honor roll his junior year, '87 
... Named to the Who's Who Among 
American High School Students, '87 
and '88 ... Was a Student Govern- 
ment Association Senator his senior 
year ... A football and track letterman 
... Football team won the state "AA" 
championship his junior year compil- 
ing a 13-0 record ... Took triple jump 
honors his junior year in the regional 
| championship. 

Personal: Bom 9/9/70. Nick is the 
son of Charlotte and Sampson 
Annan. 

Kevin Arline 

Offensive Guard 
Sr. 6-2 263 
Somerset, NJ 
Major: Criminal Justice 
High School: Franklin 

At Maryland: Finished spring drills 
as the starter at left guard ... Recov- 
: ered from knee surgery late last sea- 
'■ son to participate fully in spring 
I drills ... Will be a leader 

1991: Started first four games at left 
guard, but was limited at Georgia 
Tech with ligament problems in right 
knee ... Had knee scoped following 
Georgia Tech game ... High grade of 
the year was 79% vs Virginia. 

1990: Earned a letter playing in eight 
games ... Started the season as a 
back-up nght guard ... When starter 
Ron Staffileno was mjured in the sec- 
ond game at West Virginia, he 
moved into the starters role ... 
Started against Clemson, N.C. State 
and Michigan, third through sixth 
games ... A shoulder injury m the 
Michigan game sidelined him for 



three weeks ... Came back by sea- 
son's end as the back-up guard on 
both sides. 

1989: Spent much of the season on 
the offensive line scout team ... He 
finished the season as the No. three 
right guard, but he earned some 
practice time at the left side as well. 

1988: A redshirt year 

At Franklin: Arline was a three-year 
letterman in football and wrestling, 
serving as captain of both squads as 
a senior ... He received New Jersey 
Governor Thomas Kean's award for 
excellence in athletics as a senior, 
while also earning distinction as 
Franklin's outstanding male athlete ... 
Not surprisingly, he earned the 
George E. Dumas Memorial Trophy 
as the team's outstanding lineman, 
playing both ways at tackle ... He 
was named to the New York Daily 
News tn-state all-star team, as well 
as being named first team all-State 
offensive tackle by the Newark Star- 
Ledger and the Somerset Home 
News ... Arline also was Franklin's 
outstanding wrestler as a senior, con- 
cluding his final prep season with a 
27-3 record ... In addition to his ath- 
letic achievements, Arline was active 
in Franklin's PUSH program, an orga- 
nization which works to fight teen 
alcohol and drug abuse. 

Personal: Born 6/1/70. Kevm is the 
son of Mamie and Richard Arline. 



Shawn Bartley 

Wide Receiver 

Jr. 6-2 200 

Moreno Valley, CA 

Major: Speech Communications 

High School: Moreno Valley 

At Maryland: Begins fall practice 
second on the depth chart at the 
wide receiver position ... Coaches 
feel his size is a big asset that will 
help make him a successful receiver 
... Makes the move from the defen- 
sive backs corps ... Coaches felt his 
hands and athletic ability would 
benefit Maryland's new run and 
shoot offense. 

1991: Played in nine games as a 
back-up safety ... Credited with 
seven total tackles - four unassisted 
and three assisted ... Had two tack- 
les against North Carolina Saw 
late playing time at Georgia Tech 
and was credited with an initial hit 
... Served as back-up at both safeties 
against Wake Forest Had a solo 
tackle against Duke ... Credited with 
an assist against Penn State ... His 
all out play earned him time on the 
special teams. 

1990: Played in eight games, but did 
not letter ... Saw limited playing tune 
at safety, but got the majority of his 
playing time in games as a member 
of the special teams ... Finished the 
season as the teams' third strong 




Terprofiles 



safety, the same as he closed out 
spring practice. 

1989: A redshirt year 

At Moreno Valley: Bartley joined 
the Maryland football program as an 
All-Citrus Belt League selection in 
1988 ... As a basketball standout, 
Bartley led his team to a 23-5 record 
in 1988 and the Citrus Belt League 
Championship ... He earned one let- 
ter in football and two in basketball 
..a 1988-89 America's Who's Who 
Among High School Students ... Par- 
ticipated in the Gifted and Talented 
Education (GATE) program ... An 
Honor Roll student, Bartley received 
the Moreno Valley Special Merit 
Award for Academics in his junior 
year. 

Personal: Bom 11/6/70. Shawn is 
the son of Vonzetta and Paul 
Bartley. His brother, Paul, was a Riv- 
erside County All-Star in football for 
the 1985 and 1986 seasons and at- 
tended Riverside Community 
College. 



Joe Bergstrom 



Kevin Arline (71) and Dave deBniin (55): Experienced obstacles to 
get around. 



33 



Defensive Tackle 

Jr. 6-3 270 

Malvern, PA 

Major: Speech Communications 

High School: Archbishop Carroll 

At Maryland: Moved along the de- 
fensive line to nose guard from 
tackle during spring practice ... With 
hard work he will add depth to the 
young defensive line position. 

1991: Played in eight games, seemg 
most of his action on special teams 
... Earned first tackling statistic with 
a primary hit at Georgia Tech 
Also recorded an assist against 
West Virginia. 

1990: Made strides at defensive 
tackle on the scout team ... Spent 
the season playing on the third unit 
on the nght side ... Did not play in 
any of the regular season games. 

1989: A redshirt season 

At Archbishop Carroll: Bergstrom 
was a two-time all-Catholic, all-City 
and All-Southeastern Pennsylvania 
selection at linebacker following the 
1987 and 1988 seasons ... He was 
chosen all-Catholic in basketball for 
the 1988-89 season ... As captain of 
the 1988 football squad, Bergstrom 
was instrumental in leading Carroll 
to a 9-4 record and the Catholic 
League-Southern Division Champi- 
onship ... Earned two letters in foot- 
ball and was a four-year standout on 
the basketball team, collecting four 
letters. 

Personal: Bom 4/27/71. Joe is the son 
of Dorothea and Thomas Bergstrom. 



Terprofiles 



Brandon Bertha 

Defensive Back 
Sr. 5-11 177 
Virginia Beach, VA 
Major: Criminal Justice 
High School: Bayside 

At Maryland: A returning veteran 
who has worked his way up the 
depth chart with hard work since his 
arrival ... Had a strong spnng prac- 
tice and is listed second on the 
depth chart at right cornerback ... Is 
a consistent performer who shows 
improvement each time he steps on 
the field. 

1991: Was the back-up at left corner 
during much of the season ... 
Recorded 18 total tackles in his first 
year of extended playmg time ... 
Started six games while playmg in 
nine ... Had a strong game against 
Wake Forest durmg which he had 
three unassisted tackles, one pass 
break up and a quarterback hurry ... 
Earned the start late in the season 
versus Duke and came up strong ... 
Had six total tackles, five unassisted 
and one assisted ... Also grabbed his 
first career mterception against the 
Blue Devils and returned it 26 yards 
... Fractured his left wrist late m the 
year and was forced to miss the fmal 
two games of the season. 

1990: Did not play 

1989: Played as a true freshman. 

At Bayside: A two sport standout 
athlete in both football and track ... 
Bertha was a three-time letterwinner 
m football, indoor track and outdoor 
track ... Was named All-Beach line- 
backer following the 1988 season ... 
As a senior, he was the team captam 
for all three sports ... A long jump 
regional champion in 1989 ... Helped 
lead the track team to the 1987 State 
championship 

Personal: Born 3/27/71. Son of 
Dorothy and Willie Bertha. 

Madison Bradley 

Nose Guard 
Sr. 6-3 287 
Buffalo, NY 
Major: Art Studio 
High School: Cleveland Hill 
Nassau C.C. 

At Maryland: A strong candidate to 
become a force for the Terps on the 
defensive line ... Is listed second on 
the depth chart at nose guard behind 
Jim Panagos ... Had a strong spring 
... Can play either the offensive or 
defensive line. 




Brandon Bertha (12): Pointing towards a starting role in '92. 



1991: Saw limited playing time at 
right defensive tackle ... Did not 
record any tackles during the season. 

At Nassau C.C. and Cleveland Hill: 

A highly sought after prospect out of 
Nassau Community College ... Was a 
first team JUCO All- American, 1990 
... An All-Coastal Conference selec- 
tion, also, in 1990 ... Nassau finished 
with a regular season record of 9-1 
and were runners-up to the confer- 
ence champion Montgomery-Rockville 
... At Cleveland Hill, he was a first 
team all-State selection his senior 
season. 

Personal: Born 3/17/69. He is the son 
of Gloria Bradley. 



Jamie Bragg 



Nose Guard 

So. 6-1 254 

Severna Park, MD 

Major: Agriculture and Resource 

Economics 
High School: Severna Park 

At Maryland: One of the Terps' top 
young prospects who could develop 
into a top-notch defensive lineman ... 
Can play any of the three down line- 
man positions ... Uses his speed and 
strength well ... Graduated from 
Severna Park High School one semes- 
ter early and enrolled at Maryland for 
the spring semester 1990 ... The 
extra learning period gave him the 



experience of an extra session of 
spring and fall practice ... His early 
experience should prepare him to 
become an outstanding defensive 
lineman. 

1991: Played in all 11 games adding 
depth to the defensive line ... Best 
game came at Clemson when he 
had three unassisted tackles and one 
assist ... Had a special teams tackle 
against Penn State ... Played well 
against West Virginia and was cred- 
ited with one assisted tackle. 

1990: A redshirt year 
At Severna Park: Team captam his 
senior year ... He was an All-Met 
selection by the Washington Post as 
a senior ... He also earned All-Anne 
Arundel County honors as a senior. 
Personal: Bom 7/28/71. Jamie is the 
son of JoAnne Falise. 



Brian Brown 

Inside Linebacker 
So. 6-0 227 
Beltsville, MD 
Major: Criminal Justice 
High School: High Point 

At Maryland: Has switched posi- 
tions several times in his two years 
in the program ... Came to Maryland 
as a running back, but was moved to 
linebacker, then to nose guard, and 
now back to linebacker ... He was 
one of the most pleasant surprises of 



spring practice, concluding the drills 
No. two on the depth chart behind 
Ken Green ... That result came de- 
spite having never played a down at 
Maryland ... Pound-for-pound, he is 
among the strongest players on the 
squad ... His 347-pound power clean 
lift was the team's best durmg 
spring drills, and he totaled 1,301 
pounds m his three-lift (clean, squat 
and bench) testing set ... He also 
had an impressive 32.5-inch vertical 
jump ... Coaches consider him one of 
the toughest players on the team. 

1991: Did not play 

1990: A redshirt year 

At High Point: Was a first team All- 
Prince George's County selection 
during his senior season ... A bruis- 
ing running back who gained 1,247 
yards ... Scored a team high 22 
touchdowns ... Led the Eagles to 7-3 
finish in 1989. 

Personal: Bom 5/7/72. Brian is the 
son of Gloria and Charles Brown, Jr. 

Richard Budd 

Running Back 

Fr. 6-2 222 

Cumberland, MD 

Major: Horticulture-Landscape 

High School: Fort Hill 

At Maryland: Rick will vie for play- 
mg time in Maryland's new run and 
shoot offensive scheme ... Has the 
size and speed to be a factor in the 
new complicated offense ... Coaches 
like his ability to get open and find 
his way into the end zone ... An in- 
jury slowed his progression early in 
spnng drills. 

1991: A redshirt year 

At Fort Hill: Rick was a member of 
the academic honor roll, maintaining 
a 3.3 grade point average through- 
out high school ... A three sport let- 
terman ... Gained three in football, 
two in baseball and one in track ... 
Was named the Western Maryland 
Offensive Player of the Year by the 
prestigious Dapper Dan Club of 
Cumberland following his senior 
season ... Was selected all-City, all- 
Area and all C.V.A.I. following both 
his junior and senior years ... Led 
Fort Hill to a 10-1 record and the 2A 
State Playoffs his senior season ... 
As a senior, he averaged 5.9 yards 
per carry and scored 13 touchdowns 
on the school's Wing-T offense. 

Personal: Born 3/31/73. He is the 
son of Deborah and Richard Budd, Jr. 



34 



Doug Burnett 



Super Back 
So. 5-8 191 
Laurel Springs, NJ 
Major: Criminal Justice 
High School: Highland Hill 

At Maryland: Played in eight games 
his redshirt freshman year of '91 ... 
lHad an impressive spring ... Coach- 
ing staff found him as a strong run- 
ner and good receiver that would 
mold perfectly into their run and 
shoot offense as an all-important su- 
perback ... Has 4.7 speed in the 40- 
yard dash, bench presses 355 and 
squats 602. 

1991: Registered his first stat against 
West Virginia in season's third game 
when he caught a pass for two yards 
;... One of five A-Backs used at Pitts- 
burgh; gained four yards on one 
carry . Wake Forest was his only 
'start ... Ran well against Penn State, 
: recording long Terp run and top 
, yardage total ... Also personal best in 
yards gained ... Finished tied for 
third in rushing yardage; also had 
'one reception for two yards. 

1990: A redshirt year 



At Highland Hill: An all-State selec- 
tion in New Jersey ... Rushed for 
1,436 yards and 19 touchdowns dur- 
ing his senior season ... Was selected 
second team All-New Jersey by As- 
sociated Press ... Chosen as offensive 
Player-of-the-Year in South Jersey by 
the Philadelphia Inqmwi in 1989 ... 
Was a three-year starter at Highland 
Hill ... Rushed for 2,600 yards in his 
career and scored 42 touchdowns ... 
Finished his senior season the team's 
leading tackier as he averaged al- 
most 10 per game as a middle line- 
backer ... His high school coach, Don 
Reich, is the uncle of former Terp and 
now Buffalo Bills QB Frank Reich. 

Personal: Born 1/23/72. Doug is the 
son of Ruth and Douglas Burnett. 



Burnett's Statistics 




1991 


Rush 


Yards 


Long 


Pittsburgh 


1 


4 


4 


Ga Tech 


8 


32 


13 


Wake Forest 


8 


40 


13 


Duke 


11 


41 


15 


North Carolina 


2 


9 


9 


Penn State 


6 


52 


14 


Clemson 


6 


17 


12 


Totals 


42 


195 


15 



Doug Catherman 

Nose Guard 
Jr. 6-4 260 
Mifflinburg, PA 
Major: Criminal Justice 
High School: Mifflinburg 

At Maryland: A hard worker who 
has earned his way onto the depth 
chart at the nose guard position ... 
Enters the fall practice listed at third 
team nose guard ... His advancement 
on the field last season was fueled 
by the fact that he was injury free 
the entire year. 

1991: Spent the year running on the 
defensive line with the scout team ... 
Began spring practice at right guard 
but was moved to left tackle before 
the regular season opened ... Stayed 
there all season and learned the 
position from Larry Webster, a third 
round draft choice of the Miami 
Dolphins 



Terprofiles 



1990: Did not play. 

1989: A redshirt year. 

At Milflinburg: A two-year all- 
League offensive tackle in 1987 and 
1988 ... Earned three letters in foot- 
ball and track and was team captain 
for football in his senior year ... 
Doug was President of the National 
Honor Society and two year 
President of the Spanish Club ... 
Was on the Distinguished Honor Roll 
at Mifflinburg. 

Personal: Born 2/17/71. Doug is the 
son of Bonnie and Robert 
Catherman. 




Doug Burnett: The team strong man with quick wheels 



1896 

'In the season finale against the University oi Maryland (Baltimore), UM 
snuck three additional players on the field under the cover of darkness. 
Two days later, UM confessed to their tactics and conceded the state 
title to M.A.C.. 

'The football squad was required to get up an hour before reveille and 
run ten miles. 

'M.A.C left halfback Ben Wartons had three ribs broken as he was 
thrown into the goalpost against Episcopal High Schooi. 



1897 

'A game was scheduled against Western Maryland on October 24th, but 
the game was called off because both the referee and umpire failed to 
show. 

'As the officials removed players from a pileup in the M.A.C. - Galludet 
game, they heard a loud scream and found one of the Aggies' thumbs in 
the mouth of his opponent. Fortunately, they separated the foes before 
any permanent damage could occur. 



1898 

'Punter Sam Cooke set a record of sorts for the shortest punt, minus 25 
yards. From midfield, Cooke accidentally kicked the ball over his head in 
the game against Western Maryland. 



1899 

'In the loss to Delaware College, the Aggies got the ball but three times. 



35 



Terprofiles 




Darren Colvin: A respectably fast fullback in '90; a very fast up- 
front lineman in '92. 



Darren Colvin 

Outside Linebacker 

Sr. 6-1 253 

Belcamp, MD 

Major: Kinesiological Sciences 

High School: Aberdeen 

At Maryland: Finished the spring as 
the top outside linebacker on the 
weak side and is expected to be the 
Terps' starter ... Almost unbeliev- 
ably, considering this will be only his 
second season at the position, he is 
Maryland's most experienced player 
at the position ... Was considered the 
most impressive of the outside line- 
backer prospects by the coaching 
staff during their first spring practice 
... In spring testing, he had the best 



weight lifting total among the out- 
side linebackers at 1,326 pounds 
(compiled as a total of the best 
power clean, squat and bench lifts) ... 
His 642 pound squat was the best on 
the team ... His 4.82 time in the 40 
was the best among the outside line- 
backers during the spring. 

1991: His first year at outside line- 
backer; in fact his first year on the 
defense after two seasons as a run- 
ningback ... Played in 10 games, see- 
ing action at linebacker and on all 
special teams ... Recorded 28 tackles 
(19 unassisted, nine assisted), which 
is eighth best among returning play- 
ers ... His four pass deflections tied 
for third-best on the squad, and he 
had one quarterback sack for -8 yards 



... He was one of the most aggres- 
sive special teams players, recording 
eight total tackles, seventh-best on 
the special teams ... His six unas- 
sisted special teams tackles was 
fourth-best on the squad ... His spe- 
cial teams work included a position 
on the kickoff return unit, on which 
he returned one kick for six yards ... 
Best games of 1991 included: a 
season-high five-tackle effort against 
Syracuse ... He had three tackles 
and a tipped pass against North 
Carolina, four tackles and a sack 
against Clemson, and broke up two 
passes in the Terps' win at Wake 
Forest. 

1990: The biggest and strongest 
Terp runner as a sophomore ... The 
back-up 1990 A-Back ranked third in 
rushing (191 yards) and second in 
attempts (68) ... His three rushing 
touchdowns were the second most 
on the team ... His most productive 
scormg day came against Wake For- 
est when he rushed 15 times for 36 
yards and two TDs ... Started against 
Georgia Tech Career high m 
yards came against Clemson (11 car- 
ries, 38 yards) ... Scored on a five- 
yard TD ran at Michigan ... His best 
yards-per-attempt game came at 
Penn State, when he carried five 



times for 24 yards, including a 
career-long 14-yard jaunt ... Caught 
three passes for 30 yaids against 
the Wolverines ... Had 19-yard 
receptions against both North Caro- 
lina and Penn State. 

1989: Played in three games, West- 
em Michigan, North Carolina and 
Virginia .. Carried five times for 12 
yards and had a long carry of five 
against the Tar Heels ... His first 
carry as a Terrapin was four yards 
in the win over Western Michigan. 
Had two kickoff returns, 27 yards; 
14 agamst North Carolina and 13 in 
the season finale against Virginia. 

1988: A redshirt year. 

At Aberdeen: Co-captain of the 1987 
squad that he led to the Harford 
County Championship with a 9-1 
record . . He was an all-County se- 
lection as a junior and senior and an 
all-Metro pick as a senior and played 
in the Big 33 Game ... He also 
earned all-County honors in 
basketball ... Colvin was a high 
school teammate of former Maryland 
lmebacker Karl Edwards. 

Personal: Born 1/20/70. Darren is 
the son of Hazel and Willie Colvin. 




Joe Cooper: Instead of looking for passes as a senior, he's looking 
to make the tackle. 



36 



Terprofiles 




David Dunne Fred Ensign John Flood Jaime Flores Tim Fosque 

78 Center 30 Placekicker 46 Placekicker/Punter 49 Defensive Tackle 50 Linebacker 




Joe Gillespie 
59 Linebacker 



Angel Guerra 

42 Defensive Back 



■ 



* 



Jonathan Grant 
36 Linebacker 



Gene Gray 
41 Linebacker 



Gene Green 

9 Defensive Back 



Paul Gunsser Dave Hack Richie Harris 

64 Offensive Lineman 74 Offensive Tackle 2 Slot Receiver 



Bill Inge 

15 Strong Safety 



ir 



Steve Ingram 

54 Offensive Tackle 



Mike Jarmolowich 
40 Linebacker 



37 



John Kaleo 
3 Quarterback 



Ken Green 
56 Linebacker 




Corey Holobetz 

85 Defensive Lineman 




Jason Kremus 
81 Wide Receiver 



Terprofiles 



Joe Cooper 



Outside Linebacker 

Sr. 6-6 258 

Lykens, PA 

Major: Speech Communications 

High School: Upper Dauphin Area 

At Maryland: Will begin the 1992 
pre-season practice slate at a new 
position ■ linebacker ... The move, 
his second, comes after a move from 
quarterback to tight end upon his 
arrival in College Park in 1988 

1991: Played in all 11 games while 
starting seven ... Caught two passes 
against Pittsburgh ... Catch for 10 
yards against Pitt went for a first 
down and led to Maryland's second 
touchdown of the game ... Caught 
two passes for 16 yards against 
Georgia Tech and one for 1 1 against 
Clemson ... The longest reception of 
his career came at N.C. State and 
went for 27 yards ... Of his six 
catches, four were good for first down 
plays. 

1990: Caught one pass for 14 yards 
against Michigan ... Pass came from 
Jim Sandwisch on a fourth quarter 
drive for the Terps ... Appeared in 
five games, N.C. State, Michigan, 
North Carolina, Penn State and 
Virginia. 

1989: Did not catch a pass but 
played an important back-up role ... 
Was listed third or fourth on the 
depth chart throughout the season. 

1988: A redslurt year. 

At Upper Dauphin: A true scholar- 
athlete, he excelled on and off the 
field ... Cooper was the 1987 third 
team all-State quarterback while 
earning first team all-Conference 
recognition ... As a junior, he was 
the Twin Valley Conference's Offen- 
sive Player of the Year, leading his 
team to the conference and class 
C-II titles ... He also was an all- 
Conference basketball player and 
honorable mention all-State hoops 
player ... He earned four letters in 
football and three in basketball ... 
Off the field/court, he was a honor 
roll student and member of the 
National Honor Society. 

Personal: Born 12/29/69. Joe is the 
son of Joyce and Jerald Cooper. 




Dave DeArmas (17): One DeArmas (Dan, 10) leaves with heavy mention in the recordbook; his 
brother hopes to do as well. 



David DeArmas 

Kicker/Punter 

Fr. 5-10 195 

Adelphi, MD 

Major: Letters and Sciences 

High School: DeMatha 

At Maryland: The heir-apparent to 
the punting and kicking jobs, held 
the past three years by his record 
setting brother, Dan ... Was only the 
second punter/kicker to receive a 
scholarship at when he signed to 
attend Maryland from the famed De- 
Matha Catholic High School ... Will 
attempt to continue the Terp point 
after touchdown streak, currently at 
178 dating back to 1984. 

1991: A redshirt season 

At DeMatha: Was an all-America 
pick by SuperPrep Magazine and Pa- 
rade Magazine as both a kicker and 
punter ... Named the top placekicker 
in the nation by USA Today Newspa- 
per ... Also chosen as the top 
placekicker by Blue-Chip Magazine 
... A two-time first team all- 
Metropolitan pick by the Washington 
Post ... A two-time all-County selec- 
tion by the Prince George's Journal 
... One of the nations most sought 
after placekickers ... A first team all- 
America selection by the Poop-Sheet, 
Don Heinrich 's, Tom Lemmings and 
MARS Report Publications ... A 
Washington Metropolitan Athletic 
Conference "All-Star" selection, 
junior and senior years ... Selected as 
"All-Metropolitan" by the Washing- 
ton Pigskin Club ... Was voted 
DeMatha's "Most Valuable Player" 
his senior year ... Was perfect on 



44 extra point attempts, 15 of 19 
field goal attempts (including a long 
of 52 yards) and punted for a 45.7 
yard average as a senior ... Set a 
school record for field goals in one 
year, and for most consecutive extra 
points, 44 ... His combine junior year 
statistics: Extra Points - 86 of 88; 
Field Goals - 34 of 41 (School record 
52 yards long); Punting average - 
47.9 (15 inside opponents' 20-yard 
line; Kickoffs - 90 of 96 touchbacks 
(one through uprights) ... Cancelled 
visit to Miami (FL), Tennessee and 
Ohio State after making decision to 
attend Maryland ... Was active in 
Dematha's Campus Ministry. 

Personal: Born 7/30/72. David is the 
son of Cary and Daniel DeArmas. 

Dave deDruin 

Offensive Guard 
Sr. 6-5 275 
Akron, OH 

Major: Criminal Justice 
High School: Copley 

At Maryland: Another of the strong 
offensive lineman looking forward to 
an active season ... Was originally 
recruited to Maryland as a 
linebacker, moved to the defensive 
line in his second season and to the 
offensive line last season. 

1991: Missed practice time early in 
summer drills as he damaged carti- 
lage in his right knee ... Injury came 
during a blocking drill and deBruin 
was lost for one week, a period of 13 
practice sessions ... Returned to the 
lineup as a back-up left offensive 
tackle ... Started first game against 
Syracuse at left tackle, and remained 



there as starter until the Wake For- 
est game when he moved to left 
guard to replace an injured Kevin 
Arline, who had knee surgery ... 
Played well after switch as he 
graded-out at 85% against Wake 
Forest.. Previous starter at left tackle, 
Steve Ingram, fractured the fibula in 
his right leg in the third quarter of 
the Virginia game, elevating deBruin 
to starter's role ... Played well 
against Duke finishing with a 76% 
grade ... Played well to conclude the 
season earning 72% grades for both 
Clemson and N.C. State games. 

1990: Played on the offensive line for 
the first time in his football career - 
at any level - he was the back-up left 
tackle behind O'Neil Glenn, who was 
drafted by the New England Patriots 
in the ninth round of the 1990 draft 
... Showed consistent improvement 
and development at the position as 
the season progressed. 

1989: Finished the season as the No. 
three right defensive tackle ... Did 
not see any game action, but used 
the season to gain experience on the 
defensive line and garnered coaches 
praise for being a quick study. 

1988: A redshirt year 

At Copley: A three-sport letterman 
in football, baseball and track ... He 
led the football team to league titles 
in 1984 and 1985 and the baseball 
team to the league championship in 
1986 ... He was an all-state selection 
at linebacker and tight end. 

Personal: Born 10/6/68. Dave is the 
son of Elizabeth and Walter deBruin 
... Walter played football at Ohio State. 



38 



Terprofiles 



Jade Dubis 

Offensive Guard 

So. 61 274 

Asheboro, NC 

Major: Business Administration 

High School: Asheboro 

At Maryland: A promising young 
offensive linemen who played unex- 
pectedly well as a redshirt freshman 
... One of the top rookies in the ACC 
last year ... The starter at right guard 
as the season begins for second year 
... Slated for future stardom. 

1991: Nominated for ACC Rookie of 
the Year by the Terps finishing third 
for the honor ... Was the only rookie 
lineman to receive votes ... Started 
every game at right guard as redshirt 
frosh ... Only freshman starter on the 
football team until David Hack 
started at left tackle against Wake 
Forest ... Graded at 79% for Virginia 
game, very steady ... In on every 
snap at Pittsburgh, graded at 71%; 
earned 75% grade at Georgia Tech, 
75% against Wake Forest ... Best 
game earned an 86% grade against 
Duke .., Followed with 74% grading 
when he returned home to play at 
North Carolina Another strong 
outing vs Penn State gave him 75% 
grading (also had three knowdown 
blocks) .. Steady at Clemson with 



71% grading . Finished year with 
75% grade at N.C. State. 

1990: A redshirt year. 

At Asheboro: Captained the football 
team during his senior season 
Named first team all-Conference dur- 
ing both his junior and senior sea- 
sons ... Named first team all-County, 
also, during his final two seasons at 
Asheboro ... An all-State selection his 
senior season ... chosen for the 
Shrine Bowl ... A member of the all- 
State track team as a shot putter his 
senior season. 

Personal: Born 3/25/71. Jade is the 
son of Diane and Mike Dubis. 

David Dunne 

Center 

Sr. 6-5 280 
Burbank, IL 
Major: Art Studio 
High School: Reavis 

At Maryland: Maryland's starting 
center ... Was moved to the position 
this spring to fill the hole created by 
Mitch Suplee's graduation ... Helped 
design the 100th Anmvarsary of 
Maryland football patch worn on the 
Terrapin football uniforms ... Also 
designed the strength and condition- 
ing t-shirts. 





David Dunne: In the middle of 
the offense as newly minted 
starting center. 

1991: Started every game at right 
tackle ... Only a freak pre-season 
weighthfting accident prevented him 
from being a regular in 1990 ... Very 
mobile, quick big man ... Had a 64% 
grade against Virginia, and 79% at 
Georgia Tech ... Best game at Wake 
Forest when he graded out to 87%, 
had five Rhino's (wipe-out blocks) ... 
Earned 72% grading against Duke 
68% against North Carolina ... 75% 
vs Penn State ... Courageous outing 
at Clemson as he separated shoul- 
der that week in practice, and 
played anyway ... Earned 67% grade 
pass-blocking with one arm ... Year 
ended with 69% grade at N.C. State. 

1990: Withdrew from school prior to 
the start of the fall semester to 
concentrate on his rehabilitation ... 
Returned in January and competed 
in spring ball. 

1989: He was a backup at either 
tackle position for the entire season 
... Although he saw no game action, 
he gained valuable experience ... he 
used the year to work his way up 
the depth chart, finishing the season 
as the No. two right tackle behind 
Clarence Jones. 

1988: A redshirt year ... He trans- 
ferred to Maryland from the 
University of Kansas following his 
freshman season. 

At Burbank: Lettered two years in 
football, playing both offensive and 
defensive tackle positions ... Also 
earned monograms two years as 
member of the track team ... He 



earned all-Conference honors his 
senior year as he set a school record 
in the shot put, distance that was 
second best in the conference ... 
Captained the football and track 
teams his senior year ... He was a 
member of the Varsity Club and in- 
volved himself in high school charity 
events, the annual food drive and 
benefit basketball games. 

Personal: Born 9/23/69. Dave is the 
son of Gen and Dan Dunne. 



Fred Ensign 



Kicker 

Sr. 6-2 182 

Fairfax, VA 

Major: Economics 

High School: Bishop O'Connell 

At Maryland: Has been the Terp's 
kickoff specialist the last two years 
... Is expected to handle the chore 
again this season ... Considered one 
of the top kickoff men in the confer- 
ence ... Earned the important kickoff 
assignment after joining the team as 
a walk-on 

1991: Spent his second year as the 
Terps starting kickoff specialist ... 
His kickoffs are booming with most 
reaching the end zone ... He prac- 
ticed punting daily and although he 
was never called on, can fill m quite 
adequately at that position, too. 

1990: Handled all kickoffs for the 
Terps with tremendous effective- 
ness ... He routinely reached the 
endzone with his kicks ... For the 
season he recorded six touchbacks 
and forced opponents to start from 
their 20 or inside their 20 yard-line 
13 times. 

1989: Did not play. 

At Bishop O'Connell: A two-sport 
standout athlete m both soccer and 
football ... He earned two letters in 
each sport ... Following his senior 
season, he was a conference all-star 
selection and all-Metro selection ... 
Chosen "Golden Eleven" by 
Sportscaster George Michael in 
1987. 

Personal: Bom 3/22/70. Fred is the 
son of Nanola and Richard Ensign. 



Jade Dubis (53): He pulled-out to third in voting for ACC Rookie of 
the Year. 



1902 

'In the game against Washington College, the Aggies took a train from 
College Park at 6:30 a.m. to Baltimore, bopped on another train to Havre 
de Grace, took a ferry from Havre de Grace to the Eastern Shore, and a 
horse drawn carriage for 18 miles to the game in Chestertown. 



39 



profiles 



John Flood 

Punter 

Jr. 5-10 184 
West Seneca 

Major: Government and Politics 
High School: St. Joseph's Collegiate 
Institute 

At Maryland: After arriving in Col- 
lege Park as a placekicker/punter, he 
has concentrated his talents to punt- 
ing ... His increased attention to 
punting has assured him a look from 
the coaching staff in pre-season 
practice. 

1991: Did not play 

1990: Began his development as 
strictly a punter and he worked 
closely with then Terp starter Dan 
DeArmas ... He was not called upon 
to punt in any games during the sea- 
son but showed strong improvement 
during all practice sessions. 

1989: A redshut year 

At St. Joseph's: An All-American 
placekicker at St. Joseph's, Flood 
came to the University with impres- 
sive credentials ... Was selected all- 
Catholic and all-Western New York 
four consecutive years ... An all-State 
selection four years as well ... Earned 
four letters in football and one on 
soccer ... Captain of the soccer team. 

Personal: Born 12/22/70. John is the 
son of Patricia and John J. Flood. 

Jaime Flores 

Outside Linebacker 

Jr. 6-2 229 

Baltimore, MD 

Major: Kinesiological Sciences 

High School: Baltimore Poly 

At Maryland: Fimshed the spring as 
the No. two weakside linebacker be- 
hind Darren Colvin and is expected 
to see considerable playing time this 
season ... He has experience at both 
outside positions, so his versatility 
provides Terp coaches an added di- 
mension ... His work habits are 
among the best on the team ... His 
progress was slowed slightly in the 



spring with an injury, but he is fully 
recovered and is a key component to 
the Terps' defense. 

1991: Began the year somewhat 
slowly while recovering from spring 
surgery on this left knee ... He played 
in all 1 1 games, recording seven tack- 
les ... Saw considerable action on 
special teams ... Totaled a career- 
high three tackles against Clemson 
... Had a big game against Penn 
State with two tackles, including a 
solo shot for no gain 

1990: Played a total of 12 plays from 
the outside linebacker position and 
contributed on almost every special 
teams series ... He saw limited game 
action against Michigan, Georgia 
Tech and Wake Forest. 
1989: A redshut season. 
At Baltimore Polytechnic: Flores 
earned numerous accolades at Poly ... 
He was chosen all-State, all-City, and 
all-Metro first team as a junior and a 
senior .., A member of the 1989 
Maryland roster for the annual Big 33 
game against Pennsylvania all-stars 
...A three-sport star, 
Flores earned two letters in football 
and basketball and three in lacrosse 
... He was elected team captain for 
the football and lacrosse squads. 
Personal: Born 7/19/71. Jaime is the 
son of Martina and German Flores. 



Tim Fosque 



Outside Linebacker 

So. 6-0 227 

Neptune, NJ 

Major: Intensive Educational 

Development 
High School: Asbury Park 

At Maryland: Moved from the inside 
linebacker position to the outside in 
the spring and quickly developed a 
knack for the position ... Terp 
coaches consider him one of the most 
improved players from spring ball ... 
With continued development in the 
fall, he could vie for playing time on 
the defense and will be a likely mem- 
ber of the special teams units ... Ex- 
tremely strong for his size, he totaled 
1,224 pounds during his three-lift 
spring testing. 



1903 

'Much like his prededcessot Sam Cooke in 1898, Captain Watts punted 
the ball backwards in the St. John's game. 

'The M.A.C.- University of Maryland (Baltimore) game abruptly ended in 
protest when Maryland walked off the field in a dispute over a call 
involving an Aggr fumble recovery. 

'The Aggies were not scored on at home. 



1991: Did not play. 

At Asbury Park: Was a three-sport 
lettermen, football, basketball and 
track ... Earned four letters in foot- 
ball playing for Head Coach Leroy 
Hayes ... Was team captain during 
both his junior and senior years ... 
Team won the Shore Conference 
Championship in 1988 with an 8-2 
record ... Was a first team all-Shore 
selection his senior year ... Was a 
two-year basketball lettermen and 
team captain his senior year ... Also 
earned four letters as a member of 
the track team ... Track team won 
the state championship his senior 
season ... Individually, he won the 
state triple jump championship in 
1990 ... Was a member of the Na- 
tional Honor Society ... Earned Honor 
Roll status four times during his high 
school academic career ... Was 
named the mathematics department 
Student of the Month. 

Personal: Born 5/29/92. Tim is the 
son of Barbara Fosque and James 
Turner. A brother, Ronald, was the 
State Basketball Most Valuable 
Player in 1988. 

Joe Gillespie 

Inside Linebacker 

Fr. 6-1 227 

Summit Hill, PA 

Major: Letters & Sciences 

High School: Marion Catholic 

At Maryland: Came to Maryland in 
January of 1991, so he has been 
through two spring practices as well 
as his redshirt freshman season ... 
He is expected to add depth at in- 
side linebacker and compete for a 
spot on the special teams. 

1991: A redshirt year 

At Marion Catholic: Was a first 
team all-State selection as a senior 
linebacker ... first team all- 
Conference by the Reading Eagle 
and all-Area by the Wilkes-Barre 
Times as a linebacker and fullback ... 
Ran for 1,060 yards as a senior, aver- 
aging 5.7 yards per carry and scor- 
ing 11 touchdowns ... Ran for 2,500 
yards and scored 130 points during 
his high school career ... Tabbed one 
of the top 40 senior players in Penn- 
sylvania after his final season by 
SuperPrep Magazine. 

Personal: Born 9/20/73. Joe is the 
son of Edward Gillespie. 



Jonathan Giant 

Inside Linebacker 
Jr. 6-0 227 
Rockville, MD 
Major: Mathematics 
High School: Rockville 

At Maryland: Hardworking player 
who seems to find a way to get on 
the field ... He has been one of the 
most successful walk-ons in the pro- 
gram the last two years ... He will 
be expected to compete for playing 
time at either inside linebacker posi- 
tion and should be a fixture on the 
special teams units ... He works very 
hard in the weight room ... He 
notched a 617-pound squat, which 
tied for second-best on the team, 
during spring testing and added an 
impressive 365-pound bench press. 

1991: Saw action in six games, re- 
cording two unassisted tackles ... 
Both of those stops came against 
Clemson. 

1990: Totaled a handful of plays at 

inside linebacker and as part of the 

special teams. 

1989: A redshirt season 

Personal: Bom 1/16/71. Jonathan is 

the son of the Rev. and Mrs. Leon 

Grant. 



Gene Gray 



Inside Linebacker 
Fr. 6-1 204 
Washington, D.C. 
Major: Criminal Justice 
High School: Archbishop Carroll 
Valley Forge Military Academy 

At Maryland: Coming off a solid 
spring, which saw him poised 
among the top three players at one 
inside linebacker spot ... He is one 
of the most physically gifted players 
at the position, and coaches expect 
him to develop into an outstanding 
linebacker ... He was second only to 
Ken Green among inside linebackers 
in the 40 yard dash, running a 4.77 
... Given the need for speed in Mary- 
land's new defensive scheme that is 
a number that will translate into 
considerable playing time 

1991: A redshirt year 

At Archbishop Carroll: A three-year 
letterman and all-Met selection by 
the Washington Post in 1989 and 
1990 ... Named to the USA Today 
all-District Team at linebacker as a 
senior ... Played on the 1988 Carroll 
team that won the Metro Confer- 
ence Championship (10-1) ... At Val- 
ley Forge, he had 48 tackles and one 
interception in his one season. 

Personal: Born 12/29/71. Gene is the 
son of Elise and Eugene Gray. 



40 



Terprofiles 



Gene Green 

Defensive Back 
So. 5-9 172 
Yeadon, PA 
Major: Economics 
High School: Pennwood 

At Maryland: Had a strong spring 
and enters tall practice listed first on 
the depth chart at left cornerback ... 
His speed, 4.36 in the 40, athletic 
ability and recoverability made an 
impact on the coaching staff during 
spring practice ... Only lacks game 
experience and has the ability to be 
a strong cornerback in the ACC ... 
Was voted the most improved player 
on the squad following spring 
practice 

1991: Did not play 

At Penwood: A first team All- 
Delaware Valley and All-Delaware 
County selection during his senior 
season ... Was a second team all- 
County selection by the News ot Del- 
aware County ... Selected honorable 
mention All-Southeastern Pennsylva- 
nia ... Captained the football and 
track teams during hrs senior year ... 
Selected to play in the Hero Bowl ... 
Was voted Player of the Week seven 
of 10 weeks during his senior season 
in Delaware County as voted by the 
Coaches Association ... Has speed 
and uses it effectively ... Qualified for 
six events at the Pennsylvama State 
Indoor Track Meet in 1990 ... Ranked 
No. one in Delaware County in the 60, 
100. 200 and 300 meter runs. 

Personal: Born 9/26/72. Eugene is 
the son of Sharon and Eugene Green. 

Ken Green 

Inside Linebacker 

Fr. 6-1 229 

Norfolk, VA 

Major: Letters & Sciences 

High School: Lake Taylor 

At Maryland: Came out of spring 
ball as the likely starter along with 
All-ACC returnee Mike Jarmolowich 
at inside linebacker ... he is one of 
the team's best all-around athletes ... 
He is strong (505-pound squat), fast 
(inside linebacker-best 4.72 40) and 
agile (30-inch vertical jump) ... He is 
expected to develop into a staple of 
the Terps' defense for years to come. 

1991: Aredshirt year 

At Lake Taylor: A three-sport letter- 
man; four m football and two each in 
basketball and track ... As a two-way 
football player, he played on both the 
offensive and defensive lines ... 



Earned first team all-District and all- 
Tidewater Area offensive guard As 
a basketball center and forward, he 

.ivrl.MIni milt' imlllts .lllll 1 1 

rebounds a game and was named 
second team all-Eastern District ... As 
a track star he was a rare combina- 
tion of speed and power, excelling in 
the sprints (11.25 in the 100, 50.36 in 
the 200) while also competing suc- 
cessfully in the shot put and discus. 

Personal: Born 2/15/73. Ken is the 
son of Margie Potts. 

David Hack 

Offensive Tackle 

So. 6-6 268 

Holland, NY 

Major: Civil Engineering 

High School: St. Francis 

At Maryland: One of the top offen- 
sive tackles to play for the Terps in 
recent years ... Although ]ust a soph- 
omore, his play has projected him as 
a candidate for all-star honors ... En- 
ters fall practice as the starting right 
tackle ... As a redshirt freshman last 
season he vaulted himself into a 
starter against Duke, seventh game, 
and stayed a starter for the remain- 
der of the season. 

1991: Outstanding redshirt freshman 
talent ... Converted tight end 
Played limited downs early in the 
year, graded at 80% for Virginia, 85% 
for Syracuse, 80% for West Virginia 
and at 60% for Pittsburgh Played 
both left and right tackle at Georgia 
Tech and earned 79% grading ... 
Moved to starting left tackle against 
Duke (Kevm Arline had knee surgery 
and Dave deBruin moved to left 
guard) and was named Atlantic 
Coast Conference Rookie of the Week 
... Graded at 81% with three wipeout 
blocks (Rhinos) versus the Deacons ... 
Had big block on winning TD pass 
play ... Returned week later to regis- 
ter 78% grading agamst Duke ... Had 
team's high grading against North 
Carolina (85%) ... Had five 
knockdown blocks vs. Penn State 
and tied for high grade on line with 
76%.. Finished year with 71% grade 
against N.C. State. 

1990: A redshirt year. 

At St Francis: A first team All- 
Catholic league selection his senior 
season ... Team captain at St. Francis 
during his semor season ... A first 
team all-Western New York selection 



his final prep season ... Chosen to 
the Top-40 All-American Northeast- 
ern United States Team ... A mem- 
ber of the All-Academic team in 
western New York. 

Personal: Born 4/22/72. David is the 
son of Nancy and William Hack. 

Richie Harris 

Slot Receiver 

Sr. 5-10 151 

Columbia, MD 

Major: Afro-American Studies 

High School: Mt. St. Joseph's 

At Maryland: A dart who could 
emerge in the run and shoot offense 
as a frequently used weapon; Mary- 
land's big play threat ... Is 
Maryland's fastest player - runs the 
40 yard in 4.47 . Is dangerously 
quick ... Explosive ... Fits all the re- 
quirements of a wide receiver A 
team leader both on and off the field 
... Was one of the few recruits at 
Maryland to play as a true freshman 
in 1988 ... His high school coach was 
former Terp Chuck White who 
played from 1975-77 

1991: Caught a career high 12 
passes for 322 yards ... Started in 
every game ... Gave Terps highlight 
against West Virginia when he took 
pass in flat and sprinted 35 yards for 
TD m first quarter ... Caught a sea- 
son high three passes for 53 yards 
against the Mountaineers ... His 




career long reception, 37 yards, 
came to close the season against 
N.C. State Had two receptions 
versus Wake Forest for 26 total 
yards and two catches against 
Pittsburgh for 19 yards ... One catch 
for 24 yards agamst Penn State 
gave the Terps a first down in Balti- 
more's Memorial Stadium ... One 
catch each against Syracuse, Geor- 
gia Tech and Duke. 

1990: A redshirt year 

1989: Caught 10 passes for 150 
yards ... Played in six games and 
started the season opener against 
N.C. State where he caught two 
passes for 16 yards ... His long re- 
ception, 35 yards, came against 
Western Michigan in the rain ... 
Caught two passes for 54 yards, a 
career high, in that game also ... 
Was on the receiving end of two 
passes on four occasions ... Caught 
two passes agamst N.C. State, 
Western Michigan, Michigan and 
Wake Forest ... Had a 15.0 average 
on 10 receptions ... Except for miss- 
ing two games with an injury, he 
was not listed below second on the 
depth chart last season. 

1988: Saw action in latter part of 
season as wide receiver, but did not 
letter ... Did not have any pass re- 
ceptions 

At Mt. St. Joseph: (Baltimore) A 
three-year letter-winner m football 
... Richie was chosen all-Metro, 
MSA Ail-Star and a "Big 33" selec- 
tion his senior year ... The Mounts 
won the MSA. "A" Championship 
with a 4-1 record in '87 ... Was a 
two-year letter winner on the bas- 
ketball team and captained the 
squad his junior and semor years ... 
An all-Metro and first team All- 
Catholic League performer on the 
basketball team ... Won the Citizen- 
ship Award and the Brother Eugene 
Gentleman Scholar and Athlete 
Award given annually by the Mt. St. 
Joseph's Varsity Club ... Was a cul- 
tural activities club board member 
for three years ... Was a retreat 
leader. 

Personal: Bora 11/29/70. Richie is 
the son of Ruth and Richard Harris. 



41 



Terproffiles 



Corey Holobetz 

Defensive Line 

So. 6-4 231 

Pottsville, PA 

Major: Business Administration 

High School: Pottsville 

At Maryland: Was moved to the de- 
fensive line from tight end during 
spring practice and made great 
progress at the position ... Begins fall 
practice as the No. one long snapper 
on the depth chart ... His height and 
size make him a superb candidate for 
playing time this season and in the 
future. 

1991: Caught one pass from the tight 
end position while playing in seven 
games ... Caught a seven-yard pass 
from Tony Scarpino against West 
Virginia ... Reception came in the 
fourth quarter and was good for a 
first down ... Was used extensively 
on special teams at the end of the 
season because of injury. 

1990: A redshirt year. 

At Pottsville: All-State Pennsylvania 
tight end who caught 33 passes and 



scored four touchdowns his senior 
season ... Led Pottsville to a 10-3 
record and a playoff berth ... Caught 
99 passes for 1,200 yards during his 
prep career ... a first team all- State 
pick by the Associated Press as a 
senior ... Was an all-County and all- 
Conference pick his junior and senior 
years ... Has speed, runs the 40-yard 
dash in 4.7 ... Maintained an A aver- 
age during his high school career and 
earned over 1100 on his SAT. 

Personal: Born 9/22/71. Corey is 
the son of Maryann and Michael 
Holobetz. 

lohn Kaleo 

Quarterback 
Sr. 5-10 202 
Davidsonville, MD 
Major: Criminal Justice 
High School: Bowie/South River 
Montgomery-Rockville JC 

At Maryland: One of two top quar- 
terbacks returning that saw limited 
play last season ... Will be the lead- 
ing candidate for the starting quar- 




John Kaleo: On target to start in 12. 



terback job when pre-season prac- 
tice opens in August ... When spring 
practice started, Coach Duffner listed 
his six quarterbacks equal ... He left 
it up to a daily challenge by each 
signal-caller's performance ... At 
spring practice end, Kaleo was listed 
as the first team quarterback ... It 
will be his to keep in the fall prac- 
tices for the season opener against 
Virginia. 

1991: First JUCO quarterback to play 
for the Terps ... Replaced Jim 
Sandwisch in the second half of the 
Syracuse game ... He inherited poor 
field position (on his own one) in his 
second series, and a freakish end 
zone interception resulted when he 
tried to avoid a safety with a throw- 
away pass ... Recorded year's long 
pass play to that point, a 29-yard 
completion to Marcus Badgett over 
the middle ... Started season's third 
game against West Virginia, and 
completed first pass for 35 yard TD 
to Richie Hams and brief 7-0 lead ... 
Sandwisch replaced him to start sec- 
ond quarter ... Played one down in 
Pittsburgh game ... Finished Geor- 
gia Tech game and rushed for a TD 
from the one yard line ... Finished 
Penn State game ... Finished 
Clemson game 

At Montgomery-Rockville: Follow- 
ing his prep playing career at South 
River and Bowie High Schools, Kaleo 
entered nearby Montgomery- 
Rockville Junior College where he 
was a brilliant standout quarterback, 
1989 and 1990 ... Led the Knights as 
a first team JUCO All-Amencan to 
the national JUCO championship 



game ... Montgomery-Rockville lost 
that game to Coffeyville (KS) Junior 
College for their only loss of the sea- 
son ... Team finished with a 10-1 
record ... He was named the winner 
of the much coveted award as the 
1990 junior college "Player of the 
Year" ... It was the first time the 
JUCO ranks presented the award ... 
The award is equivalent to the Divi- 
sion I College Football Heisman Tro- 
phy ... He was voted the "Most 
Valuable Player" of the Costal Con- 
ference and "Player of the Year" at 
Montgomery ... He was also chosen 
the area "Player of the Year" by the 
prestigious Washington Touchdown 
Club... He completed 61% of his 
passes for 2963 yards and 32 touch- 
downs in 1990 ... His 2963 yards led 
the National Junior College statistics 
... Engineered 41 1.6 total offensive 
yards per game as he threw for 
319.7 yards a game ... Threw but 
nine interceptions in 304 attempts ... 
The Knights averaged 44.4 points a 
game which led the JUCO statistics. 

At Bowie and South River: Started 
his high school career at South River 
where he quarterbacked the 
Seahawks to the state playoffs in 
the 1986 and 1987 seasons ... He 
transferred to Bowie for his '88 sea- 
son prior to going to Montgomery ... 
He threw for 1143 yards and 10 
touchdowns while rushing for 286 
yards and five touchdowns in lead- 
ing the Bulldogs to an 8-2 season in 
'88 .. An honor roll student his 
sophomore and senior high school 
years. 

Personal: Born 2/5/71. John is the 
son of Christine and John Kaleo. 



Kaleo 's Statistics 














Comp. 


Att 


Yards 


TD 


Int 


Long 


Syracuse 


8 


19 


83 





2 


29 


W. Virginia 


1 


3 


35 


1 





35 


Pittsburgh 


1 


1 


-1 











Georgia Tech 


3 


8 


63 





1 


46 


Penn State 


3 


12 


28 





1 


16 


Clemson 


3 


12 


60 








25 


Totals 


19 


55 


268 


1 


4 


46 



1904 

'Once again controversy marked the University ol Maryland/Baltimore 
game, as the Aggies had both the referee and the umpire removed. The 
game was eventually called due to darkness, as the dispute consumed 
more than twenty minutes. 

'Captain Vernon Gill fractured his skull in the game against Delaware 
College. The team left Gill behind in a Wilmington hospital as they 
boarded a train back to College Park. 



42 



Terprofiles 



«■ 



Mike Lacy 

27 Defensive Back 



Dave Marrone 
48 Linebacker 



Luis Olavarria 

10 Defensive Back 




Doug Lawrence 
6 Defensive Back 



Ben Lawrynas 
57 Center 



Sharrod Mack 

99 Defensive Tackle 



Tom Marchese 
11 Quarterback 




rr^ 



K-jr 




Mark Mason 
21 Super Back 



David Mike 
8 Quarterback 



r.r— :1 

Scott Milanovich 
7 Quarterback 



T 1 f ^ r' 



Pat Norton 

72 Offensive Guard 




Jim Panagos 
95 Nose Guard 



Rich Phoenix 

93 Defensive Lineman 



Dan Prunzik 

23 Slot Receiver 



Ron Reagan 
4 Strong Safety 




Ed Regan 

79 Offensive Tackle 



Comel Rigby 
25 Linebacker 



Mike Rodgers 
58 Linebacker 



43 



1907 

'The top individual highlight was a 90-yard touchdown 
run by senior Curley Byrd against Gailaudet. 

'Byrd was also a pitcher lor the baseball team, an anchor- 
man for the track team's relay squad and a school record 
holder in the 50-, 100- and 220-yard dashes. 



1908 

'Harry Clifton Byrd became the youngest student to ever 
receive a diploma, in engineering, at the age of 19. 

'Burton Shipley, a 16-year-old member of the prep school 
class, returned a Tech High fumble 40 yards for a touch- 
down. Shipley went on to set a school record by playing 
for the university for six years. 




Jason Krcmus: His speed allows for darts to the end zone. 



Jason Kremus 

Wide Receiver 
Jr. 6-1 197 
Northampton, PA 
Major: Recreation 
High School: Northampton 

At Maryland: Finished the spring as 
the starter at outside receiver ... Will 
play an important part in Maryland's 
new run and shoot offense ... Is 
among the fastest receivers with a 
4.54 time in the 40 ... Has a career 
per reception average of 27.2 yards 
... A former member of the Maryland 
track team, he finished second in 110 
high hurdles in a time of 15.10 at the 
1991 Metropolitan Invitational 

1991: First career catch came at 
Pittsburgh and netted a 23-yard 
touchdown ... Also caught a 17-yard 
pass against Pitt for a first down 
which led to an eventual Terp touch- 
down ... Maryland closed to within 
24-20 at that point ... Longest career 
catch of 56 yards for a touchdown 
came at Clemson and gave Terps a 
first quarter lead ... Had two catches 
against Wake Forest for a 25.5 yard 
average and a long reception of 31 ... 
Comeback reception for first down 
against Duke was spectacular. 

1990: Saw action in the Duke and 
Virginia games but did not catch a 
pass ... Was listed third or fourth on 
the depth chart the entire season ... 
A hard worker who was a valuable 
member of the scout team. 

1989: A redshirt year 

At Northampton: Excelled in both 
football and track at the prep level ... 
Earned three letters in football and 
four in track ... Captained football his 
senior season and the track team for 
two years ... Was voted the most 
valuable defensive player of the 



1988 Big 33 game as he led the 
Pennsylvania all-star team to a vic- 
tory over the Maryland all-star team 
... Earned first team all-Conference 
honors as wide receiver, free safety 
and kickoff returner during his senior 
season ... Gained honorable mention 
all-State honors at wide receiver his 
senior season ... Holds the school 
record for touchdowns m a career 
with 12 ... An outstanding track run- 
ner, he won six district hurdling titles 
(110 and 300 meters), one district 
title in the 100 meter run, five confer- 
ence hurdling titles (110 and 300 
meters), conference titles in the 100 
and 200 meter runs, and three state 
hurdling titles (55 meter indoor, 110 
and 300 outdoor) during his high 
school career ... Ran the fifth fastest 
time in the nation in the 55 meter 
hurdles during his senior year ... 
Holds four school records (110 and 
300 meter hurdles, 100 and 200 
meters), two conference records (110 
and 300 hurdles) , three district 
records (110 and 300 hurdles. 100 
meter run) and one state record (300 
hurdles) ... Named first team all-State 
m 1988 (110 hurdles) and 1989 (110 
and 300 hurdles and 100 meter run). 

Personal: Born 4/22/71. Jason is the 
son of Joan and Fred Kremus. 



Mike Lacy 



Defensive Back 

Fr. 5-9 173 

Burke, VA 

Major: General Business 

Administration 
High School: Lake Braddock 

At Maryland: Speed and determina- 
tion make him a candidate for play- 
ing time ... runs the 40-yard dash in 
4.3 ... He impressed the coaching 



staff with his hard work during 
spring drills ... Has all of the charac- 
teristics of a top notch cornerback. 

1991: A redshirt year 

Personal: Born 4/20/73. Mike is the 
son of Joyce and Ogden Lacy. 

Doug Lawrence 

Cornerback 
Sr. 5-9 192 
Harrisburg, PA 
Major: Criminal Justice 
High School: Susquehanna 

At Maryland: Plays both offense and 
defense and plays both well ... 
Listed as the second team left cor- 
nerback entering the 1992 pre- 
season ... Maryland's top kickoff re- 
turn man both of the past two years 
... Will see action on special teams ... 
Coaches are counting on him for his 
leadership. 

1991: Had 45 tackles on the season 
to go along with 245 kickoff return 
yards ... Was the only defensive back 
to lead Maryland in tackles in one 
game as he recorded 12 versus 
Pittsburgh ... Recorded a hurry of 
Panther QB on a blitz ... Recorded 
six tackles against North Carolina 
and Penn State . Five tackles and a 
pass breakup came against West 
Virginia ...Is also a valuable mem- 
ber of the special teams ... Had first 
career interception at North Caro- 
lina ... Replaced Brandon Bertha as 
the starting left corner against Penn 
State; also started at Clemson and 
N.C. State ... Busiest day as a kick 
returner came versus N.C. State ... 
Returned four kickoffs for a career 
high 86 yards vs the Wolfpack ... Av- 
eraged 20.4 yards and 22.3 yards per 
game on kickoffs returns ... Long re- 
turn of 30 yards came against NCSU. 



1990: Played in all 11 games as he 
was designated the Terps number 
one kickoff return specialist ... 
Played on the kickoff coverage 
teams as well as the punt defense 
unit ... Returned 23 kickoffs for 461 
yards, a 20 yard return average and 
41.9 yards per game ... Long return 
of 32 was recorded against both Vir- 
ginia and Penn State ... Ranked 
sixth best in the ACC in kickoff re- 
turns ... Returned six kickoffs for 115 
yards at North Carolina in his busi- 
est day ... He had 14 tackles, 12 first 
hits, on the season. 

1989: Played in six games ... Had 
eight tackles, all special teams hits 
... Spent the season at the number 
two right cornerback posthon. 

1988: A redshirt year. 

At Susquehanna Twp: A three sport 
star in football, basketball and track 
... Earned three letters in football 
and was team captain as a junior 
and senior ... Was the team's MVP 
in 1987 and team Offensive Player of 
the Year in 1986 ... Was listed in 
Pennsylvania's top 100 players for 
1987 ... Played in the Maryland- 
Pennsylvania "Big 33" game his se- 
nior year ... Earned four letters in 
basketball and track ... Was captain 
of the basketball team his junior and 
senior year and captain of the track 
team his last three years ... Placed 
fifth in the 100m and 200m dashes 
in the '88 state track meet ... Doug 
was Vice-President of the Student 
Council as well as his senior class ... 
Was an academic All-Amencan in 
high school and awarded the Ken- 
neth F. Bentz Inspirational Athletic 
Award and the Dehart Award given 
annaully by the faculty. 

Personal: Bom 5/6/70. Doug is the 
son of Jacqueline Lawrence. 




Doug Lawrence: A starter holding on against youthful aspirants. 



44 



Terproffiles 



Tom Marchese 

Quarterback 

Fr. 6-2 214 

Dunmore, PA 

Major: General Business 

Administration 
High School: Dunmore 

At Maryland: When spring practice 
started, Coach Duffner and his new 
staff listed his six quarterback candi- 
dates as equal ... Taking over the 
head coaching job, he had not seen 
any of the six take a snap or throw 
the football ... He left it up to each 
players' practice performances each 
of the 15 days ... The highly- 
recruited Marchese had excellent 
grades and received a most favorable 
rating at the close of spring drills ... 
He, like the others, will have the 
opportunity to compete in the early 
pre-season practices to move to the 
notch where he will be a strong can- 
didate to establish himself for start- 
ing or backup role. 

1991: A redshirt year 

At Dunmore: A four-year letterman 
in football, basketball and track ... 
Co-captained the football and basket- 
ball teams his senior year ... While 
playing every down, both offense 
and defense as a safety, he was a 
four-year member of the basketball 
and track teams ... With all this, Tom 
found the time to earn a 4.0 scholas- 
tic grade point average and was a 
member of the National Honor Soci- 
ety, serving as its treasurer ... Along 
with Terp signee Scott Milanovich, 
Butler, PA, the pair was rated as the 
two top quarterback recruits coming 
out of Pennsylvania their senior year 
... During his four year prep career, 
he threw for a school record 3.648 
yards and 32 touchdowns ... As a se- 
nior, he threw 118 passes and was 
intercepted only twice ... Was chosen 
as the outstanding quarterback in 
the Big 11 Conference ... Was a first 
team all-State defensive back selec- 
tion also, his senior year ... Earned 
all-Regional honors as a quarterback 
and free safety ... All selections were 
AP honors ... He was a second team 
basketball pick his senior year ... Led 
Dunmore to a 13-1 record and a state 
title as a junior ... Quarterbacked the 
football team to the state title in '89 
... A member of the track team that 
won the conference title in '89 and 
the basketball team that took the dis- 
trict title in '88 ... Was senior class 
vice-president; president of the 
French Club, and a member of the 
Letterman's Club ... Chose Maryland 
over UCLA. Wisconsm and Rutgers. 

Personal: Bom 4/7/72. Tom is the 
son of Ann Mane and Sal Marchese. 




Dave Marrone: In the middle, aggressively. 



Dave Marrone 

Inside Linebacker 
Sr. 6-3 242 
North Babylon, NY 
Major: Criminal Justice 
High School: St. John Baptist 

At Maryland: Fourth-year senior who 
will team with fellow senior Mike 
Jarmolowich to provide the stability 
and leadership among the young 
linebacking corps ... He possesses 
excellent technical skills and is 
among the surest tacklers on the 
team ... He fmished spring ball just 
behind Jarmolowich at one inside 
slot, but regardless of his place on 
the depth chart he is expected to see 
significant playing time ... In addition 
to excellence on the field, he excels 
in the classroom, owning a 3.3 grade 
point average m criminal justice and 
earning mention as an Academic All- 
Amenca candidate. 

1991: Played in all 11 games, starting 
10 ... He was the team's second- 
leading tackier with 92 stops (48 un- 
assisted) ... His best games included: 
a 14-tackle effort against Clemson, 
with rune unassisted tackles ... His 
only other double-digit effort was a 
13-stop outing against Wake Forest, 



with seven unassisted tackles ... He 
had at least eight tackles in four 
other games: N.C. State and Georgia 
Tech (nine each) and Perm State and 
North Carolina (eight each) ... Re- 
corded a pass deflection against 
Pittsburgh and a tackle for loss 
against Duke (-6 yards). 

1990: Best tackle totals were six 
against West Virginia and eight 
against Georgia Tech, including two 
for no gam ... Finished the year 
strongly with four solo tackles at 
Duke, six tackles, including one for 



no gain, at Penn State, and six tack- 
les, including four initial hits and 
two for no gain at Virginia. 

1989: Appeared in four games as a 
true freshman ... Recorded 13 total 
(4 unassisted - 9 assisted) tackles 
during his limited playing time ... 
His biggest day was five (1-4) tack- 
les against Virginia He had two 
unassisted tackles against Georgia 
Tech, three tackles (0-3) versus 
Wake Forest, and three (1-2) against 
North Carolina. 

At St. John: Marrone comes to 
Maryland not only as a standout 
linebacker but an excellent student 
as well ... He was an Honorable 
Mention All-America as named by 
USA TODAY and was chosen first 
team All-State as a senior ... Earned 
first team All-League, All-Long Is- 
land, and All-Suburban honors fol- 
lowing the 1988 season ... Street & 
Smith named him to their top high 
school players list ... He was named 
to the Super Prep All-Northeast 
Team ... As a junior, Marrone was 
voted All-League ... He earned three 
letters in football and one in base- 
ball Elected team captain as a se- 
nior for football ... Helped lead the 
St. John's baseball team to a 
C.H.S.A.A. championship in 1987, 
compiling a 22-1 record along the 
way ... A member of the National 
Honor Society and four year member 
of the Honor Roll ... David can be 
found m Who's Who Among Ameri- 
can High School Students ... Recipi- 
ent of the Student Body Leadership 
award. 

Personal: Bom 1/26/71. David is the 
son of Mary and Louis Marrone. 

Marrone's Statistics 

1991: 92 tackles (48 unassisted. 44 assists) 

1990: 45 tackles (19-26) 

1989: 13 tackles (4-9) 

Totals: 150 tackles (71-79) 



1909 

'Sub- freshman Burton Shipley was promoted to quarterback in the 
fourth game of the season against Rock Hill, a tilt in which Shipley led the 
Aggies in a 5-0 victory with his passing game. 



1910 

'During the final minutes of the Johns Hopkins game, a Hopkins guard 
was penalized for running over to his bench to hand over the tooth that 
was knocked out the play before. The penalty forced Hopkins to attempt 
a held goal, which the Aggies blocked. 

'A game was scheduled at Chestertown against Washington College, but 
on two different dates. Washington had the game slated for the last 
Saturday in October, while M.A.C. had it scheduled for the first Saturday 
in November. The discrepancy was not discovered until M.A.C. failed to 
show, and a make-up could not be rescheduled. 



45 



Terprofiles 



David Mike 

Quarterback 
Jr. 6-2 204 
Aliquippa, PA 
Major: Finance 
High School: Aliquippa 

At Maryland: As one of the six quar- 
terbacks that started spring practice 
with the new coaching staff, Dave 
gave an early strong impression in 
the 15 practice sessions ... Solidified 
his opportunity to challenge for the 
job or become a strong candidate for 
back-up assignment ... Has a strong 
arm, giving him the chance in early 
pre-season practices to demonstrate 
his passing skills for the Terps' nun 
and shoot offense. 

1991: Not eligible to play. 

1990: Was listed as the third team 
quarterback behind Scott Zolak and 
Jim Sandwisch ...Did not see any 
game action. 

1989: A redshirt year. 

At Aliquippa: A three-sport letter 
winner, earning three varsity letters 
in football, one in track and one in 
baseball ... He was named honorable 
mention all-star following his junior 
and senior seasons ... Athlete of 
Week in 1988 as named by the Pitts- 
burgh Post Gazette ... Member of the 
1988 WPIAL championship squad ... 
He was instrumental in leading Al- 
iquippa to the state finals and finish- 
ing with a 14-1 record in '88 ... Led 
the team to the 1987 WPIAL AAA 
title as well, compiling a 12-1 record 
... Mike was the recipient of his 
school's Student-Athlete Award ... 
He was a two-year member of the 
National Honor Society and four-year 
member of the Honor Roll ... He, too, 
can be found in the Who's Who 
Among High School Students. 

Personal: Born 10/8/70. David is the 
son of Beverly and Michael Mike. 

Scott Milanovich 

Quarterback 

Fr. 6-4 220 

Butler, PA 

Major: Letters and Sciences 

High School: Butler 

At Maryland: Has the credentials 
and physical potential to emerge as 
one to join the long list of former bril- 
liant Terrapin quarterbacks in the 
next four years ... The highly touted 
Pennsylvanian had a standout 
spring, impressing the new coaching 
staff ... When spring practice started 
Coach Duffner listed his six quarter- 
back candidates equal ... He left it up 



to a daily challenge by each signal 
caller's performance ... At spring 
practice end, he was listed as third 
on the depth chart ... He is a definite 
to challenge for the starting job dur- 
ing the pre-season practices prior to 
the season opener at Virginia. 

1991: A redshirt year. The son of a 
coach who seemed destined to be- 
come the first True Freshman last 
year to quarterback the Terps since 
Cumberland's (Md.) Mark Manges in 
1974, but coaching staff changed 
their minds and decided to have 
Scott redshirt the entire year, thus 
keeping four full years of playing 
time ... During the season, he was 
listed as high as second team on the 
depth chart ... Made every road trip 
... As a drop back passer, he 
possesses an exceptionally strong 
throwing arm, reminiscent of several 
former Terp QB's, now starring in the 
NFL. 

At Butler: A three-year letterman in 
football, two in baseball and one in 
track ... Captained the football team 
his senior year ... Along with Terp 
teammate Tom Marchese (Dunmore, 
PA), the pair were judged as the two 
top quarterback recruits out of Penn- 
sylvania in '91 according to scouting 
services ... A first team all-State and 
all-Conference selection by the Asso- 
ciated Press ... Honored as a first 
team pick both his junior and senior 
years on the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette 
Fabulous 22 ... Also named to the 
Pittsburgh Press Finest 44 his senior 
season ... Chosen by the Press as the 
Player of the Year for '90 ... Named 
Player of the Year for '90 as selected 
by the powerful local television out- 
let, KDKA-TV ... Named the 
Pittsburgh North Player of the Year ... 
As a senior, he completed 114 of 226 
passes for 1520 yards, 19 
touchdowns and only seven intercep- 
tions ... He also punted for a 40.7 
yards per punt average and 
connected on four field goals beyond 
40 yards ... Threw for a total of 2800 
yards and 32 touchdowns during his 
prep career ... Led Butler to a 10-2-1 
record and a No. 9 ranking in the 
state, leading the team to the tough 
SPIAL 4A championship ... Selected 
to and played in the "Big 33" game, 
featuring the Pennsylvania all-star 
team against the Maryland all-stars 
... Chose Maryland over Pittsburgh 
and Louisville ... His father, Gary, 
was a former coach at Butler High 
School ... He is presently athletics 
director at Butler. 

Personal: Born 1/25/73. Scott is the 
son of Penny and Gary Milanovich. 



Luis Olavarria 

Defensive Back 
Fr. 6-1 192 
West Haverstraw, NY 
Major: Government & Politics 
High School: North Rockland 

At Maryland: Will exercise his 
speed and quickness to make an 
early impression this fall ... Is 
counted on for major contribution, 
giving the defensive backfield corps 
a first line addition to its depth ... 
Will be a strong contributor on spe- 
cial teams ... Had an eye-opening 
spring practice. 

1991: A redshirt year 

Personal: Born 12/8/72. While at 
North Rockland, Luis was an active 
member in VASA (Varsity Athletes 
Against Substance Abuse) ... He is 
the son of Norma Olavarria. 

lim Panagos 

Nose Guard 
Jr. 6-2 250 
Islip Terrace, NY 
Major: Criminal Justice 
High School: East Islip 

At Maryland: The starting nose 
guard entering the 1992 season ... 
Played hard and well in extensive 
playing time as a sophomore ... Will 
be counted on by the coaching staff 
to be exceptional as a junior ... Sec- 
ond among returning down linemen 
in tackles behind Mark Sturdivant. 

1991: Gained valuable playing time 
at the nose guard position as the 
back-up to Ralph Orta ... Dominant 
among the Maryland down linemen 
at Wake Forest, recording three un- 
assisted tackles, a tackle for loss and 
a hurry of the Deacon QB ... Had four 
tackles in three different games; 
Duke, North Carolina and Clemson 
... Had two sacks, one versus Vir- 
ginia in the season opener and one 
later versus UNC ... Against 



the Tar Heels, he had two tackles 
for loss for a total loss of seven 
yards and forced a fumble ... Played 
extensively against West Virginia 
and Wake Forest because of injury 
to Orta. 

1990: Saw action in six games and 
recorded four unassisted tackles and 
one assisted tackle ... His best out- 
ing came at Michigan as he had two 
unassisted tackles and one for no 
gain in only five plays ... Graded out 
a 100% against the Wolverines for 
his best outing percentagewise ... 
Recorded an unassisted tackle 
against Georgia Tech, had a tackle 
assist and a move of the quarter- 
back versus Wake Forest, a first hit 
against Penn State, and saw game 
action against North Carolina and 
Virginia ... Graded out above 80% 
against Wake Forest, North Carolina 
and Penn State. 

1989: Back surgery in the fall forced 
him to redshirt. 

At East Islip: As a senior, Panagos 
earned first team all-State, All-Long 
Island, all-County and all-League 
honors ... He was an all-League and 
all-County first team selection fol- 
lowing his junior year ... Helped lead 
East Islip to three consecutive 
league championships in 1986, 1987, 
and 1988, compiling a three year 
record of 24-4 along the way ... 
Earned three varsity letters in foot- 
ball and was elected team captain 
his senior year ... This Honor Roll 
member was Vice President of the 
Leaders Club ... He can be found in 
the Who's Who Among American 
High School Students ... Jim was the 
recipient of the Citizenship Award 
given by East Islip High School. 

Personal: Born 3/23/71. Jim is the 
son of Tncia and Jim Panagos. His 
brother. Peter, is currently a member 
of the West Chester University foot- 
ball squad. 




Jim Panagos: Sitting on a bright future. 



46 



Terprofiles 



Rich Phoenix 

Defensive Tackle 
Sr. 6-4 252 
Williamsport, PA 
Major: Urban Studies 
High School: Williamsport 

At Maryland: Enjoyed a fine spring 
re-acquainting himself with the de- 
fensive line after spending 1991 on 
the offensive line ... Enters the 1992 
season listed second on the depth 
chart at left tackle ... Played left 
tackle in 1990, seeing action in four 
games ... Coaches like his strong ac- 
celeration and solid running abilities. 

1991: Began the season at right 
guard but was moved to left guard 
during pre-season practice ... Worked 
his way up to the second position on 
the depth chart and gamed valuable 
playing time during the season. 

1990: Saw action in four games, all 
from the defensive left tackle posi- 
tion ... Played against Michigan, 
Georgia Tech, Wake Forest and 
North Carolina Did not record any 
tackles ... Graded out at 100% 
against UNC and above 70 percent 
against Tech and Wake. 

1989: Began the year on the scout 
team, but his consistent improve- 
ment as the season progressed al- 
lowed him to move onto the depth 
chart by midseason ... With both 
Larry Webster and Derek Steele out 
for the last couple of games, he was 
forced into action ...He totaled 20 
plays - easily his game high - 
against Virginia in the season finale. 

1988: A redshirt year. 

At Williamsport: A two-sport star 
out of high school ... He helped lead 
his team to three consecutive South- 
em Division championships and in 
1987 the team captured the Eastern 
Conference title ... His coaches 
awarded him the Andrew Knight 
Award, "for hustle, dedication, and 
giving 100 percent to his team and 
the game of football" ... A three-year 
letterwinner m track, Phoenix was 
the 1988 District IV shot put cham- 
pion and voted Most Valuable Field 
Athlete by his coaches and team- 
mates ... Phoenix was the captain of 
the 1987 football squad and the 1987 
and 1988 track teams. 

Personal: Born 11/23/70. Richard is 
the son of Dean Rowland and Nancy 
Phoenix. 



Dan Prunzik 

Slot Receiver 
Sr. 5-11 179 
Pittsburgh, PA 
Major: Urban Studies 
High School: Mt. Lebanon 

At Maryland: A senior receiver who 
will contend for substantial playing 
time ... Has 4.59 speed in the 40 ... 
Was hurt in the spring but showed 
the coaching staff his vast talents in 
a short time ... Has been used as a 
punt returner during his three-year 
career. 

1991: Caught two passes for 33 total 
yards ,.. Appeared in 10 games ... 
Longest catch, 25 yards, came versus 
Clemson One catch for eight yards 
against West Virginia Used for his 
speed against Syracuse when his 
number was called as Terp coaching 
staff called for an end around 

1990: Caught seven passes for 108 
yards, 15.8 yards per catch average 
... Appeared in nine games while 
starting season opening Virginia 
Tech game ... Was one of six return- 
ing receivers with double digit yards 
per catch average on receptions ... 
Caught two passes for 26 yards and 
returned three punts for 12 yards 
against Virginia Tech His best day 
receiving was two catches for 44 
yards against Georgia Tech ... 
Caught one pass for 10 yards versus 
N.C. State, one pass for 20 yards ver- 
sus Wake Forest and one pass for 
eight yards against Virginia ... Catch 
against No. 8 Virginia was good for 
eight yards and a first down as Terps 
marched for the game winning touch- 
down ... Saw game action against 
West Virginia, Michigan, Duke and 
Penn State but did not catch a pass. 

1989: Appeared in six games and 
caught seven passes for 121 yards ... 
Was one of seven Terp receivers to 
have a double digit average per re- 
ception ... His longest reception, 34 
yards, came in front of over 100,000 
spectators against Michigan at Mich- 
igan Stadium ... Caught two passes, 
a career high, against N.C. State 
Caught at least one pass m each of 
the six games he participated ... 
Caught passes in each Atlantic Coast 
Conference game, save one - one 
catch for 35 yards against N.C. State. 
one for 14 yards versus Georgia 
Tech. one for six agamst Wake For- 
est, one for 21 against Duke, one for 
11 agamst Virginia. 

1988: A redshirt year. 



At Mt. Lebanon: A three-year, three- 
sport letterman, starring in football, 
basketball and track ... Captained 
the basketball and track teams his 
senior year ... Selected to the Pitts- 
burgh Press "Finest 44" and the 
Pittsburgh Post Gazette's "Fabulous 
22" squads ... The football team was 
conference runner-up to the 1987 
National Champions, neighborhood 
North Hills High School ... A distin- 
guished honor came his way as he 
was named Mt. Lebanon's Male 
Athlete of the Year his senior year, 
'88 An honor roll student his last 
five semesters at Mt. Lebanon. 

Personal: Born 6/18/70. Brother Jeff 
is on the basketball team at West- 
minister (PA) College. Dan is the son 
of Susan and Peter Prunzik 



Ron Reagan 

Roverback 
Sr. 6-0 194 
Berwick, PA 
Major: Recreation 
High School: Berwick 

At Maryland: Going into his senior 
year, has accounted for 100 tackles, 
three interceptions, four forced fum- 
bles, one fumble recovery, three 
passes broken-up, and seven tackles 
for loss ... Will compete with Bill 
Inge for the starting job at roverback 
... His vast experience makes him a 
team leader ... Consistent. 

1991: Played in all 11 games and 
recorded 54 tackles to place among 
the top 10 on the Terps ... Recorded 
a career high nine unassisted tack- 
les, one tackle for no gam, a sack, 
and pass break-up m season opener 
against Virginia ... Despite playing 
with a pinched nerve in his neck 
against Syracuse he recorded five 
tackles and recovered a fumble ... 
Missed West Virginia game with 
neck injury ... Grabbed his third 
career interception versus Duke and 
returned it five yards ... Had five 
total tackles versus Pittsburgh in- 
cluding a tackle for a loss of nine 
yards ... Terps' win at Wake Forest 
saw eight total tackles and one for 
no gain ... Returned to special teams 
duty versus Penn State where he 
had his second special teams tackle 
of year ... Solid finale at N.C. State 
as he had five unassisted tackles, 
including a tackle for no gain. 



1990: Injuries kept strong safety 
Reagan out of the line-up for a good 
portion of the year ... Enjoyed an ex- 
cellent start against Virginia Tech 
as he had season high seven tack- 
les, a pass break up and two tackles 
for no gain ... Did not hit his statisti- 
cal stride because of injury until five 
games later against Georgia Tech 
when he had five solo tackles and 
forced a fumble ... Had 10 tackles in 
the last three games including three 
solo tackles in the victory over 
Virginia. 

1989: Played m six games, starting 
three ... Along with his starts in the 
final two games, he got the call for 
the Duke game at free safety as reg- 
ular Mike Thomas was held out be- 
cause of an injury ... Had 23 tackles, 
13 solo and 10 assists ... Had two 
interceptions, against Michigan and 
North Carolina Came up with 
eight tackles, season high, against 
Duke, four unassisted and four 
assisted ... Saw action on special 
teams. 

1988: A redshirt year. 

At Berwick: A "Big 33" selection in 
1988 ... He was named All- 
Anthracite, All-Southem Division, 
and a Pittsburgh Press Enterprise 
All-Star in football following his se- 
nior season ... Captained the football 
and track squads as a senior while 
earning two letters in each ... 
Reagan was a member of the Na- 
tional Honor Society ... Named 
Homecoming King in 1987. 

Personal: Bom 12/5/69. Ron is the 
son of Susan and Paul Reagan. 




Ron Reagan: Reaching toward 
a third year of starting. 



47 



erprofiles 



Cornel Rigby 

Outside Linebacker 
Sr. 6-0 200 
Casselberry, FL 
Major: English 
High School: Lake Howell 

At Maryland: Will be playing his 
third position in three years ... 
Coaches consider him the best ath- 
lete among the outside linebackers ... 
He finished sprmg ball battling with 
Chad Wiestling for the top strong- 
side spot and no matter who is the 
starter, both players will see plenty 
of game action. 

1991: Saw limited action in his first 
season on the defense ... He moved 
to safety from running back in the 
spring to provide the defensive back- 
field some additional speed and 
athleticism ... Played in six games, 
recording his lone tackle against 
Clemson ... Also saw limited action 
as part of the Terps' special teams. 

1990: Saw playing time m two 
games at running back in the Terps' 
one-back set ... He gained four yards 
on two carries (long gain of five 
yards) against Wake Forest ... He 
also saw game action against Perm 
State. 

1989: Did not play. 

1988: A redshirt year. 

At Lake Howell: Both a football and 
track star ..He earned second team 
all-Conference football honors as a 
junior and senior, leading Lake How- 
ell to the 1986 conference crown ... 
He was the district track champion 
m the 400 meters, and earned all- 
Conference track recognition as a 
senior ... As a junior, Rigby was 
awarded the Commitement to Excel- 
lence Pin, given annually by the high 
school to the student who contrib- 
utes most to athletics and academics 
at Lake Howell ... As a senior, the 
American Legion honored him with 
the Leadership and Patriotism 
Award 

Personal: Born 3/24/70 m Washing- 
ton D.C. Comel is the son of Irma 
Rigby-Sims ... In 1988, he won the 
Optimist Club Essay Contest. 



Mike Rodgers 



Outside Linebacker 
Fr. 6-3 225 
Drexel Hill, PA 
Major: Finance 
High School: Haverford 

At Maryland: Worked hard during 
spring practice and impressed the 
coaching staff with his athleticism 
and toughness ... Enters the season 
third on the depth chart at linebacker 
...A strong player with the desire 
to succeed who will be a major con- 
tributor in years to come. 

1991: A redshirt year 

At Haverford: A highly sought after 
recruit A three-year football letter- 
man, two-year basketball letterman 
and earned one letter in baseball ... 
Captained the football and basketball 
teams his senior year ... A first team 
All-Delaware County and All-Central 
League selection both his junior and 
senior years ... Pennsylvania college 
football report's top 100 high school 
players as a senior ... First team 
News Nine All-Star team Was a 
three-year two-way starter for Haver- 
ford ... Also an outstanding skier who 
finished first in the state giant slalom 
as a junior ... As a senior he was 
first in the state in the downhill 
competition. 

Personal: Born 3/14/73. Mike is the 
son of Michele and Robert Rodgers. 



Andy Rosewag 



Offensive Tackle 

So. 6-4 260 

Crownesville, MD 

Major: Agriculture-Conservation 

High School: Old Mill 

At Maryland: Practiced at the defen- 
sive tackle position m last season ... 
He finished the season listed as the 
No. three tackle on the left side ... 
Coaching staff moved him to offen- 
sive guard/tackle during spring drills 
... Will compete for playing from that 
spot. 

1991: Opened fall practice as the No. 
three defensive left tackle but did not 
see any game action ... Worked 
extremely hard and was a valued 
member of the scout team. 

1990: A redshirt year 

At Old Mill: A second team all- 
Metropolitan pick by the Baltimore 
Sun durmg his senior season ... 
Captained the football team, also his 
senior season ... A first team all- 
County selection his final year ... Was 
selected honorable mention all-State 
by the USA Today Newspaper. 

Personal: Born 10/5/72. Andy is the 
son of Joyce and Tom Rosewag. 




Tony Scarpino: A downfield target may be a '92 starting role. 



Tony Scarpino 

Quarterback 
So. 6-4 213 
Monroeville, PA 
Major: Pre-Business 
High School: Gateway 

At Maryland: One of two Terp quar- 
terbacks returning that saw limited 
play last season ... As one of the six 
signal-callers who started spring 
practice on a level keel under the 
new coaching staff, Tony responded 
impressively ... Will be a strong can- 
didate during pre-season practices to 
challenge for the starting 
assignment ... Has a strong arm and 
quick release. 

1991: Played in two games as a red- 
shirt freshman ... Entered the West 



Virginia game with 8:24 to go and 
the score 7-31 ... Long play was nine 
yard pass to Chad Wiestling ... 
Finished the final 7: 10 of the North 
Carolina game. Terps down 24-0 ... 
Hit 2 of 6 passes, both to TE Brett 
Stevenson, 7 and 5 yards. 

1990: A redshirt year 

At Gateway: All-State selection 
from the talent laden Pittsburgh 
area ... Completed 65 percent of his 
passes his senior season ... His 
rocket arm and pinpoint accuracy 
directed the Gateway offense as he 
ran the teams' run and shoot offense 
to perfection. 

Personal: Born 9/20/71. Tony is the 
son of Marlene and Tony Scarpino. 



Scarpino's 

W. Virginia 
North Carolina 


Statistics 

Comp 

5 

2 


Att 

10 

6 


Yards 

36 
12 


TD 






Int 

1 



Long 
9 
7 


Totals 


7 


16 


48 





1 


9 



48 



Terprofiles 




Scott Rosen 
24 Free Safety 



Andy Rosewag 

67 Offensive Tackle 



Tony Scarpino 
19 Quarterback 



Rudy Smith 

97 Defensive Tackle 



Ron Staffileno 

68 Offensive Guard 




Brett Stevenson 
87 Linebacker 



David Stremmel 
89 Wide Receiver 



Mark Sturdivant 
31 Linebacker 



David Terranova 
65 Offensive Tackle 



John Teter 
76 Center 





Andre Vaughn 

44 Defensive Back 



1912 

'Coach Byrd signed a new $1,200 contract. He also coached baseball and 
basketball as well as taught English and History. 

'M.A.C. became the first team to beat Western Maryland in Westminster in 
eight years, 17-7. 

'In the Hopkins game, the Baltimore Sun credited touchdowns to Country 
Morris who was injured and didn't play, instead of the proper man - Seymour 
■■Bear" W. Ruff. 



1913 

'M.A.C. won the State Championship by defeating a roster of Maryland 
colleges: Baltimore City College, 27-10; Johns Hopkins, 26-0; Western Maryland, 
46-0; St. Johns, 13-0; and Washington College. 20-0. 



49 




Terprofiles 



Rudy Smith 

Outside Linebacker 
Fr. 6-5 217 
Stoney Point, NY 
Major: General Business 

Administration 
High School: Don Bosco 

At Maryland: Outstanding physical 
talent ... His size and quickness 
make him one of the most outstand- 
ing pass rushers on the squad ... He 
has the opportunity to be a signifi- 
cant part of the Maryland defense for 
years to come. 

1991: A redshirt year. 

At Don Bosco: Standout two-year 
letterman in football and basketball 
... Was all-County and all-State by 
the Associated Press as a senior ... 
Was all-League and all-Suburban 
Parochial as a junior ... N.A.S.A.A. 
all-State ... Blue Chip and Max 
Emfinger All-America selection ... 
First team all-County by the Bergen 
Evening Record ... Second team all- 
State by the Newark Star -Ledger ... 
Played for the North in the 1991 
North/South All-Star Game ... Led 
Don Bosco to league championship in 
1989 and state title in 1990 ... Mem- 
ber of the student council, Catholic 
League Forum and Families United 
to End Drunken Driving (FUEDD). 

Personal: Bom 4/11/73. Brother, 
Roosevelt, plays football at Bucknell. 
Rudy is the son of Mane and 
Robespierre Smith. 

Ron Staffileno 

Offensive Guard 

Sr. 6-3 267 

Wellsburg, WV 

Major: Speech Communications 

High School: Brooke 

At Maryland: A starter his sopho- 
more season ... Because of an early 
season injury last season he played 
as a back-up at guard on both sides 
... Lends exceptional experience to 
the position and gives valuable 
added depth. 

1991: A returning starter he was hurt 
for opener, and played for the first 
time against Syracuse ... Was nomi- 
nated to the Exxon Supreme Team 
... Backing-up both guard spots, he 
was at left guard more often than 
not with Jade Dubis's emergence on 
the right ... Injury continued to limit 
him as he missed Georgia Tech and 
Wake Forest games ... Graded out at 
67% against Pittsburgh. 



1990: A rare sophomore starter on 
the offensive line, he earned the job 
with a strong spring and pre-season 
... Sustained a shoulder injury in the 
second game of the year in his home 
state of West Virginia ... Hometown 
of Wellsburg is 30 miles from Moun- 
taineer Stadium ... Missed four 
games, returning to the starting 
lmeup for the Wake Forest game. 

1989: Moved to the offensive line in 
the spring of 1989 and got valuable 
practice experience last season as a 
back-up at guard ... He spent most of 
the season as the No. two right 
guard behind Mike Kiselak. 

1988: A redshirt year. 

At Brooke: A two-year football letter- 
man and team captain his senior year 
... Was chosen first team all-State and 
first team All-Mountaineer League 
following the '87 campaign ... In '84 
he was voted the teams' most im- 
proved freshmen ... A member of the 
National Honor Society and was 
awarded the Brooke High School 
Academic Achievement Award ... In 
'87, the football team was undefeated 
(13-0) and captured the West Virginia 
State Championship ... Upper Ohio 
Valley Dapper Dan Honoree ... Was 
Center Circle President and Latin 
Club representative. 

Personal: Born 10/5/70. Ron is the 
son of Jams and Louis Staffileno 



Rrett Stevenson 

Outside Linebacker 

Sr. 6-5 240 

Thornton, PA 

Major: Speech Communications 

High School: West Chester East 

At Maryland: Made the switch to 
defense during the second week of 
spring ball, but the conversion may 
not be permanent ... Terp coaches 
will decide during fall drills whether 
to use him at outside linebacker or 
tight end ... At either position, his 
senior leadership and game experi- 
ence will be vital to the young Terps 
... He has gotten bigger and stronger 
with each season, but still retains 
excellent quickness and speed for 
his size. 

1991: Played in all 11 games, start- 
ing four ... He caught nine passes for 
76 yards (8.5 yards per catch), 
including a season-long 16-yard re- 
ception against Georgia Tech ...He 
totaled two catches for 21 yards 
against the Yellow Jackets ... He tied 
for team-high reception honors at 
North Carolina with three catches 
for 18 yards. 

1990: Played in seven games ... 
Caught seven passes for 67 yards ... 
Best game of the year was in Ann 
Arbor agamst Michigan, when he 
caught three passes for 31 yards ... 
Also had two catches against 
Georgia Tech as a starter. 

1989: Did not Play. 



A i* 2* X VfifcLl 


V [CM* 


uJhtfvm.'4 


tfi^Lj* 










w* 


!l~ / 









Brett Stevenson (87): The starting tight end finds a new home in 
the Run-and-Shoot. 



1988: A redshirt year. 

At West Chester East: A member of 
the 1987 first team all-state lists as 
picked by the Associated Press and 
by the Philadelphia Inquirer ... He 
was the team's Outstanding Defen- 
sive Player in 1986 and the its over- 
all MVP in 1987 ... Stevenson was 
captain of the East team in the 1987 
East-West Chester County game. 

Personal: Born 2/7/70. Brett is the 
son of Velma and William Steven- 
son. 



Stevenson's Statistics 

1990: 7 receptions, 67 yards, 9 6 
average, TDs, Long of 14 

1991: 9 receptions, 76 yards, 8.4 
average, TDs. Long of 16 

Total: 16 receptions. 143 yards, 8 9 
average, TDs, Long of 16 



David Stremmel 

Wide Receiver 

Sr. 5-11 161 

Johnstown, PA 

Major: Speech Communications 

High School: Bishop McCort 

At Maryland: A very athletic player 
who will vie for playing time with 
the varsity this season ... Back sur- 
gery two years ago kept him out of 
competition. 

1991: Did not play. 

1990: Did not play. 

1989: Did not play. 

At Bishop McCort: Was a member 
of the National Honor Society and 
the math club ... Played three years 
of varsity football and was a mem- 
ber of the track team ... The football 
team won the PIAA Championship 
and the District IX Championship in 
1988 ... Won the Point Stadium 
Award in 1988 as the best area 
athlete ... Selected a first team all- 
District IX all-star, also, in 1988 as a 
receiver ... Set the record for most 
field goals in one season as a kicker 
m 1988. 

Personal: Born 12/4/70. David is the 
son of Mary Borkow and Ken 
Stremmel ... Jason, a younger 
brother, will play soccer at UM this 
season as a freshman. 



50 



Terprofiles 




Mark Sturdivant: Crashes offensive parties, regularly. 



Mark Sturdivant 

Defensive End 
Jr. 6-4 244 
Silver Spring, MD 
Major: Family Studies 
High School: Springbrook 

At Maryland: A returning starter, he 
is among the Terps best defensive 
players ... Moved this spring from 
outside linebacker to down lineman 
and made good progress at his new 
position ... Has 112 total (60 unas- 
sisted. 52 assisted) tackles in just 
I two years of play ... Started in the 
! Independence Bowl in 1990 as a red- 
f shirt freshman, indicating potential 
for the future. 

1991: Finished third on the team in 
[ tackles with 78 despite missmg one 
: full game ... Started first three 
I games, and last three games ... Had 
1 career best days at North Carolina 
and Clemson with 1 1 total tackles in 
: both games ... Seven unassisted 
| tackles came agamst UNC and five 
, agamst the Tigers . . . Also had a 
hurry of Tiger QB against Clemson ... 
Forced a fumble and broke up a pass 
i m the season opener agamst Vir- 
ginia ... Played well against Syra- 
cuse with a rune tackle performance 
that included a pass break-up ... 
Recorded six tackles and a 12-yard 
tackle for loss against West Virginia 
... Recovered fumble and had six 
tackles at Wake Forest ... Closed the 



season with eight tackles (4UT, 4AT) 
and a tackle for no gain against N.C. 
State. 

1990: Injuries to outside linebackers, 
and special teams performances that 
were the class of 1990, garnered 
Sturdivant more playing time as the 
year wore on ... In the first four 
games, he had eight initial special 
teams hits ... Registered an early ca- 
reer high six tackles, all on special 
teams, against N.C. State ... From his 
linebacking position he had highs of 
three tackles each agamst Michigan 
and Georgia Tech. 
1989: A redshirt season 

At Springbrook: An all-Met second 
team selection as named by the 
Washington Post ... Comes from 
nearby Springbrook High School in 
Silver Spring, the 1988 Maryland 
State Champion football squad ... 
USA Today named him Honorable 
Mention All- America in 1988 and he 
was first team defense, All-County ... 
The Pigskin Club named him All-Met, 
first team defense ... Sturdivant was 
honored by sportscaster George 
Michael as one of George Michael's 
Golden 11 (Defense) ... Represented 
Maryland m the annual "Big 33" 
game against a group of Pennsylva- 
nia All-Stars ... He earned two letters 
in football and basketball and was 
captain of the basketball squad his 
senior year. 

Personal: Bom 7/2/71. Mark is the 
son of Brenda and Willard Sturdivant. 



Dave Terranova 

Offensive Tackle 

Sr. 6-5 262 

Cherry Hill, NJ 

Major: Speech Communications 

High School: Cherry Hill East 

At Maryland: Had a fine spring and 
indicated to the new coaching staff 
that he could be one of the top back- 
up tackles on the offensive line ... 
Was worked at guard, also, during 
spring drills. 

1991: Saw limited action as a back- 
up at both offensive tackle positions 
... Experience gained will be benefi- 
cial in his senior year. 

1990: Played in two games, Georgia 
Tech and Wake Forest ... Gained 
experience and learned the offensive 
system as a back-up left tackle ... 
Also gained work on the scout 
teams. 

1989: Sat out under NCAA transfer 
guidelines after transferring from 
Georgia Tech. 

1988: Attended Georgia Tech and 
transfered to Maryland after the fall 
semester. 

At Cherry Hill East: Led Cherry Hill 
East to the 1987 Colonial Conference 
championship with a 9-2 record ... 
He was named all-Conference and 
all-South Jersey that season ... A 
Cherry Hill teammate, Ed Regan, is a 
Maryland junior this season ... He 
lettered three years in football, twice 
in basketball and once in track. 

Personal: Born 3/12/70. David is the 
son of Rejina and Leonard 
Terranova. 



John Teter 

Center 

Fr. 6-6 261 

College Park, MD 

Major: Aerospace Engineering 

High School: DeMatha 

At Maryland: The College Park na- 
tive was one of the nation's most 
highly recruited offensive linemen ... 
Was the only scholarship offensive 
line candidate to jom the team last 
season ... Made an immediate im- 
pact as he worked impressively at 
both offensive tackle positions, 
spending most of his scout team ef- 
forts as the number three right 
tackle during his redshirt season ... 
Started spring practice at tackle and 
was moved to center to give the piv- 
otal assignment size and strength ... 
Projected for future all-star honors 
during this four years with the Terps. 

1991: A redshirt year. 

At DeMatha: Was ranked third aca- 
demically in his graduating class ... 
Was ranked first following his junior 
year ... A member of the National 
Honor Society ... A National Merit 
semi-finalist ... A three year starting 
left tackle lettermen and a two-year 
track letterman ... A first team all- 
County selection by the Prince 
George's Journal and the P.G. Senti- 
nel in football ... A second team all- 
Metropolitan selection by the Wash- 
ington Post ... Played in the annual 
"Big 33" All-Star Game which fea- 
tured the best prep players from the 
states of Maryland and Pennsylvania 
... Selected Maryland over Stanford 
and Georgia Tech. 

Personal: Bom 2/5/73. John is the 
son of Beverly and William Teter ... 
Twin brother Carl will be a redshirt 
freshman for the Stanford team this 
fall ... An older brother Ed, was a 
member of the varsity swim team at 
Maryland. 



1914 

'Bob "Hap" Mess defeated Washington College by kicking a held goal 
with just six seconds remaining, sending College Park into a crazed 
celebration. 



1915 

'The Johns Hopkins game attracted tie largest ever crowd at Home- 
wood Field in Baltimore, as 13,000 fans assembled to see Hopkins sqnieek 
out a 3-0 victory. 



1916 

'The Maryland Legislature changed the official name of the college from 
Maryland Agricultural to Maryland State College. 

'Edward Brooke Brewer followed his old high school coach Curley Byrd 
to Maryland. Brewer came with high expectations as he tied a world 
record for the 100 yard dash in 1915 at the age of 16. 



51 



Terprofiles 



Andre Vaughn 

Defensive Back 

Jr. 6-2 196 

Columbia, MD 

Major: Afro-American Studies 

High School: Oakland Mills 

At Maryland: With a year of 
seasoning in the defensive backfield, 
Vaughn is slated for a starting role at 
nght comerback ... 1991 was his first 
season as a DB, he served the Terps 
in his first season as a running back 
and kickoff returner ... His speed. 4.5 
in the 40, is one of his best assets ... 
Also very tough and athletic. 

1991: A converted free safety, he 
was very good for a transplanted 
tailback until injury took him from 
the schedule in mid-season ... His 
best tackle day came against West 
Virginia when he recorded four un- 
assisted stops and assisted on an- 
other ... Led the team with two inter- 
ceptions ... Grabbed an interception 
against Syracuse and returned it a 
team high 30 yards ... Also had an 
interception versus Pittsburgh as 
back-up and nickel defender ... 
Injured knee at Georgia Tech, Oct. 
12 and did not play again ... Among 



ACC interception leaders before in- 
jury ... Finally had arthoscopic sur- 
gery before Perm State. 

1990: Following a year of rehabilita- 
tion to an injured knee, Vaughn re- 
turned to the field to see his first ac- 
tion as a Terp during 1991, his 
redslurt sophomore season ... First 
action was against Clemson when he 
returned a kickoff 29 yards ... First 
run from scrimmage was agamst N.C. 
State as he ran for two yards on one 
attempt ... Ran seven times for 15 
yards against Michigan that included 
a bull strong two yard TD run ... 
Career high 10 attempts for career 
high 53 yards and a score against 
Wake Forest ... Ran five times for 24 
yards at Duke. 

1989: Did not play, recovering from 
major knee surgery. 

1988: A redslurt year. 

At Oakland Mills: Vaughn was a 
three-sport standout while attending 
high school ... As captain of the 1987 
football team, he helped lead them to 
a 7-3 record and the county champi- 
onship ... In 1985, Oakland Mills went 
undefeated, 7-0, and captured the 
county championship ... As a junior, 
he was all-County and Honorable 




Andre Vaughn: His interceptions set-up TDs. 



Mention All-Metro ... Following his 
successful senior season, Andre was 
first team all-County, all-Metro, and 
a high school All- American ... Andre 
was selected to play in the annual 
"Big 33" game in Hershey, Pennsyl- 
vania ... He was a two-year letter- 
winner m track and captain of the 
squad in 1988 ... His 4 x 200m relay 
team captured the state title in 1988 
... Earned one letter m basketball 
while playing under Gary Ahem ... 
An honor role student his senior 
year. 

Personal: Born 3/1/70. Andre is the 
son of Ann L. Scott. 

Russ Weaver 

Wide Receiver 

So. 6-3 213 

Monroeville, PA 

Major: Business Administration 

High School: Gateway 

At Maryland: A newcomer to the 
program, he is listed second on the 
depth chart at wide receiver ... 
Joined the team as a walk-on during 
the summer of 1991 ... Had a fme 
spring learnmg the Terp offense ... 
Transferred from John Carroll 
University in Ohio. 



1991: Did not play 

At Gateway: Earned academic 
honors as he made the Honor Roll 
during both his junior and senior 
years ... A four-sport star who 
earned varsity letters in football, 
basketball, soccer and volleyball ... 
Earned a total of 11 varsity letters 
during his prep career ... Won four 
monograms m soccer, three in bas- 
ketball and two each in football and 
volleyball ... Much decorated as a 
football kicker and wide receiver ... 
Selected to the Pittsburgh Post 
Gazette East Fabulous 22 Team as a 
receiver in 1990 ... Chosen by the 
Pittsburgh Press to the all-East 1st 
team in 1990 also as a receiver ... 
Captained the basketball team two 
years, the volleyball team two years 
and the soccer team one year ... Was 
a 1990 all-Section pick in basketball 
... As a soccer player, he was chosen 
All-WPIAL in 1990 and all-Section in 
1988, 89 and 90. 

Personal: Born 9/19/72. Russ is the 
son of Lois and Raymond Weaver ... 
His father played football at Holy 
Cross, a sister played basketball at 
John Carroll and a brother plays 
soccer at Lafayette College. 



1917 

"Football captain Walter Posey was among the first of 4,000,000 young 
men to be drafted into World War I. 



1918 

'Curley Byrd was promoted to Assistant to the President of the 
University. 

'Former M.A. C. tackle Charles F. "Oozey Bill" Huntemann was one of the 
first American officers to die in action. 



1919 

'The war concluded, but Maryland State star "Untz" Brewer was still 
listed as missing. Brewer showed-up the next season to lead his team to 
seven victories. 

'The series with the University of Virginia was started and Maryland 
State won, 13-0. 



1920 

'The Maryland Legislature changed the name of the school for the last 
time, calling it the University of Maryland. The university consisted of 
College Park and five professional schools of the University of Maryland 
in Baltimore. Headquarters were placed in College Park. 

'The first game under the name "University of Maryland" was a shutout 
over Randolph Macon, 54-0, at College Park. 

'For the third time in Maryland football history, a punter Jacked the ball 
over his head. This time, Andy Lyons was credited with a backward kick 
of ten yards. 

'The series with the University of North Carolina was started at Chapel 
Hill, as Maryland won, 130. 



52 



Terprofiles 




Raphael Wall 
29 Super Back 



Larry Washington 
32 Running Back 



Kevin Washington 
18 Slot Receiver 



Russ Weaver 

86 Wide Receiver 



Jahmal Webster 
52 Linebacker 




Chad Wiestling 
26 Linebacker 



Kameron Williams 
34 Super Back 



Erick Wood 
38 Linebacker 



Kevin Woodeshick 
84 Wide Receiver 



Frank Wycheck 
22 Slot Receiver 




53 



Terprofiles 



Raphael Wall 

Super Back 
So. 5-11 202 
Columbia, MD 
Major: General Business 

Administration 
High School: Wilde Lake 

At Maryland: As a true freshman in 
'91, it seemed the highly recruited 
star would lend an early impact to 
the Terps' running back corps ... Al- 
ways hesitant to using a true fresh- 
man, the coaching staff decided to 
utilize his shown and proven abilities 
... He saw action to the delight of the 
fans ... Fits into the new offense 
impressively as his 4.4/4.5 speed can 
make him an exciting runner with 
the ball as a rusher and even more 
dangerous running with the ball 
after catching it ... Academically, 
had over 3.0 average for the spring 
semester. 

1991: Made his debut in the eighth 
game of the year at North Carolina 
... The next week m Baltimore he re- 
turned a school record nine kickoffs 
for a school record 159 yards, ran for 
26 yards and a TD from the 11 -yard 
line on six carries from the line of 
scrimmage, and caught two passes 
for 30 yards agamst Perm State ... 
His 215 yards is the most all purpose 
yardage ever by a true freshman at 
Maryland ... Eclipsed the record of 
180 yards set by Mark Mason the 
year before agamst Virginia ... At 
Clemson he saw both special teams 
duty and running back time ... 
Missed finale at N.C. State with 
injury. 

At Wilde Lake: A four-year football 
letterman and three-year star on the 
track team, running dashes ... Led 
Wilde Lake to a perfect 13-0 mark 
and the state 2A championship as he 
scored the winning touchdown in 
overtime to beat Damascus, 13-7 ... 
Rushed 189 times for 2063 yards and 
31 touchdowns as a senior ... Won 
the Gatorade Player-of-the Year 
award as the top student-athlete in 
the state of Maryland ... Was hon- 
ored by the Touchdown Club of 




Raphael Wall: Against Penn State he gained more yards than any 
freshman in school history. 



Atlanta as they selected him to 
receive the 1991 Bobby Dodd State 
High School "Back of the Year" 
Award ... The award is named in 
honor of the late Bobby Dodd who 
earned Football Hall of Fame recogni- 
tion following his legendary coaching 
career at Georgia Tech ... Named the 
most valuable player in Howard 
County ... An all-County 1st team se- 
lection for three years ... Was hon- 
ored as the county "Player of the 
Year" after his senior year ... An 
honorable mention All-America pick 
by USA Today ... A first team all- 
America choice by Supei-Prep 
Magazine ... Was an all-Met selection 
by both the Washington Post and the 
Baltimore Sun ... Carried the ball for 
5100 career yards and 63 career 
touchdowns ... Scored five 
touchdowns, a career high, in one 
game his senior year ... Won the 
county 55M dash in 1988, in 6.38 
time ... Captained both the 
football and track teams ... An honor 



Wall's Statistics 














North Carolina 
Penn State 
Clemson 


Rush 

7 
8 

4 


Yards 

20 

26 

8 


Rec 


2 




Yards 


30 




KOR 

1 
9 
2 


Yards 

10 

159 

34 


Long 

10 
24 
23 


Totals 


19 


54 


2 


30 


12 


203 


24 



student, as he held a 3.2 grade point 
average ... Chose Maryland over 
Tennessee, Rutgers and Notre Dame. 

Personal: Born 4/3/73. Raphael is 
the son of Delores Bussey and 
William Wall, III. 



lahmal Webster 

Outside Linebacker 

So. 6-1 203 

North Braddock, PA 

Major: Kinesiological Sciences 

High School: Woodland Hills 

At Maryland: Talented athlete who 
is expected to provide quality depth 
on the strong side ... He finished 
spring ball as the No. three strong 
side linebacker. He also has the ath- 
letic versatility to play the other side 
as well ... During spring testing, he 
registered the best vertical jump 
(33.5 inches) and second best 40 
time (4.87) among all outside 
linebackers. 

1991: Did not play. 

1990: A redshirt year. 

At Woodland Hills: Was an honor- 
able mention all- State pick as se- 
lected by the Associated Press as a 
senior ... Led Woodland Hills in tack- 
les during his senior season ... Also 
had three fumble recoveries ... An 
all-Conference selection for two 
years ... Runs 4.7 40-yard dash and 
bench presses 350 pounds ... Had a 
3.0 GPA. 

Personal: Born 2/15/72. Jahmal is 
the son of Vicki Morton and Greg 
Webster. 



1921 

'Hopkins refused to play Maryland, protesting the eligibility of one of 
Maryland's players who participated in their match-up the year before. 



1922 

'The schedule makers were not kind to Maryland as every game was 
played away from College Park. 



1923 

'Johnny "Boots" Groves kicked the field goal that beat Pennsylvania, and 
brought Maryland its first true football notoriety. 



1925 

'Once again the scoreboard operator had the easiest job in Baltimore, as 
the traditional season finale agamst Johns Hopkins ended in a 00 tie for 
the third straight year. 



1927 

'The Terps defeated Washington College, 80-0, the largest margin of 
victory in Maryland history. 

'A near tragedy took place in Richmond against Virginia Military Institute 
as a section of the stands collapsed. Fortunately fans only received 
bruises and scratches, but the game was delayed 20 minutes. 



54 



Terprofiles 



Larry Washington 

Running Back 
So. 5-10 215 
Randallstown, MD 
Major: Letters & Science 
High School: Randallstown 

At Maryland: Along with teammate 
Raphael Wall, the Terps had a pair of 
true freshmen that impressed the 
coaching staff early into the season 
... Washington's talents were 
unveiled in the third game of the 
season against West Virginia ... 
Strong running back and kick return 
specialist. 

1991: Tied for third in rushing yards 
with 195 and caught five passes for 
48 yards on year ... Recorded 312 all- 
purpose yards ... Became the first 
true freshman to play for the Terps 
when he returned a kickoff 30 yards 
m West Virginia game ... Had nine 
KORs for 69 yards on season ... At 
Pittsburgh was inserted with five 
minutes left in first half and team 
down, 14-7 ... Ran for 20 yards on 
first three plays of the drive that 
ended with Terps tying the game at 
14-14 before the half ... Expanded 
playing time at Wake Forest as Mark 
Mason's injury forced use of more 
running backs: had season's long 
reception of 20 yards against Deacs 
... Gained even more playing time 
against Duke ... Led rushers at North 
Carolina with 33 yards ... Averaged 
5.0 yards against Penn State. 

At Randallstown: Had the unusual 
prep distinction of starring as a four- 
year letterman in three sports - 
football, baseball and basketball ... 
Captained the football team his 
senior year ... The most highly re- 
cruited football player m the state of 
Maryland in a number of years ... 
The prize catch for the Terps ran for 
what is believed to be a state record 
2275 yards and 36 touchdowns in 
leading Randallstown to a perfect 
13-0 record and the State Class 4A 
title m 1990 ... He averaged 10.0 
yards a carry his final season ... 
Scored a career 82 total touchdowns 
... A first team all-State selection and 
the Maryland State Player of the Year 
as selected by the Associated Press 
... Accorded the same honor his 
senior year by the Baltimore Morning 
and Evening Sun ... Was USA 
Today's state of Maryland Player of 
the Year ... Was all-Metro and all- 
County his last three seasons, '88, 



'89, and '90 ... Also a baseball all- 
County pick his final three years 
Considered by the national scouting 
services as one of the top 10 running 
back prospects in the nation ... His 
addition to the recruiting class gave 
Maryland one of the top recruiting 
classes in the nation ... Playing safety 
on defense, he returned three inter- 
ceptions for touchdowns ... Larry 
chose Maryland over Tennessee, 
Clemson, Michigan and Georgia 
Tech. 



Personal: Born 3/12/72. 


Larry's 


mother is Grace Price. 




Washington 


's Statistics 


1991 Rush 


Yards Long 


W. Virginia 


l 


2 2 


Pittsburgh 


4 


20 13 


Georgia Tech 


5 


3 3 


Wake Forest 


7 


34 14 


Duke 


10 


53 14 


North Carolina 


10 


33 10 


Penn State 


3 


15 9 


N.C. State 


11 


35 20 


Totals 


51 


195 20 



Kameron Williams 

Super Back 
Jr. 5-8 183 
Gamerville, NY 
Major: Criminal Justice 
High School: North Rockland 

At Maryland: Kam transferred to 
Maryland from the University of 
Cincinnati last September ('91) ... 
While setting out his transfer year, 
he made an immediate eye-popping 
impact during last fall's practices 
running the ball with abandon and 
authority for the scout team ... With 
the new coaching staff this spring, 
Coach Duffner tabbed Kam as a ma- 
jor and pleasant surprise ... Has ex- 
cellent speed and quickness, adapt- 
ing to the run-and-shoot offense like 
a veteran ... He impressed the staff 
with his overall running abilities ... 
He is a strong, hard and exception- 
ally fast runner ... Also excels 
catching the ball and running most 
effectively after a reception ... Spent 
at least half of the 15 practices as 
first team super back .. Will be a 
strong contender for the starting role 
for the Virginia opener. 



At Cincinnati: Played as a true 
freshman ... Was chosen to the 
Sporting News "Top 25" best run- 
ning backs in the nation ... Played 
sparingly as a sophomore missing 
the best part of the year because of 
injuries. 

At North Rockland: A three-year 
letterman as a tailback ... Captained 
the team his senior season ... 
Started at tailback all three years ... 
Rushed for 1763 yards his senior 
season, scored 31 touchdowns - 28 
rushing and 3 by pass receptions ... 
His pass receptions gained over 500 
yards ... His best career game was 
against arch-rival Suffem High 
School, rushing for career and school 
high of 325 yards and 5 touchdowns 
... All three years, Rockland played 
in the city championship game (The 
Top Bowl Game) and won all years 
... Was a first team all-State, all- 
Section and all-County selection ... 
Was a tri-state Junior Heisman 
Trophy nominee. 

Personal: Bom 2/4/71. Kameron is 
the son of Mana Williams. 




Larry Washington: He found open field as a true freshman running back. 



55 



Terprofiles 




Chad Wiestling: He'U stretch to make tackles in '92 on defense. 



Chad Wiestling 

Outside Linebacker 

Jr. 6-2 220 

Greencastle, PA 

Major: Kinesiology 

High School: Greencastle-Antrim 

At Maryland: Made the most cele- 
brated position switch during the 
spring ... After two seasons as one 
of Maryland's most sure-handed re- 
ceivers, he now is the likely starter 
at strongside outside linebacker ... 
Never questioned the coaches' deci- 
sion to change positions, and, m 
fact, was enthusiastic about the 
move ... He is an exceptionally hard 
hitter, which he has had the limited 
opportunity to display in the past 
two years on special teams. 

1991: Played in all 11 games ... Tied 
with Marcus Badgett for the third 
most receptions on the team (16) ... 
Those receptions went for 95 yards, 
a 5.9 yards per catch average ... his 
long catch of 15 yards came against 
Pittsburgh He shared time at H- 
Back with Frank Wycheck, the 
team's top receiver and those two 
players combined for 61 catches and 
533 yards from the position ... 
Wiestlmg also was a member of all 
the Terps' special teams ... He re- 
turned four kickoffs for 59 yards, a 
14.8 average ... Defensively, he was 
second on the squad in special 
teams tackles with 16 (eight unas- 
sisted) ... He recorded at least one 
special teams tackle in all but one 
game, and had a season-high three 
stops against Syracuse. 

1990: As a true freshman, he played 
a significant role in the Terps' of- 
fense ... Played in six games before 



a broken clavicle suffered against 
Georgia Tech ended his season ... 
His career highs all came at 
Michigan when starter Wycheck 
was hurt ... He caught nine passes 
for 77 yards agamst the Wolverines, 
including a career-long 24-yard re- 
ception ... At one point in the game, 
he converted six consecutive recep- 
tions ... Proved his value early in his 
career, making a circus catch at the 
sideline m the season's first game 
against Virginia Tech to keep alive a 
pivotal drive. 

At Antrim: Was a four-time all- 
league selection at Antrim ... Played 
numerous positions including wide 
receiver, running back, kicker and 
punter ... Also excelled on the defen- 
sive side of the ball as defensive 
back ... Was selected the offensive 
Player-of-the-Year in the Blue 
Mountain League ... Voted top 
offensive player in his league by the 
Chambeisbuig (Pa.) Public Opinion ... 
Considered the hardest hitter on his 
high school team. 

Personal: Born 3/30/72. Chad is the 
son of Patricia and Terry Wiestling. 



Wiestling 


s Statistics 




Rec 


Yards Long 


Virginia 


3 


24 12 


Syracuse 


5 


22 13 


W. Virginia 


3 


18 9 


Pittsburgh 


1 


15 15 


Wake Forest 


1 


8 8 


Penn State 


2 


-1 5 


N.C. State 


1 


9 9 


1991 Totals 


16 


95 15 


1990 Totals 


13 


112 24 


Career 


29 


207 24 



Erick Wood 

Inside Linebacker 
So. 6-1 222 
Medford, NJ 
Major: Criminal Justice 
High School: Shawnee 

At Maryland: After seeing consider- 
able action last year on special 
teams, he has earned a spot on the 
depth chart that will translate into 
playing time at inside linebacker ... 
Finished the spring listed just be- 
hind returning starters Mike 
Jarmolowich and Dave Marrone ... 
Technically strong football player 
whose speed (4.96 in the 40) is a big 
asset in the Terps' new speed- 
oriented system ... Despite being a 
relatively slight 222 pounds at inside 
linebacker, he is one of the strongest 
Terps, combining in three separate 
lifts to total 1,201 pounds during 
spring testing, including a 559- 
pound squad and a 350-pound 
bench. 

1991: Played in eight games, mainly 
with the special teams unit ... Re- 
corded four tackles, three unassisted 
... His best game came against Penn 
State, when he totaled two solo 
stops on special teams and added 
another in a brief stint at linebacker. 

1990: A redshirt year 

At Shawnee: Was a three-year 
starter for Shawnee ... Led the team 
in tackles with 78 and in unassisted 
tackles with 35 his senior season ... 
An all-Conference selection as a jun- 
ior and senior ... First team All-South 
Jersey, Burlington County, Liberty 
Division, and Group IV as a senior ... 
Was second team All-South Jersey 
and Burlington County as a junior, 
while earning first team Liberty 
Division at fullback ... Played at 
Shawnee with Geoff Smith, now a 
defensive tackle at Duke, and Eric 



Counts, a defensive tackle at N.C. 
State ... During his prep career, he 
also lettered in baseball and track & 
field. 

Personal: Born 1/12/72. Erick is the 
son of Lois and Charles Wood ... His 
father currently is the football coach 
at Cherry Hill East (NJ) High School, 
after a distinguished playing career 
at North Carolina and then profes- 
sionally with the Atlanta Falcons and 
New Orleans Saints ... Enck's 
brother, Chris, played football at 
Trenton State College. 

Kevin Woodeshick 

Slot Receiver 

So. 6-3 222 

Berwick, PA 

Major: Civil Engineering 

High School: Berwick 

At Maryland: Enters fall practice as 
a back-up at slot receiver ... Is an ex- 
cellent blocker ... Will play for the 
Terps in special situations and be a 
strong contributor to the special 
teams. 

1991: Played H-Back behind Frank 
Wycheck and Chad Wiestling ... 
Caught first pass of career against 
West Virginia; it went for seven 
yards ... Also returned kickoff in 
same game for nine yards. 

1990: A redshirt year 

At Berwick: A first-team all-State 
tight end selection by the Associated 
Press ... Caught 45 passes his senior 
season with 12 going for touchdowns 
... In addition he had 45 tackles and 
three sacks ... Led Berwick to a 14-1 
record and a No. five State ranking m 
1989 ... Berwick advanced to the 
Class 3A State Finals where it lost 
for the only blemish on its schedule 
... Maintained a 4.0 grade point 
throughout high school and was 
president of his senior class. 

Personal: Born 4/24/72. Kevin is the 
son of Susan and Herb Woodeshick. 



1928 

'Coach Byrd eliminated the tradition of team members electing captains 
by vote. Instead Byrd delegated a captain for each game, a trend which 
would continue for the next 15 years. 



1929 

'One of Maryland's most famous players, Lewis "Bosey" Berger, led the 
Terps as a sophomore to a 34-7 victory over Washington College. 



1930 

'Virginia was lor lovers as the Terps swept lour Virginia teams in 
consecutive weeks: V.M.I. , 20-0; Virginia 14-6; Washington and Lee, 41-7; 
and Virginia Poly, 13-7. 

'Maryland won the Southern Conference title. 



56 



Terprofiles 



INCOMING FRESHMEN 



Tim Brown 

Linebacker 

Fr. 6-1 205 

Statesville. NC 

High School: Statesville 

Fork Union Military Academy 

At Statesville: A three-year 
linebacker letterman His senior 
season, he led the team in tackles 
with 180, 146 solo and 34 assists ... 
13 of his tackles were for loss of 
yardage ... Had six fumble recoveries 

Named as the best linebacker on 
the team ... Was a first team all- 
Conference and all-Piedmont selec- 
tion, all-Northwest and a second 
team all-State selection ... His out- 
standing defensive play contributed 
greatly to leadmg the team to the 
State 3A championship game and 
finished as state runner-up to the 
title ... With a 13-2 record ... As a 
junior, he had 101 tackles, six for 
loss of yardage, four fumble recover- 
ies and one interception ... States- 
ville finished with an 11-2 record, 
and he was chosen first team all- 
League, all-County and all-Region ... 
As a sophomore, he gave early 
indication he would be an all-star 
linebacker as he recorded 58 tackles. 

At Fork Union: Led the team in 
tackles. 119 ... Had one interception 
and returned it for a touchdown ... 
Led the team m fumble recoveries 
with four ... Named to the Max 
Emphingers top 66 Atlantic Coast 
team. 

Personal: Bom 11/20/71. Tim is the 
son of Hattie and Douglas Brown ... 
Brother. Tony, will be a senior this 
year playing lmebacker at Appala- 
chian State University ... Cousin, 
Jody. is a member of the Wake For- 
est team ... Brother Donnie will be in 
the tenth grade at Statesville high 
this fall and also plays linebacker. 



Mario Chavez 

Linebacker 
Fr. 6-2 220 
North Miami Beach, FL 
High School: Monsignor Pace 

At Monsignor Pace: Received the 
prestigious honor with his selection 
by the Miami HeraJd as the Dade 
County "Player of the Year" ... Dade 
County is considered to be one of 



the nation's very best in turning out 
outstanding football players year in 
and year out ... He is a teammate of 
Farad Hall, giving Monsignor Pace 
two stars that chose Maryland to 
continue their educational and foot- 
ball pursuits ... A three-year letter- 
man in football and wrestling ... Cap- 
tained both teams ... A second team 
all-State selection his senior year 
and was a third team all-State choice 
his )umor year, '90 ... Also was a 
first team all-Dade County selection 
his junior and senior years ... Was 
rated #12 out of the 30 top college 
recruits out of Dade County ... Was 
the team leader on defense, leading 
the team in tackles for one of the top 
Class 3A teams in the state ... Was 
singled out as most responsible in 
leading Pace (9-2) to the District and 
Regional Championship before losing 
in the Sectional title game, 14-10 ... 
Wrestled three years in the 189- 
pound class, winning the individual 
title of the District all three years ... 
Is a quality student, carrying a 2.8 
GPA ... For two years, he was listed 
in the Who's Who Among High 
School Students ... He visited The 
Citadel, Kansas State and Central 
Florida ... He and Hall visited Col- 
lege Park together ... Their coach 
Mark Guandolo said they were over- 
whelmed and got the feeling that 
something new and excitmg was 
taking place up at Maryland and 
wanted to be part of it. 

Personal: Bom 11/2/73. Mario is the 
son of Dale Ann Stewart and Mario 
Chavez ... His father was a 1978 
Fordham graduate where he earned 
all-ECAC honors playing offensive 
guard ... His uncle, Loz, a 1985 line- 
backer graduate at Iona College ... 
Played with the New England 
Patnots (1986) and the Miami Dol- 
phins (1987). 



Matt Davenport 

Offensive Tackle 

Fr. 6-5 270 

Tallahassee, FL 

High School: North Florida Christian 

At Christian: A star offensive tackle 
for three years ... One of the first 
Florida prep stars to commit to 
Maryland ... Hails from the same 
high school as FSU star quarterback 
Casey Weldon ... Recruiting 
combines ranked him among the 
state's top 10 linemen ... He was the 
first player ever from North Flonda 
Chnstian to be named first team all- 



State ... He also was selected to the 
prestigious "All-Big Bend" team It 
covers 31 area high schools ... The 
award encompasses the entire Flor- 
ida Panhandle Region An honor 
student also and scored well over 
1.000 on his SAT's ... Matt has taken 
Tae Kwon Do (karate) for several 
years and is 3 levels from the Black 
Belt ... Already has the karate Blue 
Belt ... With his karate skills, he has- 
tened his quickness, speed and flexi- 
bility that helped his football devel- 
opment . Active in the Fellowship 
of Christian Athletes ... Spent his 
early childhood days in New Jersey 
before his family moved South ... 
Christian won the District 
Championship title in 1989 and '90 
... Chose Maryland over Flonda State 
and East Carolina. 

Personal: Born 2/11/74. Matt is 
the son of Christine and Jerome 
Davenport. 



Kenyon Drayton 

Defensive Back 
Fr. 6-0 180 
St. Petersburg, FL 
High School: Boca Ciega 

At Boca Ciega: A two-year letter- 
man as football defensive back and 
two-year letterman on the track 
team, running sprints ... He also 
played some receiver but defense is 
his special talent ... With his speed, 
he is a strong candidate as a free 
safety ... His play helped Boca 
Ciega's defense to yield an average 
of just seven points a game ... For 
his outstanding play, he gamed sec- 
ond team all-State recognition and 
first team all-Distnct honors last year 
... Has 4.5 40 speed ... Ken (Kenyon) 
led the county with eight intercep- 
tions, had two fumble recoveries and 
had two blocked field goals and one 
blocked punt ... The first team all- 
Pinellas County selection was cho- 
sen to play in the annual Flonda 
North/South all-star game this sum- 
mer ... A good student who works 
hard in the classroom ... Compiled a 
2.8 GPA ... Won the Latm Forum 
Scholastic honor award of the City of 
Orlando. FL ... Received Ciega's 
Spanish Academic Award ... A 
member of the Latm Honor Society, 
the Spanish Club. Track Club and 
JROTC ... Ken had committed to 
Purdue only to change his mind 
after his visit to Maryland ... He also 
considered Michigan State. 



Personal: Born 10/11/74 Ken is the 
son of Mary and Arthur Drayton ... 
His father played basketball and 
baseball at Stillman College where 
the baseball team won the NAIA Di- 
vision title in 1974. 



Kevin Foley 



Quarterback 

Fr. 6-2 185 

Cheny Hill, NJ 

High School: Cherry Hill East 

At Cherry Hill East: A three-sport 
all-star ... Lettered three years as 
team quarterback, leading Cherry 
Hill East into the state champion- 
ships his junior and senior year, fin- 
ishing 9-2 and 8-2 seasons as run- 
nerup to the title ... Was a four-year 
letterman on the baseball team and 
two years playing on the basketball 
team ... Captained the football and 
baseball teams his senior year ... The 
Terps snared the "Gatorade Player of 
the Year" and first team all-State QB 
One of the first players to commit 
to Coach Mark Duffner ... The 
Delaware Valley "Player of the Year" 
was an all-Amenca selection last 
year as well and a first team all-State 
and all-South Jersey selection ... 
Foley is considered one of the top 
quarterbacks in the East ... Threw for 
over 2,100 yards last year and a ca- 
reer total of over 4.000 yards ... He 
runs a 4.7 40 and is mobile enough 
for the run-and shoot offense of 
Duffner ... With a gun for an arm, his 
greatest attributes are his abilities to 
throw on the run. his poise and his 
leadership ... Chosen to play in the 
South Jersey East/West all-star game 
this summer ... Playing baseball, he 
was, his junior and senior years, se- 
lected to the all-star teams of South 
Jersey. all-State and all-Area ... He 
was an honor roll student all four 
years ... Chose Maryland over Boston 
College, Miami (FL), North Carolina 
and West Virginia. 

Personal: Bom 2/20/73. Kevin is the 
son of Sue and Ed Foley ... His father 
Ed was the quarterback for Boston 
College, 1964-65; his brother Glenn 
is the Eagles' signal caller and QB 
the past three years ... Brother Ed 
was captain of the 1989 football team 
... Brother Cliff is on a baseball 
scholarship at Villanova. 



57 



Terprofiles 



Erik Greenstein 

Offensive Guard 
Fr. 6-2 270 
Andover, MA 
High School: Andover 

At Andover: A four-year football let- 
terman and a track letterman his jun- 
ior season ... Had the distinction of 
starting every game all four years for 
the football team ... Selected by both 
the Boston Globe and Boston Herald 
to the all-Scholastic team ... Named 
to the Memmack Valley Conference 
team three years - second team his 
sophomore and junior years, then a 
first team choice last year ... Was a 
first team pick his junior and senior 
years by the Lawrence Eagle-Tribune 
... Was team captain his senior year 
... Also, voted the teams' MVP last 
year capping a brilliant four-year per- 
formance as an offensive lineman ... 
Was MVP runner-up for all the ath- 
letic teams in the Andover area ... He 
was the only area player to be cho- 
sen as a signee to a Division I school 
... Won the B'nai B'nth Award which 
recognizes the top high school Jew- 
ish athlete ... Honorable Mention for 
that award his sophomore and junior 
years ... Was selected to play in this 
summer's State Shrine All-Star game 
... Recruited by Perm State, Syracuse, 
Notre Dame and Pitt ... Chose Mary- 
land over Syracuse. 

Personal: Born: 9/21/73. Erik is the 
son of Hollis Marrs and Martin 
Greenstein. 



Farad Hall 

Defensive Lineman 

Fr. 6-2 265 

Carol City, FL 

High School: Monsignor Pace 

At Pace: A real anchor of Paces' de- 
fense ... A two-way player at Pace 
but is likely to be listed on the defen- 
sive side of the football ... A three- 
sport letterman ... Earned three in 
football, one in wrestling and one in 
track & field ... Could be a nose 
guard prospect as well as tackle ... 
His coach Matt Guandolo claims he 
will be a dominant player ... He runs 
very well and combines speed, quick- 
ness and strength (345 bench press) 
... Farad always has liked Maryland 
... He applied as a junior and was 
hoping the new staff would recruit 
him ... His hope and wish was 
granted easily as Coach Duffner and 
staff had him on their preferred list ... 
It just so happens that Duffner had a 
player from Pace and Coach Guan- 
dolo at Holy Cross ... The new Terp 
coach was well aware of the high 
school's program and reputation ... 
He was a first team all-District (Dade 
County) and third team all- State pick 
his senior year ... Won the District 
and Regional titles in '91 ... As a jun- 
ior, he was chosen all-District (Dade 
County) and named third team all- 
State his senior year ... He won the 
heavyweight wrestling crown in the 
District in '91 ... An excellent student, 
taking a 2.9 GPA into the spring 



1931 

'"Bosey" Berger and Ray Poppleman scored three touchdowns each in 
Maryland's 41-20 victory over V.M.I, at Richmond. 

'In his final game "Bosey" Berger scored two touchdowns, one on an 
85-yard run, as Maryland defeated Western Maryland, 41-6. 

'"Bosey" Berger became Maryland's first Ail-American basketball player. 



1932 

'Coach Byrd was promoted to Vice-President of the University. 

'Maryland and Duke inaugurated what would become a lasting football 
relationship in Durham, North Carolina. 

'In Maryland's 24-7 victory over St. John's, the game started with three 
consecutive fumbles that were all recovered on the St. John's 21-yard fine. 
On the fourth play, Maryland managed to hold onto the ball and scored a 
touchdown. 

'Maryland tied Yale, who was led by the brilliant Albie Booth. Byrd 
employed a 6-3-2 defense for the first time. 



1933 

'Tulane fumbled the ball away ten times in the first half, but still defeated 
Maryland, 20-0. 



period ... Was named a high school 
All-America Scholar (Language) ... 
An honor roll student ... Will study 
engineering ... Visited South Caro- 
lina and Louisville. 

Personal: Born 9/11/74. Farad is the 
son of Mary and Billy Hall. 

Aaron Henne 

Defensive Tackle 
Fr. 6-5 250 
Allison Park, PA 
High School: Shaler Area 

At Shaler Area: A three-year letter- 
man in football and wrestling ... Cap- 
tained both teams his senior year ... 
A standout starter for three years ... 
Earned first team all-Quad North 
Conference ... A "Big 33 all-state 
team nominee ... Was a Pittsburgh 
Post-Gazette selection to their "Fab- 
ulous 22" team and a first team 
Pittsburgh Press North All-Star 
choice ... The wrestling team cap- 
tured the WPIAL Section II champi- 
onship last year ... During the 1991- 
92 wrestling season, Aaron, in the 
heavyweight class, took third place 
in the WPIAL sections; fourth in the 
Brooke Tournament and second in 
the West Mifflin Tourney ... His jun- 
ior year, he took second in the WPIAL 
sections, third in the West Mifflin 
and was given the "Most Improved" 
wrestler award ... Had a career 
record of 40-26 with 26 falls ... His 
father, Leo, also a Shaler graduate in 
'69 and a four-year football player, 
played semi-pro ball with the 
Pittsburgh Ironmen & Wolfpack. 

Personal: Born 3/24/74. Aaron is the 
son of Linda and Leo Henne. 

Erik Henry 

Tight End 

Fr. 6-4 225 

Cherry Hill, NJ 

High School: Cherry Hill East 

At Cherry Hill East: An A-B Honor 
Roll student ... Scored exceptionally 
high on his SAT ... Joins with his 
high school teammate Kevin Foley as 
two Cherry Hill East stars who chose 
to be part of the Terps' new and 
promising program under Coach Duf- 
fner ... Both visited Maryland the 
same weekend and decided they 
wanted to be a part in turning 
things around at College Park ... A 
three-sport letter winner, four years 
playing football, and three years as a 
standout player on the basketball 
and baseball teams ... Captained the 
football team his senior year ... He 
missed the bulk of his senior season 
because of a kneecap injury ... Has 
recovered fully and runs a 4.7 40 ... 



Caught 6Q.of Foley's passes his jun- 
ior year He was selected to and 
played in the annual South-Jersey 
East-West all-star game this summer 
... Numerous all-star honors were 
accorded Erik during his career ... 
He received all-America honorable 
mention recognition as well as all- 
State, all-Area, all-South Jersey, all- 
Conference and honorable mention 
Group IV ... a standout player on the 
1989 State championship team and 
the all-Conference championship 
teams of '90 and '91 ... Duffner de- 
scribes Erik as a tight end who has 
the ability to play the slotback posi- 
tion also ... He chose Maryland over 
Miami (FL), Syracuse and North 
Carolina. 

Personal: Born 12/11/72. Erik is the 
son of Patricia and Robert Henry ... 
His father played basketball at the 
University of Pittsburgh. 



Wade Inge 



Wide Receiver 

Fr. 6-1 180 

Lindenwold, NJ 

High School: Overbrook Regional 

At Overbrook: Brother of Terps' 
starting senior roverback, Bill ... A 
three-sport letterman, three in foot- 
ball and four years as a basketball 
player and track star ... Captained 
the football and basketball teams his 
senior year ... Had the honor as one 
of the captains for the track team 
his last three seasons ... For coach 
Larry Maunello, he played running 
back, receiver, free safety and ran 
back punts and kicks ... Combined 
for more than 1,000 yards rushing 
and receiving last season, scoring 
nine touchdowns as a slotback and 
running back ... Caught 40 passes 
for over 500 yards and five of the 
nine scores ... His rushing figure 
stood out with 520 yards and his 
other four TDs ... Has a 34-inch ver- 
tical leap and great speed ... Was a 
first team all-South Jersey selection 
and all-Conference and all-Group IV 
... He was all-Conference and all- 
Group IV in track for 1990 and '91 ... 
Football team of '90 won the State 
Championship (8-3) ... Was FBLA 
treasurer ... An honor roll student ... 
Was student of the month for No- 
vember, 1991 ... He initially commit- 
ted to Wisconsin, but changed his 
decision after his visit to College 
Park on the final weekend for re- 
cruits to visit. 

Personal: Born 4/24/74. Wade is the 
son of Donna and William Inge. 



58 



Terprofiles 



Jermaine Lewis 

Wide Receiver 

Fr. 5-9 170 

Lanham, MD 

High School: Eleanor Roosevelt 

At Eleanor Roosevelt: With his 4 3 
explosions in the 40-yard dash, he 
proved that he was the fastest high 
school runner in the state and cited 
as one of the fastest in the nation 
with this breathtaking speed .For 
the second year in a row, he won the 
state 4A title in the 200 and 100 
meter dash This year, he set a 
state meet record in the 200, win- 
ning in 20.8 seconds, and he cap- 
tured the 100 in a breathtaking 10 3 
seconds, the second-fastest time of 
any school-boy in the nation ... He 
also ran the anchor leg of Roosevelt's 
400-meter relay team, which set a 
new state record outdoors ... Was the 
1992 National Scholastic Indoor 200- 
meter dash champion, breaking the 
200 meter meet and national record 
... The 1992 Track and Field Maga- 
zine Indoor "Athlete of the Year" ... 
Was the 1991 Gatorade Circle of 
Champion award winner for track ... 
Was a Washington Post all-Met In- 
door and Outdoor pick his junior and 
senior years . . Played football his 
junior and senior years ... Rushed for 
over 1,000 yards during his senior 
year, playing six games, averaging 
170 yards per game ... Missed three 
games because of ankle injury ... Had 
over 900 yards as a junior ... Was se- 
lected as Roosevelt's offensive 
"Player of the Year" for both '91 and 
'92 ... Selected as a first team all- 
Metropolitan running back in the 
league in '91 ... Was chosen and 
played in this summer's annual "Big 
33" game featuring the all-star play- 
ers of Maryland and Pennsylvania ... 
Hopes to be a member of the Terps' 
track team ... Turned down track of- 
fers from Nebraska, Southern 
Methodist, Michigan State and 
South Carolina to play football for the 
Terrapins and Duffner. 

Personal: Born 10/16/74. Jermame is 
the son of Rhonda and James "Jake" 
Lewis. 



Andre Martin 

Defensive Back 

Fr. 5-10 190 

Columbia, MD 

High School: Wilde Lake 

At Wilde Lake: A three-sport all star 
letterman ... Four years football, three 
basketball and two track & field ... 
Captained the football and track 
teams his senior year ... Joins last 
year's all-America running back from 
Wilde Lake. Raphael Wall ... They 
hail from one of the state's most suc- 
cessful and most respected high 
school programs ... Transferred to 
Wilde Lake from Bishop McNamarra 
High School At McNamarra, he 
was a first team all-Met and all- 
County pick his junior year while 
leading the team to a 9-1 record and 
the Metro Conference championship 
... Martin was everywhere for Coach 
Doug Duvall's team last fall, rushing 
for 935 yards while intercepting 
seven passes and scoring 1 1 touch- 
downs ... He combined for over 600 
yards on kickoff and punt returns ... 
For his brilliant year, he was 
rewarded as he was voted the "Most 
Valuable Player" award for all of 
Howard County ... His outstanding 
overall contributions led Wilde Lake 
to an undefeated 13-0 season and 
its' second consecutive Class 1A 
championship Along with the MVP 
award, he was a first team all- 
Metropolitan choice of the 
Washington Post, Washington Times. 
and Baltimore Sun ... Fastest time in 
the 40 is 4.39, but consistently runs a 
4.4 ... Winner of the B.S.A.P. award 
(Black Young Student Achievement 
Award) ... He served as chairman of 
the leadership organization. 

Personal: Bom 12/16/72. Andre is the 
son of Myra Martin. 



Deundrick Reed (Dee) 

Quarterback 

Fr. 6-2 205 

Dade City, FL 

High School: Pasco Comprehensive 

At Pasco: The three-sport star was 
highly recruited ... Was a three-year 
letterman in football as quarterback 
and defensive back ... A three-year 
guard on the basketball team and 
three years playing first base for the 
baseball team ... Captained the foot- 
ball team his senior year ... Last 
year, he led the team to a 11-1 
record while winning the District. 
Regional, Sectional and the Sunshine 
Conference State championship 
Honored as a second team all-State 
quarterback selection ... Also named 
to the first team as all-Conference, 
all-District and all-Area #1 quarter- 
back ... Was voted as Pasco's "Most 
Valuable Offensive Player" for his 
brilliant play which also included 
recognition on defense as he played 
situation free safety ... The senior 
all-star passed for 1,472 yards, threw 
16 touchdown passes as he 
completed 49 of 97 attempts in 
Pasco's Wing-T offense ... Dee also 
scored 8 running touchdowns ... 
Runs a 4.6 40 and bench presses 
over 300 pounds ... Voted a frequent 
"Player of the Week" by the Pasco 
News and St. Petersburg Times ... 
Maintained a B (3.0 GPA) ... He 
prides his selection to be the Pirates' 
junior and senior year class repre- 
sentative on the Homecoming Court 
... In leading Pasco to last year's 
playoffs, Dee's coach Perry Brown 
related a game that typifies his all- 
star abilities ... "We were #1 in the 
state and we were playing the #6 
team, who was 8-0 ... We were 
down 21-0 in the first half ... We tied 
the game up with :32 seconds left 
and went into overtime ... Four times 
on our last drive, Dee made third 
down conversions on third and long 
... Then on fourth and eight on the 
10-yard line, he threw a pass into 
the flats for the game winner ... He 
stayed incredibly poised in the drive 
and his team leadership was awe- 
some." ... Pasco stayed at the #1 in 
Florida's 3A league thanks to that 
land of play from Reed all season ... 
He was selected to play in this 
summer's state North/South all-star 
game ... As a junior, with a 7-3 
record and District runnerup, he 
threw for 672 yards and 10 touch- 
downs ... Out in the secondary, he 
had 5 interceptions ... Made all-State 
quarterback honorable mention, 



all-Conference QB and all-District 
and all- Area free safety ... As a 
sophomore, playing in 7 games, he 
hit 49 of 97 passes for over 700 
yards and made his first appearance 
on the all-Conference selection lists 
... The 1991-92 basketball team, 26- 
3, with Dee at guard, won the Dis- 
trict, Regional and Sectional champi- 
onships ... Playing baseball as first 
baseman and designated hitter, he 
hit for a .296 batting average last 
year ... Was a conference all- 
Academic selection ... At senior 
class awards day, Dee was named 
the "Outstanding Senior" of the 
graduating class ...He won the 
Uhuru Award given for Academic 
and Athletic excellence ... A member 
of the McKnight Achiever Society, 
Pasco's Black Honor Society in 
which an honoree must maintain a B 
average to be a member. 

Personal: Born: 5/2/74. Dee is the 
son of Freddie Mae and Frank 
Alexander. 

Brent Schrode 

Offensive Tackle 
Fr. 6-6 250 
Apopka, FL 
High School: Apopka 

At Apopka: Was a straight A stu- 
dent ... Awarded an honors diploma 
at June graduation ... Arrives as a 
diamond-m-the-rough recruit ... He 
played only two years, but his im- 
provement was unbelievable ... 
Came to Apopka at 6-5, 190 and is 
now 6-6, 250 ... His coach Will Carl- 
ton says he is still growing and 
could close out his Terrapin career 
at 6-8, 290, with no problems ... Was 
a second team all-State selction ... 
Named first team all-Central Florida 
... A first team all-Metro (Orlando) 
pick ... Winner of the coveted 
"Golden Helmet Award" for being 
selected as the best offensive line- 
man in the city of Orlando ... Runs a 
5.3 40 yard dash ... Was co-captain 
of his team his senior year, a selec- 
tion that illustrated his leadership 
qualities on and off the field ... Brent 
also considered Georgia Tech and 
Michigan State ... Intends to major 
in engineering. 

Personal: Bom 9/26/74. Brent is the 
son of Thelma and Norman Schrode. 



59 



Jonathon Simmons 

Defensive Back 

Fr. 5-9 175 

Miami, FL 

High School: Miami Central 

At Miami Central: Not only was 
Simmons one of the most feared hit- 
ters in the city of Miami, he also 
boasted Miami Central's highest 
grade point average - 4.2 ... Jon 
Jon, the name he goes by, received 
the coveted Dade County "Scholar 
Athlete of the Year Award" as 
selected by the Miami Herald ... The 
all-Amencan scholar scored excep- 
tionally high on his SAT ... Carried a 
team high 3.6 GPA for his prep ca- 
reer winning the senior academic 
award ... His tenaciousness on the 
field set him apart from everyone ... 
His impact on the football field was 
rewarded as he was voted the team 
"Most Valuable Player" award ... Led 
the team as captain in deep back 
tackles ... Had a team leading five 
interceptions ... Was team punter 
and averaged 40 yards per punt ... 
Named to the 1st all-City and all- 
District teams ... Is very excitied 
about the Umversity's Engineering 
curriculum ... Duffner on Simmons: 
"He is the land of guy that played at 
halftime in the band and sold tickets 
before the game m terms of every- 
thing he did. He was always there 
on offense, there on defense, never 
came out of the game." ... A very in- 
tense player ... He was the head- 
hunter on special teams, leadmg the 
pursuit downfield ... People feared 
him ... He visited Minnesota and 
East Carolina and cancelled a sched- 
uled visit to Miami after 
committmg to the Terps ... Was 
active in the FCAA, JET, and Mentor 
programs. 

Personal: Bom 12/9/73. Jonathon 
is the son of Frances and Eddie 
Simmons. 



Orlando Strozier 

Quarterback 

Fr. 6-2 190 

Augusta, GA 

High School: Hephzibah 

At Hephzibah: A four-sport athlete ... 
Lettered three years as team quarter- 
back ... Won letters his junior and 
senior years as a starting guard on 
the basketball team along with track 
monograms his junior and senior 
years ... Earned a letter his senior 
year as the starting center fielder on 
the baseball team ... Captained the 
football team his junior and senior 
years ... Co-captain of the basketball 
and track teams his senior season ... 
He rushed for 1531 yards, passed for 
907 yards and combined for 29 touch- 
downs on the ground and in the air 
... Eleven of his rushing touchdowns 
went for 60 yards or more ... His 
coach, Bruce Moser noted that he 
never got caught from behind ...He 
runs a 4.35 40 dash ... Was first-team 
all-State as a defensive back and 
second team all-State as a quarter- 
back ... Was chosen the city of Au- 
gusta's "Most Valuable Player" ... 
Was a first team all-star selection by 
the Atlanta Journal and Constitution 
... Also selected by his teammates as 
Hephzibah "Most Valuable Player" ... 
Named as the CSRA Player of the 
Year; Augusta Area Rotary Club 
Athlete of the Year; WBBQ Player of 
the Year ... Along with his quarter- 
back skills, could be a wide receiver 
candidate, utilizing his great hands 
and speed talents ... He chose 
Maryland over Hawaii, Louisville, 
'Ole Miss and East Carolina ... He 
played this summer m the annual 
Georgia-Florida All-Star Game. 

Personal: Born 8/24/74. Orlando is 
the son of Ida and Willie Roger 
Strozier ... A cousm, Walter Dunson, 
played football at Middle Tennessee 
State. 



Billy Thompson 

Defensive Tackle 
Fr. 6-5 240 
Dunwoody, GA 
High School: Dunwoody 

At Dunwoody: His senior year of '91 
was Thompson's first year of orga- 
nized football ... His coach, David 
Kelly knows why his late-bloomer 
was named to many all-area teams 
and attracted the attention of many 
Division I schools ... He chose 
Maryland over Wake Forest, East 
Carolma and Georgia Southern ... 
"He's orginally from New Jersey and 
was a lacrosse player ... This was 
his first year of football but I think 
playing lacrosse helped his overall 
ability tremendously as a football 
player ... His family moved from 
Summit, NJ to Dunwoody during his 
junior year, but the late start hardly 
affected his football debut ... He 
graded out at 89% in 561 plays at 
offensive tackle ... He runs a 4.9 40 
... A first team all-County selection 
and honorable mention all-State and 
all-Region pick ... Played in the 
Georgia state All-Star game this 
summer ... lettered two years with 
the track team in the field events ... 
He maintained over a 3.0 academic 
average at both Summit and 
Dunwoody high schools ... Served as 
one of the editors of the school 
newspaper ... At Summit High 
School, he was a standout lacrosse 
player ... His father is a graduate of 
the U.S. Naval Academy where he 
also played lacrosse. 

Personal: Born 3/6/74. Billy is the 
son of Juoynte and Edward 
Williamson. 



Al Wallace 

Wide Receiver/Linebacker 

Fr. 6-4 210 

Boca Raton, FL 

High School: Spanish River 

At Spanish River: A three-year foot- 
ball letterman and two-year varsity 
letter winner on the basketball team, 
his junior and senior years ... Was 
football team captam, both junior 
and senior years ... He personifies 
the type of athlete Coach Duffner 
and staff insist upon ... Was a starter 
on the football team junior and 
senior years ... He played as a run- 
ning back his junior season and 
gained 500 yards ... As a senior, he 
was moved to wide receiver, catch- 
ing 31 passes for 571 yards and 5 
touchdowns ... Also played on the 
other side of the ball as an outside 
linebacker ... Was named first team 
all-Broward County as a receiver and 
linebacker his senior year ... His 31 
receptions ranked second most in the 
county ... Selected to and played in 
the annual Florida North-South All- 
Star Game ... An excellent student, 
carrying a 2.5 GPA into the spnng 
term ... Scored very high on his SAT 
test ... Plans to enter the School of 
Engineering ... His father is an 
Electrical Engineer ... Visited 
Louisville, Temple, Kansas and East 
Carolma. 

Personal: Bom 3/25/74. Al is the 
son of Gma Sweeting and Andrew 
Wallace. 



Byrd Stadium's Top 7 Games 

As selected by Football Publicist Emeritus, Joe Blair. 

1. Byid Stadium Dedication. September 30, 1950. Maryland dedicated its 
new digs with a 36-21 victory over ancient rival Navy. The crowd of 43,836 
fans easily broke the home team's attendance record; Byrd Field had held at 
the most 20,000 fans for any game from the time of it construction in 1923 
through 1949. Not even in the District's Griffith Stadium, nor in the many 
Baltimore stadiums the Terps competed in, did they draw such a large home 
crowd. The stadium was named for the Umversity President, Harry Clifton 
Byrd; the first touchdown was scored by Baltimore's Jack Scarbath, who 
would eventually be selected to the College Football Hall of Fame. 

2. Best Back-to-Back Wins. November 14 and 21, 1953. The National 
Championship was more than a possibility for Jim Tatum's nationally 
ranked Number Two club, ind the season's final two opponents, Number 12 
Mississippi and Number 11 Alabama, were capable of inflicting the season's 
first losses. Maryland was al. 3 looking for revenge: Number 11 Ole Miss 



had snapped then Number Three Maryland's 22 game win streak the year 
before, the nation's longest. Number 14 Alabama then dumped the 
descending Number Eight Terps in 1952's finale. But this was 1953, and the 
Terps shut out Ole Miss and Alabama by a combined 59-0. The National 
Championship was Maryland's, and a trip to the Orange Bowl to play 
Oklahoma. 

3. First Undefeated Season. November 24, 1951. Jim Tatum had the Terps 
primed for its season fmale. The 54-7 victory over West Virginia secured a 
Sugar Bowl bid, and the school's first unbeaten (9-0) season in history. 
Number Three Maryland's Sugar Bowl opponent was Tennessee, the top- 
ranked team in the nation. Since the polls did not include bowl scores, the 
Terrapin's 28-13 upset of the Vols on January 1 did not raise their ranking. 

4. East vs. West Game of the Year. September 24, 1955. Number One 
UCLA visited Byrd Stadium in the wake of it National Championship season 
of 1954 to meet the 1953 national victors. Bob Pellegrini, who would 
become a consensus All-America, led the Terps in a defensive victory, 7-0, 
in the season opener. 



60 



Terproffiles 



Walter Williams, III 

Wide Receiver 

Fr. 6-0 170 

Miami, FL 

High School: Killian Senior 

At Killian Senior: A two-year football 
letterman and an all-star member of 
last year's track team as a hurdler ... 
Captained the track team ... Ranked 
as the second fastest hurdler in 
Florida last year ... Also won a 110- 
meter hurdle event in the record 
breaking time of 13.98 seconds ... 
Closed out his brilliant career as the 
5th ranked high school hurdler in the 
nation . . The first ranked hurdler in 
Florida last year was the #1 ranked 
hurdler in the country ... An avid fan 
of former Terrapin all-Amencan hur- 
dler and Olympian Renaldo "Skeets" 
Nehemiah ... In '91 football season, 
he caught 1 1 passes in an option ori- 
ented offense, but had phenomenal 
26.2 yard average per reception ... 
Was an honorable-mention all-Dade 
county selection . . Walt was the re- 
cipient of the Welden Mcintosh 
Memorial Scholarship Award in rec- 
ognition of athletic achievements and 
exceptional character .A member of 
the Future Business Leaders of 
American Society ... Followed his 
namesake's career, the Terps' All- 
Amencan basketball star and NBA 
Draft Lottery choice. Walt Williams ... 
Plans to continue his hurdle career 
as a member of Coach Bill 
Goodman's Terp track team. 

Personal: Born 6/29/74. Walt is the 
son of Ellen and Walter Williams, Jr., 
a Deacon in the William's family 
Church. 



lason Winn 

Kicker/Punter 
Fr. 6-11 170 
Tallahassee, FL 
High School: Leon 

At Leon: One of Leon's top four-year 
scholars ... Rewarded for his 
academic achievements as a yearly 
member of the "A-B" Honor Roll ... 
Lettered as the team placekicker and 
punter Captamed the football team 
his senior year, '91 A three-year 
soccer player and captained the team 
his ]umor year ... Kicked eight of 10 
field goals last year, long of 52 ... 
Was a perfect 32 of 32 extra points 
last season ... Had a 41.2 punting 
average in '91 ... the team's 8-2 
record earned them the City Champi- 
onship ... Soccer team finished third 
in the state ... Awarded the honor of 
being selected for the prestigious 
"All-Big Bend Kicker" Trophy ... He 
won the award which reaches out to 
31 high schools ... The award encom- 
passes the entire Florida Panhandle 
Region ... His athletic, academic and 
student activity accomplishments 
earned him the honor of bemg named 
to "Who's Who Among American 
High School Students" ... Was a 
member of the Student Government 
Association and El Cid of the Spanish 
Club ... Was voted the best dressed 
senior by his classmates ... Was 
Florida Stock Market Game Captam, 
coming in third in the state ... 
Completed the 1992 Commodity 
Challenge Program. 

Personal: Bom 6/13/74. Jason is the 
son of Judy and Stephen Winn. 



Byrd Stadium's Top 7 Games (continued) 

5. Maryland beats Perm State. November 4, 1961. Coach Tom Nugent did 
what no other Terrapin mentor has managed: Beat Perm State, 21-17. The 
victory in Byrd Stadium was the eighth game in the series which began m 
1917. Since 1961, Perm State has repeatedly edged, or throttled, the Terra- 
pin. In 1989 at Baltimore's Memorial Stadium. Maryland tied State. 13-13, 
25 games after the lone victory. 

6. Fans go Bonkers on Boomer. October 29, 1983. In a nationally televised 
game that ended in near darkness, and with no goal post in the closed end 
of the stadium, Numer 13 Ranked Maryland held off a nine point, fourth 
quarter rally by the North Carolina to win, 28-26. The student body 
stormed Byrd's turf after Maryland stopped a two-point conversion that 
would have tied the game. Maryland Lmebacker J.D. Gross put a devastat- 
ing rush on the UNC QB and forced the two-pomt pass attempt to be 
thrown wide Sports Illustrated featured the game on its cover, students 
dismantling the goal posts. The win also paved the way for the first ACC 
title m six years. 

7. Big Play Day. November 18, 1978. In an unparalleled display, Clemson 
and Maryland scored five touchdowns covering 60 or more yards each. The 
51,376 fans, including more than 3.000 from Clemson. saw an offensive 
show that included this third quarter series: A Clemson TD on an 87 yard 
pass play, followed less than a minute later by a 98 yard run by Steve At- 
kins of Maryland (the school record). Number 12 Clemson won, 28-24, over 
Number 11 Maryland. 



1934 

'Bill Guckeyson, "billed" as Maryland's all-time greatest player by Coacb 
Byrd, was the center of controversy in the Navy game. In the first hall 
Guckeyson caught a pass and darted down the sidelines, only to have an 
official rule that he stepped out of bounds on his journey. Photos indicated 
he remained in bounds, but it was to no avail as the Terps fell, 16-13. 



1935 

'After 23 years of coaching, 14 at Maryland, "Curley" Byrd retires in order 
to concentrate on his administrative duties. Professor Jack Faber, Byrd's 
main assistant, was assigned to the new vacancy. 



1937 

'Maryland won the State Championship, clinching the title with a win 
over Western Maryland at College Park, 6-0. 



1938 

'A driving sleet storm deterred all but 1,000 fans on Thanksgiving Day as 
Maryland beat Washington and Lee, 1913, in Baltimore. 



1942 

'The offense was ranked Uthin the nation. 

'Coach Shaughnessy used the "T" formation to emphasize speed and 
precision. 



1944 

'To take advantage of new Ughts, all four home games were played at 
night. 



1945 

'In Paul "Bear" Bryant's coaching debut, Maryland racked up more points 
in their 60-6 win over Guillord than they did in all of the 1944 season. 

'To protest Bryant's decision to leave, students built a huge bonfire 
outside of President Byrd's home and some refused to go to class. Bryant 
himself had to explain to the student body that his new opportunity was 
too good to pass up, and the classrooms were eventually filled once again. 



1947 

'Maryland qualified for their first bowl game, eventually tying Georgia, 
20-20, on New Year's Day in the Gator Bowl at Jacksonville, Florida. 

'Lu Gambino scored 16 touchdowns, a Terp record, in capturing All- 
Southem honors. 



1948 

'Byrd hired William Wilfred Cobey as first full-time graduate business 
manager of athletics to help raise funds to build a new stadium. George 
Carroll was also appointed to the post of sports pubilicity director. 

'The largest crowd to ever see a college football game in Washington, 
34,588, assembled at Griffith Stadium to see the Terps fall to North 
Carolina. 

'All home games were played at Griffith Stadium in Washington. 



1949 

'Sixth-ranked Maryland beat Missouri, 20-7, in the Gator Bowl at Jack- 
sonville. It was the Terps' second Gator Bowl appearance in three years. 

'Tackle Ray Krouse earned All-America honors. 



61 



otagonists 




Head Coach Tom Nugent (1961-1964), who fathered the I- Format ion and who is the only Terrapin head coach to defeat 
Penn State, is pictured with the athletes who made his era significant: End Gary Collins, an All-America; Quarterback 
Dick Shiner, the best passer in the first seven decades of Maryland football; and Darryl Hill, ACC recordholder and the 
first Black football player at Maryland (1963). 



62 



Terpreviews, 1992 




University of Virginia 

Location: Charlottesville, VA 
Enrollment: 18,137 
Conlerence: Atlantic Coast 
Stadium: Scott (42,000) 
Turf: Asttoturf 
Colors: Orange and Blue 
Nickname: Cavaliers, Wahoos 
President: John T. Casteen, HI 
Athletic Director: Jim Copeland 
Series Record: Maryland leads, 37 17-2 
Last Game. 1991, Maryland, 17-6. (At College Park) 
1991 Record: 8 3-1. 4-2-1 ACC (4th) 
(Gator Bowl Participant) 

Head Coach: George Welsh (Navy, 1956) 
Coach's Telephone: (804) 982-6900 
Best Time to Reach: Through Sports Information 
Offensive Formation: Miltiple I 
Defensive Formation: 4-3 
Lettermen Returning: 45 
Lettermen Lost: 23 
Offensive Starters Returning: 9 
Defensive Starters Returning: 7 
Sports Information Director: Rich Murray 
Telephones: (804) 982-5500 (O) 
(804) 978-2966 (H) 
Assistant Sports Information Directors: Angela Manolakas, Michael Colley. Doyle Smith 





George Welsh 



Chris Slade 



1992 Schedule 



Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept 

Sept 

Oct. 

Oct 

Oct 

Oct 

Oct 

Nov 

Nov. 



5 
12 
19 
26 

3 

10 
17 
24 
31 

7 
21 



MARYLAND 
Navy 

GEORGIA TECH 
Duke 

Wake Forest 
CLEMSON 
North Carolina 
WILLIAM & MARY 
FLORIDA STATE 
N.C, STATE 
Virginia Tech 



1991 Results 

6 Maryland 17 

17 NAVY 10 

21 Georgia Tech 24 

34 DUKE 3 

31 KANSAS 19 

20 Clemson 20 

14 NORTH CAROLINA 9 

48 WAKE FOREST 7 

42 VIJIGINIA MILITARY 7 

42 N.C. State 10 

38 Virginia Tech 

14 Oklahoma 48 
(Gator Bowl) 



Maryland leads the series (37 17-2) 



1919 
1925 
1926 
1927 
1928 
1929 
1930 
1931 
1932 
1933 
1934 
1935 
1936 
1937 
1938 
1939 
1940 
1942 
1943 



Won 

Lost 

Tie 

Lost 

Won 

Tie 

Won 

Won 

Lost 

Lost 

Won 

Won 

Won 

Won 

Lost 

Lost 

Lost 

Won 

Lost 



13- 
0- 6 
6- 6 
0-21 

18- 2 
13-1 

14- 
7- 
6- 
0- 

20- 

14- 

21- 
3- 



19-27 
7-12 
6-19 

27-12 
0-39 



1944 
1945 
1957 
1958 
1959 
1960 
1961 
1962 
1963 
1964 
1965 
1966 
1967 
1968 
1969 
1970 
1971 
1972 
1973 



Lost 
Won 
Won 
Won 
Won 
Won 
Lost 
Won 
Won 
Won 
Lost 
Lost 
Lost 
Lost 
Won 
Won 
Lost 
Won 
Won 



7-18 
19-13 
12- 
44- 6 
55-12 
44-12 
16-28 
40-18 
21- 6 
10- 
27-33 
17-41 

7-12 
23-28 
17-14 
17-14 
27-29 
24-23 
33- 



1974 
1975 
1976 
1977 
1978 
1979 
1980 
1981 
1982 
1983 
1984 
1985 
1986 
1987 
1988 
1989 
1990 
1991 



Won 
Won 
Won 
Won 
Won 
Won 
Won 
Won 
Won 
Won 
Won 
Won 
Won 
Won 
Lost 
Lost 
Won 
Won 



10- 
62-24 
28- 
28- 
17- 7 
17- 7 
31- 
48- 7 
45-14 
23- 3 
45-34 
33-21 
42-10 
21-19 
24-23 
21-48 
35-30 
17- 6 




N.C State University 

Location Raleigh. NC 
Enrollment: 26,683 
Conference: Atlantic Coast 
Stadium: Carter-Finley (52,000) 
Turf Natural Grass 
Colors: Red and White 
Nickname Wolfpack 
President Dr Larry K Monteith 
Athletic Director: Todd Turner 
Series Record Maryland leads 23-21-4 
Last Game: 1991, N.C. State, 20-17 (At Raleigh) 
1991 Record: 9-3-0, 5-2-0 ACC (T2nd) 
(Peach Bowl Participant) 



Head Coach: Dick Sheridan (South Carolina, 1964) 
Coach's Telephone: (919)737-2114 
Best Time to Reach 11:30-1:00 p.m Weekdays 
Offensive Formation Option I 
Defensive Formation Fifty 
Lettermen Returning: 58 
Lettermen Lost: 23 
Offensive Starters Returning 6 
Defensive Starters Returning: 9 
Sports Information Director: Mark Bockelman 
Telephones: (919) 515-2102 (O) 
(919) 467-7138 (H) 
Assistant Sports Information Directors: Carter Cheves, Ann Wheelwright 



r. 



fv * 



^N 



I 





Dick Sheridan 



Terry Jordan 



1992 Schedule 

Aug 29 Iowa (Kickoff Classic, 
E. Rutherford, NJ) 

Sept. 5 APPALACHIAN STATE 

Sept. 12 Maryland 

Sept. 19 FLORIDA STATE 

Sept 26 North Carolina 

Oct. 3 Georgia Tech 

Oct. 10 TEXAS TECH 

Oct. 17 Virginia Tech 

Oct 24 CLEMSON 

Nov. 7 Virginia 

Nov. H DUKE 

Nov. 21 WAKE FOREST 



1991 Results 

7 VIRGINIA TECH 

47 KENT STATE 

30 Wake Forest 

24 NORTH CAROLINA 

28 GEORGIA TECH 

15 MARSHALL 

19 Clemson 

38 South Carolina 

10 VIRGINIA 

32 Duke 

20 MARYLAND 
34 East Carolina 

(Peach Bowl) 







3 

7 

21 

14 

29 

21 

42 

31 

17 

37 



Maryland leads the series 23-21-4 



1909 
1917 
1921 
1922 
1923 
1924 
1946 
1947 
1949 
1950 
1951 
1954 
1956 
1957 
1958 
1959 
1960 
1961 
1962 



Lost 

Lost 

Tie 

Won 

Won 

Tie 

Lost 

Tie 

Won 

Lost 

Won 

Won 

Won 

Lost 

Won 

Won 

Lost 

Won 

Won 



0-31 
6-10 

6- 6 

7- 6 
26-12 

0- 
7-28 
0- 
14- 6 
13-16 
53- 
42-14 
25-14 
13-48 
21- 6 
33-28 
10-13 
10- 7 
14- 6 



1963 
1964 
1965 
1966 
1967 
1968 
1969 
1970 
1971 
1972 
1973 
1974 
1975 
1976 
1977 
1978 
1979 
1980 
1981 



Lost 

Lost 

Lost 

Lost 

Lost 

Lost 

Lost 

Lost 

Won 

Tie 

Lost 

Won 

Won 

Won 

Lost 

Won 

Lost 

Won 

Won 



14-36 
13-14 

7-29 
21-24 

9-31 
11-31 

7-24 

0- 6 
35- 7 
24-24 
22-24 
20-10 
37-22 
16- 6 
20-24 
31- 7 

0- 7 
24- 
34- 9 



1982 
1983 
1984 
1985 
1986 
1987 
1988 
1989 
1990 
1991 



Won 
Won 
Won 
Won 
Lost 
Lost 
Won 
Lost 
Won 
Lost 



23- 6 
29- 6 
44-21 
31-17 
16-28 
14-22 
30-26 
6-10 
13-12 
20-17 



63 



reviews, 1992 



West Virginia 



^ 



Location: Morgantown, WV 

Enrollment: 20,854 

Conference: Big East 

Stadium: Mountaineer Stadium (63,500) 

Turf: OmniTurf 

Colors: Old Gold and Blue 

Nickname: Mountaineers 

President: Dr. Neil Bucklew 

Athletic Director: Ed Pastilong 

Series Record: Maryland leads 14-13-2 

Last Game: 1991, West Virginia, 37-7 (At College Park) 

1991 Record: 6-5 

Head Coach: Don Nehlen (Bowling Green, 1958) 
Coach's Telephone: (304) 293-4194 
Best Time to Reach: Through Sports Information 
Offensive Formation: Multiple 
Defensive Formation: 3-4 
Lettermen Returning: 41 
Lettennen Lost: 15 
Offensive Starters Returning: 7 
Defensive Starters Returning: 5 
Sports Information Director: Shelly Poe 
Telephones: (304) 293-2821 (O) 
(304) 599-7259 (H) 
Assistant Sports Information Directors: Kevin Keys, John Antonik, Michael Fragale 





Don Nehlen 



Adrian Murrell 



1992 Schedule 



1991 Results 



Sept. 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Oct 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Nov. 



5 
12 
19 

3 
10 
17 
24 
31 

7 
14 
21 



MIAMI (OH) 
at Miami (FL) 
MARYLAND 
Virginia Tech 
BOSTON COLLEGE 
Pittsburgh 
PENN STATE 
SYRACUSE 
EAST CAROLINA 
at Rutgers 
LOUISIANA TECH 



3 

24 
21 
37 
14 
10 
31 

6 
28 

3 
10 



PITTSBURGH 
BOWLING GREEN 
SOUTH CAROLINA 
Maryland 
VIRGINIA TECH 
TEMPLE 
Boston College 
Perm State 
RUTGERS 
Miami (Fl) 
Syracuse 



34 
17 
16 

7 
20 

9 

24 
51 

3 

27 
16 



Maryland leads the series (14-13-2) 



1919 
1943 
1944 
1945 
1947 
1948 
1949 
1950 
1951 
1959 
1960 
1966 
1969 
1970 
1973 



Lost 

Lost 

Tie 

Tie 

Won 

Lost 

Won 

Won 

Won 

Won 

Won 

Won 

Lost 

Lost 

Lost 



0-27 
2- 6 
6- 6 
13-13 
27- 
14-16 
47- 7 



41- 
54- 7 

27- 7 
31- 8 

28- 9 
7-31 

10-20 
13-20 



1976 Won 

1977 Lost 

1980 Won 

1981 Lost 

1982 Lost 

1983 Lost 

1984 Won 

1985 Won 

1986 Won 

1987 Won 

1988 Lost 

1989 Lost 

1990 Won 

1991 Lost 



24- 3 
16-24 
14-11 
13-17 
18-19 
21-31 
20-17 
28- 
24- 3 
25-20 
55-24 
10-14 
14-10 
37- 7 




Penn State University 

Location: University Park, PA 

Enrollment: 30,500 

Conference: Big 10 (1993) 

Stadium: Beaver Stadium (93,176) 

Turf: Natural Grass 

Colors: Blue & White 

Nickname: Nittany Lions 

President: Dr Joab Thomas 

Director of Athletics: James I Tarman 

Series Record: Penn State Leads 33-1-1 

Last Game: 1991. Penn State, 47-7 (At Baltimore) 

1991 Record: 11-2 

(Fiesta Bowl Champions) 

Head Coach: Joe Patemo 
Coach's Telephone: (814)865-0411 
Best Time to Reach: Tuesday Press Conference, 12 30 
Offensive Formation: Multiple 
Defensive Formation: Multiple 
Letterman Returning: 37 
Letterman Lost: 28 
Offensive Starters Returning: 4 
Defensive Starters Returning: 7 
Sports Information Director: L. Budd Thalman 
Telephones: (814) 865-1757 (O) 
(814) 231-8105 (H) 
Assistant Sports Information Directors: Mary Jo Haverbeck, Jeff Brewer, Jim Caltagirone 





Joe Patemo 



O.J. McDuffie 



1992 Schedule 

Sept. 5 Cincinnati 

Sept. 12 TEMPLE 

Sept. 19 EASTERN MICHIGAN 

Sept. 26 MARYLAND 

Oct. 3 Rutgers (at Giants Stadium) 

Oct. io MIAMI (FL) 

Oct. 17 BOSTON COLLEGE 

Oct. 24 West Virginia 

Oct 3i Brigham Young 

Nov 14 Notre Dame 

Nov. 21 PITTSBURGH 



1991 Results 



34 


Georgia Tech 


81 


CINCINNATI 


10 


Southern California 


33 


BRIGHAM YOUNG 


28 


BOSTON COLLEGE 


24 


Temple 


20 


Miami (FL) 


37 


RUTGERS 


51 


WEST VIRGINIA 


47 


Maryland 


35 


NOTRE DAME 


32 


Pittsburgh 


42 


Tennessee 




(Fiesta Bowl) 



22 



21 

7 

21 

7 

26 
17 
6 
7 
13 
20 
17 



Penn State Leads the Series 3311 



1917 


Lost 


0-57 


1937 


Lost 


14-21 


1938 


Lost 


0-33 


1939 


Lost 


0-12 


1943 


Lost 


0-45 


1944 


Lost 


19-34 


1960 


Lost 


9-28 


1961 


Won 


21-17 


1962 


Lost 


7-23 


1963 


Lost 


15-17 


1964 


Lost 


9-17 


1965 


Lost 


7-19 


1966 


Lost 


7-15 


1967 


Lost 


3-38 


1968 


Lost 


13-57 


1969 


Lost 


0-48 


1970 


Lost 


0-34 


1971 


Lost 


27-63 



1972 
1973 
1974 
1975 
1977 
1978 
1979 
1980 
1982 
1984 
1985 
1986 
1987 
1988 
1989 
1990 
1991 



Lost 

Lost 

Lost 

Lost 

Lost 

Lost 

Lost 

Lost 

Lost 

Lost 

Lost 

Lost 

Lost 

Lost 

Tie 

Lost 

Lost 



16-46 

22-42 

17-24 

13-15 

9-27 

3-27 

7-27 

10-24 

31-39 

24-25 

18-20 

15-17 

16-21 

10-17 

13-13 

10-24 

7-47 



64 



Terpreviews, 1992 



University of Pittsburgh 

Location: Pittsburgh PA 

Enrollment: 13,500 

Conference: Big East 

Stadium: Pitt Stadium (56.500) 

Turf: Astroturf 

Colors: Blue and Gold 

Nickname: Panthers 

President: Dr. J. Dennis O'Conner 

Director ol Athletics : L Oval Javnes 

Series Record: Pittsburgh leads 3-2 

Last Game: 1991, Pittsburgh, 24 20 (At Pittsburgh) 

1991 Record: 6-5 



Head Coach: Paul Hackett (California-Davis, 1969) 
Coach's Telephone: (412)648-8711 
Best Time to Reach: Through Sports Information 
Offensive Formation: Multiple Pro 
Defensive Formation: Multiple, 3-4 Base 
Letterman Returning: 39 
Letterman Lost: 28 
Offensive Starters Returning: 5 
Defensive Starters Returning: 6 
Sports Information Director: Larry Eldndge, Jr 
Telephones: (412) 648-8240 (O) 
(412) 243-2458 (H) 
Assistant Sports Information Directors: Ron Wahl, Sam Sciullo, Jr 







Paul Hackett 


1992 Schedule 


Sept 


5 


KENT STATE 


Sept, 


12 


WEST VIRGINIA 


Sept 


17 


at Rutgers 


Sept. 


26 


MINNESOTA 


Oct 


3 


at Maryland 


Oct 


10 


NOTRE DAME 


Oct 


17 


at Temple 


On. 


24 


EAST CAROLINA 


Oct 


31 


at Syracuse 


Nov 


14 


LOUISVILLE 


Nov 


21 


at Perm State 


Dec. 


5 


at Hawaii 




1991 Results 

34 West Virginia 3 

35 SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI 14 

26 TEMPLE 7 
14 Minnesota 13 
24 MARYLAND 20 

7 Notre Dame 42 

27 SYRACUSE 31 
23 at East Carolina 24 
12 Boston College 38 
22 RUTGERS 17 
20 PENN STATE 32 



Pittsburgh Leads the Series 3-2 



1912 


Lost 


0-64 


1980 


Lost 


9-38 


1983 


Won 


13- 7 


1986 


Won 


10- 7 


1991 


Lost 


20-24 



Georgia Tech 




Location: Atlanta, GA 

Enrollment: 12.000 

Conference: Atlantic Coast 

Stadium: Bobby Dodd Stadium/Grant Field (46,000) 

Turf: All-Pro Turf 

Colors: Old Gold and White 

Nickname: Yellow Jackets. Rambling Wreck 

President: Dr. John P. Cercine 

Athletic Director: Homer Rice 

Series Record: Georgia Tech Leads 3-1 

Last Game: 1991. Georgia Tech, 3410 (At Atlanta) 

1991 Record: 8-5. 5-2 ACC (T2nd) 

(Aloha Bowl Champions) 

Head Coach: Bill Lewis 
Coach's Telephone: (404) 894-5419 
Best Time to Reach: Weekday Mornings 
Offensive Formation: Multiple 
Defensive Formation: Shade-50 
Lettermen Returning: 54 
Lettermen Lost: 19 
Offensive Starters Returning: 3 
Defensive Starters Returning: 6 
Specialists: 2 

Sports Information Director: Mike Finn 
Telephones: (404) 894-5445 (O) 
(404) 938-9910 (H) 
Assistant Sports Information Directors: Mike Stamus, Allison George, Ten Washington 




Jj 


fr - 


^ 


""j 



Bill Lewis 



Shawn Jones 



1992 Schedule 



Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Nov. 
Nov. 
Nov. 



12 
19 
26 

3 

10 
17 
24 
31 

7 
14 
28 



WESTERN CAROLINA 

Virginia 

CLEMSON 

N.C. STATE 

Maryland 

FLORIDA STATE 

Georgia Tech 

DUKE 

Baylor 

WAKE FOREST 

Georgia 



1991 Results 

22 Penn State 34 

30 Boston College 14 

24 VIRGINIA 21 

7 Clemson 9 

21 N.C. State 28 

34 MARYLAND 10 

14 South Carolina 23 

35 NORTH CAROLINA 14 

17 Duke 6 
19 FURMAN 17 
27 WAKE FOREST 3 

15 GEORGIA 18 

18 Stanford 17 
(Aloha Bowl) 



Georgia Tech Leads the Series (3-1) 



1988 


Won 


13- 8 


1989 


Lost 


24-28 


1990 


Lost 


3-31 


1991 


Lost 


10-34 



65 



Terpre views, 1992 




Wake Forest University 

Location: Winston-Salem, NC 

Enrollment: 3,400 

Conference: Atlantic Coast 

Stadium: Groves (31.500) 

Turf: Natural Grass 

Colors: Old Gold and Black 

Nickname: Demon Deacons 

President: Dr. Thomas K. Heam, Jr. 

Athletic Director: Dr. Gene Hooks 

Series Record: Maryland leads, 29-10-1 

Last Game: 1991, Maryland 23-22 (at Wake Forest) 

1991 Record: 3-8-0, 1-6 ACC (T7th) 



Head Coach: Bill Dooley (Mississippi State. 1966) 
Coach's Telephone: (919) 759-5631 
Best Time to Reach: 11:30 am, Mon-Thurs. 
Offensive Formation: I-Formation 
Defensive Formation: 52 
Letterman Returning: 44 
Letterman Lost: 20 
Offensive Starters Returning: 8 
Defensive Starters Returning: 7 
Sports Information Director: John Justus 
Telephones: (919) 759-5640 (O) 
(919) 722-1094 (H) 
Assistant Sports Information Directors: Dan Zacharias, Julie McClung 





Bill Dooley 



Maurice Miller 



1992 Schedule 

Sept. 5 NORTH CAROLINA 

Sept. 12 APPALACHIAN STATE 

Sept. 26 Florida State 

Oct. 3 VIRGINIA 

Oct. 10 Vanderbilt 

Oct. n Maryland 

Oct. 24 ARMY 

Oct. 31 CLEMSON 

Nov 7 Duke 

Nov. 14 Georgia Tech 

Nov. 21 N.C. State 



1991 Results 

40 WESTERN CAROLINA 24 

3 N.C. STATE 30 

14 Northwestern 41 

3 APPALACHAIN STATE 17 

10 North Carolina 24 

22 MARYLAND 23 

7 Virginia 48 

10 Clemson 28 

31 DUKE 14 

3 Georgia Tech 27 

52 Navy 24 



Maryland leads the series (29-10-1) 



1917 
1943 
1944 
1954 
1955 
1956 
1957 
1958 
1959 
1960 
1961 
1962 
1963 
1964 



Won 
Won 
Lost 
Tied 
Won 
Won 
Won 
Lost 
Lost 
Won 
Won 
Won 
Won 
Lost 



29-12 
13- 7 

0-39 
13-13 
28- 7 

6- 
27- 

0-34 

7-10 
14-13 
10- 7 
13- 2 
32- 
17-21 



1965 
1966 
1967 
1968 
1969 
1971 
1972 
1973 
1974 
1975 
1976 
1977 
1978 
1979 



Won 
Won 
Lost 
Lost 
Won 
Lost 
Won 
Won 
Won 
Won 
Won 
Won 
Won 
Lost 



10- 7 

34- 7 
17-35 
14-38 
19-13 
14-18 
23- 
37- 
47- 
27- 
17-15 

35- 7 
39- 
17-25 



1980 
1981 
1982 
1983 
1984 
1985 
1986 
1987 
1988 
1989 
1990 
1991 



Won 
Won 
Won 
Won 
Won 
Won 
Lost 
Won 
Lost 
Won 
Won 
Won 



11-10 
45-33 
52-31 
36-33 
38-17 

26- 3 
21-27 
14- 
27-24 

27- 7 
41-13 
23-22 



Duke University 

Location: Durham, NC 
Enrollment: 6.300 
Conference: Atlantic Coast 
Stadium: Wallace Wade (33,941) 
Turf: Natural Grass 
Colors: Royal Blus and White 
Nickname: Blue Devils 
President: H Keith H. Brodie, MD 
Athletic Director: Tom Butters 
Series Record: Maryland leads, 19-16 
1991 Record: 4-6-1, 1-6 ACC (T7th) 

Head Coach: Barry Wilson (Georgia, 1965) 
Coach's Telephone: 1919) 684-2635 
Best Time to Reach: Mornings 
Offensive Formation: Multiple 
Defensive Formation: 4-3 
Lettermen Returning: 38 
Lettermen Lost: 23 
Offensive Starters Returning: 5 
Defensive Starters Returning: 5 
Specialists Returning: 2 
Sports Information Director: Mike Cragg 
Telephones: (919) 684-2633 (O) 
(919) 544-0259 (H) 
Assistant Sports Information Director: Warren Miller 






Barry Wilson 



Dartell Spells 



1992 Schedule 


1991 Results 




Sept. 


5 


Florida State 


24 


South Carolina 


24 


Sept. 


12 


Vanderbilt 


42 


RUTGERS 


22 


Sept. 


18 


RICE 


42 


COLGATE 


14 


Sept. 


26 


VIRGINIA 


3 


Virginia 


34 


Oct. 


10 


EAST CAROLINA 


17 


VANDERBILT 


13 


Oct. 


17 


Clemson 


17 


Maryland 


13 


Oct 


24 


MARYLAND 


6 


GEORGIA TECH 


17 


Oct. 


31 


Georgia Tech 


14 


Wake Forest 


31 


Nov. 


7 


WAKE FOREST 


31 


N.C. STATE 


32 


Nov. 


14 


N.C. State 


14 


North Carolina 


47 


Nov. 


21 


NORTH CAROLINA 


21 


Clemson 


33 






Maryland leads the series (19-16) 





1932 
1933 
1941 
1942 
1947 
1948 
1950 
1957 
1960 
1962 
1963 
1964 
1966 
1968 



Lost 
Lost 
Lost 
Lost 
Lost 
Lost 
Won 
Lost 
Lost 
Lost 
Lost 
Lost 
Won 
Lost 



-34 
-38 
-50 
-42 
-19 
-13 
-14 
-14 
-20 
-10 
-24 
-24 
-19 
-30 



1969 
1970 
1972 
1973 
1974 
1976 
1977 
1978 
1979 
1980 
1981 
1982 
1983 
1984 



Won 
Lost 
Lost 
Won 
Won 
Won 
Won 
Won 
Won 
Won 
Won 
Won 
Won 
Won 



20- 7 
12-13 
14-20 



1985 Won 

1986 Won 

1987 Won 

1988 Won 

1989 Lost 

1990 Won 

1991 Lost 



40-10 
27-19 
23-22 
34-24 
25-46 
23-20 
13-17 



43- 7 



66 



Terpreviews, 1992 




University of North Carolina 

Location: Chapel HiU, NC 

Enrollment: 23,852 

Conference: Atlantic Coast 

Stadium: Kenan Memorial (62,000) 

Turf: Natural Grass 

Colors: Carolina Blue & White 

Nickname: Tar Heels 

President: Paul Hardin 

Athletic Director: John Swofford 

Series Record: North Carolina leads, 28-25-1 

Last Game: North Carolina, 24-0 (At Chapel Hill) 

1991 Record: 7-4-0, 3-4 ACC (5th) 

Head Coach: Mack Brown (Florida State, 1974) 
Coach's Telephone: (919) 966-2575 
Best Time to Reach: 
Offensive Formation: Multiple - 1 
Defensive Formation: Multiple 50 
Lettermen Returning: 46 
Lettermen Lost: 17 
Offensive Starters Returning: 6 
Defensive Starters Returning: 8 
Sports Information Director: Rick Brewer 
Telephones: (919) 962-2123 (O) 
(919) 929-2721 (H) 
Assistant Sports Information Directors: Dave Lohse (Associate), Steve Kirschner, 
Shen West 





Mack Brown 



Tommy Thigpen 



1992 Schedule 



Sept. 

Sept, 

Sept. 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Del 

Nov. 

Nov. 



5 
12 
19 
26 

3 

10 
17 
24 
31 

7 
21 



Wake Forest 

FURMAN 

ARMY 

NC. STATE 

NAVY 

Florida State 

VIRGINIA 

GEORGIA TECH 

Maryland 

Clemson 

Duke 



1991 Results 

51 CINCINNATI 16 

20 Army 12 
7 NC. State 24 

59 WILLIAM & MARY 36 

24 WAKE FOREST 10 

9 Virginia 14 

14 Georgra Tech 35 

24 MARYLAND 

6 Clemson 21 

21 SOUTH CAROLINA 17 
47 DUKE 14 



JVorth Carolina leads the series (28-25-1) 



1899 
1920 
1921 
1922 
1923 
1924 
1925 
1926 
1927 
1928 
1929 
1930 
1935 
1936 
1946 
1947 
1948 
1950 



Lost 
Won 
Lost 
Lost 
Won 
Won 
Lost 
Won 
Lost 
Lost 
Lost 
Lost 
Lost 
Lost 
Lost 
Lost 
Lost 
Tie 



0- 6 

13- 
7-1 6 

3-27 

14- 
6- 
0-16 

14- 6 

6- 7 
19-26 

0-43 
21-28 
0-33 
0-14 
0-33 
0-19 
20-49 

7- 7 



1952 
1953 
1954 
1955 
1956 
1957 
1958 
1959 
1960 
1961 
1962 
1963 
1964 
1965 
1967 
1968 
1971 
1972 



Won 
Won 
Won 
Won 
Lost 
Won 
Lost 

Won 
Won 
Lost 
Won 
Lost 
Won 
Lost 
Lost 
Won 
Lost 
Lost 



14- 7 
26- 
33- 
25- 7 

6-34 
21- 7 

0-27 
14- 7 
22-19 

8-14 
31-13 

7-14 
10- 9 
10-12 

0-14 
33-24 
14-35 
26-31 



1973 
1974 
1975 
1977 
1978 
1979 
1980 
1981 
1982 
1983 
1984 
1985 
1986 
1987 
1988 
1989 
1990 
1991 



Won 
Won 
Won 
Lost 
Won 
Won 
Lost 
Lost 
Won 
Won 
Won 
Won 
Lost 
Lost 
Won 
Won 
Lost 
Lost 



23- 3 
24-12 
34- 7 

7-16 
21-20 
17-14 

3-17 
10-17 
31-24 
28-26 
34-23 
28-10 
30-32 
14-27 
41-38 
38- 
34-10 

0-24 




Florida State University 

Location: Tallahassee, FL 

Enrollment: 29.000 

Conference: Atlantic Coast 

Stadium: Doak S. Campbell (60,519) 

Turf: Natural Grass 

Colors: Garnet & Gold 

Nickname: Seminoles 

President: Dr. Dale W. Lick 

Athletic Director: Bob Goin 

Series Record: Florida State Leads, 2-0-0 

Last Game: 1968, Florida State, 24-14 (At College Park) 

1991 Record: 11-2 

(Cotton Bowl Champions) 

Head Coach: Bobby Bowden (Samford, 1953) 
Coach's Telephone: (904)6441465 
Best Time to Reach: M-T, 11 am • 1 pm 
Offensive Formation: Pro-Set 
Defensive Formation: 5-2 
Lettermen Returning: 47 
Lettermen Lost: 17 
Offensive Starters Returning: 5 
Defensive Starters Returning: 5 
Sports Information Director: Wayne Hogan 
Telephones: (904) 644-1402 (O) 
(904) 562-4827 (H) 
Assistant Sports Information Directors: Rob Wilson, Donna Turner, Kim McWilliams 





Bobby Bowden 



Marvin Jones 



1992 Schedule 



1991 Results 



Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Nov. 
Nov. 
Nov. 



5 
12 
19 
26 

3 
10 
17 
30 

7 
14 
28 



DUKE 

Clemson 

N.C. State 

WAKE FOREST 

Miami 

NORTH CAROLINA 

AT Georgia Tech 

at Virginia 

MARYLAND 

TULANE 

FLORIDA 



44 
38 
58 
51 
46 
33 
39 
27 
40 
38 
16 
9 
10 



Brigham Young 

TULANE 

WESTERN MICHIGAN 

Michigan 

SYRACUSE 



Virginia Tech (at Orlando, FL) 20 

MIDDLE TENNESSEE ST. 10 

Louisiana State 16 

Louisville 15 

SOUTH CAROLINA 10 

MIAMI 17 

Florida 14 

Texas A&M (Cotton Bowl) 2 



Florida State leads the series 2-0-0 



1966 
1968 



Lost 
Lost 



21-45 
14-24 



67 



reviews, 1992 







Clemson University 

Location: Clemson, SC 
Enrollment: 17,295 
Conference: Atlantic Coast 
Stadium: Clemson Memorial (79,854) 
Turf: Natural Grass 
Colors: Orange & Purple 
Nickname: Tigers 
President: Dr. Max Lennon 
Athletic Director: Bobby Robinson 
Series Record: The series is tied, 19-19-2 
Last Game: 1991, Clemson, 7-40 (at Clemson) 
1991 Record: 9-2-1 Overall, 6-0-1 ACC (1st) 

Head Coach: Ken Hatfield (Arkansas, 1965) 
Coach's Telephone: (803) 656-2101 
Best Time to Reach: Mon. and Wed. at 130 a.m. 
Offensive Formation: I-Formation 
Defensive Formation: 5-2 
Letterman Returning: 26 
Letterman Lost: 42 
Offensive Starters Returning: 6 
Defensive Starters Returning: 6 
Sports Information Director: Tom Bourret 
Telephones: (803)656-2114(0) 
(803) 654-6240 (H) 
Assistant Sports Information Directors: Bob Bradley. Sam Blackman, Annabelle Vaughan 





Ken Hatfield 



Robert O'Neill 



1992 Schedule 


1991 Results 




Sept. 


5 


BALL STATE 


34 


APPALACHIAN STATE 





Sept. 


12 


FLORIDA STATE 


37 


TEMPLE 


7 


Sept. 


26 


Georgia Tech 


9 


GEORGIA TECH 


7 


Oct. 


3 


TENNESSEE-CHATTANOOGA 


12 


Georgia 


27 


Oct. 


10 


Virginia 


29 


N.C. STATE 


19 


Oct. 


17 


DUKE 


28 


WAKE FOREST 


10 


Oct. 


24 


N.C. State 


21 


North Carolina 


6 


Oct. 


31 


Wake Forest 


40 


MARYLAND 


7 


Nov. 


7 


NORTH CAROLINA 


41 


South Carolina 


24 


Nov. 


14 


Maryland 


31 


Duke 


21 


Nov. 


21 


SOUTH CAROLINA 


13 


California 
(Citrus Bowl) 


37 



The series is Tied (19-19-2) 



1952 


Won 


28- 


1972 


Won 


31- 6 


1953 


Won 


20- 


1973 


Won 


28-13 


1954 


Won 


16- 


1974 


Won 


41- 


1955 


Won 


25-12 


1975 


Won 


22-20 


1956 


Tie 


6- 6 


1976 


Won 


20- 


1957 


Lost 


7-26 


1977 


Won 


21-14 


1958 


Lost 


0- 8 


1978 


Lost 


24-28 


1959 


Won 


28-25 


1979 


Won 


19- 


1960 


Won 


19-17 


1980 


Won 


34- 7 


1961 


Won 


24-21 


1981 


Lost 


7-21 


1962 


Lost 


14-17 


1982 


Lost 


22-24 


1963 


Lost 


6-21 


1983 


Lost 


27-52 


1964 


Won 


34- 


1984 


Won 


41-23 


1965 


Won 


6- 


1985 


Won 


34-31 


1966 


Lost 


10-14 


1986 


Tie 


17-17 


1967 


Lost 


7-28 


1987 


Lost 


16-45 


1968 


Lost 


0-16 


1988 


Lost 


49-25 


1969 


Lost 


0-40 


1989 


Lost 


7-31 


1970 


Lost 


11-24 


1990 


Lost 


17-18 


1971 


Lost 


14-20 


1991 


Lost 


7-40 



68 



The University at College Park 




Jltfii' C(Mto!i- C( 



PADKM). 00^1919 



The 1919 team was the last, and one of only four teams, to wear the name, Maryland State College. Below is the College 
Park skyline of today, including Cole Field House (upper left) and Byrd Stadium with its new press box (upper middle). 




69 



ersity at College Park 



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1<| 





Welcome to 
Maryland 

These are great days at the 
University of Maryland at 
College Park. The university, 
through an act of the state leg- 
islature, has been designated 
officially as the state's flagship 
campus with a mandate to be- 
come one of the nation's leading 
public universities. The effect of 
that mandate is for individuals 
from all corners of the university 
to aspire toward excellence, to 
think great thoughts and to 
become immersed in an educa- 
tional enterprise of the highest 
caliber. There is an unmistak- 
able momentum for change and 
a sense of heightened expecta- 
tion at College Park - Maryland 
is choosing quality. 

The faculty have enthusiasti- 
cally endorsed a new general 
education program that began 
in the fall of 1990. It is a blue- 
print for comprehensive 
changes in the undergraduate 
experience at Maryland. The 
campus is reducing its under- 
graduate enrollment, improving 
the ratio between faculty and 
students, raising admissions 
standards, revamping the 
University Honors Program, 
strengthening the advising 
system, supporting expanded 
undergraduate research, and 
encouraging innovations in 
teaching. 

A new language house has 
opened where student residents 
have direct satellite access to 



foreign language television 
broadcasts from the USSR, Latin 
America, Italy and Japan, and 
where, in a total immersion 
setting, they have pledged to 
speak their chosen language at 
all times. A new honors house, 
a stimulating livmg-and-learning 
center for undergraduates 
taking part in the University 
Honors Program, will open in 
1992. An international house, a 
living-learning environment that 
will meet the growing needs of 
the diverse international popula- 
tion on campus, is in the works. 

Our location adds to the 
excitement on campus, too. Few 
regions in the nation have the 
intellectual, cultural and physi- 
cal resources to compare with 
those in the Baltimore- 
Washington, D.C. corridor. 
College Park's location astride 
that corridor means that Mary- 
land undergraduates may tap 
these resources to their fullest 
- through internships, research 
projects, cooperative work-study 
and other programs offering 
hands-on experience. 

We invite you to take a 
closer look at the University of 
Maryland, its extensive 
academic programs, faculty, 
research facilities, student activ- 
ities and support services and 
the resources and opportunities 
it offers. See for yourself the 
number of different ways in 
which Maryland is choosing 
quality. There has never been a 
better time to choose Maryland. 




70 



The University at College Park 



History 

Just after the American 
Revolution, the state of Mary- 
land established its first two 
colleges at Chestertown and 
Annapolis. By the 1850s, at 
least thirty little colleges had 
sprung up over the state, many 
with state support, but many of 
them disappearing within a few 
years. Then, in 1859 a different 
kind of institution appeared at 
College Park -the Maryland 
Agricultural College, the third 
such college in the world, cre- 
ated mainly for farmers' sons. 
The college was established by 
Charles Benedict Calvert, a 
wealthy planter from nearby 
Riversdale-now Riverdale-and 
later a congressman. Calvert 
built a handsome Gothic dormi- 
tory-classroom structure lo- 
cated in a grove of trees near 
the present Morrill Hall, and he 
divided the land down to the 
Baltimore-Washington Turnpike 
into small plots where each of 
the 50-or-so students experi- 
mented with, a different agricul- 
tural crop. After the Civil War 
the institution became a land- 
grant college, with small appro- 
priations from Washington. The 
little college began to grow 
about 1900 when agricultural 
experiments began to bring 
prosperity to Maryland, and 
when the college expanded its 
offerings into engineering, 
businness and the liberal arts. 
In 1912 the old Gothrc building 
burned, and the state provided 
modern structures. Women 
were admitted to the campus, 
and graduate work began. In 
1920 the college combined with 
the long-established 
professional schools of Balti- 
more and changed its name to 
the University of Maryland. 
Growth accelerated after 1935 
when the politically astute foot- 
ball coach, H.C. 'Curley' Byrd 
became president, added scores 
of new programs, and won na- 
tional football championships. In 
the 1950s and 1960s, President 
Wilson H. Elkrns maintained the 
rapid growth, and College Park 
became one of the largest cam- 
puses in the nation. President 
Elkms, a Rhodes Scholar, trans- 
formed the institution's public 
image from that of a party 
school to one of academic 




71 



The University at College Park 



integrity. In the 1970s and 1980s, 
the university's graduate and 
research programs flourished. In 
1988, the General Assembly of 
Maryland combined six state 
colleges with the five campuses 
of the University of Maryland, 
and specifically charged College 
Park with the role of leadership. 
The University of Maryland at 
College Park recognizes its 
special responsibility as the 
flagship and the largest of the 
eleven institutions within the 
statewide university system 
to lead the University of 
Maryland's quest for excellence. 
To this end, College Park offers 
broad coverage in the traditional 
arts and sciences as well as in a 
wide range of professional and 
pre-professional programs. The 
institution is organized into 
fourteen colleges and schools 
encompassing over 100 depart- 
ments and campus-wide pro- 
grams of study. A growing num- 
ber of these departments and 
programs rank among the best 
in the nation. Today the Univer- 
sity of Maryland at College Park 
stands, by any measure, as one 
of the leading institutions of 
higher education in the world. 






The University at College Park 



Locale 

The state of Maryland is unri- 
valled in its scenic beauty, its 
rich heritage, and its wealth of 
educational, recreational, and 
cultural opportunities. From the 
mountain passes of Garrett 
County in the west, to the sand 
dunes of Assateague Island on 
the Eastern Shore, and the 
cosmopolitan excitement of 
Baltimore and Washington, DC, 
there is an unparalleled variety 
of experiences and resources 
available to students at the 
university. 

Nine miles from the nation's 
capital, the University of Mary- 
land at College Park is within 
easy reach of the country's best 
research facilities. The Library 
of Congress, the National 
Archives (whose new facility is 
being constructed adjacent to 
the campus), the Smithsonian 
Institution and the National 
Libraries of Agriculture and 
Medicine are among the many 
unique resources in the area. 

In addition to traditional 
scholarly resources, the campus 
is surrounded by the dynamic 
cultural opportunities that only a 
major metropolitan area can 
provide. The Kennedy Center 
alone houses the National 
Symphony Orchestra, five per- 
formance stages, an opera 
company, and the American 
Film Institute. 

In Baltimore, one of the great 
ports of the world, a recent and 
remarkable renaissance has 



added the glistening touch of 
office towers and hotels to the 
quaint shops and ethnic restau- 
rants of its many colorful neigh- 
borhoods. Harborplace and the 
National Aquarium anchor the 
Inner Harbor, which has 
become a cultural magnet for 
thousands of tourists each year. 

The Chesapeake Bay 
accounts for nearly 20 percent 
of Maryland's acreage, and is a 
focal point for the serious study 
of estuanne ecology as well as 
a recreational treasure. It is the 
source of Maryland's famed 
crabs and other seafood 
specialties, and a refuge for 
many species of water fowl. 

Not far from any point in the 
state is evidence of the 
burgeoning development which 
has made Maryland a model for 
economic growth and fiscal 
health. High tech, engineering, 
and service industries thrive in 
proximity to the campus, 
offering a wide spectrum of 
opportunities for work-study or 
internships for students and 
career choices for graduates. 

The University of Maryland 
at College Park, as the flagship 
campus of the state higher 
education system, is a vital part 
of Maryland's current prosperity 
and its vision for the future. For 
students here, the state offers a 
bounteous extension to the 
campus's own wealth of 
opportunity. 









• fc^jssK 








73 



resident 



University President 
William E. Kirwan 

After more than 25 years of 
service as a professor and ad- 
ministrator at the University of 
Maryland at College Park, Dr. 
William E. Kirwan was 
appointed president on February 
1, 1989. He served as acting 
president of the university from 
August 1, 1988, until the time of 
his appointment as president. 

Dr. Kirwan joined the univer- 
sity in 1964 as an assistant 
professor of mathematics. He 
rose through the faculty ranks 
as associate professor (1968- 
1972), professor (1972-present), 
amd chair of the Department of 
Mathematics (1977-1981). 

In 1981, he was appointed 
vice chancellor for academic 
affairs, College Park's chief 
academic post. From August to 
November 1982, Dr. Kirwan 
served as acting chancellor, 



returning to his position as vice 
chancellor upon the arrival of the 
new chancellor. As Vice 
Chancellor, Dr. Kirwan raised 
admission standards, increased 
the number of merit scholarships 
and graduate fellowships, and 
established an academic plan- 
ning process. 

Dr. Kirwan is a member of 
numerous honorary and profes- 
sional societies, including Phi 
Beta Kappa, the American 
Mathematical Society, and the 
Mathematical Association of 
America. Recently, he was in- 
ducted into the Order of King 
Leopold II by the Belgian gov- 
ernment and into the University 
of Kentucky Hall of 
Distinguished Alumni. Dr. 
Kirwan is the co-editor of the 
book Advances in Complex 
Analysis, and the author of 
many published articles on 
mathematical research. He 
served as editor of the 
Proceedings of the American 
Mathematical Society from 1977 
to 1985. He chaired the 



Board Of Regents 

George V. McGowan 
Chair 

Queen Anne's County 

Margaret Alton 

Baltimore City 

The Honorable Mary Arabian 

Baltimore City 

Richard 0. Bemdt 

Baltimore City 

Roger Blunt 
Vice-Chair 

Montgomery County 

The Honorable Benjamin L. Brown 

Baltimore City 

Charles W. Cole, Jr. 

Baltimore County 

Earle Palmer Brown 

Montgomery County 

Frank A. Gunther 

Baltimore City 

Dona M. Hogan 

Frederick County 

Anne R. Hull 

Prince George's County 

Henry R. Lord 

Baltimore County 

Franklin P. Perdue 

Wicomico County 

Constance M. Unseld 
Assistant Secretary 

Baltimore County 



Robert L. Walker 

Anne Arundel County 

Albert N. Whiting 

Howard County 

Margaret B. Woodhull 

Baltimore County 

System Administration 

Dr. Donald N. Langenberg 

Chancellor 

John K. Martin 

Wee Chancellor tor Advancement 

Dr. George L. Marx 

Interim Vice Chancellor for 
Academic Affairs 

Donald L. Myers 

Vice Chancellor for General 
Administration 

College Park Campus 

Dr. William E. Kirwan 

President 

Dr. Jacob K. Goldhaber 

Acting Vice President lor Academic 

Affairs and Provost 

Charles F. Sturtz 

Vice President for Administrative 

Affairs 

Dr. Kathryn Costello 

Vice President for Institutional 
Advancement 

Dr. William L. Thomas, Jr. 

Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs 




Mathematical Sciences in the 
Year 2000 Committee, a task 
force created by the National 
Research Council to improve 
mathematics education at 
the nation's colleges and 
universities during the next 
decade. 

He is a member of the Board 
of Directors of the World Trade 
Center Institute, the Baltimore 
Council on Foreign Affairs, and 
the Alvin Ailey Dance Theatre 
Foundation. He also serves on 
the American Council on 
Education's Commission on 
Women in Higher Education, 
and the Prince George's County 
Ad Hoc Committee on Black 
Male Achievement. 

Born in Louisville, Kentucky, 
on April 14, 1938, Dr. Kirwan 
received a bachelor's degree in 
mathematics from the Univer- 
sity of Kentucky in 1960. He 
holds master's (1962) and Ph.D. 
(1964) degrees in mathematics 
from Rutgers University. 

Dr. Kirwan and his wife, 
Patricia, have a son who 
received his bachelor's and 
master's degrees in architecture 
from the College Park campus, 
and a daughter who received 
her bachelor's degree in 
Journalism from the University. 




Chancellor Dr. Donald N. 
Langenberg 



74 



Terpilot, Athletic Director Andy Geiger 




Andy Geiger, whose tenure 
as Athletic Director at Stanford 
University elevated hrm to 
the top rank of athletic 
administrators, was named to 
direct the athletic program at 
Maryland by College Park 
President William E. Kirwan on 
Sept. 7, 1990. 

Geiger's two-year tenure has 
elevated the image of Maryland 
athletics, and provided structure 
and planning for the 1990s and 
beyond. A national presence in 
intercollegiate athletics, he reg- 
ularly serves on NCAA panels 
dealing with the issues of the 
day, and he is a member of the 
NCAA Special Events Commit- 
tee. Geiger is frequently con- 
sulted by the media on what is 
taking place, and what will take 
place, in college athletics. 

Geiger's structuring of 
Maryland's 23-sport program 
includes the creation of a con- 
temporary fund-raising aparatus 
that will not only meet the im- 
mediate economic goals of the 
department, but also the long- 
term needs. He is responsible 
for directing the Maryland 
Partnership, a matching-gift 
program with the State that is 
rebuilding the College Park 
athletic complex. Already, $19.3 
million worth of improvements 
have gone into Byrd Stadium. 

Geiger's two years have also 
netted the school an NCAA 
Championship (Women's La- 
crosse in 1992), and the fust bid 
to a football bowl game m five 
years (the Independence Bowl 
m 1990). In Geiger's 11 years at 
Stanford, the Cardinal was as 
effective at winning NCAA ti- 
tles (27) as any school in the 
nation. His stewardship also 
mcluded a restructuring of its 
gift-giving system, and a 
continuation of the school's 
academic traditions. 



At Maryland, Geiger has 
stressed the development of the 
whole student-athlete. He has 
regorganized the Academic 
Support Unit, and in football 
there has been marked improve- 
ment in academics. Twenty- 
three players recorded 3.0 GPAs 
during the past semester, a 
130% rise over a year before. 

Geiger's academic philosophy 
was built-up over 27 years as an 
athletic administrator at some of 
the nation's most prestigious 
universities. 

He was named Athletic 
Director at Brown in 1972, and 
he moved to another Ivy League 
school, Pennsylvania in 1975. 
During his final year there 
(1978-79), Pennsylvania became 
the last Ivy school to qualify for 
the Final Four of the NCAA 
Men's Basketball Championship. 
While at Penn he was named to 
the NCAA Division I Basketball 
Committee, and as a member he 
helped direct the enormous ex- 
plosion of the NCAA Tourna- 
ment in the 1980s. 

He was named Athletic Di- 
rector at Stanford in the midst 
of the 1978-79 school year. His 
subsequent leadership resulted 
in the Cardinal attaining a posi- 
tion of athletic leadership in the 
PAC-10 Conference. In addition 
to its NCAA team success, 
Stanford's athletes won 96 
NCAA individual championships, 
the most by any school. 

At Stanford, Geiger was a 
member of the NCAA Special 
Committee on Reorganization, 
and he served as chair on sev- 
eral other committees including 
the NCAA Water Polo Commit- 
tee, the PAC-10 Television 
Committee, the Men's Adminis- 
trative Committee, and he 
founded and chaired the Com- 
mittee on Championships. He 
also served on the PAC-10 Com- 
pliance Committee, and he 
chaired the E.C.A.C. Committee 
on Infractions when he was 
Associate Commissioner of the 
organization (1970-1972). 

Geiger, 52, is a 1961 graduate 
of Syracuse where he was an 
oarsman. He competed in the 
1959 Pan-American Games as a 
member of the U.S. crew team, 
and he served as manager of 
the U.S. Pan-Am squad in 1971. 
He was freshman crew coach at 
Dartmouth immediately after 
graduation, and later served as 
secretary of the U.S. Olympic 




Andy Geiger is reshaping Maryland athletics. He greets 
Independence Bowl officials at Cole Field House. 



Rowing Committee. He served 
as Assistant Athletic Director at 
his alma mater from 1964 to 
1970. 



Geiger has been married to 
the former Eleanor Rollings 
for 30 years. They have two 
children, Phillip and Gregory. 



1950 

' Bob Shemonski scored 25 points in the first quarter against Virginia Tech, 
and 31 lor the game, to defeat the Hokies, 63-7, in the season finale. 

'Maryland quarterback Jack Scarbath scored the first touchdown in the 
new Byrd Stadium on a 21-yard quarterback keeper in the first quarter 
against Wavy. 

'Maryland scored the most points in team history (up to this time), with 
274. 

'Maryland's Bob Ward was named the school's first consensus Ail- 
American. 



1951 

'Maryland finished undefeated and untied for the second time in school 
history, capping the season with a 2813 upset over No. 1 ranked Tennes- 
see in the Sugar Bowl. By today's standards Maryland would have been 
declared national champions, but at the time the title was awarded before 
the bowl games. 

'The bowl appearance was Maryland's third in five years under coach Jim 
Tatum. Tatum also earned Southern Conference "Coach of the Year" 
honors. 

'Bob Ward won All-America honors for the second consecutive year, but 
this time on the offensive side of the ball as Jeft guard. 

'Maryland won, 53-0, over N.C. State on Dad's Day. The fathers of every 
Terp player sat on the Maryland bench as special guest, each of them 
proudly sporting the numbered jersey of their son. 



1952 

'Maryland's 19 game winning streak (22 without defeat) came to an end 
in their 21-14 Joss to Mississippi. The streak was the second longest in the 
nation at the time. 

'More Maryland players were dratted by professional teams after the '51 
and '52 seasons than any other school. 

'Quarterback Jack Scarbath and Dick "Little Mo" Modzelewski were each 
selected as unanimous Ail-Americans. Scarbath also finished second in 
voting for the Heisman Memorial Trophy and eventually became the first 
draft choice of the Washington Redskins. 



75 



Directory 




Athletic Director's Office 

Andy Geiger, Athletic Director 

Joyce Taylor, AD's Secretary 

Dr. Suzanne Tyler, Senior Associate AD 

Jeff Gray, Associate AD/External Affairs 

Academic Support Unit 

Dr. Javaune Adams-Gaston, Director 
Elizabeth Friedman 
Eleanor Green 
Lori Panko 



(301) 314-7075 



314-7076 
314-7020 



314-7043 



Business Office 

Dwight Williams, Director 
Debbie Russell 
Genny Steiger 
Phyllis Wallace 

Development 

Keith Inman, Director of Development 

Terrapin Club 

Gib Romame, Director 
Dana Delaney 
Kathy Labriola 

M-Club 

Greg Manning, Director 
Dottie Warren 



314-7051 



. 314-7077 
314-7018 



314-7014 



Equipment 

Ron Ohringer, Manager 
Ron Fulton 
John Bowie 
Eric Youngstrom 



.314-7331 



Golf Course 

Tom Hanna, Director 
Glenn McCloskey 
Ron Scales 
Ed Schmitt 

Grounds Staff 

Bunk Carter, Manager 
Bill Reinohl 

Operations & Facilities 

Curt Callahan, Director 
Anne Byrdy 
Dan Giffin 
Gary Parker 



.403-4299 



.314-7383 



.314-7126 



Sports Marketing 314-7073 

Neal Eskin, Director 

Patty Benfield 

Lee Corngan, Maryland Radio Network 314-7032 

John Mathews, Group Sales 314-7035 

Lisa Speas 

Ticket Office 314-7070 

Jack Zane, Manager 
Eloise Jones 
Marian Jones 
Eileen Williams 
Tonya Wright 

Training Staff 314-7340 

Sandy Worth, Head Trainer 

J.J. Bush 

Steve Kinsey 

Phyllis Sanders 

Bill Saylor 

Lhsa Sorensen 

Jim Weir 

Varsity Sports 314-7003 

Gothard Lane, Director 
Linda Barbour 

Sports Teams Offices 

Baseball, Tom Bradley 314-7122 

Basketball (men's), Gary Williams 314-7029 

Basketball (women's), Chris Weller 314-7010 

Cross Country (men's and women's), Dan Rincon 314-7457 

Field Hockey, Missy Meharg 314-7006 

Golf, Don Slebodmk 403-4299 

Gymnastics, Bob Nelligan 314-7007 

Lacrosse (men's), Dick Edell 314-7114 

Lacrosse (women's), Cindy Timchal 314-7002 

Soccer (men's), Alden Shattuck 314-7005 

Soccer (women's), April Heinnchs 314-7034 

Swimming & Diving (men's and women's), Steve Mahaney 314-7030 

Tennis (men's and women's), Jim Laitta 314-7131 

Track & Field (men's and women's), Bill Goodman 314-7457 

Volleyball, Janice Kruger 314-7009 

Wrestling, John McHugh 314-7134 




Dr. Suzanne Tyler 
Senior Associate AD 




Jeff Gray 

Associate AD/Extemal Affairs 



76 



Terpflex, Strength 8 Conditioning 




Dave lingerer, 35, is in his first 
year as the strength and condition- 
ing coach at Maryland. Ungerer held 
the same position at Holy Cross for 
four years under Mark Duffner. 

Ungerer carries with him a 
philosophy of atnletic improvement 
through performance enhancement. 
After only his first semester in Col- 
lege Park, performance standards in 
the weight room improved dramati- 
cally. The average bench press by 
Terrapin players improved by almost 
20 pounds and the average squat 
improved by nearly 30. Ungerer 
hopes those improvements translate 
to mcreased success on the field. 

Ungerer received his B.S. degree 
in physical education from Southern 
Connecticut State in 1980 where he 
also played varsity football. He 
earned three varsity letters as a run- 
ning back at SCSU. Ungerer began 
his football career as a running back 
and linebacker at Edison (NJ) High 
School. As a senior he rushed for 
more than 1,000 yards and earned 
all-Area honors. 

He began his coaching career as 
a graduate assistant at Rutgers 
University. At Rutgers he worked 
with the overall defensive game 
plan. He moved to Northeastern Uni- 
versity in 1985 where he was the 
defensive line coach. From 1986-87 
he coached the defensive line and 
was the strength coach at Davidson 
College. While at Davidson, he was 
the professional scout liaison. 

Ungerer joined Duffner's staff at 
Holy Cross to begin the 1988 season. 
He was the first full-time strength 
coach at H.C. While there he 
designed and implemented a 
strength and conditioning program 
that improved the overall stamina on 
the team. 

At Maryland, Ungerer hopes to 
instill a work ethic that will become 
more important than absolute 
strength. 



Dwight Gait, 35. will assist 
Ungerer in preparing the football 
Terps for each game. He is working 
on his second stint as part of the 
Terp strength staff. He was an 
assistant strength coach in 1984 and 
1985 and returned to the program 
just before the start of the 1989 
football season. 

Gait received both his undergrad- 
uate and master's degrees from the 
University of Maryland. He earned 
his B.S. in business and 
management in 1983 and his M.S. in 
exercise physiology in 1989. 

Gait has a wide ranging back- 
ground in the field of strength and 
conditioning He was the director of 
Frank Costello's Elite Training 
Center and he was worked with the 
Washington Capitals Hockey Club. 

At Costello's Training Center, he 
managed an 80-member training 
facility which specialized in workmg 
with high professional, collegiate 
and high school athletes. His 
responsibilities included testing and 
evaluation, program development, 
strength and weight training 

While workmg the Capitals, Gait 
supervised the training of the NHL 
and AHL players. His work mcluded 
directing the players in flexibility, 
plyometnc and resistance training. 
In addition, he conducted on and 
off-ice testing and assisted in the 
evaluation process. 

Gait is married to the former 
Mary Janice Taylor. The couple has 
four children. 



A goal of the Maryland Football strength and conditioning 
program is improvement through performance enhancement. 




The performance standards inside the Maryland Football weight- 
room have increased dramatically since the arrival of Head Coach 
Mark Duffner and his staff. 






* 






A challenging weightroom work-ethic has been instilled through- 
out the team; a work ethic that will translate to better 
performance on the held. 



77 



olar, Academics, Academic All-ACC 



The commitment to academic 
achievement is at the forefront of the 
athletic department's responsibility 
to every student-athlete. Striving for 
excellence is not just something that 
University of Maryland student- 
athletes do on the field. 

Toward the goal of a successful 
academic experience for each 
student-athlete, the athletic depart- 
ment created the Academic Support 
Unit. 

Academic Support offers a com- 
prehensive program for personal and 
academic development that 
includes: 

* Personal academic assessment 

* Academic advising and counseling 

* Supervised study 

* Learning and study skills programs 

* Computer training and usage 

* Group and individual tutoring 

* Career mentoring 

* Summer internships 

Dr. Javaune Adams-Gaston 

serves as the Director of Athletic 
Student Services. In this capacity, 
she directs the activities of the Ath- 
letic Medicine Department and the 
Academic Support Unit. In the Aca- 
demic Support Unit, she and her 
staff work with every student-athlete 
m detail to provide the most com- 
plete academic experience possible 
for the student-athlete. 

A licensed psychologist, Dr. 
Adams-Gaston's commitment to bet- 
tering student-athletes' lives extends 
beyond academic support. As direc- 
tor of student services, she oversees 
an exhaustive series of seminars and 
programs relating to drug education, 
time and stress management, and 
career planning. She also is available 
for one-on-one counseling sessions 
with student-athletes, and she has 
been acknowledged across the cam- 
pus community for her effective and 
committed work with students. 

Dr. Adams-Gaston graduated 
from the University of Dubuque in 
1978 with a degree in biology, 
psychology and general science. She 
earned her master's m clinical psy- 
chology from Loras College in 
Dubuque in 1980 and her Ph.D. in 
counseling psychology from Iowa 
State in 1983. 

Dr. Adams-Gaston is ably 
assisted by two assistant directors. 

Elizabeth Friedman begins her 
second year as a full-time athletic 
department employee after more 
than four years of assisting student- 
athletes on a part-time basis. 



Friedman, a native of Rockville, Md. 
and graduate of Maryland, coordi- 
nates the Academic Support Unit's 
satisfactory-progress monitoring 
system. This program of frequent 
progress reporting between the ASU, 
faculty and student-athletes insures 
that each student-athlete is making 
consistent progress toward a benefi- 
cial and meaningful degree. 

Friedman, who earned a bachelor 
of arts m criminology from Maryland 
in 1988 and a master's of arts in 
criminology and counseling m 1991 
from Maryland, follows personally 
the academic progress of the Terps 
football players, as well as several 
other sports teams. 

Eleanor Green is beginning her 
fourth year with the University and 
her second with the ASU. A native 
of Morgantown, WV, Green earned 
her bachelor's degree in social work 
in 1983 and her master's in 
counseling m 1988 from West 
Virginia University. 

She coordinates the increasing 
flow of student-athlete eligibility 
paperwork, all the while coordinat- 
ing the academic counseling and 
monitoring of eight Terp sports 
teams, including men's and women's 
basketball. Green also coordinates 
the extensive orientation program 
which every student-athlete under- 
goes on campus each fall. 

Dr. Adams-Gaston, Friedman and 
Green also provide seminars for 
student-athletes on motivation, 
study skills and time management, 
as well as several other learned 
skills. 

In addition to individual academic 
counseling, each member of the Aca- 
demic Support Unit serves in other 
capacities. The ASU staff operates 
the ever-expanding computer room, 
where student-athletes in all sports 
gain hands-on experience with vari- 
ous computer hardware and soft- 
ware. The ASU also operates an ex- 
tensive bookroom, where student- 
athletes have at their disposal the 
majority of the text books they will 
need during their undergraduate 
years. 

More than 100 tutors in all aca- 
demic disciplines are organized by 
the ASU. Student-athletes can re- 
ceive specialized one-on-one training 
in any class by a qualified tutor just 
by asking. 

In genera], the Academic Support 
Unit at the University of Maryland 
has a tremendously positive and im- 
portant impact on each of the 
student-athletes who join the Terps' 
program. 




Javaune Adams-Gaston: As the head of the Academic Support 
Unit, she provides hands-on assistance to all student-athletes. 




Eleanor Green: She is one of two full-time academic counselors on 
staff in the Academic Support Unit. 




Liz Friedman (standing): A coordinator of the ASU's Computer 
Lab, she instructs all Terp student-athletes on the latest hardware 
and software equipment. 



78 



Terpscholar, Academics 



Academic Success Outstanding in Spring 

One of the many things that impressed Maryland officials during the inter- 
view process with Mark Duffner was the consistency with which he talked 
about playbooks and textbooks, practice time and study time. 

It was clear from the start that Duffner had a strong commitment to the 
academic integrity of his program and his players. Given the academic results 
of his players in the one semester Duffner has been on board, it is clear his 
commitment to academics was genuine, and it is clear his players heeded 
his call. 

Twenty-three (23) Maryland players recorded grade point averages of at 
least 3.0 during the Spring 1992 semester. Here is a list of those players, with 
their maiors and semester GPA: 

Marcus Badgett, sociology (3.31) 

Shawn Bartley, speech communication (3.00) 

Ryan Bevendge, kinesiological sciences (3.23) 

Brian Brown, criminal justice (3.54) 

Doug Catherman, criminology (3.00) 

Joe Cooper, speech communication (3.25) 

Jamie Flores, kinesiological sciences (3.21) 

Tim Fosque, intensive educational development (3.00) 

Angel Guerra, economics (4.00) 

Paul Gunsser. criminal justice (3.00) 

Richie Hams, Afro-American studies (3.20) 

Corey Holobetz. general business administration (3.20) 

Ben Lawrynas, cnmmal justice (3.00) 

Dave Marrone, criminal justice (4.00) 



Bradley Mathews, English (3.41) 

Ron Reagan, recreation (3.46) 

Tony Scarpino, pre-business (3.00) 

Dave Terranova, speech communication (3.25) 

John Teter, aerospace engineering (3.21) 

Keith Thornton, criminal justice (3.00) 

Raphael Wall, general business administration (3.00) 

Russ Weaver, general business administration (3.06) 

Enck Wood, criminal justice (3.25) 



Maryland Football Academic Honor Roll 

The following players have maintained a 3.0 or better cumulative grade 
point average since enrolling at the University of Maryland. 

Ryan Bevendge, kinesiological sciences (3.04) 

Brian Brown, criminal justice (3.02) 

Chad Carlton, radio, television & film (3.12) 

Tim Fosque, intensive educational development (3.02) 

Corey Holobetz, general business administration (3.33) 

Dave Marrone, criminal justice (3.37) 

Bradley Mathews, English (3.19) 

Chase Mishou, accounting (3.00) 

John Teter. aerospace engineering (3.25) 

Russ Weaver, general business administration (3.03) 

Enck Wood, cnmmal justice (3.00) 





Sandra P. Worth 

Head Athletic Trainer 

Sandy Worth, with 19 years of ser- 
vice to the University, was elevated 
to Head Athletic Trainer on July 1, 
1992. Her expanded duties will in- 
clude directing the activities of the 
football training room and managing 
the duties of Maryland's 23 sport in- 
tercollegiate athletic program. 

Worth served as associate athletic 
trainer before her appointment to 
head trainer. As associate trainer, she 
managed the main training room in 
Cole Field House. In her care were 14 
teams which included the nationally 
competitive women's 
basketball, lacrosse and field hockey 
teams along with the men's wrestling 
and swimming and diving teams. 
Worth also supervised the instruction 
of the student trainers working with 
the various athletic teams. She was 
the tramer for three national champi- 
onships by the Terps women's 
lacrosse team and one by the field 



hockey team. In addition, she was 
the trainer for the women's basket- 
ball team as it won eight ACC titles. 

Worth was the head trainer for 
the 1989 US. Women's Lacrosse 
team that won the World Cup Cham- 
pionship. She traveled, again as its 
head trainer, with the U.S. team this 
summer as it competed in a tour of 
Australia. 

Education: B.S. physical education, 
Umvensty of Maryland, 1973. 
Training: University of Maryland, 
Assistant Trainer, 1973-78. Univer- 
sity of Maryland, Associate Trainer, 
1978-1992. Head trainer for U.S. 
Women's Lacrosse World Cup 
Championship, 1989. Women's 
Lacrosse National Championship, 
1981, 1986, 1992; Head Trainer for 
Field Hockey team National Champi- 
onship, 1987, Women's basketball 
ACC Championships, 1978, 1979, 
1981, 1982, 1983, 1986, 1988, 1989. 
Personal: Attended Dulaney High 
School m Timomum, MD. 

Jim Weir 

Assistant Athletic Trainer 

Jim Weir returns to work with the 
football program as an assistant 
tramer after spending last year 
working with varsity sports. During 
his now 22-year career at Maryland, 
he has worked with football during 
all but one of those years. During his 
tenure in College Park, he has been 
the trainer for wrestling and men's 
lacrosse. 

A Michigan native, he attended 
Olivet College before enlisting in the 
United State Navy in 1960. He 




served 10 years in the Navy as a 
Hoppitalman 2nd Class. Weir gradu- 
ated from the Navy Physical Therapy 
Technical School. He worked for 
three years as an assistant athletic 
trainer at the Naval Academy before 
coming to Maryland. 
Specifics: 54 (8-31-38) 
Education: Olivet (Michigan) 
College: Hospital Corpsman, U.S. 
Navy. 

Training: Navy Corpsman, 1960-79. 
University of Maryland, Assistant 
Trainer, 1970-1992. Trainer for the 
Pear-h Bowl, 1973; Liberty Bowl, 
1974; Gator Bowl, 1975; Sun Bowl, 
1978; Tangerine Bowl, 1980; Aloha 
Bowl, 1982; Citrus Bowl, 1983; Sun 
Bowl, 1984; Cherry Bowl, 1985. 
Wrestling Trainer, 1970-75, 1978-80, 
1987-91; Trainer for NCAA Men's 
Lacrosse Champions, 1973 and 1975. 
Personal: Attended Chelsea High 
School m Chelsea, Michigan. He and 
wife Marlene have three children: 
James, 29; Robert, 26 and Christina, 
22. 



Portraits of a Century 

(continued from Page 1) 
(Further explantion of each painting is 
featured on the book's divider pages 
which are noted below.) 

Front Cover. New coach Mark 
Duffner is surrounded by the Centen- 
nial logo, the new Football Complex, 
and stars Frank Wycheck (22), Mike 
Jarmolowich (40) and Mark Mason (21). 
(Divider Page 25) Top right: Coach 
Bear Bryant (1945) overlooks a collage 
of 1940's Terps-fellow coach Clark 
Shaugnessy(1942, 1946), 12-sport let- 
terwinner Tommy Mont (punting), Lu 
Gambino (44), Harry Bonk (tying shoes) 
and Ray Krouse (58). (Divider Page 11) 
Lower left: Jerry Claiborne took many 
Terps to bowls as head coach (1972- 
1981), including Randy White (94), 
Louis Carter (32) and Charlie Wyscocki 
(18). (Divider Page 25) Lower right: 
Vaultmg over the first Byrd Stadium 
that served as home of the Terps from 
1923 to 1949 are Ray Poppelman (1929- 
1931, carrying ball), Jim Meade (left 
ballcarrier, 1936, 1937), and Snitz Sny- 
der (right, 1926-1928). Center Bill 
Supplee (All-America m 1923 (is, of 
course, in the center of the collage). 
(Divider Page 113) 



Back Cover: Curley Byrd has the big- 
gest collage on this side of the book 
(lower right); he deserves it given his 
influence as player, coach, and school 
president (1905-1954). Two of his play- 
ers are pictured at lower left: the great 
Burt Shipley and A.V. Williams in var- 
sity M jacket. Williams the football 
player became an extraordinary contrib- 
utor to his alma mater's needs. (Divider 
Page 105) Upper left: Jim Tatum, the 
greatest of all Terp coaches, 
surrounded by the Sugar Bowl trophy 
(won in 1951), and stars Dick (Little Mo) 
and Ed (Big Mo) Modzelewski, Bob 
Ward (28) and Jack Scarbath (62). (Di- 
vider Page 148) Upper right: the 1980s 
meant quarterbacks at Maryland. Loom- 
ing over them all is Boomer Esiason 
(1981-1983). He had long-standmg tradi- 
tion on his side begun by George 
(Shorty) Chalmers (1929-1931), who is 
on Boomer's left. A sampling of other 
1980s standouts included Neil 
O'DonneU (14), Scott Zolak (13), Dan 
Henning (12) and Stan Gelbaugh (8). 
(Divider Page 123) Lower left: Coach 
Bobby Ross never flinched in tough 
game situations as head coach from 
1982 to 1986. The Maryland state colors 
fly over some most courageous Terps: 



John Maarleveld (73), an All-America 
tackle who overcame cancer to star in 
College Park; Michael Anderson, who 
was diagnosed with cancer in the 1986 
pre-season and who starred at running 
back in 1989, and for Gary Williams's 
basketball team; and Bill Guckeyson, 
perhaps the greatest ever to wear the 
black and gold. (Divider Page 3) 

Inside front cover: The 1915 team, 
the last to compete as the Maryland 
Agricultural College, is pictured across 
the top of the inside cover and page 
one. The team was 6-3, and had a five 
game winning streak. Pictured in front 
of a circa 1910 campus photo, that 
matches the background of the 1915 
team photo, are this year's captains: 
Marcus Badgett, Scott Rosen, Mike Jar- 
molowich and Darren Drozdov. Along 
the bottom of the page are the Satur- 
day afternoon ingredients of Maryland 
football that hopefully produce results 
like Richie Harris's (2) touchdown 
catch. 

Inside back cover: The new Football 
Complex is shown under construction 
at the top of the color collage Below it 
are scenes from Saturdays in College 
Park, and the refurbished Byrd. 



Dr. Stan Lavine 

Team Physician 

Dr. Stan Lavine, head orthopedic 
surgeon for Maryland's 23 intercolle- 
giate athletic teams, has roots that 
grow deep into Maryland's red clay. 
He first served the Terps as a foot- 
ball lettermen in 1948 and 1949 and 
has, since, served the Terps from the 
medical profession. 

A native of Pittsburgh where he 
attended Schenley High School, Dr. 
Lavine matriculated at Maryland to 
prepare for his medical career. He 
played football for initially Clark 
Shaughnesy, one of football's great 
innovators. By the time of his 1950 
graduation, he had led Maryland to, 
under then Head Coach Jim Tatum, a 
9-1 season and a 20-7 victory over 
Missouri in the Gator Bowl as the 
team's quarterback. Following his 
graduation from the University's 
Medical School, he interned in 
hospitals in Philadelphia and 
Cleveland, served two years in the 
Air Force, and then began his ortho- 
pedic career medical practice and 
work with Maryland's athletic teams. 

Dr. Lavine attends all home foot- 
ball and basketball games and some 
road games and is on call at all times 
for the athletes on the University's 
23 sports teams. His professional 
reputation is national in scope and 
many prominent athletes regularly 
seek his treatment. He was the team 
physician for the Washington Red- 
skins (1975-85), and was there for 
two Super Bowls. He was the team 
physician for the Washington Bullets 
when they won the NBA Champion- 
ship in 1978. Working with, and un- 
der the supervision of Lavine is Dr. 
Dave Linehan, another highly 
regarded orthopedic surgeon. 
Linehan worked the University's 
Student Health Center before 
deciding to go into orthopedic 
surgery. He has been associated 
with the University's athletic teams 
since 1973. 

Supporting Lavine and Head 
Trainer Sandra Worth on a day to 
day basis are Drs Sacared Bodison 
and Steve Fahey of the University's 
Student Health Center. Dr. Bodison is 
Clinical Director and Director of 
Sports Medicine. She, along with 
Fahey. take care of the daily medical 
problems that might occur m all 
sports. Diagnosis and treatment are 
overseen at the training rooms and 
at the Health. If necessary, they refer 
student-athletes to specialists 
through head tramer Worth. 



80 



Terpads, Equipment 




Dr. Stan Lavine 




Dr. Sacared Bodison 




Dr. David Linehan 




Dr. Steve Fahey 



EQUIPMENT STAFF 

Ron Ohringer enters his fifth year 
as the Terrapin head equipment 
manager. His duties in handling 
these responsibilities are numerous 
and considered a most important 
component to the success of the 23- 
sport program. 

His fifth anniversary is 
highlighted by the move of the de- 
partment from the long-time environ- 
ment of the A.V. Williams Team 
House to the spaciousness of the 
brand new team house, the new 
home of the future for all of Mary- 
land football. He will oversee the op- 
eration of all equipment transactions 
for the coaching staff, the team play- 
ers, football weight and training 
rooms in the bnllance of the new 
facility which is 160' long and 224' 
wide and covers over 45,000 square 
feet. 

Ohringer manages the inventory, 
ordering, maintenance and distribu- 
tion of all athletic gear for the foot- 
ball and basketball programs. It is 
his chore to bear responsibility to 
oversees the equipment programs in 
each of Maryland's 21 other sports. 

A native of Bethesda, MD, 
Ohringer attended the University of 
Maryland, graduating in 1985 with a 
bachelor of science in journalism and 
public relations. While a student, he 
served as a student manager and 
was selected to be the head student 
manager his senior year. 

He has worked as a public 
relations assistant with both the 
Washington Redskins and Philadel- 



phia Eagles, in addition to working 
for the Arena Football League and 
the Alexandria Baseball Dukes. 

Ohringer returned to the Univer- 
sity in 1988 after assistant equip- 
ment manager Todd Goodman was 
involved in a tragic auto accident. 

Ohringer has a staff of one full- 
time assistant, two part-time assis- 
tants and 14 student managers Eric 
Youngstrom is the staff full-time as- 
sistant. He also is in his fifth year 
with the program. He assists football 
responsibilities. He heads and coor- 
dinates the entire equipment assign- 
ments relating to men's lacrosse, 
track & field, soccer and baseball. 
Youngstrom attended the University 
of Iowa. He worked for the St. Louis 
Cardinals of the NFL and with the 
Arena Football League prior to join- 
ing the Maryland staff. 

Ron Fulton and John Bowie over- 
see the Cole Field House equipment 
room, coordinating the daily issu- 
ance and cleaning needs of seven 
varsity sports. 

Fulton is entering his 21st year m 
the Maryland equipment room. After 
spending 15 years with Macke Cor- 
poration on campus, he was hired as 
equipment manager in 1972. After 
16 years in charge, Fulton retired 
and now works part time. 

Bowie is starting his third year 
with the program. He also assists 
with football. His mam responsibility 
is overseeing the Cole Field House 
equipment room, coordinating bas- 
ketball, volleyball, field hockey and 
lacrosse equipment. He is a 1976 
graduate of Bowie State University. 




The Terrapin Equipment Staff: (left to right) Eric Youngstrom; Ron Ohringer, Head Manager; Ron Fulton; John Bowie. 

81 



TerpTurf Managers, Grounds 



GROUNDS STAFF 

Keeping Maryland's seven 
intercollegiate athletic fields 
playable is the responsibility of the 
Grounds Staff. William "Bunk" 
Carter and Bill Reinohl work to see 
that all Maryland athletes compete 
on fields that are well kept, 
consistent in quality and that meet 
all playmg standards. 

Carter, the Head Groundskeeper, 
has worked at Maryland for the last 
31 years. He has spent his entire 
career caring for the athletic playing 
fields. Carter has worked for five 
athletic directors and eight football 
coaches. He has seen the Terps win 
six Atlantic Coast Conference 
Championships and play in 12 
bowls. 



Reinohl is m his 14th year on the 
staff, his tenth as a full-time 
employee. He first began working on 
the playmg fields as a student in 
1979 and was hired full-time in 1983. 
He earned a B.S. degree in agronomy 
1987 and a second B.S. degree 
conservation/resource development 
1983 both from Maryland. Reinohl is 
an accomplished lecturer giving 
speeches regarding his field of 
study. 

The grounds staff provides 
maintenance for six natural grass 
fields and one artificial turf facility. 
Their work mcludes a fertilization/ 
herbicide program, painting and 
stenciling fields for the various 
sports, stadium cleanup and upkeep 
and field renovation. 




The baseball field is cared for throughout the year and on a daily 
basis during the spring playing season. 





The soccer field is one of the finest in the Atlantic Coast 
Conference; the grounds crew pays it strict attention. 




The football practice fields gamer constant care. 



The astroturf facility is a practice field for virtually all of the 
university's athletic teams. 



82 



Terrapin Club, M Club 



Terrapin Club, M Club combine 115 years of scholar athlete support into single mission 



Two traditional graduate arms of Maryland Athletics, representing friends and alumni of 
athletics for a combined 115 years, are joining forces to meet the extraordinary needs of 
today's student-athlete. The Terrapin Club/Maryland Educational Foundation, which for 
46 years has been raising scholarship monies, and the M Club, the alumni letterwinners 
support group for 69 years, will now have common gift-giving levels and goal support of 
Maryland 23 sport program. 



TERRAPIN CLUB 

The Terrapin Club/Maryland Educational Foundation The M Club 





The Maryland Educational Foundation was founded on July 1, 
1946, at the urging of Clark Shaugnessy, the football coach. The 
social segment of the organization, the Terrapin Club, was founded 
later that yeai. 

The membership started with 132 friends of Maryland athletics 
each donating $100 for scholarships and an additional $25 for social 
dues. The early years featured philanthropic support for Terrapin 
scholarships, which were partly supported by athletic department 
revenues. What was an informal orgnaization giving much needed 
help to Maryland athletics became an integral part of the budget 
process with the soaring costs of intercollegiate athletics in the 
1970s. Now most scholarship revenues for Terrapm student athletes 
come from the Maryland Educational Foundation. In 1991-92, 
$1.5 million was raised by the M.E.F. from 3,250 members. 



Like so many other worthy projects at the University, the M Club 
had Dr. H.C. "Curley" Byrd on board at the start as the club's first 
president in 1923. Byrd was putting the finishing touches on the 
first Byrd Stadium complex built along U.S. 1, down campus from 
the present stadium, and monies were needed to fill needs beyond 
bricks and mortar. The present University of Maryland at College 
Park was formed in 1920, and Byrd was finally getting the athletic 
complex he had desired for years. The M Club was formed to meet 
the needs of a bigger, larger athletic department, to supply support 
for the student-athlete now that a new complex was built. The same 
philosophy drives the M Club today as it provides support for 
student-athletes through its 1250 active members at a time when 
facilties are being built, and additional funds area priority. 



The Terrapin Club, one of the fastest growing booster clubs in the country, and the M Club, alumni letterwinners supporting the student 
athlete, invite friends of Maryland to make a commitment. 



The Terrapin Club 

P.O. Box 295 

College Park, Md. 20741 



The M Club 

P.O. Box 273 

College Park, Md. 20741 




s in the ACC, Bowl Alliance 




Maryland and the ACC 

The Atlantic Coast Confer- 
ence was founded on May 8, 
1953, and its origin solidified 
the South as a growing ener- 
prise in intercollegiate athletics. 
For a half-century before, 
Southern schools competed in a 
variety of conferences, and at 
one time an unwieldy 23 
schools competed in the 
Southern Intercollegiate Confer- 
ence (1929-1932). Maryland 
joined the Southern Conference 
in 1921, and was a member 
when 10 schools spilt from the 
league to start the Southeastern 
Conference in 1932. The Terra- 
pins and what was to become 
the ACC went back to a South- 
ern Conference affiliation until 
the same factors that caused 
the old conference to disband 
occurred -too many disparate 
schools over too wide an area 
led to philosophical and 
logistical problems. 

Maryland was the ACC's first 
football champion, and until 
recently ranked number one in 
both football championships 
won and total victories. In all 
sports, Maryland is the all-time 
conference leader in champion- 
ships. 

Clemson, Duke, North 
Carolina, North Carolina State, 
South Carolina, Virginia and 
Wake Forest were the other 
charter members of the ACC 
which was formed from the old 
Southern Conference. South 
Carolina withdrew in 1971 and 
Georgia Tech, which withdrew 
from the SEC in 1964, was ad- 
mitted in 1978. Florida State 
was granted admission in 1991. 




Conference without peer 

Consistency. It's the mark of 
true excellence in any endeavor. 
However, in today's intercolle- 
giate athletics, competition has 
become so balanced and so 
competitive that it is virtually 
impossible to maintain a high 
level of consistency. 

Yet the Atlantic Coast 
Conference has defied the odds. 
Now in its 40th year of competi- 
tion, the ACC has long enjoyed 
the reputation as one of the 
strongest and most competitive 
intercollegiate conferences in 
the nation. And that is not 
mere conjecture; the numbers 
support it. 

Since the league's inception 
in 1953, Atlantic Coast Confer- 
ence schools have captured 42 
NCAA and AIAW champion- 
ships, including 24 in men's 
compeitition and 18 in women's. 
In addition, 72 men and 22 
women have earned the coveted 
title of NCAA champion. 

On the gridirion, Maryland in 
1953, Clemson in 1981 and 
Georgia Tech in 1991 were 
acclaimed national champions in 
football. 

If success is best measured 
in terms of wins and osses, then 
the ACC has proven itself to be 
among the elite in Division IA 
football: the nine ACC teams 
are a combined 64-56-5 (.532) m 
bowl games -a winning per- 
centage second only to the 
PAC-10's .555 success rate. 

Georgia Tech, with a 17-8 
(.680) post-season mark, is No. 1 
among Division IA teams in 
bowl winning percentage. The 
Yellow Jackets lead a list of 



The ACC logo in its various incarnations appears above: 1954 
through the 1960s when Maryland's star was right by Washington, 
D.C.; 1971 when Maryland was moved, erroneously, to the Eastern 
Shore and there were two ACC teams in South Carolina; 1977's 
logo had one South Carolina ACC team; in 1978 there were two 
new logos recognizing Georgia Tech 's admittance to the league; in 
1989 there was a change of graphics style; and in 1991 the new 
ACC logo recognized Florida as league territory. 




teams that have distinguished 
themselves in the post-season. 
Florida State has appeared in 
the post-season on 20 
occasions, and Maryland and 
Clemson 17 times each to 
head the list of league bowl 
appearances. 

The ACC also stands at the 
forefront of intercollegiate 
athletics in terms of academic 
accomplishments of its student 
athletes. That accomplishment 
is nowhere better reflected 
than in the CFA Academic 
Achievement Award which is 
given annually to a CFA mem- 
ber institution with the highest 
graduation rate among mem- 
bers of its football teams. Six 
times over the past 11 years, an 
ACC member school has 
claimed the award. In 1989, 
Maryland was recognized by 
the CFA for its graduation rate. 
Since 1952, 38 ACC football 
players have earned first-team 
Academic All-America honors 
43 times. 




The Year in review 

The ACC enjoyed another 
productive year in 1991-1992 as 
conference teams captured four 
national championships, earned 
two berths in the combined 
"Final Fours" of the men's and 
women's basketball tournament, 
and won over 70 percent of their 
games against non-conference 
opponents in all sports. 

Duke won the Men's NCAA 
Basketball Championship for a 
second straight year, Virginia 
captured the Men's NCAA 
Soccer Championship for the 
second time in three years, 
North Carolina won the 
Women's NCAA Soccer 
Championship for a sixth 
straight year and Maryland 
won the Women's NCAA 
Lacrosse Championship after 
finishing as national runner-up 
in 1990 and 1991. 




1965 When the ACC was awarding the Carmichael Cup annually 
for all-sport excellence, Maryland won more than any school. Dr. 
Wilson H. Elkins receives the 1965 awards from Dr. Carmichael's 
daughter. 



84 



Terps in the ACC 





An unequalled and unique Atlantic Coast Conference tradition 



• Maryland football teams 
have more number one 
rankings in the national polls 
than any other league team. 

1 Maryland has scored more 
points on the football field 
than any ACC school. 

• A Maryland coach has the 
best ACC record in history. 

1 Maryland had more appear- 
ances in bowl games than 
any league team for the 
decades of the 1970s and 
1980s. 

1 Maryland had more top 10 
rankings than any league 
school in the 1950s and 
the 1970s, and more 
appearances in the top 20 
over the history of the league 
than any school, save one. 



The Football Bowl Coalition 

The Orange Bowl, Sugar 
Bowl, Cotton Bowl and Fiesta 
Bowl (Tier One) have joined 
with the Atlantic Coast 
Conference, The Big East 
Football Conference and the 
University of Notre Dame in a 
partnership to provide the 
opportunity for the champions 
of the two conferences and 
Notre Dame to appear in one of 
the four bowl games each year. 

In addition, the ACC and the 
Big East champions are guaran- 
teed a spot in the Orange Bowl, 
Sugar Bowl, or Cotton Bowl 
each year. 

The current commitments of 
the conference champions of the 
Big Eight to the Orange Bowl, 
the Southeast Conference to the 
Sugar Bowl, and the Southwest 
Conference to the Cotton Bowl 
remain intact, leavmg two 
additional berths open in the 



• Maryland played in more 
different bowl games in the 
1950s, 1960s, 1970s and 
1980s than any ACC team. 

• Maryland gave the ACC its 
first three consensus All- 
America players, its first 
National Coach of the Year 
winner, and its first national 
championship. 

• Maryland has played more 
football games than any 
league school, save one, and 
won more football games 
than any league school, save 
one. 



four Tier One coalition bowls. 
(ACC + Big East + Notre Dame 
+ Big Eight + SEC + SWC = 
six slots filled of a possible 
eight.) These two slots will be 
filled from a pool of "at-large" 
teams which will include the 
next best teams (as selected by 
the Tier One coaltion bowls) 
from the following five confer- 
ences - ACC, Big East, Big 
Eight, PAC-10 (whose champion 
remains committed to the Rose 
bowl) and SWC. The three "at- 
large" teams not selected to the 
Tier One coalition bowls will 
then be available for selection 
to the Tier Two bowls of the 
coalition (Gator Bowl, 
Blockbuster Bowl, and John 
Hancock Bowl). 

The team selection date for 
all the bowls involved in the co- 
alition (Tier One and Two) will 
be following the completion of 
regular season play. 




• Maryland presently holds the ACC records for 
the most yards gained in a game 
the most yards rushed for in a game 
the largest season scoring margin 
the least yards yielded in a season 
the fewest points allowed in a season 
the fewest points allowed per game in a season 
the fewest TDs allowed in a season 
the most consecutive victories 
the most consecutive ACC victories the most shutouts 
the largest deficit overcome to win a game 



The selection process 

1. Whenever Notre Dame, the 
ACC and The Big East champi- 
ons occupy the number one and 
two rankings in the final regular 
season Associated Press poll, 
they must play the national 
championship game in the 
Fiesta Bowl. 

2. Whenever the number one 
or two teams in the final regular 
season Associated Press poll 
come from among the ACC 
Champion, The Big East Cham- 
pion or Notre Dame, and the 
host conference champion from 
among the Sugar, Cotton, or 
Orange Bowl is ranked number 
one or two, these teams must 
play one another in the bowl of 
the host conference champion. 

3. Barring the above, the 
Orange Bowl, Sugar Bowl and 
Cotton Bowl will select first in 
order of the final rankings of 
their respective host conference 



champions. Following that 
selection, the Fiesta Bowl will 
have two selections from the 
remammg pool of five teams. 

4. Once these selections have 
been completed the remammg 
three "at-large" teams will be 
available to the Tier Two bowls 
which will select one team each 
in order of per team net payout. 

5. The ACC and Big East 
champions and Notre Dame 
have the right to pass a Tier 
One selection for a higher 
payout, to avoid a rematch of a 
regular season game, or to avoid 
playing m a particular bowl 
game for a third consecutive 
year. 

6. A team may pass a selection 
to a Tier Two Bowl only to avoid 
a rematch of a regular seson 
game, or to avoid playing in a 
particular bowl game for a third 
consecutive year. 



85 



erps in the ACC, 1953, 1955 Champions 



1953 







National champion Maryland and 18th- 
ranked Duke tied for the ACC's inaugural 
grid title. The Terps finished the regular 
season with a perfect 10-0 record, includ- 
ing a 3-0 mark in league play. Maryland, 
which lost to Oklahoma in the Orange 
Bowl, 7-0, scored 298 points, the most by a 
team until 1967, while allowing an ACC 
record-low 31 points. The Terps led the 
nation in rushing defense, 83.9 yards 
allowed per outing, and scoring defense, 
3.1 points per game. Terp tackle Stan 
Jones earned consensus All-America 
honors while teammate Bemie Faloney 
was named first team Academic All- 
America. 





CONFERENCE 


Team 




W 1 


Duke 




4 


Maryland 




3 


South Carolina 




2 


North Carolina 




2 


Wake Forest 




2 


Clemson 




1 


North Carolina State 





Virginia 







L 


T 


Pts. 


Opp. 


IV 


L 


T 








105 


27 


7 


2 


1 








70 


6 


10 


*1 





3 





58 


70 


7 


3 





3 





67 


99 


4 


6 





3 





52 


75 


3 


6 


1 


2 





25 


34 


3 


5 


1 


3 





14 


80 


1 


9 










_ 


_ 


1 


8 






ALL GAMES 
Pts. 

217 
298 
198 
173 
123 
139 
80 
75 



Opp. 

81 
38 
97 
187 
157 
172 
263 
242 



MARYLAND (3-0, 10-1-0) 

20 Missouri 6 

52 Wash. & Lee 

20 Clemson 

40 Georgia 13 

26 N. Carolina 

30 Miami (Fla.) 

24 S. Carolina 6 

27 George Washington ... 6 
38 Mississippi 

21 Alabama 

Oklahoma * 7 

'Orange Bowl 



1955 







CONFERENCE GAMES 



Team W 

Maryland 4 

Duke 4 

Clemson 3 

North Carolina 3 

Wake Forest 3 

South Carolina 1 
North Carolina State 

Virginia 



L 





1 

3 
3 
5 
2 
4 



T 






1 



1 





Pts. 

105 
94 
79 
90 

105 
75 
38 
42 



Opp. 

26 

14 

59 

102 

100 

176 

71 

80 



W 

10 
7 
7 
3 
5 
3 
4 
1 



ALL GAMES 
L T Pts. 



217 
196 
206 
117 
131 
120 
206 
96 



Opp. 

77 
95 
144 
218 
157 
209 
193 
201 



'Lost Orange Bowl game 



For the second time in the ACC's first 
three years, Duke and Maryland tied for 
the league title with identical 4-0 records. 
The Terps finished third in both polls 
while the Blue Devils earned a 16th listing 
in the UPI poll. The ACC posted a 22-18-1 
mark against non-conference opponents. 
Maryland led the nation in defense against 
the rush, allowing 83.9 yards per game. 
Maryland had a 15-game win streak 
snapped with a 20-6 loss to Oklahoma 
in the Orange Bowl. Terp center Bob 
Pellegrini was a consensus All-America. 



MARYLAND (40, 1010) 

13 Missouri 12 

7 UCLA 

20 Baylor 6 

28 Wake Forest 7 

25 N. Carolina 7 

34 Syracuse 13 

27 S. Carolina 

13 L.S.U 

25 Clemson 12 

19 George Washington ... 

6 Oklahoma* 20 

"Orange Bowl 



Top Terps in the ACC, 1974, 1975 Champions 



1974 






•\« ^3 **3 "5 ' ^ - to© "itf^l T&& 



^t""*"^ 

t? 









jt^ BaV 




Maryland won its first conference 
championship in 18 years, sweeping past 
all six of its league opponents. It marked 
the 10th time in conference history that a 
team has gone unbeaten in league play. 
An ACC record three teams earned bowl 
bids. Maryland lost to Tennessee, 7-3, in 
the Liberty Bowl. The Terps extended 
their win streak against ACC foes to 10- 
m-a-row. Clemson's Benme Cunningham, 
North Carolina's Ken Huff and Maryland's 
Randy White were consensus All- 
Americans. White, a senior defensive 
tackle, won both the Outland and 
Lombardi Trophies. 



CONFERENCE GAMES 



Team W L 

Maryland 6 

Clemson 4 2 

North Carolina 4 2 

North Carolina State 4 2 

Duke 2 4 

Virginia 1 5 

Wake Forest 6 



Pts. Opp. 



198 
130 
146 
145 
110 
61 
31 



35 
135 
115 
120 
136 
111 
169 



W 

8 
7 
7 
9 
6 
4 
1 



*4 
4 
"5 
2 
5 
7 
10 



ALL GAMES 
L T Pts. 





'Lost Liberty Bowl; "Lost Sun Bowl 
tTied Bluebonnet Bowl 





tl 






316 
246 
364 
317 
201 
207 
74 



Opp. 

104 
250 
279 
241 
208 
239 
348 



MARYLAND (60, 8-4) 

16 Alabama 21 

10 Florida 17 

24 North Carolina 12 

31 Syracuse 

41 Clemson 

47 Wake Forest 

20 N.C. State 10 

17 Penn State 24 

41 Villanova 

56 Duke 13 

10 Virginia 

3 Tennessee* 7 



1975 




Maryland captured its second consecutive 
ACC gridiron title by postmg a perfect 5-0 
league mark and extending its wm streak 
over conference opponents to 15-in-a-row, 
tying a league mark. For the third straight 
year, the Terps took part in post-season 
competition, defeatmg Florida, 13-0 in the 
Gator Bowl. Maryland, which led the 
league in total offense with a 375.2 yards 
per game average, set an ACC single game 
total offense mark with 802 yards in a 
62-24 victory over Virginia, November 22. 
Terps' John Schultz was the nation's top 
kickoff returner with a 31.0 average. 



CONFERENCE GAMES 

Team W L T 

Maryland 5 

Duke 3 2 

North Carolina State 2 2 1 

Wake Forest 3 3 

Clemson 2 3 

North Carolina 14 1 

Virginia 5 



ALL GAMES 



Pts. 

182 
131 
131 
145 
102 
119 
98 



Opp. 

73 
84 
115 
137 
141 
159 
226 



W 

*9 
4 
7 
3 
2 
3 
1 



9 

7 

10 



'Won Gator Bowl; "Lost Peach Bowl 



Pts. Opp. 



312 
197 
260 
221 
177 
207 
175 



150 
212 
210 
264 
381 
272 
428 



MARYLAND (5-0, 9-2-1) 

41 Villanova 

8 Tennessee 26 

34 North Carolina 7 

10 Kentucky 10 

24 Syracuse 7 

37 N.C. State 22 

27 Wake Forest 

13 Penn State 15 

21 Cincinnati 19 

22 Clemson 20 

62 Virginia 24 

13 Florida* 



87 



erps in the ACC, 1976, 1983 Champions 



1976 




Maryland's powerful Terrapins swept 
through the regular season undefeated 
and became only the second team in ACC 
history to win three consecutive league 
titles outright. Coach Jerry Claiborne's 
club ran its conference victory string to a 
record 20 straight. The Terps appeared in 
a bowl for the fourth straight year, losing 
to Southwest Conference champion 
Houston, 30-21, in the Cotton Bowl. 
Maryland tackle Joe Campbell and Wake 
Forest defensive back Bill Armstrong were 
consensus All-Amencans. Maryland's No. 
8 ranking in the final AP poll was the first 
top 10 finish by an ACC team since 1960. 



CONFERENCE GAMES 

Team W L T 

Maryland 5 

North Carolina 4 10 

Wake Forest 3 3 

Duke 2 3 1 

North Carolina State 2 3 

tVirginia 14 

Clemson 4 1 



Pts. Opp. 



Ill 

144 

124 

125 

97 

40 

76 



24 
102 
118 
145 

98 
111 
123 



W 

11 
9 
5 
5 
3 
2 
3 



I 

*1 
"3 
6 
5 
7 
9 
6 



ALL GAMES 
T Pts. 



"Lost Cotton Bowl; "Lost Peach Bowl 
tLoss to Virginia Tech counted as conference game 



294 
243 
177 
234 
205 
106 
172 



Opp. 

115 
220 
206 
245 
258 
266 
237 



MARYLAND (5-0, 111) 

31 Richmond 7 

24 West Virginia 3 

42 Syracuse 28 

20 Villanova 9 

16 N.C. State 6 

17 Wake Forest 15 

30 Duke 3 

24 Kentucky 14 

21 Cincinnati 

20 Clemson 

28 Virginia 

21 Houston* 30 



1983 




Maryland claimed its first ACC title since 
1976, finishing undefeated in five league 
contests while North Carolina was 
second with a 4-2 mark. Both had identical 
8-4 overall records. In bowl action, the 
Terps dropped a 30-23 decision to 
Tennessee in the Florida Citrus Bowl while 
the Tar Heels, m their fifth straight bowl 
game, lost to Florida State, 28-3, in the 
Peach Bowl. 



CONFERENCE GAMES 

Team W L T Pts. Opp. W 

Maryland 5 154 71 8 

North Carolina 4 2 184 117 8 

Georgia Tech 3 2 147 140 3 

Duke 3 3 150 183 3 

Virginia 3 3 145 150 6 

North Carolina State 1 5 108 159 3 

Wake Forest 1 5 150 218 4 

tClemson — — — — — 9 



ALL GAMES 
L T Pts. 



*4 

*«4 



•Lost Florida Citrus Bowl; "Lost Peach Bowl 
tNot eligible for championship by conference action 



316 
337 
222 
246 
252 
236 
257 
338 



Opp. 

253 
216 
313 
350 
280 
246 
281 
200 



MARYLAND (5-0, 8-4-0) 

21 Vanderbilt 14 

21 West Virginia 31 

13 Pittsburgh 7 

23 Virginia 3 

34 Syracuse 13 

36 Wake Forest 33 

38 Duke 3 

28 North Carolina 26 

23 Auburn 26 

27 Clemson 52 

29 N.C. State 6 

23 Tennessee* 30 



Top Terps in the ACC, 1984, 1985 Champions 



1984 








CONFERENCE GAMES 








ALL GAMES 




Team 


W 


I 


T Pts. 


Opp. 


W 


I 


T 


Pts. 


Opp. 


Maryland 


5 





204 


102 


*9 


3 





380 


280 


Virginia 


3 


1 


2 189 


108 


**8 


4 





337 


216 


N. Carolina 


3 


2 


1 119 


125 


5 


5 


1 


234 


274 


W.Forest 


3 


3 


91 


124 


6 


5 





205 


232 


Ga.Tech. 


2 


2 


1 114 


81 


6 


4 


1 


296 


201 


Duke 


1 


5 


67 


162 


2 


9 





128 


301 


N.C. State 


1 


5 


97 


179 


3 


8 





263 


311 


tClemson 










7 


4 





346 


215 



Maryland pocketed the championship for 
the second year in a row and earned their 
fifth outright crown over the past 1 1 
seasons. The title was not decided until 
the season's final weekend when the 
Terps knocked off Virginia, 45-33, for the 
league crown. Maryland, taking part in its 
third straight bowl game, defeated 
Tennessee in the Sun Bowl, 28-27, while 
Virginia, making its first-ever bowl game 
appearance, defeated Purdue m the Peach 
Bowl, 27-24. Maryland, trailing Miami 31-0 
at the half, rallied for 42 second half points 
to beat the Hurricanes, 42-40, setting a 
record for the greatest comeback in NCAA 
Division IA football history. 



'Won Sun Bowl; **Won Peach Bowl 
tNot eligible for championship by conference action 



MARYLAND (5-00, 9-30) 

7 Syracuse 23 

14 Vanderbilt 23 

20 West Virginia 17 

38 Wake Forest 17 

24 Penn State 25 

44 N.C. State 21 

43 Duke 7 

34 North Carolina 23 

42 Miami (Florida) 40 

41 Clemson 23 

45 Virginia 34 

28 Texas* 27 



1985 




Maryland made it three championships in 
a row and six m 12 years, by finishing 
unbeaten in ACC play. For the fourth 
straight year and the 11th time in 13 
seasons, the Terps took part in post-season 
play, knocking off Syracuse in the Cherry 
Bowl, 35-18. Maryland extended its ACC 
game win streak to 17, with a 33-21 title 
clinching victory over Virginia on the 
season's final weekend. A pair of offensive 
tackles, J.D. Maarleveld of Maryland and 
Jim Dombrowski of Virginia were tabbed 
as consensus AU-Americans. 



CONFERENCE GAMES 



ALL GAMES 



Team W L 

Maryland 6 

Georgia Tech 5 1 

Clemson 4 3 

Virginia 4 3 

North Carolina 3 4 

Duke 2 5 

North Carolina State 2 5 

Wake Forest 1 6 



Pts. Opp. 



192 
136 
167 
172 
129 

94 
121 

99 



92 

55 
122 
150 
154 
174 
189 
174 



W 

*9 
#9 
6 
6 
5 
4 
3 
4 



3 
2 
t6 
5 
6 
7 



*Won Cherry Bowl; #Won All-Amencan Bowl 
tLost Independence Bowl 



Pts. Opp. 



326 
252 
244 
262 
224 
193 
186 
212 



192 
132 
222 
217 
223 
252 
305 
249 



MARYLAND (6-0, 9-3-0) 

18 Penn State 20 

31 Boston Collge 13 

28 West Virginia 

Michigan 20 

31 N.C. State 17 

26 Wake Forest 3 

40 Duke 10 

28 North Carolina 10 

22 Miami (Flonda) 29 

34 Clemson 31 

33 Virginia 21 

35 Syracuse* 18 



89 



erp, All-ACC 




Ralph Sonntag won the Jacobs Blocking Trophy in 1969, awarded 
to the player voted as the outstanding blocker in the ACC by the 
coaches. 



1953 - FIRST TEAM 

Stan Jones - Tackle 
Jack Bowersox - Guard 
Bernie Faloney - Back 
Chester Hanulak - Back 

- SECOND TEAM 
Bui Walker - End 
Bob Morgan - Tackle 
Ralph Felton - Back 

- THIRD TEAM 

John Irvine - Center 
Marty Crytzer - End 

- PLAYER OF THE YEAR 
Bernie Faloney - Back 

- COACH OF THE YEAR 
Jim Tatum 

1954 - FIRST TEAM 

Bill Walker - End 
Dick Bielski - Back 
Ronnie Waller - Back 

- SECOND TEAM 

Bob Pellegrini - Guard 
John Irvine - Center 

- THIRD TEAM 

Jack Bowersox - Guard 

1955 - FIRST TEAM 

Mike Sandusky - Tackle 
Jack Davis - Guard 
Bob Pellegrini - Center 
Ed Vereb - Back 

- SECOND TEAM 
Bill Walker - End 
Russell Dennis - End 
Frank Tamburello - Back 



- PLAYER OF THE YEAR 

Bob Pellegrini - Center 

- COACH OF THE YEAR 
Jim Tatum 

- JACOBS BLOCKING TROPHY 
Bob Pellegrini - Center 

1956 - FIRST TEAM 

Mike Sandusky - Tackle 
Jack Davis - Guard 

- THIRD TEAM 

Gene Alderton - Center 

1957 - FIRST TEAM 

Ed Cooke - End 

Rod Breedlove - Guard 

- SECOND TEAM 

Gene Alderton - Center 

1958 -SECOND TEAM 

Fred Cole - Tackle 
Rod Breedlove - Guard 

1959 - SECOND TEAM 

Tom Gunderman - Guard 
Jim Joyce -Back 

1960 - FIRST TEAM 

Gary Collins - End 

1961 - FIRST TEAM 

Gary Collins - End 
Bob Hacker - Center 

- SECOND TEAM 
Roger Shoals - Tackle 
Bill Kirchiro - Tackle 

1962 - FIRST TEAM 

Walter Rock - Guard 
Dick Shiner - Back 
Tom Brown - Back 



1963 - SECOND TEAM 

Dick Shiner - Back 

1964 - FIRST TEAM 

Jerry Fishman - Guard 

- SECOND TEAM 

Olaf Drozdov - Tackle 
Tom Hickey - Back 

1965 -DEFENSIVE TEAM 

Bob Sullivan - Back 

1966 -DEFENSIVE TEAM 

Dick Absher - End 

1969 - OFFENSIVE TEAM 

Ralph Sonntag - Tackle 

- JACOBS BLOCKING TROPHY 
Ralph Sonntag 

1970 - DEFENSIVE TEAM 

Guy Roberts - End 

1971 - OFFENSIVE TEAM 

Dan Bungon - End 

1972 - DEFENSIVE TEAM 

Paul Vellano - Guard 
Bob Smith - Safety 
1973- DEFENSIVE TEAM 

Randy White - Tackle 
Paul Vellano - Guard 
Bob Smith - Safety 

- OFFENSIVE TEAM 
Louis Carter - Tailback 



- COACH OF THE YEAR 

Jerry Claiborne 

1974 - DEFENSIVE TEAM 

Bob Smith - Safety 

Harry Walters - Linebacker 

Randy White - Tackle 

- OFFENSIVE TEAM 
Louis Carter - Tailback 
Stan Rogers - Tackle 
Steve Mike-Mayer - Kicker 

- PLAYER OF THE YEAR 
Randy White - Def. Tackle 

1975 - DEFENSIVE TEAM 

LeRoy Hughes - End 
Jim Brechbiel - Back 
Kevin Benson - Linebacker 
Joe Campbell - Tackle 
Paul Divito - Guard 

- OFFENSIVE TEAM 
Marion Koprowski - Tackle 

- SPECIALIST 

Mike Sochko - Kicker 

- COACH OF THE YEAR 
Jerry Claiborne 

1976 - DEFENSIVE TEAM 

Ken Roy - Back 
Joe Campbell - Tackle 
Brad Carr - Linebacker 
Larry Seder - Guard 



S. 



83 



^ 




Walt Rock succeeded at every level, earning both All-ACC and 
All-Pro honors. 



90 



All-Terp, All-ACC 



- OFFENSIVE TEAM 

Mark Manges - Quarterback 
Ed Fulton - Guard 
Tom Schick - Tackle 

- COACH OF THE YEAR 
Jerry Claiborne 

1977 - DEFENSIVE TEAM 

Ted Klaube - Guard 

1978 - DEFENSIVE TEAM 

Bruce Palmer - Guard 
Charles Johnson - Tackle 
Lloyd Burruss - Back 

1979 - OFFENSIVE TEAM 

Larry Stewart - Tackle 
Charlie Wysocki - Tailback 

- SPECIALIST 

Dale Castro - Kicker 

1980 - OFFENSIVE TEAM 

Charlie Wysocki - Tailback 

- DEFENSIVE TEAM 
Lloyd Burruss - Back 
Marlin Van Horn - Guard 

1982 - OFFENSIVE TEAM 

Dave Pacella - Tackle 

- DEFENSIVE TEAM 
Mark Duda - Tackle 

- SPECIALIST 

Jess Atkinson - Kicker 

- COACH OF THE YEAR 
Bobby Ross 

1983 - OFFENSIVE TEAM 

Ron Solt - Guard 

- DEFENSIVE TEAM 
Clarence Baldwin - Back 
Pete Koch - Tackle 

Enc Wilson - Line backer 



1984 - OFFENSIVE TEAM 

Kevin Glover - Center 
Greg Hill - Wide Receiver 

- DEFENSIVE TEAM 

Al Covington - Safety 
Bruce Mesner - Guard 
Eric Wilson - Line backer 

1985 - OFFENSIVE TEAM 

J. D. Maarleveld - Tackle 
Len Lynch - Guard 

- DEFENSIVE TEAM 

Al Covington - Safety 
Keeta Covington - 
Corner Back 
Chuck Faucette - 
Linebacker 

Bruce Mesner - Guard 

1986 - DEFENSIVE TEAM 

Keeta Covington - 

Corner Back 
Chuck Faucette - 

Linebacker 
Bruce Mesner-Guard 

1987 - OFFENSIVE TEAM 

Ferrell Edmunds - End 

- DEFENSIVE TEAM 

Kevin Walker - Lmebacker 

1988 - OFFENSIVE TEAM 

Dan Plocki - Kicker 

- DEFENSIVE TEAM 
Warren Powers - Tackle 

1989 - DEFENSIVE TEAM 

Larry Webster - Tackle 




Louis Carter ran his way to All-ACC as well as MVP of the 1974 
Peach Bowl 




Mark Manges was among the great Terp quarterbacks, earning All-ACC accolades in 1976. 



91 



k 1991 Virginia 



September 7 — Maryland 17, Virginia 6 
College Park, MD 




Virginia 3 3=6 

Maryland 7 3 7 = 17 

MDlst Qtr 4:01 Troy Jackson 7 yard run, Dan DeArmas PAT 
MD2ndQtr 11:21 Dan DeArmas 25 yard field goal 

VA2ndQtr 0:17 Michael Husted 20 yard field goal 

VA4thQtr 14:53 Michael Husted 22 yard field goal 

MD4thQtr 1:50 Mark Mason 5 yard run, Dan DeArmas PAT 

The 1991 Terps opened the second generation Byrd Stadium just as the 
1950 Terps opened the first generation Byrd Stadium - with a victory. On 
a beautiful day full of sunshine and Maryland pride, Maryland opened the 
1991 season as it had closed the 1990 season with a win over Virgma. 
Quarterback Jim Sandwisch, starting his first varsity game completed 15 
of 25 passes for 125 yards. Running backs Troy Jackson and Mark Mason 
proclaimed themselves a 1-2 punch as each ran for 96 yards. It was a vic- 
tory yes, but a costly one at that. Offensive lineman Steve Ingram would 
be lost in the first half with a broken leg - he would miss the remainder 
of the season. The tough Terp defense bottled the vaunted Cavalier rush- 
ing attack and held it to 120 yards. 



Offense 




Defense 




SE 


Gene Thomas 


LE 


Greg Hmes 


LT 


Dave deBruin 


LT 


Larry Webster 


LG 


Kevin Arlme 


NG 


Ralph Orta 


C 


Mitch Suplee 


RT 


Lubo Zizakovic 


RG 


Jade Dubis 


RE 


Mark Sturdivant 


RT 


David Dunne 


hb 


Mike Jarmolowich 


TE 


Joe Cooper 


ILB 


Dave Marrone 


QG 


Jim Sandwisch 


LC 


Mike Thomas 


HB 


Frank Wycheck 


FS 


Bill Inge 


AB 


Troy Jackson 


SS 


Ron Reagan 


FL 


Richie Harris 


RC 


Brandon Bertha 



Team Statistics 


Maryland 


Virginia 


First downs 


18 


15 


rushing 


12 


7 


passing 


5 


7 


penalty 


1 


1 


Rushing attempts 


52 


36 


Yards gained rushing 


205 


146 


Yards lost rushing 


38 


26 


Net yards rushing 


167 


120 


Net yards passing 


125 


226 


passes attempted 


24 


36 


passes completed 


15 


17 


had intercepted 


1 





Total offensive plays 


76 


72 


Total Net Yards 


292 


346 


average gain per play 


3.8 


4.8 


Return yards 


39 


45 


Fumbles: number— lost 


0-0 


6-4 


Penalties: number — yards 


4-42 


3-15 


Interceptions: number— yards 


0-0 


1-5 


Number of punts— yards 


9-367 


6-276 


average per punt 


40.8 


46.0 


Punt returns: number— yards 


5-39 


6-40 


Kickoff returns: number— yards 


3-64 


4-84 


Possession time 


32:13 


27:47 


Third-down conversions 


4 of 14 


3 of 16 


Sacks by 


3-22 


2-12 


Fourth-down conversions 


1 of 2 


1 of 2 



Individual Leaders 

Passing 

Terps: Jim Sandwisch, 24-15-1 125 0TD long of 22 

Cavaliers: Matt Blundin, 36-17-0 226 0TD long of 40 

Rushing 

Terps: Troy Jackson, 22-96 1TD long of 17 

Mark Mason, 21-96 1TD long of 27 
Cavaliers: Terry Kirby, 13-73 0TD long of 22 

Nikki Fisher, 4-9 0TD long of 4 

Receiving 

Terps: Frank Wycheck, 5-61 0TD long of 22 

Gene Thomas, 1-3 0TD long of 3 
Cavaliers: Brian Satola, 1-16 0TD long of 16 , 

Aaron Mundy, 8-116 0TD long of 27 

Punting 

Terps: Dan DeArmas, 9-367, 40.8, long of 51 

Cavaliers: Ed Garno, 6-276, 46.0, long of 53 

Field Goals 

Terps: Dan DeArmas, 1 of 1, long of 25 

Cavaliers: Michael Husted, 2 of 2, long of 22 

Returns 

Terps: Mike Hopson, 5-39 punt returns 
Mike Hopson, 1-18 kjckoff returns 
Doug Lawrence, 2-46 kickoff returns 

Cavaliers: Larry Holmes, 6-40 punt returns 

Maryland Defense 

Ron Reagan 7UT 3AT 

Larry Johnson 6UT 4AT 

Mike Jarmolowich 1UT 9UT 

2 fumble recoveries, 2 pass break-ups 

Attendance: 36,198 



92 



Terplayback 1991 Syracuse 



September 14 — Syracuse 31, Maryland 17 
College Park, MD 




Syracuse. . 
Maryland . 



MDlst Qtr 
SYR 1st Qtr 

MDlst Qtr 
SYR2nd Qtr 
SYR3rd Qtr 

MD3rd Qtr 
SYR4th Qtr 
SYR4th Qtr 



John Biskup PAT 

Troy Jackson 4 yard TD run, Dan DeArmas PAT 

Doug Womack 7 yard TD run, John Biskup PAT 

John Lusardi interception in endzone, John Biskup 
PAT 

Dan DeArmas 40 yard field goal 

John Biskup 43 yard field goal 

Shelby Hill 61 yard punt return, John Biskup PAT 





Team Statistics 


Maryland 


Syracuse 




First Downs 


14 


17 




Rushing 


4 


5 




Passing 


9 


11 




Penalty 


1 


1 




Rushing Attempts 


33 


37 




Yards gained rushing 


137 


161 




Yards lost rushing 


39 


50 




Net yards rushing 


98 


111 




Net yards passing 


170 


251 




Passes Attempted 


44 


25 




Passes Completed 


22 


15 




Had Intercepted 


4 


1 




Total offensive plays 


77 


62 




Total net yards 


268 


362 




Average gain per play 


3.5 


5.8 




Return yards 


50 


98 




Fumbles: number-lost 


2-1 


3-3 




Penalties: number-yards 


5-66 


9-75 




Interceptions: number-yards 


1-30 


4-0 


7 7 7 10 - 31 


Number of punts-yards 


9-383 


8-312 


14 3 = 17 


Average per punt 


42.6 


39.0 




Punt returns: number-yards 


2-15 


7-98 




Kickoff returns: number-yards 


1-14 


3-77 


DeArmas PAT 


Possession time 


27:50 


32:10 




Third-down conversions 


7 of 19 


3 of 13 


)m Marvin Graves, 


Sacks by 


6/-42 Yards 


5/-28 Yards 




Fourth-down conversions 


0/0 


0/0 



Maryland played bowl-bound Syracuse in the first night game in the new 
Byrd Stadium under 81 degree heat at game time. The Terp running game 
came out of the gate quickly as Mark Mason galloped 71 yards for an 
early 1st quarter Terp score. A-back Troy Jackson made the score 14-7 in 
favor of the red and white at the end of the first quarter with a four-yard 
run. From that point on, visiting Syracuse outscored the Terps 24-7 to 
take the wm back to up state New York. The visiting Orange scored five 
different ways - an 18 yard Marvin Graves pass: a seven yard keeper by 
quarterback Doug Womack; an mterception of the Terp quarterback in the 
endzone for a touchdown by John Lusardi; a 61 yard punt return by 
Shelby Hill and a 43- yard field goal by John Biskup. 



Offense 




SE 


Gene Thomas 


LT 


Dave debruin 


LG 


Kevin Arline 


C 


Mitch Suplee 


RG 


Jade Dubis 


RT 


David Dunne 


TE 


Joe Cooper 


QB 


Jim Sandwisch 


HB 


Frank Wycheck 


AB 


Troy Jackson 


FL 


Richie Harris 



Defense 

LE 

LT 

NG 

RT 

RE 

HB 

ILB 

LC 

FS 

SS 

RC 



Greg Hmes 
Larry Webster 
Ralph Orta 
Lubo Zizakovic 
Mark Sturdivant 
Louis Johnson 
Mike Jarmolowich 
Mike Thomas 
Bui Inge 
Ron Reagan 
Brandon Bertha 



Individual Statistics 

Passing 

Terps: Jim Sandwisch, 25-14-1, 87 Yards, 0TD Long of 13 

John Kaleo, 19-8-3, 83 Yards, 0TD, Long of 29 
Orange: Marvin Graves, 25-15-1, 251 Yards. 1TD. Long of 41 

Rushing 

Terps: Mark Mason, 10-96, 1TD, Long of 71 

Troy Jackson, 15-34, 1TD, Long of 6 
Orange: David Walker, 14-92, 0TD, Long of 17 

Terry Richardson. 8-35, 0TD. Long of 10 

Receiving 

Terps: Frank Wycheck, 7-61, 0TD, Long of 15 

Mark Mason, 4-30, 0TD, Long of 11 
Orange: Qadry Ismail, 6-141, 0TD, Long of 41 

David Walker, 3-33, 1TD, Long of 33 

Punting 

Terps: Dan DeArmas, 9-383, 42.6, Long of 51 

Orange: Pat O'Neill, 8-312, 39.0, Long of 72 

Field Goals 

Terps: Dan DeArams, 1-1, Long of 40 

Orange: John Biskup, 1-1, Long of 43 



Returns 
Terps: 



Orange: 



Andre Vaughn, 1-30. interception returns 
Doug Lawrence, 1-14, kickoff returns 
Mike Hopson, 2-15 punt returns 
Qadry Ismail, 3-77, kickoff returns 
Shelby Hill, 7-98, punt returns 



Maryland Defense 

Terps: Mike Jarmolowich 7UT 6AT 1 fumble recovery 

Bill Inge 4UT 4AT 1 pass breakup 
Orange: John Lusardi 7UT 7AT 1 mterception (TD) 

Kevin Mitchell 5UT 4AT 2 sacks 

Attendance: 41,310 



93 



ayback 1991 West Virginia 



September 21 — West Virginia 37, Maryland 7 
College Park, MD 



_A3 
r-^Jr.'^ Terrapin 








r* Jpir ^. 









West Virginia 14 7 7 9 = 37 

Maryland 7 0= 7 

MDlstQtr 9:38 John Kaleo 35 yard pass to Richie Harris, 
Dan DeArmas PAT 

WV 1 st Qtr 6:15 Darren Studstill 1 3 yard pass to Adrian Murrell, 
Mark Johnson PAT 

WV 1 st Qtr 2:13 Darren Studstill 3 yard run, Mark Johnson PAT 

WV2nd Qti 4:27 Rodney Woodard 6 yard run, Mark Johnson PAT 

WV3rd Qtr 9:30 Adrian Murrell 1 yard run, Mark Johnson PAT 

WV4th Qtr 8:24 Mark Johnson 24 yard field goal 

WV 4th Qtr 3:15 Jim Freeman 1 yard run, Mark Johnson PAT no good 

West Virginia scored m every quarter to win in College Park for the sec- 
ond time m its last three tries. Maryland scored the first touchdown of the 
game as John Kaleo hit Richie Hams on the right flat for a 35 yard 
touchdown. The visiting Mountaineers scored the next 37 points to take 
the win. West Virginia won the battle m the ground, gaming 334 yards 
rushing to Maryland's 65, to push Maryland off the ball. Quarterback John 
Kaleo got his first Division I start in the late afternoon (4:00 p.m.) in Byrd 
and completed 1-3 passes for the touchdown to Harris. Punter Dan 
DeArmas had a booming day as he punted six times for a 43.8 yards per 
punt average. 



Offense 




Defense 




SE 


Gene Thomas 


LE 


Greg Hines 


LT 


Dave deBruin 


LT 


Larry Webster 


LG 


Kevm Arline 


NG 


Ralph Orta 


C 


Mitch Suplee 


RT 


Luba Zizakovic 


RG 


Jade Dubis 


RE 


Mark Sturdivant 


RT 


David Dunne 


ILB 


Mike Jarmolowich 


TE 


Joe Cooper 


ILB 


Dave Marrone 


QB 


John Kaleo 


LC 


Mike Thomas 


HB 


Frank Wycheck 


FS 


Bill Inge 


AB 


Troy Jackson 


SS 


Ron Reagan 


FL 


Richie Harris 


RC 


Brandon Bertha 



Team Statistics 

First downs 

rushing 

passing 

penalty 
Rushing attempts 
Yards gained rushing 
Yards lost rushing 
Net yards rushing 
Net yards passing 

passes attempted 

passes completed 

Had intercepted 
Total offensive plays 
Total net yards 

average gain per play 
Return yards 
Fumbles: number — lost 
Penalties: number— yards 
Interceptions: number— yards 
Number of punts— yards 

average per punt 
Punt returns: number— yards 
Kickoff returns: number— yards 
Possession time 
Third-down conversions 
Sacks by 
Fourth-down conversions 

Individual Leaders 

Passing 

Terps: Jim Sandwisch, 19-11-0 0TD long of 17 

John Kaleo, 3-1-0 1TD long of 35 
Tony Scarpino, 10-5-1 0TD long of 9 

Mountaineers: Darren Studstill, 12-4-1 1TD long of 13 

Rushing 

Terps: Mark Mason, 17-68 0TD long of 15 

Troy Jackson, 5-6 0TD long of 5 
Mountaineers: Adrian Murrell, 20-141 1TD long of 44 

Receiving 

Terps: Frank Wycheck. 4-21 0TD long of 1 1 

Richie Harris, 3-53 1TD long of 35 
Mountaineers: Jon Ford, 1-8 0TD long of 8 

Punting 

Terps: Dan DeArmas, 6-263, 43 8, long of 56 

Hountaineers: John Vanderjagt, 5-184, 36.8, long of 50 

Field Goals 

Terps: None 

Mountaineers: Mark Johnson, 1 of 1 long of 24 

Returns 

Terps: Mike Hopson, 3-9 punt return 

Doug Lawrence, 3-57 kickoff returns 
Mountaineers: John Jett, 3-20 punt returns 

Maryland Defense 



Maryland 


West Virginia 


12 


20 


4 


16 


6 


2 


2 


2 


27 


63 


89 


361 


24 


27 


65 


334 


142 


39 


32 


13 


17 


4 


1 


1 


59 


76 


207 


373 


3.5 


4.9 


9 


80 


2-1 


1-0 


5-35 


9-68 


1-0 


1-59 


6-263 


5-184 


43.8 


36.8 


3-9 


4-21 


7-124 


1-23 


25:43 


34:17 


5 of 13 


5 of 16 


2 of 9 


3 of 15 


Oof 3 


2 of 2 



Hugh Brown 


1UT 


9AT 


Doug Lawrence 


4UT 


4AT 


Mike Jarmolowich 


3UT 


4AT 


Attendance: 40,442 







94 



Terplayback 1991 Pittsburgh 



October 5— Pittsburgh 24, Maryland 20 
Pittsburgh, PA 



It 



•* ;2=r it 




Maryland . . . 
Pittsburgh . . 

MDlst Qtr 
Pitt2nd Qtr 

Pitt2nd Qtr 

MD2nd Qtr 

Pirt3rd Qtr 
Pitt4th Qtr 
MD4th Qtr 



Scott Kaplan PAT 

5:19 Eric Seaman 27 yard pass from Alex Van Pelt. Scott 
Kaplan PAT 

2:05 Jason Kremus 23 yard pass from Jim Sandwisch, 
Dan DeArmas PAT 

14:18 Vince Williams 2 yard run, Scott Kaplan PAT 

6:41 Scott Kaplan 19 yard field goal 

6:04 Marcus Badgett 58 yard pass from Jim Sandwisch, 
2pt conversion attempt failed 





Team Statistics 


Maryland 


Pittsburgh 




First Downs 


2 


28 




Rushing 


9 


9 




Passing 


11 


16 




Penalty 


2 


3 




Rushing Attempts 


36 


39 




Yards gained rushing 


198 


186 




Yards lost rushing 


42 


28 




Net yards rushing 


156 


158 




Net yards passing 


229 


353 




Passes Attempted 


48 


46 




Passes Completed 


23 


27 




Had Intercepted 


2 


1 




Total offensive plays 


84 


85 




Total net yards 


385 


511 




Average gain per play 


4,6 


6.0 




Return yards 





-3 




Fumbles: number-lost 


1-0 


3-1 




Penalties: number-yards 


8-64 


8-65 




Interceptions: number-yards 


1-0 


2-0 


7 7 6 = 20 


Number of punts-yards 


10-332 


5-199 


14 7 3 = 24 


Average per punt 


33.2 


39.8 




Punt returns: number-yards 


0-0 


l-(-3) 




Kickoff returns: number-yards 


2-38 


1-28 


DeArmas PAT 


Possession time 


27:46 


32:14 




Third-down conversions 


6 Of 19 


6 of 16 


n Alex Van Pelt, 


Sacks by 


6/- 19 Yards 


5/-35 Yards 




Fourth-down conversions 


1-2 


0-2 



Maryland entered Pitt Stadium on a partly sunny, 73 degree day as a 
huge underdog but nearly went home with a victory. Terp quarterback 
Jim Sandwisch a shining day in the Pittsburgh sun completing 22 of 47 
passes for 230 yards and two touchdowns. Sandwich drove the Terps up 
and down the field and almost in for the win late in the fourth quarter. He 
completed a 58-yard pass to Marcus Badgett midway through the fourth 
quarter to close the Panther gap to four at 24-20. Sandwisch drove the 
offense deep mto enemy territory before being intercepted with only 31 
ticks on the clock. Mark Mason was the running star of the game as he 
slashed and ran his way to 118 yards - a season high. 



Offense 




SE 


Gene Thomas 


LT 


Dave debruin 


LG 


Kevin Arline 


C 


Mitch Suplee 


RG 


Jade Dubis 


RT 


David Dunne 


TE 


Joe Cooper 


QB 


Jim Sandwisch 


HB 


Frank Wycheck 


AB 


Troy Jackson 


FL 


Richie Hams 



Defense 

LE 

LT 

NG 

RT 

RE 

HB 

HB 

LC 

FS 

SS 

RC 



Greg Hmes 
Larry Webster 
Ralph Orta 
Lubo Zizakovic 
Joel Goode 
Dave Marrone 
Mike Jarmolowich 
Doug Lawrence 
Bui Inge 
Ron Reagan 
Mike Thomas 



Individual Statistics 

Passing 

Terps: Jim Sandwisch, 47-22-2, 230 Yards, 2TD Long of 58 

John Kaleo, 1-1-0, (-1) Yards, 0TD, Long of (-1) 
Pitt: Alex Van Pelt, 45-27-1, 353 Yards, 2TD, Long of 58 

Rushing 

Terps: Mark Mason, 17-118, 1TD, Long of 22 
Troy Jackson, 8-47, 0TD. Long of 19 

Pitt: Curtis Martin, 23-121, 0TD, Long of 12 

Jermaine Williams, 10-37, 0TD, Long of 11 

Receiving 

Terps: Marcus Badgett, 2-70, 1TD, Long of 58 

Gene Thomas, 3-29, 0TD, Long of 13 
Pitt: Dave Moore, 7-70. 0TD. Long of 22 

Curtis Martin, 6-66, 0TD, Long of 18 

Punting 

Terps: Dan DeArmas, 10-332, 33.2, Long of 41 
Pitt: Leon Theodorou, 5-199, 39.8, Long of 52 

Field Goals 

Pitt: Scott Kaplan. 1-2, Long of 19 



Returns 

Terps: 

Pitt: 



Andre Vaughn, 1-0, mterception returns 
Mark Mason, 2-38. kickoff returns 
Steve Israel. 1-28, kickoff returns 
Doug Whaley, 1-0. Interception returns 



Maryland Defense 

Mike Jarmolowich 5UT 
Bill Inge 8UT 

Charles Williams 8UT 
Doug Whaley 5UT 

Attendance: 38.328 



5AT 

1AT 

1AT 1 tackle for loss 

3AT 1 tackle for loss 



95 



Terplayback 1991 Georgia Tech 



October 12— Georgia Tech 34, Maryland 10 
Atlanta, GA 



GEORGIA TECH 




Maryland 

Georgia Tech. 

MD2nd Qtr 
GT2nd Qtr 
GT2nd Qtr 
GT3rd Qtr 
GT3rd Qtr 

GT3rd Qtr 

GT4th Qtr 



3 7 = 10 
10 17 7 = 34 



13:36 Dan DeArmas 29 yard Field Goal 

4:02 David Hendrix 8 yard run, Scott Sisson PAT 

0:00 Scott Sisson 37 Yard Field Goal 

10:16 Scott Sisson 30 Yard Field Goal 

5:36 All Harris yard pass from Shawn Jones, Scott Sisson 
PAT 

2:38 Jason McGill 49 yard pass from Shawn Jones, Scott 
Sisson PAT 

14:16 Keenan Walker 82 yard pass from Shawn Jones, Scott 
Sisson PAT 



MD4th Qtr 6:17 John Kaleo 1 yard run, Dan DeArmas PAT 

Maryland was swarmed under as the Hive rolled to a big victory on a sunny 
and pleasant day in Atlanta. Maryland was playing well, and hard, but had 
its momentum as the second quarter ended as Tech's kicking specialist 
Scott Sisson kicked a 37 yard field goal with no time remaining on the clock. 
The three-pointer gave Tech a 10-3 lead at the intermission. Maryland had 
its spirit downed once again in the third quarter as A-back Mark Mason has 
his season ended when he suffered a broken leg. Before the broken leg, Ma- 
son seemed on his way to greatness - his early season numbers were ap- 
proaching those of great Terp runners of years past. Quarterback John Kaleo 
scored Maryland's only touchdown of the day on a 1-yard plunge up the 
middle. Dan DeArmas added the point after touchdown. 



Offense 

SE 

LT 

LG 

C 

RG 

RT 

TE 

QB 

HB 

AB 

FL 



Gene Thomas 
Dave deBrum 
Kevin Arline 
Mitch Suplee 
Jade Dubis 
David Dunne 
Brett Stevenson 
Jim Sandwisch 
Frank Wycheck 
Troy Jackson 
Richie Harris 



Defense 

LE 

LT 

NG 

RT 

RE 

ILB 

ILB 

LC 

FS 

SS 

RC 



Greg Hines 
Larry Webster 
Ralph Orta 
Lubo Zizakovic 
Mark Sturdivant 
Mike Jarmolowich 
Dave Marrone 
Doug Lawrence 
Bill Inge 
Ron Reagan 
Brandon Bertha 



Team Statistics 

First Downs 

Rushing 

Passing 

Penalty 

Rushing Attempts 
Yards Gained Rushing 
Yards Lost Rushing 
Net Yards Rushing 
Net Yards Passing 

Passes Attempted 

Passes Completed 

Had Intercepted 
Total Offensive Plays 
Total Net Yards 

Average Gam Per Play 
Return Yards 
Fumbles: Number-Lost 
Penalties: Number- Yards 
Interceptions: Number- Yards 
Number of Punts-Yards 

Average Per Punt 
Punt Returns: Number- Yards 
Kickoff Returns: Number- Yards 
Possession Time 
Third-Down Conversions 
Sacks By 



Individual Statistics 



Maryland 

14 

10 

4 



45 

151 

62 

89 

162 

33 

14 

2 

78 

251 

3.2 

41 

2-1 
6-68 

0-0 
9-390 
43.3 
5-41 
5-75 
30:48 
4 of 19 

1-6 



Georgia Tech 

19 

8 

10 

1 

44 
140 

19 
121 
308 

31 

15 



75 
429 

5.7 

69 

2-1 
6-38 
2-17 
8-311 
39.0 
7-52 
2-23 
29:12 
7 of 17 
3-20 



Passing 

Terps: Jim Sandwisch, 25-11-1 99 yards, 0TD long of 22 

Jackets: Shawn Jones, 21-10-0, 227 yards, 3TD, Long of 82 

Rushing 

Terps: Mark Mason, 17-74 yards 0TD long of 13 

Doug Burnett, 8-32 yards, 0TD, Long of 13 
Jackets: David Hendrix, 8-34 yards 1TD long of 11 

Receiving 

Terps: Marcus Badgett, 4-96, 0TD, Long of 36 

Brett Stevenson, 2-21, 0TD, Long of 16 
Jackets: Greg Lester, 3-83 0TD long of 28 

Jason McGill, 3-68 1TD long of 49 

Punting 

Terps: Dan DeArmas, 9-390, 43.3, long of 50 

Jackets: Jason bender, 7-277, 39.6, long of 48 

Field Goals 

Terps: Dan DeArmas, 1 of 1, long of 29 

Jackets: Scott Sisson, 2 of 2, long of 37 



Returns 
Terps: 



Jackets: 



Mark Mason, 1-29 kickoff returns 
Larry Washington 2-27 kickoff returns 
Mike Hopson, 3-25, punt returns 
Kevin Tisdel, 1-19 kickoff returns 
Willie Clay, 6-42 punt returns 



Maryland Defense 

Mike Jarmolowich 10UT 
Mark Sturdivant 6UT 

Lubo Zizakovic 2UT 

Attendance: 42,011 



1AT 
2AT 
1AT 1 Sack (-6) 



96 



Terplayback 1991 Wake Forest 



October 19 - Maryland 23, Wake Forest 22 
Winston-Salem, NC 



KICKOFF 



Maryland 7 10 6 = 23 

WakeForest 3 16 3 = 22 

WFlstQtr 6:14 Mike Green 29 Yard field goal 

WF2ndQtr 14:57 Mike Green 22 Yard field goal 

MD2ndQtr 8:40 Troy Jackson 2 yard run, Dan DeArmas PAT 

WF2nd Qtr 6:15 Keith West 66 yard pass to Todd Dixon, Mike Green 
PAT 

Wf 2nd Qtr 0:20 Mike Green 44 yard field goal 

WF2ndQtr 00 Mike Green 43 yard field goal 

MD3rdQtr 6:55 Dan DeArmas 27 yard field goal 

MD3rdQtr 2:45 Jim Sandwisch 1 1 yard pass to Marcus Badgett, 
Dan DeArmas PAT 

WF4th Qtr 12:59 Mike Green 1 9 yard field goal 

MD4th Qtr 1:34 Jim Sandwisch 35 yard pass to Frank Wycheck Dan 
DeArmas PAT 

Quarterback Jim Sandwisch engineered a seven play 80 yard dnve with 
under three minutes remaining to give Maryland the thrilling 23-22 vic- 
tory over Wake Forest m Winston- Salem. Sandwisch ended the dnve as 
he hooked up with Frank Wycheck on a 35 yard scoring pass that put 
Maryland up for the first time durmg the game. Wycheck caught two 
passes for 58 yards on the final dnve. Sandwisch completed 18 passes for 
318 yards on the day; wide out Marcus Badgett led the way with 94 pass 
reception yards a sunny 84 degree day. After Allowing the homestandmg 
Deacons 19 first half points the Terps defense stood up and allowed only 
a fourth quarter field goal m the second half. 



SE 


Gene Thomas 


LT 


Dave deBruin 


LG 


Ron Staffileno 


C 


Mitch Suplee 


RG 


Jade Dubis 


RT 


David Dunne 


TE 


Joe Cooper 


QB 


John Kaleo 


HB 


Frank Wycheck 


AB 


Troy Jackson 


FL 


Richie Hams 



Defense 

LE 
LT 
NG 
RT 
RE 
ILB 

hb 

LC 
FS 
SS 
RC 



Greg Hines 
Larry Webster 
Ralph Orta 
Lubo Zizakovic 
Mark Sturdivant 
Mike Jarmolowich 
Dave Marrone 
Mike Thomas 
Bill Inge 
Ron Reagan 
Brandon Bertha 



Team Statistics 


Maryland 


Wake Forest 


First Downs 


21 


24 


Rushing 


8 


13 


Passing 


12 


11 


Penalty 


1 





Rushing Attempts 


37 


50 


Yards Gained Rushing 


161 


224 


Yards Lost Rushing 


35 


30 


Net Yards Rushing 


126 


194 


Net Yards Passing 


318 


249 


Passes Attempted 


41 


39 


Passes Completed 


18 


20 


Had Intercepted 








Total Offensive Plays 


78 


89 


Total Net Yards 


444 


446 


Average Gain Per Play 


5.7 


5.0 


Return Yards 


19 


21 


Fumbles: Number-Lost 


1-1 


3-1 


Penalties: Number- Yards 


5-41 


5-45 


Interceptions: Number-Yards 


0-0 


0-0 


Number of Punts-Yards 


6-212 


6-247 


Average Per Punt 


35.0 


41.2 


Punt Returns: Number- Yards 


3-19 


3-21 


Kickoff Returns: Number- Yards 


3-58 


2-44 


Possession Time 


26:03 


33:57 


Third-Down Conversions 


4 of 13 


5 of 20 


Sacks By 


lof 11 


lof 14 



individual Statistics 

Passing 

Terps: Jim Sandwisch, 41-18-0, 318 yards 2TD long of 42 

Deacons: Keith West, 39-20-0, 249 yards 1TD long of 66 

Rushing 

Terps: Jim Sandwisch, 8-44. 0TD, Long of 18 

Troy Jackson, 12-19 1TD long of 9 
Deacons: Anthony Williams, 25-97 0TD long of 13 

Receiving 

Terps: Marcus Badgett, 5-94, 1TD. Long of 42 

Frank Wycheck, 3-83 1TD long of 35 
Deacons: Bobby Jones, 4-57 0TD long of 31 

Punting 

Terps: Dan DeArmas, 6-212, 35.0, long of 45 

Deacons: Kim Sheek, 5-204, 40.8, long of 49 

Field Goals 

Terps: Dan DeArmas, 1 of 2, Long of 27 
Deacons: Mike Green, 5 of 6, long of 44 

Returns 

Terps: Gen Thomas, 3-19, punt returns 

Marcus Badgett. 3-58. kickoff returns 
Deacons: George Coghill, 3-21 punt returns 



Maryland Defense 

Mike Jarmolowich 10UT 
Bill Inge 7UT 

Mike Thomas 8UT 

Attendance: 17,342 



3AT 
3AT 
1AT 



97 



back 1991 Duke 



October 26 — Duke 17, Maryland 13 
College Park, MD 




Duke 

Maryland . 

Mist Qtr 
D2nd Qtr 
M2nd Qtr 
D4th Qtr 

M4th Qtr 
D4th Qtr 



7 10 = 17 
7 3 3 = 13 



4:17 Troy Jackson 4 yard run, Dan DeArmas PAT 

2:12 Dave Brown 4 yard run, Randy Gardner PAT 

0:00 Dan DeArmas 50 yard field goal 

11:56 Dave Brown 27 yard pass to Brad Breedlove, Randy 
Gardner PAT 

6:51 Dan DeArmas 26 yard field goal 

1:57 Randy Gardner 26 yard field goal 



Homecoming for Maryland featured a strong kicking game and an offense 
that did not take advantage of its opportunities. The result: a heartbreak- 
ing loss. Terp kicker Dan DeArmas was a perfect two-for-two in field 
goals, and kicked a personal best 50 yard field goal with 0:00 left in the 
first half to give the Terps a 10-7 lead. That was the high point. Second 
half scoring belonged to Duke, with the big plays fourth quarter intercep- 
tions that led to the winning points and to stifling Maryland's last real 
chance at a comeback. With 12:56 to go an interception put the ball at 
Duke's 45, and three plays later the score was 14-13, Duke. With 3:24 left 
Duke intercepted at Maryland's 25 yard line, and Duke kicked a field goal 
six plays later to account for the final score. The weather was perfect: 68 
degrees, sunny and calm. 



Oftem 


e 


Defense 




SE 


Marcus Badgett 


LE 


Joel Goode 


LT 


Dave Hack 


LT 


Larry Webster 


LG 


Dave deBruin 


NG 


Ralph Orta 


C 


Mitch Suplee 


RT 


Derek Steele 


RG 


Jade Dubis 


RE 


Greg Hines 


RT 


David Dunne 


ILB 


Dave Marrone 


TE 


Joe Cooper 


ILB 


Mike Jarmolowich 


QB 


Jim Sandwisch 


LC 


Brandon Bertha 


HB 


Frank Wycheck 


FS 


Bill Inge 


AB 


Doug Burnett 


SS 


Ron Reagan 


FL 


Richie Harris 


RC 


Mike Thomas 



Team Statistics 

First downs 

Rushing 

Passmg 

Penalty 

Rushing attempts 
Yards gained rushing 
Yards lost rushing 
Net yards rushing 
Net yards passing 

Passes attempted 

Passes completed 

Had intercepted 
Total offensive plays 
Total net yards 

Average gain per play 
Fumbles: number -lost 
Penalties: number -yards 
Interceptions: number -yards 
Number of punt-yards 

Average per punt 
Punt returns: number -yards 
Kickoff returns: number -yards 
Possession time 
Third-down conversions 
Sacks by 
Fourth-down conversions 

Individual Statistics 



Maryland 

19 
9 
8 
2 

43 
172 
20 
152 
136 
30 
15 
4 

73 

288 

3.9 

1-0 

8-66 

2-31 

6-221 

36.8 

2-10 

4-89 

31:55 

6 of 16 

3-23 

OofO 



Passing 

Terps: Jim Sandwisch, 30-15-4, 136 yards TD long of 19 

Devils: David Brown, 42-30-2, 234 yards 1 TD long of 27 

Rushing 

Terps: Larry Washington, 10-53 TD long of 14 

Troy Jackson, 13-55 1 TD long of 14 
Devils: Leroy Gallman, 6-21 TD long of 9 

Receiving 

Terps: Frank Wycheck, 6-50 TD long of 16 

Gene Thomas, 4-26 TD long of 17 
Devils: Aaron Shaw, 11-149 TD long of 22 

Leroy Gallman, 5-27 TD long of 12 

Walter Jones, 4-55 TD long of 17 

Punting 

Terps: Dan DeArmas, 6-221, 36.8, long of 49 
Devils: Tim Davis, 3-118, 39.3, long of 48 
David Brown, 2-65, 32.5, long of 38 

Field Goals 

Terps: Dan DeArmas, 2 of 2, long of 50 

Devils: Randy Garnder, 1 of 2, long of 26 

Returns 

Terps: Marcus Badgett, 4-89 kickoff returns, long of 27 

Brandon Bertha, 1-26 interception 

Ron Reagan, 1-5 interception 
Devils: Brad Breedlove, 1-47 kickoff return 



Duke 

22 
1 

19 
2 

28 

77 

43 

34 

334 

42 

30 
2 

70 

368 

5.3 

1-1 
6-42 
4-10 
5-183 
36.6 

2-5 
1-47 
28:05 
3 of 12 
5-17 
Oofl 



Maryland Defense 

Larry Webster 4UT 

Greg Hines 5UT 

Louis Johnson 6UT 

Mike Jarmolowich 8UT 

Dave Marrone 4UT 

Brandon Bertha 5UT 

Mike Thomas 6UT 

Attendance: 35,423 



3AT tackle for loss (-1), 2 sacks (-11), hurry of qb 

1AT tackle for loss (-1), recovered fumble 

3AT caused fumble 

7AT hurry of qb 

2AT tackle for loss (-6) 

1AT interception 

3AT 



98 



Terplayback 1991 North Carolina 



November 2 — North Carolina 24, Maryland 
Chapel Hill, NC 



CAROLINA 




Maryland 

North Carolina 



NCI st Qtr 3 
NC2nd Qtr 7 
NC2nd Qtr 



06 Natrone Means 7 yard run, Clint Gwaltney PAT 

24 Jason Stanicek 4 yard TD pass to Corey Holliday, 
Clint Gwaltney PAT 



NC4thQtr 11:45 Clint Gwaltney 22 yard field goal 

Many statistics told a sad tale for the Tenapin on a 73 degree, sunny day 
in Blue Heaven, but none was more graphic than the net rushing yardage 
advantage for Carolina: 308 yards to 67. The ball remained in the home 
team's hands for over 36 minutes, and the hands that moved the farthest 
were those of Natrone Means and William Henderson, each of whom 
gained more than 100 yards from tailback. The leading Terp rusher was 
freshman Larry Washington (33 yards). 



SE 


Gene Thomas 


LT 


Dave Hack 


LG 


Dave deBruin 


C 


Mitch Suplee 


RG 


Jade Dubis 


RT 


David Dunne 


TE 


Brett Stevenson 


QB 


Jim Sandwisch 


HB 


Frank Wycheck 


AB 


Troy Jackson 


FL 


Richie Hams 



Defense 

LE 

LT 

NG 

RT 

RE 

ILB 

HB 

LC 

FS 

SS 

RC 



Joel Goode 
Larry Webster 
Ralph Orta 
Lubo Zizakovic 
Mark Sturdivant 
Dave Marrone 
Mike Jarmolowich 
Brandon Bertha 
Bill Inge 
Ron Reagan 
Mike Thomas 







Team Statistics 


Maryland 


North Carolina 






First downs 


8 


24 






Rushing 


5 


18 






Passing 


2 


5 






Penalty 


1 


1 






Rushing attempts 


28 


63 






Yards gained rushing 


99 


343 






Yards lost rushing 


32 


35 






Net yards rushing 


67 


308 






Net yards passing 


64 


104 






Passes attempted 


25 


19 






Passes completed 


9 


12 






Had intercepted 


2 


2 






Total offensive plays 


53 


82 






Total net yards 


131 


412 






Average gain per play 


2.5 


5.1 






Return yards 


12 


102 






Fumbles: number -lost 


0-0 


2-1 






Penalties: number -yards 


6-49 


3-25 






Interceptions: number-yards 


2-12 


2-20 





ooo-o 


Number of punts -yards 


10-391 


3-112 


7 


14 3 = 24 


Average per punt 


39.1 


37.3 






Punt returns: number -yards 


0-0 


6-89 






Kickoff returns: number -yards 


3-53 


0-0 


rW 


altney PAT 


Possession time 


23:31 


36:29 






Third-down conversions 


4 of 14 


11 of 18 


iW 


altney PAT 


Sacks by 


2-17 


2-22 



Individual Statistics 

Passing 

Terps: Jim Sandwisch, 7-18-1, 52 yards TD long of 15 

Tony Scarpino, 2-6-0, 12 yards TD long of 7 
Heels: Jason Stanicek, 12-19-2, 104 yards 1 TD long of 20 

Rushing 

Terps: Larry Washington, 10-33 TD long of 10 

Heels: Natrone Means, 16-101 2 TDs long of 28 

William Henderson, 10-101 TD long of 57 
Randy Jordan, 14-73 TD long of 15 

Receiving 

Terps: Frank Wychek, 3-15 TD long of 9 

Brett Stevenson, 3-18 TD long of 15 
Heels: Corey Holliday, 3-39 TD long of 20 

Punting 

Terps: Dan DeArmas, 10-391, 39.1, long of 49 
Heels: Scott McAllister, 3-112, 37.3, long of 52 

Field Goals 

Heels: Clint Gwaltney, 1-1 long of 22 



Returns 

Terps: 

Heels: 



Marcus Badgett, 2-43 kickoff returns, long of 26 

Mike Jarmolowich, 1-12 interception 

Doug Lawrence, 1-0 interception 

Eric Blount, 6-89 punt returns, long of 29 



Maryland Defense 

Mike Jarmolowich 5UT 



Greg Hrnes 


5UT 


Joel Goode 


4UT 


Jim Panagos 


3UT 


Larry Webster 


6UT 


Ralph Orta 


5UT 


Attendance: 50,000 





14AT interception, tackle for loss (-3) 
4AT 2 tackles for loss, recovered fumble 
5AT sack, caused fumble 
OAT tackle for loss, caused fumble 
3AT 3 tackles for no gain 
OAT tackle for loss, sack 



99 



ayback 1991 Penn State 



November 9— Penn State 47, Maryland 7 
Baltimore, MD 




Perm State . 
Maryland . . 



14 10 6 17 = 47 
7=7 



Plst Qtr 
Plst Qtr 

P2nd Qtr 
P2nd Qtr 
P3rd Qtr 
P4th Qtr 
P4th Qtr 
M4th Qtr 
P4th Qtr 



11:55 Richie Anderson 11 yard run, Craig Fayak PAT 

2:14 Tony Sacca 3 yard TD pass to Kyle Brady, Craig 
Fayak PAT 

6:39 Tony Sacca 1 yard mn, Craig Fayak PAT 

1 : 56 Craig Fayak 40 yard field goal 

5:21 Richie Anderson 6 yard run, Craig Fayak PAT 

14:11 Craig Fayak 27 yard field goal 

13:27 QJ. McDuffie 60 yard punt return, Craig Fayak PAT 

7:56 Raphael Wall 11 yard run, Dan DeArmas PAT 

6:21 Kerry Collins 64 yard pass to J.T. Morris, 
V.J. Muscillo PAT 



Maryland set an individual record on this cold, cloudy day (44 degree) in 
Memorial Stadium -Raphael Wall returned nine kickoff returns for 159 
yards. That is not the kmd of record anyone wants, but that was the top 
statistical effort on a day when few passes were completed by the Terps, 
and Doug Burnett's 52 rushing yards was the outstanding effort from the 
line of scrimmage. Mike Jarmolowich's 15 tackles topped the Terp defen- 
sive effort. Penn State's road to the Fiesta Bowl ran right through Memo- 
rial Stadium in what might be the last college football game there. 



Offense 




SE 


Gene Thomas 


LT 


Dave Hack 


LG 


Dave deBruin 


C 


Mitch Suplee 


RG 


Jade Dubis 


RT 


David Dunne 


TE 


Brett Stevenson 


QB 


Jim Sandwisch 


HB 


Frank Wycheck 


AB 


Troy Jackson 


FL 


Richie Harris 



Defense 

LE 

LT 

NG 

RT 

RE 

ILB 

ILB 

LC 

FS 

SS 

RC 



Mark Sturdivant 
Larry Webster 
Ralph Orta 
Lubo Zizakovic 
Greg Hines 
Dave Marrone 
Mike Jarmolowich 
Doug Lawrence 
Bill Inge 
Ron Reagan 
Mike Thomas 



Team Statistics 


Maryland 


Penn State 


First downs 


12 


20 


Rushing 


7 


9 


Passing 


4 


9 


Penalty 


1 


2 


Rushing Attempts 


34 


52 


Yards gained rushing 


147 


234 


Yards lost rushing 


36 


20 


Net yards rushing 


111 


214 


Net yards passing 


99 


266 


Passes attempted 


28 


22 


Passes completed 


9 


15 


Had intercepted 


2 





Total offensive plays 


62 


74 


Total net yards 


210 


480 


Average gam per play 


3.4 


6.5 


Return yards 


17 


154 


Fumbles: number -lost 


0-0 


0-0 


Penalties: number -yards 


7-85 


4-35 


Inrterceptions: number -yards 


0-0 


2-23 


Number of punts -yards 


10-402 


4-156 


Average per punt 


40.2 


39.0 


Punt returns: number -yards 


3-17 


6-131 


Kickoff returns: number -yards 


9-159 


1-0 


Possession time 


25:18 


34:42 


Third-down conversions 


2 of 12 


7 of 15 


Sacks by 


2-12 


2-12 


Fourth-down conversions 


OofO 


Oof 1 



Doug Burnett, 6-52 TD long of 14 
Raphael Wall, 6-26 1 TD long of 11 
Richie Anderson, 16-96 2 TDs long of 30 



Inividual Statistics 

Passing 

Terps: Jim Sandwisch, 6-16-1, 71 yards TD long of 24 
John Kaleo, 3-12-0, 28 yards TD long of 18 

State: Tony Sacca, 13-18-0, 198 yards TD long of 54 
Kerry Collins, 2-4-1, 68 yards 1 TD long of 64 

Rushing 
Terps: 

State: 
Receiving 

Terps: Frank Wycheck, 2-19 TD long of 11 

Raphael Wall, 2-30 TD long of 23 

Richie Harris, 1-24 TD 
State: Terry Smith, 3-82 1 TD long of 54 

O.J. McDuffie, 4-62 TD long of 23 

J.T. Morris, 1-64 1 TD 

Punting 

Terps: Dan DeArmas, 10-402, 40.2, long of 52 
State: Doug Halkowski, 4-156, 39.0, long of 48 
Field Goals 



State: 

Returns 

Terps: 

State: 



Craig Fayak, 2 of 2, long of 40 

Raphael Wall, 9-159 kickoff returns, long of 24 
Mike Hopson, 3-17 punt returns, long of 8 
O.J. McDuffie, 5-121 punt returns, long of 60 



Maryland Defense 

Larry Webster HUT 

Mike Jarmolowich 9UT 

Dave Marrone 5UT 

Bill Inge 7UT 

Mark Sturdivant 7UT 

Doug Lawrence 5UT 

Ralph Orta 5UT 

Attendance: 57.416 



1AT tackle for loss(-4), sack (-11) 

3AT tackle for loss (-1) 

3AT tackle for no gain 

OAT 

3AT 

1AT 

1AT 



100 



Terplayback 1991 Clemson 



November 16— Clemson 40, Maryland 7 
Clemson, SC 




Maryland . 



7 0=7 

Clemson 10 10 14 6 = 40 

Mist Qtr 12:33 Jason Kremus 56 yard pass from Jim Sandwisch, 
Dan DeArmas PAt 

Cist Qtr 9:23 Tony Kennedy 1 yard run, Nelson Welch PAT 

Cist Qtr 2:47 Nelson Welch, 27 yard field goal 

C2ndQtr 14:11 Terry Smith 53 yard pass from DeChane Cameron, 
Nelson Welch PAT 

C2ndQtr 0:00 Nelson Welch 22 yard field goal 

C3rd Qtr 10:02 Rodney Blunt 4 yard run, Nelson Welch PAT 

C3rd Qtr 0:22 Richard Moncrief, 28 yard run, Nelson Welch PAT 

C4th Qtr 13:02 Darnel Stephens, 89 yard punt return, 
Nelson Welch PAT 

The Tiger has its fur mussed two minutes and 27 seconds into the game, 
but spent the rest of the afternoon licking its fur -and its chops. Jason 
Kremus's long TD reception from Jim Sandwisch was a wake-up call for 
the stnped beast; perhaps he had been lulled by the lovely weather into a 
nap (67 degrees, sunny, low humidity). In any case, Clemson's band had 
plenty of time to play its Hold That Tiger. Dan DeArmas had another 
great day punting the ball, he had nine kicks for a 42.3 average, including 
a 56 yarder. Frank Wycheck again led Maryland in pass receptions. 
Maryland's defensive line put great pressure on DeChane Cameron, sack- 
ing him three tunes for a -19 yards. 



Offense 




SE 


Gene Thomas 


LT 


Dave Hack 


LG 


Dave deBruin 


C 


Mitch Suplee 


RG 


Jade Dubis 


RT 


David Dunne 


TE 


Brett Stevenson 


QB 


Jim Sandwisch 


HB 


Frank Wycheck 


AB 


Troy Jackson 


FL 


Riclue Hams 



Defense 

LE 

LT 

NG 

RT 

RE 

ILB 

ILB 

LC 

FS 

SS 

RC 



Mark Sturdivant 
Larry Webster 
Ralph Orta 
Lubo Zizakovic 
Greg Hines 
Dave Marrone 
Mike Jarmolowich 
Doug Lawrence 
BUI Inge 
Ron Reagan 
Mike Thomas 



Team Statistics Maryland Clemson 

First downs 15 25 

Rushing 7 13 

Passing 6 10 

Penalty 2 2 

Rushing attempts 31 60 

Yards gained rushing 80 253 

Yards lost rushing 41 23 

Net yards rushing 39 230 

Net yards passing 175 230 

Passes attempted 30 25 

Passes completed 11 14 

Had intercepted 1 

Total offensive plays 61 85 

Total net yards 214 460 

Average gain per play 3.5 5.4 

Return yards 1 169 

Fumbles: number-lost 2-1 2-2 

Penalthes: number -yards 11-69 6-55 

Interceptions: number -yards 1-0 0-0 

Number of punts -yards 9-391 3-90 

Average per punt 42.3 30.0 

Punt returns: number -yards 1-1 7-169 

Kickoff returns: number -yards 7-126 2-53 

Possession time 24:43 35:17 

Third-down conversions 3 of 13 8 of 16 

Sacks by 3-19 4-19 

Individual Statistics 



Passing 
Terps: 

Tigers: 

Rushing 

Terps: 

Tigers: 



Jim Sandwisch, 8-18-0, 115 yards 1 TD long of 56 
John Kaleo, 3-12-0, 60 yards TD long of 25 
DeChane Camerson, 13-23-1, 213 yards 1 TD long of 52 

Doug Burnett, 6-17 TD long of 12 
Troy Jackson, 11-30 TD long of 11 
Rodney Blunt, 17-79 1 TD long of 10 
Richard Moncrief, 4-49 1 TD long of 28 



Receiving 



Terps: 
Tigers: 

Punting 
Terps: 
Tigers: 
Field Goals 



Frank Wycheck. 4-42 TD long of 24 
Jason Kremus, 1-56 1 TD 
Terry Smith. 4-120 1 TD long of 52 
Larry Ryans, 3-22 TD long of 8 



Dan DeArmas, 9-381, 42.3 long of 56 
Chuck Lynch, 3-90, 30.0 long of 39 



Tigers: 

Returns 
Terps: 



Nelson Welch, 2-2, long of 27 



Chad Wiestkng, 3-50 kickoff returns 
Doug Lawrence, 2-42 kickoff returns 
Mike Hopson, 1-0 interception 
Tigers: Darnel Stephens, 4-116 punt returns 
Robert O'Neal. 3-53 punt returns 
Larry Ryans, 2-53 kickoff returns 

Maryland Defense 



Hugh Brown 


7UT 


4AT 2 no gam tackles, 1 passbrkup tackle 
for loss (-2) 


Mike Jarmoliwich 


9UT 


6AT 


Dave Manone 


9UT 


5AT 


Greg Hines 


5UT 


2AT hurry, sack (-6). caused fumble 


Ralph Orta 


3UT 


2AT sack (-5), recovered fumble 


Attendance: 73.000 







101 



Terplayback 1991 N.C. State 



November 23 - N.C. State 20, Maryland 17 
Raleigh, NC 




Maryland 3 7 7 = 17 

N.C.State 14 3 3 = 20 

Slst Qtr 14:41 Anthony Barbour 75 yard run Damon Hartman PAT 

SlstQtr 9:09 Aubrey Shaw 1 yard run Damon Hartman PAT 

Mist Qtr 4:50 Dan DeArmas 35 yard field goal 

S2nd Qtr 9:45 Damon Hartman 26 yard field goal 

M2ndQtr 0:27 Jim Sandwisch 20 yard TD pass to Gene Thomas, Dan 
DeArmas PAT 

M4th Qtr 12 : 50 Troy Jackson 3 yard run Dan DeArmas PAT 

S4thQtr 7:01 Damon Hartman 29 yard field goal 

Maryland allowed State an early two touchdown lead, and spent the 
remamder of the day trying to catch up. In the end, Damon Hartman's foot 
made the difference in an exciting regular season finale. Played on an ideal 
day, sunny with temperatures in the high 60s, the Maryland attack was led 
by seniors. Wide Receiver Gene Thomas had his best day of the year, and 
Running Back Troy Jackson and Quarterback Jim Sandwisch ended their 
careers with strong outings. Senior kicker Dan DeArmas's outstanding 
career concluded with Mm settmg records for punts attempted, and punting 
yardage in a career; he also left with ACC marks for punts in a season and 
m a career. He made 32 of 43 field goal attempts in his career. 



Offense 




SE 


Gene Thomas 


LT 


Dave Hack 


LG 


Dave deBruin 


C 


Mitch Suplee 


RG 


Jade Dubis 


RT 


DAvid Dunne 


TE 


Joe Cooper 


QB 


Jim Sandwisch 


HB 


Frank Wycheck 


AB 


Troy Jackson 


FL 


Richie Harris 



Defense 

LE 
LT 
NG 
RT 
RE 
ILB 

ilb 

LC 
FS 
SS 
RC 



Mark Sturdivant 
Larry Webster 
Ralph Orta 
Lubo Zizakovic 
Greg Hmes 
Dave Marrone 
Mike Jarmolowich 
Doug Lawrence 
Bill Inge 
Ron Reagan 
Mike Thomas 



Team Statistics 


Maryland 


N.C. State 


First downs 


14 


22 


Rushing 


7 


14 


Passing 


7 


6 


Penalty 





2 


Rushing Attempts 


33 


62 


Yards Gained Rushing 


126 


300 


Yards lost rushing 


25 


26 


Net Yards Rushing 


101 


274 


Net Yards Passing 


195 


176 


Passes attempted 


28 


20 


Passes completed 


15 


11 


Had intercepted 


1 





Total offensive plays 


61 


82 


Total net yards 


296 


450 


Average gain per play 


4.8 


5.5 


Return yards 





29 


Fumbles: number-lost 


0-0 


2-1 


Penalties: number -yards 


2-25 


1-10 


Interceptions: number -yards 


0-0 


1-15 


Number of Punts -yards 


6-273 


4-133 


Average per punt 


45.6 


33.3 


Punt Returns: Number -Yards 


0-0 


4-14 


KO Returns: Number -Yards 


5-79 


3-78 


Possession time 


21:19 


38:41 


Third-Down conversions 


4 of 14 


8 of 20 


Sacks by 


2-18 


1-12 


Individual Statistics 






Passing 






Terps: Jim Sandwisch, 15-28-1, 195 yards 1 TD long of 41 




State: Terry Harvey, 11-20-0, 


176 yards TD long of 43 




Rushing 






Terps: Troy Jackson, 20-85 1 TD long of 32 





Larry Washington, 11-40 9 TD long of 20 
State: Anthony Barbour, 24-171 1 TD long of 72 
Gary Downs, 13-53 TD long of 13 

Receiving 

Terps: Frank Wycheck, 6-53 TD long of 13 
Gene Thomas, 2-61 1 TD long of 41 
Richie Harris, 1-37 TD long of 37 

State: Charles Davenport, 3-86, TD long of 43 
Todd Harrison, 2-35 TD long of 26 

Punting 

Terps: 

State: 



Dan DeArmas, 6-272, 45.5, long of 60 
Tom Muse, 3-98, 32.6, long of 40 
Tim Kilpatrick, 1-35, long of 35 

Field Goals 



Terps: 
State: 

Returns: 

Terps: 

State: 



Dan DeArmas 1 of 2, long of 35 
Damon Hartman 2 of 4, long of 29 

Doug Lawrence, 4-86 kickoff returns, long of 30 
Anthony Barbour, 3-78 kickoff returns, long of 33 
Ladel George, 1-17 punt returns 



Maryland Defense 



Ralph Orta 


12UT 


Mike Jarmolowch 


3UT 


Dave Marrone 


3UT 


Larry Webster 


6UT 


Darren Drozdov 


6UT 


Greg Hines 


9UT 


Mark Sturdivant 


4UT 


Attendance: 36,491 





6AT sack (-8), no gain, 2 hurries 

8AT 

6AT 

OAT caused fumble, move of qb 

4AT tackle for loss (-1) 

4AT 2 tackles for loss (-4) 2 no gain tackles, hurry 

4AT no gain tackle 



102 



Terplayback 1991 Statistics 


TOTAL OFFENSE 
























RUSHING 






PASSING 


YDS/ 


YDS/ 






ATT GAIN 


LOSS 


NET 


TD 


ATT 


COMP YDS TD PLAYS 


YDS 


PLAY 


GAME TD 


Jim Sandwisch 


63 


110 


207 


■97 





291 


142 1499 6 354 


1402 


4.0 


127.5 6 


Mark Mason 


82 


470 


18 


452 


3 





82 


452 


5.5 


90.4 3 


Troy Jackson 


123 


469 


55 


414 


5 





123 


414 


3.4 


37.6 5 


John Kaleo 


12 


5 


59 


■54 


1 


55 


19 268 1 67 


214 


32 


30.6 2 


Doug Burnett 


42 


206 


11 


195 








42 


195 


4.6 


17.7 


Larry Washington 


51 


209 


14 


195 








51 


195 


3.8 


21.7 


Raphael Wall 


17 


60 


6 


54 


1 





17 


54 


3.2 


18.0 1 


Tony Scarpino 


1 





6 


•6 





16 


7 48 17 


42 


2.5 


21.0 


Frank Wycheck 


3 


22 





22 





1 


4 


22 


5.5 


2.0 


Gene Thomas 


1 


3 





3 








1 


3 


3.0 


0.3 


Ed Suggs 


1 


3 





3 








1 


3 


3.0 


0.3 


Richie Harris 


2 


8 


10 


-2 








2 


-2 


-1.0 


-0.2 


Dan Prunzik 


1 





4 


-4 








1 


-4 


-4.0 


-0 4 


MD TOTALS 


399 


1565 


390 


1175 


10 


363 


168 1815 7 762 


2990 


3.9 


271.8 17 


OPPONENTS 


534 


>425 


327 


2098 


18 


318 


180 2536 13 852 


4634 


54 


421.3 31 


RUSHING 
























G/GS 


ATT 


GAIN 


LO! 


NET AVG. YDS/GAME 


TD 


LG 


(OPP.) 


Mark Mason 


5/3 




82 


470 




18 


452 5.5 90.4 


3 


71 


(Sy) 


Troy Jackson 


11/7 


123 


469 




55 


414 3.4 37.6 


5 


32 


(NCSU) 


Doug Burnett 


11/1 




42 


206 




11 


195 4.6 17.7 





15 


(Duke) 


Larry Washington 


9/0 




51 


209 




14 


195 3.8 21.7 





20 


(NCSU) 


Raphael Wall 


3/0 




17 


60 




6 


54 3.2 18.0 


1 


11 


(PSU) 


Frank Wycheck 


11/11 




3 


22 







22 7.3 2.0 





12 


(Ga Tech) 


Ed Suggs 


5/0 




1 


3 







3 3.0 0.6 





3 


(PSU) 


Gene Thomas 


11/10 




1 


3 







3 3.0 0.3 





3 


(PSU) 


Richre Harris 


11/8 




2 


8 




10 


-2 -1.0 -0.2 





8 


(Duke) 


Dan Prunzik 


10/0 




1 







4 


-4 -4.0 -0.4 









Tony Scarpino 


2/0 




1 







6 


-6 -6.0 -3.0 









John Kaleo 


7/1 




12 


5 




59 


-54 -4.5 -7.7 


1 


3 


(WF) 


Jim Sandwisch 


11/10 




63 


110 




207 


-97 -1.5 -8.8 





18 


(WF) 


MD TOTALS 


11/11 


399 


1565 




390 


1175 3.0 106.8 


10 


— 




OPPONENTS 


11/11 


534 


2425 




327 


2098 3.9 1907 


18 


- 




PASSING 
























G/GS 


ATT 


COMP 


.PCT 


YDS 


COMP YDS/GAME TD 


INT 


LG 


(OPP.) 


Jim Sandwisch 


11/10 


291 




142 


.488 


1499 


10.6 136.3 6 


12 


58 


(Pitt) 


John Kaleo 


7/1 


55 




19 


.346 


268 


14.1 38.3 1 


5 


46 


(Ga Tech) 


Tony Scarpino 


2/0 


16 




7 


.438 


48 


6.9 24.0 


1 


9 


(WVU) 


Frank Wycheck 


11/11 


1 







.000 





00 


1 






MD TOTALS 


11/11 


363 




168 


.463 


1815 


10.8 165.0 7 


19 


— 




OPPONENTS 


11/11 


318 




180 


566 


2536 


14.1 230.6 13 


8 


- 




RECEIVING 














GAMEBY-GAME RESULTS 










YDS/ 




YDS/ 








DATE OPPONENT SCORE W-L 


ATTEN. i 


"iCC REC. 


OVERALL REC. 




G/GS REC 


YARDS 


REC 


GAME TD LG 


(OPP.) 


9/7 VIRGINIA* 17-6 W 


36,198 


1-0-0 


1-0-0 


Frank Wycheck 


11/11 45 


438 


9.7 


39.8 


1 35 


(WF) 


9/14 SYRACUSE 17-31 L 


41,310 


1-0-0 


1-1-0 


Gene Thomas 


11/10 21 


209 


10.0 


19.0 


1 41 


(NCSU) 


9/21 WEST VIRGINIA 7-37 L 


40,442 


1-0-0 


1-2-0 


Chad Wiestling 


11/0 16 


95 


5.9 


8.6 


15 


(Pitt) 


10/5 at Pittsburgh 20-24 L 


38,328 


1-0-0 


1-3-0 


Marcus Badgett 


11/3 16 


336 


21.0 


30.6 


2 58 


(Pitt) 


10/12 at Georgia Tech* 10-34 L 


42,011 


1-1-0 


1-4-0 


Mark Mason 


5/3 13 


76 


5.9 


15.2 


11 


(Sy) 


10/19 at Wake Forest* 23-22 W 


17,342 


2-1-0 


2-4-0 


Richie Hams 


11/10 12 


171 


14.3 


15.6 


1 35 


(WVU) 


10/26 DUKE* 13-17 L 


35,423 


2-2-0 


2-5-0 


Troy Jackson 


11/7 10 


37 


3.7 


3.4 


10 


(UVA) 


11/2 at North Carolina* 0-24 L 


50,000 


2-3-0 


2-6-0 


Brett Stevenson 


11/6 9 


76 


8.5 


7.6 


16 


(Ga Tech) 


11/9 PENN STATE 7-47 L 


57,416 


2-3-0 


2-7-0 


Joe Cooper 


11/5 6 


71 


11.8 


6.5 


27 


(NCSU) 


11/16 atClemson* 7-40 L 


73,000 


2-4-0 


2-8-0 


Jason Kremus 


8/0 6 


163 


27.2 


20.4 


2 56 


(CU) 


11/23 at N.C. State' 17-20 L 


36,491 


2-5-0 


2-9-0 


Larry Washington 


9/0 5 


48 


96 


5.3 


20 


(WF) 










Dan Prunzik 


10/0 2 


33 


16.5 


3.3 


25 


(CU) 


* denotes Atlantic Coast Conference games 






Raphael Wall 


3/0 2 


30 


10.0 


15.0 


23 


(PSU) 


Home games m CAPS 








Doug Burnett 


11/1 1 


2 


2.0 


0.2 


2 


(WVU) 


ATTENDANCE 








Ed Suggs 

Kevin Woodeshick 


5/0 1 
8/0 1 


16 
7 


16.0 
7.0 


3.2 

0.9 


16 

7 


(PSU) 
(WVU) 


Overall Attendance (Avg.) 467,961 (42,542) 






Corey Holobetz 


7/0 1 


7 


7.0 


1.0 


7 


(WVU) 


ACC Attendance (Avg.) 290,465 (41,495) 
Home Attendance (Avg.) 210.789 (42,158) 
Away Attendance (Avg.) 257,172 (42,862) 






MD TOTALS 


11/11 167 


1815 


10.9 


165.0 


7 - 








OPPONENTS 


11/11 180 


2536 


14.1 


230.6 


13 - 




SCORE BY QUARTERS 




































1st Avg. 2nd Avg. 


3rd Avg. 


4th Avg. 


Totals Avg. 
















TERPS 52 4.7 30 2.7 


13 1.2 


43 3.9 


138 12.6 
















Opponents 69 6.3 101 9.2 


58 5.3 


74 6.7 


302 27.5 



103 



yback 1991 Statistics 



DEFENSE 




















G UT 


AT 




TT 


SK/YDS TL/YDS 


FF FR 


PD 




INT 


SAF 


Mike Jarmolowich 1 1 77 


76 




153 


0/0 0/0 


3 


1 




1 





Dave Marrone 1 1 48 


44 




92 


0/0 0/0 





1 










Mark Sturdivant 10 38 


40 




78 


0/0 1/2 


1 1 


2 










BUI Inge 11 53 


19 




72 


0/0 0/0 


2 


8 










Greg Hines 10 42 


26 




68 


3/16 9/22 


2 2 













Louis Johnson 8 45 


22 




67 


1/6 2/7 


2 













Larry Webster 11 46 


20 




66 


4/27 7/34 


1 


1 










Hugh Brown 11 34 


31 




65 


0/0 1/2 





1 










Mike Thomas 11 46 


18 




64 


0/0 3/7 





5 




1 





Ron Reagan 1 1 44 


10 




54 


1/6 2/15 


1 


2 




1 





Ralph Orta 11 38 


13 




51 


4/22 6/25 


2 













Joel Goode 8 31 


20 




51 


3/33 7/51 


6 1 


4 










Doug Lawrence 11 35 


10 




45 


0/0 0/0 





3 




1 





Darren Drozdov 10 22 


23 




45 


0/0 2/8 


1 


3 










Lubo Zizakovic 10 18 


13 




31 


2/16 2/16 





3 










Darren Colvin 10 19 


9 




28 


1/8 1/8 





4 










Jim Panagos 10 16 


5 




21 


2/10 5/15 


1 













Brandon Bertha 10 15 


3 




18 


0/0 0/0 


1 


2 




1 





Chad Wiestling 1 1 9 


7 




16 


0/0 0/0 
















Derek Steele 8 13 


2 




15 


0/0 4/11 


2 













Mitch Suplee 11 2 


6 




8 


0/0 0/0 
















Andre Vaughn 5 4 


3 




7 


0/0 0/0 





1 




2 





Jaime Flores 11 1 


6 




7 


0/0 0/0 
















MD TOTALS 11 719 


435 




1154 


21/144 55/239 


16 14 


42 




8 





OPPONENTS 10 472 


272 




744 


36/221 75/285 


7 9 


37 




19 





KICKOFF RETURNS 










INTERCEPTIONS 












YDS/ 


YDS/ 










G NO 


YDS AVG. 


TD 


LG 


G NO YDS RET 


GAME 


TD 


LG 


(OPP.) 


Andre Vaughn 


4 2 


30 


15.0 





30 


Doug Lawrence 11 12 245 20.4 


22.3 





30 


(NCSU) 


Ron Reagan 


11 1 


5 


5.0 





5 


Raphael Wall 3 12 203 16.9 


67.7 





24 


(PSU) 


Mike Thomas 


11 1 





0.0 








Marcus Badgett 11 10 203 20.3 


18.5 





27 


(Duke) 


Doug Lawrence 


11 1 





0.0 








Chad Wiesthng 11 4 59 14.8 


5.4 





20 


(CU) 


Brandon Bertha 


9 1 


26 


26.0 





26 


Larry Washington 9 4 69 17.3 


7.7 





30 


(WVU) 


Mike Hopson 


8 1 





0.0 








Mark Mason 5 3 67 22.3 


13.4 





29 


(Ga Tech) 


Mike Jarmolowich 


11 1 


12 


12.0 





12 


Mike Hopson 8 2 34 17.0 
Darren Colvin 10 1 6 6.0 
Kevin Woodeshick 8 1 9 9.0 


4.3 
0.6 
11 








18 
6 
9 


(UVA) 
(Ga Tech) 
(WVU) 


MD TOTALS 

OPPONENTS 


11 8 

11 19 


73 

149 


9.1 

7.8 




1 


- 














MD TOTALS 11 49 895 18.3 


81.4 





— 




OPPONENTS 11 20 457 22.9 


41.6 





- 




TEAM SCORING 






















PUNT RETURNS 

YDS/ 
G NO YDS RET 

Mike Hopson 8 17 116 6.8 
Gene Thomas 11 6 42 7.0 
Frank Wycheck 11 2 6 3.0 


YDS/ 

GAME 

14.5 

3.8 
0.6 


TD 






LG 

20 

13 

5 


(OPP.) 

(UVA) 
(Pitt) 
(Ga Tech) 


TOUCHDOWNS 
G RUSH REC RET MISC PAT FGS SFTY TOT. PTS PTS AVG. 

DanDeArmas 11 15 7 36 3.3 
Troy Jackson 11 5 30 2.7 
Mark Mason 5 3 18 3.6 
Raphael Wall 3 10 6 2.0 
Jason Kremus 8 2 12 1.5 


MD TOTALS 11 25 164 6.6 

OPPONENTS 11 53 637 12.0 


14.9 

57.9 




3 


- 




Marcus Badgett 1 1 
John Kaleo 7 
Frank Wycheck 1 1 


2 
10 
10 












12 
6 
6 


1.1 
0.9 
0.6 












PUNTING 

G NO YDS AVG. BLKD 

DanDeArmas 11 90 3615 40.2 2 


LG 

60 


(NCSU) 


Richie Harris 1 1 
Gene Thomas 1 1 


10 
10 










6 
6 


0.6 
0.6 


MD TOTALS 11 

OPPONENTS 11 


10 7 

18 13 4 


15 7 
33 20 







138 
303 


12.6 

27.6 


MD TOTALS 11 90 3615 40.2 


2 


— 
















OPPONENTS 11 56 2169 38.7 





- 
















FIELD GOALS 




















1-19 YDS 


20-29 YDS 




30-39 YDS 40-49 YDS 


50 & OVER 


TOTAL 






G FG-FGA PCT FG-FGA 


PCT 


FG-F 


FG-FGA .PCT 


FG-FGA 


PCT BLK 


LG 


DanDeArmas 11 0-0 .000 


4-5 


.800 




0-1 000 2-2 1000 


1-1 1.000 


7-9 




778 


50 


MD TOTALS 11 0-0 .000 


4-5 


.800 




0-1 .000 2-2 1.000 


1-1 1.000 


7-9 




778 


- 


OPPONENTS 11 2-2 1.000 


13-15 


.867 




1-2 .500 4-6 .667 


0-0 .000 


20-25 




800 1 


- 





104 



Terplayers, Letterwinners 








The national championship plaque, awarded to Maryland in 1953 by the Notre Dame Monogram Club, looms over all of 
Maryland football history, and in this painting over the man who made the championship possible, Curley Byrd. Athlete, 
coach (1914-1934), and school president (1934-1954), Byrd bad extraordinary abilities to produce results on a grand scale. 
The second Byrd Stadium, the present home of the Terps, is depicted with its original lines and support buildings. Also in 
the painting is Burton Shipley (lower left), the first great athlete at Maryland. A. V. Williams, a member of the 1916 and 
1917 teams is pictured in a Block M letterwinners jacket in the lower left. Williams has given the University S4.5 million 
towards its athletic renovations. 



105 



erplayers, Letterwinners 



"A" 

Abbott, Robert 1971 
Abdur-Ra'oof, Azizuddin 

1984, '85, '86, 87 
Absher, Dick 1964, '65 '66 
Adams, Chester 1908 
Adams, Donald 1925, '26 '27 
Adams, Ron 1963, '64 
Adams, Steve 1981 
Agent, Mark 1986, '87, '88, '89 
Aitcheson, Leither 1917 
Aitcheson, Whitney 1913, '14 
Albarano, Ralph 1937, 38, '39 
Albrecht, George 1952, '53 '54 
Albnttain, Lemuel 1902, '03 
Alderton, Gene 1955, '56, '57 
Alderton, John 1950, '51, '52 
Alexander, Richard 1941 
Alkire, John 1973. '74 
Alston, O'Brien 1984, '85, '86. '87 
Ambrusko, Ken 1962, '64 '65 
Amend, David 1984, '85, '86, '87 
Anderson, Mike 1985, '86, '87, '89 
Andorka, Bill 1934 
Andrews, Olin 1908, '09, '10 
Andrus, Robert 1946 
Arbutina, Matt 1963, '64 '65 
Anzzi, Ernie 1961, '62. '63 
Arkne, Kevin 1990, '91 
Armsworthy, Frank 1950 
Arnold, Bob 1984, '85, '86, 87 
Askew, Lewis 1984, '85, '86 
Athey, Ronald 1955, '56 
Atkins, Steve 1975, '76, '77, '78 
Atkinson, Jess 1981, '82, '83, '84 
Augsburger, Pete 1948, '49, '50 
Aulisi, Ed 1980, '81, '82 
Aulisi, Joe 1980, '81, '82 
Austin, Gerald 1982 
Avelhni, Bob 1972. '73, '74 
AxtR.W. (Dutch) 1915, '16, '17 

"B" 

Bach, Billy 1966 

Badanjek, Rick 1982, '83, '84, '85 

Badgett, Marcus 1990, '91 

Bafford, Harold 1925, '26, '27 

Bagranoff, Larry 1963, '64, '65 

Baierl, Ralph 1953, '54 

Bailey, Caleb (Zeke) 1918, '19, '20, 

'21, '22 
Bailey, Joe 1984, '85 
Baker, Brian 1981, '82, '83 
Baker, Charles 1906 
Baker, Pat 1965, '66, '67 
Baldante, John 1978, '79 
Baldwin, Clarence 1981, '82, '83 
Banner, Murnis 1960, '61, '62 
Bannon, J. G. 1892, '93, '94 
Barbiasz, Chris 1979, '80 
Barkalow, Gerald 1945 
Barlund, Dick 1959, '60, '61 
Barnes, George 1941, '42, '45 
Barnes, Hank 1969, '70, '71 
Baroni, John 1947, '48 
Barntt, Ed 1952 
Bartlett, W. D. 1923 
Bates, Duane 1944 
Battagua, Sam 1967 
Bauer, J. W. 1908 




Ralph Albarano: '37, '38, '39 

Beamer, Francis 1938, '39 
Beardsley, Al 1956, '58 
Beasley, Mike, 1987, '88 
Beatty, BUI 1924, '25 
Becker, Ed 1958 
Bednar, Ray 1970, 71, '72 
Behbaham, Kambiz 1971 
Behr, Sam 1945, '47 
Behrmann, Joe 1957, '58 
Beightol, Lynn 1951, '53, '54, '55 
Bell, Fred 1896, '97 
Bell, Karl 1965 
Bell, Bobby 1976 
Benner, Willis 1932, '33 
Bennett, Gordon 1960 
Benson, Kevin 1972, '73, '74, '75 
Benson, Shawn 1982, '83 
Benson, Todd 1978, '79, '80 
Berger, Louis (Bosey) 1930, '31 
Bernardo, Ralph 1943 
Berry, Harold 1940, 41 
Bertha, Brandon 1991 
Besley, Kirk 1922, '24/25 
Betty, Dale 1958, '59, '60 
Betz, Theodore 1948, '49, '50 
Bielski, Dick 1952, '53, '54 
Bilanciom, Bert 1965 
Bmder, Paul 1910 
Birkland, John 1934, '35, '36 
Bishop, Randolph 1944, '46 
Bissell, John 1945 
Bittner, Dick 1955 
Blackburn, Ray 1953, '54 
Blackistone, Wade 1894 
Blandford, James 1897, '98 
Bloomingdale, Alan 1973,74 
Blount, Alvin 1983. '84, '85, '86 
Bobenko, Alex 1943 
Boehly, Bret 1987, '88, '89 
Boen, Walter 1951, '52 
Boinis, John 1962 
Boinis, Pete 1958, '59, '60 
Bolton, Ed. 1949, '50 
Bonato, John 1986, '87 
Bond, Carl 1985 
Bonk, Harry 1945, '46, '47, '48 
Bonnet, Arthur 1924, '25 
Boothe, Dan 1942 
Boring, Les 1980. '81 
Bosley, John 1905 



Bosley, Lester 1918, '19, '20, '21 

Bovic, Charles 1902 

Bouscaren, William 1897 

Bowersox, Jack 1953, '54 

Bowland, Bill 1904, '05, '06 

Bowland, Jay 1911, '12, '13, '14 

Bowman, Charles 1967 

Boxold, Charles 1953, '54 

Boyda, John 1937, '38, '39 

Bozeman, Richard 1943 

Bracken, Lou 1967, '68 

Bradford, Jack 1987, '88, '89 

Bradford, Robert 1949 

Bradley, J. A. 1898, '99 

Bradley, Walter 1933 

Bramson, Bernardo 1964, '65, '66 

Brancato, Joe 1973, '74 

Brand, Robert 1937, '38 

Brandt, Marshall 1942 

Brannan, Tim 1970, '71, '72 

Branner, Cecil 1919, '20, '21, '22, '23 

Brant, Mike 1967, '68, '69 

Brant, Tim 1970, 71, '72 

Branthover, Lee 1970, '71 

Brasher, James 1947, '48, '49 

Bray, Leon 1986 

Brechiel, Jim 1973, '74, '75 

Breedlove, Rod 1957, '58, '59 

Brenner, John 1941, '42 

Bresnahan, Tom 1964 

Breunich, Tom 1952, '53 

Brewer, Edward B. (Untz) 1916, '20, '21 

Brewer, Mac 1922, '23 

Brkovich, Joe 1981, '82, '83 

Broglio, Paul 1947, '48 

Bromley, Walter 1922, '23, '24, '25 

Brougher, Don 1952, '53, '54 

Broumel, Tom 1960 

Brown, David 1900, '01, '02, '03 

Brown, Donald 1984, '85 

Brown, Gumest 1979, '80, '81, '82 

Brown, Hugh 1991 

Brown, James (J. B.) 1985, '86, '87, '88 

Brown, Robert 1937, '38, '39 

Brown, Tom 1960, '61, '62 

Brubaker, Eric 1975 

Brunson, Wayne 1985, '86, '87, '88 

Bryan, Thomas 1901 




John Baroni: '47, '48 



Bryant, William 1937 

Brzostowski, Art 1965, '66, '67 

Budkoff, Nick 1936, '37 

Bullock, Keith 1985 

Bungon, Dan 1971, '72, '73 

Burdelski. Steve 1983 

Burgee, Dick 1953, '54, '55 

Burger, Joe 1921, '22, '23, '24 

Burgess, Tom 1977, '78, '79 

Burgley, Bill 1956, '57 

Burke, Pat 1968, '69, '70 

Burke, Steven 1983 

Burke, Terry 1983, '84, '85, '86 

Burlin, Ralph 1939, '40, '41 

Burmeister, Doug 1984 

Burnett, Doug 1991 

Burns, Jimmy 1910 

Burruss, Lloyd 1976, '77, '78. '80 

Burton, Bob 1961, '62, '63 

Bury, Lou 1962, '63 

Buscher, Bemie 1933, '34, '35 

Buscher, F. A. 1932, '33 

Butsko, Harry 1961, '62 

Byrd, Bill 1942 

Byrd, Harry C. (Curley) 1905, '06, '07 

Byrom, Bruce 1977, '78,. '79, '80 

"C" 

Calandra, William 1971 
Caldwell, Rodney 1982 
Callahan, Charles 1933, '34, '35 
Calta, Keith 1976, 77, 78 
Campbell, Joe 1973, 74, 75, 76 
Carmci, Jan 1978, 79, '80 
Carliss, Ernest 1919, '20, '21 
Carlson, Rick 1966, '67, '68 
Carney, Mike 1978, 79, '80 
Can, Brad 1974 75, 76, 77 
Can, David 1988, '89 
Carroll, Charles 1957 
Carroll, Douglas 1899 
Carter, A. R. 1914 
Carter, Crawford 1918 
Carter, Louis 1972, 73, 74 
Carter, Vernon 1983 
Castro, Dale 1978, 79, '80 
Cashwell, Dorsey 1897. '98 
Chacos, Louis 1942 
Chadick, Mike 1968 
Chalmers, George (Shorty) 1929, '30, '31 
Chamberlain, Glenn 1977. 78 
Chapman, Ted 1984, '85, '86 
Chiavenni, Len 1962, '63 
Chisari, Thomas 1943, '44, '45 
Chovanes, Eddie 1941, '42, 46 
Chnstianson, Dave 1951 
Church, C. Grant 1897, '99 
Church, L. M. 1905 
Ciambor, Steve 1967, '68, '69 
Cianciulli, Steve 1978 
Cianelli, Dave 1949, '50, '51 
Cichowski, Tom 1963, '65, '66 
Cielensky, Mike 1973, 74, 75 
Claiborne, Jonathan 1975, 76, 77 
Clark, Morrison 1920 
Cloud, Everett 1958, '59, '60 
Coggins, Bert 1916 
Coggins. Irving 1914, '15, '16 
Colbert, Bob 1967, '68, '69 



106 



Terplayers, Letterwinners 



Cole, Bob 1958 
Cole, Fred 1956, '57, '58 
Cole, George 1932 
Collins, Bobby 1964, '65, '66 
Collins, Gary 1959, '60, '61 
Collins, Scott 1977, '78, '79 
Colteryahn, Lloyd 1951, '52 
Colton, George 1984, '85 
Colvin, Darren 1990, '91 
Crompton. Barnes 1892, '93 
Condie. Dennis 1960, '61 
Condon, John 1949 
Conrad, Dave 1974, 75, '76 
Conrad, Luther 1940, '41, '42 
Conroy, Brian 1984 
Continetti, Reno 1943, '44 
Cooke, Ed 1955, '57 
Cooke, Sam 1897, '98, '99 
Cooper. Barney 1905, '06, '07 
Cooper, Fred 1964, '65. '66 
Cooper, Joe 1991 
Cooper, Larry 1943, '44 
Corcoran, Jim 1962. '64. '65 
Cordyack, John 1940, '41 
Corvino. Mike 1979, '80, '81, '82 
Cory, Ernest 1907, 08 
Cosgrove, Tom 1950, '51, '52 
Coster, H. Q. 1916, '17, '18 
Couch, George 1942 
Covington, Al 1982, '83, '84, '85 
Covington, Bryant 1983, '84, '85, '86 
Cozzi, Richard 1975 
Cowdrey, Chris 1970, '71, '72 
Cox, Doug 1983, '84 
Crapster, Jack 1908 
Crecca, Joseph 1932, '33 
Crosland, Robert 1945, '46 
Crossan. Dave 1960, '61, '62 
Crothers, Qmar (Gus) 1926, '27, '28 
Crytzer. Marty 1951, '52, '53 
Cummins, Richard 1978, '79 

"D" 

D'Addio, Dave 1979, '80, '82, '83 
D'Amico, Matt 1985, '86, '87, '88 
D'Atn, Pat 1984, '85 
Dailey, Darnell 1978, '79, '81 
Daly. Ed 1934, '35. '36 
Daly. Leslie 1943. '44. '45 
Darby. Samuel 1899 
Dare, Howie 1954, '55, '57 
Davidson, Jim 1959, '60, '61 
Davis, Fred 1946, '47, '48, '49 
Davis, Jack 1954, '55, '56 
Davis, Lynn 1949, '50, '51 
Davis, Russell 1981, '82, '83 
Dean, Robert 1948, '49, '50 
DeArmas, Dan 1988, '89, '90, '91 
DeArmey, Frank 1935, '36, '37 
DeArmey, John 1938 
deBrain, Dave 1991 
DeCarlo, Dan 1974, '75 
DeCicco, Nick 1955, '56, '57 
DeMoss, James 1989 
Decker, Don 1951, '52 
Deckman, Joe 1930 
Demczuk, Bernard (Sonny) 1968, '69 
Dennis, Russell 1953, '54, '55 



Dent, Gilbert W 1990 
Dent, Gil 1926 
DePaul, Bobby 1982, '83 
Derrick, H. B. 1914. '1516 
DeStephano, Robert 1950, '51, '52 
Detko, Chester 1960, '61, '62 
Devon, Joe 1898 
Dewitz, Brant 1979, '80 
DiCapno, Richard 1973, '74 
Dick, Larry 1975, '77 
Dickey, Edmund 1900 
Dietrich, Leroy 1958, '59, '60 
Dietz, Guy 1973, '74 
Dil, Chris 1965 
Dill, John 1967, '68, '69 
DiMana, Phil 1989 
DiOno, Joe 1967, '68 
Dittmar, Jack 1941, '42 
Divito, Paul 1973, 74, 75 
Doak, Harry 1906, '07 
Dodson, Charlie 1927, '28, '29 
Dominic, Brian 1971 
Donas, Kevin 1983, '84 
Donofrio, Ralph 1966, '67 
Doory, Frank 1943, '44 
Dotter, Don 1977, 78 
Douglas, John 1976, 77 
Drach. Joseph 1945, '46. '47 
Dragan, Doug 1984 
Drass, Pat 1959, '60, '61 
Dnmal, Chuck 1967 
Drozdov, Darren 1988, '89 
Drozdov, Olaf 1962, '63, 64 
Dubis, Jade 1991 
DuBois, Oscar 1942 
Duda, Mark 1979, '80, '81, '82 
Dudish, Mickey 1976, 77, 78 
Duley, Tom 1931 
Dunbar, Emmons 1900, '01, '02 
Dunham, Duane 1984, '85, '86,'87 
Dunne, Dave 1991 
Durbin, Mark 1981 
Dutton, Ken 1967, '68, '69 
DuVall, Mearle 1939, '40, '41 
Dwyer, Frank 1939 
Dyer, John 1968, '69,70 
Dyson. Gene 1955 



"E" 

Earley, Harold 1949 

Edel. Sam T, 1919 

Edmunds, Ferrell 1984, '85, '86, '87 

Edwards, Jason 1986 

Edwards, Karl 1987, '88, '89 

Edwards, Tony 1983. '84, '85 

Ellinger, Charlie 1934, '35, '36 

Ellis, Gary 1978, 79 

Emerson, Darryl 1982 

Emrich, William 1971 

Enms, Lou 1933, '34, '35 

Eppley, Geary (Swede) 1919, '20 

Erhard. Jeiry 1970, 72 

Esiason, Norman 1981, '82, '83 

Eubanks, Howard 1979, '80, '81. '82 

Evans, Bui 1974, 75 

Evans, Clay 1907 

Evans, Francis 1945, '46, '47, '48 

Evans, William 1928, '29, '30 

Everson. William 1947, '48 

iipti 

Faber, Parker 1930, '31 

Faloney, Berme 1951, '52, '53 

Faucette, Chuck 1983, '84, '85, '86 

Fazio, Ron 1982, '83, '84 

Fanz, Scott 1978, 79, '80 

Farrell, Albert 1932 

Fasano, Rick 1978. 79, '80 

Fastuca, Sal 1944 

Feher, Gene 1961, '62, '63 

Fehr, Walter 1945, '46 

Felton, Ralph 1951, '52, '53 

Ferrante, Joe 1961, '62, '63 

Fesmeyer, Charles 1901, '02 

Fiedor, John 1973 

Fmcke, Edward 1950 

Finkle, Edward 1988 

Chris Finkle, 1988 

Firor, Guy 1905, '06 

Fischer, Stanley 1952 

Fisher, Ralph 1973, 74, 75, 76 

Fisher, William 1930 

Fishman, Jeny 1963, '64 

Fitzpatnck, Paul 1967, '68, '69 














& 


1 

1 


t <i 


* 




: 



Parker Faber: '30, '31 



Chick Fry: '49, '50, '51 

Fleece, Rick 1988, '89 
Fletcher, Andy 1916, '17 
Fletcher, Dwayne 1958, '59, '60 
Fletcher, Edward 1935, '36 
Flick, Paul 1942 
Flor, Tom 1957, '58, '59 
Flynn, Tim 1953, '54, '55 
Forbes, John 1957, '58 
Ford, James 1977 
Forrester, James 1937, '38 
Foster, Daniel 1975 
Fotta, Bill 1976 
Fowlkes, Kevin 1987, '88 
Fox, Hank 1949, '50, '51 
Franciscus, Tony 1989 
Franklin, Jamie 1972, 75 
Frattaroh, Joe 1962, '64 
Fnedgen, Ralph 1968 
Fries, Greg 1968, '69, 70 
Fntsch, John 1955. '56, '57 
Fritz, Emile 1945, '46 
Fromang, Steve 1970, 71, 72 
Fry, Clarence (Chick) 1949, '50, '51 
Fullerton, Ed 1950, '51, '52 
Fuller. Clifton 1892, '93, '94 
Fulton, Ed 1973, 74, 75, 76 
Funk, Mike 1962 
Furman. Jeff 1984 
Furman, Tyrone 1981, '82, '83 
Furst, Walter 1911 

"G" 

Gaam, Tim 1986, '87 
Gaetz, Norman 1944 
Games, Mike 1970, 71. 72 
Gall, Ed 1977, 78, 79, '80 
Gallagher, Bob 1958 
Gait, Pete 1905 
Gambino, Lou 1946, '47 
Garber, Chip 1975, 76, 77 
Gardi, Joe 1957, '58, '59 
Gareis, Hank 1967, '68. '69 
Gamer. Enoch 1902 
Ganott. William 1933, '35 
Gawlick, Fred 1965, '66. '67 
Gayzur, Rudolph 1949 
Gebhardt, John 1967, '68 
Gelbaugh. Stan 1984, '85 
Getz, Harry 1935 
Gibbons. Charles 1896. '97 
Gibson. Ray 1962 



107 



ers, Letterwinners 



Gienger, Craig 1970 
Gienger, George 1939, '40 
Gierula, Chester 1947, '48, '49, '50 
Gilbert, Herbert 1918, '19, '20, '21 
Gill, Vemon 1903, '04 
Gillespie, Bill 1967, '69 
Gilmore, Jack 1962, '63 
Gilmore, John 1940, '42 
Gioia, Bob 1980, '81 
Gmliano, Joe 1986, '87 
Glamp, Paul 1976, '78, '79 
Glamp, Pete 1978, '79, '80 
Gleasner, Donald 1945 
Glover, Kevin 1982, '83, '84 
Goldman, Luther 1933 
Goode, Joel 1989 
Goodman, Jim 1946, '47, '48 
Gormley, John 1934, '35, '36 
Grace, Mike 1966, '67, '68 
Graff, Gustavius 1892, '93 
Graham, Duey 1970 
Grant, Bill 1967, '68 
Grason, Andy 1898, '99 
Green, Dean 1988, '89 
Greene, Tony 1968, '69, '70 
Greer, William 1944, '45 
Gregory, Larry 1979 
Gretz, Harry 1933 
Grey, Chris 1978, '79 
Gross, James 1981. '82, '83 
Groves, John (Boots) 1919, '20, '21, 

'22, '23 
Guckeyson, Bill 1934, '35, '36 
Gunderman, Bobby 1982, '83, '84 
Gunderman, Ed 1965, '66 
Gunderman, Tom 1957, '58, '59 
Gundry, Jesse 1921 

"H" 

Hack David 1991 
Hacker, Bob 1959, '60, '61 
Hafer, Robert 1943 
Hagen, James 1977 
Hagerman, Tom 1942 
Haley, Bob 1967, '68 
Hall, Irving (Bottle) 1923, '24 
Hamilton, Fred 1955, '56, '57 
Hamley, James 1969 
Hanrugan, John 1961, '62 
Hanulak, Chet 1951, '52, '53 
Harbert, Doug 1975, '76, '77 
Harding, Samuel (Pop) 1892, '93, '94 
Hardisty, John 1899, 1900 
Harraka. Greg 1982, '83, '84 
Harrell, Greg 1984 
Hams, Denck 1974 
Hams, George 1893, '94 
Hams, Leon 1976 
Hams, Richie 1989, '91 
Hamson, Roland 1892, '93, '94 
Hart, R. G. 1915 
Hatfield, Norm 1962, '63 
Hatter, Jim 1956, '57, '58 
Hatton, Hannibal 1905, '06 
Haussmann, Kevin 1978 
Havener, Chris 1980 
Hawkins, Ralph 1956, '57 
Hayden, Courtney 1930, '31 




Eugene Kinney: '45, '46, '47, '48 



Hayman, Edgar 1904 
Headley, Coleman 1934, '35, '36 
Heagy, Al 1927, '28, '29 
Healy, Don 1955, '56, '57 
Healy, Jack 1955, '56 
Heffner, Fred 1952, '53 
Heine, George 1923, '24 
Heintz, William 1928, '29 
Helbock, Bill 1942 
Henmng, Dan 1985, '86 '87 
Herzog, Fred 1924. '25 
Hetrick, John 1966 
Heunng, Ed 1954, '55, '56 
Heward, Harry 1894, '96 
Hewitt, Frederick 1937, '38 
Heyer, Frank 1940, '41 
Hickman, William 1943 
Hicks, Chaplain 1907, '08 
Hill, Darryl 1963 
Hill, Greg 1982, '83, '84 
Hillis, Robert 1943 
Hinebaugh, Wade 1896, '97 
Hindman. F.R. 1913, '14, '15 
Hines, Frank 1898, '99 
Hines, Frank, Jr. 1932 
Hines, Greg 1989, '90, '91 
Hinkle, Monte 1971, 72, '73 
Hoch, Mike 1966 
Hoen, Ralph 1907, '08 
Hoen, Stanley 1908 
Hoffecker, Frank 1911, '12, '13 
Hoffman, Charles 1968, '69 
Hoffman, Edward 1943 
Hoffman, Gil 1982, '83, '84 
Hoffman, Herb 1952, '53, '54 
Hoffman, Jeff 1989 
Hofland, Mark 1986, '87, '88, '89 
Hoge, Hamilton 1906 
Holder, Enc 1983, '84, '85 
Holinka, Jeff 1983, '84, '85 
Hollis, Michael 1987, '88, '89 
Hons, Craig 1970 
Hoopengardner. Joe 1940, '42 
Hoover, Kim 1973, '74, '75 
Hopson, Mike 1990, '91 
Horning, Joe 1951, 52, '53, '54 
Hough, John 1922, '23, '24 
Hrezo, Joe 1960, '61, '62 
Hufman, Jack 1942 
Hughes, Bill 1984, '85, '86 '87 



Hughes, Leroy 1972, '73, '74, '75 

Humphries, Howard 1963, '64, '65 

Hunt, Max 1940 

Hunteman, Charles 1912, '13 

Hurd, Art 1951, '52 

Hurson, Edward 1943 

njtt 

Idzik, John 1947, '48, '49, '50 
Iglehart, John 1905 
Igus, Chris 1983, '84 
Imphong, Mike 1967 
Inge, Bill 1990, '91 
Irvine, John 1952, '53, '54 

"J" 

Jackson, Fred 1946 
Jackson, Troy 1990, '91 
James, Robert 1941, '42, '46 
Jameson, George 1906 
Jankowski, Gary 1960, '61, '62 
Jarmolowich, Michael 1989, '90, '91 
Jarmoska, George 1940, '41, '42 
Jefferson, Ben 1985 '87, '88 
Jennings, Ricky 1973, '74, '75 
Jemigan, Cy 1971, '73 
Johnson, Barry 1987, '88, '89 
Johnson. Charles 1976, '77, '78 
Johnson, Dave 1911, '12, '13 
Johnson, Ed 1965 
Johnson, Louis 1990, '91 
Johnson, Sam 1978, '79, '80 
Johnston, Richard 1945, '46 
Johnson, Ricky 1988, '89 
Joines, Vemon 1985, '86 '87, '88 
Jones, Clarence 1987, '88, '89 
Jones, David 1971 
Jones, Lendell 1981, '82, '83 
Jones, Stan 1951, '52, '53 
Joyce, Fred 1962, '63, '64 
Joyce, Jim 1957, '58, '59 
Joyce, Jim 1981, '82, '83 
Joyner, Willie 1981, '82, '83 

"JC" 

Kane, Ed 1966, '67, '68 
Karangalen, Peter 1943 
Karnash, Stanley 1948, '49, '50 
Kaufman, Norman 1959, '60 
Kecman, Dan 1967, '68, '69 
Kecman, Ron 1970, '71, '72 
Keith, Jeff 1949, '51 
Keenan, Charles 1930, '31, 32 
Keenan, John 1926, '27, '28 
Kafauver. Harry 1898, '99 
Kelly, Harold 1970 
Kelly, Steve 1983, '84. '85, '86 
Kemp, William 1909, '10, '11 
Kenley, Frank 1896, '97, '98 
Kenny, John 1964, '65 
Kensler, Ed 1948, '49, '50, '51 
Kern, Fred 1957, '58 
Kershner, Ted 1956, '57, '58 
Kessler, Gordon 1926, '27, '28 
Kichman, Charles 1956 
Kieman, Paul 1931. '32 
Kilgallen. Jim 1953 
Kinard, Ben 1973, '74 
King, John 1968, '69 
Kinney, Eugene 1945, '46, '47, '48 
Kinney, Vince 1975, '76, 77 



Kirchiro, BUI 1959, '60, '61 

Kiselak, Mike 1987, '88, '89 

Kishpaugh, W.M. 1913, '14, '15, '16 

Klaube, Ted 1975, 76, 77 

Klein, Robert 1984, '85, '86, '87 

Klingerman, Doug 1964, '65 

Kloppmeyer, Charles 1906 

Knight, Chris 1983, '85 

Knight, John 1988 

Knode, Bobby 1916, '17, '18, '19 

Knode, Ken 1911, '12, '13, '14, 'IS 

Koch, Peter 1981, '82, '83 

Koehler, Hugh (Pop) 

1909, '10, '11, '12 

Koelle, Raymond 1930, '31 

Kolarac, George 1954, '55, '56 

Kolencik, Frank 1979, '80, '81, '82 

Kolodne, Walter 1943 

Komlo, Bill 1956 

Koprowski, Manon 1973, 74, 75 

Koziol, Steve 1976, 77, 78 

Krahling, Chick 1964, '65 

Krajcovic, Jess 1929, 30, '31 

Kramer, Marvin 1949, '50 

Kramer, Paul 1953 

Kraus, Joe 1983, '84 

Kreider, John 1979, '80, '81 

Kremus, Jason 1991 

Kronberg, Vic 1982 

Krouse, Bill 1939, '40 

Krouse, Raymon 1947, '48, '49, '50 

Kubany, Glenn 1968, '69 

Kuchta, Joe 1948, '49, '50 

Kurz, Jim 1946 

"I" 

Ladygo. Peter 1950, '51 
LeHayne, Alfred 1975 
Landolt, Dean 1968 
Laneve, Ron 1957, '58 
Lange. Robert 1973, 74 
Lanigan, Pat 1924, '25 
Larkin, Bob 1980 
Larkm, Edward 1971 
LaRue, James 1947, '48, '49 
Lary, Ralph 1977, 78, 79, '80 
Latham, Ector, 1922, '23 
Lattimer, Charles 1951, '52, '53 
Laughery, Bob 1952 
Lavine, Stanford 1948, '49 
Lavrusky, Jim 1965, '66, '67 
Lawrence, Doug 1990, '91 
Lawrence, George 1938, '39 
Lawrence, James 1968 
Lawson, J. W. 1892 
Layman, Bob 1956, '57, '58 
Lazaro, Bill 1958, '59 
Lazzarino, Joe 1954, '55 
Leatherman, John 1926 
LeGore, Walter 1904 
Lewis, Dickie 1956, '57, '58 
Lewis, Gomer 1924 
Lewis, Grenville 1894, '96 
Lewis, Mike 1979. '80, '81, '82 
Lewis. Ron 1962. '63 
Liebold, Leland 1952 
Lillibridge, John 1896. '97 
Lilly, Hank 1963 
Lindsay. Paul 1951 
Linkous. Fred 1925, '26, '27 



108 



Terplayers, Letterwinners 




Charlie May: 29. '3J 

Lishack. Michael 1971 
Livingston, Phil 1978, '79 
Lloyd, Edward 1938, '39 
Lombard, Henry 1928. '29 
Loncar, Ed 1977, '78 
Lpomis, Lynn 1912. 13 
Lorton. Kyle 1979, '80 
Lovett, Billy 1966, '67, '68 
Lowery, Bren 1986 '87, '88, '89 
Luckey. George 1923, '24 
Lumsden. Milton 1939, '40 
Lunn. Cameron (Tubby) 1906, '07 
Lutz, James 1943 
Lynch, Leonard 1981 '82, '84. '85 

"M" 

Maarleveld. John 1984. '85 
Mac Bride, Bob 1969, '70 
MacDonald. Alexander 1916. '17, '18, 

'19. '20 
MacDonald, John 1932 
Mace, Ron 1962 

Mackall. Thomas 1904. '05, '06, '07 
Mackert, Roy 1919. '20 
Maddox, Alvrn 1976. '77. '78 
Madigan, George 1928. '29 
Mahnic. Robert 1969. '70 
Maw. Wilber 1956. '57 
Makar, James 1943 
Maletzky, BUI 1951. '52 
Mallonee, Lloyd 1942 
Manges. Mark 1974, '75, '76, '77 
Marchetti, Nick 1986, '88 
Marchetto. Peter 1977 
Marcmiak, Walt 1964, '65 
Manno, Chris 1983 
Markoe, Dave 1964 
Marrone. Dave 1990, '91 
Marshall, Larry 1969, '70. '71 
Martell, James 1970. '71, 72 
Martin. Andy 1963, '64 
Martin. Bill 1957, 58 
Martin. Charles 1963. '64 
Martine, Roy 1950. '51 
Mason. Mark 1990, '91 
Massey, Paul 1946 
Massey, Tom 1898 



Massie, Leonard 1969, '70, '71 
Matera, Brian 1977, 78, 79 
Matthews, J. Marsh 1900, '01, '02 
Matthews, James 1989 
Mattia, Peter 1968, '69, 70 
Mattis, Bob 1982 
May, Charlie 1929, '31 
Mayer, George 1904 
Mayhew, John 1932 
Mayo, Edmund 1903 
McCarthy, John 1936, '37 
McCarthy, Joseph 1944, '45 
McCarthy, Patrick 1943, '46 
McCaw. Stewart 1934 
McDonald, John 1927, '28, '29 
McFadden, Bill 1981, '82 
McFadden, Earl 1943 
McGonmgal, Brett 1988 
McHale, Tom 1983 
McHugh, Thomas 1947, '48, '49, '50 
McLaughlin, Tom 1935 
McLuckie, Tom 1952. '53. '54 
McManus, Edward 1970, 71 
McNeil, Paul 1940 
McNutt, Alonzo 1905 
McQuade, Jack 1921. '22. '23 
McQuade. Thomas 1949 
McQueen, Lone 1964, '65 
McQuown, Wymand 1964, '65, '66 
McVicker, John 1955 
Meade, Jim 1936, '37 
Medile, Sam 1979. '80 
Meister, Bill 1968. '69, 71 
Melcher, Dick 1963. '65 
Melcher, Mick 1963, '64, '65 
Merntt, Roland 1968, '69 
Mesner, Bruce 1983, '84, '85, '86 
Mess, R. W. 1913, '14 
Michael. R. M. 1916 
Mier, Jack 1941, '42 
Mike-Mayer. Steve 1972. 73. 74 
Miles. Larry 1984, '85 
Milkovich. Bob 1979, '80, '81 
Miller, Charlie 1929 
Miller, Chns 1973, 74 
Miller, Doug 1982 
Miller, Gary 1963 



Miller, Mike 1975, 76 
Miller. Tom 1969, 70. 71 
Milling, James 1984. '85, '86 '87 
Miloszewski. John 1966 
Minion, Ed 1933, '34, '35 
Mitchell. Hanson 1896 
Mitchell. John 1931, '32 
Mitchell, Parker 1892, '93 
Mitchell, Walter 1900, '01, '02. '03 
Modzelewski, Dick 1950, '51, '52 
Modzelewski, Edward 1949, '50, '51 
Molster, James 1947 
Molster, Charley 1918 
Mona, Joe 1959, '61. '62 
Mondorff, Pershing 1937, '39 
Mont, Tom 1941, '42, '46 
Montgomery, Tom 1913 
Moore, Eric 1970 
Moore, John 1919, '20, '21, '22 
Moran, J. Patrick 1944 
Morgan, Bob 1951, '52, '53 
Morhinweg, Fred 1917 
Morris, Scott 1943 
Morris, William (Country) 1912, '13 
Morrison, Clark 1921 
Mortensen, Carl 1966 
Morter, LaRoy 1945, '46 
Morton. Carl 1986 
Morton, John 1939, '40, '41 
Moss, Charles 1976 
Moss, Joseph 1949, 50, 'SI 
Mudd, Khostka 1909, '10, '11 
Mueller, John 1940 
Mueller, Leo 1938, '39, '40 
Muffler, Joe 1976, 77, 78 
Muller, Mike 1980, '81, '82 
Mulliken, Clarence 1894 
Murphy, Bill 1972, 73 
Murphy, Joe 1939, '40 
Murphy, Scott 1975 
Myers, Dutch 1918, '19 
Myrtle. Chip 1964, '65, '66 
Myslinski, Tom 1965, '66, '67 

"JV" 

Nairn, Roland 1950 

Nalewak, Ron 1964, '65 

Nardo. Anthony 1942 

Nardo, Dave 1962, '63 

Nash, John 1973, 74, 75 

Nash, John 1980, '81, '82 

Navarro, Frank 1950, '51, '52 

Naylor, Ralph 1900, '01. '02 

Neal, Tommy 1983, '84, '85, '86 

Nelligan, Bert 1896 

Nelson, Richard 1932, '33, '34 

Nelson, Richard 1986 '87, '88 

Nesbit. Andy 1918, '19, '20, '21, '22 

Nestor, Paul 1951. '52 

Neville, Al 1971. 72, 73 

Nick, Glenn 1977 

Nickla, Ed 1958 

Niederhelman. Joe 1982, '83 

Nolan, Dick 1952, '53 

Noms. John 1930, '31 

Novak. Dick 1959, '60. '61 

Nusz, Dave 1953, 54, '55 



"0" 

Oberle, Ken 1987, '88, '89 
Oberlin, Lyman 1914, 15, '16 
Ochap, Gene 1974, 75, 76 
O'Connor, Ed 1952 
Odel), Dave 1976 
O'Donnell, Dick 1954 
O'Donnell, Neil 1987, '88, '89 
Oertly. Fred 1893 
O'Hara, Dermis 1968, '69, 71 
O'Hare. Tim 1978 
Oifebeson. Whitney 1915 
Olecki, Bruce 1967, '69 
Olkewicz, Neal 1976, 77, 78 
Orta, Ralph 1989, '90, '91 
Osbom. Downey 1923, '24 
Osier, Jerry 1962 
Owen, Norman 1943 



Pacella David 1979, '80, '81, '82 

Pagannucci, Romeno 1919, '20, '21 

Page, Calvin 1901 

Page. Glenn 1987, '88, '89 

Palahumk. George 1952. '53, '54 

Palanda, Michael 1977 

Palmer, Bruce 1976, 77, 78 

Panagos, Jim 1991 

Pancza, Joe 1967 

Papuchis, John 1978 

Paredes, Ramon 1985, '86 

Parker, Alvin 1924, '25 

Parker, David 1989 

Parker. Tommy 1983. '84, 85, '86 

Parsons, Jim 1952, '53, '54, '55 

Parsons, John 1926, '27 

Pastrana, Alan 1965, '66, '68 

Pearson, Ron 1966, '67. '68 

Pease, Al 1929, '30, '31 

Pellegrini, Bob 1953, '54, '55 

Pennington, Victor 1914 

Perlo, Phil 1955, '57 

Peters, Francis 1898. '99. 1900 

Petitbon. Richie 1984, '85, '86. '87 

Petronaci, John 1971 

Petruzzo, Joseph 1950, '51 

Petry, Phil 1964. '65 

Pettit. Bill 1964 

Philips. Al 1946, '47, '48 

Pietrowski, Joseph 1945 

Piker, Robert 1945 

Pmck, Guy 1904 

Piper. Dan 1960, '61. '62 

Pirronello, William 1943 

Pitzer. John 1930 

Plasnig, Dutch 1921 

Plevin, Tom 1966, '67, '68 

Plocki. Dan 1985. '86 '87, '88 

Pobiak. Ed 1948, '49, '50 

Poling, William 1945, '46 

Pollock, George (Rosy) 1921, '22, '23 

Polyanski, Stan 1955 

Pomatowski, Hank 1959. '60. '61 

Poppelman. Ray 1930, '31. '32 

Posy. Gilbert 1909. '10, '11 

Posey. Walter 1913. '14, '15. '16. '17 

Pouleur, A. L. 1902, '03 

Powers. Warren 1985. '86 '87, '88 



109 



layers, Letterwinners 









Semler, Eddie 1920, '21, '22 


Staifort, Carl 1933, '34, '35 








Rogers, Bill 1983, '84 




JL 


Rogers, Jerry 1978, '79 


Senft, Brad 1978, 79, '80 


Staines, Pat 1987 






• ^i^_ ■ "* - •*■ 


Rogers, Stan 1972, 73, 74 


Senior, Jethro 1980 


Stalnaker, Wally 1967, '68, '69 








Rollins, W. T. 1892, '93, '94 


Settino, Joe 1931 


Stanford, John 1975, 76, 77 






Romano, Frank 1972, 73, 74 


Seymour, Art 1970, 71, 72 


Stankus, Ray 1951, '52 






Jb^E wt* 


Rooney, Thomas 1930 


Shaffer, Dick 1939, '40 


Steele, Derek 1989, '90, '91 






^^^^M^ 


Rose, Blaine 1986, '87, '88, '89 


Shaffer, James 1976, 77, 78, 79 


Stefl, Tom 1955, '56, '57 






^^^™ W 1 


Rosen, Scott 1989 


Shaffer, Ron 1957, '58, '59 


Steiner, Ted 1969, 70, 71 






P\ 


Rosenthal, Malcolm 1944 


Shamberger, D. F. 1898 


Stem, George 1964, '65 






^B^P' 


Roth, Earl 1947, '48, '49 


Shank, H. A. 1915 


Stephens, Todd 1981 






XSji^r 


Rothrock, Mark 1986 


Shank, Scott 1969, 70, 71 


Sterling, Rob 1986 






Mvji 


Roulette, Robert 1948, '49 


Sharkey, Jack 1975 


Stem, George 1963 






v J^^L 


Rowden, Jake 1947, '48, '49, '50 


Sharpless, Rod 1973, 74 


Stevens, Jimmy 1917 






|iH^ 


Roy, Ken 1973, 74, 75, 76 


Shaughnessy, Emmett 1946 


Stevens, Myron 1925, '26 






HI »^ ~^> 


Ruff, Seymour 1912, '13, '14 


Shelton, Carl 1970, 71 


Stevenson, Brett 1990, '91 






^5 k - 


Ruffner, Robert 1905, '06, '07 


Shemonski, Bob 1949, '50, '51 


Stewart, Larry 1977, 78, 79 






ti ; *fcK 


Rugg, John 1985, '86 '87, '88 


Sherman, Franklin 1896 


Stickel, Lou 1965, '66, '67 






^ . ^p 


Rushnak. Bob 1989 


Sherman, Henry 1893 


Stoh, Wilbur 1901, '02, '03, '04 








Rusevlyan, Bob 1956, '57, '58 


Shihda, George 1973, 74, 75 


Stonebraker, Jack 1934, '35 








Russell, Frank 1972, 73, 74 


Shiner, Dick 1961, '62, '63 


Strano, Tony 1991 




■fcEL-L-: - 


Ryan, Charley 1943 


Shipley, Burt 1908, '09, '10, '11, 


Stuart, Adam 1946 




~ J-, ***C 


"S" 


'12, '13 

fit,. i t mfto inn 


Stubbs, J. S. 1916, '17, '18 




Richard Nelson: '32, '33, '34 


Sabrowski, Jon 1984, '85, '86 
Sachs, George 1933, '34, '35 


Shipley, James 1897, 98 
Shipley, Richard 1952, '53, '54 


Stubljar, Mike 1967, '68, '69 
Stump, Doug 1989 






Sadler, Alan 1982, '83 


Shoals, Roger 1960, '61, '62 


Stull, James 1967, '69 




Prough, Pearse 1892, '93 


Salgado, Rich 1989 


Shockey, Don 1940 


Sturdivant, Mark 1990, '91 




Prunzik, Dan 1989, '90, '91 


Salley, Ernie 1974, 75, 76, 77 


Shoffler, Karl 1988 


Suchy, Bob 1955, '56 




Psira, Ken 1960 


Sampson, Neal 1984, '86 


Shugars, Jeff 1969, 70, 71 


Suggs, Ed 1991 




Pue, Dick 1892, '93 


Sandusky, Mike 1954, '55, '56 


Shure, Richard 1985, '86, '87 


Sukeena, Dick 1961 




Pugh, Bill 1981 


Sandwisch, Jim 1990, '91 


Sievers, Eric 1976, 77, 78, '80 


Sullivan, Bob 1963, '64, '65 




Pugh, Charhe 1927 


Sankovich, Tom 1959, '60, "61 


Silvester, Edward 1909 


Sullivan, Jerry 1917, '18, '19, '20 




Pugh, Ed 1921, '22, '23, '24 


Santa, Jim 1972, 73, 74 


Silvester, Lindsay 1908, '09 


Sullivan, Sean 1983, '85, '86 




Purvis, Bart 1971, '72, '73 


Santacroce, Leonard 1970 


Simler, George 1946, '47 


Suplee, Mitch 1988, '89, '90, '91 




"Q" 


Santy, Tony 1965, '66, '67 
Sappington, Earl 1899 


Simmons, Jonathan 1981, '82, '83 
Simoldom, Joe 1965, '66 


Supplee, Bill 1923, '24, '25 
Surgent, Mike 1935, '36, '37 




Quander, Timmy 1982 


Saunders, Oswald 1908, '09 


Simon, Mike 1976, 77, 78 


Swingle, Dan 1984 




Queen, C. J. 1896 
"J?" 


Saylor, Scott 1986, '87, '88, '89 
Scarbath, Dick 1958 
Scarbath, Jack 1950, '51, '52 


Simpson, John 1932, '33. '34 
Simpson, Mike 1962 
Skarda, Jim 1955, '56 


Sydnor, Chad 1985, '86, '87, '88 
Symons, Thomas '1898, '99 




Rata, Robert 1973, '74. '75, 76 


Schaefer, Rich 1963, '64 


Skinner, W. W. 1892 


limit 




Radice, Julie 1928, '29 
Rae, Tom 1960, '61, '62 
Raedy, Mike 1918, '19 
RatUff, Don 1970, 71, '72 
Reagan, Ron 1989, '90, '91 
Reich, Frank 1983, '84 
Reilly, Charles 1969, '70, '71 
Reilly, Jack 1960 
Reitz, Mike 1972 
Renaldo, Chris 1982, '83 


Schick, Tom 1973, 74, 76 
Schmaltz, Richard 1974, 76 
Schmitt, Jeff 1983 
Schankweiler, Scott 1983, '84/85 
Schnebley, Robert 1942 
Schneider, Leroy 1943 
Schoenherr, Charley 1943 
Schrecongost, John 1945 
Schroy, Ken 1972, 73, 74 
Schultz, Eddie 1983, '84 


Skotnicki, Frank 1937, '38, '39 
Slaninka, Richard 1968, '69, 70 
Smith, Blair 1935, '36, '37 
Smith, Bib 1939, '40 
Smith, Bob 1972, 73, 74 
Smith, Eager 1899 
Smith, Irvin 1985. '86, '87, '88 
Smith, Jamie 1916 
Smith, Ken 1960, '61, 62 
Smith, Les 1944, '45 


Tamburello, Frank 1954, '55 
Tarbutton, Clyde 1914, '15. '16 
Targarona, Jack 1949, '50 
Tate, Darnell 1970 
Tauszky, Carroll 1907 
Taylor, David 1981 
Taylor, Kevin 1982 
Temey, Edward 1925, '26 
Terry, Richard 1943 




Rhodes, Don 1977 


Schultz, Ferdinand 1945 


Smith, Wesley 1902, '04 


Teslovich, Michael 1943 




Ribirutzki, Fred 1929 


Schultz, John 1973, 74, 75 


Sniscak, Berme 1946 


Thomas, Al 1968, '69, 70 




Rich, M.N. 1915, '16 


Schwartz, Robert 1975 


Snyder, Gerald 1926, '27, '28 


Thomas, Gene 1990, '91 




Richards, Dean 1975, '76, '77, '78 


Schwartz, Victor 1957, '58, '59 


Snyder, Leo 1917, '18, '20 


Thomas, Lewis (Knocky) 1925, '26, 


'27 


Richey, James 1975 


Schwarz, Edward 1945, '46, '47, '48 


Snyder, Robert 1933 


Thomas, Mike 1988, '89. '90, '91 




Ridgely, Charles 1897 


Schwarz, Kurt 1957, '58, '59 


Sobel, Mark 1981 


Thompson, Greg 1983, '84 




Ridgley, Terry 1982, '84 


Scioscia, Kamey 1949, '50, '51 


Sochko, Mike 1975, 76, 77 


Tice, John, 1979, '80, '81, '82 




Riendeau, Brian 1980, 81 


Scott, George 1976, 77 


Solt, Ron 1981, '82, '83 


Tice, Mike 1978, 79, '80 




Rigby, Elmer 1940, '41, '42 


Scott, Ken 1971, 72, 73 


Sonntag, Ralph 1967, '68, '69 


Tiesi, James 1970, 71 




Riggleman, Mickey 1972, '73 


Scott, Sean 1984, '85, '86 '87 


Soporowski, Raymond 1969, 70, 71 


Tine, Chuck 1965, '66, '67 




Riggs, M. Talbot 1919 


Scott, Vincent 1958, '59. '60 


Soma, John 1984, '85, '86 '87 


Toler, Dick 1945 




Roberts, Augie 1927, '28, '29 


Scotti, Ben 1956, '57, '58 


Sothoron, Norwood 1932, '34 


Tomasetti, Vince 1980, '81, '82 




Roberts, George 1928 


Scotti, Tony 1958, '59 


Speer, Talbot 1915 


Tomlin, Eddie 1989 




Roberts, Guy 1969, '70, '71 


Scriber, Spencer 1980, '82, '83 


Spinelh, Dennis 1986, '87. '88, '89 


Tonetti, Paul 1955, '56, '57 




Robertson, Gilbert 1899 


Scnber, Stephon 1984, '85, '86 


Springer, Bruce 1965 


Torain, Ernie 1965, '66. '68 




Rock, Walter 1960, '61, '62 


Seder, Larry 1975, 76, 77 


Stable, Sydney 1909 


Trachy, John 1964, '65, '66 




Rock, Wilbur 1943, '44 


Seppy, Bill 1957, '58 


Staffien, Dan 1950, '51, '52 


Trax, G. P. 1910, '11 




Rodenberger, Jeff 1979, '80, '81 


Seibert, Vemon 1946, '47, '48, '49 


Staffileno, Ron 1990, '91 


Trexler, Charles 1951, '52 




Rog, Ed 1962 


Selep, Tom 1954, '56 


Staia, Dom 1952 


Trimble. Steve 1978, 79, '80 





no 



Terplayers, Letterwinners 



Troha, John 1947, '48. '49, '50 
Troll, Robert 1943, '44 
Troxell, Walter 1925 
Trust, Don 1960 
Tucker, Hubert 1942 
Tucker, Joe 1947, '48, '49 
Tucker, Robert 1970, 71, '72 
Tullai, Fred 1955 
Turner, Bill 1955. '56, '57 
Turner, J.M, 1901 
Turyn, Vic 1945, '46, '47. '48 
Tuschak, Richard 1943 
Tweedy, James 1970, 71, '72 
Tye, Scott 1982, '84, '85 

"17" 

Ulam, James 1977. '78 
Ulam, Pat 1972. '73, '74 
Ulman, Bernie 1939, '40, '41 
Underwood, Eddie 1900 

Vanderhout, Greg 1979, '80, '81 
Van Heusen. Billy 1965, '66, '67 
Van Horn, Marlin 1977, 78, '80 
Van Reenan, Don 1960 
Van Sickler, Gary 1968. '69 
Vaughn. Andre 1990, '91 
Vellano, Paul 1971, '72, '73 




Bob Smith: '39, '40 

Venezia, Harry 1980, '81, '82, '83 
Veraidi, Gene 1957, '58, '59 
Vereb, Ed 1953, '54, '55 
Vesce, John 1973. '74 



1953 

'The Terps won the National Championship, clinching the title and an 
undefeated and untied regular season with a 210 shut out of Alabama. 
Maryland's fourth bowl appearance in Tatum's eight years in College Park 
followed. 

'Bemie Faloney earned first-team Academic All-America honors and was 
named "Player of the Year" in the Atlantic Coast Conference. Faloney went 
on to become the first draft choice of the San Francisco Forty-Niners. 



1954 

'More Maryland players were drafted by professional teams than any other 
school for the third time in four years. Ten players in all were drafted into the 
professional ranks. 

'Dick Bielski was voted "Most Valuable Player" in the North-South Shrine 
game held in Miami, Fla. Bielski went on to be the first round draft choice of 
the Philadelphia Eagles. 

'Halfback Ron Waller carried the ball 66 times for 601 yards, which equates 
an astonishing 9.1 yards-per-carry average. 



1955 

'For the third time in five years, Maryland finished the regular season 
unde/eated. 

'Maryland concluded its season with an appearance in the Orange Bowl, it's 
third bowl invite in five years and their fifth in nine years. 

'Ed Vereb led the nation in scoring, and broke the ACC record in this 
category, as he contributed 66 points to the season. 

'Maryland finished the year in a 15-game win streaJc, sharing the ACC title 
with Duke. 

'Maryland's defense was ranked No. 1 in the nation as it allowed 76 yards 
rushing a game. 

'Despite never playing center before his senior season All-American Bob 
Pellegrini was considered the nation's best at that position in preseason 
because of his excellent sophomore and junior years at the guard position. 
Pelligrini even donned the cover of Sports Illustrated. 

'Pellegrini won ACC Player of the Year honors, the first lineman to do so. 



Vierra, Ken 1985 
Vince, Larry 1966. '68 
Vincent, Reginald 1940, '41, '42 
Vincent, Rufus 1932 
Visaggio, Dave 1972, '73, 74 
Vucin, Milan 1964, '65. '66 

"W" 

Wagenheim, Phil 1973, 74 
Walker, Arnold 1987 
Walker, Bill 1953, '54, '55 
Walker, Clarence 1894 
Walker, Frank 1900 
Walker, Kevin 1984, '85, '86, '87 
Waller, Ron 1952, '53, '54 
Walsh, Mark 1986, '87, '88, '89 
Walter, John 1920 
Walters, Harry 1973, 74 
Walton, Robert 1936, '37 
Ward, Bob 1948, '49, '50, '51 
Ward, Chnst 1976, 77, 78 
Ward. Frank 1908. '09 
Ward, Kevin 1972. 73 
Warfield, Jack 1939 
Warfield, Joshua 1900, '01 
Waseleski, Barry 1984 
Washington. Larry 1991 
Waters, Jean 1954, '55, '56 
Waters, John 1924, '25 
Watkins, Ben 1896 
Watkins, James 1970, 71 
Watson, Ken 1976, 77 
Watts, Harry 1901, '02. '03 
Webb. Thomas 1932, '33 
Webster, Fletcher 1903 
Webster, Larry 1988. '89, '90, '91 
Weiciecowski, John 1953 
Weider, Fred 1939 
Weidensaul, Lou 1951, '52 
Weidinger, Charlie 1936, '37, '38 
Weimer. Clay 1892. '93 
Weiss. Don 1972. 73 
Welsh. George 1899 
Wentworth, George 1903 



Werner, Hubert 1942, '47, '48 
Wethington, Ray 1970, 71, 72 
Wharton, Al 1954, '55. '56 
Wharton, Jim 1939, '41 
Wharton, Thomas 1893, '94 
Whelchel, David 1925 
White, Charles 1911 
White, Charles 1975, 76, 77 
White, Donald 1962 
White, F. M. 1908 
White, Floyd. 1970, 71 
White, Harry 1912 
White, Randy 1972, 73, 74 
White, Walter 1973, 74 
White, WeUstood 1904 
Whittle, Tim 1979. '81. '82 
Whittier, Scott 1986, '87, '88 
Widmyer, Earl 1932, '33, '34 
Wiesthng. Chad 1990, '91 
Wikander, Gary 1961 
Wilkins, Joe 1979, '80, '81, '82 
Williamowsky, William 1943 
Williams, A. V. 1915, '16 
Williams, E .P. 1910, '11, '12, '13 
Willis, Vic 1934, '35, '36 
Wilson, Len 1912 
Wilson, Eric 1981, '82, '83, '84 
Wilson, James 1986, '87 
Wilson, Mark 1980, '81 
Wilson, Roger 1905. '06. 07 
Wilson, Tim 1974, 75, 76 
Wingate, Elmer 1947, '48, '49. '50 
Wingfield, Wayne 1979. '80. '81, '82 
Winslaw, J. L. 1903 
Wolfe, Percy 1943 
Wolfe, William 1935, '36. '37 
Wonderack, Arthur 1926, '27, '28 
Wood, William 1930, '32 
Woods, Al 1930, '31, '32 
Woodward, A. N, 1910 
Wooters, William 1892, '93, "94 
Worthington, Arthur 1892 
Wright, Darryl 1984. '85, '86, '87 
Wright, Jack 1941, '42, '46 
Wright, Todd 1979, '81 
Wyatt, Kerwn 1976. 77. 78. 79 
Wycheck, Frank 1990, '91 
Wyres. James 1970, 71 
Wysocki, Charlie 1978, 79, '80, '81 

IIDII 

Yamell. Dermis 1971 
Yeager, Charles (Buddy) 
1933, '34, '35 

Yeates, Mike 1975, 76, 77 
York, Bob 1964, '65, '66 
Young, Walter 1921, '22, '23 
Younge, Joe 1972. 74. 75 

"Z" 

Zachary, Pete 1973, 74, 75 
Zannoni, Steve 1972, 73. 74 
Zemhelt, John 1974, 76, 77 
Zetts, Michael 1943 
Zizakovic, Lubo 1988, '89, '90. '91 
Zillman. Pat 1979. 80, '81 
Zolak, Scott 1989 
Zulick. Charlie 1936 
Zulick, Earl 1925 '26 '27 



111 



sages, 



Terp Won- 

w 

Air Force Acad 2 

Alabama 1 

Alex. High 1 

American Univ 

Auburn Univ 1 

Bainbridge Training ... 1 

Baltimore City Col 2 

Baltimore Med. Col. ... 

Baltimore Poly 3 

Baylor Univ 1 

Bethel Mil. Acad 1 

Boston College 1 

Boston Univ 2 

Business High 1 

Carnegie Tech 

Catholic Univ 8 

Central High 6 

Charlotte Hall Mil 1 

Chicago Univ 

Cincinnati 2 

Clemson Univ 19 

Clifton Ath. Club 1 

Columbia Ath. Club ... 

Connecticut 1 

Curtis Bay Coast Guard 

Delaware 3 

Dinkinson Col 1 

Duke 18 

Duquesne Univ 1 

Eastern High 4 

Episcopal High 

Florida 6 

Florida State 

Fortress Monroe 

Fredericksburg Col 2 

Gallaudet 9 

Georgetown Umv 6 

Georgetown Prep 1 

George Washington ... 10 

Georgia 3 

Georgia Tech 1 

Gibraltar Ath. Club .... 

Gonzaga High 1 

Greenville (SO AAB ... 1 

Guilford Col 1 

Gunton Tem. Bapt. Ch. 1 

Hampden Sydney 2 

Haverford Col 

Houston 

Indiana State 1 

Indiana Univ 

Johns Hopkins 16 

Kentucky 3 

Lakehurst Nav. Air Sta. 1 

Louisiana State Umv. . . 3 

Louisville 3 

U.S. Marine Barracks . . 1 



Loss Log with Opponents 



L 




T 




2 











1 





2 





1 











1 





1 





1 











1 

















1 





1 


2 


2 











1 











19 


2 








1 











1 





5 


1 








16 

















3 





11 





2 








1 








6 


1 


9 





1 





3 





2 


1 


3 





1 





1 























2 





2 





1 











2 





11 


5 


2 


2 



























1 

14 



29 
21 



33 
1 
2 
2 
2 



W 

Merchant Marine Acad 1 

Miami (Fla.) 7 

Miami (Ohio) 

Michigan 

Michigan State 1 

Minnesota 1 

Mississippi 1 

Mississippi State 1 

Missouri 6 

Mt. of St. Joseph's Col. 2 

Mt. St. Mary's Col 2 

Mt. Washington Club.. 

Navy 5 

New York Umv 2 

North Carolina 25 

N.C. State 23 

Ohio Univ 1 

Oklahoma Univ 

Old. Umv. of Md 3 

Olympia Ath. Club 1 

Onent Ath. Club 1 

Pennsylvania 1 

Perm State 1 

Perm Military 3 

Pittsburgh 2 

Prmceton 

Randolph-Macon Col. . . 

Rich. Army Air Base ... 1 

Richmond Univ 11 

Rock Hill Col 3 

Rutgers Univ 4 

St. Johns Col 18 

South Carolma 17 

SMU 2 

Swarthmore Col 

Syracuse 14 

Tech. High 5 

Tennessee 2 

Texas 

Texas A&M 

Third Army Corps 1 

Tulane Univ 2 

UCLA 1 

Vanderbilt 4 

Villanova 8 

Virginia 37 

Virginia Mil. Inst 14 

Virginia Tech 14 9 

Wake Forest 29 10 

Walbrook Ath. Club. ... 1 

Washington & Lee 13 5 

Washington Col 18 3 

West Virginia 14 13 

Western High 

Western Md 18 13 

William & Mary 1 2 

YaleUniv 2 8 



L T 





1 
17 
2 
5 
3 
2 





1 




2 1 













4 




5 2 



1 

3 

11 

11 









2 

1 

8 

2 
17 2 

9 2 

1 

2 
1 
2 
1 
1 

1 



1956 

'Ninety percent of the 100 players who used up their eligibility graduated 
under Tatum. 



1961 

'Receiver Gary Collins was elected Ail-American, the first Terp to do so 
since 1955. Collins set all school receiving records before he left Maryland. 
He ended his career with 1,182 total yards and 74 receptions. 

'Coach Nugent told his team he was taking them to a secret workout and 
loaded them on buses, only to end up at a surprise swim party. 

'Maryland beat Penn State, 21-17, in College Park, marking the only time in 
history the Terrapins conquered the Nittany Lions. 



Year 

1892 
1893 
1894 
1895 
1896 
1897 
1898 
1899 
1900 
1901 
1902 
1903 
1904 
1905 

1906 
1907 

1908 
1909 

1910 
1911 

1912 
1913 
1914 
1915 
1916 
1917 
1918 
1919 
1920 
1921 
1922 
1923 
1924 
1925 
1926 
1927 
1928 
1929 
1930 
1931 
1932 
1933 
1934 

1935 
1936 
1937 

1938 
1939 

1940 

1941 
1942 
1943 
1944 



Terp Won- 

Head Coach 

*W. W. Skinner 
*S. H. Harding 
*J. G. Bannon 

No Team 
•Grenville Lewis 
'John Lillibridge 
*J. F. Kenly 
*S. M. Cooke 

F. H. Peters 
*E. B. Dunbar 

D. John Markey 

D. John Makey 

D.John Markey 

D. John Markey 

Fred Nielsen 
C. G. Church & 
C. Melick 
Bill Lang 
Bamey Cooper & 

E. Larkin 
R. Alston 

C. Donnelly & 
H. C. Byrd 
H. C. Byrd 
H. C. Byrd 
H. C. Byrd 



H. C. 
H. C. 
H C. 
H C. 
H. C. 
H C. 
H. C. 
H. C. 
H. C. 



Byrd 
Byrd 
Byrd 
Byrd 
Byrd 
Byrd 
Byrd 
Byrd 
Byrd 



H. C. Byrd 
H. C. Byrd 
H. C. Byrd 
H. C. Byrd 
H. C. Byrd 



Byrd 
Byrd 
Byrd 
Byrd 
Byrd 
Byrd 



Loss Log, Coaches Records 

Year Head Coach 

1945 Paul "Bear" Bryant 



Jack Faber 
Jack Faber 
Jack Faber 

Frank M Dobson 
Frank M. Dobson 

Jack Faber, 

Al Heagy 

Al Woods 

Clark Shaughnessy 

Clarence Spears 

Clarence Spears 



W L T 

3 

6 

3 3 



2 

4 

5 

4 

4 

7 

5 

4 

4 

4 

(18-17-4) 
5 3 
3 6 

3 8 
2 5 

4 3 1 

4 4 2 



1 1 
3 



3 5 

4 5 
7 2 



3 3 3 



1 1 

6 

7 
3 



(117-82-15) 

7 2 2 

6 5 

8 2 
(21-9-0) 

2 7 

2 7 

(4-14-0) 

2 6 1 

3 5 1 

7 2 

4 5 
1 7 1 

(5-12-0) 



1947 Jim 

1948 Jim 

1949 Jim 

1950 Jim 

1951 Jim 

1952 Jim 

1953 Jim 

1954 Jim 

1955 Jim 



1959 
1960 
1961 
1962 
1963 
1964 
1965 



1987 
1988 
1989 
1990 
1991 



Tatum 
Tatum 
Tatum 
Tatum 
Tatum 
Tatum 
Tatum 
Tatum 
Tatum 



1956 Tommy Mont 

1957 Tommy Mont 

1958 Tommy Mont 



Tom Nugent 
Tom Nugent 
Tom Nugent 
Tom Nugent 
Tom Nugent 
Tom Nugent 
Tom Nugent 



1966 Lou Saban 

1967 Bob Ward 

1968 Bob Ward 

1969 Roy Lester 

1970 Roy Lester 

1971 Roy Lester 



1972 Jerry 

1973 Jerry 

1974 Jerry 

1975 Jerry 

1976 Jerry 

1977 Jerry 

1978 Jerry 

1979 Jerry 

1980 Jerry 

1981 Jerry 



Claiborne 
Claiborne 
Claiborne 
Claiborne 
Claiborne 
Claiborne 
Claiborne 
Claiborne 
Claiborne 
Claiborne 



1982 Bobby Ross 

1983 Bobby Ross 

1984 Bobby Ross 

1985 Bobby Ross 

1986 Bobby Ross 



Joe Krivak 
Joe Krivak 
Joe Krivak 
Joe Krivak 
Joe Krivak 



1946 Clark Shaughnessy 3 



L T 

2 1 
(6-2-1) 

6 
(3-6-0) 

2 2 

4 

1 

2 1 


2 

1 

2 1 
1 



(75-15-4) 
2 7 1 
5 5 
4 6 

(11-18-1) 



(36-34-0) 

4 6 

(4-6-0) 

9 

2 8 
(2-17-0) 

3 7 
2 9 
2 9 

(7-25-0) 



5 
4 
4 
2 
1 
4 
3 
4 
4 
6 

(72-37-3) 
4 

4 
3 
3 

5 1 



(39-19-1) 
4 7 



5 6 
3 7 1 

6 5 1 
2 9 

(20-34-1) 



99 Year Totals 

• Teams Coached by Captains 



500 439 42 



112 



Terpassages, 981 games 




There was good football from the start at the University of Maryland College Park. The final name change for the school 
came in 1920; in 1923 the first Byrd Stadium was built. The man in the center of the collage, Bill Supplee, was the first 
All-America in 1923. He used a punishing peformance at Pennsylvania to vault himself and his team to the forefront of 
Eastern football. Following in his footsteps was the second All-America, Snitz Snyder (right), in 1928. He had a hand in the 
greatest win of the 1920s, a 15-0 victory in New Haven over Yale in 1926. The Eli had won by a combined 90-14 score the 
two previous seasons. Jim Meade (lower left) was a dashing halfback who earned honorable mention All-America in 1937. 
Ray Poppleman was the star of Curley Byrd's best team, the 1931 Old Liners who went 8-1-1. His 194 yards gained against 
VPI that year is the 10th best rushing day in school history. 



113 



Terpassages, 981 Gaines 



1892 (0-3-0) 

Oct. 15 at St. Johns 

Johns Hopkins 
(Clifton Park.Baltimore) 
Nov. 19 Episcopal High 



Oct 



Nov 
Nov. 



Oct. 



Oct. 



1 

12 



27 



Nov 13 



Nov. 20 



1893 (6-0-0) 

Eastern High 
Central High 
Bait. City Coll. 
St Johns 
West. Md 
Onental Ath. Cluh 

1894 (3-3-0) 

W. Md Coll. 
at Wash. Coll. 
at St. Johns 
Georgetown 
Col. Ath Club 
at Mt. St. Mary's 
(Thanksgiving) 

1895 (0-0-0) 
No Team 

1896 (6-2-2) 

Eastern High 
Gallaudet 
Business High 
Cential High 
Alexandria High 
Bethel M A 
Episcopal High 
West. Md 
Central High 
U. of Md. 

1897 (2-4-2) 

Central High 
Eastern High 
Johns Hopkins 
St Johns 
Gallaudet 
Bait Med. Coll. 
(Electric Park) 



W 
W 

w 
w 
w 
w 



w 
w 

L 
W 
L 
L 



0-50 
0-62 



0-16 



36-0 
10-0 
18-0 
6-0 
18-10 
16-6 



52-0 
12-0 
22-6 
6-4 
0-26 
0-24 



L 
T 
W 
W 
W 
W 
L 
W 
W 
T 



W 
W 
L 
L 
L 
L 



0-6 

0-0 
320 
10-6 
18-0 
20-10 

0-6 
16-6 
14-0 

0-0 



24-6 
4-0 

0-30 
4-6 

6-16 

0-10 



Oct. 



14 
25 
28 



Oct. 

Oct 
Oct 
Nov. 

Nov 



Oct 13 

Oct 21 

Nov 10 

Nov 17 



Oct. 


5 


On. 


16 


Oct 


19 


On. 


26 


Nov. 


2 


Nov. 


12 


Nov. 


16 


Nov 


23 



1898 (2-5-0) 

Columbian U. 
at West. Md 
Eastern High 
Gallaudet 
Johns Hopkins 
at Episcopal High 
Rock Hill Coll. 

1899 (1-4-0) 

West. Md 
Eastern High 
at Johns Hopkins 
Delaware Coll. 
(Wilmington) 
at St. Johns 

1900 (3-4-1) 

Western High 
Gib Ath. Col 
Georgetown Prep 
Georgetown Prep 
Episcopal High 
Gonzaga 
Gonzaga 
Char. Hall Ac. 

1901 (1-7-0) 

Delaware Coll 
Gallaudet Reserves 
Johns Hopkins 
Rock Hill College 
Central High 
US Marines 
Walk Ath College 
West Md 

1902 (3-5-2) 

Georgetown 
Mt. St. Joseph's 
Columbian U. 
Olympia Ath. Club 
Wash. Coll 
Mt. St. Mary's 
West. Md 
U. of Md 
Johns Hopkins 
Delaware Coll. 



L 
L 
W 
L 
L 
L 
W 



L 
W 
L 
L 



T 
L 
L 

W 
L 
L 
W 
W 



L 
W 
W 
W 
T 
L 
L 
L 
I 
T 



5-17 
0-32 
4-0 
0-33 
0-16 
0-37 
27-0 



0-21 
26-0 

0-40 
0-34 

0-62 



0-0 
0-17 

0-5 
15-0 
6-34 
5-11 
210 
21-0 



6-24 

10-11 
0-6 
6-11 
0-11 
27-0 
0-36 
0-30 



0-27 

5-0 
11-10 
6-0 
0-0 
0-5 

6-26 
0-5 

0-17 
0-0 




Maryland's first official football team was funded by a $10 athletic fee assessed to all of 
its 80 students. This funding did not include the purchase of headgear, so the players 
compensated by letting their hair grow long for protection. 



Oct 11 

Oct. 14 

Oct. 22 

Oct. 27 



Nov 2 

Nov. 15 

Nov. 18 

Nov 27 



Sept. 
Oct. 

Oct. 
Oct. 

Nov. 

Nov 



Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct 
Oct. 
Nov. 
Nov. 
Nov. 
Nov. 
Nov 



Sept. 
Oct. 
Oct 
Oct. 

Oct 
Nov 
Nov. 
Nov. 



Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 

Nov. 
Nov 

Nov 



Sept. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 



Nov. 



26 

3 



3 
26 



7 
14 
21 
25 
28 

4 
11 
18 
25 
30 



29 

6 
10 
13 

20 
10 
17 
24 



Sept. 28 



5 

9 

12 

26 

9 
16 
23 



25 
2 
9 
16 
23 



1903 (7-4-1) 

U. of Md 
Tech Hi 

at Columbian U 
Georgetown 
Clifton Ath. Club 
Gunton Tem. 
at St. Johns 
Wash Col. 
West. Md 
at Mt St. Mary's 
Delaware Coll. 
(Wilmington) 

1904 (2-4-2) 

at Georgetown 
Randolph Macon 
Ftress Monroe 
at Mt. St. Mary's 
West. Md 
Gallaudet 
U of Md 
Delaware Coll. 
(Wilmington) 

1905 (6-4-0) 

Bait Poly In. 
Gallaudet 

West Md 
at Navy 

Mt. St. Joseph's 
at Wm 8i Mary 
St. Johns 
at Wash Col 
U. of Md. 
at Delaware Coll. 

1906 (5-3-0) 

Tech High W 

Bait. City Coll. W 

at Navy L 

Georgetown L 

(Griffith Stadium.Washington) 

at Mt. Wash. Coll. L 

at St. Johns W 

at Rock Hill W 

Wash Coll. W 



W 

w 
w 

L 
W 
W 
L 
W 
W 
L 
L 



L 
T 
T 
W 
L 
W 
L 
L 



W 
W 
L 
L 
W 
W 
W 
L 
W 
L 



1907 (3-6-0) 

Tech High 

Georgetown 

at Richmond Coll 

at Navy 

at Mt. St Mary's 

George Wash. 



W 
L 
W 
L 
L 
W 



(Griffith Stadium, Washington) 
at Wash. Coll W 

St Johns L 

at Gallaudet L 

(Kendall Green) 

1908 (4-7-0) 

Central High W 

Tech High L 

at Richmond Coll. L 

at Johns Hopkins L 

Navy L 

Gallaudet W 

at Fredncksburg W 

Baltimore Poly W 

St Johns L 

Wash. Coll L 

George Wash L 

1909 (2-5-0) 

Tech High L 

at Richmond Coll L 

at Johns Hopkins L 

Rock Hill W 

George Wash L 
(Griffith Stadium. Washington) 

N.C. State L 

at Gallaudet W 



11-0 
27-0 

6-0 
0-28 

5-0 
21-0 
0-18 
28-0 

6-0 

0-2 
0-16 



0-22 
0-0 
0-0 

11-6 
0-5 

22-5 
0-6 

0-18 



20-0 
16-0 
0-10 
0-17 
28-0 
17-0 
27-5 
0-17 
23-5 
0-12 



5-0 
22-0 
0-12 
0-28 

0-29 

20-4 
16-0 
35-0 



13-0 

0-10 

5-1 

0-12 

6-12 

10-0 

10-5 

0-16 

0-5 



5-0 
5-6 
0-22 
0-10 
0-57 
5-0 
10-0 
12-0 
0-31 
0-11 
0-57 



0-11 

012 

0-9 

5-0 

0-26 

0-31 
14-12 



114 



Terpassages, 981 Gaines 




The 1903 Aggies were not scored on at home while outscoring their opponents, 104-62. 



1910 (5-3-1) 



Oct 
On 
Oct 
Oct 

Nov. 
Nov 
Nov 



Sept 
Oct 
Oct 
Oct 
Nov. 
Nov 
Nov. 
Nov 



15 

19 

12 
19 
24 



30 
14 
21 
28 
4 
11 
18 
25 



Central High 


W 


12-0 


at Richmond Coll. 


W 


22-0 


at Johns Hopkins 


T 


11-11 


Catholic U. 


W 


20-0 


at George Wash 


W 


6-0 


(Griffith Stadium, Washington) 




at V.M.I. 


L 


0-8 


at St Johns 


L 


0-6 


at West Md 


L 


3-17 


1911 (4-4-2) 






Central High 


L 


0-14 


Tech. High 


W 


6-0 


Richmond 


W 


20-0 


Fredncksburgh Coll. 


w 


5-0 


Johns Hopkins 


L 


3-6 


Catholic U. 


T 


6-6 


St. Johns 


L 


0-27 


at Wash. Coll. 


L 


5-17 


West. Md. 


L 


6-0 


Gallaudet 


W 


6-2 


1912 (6-1-1) 






Tech High 


W 


6-0 


at Johns Hopkins 


W 


13-0 


U. of Md 


W 


68-0 


at St Johns 


L 


0-27 


Gallaudet 


W 


13-6 


at West. Md 


w 


17-7 


at P.M.C. 


T 


13-13 


Richmond Coll. 


W 


42-0 



Sept 
On. 
Oct 
Oct 
Oct. 
Nov. 
Nov. 
Nov. 
Nov. 



27 
4 
11 
18 
26 
8 
14 
22 
27 



1913 (6-3-0) 

Bait. City Coll. 
Richmond Coll. 
at Johns Hopkins 
West. Md. 
at Navy 
St. Johns 
Wash. Coll. 
Gallaudet 
PMI 
(Thanksgiving) 



W 
W 
W 
W 
L 
W 
W 
L 
L 



27-0 
45-0 
26-0 
46-0 
0-76 
13-0 
20-0 
0-13 
7-27 



Sept. 

Oct 

Oct 

Oct. 

Oct. 

Nov. 

Nov. 

Nov 



Sept 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 

Oct. 
Nov. 

Nov 
Nov. 



26 
3 
10 
24 
27 
6 
14 
26 



25 
2 
9 

16 

30 
6 

13 
25 



Sept. 6 
Sept. 11 

Sept. 25 



Nov. 30 



1914 (5-3-0) 

Baltimore Poly. 
Catholic U. 
at West. Md 
at Johns Hopkins 
at St. Johns 
at Wash Coll 
at Gallaudet 
Perm Mil. Coll. 
(Thanksgiving) 

1915 (6-3-0) 

Bait. Poly 
at Haverford 
Catholic U. 
Gallaudet 
Perm. Mil. Coll. 
St. Johns 
Wash. Coll. 
West. Md 
at Johns Hopkins 
(Thanksgiving) 

1916 (6-2-0) 

Dickinson 
Navy 
V.M.I. 
Haverfoid 
St. Johns 
at N.Y.U. 
Catholic U 
at Johns Hopkins 
(Thanksgiving) 



L 
W 
L 
W 

w 
w 

L 
W 



W 
L 
L 
W 
W 
W 
W 
W 
L 



W 
L 
W 
L 
W 
W 
W 
W 



6-0 

6-0 

13-20 

14-0 

27-14 

3-0 

23-0 

26-0 



31-0 

0-7 

0-16 

10-3 

14-13 

27-14 

28-13 

51-0 

0-3 



6-0 
7-14 
15-9 

6-7 
31-6 
10-7 
13-9 
54-0 



Oct. 
On. 
On 
On. 
Nov. 

Nov. 
Nov 
Nov 



On. 
Nov. 



Nov 
Nov. 



Oct. 
Oct. 
Nov. 
Nov 



Sept 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct 
Nov. 
Nov. 
Nov 



Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct 
Oct. 

Oct. 



6 
13 
20 
27 

3 

10 
17 
30 



i'.t 
2 



16 
23 



Nov. 28 



18 

25 

1 



Nov. 27 



25 
2 
9 
16 
23 
30 
6 

16 
25 



15 
22 



29 



Nov. 5 

Nov. 12 

Nov. 19 

Nov 24 



1917 (4-3-1) 

Delaware Coll 
at Navy 
at V M.I. 
Wake Forest 
N.C. A8.M 



W 

L 

T 
W 
L 



20-0 
0-62 
1414 
29-13 
6-10 



(Central High Stadium.Washington) 
St. Johns W 13-3 

at Perm State L 0-57 

at Johns Hopkins W 7-0 

(Thanksgiving) 



1918 (4-1-1) 

Amencan U 
at V.M.I 
West Md 

(Homewood Field) 
N.Y.U. 
St. Johns 

(Homewood Field) 
at Johns Hopkins 

(Thanksgiving) 

1919 (5-4-0) 

Swarthmore 
at Virginia 
West. Va. 
Va. Poly 
at Yale 
at St. Johns 
Catholic U. 
West Md 
at Johns Hopkins 
(Thanksgiving) 

1920 (7-2-0) 

Randolph Macon 
at Rutgers 
at Princeton 
Wash. Coll, 
at Virginia Poly 
at North Carolina 
at Catholic U 
at Syracuse 
Johns Hopkins 



L 6-13 

W 7-6 

W 10-0 

W 6-2 

W 1914 

T 0-0 



L 


6-10 


W 


13-0 


L 


0-27 


L 


0-6 


L 


0-31 


W 


27-0 


W 


13-0 


W 


20-0 


W 


13-0 



W 
L 
L 

W 

w 
w 
w 
w 
w 



54-0 
0-6 
0-35 
27-0 
7-0 
13-0 
14-0 
20-7 
24-7 



(Baltimore Stadium, Thanksgiving) 



1921 (3-5-1) 

at Rutgers 
at Syracuse 
St. Johns 
Virginia Poly 

(Washington) 
North Carolina 

(Baltimore Stadium) 
at Yale 
at Catholic U. 
at Carnegie Tech 
N.C State 



W 
L 
L 
W 



L 

W 
L 

T 



3-0 
0-42 

3-7 
10-7 

7-16 

0-28 

16-0 

0-21 

6-6 



(Baltimore Stadium. Thanksgiving) 



1961 

'According to NCAA and Maryland research the Terrapins were the first collegiate team to take the 
held with players' names on their uniforms, defeating SMV 14-6 on Sept. 23. 



1962 

'Against Miami, Tom Brown returned the opening kickoff 98 yards for a touchdown; against South 
Carolina, Brown set the record for receptions in one season. 

'Maryland broke or tied 35 Atlantic Coast Conference and school records. 



1963 

'Darryl Hill, the first black football player to ever play at Maryland, broke the ACC record for 
touchdown receptions. 



115 





igski 


assages, 981 Games 






















1928 (6-3-1) 




















1 














Sept. 


29 


Wash. College W 31-0 


1 






{■ 






* 


Oct 


6 


North Carolina L 19-26 


1 






^^^m 






■ 


Oct. 


13 


at South Carolina L 7-21 


1 3 






A AM 










Oct. 

Oct. 


20 
27 


West. Md W 13-6 
at V.M.I. T 0-0 


' 


& <6 


^ 




^^L 


if '*" 


- 


1 


1 


^ ~ 


$* ^ 


, 


V 


W ^ 


r ■ 


Nov. 
Nov. 


3 
10 


at Virginia Poly L 6-9 
at Yale W 6-0 


1— ■ 


■ 


1?n 


f 

M 


I 


1 


' :-*fl 


2j ~ ; 


Nov. 
Nov. 
Nov. 

Sept. 
Oct 


17 
24 
29 

27 
5 


Virginia W 18-2 
at Wash. & Lee W 6-0 
Johns Hopkins W 26-6 
(Baltimore Stadium, Thanksgiving) 

1929 (4-4-2) 

Wash, College W 34-7 
North Carolina L 0-43 






1 






I H 


*s 


Oct 


12 


South Carolina L 6-26 








£ £ 




J 


m> 


m+ 


m\ 


Oct 
Oct. 


19 
26 


Gallaudet W 13-6 
at V.M.I. L 6-7 






« 


wH^mi 


m MU f 


> J 


Mr 


Mr 


m\ ^B 


Nov 


2 


Virginia T 13-13 




I- . 


'1 


WQ 


' Jr. 




■** jm&, 3"^y "■"">- 




Nov 


9 


at Yale T 13-13 




£* 


> 


i v .<* '' 




" 




mT" j» 




Nov. 


16 


at Virginia Poly W 24-0 






m 










Wf 


WVI 


Nov 


28 


Johns Hopkins W 39-6 

(Baltimore Stadium, Thanksgiving) 
West. Md L 0-12 






ffc 


L 






tf if** 


Dec 


7 


111 


■rr 


*va^ J 


k 


4^ 


/ 


»m # 






(Baltimore Stadium) 


1 




JfB^WT 


"% 






y t^KSIj 






1930 (7-5-0) 


1 ' 


4 


±M w 


1\ 




* 


Sept. 


27 


Wash. CoUege W 60-6 


1 


i 






^Pw - 


• 


MM>] 


Oct 


4 


at Yale L 13-40 


1 




i "^' • ' &-**,-** 


t 






'^.rw + 


Oct. 


11 


at North Carolina L 21-28 






w 




f 1 


r 


■^""W , 1 


Oct. 


18 


St Johns W 21-13 










-f 






1 


Oct 
Nov. 
Nov. 


25 
1 
8 


at V.M.I. W 20-0 
at Virginia W 14-6 
Wash. & Lee W 41-7 




The top individual highlight of the 1907 team was a 


90-yard touchdown run by H.C. Byrd 


(holdi 


ng football) against Gallaudet. 










Nov. 


15 


at Vuginia Poly W 13-7 
















Nov. 


22 


at Navy L 0-6 






1922 (4-5-1) 








1925 (2-5-1) 


Nov 


27 


Johns Hopkms W 21-0 


Sept. 


3( 


3rd Army Cor W 


7-0 


Sept. 


26 


Wash. CoUege W 13-0 






(Baltimore Stadium, Thanksgiving) 






(Homewood Field) 




Oct. 


10 


Rutgers W 16-0 


Nov. 


29 


at Vandeibilt L 7-22 


Oct. 


' 


Richmond T 


0-0 






(Philadelphia) 


Dec 


6 


West. Md L 0-7 


Oct. 


V 


at Pennsylvania L 


0-12 


Oct. 


17 


at Virginia Poly L 0-3 






(Baltimore Stadium) 


Oct. 


21 


at Princeton L 


0-26 


Oct 


24 


at Virginia L 0-6 








Oct. 


2! 


at North Carolina L 


3-27 


Oct 


31 


North Carolina L 0-16 






1931 (8-1-1) 


Nov. 


4 


at Virgina Poly L 


0-21 






(Baltimore Stadium) 


Sept. 


26 


Wash. College W 13-0 


Nov. 


11 


at Yale L 


3-45 


Nov. 


7 


at Yale L 14-43 


Oct. 


3 


Virginia W 7-6 


Nov. 


IE 


at Johns Hopkins W 


3-0 


Nov. 


14 


Wash, and Lee L 3-7 


Oct. 


10 


Navy W 6-0 


Nov. 


2! 


at Catholic U. W 


54-0 


Nov. 


26 


Johns Hopkms T 7-7 






(Griffith Stadium, Washington) 


Nov. 


3t 


at N.C. State W 

(Thanksgiving) 


7-6 






(Baltimore Stadium, Thanksgiving) 
1926 (5-4-1) 


Oct. 
Oct 
Oct. 


17 
24 
31 


Kentucky T 6-6 
at V.M.I. W 24-20 
at Virginia Poly W 20-0 






1923 (7-2-1) 




Sept. 


25 


Wash. College W 63-0 


Nov. 


7 


at Vanderbilt L 12-39 


Sept. 


2E 


Randolph Macon W 


53-0 


Oct 


2 


at South Carolina L 0-12 


Nov. 


21 


Wash. & Lee W 13-7 


Oct. 


I 


at Pennsylvania W 


3-0 


Oct. 


9 


at Chicago L 0-21 


Nov. 


26 


Johns Hopkins W 35-14 


Oct. 


l; 


Richmond W 


23-0 


Oct. 


16 


at Virginia Poly L 8-24 






(Baltimore Stadium, Thanksgiving) 


Oct. 


2C 


Virginia Poly L 


9-16 






(Norfolk) 


Dec. 


5 


West, Md W 41-6 






(Griffith Stadium, Washington) 




Oct. 


23 


North Carolina W 14-6 






(Baltimore Stadium) 


Oct 


2' 


North Carolina W 


14-0 


Oct. 


30 


Gallaudet W 38-7 








Nov. 


; 


St. Johns W 


28-0 


Nov. 


6 


at Yale W 15-0 






1932 (5-6-0) 


Nov. 


K 


at Yale L 


14-16 


Nov. 


13 


Virginia T 6-6 


Sept. 


25 


Wash, CoUege W 63-0 


Nov. 


r 


at N.C State W 


26-12 


Nov. 


20 


at Wash. & Lee L 0-3 


Oct. 


1 


at Vuginia L 6-7 


Nov. 


24 


Catholic U. W 


40-6 


Nov 


25 


Johns Hopkms W 17-14 


Oct. 


8 


Virginia Poly L 0-23 


Nov. 


2£ 


Johns Hopkins T 
(Baltimore Stadium, Thanksgiving) 


6-6 






(Baltimore Stadium, Thanksgiving) 
1927 (4-7-0) 


Oct. 
Oct. 
Oct. 


15 
22 
29 


at Duke L 0-34 
St, Johns W 24-7 
at V.M.I. W 12-7 






1924 (3-3-3) 




Sept. 


24 


Wash. College W 80-0 


Nov. 


5 


Vanderbilt L 0-13 


Sept. 


2' 


Wash. College W 


23-0 


Oct 


1 


South Carolina W 26-0 






(Griffith Stadium, Washington) 


Oct. 


4 


Wash, and Lee L 


7-19 


Oct. 


8 


at North Carolina L 6-7 


Nov. 


12 


Navy L 7-28 


Oct 


11 


Richmond W 


38-0 


Oct 


15 


at Virginia Poly W 13-7 






(Baltimore Stadium) 


Oct. 
Oct. 


If 

2; 


at Virginia Poly L 0-12 

(Central High Stadium. Washington) 
at North Carolina W fi-o 


Oct. 
Oct. 
Nov. 


22 

29 

5 


at V.M.I. W 10-6 
Wash. & Lee L 6-13 
at Yale L 6-30 


Nov 
Nov. 


19 
24 


Wash. & Lee W 60 

(Baltimore Stadium) 
Johns Hopkms W 23-0 


Nov. 


i 


at Catholic U. T 


0-0 


Nov. 


12 


at Virginia L 0-21 






(Baltimore Stadium, Thanksgiving) 


Nov. 


t 


at Yale L 


0-47 


Nov. 


19 


at Vanderbilt L 20-39 


Dec 


3 


West, Md L 7-39 


Nov. 


1! 


N.C. State T 


0-0 


Nov. 


24 


Johns Hopkins L 13-14 






(Baltimore Stadium) 


Nov. 


2" 


Johns Hopkins T 
(Baltimore Stadium. Thanksgiving) 


0-0 


Dec 


3 


(Baltimore Stadium. Thanksgiving) 
at Florida L 6-7 






















116 













Terpassages, 981 Games 







1933 (3-7-0) 
































Sept. 


30 


St. Johns 


W 


20-0 














Oct 


7 


at Virginia Poly 


L 


6-7 














Oct. 


14 


at Tulane 


L 


0-20 




V r 


) CX ■* r% ^L ^ 


!■) 




Oct 


21 


atV.M.I. 


L 


13-19 








ff!f!£nfl 


^^^ 


^^ ' ^^v* - , '^^PW*** r i»* 'HI 


On 


28 


West Md 
(Baltimore Stadium) 


L 


713 






7-14 ^8 ff 5 §2 W 


Jll : 


*3 


?,,^T?e.- 


Nov 
Nov 


4 

11 


at Virginia 
Duke 


L 
L 


0-6 

7-38 


1 n~ M 


r Ol \0 r\ a *r% m 


: if 


!ri 


«. -" jt 


V^Hfl 


21 54 4 


2 41 1 


Nov 


18 


at Johns Hopkins 


W 


27-7 


l 3 *.^! 


' 3, «e ' Z ^ *4« *<G * 


$ "a 


m 


(S. '. w. 


Nov 


23 


Wash, & Lee 


W 


3313 


Ik -z& 


<^ V if > T 


WawmR 


■ m' 


f - •^^K^'^y" 


1 *?■;) *%m 


Dec 


2 


Flonda 


L 


019 


■ r- WXw^M 




>R o 


o 


•^fi 




- ^ ^- *^l 




BM^ 






Sept 
Oct 
On 


29 
6 
13 


(Tampa) 

1934 (7-3-0) 

St Johns 

at Wash 8i Lee 

at Navy 


W 
L 
L 


13-0 

0-7 

13-16 










2 


1 w 


25 35* 


m 


-ti^^B 


^■z — 


f^— L 


t ^. M,^ 


r »**•- 






: so 3tti 


I.QS 




17 !3SLsel4P 


:*9 


T 


46 


Hi* 


l\ '^^^iiiM 


TW/ ^^> ^^\~ 




V 


^■Br* -^mW h r^^*Wr - ^BM 


Oct 


20 


at Virginia Poly 


W 


14-9 








r» ^ 




Oct 


27 


Flonda 
(Baltimore Stadium) 


W 


21-0 






























Nov 


3 


Virginia 


w 


20-0 


The 50th anniversary team employed Coach Shaughnessy's "T" formation, ranking 11th in 


Nov 


12 


VMI 


w 


23-0 


the nation offensively. 












(Baltimore Stadium) 
















Nov. 


17 


Indiana 


L 


14-17 




1938 (2-7-0) 






1941 (3-5-1) 


Nov. 


24 


Georgetown 


w 


6-0 


Sept. 24 


Richmond L 6-19 


Sept. 


27 


Hamp.-Syd. W 18-0 


Nov. 


29 


Johns Hopkins 


w 


19-0 


Oct 1 


at Perm State L 0-33 


Oct. 


4 


West Md T 6-6 






(Baltimore Stadium, Thanksgiving) 




Oct. 8 


at Syracuse L 0-53 






(Baltimore Stadium) 












Oct. 16 


West Md W 14-8 


Oct. 


11 


Duke L 0-50 






1935 (7-2-2) 








(Baltimore Stadium) 






(Baltimore Stadium) 


Sept 


28 


St. Johns 


w 


39-6 


On. 22 


Virginia L 19-27 


Oct 


18 


Flonda W 13-12 


On 


5 


Virginia Poly 


w 


7-0 


Oct 29 


V.M.I. L 14-47 


Oct. 


25 


at Pennsylvania L 0-55 






(Baltimore Stadium) 






Nov 12 


at Florida L 7-21 


Nov 


1 


at Rutgers L 0-20 


Oct 


12 


North Carolina 
(Baltimore Stadium) 


L 


33-0 


Nov 19 
Nov. 24 


Georgetown L 7-14 
Wash. & Lee W 1913 


Nov 


8 


Georgetown L 0-26 
(Griffith Stadium. Washington) 


Oct 


19 


at V.M.I. 


W 


6-0 




(Baltimore Stadium, Thanksgiving) 


Nov. 


15 


V.M.I. L 0-27 


Oct 


26 


at Florida 


W 


20-6 






Nov. 


20 


Wash. & Lee W 6-0 


Nov 


2 


at Virginia 


W 


14-7 




1939 (2-7-0) 






(Baltimore Stadium. Thanksgiving) 


Nov. 


9 


Indiana 
(Baltimore Stadium) 


L 


7-13 


Sept. 30 
Oct. 7 


Hamp.-Syd W 26-0 
West Md W 12-0 






1942 (7-2-0) 


Nov. 


16 


Wash. & Lee 


T 


0-0 




(Baltimore Stadium) 


Sept. 


26 


Connecticut W 34-0 


Nov. 


23 


at Georgetown 


W 


12-6 


Oct 14 


at Virginia L 7-12 


On. 


3 


Lakehurst NAS W 14-0 






(Griffith Stadium. Washington) 




Oct. 21 


at Rutgers L 12-25 


Oct. 


10 


Rutgers W 27-13 


Nov. 


28 


Syracuse 


T 


0-0 


Oct 28 


Flonda L 0-14 






(Baltimore Stadium) 






(Baltrmore Stadrum, Thanksgiving) 




Nov 4 


at Perm State L 0-12 


On. 


17 


at V.M.I L 0-29 


Dec 


6 


West. Md 
(Baltimore Stadium) 


W 


22-7 


Nov 11 


Georgetown L 0-20 
(Griffith Stadium. Washington) 


Oct 


24 


West. Md W 61-0 
(Baltimore Stadium) 












Nov 18 


at V.M.I. L 14-47 


Oct. 


31 


Honda W 13-0 






1936 (6-5-0) 






Nov. 30 


Syracuse L 7-10 






(Griffith Stadium. Washington) 


Sept. 


26 


St. Johns 


W 


28-0 




(Thanksgiving) 


Nov. 


7 


at Duke L 0-42 


Oct. 


3 


at Virginia Poly 


w 


6-0 






Nov 


14 


at Virginia W 27-12 


On. 


10 


at North Carolina 


L 


0-14 




1940 (2-6-1) 


Nov. 


21 


Wash 8t Lee W 32-28 


Oct 


17 


at Virginia 


W 


21-0 


Sept. 28 


Hamp.-Syd L 6-7 








Oct 


24 


Syracuse 


W 


20-0 


On. 5 


at Pennsylvania L 0-51 






1943 (4-5-0) 


Oct. 


31 


(Polo Grounds. NY) 
at Flonda 


L 


6-7 


Oct. 12 
On. 19 


Virginia L 6-19 
at Flonda L 0-19 


Sept. 
Oct. 


25 
2 


Curtis Bay CG L 7-13 
Wake Forest W 13-7 


Nov. 


7 


at Richmond 


W 


12-0 


Oct. 25 


West Md W 6-0 


Oct. 


9 


Rich. Army Base W 19-6 


Nov. 


14 


V.M.I. 


L 


7-13 




(Baltimore Stadium) 


Oct. 


16 


at West Virgnia L 2-6 


Nov. 


21 


Georgetown 


L 


6-7 


Nov. 9 


Georgetown L 0-41 


Oct. 


23 


Perm State L 0-45 


Nov. 


26 


Wash. & Lee 


W 


19-6 


Nov. 16 


V.M.I. L 0-20 


Oct. 


30 


at Greenville An W 43-18 






(Baltrmore Stadium. Thanksgiving) 




Nov 21 


Rutgers W 14-7 


Nov. 


6 


at Virginia L 0-39 


Dec 


5 


West. Md 


L 


0-12 




(Baltimore Stadium, Thanksgiving) 


Nov. 


13 


Brainbndge NTS L 0-46 






(Baltimore Stadium) 






Nov. 30 


Wash 8i Lee T 7-7 


Nov. 


25 


V.M.I. W 24-21 






1937 (8-2-0) 














(Roanoke. Thanksgiving) 


Sept 


25 


St. Johns 


W 


25-0 












Oct 


2 


at Pennsylvania 
(Franklin Field) 


L 


21-28 












On 


9 


West. Md 


W 


6-0 












Oct 
Oct 


16 
23 


at Virginia 
Syracuse 


W 
W 


3-0 
13-0 
































(Baltimore Stadium) 








1964 










Oct 


30 


Flonda 


W 


13-7 














Nov. 


6 


at V.M.I. 


W 


9-7 




'Kenny Ambrusko returned the last kickoff agains 


tNavyfr 


jm St 


veral yards deep in his own endzone 


Nov, 


13 


at Perm State 


L 


14-21 




for a touchdown to defeat the shocked Middies. 








Nov. 


20 


Georgetown 
(Griffith Stadium, Washingt 


W 
on) 


12-2 




1970 














Nov 


25 


Wash. & Lee 


W 


8-0 
















(Baltimore Stadium. Thanksgiving) 






'Dennis O'Hara switched from quarterback durin 


j the pre 


vious 


season to wide receiver. 














'Art Seymore gained 945 yards, the second highe 


st in school history. 

















117 



ssages, 981 Gaines 



1944 (1-7-1) 




1948 (6-4-0) 




1952 (7-2-0) 




Sept. 29 Hamp.-Syd L 


0-12 


Sept. 26 at Richmond W 19-0 




Preseason #2 




Oct. 7 at Wake Forest L 


0-39 


Oct. 2 at Delaware W 21-0 


Sept. 20 


at Missoun W 


13-10 


(Winston Salem) 




Oct. 9 Virginia Polytechnic W 28-0 


Sept. 27 


at Auburn W 


13-7 


Oct 14 West Virginia T 


6-6 


(Griffith Stadium, Washington) 


Oct. 4 #3 


Clemson W 


28-0 


Oct. 20 Michigan State L 


0-8 


Oct 16 Duke #18 L 12-13 


Oct 11 #4 


at Georgia #19 W 


37-0 


Nov. 4 Virginia L 


7-18 


(Griffith Stadium, Washington) 


Oct. 18 #2 


Navy #20 W 


38-7 


(Griffith Stadium, Washington) 




Oct. 23 George Washington W 47-0 


Oct. 25 #2 


Louisiana State W 


34-6 


Nov. 11 at Michigan State L 


0-33 


(Griffith Stadium, Washington) 


Nov 1 #2 


at Boston University W 


34-7 


Nov. 18 at Perm State L 


19-34 


Oct 29 at Miami W 27-13 


Nov 15 #3 


at Mississippi #11 L 


14-21 


Nov. 28 at Florida L 


6-14 


Nov 6 at South Carolina W 19-7 


Nov. 22 #8 


at Alabama #14 L 


7-27 


Nov. 30 V.M.I. W 


8-6 


Nov. 13 North Carolina #6 L 20-49 


Final Poll #13 






(Roanoke, Thanksgiving) 




Nov. 20 atVanderbilt L 0-34 
(Griffith Stadium. Washington) 




1953 (10-1-0) 




1945 (6-2-1) 




Nov. 27 at West Virginia L 14-16 


(ACC 3-0-0, Co-Champions) 




Sept. 28 Guilford Coll. W 


60-6 






Pre Season #9 




Oct. 6 at Richmond W 


21-0 


1949 (9-1-0) 


Sept. 19 


at Missoun W 


20-6 


Oct 12 U.S. Merch.Mar W 


22-6 


Sept. 24 at Virginia Polytechnic W 34-7 


Sept. 26 


Wash and Lee W 


52-0 


Oct 20 at V.P.I. L 


13-21 


Sept 30 Georgetown W 33-7 


Oct 3 #3 


at Clemson W 


20-0 


Oct. 27 at West Virginia T 


13-13 


Oct. 8 at Michigan State #13 L 7-14 


Oct 10 #4 


Georgia W 


40-13 


Nov. 3 Wm and Mary L 


14-33 


Oct 22 at N.C State W 14-6 


Oct 17 #3 


at North Carolina W 


26-0 


Nov. 10 V.M.I. W 


38-0 


Oct 29 South Carolina #15 W 44-7 


Oct. 23 #3 


at Miami W 


30-0 


Nov. 24 Virginia W 


19-13 


Nov. 5 George Washington W 40-14 


Oct 31 #2 


South Carolina W 


24-6 


(Griffith Stadium, Washington) 




Nov. 12 at Boston University W 14-13 


Nov. 7 #2 


at Geoige Washington W 


27-6 


Dec. 1 at South Carolina W 


19-13 


Nov 24 #15 West Virginia W 47-7 




(Gnffith Stadium, Washington) 








Dec 2 #14 at Miami W 13-0 


Nov 14 #2 


Mississippi #12 W 


38-0 






Jan 2 #14 


Nov 21 #2 


Alabama #11 W 


21-0 






Gator Bowl Missouri W 20-7 


Jan 1 












Orange Bowl 


Oklahoma #4 L 


0-7 










Final Boll #1 


1954 (7-2-1) 
(ACC 4-0-1, 2nd) 
Pre Season #3 




© a e a o §• 


ft 

- 


a a © © a & © « 




,-^^^^^^t^ 


fefil^ 


2^^^3fK%5^3^]^ 




Sept. 18 
Oct. 1 #6 


at Kentucky W 
at U.C.L.A. #4 L 


24-0 
7-12 




- r ^; i^- f l <~ s 'i \f^ 




Oct 9 #13 
Oct. 16 
Oct. 22 
Oct 30 
Nov. 6 
Nov 13 #17 


at Wake Forest T 
North Carolina W 
at Miami #16 L 
at South Carolina W 
N C State W 
Clemson W 


13-13 
33-0 
7-9 
20-0 

42-14 
16-0 




&&£*/%&* Hwi 




Nov. 20 #13 
Nov 25 #10 
Final Boll #8 


Geoige Washington W 
Missoun W 

1955 (10-1-0) 


48-6 
74-13 


Sixteen men who played under Paul 


"Bear" Bryant at the University of North Carolina 




Pie-Flight Training School followed their mei 


itor to College Park. Bryant even brought 


(ACC 4-0-0, Co-Champions) 




his team manager with him. 








Pre Season #5 










Sept 17 


at Missoun W 


13-12 








Sept. 24 


U.C.L.A. W 


7-0 


1946 (3-6-0) 




1950 (7-2-1) 


Oct 1 


at Bayloi W 


20-6 


Sept. 28 Bainbndge Naval W 


54-0 


Preseason #15 


Oct 1 


Wake Forest W 


28-7 


Oct. 4 Richmond L 


7-37 


Sept 23 at Georgia L 7-27 


Oct 15 


at North Carolina W 


25-7 


Oct. 12 at North Carolina L 


0-33 


Sept. 30 Navy W 35-21 


Oct. 22 


at Syracuse W 


34-13 


Oct. 18 Virginia Polytechnic W 


6-0 


Oct 7 at Michigan State W 34-7 


Oct. 29 


South Carolina W 


27-0 


Nov. 2 at William & Mary L 


7-41 


Oct 14 at Georgetown W 25-14 


Nov. 5 


Louisiana State W 


13-0 


Nov. 9 South Carolina L 


17-21 


(Griffith Stadium, Washington) 


Nov 12 


at Clemson W 


2612 


Nov. 16 Wash. & Lee W 


24-7 


Oct 21 N.C. State L 13-16 


Nov. 19 


George Washington W 


19-0 


(Baltimore Stadium) 




Oct 28 at Duke W 26-14 


Jan. 2 #3 






Nov. 23 at Michigan State L 


14-26 


Nov. 4 George Washington W 23-7 


Orange Bowl 


Oklahoma #1 L 


6-20 


Nov. 30 at N.C. State L 


7-28 


Nov. 11 at North Carolina T 7-7 
Nov 18 at West Virginia W 41-0 


Final Boll #3 






1947 (7-2-2) 




Dec. 2 Virginia Polytechnic W 63-7 




1956 (2-7-1) 




Sept. 27 at South Carolina W 


19-13 






(ACC 2-2-1, 4th) 




Oct. 3 Delaware W 


43-19 


1951 (10-0-0) 




Pre Season #6 




Oct 10 Richmond W 


18-6 


Preseason #16 


Sept. 22 


Syracuse L 


12-26 


Oct. 18 at Duke L 


7-19 


Sept. 29 at Wash. & Lee W 54-14 


Sept. 29 


at Wake Forest W 


6-0 


Oct 25 at Virigina Polytechnic W 


21-19 


Oct 6 George Washington W 33-6 


Oct. 6 


Baylor #16 L 


0-14 


Nov, 1 West Virginia W 


27-0 


Oct 13 at Georgia W 43-7 


Oct. 12 


at Miami #11 L 


6-13 


Nov. 8 at Duquesne W 


32-0 


Oct. 20 North Carolina W 14-7 


Oct. 20 


at North Carolina L 


6-34 


Nov. 15 North Carolina L 


0-19 


Oct. 27 at Louisiana State W 27-0 


Oct. 27 


at Tennessee #4 L 


7-34 


(Griffith Stadium Washington) 




Nov. 3 Missouri W 35-0 


Nov. 3 


Kentucky L 


0-14 


Nov. 22 atVanderbilt W 


20-6 


Nov. 10 at Navy W 40-21 


Nov. 10 


Clemson #11 T 


6-6 


Nov. 29 N.C. State T 


0-0 


(Baltimore Stadium) 


Nov. 17 


at South Carolina L 


0-13 


Jan. I 




Nov. 17 N.C State W 53-0 


Nov. 22 


at N.C. State W 


25-14 


Gator Bowl Georgia T 


20-20 


Nov 24 West Virginia W 54-7 
Jan 2 *2 

Sugar Bowl Tennessee W 28-13 
Final Poll #3 












118 











Terpassages, 981 Games 





Sept 


22 


1962 (6-4-0) 
(ACC 5-2-0, 3rd) 

SMU 


w 


7-0 






I 1 




■J— « — 








» 










1 


ft £• r 


'* ■SOL \ 


^"VaH^ 


Sept 
On. 
Oct 


29 
6 
13 


Wake Forest 
N.C. State 
North Carolina 


W 

w 
w 


13-2 

14-6 
3113 




K 1 «i J 




i m jfflltikj 


On. 
Oct. 


19 
27 


at Miami 
South Carolina 


L 

w 


24-28 
13-11 


■ r J 


»• "" 


\^\ T 




Nov. 


3 


at Penn State 


L 


7-23 


md 


t 1 


V^» V 




Nov 


10 


at Duke 


I 


7-10 


1 y 


» 


■i\ ^ V 


w 


WH% ' <*: rkA^h V i'*t 


Nov. 


17 


Clemson 


I 


14-17 


1 


1 


'WfkS •£' ^ 


1 


^1 m jfc^Br ^BBFi r-.\«BBfl 


Nov 


24 


Virginia 


W 


40-18 




* 


$v& 


V 


■ - m m^WLtwH 






1963 (3-7-0) 










^» % rs 


I 








(ACC 2-5-0, 5th) 






■ 


/ 


F» X » j 


f 


LS BnS# <j 


Sept 


21 


N C State 


L 


14-36 




r 


l *"^ 




Sept 


28 


at South Carolina 


L 


13-21 






1 




Vi ^aw 


Oct. 


5 


Duke (at Richmond) 


L 


12-30 


I . 




^ > A -^ — ^ 




■* 1 aw'k. ^QaV^ 


^^^r 




On. 


12 


North Carolina 


L 


7-14 


1 




* 'fi #^# 




y^- r - ^^ 5 






On. 


19 


An Force 


W 


21-14 






T mF 






* '■+* -^ A 1 


On. 
Nov. 
Nov. 


26 
2 

9 


at Wake Forest 

Penn State 

at Navy #4 


w 

L 
L 


32-0 

15-17 
7-42 


r^^^ 


a jm 


1 


^^^ 


i ^/^' 


"'_ 


^^^^^^ V 1 ^^ ' \. "^^ 


Nov 


16 


at Clemson 


L 


6-21 






# 






Nov. 


23 


Virginia 
1964 (5-5-0) 


W 


21-6 






J — ji 








(ACC 4-3-0, tie 3rd) 










% IL, 


A 


(a^j^* 1 " '^W >j 


Sept 


19 


Oklahoma #2 


L 


3-13 




m J 


. ' 


IH^'V - x.^ 


Sept 


26 


South Carolina 


W 


24-6 






i fl^Ei 


" 


Oct 


3 


at N C State 


L 


13-14 






i 




^ ~ ^^ 


Oct. 


10 


at Duke 


L 


17-24 




■ * ^ 


























Oct. 
Oct 


17 
24 


North Carolina 
(Norfolk, Va) 
Wake Forest 


W 
L 


10-9 

17-21 


Members of the 1948 Gator Bowl bound Terps celebrate the first ever bowl bid in school 


history. 








Oct 


31 


at Penn State 


L 


9-17 












Nov 


7 


Navy 


W 


27-22 






1957 (5-5-0) 






1960 (6-4-0) 


Nov. 


14 


Clemson 


w 


34-0 






(ACC 4-2-0, tie 3rd) 






(ACC 5-2-0, 3rd) 


Nov. 


21 


at Virginia 


w 


10-0 


Sept. 


21 


at Texas A & M #2 


L 


13-21 


Sept. 17 at West Virginia W 31-8 












Sept. 


28 


N.C. State 


L 


13-48 


Sept. 24 Texas #15 L 0-34 






1965 (4-6-0) 






Oct 


5 


at Duke #4 


L 


0-14 


Oct. 1 Duke L 7-20 






(ACC 3-3-0, tie 5th) 






Oct 


12 


Wake Forest 


W 


27-0 


Oct 8 at N.C. State L 10-13 


Sept. 


25 


Ohio University 


w 


24-7 


On 


19 


North Carolina #14 


W 


21-7 


Oct. 15 Clemson #8 W 19-17 


Oct. 


2 


Syracuse 


L 


7-24 


Oct 


26 


Tennessee 


L 


0-16 


Oct. 22 at Wake Forest W 14-13 


Oct. 


9 


at Wake Forest 


w 


10-7 


Nov 


2 


at South Carolina 


W 


10-6 


Oct. 29 South Carolina W 15-0 


Oct. 


16 


at North Carolina 


L 


10-12 


Nov 


9 


at Clemson 


L 


7-26 


Nov. 5 at Perm State L 9-28 


Oct. 


23 


N.C. State 


L 


7-29 


Nov. 


15 


at Miami 


W 


16-6 


Nov. 12 at North Carolina W 22-19 


Oct 


30 


at South Carolina 


W 


27-14 


Nov. 


23 


Virginia 


W 


12-0 


Nov. 19 at Virginia W 44-12 


Nov. 
Nov 


6 
13 


at Navy 
at Clemson 


L 
W 


7-19 
6-0 






1958 (4-6-0) 






NOTE 1961-1967 ONLY TOP 


Nov 


20 


Virginia 


L 


27-33 










TEN TEAMS RANKED 


Dec. 


4 


Penn State 


L 


7-19 






(ACC 3-3-0, 5th) 


















Sept. 
Sept. 
Oct. 


20 
27 

4 


at Wake Forest 

at N C State 

Clemson #10 


L 
W 
L 


0-34 

21-6 
0-8 


1961 (7-3-0) 
(ACC 3-30, 3rd) 






1966 (4-6-0) 
(ACC 3-3-0, tie 3rd) 






Oct 


11 


Texas A & M 


L 


10-14 


Pre Season - other teams receiving votes 


Sept. 


17 


at Penn State 


L 


7-15 


Oct. 


18 


at North Carolina 


L 


0-27 


Sept. 23 atS.M.U. W 14-6 


Sept. 


24 


Wake Forest 


W 


34-7 


Oct. 


25 


at Auburn 


L 


7-20 


Sept. 30 at Clemson W 24-21 


Oct. 


1 


Syracuse 


L 


7-28 


Nov. 


1 


South Caiolina 


W 


10-6 


Oct. 7 Syracuse #7 W 22-21 


On. 


8 


Duke 


W 


21-19 


Nov. 


8 


at Navy 


L 


14-40 


Oct. 14 #10 North Carolina L 8-14 


On. 


15 


West Virginia 


W 


28-9 


Nov. 


14 


at Miami 


W 


26-14 


On. 21 at Air Force W 21-0 


On. 


29 


South Carolina 


W 


14-2 


Nov. 


22 


at Virginia 


W 


44-6 


Oct. 28 at South Carolina L 10-20 


Nov. 


5 


at N. C. State 


L 


21-24 












Nov. 4 Penn State W 21-17 


Nov. 


12 


Clemson 


L 


10-14 






1959 (5-5-0) 
(ACC 4-2-0, 3rd) 






Nov. 11 N.C State W 10-7 


Nov. 


19 


at Virginia 


L 


17-41 










Nov. 18 Wake Forest W 10-7 


Nov 


26 


at Florida State 


L 


2145 


Sept. 


19 


West Virginia 


W 


27-7 


Nov. 26 at Virginia L 16-28 












Sept. 


26 


at Texas 


L 


0-26 














Oct 


3 


at Syracuse #20 


L 


0-29 














Oct. 


10 


Wake Forest 


L 


7-10 














Oct. 


17 


North Carolina 


W 


14-7 














Oct. 


31 


at South Carolina 


L 


6-22 














Nov. 
Nov. 


7 

14 


at Navy 

at Clemson #11 


L 

W 


14-22 
28-25 




1972 










Nov 


21 


Virginia 


w 


55-12 










Dec. 


5 


N.C State 


w 


33-28 


'Maryland's defense finished the season ranked No. 1 in the ACC after finishing last the 


year 


be/ore. 












The offense totaled 109 points, the most since 1954. 




















'Defensive guard Paul Vellano received All-ACC honors. He was 


also credited with a sack against 












Virginia after he threw the center into the quarterback. 















119 



rpassages, 981 Games 



















Dec 16 #10 






■ 










i m 


• -Lj4E$sirr7££3 


1 - * ■■* 




» *. '■ - 


f 


c-JL 


tW'-r ' > 


-.&:i$3k(ffiyt &>\ 


5- .T ..' 


Liberty Bowl Tennessee 


L 


3-7 


l-l*("'* 


lfc£ 


*-T *flM 


hs&lt 


m 


, 


M 3 


k 


Final Poll #13 

1975 (9-2-1) 






1 * * 


iM 


■V» 7 r*' .. 


/£m .r 


'■fij 


C2L. i 


v| 


II 


w 




T*Ji 


Br* 1 


t '-#■ 


__JU m 1 




(ACC 5-0-0, Champions) 






i 


l\ 




* ?j 






J 


Pre Season #17 






;i ,' 


l\ 


Bfoj:** : 


1 1 


f 


Sept, 6 #17 Villanova 


W 


41-0 


: 




f '7IA 


a^ 






L_ 


Sept. 13 #14 at Tennessee #20 


L 


8-26 


i | 




r7 fy 


m& 


■*r* 




Sept. 20 at North Carolina 
Sept. 27 #20 at Kentucky 


W 
T 


34-7 
10-10 


I 




4 


/ 


•//■ 


*7fm 


&j& 




Oa. 4 Syracuse 
Oa. 11 N. C. State 


W 
W 


24-7 
37-22 


II 








r»i 




Oct. 18 #19 at Wake Forest 


W 


27-0 


1 




'■'>1,P 




n 


p; 


£5* 


■ 


Oa. 29 #18 

Nov. 1 #14 Perm State #9 

Nov 8 #16 at Cincinnati 

Nov. 15 at Clemson 

Nov 22 #20 Virginia 

Nov. 24 #17 

Dec. 1 #17 


L 
W 
W 
W 


13-15 
21-19 
22-20 
62-24 


The Big Red Monster defeated Boston University and the Big Green Monster at Fenway 


Park, 


14-13, 


in 1949 as Coach Tatum looked on. 






Dec. 29 #17 






















Gator Bowl Florida #13 


W 


13-0 






1967 (0-9-0) 






Oa. 9 


Syracuse L 


13-21 


Final Poll #13 










(ACC 0-6-0, 8th) 






Oa. 16 


at South Carolina L 


6-35 








Sept. 


30 


at Oklahoma 


i 


0-35 


Oa. 23 


at Florida L 


23-27 


1976 (11-1-0) 






Oct. 


7 


Syracuse 


L 


3-7 


Oa. 30 


V.M.I. W 


38-0 


(ACC 5-0-0, Champions) 






Oct. 


14 


N. C. State #9 


L 


9-31 


Nov. 6 


at Penn State #6 L 


27-63 


Pre Season #13 






Oct. 


21 


at North Carolina 


L 


0-14 


Nov 13 


at Clemson L 


14-20 


Sept 11 #13 Richmond 


W 


31-7 


Oct. 


28 


at South Carolina 


L 


0-31 


Nov. 20 


Virginia L 


27-29 


Sept. 18 #10 at West Vuginia 


w 


24-3 


Nov. 


4 


Penn State 


L 


3-38 








Sept. 25 #8 at Syracuse 


w 


42-28 


Nov. 


11 


at Clemson 


L 


7-28 




1972 (5-5-1) 




Oa. 2 #7 Villanova 


w 


20-9 


Nov. 


17 


at Wake Forest 


L 


17-35 




(ACC 3-2-1, 3rd) 




Oa 9 #7 at N. C. State 


w 


16-6 


Nov. 


25 


Vuginia 


L 


7-12 


Sept. 9 


at N. C. State T 


24-24 


Oa. 16 #5 Wake Forest 


w 


17-15 












Sept. 16 


North Carolina L 


26-31 


Oa. 23 #6 at Duke 


w 


30-3 






1968 (2-8-0) 






Sept. 23 


V.M.I. W 


28-16 


Oa. 30 #5 Kentucky 


w 


24-14 






(ACC 2-4-0, 7th) 






Sept. 30 


at Syracuse L 


12-16 


Nov. 6 #6 Cincinnati 


w 


21-0 


Sept. 


21 


Florida State 


L 


14-24 


Oa. 7 


Wake Forest W 


23-0 


Nov 13 #6 Clemson 


w 


20-0 


Sept. 


28 


at Syracuse 


L 


14-32 


Oa. 14 


Villanova W 


37-7 


Nov. 20 #6 at Virginia 


w 


28-0 


Oct. 


5 


Duke 
(at Norfolk, Va) 


L 


28-30 


Oa 21 
Oa. 28 


Duke L 
at Vugrnia W 


14-20 
24-23 


Nov. 22 #5 
Nov. 29 #4 






Oct. 


12 


North Carolina 


W 


33-24 


Nov. 4 


at Penn State #10 L 


16-46 


Jan. 1 #4 






Oct. 


19 


South Carolina 


W 


21-19 


Nov, 11 


Clemson W 


31-6 


Cotton Bow) Houston #6 


L 


21-30 


Oct. 


26 


at N. C. State 


L 


11-31 


Nov 18 


at Miami L 


8-28 


Final Poll #8 






Nov. 


2 


at Wake Forest 


L 


14-38 














Nov. 


9 


Clemson 


L 


0-16 




1973 (8-4-0) 




1977 (8-4-0) 






Nov. 


16 


Penn State #3 


L 


13-57 




(ACC 5-1-0, 2nd) 




(ACC 4-2-0, tie 3rd) 






Nov. 


23 


at Virginia 


L 


23-28 


Sept. 15 


West Virginia L 


13-20 


Pre Season #10 
















Sept. 22 


at North Carolina W 


23-3 


Sept. 10 #10 at Clemson 


w 


21-14 






1969 (3-7-0) 






Sept. 29 


Villanova W 


31-3 


Sept. 17 #11 West Virginia 


L 


16-24 






(ACC 3-3-0, tie 3rd) 






Oa. 6 


Syracuse W 


38-0 


Sept. 24 at Penn State #5 


L 


9-27 


Sept. 


20 


at West Virginia 


L 


7-31 


Oa. 13 


at N. C. State L 


22-24 


Oa 1 at N. C. State 


L 


20-24 


Sept. 


27 


N. C. State 


L 


7-24 


Oct. 20 


at Wake Forest W 


37-0 


Oa. 8 Syracuse 


W 


24-10 


Oct. 


4 


at Wake Forest 


W 


19-14 


Oa. 27 


Duke W 


30-10 


Oa 15 at Wake Forest 


W 


35-7 


Oct. 
Oct 


11 
18 


Syracuse 
Duke 


L 
W 


9-20 
20-7 


Nov. 3 


(at Norfolk. Va) 
Penn State #6 L 


22-42 


Ott. 22 Duke 

Oa. 29 North Carolina 


W 
L 


31-13 
7-16 


Oct. 
Nov. 


25 

1 


at South Carolina 
at Clemson 


L 
L 


0-17 
0-40 


Nov. 10 
Nov. 17 


Virginia W 
at Clemson W 


33-0 
28-13 


Nov 5 Villanova 
Nov. 12 at Richmond 


W 
W 


19-13 
27-24 


Nov. 


8 


Miami (Ohio) 


L 


21-34 


Nov 24 
Nov 26 
Dec. 3 
Dec. 28 


Tulane #17 W 
C18 
»18 

m 


42-9 


Nov. 19 Virginia 


W 


28-0 


Nov. 


15 


at Penn State #5 


L 


0-48 




Dec. 22 






Nov. 


22 


Vuguna 


W 


17-14 




Hall ot Fame Minnesota 
Bowl 


IV 


17-7 












Peach Bow) 


Georgia L 


16-17 












1970 (2-9-0) 
(ACC 2-4-0, tie 6th) 






Finar Poll #2£ 






1978 (9-3-0) 






Sept. 
Sept. 
Sept. 


12 
19 
26 


Villanova 

at Duke 
North Carolina 


L 
L 
L 


3-21 
12-13 
20-53 




1974 (8-4-0) 
(ACC 6-0-0, Champions) 




(ACC 5-1-0, 2nd) 

Sept. 9 Tulane 


W 


31-7 


Oa. 


2 


at Miami 


L 


11-18 




Pre Season #14 




Sept. 16 #20 at Louisville 


w 


24-17 


Oct. 


10 


at Syracuse 


L 


7-23 


Sept. 14 


C14 Alabama #3 L 


16-21 


Sept. 23 #18 at North Carolina 


W 


21-20 


Oct. 


17 


South Carolina 


W 


21-15 


Sept. 21 


((14 at Florida L 


10-17 


Sept. 30 #15 Kentucky 


w 


20-3 


Oa. 


24 


N.C State 


L 


0-6 




(Tampa) 




Oa 7 #12 N C. State 


w 


31-7 






(at Norfolk. Va) 






Sept. 28 


North Carolina W 


24-12 


Ott. 14 #10 at Syracuse 


W 


24-9 


Oa. 


31 


Clemson 


L 


11-24 


Oct. 5 


at Syracuse W 


31-0 


Ott. 21 #6 Wake Forest 


w 


39-0 


Nov. 


7 


Penn State 


L 


0-34 


Oa. 12 


Clemson w 


41-0 


Oct. 28 #6 at Duke 


W 


27-0 


Nov. 


21 


at Virginia 


W 


17-14 


Oa. 19 


1*18 Wake Forest W 


47-0 


Nov. 4 #5 at Penn State #2 


L 


3-27 


Nov. 


28 


West Virginia 


L 


10-20 


Oa. 26 


1*15 N, C. State #17 W 


20-10 


Nov. 11 #13 at Virginia 


W 


17-7 












Nov 2 #15 at Penn State #10 L 


17-24 


Nov. 18 #11 Clemson #12 


L 


24-28 






1971 (2-9-0) 






Nov. 9 #14 Villanova w 


41-0 


Nov 20 #13 










(ACC 1-4-0, 7th) 






Nov 16 #13 Duke w 


56-13 


Nov. 27 #13 






Sept. 


11 


Villanova 


L 


13-28 




(Norfolk, Va) 




Dec. 4 #13 






Sept. 


18 


N. C. State 


W 


35-7 


Nov, 23 #11 at Virginia w 


10-0 


Dec 23 






Sept. 


25 


at North Carolina 


L 


14-35 


Nov. 25 #11 




Sun Bowl Texas #14 


L 


0-42 


oa. 


2 


Wake Forest 


L 


14-18 


Dec. 2 #10 




Final Poll #20 







120 



Terpassages, 981 Games 









1979 (7-4-0) 








1984 (9-3-0) 








1988 (5-6-0) 












ACC 4-2-0, tie 2nd) 








(ACC 6-0-0, Champions) 








(ACC 4-3-0, tie 4th) 






Sept 


8 




Villanova 


W 


24-20 


Sept. 8 


Syracuse 


L 


7-23 


Sept 3 


Louisville 


.: 


27-16 


Sept. 


15 




at Clemson 


w 


190 


Sept. 16 


Vandeibilt 


L 


14-23 


Sept. 17 


at West Virginia #12 


1 


24-55 


Sept 

Sept. 

Oct 

Oa. 

Oct 

Oct. 


22 

29 
6 
13 
20 
27 




Mississippi State 

at Kentucky 

Penn State 

atN. C State #17 

at Wake Forest 

at Duke 


w 
I 

L 
L 
L 

W 


35-14 

714 

7-27 

0-7 

17-25 
27-0 


Sept. 22 
Sept. 29 
Oct 6 
Oct. 13 
Oa. 27 
Nov 3 


at West Virginia #18 

Wake Forest 

at Penn State #11 

IIC State 

at Duke 

at North Carolina 


W 
W 
L 
W 
W 
W 


20-17 
38-17 
24-25 
44-21 
43-7 
34-23 


Sept 24 
Oct. 1 
Oct. 8 
Oct. 15 
Oct. 22 
Oct. 29 


N. C. State 
at Syracuse 
Georgia Tech 
Wake Forest 
at Duke 
at North Carolina 


W 
L 
W 
L 
W 
W 


30-26 
9-20 
13-8 

24-27 
34-24 
41-38 


Nov. 
Nov. 


3 
17 




North Carolina #18 
Louisville 


w 

w 


17-14 
28-7 


Nov. 10 
Nov 17 


at Miami #6 
Clemson #20 


w 
w 


42-40 
41-23 


Nov. 5 
Nov. 12 


at Penn State 

Clemson #16 


L 
L 


10-17 
25-49 


Nov 


24 




Virginia 

1980 (8-4-0) 
(ACC 5-1-0, 2nd) 


w 


17-7 


Nov. 24 
Dec. 22 
Sun Bowl 


(Baltimoie Stadium) 
#18 at Virginia 

Tennessee 


w 
w 


45-34 
28-27 


Nov. 19 


at Virginia 

1989 (3-7-1) 
(ACC 2-5-0) 


L 


23-24 


Sept. 


6 




Villanova 


w 


7-3 










Sept 2 


at N. C. State 


L 


6-10 


Sept. 


13 




Vanderbilt 


w 


31-6 




1985 (9-3-0) 






Sept. 9 


West Virginia #17 


L 


10-14 


Sept 


20 




at West Virginia 


w 


14-11 




(ACC 6-0-0, Champions) 






Sept. 16 


Western Michigan 


W 


23-0 


Sept 


27 


#19 


at North Carolina #14 


L 


3-17 


Sept. 7 


#7 Perm State #19 


L 


18-20 


Sept. 23 


at Clemson #7 


L 


7-31 


Oa 


4 




at Pittsburgh #6 


L 


9-38 


Sept. 14 


#17 at Boston College 


w 


3113 


Sept. 30 


at Michigan #6 


L 


21-41 


Oa 


11 




Penn State #14 


L 


10-24 


Sept. 21 


#17 West Virginia 


w 


28-0 


OCT. 7 


at Georgia Tach 


L 


24-28 


Oa. 


18 




Wake Forest 


W 


11-10 


Sept. 28 


#17 at Michigan #12 


L 


0-20 


Oa. 14 


at Wake Forest 


W 


27-7 


Oa. 


25 




at Duke 


W 


17-14 


Oa 5 


at N. C State 


W 


31-17 


Oa. 21 


Duke 


L 


25-46 


Nov. 


1 




N. State 


w 


24-0 


Oct 19 


at Wake Forest 


W 


26-3 


Oct. 28 


North Carolina 


W 


38-0 


Nov. 


15 




Clemson 


w 


34-7 


Oa. 26 


Duke 


W 


40-10 


Nov 11 


Penn State #13 


T 


13-13 


Nov. 


22 




at Virginia 


w 


31-0 


Nov. 2 


North Carolina 


W 


28-10 




(Baltimore Stadium) 






Dec. 


20 










Nov. 9 


Miami #8 


L 


22-29 


Nov. 18 


Virginia #16 


L 


21-48 


Tangerine 
Bowl 




Florida 


I 


20-35 


Nov 16 


(Baltimore Stadium) 
at Clemson 


W 


34-31 




1990 (6-5-1) 












1981 (4-6-1) 






Nov 29 


Virginia 


L 


33-21 




(ACC 4-3, 4th) 












(ACC 4-2-0, 3rd) 






Dec 21 








Sept. 1 


Virginia Tech 


W 


20-13 


Sept 


12 




at Vanderbilt 


L 


17-23 


Cherry Bowl Syracuse 


W 


35-18 


Sept. 8 


West Virginia #25 


W 


14-10 


Sept. 


19 




West Virginia 


L 


13-17 










Sept. 15 


Clemson #16 


L 


17-18 


Sept. 


26 




at N. C. State 


W 


34-9 




1986 (5-5-1) 








(Baltimoie Stadium) 






Oa. 
Oa 
Oa 
Oa. 
Oa. 
Nov 
Nov. 


3 

10 

17 
24 
31 
7 
14 




Syracuse 

at Flonda 

at Wake Forest 

Duke 

North Carolina #9 

at Tulane 

at Clemson 


T 
L 
W 
W 
L 
L 
L 


17-17 
10-15 
45-33 
24-21 
10-17 
7-14 
7-21 


Sept. 1 
Sept. 13 
Sept. 20 
Sept. 27 
Oa 11 
Oa. 18 


(ACC 2-3-1, 5th) 

at Pittsburgh 
Vanderbilt 
at West Virginia 
N. C. State 
Boston College 
Wake Forest 


W 

w 
w 

L 
L 
L 


10-7 
35-21 

24-3 
16-28 
25-30 
21-27 


Sept. 22 
Sept. 29 
Oct. 6 
Oct. 13 
Oa. 20 
OCT. 27 
Nov. 10 


N C. State 

at Michigan #6 

Georgia Tech #23 

Wake Forest 

at Duke 

at North Carolina 

at Penn State #18 


W 
L 
L 
W 
W 
L 
L 


13-12 

17-45 
3-31 
41-13 
23-20 
10-34 
10-24 


Nov. 


21 




Virginia 

1982 (8-4-0) 
(ACC 5-1-0, 2nd) 


W 


48-7 


Oct. 25 
Nov 1 
Nov. 8 

Nov 15 


at Duke 

at North Carolina 

at Penn State #2 

Clemson #15 


W 

L 
L 
T 


27-19 
30-32 
15-17 
17-17 


Nov. 17 
Dec. 15 


at Vuginia #8 
at Louisiana Tech 

1991 (2-9-0) 


W 
T 


35-30 
34-34 


Sept 


11 




at Penn State #7 


L 


31-39 




(Baltimore Stadium) 








ACC (2-0) 






Sept. 


18 




at West Virginia #17 


L 


18-19 


Nov. 28 


at Vuginia 


W 


42-10 


Sept. 7 


Virginia 


W 


17-6 


Sept. 


25 




N. C State 


W 


23-6 










Sept. 14 


Syracuse #22 


L 


17-31 


Oa 


2 




at Syracuse 


W 


26-3 




1987 (4-7-0) 






Sept. 21 


West Virginia 


L 


7-37 


Oct 


9 




Indiana State 


w 


38-0 




(ACC 3-3-0, 5th) 






Oct. 5 


at Pittsburgh #17 


L 


20-24 


Oct. 


16 




Wake Forest 


w 


52-31 


Sept 5 


at Syracuse 


L 


11-25 


Oct. 12 


at Georgia Tech 


L 


10-34 


Oct 


23 




Duke 


w 


49-22 


Sept. 12 


Virginia 


W 


21-19 


Oct. 19 


at Wake Forest 


W 


23-22 


Oct 


30 




at North Carolina #10 


w 


31-24 


Sept 19 


West Virginia 


W 


25-20 


Oct. 26 


at Duke 


L 


13-17 


Nov. 


7 


#19 


Miami 


w 


18-17 


Sept. 26 


at N. C. State 


L 


14-42 


Nov. 2 


at North Carolina 


L 


0-34 


Nov. 


13 


#18 


Clemson # 1 1 


L 


22-24 


Oa. 10 


at Miami #3 


L 


16-46 


Nov. 9 


Penn State #9 


L 


7-47 


Nov 


20 


#19 


at Virginia 


W 


45-14 


Oa. 17 


at Wake Forest 


W 


14-0 




(Baltimore Stadium) 






Nov. 


22 


#16 








Oa. 24 


Duke 


W 


23-22 


Nov. 16 


at Clemson #15 


L 


7-40 


Nov. 


29 


#17 








Oct. 31 


North Carolina 


L 


14-27 


Nov. 23 


at N.C. State #22 


L 


23-20 


Dec 


6 


#16 








Nov 7 


Penn State #16 


L 


16-21 










Dec. 


25 


#16 










(Baltimore Stadium) 






1950s 


67-31 




.683 


Aloha Bow) 




Washington #9 


L 


20-21 


Nov. 14 


at Clemson #9 


L 


16-45 










Final Poll #20 








Nov 21 


at Vanderbilt 


L 


24-34 


1960s 


40-59-0 




.404 








1983 (8-4-0) 














1970s 


69-45-2 




.605 






(ACC 5-1-0, Champions) 




























Pre Season #17 














1980s 


63-49-3 




.563 


Sept. 


10 


#17 


at Vanderbilt 


W 


21-14 


















Sept 
Sept. 
Oct 


17 

24 

1 


#17 


West Virginia 


L 


21-31 










1900s 


8-14-1 




.369 


#19 


Pittsburgh 
Virginia 


W 

w 


13-7 
23-3 




1973 
















Oct 


8 


#16 


Syracuse 


w 


34-13 
















Oct 


15 


#16 


at Wake Forest 


w 


36-33 


'VeiJano had a Terrapin tattooed to his upper leg 


in order to 


'identify with the schooL" 






Oct. 


22 


#15 


Duke 


w 


38-3 


















Oct. 


29 


#13 


North Carolina 


w 


28-26 


'Maryland's 8-4 finish was theii best record in IS 


years; it also reached its first oowJ over the same 


Nov. 


5 


#7 


at Auburn 


L 


23-25 


span. 
















Nov 
Nov 


12 
19 


#11 
#20 


at Clemson 
at N C State 


L 
W 


27-52 
29-6 


'Maryland met Georgia in the Peach Bowl; the piaj 


rers heard of the invitation while waiting for 


a plane 


Nov. 


21 


#17 


after defeating Clemson. A pep rally ensued at to 


e airport. 








Nov. 


28 


#16 








'Tailback Louis Carter, a two-time All-ACC pick, 


won the Most Valuable Player award in the Peach 


Dec. 5 
Dec, 17 
Citrus Bowl 


#16 


Tennessee 


I 


23-30 


Bowl. 





















121 



The Last Time It Happened In Terrapin History 



KICKOFF RETURNED FOR A 
TOUCHDOWN - Oct. 24, 1981. Tim 
Quander, a defensive lineman, re- 
turned a Duke kickoff 92 yards at 
Byrd Stadium. The Terrapms went 
on to win that 1981 homecommg 
game 24-21. 

KICKOFF RETURNED 100 YARDS 
FOR A TOUCHDOWN. - Nov 7, 
1964. Kenny Ambrusko, who 
received three varsity letters at 
Maryland, returned a kickoff 100 
yards for a touchdown against Navy. 

BLOCKED PUNT RETURNED FOR A 
TOUCHDOWN - Oct 23, 1983 
Reserve linebacker Doug Cox 
blocked a punt and scored on a 49- 
yard play. The play helped the Terra- 
pins to a 13-7 victory over Pittsburgh 
in Byrd Stadium. Cox was named the 
Sports Illustrated Defensive Player of 
the Week. 

PUNT RETURNED FOR A TOUCH- 
DOWN - Sept. 9, 1978. Lloyd 
Burruss returned a punt 47 yards for 
a touchdown in a 31-7 victory over 
Tulane in Byrd Stadium. 

INTERCEPTION RETURNED FOR 
TOUCHDOWN - Oct 28, 1989 - 
Mike Thomas intercepted a pass in 
the third quarter against North Caro- 
lina and galloped 26 yards for a 
touchdown to put the Terps up 21-0. 
The Terps went on to win 38-0, their 
largest winning margin in seven 
years. 

RECORDED A SAFETY - Oct. 10, 
1987. At Miami (Fla.) Willis Puguese 
snapped the ball over punter Jeff 
Feagles head and out of the 
endzone. The safety resulted in a 
14-2 first quarter lead for the Hurri- 
canes, who went on to win the game 
46-16. 

RECOVERED TWO FUMBLES IN 
ONE GAME - Sept. 7, 1991. Line- 
backer Mike Jarmolowich recovered 
two fumbles against Virgmia to open 
the 1991 season. The first led 
directly to a Terp touchdown and the 
second stalled a 3rd quarter Cavalier 
drrve. 

SHUT OUT AN OPPONENT - Oct. 
28, 1989 - Maryland blanked North 
Carolina 38-0 for Maryland's largest 
winning margin since the 1983 sea- 
son. The shutout win was the Terps 
largest since a 28-0 win over West 
Virginia during the 1985 season. The 
Terp defense forced the Tar Heels 
into nine turnovers and only 219 
yards on the day. 



FIVE TOUCHDOWNS IN ONE GAME 

- Nov. 7, 1950. Bob Shemonski 
scored five touchdowns in a 63-7 
victory over Virginia Tech. 

FOUR TOUCHDOWNS IN ONE GAME 

- Nov. 3, 1984. Rick Badanjek scored 
four times in the Terps' 34-23 victory 
over the Tar Heels at Kenan Stadium. 

THREE TOUCHDOWNS IN ONE 
GAME - Nov. 12, 1988. With the 
Atlantic Coast Conference title on the 
lme tailback Ricky Johnson scored 
three touchdowns against Clemson m 
Byrd Stadium. He scored on runs of 
seven and five yards and caught a 
pass from Neil O'Donnell from 24 
yards out. Johnson was not enough 
as the Terrapms fell, 49-25 

TWO TOUCHDOWNS IN ONE GAME 

- Oct. 7, 1989 - Terp running back 
Ricky Johnson scored twice - one by 
land and one by air - during the Terps 
28-24 loss to Georgia Tech. He 
opened the scormg with a 2 yard 
dash m the games openmg minutes 
and was on the receiving end of a 
5-yard pass from quarterback Neil 
O'Donnell m the third quarter. 

MISSED A POINT AFTER TOUCH- 
DOWN - Oct. 28, 1984. After hitting 
on 95 straight point after touchdowns 
and setting an ACC record, Jess 
Atkmson sailed a kick to the right of 
the goalpost in a 43-7 Terp romp over 
Duke. 

FIELD GOAL OF 50 OR MORE 
YARDS - Oct. 26, 1991. Dan 
DeArmas connected on a 50-yard field 
goal on homecoming day 1991. The 
kick came at the end of the second 
quarter and put the Terps up 10-7. 
The Terps would lose to Duke, 17-13, 
as Maryland was outscored 10-3 in 
the second half of the game. 

THREE FIELD GOALS IN ONE GAME 

- Sept. 16, 1989. Terp kicker Dan 
DeArmas kicked three field goals de- 
spite a driving rain during Maryland's 
23-0 blanking of Western Michigan. 

FOUR FIELD GOALS IN ONE GAME 

- Oct. 19, 1985. The Terps got four 
field goals from Dan Plocki and beat 
Wake Forest 26-3 in Groves Stadium. 

FIVE FIELD GOALS IN ONE GAME - 
Sept. 22, 1979. Dale Castro booted 
five field goals in a 35-14 victory over 
Mississippi State in Byrd Satdium. 



The Last Time In Terrapin Opponents' History 



KICKOFF RETURNED FOR A 
TOUCHDOWN - Sept. 17, 1987. 
West Virginia's Eugene Napoleon of 
the Mountaineers returned the open- 
ing kickoff from Dan Plocki 94 yards 
for a touchdown. The Terps, how- 
ever, won the contest, 25-20 in Byrd 
Stadium. 

BLOCKED PUNT RETURNED FOR A 
TOUCHDOWN - Oct. 31, 1987. 
Norris Davis of North Carolma 
picked-up a blocked Darryl Wright 
punt and returned it 26 yards for a 
Tar Heel touchdown in a 27-14 win 
over the Terps. 

PUNT RETURNED FOR A TOUCH- 
DOWN - Nov. 15, 1991. Darnell 
Stephens raced 89 yards with a Dan 
DeArmas punt as Clemson defeated 
Maryland 40-7 at Clemson's Death 
Valley. DeArmas was punting from 
the Maryland 48 and kicked a 37- 
yard spiral that Stephens returned to 
cap Clemson's scoring for the day. 

INTERCEPTION RETURNED FOR A 
TOUCHDOWN - Oct 21, 1989 
Syracuse linebacker John Lusardi 
intercepted a John Kaleo pass in the 
endzone for an Orange touchdown. 
The interception and ensuing score 
put Syracuse up 21-14; they never 
trailed after that. Syracuse won the 
game 31-17 in Byrd Stadium. 

RECORDED A SAFETY AGAINST 
MARYLAND- Oct. 22, 1988. Duke's 
Mark Allen sacked Terp quarterback 
Neil O'Donnell in the endzone giving 
the Blue Devils an early 9-0 lead. 
O'Donnell got off the ground and 
rallied the Terps to a 34-24 victory in 
Durham, NC. 

SHUTOUT MARYLAND - Nov 2, 
1991. North Carolina won at its 
homecommg, shutting out Maryland, 
24-0. Maryland was outgained on 
the ground 308-67. It was the first 
time in 71 games that Maryland did 
not score. 



THREE TOUCHDOWNS IN ONE 
GAME - Oct. 29, 1988. Despite 
three touchdowns by Kennard 
Martin of North Carolma on runs of 
28, 13, and 2 yards, the Terps beat 
the Tar Heels, 41-38, at Kenan 
Stadium. 

TWO TOUCHDOWNS IN ONE 
GAME - Nov. 9, 1991. Penn State 
fullback Richie Anderson scored 
twice as the Nittany Lions defeated 
Maryland, 47-7, m Baltimore's Me- 
morial Stadium. Anderson scored on 
runs of 11 and six yards to lead 
Penn State. 

MISSED POINT AFTER 
TOUCHDOWN - Nov. 16, 1991. 
Clemson place kicker Nelson Welch 
was wide left m the fourth quarter 
during the Tigers 40-7 victory at 
Clemson. Welch, who was 5-6 PAT's 
for the day, was kicking after 
Darnell Stephens returned a punt for 
a touchdown. 

THREE FIELD GOALS IN ONE 
GAME - Sept. 24, 1988. Damon 
Hartman connected on field goals of 
45,28, and 25 yards for N.C. State m 
a 30-26 loss to the Terps in Byrd 
Stadium. 
TWO FIELD GOALS IN ONE GAME 

- Nov. 23, 1991. N.C. State's Damon 
Hartman kicked a pair of three 
pointers from 29 and 35 yards as the 
Wolfpack defeated the Terps, 20-17, 
in Raleigh. Hartman's second field 
goal from 29 yards with 7:01 
remaining in the game proved to be 
the game winner. 

FIVE FIELD GOALS IN ONE GAME 

- Oct. 19, 1991. Wake Forest's Mike 
Green kicked a school record five 
field goals but it was not enough as 
Maryland prevailed 23-22 m Groves 
Stadium. Green was successful from 
19, 22, 29, 43, and 44 yards. 
FIELD GOAL OF 50 YARDS OR 
MORE - Nov., 12, 1988. Chns 
Gardocki of Clemson connectedfrom 
51 yards during a 49-25 victory at 
Byrd Stadium. 




Bob "Shoo-Shoo" Shemonski scored five touchdowns and 31 
points against Virginia Tech in 1950. 



122 



Terpacesetters 




sw 



The Boomer stands above all others in this collage of 1980s quarterbacks who combined for over 25,000 yards of passing. 
Esiason had many quality predecessors, from Jack Scarbath, to Bemie Faloney, to Dick Shiner, and way back to Shorty 
Chalmers (at Boomer's left). Chalmers was the first great passer in College Park (1929, 1930, 1931). Boomer was the Terp 
gun from 1981 to 1983; Neil O'DonneU (14) from 1987 to 1989; Scott Zolak (13) in 1990; Dan Henning (12) in 1986 and 1987; 
and Stan Celbaugh (8), in 1985. 



123 



acesetters, Rushing, Scoring Leaders 



Rushing 








Scoring 










Year 




Rushes 


Yards 


Year 




TD 


Xpts 


FG 


Pts 


1947 


Lou Gambino 


125 


904 


1947 


Lou Gambino 


16 








96 


1948 


Herbert Werner 


101 


554 


1948 


Harry Bonk 


5 








30 


1949 


Dick Modzelewski 


120 


589 


1949 


Stan Lavine 


7 








42 


1950 


Bob Shemonski 


101 


560 


1950 


Bob Shemonski 


16 


1 





97 


1951 


Ralph Felton 


83 


485 


1951 


Jack Scarbath 


7 








42 


1952 


Jack Scarbath 


103 


237 


1952 


Chet Hanulak 


6 








36 


1953 


Ralph Felton 


100 


558 


1953 


Bernie Faloney 


9 








54 


1954 


Ron Waller 


66 


592 


1954 


Dick Bielski 


6 


15 


1 


54 


1955 


Ed Vereb 


113 


642 


1955 


Ed Vereb 


16 








96 


1956 


Tom Selep 


62 


315 


1956 


John Fritsch 


3 


1 





19 


1957 


Ted Kershner 


41 


227 


1957 


Howie Dare 


4 








24 


1958 


Jim Joyce 


97 


406 


1958 


John Forbes 


6 








36 


1959 


Jim Joyce 


137 


567 


1959 


Jim Joyce 


8 








48 


1960 


Pat Drass 


76 


297 


1960 


Gary Collins 


4 


1 





26 


1961 


Ernie Arizzi 


79 


375 


1961 


John Hannigan 





17 


5 


56 


1962 


Len Chiaverini 


156 


602 


1962 


Tom Brown 


6 








38 


1963 


Jerry Fishman 


116 


480 


1963 


Darryl Hill 


8 


7 





55 


1964 


Bo Hickey 


182 


894 


1964 


Bernardo Bramson 





17 


9 


44 


1965 


Ernie Torain 


93 


370 


1965 


Bernardo Bramson 





15 


7 


36 


1966 


Billy Lovett 


98 


451 


1966 


Billy Van Heusen 


7 








42 


1967 


Billy Lovett 


137 


499 


1967 


Rick Carlson 


2 


4 


4 


28 


1968 


Billy Lovett 


217 


963 


1968 


Billy Lovett 


8 


1 





50 


1969 


Tom Miller 


169 


629 


1969 


Paul Fitzpatrick 


3 


2 





20 


1970 


Art Seymore 


221 


981 


1970 


Robert Tucker 


3 








18 


1971 


Monte Hinkle 


117 


472 




Art Seymore 


3 








18 


1972 


Louis Carter 


119 


504 


1971 


Kambiz Behbahani 





24 


10 


54 


1973 


Louis Carter 


218 


801 


1972 


Steve Mike-Mayer 





25 


10 


55 


1974 


Louis Carter 


224 


991 


1973 


Louis Carter 


14 








84 


1975 


Steve Atkins 


87 


491 


1974 


Steve Mike-Mayer 





34 


15 


79 


1976 


Alvin Maddox 


141 


678 


1975 


Mike Sochko 





31 


12 


67 


1977 


George Scott 


188 


894 


1976 


Tim Wilson 


7 








42 


1978 


Steve Atkins 


283 


1261 


1977 


Steve Atkins 


9 








54 


1979 


Charlie Wysocki 


247 


1140 


1978 


Ed Loncar 





25 


16 


73 


1980 


Charlie Wysocki 


334 


1359 


1979 


Dale Castro 





19 


17 


70 


1981 


Charlie Wysocki 


159 


715 


1980 


Charlie Wysocki 


11 








66 


1982 


Willie Joyner 


177 


1039 


1981 


Jess Atkinson 





24 


12 


60 


1983 


Willie Joyner 


198 


908 


1982 


Jess Atkinson 





39 


16 


87 


1984 


Rich Badanjek 


173 


832 


1983 


Jess Atkinson 





28 


15 


73 


1985 


Alvin Blount 


171 


828 


1984 


Rick Badanjek 


16 


3 





102 


1986 


Alvin Blount 


119 


517 


1985 


Rick Badanjek 


12 








72 


1987 


Bren Lowery 


168 


556 


1986 


Dan Plocki 





29 


11 


62 


1988 


Ricky Johnson 


136 


635 


1987 


Bren Lowery 


7 








42 


1989 


Bren Lowery 


100 


482 


1988 


Dan Plocki 





27 


17 


78 


1990 


Troy Jackson 


176 


662 


1989 


Dan DeArmas 





24 


11 


57 


1991 


Mark Mason 


82 


452 


1990 


Dan DeArmas 





23 


14 


65 










1991 


Dan DeArmas 





15 


7 


36 






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Charlie Wysocki: no Terp ever ran farther, in a season or a 


career. 


^like-Mayer: he kicked 15 held goals 


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lead the team in scoring in 1974. 











124 







Terpacesetters, 


Kickoff and Punt Return Leaders 


Kickoff Return Average (minimum two) 




Punt Return Average (minimum two) 






Year 




No. Yds. 


Avg. 


Year 




No. 


Yds. 


Avg. 


1947 


Lou Gambino 


7 174 


249 


1947 


Hubert Werner 


6 


118 


19.7 


1948 


John Baroni 


5 147 


29.4 


1948 


John Idzik 


10 


137 


13.7 


1949 


Bob Shemonski 


5 136 


27.1 


1949 


Jim Larue 


8 


138 


17.3 


1950 


Bob Shemonski 


10 259 


25.9 


1950 


Joe Petruzzo 


13 


276 


21.2 


1951 


Ed Fullerton 


3 51 


17.0 


1951 


Bernie Faloney 


2 


18 


9.0 


1952 


Dick Nolan 


6 180 


30.0 


1952 


Bernie Faloney 


8 


109 


13.6 


1953 


Bernie Faloney 


2 116 


58 


1953 


Dick Nolan 


6 


150 


25 


1954 


Howie Dare 


2 77 


38.5 


1954 


Ron Waller 


13 


199 


15.3 


1955 


Frank Tamburello 


2 78 


39.0 


1955 


Dick Burgee 


3 


37 


12.3 


1956 


Ted Kershner 


9 161 


17.9 


1956 


Ted Kershner 


9 


41 


4.6 


1957 


Howie Dare 


6 264 


44 


1957 


Howie Dare 


10 


49 


4.9 


1958 


Bob Gallagher 


5 113 


22.6 


1958 


Bob Rusevlyan 


3 


25 


8.3 


1959 


Edward Fletcher 


8 155 


19.3 


1959 


Gene Verardi 


5 


61 


12.2 


1960 


Dennis Condie 


10 352 


35.2 


1960 


Jim Davidson 


16 


169 


10.6 


1961 


NA 






1961 


Tom Brown 


8 


194 


22.4 


1962 


Tom Brown 


11 284 


25.8 


1962 


Ken Ambrusko 


9 


167 


18.6 


1963 


Darryl Hill 


13 317 


24.4 


1963 


Gary Miller 


2 


25 


12.5 


1964 


Ken Ambrusko 


9 280 


31.1 


1964 


Richard Nye 


3 


45 


15.0 


1965 


Gary Collins 


10 270 


27.0 


1965 


Ken Ambrusko 


2 


27 


13.5 


1966 


Billy Van Heusen 


8 173 


21.6 


1966 


Bobby Collins 


18 


160 


8.8 


1967 


Billy Lovett 


8 125 


19.7 


1967 


Bob Haley 


8 


125 


15.6 




Paul Fitzpatrick 


3 59 


19.7 


1968 


Tony Greene 


3 


21 


7.0 


1968 


John King 


17 382 


22.5 


1969 


Larry Marshall 


4 


89 


22.2 




Ken Dutton 


8 180 


22.5 


1970 


Larry Marshall 


28 


192 


6.8 


1969 


John King 


10 267 


26.7 


1971 


Larry Marshall 


35 


375 


10.7 


1970 


Larry Marshall 


21 469 


22.3 


1972 


Pat Ulam 


3 


44 


14.7 


1971 


Larry Marshall 


22 587 


26.7 


1973 


Ken Schroy 


10 


108 


10.8 


1972 


Jamie Franklin 


11 239 


21.7 


1974 


Ken Schroy 


11 


206 


18.7 


1973 


Louis Carter 


14 312 


22.3 


1975 


Jim Brechbiel 


19 


206 


10.8 


1974 


Louis Carter 


11 286 


26.0 


1976 


Dean Richards 


11 


94 


8.6 


1975 


Ricky Jennings 


8 297 


37.1 


1977 


Dean Richards 


32 


192 


6.0 


1976 


Kenny Roy 


12 252 


21.0 


1978 


Lloyd Burruss 


25 


169 


6.8 


1977 


Don Dotter 


7 187 


26.7 


1979 


Sam Johnson 


12 


135 


11.3 


1978 


Steve Atkins 


8 228 


28.5 


1980 


Jap Trimble 


22 


164 


7.5 


1979 


Charlie Wysocki 


7 96 


13.7 


1981 


Mike Lewis 


24 


151 


6.3 


1980 


Sam Johnson 


5 189 


37.8 


1982 


Mike Lewis 


7 


48 


6.9 


1981 


Timmy Quander 


5 184 


36.8 


1983 


Rick Badenjek 


20 


223 


11.2 


1982 


Timmy Quander 


23 530 


23.0 


1984 


Keeta Covington 


26 


274 


10.5 


1983 


Tommy Neal 


15 331 


22.1 


1985 


Keeta Covington 


16 


103 


6.4 


1984 


Keeta Covington 


25 479 


19.2 


1986 


Mike Anderson 


8 


124 


15.5 


1985 


Keeta Covington 


24 556 


23.2 


1987 


Mike Anderson 


8 


54 


6.8 


1986 


Keeta Covington 


23 485 


21.1 


1988 


Bren Lowery 


17 


121 


7.1 


1987 


Mike Beasley 


14 296 


21.1 


1989 


Bren Lowery 


21 


213 


10.0 


1988 


Ricky Johnson 


17 388 


22.8 


1990 


Mike Hopson 


34 


240 


7.1 


1989 


Bren Lowery 


14 334 


23.9 


1991 


Mike Hopson 


17 


116 


6.8 


1990 


Mark Mason 


11 254 


23.1 












1991 


Doug Lawrence 


12 245 


20.4 














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Rick Badanjek: his versatility led to 28 career touchdowns; he also 


Mike Anderson: a runner in every 


sense of the word. As a 


running 


led the team in punt returns in 1983. 




back, kick and punt returner he totaled over 


1,000 yards. 





125 



cesetters, Passing Leaders 



Passing 



Year 




Att 


Comp 


Yds 


TD 


1947 


Vic Turyn 


59 


32 


504 


6 


1948 


Vic Turyn 


111 


45 


595 


10 


1949 


Stan Lavine 


65 


35 


554 


6 


1950 


Jack Scarbath 


80 


32 


463 


4 


1951 


Jack Scarbath 


67 


34 


675 


8 


1952 


Jack Scarbath 


113 


59 


1149 


10 


1953 


Bernie Faloney 


68 


31 


599 


5 


1954 


Charlie Boxold 


59 


23 


525 


6 


1955 


Frank Tamburello 


58 


28 


497 


4 


1956 


John Fritsch 


52 


23 


219 





1957 


Bob Rusevlyan 


58 


26 


297 


3 


1958 


Bob Rusevlyan 


109 


59 


657 


2 


1959 


Dale Betty 


76 


39 


552 


9 


1960 


Dale Betty 


132 


82 


796 


6 


1961 


Richie Novak 


99 


55 


487 


5 


1962 


Dick Shiner 


203 


121 


1324 


4 


1963 


Dick Shiner 


222 


108 


1165 


10 


1964 


Phil Petry 


162 


73 


809 


5 


1965 


Phil Petry 


135 


65 


763 


3 


1966 


Alan Pastrana 


195 


102 


1499 


17 


1967 


Chuck Drimal 


123 


54 


669 


1 


1968 


Alan Pastrana 


172 


81 


1053 


6 


1969 


Jeff Shugars 


114 


47 


716 


3 


1970 


Jeff Shugars 


175 


75 


836 


3 


1971 


Al Neville 


204 


107 


1275 


10 


1972 


Bob Avellim 


170 


98 


1251 


7 


1973 


Al Neville 


92 


51 


554 


4 


1974 


Bob Avellini 


189 


112 


1648 


7 


1975 


Larry Dick 


158 


90 


1190 


8 


1976 


Mark Manges 


139 


81 


1145 


11 


1977 


Larry Dick 


135 


83 


1351 


5 


1978 


Tim O'Hare 


192 


105 


1388 


4 


1979 


Mike Tice 


154 


75 


897 


5 


1980 


Mike Tice 


140 


71 


928 


5 


1981 


Boomer Esiason 


242 


122 


1635 


9 


1982 


Boomer Esiason 


314 


176 


2302 


18 


1983 


Boomer Esiason 


294 


163 


2322 


15 


1984 


Frank Reich 


169 


108 


1446 


9 


1985 


Stan Gelbaugh 


311 


166 


2475 


15 


1986 


Dan Henning 


353 


196 


2725 


15 


1987 


Dan Henning 


287 


157 


1835 


9 


1988 


Neil O'Donnell 


267 


160 


1973 


12 


1989 


Neil O'Donnell 


280 


156 


2103 


10 


1990 


Scott Zolak 


418 


225 


2589 


10 


1991 


Jim Sandwisch 


291 


142 


1499 


6 




Boomer Esiason: the best in school history, his records are a 
mountain of numbers, not easily scaled by pretenders. 




Bemie Faloney rifled a button hook pass to his right end Bill Walker for a 17-yard gain in the Terps' 40-13 
victory over Georgia, October 10, 1953. 



126 



I 


Terpacesetters, Receiving Leaders 





Receiving 


1 




Year Caught Yards TD 




1947 Elmer Wingate 12 145 3 


^§k 


1948 Elmer Wingate 9 


m m 


1949 Stan Karnash 16 245 


W*m 


1950 Pete Augsberger 25 422 


tkT 


1951 Lou Weidensaul 18 249 4 


Vl^ ^ 


Hi!.:: Lloyd Colteryahn 32 593 4 


«r **w 


1953 Chet Hanulak 10 152 


^ J^. 


1954 Bill Walker 13 209 1 


m 0\ m 


1955 Jack Healy 10 182 2 


^ fcB • 


Howie Dare 10 74 3 


1956 Bill Turner 7 74 


1957 Ed Cooke 14 137 




1958 Ben Scotti 18 282 1 




Ron Shaffer 18 141 1 


^H ^P 


1959 Gary Collins 14 350 4 


f 


1960 Gary Collins 30 404 4 




1961 Gary Collins 30 428 4 




1962 Tom Brown 47 557 4 




1963 DarrylHill 43 516 7 


A 1 ^^— 


1964 Dick Absher 22 268 1 


1965 Dick Absher 33 382 1 




Mm 


1966 Billy Van Heusen 25 536 7 

1967 Rick Carlson 24 309 2 

1968 Bernard Demczuk 23 215 




■ ^J| 


1969 Roland Merntt 19 499 2 




I i * \ 


1970 DonRatliff 26 242 

1971 Dan Bungori 32 490 8 
Dennis O'Hara 32 423 2 

1972 Don Ratliff 36 515 6 




1973 Frank Russell 39 468 3 


1 \ 


1974 Frank Russell 31 404 


■ 


1975 Kim Hoover 38 532 5 


r^ 


1976 Charles White 23 402 4 


■^ 


1977 Eugene Kinney 32 505 




1978 Dean Richards 35 575 1 


ii 


1979 Jan Carinci 30 275 1 




1980 Chris Havener 29 436 3 


II 


1981 JohnTice 31 353 4 

1982 John Tice 34 396 1 

1983 Russell Davis 29 465 1 


Dan Bungori: caught TD passes at a record pace in 1971. 




1984 Greg Hill 51 820 4 




1985 Azizuddin AMur-Ra'oof 35 671 4 




1986 James Milling 33 650 6 




1987 Bren Lowery 44 252 2 




1988 Vernon Joines 29 433 2 




1989 Barry Johnson 43 689 6 




1990 Frank Wycheck 58 509 






1991 Frank Wycheck 45 


438 1 




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Greg Hil/: no Terp caught TD passes as well as i 


lumber 4. 








1 


27 





setters, Tackling, Interception Leaders 



Tackles 

Year 

1969 
1970 
1974 
1975 
1976 
1977 
1978 
1979 
1980 
1981 
1982 
1983 
1984 
1985 
1986 
1987 
1988 
1989 
1990 
1991 



John Dyer 
Peter Mattia 
Harry Walters 
Kevin Benson 
Brad Carr 
Ted Klaube 
Neal Olkewicz 
Brian Matera 
Joe Wilkins 
Mike Muller 
Joe Wilkins 
Eric Wilson 
Eric Wilson 
Chuck Faucette 
Chuck Faucette 
Kevin Walker 
Scott Saylor 
Glenn Page 
Glenn Page 
Mike Jarmolowich 



No. 

99 
113 
173 
149 
157 
186 
188 
159 
131 
107 
119 
178 
160 
144 
151 
172 
119 
111 
102 
153 




Ted Klaube: his 186 tackles were a school record, to be echpsed 
the following year by Neal Olkewicz. 

IT 




Bob Smith: All-ACC, a career leader in interceptions. 



Interceptions 



Year 
1947 
1948 
1949 
1950 
1951 
1952 

1953 
1954 
1955 

1956 
1957 
1958 
1959 



960 
961 
962 
963 
964 
965 
966 
967 
968 
969 
970 



971 
972 
973 
974 
975 
976 

977 
978 
979 
980 

981 

982 
983 
984 

985 
986 

987 

988 



1989 

1990 
1991 



John Idzik 
John Idzik 
Jim Larue 
Bob Shemonski 
Joe Horning 
Bernie Faloney 
Dick Nolan 
Bernie Faloney 
Frank Tamburello 
Ed Vereb 
Dave Nusz 
Bob Rusevlyan 
Howie Dare 
Rod Breedlove 
Jim Joyce 
Victor Schwartz 
George Scott 
Jim Davidson 
Tom Brown 
Tom Brown 
Tom Brown 
Ernie Arizzi 
Bob Sullivan 
Bob Sullivan 
John Hetrick 
Wally Stamaker 
Wally Stamaker 
Tony Greene 
Ted Sterner 
Leonard Massie 
Tony Greene 
Larry Marshall 
Bob Smith 
Jim Brechbiel 
Jim Brechbiel 
Kenny Roy 
John Stanford 
Kenny Roy 
Lloyd Burruss 
Lloyd Burruss 
Ralph Lary 
Lloyd Burruss 
Howard Eubanks 
Lendell Jones 
Howard Eubanks 
Lendell Jones 
Clarence Baldwin 
Eric Wilson 
Chuck Faucette 
Keeta Covington 
Chuck Faucette 
Chad Sydnor 
J.B. Brown 
J.B. Brown 
Irvin Smith 
Matt D'Amico 
Glenn Page 
Eddie Tomlin 
Michael Hollis 
Michael Hollis 
Andre Vaughn 



No. 
5 
4 
5 
4 
6 
3 
3 
6 
4 
4 
4 
3 
4 
5 
2 
2 
2 
2 
3 
8 
6 
4 
3 

10 
4 
4 
5 
5 
2 
2 
2 
6 
7 
5 
4 
4 
4 
4 
3 
3 
7 
3 
3 
4 
4 
7 
7 
2 
2 
6 
3 
3 
4 
2 
2 
2 
2 
3 
3 
3 
2 



128 



Terprolific, the Recordsetters 




A 19th century team is depicted in front of the Tyser Tower, the new press box at Byrd Stadium. Not only could the first 
teams not envision an edifice like the 90 foot high Tyser Tower, it could not understand today's game at first sight. There 
was no air power, only dirt, grunts, and the will to go forward, rugby style. 



129 



Hfic, Team Records 



SCORING 


RUSHING 


Most Total Points Scored By Both Teams 


Most Total Yards Gained Rushing 


Game: 90 in 1971, Maryland 27, Perm State, 63 


Game: 582 vs. Virginia, 1975 (67 carries) 


Largest Victory Margin 


Season: 2,921 in 9 regular season games, 1951 


Game: 80-0 vs. Washington College, 1927 


Most Rushes 


Largest Defeat Margin 


Game: 76 vs. Miami. 1958 
Season: 654 in 1974 


Game: 0-76 vs. Navy, 1913 




Most Points Scored 


Rushing Plays 

Game: 

Season: 654 m 1976 (2,874 yards) 


Game: Maryland 80, Washington College 0, 1927 


Season: 353 in 9 regular season games, 1951 




353 in 11 regular season games, 1982 


Fewest Net Yards Gained Rushing by Opponents 


Fewest Points Scored (Full Season) 


Game: Minus 21 by West Virginia, 1951 
21 by UCLA, 1956 


Season: 39 in 9 games, 1940 


Season: 680 in 1951 


Most Points Scored By Opponents 


Most Yards Gained Rushing By Opponent 


Season: 304 in 11 games, 1988 


Season: 2,371 m 9 games, 1967 


Fewest Points Scored By Opponents 


Fewest Net Yards Gained Rushing 


Season: 21 in 10 regular season games, 1953 


Game: Minus 58 vs. Navy, 1965 


Most Touchdowns Scored 


Best Average Per Rush 


Game: 12 vs. Washington College, 1927 


Game: 10.5 yards vs. Virginia Tech, 1950 (577 yards, 55 rushes) 


Season: 52 in 9 regular season games, 1951 






Most First Downs Rushing 


Most Touchdowns Scored Passing 


Game: 28 vs. Virginia, 1975 


Game: 5 vs. Villanova, 1975 (4 by Mark Manges, 1 by Larry Dick) 


Season: 155 in 1976 


Season: 18 in 1982 






Fewest First Downs Rushing 


Most Touchdowns Scored Passing by Opponents 


Game: 1 vs. Michigan State, 1944 


Game: 4 by Wake Forest, 1958 (3 by Norm Snead, 1 by Charlie Parker) 


1 vs. Syracuse, 1959 


4 by Virginia, 1965 (by Bob Davis) 
4 by Florida, 1971 (by John Reaves) 


Fewest First Downs Rushing By Opponent 


4 by Perm State, 1982 (by Todd Blackledge) 


Game: by Wake Forest, 1973 


4 by Miami (Fla.), 1984 (by Bernie Kosar) 


by Virginia, 1980 


Season: 18 in 1981, 1984 


Season: 44 in 1951 


Most Field Goals Scored 


PASSING 


Game: 5 vs. Mississippi State, 1979 


Most Yards Gained Passing 


Season: 17 in 1979 


Game: 367 vs. North Carolina, 1986 (18-29) 


17 in 1984 


Season: 2,774 in 1990 


17 in 1988 






Most Passes Attempted 


Most Points After Touchdowns Scored 


Game: 54 vs. N.C. State, 1986 (27 completions for 300 yards) 


Game: 8 vs. Washington College 


Season: 441 in 1990 


8 vs. Missouri, 1954 




8 vs. Duke, 1974 


Most Passes Completed 


8 vs. Virginia, 1975 


Game: 36 vs. Michigan, 1990 
Season: 238 m 1990 


Most Points After Touchdowns Scoring (All Points) 


Season: 45 (39 kicking, 6 passing, in 11 regular season games, 1982) 


Best Completion Percentage (Minimum 10 attempts) 




Game: .824 vs. Tulane, 1973 (14 completions, 17 attempts) 


Most Safeties Scored 


Season: .618 m 1984, 11 games (189 of 306) 


Game: 2 vs. Delaware, 1974 


.593 in 1973, 11 games, (118 of 199) 


2 vs. Georgetown, 1950 vs. Villanova, 1974 




Season: 


Most Yards Gained Passing By Opponents 




Season: 2,915 in 1981 


TOTAL OFFENSE 


Fewest Yards Gained Passing By Opponents 


Most Total Yards Gained Rushing and Passing 


Game: Minus 1 by Clemson, 1956 


Game: 802 vs. Virginia, 1975 (583 rushing; 220 passing) 


Season: 731 in 10 games, 1957 (early records mcomplete) 


Season: 4,910 in 1984 (2,308 rushing; 2,602 passing) 


Best Passing Percentage By Opponents 


Fewest Total Yards Gained 


Season: .611 m 1988 (204/334) 


Game: 29 vs. Syracuse. 1959 


Most Passes Attempted by Opponents 


Season: 2228 in 1967 (early records incomplete) 


Game: 67 by Wake Forest, 1981 (completed 47) 


Most Total Plays 


Season: 445 in 1981 


Game: 93 by N.C. State, 1973 


Fewest Passes Completed by Opponents 


Season: 845 in 1982 


Game: by Syracuse, 1939 (5 attempts) 




by Michigan State. 1944 (0 attempts) 


Most Yards Gained Rushing and Passing by Opponents 


by Delaware, 1948 (3 attempts) 


Season: 4,634 m 11 games, 1991 (2.098 rushing; 2.536 passing) 


by Boston University, 1952 (6 attempts) 


Fewest Yards Gained Rushing and Passing By Opponents 


by Kentucky, 1956 (3 attempts) 


Season: 1,691 in 10 games, 1955 (761 rushing; 930 passing) 


Season: 88 m 1956 



130 



Terprolific, Team Records 


Fewest Yards Gained Passing 


Most Yards Penalized 


Game: vs. Michigan State, 1944 


Game: 147 vs Duke, 1982 


vs. Vanderbilt, 1948 


Season: 851 in 11 games, 1982 


vs. Missouri, 1951 


Fewest Penalties 


Season: 813 in 1966 


Game: vs Duke, 1941 


Fewest Passes Completed 


Season: 38 in 1967 


Game: vs. Michigan State, 1944 (1 attempt) 
vs. Vanderbilt, 1948 (12 attempts) 


Most Penalties By Opponents 


vs. Missouri, 1951 (3 attempts) 


Game: 15 by Miami (Fla.), 1957 


Season: 44 in 1954 


Season: 72 in 1987 


Most First Downs Passing 


Most Yards Opponents Penalized 


Game: 18 vs. Penn State, 1971 


Game: 136 by Penn State, 1982 


Season: 123 in 1983 


Season: 703 in 1981 


Fewest First Downs Passing 


Fewest Penalties by Opponents 


Game: 0-13 times, last vs. Wake Forest, 1969 


Game: by Western Maryland, 1937 


Season: 29 in 1956, 1951 


by Western Maryland, 1939 




by Florida, 1939 


PUNTING 


by Washington and Lee, 1941 


Most Punts 


by William and Mary, 1945 


Game: 14 vs. Virginia. 1937 


by South Carolina, 1953 


14 vs. Western Maryland. 1940 


Season: 31 in 1951 


Season: 90 in 11 games. 1991 


Fewest Yards Opponents Penalized 


Most Total Yards Punting 


Game: 


Game: 510 vs. Syracuse, 1936 (10 punts) 


Season: 263 in 1951 


Season: 2.832 in 10 games, 1969 (73 punts, 
3,615 in 11 games, 1991 


FUMBLES 


Best Punting Average 


Most Fumbles 


Game: 51.7 yards vs. Washington and Lee, 1951 (155 yards, 3 punts) 


Game: 8 vs. Georgia, 1952 (lost 2) 


Season: 42.6 in 1974. (54 punts) 


Season: 44 in 10 games, 1950 (lost 22) 


Most Punts By Opponents 


Most Opponents Fumbles 


Game: 


Game: 8 by South Carolina, 1947 


Season: 94 in 11 games, 1979 


8 by Mississippi, 1953 


Fewest Punts 


Season: 40 m 10 games, 1960 (Maryland recovered 19) 


Game: vs. Virginia, 1975 


40 in 11 games, 1971 (Maryland recovered 22) 


Season: 37 in 1953 


Fewest Fumbles 




Game: vs. several opponents 


FIRST DOWNS 


Season: 11 m 11 games, 1991 (Lost 5) 


Most Total First Downs 


Most Fumbles Lost 


Game: 35 vs. Virginia, 1975 


Game: 6 vs North Carolina, 1947 


35 vs. Clemson, 1984 


Season: 24 in 1953 


Season: 256 in 1984 (141 rushing, 112 passmg, 3 penalty) 




Most First Downs By Opponent 

Game: 

Season: 254 in 1988, 11 games (old mark, 242 m 1986, 11 games) 


Most Opponents' Fumbles Recovered 

Game: 5 vs. Missouri in Gator Bowl, Jan. 1, 1950 


5 vs. West Virginia, 1950 
5 vs. North Carolina, 1960 


Fewest Total First Downs 


Season: 23 in 1970 


Game: 1 vs Michigan State, 1944 




Season: 114 m 1966 


COMEBACKS 


Fewest Total First Downs By Opponents 


NCAA: Most Points Coming From Behind to Win 


Game: 1 by Wake Forest, 1973 (passmg) 


Terps trailed Miami (Fla.), 31-0 at halftone in the 1984 contest, and came back 


Season: 88 m 1952 


to wm 42-40. Maryland trailed by more than 28 points and won the game - 


INTERCEPTIONS 


called the greatest comeback in NCAA history 


Most Passes Intercepted 


VICTORIES 


Game: 7 vs. Georgia. 1951 


Best Season 


Season: 34 in 9 games, 1951 


1976 Won 11, Lost regular season 


38 m 10 games (including Sugar Bowl, Jan. 1 1952) 


lost to Houston 30-21 in the Cotton Bowl for 11-1 


Most Passes Had Intercepted 


Worst Season 


Game: 6 by Pennsylvania, 1941 


1967 Won 0, Lost 9 


Season: 23 in 10 games, 1948 




PENALTIES 


ATTENDANCE 


Most Penalties 


Average Attendance Per Home Game 


Game: 18 vs. Virginia Tech. 1950 


46,403 in 1983 for 6 games (old mark 45.657 m 1975) 


Season: 88 in 11 games. 1982 


Average Attendance All Games 


88 m 11 games. 1985 


48.255 in 1983 for 11 games (old mark 44.636. 12 games 1976) 



131 



lific, Individual Records 



SCORING 

Most Points Scored 

Season: 102 by Rick Badanjek, 1984 (11 games) 

Caieer: 308 Kicking by Jess Atkinson, 1981-84 (128 PATs, 60 FG) 

286 Run & Pass by Rick Badanjek, 1982-85 (46 tds, 5 conversions) 

Most Points Scored, One Season Including Bowl Games 

Season: 114 by Lou Gambino (96 in 1947 plus 3 tds in 1948 Gator Bowl) 
114 by Rick Badanjek (102 in 1984 plus 2 tds in 1984 Sun Bowl) 

Most Touchdowns Scored 

Game: 5 by Bob Shemonski vs. Virginia Tech, 1950 
Season: 16 by Lou Gambino, 1947 (10 games) 

16 by Bob Shemonski, 1950 (10 games) 

16 by Ed Vereb, 1955 (10 games) 

16 by Rick Badanjek, 1984 (11 games) 

Most Touchdowns Scored One Season, Including Bowl Games 

19 by Lou Gambino (16 m 1947, plus 3 in 1948 Gator Bowl) 
18 by Rick Badanjek (16 in 1984 plus 2 in 1984 Sun Bowl) 
Career: 48 by Rick Badanjek, 1982-84 (46 rushing, 2 pass receiving) 

Most Points After Touchdowns Scored 

Game: 8 by Steve Mike-Mayer vs. Duke, 1974 

8 by Mike Sochko vs. Virginia, 1975 
Season: 39 by Jess Atkinson, 1982 
Career: 128 by Jess Atkinson, 1981-84 (131 attempts) 

Most Touchdown Passes Caught 

Game: 3 by James Milling vs. North Carolina, 1986 

2 by 18 players 
Season: 8 by Dan Bungori, 1971 m 11 games 
Career: 18 by Greg Hill, 1982-84 

Most Touchdowns Responsibility, Run and Pass 

Game: 5 by Bob Shemonski vs. Virginia Tech, 1950 
Season: 21 by Alan Pastrana, 1966 (17 TD passes, 4 TDs) 
Career: 46 by Boomer Esiason, 1981-83 
46 by Rick Badanjek, 1982-85 




Alvin Blount: he rushed the length of two football fields, and then 
some, against the Tigers in 1984. 



Most Field Goals 



Game: 
Season: 



Career: 



5 by Dale Castro vs. Mississippi State, 1979 
17 by Dale Castro, 1979 
17 by Jess Atkinson, 1984 
17 by Dan Plocki, 1988 
60 by Jess Atkinson, 1981-84 (82 attempts) 



Most Points Scored By Freshman 

56 by Rick Badanjek, 1982 (9 touchdowns and conversion pass) 

Most Points By Kicking 

Season: 88 by Jess Atkinson, 1984 

TOTAL OFFENSE 



Most Net Yards Gained Rushing and Passing 

Game: 368 by Stan Gelbaugh vs. Clemson, 
Season: 2,681 by Dan Henning, 1986 
Career: 6,081 by Boomer Esiason, 1981-83 

Most Total Plays, Rushing and Passing 



1985 



Game: 



Season: 
Career: 



52 by Scott Zolak vs. N.C. State, 1990 (47 pass, 5 run) 

50 by Charlie Wysocki vs. Duke, 1980 (50 rushes) 

50 by Stan Gelbaugh vs. Penn State, 1984 (48 pass, 2 run) 

418 by Dan Henning, 1986 
1,006 by Boomer Esiason 



Best Offensive Average 

(Mmimum Four Plays, Rushing and Passing) 

Game: 24.0 by Ernie Anzzi vs. Syracuse, 1961 (4 plays, 96 yards) 

RUSHING 

Most Yards Gained Rushing (Net) 

Game: 240 by Willie Joyner vs. North Carolina, (16) 1982 

237 by George Scott vs. Villanova (42) 1977 

222 by Charlie Wysocki vs. Louisville (43) 1979 

217 by Rick Badanjek vs. Virginia (17) 1984 

215 by Steve Atkins vs. Syracuse (29) 1976 

214 by Alvin Blount vs. Clemson (29) 1984 

213 by Louis Carter vs. Virginia (29) 1974 

202 by Charlie Wysocki vs. Virginia (33) 1979 

197 by Steve Atkins vs. Clemson (28) 1978 

193 by Ray Poppleman vs Western Maryland (24) 1931 

186 by Alvin Blount vs Virginia (26) 1985 

180 by Louis Carter vs. N.C. State (35) 1974 

178 by Charlie Wysocki vs. Clemson (32) 1979 
Season: 1,359 by Charlie Wysocki, 1980 
Career: 3,317 by Charlie Wysocki, 1978-81 (39 games) 

Most Rushes 

Game: 50 by Charlie Wysocki vs. Duke, 1980 
Season: 334 by Charlie Wysocki, 1980 
Career: 796 by Charlie Wysocki, 1978-81 

Best Rushing Average 

Game: 24.0 by Ernie Arizzi vs. Syracuse, 1961 (4 carries) 

Season: 9.8 yards by Chet Hanulak, 1953 

Career: 8.1 yards by Chet Hanulak, 28 games, 1951-53 (1.544 yards, 190 

carries) - Regular season games only 
Career: 7.9 yards by Chet Hanulak, 30 games including 35 yards on 4 

carries in the 1952 Sugar Bowl and 39 yards on 12 carries in 

the 1954 Orange Bowl. 

Average Yards Per Game 

Season: 126.7 by Charlie Wysocki, 1979 

Longest Scoring Run From Scrimmage 

98 yards by Steve Atkins vs. Clemson, 1978 

Longest Non-Scoring Run From Scrimmage 

76 yards by Harry Bonk vs. North Carolina 

Most Rushes in a Half 

32 by Charlie Wysocki vs. Duke, 1980 (second half) 



132 



Terprolific, Individual Records 



PASSING 

Most Passes Attempted 

Game: 54 by Dan Henning vs. N.C. State, 1986 
Season: 418 by Scott Zolak, 1990 
Career: 850 by Boomer Esiason, 1981-83 

Most Passes Completed 

Game: 29 by Scott Zolak vs. Michigan, 1990 
Season: 225 by Scott Zolak, 1990 
Career: 461 by Boomer Esiason, 1981-83 

Most Yards Gained Passing 

Game: 367 by Dan Henning vs. North Carolina, (18/29), 1986 
Season: 2.725 by Dan Henning, 1986 
Career: 6,259 by Boomer Esiason, 1981-83 

Best Completion Percentage 

Game: 
Season: 



Career: 



.909 by Bob Avellim vs. Duke. 1974 (10 of 11) (minimum 10 attempts) 

6396 by Neil O'DonneU, 1987 (71 of 111) 

.6391 by Frank Reich, 1984 (108 of 169) 

588235 by Larry Dick (180-306) 1975, 1977 (minimum 300 attempts) 

.587253 by Neil O'DonneU (387-659) 

.586 by Bob Avellim (231-394) 1972-74 



Most Touchdown Passes Thrown 

Game: 4 by Mark Manges vs. Villanova, 1975 
Season: 18 by Boomer Esiason, 1982 
Career: 42 by Boomer Esiason, 1981-83 

Most Passes Caught 

Game: 14 by Frank Wycheck vs. Virginia Tech, 1990 

Season: 58 by Frank Wycheck, 1990 

Career: 108 by Azizuddin Abdur-Ra'oof, 1984-87 

Most Yards Gained on Pass Receptions 

Game: 220 by James Muling vs. North Carolina, 1986 (5 catches) 
Season: 820 by Greg Hill, 1984 (51 receptions, 11 games) 
675 by Azizuddin Abdur-Ra'oof, 1985 
(35 receptions, 11 games) 
Career: 1,895 by Azizuddin Abdur-Ra'oof, 1984-87 

1,731 by Barry Johnson, 1987-90 (106 receptions) 
1,721 by Greg Hill, 1982-84 (97 receptions) 

Most Passes Had Intercepted 



Game: 



Season: 
Career: 



4 by Dick Shiner vs. Navy, 1963 
4 by Alan Pastrana vs. Clemson, 1966 
4 by Larry Dick vs. North Carolina, 1977 
4 by Scott Zolak vs. North Carolina State, 1990 
19 by Scott Zolak, 1990 



Most Passes Intercepted 

Game: 4 by Lendell Jones vs. Duke, 1982 

Season: 10 by Bob Sullivan in 10 games, 1965 (led nation) 

Career: 17 by Tom Brown, 30 games, 1960-62 

Most Conversion Passes Thrown 

Game: 

Career: 7 by Boomer Esiason, 1981-83 

Season 

Longest Scoring Pass and Run 

92 yards by Stan Lavme to Ed Bolton vs. South Carolina, 1949 
(pass 15 yards, run 77 yards) 

Longest Scoring Run After Pass 

77 yards by Ed Bolton on pass from Stan Lavine vs. South Carolina 1949 
(pass 15 yards) 




Bob Avellini: a near perfect performance against Duke helped lead 
Maryland to its first outright ACC title in 1974. 



Longest Non-Scoring Pass and Run 

73 yards by Tommy Mont to Hubie Wemer vs. Lakehurst, 1942 

(pass 32 yards, run 41 yards) 
73 yards by Neil O'DonneU to FerreU Edmunds vs. North Carolina, 1987 

(pass 10, run 63 yards) 

Longest Non-Scoring Run After Pass 

63 yards by FerreU Edmunds vs. North Carolina, 1987. on 10 yard pass from 
NeU O'DonneU 

Most Yards Gained On Interception Runbacks 

Game: 111 yards by Dick Lewis vs. N.C. State, 1956 

Season: 147 by Joe Horning, 1951 ( 6 interceptions in 9 games) 

Career: 

Longest Scoring Run of Intercepted Pass 

100 yards by Joe Horning vs. Missouri, 1951 (105 actual) 
100 yards by Dickie Lewis vs. N.C. State, 1956 (103 actual) 
100 yards by Tom Brown vs. Virginia, 1962 

Longest Non-Scoring Run of Intercepted Pass 
89 Yards by Kevin Benson vs. Virginia, 1973 

Longest Scoring Run of Intercepted Pass by Opponent 
93 yards by Walter Matson of Pennsylvania. 1941 

RECEIVING 

Most Consecutive Games Catching a Pass 
25 by Azizuddin Abdur-Ra'oof, 1984-86 



133 



profilic, Individual Records 



PUNTING 

Most Punts 

Game: 12 by Steve Adams vs. Florida, 1981 (466 yards) 
Season: 90 by Dan DeArmas, 1991 
Career: 268 by Dan DeArmas, 1988-91 

Most Total Yards Punting 

Game: 510 by Bill Guckeyson vs. Syracuse, 1936 

Season: 3,615 by Dan DeArmas, 1991 
Career: 10,591 by Dan DeArmas, 1988-91 

Best Punting Average 

Game: 53 yards by Lynn Beightol vs. Oklahoma, 1956 Orange Bowl 

(3 punts) 
Season: 43.7 by Bill Walker in 10 games, 1955 (15 punts). Walker added four 

punts in the 1956 Orange Bowl for an 11-game average of 41.2 

(19 punts). 
Career: 41.8 by Bill Walker, 1953-55 

Longest Punt With Roll 

88 yards by John Fntsch vs. Miami, 1956 

Note: "Untz" Brooke Brewer had a 93-yard punt vs. VMI, 1916, but records are 

incomplete. Kick may have been measured from point of kick, not from line of 

scrimmage. 

Longest Punt With Roll By Opponent 

84 yards by Charlie Justice of North Carolina, 1948 

PUNT RETURNS 

Most Punts Returned 

Game: 8 by Larry Marshall vs. Villanova, 1971 (141 yards) 
Season: 40 by Bob Smith m 11 games, 1973 (420 yards) 
Career: 

Most Yards Gained Returning Punts 

Game: 146 by Bob Shemonski vs. N.C. State, 1950 (5 returns) 

Season: 420 by Bob Smith in 11 games, (40 returns) 

Career: 

Best Punt Return Average (Minimum three) 

Game: 

Season: 24.5 by Tom Brown on 8 returns, 1961 

Career: 

Longest Punt Returned for Touchdown 

90 yards by Dick Nolan vs. Clemson, 1953 

Longest Punt Return for Touchdown By Opponent 

100 yards by Frank Brady of Navy, 1951 
Longest Non-Scoring Punt Return 

67 yards by John McVicker vs. Syracuse, 1956 

KICKOFF RETURNS 

Most Kickoff Returns 

Game: 9 by Raphael Wall vs. Perm State, 1991 (159 yards) 
Season: 34 by Bren Lowery, 1988, (702 yards, 11 games) 

25 by Keeta Covington, 1984 (479 yards, 11 games) 

24 by Kenny Dutton, 1967 (454 yards) 
Career: 

Most Yards Gained on Kickoff Returns 

Game: 159 by Raphael Wall vs. Penn State, 1991 ( 11 returns) 
Season: 702 by Bren Lowery on 34 returns, 1988 

Best Kickoff Return Average (Minimum three) 

Game: 

Season: 44 yards by Howie Date, 1957 (6 returns for 264 yards) 

Longest Kickoff Return for Touchdown 

100 yards by Dick Novak and Dennis Condie vs. Virgmia, 1960 

(102 yards actual). Novak ret. to nme yard line, then lateraled to Condie 
who returned 91 yards. 

100 yards by Kenny Ambrusko vs. Navy, 1964 (101) actual). 

Longest Kickoff Return for Touchdown By Opponent 

98 yards by Doug Thomas of Clemson, 1990 

Longest Non-Scoring Kickoff Return 

97 yards by Sammy Johnson vs. Vanderbilt, 1980 



KICKING 

Best Point After Touchdown Average 

Season: 1.000 by John Hanmngan, 1961 (17 for 17) 
1.000 by Bernardo Bramson, 1965 (15 for 15) 
1.000 by Jess Atkinson, 1982 (39 for 39) 
1.000 by Jess Atkinson, 1983 (28 for 28) 
1.000 by Dan Plocki, 1985 (20 for 20) 
1.000 by Ramon Paredes, 1985 (13 for 13) 
1.000 by Dan Plocki, 1986 (29 for 29) 
1.000 by Dan Plocki, 1987 (16 for 16) 
1.000 by Dan Plocki, 1988 (27 for 27) 
1.000 by Dan DeArmas, 1989 (24 for 24) 
1.000 by Dan DeArmas, 1990 (23 for 23) 
1.000 by Dan DeArmas, 1991 (15 for 15) 

Career: 1.000 by Dan Plocki, 1986-88 (72 for 72) 

1.000 by Dan DeArmas, 1989-92 (62 for 62) 

Longest Field Goal 

54 yards by Steve Mike-Mayer vs. Villanova, 1973 

Most Consecutive Field Goals 

16 by Dale Castro, 1979 (NCAA Record) 

Most Consecutive Points After Touchdown Kicked 

93 by Jess Atkinson, 1981-84 

TACKLES 

Most Tackles 

Game: 

Season: 188 by Neal Olkewicz 

Career: 485 by Eric Wilson, 1981-84 

467 by Chuck Faucette, 1983-86 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Longest Scoring Run with Recovered Fumble 

23 yards by Howie Dare vs. N.C. State, 1954 

Longest Non-Scoring Run With Recovered Fumble By Opponent 

75 yards by Dave Russell of Washrngton and Lee, 1942 

Most Opponents' Fumbles Recovered 

Game: 3 by Tom Gunderman vs. Miami, 1957 



1974 

'Maryland won its first outright ACC title. 

"For the second consecutive year Maryland was rewarded with a bowl 
invitation, this time accepting a bid to take on Tennessee in the Liberty 
Bowl. 

'Loius Carter gained 991 yards for the season, including 213 yards against 
Virginia in the season final to set a Terrapin single-game record. Carter 
would have eclipsed the 1,000 yard plateau but he missed two games after 
suffering a rib injury against Villanova in week nine. 

'Randy White, Louis Carter, Steven Mike-Myer, Bob Smith, Stan Rogers 
and Harry Walters earned All-ACC honors. It was Smith 's third such honor, 
a first for the school, as well as the most players ever named to the team 
from Maryland. 



1975 

'Maryland qualified for yet another postseason dance, this time it was a 
successful one as the underdog Terps shutout Florida 13-0 in the Gator 
Bowl. 



1976 

'Maryland finished the regular season undefeated for the fourth time in 
school history. Their 11-0 regular season extended their winning streak to 
26 games. 

"Graduating seniors played in four bowls, the only Maryland class to ever 
accomplish such a feat. This also tied a conference record. 



134 



Terprofilic, Top Single Game Efforts 



1983 



1982 



1983 



PASSING 

Most Passes Attempted 

1. 54 Dan Henning vs. N.C. State, Sept. 27, 1986 

2. 48 Stan Gelbaugh vs. Penn State, Oct 6, 1984 

3. 46 Scott Zolak vs. Virginia Tech, Sept. 1, 1990 

4. 45 Scott Zolak vs. Michigan, Sept. 29, 1990 

5. 44 Dan Kenning vs. N.C. State, Sept. 26,1987 

6. 43 Scott Zolak vs. Clemson, Sept. 15,1990 

7. 42 Scott Zolak vs. West Virginia, Sept. 8, 1990 
7. 42 Boomer Esiason vs. West Virginia, Sept. 17, 
9. 47 Jim Sandwisch vs. Pittsburgh, Oct. 5, 1991 

10. 40 Dan Kenning vs. Penn State,- Nov. 8, 1986 

10. 40 Boomer Esiason vs. West Virginia, Sept. 18, 

Most Passes Completed 

1 29 Scott Zolak vs Michigan, Seat. 29, 1990 

2. 28 Scott Zolak vs. Virginia Tech, Sept. 1, 1990 

3. 27 Dan Kenning vs. N.C. State, Sept. 27, 1986 

4. 24 Boomer Esiason vs. Clemson, Nov. 13, 1982 

5. 23 Scott Zolak vs. West Virginia, Sept. 8, 1990 
5. 23 Boomer Esiason vs. West Virginia. Sept. 17, 
5. 23 Al Nevilie vs Penn State, Nov. 6, 1971 

22 Scott Zolak vs. Duke, Oct. 20, 1990 

22 Neil O'DonneU vs N.C. State, Sept. 2, 1989 

22 Neil O'DonneU vs. Louisville, Sept. 3, 1988 

22 Jim Sandwisch vs. Pittsburgh, Oct. 5, 1991 

Most Yards Passing 

1. 367 Dan Kenning vs. North Carolina, Nov. 1, 1986 

2. 361 Stan Gelbaugh vs. Clemson, Nov. 16, 1985 

3. 318 Jim Sandwisch vs. Wake Forest, Oct. 19, 1991 

4. 315 Dan Kenning vs. Vanderbilt, Sept. 13, 1986 

5. 314 Stan Geloaugh vs. Duke, Oct. 26, 1985 
5. 314 Bob Avellini vs. Duke, Oct. 21, 1972 

7. 313 Scott Zolak vs. West Virginia, Sept. 8, 1990 

8. 308 Stan Gelbaugh vs. Penn State, Oct. 6, 1984 

9. 303 Scott Zolak vs. Virginia Tech, Sept. 1,1990 
10. 300 Dan Henmngvs. N.C. State, Sept. 27, 1986 

Passing Completion Percentage (minimum 10 attempts) 

1. 909 Bob Avelhni vs. Duke (10-11)1974 

2. 777 Scott Zolak vs. Wake Forest (14-18) 1990 

2. 777 Dick Shiner vs. North Carolina (14-18) 1962 

4. 677 Bob Avellini vs. Duke (21-31)1972 

5. 666 Scott Zolak vs. Duke (8-12)1990 
5. 666 Mike Tice vs. Duke (8-12)1979 

5. 666 Jack Scarbath vs. Boston (8-12) 1952 

8. 653 Dick Shiner vs. South Carolina (17-26)1962 

9. 647 Neil O'DonneU vs. N.C. State (22-34) 1989 
10. 644 Scott Zolak vs. Michigan (29-45)1990 

Most Touchdowns 

1. 4 Mark Manges vs. ViUanova, Sept. 6, 1975 

2. 3 Neil O'DonneU vs. North Carolina, Oct. 29, 1988 
2. 3 Dan Kenning vs. North Carolina, Nov. 1, 1986 
2. 3 Dan Kenning vs. Wake Forest, Oct. 18, 1986 

2. 3 Stan Gelbaugh vs. Clemson, Nov. 16, 1985 

2. 3 Stan Gelbaugh vs. Duke. Oct. 26, 1985 

2. 3 Stan Gelbaugh vs. Duke, Oct. 27, 1984 

2. 3 Frank Reich vs. Miami. Nov. 10, 1984 

2. 3 Boomer Esiason vs. Wake Forest, Oct. 15, 1983 

2. 3 Boomer Esiason vs. Virginia, Nov. 20, 1982 

2. 3 Alan Pastrana vs. Flonda State, Nov. 26, 1966 

2. 3 Alan Pastrana vs. N.C. State, Nov. 6, 1966 

2. 3 Alan Pastrana vs. Wake Forest, Sept. 24, 1966 

2. 3 Jack Scarbath vs. Louisiana State, Oct. 25, 1952 

Note: 2 Touchdowns thrown by 14 people 29 tunes. 



RECEIVING 

Most Passes Caught 

1. 14 Frank Wycheck vs Virginia Tech, Sept. 1, 1990 

2. 12 Frank Wycheck vs. N.C State, Sept 22, 1990 

3 11 John Tice vs. Clemson, Nov 13. 1982 

4 10 Darryl Hill vs Clemson, Nov. 16, 1963 

5. 9 Chad Wiestling vs. Michigan, Sept. 29, 1990 

5. 9 John Schultz vs. Tennessee, Sept. 13, 1975 

7. 8 David Carr vs. Western Michigan, Sept. 16, 1989 

7. 8 Bren Lowery vs. Duke, Oct. 25, 1987 

7. 8 Greg Hill vs. Miami, Nov. 10, 1984 

7. 8 Dave DAddiovs. Vanderbilt, Sept. 10,1983 

7. 8 John Nash vs. Tulane, Nov. 7,1981 

7. 8 Tom Brown vs. N.C. State, Oct 6, 1962 

7. 8 Lloyd Colteryahn vs. Alabama, Nov 22, 1952 

Most Yards 
1. 

2. 

3. 

4 

5. 

6. 

7. 

8. 

9. 
10. 
10. 



220 James Milling vs. North Carolma, Nov. 1, 1986 

188 Russell Davis vs. Penn State, Sept. 11, 1982 

151 Azizuddin Abdur-Ra'oof vs. Vanderbilt, Sept. 15. 1984 

127 Pete Augsberger vs. Navy, Sept. 30, 1950 

123 Azizuddin Abdur-Ra'oof vs. Vanderbilt. Nov. 21, 1987 

121 Vince Kinney vs. West Virginia, Sept. 17. 1977 

120 Dean Richards vs. Virginia, Nov. 11, 1978 

116 Azizuddin Abdur-Ra'oof vs. Wake Forest. Oct. 19, 1985 

115 Gene Verardi vs. Wake Forest, Oct. 12, 1957 

113 Dave D'Addio vs. Vanderbilt, Sept. 10, 1983 

113 John Tice vs. Clemson, Nov. 13. 1982 



Average Per Reception 

1. 44 James Milling vs. North Carolina (5/220) 1986 

2. 28 Lloyd Colteryahn vs. Auburn (4/112) 1952 

3. 26.8 RusseU Davis vs. Penn State (7/188) 1982 

4. 26 Ben Scotti vs. Auburn (4/104) 1958 

5. 25.4 Pete Augsberger vs. Navy (5/127) 1950 

6. 20.7 Lou Weidensaul vs. Clemson (4/83) 1952 

7. 20.3 Greg Hill vs. Duke (6/122) 1984 

8. 20 Dean Richards vs. Virginia (6/120) 1978 

9. 19 Frank RusseU vs. Villanova (5/95) 1972 
10. 18.6 Kim Hoover vs. Wake Forest (6/112) 1975 




Pete Augsberger sank the Middies with a career-best 
performance. 



135 



profilic, Top Single Game Efforts 



Most Touchdowns 


PUNTING 


1. 3 James Milling vs. North Carolina, Nov. 1, 1986 


Most Punts 

1. 12 Steve Adams vs. Florida, Oct. 10, 1981 


2. 2 Barry Johnson vs. Michigan, Sept. 30, 1989 


2. 2 Vernon Jomes vs. North Carolina, Oct. 31, 1987 


2. 11 Dale Castro vs. Perm State, Oct. 6, 1979 


2. 2 BrenLowery vs. West Virginia, Sept. 19, 1987 
2. 2 Greg Kill vs. Miami, Nov. 10, 1984 


2. 11 Dale Castro vs. Kentucky, Sept. 29, 1979 
2. 11 Mike Sochko vs. Cincinnati, Nov. 8, 1975 


2. 2 Greg Hill vs. Wake Forest, Oct. 15, 1983 
2. 2 Greg Kill vs. West Virginia, Sept. 17, 1983 


2. 11 Greg Fries vs. Syracuse, Oct. 11, 1969 
2. 11 Greg Fries vs. Clemson, Nov. 9, 1968 


2. 2 Greg Hill vs. Duke, Oct. 23, 1982 

2. 2 Greg Hill vs. Wake Forest, Oct 16, 1982 


7. 10 Dan DeArmas vs. Georgia Tech, Oct. 6, 1990 
7. 10 Dale Castro vs. Clemson, Sept. 15, 1979 


2. 2 Russell Davis vs. Perm State, Sept. 11, 1982 


7. 10 Dale Castro vs. Perm State, Nov. 4, 1978 


2. 2 Vince Kinney vs. Villanova, Sept. 6, 1975 


7. 10 Mike Sochko vs. Perm State, Sept. 24, 1977 


2. 2 Billy Van Heusen vs. Florida State, Nov. 26, 1966 


7. 10 Dan DeArmas vs. Georgia Tech, Oct. 12, 1991 


2. 2 Darryl Hill vs. Wake Forest, Oct. 26, 1963 


7. 10 Dan DeArmas vs. North Carolina, Nov. 2, 1991 


2. 2 Darryl Hill vs. Air Force, Oct. 19, 1963 


7. 10 Dan DeArmas vs. Perm State, Nov. 9, 1991 


2. 2 Lloyd Colteryahn vs. Louisiana State, Oct. 25, 1952 






Best Punting Average (minimum 2 punts) 




1. 47.6 Bemie Falony vs. Mississippi, Nov. 15, 1952 


RUSHING 


2 


47.3 Dan DeArmas vs. Wake Forest, Oct. 13, 1990 


Most Attempts 


3 


46.6 Phil Wagenheim vs. Virginia, Nov. 23, 1974 


1. 49 Charlie Wysocki vs. Duke, Oct. 25, 1980 


4 


45.5 Greg Fries vs. South Carolina, Oct. 19, 1968 


2. 42 George Scott vs. Villanova, Nov. 5, 1977 


5 


45.0 Phil Wagenheim vs. Wake Forest, Oct. 19, 1974 


3. 39 Charlie Wysocki vs. Syracuse, Oct. 3, 1981 


6 


44.3 Mike Sochko vs. Clemson, Sept. 10, 1977 


3. 39 Billy Lovett vs. South Carolina, OCT. 19, 1968 


7 


44.0 GregFnes vs. Florida State, Sept. 21,1968 


5. 35 Charlie Wysocki vs. West Virginia, Sept. 20, 1980 


8 


43.1 Ken Schroy vs.Miami(Fla),Nov. je, 1972 


5. 35 Charlie Wysocki vs. Richmond, Nov. 12, 1977 


9 


43.0 Dan DeArmas vs. West Virginia, Sept. 8, 1990 


7. 33 Charlie Wysocki vs. Virginia, Nov. 21, 1981 


9 


43.0 Steve Adams vs. Vanderbilt, Sept. 12,1981 


7. 33 Len Chiavermi vs. South Carolina, OCT. 27, 1962 


9 


43.0 Dale Castro vs. Wake Forest, Oct. 18,1980 


9. 32 John Nash vs. Wake Forest, Oct. 17, 1981 




9. 32 Charlie Wysocki vs. Clemson, Sept. 15, 1979 


FIELD GOALS 




Most Attempts 


Most Yards Gained 


1. 5 DanPlocki vs. West Virginia, Sept. 21, 1985 


1. 240 Willie Joyner vs. North Carolina (16) 1982 


1. 5 Dale Castro vs. Mississippi State, Sept. 22, 1979 


2. 237 George Scott vs. Villanova (42) 1977 


3. 4 Dan DeArmas vs. Wake Forest, Oct. 14, 1989 


3. 222 Charlie Wysocki vs. Louisville (43) 1979 


3. 4 Dan Plocki vs. N.C. State, Sept. 27, 1986 


4. 217 Rick Badanjek vs. Virginia (17) 1984 


3. 4 Jess Atkinson vs. Vanderbilt, Sept. 15, 1984 


5. 216 Charlie Wysocki vs. Duke (49) 1980 


3. 4 Jess Atkmson vs. N.C. State, Sept. 26, 1981 


6. 215 Steve Atkms vs. Syracuse (29) 1976 


3. 4 Dale Castro vs. Clemson, Sept. 16, 1979 


7. 214 Alvm Blount vs. Clemson (29) 1984 


3. 4 Ed Loncar vs. Louisville, Sept. 16, 1978 


8. 213 Louis Carter vs. Virginia (29) 1974 


3. 4 Ed Loncar vs. Syracuse, Oct. 14, 1975 


9. 202 Charlie Wysocki vs. Virginia (33) 1979 


3. 4 Bernardo Bramson vs. Clemson, Nov. 13, 1965 


10. 197 Steve Atkms vs. Clemson (28) 1979 


Most Made 


Average Per Carry (minimum 10 carries) 

1. 15.0 Willie Joyner vs. North Carolma (16/240)1982 

2. 14.3 Ralph Felton vs. N.C. State (13/186) 1951 

3. 12.7 Rick Badanjek vs. Virginia (17/217)1984 

4. 9.9 Ted Kershner vs. N.C. State (13/129) 1956 

5. 9.6 Bob Shemonski vs. Georgetown (10/96) 1950 

6. 9.4 Ed Modzelewski vs. West Virginia (14/131) 1951 

7. 9.2 Ed Modzelewski vs. George Washington (15/138)1951 

8. 8.54 Ed Vereb vs. South Carolma (13/111) 1955 

9. 8.5 Ed Modzelewski vs. Missouri (12/102) 1951 


1 5 Dale Castro vs. Mississippi State, Sept. 22, 1979 

2. 4 Dan Plocki vs. West Virgima, Sept. 21, 1985 

2. 4 Dale Castro vs. Clemson, Sept. 15, 1979 

4. 3 Dan DeArmas vs. Duke, Oct. 20, 1990 

4. 3 Dan DeArmas vs. Western Michigan, Sept. 16, 1989 

4. 3 Dan Plocki vs. Syracuse, Oct. 1, 1988 

4. 3 Dan Plocki vs. N.C. State, Sept. 27, 1986 

4. 3 Jess Atkinson vs. Virginia, Oct. 1, 1983 

4. 3 Ed Loncar vs. North Carolma, Sept. 23, 1978 

4. 3 Steve Mike-Mayer vs. Alabama, Sept. 14, 1974 


10. 8.4 Steve Atkms vs. Richmond (20/169) 1976 


4. 3 Steve Mike-Mayer vs. Villanova, Oct. 14, 1972 


Most Touchdowns 




4. 3 Vincent Scott vs. West Virginia, Sept. 19, I9b9 


Ai_a*/ ^/ v^r. i" jhnmri ' < jJ^km^^^h 


1. 5 Bob Shemonski vs. V.P.I., Dec. 2, 1950 


PfT'tf JM W\ *WfW5 - afc£- ^ 


2. 4 Charlie Wysocki vs. Virginia, Nov. 21, 1981 


Hffl ft.l&StSrPiiniL/ im 


3. 3 Rick Badanjek vs. North Carolina, Nov. 3, 1984 




* M&T%&fli£EWfzm33k*^m\ 


3. 3 Rick Badanjek vs. N.C. State, Oct. 13, 1984 




I ^* fiflfjj^ n^> A mSF^Brf^Mml 


3. 3 John Nash vs. Wake Forest, Oct. 16, 1982 
3. 3 Steve Adkins vs. Duke, Oct. 28, 1978 




j\ *-^M*mk iiw* m^k^M ^^P ^ml v 


1 1 r^^K^pj ■ ^^^^L il^^^^l 


i /^^S^^SS ^E^ ^B ik^.i 


> -y ? v> ■ 


3. 3 George Scott vs. Villanova, Nov. 5, 1977 


Iij^^^B IBwfl w*a V 


3. 3 Steve Adkins vs. Duke, Oct 22, 1977 




3. 3 Steve Adkins vs. Syracuse, Sept. 25, 1977 




3. 3 Louis Carter vs. Clemson, Nov. 17, 1973 


r^k ^m ^^Fj^V ^^k W? ^^^ u^^Haift , ^^* 


3. 3 Dennis O'Hara vs. Wake Forest, Oct. 4, 1969 


njk^^^^E ^^^C ^ *■ - Jm v? 


3. 3 Dennis Condie vs. Virginia, Nov. 19, 1960 


£ TU ^WfcJr-^ i^r . T^BflSr B 


3. 3 Jim Joyce vs. Virginia, Nov. 21, 1959 

3. 3 John Forbes vs. Miami (Fla), Nov. 14, 1958 


Vawftf r^k r ~^^^^^^^^^^r~*i- x ■' *-t 4 


Kevin Glover was the center of attention in 1984. 



136 



Terproiific, Top season Efforts 



PASSING 


RECEIVING 


RUSHING 


Most Passes Attempted 


Receptions 

1 58 Frank Wycheck • 1990 


Attempts 

1. 334 Charlie Wysocki - 1980 


1. 418 Scott Zolak ■ 1990 


2. 51 Greg Hill • 1984 


2 283 Steve Atkins - 1978 


2. 353 Dan Henning - 1986 


3. 47 Tom Brown - 1962 


3. 247 Charlie Wysocki - 1979 


3. 314 Boomer Esiason - 1982 


4. 45 Frank Wycheck ■ 1991 


4 224 Louis Carter - 1974 


4. 311 Stan Gelbaugh - 1985 


5. 44 Bren Lowery - 1987 


5. 221 Art Seymore - 1970 


5. 294 Boomer Esiason - 1983 


6. 43 Darryl HiU ■ 1963 


6. 218 Louis Carter - 1973 


6 291 Jim Sandwisch - 1991 


43 Barry Johnson ■ 1989 


7. 217 BiUy Lovett - 1968 


7. 287 Dan Henning ■ 1987 


8. 39 Azizuddin Abdur-Ra'oof • 1987 


8. 198 Willie Joyner - 1983 


8 280 Neil O'DonneU • 1989 


39 Frank Russell • 1973 


9 188 George Scott - 1977 


9, 267 Neil O'DonneU • 1988 


10. 38 Kim Hoover - 1975 


10 182 Bo Hickey - 1964 


10. 242 Boomer Esiason • 1981 


Yards 


Yards 


Most Passes Completed 


1. 820 Greg HU1 - 1984 


1. 1359 Charlie Wysocki- 1980 


1. 225 Scott Zolak - 1990 


2. 689 Barry Johnson - 1989 


2. 1261 Steve Atkins - 1978 


3. 671 Azizuddin Abdur-Ra'oof - 1985 


3. 1140 Charlie Wysocki - 1979 


2. 196 Dan Henning - 1986 


4. 650 James MiUing - 1986 


4. 1063 Willie Joyner - 1982 


3. 176 Boomer Esiason - 1982 


5. 629 Barry Johnson - 1990 


5. 991 Louis Carter - 1974 


4. 166 Stan Gelbaugh - 1985 


6. 617 Azizuddin Abdur-Ra'oof - 1987 


6. 981 Art Seymore - 1970 


5. 163 Boomer Esiason - 1983 


7. 603 FerreU Edmunds - 1987 


7. 963 Billy Lovett - 1968 


6. 160 Neil O'DonneU • 1988 


8. 593 Lloyd Colteryahn - 1952 


8. 908 Willie Joyner - 1983 


7. 157 Dan Henning - 1987 


9. 575 Dean Richards - 1978 


9. 904 Lou Gambino - 1947 


8. 156 Neil O'DonneU • 1989 


10. 570 Greg HiU - 1983 


10. 894 George Scott - 1977 


9. 142 Jim Sandwisch -1991 




894 Bo Hickev - 1964 


10 122 Boomer Esiason - 1981 


Average Per Reception 

1. 21.0 Marcus Badgett - 1991 


^^ 


Most Yards 


2. 19.7 James MiUing - 1986 


*J44 


1. 2725 Dan Henning - 1986 


3 19.2 Azizuddin Abdur-Ra'oof - 1987 


Wtcrv 


2. 2589 Scott Zolak • 1990 


4. 18.5 Barry Johnson - 1990 


sSCj^? 


3. 2475 Stan Gelbaugh- 1985 


18.5 Lloyd Colteryahn - 1952 
6. 17.2 FerreU Edmunds - 1987 




4. 2322 Boomer Esiason - 1983 


7. 16.4 Dean Richards - 1978 


^ 


5. 2302 Boomer Esiason - 1982 


8. 16.1 Greg HiU - 1984 


£f -A Bk *M'" 


6. 2103 Neil O'DonneU • 1989 


9. 16.0 Barry Johnson - 1989 


^i"V t > 


7. 1973 Neil O'DonneU - 1988 


10. 15.8 Azizuddin Abdur-Ra'oof - 1987 




8. 1835 Dan Henning - 1987 


15.8 Eugene Kinney - 1977 


% w 


9. 1648 Bob AveUini • 1974 






10 1635 Boomer Esiason • 1981 


Touchdowns 

1. 8 Dan Bungon - 1971 




Completion Percentage 


2. 7 Billy Van Heusen - 1966 
7 Greg HiU - 1982 
7 Greg Hill - 1983 


1 *" WM 


(200 attempts minimum) 




1 599 Neil O'DonneU • 1988 


5. 6 Don Ratliff - 1972 


w m> 


2. .596 Dick Shiner • 1962 


6 James Milling - 1986 


1 rl 


3 .561 Boomer Esaison ■ 1982 


6 Barry Johnson - 1989 


si MW 


4. .557 NeU O'DonneU • 1989 


8. 5 Walter White - 1973 


~ ilP 


5. .544 Boomer Esaison - 1983 


5 Kim Hoover - 1975 


i . \ ~ i 


6 .547 Dan Henning - 1987 


5 Vemon Jomes - 1987 


Dan Henning: he passed for more yards in 


7. .538 Scon Zolak • 1990 


5 Sean Sullivan - 1983 


1986 than any other Terp QB in a single 


8. .534 Stan Gelbaugh - 1985 
9 524 Al NpviIIp ■ 1971 


5 RusseU Davis - 1982 


season. 




&. '.'^1 ill .1" Wilt I> !| 1 

10. .504 Boomer Esiason - 1981 


1977 






'The 21-14 victory over Clemson in the season opener marked the apex of a school and conference 


Touchdowns 


record winning streak of 21 ACC games. 




1 18 Boomer Esaison - 1982 


'Maryland earned their fifth consecutive bowl in 


vitation, defeating Minnesota 17-7 in the Hall of 


2. 17 Alan Pastrana - 1966 


Fame Bowl. 




3. 15 Boomer Esaison - 1983 
15 Stan Gelbaugh - 1985 






1978 




15 Dan Henning - 1986 


'The Terps won the first eight games of the seaso 


n and climbed to #5 in the nation. 


6. 12 NeU O'DonneU - 1988 


'Maryland competed in a bowl game for the sixth consecutive year, meeting Texas in the Sun Bowl. 


7. 11 Mark Manges • 1976 






8. 10 Al NeviUe - 1971 


'Quarterback Tim O'Hare led the ACC in passing. 




10 Dick Shiner - 1963 






10 NeU O'DonneU - 1989 


1979 




10 Scott Zolak - 1990 


'Consensus AH- American kicker Dale Castro set ai 
held goals. 


i NCAA single season record with 16 consecutive 









137 



lific, Top Season Efforts 



Average Per Carry 
(minimum 100 carriers) 


1. 7.2 


Lou Gambino - 1947 


2. 5.9 


Willie Joyner - 1982 


3. 5.9 


Alvm Blount - 1984 


4. 5.8 


Steve Adkms - 1976 


5. 5.7 


Ed Vereb - 1955 


6. 5.6 


Ralph Felton • 1953 


7. 5.5 


Tommy Neal - 1984 


8. 5.5 


Ed Modzelewski - 1949 


9. 5.5 


Bob Shemonski - 1950 


10. 5.2 


Hubert Werner - 1948 



Rushing Touchdowns 



1. 



15 Bob Shemonski - 1950 

15 Rick Badanjek - 1984 

14 Ed Vereb - 1955 

14 Louis Carter - 1973 

12 Rick Badanjek - 1985 

11 Lou Gambino - 1947 

11 Charlie Wysocki - 1980 

10 Steve Atkins - 1978 

9 Steve Adkins - 1977 

9 Rick Badanjek - 1982 



PUNTING 


Punts 




1. 


90 


DanDeArmas- 1991 


2. 


83 


Dale Castro - 1979 


3. 


83 


Dale Castro - 1980 


4. 


72 


Greg Fnes - 1969 


5. 


72 


Greg Fnes - 1968 


6. 


70 


Dan DeArmas - 1990 


7. 


67 


John Petronaci - 1971 


8. 


66 


Dale Castro - 1978 


9. 


63 


Darryl Wright • 1987 


10. 


62 Darryl Wright - 1986 


Punting Average 


l. 


42.2 


Phil Wagenheim - 1974 


2. 


41.5 


Dan DeArmas - 1989 


3. 


40.9 


Dale Castro • 1980 


4. 


40.8 


Mike Sochko - 1977 


5. 


40.6 


Darryl Wright - 1987 


6. 


40.4 


Mike Sochko - 1975 




40.4 


Duey Graham - 1970 


8. 


40.2 


Dan DeArmas -1991 


9. 


39.7 


Ed Roth - 1949 


10. 


39.5 


Dan DeArmas - 1990 


KICKING 


Field Goals Attempted 


l. 


26 


Ed Loncar - 1978 


2. 


25 


Steve Mike-Mayer • 1974 


3. 


24 


Steve Mike-Mayer - 1973 


4. 


22 


Jess Atkinson - 1982 




22 


Dan Plocki - 1988 


6. 


21 


Jess Atkinson - 1981 




21 


Dale Castro - 1979 


8. 


20 


Jess Atkinson - 1984 




20 


Mike Sochko - 1975 


10. 


19 


Jess Atkinson - 1983 



Field Goals Made 

1. 17 Jess Atkinson - 1984 

17 Dan Plocki - 1988 

17 Dale Castro - 1979 

4. 16 Jess Atkinson - 1982 

16 Ed Loncar - 1978 

6 15 Jess Atkinson - 1983 

15 Steve Mike-Mayer - 1974 

8. 14 Dan DeArmas - 1990 

9. 12 Jess Atkinson - 1981 

12 Steve Mike-Mayer - 1973 

12 Mike Sochko - 1975 



SCORING 


Points Scored 


1. 102 


Rick Badanjek - 1984 


2 97 


Bob Shemonski - 1950 


3. 96 


Lou Gambino - 1947 


96 


Ed Vereb - 1955 


5. 88 


Jess Atkinson - 1984 


6. 87 


Jess Atkinson - 1982 


7. 84 


Louis Carter - 1973 


8. 79 


Steve Mike-Mayer - 1974 


9. 78 


Dan Plocki - 1988 


10 73 


Jess Atkinson - 1983 


73 


Ed Loncar - 1978 



T OTAL OFFENSE 

Yards 

1. 2,681 DanHenmng- 1986 

2. 2,392 Scott Zolak - 1990 

3. 2,385 Stan Gelbaugh- 1985 

4. 2,290 Boomer Esiason - 1983 

5. 2,231 Boomer Esiason - 1982 

6. 2,139 Neil O'Donnell - 1988 

7. 2,059 Neil O'Donnell - 1989 

8. 1,782 DanHenmng- 1987 

9. 1,689 BobAvellini- 1974 
10. 1,593 Mark Manges - 1976 




Ferrell Edmunds: he contributed over a 
century's worth of receptions in his career. 



DEFENSE 


Tackles 




1. 


188 


Neal Olkewicz - 1978 


2. 


186 


Ted Klaube - 1977 


3. 


180 


Eric Wilson - 1983 


4. 


173 


Harry Walters - 1974 


5. 


172 


Kevm Walker - 1987 


6. 


160 


Eric Wilson - 1984 


7. 


159 


Brian Matera - 1979 


8. 


157 


Brad Can - 1976 


9. 


153 


Mike Jarmolowich - 1991 


10. 


151 


Chuck Faucette - 1986 




151 


Bruce Palmer- 1978 


Sacks 




1. 


13 


Mark Duda - 1982 




13 


Bruce Palmer - 1978 


3. 


12 


Randy White - 1974 




12 


Charles Johnson - 1978 




12 


Bruce Mesner - 1985 


6. 


11 


Mike Corvmo - 1981 




11 


Marlin Van Horn - 1978 


8. 


10 


Gumest Brown - 1981 




10 


Jack Bradford - 1990 


10. 


8 


Ernie Salley - 1975 



1980 

'Alter finishing the regular season with eight 
victories, Maryland was invited to the Tangerine 
Bowl to take on the Florida Gators. It was the 
Terps' seventh bowl appearance in eight years. 

'The 6-3 victory over Villanova marked their 
sixth consecutive opening game victory. 

'Charlie Wysocki led the ACC in rushing for the 
second consecutive year. He also tied an NCAA 
record with 32 carries in the second half against 
Duke. 

'Bob Ward became the first Maryland player 
inducted into the National Football Foundation 
College Hall of Fame. 



1982 

'Maryland sported new red uniforms with white 
lettering, and a matching helmet. 



1983 

'For the second consecutive year, Maryland 
qualified for post season competition as they 
played Tennessee in the Citrus Bowl Dec. 17. 

'Maryland won the ACC title with a 5-3 confer- 
ence record. 

'Senior quarterback Boomer Esiason left his 
mark in the Terrapin record books. He set 
records for: most net yard gained rushing and 
passing (6,081); most total plays rushing and 
passing (1,006); most yards gained passing 
(6,259); most passes attempted (850); most 
passes completed (461); most touchdown passes 
thrown in the regular season (42); and most 
conversion passes thrown (7). 

'Former quarterback Dick Scarbath became the 
second Terrapin inducted in the National Foot- 
ball Foundation College Hall of Fame. 



138 



Terprolific, Top Career Efforts 



PASSING 

Most Passes Attempted 

1. 850 Boomer Esiason (1981-83) 

2. 658 Neil O'DonneU (1987-89) 
3- 641 Dan Henning (1985-87) 

4. 536 Dick Shiner (1961-63) 

5. 509 Scott Zolak (1988-90) 

6. 454 Stan Gelbaugh (1981-85) 

7. 402 Al Neville (1971-73) 

8. 394 Bob Avellini (1972-74) 

9. 367 Alan Pastrana (1966, 68) 
10. 366 Jeff Shugars (1969-71) 

Most Passes Completed 

1. 461 Boomer Esiason (1981-83) 

2. 387 Neil O'DonneU (1987-89) 

3. 353 Dan Henning (1985-87) 
4 287 Dick Shiner (1961-63) 

5. 270 Scott Zolak (1988-90) 

6. 251 Stan Gelbaugh (1981-85) 

7. 231 Bob Avelhni (1972-74) 

8. 217 A Neville (1971-73) 

9. 183 Alan Pastrana (1966, 68) 
10. 180 Larry Dick (1975, 77) 

Most Yards 

1.6,259 Boomer Esiason (1981-83) 

2. 4,984 Neil O'DonneU (1987-89) 

3. 4,560 Dan Henning (1985-87) 

4. 3,659 Stan Gelbaugh (1981-85) 

5. 3,410 Dick Sinner (1961-63) 

6. 3,222 Bob Avellini (1972-74) 

7. 3,124 Scott Zolak (1988-90) 

8. 2,601 Larry Dick (1975, 77) 

9. 2,552 Alan Pastrana (1966, 68) 
10. 2,493 Al Neville (1971-73) 

Completion Percentage 



1. 


.629 


(132-210) 


2. 


.590 


(231-394) 


3. 


.588 


(180-306) 




.588 


(387-658) 


5. 


.582 


(127-218) 


6. 


.553 


(251-454) 


7. 


.551 


(353-641) 


8. 


.547 


(58-106) 


9. 


.542 


(461-850) 



Frank Reich (1983-84) 
Bob Avellini (1972-74) 
Larry Dick (1975, 77) 
Neil O'DonneU (1987-89) 
Dale Betty (1958-60) 
Stan Gelbaugh (1981-85) 
Dan Henning (1985-87) 
Ben Kinard (1973-74) 
Boomer Esiason (1981-83) 



Touchdowns 

1. 42 Boomer Esiason (1981-83) 

2. 26 NeU O'DonneU (1987-89) 

3. 24 Dan Henning (1985-87) 

4. 23 Alan Pastrana (1966, 68) 

5. 22 Jack Scarbath (1950-52) 

6. 21 Dick Shiner (1961-63) 

7. 20 Stan Gelbaugh (1981-85) 

8. 19 Bob Avellini (1972-74) 

9. 17 Al NeviUe (1971-73) 
10. 16 Dale Betty (1958-60) 



RECEIVING 

Receptions 

1 108 Azizuddin Abdur-Ra'oof (1984-87) 

2 106 Barry Johnson (1987-90) 

3 103 Frank Wycheck (1990- ) 

4 101 Ferrell Edmunds (1984-87) 

5. 100 Frank Russell (1972-74) 

6. 97 Greg Hill (1982-84) 

7. 89 Bren Lowery (1986-89) 

8. 83 Vernon Joines (1985-88) 
83 John Tice (1979-82) 

10. 82 Russell Davis (1981-83) 

Yards 

Azizuddin Abdur-Ra'oof (1984-87) 
Greg Hill (1982-84) 
Barry Johnson (1987-90) 
FeneU Edmunds (1984-87) 
James MiUing (1984-87) 
RusseU Davis (1981-83) 
Frank RusseU (1972-74) 
Vernon Joines (1985-88) 
Gary CoUins (1959-61) 
Dean Richards (1975-78) 

Average Per Reception 
(minimum 40 receptions) 

1. 19.1 Billy Van Heusen (1965-67) 

2. 18.6 Lloyd Colteryahn (1950-52) 

3. 18.1 James Muling (1984-87) 

4. 17.7 Greg HiU (1982-84) 

5. 17.5 Azizuddin Abdur-Ra'oof (1984-87) 

6. 17.2 RusseU Davis (1981-83) 

7. 17.1 Bobby Collins (1964-66) 

8. 16.2 FerreU Edmunds (1984-87) 
16.2 Barry Johnson (1987-90) 

10. 15.8 Vmce Kinney (1975-77) 



1. 


1,895 


2. 


1721 




1.721 


4 


1,641 


5. 


1,445 


6. 


1,408 


7. 


1,344 


8. 


1,253 


9. 


1,211 


10 


1,194 



Touchdowns 

1 18 Greg Hill (1982-84) 

2. 12 Gary CoUins (1959-61) 

3. 11 Barry Johnson (1987-90) 

4 10 Azizuddin Abdur-Ra'off (1984-87) 

10 FeneU Edmunds (1984-87) 

6 9 Vernon Jomes ( 1985-88) 

7. 8 RusseU Davis (1981-83) 
8 Walter White (1973-74) 

8 Lou Weidensaul (1950-52) 

10. 7 James Muling (1984-87) 

7 Sean Sullivan (1983-86) 

7 Billy Van Heusen (1965-67) 

7 Darryl Hill (1963-64) 

7 Howie Dare (1954-55, 57) 

RUSHING 
Attempts 

1. 769 Charlie Wysocki (1978-81) 

2. 625 Steve Atkins (1975-78) 

3. 561 Louis Carter (1972-74) 

4. 521 Rick Badanjek (1982-85) 

5. 452 Buly Lovett (1966-68) 

6. 437 Wulie Joyner (1980-83) 
437 Art Seymore (1970-72) 

8. 426 Alvin Blount (1983-86) 

9. 402 Bren Lowery (1986-89) 
10. 339 Alvm Maddox (1975-78) 



Charlie Wysocki (1978-81) 
Steve Atkins (1975-78) 
Rick Badanjek (1982-85) 
Louis Carter (1972-74) 
Alvm Blount (1983-86) 
Willie Joyner (1980-83) 
Buly Lovett (1966-68) 
Alvm Maddox (1975-78) 
Art Seymore (1970-72) 
Bren Lowery (1986-89) 



Yards 


1. 


3,317 


2. 


2,971 


3. 


2,417 


4. 


2,266 


5. 


2,158 


6. 


2,140 


7. 


1.913 


8. 


1,845 


9. 


1,656 


10 


1,611 







Lu Gambino was everything but an average rusher in 1947. 



139 



lific, Top Career Efforts 



Rushing Touchdowns 

1. 46 Rick Badanjek (1982-85) 

2. 31 Steve Atkins (1975-78) 

3. 26 Charlie Wysocki (1978-81) 

4. 25 Louis Carter (1972-74) 
5- 18 Tommy Neal (1983-86) 

18 Bob Shemonski (1950-51) 

7. 17 Ed Vereb (1953-55) 

8. 15 ChetHanulak (1951-53) 

9. 14 AlvinMaddox (1975-78) 
10. 12 Alvin Blount (1983-86) 

PUNTING 

Punts 

1. 268 Dan DeArmas (1988-91) 

2. 224 Dale Castro (1978-80) 

3. 209 Danel] Wright (1984-87) 

4. 169 Mike Sochko (1975-77) 

5. 168 Greg Fries (1968-70) 

6. 142 Howard Humphries (1963-65) 

7. 132 Alan Sadler (1981-83) 

8. 113 Gary Collins (1959-60) 

9. 106 Phil Wagenheim (1973-74) 
10. 100 Billy Van Heusen (1966-67) 



Dan DeArmas (1988-91) 
Dale Castro (1978-80) 
Darrell Wright (1984-87) 
Mike Sochko (1975-77) 
Greg Fries (1968-70) 
Howard Humphries (1963-65) 
Alan Sadler (1982-83) 
Gary Collins (1959-60) 
Phil Wagenheim (1973-74) 
Billy Van Heusen (1965-67) 

Average 

1. 40.7 Phil Wagenheim (1973-74) 

2. 40.4 Duey Graham (1970) 

3. 40.2 Mike Sochko (1975-77) 

4. 40.1 Darrell Wnght (1984-87) 

5. 39.9 Greg Fries (1968-70) 

6. 39.7 Dan DeArmas (1988-91) 

7. 39.6 Billy Van Heusen (1966-67) 

8. 38.8 Alan Sadler (1981-83) 

9. 38.2 Dale Castro (1978-80) 
38.2 BemieFaloney (1951-53) 

KICKING 

Field Goals Attempted 

1. 82 Jess Atkinson (1981-84) 

2. 71 Steve Mike-Mayer (1972-74) 

3. 63 Dan Plocki (1985-88) 

4. 43 Dan DeArmas (1988-91) 

5. 39 Dale Castro (1979-80) 

39 Bernardo Bramson (1964-66) 

7. 36 Ed Loncar (1976-78) 

36 John Hannigan (1961-62) 

9. 28 Mike Sochko (1975-76) 

10. 19 Kambiz Behbahani (1970-71) 



Yards 


1. 


10,627 


2. 


8,548 


3. 


8,389 


4. 


6,789 


5. 


6,696 


6. 


5,290 


7. 


5,125 


8. 


4,205 


9. 


4,138 


10. 


3,957 



Field Goals Made 

1. 60 Jess Atkinson (1981-84) 

2. 47 Dan Plocki (1985-88) 

3. 37 Steve Mike-Mayer (1972-74) 

4. 32 Dan DeArmas (1988-91) 

5. 27 Dale Castro (1979-80) 

6. 22 Ed Loncar (1976-78) 

22 John Hannigan (1961-62) 

8. 18 Bernardo Bramson (1964-66) 

9. 17 Mike Sochko (1975-76) 

10. 12 Kambiz Behbahani (1970-71) 

Scoring 

1. 308 Jess Atkinson (1981-84) 

2. 286 Rick Badanjek (1982-85) 

3. 227 Dan Plocki (1985-88) 

4. 203 Steve Mike-Mayer (1972-74) 

5. 192 Steve Atkins (1975-78) 

6. 162 Louis Carter (1972-74) 

7. 158 Charlie Wysockif 1978-81) 
158 Dan DeArmas (1988-91) 

9. 126 Ed Modzelewski (1949-51) 

10. 121 Dale Castro (1979-80) 

TOTAL OFFENSE 

1. 6,081 Boomer Esiason (1981-83) 

2. 5,060 Neil O'DonneU (1987-89) 

3. 4,483 Dan Henmng (1985-87) 

4. 3,569 Stan Gelbaugh (1981-85) 

5. 3,533 Dick Shiner (1961-63) 

6. 3,423 Charlie Wysocki (1978-81) 

7. 3,285 Bob Avellini (1972-74) 

8. 3,107 Rick Badanjek (1982-85) 

9. 3,062 Steve Atkins (1975-78) 
10. 2,875 Scott Zolak (1988-90) 



DEFENSE 

Tackles 

1. 481 Eric Wilson (1981-84) 

2. 466 Chuck Faucette (1983-86) 

3. 386 Brad Can (1974-77) 

4. 382 Scott Saylor (1987-89) 

5. 351 Bruce Palmer (1976-78) 

6. 347 Mike Corvino (1979-82) 

7. 344 Ted Klaube (1975-77) 

8. 330 Kevin Walker (1985-87) 

9. 304 Mike Jarmolowich ( 1989- ) 
10. 303 Charles Johnson (1975-78) 

Interceptions 

1. 17 Tom Brown (1960-62) 
2 15 Bob Smith (1972-74) 

3. 14 Lendell Jones (1981-83) 

4. 13 Ken Schroy (1972-74) 
13 Bob Sullivan (1963-66) 

6 10 Howard Eubanks (1979-82) 

10 Lloyd Burruss (1976-80) 

10 Ralph Lary (1977-80) 

9. 9 Eric Wilson (1980-84) 

9 Clarence Baldwin (1981-83) 

9 Jim Brechiel (1973-75) 

9 Wally Stainaker (1967-69) 

9 Keeta Covington (1983-86) 

Sacks (1974- ) 

1 24 Mike Corvino (1979-82) 

2. 19 Mark Duda (1979-82) 
19 Bruce Palmer (1976-78) 

19 Charles Johnson (1976-78) 

5. 18 Bruce Mesner (1983-86) 
18 Gumest Brown (1979-82) 

7. 17 Joe Campbell (1973-76) 

8. 15 Jack Bradford (1987-90) 
15 Ernie Salley (1974-77) 

10. 14 Marlin Van Horn (1977-78, 80) 

6 Keeta Covington, 1985 







Hi 



Eric Wilson: led the team in tackles and interceptions in 1984. 



140 



*>i 



'920 



mL\ 



Terprizes 



15C NOVEMBtK 



ELECTION FORECAST 

Democrats will gain 
I never had to scream 

BY BING CROSBY 

exclusive: Nehru talks 



m*s 



X 



J 

/ 



V 



Dick Bielski (41) was the epitome of the Maryland football player, junior Leoma Naughton 
the symbol of the ideal coed in this 1954 Look Magazine preseason cover story. Maryland 
was indeed Number One. The 1985 Sport Magazine cover resurrected the Terrapins as 
Number One in another preseason wrap-up. J.D. Maarleveld and Rick Badanjek smiled for 
the camera. A bowl season followed. 



141 



rizes, Team Awards 



Alvin L. Aubinoe Trophy 

to the unsung hero of the season. 

1956 Al Wharton - Tackle 

1957 Wilbur Main - Center 

1958 Ted Kershner - Back 

1959 Joe Gardi - Tackle 

1960 Leroy Dietrich - Center 

1961 Dick Barlund - End 

1962 Mumis Banner - Halfback 

1963 George Stem - Halfback 

1964 John Kenny - End 

1965 Charles Krahling ■ Center 

1966 Bobby Collins - Back 

1967 Pat Baker - Back 

1968 Rick Carlson - End 

1969 Paul Fitzpatnck - Back 

1970 Robert J. MacBnde - Tackle 

1971 Jeff Shugars • Quarter back 

1972 Ron Kecman - Center 

1973 Ken Scott • Tackle 

1974 Frank Russell - End 

1975 Jim Richey • Tackle 

1976 BobRaba-End 

1977 Don Rhodes - Center 

1978 Mike Simon - Center 

1979 Richard Cummins - Guard 

1980 Scott Fanz • Tackle 

1981 Todd Wnght • Center 

1982 Frank Kolencik - Defensive Guard 
John Nash - Back 

Doug Miller - Center 

1983 Tyrone Furman - Guard 

1984 Bill Rogers • Tight End 

1985 George Colton • Guard 

1986 Sean Sullivan - End 

1987 Robert Klein - Guard 
Sean Scott - Linebacker 

1988 Matt D'Amico - Linebacker 
Dan Plocki • Kicker 

1989 Dean Green • Wide Receiver 
Mark Walsh - Defensive End 

1990 Doug Stump - Running Back 

1991 Greg Hines - Lmebacker 

Anthony C. Nardo 
Memorial Trophy 

to the best football lineman of the year. 

1947 Pat McCarthy - Guard 

1948 Gene Kinney - Tackle 

1950 Bob Ward - Guard 

1951 Bob Ward - Guard 

1952 William Maletzky - Guard 

1953 Stan Jones • Tackle 

1954 Bob Pellegrini - Guard 

1955 Mike Sandusky - Tackle 

1956 Al Wharton • Tackle 

1957 Don Healy • Tackle 

1958 Fred Cole • Tackle 

1959 Tom Gunderman - Guard 

1960 Gary Collins • End 

1961 Bill Kirchiro - Tackle 

1962 Dave Crossan - Tackle 

1963 Olaf Drozdov - Tackle 

1964 Fred Joyce • Guard 

1965 Dick Absher - End 

1966 Dick Absher • End 

1967 Jim Lavrusky • Linebacker 

1968 Ron Pearson - End 

1969 Peter Mattia ■ Tackle 



Bob Beall, Tommy Marcos 
Trophy 

to the best football lineman of the year. 

1970 Guy M. Roberts - End 

1971 Dennis O'Hara • End 

1972 Paul Vellano • Guard 

1973 Randy White • Tackle 

1974 Randy White - Tackle 

1980 Eric Sievers - Tight End 

1981 Dave Pacella - Tackle 

1982 Dave Pacella - Tackle 

1983 Ron Solt - Guard 

1984 Kevm Glover • Center 

1985 J. D. Maarleveled - Tackle 

1986 Billy Hughes • Center 

1987 Billy Hughes • Center 

1988 Mark Agent - Center 

1989 Mike Kiselak - Guard 

1990 Clarence Jones - Tackle 

1991 Mitch Suplee - Center 

Ray Krouse Memorial 
Award 

to most valuable senior. 

1972 Ron Kecman - Center 

1974 Randy White • Defensive Tackle 

1975 John Schultz • Wmgback 

1976 Tun Wilson - Fullback 

1977 Ted Haube • Guard 

1978 Neal Olkewicz • Lmebacker 

1979 Bnan Matera - Lmebacker 

1980 Lloyd Burruss - Defensive Halfback 

1981 Greg Vanderhout- Defensive Guard 

1982 John Tice - Tight End 

1983 Boomer Esiason - Quarterback 

1984 Eric Wilson - Lmebacker 

1985 Stan Gelbaugh • Quarterback 

1986 Chuck Faucette - Lmebacker 

1987 Kevm Walker - Lmebacker 

1988 Dan Plocki - Kicker 

1989 Neil O'Donnell • Quarterback 
Scott Saylor • Linebacker 

1990 Scott Zolak - Quarterback 

1991 Larry Webster - Defensive Tackle 

The Teke Trophy 

to the student who during his four years 
at the University has rendered the 
greatest service to football. 

(Became the Tenapm Club Award 
in 1975J 

1949 John Idzik -Back 

1950 John Idzik - Back 

1951 Bob Ward • Guard 

1952 Ed Fullerton • Back 

1953 Bernie Faloney • Back 

1954 John Irvine - Center 

1955 Bob Pellegrini • Center 

1956 Mike Sandusky • Tackle 

1957 Gene Alderton - Center 

1958 Bob Rusevlyan • Back 

1959 Kurt Schwarz • Tackle 

1960 Vincent Scott - End 

1961 Gary Collins End 

1962 Tom Brown - Halfback 

1963 Bob Burton • Halfback 

1964 Olaf Drozdov • Tackle 

1965 George Stem - Back 

1966 Dick Absher • End 

1967 Lou Stickel • Back 

1968 Billy Lovett - Fullback 

1969 Kenneth B. Dutton • Back 

1970 Peter Mattia - Tackle 



1971 Tommy Miller - Back 

1972 Don Ratliff - End 

1973 Paul Vellano - Guard 

1974 Randy White ■ Tackle 

1975 LeRoy Hughes • End 

1976 BobRaba-End 

1977 Brad Can - Linebacker 

1978 Dean Richards - End 

1979 James Shaffer - End 

1980 Lloyd Burruss - Halfback 

1981 Charlie Wysocki - Tailback 

1982 Mike Corvino - Defensive Guard 

1983 Boomer Esiason - Quarterback 

1984 Eric Wilson - Linebacker 

1985 Rick Badanjek - Fullback 

1986 Chuck Faucette - Lmebacker 

1987 Ferrell Edmunds - Tight End 

1988 Dan Plocki - Kicker 

1989 Mark Agent - Center 

1990 Barry Johnson - Wide Receiver 

1991 Larry Webster - Defensive Tackle 

Terps honored by the 
MClub 

A.V. WILLIAMS AWARD 

(Outstanding and conspicuous 
sportsmanship) 

1955 Ronnie Waller, Football 

1956 Lynn Beightol, Football 
Jack Davis, Football 

1957 Howard B. Dare, Jr., Football 

1958 Robert Rusevlyan, Football 

1959 Allen J. Bunge, Basketball 

1960 Dale Betty, Football 

1961 Donald Brown, Football 

1962 Clayton A Beardmore, Lacrosse 

1963 Samuel G. Bossert, Wrestling 

1964 Robert J Kopmsky, Wrestlmg 

1965 Donald Dunphy, Swimming 

1966 Frank Costello, Track 

1967 Robert C. Karch, Wrestling 

1968 Roland E. Merritt, Track 

1969 David C. Reiss, Track 

1970 John Baker, Track 

1971 James F. Norns, Baseball 

1972 Vince L. Struble, Track 

1973 Albert A. Neville, Football 

1974 Tyrone Neal, Wrestling 

1975 LeRoy D. Hughes, Football 

1976 Robert W. Raba, Football 
Eugene F. Ochap, Football 

1977 Bradley S. Can, Football 

1978 Dean Richards, Football 

1979 James K. Shafer, Football 

1980 Eric S. Sievers, Football 

1981 Brian J. Riendeau, Football 

1982 David W. Pacella, Football 

1983 Boomer Esiason, Football 

1984 Enc W. Wilson, Football 

1985 Scott B Schankweiler, Football 

1986 Lewis 1. Askew, Jr., Football 

1987 Robert Klein, Football 

1988 Chad Sydnor, Football 

1989 Bren Lowery, Football 

1990 Barry Johnson, Football 

1991 Lubo Zizakovic, Football 



JAMES M. "JIM" TATUM 
MEMORIAL AWARD 

(Lineman of the year) 

1959 Kurt A. Schwarz 

1960 Thomas E. Sankovich 

1961 Bill Kirchiro 

1962 David H. Crossan 

1963 Olaf A. Drozdov 

1964 Larry Bagranoff 

1965 Larry Bagranoff 

1966 Thomas J. Cichowski 

1967 TomMyslmski 

1968 Thomas A. Plevin 

1969 Peter A. Mattia 

1970 Peter A. Mattia 

1971 Guy Roberts 

1972 Paul E. Vellano 

1973 Randy L. White 

1974 Randy L. White 

1975 Manon Koprowski 
Paul J. Divito 

1976 Joseph P. Campbell 

1977 Theodore J. Klaube 

1978 Charles A. Johnson 

1979 Kervin D. Wyatt 

1980 Edward J. Gall, Jr. 

1981 Gregory A. Vanderhout 

1982 MarkD. Duda 

1983 Ronald M. Solt 

1984 Kevin P. Glover 

1985 Leonard A. Lynch 

1986 Bruce M. Mesner 

1987 Robert Arnold 

1988 Warren Powers 

1989 Mike Kiselak 

1990 Jack Bradford 
Rick Fleece 

1991 Larry Webster 

GEORGE C. COOK 
MEMORIAL AWARD 

(Highest academic average) 

1962 Don White, Quarterback 

1963 David D. Nardo, End 

1964 David D. Nardo, End 

1965 Bruce Sprmger, Back 

1966 Larry Bagranoff, Tackle 

1967 Charles Tme, Tackle 

1968 Ralph H. Fnedgen, Guard 

1969 Ralph H. Fnedgen, Guard 
William L. Grant, End 

1970 Patnck Burke, Guard 

1971 Stephen D. Fromang, Tackle 

1972 Stephen D. Fromang, Tackle 

1973 James J. Martell, End 

1974 Albert A. Neville, End 

1975 Kim R. Hoover, End 

1976 Jonathan E. Claiborne, Safety 

1977 Jonathan E. Claiborne, Safety 

1978 Joseph M. Muffler, Defensive end 

1979 Ralph L. Lary III. Safety 

1980 Ralph L. Lary III, Safety 

1981 Mark Sobel. End 

1982 Gregory E. Harraka, Center 

1983 Gregory E. Harraka. Guard 

1984 Gregory E Harraka, Guard 

1985 Dolph M. Tokarczyk, Tight End 

1986 Richard D. Shure, Fullback 

1987 Richard D. Shure, Fullback 

1988 John Rugg, Guard 

1989 Mark Agent, Center 

1990 Ken Oberle. Guard 

1991 Mitch Suplee, Center 



142 



Terprizes, Coaches Awards 



Terp Coaches Awards 

OFFENSIVE BACK 

1952 Chester Hanulak - HB 

1953 Ralph Felton - FB 

1954 Ron Waller -HB 

1955 Ed Vereb -HB 

1956 Fred Hamilton • HB 

1957 Bob Rusevlyan - QB 

1958 Bob Rusevlyan ■ QB 

1959 Jim Joyce ■ FB 

1960 Dale Betty - QB 

1961 Dick Shiner -QB 

1962 Tom Brown - HB 

1963 Dick Shiner - QB 

1964 Tom Hickey - TB 

1965 Walt Marciniak - FB 

1966 Alan Pastrana - QB 

1967 Billy Lovett - FB 

1968 Billy Lovett - FB 

1969 Tom Miller - FB 

1970 Art Seymore - HB 

1971 Al Neville - QB 

1972 Bob Avelhni - QB 

1973 Louis Carter - TB 

1974 Louis Carter - TB 

1975 John Schultz - WB 

1976 Mark Manges - QB 

1977 Larry Dick - QB 
George Scott - HB 

1978 Steve Atkins - TB 

1979 Charlie Wysocki - TB 

1980 Charlie Wysocki - TB 

1981 Boomer Esiason - QB 

1982 Boomer Esiason - QB 
Willie Joyner - RB 

1983 Willie Joyner - RB 

1984 Rick Badanjek - FB 

1985 Rick Badanjek - FB 

1986 Tommy Neal - RB 

1987 Bren Lowery - RB 

1988 Ricky Johnson - TB 

1989 Ricky Johnson - TB 

1990 Scot Zolak - QB 

1991 Troy Jackson - RB 



OFFENSIVE LINEMAN 

Tom Cosgrove - C 
Marty Crytzer - E 
Jack Bowersox - G 
Russell Dennis -E 
Al Wharton - T 
Tom Gunderman -G 
Fred Cole - T 
Tom Gunderman - G 
Bob Hacker - C 
Roger Shoals - T 
Roger Shoals - T 
Gene Feher - C 
Joe Frattaroli - G 
Matt Arbutina - T 
Tom Cichowski - T 
Ron Pearson - G 
Bill Meister -G 
Bill Meister - G 
Pat Burke - G 
Tim Brannon - G 
Tim Brannon - G 
Bart Purvis - G 
Stan Rogers - T 
Marion Koprowski - T 
Ed Fulton - G 
Tom Schick - T 
Mike Yeates - G 

Eric Sievers - TE 
Kerwin Wyatt - G 
Kewin Wyatt - G 
Eric Siever - TE 
Dave Pacella - T 
Dave Pacella - T 

Ron Solt - G 
Kevin Glover - C 
J. D. Maarleveld - T 
Billy Hughes - C 
Billy Hughes - C 

Mark Agent - C 
Mike Kiselak - G 
Clarence Jones - T 
Mitch Suplee - C 



1984 

'The Terps recorded the greatest comeback in NCAA Division IA football 
history, coming from a 31-0 halttime deficit to score 42 in the second half to 
beat the sixth ranked and defending national champion Miami Hurricanes 
42-40, Nov. 10 in the Orange Bowl. 

'Maryland won its second consecutive ACC crown. After losing the 
opening two games, the Terps won seven in a row and nine of their last ten. 

'Mary/and avenged its Citrus Bowl loss the previous season to Tennessee 
with a 28-27 victory over the Volunteers in the Sun Bowl on Dec. 22. The 
"comeback kids" were down 21-0 at half but outscored the Tennessee 28-6 
in the second hall. It was the Terps' third consecutive bowl appearance. 

'Maryland was the only team in the nation to play the last three national 
champions and came away with two wins and a one point loss. They lost 
to Penn State (1982) 24-25, beat Miami 42-40 (1983) and conquered Clemson 
(1981) 41-23. 

'Rick Badanjek set a single season Terp record in points scored (102), and 
equalled the touchdown marJt (16). 

'Greg Hill set Maryland records for most pass receptions in a season, 
catching 51 passes for 820 yards. 



DEFENSIVE BACK 

Ed Fullerton - HB 
Dick Nolan - HB 
Joe Horning - HB 
Lynn Beightol - QB 
Bob Rusevlyan - QB 
Bob Layman - HB 
Jim Joyce - FB 
Dwayne Fletcher - HB 
Jim Davidson - HB 
Tom Brown - HB 
Joe Hrezo - LB 
Eernie Anzzi - HB 
Bob Sullivan - HB 
Fred Cooper - HB 
Lou Stickel - HB 
Bob Colbert - HB 
Kenny Dutton - HB 
Tony Greene - S 
Tony Greene - S 
Larry Marshall - HB 
Bob Smith - S 
Harry Walters - LB 
Harry Walters - LB 
Kevin Benson - LB 
Brad Carr - LB 

Brad Carr - LB 

Neal Olkewicz - LB 



Brian Matera - LB 
Lloyd Burruss - HB 
Darnell Dailey - LB 
Bill McFadden - HB 

Clarence Baldwin - HB 
Al Covington - S 
Al Covington - S 
Keeta Covington - CB 
Chad Sydnor - CB 
Chad Sydnor - CB 
Eddie Tomlin - S 
Glenn Page - LB 
Mike Jarmolowich - LB 



DEFENSIVE LINEMAN 

John Alderman - E 
Bob Morgan - T 
Tom McLuckie - G 
Mike Sandusky - T 
Mike Sandusky - T 
Rod Breedlove - G 
Ben Scotti - E 
Rod Breedlove - G 
Tom Sankovich - T 
Dave Crossan - T 
Walter Rock - G 
Joe Ferrante - G 
Olaf Drozdov - T 
Larry Bagranoff - T 
Jim Lavrusky - LB 
Mike Grace - G 
Henry Gareis - E 
Peter Mattia - T 
Guy Roberts - E 
Chris Cowdrey - E 
Paul Vellano - G 
Randy White - T 
Randy White - T 
Paul Divito - G 
Joe Campbell - T 

Ted Klaube - G 

Charles Johnson - T 

Bruce Palmer - G 
James Shaffer - E 
Ed Gall - T 
Greg Vanderhout - G 
Mark Duda - T 

Pete Koch - T 
Bruce Mesner - G 
Bruce Mesner - G 
Ted Chapman - T 

Warren Powers - DT 
Larry Webster - DT 
Rick Fleece - G 
Larry Webster - DT 



1985 

'Maryland squeezed the Orangemen in a 35-18 Cherry Bowl victory at the 

Pontiac Silverdome, Dec. 21. 

'Offensive tackle J.D. Maarleveld was selected to First-Team Ail-American 

by the American Coaches Association, United Press International and the 

Sporting News. 

'Quarterback Stan Gelbaugh set the Terp mark for most net yards gained 

rushing and passing in a single game as he was responsible for 368 yards vs. 

Clemson. 



1986 

'Defensive guard Bruce Mesner made the AH- ACC team for the third year in 
a row. 

'Quarterback Dan Henning surpassed Boomer Esiason in single season 
records for total offense (2681 yds), yards passing (2725) and pass comple- 
tions (196). 



1987 

'Azizuddin Abdur-Ra 'oof Zizudin hroire Terp receiving records for most 
catches and total yards in a career, pulling down 108 catches for 1,895 yards. 



143 



rp All-America 



ASSOCIATED PRESS 

First Team 

1950 Bob Ward - G 

1951 Bob Ward - G 

1952 Jack Scarbath - QB 
Dick Modzelewski - DT 

1953 Stan Jones - T 
1955 Bob Pellegrini - C 

1973 Randy White - DT 

1974 Randy White - DT 

Second Team 

1923 Bill Supplee - E 
1928 Gerald Snyder - FB 
1949 Ray Krouse • T 
1951 Dick Modzelewski - T 
Ed Modzelewski - FB 

1953 Bemie Faloney - QB 

1954 Bill Walker -E 
1961 Gary Collins - E 
1976 Joe Campbell - DT 
1984 Enc Wilson - LB 

Third Team 

1955 Ed Vereb - HB 
1973 Paul VeUano - DG 



Honorable Mention 

AH -Americans 

(A P & UPI) 

1931 Jess Krajcovic - G 

1934 Norwood Sothoron - FB 
Vic Willis - E 

Bill Guckeyson - HB 
Ed Minion - T 

1935 Bill Guckeyson - HB 
Vic Willis - E 

1936 Bill Guckeyson - HB 

1937 Jim Meade -HB 
1940 Bob Smith - C 

Ralph Albarano - T 
1942 Tommy Mont - QB 
Paul Flick - C 

1947 Lou Gambino - HB 
Gene Kinney - C 

1948 Ray Krouse -T 
Elmer Wmgate - E 

1950 Ed Modzelewski • FB 

1951 Jack Scarbath - QB 
Tom Cosgrove • C 
Dave Cianelli - FB 
Joe Petruzzo - HB 

1952 Stan Jones - T 

1953 Chet Hanulak • HB 
Ralph Felton - FB 
Bui Walker • E 
John Irvine - C 
Bob Morgan • T 



FOOTBALL NEWS 

First Team 

1984 Enc Wilson -LB 

INTERNATIONAL NEWS 
SERVICE 

(now merged as UPI) 
First Team 

1951 Bob Ward - G 

1952 Jack Scarbath - QB 
Dick Modzelewski - T 

1953 Stan Jones - T 
Bemie Faloney - QB 

1955 Bob Pellegrini - C 
Second Team 
1953 Chet Hanulak - HB 
1955 Ed Vereb - HB 

THE SPORTING NEWS 

First Team 

1951 Bob Ward -G 

1952 Jack Scarbath - QB 
Dick Modzelewski - T 



1953 Stan Jones -T 

Bemie Faloney - QB 

1955 Bob Pellegrini - C 
Mike Sandusky-T 

1974 Randy White • DT 
Steve Mike-Mayer - K 

1976 Joe Campbell - DT 

1979 Dale Castro -K 

1984 Kevm Glover - C 

1985 J. D. Maarleveld - OT 

Second Team 

1983 Boomer Esiason - QB 
Ron Solt -OG 

UNITED PRESS 

First Team 

1951 Bob Ward -G 

1952 Jack Scarbath - QB 
Dick Modzelewski - DT 

1953 Stan Jones - T 
1955 Bob Pellegrini - C 
1961 Gary Collins - E 



1974 Randy White - DT 
1979 Dale Castro - K 
1985 J. D. Maarleveld - OT 

Second Team 

1950 Bob Ward -G 

1951 Ed Modzelewski - FB 
1953 Bernie Faloney - QB 
1955 Mike Sandusky - T 

Bill Walker - E 

1973 Paul Vellano - DG 
1976 Joe Campbell - DT 
Third Team 

1951 Dick Modzelewski - DT 
1955 Ed Vereb - HB 

TIME MAGAZINE 

First Team 

1974 Randy White - DT 
Steve Mike-Mayer - K 



1954 Dick Bielski - FB 
Ronnie Waller - HB 
Jack Bowersox - G 
John Irvine - C 
Bill Walker - E 
Bob Pellegrini - G 
George Palahumk - G 



1955 Mike Sandusky - T 
Jack Davis - G 

Frank Tamburello - QB 
Ed Heunng - T 

1956 Mike Sandusky - T 
Jack Davis - G 
Gene Alderton - C 



1957 Rod Breedlove - G 
Ed Cooke - E 
Gene Alderton - C 

1958 Rod Breedlove - G 
Fred Cole - T 




Ail-Americas Mike Sandusky, Ed Vareb, Bob PeUigrini and BUI Walker led the 1955 undefeated squad. 



144 



All-Terp All-America 







£^2 




f* ^^^^ 


** ^ 


- 


^^r^ 


A 





Chet "The Jet" Hanulak was one third of the All-America backfield 
in the 1953 Championship season. 



1959 Rod Breedlove • G 
Jim Joyce • FB 
Gary Collins - E 
Tom Gunderman ■ G 
Kurt Schwarz - T 

1960 Gary Collins • E 
Dale Betty • QB 

1961 Bob Hacker ■ C 

1962 Dick Shiner ■ QB 
Walter Rock • G 
Roger Shoals - T 
Tom Brown - HB 

1965 Bob Sullivan ■ DB 

1969 Ralph Sonntag - OT 

1970 Guy Roberts - DE 

1972 Paul Vellano - DG 
Bob Smith ■ DB 

1973 Randy White • DT 
Louis Carter - HB 
Bob Smith - DB 

1974 Louis Carter - HB 
Steve Mike-Mayer - K 
Stan Rogers - OT 
Bob Smith • DB 
Hany Walters - LB 
Walter White - TE 

1975 LeRoy Hughes • DE 
Jim Brechbiel - DB 
Kevin Benson - LB 
Paul Divito - DG 



1976 Brad Carr - LB 
Ed Fulton - OG 
Mark Manges - QB 
Ken Roy - DB 
Tom Schick-OT 
Larry Seder - DG 

1977 TedKlaube-DG 

1978 Steve Atkins - TB 
Charles Johnson - DT 
Bruce Palmer - DG 
Lloyd Burruss - DB 

1979 Charlie Wysocki • TB 
Larry Stewart • OT 

1980 Charlie Wysocki • TB 
Lloyd Burruss • DB 
Marlin Van Horn - DG 

1982 Jess Atkinson • K 
Mark Duda- OT 
Boomer Esiason • QB 
Dave Pacella - OT 
John Tice - TE 

1983 Jess Atkinson • K 
Clarence Baldwin - DB 
Boomer Esiason • QB 
Pete Koch • DT 

Ron Solt - OG 
Enc Wilson - LB 

1984 Rick Badanjek - RB 
Al Covington • DB 
Ferrell Edmunds - TE 
Chuck Faucette • LB 
Kevin Glover • C 
Greg Hill - WR 

Len Lynch - OG 
Bruce Mesner - DG 



1985 Rick Badanjek - FB 
Al Covington • DB 
Keeta Covington ■ DB 
Ferrell Edmunds ■ TE 
Chuck Faucette - LB 
Len Lynch - OG 

J. D. Maarleveld - OT 
Bruce Mesner • DG 

1986 Chuck Faucette • LB 
Bruce Mesner - DG 
Keeta Covington • DB 
Ferrell Edmunds • TE 

1987 Ferrell Edmunds • TE 
Kevin Walker ■ LB 

1988 Matt D'Amico - LB 
Ben Jefferson - OT 
Dan Plocki • K 
Warren Powers - DT 
Scott Saylor - LB 



American Football 
Coaches Association 

First Team 

1961 Gary Collins - E 

1973 Paul Vellano - DG 

1974 Randy White ■ DT 
1976 Joe Campbell - DT 
1985 J.D Maarleveld - QT 

Football Writers 
Association 

First Team 
1961 Gary Collins ■ E 
1974 Randy White • DT 
1976 Joe Campbell - DT 
1979 Dale Castro • K 




Gary Collins caught many key passes for the Terps and was 
voted All-America in 1961. 



145 



Azizuddin Abdur-Ra'oof 


WR 


Dick Absher 


LB-K 


John Alderton 


DE 


Steve Adkins 


RB 


O'Brien Alston 


LB 


Jess Atkinson 


K 


Bob Avellini 


QB 


Rick Badanjek 


FB 


Dick Bielski 


FB-TE-K 


Alvin Blount 


RB 


Rod Breedlove 


LB 


Brooke Brewer 


HB 


Donald Brown 


DB 


JB Brown 


DB 


Tom Brown 


S 


Lloyd Burruss 


S 


Harry Butsko 


LB 


Joe Campbell 


DE 


Louis Carter 


RB 


Ted Chapman 


DL 


Tom Chichowski 


T 


Fred Cole 


G 


Gary Collins 


FL-P 


Lloyd Colteryahn 


E 


George Colton 


G 


Ed Cooke 


DE 


Jim Corcoran 


QB 


Dave Crossan 


C 


Dave D'Addio 


RB 


Matt D'Amico 


LB 


Jack Davis 


G 


Mark Duda 


DT 


Ferrell Edmunds 


TE 


Boomer Esiason 


QB 


Chuck Faucette 


LB 


Ralph Felton 


LB 


Andy Fletcher 


FB 


Ed Fullerton 


DB 


Ed Fulton 


G 



Kansas City (1988-89) 

Washington (1967), Atlanta (1967-68), 

New Orleans (1969-71), 

Philadelphia (1972) 

Pittsburgh (1953) 

Green Bay (1979-81) 

Indianapolis Colts (1988- ) 

NY Giants (1985), St. Louis 

(1985), Washington (1986-87) 

Chicago Bears (1975-84), NY Jets (1984) 

Washington (1986) 

Philadelphia (1955-59), Dallas (1960-61), 

Baltimore (1962-63) 

Dallas (1987) 

Washington (1960-64), 

Pittsburgh (1965-67) 

Cleveland (1921), Akron (1922) 

Miami (1986), San Diego(1986) 

Miami (1989-91) 

Green Bay (1964-68), Washington (1969) 

Kansas City (1981-91), Denver (1992- ) 

Washington (1963) 

New Orleans (1977-78), Oakland 

(1979-81) 

Oakland (1975), Tampa Bay (1976-78) 

L.A. Raiders (1987) 

Denver (1967-68) 

LA Chargers (1960) 

Cleveland (1962-71) 

Baltimore (1954-56) 

New England (1987) 

Chicago Bears (1958), Philadelphia 

(1958), Baltimore (1959), NY Titans 

(1960-62), NY Jets (1963), Denver 

(1964-65), Miami (1966-67) 

Boston (1968) 

Washington (1965-69) 

Detroit (1984) 

Cincinnati (1989) 

Boston (1960) 

St. Louis (1983-85) 

Miami (1988- ) 

Cincinnati (1984- ) 

San Diego (1987- ) 

Washington (1954-60), Buffalo (1961-62) 

Buffalo (1920) 

Pittsburgh (1953) 

LA Rams (1978), Buffalo (1979) 





Neil O'Donnell's future looks bright after starting for the 
Pittsburgh Steelers last season. 



Ed Vereb, seen here against Oklahoma in the 1955 Orange Bowl, 
played for the Washington Redskins in 1960. 



Lou Gambino 
Stan Gelbaugh 
O'Neil Glenn 
Kevin Glover 
Tony Greene 
Chet Hanulak 
Don Healy 

Bo Hickey 
Ben Jefferson 
Rick Jennings 

Barry Johnson 
Charles Johnson 
Vemon Joines 
Clarence Jones 
Stan Jones 

Vince Kinney 
Bill Kirchiro 
Pete Koch 

Ray Krouse 



Pete Ladygo 
John Lookabaugh 
J.D. Maarleveld 
Mark Manges 
Larry Marshall 



Jim Meade 
Bruce Mesner 
Steve Mike-Mayer 



James Milling 
Charlie Mills 
Stan Mills 



HB 

QB 

OT 

C 

CB 

HB 

T 

RB 
OT 
WR 

WR 
NT 
WR 
OT 
G-T-DT 

WR 

G 

DE 

DT 



G 

E 

T 

QB 

KR-DB 



FB 
DT 
K 



WR 
FB 
HB-E 



Baltimore (1948-49) 

Buffalo (1986-89), Cincinnati (1990- ) 

New England Patriots (1991- ) 

Detroit (1985- ) 

Buffalo (1971-79) 

Cleveland (1954, 1957) 

Chicago (1958-59), Dallas (1960-61), 

Buffalo (1962) 

Denver (1967) 

Indianapolis (1989) 

Oakland (1976-77), Tampa Bay 

(1977), San Francisco (1977) 

Denver Broncos (1991- ) 

Green Bay (1979-80, 1983) 

Cleveland (1989), Denver (1991- ) 

NY Giants (1991- ) 

Chicago Bears (1954-65), 

Washington (1966) 

Denver (1978-79) 

Baltimore (1962) 

Cincinnati (1984), Kansas City (1985-8 

L.A. Raiders (1989- ) 

NY Giants (1951-55), Detroit (1956-57), 

Baltimore (1958-59), 

Washington (1960) 

Pittsburgh (1952, 1954) 

Washington (1946-47) 

Tampa Bay (1986-87) 

St. Louis (1978) 

Kansas City (1972-73). 

Minnesota (1974), Philadelphia 

(1974-77), LA Rams (1978) 

Washington (1939-40) 

Buffalo (1987- ) 

San Francisco (1975-76), Detroit 

(1977), New Orleans (1978), 

Baltimore (1979-80) 

Atlanta (1988-91), NY Giants (1991- ) 

Buffalo (1920) 

Akron (1924) 



146 



ipeline 



Dick Modzelewski 



Ed Modzelewski 
Tommy Mont 
Bob Morgan 

Joe Moss 
Chip Myrtle 
Ed Nickla 
Dick Nolan 

Jack Norris 
Neal Olkewicz 
Dave Pacella 
Al Pastrana 
Bob Pellegrini 

Phil Perlo 

Dan Plocki 
Warren Powers 
Rob Raba 

Don Ratliff 
Frank Reich 
Guy Roberts 

Walter Rock 

Stan Rogers 
Mike Sandusky 
Jack Scarbath 
Ken Schroy 
John Schultz 
Ben Scotti 



DT 



FB 
QB 
T 

T 
LB 
G 
DB 

E 

LB 

G-C 

QB 

LB 

LB 
K 

DE 
TE 

DE 
QB 
LB 



T 

T-G 

QB 

S 

WR 

DB 



Washington (1953-54), Pittsburgh 

(1955), NY Giants (1956-63), 

Cleveland (1964-66) 

Pittsburgh (1952), Cleveland (1955-56) 

Washington (1947-49) 

Chicago Cardinals (1954), 

Washington (1954) 

Washington (1952) 

Denver (1967-72), San Diego (1974) 

Chicago (1959) 

NY Giants (1954-57; 1959-61), 

Chicago Cardinals (1958), Dallas (1962) 

Staten Island (1932) 

Washington (1979-89) 

Philadelphia (1984) 

Denver (1969-70) 

Philadelphia (1956; 1958-61), 

Washington (1962-65) 

Houston (1960) 

Cleveland (1989) 

Denver (1989) 

NY Jets (1977-79), Baltimore 

(1980).Washrngton (1981) 

Philadelphia (1975) 

Buffalo (1985- ) 

Houston (1972-75), Atlanta (1976), 

Miami (1977) 

San Francisco (1963-67), 

Washington (1968-73) 

Denver (1975) 

Pittsburgh (1957-65) 

Washington (1953-54), Pittsburgh (1956) 

NY Jets (1977-84) 

Denver (1976-78) 

Washington (1959-61), 

Philadelphia (1962-63), 

San Francisco (1964) 





Scott Zolak: led the Terps to the 1990 Independence Bowl on his 
way to joining Maryland's long list of NFL quarterbacks as he 
was selected in 1991 by the New England Patriots. 

Dick Shiner QB Washington (1964-66), Cleveland 

(1967), Pittsburgh (1968-69), NY 
Giants (1970), Atlanta (1971, 1973), 
New England (1973-74) 

Roger Shoals T Cleveland (1963-64), Detroit (1965-70), 

Denver (1971) 

Eric Sievers TE San Diego (1981-88). 

New England (1989- ) 

Irvin Smith DB N Y Jets (1989-90). Miami (1991- ) 

Jerry Snyder HB NY Giants (1929). Staten Island (1930) 

Ron Solt G Indianapolis (1984-88). Philadelphia 

(1988- ) 

Chad Sydnor DB Chicago (1989) 

John Tice TE New Orleans (1983- ) 

MikeTice TE Seattle (1981-88). Washington (1989- ) 

Steve Trimble DB Denver (1981-83) 

Billy Van Heusen SEP Denver (1968-76) 

Ed Vereb HB Washington (1960) 

Kevin Walker LB Cincinnati (1988- ) 

Ron Waller HB-KR LA Rams (1955-58), LA Chargers (1960) 

Randy White DT-LB Dallas (1975-88) 

Walter White TE Kansas City (1975-79) 

Eric Wilson LB Buffalo (1985- ) 

Tim Wilson RB-TE Houston (1977-82), New Orleans (1983-84) 

Elmer Wingate DE Baltimore (1953) 

John Wright FB Baltimore (1947) 

Kervin Wyatt LB NY Giants (1980) 

Scott Zolak QB New England Patriots (1991- ) 



Mike Sandusky was a dominating tackle 
from 1957-65. 



ittsburgh Steelers 





1992 NFL DRAFT 


Dan DeAnnas 


- Kansas City (Free Agent) 


Derek Steele - 


Indianapolis (7th Round) 


Gene Thomas 


• Chicago (Free Agent) 


Larry Webster 


- Miami (3rd Round) 


Lubo Zizakovk 


- Chicago (Free Agent) 



147 




If a single symbol reflects football greatness at Maryland it is Jim Tatum and bis 1950s juggernaut. Five of the six first 
team Associated Press All-Americans to play at Maryland played between 1950 and 1955. The coach is joined in this 
collage that uses the 1951 Sugar Bowl Championship Trophy as its centerpoint by the Modzelewski brothers, Dick and Ed 
(lower left), Bob Ward (28) and Jack Scarbath (62). There were many, many other excellent athletes in this era, but it was 
Ward who became the first National Lineman of the Year at the school and first consensus All-America. It was Scarbath 
who supplied the quarterbacking leadership that led to so much greatness. It was Big Mo and Little Mo from Western 
Pennsylvania who epitomized the toughness of Maryland football. In its first 100 years, Maryland was entitled to only one 
era like Tatum's. Most schools get none. 



148 



Jim Tatum 



By Frank Bertucci 

The eight-column banner head- 
line across the top of the front 
page of The Washington Post of 
,; Jan. 9, 1956 read: 

"Tatum Goes to North 
Carolina." 

With two subheads: "42 Year- 
Old Coach Posted Record of 73- 
15-4, Had Five Bowl Teams," "Jim 
Leaves Maryland, Signs Pact for 
10 Years" 

At the top of that front page 
was this tag for another story: 
"Ike Hints at Tentative Decision" 

Maybe Jim Tatum outhead 
lined The President of the United 
States because he had made his 
decision, while Mr. Eisenhower 
wasn't making his decision to run 
for re-election public yet. Or 
maybe Jim Tatum, and his Mary- 
land football teams of the early 
1950s were really The Big Story 
around the Na tion's Capital. 

In a brief time as a college foot- 
ball head coach, one season at 
North Carolina (1942, 5-2-2), one 
at Oklahoma (1946, 8-3, Gator 
Bowl victory over North Carolina 
State), nine years at Maryland 
(1947-55,73-15-4,2-2-1 in bowl 
games), Jim Tatum had become a 
coaching legend. Indeed, if he had 
lived longer than 46 years, and 
coached past those last three 
years at North Carolina (14-15-1), 
he may have been remembered as 
vividly as the man who replaced 
him at Oklahoma (Bud Wilkinson) 
or the man who coached Maryland 
two years before he arrived (Paul 
"Bear" Bryant). 

Talk with some of his former 
Maryland players, more than 30 
years after any of them played for 
him, and you'll realize the effect 
he had on them, and on college 
football. "He and Vmce Lombardi 
could have been brothers," said 
Jack Scaibath, College Hall of 
Fame quarter back (1950-52). "He 
was probably the forerunner of 
the organized practice that is still 
used today. An individual player 
was never still. He'd blow his 
whistle and you'd move to 
another drill. The players were 
always on the move." 

"Coach Tatum was a master 
coach," said Bob Ward, a Hall-of- 



Fame lineman (1948-51) whom 
Tatum called "the greatest little 
player I've ever seen." 

"He (Tatum) knew how to 
recruit, and how to handle us 
roughnecks," Ward said. "He was 
extremely organized, a born 
coach." 

"It's a shame he never got 
into coaching professional foot- 
ball," said Dick (Little Mo) 
Mod zelewski, Outland Award 
winner as a senior in 1952, him- 
self an assistant coach with five 
NFL teams. "He had no favorites. 
He knew how to motivate us, and 
was always very organized." 

"He assembled unbelievable 
teams at Maryland," said Bob 
Pellignni (1953-55), co-captain of 
Tatum's last Maryland team. 
"Those teams looked like Miami 
or Oklahoma do today. He put 
Maryland on the map. He was 
quotable, magnetic, with a certain 
flair." 

Dick Bielski co-captained 
Tatum's 1954 team, and had the 
most unique relationship with the 
coach of any of the former 
Terrapin players. He lived with 
him during his freshman year at 
Maryland. 

"I wasn't much of a football 
player in high school (Patterson 
Park in Baltimore) until my senior 
year," he remembered. "Southern 
Cal was m town for a game with 
Navy, and the Southern Cal 
coaches invited me to eat with the 
team before the game. It was re- 
ally a big deal. I fell in love with 
those maroon jackets those South- 
ern Cal guys had, and I decided 
that was it, I was gomg to college 
in California. 

"Coach Tatum found out about 
this and gave my mother a song- 
and-dance about being 3000 miles 
from home. And after talking with 
him, she told me 'You're gomg to 
Maryland." 

"Well, USC was going to give 
me a full scholarship, room-and- 
board off campus, and send my 
scholarship money home. Coach 
Tatum told my mom I could live at 
his house, and he'd send the 
scholarship money to her. 

"So I lived with Coach and his 
family during my freshman year. 
We would have breakfast 



together, then he would drive to 
school and I would walk. If he did 
drive me in, he would let me out 
of his car a few blocks before we 
got there. I understood that. The 
other players knew about my 
situation, but Coach wouldn't 
show any favoritism, or let anyone 
think there was." 

Tatum's teams from 1950-1955 
were 51-8-2, with a perfect 10-0 
record and Sugar Bowl victory in 
1951, and 10-0 regular-season 
records in 1953 and 1955 before 
both teams were upset by 
Oklahoma in the Orange Bowl. 
And those three teams seemingly 
never had close games. The 1951 
team outscored its opponents by 
381-75; m 1953 it was Maryland 
298-Opponents 38; 1955, Terra- 
pins 217-Others 77. That average 
to Maryland 28-Opponents 5.8. "I 
don't ever remember bemg down 
by more than seven points in any 
game," said Scarbath. "We never 
had a lot of changing or adjusting 
to do be cause we were always 
ahead." 

"I don't think Coach Tatum 
was a good sideline coach," said 
Ward, "but we were always so 
well prepared, we just didn't 
allow a lot of points to the other 
team." 

"I remember during one game, 
we were down at the half," 
Bielski said. "We knew we were 
going to get a chewing out. You 
could hear his footsteps m the 
hallway, and you knew he was 
coming. 

"Well, five minutes go by, then 
10, and there's no coaches at all in 
the dressing room. Twelve, 13, 14 
minutes and the officials come m 
and tell us to get on the field. 

"Coach Tatum walked right out 
the door and never said a word to 
us. That was his half-time speech, 
nothing at all. Of course, we went 
out and won the game. 

"Whenever he said something 
it carried a lot of weight. He didn't 
do it with iire-and-brimstone, he 
was no Knute Rockne. He was a 
winner." 

All of the former Terps remem- 
ber Tatum as a man they could 
talk to when they needed it. 

"You knew you could go to him 
for advice," said Modzelewski. 



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"He looked after us for our 
education. He made sure we got 
an education along with the 
playing time." 

"One of my best friends at 
Maryland was Ed Vereb (starting 
quarterback on the 1955 team)," 
said Pellignni. "He wanted to go 
to dental school and I remember 
Coach Tatum telling him that no 
matter what happened on the 
field, if he wanted to go to med 
school he'd (Tatum) help him." 
Maryland's teams have yet to 
regam the national heights of Jim 
Tatum's teams of the early 1950s. 
His teams' records tell all about 
him as a coach; his former players 
tell all about him as a person. 

"He would always take the 
blame when things went wrong, 
but he was good at giving out 
praise," said Scarbath, "especially 
m front of the press." 

Jim Tatum died in July, 1959 
after contacting a "mystery virus" 
while in Canada. (The virus was 
later determined to be Rocky 
Mountain Fever.) In 1984, his 
name was added to the National 
Football Foundation College Hall 
of Fame lists, along with two of 
his former Maryland players, Bob 
Ward and Jack Scarbath. 

He left Maryland to become 
head coach at his alma mater, 
North Carolina, saying, "I leave 
Maryland with mixed emotions. 
Like the King of England when he 
abdicated the throne for the 
woman he loved." 

And he replaced the President 
of the United States on the front 
page of The Washington Post. 



149 



By Ftank Bertucci 

"Bob Ward is the greatest little 
player, ounce for ounce, I've ever 
seen." 

- Jim Tatum 

Head Coach 

University of Maryland 

Not "pound-for-pound", but 
"ounce-for-ounce." 

Bob Ward weighed all of 185 
pounds throughout his four-year 
playing career at Maryland, and 
even in the early 1950s that was 
no size for a lineman. Especially a 
lineman who was a first-team All- 
American middle guard on 
defense as a junior in 1950, and a 
first-team All American offensive 
guard as a senior in 1951. 

"I was taught to play both 
ways," said Ward, who was voted 
Most Valuable Player by his team- 
mates in each of his four years at 
Maryland. "I started every game 
but one m four years, and that 
was because of a minor injury. I 
could have started that game, too. 
I always thought I was a very 
consistent player. My forte was 
consistency." 

The forte of the Maryland 
teams of the early 1950s was con- 
sistency, a winning consistency. 
Bob Ward's four teams were a 
combined 32-7-1, winning two 
bowl games (1949 Gator over Mis- 
souri, 1951 Sugar over 
Tennessee to complete a perfect 
10-0 season). And Bob Ward was 
the heart and soul of those teams. 

The college teams of the late 
1940s were a mixture of Army 
veterans and teenagers just out of 
high school. The flourishing ser- 
vice football teams were a fertile 
source for college recruiters. 

Bob Ward was an Army para- 
trooper after the war, and was 
stationed at Fort Benning, Ga., 
when he became a hot recruit. 

"My line coach at Fort Benning 
was an ex-Alabama player, and he 
steered me to Alabama," Ward 
remembered. "I signed a letter of 
intent to go there, but I wasn't 
that keen on the idea. 

"I was discharged in January of 
1948, and went home (to Elizabeth, 
NJ), when Coach Tatum called. I 
changed my mind then, and 



decided to attend Maryland. I 
know I went to the right school 
for me." 

Veterans were permitted to 
play as freshmen at that time, so 
Ward moved right into the defen- 
sive line. 

"I think I had a God-given tal- 
ent to be a middle guard," he 
said. "Most of the good linemen at 
that time were quicker. It was the 
era of transition from the single 
wing to the T-formation, and you 
couldn't be a single wing guard 
and not be able to move." 

Jim Tatum's Maryland teams 
were at the forefront of that tran- 
sition. Maryland's split T-offense 
was to become one of the most 
potent ot the early 1950s, opening 
up the field, gaining yardage and 
scoring touchdowns in record 
numbers. And Bob Ward led the 
defense. In his sophomore and 
junior seasons (1949-50), Mary- 
land allowed two or more TDs in 
just eight of 20 games, and six of 
those eight games were Terrapin 
victories. Bob Ward did not play in 
a losing game in his last 15 games 
for Maryland. 

"I think those Maryland teams 
from 1951-1955 were the school's 
best," said Ward, who was an as- 
sistant coach with the Terps for 
six years after his graduation 
"Coach Tatum had some terrific 
teams. The '51 team was a good 
team (10-0, Sugar Bowl champion), 
and the '53 team may have been 
better (10-1, National Champion 
despite an Orange Bowl upset 
loss to Oklahoma). We had a lot of 
good players. I'd have to say that 
that was the best era for Mary- 
land football." 

Ask Bob Ward, or most of his 
teammates, for one game that 
stands out in their memory, and 
they bring up the Sugar Bowl of 
January 1, 1952, when the 9-0, 3rd 
ranked Terrapins faced the top- 
ranked 10-0 Tennessee 
Volunteers. 

"Tennessee was No. 1,1 think 
Michigan State was No. 2, and we 
were ranked third," Ward remem- 
bered. "We wanted to play Ten- 
nessee, and we didn't just beat 
them in that game, we killed 
them. 

"Our defense was awesome, 
our offense was moving the ball. 
Ed Modzelewski was ripping them 
up the middle, Ed Fullerton threw 



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one TD pass, scored another and 
played both ways. Either one of 
them could have been MVP 
(Modzelewski was). 

"We just dominated the game. 
I think we set a record for penal- 
ties called in one game, we had 
one more TD called back. 

"And remember this was be- 
fore the Orioles and Colts. The 
entire state went crazy over us." 

One fact Bob Ward fails to 
mention about that game can be 
quoted from The Washington Post 
story of Morrie Siegel, which ap- 
peared on January 2, 1952: "In a 
head-to-head battle between All 
American guards, Bobby Ward 
outplayed Ted Daffer from here to 
Knoxville and that's the chief rea- 
son Maryland smashed Tennessee 
and today is being toasted down 
here as the Nation's real No. 1 
team. Ward's terrific blocking, 
centered all game on Daffer, 
practically demolished the Vol line- 
man and opened the way for 
Mighty Mo Modzelewski and his 
pulverizing smashes through the 
Vol line." 

The awards and honors earned 
by Bob Ward as a Maryland player 
belie physical stature, but speak 
volumes about the man: 
- MVP of the 1949 Gator Bowl, 

Maryland's first bowl victory. 



- Only player ever to earn first 
team All-American honors as 
both an offensive and defen- 
sive position player. 

- Southern Conference Player- 
of-the-year a": a senior. 

- Lineman-of-the-Year as chosen 
by the Washington Touchdown 
Club and the Philadelphia 
Sportswriters Association in 
1951. 

Bob Ward's size finaly caught 
up with him after his senior sea- 
son. Even in the 1950s, a 185- 
pound lineman did not fit the 
professional football mold. So he 
remained at Maryland as an assis- 
tant coach, eventually retummg to 
his alma mater as head football 
coach for three seasons in the late 
1960s. 

Dick Modzelewski, Little Mo, a 
teammate of Bob Ward's for two 
years at Maryland, an all-pro in 
the National Football League, and 
a long-time defensive line coach in 
the NFL remembered his team- 
mate this way: 

"Bobby Ward played with no 
face mask. He had no skin on his 
nose. He was tough. He was the 
kind of player you would love to 
have as a coach. He always 
worked hard." 

And he helped Maryland reach 
special heights on the football 
field. 



150 



lack Scarbath 



By Frank Bertucci 

The story could have been 
taken from a Hollywood script of 
the 1930s. 

School president wants his 
school on the football map ... he 
visits his sister for a holiday, and 
takes in a high school football 
game ... He likes what he sees of 
the star of the winning team, and 
invites him to his school ... the 
football player goes on to become 
an AU-American quarterback and 
leads his team to the top of the 
national rankings. 

Hollywood B-movie, no doubt. 
But fill in a few names of real peo- 
ple and places. Dr. Harry C. Byrd 
... Jack Scarbath ... University of 
Maryland. And your movie 
becomes fact, no longer fiction. 

"It is a true story," remembers 
Jack Scarbath, the quarterback in 
question. "I was playing for 
Baltimore Poly agamst City Col- 
lege on Thanksgiving (1948). Dr. 
Byrd was visiting his sister and 
came to our game. He didn't come 
down on the field after the game 
and invite me to Maryland or any- 
thing like that, but I heaid from 
the football staff not long after." 

Jack Scarbath probably repaid 
Dr. Byrd two yeais after that 
when he scored the first touch 
down in the new Byrd Stadium, a 
25-yard run, as the Terrapins won 
their first game of the 1950 sea- 
son, 35-21, over Navy. It was Jack 
Scaibath's first collegiate start. 

Maryland dommated the 
college football scene in the early 
1950s. Head Coach Jim Tatum 
installed a new offense called the 
split T", and Jack Scarbath ran it 
to perfection. "It was a very new 
offense," Scarbath recalls. "Most 
teams were still using the smgle 
wing, and it was extremely diffi- 
cult to defense our attack. As a 
split T-quarterback, I'd move 
behind the lme and decide which 
way to go when I saw how the 
defense reacted. It wasn't a good 
offense if your team was far be- 
hind, but that didn't happen to us 
very often." 

In three years as Maryland's 
starting quarterback, Jack 
Scarbath led the Terps to a 24-4-1 
record, with a memorable 28-13 
Sugar Bowl victory over Tennessee 
cappmg a perfect 10-0 1951. 



The team had a 22-game 
unbeaten streak between the 
sixth game in 1950 and the eighth 
game of 1952, with 19 consecutive 
victories over three seasons. Dur- 
ing the streak, the Terps' split T 
offense scored 738 points, an aver- 
age of 33.5 per game, while the 
defense was allowing just 147 
points (6.7 per game). Opponents 
scored more than seven points m 
just four games during the streak. 
No, the Terps did not have many 
come- from-behind victories in 
those days. 

And the split T quarterback 
was personally rewriting the 
Maryland recordbook. In three 
seasons, he completed 125 of 260 
passes for 2287 yards, an average 
of 18.3 yards for every reception, 
22 of which were touchdowns. His 
2938 yards of total offense was a 
new school record, as was the 35 
TDs he was responsible for. His 
senior numbers of 1149 passing 
yards and 1386 total offense yards 
stood as school records for 10 
years, until Dick Shiner surpassed 
them m 1962. 

"Some of those records that 
those teams set, for one game or 
one season, lasted 20 years," he 
said. "You can see that we had 
some good teams." 

Like many of his former team 
mates, Scarbath keeps the Sugar 
Bowl of New Year's Day, 1952 as 
a special memory. But there's one 
other which especially stands out 
for him. 

"Maryland football was just 
evolving from playing George 
Washington, Georgetown and Del- 
aware, and was now scheduling 
Navy and Georgia, Michigan 
State, Alabama and LSU," he said. 
"But the Michigan State game of 
my sophomore year was the one 
that put us on the map, so to 
speak." 

Michigan State, the No. 1 
college football team in the nation 
m 1949, had handed Maryland its 
only loss that season, 14-7. The 
1950 rematch was played at East 
Lansing, and Maryland and its 
sophomore quarterback were off 
to a 1-1 start (loss to Georgia, win 
over Navy m Byrd Stadium's first 
game). 

Our coaching staff did a 
tremendous job in preparing us 
for that game." he recalls. "In fact, 
I'd have to say that it was one of 



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the easier games I ever had to call 
because of our preparation. We 
knew what to look for in their de- 
fense, and we took advantage of 
everything we saw." 

The final score was Maryland 
34-Michigan State 7 No bowl 
game followed that 7-2-1 season, 
but the Sugar Bowl was waiting 
after a 9-0 1951, when the Terps 
outscored opponents by 291 
points. 

"The previous sprmg, General 
Neyland (Tennessee's legendary 
coach), had attended our practices 
to leam how to defense the split 
T," Scarbath remembers, "and 
ironically we wmd up playing 
them m the Sugar Bowl. 

"We didn't know if they'd 
change from their normal defense 
to something special just for that 
game, but they didn't until the 
second half. By that time it was 
too late. They thought they could 
manhandle us but they couldn't. I 
think that our defense held their 
offense to minus yards running 
that day. 

"Personally the games with 
Navy were always special for me. 
I'm from Baltimore, and the Mid- 
shipmen were in our back yard. I 
remember selling programs at an 
Army-Navy game in Baltimore 
when I was in high school. It was 
a natural rivalry. We played them 
once in Byrd Stadium and twice in 



Baltimore (winning all three by 
35-21, 40-22,38-7)." 

After his senior season, Jack 
Scarbath finished runner-up to 
Oklahoma's Billy Vessels in votmg 
for the Heisman Trophy, was a 
first team Ail-American quarter- 
back, and a first-round draft choice 
of the Washington Redskins. He 
and Jim Tatum and Bob Ward and 
the Modzeleweski brothers -and 
Dr. Harry C. Byrd -had helped 
write a special chapter of the 
Maryland football story. "I'm still 
very close to a lot of those guys," 
he said. "I roomed with Mo (Dick 
Modzelewski) and Bernie Faloney 
(who followed him at quaterback). 
And Bobby Ward was just a tre- 
mendous leader. He was as quick 
as a cat on the field. And I don't 
think anyone else has ever been 
an All- American as both an 
offensive and a defensive player. 

"And Coach Tatum ran the 
show, no ifs, ands or buts." 

In 1983, Jack Scarbath became 
the second Maryland football 
player inducted into the National 
Football Foundation College Hall 
of Fame, joining Bob Ward. His 
number "62" was retired, along 
with the "28" of Ward, and the 
"94" of Randy White. 

It may have been a hard-to- 
believe Hollywood script, but Jack 
Scarbath' s Maryland story was 
true. 



151 



odzelewski 



By Frank Bertucci 

The name has almost always 
been a part of him. 

"Little Mo" 

Through three Ail-American 
years at Maryland, and 14 all-pro 
years in the National Football 
League, Dick Modzelewski was 
always Little Mo. 

At 6-0, 235 pounds during his 
playing days at Maryland he was 
one of the bigger collegiate line- 
men of the early 1950s. But he 
was the second Mo at Maryland, 
so he had to be "Little" to his 
older brother Ed, "Big Mo." 

"I wasn't sure about coming to 
Maryland after high school," 
Modzelewski said. "I was all set 
to go to the University of Cincin- 
nati where Sid Gillman and Paul 
Dietzel were coaching. My brother 
Ed was at Maryland already (a 
year ahead of Dick), and I wanted 
to do things on my own, to show 
what I could do. 

"But then my family got mto it, 
and I realized it wouldn't be so 
bad. Jim Tatum and his assistants 
were super recruiters. They 
recruited a lot of us from western 
Pennsylvania." 

So Dick was off for College 
Park, and since there was already 
one Mo there, an older Mo, the 
pair became Big Mo and Little Mo. 
Ed, Big Mo, was a powerful full- 
back, who would eventually be 
the Most Valuable Player of the 
1951 Sugar Bowl victory over 
Tennessee, and he became 
Mighty Mo, after the battleship of 
the same title. (A third 
Modzelewski followed his older 
brothers to College Park; he 
would become "No Mo.") 

Dick Modzelewski played three 
years as a defensive tackle for the 
Terrapins, on the great teams 
which were 24-4-1. He would 
become Maryland's first winner of 
a major national honor when he 
earned the Outland Trophy as the 
nation's top lineman for 1952. But 
he admits that his first on-field 
experience at Maryland did not 
lead him to think he would be an 
Ail-American, let alone a starter. 

"The freshmen scrimmaged 
agamst the varsity at the end of 
practice before the start of the 



season (1949), and I lined up 
against Bob Ward," he 
remem bered. 

Ward weighed all of 185 
pounds, but was regarded as one 
of the best collegiate linemen of 
his time. He is still the only player 
to be a first team All-Amencan as 
a defensive player one year, and 
an offensive player the next. 

"Well, I'm bigger than he is," 
Modzelewski went on. "So I 
thought I'd be able to handle this 
guy. He kicked the hell out of me, 
pushed me all over the place. That 
settled me down m a hurry." 

Like most of the players of the 
early 1950s, Modzelewski consid- 
ers the 1951 Sugar Bowl triumph 
over Tennessee as Maryland's fin- 
est hour, especialy in his case 
smce his brother Ed was the 
game's MVP. But there were other 
games which had special personal 
meaning for him. 

"The Michigan State game of 
my sophomore year (1950) was a 
big game for me and my brother," 
he said. "It was at Michigan State 
and a whole trainload of our rela- 
tives were coming up (to East 
Lansing) for the game. The game 
was written up like Michigan 
State would tear us apart. We 
were referred to as a farm team. 

"Michigan State had one player 
from a rival high school of mme m 
western Pennsylvania. My team 
(West Natrona) had never beaten 
his team in four years m high 
school, and I really wanted to beat 
this guy now. Well, Jim Tatum 
fired all of us up pretty good. We 
had a big win." 

The big win was by 34-7 over 
the reigning national champion. 
That game certainly put Maryland 
on college football's map. A 16-13 
loss to North Carolma State two 
games later would be the last for 
Dick Modzelewski and his team- 
mates for over two years, an un- 
beaten streak of 22 games, includ- 
ing 19 consecutive victories. 

"Jim Tatum treated everybody 
like family," Modzelewski said. 
"He had no favorites. He was in 
complete control of the team. 

"There were 15 or 16 of us 
from western Pennsylvania on 
that Sugar Bowl team. I think Jim 
Tatum and his staff were the first 




Jack Scarbath, Jim Tatum, Dick Modzelewski. 



of the great recruiters. Jack 
Hennemeier (assistant coach) 
would be around so often every- 
body knew who he was when he 
was recruiting." 

The other game Modzelewski 
likes to remember was during his 
senior year (1952), agamst Navy. 

"They had this Ail-American 
lineman named (Larry) Eisenhouer 
," he said. "I played against him 
head-to head, and didn't do too 
well m the first half. The coaches 
put the spark into me at halftime, 
and I had a field day m the sec- 
ond half (of a 38-7 Terrapin win)." 

At the end if his senior season, 
Dick Modzelewski was named to 
every Ail-American team, and was 
awarded the Outland Trophy. He 
was a second-round draft choice 
of the Washington Redskins; his 
teammate quarterback Jack 
Scarbath had been the Redskins' 
first choice. Since then, he has 
spent his life in the National Foot- 
ball League, splitting 14 playing 
seasons with the Redskms, Pitts- 
burgh Steelers, becoming an all- 
pro with the New York Giants and 
Cleveland Browns, playing on NFL 
champions with the Giants (1956) 
and Browns (1964). After his 
retirement as a player, 



Modzelewski became a defensive 
line coach, helpmg the 1982 
Cincinnati Bengals into the Super 
Bowl. And he still holds his former 
Maryland coach Jim Tatum in high 
esteem. 

"It's a shame he never got into 
coaching professional football," 
Mo said. "He was very organized, 
he knew how to motivate his play- 
ers. He knew the offense and the 
defense. Those coaches got us 
thinking about the game plan and 
fired us up. We went after teams 
from the begmnmg of the game." 

"I still think those teams were 
Maryland's best. In that Sugar 
Bowl game, we held Hank Lauri- 
cella to minus one yard rushing. 
The Maryland teams could do that 
to anybody." 

Through the 22-game unbeaten 
streak, the Little Mo Modzelewski 
led defense allowed only 147 
points, with only four teams scor- 
ing better than one touchdown, 
and six bemg shutout. In his three 
seasons, the Terrapms were 
beaten only four times. 

But because of his big brother, 
Dick Modzelewski will always be 
remembered as "Little Mo"; it's 
only a nickname, but it was never 
on target. 



152 



Randy White 



By Frank Bertucci 

When Randy White arrived at 
Maryland as a freshman in the fall 
of 1971, he was not heralded as 
the beginning of a new age for 
Maryland football 

But by the time his playing- 
career as a Terrapin had ended he 
was regarded as one of the best 
college linemen of all-time. 

Maryland's football fortunes 
had waned since the mid-1950s 
and Jim Tatum's all-conquering 
teams. There had been just three 
winning seasons in 15 years. 
Randy White was just a good- 
looking lineman in the 1971 fresh- 
man team, while the varsity was 
going 2-9 for the second yeai in a 
row. 

Then Jerry Claiborne became 
Maryland's head coach before 
Randy White's sophomore year 
Good fortune was about to return 
to Terrapin football, and the 
leader would be, of all positions, a 
defensive tackle. 

"My first look at Randy White 
was of a player with good speed 
and movement, but of someone 
who wanted to be a better 
player," Claiborne said. 

"When I arrived at Maryland, 
I talked to all of the players indi 
vidually," he said. "I asked Randy 
if he wanted to be an All- 
Amencan, and he said yes. I told 
him he could be one of the five 
best lmemen in the U.S. if he 
wanted to, but he had to realize 
how much work that would take. 

"The ability was naturally 
there, but he was a worker. He 
never missed any time in the 
weightroom, and he made him- 
self bigger and faster. By the time 
he was a senior, he was as fast as 
some offensive backs I had 
coached." 

In the early 1970s, Randy White 
changed the look of football's de- 
fensive lines. At Maryland, and 
later m an all-pro National Foot- 
ball League career with the Dallas 
Cowboys, he was regarded as the 
quickest defensive lineman to play 
the game. He could be in an oppo- 
nent's backfield before a quarter- 
back could make a handoff. Fif- 
teen years after he played his last 
game at Maryland he still held the 



season record for tackles in the 
opponents' backfield (24). 

In White's sophomore season, 
Maryland was 5-5-1, its first .500 
season in eight years. In his junior 
year of 1973, the Terrapins were 
8-4, 5-1 in the Atlantic Coast 
Conference, and played in the 
Peach Bowl against Georgia, 
Maryland's first bowl appearance 
since the 1955 team had played in 
the Orange Bowl. 

And Randy White was 
beginning to be noticed. He was 
cho sen first-team all-ACC, and 
his name appeared in several A1I- 
Amencan listings. 

White had a lot to live up to 
going into the 1974 season. He 
was an unanimous All-American 
selection, on the cover of pre- 
season magazines, even on the 
cover of Maryland's football guide. 

He told a Washington Post 
writer early in that season: "I 
haven't got time for anything else 
but football. I love it more than 
anything else in life. I like every- 
thing about it, the hitting, the 
competition. You know, it's fun. 
It's what I want to do." 

But Maryland's season began 
with losses to Alabama and 
Flor ida. The season turned the 
next week, a 24-12 ACC victory 
over North Carolina. It was four 
more weeks before another team 
would score at all against Randy 
White and the Terrapin defense. 
The only other regular season loss 
would be to Penn State; Maryland 



had an 8-3 regular season, and its 
first outright ACC title ever. In 11 
games, the defense had five shut- 
outs, and allowed just 35 points in 
its eight wins. 

And then Randy White cleaned 
up the awards plate. Outland and 
Lombardi Trophies as the top col- 
legiate lineman, ACC Player-of-the 
Year unanimous first team All- 
Amencan, Delaware's (his home 
state) Athlete-of-the-Year, Phila- 
delphia Sportswriters Amateur 
Athlete- of-the-Year. You name 
the award and Randy White's 
name was engraved on it. "He 
was the best player that I ever 
coached," said Claiborne, 14 years 
after he last coached Randy 
White. "In his prime he was as 
good as anybody who ever played 
defensive line, college or pro." 

"I'll never forget one play 
against Clemson. They have a 
fourth-and-goal at our one yard 
line. They run a dive play behind 
their offensive guard. Our defen- 
sive line, including Randy, is 
slanting in the other direction. It's 
a touchdown. But Randy was so 
fast, he cut back and still stopped 
the play. Clemson had run a per- 
fect play and Randy had stopped 
it. Their coach, Red Parker, told 
me afterward that he didn't see 
how it was humanly possible for 
anybody to make that play." 

The 1974 Terps went to the 
Liberty Bowl, where a late 
Tennessee touchdown gave the 




Randy White (94) is one of the best to play the game — on any 
level. 



Vols a 7-3 win in Memphis. But 
Randy White was named Player- 
of-the-Game. 

A first-round draft choice of the 
Dallas Cowboys, the second player 
selected in the entire draft, White 
was an all-Pro performer through- 
out his career, and shared Super 
Bowl MVP honors with Dallas 
teammate Harvey Martin when 
the Cowboys defeated Denver in 
Super Bowl XII. 

White and Dick Modzelewski, 
both recipients of the Outland 
Trophy, are the only Maryland 
players to be voted individual 
post-season player-of-the-year 
awards. Like White, Modzelewski 
was an all-star in professional 
football, and be came a defensive 
line coach after his retirement. He 
never coached Randy White, but 
he coached against him many 
times. 

"He has such quickness and 
explosion off the ball," said Little 
Mo. "He goes 100% all the time. 
He's been all-Pro so many times, 
that tells you what kind of a 
player he is." 

No one else will wear "94" at 
Maryland; Randy White's number 
has been retired. He played a 
major role in the return of 
Maryland to the top of ACC 
football in the 1970s, and earned 
himself a permanent place with 
college football's all-time great 
players. 



153 



"The film showed everything but 
the play a lot of people wanted to 
see the most. The one where Stanley 
Jones sailed into Walter White and 
Zeke Bratkowski and knocked them 
Hat." 

Merrell Whittlesey 
Washington Star 
Oct. 12, 1953 
by Chuck Walsh 

In what is considered the most 
famous play of the most famous year 
in Maryland football history, Stan 
Jones became part of Terp lore. With 
one powerful block, Jones made him- 
self an All-Amenca candidate, and 
started the Terps on the road to a 
national championship. The play oc- 
curred m the third quarter of Mary- 
land's 40-13 victory over Georgia m 
Byrd Stadium. The Terps were 
ranked fourth in the United Press 
Poll and undefeated at the tune. As 
Bratkowski, the Bulldog quarterback, 
faded back to pass, Jones broke 
through the line and swiped at the 
All-Amencan. Jones missed the 
tackle as the pass was thrown. 

Terp defensive back Dick Nolan 
kept the play alive as he intercepted 
the pass. Jones got up to clear a 
path for the oncommg Nolan. 

Jones blocked Walter White, a 
Bulldog guard with such a force that 
he was thrown into Bratkowski who 
was standing directly behind. Both 
players left the game and the Terps 
went on to a victory. 



Today, 29 years later, Stan Jones 
is known for something larger than 
a powerful block. After his All- 
Amencan career as a Terp, he 
served 13 years m the NFL. He was 
enshiined m the National Football 
League Hall of Fame on July 27, 
1991. In so doing, be became the 
first Terp to be so honored. 

"That block is one of my most 
memorable moments while I was at 
Maryland," said Jones. "I was able 
to get up off the ground and throw a 
block as I had been taught." 

Throughout his career, both colle- 
giate and professional, Jones 
pnded himself on his defense. 

"When I played the game, I 
learned how to block and tackle," 
Jones recalled. "When I arrived at 
Maryland the coaching staff taught 
the fundamentals. I really believe 
that what I learned at Maryland 
added an extra four years on to my 
professional career." 

As Jones recalled, he was not the 
most highly recruited player com- 
ing out of high school in Lemoyne, 
Pennsylvania, m 1950. He made vis- 
its to powerhouse schools North 
Carolina and Pittsburgh, but they 
chose not to offer him a scholar- 
ship. He was not offered a chance to 
play in college until Maryland's Jim 
Tatum came calling. 

"Tatum was able to see the fu- 
ture in me," Jones said. "He saw 
what the others did not see m me 




Stan Jones: Terp All-Amencan, Chicago Bear All-Pro and Maryland's 
first inductee into the National Football League Hall of Fame. 



coming out of high school. When I 
arrived here, I entered into a good 
teaching system set up by the 
coaching staff. 

"Jim Tatum was so far ahead of 
the rest m college football that the 
others suffered. We received teach- 
ing that no other team in college 
did." 

An All Susquehanna Conference 
and All-Harrisburg Area selection, 
Jones was recruited as an offensive 
lineman. He was touted as Tatum's 
big hope around which the offensive 
line would be built. The 1951 Mary- 
land Press Guide remarked that 
Jones was "probably the strongest 
man on the squad." 

"He wasn't that big when he 
came in as a freshman but he was a 
strong kid," said Bob Ward, who 
was the offensive line coach when 
Jones arrived. He was the first guy 
to get into the weights, and I really 
believe he would not have played in 
pro football had he not gotten into 
lifting weights." 

By gettmg into the weight room, 
Jones increased his size and speed 
which allowed him to excel as a 
"two-way" player. In the early days 
of footbal 1 , most players played of- 
fense, defense and special teams. 
Jones was no exception to that rule. 

After playing on the freshman 
squad his first season, Jones was a 
starter on the varsity the next three 
years. He was an outstanding offen- 
sive player for two seasons before 
concentrating on defense as a se- 
nior. During his three-year varsity 
career, Maryland had two 
undefeated seasons, and defeated 
number one Tennessee in his 
sophomore year. He was drafted as 
a junior-eligible by the Chicago 
Bears in 1953. 

His decision to return to Mary- 
land in 1953 for his senior season 
paved the way for an undefeated 
regular season, the National Champi- 
onship, and a spot m the Orange 
Bowl. 

Jones was the starting right 
tackle on the Terp defense that al- 
lowed only 31 points during 10 regu- 
lar season games in 1953. With Jones 
leading the way, Maryland recorded 
six shutouts and allowed only one 
team, Georgia, to score more than 
six points. 

The play of the defense spurs 
Jones to recall another of his fondest 
memories. It came dunng a 21-0 vic- 
tory over Alabama, a win which 
boosted Maryland to the number one 
spot in the United Press Poll. 

"We were ranked pretty highly 
(No. 2) at the time and so was Ala- 



bama (No. 11)" Jones recalls. "We 
stopped them on the goal line in the 
fourth quarter to preserve the shut- 
out. The game was a lot closer than 
the score indicated and the goal line 
stand mdicated how tough the game 
was." 

Twice during the fourth quarter 
the Crimson Tide offense moved the 
ball inside the Terp five yard line. 
Twice they had first and goal. Twice 
they were unable to dent the Terps. 

The news accounts said that "a 
finer defensive effort had not before 
been seen m Byrd Stadium." 

Following the 1953 season, Jones 
was selected as the "Outstanding 
College Lineman of 1953" by the 
College Football Coaching Board. He 
was a consensus All-Amenca selec- 
tion. He appeared on the Ed Sullivan 
show as a member of the Collier's 
Magazme All-Amenca team. From 
there he began an lllustnous 
professional career. 

The Bears finished with a win- 
ning record nine of his 12 seasons. 
They played m the NFL Champion- 
ship game twice, both times playing 
the New York Giants. The Giants 
claimed the championship in 1956 
and the Bears in 1963. He played his 
final professional season as a mem- 
ber of the Washington Redskins. 

Now, as a coach with the New 
England Patriots, Jones teaches 
many of the ideas he learned in 
College Park. The ideas of blocking 
and tacking, leverage and position- 
ing, and playing all out which he 
learned while a Terp will always be 
with him. 

"I was very prepared for the NFL 
when I left Maryland," he said. 
"From my coaches who taught me 
football to my professors who taught 
me anatomy, physiology and weight 
training, I received a great educa- 
tion. I couldn't have picked a better 
place to go - they picked me and 
there was not a better place to be." 

Jones was like a rookie again; he 
stood addressmg the gathenng at 
the Hall of Fame induction ceremo- 
nies. He was mtroduced by long- 
time friend Bob Killan, a teammate of 
Jones' with the Bears. The emotion 
of the day was escalated by 125 
family members and friends in 
Canton, Ohio. 

"I stood at the podium reflecting 
on my life and my career. There 
were so many things running 
through my mind. I had to call upon 
an inner reserve to make it through 
the ceremony." 

For Stan Jones the inner reserve 
was always there. Fortunately for 
Maryland, Jim Tatum saw it. 



154 



Terp Hall of Fame 




7 






James G. Meade, an inaugural 
inductee, accepted the Most 
Valuable Player for the DC. 
area in 1937 from "Dutch" 
Bergman. 

The Athletic Hall of Fame was 
founded in 1982 by the M Club 
Foundation as a joint project of the 
Department of Intercollegiate Athlet- 
ics and the M Club The first commit- 
tee was organized by then Athletic 
Director Dick Dull and consisted of 
outstanding Terrapin athletes and 
coaches Jack Faber (Class of 1926), 
Tom Fields (Class of 1942), Al Heagy 
(Class of 1930), Jim Kehoe (Class of 
1940) and Jack Scarbath (Class of 
1952). Arthur L Kramer (Class of 
1942). a letterwinner in tennis, 
was particularly important in the 
founding of the Hall of Fame, 

Among the qualifications for nom- 
inees are being out of school at least 
10 years, having earned a minimum 
of one varsity letter, and if not an 
undergraduate athlete, being a 
Department of Intercollegiate 
Athletics staff member for at least 15 
years. Nominees will be judged on 
personal conduct in life and their 
contributions to the high ideals of 
intercollegiate athletics 

The Hall of Fame 

1982 inductees 

Louis W. Berger '32, football, 

basketball, baseball 
'Joseph C. Burger '25, football 

basketball, lacrosse 
'Hany C. Byrd '08, football, track and 

field, baseball, coach 
Arthur E. Cook, rifle (Olympic 

Champion) 
■Geary F. Eppley '21. football, track 

and field, coach 
'John W. Guckeyson '36, football, 

basketball, track and field, baseball 
Charles E. Keller '37, basketball, 

baseball 
'Frederick C. Lrnkous '28, football, 

basketball, lacrosse 
'Charles L. Mackert '21, football, coach 



Charles L. Mackert remained at 
the school for over 20 years as 
head of the Physical Education 
Department. 



'James G. Meade '39, football, 

lacrosse 
'Julius J. Radice '30, football, 

basketball, baseball 
*H. Burton Shipley '14, football, 

basketball, baseball, coach 
•William C Supplee '26, football, 

basketball, track and field 

1983 inductees 

'George V. Chalmers '32, football, 

basketball, baseball 
'William W. Evans '30, football, 

basketball, lacrosse 
John E. Faber, Jr. '26, basketball, 

lacrosse, coach 
Norwood S. Sothoron '35, football, 

basketball, baseball, lacrosse. 

1984 inductees 

'Caleb "Zeke" Bailey '22. football, 

baseball 
'Brooke "Untz" Brewer '22, football, 

track and field 
John F. Chnstfulf '36, lacrosse 
William W Cobey '30. Director of 

Athletics 
•Joseph H. Deckman '31, lacrosse, 

football 
'Charles F. Elhnger '37, football, 

lacrosse 
Albert B. Heagy '30, football, 

basketball, lacrosse, coach 
Fredenck M. Hewitt '39, football, 

lacrosse 
John F. Kelly '37, lacrosse 
'Ivan M. Marty '24, lacrosse 
'William G "Country" Moms '13, 

football, baseball 
John C. Norris '32, football, 

basketball, lacrosse 
'Edwin E. Powell '13, lacrosse 
'Gordon S. Pugh '32, lacrosse 
Jack C. Scarbath '52, football, 

lacrosse 
'Gerald "Snitz" Snyder '29. football, 

lacrosse 



Ray Poppelman dodged many 
foes in his career and was in- 
ducted in 1988 for his efforts. 



•James M. Tatum, football coach 
Reginald Van Trump Truitt '14, 

lacrosse, coach 
Robert Ward '52, football, coach 
Albert W. Woods 33, football, coach 

1985 inductees 

Frank H Cronrn '39, track and field, 

boxing, coach 
John F. "Tony" Hough '25, football, 

lacrosse 
"Thomas J. McQuade '24, football, 

lacrosse 
Perslung L. Mondorff '41, football, 

basketball, baseball, soccer 
•Kenneth T. Knode '16, football, 

baseball 
'Harry Edwin Semler '22, football, 

baseball 

1986 inductees 

Benny Alperstein '39. boxing 
Francis A. "Bucky" Buscher '34, 

football, basketball, baseball 
James R. Kappler '57, lacrosse 
James H Kehoe, Jr. '40, track and 

field, cross country, coach, athletic 

director 
'Jesse J. Krajovic '31, football, track 

and field 
John W. Zane '60, sports information 

director, assistant athletic director 

1987 inductees 

Thomas M. Fields '42, track and 

field, cross country 
William E. Krouse '41, football. 

wrestling, coach 
Thomas A. Mont '47. football, 

basketball, lacrosse, coach 
'George W. Knepley '39, basketball, 

baseball 
'Howard V. Keene '21, baseball 
Charles E. Wicker '56. lacrosse, 

soccer 



Coach Jim Tatum and quarter- 
back Jack Scarbath were in- 
ducted in 1984 to honor such 
accomplishments as their 1951 
undefeated season. 

1988 inductees 

Clayton A Beardmore '62, lacrosse, 

coach 
Bernard J. Faloney '53, football, 

baseball 
John D. Gilmore, Jr. '43, football, 

basketball, track and field, boxing 
Herman A. Millikan, basketball 
coach 
Raymond J Poppelman '33, football, 

lacrosse 
Doyle P. Royal '43, tennis, soccer, 

coach 
'Victor G Willis '37, football, 

basketball, baseball 

1989 Inductees 

William R Campbell '56, swimming 

and diving coach 
W Ernest Fischer '54, wrestling 
James H. Keating, Jr., '57, lacrosse 
Edward Ronton '32. basketball, 

lacrosse 
John W. Simmons, Jr. '56. lacrosse 

1990 Inductees 

Hotsy Alperstein '42, boxing 
Ernest J. Betz '58, lacrosse 
Charles A. May '31, basketball, 

football, lacrosse 
Edward M. Minion '38. football, 

lacrosse 
Milton M. Mulitz '40. basketball, 

lacrosse 
'Myron B. Stevens '27, baseball, 

basketball, football 

1991 Inductees 

Jack Flynn '46. basketball, baseball 
Stan Jones '53. football 
Alan Lowe '67. lacrosse 
Richard Moran '60, larcosse 
Edward Rieder '49, boxing, soccer 
Gene Shue '54. basketball 
•Robert Smith '41. football, baseball 

'Deceased 



155 



ision, The Bowls 



HALL OF FAME BOWL 

SUN BOWL PE L S^ L B0WL 
IOTTON BOWL 



GATOR BOWL 

TANGERINE BOWL 




Tackle Randy White and Tailback Louis Carter are two reasons why football improved for a long time under Jerry 
Claiborne. The records in the following pages reflect their greatness. White was consensus All-America, and both the 
Outland Trophy and Lombardi Award winner, sweeping college football's most prestigious honors for a lineman. His 
career in the National Football League with the Dallas Cowboys was even more prolific. Carter graduated as simply the 
best runner in school history through 1974. He had gained more yards, more ways— from the line of scrimmage, catching 
the ball, and returning punts and kickoffs—than any Terrapin back. Charlie Wysocki (18) absolutely owns the rushing 
recordbook. He outgained most of the teams of the first century. 



156 



Terp Bowls — The Gator in 1948, 1950 



GATOR BOWL- JACKSONVILLE, FL - 1/1/48 






%odGi 



ante 



nEW YEAR'S DRY 
JfinUARY 1st 1948 

GEORGIA 
MARYLAND 




M - Gambmo 35 run (McHugh kick); G • Rausch 1 run (Gen kick); M 
-Gambrno 1 run (kick failed); M - Gambino 24 pass from Baroni (McHugh 
kick); G - Gen 4 run (kick failed); G - Donaldson 9 pass from Rauch (Gen 
kick). 





TEAM STATISTICS 






Maryland 


Georgia 


First Downs 


16 


19 


Yards Rushing 


247 


219 


Yaids Passing 


127 


187 


Total Yards 


374 


406 


Passing 


7-14-1 


12-20-1 


Punts-Average 


5-44.2 


4-40.0 


Fumbles-Lost 


0-0 


2-1 


Penalties-Yards 


5-66 


4-80 



INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS 
RUSHING: 

Maryland-- Gambmo 23 for 165 yds.; Idiak 2 for 32 yds.; Bronk 5 for 23 yds.; 
Laruel 4 for 24 yds. 

Georgia - Donaldson 10 for 69 yds ; Geri 7 for 56 yds.; Henderson 8 for 48 
yds.; Reid 7 for 46 yds. 

The first capacity crowd in Gator Bowl history - attendance was 16,666 that 
day - witnessed one of the greatest games in the storied history of the bowl. 
A young Maryland team, underdog to an expenenced Georgia squad, got up 
by 13 pouits in the fourth quarter and eventually settled for the 20-all tie. Lou 
Gambmo was a one-man wrecking crew for the Terrapins, scoring the only 
touchdown of the first half on a 35-yard run. In the second half, after a 
Georgia score, Gambmo scored on a 1-yard run and on a 24-yard pass from 
John Baroni. A senes of special teams miscues - namely a short kickoff and 
mishandled punt - set up Georgia's comeback. Despite the tie, there was no 
question as to the game's most valuable player. Gambmo won the Burkhalter 
Award, signifying the game's outstanding performer. 



GATOR BOWL - JACKSONVILLE, FL - 1/2/50 




iniiunii 

M ISMII II I 



Maryland . 
Missouri . . 



7 13 =20 
7=7 



MD- Shemonski 11 run (Dean kick); MD - Modzelewski 2 run (kick failed); 
MD -Shemonski 6 run (Dean kick); M - Klien 4 run (Glonoso kick) 



First Downs 
Rushing Yards 
Passing Yards 
Passing 
Punts-Average 
Fumbles-Lost 
Penalty Yaids 

Three times in the first half Missouri turned the ball over and all three times 
Maryland took it in for touchdowns as the Terrapins handed the Tigers then 
second consecutive Gator Bowl loss. Defensive back John Idzik set up 
Maryland's first score with a 26-yard interception return to the Mizzou 11. Bob 
Shemonski scored on a sweep on the next play, and the rout was on. Ed Mod- 
zelewski scored on a three-yard run to give the Terps a 13-0 lead and She- 
monski capped Maryland's scoring later in the second quarter with a six yard 
touchdown run. 



TEAM STATISTICS 




Maryland 


Missouri 


11 


13 


266 


100 


16 


167 


2-17-1 


11-29-3 


7-39.0 


3-380 


1-1 


5-5 


63 


10 



Maryland's Bowl Record (6-9-2) 




Jan 1, 1948 


Gator 


20 


Georgia 


20 


Jan. 1, 1950 


Gator 


20 


Missouri 


7 


Jan. 1, 1952 


Sugar 


28 


Tennessee 


13 


Jan. 1, 1954 


Orange 





Oklahoma 


7 


Jan. 1, 1956 


Orange 


6 


Oklahoma 


20 


Dec. 28. 1973 


Peach 


16 


Georgia 


17 


Dec. 16, 1974 


Liberty 


3 


Tennessee 


7 


Dec 29. 1975 


Gator 


13 


Florida 





Jan. 1, 1977 


Cotton 


21 


Houston 


30 


Dec. 22, 1977 


Hall of Fame 


17 


Minnesota 


7 


Dec. 23, 1978 


Sun 





Texas 


42 


Dec. 20, 1980 


Tangerine 


20 


Florida 


35 


Dec. 25, 1982 


Aloha 


20 


Washington 


21 


Dec. 17, 1983 


Florida Citrus 


23 


Tennessee 


30 


Dec 22. 1984 


Sun 


28 


Tennessee 


27 


Dec. 21. 1985 


Cherry 


35 


Syracuse 


18 


Dec. 15. 1990 


Independence 


34 


Louisiana Tech 


34 



157 



The Sugar in 1952, The Orange in 1954 



SUGAR BOWL - NEW ORLEANS, LA - 1/2/52 




18 AN N UAL 



CLASSIC 



MARYLAND Jk TENNESSEE 



LANE-SUGAB BOWl STADIUM 



Official Souvenir 



Maryland . . 
Tennessee. 



7 14 7 = 28 
6 7 = 13 



M - Fullerton 2 run (Decker kick); M - Shemonski 7 pass from 
Fullerton (Decker kick); M - Scarbath 1 run (Decker kick); T - Rechichar 4 
pass from Payne (kick failed); M - Fullerton 46 interception return (Decker 
kick); T - Payne 2 run (Rechichar kick). 



First Downs 
Rushes - Yards 
Passing Yards 
Return Yards 
Passing 
Punts - Avg. 
Fumbles - Lost 
Penalties • Yards 



TEAM STATISTICS 
Maryland 

18 
64-289 

63 

29 

7-13-1 

8-38 

7-1 
12-120 



Tennessee 

12 
35-81 

75 

16 

9-19-4 

7-43 

2-2 
2-20 



INDIVIDUAL LEADERS 
PASSING: 

Maryland - Scarbath, 6 for 9, 57 yds. 

Tennessee - Payne, 7 of 14. 

RUSHING: 

Maryland - Ed Modzelewski, 28 for 153 yds.; Fullerton, 9 for 22 yds. 

Tennessee - Payne, 11 for 54; Kozar, 9 for 29. 

In a game historians even today call the biggest win in Maryland football 
history, Jim Tatum's Terrapms upset the nation's No. 1 ranked Tennessee 
Volunteers of Gen. Bob Neyland. Buoyed by the running of All-Amencan full- 
back Ed "Mighty Mo" Modzelewski (153 yards on 28 carries) and All- 
Amencan quarterback Jack Scarbath, the No. 3 ranked Terps scored three 
TDs before the Vols got one in the first half for a 21-6 lead. They put the 
game out of reach in the third quarter with a 46-yard interception return TD 
by Ed Fullerton for a 28-6 margin lead. The Terrapin defense was brilliant all 
afternoon. 



ORANGE BOWL- MIAMI, FL - 1/1/54 




rtU-ugj 1 Aflf AH HM V ' /JE 9 OKLAHOMA 




Maryland , 


ooo-o 


Oklahoma 


7 0-7 


- Gngg 25 run (Leake kick) 




TEAM STATISTICS 




Maryland 


Oklahoma 


First Downs 13 


10 


Rushing Yards 176 


208 


Passing Yards 36 


22 


Return Yards 25 


7 


Passing 5-12-0 


4-6-1 


Punts - Avg. 5-29.0 


7-31.3 


Fumbles - Lost 1-1 


2-2 


Penalties - Yards - 15 


-45 


INDIVIDUAL LEADERS 




PASSING: 




Maryland - Boxold, 3 of 9, 42 yds., 1 Int. 




Oklahoma - Calame, 4 of 4, 22 yds. 




RECEIVING: 




Maryland - Nolan, 2 for 31 yds. 




Oklahoma - R. Burns, 3 for 17 yds. 




RUSHING: 




Maryland - Felton, 10 for 51 yds. 




Oklahoma - Gngg, 13 for 89 yds., 1 TD. 




Attendance - 68,718 





The Terrapms took another undefeated (10-0) record and the nation's No. 1 
ranking in their second Orange Bowl visit in three years, and again played 
Oklahoma. The Sooners, completely unawed by the Terps National Champion- 
ship team, staged a second quarter land rush to score the only score on a 25- 
yard sprint by team captain and halfback Larry Gngg. The Terrapins suffered 
a major setback when All-Amencan Berme Faloney could not start because of 
severe ankle injury. He entered the game in the 3rd quarter for five plays, but 
was unable to continue. 



158 



Terp Bowls — The Orange in 1956, The Peach in 1973 



ORANGE BOWL - MIAMI, FL - 1/2/56 




Maryland 

Oklahoma 

M - Vereb 15 run (kick failed); 



6 

14 6 

McDonald 4 run (Prices kick); - 



6 
20 



O'Neal 1 run (Prices kick); - Dodd 82 interception return (kick failed). 



First Downs 
Rushes - Yards 
Passing Yards 
Passing 
Punts - Avg. 
Fumbles - Lost 
Penalties - Yards 



TEAM STATISTICS 
Maryland 

9 
47-187 

46 

3-10-3 

7-40 

3-2 

4-61 



Oklahoma 

16 
64-202 

53 

4-10-1 

8-34 

1-1 

4-35 



INDIVIDUAL LEADERS 
PASSING: 

Maryland - Beightol. 2 of 7, 46 yds., 2 Int.; Tamburello, 1 of 2. 11 yds.. 1 Int. 

Oklahoma - Hams. 3 of 5, 34 yds.; McDonald, 1 of 4, 19 yds. 

RECEIVING: 

Maryland - Cooke, 1 for 21: Flynn, 1 for 14; Healy, 1 for 11. 

Oklahoma - Bums, 2 for 28; Pnces, 1 for 19. 

RUSHING: 

Maryland - Vereb, 8 for 108, 1 TD; Perlo, 6 for 22. 

Oklahoma - Hams, 9 for 63; Bums. 9 for 34 

The victory extended Oklahoma's winning streak to 30 games and snapped 
Maryland's 15-game winning string. The Terps were No. 3 ranked and the 
Sooners. No. 1. This was a reversal of the '54 Orange Bowl two years earlier 
as the Terps were the No. 1 team in the nation, and the Sooners. No. 3. The 
Terps held a 6-0 halftime lead and then were bewildered by three Sooner 
second half touchdowns for their second Orange Bowl win over the Terps. 



PEACH BOWL - ATLANTA, GA - 12/28/73 



ATLANTA STADIUM Friday. DMtmlm 28. 1B73 • Kkkolf p.m. 




Maryland . 
Georgia... 



10 6 
10 7 



16 
17 



G-- Poulous 62 pass from Johnson (Leavitt kick); M - White 68 pass from 
Carter (Mike-Mayer kick); M - Mike-Mayer 36 FG; G - Leavitt 26 FG; 
G - Johnson 1 run (Leavitt kick); M - Mike-Mayer 25 FG; M - Mike-Mayer 
28 FG. 





TEAM STATISTICS 






Maryland 


Georgia 


First Downs 


15 


11 


Rushes - Yards 


52-219 


56-170 


Passing Yards 


242 


114 


Return Yards 


14 


3 


Passing 


8-18-1 


5-16-1 


Punts - Avg. 


6-32 


8-41 


Fumbles - Lost 


4-3 


2-2 


Penalties - Yards 


5-63 


1-5 



INDIVIDUAL LEADERS 
PASSING: 

Maryland - Kinard. 4 of 8, 113 yds., 1 Int.; Carter, 2 of 3. 83 yds., 1 TD. 
Georgia - Johnson. 5 of 16, 114 yds.. 1 TD, 1 Int. 
RECEIVING: 

Maryland - Jennings, 3 for 75; White, 2 for 106, 1 TD. 
Georgia - Poulous, 2 for 62, 1 TD; King, 2 for 22. 
RUSHING: 

Maryland - Carter, 29 for 126; Jennings. 5 for 41. 
Georgia - - King, 16 for 57; Johnson, 18 for 48, 1 TD; Bums, 9 for 43. 
Attendance - 38,107 

Maryland came away from its first bowl game in 18 years a bitterly 
disappointed team. The Terrapins had dominated Georgia in all phases of the 
game Both teams scored 10 first half points. The Bulldogs went up. scoring m 
the third after recovering a Terp fumble. Seven times, the Terrapins were 
inside the Georgia 20-yard line that ended in three Mike-Mayer field goals. On 
four of the seven occasions, they were within the 13 and came away with 
zero points. 



159 



wis — The Liberty in 1974, The Gator in 1975 



LIBERTY BOWL - MEMPHIS, TN - 12/16/74 



SDCJPNTH ANNUAL ■_ 

■ pberty Bowl 



;. )^> 



M6ER 1«, 1974 X * 



-OFFICIAL MAGAZINE $1.50 






flW 



TENNESSEE 



'MARYLAND! 



Maryland 3 = 3 

Tennessee 7 = 7 

M - Mike-Mayer 28 FG; T - Seivers 11 pass from Wallace (Townsend kick) 



First Downs 
Rushes - Yards 
Passing Yards 
Return Yards 
Passing 
Punts - Avg. 
Fumbles - Lost 
Penalties - Yards 



TEAM STATISTICS 
Maryland 

16 
42-108 

158 

76 
15-24-2 
6-41.0 

3-3 
4-63 



Tennessee 

15 
54-173 

65 

65 
7-16-0 
7-39.0 

4-2 
8-69 



INDIVIDUAL LEADERS 
PASSING: 

Maryland - AveUrni, 15 of 22 for 158 yds., 2 Int. 

Tennessee - Holloway, 6 of 15 for 54 yds.; Wallace, 1 of 1 for 11 yds., 1 TD 

RECEIVING: 

Maryland -- White, 5 for 68 yds; Carter, 6 for 49 yds. 

Tennessee - Seivers, 4 for 38 yds., 1 TD; Morgan, 2 for 14 yds. 

RUSHING: 

Maryland - Carter, 22 for 65 yds.; Bloommgdale, 8 for 36 yds. 

Tennessee - Gayle, 17 for 106 yds.; Holloway, 12 for 41 yds. 

Attendance - 51,284 

Tennessee scored their only but winning touchdown with 2:08 left in the 
game. The winning score came on a 11 -yard pass from second string 
quarterback Randy Wallace to end Larry Seivers. It was Wallace's only pass of 
the game. The Terps were punting from their 13 when a bad snap from center 
was recovered by the Vols on the Terps 7. After a loss of 4 yards, Wallace 
threw for the score. The Terps put on a desperation dnve and an apparent 
20-yard TD winning reception was ruled out of bounds. 



GATOR BOWL - JACKSONVILLE, PL - 12/20/75 




Maryland . 
Florida... 



7 3 3 = 13 
0= 



M - Hoover 19 pass from Dick (Sochko kick); M - Sochko 20 FG; 
M - Sochko 27 FG 





TEAM STATISTICS 






Maryland 


Florida 


First Downs 


15 


14 


Rushes - Yards 


52-209 


54-182 


Passing Yards 


82 


28 


Return Yards 


26 


25 


Passing 


7-16-0 


3-19-3 


Punts - Avg. 


7-39.8 


7-38.5 


Fumbles - Lost 


0-0 


1-1 


Penalties - Yards 


5-47 


6-48 



INDIVIDUAL LEADERS 
PASSING: 

Maryland - Dick, 5 of 13 for 67 yds.; Manges, 2 of 3 for 15 yds. 

Florida - Fisher, 2 of 12 for 33 yds., 1 Int; Gaffney, 1 for 7, 

minus 5 yds. 

RECEIVING: 

Maryland- Hoover, 2 for 24, 1 TD; Wilson, 2 for 21; Jennings, 

2 for 15 

Florida - Lecount, 1 for 25; Enclade, 1 for 8 

RUSHING: 

Maryland - Atkins, 20 for 127; Jennings, 9 for 53 

Florida - DuBose, 18 for 95; Green, 13 for 31; Fisher, 6 for 21 

The ACC champion Terrapins upset the seven-point favorite Florida Gators in 
a game played in a steady downpour. The Terps had posted their best season 
record in 20 years (8-2-1). They intercepted three Florida passes, turning two 
of them into scores, a 19-yard touchdown pass to Kim Hoover from Larry Dick 
and 20-yard field goal by Mike Sochko for a 10-0 half time lead. Sochko added 
a 27-yarder in the fourth quarter. It was the first Terp win over a SEC team 
since 1955. The Gators went into the game (9-2) as the SEC's total offense 
leader. 



160 



Terp Bowls — The Cotton in 1977, The Hall off Fame in 1977 



COTTON BOWL - DALLAS, TX - 1/1/77 




Maryland . 
Houston . . 



7 7 7 = 21 
22 6 3 = 30 



H - Thomas 11 run (Coplin kick); H - Blackwell 33 run (Coplin kick); H - 
Blackwell 1 run (Coplin kick); M - Manges 6 run (Loncar kick); H - Bass 33 
pass from Davis (kick failed); M - Sievers 11 pass from Manges (Sochko 
kick); M - Wilson 1 run (Sochko kick); H • Coplm 28 FG. 



First Downs 
Rushes - Yards 
Passing Yards 
Return Yards 
Passing 
Punts • Avg. 
Fumbles - Lost 
Penalties • Yards 



TEAM STATISTICS 
Maryland 

17 
40-120 

179 

13 
17-32-0 
6-44.0 

1-1 
8-80 



Houston 

20 
64-320 

108 

5 
5-8-0 
4-36.0 

4-3 

5-22 



INDIVIDUAL LEADERS 
PASSING; 

Maryland - Manges, 17 of 32, 179, 1 TD 

Houston -- Davis, 5 of 8. 108, 1 TD 

RECEIVING: 

Maryland - Kinney, 6 for 72; Wilson, 5 for 26; Richards, 3 for 39 

Houston - Foster, 3 for 62; Bass, 1 for 33, 1 TD; Lavergne, 1 for 13 

RUSHING: 

Maryland - Scott, 11 for 47; Manges, 14 for 32, 1 TD; Wilson, 9 for 28. 

Houston - Blackwell, 22 for 149, 2 TD's; Thomas, 14 for 104. 1 TD; 

Davis. 21 for 51 

Attendence - 58,500 

Houston quickly dashed the undefeated hopes of the Terrapins for a perfect 
season as the Cougars upset the favored Terps in their first Cotton Bowl 
appearance and first ever meetmg between the two schools. Houston struck 
for 21 first quarter points and added another in the second quarter to take a 
27-20 lead at halftime. They overwhelmed the Terp defense with 320 rushing 
yards on 64 cames. They passed but eight times. 



HALL OF FAME BOWL -BIRMINGHAM, AL -12/22/77 




Maryland 




3 


14 - 17 


Minnesota 




7 
Md 


0-7 


Minn - Barber 1 run (Rogmd kick); Md - Sochko 32 FG; 


- Scott 2 run 


(Sochko kick); Md - 


Scott 1 run (Sochko kick). 

TEAM STATISTICS 








Maryland 




Minnesota 


First Downs 


15 




17 


Rushes - Yards 


41-120 




55-113 


Passing Yards 


211 




155 


Return Yards 


3 




6 


Passing 


12-23-1 




13-26-0 


Punts - Avg. 


5-36.8 




9-27.7 


Fumbles - Lost 


3-2 




3-2 


Penalties - Yards 


12-80 
INDIVIDUAL LEADERS 




6-54 


PASSING: 








Maryland - Dick, 12 of 20, 211 yds. 






Minnesota - Avery 


12 of 23, 130 yds. 






RECEIVING: 








Maryland - White, 


3 for 126; Scott, 2 for 16 






Minnesota - Anhorn, 5 for 49; Barber 4 for 58 






RUSHING: 








Maryland - Scott, 24 for 75 2 TD's; Maddox, 2 for 17 






Minnesota - Kitzmann. 24 for 76; Thompson, 4 for 11 






Attendance - 47,000 







Maryland silenced the critics m defeating Big Ten Minnesota in the first Hall 
of Fame Bowl Classic and the first meetmg between the two schools. The 
Gophers scored thieir only touchdown midway in the first quarter. The Terps 
got a 32-yard FG from Mike Sochko and a pair of second quarter scoring runs 
from George Scott for the 17-7 halftime lead. The second half was scoreless as 
the Terp defense swarmed the offense of Minnesota. 



161 



Is — The Sun in 1978, The Tangerine in 1980 



SUN BOWL - EL PASO, TX - 12/23/70 




1978 
Sun Bowl 



Sun Bnvl Stadiun 



82.00 



December S3, 1978 



Maryland 0=0 

Texas 21 7 14 = 42 

T - L. Jones 7 run (Erxleben kick); T - J. Jones 1 run (Erxleben kick); T - 
L. Jones 29 pass from McBath (Erxleben kick); T - McBath 2 run (Erxleben 
kick); T - J. Jones 14 run (Erxleben kick); T - H. Jones 32 run (Erxleben 
kick). 



INDIVIDUAL LEADERS 

PASSING: 

Maryland - O'Hare, 12 of 27 for 146 yds., 3 Int.; M.Tice, 5 of 16 for 68 yds., 
1 Int. 

Texas -■ McBath, 2 of 5 for 45 yds. 

RECEIVING: 

Maryland - Richards, 4 for 52; Carina, 4 for 52 

Texas - L. Jones, 2 for 45 

RUSHING: 

Maryland - Atkins, 10 for 15 

Texas -■ H Jones, 14 for 104, 1 TD; J. Jones, 19 for 100, 2 TD's. 

Attendance - 33,122 

The Jones boys, "Lam", "Jam" and "Ham" scored five of Texas' six touch- 
downs, three in the first quarter. The loss, before a national television 
audience and a record Sun Bowl crowd of 33,122, was the worst m Coach 
Jerry Claiborne's seven years at Maryland. The Terps had scored in 95 
consecutive games, 82 of the games since Claiborne's arrival in 1972. It was 
the third longest streak in the nation. 



TANGERINE BOWL - ORLANDO, FL • 12/20/00 




Maryland 

Florida 

M - Castro 35 FG; F 

Castro 27 FG; M - Castro 27 FG; F 



3 6 11 = 20 

14 14 7 = 35 

Collinsworth 24 pass from Peace (Clark kick); M - 

Jones 2 run (Clark kick); M - Wysocki 



1 run (Tice run); M - Castro 43 FG; F - Peace 1 run (Clark kick); F - 
Collinsworth 21 pass from Peace (Clark kick); F - Brown 2 run (Clark kick). 





TEAM STATISTICS 












Maryland 


Texas 




TEAM STATISTICS 




First Downs 


20 


18 




Maryland 


Florida 


Rushes - Yards 


40-34 


58-220 


First Downs 


19 


16 


Passing Yards 


214 


45 


Rushes - Yards 


54-181 


35-108 


Return Yards 





20 


Passing Yards 


155 


271 


Passing 


17-43-4 


2-7-0 


Return Yards 


14 


54 


Punts - Avg. 


8-37.0 


7-41.0 


Passing 


12-26-3 


20-34-1 


Fumbles - Lost 


2-1 


3-1 


Punts - Avg. 


4-39 


6-34 


Penalties • Yards 


5-35 


7-42 


Fumbles - Lost 


4-2 


1-0 








Penalties - Yards 


6-44 


11-108 



INDIVIDUAL LEADERS 
PASSING: 

Maryland - M. Tice, 11 for 23, 129 yds., 3 Int.; Mukovich, 1 for 3, 26 yds. 

Florida - Peace, 20 for 24, 271 yds., 1 Int. 

RECEIVING: 

Maryland - Havener, 4 for 83; Sievers, 3 for 24. 

Florida - Collinsworth, 8 for 166, 2 TD's; Young, 8 for 66. 

RUSHING: 

Maryland - Wysocki, 39 for 159, 1 TD; Fasano, 3 for 13. 

Florida - Brown, 16 for 71; Peace, 6 for 12. 

Attendance - 52,541 

This was Maryland's first appearance in the Tangerine Bowl, played before a 
record crowd, 52,541 fans. The Terps were behind 14-9 at halftime, with their 
points coming on three Dale Castro field goals. After Maryland took a 20-14 
lead with five minutes gone in the third quarter, the Gators scored the next 21 
points. Castro's fourth field goal in the third quarter tied the bowl record. 



162 



Terp Bowls — The Aloha in 1982, The Citrus in 1983 



ALOHA BOWL - HONOLULU, HAWAII - 12/25/02 




Maryland 6 6 8 = 2C 

Washington 7 7 7 = 21 

W - Allen 27 pass from Cowan (Nelson kick); M - D'Addio 6 pass from 
Esiason (kick failed); W - Allen 71 pass from Cowan (Nelson kick); M - Tice 
36 pass from Esiason (run failed); M - Nash 2 run (Tice pass from Esiason); 
W - Allen 11 pass from Cowan (Nelson kick). 





TEAM STATISTICS 






Maryland 


Washington 


First Downs 


17 


20 


Rushes • Yards 


36-68 


27-63 


Passing Yards 


251 


369 


Return Yards 


45 


43 


Passing 


19-32-1 


35-55-0 


Punts - Avg. 


7-38.4 


5-45.4 


Fumbles - Lost 


2-1 


4-4 


Penalties ■ Yards 


8-55 


7-50 


Tune of Possession 


31:04 


28:56 



INDIVIDUAL LEADERS 
PASSING: 

Maryland - Esiason, 19 of 32, 1 TD 

Washington - Cowan, 33 of 55, 3 TD's 

RECEIVING: 

Maryland - Tice. 6 for 85 yds.; DAddio, 4 for 30 yds.; Nash, 3 for 52 yds. 

Washington - Skansi, 10 for 81 yds ; Allen, 8 for 152 yds., 3 TD's; Lutu, 7 for 

57 yds. 

RUSHING: 

Maryland - Nash, 11 for 41 yds.; Joyner, 10 for 28 yds. 

Washington - Robmson, 16 for 50 yds.; Cowan, 4 for 13 yds. 

Attendance - 30,055 

This was the first Aloha Bowl game. Maryland took a 20-14 lead with 10:44 
remaining in the game. With a chance to go up by 9 points with 3:39 left in 
the game. Jess Atkinson failed on a 32-yard field goal attempt. The Huskies 
then drove 80 yards and scored on a 11 -yard pass TD with six seconds left to 
play for the win. 



CITRUS BOWL - ORLANDO, FL - 12/17/03 



Florida Citrus Bowl 




.raiaVrd leather mil "bj tvrotcaroa w.afceE. wither - ' 1 " 




Tennessee vs. Maryland 
December 17. 1983, 8:00 p.m. Orlando, Florida 



Maryland 

Tennessee 

M - Atkinson 18 FG; 
Atkinson 48 FG; M - 



3 6 11 3 = 

7 3 6 14 = 

T - Taylor 12 pass from Cockrell (Reveiz kick); M - 
Atkinson 31 FG; T - Reveiz 25 FG; M - Atkinson 22 



FG; T - Henderson 19 run (pass failed); M - Badanjek 3 run (Badanjek run): 
T - J. Jones 1 run (Reveiz kick); T - J. Jones 2 run (Reveiz kick); 
M - Atkinson 26 FG. 





TEAM STATISTICS 






Maryland 


Tennessee 


First Downs 


17 


25 


Rushes - Yards 


34-95 


49-201 


Passing Yards 


253 


185 


Return Yards 


10 


26 


Passing 


18-28-1 


16-23-1 


Punts - Avg. 


0-0 


1-47 


Fumbles - Lost 


3-1 


1-1 


Penalties - Yards 


6-32 


1-5 


Time of Possession 


29:48 


30:12 



INDIVIDUAL LEADERS 
PASSING: 

Maryland - Esiason, 4 of 6 for 61 (Injured 2nd Q); Reich, 14 of 22, 192 yds., 1 

Int. 

Tennessee - Cockrell, 16 of 23, 185 yds., 1 TD, 1 Int. 

RECEIVING: 

Maryland - Davis. 4 for 66; Joyner, 4 for 65; Badanjek, 4 for 36. 

Tennessee - Duncan, 6 for 59; Taylor, 4 for 68. 1 TD. 

RUSHING: 

Maryland - Joyner, 17 for 58; Badanjek, 14 for 44, 1 TD. 

Tennessee - J. Jones, 29 for 154, 1 TD. 

Attendance - 50,183 

For the second consecutive year, the Terps were invited to a bowl game with 
an 8-3 record. Quarterback Boomer Esiason was sacked on the second play of 
the second quarter and suffered a shoulder injury forcing Frank Reich to take 
over. The Terps took a 20-16 lead mto the fourth quarter, but the Vols scored 
twice, the second after an interception return to the 14, to get the advantage. 
Jess Atkinson kicked 5 field goals for the Terps. 



163 



owls — The Sun in 1984, The Cherry in 1985 



SUN BOWL - EL PASO, TX - 12/22/84 




Maryland 22 6 = 2 

Tennessee 10 11 6 = 2 

T - Jones 2 run (Reveiz kick); T - Reveiz 24 FG; T - Reveiz 52 FG; T - 
McGee 6 pass from Robinson (McGee pass from Robinson); M - Neal 57 run 
(pass failed); M - Atkinson 23 FG; M - Badanjek 1 run (run failed); M - 
Edmunds 40 pass from Reich (Atkinson kick); T - Panuska 100 kickoff return 
(pass failed); M - Badanjek 1 run (pass failed). 



INDIVIDUAL LEADERS 
PASSING: 

Maryland - Reich, 17 of 28, 201 yds., 1 TD, 1 Int. 

Tennessee - Robinson, 15 of 24, 132 yds., 1 TD. 

RECEIVING: 

Maryland • Hill, 4 for 69; Edmunds, 3 for 53, 1 TD; Abdur- Ra'oof, 3 for 45; 

Tennessee - McGee, 6 for 66, 1 TD; Harvard, 3 for 22. 

RUSHING: 

Maryland - Neal, 12 for 107, 1 TD; Badanjek, 21 for 90, 2 

TD's; Blount, 14 for 80. 

Tennessee - Jones, 16 for 69, 1 TD; Robinson, 8 for 43. 

Attendance - 50,126 

The fantastic comeback year. Trailing the Volunteers 21-0 at halftime, the 
Terrapins showed coming back from halftime deficits was nothing new. They 
erupted for 22 third quarter points and a fourth quarter score with 5:35 left to 
play for the win. It was on November 10, they had fallen behind Miami, 31-0, 
at halftime but rallied for a 42-40 victory in the greatest comeback in major 
college history. Rick Badanjek had a pair of scores while QB Frank Reich was 
17 of 28, 201 yards and one touchdown for the ACC and Sun Bowl champions. 



CHERRY BOWL - PONT I AC. Ml - 12/21/85 




Maryland 6 22 7 = 35 

Syracuse 3 7 8 = 18 

S - McAulay, 26 FG; M - Gelbaugh, 4 run (kick failed); S - Drummond 10 
run (McAulay kick); M - Knight 4 pass from Gelbaugh (Badanjek lun); M - 
Tye, 8 fumble return (Plocki kick); M - Blount 20 run (Plocki kick); M - 
Abdur-Ra'oof 6 pass from Gelbaugh (Plocki kick); S - McPherson 17 run 
(Schwedes pass from McPherson). 





TEAM STATISTICS 






TEAM STATISTICS 






Maryland 


Tennessee 




Maryland 


Syracuse 


First Downs 


22 


13 


First Downs 


22 


28 


Rushes - Yards 


54-229 


34-148 


Rushes - Yards 


43-244 


39-241 


Passing Yards 


201 


132 


Passing Yards 


223 


204 


Return Yards 


44 


24 


Return Yards 


99 


135 


Passing 


17-28-1 


15-24-0 


Passing 


14-20-1 


18-30-3 


Punts - Avg. 


4-47 


5-42 


Punts - Avg. 


3-39 


1-52 


Fumbles - Lost 


2-2 


2-2 


Fumbles - Lost 


0-0 


3-2 


Penalties - Yards 


8-63 


6-49 


Penalty Yards 


5-54 


3-26 


Time of Possession 


35:57 


24:03 


Time of Possession 


30:54 


29:06 



INDIVIDUAL LEADERS 
PASSING: 

Maryland - Gelbaugh, 14 of 20, 223 yds., 2 TD's, 1 Int. 

Syracuse - McPherson, 18 of 30, 204 yds., 3 Int. 

RECEIVING: 

Maryland - Abdur-Ra'oof, 5 for 86, 1 TD; Edmunds, 2 for 56; Holder, 2 for 32; 

Milling, 2 for 26. 

Syracuse - Siano, 5 for 60; Schwedes, 4 for 69; Gnmes, 4 for 42. 

RUSHING: 

Maryland - Blount, 24 for 135, 1 TD; Badanjek, 11 for 41. 

Syracuse - McPherson, 21 for 111, 1 TD; Drummond, 10 for 93, 1 TD. 

Attendance - 51,858 

This was the second Cherry Bowl game in the Pontiac Silverdome. The Terps 
scored 22 points in the second quarter to take a 28-10 halftime lead. Each 
team then scored once in the third quarter. Quarterback Stan Gelbaugh, in his 
final game for Maryland, was named Offensive Player of the Game after 
completing 14 of 20 passes for 223 yards and a pair of touchdowns. It was to 
be Bobby Ross' final game as Maryland's head coach. 



164 



Terp Bowls — The Independence in 1990, Ranked Terps 



INDEPENDENCE BOWL - SHREVEPORT, LA - 12/15/90 



SfllUKDAY, MICIMBIK lh.lSSO 



S3.00 



II^PENDENCE BOWL 

■ e - Hi - 7 - • • - n ■ 

■■• ' #1 ■ '■•■■■■■■■■■■■■■•■■•• 
'■■ ■ » ■ > ' • • ' 
•'•>' * Vi\ ••■■■■■■■■■■••«•••••■ 

■*••■••■••■■■ 




LOUISIANA TECH 



VS. 



MARYLAND 



Maryland 14 6 4 = 34 

Louisiana Tech 14 14 6 = 34 

M ■ Jackson 1 run (DeArmas kick); M - Jackson 2 run (DeArmas kick); LaT - Richard- 
son 5 run (Bomol kick); LaT - Davis 3 run (Bonrol kick); LaT • Richardson 1 run (Bo- 
niol kick); M - Jackson 11 run (kick failed); LaT - Slaughter 11 pass from Johnson 
(Bomol kick); LaT - Bomol 36 FG; M - Mason 28 pass from Zolak (DeArmas kick); M - 
Johnson 15 pass from Zolak (DeArmas kick); LaT - Bomol 29 FG. 



First Downs 
Yards Rushing 
Yards Passing 
Total Yards 
Passing 
Punts-Average 
Fumbles-Lost 
Penalties-Yards 



TEAM STATISTICS 

Maryland 

25 

150 

254 

404 

18-29-3 

1-34.0 

3-1 

6-53 



Louisiana Tech 

16 

191 

115 

306 

11-18-1 

4-37.3 

1-1 

9-88 



INDIVIDUAL STATISTICS 
PASSING: 

Maryland - Zolak, 17 of 28, 215 yds., 1 TD, 3 Int.; Jackson, 1 of 1, 39 yds. 
LA Tech - Johnson, 7 of 8, 70 yds, 1 TD; Hughes, 4 of 9, 45 yds.; Slaughter, of 1, 

lint. 

RECEIVING; 

Maryland - Johnson, 5 for 107, 1 TD; Wycheck, 5 for 46; Mason, 3 for 47, 1 TD 
LA Tech - Slaughter, 5 for 66. 1 TD 

RUSHING: 

Maryland - Mason, 15 for 93; Jackson, 17 for 50. 3 TD 

LA Tech - Richardson, 27 for 81, 2 TD; Davis, 12 for 72, 1 TD 

Attendance - 48,325 

Although Maryland generated the statistical advantages, it was the Terps who 
needed to rally from being down, 31-20, with 13:52 to go to tie the game. The arm 
of Scott Zolak produced 28 yard (to Mark Mason) and 15 yard (to Barry Johnson on 
fourth down and 12 at La Tech's 15-yard line) TD strikes, the latter coming with 52 
seconds remaining. With the game in hand if it could hold the Techsters out of 
field goal range, Maryland failed to stop them and with no time remaining a field 
goal was kicked from 29 yards. High points for Maryland were Troy Jackson's three 
TDs. the running of Mason and the pass catching of Johnson. 



United Press International 



1951 

1. Tennessee 

2 Michigan State 

3 Illinois 

4. MARYLAND 

5. Georgia Tech 

6. Princeton 

7. Stanford 

8 Wisconsin 

9 Baylor 

10 TCU 

11 Oklahoma 

12. California 

13. Notre Dame 

14. San Francisco 
Purdue 
Washington State 

17. Holy Cross 

UCLA 

Kentucky 
20. Kansas 

1952 

1. Michigan State 

2. Georgia Tech 

3. Notre Dame 

4 Oklahoma 

use 

6. UCLA 

7. Mississippi 

8. Tennessee 
9 Alabama 

10. Wiscomsn 

11. Texas 

12. Purdue 

13. MARYLAND 
14 Princeton 

15. Ohio State 
Pittsburgh 

17. Navy 

18. Duke 

19 Houston 
Kentucky 

1953 

1. MARYLAND 

2. Notre Dame 

3. Michigan State 

4. UCLA 

5 Oklahoma 

6 Rice 

7. Illinois 

8. Texas 

9. Georgia Tech 
10 Iowa 

11. Alabama 

12 Texas Tech 

13 West Vugima 

14 Wisconsin 

15 Kenutcky 

16 Army 
17. Stanford 
18 Duke 

19. Michigan 

20 Ohio State 

1954 

1. UCLA 

2. Ohio State 

3. Oklahoma 

4. Notre Dame 

5. Navy 

6. Mississippi 

7 Army 

8. Arkansas 

9. Miami (Fla.) 

10. Wisconsin 

11. use 
MARYLAND 
Georgia Tech 



14 Duke 

15 Michigan 
16. Perm State 

17 SMU 

18 Denver 

19 Rice 

20 Minnesota 

1955 

1 Oklahoma 

2. Michigan State 

3. MARYLAND 

4. UCLA 

5. Ohio State 
6 TCU 

7. Georgia Tech 

8. Auburn 

9. Mississippi 

10. Notre Dame 

11 Pittsburgh 

12. USC 

13 Michigan 

14 Texas A&M • 

15. Army 

16. Duke 

17. West Vugima 

18. Miami (Fla.) 

19. Iowa 

20. Navy 
Stanford 
Miami (Ohio) 

1974 

l.USC 

2 Alabama 

3. Ohio State 

4. Notre Dame 

5. Michigan 

6. Auburn 

7. Penn State 

8. Nebraska 

9. North Carolina State 
10 Miami (Ohio) 

11. Houston 

12 Flonda 

13. MARYLAND 

14. Baylor 

15. Texas A&M 
Tennessee 

17 Mississippi State 

18. Michigan State 

19. Tulsa 
USC 

1975 

1. Oklahoma 

2. Arizona State 

3. Alabama 

4. Ohio State 

5. UCLA 

6 Arkansas 

7. Texas 

8. Michigan 
9 Nebraska 

10. Penn State 

11. MARYLAND 

12. Texas A&M 

13. Arizona 
Pittsburgh 

15 California 

16. Miami (Ohio) 

17. Notre Dame 
West Virginia 

19. Georgia 
Kentucky 

1976 

1. Pittsburgh 
2 USC 
3. Michigan 
4 Houston 



5. Ohio State 

6. Oklahoma 

7. Nebraska 

8 Texas A&M 

9. Alabama 
10 Georgia 
11. MARYLAND 
12 Notre Dame 
13. Texas Tech 

14 Oklahoma State 

15 UCLA 

16. Colorado 

17, Rutgers 
18 Iowa State 
19. Baylor 

North Carolina State 

1982 

1. Penn State 

2. SMU 

3. Nebraska 

4. Georgia 

5. UCLA 

6. Anzona State 

7. Washington 

8. Arkansas 

9. Pittsburgh 
10 Flonda State 
11. LSU 

12 Ohio State 

13. North Carolina 

14. Auburn 

15. Michigan 

16. Oklahoma 

17. Alabama 
18 Texas 

19. West Vuginia 

20. MARYLAND 

1984 

1 Bngham Young 

2 Washington 

3. Nebraska 

4. Boston College 

5. Oklahoma State 

6. Oklahoma 

7. Florida 

8. SMU 

9. USC 

10. UCLA 

11. MARYLAND 
12 Ohio State 

13. South Carolina 

14 Auburn 

15 Iowa 

16. LSU 

17. Virginia 

18 West Virginia 

19 Kentucky 
Flonda State 

1985 

1. Oklahoma 

2. Michigan 

3. Penn State 

4. Tennessee 

5. Air Force 

6. UCLA 

7. Texas A&M 

8. Miami (Fla.) 

9. Iowa 

10. Nebraska 

11. Ohio State 

12. Arkansas 

13. Florida State 

14. Alabama 
15 Baylor 

16. Fresno State 
17 Bngham Young 

18. Georgia Tech 

19. MARYLAND 

20. LSU 



165 



Ranked Terps, AP 8 USA Today Rankings 









Associated Press 










1949 


1951 


1952 




1953 


1954 




1955 


1. 


Notre Dame 


1. Tennessee 


1. Michigan State 


1 


MARYLAND 


1. Ohio State 


1 


Oklahoma 


2. 


Oklahoma 


2. Michigan State 


2. Georgia Tech 


2 


Notre Dame 


2. UCLA 


2 


Michigan State 


3. 


California 


3. MARYLAND 


3. Notre Dame 


3 


Michigan State 


3. Oklahoma 


3. 


MARYLAND 


4. 


Army 


4. Illinois 


4. Oklahoma 


4 


Oklahoma 


4. Notre Dame 


4 


UCLA 


5. 


Rice 


5. Georgia Tech 


5. USC 


5 


UCLA 


5. Navy 


5 


Ohio State 


6. 


Ohio State 


6. Princeton 


6. UCLA 


6 


Rice 


6. Mississippi 


6 


TCU 


7. 


Michigan 


7. Stanford 


7. Mississippi 


7 


Illinois 


7. Army 


7 


Georgia Tech 


8. 


Minnesota 


8. Wisconsin 


8. Tennessee 


8 


Georgia Tech 


8. MARYLAND 


8 


Auburn 


9. 


LSU 


9. Baylor 


9. Alabama 


9 


Iowa 


9. Wisconsin 


9 


Notre Dame 


10. 


Pacific 


10. Oklahoma 


10. Texas 


10 


West Virginia 


10. Arkansas 


10 


Mississippi 


11. 


Kentucky 


11. TCU 


11. Wisconsin 


11 


Texas 


11. Miami (Fla.) 


11 


Pittsburgh 


12. 


Cornell 


12. California 


12. Tulsa 


12 


Texas Tech 


12. West Virginia 


12 


Michigan 


13. 


Villanova 


13. Virginia 


13. MARYLAND 


13 


Alabama 


13. Auburn 


13 


USC 


14. 


MARYLAND 


14. San Francisco 


14. Syracuse 


14 


Army 


14. Duke 


14 


Miami (Fla.) 


15. 


Santa Clara 


15. Kentucky 


15. Florida 


15 


Wisconsin 


15. Michigan 


15 


Miami (Ohio) 


16. 


North Carolina 


16. Boston Univ. 


16. Duke 


16 


Kentucky 


16. Virginia Tech 


16 


Stanford 


17. 


Tennessee 


17. UCLA 


17. Ohio State 


17 


Auburn 


17. USC 


17 


Texas A&M 


18. 


Princeton 


18. Washington State 


18. Purdue 


18 


Duke 


18. Baylor 


18 


Navy 


19. 


Michigan State 


19. Holy Cross 


19. Princeton 


19 


Stanford 


19. Rice 


19 


West Virginia 


20. 


Missouri 
Baylor 


20. Clemson 


20. Kentucky 


20 


Michigan 


20. Penn State 


20 


Army 




1973 


1974 


1975 




1976 


1978 




1982 


1. 


Notre Dame 


1. Oklahoma 


1. Oklahoma 


1 


Pittsburgh 


1. Alabama 


1 


Penn State 


2. 


Ohio State 


2. USC 


2. Arizona State 


2 


USC 


2. USC 


2 


SMU 


3. 


Oklahoma 


3. Michigan 


3. Alabama 


3 


Michigan 


3. Oklahoma 


3 


Nebraska 


4. 


Alabama 


4. Ohio State 


4. Ohio State 


4 


Houston 


4. Penn State 


4 


Georgia 


5. 


Penn State 


5. Alabama 


5. UCLA 


5 


Oklahoma 


5. Michigan 


5 


UCLA 


6. 


Michigan 


6. Notre Dame 


6. Texas 


6 


Ohio State 


6. Clemson 


6 


Arizona State 


7. 


Nebraska 


7. Penn State 


7. Arkansas 


7 


Texas A&M 


7. Notre Dame 


7 


Washington 


8. 


use 


8. Auburn 


8. Michigan 


8. 


MARYLAND 


8. Nebraska 


8 


Clemson 


9. 


Arizona State 


9. Nebraska 


9. Nebraska 


9 


Nebraska 


9. Texas 


9 


Arkansas 




Houston 


10. Miami (Ohio) 


10. Penn State 


10 


Georgia 


10. Houston 


10 


Pittsburgh 


11. 


Texas Tech 


11. N. C. State 


11. Texas A&M 


11. 


Alabama 


11. Arkansas 


11 


LSU 


12. 


UCLA 


12. Michigan State 


12. Miami (Ohio) 


12 


Notre Dame 


12. Michigan State 


12 


Ohio State 


13. 


LSU 


13. MARYLAND 


13. MARYLAND 


13. 


Texas Tech 


13. Purdue 


13 


Florida State 


14. 


Texas 


14. Baylor 


14. California 


14. 


Oklahoma State 


14. UCLA 


14 


Auburn 


15. 


Miami (Ohio) 


15. Florida 


15. Pittsburgh 


15. 


UCLA 


15. Missouri 


15 


USC 


16. 


N. C. State 


16. Texas A&M 


16. Colorado 


16. 


Colorado 


16. Georgia 


16 


Oklahoma 


17. 


Missouri 


17. Mississippi State 


17. USC 


17. 


Rutgers 


17. Stanford 


17 


Texas 


18. 


Kansas 


Texas 


18. Arizona 


18. 


Kentucky 


18. N. C. State 


18 


North Carolina 


19. 


Tennessee 


19. Houston 


19. Georgia 


19. 


Iowa State 


19. Texas A&M 


19 


West Virginia 


20. 


MARYLAND 

Tulane 


20. Tennessee 


20. West Virginia 


20. 


Mississippi State 


20. MARYLAND 


20. 


MARYLAND 








USA Today 1 CNN 










1984 


1985 


1982 




1983 


1984 




1985 


1. 


Brigham Young 


1. Oklahoma 


1. Penn State 


1. 


Miami (Fla.) 


1. Brigham Young 


1. 


Oklahoma 


2. 


Washington 


2. Michigan 


2. SMU 


2. 


Auburn 


2. Washington 


2. 


Penn State 


3. 


Florida 


3. Penn State 


3. Nebraska 


3. 


Nebraska 


3. Florida 


3. 


Michigan 


4. 


Nebraska 


4. Tennessee 


4. Georgia 


4. 


Georgia 


4. Nebraska 


4. 


Tennessee 


5. 


Boston College 


5. Florida 


5. UCLA 


5. 


Texas 


5. Oklahoma 


5. 


Florida 


6. 


Oklahoma 


6. Texas A&M 


6. Arizona State 


6. 


Brigham Young 


6. Boston College 


6. 


Miami 


7. 


Oklahoma State 


7. UCLA 


7. Pittsburgh 


7. 


Michigan 


7. Oklahoma State 


7. 


Air Force 


8. 


SMU 


8. Air Force 


8. Arkansas 


8. 


Ohio State 


8. SMU 


8. 


Texas A&M 


9. 


UCLA 


9. Miami (Fla.) 


9. Clemson 


9. 


Florida 


9. MARYLAND 


9. 


UCLA 


10. 


use 


10. Iowa 


10. Washington 


10. 


Clemson 


10. South Carolina 


10. 


Iowa 


11. 


South Carolina 


11. Nebraska 


11. LSU 


11. 


Illinois 


11. USC 


11. 


Nebraska 


12. 


MARYLAND 


12. Arkansas 


12. Florida State 


12. 


SMU 


12. UCLA 


12. 


Alabama 


13. 


Ohio State 


13. Alabama 


13. Ohio State 


13. 


Alabama 


13. LSU 


13. 


Ohio State 


14. 


Auburn 


14. Ohio State 


14. USC 


14. 


Air Force 


14. Ohio State 


14. 


Florida State 


15. 


LSU 


15. Florida State 


15. Oklahoma 


15. 


West Virginia 


15. Auburn 


15. 


Arkansas 


16. 


Iowa 


16. Brigham Young 


16. Auburn 


16. 


Iowa 


16. Miami 


16. 


Brigham Young 


17. 


Florida State 


17. Baylor 


17. West Virginia 


17. 


Tennessee 


17. Florida State 


17. 


MARYLAND 


18. 


Miami (Fla.) 


18. MARYLAND 


18. MARYLAND 


18. 


UCLA 


18. Virginia 


18. 


Georgia Tech 


19. 


Kentucky 


19. Georgia Tech 


19. North Carolina 


19. 


Pittsburgh 


19. Kentucky 


19. 


Baylor 


20. 


Virginia 


20. LSU 


20. Texas 


20. 


Penn State 


20. Iowa 


20. 


Auburn 








21. Michigan 


21. 


Oklahoma 


21. West Virginia 


21. 


LSU 








22. Alabama 


22. 


Boston College 


22. Army 


22. 


Army 








23. Tulsa 


23. 


Oklahoma State 


23. Georgia 


23. 


Fresno State 








24. Iowa 


24. 


MARYLAND 


24. Air Force 


24. 


Georgia 








25. Florida 


25. 


East Carolina 


25. Notre Dame 


25. 


Oklahoma State 



166 



Terpundits, Jefferson-Pilot TV 8 Radio 



IP SPORTS 

Maryland Radio Network 

For most of Maryland's football century, young and old have 
leaned into their radios, ears cocked, to hear whether the Terps 
score, or hold at the one yard line. "He's up, he's over, Score 
Maryland!" The voice brings the ballcarrier to the mind, stretching 
as far as possible over the line, and landing in the end zone. And 
further, the mind imagines end zone celebrations and crowds going 
bonkers. Radio is more thorough in the mind's coverage of the game. 
How much easier is it to remember the game on the radio from long 
ago rather than the more recent TV game? 

Perhaps the mind remembers Jimmy Gibbons doing the play-by- 
play of Jim Tatum's national championship season, describing the 
big wins over Alabama and Mississippi. The voice is not the same, 
but Gibbons is still a part of Maryland broadcasts. He owns WFMD 
Radio in Frederick that carries Terp games as part of the Maryland 
Network. 

Other voices, other times at Maryland football games: Jim 
Simpson as WRC-TV sports director and play-by-play man, Dan 
Daniels, WTOP-TV, color commentator; WMAL's Steve Gilmartin and 
Mai Campbell. 

A tradition of recognizable Maryland voice is upheld nicely by 
Johnny Holliday, in his 13th year describing the play-by-play of 
Terrapin football and basketball games. Holliday's voice is Maryland 
to the listener's mind -he calls the winning touchdown, the winning 
basket. He is the smooth pro whose voice, without being loud, 
conveys great drama; whose voice, without losing any of its profes- 
sionalism, conveys the missed shot. 

Holliday's expertise is utilized by ABC Radio at the Olympic 
Games, by Home Team Sports in its premium cable package, and on 
WRC Radio in Washington as its morning drive time sports expert. 
Holliday began a closer relationship with Maryland Athletics by 
becoming an employee in 1991, guaranteeing the continuation of a 
quality Maryland voice. 

His teammate in the booth is Azizuddin Abdur-Ra'oof, the all-time 
leading receiver at Maryland. In his second yeai of supplying color 
commentary, "Ziz" until recently was the campus's Director of 
Maiketing and Membership Development m the Office of Alumni 
relations. He is currently working with Herff Jones, Inc. 



IP SPORTS 




ACC Television Terp Games 




September 12 N.C. State 


Noon 


November 7 at Florida State 


Noon 


November 14 Clemson 


Noon 



The first commercially televised game 

The first TV production as we know it today came 51 yeais ago 
on October 5, 1940, when Sully Krouse, Class of '41, and a band of 
Terps went north to Philadelphia to play Pennsylvania. At that game 
were two TV cameras with telescopic lenses and a set of announc- 
ers. The signal was first fed through a production unit that selected 
the best action to be transmitted eventually to sets in Philadelphia 
and as fai away as Reading. 

The first couch potatoes were journalists at the Warwick Hotel, 
engineers from Philco Inc., and viewers in many parts of the city 
who had television sets that were able to cany programming from 
station W3XE (in later yeais NBC outlet, WPTZ). The game was the 
opener for both teams and was part of a golden era m Eastern foot- 
ball when teams like Pennsylvania led the nation in attendance. 



The televised game most noted by historians as being first was 
an encounter between Fordham and Waynesburg at New York's 
Randall's Island in 1939. Compared to the 1940 production it was 
rudimentary, a one-shot experiment that ended with that game. The 
Maryland-Pennsylvania game was the first in a series of Penn home 
games carried by Philco that ran as regular, commerical program- 
ming for 12 years. (The end came in 1953 when the NCAA won a 
lawsuit against Notre Dame and Pennsylvania for the exclusive right 
to show all live college football games. Years later it seems a waste 
of lawsuit; the NCAA lost exclusive rights in the 1980s). But as any 
Philadelphian will tell you, it's just like New York to claim it 
invented everything. 



Maryland 
Radio Network 




Maryland 

Aberdeen WAMD-AM (970) 

Annapolis WYRE-AM (810) 

Baltimore WBAL-AM (1090) 

Cambridge WCEM-AM (1240) 

Chestertown WCTR-AM (1530) 

Frederick WFMD-AM (930) 

Hagerstown WARK-AM (1490) 

Thurmont WTHU-AM (1450) 

Lexington Park WPTX-AM (920) 

Ocean City WETT-AM (1590) 

PocomokeCity WDMV-AM (540) 

Salisbury WLVW-AM (960) 

Westmmster WTTR-AM (1470) 

Pennsylvania 

Carlisle WI00-AM (1000) 

Elizabethtown WPDC-AM (1600) 

Washington, D.C. 

Metro Washington WRC-AM (980) 

West Virginia 

Berkeley Sprmgs WCST-AM (1010) 




Radio 11 

WBAL 

Baltimore's NEWS-TALK Station 



TokMih 



WRC 980 AM 



WASHINGTON. DC 



167 



Terp Watchers — The Media 



Publication 


Cumberland Times 


Radio 


Television 


The Washington Post 


19 Mechanic St. 
Cumberland, MD 21502 


WRC Radio (202) 587-4900 


WRC-TV (202) 885-4451 


1150 15th St., N.W. 


(301) 722-4600 

Sports Editor: Mike Burke 


8121 Georgia Avenue 


(Channel 4 - NBC) 


Washington, DC. 20071 
(202) 334-7350 


Silver Spring, MD 20910 
Johnny Holliday 


4001 Nebraska Ave., N.W. 
Washington, DC. 20016 


Sports Editor: George Solomon 


Salisbury Times 


WTOP Radio (202) 895-5060 


George Michael/Wally Bruckner 


Beat Writer: Steve Berkowitz 


P.O. Box 1937 


3400 Idaho Avenue, N.W. 


WUSA-TV (202) 895-5600 


Columnist: Ken Denlinger 


Salisbury, MD 21801 


Washington, DC. 20016 


(Channel 9 - CBS) 


The Washington Times 

3600 New York Ave., N.E. 


(301) 749-7171 


Dave Johnson 


4100 Wisconsin Avenue, N.W. 


Sports Editor: Rick Cullen 


WMAL Radio (202) 686-3010/3098 


Washington, D.C. 20016 


Washington, DC. 20002 


Easton Star-Democrat 


4400 Jenifer St., N.W. 


Warner Wolf/Ken Mease 


(202) 636-3251 


1 Airport Drive 


Washington, DC. 20015 


WJLA-TV (303) 364-7726 


Sports Editor: Mark Green 


Easton, MD 21601 


Tim Brant/Ken Beatrice 


(Channel 7 - ABC) 


Beat Writer: TBA 


(301) 822-1500 


Sports Director 


3007 Tilden Street, N.W. 


Columnist: Dan Daly 


Sports Editor: Richard Midcap 


WINX Radio (301) 424-9292 


Washington, D.C. 20008 


Baltimore Sun 


Montgomery Journal 


P.O. Box 1726 


Mike Cairns/Rene Knott 


Calvert & Centre Sts. 


2 Research Court 


Rockville, MD 20850 


WTTG-TV (202) 895-3026 


Baltimore, MD 21203 


Rockville, MD 20850 


Doug Glotzbach 


(Channel 5 - Fox) 


(301) 332-6200 
Sports Editor: Jack Gibbons 
Beat Writer: Mike Preston 
Columnist: Mike Littwin 


(301) 670-1427 


Sports Director 


5151 Wisconsm Ave., N.W. 


Sports Editor: Jeff Thoreson 


WTEM Radio (301) 770-5700 


Washington, D.C. 20016 


Frederick News-Post 

200 E. Patrick St. 


11300 Rockville Pike 
Rockville, MD 20852 
Andy Pollin 
Sports Director 


Steve Buckhantz/Igus Johnson 
Sports Director 


Prince George's Journal 


Frederick, MD 21701 


WBOC-TV (410) 749-1111 

Radio-TV Park 


9426 Annapolis Rd. 


(301) 662-1177 


WYST (Independent) (301) 523-6900 


Salisbury, MD 21801 


Lanham, MD 20706 


Sports Editor: Stan Goldberg 


1111 Park Avenue/The Penthouse 


Bob West 


(301) 731-8330 


Terrapin Times 


Baltimore, MD 21201 


WMAR-TV (301) 377-7558 


Beat Writer: Mark Stewart 


P.O. Box 34405 


Bob Green 


(Channel 2 - NBC) 


The Diamondback/Sports Editor 


Bethesda, MD 20827 


WITH (301) 528-1230 


6400 York Road 


University of Maryland 


(301) 530-7703 


5 Light Street 


Baltimore, MD 21212 


3136 South Campus Dining Hall 


Editor/Publisher: Keith Cavanaugh 


Baltimore, MD 21202 


Scott Garceau/Keith Mills 


College Park, MD 20742 


Carroll County Times 


Cary Carlton 


WBAL-TV (301) 467-3000 


(301) 314-8200 


201 Railroad Ave. 


WFMD (Independent) (301) 948-8521 


(Channel 11 -CBS) 


Hagerstown Morning Herald 


P.O. Box 346 


P.O. Box 151 


3800 Hooper Ave. 


100 Summit Ave. 


Westminster, MD 21157 


Frederick, MD 21701 


Baltimore, MD 21212 


Hagerstown, MD 21740 


(301) 848-4400 


Pierce Michaels 


Vince Bagli/ Jerry Sandusky 


(301) 733-5131 


Sports Editor: Dave Ammenheuser 


WBAL Radio (301) 467-3000 


WJZ-TV (301) 578-7522 


Sports Editor: Art Carucci 
Beat Writer: Scott Reinardi 


USA Today 

Sports Department 
P.O. Box 500 


3800 Hooper Ave. 
Baltimore, MD 21211 


(Channel 13 - ABC) 
Television Hill 


Hagerstown Daily Mail 


Jeff Rimer/ Jim West 


Baltimore, MD 21211 


100 Summit Ave. 
Hagerstown, MD 21740 
(301) 733-5131 
Sports Editor: Larry Yanos 
Beat Writer: Larry Yanos 


Waslungton, DC. 20044 
(202) 276-3714 

Cambridge Daily Banner 

1000 Good Will Road 
P.O. Box 580 


Sports Director 

WMUC Radio (301) 314-7866 

University of Maryland 
P.O. Box 99 

College Park, MD 20742 
Sports Director 


John Buren/Chns Ely 
Sports Director 
WHAG-TV (301) 797-4400 

13 E. Washington Street 
Hagerstown, MD 21740 
Ted Alexander 


Annapolis Evening Capital 


Cambridge, MD 21613 


WALI Radio (301) 759-3600 


Sports Director 

News Channel 8 (703) 912-5300 

7600 D. Boston Blvd. 


2000 Capitol Drive 
Annapolis, MD 21404 


(410) 228-3131 

Sports Editor: John White 


516 White Avenue 
Cumberland, MD 21502 


(301) 263-5000 




Sports Director 


Springfield, VA 22153 


Sports Editor. Joe Gross 




WCBM Radio (410) 356-3003 


Dyrol Joyner 


Beat Writer: Brett Fnedlander 




68 Radio Plaza 






Owings Mills, MD 21117 


Sports Director 
WBFF-TV (301) 462-4500 






Shay Stevens 


3500 Parkdale Avenue 






Sports Director 


Baltimore, MD 21211 






WMET Radio (301) 428-3555 


Bruce Cunningham 


A 




20201 Watkins Mill Road 




^-*iit 




Gaithersburg, MD 20879 


'Azizuddin Abdur-ra'oof 


s\HA\ 




Christine Cole 


Football Analyst (301) 890-9080 

3404 Gateshead Manor Way #102 


f> vyr s*$~\ 






Silver Spring, MD 20904 


aS 






Wire Service 

Associated Press 

Dave Ginsburg 
222 St. Paul Place 
Baltimore. MD 21202 
(301) 539-3524 



168 



Welcome to Maryland 



4 BWI 
Airport 

USE EXIT 22A 



Directions 

to Byrci Stadium 

From Baltimore 

Interstate-95 South to Capital Belt- 
way (Intersate-495); follow signs to 
College Prk. U.S. 1 South 
(Interchange 25) After three traffic 
lights go West on Maryland 193. At 
second light, go left again onto Sta- 
dium Drive Byrd. Maryland's most 
historic stadium, is just ahead. 
From BWI 

(Baltimore/Washington 
International Airport) 
Baltimore-Washington Parkway 
(Maryland 295) south to Greenbelt 
Road (Maryland 193 West). Proceed 
through town of Greenbelt and take 
left on Stadium Drive (two lights af- 
ter crossing under U.S. 1). It's time to 
Terp Tailgate. 
From the East 
(Annapolis) 

U.S. 50 to Capital Beltway (Interstate 
495); north on Interstate 495 to Col- 
lege Park; exit Beltway at 
Interchange 25 (U.S. 1 South); pro- 
ceed through three lights and take 
Maryland 193 West Exit. Two lights 
later is Stadium Drive and the Lair of 
the Fighting Terp. 
From the West 
(Montgomery County) 
Capital Beltway (Interstate 495) to 
U.S. 1 South (Intercahnge 25); pro- 
ceed through two traffic lights and 
take Maryland 193 West Exit. A left 
two lights later at Stadium Dnve and 
it's Top Tailgating outside Byrd Sta- 
dium 

From National Airport 
Exit Airport and take Wilson Bridge 
to Capital Beltway (Interstate 495). 
Go North to Exit 25 (U.S. 1 South) Go 
through three lights and take Mary- 
land 193 West. Two lights later and 
it's a touch down at Byrd Stadium. 

Where to Stay 

Marriott 
6400 Ivy Lane 
Greenbelt 
(301)441-3700 

Holiday Inn 

7200 Hanover Dnve 

Greenbelt 

(301)982-7000 

Best Western 
Maryland Inn 
2601 Baltimore Blvd. 
College Park 
(301)474-2800 




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