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Full text of "University of Massachusetts Dartmouth General Catalogue, 2002-2003"

For University of Massachusetts policies 
see http://www.umassp.edu/policy/ 



Accreditation 

University of Massachusetts Dartmouth is 
accredited by the New England Association 
of Schools and Colleges, which accredits 
schools and colleges in the six New England 
states. Membership in the Association 
indicates that the institution has been 
carefully evaluated and found to meet 
standards agreed upon by qualified 
educators. Many specific programs are also 
accredited by professional or educational 
associations, as stated in the college and 
departmental sections of this publication. 

Compliance 

The University of Massachusetts Dartmouth 
complies with both the intent and spirit of 
appropriate federal and state antidiscrimina- 
tion laws including Title VII of the Civil 
Rights Act, Title IX of the Educational 
Amendments of 1972, Section 504 of the 
Rehabilitation Act of 1973, and the 
Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. 

Statement of Equal Opportunity and 
Affirmative Action 

University of Massachusetts Dartmouth 
wholeheartedly supports and encourages 
the development of action programs 
designed to promote the employment and 
advancement of women, Blacks, Latino, 
Asians, Native Americans, persons with 
disabilities, and Vietnam-era Veterans as a 
means of assuring compliance with the 
provisions of campus Affirmative Action 
plans. 

The University firmly supi- 's the concept 
of equal opportunity without regard to an 
individual's race, color, age, religion, 
gender, sexual orientation, national origin, 
disability, or veteran status as it applies to 
his/her employment, admission to and 
participation in the University's programs 
and activities, provision of services, and 
selection of vendors who provide services or 
products to the University. 

The following person has been designated 
to handle inquiries regarding the nondis- 
crimination policies: Assistant Chancellor for 
Equal Opportunity/Diversity/Outreach, Foster 
Administration Building, Room 323, 
University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, 285 
Old Westport Road, North Dartmouth, MA 
02747. Telephone 508 999-8008. 

Inquiries concerning the application of 
nondiscrimination policies may also be 
referred to the Regional Director, Office for 
Civil Rights, John F. Kennedy Federal 
Building, Room 1875, Government Center, 
Boston, MA 02203. 

Resolution in Support of Pluralism 

The Board of Trustees affirms its commit- 



ment to maintaining an academic environ- 
ment which fosters pluralism, mutual 
respect, appreciation of divergent views, 
and awareness of the importance of 
individual rights. To this end, we reassert 
the importance of civility and the valuable 
contribution that diversity in race, ethnicity, 
religion, sexual orientation and culture 
brings to the University community, and 
therefore we strongly encourage and 
support racial, ethnic, cultural and religious 
pluralism. (University of Massachusetts, 6/3/ 
92) 

Policy Against Intolerance 

The Board of Trustees denounces intoler- 
ance, particularly that based on ethnicity, 
culture, religion, race or sexual orientation 
which interferes with those rights guaran- 
teed by law, and insists that such conduct 
has no place in a community of learning. 
We also recognize the obligation of the 
University to protect the rights of free 
inquiry and expression, and nothing in the 
Resolution in Support of Pluralism or Policy 
Against Intolerance shall be construed or 
applied so as to abridge the exercise of 
rights under the Constitution of the United 
States and other Federal and State laws. 
(University of Massachusetts, 6/3/92) 

Statement on Cultural 
Diversity and Inclusion 

University of Massachusetts Dartmouth 
affirms its strong support and deep 
commitment to the continued development 
and maintenance of an academic commu- 
nity in which the individual dignity and 
potential of each of its members are given 
full respect, recognition, and encourage- 
ment. Our goal is an institution in which all 
may study, live, and work securely and 
productively in an atmosphere characterized 
by civility and openness to the pursuit of 
academic excellence in the finest tradition of 
academia. 

University of Massachusetts Dartmouth is 
opposed to and condemns racism. Acts of 
harassment, intimidation, or invasion of 
privacy which interfere with the rights of an 
individual or group to participate in the 
activities of the academic community shall 
be considered to be in violation of this 
policy and may be dealt with appropriately 
under applicable University codes and as 
regulated by statute. 

We recognize the affirmative obligation of 
the University to foster a diverse and 
integrated learning environment. To this 
end, the University has a responsibility to 
vigorously pursue efforts to attract 
minorities, women, and members of other 
historically disadvantaged groups as 
students, faculty members, and staff in 
sufficient numbers to alleviate isolation and 
to ensure real integration and diversity in 



academic life. We also recognize our 
obligation to nurture community-wide 
appreciation of cultural diversity and will 
dedicate appropriate resources to meet this 
commitment on an on-going basis. 

Statement on Sexual Harassment 

Sexual harassment is sex discrimination and, 
therefore, a violation of federal and state 
law. It is the policy of the University of 
Massachusetts that no member of the 
University community may sexually harass 
another. For purposes of this policy and 
consistent with federal regulations, sexual 
harassment is defined as follows: 

Unwelcomed sexual advances, requests for 
sexual favors and other verbal or physical 
conduct of a sexual nature constitute sexual 
harassment when: 
1. 

submission to such conduct is made either 
explicitly or implicitly a term or condition of 
an individual's employment or academic 
work, 
2. 

submission to or rejection of such conduct 
by an individual is used as the basis for 
employment or academic decisions affecting 
such individual or 
3. 

such conduct has the purpose or effect of 
unreasonably interfering with an individual's 
work performance or creating an intimidat- 
ing, hostile or offensive working or 
academic environment. 

It is the policy of the University of Massa- 
chusetts to protect the rights of all persons 
within the University community by 
providing fair and impartial investigations of 
all complaints brought to the attention of 
appropriate officials. Any member of the 
University community found to have violated 
this sexual harassment policy will be subject 
to disciplinary action. 

Chancellors are directed to take appropriate 
measures to inform each member of the 
University community of this policy 
statement and to develop procedures, in 
conjunction with the President's Office, for 
filing, hearing, and resolving complaints. 
(University of Massachusetts, 6/3/92) 

Statement on 
Gender Discrimination 

University of Massachusetts Dartmouth is 
committed to ensuring equality and 
avoiding gender discrimination. Therefore, it 
is the University policy to avoid, in all 
University publications and communications, 
the use of language that perpetuates 
gender bias. University employees are 
encouraged to use gender-neutral language. 
In selecting textbooks and readings of the 
very highest quality, faculty are urged to 
select those that are free of gender bias. 



University of Massachusetts 
Dartmouth 



General Catalogue 
2002—2003 



Undergraduate Programs 
and 

Courses, Policies, and 
Procedures 



University of Massachusetts Dartmouth (USPS #015-139) 
Volume 6, Number 7, July 2002 

University of Massachusetts Dartmouth is published once 

in January, thrice in April, twice in June, twice in July, twice 

in August, and twice in December by the 

University of Massachusetts Dartmouth 

285 Old Westport Road 

North Dartmouth, MA 02747-2300 

Periodicals postage paid at 

New Bedford, Massachusetts 02740 

POSTMASTER: 

Send address corrections to the 

University of Massachusetts Dartmouth, 

285 Old Westport Road 

North Dartmouth, Massachusetts 02747-2300 



Purposes of this Catalogue 



More information available on 
World Wide Web 



The 2002-2003 
General Catalogue 
was produced using 
Aldus PageMaker 6.5 
in Frutiger Light type. 



Editorial responsibilities 
for the publication 
reside with the 
Office of Academic Affairs 



General Editor 
Richard Panofsky 
Associate Vice Chancellor 
for Academic Affairs and 
Graduate Studies 

Managing Editor 
Catherine Sullivan 

Design and Editorial Assistance 
Margo J. Moore 



This catalogue is the official source of 
information about the University's under- 
graduate academic programs, its approved 
courses, and associated policies and 
procedures. Its purpose is to guide students 
in planning a course of study and in meeting 
program, department, and University 
requirements; and to provide information 
about the University to students, employees, 
applicants, parents, teachers, counselors, 
and the general public. See the table of 
contents and index for an outline of the 
information provided. 

This catalogue emphasizes the university's 
undergraduate programs. For centrality of 
reference, however, it lists all current 
graduate as well as undergraduate courses 
of the university. Please consult the 
Graduate Catalogue for detailed graduate 
program information. 

The information in this catalogue should be 
current for the time of publication, although 
some changes may have occurred between 
the time of going to press and the opening 
of the academic year. The University reserves 
the right to change at any time the degrees, 
programs, and services offered, the 
reguirements, and the courses. Corrections 
of errors may also be made. All official 
changes and corrections will be filed with 
the Office of Academic Affairs/Graduate 
Studies and the Registrar. 



The University of Massachusetts Dartmouth 
home page can be reached on the Internet's 
World Wide Web at: 

http://www.umassd.edu 

This complete catalogue, plus much more 
information about different aspects of the 
University, can be found from our home 
page. 

As this catalogue went to press, our 
constantly growing Web pages included not 
only detailed information about administra- 
tive and student offices and programs 
(Admissions, Career Services, Financial Aid, 
Sports, Student Organizations, to list just a 
few) but also specific sites or home-pages 
for many academic programs, special 
research or outreach projects, University 
news releases, personnel announcements, 
special events announcements, and a large 
variety of publications. Applicants can apply 
for admission using forms and instructions 
available on the Web. 

Most UMass Dartmouth programs host web 
sites of their own, accessible from our 
general site referenced above. There are also 
links to the other UMass campuses and to 
general information about the University of 
Massachusetts. 



Such charges as tuition and fees, the 
policies associated with such charges, and 
academic or general University policies are 
subject to change without notice. There will 
be no refund of tuition, fees, charges, or 
any other payments made to the University 
in the event that the operation of the 
University is suspended at any time as a 
result of any act of God, strike, riot, or 
disruption, or for any other reasons beyond 
the control of the University. 



The information in this publication is 
provided solely for the convenience of the 
reader, and the University expressly disclaims 
any liability which may otherwise be 
incurred. This publication is neither a 
contract nor an offer to make a contract. 



Table of Contents 



Programs and Accreditations 4 

Institutional History and Mission 6 

Academic Calendars 10 

Admission to the University 11 

Expenses and Student Financial Services 17 

The Campus Experience: Services and 24 
Support 

Academic Regulations and Procedures 36 

Special Learning Opportunities 54 

Outreach: Centers, Laboratories, 58 
Programs, and Events 

Key to Course Listings 63 

College of Arts and Sciences 65 

Biology 68 

Chemistry and Biochemistry 76 

Economics 91 

Education 96 

English 104 

Foreign Literature and Languages 1 18 

History 125 

Humanities and Social Sciences 133 

Mathematics 134 

Medical Laboratory Science 142 

Multidisciplinary Studies 148 

Philosophy 149 

Political Science 1 55 

Portuguese 161 

Psychology 166 

Sociology and Anthropology 1 72 

Charlton College of Business 181 

Accounting and Finance 186 

Management 191 

Marketing and Business Information Systems 195 



College of Engineering 202 

Civil and Environmental Engineering 207 

Computer and Information Science 212 

Electrical and Computer Engineering 222 

Mechanical Engineering 240 

Engineering Technology 248 

Physics 252 

Textile Sciences 260 

College of Nursing 271 

Adult and Child Nursing; Community Nursing 272 

College of Visual and Performing Arts 283 

Art Education 289 

Art History 294 

Design 299 

Fine Arts 314 

Music 319 

School for Marine Sciences and 330 
Technology 

Divisionof Continuing Education 334 

Interdisciplinary and Special Programs 336 

African and African-American Studies Minor 337 

Gerontology Minor and Certificate 340 

Honors Program 344 

International Marketing/French Certificate 346 

Judaic Studies Minor 347 

Labor Studies Minor and Certificate 349 

Post-Baccalaureate Certificate 354 

Pre-Law 355 

Pre-Medical 355 

Women's Studies Minor 356 
UMass Dartmouth/Southern New England 

School of Law Three-Plus-Three Program 360 

Trustees, Officers, and Faculty 363 

Index 378 

Directionsfor Travel and inside 
Correspondence back cover 



Academic Programs at UMass Dartmouth 



College of Arts and Sciences 

Department of Biology 
Biology BS 

Students may select an option: 
Marine Biology 
Biology/Marine Biology MS 

Department of Chemistry 
Chemistry BS 

Students may select one of these options: 

Biochemistry 

Environmental Chemistry 

Pre-Medical Chemistry 

BS-MS Option 
Biochemistry Minor 
Chemistry Minor 
Chemistry MS 

Chemistry PhD, Joint Program with UMass 
Lowell 

Chemistry PhD, Cooperative Program with 
UMass Amherst 

Department of Economics 
Economics BA 
Economics Minor 

Department of Education 
Elementary teacher certification 
Secondary teacher certification 

Department of English 
English BA 

Students will select one of these options: 

Drama/Film Studies 

Literature 

Writing/Communication 
Drama/Film Studies Minor 
Literature Minor 
Writing/Communication Minor 
Professional Writing MA 

Department of Foreign Literature and 

Languages 

French BA 

French Minor 

German Minor 

Spanish BA 

Spanish Minor 

Department of History 
History BA 
History Minor 

Department of Mathematics 
Mathematics BS or BA 

Students may select this option: 

Computer-Oriented Mathematics (BS 
only) 

Mathematics Minor 



Department of Medical Laboratory Science 
Medical Laboratory Science BS 

Students will select one of these options: 
Clinical 

Cytotechnology 

Department of Philosophy 
Philosophy BA 
Philosophy Minor 

Department of Political Science 
Political Science BA 
Political Science Minor 

Department of Portuguese 
Portuguese BA 
Portuguese Minor 

Department of Psychology 
Psychology BA 
Psychology MA 

Students will select one of these options: 

Clinical/Behavioral Psychology 

General Psychology 

Department of Sociology 
Sociology BA 

Students may select one of these options: 

Anthropology 

Criminal Justice 

Social Services 
Anthropology Minor 
Sociology Minor 

Interdepartmental 

Humanities and Social Sciences BA 

Multidisciplinary Studies BA or BS 

Pre-Law Program 

Pre-Medical Program 

African and African-American Studies Minor 

International Marketing/French Certificate 

Labor Studies Certificate 

Labor Studies Minor 

Master of Art in Teaching MAT 

Students will select one of these options: 
Middle & Secondary School Education 
options in business, English, 
foreign literature and languages 
(French, Portuguese, Spanish), 
history, mathematics, sciences, and 
social studies 
Elementary Education 



Charlton College of Business 

Department of Accounting and Finance 
Accounting BS 
Finance BS 

Post-baccalaureate Certificate in Accounting 

Department of Management 
Management BS 

Department of Marketing and Business 
Information Systems 
Marketing BS 

Business Information Systems BS 

Interdepartmental 

Business Administration Minor 

International Business Certificate 

Master of Business Administration MBA 

Master of Business Administration/Juris Doctor 

MBA/JD (Joint program with Southern New 

England School of Law) 

College of Engineering 

Department of Civil and Environmental 

Engineering 

Civil Engineering BS 

Department of Computer and Electrical 
Engineering 

Computer Engineering BS 

Electrical Engineering BS 

Electrical and Computer Engineering Minor 

Computer Engineering MS 

Electrical Engineering MS 

Electrical Engineering PhD 

Students will select one of these options: 
Electrical Engineering 
Computer Engineering 
Graduate Certificates in Acoustics, 

Communications, Computer Systems 

Engineering, Digital Signal Processing, 

Electrical Engineering Systems 

Department of Computer and Information 
Science 

Computer Science BS 

Computer Science Minor 

Software Engineering Minor 

System Software Minor 

Computer Science MS 

Graduate Certificate in Computer Science 

Department of Mechanical Engineering 
Mechanical Engineering BS 
Students may select an option: 
Manufacturing 
Mechanical Engineering MS 



4 



Listed by college and department are undergraduate majors and their formal options, with 
the degree offered; undergraduate minors; graduate programs and their formal options, 
with the degree offered; and formal certificate programs. 



Department of Physics 
Physics BS 

Students may select this option: 
Materials Science 
Environmental Physics Minor 
Physics Minor 
Physics MS 

Physics PhD, Cooperative Program with UMass 
Amherst 

Department of Textile Sciences 
Textile Chemistry BS 
Textile Science BS 

Students may select this option: 
Applied Fiber Materials 
Textile Chemistry MS 
Textile Technology MS 

Interdepartmental 

Graduate Certificate in Computer Systems 
(Departments of Computer and Information 
Science and Electrical and Computer 
Engineering) 

College of Nursing 

Departments of Adult and Child Nursing and 
Community Nursing 
Nursing BS 

Students are accepted into either the Basic 

Program or the RN track 

RN track students may select this option: 
BS-MS option 
Nursing MS 

Graduate Certificate in Nursing Leadership/ 

Management 
Graduate Certificate in Nursing Education 
Post-MS Adult Nursing Practitioner Certificate 

College of Visual and Performing Arts 

Department of Art Education 
Art Education BFA 
Art Education MAE 

Department of Art History 
Art History BA 
Art History Minor 

Department of Design 
Textile Design/Fiber Arts BFA 
Visual Design BFA 

Students will select one of these options: 
Ceramics 

Electronic Imaging 
Graphic Design 
Illustration 
Jewelry/Metals 
Photography 



Department of Fine Arts 
Painting/2D Studies BFA 
Sculpture/3D Studies BFA 

Department of Music 
Music BA 

Students may add one of these options: 
Western Music 

World/African American Music 

Music Education 

Music Technology 
Music Minor 
Music Therapy Minor 

In terdepartmen tal 
Certificate in Artisanry 
Certificate in Fine Arts 
Master of Fine Arts MFA 
Students will select one of these studios: 
Artisanry Studios 

Ceramics, Jewelry/Metals, Fibers/Textile 
Design, Wood and Furniture Design 
Fine Arts Studios 

Drawing, Painting, Printmaking, 
Sculpture 
Visual Design Studios 

Graphic Design, Electronic Imaging, 
Illustration, Multi-Media, Photography, 
Typography 

School of Marine Sciences and 
Technology 

Marine Sciences and Technology MS 
(jointly with UMass Amherst, Boston, and 
Lowell) 

Students will select one of these options: 
Modelling Marine & Atmospheric 
Systems 

Biogeochemical Cycles, Environmental 

Changes 
Coastal Systems Science 
Ocean and Human Health 
Integrated Coastal Management 
Living Marine Resources Science/ 

Management 
Marine Observation Biotechnology 

Marine Sciences and Technology PhD 
(jointly with UMass Amherst, Boston, and 
Lowell) 

Students will select one of these options: 
Modelling Marine & Atmospheric 
Systems 

Biogeochemical Cycles, Environmental 

Changes 
Coastal Systems Science 
Ocean and Human Health 
Integrated Coastal Management 
Living Marine Resources Science/ 

Management 
Marine Observation Biotechnology 



Interdisciplinary Graduate Program 

Biomedical Engineering/Biotechnology PhD 
(jointly with UMass Boston, Lowell, and 
Worcester) 

Students will select one of these options: 
Agricultural Biotechnology 
Biomechanics 

Biomedical Information Systems 

Molecular Biotechnology 

Medical Physiology, Radiological Science 

Bioprocessing, Applied Microbiology 

Biomedical Instrumentation 

Biomaterials 

Interdisciplinary Minors and Special 
Programs/Curricula 

Gerontology Certificate 
Gerontology Minor 
Honors Program 
Judaic Studies Minor 

Post-Baccalaureate Certificate Program (allows 
individuals with bachelor's degrees to 
design their own certificate program) 

UMass Dartmouth/Southern New England 
School of Law Three-Plus-Three Program 

Women's Studies Minor 



5 



Accreditations 



UMass Dartmouth has full accreditation from the regional accrediting organization for New 
England higher education institutions: 

New England Association of School and Colleges (NEASC). 



Some academic fields have external accrediting agencies which review and accredit academic 
programs or the campus, in addition to regional accreditation. These agencies accredit 
programs either at the undergraduate level only or at all levels of study. 



The following specific UMass Dartmouth programs are accredited: 



Art Education, Art History, Visual Design, 
Textile Design, Artisanry, and Fine Arts 

Chemistry (BS level) 

Civil Engineering, Computer Engineering, 
Computer Science, Electrical Engineering, 
Mechanical Engineering (BS levels) 

MBA, Accounting, Business Information 
Systems, Finance, Management, Marketing 

Medical Laboratory Science 
Nursing 



Teacher Certification program, Master's 
of Art in Teaching, Art Education 



National Association of Schools 
of Arts and Design (NASAD) 

American Chemical Society (ACS) 

Accreditation Board for Engineering 
and Technology 



AACSB International (Association to 
Advance Collegiate Schools of Business) 

National Accrediting Agency for 
Clinical Laboratory Sciences (NAACLS) 

The National League for Nursing 
Accrediting Commission (NLNAC) 

Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
Department of Education/National 
Association of Departments of 
Teacher Education (NASDTEC) 



UMass Dartmouth's 




External Identification Numbers 


College Board 


3786 


FAFSA 


002210 


IPEDS UNITID 


167987 


FICE/OPEID 


002210 


Federal TIN 


04-3167352 


DUNS 


78-395-6568 


(Dunn & Bradstreet) 




Carnegie Classification 




Master's (Comprehensive) 


Universities and Colleges 1 



6 



Introduction to the University 



The University of Massachusetts 



The University of Massachusetts 
Dartmouth 



Founded as an agriculture college in Amherst 
in 1863, the University of Massachusetts is a 
uniquely American institution, a public land- 
grant university. Such institutions have three 
basic characteristics: 
• 

First, they are "people's universities," 
intended to serve all students who can do the 
academic work. 
• 

Second, they are committed to practical as 

well as theoretical education. 

• 

Third, they put new knowledge to work for 
the common good. 

With those firm guidelines and a modest start 
from the sale of federal lands, the Amherst 
college grew to become the modern 
University of Massachusetts, the largest 
university, public or private, in New England. 
The UMass of today includes campuses in 
Amherst, Boston, Dartmouth, and Lowell and 
a medical school in Worcester. 



UMass Dartmouth provides educational 
programs, research, and continuing 
education services in the liberal and creative 
arts and sciences and in the professions. It 
offers a broad range of baccalaureate and 
graduate degrees vital to the economic and 
cultural well-being of the region and the 
Commonwealth. 

The Dartmouth campus traces its roots to 
1 895. In that year the legislature chartered 
the New Bedford Textile School and the 
Bradford Durfee Textile School in Fall River. 

As the region's economic base shifted from 
textiles to more diverse manufacturing and 
service industries, the colleges changed too. 
They diversified their curricula, responding to 
the needs of new generations of students. By 
the middle of the 20th century they were 
growing rapidly, spurred by such forces as 
the Gl Bill and the clear economic and social 
advantages of a well-educated citizenry. They 
had become multipurpose institutions, 
preparing engineers, health care workers, 
teachers, and business leaders. 

In 1962 the state legislature created 
Southeastern Massachusetts Technological 
Institute by merging the New Bedford Textile 
School and the Bradford Durfee Textile 
School. The 710 acre campus in North 
Dartmouth, part way between New Bedford 
and Fall River, was begun in 1964. The 
dramatic campus design was the work of 
architect Paul Rudolph, then dean of Yale's 
School of Art and Architecture. 



In 1991 a new University of Massachusetts 
structure combined the Amherst, Boston, and 
Worcester campuses with Southeastern 
Massachusetts University and the University 
of Lowell. Thus Southeastern Massachusetts 
University became the University of Massa- 
chusetts Dartmouth. 

In 1994 UMass Dartmouth received approval 
to offer its first PhD degree, in Electrical 
Engineering. It also offers several joint 
doctoral programs with other UMass 
campuses. 

In 1997 construction was completed of the 
building for the present School for Marine 
Science and Technology, located on 2.6 acres 
in New Bedford near Buzzards Bay. A full 
program of research and development is now 
supported in this facility. Two new student 
residence buildings have been completed in 
2002. Starting in 1997, student/faculty teams 
have engaged in landscaping beautification 
projects across campus. 

UMass Dartmouth has more than 7,500 
students, more than 3,200 of whom live on 
campus. It offers 37 undergraduate majors 
and 18 graduate degree programs, and has 
more than 320 full-time faculty. 



There was a clear public demand for a 
comprehensive university, and in 1969 SMTI 
became Southeastern Massachusetts 
University. 

The university continued to grow through the 
1 970s when its residence halls were finished 
and through the '80s as research and studio 
facilities came into being. In 1988 the Dion 
Science and Engineering Building was 
opened, as was the Cedar Dell Townhouse 
Complex. Also in 1988, the Swain School of 
Design merged with the university's College 
of Visual and Performing Arts, strengthening 
programs in art and artisanry. The Swain 
merger brought additional art facilities in 
New Bedford to the university. 



7 



The University of Massachusetts Mission 



Strategic Priorities of the University 
of Massachusetts 



The University's mission is to provide an 
affordable education of high quality and 
conduct programs of research and 
public service that advance our knowl- 
edge and improve the lives of the 
people of the Commonwealth. 

"...it is for life, not only for a living, that 
we must prepare our students. " 
— William M. Bulger, President 



D 

The University shall maintain the highest 
standard of academic excellence. 

The University of Massachusetts shall provide 
a quality, affordable university education to 
the citizens of the Commonwealth. The 
University shall strive to serve all qualified 
students regardless of their economic means. 
The University shall pursue distinction in its 
research and scholarship. 
2) 

The University shall maintain an 
atmosphere where each person, 
regardless of religious, ethnic, economic 
or social background, will be comfort- 
able. 

The University shall enroll and employ a 
diverse community of people. 



3) 

The University shall offer and promote 
distinctive forms of public service. 

The University of Massachusetts shall provide 
the state with policy research, programs, and 
leadership to address public needs. The 
University shall support efforts to improve 
primary and secondary education and shall 
expand its continuing education programs to 
encourage lifelong learning. The University 
shall continue to promote the economic 
development of the state and its regions. 
4) 

The University shall develop and manage 
its resources effectively. 

The University shall wisely manage existing 
resources and aggressively develop new 
sources of revenue to meet operating and 
capital needs. 
5) 

The University shall demonstrate the 
excellence and advance the unique 
missions of its five campuses. 

The University shall encourage its five 
campuses to pursue with distinction their 
respective strengths and strive to serve the 
best interests of their communities. 



The UMass Dartmouth Vision 



Drawing from the vision statement for the 
entire University of Massachusetts, UMass 
Dartmouth developed a campus vision 
statement in 1992 placing emphasis on a 
special relationship between undergraduate 
and graduate education. Here's that 
statement: 



The University of Massachusetts Dartmouth 
distinguishes itself by providing an intimate 
academic environment where the scholarly 
research and creative activities of faculty and 
graduate students are interwoven with the 
undergraduate experience. More than a 
regional university, the Dartmouth campus 
offers programs of educational excellence to 
undergraduate and graduate students from 
throughout the Commonwealth and beyond. 
While its academically distinguished faculty 
engage in professional activities of national 
and international scope, the campus has long 
been committed to economic development 
and has been a catalyst for regional 
initiatives. The university will continue its 
commitments to education and public service 
while expanding research efforts, establishing 
additional graduate programs, and address- 
ing the educational needs of the state's 
increasingly diverse population. Its mission 
will reflect the university's in the following 
ways: 



Access — Providing, within a personalized 
setting, a wide range of high quality 
baccalaureate and masters programs and 
selected doctoral programs; meeting the full 
financial need, as defined by standard 
measures, of all qualified applicants; 
strengthening student outreach efforts and 
collaboration with schools and community 
colleges; encouraging and supporting the 
educational aspirations of under-represented 
student populations, thereby increasing the 
diversity of the campus community; easing 
transfer among institutions; and offering 
flexible programs for working adults. 

Excellence — Offering intellectually challeng- 
ing undergraduate and graduate programs 
that meet both individual student needs and 
those of the state; offering solid liberal arts 
curricula, for their own sake and as a 
foundation for professional programs; 
obtaining and maintaining national program 
accreditation where applicable; exposing 
students to new ideas and developments in 
their fields through close interaction with 
faculty; and building distinctive doctoral 
programs where research strengths exist and 
where special resources and needs are 
identified, such as the coastal marine 
environment, and including joint programs 
with other UMass campuses. 

Innovation — Enabling undergraduate and 
graduate students to experience the creation 
and application of new knowledge by 
expanding opportunities for them to 
participate in faculty research on campus and 
internships at nearby public and private 
organizations, thereby enriching students' 
education and aiding development in the 
region; continuing to create innovative 
interdisciplinary courses and degree 
programs, such as project-driven courses and 
community-based collaborative projects in 
health, education and the social sciences; and 
placing increased emphasis on a holistic 
approach to the undergraduate experience. 

Economic Development and Global 
Competitiveness — Modernizing under- 
graduate and graduate education and 
supporting economic development by more 
closely linking liberal and professional 
education with the workplace, so that 
students can better integrate and apply their 
knowledge as they learn; providing research 
and technology transfer to marine and 
environmental industries; and providing 
research assistance and consultation to 
business, labor, government, health care and 
social service organizations. 



Public Service — Improving the effectiveness 
of elementary and secondary education 
through collaborative undergraduate and 
graduate teacher education and in-service 
programs; adding cultural dimension to the 
lives of citizens through exhibitions and 
performances in the visual and performing 
arts; and providing support to businesses, 
human services organizations, and munici- 
palities through research and policy analysis, 
student internships, forums, training 
assistance, and community-based programs. 

Quality of Life — Enhancing and supporting 
the quality of life for individuals within a 
culturally diverse university community and 
for the citizens of the region by providing 
university-level library resources, distin- 
guished programs in the visual and creative 
arts, and an accessible, stimulating intellec- 
tual environment; celebrating the cultural 
and linguistic richness of the area in studies 
and events; hosting eminent scholarly 
forums; and building a university community 
that fosters personal development, respect 
for the individual and cultural diversity of 
others and responsible citizenship. 



9 



Academic Calendar 



2002-2003 



First Semester - Fall 2002 

Sunday, September 1 
Monday, September 2 
Tuesday, September 3 

Monday, October 14 
Wednesday, October 16 
Monday, November 1 1 
Tuesday, November 12 
Wednesday, November 27 

Monday, December 2 
Friday, December 13 
Monday, December 16 
Saturday, December 21 



Academic year commences 
Labor Day, no classes 
Fall classes begin 
Freshman Convocation 
Columbus Day, no classes 
Follow Monday's schedule 
Veterans' Day, no classes 
Follow Monday's schedule 
Thanksgiving recess begins 
(after last class or lab) 
Class resume, 8:00 am 
Fall classes end 
Examinations begin 
Examinations end 



Intersession 2003 



Thursday, January 2 
Monday, January 20 

Wednesday, January 22 
Thursday, January 23 



Intersession commences 
Martin Luther King Jr.'s Birthday 
University closed 
Last intersession class day 
Intersession Final examinations 



Second Semester - Spring 2003 



Monday, January 27 
Monday, February 17 
Tuesday, February 18 
Friday, March 14 

Monday, March 24 
Monday, April 21 
Wednesday, May 7 
Wednesday, May 14 
Thursday, May 1 5 
Friday, May 16 
Thursday, May 22 
Monday, May 26 



Spring classes begin 
Presidents' Day, no classes 
Follow Monday's schedule 
Spring vacation begins 
(after last class or lab) 
Classes resume, 8:00 am 
Patriots' Day, no classes 
Honors Convocation 
Spring classes end 
Study Day 
Examinations begin 
Examinations end 
Memorial Day, University closed 



To be Announced 



Commencement 



10 



Admission to the University 



Phone: 508-999-8605 General Application Procedures Applicant Types 

www:umassd.edu 



Undergraduate admission to the university is 
selective, based on academic performance 
and promise. The university is interested in 
applicants whose scholastic performance, 
aptitude, interests, character, and study 
habits give promise of success. 

UMass Dartmouth admits its applicants into 
a specific curriculum, which is either a 
certain major or a cluster of majors. 
Applicants are evaluated both by general 
standards of qualification to do university 
work and by special standards for admission 
into the academic areas that they request. 
Access to programs may be limited by 
constraints of space and financing. 

Each applicant's overall record is assessed 
for both strengths and weaknesses as 
indicated by such records as the candidate's 
secondary school class standing; subjects 
completed, curricular levels, and grades 
received; SAT or ACT scores; college-level 
records for transfer applicants; and other 
appropriate indicators. This approach gives 
attention to each applicant as an individual. 
We do not make admissions decisions based 
on quotas or formulas. 

UMass Dartmouth admits applicants by 
"rolling admission." This means that there is 
no set deadline and qualified candidates will 
be accepted until the time when the 
university's capacity has been reached in the 
program of choice. 

Interviews and Campus Visits 

We invite applicants and family members to 
visit the campus and become acquainted 
with the university. A personal interview is 
not required. Several times each week from 
October to April, and on many Saturdays, 
the Admissions Office schedules information 
sessions and campus tours. Tours are also 
available during the summer. Individual 
tours can also be arranged. Those interested 
are invited to call. Classroom visits may be 
arranged in some majors. 



Freshman applicants should complete their 
applications as soon as possible after the 
conclusion of the first marking period of 
their senior year, preferably before the end 
of December and at the latest by March. 
Transfer applicants should apply as soon as 
they can after their fall semester grades are 
available. 

As soon as a sufficient number of qualified 
candidates for the available space in each 
program — and for on-campus housing — 
have been admitted, admission into that 
program will be closed. After March, some 
well-qualified candidates may be denied 
entrance to the university or to their first- 
choice program. The general laws of supply 
and demand have a significant effect on the 
admissions process. As the interests of 
students change from time to time, 
enrollment pressures in different fields of 
study either increase or diminish. 

The university requires each applicant to 
submit the record of prior schooling and the 
results of standardized test scores. Other 
information may be requested, and all 
information submitted will be considered. 
Every year, the university's Admissions 
Viewbook gives complete information and 
instructions, identifying the specific records 
and other information that must be 
submitted. The Viewbook also contains an 
application form. Those interested are 
invited to call to request a copy. 



Application/Processing Fees 

Reasonable nonrefundable application fees 
are charged as announced in the next 
section of this Catalogue. 

The application fee may be waived upon 
demonstration of significant financial 
hardship. Secondary school students who 
are eligible for the College Board Admis- 
sions Testing Program's fee waiver should 
have their school counselors attach a copy 
of that waiver form to the UMass Dart- 
mouth application. Transfer and "adult" 
applicants should support a written fee 
waiver request with a letter from a social 
worker, financial aid officer, or member of 
the clergy. 



Two Main Types: Freshman and Transfer 
Applicants 

Applicants who will have secondary school 
or equivalency diplomas and who have 
never attended degree-granting post- 
secondary educational institutions are 
considered for freshman admission. Also 
considered for freshman admission are 
applicants who have successfully completed 
fewer than 1 5 semester credits of college 
study. 

All who have attended degree-granting 
post-secondary educational institutions and 
completed 1 5 or more credits are consid- 
ered transfer applicants. 

Whether applying for freshman or transfer 
admission, those who completed secondary 
school at least three years prior to entering 
the university are not required to submit 
standardized test scores for admission. 
Approximately one quarter of our entering 
students are in this "Returning Students" 
category, and the admissions staff is 
available to advise applicants with any 
special circumstances. Returning Student 
applicants who would like to discuss their 
educational plans are encouraged to 
telephone to arrange an appointment. 

Freshman Applicants for Early Decision 

Those freshman applicants whose secondary 
school grades and SAT scores are strong, 
and who have decided that UMass 
Dartmouth is their first choice, may apply for 
Early Decision. They benefit by receiving a 
decision before the number of available 
spaces begins to decline; in return, once 
accepted they must submit a non-refund- 
able deposit and withdraw all applications 
to other colleges or universities. For Early 
Decision consideration, the completed 
application form, school records through the 
end of the junior year, and official SAT 
scores (taken before the senior year), must 
be received by November 1 5; decisions will 
be mailed by December 1 5. 

Alternative Admission for Academically 
Disadvantaged New Freshmen 

The university realizes its commitment to 
equal access through alternative admission 
programs. Although they may not have met 
entrance standards in prior schooling or as 
expressed in performance on standardized 
tests, students in these programs do achieve 
levels of academic accomplishment 
comparable to those of other students at 
the university. The university is committed to 
the recruiting, counseling, and special 
academic services which have proven 



11 



Freshman Admission 
to the University 

Qualifications for Admission 



effective in enabling these students to 
achieve their full potential. 

Academically disadvantaged students who 
have the ability, desire, and motivation to 
benefit from the university's programs, but 
who lack qualifications for admission, can 
apply to enter UMass Dartmouth through 
the alternative admissions program, called 
College Now . Applicants must be in-state 
residents, cannot exceed 24 transferable 
college credits, and must meet at least one 
of the following eligibility criteria: low 
income status, limited English background, 
first generation to attend college, disability, 
or ethnic student of color status. College 
Now is a fall admissions program only. The 
Admissions Viewbook gives detailed 
instructions, and the program is described 
elsewhere in this Catalogue. 

Some applicants interested in a scientific or 
technical major who lack the secondary-level 
preparation may be offered participation in 
the Start Program ("Steps Toward 
Abstract Reasoning and Thinking"). Women 
and students of color, as groups traditionally 
under-represented in the scientific and 
technical fields, are eligible for this 
freshman-year program of special courses. 
Those who indicate a first-choice major in a 
science or engineering field are considered. 
The START curriculum helps its students 
acquire math, science, and reasoning skills 
in a special first year program of courses in 
mathematics, science concepts, and 
problem-solving. 

Students admitted to these programs 
receive conditional admission to the 
university. To remain at the university after a 
stipulated trial period, they must satisfy 
conditions for academic performance and 
progress that are stated clearly in the offer 
of admission. They should expect to spend 
five years to complete the degree. 

Early Admission for New Freshmen 

Superior secondary school students 
sometimes exhaust the curricular offerings 
of their schools by the end of the junior 
year. These students may seek admission to 
UMass Dartmouth without a secondary 
school diploma. Their high school records 
and SAT scores must both be superior. They 
must also obtain from an official of their 
secondary school a written agreement that a 
secondary-level diploma will be granted 
upon satisfactory completion of one or two 
semesters of college work. 



Dual Enrollment Program 

UMass Dartmouth welcomes students from 
current secondary school interested in 
pursuing studies under the Common- 
wealth's Dual Enrollment program. This 
program, funded by special legislation, 
covers the cost for qualified Massachusetts 
public school students to take courses at the 
university. Students generally enroll in one 
or two courses, enrolling concurrently in 
high school and university courses. Students 
and parents should contact their high school 
guidance office or the Office of Admissions 
for assistance. 



Secondary-Level Preparation: 
College-Preparatory Units 

It is expected that an applicant's secondary 
school record will include at least 16 units of 
college preparatory courses: 
• 

4 units in English 
• 

2 units in social science including one in U.S. 
history 

• 

3 units in mathematics 

2 units in the same foreign language 
• 

3 units in a science (two years with 
laboratory) 

• 

2 units of college-preparatory electives. 

One or more of these requirements may be 
waived for applicants who present alterna- 
tive indications of academic potential. 

Secondary-Level Preparation: 
Program-Specific 

Certain programs within the university 
require specific course backgrounds in 
addition to the general secondary-level 
requirements stated above. On the other 
hand, the Admissions Office will consider 
persons of extraordinary promise and talent 
for admission into a program even though 
they do not meet all of its prior-course 
requirements. 
• 

Chemistry, Computer Science, Engineering, 
Mathematics, Physics, and Textile Chemistry 
require 3 and one-half units in college- 
preparatory mathematics which must 
include at least 2 units in algebra and one- 
half unit in trigonometry; and either (a) 
physics and chemistry, one of which must 
be a laboratory course, or (b) 3 units in 
natural science, one of which must be a 
laboratory course in physics or chemistry. 
Physics is strongly recommended for all 
engineering applicants. 
• 

Biology, Medical Laboratory Science.and 
Nursing require 3 units of college-prepara- 
tory mathematics, which must include 2 
units of algebra; and 2 units of natural 
laboratory science. Physics is strongly 
recommended for all engineering technol- 
ogy applicants and chemistry for all nursing 
and Medical Laboratory Science applicants. 
• 

Business requires 3 units of college- 
preparatory mathematics, which must 
include 2 units of algebra. 



12 



Admission 



Transfer Admission 
to the University 



Humanities and Social Sciences majors 
receive the degree of Bachelor of Arts. This 
degree requires that students satisfy a 
foreign language requirement. Therefore, 
we specifically consider the performance of 
our humanities and social sciences appli- 
cants in their secondary school foreign 
language courses. 

College Board Scholastic Assessment 
Test (SAT) Results 

The university uses SAT results as one means 
of assessing applicants' academic potential. 
The results of the ACT may be substituted. 

The Admissions Bulletin gives full informa- 
tion about how to register and have score 
reports sent. 

College Board Subject Achievement Tests 
are not required but the university urges 
applicants to submit these test results in 
appropriate subject matter areas. The 
achievement tests have significant predictive 
value, especially in the sciences, and can be 
a valuable source of data in the decision 
process. 

Exceptions to the SAT Requirement 
• 

Applicants who have left high school three 
or more years ago (or who have completed 
30 or more transferrable credits at a college 
or university) are not required to submit SAT 
scores. 
• 

Massachusetts residents who have been 
diagnosed as having a learning disability 

as determined by Chapter 766 or Chapter 
344 may submit, instead of the SAT, proof 
of a diagnosis of a learning disability. 

Applicants from a Second-Language 
Background 

Sensitive to its location in an area of ethnic 
diversity, the university recognizes the 
barrier which the cultural and linguistic 
assumptions of standardized tests place 
between talented students for whom 
English is a second language and access to 
academic programs from which they can 
benefit. We will exempt students for whom 
English is a second language from those 
portions of our admissions standards which 
place them at a disadvantage. 

Quality of Performance in Previous 
Schooling and on the SATs 

For both freshman and transfer decisions, 
the evaluation of each applicant relies on an 
assessment of the quality of the applicant's 



previous school performance, test scores, 
abilities, and other aspects that are relevant 
to a prediction of probable success at the 
university. For each of the majors and 
curricula, somewhat different criteria are 
applied. The derivation of these criteria is 
the responsibility of the departments and 
colleges, in close cooperation with the 
representatives of the Admissions Office, 
who will implement the criteria in individual 
admissions decisions. 

Information about the university's previous 
application decisions is routinely made 
available to secondary-school counselors. 
Applicants are encouraged to consult these 
officials at their institutions for advice about 
their prospects for admission to the 
university. 

Some freshman applicants who are denied 
admission are advised by our admissions 
officials to pursue studies at a community 
college for one or more semesters and to 
reapply for admission. Subsequent admis- 
sion is not automatic but conditional on 
good performance at the community 
college. 



UMass Dartmouth welcomes transfer 
applications from students attending, or 
who have attended, public or private two- 
and four-year institutions. The university 
strives especially to facilitate the transfer of 
students from Massachusetts public 
community colleges through a variety of 
special contacts and communications. We 
accept the Commonwealth Transfer 
Compact. 

Information about the university's previous 
application decisions is routinely made 
available to community college transfer 
officials. Applicants are encouraged to 
consult the officials at their institutions for 
advice about their prospects for admission 
to the university. 

Some transfer applicants with few com- 
pleted college credits who have been denied 
admission may be advised by our admissions 
officials to pursue studies at a community 
college for one or more semesters and then 
reapply for admission. Subsequent admis- 
sion is not automatic but conditional on 
good performance at the community 
college. 



Community College/UMass Dartmouth 
Joint Admission 

The university offers access to a significant 
group of students through formal Joint 
Admission Agreements with all public 
community colleges in Massachusetts. The 
university also has agreements with the 
Community College of Rhode Island, Dean 
College, and Quincy College. 

By the joint admission agreement, students 
entering a transfer degree program at the 
community college are admitted to UMass 
Dartmouth concurrently, being eligible to 
transfer after completion of the Associate's 
Degree, without making an additional 
application. Achievement of a 2.500 
cumulative grade average, and remaining in 
the approved transfer program are the main 
conditions that the student must fulfill. The 
program involves active academic program 
planning and advisement by both college and 
university personnel, to assist students in 
meeting any requirements for the specific 
major program the student plans to enter at 
the university. 

Prospective or current community college 
students should contact the UMass Dart- 
mouth Admissions Office or an admissions 
officer or transfer counselor at the commu- 
nity college for further information. 



13 



Qualification for Admission: Transfer 
Applicants 

In evaluating the qualifications of transfer 
applicants, procedures similar to those for 
freshman applicants are used in assessing 
the extent and levels of previous schooling 
and the quality of each applicant's 
performance. The exceptions are noted 
below. In general, secondary school records 
for transfer applicants who have completed 
relatively few college-level credits will be 
weighted more heavily than for those who 
have completed significant amounts of 
college-level work. 

Records from Other Post-Secondary 
Institutions and Secondary-Level 
Records 

Transfer students must arrange for certified 
transcripts to be sent to us from all colleges/ 
universities that they have attended 
(including any for UMass Dartmouth's 
regular sessions and/or Division of Continu- 
ing Education). In addition, they must 
submit a listing of any courses in progress 
and course descriptions in some cases. 

Transfer applicants who have completed 30 
or more transferable credits at a college or 
university are not required to submit 
secondary school records. Others must 
submit both secondary school and college 
transcripts. Those who completed high 
school through the GED program must send 
a copy of the GED certificate as well as the 
GED test scores in addition to the transcript 
of their last-attended school. Additional 
materials, such as teacher or counselor 
recommendations, are welcome. In specific 
cases, the admissions staff may ask for 
additional records. 

College Board Scholastic Assessment 
Test (SAT) Results 

Transfer applicants who present at least 30 
transferrable college credits at the time of 
application are not required to submit 
College Board SAT results. Others are 
required to do so; most will submit the 
scores that they earned while they were in 
secondary school. 

The Admissions Viewbook gives full 
information about how to register and to 
have score reports sent. 

The Commonwealth Transfer Compact 

The Transfer Compact offers special 
opportunities for students transferring from 
Massachusetts public community colleges to 
Massachusetts public colleges and universi- 



ties. Specifically, the Compact is for students 
who will complete an associate's degree at 
the community college that is designed to 
prepare them to transfer to a four-year 
academic program. Students who have 
completed or will complete such a program 
are designated as Transfer Compact 
students by their community college. 

UMass Dartmouth welcomes applications 
from Transfer Compact students with strong 
academic records. Among the advantages 
are a guaranteed acceptance of 60 credits in 
transfer, protections against having to 
repeat requirements (especially those for 
general education), and transferability of 
"D" grades. The complete text of the 
Transfer Compact is available at the 
community colleges, and a transfer 
counselor there should be able to provide 
guidance and explanations. It is also 
available from UMass Dartmouth, upon 
request. 

We encourage those who are attending one 
of the Massachusetts public community 
colleges — even if they will not be Transfer 
Compact students — to plan their studies 
with eventual transfer to UMass Dartmouth 
in mind. The counseling or advising 
professionals at the student's community 
college can assist valuably in these plans. 

Advanced Standing through Transfer 
Credits 

The quality and quantity of academic work 
completed at previous higher education 
institutions determine the amount of 
transfer credit accepted at UMass Dart- 
mouth and its applicability toward a degree. 
We accept college/university level credits 
taken at an accredited institution if the 
content is equivalent to a course or 
appropriate to a curriculum that we offer. 
Vocational or non-college level courses (such 
as physical activity, trade education, and 
high-school level courses) are not transfer- 
able. 

The university's basic course and credit 
transfer policies are stated as follows. These 
policies apply unless a special transfer 
agreement or program imposes different 
conditions approved for that program. 
Special conditions apply for Interchange 
Transfer students, students entering under 
the Transfer Compact, and students in Study 
on Exchange status. 

Transferred credits and course titles will be 
recorded on the transcript, without a grade 
designation; they will not be included in the 



grade point average that is earned here. 
Only credits for courses in which "C-" or 
higher grades were received will transfer. 

At least 45 credits of course work must be 
completed at UMass Dartmouth. Other 
credits that may be applied to the degree 
include advanced placement and CLEP 
credits. No more than 60 credits can be 
accepted from any combination of post- 
secondary 2-year institutions, advanced 
placement, or CLEP credits. 

At least 30 credits of advanced and 
specialized courses must be completed 
(UMass Dartmouth courses numbered 300 
or higher). It is expected that students will 
earn most of their advanced and specialized 
course credits at UMass Dartmouth. 
Students may be granted permission by the 
appropriate chairperson and college dean to 
earn some of these credits at another 
institution so long as UMass Dartmouth 
major and minor requirements are met to 
their satisfaction thereby. 

All courses accepted for transfer credit will 
count as UMass Dartmouth credits, but they 
will not necessarily count toward the specific 
degree requirements of the candidate's 
college and department. Some may be 
awarded as free electives only. Transcripts 
are evaluated by the Admission Office or the 
college into which the applicant is accepted. 

Interchange Transfer, Permanent 

Currently enrolled degree-seeking students 
at UMass Amherst, UMass Boston, or UMass 
Lowell who wish to change to be degree- 
seeking students at UMass Dartmouth may 
request Interchange Transfer. No application 
fee is required. To be eligible, the applicant 
must be in good academic standing and be 
currently enrolled with a load of 12 or more 
credits, have completed successfully at least 
12 credits, and have at least a 2.000 
cumulative grade point average. 

Interchange transfer applicants must submit 
our application form and have an official 
copy of their current UMass transcript sent 
to us; if they meet the eligibility criteria, no 
other documents need to be sent. 

Part-time, continuing-education, or non- 
degree "special students" at a UMass 
campus are considered regular applicants 
and must submit all documentation and pay 
the application fee. 

more on next page 



14 



Admission 



Transfer applicants 

continued 



Additional Application 
Requirements 



Please contact the UMass Dartmouth Office 
of Admissions for specific instructions. 

Temporary Interchange Transfer 

Temporary interchange students from the 
other campuses attend UMass Dartmouth 
for one or two semesters, applying UMass 
Dartmouth credits to the degree require- 
ments of their home campus. 

Before registering, temporary interchange 
students should receive from their home 
campus all necessary approvals regarding 
the applicability of UMass Dartmouth 
courses to the degree requirements of their 
home campus. Temporary interchange 
students receiving financial aid work 
through the financial aid office at their 
home campus. 



Other Types of Credit 

Applicants have opportunities for academic 
credit in addition to that provided by the 
transfer of credits from other institutions of 
higher learning. 

AP examinations. Increasing numbers of 
students complete college-level studies 
while still in secondary school, through the 
Advanced Placement program of the 
College Board. We award advanced 
placement and/or college credit for AP 
examination scores of 3 or higher (with one 
exception: Psychology requires a 4 or 5) in 
most AP fields. Additional information is 
available at the Office of Admissions. 

CLEP credit. The university has approved the 
use of the College Board College Level 
Examination Program (CLEP). This program 
uses test results to show that an individual 
has achieved college-level education in a 
certain academic field. We can award credit 
for CLEP Subject Examination scores of 50 
or above, as reported on the CLEP score 
report. Some CLEP Subject Examinations 
may not receive credit, and the equivalency 
of these to UMass Dartmouth's courses will 
be determined by the academic department 
for that subject. UMass Dartmouth does not 
give credit for CLEP General Examinations. 
Please consult the more detailed statement 
in the chapter on Special Learning Opportu- 
nities. 

Military training courses. For military service 
school training, credit will be evaluated 
according to the recommendations of the 
Guide to the Evaluation of Educational 
Experience in the Armed Services, prepared 



by the American Council on Education. 
Degree candidates normally do not use 
these credits within the major field. 

Challenge credits. Students transferring to a 
Business Administration or Nursing major, as 
well as to certain other fields, may be asked 
to verify proficiency in some subjects taken 
earlier, through challenge examinations. 
Some examinations are departmental^ 
administered; the CLEP program, mentioned 
above, might also be used. Details will be 
provided by the departments. 

Continuing Education degree offerings; prior 
learning credit. The Division of Continuing 
Education at UMass Dartmouth offers credit 
for validated prior learning to those who 
have become registered students. This 
program provides university academic credit 
for adult students who, through occupa- 
tional or other experiences, have achieved 
the equivalent of college-level knowledge. 
Their prior learning is documented through 
a one-semester workshop and then 
evaluated for credit. 

Credit courses taken from UMass 
Dartmouth's Division of Continuing 
Education are considered regular courses of 
the university. They appear on the transcript 
and the grades earned are reflected in the 
candidate's grade point average at the 
university. 



The nature of some majors or curricula may 
make it desirable for additional information 
to be gathered systematically as a part of 
the application process so long as they do 
not contradict the admissions policies and 
procedures of the university. Three such 
requirements are currently in effect. 

M u Itidisci pi inary Studies 

Applicants for admission to this individually- 
designed major must arrange a program of 
study with the program director before 
acceptance can be offered. This program is 
open to transfer applicants only. 

Music Audition Requirement 

Applicants for admission to the music major 
must audition in person in their principal 
applied area (either instrument or voice); the 
audition is a requirement for a completed 
application in music. Those who cannot 
audition in person must request permission 
to submit recordings. 

Studio Art Portfolio 

The faculty of the College of Visual and 
Performing Arts review applicants' art 
portfolios as a part of the application 
process. Complete instructions to help 
applicants meet these requirements are 
given in the Admissions Viewbook. 

Nursing, RN Track 

Matriculation in this program requires a 
student to have a nursing associate's degree 
or hospital diploma and a current Massachu- 
setts RN license. 



Regional Student Admission: Reduced Tuition Program 

The New England Regional Student Program enables residents of Rhode Island, Connecti- 
cut, Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont who apply for academic programs not available 
in their own public colleges and universities to receive special consideration for admission 
and to pay significantly reduced tuition at this university (in-state tuition plus 50%). 
Secondary school guidance counselors and college transfer officers can provide details 
about this program, or one can contact the New England Board of Higher Education, 
Boston, MA 01984, phone (617) 357-9620. The following table indicates UMass Dart- 
mouth undergraduate programs that are available to New England residents at reduced 
tuition charges: 

Program Eligible State Residents 

Textile Chemistry CT, ME, NH, Rl, VT 

Textile Science CT, ME, NH, Rl, VT 

Portuguese ME, NH, Rl, VT 

Sculpture/3D CT, ME, NH, Rl, VT 

Textile Design CT, ME, NH, Rl, VT 

Visual Design ME, Rl, VT 

Art Education Rl 



15 



Other Applicant Types 



International Applicants 

(those needing to receive F-1 visas) 
To the extent possible, international 
applicants should follow the instructions for 
either new freshman or transfer application, 
depending on their individual circumstances. 
International applicants will pay the out-of- 
state application fee and are not eligible for 
waivers of this fee. Upon acceptance and for 
as long as they attend the university, they 
must pay out-of-state tuition. International 
undergraduate students are not eligible to 
receive financial aid from the university. 

International applicants must submit their 
application fees in US currency. Checks not in 
US currency will be returned and the 
application will not be processed until the fee 
has been resubmitted in US currency. 

These applicants must also meet all 
requirements of the United States Office of 
Immigration, in order to be issued the I-20 
form. They must satisfy the conditions for 
admission to the university and become full- 
time, degree-seeking students. 

In addition, international applicants whose 
native language is other than English must 
submit official scores from the Test of 
English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), 
which is offered at regularly scheduled 
intervals throughout the world. Foreign 
nationals who have completed a year or 
more of study in United States institutions, 
or whose education abroad was conducted 
in institutions in which the primary language 
of instruction is English, are exempt from 
this requirement. 

Students Seeking a Second Bachelor's 
Degree 

Students who have earned a bachelor's 
degree at UMass Dartmouth or a predeces- 
sor institution who wish to pursue a second 
baccalaureate degree here, are invited to 
apply for readmission at the Registrar's 
Office. Those with a degree from another 
institution apply to the Admissions Office. 

UMass Dartmouth Students Seeking Re- 
Admission 

Any student who was previously admitted to 
UMass Dartmouth (day division) as a degree 
candidate and who registered for one or 
more semesters may request re-admission 
by contacting the Registrar's Office at (508) 
999-8615. 



Access to Courses, for Students Not 
Seeking a Degree (Non-Degree 
Students) 

There are many reasons why a person might 
wish to take one or more courses at the 
university without seeking a degree. When 
feasible, therefore, we allow qualified 
students who are not UMass Dartmouth 
degree candidates to register for courses as 
special students. They may register only for 
courses for which they are qualified and in 
which space is available after the degree- 
seeking students have registered, and will 
be held to a strict limit in the total number 
of credits for which they may enroll as 
special students. Specific regulations for 
special students are given in the Academic 
Policies and Regulations section of this 
Catalogue. 

Non-Degree Student registration may take 
place after the close of registration for 
degree students. An initial review of those 
seeking to register as undergraduate non- 
degree students is made in the Academic 
Advising Center. Applicants should be 
prepared to discuss their plans and to show 
appropriate records of prior schooling. 

Visiting and Exchange Students 

The university welcomes visiting students, 
who are matriculated at another university or 
college but wish to pursue their studies with 
us temporarily. We are especially interested in 
supporting students whose studies at another 
university will be enriched by a planned 
semester here, arranged between academic 
departments or faculty advisors. 

The university also participates in formal as 
well as informal international student 
exchanges. A listing of formal exchange 
programs appears elsewhere in this 
catalogue. Contact the director of any of the 
exchange programs for additional informa- 
tion about the programs. Students accepted 
in exchange are issued paperwork authoriz- 
ing them to receive a J-1 student visa, 
through the Office of Academic Affairs/ 
Graduate Studies (508-999-8024). 

Students with Disabilities 

Applicants are under no obligation to disclose 
a disability. The university will admit students 
who clearly demonstrate the ability to 
perform the academic work, without 
reference to learning or physical disability, as 
with all applicants. 

Students with a physical or learning disability 
who are offered admission are encouraged to 
contact us about the support services we 



offer, to help them make their decision 
whether to enroll. An early meeting with 
Carole Johnson, Director of the Office of 
Disabled Student Services, is recommended, 
call (508) 999-871 1 . Students considering 
application may also call this office; the 
admission decision will be made indepen- 
dently of such preliminary inquiries. 

Mid-Year Admissions 

To the extent that space and fiscal resources 
permit, the university will admit qualified 
mid-year applicants. Special efforts will be 
made to ensure that spaces are available in 
appropriate spring semester classes for 
those admitted. 

Social Security Number 

The university requests all students (except 
international students who lack them) to 
submit their social security numbers for use 
as their student ID number. However, those 
who do not wish to have their social security 
numbers used as their student identifier will 
be issued a special nine-digit number for this 
purpose, upon formal request to the Office 
of the University Registrar. Students can be 
assured that the university will respect and 
protect their privacy and their social security 
numbers. 

Graduate Admissions 

Contact the Office of Graduate Studies for 
information, program descriptions, and 
application materials. Phone (508) 999- 
8604. 



16 



Admission 



Expenses and Student Financial Services 



The cost to students of an education at a 
public university remains one of the great 
bargains of our time. While there have been 
increases in recent years, the charges are 
still very affordable, especially when one 
considers the high quality of the education 
offered. Tuition and fees cover a part of the 
costs, but the remainder is made available 
by the taxpayers of the Commonwealth. The 
result is a creative partnership between the 
individual students and their families and 
the members of an enlightened democracy, 
which believes that the economic, political, 
and cultural success of the society depends 
on a well-educated citizenry. 

Undergraduate and graduate students at 
the university pay tuition and various fees. In 
addition, they will have costs for textbooks 
and other incidentals and for meals and 
housing. This section gives information 
about the structure of charges at the 
university, focusing specifically on charges 
to undergraduate students. It is intended to 
assist students and their families in their 
financial planning. 

More detailed information on graduate 
student charges is available in the Graduate 
Catalogue (from the Office of Graduate 
Studies). 

The university provides comprehensive 
financial aid and related services. Applicants 
and current students are invited to inquire 
about the aid and scholarship opportunities 
that are described later in this chapter. 

Disclaimer: 

Currency of Information 

In preparing this Catalogue, we have made 
every effort to give the most up-to-date 
information possible. However, changes in 
tuition and fees may occur after the book 
has been printed. An exact schedule of all 
current charges is available from the Office 
of the Bursar, Foster Administration 
Building, second floor, or the University 
Enrollment Center, first floor. 

All expenses are subject to change at the 
discretion of the Commonwealth, the Board 
of Higher Education, or the University. 
Similarly subject to change may be various 
policies associated with charges. 

Payment Policy 

Students may pay all tuition, fee, room, and 
board payments by mail, or at the University 
Enrollment Center, first floor of the Foster 
Administration building, hours are Monday 
through Thursday, 8 a.m. to 7 p.m., and 



Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Credit cards 
(Mastercard, Visa, and Discover) are 
accepted. 

All charges are due and payable at a date 
set by UMass Dartmouth (usually August 20 
and January 5). Payments received after the 
due date indicated will be charged a late 
fee. The University mails bills to the 
student's permanent address; students must 
take care that they list an appropriate 
permanent address, for this reason. 

Students are expected to keep their 
accounts current and to pay their financial 
obligations to the university. Students may 
not attend classes until all charges have 
been paid, or vouched for. In appropriate 
circumstances, the Bursar's Office may 
impose various restrictions in order to 
enforce payment of an obligation, including 
withholding of official transcripts and the 
diploma. The Vice Chancellor for Fiscal 
Affairs/designee hears appeals of difficult 
cases. 



Policies Affecting Charges 

As a state-supported institution, UMass 
Dartmouth's programs and facilities are 
available at reasonable tuition rates to 
residents of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts. 

The table to the right shows tuition and fee 
charges for the 2002-2003 academic year. 

Residency: Massachusetts state residents pay 
a considerably reduced tuition and 
curriculum fee charge over that paid by out- 
of-state residents. Under the New England 
Board of Higher Education's Regional 
Student Program, residents of other states in 
New England are eligible for reduced out-of- 
state tuition for some academic programs 
not available in their own state. Later in this 
section we give additional information 
about the tuition/fee residency policies. 

Prorating by credit load: Students pay the 
full amount for tuition and mandatory fees 
if taking twelve or more credits. Charges for 
those taking fewer than twelve credits are 
prorated evenly by the number of course 
credits. A table at the end of this chapter 
shows the per-credit/per-semester charges 
in effect for the 2002-2003 academic year. 

Charges by type of study: Degree students, 
non-degree students, and students auditing 
a course or courses pay the same academic 



charges. 

The Division of Continuing Education offers 
courses under a structure of charges differ- 
ent from that presented in this catalogue. 

Tuition and Mandatory Fees 
Tuition 

Tuition charges are established annually by 
the Board of Higher Education of the 
Commonealth of Massachusetts. 

Mandatory Fees 

In addition to tuition, all students pay the 
following mandatory fees: 

All students are assessed a curriculum 
support fee , which is calculated by a 
different rate depending on state residency. 
This fee supports the full program of 
academic and student services of the 
university. 

The athletics fee supports the men's and 
women's athletic programs. The student 
fee supports student publications, the 
student radio station, and various other 
student related activities. These fees are 
determined by the students themselves, 
through the student governance process. 
(Note that these two fees represent a 
division of the previous single fee called the 
"general fee.") 

The campus center fee is used to support 
the programming activities and general 
administrative expenses of the Campus 
Center. A Board of Governors, composed of 
13 students, one alumnus, and two 
administrators, oversees the operation. 

The health fee supports on-campus health 
services, available to all students. 

The MassPIRG fee , imposed by student 
vote, is charged each semester. It supports 
the activities of the Massachusetts Public 
Interest Research Group, and is waivable 
upon request. 

Refunds — Withdrawal from School 

A student who registers and commences 
studies but then withdraws officially from 
UMass Dartmouth for any reason during an 
academic semester will be granted a refund 
according to the refund schedule given later 
in this section. A student who remits, in 
advance, a payment of tuition and fees but 



17 



Summary of Annual Expenses 
2002-2003 



Excluding Room and Board Including Room and Board 

(and excluding individual and onetime expenses) (and excluding individual and onetime expenses) 





Undergraduates 


Graduates 




Undergraduates 


Graduates 


Massachusetts 






Massachusetts 






Residents 






Residents 






Tuition 


1,417 


2,071 


Tuition 


1,417 


2,071 


Curriculum Support Fee 


3,220 


3,703 


Curriculum Support Fee 


3,220 


3,703 


Athletics Fee 


185 


185 


Athletics Fee 


185 


185 


Student Fee 


125 


125 


Student Fee 


125 


125 


Campus Center Fee 


150 


150 


Campus Center Fee 


150 


150 


Health Fee 


32 


32 


Health Fee 


32 


32 








Room (and Board) 


*6,144/ 


**4,300 


Total 


5,129 


6,266 


Total 


11,273 


10,566 



Non-Massachusetts 
Residents 






Non-Massachusetts 
Residents 






Tuition 


8,099 


8,099 


Tuition 


8,099 


8,099 


Curriculum Support Fee 


5,038 


5,038 


Curriculum Support Fee 


5,038 


5,038 


Athletics Fee 


185 


185 


Athletics Fee 


185 


185 


Student Fee 


125 


125 


Student Fee 


125 


125 


Campus Center Fee 


150 


150 


Campus Center Fee 


150 


150 


Health Fee 


32 


32 


Health Fee 


32 


32 








Room (and Board) 


*6,144/ 


**4,300 


Total 


13,629 


13,629 


Total 


19,773 


17,929 



Regional Student Program 
Non-Residents 






Regional Student Program 
Non-Residents 






Tuition 


2,126 


3,107 


Tuition 


2,126 


3,107 


Curriculum Support Fee 


4,129 


4,371 


Curriculum Support Fee 


4,129 


4,371 


Athletics Fee 


185 


185 


Athletics Fee 


185 


185 


Student Fee 


125 


125 


Student Fee 


125 


125 


Campus Center Fee 


150 


150 


Campus Center Fee 


150 


150 


Health Fee 


32 


32 


Health Fee 


32 


32 








Room (and Board) 


*6,144/ 


**4,300 


Total 


6,747 


7,970 


Total 


12,891 


12,270 



All tuition and fee cost figures are based on enrollment in 12 or 
more credits each semester. 

$600 additional for books and supplies is typical, although different 
subjects of study have considerable variation. Additional charges also 
occur through college, department, or course-specific fees. 



*Dormitory plus the 12-meal plan, the one most commonly 
selected. See table of meal plans below for choices we offer. 

**Cedar Dell Apartments: Advanced undergraduate housing is in 
the Cedar Dell Student Apartments, the cost for which does not 
include meals. 



18 



Expenses 



then does not subsequently register and 
attend will be given full refund of tuition 
and fees. 

All refunds are based on official withdrawal 
notices as dated and processed by the Office 
of the University Registrar and then 
forwarded to the Bursar's Office. 



Health Insurance 

Students enrolled in a 3/4 time load or 
higher (9 credits for undergraduate 
students) are required by state law to be 
covered by appropriate health insurance. 
The university provides this insurance and 
charges a health insurance fee to cover its 
cost, unless students are already covered by 
an appropriate insurance program. This fee 
is waived if the student presents proof of 
appropriate insurance coverage, to the 
Bursar's Office or University Enrollment 
Center. This insurance coverage must meet 
the Qualifying Student Health Insurance 
Program guideline and be billable in the 
local UMass Dartmouth area. 

The fee covers the cost of enrollment in a 
program for group health insurance 
coverage that has been negotiated by the 
university. Students enrolling in this plan 
receive full disclosure of the benefits they 
will receive. Detailed information is available 
at the Student Health Office. Students 
enrolled in less than a 3/4-time load are not 
eligible for this insurance. 

International students on a visa who are not 
formal participants in an approved exchange 
program with preexisting insurance 
coverage will automatically be enrolled in 
the Qualifying Student Health Insurance 
Program at UMass Dartmouth. Certain 
classes of international students may be 
required to have insurance coverage 
different from or additional to that of the 
regular health insurance plan. The university 
makes available to students plans providing 
this coverage. 



New England Regional Student Program 

The university is a member of the New 
England Regional Student Program. Under 
this program students from other New 
England states may receive tuition benefits if 
a similar program is not available in their 
home state. 

Eligible programs for 2002-2003 and the 



schedule of charges are given in tables 
accompanying the chapter on Admissions. 

For more information, contact the Office of 
the Regional Student Program, New England 
Board of Higher Education, 45 Temple Place, 
Boston, MA 021 1 1 ; phone 61 7 357-9620. 



Tuition/Fee Waivers for Special Groups 

Those in certain classifications may receive 
waivers of tuition or fees, some of which are 
listed here. If you believe you are a member 
of a group eligible for a waiver, please 
consult the University Enrollment Center or 
Bursar's Office. 

Students sixty years of age or over who 

are Massachusetts residents are exempt 
from tuition and mandatory fee charges. 
Applications for tuition and fee exemption 
may be obtained from the Bursar's Office or 
University Enrollment Center. 

Some categories of state workers may 

receive waivers of tuition charges, but not of 
fees. Some categories of veterans may 
receive waivers of tuition, but not of fees. 



Program- and Course-Specific Fees 

Specific fee amounts are shown in an 
accompanying table. Beginning in the 2001- 
2002 academic year, there is a restructuring 
of fees. Previously, students registered in 
certain courses were required to pay Studio/ 
Lab fees (called S/LA fees), which ranged 
from $1 1 to $60 but were higher for a few 
courses. Now, these course-by-course fees 
have been consolidated into semester fees 
charged by the students' college or major 
program. These fees cover costs directly 
associated with the delivery of instruction, 
for example, providing supplies and 
equipment for scientific laboratories, 
equipment for instructional computing, and 
art studio supplies. 

Engineering Equipment Fee. Students in 
majors in the College of Engineering will be 
charged a special fee each semester, to 
assist with the costs of laboratory equip- 
ment. This fee now also covers fee 
payments that were previously assessed as 
SLA fees. 

Nursing Instructional Fee. Students in 
majors in the College of Nursing will be 
charged a special instructional fee each 
semester. This fee now also covers fee 



payments that were previously assessed as 
SLA fees. Students registered in clinical 
nursing courses must have liability 
insurance, which they arrange separately 
from the university. 

Business Administration Fee. Students in 
majors in the Charlton College of Business 
will be charged a special fee each semester, 
to assist with equipment and other 
instructional costs. This fee now also covers 
fee payments that were previously assessed 
as SLA fees. 

CVPA Specialized Course Support Fee. 
Students in majors in the College of Visual 
and Performing Arts will be charged a 
special fee each semester, which covers fee 
payments that were previously assessed as 
SLA fees to assist with equipment and other 
instructional costs. 

College of Arts and Sciences — Level 1 
Program Fee. Students in majors in the 
Humanities and Social Sciences and 
Interdisciplinary programs in the College of 
Arts and Sciences will be charged a special 
fee each semester, which covers fee 
payments that were previously assessed as 
SLA fees to assist with equipment and other 
instructional costs. 

College of Arts and Sciences — Level 2 
Program Fee. Students in majors in the 
Sciences in the College of Arts and Sciences 
will be charged a special fee each semester 
which covers fee payments that were 
previously assessed as SLA fees to assist with 
equipment and other instructional costs. 

Applied Music Course Fee. Applied music 
courses require payment of a course fee in 
addition to other tuition and fees. The fee is 
charged for every registration in one of 
these courses, except that Music majors may 
take one applied music course each 
semester without this fee. Applied Music 
courses are identified in the Music 
Department section of this catalogue and 
specific charges are shown in an 
accompanying table in this chapter. 



One-Time Fees 

Specific fee amounts are shown in an 
accompanying table. 

Application Fee. Applicants are charged a 
non-refundable, non-waivable application 
fee. Massachusetts and Non-Massachusetts 
residents pay different application amounts. 



19 



Admissions Deposits. Students who have 
been accepted for admission to the 
university must reserve a space in the 
entering class by submitting an admissions 
fee deposit. Admitted applicants are given 
until a stated deadline to submit the 
deposit, after which date the space reserved 
for them will be given to another candidate. 
Prospective students who have a hardship 
associated with this deadline may discuss 
that situation with the Director of Admis- 
sions. This fee will be applied towards 
tuition, upon registration. Complete 
instructions are given along with the letter 
of admission. Similarly, a housing reserva- 
tion deposit is charged. This fee will be 
applied to the student's housing bill, upon 
registration. 

Orientation Fee. An Orientation Fee is paid 
by all incoming freshman, transfer, and 
international students (all levels) to help 
defray the expenses of the summer New 
Student Orientation Program. Freshmen 
attend a two-day, overnight program, and 
transfer students attend a day-long 
program. 

Transcript Fee. Paid the first semester one 
is in attendance as a degree student, this 
fee provides life-time transcripts at no 
charge and supports availability of advising 
transcripts. 

Withdrawn on Exchange Fee. Students 
pay a small fee in order to remain in active 
status at the university while engaging in an 
educational activity under the university's 
sponsorship but at a different location, such 
as study abroad. 

Program Continuation Fee. This fee 
allows graduate students who require a 
semester or more to complete a project, 
thesis, or dissertation but who have 
completed course requirements to register, 
for a charge well below that for a three- 
credit course. This fee can also be used to 
bridge across a semester or more of absence 
from course registration when a graduate 
student remains active as a candidate for 
the degree. 

Readmission Fee. Applicants for readmis- 
sion are charged a readmission fee. The fee, 
which covers costs associated with 
processing the application, is to be 
paid before the student's file is forwarded to 
the department for consideration. Policies 
regarding readmission and leave of absence 
are covered in the chapter on Academic 
Regulations and Procedures. 



Graduation Fee. Students pay this fee in 
their last semester prior to receiving a 
degree to help defray costs associated with 
graduation and commencement. An 
additional portion provides a one-year 
membership in the Alumni Association. A 
refund of the Alumni Association member- 
ship fee portion may be obtained by those 
not wishing to participate, if application is 
made to the Bursar or the University 
Enrollment Center. 



Payment Financing 

The university makes available the services 
of private financing programs to assist those 
students who wish to spread their tuition 
and fee payments out rather than paying 
the entire amount at the beginning of the 
term. Information and application forms are 
available from the Bursar or the University 
Enrollment Center. 



Books and Supplies 

Costs for books and supplies vary with the 
habits of the individual as well as with the 
nature of each student's academic program. 
The following information may provide a 
general guideline, for planning. 

$600 per year for books and supplies is an 
estimated or typical amount. Generally, 
books cost more in the scientific and 
technical fields. First year Engineering 
students have additional expenses for 
engineering drawing equipment and related 
materials. Students in the College of Visual 
and Performing Arts will incur some 
additional expenses for art supplies. 

Students registered in clinical nursing 
courses have an additional expense for 
uniforms and for insurance. Medical 
Laboratory Science seniors have additional 
expenses for uniforms and lab coats, 
malpractice insurance, and commuting to 
participating hospitals. They are also 
responsible for providing their own 
transportation for clinical practice. 



Residency Requirements for Tuition and 
the Curriculum Support Fee 

Massachusetts "resident students" pay in- 
state tuition and fee charges. Others pay 
out-of-state charges. Certain non-Massa- 
chusetts students — in specified programs 
only and residents of specified New England 



states — receive a substantial reduction of 
the non-resident tuition charge through the 
New England Regional Student Program. 

The full regulations on determining 
residency are included at the end of this 
chapter; what follows is a brief overview. 

To be deemed a Massachusetts resident, 
one must have had a legal domicile in the 
state for at least one year before the 
commencement of the academic semester, 
residing in the state for purposes other than 
attending an educational institution (or 
one's parents, if one is financially dependent 
on them). Those who do not meet the 
conditions are considered out-of-state or 
non-resident students. A student at a certain 
degree level, e.g., undergraduate, may 
retain in-state residency during continuous 
attendance at the institution, until attain- 
ment of the degree for which enrolled. 

Students whose situation changes may 
request a determination of in-state residency 
by filing the residency reclassification form 
and submitting appropriate documentation. 
A similar process is used to contest an initial 
residency determination. Appeals are heard 
by a campus Residency Appeal Committee, 
which makes the final residency determina- 
tion. Questions on residency policies, and 
requests for reconsideration and the appeals 
process, are handled by Chris Kaylor, Office 
of University Records, phone 508 999-8620 

Any student who undertakes university 
study under a non-resident temporary 
student visa (having been issued a form 1-20 
or IAP-66 by us) must pay the out-of-state 
rate for application fee and tuition charges 
This remains in force for the duration of the 
student's attendance at the University of 
Massachusetts Dartmouth for as long as the 
individual remains an international student 
on a non-resident visa. 

Room and Board Charges 

Students of the university who live on- 
campus are offered a number of plans. 
Specifics of what each plan provides are 
available from the Office of Housing and 
Residential Life, and are summarized in the 
chapter on the Campus Experience. Further 
details and instructions for reserving a space 
are mailed to every applicant who has been 
accepted for housing. The costs for the 
different plans are listed in an accompany- 
ing table. 



20 



Expenses 



Tables of Charges 



Charges Per Credit per Semester 

2002-2003 Rates 

At 12 credits the charge will be at a 
maximum. Credits above 12 are added at no 
additional charge. The charges shown here 
do not include non-mandatory fees, course/ 
college fees, housing, books/supplies, or 
personal expenses. 



Undergrad. 



Grad. 



Massachusetts Residents 



Tuition 


59.04 


86.29 


Curriculum Support Fee 


134.16 


154.29 


Athletics Fee 


7.71 


7.71 


Student Fee 


5.21 


5.21 


Campus Center Fee 


6.25 


6.25 


Health Fee 


1.33 


1.33 


Total 


213.70 


261.08 


Non-Massachusetts Residents 




Tuition 


337.46 


337.46 


Curriculum Support Fee 


209.91 


209.91 


Athletics Fee 


7.71 


7.71 


Student Fee 


5.21 


5.21 


Campus Center Fee 


6.25 


6.25 


Health Fee 


1.33 


1.33 


Total 


567.87 


567.87 


Regional Student Program 




Tuition 


88.56 


129.44 


Curriculum Support Fee 


172.04 


182.10 


Athletics Fee 


7.71 


7.71 


Student Fee 


5.21 


5.21 


Campus Center Fee 


6.25 


6.25 


Health Fee 


1.33 


1.33 


Total 


281.10 


332.04 



Annual Campus Housing Charges 

(2002-2003 charges shown) 

Double room, 19 meal plan 
Double room , 1 6 meal flex plan 
Double room, 12 meal flex plan 
Double room, 7 meal flex plan 
Single room, additional 
Cedar Dell Apartment, Single room 
Telephone charge (mandatory) 
Housing reservation deposit 
New Dorms 

"A" Room (Triple Premium) 



Refund of charges for on-campus meals and 
housing is governed by the terms of the 
housing contract. 



6 


526 


6 


441 


6 


144 


6 


028 




190 


4 


300 




244 




200 


4 


181 


3,741 



One-Time and Individual Fees and Charges, 2002-2003 Rates 

Application Fee 



Massachusetts residents 


35 


Non-Massachusetts residents 


55 


Admissions Deposit 




(applied toward tuition upon matriculation) 


150 


Transcript fee (one-time payment, all degree students) 


50 


New ID card/Replacement ID Card 


25/15 


Readmission Fee 


25 


Withdrawn on Exchange Fee 


25 /semester 


Withdrawn on Exchange Fee (Co-op Students) 


1 00 /semester 


Program Continuation Fee 


90 /semester 


Mass-PIRG Fee (waiveable) 


7 /semester 


Health Insurance Plan 


885 /year 




556 /spring, summer 


Engineering Equipment Fee 


240 /semester 


Nursing Instructional Fee 


200 /semester 


Business Administration Fee 


70 /semester 


College of Arts and Science — Level 1 Program Fee 


70 /semester 


College of Arts and Science — Level 2 Program Fee (Sciences) 


1 00 /semester 


CVPA Specialized Course Support Fee 


190 /semester 


Applied Music Course Fee 




Individual 


400 /semester 


Group 


1 00 /semester 


Orientation Fee 




New freshmen 


200 


New transfers 


125 


New international students (all levels including graduate) 


200 


Graduation Fee 




For commencement costs 


100 


Alumni Association one-year membership (refundable) 


20 



Refund Schedule 

A student who registers and commences studies but then withdraws officially from UMass 
Dartmouth for any reason during an academic semester will be granted a refund according 
to the refund schedule given on the following page. A student who remits, in advance, a 
payment of tuition and fees but then does not subsequently register and attend will be 
given full refund of tuition and fees. All refunds are based on official withdrawal notices as 
dated and processed by the Office of the University Registrar and then forwarded to the 
Bursar's Office. 

Percentage and type of refund, upon Official Withdrawal from UMass Dartmouth 

Prior to first day and through 

to end of publicized drop/add 

period each semester 
During second week (next 5 class days) 
During third week (next 5 class days) 
During fourth week (next 5 class days) 
After fourth week 



100% tuition and all fees 
90% tuition and curriculum support fee 
70% tuition and curriculum support fee 
50% tuition and curriculum support fee 
No refund of charges 



"Official Withdrawal" is defined in the chapter on Academic Regulations and Procedures, 
applying to the regular courses of the university. The Division of Continuing Education has a 
separate fee schedule, billing process, and refund schedule. 

One-time fees, such as the application or orientation fees, are not refunded. 



21 



Financial Aid Services 



Student Employment 



Nearly all students are eligible for some type 
of financial assistance. 

Financial Aid Services is located at 105 
Foster Administration Building and 
welcomes inquiries from current and 
prospective students and their families. They 
conduct many financial aid presentations 
both on and off-campus each year to assist 
university applicants and the community. 

If students experience unforeseen financial 
difficulties at any time or have questions 
concerning financial aid, they should 
contact the University Enrollment Center or 
Financial Aid Services, Foster Administration 
Building, x8632. 

UMass Dartmouth awards financial aid 
based upon federal, state, and institutional 
guidelines, and determines eligibility by 
using the free Application for Federal 
Student Aid (FAFS A). Financial assistance 
may be available in the form of need-based 
grants, scholarships, loans and work-study 
programs. Non need-based loans are also 
available to students and families who do 
not qualify for need-based aid. 

The eligibility for a need-based financial aid 
award is based on each individual 
applicant's financial need, which is 
determined in the financial aid application 
process. Both the amount and the type of 
aid awarded are related to the financial 
needs and circumstances of the individual 
and the timeliness of the FAFSA form. 

Financial Aid Services is committed to 
helping applicants and students with all 
phases of the aid application and award 
process. The office provides much guidance 
in helping applicants through the steps in 
the process; however, it is the responsibility 
of the student who desires aid to obtain the 
necessary forms and instructions from 
Financial Aid Services and to fill out all 
required forms accurately and to supply all 
necessary information and to meet all 
applicable deadlines. 

Application Process 

Application for all need-based aid programs 
is made by completing the Free Application 
for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Certain 
non-need parent and student loans also 
require submission of the FAFSA. 

Early application is strongly encouraged. 
The priority filing date is for FAFSA 
materials to be received at the Federal 
processor by March 1st before the year 



for which aid is sought, with UMass 
Dartmouth included in the list of schools. 
The UMass Dartmouth Title IV school code is 
002210 . We recommend mailing your 
FAFSA by February 1 5th to ensure priority 
consideration. 

Students must be admitted to a degree 
program before eligibility can be determined 
for financial aid. Graduate students and 
second-degree students are not eligible for 
federal or state grant programs. Students 
enrolling in study away or overseas study 
may receive limited funding, if the studies 
are integral to their degree program. 
Students enrolling for less than full-time may 
receive limited funding. 

Students receiving need-based financial 
assistance are subject to requirements for 
academic progress and performance in 

the continuation of their studies. These 
standards are outlined in the Academic 
Regulations and Procedures section of this 
Catalogue, and full information about the 
process and its conditions is available in 
Financial Aid Services. 

Financial Aid Services Office 

The Financial Aid Services Office offers a 
complete range of grants, loans, and 
student employment opportunities. The 
Financial Aid Services Office serves as a 
clearinghouse for Federal, state, and 
institutional sources of financial assistance. 
The Financial Aid Services Office also assists 
students in researching scholarship resources 
as well as alternative loans and payments 
plans. 

Scholarships 

The university offers many private and 
foundation scholarships, which originate 
from a variety of sources. A listing of the 
scholarship opportunities is accessible from 
the UMass Dartmouth web home page. 
Included are both merit-based and need- 
based scholarships, which are often targeted 
for particular types of students. 

In addition, other merit-based scholarships 
are offered competitively to entering 
freshman and transfer students on the basis 
of academic achievement and evidence of 
intellectual and personal creativity. Informa- 
tion about this program is available from the 
Office of Admissions. 



Students at the university can contribute 
toward their college expenses and gain 
valuable work experience through many 
varieties of student employment. Many 
students have work allotted through federal 
college work-study awarded as a part of 
financial aid. In addition, however, many 
others find campus jobs regardless of 
whether they have demonstrated a financial 
need or received an aid award. Furthermore, 
others seek part-time or summer work off 
campus, and the university assists them in 
learning of such opportunities. 

Students seeking employment, both those 
awarded federal work-study and those 
seeking other forms of work, should visit the 
Career Resources Center to learn about work 
opportunities and receive job assignments. 

Students who are awarded federal work- 
study through the financial aid process 
receive the necessary support to obtain their 
actual work-study assignment from Career 
Resources. A Federal work-study award is an 
indicator only of eligibility to apply for a 
work-study job, not a guarantee of employ- 
ment. Information sessions held during the 
summer and into the fall semester give the 
information students need to make the most 
of their college work-study experience. Many 
kinds of on-campus work-study assignments 
are available, and off-campus work-study is 
also available through the Community Service 
Learning Program. 

Non-work-study employment is also found at 
Career Resources. The Student Employment 
Directory lists positions with various campus 
organizations and departments, and the 
office staff assists students in matching their 
interests and qualifications to the available 
positions. The office also maintains a listing 
of off-campus part-time work and summer 
jobs, posting vacancies on bulletin boards in 
the office and, along with full-time opportu- 
nities, publishing announcements in the 
weekly JobTrakker Bulletin. 



22 



Expenses 



Regulations Governing Residency for Tuition Purposes 



These rules and regulations, approved by the University's Board of Trustees, are current as of publication. They apply to the classification of students at 
the University of Massachusetts as Massachusetts or non-Massachusetts students for tuition and fee purposes. They apply both to degree and non- 
degree students. 



Part 1. Definitions 

1. 1 "Academic period" shall mean a term or 
semester in an academic year or a summer session, 
as prescribed by the Board of Trustees or under their 
authority. 

1.2 "Continuous attendance" shall mean 
enrollment at the University for the normal academic 
year in each calendar year, or the appropriate 
portion or portions of such academic year as 
prescribed by the Board of Trustees or under their 
authority. 

1.3 "Emancipated person," for the purposes of 
residency classification for tuition, shall mean a 
person who has attained the age of 1 8 years and is 
financially independent of his or her parents, or if 
under 1 8 years of age (a) whose parents have 
entirely surrendered the right to the care, custody, 
and earnings of such person and who no longer are 
under any legal obligation to support or maintain 
such person; or (b) a person who is legally married, 
or (c) a person who has no parent. If none of the 
aforesaid definitions apply, said person shall be 
deemed an "unemancipated person." 

1.4 "Parent" shall mean 

a) the person's father and mother, jointly; 

b) if the person's father is deceased the person's 
mother; if the person's mother is deceased, the 
person's father; 

c) if a legal guardian has been appointed by a court 
having jurisdiction, the legal guardian; 

d) if neither the father nor mother is living and no 
legal guardian has been appointed, the person who 
then stands in loco parentis to the person; 

e) if the father and mother are divorced, separated 
or unmarried, the parent who has been awarded 
legal custody of the person; or if legal custody has 
not been awarded, the parent with whom the 
person lives. With respect to any adopted student, 
the word "adoptive" should be inserted before the 
words "father" and "mother" wherever used. 

7.5 "Reside," "residency," or "resident" shall 
mean "domicile," i.e., a person's true, fixed and 
permanent home or place of habitation, where he or 
she intends to remain permanently. 

Part II. Classification 

2. 1 For the purpose of assessing tuition and fees, 
each student shall be classified as a "Massachusetts 
resident" or a "non-Massachusetts resident." A 
person shall be classified as a Massachusetts resident 
if he or she (or the parent of an unemancipated 
student) shall have resided in the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts for purposes other than attending an 
educational institution for twelve months 
immediately preceding the student's entry or reentry 
as a student. 

Physical presence for this entire twelve-month period 
need not be required as long as the conduct of an 
individual, taken in total, manifests an intention to 
make Massachusetts his or her permanent dwelling 
place. 



Part III. Determination of Residency 

3. 1 Proof of Residency 

a) Each case will be decided on the basis of all facts 
submitted with qualitative rather than quantitative 
emphasis. A number of factors is required for 
residency to determine the intention of the person to 
maintain permanent residence in Massachusetts. No 
single index is decisive. The burden of proof rests on 
the student seeking classification as a Massachusetts 
resident. 

b) The following shall be primary indicia of residency: 

1) For an unemancipated person, the residency of 
parents, having custody, within Massachusetts; 

2) Certified copies of federal and state income tax 
returns; 

3) Permanent employment in a position not 
normally filled by a student; 

4) Reliance on Massachusetts sources for financial 
support; 

5) Former residency in Massachusetts and 
maintenance of significant connections there while 
absent. 

c) The following shall be secondary indicia of 
residence, to be considered of less weight than the 
indicia listed above in subsection b): 

1) Continuous physical presence in Massachusetts 
during periods when not an enrolled student; 

2) Military home of record; 

3) All other material of whatever kind or source 
which may have a bearing ondetermining 
residency. 

3.2 Proof of Emancipation. A student asserting 
that he or she is an emancipated person shall furnish 
evidence to support such assertion. Such evidence 
may include; 

a) Birth certificate or any other legal document that 
shows place and date of birth; 

b) Legal guardianship papers — court appointment 
and termination must be submitted; 

c) Statements of the person, his or her parent(s), 
guardian(s), or others certifying no financial support; 

d) Certified copies of federal and state income tax 
returns filed by the person and his or her parent(s); 

e) Where none of the foregoing can be provided an 
affidavit of the emancipated person in explanation 
thereof and stating fully the grounds supporting the 
claim of emancipation. 

3.3 Presumptions, etc. 

a) Residency is not acquired by mere physical 
presence in Massachusetts while the person is 
enrolled in an institution of higher education. (See 
Section 2.1) 

b) A person having his or her residency elsewhere 
than in Massachusetts shall not be eligible for 
classification as a Massachusetts resident for tuition 
purposes except as herein provided. 

1 ) Any person who is registered at the University as 
a Massachusetts resident shall be eligible for 
continued classification as a Massachusetts 
resident for tuition purposes (until attainment of 
the degree for which he or she is enrolled) during 
continuous attendance at the institution. 

2) The spouse of any person who is classified or is 
eligible for classification as "Massachusetts 
resident" is likewise eligible for classification as a 
"Massachusetts resident." This provision will not 



apply in the case of a spouse in the United States 
on a non-immigrant visa. 

3) A person who is an immigrant/permanent 
resident of the United States (or has applied for 
such status) is eligible to be considered for 
Massachusetts residency for tuition purposes 
provided that he/she meets the same requirements 
for establishing residency in Massachusetts as are 
required of a United States citizen. Non-citizens 
who are in (or who have applied for) refugee/ 
asylum status are likewise eligible to be considered 
for Massachusetts residency for tuition purposes 
provided that he/she meets the same requirements 
for establishing residency in Massachusetts as are 
required of a United States citizen. All non-citizens 
must provide appropriate documentation to verify 
their status with the United States Immigration and 
Naturalization Service. 

4) Those students whose higher educational 
pursuits are funded by the Department of Welfare, 
the Massachusetts Rehabilitation Department, or 
any of the other Commonwealth of Massachusetts 
public assistance programs. 

c) A person does not gam or lose instate status solely 
by reason of his or her presence in any state or 
country while a member of the Armed Forces of the 
United States. 

d) For the purposes of this policy the following 
persons shall be presumed to be Massachusetts 
residents; 

1) A member of the Armed Forces of the United 
States who is stationed in Massachusetts on active 
duty pursuant to military orders, his or her spouse 
and dependent students. 

2) Full-time faculty, professional staff, and 
classified staff employees of the university of 
Massachusetts system and their spouses and 
dependent students. 

Part IV. Appeals 

4. 1 Any student or applicant who is unwilling to 
accept the initial ruling relative to his or her residency 
classification, or who wishes to seek reclassification, 
may file a "Residency Reclassification Form." 

4.2 Any student or applicant who is unwilling to 
accept the ruling relative to his or her residency 
reclassification may submit an appeal through the 
appeal process established by the campus at which 
that student or applicant seeks reclassification. The 
decision on appeal is final and may not be appealed 
further. 

4.3 In any case where the Admissions Office is 
unable to make an initial determination based on the 
evidence submitted, the applicant may be required 
to submit a "Residency Reclassification Form" to the 
admission office for their review before being finally 
classified as a resident or a nonresident. 

Part V. Penalties 

Misrepresentation in or omission from any evidence 
submitted with respect to any fact, which if correctly 
or completely stated would be grounds to deny 
classification as a Massachusetts resident, shall be 
cause for exclusion or expulsion from or other 
disciplinary action by the University. 



23 



The Campus Experience: Services and Support 

Academic Enrichment and Academic Support 



This chapter describes the wide range of 
academic and student support services 
available at UMass Dartmouth. 

Help with Academic Plans and Goals 

Students are aided in their adjustment to 
academic life and in their decision making 
processes through regular conferences with 
a designated faculty advisor. Each college 
has an academic advising network for its 
students, and the campus-wide Academic 
Advising Center serves students in 
transition. 

The key activities of advising are to help 
each student formulate academic and 
career goals, select courses that will meet 
those goals, and monitor progress toward 
fulfilling degree requirements. Students also 
consult their advisors about academic 
problems and concerns, to arrange special 
learning opportunities, or for advice about 
further study or careers. Students meet with 
their advisors at least every semester, to 
select and obtain approval of their courses 
for the upcoming semester. 

For more detail and official guidelines, 
please refer to the "Academic Advising" 
section in the chapter on Academic Policies 
and Procedures. 

Academic Advising Center 

The Academic Advising Center, located on 
the ground floor of the administration 
building, is open Monday through Friday 
throughout the year. Students may consult 
the faculty advisors of the Center on a 
walk-in basis, or by appointment when 
classes are not in session. The Center assists 
students with special issues or concerns, 
and provides guidance to those considering 
changing a major or who need assistance 
with the university's advising system. It also 
is the site of academic advising for Liberal 
Arts students, who have not yet selected a 
specific major, for first and second year 
business students, and for other students as 
well. The Center is staffed by faculty 
members drawn from every college in the 
University and has a Director, Dr. John 
Carroll, Professor of Political Science, 
appointed from the faculty. 

International Study and Travel 

Students interested in pursuing a course of 
study and travel in another country may 
obtain assistance in academic planning from 
The Academic Advising Center. Information 
about foreign and domestic colleges and 
universities offering these programs is 
available from the Academic Advising 



Center, Foster Administration Building, 
room 008. Students may remain registered 
as continuing students of this university 
while they pursue studies abroad, through 
Withdrawn on Exchange status. 

University Honors Program 

University-wide honors activities are 
available to students who demonstrate high 
academic achievement. This program is 
described more fully in the Interdisciplinary 
and Special Programs section of this 
catalogue. 

Pre-Medical, Pre-Law, and 
Pre-MBA Advising 

Students who wish to prepare for admission 
into graduate schools of medicine, law, or 
business have many options open to them. 
By the judicious use of electives, any student 
within the College of Arts and Sciences can 
satisfy the course requirements of most 
medical, law, or business schools. Any 
student interested in pursuing one of these 
careers should see one of the following 
advisors early in his or her academic career: 
• 

Medicine: Prof. Alan Bates, or Prof. Russell 
Bessette, Chemistry Department; Prof. 
Debra J. Ellis or Prof. Donald J. Mulcare, or 
Prof. Robert Griffith Biology Department; 
Prof. Eileen Carreiro-Lewandowski, Medical 
Laboratory Science Department; Prof. Robert 
Bento, Physics Department; Dr. Barry 
Haimson, Psychology Department. The 
Biology and Chemistry Depart-ments both 
offer formally-structured pre-medical 
options, or advisement tracks, but pre-med 
advising is available to students, in any 
major, who are aiming at a medical career. 
• 

Law: Prof. Kenneth Manning, Political 

Science Department 

• 

Business: Prof. David Berger, Economics 
Department 

University Enrollment Center 

All students (Day, Evening, Summer and 
Graduate) receive comprehensive enrollment 
and financial services at the University 
Enrollment Center. 

All in one location, students can 

• pay tuition, fees, and housing charges 

• check the status of financial aid (and get 
help understanding it) 

• register for classes; add and drop classes; 
etc. 

• check their billing account (and get help 
understanding it) 

• get a copy of class schedule 



• check transcript or obtain or order 
transcripts 

• obtain or submit financial aid forms or 
documents 

• obtain enrollment certifications for 
health insurance or other purposes 

• and most importantly, obtain advice and 
assistance! 

By integrating financial and registration 
services in one location, the university 

• assists students with the interrelation- 
ships between their aid, registration, and 
account status 

• eliminates the necessity to go to three or 
four different offices 

• refers special problems to the best place 
for immediate, quality assistance 

The University Enrollment Center counter is 
located in the Foster Administration Building 
Lobby. 

Academic Resource Center 

The Academic Resource Center (ARC) is an 
academic support service which provides 
peer tutoring and small group review 
sessions for UMass Dartmouth students. 
These support activities are provided free for 
courses through the three area centers of 
the ARC. 
• 

Math and Business Center, Sokratis Koumas, 
Director, Group 1-010, x8716 
Tutoring in algebra, calculus, accounting, 
economics, management science, elemen- 
tary statistics, and other quantitative 
courses. 
• 

Science and Engineering Center, John 
Fernandes, Director, Group II. 217B, x8718 
Tutoring in biology, chemistry, physics, 
computer science, nursing, civil, electrical, 
computer, and mechanical engineering. 
• 

Writing/Reading Center, Amy Parelman, 
Director and Noreen Cleffi, Assistant 
Director, Group I-220, x8710 
Tutoring in English, history, philosophy, 
political science, psychology, sociology, 
English as a second language, essay writing, 
research papers, business and technical 
communication, reading, and study skills. 
• 

Disabled Student Services, Carole Johnson, 

Director, Group 1-016, x871 1 

Support for learning and physically disabled 

students, including mobility assistance, note 

takers, information for Talking Books, 

advocacy. 

• 

ARC Central Office, Thomas Daigle, 



24 



Services and Support 



Director, Group 1-005, x8709 
The Academic Resource center is open daily 
when classes are in session. Call for 
additional information. 

Through a federal grant, the Academic 
Resource Center (ARC) makes the following 
student support services available to eligible 
students: mentors, study groups and study 
partners, assistance in preparing applica- 
tions for graduate school, individualized 
needs assessments, cultural activities, and 
academic enrichment activities. 

The US. Department of Education awarded 
TRIO funding to the Academic Resource 
Center (ARC), which administers grant 
services to eligible students at UMass 
Dartmouth. For information concerning 
eligibility and/or services available contact 
Thomas Daigle, Director, at the ARC Central 
Office, Group 1-005, x8709. 

University Library 

The University Library provides information 
in support of all academic programs, 
research, and other intellectual pursuits. The 
library is the largest building on campus 
with seating for 1,200 people, and is open 
seven days a week during the academic 
year. 

Working closely with faculty, the library 
staff have developed a strong collection of 
books, journals, reference works, and 
databases to meet the ever increasing needs 
of undergraduates, faculty, and graduate 
students. 

The library's holdings include more than 
360,000 books, subscriptions to 
approximately 2,900 periodicals, and more 
than 200,000 bound volumes of periodicals. 
A constantly growing collection of 
electronic databases provides on-line access 
to indexing as well as full-text of many 
journals. 

E-reserves, a digital reserve system, enables 
students to access and use reserve items 
from any location on or off campus at any 
time. 

The library has been a user of technology 
from the inception of computing on 
campus. In 2001 access was extended from 
the on-line Voyager system to the libraries 
of the Boston Library Consortium (BLC) and 
much of Massachusetts through the Virtual 
Catalog Project sponsored by the 
Massachusetts Board of Library 
Commissioners. The Virtual Catalog enables 



users to search the electronic catalogs of 
other libraries and place requests for items 
not held in their home library. Delivery to the 
borrower's library completes the transaction. 
Participation in the BLC, an association of 
major research libraries in New England, 
opens the doors of these institutions to 
researchers and students and greatly 
expands the resources available to them. 

The library provides one-on-one instruction, 
individualized research assistance, and 
classroom instruction to help students use 
these and other resources. 

The university identification card (UMass 
Pass) with library barcode entitles students 
and faculty to use and borrow library 
materials from any public college or 
university in the state as well as a number of 
local libraries. 

The five libraries of the UMass system 
collaborate in a variety of ways in the 
implementation of a Digital Library. Cross 
campus access to electronic databases, 
reference service extended through on-line 
chat service, and the creation of digital 
collections highlighting unique materials on 
each campus are examples of this activity. 

For more information about the library, visit 
its web site at http://www.lib.umassd.edu 

Computing on Campus 

Computing and information technology are 
integral to the curriculum at this university. 
Faculty members have developed creative 
and effective ways for students to learn by 
using computers utilizing smart classrooms 
and the Web. 

At UMass Dartmouth, the many computing 
and information technology functions and 
services are administered through Comput- 
ing and Information Technology Services 
(CITS). A team approach provides unified 
services in the areas of computing support, 
cluster/classroom operations and support, 
information systems, instructional develop- 
ment and support, web site development, 
microcomputer maintenance and repair, 
networking and systems, and operations and 
access. For questions or information, please 
call the CITS Customer Support Center 508 
999-8790 or e-mail cscenter@umassd.edu 

The backbone of institutional computing at 
UMass Dartmouth is the UMDNet that 
allows access to a number of campus 
computing activities. These include access to 
the Internet, e-mail, student information, the 



library system, the campus web site, 
CyberEd/UMass Online, and distance 
learning. These network services are 
accessible from every part of the campus 
including student housing (ResNet) via direct 
Ethernet communications. Every student 
receives an e-mail account which can be 
accessed using POP or IMAP clients and by 
using http://webmail.umassd.edu/ 

The ALPHA cluster, running an OpenVMS 
operating system, has the following 
programming languages available: Basic, 
Fortran, Pascal, C++ and COBOL. Students 
also have access to student information such 
as courses, registration, grades, transcripts, 
and billing information via Web Student. 
UMDNet is a part of the Internet global 
network making possible communication 
with and access to off -campus locations. 

Along with UMass Dartmouth's Web page, 
CITS uses a listserv approach through 
UMDAnnounce, UMDNotify, and UMDAIert 
to provide campus announcements, 
important information, and emergency 
information, respectively. At the beginning 
of each semester all new students are 
subscribed; those wishing to unsubscribe 
from UMDAnnounce may do so. 

Students living on campus have the 
opportunity to connect to the UMass 
Dartmouth Residential Network. This 
provides a significantly faster Internet 
connection than those available through a 
traditional telephone line. Every bed in the 
residence hall has a port, which means that 
every student can have a network connec- 
tion in the room. Students may obtain self- 
install packets from the Residential Network 
Operations Center (ResNOC) located on the 
ground floor of Phase 3A in traditional 
housing. Telephone and e-mail support are 
available at extension 8040 (ResNet Help 
Line) and at resnet@umassd.edu. 

Students who wish to access the Internet 
from off-campus must establish with an 
Internet Service Provider (ISP) and have the 
necessary equipment required by the 
provider in order to access the service. A 
number of providers will connect your off 
campus computer to the Internet and 
UMass Dartmouth. 

CITS provides access, user support, and 
training for students, faculty, and staff for 
the following: 
• 

Help Desk. CITS provides walk-in help desk 
sen/ices through a student Help Desk 



25 



located in the Library basement (phone 508 
999-8884; e-mail citshelp@umassd.edu), or 
a student Residential Help Desk (phone 508 
999-8040; e-mail resnet@umassd.edu) 
located in the residence halls, and a Faculty 
and Staff Help Desk (phone 508 999-8790; 
e-mail cscenter@umassd.edu) located in the 
Computing Support Center. 
• 

Documentation. CITS provides free printed 
documentation in the public access 
computing facilities and distributes the 
Student Guide to Computing and Getting 
Wired widely. 
• 

Training. CITS offers New User Sessions 
teaching basic, intermediate and advance 
skills for supported hardware and supported 
software applications. For information on 
the sessions, call our Help Desk at 508 999- 
8884 or send e-mail to 
citshelp@umassd.edu 
• 

CITS offers nearly 350 Macintosh and 
Windows microcomputers in public access 
computing labs and classrooms located in 
the Library, residential housing, and most 
academic buildings. CITS also has a number 
of campus partners to include the Colleges 
of Business and Engineering, the Computer 
and Information Sciences and English 
Departments, and the Library. Partnering 
offers prioritized access to the campus 
partner in specialized labs during designated 
class hours and public access to all students 
in all majors usually in the evenings and on 
weekends. 
• 

Employment. CITS provides many student 
employment opportunities; hiring more than 
100 students as Computing Assistants, 
Residential Assistants, and Graduate 
Assistants within the various teams. 

Active distributed learning is evidenced by 
our campus' unique and nationally 
recognized CyberEd offerings, UMass-wide 
distance learning courses, and the Impulse 
programs. CITS currently supports three 
distance learning classrooms on the main 
campus and one at the School for Marine 
Science and Technology (SMAST) located 
about six miles southeast of the main 
campus. While the facilities are in various 
stages of development, there are a number 
of distance learning courses that are 
offered/received via our UMass sister 
campuses (Amherst, Boston, Lowell, 
Worcester) as well as Martha's Vineyard and 
Attleboro via the UMass Dartmouth Division 
of Continuing Education. This includes 
distance-learning courses taught by faculty 



from each of UMass Dartmouth's five 
colleges. Additionally, as faculty develop- 
ment and support programs are imple- 
mented, CITS expects to facilitate even more 
courses through this medium. 

Through the CyberEd program, UMass 
Dartmouth has offered web-based courses 
to students from around the world since its 
pioneering efforts which began in 1995. 
Online classes in art history, music, writing, 
physics, history, chemistry, nursing, web 
design and others have been offered at the 
graduate, undergraduate or non-credit level. 
With the initiation of UMass Online this 
system is expected to grow dramatically 
with the introduction of certificate and 
degree programs in the coming year. Some 
of the new programs and courses are 
"hybrids" - that is, some courses may be 
taken partially online, and partially in the 
traditional face-to-face classroom giving the 
best of both worlds. The new courses and 
programs are supported in part through the 
system wide effort known as UMass Online. 
As this better defined it is expected to offer 
students many more opportunities not only 
in terms of when and where they take a 
course, but in the variety of courses and 
programs available. 

CourseBuilder, an in-house developed tool, 
assists faculty in incorporating the Web into 
course delivery. CourseBuilder provides for 
syllabi, assignments, links to outside 
resources, papers, lecture notes, and course 
discussion items, all posted through web 
browsers with no special skills required of 
faculty or student. The technology has been 
adopted for all English 101 classes, and 
more than one third of the total faculty have 
used it. As course offerings have expanded, 
CyberEd faculty, students and staff have the 
opportunity to experiment with a variety of 
teaching techniques and on-line technolo- 
gies. This activity is expected to expand with 
the introduction of new, still more effective 
tools. Accompanying this will be a new 
training facility for faculty, staff, and K-12 
teachers in the region, as well as a new 
instructional support center where faculty 
will find a variety of tools and expertise 
available to help them incorporate Web use 
in instruction. 

Faculty and staff receive Web accounts 
through https://ssl.umassd.edu/webaccount/ 
that are used to grant them access to 
CourseBuilder, personal and departmental 
Web sites, the work order systems, and 
other web-based activities. 



For additional information visit 
http://www.umassd.edu/cits/ 

College Now 

College Now is an admissions and support 
program for students whose educational 
achievement has been hampered as a result 
of social, educational, or economic 
inequities. From the moment of admission 
to graduation, students enrolled through 
the College Now Program are provided with 
essential supportive services. College Now 
freshman students participate in an 
individualized Fall academic program in 
which they receive assistance and guidance 
in developing and sharpening those basic 
academic skills and attributes that are vital 
to their success at the university. Each 
College Now student is assigned a counselor 
who, during the student's five years to 
graduation, will offer assistance with goal 
setting, academic achievement, and short- 
and long-range planning. 

See the Admissions section of this Catalogue 
for information about admission to the 
university through the College Now 
program. 

Office of University Registrar 

Located on the first floor of the Foster 
Administration building, this office serves 
the instructional program by preparing, 
retaining, and making accessible all records 
pertaining to the academic programs and 
the academic work of the individual 
students of the university. Here students 
register for classes and receive the records 
of their progress and achievement; when 
they graduate, all students' academic 
records are made available through a 
transcript-production service. Here the 
schedules of the instructional program are 
prepared each semester for the academic 
departments. 

Beyond such services, the Office maintains 
the record of the university's academic 
affairs through the computerized Student 
Information System and monitors and 
enforces many of the academic procedures 
and policies of the university, as described in 
the Academic Policies and Procedures 
section of this Catalogue. 

Services for Veterans 

VA programs are approved for benefits 
available under specified chapters of Title 
38, U.S. Code. Eligible students must obtain 
an application on campus, or from their 
regional Veterans Administration Office. 
UMass Dartmouth will issue a Certificate of 



26 



Services and Support 



Student Affairs and Development 



Eligibility which should be presented to the 
Office of Veterans' Affairs for certification 
of enrollment. It is the veteran students' 
responsibility to notify the university of any 
changes in course credit load or addresses, 
in a timely manner. 

Veterans' tuition waivers are available for 
those individuals who are considered 
Veterans under M.G.L. Chapter 4, Section 7 
(43), including WWI, WWII, Korean, 
Vietnam, Lebanese peace keeping force, 
Grenada rescue mission, the Panamanian 
intervention force, or the Persian Gulf, 
provided they meet other eligibility criteria, 
to include: a permanent legal resident of 
Massachusetts for at least one year and in 
accord with the university's residency 
requirements; not in default of any federal 
student loans or owing a refund; must be a 
degree candidate or eligible to apply for a 
degree candidacy. 

Disabled Student Services 

Disabled Student Services, a part of the 
Academic Resource Center, provides 
support to both learning and physically 
disabled students by helping them pursue 
their educational goals while adjusting to 
their new environment. The following 
services are provided on an individual basis: 

• mobility assistance 

• reading assistance 

• note-taking 

• alternative testing 

• peer and professional counseling 

• advocacy and support 

• organizational skills 

By assisting with university procedures such 
as orientation, residence hall placement, 
and student registration, DSS maximizes its 
ability to help by interacting with other 
departments. The DSS also organizes and 
holds workshops addressing sensitivity and 
awareness within the university. 

UMass Dartmouth policy regarding 
admission and access to programs prohibits 
discrimination on the basis of disability. 
While new applicants and enrolled students 
are not required to disclose a disability, it is 
highly recommended they contact the 
Office of Disabled Student Services to 
confidentially discuss accommodations that 
may be needed. These conferences are kept 
entirely separate from the admissions 
decision, and enable students to determine 
if UMass Dartmouth can meet their needs. 
The information will be used in accordance 
with 34 Code of Federal Regulations Part 
104. 



The Director of Disabled Student Services is 
Carole J. Johnson. The Office is located on 
the Ground Floor of Group I, room 016. 
Inquiries are invited by phone at 508 999- 
871 1 or by e-mail to cjohnson@umassd.edu 

Upward Bound Program 

Upward Bound is a college preparatory 
program that provides academic and 
counseling support services to students who 
attend New Bedford, Westport, and Greater 
New Bedford Vocational High Schools. It is 
designed to generate the skills and 
motivation necessary to succeed in post- 
secondary education. This objective is 
achieved by providing students with tutorial 
and instructional services coupled with 
intensive academic, career, and personal 
counseling. 

During the Academic year students enroll in 
the Upward Bound course at their high 
school. The course is designed to instruct 
students in areas relevant to becoming 
strategic learners as well as areas of social 
and cultural interest. Class time is also set 
aside for tutorial help. 

The program also offers a six-week summer 
residential component on the UMass 
Dartmouth campus. Students attend classes 
in a variety of subjects, and many are 
offered a tuition-free college course. 
Academic activities are paired with a host of 
other activities and trips, culminating in a 
student-developed Production at the end of 
the program. 

All Upward Bound students have been 
defined as "at risk." The support services 
they are offered encourage and motivate 
them to complete high school and go on to 
institutions of higher learning. 



Student Affairs Mission Statement 

The Division of Student Affairs is an integral 
part of the educational process and offers 
programs and services that assist students in 
achieving their fullest potential at UMass 
Dartmouth. As administrators, educators, 
advisors and advocates, we strive to provide 
an environment that holistically promotes 
personal growth, leadership development, 
social responsibility, student empowerment, 
involvement, and well-being in the 
intellectual, social, cultural, spiritual, 
emotional, career, and physical realms. 

We are committed to building a community: 
• 

where quality deliverables are accessible and 
where a receptive and well-trained staff is 
efficient, caring, responsive, and user- 
friendly. 
• 

where civility is affirmed; community service 
is rewarded; access and retention are 
supported; the living and learning environ- 
ments are cohesive; student life is vibrant 
and possesses school spirit and traditions; 
student rights and responsibilities guide 
behavior for the common good; and 
diversity, respect, and tolerance of differ- 
ences are aggressively pursued on an 
individual, institutional, and global level. 
• 

where learning and personal development 
through co-curricular programs foster an 
environment where students learn outside 
of the classroom through increasing 
opportunities and raising student expecta- 
tions and through involving students in 
decision-making and leadership roles. 

The division's programs and services are 
designed to motivate and inspire students to 
devote time and energy to educationally 
purposeful activities and support an 
effective academic community. 

Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs 

The vice chancellor and associate vice 
chancellor direct and supervise all of the 
activities of the Division of Student Affairs to 
meet effectively the broad educational goals 
of the university and the individual needs of 
students. 

The vice chancellor's office serves as an 
advocate for all students. As a member of 
the top administration of UMass Dartmouth, 
the vice chancellor serves as a liaison 
between the faculty and the co-curricular 
needs of the student. 



27 



Associate Dean of Students 

The Associate Dean of Students assists 
students in personal and social matters and 
strives to improve the quality of campus life 
by helping students and organizations. In 
addition, the Associate Dean of Students 
supervises the staffs of the Student Activities 
Office, International Students Office, Co- 
ordinator for Student Judicial Affairs Office, 
and Greek Affairs Office. The Associate 
Dean of Students also coordinates New 
Student Orientation programs and services 
as advisor to the freshman class. The 
Associate Dean of Students reports directly 
to the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs. 

International Students' Advising 

The Academic Affairs/Graduate Studies 
office issues initial student visas to graduate 
students, and provides visa-related services 
to students, faculty, and staff. This office 
also oversees the university's many 
exchange-student programs. 

The Coordinator for International Students, 
Christina Bruen, and the staff of the Office 
for International Students serve interna- 
tional students by providing general advice 
and assistance with campus life and 
personal needs. Ongoing support with visas 
and other immigration forms is available as 
well as assistance with documentation that 
students need while studying at the 
university. Workshops are offered during the 
course of the year pertaining to employ- 
ment, taxes, and other subjects of particular 
interest to international students. Cultural 
events are cosponsored by the this office 
and other organizations on campus. The 
Office will move to the International Center 
in the newly constructed Residence Hall One 
sometime during the 2002-2003 academic 
year. 

Judicial Affairs 

The Judicial Affairs Office is responsible for 
overseeing the development, distribution, 
and enforcement of university student 
conduct regulations and publishing the 
Student Handbook. The mission of the 
Judicial Affairs Office is to foster the 
development of community standards and 
individual behavior through education, with 
an emphasis on policies and procedures, 
and student rights and responsibilities. The 
Office of Judicial Affairs is located in Room 
209, Foster Administration Building. For 
more information, phone 508-999-9205. 

Counseling and Student Development 

The Counseling and Student Development 
Center offers a safe, supportive place for 



students to explore concerns, clarify choices, 
and develop action plans. Services are free 
and confidential. Students can make an 
appointment by calling 508 999-8648, or 
students can walk in and be seen 
immediately between 12:30 and 2:00 pm 
each working day The Center is located in 
the Auditorium Annex and open from 8 am 
to 5 pm, Monday through Friday. 

The Center provides individual counseling 
for personal issues such as relationship 
problems, homesickness, adjustment to 
college life, bereavement, depression, poor 
self-esteem, anger management, procrasti- 
nation, anxiety, eating disorders, ADD, 
learning disabilities, academic problems, and 
test anxiety. A consulting psychiatrist is 
available to see students who might benefit 
from a trial of medication. In addition, each 
semester several personal growth or support 
groups are offered. Career interest testing 
and help in choosing a major are also 
available. 

Workshops are offered each semester on 
topics such as leadership skills, assertiveness, 
time management, improving your memory, 
preparing for graduate school, and other 
topics important to success in college. 
Students may use the Center's self-help 
library of books, handouts, videos, and 
pamphlets as well as an educational 
resource library with information on 
graduate and undergraduate institutions 
and testing programs for entry into 
graduate and professional programs. The 
Center also offers a support group for 
graduate students working on a dissertation 
or thesis. 

Alcohol and Drug Education 

The Alcohol and Drug Education program 

• supports students and staff in 
demonstrating responsible conduct 
regarding alcohol and drugs; 

• promotes attitudes and behaviors 
regarding alcohol and drugs which 
create a university atmosphere of civility 
and discourage any behavior that is 
abusive to oneself or others; and 

• provides, consolation, evaluation, 
intervention, support groups, and 
referral services to students. 

The education program provides orientation 
for new students about alcohol and drug- 
related issues and university policies, 
workshops for student organizations and 
departments regarding assessment of 
alcohol/drug troubled students, weekly 
professional lectures and seminars on 



current alcohol and drug related topics, an 
extensive alcohol and drug education library, 
alcohol and drug awareness weeks, and 
assistance to faculty in teaching about 
alcohol and drug-related issues. 

The program offers a mandatory multilevel 
program for students who violate the 
university alcohol and drug policy. 
Intervention is available to any student 
identified as having a problem with alcohol 
or drugs. Any student, staff, or faculty 
person can request intervention support 
information from the Alcohol/Drug 
Education Coordinator. 

A student organization. Peer Alcohol 
Concerns Educators (PACE) , is a peer 
resource for student alcohol and drug 
concerns. Experiential learning credit is 
available. For information, contact Laurajane 
Fitzsimons, Alcohol and Drug Education 
Coordinator, Counseling and Student 
Development Center, Upper level, Audito- 
rium Annex, 508 999-91 53 or Lfitzsimons 
©umassd.edu 

Career Resource Center (CRC) 

The CRC provides a wide array of career 
resources and services to help students 
clarify career goals and develop professional 
skills. Individual career advisement sessions 
are available by appointment. Workshops 
are offered frequently in a variety of career- 
related areas such as resume writing, 
interviewing techniques, career planning 
and professional etiquette. 

The Center also coordinates all on and off 
campus student employment, including 
Federal Work Study. 

The CRC's Career Resource Library helps 
students research and explore careers and 
find employment opportunities. Various job 
listings are available including full-time, 
part-time, and summer employment. 
Internship, experiential learning and co-op 
opportunities are also available both in the 
library and, on our website 
www.umassd.edu/CRC. Students may visit 
the library on a drop-in basis. 

The CRC also coordinates special career- 
related events and activities such as the 
annual Career Expo which has become one 
of the largest on-campus job fairs in 
southeastern New England. Other activities 
include Career Chats, Student Employee 
Appreciation Day and Take Our Daughters 
to Work Day, which is co-sponsored by the 
Women's Resource Center. The CRC 



28 



Services and Support 



\ 



coordinates on-campus recruitment for 
seniors. 

The CRC helps students identify and arrange 
experiential learning and internship 
opportunities, which offer work experience 
for academic credit. On-campus or local 
placements are widely available. Students 
may also seek such placements as Disney 
World in Orlando, Florida, and The 
Washington Center in Washington, DC. 
These many opportunities are described fully 
in the chapter of this catalogue on Special 
Learning Opportunities. 

The CRC is committed to helping UMass 
Dartmouth foster a service ethic on campus. 
To this end, assisted by Dierdre Healy, 
Community Service Coordinator, the CRC 
coordinates community service activities 
through the Community Service Desk and 
by publishing a Community Service Guide to 
assist students in finding meaningful and 
rewarding service activities. There are 
community service-related work study 
opportunities such as the Community 
Service Learning Program and America 
Reads Program and a host of volunteer 
agencies and activities in local communities. 
All students are encouraged to participate in 
special community service events such as 
Make A Difference Day and Hunger and 
Homelessness Clean-Up Day. 

Health Services 

The Health Services Office is located in 
Phase 3A Residence Halls, phone 508 999- 
8986. During the academic year, a physician 
and nurse practitioner(s) are on duty each 
class day. Two registered nurses, a 
consulting dermatologist, and a consulting 
nutritionist are also on staff. This office is 
equipped to handle most health related 
problems students may encounter while at 
UMass Dartmouth. Referrals are made to 
community resources when appropriate. 

All services are available to all students 
through the Student Health Fee. The Health 
Office is concerned with the total well-being 
of each student and is committed to health 
education and disease prevention. Also, 
Health Services contracts for student health 
insurance. The Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts requires university students to have 
comprehensive health insurance, and 
information regarding coverage is included 
with each student's tuition statement. See 
the chapter on Expenses for the policies on 
the university's health insurance require- 
ments. 



Frederick Douglass Unity House 

The Frederick Douglass Unity House is the 
first cultural center established on the 
UMass Dartmouth campus, opening in 
September of 1995. The mission of the 
Unity House is to institutionalize on the 
UMass Dartmouth campus an environment 
which nourishes the special academic, 
cultural, informational and social/communal 
needs of students, faculty and staff of color. 
All students, faculty, and staff are welcomed 
and encouraged to share in the develop- 
ment of this vital organization. 

The facility provides a culturally focused 
library, study area, computer facilities, 
meeting/conference room, and lounge. 
Students play a major role in the operation 
of the center by creating programs and 
events that help to achieve the mission of 
the center. All members of the university 
community, especially students, are 
encouraged to develop activities that will 
assist the Unity House to fulfill its goals and 
mission as well as celebrate diversity at 
UMass Dartmouth. The Unity House is 
located in Resident Dining Building, phone 
508 999-9220. 

Religious Resource Center 

Campus Ministry coordinates the religious 
activities and serves the spiritual needs of 
the university community. Clergy and 
ministers from major religious denomina- 
tions provide opportunities for worship, 
spiritual direction and counseling, and 
special programs. The office is located on 
the second floor of the Campus Center — 
phone 508 999-8872. The university hosts a 
Catholic Student Organization (8872), 
UMass Dartmouth Christian Fellowship 
(8584), Episcopal/Protestant Ministry (8875), 
and Jewish Student Center/Hillel (9241). 

Multicultural Support Services and 
Assessment 

This office provides support services to the 
students of color at UMass Dartmouth, both 
undergraduates and graduate students. The 
program's primary goal is to increase the 
retention and success of students of color at 
the university, and another important goal is 
to help the university community better to 
meet, understand, and appreciate the needs 
of students of color. Phone 508 999-8602 
to contact the Director, Norman Barber. 

Children's Centerfor Learning 

The Children's Center for Learning, a 
licensed, professionally staffed early learning 
facility, is available for the children of 
students, faculty, and staff. To be eligible 



for enrollment, children must be between 
two years and nine months and six years 
old. Hours are from 7:30 am. to 5:00 pm. 
on all days when the university is in session 
during the academic year. The Center is 
located in the Residence Halls, Phase IIIA. 
Additional information is available from the 
Director at 508-999-8873. 

Women's Resource Center 

The information and services offered by the 
Women's Resource Center (WRC) reflect the 
interests and concerns of women: health, 
social, and legal issues. The center provides 
cultural opportunities that further women's 
personal and professional development and 
promotes a broader understanding of the 
diverse experiences of all women. The WRC 
acts as a central coordinating agency for 
campus and community groups. 

The Center offers programs on women's 
health, political activism, diversity, violence 
against women, and sisterhood. Each 
semester the WRC sponsors discussion 
groups, forums, and workshops on topics 
such as sexual harassment, gender equity, 
racism, women's ways of leading, 
motherhood, ageism, and sex. 

The WRC has a variety of resources 
including: 

• a library containing more than 500 
books, references, and recent 
publications 

• videos 

• a lounge for group or classroom use 

• a spiritual room/breast feeding area/Kid's 
Corner 

The WRC is a member of the Women's 
Caucus of the National Women's Studies 
Association. The Center can provide 
information on nationally scheduled events 
which are held throughout the year, such as 
reproductive rights conferences, women's 
conferences, and political rallies. Informa- 
tion is also available on lectures and events 
in nearby communities. The center 
collaborates closely with the university's 
Women's Studies Program. 

The Women's Resource Center is open year 
round and is located in New Dorm I, The 
Director is Juli L. Parker, phone 508 910- 
4584. 



29 



A List of Clubs and Organizations 



The following list is presented to show the 
range and variety of student clubs and 
organizations. Refer to the Student 
Handbook for official details and contact 
persons. 

Academic and Honor Societies 

Accounting Association 

American Association of Textile Chemists 

and Colorists Club 
American Marketing Association 
American Society of Civil Engineers 
American Society of Mechanical Engineers 
Association for Computing Machinery 
Biology Association 
Center for Rehabilitation Engineering 
Ceramics Club 
Chemistry Club 
Delta Mu Delta 
Disabled Students Coalition 
Economics Association 
Engineers Student Chapter 
Eta Kappa Nu, Zeta Xi Chapter 
Fibers Club 

Finance and Investment Club 
French Club 

Golden Key International Honor Society 

History Association 

IEEE Computer Society 

Institute of Electrical and Electronic 

Engineers 
Literary Association 
Medical Laboratory Science Club 
Metals Guild 

National Society of Professional 

NSPE Massachusetts Society of Professional 

Engineers 
Phi Psi 

Philosophy Club 
Physics Club 

Pi Sigma Alpha, Mu Kappa Chapter 
Political Science Association 
Pre-MBA, Pre-Law, Pre-Med Associations 
Psi Chi 

Psychology Association 

Sculpture Club 

Senior Nurse Pinning 

Sigma Delta Pi, Mu Phi Chapter 

Society of Automotive Engineers 

Society of Manufacturing Engineers 

Society of Women Engineers 

Student Chapter of the Association for 

Computing Machinery 
Tau Alpha Pi, Delta Delta Chapter 
Theta Kappa Chapter of Sigma Theta Tau 
UMass Dartmouth Student Chapter: Clinical 

Laboratory Science 
UMass Dartmouth Student Nurse 

Association 
Wood Club 



Campus Events 

Council on Cultural Diversity and Pluralism 

Cultural Affairs Committee 

Gallery 

Lecture Series Committee 

Ethnic Heritage and Multiculturalism 

Asian Student Association 
Cape Verdean Student Association 
Chinese Student Association 
The Diversity Circle 
Frederick Douglass Unity House 
Indian Students Association 
Luso-American Student Association 
Portuguese Language Club 
Taiwan, Republic of China Student 

Association 
The Office of Multicultural Support and 

Assessment 
United Brothers and Sisters 
United Latino Society 

Global Organizations 

Amnesty International 
MassPIRG 

Greek Life 

Alpha Sigma Tau 
Beta Theta Pi 
lota Phi Theta 

Phi Sigma Sigma National Sorority 
Sigma Tau Gamma Fraternity 

Music 

Concert Band 

Jazz Improvisation Ensemble 

Music Guild 

Pep Band 

Stage Band 

UMD Chorus 

UMD Gospel Choir 

UMD Spinners 

Religious 

Catholic Campus Ministry 
Catholic Student Organization 
Christian Fellowship 
Episcopal and Protestant Ministry 
Hillel-Jewish Student Association 
Islamic Society of UMass 
Religious Resource Center 
Wiccan Pagan Coalition 

Special Interests 

Book Art Center 
Campus Design 
Circle K Club 
Dance Club 

Division of Student Affairs' Spirit Group 
Experiential Programs, Internships 
Feminist Majority 
Fine Arts Committee 



International Student Leadership Institute 
Literary Club 

Massachusetts Community Water Watch 

Pride Alliance (BiGaLA) 

Southeastern Massachusetts Partnership 

Student Athlete Advisory Board 

The University Food and Dining Committee 

Theatre Company 

Twenty Cent Fiction 

UMass Aviation Club 

WSMU Radio -91.1 FM 

Student Government 

Board of Governors, BOG 
Class Officers 
College Democrats 
College Republicans 

Division of Continuing Education Student 

Government 
Residence Halls Congress 
Student Senate 

Student Publications 

Deadline Studios 
Scrimshaw (yearbook) 
Siren 
Temper 

The Torch (student newspaper) 



30 



Student Activities, Clubs, and 
Organizations 

Campus Center 

The Campus Center is the heart of the co- 
curricular activities and services of the 
University. It is the community "living and 
dining room" for all members of the 
University family: students, faculty, staff, 
alumni, and guests. Housed in the Campus 
Center are such services as the Campus 
Shop, Main Cafeteria, Sunset Dining Room 
and Pub, Underground Cafe, UMass Pass 
(debit card), Snack Bar, and Information 
Center. Also housed in the Campus Center 
are 21 clubs and organizations, the Student 
Activities Office, the Radio Station, and the 
university newspaper. The Campus Center is 
open daily. The Main Auditorium is home to 
the University Theater Company and used 
by many organizations for large concert hall 
type events. Community events are often 
held in the Auditorium, which is a fully 
equipped theater. The Community Art 
Gallery is in the Auditorium Lobby. 

Office of Student Activities 

The Office of Student Activities is the center 
of student activities and co-curricular 
programs. It provides assistance and 
resources in all aspects of program planning, 
to student organizations and clubs. The 
Coordinator of Student Activities coordi- 
nates the activities of about 1 00 student 
organizations and advises the Student 
Activities Board, which sponsors university- 
wide programs. The office also has a 
publicity staff that provides advertising 
services for any campus group or function. 

The Student Activities Board plays an 
integral part in the educational development 
of UMass Dartmouth students by involving 
them in the planning of events. SAB is the 
largest volunteer student campus organiza- 
tion. The Office of Student Activities advises 
all organizations on the implementation of 
their programs — from answering questions 
to assisting with the entire event. 

MassPIRG 

The Massachusetts Public Interest Research 
Group is a state-wide, nonprofit and 
nonpartisan organization directed solely by 
students. MassPIRG has two basic goals: to 
research and promote solutions to impor- 
tant social problems at the local, state, and 
national levels; and to teach students civic 
values through a variety of project and 
internship opportunities. As approved by the 
university's student government, the 
valuable public-interest work of this 



organization is supported by a waiveable 
fee. 

Greek Affairs 

The Associate Dean of Students works 
closely with the Greek Liaison/Advisor to 
develop programs and policies. This office 
also provides service to Greek groups such 
as training, and assists groups with meeting 
the requirements of their national offices. 

Student Government 

Students hold office in various organizations 
that govern the campus, and they serve on 
committees that determine policies and 
directions for many aspects of campus life. 

The Student Senate is the major governing 
body and offers a forum for debate on 
matters of importance to the student body. 
The Senate also appoints students to 
membership on a wide range of university 
committees. Students are active, voting 
participants on many of the committees that 
recommend policies and regulate proce- 
dures for academic as well as social aspects 
of the university. A student is also elected to 
the Board of Trustees of the University of 
Massachusetts. 

Golden Key International Honor Society 

UMass Dartmouth has been accepted to 
charter membership in the Golden Key 
International Honor Society. Our students 
ranked among the top 1 5% of juniors and 
seniors are invited to become members. 
Activities include participation in regional 
and national leadership conferences. 
Lifetime membership is a tribute to 
academic achievement and also an 
investment that can provide leadership 
training, scholarship opportunities, and 
career assistance. 



31 



Services and Support 



Student Athletics 



Intercollegiate Athletics 

The university is a member of National 
Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA), 
Division III, the Eastern Collegiate Athletic 
Conference (ECAC), the Little East Confer- 
ence (LEC), the New England Football 
Conference (NEFC), and the New England 
Women's Lacrosse Alliance (NEWLA). The 
university fields intercollegiate teams for 
men in baseball, basketball, cross country, 
football, golf, ice hockey, lacrosse, soccer, 
swimming and diving, tennis, and track and 
field (indoor and outdoor). Intercollegiate 
teams for women are fielded in basketball, 
cheerleading, cross country, equestrian, 
golf, field hockey, soccer, softball, swim- 



ming and diving, tennis, track and field 
(indoor and outdoor), volleyball, and water 
polo. 

The Director of Athletics is Robert Mullen. 
One may contact the department at 508 
999-8720. 

Intramural and Instructional Athletics 

Intramural opportunity for all students is 
provided in basketball, cross country, flag 
football, co-ed soccer, swimming, tennis, 
volleyball, water basketball, water polo, 
softball, and co-ed softball. Non-credit 
courses are offered at convenient times for 
all interested students in the following: 



aerobics, step aerobics, weight training, 
fencing, swimming, endurance swimming, 
water aerobics, first aid, lifesaving, WSI, 
scuba, CPR, kayaking, and Tae Kwan Do. 

Facilities 

Facilities are available for recreational use by 
students throughout the school year. They 
include the fitness center, gymnasium, 
swimming pools, running track, various 
athletic fields, and tennis courts. Equipment 
is also available. Schedules are available in 
the Tripp Athletic Center or by calling 508 
910-6910. 




32 



Housing and Residential Life 



Department of Public Safety 

Emergency on campus, dial 9191 



The Office of Housing and Residential Life, 
located in Residence Hall IIIA, is responsible 
for all phases of resident living on campus. 
This includes social, cultural, and 
educational programming, custodial and 
maintenance, discipline, room assignments, 
and, in general, the promoting of a living/ 
learning environment in on-campus 
housing. The staff of this office also 
administers the housing needs of summer 
students and conferences. 

The residence halls are more than just places 
to eat and sleep; they provide the 
opportunity for students to become part of 
a community. 

Residence Halls and Student Apartments 

The university has six residence halls housing 
2,300 students and two townhouse clusters 
housing 800 students. 

The residence halls have 10 and 12 person 
wings with double and single rooms and 
one or two bathrooms. Each section of 
these wings has at least one lounge/ 
kitchenette. Recreation, mail, laundry 
facilities, and a resident director's apartment 
are part of each building. 

Within the Residence Halls are located a 
Coffee House, two Computer Clusters, and 
multi-purpose lounge areas. The Women's 
Resources Center, Office of International 
Student Affairs, Honors Program Office, and 
the Impulse Office are located in the 
Residence Halls. 

Apartment-style living is found in the Cedar 
Dell student apartments, which consist of 
1 36 five and six person townhouse style 
apartments housing students in single 
rooms. Recreation, mail and laundry facilities 
are available in two student centers. The 
Cedar Dell Village environment is more 
autonomous than in the residence halls, and 
priority for this housing is given to upper- 
class and graduate students. 

A Cable TV signal is provided to each room 
in both residence areas. Also, each bedroom 
has a live telephone port and a port to 
access the computer network. 

Smoking 

Most areas are nonsmoking. Smokers may 
ask for a "smoking allowed" room. 

Student Involvement 

Students participate through the Residence 
Halls Congress, a collective advisory group 
representing student interests in the 



residential facilities. The Residence Halls 
Congress also creates program opportunities 
for the on-campus population and in many 
ways works closely with the Office of 
Housing and Residential Life to enhance on- 
campus life. 

Charges 

Charges for student housing are shown in 
the chapter on Expenses and Student 
Financial Services. The Student Handbook 
gives additional information. 

Access to On-Campus Housing 

Preference for on-campus housing is given 
to full-time undergraduate students. 
Although graduate and non-degree 
students may apply, priority is given to 
undergraduates. Special considerations for 
housing must be approved by the Office of 
Housing and Residential Life and will be 
considered on a space-available basis. 

Meals for On-Campus Students 

Students living in the residence halls receive 
meals in the Residence Dining Hall. A 
student may contract for one of several 
board plans which range from 5 to 19 meals 
per week, including brunch and dinner on 
weekends, or may pay a single meal rate 
which includes unlimited seconds. Charges 
for student meal plans are shown in the 
chapter on Expenses and Student Financial 
Services. (Dining Services are not offered 
through the Student Services Division but 
are administered by the Auxiliary Services 
unit of the university.) 



Dining Services forthe Campus 

The university offers a range of food and 
dining services. 

A la carte dining services are available in the 
Commuter Cafe, North Alcove and the 
Magic Oven Cookie and Coffee Shop. In 
addition, the Sunset/Cove Room located on 
the second floor of the Campus Center 
serves fresh pizza, sandwiches and fresh 
green salads. Automatic vending machines 
are located in all buildings. 

Arrangements for special functions, and 
meeting space may be made with the 
Conference and Function Office located on 
the ground floor of the Residence Dining 
Hall. In addition, the UMass Pass Office 
located in the Campus Store handles Board 
plans and the UMass Pass Debit Card. 



The Department of Public Safety provides 
twenty-four hour a day protection of the 
entire campus and individuals on the 
campus. Our police officers are vested with 
full law enforcement powers, identical to 
the local police in the community. The 
Officers are trained at the Massachusetts 
Criminal Justice Training Academy and also 
receive annual in-service and specialized 
training in such aspects as first-aid, CPR, 
defense tactics, legal updates, evidence 
gathering, traffic control, and investigations. 

The University provides the "DART," a 
shuttle van for on-campus safety transporta- 
tion. The service begins at 5:30 each night 
and ends at 2:00 am, 7 days a week. When 
there are special events on campus, 
extended service is provided for one half- 
hour after the event closes. There is a pre- 
set route that takes approximately 20 
minutes to complete. DART service stops are 
designated with a sign and are located at 
the residence halls, the campus center, the 
gym, Cedar Dell, and the library. The DART 
does not respond to special requests for 
transportation except to provide direct 
service for disabled students. 

Any student, faculty, staff or visitor may 
report a potential criminal action and 
emergency on campus by calling 9191 for 
emergencies or 8107 for the police 
dispatcher. 

Crime Statistics 

A list of campus crime statistics for the 
previous three-year period is available from 
the Department of Public Safety upon 
request and through the pamphlet, A Guide 
to Campus Safety and Law Enforcement. 

Emergency Call Boxes 

An emergency telephone system is provided 
on campus. These emergency telephones 
are in strategic locations around campus 
and are easily identified by their distinctive 
orange containers as well as by their bright 
blue light during the nighttime. The 
emergency phones are connected directly to 
the police dispatch desk. No dialing is 
required. They may also be used to summon 
an escort. 

Public Safety Programs 

A unit in the Department of Public Safety is 
the Investigations and Crime Prevention 
Unit. Officers who specialize in selected 
crime prevention duties staff this section. 
Programs available through the Crime 
Prevention section include a the DART 
shuttle, Rape Aggression Defense (RAD) 



33 



Services and Support 



Other Student Services and Programs 



course for women, Operation I.D., Alcohol 
Awareness, and Anti-drunk Driving 
Workshops. 

Safety or Health Issues 

Safety is monitored carefully in classes and 
laboratories in chemistry, biology, medical 
technology, physics, and studio arts that 
may contain or use chemicals, bacteria, 
viruses, silica, asbestos, x-ray, radiation or 
animals, which under normal conditions are 
harmless but may affect persons with high 
risk conditions. Wayne LeBlanc, at 508 999- 
8242, is the university's Safety Officer. 

Students should report to the Health Office, 
the Office of Facilities and Physical Plant, the 
Campus Police, or the appropriate depart- 
ment chairpersons anything on campus that 
could be hazardous. 



Parking on Campus 

All members of the university community 
wishing to use their cars on campus must 
register with the Department of Public 
Safety and receive a parking sticker. 
Residence students may keep a vehicle on 
campus, upon payment of a fee. 

Parking decals are available at Mass Pass 
located in the campus center. Decals for 
handicapped parking will be issued at the 
Department of Public Safety; all wishing 
permits for handicapped parking must 
register there. 

Parking is free of charge. 



UMass Dartmouth Campus Store 

The University Campus Store, located on the 
ground floor of the Campus Center, carries 
required and recommended textbooks, 
reference books, computer hardware, 
software, general school supplies, school- 
name clothing, and a good selection of 
sundries and gift items. Textbooks go on 
sale in August for the fall semester and in 
early January for the spring semester. 
Special order service is offered for hard-to- 
find books. 

Call 508 999-8180 for complete information 
on store hours, textbook returns, and book 
buy-back, or visit umassd.edu/campus store 

In addition to cash transactions, the Campus 
Store accepts VISA, Master Card, American 
Express, Discover, and checks in the amount 
of the sale, with appropriate identification. 
Also, the Campus Store is integrated with 
the "UMass Pass" system which allows 
students, once funds are deposited, to make 
purchases and charge their accounts. 

UMass Dartmouth Alumni/ae 
Association 

All current students should consider 
remaining active participants in the life of 
the university, through the UMass Dart- 
mouth Alumni Association. Described here 
are those aspects of the Association's many 
activities that relate especially to current 
students. 

The UMass Dartmouth Alumni Association is 
the largest volunteer organization on 
campus. It represents the interests of more 
than 30,000 former students in all 50 states 
and around the world. Serving as liaison 
between the university and its former 
students, the Alumni Association provides 
opportunities for people to get involved in 
shaping the future of their school. 

This year, alumni contributors will help the 
Alumni Association provide money for 
scholarships, gifts, and grants for students, 
faculty and campus projects. During the 
Annual Fund phonations, students call 
graduates to solicit gift support. Alumni also 
participate in recruitment of new students 
by hosting get-together sessions in various 
communities of the state. 

Some of the on-campus activities the 
Alumni Association sponsors include: 

• Homecoming Weekend 

• Senior Class Pancake Breakfast 

• Alumni Employees Pride Day. 



On Homecoming Weekend, hundreds of 
alumni return to campus for events that 
include the Corsair Hall of Fame induction 
banquet, the annual Homecoming football 
game, and a post game party. Students are 
invited to attend most activities. Various 
classes and student organizations have 
reunions at different times of the year. 

Students have the opportunity to talk with 
alumni about career choices throughout the 
year. During the year career panels bring 
alumni from various professions back to 
campus to tell students about their career 
paths and to offer students tips on how to 
enter the job market. The Alumni Career 
Network reference guide is available to 
students in the Office of Career Services. 
The guide gives students an opportunity to 
contact alumni directly for career advice or 
to arrange visits to job sites. 

A description of the programs and activities 
of the Alumni Association is given in a 
subsequent section of this Catalogue 

UMass Pass / Student ID Card 

The campus identification card, called the 
UMass Pass or University One-Card, is 
required to access the student residences, 
library, Fitness Center, and various campus 
activities or events. The One-Card is active 
for the entire time a student is registered or 
employed at UMass Dartmouth. There is a 
fee for new and replacement cards. 

The UMass Pass debit account is offered to 
all cardholders. It can be used to purchase 
services that would otherwise require cash 
on campus, and at a growing list of off- 
campus businesses. All forms of payment 
are accepted, including deposits with Master 
Card, Visa, or American Express (call 508 
910-6913 or mail checks to UMass Pass 
Office, 285 Old Westport Road, North 
Dartmouth, MA 02747). 

The UMass Pass office is located in the 
Campus Store and can be reached at 508 
910-6440 or 508 999-8188. 



34 



Services and Support 



35 



Academic Regulations and Procedures 



All rules are subject to change in accordance 
with existing and hereafter adopted 
university policies. Official changes will be 
clearly stated in university policy documents. 

Notations may indicate when specific 
regulations became or will become effective. 
If there is no notation, regulations are now 
fully in effect. 



Catalogue Commitments 

The catalogue which is in effect when a 
student first enters the university (as an 
admitted degree student) is generally the 
one that will govern that student's course 
and program requirements. However, 
circumstances may occur that require 
modification of this principle. 

Changes may occur in the requirements for 
academic programs or regulations. 
Whenever possible, such changes will be 
phased in, with the class affected and year 
when the changes first apply being stated. If 
a formerly required course or courses should 
no longer be offered, substitutions will be 
considered in individual program planning; 
the institution will attempt to respond 
flexibly in such cases. In the rare event of an 
academic program being phased out, those 
in the program will be given a reasonable 
amount of time to complete the require- 
ments. Neither transfers in nor new 
admissions will occur. 

For students who return after a period of 
withdrawal or dismissal (in other words, 
who do not maintain continuous registra- 
tion or who leave without a granted leave of 
absence), the governing catalogue will 
become that which is in effect when they 
are re-admitted. Individual requests to be 
allowed to revert to the earlier catalogue 
will be reviewed by the dean of the 



student's college. 

Students may wish to change their majors a 
year or more after they join the university. 
Such students may be refused the option of 
using the version of the major that was 
listed in a former catalogue, being instead 
subject to requirements of a newer version. 
Students who entered under one governing 
catalogue may prefer the requirements in a 
subsequent catalogue. They may request 
permission to have that newer catalogue 
apply to them; in such cases, however, they 
shall then adopt all requirements from the 
newer catalogue. Ten years is deemed 
sufficient time for a part-time student, in 
continuous registration, to complete a 
degree. If a student takes more time than 
this, the university will reserve the right to 
impose the requirements of a later 
catalogue. Because each edition of the 
General Catalogue may not be prepared 
significantly in advance of its distribution 
and the Catalogue is not re-edited every 
year, changes may go into effect before the 
next edition is printed. Such changes will be 
clearly stated in university policy documents. 

Issues concerning the catalogue that 
governs for individual students are resolved 
at the level of the college dean. 

Maintenance of University Records 

The Office of the University Registrar 
maintains the official educational records of 
all graduate and undergraduate students. 

The Registrar's Office also conducts 
registration, arranges schedules, enforces 
certain academic regulations, and issues 
official transcripts from the university. 
Petitions to receive credit toward one's 
university degree for courses which have 
been taken elsewhere must be filed with the 
Registrar. The Registrar also certifies 
enrollment to the Social Security Administra- 
tion, the Veterans Administration, insurance 
companies, banks, guaranteed student loan 
agencies, and other agencies including 
higher education loan agencies. 

Confidentiality of Records 

The university policy on the confidentiality 
of records is consistent with the require- 
ments of the Family Education Rights and 
Privacy Act of 1975 (FERPA). 

The policy is designed 

• to protect the privacy of educational 

records, 



• to establish the right of students to 
inspect and review their educational records, 
and 

• to provide guidelines for the correction of 
inaccurate or misleading data through 
informal and formal hearings. 

Students also have the right to file com- 
plaints with the Family Policy Compliance 
Office, U.S. Department of Education, 
Washington, DC 20202-4605 concerning 
alleged failures by the university to comply 
with the Act. 

The university is allowed to disclose certain 
basic information about students without 
their assent, and is in fact required to do so 
by state statutes. Such disclosable informa- 
tion is called "Directory Information." 

The university has designated the following 
categories of student information as 
directory information: student's name, local 
and permanent addresses, most-recently 
attended previous school or college, major 
field of study, dates of attendance, home 
town where applicable, membership in 
university curricular and extra-curricular 
organizations, weight/height of members of 
athletic teams, and degrees and awards 
received Currently enrolled students may 
withhold disclosure of the above categories 
of information by submitting written 
requests to the University Enrollment 
Center. Once a non-disclosure request has 
been filed, it will remain in effect until 
further notification from the student. The 
university assumes that absence of a 
student's request to withhold public 
information indicates individual approval of 
disclosure. 

UMass Dartmouth publishes a directory 
listing its current students, issuing a new 
directory each fall semester. The directory 
will list names, local and permanent 
addresses, campus electronic mail addresses, 
major field of study, and dates of atten- 
dance or class year. This directory will be 
sold at a reasonable cost in the Campus 
Store. It will thus be available not only to 
students but to members of the general 
public, including political groups, public or 
private agencies, and advertisers. As stated 
above, students may request non-disclosure 
at the University Enrollment Center. 

FERPA restricts significantly the right of 
others to view a student's educational 
records. The following are some categories 
of individuals who may view or receive a 
student's educational records, by federal law 



New in 2002-2003 Catalogue 

• General Education rules are clarified 
for when one course can count 
toward more than one requirement 
and for transfer courses. 

• Academic Eligibility rules are modified 
(e.g., for students to participate in 
athletics or student leadership). 

• A new policy is announced permitting 
combined bachelor's/master's 
programs that can reduce the 
student's total credits for the degrees. 



36 



and by the procedures established for the 
university. 

1. 

The student him or her self (except materials 
to which the student has waived the right of 
access, such as confidential letters of 
recommendation, and records that are not 
"educational records"). 
2. 

Persons whom the student authorizes by 
name in a written, signed statement that 
specifies the purpose of the disclosure and 
names the records to be released. This rule 
covers special requests and also all requests 
to send transcript copies to employers or 
other educational institutions. Such 
disclosure may be incorporated within 
signed agreements to participate in an 
activity or program — for example, receiving 
a scholarship. 
3. 

Officials of the campus and university who 
have a "legitimate educational interest" in 
the information. At UMass Dartmouth, 
"officials" includes... 

• Persons employed by UMass Dartmouth 
in an administrative, supervisory, 
academic or research, or support staff 
position (including some student 
workers); 

• Officers of the UMass central administra- 
tion; or 

• Persons, including students, serving on 
committees where legitimate "need to 
know" exists (examples are persons 
serving on a committee that recom- 
mends award of scholarships or persons 
serving on the board of an honor 
society). 

Such officials have a "legitimate educational 
interest" or "need to know" if performing a 
task that ... 

• Falls within the context of assigned 
institutional duties or responsibilities; 

• Relates to the functioning of the office, 
position, or committee involved; 

• Relates to the education or the disciplin- 
ing of the student; and 

• Is consistent with the purposes for which 
the information is kept. 

4. 

Parents who have established that the minor 
student is a dependent on their federal 
income tax. Otherwise parents have no right 
of access to their daughter's or son's 
educational records. The university does not 
routinely share student information in this 
case, but can use this clause if special 
circumstances merit its use. 



5. 

Persons or organizations providing financial 
aid to students or determining those aid 
awards, as necessary to determine eligibility, 
amounts, or conditions of an award or to 
enforce its terms and conditions. 
6. 

Persons in compliance with a judicial order 
or lawful subpoena. The university will make 
a reasonable attempt to notify the student 
in advance of such release of information. 
7. 

Appropriate parties in an emergency if the 
knowledge or information is necessary to 
protect the heath or safety of the student or 
others. 
8. 

Officials of other educational institutions, in 
the case of notification of certain disciplin- 
ary actions taken against the student at 
UMass Dartmouth. 
9. 

An alleged victim of any crime of violence, 
of the final results of any institutional 
disciplinary proceeding against the alleged 
perpetrator of that crime with respect to 
that crime. 

Persons authorized to view or retain a 
student's educational records, as above, 
may in no case transmit, share, or disclose 
the information to any third party. All third- 
party requests for information should be 
addressed to the Office of the University 
Registrar. 

The complete UMass Dartmouth FERPA 
policy statement gives additional details and 
categories. It also defines what records are 
deemed to be "educational records" in this 
context. 

A complete copy of the university's 
procedures and policies regarding the Family 
Educational Rights and Privacy Act is 
available for inspection at the Office of the 
University Registrar. Notification of these 
policies is distributed in print each year to 
our active students through the semester 
Course Listings booklets. 

Access to One's Educational Records 

Students may inspect and review their 
education records upon request to the 
Office of University Records. The student 
should submit a written request which 
identifies as precisely as possible the record 
or records he or she wishes to inspect. 

The Office of University Records will make 
the needed arrangements for access as 
promptly as possible and notify the student 



of the time and place where the records 
may be inspected. Access must be given in 
45 days or less from the receipt of the re- 
quest. When a record contains information 
about more than one student, the student 
may inspect and review only the portion of 
the records which relate to him/her. 

Requests for Transcripts 

Transcripts may be obtained through the 
University Enrollment Center or from the 
Registrar's Office. Both official and unofficial 
copies are available. As of Fall 2001, degree 
students pay a one-time transcript fee; 
transcripts are provided to them, and to all 
others, at no cost both now and for the 
future. Requests for transcripts must be 
made in person, in writing, or by FAX, 
because the student's signature is required 
as a release. The Registrar will enforce 
policies to see that transcript requests are 
reasonable. 

Student ID/UMass Pass Card 

Students, faculty, and staff are required to 
have a UMass Dartmouth identification card 
to access various university services and 
functions. A fee is charged for new and 
replacement cards. Further information is 
available in the "UMass Pass" section of the 
chapter on The Campus Experience. 

Student ID Number 

The university requests all students (except 
international students who lack them) to 
submit their social security numbers for use 
as their student ID number. However, those 
who do not wish to have their social security 
numbers used as their student identifier will 
be issued a special nine-digit number for 
this purpose, upon formal request to the 
Office of the University Registrar. Students 
can be assured that the university will 
respect and protect their privacy and their 
social security numbers. 

Change of Student Information 

Students should notify the University 
Enrollment Center or Registrar's Office of 
any change in their student information. A 
form is made available to report changes in 
personal information, such as a change of 
name or address. The student's University 
Records file is the official repository of 
individual information such as personal data, 
major and minor programs, and academic 
records. Current and accurate information is 
important, and for some purposes manda- 
tory (for example, for international students 
to retain visa status). 



37 



Academic Regulations 



Undergraduate Degree Requirements 



To earn a UMass Dartmouth undergraduate 
degree, a student must meet the following 
UMass Dartmouth requirements: 

1. Be admitted to degree status as a 
UMass Dartmouth undergraduate 
student 

UMass Dartmouth offers the under- 
graduate degrees of Bachelor of Arts, 
Bachelor of Fine Arts, and Bachelor of 4. 
Science. (See the Graduate Catalogue 
for graduate offerings.) Each degree 
requires being accepted into and 
fulfilling the requirements of a major. 
Students are admitted to degree status 
through the Office of Admissions or 
through the official degree admission 
procedures of the Division of Continu- 
ing Education. Non-degree students, 
sometimes called "special students," 
are not eligible for a UMass Dartmouth 
degree. 

2. Meetthe residency requirement of 
UMass Dartmouth 

5. 

At least 45 credits of work must be 
completed at UMass Dartmouth. 
However, no more than 60 credits can 
be accepted from any combination of 
postsecondary 2-year institutions, 
advanced placement, or CLEP credits. 
Credits that may be applied to the 
degree include advanced placement, 
CLEP credits, and transfer credits. 

At least 30 credits of advanced and 
specialized courses must be completed 
(UMass Dartmouth courses numbered 
300 or higher, excluding courses 
numbered 900 — Contract Learning). 

It is expected that students will earn 
most of their advanced and specialized 
course credits at UMass Dartmouth. 
Students may be granted permission by 
the appropriate chairperson and 
college dean to earn some of these 
requirements at another institution, so 
long as UMass Dartmouth major and 
minor requirements are met to their 
satisfaction thereby. 

3. Satisfy the general education 
requirements of UMass Dartmouth 

This category refers to a series of 
requirements that all UMass Dartmouth 



students must meet, beginning with 
students entering in fall 1998. They are 
stated later in this catalogue section. 
Those entering previously do not need 
to meet a general education require- 
ment (unless returning in fall 1998 or 
beyond after a lapse from active 
student status — see "Catalogue 
Commitments" section, above). 

Satisfy the distribution require- 
ments of the college and the 
academic major 

UMass Dartmouth requires students to 
complete distribution requirements 
according to the degree sought and 
the program and College. These 
distribution requirements vary among 
colleges and majors and with year of 
graduation. They are described in the 
college and department chapters of 
this catalogue. Distribution require- 
ments ensure breadth of studies 
beyond limits of the academic major. 

Complete a UMass Dartmouth 
academic major 

In order to graduate from UMass 
Dartmouth, a student must successfully 
meet all requirements for a specified 
major within a recognized department, 
or an approved inter-departmental 
major. Specific requirements for each 
major are included in each 6. 
department's section of this catalogue. 
A UMass Dartmouth major must 
consist of at least 30 credits in 
appropriate courses carrying depart- 
mental approval; some majors require 
additional credits. Most majors require 
a seminar equivalent or special 
individual project. Such a project may 
be incorporated in a specific course or 
carry separate credit. 

7. 

While some programs require approval 
of a major early in a student's college 
career, all UMass Dartmouth students 
shall be required to request a major no 
later than the registration period for 
the fall semester of the junior year. 
Formal request shall be made to the 
appropriate chairperson, or as the case 
may require (e.g., multidisciplinary 
studies), the program coordinator. 

Students whose overall grade point 



average is above the dismissal grade 
point average shall be allowed to 
request a major. (However, most 
majors require a minimum GPA of 2.0 
or higher.) Students whose overall 
grade point average is below the 
dismissal grade point average shall be 
candidates for dismissal. 

By being accepted into and fulfilling 
the requirements of two majors, a 
student may graduate with one degree 
and a dual major, or two degrees 

Students admitted to a major may 
remain in it until graduation, until they 
shift to another major, or unless they 
are dismissed from the major because 
they did not meet a requirement for 
progression. Requirements for 
progression in each major are stated in 
the appropriate sections of the General 
Catalogue. Such requirements may 
include (but are not limited to) the 
following: maintenance of a minimal 
GPA in all courses or in all major 
courses; satisfaction of requirements 
for progress in completing major 
courses; the passing of one or more 
mid-program reviews; the meeting of 
stated requirements for professional 
practice. Dismissals from a major are 
recommended by the department to 
the college dean. 

Have a grade point average of at 
least 2.000 in all courses taken in 
the major 

All work required in the student's 
major field of concentration must be 
satisfactorily completed. The cumula- 
tive grade point average for courses 
taken in the major shall be set by the 
department at not less than 2.000. 

Have at least 30 course credits in 
advanced and specialized courses 

At least 30 course credits in advanced 
and specialized courses — courses 
numbered 300 or higher, excluding 
courses numbered 900 (contract 
learning) — must be satisfactorily 
completed at or under the sponsorship 
of UMass Dartmouth. 



38 



\ 



Other Program Options 



Have a cumulative grade point 
average of at least 2.000 

A cumulative grade point average of 
not less than 2.000 for all credits 
submitted for the degree must be 
attained. 

Complete 1 20 credits of courses 
(minimum — some programs require 
a higher number of credits for the 
degree) 

The requirement to complete 120 
credits of courses is a minimum. Some 
programs require a higher number of 
credits for the degree. 



Department or College Requirements 

Academic requirements more restrictive 
than or in addition to UMass Dartmouth 
requirements may be established for any 
major or program. 



Qualified students may complete an 
academic minor or a double major. General 
requirements of the university's academic 
minors are stated below, and specific minor- 
program requirements are stated in the 
program sections of this catalogue. 

According to a new policy, some academic 
departments may announce combined 
bachelor's/master's programs allowing well- 
qualified undergraduates to move directly to 
master's level study in the same department. 
The policy permits curricular designs 
allowing up to 1 5 credits of coursework to 
count for both the bachelor's and master's 
level, thus reducing the total credits required 
to earn both degrees. 

Within their studies, many students will also 
work towards a certain goal, such as 
preparation for teaching, entrance to law 
school or medical school, or certification in a 
certain area of studies. These many options 
are described in other places in this 
catalogue. 



Minor Requirements 

Approved minors consist of at least 18 
credits, of which 9 must be at the upper 
division level. Individual departments will 
designate their upper division courses. The 
same course may count both for minor and 
for distribution requirements. 

Any degree candidate who has earned at 
least 54 credits, with a cumulative grade 
point average of 2.000 and with a 2.500 
grade point average in the major, may 
request from the department in question 
admission to a minor. 

Successful completion of a minor will be so 
noted on the student's transcript. 

A department offering a minor may 
establish other specific requirements. 




39 



Academic Regulations 



General Education Requirement 



Code Qualifiers 



The current General Education program was 
initiated in Fall 1998, with a phase-in process 
between that date and fall 2000. 

To qualify for graduation, students must 
meet the General Education Requirement by 
means of an appropriate selection of courses. 
The table to the right summarizes the 
requirements. 

Goal of General Education 

The goal of UMass Dartmouth's General 
Education program is to educate students to 
be not only proficient in their areas of 
specialty, but also 

• to have a working understanding of the 
connections between disciplines; 

• to appreciate and respect the differences 
among ourselves; 

• to be ethical, culturally-aware, and 
socially-responsible citizens; 

• to be quantitative and rational thinkers; 
and 

• to be effective and creative 
communicators. 

Information about General Education 

The approved lists of general education 
courses and categories are made available 
every semester in the published Course 
Listings booklets that give the schedule of 
classes. 

The code symbols from the chart in the next 
column are also shown in the course 
descriptions of the General Catalogue to 
identify all courses that have received 
"permanent designation" as counting for 
one or more of the general education areas. 

A few courses apply toward a category of 
general education only in certain years or 
depending on the instructor assigned to 
teach them; these courses, which receive 
"contingent designation," are identified only 
in the Course Listings booklets. 

The General Education Committee is actively 
at work helping the campus community to 
implement these requirements and approving 
additional general education course 
requirements. 



General Education Area 



Cultural & Artistic Literacy C 
9 credits 



Ethics & Social Responsibility E 
3 credits 



Global Awareness & Diversity G 
6 credits AND 

D 



Information & Computer Literacy Tier 1 
6 credits 

AND 

(Advanced, Tier 2) I 



Mathematics, Natural Science, and M 
Technology 

AND 

9 credits 

S 



Written & Oral Communications Tier 1 
Skills 

(Advanced, Tier 2) W 

9 credits 



O 



All regular courses from the departments 
of history, philosophy, foreign language, 
and English (literature and creative writing 
courses only); and from the College of 
Visual and Performing Arts. No more than 
6 credits from the same department 



A course which has at least 12 instructional 
hours in ethics and social responsibility, from 
the approved list 
OR 

A departmental major or college requirement 
(course or sequence of courses) which has at 
least 12 instructional hours in ethics and 
social responsibility, as approved for that unit 



A three-credit course in global awareness, 
from the approved list; 

A three-credit course in diversity, from the 
approved list 



English 101 and 102, incorporating 
computer-based assignments and library 
instruction 



Department-specific advanced literacy skills, 
as approved for that unit (credits unspeci 
fied). 



A three-credit course from the depart- 
ment of mathematics (non-remedial) 



Six credits from . . . 

(a) all regular courses from the departments 
of biology, chemistry, medical laboratory 
science, civil and environmental engineering, 
computer and information science, electrical 
and computer engineering, mechanical 
engineering, and physics; 

OR 

(b) other courses which emphasize funda- 
mental scientific concepts or application of 
scientific methods in critical thinking and 
problem-solving in the natural sciences, from 
the approved list 



English 101 and 102 AND 

Three credits in a writing-intensive course 
from the approved list. The curriculum is to 
be designed so students complete this 
course before the student's senior year. 
AND 

At least two formal oral presentations in 
one or more courses designated by the 
student's major department and approved 
for that unit (Tier 2 oral communication) 



40 



Courses that meet these requirements are 
coded in the departmental course listings of 
this catalogue. 



Gen Ed and Transfer Credit 

Course equivalencies are determined in the 
transfer credit approval process. If a course 
from elsewhere is found equivalent to a 
UMass Dartmouth course or category of 
courses that satisfies a general ed require- 
ment, the transferred-in course will satisfy 
that same requirement. For courses that do 
not have exact equivalency to a UMass 
Dartmouth course, those who make transfer 
credit decisions have discretion to make 
judgments that another school's course 
meets one or more of our general education 
requirements. 

Relation to Other UMass Dartmouth 
Requirements 

General Education course requirements take 
their place beside other requirements, as 
outlined in the section on Undergraduate 
Degree Requirements, rather than replacing 
any other graduation requirements. Students 
are alerted especially that the general 
education requirements and the distribution 
requirements for their major and college are 
not necessarily the same; both sets of 
requirements must be satisfied. 

However, any courses used in satisfying a 
general education requirement may also be 
used to satisfy other kinds of requirements. 

That is. Gen Ed is an "overlay" requirement, 
not a separate requ : ,ement. 

For example, some courses used for general 
education will often also meet requirements 
for the major. Other general education 
courses may meet the "distribution 
requirements" established by the colleges of 
the student's major. 

Can One Gen Ed Course Satisfy More 
Than One Gen Ed Requirement? 

In the case of content courses that can 
satisfy different General Education content 
requirements, a student can use such a 
course only to satisfy one such requirement. 
For example, if a course is listed as satisfying 
both the Global Awareness and Diversity 
requirements, a student can use it to satisfy 
only one of those requirements. 

When a general education content course 
has also embedded within it a unit or 
attribute that satisfies a skills area require- 
ment (that is, when a C, D, E, G, M, or S 
course is also identified as I Tier 2, W Tier 2, 
or 0), it may be used to satisfy or contribute 
toward satisfying both requirements. 
Similarly, a single course may be identified as 
satisfying more than one skills attribute. 



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41 



Academic Regulations 



Academic Advising at UMass Dartmouth 



Roles of the Academic Advisor 

UMass Dartmouth's faculty take their 
obligation to advise students seriously. 
Students consult their advisors for assistance 
in — 
• 

forming their academic goals and career 

objectives 

• 

establishing an overall plan for their program 

of study 

• 

understanding and meeting degree 
requirements, requirements in the specific 
academic program or major, distribution 
requirements and college requirements, and 
general education requirements 
• 

understanding academic regulations and 

procedures 

• 

monitoring their progress toward completion 

of their degree 

• 

identifying campus services appropriate to 

their needs 

• 

planning for any special programs like an 
experiential learning experience or study 
abroad 
• 

responding to academic difficulties. 

Students must see their advisor before they 
register each semester. In this contact, the 
advisor should review the student's academic 
progress, review the student's career plans, 
and assist the student in selecting the next 
semester's courses. The advisor must sign to 
approve the student's course selections 
before the student registers; in many cases, 
the advisor can register the student directly 
from his or her office. 

Students may see their advisor at other 
times. The advisor can call a conference with 
the student at any time, with reasonable 
notice. The first stop for students who 
receive notice of academic warning or 
probation should be the office of their 
advisor (see below, the section on "Aca- 
demic Sanctions"). 

The Academic Advising System at UMass 
Dartmouth 

Every degree candidate has an assigned 
individual faculty member who serves as his 
or her academic advisor. 

The student's major program determines the 
assignment of the faculty academic advisor. 
The academic department assigns each 



student to an academic advisor, except in 
certain special cases noted here — 
• 

Students who have selected Liberal Arts as 
their initial program receive academic 
advising in the Academic Advising Center. 
• 

Freshman students in certain majors — like 
Business — may receive academic advising 
from faculty selected from their college, 
located in the Academic Advising Center. 
• 

Freshman students in the studio arts receive 
academic advising through a special 
orientation course and program provided in 
their College. 
• 

Students pursuing their degree in the Division 
of Continuing Education receive academic 
assistance from qualified staff members, who 
provide a link between each student and the 
academic department of their major. 

New students, be they incoming freshmen or 
transfer students, will meet their advisors at 
the New Student Orientation program. 

In many academic majors, the student retains 
the same academic advisor throughout the 
program. In others, students change their 
advisor as they progress in their degree 
program. 

In certain circumstances, a student will work 
with an advisor in addition to her or his mam 
advisor — for example, if pursuing an 
academic minor; a special program such as 
teacher preparation, pre-medical, or pre-law; 
or cooperative education. When a student 
has a double major, s/he will have a different 
advisor assigned for each major. 

Students have an obligation to know who 
their advisor is and to contact that advisor 
when required or when needing assistance. 
At the same time, each academic department 
has an obligation at the beginning of every 
semester to post in a conspicuous place the 
faculty advising assignments for each major 
student in the department. All members of 
the faculty must have scheduled conference 
hours posted on their office doors and are 
expected to be available during those hours 
to advisees; in addition, students may 
schedule appointments with their advisors at 
other times. 

Because the department chairperson, not the 
advisor, must approve each student for 
graduation, the department chairperson or 
designee should review the record of each 
major in the department at the point of 



completing 90 credits, or three-quarters of 
the requirements for the degree. The 
department chairperson or designee is 
responsible to inform the student of 
requirements that remain unfilled. 

As partners with their faculty advisors in the 
advising relationship, students have the final 
responsibility to understand the requirements 
for their majors and degrees and the policies 
of the university. Each student is given a copy 
of the General Catalogue in effect for the 
year of their entrance to degree study. 

Students needing assistance with the advising 
system should go either to the office of the 
Chairperson of the department of their major 
or to the university's Academic Advising 
Center. A current list of academic depart- 
ment locations and phone numbers is 
published annually in the Student Handbook, 
which is given to every student each year. 
The Academic Advising Center, described 
above in the chapter on Campus Services and 
Support, will consult with any student on a 
walk-in basis and provides special guidance 
to those considering changing their major. 

The Dean of each College has ultimate 
responsibility for the academic advising 
system for the students in the programs in his 
or her College. 

Statement of Final Responsibility 

Although faculty advisors and many others 
seek to guide and assist each student, it is 
the student — not the faculty advisor, 
department chairperson, or other university 
official— who is ultimately responsible for 
seeing that his or her program fulfills degree 
requirements. 

Academic Advising Goals and Emphases 

The Faculty Senate has adopted the following 
"Academic Advising Policy Statement" to 
encourage faculty in the philosophy and 
practice of developmental advising.* 

The functions of academic advising at UMass 
Dartmouth include: 

1. 

Assisting students in self-understanding and 
self-acceptance (value clarification, under- 
standing abilities, interests and limitations). 
2. 

Assisting students in their consideration of 
life goals by relating interests, skills, abilities, 
and values to careers, the world of work, and 
the nature and purpose of higher education. 
3. 

Assisting students in developing an educa- 



42 



UMass Dartmouth Courses 



tional plan consistent with life goals and 
objectives (alternative course action, alternate 
career considerations, and selections of 
courses). 
4. 

Assisting students in developing decision- 
making skills. 
5. 

Providing accurate information about 
institutional policies, procedures, resources, 
and programs. 
6. 

Making referrals to other institutional or 

community support services. 

7. 

Assisting students in evaluation or revalua- 
tion of progress toward established goals and 
educational plans. 
8. 

Providing information about students to the 
institution, colleges and/or academic 
departments. 
9. 

Facilitating the students' successful attain- 
ment of educational and career goals. 
10. 

Facilitating the students' achievement of 
GPAs consistent with their abilities. 
11. 

Making students aware of the wide range of 
services and educational opportunities that 
may be pertinent to their educational 
objectives. 
12. 

Assisting students in exploring the possible 
short-and-long range of consequences of 
their choices. 
13. 

Assisting students in choosing educational 
and career objectives commensurate with 
their interests and abilities. 

* Adopted from the National Academic 
Advising Association. 

Advising for Non-Degree Students or 
Prospective Students 

Students who wish just to take a course or 
courses without being in degree status may 
receive assistance at the Academic Advising 
Center. 

Such individuals may study at the university in 
non-degree special student status. The 
faculty advisors in the Academic Advising 
Center welcome contacts from such students 
and assist them in formulating their goals of 
study. 

Students considering admission to degree 
study, either full or part time, should contact 
the Office of Undergraduate Admissions. 



Role of the Deans of the Five Colleges 

Students may consult the office of the Dean 
of their College for information or inquiries 
about the departmental programs or 
academic requirements, regulations, and 
processes. A role of the Deans is to approve 
special academic petitions and requests or to 
waive an academic regulation, due to 
hardship or special conditions. Another role is 
to give assistance with any student's 
concerns, or to handle complaints and special 
appeals. 



Statement on Outside Work 

The University of Massachusetts Dartmouth is 
committed to delivering the highest quality 
education to all of its students. In this 
context, we believe that for each credit, 
students should expert at least three hours of 
related academic work outside of class. While 
the campus is appreciative of the necessity of 
students having outside employment, full- 
time students should think carefully about the 
number of hours they spend in outside 
employment. Faculty members offer students 
a workload that challenges students to get 
the most out of their educational experience. 
Each student at the University registered for 
1 5 credits should expert at least 60 hours of 
academic work per week. 



Course Credits 

Courses are the basic units of teaching at 
UMass Dartmouth. A course is a segment of 
an academic or professional field which 
provides insight and understanding of those 
topics, skills, and approaches to knowledge 
which are determined by the University to 
be important to students' educational 
development, personal growth, and/or 
career preparation. 

Each course at UMass Dartmouth carries the 
number of credit hours specified in the 
course description. Lecture/discussion 
courses ordinarily meet three hours per 
week in each semester. There is, however, a 
wide range of hour and credit arrange- 
ments, ranging from one-credit laboratories 
to 15-credit practice teaching courses. 
Consult the chapter on "Other Learning 
Opportunities" for further variations. 

Course Load 

Full-time load: An undergraduate student is 
deemed to be in full-time status during a 
semester if carrying 12 or more credits. A 
graduating senior in the final semester may 
be considered full time with fewer credits, 
thus maintaining financial aid status. Some 
financial aid programs may be reduced if 
enrollment is for fewer than 12 credits. 
Please confirm awards with the Financial Aid 
Services Office. 

Maximum load: Undergraduate degree 
candidates who wish to register for more 
than 18 credits in a semester must obtain 
approval of the appropriate dean. A student 
may accumulate a maximum of 30 credits in 
excess of degree requirements. 

Course Level and Number System 

Courses are listed by number and title. 
Courses are numbered according to the 
following system: 

100-level — introductory courses 

200-level — intermediate courses 

300/400-level — advanced and specialized 
courses normally requiring prerequisites; 
including seminars, honors, practica, theses, 
and independent study 

500/600/700-level— graduate courses. 
Open to undergraduates only with 
permission. Some programs prohibit 
undergraduates from registering in 500/ 
600-level courses. 

Courses may be offered that do not give 
credit toward graduation but count in 



43 



Academic Regulations 



Student Enrollment Status 



calculating a student's load ("administrative 
credit"). Usually, these courses are 
numbered 100 or lower (e.g.. Math 100). 

Waiver of Courses 

If students demonstrate proficiency in areas 
that are part of their degree program of 
study and have the approval of the faculty 
specializing in that area, they may petition 
through the department chairperson to the 
dean of the appropriate college to have the 
course(s) for which the proficiency is proven 
(by examination, portfolio review, successful 
completion of a previous program of studies 
for which credit may not have been 
received, etc.) waived as a requirement for 
the fulfillment of their degrees. When a 
course is waived as a degree requirement, 
the student is still responsible for the 
successful completion of a number of credits 
equal to those assigned to the waived 
course. 

Repeating of Courses 

Students may repeat individual courses 
once, but only if space is available and with 
the written consent of their department 
chairperson and their advisor. Students who 
wish to take the same course a third or 
subsequent time may be permitted to do so 
only after obtaining written permission from 
the instructor, from the academic advisor, 
and from the chairperson. It is the student's 
responsibility to follow this procedure since 
instructors may remove names of students 
from the class roster who have not received 
permission to attend the class. 

Only the appropriate UMass Dartmouth 
course may be used; no course taken at 
another institution can replace a UMass 
Dartmouth course's grade. Only the most 
recently earned course grade (whether 
higher or lower) shall enter into calculation 
of the cumulative grade point average. 
However, all courses attempted by a student 
will be part of the permanent record. 



Transfer of Credit from Other Institu- 
tions 

The detailed practices in transfer of credit by 
incoming students are stated above, in the 
chapter on Admission to the University, in 
the section called "Advanced Standing 
through Transfer Credits." 

A current UMass Dartmouth student who 
wishes to enroll in courses in another 
university or college for transfer credit to 
UMass Dartmouth should have such courses 



approved in advance by the appropriate 
department chairperson and college dean in 
order to insure the transferability of such 
credits. A form is available for this purpose, 
and assistance may be sought at the 
Academic Advisement Center. 

On completion of the courses, an official 
transcript should be forwarded to the 
UMass Dartmouth Registrar. A C- grade is 
the minimum acceptable grade for receiving 
undergraduate transfer credit at UMass 
Dartmouth. Transfer coursework for which 
credit is given will be recorded on the 
student's permanent record card without a 
grade designation. It will not be calculated 
in the student's grade point average. 

Certain courses completed at another 
institution are, by prior arrangement, 
deemed to count as UMass Dartmouth 
credit. Examples include courses taken in 
Study Abroad, in formal Exchange status, 
and in special arrangements whereby 
another institution's courses are identified 
as receiving UMass Dartmouth credit (for 
example, if taken within a formal joint 
program between or among UMass 
campuses). Grades earned in such courses 
are displayed on the UMass Dartmouth 
transcript and affect the student's grade 
point average. 



Registration 

Registration is the process by which students 
enroll in courses each semester. Returning 
students are responsible for registering 
during the established registration period. 
New and transfer students and re-admitted 
students register according to the most 
recent instruction from the Office of the 
University Registrar Registration will not be 
considered effective until all financial 
obligations to UMass Dartmouth are met. 

Add/Drop 

Up to the end of the first week (five class 
days) of the semester, a student may 
officially Add courses or Drop courses 
without record. In the case of courses that 
meet only once a week, the Add/Drop 
period shall be two weeks. No one shall 
enroll for Experiential Learning, Independent 
Study, and Honors Thesis credits after the 
second week (ten class days) of the semester 
without the permission of the appropriate 
dean or a designee. 

Withdrawal from Courses 

Students may withdraw from a course only 
through the end of the tenth week of 
classes of the semester. A grade of W will 
be recorded (the former grades of WF and 
WP will no longer be used.) 

More than 24 credits of W makes the 
student subject to dismissal from the 
University through the action of the Dean of 
the student's College. Grades of W do not 
affect a student's GPA 

A student who withdraws from all courses 
shall be deemed to have withdrawn from 
the university. 

Class Attendance 

There is no University-wide attendance 
policy. Students are expected to be present 
at all scheduled activities related to courses 
in which they are enrolled and are respon- 
sible for the course work and assignments 
missed during any absences. They must take 
the initiative in making up any work missed 
and finding out about any assignments 
made during their absence. Extended 
absences for medical or personal reasons 
should be reported to the Office of the 
Dean of Students. 

Individual faculty members are responsible 
for informing students of the attendance 
rules for each class and the penalties for 
violating them. Faculty members are solely 
responsible for the enforcement of these 
rules. 



44 



) 



A class session is considered canceled if the 
instructor does not report within ten 
minutes from the beginning of the class 
period. 

Absence for Religious Observance 

Students have the right to make up 
examinations, study, or work requirements 
that they miss because of absence from 
class for religious observance, but they also 
have an obligation to inform the course 
instructor as to the days on which they will 
be absent for religious reasons. Students 
should inform the course instructor in 
writing of the days they will be absent as 
early as possible in the semester and always 
prior to the day(s) the student will be absent 
for religious reasons. 

If they feel that it is important for course 
planning, instructors have the right to 
require students to provide a written list of 
days they will be absent for religious 
observance within one full week after the 
students' enrollment in the course, provided 
the instructor lists this requirement and 
corresponding deadline on the course 
outline or other handout. 

In the event of a dispute about religious 
observance between a faculty member and 
a student, the chairperson of the depart- 
ment in which the course is taught shall be 
responsible for its amicable resolution. If the 
dispute cannot be resolved at this level, the 
issue will be referred to the dean of the 
college in which the course is taught. 

For convenience, a listing of major days of 
religious observance is given at the end of 
this chapter. 

Financial Obligations 

Any student who has an outstanding 
financial obligation to the University will not 
be considered officially registered for 
courses. The obligations include tuition, 
fees, housing charges, Campus Store 
balance, library fines, loan balances, parking 
fines, etc. Financial clearance must be 
obtained from the Bursar's Office. 

Change of Major or College 

Students requesting a change of major will 
be expected to meet entrance requirements 
of the new major. Access to majors may be 
limited. 

Requests for change of academic major or 
college must be approved by the depart- 
ment chairpersons involved and the dean of 
the college to which the student is 



transferring. The change of major form is 
obtained in the Registrar's Office and the 
Academic Advising Center. 

Study Away/Study Abroad Status 

Students who undertake formal study 
experiences such as study abroad, intern- 
ships, clinicals, or cooperative education 
placements at a different institution or off- 
campus setting may retain enrolled status at 
UMass Dartmouth and, in some cases, be 
eligible to receive UMass Dartmouth 
financial aid. Such study must be under the 
sponsorship of UMass Dartmouth, be an 
approved element in the student's degree 
program, and receive approval from the 
department, dean, and Academic Advising 
Center, which serves as the contact-point 
for requesting this status. Amounts and 
types of aid may vary depending on the type 
of program, length of study, and program 
costs. 

Leave of Absence 

A student may request of the appropriate 
college dean a leave of absence for a period 
no longer than two calendar years. Students 
on leave of absence may return within the 
stipulated period by writing to the college 
dean at least four weeks prior to the first 
day of classes in the semester of return. The 
college dean may specify an earlier 
notification deadline in limited enrollment 
programs. Students on leaves of absence 
who exceed their stipulated time on leave 
will be considered to have withdrawn and 
so will be subject to the re-admission 
procedures, below. 

Students on leave are not considered 
enrolled. 

Re-admission After Interruption of 
Study 

Former students may request re-admission 
to continue undergraduate work, after an 
absence longer than that covered by an 
approved leave of absence or after an 
absence for which they did not obtain an 
approved leave. Re-admission requests are 
submitted to the Registrar, who forwards 
the request to the dean of the college of the 
student's major. A modest fee is charged to 
each applicant for re-admission. 

An individual's re-admission is not auto- 
matic; some re-admission requests are 
denied. The individual is evaluated for 
academic progress and for availability of 
space in the major program and must 
receive Bursar's clearance. Applicants who 
wish to be re-admitted in a different major 



or who were not making satisfactory 
progress when they withdrew receive a 
special scrutiny at the departmental and 
dean's level. "Satisfactory progress" in the 
phrase above refers to students who were 
neither dismissed from the university for 
academic reasons nor on academic 
probation at the time of withdrawal. 

Withdrawal from the University 

A student who wishes to withdraw from 
UMass Dartmouth should file a Withdrawal 
Notice Form with the Registrar, who will 
inform the dean of the student's college. 
Failure to follow this procedure will 
jeopardize the student's re-admission. A 
student who officially withdraws shall 
receive a W in each course as appropriate 
(see Grading System). If a student does not 
reenter the University in the following 
semester but plans to at some later time, he 
or she should apply for a leave of absence. 

Veterans who withdraw are urged to 
consult the office that assists with veterans' 
affairs. 

Full-time undergraduate degree candidate 
students who withdraw separately from all 
class sections in which they were enrolled in 
a term are deemed to have withdrawn from 
the university. 

Students may withdraw from the university 
and receive " W" grades through the end of 
the final day of the official instructional 
period for that term or semester. If they 
withdraw after the final examination period 
has commenced, they are subject to 
standard grades for that term. 

Withdrawal from the university can have 
consequences regarding need-based 
financial aid. Students who withdraw from 
the university before 60% of the semester is 
completed will have their Federal financial 
aid eligibility recalculated in direct propor- 
tion to the length of the enrollment. The 
percentage of time the student remained 
enrolled is that student's percentage of 
dispersible aid for the semester. A student 
who remains enrolled beyond the 60% 
point earns all aid for the period. With- 
drawal is recorded by the Office of the 
University Registrar in accordance with 
UMass Dartmouth withdrawal policies. More 
complete information is available from the 
Financial Aid office or web site. 

Re-admission to Pursue a Second 
Bachelor's Degree 

Individuals who received a bachelor's degree 



45 



Academic Regulations 



Grades and Grading System 



from UMass Dartmouth or a predecessor 
institution may request re-admission to 
pursue a second bachelor's degree. As 
above, these requests are submitted to the 
Registrar, who forwards the request to the 
dean of the college of the student's 
intended new major. Such a student must 
complete at least 30 additional credits at 
UMass Dartmouth, and will complete all 
courses required for the second degree, 
including any prerequisite or deficiency 
courses not previously completed satisfacto- 
rily. Such a re-admitted student will be 
considered a regular degree-seeking student 
and be subject to major program require- 
ments and the university's academic policies 
and procedures. 

Re-admission to pursue a second degree is 
not automatic; some re-admission requests 
are denied. The individual is evaluated for 
academic qualifications and for availability 
of space in the major program. 

Students with a bachelor's degree from a 
different institution may seek admission to 
UMass Dartmouth to pursue a second 
bachelor's degree through the university's 
Office of Undergraduate Admissions. Such 
students, upon admission, will be required 
to complete at least 45 credits at UMass 
Dartmouth, meeting the terms of the 
university's undergraduate residency 
requirement, given earlier in this chapter. 

Re-admission to Pursue a Non-Degree 
Course of Study 

Former students who wish to return to 
UMass Dartmouth to earn a certificate or 
take courses not applied toward a degree 
should seek acceptance as non-degree 
special students, in a process described 
earlier in this chapter. Many options are 
available, from selecting courses for 
personal interest or benefit to entering one 
of the university's formal certificate 
programs, described below in the chapter 
on Interdisciplinary and Special Programs. 



Grades are determined and assigned by 
Instructors according to the guidelines 
indicated below. Each student's academic 
achievement and fulfillment of degree 
requirements are reflected in the transcripts 
which are issued at the end of each 
semester. 

The UMass Dartmouth grading system 
includes plus and minus grades which are 
used in computing grade point averages. 

The grading system used specifically for 
undergraduate courses includes the 
following letter grades and quality points: 

A Excellent 
Quality Points: 
A+ 4.000 
A 4.000 
A- 3.700 

B Good 
Quality points: 
B+ 3.300 
B 3.000 
B- 2.700 

C Satisfactory 
Quality Points: 
C+ 2.300 
C 2.000 
C- 1.700 

D Marginal 
Quality Points: 
D+ 1 .300 

D 1 .000 

D- 0.700 

D- is the lowest grade acceptable for credit. 

F Unsatisfactory 
Quality Points: 

Failure to meet minimum standards either 
on the basis of work submitted or not 
submitted. No credit awarded. quality 
points awarded for purpose of computing 
GPA credits as indicated in course descrip- 
tion. 

F(D 

Quality Points: 

An F assigned for failure to complete a 
course within a year after the assignment of 
an I notation. 

W 

Official withdrawal by the student from a 
course after the Add/Drop period, and up to 
the completion of tenth week of the 
semester. No credit awarded. W grades do 
not affect a student's GPA 
46 



CR 

A passing grade. Credit given upon 
satisfactory completion of a Cooperative 
Education semester or a contract under the 
Experiential Learning program. Not included 
in grade point average. This grade may also 
be assigned as a passing grade under grade 
appeal procedure. 

NC 

A failing grade. Under Cooperative 
Education or Experiential Learning program, 
no credit awarded. For purposes of 
computing GPA credits as agreed upon by 
contract. 

I 

Work Incomplete May be given only in 
exceptional circumstances at the instructor's 
discretion and at the student's request made 
no more than 48 hours after the final 
examination or last class. The student must 
be passing at the time of the request or 
must be sufficiently close to passing for the 
instructor to believe that upon completion 
of the work the student will pass the course. 
If the work is not completed within a year of 
recording of the I, the grade will become an 
F(l). "I" grades cannot be changed to W. 

P 

Passing. The P grade is recorded for grades 
of A, B, C, or D, under the pass-fail option. 
The grade of P may also be used for 
satisfactory completion of courses that do 
not carry graduation credit. Not figured in 
grade point average. 

IP 

In Progress. Notation used in special cases to 
indicate that academic progress covers more 
than one term; e.g., that a grade will be 
assigned on the completion of the task 
involved. The "IP" notation is replaced upon 
receipt of the official grade. Until or unless 
replaced by an official final grade, the 
notation "IP" will remain on the transcript. 

NR 

Grade not reported by instructor at time of 
grade processing. "NR" is not a permanent 
grade. 

F 

Under pass/fail option. See "F" definition 
above. No credit awarded. quality points 
awarded, for purposes of computing GPA 
Credits as indicated in course description. 

AU 

Audit. Registration and permission of 



Instructor needed for auditing, submitted to 
the Registrars Office no later than the end 
of the add-drop period. This notation is used 
when no examinations, evaluation, or credit 
are involved. 

Pass/Fail Option 

Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors may select 
a Pass/Fail Option for one course per 
semester (up to a maximum of four 
courses), except in the following cases: 
• 

any course specified as a degree require- 
ment; 
• 

any course in a student's major, unless the 

department rules otherwise; 

• 

any course used to satisfy general education 
requirements or the distribution require- 
ments of the degree program in which the 
student is enrolled. 

Pass/Fail is not available to graduate 
students. 

Selection of Pass/Fail Option 

Students will be given through the first five 
weeks of each semester to exercise the 
option, which shall then be irrevocable. Only 
the student and the Registrar shall know 
that the option has been selected. Grading 
practice, vis-a-vis faculty and students, will 
be identical to the usual marking procedure. 

The burden of selecting a proper course 
under Pass/Fail rules shall be borne by the 
student. Any doubt whether a course is a 
degree requirement and so not eligible for 
Pass/Fail shall be resolved by consultation 
with the dean of the college in which the 
student is enrolled. If the course chosen is a 
degree requirement, then the student will 
be subject to the usual marking practices. 

Pass-Fail Grading 

Grading practices under this option are as 

follows: 

• 

A Pass/Fail student who does passing (i.e., A 
through D-) work in a course shall be given 
a grade of P (Pass). Passing a course shall 
earn a student graduation credits but shall 
not be counted in the cumulative average. 
Failure in a course will be quality points 
and will be counted in the GPA 
• 

The Registrar shall be required to keep a 
separate record of the grades obtained in 
the Pass/Fail courses and will issue this 
record only on the request of the student. 



The transcripts will contain the Pass/Fail 
notation, but the grade actually achieved 
will be kept on file in the Registrar's Office. 

Scholastic Standing 

A grade point average (GPA ) is determined 
for each student at the end of each term's 
program of courses. A GPA is computed by 
multiplying the credit of each UMass 
Dartmouth course by the quality points of 
grade received in that course. The sum of 
the above is then divided by the total 
number of credits in courses in which the 
student enrolled. Grades of P, CR, I, W, WP, 
WF, IP, AU are not included. 

A cumulative grade point average is the 
average of all the UMass Dartmouth grades 
other than of P, CR, I, W, WP, WF, IP, AU, of 
the student. Grades of F, F(l), and NC earn 
zero quality points. Such grades are included 
in the student's average according to the 
number of credits specified in the course 
description. 

Change of Grade 

Whether for a one- or two-semester course, 
the grade received at the end of each 
semester stands as the final grade for the 
semester. For certain special coursework 
(honors, research programs, etc.) in which it 
is extremely difficult to assess academic 
progress on the basis of one term, the 
notation "IP" (In Progress) is acceptable on 
an interim basis. The "IP" notation is 
replaced upon receipt of the official grade. 

The statute of limitations on all grade 
change requests is one year from the date 
that the grade was placed on the student's 
record. In extreme and exceptional cases, on 
request of the student and recommendation 
of faculty, the instructor and/or the 
appropriate college dean may authorize 
changes in grades given over one year from 
the date the grade was assigned. 

Grade Appeal 

Grade appeals are pursued through a formal 
process, which is conveyed in the 
university's Grade Appeal Policy. Copies of 
the full policy and an outline of procedures 
are available in the offices of the college 
deans, at the Academic Advising Center, 
and at the Office of Academic Affairs. The 
following paragraphs summarize the grade 
appeal process. 

A faculty member is identified to act as a 
Grade Appeal Facilitator, who will offer 
advice to both students and faculty about 
how to prepare for and conduct their 



respective roles in the process. The present 
Grade Appeal Facilitator is Dr. D. Steven 
White, Professor of Marketing. 

Only final course grades may be appealed. 
For the purposes of appeal a final grade may 
be alleged to be (1) unfair because of the 
unequal application of grading standards 
within the course section, or (2) in error 
because of a clerical or computational error. 
An appeal may be pursued only if there is a 
valid basis and evidence for it, and the 
collection of evidence to support an 
allegation is the obligation of the student. 
Students will attempt to resolve differences 
first through informal and amicable 
discussions with the faculty member or 
through the good offices of the Grade 
Appeal Facilitator. 

Formal appeals are addressed in writing to 
the Grade Appeal Facilitator and must be 
initiated within the first 20 class days of the 
following semester, excluding summers, or 
within 25 working days from the date that 
the grade report is mailed out from the 
Registrar's Office, whichever is later. 

Responsibility for initiating an appeal rests 
with the student who received the disputed 
grade. Responsibility for developing and 
presenting evidence that the grade given is 
unfair or in error rests with the student 
making the appeal. 



Class Standing 

Freshman/First Year: Up to and including 29 
credits or 1/4 of graduation credit require- 
ments in the student's degree program. 

Sophomore/Second Year: From 30 to 59 
credits or 1/2 of graduation credit require- 
ments in student's degree program. 

Junior/Third Year: From 60 to 89 UMass 
Dartmouth credits or up to 3/4 of gradua- 
tion credit requirements in student's degree 
program. 

Senior/Fourth Year: More than 90 credits or 
more than 3/4 of graduation credit 
requirements in student's degree program. 

The university's computer system will 
identify students' class standings by credits 
completed — freshman, through 29; 
sophomore, 30 to 59; junior, 60 to 89; 
senior, 90 or above. Students may request a 
calculation by hand if the standard 
calculation is wrong for their program. 



47 



Academic Regulations 



Academic Recognition and Academic Honors 



Dean's List 

Following the completion of each semester, 
full-time undergraduate degree students (in 
both "day" and Continuing Education) who 
have completed at least 12 course credits, 
excluding courses taken under the Pass-Fail 
option and Experiential Learning, and who 
have no "I" grades outstanding for that 
semester, are considered for the Dean's List 
and the Chancellor's List for that semester. 
Those who achieved a grade point average 
of at least 3.200 will be named to the 
Dean's List for that semester. This accom- 
plishment will be noted on the student's 
transcript. 

Part-time students who meet the above 
criteria in the just-completed semester 
together with the semester or term just 
preceding it, may receive the same 
recognition if the total credits completed in 
the two terms are at least 1 2 and the 
combined grade point average for those 
two semesters is at least 3.200. 

Chancellor's List 

Under the same limitations as for the Deans' 
List, those who achieve a GPA of 3.800 or 
better for a given semester will be named to 
the Chancellor's List rather than the Dean's 
List. This accomplishment will be noted on 
the student's transcript. 

Part-time students who meet the above 
criteria in the just-completed semester 
together with the semester or term just 
preceding it, may receive the same 
recognition if the total credits completed in 
the two terms are at least 1 2 and the 
combined grade point average for those 
two semesters is at least 3.800. 

Graduation with Distinction 

Students are eligible for graduation with 
distinction provided they achieve a 
cumulative grade point average in all of 
their UMass Dartmouth credits of: 

3.200 to 3.499 Cum Laude 

(Distinction) 

3.500 to 3.799 Magna Cum Laude 

(High Distinction) 

3.800 to 4.000 Summa Cum Laude 

Highest Distinction). 

Graduation with "Cum Laude," with 
"Magna Cum Laude," or with "Summa 
Cum Laude" is inscribed on the student's 
diploma. Graduation with distinction is 
based on all UMass Dartmouth work 
including the final semester. 



University Honors Program 

University-wide honors activities are available 
to full-time undergraduate students who 
demonstrate high academic achievement. 
University Honors Programs are designed to: 
• 

provide a forum for the discussion of topics 
of academic interest along interdisciplinary 
lines; 
• 

offer departmental and interdisciplinary 

honors courses; and 

• 

recognize those students whose academic 
accomplishments are outstanding. 

Students with an excellent academic record 
receive an invitation also to participate in the 
Honors Colloquium, an Honors Essay 
Contest, and ether events that recognize the 
achievement of honors students. 

For further information contact the office of 
University Honors Programs located in Room 
339 of the Group I Building, x8277 

Students with a minimum GPA of 3.200 may 
enroll in available introductory level honors 
sections of courses such as history, 
sociology, psychology, English, chemistry, 
philosophy, biology, and business. Students 
applying for admission to UMass Dartmouth 
with test scores and/or high school records 
which predict university performance at 
honors level will also be invited to enroll in 
honors sections, and nominations from high 
school counselors or teachers of their 
creative, high-potential students are 
welcome. 

For continuation in the program students 
must maintain a minimum GPA of 3.200 in 
honors courses and 3.200 in all course work. 
Those who complete the full University 
Honors Program earn the designation 
Commonwealth Scholar. Required are: 
• 

completion of 15 credits of 100- and 200- 
level honors courses outside the student's 
major 
• 

completion of HON 201 Multidisciplmary 
Approaches to Scholarly Research and 
Writing 
• 

completion of 6 credits of junior level honors 
course work in the student's major, in 
conjunction with a department's honors 
curriculum or via an honors contract through 



48 



the University Honors Program 
• 

completion of 6 credits m the senior year 
earned for an honors project or thesis, in 
conjunction with a department's honors 
curriculum or via honors thesis guidelines of 
the University Honors Program. 

Departmental Honors 

Several Departments offer to qualified 
students a special curriculum leading to 
Honors in the major field. Students 
satisfactorily completing the departmental 
requirements for Honors in the Major will, 
upon graduation, have their diplomas so 
inscribed and be so designated on the 
graduation program. Departments will 
notify all eligible candidates by the end of 
their Junior year. Potential participants shall 
follow departmental guidelines for entry 
into the Honors program. 

Participants shall have a minimum GPA of 
3.000 for all course work. Departments may 
require higher minima and, in addition, may 
set minimum GPA s in the majors. GPA s will 
normally be determined after the fifth 
semester. 

Departmental Honors Programs will include 
an appropriate end product, normally a 
project or thesis. A maximum of six credit 
hours may be awarded for completion of 
the project/thesis. Departments shall 
develop procedures for approval of 
participants' proposals. A faculty sponsor or 
honors advisor shall advise an honors 
candidate, according to departmental or 
program guidelines. An evaluation commit- 
tee, which shall be multidisciplinary in 
nature, shall be established according to 
departmental or program guidelines. This 
committee shall evaluate the completed 
honors project/thesis and determine if the 
work meets standards for honors. 



Academic Sanctions 



Academic Warning 

Any student having a semester grade point 
average below 2.000 at the conclusion of 
any term shall be issued an academic 
warning. Such warning will be available to 
the student's dean, department chairperson, 
an academic advisor, or, in the case of 
students who have yet to declare a major, to 
their advisors of record and to the Academic 
Advising Center. (In cases of concurrent 
"day" and DCE enrollment, the semester 
GPA will combine the two.) 

Students who receive three or more grades 
of "I" or "W" in a semester shall be issued 
an academic warning. 

The purpose of academic warning is to call 
the interested parties' attention to the 
student's academic situation and to begin to 
institute action where necessary. Students 
receiving academic warning should 
immediately contact their advisors. 

Academic Warning status shall be rescinded 
if the student's grade point average for the 
succeeding term is 2.000 or above, or, in 
the case of grades of "I," when the work 
has been completed and the grade 
recorded. Deans may rescind academic 
warning status if they determine that 
warning status has been inappropriately 
applied. 

Academic Good Standing 

A student is deemed to be in academic 
good standing if maintaining a cumulative 
GPA of 2.000 or above after completing 30 
credits and if not having received a second 
consecutive Warning. 

Academic Probation 

Any student having a cumulative grade 
point average below 2.000 after the 
completion of 30 credits and two semesters 
at UMass Dartmouth, or who shall have 
received academic warning in two consecu- 
tive semesters, shall be placed in academic 
probation. Notice of probationary status 
shall be available to the student's dean, 
department chairperson, and academic 
advisor, or, in the case of students who have 
yet to declare a major, to their advisors of 
record and to the Academic Advising 
Center. 

The purpose of academic probation is to 
notify the student of the possibility of his or 
her dismissal from the university for 
academic reasons, and of the seriousness of 
the student's position. 



Academic probation has serious conse- 
quences. Among them: 
• 

Probationary status is marked on the 

student's transcript; and 

• 

Probationary status precludes a student's 
participation in extracurricular activities, 
including intercollegiate athletics. See 
separate statement below on Academic 
Eligibility. 

Students placed on academic probation may 
request from the appropriate dean(s) a leave 
of absence, especially if continued academic 
activity is likely to lead to a notice of 
dismissal. Length of the leave and terms of 
readmission should be determined as a part 
of the negotiation process for the leave of 
absence. 

Academic Probation status shall cease when 
the student's cumulative grade point 
average rises to 2.000 or above or, if the 
student's probationary status stems from 
consecutive semesters of academic warning, 
when the student completes a semester 
with average grades of 2.000 or above. 
Deans may rescind academic probation 
status if they determine that warning status 
has been inappropriately applied. In such 
cases notice of probationary status shall be 
expunged from the student's record. 

No student will be placed on probation after 
only one semester at UMass Dartmouth. 

Academic Dismissal 

Any student whose cumulative grade point 
average falls below a satisfactory level in 
relation to the number of credits completed 
or who shall have been on academic 
probation for more than three consecutive 
terms shall be subject to dismissal by his or 
her college dean for unsatisfactory academic 
performance. 



Satisfactory levels are as follows: 



Cumulative 
credits 
to 30 
31-60 
61-90 
91 -above 



GPA 

requirement 

1.500 

1.700 

1.850 

2.000 



"Cumulative credits" include transfer, CLEP, 
prior learning, exchange, and UMass 
Dartmouth credits and exclude courses 
graded W, I, AU, IP, and NR. 



Students who withdraw from courses whose 
cumulative credits exceed 24 are subject to 
dismissal. 

Students who accumulate more than 30 
credits in excess of degree requirements 
within the major are subject to dismissal. 
Therefore students whose grade point 
averages are 2.000 or above but whose 
average grades within the major are below 
the minimum standards set by that major 
have a limited time to reach the major's 
grade point average after their other degree 
requirements have been met. In each case 
the student's dean or his or her designee 
will define "degree requirements" as 
reflected in the professional certification in 
addition to meeting the requirements of a 
traditional major. 

Students receiving notice of academic 
dismissal should discuss their status 
immediately with their college deans and 
chairpersons. 

No student will be dismissed for academic 
reasons after only one semester at UMass 
Dartmouth. 

Academic Eligibility 

Students who have been placed on 
academic probation may not serve on 
university committees, hold leadership 
positions in student government and other 
major co-curricular organizations, or 
represent the university in intercollegiate 
athletics. 

A permanent Academic Eligibility Appeals/ 
Review Committee is established as a sub- 
committee of the university's Student 
Faculty Academic Affairs Committee 
(SFAAC). This committee is composed of 
two faculty members from that committee 
(elected by the SFAAC, one elected chair), 
two students from that committee (elected 
by the SFAAC as observers, non-voting), the 
Faculty Athletic Advisor, and the Associate 
Dean of Students (ex-officio, non-voting). 
This committee may review requests for 
waiver of academic eligibility sanctions. 

To be eligible for leadership positions in co- 
curricular organizations, non-Continuing 
Education students shall be enrolled full 
time (at least 12 hours) and Continuing 
Education students shall be enrolled at 
equivalent full-time levels for their specific 
programs. Participation in intercollegiate 
athletics is also governed by enrollment 
status conditions. 



49 



Academic Regulations 



Academic Ethical Standards 



Satisfactory Academic Progress for 
Financial Aid Eligibility 

To maintain eligibility for financial aid, 
students must meet both quantitative and 
qualitative measures at specific measure- 
ment points. The Financial Aid Services 
office mea-sures incremental progress 
toward degree completion annually at the 
end of the acade-mic year in June and will 
notify students who fail to meet the 
progress requirements. 

Students who fail to meet the requirements 
will be ineligible for any federal, state, or 
institutional financial aid until they are once 
again in compliance. Students who fail to 
meet the progress requirements may receive 
federal, state, and institutional financial aid 
for the next academic year by pursuing one 
of the following options: 
• 

By taking summer courses (at their own 
expense) to raise either the credit hour or 
grade point average requirement, or both. 
• 

By requesting a waiver of the requirements 
due to mitigating circumstances. Mitigating 
circumstances include, but are not limited 
to, medical issues, family difficulties, docu- 
mented waiver, or addition by Dean to 
program/major requirements. Students 
wishing to have the requirements waived 
should write a letter to the Director of 
Financial Aid detailing reasons for failure to 
meet the requirements. Students receiving 
this waiver will be notified of the require- 
ments necessary to bring the hours or grade 
point average into compliance at the next 
incremental measurement period. 

Quantitative Component 

For an undergraduate degree, the maximum 
credits attempted cannot exceed 1 50% of 
the published credits required to complete 
that program. For example, students could 
not attempt more than 180 credits in a 120 
credit program. At each annual measure- 
ment period, students must have completed 
at least 67% of all courses attempted. 

Calculation of credits successfully completed 
does not include grades of W, I, F, NC, AU, 
IP, and NR. Transfer students' credits 
accepted by UMass Dartmouth will be 
calculated into their quantitative measure of 
progress. Administrative-credit courses 
(those that do not count toward degree 
requirements) are excluded from satisfactory 
academic progress determination. Repeated 
courses are included in the measurement of 
satisfactory academic progress. 



All UMass Dartmouth students are expected 
to maintain high standards of academic 
integrity and scholarly practice. The 
University does not tolerate academic 
dishonesty of any variety, whether as a result 
of a failure to understand proper All UMass 
Dartmouth students are expected to 
maintain high standards of academic 
academic and scholarly procedure or as an 
act of intentional dishonesty. 

A student found guilty of academic 
dishonesty is subject to severe disciplinary 
action which may include expulsion from the 
University. Refer to the Student Handbook 
and Student Judicial Code for due process. 

A high standard of academic integrity 
promotes the pursuit of truth and learning 
and respect for the intellectual accomplish- 
ments of others. These are values that are 
fundamental to the mission of this Univer- 
sity. Such values are undermined by 
academic dishonesty. 

Academic dishonesty is defined as attempt- 
ing to obtain academic credit for work that 
is not one's own. Examples include: (1) 
copying another student's answers on an 
examination; (2) obtaining, or attempting to 
obtain, the answers to an examination in 
advance; 

(3) submitting a paper that was written by 
someone else; (4) submitting a paper that 
includes phrases, sentences and paragraphs 
that were copied verbatim, or almost 
verbatim, from a work written by someone 
else, without making this clear without 
indicating that these words were someone 
else's through the use of quotation marks or 
other appropriate citation conventions; 
(5) collaborating on a homework assignment 
when this has been expressly forbidden by 
the professor; (6) using unauthorized 
materials in completing assignments or 
examinations; (7) submitting the same paper 
for more than one class without the express 
permission of the instructors involved. This 
list of examples should not be considered 
exhaustive. 

This definition of academic dishonesty 
applies to information submitted in other 



forms besides paper. Submitting a project of 
a musical or artistic nature where all or part 
of the project is someone else's work, 
without acknowledging this fact, constitutes 
academic dishonesty. Submitting computer 
files that do not represent one's own work 
is also considered to be academic dishon- 
esty; examples of computer-based academic 
dishonesty would include submitting a 
computer program or text file created by 
someone else as one's own, or submitting 
the output of a computer program written 
by someone else, and claiming to have 
written the program that generated the 
output. 

For all forms of academic dishonesty, 
students who knowingly allow other 
students to use their work are themselves 
considered to be academically dishonest 
Examples would include students who 
knowingly allow other students to copy their 
exam answers, and students who give 
papers that they have written to other 
students so that the other students can 
submit them for credit. 

A faculty member is appointed by the 
Faculty Senate to act as an Academic Ethical 
Matters Facilitator. This individual will offer 
advice to both students and faculty about 
the issues involved in penalizing academic 
dishonesty, and the process of appealing 
such penalties. 

Penalties assessed by faculty members for 
academic dishonesty generally consist of a 
reprimand, a requirement to resubmit the 
work in a more acceptable form, a lowering 
of a grade, failure in the course in which the 
alleged infraction took place, or a combina- 
tion of these. 

Instead of (or in addition to) assessing such 
penalties, a faculty member may refer the 
matter to the UMass Dartmouth Student 
Judiciary. Decisions made by the Student 
Judiciary may be appealed to the University 
Appellate Board. 

A form acknowledging that each student 
has read, understands, and will abide by 
these standards will be signed by the 
student and placed into the student's 
permanent file. 



Qualitative Component 

At each annual measurement period 
Students with this number of completed credits: 0-30 31 -60 61-90 91 -above 
Must have at least this minimum cumulative GPA: 1 .500 1 .700 1 .850 2.0. 

50 



Graduation Requirements 



Degree Conferral 

Candidates for graduation must declare 
their intention to graduate formally at the 
Registrar's Office. The deadlines for that 
filing are shown in the table. We strongly 
advise meeting with one's academic advisor 
during the previous semester to plan the 
final semester's selection of courses. At 
about the same time that they declare 
intention to graduate, students should 
review their academic records with their 
departmental advisors for a final time, to 
ensure that all requirements will have been 
met properly. 

Completion of degree requirements is 
certified at three different times during the 
year. Diplomas and transcripts show the 
date of degree conferral as in the table 
below. 

To give an example, students who com- 
pleted final required courses in December 
2001 had the degree conferred on January 
31, 2002, as did students completing a final 
required course in the January 2002 
Intersession. Students completing final 
required courses in spring 2001 had the 
degree conferred on June 2, when 
commencement was held that year. (See 
below, under "Commencement Exercises," 
for the policy allowing some students who 
will not yet have completed requirements to 
participate in the graduation ceremony.) 
Students completing requirements in July 
and August will receive the September 1 
completion date. 

The spring graduation conferral date is the 
date of the actual commencement 
ceremony. Students who complete their 
final required courses in a term ending by 
that date will have the June conferral date. 

Course grades are recorded for the term in 
which the student registered for the course. 



In the case of incompletes, the actual work 
will be completed after that date. If a 
student cannot graduate at the end of his or 
her last term because one or more courses 
required for graduation have incomplete 
grades, the student will not receive the 
diploma or the final transcript until after the 
incomplete work is made up and the 
professor has assigned the appropriate new 
grade. In other words, diplomas and final 
transcripts are given out after all work 
required for the degree is completed, but 
the date on the diploma corresponds to the 
term in which the final grade is registered. 

Graduate students have an exception to this 
rule for a thesis, project, or dissertation that 
is not completed by the time that all 
coursework for the degree is completed. 
These students register in a special "continu- 
ation" status for each term needed to 
complete their work, and the date of the 
degree conferral is that for the end of the 
term in which that work is completed and 
approved for graduation. See the Graduate 
Catalogue for details. 

Once a student graduates, the transcript is 
closed to subsequent changes (with the 
exception of correction of errors), to 
preserve the accuracy of the certification. 

Commencement Exercises 

The university holds one formal commence- 
ment ceremony each year, at the conclusion 
of the spring semester. Students may 
participate in the spring commencement 
exercises once their records are certified. 
Those whose requirement records are 
incomplete may also participate under the 
following conditions: 

• Insufficient Credits: Undergraduate 
students who are no more than twelve 
credits shy of completion may participate in 
the spring commencement exercises but will 
not receive diplomas at the ceremony. 



Permission to participate in the graduation 
ceremony will be determined by the 
student's department. The student must be 
able to complete work to be eligible for the 
September 1 diploma. 

• Missing Transfer Credits: Students whose 
records will be completed with the inclusion 
of credits for one or more courses in transfer 
from another institution must insure that 
UMass Dartmouth will have received 
notification from the other institution by the 
ending due date for UMass Dartmouth's 
spring term final grades. Those for whom 
such notification is received later may 
participate in the ceremony but will not 
receive diplomas there. They will receive 
their diplomas at a later date, and their 
degree certification will be retroactive to the 
date of course completion. 

We invite students completing requirements 
in July/August or December/January to 
participate in the up-coming June gradua- 
tion ceremony, if they have not already 
participated in the previous spring. An 
individual may participate in only one 
graduation ceremony per degree. 

Graduate students should consult the 
current Graduate Catalogue about 
requirements for participation in commence- 
ment. 



Completion 
occurring 

In July/August 

In December/January 

By commencement 



Dare on 
diploma 

September 1 
January 31 

Day of commencement 



Deadline to declare 
intention to graduate 

July 1 

November 1 
March 15 



51 



Academic Regulations 



Enrollment as a Non-Degree Student 



For assistance: 

contact Academic Advisement Center, x8455 



Non-Degree or Special Student 
Registration 

Non-Degree or Special Student status allows 
those not seeking a UMass Dartmouth 
degree to register for undergraduate classes 
of the university on a space-available basis. 
(For graduate non-degree student registra- 
tion, see the Graduate Catalogue.) 

The following types of people are welcome 
to reguest undergraduate non-degree 
student status: 
• 

Students not seeking a degree who wish to 
take courses for personal and professional 
reasons. At least a high school diploma or 
GED must have been received in order for 
registration to occur. Students must each 
submit proof of having received a high school 
diploma or GED, or an associate's or post- 
baccalaureate degree, before grades are 
issued at the end of the semester of 
registration as a special student. 
• 

Visiting students matriculated at another 
college. Before registration, an official letter 
of authorization should be provided from the 
student's home institution verifying that the 
student is in good standing. International 
students seeking a degree and in good 
standing at another university and holding 
the F-1 visa from that institution may also 
request registration as visiting special 
students at UMass Dartmouth. Visiting 
students from another UMass campus are 
invited to use a simplified process to enroll 
here; see the Admissions chapter of this 
catalogue. 
• 

Exchange students studying here by terms of 
an agreement between UMass Dartmouth 
and the home institution in another country, 
pursuing a degree at the home institution. 
Exchange students receive formal acceptance 
to the exchange program and are registered 
in special student status. 
• 

Persons pursuing one of the certificate 
programs of the university, listed in the 
General Catalogue chapter on Interdiscipli- 
nary and Special Programs. Because 
certificate students do not receive a formal 
degree, they are registered as special 
students. The university's certificate programs 
offer various opportunities for advisement, 
program planning, and registration for 
courses. Participants in certificate programs 
apply for and formally receive acceptance, 
and they must meet formally expressed 
conditions for completion of the program 



and award of the certificate. 
• 

High school students. Exceptional high school 
students may be accepted as part time 
special students. High school transcripts and 
letters of recommendation must be provided 
by the student's high school counselor or 
principal prior to registration. Such students 
may study here under the Commonwealth's 
Dual Enrollment program, described in the 
chapter on Admissions. 
• 

Applicants for admission to UMass Dart- 
mouth who were qualified but were denied 
admission because of space limitations. 

The following are not accepted as non- 
degree students: 
• 

Applicants who were denied admission to 
UMass Dartmouth because they did not have 
the necessary qualifications. 
• 

Students who have been dismissed by UMass 
Dartmouth or any other college or university, 
for at least one semester following the 
dismissal. Such dismissed students may be 
recommended by the dean of their college 
for admission as special students, after a 
semester away, with conditions for re- 
admission as regular students specified and 
with an educational plan designed to assist in 
the amelioration of past deficiencies. (Others 
may be recommended to apply for re- 
admission as regular students after a 
semester or more away.) 
• 

International students who would need F-1 
visas, except in the case of certain formal 
certificate programs. 

The following procedures and regulations 
apply to non-degree students: 

Students may remain as non-degree students 
at UMass Dartmouth for a maximum of 30 
credits. (The 30-credit limit does not apply to 
senior citizens.) After completion of 24 
credits, the Registrar's Office will inform the 
student that a maximum is being ap- 
proached. Any special students who later 
decide to pursue a degree should seek 
admission at an early time to guarantee 
adequacy of academic advisement and 
progress without an interruption. 

Non-degree students whose academic 
performance falls below the university's 
general requirements for continuation or 
who are demonstrably unable to benefit from 



the educational experience offered may be 
prohibited from future registration. Such 
cases are reviewed by the Director of the 
University Academic Advising Center, whose 
recommendations are brought for action to 
the Associate Vice Chancellor for Academic 
Affairs and Graduate Studies. 

All non-degree special students will go to the 
Academic Advising Center for approval of an 
application to register for undergraduate 
courses. 

Those seeking graduate enrollment may 
contact the Office of Graduate Studies for 
assistance. 



Note: 

Non-degree special students are not 
eligible to receive financial aid. An 
exception to this rule may be made for 
those admitted to certain official 
certificate programs. 



52 



Major Days of Religious Observance 
2002-2003 



University policy and Massachusetts state law require faculty to offer make-up assignments or exams to students who are absent for religious 
observance. As an aid to curriculum planning, the following list of major religious observances is made available by the Office of the Provost. 
Faculty, staff, and students are advised that the list is not exhaustive of observances of any religion. Please note that Jewish, Baha'i, and 
some Muslim religious observances begin at sundown of the previous day. Students planning to be absent from classes due to religious 
observance must notify their instructors at least one week in advance, and otherwise follow the policy stated earlier in this chapter. 



Observance/Religion 



Fall 2002 

Rosh Hashanah 
(Jewish New Year)/J 
September 7-8 (Sa, S) 

Yom Kippur 
(Atonement)/J 
September 16 (M) 

Sukkot 

(Festival of Tabernacles)/J 
October 21-22 (Sa, S) 

Durga Puja 

(Worship of Divine Mother)/H 
October 23 (W) 

Diwali (Festival of Lights)/H 
November 4 (M) 

Ramadan Begins/M 
November 6 (W) 

Birth of Baha'u'llah/Ba 
November 1 2 (Tu) 

Idul Fitr (End of Ramadan)/M 
December 6 (F) 

Bodhi Day 
(Enlightenment)/B 
December 8 (S) 

Christmas 

(Birth of JesusVC (legal holiday) 
December 25 (Tu) 



Spring 2003 

Idul-Adha (Day of Sacrifice)/M 
February 1 1 (Tu) 

Muharram (Islamic New Year)/M 
March 4 (Tu) 

Maha Shivaratri (worship of Shiva)/H 
March 1 (Sa) 

Holi (Festival of Colors)/H 
March 17 (M) 

Naw-Ruz (Baha'i New Year)/Ba 
March 21 (F) 

Wesak (in celebration of the Buddha)/B 
April 8 (Tu) 

Hanamatsuri (Birth of Buddha)/B 
April 8 (M) 

Baisakhi (Brotherhood-Sisterhood)/S 
April 13 (S) 

First Days of Passover/J 
April 17-18 (Th, F) 

Good Friday 
.(Crucifixion of Jesus)/C 
April 1 8 (F) 

Easter (Resurrection of Jesus)/C 
April 20 (S) 

Ramanavami (Birth of Rama)/H 
April 21 (M) 

First Day of Ridvan 
(Declaration of Baha'u'llah)/Ba 
April 21 (M 



Summer 2003 

Shavuoth (Festival of Weeks)/J 
June 6-7 (F, Sa) 



B=Buddhist; 

Ba=Baha'i; 

C=Christian; 

H=Hindu; 

J=Jewish; 

M=Muslim; 

S=Sikh 



53 



Academic Regulations 



Special Learning Opportunities 

Individualized Courses, Alternative Credit, Experiential Learning, Study at Other Institutions 



Internships, Practicums, and 
Experiential Learning 



Many students will desire educational 
experiences that extend beyond the regular 
courses of the university. The university thus 
offers various individually-initiated learning 
experiences to its students. 

Such opportunities are of many sorts. They 
include Independent Study, Contract 
Learning, and Directed Study; study at a 
nearby university through cross-registration; 
study abroad; and receiving credit through a 
variety of standardized examinations. 



Special Course Opportunities 
Directed Study 

Students who wish to take a regular 
university course in a term when it is not 
offered may seek to do so through a 
Directed Study option. However, students 
must understand that, because the 
appropriate faculty must be available and 
approvals must be granted, the option of 
Directed Study for a particular course is not 
always available. 

In Directed Study, the faculty member must 
agree to provide the student with close 
supervision, in achieving the same course 
objectives that would have been accom- 
plished had the student taken the course on 
a regular class basis. Permission for Directed 
Study must be obtained from the subject/ 
course faculty member, the student's 
department chairperson, and the college 
dean, after consultation with the faculty 
advisor. 

Forms for enrolling in Directed Study are 
available at the Registrar's Office. Directed 
Study courses will be so designated on the 
student's transcript, displaying the title of 
the course undertaken. Directed Study 
courses are offered at each course level, 1xx, 
2xx, 3xx, and 4xx, in order to match the 
level of the course of record. 

Independent Study 

Independent Study, which is faculty- 
supervised research or readings into areas of 
study outside the current curriculum, offers 
students the opportunity to investigate a 
research topic or readings independently, 
under the close supervision of a faculty 
member. Independent Study will only be 
approved for research into areas of study 
that do not duplicate the University's current 
curriculum of courses. 

The student will be responsible for meeting 
the requirements of the Independent Study 



as outlined and approved, and the faculty 
sponsor will assume responsibility for 
coordinating the Independent Study, 
evaluating its results, and determining an 
appropriate grade. 

Upper Division students may request to do 
Independent Study, upon recommendation 
of a faculty sponsor and approval of the 
student's department chairperson and 
college dean. Twelve semester credits is the 
maximum of Independent Study allowed for 
an undergraduate academic career. The 
student must submit a written proposal and 
outline of the program of study to be 
undertaken, which, if approved by the 
sponsor and the department chairperson, 
will become a guide for evaluating the 
student's performance and accomplishment. 

Forms for enrolling in Independent Study are 
available at the Registrar's Office. Indepen- 
dent Study courses will be so designated on 
the student's transcript, displaying an 
annotation of the topic undertaken. 



Students in any major may arrange for an 
external learning experience. Most 
departments list the course Experiential 
Learning for their majors; it offers lower- 
division work experience at an elective 
level. Some of the university's majors 
offer upper-division internship or 
practicum opportunities for students. 
There is considerable variety in the types 
of experience provided and the levels and 
amounts of credit. 

Experiential Learning 

Experiential Learning provides an 
opportunity for practical application of 
academic training while earning academic 
credit. 

Under the direction of a faculty sponsor, 
arrangements are made to work under 
the immediate supervision of a supervisor 
at a work site, which may be located on 
or off campus. The range of project types 
and settings is almost limitless, creating 
exciting ways to enrich one's academic 
studies, to test a tentative career choice, 
and to gain valuable experience. 

The program is administered through the 
Career Resource Center, where students 
obtain assistance in finding a faculty 
sponsor and a work setting and in complet- 
ing the required forms. 

The Experiential Learning contract is an 
agreement to undertake a significant 
academic learning experience: 
• 

Participating students maintain a log or 
journal of experiences. They also receive 
assessments from the individual they are 
working for, the supervisor at the work site. 
• 

In all cases, the student must submit a work 
of writing and reflection to the faculty 
sponsor. Such a document might, for 
example, include the following: a) how 
objectives were met, b) how personal 
improvement has been stimulated, c) how 
the internship experience has related to the 
student's academic experience, and d) how 
the internship could be improved for 
students who pursue similar projects in the 
future. The exact assignment is determined 
by the sponsoring faculty member. 
• 

The faculty sponsor evaluates the project 
and assigns either a CR or NC grade. 

Students wishing to participate must submit 
a contract proposal and receive the required 
approvals. The Career Resource Center 



54 



/ 



assists students in making these arrange- 
ments. 
• 

Students must propose a contract and 
receive an initial approval before the 
deadline for registration. 
• 

By another deadline, the student must 
submit a formal written proposal to the 
faculty sponsor that both specifies the goals 
and objectives of the internship and details 
the activities and academic work to be 
performed. 
• 

By the same deadline, the student must 
obtain approvals from the faculty sponsor, 
his/her department chairperson, and her/his 
college dean. 

The following are some of the academic 

limitations and definitions: 

• 

Students must be at least sophomores to 

participate. 

• 

Although the typical internship contract 
would earn three credits, internships 
proposing a greater/lesser number of credit 
hours are also possible. Experiential Learning 
credits are part of the normal student credit 
load and subject to university policy with 
regard to credit hour limitations. 
• 

Experiential Learning courses may not be 
used to fulfill distribution or general 
education requirements but serve as free 
electives and may be accepted toward the 
requirements of some majors. 
• 

Experiential Learning credits are lower- 
division credits. 
• 

Students on academic probation are not 
eligible for Experiential Learning, unless 
ineligibility is waived by their college dean. 
• 

The work assignment is to comprise at least 
45 clock hours per academic credit, for the 
semester. 
• 

Supervision of students doing projects under 
the Experiential Learning program shall in all 
cases exc'ude individuals who are them- 
selves undergraduate degree candidates; 
and a faculty member cannot serve as both 
supervisor and sponsor. 

Students in the College of Business are 
offered a junior-level Internship course in 
lieu of Experiential Learning. They may 
contact the Career Resource Center for 
assistance. 



General Limitation on Internship 
Credit 

No more than 1 /8th of the graduation 
credits required for the student's major may 
be earned in optional internships, including 
Experiential Learning. Thus, a student in a 
1 20 credit program could apply up to 1 5 
credits in such studies toward the degree. 



Internships, Clinical Experiences, and 
Practicums in the Majors 

In some of the university's majors, 
students are required to have an upper- 
division internship, practicum, or clinical 
experience; in some others, an optional 
course is offered. These studies range 
from an experience nearby in a course the 
student takes along with other on- 
campus courses that semester, to a 
semester or even a year in an extensive 
experience which may be well away from 
campus. Consult the requirements 
section for your major to learn of these 
opportunities. 



Cooperative Education in Engineering 

The College of Engineering offers 
cooperative education experiences to 
qualified students. Students in the 
program alternate a semester/summer in 
coursework with a semester/summer on 
the job full time. Please consult the front 
of the catalogue section on the College 
of Engineering. 



Internships Away from Campus 
through Affiliated Programs — The 
Washington Center; Disney 

Some programs that may be available to 
UMass Dartmouth students, like those of 
The Washington Center or Disney 
Enterprises, offer a full semester at an 
internship site. The university has 
formulated procedures whereby the 
student can maintain an appropriate 
enrollment status to participate in such 
internship programs. 

Financial arrangements, enrollment 
status, and credit that can be earned vary, 
depending on the program. The 
Washington Center program provides 
financial assistance in the form of tuition 
waivers and some scholarship support, 
and offers means of earning UMass 



Dartmouth credit while participating. 
Disney internships differ depending 
whether one undertakes an initial or a 
second experience, as these vary in how 
UMass recognizes the academic experi- 
ence. 

More can be learned about these 
opportunities from advisors in the 
student's major field or at the Career 
Resource Center, which serves as the 
contact point for the many arrangements 
that the students need to make. 



55 



Special Learning Opportunities 



Study Abroad 



The university encourages its students to 
study abroad. A number of exchange 
agreements have been established to 
facilitate study abroad, together with 
procedures for academic advisement, 
registration, and planning personal finances. 
In addition, a wide variety of programs are 
available, both of short duration and for a 
semester or a year. 



Opportunities 

The university has formal exchange 
agreements with the University of Grenoble 
(France), the Lycee du Gresivaudan at 
Meylan (just outside Grenoble), Nottingham 
Trent University (England), the Baden- 
Wurttemburg Universities (Germany), 
Centro de Arte e Communiqacao (Lisbon, 
Portugal); Nova Scotia College of Art and 
Design, the Ecole Nationale Superieure des 
Industries Textiles of the Universite de Haute 
Alsace (France), and Minho University 
(Portugal). We are also a member of a 
consortium of art schools — SACI — in 
Florence, Italy. Programs at these schools 
allow students to pursue studies in or 
related to their UMass Dartmouth major 
fields. 

These exchange agreements also bring 
students from these many countries to study 
at UMass Dartmouth. 

The exchange programs listed above present 
only one way for UMass Dartmouth 
students to study abroad. A large pool of 
additional exchange opportunities is made 
available to our students through the 
Massachusetts Consortium on International 
Education (MaCIE), which includes all public 
colleges and universities in the state. 
Through MaCIE, our students can choose 
from the study abroad opportunities offered 
by other public higher education institutions 
in Massachusetts. In addition, there are 
informal opportunities for study and travel 
during the academic year and summer. 

For example, in a recent summer, the 
College of Visual and Performing Arts 
offered a design, painting, and drawing 
workshop in La Napoule, France (near the 
French Riviera). The Overseas Study Program 
in the College of Business sponsors a yearly 
trip to another country to explore an area of 
interest in international business. The Center 
for Portuguese Studies offers yearly summer 
study trips to Portugal. 

The following people can provide more 



information about these programs and 
related opportunities. 

General assistance with study abroad — John 
Carroll, Academic Advising Center 

Baden-Wurttemburg, and its affiliated 
universities: The Universities of Heidelberg, 
Mannheim, Freiburg, Ulm, Stuttgart, 
Konstanz, Tubingen, Hohenheim, and 
Karlsruhe — Joseph Bronstad, Department of 
Foreign Literature and Languages; Richard 
Golen, Assistant Dean, Charlton college of 
Business 

Centro de Arte — Memory Holloway, 
Department of Art History; Susan Hamlet, 
Department of Visual Design 

University of Grenoble — Richard Baker, 
Department of Accounting 

France — Lewis Kamm, Department of 
Foreign Literature and Languages 

United Kingdom — Peter Owens, Department 
of English 

Ecole Nationale Superieure des Industries 
Textiles; Minho University (Portugal) — 
Kenneth Langley, Department of Textile 
Sciences 

Duncan of Jordanstone College, University 
of Dundee — Michael Taylor, Department of 
Art History 

Australia and New Zealand — Kathleen 
Suchon, Department of Management 

Ireland — John Carroll, Academic Advising 
Center, Political Science Department 

Portugal — Victor Mendes, Department of 
Portuguese 

Latin America and Spain — John Twomey, 
Department of Foreign Literature and 
Languages 

Policies and Procedures 

The Office of the Associate Vice Chancellor 
for Academic Affairs/Graduate Studies 
provides general oversight over exchange 
programs. The Academic Advising Center 
assists students in making a choice of study 
abroad site, in making academic plans, and 
with visa and travel arrangements. 

Financial aid may be obtained, if the student 
is eligible and pursuing the study abroad 



experience to earn credits toward degree 
requirements. Students should contact their 
Financial Aid counselor. Furthermore, a 
special scholarship, the Mary Louise Walsh 
Fund for International Study, makes 
assistance available in the form of grants to 
undergraduates and graduating seniors. 

Students who wish to study abroad while 
remaining in active student status may be 
listed as in Study on Exchange status 
(sometimes called Study Away or Study 
Abroad). This status allows students to 
remain in current, registered status while 
they pursue full-time studies at another 
higher-education institution, which is usually 
located in another country. They may thus 
remain matriculated students and continue 
to qualify for their financial aid benefits. A 
modest fee is charged for Study on 
Exchange status. Forms may be obtained in 
the Academic Advising Center. 

Students seeking to study abroad must first 
plan with their faculty advisors the program 
of study that they intend to pursue at the 
other institution and receive departmental 
approval of this study plan. 

Credits completed while a student is in 
Study on Exchange status will be displayed 
on the transcript with grades shown and will 
be considered for financial aid qualitative 
requirements. Grades earned in study 
abroad, converted to UMass Dartmouth 
equivalents, will be included in calculating 
the student's GPA and cumulative grade 
record. 



56 



Receiving Credit Through Standardized Examinations 



CLEP Examinations 

The University has approved the use of the 
College Level Examination Program (CLEP). 
The CLEP exams are offered by the College 
Entrance Examination Board. The program 
enables those who have reached the college 
level of education outside the university to 
demonstrate their achievement and to use 
the test results for college credit and/or 
placement. 

The equivalency of CLEP examinations to 
this university's courses shall be determined 
by the department that teaches that subject 
matter. CLEP credits may not be used to 
duplicate or replace credits for coursework 
taken here or elsewhere. The Office of the 
University Registrar maintains a current list 
of CLEP examinations accepted for credit; 
we advise current students to consult us 
before deciding to take CLEP tests. 

CLEP credits are defined as transfer credits 
and will not be reflected in an individual's 
grade point average. No more than 30 
credits earned by CLEP Examination may be 
used to satisfy degree requirements. 

Two types of CLEP examinations are offered: 

Subject Examinations 

One semester's course credits (usually 3) or 
two semesters' course credits (usually 6) 
may be awarded for a score at or above 50, 
as reported on the CLEP score report. Such 
credits are generally used to satisfy 
university distribution requirements or may 
be used as elective credits. 

General Examinations 

Credit is nor awarded at UMass Dartmouth 
for the CLEP General Examinations. 

Advanced Placement — AP Credit 

Advanced placement and/or college credit 
are awarded to entering freshman students 
presenting Advanced Placement Examina- 
tion grades of three or higher (four for 
credit in Psychology) in most AP fields. AP 
courses taught in high schools are college- 
level courses, and the students' mastery of 
the content is validated by the AP Examina- 
tion series administered by the College 
Board. Such course credits may be used to 
satisfy degree requirements, general 
education requirements, or will allow 
students to place into a more advanced 
initial course. 



Advanced Placement — Dual Enrollment 
Credit 

Some freshman students enter the university 
with college credit already earned, from 
courses taken at a college or university while 
they were in high school, many through the 
Massachusetts Dual Enrollment program. 

Proficiency Challenge Examinations 

Students transferring to the major in 
nursing, as well as certain other programs, 
may be asked to verify proficiency in some 
subjects taken earlier, through challenge 
examinations. Some examinations are 
departmentally administered, while others 
are provided through the CLEP program, 
mentioned above. Refer to the departmental 
sections in the General Catalogue; details 
will also be provided by the departments. 

Military Service Training 

For Military Service School training, credit 
may be awarded according to the recom- 
mendations contained in the most recent 
Guide to the Evaluation of Educational 
Experience in the Armed Services of the 
American Council on Education. These 
credits cannot be applied to the student's 
major field of studies. Additional informa- 
tion is available at the Office of Admissions. 

Creditfor Validated Prior Learning 

The Division of Continuing Education offers 
credit for validated prior learning to those 
who have become regular, registered 
students. This program provides university 
academic credit for students in most majors 
who, through occupational or other 
experiences, have achieved the equivalent of 
college-level knowledge. Their prior learning 
is documented through a one-semester 
workshop and then evaluated for credit. For 
further information, consult the Division of 
Continuing Education. 



SACHEM Cross-Registration 

UMass Dartmouth students may cross- 
register for courses at other SACHEM 
(Southeastern Association for Cooperation 
in Higher Education in Massachusetts) 
institutions on a space-available, prior- 
approval basis. Likewise, students at these 
other institutions may cross-register for 
courses at UMass Dartmouth. Institutions 
involved in the program, in addition to 
UMass Dartmouth, are: 

Bridgewater State College 

Bristol Community College 

Cape Cod Community College 

Dean College 

Massachusetts Maritime Academy 
Massasoit Community College 
Stonehill College 
Wheaton College. 

Tuition and fees established by the "away" 
institution are suspended, provided that the 
matriculated student is a degree-seeking 
student at the home institution and carries 
and pays for a full-time load there. Further 
information and appropriate forms may be 
obtained in the Registrar's Office. 



57 



Special Learning Opportunities 



Outreach: Centers, Laboratories, Programs, and Events 



A variety of departments, centers, institutes, 
and special programs demonstrate UMass 
Dartmouth's commitment to the well-being 
of this region and its people. The university 
plays a singularly important role in the 
community — a cultural, social, political, and 
economic resource as well as the predomi- 
nant center of education and research. The 
work done in the centers and laboratories 
expands knowledge and bolsters economic 
development, while programs and projects 
inform, inspire, and entertain. 

The following are profiles of those arms of 
the university that extend into the commu- 
nity, and help UMass Dartmouth serve its 
diverse constituencies. The listing is by no 
means exhaustive, but presents some key 
programs and offices that help the 
institution fulfill its broader purposes. 



UMass Dartmouth Foundation 

The UMass Dartmouth Foundation develops 
and directs the university's fund-raising and 
alumni relations activities. Through the 
Annual Fund and other campaigns, the 
Foundation helps secure continuing support 
for the university and many of its educa- 
tional, research, and cultural programs. 

The Foundation is a tax-exempt corporation 
with its own charter and board of directors. It 
solicits, receives, and administers gifts to the 
university. It also manages UMass 
Dartmouth's endowment, which includes 
funds designated for specific purposes, such 
as scholarships, library programs, faculty 
development, and the like. The Foundation 
seeks support for the university in the form of 
both monetary and non-monetary gifts, and 
assists with planned gifts and bequests. 

Persons who would like to offer support — or 
who know alumni or others who wish to do 
so — are encouraged to contact the UMass 
Dartmouth Foundation at 508 999-8760. 

UMass Dartmouth Alumni Association 

The Alumni Association provides a variety of 
activities and services for the university's 
more than 25,000 alumni living in this 
country and abroad. The largest volunteer 
organization on campus, the Association is 
the liaison between the university and its 
former students; through it, former students 
are able to have a voice in determining 
UMass Dartmouth's future. The association 
sponsors an annual Homecoming Weekend 
and numerous other events, and its 
newsletters keep alumni informed about the 
school and each other. For further informa- 
tion, call Alumni Association at 508 999- 
8031, or visit its website, umassd.edu/aa/ 

Office of Grants and Contracts 

The Office of Grants and Contracts helps the 
university realize one of its key goals: 
supporting and fostering research, scholar- 
ship, and creative productions by faculty and 
staff. It does so by providing: 
• 

Assistance in identifying funding opportuni- 
ties; maintaining up-to-date information on 
sources likely to be most responsive to the 
university's needs; and lending administrative 
support for faculty research projects; 
• 

Assistance and guidance in all aspects of 
development and submission of a proposal; 
• 

Negotiation and administration of contracts 
for awards, on behalf of the university. (The 
university's Fiscal Affairs division handles 



post-award management.) 

Today, the university administers more than 
12 million dollars in externally funded 
projects that involve, among other things, 
research, educational support, and training. 
In the past five years, the level of funding 
received by the university has more than 
tripled, the results mean additional support 
for graduate education, expanded opportuni- 
ties for faculty research, and a stronger link 
between the university's goals and the 
ongoing research activities. 

The Office of Grants and Contracts is located 
in Room 01 1, Foster Administration Building, 
508 999-8942. 

Office of Institutional Research 

Institutional Research (IR) designs and 
manages the programs and processes that 
enable UMass Dartmouth to look at itself and 
determine if it is fulfilling its mission. The 
office researches data and produces 
information and analyses; does strategic 
planning, with a focus on outcomes 
assessment; studies specific issues and 
implements the recommended course of 
action; conceptualizes and manages data 
systems; analyzes and recommends on 
program and policy issues; and advises on 
planning and management of resources. 

The office oversees preparation of the many 
reports which the UMass system, state and 
federal governments, and public and private 
groups require. It works with the academic 
community on evaluating and implementing 
actions that aim to enhance students' 
education and university experience. For 
further information, call 508 999-8486. 

Office of News and Public Information 

The News and Public Information Office 
serves as the link between the university and 
the media, answering questions and advising 
of activities, events, and programs. It sends 
press releases on cultural, education, and 
social events on campus to newspaper, radio, 
and television outlets. Feature stories about 
student achievements are sent to students' 
hometown newspapers. The office also 
publishes the campus newspaper, The 
Observer. 

The office assists students, faculty, staff, and 
university organizations with the publicizing 
of events and achievements. It also works 
closely with advancement offices and various 
agencies to promote the university. The office 
is located in the Foster Administration 
Building, 508.999-8765. 



58 



J 



The Conferences and Functions Office 

helps to coordinate the wide variety of 
conferences and gatherings that occur at 
UMass Dartmouth. For information, call 508 
999-8143 or 8139. 

In September of 2002 a new Fall River 
Educational Center will open in a former 
department store in the downtown area. This 
new venture for the Department of 
Continuing Education will offer special 
educational and professional development 
programs for non-traditional students. The 
Cherry & Webb venture reflects the 
university's continuing collaboration with 
neighboring communities to expand 
educational opportunities in the region. 



Laboratories, Centers, and institutes 

Centers, institutes, laboratories, and special 
programs enable the university to realize the 
goals it has set in a variety of areas. 

These special components of UMass 
Dartmouth play many roles. They: 
• 

encourage and facilitate education that is 
multidisciplinary and collaborative; 
• 

support and assist faculty from different 
disciplines in their research work; 
• 

explore and expedite ways to incorporate 

modern technology into learning; 

• 

develop initiatives and activities to bolster the 

economy; 

• 

bring cultural and artistic events to both 
students and the surrounding communities. 

Listed here are some of the laboratories, 
centers, and institutes that demonstrate the 
university's commitment in the areas of 
education, research, and public service. Other 
examples can be found throughout this 
catalogue. 

The School for Marine Science and 
Technology (SMAST) , an academic unit of 
UMass Dartmouth, is a major center of 
education, research, and economic 
development for this campus and the entire 
UMass system. It spearheads and imple- 
ments a host of interdisciplinary programs 
and research ventures in marine science, 
marine policy, and engineering and 
technology. 



Its director, Dr. Brian Rothschild, joins with 
the deans of UMass Dartmouth to comprise 
the academic administration. SMAST is not 
further divided into departments; it has a 
program chairperson, and faculty may hold 
joint appointments in one of UMass 
Dartmouth's college. 

Elsewhere in this catalogue is a description of 
SMAST's academic program, which 
constitutes part of the emerging, innovative 
University of Massachusetts Intercampus 
Graduate School of Marine Sciences and 
Technology. 

Faculty and staff engage in basic and applied 
marine science and technology investigations. 
Continuing research efforts cut across various 
disciplines: ocean predicting and monitoring 
systems; coastal zone systems; ocean 
communications, tracking, and control; 
fisheries assessment management systems; 
and aquaculture systems development. An 
emerging area of research, conducted with 
the Naval Undersea Warfare Center, involves 
unmanned underwater vehicles. 

SMAST concentrates on the watersheds, 
embayments, and estuaries along the 
coastline of Massachusetts and New England, 
and on the waters of the adjacent U.S. 
Continental Shelf. This is an important 
natural laboratory, given its diversity of 
natural and anthropogenic environmental 
variability. 

SMAST is located on 2.6 acres of land in New 
Bedford along Clark's Cove, which empties 
into Buzzards Bay. With 32,000 square feet, 
the facility features 14 research laboratories, 
including a freestanding acousto/optic tank. 
It incorporates a 300 gallon/minute flow- 
through sea water system which provides 
ambient Buzzards Bay sea water to all 
laboratories and a large sea water tank room. 
It also contains: space to store and maintain 
marine organisms for use in research and 
teaching; a radionuclide laboratory; a 
greenhouse for growth and maintenance of 
aquatic photosynthetic organisms under 
natural light; three temperature control 
rooms for long-term behavioral and 
physiological experiments and acclimation of 
marine organisms for culture and reproduc- 
tion; a 50-foot coastal research vessel, the R/ 
V Lucky Lady; and a dock for temporary 
mooring and off-loading of research vessels. 
Support areas include a machine shop, 
computer room, a conference room with 
state-of-the-art visual display capabilities and 
distance learning hardware, and a library/ 
chart room. 



The facility's proximity to Buzzards Bay, New 
Bedford's fishing fleet, and numerous 
marine-oriented commercial, research, and 
educational institutions offers unique 
resources and opportunities, and fosters 
development of strong links with industry, 
government agencies, and research and 
academic institutions. Those interested may 
contact Dr. Brian Rothschild, director, or Dr. 
Joseph Deck, deputy director, at 508 999- 
8925, or visit www.cmast.umassd.edu 

The Northeast Regional Aquaculture 
Center (NRAC), located at UMass Dart- 
mouth, serves to support research, 
development, and education that will 
enhance viable, profitable aquaculture in 
this country. The center is one of five such 
facilities, established by Congress and 
funded through the U.S. Department of 
Agriculture's Cooperative State Research, 
Education, and Extension Service (CSREES). 
Its major function is funding of projects in 
the 12 northeastern states. 

The center also develops communications 
and networking links among the many 
educational, commercial, and state and 
federal institutions involved in aquaculture; it 
frequently hosts conferences and workshops. 
The Executive Director can be reached at 508 
999-81 57/8536, or visit its website at 
www.umassd.edu/specialprograms/nrac 

As one of only eight members of the 
National Textile Center the university has 
received grants of $500,000 to $1 million 
annually over the last four years. With these 
awards, faculty undertake fundamental 
research on developing and/or improving 
the many technologies involved in textiles, 
apparel, and fibers. 

The Advanced Technology and Manufac- 
turing Center (ATMC) teams with 
industries to develop and refine sophisti- 
cated technology responses to the current 
and future needs of the workplace. Through 
the center, faculty and students are offered 
significant high technology research 
opportunities. For students, the center 
provides a real-world learning experience 
that makes them particularly appealing to 
prospective employers. For industry and the 
southeastern region, the center offers 
creative yet practical paths toward techno- 
logical and economic growth. 

The ATMC is approximately seven miles from 
the main campus, on Route 6 in Fall River, 
near the intersection of Routes 24 and 195. 



59 



University Outreach 



It has research and incubator facilities for 
new and emerging firms, as well as 
conference areas and rental space for 
technology companies that wish to be near 
the university. 

Through its "Research and Partnering" 
component, the center becomes involved in 
projects and contracts that are funded by 
industry, government agencies, and other 
academic institutions. Faculty and students 
provide the bulk of the technical expertise, 
with labor supplied by undergraduate and 
graduate students. The full-time staff 
provides the coordination and oversight to 
assure schedule, budget, and contract 
compliance. 

For the students working there, the center 
replicates the technological business 
environment of the actual workplace. 
Qualified students can work in areas such as 
acoustics, optics, telecommunications, 
textiles, materials, environmental engineer- 
ing, manufacturing, transportation systems, 
and health care technology. Individualized 
labs feature specialized equipment, and there 
are core labs for computer software 
development and mechanical and electrical 
equipment prototyping. 

Incubator areas use an open format to 
provide flexible facilities for start-up 
companies, who receive management and 
marketing advice and administrative support 
from the university's Commercial Ventures 
and Intellectual Properties organization. 

Conference space features moveable walls so 
groups of 20 to 200 can meet at any one 
time. A wide variety of presentation 
technologies, video and teleconference, and 
internet access are available. 

The Director of the ATMC is Roy W. Miller. 
For more information, contact the center at 
508 999-9116; its website is 
www.umassd.edu/advtechctr/ 

The Family Business Center offers support 
and assistance to families who own and 
operate businesses. The center engages in 
research, gathers and distributes informa- 
tion, and hosts workshops and seminars. Its 
programs address a variety of issues, such as 
teamwork and leadership succession. 
Contact Donald Berube, director, at 508 
999-8773. 

The Omer E. and Laurette M. Boivin 
Center for French Language and Culture 

promotes and supports teaching of, 



research about, and the appreciation and 
preservation of the French language and 
culture. Among its many projects are a 
certificate program in International Business/ 
French, a cultural series of speakers and 
entertainers, and the annual Boivin Center 
Scholarship. The director is Dr. Mel Yoken, 
Professor of French, who can be reached at 
508 999-8335. 

The Center for Jewish Culture , through its 
educational and cultural programs, aims to 
increase understanding and communication 
between Jewish and non-Jewish people of 
Southeastern Massachusetts. The center, 
which often collaborates with other groups, 
sponsors workshops, lectures, seminars, and 
institutes that explore aspects of Jewish 
culture. It works to expand the Judaica 
collection in the library, including an archive 
on the history of Jewish organizations and 
individuals in the southeastern area. The 
center also contributes to the support of the 
campus chapter of Hillel, the international 
Jewish student organization. Co-directors 
are Dr. Janet Freedman, professor of 
education, 508 999-8269, and Dr. Lewis 
Dars, professor of economics, 508 999- 
8050. 

The Arnold M. Dubin Labor Education 
Center, established in 1975, focuses on the 
educational needs of workers as labor 
movement members and leaders, and 
promotes understanding and cooperation 
between labor and business, religious, 
environmental, and community organiza- 
tions. The center offers a Certificate in Labor 
Studies, and its Workplace Education Project 
provides job-related training. The center 
sponsors non-credit courses, seminars, and 
special programs; offers support and 
guidance on labor groups' educational 
ventures; provides technical and informa- 
tional resources to workers and unions; and 
is the university's liaison to labor organiza- 
tions on numerous fronts, including worker 
literacy, training, and economic develop- 
ment activity. Director is Jose A. Soler, 508 
999-8007; co-coordinators of the Work- 
place Education Project are Lisa Jochim and 
Andrea Muller, 508 999-4047. 

The Center for Policy Analysis is a 

multidisciplinary research unit which 
provides research, information, and 
technical assistance to government, 
nonprofit, and educational agencies. The 
Center's guiding mission is betterment of 
the economic and social well-being of 
citizens. The Center, striving to remove the 
walls between education and research, 



spearheads a number of university and 
community-based education programs. 
Students have the chance to work at the 
center and so become familiar with applied 
social science techniques. Director is Dr. 
Clyde W. Barrow, political science professor, 
who may be reached at 508 999-8943. 

The Center for Portuguese Studies 

develops academic programs in Portuguese 
language, literature, and area studies, as 
well as interdisciplinary programs and 
services for the campus and community. It 
funds research, development, and educa- 
tional projects, and is building a resource 
library and archive. The center hosts 
comprehensive summer institutes, and 
sponsors a wide range of educational 
activities and social events to which the 
public is invited. Support for its work has 
come from the Portuguese government and 
state of Massachusetts; the Camdes 
Institute, the Gulbenkian Foundation, and 
the Luso-American Development Founda- 
tion; and local businesses and friends of 
Portugal and UMass Dartmouth. Director 
Frank Sousa, professor of Portuguese, can 
be reached at 508 999-8255. 

The Center for Teaching and Learning 

promotes effective teaching both in the 
kindergarten-Grade 12 schools of the region, 
and at UMass Dartmouth. The Center builds 
partnerships among educators in area school 
districts and university faculty, thus encourag- 
ing a collaborative approach for improving 
curriculum and programs. It links K-12 
educators with university faculty on the 
design and delivery of pre-service and in- 
service programs for teachers. It also offers a 
variety of professional development 
workshops, seminars, graduate courses, and 
leadership training programs for teachers and 
administrators. Through "Project Impact," 
the Center helps schools implement 
standards-based mathematics and science 
programs. 

To promote effective teaching on campus, 
the Center provides a program of faculty 
development that includes seminars, 
workshops, faculty partnerships, new faculty 
orientation, colloquia, and access to a library 
of resources on teaching and learning. The 
faculty development program seeks to 
promote active and collaborative learning, 
effective classroom interactions, classroom- 
based assessment to inform teaching 
practice, and effective use of instructional 
technology. Dr. Marjorie Condon, executive 
director, can be reached 508 999-9182. 



60 



The Centerfor Rehabilitation Engineer- 
ing helps to improve the quality of life of 
disabled individuals through creative use of 
engineering knowledge and technology. The 
Center develops innovative rehabilitation 
equipment, techniques, and services, and 
makes them available to agencies and 
individuals with disabilities. Volunteers — 
students, university staff, and community 
members — are critical to the continuing 
success of the organization, which has 
received regional and nationwide acclaim. 
Director is Engineering Professor Lester 
Cory, who can be reached at 508 999-8482. 

The new Center for Indie Studies fosters 
education about, and understanding of, the 
arts, philosophy, culture, societal values, and 
customs of India. The programs and special 
events promote the study of issues of 
contemporary Indian society and their place 
within a multicultural global society. The 
center also seeks to increase Americans' 
knowledge of contemporary India and its 
diversity in the 21st century. Director Bal 
Ram Singh, chemistry professor, can be 
reached at 508 999-8588. 

The Gerontology Center is a 

multidisciplinary venture, which develops 
and coordinates programs and courses on 
gerontology, the study of aging. The center 
maintains ties with the community through 
its educational and research-based activities. 
It has a close relationship with the 
university's academic offerings, which 
include a certificate program and a minor in 
gerontology (described in this catalogue's 
chapter on interdisciplinary programs). 
Director Shaleen Barnes can be reached at 
508 999-9299 

The Small Business Development Center , 

operated by the Charlton College of 
Business, serves the businesses of southeast- 
ern Massachusetts, Nantucket, and Martha's 
Vineyard. Funded by the Small Business 
Administration and the Massachusetts 
Office of Business Development, it offers 
free individualized counseling to prospective 
and existing small businesses on topics such 
as business plan development, financing, 
and personnel. There are also inexpensive 
training programs on a variety of manage- 
ment issues. The center can be reached at 
508 673-9783. 

The Robert F. Kennedy Assassination 
Archive is an unparalleled, extensive 
collection of police and FBI reports, audio and 
video tapes, transcripts, and private papers 
relating to the assassination of Democratic 



presidential candidate and New York senator 
Robert F Kennedy. A project of Political 
Science Professor Philip H. Melanson with the 
UMass Dartmouth library, the archive has 
been recognized nationally and internation- 
ally both for its contents and as an important 
testament to fundamental rights to informa- 
tion. Located in the library, the archive can be 
reached at 508 999-8686. 

The Slade's Ferry Bank Center for 
Business Research is a singular, affordable 
source of assistance to businesses in the 
region. Under the auspices of the Charlton 
College for Business and with financial 
support from Slade's Ferry Bank, the center 
offers to businesses research, training, and 
consulting in the areas of accounting, 
finance, information systems, management, 
and marketing. Businesses are able to draw 
on the university's resources, including the 
expertise of the Charlton faculty and 
assistance from students who are guided by 
their professors. Dr. Nora Ganim Barnes, 
marketing professor, is director, and can be 
reached at 508 999-8756, or via e-mail, 
nbarnes@umassd.edu 

UMass Dartmouth Parents' Association 

Formed in 1991, the UMass Dartmouth 
Parents' Association actively participates 
with university administrators and students 
to insure communication of ideas, to 
promote programs that benefit students, 
parents, and the university, and to act as a 
parents' support group. Every parent of a 
current UMass Dartmouth undergraduate 
student is automatically a member of the 
organization and is encouraged to offer 
financial as well as personal support to the 
activities of the Parents' Association. 

Administrative liaison for the Association is 
provided by the Vice Chancellor for Student 
Services (contact 508-999-8600 for further 
information). 

The International Student Leadership 
Institute (ISLI) is a program sponsored by 
the University of Notre Dame and offered 
annually by UMass Dartmouth to New 
England high school students. The Institute 
develops the leadership skills of the 
participants, and encourages the students to 
seek opportunities for personal advancement 
in the service of others. UMass Dartmouth 
students are group leaders. Persons 
interested can contact Dr. Victor P. Caliri, 
psychology professor, at 508 999-8341, or 
John Fernandes, science and engineering 
center director, at 508 999-871 8. 



The Spotlight Program is a cultural 
enrichment program in which area high 
school students come to the UMass 
Dartmouth campus for a series of lectures, 
workshops, courses, and special events 
during the academic year. This is one of the 
activities of the UMass Dartmouth Projects 
for High Learning Potential. Director is 
English Professor William Nelles, 508 999- 
8278; for information, contact the Program 
Assistant, Diane Terrill, at 508 999-8899. 



61 



University Outreach 



The Arts in Exhibit and Performance 



UMass Dartmouth offers the best in arts 
programming to its students and the 
community — talented faculty, a variety of 
groups and ensembles giving performances 
and mounting exhibits, and superior facilities 
at both the main campus and the Star Store 
building in downtown New Bedford make 
this possible. 

Throughout the year, the university sponsors 
live theater, musical productions, concerts, 
films, lectures, and fine arts exhibits. The 
artists and performers might be students, 
area residents who are launching their 
careers, or well-known individuals who enjoy 
international acclaim. As an artistic resource 
for the entire region, the university enthusias- 
tically encourages the community to attend 
these events. 



Musical Ensembles 

Throughout the year, the university sponsors 
musical offerings of a rich variety, featuring 
guest artists from around the world from 
genres of music ranging from classical to 
New Wave to jazz. 

Among on-campus groups that give concerts 
are: the African Drumming and Dance 
Ensemble, various jazz ensembles, Concert 
Band, and the Chorus. Music Department 
faculty coordinate these concerts, and 
students from all colleges of the university 
participate. 

Each semester, the College of Visual and 
Performing Arts sponsors a Guest Artist 
Series, which features instrumental and voice 
performances and master classes given by 
internationally-recognized artists. 



Theatre Company 

The UMass Dartmouth Theatre Company 
stages a series of plays throughout the 
academic year. The productions of musicals, 
period pieces, and dramatic plays draw large, 
enthusiastic audiences. Students are joined 
by university staff and faculty, and frequently 
members of the community, for both acting 
and production jobs. 

Film Series 

An international film series is organized each 
semester by Dr. Charles White of the English 
Department. The films come from countries 
throughout the world, with storylines that 
are diverse and generally unconventional. 
Videos of the films become a permanent 
part of the library collection. 

UMass Dartmouth Art Galleries 

The university has an arts gallery in its Visual 
and Performing Arts building and the Crapo 
Gallery at the Star Store, New Bedford site. 
Each showcases the works of students and 
faculty, and throughout the year host exhibits 
by both emerging and long-established artists 
who work in a range of mediums. Video 
presentations and artist lectures often 
complement the exhibits. 

A smaller exhibit space in the Campus Center 
displays artistic works, often those of 
students and staff. 



Visual Arts Events 

Highly-regarded artists are invited to the 
campus each year In addition to offering 
workshops on their mediums and critiques to 
UMass Dartmouth arts students, the guests 
often have exhibits and give lectures for the 
public. 

College of Visual and Performing Arts 
students exhibit and display their work 
annually. Favorite events include a showing 
of animation art by electronic imaging 
students and a spring student outdoor 
sculpture show. 

By taking trips each semester to museums 
and galleries in Boston, Providence, New 
York, and Hartford, students broaden their 
education and see firsthand what is 
happening on the contemporary art scene. 

Summer Events 

During the summer, UMass Dartmouth hosts 
a number of events, notably the Fourth-of- 
July Celebration that features music, food, 
and fireworks. The increasingly popular 
Institute for Art Education sponsors summer 
seminars and workshops for persons 
interested in the visual arts. 



62 



Key to the Listings of Courses and Programs 



Program Requirements 

A general statement for each college is 
followed by separate descriptions of each 
department in the college and its programs. 
General requirements that apply to all 
students in a college are given in the section 
describing the college. Requirements specific 
to the programs follow in the sections 
devoted to each department. 

Although the program requirements are 
presented in full detail, there are many 
aspects of program planning which will 
require each student to consult regularly 
with an academic advisor, and certain 
decisions require specific permission of the 
advisor. 



Course Descriptions 

Following the program descriptions and 
requirements is a listing of the courses from 
that department. To learn the selection of 
courses that is to be offered in any one 
semester or term, consult the semester 
Course Listings booklet available at the 
Office of the Registrar. 

This catalogue uses a systematic format for 
course descriptions. Two examples follow, 
with explanatory notes: 

Notes 



BIO 314 four credits la, b 

General Ecology 2 

3 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratory 

lecture, 3 hours laboratory 3 

Prerequisites: BIO 121, 122 4 



General ecology considers the general field 
of interrelationships between organisms and 
their environments with emphasis on the 
biology of populations, and includes 
laboratory and field studies of terrestrial, 
fresh water and marine environments. 
Extended field trips, some of which will be 
held on weekends and/or holidays, are an 
integral part of this course. 5 



ARH 150 three credits 1a, b 

Studies in Visual Culture: 

Renaissance to Modern Art 2 

Prerequisite: ARH 125 or permission by 
instructor 4 

Surveys painting, sculpture, and architecture 
from the Renaissance to Impressionism. FOU 
1 2 5 and 150 need not be taken in se- 
quence. (Formerly ARH 102) 5 



1a. 

Department Designation and Course 
Number. Departments use a standard three- 
letter abbreviation to identify the depart- 
ment or field of the course; the courses 
shown are for Biology and Art History. The 
course number then identifies each course 
uniquely. The 100-level courses are 
introductory-level; 200, intermediate-level; 
300 and 400, advanced and specialized- 
level; 500 and 600, graduate level. It is 
generally assumed that students may take 
the more advanced-level courses only with 
an appropriate foundation in the field, even 
if specific prerequisites are not stated. 

1b. 

Number of Credits. Each course carries the 
number of credits specified. The more 
credits, the greater the obligation the course 
carries for in-class and out-of-class work. In 
courses that use the lecture or lecture- 
discussion format, there is a one-to-one 
relationship between the number of credits 
and the number of class contact hours each 
week (based on a 50-minute period per 
hour). See note 3, below. 

2. 

Course Title. Each course is given a unique, 
descriptive title that indicates its topic and 
content. 

3. 

Class Type and Contact Hours. Some courses 
use formats that differ from the lecture or 
lecture-discussion type. For example, the 
Biology course here exemplifies a combina- 
tion of lecture and laboratory experiences. 
As shown, the number of class contact 
hours per credit may exceed the number for 
a class that uses the lecture or lecture- 
discussion formats only. When there is no 
annotation, the course uses the lecture or 
lecture-discussion format. The Art History 
course exemplifies this. Some course listings 
have a blanket annotation that applies to an 
entire sequence of courses. 

4. 

Prerequisites. Stated here are any specific 
courses (or other requirements) that should 
have been completed satisfactorily as a 
condition for taking the course. Prerequisites 
ensure adequate preparation and maintain 
an appropriate order in the student's 
progression through the topics of study in 
the field. As stated above, even if specific 
prerequisites are not listed, generally 
students may take more advanced-level 
courses only with an appropriate foundation 
in the field. Corequisites are shown for some 



courses. These are like prerequisites but 
indicate another course or other experience 
that is to occur at the same time that the 
student takes the present course. 

5. 

Course Description. The course description 
indicates the nature and scope of the 
course. Often, information is also given 
about the type of work for the course, as is 
shown in the Biology example. Course 
descriptions may close with a special- 
purpose annotation, as is the case with the 
Art History course; that annotation indicates 
a previously-used course number and 
informs the reader that this new course 
occupies a parallel role in the curriculum to 
that of the previous course and that their 
content is similar. Course descriptions do 
not indicate the status of a course to fulfill 
requirements of an academic program. For 
this information, Catalogue users should 
consult the program requirements listings. 

For each course attempted, the course 
number, course title, and the number of 
credits are recorded on the student's 
transcript, together with the grade received. 



Courses for General Education 

Many different courses satisfy the 
various requirements of the General 
Education program. (General Education 
requirements are summarized in the 
Academic Regulations and Procedures 
section of this catalogue.) 

Courses identified as Permanently 
Designated for a General Education 
requirement are identified in the 
catalogue's course listings by the 
following Key. 

C Cultural and Artistic Literacy 
D Diversity 

E Ethics and Social Responsibility 

G Global Awareness 

I Information and Computer Literacy, 

Advanced (Tier 2) 
M Mathematics 
O Oral Skills 

S Natural Science and Technology 
W Writing-Intensive Course (Tier 2) 

A detailed listing of courses that satisfy 
these requirements is published separately 
from the catalogue, in each semester's 
Course Listings booklet. 



64 



College of 

Arts and Sciences 




The programs of the College of Arts and Sciences offer 
students the theoretical and practical foundations for 
careers in the sciences, humanities, and social sciences, 
and develop the understanding that enables an in- 
formed and independent life. 

Majors are offered in Biology, Chemistry, and Medical 
Laboratory Science (Bachelor of Science); Mathematics, 
and Multidisciplinary Studies (Bachelor of Arts or 
Bachelor of Science); and Economics, English, French, 
History, Humanities/Social Sciences, Philosophy, Political 
Science, Portuguese, Psychology, Sociology/Anthropol- 
ogy, and Spanish (Bachelor of Arts). 

The College also offers minor programs that invite 
inquiry beyond the bounds of the traditional disciplines. 
These include: African and African-American Studies, 
Anthropology, Economics, English (Literature, Writing/ 
communications, and Drama/film Studies), French, 
German, History, Judaic Studies, Labor Studies, Math- 
ematics, Philosophy, Political Science, Portuguese, 
Sociology, Spanish, and Women's Studies. 

The University does not offer degrees in Pre-Law or Pre- 
Medical studies, but students intending to enter 
medical school or law school can plan appropriate 
programs of study with the help of the Pre-Law or Pre- 
Medical Advisory Committee. Students interested in 
teaching careers enroll in the Education Department's 
program for state certification in addition to their major 
field of study. 

Since many Arts and Sciences students enter the 
university without yet knowing the specific fields in 
which they would like to major, the College offers the 
Liberal Arts pre-major program. This provides students 
a flexible and well-rounded course of study in the 
liberal arts and sciences, while also giving them time to 
discover their individual areas of interest and ability. 



Bachelor of Arts Degree 
Requirements 



All College of Arts and Sciences bachelor of 
arts candidates must complete the following 
courses and credits and meet the following 
requirements. 

6 credits 

Critical Writing and Reading 
ENL101.102 

6 credits 

Literature (except English majors) 
Literature in English, literature in a foreign 
language or foreign literature in translation. 
Departments of English, Foreign Literature 
and Languages, and Portuguese shall specify 
which courses satisfy the requirements. 

9 credits 
Natural Science 

Courses taught in Chemistry, Biology, 
Medical Laboratory Science, Physics, and 
selected courses in Nursing and Engineering. 

9 credits 
Humanities 

The credits must not be taken in a student's 
major field. No more than 6 credits from any 
one field. Choose from History, Philosophy 
(including logic), Art History, Music 
(excluding applied courses), and culture and 
civilization courses from the departments of 
Foreign Literature and Languages and 
Portuguese. 

12 credits 
Social Science 

The credits must not be taken in a student's 
major field. No more than 6 credits from any 
one field. Choose from Economics, Political 
Science, Psychology, and Sociology/ 
Anthropology. 



Department Requirements 

Every student must complete at least thirty 
semester credits of work in the major field. 
For details see sections under major 
programs. 

A sufficient number of courses must be 
elected so that the earned credits total a 
minimum of 120. Certain majors require 
more than 1 20 credits. 

At least 30 credits must be in courses 
numbered 300 or higher, exclusive of 
experiential learning. 



Language Requirement 

All candidates for the Bachelor of Arts 
degree (including returning students and 
transfers from other universities, colleges, or 
community colleges) must satisfy a language 
requirement in one of the following ways: 
1. 

Completion of a 202-level course in a 

language other than English. 

2. 

Satisfactory performance in both oral and 
written UMass Dartmouth proficiency tests, 
if a student has fluency in French, German, 
Italian, Latin, Portuguese, or Spanish. No 
academic credits are awarded for satisfac- 
tory performance on this test. Proficiency 
tests are administered for all incoming 
students and transfers on Orientation dates 
if requested. 
3. 

Satisfactory score on the ETS Achievement 
Test, the Advanced Placement Test, the 
Advanced Placement Literature Test, the 
CLEP Examination, or the TOEFL Examina- 
tion; the last two, when combined with a 
writing sample, an oral examination, and 
the written permission of the chairperson of 
the Department of Foreign Literature and 
Languages. 
4. 

Completion of American Sign Language 
certification at the intermediate level. Up to 
six academic credits are awarded for 
American Sign Language courses provided 
they are taken at an institution of higher 
learning such as a Massachusetts commu- 
nity college (in transfer credit); prior 
approval must be obtained from the 
Chairperson of the Department of Foreign 
Literature and Languages. 

Exceptions: 
1. 

Students majoring in Sociology/Criminal 
Justice and taking Spanish as their required 
language may opt to satisfy the intermedi- 
ate-level requirement by taking SPA 207 and 
208, Spanish for Law Enforcement 
Personnel I and II, instead of SPA 201 and 
202. 
2. 

Learning Disabled Students. Students who 
are certified by the Disabled Students Office 
as having difficulties in learning a foreign 
language may fulfill their requirement by 
taking two courses taught in English on the 
history, culture or literature of non-English 
speaking countries. Courses will be 
approved by the chair of the Foreign 
Languages Department, and are in addition 
to courses used to fulfill the college 



distribution requirements. 
3. 

Hardship cases. Although there is no 
provision for waiver of the foreign language 
requirement, a formal mechanism exists 
whereby students may seek a reduction of 
the requirement. The student must initiate 
the procedure with a written petition to the 
chairperson of the Foreign Literature and 
Languages department. The final decision 
will be made by the dean of the College of 
Arts & Sciences on an individual basis. If a 
reduction is granted, the student must fulfill 
the remainder of the requirements with 
courses taught in English on the history, 
culture or literature of non-English speaking 
countries. Courses will be approved by the 
chair of the Foreign Languages Department, 
and are in addition to courses used to fulfill 
the college distribution requirements. 

No credit is awarded to students who have 
received advanced standing or satisfied the 
language requirement by passing the 
appropriate test or by a reduction in the 
requirement. 

Quality Requirement 

A cumulative grade point average of at least 
2.00 out of a possible 4.00 is required of all 
students. A grade point average of at least 
2.00 is also required in courses in the major 
field. Individual departments may establish 
higher quality requirements. 



66 



Bachelor of Science Degree 



Requirements 



All College of Arts and Sciences bachelor of 
science candidates must complete the 
following courses and credits and meet the 
following requirements. 

6 credits 

Critical Writing and Reading 
ENL101.102 

6 credits 
Literature 

Literature in English, literature in a foreign 
language, or foreign literature in translation. 
The Departments of English, Foreign 
Literature and Languages, and Portuguese 
shall specify which courses satisfy this 
requirement. 

18 credits 

Humanities/Social Sciences 

These credits are to be taken from the areas 
of Humanities and Social Sciences listed 
below, with a minimum of six credits from 
Humanities and six from Social Sciences. The 
credits may not be taken in a student's 
major field. 

Humanities 
History 

Philosophy (including Logic) 
Art History 

Music (excluding applied courses) 
Foreign Language (excluding Literature) 



Department Requirements and Free 
Electives 

Every student must complete at least thirty 
semester credits of work in the major field. 
For details see section under major program 

A sufficient number of courses must be 
elected so that the earned credits total a 
minimum of 120. Certain majors require 
more than 120 credits. 

At least 30 credits must be in courses 
numbered 300 or higher, exclusive of 
experiential learning. 



Quality Requirement 

A cumulative grade point average of at least 
2.00 out of a possible 4.00 is required of all 
students. A grade point average of at least 
2.00 is also required in courses in the major 
field. Individual departments may establish 
higher quality requirements. 



Social Sciences 
Economics 
Political Science 
Psychology 
Sociology 



67 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Biology 



Faculty and Fields of Interest Biology Major 

BS degree 



The biology major provides opportunities for 
building the foundation of a career in one 
of the many specialties in private industry 
and in federal and state agencies which 
employ biologists. 

Students planning to enter graduate school 
should, in consultation with their advisor, 
strongly consider electing a foreign 
language, analytic geometry, and calculus. 
For those students interested in pursuing 
such broad fields of study as ecology, 
courses which stress computer literacy and 
database management are good foundation 
courses. Students looking toward such 
disciplines as cell and/or molecular biology 
and developmental biology should take 
genetics, molecular and cell biology, and 
biochemistry. 

Modern biology requires a wide range of 
supporting courses in such other fields of 
study as statistics, computers, physics, 
chemistry, electronics, meteorology, and 
geology. Student biology majors should 
consult with their advisors early in their 
program of study as to possible career 
choices and plan to take appropriate 
elective supporting courses for their 
selected field of study. 



Richard C. Connor marine mammal biology 

Debra J. Ellis microbial and molecular 
ecology, soil biogeochemistry, biotechnology 

Marta Concha Frisardi molecular genetics 
of parasites 

Robert Griff ith environmental physiology, 
vertebrate anatomy and physiology 

Frederick Y. Kazama microbiology, cell 
biology, organismal biology 

Palma Longo science education 

Barton M. Matsumoto entomology, 
statistics 

Donald J. Mulcare developmental biology, 
gerontology, embryology 

Nancy J. O'Connor invertebrate biology, 
marine ecology, biology of marine larvae 

Dorothy Read (chairperson) molecular 
biology, bacterial genetics, biotechnology 

Jefferson Turner biological oceanography, 
marine plankton, biogeography 



Students may prepare for admission to 
medical, dental, and veterinary colleges and 
for admission to graduate work in the life 
sciences. Increasing numbers of students 
elect to major in biology as a means of 
providing themselves with a general 
framework of ideas concerning the 
interactions of living things. A substantial 
number of these students proceed toward 
vocational objectives that do not require a 
specialist's knowledge of biology. 

Biology Major 

Marine Biology Option 

The marine biology option is designed to 
meet the needs of students who aspire to 
careers in ecology, marine biology, fisheries 
biology, and biological oceanography. 
Students who elect the Marine Biology 
Option are urged to plan their program in 
close cooperation with their advisors. 
Biology majors who choose the marine 
biology option have an opportunity to elect 
marine-oriented courses during their junior 
and senior years and must meet college 
degree requirements for the BS degree. 



68 



Requirements 



First Two Years 

(common to both options) 



Semester Credits 



Junior/Senior Eiectives for 
Marine Biology Option 



First Year 




First 


BIO 121, 131 


Biology of Organisms I with Lab 


4 


BIO 122, 132 


Biology of Organisms II with Lab 




CHM 151, 152 


Principles of Modern Chemistry 


3 


CHM 161, 162 


Introduction to Applied Chemistry 


1 


ENL 101, 102 


Critical Writing and Reading 


3 


MTH 101, 102* 


Elements of College Mathematics 


3 






14 



Second 



4 
3 

•1: 
3 
3 

14 



* Math course to be selected in consultation with the advisor. MTH 111, 112 (Calculus) is 

recommended for students whose math background is good, and required for later entrance 

to graduate programs with a molecular orientation. 

It is also a prerequisite for Physical Chemistry. MTH 111, 1 12 is required for 

PHY 113, 1 1 4 but can be taken concurrently with it. 



Second Year 

BIO 210, 21 1 
BIO 234, 244 
CHM 251, 252 
CHM 263, 264 
PHY 101, 102** 



Biology of Populations with Lab 
Biology of Cells with Lab 
Organic Chemistry 
Bio-organic Chemistry Lab 
Introduction to Physics 
Humanities/Social Science Eiectives 



4 
3 
1 
3 
6 
17 



3 
1 
3 
6 
17 



Eighteen credits should be elected from 
upper-division biology courses. At least 12 
of these credits must come from the 
following list of courses. 



BIO 


317 


Biology of Invertebrates 


BIO 


413 


Biology of Fishes 


BIO 


414 


Biology of Marine Mammals 


BIO 


416 


Biology of Algae 


BIO 


424 


Biology of Animal Parasites 


BIO 


429 


Aquaculture 


BIO 


454 


Biology of Sharks 


BIO 


471 


Marine Microbiology 


BIO 


526 


Marine Benthic Ecology 


BIO 


531 


Advanced Ichthyology 


BIO 


536 


Estuarine Ecology 


BIO 


545 


Biological Oceanography 


BIO 


546 


Biology of Marine Larvae 



PHY 113, 114 may be substituted for PHY 101, 102. 



Third and Fourth Years 

(common to both options) 

Course selection for the third and fourth years of the biology major must be determined in 
consultation with an advisor. During the third and fourth year all majors are required to 
elect at least 18 credits in upper-division biology courses (courses numbered 300 or higher). 
Upper-division courses in physics, chemistry, engineering, or mathematics may be substi- 
tuted with the written approval of the advisor and the department chairperson prior to 
registration in the course. A maximum of 3 credits in biology proseminar may be included in 
the 18 credits. The requirements of the College of Arts and Sciences must also be met prior 
to graduation. 

Students who have completed the first two years of the biology major may elect to 
concentrate in courses dealing with the ecology of the coastal zone, its estuaries and 
inshore waters. 



General Education Departmental Requirements 

Students majoring in Biology will meet their departmentally-controlled General Education 
requirements as follows: 

Area E: Students may choose a course from the approved list 
Area I, Tier 2: Satisfied by BIO 210, 21 1 
Area W, Tier 2: Satisfied by BIO 234 

Area O: Students may take any two of the following: BIO 321, 413, 422, 471 



69 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Gen Ed note: Biology courses satisfy the 
Natural Science and Technology require- 
ment. Those marked S below are appropri- 
ate for non-science/engineering majors. 

Biology Courses 



BIO 101 three credits S 
General Biology I 

3 hours lecture 

An introductory human biology course 
emphasizing energy flow and the function 
of cells and molecules, basic genetics, and 
selected aspects of human physiology. 

BIO 102 three credits S 
General Biology II 

3 hours lecture 

Prerequisite: BIO 101 or permission of 
instructor 

Continuation of introductory biology with 
emphasis on the reproduction and genetics 
of organisms, their evolution, behavior, and 
interactions within ecosystems. 

BIO 103 three credits S 
Topics in Biology 

3 hours lecture 

Prerequisite: BIO 101 or permission of 
instructor 

Study in specific areas of biological science 
such as human genetics, microbes, and the 
insect world. Not offered for credit to 
biology majors. 

BIO 105, 106 three credits each S 
Readings In Modern Biology I, II 

Selected books and articles for the general 
public by scientists and science writers on 
ideas and research in modern biology. This is 
a course for non-majors focusing on two or 
three topics of current interest to biologists: 
evolution, human evolution, the human 
brain, genetics and the human genome 
project interaction of biology and society, 
and biodiversity. Other topics will be 
introduced as new books appear. Students 
will learn how to use the World Wide Web 
and library in preparing a term project in an 
area of personal interest. 

BIO 111 four credits S 
Introduction to Human Physiology 

4 hours lecture 

Introduction to the general physiological 
principles involved in human body functions 
with homeostasis as the unifying theme. Not 
offered for credit to biology majors. 

BIO 112 three credits S 
The Ocean Environment 

3 hours lecture 

The study of the ocean environment as an 
integrated ecosystem: The biology of marine 
organisms and the related physical, 
chemical, and geological processes of the 
sea with attention given to the exploitation 
of marine resources and pollution. Not 
offered for credit to biology majors. 



BIO 113 three credits S 

The Darwinian Revolution (Honors) 

An analysis of the claims, evidence, and 
methods of Darwinian evolutionary biology 
based upon an examination of Darwin's On 
the Origin of Species (1st ed., 1859). 

BIO 121, 122 three credits each 
Biology of Organisms I, II 

3 hours lecture 

The first course for biology majors is an 
introduction to structure, function, and 
behavioral adaptations in the world of living 
organisms. During the initial half of this two 
semester course cell origin, structure and 
chemistry, basic cellular physiology, and 
genetics are emphasized. The second 
semester covers the diversity and evolution- 
ary relationships of living organisms, 
culminating in an in-depth study of a 
selected ecosystem. Pre-professional aspects 
are emphasized during both semesters for 
the biology major student. Field experiences, 
writing, and problem-solving are integrated 
into the course work. 

BIO 125 three credits S 
Horticulture 

Integrates applied aspects of horticulture 
(plant propagation, cultivation, landscaping 
styles, soils, plant materials) with inquiries 
into the basic structure, reproduction, and 
other life processes of plants. Work in the 
greenhouse provides an opportunity to put 
theoretical questions and topics into 
practice. Students will develop a sense of 
the value of plants and gardens in current 
society; an understanding of horticulture 
and its relationship to science, technology 
and arts; and the confidence to work 
successfully with plants, gardens, and 
landscapes. 

BIO 131, 132 one credit each 
Biology of Organisms Laboratory I, II 

1 hour laboratory lecture, 2 hours laboratory 
The biology of organisms laboratory courses 
cover two semesters and are designed to 
provide the student with hands-on 
experience in investigative techniques and 
problem-solving. Students work closely with 
faculty and staff in specialized laboratory 
investigations in various biological disci- 
plines. 

BIO 154 three credits 
Fundamentals of Biology 

3 hours lecture 

Prerequisite: Nursing major 

Specifically designed to meet the needs and 

schedule of the nursing major, covering the 

breadth of biology in one semester. The 



ideology and approach of the biological 
sciences, the chemical and physical 
foundations of living systems, energy 
transformations, the origin and diversity of 
life, Mendelian and molecular genetics, 
evolution, and population and community 
ecology. 

BIO 210 three credits 
Biology of Populations 

3 hours lecture 

Prerequisites: BIO 121, 122, 131, 132 
An introduction to the biology of groups of 
individuals of the same specific kind as units 
of evolutionary and ecological change: the 
characterization, origin, and maintenance of 
phenotypic and genetic variety and the 
selective and chance processes that shape 
this variation and effect adaptation, 
speciation, and the observed geographical 
and temporal distributions of different kinds 
of organisms. 

BIO 211 one credit 

Biology of Populations Laboratory 

3 hours laboratory 
Corequisite: BIO 210 

Experimental approaches to selected topics 
in population biology are investigated by 
linking observations on laboratory popula- 
tions with expectations generated by 
student-designed computer simulations 
using BASIC programming Topics include 
selection, genetic drift, heritability, and 
spatial and temporal dispersion patterns. 

BIO 216 three credits 
Biology of Aging 

3 hours lecture 

Prerequisite: BIO 101 or equivalent 
Presents the biological background to the 
aging process. This will include a description 
of the theories of aging and the develop- 
mental and physiological changes that occur 
throughout the aging process. Science 
elective for Liberal Arts students, free 
elective for Biology majors. Cross-listed as 
GRT 216. 

BIO 221 three credits 
Anatomy and Physiology I 

3 hours lecture 
Prerequisite: BIO 101 
A systematic study of the human body 
emphasizing structural and functional 
relationships. Topics include cellular activity 
and tissue organization. The skeletal, 
muscular, and cardiovascular morphology 
and function are presented. 

BIO 222 three credits 
Anatomy and Physiology II 



70 



3 hours lecture 

Prerequisite: BIO 221 

Continuation of BIO 221 . Study of the 

structure and function of the respiratory, 

digestive, nervous, urinary, endocrine, and 

reproductive systems. 

BIO 223 one credit 

Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory I 

1 hour laboratory lecture, 2 hours laboratory 
Emphasis is placed on methods of measur- 
ing physiological processes. Study of body 
structure is accomplished by dissection of 
animal specimens and by use of tissue 
materials. 

BIO 224 one credit 

Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory II 

1 hour laboratory lecture, 2 hours laboratory 
Prerequisite: BIO 223 
Continuation of BIO 223. 

BIO 234 three credits W 
Biology of Cells 

3 hours lecture 

Prerequisites: two semesters Chemistry 
(concurrent enrollment or credit in Organic 
Chemistry recommended) 
A study of energy transformations, gene 
expression and regulation, and the function 
of cells and their organelles. The course 
emphasizes how function follows structure, 
particularly at the level of macromolecules. 

BIO 244 one credit 
Biology of Cells Laboratory 

1 hour laboratory lecture, 2 hours laboratory 
Corequisite: BIO 234 
A laboratory course emphasizing the 
biochemical, spectroscopic, and microscopic 
procedures necessary to study cell function. 

BIO 251 three credits 
Medical Microbiology 

3 hours lecture 

Prerequisites: BIO 154, CHM 101, 102; open 
only to students enrolled in the College of 
Nursing, except by special permission of 
instructor 

Fundamentals of microbiology are presented 
to prepare students interested in health 
science field. Topics include basic microbiol- 
ogy, control of microorganisms, host 
resistance, and pathogenic microorganisms. 

BIO 261 one credit 

Medical Microbiology Laboratory 

Prerequisite: BIO 154, CHM 101, 102 
Corequisite: BIO 251 

Exercises in microbiological principles and 
techniques, such as microscopy, staining, 
growth and quantitation of microbial 



cultures, and identification of microorgan- 
isms by biochemical and other tests. 
Intended to accompany and illustrate BIO 
251 Medical Microbiology. 

BIO 298 one to six credits 
Experiential Learning 

Prerequisites: At least sophomore standing; 
permission of the instructor, department 
chairperson, and college dean 
Work experience at an elective level 
supervised for academic credit by a faculty 
member in an appropriate academic field. 
Terms and hours to be arranged. Graded 
CR/NC. For specific procedures and 
regulations, see section of catalogue on 
Other Learning Experiences. 

BIO 314 four credits 
General Ecology 

3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory 
Prerequisites: Biology core; MTH 101, 102; 
CHM 151, 1 52, or permission of instructor 
The principles and practices of the scientific 
discipline of ecology. Interactions among 
organisms and between organisms and their 
environment will be emphasized. Interac- 
tions will be described and analyzed at the 
organismal, population, community, and 
ecosystem levels. In the laboratory, students 
will use hypothesis-testing and experimenta- 
tion to examine theoretical and empirical 
aspects of ecology. 

BIO 316 three credits 
Descriptive Oceanography 

3 hours lecture 

Prerequisites: Biology core, or permission of 
instructor 

An introduction to the field of oceano- 
graphy. Physical, chemical, geological, and 
biological aspects are emphasized to provide 
a basic foundation for further work in 
biological oceanography. 

BIO 317 four credits 
Biology of Invertebrates 

3 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratory lecture, 3 
hours laboratory 
Prerequisites: BIO 121, 122 
This course presents an intensive survey of 
the taxonomy and functional morphology of 
the major invertebrate phyla, with special 
reference to adaptations of the intertidal 
marine invertebrates of the North Atlantic 
coast. Field trips to the diverse habitats of 
the area constitute an integral part of the 
laboratory. 

BIO 318 four credits 
General Entomology 

3 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratory lecture, 2 



hours laboratory 
Prerequisites: BIO 121, 122 
Introductory survey course in the study of 
insects. The taxonomy of families will be 
emphasized in lectures. Studies will also 
include the structure, habits, physiology, 
and ecology of insects. During some 
laboratories, field trips will be conducted. 

BIO 320 four credits 
Embryology 

3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory, 1 hour 
laboratory lecture 
Prerequisite: Biology core 
A description of reproductive and embryo- 
logical principles, followed by a study of 
typical vertebrate and invertebrate embryol- 
ogy. The organogenesis of the major 
vertebrate systems will be described. The 
laboratory will include the microscopic study 
of vertebrate embryos and the observation 
of the development of selected living 
vertebrate and invertebrate embryos. 

BIO 321 four credits O 
General Microbiology 

3 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratory lecture, 3 
hours laboratory 
Prerequisite: Biology core 
The nature and diversity of microorganisms. 
Special emphasis is placed on bacterial 
cytology, nutrition, physiology, and growth. 
Topics on the significance of microorgan- 
isms in the environment and the evolution- 
ary relationships of microorganisms are 
included. 

BIO 322 four credits 

Medical Anatomy and Physiology 

3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory 
Prerequisites: Biology core; BIO 22 1 , or 
permission of instructor 
Detailed study of the structure and function 
of the human body concentrating on the 
cardiovascular, immune, respiratory, 
digestive, urinary, and reproductive systems 
with an emphasis on clinical applications. 
Lectures coincide with BIO 222 but exams 
and assignments are separate. Independent 
laboratory projects allow students to 
research, design, and execute experiments in 
anatomy and physiology. 

BIO 333 four credits 
General Genetics 

3 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratory lecture, 3 

hours laboratory 

Prerequisite: Biology core 

Introduction to the science of heredity. The 

lectures present an integrated concept of 

the gene provided from the study of 

Mendelian and molecular genetics. Selected 



71 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Gen Ed note: Biology courses satisfy the 
Natural Science and Technology require- 
ment. Those marked S below are appropri- 
ate for non-science/engineering majors. 



topics in quantitative inheritance, and 
human genetics are included. 

BIO 350 four credits 
Survey of Plant Kingdom 

3 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratory lecture, 3 
hours laboratory and field trips 
Prerequisite: One year of Biology of 
Organisms or equivalent 
The phylogenetic relationship among 
members of the plant kingdom, with an 
emphasis on evolutionary trends among 
plant groups rather than on individual plant 
species. Toward this goal the cytology, 
anatomy and morphology of monerans 
through the angio-sperms will be covered. 
Representatives of most groups will be 
studied in the laboratory and some will be 
observed in their natural habitats during 
two field trips. 

BIO 370 four credits 
Animal Physiology 

3 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratory lecture, 2 
hours laboratory 

Prerequisites: Biology of Cells (or equiva- 
lent); Organic Chemistry 
A study of the general principles of animal 
physiology integrating molecular, cellular, 
organ system, and whole organism 
approaches. The accompanying laboratory 
will provide skill in the techniques used in 
animal physiological investigations. 

BIO 411 one to three credits 
Proseminar: Current Topics in Biology 

1 to 3 hours 

Students with senior standing (or others 
with consent of the instructor) report on 
and discuss current biological problems as 
presented in principle journals, abstracts 
and reviews. The work of each seminar is 
usually built upon a single unifying content 
area. 

BIO 413 four credits O 
Biology of Fishes 

3 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratory lecture, 3 
hours laboratory 
Prerequisites: BIO 121, 122 
Field trips and extensive laboratory work are 
emphasized in this course. The life histories, 
ecology and classification of the fishes of 
the coastal and inland waters of the 
northeastern states are studied in detail. 

BIO 414 three credits 
Biology of Marine Mammals 

Prerequisite: Biology core 
Biology of marine mammals, including 
cetaceans (whales and dolphins), pinnipeds 
(seals, sea lions, and walruses), sirenians 



(dugongs and manatees), and sea otters. 
Fossil, anatomical, physiological, life history, 
behavioral, and ecological evidence is 
marshalled to explore marine mammal 
adaptations for reproduction, feeding, 
locomotion, diving, thermoregulation, 
communication, and sensing their environ- 
ment. 

BIO 415 four credits 
Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy 

3 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratory lecture, 2 
hours laboratory 

Structure and phylogeny of vertebrates. 
Laboratory work illustrates evolutionary 
trends and specializations. 

BIO 416 four credits 
Biology of Algae 

3 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratory/lecture, 3 
hours laboratory 

Prerequisite: One year of Biology of 
Organisms or equivalent 
The freshwater and marine algae of the 
northeastern United States, surveyed with an 
emphasis on their taxonomy, evolution and 
ecology. The laboratory focuses upon the 
identification, morphology and ecology of all 
major algal groups. Extended field trips into 
Buzzards Bay, Vineyard Sound, and the 
north shore are an integral part of the 
course. 

BIO 419 four credits 
Biological Scanning Electron 
Microscopy 

1 hour lecture, 6 hours laboratory 
Prerequisite: Permission of instructor 
Theory and techniques of scanning electron 
microscopy, including optical theory, 
photographic darkroom techniques, and 
specimen preparation. Students will be 
expected to complete a project, the results 
of which will be presented in written and 
finished photographic form. 

BIO 420 three credits 
Animal Behavior 

Prerequisite: Biology core 
The study of comparative and evolutionary 
aspects of behavior of invertebrate and 
vertebrate animals. Structure and function of 
nervous systems, simple behavioral patterns 
including reflexes and other forms of innate 
behavior as well as more complex patterns 
including learning and social behavior are 
stressed. 

BIO 421 four credits 
Developmental Biology 

3 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratory lecture, 3 
hours laboratory 



Prerequisite: Biology core, especially biology 
of cells 

The molecular, cellular and morphogenetic 
aspects of embryology, organogenesis and 
other developmental phenomena of animals 
are considered in the lecture. Some aspects 
of plant development are discussed. The 
laboratory includes experiments that 
demonstrate the morphogenetic activities of 
the cell. Students are encouraged to design 
their own experiments. 

BIO 422 three credits O 
Immunology 

3 hours lecture 

Prerequisites: BIO 234 or equivalent, CHM 
251 

Molecular and cellular basis of immune 
phenomena with emphasis on experimental 
foundations of current models. Differentia- 
tion of T and B lymphocytes, cell-cell 
interactions, antibody structure and function 
with underlying genetic rearrangements, 
mechanisms of resistance to disease and 
immune dysfunction, including AIDS. 
Understanding of research techniques and 
research process is promoted. 

BIO 424 four credits 
Biology of Animal Parasites 

3 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratory lecture, 2 
hours laboratory 

An introductory course in parasitology 
emphasizing the more important protozoan, 
helminth, and arthropod parasites of 
medical, veterinary, and marine significance. 
Laboratory exercises include practical and 
experimental techniques. 

BIO 427 three credits 
Molecular Biology 

3 hours lecture 
Prerequisites: BIO 234, 244 
The methods and research that support 
models of cell function at the molecular 
level. This three credit lecture course will 
present current advanced research methods 
in molecular biology — those used to study 
the expression and regulation of genes, and 
the laboratory research on the macromol- 
ecules involved. Students will read and 
paraphrase current literature in the field of 
molecular biology. 

BIO 428 three credits 
Evolutionary Ecology 

Prerequisite: BIO 314, 420 or 437 
Natural selection theory applied to diverse 
problems in evolutionary biology including 
the levels of selection, adaptation and 
optimality models, kin selection, recognition 
systems, cooperation and altruism among 



72 



non-relatives, co-evolution, mutualism and 
parasitism, specialization, sex ratio evolu- 
tion, genetic conflicts, the evolution of sex, 
sexual selection, parental care, life history 
evolution, game theory and animal contests, 
group living and social organization in birds 
and mammals. 

BIO 429 four credits 
Aquaculture 

3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory 
Prerequisites: Biology core, BIO 314, BIO 
317, BIO 413, or BIO 416, or permission of 
instructor 

The study of aquaculture in a global context 
with emphasis upon a few selected forms to 
serve as working models. The course 
includes a consideration of both theoretical 
and practical aspects of aquaculture. 
Whenever possible, the laboratory work will 
emphasize hands-on experience in labora- 
tory and field aquaculture techniques. A 
student team approach will initiate, develop 
and/or maintain an aquaculture project. 

BIO 430 four credits 

Introduction to Biological Statistics 

3 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratory lecture, 2 
hours laboratory 

Prerequisite: MTH 101, 102 or equivalent, 
upper division biology standing 
Statistical concepts for the planning of 
experiments and the summarization of 
numerical data. Lectures emphasize 
probability, testing of hypothesis and the 
application of different, statistical concepts 
and problems. 

BIO 435 three credits 

Methods and Materials for Secondary 

School Teachers o f Biology 

Free elective credit only 
This course is designed for future teachers 
of biology. The course emphasizes modes of 
inquiry, methods of research and experi- 
mentation, and teaching strategies. MAT 
graduate students take this course as BIO 
635. 

BIO 437 three credits 
Evolutionary Biology 

3 hours lecture 
Prerequisites: Biology Core 
An overview of contemporary evolutionary 
biology with an emphasis on evolutionary 
processes. A non-introductory study of the 
interplay in time and space of genetic 
variety, ecological opportunity, and chance 
resulting in the evolutionary change in 
groups of organisms. 



BIO 438 one credit 
Evolutionary Biology Laboratory 

3 hours laboratory 
Prerequisites: Biology Core 
Corequisite: BIO 437 

Computer models of aspects of evolutionary 
processes will be designed. The models will 
selectively address problems in such areas as 
selection and polygenic inheritance, genetic 
drift, concerted evolution in multigene 
families, differentiation of protein-coding 
nucleotide sequences, molecular clocks, sex, 
stochastic processes in macroevolution and 
wild animal conservation genetics. A Biology 
of Populations-level (BIO 21 1) knowledge of 
BASIC programming is expected. 

BIO 440 two credits 
Research Project 

Hours will be arranged. 
An advanced research project in an 
advanced student's field of general interest 
conducted under the supervision of an 
appropriate staff member, in the form of 
independent research leading to the 
solution of a problem. 

BIO 441 two credits 
Research Project 

Continuation of BIO 440. 

BIO 442 three credits 
Advanced Genetics 

3 hours lecture 
Prerequisite: BIO 337 or 333 
A historical perspective of the concepts 
leading to the present theory of gene 
structure and function. The rigorous 
experimental evidence supporting this 
synthesis is reviewed by extensive reading 
and discussion of original publications. 
Particular emphasis is placed on papers 
published since 1940 and having direct 
bearing in elucidating the structure and 
function of the gene. 

BIO 452 three credits 
Virology 

Prerequisites: BIO 234, 244 or permission of 
instructor 

Nature of the virus as both an evolutionary 
entity and an obligatory cellular parasite. 
The structure and replicative strategies of 
representative viruses are studied. The ap- 
proach is molecular and stresses the inter- 
action of the viral genome with cytoplasmic 
and nuclear elements of the host cell. 

BIO 454 three credits 
Biology of Sharks 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor 

The morphology, physiology, behavior and 



evolutionary history of the most ancient 
group of living jawed fishes. The most 
unusual aspects of these fish, such as modes 
of reproduction, osmotic regulation, feeding 
mechanisms, and sensory physiology, will be 
stressed throughout. 

BIO 471 four credits O 
Marine Microbiology 

3 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratory lecture 
Taxonomy, physiology, and the role of 
heterotrophic microorganisms in the marine 
environment. The viruses will also be 
considered. Emphasis will be placed on the 
activities of the viruses, bacteria, and the 
fungi in the marine environment in the 
laboratory, exercises will be conducted on 
the methods of enumeration, detection of 
selected physiological groups, uptake and 
deputation of microorganisms by shellfish, 
marine biodeterioration, and the influence 
of environmental parameters on the growth 
and activities of marine microorganisms. 

BIO 495 three credits 
Independent Study 

Prerequisites: Upper-division standing; 
permission of instructor, department 
chairperson, and college dean 
Study under the supervision of a faculty 
member in an area not otherwise part of the 
discipline's course offerings. Terms and 
hours to be arranged. 

BIO 196, 296, 396, 496 three credits 
Directed Study 

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor, 
department chairperson, and college dean 
Study under the supervision of a faculty 
member in an area covered in a regular 
course not currently being offered. Terms 
and hours to be arranged. 



73 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Note: Some graduate courses may be open 
to undergraduates. Please consult your 
department chairperson. See the Graduate 
Catalogue for graduate general and program 
requirements. 



Graduate Courses in Biology 

BIO 510 four credits 
Marine Biotechnology 

Designed for persons who wish to partici- 
pate in research and development within 
biotechnology. This course features 
extensive hands-on laboratory work with 
current techniques and experimental 
approaches, integrated with an exposition 
of the principles underlying the techniques. 

BIO 511 one to four credits 
Graduate Seminar in Biology 

1 to 4 hours in varied formats 
Selected topics in Biology. In recent years 
these have included physiology and 
biochemistry of marine animals, evolutionary 
ecology, biology of marine mammals, 
morphometries and phylogenetic systemat- 
ics, and extremophiles. 

BIO 513 four credits 
Biology of Fishes 

See BIO 413. 

BIO 514 three credits 
Biology of Marine Mammals 

See Bio 414. 

BIO 516 four credits 
Biology of Algae 

(Formerly BIO 515) 
See BIO 41 6. 

BIO 518 three credits 
Biogeography 

Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing 
The study of present and past global 
distributions of plant and animal taxa in 
terrestrial, marine and freshwater habitats. 
Distributional patterns will be considered in 
relation to changes of the physical environ- 
ment over geological time, such as in global 
patterns of climate and resources. The 
evolution of recent association of organisms 
will also be examined in relation to 
ecological interactions between organisms, 
such as competition and predation. 

BIO 520 three credits 
Animal Behavior 

See BIO 420 

BIO 524 four credits 
Biology of Animal Parasites 

See BIO 424. 

BIO 525 one credit 
Graduate Student Seminar 

Prerequisite: Graduate status 



Each student will present a seminar related 
to the current semester's theme and based 
on several contemporary publications. 
Students are responsible for preparing a 
comprehensive bibliography, an abstract, 
and evaluations of peers' seminars. (One 
semester required; maximum two credits 
towards MS degree.) 

BIO 526 four credits 
Marine Benthic Ecology 

3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permis- 
sion of instructor 

An advanced overview of the structure and 
function of marine benthic communities 
from the intertidal zone to the deep sea, 
focusing on the power of experimental 
studies in elucidating ecological processes. 
Students will improve writing skills via 
preparation of short research proposals, a 
term paper, and through peer review of 
other students' work. Students will also lead 
discussions of journal articles, and plan, 
undertake, and present the results of a field 
biofouling study. 

BIO 527 three credits 
Molecular Biology 

See BIO 427. In addition, graduate students 
will present two typical reviews of current 
problems in molecular biology, both as 
written expositions and as interactive lecture 
presentations to other class members. Pre- 
and post-presentation interviews with the 
instructor are also required. 

BIO 528 four credits 
Evolutionary Ecology 

See BIO 428 

BIO 530 four credits 

Introduction to Biological Statistics 

See Bio 430 

BIO 531 four credits 
Advanced Ichthyology 

3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or consent 
of instructor 

Studies of fish phylogeny and classification, 
physiological problems peculiarly faced by 
fish, and aspects of fisheries' hydrography. 
The laboratory stresses independent work 
on the structure of fish populations, 
measurement of physiological parameters, 
and morphometric analysis. 

BIO 535 four credits 
Analysis of Biological Data 

3 hours lecture, 2 1-1/2 hour laboratory 
meetings 



Prerequisite: Introduction to biological 
statistics or equivalent 
The processing and analysis of biological, 
and especially ecological data. Topics 
include problems encountered in processing 
and handling of data, distributions and 
transformations, associations, computer 
simulations, parametric and non-parametric 
methods, and usefulness and limitations of 
multivariate methods. 

BIO 536 four credits 
Estuarine Ecology 

3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permis- 
sion of instructor 

An overview of biological, geological, 
physical, and chemical factors and processes 
important for organisms in estuarine 
environments. Emphasis is on contemporary 
research areas, including human impacts in 
estuaries. Students will design, perform, 
analyze and present the results of semester- 
long field projects characterizing a local salt- 
marsh ecosystem. 

BIO 537 three credits 
Evolutionary Biology 

See BIO 437. 

BIO 538 one credit 
Evolutionary Biology Laboratory 

See BIO 438. 

BIO 545 four credits 
Biological Oceanography 

3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory 
Prerequisite: BIO 316 or permission of the 
instructor 

The cycle of productivity in the marine 
environment and the physiological and 
morphological adaptations of plant, animal 
and bacterial populations within various 
oceanic regions. Interrelationships of the 
plankton, the nekton, and the benthos are 
stressed. 

BIO 546 four credits 
Biology of Marine Larvae 

3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory 
Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permis- 
sion of instructor 

An analysis of factors important for animals 
with complex life cycles, focusing on marine 
benthic invertebrates. Larval stages will be 
examined from a wide range of perspec- 
tives: ecological, evolutionary, oceanogra- 
phy, behavioral, physiological, and 
developmental. Students will hone verbal 
skills through presentations on species and 
topics of interest, and by leading class 



74 



Note: Some undergraduate senior-level 
courses are offered to graduate students 
under a corresponding 5xx number, with 
concurrent enrollment but additional work 
expectations. 



discussion. The laboratory will examine larval 
types and aquacultural techniques. 

BIO 552 three credits 
Virology 

See BIO 452. 

BIO 554 three credits 
Biology of Sharks 

See BIO 454 

BIO 571 four credits 
Marine Microbiology 

See BIO 471. 

BIO 593 one to three credits 
Graduate Research Project 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent 
of instructor 

Directed research for graduate students, 
hours by arrangement. Graded A-F. 

BIO 595 three credits 
Graduate Independent Study 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing; permission 
of instructor, graduate director, and college 
dean 

Study under the supervision of a faculty 
member in an area not otherwise part of the 
discipline's course offerings. Terms and 
hours to be arranged. 

BIO 596 three credits 
Graduate Directed Study 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing; permission 
of the instructor, graduate director, and 
college dean 

Study under the supervision of a faculty 
member in an area covered in a regular 
course not currently being offered. Terms 
and hours to be arranged. 

BIO 599 not to exceed ten credits 
Graduate Thesis 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and consent 
of instructor 

Terms and hours to be arranged. 
Graded A-F. 



Graduate Courses in Biology 
Education for Master of Arts in 
Teaching 

BIO 600 three credits 

Teaching Science in the Elementary 

School 

Not for credit in Biology MS program. 
Life, physical, and earth sciences that are 
involved in the development of scientific 
concepts and processes for elementary school 
science. A variety of natural phenomena, 
such as the plant, Brassica rapa, will be used 
as models to develop an inquiry and 
standards approach to the learning and 
teaching of science. 

BIO 635 three credits 

Methods and Materials for Secondary 

School Teachers o f Biology 

Not for credit in Biology MS program. 
Modes of inquiry, methods of research and 
experimentation, and teaching strategies. 
This course is designed for future teachers 
of biology. Graduate students enroll 
concurrently with students in BIO 435 but do 
additional work. 



75 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Chemistry and Biochemistry 



Undergraduate chemistry at UMass 
Dartmouth provides the student with the 
theoretical and practical expertise neces- 
sary for success in a wide variety of 
careers, consistent with the nature of 
chemistry as the central science. Chemists 
pursue a broad spectrum of rewarding 
professional careers ranging from produc- 
tion supervisors in the chemical or 
petroleum industries to physicians and 
patent attorneys. The Department is 
professionally accredited by the American 
Chemical Society and provides individual- 
ized attention and instruction usually 
encountered only in a small-college setting. 
Class sizes, especially at the junior and 
senior levels, are usually small, affording 
the student ample opportunities for 
interaction with the faculty. 

Teaching and research facilities of the 
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry 
are equipped with modern instrumentation. 
Recent acquisitions include a Bruker 
300MHz FT-NMR, a Bruker Vector 22 FT-IR 
Spectrometer, a Fluoromax-2 Fluorescence 
Spectrometer, a Microcal Microcalorimeter, 
a Midac M-2000 FT-IR with modified cell for 
protein analysis, a JASCO J- 1 75 Circular 
Dicroism Spectrometer, a Finnigan MAT 
4500 TSQ GC/MS/MS/DS Mass Spectrom- 
eter, a Finnigan MAT Isotope Ratio Mass 
Spectrometer, a Perkin-Elmer Atomic 
Absorption Spectrophotometer, an 
Instrumentation Lab. Flame AA/AE Spec- 
trometer, several high performance liquid 
chromatographs, several UV-V Visible 
spectrometers, a Sippican/NRL Optical Fiber- 
optic based Biosensor, a Cynosure SLL250 
Dye Laser Spectrometer, a Antek Nitrogen 
Analyzer, spectrofluorometers, Pharmacia 
Biotech Electrophoresis systems, a Jordan 
Scientific DNA Sequencer, a Amicon 
Dialyzer/Protein Concentrator, an BAS 
1 00B W3 1 1 3300 Electrochemical Work Station, 
an SLM steady state spectrofluorometer, an 
ISSK03 time-resolved spectrofluorometer. 
Waters HPLC systems with diode array 
detector, a CSC isothermal titration calorimeter, 
a Quanta 4000 capillary zone electrophore- 
sis system. These new instruments augment 
existing equipment, which includes infrared, 
UV-Visible, atomic absorption NMR and mass 
spectrometers, a differential scanning 
calorimeter, a capillary gas chromatography, 
preparative and analytical gas and liquid 
chromatographs, ultracentrifuges, a 
voltametric analyzer, scintillation counter, 
microtiter plate reader and washer, Parr 
hydrogenation apparatus, electroanalytical 



instrumentation and related apparatus for 
chemical and biochemical research. In 
addition, an electronics shop and electron 
microscope facilities are shared with other 
science departments. 

The Department, consistent with university 
policies, emphasizes computer use. The 
Department maintains a variety of comput- 
ers and accessories, including IBM and 
Macintosh microcomputers, terminals, 
plotters, and printers. The university 
maintains two Alpha 2 1 00s (Model 4/275) 
and an Alpha 2000 (Model 4/200) for library 
research and instructional use. These Alpha 
computers provide 64 gigabytes of disk 
storage, operate on an FDDI network, and 
are full partners in our campus network. 

The Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry 
at UMass Dartmouth also offers a graduate 
program leading to the degree of Master of 
Science in Chemistry. 

In conjunction with UMass Lowell, this 
department offers a joint PhD program. This 
program combines the outstanding resources of 
the graduate chemistry programs at Lowell and 
Dartmouth in a new partnership in excellence. 
The combined areas of research and profes- 
sional interest on the two campuses offer a rich 
range of opportunities for their advanced 
students. 

The Department also participates cooperatively 
in a doctoral program with the University of 
MassachusettsAmherst. Cooperative 
Dartmouth/Amherst Chemistry PhD students 
are supported by assistantships from UMass 
Dartmouth and pursue their principal 
research with UMass Dartmouth faculty while 
they are matriculated degree students of UMass 
Amherst. 



76 



Chemistry Major 

BS degree 



Faculty and Fields of Interest 



Alan H. Bates inorganic and 
organometallic chemistry 

Donald W. Boerth physical organic 
chemistry, theoretical chemistry 

William L. Dills, Jr. (chairperson) 

biochemistry of carbohydrates, metabolism 
and metabolic effects of carbohydrate 
analogues 

James A. Golen physical inorganic 
chemistry, synthesis and molecular 
spectroscopy of inorganic compounds 

David Z. Goodson physical chemistry, 
theoretical chemistry, environmental 
chemistry 

Gerald B. Hammond organic chemistry, 
organofluorine chemistry, natural products, 
ethnomedicinal chemistry 

Michele I. Mandrioli transition metal 
chemistry and magnetic resonance, 
computers in chemical education 

Catherine C. Neto inorganic/organic 
chemistry 

Vesa Nevalainen organic chemistry, 
catalytic and enantioselective reactions, 
synthetic and computational chemistry 

Emmanuel C.A. Ojadi chemical physics, 
laser spectroscopy and photochemistry 

Bal-Ram Singh physical biochemistry, 
structure-function relationships of biological 
macromolecules 

Timothy C. K. Su physical chemistry, ion- 
molecule reactions, mass spectrometry 

Dragic Vukomanovic analytical chemistry, 
electroanalytical chemistry, mass spectrom- 
etry, redux biochemistry 

Yuegang Zuo analytical, marine, and 
environmental chemistry 



Faculty Member with Chemistry and 
Biochemistry Joint Appointment 

Primary Department 

Mark A. Altabet 

School of Marine Sciences and Technology 



The programs for chemistry majors are 
designed to provide a solid foundation in 
the theoretical knowledge and practical 
laboratory skills necessary for a variety of 
professional careers. The programs prepare 
students for graduate study, medical or 
professional school, teaching, technical 
sales, technical writing, and industrial or 
government employment. 

In order to fit the needs of the individual 
student, the department offers to chemistry 
majors four different options. The courses 
prescribed for each of these options and the 
career opportunities available upon 
completion of each major are described 
below. 

Requirements for each option are shown on 
the following pages. 



77 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Chemistry Major 

Chemistry Option 



Requirements 



Chemistry Electives 



Semester Credits 



This option prepares students for employment in the chemical industry as chemical 
technicians, salespersons, purchasing agents, market analysts, production supervisors, etc., 
or in education as secondary school teachers. In addition, this option prepares students for 
graduate work in fields of chemistry, both pure, such as organic, inorganic, physical, 
analytical, or biochemistry, and applied, such as clinical, forensic, polymer, marine, or 
environmental chemistry. It may also be supplemented by graduate work in law, 
librarianship, or business, leading to a career as a research chemist, chemical patent 
attorney, librarian, science illustrator, technical writer, or chemical industry executive. A 
number of free electives are included to provide flexibility in the program to suit the 
student's special interest. 



First Year 




First 


Second 


CHM 151, 152 


Principles of Modern Chemistry 


3 


3 


CHM 165, 166 


Introduction to Experimentation 


2 


2 


CHM 172 


Intro, to Computer Applications for Chemists 


• 


1 


MTH 111,112 


Analytical Geometry and Calculus I, II 


4 


4 


ENL 101, 102 


Critical Writing and Reading I, II 


3 


3 




Humanities or Social Science' 


3 


3 






15 


16 


Second Year 








CHM 251, 252 


Organic Chemistry I, II 


3 


3 


CHM 265, 266 


Organic Chemistry Lab I, II 


2 


2 


MTH 211 


Analytical Geometry and Calculus III 


4 




CHM 272 


Descriptive Inorganic Chemistry 




4 


PHY 113, 114 


Classical Physics I, II 


4 


4 




Humanities, Social Science or Literature 


3 






Free Elective 




3 






16 


16 


Third Year 








CHM 305 


Modern Methods of Chemical Analysis 


3 




CHM 307 


Procedures of Chemical Analysis 


2 




CHM 315, 316 


Physical Chemistry I, II 


4 


4 


CHM 318 


Physical Chemistry Measurements I 




2 


CHM 422 


Computer/Math Methods in Physical Science^ 




3 




Humanities, Social Science or Literature 


3 


3 




Free Electives 


3 


3 






15 


15 


Fourth Year 








CHM 319 


Physical Chemistry Measurements II 


2 




CHM 401, 402 


Chemistry Seminar 


0.5 


0.5 




Humanities, Social Science or Literature^ 




6 




Advanced Chemistry Electives 2 


6 


3 




Free Electives 


6 


6 






14.5 


15.5 



CHM 352 Organic Preparations 

CHM 362 Introduction to Biochemistry 

CHM 411 Biochemistry I 

CHM 412 Biochemistry II 

CHM 414 Biochemistry Laboratory 

CHM 421 Organic Mechanisms 

CHM 426 Polymer Synthesis and 

Characterization 

CHM 431 Principles of Inorganic Chemistry 

CHM 432 Organic Analysis 

CHM 433 Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory 

CHM 442 Applied Spectroscopy 

CHM 491 Introduction to Research I 

CHM 492 Introduction to Research II 

CHM 510 Advanced Organic Chemistry 

CHM 51 1 Biochemistry I 

CHM 512 Biochemistry II 

CHM 520 Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 

CHM 521 Organic Mechanisms 

CHM 523 Thermodynamics 

CHM 525 Theoretical Organic Chemistry 

CHM 526 Polymer Synthesis and 

Characterization 

CHM 527 Electronic Structure of Atoms and 

Molecules 

CHM 529 Physical Biochemistry 

CHM 531 Chemical Kinetics 

CHM 533 Statistical Mechanics 

CHM 542 Quantum Chemistry 

CHM 544 Applied Spectroscopy 

CHM 550 Special Topics in Chemistry 

CHM 551 Electroanalytical Chemistry 

CHM 552 Instrumental Methods of Analysis 

CHM 553 Nuclear and Radiochemistry 

CHM 554 Molecular Spectra and Structure 

CHM 555 Methods of Chemical Separation 

CHM 556 Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy 

CHM 560 New Synthetic Methods 

CHM 562 Natural Products 



Departmental General Education 
Requirements 



Total credits: 123 

1. The Humanities/Social Sciences requirement of 18 credits must consist of at least 6 credits 
of Humanities and 6 credits of Social Sciences. Note that there is no foreign language 
requirement for the BS degree. Literature requirement: 6 credits. Literature must be in the 
English language. 

2. Students who wish to be certified by the American Chemical Society must include among 
their advanced chemistry electives CHM 552, CHM 431, and CHM 433. Students who elect to 
do senior research may count either CHM 491 or CHM 492 toward certification. Similarly, 
students may receive certification credit for one term of the 400-level biochemistry sequence. 
The ACS also recommends that some advanced course work be in polymer chemistry and 
biochemistry. 

3. Any of the following combinations of courses fulfill the CHM 422 requirement: MTH 212 
(or MTH 204) and PHY 234; MTH 2 1 2 (or MTH 204) and MTH 22 1 or 227; MTH 2 1 2 (or MTH 
204) and EGR 301 . Students who fulfill the requirement by taking one of these alternative 
course combinations may not receive additional credit for CHM 422/522. 



Students majoring in Chemistry will meet 
their departmentally-controlled General 
Education requirements as follows: 

Area E: Students should select a course from 
the published list of available courses that 
satisfy this requirement. 

Area I, Tier 2: Satisfied by CHM 172 or CHM 
422 

Area W, Tier 2: Satisfied by CHM 307, CHM 
318, orCHM 412 

Area O: Satisfied by CHM 401/402 and one 
additional course from : CHM 272, 431, or 
412 



78 



Chemistry Major 

Biochemistry Option 

Requirements 

Semester Credits 



Tho hin/~hom ictn/ nntinn for thp R^. Honroo in 
1 tier UIUCI Ifcrl 1 1IMI y UfJUUM IUI lllc oj Ucyictr 111 


Firct Yoar 
ill 9% i cal 




First 

11131 


Cornnrl 

JCLUI iu 


("hpmKtrv k Hp<;innpH fnr thn^p ctiiHpntc with 
v_iidiiouy id ucjiyiicu i ui li iudc jiuuci iij vvilii 


CHM 1 S 1 IS? 


Prinrinlp^ nf Mnrlprn ("hpmktrv 

i i 1 1 i c_ i kJ i c _> ui iviuuci i i \_i ici i iuu y 


3 


3 


dual interests in biology and chemistry. A 


CHM 165, 166 


Introduction to Experimentation \, II 


2 


2 


student receiving this degree will be qualified 


CHM 172 


Intro, to Computer Applications for Chemists 




1 


LU clllci IllUUbUy ab a DO UlUCNcf Illbl Ul, Willi 


MTH 111 1 1 9 

ivi i n iii, i i z. 


MNdiyilLdl OcUIIlcLiy dllU \-dlLUIUo 1, II 


A 
H 


A 


thp ^plprtinn of ^pv/pr^l prlur^tinn rour^P's 

11 IC jC IC\_ UUI 1 Ul jC VCIal CUU1.C11IUI 1 LUUI jCj, 


ENL 101 102 


Critical Writing and Reading 1, II 


3 


3 


\A/ill hp va/pII ni i^lifipH ^ hmh crhnnl cnpnrp 

Will UC WCII U,UdllllCU Oj CI IIIUII j^l IUUI ULIC.I IV_C 




Hi irnanitipc. nr ^nri^l ^ripnrp^ 
nui i icii iilicj ui julicii jlici iv.c 


a 

j 


3 


teacher. Students with th6 biochemistry 






15 


16 


nntmn \a/iII hp ^hlp tn pntpr nrpHn^tP <;rhnnl 

UUUUII Will UC aUlC LU CIILCI Ljl aUUaltr jL_l IUUI 










in any of the areas of chemistry, biochemis- 


CHM 251, 252 


Organic Chemistry 1, II 


3 


3 


tn./ mnlon Mar hinlnnw nh^rmarnlnnw 
li y, it luicLuidi uiuiuy y , ui idi 1 1 idLUiuy y, 


\^mvi iujj z.uu 


Orn^nir f~hpmictn/ 1 ^h 1 
wiydiiiL v_i ici i ii j li y lju i, ii 


7 
& 


i 


nutrition or other life science programs. The 


MTH211 


Analytical Geometry and Calculus III 


4 




fnllnAA/inn nirrinihim rnnfnrmc tn th^t 

lUIIUWIIiy LU 1 1 lt_U 1 U 1 1 1 LUIIIUIIII3 LU LllaL 


BIO 234 


Rinlnnv nf f~ p»| Ic ^ 
Diuiuyy ui ciij 


3 




rprnmmpnHpH hv thp Amprir^n ^nriptv of 

ICLUMItltCIIUCU \Jy LI IC AAI 1 IC 1 ILa 1 1 _}UV_IC Ly U 1 


BIO 244 


Rinlnnv nf CpIK 1 ^h^ 
uiuiuyy ui \_ ci i j t—o u 


1 




Rinr"hpmKtr\/ and Mnlprulair Rinlnnv fnr ja.n 
o iuli ici 1 1 13 li y aim. iviuicLuiai Diuiuyy iui 01 1 


PHY 113 114 

r i i i i i j ( i it 


ria^iral Phv<;ir<; 1 II 
v_ioo3>ii_ai r i ly jil_j i, \\ 


4 


4 


i inrlprnr^Hi i^tp Honr&o in hmrhpmKtn/ 

U 1 IUCI y 1 aUUa LC UCyiCC III UIUL1 ICI 1 MjLI y. 


Third Year 


Hi im^nitipc, ^nri^l ^ripnrp nr 1 itpr^ti irp^#3 

nUIIIGIIILICj, JUv_ICIIJL_ICIItwCUI l_l LCI O. LU 1 C * 


17 


5 
15 




CHM 315, 316 


Physical Chemistry I, II 


4 


4 




v_ n IVI H 1 1 , 4 1 i 


DiUi-ficiiiidiry i, n 




j 




CHM 414 

1 1 1 VI tit 


RinrhpmKtrv I phnr^tnrv^ 

UlULMCMlliLiy LOUUI a LUI y 




3 




CHM 305 


Modern Methods of Chemical Analysis 


3 






CHM 307 


Procedures of Chemical Analysis 
Free Elective 


2 


3 






Humanities, Social Science or Literature"' 


3 
15 


3 
16 




Fourth Year 










CHM 529 


Physical Biochemistry 


3 






CHM 401, 402 


Chemistry Seminar 


0.5 


0.5 






Biology/Chemistry Electives 


6 


3 






Humanities, Social Science or Literature 1 


3 


3 






Free Electives 


3 
15.5 


6 
12.5 


Biology Electives 










(2 required)^ 




Total credits: 


122 



BIO 321 General Microbiology 
BIO 327 Molecular Biology 
BIO 333, 334 General Genetics 
BIO 41 1 Proseminar: Current Topics in 
Biology 

BIO 419 Biological Scanning Electron 

Microscopy 
BIO 421 Developmental Biology 
BIO 460 Transmission Electron Microscopy 

Chemistry Electives 

(1 required) 

CHM 318 Physical Chemistry 

Measurements I 
CHM 319 Physical Chemistry 

Measurements II 
CHM 421 Organic Mechanisms 
CHM 422 Computer/Math Methods in 

Physical Science 
CHM 431 , 433 Inorganic Chemistry 
CHM 442 Applied Spectroscopy 
CHM 552 Instrumental Methods of Analysis 
CHM 555 Methods of Chemical Separation 



1. The Humanities/Social Sciences requirement of 18 credits must consist of at least 6 credits 
of Humanities and 6 credits of Social Sciences. Note that there is no separate foreign language 
requirement for the BS degree. It is strongly recommended that the humanities requirement be 
satisfied by taking at least 1 and preferably 2 years of French or German. Literature require- 
ment: 6 credits. 



2. Students with weak backgrounds in biology may need to take BIO 121, 1 22, 
before attempting subsequent biology courses. 



31, 132 



3. Students who have not definitely decided on the biochemistry option may instead take 
CHM 272 in order to retain the option of choosing the conventional chemistry option. If 
students remain in the Biochemistry Option, then CHM 272 would become a free elective. 

4. Students who do not contemplate doing undergraduate research (CHM 491-492) may 
postpone CHM 414 until their senior year. 



5. Other advanced biology or chemistry courses may be substituted with the prior written 
permission of the biochemistry advisor. 



79 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Chemistry Major 

Environmental Chemistry Option 



Requirements 



Semester Credits 



The Environmental Chemistry Option is designed for students who are interested in the 
interface of chemistry and science of the environment. Students completing the Environmental 
Chemistry Option are well prepared for a variety of post baccalaureate careers. Typical career 
objectives might include those that entail environmental monitoring and analysis, regulatory 
monitoring and enforcement, industrial compliance and others. In addition, a student who 
selects the Environmental Chemistry Option is well prepared for graduate studies in chemistry, 
environmental science, marine science, environmental chemistry and other areas. The variety 
of environment-related course electives allows students to select a program of study that fits 
their interests, while the required chemistry courses ensure that they develop expertise within 
the fundamental areas of chemistry. 



First Year 




First 


Second 


CHM 151, 152 


Principles of Modern Chemistry I, II 


3 


3 


CHM 165, 166 


Introduction to Experimentation I, II 


2 


2 


CHM 172 


Intro, to Computer Applications for Chemists 




1 


MTH 111, 112 


Analytical Geometry and Calculus I, II 


4 


4 


ENL 101, 102 


Critical Writing and Reading \, II 


3 


3 




Humanities or Social Science'' 


3 


3 






15 


16 


Second Year 








CHM 251, 252 


Organic Chemistry I, II 


3 


3 


CHM 265, 266 


Organic Chemistry Lab I, II 


2 


2 


CHM 272 


Descriptive Inorganic Chemistry 




4 


MTH 21 1 


Analytical Geometry and Calculus III 


4 




BIO 234 


Biology of Cells^ 


3 




PHY 113, 1 14 


Classical Physics I, II 


4 


4 




Humanities, Social Science or Literature 




3 






16 


16 


Third Year 








CHM 315, 316 


Physical Chemistry I, II 


4 


4 


CHM 355 


Aquatic Environmental Chemistry 


3 




CHM 356 


Atmospheric/Terrestial Environmental Chemistry 




3 


CHM 318 


Physical Chemistry Measurements I 




2 


CHM 305 


Modern Methods of Chemical Analysis 


3 




CHM 307 


Procedures of Chemical Analysis 


2 






Free Elective 




3 




Humanities, Social Science or Literature 


3 


3 






15 


15 


Fourth Year 








CHM 401, 402 


Chemistry Seminar 


0.5 


0.5 


CHM 350 


Chemical Oceanography 


3 






Environment Related Course Elective 


3 


3 




Advanced Chemistry Elective^ 


3 


3 




Humanities, Social Science or Literature 


6 


3 




Free Electives 




6 






15.5 


15.5 



Environment Related Electives 

An * indicates that this course will also meet 
College of Arts and Sciences Humanities/ 
Social Sciences requirements. Students 
should note that these courses may meet 
multiple requirements (College, General 
Education or Departmental) although a total 
of 124 credits (minimum) will still be 
required for graduation. 

BIO 316 Descriptive Oceanography 

ECO 337 Environmental Economics* 

PHL 320 Philosophy of Science* 

PHY 351 Physics of the Environment I 

PHY 352 Physics of the Environment II 

PSC 345 Politics of Public Health* 

PSC 347 Environmental Law* 

PSC 348 Marine Policy and Law* 

TES 350 Environmental Science and 

Industry Compliance 

BIO 419 Biological Scanning Electron 

Microscopy 

BIO 471 Marine Microbiology 

ECO 472 Coastal Resource Economics* 

Advanced Chemistry Electives 

Recommended for the Environmental 
Chemistry Option 

CHM 319 Physical Chemistry 

Measurements II 
CHM 411 Biochemistry I 
CHM 412 Biochemistry II 
CHM 422 Computer/Math Methods in 

Physical Science 
CHM 431 Principles of Inorganic Chemistry 
CHM 433 Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory 
CHM 491, 492 Introduction to Research I, II 
CHM 531 Chemical Kinetics 
CHM 544 Applied Spectroscopy 
CHM 550 Special Topics 
CHM 551 Electroanalytical Chemistry 
CHM 552 Instrumental Methods of Analysis 
CHM 553 Nuclear and Radiochemistry 
CHM 555 Methods of Chemical Separation 
CHM 562 Natural Products 



Total credits: 



124 



1. The Humanities/Social Sciences requirement of 18 credits must consist of at least 6 credits 
of Humanities and 6 credits of Social Sciences. Note that there is no separate foreign language 
requirement for the BS degree. The College of Arts and Sciences Literature requirement is 6 
credits in the English language beyond ENL 101 and 102. Courses taken to meet College 
requirements may also meet environment related course elective requirements and/or General 
Education requirements. 

2. Students with weak backgrounds in biology may need to take BIO 121, 122, 131, 132 
before attempting subsequent biology courses. 



3. Students who wish to be certified by the American Chemical Society must include among 
their advanced chemistry electives CHM 319, CHM 431, CHM 433, CHM 41 1 and CHM 552. 



80 



Chemistry Major 

Premedical Option 

Requirements 



Semester Credits 


This option offers distinct advantages in 


First Year 




First 


Second 


efficiency, versatility, and rigor in preparation 










for students interested in further studies in a 


CHM 151, 152 


Principles of Modern Chemistry 


3 


3 


medical, dental, optometric, podiatric, 


CHM 165, 166 


Introduction to Experimentation 


2 


2 


osteopathic, or veterinary school. Programs 


CHM 172 


Intro, to Computer Applications for Chemists 




1 


for pre-med students should have the 


MTH 111,112 


Analytical Geometry and Calculus I, II 


4 


4 


approval of Dr. Alan Bates, co-chairperson of 


ENL 101, 102 


Critical Writing and Reading I, II 


3 


3 


the Pre-medical Advisory Committee. 




Humanities, Social Sciences, or Literature 1, 5 


3 


3 


Premedical chemistry majors are certified for 






15 


16 


graduation by the Chemistry Department, 


Second Year 








just as are conventional majors. 


CHM 251, 252 


Organic Chemistry I, II 


3 


3 




CHM 265, 266 


Organic Chemistry Lab I, II 


2 


2 


Separately, premedical advising is offered for 


CHM 272 


Descriptive Inorganic Chemistry 




4 


students in any major at UMass Dartmouth 


MTH 2 1 1 


Analytical Geometry and Calculus III 


4 




(see program description elsewhere in this 


PHY 113, 114 


Classical Physics I, II 


4 


4 


Catalogue). 


BIO 234 


Biology of Cells 1 


3 






BIO 244 


Biology of Cells Lab 


1 




A wide variety of majors is appropriate for 


BIO 


Biology Elective^ 




3 or 4 


those intending to attend medical or 




Humanities, Social Sciences, or Literature 




3 


veterinary school, with appropriate advising. 


Third Year 




17 


19 or 20 




CHM 305 


Modern Methods of Chemical Analysis 


3 






CHM 307 


Procedures of Chemical Analysis 


2 






CHM 315, 316 


Physical Chemistry I, II 


4 


4 




CHM 318 


Physical Chemistry Measurements I 




2 




BIO 333 


General Genetics 
Science Elective^ 


4 


3 or 4 






Humanities, Social Sciences, or Literature 


3 
16 


6 

15 or 16 




Fourth Year 










CHM 401, 402 


Chemistry Seminar 


0.5 


0.5 




CHM 41 1 


Biochemistry I 


3 








Humanities, Social Sciences, or Literature 


3 


3 






Free Electives^ 


6 
12.5 


9 
12.5 



Total credits: 123-125 



1. Students with weak backgrounds in biology may need to take Biology of Organisms (BIO 
121, 122, 131, 132) before attempting subsequent biology courses. Therefore, these two H/SS 
courses may need to be moved to another year or to a summer session. 

2. Appropriate biology electives are BIO 320 (Embryology) or BIO 370 (Animal Physiology). 

3. Appropriate electives would be CHM 422 (Computer and Mathematical Methods in 
Physical Science), CHM 442 (Applied Spectroscopy), CHM 552 (Instrumental Methods of 
Analysis), BIO 327 (Molecular Biology) or BIO 421 (Developmental Biology). 

4. Appropriate electives would be CHM 412 (Biochemistry II), CHM 431 (Principles of 
Inorganic Chemistry) or CHM 491-492 (Introduction to Research I, II). 

5. The Humanities/Social Sciences requirement of 18 credits must consist of at least 6 credits 
of Humanities and 6 credits of Social Sciences. Note that there is no separate foreign language 
requirement for the BS degree. Literature requirement: 6 credits. 



81 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Chemistry Major 

BS-MS Option 



Requirements 



Semester Credits 



This option offers advantages to capable 
students who are willing to devote their 
summers to furthering their education. For 
those going on to graduate work, 
it provides exposure to graduate courses and 
research, making the transition from BS to 
PhD level performance easier. For those 
going into teaching or industry, it yields a 
significant financial advantage. 



1. Humanities/Social Sciences requirement of 
1 8 credits must consist of at least 6 credits of 
Humanities and 6 credits of Social Sciences. 
Literature requirement: 6 credits. 

2. Should a student desire to lighten his/her 
course load in years three and four, 
Humanities/Social Sciences electives could be 
taken during Summer 2. 

3. The student should select the BS-MS 
option no later than the beginning of the 
fourth semester. Entrance into the program 
requires approval of the Chemistry Faculty. 
The student in the program may elect to 
terminate the program after the seventh 
semester with the completion of the BS 
requirements. 

4. Students who select the BS-MS program 
are eligible for teaching assistantships after 
completing the requirements for the BS 
degree (after the seventh semester) and for 
summer stipends during the fourth and fifth 
summers. 



First Year 

CHM 151, 152 
CHM 165, 166 
CHM 172 
MTH 111,112 
ENL 101, 102 



Second Year 

CHM 251, 252 
CHM 265, 266 
MTH 211 
CHM 272 
PHY 113, 114 



Third Year 

CHM 305 
CHM 307 
CHM 315, 316 
CHM 318 
CHM 422 
CHM 402 



CHM 492 
Summer 3 



Fourth Year 

CHM 401 
CHM 319 

CHM 491 



Summer 4 

Fifth Year 

CHM 600 
CHM 

Summer 5 



Principles of Modern Chemistry 
Introduction to Experimentation 
Intro, to Computer Applications for Chemists 
Analytical Geometry and Calculus I, II 
Critical Writing and Reading I, II 
Humanities, Social Science or Literature 



Organic Chemistry I, II 
Organic Chemistry Lab I, II 
Analytical Geometry and Calculus III 
Descriptive Inorganic Chemistry 
Physics I, II 

Humanities, Social Science or Literature 1 
Free Elective 



Modern Methods of Chemical Analysis 

Procedures of Chemical Analysis 

Physical Chemistry I, II 

Physical Chemistry Measurements I 

Computer/Math Methods in Physical Science 

Chemistry Seminar 

Humanities, Social Science or Literature 
Free Electives 
Introduction to Research 

Research 
Free Elective 



Chemistry Seminar 

Physical Chemistry Measurements II 

Advanced Chemistry Electives 

Introduction to Research 

Humanities, Social Science or Literature 

Free Elective 

Research 



Thesis Research 

Advanced Chemistry Electives 



First 

3 
2 

4 
3 
3 
15 

3 
2 
4 

4 

3 

16 

3 
2 
4 



6 
3 

18 



0.5 
2 
6 
3 
3 
3 
17.5 



6 
6 
12 



Second 

3 
2 
1 
4 
3 
3 
16 

3 
2 

4 
4 
3 
3 
19 



4 

2 
3 

0.5 
3 
3 
3 

18 .5 

3 
3 



Research and completion of thesis 



Total credits: 



6 
3 
9 

153 



5. At least 12 credits of the chemistry courses 
that count toward the MS degree must be at 
the 500 level. 

6. This program may be applied to the 
Biochemistry Option with appropriate 
modifications. 



7. Students in the BS-MS program must have 
and maintain a chemistry GPA of at least 
3.00 and an overall GPA of 2.75. 



82 



Chemistry and Biochemistry Minors Requirements 



Degree candidates who have a grade point 
average of at least 2.5 in the 100- and 200- 
level chemistry courses may request 
admission to the Chemistry or Biochemistry 
minors. This request must be approved by the 
Department Chairperson. A 2.0 grade point 
average in the courses listed will be required 
for completion of the minor. 



CHM 263, 264 


Bio-Organic Chemistry Laboratory I & II OR 


2-4 


CHM 265, 266 


Organic Chemistry Laboratory I & II 




CHM 305 


Modern Methods of Chemical Analysis 


3 


CHM 307 


Procedures of Chemical Analysis Laboratory 


2 


CHM 315 


Physical Chemistry I OR 


4 


CHM 316 


Physical Chemistry II (by permission) 





Total 27-29 



Chemistry Minor Credits 

CHM 151, 152 Principles of Modern Chemistry I & II 6 

CHM 161, 162, 166 Introduction to Applied Chemistry I & II and 4 

Introduction to Experimentation II OR 
CHM 165, 166 Introduction to Experimentation I & II 

CHM 251 , 252 Organic Chemistry I & II 6 



Biochemistry Minor Credits 



CHM 151, 152 


Principles of Modern Chemistry I & II 




6 


CHM 161, 162,166 
CHM 165, 166 


Introduction to Applied Chemistry I & I 
Introduction to Experimentation II OR 
Introduction to Experimentation I & II 


I and 


4 


CHM 251, 252 


Organic Chemistry I & II 




6 


CHM 263, 264 
CHM 265, 266 


Bio-Organic Chemistry Laboratory I & I 
Organic Chemistry Laboratory I & II 


I OR 


2-4 


CHM 305 
CHM 315 


Modern Methods of Chemical Analysis OR 
Physical Chemistry I* 


3 or 4 


CHM 41 1, 412 


Biochemistry I & II 




6 



Total 27-30 

* CHM 316, Physical Chemistry II, may be substituted for CHM 315, with permission. 



83 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Combined Chemistry Major — Business Administration Minor 



Requirements 

Semester Credits 



This arrangement of courses is designed for the student who combines an interest in Chemistry 
with career goals in the business world. It is designed to enable the student to fulfill all 
requirements for the Chemistry Major and the Business Minor within the standard four-year 
curriculum. The student must be aware that deviations from the recommended course 
schedule will ensure that additional time in residence will be required. A comparable track is 
possible for the Biochemistry Option by substituting the appropriate courses. 



First Year 




First 


Second 


CHM 151, 152 


Principles of Modern Chemistry I, II 


3 


3 


CHM 165, 166 


Introduction to Experimentation 


2 


2 


CHM 172 


Intro, to Computer Applications for Chemists 






MTH 111,112 


Analytical Geometry and Calculus I, II 


4 


4 


ENL 101, 102 


Critical Writing and Reading I, II 


3 


3 


ECO 231 


Economics I 




3 




Humanities, Social Sciences, or Literature Elective 


3 








15 


16 


Second Year 








CHM 251, 252 


Organic Chemistry I, II 


3 


3 


CHM 265, 266 


Organic Chemistry Lab I, II 


2 


2 


CHM 272 


Descriptive Inorganic Chemistry 




4 


MTH 211 


Analytical Geometry and Calculus III 


4 




PHY 113, 114 


Classical Physics I, II 


4 


4 


ACT 211 


Principles of Accounting I 




3 




Humanities, Social Sciences, or Literature Elective 


3 








16 


16 


Third Year 








CHM 305 


Modern Methods of Chemical Analysis 


3 




CHM 307 


Procedures of Chemical Analysis 


2 




CHM 315, 316 


Physical Chemistry I, II 


4 


4 


CHM 318 


Physical Chemistry Measurements I 




2 


CHM 422 


Computer/Math Methods in Physical Science 




3 


MKT 211 


Principles of Marketing 


3 




MGT311 


Organizational Behavior 




3 




Humanities, Social Sciences, or Literature Electives 


3 


3 






15 


15 


Fourth Year 








CHM 319 


Physical Chemistry Measurements II 


2 




CHM 401, 402 


Chemistry Seminar 


0.5 


0. 




Advanced Chemistry Electives 


3 


6 




Humanities, Social Sciences, Literature or 








Business Electives 


9 


9 



14.5 15.5 



Total credits: 123 



Business Minor Requirements: ECO 231, ACT 211, MKT 21 1, and MGT 31 1 are required 
courses for the Business Minor. ECO 231 also satisfies one of the College of Arts and Sciences 
Social Sciences requirements. Three courses (9 credits) from among ACT 212, BIS 315, FIN 312, 
MGT 312, MGT 365, MGT 346, MGT 347 are required to complete the Business Minor. The 
University requirements for a minor specify that 9 credits must be at the 300-level or above. 
Note that BIS 315, FIN 312, and MGT 346 have additional prerequisites. 

College of Arts and Sciences Requirements: Humanities/Social Science Requirements: 5 courses 
(besides ECO 231) which must include 2 humanities and one more social science course. 
Literature requirements: two courses. 

General Education Requirements: Students should carefully plan their programs with their 
advisor to ensure that their courses selected for the Arts and Sciences requirements will also 
satisfy the appropriate General Education Requirements. 



84 



Gen Ed note: Chemistry courses satisfy the 
Natural Science and Technology require- 
ment. Those marked S below are appropri- 
ate for non-science/engineering majors. 

Chemistry and Biochemistry Courses 



CHM 100 four administrative credits* 
Preparation for College Chemistry 

2 hours lecture, 1 hour recitation, 

2 hours laboratory 

Helps students overcome science, math- 
ematics, and reasoning difficulties so that 
they may be successful in their required 
general chemistry course. The lecture and 
the laboratory are integrated to ensure that 
students have direct hands-on experience 
with most of the abstract ideas covered in 
the lecture. 

CHM 101 three credits S 
General Chemistry I 

4 hours lecture and recitation 
Pre- or Corequisite: MTH 101 
An introduction to the fundamental 
chemical laws and theories covering 
inorganic and organic chemistry and 
biochemistry with some descriptive 
chemistry. For non-science majors, nurses 
and technologists. 

CHM 102 three credits S 
General Chemistry II 

4 hours lecture and recitation 
Prerequisite: At least a C- in CHM 101 
Continuation of CHM 101. 

CHM 130 three credits S 
Chemistry and the Environment 

3 hours lecture 

Available to anyone in the university, this 
course provides substantial treatment, with 
demonstrations, of the chemistry involved in 
consumer concerns (food additives, 
medicines, detergents, etc.), air and water 
pollution, elementary biochemistry, and the 
general question of power generation and 
utilization (fuel cells, solar energy conver- 
sion, nuclear energy, etc.). No knowledge 
of chemistry is assumed, but it is hoped the 
student will have had high school chemistry 
or its equivalent. 

CHM 131 three credits S 
Environmental Issues from a Chemical 
Perspective 

3 hours lecture 

Examines some of the major environmental 
problems facing society and the knowledge 
of chemistry needed to comprehend the 
problem and evaluate possible solutions. 
The course is available to anyone in the 
university. It will cover issues associated with 
chemical industry such as hazardous waste 



* Administrative credits do not count 
towards the total required for graduation. 



management and pesticide use as well as 
the risks and benefits of living in a chemical 
world. 

CHM 132 three credits S 
Chemistry in Nutrition and Health 

3 hours lecture 

Nutrition and health issues facing people 
today and the chemistry needed to 
understand them. Topics to be discussed 
include health efforts of toxic substances, 
the science of proper diet, and some of the 
biochemistry needed to understand diseases 
such as cancer and AIDS. 

CHM 151 three credits S 
Principles of Modern Chemistry I 

4 hours lecture and recitation 
Prerequisites: High school chemistry and 
algebra 

Corequisite: MTH 131 or 1 1 1 
Physical and chemical principles pertaining 
to the structure of chemical species and the 
nature, extent, and rates of chemical 
reactions. The details of stoichiometry, 
energy changes associated with chemical 
reactions, atomic and molecular structure, 
chemical bonding, and the phenomenon of 
chemical periodicity are emphasized and 
discussed in light of modern scientific 
theories. For science and engineering 
majors. Honors sections are offered. 

CHM 152 three credits S 
Principles of Modern Chemistry II 

4 hours lecture and recitation 
Prerequisite: At least a C- in CHM 151 
A continuation of CHM 151. The details of 
the behavior of solids, liquids, & gases, the 
types of intermolecular forces, colligative 
properties, gaseous equilibrium, aqueous 
equilibrium, thermodynamics, electrochem- 
istry, kinetics, and nuclear chemistry are 
emphasized and discussed in light of 
modern scientific theories. For science and 
engineering majors. Honors sections are 
offered. 

CHM 153 three credits S 

Principles of Modern Chemistry for 

Engineers 

Combined lecture/laboratory format 
Prerequisites: High school chemistry and 
algebra 

Corequisite: MTH 1 13 or 1 1 1 
Physical and chemical principles pertaining to 
the structure of chemical species and the 
nature, extent and rates of chemical 
reactions. The details of stoichiometry, 
energy changes associated with chemical 
reactions, atomic and molecular structure, 
chemical bonding, chemical periodicity, and 



the application to materials are emphasized 
and explored in an interactive format. 

CHM 161 one credit 

Introduction to Applied Chemistry I 

1 hour lecture, 2 hours laboratory 
Prerequisites: High school chemistry (with 
laboratory) is strongly recommended. 
Corequisite: CHM 151 
An introduction to chemical laboratory 
techniques and methods with emphasis on 
preparation, purification, and identification 
of compounds, elemental analysis, reaction 
stoichiometry, chemical ionization, 
thermochemistry, spectrophotometric 
techniques, and selective descriptive 
inorganic chemistry. Most experiments 
involve the identification of unknowns and 
statistical analysis of data. The experiments 
in CHM 161 parallel the topics covered in 
CHM 1 51 . A written laboratory report 
summarizing the procedure and results for 
each experiment is required. For science and 
engineering majors. Honors sections are 
offered. 

CHM 162 one credit 

Introduction to Applied Chemistry II 

1 hour lecture, 2 hours laboratory 
Prerequisites: At least a C- in CHM 151, 161 
Corequisite: CHM 152 

A continuation of CHM 161 with emphasis 
on molecular weight determination 
techniques, colligative properties, qualitative 
analysis, acid-base chemistry, properties of 
buffer solutions, chromatographic tech- 
niques, kinetics, solubility constant 
determination, and electrochemistry. Most 
experiments involve the identification of 
unknowns and statistical analysis of data. 
The experiments in CHM 162 parallel the 
topics covered in CHM 1 52. A written 
laboratory report summarizing the proce- 
dure and results for each experiment is 
required. For science and engineering 
majors. Honors sections are offered. 

CHM 165 two credits 
Introduction to Experimentation I 

2 hours lecture, 4 hours laboratory 
Pre- or Corequisite: CHM 151 
Corequisite: MTH 131 or MTH 1 1 1 
Laboratory for chemistry and textile 
chemistry majors. An introduction to the 
basic techniques, methods and theory of 
chemical experimentation, and the 
recording, analysis, interpretation and 
reporting of experimental results, based on 
qualitative and quantitative chemical 
procedures. Skills of professional quality, 
needed to use apparatus for the accurate 
measurement of mass, volume, color 



85 



College of Arts and Sciences 



intensity, etc., will be developed. 

CHM 166 two credits 
Introduction to Experimentation II 

2 hours lecture, 4 hours laboratory 
Prerequisite: At least a C- in CHM 165 
Pre- or Corequisite: CHM 1 52 
Continuation of CHM 165. 

CHM 167 one credit 
Introduction to Statistics for the 
Chemistry Lab 

2 hours lecture and recitation 
Statistics at an introductory level as applied 
to experiments in a college freshman level 
chemistry laboratory. Topics covered include 
the nature of distributions of data, 
histograms, basic statistical calculations, the 
normal distribution, t-distributions, statistical 
tests appropriate for small samples of data 
criteria for rejection of data, analysis of data 
and reporting of result and an introduction 
to propagation of errors. Credit cannot be 
received for both CHM 165 and CHM 167. 

CHM 172 one credit 

Introduction to Computer Applications 
for Chemists 

1 hour lecture, 1 hour recitation 
Prerequisites: At least a C- in CHM 151, 165 
Corequisites: CHM 152, 166 
Approaches to chemistry problem-solving 
using microcomputers. Spreadsheets and 
other commonly-available applications will be 
used to study mathematical concepts related 
to chemistry, to solve problems on topics 
from the chemistry majors' lecture and lab 
courses, and to analyze data obtained in the 
lab. Students also will be taught to search 
for chemical information on the World Wide 
Web. 

CHM 251 three credits 
Organic Chemistry I 

4 hours lecture and recitation 
Prerequisite: At least a C- in CHM 1 52 
A survey of the chemistry of carbon 
compounds and introduction to the basic 
principles of organic chemistry. 

CHM 252 three credits 
Organic Chemistry II 

4 hours lecture and recitation 
Prerequisite: At least a C- in CHM 251 
Continuation of CHM 251 . 

CHM 263 one credit 

Bio-organic Chemistry Laboratory I 

1 hour lecture, 3 hours laboratory 
Prerequisites: At least a C- in CHM 1 52, 1 62 
Corequisite: CHM 251 

The synthesis of organic compounds and an 



introduction to the organic methods of 
separation, purification and identification. 
This course is coordinated with CHM 251 
and is designed for biology and medical 
laboratory science majors. 

CHM 264 one credit 

Bio-organic Chemistry Laboratory II 

1 hour lecture, 3 hours laboratory 
Prerequisites At least a C- in CHM 251 , 263 
Corequisite: CHM 252 
Continuation of CHM 263. 

CHM 265 two credits 

Organic Chemistry Laboratory I 

1 hour lecture, 3 hours laboratory 
Prerequisites: At least a C- in CHM 152, 
166; or CHM 162 

The synthesis of organic compounds and an 
introduction to the organic methods of 
separation, purification and identification. 
This course is coordinated with CHM 251 
and is designed for chemistry and textile 
chemistry majors. 

CHM 266 two credits 

Organic Chemistry Laboratory II 

1 hour lecture, 3 hours laboratory 
Prerequisites: At least a C- in CHM 251, 265 
Corequisite: CHM 252 

Continuation of CHM 265. 

CHM 272 four credits 
Descriptive Inorganic Chemistry 

2 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory 
Prerequisites: At least a C- in CHM 1 52, 1 66 
A survey of the preparations and reactions 
of selected representative elements and 
transition metals. For each element the 
following points are treated: physical and 
chemical properties of the element; 
occurrence of the element in nature, its 
extraction and uses; important compounds 
and their uses, including industrial pro- 
cesses. An introduction to transition metal 
complexes. An advanced treatment of ionic 
equilibria including precipitation and 
complex-formation reactions. 

CHM 298 one to six credits 
Experiential Learning 

Prerequisites: At least sophomore standing; 
permission of the instructor, department 
chairperson, and college dean 
Work experience at an elective level 
supervised for academic credit by a faculty 
member in an appropriate academic field. 
Conditions and hours to be arranged. 
Graded CR/NC. For specific procedures and 
regulations, see section of catalogue on 
Other Learning Experiences. 



CHM 305 three credits 

Modern Methods of Chemical Analysis 

3 hours lecture 

Prerequisites: At least a C- in CHM 252, 
266, 166; recommended: CHM 272 
Introduction to chemical and instrumental 
analytical techniques. The theory of 
neutralization reactions in aqueous and 
nonaqueous systems. Oxidation-reduction 
and complex formation equilibria. Basic 
theory of electronic circuitry. Introduction to 
electrochemical methods. Introduction to 
chromatographic and spectrophotometry 
techniques. 

CHM 307 two credits 
Procedures of Chemical Analysis 

1 hour lecture, 4 hours laboratory 
Corequisite: CHM 305 
Laboratory experimentation designed to 
develop the techniques and illustrate 
applications of analytical procedures to the 
solution of chemical problems. 

CHM 315 four credits 
Physical Chemistry I 

4 hours lecture, 1 hour recitation 
Prerequisites: At least a C- in CHM 1 52, 
MTH 211, two semesters of college physics 
An introduction to the theoretical principles 
underlying chemical phenomena; applica- 
tions of thermodynamics to chemical 
phenomena. 

CHM 316 four credits 
Physical Chemistry II 

4 hours lecture, 1 hour recitation 
Prerequisite: At least a C- in CHM 315 
An introduction to quantum mechanics, 
symmetry, spectroscopy, chemical kinetics 
and transport processes. 

CHM 318 two credits 

Physical Chemical Measurements I 

1 hour lecture, 4 hours laboratory 
Prerequisites: At least a C- in CHM 305, 
307, 315 

Corequisite: CHM 316 
Experiments in physical chemistry designed 
to test established theoretical principles 
which have been introduced in CHM 315 
and 316. The experiments provide the 
student with basic experience in obtaining 
precise physical measurements of chemical 
interest. 

CHM 319 two credits 

Physical Chemical Measurements II 

1 hour lecture, 4 hours laboratory 
Prerequisites: At least a C- in CHM 305, 
307, 316 

Continuation of CHM 318. 



86 



Gen Ed note: Chemistry courses satisfy the 
Natural Science and Technology require- 
ment. Those marked S below are appropri- 
ate for non-science/engineenng majors. 



CHM 350 three credits S 
Chemical Oceanography 

Prerequisites: At least a C- in CHM 1 51, 1 52 
Chemical oceanography, with an overview 
of the interaction between marine chemistry 
and oceanic physics, biology, and geology. 
The fundamental processes controlling the 
distribution of chemical species in the ocean 
will be explored and implications for global 
environmental change highlighted. 

CHM 352 three credits 
Organic Preparations 

1 hour lecture, 4 hours laboratory 
Prerequisites: At least a C- in CHM 252, 266 
A study of the more intricate synthetic 
procedures of organic chemistry including 
use of the literature for choice of optimum 
methods. 

CHM 355 three credits 

Aquatic Environmental Chemistry 

Prerequisites: At least a C- in CHM 151, 152 
or permission of instructor 
Fundamentals of aquatic environmental 
chemistry. Topics include dissolved gases 
chelation, complexation, role of humic 
substances in the aquatic environment, 
oxidation-reduction phenomena, chemical 
speciation, phase equilibria and chemistry 
related to water pollution issues. 

CHM 356 three credits 
Atmospheric/Terrestrial Environmental 
Chemistry 

Prerequisite: At least a C- in CHM 355 
Fundamentals of atmospheric and terrestrial 
environmental chemistry. Topics include 
physical and chemical characteristics of the 
atmosphere, reactions involving oxygen, 
nitrogen, carbon dioxide, water and 
particulates in the atmosphere, gaseous 
organic and inorganic pollutants. Additional 
topics include fundamentals of soil chemis- 
try, organic and inorganic soil contaminants 
and environmental biochemistry and 
toxicology. 

CHM 362 three credits 
Introduction to Biochemistry 

3 hours lecture 

Prerequisite: At least a C- in CHM 252 
Students may not receive credit for both 
CHM 362 and CHM 41 1, 412. 
An introduction to the chemical properties 
of compounds of biological interest; bio- 
energetics and enzymology. A survey of the 
metabolism of proteins, carbohydrates, 
lipids, nucleic acids and other bio-sub- 
stances. 

CHM 370 three credits 



Introduction to Chemical Engineering 

3 hours lecture 

Prerequisites: At least a C- in CHM 1 52, 315, 
or EGR 232 

An introduction to the principles of chemical 
processes, with a special emphasis on 
material and energy balances. Departmental 
elective for majors in chemistry and 
mechanical engineering. 

CHM 401 one-half credit 
Chemistry Seminar I 

1 hour lecture 

Lectures on current topics in chemistry from 
guest lecturers and students. Majors must 
enroll for two semesters out of four in the 
junior and senior years. 

CHM 402 one-half credit 
Chemistry Seminar II 

1 hour lecture 
Continuation of CHM 401 . 

CHM 411 three credits 
Biochemistry I 

3 hours lecture 

Prerequisite: At least a C- in CHM 252, 

recommended BIO 234 

Students may not receive credit for both 

CHM 362 and CHM 411, 412 

See description under CHM 511. 

CHM 412 three credits 
Biochemistry II 

Prerequisite: At least a C- in CHM 41 1 
See description under CHM 512. 

CHM 414 three credits 
Biochemistry Laboratory 

1 hour lecture, 6 hours laboratory 
Prerequisite: At least a C- in CHM 264 or 
266; CHM 41 1 

Pre- or Corequisite: CHM 412 
Recommended: CHM 305, 307; 
BIO 234, 244 

Basic biochemical techniques and methods 
including spectrophotometry, electrophore- 
sis, chromatography, ultracentrifugation and 
radioisotopic techniques and their applica- 
tion to amino acids and proteins, lipids and 
membranes, enzymes and nucleic acids. 

CHM 421 three credits 
Organic Mechanisms 

Pre- or Corequisite: At least a C- in CHM 
315 

See description under CHM 521 . 

CHM 422 three credits 

Computer and Mathematical Methods 

in Physical Science 

Prerequisite: At least a C- in CHM 172, 315 



Recommended corequisite: CHM 316 
See description under CHM 522. 

CHM 426 three credits 

Polymer Synthesis and Characterization 

2 hours lecture, 4 hours laboratory 
Prerequisites: At least a C- in CHM 252, 
315; recommended, TEC 410 

See description under CHM 526. 

CHM 431 three credits 
Principles of Inorganic Chemistry 

Prerequisite: One year of physical chemistry 
with grades of C- or better 
The application of physico-chemical 
principles to inorganic systems. Discussion of 
chemistry of the representative elements 
utilizing thermodynamic principles and the 
modern theories of bonding and structure. 
Introduction to coordination chemistry. 

CHM 432 four credits 
Organic Analysis 

Prerequisites: Organic and analytical 
chemistry with grades of C- or better 
Quantitative elemental and group determi- 
nation on a microscale followed by a study 
of the systematic identification of organic 
compounds. Extensive laboratory work on 
unknowns is required. 

CHM 433 one credit 

Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory 

Prerequisite: At least a C- in CHM 3 1 6; 
corequisite: CHM 431 
Synthetic and instrumental techniques 
currently used by inorganic chemists, 
including electrolytic, inert atmosphere, tube 
furnace and organometallic syntheses; 
ultraviolet-visible, nuclear magnetic 
resonance, infrared and mass spectrometry, 
magnetic susceptibility determination, as 
applied to a range of inorganic materials. 

CHM 442 three credits 
Applied Spectroscopy 

3 hours lecture 

Prerequisites: At least a C- in CHM 252, 
266, 315 

See description under CHM 544. 

CHM 449 three credits 
Theory and Applications of One- and 
Two-Dimensional Fourier Transform 
Nuclear Magnetic Resonance 

Prerequisites: At least a C- in CHM 251/252 
and CHM 315 

See description under CHM 549. 

CHM 491 three to six credits 
Introduction to Research I 

9 to 18 hours laboratory 



87 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Note: Some graduate courses may be 
open to undergraduates. Please consult 
your department chairperson. See the 
Graduate Catalogue for graduate general 
and program requirements. 



Prerequisite: Departmental permission 
Chemistry majors who are doing well in 
formal course work and who have indicated 
research potential are encouraged to 
undertake an original investigation under 
the direction of a member of the chemistry 
faculty. 

CHM 492 three to six credits 
Introduction to Research II 

9 to 18 hours laboratory 
Continuation of CHM 491 . 

CHM 495 variable credit 
Independent Study 

Prerequisites: Upper-division standing; 
permission of instructor, department 
chairperson, and college dean 
Study under the supervision of a faculty 
member in an area not otherwise part of 
the discipline's course offerings. Terms and 
hours to be arranged. 

CHM 196, 296, 396, 496 variable credit 
Directed Study 

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor, 
department chairperson, and college dean 
Study under the supervision of a faculty 
member in an area covered in a regular 
course not currently being offered. Terms 
and hours to be arranged. 



Graduate Courses in Chemistry and 
Biochemistry 

CHM 510 three credits 
Advanced Organic Chemistry 

Prerequisites: One year of physical 
chemistry and CHM 521 with grades of 
C- or better 

A study of mechanisms and stereo- 
chemical aspects of chemical reactions 
including considerations of chemical 
kinetics and reactivity in terms of 
modern bonding theory and structural 
concepts. 

CHM 511 three credits 
Biochemistry I 

Prerequisite: One year of organic 
chemistry with grades of C- or better; 
recommended, cell biology or equiva- 
lent 

A comprehensive study of biochemistry 
including amino acid and protein 
chemistry, enzymology, enzyme 
kinetics, bioenergetics, metabolism of 
carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids, nucle- 
otides; biosynthesis of nucleic acids and 
proteins. 

CHM 512 three credits 
Biochemistry II 

Prerequisite: At least a C- in CHM 511 
A continuation of CHM 51 1 . 

CHM 514 three credits 
Biochemistry Laboratory 

1 hour lecture, 6 hours laboratory 
Basic biochemical techniques and methods 
including spectrophotometry, electrophoresis, 
chromatography, ultracentrifugation and 
radioisotopic techniques and their application 
to amino acids and proteins, lipids and 
membranes, enzymes and nucleic acids. 

CHM 520 three credits 
Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 

Prerequisites: At least a C- in CHM 317 and 
CHM 431 

Selected topics in modern inorganic 
chemistry. 

CHM 521 three credits 
Organic Mechanisms 

Prerequisite: CHM 252. Prerequisite or 
Corequisite: One semester of physical 
chemistry 

The first part of the course provides a 
background in the various areas of physical 
organic chemistry such as thermodynamics, 



kinetics, acid-base theory, structure- 
reactivity relationships and dipole moments 
This is followed by a systematic study of 
reaction mechanisms. 

CHM 522 three credits 

Computerand Mathematical Methods 

in Physical Science 

Prerequisites: One semester physical 
chemistry; three semesters calculus, working 
knowledge of spreadsheets; permission of 
instructor. Recommended Pre- or Corequi- 
site: CHM 316 or equivalent 
Mathematical techniques in physical science 
using computers. Includes matrices, linear 
algebra, introduction to computer graphics, 
curve-fitting, iterative solutions, numerical 
methods of integration and solution of 
differential equations, eigenvalue-eigenvec- 
tor problems, molecular orbital calculations, 
trajectory calculations, spectrum simulation. 

CHM 523 three credits 
Thermodynamics 

Prerequisite: One year of physical chemistry 
with grades of C- or better 
Development of the general thermodynamic 
theory from the first and second laws and 
application to homogeneous and heteroge- 
neous reaction systems. 

CHM 525 three credits 
Theoretical Organic Chemistry 

Prerequisites or Corequisites: One year each 
of organic and physical chemistry 
Molecular orbital theory of organic 
molecules; applications of molecular orbital 
theory; reactivity, ESR, Carbon-13 NMR, 
photoelectron spectroscopy, etc.; orbital 
symmetry in electrocyclic reactions, 
cycloadditions, and sigmatropic reactions. 

CHM 526 four credits 

Polymer Synthesis and Characterization 

Prerequisites: At least a C- in CHM 252, 
CHM 315; recommended, TEC 410 
Laboratory synthesis of polymers and 
copolymers by different methods with an 
emphasis on the practical aspects of 
polymer synthesis. A discussion of various 
techniques of polymer characterization in 
terms of basic principles, experimental 
procedure, and interpretation of results. A 
selected number of experiments will be 
conducted on a class-project basis. 

CHM 527 three credits 
Electronic Structure of Atoms and 
Molecules 

Prerequisite: One year of physical chemistry 
with grades of C- or better 
Fundamental quantum mechanical 



88 



principles of electronic structure. Angular 
momentum, the hydrogen atom problem, 
helium ground and excited states, electron 
spin and antisymmetrization, many electron 
atoms, bonding theory, valence bond and 
molecular orbital theory of diatomic and 
polyatomic molecules, applications of group 
theory to molecular orbital calculations, the 
self-consistent field method. 

CHM 529 three credits 
Physical Biochemistry 

Prerequisite: One year each of physical 
chemistry and biochemistry with grades of 
C- or better 

Physico-chemical principles governing 
structures of biological macromolecules. 
Topics include energetics and kinetics of 
biochemical processes, including binding, 
catalysis, diffusion/transport, and folding/ 
unfolding; behavior of macromolecules in 
aqueous medium; and application of 
spectroscopic methods in biochemistry. 

CHM 531 three credits 
Chemical Kinetics 

Prerequisite: One year of physical chemistry 
with grades of C- or better 
Principles and selected topics, including 
analysis of reaction rates, kinetic and 
transition state theories, reactions in gas and 
liquid phases, unimolecular reactions, fast 
reactions, trajectory calculations, enzyme 
kinetics, and polymer kinetics. 

CHM 533 three credits 
Statistical Methods 

Prerequisite: One year of physical chemistry 
with grades of C- or better 
Introduction to the principles and methods 
of statistical mechanics. Classical and 
quantum partition functions applied to the 
calculation of thermodynamic properties. 

CHM 542 three credits 
Quantum Chemistry 

Prerequisite: One year of physical chemistry 
with grades of C- or better 
Fundamental concepts of quantum 
mechanics; wave properties, Schrodinger 
equation, and operators. Basic application to 
free particles, harmonic oscillator, hydrogen 
atom. Perturbation theory and variation 
method. Applications to many-electron 
systems and time-dependent problems. 

CHM 544 three credits 
Applied Spectroscopy 

Prerequisites: One year each of organic and 
physical chemistry with grades of C- or 
better 

A study of spectroscopic methods of 



determination of structure of organic 
compounds, especially infrared, ultraviolet, 
visible, nuclear magnetic resonance, and 
mass spectrometry, with extensive applica- 
tions to individual cases. 

CHM 549 three credits 

Theory and Applications of One- and 

Two-Dimensional FT-NMR 

Prerequisites: At least a C- in CHM 251/252 
and 315, or equivalent 
Fundamentals of Fourier Transform Nuclear 
Magnetic Resonance (FT-NMR) spectros- 
copy, including one- and two-dimensional 
techniques discussed from the perspective 
of structural determination. Generation of 
NMR signals and parameter optimization 
using a 300 MHz FT-NMR spectrometer will 
complement the analysis of NMR signals 
generated in situ. 

CHM 550 three credits 
Special Topics in Chemistry 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor 
An advanced treatment of special topics in 
chemistry with an emphasis on recent 
developments. The subject matter varies 
from year to year. 

CHM 551 four credits 
Electroanalytical Chemistry 

Prerequisite: One year of physical chemistry 
with grades of C- or better 
The development of the fundamental 
mathematical relationships upon which 
electrochemical methods are based. The 
interpretation of the kinetics of electrode 
reactions and the transfer of material to and 
from electrodes under various conditions. 
The interpretation of data of direct 
analytical significance generated by the 
methods and techniques of modern 
electrochemistry. 

CHM 552 four credits 
Instrumental Methods of Analysis 

Prerequisites: Quantitative analysis and one 
year of physical chemistry with grades of C- 
or better 

The theory and practice of modern analysis 
utilizing optical and electrochemical 
instrumentation in the solution of chemical 
problems. Topics discussed include 
ultraviolet, visible, and infrared spectropho- 
tometry, fluorimetry, flame emission and 
atomic absorption spectroscopy, plasma 
emission spectroscopy, potentiometry 
utilizing ion specific electrodes, radiochemis- 
try, thermoanalytical methods, voltammetry 
including polarography, amperometry, and 
coulometry; liquid chromatography, electron 
spectroscopy, x-ray fluorescence analysis, 



and neutron activation analysis. 

CHM 553 three credits 
Nuclearand Radiochemistry 

Prerequisite: One year of physical chemistry 
with grades of C- or better 
Application of nuclear and radiochemical 
methods. Topics include fundamentals of 
radioactive decay, radiation safety, 
interaction of radiation with matter, 
instrument design and function, radiotrac- 
ers, radioanalytical methods, and related 
non-destructive methods for quantitative 
analysis. 

CHM 554 three credits 
Molecular Spectra and Molecular 
Structure 

Prerequisite: One year of physical chemistry 
with grades of C- or better 
Basic principles of molecular spectroscopy, 
rotational, vibrational, and electronic 
spectral transition moments and selection 
rules. Use of spectra to find dissociation 
energies, force constants, inter-atomic 
distances, molecular symmetry and related 
quantities. Applications to real molecules in 
conjunction with other techniques for study 
of molecular structure. 

CHM 555 three credits 
Methods of Chemical Separation 

Prerequisites: Analytical and physical 
chemistry with grades of C- or better 
A survey of modern separation methods. 
Topics include liquid, gas, thin layer and ion 
exchange chromatography; electrophoresis; 
sample preparation and extraction. 

CHM 556 three credits 

Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy 

Prerequisite: One year of physical chemistry 
with grades of C- or better; quantum 
mechanics recommended 
Introduction to the theory of electron 
paramagnetic resonance and nuclear 
magnetic resonance; applications in the 
study of molecular structure. 

CHM 560 three credits 
New Synthetic Methods 

Prerequisite: One year of organic chemistry 
with grades of C- or better 
Survey of preparative methods in organic 
chemistry and their application to the 
synthesis of complex molecules. 

CHM 562 three credits 
Natural Products 

Prerequisite: One year of organic chemistry 
with grades of C- or better 
Isolation, structure elucidation, total 



89 



College of Arts and Sciences 



synthesis, biogenesis, metabolism, and 
physiological importance of natural 
products. 

CHM 595 three credits 
Graduate Independent Study 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing; permission 
of instructor, graduate director, and college 
dean 

Study under the supervision of a faculty 
member in an area not otherwise part of 
the discipline's course offerings. Terms and 
hours to be arranged. 

CHM 596 three credits 
Graduate Directed Study 

Prerequisites: Graduate standing; permission 
of instructor, graduate director, and college 
dean 

Study under the supervision of a faculty 
member in an area covered in a regular 
course not currently being offered. Terms 
and hours to be arranged. Terms and hours 
to be arranged. 

CHM 600 three to nine credits per term 
Thesis Research 

Prerequisite: Departmental permission 
Original chemical research and preparation 
of thesis. Required for Plan A master's 
degree. Graded P/F. 

CHM 610 two to five credits per term 
Project Research 

Prerequisite: Departmental permission 
Original chemical research, required for Plan 
B master's degree. Written project report 
required. Graded P/F. 

CHM 620 two to five credits per term 
Library Research 

Prerequisite: Departmental permission 
Survey of a particular topic in the chemical 
literature. Written final summary report 
required. Graded P/F. 

CHM 650 one credit 
Graduate Seminar 

Lectures on current topics in chemistry from 
guest lecturers and students. The graduate 
student will present a total of two seminars, 
one of which will be the thesis seminar. 
Each graduate student is required to enroll 
in this course for each semester in resi- 
dence. This course will not count toward 
the 30 credits of course work and research 
required for the degree. 



90 



Economics 



Faculty and Fields of Interest 



Economics Major 

BA Degree 



A major in Economics provides students 
with a unique blend of the perspective 
gained from a liberal arts education and the 
practical skills necessary for intelligent 
decision-making and administration in 
business and government. In addition to 
providing a sound theoretical foundation in 
economic theory and economic statistics, 
the economics major introduces students to 
a variety of applied fields which focus on 
international, national, and regional 
economic problems, issues, and policies. 
Class sizes in major courses are relatively 
small, and there is much opportunity for 
direct contact and interaction with faculty. 

Economics is the science of decision- 
making. Students of economics learn to 
identify and analyze the costs and benefits 
of financial and social decisions. Skills in 
cost-benefit analysis, the core of econo- 
mists' training, are widely applicable and 
highly valued in current job markets. 

Graduates of the economics program are 
prepared for and have been employed in 
finance, insurance, real estate (for example 
as real estate appraisers, stock brokers, 
credit analysts, loan officers, research 
analysts); management positions in 
business; economic journalism; high school 
teaching, public policy and government 
employment (federal, state, local). 

Opportunities for further education include 
law school (JD Degree); graduate business 
school (MBA degree); MS degrees in 
accounting, business, or finance; master's 
degree in public policy; master's degree and 
PhD in economics. 



David E. Berger labor economics, regional 
economics 

Lewis Dars micro- and macroeconomics, 
econometrics 

Daniel L. Georgianna comparative 
economic systems, resource economics, 
history of economic thought 

William Hogan (chairperson) economic 
statistics & econometrics, macroeconomics, 
demography 

Robert Jones economics of health and 
medicine, public finance, microeconomics, 
econometrics 

Joy Ongardanunkul industrial organiza- 
tion, antitrust, regulation, microeconomics, 
economic statistics 

Ronald Shadbegian public economics, 
state and local public finance, environmental 
economics, microeconomics, econometrics 

Sonia Walgreen economics of aging, 
economic development, urban economics 



Students who wish to pursue a professional 
career in economics should plan to attend 
graduate school. For admission to graduate 
programs in Economics students should 
follow the curriculum of the honors major in 
economics and should discuss their plans 
with faculty advisors. 



91 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Requirements 



Credits 



Honors Major in 
Economics 



ECO 100 One 100-level course* 

Introductory level major requirements 

ECO 200 Computing and Information Technology Applications 

ECO 231, 232 Principles of Micro, Macro 

Core major requirements 

ECO 301, 31 1 Intermediate Micro, Macro 
ECO 332 Economic Statistics 

Upper-level electives 

ECO 1 2 credits of 300- or 400-level courses* 

Research course requirements 

ECO Two 400-level courses** 

Total 



12 

6 
39 



Honors Major requirements are the same as 
specified for the regular Economics major, 
except that 

ECO 333, Econometrics, and ECO 498, 
Honors Thesis, must be included as 6 of the 
credits among the Upper-level electives; 

and 

Students must achieve a minimum cumula- 
tive grade point average of 3.200 in courses 
required for the Economics Honors major. 



* Majors are encouraged to take a 100-level Economics course during their freshman or 
sophomore years. However, Economics majors may not take any 100-level Economics course 
for credit toward the major after completing any 300- or 400-level Economics course. In this 
case, an additional 300-level or 400-level course is required, for a total of 1 5 credits at the 
300- or 400-level. In either case, a total of 36 credits is required in Economics courses. 

** Research courses require a major research paper. All 400-level courses in Economics 
require a major research paper. Under some circumstances, students may be allowed to use 
a 300-level course toward this requirement if the course includes a requirement of a major 
research paper. Please see the Department Chair if you have questions. 

Students must achieve a minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.000 in courses 
required for the Economics major. 



Economics Minor 



Departmental General Education Requirements 

Students majoring in Economics will meet their departmentally-controlled General Education 
requirements as follows: 

Area E: Economics majors are required to complete both ECO 231, Principles of Microeco- 
nomics, and ECO 232, Principles of Macroeconomics. Each of these courses satisfies the Gen 
Ed requirement in Area E. 

Area I, Tier 2: Economics majors are required to compete ECO 200, Computing and Informa- 
tion Technology Applications. This 3-credit course satisfies the Gen Ed Area I, Tier 2 require- 
ment for Economics. 

Area W, Tier 2: Students should select a course from the published list of available courses 
that satisfies this requirement. Several ECO courses have been authorized to satisfy this Gen Ed 
requirement. 

Area O: Students should select a course from the published list of available courses that satisfy 
this requirement. Several ECO courses have been authorized to satisfy this Gen Ed require- 
ment. 



A minor in economics may be elected by a 
student majoring in any other field. Any 
degree candidate who has between 54 and 
84 credits, with a cumulative grade point 
average of 2.0 and with a 2.5 grade point 
average in his or her major, may request 
admission to the minor. Before being 
admitted to the economics minor, student 
must obtain approval of the Economics 
Department chairperson. 

Eighteen credit hours are required and must 
include the following courses: 
ECO 23 1 , 232, and either 301 or 31 1 
(9 credits). The remaining 9 credits must be 
selected from courses in economics 
numbered ECO 300 or higher. Independent 
study, directed study, or experiential 
learning may not be applied toward the 
minor. Students must have, at the time of 
graduation, an average of at least 2.5 in all 
courses taken in economics to qualify for 
the minor. 



92 



Economics Courses 



ECO 101 three credits E, G 
Contemporary Issues in Economics 

Basic economics concepts are used to 
analyze issues of social responsibility at 
global and domestic levels. Topics such as 
national health, aging and care of the 
elderly, economics of professional sports, 
pollution, governmental control of prices, 
inflation unemployment, the national debt, 
and economic growth are covered. 

ECO 103 three credits D, E, O 
Cities, Minorities, and Poverty 

Review and analysis of major social 
problems faced by cities; emphasis on 
origin, causes and possible solutions for 
poverty and minority problems. Cross-listed 
as AAS 1 03, LST 1 03, and WMS 1 03. 

ECO 105 three credits 
Economic Development 

The meaning of economic development. The 
interaction of economic, social and cultural 
forces in development. Widely different time 
periods will be considered. 

ECO 107 three credits 
Economics of Pollution 

Basic economic analysis of pollution control. 
A growing concern of policy-makers is how 
to achieve both economic growth and a 
cleaner environment. We will examine issues 
such as how the EPA sets ambient air quality 
standards and how we can achieve those 
standards in a cost-effective way. 

ECO 111 three credits D, E, O 
Jobs and Discrimination 

Basic analysis of problems of economic 
growth, job creation, and unemployment; 
structure of work and jobs will be explored, 
along with current issues surrounding the 
government's impact on inflation, taxation, 
and economic planning. Cross-listed as LST 
1 1 1 and WMS 111. 

ECO 200 three credits I, O, W 
Computing and Information Technology 
Applications 

Prerequisites: ECO 231, 232, or permission of 
instructor 

Introduction to computing and information 
technology for economics majors. Students 
carry out a semester-long research project 
and use computing and information 
technology for searches, data analysis, and 
communication of results. 

ECO 231 three credits E, G 
Principles of Microeconomics 

Prerequisites: none 

Survey of the American economy focusing on 



markets, the price system, and resource 
allocation. Price determination in competitive 
and imperfectly-competitive markets. 
Applications in agricultural economics, legal 
prices, excise taxes, labor market issues, 
advertising, technological change, pollution 
and the environment, public goods, antitrust 
policy, international trade, and alternative 
economic systems. 

ECO 232 three credits E, G 
Principles of Macroeconomics 

Prerequisites: None. This course may be taken 
before ECO 231. 

Survey of introductory macroeconomics with 
focus on economic growth, unemployment, 
and inflation. Topics covered include national 
income accounting, inflation, unemployment, 
fiscal policy, money, the banking system, and 
monetary policy are covered. Balance of 
payments and currency exchange rate issues 
are analyzed. 

ECO 298 one to six credits 
Experiential Learning 

Prerequisites: At least sophomore standing; 
permission of the instructor, department 
chairperson, and college dean 
Work experience at an elective level 
supervised for academic credit by a faculty 
member in an appropriate academic field. 
Conditions and hours to be arranged. Graded 
CR/NC. For specific procedures and 
regulations, see section of catalogue on 
Other Learning Experiences. In this depart- 
ment, students may receive credit only for 
experiences in which they do not receive pay 
for the same work. 

ECO 301 three credits 
Intermediate Microeconomics 

Prerequisites: ECO 231, 232; or permission of 
instructor 

Contemporary intermediate treatment of 
microeconomic theory, applications, and 
price policy. Covers the theory of price 
determination, resource allocation, income 
distribution, and welfare economics. Perfectly 
competitive markets and models of imperfect 
competition are covered. Theory is integrated 
with public policy questions. 

ECO 311 three credits 
Intermediate Macroeconomics 

Prerequisites: ECO 231, 232; or permission of 
instructor 

A one-semester course in contemporary 
intermediate macro theory. Covers issues in 
economic growth, unemployment, and 
inflation. Develops and contrasts the New 
Classical (equilibrium) and Neo-Keynesian 
(disequilibrium) models in the aggregate 



demand/aggregate supply framework for 
both closed and open economies. Policy 
implications of each model are discussed. 
Introduces students to sources of macroeco- 
nomic data. 

ECO 321 three credits 
Comparative Economic Systems 

Prerequisites: ECO 231, 232 
Comparisons in terms of structure and 
performance between different types of 
market economies, ranging from smaller to 
larger public sectors, market socialist 
economies, and mixed economies. The case 
study method is used, taking examples from 
the economies of the European Union, 
export-oriented Asian economies, and less 
developed African and South American 
economies. 

ECO 331 three credits 

Economics of Developing Countries 

Prerequisites: ECO 231, 232 
A study of economic development in Third 
World nations. Emphasis is on the analysis 
of critical development problems from a 
combined theoretical, empirical, and policy- 
oriented perspective. The course will also 
explore the historical, political, social, and 
economic roots of underdevelopment and 
the future of the world economy in an age 
of increasing interdependence. 

ECO 332 three credits 
Economic Statistics 

Prerequisites: ECO 231, 232, and 3 credits of 
MTH; or permission of instructor 
Introduction to data and statistical methods 
used in economics. Descriptive statistics, 
probability distributions, sampling, estima- 
tion, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, 
correlation, and regression including multiple 
regression are covered. Applications in 
economics with current economic data are 
emphasized. 

ECO 333 three credits 
Econometrics 

Prerequisite: ECO 332; or permission of 
instructor 

Introduction to econometrics including 
development of basic techniques of bivanate 
and multivariate linear regression analysis; 
use of lagged variable and dummy variables 
in model building; problems of 
multicollinearity, autocorrelation and 
heteroscedasticity. 

ECO 335 three credits 
Resource Economics 

Prerequisites: ECO 231, 232; or permission 
of instructor 



93 



College of Arts and Sciences 



The economics of renewable and non- 
renewable, common and private resources. 
The focus of this course will be comparison 
between markets and planning in the use of 
resources; the international distribution and 
use of resources will also be covered. 

ECO 337 three credits 
Environmental Economics 

Prerequisite: ECO 231 
This course will study the fascinating and 
growing field of environmental and natural 
resource economics. All the topics covered 
(e.g., property rights and externalities, 
regulation and pollution control) will be 
examined as part of the general focus on 
the problem of economic growth in the 
presence of limited environmental and 
natural resources. We will employ the tools 
from 'basic' microeconomic theory to study 
the relationship between the economy and 
the natural environment. 

ECO 342 three credits 
Labor Economics 

Prerequisites: ECO 231, 232; or permission 
of instructor 

The labor force. Wages in competitive and 
non-competitive markets. Wage structures. 
Inequalities and discrimination. Impacts of 
unions and social standards. Indexation, 
inflation and unemployment. Cross-listed as 
LST 342. 

ECO 343 three credits E, G 
The Economics of Sex and Race 
Discrimination 

Prerequisites: ECO 231, 232; or permission 
of instructor 

The theory of labor markets and the 
problem of discrimination. Current problems 
facing women and minorities will be 
examined. Existing programs and trends will 
be explored. Cross-listed as AAS 343, LST 
343, and WMS 344. 

ECO 344 three credits 
Work, Jobs, and income 

Prerequisites: ECO 231, 232; or permission 
of instructor 

Study of changes in the labor force, the 
impact of labor market processes and how 
they effect work motivation, job perfor- 
mance and income distribution. Formerly 
ECO 453, and may not be repeated under 
this new number. Cross-listed as LST 344 
and WMS 344. 

ECO 345 three credits 

Education, Work, and Discrimination 

Prerequisite: Any 100 or 200 level econom- 
ics course; or permission of instructor 



Examination of the economic and social 
issues associated with education and 
training which include productivity, 
employment, wages, and income distribu- 
tion. Includes topics on testing, discrimina- 
tion, poverty, and taxation. Cross-listed as 
LST 345 and WMS 345. 

ECO 355 three credits 
Antitrust Law and Economics 

Prerequisite: ECO 231 

The main antitrust laws and the rich variety 
of court decisions that have influenced 
decades of economic activity. The argu- 
ments of the plaintiffs and prosecution are 
discussed and evaluated as well as the 
majority and minority opinions of the Court. 
Economic analysis is employed to view the 
economic motives of the firms involved. 
Students learn about monopolization cases 
from the famous ALCOA case (1 945) to the 
Microsoft antitrust case. Precedent-setting 
cases involving "price fixing," exchange of 
price information, exclusive dealing, tying 
contracts, price discrimination and mergers 
are analyzed. 

ECO 362 three credits 
Monetary Theory and Policy 

Prerequisites: ECO 231, 232 
Structure of the American monetary and 
banking system. Monetary theory is 
developed and monetary policies are 
considered. 

ECO 366 three credits 
Economics of Aging 

Prerequisites: ECO 231, 232; or permission 
of instructor 

Economic issues associated with "growing 
older" as well as issues and policies related 
to "being older"; including the economic 
status of the elderly, economic implications 
of paid work or retirement, the economic 
impact of social security, health care needs, 
and costs. Cross-listed as GRT 366. 

ECO 371 three credits 
International Trade 

Prerequisites: ECO 231, 232 
Examination of international trade theory 
and policy. The course develops the 
theoretical framework for analyzing the 
potential gains from, direction of, and 
distributional effects of international trade 
as well as the potential impacts of tariffs 
and other policies affecting trade. Among 
other topics, the course will examine free 
trade versus protectionism, governmental 
promotion of competitiveness and the 
growing importance of trading blocs. 



ECO 372 three credits 
International Finance 

Prerequisites: ECO 231, 232 
Examination of international monetary 
theory and policy. The course develops the 
basic analytical tools for analyzing monetary 
relations among nations. The causes and 
effects of foreign exchange rate changes are 
explored. Macroeconomic interdependence 
among nations and its implications for policy 
are examined. The pros and cons of 
alternative international monetary systems 
are compared. 

ECO 401 three credits 
Industrial Organization 
and Antitrust Policy 

Prerequisite: ECO 231, 232; or permission of 
instructor 

Development of antitrust policy in the U.S. 
Discussion of tying arrangements, vertical 
integration, price discrimination, market 
structure and technological innovation, 
diversification, mergers, and patents. 
Theoretical and empirical discussion of 
barriers to new competition in American 
industries. 

ECO 402 three credits 
Economics of Regulation 

Prerequisite: ECO 231, 232 
The impact of state and federal government 
economic and social regulation on industrial 
economics. Topics include economic 
regulation of the financial sector and natural 
monopoly situations (electric power, natural 
gas, and local telephone service); common 
resource problems — broadcasting; social 
regulation of health, safety, and the 
environment; and deregulation of transpor- 
tation industries. 

ECO 416 three credits 
History of Economic Thought 

Prerequisites: ECO 231, 232 
The development of economic thought with 
emphasis on the period beginning with 
Adam Smith and ending with J.M. Keynes. 
Methodological issues in economics are also 
considered, and questions concerning the 
current status and the future directions of 
the profession are addressed. 

ECO 417 three credits E, O, W 
Economics and Population Analysis 

Prerequisites: ECO 231, 232 if economics 
major; or permission of instructor 
The measurement and behavior of the major 
demographic variables, fertility, mortality, 
and migration, and their role in determining 
the growth and age distributions of 
populations. Applications include historical 



94 



demography, the relation of population 
growth to economic development, urban 
concentration and crowding, environmental 
deterioration, the aging of populations, and 
zero population growth. Population policy 
and prospects for both the near future and 
the longer run are also considered. Students 
at the junior or senior level in majors other 
than economics are encouraged to consider 
this multidisciplinary course even though 
they may not have taken ECO 231 and ECO 
232. 

ECO 441 three credits 
Public Economics I 

Prerequisites: ECO 231, 232, 301; or 
permission of instructor 
First of a two semester inquiry into the role 
of government in a market economy. Topics 
include economic efficiency and the public 
interest, rationale for government interven- 
tion in the private sector and an economic 
model of the democratic process. 

ECO 442 three credits 
Public Economics II 

Prerequisites: ECO 231, 232, 301, 441; or 
permission of instructor. 
Concerns itself with the economic and 
behavioral effects of government's spending 
tax policies. Topics include the effect of tax 
policy on private investment, saving and 
labor supply, as well as other issues related 
to the effects of different government 
economic policies. 

ECO 443 three credits 

State and Local Public Economics 

Prerequisites: ECO 231 and upper-class 
standing 

Explores the major economic decisions of 
subnational governments — taxation and 
expenditures — and how these decisions 
affect the allocation of private resources. 
Specifically, the course focuses on the 
constraints imposed on state and local 
governments that are not placed on the 
federal government. 

ECO 452 three credits 
Labor and Regional Growth 

Prerequisites: ECO 231, 232; or permission 
of instructor 

Review of labor market problems and 
programs in growing and depressed 
regions, with special emphasis on New 
England. Attention focused on the impact 
of education, training and government 
manpower programs. Cross listed as LST 
452. 

ECO 461 three credits 



Urban Economics 

Prerequisites: ECO 231, 232; or permission 
of instructor 

An examination of the economics of urban 
areas, with an emphasis on the location 
decision of individuals, firms, and industries. 
Urban problems and public policy decision- 
making are covered. 

ECO 472 three credits 
Coastal Resource Economics 

Prerequisites: ECO 231, 232; or permission 
of instructor 

An examination of the economic, public 
policy and regulatory issues affecting coastal 
zone resources. The focus will be on specific 
case studies with an emphasis on examining 
policy and environmental issues. Students 
will be involved in projects on specific cases. 

ECO 492 three credits 
Senior Seminar 

Prerequisites: ECO 231, 232, and a 300 or 
400 level Economics course. Permission of 
instructor required if prerequisites are not 
met. 

In-depth coverage of an economic topic of 
contemporary interest; research paper 
required. 

ECO 495 variable credit 
Independent Study 

Prerequisites: Upper-division standing; 
permission of instructor, department 
chairperson, and college dean 
Study under the supervision of a faculty 
member in an area not otherwise part of the 
discipline's course offerings. Conditions and 
hours to be arranged. 

ECO 196, 296, 396, 496 three credits 
Directed Study 

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor, 
department chairperson, and college dean 
Study under the supervision of a faculty 
member in an area covered in a regular 
course not currently being offered. 
Conditions and hours to be arranged. 

ECO 498 three credits 
Honors Thesis 

Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Economics 
Majors enrolled in the Economics Honors 
Major, and permission of instructor. 
Research and preparation of an honors thesis 
in partial fulfillment of the requirements for 
the Economics Honors Major. May be taken 
for credit more than once, up to total 6 
credits. 



95 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Education 



Faculty and Fields of Interest Elementary, Middle, and Secondary 

Education Licensure Programs 



The Education Department is committed to 
preparing teachers who are reflective 
practitioners engaged in better understand- 
ing the complex social contexts of learning, 
education, and schooling in both urban and 
suburban settings. In addition to a rigorous 
preparation in subject-matter fields, teacher 
candidates develop their ability to apply 
pedagogical theory to practice and reflect 
on the complexities inherent in their craft. 
Teacher candidates are engaged in effective 
teaching practices that support students 
with a variety of learning styles and abilities. 
Our candidates value diversity including, but 
not limited to, racial, cultural, developmen- 
tal, and learning differences. 



Eileen Wynne Ball elementary education, 
reading, language arts, social studies 

Anne Foley literacy, curriculum design, 
instructional development, reading, 
professional development, special education, 
program evaluation 

Janet Freedman adult education, instruc- 
tional development, women's studies, 
library/media resources, innovation and 
reform 

Cynthia Kruger middle and secondary 
education, curriculum development, 
methodology, social studies, reading, 
inclusive education 



Initial License Certificate, Undergraduates 
Teacher candidates pursue an academic 
major in another department in the College 
of Arts and Sciences. All interested 
undergraduates should meet with a member 
of the Education Department early in their 
academic career to apply to the program 
and to develop their plan of study. They 
should regularly meet with their assigned 
Education advisor to assure that all new 
university and state requirements are met. 
To teach at the elementary, middle, and 
secondary licensure levels, students 
complete their academic major, a sequence 
of education courses that include fieldwork 
in local area schools, and one full semester 
of student teaching. 

Initial License Certificate, Post-Baccalaure- 
ate: We offer the opportunity to career 
changers and other potential teacher 
candidates who already hold an appropriate 
undergraduate degree to earn an initial 
teaching license. The Post-Baccalaureate 
Initial Certificate requires one to complete a 
series of education and content courses that 
include fieldwork in local area schools, and 
to complete one full semester of student 
teaching or, for those already teaching, a 
supervised internship. 

Students who complete our teacher 
preparation program and who successfully 
complete the required state teacher 
examinations are eligible for initial teaching 
licensure in the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts. Initial certificate holders are 
also eligible for licensure reciprocity in states 
that participate in the National Association 
of Departments of Teacher Education 
(NASDTEC) Interstate Contract. 

Professional License Certificate, Masters in 
Teaching: UMass Dartmouth's Masters of 
Art in Teaching (MAT) degree provides 
graduate students in possession of an initial 
teaching license the opportunity to obtain a 
professional license through an appropriate 
master's program. See the Graduate 
Catalogue for details. 



96 



Education Licensure Programs 



Admission, Progression, and Licensure 



Currently, the following certification 
programs are offered for provisional 
certification at UMass Dartmouth, with 
grade-levels indicated: 

Elementary Education Teacher (1-6) 
Teacher of Visual Art (PreK-9; 5-1 2) 
Teacher of Biology (9-12) 
Teacher of Chemistry (9-12) 
Teacher of English (5-9; 9-12) 
Teacher of French (5-9; 9-12) 
Teacher of History (5-9; 9-12) 
Teacher of Mathematics (5-9; 9-12) 
Teacher of Music (all) 
Teacher of Physics (9-12) 
Teacher of Portuguese (5-9; 9-12) 
Teacher of Social Studies (5-9; 9-12) 
Teacher of Spanish (5-9; 9-12). 



Requirements for admission to the teacher preparation program 

• An interview with the Education Department Chairperson 

• Formal acceptance into an appropriate UMass Dartmouth degree program or possession 
of an appropriate BA or BS degree 

• A cumulative grade point average of 2.75. (A GPA of 2.5 will qualify for probationary 
status). The Department of Education may consider students who do not meet this 
requirement. An appeal process has been instituted for this purpose. 

• Successfully passing the Communication and Literacy Skills Test (CLST) of the Massachu- 
setts Test of Educator Licensure (MTEL) 

Requirements for student teaching 

In order to be eligible for student teaching, students must have a cumulative grade point 
average of 2.75, have successfully completed all required Education courses with at least a B- 
grade, and have successfully passed the appropriate content area tests of the MTEL. 

Summary of Requirements for an initial license, undergraduate and post-baccalaure- 
ate students 

• Completion of an appropriate BA or BS degree 

• Completion of all required Education courses (elementary, middle, or secondary) with at 
least a grade of B- in each 

• Completion of a 400 hour Practicum (student teaching and workshops) or, for those 
already teaching, a supervised internship) 

• Satisfactory completion of all MTEL state examinations (communication and literacy skills 
and the required content area test) 



Art Education and Music 

See the sections elsewhere in this catalogue for information about admission to and 
progression in these programs. 

Contacts: Marie Nelson, Director of Music Education (508 999-8568) 

Arlene Mollo, Chairperson, Art Education Department (508 999-8548) 



97 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Elementary Education Licensure, Undergraduate Students 

Admission to the program requires passing the MTEL Communication and Literacy Skills tests and meeting other entrance requirements (see 



preceding page). 

Requirements for the initial license program Prerequisites Credits 

EDU 207 Teaching as a Profession 3 

EDU 220 Teaching Reading in the Elementary School 3 

MTH 108 Mathematics for Elementary Teachers 3 

PSY201 Child Psychology PSY 101 3 

EDU 304 Integrated Language Arts/Social Studies EDU 207; admission to program 3 

BIO 600 Teaching Science in the Elementary School EDU 207; admission to program 3 
(An undergraduate course is in process of approval at catalogue printing date) 

EDU 327 Integrated Instructional Planning K-1 2 EDU 207; admission to program 3 

EDU 347 Teaching and Managing Inclusive Classrooms K-1 2 admission to program 3 

EDU 414 Elementary Practicum MTEL content test 12 

Passing above courses, B- or better 

EDU 416 Elementary Seminar MTEL content test 3 

Passing above courses, B- or better 

Total 39 



Elementary Education Licensure, Post Baccalaureate Students 

Admission to the program requires possession of an appropriate bachelor's degree, meeting other entrance requirements, including Child 
Psychology, and passing both the Communication and Literacy Skills Test and Elementary content knowledge test (MTEL). 



Requirements for the initial license program Prerequisites Credits 

EDU 520 Teaching Reading in the Elementary School Admission to program 3 

MTH 592 Topics in Mathematics 3 

EDU 504 Integrated Language Arts/Social Studies EDU 520; admission to program 3 

BIO 600 Teaching Science in the Elementary School admission to program 3 
(An undergraduate course is in process of approval at catalogue printing date) 

EDU 527 Integrated Instructional Planning K-1 2 admission to program 3 

EDU 547 Teaching and Managing Inclusive Classrooms K-1 2 admission to program 3 

EDU 514 Elementary Practicum Passing above courses, B- or better 3 
or supervised internship for those already teaching 

EDU 516 Elementary Seminar Passing above courses, B- or better 3 

Total 24 



98 



Middle/Secondary School Education Licensure, Undergraduate Students 

Admission to the program requires passing the MTEL Communication and Literacy Skills tests and meeting other entrance requirements (see 



preceding page). 

Requirements for initial license program Prerequisites Credits 

EDU 207 Teaching as a Profession 3 

PSY215 Adolescent Psychology PSY 101 3 

EDU 315 Reading in the Content Areas, Middle/Secondary EDU 207; admission to program 3 

EDU 327 Integrated Instructional Planning K-1 2 EDU 207; admission to program 3 

EDU 347 Teaching and Managing Inclusive Classrooms, K-1 2 admission to program 3 

XXX xxx One Content Pedagogy/Methods Course 3 

EDU 41 5 Middle/Secondary Practicum MTEL content test 12 

Passing above courses, B- or better 

EDU 417 Middle/Secondary Workshop MTEL content test 3 

Passing above courses, B- or better 

Total 33 



Middle/Secondary School Education Licensure, Post Baccalaureate Students 

Admission to the program requires possession of an appropriate bachelor's degree and meeting other entrance requirements, including 
Adolescent Psychology and passing both the Communication and Literacy Skills Test and appropriate content knowledge test (MTEL). 



Requirements for initial license program Prerequisites Credits 

EDU 525 Reading in the Content Areas, Middle/Secondary Admission to program 3 

EDU 527 Integrated Instructional Planning K-1 2 EDU 207; admission to program 3 

EDU 547 Teaching and Managing Inclusive Classrooms K-1 2 admission to program 3 

XXX xxx One Content Pedagogy/Methods Course 3 

EDU 515 Middle/Secondary Practicum Passing above courses, B- or better 3 
or supervised internship for those already teaching 

EDU 517 Middle/Secondary Workshop Passing above courses, B- or better 3 

Total 18 



99 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Education Courses 



EDU 201 three credits 
Philosophy of Education 

An introduction to major issues and 
problems in philosophy of education. 
Examination of some of the traditional areas 
of philosophical concern, and their relevance 
to the teacher-learning process is under- 
taken. 

EDU 205 three credits 

Human Development and Learning 

A study of central development tendencies 
and stages as these underlie the unfolding 
of human potentialities. Consideration will 
be given to those conditions and factors 
which influence learning and forgetting. The 
nature of intelligence, the nature of 
learning, and the meaning of personality will 
be examined in the context of the teacher- 
learning process. This course meets the 
Massachusetts Office for Children require- 
ments for day care center certification, OFC 
Category A, Child Growth and Develop- 
ment. 

EDU 207 three credits 
Teaching as a Profession 

Includes 15 hours pre-practicum 
Introduction to teaching through an in- 
depth analysis of the profession. This course 
surveys the history, philosophy, sociology, 
and politics of US education as well as 
current educational issues and reform. 

EDU 220 three credits 

Teaching Reading in Elementary Schools 

Includes 20 hours pre-practicum 
Teaching of reading, explored from a variety 
of perspectives for thoughtful application in 
a diverse society. This course is about the 
nature of literacy, how children learn to read 
and write, and the assessment and teaching 
of reading. Offered at the graduate level as 
EDU 520. 

EDU 273 variable credits 
Non-Traditional Prior Learning 

Students prepare a portfolio to document 
non-traditional prior learning, for review by 
department(s) in consideration of award of 
credit. 

EDU 298 one to six credits 
Experiential Learning 

Prerequisites: At least sophomore standing; 
permission of the instructor, department 
chairperson, and college dean 
Work experience at an elective level 
supervised for academic credit by a faculty 
member in an appropriate academic field. 
Conditions and hours to be arranged. 
Graded CR/NC. For specific procedures and 



regulations, see section of catalogue on 
Other Learning Experiences. 

EDU 304 three credits 

Integrated Language Arts and Social 

Studies 

Includes 20 hours pre-practicum 
Prerequisites: EDU 207, 220; acceptance to 
the teacher preparation program 
Addresses the centrality of reading, writing, 
listening, speaking, viewing, and visual 
representation in all thinking. The social 
studies will be emphasized as we apply 
current and traditional ideas about language 
arts instruction to the practice of teaching. 
Offered at the graduate level as EDU 504. 

EDU 325 three credits 

Reading in the Content Areas: Middle 

and Secondary 

Prerequisite: EDU 207; acceptance to the 
teacher preparation program 
Critical examination of the breadth of 
literacy needed to become a successful 
student at the middle and secondary levels. 
Participants study the reading process, 
including strategies for improving reading 
comprehension, identify the components of 
specific genres found in the disciplines, and 
develop strategies for reading across the 
content areas. Previously offered as EDU 
315. 

EDU 326 three credits 

Contemporary Middle and High School 

Education 

Includes 25 hours pre-practicum 
Prerequisite: EDU 207; acceptance to the 
teacher preparation program 
Equity, diversity, motivation, alternative 
assessment, multicultural education, and the 
social problems of adolescents in middle and 
high school. Provisions for the inclusion of 
special needs students, state and federally- 
mandated educators are pursued through 
cooperative learning with an instructional 
prototype as the result. Students complete 
extensive reading assignments, written 
reports, action research, varied assessments, 
and a demonstration project. 

EDU 327 three credits 

Integrated Instructional Planning, K-12 

Includes 20 hours pre-practicum 
Prerequisite: EDU 207; acceptance to the 
teacher preparation program 
Participants examine instructional practices 
and learning strategies to create a classroom 
where all students have the opportunity to 
learn. The course focuses on specific 
methods and techniques to address content, 
lesson planning and curriculum design that 



integrate disciplines, and classroom 
assessment and evaluation of student 
learning. The course is designed with special 
topics for elementary, middle, and second- 
ary students. Graduate-level students must 
meet additional work expectations. 

EDU 330 three credits 

Teaching Methods and Materials in 

Managing Business Education 

Prerequisite: EDU 207 or equivalent 
Basic methods and materials that relate to 
the instruction of business education. 
Particular emphasis will be devoted to 
teaching and developing alternative 
curricula designs and resource units in a 
variety of business subjects. 

EDU 347 three credits 

Teaching and Managing Inclusive 

Classrooms, K-12 

Includes 20 hours pre-practicum 
Prerequisite: Acceptance to the teacher 
preparation program 

A survey of instructional and management 
techniques for teaching all students in 
general education classrooms through 
differentiated instruction and attention to 
different learning styles. Participants 
examine disability law and requirements to 
meet the needs of students identified with 
special needs in an inclusive classroom. 
Offered at the graduate level as EDU 547. 

EDU 350 three credits 
Educational Research 

Prerequisite: Acceptance to the teacher 
preparation program or permission of 
instructor 

Prepares students to evaluate work 
conducted in the area of educational 
research. Both quantitative and qualitative 
education research are investigated. 

EDU 353 three credits 
Education: Administration and 
Supervision 

Prerequisite: Acceptance to the teacher 
preparation program 
General introduction to contemporary 
practices and policies in educational 
administration and supervision. Instruction 
will be by lecture, case studies, and student 
reports. Topics covered include curriculum 
planning and design, staff organizations and 
relationships, and student and community 
relationships. 

EDU 370 three credits 
Urban Education 

Prerequisite: Acceptance to the teacher 
preparation program or permission of 



100 



instructor 

Designed to offer a broad focus on the 
urban student as contrasted with his/her 
rural/suburban counterpart. Current 
educational problems with historical 
perspectives speak to reform and change in 
urban schools and community settings. 

EDU 376 three credits 

Using Educational Technology in 

Educational Settings 

Prerequisite: Familiarity with personal 
computing and word processing and 
acceptance to the teacher preparation 
program; or permission of instructor 
Exploration of educational technology as a 
tool to support teacing and learning at 
elementary and secondary levels. Computer 
software, CD ROM and laser disk applica- 
tions, educational telecommunications, and 
network resources are examined. 

EDU 409 three credits 
Sociology of Education 

Prerequisite: Acceptance to the teacher 
preparation program or permission of 
instructor 

A study of social processes underlying 
education. Major areas covered include the 
current social forces affecting education, 
the place of the school in American culture, 
the impact of social stratification on 
education, and the role of the teacher in a 
period of rapid social change. 

EDU 410 three credits 

Educational Tests and Measurements 

Prerequisite: Acceptance to the teacher 
preparation program or permission of 
instructor 

Assists the student in evaluating educational 
tests and measurements conducted in the 
area of descriptive and inferential statistics. 
Concepts such as central tendency, 
correlation, regression, variability, T-test, 
analysis of variance, Chi-square, and 
hypothesis testing will be discussed in 
depth. 

EDU 414 twelve credits 
Practicum (Elementary) 

Prerequisites: All program coursework 
completed with B- or better in each course; 
2.75 GPA; and passing score on the 
Elementary Content Area of the MTEL 
Corequisite: EDU 416 
A fifteen-week full-time classroom 
experience under the direction of university 
faculty and cooperating classroom teachers. 

EDU 415 twelve credits 
Practicum (Middle and Secondary) 



Prerequisites: All program coursework 
completed with B- or better in each course; 
2.75 GPA; and passing score on the 
appropriate Content Area of the MTEL 
Corequisite: EDU 417 
A fifteen-week full-time classroom experi- 
ence under the direction of university faculty 
and cooperating classroom teachers. 

EDU 416 three credits 
Seminar, Elementary 

Corequisite: EDU 414 
Small group meetings, workshops, and 
discussions with university faculty and other 
key school personnel about critical incidents 
and issues arising from and related to the 
interns' actual teaching experiences. 

EDU 417 three credits 
Seminar, Middle and Secondary 

Corequisite: EDU 41 5 
Small group meetings, workshops, and 
discussions with university faculty and other 
key school personnel about critical incidents 
and issues arising from and related to the 
interns' actual teaching experiences. 

EDU 451 three credits 
Contemporary Issues and Challenges 

Prerequisite: Acceptance to the teacher 
preparation program or permission of 
instructor 

Contemporary problems such as drugs, 
violence, sexism, and racism, in relation to 
the school setting. Cross-listed as AAS 451 
when the subject is related to that minor. 

EDU 495 three credits 
Independent Study 

Prerequisites: Upper-division standing; 
permission of instructor, department 
chairperson, and college dean 
Individual study of additional areas needed 
for teacher certification, including methods 
in specific disciplines, reading, etc. Terms 
and hours will be arranged. Confer with 
appropriate members of the Education 
Department. 

EDU 196, 296, 396, 496 three credits 
Directed Study 

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor, 
department chairperson, and college dean 
Study under the supervision of a faculty 
member in an area covered in a regular 
course not currently being offered. 
Conditions and hours to be arranged. 
Confer with Department Chairperson and 
Director of Teacher Certification. 



Graduate Courses for Licensure 

Graduate versions of Education courses are 
offered for initial licensure certification of 
students who already possess a bachelor's 
degree. 

EDU 504 three credits 

Integrated Language Arts and Social 

Studies 

Prerequisite: EDU 520 

See EDU 304. Graduate-level students must 
meet additional work expectations. 

EDU 520 three credits 

Teaching Reading in Elementary Schools 

See EDU 220. Graduate-level students must 
meet additional work expectations. 

EDU 527 three credits 

Integrated Instructional Planning, K-1 2 

See EDU 327. Graduate-level students must 
meet additional work expectations. 

EDU 514 three credits 
Practicum, Elementary 

400 hours supervised student teaching 
Prerequisites: EDU 504, 520, 527, 547, BIO 
600, content methods course (or Music 
Education course sequence); and passing 
score on the Elementary Content Area of 
the MTEL 

Corequisite: EDU 516 
A fifteen-week full-time classroom experi- 
ence under the direction of university faculty 
and cooperating classroom teachers. 

EDU 515 three credits 
Practicum, Middle and Secondary 

400 hours supervised student teaching 
Prerequisites: EDU 525, 527, 547, content 
methods course (or Music Education course 
sequence); and passing score on the 
appropriate Content Area of the MTEL 
Corequisite: EDU 517 
A fifteen-week full-time classroom experi- 
ence under the direction of university faculty 
and cooperating classroom teachers. 

EDU 516 three credits 
Seminar, Elementary 

Corequisite: EDU 514 
Small group meetings, workshops, and 
discussions with university faculty and other 
key school personnel about critical incidents 
and issues arising from and related to the 
interns' actual teaching experiences. 

EDU 517 three credits 
Seminar, Middle and Secondary 

Corequisite: EDU 515 

Small group meetings, workshops, and 



101 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Complete program descriptions are available 
in the Graduate Catalogue. 



discussions with university faculty and other 
key school personnel about critical incidents 
and issues arising from and related to the 
interns' actual teaching experiences. 

EDU 525 three credits 

Reading in the Content Areas: Middle 

and Secondary 

Prerequisite: EDU 207; acceptance to the 
teacher preparation program 
See EDU 325. Graduate-level students must 
meet additional work expectations. 

EDU 547 three credits 

Teaching and Managing Inclusive 

Classrooms, K-12 

See EDU 347. Graduate-level students must 
meet additional work expectations. 

Education Courses for the Masters 
of Art in Teaching 

EDU 607 six credits 
Teaching forthe 21st Century 

A year-long study which explores the 
philosophy, the underlying theories, and the 
classroom applications of current paradigm 
shift in education. 

MAT 609 three credits 

Effective Instruction — Research Based 

Models 

Prerequisite: MAT enrollment or permission 
of instructor 

Translating the results of research into 
practical, usable, and theoretically sound 
strategies that teachers can use in today's 
diverse classrooms. 

EDU 610 three credits 
Developmental Language Arts 

Surveys methods of teaching the language 
arts which take into consideration elemen- 
tary and middle school students' needs and 
abilities. 

EDU 611 three credits 
Developmental Reading 

A study of the cultural, social and psycho- 
linguistic principles, strategies and practices 
underlying reading and learning to read. 

EDU 612 three credits 

Teaching Writing in the Elementary and 

Middle School 

A developmental^ appropriate model to 
provide participants with the theory, the 
tools, and the support to create a writing 
program in their classrooms. 



EDU 613 three credits 

Literature for the Elementary and 

Middle School Child 

Introduces methods of bringing literature to 
children grades K-8. 

EDU 615 three credits 

Current Trends in the Teaching of Social 

Studies in Elementary and Middle 

Schools 

Social studies as a tool to help young people 
develop the ability to make informed 
decisions for the public good as citizens of a 
culturally diverse, democratic society in an 
independent world. 

EDU 625 / FLL 625 three credits 
Alternative Assessment and The 
National Standards in Foreign Language 
Education 

A critical examination of recent theory and 
practice concerning the role of assessment 
in foreign language curricula. 

EDU 662 three credits 

The Newspaper as a Tool for 

Reading Instruction 

Analysis of basic reading skills (comprehen- 
sion, vocabulary development) and transfer 
of these basic skills to content area reading. 
Identification of specific reading needs, 
correlation of reading instruction with a 
student need assessments, and the 
development of reading material reflecting 
reading skills and student needs are also 
addressed through the use of the newspa- 
per as a tool in reading instruction. This 
reading course is designed for teachers in 
grades K-12. 



Other Graduate Education Course 

EDU 551 three credits 
Contemporary Issues and Challenges 

A variable-topics course for education topics 
of current interest. Recently offered topics 
include Authentic Assessment, Leadership 
Mentoring, Teaching and Learning Intuition, 
Teaching and Learning About Women. 



Master of Arts in Teaching Core 
Courses 

These courses may be taught by faculty 
from various departments in the College 
Full course descriptions are available in the 
Graduate Catalogue. 



MAT 601 three credits 

Curriculum Design and Implementation 

Prerequisite: MAT enrollment or permission 
of instructor 

A study of curriculum dimensions, concepts, 
design, and products for varied student 
populations and school settings. This course 
focuses on curriculum planning on 
multicultural and multisector levels, research 
of curriculum development, and the study of 
curriculum issues, trends, and innovations. 

MAT 603 three credits 
Foundations of Education 

Prerequisite: MAT enrollment or permission 
of instructor 

A study of insights which various disciplines 
can offer to the discussion of major 
educational issues, policies, and trends. The 
disciplines of philosophy, psychology, 
sociology, and history will provide the 
intellectual foundation designed to develop 
an awareness of and critical disposition to 
pressing educational concerns. 

MAT 605 three credits 
Effective Research Methods 

Prerequisite: MAT 603 
The techniques and criteria for understand- 
ing and conducting research in education 
with emphasis on action research. Topics 
include research strategies, secondary 
literature review, research design, data 
collection, research techniques, and the 
completion of a research proposal for a 
Thesis Research Project. 

MAT 606 three credits 
Thesis Research Project 

Prerequisite: MAT 605 or equivalent 
Researching an applied, experimental, or 
theoretical problem in education with an 
emphasis on action research, its application 
to K-12 teaching and learning, and the 
professional development of the researcher. 
The research will lead to a Thesis Research 
Report which requires approval by the 
candidate's Thesis Research Project 
Committee for the awarding of an MAT 
degree. 



102 



Interdisciplinary Courses for the 
Master of Arts in Teaching 

MAT 650 one to four credits (usually three) 
Seminar: Contemporary Issues in 
Teaching and Education 

An investigation of current issues in 
education. The seminar will bring together 
area teachers and administrators, faculty, 
and invited experts across grade-level 
divisions, but on some occasions, sessions 
may be held covering topics that will be 
considered for a particular grade level. May 
be repeated with change of content. 

MAT 695 three credits 
Internship 

A fifteen week full-time classroom experi- 
ence under the mentoring of university 
faculty and cooperating classroom teachers 

MAT 699 three credits 
Graduate Thesis 

Prerequisites: MAT candidacy and MAT 605 
or equivalent 

Thesis research and writing. Submission of 
formal thesis is required for awarding of 
credit. Graded P/F. 



SCI 501 Teaching Life Science and 
laboratory Techniques three credits 
Prerequisite: MAT enrollment or permission 
of instructor 

Life science concepts and laboratory skills 
that relate to the instruction of middle and 
secondary education. Particular emphasis is 
devoted to the application of infused 
technology and science in unit development 
and lesson plans. 

SCI 503 Marine Science for Teachers 

three credits 

Prerequisite: MAT enrollment or permission 
of instructor 

Marine science for teachers, in application 
to the local environment. This is a class- 
room/ field-based science course for general 
science teachers that will link specific 
learning standards from the Massachusetts 
State Frameworks to the local environment. 
Sample MCAS questions from fifth, eighth, 
and tenth grade science and technology 
examinations will be analyzed. 



103 



College of Arts and Sciences 



English 



Faculty and Fields of Interest 



In scheduling its courses, the English 
Department recognizes its obligations to its 
English majors — a group that includes those 
who intend to go on to graduate study, 
those who intend to enter the teaching 
profession, and those who plan careers in 
such areas as public relations, editorial 
work, journalism, technical and professional 
writing, creative writing, personnel work, 
and the like. The department also recog- 
nizes its obligations to non-English majors— 
those students who elect English courses in 
order to gain some acquaintance with the 
rich cultural heritage that English, Ameri- 
can, and comparative literature provide, and 
those who, through advanced courses in 
writing, wish to improve their powers of 
communication. 

In addition, the department provides a first 
year English program that includes 
introductory composition courses (ENL 101, 
102), testing and evaluation of writing 
ability of incoming students, English-as-a- 
second language instruction, and profes- 
sional communications courses for the 
students in business, technology, engineer- 
ing, and computer science programs. 

English majors are offered a choice of three 
options: the literature option, the writing/ 
communications option and the drama/film 
studies option, each leading to a Bachelor 
of Arts degree. These options reflect the 
department's conviction that perceptive 
reading, effective writing, and clear thinking 
are interconnected. 

The English department also offers a 
graduate program leading to a Master of 
Arts degree in professional writing designed 
to give students a background in rhetorical 
and communication theories and the 
advanced skills necessary for professional 
jobs in business, government, media, 
teaching, industry, or publishing. 



Jerry Blitefield composition, creative 
writing 

James Bobrick modern poetry, Renaissance 
literature, children's literature, fantasy 

Janet Gardner dramatic literature, 
computers and literary study 

Louise A. Habicht (director of university 
honors programs) American literature, 
regional literature, multicultural American 
literature 

Mary Hallet writing pedagogy, composition 
and rhetoric, creative nonfiction 

Everett H. Hoagland African-American 
literature, African and West Indian literature, 
creative writing (poetry) 

Catherine Houser literary nonfiction, 
creative writing (fiction), professional writing 

Barbara R. Jacobskind American literature, 
women's literature 

Joan Kellerman ESL, creative writing 
(poetry), comedy, literature and psychology 

John M. Lannon composition, professional 
writing 

Richard J. Larschan medieval literature, 
18th-century British literature, satire 

James E. Marlow 1 9th-century British 
literature, theory of fiction, creative writing 
(fiction and drama) 

William Nelles critical theory, medieval 
literature 

Peter Owens journalism, editing, research 
methods, computers and writing, creative 
writing (fiction) 

Alan R. Rosen Victorian poetry and poetics, 
Modern British and American fiction, 
research methods, scriptwriting 

Lulu C. H. Sun rhetoric and composition, 
English education, English romantic 
literature 



Linus Travers restoration-18th-century 
British literature, drama, comic literature, 
grants writing 

John Luther Wallin rhetoric, ethics in 
professional writing, environmental writing, 
documentary writing, science journalism 

Robert P. Waxier romanticism, Jewish 
studies, professional writing, communication 
theory 

Charles W. White III American literature, 
film 



JudySchaaf 1 9th century American 
literature, Medieval English literature, 
literature of the environment 

Edwin J.Thompson (chairperson) 

comedy, film, post World War II fiction 



104 



English Major 

BA degree 



To receive a degree with a major in English, 
students must demonstrate their ability to 
read intelligently and perceptively in such 
genres as fiction, poetry, and drama, in 
works of literary criticism and literary 
history, and in works dealing with the 
nature of language itself. Candidates must 
also demonstrate the ability to write 
effectively, to use a library efficiently and 
honestly, to deal critically with generaliza- 
tions about historical periods and genres, 
and to handle a variety of critical questions 
with some maturity. 

The English department offers three options 
within the major: the literature option, the 
writing/communications option, and the 
drama/film studies option. Each student 
selects one of these options. 

Writing/communication candidates must 
demonstrate their ability to analyze 
rhetorical problems while composing 
effective, well-formulated documents for 
specified audiences and to create docu- 
ments using appropriate computer software. 

Students who select the drama/film studies 
option will master analytical approaches to 
and historical development of dramatic 
literature and film as well as their relation- 
ship to the development of other genres. In 
addition, they will learn to create effective 
written work in the form of reviews, critical 
essays, and stage or screen plays. Although 
this option will concentrate on courses in 
literature and writing, students are 
encouraged to participate in theater and/or 
film production and to arrange an appropri- 
ate off-campus applied internship. 



English Major 

Literature Option 







Credits 


Requirements 






ENL 300, 302 


Survey of British Literature I and II 


6 


ENL 303 


Survey of American Literature I 


3 


ENL 319 


Shakespeare 


3 


ENL 236 


Ancient World to the Renaissance 


3 


ENL 260* 


Intermediate Composition 


3 


One of 






the following: 


ENL 305, 307, 308, 318, 321 




Three literature courses at the 300-level 


9 


One 400-level literature seminar 


3 


Three additional English courses 


9 




Total 


42 


* a prerequisite for any 300-level writing course 




English Major 






Writing/Communication Option 








Credits 


Requirements 






ENL 300, 302 


Survey of British Literature I and II 


6 


ENL 303 


Survey of American Literature I 


3 


ENL 319 


Shakespeare 


3 


ENL 236 


Ancient World to the Renaissance 


3 


ENL 260* 


Intermediate Composition 


3 




(must be taken at UMass Dartmouth) 




One of 






the following: 


ENL 262, 265, 266, 350, 362 


3 


ENL 355 


Rhetorical Theory OR 


3 


ENL 356 


Language and Culture 





One 400-level writing/communications workshop 
(or approved 600-level graduate writing course) 

Three additional writing/communications courses, 
one at the 300-level 

Two additional English courses, one a literature course 

Total 

* a prerequisite for any 300-level writing course 



6 
42 



General Education Departmental Requirements 

Students majoring in English will meet their departmentally-controlled General Education 
requirements as follows: 

Area E: Select a course from the approved list 
Area I, Tier 2: Satisfied by ENL 361, 368, 369 
Area W, Tier 2: Satisfied by ENL 260 

Area O: Satisfied by ENL 265, 266, 270, 271, 272, 363, or 454 



105 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Credits 



English Major 

Drama/Film Studies Option 



ENL 300, 302 
ENL 303 
ENL 319 
ENL 236 
ENL 260* 



ENL 253 
ENL 255 

ENL 321 
ENL 362 



Survey of British Literature I and II 
Survey of American Literature I 
Shakespeare 

Ancient World to the Renaissance 

Intermediate Composition 

(must be taken at UMass Dartmouth) 

Introduction to Drama OR 
Introduction to Film 

Golden Ages of Drama 
Review Writing 



One 400-level seminar in dramatic literature or film; or 
writing workshop in drama or film (or approved 
600-level graduate writing course) 

Two 300-level drama or film courses 

One creative drama or film course 

One additional English course 



Total 



Credits 

6 
3 
3 
3 
3 



6 
3 
3 
42 



English Minor 

Literature Option 

Credits 

Three of the following: 

ENL 300, 302, 303, 304. 236 9 

ENL 319 Shakespeare 3 

Three additional literature courses 9 

Total 21 



English Minor 

Writing/Communication Option 



Credits 



a prerequisite for any 300-level writing course 



Three writing courses 
(one at the 300-level) 

One 400-level writing workshop 

Three literature courses 
(one at the 300-level) 

Total 



9 
21 



English Minor 

Drama/Film Studies Option 

Credits 

Twenty-one credits (7 courses) are required in the following distribution: 
3 in intermediate composition, 9 in film, and 9 in drama. 



ENL 253 or 255 3 

ENL 260* Intermediate Composition (must be taken at UMass Dartmouth) 3 
ENL 319 Shakespeare 3 

One course in dramatic literature or film literature (e.g., ENL 217, 253, 276, 
321,332,348,377) 3 

One creative drama or film course (e.g., ENL 269, 378, 453 or possibly 

a creative drama or film course in a foreign language 3 

One 300-level drama or film course or ENL 362 (applied drama course may 

be taken through Experiential Learning or Independent Study) 3 

One 400-level seminar in dramatic literature or film literature or a 400-level 

writing workshop in drama or film 3 

Total 21 

* a prerequisite for any 300-level writing course 



106 



English Honors Program 



English Courses 



Candidates must have completed a 
minimum of 6 English courses beyond the 
freshman level and have maintained a 
minimum GPA of 3.2 in all English courses 
taken, to be considered for admission to 
English Honors. Qualified candidates will be 
admitted upon recommendation of an 
English department faculty member willing 
to serve as sponsor. 

Requirements 

The program involves a closely supervised, 
two semester (6-credit) investigation into 
some literary, creative, or rhetorical topic 
devised by the student in consultation with 
the faculty sponsor, and requiring a 
substantial amount of independent reading 
and research. 

The program consists of two separable 
halves: The first part (ENL 491 or ENL 493) 
consists of intensive reading and study in 
the area of the student's proposal, based on 
the approved bibliography. By the end of 
semester I, students must (1) present a 
written proposal for an Honors Project and 
(2) take a written examination in the area of 
study — both to be administered and graded 
by the faculty sponsor. In this way students 
may receive three credits and a grade even if 
they decide not to continue in the full 
program. Based on the outcome of written 
work to date, the faculty member can assess 
whether to permit the student to continue: 
a minimum grade of "B" is required. 

In the second semester the student 
composes the Honors paper (ENL 492 or 
ENL 494), and a grade is awarded on the 
basis of this final paper. However, "Honors" 
will be awarded separately, according to 
criteria set forth below. (Hence it will be 
possible to make independent decisions on 
the awarding of "Honors," or mere credit.) 

Criteria and Methods of Evaluation 

A three person faculty committee — 
preferably one of them a specialist in the 
field under investigation — will judge all 
written work and administer an oral 
examination on the subject of the Honors 
Thesis (Students are entitled to select one of 
their examiners.) This committee will then 
award "Honors" or not, on the basis of the 
following criteria: (1) overall seriousness of 
purpose; (2) mastery of scholarly or creative 
methodology; (3) sophistication of insights 
achieved; (4) ability to relate findings 
verbally. 



Implementation 

Each spring the department will inform all 
junior English majors with the minimum 
grade point average that they qualify to 
participate in the Honors Program, and 
indicate what the program entails. Students 
will be responsible for selecting their own 
sponsors. No department member will be 
expected to direct more than one Honors 
student per year. 



Notes 

* Administrative credits do not count 
towards the total required for graduation. 

** English 101 and 102 satisfy the "Tier 
1 " requirements in Information/Computer 
Literacy and in Writing Skills. 



ESL 100 three administrative credits* 
Basic English as a Second Language 

An introductory review of English language, 
reading, writing, speaking, and study skills 
designed for non-native speakers of English. 
This course requires work in the language 
lab and the Writing/Reading Center as well 
as class. The course focuses on ESL readings, 
idiomatic usage, vocabulary building, 
grammar review, pronunciation, conversa- 
tion, listening skills, and composition. 

ESL 101 three credits 

English as a Second Language 

Prerequisite: ESL 100 or by pre-test 
placement 

A writing course for non-native speakers 
who have developed basic proficiency in 
English. Students address rhetorical 
problems using complex syntactical and 
grammatical structures suitable for abstract 
thinking and academic discourse. Prepara- 
tion for ENL 101. 

ENL 101 three credits 

Critical Writing and Reading I** 

Writing in a variety of modes for various 
purposes and audiences; writing to 
communicate and to learn in the humani- 
ties. Rhetorical choices and revision 
strategies will be studied. Students will 
develop skill in critical reading necessary for 
thinking and writing. 

ENL 102 three credits 

Critical Writing and Reading II** 

Prerequisite: ENL 101 

A course designed to advance the rhetorical 
skills and understanding developed in ENL 
101. Critical reading of various literary 
genres and analytic and argumentative 
writing assignments enhance the student's 
awareness and use of effective language. 

ENL 200 three credits C 
Studies in Literature 

A study of selected readings dealing with a 
special topic chosen by the instructor. 
Recent special topics include New England 
Literature, Children's Literature, the Artist in 
Literature, Black Music and Black Literature. 
May be repeated with change of content. 
Cross-listed as AAS 200. 

ENL 201 three credits C 
Major British Writers 

A study of selected works, from several 
genres, by outstanding British authors. 

ENL 202 three credits C 
Major American Writers 

A study of selected works, from several 



107 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Gen Ed Note: In English, all literature 
and creative writing courses satisfy 
Cultural/Artistic Literacy. Eligible lower 
division courses are markedC; advanced 
literature courses are eligible as well. 
Some courses satisfy other requirements, 
as noted. 



genres, by outstanding American authors. 

ENL 203 three credits C, G 
Survey of World Literature I 

A study of selected masterpieces from the 
Golden Age of Greece to the Renaissance. 

ENL 204 three credits C, G 
Survey of World Literature II 

A study of selected masterpieces from the 
Renaissance to the present. 

ENL 205 three credits C, G 
Travel Literature 

Prerequisite: ENL 102 

Reading and discussion of important works 
of travel literature from a wide range of 
periods and genres, with particular emphasis 
on international and multicultural narratives. 

ENL 206 three credits C 
Detective Fiction 

A study of famous mystery, suspense, and 
detective fiction. 

ENL 208 three credits C 
Myth and Literature 

An exploration of the role of myth and 
dream in poetry, fiction, film, and drama. 
Heavy emphasis on Jungian and Freudian 
interpretation of myth, but not to the 
exclusion of other anthropological, 
psychological, or theological approaches, 
through readings in Homer, Ovid, Beowulf, 
Shakespeare, Coleridge, Joyce, and Hesse. 

ENL 209 three credits C 
The Bible as Literature 

Readings from the Old and New Testament 
discussed in the context of the history of 
ideas, literary genres, the effectiveness of 
communication to the intended audience, 
and influences on other literature. 

ENL 210 three credits C 
Literature of the American West 

An exploration of the myths and realities of 
the American West (west of the Mississippi) 
as they are reflected in literature — e.g., the 
cowboy, westward expansion, the Spanish 
conquistadors. 

ENL 211 three credits C 
The American Dream 

A study of the meaning of success as 
reflected in works ranging from those of 
Benjamin Franklin and Horatio Alger to the 
plays of Arthur Miller. Cross-listed as LST 
211. 

ENL 214 three credits C 
African-American Literature 



Chronological survey beginning with Gusta- 
vus Vassa and Robert Hayden's "Middle 
Passage" and continuing through contem- 
porary writers. Toward the end of the course 
there will be focus on new women writers 
and major writers through the 1990s. Cross- 
listed as AAS 214; WMS 214. 

ENL 215 three credits C 

West Indian and African Literature 

A study of important and innovative West 
Indian and contemporary African writers. 
Cross-listed as AAS 215. 

ENL 216 three credits C 
Comedy and Satire 

A study of the philosophy and psychology of 
literary and other forms of comedy and 
satire, including works by such writers as 
Aristophanes, Shakespeare, Swift, Voltaire, 
Wilde, Shaw, Waugh, Heller, Vonnegut, and 
others, as well as film artists such as 
Chaplin, Sellers, and Woody Allen. 

ENL 217 three credits C 
Greek Myth and Drama 

An exploration of the role of myth in the 
creation of the plots of Aeschylus, 
Sophocles, Euripides, and Aristophanes. 

ENL 218 three credits C 
Literature and Society 

A study of the relationship between the 
individual and society through readings in 
modern literature. Cross-listed as LST 218. 

ENL 219 three credits C 
Classicism and Romanticism 

A course contrasting the two major modes 
of thought in Western Civilization to show 
what part each has played in the creation of 
major works of literature, with consideration 
of analogous examples from music, painting, 
sculpture, and architecture. 

ENL 221 three credits C 

Special Topics in Comparative Literature 

A course dealing with literature of two or 
more countries, based on a topic selected by 
the instructor. May be repeated with change 
of topic. 

ENL 223 three credits C 
Fantasy Literature 

A study of fantasy as a genre, comparing 
other works with Tolkien's Lord of the Rings 
trilogy. 

ENL 224 three credits C 
Jewish Literature 

A study of modern Jewish stories and novels 
with emphasis on such writers as Singer, 



Bellow, Wiesel, Malamud, and others. 
Cross-listed asJST224. 

ENL 225 three credits C 
Native American Literature 

Reading, studying, thinking critically, and 
writing about Native American literature. 

ENL 226 three credits C, D 
Multicultural American Literature 

A study of imaginative literature by writers 
representing the rich variety of racial, ethnic, 
religious, social, and regional groups in 
America. Specific focus of the course may 
vary depending on the instructor. 

ENL 227 three credits CO 
Semiotics of Culture 

Introduces basic theories of communication 
and models of semiotic analysis. Topics 
include iconicity, proxemics, kinetics, and 
the multiple levels of decoding. Readings 
include analysis of common cultural artifact, 
verbal and visual media. Students will 
analyze popular myths and television and 
print advertising. 

ENL 228 three credits C 
Semiotics of Media 

The semiotics of media introduces theories 
of communication tailored for the verbal 
arts. Such topics as iconology, iconicity, and 
hegemonic coding in art style are examined 
to broaden interpretations of poetry, fiction, 
film, and theater. 

ENL 236 three credits C, G 
Ancient World to the Renaissance 

A study of the origins of English literature 
embedded in Biblical, Classical, and 
Medieval sources, with special emphasis on 
Homer, the Greek dramatists, Virgil, and 
Dante. Designed to help English majors 
understand the allusions that enrich English 
literature. 

ENL 245 three credits C 
Images of Woman in Literature 

Study of archetypes and stereotypes of 
women in literature from the ancient world 
to the present in an attempt to reevaluate 
traditional literary criticism and how authors 
have used images of women to create 
character, plot, etc. Cross-listed WMS 245. 

ENL 246 three credits C 
Women Writers 

Examination of the relationship between the 
woman writer and her work through a study 
of literature by and about women. Cross- 
listed WMS 246 and AAS 246 



108 



Note: ENL 101 and ENL 102 are prerequi- 
sites for all 200-level or higher English 
courses unless otherwise noted. 



ENL 250 three credits C 
Introduction to Poetry 

A course in the analysis of poetry showing 
how formalistic and thematic elements in 
the poem interact to create meaning 
through an examination of a variety of 
poetic forms. 

ENL 251 three credits C 
Introduction to the Short Story 

A consideration of short fiction to illustrate 
the history, range, and properties of the 
genre. The course treats such representative 
authors as Poe, Hawthorne, Tolstoy, Joyce, 
Faulkner, and other 19th and 20th century 
figures from a variety of national literatures. 

ENL 252 three credits C 
Introduction to the Novel 

A study of how to read and identify the 
various types of novels, coupled with an 
introduction to the history of the novel. 

ENL 253 three credits C 
Introduction to Drama 

An introductory course in how to read and 
view a play, including instruction in the 
nature and methods of tragedy, comedy, 
melodrama, tragicomedy. 

ENL 254 three credits C 
Autobiographical Writing 

A course emphasizing the development of 
techniques of lifewriting through exercises 
in journal-keeping and autobiographical 
writing. The course includes readings in 
sample journals and autobiographies and 
study of autobiographical theory. 

ENL 255 three credits C 
Introduction to Film 

Provides beginning students of film with a 
comprehensive view of its history, aesthet- 
ics, and critical terminology. Attention will 
also be paid to elementary film theory, to a 
comparison of film with other genres 
(especially drama and narration), and to 
representative works of such major figures 
in the artistic development of the genre as 
Chaplin, Renoir, Welles, Bergman, 
Hitchcock, and Kurosawa. 

ENL 260 three credits W 
Intermediate Composition 

A course emphasizing the development of 
skill in organizing materials, the formation 
of a lively and concrete style and an 
authentic personal voice, and the growth of 
useful techniques in the arts of exposition, 
persuasion, and argumentation. 

ENL 262 three credits W 



Journalism I 

An exploration of the principles of journal- 
ism as applied in effective news writing and 
media reporting. Students develop skills in 
story design and structure, note-taking and 
story development, accuracy, balance, 
fairness, style, and writing technique. Legal 
and ethical issues are explored in detail as 
students develop and write local stories. 

ENL 265 three credits W, O 
Business Communications 

An introduction to the communication skills 
required in business and industry which 
emphasizes writing and revising business 
reports and proposals, letters and memoran- 
dums and on preparing and presenting oral 
reports. Computer applications are included. 

ENL 266 three credits W, O 
Technical Communications 

An introduction to the many purposes, 
audiences, forms, and formats of technical 
documents and professional correspon- 
dence. Students practice writing and editing 
letters, memos, and reports to achieve 
worthwhile content, sensible organization, 
and readable style and learn techniques of 
audience-and-use analysis to adjust a 
message's level of technicality to the needs 
and background of its audience. The course 
focuses throughout on writing as a 
deliberate process of deliberate decisions. 
Computer applications included. 

ENL 267 three credits C 
Creative Writing: Poetry 

The study of contemporary techniques in 
the writing of poetry. Manuscripts are read 
and discussed in class and during individual 
conferences. Workshop format. 

ENL 268 three credits C 
Creative Writing: Fiction 

Techniques of writing fiction. Manuscripts 
are read and discussed in class and during 
individual conferences. Workshop format. 

ENL 269 three credits C 
Creative Writing: Drama 

A study of the fundamental principles of 
dramaturgy. Manuscripts are read and 
discussed in class and during individual 
conferences. Workshop format. 

ENL 270 three credits O 
Speech Communication 

An introduction to the art of public speaking 
through the study of effective principles 
combined with practice in speaking before a 
group. 



ENL 271. 272 three credits each C, O 
Oral Interpretation of Literature I, II 

Study of and practice in the oral interpreta- 
tion of literary works with heavy emphasis 
on acting and the Stanislavski method. 

ENL 276 three credits C, G 
Film as Drama 

An intensive study of outstanding films with 
attention to the techniques of film criticism. 

ENL 279 three credits W 

Tutoring Writing: Theory and Methods 

— Honors 

Prerequisites: Honors Program or 3.20 GPA; 
by nomination and invitation only 
The training course designed for the Honors 
Writing Fellows Program. The course 
provides students opportunities to learn 
about on-going theoretical conversations 
regarding composition instruction, collabo- 
rative tutoring, and writing pedagogy. 
Students learn to use their theoretical 
knowledge to determine strategies for 
assisting peers with their written work. Once 
class hour per week is devoted to applica- 
tion in the Writing Center or in fellowing 
papers from a class, taping, and analyzing 
tutorial sessions, and interviewing faculty 
members about writing in the disciplines. 

ENL 293 three credits C 
Literature of the American South 

A study of such Southern writers as 
Faulkner, Wolfe, Warren, McCullers, 
O'Connor, Ellison, Ransom, Tate, and 
Tennessee Williams with the following 
questions in mind: What was the mood of 
the South which produced the 20th century 
renaissance? In what manner are the works 
related to or dependent on the writers' 
Southern background? What is the 
relationship of Southern to American 
literature? 

ENL 298 one to six credits 
Experiential Learning 

Prerequisites: At least sophomore standing; 
permission of the instructor, department 
chairperson, and college dean 
Work experience at an elective level 
supervised for academic credit by a faculty 
member in an appropriate academic field. 
Conditions and hours to be arranged. 
Graded CR/NC. For specific procedures and 
regulations, see section of catalogue on 
Other Learning Experiences. 

ENL 299 three credits C 
Introduction to Shakespeare 

A course designed primarily for non-English 
majors, which examines some of the typical 



109 



College of Arts and Sciences 



plays of the greatest dramatist in the English 
language. 

ENL 300 three credits C 
Survey of British Literature I 

A study of British literature from Beowulf to 
1798, with attention given to the cultural 
and historical context. 

ENL 302 three credits C 
Survey of British Literature II 

A study of British literature from 1 798 to the 
mid-20th Century, with attention given to 
cultural and historical context. 

ENL 303 three credits C 
Survey of American Literature I 

A survey of American writing from the 
Colonial Period to the Civil War, with 
emphasis on the historical, cultural, and 
philosophical developments which parallel 
the development of an American literature. 

ENL 304 three credits C 
Survey of American Literature II 

A continuation of ENL 303. A survey of 
American writing from the Civil War to the 
present, with some emphasis on historical, 
cultural, and philosophical developments in 
America during the period covered. 

ENL 305 three credits C 
Medieval Literature 

Reading and discussion of major works of 
medieval literature. This course focuses on 
English literature from Beowulf to Malory, 
but includes translations of key sources and 
analogues from other literatures. 

ENL 307 three credits C 
The English Renaissance 

A chronological overview of the major 
literary works, themes, and genres of the 
English Renaissance from Caxton and the 
inception of printing through Milton and the 
last of the great Renaissance epics. The 
course focuses on the development of 
poetic genres and on representative prose 
forms. Writers studied include Spenser, 
Sidney, Shakespeare, Donne, Herbert, 
Vaughn, and Milton. 

ENL 308 three credits C 
The Enlightenment 

A study of English Neo-classical and Pre- 
romantic writings by Dryden, Swift, Pope, 
Fielding, Johnson, Boswell, Goldsmith, and 
others. 

ENL 309 three credits C 
The Romantic Age 

A survey of English literature from 1796- 



1832 stressing the major poets — Blake, 
Wordsworth, Byron, Shelley, and Keats, with 
some study of novels and personal essays. 

ENL 310 three credits C 
The Victorian Age 

A study of the major English writers of 
nonfiction from 1832-1900, covering some 
prose nonfiction (Carlyle, Ruskin, Mill), but 
emphasizing such poets as Tennyson, 
Browning, Arnold, Rossetti, Swinburne, 
Meredith, Hopkins, and Housman. 

ENL 311 three credits C 
The Victorian Novel 

A study of the Victorian novel, both 
historically and generically, from Jane Austen 
to Thomas Hardy, including works by 
Austen, the Brontes, Dickens, Thackeray, 
George Eliot, Trollope, Meredith, and Hardy. 

ENL 314 three credits C 
Colonial American Literature 

A study of 1 7th- and 1 8th-century American 
literature from Captain John Smith through 
Benjamin Franklin with emphasis on the 
historical background and the various types 
of literature produced in the period. 

ENL 315 three credits C 
The American Renaissance 

A study of selected major writers from mid- 
1 9th-century America: Poe, Hawthorne, 
Melville, Emerson, Thoreau, Whitman, Fuller, 
and Douglass. Additional readings about the 
intellectual and social movements of the 
period are required. 

ENL 316 three credits C 

The 19th Century American Novel 

A study of American novelists from Cooper 
to Crane and Chopin with focus on 
individual novels as works of art and as 
examples of the development of the novel 
form in America in the 19th century. 

ENL 317 three credits C 

1 9th Century American Poetry 

A careful study of the major American poets 
of the 19th century from Freneau to 
Whitman and Dickinson. 

ENL 318 three credits C 
Chaucer 

Intensive and critical reading of Chaucer's 
major writings with attention to his cultural 
context. This course is designed primarily for 
English majors. 

ENL 319 three credits C 
Shakespeare 

A careful reading of Shakespeare's plays 



selected from the comedies, tragedies, and 
histories. The course explores Shakespeare's 
development as a dramatist, the reasons for 
his reputation as the greatest poet in the 
language, and the manner in which his plays 
reflect Elizabethan custom, attitudes, and 
beliefs. Some outside readings required in 
Shakespearean criticism and in the 
background of the period. 

ENL 321 three credits C 
The Golden Ages of Drama 

Representative plays from the most famous 
and most productive eras in the history of 
world drama — Fifth Century B.C. Greece, 
the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the age 
of Moliere, and the realistic and romantic 
drama of 19th century France and Germany. 

ENL 326 three credits C 

Studies in Modern Irish Literature and 

Culture I 

Development of Irish literature from the end 
of the 19th century through the first 
decades of the 20th century. Writers include 
Yeats, Joyce, Synge, O'Casey. The course 
examines the cultural, historical, and 
political background of Anglo-Irish relations. 

ENL 327 three credits C 

Studies in Modern Irish Literature and 

Cultured 

The drama, fiction, poetry and film created in 
Ireland since World War II. These works will 
be studied as a reflection of the profound 
changes in Irish society, politics and culture, 
on both sides of the border. Students will 
explore the reasons for the emergence of an 
Ireland with a cultural significance out of all 
proportion to its numbers. 

ENL 330 three credits C 
20th Century British Fiction 

A study of the 20th-century British novel, 
including such authors as Woolf, Joyce, 
Lawrence, Forster, Huxley, Cary, Spark, 
Lessing, and Sillitor. 

ENL 332 three credits C 
20th Century British Drama 

A study of British drama from the comedy of 
manners of Wilde and Shaw to the theater 
of the absurd of Beckett and Pinter. 

ENL 333 three credits C 
Modern British Poetry 

A study of the chief trends and the major 
poets and movements in modern British 
poetry. 

ENL 335 three credits C 

20th Century American Fiction — 1 900- 



110 



Note: ENL 101 and ENL 102 are prerequi- 
sites for all 200-level or higher English 
courses unless otherwise noted. 



1 



1945 

A study of the 20th-century American novel 
including Fitzgerald, Hemingway, Faulkner, 
West, and McCullers. 

ENL 336 three credits C 

20th Century American Fiction — 1 945 to 

the present 

A study of significant fiction in America 
since the middle of the 20th century, 
including Bellow, Ellison, Heller, Pynchon, 
LeGuin, Doctorow, Morrison, O'Brien, and 
others. 

ENL 337 three credits C 

20th Century American Poetry 

A study of major American poets of this 
century from Frost to Richard Wilbur. 

ENL 338 three credits C 
Modern Drama 

A study of modern dramatists from Ibsen, 
Chekhov, and Strindberg through such 
playwrights as Shaw, Brecht, O'Neill, 
Galsworthy, Eliot, Williams, Miller, 
Giraudoux, Albee, Pinter, and lonesco. 

ENL 339 three credits C 
American Drama 

A study of American drama from its 
beginnings to the present. 

ENL 340 three credits C 
Literature and Psychology 

An introduction to psychological interpreta- 
tions of literary works, including character 
analysis, ethnopoetics, and the psychology 
of audience. The course requires reading of 
selected literary texts in all genres, as well as 
works by psychoanalytical literary critics, 
philosophers, and anthropologists. 

ENL 341 three credits 

The Writing of Advertising 

Prerequisite: ENL 101, ENL 102 
Reviews the semiotic theories of Saussure, 
Peirce, Jakobson, Barthes and others. Using 
theories of verbal and visual persuasion, 
poetic diction and bits of plot, students study 
techniques of attracting and convincing 
audiences of radio, print, poster, and 
television ads. Finally, students will create 
effective ads. 

ENL 345 three credits C 
Literary Theory 

Introduction to key primary documents in the 
history of literary theory, from Plato and 
Aristotle through contemporary critical 
theory. 

ENL 346 three credits 



Wise Women 

Multidisciplinary perspective of the 
phenomena of women and aging in 
American society in a team-taught format. 
The experiences of older women are 
explored through literature, oral histories, 
and intergenerational class projects to 
determine the forces that affect quality of 
life and productivity in later life. Cross-listed 
as WMS 346. 

ENL 347 three credits C 

Special Topics in Women's Literature 

Advanced study of a specialized topic 
chosen by the instructor. Cross-listed as 
WMS 347. 

ENL 348 three credits C, D 
American Women Playwrights 

Analysis, evaluation, comparison, and 
appreciation of plays by 20th-century 
American women playwrights and insights 
into their themes and the images of women 
which they create. 

ENL 349 three credits 

Teaching English: Classroom Methods 

Prerequisite: ENL 260 

Theory and practice of teaching secondary 
English in its three dominant areas of 
reading, writing, and rhetorical analysis of 
literary works. Special focus will be upon 
how students acquire language and 
theoretical skills within the complex milieu 
of classrooms and how teachers can 
enhance that learning by translating sound 
theory into a broad range of learning 
activities and classroom strategies. This 
course is required for certification in 
secondary English teaching in the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts. 

ENL 350 three credits W 
Report and Proposal Writing 

Prerequisite: ENL 260 
An advanced professional writing course 
focusing on methods of gathering, analy- 
zing, organizing, and presenting data in 
graphic, written, and oral forms; on format- 
ting reports and proposals; and on revising 
and editing for clarity and conciseness. 

ENL 352 three credits W 
Public Relations Writing 

Prerequisite: ENL 260 
Development of a comprehensive under- 
standing of the principles and purposes of 
public relations. This writing-intensive course 
explores rhetorical strategies used by 
individuals, agencies, corporations, and 
governments to reach intended audiences. 
Students gain experience in public speaking 



and writing press releases, brochures, 
speeches, and audio-visual press releases. 

ENL 355 three credits 
Rhetorical Theory 

Prerequisite: ENL 260 

A study of rhetorical traditions, focusing on 
major theoreticians from Aristotle to 
Kenneth Burke. Depending on instructor, 
the course will concentrate on such topics as 
Classical rhetoric (from 5th-century B.C. 
through the English Renaissance), 18th- 
century rhetoric (Smith, Blair, Whately, 
Campbell), or contemporary rhetoric 
(Toulmin, Burke, Richards, Perelman, 
Kinneavy, Searle). 

ENL 356 three credits 
Language and Culture 

Prerequisite: ENL 260 

An examination of language's pivotal role in 
shaping a culture's values, beliefs, biases, 
and world view. By reading a broad range of 
essays, excerpts, and articles, students will 
learn how language shapes thought, molds 
perceptions, and determines how we think 
about and react to various people, groups, 
and cultures. Students will write a series of 
articles for lay audiences based on what 
they learn during the course. 

ENL 360 three credits W 
Advanced Thinking and Writing 

Prerequisite: ENL 260 
An advanced writing course emphasizing 
the application of the principles of argument 
(from ENL 260) to a variety of rhetorical 
situations. The course covers refinement of 
notions of persuasive content and logical 
organization in any discourse, development 
of a keen sense of style as outlook — of the 
figures of language and the range of 
connotation. 

ENL 361 three credits W 
Techniques of Critical Writing 

Prerequisite: ENL 260 
An advanced critical writing course with 
emphasis selected by the instructor. The 
course requires composition of a wide array 
of essays ranging from critical analyses and 
reviews to various types of persuasive 
discourses. Intensive practice in the critical 
or rhetorical evaluation of selected texts. 

ENL 362 three credits W 
Writing Reviews 

Prerequisite: ENL 260 

Fosters the ability to write effectively and to 
communicate the journalist's own interpre- 
tation and evaluation of art forms. Students 
produce reviews suitable for publication on 



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College of Arts and Sciences 



and off campus. 

ENL363 three credits W, 
Journalism II 

Prerequisite: ENL 260 
An exploration of news writing and 
reporting in selected areas of politics, social 
services, social science, technology, 
environment, law, natural science, 
education, arts, media, business, and other 
significant media subject areas. The course 
concentrates on effective research, story 
design, and writing technique for news 
stories and features across these areas. 

ENL 364 three credits W 
Feature Story and Article Writing 

Prerequisite: ENL 262 or ENL 363 
An exploration of the problems and 
principles of such feature story modes as 
profiles, how-to articles, narrative adven- 
tures, humor, news features, investigative 
reporting, interpretive and analytic 
reporting, opinion columns, and editorials. 

ENL 365 three credits W 
TheCommunityand Environmental 
Reporting 

Prerequisite: ENL 260; CHM 130, PHY 162, 
or BIO 112 

Studying and reporting on ways in which 
communities see themselves and their 
environments, and ways in which these self- 
images lead to specific policies and actions. 
This course focuses on researching and 
writing and explores the rhetorical situation 
for the reporter and the treatment meted 
out to nature. 

ENL 366 three credits C 

Creative Writing: Forms of Fiction 

Prerequisite: ENL 268 or permission of 
instructor 

Exploration of the forms of fiction and how 
a writer's creative choices with regard to 
form determine characterization, dialogue, 
plot, and narration. Assignments will 
include writing various creative pieces. 
Forms include, but are not limited to, the 
paragraph, the short short story, the short 
story, the novella, and the novel. 

ENL 368 three credits 

Web and Presentation Writing 

Prerequisite: ENL 260 

Introduction to writing on the Web and for 
electronic "slide show" presentations 
frequently used in the business and 
professional worlds. Students learn basic 
rhetorical principles involved in composing 
hyper documents while developing hardware 
and software skills that apply. 



ENL 369 three credits 
Desktop Publishing 

Prerequisite: ENL 260 
Exploration of principles of electronic 
document design used in professional 
writing. The course concentrates on desktop 
publishing, a genre of writing and design 
devoted primarily to creating paper docu- 
ments using the computer as the composing 
shop and printing press. Emphasis is on 
rhetorical and design skills required in 
generating professional-quality documents. 

ENL 370 three credits W 
Women, Writing, and the Media 

Prerequisite: ENL 260 

Studying and writing about issues related to 
gender, gender-specific language, and the 
representation of women in various forms of 
media. The course focuses on discovering, 
exploring, researching, and writing about 
women's issues. Cross listed as WMS 370 

ENL 372 three credits W 
Writing About Popular Culture 

Prerequisite: ENL 260 
Studying, thinking critically, and writing 
about popular culture and issues arising 
from it. This course involves exploring, 
researching and writing about such diverse 
and interconnected cultural elements as 
literature, politics, media, religion, science, 
food, fashion, sports, and the arts. 

ENL 373 three credits C 

World Cinema I: Origin to the New Wave 

Prerequisite: ENL 102 

A study of the international emergence and 
evolution of narrative film as a major genre 
of story-telling, from its origins in late 19th 
century photographic technology through its 
maturation in the mid-20th century. 
Through a combination of readings, film- 
viewing, and Internet research, students 
study the impact of technological change on 
the film medium, the development of film 
theory and aesthetics, major historical 
movements like German Expressionism and 
Italian Neoreahsm, and the impact of such 
seminal figures as Griffith, Eisenstein, 
Renior, Welles, Bergman, Kurosawa, 
Hitchcock, and Fellini. 

ENL 374 three credits C 

World Cinema II: New Wave to the 

Present 

Prerequisite: ENL 102; ENL 373 recom- 
mended, not required 
A continuation of ENL 373, focusing on 
developments in film production, theory, 
and criticism since 1960. As in ENL 373 
course materials include readings, films, and 



Internet resources. Among the topics are the 
French New Wave and its influence on 
European and American film, the emer- 
gence of Third World cinemas, post-modern 
theory and criticism, and the work of 
important contemporary filmmakers like 
Godard, Bunuel, Fellini, Tarkovsky, 
Wertmuller, Wenders, Altman, Scorsese, 
Nair, Lee, Zhang, Campion, and Tarantino. 

ENL 376 three credits 
Video Production 

Video production: theory, writing and 
techniques of video production. This course 
will introduce students to the scriptwnting, 
theoretical, and scientific readings and 
practical techniques of video production. 
Students will examine the theory and 
acquire training in the range of technical 
skills of this medium from story board to 
editing suite: scripting, composition, 
lighting, sound, camera operation, and 
video and audio editing. 

ENL 377 three credits C 

Special Topics in Film and Video 

Advanced and specialized studies in film 
(e.g., Shakespeare on Film) or in video 
production; topic selected by the instructor. 
May be repeated with change of topic. 

ENL 378 three credits 
Screenwriting 

Prerequisite: ENL 260 

An introduction to the principles of dramatic 
film writing, with emphasis on structure and 
form from treatment to finished script. 

ENL 390 three credits C 
Advanced Studies in Literature 

Advanced and specialized studies in literature 
(e.g. existential fiction, comparative literature, 
etc.). Topics will be selected by instructor. 



112 



Seminars and Workshops 

Seminars and workshops are open only to 
junior and senior English majors and minors. 
English majors in the Literature Option must 
take a literature seminar; English majors and 
minors in the Writing/Communications 
Option must take a writing workshop. 

ENL400 three credits 
Seminar in American Literature 

ENL401 three credits 

Seminar in 1 9th-Century American 

Literature 

ENL402 three credits 

Seminar in 20th-century American 

Literature 

ENL403 three credits 

Seminar in an American Author 

ENL410 three credits 

Seminar in British Literature before 1 7th 

Century 

ENL411 three credits 
Seminar in 1 7th-Century British Litera- 
ture 

ENL412 three credits 
Seminar in 1 8th-Century British Litera- 
ture 

ENL413 three credits 
Seminar in 1 9th-Century British Litera- 
ture 

ENL414 three credits 
Seminar in 20th-century British Litera- 
ture 

ENL415 three credits 
Seminar in a British Author 

ENL421 three credits 

Seminar in An American Literature 

Theme 

ENL422 three credits 

Seminar in British Literature Theme 

ENL424 three credits 
Seminar in Genre Studies 

ENL425 three credits 

Seminar in Comparative Literature 



ENL429 three credits 
Seminar in Critical Methods 

ENL430 three credits 
Seminarin Bibliography and 
Research Methods 

ENL450 three credits 
Advanced Poetry Workshop 

ENL451 three credits 
Advanced Fiction Workshop 

ENL452 three credits 
Playwriting Workshop 

ENL453 three credits W 
Advanced Writing Workshop 

ENL454 three credits W 
Advanced Journalism Workshop 

Honors Courses 

The following courses are arranged with 
permission of the instructor, the department 
chairperson, and the dean of the college or 
through the procedures specified for 
participation in honors work. 

ENL491 three credits 
Honors Study: Literature 

ENL492 three credits 
Honors Thesis: Literature 

ENL493 three credits 
Honors Study: Writing 

ENL494 three credits 
Honors Paper: Writing 



ENL495 variable credit 
Independent Study 

Prerequisites: Upper-division standing; 
permission of instructor, department 
chairperson, and college dean 

Study under the supervision of a faculty 
member in an area not otherwise part of the 
discipline's course offerings. Conditions and 
hours to be arranged. 

ENL 1 96, 296, 396, 496 three credits 
Directed Study 

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor, 
department chairperson, and college dean 

Study under the supervision of a faculty 
member in an area covered in a regular 
course not currently being offered. 
Conditions and hours to be arranged. 



113 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Courses in Professional 
Writing 

ENL 501 three credits 
Rhetorical Theory 

Aristotle defined rhetoric as "the faculty of 
discovering all the available means of 
persuasion in any given situation." W. Ross 
Winterowd defines it as "the global art that 
. . . studies the manifestations of all human 
discourse, not just persuasion." We will 
study our rhetorical tradition, focusing on 
major theorists from Aristotle to Foucault. 
Depending on the instructor, the course 
may concentrate on such topics as Classical 
Rhetoric (from the fifth century B.C. 
through the English Renaissance), Eigh- 
teenth Century Rhetoric (Smith, Blair, 
Whately, Campbell), or Contemporary 
Rhetoric (Toulmin, Burke, Richards, 
Perelman, Kinneavy, Searle, Foucault, and 
Derrida). 

ENL 502 three credits 
Communication Theories 

How does language shape thought? How 
do human beings communicate? What are 
the effects of mass communication? The 
study of communication draws from a 
range of disciplines including linguistics, 
semantics, philosophy, psycholinguistics, 
psychology, psychoneurology, and sociology 
to derive answers to how humans, as 
symbol makers, communicate. We will study 
communication models, mechanistic and 
transactional analogues, intra- and 
interpersonal systems, and systems theories. 
Topics will include: information processing, 
language as transactional process, 
communication models, rules of perceptual 
organization, communication networks, 
dyadic versus group and mass communica- 
tion, and nonverbal and interpersonal 
interactions. 

ENL 503 three credits 
Language and Its Use 

We will study the various grammars and the 
controversies surrounding them. Attention 
will be given to the history and growth of 
language, the artistic language of literature, 
and the basic vocabulary of language arts 
(e.g., style, rhetoric, linguistics, semantics, 
and technical versus artistic language). 

ENL 505 three credits 
Stylistics 

This course explores the analytical and 
creative possibilities of language. Through 
both a theoretical discussion and practical 
application, we will examine how basic 
elements of writing, such as diction - 



including figurative language - syntax, 
structure, and rhetorical style, express and 
modulate meaning in a variety of writing 
forms. Students will analyze, create, and 
critique imaginative pieces, including 
advertising copy, written speeches, song 
lyrics, technical articles, short fiction poetry, 
drama, and literary nonfiction. 

ENL 510 three credits 
Thesis/Project Research 

Principles of research, writing the thesis/ 
project proposal, and initial thesis/project 
drafting. The course explores primary and 
secondary research methods. Course 
content includes in-depth and formal 
interviewing techniques, principles of field 
observation, content analysis, literature 
reviews, electronic data searches, historical 
analysis, focus groups, case studies, 
questionnaire design, use and abuse of 
statistical inquiry, fundamentals of logic and 
causation, and philosophical inquiry into 
qualitative and quantitative research 
perspectives. The course places major 
emphasis on how to write a proposal and 
thesis/project aimed at eventual publication. 

ENL 550 three credits 
Special Area Study 

May be repeated once with change of 
content. 

Prerequisite: Approval of instructor and 
graduate program director 
Under special circumstances, graduate 
students may take a maximum of two 300- 
400 level undergraduate courses for 
graduate credit. Students cannot do 
"independent study"; they must take a 
course, and they must arrange with the 
instructor to do more writing than required 
of the undergraduates to justify the 
graduate level credit. This option is not 
intended for students needing to make up 
deficiencies in order to perform at an 
appropriate level in graduate courses, but as 
an opportunity for students to explore 
specialized areas of interest. Before 
registering for this course, students must 
write a proposal that clearly delineates the 
writing projects they will undertake. 

ENL 600 three credits 
Technical and Business Writing 

This course introduces students to the many 
purposes, audiences, forms, and formats of 
technical documents and professional 
correspondence. They will receive practice in 
writing and designing a variety of docu- 
ments to achieve worthwhile content, 
sensible organization, and readable style. 
Focus will be on techniques of audience- 



and-use analysis to adjust a message's level 
of technicality to the needs and background 
of its audience. Focus throughout is on 
writing as a deliberate process of deliberate 
decisions. 

ENL 601 three credits 
Report and Proposal Writing 

This course is a case-approach to research- 
ing, planning, writing, and revising 
recommendation reports and proposals to 
be used by decision-makers. Students will 
do primary research, on-line bibliographic 
searches, and learn how to access govern- 
ment documents. They also will learn 
techniques for writing and designing long 
reports and proposals for multiple audi- 
ences. 

ENL 602 three credits 
Grants Writing 

The course includes intensive research into 
funding sources, analysis and interpretation 
of guidelines and writing several drafts of 
grant proposals. This specialized rhetorical 
form involves analyzing complex audiences 
and learning persuasive techniques unique 
to grants writing. 

ENL 604 three credits 
Fundraising Rhetoric 

Analysis of the several modes of persuasive 
and descriptive writing used in successful 
fund-raising: direct mail solicitation, major 
gift proposals, planned given proposals and 
documentation, and stewardship. Students 
will study the ethos of the fund-raising 
community through a series of actual fund- 
raising initiatives. 

ENL 605 three credits 
Persuasive Writing and Speaking 

We will survey strategies from Aristotle 
through Madison Avenue, focusing on 
ethics and legality and techniques of 
argumentative discourse: its substance, 
shape, and style. Emphasis also is on 
avoiding logical fallacies, composing 
persuasive messages for clients, customers, 
colleagues, supervisors, subordinates, and 
audiences; on writing advertising copy and 
on giving oral presentations. 

ENL 610 three credits 
Rhetorical Strategies: Achieving 
Effective Style 

The theory and practice of style as a writer's 
"way of seeing." By analyzing and 
emulating outstanding contemporary prose, 
we develop a style vocabulary, and we 
explore possible "voices" for expressive, 
explanatory, or persuasive writing. Reading, 



114 



Note: Undergraduates may be prohibited 
from taking graduate courses, or access to 
them may be limited. See the Graduate 
Catalogue for graduate general and 
program requirements. 



writing, and editing assignments focus on 
the enduring qualities of forceful, readable, 
and emphatic style: clarity, conciseness, 
fluency, exactness, and engaging tone, 
among a wide array of syntactic and 
semantic elements that help make writing 
make a difference. 

ENL621 three credits 

Editing, Layout, and Document Design 

Students will learn about the in-house 
publishing process, with an emphasis on 
publications management and automation. 
Students will coordinate all facets of 
manuscript production, from automated text 
editing (or word processing) to automated 
typesetting and computer graphics. They will 
work with manuscripts at all production 
stages: copyediting, galley and page-proof, 
art development, and indexing. 

ENL623 three credits 
Web Authoring 

Problems, issues, and rhetorical strategies in 
authoring effective Web pages and content. 
The primary focus of the course is in 
authoring hypertext and hypermedia 
documents for the World Wide Web. In the 
process, students grapple with a host of 
problems related to effective non-linear 
writing, efficient and user-friendly interface 
design, and inventive mixing of text, 
graphics, video, sound, animation, and 
navigational components to achieve the 
most dynamic messages possible within the 
many constraints of hardware and software. 

ENL630 three credits 

Teaching Writing: Theory and Practice 

Analysis of contemporary composing and 
rhetorical theories to determine their 
significance for teaching writing Strategies 
for teaching writing will be developed. 
Topics range from methods for evaluating 
papers to collaborative learning, to cognitive 
processes and ways of interacting reading 
and writing. 

ENL631 three credits 

Teaching Technical and Professional 

Writing 

This practicum includes an eclectic survey of 
theories, tests, and strategies, the supervised 
teaching of an undergraduate course, and 
weekly colloquia to assess classroom practice 
and to share approaches. In addition, each 
student will complete a related research 
project (e.g., a comparative analysis of 
leading textbooks, course structures, or 
writing needs in local businesses). 

ENL632 three credits 



Teaching Reading and Writing: Theory 
and Practice 

Theories on reading and writing and their 
application to practice in both literature and 
the composition classrooms. The course 
covers current pedagogical methods and 
provides opportunities for students to 
discuss their own pedagogies and method- 
ologies for teaching. 

ENL640 three credits 

Advanced Principles in Journalism and 

Article Writing 

This course examines the limits, techniques, 
and constraints of investigative journalism. 
Emphasis will be placed on in-depth 
reporting in difficult settings, handling of 
controversial material, and story construc- 
tion of multi-source, highly complex, highly 
researched articles. 

ENL 641 three credits 

Technical and Scientific Journalism 

This course examines the problems, 
principles, and techniques of writing 
effectively in science and technology for 
both the general public and specialized 
audiences. Emphasis will be on evaluating 
technical language and jargon; understand- 
ing the needs of various audiences; learning 
research techniques; and developing 
interview and validation strategies that help 
writers clarify trends, theories, patterns, and 
perspectives. Students will be expected to 
write articles about newsworthy events for 
scientific and technical journals. 

ENL 642 three credits 
Public Relations Techniques 

This course offers students a comprehensive 
understanding of the purposes of public 
relations, its principles, and the techniques 
bywhich its goals are accomplished. The 
course covers the full range of public 
relations strategies used by individuals, 
agencies, corporations, and governments, 
including press releases, audio-visual 
presentations, public speaking, paid 
advertising, lobbying, fostering employee 
relations, and promoting citizen involve- 
ment. 

ENL 643 three credits 
Arts Reviewing 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Masters in 
Professional Writing Program 
A journalism course for potential or 
practicing critics/reviewers. Students will 
develop their ability to write effectively about 
and evaluate the visual, written or perform- 
ing arts. The course stresses both theoretical 
considerations concerning ethics, rhetorical 



strategies and persuasive techniques directed 
at varied audiences (i.e. general circulation 
publications versus specialty arts publications, 
alternative press versus mainstream) and the 
practical preparation of reviews which meet 
varying editorial requirements. 

ENL 645 three credits 

Visual Display, Formatting, and Desktop 

Publishing 

This course is designed to expose students 
to the principles of visual display in working 
documents so that, as editors and writers, 
they can work effectively with photogra- 
phers and artists in the creation of finished 
texts. Students will explore the use of 
photos, headlines, graphics, and visual 
elements as they can be used to enhance 
the meaning and effectiveness of written 
text. Students will learn to plan visual 
elements in the early stages of story, 
computer program, or document concep- 
tion. They will explore basic principles of 
visual design and experience the limitations 
and problems inherent in generating visual 
elements. Students will receive practical 
experience in dummying and layout, and 
will oversee several projects incorporating 
visual elements into written works. The 
purpose of the course is to train writers and 
editors to be sensitive and effective users of 
visuals designed primarily by others. 

ENL 650 three credits 

Topics in Professional Writing 

An in-depth writing workshop focusing on 
various topics in professional writing. The 
type of writing taught during a particular 
semester will vary, depending on student 
interests, faculty research and publication, 
or the strengths of visiting writers. Possible 
topics include approaches to writing novels, 
short stories, screenplays, or poetry; 
editorial, feature, how-to environmental, 
and other forms of journalistic writing; free- 
lance writing; and special topics in technical 
and professional writing. 

ENL 659 three credits 

Teaching Multicultural Literature: 

Theory and Practice 

Exploration of the study of multicultural 
literature in light of current thematic and 
cultural perspectives, including women's 
literature, minority literature, and third- 
world literature — especially as such works 
contrast with or depart from the established 
canon. The course will examine the 
influence of these works on student learning 
and issues that arise in the classroom when 
they are introduced and will consider 
options for use of alternative, non- 



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College of Arts and Sciences 



traditional materials. Discussion will focus 
on the pedagogical limitations, problems, 
and issues inherent in using a cultural or 
thematic approach, seeking ways to animate 
and vitalize the literature classroom. 

ENL660 three credits 
Graduate Workshop in Creative 
Writing I 

Fiction, poetry, playwriting, or the essay will 
be addressed, under the guidance of a 
published author. Students must demon- 
strate a talent for performance in one or 
more of the above genres - either by 
published works or by a reasonable body of 
manuscripts completed or in progress. As a 
class, we will discuss prototypical works, 
techniques, and the manuscripts of 
colleagues. A finished piece of work will be 
required of each student at approximately 
biweekly intervals. 

ENL 661 three credits 
Graduate Workshop in Creative 
Writing II 

Special topics, or continuation of ENL 660. 

ENL 662 three credits 

Graduate Workshop in Literary Nonf ic- 

tion 

This course offers students a comprehensive 
understanding of the principles and 
techniques involved in writing literary 
nonfiction. Students will explore how 
techniques of fiction are applied to 
experience and reality to create this modern 
form of American literature. 

ENL 665 three credits 
Practicum in Screenwriting 

Students will write an original theatrical- 
length script or one adapted from another 
media. 

ENL 666 three credits 

Practicum in Writing for Television: The 

Pilot Script and the Series 

This is a practicum in writing the television 
series, including the creation of a pilot script 
and related installments. Students may also 
elect to work in non-fiction television (e.g., 
training videos, documentary features and 
documentary serials). Series may include 
mini-series. 

ENL 667 three credits 
Documentary Writing 

Documentary Writing enables students to 
develop and write documentary scripts for 
film and television, training and industrial 
films for business, and films for educational 
organizations, as well as scripts for radio. 



Technical, artistic, and ethical issues of visual 
and oral representation will be addressed 
through practical writing projects. 

ENL 690 three credits 
Composition Theory 

Explores the history and principles of the 
relatively new discipline of composition 
studies. The course asks questions: What is 
the nature of composition studies? What is 
the history of the discipline? What is the 
relationship between rhetoric and composi- 
tion, between theory and practice? What 
bibliographic resources aid the work of 
composition specialists? What role do 
departmental and institutional policies play 
in shaping/influencing the teaching of 
writing? How has pedagogy been influ- 
enced by recent developments in rhetorical 
criticism, cultural studies, feminism, literary 
theory, language philosophy, and technol- 
ogy? In addition, the course will consider 
the future of composition studies within the 
university in areas of instruction such as 
basic writing, English as a second language, 
writing across the curriculum, and 
hypermedia. 



Internships 

ENL 701-702 three credits each 
Internship in Technical Writing 

Students will work as writers, editors, or 
special consultants for organizations or 
companies producing technical documents, 
computer programs, or technical memos 
and reports. Emphasis will be placed on the 
quality of the student's work and on the 
problems of collaborating with specialists to 
produce work for a range of audiences. 

ENL 703-704 three credits each 
Internship in Journalism 

Students will work as writers, editors, or 
assistants for newspapers, magazines, radio 
or TV stations, news organizations, or may 
work in a news writing or editing capacity in 
public relations. Emphasis will be placed on 
the quality of published work produced by 
the student. 

ENL 705-706 three credits each 
Internship in Creative Writing, 
Scriptwriting, or Translation 

Students will work as writers, editors, or 
free-lancers for publications, publishers, 
agents, or under the supervision of the 
course instructor who will serve as project 
reviewer. Emphasis will be placed on the 
quality of writing and the process of 
marketing manuscripts, scripts, and other 



creative works. 

ENL 707-708 three credits each 
Internshipin Businessand 
Professional Writing 

Students will work as writers, editors, 
assistants, or special consultants in business, 
industry, or nonprofit organizations Writing 
might include public relations pieces, such 
as press releases, advertising copy or 
unsolicited sales letters, and house organs; 
background papers for managers or 
executives, and memos, letters, and short 
reports. Emphasis will be placed on the 
quality of work produced by the student at 
the field sites. 

ENL 709-710 three credits 
Internship inTeaching 

Students will work in teaching or teaching- 
related activities m the field of writing, 
including tutoring programs or writing 
centers in public or private schools or 
special summer programs, under the 
supervision of an on-site supervisor and the 
direction of a faculty sponsor who teaches 
ENL 630, ENL 631 , or ENL 632. Emphasis 
will be placed on the quality of instructional 
materials produced by the student; 
programs created, updated, or redesigned; 
and written report of goals. No student 
shall receive credit for this course for work 
done as a teaching or graduate assistant, 
unless in connection with a project assumed 
in addition to the regular duties of that 
position. 



Project or Thesis 

ENL 750 three credits 

Thesis or Project in Professional Writing 

First semester. Graded CR/NC (upon 
approval of completed thesis or project). 



116 



Courses Specifically for the Master 
of Arts in Teaching 

ENL657 three credits 
Literature Seminar: Historical Ap- 
proaches 

Explores canonical and/or non-canonical 
literature from a historical perspective to 
strengthen background knowledge and 
understanding of literature, using represen- 
tative literary texts as a point for departure 
and discussion. Includes discussion of issues 
relating the role of historical texts to 
alternative, non-traditional, and multi- 
cultural contexts and of the pedagogical 
limitations and issues inherent in using a 
historical approach. Specific focus of the 
seminar, such as the Dickens Novel, will be 
listed in the course bulletin and on student 
transcripts. 

ENL659 three credits 

Graduate Literature Seminar: Thematic 

and Cultural Approaches 

Prerequisite: Graduate status or permission 
of instructor and director 
Exploration of the study of literature in light 
of current thematic and cultural perspec- 
tives. This course includes discussion of 
women's literature, minority literature, and 
third-world literature, especially as such 
works contrast with or depart from the 
traditional canon. The course will examine 
the influences of these works on student 
learning and issues that arise in the 
classroom when they are introduced. In 
addition to traditional texts, the course will 
consider the options for use of alternative, 
non-traditional materials. Discussion will 
focus on the pedagogical limitations, 
problems, and issues inherent in using a 
cultural or thematic approach, with 
emphasis on finding ways to animate and 
vitalize the literature classroom. 

ENL 676 / FLL 676 three credits 
Discourse Processes 

Prerequisite: Must be a MAT student 
An advanced seminar in exploration of 
classroom communication with a focus on 
the means by which language is taught and, 
specifically, on analyzing and recording 
instructional conversations involving 
multicultural populations. The course is 
intended to provide experience in the 
investigation of a classroom research 
question. Students will undertake supervised 
fieldwork and careful study of the theory 
and methods of descriptive research from a 
sociolinguistic perspective. 



ENL 684 / FLL 684 three credits 
Literary Criticism I: Theory and Practice 
in Teaching Literature 

Prerequisite: MAT enrollment or permission 
of instructor 

Intensive readings with analysis of relation- 
ships among language, thought, form, and 
content. The course will examine the 
intellectual, emotional, cultural, 
multicultural, and aesthetic qualities of 
texts, including the links among stylistic 
devices, central motifs, author's purpose, 
motivation, imagination, and psychology 
with emphasis on secondary students' 
analytic writing and reading abilities. The 
course will examine forms of literary 
criticism as they apply to teaching secondary 
language and literature. 



117 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Foreign Literature and Languages 



Majors in French and Spanish 

BA degree 



Faculty and Fields of Interest Requirements 



The Department offers basic courses in four 
languages: French, German, Italian, and 
Spanish, in addition to courses in Latin, 
linguistics, and language methodology. 
Students who have demonstrated aptitude 
and performance in languages may elect a 
major in French, or Spanish. Minors are also 
offered in these languages, and in German. 

In conjunction with the Boivin Center for 
French Language and Culture and the 
College of Business, the Department offers 
a Certificate in International Business/ 
French. See the chapter on Interdisciplinary 
Programs. 

In conjunction with the Charlton College of 
Business and the German universities in the 
States of Hessen and Baden-Wurttemberg, 
the Department participates in the 
Certificate in International Business with 
overseas experiences in Germany. See the 
Charlton College of Business section, below. 



Carlos Benavides Spanish language and 
literature, linguistics 

Christina Makara-Biron Spanish literature 
and language, foreign language education 

Joseph A. Bronstad 20th-century German 
literature and culture 

Lewis Kamm 19th- and 20th-century 
French literature 

Deborah Lee 20th-century French literature 

Giulio Massano Spanish and Italian 
literature of the Middle Ages, Renaissance 
and Baroque 

John H. Twomey (chairperson) 20th- 
century Spanish and Latin American 
literature 

Mel B. Yoken 19th- and 20th-century 
French literature, Quebec literature 



A student who wishes to major in foreign 
literature and languages — French or 
Spanish — must complete a minimum of 30 
credits in 300- and 400-level courses in the 
major field. Twenty-seven of these credits 
must be taken in courses taught in the 
language of the selected major. In French 
and Spanish, courses 301 and 302 and six 
credits in "survey of literature" are required. 
The remaining hours will be chosen at the 
discretion of the student with the approval of 
the advisor. To qualify for any language 
course at the 300 level, a student must 
complete courses through 202, or their 
equivalent in that language. Students wishing 
to take 400-level courses must normally 
obtain the consent of the instructor teaching 
the 400-level course and have earned at least 
12 credits in their major at UMass Dart- 
mouth. A grade point average of 2.0 in 
courses in the chosen language must be 
attained for graduation. 

The Department recommends that all 
students specializing in foreign literature and 
languages, especially those planning to teach 
or pursue a higher degree, take at least 18 
hours in a second foreign language. 

The Department also strongly recommends 
that both majors and minors in foreign 
language seriously consider a study abroad 
experience. Information and advisement 
concerning a wide variety of options for 
study abroad is available from various faculty 
members in the Department. 



118 



Minors in French, German, and 
Spanish 



Foreign Literature and Languages 
Courses 



The minors in French, German, and Spanish 
may be elected by students majoring in any 
other field. 

Any degree candidate who has between 54 
and 84 credits, with a minimum cumulative 
grade point average of 2.0 and a 2.5 grade 
point average in his or her major, may 
request admission to a minor in the 
Department of Foreign Literature and 
Languages. Before being admitted to the 
Foreign Literature and Languages minor, 
students must obtain permission from the 
Department Chairperson. 



Requirements 

Eighteen credits in the one language of the 
minor are required, and must include: 

Both courses 301, 302 (or equivalent) 

6 credits in 300 or 400-level courses beyond 

301-302. 



Practice Teaching 

The Department of Foreign Literature and 
Languages permits students with a 3.0 
cumulative average in their major to engage 
in the University's Teacher Certification 
Program. Students seeking middle and 
secondary certification take FLL 322 
Introduction to Second Language Acquisition, 
FLL 326 Discourse Perspectives in Foreign 
Language Education, and FLL 324 Concepts 
of Foreign Language Teaching, in addition to 
the required courses offered by the Education 
Department. Each semester, a list of names 
of qualified students will be submitted to the 
Department of Education. Students should 
see Professor Christina Makara Biron for 
advising. 



Foreign Literature and Languages Honors 
Program 

Senior majors in the Foreign Literature and 
Languages Department who have a 
cumulative average of 3.5 can choose to do 
honors work. The student must take a three- 
or six-credit independent study on a specific 
topic. This course will have an extensive 
reading list, and the student must present a 
substantial term paper which will be 
evaluated by a faculty committee. The term 
paper must earn at least a grade of A-. 



French Courses 

FRN 101 three credits 
Elementary French I 

3 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratory 
Essentials of aural-oral, reading and writing 
usage, with intensive drilling in pronuncia- 
tion, intonation and grammar. 

FRN 102 three credits 
Elementary French II 

Prerequisite: FRN 101 or equivalent 
3 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratory 
Continuation of FRN 101 . 

FRN 201 three credits 
Intermediate French I 

Prerequisite: FRN 102 or equivalent 
3 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratory 
Review of grammar with composition and 
aural-oral practice. Introduction to French 
culture and civilization through intensive 
and extensive reading. 

FRN 202 three credits 
Intermediate French II 

Prerequisite: FRN 201 or equivalent 
3 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratory 
Continuation of FRN 201 . 

FRN 203 three credits 

French Literature in Translation I 

Prerequisite: ENL 102 
Outstanding works of French literature in 
translation. Readings, lectures, and 
discussions in English. 

FRN 204 three credits 

French Literature in Translation II 

Prerequisite: ENL 102 
Continuation of French 203. 



General Education Departmental Requirements 

Students majoring in French or Spanish will meet their departmentally-controlled General 
Education requirements as follows: 

Area E: Students may choose a course from approved list 

Area I, Tier 2: FRN 312, 337, 331, 332, or 411 
SPN 302 

Area W, Tier 2: FRN 312, 331, 332, 41 1, 413, 415, 417, 418, or 420 

SPA 304, 312, 314, 331, 332, 333, 334, 445, 446, 455, or 456 

Area O: FRN 312 or 337 

SPA 301, 302, or 312 



FRN 298 one to six credits 
Experiential Learning 

Prerequisites: At least sophomore standing 
permission of the instructor, department 
chairperson, and college dean 
Work experience at an elective level 
supervised for academic credit by a faculty 
member in an appropriate academic field. 
Conditions and hours to be arranged. 
Graded CR/NC. For specific procedures and 
regulations, see section of catalogue on 
Other Learning Experiences. 

FRN 301 three credits 

French Composition and Conversation I 

Prerequisite: FRN 202 or equivalent 
Oral and written reports. Practical applica- 
tion of grammar, vocabulary-building and 
introduction to style. 



119 



College of Arts and Sciences 



FRN 302 three credits 

French Composition and Conversation II 

Prerequisite: FRN 301 
Continuation of FRN 301. 

FRN 312 three credits 

Culture and Civilization of France 

Prerequisite: FRN 202 or equivalent 
Introduction to the cultural development of 
the French people throughout history. 
Lectures, class discussions, written and oral 
reports on the significant aspects of French 
literary, social, and artistic life. 

FRN 331 three credits 
Masterpieces of French Literature I 

Prerequisite: FRN 302 or equivalent 
The representative authors, poets and 
dramatists of French literature from La 
Chanson de Roland through the age of 
Enlightenment will be read and discussed. 

FRN 332 three credits 
Masterpieces of French Literature II 

Prerequisite: FRN 302 or equivalent 
The main literary movements from the 
nineteenth century to the contemporary 
period will be analyzed. Discussion of 
literary genres and important aspects of 
French literary history. 

FRN 337 three credits 
Commercial French 

Prerequisite: FRN 202 or equivalent 

An introduction to business in France and 

Quebec. Topics include business vocabulary, 

letter writing, transportation, insurance, 

accounting, labor relations, economic 

geography. 

FRN 411 three credits 
La Poesie Franchise 

Prerequisite: FRN 302 or consent of 
instructor 

Elements of French poetry. An examination 
of versification, melody, rhyme, rhythm 
harmony, imagery, metaphor, and symbol in 
representative French poets from the Middle 
Ages to the present. The course may focus 
on selected topics and poets. Different 
instructors may emphasize different periods 
and works, but at least two centuries will be 
covered. 

FRN 413 three credits 
Le Theatre Franqais 

Prerequisite: FRN 302 or consent of 
instructor 

Elements of French theatre. An examination 
of such elements as character, time, place, 
and action in plays representative of French 
theatre and its evolution. The course may 



focus on selected playwrights, plays, topics, 
or themes. Different instructors may 
emphasize different periods and works, but 
at least two centuries will be covered. 

FRN 415 three credits 

La Litterature Quebecoise 

Prerequisite: FRN 302 or consent of 
instructor 

Aspects of Quebec Literature: the novel, 
theatre, and poetry. Emphasis will be placed 
on the distinctive nature of the Quebec 
literary mind. The course may focus on a 
single genre or on representative authors. 

FRN 417 three credits 
Le Roman Francaisl 

Prerequisite: FRN 302 or consent of 
instructor 

Elements of the French novel. An examina- 
tion of character, vision, and development 
of the novel focusing on representative 
works and authors. Different instructors may 
emphasize different periods and works, but 
at least two centuries will be covered. 

FRN 418 three credits 
Le Roman Francais II 

Prerequisite: FRN 302 or consent of 
instructor 

Similar to FRN 417, but different authors 
and works will be studied. Thus offering a 
more complete picture of the scope and 
range of the French novel. 

FRN 420 three credits 

Major Currents of French Thought 

Prerequisite: FRN 302 or consent of 
instructor 

Examination of influential thinkers from the 
Renaissance to the present. Possible topics 
include: Montaigne, Descartes, the 
Philosophes, Rousseau, Existentialism, 
Structuralism, Barthes, Lacan and his 
feminist critics, Derrida, and so forth. 

FRN 481 three credits 
Seminarin French 

Prerequisite: FRN 302 or consent of 
instructor 

An intensive study of a specific topic, such 
as aural French comprehension, or a 
particular author or a literary movement. 
The topic will vary from year to year so that 
the course may be repeated for credit. 

FRN 482 three credits 
Seminarin French 

Prerequisite: FRN 302 or consent of 
instructor 

Similar to FRN 481 but with a different 
topic, including history of the French 



language. 

FRN 495 three credits 
Independent Study 

Prerequisite: Senior standing 
Intensive study or research on a special topic 
under the direction of a staff member. 
Hours to be arranged. 

FRN 196, 296, 396, 496 three credits 
Directed Study 

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor, 
department chairperson, and college dean 
Study under the supervision of a faculty 
member in an area covered in a regular 
course not currently being offered. 
Conditions and hours to be arranged. 



German Courses 

GER 101 three credits 
Elementary German I 

3 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratory 
Introductory study of the language and its 
grammatical structure. Development of the 
skills of understanding, speaking, reading, 
and writing. 

GER 102 three credits 
Elementary German II 

Prerequisite: GER 101 or equivalent 
3 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratory 
Continuation of GER 101. 

GER 103 three credits 
Conversational German I 

This course is parallel to GER 1 01 , but the 
emphasis is on learning to understand and 
speak in everyday situations, particularly in 
connection with travel and life in Germany 
today. No previous knowledge of German 
required. 

GER 104 three credits 
Conversational German II 

Prerequisite: GER 103 or equivalent 
Continuation of GER 103 (parallel to GER 

102). 

GER 201 three credits 
Intermediate German I 

Prerequisite: GER 102 or equivalent 
3 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratory 
Review of grammar. Development of facility 
in composition and conversation. Intensive 
and extensive reading in texts of cultural 
and literary value. 

GER 202 three credits 
Intermediate German II 

Prerequisite: GER 201 or equivalent 



120 



Gen Ed Note: All Foreign Literature and 
Languages courses satisfy area C, Cultural 
and Artistic Literacy. They also satisfy other 
areas as noted. 



3 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratory 
Continuation of GER 201 . 

GER 203 three credits 

German Literature in Translation 

Prerequisite: ENL 102 
A survey of German literature from its 
beginnings through the works of Goethe 
and Schiller. Lectures, discussion, and 
reading in English. 

GER 298 one to six credits 
Experiential Learning 

Prerequisites: At least sophomore standing; 
permission of the instructor, department 
chairperson, and college dean 
Work experience at an elective level 
supervised for academic credit by a faculty 
member in an appropriate academic field. 
Conditions and hours to be arranged. 
Graded CR/NC. For specific procedures and 
regulations, see section of catalogue on 
Other Learning Experiences. 

GER 301 three credits 

German Composition and Conversation 

Prerequisite: GER 202 or equivalent 
Extensive oral and written application of 
German on the advanced level. The course 
will be conducted in German with emphasis 
on idiomatic use of the language and finer 
points of grammar to give the student 
greater confidence and accuracy in 
expression. 

GER 311 three credits 

German Culture and Civilization 

Prerequisite: GER 202 or equivalent 
Through reports, readings, and discussions 
in German, the student will learn about life 
in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland, both 
on the contemporary scene and from an 
historical perspective. 

GER 326 three credits 

History of the German Language 

The historical development of German from 
its Indo-European origins to the present, its 
vocabulary, forms, and syntax particularly in 
their relationship to English. No previous 
knowledge of German required. 

GER 335 three credits 
German Poetry 

Prerequisite: GER 202 or consent of 
instructor 

A survey of German poetry from the ninth 
to the twentieth century, with analysis of 
changing form and content. 

GER 357 three credits 
German Novelle 



Prerequisite: GER 202 or consent of 
instructor 

The short prose form in its development 
during the nineteenth and twentieth 
centuries through a reading of representa- 
tive authors. 

GER 366 three credits 
Contemporary German Literature 

Prerequisite: GER 202 or equivalent 
Recent developments in German literature in 
the Federal Republic of Germany and the 
German Democratic Republic, as well as in 
Austria and Switzerland. Material will be 
presented through reports, readings, and 
discussions in German. 

GER 374 three credits 
German Drama 

Prerequisite: GER 202 or consent of 
instructor 

German drama from its beginnings to the 
present day through a reading of represen- 
tative plays. 

GER 481 three credits 
Seminar in German 

Prerequisite: A 300-level course in German 
or consent of instructor 
An intensive study of a specific topic, such 
as a particular author or literary movement. 
The topic will vary from year to year so that 
the course may be repeated with credit. 

GER 495 two to four credits 
Independent Study 

Prerequisites: Upper-division standing; 
permission of instructor, department 
chairperson, and college dean 
Study under the supervision of a faculty 
member in an area not otherwise part of the 
discipline's course offerings. Conditions and 
hours to be arranged. 

GER 196, 296, 396, 496 three credits 
Directed Study 

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor, 
department chairperson, and college dean 
Study under the supervision of a faculty 
member in an area covered in a regular 
course not currently being offered. 
Conditions and hours to be arranged. 



Italian Courses 

ITA 101 three credits 
Elementary Italian I 

3 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratory 
Essentials of aural-oral, reading and writing 
usage with intensive drilling in pronuncia- 



tion, intonation, and grammar. 

ITA 102 three credits 
Elementary Italian II 

Prerequisite: ITA 101 or equivalent 
3 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratory 
Continuation of ITA 101. 

ITA 201 three credits 
Intermediate Italian I 

Prerequisite: ITA 102 or equivalent 
3 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratory 
Review of grammar with composition and 
aural-oral practice. Extensive readings of 
cultural and literary value. Emphasis on 
practical application of grammar in 
conversations. 

ITA 202 three credits 
Intermediate Italian II 

Prerequisite: ITA 201 or equivalent 
Continuation of ITA 201 . 

ITA 495 two to four credits 
Independent Study 

Prerequisites: Upper-division standing; 
permission of instructor, department 
chairperson, and college dean 
Study under the supervision of a faculty 
member in an area not otherwise part of the 
discipline's course offerings. Conditions and 
hours to be arranged. 

ITA 196, 296, 396, 496 three credits 
Directed Study 

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor, 
department chairperson, and college dean 
Study under the supervision of a faculty 
member in an area covered in a regular 
course not currently being offered. 
Conditions and hours to be arranged. 



Latin Courses 

LAT 101 three credits 
Introductory Latin I 

Fundamentals of the Latin language with 
selected readings, designed especially for 
those majoring in English or foreign 
languages. The course seeks to develop a 
measure of oral ability in the language and 
knowledge of the phonemics, morphology, 
and syntax of the declensional and 
conjugational systems. 

LAT 102 three credits 
Introductory Latin II 

Prerequisite: LAT 201 or equivalent 
Continuation of LAT 101 . 

LAT 201 three credits 



121 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Intermediate Latin I 

Prerequisite: LAT 102 or equivalent 
A third semester of Latin, designed to 
develop skill in the reading of representative 
authors of the Golden Age (Catullus, Cicero, 
Nepos, Horace, Martial, et al.), with 
additional selections from the Patristic 
Period (Vulgate) and from the Medieval 
Period (Isidore of Seville, the Venerable 
Bede). 

LAT 202 three credits 
Intermediate Latin II 

Prerequisite: LAT 201 or equivalent 
A fourth semester course paralleling LAT 
201 but with more extensive selections, 
from Nepos, Horace and Phaedrus (Au- 
gustan Period); from the Epistolae of Pliny 
the Younger, mirroring Roman life, and 
from the Saturae of Martial; supplemented 
by other materials where feasible. While one 
purpose of LAT 201-202 will remain 
building ability to translate, the courses also 
aim to foster reading of the Latin texts 
directly in the original for personal enrich- 
ment and satisfaction. 

LAT 495 three credits 
Independent Study 

Prerequisites: Upper-division standing; 
permission of instructor, department 
chairperson, and college dean 
Study under the supervision of a faculty 
member in an area not otherwise part of the 
discipline's course offerings. Conditions and 
hours to be arranged. 

Spanish Courses 

SPA 101 three credits 
Elementary Spanish I 

3 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratory 
Essentials of aural-oral, reading and writing 
with intensive drilling on pronunciation, 
intonation and grammar. 

SPA 102 three credits 
Elementary Spanish II 

3 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratory 
Continuation of SPA 101. 

SPA 201 -," ee ced ts 
Intermediate Spanish I 

3 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratory 
Prerequisite: SPA 102 or equivalent 
Review of grammar with composition and 
aural-oral practice. Introduction to Hispanic 
Culture and civilization through intensive 
and extensive reading. 

SPA 202 three credits 



Intermediate Spanish II 

Prerequisite: SPA 201 or equivalent 
Continuation of SPA 201 . 

SPA 203 three credits 

Spanish Literature in Translation 

Prerequisite: ENL 102 
Outstanding works of Spanish literature 
through the eighteenth century. Readings 
lectures, and discussions in English. 

SPA 207 three credits 
Spanish for Law Enforcement 
Personnel I 

Prerequisite: SPA 102 or equivalent; or 
permission of the instructor 
Spanish language to help law enforcement 
personnel deal with the Spanish speaking 
community. Individual case studies will be 
examined in depth in order to facilitate the 
total involvement of law enforcement per- 
sonnel in their work. This course is designed 
principally for students of criminal justice. 

SPA 208 three credits 
Spanish for Law Enforcement 
Personnel II 

Prerequisite: SPA 207 
Continuation of SPA 208. 

SPA 298 one to six credits 
Experiential Learning 

Prerequisites: At least sophomore standing; 
permission of the instructor, department 
chairperson, and college dean 
Work experience at an elective level 
supervised for academic credit by a faculty 
member in an appropriate academic field. 
Conditions and hours to be arranged. 
Graded CR/NC. For specific procedures and 
regulations, see section of catalogue on 
Other Learning Experiences. 

SPA 301 three credits 
Composition and Conversation I 

Prerequisite: SPA 202 or equivalent 
Oral and written reports. Practical applica- 
tion of grammar, vocabulary-building, and 
introduction to style. 

SPA 302 three credits 
Composition and Conversation II 

Prerequisite: SPA 301 or equivalent, or 
permission of instructor 
Continuation of SPA 301 . Discussion and 
oral reports based on modern literary works, 
expository or journalistic prose from Spain 
and Latin America. Vocabulary-building and 
frequent compositions. 

SPA 304 inree credits 
Advanced Composition and 



Conversation 

Prerequisite: SPA 302 or consent of 
instructor 

Abundant discussion and oral reports on 
current themes in the Hispanic world. 
Frequent compositions on topics found in 
Spanish, and Spanish-American periodicals 
and newspapers. 

SPA 305 three credits 
Business Spanish 

Prerequisite: SPA 202 
Spanish for correspondence, investments, 
law, transportation, banking, administration, 
personnel, publicity and promotion. 
Abundant practice in translation and 
vocabulary. Readings and selections from 
different fields for comprehension. 

SPA 312 three credits 

Culture and Civilization of Spain 

Prerequisite: SPA 302 or consent of 
instructor 

Introduction to the cultural development of 
the Spanish people throughout their history. 
Lectures, class discussions, and written and 
oral reports convey significant aspects of 
Spanish literary, social and artistic life. 

SPA 314 three credits 

Culture and Civilization of Latin America 

Prerequisite: SPA 301 or consent of 
instructor 

Lectures, class discussions, written and oral 
reports on the significant aspects of Latin 
American literary, social, and artistic 
development from the period of discovery 
and colonization to present times. 

SPA 325 three credits 

Advanced Spanish Grammar and Syntax 

Prerequisite: SPA 202 

A systematic study of Spanish grammar with 
extensive practice in composition. Recom- 
mended for those planning to teach. 

SPA 331 three credits 
Masterpieces of Spanish Literature I 

Prerequisite: SPA 302 or consent of 
instructor 

The representative authors, poets and 
dramatists of Spanish literature from El 
Cantar de Mio Cid in the Middle Ages to 
Quevedo in the Baroque period. 

SPA 332 three credits 

Masterpieces of Spanish Literature II 

Prerequisite: SPA 302 or consent of 
instructor 

Selected plays, novels and poetry from the 
eighteenth century to the contemporary 
period. 



122 



Gen Ed Note: All Foreign Literature and 
Languages courses satisfy area C, Cultural 
and Artistic Literacy. They also satisfy other 
areas as noted. 



SPA 333 three credits 
Representative Authors of Spanish 
American Literature I 

Prerequisite: SPA 302 or consent of 
instructor 

The main writers from the period of 
conquest and discovery in the New World to 
the development of Gaucho literature in the 
nineteenth century. 

SPA 334 three credits 
Representative Authors of Spanish 
American Literature II 

Prerequisite: SPA 302 or consent of 
instructor 

The major works from the pre-Modernist 
period in the nineteenth century to the 
contemporary period. 

SPA 445 three credits 

Spanish Poetry and Drama of the 

Golden Age 

Prerequisites: SPA 331 , 332; or 333, 334; or 
consent of instructor 

The poetry of the Renaissance and Baroque 
periods together with the selected plays of 
Lope de Vega, Calderon de la Barca and 
Tirso de Molina. 

SPA 446 three credits 

Spanish Prose of the Golden Age 

Prerequisite: SPA 331, 332; or 333, 334; or 

consent of instructor 

The main authors of the sixteenth and 

seventeenth centuries with emphasis on the 

life and major works of Miguel de 

Cervantes. 

SPA 455 three credits 

Literature of the Nineteenth Century 

Prerequisites: SPA 331, 332; or 333, 334; or 
consent of instructor 

The main literary movements, romanticism, 
realism and naturalism are studied together 
with the representative works of outstand- 
ing authors, poets, and dramatists. 

SPA 456 three credits 
Contemporary Spanish Literature 

Prerequisites: SPA 331, 332; or 333, 334; or 
consent of instructor 
The leading writers of each literary form 
from the generation of '98 to the present. 

SPA 481 three credits 
Seminar in Spanish 

Prerequisites: SPA 331, 332; or 333, 334; or 
consent of instructor 
An intensive study of a specific topic or 
topics, such as a particular author, genre, or 
literary movement. The topic or topics will 
vary from year to year so that the course 



may be repeated with credit. 

SPA 482 three credits 
Seminarin Spanish 

Prerequisites: SPA 331, 332; or SPA 333, 

334; or consent of instructor 

Similar to SPA 481 but with a different 

topic. 

SPA 495 three credits 
Independent Study 

Pre r equisites: Upper-division standing; 
permission of instructor, department 
chairperson, and college dean 
Intensive study or research on a special topic 
in Spanish or Spanish American literature 
under the direction of a faculty member. 

SPA 196, 296, 396, 496 three credits 
Directed Study 

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor, 
department chairperson, and college dean 
Study under the supervision of a faculty 
member in an area covered in a regular 
course not currently being offered. 
Conditions and hours to be arranged. 

Linguistics/Teaching Methods 
Courses 

FLL211 three credits 
Textual Analysis 

Literary explication. Intensive readings with 
analysis of relationships between language 
and thought and form and content. Training 
in the writing of analytical critique. Course 
taught in English. 

FLL250 three credits C, W 
Language and the Mind 

Prerequisite: ENL 102 

Examination of language and the relation- 
ships among language, thought, and culture 
by focusing on various human-interest 
aspects of linguistics. Topics include 
language of propaganda and politics, 
language of advertising, language and 
sexism, euphemisms, jargon, and double- 
talk, taboos, doctorese, legalese, bilingual- 
ism, social judgments and standard versus 
non-standard English. 

FLL 322 three credits 
Introduction to Second Language 
Acquisition 

Factors that affect the production and 
comprehension of foreign language 
acquisition, with particular emphasis on 
acquisition of the Romance Languages. 
Topics studied include comparisons of 
second language acquisition with first 



language acquisition, affective factors, 
interlanguage, learner strategies, sociocul- 
tural factors, and evaluation of proficiency. 

FLL 324 three credits 

Concepts of Foreign Language Teaching 

An analysis of methods and techniques in 
the teaching and learning of foreign 
languages. Examination of innovations in 
foreign language education. A study of the 
problems of language, subject matter, and 
materials inherent in bilingual education. 
Individual and group projects with applica- 
tion of theory to practice. 

FLL 326 three credits 

Discourse Perspectives in Foreign 

Language Education 

Factors that affect the understanding and 
production of foreign language texts. An 
analysis of how meaning is socially and 
cognitively constructed. Topics studied 
include the negotiation of meaning, oral vs. 
written texts, schema theory, ethnography 
of communication, genre analysis, content 
language instruction, and evaluation of 
discourse production and comprehension. 
An examination of methods and techniques 
that apply discourse theory to the foreign 
language classroom. 

FLL 425 three credits 

Origin and Evolution of Romance 

Languages 

Examination of the common origin of the 
romance languages in Latin and their 
evolution into French, Italian, Portuguese, 
and Spanish. The course uses both the 
traditional philological method and modern 
theoretical linguistics, both synchronic and 
diachronic. Furthermore, linguistic features 
are interpreted for their historical and 
sociological factors. 

FLL 495 three credits 
Independent Study 

Prerequisites: Upper-division standing; 
permission of instructor, department 
chairperson, and college dean 
Study under the supervision of a faculty 
member in an area not otherwise part of the 
discipline's course offerings. Conditions and 
hours to be arranged. 



123 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Graduate Courses for the 
Master of Arts in Teaching 

FLL 525 three credits 

Origin and Evolution of Romance 

Languages 

Prerequisite: FRN 302, POR 302, or SPA 302 
(or equivalent) 

Examination of the common origin of the 
romance languages in Latin and their 
evolution into French, Italian, Portuguese, 
and Spanish. The course uses both the 
traditional philological method and modern 
theoretical linguistics, both synchronic and 
diachronic. Furthermore, linguistic features 
are interpreted for their historical and 
sociological factors. 

FLL 625 three credits 
Alternative Assessment and The 
National Standards in Foreign Language 
Education 

Prerequisite: Must be a MAT student 
A critical examination of recent theory and 
practice concerning the role of assessment 
in foreign language curricula. The course 
will emphasize student analysis of current 
evaluation and assessment models to meet 
the goals of National Standards and how 
these models compare with those currently 
in use in secondary schools within the area. 

FLL 676 / ENL 676 three credits 
Discourse Processes 

Prerequisite: Must be a MAT student 
An advanced seminar in exploration of 
classroom communication with a focus on 
the means by which language is taught and, 
specifically, on analyzing and recording 
instructional conversations involving 
multicultural populations. The course is 
intended to provide experience in the 
investigation of a classroom research 
question. Students will undertake super- 
vised fieldwork and careful study of the 
theory and methods of descriptive research 
from a sociolinguistic perspective. 



FLL 684 / ENL 684 three credits 
Literary Criticism I: Theory and Practice 
in Teaching Literature 

Prerequisite: MAT enrollment or permission 
of instructor 

Intensive readings with analysis of relation- 
ships among language, thought, form, and 
content. The course will examine the 
intellectual, emotional, cultural, multicul- 
tural, and aesthetic qualities of texts, 
including the links among stylistic devices, 
central motifs, author's purpose, motivation, 
imagination, and psychology with emphasis 
on secondary students' analytic writing and 
reading abilities. The course will examine 
forms of literary criticism as they apply to 
teaching secondary language and literature. 



124 



History 



Faculty and Fields of Interest 



History Minor 



History students are offered study in United 
States, European, Russian, Latin American, 
African, and Asian history. Students can 
expect to participate in a variety of 
academic activities including lecture and 
discussion courses and seminars. The history 
curriculum acquaints students with the 
various methods of historical study, provides 
them with a broad understanding of the 
major themes of history, allows them to 
concentrate on topical courses and themes 
of their choosing, and offers opportunities 
to propose and implement their own 
research projects. 

As a broadly based liberal arts degree, the 
major emphasizes the development of 
critical thinking and communication skills as 
well as the acquisition of historical 
perspective. Graduates prepare themselves 
for a wide variety of positions in govern- 
ment, education, and business. A B.A. in 
History can also lead to graduate work in a 
variety of fields and serve as a sound 
foundation for law school. 



Linsun Cheng Asian history 

Kevin J. Hargreaves France, European 
intellectual history, Canada 

James A. Hijiya early America, 
recent U. S., Central America 

Gerard M. Koot (chairperson) modern 
Britain, modern Europe.European economic 
and social history 

Betty L. Mitchell nineteenth-century United 
States, Women's history 

Geraldine M. Phipps Russia, Eastern 
Europe 

Benjamin F. Taggie medieval studies 

LenTravers American history: colonial, 
early republic, and New England 

Brian Williams Islamic studies, world history 



Any degree candidate who has at least 54 
credits with a cumulative grade point 
average of 2.0 and at least 2.5 grade point 
average in his or her major may request 
admission to the minor in history. This 
request must be approved by the Depart- 
ment Chairperson. Upon admission students 
will be assigned an advisor. 



Requirements 
1. 

1 8 credits in history as follows: a) At least 9 
credits of 300-400 level courses; b) At least 
3 credits in or a seminar; c) No more than 6 
credits at the 100 level. 

2. 

A student who maintains a 2.0 average in 
his/her history courses (for the minor) will 
have the successful completion of a minor 
in history noted on his or her transcript. 



Students with a GPA of 3.2 are eligible for 
nomination to the University's Alpha Eta 
Theta Chapter of the International History 
Honor Society, Phi Alpha Theta. 



History Honors Program 

The department offers an Honors Program 
for senior history majors with a 3.2 
cumulative average. In this program 
students write a research paper under the 
direction of a faculty member of their 
choice. For details of this program, students 
should consult their advisors. 



Students with a GPA of 3.2 are eligible for 
nomination to the university's Alpha Eta 
Theta Chapter of the International History 
Honor Society, Phi Alpha Theta. 



125 



College of Arts and Sciences 



History Major 

BA degree 



History Courses 



All history majors will be required to take 36 credits in history as indicated in requirements 
below. Freshmen will normally not take courses above the 100 or 200 level. It is expected 
that each history major will consult regularly with his or her class advisor in formulating a 
program of study that will help to fulfill his or her educational and career goals. 



Credits 



Requirements 

HST 101 
HST 102 

HST 103 
HST 104 



History of Western Civilization I and 
History of Western Civilization II 
OR 

World Civilizations I and 
World Civilizations II 



30 credit-hours of history courses, to be divided in the following manner: 

Six credits in U.S. History (above the 100 level) 

Six credits in European History (above the 100 level) 

Six credits in "other" history (e.g., Russia, Latin America, Asia, Near East, 
Africa, Ancient) 

Three credits in a history seminar 
Nine credits of history electives 

Total 

No more than a total of 12 credits may be taken at the 100 level. 



6 
6 
6 

3 
9 
36 



Department General Education Requirements/History 

The department has determined the following areas of the General Education requirement 
for its students: 

Area E: Students should select a course from the published list of available courses that 
satisfy this requirement 

Area I, Tier 2: Satisfied by a history seminar, HST 401 , 402 or 403 
Area W, Tier 2: Satisfied by a history seminar, HST 401 , 402 or 403 
Area O: Satisfied by a history seminar, HST 401, 402 or 403 



HST 101 three credits C,G 
History of Western Civilization I 

A survey of the growth of European 
civilization from ancient times to the end of 
the Middle Ages, including economic, social, 
political, and intellectual developments. 

HST 102 three credits C, G 
History of Western Civilization II 

Continuation of the study of European civili- 
zation from the end of the Middle Ages to 
the present, emphasizing the origins and 
development of 20th-century societies and 

issues. 

HST 103 three credits C,G 
World Civilizations I 

Introduces students to historical method and 
perspective through comparative study of 
human societies and cultures. The concept 
of "civilization" is examined in varied 
contexts through comparisons of social, 
economic, and political institutions, as well 
as systems of thought and religion, from 
pre-history to around 1400. 

HST 104 three credits C, G 
World Civilizations II 

A continuation of the study of World 
Civilizations, from 1400 to the present. 

HST 115 three credits C, D 
History of the United States I 

A survey of American history from the 
beginning to the Civil War. Emphasis on the 
interactions among people from different 
races, ethnic groups, sexes, classes, 
religions, and political persuasions. 

HST 116 three credits C, D 
History of the United States II 

A continuation of the survey of American 
history, from the Civil War and Reconstruc- 
tion to the present. 

HST 160 three credits C.G 
Slavic Civilization 

Survey of the cultural, political, and 
economic development of Slavic peoples of 
Eastern Europe and Russia. 

HST 180 three credits C,G 
Asian Civilization 

A survey of Asian culture, its origins in 
Chinese and Indian civilizations, and its 
subsequent development. Includes the 
historical, social, and economic development 
of such newly independent Asian countries 
as Indonesia, Malaysia, and Singapore. 

HST 190 three credits C,G 
African Civilizations 



126 



Gen Ed Key 



All History courses satisfy Cultural/Artistic 
Literacy; lower division courses are marked 
C, but advanced courses are eligible as 
well. Other courses satisfy other require- 
ments as marked. 



An introduction to the culture, history, and 
civilizations of the African continent, with 
special emphasis on sub-Saharan Africa. This 
one-semester survey is designed to acquaint 
the student with the principal themes of 
African history and development from 
prehistoric to modern times. 

HST200 three credits C 
Topics in History 

This course will deal with a variety of topics 
from Russian, European, and American 
history. One specific topic, e.g. the Russian 
Revolution, will be taught in any semester. 

HST203 three credits C, D 
20th Century America I 

An interpretive analysis of the major 
American domestic and foreign policy trends 
from 1900 to 1945: Progressive Era, World 
War I, Red Scare, Roaring Twenties, 
Depression, New Deal, World War II. 

HST 204 three credits C. D 
20th Century America II 

An interpretive analysis of the major 
American domestic and foreign policy trends 
from 1945 to the present: the Cold War, Fair 
Deal, McCarthyism, Eisenhower Years, New 
Frontier, Great Society, Vietnam, Countercul- 
ture, Nixon Years, the Me-Decade, the 
Reagan and Bush presidencies. 

HST 205 three credits C, D 
African-American History I 

A survey of the role of African-Americans in 
American life and culture from the colonial 
period to the 1890s. Cross-listed as AAS 205 
and LST 205. 

HST 206 three credits C,D 
African-American History II 

A continuation of the study of the role of 
African-Americans in American history, from 
the 1890s to the present. Cross-listed as AAS 
206 and LST 206. 

HST 207 three credits C, D 

Women's History in the United States: 

Colonial to the Present 

Survey of the history of women — black and 
white, native and immigrant, rich and poor — 
in the U.S. from colonial times to the 
present. Among the topics to be discussed 
are: women's role in agrarian vs. industrial 
society; women and the family; women in 
the labor movement; female friendships and 
organizations; the frontier experience; 
women's suffrage; sex and sex roles; and the 
birth and growth of the feminist movement. 
Cross-listed as WMS 207. 



HST 209 three credits C, D 

History of Labor in the United States 

History of the American working class 
throughout the 19th and 20th centuries. 
The course will examine the experiences of 
both organized labor and the masses of 
unorganized workers, and highlight issues 
of race, class, gender, and ethnicity. Cross- 
listed as LST 209. 

HST 212 three credits C 
The Case of Lizzie Borde n 

Using primary source documents such as 
newspapers, wills, city directories, the 
federal census, etc., students will study the 
fascinating case of Lizzie Borden of Fall River 
who was accused of the brutal axe murder 
of her father and step-mother. Students will 
develop their skills in historical methodol- 
ogy, and participation in class discussions is 
emphasized. Cross-listed as WMS 212. 

HST 213 three credits C. G 
World of the Old Testament 

An historical, sociological, and philosophical 
study of the world of the Old Testament and 
its effect upon the development of both 
Christianity and Islam. Special emphasis is 
placed upon recent archaeological discoveries 
which shed light upon the interaction of 
ancient Israel with surrounding cultures and 
its place in the context of Middle Eastern 
civilization. Lecture and discussion are 
supplemented with slide presentations and 
the display of various artifacts that reflect the 
lifestyles of the Biblical period. Cross-listed as 
JST213. 

HST 214 three credits C, G 
The Post-Biblical World 

An historical, sociological, and philosophical 
study of the post-Biblical world. Particular 
emphasis is placed upon both the origins of 
Christianity within the context of Jewish, 
Middle Eastern, and Roman history and the 
parallel development of Rabbinic Judaism. In 
addition to lecture and discussions, the class 
participates in a Seder Meal where the ritual 
practices of first-century Israel are recreated. 
Cross-listed as JST 214. 

HST 223 three credits C.G 
Medieval History 

The transition of Europe during the period 
from the end of the Classical World to the 
Renaissance. Emphasis on political develop- 
ment, social and economic change, and the 
role of the Church. 

HST 250 three credits C 
Historiography 

Devoted to the study of history as a means 



to understanding human experience and 
development. Acquaints the student with 
source materials, research methods, and 
problems of interpretation. 

HST 260 three credits C, G 

The History of the Jewish People 

A survey of the social, political, and economic 
history of the Jewish people from the first 
century through the modern era. Special 
emphasis is placed upon Jewish-Christian and 
Jewish-Islamic relations and their effect upon 
anti-semitism, the Holocaust, and the growth 
and development of Zionism. The student 
becomes acquainted with the place of the 
Jewish people in the mainstream of western 
culture and with the problem of maintaining 
ethnic and religious identify in a basically 
hostile environment. 

HST 270 three credits C, G 
Latin American Civilizations 

A comprehensive survey of the pre- 
Colombian and European-initiated civiliza- 
tions which developed in regions of the 
Western Hemisphere colonized by Spain and 
Portugal. Emphasis is on the independent 
nations of Latin America from the 1820's to 
the present. Issues include race and class 
economic development and dependency, and 
the legitimation of political authority. 

HST 282 three credits C,G 
China and the Far East 

Introduces the history and geography of 
China, Japan, and Korea. Emphasis on 
events since the establishment of relations 
with the West. The interrelations of the 
three principal Far Eastern states in modern 
times will be studied. 

HST 283 three credits C. G. D 
Chinese Civilization and Culture 

General Chinese history and civilization from 
ancient times to the present. Emphasis on 
China's cultural contributions at times of 
both unity and disunity, and upon the 
characteristics of cultural change and 
continuity. 

HST 284 three credits C 
Japanese Civilization and Culture 

A study of Japanese cultural and political 
development from ancient to modern times 
with emphasis on literature, religion and art. 

HST 290 three credits C, G 
Modern Africa 

Survey of Africa's modern history, beginning 
especially after 1800. It looks at the 
beginnings and expansions of European and 
African-American settlements there, the 



127 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Zulu and Islamic Revolutions, the conquest 
and colonization of Africa, and post-colonial 
developments. Cross-listed as AAS 290 

HST 298 one to six credits 
Experiential Learning 

Prerequisites: At least sophomore standing; 
permission of the instructor, department 
chairperson, and college dean 
Work experience at an elective level 
supervised for academic credit by a faculty 
member in an appropriate academic field. 
Conditions and hours to be arranged. 
Graded CR/NC. For specific procedures and 
regulations, see section of catalogue on 
Other Learning Experiences. 

HST 300 three credits 
Topics in American History 

A critical analysis of selected topics or issues 
in American history which are not otherwise 
offered in the standard catalogue courses. 
Cross-listed as AAS 300. 

HST 301 three credits D 
American Colonial History 

Prerequisite: HST 1 1 5 or equivalent 
A survey of the European colonies — 
especially the Spanish, English, and French — 
that eventually became part of the United 
States. Emphasis is on the confrontation of 
Native-American, European, and African 
peoples between 1492 and 1763. 

HST 302 three credits D 
History of Religion in America I 

A survey of the American religious ex- 
perience from the seventeenth century to 
the Civil War, focusing on the redefinition of 
European religious turmoil in the colonies, 
Native-American religion, the Great 
Awakening, eighteenth century Civil 
millennialism, early growth of Catholicism 
and Judaism, the communitarian impulse, 
the explosion of Evangelicalism, the impact 
on humanitarian reform and the shaping of 
the African-American religious alternatives. 

HST 303 three credits D 
History of Religion in America II 

A survey of the American religious experi- 
ence from the Civil War to the present, 
focusing on the rise of Black churches, the 
impact of immigration and urban industrial- 
ism, the Ghost Dance religions, the Social 
Gospel, the Americanization of the Catholic 
Church, the Fundamentalist controversy, the 
impact of the Depression, Neo-Orthodoxy, 
the public religion of the Cold War, Pan- 
Indiamsm, twentieth century Judaism, the 
flowering of the cults, and the emergence of 
the electronic churches. 



HST 304 three credits D 

History of North American Indians 

Prerequisites: HST 1 1 5 or 1 1 6 or SOC/ANT 
204 or permission of the instructor 
Survey of the history of Indians of North 
America from their origins to the present. 
The course will examine a variety of native 
peoples in different regions of the conti- 
nent, but mostly in what is now the United 
States, and the interaction between those 
native peoples and newcomers from Europe 
and Africa. 

HST 305 three credits D 

The United States in the Age of 

Revolution 

Prerequisite: HST 1 1 5 or HST 301 , or 
equivalent 

A study of the period from 1 760s to the 
1840s, concentrating on the development 
of political ideas and practices. Topics will 
include the Revolution, its origins and 
consequences; the Constitution; the rise of 
political parties; Jeffersonian and Jacksonian 
democracy; and territorial expansion. 

HST 306 three credits D 
Civil Warand Reconstruction 

The antebellum, Civil War, and Reconstruc- 
tion period of American history. This was a 
crucial era because so many fundamental 
issues were at stake: the place of African- 
Americans in American society; the destiny 
of Southern whites who tried to save their 
slave regime by seceding from the Union; 
and, the very survival of the United States as 
a nation. 

HST 307 three credits D 
Plymouth Colony 1 620-1 692 

Prerequisite: HST 115 
Explores the history of the colony of New 
Plymouth, with an emphasis on the 
interaction of the colonists with the native 
people of Southeastern Massachusetts. 
Students analyze primary sources as well as 
recent historical works to understand the 
relation between American myth and 
American history. 

HST 309 three credits 

The History of Business in America 

The development of American business and 
industry from the age of the colonial 
merchants, through the emergence of large 
scale industry in the nineteenth century into 
the modern era. It is primarily a business 
history course, focusing upon various 
industries and their development. 

HST 310 three credits D 
America's Working Women 



The experience of American working 
women — black and white, native and 
immigrant, organized and unorganized — 
from the colonial period to the present day. 
Because work is defined as productive labor, 
this course will examine women as paid and 
unpaid workers — in the marketplace as well 
as in the home. Some of the areas of study 
will be women on the frontier, women in 
the mills and factories, labor union women, 
women in the professions, and the history 
and politics of housework. Cross-listed as 
LST310and WMS310. 

HST 311 three credits 

New England Maritime History 

The relationship between New England and 
the sea. This course is more local in its 
approach than the American Maritime 
History course, and treats coastal and 
foreign trade of individual ports, whaling, 
fishing, and recreational industries. The 
decline of maritime New England is also 
treated, bringing the course into the most 
recent decades. 

HST 312 three credits 
American Maritime History 

The development of the American merchant 
shipping industry since colonial times, and 
its role in American political, economic, and 
cultural history. 

HST 313 three credits 

Territorial Expansion of the United 

States 

Examines the geographic, economic, social, 
and diplomatic issues involved in the 
settlement and development of the nation 
from the earliest European outposts to the 
passing of the frontier and the shift to 
overseas territories. In tracing the internal 
expansion of the United States, attention 
will be focused upon the exclusion of the 
native Americans from the mainstream of 
American life. 

HST 314 three credits D 
History of Urban America 

The emergence and development of the 
American city from the seventeenth century 
to the present, stressing the colonial town, 
cities and the new nation, immigration and 
the nativist reaction, slavery in the city, the 
completion of the urban network, the 
political machine, the urban reformer, the 
company town, the African-American 
migration to the city and the emergence of 
the metropolis. 

HST 315 three credits 
History of Massachusetts 



128 



Gen Ed Key 



All History courses satisfy Cultural/Artistic 
Literacy; lower division courses are 
marked C, but advanced courses are 
eligible as well. Other courses satisfy 
other requirements as marked. 



The development of the state from its 
Colonial beginnings, through its transforma- 
tion into an industrial society during the 
nineteenth century and its twentieth century 
adaptation to industrial and technological 
changes. This will not be simply a political 
history but will include geography, industrial 
history, social and transportational as well as 
immigration studies. There will be a 
discussion of the broadest variety of topics 
possible. 

HST317 three credits G, D 
History of European Women 

A survey of women's history from the 
Renaissance to the present that critically 
examines the recent scholarship on this 
topic. The course will deal both with 
remarkable and ordinary women. Extensive 
use will be made of recent research on the 
history of the family and social demography 
as well as the more traditional areas of 
political, intellectual, and economic history. 
While emphasizing Western Europe, the 
course will include some material from the 
Americas and other areas. Cross-listed as 
WMS 317. 

HST318 three credits 
Women's Biography 
and Autobiography 

Examines the lives of various women in the 
United States, Great Britain, and elsewhere 
both from a literary and historical perspec- 
tive. Examples of women whose lives will be 
studied are Charlotte Bronte, Sarah and 
Angelina Grimke, and Charlotte Perkins 
Gilman. Cross-listed as WMS 318. 

HST319 three credits G 

Early Modern Europe 1 600 to 181 5 

A survey of post-Renaissance European 
civilization to the 19th century. Emphasis on 
the growth of the modern state system, the 
origins of capitalist economies, the scientific 
revolution and Enlightenment, and the 
political history of the principal monarchies. 

HST321 three credits G 

1 7th and 1 8th Century Europe: 

An Intellectual History 

A survey of the intellectual history of Europe 
in the early modern period, including the 
growth of skepticism and the secularization 
of thought, the scientific revolution, the 
Enlightenment and the creation of a liberal 
climate of opinion, and the origins of 
modern political and economic theory. 

HST322 three credits G 

1 9th and 20th Century Europe: 

An Intellectual History 



An examination of such intellectual currents 
as romanticism, liberalism and conservatism, 
nationalism, socialism and capitalism, and 
social Darwinism. Attention will be paid to 
the development and maturation of these 
currents in the 19th century, and their 
modification in the 20th century. 

HST323 three credits G 
Europe in the 19th Century 

The major political, economic, intellectual 
and social developments in Europe from the 
defeat of Napoleon to the outbreak of 
World War I. 

HST324 three credits G 
Europe in the 20th Century 

A study of the forces shaping contemporary 
Europe. Attention will be paid to World War 
I and its impact, the Versailles settlement, 
liberalism and democracy in the 20th 
century, the challenge of totalitarian 
systems, the Second World War, the Cold 
War, the West European unification, and 
disintegration of the Eastern Bloc. 

HST325 three credits G 
European Overseas 
Expansion 1500 to 1800 

Examines European mastery of the oceans 
from the beginning of long-distance trade 
with Africa to colonization and empire- 
building in Asia and the Americas. Emphasis 
on the pioneering activities of Portugal and 
the competing interests of Spain, the 
Netherlands, France, and England. 

HST 327 three credits 
Topics in the History of Ideas 

Treats the history of ideas as an inter- 
disciplinary approach to both intellectual 
history and the history of European society. 
Topics will vary with the instructor. 

HST 329 three credits G 
European Economic History 

An analysis of economic growth, economic 
policy and social change in Europe from the 
medieval period to the present, including a 
discussion of the contemporary European 
economy. 

HST 331 three credits G 
The Renaissance 

A survey of political, economic, and cultural 
developments in Europe from 1 300 to 1 500 
with special emphasis on Italy. 

HST 332 three credits G 
The Reformation 

A survey of the background of the Reforma- 
tion, the religious changes of the period, the 



role of reformers such as Luther, Calvin and 
Zwingli, and the effects of reform between 
1500 and 1648. 

HST 333 three credits G 

History of the British Isles to 1485 

A survey of the history of the English, Irish, 
and Scottish peoples of the British Isles from 
the earliest times to 1485. Topics include 
Celtic, Roman, Anglo-Saxon and Viking 
Britain; the development of the medieval 
monarchy; and medieval culture and society. 

HST 334 three credits G 

History of the British Isles from 1485 to 

1800 

A survey of the history of the English, Irish, 
and Scottish peoples of the British Isles from 
the end of the medieval period to 1 800. 
Topics include the Tudor, Stuart and 
Hanoverian monarchies; the Reformation and 
Civil War; society and culture; the British 
Empire; and the strengthening of English, 
Irish, and Scottish identities. 

HST 335 three credits G 

History of the British Isles from 1 800 to 

the Present 

A survey of the history of the English, Irish, 
and Scottish peoples of the British Isles from 
the early Victorians to the present. Topics 
include the expansion and decline of the 
British Empire, the famine and conflict in 
Ireland, the coming of democracy, the 
creation of the first industrial economy and 
society, the movement for women's rights, 
British participation in two world wars, and 
contemporary issues. 

HST 337 three credits G 
English Constitutional History 

Prerequisites: HST 333, 334. 
A survey of the legal and constitutional 
development of England from the Anglo- 
Saxon settlement to the Reform Bill of 1832. 
Attention to documents and other contem- 
porary materials (in English). Recommended 
for pre-law students. 

HST 339 three credits G 
Canada to 1867 

3 hours lecture 

Prerequisites: Sophomores and above; HST 
1 02, or HST 1 1 5, or equivalent 
Survey of Canadian history from European 
contact to the year of confederation. 
Lectures and readings integrate themes in 
the political, social, economic and military 
history of native, French, and British 
populations, with emphasis on the 
development of the early maritimes and 
Quebec. 



129 



College of Arts and Sciences 



HST 340 three credits G 
Canada Since 1867 

Extending the survey of Canadian history 
from Confederation to the present, this 
course focuses on the political history of 
post-colonial Canada, with social, economic 
and cultural issues introduced to illuminate 
the problem of nation-building for a 
population divided by regional and ethnic 
differences. Special attention will be paid to 
Quebec and the Mantimes, native- 
Canadians, U.S. relations, and contempo- 
rary constitutional issues. HST 339 is 
recommended, but not required as a 
prerequisite. 

HST 341 three credits G 
France to 1789 

A survey of French history in the 1 7th and 
18th centuries. Topics include the rise of the 
Bourbon monarchy, the reign of Louis XIV, 
the growth of religious and political dissent, 
the struggle for European hegemony and 
overseas empire, the cultural influence of 
France in the Enlightenment, and the crisis 
of the old regime. 

HST 343 three credits G 
History of Greek Civilization 

An introduction to the history of Greek 
civilization, from Minoan and Mycenaean 
times to the Hellenistic period. Emphasis will 
be on cultural and intellectual developments 
in their social and political contexts. 

HST 344 three credits G 
History of Roman Civilization 

A survey of Roman civilization from the 
origins of Rome to the age of Constantine, 
emphasizing Roman social and political 
institutions. Related topics include Roman 
imperialism, Latin literature, Roman religion, 
and early Christianity. Readings include a 
variety of primary sources. 

HST 347 three credits G 

History of Italy in the 19th Century 

A detailed study of the Risorgimento, or 
movement for Italian unification. Attention 
will be given to economic and cultural life 
as well as political events. 

HST 348 three credits G 

History of Italy in the 20th Century 

An analysis of the rise and fall of Italian 
fascism, including a study of Italy's 
participation in both World Wars. 

HST 351 three credits G 
History of Germany to 1 786 

A study of the development of the 
Germanic states from the founding of the 



First Reich in the 10th century to the death 
of Frederick the Great. Topics to be 
considered include: the development and 
nature of the medieval empire, the conflict 
with the Papacy; the Reformation; the 
Counter-Reformation; the spread of 
absolutism; the development of Prussia; and 
the role of the Hapsburgs in German affairs. 

HST 352 three credits G 
History of Germany from 
1786 to the Present 

A history of Germany in the modern era 
with the emphasis on politics and culture. 
Detailed treatment of 19th century 
unification and the rise and fall of Fascism. 

HST 353 three credits 

History of Germany from 1890 to 1933 

A study of Germany from the dismissal of 
Bismarck to the appointment of Hitler 
incorporating political, social, and intellec- 
tual history. Topics to be considered in depth 
include; the nature of the Second Reich 
under William II; the growth of anti- 
Semitism; World War I; the revolution of 
1918; and the development and collapse of 
the Weimar Republic. 

HST 354 three credits 

History of Germany from 1933to the 

Present 

A study of Germany from Hitler to the 
present day. Topics to be considered in 
depth include: the career and personality of 
Hitler; the growth of the Nazi Movement; 
the nature of the Nazi state; the origins of 
World War II; Germany's post-war recovery; 
and the government, society and roles of the 
(West) German Federal Republic and the 
(East) German Democratic Republic, and 
reunification. 

HST 355 three credits E, G 
Anti-Semitism and Its Ethical Issues 

Explores the issues of moral choice and 
ethical responsibility inherent in the history of 
the Jews in Biblical times, the patristic period, 
Middle Ages, Reformation, Enlightenment, 
French Revolution, nineteenth-century Europe 
and the United States, the Holocaust, up to 
the present day. 

HST 356 three credits G 
The Holocaust 

An examination of the Holocaust, including 
the psychosocial aspects of prejudice; the 
history of Jew hatred from Biblical times; the 
historical, political, racist, economic, social, 
psychological, literary, legal, theological, and 
moral aspects of the Holocaust. Cross-listed 
asJST 356. 



HST 357 three credits G 

Empires of Central Asia, From Attila the 

Hun to the Taliban 

Survey of the cultures and ethnic groups of 
Islamic Central Asia (Afghanistan, 
Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan, etc.) from the 
Middle Ages to the 21st Century. Provides 
an introduction to Islam and the various 
empires of Central Asia such as the state of 
Attila the Hun, Arab Empire, Mongol 
Khanates, Soviet Union and Taliban in 
Afghanistan. 

HST 358 three credits G 

Ethnicity and Conflict in the Lands of 

the Ottoman Empire 

Political and cultural survey of the Islamic 
Ottoman Empire in the Middle East, North 
Africa, and Balkans which commences with 
the Arab and Turkish conquests during the 
Middle Ages. An underlying theme for this 
course will be understanding the historic 
roots of nationalism and recent ethnic 
conflict in former Ottoman lands such as 
Bosnia, Kosovo, Turkey, Macedonia, and 
Palestine. 

HST 360 three credits G 

The United States in the 1 960s 

An examination of the United States from 
the 1950s to the 1970s. Topics to be 
considered include the black freedom 
struggle, Vietnam, the New Left, the 
women's movement, gay liberation, and the 
counter culture. 

HST 361 three credits G 
Russia to 1855 

Survey of Russia from the 9th Century to 
1855. Stress will be given to political, social, 
and economic developments. 

HST 362 three credits G 

Russia in Reform and Revolt, 1855 to 

1918 

Survey of Russia from 1855 to 1918. 
Emphasis will be on the great reforms, 
political and economic changes, the rise of 
revolutionary movements, the Revolution of 
1905, and the Revolution of 1917. 

HST 363 three credits G 
History of the Soviet Union 

Study of Russia from 1918 to the present. 
Stress will be given to the establishment of 
the Communist government, the Five Year 
Plans, and the social and cultural changes 
resulting from the adoption of Soviet 
ideology. Attention will be given to the role 
of Russia in the modern world. 

HST 364 three credits G 



130 



Social and Cultural History of Russia 

Topics pertaining to social classes, the 
development of serfdom, religion, and art 
and literature in Russia from the 9th Century 
to the present. Cross-listed as WMS 364. 

HST 365 three credits G 
Eastern European History 

The study of the Eastern European bloc from 
the Middle Ages to the present. Emphasis 
will be given to the political and economic 
development of these countries and the 
establishments of Communism in the post- 
World War II period. 

HST 366 three credits G 

Topics in the History of Soviet Foreign 

Policy 

Topics relating to the principles underlying 
Soviet foreign policy and to different 
countries and areas where the Soviet 
government has conducted foreign policy: 
for example, the United States, Western 
Europe, the Third World, China. Not every 
topic will be taught each time the course is 
given. 

HST 370 three credits G 

Portugal and Spain in the Middle Ages 

Medieval antecedents of modern Portugal 
and Spain. Students examine the political, 
cultural, and economic contributions of the 
Romans, Visigoths, and Moors. Particular 
attention is given to the dominance of 
Castile-Leon, which emerged as modern 
Spain and the seminal factors that led to an 
independent Portugal. 

HST 371 three credits G 
History of Portugal 

A survey from the Roman era to the present 
with emphasis on the post-medieval period. 
Topics include the emergence of a unified 
state, dynastic rivalries, the economy, 
overseas expansion and empire, constitu- 
tional development, the "New State" of 
Salazar, the revolution of 1974, and post- 
revolutionary Portugal. 

HST 372 three credits G 
Latin American-United States 
Relations 

Surveys the long history of contacts 
between Anglo and Latin America, with 
fullest emphasis on the era of the national 
states and the evolution of the inter- 
American system. Economic, cultural, and 
political aspects of the relationship will be 
studied, up to the present. 

HST 376 three credits G 
History of Brazil 



Emphasis on the period since independence 
in 1822. Topics include the empire and 
slavery, coffee, European immigration, the 
republic, race and class, foreign economic 
and ideological influences, and Brazil in the 
1980s. 

HST 378 three credits D, G 
Slavery in the New World 

The trans-Atlantic slave trade and slavery in 
the Americas from the sixteenth to the 
nineteenth century. Emphasis on the 
beginning and development of the trans- 
Atlantic slave trade; moral issues, econom- 
ics, and tactics of the trade; and compari- 
sons of the slave societies of Brazil, the 
Caribbean, and the United States. Cross- 
listed as AAS 378 and LST 378. 

HST 381 three credits G 
Modern Japan 

A survey of modern Japan since the 1 9th 
Century, with emphasis on post-war 
Japanese politics and Japan's present role in 
world affairs. 

HST 382 three credits G 
Modern China 

A study of the major themes of modern 
Chinese history, including culturalism and 
nationalism, responses to the impact of the 
West, and the development of revolutionary 
ideology. 

HST 385 three credits G 

History of the People's Republic of 

China 

A study of the world's most populous 
country. Covers the rise and fall of 
Nationalist China, the establishment of the 
People's Republic, social transformation, 
economic policy, bureaucracy, and freedom, 
Mao's ideology, the people's communes, 
the cultural revolution, the new leadership, 
and the new U.S./China relationship. 

HST 391 three credits G 
Topics in African History 

Prerequisites: HST 1 90 or HST 290 or written 
permission of the instructor 
Advanced-level course for students with a 
background in African history. Topics vary 
from year to year. Research papers are 
required. Cross-listed as AAS 391 and LST 
391. 

HST 395 three credits G,W 
World Religions and Spirituality 

Comparative and historical perspectives on 
world religions and humanity's search for 
meaning. Focuses on various cultural 
responses to "ultimate concerns" about the 



purpose of existence, creation, the super- 
natural, eternity, soul or spirit, death, 
suffering, good and evil, enlightenment, and 
salvation. Encompasses varied forms of 
religion and spiritual expression from highly 
structured and defined systems to folkways 
and mysticism. 

HST 399 three credits 

Teaching History and Social Studies in 

Middle and Secondary Schools 

Prerequisites: EDU 207, 327 
Examines the major genres, philosophies, and 
reference tools for the teaching of history 
and social studies in middle and high schools. 
All students will collect material, including 
documents and audio-visuals, for a topic to 
be taught in the schools. 

HST 401 three credits 
Seminar in American History 

Seminars will be offered variously in topics in 
American History. The writing of a substantial 
paper will be required. Content will vary with 
instructor; may be repeated with change of 
content. Cross-listed for AAS, JST, and WMS 
when the content is appropriate. 

Recent offerings include: 

HST 401 three credits 
Seminar: Plymouth Colony 

HST 401 three credits 
Seminar: Civil War Biography 

HST 401 three credits 
Seminar: U.S. Women's History 

HST 401 three credits 
Seminar: America in the 1960s 

HST 402 three credits G 
Seminar in European History 

Seminars will be offered variously in topics in 
American History. The writing of a substantial 
paper will be required. Content will vary with 
instructor; may be repeated with change of 
content. Cross-listed for JST and WMS when 
the content is appropriate. 

Recent offerings include: 

HST 402 three credits G 

Seminar: British Industrial Revolution 

HST 403 three credits G 
Seminar in World History 

Seminars will be offered variously in topics in 
non-European World History. The writing of a 
substantial paper will be required. Content 
will vary with instructor; may be repeated 



131 



College of Arts and Sciences 



with change of content. Cross-listed for 
AAS, JST, and WMS when the content is 
appropriate. 



Courses for the Master of Arts in 
Teaching 



HST 543 three credits 
Greek Civilization 

See HST 343. 



Recent offerings include: 

HST 403 three credits G 

Seminar: Russian Revolutionary Thought 

HST 403 three credits G, W 
Seminar: Latin America 

HST 403 three credits G 
Seminar: Modern China 



HST 404 three credits G 

Honors Seminar in American History 

Honors version of HST 401 . 

HST 405 three credits G 

Honors Seminar in European History 

Honors version of HST 402. 

HST 406 three credits G 

Honors Seminar in World History 

Honors version of HST 403. 



HST 495 variable credit 
Independent Study 

Prerequisites: Upper-division standing; 
permission of instructor, department 
chairperson, and college dean 
Study under the supervision of a faculty 
member in an area not otherwise part of the 
discipline's course offerings. Conditions and 
hours to be arranged. 

HST 196. 296. 396. 496 three credits 
Directed Study 

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor, 
department chairperson, and college dean 
Study under the supervision of a faculty 
member in an area covered in a regular 
course not currently being offered. 
Conditions and hours to be arranged. 

HST 499 six credits 
Honors Research Paper 

The writing of an honors research paper. 
Students may elect to take three credits one 
semester and three in another. 



Some undergraduate senior-level courses 
are offered to graduate students under a 
corresponding 5xx number, with concurrent 
enrollment but additional work expecta- 
tions. 



HST 501 three credits 

Theory and Practice of Teaching History 

and Social Studies 

The historical and contemporary debate on 
the nature of the history and social studies 
curriculum in secondary schools. This course 
will investigate the actual curriculum and 
practice of history and social studies 
teaching in area schools, and formulate 
specific strategies for effective teaching and 
curriculum building. 

HST 511 three credits 
Teaching American History 

Prerequisite: Graduate student status or 
special permission of instructor 
Seminar examining current trends and issues 
in the study of American history. Intended 
primarily for MAT candidates in history and 
social studies, this course will focus on 
recent developments in scholarship and their 
implications for the teaching of American 
history. 

HST 512 three credits 
Teaching European History 

The content and methodology of European 
history courses in secondary schools. 
Participants will study recent scholarship on 
major historical topics in European history 
and organize materials and design strategies 
to integrate this scholarship in the curricu- 
lum. 

HST 513 three credits 
Teaching World History 

The content and methodology of world 
history courses in secondary schools. 
Participants will study recent scholarship and 
consider new interpretations of major 
historical issues in world history. They will 
then organize materials and design 
strategies to integrate these perspectives 
and scholarship into the curriculum. 

HST 521 three credits 
Graduate Seminar in History 

Graduate Seminars in history are designed 
to allow participants to pursue reading and 
research on a particular historical topic. 
Course may be repeated with change of 
topic. 



HST 544 three credits 
Roman Civilization 

See HST 344. 

HST 585 three credits 
People's Republic of China 

See HST 385. 



132 



Humanities/Social Sciences 



Humanities/Social Sciences Major 

BA degree 



Program Director, Frederick Gifun 

Professor of History 



The Bachelor of Arts in Humanities/Social 
Sciences offers students the opportunity to 
gain a broad-based understanding of human 
activities, institutions, and societies and to 
develop their ability to think and write 
critically, all in the classical tradition of the 
liberal arts. The program prepares students 
for a wide variety of careers in human 
services, the professions, and the corporate 
world. It is especially recommended for those 
intending to become elementary teachers. 
Given its broad academic scope, it provides 
the foundation for long-term career 
development and change. 



The interdisciplinary nature of the Humani- 
ties/Social Sciences major makes it especially 
important that students work closely with 
their faculty advisor in selecting courses and 
constructing a coherent academic program. 
Within the major, students select a field of 
concentration (a four-course sequence in one 
department or discipline), which can also 
form the basis for a minor in a department or 
topical area such as Women's Studies, Labor 
Studies, African/African American Studies, 
Gerontology, etc. 

Students are encouraged to declare the 
Humanities/Social Sciences major as soon as 
possible in their academic career, at which 
time they should submit a written rationale 
and proposed program of study to the 
Program Director and their faculty advisor. 
The major is also available to entering 
freshmen who plan to seek certification as 
elementary teachers. B.A. degree candidates 
may not use it as part of a double major. 



Requirements 

The major consists of 36 credits of Humani- 
ties/Social Sciences courses, at least 24 credits 
of which must be at the 300-level or above. 
Up to 1 2 credits may be taken at the 200- 
level. No 1 00-level course may be used to 
satisfy major requirements. Courses used for 
the major may also be used to satisfy the 
requirements of a minor or parts of the 
University's General Education program, but 
not the distribution requirements of the 
College of Arts and Sciences. 

A. 

Distribution of courses in the major. Within 
the 36 credits of the Humanities/Social 
Sciences major the following distribution 
must be followed: 

1. 

Students choose at least two areas (disci- 
plines) in the Humanities and at least two in 
the Social Sciences (four areas total-see lists 
of disciplines under 4). 
2. 

At least 6 credits (two courses) must be taken 

in each of the four areas selected. 

3. 

Area of concentration. A minimum of 12 
credits, including a 400-level course, must be 
taken in one of the four areas selected. 
4. 

The remaining 6 credits of the major may be 
taken in any of the ten Humanities/Social 
Sciences areas or disciplines. 



Humanities Disciplines 
English 

Foreign Literature and Languages 

History 

Philosophy 

Art History 

Music (non-applied courses) 

Social Sciences Disciplines 
Economics 
Political Science 
Psychology 

Sociology/Anthropology 

B. 

College distribution requirements. 

Humanities/Social Sciences majors must 
satisfy the College of Arts and Sciences 
distribution requirements for BA candidates. 
Courses used to satisfy the college distribu- 
tion requirements and H/SS major require- 
ments may also be used to satisfy require- 
ments in the University's General Education 
program. 

C. 

University General Education Program. 

All majors in the University are required to 
complete the General Education require- 
ments. Several of the General Education 
categories are automatically satisfied by the 
College distribution requirements (categories 

C, S, and Tier 1 of categories I and W). 
Students normally satisfy categories E, G, and 

D, in the course of meeting distribution and 
major requirements, although it is the 
responsibility of students to make sure that 
they choose courses that will satisfy those 
categories. The Tier 2 requirements in 
Information and Computer Literacy, and 
Writing Skills, as well as the Oral Skills 
requirement are normally met within 
departments. Since the H/SS major is 
interdisciplinary, students will normally use 
the department of their area of concentration 
to meet these requirements. In any case, 
students should discuss their General 
Education options with their major advisor. 



133 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Mathematics 



Faculty and Fields of Interest 



Mathematics can be pursued as a scholarly 
discipline of an especially elegant kind — a 
creative art form — or it can be treated as a 
valuable tool in an applied discipline. 

The program for mathematics majors is 
designed to provide a solid foundation in the 
theoretical and applied aspects of math- 
ematics necessary for a variety of profes- 
sional careers. The flexibility within the third 
and fourth years was established to enable 
mathematics majors to concentrate in areas 
of their interest. The Computer-Oriented 
Mathematics Program (COMP) is designed 
for those seeking positions in industry or 
with the government. The program 
emphasizes applied and computer math- 
ematics. Students can choose their curricula 
so as to emphasize that role of mathematics 
which will be useful to them in later years. 
For example, students may use our offerings 
as preparation for 
• 

secondary school teaching; 
• 

graduate school in mathematics, applied 
mathematics, or computer science; 
• 

a career in applied mathematics in either the 

public or private sector; and 

• 

graduate school in an area that uses 
mathematics, such as economics, biology or 
psychology. 

Some mathematics majors have had success 
in law school, pharmaceutical school, and 
medical school. 

The Department offers both a major and a 
minor program. 



Louis G. Bianco probability, statistics 

Maria Blanton mathematics education 

Nurit Budinsky nonlinear differential 
equations, numerical analysis, nonlinear 
dynamical systems 

Richard Faulkenberry linear algebra 

Dana Fine applied math, relativity theory 

Sigal Gottlieb applied mathematics, 
scientific computing, parallel computing 

Ivona Grzegorczyk (on leave) algebraic 
geometry, mathematics education 

Adam O. Hausknecht algebra, analysis of 
algorithms 

Stephen Hegedus mathematics education 

James J. Kaput algebra, math education 
and the philosophy of mathematics 

SaejaOh Kim modern algebra 

Robert E. Kowalczyk probability, numerical 
analysis, computer applications 

Steven J. Leon numerical analysis, linear 
algebra 

Gary Martin logic 

Robert McCabe analysis 

Despina Stylianou mathematics education 

Ronald Tannenwald (chairperson) 

dynamical systems 



134 



Mathematics Major 

BA degree 



Requirements 

Regular Option 



Semester Credits 



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3 


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6 


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15 


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Modern Algebra 


3 




departments themselves would credit to a 




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3 


3 


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3 


3 


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4 


6 


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13 


12 


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Total credits: 


120 



Mathematics Electives 

code* 



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Theory of Numbers 


T 


MTH 310 


Modern Methods in Mathematics Teaching 


T 


MTH 311, 312 


Advanced Calculus I, II 


T, G, A 


MTH 321, 322 


Topics in Applied Math I, II 


A, G 


MTH 331 


Probability 


A, G 


MTH 332 


Mathematical Statistics 


A, G 


MTH 353 


Applied Linear Algebra 


A 


MTH 361, 362 


Numerical Analysis I, II 


A, G 


MTH 381 


Combinatorial Theory 


A, G 


MTH 382 


Graph Theory 


A,G 


MTH 421 


Complex Variables 


A, G 


MTH 441, 442 


Modern Algebra I, II 


A, G 


MTH 443 


Applied Modern Algebra 


A, G 


MTH 451 


Differential Geometry 


G 


MTH 452 


Higher Geometry 


G, T 


MTH 461 


Elementary Topology 


G 


MTH 463 


Math Models 


A 


MTH 487 


Math Inquiry I 


T, G 


MTH 488 


Math Inquiry II 


T, G 


MTH 499 


Selected Topics in Math 


T, G 


* Code 







T — recommended for students preparing to teach 

G — recommended for students preparing for graduate school 

A — recommended for students in applied mathematics 



135 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Mathematics Major: Computer- Requirements 

Oriented Mathematics Option Computer-Oriented Option 

BS degree Semester Credits 



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3 
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PHY 1 1 ^ 114 

1 1 I 1 ) 1 J, 1 IH 


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4 


4 






Humanittes/Socisl Science Electives 


3 


6 


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1 1 It Wl VUI UHl 1 IQJ VII lUQIIj Lilt Jul 1 IC 


MTH 221 

1 VI 1 1 1 £— £— 1 


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3 


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15 


16 


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MTH 321 322 

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3 


3 


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MTH 331 


Probability 


3 




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MTw 332 

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3 


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ci iu ui liic _>cl_ui iu ycai wiiiiuul any iu_o ui 




Science Electives* 


3 


a 

J 


time. 




Free Eleaives 


3 


3 






Literature 


3 


3 


A RQ Honroo m C nmm itor_("lnontoH 
M Oj Ucyicc IN V.UII IUU lci ~\J\ Ici 1 IcU 






15 


•c 


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Fourth Year 








computer-oriented mathematics or enter 


MTH 361, 362 


Numerical Analysis 1, II 


3 


3 


industrial employment where physical and 




Humanities/Social Science Elective 


3 




industrial problems are analyzed mathemati- 




Technical Electives** 


3 


3 


cally. 




Free Electives 


6 


4 




MTH 353 


Applied Linear Algebra 




3 


The program offers a large choice of 






15 


13 


electives within the context of computer- 










oriented mathematics. The student can thus 




Total credits: 


121 


pursue his or her special interests in any 










particular phase of computer-oriented 










mathematics. 


* 










The Science Elective is defined as any course in Biology, Chemistry, Physics, or Medical 


See requirements on next page. 


Laboratory Science which is accepted for credit by majors in those programs. 





** 

The Technical Elective is defined as any upper-division Mathematics or Computer and 
Information Science course. 



General Education Departmental Requirements 

Students majoring in Mathematics will meet their departmentally-controlled General 
Education requirements as follows: 

Area E: Students may choose a course from the approved list 
Area I, Tier 2: TBD 

Area W, Tier 2: Students may choose a course from the approved list 
Area 0: TBD 



136 



Mathematics Minor 



Mathematics Courses 



The minor in mathematics comprises a 
central core of required courses followed by 
opportunities for advanced work and some 
specialization. Any student of the university is 
eligible for the designation "Minor in 
Mathematics" upon completion of the 
following requirements. Each course for the 
minor must be completed with a grade of C- 
or better, and the student must maintain at 
least a C average (2.0 GPA) in the minor 
program. 



Requirements 

Credits 

MTH 1 1 1 Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus I 4 

MTH 1 1 2 Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus II 4 

MTH 2 1 1 Analytic Geometry and 

Calculus III 4 

At least one of the following courses: 

MTH 212 Differential Equations 3 
MTH 221 Linear Algebra 
MTH 227 Linear Algebra for Applied 
Science 

At least three additional three-credit 
courses, numbered 300 or higher. 9 

Total 24 



MTH 100 three administrative credits * 
Basic Algebra 

An introductory level algebra course 
intended primarily for those with weak or 
no skills or those who have been away from 
the subject for some time. This course 
provides the algebra background required 
for all entry level courses in mathematics. 

MTH 101 three credits M 
Elements of College Mathematics I 

MTH 101, 102 comprise a terminal course 
of study for students whose curriculum calls 
for one year of mathematics. MTH 101 is 
also a prerequisite for MTH 231 . The first 
semester covers selected topics from 
algebra, set theory, matrix algebra, and 
elementary functions. 

MTH 102 three credits M 
Elements of College Mathematics II 

Prerequisite: MTH 101 or MTH 103 
Introduction to differential and integral 
calculus. 

MTH 103 three credits M 
Finite Mathematics 

Will cover selected topics from Logic, Set 
Theory, Vectors and Matrices, Linear 
Programming, Probability, Graphs and 
Theory of Games. May be taken in lieu of 
MTH 101. 

MTH 104 three credits M 
Fundamentals of Statistics 

The mathematical techniques involved in 
organizing data, averages and variation, 
elementary probability theory, the binomial 
distribution, normal distributions and related 
topics, estimation, hypothesis testing, 
regression and correlation, Chi Square- tests 
of independence, Chi Square- goodness of 
fit and analysis of variance: comparing 
several sample means. 

MTH 105 three credits 
Technical Calculus I 

First semester of a four-term calculus 
sequence required of technology students 
and recommended for non-physical science 
majors desiring a basic introduction to 
analysis. The first term will review those 
topics from algebra and trigonometry 
needed in the sequel. Then the basic 
concepts of the differential calculus will be 
studied. 



* Administrative credits do not count 
towards the total credits required for 
graduation. 



MTH 106 three credits 
Technical Calculus II 

Prerequisite: MTH 105 
Continuation of MTH 105. Further study of 
algebraic and transcendental functions of 
one variable and topics from the integral 
calculus of these functions. 

MTH 107 three credits M 
Elements of College Mathematics 
Enhanced 

Elements of college mathematics in 
application to business, selected to 
emphasize interpretation and explanation 
and to de-emphasize computation. 

MTH 108 three credits M 

Modern Math for Elementary Teachers 

Problems of the changing modem math- 
ematics curriculum. Current issues, 
attitudes, and learning theories will be 
studied, including the mathematical 
foundations of the elementary school 
curriculum. 

MTH 109 two credits 
Mathematical Problem Solving and 
Reasoning I 

Basic mathematical problem solving and 
reasoning skills development. The course 
uses an intensive hands-on, problem- 
centered approach to develop mathematical 
thinking skills, frequently using computer 
software and group work. The course 
begins with simple thinking skills and 
mathematical ideas, and "what to do when 
you're stuck" strategies. The goal is to 
develop strategies for solving hard problems 
and understanding complex or abstract 
ideas. 

MTH 110 three credits M 
Mathematical Problem Solving and 
Reasoning II 

Continuation of MTH 109. 

MTH 111 four credits 

Analytic Geometry and Calculus I 

Prerequisite: Trigonometry 
First semester of a four term sequence 
required of majors in mathematics, the 
physical sciences and engineering. Recom- 
mended for others desiring a thorough 
background in elementary analysis. Term 1 
will cover topics in analytic geometry, the 
concepts of function and limit, continuity, 
differentiability and integrability of 
elementary algebraic and transcendental 
functions. Techniques of differentiation and 
applications will then be studied. 



137 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Gen Ed note: Mathematics courses satisfy 
the Mathematics requirement. Those 
marked M below are appropriate for non- 
science/engineenng majors. 



MTH 112 four credits 

Analytic Geometry and Calculus II 

Prerequisite: MTH 1 1 1 
Continuation of MTH 111. Topics from the 
integral calculus, stressing techniques of 
integration (including numerical methods). 
Infinite series. 

MTH 113 four credits 

Calculus for Applied Science and 

Engineering I 

Prerequisite: Trigonometry 
Corequisites: PHY 111, EGR 107 
Functions, limits, differentiation and 
integration of elementary algebraic and 
transcendental functions. Vectors, vector 
operations, vector fields and line integrals 
will be introduced. Technological tools an a 
computer algebra system will be used 
extensively throughout the course. 

MTH 114 four credits 

Calculus for Applied Science and 

Engineering II 

Prerequisite: MTH 1 13 or MTH 1 1 1 
Corequisites: PHY 112, EGR 108 
Continuation of MTH 1 1 3 or MTH 111. 
Techniques of integration, improper 
integrals, applications of integrals, series, 
polar coordinates and an introduction to 
differential equations. Selected topics from 
multivariate calculus will include partial 
differentiation, double and triple integrals, 
line integrals and flux. 

MTH 117 three credits M 

Fractals and Chaos via Elementary 

Mathematics 

Prerequisite: Above average score on the 
MTH 101 placement test 
The new science of chaos revealed through 
its fascinating history and stimulating 
examples. The connection will be demon- 
strated between such seemingly unrelated 
topics as weather and stock prediction, 
management and scientific decisions, the 
erratic motion of a pendulum and the 
delicate design of snowflakes, clouds, or the 
fjords of Sweden. Students will create their 
own fractals and play the chaos game using 
computer software, calculators, or even just 
pencil and paper. 

MTH 118 three credits M 
Mathematics for Artists 

Prerequisite: satisfactory score on mathemat- 
ics placement exam 

Relationships between fine art and math- 
ematics, with an emphasis on understanding 
geometric patterns and concepts. Topics 
include art-related examples and hands-on 
experiences which give basic mathematical 



background for future artistic students' 
endeavors. 

MTH 119 three credits M 
Math and Music 

Prerequisite: minimal ability to read music 
Topics which emphasize and explore the 
close connection between mathematics and 
music. Historical connections will be studied, 
as well as the mathematics behind acoustics, 
rhythm, and 20th century music, and 
mathematical theories of randomness, 
leading to fractal music and fractal noise. 
The mathematical structures behind non- 
Western musical theories such as pentatomc 
and quarter-tone scalings, and polyrhythms 
will be explored. 

MTH 120 three credits M 
Quantitative Reasoning 

Prerequisite: Satisfactory score on math- 
ematics placement exam 
Fundamentals of quantitative literacy 
including inductive-deductive reasoning, 
paradoxes, and problem-solving strategies. 
Numeracy including estimation, scaling, 
uncertainty, and infinity will be discussed. 
Rate of change, linear and exponential 
models will be explored. Applications of 
quantitative reasoning to the social sciences 
will be emphasized. 

MTH 127 three credits M 
Evolution of Mathematics As the 
Language of Nature 

Prerequisite: above average score on MTH 
101 placement test; or permission of 
instructor 

Eratosthenes measured the earth without 
encircling it more than two thousand years 
ago. Elementary mathematics will be used to 
rediscover Eratosthenes and other human 
giants' methods in measuring the distance 
from Earth to the moon, the sun or other 
heavenly stars, to find out the precise orbit 
of Mars, and to prove that the planets 
(including Earth) do accelerate towards the 
sun. Philosophy and the foundation of 
principles in science will be discussed, such 
as quantitative verses, qualitative principles, 
and the discovery that Nature is written in 
the language of mathematics. 

MTH 131 three credits M 
Pre-calculus 

This course is designed to provide students 
with the precalculus background necessary 
for MTH 1 1 1 or MTH 105. The course covers 
topics in algebra, trigonometry and finite 
mathematics. 

MTH 181/182 three credits each 



Introduction to Discrete Structures I, II 

Review of set algebra including mappings 
and relations, algebraic structures including 
semigroups and groups. Elements of the 
theory of directed and undirected graphs. 
Boolean algebra and propositional logic. 
Applications of these structures to various 
areas of computers. 

MTH 203 three credits 
Technical Calculus III 

Prerequisite: MTH 106 
Continuation of MTH 106. Topics include 
conic sections, polar coordinates, functions 
of two variables, partial differentiation, 
multiple integration and infinite series. 

MTH 204 three credits 
Elementary Differential Equations 

Prerequisite: MTH 203 
Techniques in the solutions of ordinary 
differential equations, and applications from 
engineering. Similar to MTH 212 with less 
emphasis on theory and more on applica- 
tions. The natural continuation of MTH 203. 

MTH 211 four credits 

Analytic Geometry and Calculus III 

Prerequisite: MTH 1 12 
Continuation of MTH 1 12. Two and three 
dimensional vectors, partial differentiation, 
multiple integrals and applications. 

MTH 212 three credits 
Differential Equations I 

Prerequisite: MTH 112 
Continuation of MTH 211. Ordinary 
differential equations of the first order, 
linear differential equations of the nth 
order, some nonlinear second order 
equations, series solutions and Laplace 
transforms. 

MTH 213 four credits 

Calculus for Applied Science and 

Engineering III 

Prerequisite: MTH 1 14 
Continuation of MTH 1 14. An introduction 
to multivariate and vector calculus. The 
course covers multivariate functions, partial 
differentiation, multiple integrals, param- 
eterized curves and surfaces, vector fields, 
line integrals, flux and divergence. 

MTH 221 three credits 
Linear Algebra 

Prerequisite: MTH 1 1 1 
Required of all second-year mathematics 
majors and recommended for students in 
the physical, natural, behavioral and 
management sciences. Course material 
includes systems of linear equations, matrix 



138 



theory, vector spaces, linear transforma- 
tions, Eigenvalues. 

MTH 227 three credits 

Linear Algebra for Applied Sciences 

Prerequisite: MTH 1 1 1 
A first course in linear algebra covering 
general theory of matrices and linear 
systems. Topics include: Matrices and linear 
systems, determinants, vector spaces , 
orthogonality, and eigenvalues. Computer 
laboratory exercises included. 

MTH 231 three credits 
Elementary Statistics I 

Prerequisite: MTH 101 or equivalent 
Fundamental business statistics. The text, 
examples, and applications are all business- 
oriented. The first-semester topics include 
descriptive statistics, probability, estimation, 
statistical inference and sampling. 

MTH 232 three credits 
Elementary Statistics II 

Prerequisite: MTH 231 
Continuation of MTH 231. Regression and 
correlation analysis. Analysis of variance. 
Goodness-of-fit tests. An introduction to 
Bayesian decision methods. 

MTH 233 three credits 

Elementary Applied Statistics (Honors) 

Prerequisites: College Algebra and at least a 
score of 570 on Math SAT, or permission of 
the instructor 

Topics in descriptive and inferential statistics 
including summary measures, discrete 
probability, normal density functions, point 
and interval estimation, hypothesis testing 
procedures, t-tests, analysis of variance, chi- 
square tests, correlation, and regression an- 
alysis. A statistical computer software pack- 
age will be extensively utilized. Condensing 
the topics covered in MTH 231 and 232, this 
course satisfies the MTH 231/2 requirement 
of most business-related majors. 

MTH 298 one to six credits 
Experiential Learning 

Prerequisites: At least sophomore standing; 
permission of the instructor, department 
chairperson, and college dean 
Work experience at an elective level 
supervised for academic credit by a faculty 
member in an appropriate academic field. 
Conditions and hours to be arranged. 
Graded CR/NC. For specific procedures and 
regulations, see section of catalogue on 
Other Learning Experiences. 

MTH 302 three credits 
Theory of Numbers 



A study of the integers, divisibility proper- 
ties, diophantine equations, congruences, 
quadratic residues, Pythagorean triangles 
and selected higher topics. 

MTH 310 three credits 
Modern Methods in 
Mathematics Teaching 

Prerequisite: mathematics major 
The use of techniques and materials in 
teaching the mathematical sciences in 
grades 8-12. Special attention will be given 
to new information technology and its use 
in enhancing learning and problem-solving 
abilities. This course will concentrate on the 
integration of commercially-available 
computer software into the mathematics 
curriculum in algebra, geometry, statistics, 
and precalculus, as well as with more 
traditional materials. This course is for 
mathematics majors intending to teach. 

MTH 311 three credits 
Advanced Calculus I 

Prerequisite: MTH 212 
This course is a rigorous analysis of the 
concept of limits, continuity, the derivative 
and other selected areas. 

MTH 312 three credits 
Advanced Calculus II 

Prerequisite: MTH 31 1 

Continuation of MTH 31 1 with emphasis on 
uniform convergence and related topics. 

MTH 321 three credits 

Topics in Applied Mathematics I 

Prerequisite: MTH 212 
A study of Fourier Series and Integrals, 
Fourier and Laplace Transforms, Partial 
Differential Equations. 

MTH 322 three credits 

Topics in Applied Mathematics II 

Prerequisite: MTH 321 

Continuation of MTH 321 . The course 

covers Besel functions and Legendre 

polynomials; calculus of variations, vector 

analysis. 

MTH 331 three credits 
Probability 

Prerequisite: MTH 1 12 
A calculus-based introduction to statistics. 
This course covers probability and combina- 
torial problems, discrete and continuous 
random variables and various distributions 
including the binomial, Poisson, hyper- 
geometric normal, gamma and chi-square. 
Moment generating functions, transforma- 
tion and sampling distributions are studied. 



MTH 332 three credits 
Mathematical Statistics 

Prerequisite: MTH 331 
Continuation of MTH 331. Classical 
estimation methods and hypothesis testing 
are studied. This course also covers Chi 
square tests for goodness-of-fit and 
independence, regression and correlation 
analysis, and one-way and two-way analysis 
of variance including factorial designs and 
tests for the separation of means. 

MTH 353 three credits 
Applied Linear Algebra 

Prerequisites: MTH 221, CIS 261 
Orthogonality and least square problems. 
Other topics include applications of 
eigenvalue, quadratic forms, Numerical 
Linear Algebra. 

MTH 361 three credits 
Numerical Analysis I 

Prerequisites: MTH 221, 212, CIS 261, (MTH 
221 may be taken concurrently) 
Theory and computer-oriented practice in 
obtaining numerical solutions of various 
problems. Topics include stability and 
conditioning, nonlinear equations, systems 
of linear equations, interpolation and 
approximation theory. 

MTH 362 three credits 
Numerical Analysis II 

Prerequisite: MTH 361 
Numerical methods for solving initial value 
problems. Topics include: numerical 
differentiation and integration, Euler 
method and Taylor's series method, Runge- 
Kutta methods, multi-step methods, and 
stiff equations. 

MTH 381 three credits 
Combinatorial Theory 

Prerequisites: MTH 1 1 1, 1 12, 181, 
182, 221 

Techniques of counting: elementary 
enumerative methods, generating functions, 
partitions, recurrence relations, inclusion- 
exclusion principle, the Polya theory of 
counting, generalizations of the pigeonhole 
principle and selected topics from experi- 
mental design and coding theory. 

MTH 382 three credits 
Graph Theory 

Prerequisites: MTH 111, 112, 181, 
182, 221 

A study of graph theory and its applications. 
Topics included are Hamiltonian and 
Eulerian properties, matching, trees, 
connectivity, coloring problems, and 
plananty. Emphasis will be on applications 



139 



College of Arts and Sciences 



including optimization of graphs and 
networks. 

MTH421 three credits 
Complex Analysis 

Prerequisite: MTH 21 1 
Analytic functions, differentiation, integra- 
tion, conformal mapping, calculus of 
residues and infinite series. 

MTH 441 three credits 
Modern Algebra I 

Prerequisite: MTH 221 

The study of relations, functions, groups, 

rings and fields. 

MTH 442 three credits 
Modern Algebra II 

Prerequisites: MTH 221, 441 
This course deals primarily with the 
following: Sylow theorems, polynomials, 
field extensions and Galois theory. 

MTH 451 three credits 
Differential Geometry 

Prerequisite: MTH 312 
Analysis of curves and surfaces. Frenet- 
Serret formulae. First and second funda- 
mental forms for surfaces, Gaussian and 
mean curvature, theorems of Meusnier and 
Rodriques, and the Gauss-Bonnet theorem 
are also studied. 

MTH 452 three credits 
Introduction to Higher Geometry 

Prerequisite: MTH 21 1 
A survey of the history of geometry, 
emphasizing the scholars of antiquity. 
Topics from modern (college) geometry, 
projective and non-Euclidean geometries. 

MTH 461 three credits 
Elementary Topology 

Prerequisite: MTH 312 
An introduction to point-set and combin- 
atorial topology. 

MTH 463 three credits 
Math Modeling 

Selected topics from the areas of linear 
programming, dynamic programming, 
Markov chains and game theory. Mathe- 
matical model building will be developed 
through the use of numerous case studies 
from the natural and social sciences, e.g., 
ecological models, network models, 
scheduling models, urban structure, traffic 
flow, growth, etc. 

MTH 464 three credits 
Simulations 

Deterministic and nondeterministic 



simulation. Random number generators, 
Monte Carlo techniques, discrete simulation 
techniques and simulation computer 
languages (e.g., GPSS, SIMSCRIPT) are 
studied. Standard Simulations Models, such 
as the national economy model, inventory 
control, banking, blackjack, etc., will also be 
covered. 

MTH 487 three credits 
Mathematical Inquiry I 

Prerequisite: MTH 212 

Course is conducted as a seminar. An 

elementary question is posed to the students 

who must generate their own mathematics 

in an attempt to find a solution. The aim is 

to develop student independence and 

creativity. 

MTH 488 three credits 
Mathematical Inquiry II 

Prerequisite: MTH 212 

A second semester of inquiry, independent 

of the first. 

MTH 495 variable credit 
Independent Study 

Prerequisites: Upper-division standing; 
permission of instructor, department 
chairperson, and college dean 
Study under the supervision of a faculty 
member in an area not otherwise part of the 
discipline's course offerings. Conditions and 
hours to be arranged. 

MTH 196, 296, 396, 496 three credits 
Directed Study 

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor, 
department chairperson, and college dean 
Study under the supervision of a faculty 
member in an area covered in a regular 
course not currently being offered. 
Conditions and hours to be arranged. 

MTH 499 three credits 
Selected Topics in Mathematics 

Prerequisites: MTH 212 and permission 
of department 

A special course to meet the needs of 
students for material not encountered in 
other courses. Topics dealt with require the 
approval of the departmental chairperson. 



Graduate Courses in Mathematics 
and Mathematics Education 

MAE 507 three credits 
Probability for Teachers 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor or 
undergraduate algebra 
Probability for Teachers is an introduction to 
the discrete probability theory in an 
experimental hands-on way. The stress is put 
on pedagogical contents, including common 
misconceptions and misunderstandings in 
probability. The course also examines the 
modern educational technology and 
software used in probability. 

MAE 508 three credits 
Statistics for Teachers 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor or MAE 
507 

Statistics for Teachers surveys the statistical 
methods used in science and everyday life 
and addresses the problem of pedagogy and 
statistical misconceptions. The course also 
examines the modern educational technol- 
ogy and software used in statistics. 

MAE 511 three credits 

Calculus and Analysis for Teachers 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor or 
undergraduate calculus 
Calculus and Analysis for Teachers assumes 
successful completion of a standard 
university calculus sequence. It addresses the 
key underlying idea of the mathematics 
change: notions of variation, rate, mean 
value, and accumulation across many 
contexts and representations, as well as the 
connections between rates and accumula- 
tion as embodied in the Fundamental 
Theorem of Calculus. It also addresses 
relations between discrete and continuous 
models of change, including conceptions of 
limit. 

MAE 520 three credits 
Discrete Math for Teachers 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor or 
modern algebra 

Topics in Discrete Mathematics, including 
combinatorics, logic and set theory, 
algorithms, linear algebra, relations and 
functions, elements of number theory, and 
chaos/fractals. The focus will be on the 
connections and deep structural themes 
unifying these areas, and on using discrete 
math to gain a deeper understanding of 
high-school algebra and calculus. 

MAE 521 three credits 
Geometry forTeachers 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor or 



140 



undergraduate geometry 
Geometry for Teachers surveys the new 
types of geometry made possible by 
dynamic computer graphics as well as topics 
that help students deepen their understand- 
ing of the key ideas of Euclidean geometry. 
The course also examines the forms and 
purposes of proof, and student develop- 
ment of spatial and logical reasoning. 

MAE 522 three credits 
Algebraic Structures for Teachers 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor or 
undergraduate algebra 
Algebraic Structures for Teachers examines 
the many forms of algebraic reasoning and 
their conceptual underpinnings, the 
fundamental shift in the place of algebra in 
school mathematics, and the potential 
unifying role of abstract and general 
algebraic structures at the upper secondary 
level. The course will engage students in 
vigorous critique of traditional and 
innovative algebra learning materials and 
technologies. 

MAE 591/2 three credits 

Topics in Mathematics for Teachers 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor 
Individual and/ or group study under 
supervision of a faculty member in an area 
of mathematics for teachers that is not 
otherwise part of graduate course offerings. 



141 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Medical Laboratory Science 



In medical laboratory science, both the 
clinical laboratory science option and the 
cytotechnology option, provide students 
with the concepts, professional attitudes, 
scientific theory and skills essential for 
practicing clinical laboratonans. Medical 
laboratory science leads students to 
understand the health care delivery system 
and the role of the clinical laboratory 
scientist and cytotechnologist in that system, 
to function as professionals, and to gain the 
skills and attitudes needed to enter their 
practice. All graduates are eligible for 
national certification and licensure. 

Students use state-of-the-art equipment and 
laboratory methods in the new, modern- 
design laboratory facility. The medical 
laboratory science faculty are professional 
laboratory scientists and leaders in local, 
regional, and national professional and 
scientific organizations who influence the 
practice of the profession by serving on 
committees and as consultants. 



Faculty and Fields of Interest 



Dorothy A. Bergeron immunohematology, 
health education, professional issues 

Brenda Bouchard coagulation, serology, 
science education 

Lynne Brodeur medical laboratory science 

Eileen Carreiro-Lewandowski clinical 
chemistry, biochemistry, laboratory 
regulation 

Thorn Goodwin medical laboratory science 

James T. Griffith (chairperson) microbiol- 
ogy, antimicrobial agents, health legislation 

Susan J. Leclair hematology, health 
planning 

Frank J. Scarano molecular epidemiology, 
clinical microbiology 



Medical Laboratory Science Major 

BS degree 



Entrance to Medical Laboratory Science 

In addition to the general course require- 
ments for admission, the Department of 
Medical Laboratory Science more specifically 
requires 3 units of Natural Science and 3 
units of College Preparatory Mathematics 
which must include 2 units of algebra. 

Admission of Transfer Students and 
Certified Clinical Laboratory Technicians 

Credits earned at another institution will be 
evaluated for transferability and equivalency 
to existing UMass Dartmouth courses. All 
required Medical Laboratory Science courses 
must be taken at the University of Massa- 
chusetts at Dartmouth, unless approved by 
the department. 

Health Policies 

Students admitted to medical laboratory 
science programs are expected to have a 
complete physical examination and the 
appropriate immunizations as outlined by 
the department. 



142 



Medical Laboratory Science Major 

Clinical Laboratory Science Option 



The option in clinical laboratory science is 
an integrated program, accredited by the 
National Accrediting Agency for Clinical 
Laboratory Sciences, 8410 West Bryn Mawr 
Avenue, Suite 670, Chicago, IL 60631- 
341 5. The program officials are David K. 
Rubin, MD (Medical Advisor), and Dorothy 
A. Bergeron, MS (Program Director). 
Academic and technical competence are 
developed in the major areas of clinical 
laboratory practice: hematology, clinical 
chemistry, clinical microbiology and 
immunohematology. The clinical laboratory 
theory and methods integrated throughout 
the four-year curriculum culminate with a 
clinical practicum in an affiliated hospital 
during the second semester of the senior 
year. Laboratory instrumentation, use of 
computers in laboratories, and quality 
assurance are emphasized throughout. 

Careers are available in hospital, indepen- 
dent, public health, industrial, pharmaceuti- 
cal, and private laboratories as scientists and 
researchers, and some clinical laboratory 
scientist work as educators, administrators, 
and consultants. By presenting a diverse 
background in science, analytical skills, and 
problem-solving, medical laboratory science 
prepares students for post-graduate studies 
in the sciences (including chemistry, 
microbiology, pathology), administration 
(including human resource management, 
health service administration, and business 
administration) and professional schools 
(including medical, osteopathy, and 
physician assistant). 

After completion of this program, the 
graduate will be able to demonstrate entry 
level competencies in the following areas of 
professional practice: 

• collect and process biological specimens 
for analysis; 

• perform analytical tests on body fluids, 
cells, and other samples; 

• make critical judgments by integrating 
and relating data generated by the 
various clinical laboratory departments; 

• evaluate quality control results and 
institute corrective procedures; 

• perform preventive and corrective 
maintenance on equipment and 
instruments or refer to appropriate 
source for repair; 

• evaluate new techniques and procedures 
in terms of usefulness and practicality 
within the context of a given 
laboratory's resources; 

• demonstrate concern for the patient and 
cooperate with laboratory personnel and 



other health care professionals; 

• communicate effectively and in a 
professional manner with patients, 
laboratory personnel, other health care 
professionals, and the public; 

• assume responsibility for continuing 
professional development and compe- 
tence; 

• assume leadership to effect positive 
change in the profession; 

• apply principles of safety, management 
and supervision, education methodolo- 
gies, and current information systems. 

Entrance to the Upper Division of the 
Option in Clinical Laboratory Science 

The Committee on Advanced Standing 
meets each year to evaluate the academic 
and professional progress of sophomore 
students who have completed sophomore- 
level requirements. After reviewing the 
records, the committee recommends to the 
department faculty those students to be 
admitted to the upper division of the option 
in clinical laboratory science. Conditional 
acceptance with academic qualifications is 
possible in unusual circumstances. 

Admission to the upper division of the 
option in clinical laboratory science requires: 
1. 

completion of all prerequisites in the first 
two years as outlined in the requirements; 
2. 

a minimum cumulative science grade point 
average of 2.0 in all completed courses 
required by the major; 
3. 

evidence that the student is making progress 
toward satisfying degree requirements and 
certification requirements; 
4. 

evidence that the student is able to meet the 
following non-academic criteria (technical 
standards) 

• Observation. The student must be able 
to participate actively in laboratory 
exercises and clinical experiences. 

• Communication. The student must be 
able to communicate with fellow 
students, faculty, staff and members of 
a health care team. 

• Motor. The student must have 
sufficient motor skills to perform basic 
diagnostic tests. 

• Intellectual/Conceptual, Integrate and 
Quantitative Abilities. The student must 
be able to problem solve and compre- 
hend spatial relationships of structures. 



Clinical Practicum 

The faculty assigns the students to the 
clinical practicum at the following affiliates: 
Charlton Memorial Hospital (Fall River, MA), 
Massachusetts General Hospital (Boston, 
MA), Morton Hospital and Medical Center 
(Taunton, MA), New England Medical 
Center (Boston, MA), Roger Williams 
Medical Center (Providence, Rl), St. Anne's 
Hospital (Fall River, MA), St. Luke's Hospital 
(New Bedford, MA), and South Shore 
Hospital (South Weymouth, MA). Students 
may be assigned to a rotation at enrichment 
sites: Rhode Island Blood Center (Provi- 
dence, Rl) and State Laboratory Institute, 
Massachusetts Department of Public Health 
(Jamaica Plain, MA). 



See requirements on next page. 



143 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Requirements 



Semester Credits 



Medical Laboratory Science Major 

Cytotechnology Option 



First Second 



152 



First Year 

MLS 1 1 5 
MLS 116 
MLS 121 
MLS 122 
CHM 151, 
CHM 161, 162 
MTH 104 
ENL 101, 102 



Second Year 

MLS 221 
MLS 222 
MLS 241 



MLS 242 

BIO 111 
CHM 251 
CHM 263 



Fundamentals of Medical Laboratory Science 

Fundamentals of Medical Lab Sci Techniques 

Human Genetics 

Human Genetics Laboratory 

Principles of Modern Chemistry I, II 

Introductory Applied Chemistry I, II 

Fundamentals of Statistics 

Critical Writing and Reading I, II 

General Education/Distribution Requirements 



Pathophysiology 

Pathophysiology Laboratory 

Clinical Chemistry Applied to Diagnostic 

Techniques 

Clinical Chemistry Applied to Diagnostic 

Techniques Laboratory 

Introduction to Human Physiology 

Organic Chemistry I 

Bio-Organic Chemistry Laboratory 

General Education/Distribution Requirements 



Integrated Program 
Third Year 

MLS 301 
MLS 303 
MLS 313 
MLS 314 
MLS 325 
MLS 326 
MLS 331 
MLS 332 
MLS 341 
MLS 342 
PHL 317 



Principles of Microbiology 
Principles of Microbiology Laboratory 
Medical Microbiology 
Medical MicrobiologyLaboratory 
Clinical Immunobiology 
Clinical Immunobiology Laboratory 
Fundamentals of Clinical Hematology 
Fundamentals of Clinical Hematology Lab 
Clinical Instrumental Analysis 
Clinical Instrumental Analysis Laboratory 
Ethics and Health Care Professionals 
Free Electives 



Fourth Year 

MLS 401, 411 
MLS 421, 422 
MLS 443, 444 
MLS 431, 432 
MLS 429 
MLS 450 



Clinical Microbiology I, II 
Immunohematology I, II 
Clinical Biochemistry I, II 
Hematology I, II 
Clinical Serology 
Senior Seminar 



3 
1 

3 
6 
15 



4 
3 
1 
6 
14 



3 
12 

5 
2 
5 
3 
2 

17 

Total Credits 



3 
1 
3 
1 
3 
3 
3 
17 

3 
1 

3 

1 



9 
17 



2 
1 
2 
1 
3 

13 

4 
2 
4 

3 

2 
15 

120 



Note: The department has renumbered many courses; previous numbers are shown at the 
end of each course description in this catalogue. 

General Education Departmental Requirements 

Students majoring in the Clinical Laboratory Science option will meet their departmentally- 
controlled General Education requirements as follows: 

Area E: Satisfied by PHL 317 

Area I, Tier 2: Satisfied by MLS 242, 341, 342, 443, and 450 
Area W, Tier 2: Satisfied by ENL 266 
Area O: Satisfied by MLS 326 and 450 



Cytotechnology, a specialty in the clinical 
laboratory, evaluates cells microscopically to 
detect morphologic changes related to 
benign and malignant disease. The first 
three years are spent on campus building a 
foundation in biology, chemistry, math, and 
medical laboratory science, followed by a 
one year clinical practicum in an accredited 
hospital program. A strong sense of 
responsibility, ability to concentrate, and an 
interest in natural science are necessary 
qualities for a cytotechnologist. Career 
opportunities are excellent. 
Cytotechnologists are employed as 
laboratory managers, educators, medical 
sales representatives, technical representa- 
tives, and scientists in private and hospital- 
based laboratories, state, federal or 
industrial laboratories, research laboratories 
and veterinary laboratories. Graduate study 
possibilities include pathology, anatomy, or 
genetics. 



Entrance to the Option in 
Cytotechnology 

Students interested in this option are 
encouraged to discuss cytotechnology with 
the department chairperson as early as 
possible to select the most appropriate 
courses. Application for this option should 
be made during the spring semester of the 
sophomore year and no later than the fall 
semester of the junior year. Generally, 
students apply for admission to the 
accredited hospital program in the spring 
semester of the junior year. 

See requirements on next page. 



General Education Departmental 
Requirements 

Students majoring in the Cytotechnology 
option will meet their departmentally- 
controlled General Education requirements 
as follows: 

Area E: Satisfied by PHL 317 
Area I, Tier 2: Satisfied within hospital 
placement, as arranged between MLS 
Department Chairperson and placement 
supervisor 
Area W, Tier 2: Satisfied by ENL 266 
Area O: Satisfied by MLS 307 and 450 



144 



Requirements Medical Laboratory Science Courses 



Gen Ed note: Medical Laboratory Science 
courses satisfy the Natural Science and 
Technology requirement. Those marked S 
are appropriate for non-science/engineering 
majors. 



1. 

A minimum of 20 semester hours of 
approved courses in biological and 
laboratory science. 
2. 

A minimum of 8 semester hours of 

chemistry. 

3. 

All requirements of the university and the 
College of Arts and Sciences for a B.S. 
degree. 
4. 

Free electives to bring the total to 90 
credits, preceding the fourth year. 
5. 

Successful completion of an accredited 
hospital cytotechnology program. 

Each hospital cytotechnology program 
determines the number of credits in a 
specific course based on the nature of the 
laboratory and the range of case presenta- 
tions. 

A minimum of thirty credits from the 
courses listed below are granted at the 
completion of the hospital cytotechnology 
program. 

MLS 461 Introduction to Cytotechnology 
MLS 462 Special Topics in Cyto- 
technology 
MLS 463 Cytopathology 
MLS 464 Medical Cytology 
MLS 465 Cytotechnology Seminar 
MLS 466 Applied Cytotechnology 
MLS 467 Cytology Practicum 
MLS 468 Cytology Practicum II 

All students must be recommended by the 
department chairperson to the approved 
hospital program. The university cannot 
guarantee placement in an approved 
hospital program. 

Clinical fees are established by the hospital 
program. Students are required 
to pay this fee in addition to the usual 
university fees. 



MLS 105 three credits S 
Contemporary Topics in Human 
Ecology I 

Medical-social problems as they relate to 
modern society. Contemporary topics such 
as over-the-counter drugs, factors affecting 
I.Q., basic human physiology, the disease 
state, diabetes, and eugenics. 

MLS 106 three credits S 
Contemporary Topics in Human 
Ecology II 

Continuation of MLS 105. Medical-social 
problems as they relate to modern society. 
Contemporary topics such as sexuality, 
inheritance, stress, and aging are discussed. 

MLS 115 one credit 

Fundamentals of Medical Laboratory 

Science 

Specialty areas, professional issues, career 
mobility and an introduction to the 
university and its facilities presented in 
lectures, field trips and laboratory experi- 
ences. Student Resource Center facilities will 
be utilized during class time. 

MLS 116 one credit 

Fundamentals of Medical Laboratory 

Science Techniques 

An orientation to clinical laboratory 
techniques. 

MLS 121 three credits 
Human Genetics 

An intensive survey of genetic mechanisms 
emphasizing the effect on human inherit- 
ance and disease. 

MLS 122 one credit 

Human Genetics Laboratory 

Corequisite: MLS 315 

Laboratory correlated with MLS 315. 

MLS 221 three credits 
Pathophysiology 

Prerequisite: BIO 1 1 1 or perm, of instructor 
The selection, generation, and translation of 
basic information for the diagnosis, 
prognosis and management of clinical 
samples. Health screen vs. diagnostic and 
prognostic profiles will be discussed. 

MLS 222 one credit 
Pathophysiology Laboratory 

Corequisites: MLS 112, 221 

Prerequisite: MLS 1 12 or perm, of instructor 

Laboratory correlated with MLS 221. 

MLS 241 three credits 

Clinical Chemistry Applied in Diagnostic 

Techniques 



Prerequisites: CHM 152, 162; or perm, of 
instructor. 

Medically relevant carbohydrates, proteins, 
lipids, hormones, nonprotein nitrogenous 
substances, and enzymes will be discussed. 

MLS 242 one credit 

Clinical Chemistry Applied in Diagnostic 
Techniques Laboratory 

Corequisite: MLS 241 

Laboratory correlated with MLS 241. 

MLS 298 one to six credits 
Experiential Learning 

Prerequisites: At least sophomore standing; 
perm, of the instructor, department 
chairperson, and college dean 
Work experience at an elective level 
supervised for academic credit by a faculty 
member in an appropriate academic field. 
Conditions and hours to be arranged. 
Graded CR/NC. For specific procedures and 
regulations, see section of catalogue on 
Other Learning Experiences. 

MLS 301 four credits 
Principles of Microbiology 

Prerequisite: MLS 241 or perm, of instructor 
This course presents the basic concepts of 
physiology, genetics, morphology, ecology, 
systematics and control of microorganisms. 

MLS 303 one credit 

Principles of Microbiology Laboratory 

Corequisite: MLS 301 

Laboratory correlated with MLS 301. 

MLS 313 three credits 
Medical Microbiology 

Prerequisite: MLS 301 
The theoretical basis for an in-depth 
understanding of organisms of medical 
importance. Stress shall be placed on 
bacterial physiology as it relates to disease. 
Quality control, statistical methods, and 
current literature shall be analyzed. 

MLS 314 one credit 

Medical Microbiology Laboratory 

Corequisite: MLS 31 1 

Prerequisite: MLS 302 or perm, of instructor 
Laboratory correlated with MLS 311. 

MLS 325 three credits 
Clinical Immunobiology 

The emerging concepts of immunobiology. 
Topics will include immunogens, immuno- 
globulins, autoimmunity, infection and 
immunity, immunohematology, and tumor 
biology. 

MLS 326 one credit 



145 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Clinical Immunobiology Laboratory 

Corequisite: MLS 325 

Laboratory correlated with MLS 325. 

MLS 331 two credits 

Fundamentals of Clinical Hematology 

Prerequisites: MLS 121, 122, 221, 222; or 
perm, of instructor 

Introduction to the pathophysiology of 
anemias, leukocyte dyscrasias and disorders. 
Topics may include bone marrow activity, 
cell energetics, testing protocols and 
examples of various modalities of therapy. 

MLS 332 one credit 

Fundamentals of Clinical Hematology 
Laboratory 

Corequisite: MLS 331 

Prerequisites: MLS 121, 122, 221, 222; or 

perm, of instructor 

Introduction to the morphology and 

biochemical testing of cells involved in 

anemias, leukocyte dyscrasias and other 

disorders. Topics may include bone marrow 

morphology, peripheral blood morphology 

and cytochemical testing protocols. 

MLS 341 two credits 

Clinical Instrumental Analysis 

Prerequisite: MLS 241 or perm, of instructor 
Study of chemical and analytical techniques 
used in clinical laboratory analysis. Topics 
include photometric, electrochemical, and 
immunochemical separation used in 
research, forensic, and medical applications. 

MLS 342 one credit 

Clinical Instrumental Analysis Labora- 
tory 

Corequisite: MLS 341 
Prerequisite: MLS 242 

Laboratory course correlated with MLS 341 . 

MLS 351 one to three credits 

Medical Laboratory Science Seminar I 

Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing or 
perm, of instructor 

Selected topics shall be presented, deter- 
mined by current interests and develop- 
ments in clinical laboratory science. 

MLS 352 one to three credits 

Medical Laboratory Science Seminar II 

Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing and 
perm, of chairperson 

Selected topics shall be presented by both 

faculty and students. Topics shall 

be submitted from affiliated hospitals. 

MLS 381 three credits 
Health Care Legislation 

Major, recent, and pending health care 



legislation and its impact on the provider will 
be discussed. Possible topics include: 
Medicare, Medicaid, health manpower, 
accreditation, licensure, professional 
standards review, health systems agencies, 
and national health insurance. 

Senior Courses: Option in Clinical 
Laboratory Science 

The following courses are presented on 
campus and at affiliated hospitals for an 
academic year that may exceed the regular 
academic year. This year will consist of 40 
hours per week on campus and/or in 
affiliated hospital(s). Lecture and laboratory 
hours shall comply with the standards set by 
the National Accrediting Agency for Clinical 
Laboratory Sciences. These are open only to 
medical laboratory science students or by 
perm, of the Department: 

MLS 401 five credits 
Clinical Microbiology I 

Prerequisites: MLS 311,314 
The principles or practice of diagnostic 
microbiology such as specimen collection 
and handling, quality control, and laboratory 
safety. Clinical correlation, immunology and 
hospital surveillance will be included. 

MLS 411 four credits 
Clinical Microbiology II 

Prerequisite: MLS 401 
Continuation of MLS 401. 

MLS 421 two credits 
Immunohematology I 

The principles of blood banking, including 
the preparation and storage of blood and its 
components, donor evaluation, transfusion, 
required record keeping, and processing of 
frozen blood. Clinical correlation, quality 
control and laboratory safety will be 
included. 

MLS 422 two credits 
Immunohematology II 

Prerequisite: MLS 421 
Continuation of MLS 421 . 

MLS 428 two credits 

Clinical Microscopy and Serology 

Prerequisites: MLS 305, 307 
The applied principles of the clinical 
evaluation of the physical and chemical 
constituents and formed elements of kidney 
filtrate. Quality control, laboratory safety 
and clinical correlation shall be covered. 

MLS 431 three credits 



Hematology I 

Prerequisites: MLS 331, 322 
Subjects include the analysis and clinical 
correlation of quantitative and qualitative 
variations in blood. Blood cell and other 
formed element morphology, the dynamics 
of coagulation, processing and evaluation of 
human bone marrow, quality control and 
laboratory safety will be studied. 

MLS 432 three credits 
Hematology II 

Prerequisite: MLS 431 
Continuation of MLS 431 . 

MLS 443 five credits 
Clinical Biochemistry I 

Prerequisites: MLS 341, 342 
Principles of the physical and chemical 
analysis of medically significant organic and 
inorganic substances found in human body 
fluids and tissues. Laboratory instrumenta- 
tion and electronics, metabolic screening, 
specimen collection, clinical correlation, 
quality control and laboratory safety will be 
emphasized. 

MLS 444 four credits 
Clinical Biochemistry II 

Prerequisite: MLS 443 
Continuation of MLS 443. 

MLS 450 two credits 
Senior Seminar 

Prerequisites: MLS 41 1, 421, 444, and 432; 

or perm, of the instructor. 

Intensive, integrated study of selected topics 

in clinical laboratory science including 

management. 

Senior Courses: Option in Cytotech- 
nology 

MLS 461 one to three credits 
Introduction to Cytotechnology 

Prerequisite: Perm, of chairperson 
A review of cell structure, principles of 
microscopy, and staining techniques. 
Anatomy and physiology of the female 
reproductive system and study of the non- 
malignant cytology of the female genital 
tract will be covered. 

MLS 462 one to three credits 
Special Topics in Cytotechnology 

Prerequisite: Perm, of chairperson 
Special projects in cytology, cytopathology 
or cytotechnology are investigated or 
reviewed and reported by the student. 
Written or oral presentation is required. 



146 



MLS 463 one to four credits 
Cytopathology 

Prerequisite: Perm, of chairperson 
Cytopathology and clinical aspects of 
cervical dysplasia, carcinoma-in-situ and 
invasive squamous cell carcinoma. Consider- 
ation of endometrial and endocervical 
carcinoma, other genital tract cancers and 
radiation effect. 

MLS 464 one to four credits 
Medical Cytology 

Prerequisite: Perm, of chairperson 
Benign and malignant cytology of the 
respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts will be 
correlated with anatomy and physiology. 
Benign, a-typical, and malignant exfoliative 
cells from the urinary tracts, serous effusion, 
cerebrospinal fluid and breast secretions will 
be studied. 

MLS 465 one to two credits 
Cytotechnology Seminar 

Prerequisite: Perm, of chairperson 
Presentation, discussion and interpretation 
of benign, suspicious, and hormonal 
conditions. The cytological diagnostic 
criteria of malignant tumors from various 
body sites and their histopathological 
correlation will be studied. 

MLS 466 one to three credits 
Applied Cytotechnology 

Prerequisite: Perm, of chairperson 
The microscopic evaluation and screening of 
cytological smears from various body sites. 
Effects of radiation and of chemotherapy; 
diagnosis of suspicious and hormonal 
conditions; cytological observations in 
pregnancy. Cell research techniques. 
Epidemiology and current concepts related 
to cytotechnology. 

MLS 467 one to eight credits 
Cytology Practicum I 

Prerequisite: Perm, of chairperson 
The microscopic evaluation and screening of 
benign cytological smears and smears from 
cervical dysplasia; carcinoma-in-situ, and 
invasive malignant tumors of the female 
genital tract. 

MLS 468 one to eight credits 
Cytology Practicum II 

Prerequisite: Perm, of chairperson 

The microscopic evaluation and screening of 

cytological smears from the respiratory 

tract, gastrointestinal tract, urinary tract and 

from body fluids. Continuing evaluation of 

cytological smears from the gynecological 

tract. 



Senior courses for either option 

MLS 495 one to four credits 
Independent Study 

Prerequisites: Upper-division standing; perm, 
of instructor, department chairperson, and 
college dean 

The student selects a topic for in-depth 
study. Readings and reports are supervised 
by a member of the faculty. 

MLS 196, 296, 396, 496 three credits 
Directed Study 

Prerequisites: Perm, of the instructor, 
department chairperson, and college dean 
Study under the supervision of a faculty 
member in an area covered in a regular 
course not currently being offered. 
Conditions and hours to be arranged. 

MLS 497 two credits 
Research Project 

4 hours per credit hour per week. 
Prerequisite: Perm, of instructor 
The student initiates a proposal on a 
selected research topic. The research is done 
under the supervision of the appropriate 
faculty member. A completed paper is 
required. 

MLS 498 one to four credits 
Research Project 

Continuation of MLS 497. 



Graduate Courses 

MLS 510 three credits 
Bioethics 

Issues and cases in bioethics, across the range 
of medical practice, individual rights, and 
social implications. 

MLS 522 three credits 

Evidence and Courtroom Proceedings 

The use of DNA evidence in the court. The 
implications of relevancy, competency, 
impeachment, hearsay, and expert 
testimony will be discussed. Constitutional 
issues of privacy, informed consent, and 
mandated registries will be weighed. Special 
considerations will be presented, from issues 
of paternity and he sanctity of marriage to 
the practical issues of specimen collection, 
quality, and processing. 

MLS 525 three credits 
Pathophysiology 

Investigations of the aberrations of normal 
physiology, with the processes that bring 
about these disruptions. The course covers 
the ways in which the disruptions manifest 
themselves as symptoms, signs, physical 
findings, and laboratory findings, including 
advanced topics in the selection, generation, 
and translation of information for the 
diagnosis, prognosis, and management of 
clinical samples. 



147 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Multidisciplinary Studies 



The Multidisciplinary Studies major may be 
earned as a BS or BA degree depending on 
the design of the program of study 



Requirements 



Program Director, Dorothy Bergeron 

Professor of Medical Laboratory Science 

Students with a GPA of at least 2.5 who 
wish to pursue in depth a particular topic or 
area of study not available in an established 
major may choose the Multidisciplinary 
Studies (MDS) major. MDS allows students 
to combine course work in two or three 
disciplines to create their own major, in 
consultation with a faculty advisor and the 
Director of Multidisciplinary Studies. 
Considerable latitude is allowed in the 
design of the program of study, and course 
work, studios and laboratories from any of 
the colleges may be included, as long as one 
of the Core disciplines is in Arts and 
Sciences. Examples of topics or themes 
chosen by MDS majors are 

Communications/Advertising 
Communications/Photography 
Environmental Studies 
Society and Aging 
International Relations/Business 
Sociobiology 

Consumer Psychology/Marketing 

Multidisciplinary studies is intended as an 
option for students who have some 
familiarity with college-level study. Thus it is 
available only to students who have 
completed at least one semester of college 
work, and not to entering freshmen. 
Transfer applicants with a minimum of 1 5 
transferable credits may receive admission, if 
otherwise qualified, upon the recommenda- 
tion of the MDS Director, based on a 
personal interview. The earlier a program of 
study is designed, the greater the flexibility 
in scheduling the required courses. As with 
most other changes of major, requests from 
seniors can rarely be accommodated. 
Students may not double-major with MDS. 



The Multidisciplinary Studies major is built 
around a thematic program of study that 
encompasses two or three disciplines, one of 
which must be in the College of Arts and 
Sciences. The program will consist of a 
minimum of 36 credits in the selected 
disciplines, 30 of which must be at the 300 
level or above and constitute the Core 
courses of the major. (Experiential learning 
and courses in pedagogy may not be 
included in the 300- and 400-level courses.) 
Ordinarily only three credits of either 
independent study or directed study may be 
included in the 30 credits of Core courses. 

To become a Multidisciplinary Studies major 
students must, before the end of the Junior 
year: 

1. 

Identify a faculty member who will act as 
academic advisor and who, along with the 
Director, will assist in the design of the 
program. 

2. 

Write a one-page description of the proposed 
program of study and complete a change of 
major form with the Director. The description 
should include the objectives of the program 
and a rationale for how each of the Core 
courses will help meet the objectives. 

3. 

Develop, with the Director, a Contract 
containing the description and a list of the 
courses that will comprise the program. 
Substitution for courses in the Contract is 
allowed only with prior written approval by 
the faculty advisor and the Director. 

Interested students should contact the 
Director o5f Multidisciplinary Studies, at 508 
999-8584. 



Multidisciplinary Studies Major 
BA degree 

For the BA degree, students must satisfy all 
College of Arts and Sciences requirements for 
that degree, along with the program of 
courses listed in the Contract. 



Multidisciplinary Studies Major 
BS degree 

For the BS degree, students must satisfy all 
College of Arts and Sciences requirements for 
that degree, along with the program of 
courses listed in the Contract. The Contract 
must contain the components of either of the 
two options given below: 

Option 1 

a) 36 credits in two or three sciences,* 30 of 
which are at the 300-level or higher. 

b) A two-semester sequence of mathemat- 
ics, if mathematics is not a component of 
a) above. 

Option 2 

a) 1 5 credits at the 300-level or above in 
one or two sciences. 

b) 1 5 credits at the 300-level or above in 
one or two disciplines other than science. 

c) 9 credits in sciences at any level, other 
than disciplines included in a) above. 

d) A two-semester sequence of mathemat- 
ics, if mathematics is not a component of 
a) or c) above. 

*For these options, "sciences" include 
Biology, Chemistry, Computer and Informa- 
tion Science, Mathematics, Medical 
Laboratory Science, and Physics. 



General Education Departmental Requirements 

Students majoring in Multidisciplinary Studies must pay special attention to selecting courses so as to satisfy both their general education and 
college distribution requirements. Courses used to satisfy major and college distribution requirements may also be used to satisfy specific 
University General Education requirements. 

The University General Education requirements in categories C and S, and Tier 1 of categories I and W are automatically met through the BA or 
BS versions of the Arts and Sciences college distribution requirements. Special care must be taken to identify specific courses that satisfy the D, 
E, and G categories. Students will normally satisfy "departmental" requirements in the Tier II General Education categories (I and W), and in Oral 
Communication, through one of the Core discipline departments chosen for the major. Students are ultimately responsible for meeting all 
distribution and General Education requirements and should consult with their advisors on both major and General Education requirements. 



148 



Philosophy 



Faculty and Fields of Interest 



Philosophy is the cornerstone of the 
humanities. A major in philosophy cultivates 
the development of analytical skills and clarity 
of thought that are invaluable, not only in 
pursing a college degree, but later in 
developing a rewarding career and a 
meaningful life. Training in philosophy is 
highly regarded in professional fields such as 
law, medicine, artificial intelligence, or 
government. 

The faculty in the department have a diversity 
of backgrounds and areas of specialization. 
This makes possible a solid grounding in the 
history of philosophy and in the various sub- 
areas of philosophy - ethics, logic, metaphys- 
ics, philosophy of religion, philosophy of 
science, theory of knowledge. The approach 
of the department is pluralistic. 



Diane Barense philosophy of logic, 
philosophy of science, philosophy of 
language, philosophy of feminism 

Philip Cox (chairperson) ethics, medical 
ethics, philosophy of law, social theory 

Catherine Villanueva Gardner ethics, 
feminist philosophy 

James Gordon Place history of philosophy, 
contemporary European philosophy, 
aesthetics 



149 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Philosophy Major 

BA degree 



Requirements 



Credits 



PHL 110 


Logic (PHL 108 Critical Thinking or PHL 235 


3 


General Education Departmental 




Symbolic Logic may be substituted) 




Requirements 


PHL221 


History of Western Philosophy: Ancient 


3 






(PHL 223 History of Western Philosophy: 




Students majoring in Philosophy will meet 




Medieval may be substituted) 




their departmentally-controlled General 


PHL 222 


History of Western Philosophy: Modern 


3 


Education requirements as follows: 


Two courses in contemporary philosophy selected from: 




Area E: Satisfied by coursework required of 








all philosophy majors 


PHL 361 


Contemporary Continental Philosophy 


6 




PHL 371 


Contemporary Anglo-American Philosophy 




Area I, Tier II: Satisfied by a 200 or 300 


PHL 382 


Contemporary American Philosophy 




level course carrying a W designation. 








Students are required to submit a sample 


A seminar course selected from: 




paper from this course, demonstrating 








advanced word-processing skills and web- 


PHL 410-419 


Seminar (consult course listings) 


3 


based research, to the Chair of the 








Philosophy Department during the semester 


At least three courses in systematic philosophy selected from courses 




preceding graduation 


numbered 300-349 












Area W, Tier II: Satisfied by a 300 level 


PHL 300 


Special Topics 


9 


philosophy course that carries a W 


PHL 301 


Theory of Knowledge 




designation 


PHL 303 


Metaphysics 






PHL 311 


Philosophy of Language 




Area O: Satisfied by a course from the 


PHL 315 


Ethics II 




approved list of O designated courses 


PHL316 


Political Philosophy 






PHL318 


Bioethics 






PHL 320 


Philosophy of Science 






PHL 323 


Philosophy of Art 






PHL 324 


Philosophy of History 






PHL 325 


Philosophy of Religion 






PHL 326 


Philosophy of Law 






PHL 332 


Philosophy of Human Nature 






Two courses selected from the following list: 






PHL 101 


Introduction to Philosophy 


6 




PHL 102 


Philosophical Aspects of Feminism 






PHL 105 


Special Topics 






PHL 108 


Critical Thinking (if not taken above) 






PHL 200 


Special Topics in Philosophy 






PHL 207 


Introduction to Aesthetics 






PHL 210 


Socrates 






PHL 215 


Ethics I 






PHL 222 


History of Western Philosophy: Modern (if not taken above) 






PHL 223 


History of Western Philosophy: Medieval (if not taken above) 




PHL 224 


Nineteenth Century Philosophic Thought 






PHL 226 


Marx 






PHL 227 


Nietzsche 






PHL 232 


Inductive Inference 






PHL 235 


Symbolic Logic (if not taken above) 







Total 



33 



150 



Philosophy Minor 



Requirements 



Philosophy Courses 



Credits 



Ancient (if not taken above) 
Modern (if not taken above) 
Medieval (if not taken above) 



One course in the history of philosophy 

PHL 221 History of Western Philosophy: Ancient OR 

PHL 222 History of Western Philosophy: Modern OR 

PHL 223 History of Western Philosophy: Medieval 

Four courses selected from the following list, with the understanding that 
two of the courses must be upper division (numbered between 300 to 391): 

PHL 101 Introduction to Philosophy 

PHL 1 02 Philosophical Aspects of Feminism 

PHL 105 Special Topics 

PHL 110 Logic 

PHL 200 Special Topics 

PHL 207 Introduction to Aesthetics 

PHL 210 Socrates 

PHL 21 5 Ethics I 

PHL 221 History of Western Philosophy 

PHL 222 History of Western Philosophy 

PHL 223 History of Western Philosophy 

PHL 224 Nineteenth Century Philosophic Thought 

PHL 226 Marx 

PHL 227 Nietzsche 

PHL 232 Inductive Inference 

PHL 235 Symbolic Logic 

PHL 300 Special Topics 

PHL 301 Theory of Knowledge 

PHL 303 Metaphysics 

PHL 311 Philosophy of Language 

PHL 315 Ethics II 

PHL 316 Political Philosophy 

PHL 318 Bioethics 

PHL 320 Philosophy of Science 

PHL 323 Philosophy of Art 

PHL 324 Philosophy of History 

PHL 325 Philosophy of Religion 

PHL 326 Philosophy of Law 

PHL 332 Philosophy of Human Nature 

PHL 361 Contemporary Continental Philosophy 

PHL 371 Contemporary Anglo-American Philosophy 

PHL 382 Contemporary American Philosophy 

One seminar from PHL 409-419 



12 



Total 



18 



Selection of philosophy as a minor requires that the grade point average in one's major be at 
least 2.5. 



PHL 101 three credits C. E 
Introduction to Philosophy 

An introduction to philosophy as the 
persistent and methodical attempt to think 
clearly about universal problems of human 
life, such as ways of knowing and studies in 
value. 

PHL 102 three credits C, W 
Philosophical Aspects of Feminism 

An introduction to philosophical reasoning, 
analysis of arguments and developing of 
critical skills, through a consideration of 
various topics relevant to feminism. Topics 
may include: presuppositions about 
woman's nature, abortion, sex equality, 
affirmative action. Cross-listed as WMS 102. 

PHL 105 three credits C 
Special Topics in Philosophy 

Offered as needed to present current topics 
in the field or other material of interest. 
The specific topic is stated when the course 
is scheduled. May be repeated with change 
of content. 

PHL 108 three credits C 
Critical Thinking 

A course in informal logic concentrating on 
the evaluation of reasoning in "real life" 
contexts. The material for analysis will be 
drawn from newspaper editorials, political 
speeches, media articles, textbooks, 
advertisements, etc.; we will concentrate on 
arguments about issues of current public 
interest. The following topics will be 
emphasized: the identification of argu- 
ments; techniques for portraying argument 
structure; the evaluation and criticism of 
arguments; informal fallacies; the influence 
of language on clear thinking. This course is 
designed for students with no previous 
background in philosophy. (Students who 
complete this course should not enroll in 
PHL 110). 

PHL 110 three credits C 
Logic 

An introduction to the methods and 
principles used to distinguish correct from 
incorrect reasoning. The course aims at 
imparting skill in identifying fallacies in 
reasoning and in using elementary formal 
techniques to analyze natural language 
arguments. In addition, such topics as the 
nature of meaning, the various uses of 
language, and the logic of science are 
discussed. (Students who complete this 
course should not enroll in PHL 108). 



PHL 200 three credits C 
Special Topics in Philosophy 



151 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Gen Ed Key 



All Philosophy courses satisfy Cultural/Artistic 
Literacy, lower division courses are marked 
C, but advanced courses are eligible as well. 
Other courses satisfy other requirements as 
noted. 



Offered as needed to present current 
topics in the field or other material of 
interest. The specific topic is stated when 
the course is scheduled. May be repeated 
with change of content. 

PHL207 three credits C 
Introduction to Aesthetics 

An introduction to philosophy through 
examination of paintings, photographs, 
poems, novels, and music in order to 
discover the styles of individual commitment 
through which people have tried to bring 
meaning into their lives. While attempting 
to grasp the aesthetic significance of each 
work of art, we will continually push toward 
an understanding of the philosophical 
dimension of human life as expressed in 
each work. 

PHL210 three credits C, W 
Socrates 

A study of Socrates through an examination 
of two sorts of problems — the first (the so- 
called 'Socratic Problem') is the problem of 
evaluating the evidence which we possess 
about Socrates. This will proceed by reading 
an analysis of Aristophanes' Clouds, 
Xenophon's Memorabilia and Apology, 
some passages from Aristotle and the 
following 'early' dialogues of Plato: 
Apology, Cnto, Euthyphro, the Charmides, 
Laches and Protagoras. The second problem 
to be dealt with is the extraction and 
evaluation of the main tenets of Socrates' 
philosophy, such as the claims that virtue is 
knowledge and that no one ever does 
wrong willingly. 

PHL215 three credits C, E, W 
Ethics I 

A critical examination of normative theories 
of obligation and value. A philosophical 
examination of some moral problems: 
abortion, euthanasia, death penalty, sexual 
equality, reverse discrimination, pornogra- 
phy and censorship, violence, and economic 
injustice. 

PHL221 three credits C, W 

H istory of Western Philosophy: Ancient 

A study of philosophy from its origin with 
the pre-Socratics to the middle ages. The 
major portion of the course will be devoted 
to the philosophies of Plato and Aristotle. 

PHL 222 three credits C 

History of Western Philosophy: Modern 

A study of the major philosophical 
movements (rationalism, empiricism and 
critical philosophy) in the 17th and 18th 
centuries. Philosophers studied include 



Descartes, Spinoza, Leibnitz, Locke, 
Berkeley, Hume, Kant. In addition to these 
major philosophers, consideration will also 
be given to the work of Rousseau, Pascal, 
Malebranche, the French Enlightenment. 

PHL 223 three credits C 
History of Western Philosophy: 
Medieval 

A study of the philosophical views devel- 
oped from the 4th to the 14th centuries. 
The following Christian, Jewish and Islamic 
philosophers are studied: Augustine, 
Beothius, Scotus Erigena, Anselm, Abelard, 
John of Salisbury, Alfarabi, Avicenna, 
Averroes, Maimonides, Bonaventure, Bacon, 
Aquinas, Scotus, William of Ockham, 
Nicholas of Autrecourt, Marsilius of Padua. 

PHL 224 three credits C 
Nineteenth Century Philosophic 
Thought 

Writings selected from a century of great 
philosophical vitality and versatility. The 
culminating achievements of the western 
philosophical tradition and the first 
powerful stirring of major contemporary 
trends are fed by such currents as evolution- 
ism, empiricism, idealism, positivism, 
existentialism, and dialectical materialism. 
Philosophers studied include Hegel, Fichte, 
Bradley, Schopenhauer, Comte, Mill, 
Spencer, Marx, Kierkegaard, and Nietzsche. 

PHL 226 three credits C 
Marx 

Designed as an introduction to the work of 
Karl Marx for those students who do not 
necessarily have philosophical backgrounds. 
The thoughts of Marx will be presented in 
two parts. At first, the more philosophical 
thought of the young Marx will be 
examined in its relation to Hegel and his 
followers up to Marx's "settling of 
accounts" with German philosophy. The 
second part will deal with the more 
scientific phase of Marx's thought expressed 
in Das Capital. Marx's own works will form 
the reading in the course. Cross-listed as 
LST 226. 

PHL 227 three credits C, W 
Nietzsche 

A critical analysis of the major philosophical 
themes in Nietzsche's thought. Emphasis is 
placed on Nietzsche's roots in the classical 
tradition. Readings include most of 
Nietzsche's major works as well as 
secondary criticism. 

PHL 232 three credits C 
Inductive Inference 



Prerequisites: PHL 110, 235; or consent of 
instructor 

A critical examination of theories about the 
structure and justification of inductive 
reasoning. Included will be a study of 
theories of probability and of the nature of 
causation. 

PHL 235 three credits C 
Symbolic Logic 

Prerequisite: PHL 1 10 or consent of 
instructor 

A study of the formal techniques of 
sentential and predicate logic. The course 
aims at imparting skill in applying logic to 
natural language arguments and in 
recognizing and constructing correct 
deductions and refutations. Philosophical 
issues pertaining to the application of logic 
to natural language as well as elementary 
results of metalogic are discussed. 

PHL 298 one to six credits 
Experiential Learning 

Prerequisites: At least sophomore standing; 
permission of the instructor, department 
chairperson, and college dean 
Work experience at an elective level 
supervised for academic credit by a faculty 
member in an appropriate academic field. 
Conditions and hours to be arranged. 
Graded CR/NC. For specific procedures and 
regulations, see section of catalogue on 
Other Learning Experiences. 

PHL 300 three credits W 
Special Topics in Philosophy 

Offered as needed to present current topics 
in the field or other material of interest. 
The specific topic is stated when the course 
is scheduled. May be repeated with change 
of content. 

PHL 301 three credits W 
Theory of Knowledge 

Prerequisite: Semester course in Philosophy 

or consent of instructor 

An analysis of the scope and structure of 

knowledge and its relation to other human 

activities. 

PHL 303 three credits 
Metaphysics 

Prerequisite: Semester course in Philosophy 
or consent of instructor 
A study of some representative philosophical 
views on the general structure and ultimate 
explanation of reality. Some topics 
considered will be causality, chance and 
necessity, the problem of first cause. 
Consideration will also be given to some 
objections to metaphysics as a philosophical 



152 



undertaking. 

PHL311 three credits W 
Philosophy of Language 

Prerequisite: Semester course in Philosophy 
or consent of instructor 
An examination of how language relates to 
the world and to thought. Topics will 
include the nature of meaning, truth, 
metaphor, and linguistic competence; 
speech act theory; and the relation of logic 
to syntax and semantics. Readings will be 
from contemporary linguistics as well as 
from philosophy. 

PHL315 three credits 
Ethics II 

Prerequisite: PHL 215 
Concentrates on the meaning of ethical 
terms, the objectivity of moral judgments 
and the justification of these moral 
judgments. The Is-Ought Question is studied 
at some length, as well as the possibility of 
an ontology of morals proposed by 
contemporary metaphysicians. 

PHL 316 three credits 
Political Philosophy 

Prerequisite: Semester course in Philosophy 
or consent of instructor 
A study of some of the major themes and 
problems traditionally considered by political 
philosophers. A consideration of what 
constitutes a political problem and a 
discussion of the role of philosophy with 
regard to such problems. The course thus 
combines an analytical and an historical 
approach in the effort to relate traditional 
political thought to contemporary problems. 

PHL 317 three credits E 

Ethics and Health Care Professionals 

Prerequisite: Junior standing in Medical 
Laboratory Science, Nursing, Psychology, or 
Sociology 

An examination of the ethical aspects of the 
health care professions, and the impact of 
the ethical issues on the professional's life. 
Topics include: responsibility, conscience, 
professional codes of ethics, privacy, 
informed consent, access to health care, 
loss, and death. Cross-listed as GRT 317. 

PHL 318 three credits 
Bioethics 

Prerequisite: PHL 215 or its equivalent; or 
consent of instructor 

A study of the ethical issues related to death 
and dying, behavior control, genetic 
counseling and genetic engineering, and 
population limitation. The work of specific 
research projects and institutes will be 



studied. 

PHL 320 three credits W 
Philosophy of Science 

Prerequisite: Semester course in Philosophy 
or consent of instructor, or third year in 
Mathematics or a science major. 
A critical analysis of science and its 
methods, a study of the justification and the 
range of scientific knowledge. 

PHL 323 three credits 
Philosophy of Art 

Prerequisite: Semester course in Philosophy 
or consent of instructor 
Continues on a more advanced level the 
development of a theory of art already 
begun in the introduction to aesthetics. 
Themes to be discussed include the nature 
of form and expression in art, the 
nondiscussive character of art, the similari- 
ties and differences between the artist's 
relation to the work of art and the 
spectators', the relation between art and 
subjectivity, the difference between the 
linguistic and visual arts, the social function 
of art. The works of a few major philoso- 
phers will be compared to give students 
alternative points of view. 

PHL 324 three credits 
Philosophy of History 

Prerequisite: Semester course in Philosophy 
or consent of instructor 
This course will consider various theories 
that have been proposed for interpreting 
history, as well as recurrent problems about 
the structure of historical explanation, the 
possibility of objectivity in history, and the 
relationship between history and the social 
sciences. 

PHL 325 three credits 
Philosophy of Religion 

Prerequisite: Semester course in Philosophy 
or consent of instructor 
Analytical and constructive study of central 
concepts and essential manifestations of 
religion. Both historical and contemporary 
readings are required. 

PHL 326 three credits 
Philosophy of Law 

Prerequisite: Semester course in Philosophy 
or consent of instructor 
Approaches to the philosophy of law. The 
course addresses questions like, What gives 
meaning to law? How is the law interpreted, 
or how are judicial interpretations justified? 
What is the relationship between law and 
morality, or law and culture or custom? The 
course examines a number of state and 



Supreme Court opinions (on issues like free 
speech and expressive liberties, reproductive 
issues, obscenity, legal ethics, jury nullifica- 
tion, and hate crime legislation) with a 
critical eye toward their philosophical or 
juridical soundness. This course is valuable 
for those considering careers in law, public 
affairs or politics. 

PHL 332 three credits 
Philosophy of Human Nature 

Prerequisite: Semester course in Philosophy 

or consent of instructor 

An examination of the major views on the 

nature of human beings. The mind-body 

problem and the problem of freedom will be 

discussed. 

PHL 361 three credits 
Contemporary Continental 
Philosophy 

Prerequisite: Semester course in Philosophy 
or consent of instructor 
A study of the various currents of con- 
tinental European thought in this century 
with special concentration on existentialism, 
structuralism, and post-structuralism. 
Husserl, Heidegger, Sartre, Merlea-Ponty, 
Saussure, Levi-Strauss, Lacan, Kristeva, 
Foucault, Derrida and others will be 
discussed. 

PHL 371 three credits W 
Contemporary Anglo-American 
Philosophy 

Prerequisite: Semester course in Philosophy 
or consent of instructor 
An examination and critique of 20th century 
analytic philosophy, whose dominant theme 
has been that philosophical problems are 
best understood as problems regarding the 
use of language. Among the writers we will 
discuss are Moore, Russell, Wittgenstein, 
Ayer, Carnap, Hemple, Ryle, Austin, Quine, 
Davidson, Searle, Dennett, Kripke, Putnam, 
and Rorty. 

PHL 382 three credits 
Contemporary American Philosophy 

Prerequisite: Semester course in Philosophy 
or consent of instructor 
The major positions since the late 19th 
century (pragmatism, idealism naturalism 
and process philosophy) will be studied 
through selected texts from Peirce, James, 
Royce, Dewey, Santayana and Whitehead. 

PHL 409-419 three credits each 
Seminars 

Prerequisite: Major or Minor in Philosophy or 

consent of instructor 

Intensive study of (1) major philosophers. 



153 



College of Arts and Sciences 



such as Plato, Aristotle, Kant, Santayana, 
Whitehead, Wittgenstein, or (2) philoso- 
phers related by a common theme in 
development, such as Aquinas, Scotus, 
Ockham, or Locke, Berkeley, Hume, or 
Descartes, Spinoza, Leibnitz, or (3) current 
philosophical work. 

PHL420 three credits 
Directed Honors Thesis 

Prerequisite: Major in Philosophy and 
3.0 average in philosophy courses 
Departmental guidance for a thesis 
developing out of the primary and continu- 
ing interest of the student. 

PHL495 three credits 
Independent Study 

Prerequisites: Philosophy major; Upper- 
division standing; permission of instructor, 
department chairperson, and college dean 
Study under the supervision of a faculty 
member in an area not otherwise part of the 
discipline's course offerings. Conditions and 
hours to be arranged. 

PHL 196, 296, 396,496 three credits 
Directed Study 

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor, 
department chairperson, and college dean 
Study under the supervision of a faculty 
member in an area covered in a regular 
course not currently being offered. 
Conditions and hours to be arranged. 



154 



Political Science Political Science Major 

BA degree 

Faculty and Fields of Interest Requirements 



Political Science offers a variety of courses 
in the major subfields of the discipline: 
American politics, comparative politics, 
international relations, political theory, 
public administration, and public policy. The 
program emphasizes the development of 
analytical and communications skills linked 
to a substantive understanding of politics, 
governments, and administration. These 
skills and a knowledge of political science 
are useful in a broad range of career 
pursuits. 

UMass Dartmouth Political Science 
graduates are pursuing successful careers in 
state, local, and federal government 
administration, social work, urban planning, 
the diplomatic service, and business. Some 
have careers in politics as elected officials, 
legislative aides, or in lobbying, campaign 
management, and polling analysis. The 
departmental program offers several 
opportunities for student internships that 
provide practical experience in many of 
these areas. Finally, many of the 
department's graduates enroll in some of 
the nation's leading law, graduate, and 
professional schools where they go on to 
careers in college teaching, law, and 
corporate management. 



Clyde W. Barrow political theory (Ameri- 
can, European), political economy, public 
policy (higher education, fiscal) 

Michael Baum comparative politics 
(Western and Southern Europe Africa, Latin 
America), theory, development studies and 
policy 

John J. Carroll (chairperson; director of 
university academic advising) American 
politics (institutions, state governments), 
public law 

John Fobanjong American government, 
ethnic politics, public administration, 
international relations (Africa) 

Kenneth L. Manning constitutional law, 
judicial behavior, American politics 

Philip H. Melanson public policy, American 
politics (governmental secrecy, political 
violence) 

Michael Steinman (dean of the college 
of arts and sciences) American politics, 
public policy 



Political Science majors must complete 36 
credits in political science. In addition, 
majors must satisfy specific cognate 
requirements in selecting their distribution 
courses for the Bachelor of Arts degree. 

The following courses are required: 

Credits 



PSC 101 Intro, to American Politics 3 
PSC151 Introduction to Comparative 

Politics 3 
PSC 161 Introduction to International 

Relations 3 
PSC 200-level elective 3 
PSC 349 Research Methods in Political 

Science 3 

One course in Political Theory from the 
following list: 3 



PSC 320 American Political Thought I 

PSC 321 American Political Thought II 

PSC 351 Modern Political Thought 

PSC 352 Classical Political Thought 

PSC 353 Non-Western Political Thought 

PSC 354 Contemporary Political Thought 

PSC 357 Marxian Political Theory 

PSC 300-level electives 9 



The Political Science faculty is active in 
research, government, and community 
service, and publishes many books and 
articles in the several subfields of the 
discipline. 



PSC 305 Internship 3 

PSC 400-level Research Seminars 6 
(One each in junior and senior years) 

Total 36 

Political science majors must also take 
ECO 232 Macroeconomics. 



This course complements and supports the 
major concentration and also satisfies a 
portion of the distribution requirements in 
social sciences in the College of Arts and 
Sciences. 



General Education Departmental Requirements 

Students majoring in Political Science will meet their departmentally-controlled General 
Education requirements as follows: 

Area E: Satisfied by ECO 232 
Area I, Tier 2: Satisfied by PSC 349 

Area W, Tier 2: Students may choose a course from the approved list 
Area 0: TBD 



155 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Political Science Minor 



Political Science Courses 



Students choosing to Minor in Political 
Science must achieve at least a 2.5 average 
in all Political Science courses and a 2.0 
cumulative grade point average. Students 
must formally declare the minor by the end 
of their fifth semester and must have 
completed 54 credits. Appropriate forms 
will be available from faculty advisors in the 
Political Science department. 

Requirements 

The minor in political science consists of 21 
credits. Minor course credits must be taken 
with at least three different professors. 

The following courses are required: 

Credits 

PSC 101 Intro, to American Politics 3 

PSC 151 Intro, to Comparative Politics 3 

PSC 349 Research Methods in Political 

Science 3 

PSC 300-level electives 9 

PSC 400-level Research Seminar 3 

Total 21 



Political Science Honors Program 

The Political Science Department offers an 
Honors Program to qualified majors. To be 
admitted to the program, students must 
demonstrate outstanding scholarship during 
their first five semesters. Details of the 
program may be obtained from the 
Department Chairperson. 



PSC 101 three credits E 
Introduction to American Politics 

Theory and practice of national government 
in Congress, the Presidency, and the 
Supreme Court, and the interaction of these 
institutions with interest groups, political 
parties, public opinion and the mass media. 

PSC 151 three credits G 
Introduction to Comparative Politics 

Study of political processes, ideologies, 
constitutional systems and governmental 
structure of foreign countries including Great 
Britain, France, Germany, the CI S. and 
selected Third World nations. Comparison 
with American system of government. Stress 
laid on the use of the analytical methods. 
(Formerly PSC 102.) 

PSC 161 three credits G 

Introduction to International Relations 

Helps students relate, organize, and analyze 
political events that occur on the interna- 
tional level. Students will learn how to think 
critically about international relations and its 
impact on lives and well-being in the present 
and future. The concept of power, the 
factors that shape the foreign policies of 
states, the politics of economic relations, the 
use of force, and a broad range of global 
issues are examined. 

PSC 201 -249 three credits 
American Political Issues and Ideas 

Issues and ideas courses on selected topics to 
be developed by instructors as student 
interest and faculty preference indicate. 
Students who are not political science majors 
are particularly invited to enroll in such 
courses. Anticipated offerings in this 
category include Introduction to Political 
Economy, Local Politics, Political Essay, 
Political Assassinations in America, Funda- 
mentals of Political Behavior. 

The following are regularly offered: 

PSC 201 three credits 
Class, Power, and the State 

PSC 210 three credits 
Politics of Health Care Reform 

PSC 212 three credits 
Politics in film 

PSC 219 three credits 

Workforce Development Policy: SCANS 

PSC 222 three credits 

Political Assassination in America 



PSC 228 three credits 

Problems of Law in Political Science 

In addition, the following have been offered 
recently: 

PSC 208 three credits 
Politics of Welfare Reform 

PSC 222 three credits 

Political Assassination in America 

PSC 224 three credits 
Modern Employment Laws and Develop- 
ment in the Workplace 

PSC 226 three credits 

Problems in Comparative Politics 

PSC 227 three credits 
Campaigning for Congress 

PSC 235 three credits 
Environmental Policy 

PSC 236 three credits 
People and Politics 

PSC 237 three credits 

Politics of Free Speech and Religion 

PSC 239 three credits C, D 
African American Politics 

A study of the role of African Americans in 
the American political system, both 
historically and contemporarily, with special 
attention given to the alternative political 
strategies used in the struggle for political 
inclusion. Various philosophies that have 
been adopted to open up the political 
process and increase the democratic 
participation of African Americans are 
studied. Cross-listed as AAS 239. 

PSC 243 three credits 
Ethnic Politics 

Prerequisites: PSC 101 
The complex ethnic structure of the 
American political landscape. The course 
examines the role that ethnicity plays in 
American politics in a comparative examina- 
tion of the politics of major racial and ethnic 
minority groups. Previously offered as PSC 
266. Cross-listed as AAS 243. 



PSC 251-299 three credits 
World Political Issues and Ideas 

Issues and ideas courses on selected topics 
to be developed by instructors as student 
interest and faculty preference indicate. 
Students who are not political science 



156 



Gen Ed Key 



C Cultural and Artistic Literacy 

E Ethics and Social Responsibility 

G Global Awareness 

D Diversity 

W Writing-Intensive Course 

I Information and Computer Literacy 

O Oral Skills 



majors are particularly invited to enroll in 
such courses. Anticipated offerings in this 
category include Contemporary Issues in the 
Middle East, Contemporary Issues in World 
Politics, and Contemporary Issues in Human 
Rights. 

The following are regularly offered: 

PSC258 three credits 
Political Psychology 

PSC261 three credits G 
Problems US/China Relations 

PSC 266 three credits G 
Problems in Comparative Politics 

PSC 291 three credits 

Contemporary Issues in Human Rights 

Central concepts in human rights and 
international barriers to action. This is a 
discussion course addressing questions like, 
Can or should human rights be protected 
internationally? Is it possible to balance 
conflicting rights? What is the continuing 
role of torture in Europe and elsewhere? 

In addition, the following have been offered 
recently: 

PSC 253 three credits 
Contemporary Issues: US and Middle 
East 

PSC 286 three credits 

Contemporary Issues in World Politics 

PSC 301 three credits 
The Presidency 

Prerequisites: PSC 101 and upper-division 
standing 

The development of the contemporary 
presidency and its position within the 
American constitutional framework. Special 
attention will be paid to the presidential 
selection system, to alternate models of the 
presidency and to presidential power. 

PSC 302 three credits 
The Legislative Process 

Prerequisites: PSC 101 or permission of the 
instructor; and upper-division standing 
A thorough study of the United States 
Congress and its power to make law. 
Elections, legislative leadership, congres- 
sional committees, inter-branch relations, 
and the dynamics of the legislative process 
are some of the sub-themes. 

PSC 303 three credits C, D, G 
Cape Verdean Politics and Society 



A study of Cape Verdeans as an ethnic sub- 
population in the United States, and as 
comprising an independent, self-governing 
nation-state. The historical, political, social, 
and economic contributions of Americans of 
Cape Verdean descent in the United States 
and in Cape Verde are examined. Cross- 
listed as AAS 303. 

PSC 304 three credits W 
Bureaucratic Politics 

Prerequisite: PSC 101 or prior coursework in 
social science 

A broad overview of the development and 
performance of bureaucratic institutions in 
the U.S. political system, exploring the 
extraordinary expansion of bureaucratic 
authority in recent decades and various 
explanations of government growth. A 
review of the historical development of 
bureaucratic institutions will set the stage 
for subsequent discussions of the perfor- 
mance of public sector organizations and 
prospects for significant reform in the next 
decade. 

PSC 305 three to fifteen credits 
Internship 

Students take part in internship opportuni- 
ties in the public and private sector, in 
conjunction with a series of five on-campus 
seminars with core readings designed to 
integrate the student's real-world experi- 
ence with the academic discipline. Students 
are placed on congressional and state 
legislative staffs, in state and local govern- 
ment, in the judicial system, in prosecutors' 
offices, in law firms, and a variety of other 
public and non profit organizations. 

PSC 306 three credits C, D 

Civil Rights Movements in the United 

States 

A study of the politics of civil rights and the 
various philosophical approaches that have 
been used to extend such rights to groups 
that have traditionally had no access to the 
agenda setting processes within the 
legislative system. Emphasis is placed on the 
philoscohy of nonviolence and on the 
political effectiveness of such organizing 
strategies as marches, sit-ins, and public 
demonstrations; and how the American 
experience with civil rights has influenced 
civil rights movements in other parts of the 
world. Cross-listed as AAS 306. 

PSC 311 three credits 
State Politics 

Prerequisites: PSC 101 and upper-division 
standing 

An exploration of politics and government in 



the American states. The course is a 
comparative analysis of the 50 states, 
although special attention will be given to 
Massachusetts. 

PSC 312 three credits 
Massachusetts Politics 

Prerequisites: PSC 101 or consent of 
instructor and upper-division standing 
An analysis of selected aspects of Massachu- 
setts politics and government: the state 
legislature, electoral trends, parties, courts, 
and executive policy are potential subjects. 
There will be a special emphasis on student 
research. 

PSC 313 three credits D 
Urban Politics 

Prerequisites: PSC 101 and upper-division 
standing 

A critical examination of the urban political 
community in the United States. Particular 
attention is given to the adequacy of the city 
as an arena of conflict resolution and 
decision-making as well as such current 
problems as urban reconstruction in the 
ghettos. Field research in the area by 
individuals or groups is encouraged but not 
required. Cross-listed as AAS 313. 

PSC 31 5 three credits 
Public Policy in America 

Prerequisites: PSC 101 and upper-division 
standing 

The policy-making roles, processes, and 
dynamics of U.S. political institutions, 
including the federal bureaucracy, media, 
think tanks, and universities. Major theme 
and dynamics examined include: govern- 
mental secrecy, covert action, the role of 
scientific experts, and the right to privacy. 

PSC 317 three credits C, D, G 
African Political Systems 

A study of the contemporary politics of 
African states and governments, and 
providing exposure to the African historical 
backgrounds, political cultures, political 
trends, and ideology. The colonial heritage 
of African states, the quest for moderniza- 
tion and nation-building, and the transition 
to democratic governance are explored. 
Cross-listed as AAS 317. 

PSC 320 three credits 
American Political Thought I 

American political thought from the 
Revolution to the Civil War with particular 
emphasis on ideas of state-building and 
political economy. Readings may vary, but 
will likely include the Declaration of 
Independence, early state constitutions, the 



157 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Articles of Confederation, The U.S. Constitu- 
tion, The Federalist, selections from the 
Jacksonian democrats, and articles by 
George Fitzhugh. 

PSC321 three credits 
American Political Thought II 

American political thought from the end of 
Reconstruction to the New Deal, with 
particular emphasis on ideas of state- 
building and political economy. Readings 
may vary but will likely include William 
Graham Sumner, selected American 
Socialists, J. Allen Smith, and Herbert Croly. 

PSC 322 three credits O, W 
Constitutional Law 

Prerequisites: PSC 101 and upper-division 
standing 

Course centers on the development of the 
constitutional framework of American 
government. Supreme Court cases will cover 
judicial review, the powers of the three 
branches, and federalism. 

PSC 323 three credits E 
Civil Liberties 

Prerequisites: PSC 101 and upper-division 
standing. 

In effect the second half of the course on 
Constitutional Law. The Civil Liberties course 
deals with the relations between the 
individual and the state as defined by U.S. 
Supreme Court decisions. Topics may include 
rights of racial minorities, freedom of 
speech, church-state relations, and the rights 
of criminal defendants. 

PSC 326 three credits 

Labor Relations: 

Law, Practice, and Policy 

An examination of the political and legal 
framework of U.S. labor relations. 
The course will include analysis of legislation 
and Supreme Court and NLRB cases which 
shape national labor policy and define 
relations among workers, employers, and the 
state. Cross-listed as LST 326. 

PSC 331 three credits 

Political Parties and Interest Groups 

Prerequisites: PSC 101 or written permission 
of instructor; and upper-division standing 
The development and function of political 
parties and political interest groups in 
American politics. Strategies for lobbying 
and for creating interest groups also 
examined. 

PSC 332 three credits 
Sex Roles and Politics 

Prerequisites: PSC 101 or PSC 238 or WMS 



100, and upper-division standing 
An examination of the impact of gender as a 
variable in American politics. The course 
analyzes women in the electorate as 
candidates, as office holders, and as political 
participants including participation in 
political organizations and lobbying groups. 
Cross-listed as WMS 332. 

PSC 333 three credits 
Political Behavior 

Prerequisites: PSC 101 or PSC 238 and PSC 
349, or written permission of instructor; and 
upper-division standing 
Examines political behavior within the 
American political system. Special emphasis 
on quantitative methods to examine 
participation. Original data sets which have 
provided the sources for assigned readings 
are supplied. Emphasis on socio-economic 
models of participation. 

PSC 339 three credits D 
Women and Public Policy 

Prerequisites: PSC 101 and upper-division 
standing 

Examines public policies and landmark 
Supreme Court opinions relating to gender 
equality and women's interests in the United 
States. Topics may include educational 
policies, employment policies, child care 
policies, health care policies, reproductive 
rights, and policies relating to women as 
criminals. Cross-listed as WMS 339. 

PSC 341 three credits 
Governmental Secrecy 

Prerequisite: PSC 101 

A survey of the political issues and policies 
relating to the federal secrecy system and 
the individual agencies within it, such as the 
CIA, FBI, Pentagon, and National Security 
Agency. Major topic areas include classifica- 
tion and declassification systems, rights to 
privacy, national secrecy, and proposed 
changes and reforms. The balance between 
secrecy and the public right to know in a 
democratic system is a primary focus, and 
legal processes for citizens to obtain 
information are explored: Freedom of 
Information Act, Privacy Act, administrative 
and legal challenges to government 
withholding of information regarding both 
individual files and topics concerning 
political/historical events. 

PSC 342 three credits 
Public Administration 

Prerequisites: PSC 101 and upper-division 
standing 

Examination of the general nature of the 
bureaucracy in public and private organiza- 



tion and in various cultural contexts. 
Attention is given to administrative 
responsibility. 

PSC 347 three credits 
Environmental Law 

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing 
An introduction to basic concepts of 
environmental law. The emphasis is on 
broad introductory themes. 

PSC 349 three credits 

Political Science Research Methods 

Prerequisites: PSC 101, 151, or 161, or 
permission of instructor; and upper-division 
standing 

An introduction to the various subfields of 
political science from a practitioner's point 
of view. Students will learn how to study 
politics "scientifically" using theories, 
hypotheses, and concepts to explore the 
relationships among variables Students will 
also learn how to define and critique 
concepts commonly used in professional 
journals. The course concludes with an 
overview of descriptive statistics and their 
application to data analysis within a Political 
Science framework. 

PSC 351 three credits 
Modern Political Thought 

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing 
European political theorists from the 16th 
through 19th centuries. Course will focus on 
the development of modern liberalism with 
some attention to its nineteenth century 
critics. Readings may vary, but most likely 
will include the major political writings of 
Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, and Bentham. 

PSC 352 three credits 
Classical Political Thought 

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing 
European political theorists from ancient 
Greece through the 15th century. Readings 
may vary, but most likely will include the 
major political writings of Plato, Aristotle, St. 
Augustine, and others. 

PSC 353 three credits G 
Non-Western Political Thought 

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing 
The political philosophy of non-western 
thinkers whose ideas had a deep impact on 
the political institutions in lands outside 
Europe. Emphasis is on Buddhist, Hindu and 
Muslim thinkers who at different periods of 
history gave insightful expositions of human 
nature in politics. 

PSC 354 three credits 
Contemporary Political Thought 



158 



Prerequisite: Upper-division standing 
The recent ideological currents in advanced 
capitalist societies: neo-conservatism, neo- 
liberalism, syndicalism, postmarxian 
socialism, eco-anarchism, and corporate 
fascism. The course will focus on political 
thinkers who have made significant 
contributions to the interpretation of 
contemporary political and economic 
developments. 

PSC 357 three credits 
Marxian Political Theory 

Prerequisite: PSC 201 or 204, ECO 232, SOC 
200; or permission of the instructor 
The basic concepts of 'Radical' political 
economy. Course will include an in-depth 
analysis of Marx's Capital, Vol. I, as well as a 
survey of current trends in the development 
of a critical theory of the state. Cross-listed 
as LST 357. 

PSC 360 three credits G 
Politics and Governments of 
Western Europe 

Prerequisite: PSC 151 or upper-division 
standing 

The political culture, historical political 
development, and governmental institutions 
of major Western European nations, 
including the European Union. The course 
will focus on Britain, France, Germany, and 
Italy. 

PSC 361 three credits 

Chinese Government and Politics 

Prerequisites: PSC 151 and upper-division 
standing 

An introduction to the People's Republic of 
China and its political process. The 
interrelationships between China's 
revolutionary heritage and the development 
of Maoist ideology and mass mobilization 
politics, economic policy, and foreign policy 
will be examined. Finally, post-Mao politics 
will be studied to determine the degree and 
direction of change and its implication for 
Chinese politics and for the Chinese people. 

PSC 363 three credits C,G 
Politics and Government of 
the Middle East 

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing 
The politics of the Middle East in terms of 
the region's history, geography, culture and 
the impact of the West. Country studies 
include Turkey, Egypt, Syria, Israel, Jordan, 
Iraq, Saudi Arabia, and other Gulf States. 

PSC 366 three credits C, G 
Islam and Politics 

The political and cultural history of Islam. 



Students will learn about the contemporary 
revolutionary religious movements in Muslim 
countries and their effect on world politics. 

PSC 368 three credits G,W 
Government and Politics of the Former 
Soviet Union 

Prerequisites: PSC 151 or permission of the 
instructor, and upper-division standing 
Examination of the factors which led to the 
demise of the former Soviet Union as well as 
the politics of transition during the post- 
Soviet period including the relationships 
between political and economic change, 
institution building, and state capability, and 
the evolution of new sources of political 
legitimacy. 

PSC 369 three credits 
Transitions to Democracy 

Transitions from non-democratic to 
democratic regimes in three major areas of 
the world, Southern Europe, the Soviet 
Union and East-Central Europe, and South 
America, from a comparative theoretical 
perspective. Theoretical problems include 
what democracy is and is not, democratic 
transition and democratic consolidation, 
how and why transitions to democracy have 
occurred, and factors that influence the 
success or failure of democratization. 

PSC 381 three credits 
Contemporary International 
Relations 

Prerequisite: Upper-division standing 
Problems in international relations with 
emphasis on changing characteristics of 
contemporary world politics. Attention is 
given to super-power politics and accommo- 
dations (detente) in Europe, East Asia, the 
Middle East, and Africa, and the problems 
associated with the emergence of a new 
world order. 

PSC 382 three credits 
American Foreign Policy 

Prerequisite: PSC 161 or permission of the 
instructor 

Policy choices made by the United States 
and the actors, institutions, and influences 
that affect those decisions. Students gain 
an understanding of the foreign policy 
positions of presidential candidates and 
presidents, the various influences on the 
making of American foreign policy and the 
American foreign policy process, and the 
impact of the changing international 
environment on American foreign policy. 

PSC 383 three credits G. W 

The Politics of International Economic 



Relations 

Prerequisites: PSC 151 or PSC 161 or 
permission of instructor, and upper-division 
standing 

Examination of the politics and impact of 
international economic issues globally, 
including how international economic 
policies are made, their differential impact 
on industrialized and less-industrialized 
countries, and the evolution and behavior of 
important actors in the global economy 
(governments, international organizations, 
NGOs). 

PSC 385 three credits 
Multiculturalism and Diplomacy in 
World Affairs 

Prerequisites: PSC 151, 161 
Diplomacy, negotiation, and foreign policy 
decision-making. Students will learn the 
theory of negotiation from structured 
student-participation discussions. Students 
then participate in a multi-university, multi- 
national foreign policy web-based simula- 
tion exercise that helps illustrate the 
problems and possibilities of international 
interactions, in which students negotiate 
with other "state" diplomats to achieve 
foreign policy goals concerning such issues 
as drug trafficking, terrorism, human rights, 
world health, the environment, and debt 
and development. 

PSC 386 three credits 
International Conflict 

Prerequisite: PSC 161 
Analysis of the causes of and state 
responses to international conflict and 
violence. A particular emphasis is placed on 
ethnic conflict, managing conflict, and the 
future of international conflict. Can conflict 
be minimized or controlled? Is our world 
more or less safe than it was before? Are we 
heading toward a World War III? 

PSC 393 three credits G 

Portugal and the European Union 

Prerequisite: sophomore standing or above 
Examines the political, economic, and 
demographic shifts in Portuguese society 
that have accompanied the process of 
European integration. This is a four-week 
summer course offered in a study-abroad 
format in Portugal. Various field trips and 
guest lectures will shed light on the impact 
of EU integration. 

PSC 394 three credits G 

The Politics of European Integration 

Prerequisite: sophomore standing or above 
Topics on European integration, the 
historical development of the European 



159 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Union, eastward expansion, treaties, the 
Single Market, the EURO, theories of 
European integration, and challenges facing 
small states in the EU. This is a four-week 
summer course offered in a study-abroad 
format in Portugal. Various field trips and 
guest lectures will shed light on the impact 
of EU integration. 

PSC 395 three credits G 

Politics and Development of Modern 

Portugal 

The politics and economic development of 
20th century Portugal. This course will 
explore the links between changes in the 
socio-economic structures of the country and 
the transformation of the political system. 
Portuguese colonialism, the corporatist 
Estado Novo, and the transition to and 
consolidation of democracy will be examined 
from a comparative European perspective. 

PSC 400-449 three credits 

Seminars in American Politics and Ideas 

Recently offered seminars include: 

PSC 401 three credits O 
Seminar: American Presidency 

PSC 403 three credits 
Seminar: The Corporate State 

PSC 405 three credits 
Seminar: Sports and Politics 



PSC 456 three credits 
Seminar: Globalization 

PSC 477 three credits 

Research Seminar in World Politics and 

Ideas 



PSC 495 variable credit 
Independent Study 

Prerequisites: Upper-division standing; 
permission of instructor, department 
chairperson, and college dean 
Study under the supervision of a faculty 
member in an area not otherwise part of the 
discipline's course offerings. Conditions and 
hours to be arranged. 

PSC 196, 296, 396, 496 variable credit 
Directed Study 

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor, 
department chairperson, and college dean 
Study under the supervision of a faculty 
member in an area covered in a regular course 
not currently being offered. Conditions and 
hours to be arranged. 

PSC 499 variable credit 
Thesis 

Undergraduate thesis under the supervision of 
a faculty member, by arrangement. 



Course for the Master of Arts in 
Teaching 

PSC 501 three credits 

Teaching Political Science in Secondary 

Schools 

Analysis of the policy-making process, 
particularly in contemporary American 
national, state and local politics; compara- 
tive analysis of other political systems; 
development of issue oriented case studies 
and units for use in secondary school social 
studies courses; development of critical 
thinking and communications skills. 



PSC 407 three credits 
Seminar: Identity Politics 

PSC 408 three credits 
Seminar: Judicial Process 

PSC 412 three credits 

Seminar: Contemporary American 

Political Ideas 

PSC 444 three credits 
Seminar: Politics of 
Assassination 

PSC 445 three credits 

Research Seminar in American Politics 

and Ideas 



PSC 450-494 three credits 
Seminars in World Politics and Ideas 

Recently offered seminars include: 

PSC 451 three credits G 
Seminar: Politics of Developing 
Countries 



160 



Portuguese Portuguese Major 

BA degree 

Faculty and Fields of Interest Requirements 



The Department offers a solid foundation in 
the study of Portuguese, the sixth most 
spoken language in the world. A three-tier 
program introduces students to the rich 
cultural diversity of the Portuguese-speaking 
world, composed of 200 million people in 
eight countries on four continents. In 
addition to the regular academic year 
program, the Department of Portuguese 
offers a comprehensive Summer Program in 
Portuguese that attracts students from 
throughout the United States, with intensive 
courses in Portuguese language and 
Lusophone Literatures and Cultures. 

There are a number of resources available to 
students of Portuguese. The University has a 
state of the art language laboratory that houses 
multimedia educational resources, allowing 
for learning beyond regular class hours. Lo- 
cated in the heart of the region that boasts the 
largest concentration of Portuguese, Cape 
Verdeans, Brazilians, and their descendents in 
North America, the University of Massachu- 
setts Dartmouth provides a unique environ- 
ment for the learning of Portuguese in a 
thorough immersion setting. 

Department of Portuguese offerings are 
supplemented by the activities of the Center 
for Portuguese Studies and Culture. The 
Center organizes a variety of cultural events 
throughout the year, including lectures, 
exhibitions, concerts and colloquia. The 
Center also publishes three book series and 
a semiannual academic journal entitled 
Portuguese Literary & Cultural Studies. 



Dario Borim Portuguese language and 
Brazilian cultural discourse 

Anna Klobucka Portuguese and lusophone 
African literatures and pedagogy 

Victor Mendes Portuguese literature, 
critical theory 

Frank Sousa (chairperson) 1 9th and 20th 
centrury Portuguese and Brazilian fiction 

Sandra Sousa (Camoes Institute Lecturer) 
Portuguese language 



Students may declare a Portuguese Major at 
any time during their academic career, includ- 
ing at the time of admission to the University 
as an incoming freshman or transfer student. 
It is possible for students to start Portuguese at 
UMass Dartmouth and become majors by tak- 
ing intensive language courses either during 
the academic year or during the Summer Pro- 
gram in Portuguese. Majors are required to 
complete a minimum of 33 credits of Portu- 
guese course work at the 300- and 400-level. 
A grade point average of 2.0 in Portuguese 
courses is required for graduation. Students 
are strongly encouraged to take elective courses 
in art history, history, political science, and 
anthropology/sociology related to Brazil, Cape 
Verde, and Portugal. 

Upon completion of the major, students are 
expected to speak fluently, write effectively 
and read critically in Portuguese. A degree in 
Portuguese offers access to careers in 
education, translation, business, interna- 
tional relations, print and visual media, 
social and non-profit/non-governmental 
organizations, and politics, among other 
fields. 



161 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Portuguese Major 

BA degree 



Requirements 



Other Program Information 



Minor in Portuguese 



credits 

POR 301 , 302 Portuguese Grammar and 

Composition I and II 6 

POR 3 1 Introduction to Literary 

and Cultural Analysis 3 

POR 331, 332, Three of these four 9 
333, 334 

POR Five additional courses 15 

at the 300- or 400-level, 
two of which must be 
at the 400 level 

Total 33 



General Education Departmental 
Requirements 

Students majoring in Portuguese will meet 
their departmentally-controlled General 
Education requirements as follows: 

Area E: Satisfied by PHL 101 or 215 (advisor 
may approve using another course from 
the approved list) 

Area I, Tier 2: Satisfied by two 400-level 
POR courses (subject to Gen Ed Commit- 
tee approval) 

Area W, Tier 2: Satisfied by POR 301 and 
302 (subject to Gen Ed Committee 
approval) 

Area O: Satisfied by POR 301 and 302 
(subject to Gen Ed Committee approval) 



Study Abroad Program 

The Department of Portuguese strongly 
encourages students to study at a Portu- 
guese or Brazilian university for at least a 
semester. 

Phi Lambda Beta (National Portuguese 
Honor Society) 

Students who have studied Portuguese for a 
minimum of three years at the college level 
may be eligible for membership. For further 
information please contact the Department. 

Student Placement Exams 

Students who have formally studied 
Portuguese at the high school or college 
level, or are heritage speakers, are encour- 
aged to take a placement exam to deter- 
mine the appropriate level to begin studying 
Portuguese at UMass Dartmouth. Students 
should contact the Department for 
information about examination schedule. 

Scholarships 

The Department of Portuguese offers a 
limited number of undergraduate and 
graduate scholarships based on academic 
qualifications and financial need. 

Tuition Reduction 

The Portuguese program qualifies under the 
New England Regional Student Program to 
allow non-Massachusetts resident students 
from the other new England states to pay a 
substantially reduced non-resident tuition. 
See the chapters on Expenses and Admis- 
sions for details 



Minors in Portuguese develop a strong foun- 
dation in the language and receive a thorough 
introduction to the cultures of the Portuguese- 
speaking world that will complement any 
major. 

Students must have 54 credits and a cumula- 
tive GPA of 2.0 and a 2.5 in their major field to 
declare a minor in Portuguese. Minors in Por- 
tuguese must complete 18 credits (refer to 
chart below for specific requirements). 

credits 

POR 301 , 302 Portuguese Grammar 

and Composition I and II 6 



POR 



POR 



Two additional courses 

at the 300-or 400-level 6 



Any two courses in 
Portuguese 

Total 



6 
18 



162 



Gen Ed Note: All Portuguese courses satisfy 
area C, Cultural and Artistic Literacy. Some 
courses satisfy other requirements, as noted. 



Portuguese Courses 



POR 101 three credits G 
Elementary Portuguese I 

3 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratory 
Introduction to the foundations of the 
Portuguese language for students who have 
little or no knowledge of Portuguese. 
Students develop listening comprehension, 
speaking, reading, and writing skills. The 
course offers regular presentation of music 
and slides/websites depicting everyday life 
in Portuguese-speaking countries. 

POR 102 three credits G 
Elementary Portuguese II 

3 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratory 
Prerequisite: POR 101 or equivalent 
Continuation of POR 101. Short readings on 
contemporary life in Portuguese-speaking 
countries will be introduced. 

POR 103 six credits G 

Intensive Elementary Portuguese 

An intensive course designed for beginners 
who desire to master the basic structures 
and vocabulary of the language in one 
semester; students complete a year of 
language in one semester. Students learn in 
a communicative environment using all four 
of the language skills: listening, speaking, 
reading, and writing. This course is 
equivalent to POR 101 and 102. 

POR 201 three credits G 
Intermediate Portuguese I 

3 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratory 
Prerequisite: POR 102 or equivalent 
Continuation of Portuguese for students 
who have had a solid introduction to the 
Portuguese language. In addition to 
focusing on grammatical concepts and 
conversation, new vocabulary will be 
introduced. Greater emphasis will be given 
to writing. Readings include short stories, 
newspaper and magazine articles, and 
poetry. There will also be a more intensive 
look at topics of relevance to the Portu- 
guese-speaking world, including aspects of 
social and cultural interest. 

POR 202 three credits G 
Intermediate Portuguese II 

3 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratory 
Prerequisite: POR 201 or equivalent 
Continuation of POR 201. 

POR 203 six credits G 

Intensive Intermediate Portuguese 

An intensive intermediate Portuguese 
language course. This course is designed to 
review the grammar and syntax of the 
Portuguese language studied in the first 
year, stressing usage and accuracy in all 



four language skills and emphasizing the 
expansion of vocabulary and use of 
Portuguese practical situations. Students 
complete a year of language in one 
semester. This course is equivalent to POR 
101 and 102. (Formerly offered as POR 200.) 

POR 214 three credits G 
Portuguese Literature in Translation 

Prerequisite: ENL 102 

Outstanding works of Portuguese literature 
and culture, with readings, lectures, and 
discussions in English. (Formerly offered as 
POR 203.) 

POR 215 three credits G 
Brazilian Literature in Translation 

Prerequisite: ENL 102 

Outstanding works of Brazilian literature and 
culture, with readings, lectures, and 
discussions in English. (Formerly offered as 
POR 204.) 

POR 216 three credits G 
Lusophone African Literatures in 
Translation 

Prerequisite: ENL 102 
Outstanding works of Cape Verdean, 
Angolan, and Mozambican literatures and 
cultures, with readings, lectures, and 
discussions in English. 

POR 270 three credits G 

Music and Cinema of Brazil (in English) 

A panoramic view of the ethnically diverse 
Brazil through music and cinema. Topics 
fostering global awareness and artistic 
literacy include the international reception of 
Cinema Novo and post-Cinema Novo, as 
well as bossa nova, samba, Tropicalia and 
new fusions of world music. Social and 
historical perspectives on racial and regional 
diversity are explored. Materials and 
discussions are in English. 

POR 298 one to six credits 
Experiential Learning 

Prerequisites: At least sophomore standing; 
permission of the instructor, department 
chairperson, and college dean 
Students receive academic credit for work 
experience, with the Portuguese language in 
its written and spoken form as a focus in the 
work conducted. A faculty member who is 
in the field will oversee the work and 
arrange conditions and hours with the 
student. Graded CR/NC. For specific 
procedures and regulations, see section of 
catalogue on "Other Learning Experiences." 

POR 301 three credits G 
Portuguese Composition and 



Conversation I 

Prerequisite: POR 202, or equivalent 
Designed to expand the student's vocabu- 
lary considerably, while providing an in- 
depth review of Portuguese grammar. The 
goal is for the student to achieve overall 
language proficiency. The readings will 
focus on short stories from the diverse 
Portuguese-speaking world. Compositions 
on a variety of topics will be assigned 
weekly. This course is conducted entirely in 
Portuguese. 

POR 302 three credits G 
Portuguese Composition and 
Conversation II 

Prerequisite: POR 301 
Continuation of POR 301. 

POR 305 three credits 

Introduction to Translation and Business 

Portuguese I 

Prerequisites: POR 302; or consent of 
instructor 

Introduction to translation theory and 
techniques. A number of texts from a variety 
of genres, including essay, short stories, and 
journalistic texts, will be distributed to 
students for translation. Students will 
present portions of their translated text to 
the class for comment. A portion of the 
course will also be dedicated to the 
fundamental terms of business correspon- 
dence in Portuguese. (Formerly offered as 
POR 337.) 

POR 306 three credits 

Introduction to Translation and Business 

Portuguese II 

Prerequisites: POR 305; or consent of 
instructor 

Continuation of POR 305. (Formerly offered 
as POR 338.) 

POR 308 three credits G 
Advanced Grammar and Syntax 

Prerequisite: POR 202 or equivalent 
Study of Portuguese grammar and its uses, 
with extensive exercises. Emphasis will be 
placed on particular topics in Portuguese 
grammar and on advanced writing skills to 
be complemented by readings from 
Brazilian, Cape Verdean, Portuguese and 
Lusophone literatures. (Formerly offered as 
POR 325.) 

POR 310 three credits 

Introduction to Literary and Cultural 

Analysis 

Prerequisite: POR 302 or consent of 
instructor 

A study of fundamental issues underlying 



163 



College of Arts and Sciences 



literary and cultural analysis, and method- 
ological backgrounds of critical strategies. 
The course will explore theory from Aristotle 
to contemporary critical schools like 
Marxism, Feminism, Deconstruction, New 
Historicism, and Cultural Criticism. Samples 
from some of the major genres and works 
of the Portuguese-speaking world are 
analyzed. Students write several short 
papers. 

POR312 three credits G 

Culture and Civilization of Portugal 

Prerequisite: POR 302 or consent of 
instructor 

Introduction to the cultural development of 
the Portuguese people throughout history. 
Lectures, class discussions, written and oral 
reports on significant aspects of Portuguese 
literary, social and artistic life. 

POR 314 three credits G 
Culture and Civilization of Brazil 

Prerequisite: POR 301 or equivalent 
The development of Brazil and its people 
from the colonial period to the present. 
Films, documentaries, textbooks and music 
studied through lectures, computerized 
instruction, in-class discussions, plus written 
and oral reports on significant aspects of 
Brazilian literary, social, political, economic, 
and artistic life. 

POR 321 three credits 

Teaching Portuguese as a Foreign 

Language 

Prerequisite: POR 302 or consent of 
instructor 

A theoretical and practical survey of 
methods and techniques used to teach 
foreign languages designed principally for 
preservice teachers in k-12 Portuguese 
language education. Development of 
educational materials for Portuguese and 
methodological issues applicable to heritage 
language learners are particularly empha- 
sized. Assignments include presentations of 
teaching modules, classroom observations 
and preparation of professional portfolios. 

POR 331 three credits G 

Introduction to Portuguese Literature I 

Prerequisite: POR 302 or equivalent 
Survey of Portugal's most significant works 
from the medieval lyric to the chronicles of 
Fernao Lopes, the theatre of Gil Vicente, the 
poetry of Luis de Camoes, and the sermons 
of Padre Ant6nio Vieira. The objective of this 
course is to introduce students to the critical 
reading of complex Portuguese texts. 

POR 332 three credits G 



Introduction to Portuguese Literature II 

Prerequisite: POR 331 or consent of 
instructor 

Continuation of POR 331, covering 
Portuguese literature from Romanticism to 
the present. Attention will be given to 
literary history and criticism. 

POR 333 three credits G 
Introduction to Brazilian Literature I 

Prerequisite: POR 302 or equivalent 
Survey of the development of Brazilian 
literature from the colonial period to the 
nineteenth century. Attention is given to 
literary history and criticism. 

POR 334 three credits G 
Introduction to Brazilian Literature II 

Prerequisite: POR 333 or consent of 
instructor 

Continuation of POR 333 A survey of 
twentieth century Brazilian literature. 
Emphasis on major authors and literary 
periods. Attention is given to literary history 
and criticism. 

POR 335 three credits G 
Lusophone African Literatures and 
Cultures 

Prerequisites: POR 301, 302 or consent of 
instructor 

Study of Cape Verdean literature and 
culture with special attention to writers and 
texts representative of the Claridade literary 
movement (1936-1960), such as Jorge 
Barbosa, Baltasar Lopes, and Manuel Lopes. 
The novel and poetry of the post-indepen- 
dence period will also be studied. Other 
literatures and cultures of Lusophone Africa 
will also be considered. 

POR 350 three credits G 
The Classical Period 

Prerequisites: POR 331, 332; or consent of 
instructor 

The prose, poetry, and theater of sixteenth 
century Portugal, including literature related 
to the Portuguese Expansion. (Formerly 
offered as POR 445.) 

POR 360 three credits G 
Nineteenth Century Portuguese 
Literature 

Prerequisites: POR 331, 332; or consent of 
instructor 

Study of the major authors and literary 
movements of the nineteenth century 
including works of Almeida Garrett, 
Alexandre Herculano, Camilo Castelo 
Branco, Antero de Quental, Eqa de Queiros, 
and CesaVio Verde among others. (Formerly 
offered as POR 455.) 



POR 361 three credits G 
Twentieth Century Portuguese Litera- 
ture 

Prerequisites: POR 331, 332; or consent of 
instructor 

Study of the major literary authors and 
movements of the twentieth century 
including readings from Fernando Pessoa, 
Carlos de Oliveira, Jorge de Sena, Vergilio 
Ferreira, Agustma Bessa Luis, Jose Cardoso 
Pires, and Jose Saramago, among others. 
(Formerly offered as POR 456.) 

POR 370 three credits 
Music and Cinema of Brazil 

Prerequisites: POR 333, 334; or consent of 
instructor 

A panoramic view of the music and cinema 
of Brazil. Regionally and aesthetically diverse 
songs and films composes the corpus of this 
course. Topics include bossa nova, samba, 
tropicalismo, Cinema Novo, and post- 
Cinema Novo. Representations taken from 
myths, mysteries, fantasies, and traditions 
are studied from social and historical 
perspectives. 

POR 400 three credits 
Luis de Camoes 

Prerequisites: POR 331, 332; or consent of 
instructor 

This course consists of two parts. First, 
students analyze the types of lyrical poetry 
Camoes wrote — traditional peninsular forms 
and those taken from the Renaissance — and 
study the recurring themes in Camoes. 
Second, we study the epic poem. The 
Lusiads. Attention is given to the influence 
of Camoes in Portuguese culture. (Formerly 
offered as POR 446.) 

POR 410 three credits 
Eca de Queiros 

Prerequisites: POR 331, 332; or consent of 
instructor 

Study of the major works of the foremost 
Portuguese novelist of the nineteenth 
century. Examination of the aesthetic and 
ideological significance of Ega's works. The 
analysis of his works as a critical response to 
European literature and philosophy, and 
specific authors of the Portuguese and 
Spanish tradition. Discussion of themes such 
as the relation between nature and culture, 
language and reality, technology and man, 
the past and historiography, and Portuguese 
nineteenth century society. 

POR 420 three credits G 
Machadode Assis 

Prerequisites: POR 333, 334; or consent of 
instructor 



164 



Study of the major novels and short stories 
of the foremost Brazilian author of the 
nineteenth century. The course examines 
the innovative narrative techniques that 
characterize his works, and their relation- 
ship to precursors such as Lawrence Sterne 
and Almeida Garrett. The course also 
explores how Machado's skepticism and 
irony anticipates modernist and post- 
modernist writings. 

POR430 three credits G 
Fernando Pessoa and Twentieth 
Century Portuguese Poetry 

Prerequisites: POR 331, 332; or consent of 
instructor 

Study of the poetry of Fernando Pessoa as 
an example of Modernism. The course 
examines the major heteronyms and their 
significance and discusses subsequent 
Portuguese literary generations of the 20th 
Century, their characteristics, and most 
important authors, with emphasis on 
poetry. 

POR 481 three credits G 
Seminar in Portuguese 

Prerequisites: POR 332, 334; or consent of 
instructor 

The study of a specific topic, author, or 
literary period from Portugal, Brazil and/or 
Lusophone Africa. May be repeated with 
change in content. 

POR 495 three credits 
Independent Study 

Prerequisites: Upper-division standing; 
permission of instructor, department 
chairperson, and college dean. 
Intensive study or research on a specific 
topic in Portuguese, Brazilian or Lusophone 
African studies under the direction of 
faculty member. Conditions and hours to be 
arranged. 

POR 496 three credits 
Directed Study 

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor, 
department chairperson, and college dean 
Study under the supervision of a faculty 
member in an area covered in a regular 
course not currently offered. Conditions and 
hours to be arranged. 



165 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Psychology 



Psychology Major 

BA degree 



Faculty and Fields of Interest 



The focus of psychology is the scientific 
study of behavior. Psychology is studied as a 
science with the implication that there is a 
commitment to rational thinking and 
empirical analysis of the problems encoun- 
tered in describing and explaining human 
behavior. 

A three-course core sequence introduces 
students to the way in which psychology as 
a field advances through scientific research. 
A wide range of subfields of psychology are 
offered through courses that emphasize our 
biological heritage (e.g., physiological 
psychology, perception) to those that 
examine basic human functioning (e.g., 
cognition, learning, personality, social) and 
those that have a distinct applied orientation 
(e.g., counseling, behavior modification, 
organizational, and community psychology). 

There are also opportunities for students to 
engage in independent research and honors 
research projects and to participate in 
internships in various clinical settings. The 
curriculum can be structured to prepare 
students for graduate education or to 
include applied clinical coursework and 
experiences that would allow graduates to 
seek employment in a variety of human 
services agencies. 

Students who major in psychology find 
primary employment opportunities in 
personnel management, elementary and 
secondary high school education, social 
work, software and other product develop- 
ment. Higher level psychological activities, 
such as counseling psychotherapy, university 
instruction, psychological research (in 
industry, universities, and research centers) 
and various administrative mental health 
positions generally require a master's degree 
or preferably a doctorate in psychology. 

The department also offers a graduate 
program in psychology leading to a master 
of arts degree, with distinct clinical and 
research options. 



Victor P. Caliri counseling and organiza- 
tional psychology, humanistic and health 
psychology, psychology of religion 

LynnTondat Ruggeri physiological 
psychology, recovery following neural 
damage, and psychopharmacology 

John Caruso general psychology, human 
learning and cognition, sport psychology 

John K. Conboy child and family psycho- 
therapy, psychological assessment, sports 
psychology, child neuropsychology counsel- 
ing 

Donald Corriveau (chairperson) clinical 
research, counseling, behavioral medicine 

Paul A. Donnelly counseling psychology, 
treatment of adolescent and criminal 
offenders 

Susan Egan developmental psychology, 
gender development 

Morton H. Elfenbein social psychology, 
group and organizational behavior, 
evaluation research, epistemology 

Barry R. Haimson psychophysiology and 
perception 

Mahzad Hojjat social psychology, multicul- 
tural psychology 

William R. Holt general psychology, 
behavioral and quantitative psychology, 
developmental psychology 

Theodore A. Powers clinical training, 
personality disorders, online counseling 

James B. Riley behavior modification and 
community psychology 

Amy M. Shapiro (on leave) human learning 
and memory, educational technology, and 
psycholinguistics 

Judith E. Sims-Knight cognitive and 
developmental psychology, human-computer 
interaction 



GPA Requirements 

The Psychology Department has a GPA 
requirement that varies with the number of 
credit hours completed (see below). Failure 
to maintain the minimum grade point 
average will mean Departmental Probation. 
Following two consecutive semesters with a 
GPA below what is required, the student 
will no longer be allowed to register for 
courses designated for psychology majors 
only. 

Number of credit hours/GPA 
15/1.900 60/2.350 
30/2.050 75/2.425 
45/2.200 90/2.500 



Major Requirements 

Psychology majors must fulfill requirements 
listed below. Students must have a C- or 
better in any psychology course taken to 
meet the requirements listed in the Required 
Courses and the Area Requirements, 
including Area 5 PSY electives. 

All psychology majors are required to 
complete successfully General Psychology 
(PSY 101), Statistics (PSY 205), and 
Experimental Methods (PSY 210). In addition 
twenty-one credits must be taken among 
the five areas listed in the requirements 
section. This system is designed for the 
student who wishes to obtain a broad liberal 
education in the field. Students should plan 
to complete General, Statistics, Experimental 
Methods, and their choice from Area 1 
(Child or Adolescent Psychology) by the end 
of sophomore year. Available as electives is 
a three-course counseling sequence, PSY 
406, 407 and 480, which introduces 
students to some of the applied aspects of 
psychology. In addition, students who have 
interests in research and are considering 
eventual graduate education in psychology 
may apply to pursue Honors Research. Both 
of the above options are available for 
students interested in pursuing clinical 
research. Students may also participate in 
the Cognitive Science Program, the 
interdisciplinary study of issues of the 
human mind and its applications to effective 
design (of educational curriculum and 
experiences, computer software, books, and 
other products.) 



166 



Required Courses 



Psychology Courses 



Credits 



PSY 101 General Psychology 3 
PSY 205 Statistics for Psychology 4 
PSY 210 Experimental Methods 4 

Area Requirements 

Area 1: Choose one of the following: 

PSY 201 Child Psychology 3 
PSY 215 Adolescent Psychology 

Area 2: Choose two of the following: 

PSY 202 Abnormal Psychology 6 
PSY 204 Social Psychology 
PSY 302 Psychological Testing 

Area 3: Choose one of the following: 

PSY 305 Physiological Psychology 3 
PSY 320 Psychology of Perception 

Area 4: Choose one of the following: 

PSY 303 Psychology of Learning 3 
PSY 308 Cognitive Processes 

Area 5: Choose at least two upper-level 
electives, excluding contract learning: 

Psychology electives 300-level and above 6 

Total 32 



Psychology Honors Program 

The Psychology Department participates in 
the university honors program by offering 
honors sections of general psychology, and 
it also has a departmental honors program. 

The psychology honors program is designed 
to provide psychology students with the 
opportunity to engage in independent 
research. It is recommended for all students 
who wish to pursue a PhD degree, whether 
in an experimental or applied area. THonors 
students typically have GPAs over 3.0, but 
admission to the honors program is based 
on overall potential and motivation rather 
than on grade point average alone. 

The sequence begins in the junior year with 
the identification of a research topic and a 
faculty advisor. Beginning in their junior year 
or in the first semester of their senior year 
honors students carry out an original 
research project by enrolling in an eight 
credit honors research seminar. 



General Education Departmental 
Requirements 

Students majoring in Psychology will meet 
their departmentally-controlled General 
Education requirements as follows: 

Area E: Satisfied by three of the following: 

PSY 101, 202, 204, 210, 302, 406, 490 
Area I, Tier 2: Satisfied by PSY 205 
Area W, Tier 2 : Satisfied by PSY 2 1 
Area O: Satisfied by PSY 2 1 0, 490 (both 
must be taken) 



PSY 101 three credits 
General Psychology 

A broad survey of principles underlying the 
systematic study of behavior. Using 
examples from basic research and applied 
settings, a variety of perspectives are 
explored, including findings associated with 
the physiological, behavioral, cognitive, 
developmental and social approaches. 

PSY 201 three credits 
Child Psychology 

Prerequisite: PSY 101 

A study of the child from both the develop- 
mental and experimental approaches. Topics 
that may be included are methodology in 
child research, heredity and environment 
controversy, intelligence, language and 
communication, learning in infancy and 
childhood, and motor, cognitive, perceptual, 
personality, and social development. This 
course meets the Massachusetts Office for 
Children requirement for day care center 
certification, OFC Category A, Child Growth 
and Development. 

PSY 202 three credits 
Abnormal Psychology 

Prerequisite: PSY 101 

Study of development and characteristics of 
behavior disorders. Topics to be considered 
include: cause of abnormal behavior, 
transient personality reaction to acute or 
special stress, psychoneurotic disorders, and 
therapeutic measures. 

PSY 204 three credits G 
Social Psychology 

Prerequisite: PSY 101 

The study of experimental findings, 

theoretical and methodological issues in 

understanding the individual in a social 

context. 

PSY 205 four credits W 
Statistics for Psychology 

Prerequisite: PSY 101 

An introduction to analysis of quantitative 
data in psychology, including probability, 
descriptive statistics, correlation and 
regression, analysis of variance and data 
analysis by computer. 

PSY 210 four credits W, O 
Research Methods 

Prerequisites: PSY 101, 205 
An introduction to the design, administra- 
tion and analysis of psychology experiments, 
and other types of research including 
computer applications. Emphasis also on 
evaluation of research and scientific report 
writing. 



167 



College of Arts and Sciences 



PSY 215 three credits 
Adolescent Psychology 

Prerequisite: PSY 101 

A survey of theories of adolescent personal- 
ity development, psychopathology and 
current issues in the field. 

PSY 298 one to six credits 
Experiential Learning 

Prerequisites: At least sophomore standing; 
permission of the instructor, department 
chairperson, and college dean 
Work experience at an elective level 
supervised for academic credit by a faculty 
member in an appropriate academic field. 
Conditions and hours to be arranged. 
Graded CR/NC. For specific procedures and 
regulations, see section of catalogue on 
Other Learning Experiences. 

PSY 301 three credits 

Psychology of Adulthood and Aging 

Prerequisites: PSY 101, 201 or 21 5 
A study of normative adult life transforma- 
tions and crises within the context of cultural 
diversity and empowerment. Students will 
investigate culture, gender, and ethnicity 
patterns. Topics include methodology; 
developmental theories of adulthood; 
physical and cognitive changes in adulthood; 
changing societal, familial, and occupational 
roles in adulthood; changes in personality 
and responses to stress in adult lives; and 
dying as the final stage of development. 

PSY 302 three credits 
Psychological Testing 

Prerequisites: PSY 101, 205 
An introduction to basic principles and 
techniques of psychological testing, and a 
study of the major types of tests. 

PSY 303 three credits 
Psychology of Learning 

Prerequisites: PSY 101, 205, 210 

A survey of learning principles from simple 

conditioning to complex creative behavior. 

PSY 305 three credits 
Physiological Psychology 

Prerequisites: PSY 101, 205, 210; basic 
biology recommended 
The study of the biological basis of 
behavior. Course covers basic principles of 
neurophysiology, neuroanatomy, neurop- 
harmacology. This course also covers 
biological bases of abnormal behavior, drug 
addiction, visual processing and sleep 
mechanisms. 

PSY 308 three credits 
Cognitive Processes 



Prerequisites: PSY 101, 205, 210 
A history of cognitive science as a discipline. 
Topics such as human learning, memory, 
perception, language, and attention are 
reviewed. Theories and research on mental 
processes underlying these behaviors are 
studied. Biological underpinnings and real- 
life application of these topics are also 
discussed. 

PSY 312 three credits 
Organizational Behavior 

Prerequisite: PSY 101 

A review of historical and current psycho- 
logical theories and empirical data concern- 
ing organizational behavior through lectures 
and experiential learning groups. 

PSY 320 three credits 
Psychology of Perception 

Prerequisites: PSY 101, 205, 210; basic 
biology recommended 

An overview of research methods and results 
in the area of perception. Special emphasis 
on role of stimulus variables and attention 
on the perceptual constancies, color, size, 
form, and space perception. 

PSY 323 three credits 
Psychology of Adjustment 

Prerequisites: PSY 101, 202, junior standing 
A study of the ways in which people adjust 
to the complex problems of mental health 
and behavioral dysfunction. The emphasis is 
on psychosocial models and developmental 
perspectives rather than medical disease 
models. Psychoanalytic and behavioral 
approaches are contrasted with humanistic- 
existential concepts. Various strategies and 
approaches for coping with maladaptive and 
dysfunctional conditions including depres- 
sion, anxiety, and alcohol and drug abuse 
are reviewed. This course does not fulfill the 
upper level psychology requirement for 
psychology majors. 

PSY 330 three credits 
Personality Theory 

Prerequisites: PSY 101, 202, junior or senior 
psychology major 

Study of personality structure and develop- 
ment through analysis of the theoretical 
contributions of major personologists. 

PSY 333 three credits 
Psychology in Sports 

Prerequisites: PSY 101, 205, 210; or 
permission of instructor 
Investigates behavior in high-level competi- 
tive sports and noncompetitive sport 
activities. Study in the field, which has 
theoretical, applied and clinical aspects, 



focuses on athletes, coaches, teams, and 
spectators. 

PSY 370 three credits 
Group Dynamics 

Prerequisites: PSY 101, 205, 210 
Group dynamics as both an experiential 
activity and an empirical science. This course 
includes a sensitivity training group. 

PSY 375 three credits E, D 
Psychology of Sex Differences 

Prerequisites: PSY 101, 205, 210 
Development of sex differences, socializa- 
tion practices, attitudes, values and role 
expectations which affect the self-concept 
and interpersonal relationships. This course 
is designed to stimulate discussion among 
men as well as women. 

PSY 406 three credits 
Counseling I 

Prerequisites: PSY 101, 202, 330 
Introduction to philosophies, theories and 
techniques of counseling, and demonstra- 
tions of various psychotherapeutic methods. 
This course is best taken in the spring of the 
junior year, so students have the option of 
taking PSY 407 and PSY 480 in sequence in 
the senior year. 

PSY 407 three credits 
Counseling II 

Prerequisites: PSY 406, and permission of 
instructor 

Continuation of PSY 406, plus tape 
experiences and supervised practicum 
experiences. 

PSY 409 three credits 
Community Psychology 

Prerequisites: PSY 101, and any three 
among PSY 201, 202, 215, 330, 406 
A survey of the theories, techniques, and 
goals of community psychology, particularly 
as they relate to the community mental 
health movement. 

PSY 416 three credits 
Seminar in Psychopathology 

The nature of psychopathology as an 
evolving set of constructs rooted in a matrix 
of cultural, biological and behavioral 
variables. Using the American Psychiatric 
Association's Diagnostic and Statistical 
Manual (DSM) criteria to define and order 
groupings of mental disorders, students 
study a broad range of issues relating to the 
diagnosis of psychopathological conditions. 

PSY 418 three credits 
Behavior Modification 



168 



Prerequisites: PSY 101, 205, 210, 303 
The course begins with a discussion of 
ethical standards relevant to the modifica- 
tion of human behavior. Psychodynamic 
theory is reprised to provide a contrasting 
theoretical perspective to the therapeutic 
uses of behavior modification techniques. 
Classical and operant conditioning 
procedures are reviewed. 

PSY 455 three credits 
Psychology of Religion 

Prerequisites: PSY 101, 202, 330, junior 
standing; or permission of instructor 
Comprehensive multicultural study of the 
value systems of the major religions (e.g. 
Judaism, Christianity, Islam) along with the 
study of other religions and cults and their 
psychological impact on human behavior. 
Included is the study of agnosticism and 
atheism and their influence on the 
development of human values and 
behavior. This course consists of lectures, 
seminar presentations, and research papers. 

PSY 480 three credits 
Field Work in Counseling 
Psychology 

Prerequisites: PSY 202, 302, 370, 406, 407, 
and permission of instructor 
A practical one day a week assignment in a 
cooperating state or private mental health 
facility. Where permitted, students will 
participate in learning about counseling, 
interviewing, referral and some evaluation 
techniques. On-site and departmental 
supervision is required, with a detailed final 
report. 

PSY 490 variable credits O, W 
Special Topics in Psychology 

Prerequisites: PSY 101, 205, 210, and other 
upper level courses depending on topic 
Advanced seminar usually offered for one 
semester on a special topic. Check course 
schedule for special topics seminars. 
Examples of special topic courses recently 
offered include: Human-Computer 
Interaction, Psychopharmacology. 

PSY 495 variable credits 
Independent Study 

Prerequisites: PSY 101, 205, 210 and other 
upper level courses; and permission of 
instructor 

Students independently pursue an individual 
research project, under the supervision of a 
faculty advisor. 

PSY 498 four credits 
Honors Project I 



Prerequisites: PSY 101, 205, 210, appropri- 
ate upper-level courses, and permission of 
faculty advisor and course instructor 
The first course in the two-course honors 
thesis sequence. Students meet weekly with 
their thesis advisors on an individual basis 
and weekly as an honors seminar group. 
During the seminar the honors faculty 
discuss with the students the general issues 
of developing a thesis and during the 
individual meetings with the faculty advisor 
individual issue and problems are discussed. 
The goal of this course is to develop a thesis 
proposal and complete the preparation 
necessary to conduct the thesis project 
during the next semester. The optimal time 
to take this course is the spring of junior 
year, but it may also be taken in the fall of 
senior year. 

PSY 499 four credits 
Honors Project II 

Prerequisite: PSY 498 

Continuation of PSY 498. The goal of this 

course is to conduct, analyze, and write up 

the research described in the thesis proposal. 

Students will meet regularly with their thesis 

advisors. 



Course for the Master of Arts in 
Teaching 

PSY 609 three credits 
Early/Middle Adolescence 

Prerequisite: An undergraduate course in 
child or adolescent psychology or its 
equivalent 

What makes young adolescents distinctly 
different-such as issues of puberty, 
conformity, burgeoning intellectual powers. 
Of particular concern are two issues: (a) 
evaluating the validity of the research that 
provides us with our knowledge of them, 
and (b) exploring how to apply our 
knowledge to effective practice both in 
formal and informal settings. 



169 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Note: Some graduate courses may be open 
to undergraduates Please consult your 
department chairperson See the Graduate 
Catalogue for graduate general and 
program requirements. 



Graduate Courses in Psychology 

PSY 501 three credits 

Physiology, Psychology, and Psychop- 

harmacology 

Advanced study of the physiology of the 
nervous system and the workings of the 
brain. Included is a working understanding 
of psychopharmacology in present day use. 
Practical application, side effects, and uses 
of medication in the mental health field 
today are of specific concern. 

PSY 503 three credits 
Advanced Psychopathology 

Theories of abnormal psychology, in an 
advanced study of the major forms of 
psychopathology. Students will be exposed 
to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of 
Mental Disorders (American Psychiatric 
Association). Case studies and therapeutic 
intervention strategies will be emphasized. 

PSY 505 three credits 
Research Methods and Design 

Prerequisites: A statistics course and 
permission of instructor 
Integrates research design, data analysis, 
data interpretation, and APA format report 
writing across the two dominant paradigms 
in contemporary psychology. The course 
includes the use of the SPSS statistical 
software for univariate parametric and some 
non-parametric models. The course contains 
a strong experiential component to prepare 
students for thesis writing. 

PSY 506 three credits 
Advanced Research Design 

Prerequisite: PSY 505 or permission of 
instructor 

In-depth study of statistics in psychological 
research. Major topics include regression 
and structural equation models. 

PSY 510 three credits 

Seminar in Helping Relationships 

Prerequisites: Graduate status and permission 
of instructor 

Major approaches to supportive and 
therapeutic interventions employed by 
psychologists to help others. Core theoretical 
constructs and basic counseling techniques 
are emphasized. This course fulfills a portion 
of the Mental Health Counselors license 
requirement. 

PSY 511 three credits 
Theories of Psychotherapy 

The major counseling theories explored in 
an academic and experiential format. Role 
playing and videotaping are used. Theories 



discussed include reality therapy, behavior 
therapy, rational emotive therapy, gestalt 
therapy, transactional analysis, client- 
centered therapy, and the psychoanalytic 
model. 

PSY 512 three credits 
Evaluation Techniques 

Traditional components of psychological 
testing, including test construction, test 
development, test administration and test 
interpretation, and specific training in 
frequently administered clinical tests (e.g., 
MMPI, WAIS and WISC). Beyond traditional 
test theory, students will be exposed to 
contemporary evaluation devices including 
behavioral assessment, interview data, and 
naturalistic observation. 

PSY 513 three credits 
Seminar: Topics 

Pre- or Corequisite: PSY 506 
In-depth seminar on selected topics in a field 
of psychology. A few specific topics will be 
examined in depth — the historical roots, 
theories, and current research approaches. 
Two areas are offered in alternate years: 
personality and psychopathology; cognition. 
One of the primary goals of this course is to 
prepare students for PSY 514, in which 
knowledge gained in this course will be 
used to conduct research projects. 

PSY 514 three credits 
Research Techniques: Topics 

Prerequisites: PSY 506, PSY 513 
Research techniques in the context of 
specific topics studied in the associated 
seminar. Two areas are offered in alternate 
years: personality and psychopathology; 
cognition. The course will include both 
formal and hands-on work. 

PSY 515 three credits 

Human Growth and Development 

Prerequisite: Psychology graduate status 
The nature of normative transitions across 
the life span. The course fosters an under- 
standing of change from conception through 
death. Special emphasis is given to both 
cognitive and behavioral theories as well as 
supporting research. This course fulfills a 
portion of the Mental Health Counselors 
license requirement. 

PSY 516 three credits 

Social and Cultural Foundations 

Prerequisite: Psychology graduate status 
Nature and dynamics of interpersonal group 
relations as they occur within a multicultural 
context. Students will study relations among 
diverse ethnic, racial, and cultural groups in 



the United States and globally. The course 
looks at cross-cultural relations from an 
interdisciplinary perspective, considering 
psychological, sociological, and historical 
factors; considers several relevant issues m 
counseling from a multicultural perspective, 
and studies specific cultural groups in the 
context of therapy issues. This course fulfills a 
portion of the Mental Health Counselors 
license requirement. 

PSY 517 three credits 

Psychology of Close Relationships 

Seminar in the study of close relationships. 
Students will study existing research and 
learn to think critically about the underlying 
theory and research. Major emphasis is 
placed on romantic relationships. 

PSY 521 three credits 

Behavior Modification and Behavior 

Therapy 

Basic principles of learning as theoretical 
underpinnings of contemporary applied 
behavioral psychology. Behavior change 
techniques derived from learning theory 
widely used in clinical, education, recre- 
ational, and family settings will be exam- 
ined, and individual group applications 
compared and contrasted. 

PSY 522 three credits 

Behavioral Family and Group Counseling 

Detailed analysis of the function and 
structure of the family unit. The academic 
component includes topics such as family 
systems, behavioral contracting, networking, 
family sculpting, power, control, setting 
behavioral goals, the double bind, the 
identified patient, groups as a system, and 
the structuralist approach. The experiential 
component involves the inter-generational 
family tree, role playing diagnosis, and 
evaluation of actual families. 

PSY 523 three credits 
Behavioral Medicine 

An interdisciplinary approach to health and 
illness. Particular emphasis is placed on the 
interface of psychology and other allied 
disciplines with traditional medical ap- 
proaches. Students are introduced to 
medical psychology as a profession and 
exposed to practical applications including 
stress management and biofeedback 
training. 

PSY 524 three credits 

Advanced Behavior Modification and 

Behavior Therapy 

Theoretical and functional considerations for 
the design and implementation of effective 



170 



behavior programming. Through readings 
and analysis of case studies, students gain 
familiarity with the theoretical and applied 
principles of behavior modification and 
therapy. 

PSY 570 three credits 
Advanced Group Processes 

Prerequisite: Psychology graduate status 
Theoretical, research, and experiential aspects 
of the study of group processes or group 
dynamics. The course examines applications 
of theory and research in settings such as 
organizations, organizational development, 
and group therapy and uses lecture, student 
seminar presentations, and class experiential 
self-analytic group activities. This course 
fulfills a portion of the Mental Health 
Counselors license requirement. 

PSY 575 three credits 
Lifestyle, School, and Career Develop- 
ment 

Explores the impact of diverse lifestyles on 
mental health issues and academic and 
vocational adjustment. The course examines 
the effect of culture, gender, ethnicity, race, 
socioeconomic stature, and sexual orientation 
on psychotherapy, assessment, and academic 
and vocational adjustment. Special emphasis 
is given to cultural differences, alternative 
lifestyles, gay and lesbian issues, family 
patterns, fairness in testing, the "Bell Curve" 
debate, career counseling, and the relation- 
ship between cultural norms and 
psycopathology. This course fulfills a portion 
of the Mental Health Counselors license 
requirement. 

PSY 580 three credits 
Graduate Seminar in Psychology 

Graduate seminar offered for one semester 
on a specific topic. Topics vary according to 
student needs and faculty expertise in 
particular areas of study. 

PSY 589 four credits 
Graduate Practicum 

Prerequisite: Departmental permission 
A distinctly defined, pre-internship, 
supervised curricular experience. Course 
requirements include Massachusetts 
licensing requirements for Master's level 
mental health counselors. Students provide 
direct service with a clientele appropriate to 
the program emphasis. Classroom work 
includes role plays or other laboratory 
experiences. Students are provided with 
both individual and group supervision 
experiences. 

PSY 590 variable credits 



Field Experience 

Prerequisite: Departmental permission; 
Corequisites: PSY 511, PSY 512, or PSY 522 
Placement at area mental health facilities, 
involving students in the practical application 
of the theories being studied in the 
classroom. The placements vary according to 
the specific course being taken conjointly. 

PSY 591, PSY 592 four credits each 
Internship!, II 

Prerequisite: Departmental permission 
Application of skills acquired through 
classroom work through internship 
placements. Students will be placed in 
mental health agencies and will receive 
extensive supervision. 

PSY 593 variable credits 
Seminar in Clinical Methods 

Review of research in a major clinical area, 
for third year graduate students. Students 
create an in-depth review of the literature, 
culminating in a final project that is 
presented to two graduate faculty for 
review. 

PSY 594 variable credits 

Seminar in Professional and Ethical 

Issues 

Advanced seminar on legal, ethical, 
professional, and moral issues facing mental 
health practitioners. Aspects of testing, 
assessment, psychotherapy, and psychopa- 
thology theory will be central issues. The 
course culminates in a written or oral exam 
testing application of clinical knowledge, 
ethical, and legal issues through a clinical 
case study model. 

PSY 595 three credits 
Independent Study 

Prerequisites: Permission of instructor, 
graduate director, and college dean 
Independent pursuit of an individual 
research project under the supervision of a 
faculty sponsor. 

PSY 596 variable credits; typically six 
Graduate Thesis 

Prerequisite: Departmental permission 
Student develops and executes an indepen- 
dent research thesis under the direction of a 
faculty advisor. Graded A-F. 



171 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Sociology and Anthropology 



Sociology Major 

BA degree 



Faculty and Fields of Interest 



The department's primary focus is the study 
of human beings and the analysis of 
collective action and the socio-cultural 
settings in which it occurs. The department 
offers courses in sociology, anthropology, 
social work, and a number of courses that 
are primarily interdisciplinary in nature. 
Sociology is the study of social behavior in 
its different forms. It is the study of whole 
societies and their basic institutions (e.g. 
religion). It also studies human groups on a 
smaller scale such as the family, peer group, 
and neighborhood. 

Anthropology and sociology overlap 
somewhat, although an anthropologist is 
more likely to study non-western societies 
and to emphasize more the biological base 
of human behavior, human evolution, and a 
society's ethos. Social work is the applica- 
tion of concepts from disciplines such as 
sociology, psychology, and anthropology to 
an area of concern in modern society. Social 
work and social action growing out of the 
basic disciplines (above) increasingly 
attempt not only to study and treat but 
create new social realities. 

A major in this department may be chosen 
for the inherent satisfaction that the 
knowledge of it provides. It also may be the 
foundation for social action or for graduate 
work. 



Jane Hilowitz American society, European 
society 

Toby E. Huff sociology of law, science and 
religion; quantitative studies of American 
society; theory; the Muslim World, globaliza- 
tion, and the Internet 

Andrea C. Klimt sociocultural anthropol- 
ogy, construction of identity, Europe, 
contemporary US, Portuguese diaspore, 
medical anthropology, migration and 
transnationalism 

Susan Krumholz (coordinator, criminal 
justice) criminal justice, theories of crime, 
domestic violence, policing 

Yale R. Magrass social theory, historical 
and political sociology, methodology, social 
impact of science and technology 

Larry M. Miller (co-chairperson) historical 
sociology, Meso-America, social theory, 
sociology of art and literature, social 
education 

Thomas K. Ranuga third world studies, 
social movements, comparative ethnic 
relations 

R. Penn Reeve (co-chairperson) cultural 
anthropology, social inequality, race and 
ethnicity, gay and lesbian studies 

Jack Stauder anthropology, marriage and 
family, social change, morality and human 
nature, environmental issues, ranching and 
the American West 



Students are offered, in addition to the 
many selections in general sociology, three 
major options, the option in anthropology, 
the option in criminal justice, and the option 
in social services. 

The courses listed "SOC or ANT" are 
courses that bridge the fields of sociology 
and anthropology. Students may elect to 
gain credit in either field by registering in 
the course and selecting one prefix. 
Anthropology credits can be counted 
toward a sociology major. 

Students must have a 2.0 cumulative grade 
point average to be accepted into the major 
and must maintain a 2.5 GPA in major 
courses in order to graduate with a 
sociology major. 



172 



Sociology Major Sociology Major 

General Option Option in Anthropology 



Requirements Requirements 



Sociology Major Common Departmental 
Distribution Requirement 

To expose sociology majors to important 
subject areas in the field and offer organiza- 
tion and coherence to their choices, we 
require one course from each of the follow- 
ing four areas. This departmental distribu- 
tion requirement is to be met within the 
requirements and electives of the student's 
sociology major or option. Courses which 
have not been included (special topics, 
readings courses, independent study) may 
be substituted for courses in the various 
areas, where appropriate and with approval 
of the student's advisor. New courses may 
be added to each of the three areas as 
appropriate, again with approval. 

All majors are required to complete one 
course from each of the three categories. 

Cultural and Social Institutions 

SOC 102 Social Problems 
SOC 164 Environmental Issues 
SOC 167 The Human Environment 
SOC 203 Social Welfare Policy 
SOC 209 Sociology of Life, Death, and 

Meaning 
SOC 220 Social Change 
SOC/ANT 268 Environmental Issues 
SOC 301 Sociology of Work 
SOC 302 Sociology of Art 
SOC 312 Deviant Behavior 
SOC 323 Morality and Society 
SOC 325 Sex, Marriage, and Family 
SOC 341 Community Organization 
SOC 342 Organization of Criminal Behavior 
SOC 350 Culture and the Experience of 

Nature (Reading Course) 
SOC 351 Landscape and Gardens (Reading 

Course) 

Designs of the Living World 

(Reading Course) 
SOC 357 Justice and Society 
SOC 381 Social Impact Science/Technology 

Difference and Social Inequality 

SOC 305 Political Sociology 

SOC 230 Black Identity & the Social World 

SOC/ANT 300 Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual 

Identity and Culture 
SOC 310 Social Movements 
SOC 330 Blacks and Whites in America 
SOC 336 Women and Social Policy 
SOC/ANT 337 Comparative Ethic Relations 
SOC 351 The Black Family (Reading Course) 
SOC 356 Wealth, Status, Power in America 

Continued in column to right 



Majors are required to take 30 credits in the 
department, including 12 upper-division 
credits. 

Credits 

SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology OR 3 
ANT 1 1 1 Cultural Anthropology OR 
SOC/ANT 113 Intro, to Social and Cultural 
Behavior 

Methods Requirement 3 

SOC 206 Intro, to Research Methods OR 
SOC/ANT 401 Research Methods 

Theory Requirement 3 

SOC 200 Intro, to Social Thought OR 
SOC 358 Criminological Theory OR 
SOC 402 Sociological Theory OR 
ANT 405 Anthropological Theory 



Electives in Sociology or Anthropology 21 

Total 30 Methods requirement 



This option introduces students to the 
anthropological perspective: the physical 
and cultural evolution of the human species; 
prehistoric cultures, comparison of cultures 
from different parts of the world. Intended 
for students interested in a cross-cultural 
world perspective as a sound basis of a 
liberal arts education and/or as preparation 
for graduate school in anthropology or 
employment in a variety of fields. 

Majors are required to take 30 credits in the 
department, including 12 upper-division 
credits. 

Credits 

ANT 1 10 Intro, to Physical Anthropology 3 
ANT 1 1 1 Intro, to Cultural Anthropology 3 
ANT 261 Introduction to Archeology I 3 

Theory requirement 3 

ANT 405 Anthropological Theory OR 
SOC 200 Intro, to Social Thought 



SOC/ANT 206 Intro. Research Meth. OR 
SOC/ANT 401 Research Methods OR 
SOC/ANT 407 Field Inquiry 

Electives in sociology or anthropology 1 5 

Total 30 



Comparative Cultures and Global Issues 

ANT 111 Introduction to Cultural 

Anthropology 
SOC/ANT 113 Introduction to Cultural and 

Social Behavior 
SOC/ANT 160 Cultural Evolution 
SOC 205 Indust. Society & Human Problems 
SOC.ANT 327 Myth and Ritual 
SOC/ANT 332 Portuguese in the Americas 
SOC 334 Sociology of Food 
SOC 340 Law and Society 
SOC 350 Women and Islam (Reading 

Course) 

SOC/ANT 351 Health, Disease, and Curing 

(Reading Course) 
SOC/ANT 361 Peoples and Cultures of 

Europe 

SOC/ANT 363 Environment and 

Development 
ANT 372 Peace Studies 



General Education Departmental 
Requirements 

Students majoring in Sociology and 
Anthropology will meet their departmen- 
tally-controlled General Education 
requirements as follows: 

Area E: Students will select a course from 

approved list 
Area I, Tier 2: TBD 
Area W, Tier 2: Students will select a 

course from the approved list 
Area O: Students select a course from 

approved list 



173 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Sociology Major 

Option in Criminal Justice 



Requirements 

Credits 



The program in criminal justice is an 
interdisciplinary concentration grounded in 
the liberal arts tradition. It draws on the full 
range of the university's resources to give 
students new opportunities to combine a 
university education with enhanced avenues 
for career advancement and public service. 

Students wishing to chose this option should 
consult a faculty advisor in the Department 
of Sociology and Anthropology. 

In addition to providing a university 
education for students who aspire to serve in 
the criminal justice system, UMass 
Dartmouth's program seeks to foster an 
understanding of the role of criminal justice 
systems in democratic societies. The intent of 
the training is to study the whole range of 
criminal justice activities and agencies which 
extend from the commission of criminal acts, 
the police and the courts, to probation, 
parole, and the social service system. Efforts 
have also been made to incorporate 
comparative and historical perspectives 
which focus on the processes which give rise 
to legal and extra-legal activities. Courses in 
counseling, as well as probation and parole, 
will form an integral part of the program. 

All "pre-service" students will be required to 
take a one-semester internship. The student 
will be placed in a relevant position in the 
criminal justice system, such as a parole 
office, court, or correctional institution, and 
his or her experience will be supervised by a 
UMass Dartmouth faculty member. 

Students with one or more years of working 
experience in the criminal justice system will 
substitute SOC 400 (Special Topics) or SOC 
495 (Independent Study) for the Internship 
upon the recommendation of the Chairper- 
son of the Department. 



Required Core Courses 
Introductory Requirement 

SOC 1 01 Introduction to Sociology OR 

ANT 1 1 1 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology OR 

SOC/ANT 1 1 3 Introduction to Social/Cultural Behavior 

Theory Requirement 

SOC 200 Introduction to Social Thought 

Methods Requirement 

SOC/ANT 206 Research Methods OR 
SOC/ANT 401 Research Methods 

Required Core Courses 

SOC 190 Introduction to Criminal Justice 

SOC 270 Criminal Due Process 

SOC 358 Criminology 
SOC 400 Special Topics 

SOC 450 Internship 

Two courses from Group I - Systems 

SOC 305 Political Sociology 

SOC 310 Social Movements 

SOC 323 Morality and Society 

SOC 340 Law and Society 

SOC 357 Justice and Society 

Two courses from Group II - Context 

SOC 203 Social Work I 

SOC 342 Organization of Criminal Behavior 

PHL 326 Philosophy of Law 

PSY 202 Abnormal Psychology 

PSY 406 Counseling 

Two courses from Group III - Multicultural 

SOC 330 Black and White in America 

SOC 332 Portuguese in the Americas 

SOC 336 Women and Social Policy 

SOC 337 Comparative Ethnic Relations 

SOC 356 Wealth, Status, and Power 



15 



Total 



42 



Other courses may be substituted at the discretion of the Coordinator for the Criminal 
Justice Option 



174 



Sociology Major 

Option in Social Services 



Note: As of fall 2002 and until further 
notice, the Social Services option is closed 
to new entrants. 



Requirements 



Credits 



The Social Services option provides students 
with the knowledge to confront the social 
issues and problems that social workers 
encounter in their work and to analyze them 
in a broad social, political, and economic 
context. The option helps to develop the 
beginning skills necessary to provide services 
and includes the study of the functions and 
characteristics of the social services in our 
society; exploration of the personal and 
social values that influence our work with 
people in a helping relationship; practitioner 
roles and methods of social intervention; 
and practical "hands-on" experience 
working in social service agencies. The 
option is intended for students planning to 
enter the social service profession or 
graduate studies in social work. 



Majors are required to take 33 credits in the department, including 12 upper-division credits. 
Students select courses within the following clusters: 

Introductory Requirement 3 

SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology OR 

ANT 1 1 1 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology OR 

SOC/ANT 1 1 3 Introduction to Social/Cultural Behavior 

Theory Requirement 3 
SOC 200 Introduction to Social Thought OR 

SOC 402 Sociological Theory OR 

ANT 405 Anthropological Theory 

Methods Requirement 3 
SOC 206 Research Methods OR 

SOC 401 Research Methods 

Area I: The Context of Social Welfare' 
Sociology, 9 credits selected from the following 



SOC 205 Industrial Society and Human Problems 9 

SOC 305 Political Sociology 

SOC 312 Deviant Behavior 

SOC 356 Wealth, Status and Power in America 

SOC 357 Justice and Society 



Note: Most of these courses require an introductory sociology course as a prerequisite. 



Psychology, 6 credits selected from the following* 6 

PSY201 Child Psychology 

PSY 202 Abnormal Psychology 

PSY 2 1 5 Adolescent Psychology 

PSY 323 Psychology of Adjustment 

PSY 330 Personality Theory 

PSY 406 Counseling I 



Note: PSY 101 is a prerequisite for all of these courses. 



Area II: Issues of Race, Gender, and Ethnicity, 6 credits 
selected from the following* 

SOC 230 Black Identity and the Social World 

SOC 336 Women and Social Policy OR 

WMS 101 Introduction to Women's Studies 

WMS 1 10 Women in Contemporary Society 

SOC/ANT 337 Comparative Ethnic Relations 



Social Welfare and the Social Services — 9 credits 9 
SOC 203 Social Welfare Policy 

SOC 341 Community Organizing 

SOC 355 Social Work Practice 



Area lit. Social Work Practice — 3 credits 3 

SOC 408 Social Service Internship 

Note: Students must first complete SOC 203, 341, and 355. 



Total 42 



*Courses can be substituted for those listed in Areas I and II above with permission of the 
program coordinator. , 



175 



College of Arts and Sciences 



Sociology Minor 



Sociology/Anthropology 
Courses 



A student can request entrance to the minor 
program in sociology after completing at 
least 54 credits with a cumulative grade 
point average of 2.0 and with at least a 2.5 
grade point average in his/her major. 
Requests must be approved by the 
chairperson of the Sociology/Anthropology 
Department. 

Requirements 

The minor in sociology requires completion 
of at least 1 8 credits, of which 9 must be at 
the upper division level. Three courses (as in 
the major) will be taken which include 
Introductory level courses (SOC 101, ANT 
1 1 1 , or SOC/ANT 1 1 3), a theory course 
(SOC 200, ANT 208, SOC 402, or ANT 405), 
and a methods course (SOC 206 or SOC 
401 or equivalent methods course in 
Economics, Political Science, or Psychology), 
plus three upper-division sociology or 
anthropology courses. All anthropology 
courses can count for the Sociology minor, 
as they do for the major. 



Anthropology Minor 



A student can request entrance to the minor 
program in anthropology after completing 
at least 54 credits with a cumulative grade 
point average of 2.0 and with a 2.5 grade 
point average in his/her major. Requests 
must be approved by the chairperson of the 
Sociology/Anthropology Department. 

The department also offers an option in 
social anthropology for sociology majors. 

Requirements 

The minor in anthropology requires 
completion of at least 18 credits, of which 9 
must be at the upper division level. 
Specifically, they will include ANT 111, 
either ANT 1 1 or ANT 261 ; ANT 208 or 
ANT 405; and three additional upper level 
courses Sociology/Anthropology or 
Anthropology electives. 



SOC 101 three credits D 
Introduction to Sociology 

A survey of the fundamental principles of 
sociology and the basic factors conditioning 
social behavior. 

SOC 102 three credits 
Social Problems 

A survey of various social problems in the 
contemporary world. Special emphasis will 
be placed upon analysis of social problems 
in American society. 

ANT 110 three credits 
Introduction to Physical 
Anthropology 

A survey of the fundamental concepts of the 
science of human beings. This course 
concentrates upon the physical evolution of 
the human species, the comparison of the 
behavior of currently existing primates, and 
interdisciplinary searches into topical 
questions such as the evolution and nature 
of aggression and/or hierarchy and 
dominance. 

ANT 111 three credits G 
Introduction to Cultural 
Anthropology 

An introduction to the basic concepts of 
social and cultural anthropology. Readings 
emphasize the comparative study of 
societies at different levels of socio-cultural 
integration and from different areas of the 
world. This may include a brief introduction 
to physical anthropology and archaeology. 

SOC 113 or ANT 113 three credits 
Introduction to Social and 
Cultural Behavior 

A combined introduction to Anthropology 
and Sociology, the comparative study of 
societies, their similarities and differences 
and how these are understood by social 
science. 

SOC 159-199 three credits 
Social Issues 

Courses are offered on selected social issues 
as student and faculty interest indicate. May 
be offered under the ANT prefix where 
appropriate. 

Recent offerings include: 

SOC 160 or ANT 160 three credits 
Social and Cultural Evolution 

SOC 164 three credits E 
Environmental Issues 

SOC 167 three credits 

Social Issue: Human Environment 



SOC 174 three credits 
Portuguese/American Cultures 

SOC 177 three credits E 

Introduction to Sex, Marriage, and the 

Family 

SOC 190 three credits 
Introduction to Criminal Justice 

A broad overview of the criminal justice 
system and its major component parts, 
including police, the courts, and corrections. 



SOC 200 three credits 

Introduction to Sociological Thought 

Prerequisite: SOC 101 
An introduction to the enterprise of 
sociological theory. As such, it attempts to 
introduce students to the questions, 
problems, and intellectual tasks of theoriz- 
ing about society and our social lives as well 
as to expose students to some of the most 
important competing ways in which 
previous social theorists have gone about 
this task. 

SOC 203 three credits 
Social Welfare Policy 

Prerequisite: SOC 101 or 102 
Theoretical framework and cross-cultural 
perspective for understanding the role of 
the social services in our society. An 
exploration of the history, politics and 
economics of our social welfare system will 
be undertaken through discussion, guest 
speakers and field work. Cross-listed as 
WMS 203. 

SOC 205 three credits 

Industrial Society and Human Problems 

An overview of modern society, particularly 
our own, with an emphasis on the problems 
and possibilities we face today. 

SOC 206 or ANT 206 three credits 
Introduction to Research Methods 

Prerequisite: SOC 101 or ANT 1 1 1 or SOC/ 
ANT 1 1 3 

An introduction to the concepts and 
methodology of social science research. 

ANT 208 three credits 

Introduction to Anthropological Theory 

Prerequisite: ANT 1 1 1 

A historical analytical and current review of 
the anthropological perspective. Several 
themes basic to anthropological thinking are 
compared including, holism, systems and 
processes, folk versus analytical perspective, 
and case studies. The systematic nature of 
anthropological inquiry with testing of 



176 



findings, theories, laws, generalizations, and 
modes of research and interpretation will be 
noted in the reading of original sources. 

SOC 209 three credits 

Sociology of Life, Death, and Meaning 

An exploration of the exclusion of the 
organic — birth, death, the body, committed 
relationships, family, community, and 
nature — from work or technical perfor- 
mance in industrial institutions. 

SOC 220 three credits 
Social Change 

Prerequisite: SOC 101 
Analysis of the processes of social change. 
Why does social change occur? Attention is 
given to both economic factors and 
conscious movements for social change. 

SOC 226 or ANT 226 three credits 
Sociology of Africa 

A survey of change and conflict in African 
society, historically and at present. Particular 
attention will be paid to the effects of 
colonialism and African resistance to it. 
Cross-listed as AAS 226. 

SOC 228 three credits 
Sex Roles and Sexuality in 
American Society 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor 
The changing definitions of the roles of men 
and women in American society from our 
own experience and from social, historical, 
and biological perspectives. The course 
covers the development of male and female 
in the evolutionary system; human sexuality; 
cross-cultural sexual identities; images of 
male and female in American literature, 
movies, and the popular imagination; 
socialization and the development of sexual 
identity; problems of courtship and intimacy. 
Cross-listed as WMS 228. 

SOC 230 three credits 

Black Identity and the Social World 

The course examines the African past 
through literature, the survival techniques 
which Blacks developed in order to survive 
in an alien world, and the collective identity 
of Black people at the present time. This 
course is especially designed for Black 
students and White students who are 
concerned with Black heritage. Cross-listed 
as AAS 230. 

ANT 261 three credits 

Introduction to Method and Theory in 

Archaeology 

An introduction to the principles of method 
and theory of modern American 



archaeology. 

ANT 262 three credits G 
Introduction to World Prehistory 

An introduction to archaeological documen- 
tation of prehistoric socio-political organiza- 
tion. Emphasis on the development of state 
levels of social organization in an evolution- 
ary perspective. 

SOC 268 or ANT 268 three credits 
Environmental Issues 

Introduction to controversial social issues 
surrounding environmental problems. The 
course addresses how modern society is 
creating and responding to current 
environmental trends and gives social 
ecological perspective on our human 
prospect. 



SOC 270 three credits 
Criminal Due Process 

The law of criminal procedure as defined by 
the constitution and the courts. This course 
is designed to familiarize students with the 
law as it pertains to the work of the criminal 
justice system and exposes students to case 
law. Written case briefs are used as an 
instructional method. 



SOC 298 or ANT 298 one to six credits 
Experiential Learning 

Prerequisites: At least sophomore standing; 
permission of the instructor, department 
chairperson, and college dean 
Work experience at an elective level 
supervised for academic credit by a faculty 
member in an appropriate academic field. 
Conditions and hours to be arranged. 
Graded CR/NC. For specific procedures and 
regulations, see section of catalogue on 
Other Learning Experiences. 

SOC 300 or ANT 300 three credits 
Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual 
Identity and Culture 

Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transexual 
identity, history, and culture, sexual roles, 
homophobia, heterosexism, the gay 
liberation movement, and cross-cultural 
experiences will be examined. Family, 
health, religious, economic, racial, political 
and legal issues will be explored. 

SOC 301 three credits 
The Sociology of Work 

Prerequisite: SOC 101 or ANT 1 1 1 or SOC/ 
ANT 1 1 3 

The analysis of work in modern society, and 
how, historically, labor/management 



relations have shaped our lives. Cross-listed 
as LST301. 

SOC 302 three credits 
The Sociology of Art 

Prerequisite: either SOC 101, SOC 111, SOC/ 
ANT 1 1 3, or History of Art; or permission of 
instructor 

The relationship between society and art and 
artists. 

SOC 304 or ANT 304 three credits 
Third World Development 

Prerequisite: SOC 101, 1 1 1, or 1 13 
A study of the "Third World" — its political 
economy and roots in world history and 
international relations. The focus will be on 
understanding the sources of underdevelop- 
ment and the possibilities for development. 

SOC 305 three credits 
Political Sociology 

Prerequisites: SOC 101, SOC/ANT 113, PSC 
101, 102; or permission of instructor 
Sociological perspectives on the study of 
power relationships, political communities, 
political processes, and institutions. The 
course addresses questions like, Who 
controls America's institutions? What are the 
rights and powers of ordinary citizens? How 
are decisions made about war and peace? 
About the distribution of resources? What is 
the relationship between political, economic, 
and ideological power? 

SOC 306 or ANT 306 three credits 
Cultures of Contemporary Portugal 

The cultures of contemporary Portugal. We 
will draw on the work of anthropologists, 
sociologists, and historians and focus on key 
issues including changes in traditional roles of 
men and women, Portuguese emigration and 
its effect on Portuguese society, patterns of 
ritual and religion, and national citizenship. 

SOC 308 three credits 
Sociology of Religion 

Prerequisites: SOC 101 or SOC/ANT 113; 
and upper-division status 
Comparative sociological analysis of religious 
movements in industrial and non-industrial 
societies. The interplay between religion and 
social structure is examined. The church-sect 
typology and the institutionalizing of 
religious belief systems will be examined. 
Consideration will also be given to the 
influence of religious creeds upon patterns 
of thought and action and on socio-cultural 
change. 

SOC 309 or ANT 309 three credits 
Readings in Sociological and Anthropo- 



177 



College of Arts and Sciences 



logical Literature 

Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing. 
Reading and writing on specific sociological 
and anthropological topics normally not 
included in the curriculum. Students will 
work on these topics under the close 
supervision of individual instructors. 
Students are limited to one such reading 
course per semester. 

SOC310 three credits 
Social Movements 

Prerequisite: SOC 101 or permission of 
instructor 

A sociological analysis of the origin and 
development of social movements with an 
emphasis on detailed study of particular 
social movements. Cross-listed as AAS 310. 

SOC 312 three credits 
Deviant Behavior 

Prerequisite: SOC 101; junior or senior 
standing 

Review of theory and research with 
emphasis on their implications for a general 
theory of deviant behavior. Sociological 
knowledge will be applied to the analysis of 
selected topics such as: organized crime and 
drug addiction. Social factors and influences 
in deviant conduct are given heavy stress. 
Sociological analysis of the agencies of 
control will be included. 

SOC 320 or ANT 320 three credits 
Junior Seminar 

Prerequisite: For juniors only; permission of 
instructor 

Students will discuss and write papers on 
aspects of a subject chosen for the 
semester. 

SOC 323 or ANT 323 three credits E 
Morality and Society 

Inquiry into morality and its role in society 
and social change. This course will consider 
the origins and evolution of morality, looking 
at similarities and difference in the moral 
codes of different cultures, as well as of 
different periods of Western history. 
Attention will be given to sources of change 
and conflict involving moral issues in modern 
society. 

SOC 324 or ANT 324 three credits 
Women in Contemporary Society 

The roles and status of women in contem- 
porary societies are examined using an 
historical and comparative approach. The 
course integrates theory of sexual inequality 
and its relation to other forms of social 
inequality and empirical analysis of the 
actual conditions of women. Women's 



participation in social movements in the U.S. 
and Third World countries is addressed as 
part of the analysis of the changing roles 
and statuses of women. Cross-listed as 
WMS 324. 

Soc 325 or ANT 325 three credits E 
Sex, Marriage and Family 

A survey of basic human patterns of 
bonding and reproduction in different 
cultures, through human evolution to 
modern times, focusing on an exploration of 
issues surrounding sex, marriage and family 
in contemporary society. 

SOC 327 or ANT 327 three credits 
Myth and Ritual 

Prerequisite: ANT 111 or 1 1 3 
Exploration of the significance of myth and 
ritual and the history of their study. Myths 
and rituals of a world wide sample are 
analyzed from functional, structural, and 
symbolic points of view. 

SOC 328 or ANT 328 three credits 
Cultural Ecology 

The study of culture and society from an 
anthropological and ecological approach, 
focusing on the interaction between human 
societies and their natural environment. 

SOC 330 three credits 
Blacks and Whites in America 

A multimedia course focusing on the social 
and cultural similarities and differences 
between Blacks and Whites in America. 
National survey data, field studies, biogra- 
phies, autobiographies along with novels 
and films are included among the materials 
analyzed. Students will also be taught the 
fundamentals of survey data analysis using 
personal computers. 

SOC 331 three credits 
Race and Ethnicity 

Prerequisite: SOC 101 or 1 1 1 or 1 13 
A study of the concepts of "race" and 
"ethnic group" and the role these concepts 
play in social interaction and social 
differentiation. 

SOC 332 or ANT 332 three credits D 
Portuguese in the Americas 

The history, culture, identities, and experi- 
ences of Portuguese who have emigrated to 
the Americas. Emphasis is on the formation 
of the Portuguese-American communities in 
southeastern Massachusetts. Published 
research will be examined and class research 
projects will be assigned in the local 
community. Students conduct research 
projects and oral histories in the local 



Portuguese community which are published 
on a web site. 

SOC 334 three credits 
Sociology of Food 

A look at ancient and modern food 
production and its environmental impact. 
Diet and nutrition, population pressure and 
hunger; the politics of food, and, modern 
food processing and its implications are all 
subjects of study. 

SOC 335 three credits 
Social Policy 

Prerequisite: SOC 101 or 203 
An analysis of the relationship between 
social needs and societal response with an 
examination of the effectiveness of current 
policies in meeting human needs. The 
policies selected for analysis will be 
programs and provisions directed toward a 
specific population, e.g. elderly, women, 
etc. The policies to be studied will focus on 
a particular substantive area and may 
change with each semester that the course 
is offered. 

SOC 336 three credits 
Women and Social Policy 

Family policy issues in the U.S. such as 
childcare, family leave, job equity, and 
marriage and family relationships. U.S. 
public policy is compared with that of other 
countries. Cross-listed as WMS 336. 

SOC 337 or ANT 337 three credits D 
Comparative Ethnic Relations 

A comparative analysis of interracial and 
interethnic relations in various areas of the 
world including the U.S., Latin America, 
Africa, and Europe. An examination of the 
causes of interethnic conflict, assimilation, 
ethnic solidarity, and changes in ethnic 
identity. Cross-listed as AAS 337. 

SOC 340 three credits 
Law and Society 

Investigation of problems in the sociology of 
law, including lawmaking processes; 
administration justice and correctional 
systems. Comparative analysis of legal 
systems and their administration. 

SOC 341 three credits 
Community Organizing 

An analysis of the theory and practice of 
community organizing with particular 
emphasis on the development of social 
action and community development 
techniques on the grass-roots level. This 
course will be conducted as a seminar with 
student participation expected in class 



178 



discussions. In addition, mini-lectures, field 
simulations, role-playing, guest speakers, 
and field observations will be utilized. 
(Formerly SOC 240) Cross-listed as LST 341 
and WMS 341. 

SOC 342 three credits 
Organization of Criminal Behavior 

Prerequisite: SOC 101 or equivalent 
Sociological approaches to the study of 
crime typologies. Criminal behavior is best 
explained when broken down into types. 
After discussing the construction of types of 
crimes, there will be an exploration of the 
systems within which criminal behavior 
develops. 

SOC 345 or ANT 345 three credits 
Human Evolution 

A systematic and multidisciplinary approach 
to the origin and evolution of the human 
species from its primate ancestors. Topics 
include the evolutionary relationships of the 
various groups of modern primates, the 
divergence and physical evolution of the 
human lineage and origin of modern Homo 
Sapiens. In addition an attempt is made to 
correlate our knowledge of the behavior of 
the nonhuman primates, ethnography, 
fossils, and archeology so as to gain insights 
into the origins and evolution of human 
social behavior and our distinctive cultural 
adaptation. 

SOC 350 or ANT 350 three credits 
Readings in Sociological and 
Anthropological Literature I 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor 
Directed readings and analysis in selected 
sociological topics. Cross-listed as WMS 350 
with appropriate topic. 

SOC 351 or ANT 351 three credits 
Readings in Sociological and 
Anthropological Literature II 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor 
Directed readings and analysis in selected 
sociological topics. 

SOC 352 or ANT 352 three credits 
Readings in Sociological and 
Anthropological Literature III 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor 
Directed readings and analysis in selected 
sociological topics. 

SOC 353 three credits 
Readings in Sociological 
Literature IV 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor 
Directed readings and analysis in selected 
sociological topics. Cross-listed as AAS 353 



with appropriate topic. 

SOC 355 three credits 
Social Work Practice 

Prerequisite: SOC 203 

The knowledge, values and skills that under- 
lie social work practice. We will consider the 
roles that social workers assume, the 
settings in which they work and the 
methods of intervention that are used in 
working with individual, groups, and 
communities. Issues related to cross-cultural 
social work will also be explored. 

SOC 356 three credits 

Wealth, Status, and Power in America 

The study of the various ways in which 
different societies assign their members to 
higher and lower positions of prestige, 
power, and possessions. A sociological 
analysis of the ways in which a person's 
stratified rank influences personality and 
life-opportunities in society. Cross-listed as 
LST 356. 

SOC 357 three credits 
Justice and Society 

Prerequisites: SOC 101 or equivalent and 
junior status; or permission of instructor 
An introduction to the wider cultural and 
legal contexts of the criminal justice system. 
The course draws on the sociology of law 
and the police, as well as the functioning of 
the courts in order to understand the 
concept of law, the notion of the "rule of 
law," due process, and the role of constraint 
in law enforcement in a democratic society. 

SOC 358 three credits 
Criminological Theory 

Prerequisites: SOC 101 or equivalent and 
upper-division standing 
A review of the principal forms of explana- 
tion in the social sciences, including 
environmental, psycho-social, economic, 
and sociological. Application of these 
approaches is extended to various forms of 
behavior including crime and delinquency 
through the work of Durkheim, Lombroso, 
Freud, Merton, Sutherland, Lemert, 
Chambliss, and others. 

SOC 361 or ANT 361 three credits 
Peoples and Cultures of Europe 

Prerequisite: SOC 101 or ANT 1 1 1 or SOC/ 
ANT 113 

An examination of selected societies of 
Europe from an anthropological perspective, 
with special attention paid to rural-urban 
relations and to processes of transformation 
and development. An attempt will also be 
made to account for the similarities and 



differences of the peoples and societies 
studied. 

SOC 362 or ANT 362 three credits 
Peoples and Cultures of the World 

Prerequisite: SOC 101 or ANT 1 1 1 or SOC/ 
ANT 113 

Classic ethnographies and films of peoples 
in the pre-Columbian Americas, Africa, 
Melanesia and the Orient. The course 
features cross cultural exploration through 
the works of anthropologists like 
Malinowski, Benedict, Evans-Pritchard and 
Levi-Strauss and of indigenous peoples like 
Black Elk. The anthropological concepts and 
methods of the authors are contrast and 
effects of different levels of development on 
lifestyles are considered. 

SOC 363 or ANT 363 three credits G 
Environment and Development 

Prerequisite: SOC 101 or ANT 1 1 1 or SOC/ 
ANT 1 1 3 

A search for social change which will 
improve conditions for all and be beneficial 
to the long-run survival and future of the 
planet and our human species. The course 
discusses action strategies for constructive 
group living by self-reliant participation in 
productive activities on local levels and 
beyond. 

SOC 372 or ANT 372 three credits 
Peace Studies 

Prerequisite: SOC 101, ANT 1 1 1 , or SOC/ 
ANT 1 1 3 

A study of peaceful, non-violent societies 
and observation of the processes and 
conditions that shape relations of peace and 
non-violence. The course presents evidence 
that our human potential for peaceful 
relationships is strong and is a long- 
standing part of our human behavior. 
Studies of peace suggest we have the ability 
to find new approaches to the attainment 
of peace in our own violent and warlike 
time. 

SOC 381 three credits 

Social Impact of Science and Technology 

A look at the scientific and technological 
world views: the claim that tools are value- 
free, that knowledge (software, etc.) should 
be property; that natural and social reality 
should be quantified. 

SOC 400 three credits 
Special Topic 

Prerequisite: Open to seniors electing the 
Criminal Justice option, or by permission of 
instructor 

Selected topics such as juvenile delinquency, 



179 



College of Arts and Sciences 



probation and parole, white collar crime, 
and related topics in criminal justice will be 
offered. May be repeated with change 
content. 

SOC 401 or ANT 401 three credits 
Research Methods 

Prerequisites: SOC 101 or ANT 1 1 1 or SOC 
1 13 or ANT 113; and one advanced course 
in a social science. 

Language and social inquiry; issues related 
to ideas of knowing, explaining, understand- 
ing, confirming, etc.; valuative and effective 
elements in inquiry; empirical testability of 
propositions; quantitative and qualitative 
procedures of data collection and analysis; 
study of example cases. 

SOC 402 three credits 
Sociological Theory 

Prerequisite: SOC 101 or SOC 1 13 or ANT 
1 1 3; and one advanced sociology course. 
The synthesizing and integrative functions of 
theory in the sociological enterprise. The 
course seeks to awaken an awareness of the 
nature and role of concepts in theory 
construction, and to highlight the gains and 
losses which accrue in all linguistic state- 
ments about the world. The work of Marx, 
Durkheim, Weber, Veblen, Sorokin, G.H. 
Mead, and R.K. Merton are given special 
attention, both as pioneering examples of 
theoretical innovation and as substantive 
points of departure for future inquiry. Cross- 
listed as LST 402. 

ANT 405 three credits 
Anthropological Theory 

Prerequisite: ANT 1 1 1 or ANT 113 
An analysis of the major theoretical 
orientations of anthropologists toward the 
two central anthropological questions: the 
nature and origin of the human species and 
the nature and origin of culture and 
civilization. 

SOC 407 or ANT 407 three or 
six credits 
Field Inquiry 

Prerequisites: SOC 101 or ANT 1 1 1, or SOC 
1 1 3 or ANT 1 1 3; and one advanced course 
in social science; and permission of 
instructor. 

Research problem formulation, study design, 
and the gathering and analysis of data in 
Sociology and Anthropology, with primary 
emphasis upon field work. In addition to 
reading and seminar discussions, each 
student will participate throughout the 
seminar in supervised field inquiry. Interested 
students should talk with the instructor 
about field work possibilities and arrange- 



ments. Upon the approval of the instructor, 
students may register for either three or six 
semester hours in a single semester or three 
semester hours in each of two successive 
semesters. 

SOC 408 three credits 
Social Service Internship 

Prerequisites: SOC 203, 355 
This course will provide students with the 
opportunity to integrate social work theory 
with practice. Students will intern with an 
agency/organization in the community or on 
campus and will meet as a seminar to 
analyze and reflect upon their experiences 
and to further develop skills and knowledge 
about the social services in our society. 

SOC 420 or ANT 420 three credits 
Senior Seminar 

Prerequisites: For seniors only; permission of 
instructor required 

Students will discuss and write papers on 
aspects of a subject chosen for the 
semester. 

SOC 430 three credits 

Seminar on Advanced Problems in 

Sociological Theory I 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor 
Selected theoretical problems, theorists or 
schools of thought examined in depth. 

SOC 431 three credits 

Seminar on Advanced Problems in 

Sociological Theory II 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor 
Selected theoretical problems, theorists or 
schools of thought examined in depth. 

SOC 450 three credits 
Internship 

Prerequisite: Senior sociology major or 
permission of instructor 
Students registering for this course are 
placed in relevant positions in the criminal 
justice system, such as a parole office, court, 
or correctional facility, where their work will 
be supervised by an on-site sponsor as well 
as Departmental advisor. 

SOC 492 or ANT 492 variable credit 
Honors Research 

Research project under independent faculty 
supervision, by permission. 



SOC 495 or ANT 495 variable credit 
Independent Study 

Prerequisites: Upper-division standing; 
permission of instructor, department 
chairperson, and college dean 
Study under the supervision of a faculty 
member in an area not otherwise part of the 
discipline's course offerings. Conditions and 
hours to be arranged. 

SOC 196, 296, 396, 496 or 

ANT 1 96, 296, 396, 496 variable credit 

Directed Study 

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor, 
department chairperson, and college dean 
Study under the supervision of a faculty 
member in an area covered in a regular 
course not currently being offered. 
Conditions and hours to be arranged 



180 



Earle P. Charlton 
College of Business 




The Earle P. Charlton College of Business 
serves three distinct and important stakehold- 
ers: undergraduate and graduate majors, 
students from other academic units in the 
university, and the broader professional and 
business community. 

The Charlton College offers five undergradu- 
ate programs in business, all leading to the 
Bachelor of Science degree. These programs 
are designed to prepare the graduate for 
careers in administration, research, and teach- 
ing; or for graduate study. 

The College also offers a minor in Business 
Administration that helps non-College majors 
acquire an understanding of business 
essentials. College majors have an option to 
add a Certificate in International Business. 



Students in the Charlton College of Business 
engage in projects and case studies that 
involve all areas of business-marketing, man- 
agement, finance, systems development, and 
accounting. Each student's studies combine 
real breadth-through courses in arts, humani- 
ties, sciences, and social sciences; foundation 
knowledge in accounting, behavioral science, 
economics, and mathematics and statistics; 
oral and written communication-with the 
advanced specialization of a major field. 
Students will also gain an understanding of 
ethical and global issues; political, social, legal, 
environmental, and technological issues; and 
the impact of diversity on organizations. 

The Charlton College of Business is accredited 
by AACSB International (Association to 
Advance Collegiate Schools of Business). 



College Mission Statement 



Accreditation 



General Requirements for 
Undergraduate Programs 



The Earle P. Charlton College of Business 
provides a strong basic business education 
that challenges students and meets the 
needs of the southeastern Massachusetts 
business community and beyond. Grounded 
in excellent general education programs, the 
college provides quality undergraduate 
programs in Accounting, Business Informa- 
tion Systems, Finance, Management, and 
Marketing. The MBA program provides 
continuing leadership education for the 
region and beyond. The college encourages 
students to be lifelong learners through 
faculty commitment to scholarly endeavor 
and active involvement in the business 
profession and community. 

The purpose of our business programs is to 
instill in our students a knowledge of the 
best business practices; ethical questions; 
and the influence of environmental, legal 
and regulatory, political, social, global, and 
technological factors on the success of 
organizational activities. 



The Charlton College of Business is 
accredited by AACSB International (Associa- 
tion to Advance Collegiate Schools of 
Business). The College is also a member of 
this organization. 



The College's five business major programs 
focus on interrelations among business 
enterprise, the economy, and society. 
Students develop skills in the use of 
quantitative data and theoretical tools in 
analyzing problems related to business and 
the economy. They are also assisted in 
developing the skills and intellectual 
capacities which foster mature and 
competent judgement. 

Students enrolled as business majors 
complete a common program of study 
during the first two years. This 
lower-division program emphasizes a 
general education background with courses 
in the humanities, mathematics, and both 
social and natural sciences. The objective of 
this approach is to provide a foundation of 
work in those academic areas necessary for 
the appropriate combination of descriptive 
and analytical skill development to the study 
of business. 



Earle P. Charlton 



At its February 1997 meeting, the University 
of Massachusetts Board of Trustees voted to 
name the College of Business at UMass 
Dartmouth the Earle P. Charlton College of 
Business. The name honors Earle P. 
Charlton, a co-founder of the F. W. 
Woolworth Company, who began his retail 
empire in 1890 in Fall River, Massachusetts 
and acknowledges a substantial gift to the 
College by the Charlton Charitable Trust. 

In the words of his grandson, Earle P. 
Charlton II, "This is the American Dream. 
My grandfather started with nothing and 
built an empire of 53 stores across New 
England to the Pacific Coast and in Canada. 
He was an inspiration to me, my hero. He 
wanted to make a difference in the world." 

The gift acknowledges a strong belief in the 
value of public education in our society and 
in the importance of private support for it. 
His grandfather "never had the opportunity 
to go to college," explains Earle P. Charlton 
II, yet "I know he would be extremely proud 
to give to these students ... the opportu- 
nity to get the education he missed." 



Transfer of Community and Junior College Credit 

Generally, lower-level business course credits (first and second year courses) can be 
transferred from junior and community colleges, assuming the course work is comparable to 
that offered at UMass Dartmouth. All transfer credits to apply toward the degree are given 
at the discretion of the College. 

The following courses from Bristol Community College will be accepted as equivalent to the 
following UMass Dartmouth courses: 



Bristol Community College: 

MAN 1 1 Principles of Management 

ACC 11,12 Accounting I & II 

BUS 51 Business Law 

BUS 53 Corporation Finance 

MAR 1 1 Principles of Marketing 

CPR 1 1/CIS 1 1 Intro, to Data Processing 



UMass Dartmouth: 



MGT311 
ACT 211, 212 
MGT 312 
FIN 312 
MKT 21 1 
BIS 101 



Organizational Behavior 
Accounting I & II 
Legal Framework Business 
Financial Management 
Principles of Marketing 
Business Organization 



Comparable courses from other community colleges will also be accepted as equivalent to 
these UMass Dartmouth courses. 



Graduate Program 

An MBA program is offered by the Earle P. 
Charlton College of Business. See the 
Graduate Catalogue for graduate general 
and program requirements. 



Transfer students from community colleges must comply with the university requirement to 
complete at least 60 credits at UMass Dartmouth. Furthermore, a student needs to complete 
at least 30 credits of upper-level business courses at UMass Dartmouth. Business elective 
courses taken at the 100 or 200 level cannot be transferred for upper-division business 
elective credit, nor can they be transferred as non-business electives. 



182 



General Education and Core Business Requirements 



Change of Major to Business 



Each business student is required to complete 
a sequence of courses called the Core 
Business Requirements. In addition, each 
student who will graduate with the class of 
2002 must complete the UMass Dartmouth 
general education requirement; others are 
held to the college's distribution require- 
ments. Students take 60 credits of their 
graduation requirements from outside the 
College of Business. The remaining 60 credits 
are in courses from within the College, 
making up the Core Business Requirements 
as well as the student's Major Requirements. 

The majors in the College of Business meet 
the General Education requirements in the 
following manner (some of the following 
statements are still in process of receiving 
committee review and approval): 

Tier 1 Information and Computer Literacy; 

Writing Skills ENL 101, 102 
I Information & Computer Literacy (Tier II) 

GBA 101; MGT210, 211; ACT212; BIS 

315/ACT355 
W Writing Intensive ENL 265 (Tier II) 
O Oral Skills ENL 265 
M Mathematics MTH 107 
E Ethics 1 2 hours within the Core Business 

Requirement (integrated within GBA101 ; 

ACT211.212; MKT 211; MGT311; MGT 

312; MGT 345; BIS 315/ACT355; FIN 

312; and MGT 490) 
C Cultural and Artistic Literacy 

9 credits from Gen Ed list 
S Natural Science and Technology 6 credits, 

from Gen Ed list 
G Global Awareness 3 credits, from either 

ECO 231 or 232 
D Diversity 3 credits from Gen Ed list 

In addition, students in the Charlton College 
of Business will take six credits of social 
sciences (distribution requirement). 

Dual Major Requirements for the 
College of Business 

All students who select a dual major within 
the College of Business must complete a 
minimum of 24 credit hours for the second 
business major. This will bring the gradua- 
tion requirement to at least 144 credit hours 
for dual majors. 



Courses offered outside the Business 
Curriculum 

Credits 



ENL 1 01 , 1 02 Critical Writing and 

Reading I & II 6 

MTH 107 Elements of College 

Math Enhanced 3 

ECO 231, 232 Principles of Micro/ 

Macroeconomics 6 

ENL 265 Business Communica- 
tions 3 

MGT 2 1 0, 2 1 1 Business Statistics I & II 6 
Cultural and Artistic 
Literacy 9 
Diversity course 3 
Natural Science/ 
Technology 6 
Social science electives 6 
Non-business electives 12 

Core Business Requirement 

GBA 101 Business Organization 3 
ACT 211,212 Principles of Accounting 

I & II 6 

MKT 211 Principles of Marketing 3 

MGT 311 Organizational Behavior 3 
MGT 312 Legal Framework of 

Business 3 

FIN 312 Financial Management 3 

BIS 315 Business Information 

Systems 3 



(Accounting majors take 
ACT 355 Accounting Info. 
Systems) 

MGT 333 Quantitative Business 

Analysis 3 
MGT 345 Operations Management 3 
MGT 490 Strategic Management 

and Policy Formulation 3 



Current UMass Dartmouth students 
majoring in a degree program that is not in 
the Charlton College of Business may wish 
to change to one of the business majors. A 
new policy is in effect for students who 
decide to make this change. 

To be permitted to do so, they must be in 
overall good academic standing and must 
first successfully complete the following 
Business courses with at least a C- in each 
and an overall grade average of 2.7 in four 
courses together: MGT 2 1 0, ACT 211, ACT 
212, and one of the following: FIN 312, 
MGT 312, and MKT 211. Those who do not 
meet this standard may still qualify to join 
the Business Administration Minor described 
on the following page; three of the four 
courses above will count toward that minor. 

Students seeking to make this change 
should select their current courses carefully. 
Specifically, they should plan to be able to 
complete their present majors if they do not 
succeed in making the shift to a major in the 
Charlton College of Business. Students in 
the Liberal Arts program in the College of 
Arts and Sciences should take the language 
courses they will need if they remain to 
complete one of the Bachelor of Arts 
degrees; those courses will count towards 
the General Education area C requirement if 
they succeed in changing to a business 
major. 



183 



College of Business 



Business Administration Minor 



General Business Course 



The Minor in Business Administration is 
designed for non-College of Business 
students whose objective is to acquire an 
understanding of business essentials to 
supplement their own area of expertise. By 
selecting a Minor in Business Administration, 
a non-business major can open both 
educational and career opportunities in 
business as a secondary area of study. For 
the non-business student who is planning 
on entering a Masters of Business Adminis- 
tration program, the completion of the 
Minor in Business administration would 
satisfy part of the foundation requirements 
of the UMass Dartmouth MBA program, as 
well as MBA programs offered at other 
institutions. 



Admission to the Minor 

Any undergraduate degree candidate, at 
UMass Dartmouth, with a declared major 
other than one in the College of Business, 
who has a GPA of 2.4 or higher in ACT 21 1, 
and one of the following: FIN 312, MGT 
312, and MKT 211, and is in good academic 
standing in the major will be admitted into 
the minor. Applications for admission should 
be made to Richard F. Golen, Assistant Dean 
for Undergraduate Programs, Charlton 
College of Business. 



Minor Coordinator 
Richard F. Golen 

Assistant Dean of Undergraduate Programs 
Charlton College of Business 



Requirements 



Complete the following core courses Credits 

MKT 211 Principles of Marketing 3 
ECO 231 Principles of 

Microeconomics 3 

ACT 211 Principles of Accounting I 3 

MGT 311 Organizational Behavior 3 



GBA 101, 102 one and one half credits 

each semester E 

The Business Organization I, II 

Prerequisite: Freshman only 
A two-semester, cross-discipline course for 
first-year day students, the first business 
core course. It introduces first-year business 
majors to the world of business and 
enriches their first-year experience. It 
provides students with an overview of 
business, its environment and its sub- 
systems (e.g. operations, marketing, 
accounting, finance, and information 
systems); enhances their information and 
computer skills; and develops their team- 
working skills and attitude. Informational 
and advising sessions help students make 
decisions in areas such as the selection of 
courses, a major, a career, and the 
utilization of on-campus student resources. 
This course meets for one-hour per-week 
for each semester during the student's first 
year in the Charlton College of Business. 
(Formerly offered as BIS 101.) 

Transfer students, change of major, and 
students enrolled in the Division of Continu- 
ing Education will substitute, later in their 
program, a 300 or 400-level business elective 
for GBA 101. 



Select three courses from the following 9 Prerequisites 

ACT 212 Principles of Accounting II ACT 211 

BIS 315 Information Systems 

FIN 312 Business Finance ACT 212, ECO 231 

MGT 365 Managing People: 

Theory and Practice 

MGT 312 Legal Framework of Business 

MGT 345 Operations Management MGT 333 

Total: 21 

At least five of these courses must be completed at UMass Dartmouth. 

Course descriptions will be found in the appropriate sections of the Catalogue. 

Certain courses may require prerequisites, and students must meet the prerequisites prior to 
enrolling in any course within the minor. 



184 



Certificate in International Business 



The International Business Certificate 
Program offers a unique opportunity for 
students to gain exposure to international 
business through a combination of 
coursework and travel in an overseas 
setting. 

The program is open to College of Business 
degree students who are interested in 
international business. 

The Certificate consists of 21 credit hours, 
which must include an overseas experience 
(see below), and will be awarded with the 
diploma at graduation, providing that the 
student has at least a 2.5 GPA in the 
Certificate Courses. 

The overseas experience can be fulfilled in 
one of the following ways: 

• UMD/CCB sponsored course that has a 
minimum overseas stay of 2 weeks; 

• A semester abroad at a partner 
university; 

• A summer session at a partner 
university; 

• A year abroad at a partner university 

During the course of the overseas 
experience students may take up to 6 
credits of course work (or their equivalent) 
which would fulfill the requirements of the 
Certificate. 



Certificate Requirements 

Courses in Foreign Language (6 credits) 
Elementary or Intermediate Level 

Required Upper Division Elective courses 

Courses in Business (3 credits) 
Choose one from the following: 
MGT420 International Management 
MKT 420 International Marketing 
FIN 494 International Financial Manage- 
ment 

Courses in Economics (3 credits) 
Choose one from the following: 
ECO 371 International Trade 
ECO 372 International Finance 

Additional Upper Division Elective courses 
(3 credits) 

Any 300 or 400 level advanced course in 

the chosen foreign language 
Any 300 or 400 level course in history or 

sociology, which focuses on the history 

or culture of the chosen foreign 

language 

General Elective Courses (6 credits) 
Any 200 level (or above) course (or courses) 
in the chosen foreign language not used 
to satisfy the Language Requirement 
above. 

Any economics course in international 
issues not used to satisfy the Economics 
elective above 

Any history or sociology course in history or 
culture of the chosen foreign language 
not used to satisfy the Additional Upper 
Division Elective course above 



Coordinator 
Richard F. Golen 

Assistant Dean of Undergraduate Programs 
Charlton College of Business 

The Assistant Dean for Undergraduate 
Programs must approve certificate 
participants' course programs. Courses 
may be substituted with the approval of 
the Assistant Dean for Undergraduate 
Programs. 



185 



College of Business 



Accounting and Finance 



Accounting Major 

BS degree 



Faculty and 
Fields of Interest 



The Department of Accounting and Finance 
offers two major programs leading to the 
Bachelor of Science degree. The Accounting 
program is designed to prepare graduates 
for a variety of careers in accounting 
through a curriculum that emphasizes 
technical accounting knowledge and the 
development of analytical, problem solving 
and computer skills. The Finance program is 
designed to produce graduates who can 
apply financial concepts and analytical skills 
for use in investment analysis and financial 
planning. 



Michael H. Anderson financial institutions, 
corporate finance, international finance 

C. Richard Baker financial accounting and 
auditing 

Michael Griffin finance, investments, 
accounting 

Raymond Jackson (interim dean, 
Charlton College of Business) finance, 
financial planning 

Frederick Jones information systems, 
financial accounting 

Jeanne H. LaFond accounting theory and 
taxation 

Lawrence B. Logan corporate accounting 

Kooros Maskooki corporate finance, 
international finance 

Deborah Prentice accounting 

Trib Puri corporate finance, international 
finance 



The accounting profession plays an essential 
role in a modern economy by providing a 
flow of financial information necessary for 
problem solving and decision-making by 
managers within an organization and by 
investors, leaders, and government 
agencies. Accountants are important 
members of an organization's decision- 
making team. Managers rely on accountants 
for financial planning, budgeting, and 
interpretation of financial results. Students 
learn how to provide information that is 
relevant and appropriate for a variety of 
decisions that managers must make. 

Investors, lenders, government agencies, 
and other external parties also rely on 
accountants and auditors to provide 
accurate and reliable financial statements 
about an organization Students learn how 
to apply accounting concepts, standards, 
and regulations in preparing, auditing, and 
analyzing financial statements. 

Because accounting is an information 
system, there is substantial emphasis in the 
program on computer and information 
technology skills, including the use of 
accounting, spreadsheet, and database 
applications as well as the use of technology 
for accounting and tax research. 

The accounting program provides a strong 
foundation for pursuit of a career in private 
or public accounting, or for further 
education in graduate school. In private 
accounting, students may prepare for 
certification as a Certified Management 
Accountant (CMA). Preparation for a career 
as a Certified Public Accountant (CPA) has 
been enhanced by state regulations that 
now require 1 50 hours of education prior to 
certification. Students interested in a public 
accounting career should talk with a faculty 
member to consider ways of achieving the 
150-hour requirement. 



186 



Requirements 



Credits 



Accounting Courses 



General Requirements — Years One and Two 

ENL 101, 102 Critical Writing and Reading I, II 

MTH 107 Elements of College Math Enhanced 

MGT 2 1 0, 2 1 1 Business Statistics I, II 

GBA 101 The Business Organization 

ENL 265 Business Communications 

ECO 231, 232 Principles of Micro/Macroeconomics 

ACT 211, 212 Principles of Accounting I, II 

Cult /artistic literacy 

Diversity course 

Natural science/technology 

Social science electives 

Core Business Requirements 

MKT 211 Principles of Marketing 

MGT 31 1 Organizational Behavior 

ACT 355 Accounting Information Systems 

MGT 333 Quantitative Business Analysis 

FIN 312 Financial Management 

MGT 312 Legal Framework of Business 

MGT 345 Operations Management 

MGT 490 Strategic Management and Policy Formulation 



Core Accounting Requirements 



57 

6 
3 
6 
3 
3 
6 
6 
9 
3 
6 
6 

24 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

21 



ACT 211 three credits E 
Principles of Accounting I 

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing 
Accounting concepts and procedures, 
studied through the analysis, classification, 
recording, and summarizing of business 
transactions. Financial statements are 
introduced and shown to be a source of 
essential information for management and 
others outside of the business. Ethical issues 
in financial reporting are considered. 

ACT 212 three credits 
Principles of Accounting II 

Prerequisites: ACT 211, sophomore standing 
An introduction to managerial accounting 
emphasizing how managers use accounting 
data within their organizations for planning, 
control, and making decisions. The course is 
structured to provide a foundation of cost 
terms, systems design, cost behavior, 
procedural techniques for planning and 
control, performance measurements, and 
the use of data for making operational 
decisions. Ethical issues in managerial 
reporting are considered. 



ACT 311, 312 Intermediate Accounting I, II 

ACT 351 Cost Accounting 

ACT 401 Auditing 

ACT 41 1 Taxation 

ACT 452 Special Topics in Accounting 

ACT 41 2 Advanced Taxation OR 

ACT 431 Advanced Managerial Accounting 

Accounting Elective 

All Accounting electives must be 400-level courses. All accounting 
electives must be taken at the 400 level. Students who plan careers 
in public accounting should seek the advice of accounting faculty 
concerning their choice of accounting electives. 

Business Elective 

Any 300- or 400- level course in College of Business except BIS 315 

Non-Business Electives 

Courses outside the College of Business 



12 



ACT 311 three credits 
Intermediate Accounting I 

Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in both 
ACT 2 1 1 and 2 1 2 and at least junior 
standing 

The first of two courses that provide a 
comprehensive treatment of financial 
reporting topics. The course focuses on the 
conceptual, procedural, and regulatory 
issues involved in preparing and understand- 
ing corporate financial statements. 

ACT 312 three credits 
Intermediate Accounting II 

Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in ACT 
31 1 and at least junior standing 
A continuation of the study of financial 
reporting and financial statement analysis 
that begins in ACT 311. 



Total credits: 



120 



ACT 351 three credits 
Cost Accounting 

Prerequisites: ACT 2 1 2 and at least junior 
standing 

A study of the basic concepts, analyses, uses 
and procedures of cost accounting; cost 
accounting as a managerial tool for business 
strategy and implementation of operational 
decisions; how different costs are used for 
different purposes; ethical issues in 
operational decisions. 



ACT 355 three credits E 
Accounting Information Systems 

Prerequisites: ACT 211, BIS 101 or ENL 102, 



187 



College of Business 



or permission of Assistant Dean for 
Undergraduate Programs; at least junior 
standing 

A study of the design and implementation of 
successful accounting systems. Significant 
attention is devoted to the relationship 
among components of an accounting 
system, the use of information for decision- 
making, and internal control. Ethical issues 
in providing and using information are 
considered. For accounting majors and non- 
business students only. Cannot be used as a 
business elective by non-accounting majors. 

ACT 399 three credits 
Internship in Accounting 

Prerequisites: At least junior standing; 
permission of the instructor, department 
chairperson, and college dean; approved 
contract filed by end of the add/drop period 
of the semester 

Work experience at a specialized level 
supervised for graded academic credit by a 
faculty member in the student's major field. 
Terms and hours to be arranged. Students 
must register in advance to receive credit for 
an internship in the Business College. 
Deadline for registration and approval for 
internship contracts is the end of the add/ 
drop period; no late contracts or registra- 
tions will be accepted. For specific proce- 
dures and regulations, see section of 
catalogue on Other Learning Experiences. 

ACT 401 three credits 
Auditing 

Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in ACT 
31 1 ; at least junior standing 
A study of the audit function as performed 
by the outside public accounting firm. All 
stages are covered: planning the audit, 
gathering evidence, review of internal 
control provisions, development of working 
papers, analysis of accounts, preparation of 
statements, and final audit report. The ethics 
of the accounting profession are stressed 
throughout the course. 

ACT 402 three credits 
Advanced Auditing 

Prerequisites: ACT 401 and senior standing 
Contemporary issues and problems in 
auditing and assurance services. Topics may 
include application of auditing concepts and 
theory, auditing in a computerized environ- 
ment, application of judgment relative to 
assurance services, and management of risk 
in the contemporary environment. 

ACT 410 three credits 
Federal Tax Accounting 

Prerequisites: ACT 212 and at least junior 



standing; not for accounting majors 
Overview of the federal, state and local tax 
laws as they apply to individuals and 
businesses. This course focuses on specific 
tax laws which apply to individuals, 
partnerships and corporations, with 
emphasis on tax planning rather than 
preparation of the specific tax forms. 

ACT 411 three credits 
Taxation 

Prerequisites: ACT 212 and at least junior 
standing 

A study of federal income taxes. Topics will 
include history and background of the 
federal income tax system, taxable items, 
and methods of computation. Research skills 
will be taught and competency will be 
developed using both paper and electronic 
sources. 

ACT 412 three credits 
Advanced Taxation 

Prerequisites: ACT 41 1 and at least junior 
standing 

Comprehensive tax research techniques 
applied to different business entities. The 
course will enhance both research and 
communication skill in taxation. 

ACT 421 three credits 
Advanced Financial Accounting 

Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in ACT 
311 and ACT 312; senior standing 
Advanced topics in financial accounting. 
Students will become familiar with 
accounting for investments, business 
combinations, consolidated financial 
statements, and foreign currency transla- 
tions. 

ACT 431 three credits 

Advanced Managerial Accounting 

Prerequisites: ACT 351 and senior standing 
Advanced concepts and methods of the 
flow of accounting information through the 
organization. The course emphasizes uses of 
accounting so that managers can effectively 
make plans to control resources, including 
planning and controlling of business 
activities and managerial decision making. 

ACT 441 three credits 

Government and Non-Prof it Accounting 

Prerequisites: ACT 312 and senior standing 
A study of non-corporate organizations with 
primary focus on governments, hospitals, 
colleges and universities, and voluntary 
health and welfare organizations. Coverage 
will include principles of fund accounting, 
financial reporting, budgeting, and auditing 
governmental and not-for-profit organiza- 



tions. In addition, topics related to operating 
a business as a partnership will be included. 

ACT 452 three credits 
Special Topics in Accounting 

Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in ACT 

31 1 and 312; senior standing 

Current topics of interest to the accounting 

profession 

ACT 493 (FIN 493) three credits 
Financial Management of Corporations 

Prerequisites: FIN 312, at least junior 
standing 

Advanced work in the management of 
corporate funds. Selected topics from the 
various fields of financial activity with 
emphasis on trends, current problems and 
research are studied. The topics emphasized 
include: capital expenditure policies, long- 
term and short-term financing problems, 
dividend policies, mergers and consolidat- 
ing, and trends in financial markets. 

ACT 495 variable credit 
Independent Study 

Prerequisites: Upper-division standing; 
permission of instructor, department 
chairperson, and college dean 
Study under the supervision of a faculty 
member in an area not otherwise part of the 
discipline's course offerings. Conditions and 
hours to be arranged. 

ACT 396, 496 three credits 
Directed Study 

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor, 
department chairperson, and college dean 
Study under the supervision of a faculty 
member in an area covered in a regular 
course not currently being offered. 
Conditions and hours to be arranged. 



188 



Finance Major 

BS degree 



Requirements 

Credits 



The curriculum in finance seeks to develop General Requirements — Years One and Two 57 

an understanding of the role played by 

finance in various organizations. Finance ENL 101, 102 Critical Writing and Reading I, II 6 

deals with the acquisition and management MTH 107 Elements of College Math Enhanced 3 

of resources to accomplish organizational MGT210, 211 Business Statistics I, II 6 

objectives within an acceptable risk/return GBA 101 The Business Organization 3 

profile. The financial manager decides how ENL 265 Business Communications 3 

to raise funds in the capital markets and ECO 231, 232 Principles of Micro/Macroeconomics 6 

how best to invest these funds in order to ACT 21 1,212 Principles of Accounting I, II 6 

accomplish organizational objectives. To Cult./artistic literacy 9 

accomplish these tasks the discipline of Diversity course 3 

finance has developed a sophisticated set of Natural science/technology 6 

analytical tools that bring together concepts Social science electives 6 
from a variety of sources such as economics, 

accounting and mathematics. The concepts Core Business Requirements 24 

and techniques developed in finance are 

equally applicable to not-for-profit MKT 211 Principles of Marketing 3 

organizations that must also raise and invest MGT311 Organizational Behavior 3 

funds in an efficient manner. Those skilled BIS 315 Business Information Systems 3 

in financial analysis play a central role in MGT 333 Quantitative Business Analysis 3 

deciding such current issues as mergers, FIN 312 Financial Management 3 

buyouts and international investments. MGT 312 Legal Framework of Business 3 

MGT 345 Operations Management 3 

MGT 490 Strategic Management and Policy Formulation 3 

Finance Core Courses 24 

FIN 383 Investment Analysis 3 

FIN 385 Applied Capital Budgeting 3 

FIN 398 Financial Institutions 3 

FIN 484 Advanced Investment Analysis 3 

FIN 485 Seminar 3 

FIN 493 Financial Management of Corporations 3 

FIN 494 International Financial Management 3 

ACT 410 Federal Tax Accounting 3 

Business Elective 3 

Any 300- or 400- level course in College of Business except ACT 355 

Non-Business Electives 12 

Courses outside the College of Business 

Total credits: 120 



189 



College of Business 



Finance Courses 



FIN 312 three credits E 
Business Finance 

Prerequisites: ACT 212, ECO 231 and at 
least junior standing 

An introduction to the nature of financial 
management. The course presents the basic 
tools used in the decision-making process as 
they pertain to the acquisition, manage- 
ment, and financing current and long-term 
assets. Working capital policies, the time 
value of money, capital budgeting, and debt 
and equity financing are discussed. 

FIN 320 three credits 
Personal Finance 

Prerequisite: at least junior standing 
An introduction to the financial planning 
process of setting goals, developing action 
plans, creating budgets and measuring 
results. The student will become familiar 
with the techniques of financial analyses 
necessary to make choices when consider- 
ing housing, insurance, retirement plans, 
borrowing and other personal finance 
issues. 

FIN 383 three credits 
Investment Analysis 

Prerequisites: FIN 3 1 2; at least junior 
standing 

Method and techniques of determining 
investment merit of various types of 
securities. Bonds, preferred stocks and 
common stocks in various types of 
investment portfolios are studied. The effect 
of the business cycle on investment policy 
will be examined and the importance of 
timing investment commitments will be 
stressed. The investment techniques of 
fundamental analysis, technical analysis and 
efficient market theory are carefully 
explored. (Formerly FIN 483.) 

FIN 385 three credits 
Applied Capital Budgeting 

Prerequisites: MGT 210 and at least junior 
standing 

A study of theoretically valid and 
readily-applied methods of capital budget- 
ing for business and government organiza- 
tions. Complexities such as risk, timing and 
measurement problems dealt with only 
briefly in introductory courses are examined 
more fully. Capital budgeting considerations 
in government organizations not presented 
in the current finance curriculum will be 
discussed thoroughly. 

FIN 397 three credits 
Financing Forecasting Methods 

Prerequisites: FIN 312 and at least junior 
standing 



A study is made of the dynamic forces on 
economic activity. National income 
accounting and analysis, economic indicators 
and measures, forecasting for the economy 
of the firm, and problems of stability and 
growth are considered 

FIN 398 three credits 
Financial Institutions 

Prerequisites: FIN 312 and at least junior 
standing 

A detailed study of the operations of 
financial institutions and the interrelation- 
ships between their operations and 
economic activity. Emphasis is placed on the 
effect of economic forces, regulation and 
technological change on the operations of 
these institutions. 

FIN 399 three credits 
Internship in Finance 

Prerequisites: At least junior standing; 
permission of the instructor, department 
chairperson, and college dean; approved 
contract filed by end of the add/drop period 
of the semester 

Work experience at a specialized level 
supervised for graded academic credit by a 
faculty member in the student's major field. 
Terms and hours to be arranged. Students 
must register in advance to receive credit for 
an internship in the Business College. 
Deadline for registration and approval for 
internship contracts is the end of the add/ 
drop period; no late contracts or registra- 
tions will be accepted. For specific proce- 
dures and regulations, see section of 
catalogue on Other Learning Experiences. 

FIN 484 three credits 
Advanced Investment Analysis 

Prerequisites: FIN 383; at least junior 
standing 

An examination in greater depth of subjects 
covered in the foundation investment 
analysis course and an introduction to recent 
innovations in the field. Emphasis is give to 
the place of derivatives in the portfolio, the 
active management of risk, and the 
management of retirement assets and 
pension funds. Assignments include case 
studies involving the use of computer 
software and reports requiring an analysis of 
current research literature. 

FIN 485 three credits 
Seminar 

Prerequisites: FIN 385, 398; senior standing 
Emphasis on the analysis of case studies. 
Based on assigned readings in the finance 
literature, students select a topic for 
independent research. Progress on the 



research paper is closely monitored by 
conferences and class presentations 

FIN 493 (ACT 493) three credits 
Financial Management 
of Corporations 

Prerequisites: FIN 312 and at least junior 
standing 

Advanced work in the management of 
corporate funds Selected topics from the 
various fields of financial activity with 
emphasis on trends, current problems and 
research are studied The topics emphasized 
include: capital expenditure policies, 
long-term and short-term financing 
problems, dividend policies, mergers and 
consolidations, and trends in financial 
markets. 

FIN 494 three credits 

International Financial Management 

Prerequisites: FIN 312 and at least junior 
standing 

Understanding the forces that affect the 
relative value of currencies in international 
markets, covering the major problems 
encountered by the firm in financing 
international operations 

FIN 495 variable credit 
Independent Study 

Prerequisites: Upper-division standing; 
permission of instructor, department 
chairperson, and college dean 
Study under the supervision of a faculty 
member in an area not otherwise part of the 
discipline's course offerings. Conditions and 
hours to be arranged 

FIN 396, 496 three credits 
Directed Study 

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor, 
department chairperson, and college dean 
Study under the supervision of a faculty 
member in an area covered in a regular 
course not currently being offered. 
Conditions and hours to be arranged 



190 



Management 



Management Major 

BS degree 



Faculty and Fields of Interest 



The Department of Management offers a 
major program leading to a bachelor of 
science degree in Management. The purpose 
of the Management program is to enable 
undergraduate management students to gain 
the requisite understanding of management 
concepts and to acquire the appropriate 
application skills which will allow them to 
function creatively, flexibly, and successfully 
in private or public, domestic, and global 
organizations of any size. 



William R. Allen strategic management, 
organizational behavior, human resources 
development 

Paul Bacdayan organizational behavior, 
total quality management, management 
communications 

Walter O. Einstein strategic management, 
organizational behavior/development, 
leadership, motivation 

Laura Forker supply chain management, 
quality management, process management, 
service operations management 

Audrey Glassman statistics 

Richard F. Golen (assistant dean for 
undergraduate programs) business law, 
computer law, human resources law 

A. Gunasekaran operations management, 
materials management, total quality 
management, quantitative analysis 

Bulent Kobu operations management, 
quantitative analysis, quality and productiv- 
ity management 

Kellyann Kowalski human resources 
development, organizational behavior, 
managing diversity, labor relations 

Matthew H. Roy organizational behavior 

Susanne Scott organizational behavior, 
team development, leadership and innova- 
tion 

Dennis Shaul legal framework of business, 
industrial relations, regulatory law 

Kathleen Suchon strategic management, 
human resources development 

Ercan Tirtiroglu quantitative analysis, 
statistics, information, theory, quality and 
marketing science 



The Management major seeks to enable 
undergraduate management students to gain 
the requisite understanding of management 
concepts and to acquire the appropriate 
application skills to function creatively, 
flexibly and successfully in private or public, 
domestic, and global organizations of any 
size. 



191 



College of Business 



Requirements 



Management Courses 

Credits 



General Requirements — Years One and Two 

ENL 101, 102 Critical Writing and Reading I, II 

MTH 107 Elements of College Math Enhanced 

MGT 210, 21 1 Business Statistics I, II 

GBA 101 The Business Organization 

ENL 265 Business Communications 

ECO 231, 232 Principles of Micro/Macroeconomics 

ACT 211,212 Principles of Accounting I, II 

Cult./artistic literacy 

Diversity course 

Natural science/technology 

Social science electives 

Core Business Requirements 

MKT 211 Principles of Marketing 

MGT 31 1 Organizational Behavior 

BIS 31 5 Business Information Systems 

MGT 333 Quantitative Business Analysis 

FIN 312 Financial Management 

MGT 312 Legal Framework of Business 

MGT 345 Operations Management 

MGT 490 Strategic Management and Policy Formulation 

Management Core Courses 

MGT 336 Management History and Theory 

MGT 365 Managing People: Theory and Practice 

MGT 431 Developing and Managing Work Teams 

MGT 445 Total Quality Improvement 

Management Career Direction 

Students must work with their advisor to decide on a particular 
career direction before undertaking these courses; requires 
departmental chairperson approval. 

Human Resource Development 
MGT 443 Human Resources Development 

MGT 461 Organizational Development 

MGT 452 Human Resources Law 

MGT 462 Managing Diversity 



Operations 
MGT 41 5 
MGT 446 
MGT 425 
MGT 465 



Applied Decision Models 
Process Design and Management 
Materials Management 
Logistics and Supply Management 



Business Elective 

Any 300- or 400- level course in College of Business except ACT 355 

Non-Business electives 

Courses outside the College of Business 

Total credits: 



57 

6 
3 
6 
3 
3 
6 
6 
9 
3 
6 
6 

24 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 

12 

3 
3 
3 
3 

12 



12 



120 



MGT 120 three credits 

Business, Government, and Social 

Responsibility 

The role of private enterprise in the economy 
and in society. The course explores economic, 
political, and ethical dimensions of business 
actions. Case examples are drawn from 
around the world Not for use by College of 
Business students, specifically, cannot be 
used as a College of Business elective within 
the business degree. Students changing to a 
College of Business major who have taken 
this course may use it as a substitute for GBA 
101/102. 

MGT 210 three credits 
Business Statistics I 

Prerequisites: MTH 107; sophomore 
standing 

Examines descriptive and inferential statistics 
with applications applied to business. Topics 
include basic probability; and discrete, 
normal and sampling probability distribu- 
tions. Emphasis is placed on concept 
applications and the proper use of statistics 
to analyze data with computer software. 

MGT 211 three credits 
Business Statistics II 

Prerequisites: MGT 210; sophomore 
standing or permission of advisor 
Examines inferential statistics focusing on 
regression and correlation analysis, time 
series forecasting, design of experiments, 
enumerative studies and the analysis of 
differences. Emphasis is on applications of 
statistical concepts as practiced in business & 
industry. Students will use appropriate 
computer software to perform statistical 
analyses. 

MGT 311 three credits E, O 
Organizational Behavior 

Prerequisites: ENL 265; junior standing 
An interactive skills-building course to 
improve managerial and team performance. 
Students will develop an understanding of 
themselves in relation to others in an 
organizational context. Class time will be 
allocated among short lectures, exercises, 
discussion, process observation, role playing, 
and team work research. 

MGT 312 three credits E 
Legal Framework of Business 

Prerequisite: At least sophomore standing. 
Overview of the legal environment of 
business. Topics covered include contracts, 
agency and tort law; labor law; securities 
law. Students will develop a general 
background in the major aspects of the law 
as it affects the daily business environment. 



192 



MGT333 three credits 
Quantitative Business Analysis 

Prerequisites: MTH 107; MGT210, 211; 
junior standing 

Provides the student with an appreciation of 
the power and limitations of common 
managerial techniques used in the analysis of 
business problems requiring a quantitative 
decision-making approach. The emphasis is 
on a careful presentation of problem 
formulation, mathematical analysis, and 
solution procedures using examples involving 
business situations. Computer use is 
emphasized. 

MGT 336 three credits 
Management History and Theory 

Prerequisites: MGT 31 1 and at least junior 
standing 

A critical review of organizational theory 
and practice, from the "Classical Schools" 
to contemporary notions. Students will learn 
the historical roots of current managerial 
practices; primary focus will be put upon 
students being able to examine critically and 
apply such theories to current business 
organizations. 

MGT 345 three credits 
Operations Management 

Prerequisites: MGT 333 and at least junior 
standing 

The planning, coordination, and execution 
of activities in transformation processes in 
manufacturing and serve organizations 
where the inputs to the process may be the 
customers themselves. The role of the 
operations manager is explored, and 
attention is given to analytical methods that 
improve production processes and enhance 
competitiveness. 

MGT 365 three credits 

Managing People: Theory and Practice 

Prerequisites: MGT 31 1 and at least junior 
standing 

An examination of the interrelated concepts 
of motivation and leadership. Students will 
explore, experientially and theoretically, 
historical and contemporary theories of 
supervising, managing, leading, and 
motivating people in organizational 
contexts. Specific "real world" tools will be 
examined for their efficacy in supervising 
and managing people. 

MGT 399 three credits 
Internship in Management 

Prerequisites: At least junior standing; 
permission of the instructor, department 
chairperson, and college dean; approved 
contract filed by end of the add/drop period 



of the semester 

Work experience at a specialized level 
supervised for graded academic credit by a 
faculty member in the student's major field. 
Terms and hours to be arranged. Students 
must register in advance to receive credit for 
an internship in the Business College. 
Deadline for registration and approval for 
internship contracts is the end of the add/ 
drop period; no late contracts or registra- 
tions will be accepted. For specific proce- 
dures and regulations, see section of 
catalogue on Other Learning Experiences. 

MGT 415 three credits 
Applied Decision Models 

Prerequisite: MGT 333; and at least junior 
standing 

Manufacturing and service applications of 
selected analytical decision-making tools and 
techniques. The course illustrates, by 
example, how manufacturing and service 
operations can apply quantitative tools to 
decisions using queuing theory; staffing, 
scheduling or product mix planning using 
linear programming; and using simulation in 
inventory control. (Formerly offered as MGT 
334.) 

MGT 420 three credits 
International Management 

Prerequisites: Senior standing 
A systematic treatment of management and 
marketing on a global scale. Emphasis is 
placed on the study of the dimensions of 
foreign market environments, marketing 
across national boundaries and manage- 
ment and marketing simultaneously in two 
or more national environments. 

MGT 425 three credits 
Materials Management 

Prerequisite: MGT 345 and senior standing 
Focuses on the management of materials 
flow within and outside the organization. 
The course describes strategies, methods 
and technologies of an efficient materials 
management system along the supply chain. 
Topics covered include capacity planning 
and control, inventory models, materials 
requirements planning (MRPII), distribution 
requirements planning (DRP), and Just-In- 
Time) JIT. The learning process includes case 
studies, industrial projects, group presenta- 
tions, participation in professional meetings, 
and training on an MRP system. 

MGT 431 three credits 

Developing and Managing Work Teams 

Prerequisites: MGT 31 1, 336, 365 and 
senior standing 

An exploration of the concept of team 



development in U.S. organizations today. 
Students will examine the approaches, 
successes, and failures of team develop- 
ment, and will be required to engage in 
team management and development efforts 
as a significant part of the course. 

MGT 443 three credits 

Human Resources Development 

Prerequisites: MGT 311, 336, 365 and 
senior standing 

The study of sets of systematic, planned 
activities which organizations develop for 
the purpose of providing people with skills/ 
knowledge appropriate for the current 
health and future positive growth of the 
people and organization. Students will learn 
basic Human Resources Management skills, 
the roles of HRD professionals, organiza- 
tional and individual needs assessment tools/ 
skills; training and development program 
development tools; and HRD program 
evaluation skills/techniques. Cross-listed as 
LST 443. 

MGT 445 three credits 
Total Quality Improvement 

Prerequisite: MGT 345 and senior standing 
Principles and practices underlying the 
continuous improvement of quality in the 
business and non-business enterprise. 
Particular attention is given to philosophies 
and methods of managing for quality, and 
to tools for quality improvement. The 
instructional approach is highly experiential 
and interactive, and features contact with 
quality systems professionals. 

MGT 446 three credits 
Process Management 

Prerequisites: MGT 345 and senior standing 
Methodologies for the design and manage- 
ment of processes used for delivering and 
maintaining products and services to 
customers. This course examines customer 
requirements for products and services and 
the contexts in which this information will 
be used by looking at a total design 
methodology that integrates customer- 
focused, technology-independent methods 
with traditional engineering design 
processes. A systems approach is employed 
that recognizes the impact on the design 
process of technology, the competitor, the 
customer, costs of production, and quality, 
innovation, and delivery. 

MGT 452 three credits D 
Human Resources Law 

Prerequisites: MGT 312, 365; and at least 
junior standing 

The laws, executive orders, and political and 



193 



College of Business 



social factors external to firms which affect 
their human resources management 
practices. Topics include ethics and social 
responsibility, regulatory issues, EEOC, 
affirmative action, performance appraisal, 
and discrimination in the workplace. Cross- 
listed as LST452. 

MGT461 three credits 
Organizational Development 

Prerequisites: MGT 311, 336; and at least 
junior standing 

An exploration of contemporary theories for 
effectively structuring and maintaining 
organizations. Students will examine the 
theories and assumptions which underlie the 
decisions to configure business organiza- 
tions. Topics include: OD and systems 
theory, bureaucratic structures, organic 
structures, virtual corporations, team 
structures, the relationship of structure to 
people, managing change. 

MGT 462 three credits D 
Managing Diversity 

Prerequisites: MGT 31 1, 336, 365; and at 
least junior standing 

A skills-building course aimed at increasing 
awareness of the issues related to managing 
multicultural workplaces. Focus will be 
placed on the challenges and opportunities 
afforded leaders/managers in dynamic U.S.- 
based workplaces. Personal exploration of 
prejudices, myths/facts, and perceptions 
which shape effective leadership will be 
central to this course. Cross-listed as LST 
462. 

MGT 463 three credits 
Management of Technology 

Prerequisite: MGT 461; and at least junior 
standing 

Issues and concerns in technology adoption 
and implementation. Particular attention is 
given to the implication of new technology 
for business strategies regarding work force, 
employment, processes, investment, and 
marketing. The course emphasizes the 
immense potential of advancing technology 
and channeling it for higher productivity and 
better quality. This course serves as an 
elective in the College of Business. 

MGT 465 three credits 

Logistics and Supply Management 

Prerequisite: Senior standing 
Skills, issues, and operating procedures in the 
integrated supply chain process. Attention is 
given to skills building in negotiation, price/ 
cost analysis, and coverage of logistical 
resources, organization, and contemporary 
issues such as E-commerce. The instructional 



approach is highly participative with in-class 
simulations case discussions, and contact 
with industry professionals. 

MGT 470 three credits 
Management Seminar 

Prerequisite: Senior standing 

Reading and discussion of important research 

and literature in student's particular field of 

interest, culminating in a major written 

paper. 

MGT 490 three credits E 
Strategic Management and Policy 
Formulation 

Prerequisites: MGT 311; 333; 345; FIN 312; 
BIS 315 or ACT 355; MKT 211; senior 
standing; for business majors only 
The capstone course for majors in business 
administration. Students bring to bear all 
their functional expertise, communication 
skills, and problem-solving abilities onto 
issues faced by senior management in 
business organizations in the world today. 
This course is to be taken during the last 
year of the student's program. 

MGT 495 variable credit 
Independent Study 

Prerequisites: Upper-division standing; 
permission of instructor, department 
chairperson, and college dean 
Study under the supervision of a faculty 
member in an area not otherwise part of the 
discipline's course offerings. Conditions and 
hours to be arranged. 

MGT 396, 496 three credits 
Directed Study 

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor, 
department chairperson, and college dean 
Study under the supervision of a faculty 
member in an area covered in a regular 
course not currently being offered. 
Conditions and hours to be arranged. 



194 



Marketing and Business Information Systems 



Faculty and Fields of Interest 



The Department of Marketing and Business 
Information Systems offers major programs 
leading to Bachelor of Science Degree. 



Nora Ganim Barnes marketing research, 
consumer behavior 



The purpose of the Marketing Program is to 
prepare students for careers in domestic and 
international marketing with a focus on 
consumers and acquiring information for 
decision making. 



John A. Chopoorian (chairperson) 

international marketing, marketing 
management 



Fahri Karakaya consumer behavior, 
marketing research, marketing 
management 



The purpose of the Business Information 
Systems program is to prepare students for 
careers in the application of information 
technology that solve business problems and 
explore new business opportunities. 



Omar E. M. Khalil (assistant dean for 
graduate programs) management 
information systems, database systems, 
information management 



Sharon Ordoobadi Information Systems 

Timothy Shea systems analysis, database 
systems, management information systems 

ShouhongWang systems analysis, 
programming, electronic commerce 

D. Steven White services marketing, 
promotion and advertising, selling and 
sales management, international marketing 



195 College of Business 



Business Information Systems Major 

BS degree 

Requirements 

Credits 



The Business Information Systems program General Requirements — Years One and Two 57 

of study is designed to prepare students for 

one of the most rapidly expanding profes- ENL 101, 102 Critical Writing and Reading I, II 6 

sions in the business world. MTH 107 Elements of College Math Enhanced 3 

MGT 2 1 0, 2 1 1 Business Statistics I, II 6 

BIS prepares the student both to analyze an GBA 101 The Business Organization 3 

organization's information systems structure ENL 265 Business Communications 3 

and to design and implement appropriate ECO 231 , 232 Principles of Micro/Macroeconomics 6 

systems. This major offers a broad educa- ACT 21 1,212 PrinciplesofAccountingl.il 6 

tional experience in business, computer Cult./artistic literacy 9 

applications, the humanities, and social Diversity course 3 

sciences Natural science/technology 6 

Social science electives 6 

The primary emphasis of the program is the 

application of the "systems approach " to Core Business Requirements 24 

business problem-solving and decision- 
making. Analysis of both on-campus and MKT 211 Principles of Marketing 3 
off-campus "real-life" business systems MGT 311 Organizational Behavior 3 
provides students with practical experience BIS 315 Business Information Systems 3 
and increases their value in the professional MGT 333 Quantitative Business Analysis 3 
career market FIN 312 Financial Management 3 

MGT 312 Legal Framework of Business 3 

Business Information Systems majors differ MGT 345 Operations Management 3 

from computer science majors in emphasiz- MGT 490 Strategic Management and Policy Formulation 3 
ing applications of computer systems over 

their development and analysis. The Business Information Systems Core Courses 21 

applications are focused on complex 

business needs in organizations. BIS majors BIS 211 Information Technology Hardware and Software 3 

conceptualize, design, and implement high BIS 212 Programming and Problem Solving 3 

quality business systems and build bridges BIS 322 Systems Analysis and Design 3 

between technical realities, organizational BIS 341 Data Communication and Networks 3 

functions, and decision-making by manag- BIS 432 Database Design and Implementation 3 

ers. BIS 461 Management of Information Systems 3 

BIS 462 Advanced Information Systems Project 3 

Business Information Systems Elective 3 

Business Elective 3 

Any 300- or 400- level course in College of Business except ACT 355 

Non-Business Electives 12 

Courses outside the College of Business 

Total credits: 120 



196 



Business Information Systems Courses 



BIS 211 three credits 

Information Technology Hardware and 

Software 

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing 
Provides the hardware-software technologi- 
cal background to enable students to 
understand the tradeoffs in computer 
systems architecture for effective use in the 
business environment. Topics include 
hardware components (e.g., CPU architec- 
ture, memory, registers, addressing modes, 
busses, instruction sets, peripheral devices) 
and software components (e.g., software 
environment, system software evolution, 
and the types and functionalities of 
operating systems and system-user 
interfaces. BIS majors only, cannot be used 
to fulfill a Business Elective for non-BIS 
majors. 

BIS 212 three credits 

Problem Solving and Programming 

Prerequisite: BIS 101; sophomore standing 
Develops skills in business computing 
problem solving. Issues include business 
data processing, business software 
development, Web-page development, 
graphical user interface design, and decision 
support systems. The course provides an 
overview of multiple computer languages 
(COBOL, C++, HTML, JavaScript, Java, and 
Visual BASIC) that are commonly used in the 
business field. Students learn to use 
structured programming and object- 
oriented programming techniques for 
business computing. BIS majors only, cannot 
be used to fulfill a Business Elective for non- 
BIS majors. 

BIS 312 three credits 

Web-Based Application Development 

and Advanced Programing 

Prerequisites: BIS 212 and junior standing 
The use of computer programming to 
develop Web-based computing applications. 
Topics include physical design, program- 
ming, testing, and implementation of three- 
tier Web-based information systems. 
Emphasis is placed on programming on the 
server's side. Students learn advanced 
computer programming languages, 
including CGFI Perl and Java, to implement 
Web-based business applications. 

BIS 315 three credits E 
Information Systems 

Prerequisite: At least junior standing; BIS 101, 
or ENL 102, or permission of Assistant Dean 
for Undergraduate Programs. 
Provides an understanding of information 
technology and systems and how information 
is used in support of decisions and organiza- 



tional processes. Emphasis is on how 
information systems relate to organizational 
systems and decision making, information 
systems components, implementation and 
evaluation of systems performance, and 
ethical issues related to information systems 
design and use. Cannot be used as a 
Business Elective by Accounting Majors. 

BIS 322 three credits 

Business Systems Analysis and Design 

Prerequisites: BIS 31 5 and at least junior 
standing 

Provides students with a basic understand- 
ing of the process and the techniques of 
analyzing and designing computer-based 
information systems. The entire spectrum of 
system analysis and design will be covered, 
beginning with the first request for a system 
study and continuing through with the 
feasibility, analysis, design, implementation, 
and maintenance phases of the system 
development life cycle. 

BIS 341 three credits 

Data Communication and Networks 

Prerequisites: BIS 31 5 and at least junior 
standing 

How individual computers and groups of 
computers can be linked together via 
telecommunication networks to form 
optimally performing, integrated computer 
networks. Emphasis is placed on how such 
networks make the best use of available 
computer resources while also providing 
computer system users with information of 
the highest value at the lowest cost. The 
course also examines the communications 
environment, regulatory issues, and network 
pricing and management. 

BIS 371 three credits 

End-User Software Applications 

Prerequisite: At least junior standing; BIS 101 
Emphasizes computer competency in the 
use of personal computers in the modern 
business environment. Personal productivity 
applications involving spreadsheet analysis, 
database construction, and advanced word- 
processing applications are studied. 

BIS 372 three credits 
Managing PC Workstations 

Prerequisites: BIS 31 5 and junior standing; 
or permission of instructor 
Introduction to basic skills and techniques 
required to manage and maintain PC 
workstations. Students are introduced to PC 
operations and maintenance, and are shown 
how to complete hardware and software 
installations, step-by-step, using laboratory 
computer systems. 



BIS 375 three credits 

Information Systems Applications for 

Manufacturing 

Prerequisite: BIS 315 and junior standing; or 
permission of instructor 
Provides a basic understanding of the 
potential benefits, dangers, and limitations 
of using information technology (IT) and 
systems in support of manufacturing. Topics 
covered include contemporary manufactur- 
ing systems, IT-enabled manufacturing, IS 
applications in manufacturing (e.g., 
computer integrated manufacturing, CAD/ 
CAM, artificial intelligence, EDI). 

BIS 381 three credits 

Legal and Ethical Issues in Information 

Systems 

Prerequisite: BIS 31 5 and junior standing 
Legal and ethical issues relating to the use of 
information technology and systems in 
modern society. Topics to be covered include 
contracts for computer services such as sales 
and leasing; intellectual property areas such 
as software protection, licensing, copyright- 
ing, etc.; tort and constitutional areas 
dealing with rights of privacy; criminal areas 
dealing with computer crime, and tax law 
issues of computer hardware/software. 

BIS 399 three credits 

Internship in Business Information 

Systems 

Prerequisites: At least junior standing; 
permission of the instructor, department 
chairperson, and college dean; approved 
contract filed by end of the add/drop period 
of the semester 

Work experience at a specialized level 
supervised for graded academic credit by a 
faculty member in the student's major field. 
Terms and hours to be arranged. Students 
must register in advance to receive credit for 
an internship in the Business College. 
Deadline for registration and approval for 
internship contracts is the end of the add/ 
drop period; no late contracts or registra- 
tions will be accepted. For specific proce- 
dures and regulations, see section of 
catalogue on Other Learning Experiences. 

BIS 432 three credits 
Business Data Systems 

Prerequisites: At least junior standing; BIS 
322 

Students demonstrate their mastery of the 
analysis and design processes acquired in 
earlier courses by designing and constructing 
databases to meet the information needs of 
users. Topics covered include data models 
and modeling techniques, information 
engineering, database design and imple- 



197 



College of Business 



mentation, data quality and security, and the 
client/server environment. 

BIS 433 three credits 
Advanced Database/E-Business 
Applications Development 

Prerequisite: BIS 432 and senior standing 
Focuses on advanced database techniques 
and issues for e-commerce applications 
including web-based database application 
development and data warehousing design. 
The course provides extensive opportunities 
for applying and extending database 
concepts learned In BIS 432 (Business Data 
Systems) through hands-on use of web- 
based database applications development 
tools that are commonly used in the 
business field. Students complete a major 
project. 

BIS 451 three credits 
Management of End-User 
Computing 

Prerequisites: BIS 31 5 and senior standing 
Theoretical and conceptual framework of 
end-user computing. The course emphasizes 
the development of management informa- 
tion systems skills to guide end users in 
applications, analysis, hardware configura- 
tion selection, software package selection, 
training, and applications development. 

BIS 461 three credits 

Management of Information Systems 

Prerequisites: BIS 315 and senior standing 
Technical tools and managerial approaches 
required in the administration of information 
systems functions and projects. Topics 
include budgeting and planning, the 
structure and management of computer 
operations, measurement of operating 
performance, project management 
techniques for systems development and 
implementation, human resource manage- 
ment, and the role of the information 
systems manager. 

BIS 462 three credits 

Advanced Business Information Systems 
Projects 

Prerequisites: Senior standing 
Capstone course in the Business Information 
Systems program. Project management 
techniques are utilized in the development 
of a functioning information system for an 
actual organization. Group work is empha- 
sized in the implementation of technology- 
based solutions to real business problems. 

BIS 471 three credits 

Advanced Software Applications 

Prerequisite: BIS 315 and senior standing 



Emphasizes the necessity of computer 
competency in the use of personal comput- 
ers in the modern business environment. 
Personal productivity applications involving 
spreadsheet analysis, data base construction, 
advanced word processing, and web page 
design/construction are studied. 

BIS 475 three credits 
Information Systems and Business 
Process Design 

Prerequisites: BIS 31 5 and senior standing 
Introduction to the role if information 
technology (IT) and systems in support of an 
organization seeking to improve the 
efficiency and effectiveness of its business 
processes. Topics covered include total 
quality management (TQM) and business 
process reengineering (BPR). BPR method- 
ologies, enterprise modeling and modeling 
techniques, IT-enabled change, change 
management, IS role in BPR projects, and IS 
role in process management. 

BIS 481 three credits 

Electronic Commerce/Electronic Business 

Prerequisites: BIS 31 5 and senior standing 
Provides an understanding of what 
Electronic Commerce/Electronic Business 
(EC/EB) involves, how it is accomplished, and 
its impact on organizations. Both the 
Business-to-Business and the Business-to- 
Consumer sides of EC/EB are examined. 

BIS 490 three credits 

Special Topics in information Systems 

Prerequisite: Senior standing 
Reserved for special topics in business 
information systems. May be repeated with 
change of content. 

BIS 495 variable credit 
Independent Study 

Prerequisites: Upper-division standing; 
permission of instructor, department 
chairperson, and college dean 
Study under the supervision of a faculty 
member in an area not otherwise part of the 
discipline's course offerings. Conditions and 
hours to be arranged. 

BIS 396, 496 three credits 
Directed Study 

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor, 
department chairperson, and college dean 
Study under the supervision of a faculty 
member in an area covered in a regular 
course not currently being offered. 
Conditions and hours to be arranged. 



198 



Marketing Major 

BS degree 



Requirements 

Credits 



The marketing curriculum is designed to General Requirements — Years One and Two 57 

prepare students for successful careers in 

the many phases of marketing and ENL 101, 1 02 Critical Writing and Reading I, II 6 

distributing products and services through- MTH 107 Elements of College Math Enhanced 3 

out the economy. Graduates are prepared MGT210, 211 Business Statistics I, II 6 

for career opportunities such as research GBA101 The Business Organization 3 

analysts, sales managers, directors of ENL 265 Business Communications 3 

marketing programs, or professional sales ECO 231, 232 Principles of Micro/Macroeconomics 6 

personnel. ACT 21 1,212 Principles of Accounting I, II 6 

Cult./artistic literacy 9 

Courses are oriented toward problem- Diversity course 3 

solving and management decision-making. Natural science/technology 6 

The total curriculum emphasizes knowledge Social science electives 6 
and competence in marketing that will 

enable the program's graduates to progress Core Business Requirements 24 

well in the early stages of their careers; to 

develop the ability to analyze, plan, MKT 211 Principles of Marketing 3 

organize, coordinate, motivate and control; MGT 31 1 Organizational Behavior 3 

to think creatively; to communicate BIS 315 Business Information Systems 3 

effectively; and to gain broad perspectives MGT 333 Quantitative Business Analysis 3 

essential to the attainment of ownership or FIN 312 Financial Management 3 

executive management responsibilities. MGT 312 Legal Framework of Business 3 

MGT 345 Operations Management 3 

There are also opportunities for students to MGT 490 Strategic Management and Policy Formulation 3 
gam actual work experience through the 

International Business Association, which Marketing Core Courses 21 

sponsors student-run trade missions to 

various overseas locations, conducts a special MKT 331 Promotional Strategy . 3 

market research program in which students MKT 330 Marketing Intelligence and Information Technology 3 

do marketing research projects for area MKT 341 Consumer Behavior 3 

business and organizations, and oversees a MKT 420 International Marketing and Management 3 

student-run advertising agency, OmniAd. MKT 432 Sales Management 3 

MKT 441 Marketing Management 3 

MKT 442 Marketing Research 3 

Marketing Elective 3 

Business Elective 3 

Any 300- or 400- level course in College of Business except ACT 355 

Non-Business Electives 12 

Courses outside the College of Business 

Total credits: 120 



199 



College of Business 



Marketing Courses 



MKT 211 three credits E 
Principles of Marketing 

Prerequisite: sophomore standing 

A basic understanding of the role and scope 

of responsibilities facing contemporary 

marketing management. Emphasis is placed 

on the integration of marketing principles 

into an organized approach for decision 

making. 

MKT 330 three credits 

Marketing Intelligence and Information 

Technology 

Prerequisite: Junior standing; MKT 21 1 
Provides students a working knowledge of 
secondary data acquisition and analysis. This 
course places strong emphasis on written 
and oral communication skills. 

MKT 331 three credits 
Promotional Strategy 

Prerequisites: MKT 21 1 and junior standing 
Basic understanding of the factors affecting 
promotional decisions as well as the role of 
promotional effort in market strategy 
planning. The basic principles of advertising, 
sales promotion and personal selling are 
integrated. 

MKT 370 three credits 

Social and Ethical Issues in Marketing 

Prerequisites: MKT 21 1 and junior standing 
An examination and appraisal of contempo- 
rary thought on the extent to which 
marketing activities influence the ethical 
and social values of society. 

MKT 360 three credits 

Busi ness-to-Busi ness Marketing 

Prerequisites: MKT 21 1 and junior standing 
A study of contemporary market strategy 
techniques in industrial companies. 
Emphasis is placed on the case approach 
where students are provided an opportunity 
to develop strategies in response to given 
market opportunities and competitive 
behavior. 

MKT 372 three credits 

Retail Managementand Fashion 

Merchandising 

Prerequisites: MKT 21 1 and junior standing 
Presents a strategic marketing-oriented 
framework within which the student can 
appreciate the interrelationships of the 
industries and forces that make up the 
businesses bringing "fashion" fiber to 
market. The course examines the basic 
concepts fundamental to understanding the 
retail environment and the operation of 
retail firms. 



MKT 399 three credits 
Internship in Marketing 

Prerequisites: At least junior standing; 
permission of the instructor, department 
chairperson, and college dean; approved 
contract filed by end of the add/drop period 
of the semester 

Work experience at a specialized level 
supervised for graded academic credit by a 
faculty member in the student's major field. 
Terms and hours to be arranged. Students 
must register in advance to receive credit for 
an internship in the Business College. 
Deadline for registration and approval for 
internship contracts is the end of the add/ 
drop period; no late contracts or registra- 
tions will be accepted. For specific proce- 
dures and regulations, see section of 
catalogue on Other Learning Experiences. 

MKT 420 three credits 
International Marketing 

Prerequisites: MKT 21 1 and senior standing 
A systematic treatment of marketing and 
management on a global scale. Emphasis is 
placed on the study of the dimensions of 
foreign market environments, marketing 
across national boundaries and management 
and marketing simultaneously in two or 
more national environments. 

MKT 421 three credits 
Advertising 

Prerequisites: MKT 21 1, 331 and senior 
standing 

Principal form and applications of advertising 
alternatives as a part of overall market 
strategy planning. Considerable emphasis is 
placed on applied problems which allow for 
student planning of advertising campaigns. 

MKT 425 three credits 
Product Strategy 

Prerequisites: MKT 21 1 and senior standing 
The decision steps of the product develop- 
ment process: innovation strategy, opportu- 
nity identification, designing new products, 
testing and improving products, product 
introduction and profit management, and 
implementing the new product development 
process. 

MKT 431 three credits 
Consumer Behavior 

Prerequisites: MKT 21 1 and senior standing 
A study of consumer decision processes as a 
series of activities related to the purchase 
and consumption of goods. Emphasis is 
given to contemporary thought on the 
consumer problem-solving process, namely 
problem recognition, search, evaluation, 
commitment and post-purchase behavior. 



MKT 432 three credits 
Sales Management 

Prerequisites: MKT 211 and senior standing 
Sales programs are formulated and then 
implemented. This course deals with 
understanding the importance of these 
major responsibilities in an age of accelerat- 
ing product complexity. 

MKT 441 three credits 
Marketing Management 

Prerequisites: MKT 21 1 and senior standing 
A capstone course that integrates marketing 
and business principles learned m prior 
courses. Being decision-oriented and 
analytical it sets forth a definite way of 
surveying current developments in market- 
ing practice, with the advantage of allowing 
the student freedom, via the case approach, 
in his or her choice of executive action. 
Students are required to complete a 
marketing plan. 

MKT 442 three credits 
Marketing Research 

Prerequisites: MKT 211; MGT210, 211; 
MKT 330; and senior standing 
An examination of the market research 
process as used in approaching contempo- 
rary marketing problems. Emphasis is placed 
on the current status of research techniques 
and their application. 

MKT 490 three credits 
Special Topics in Marketing 

Prerequisite: Junior standing and MKT 21 1 
Reserved for special topics in Marketing. 
May be repeated with change of content. 

MKT 495 

Independent Study variable credit 
Prerequisites: Upper-division standing; 
permission of instructor, department 
chairperson, and college dean 
Study under the supervision of a faculty 
member in an area not otherwise part of the 
discipline's course offerings. Conditions and 
hours to be arranged. 

MKT 396, 496 

Directed Study three credits 
Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor, 
department chairperson, and college dean 
Study under the supervision of a faculty 
member in an area covered in a regular 
course not currently being offered. 
Conditions and hours to be arranged. 



200 



Graduate MBA Courses 

MBA graduate courses are not open to 
undergraduates. See the Graduate Catalogue 
for general and program requirements and 
for the descriptions for these courses. 



Foundation Courses 

MGT 500 three credits 
Statistical Analysis 

FIN 500 three credits 

Economic Concepts for Managers 

ACT 500 three credits 
Managerial Accounting 



Required MBA Core Courses 

ACT 650 three credits 
Accounting for Decision Making 

BIS 650 three credits 

Information Technology Management 

FIN 650 three credits 
Finance for Decision Making 

MGT 650 three credits 

Management of Organizational Behavior 

MGT 651 three credits 
Operations Analysis 

MKT 650 three credits 
Marketing Strategy 

MGT 659 three credits 
Strategic Management 



Elective MBA Courses 

ACT 670 three credits 
Financial Statements Analysis 

ACT 671 three credits 
Management Control and Business 
Improvement 

ACT 672 three credits 

Taxes and Business Decisions 

BIS 670 three credits 
Managing Information 

BIS 671 three credits 
Managing Systems 



BIS 672 three credits 

Digital Economy and Commerce 

FIN 670 three credits 
Investment Analysis 

FIN 671 three credits 
Personal Financial Planning 

FIN 672 three credits 

International Financial Management 

MGT 670 three credits 

Regulatory and Administrative Law 

MGT 671 three credits 

Management of Organizational Change 

MGT 672 three credits 

Designing Team-Based Organizations 

MGT 675 three credits 

International Supply Chain Management 

MGT 676 three credits 
Business Process Design 

MGT 677 three credits 

Leading, Motivating, and Empowering 

Others 

MKT 670 three credits 
Interactive Marketing 

MKT 671 three credits 
Marketing Research 

MKT 672 three credits 

International Business and Multinational 

Enterprises 

Common, Variable Courses 

ACT 690, BIS 690, FIN 690, MGT 690, 

MKT 690 three credits 
Special Topics 

ACT 695, BIS 695, FIN 695, MGT 695, 

MKT 695 variable credits 
Independent Study 

ACT 696, BIS 696, FIN 696, MGT 696, 

MKT 696 three credits 
Directed Study 



201 



College of Business 



College 

of Engineering 




The College of Engineering offers engineering programs 
leading to the B.S. degree in Electrical, Computer, 
Mechanical, and Civil Engineering and also the B.S. 
degree in Physics, Computer Science, Textile Science, 
and Textile Chemistry. 

Our engineering programs form a strong foundation in 
basic sciences, mathematics, and engineering sciences. 
Our applied science students acquire a strong founda- 
tion in the basic sciences and mathematics along with 
the applied sciences associated with their major. A 
progression of innovative design experiences culminates 
in a senior design project. Students in the College of 
Engineering use high-tech laboratories and sophisti- 
cated computer systems, beginning in their freshman 
year. The many faculty involved with significant research 
projects bring excitement into the classroom and tie 
theory to practical applications. 



Through cooperation with industry and government 
agencies, the College of Engineering also offers stu- 
dents the opportunity to obtain valuable work experi- 
ence before graduation. Qualified students can partici- 
pate in internships or cooperative education so that 
they gain practical engineering experience, a taste of 
the "real world," and significant income to help offset 
college expenses. 

All undergraduate engineering programs in Civil, 
Computer, Electrical, and Mechanical Engineering are 
accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commis- 
sion and the program in Computer Science is accredited 
by the Computing Accreditation Commission of the 
Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, 
1 1 1 Market Place, Suite 1 050, Baltimore, MD 2 1 202- 
4012. 



Our students develop the knowledge, creativity, and 
expertise to succeed in today's rapidly changing techni- 
cal world. Our graduates are actively recruited by 
industry and find rewarding careers, or have gone on 
for advanced degrees in competitive graduate programs 
around the country. 



Mission, Goals, and Objectives of the College of Engineering 



Transfer Agreements 



The mission and goals of the College of 
Engineering are molded by the history of the 
region and the institution, by the existing 
needs of the region and its people, and by 
the emerging opportunities for regional 
economic growth. Building upon its quality 
undergraduate and expanding graduate 
programs, its facilities, and its faculty, the 
mission of the University of Massachusetts 
Dartmouth College of Engineering is to 
provide educational opportunities for the 
region that emphasize teaching and 
learning, and to provide increased access to 
the College that will support economic 
growth in the region, the Commonwealth, 
and beyond. 

Given the above mission the educational 
goals of the University of Massachusetts 
Dartmouth College of Engineering are to 
provide its graduates with a solid foundation 
of knowledge, and a level of skill that will 
allow them to function successfully in their 
professions upon graduation, and to have a 
breadth of education that will allow them to 
meet the needs of the contemporary 
workplace and to be life-long learners. 

In particular, it is our intention to demon- 
strate that a graduate of the UMass 
Dartmouth College of Engineering will have 
met the following outcome objectives: 

• the ability to apply knowledge of 
mathematics, science, and engineering; 

• the ability to design and conduct 
experiments, as well as to analyze and 
interpret data; 

• the ability to design a system, compo- 
nent, or process to meet desired needs; 



• a recognition of the need for and an 
ability to engage in life-long learning; 

• a knowledge of contemporary issues; 
and, 

• the ability to use techniques, skills, and 
modern engineering and science tools 
necessary for professional practice. 

The knowledge and skills represented by the 
above list, which are consonant with those 
of the Accreditation Board for Engineering 
and Technology (ABET), are essential in 
contemporary engineering and science 
endeavors, and contribute significantly to 
the graduate's ability to function success- 
fully in the ever-challenging and exciting 
engineering and science professions. 



The College of Engineering seeks to 
facilitate the transfer of students from 
community colleges, and from four-year 
institutions that lack the engineering 
baccalaureate, by means of a variety of 
transfer and matriculation agreements. 
• 

Course and program articulation matrices 
are maintained to facilitate planning and 
transfer between UMass Dartmouth 
engineering curricula and the courses and 
programs at Bristol, Massasoit, and Cape 
Cod Community Colleges. Transfer 
applicants from other institutions are 
assessed individually. 
• 

Students at the University of Massachusetts 
Boston, Framingham State College, and 
Worcester State College who complete an 
identified 2-year curriculum and meet 
conditions for a standard of performance 
receive guaranteed admission to identified 
engineering programs at UMass Dartmouth. 



• the ability to function on multidisciplinary 
teams; 

• the ability to identify, formulate, and 
solve engineering and science problems; 

• the understanding of professional and 
ethical responsibility; 

• the ability to communicate effectively; 

• the broad education necessary to 
understand the impact of engineering 
and scientific solutions in a global/societal 
context; 



Distribution Requirements / General Education Requirements for Civil, 
Computer, Electrical, and Mechanical Engineering 

Degree candidates in the College of Engineering must satisfy the university's General 
Education requirements, as described in the Academic Policies section of this Catalogue. 
• 

General Education requirements in Areas M and S and the Tier 1 Writing/Information 
requirement are automatically satisfied by the courses shown as required for these majors. 
• 

The General Education requirements in Areas C, G, and D may be fulfilled by selecting courses 
from the approved lists in each area, using the General Education electives shown in the 
course requirement tables for each major. 
• 

The requirements for General Education areas E, I, W, and will be specified within courses 
that are included in each major. Requirement tables for these areas are included for each 
major. 



203 



College of Engineering 



Special Admission Programs 



Cooperative Education and Internships in the College of Engineering 



Engineering Path Admission 

The engineering programs are rigorous, 
requiring strong high school preparation and 
high motivation. Students who have 
demonstrated an aptitude for engineering 
based upon SATs, or have demonstrated the 
ability and motivation for engineering 
studies as evidenced by their high school 
record but have some deficiencies in their 
high school program of study, may still be 
offered admission to the college of 
engineering. 

If the deficiencies identified are corrected 
during the summer preceding the start of 
the fall semester, these students may enroll 
in the engineering major of their choice in 
the fall semester. Otherwise, these students 
will be admitted into the Engineering Path 
program. 

The Engineering Path program is intended 
for those students who have more deficien- 
cies than can be made up during the 
summer, but are otherwise qualified for the 
rigors of an engineering program. For these 
students, a year-long program at UMass 
Dartmouth as an undeclared engineering 
major is required during which deficiencies 
are made up and progress on other required 
courses is obtained. The second year of this 
program is essentially the freshman year of 
the specific engineering program of interest, 
less any required courses completed during 
the year as an undeclared engineering 
major. The student can choose this lighter 
load to further enhance his/her academic 
standing, or can select other required 
courses in the curriculum to help shorten the 
time to graduation. Students who enter the 
College of Engineering via the Engineering 
Path will be able to proceed at their own 
pace after their first year. 

Reduced Load 

Other students may carry a lighter course 
load than that defined by the standard 
curriculum, so that the degree requirements 
are completed in five years instead of four. 
The recommended option continues a 
schedule of 12 to 15 credits each semester 
and leads to a degree 5 years after 
admission. A five year schedule is recom- 
mended for those students who want a 
reduced course load to provide sufficient 
time for a part-time job, sports, or other 
extracurricular activities. Many students who 
start on the standard 4 year engineering 
curriculum later find it necessary to extend 
their program to 4 1/2 years or 5 years. For 
many students it is better to plan on a 5 year 
schedule from the beginning. 



College of Engineering students have the 
opportunity to gain valuable work experi- 
ence with industry and government 
agencies, before graduation. Working as 
engineers in industry or government 
agencies can provide engineering students 
with an exceptional educational experience. 

We encourage students majoring in any of 
the engineering fields to participate in co- 
op, engineering, or computer science 
internship opportunities. 

Cooperative Education 

Through cooperative education, students 
alternate work and school sessions. Co-op 
students often earn substantial income 
while completing their degree. This can 
reduce the financial burden of a college 
education. Furthermore, co-op students 
frequently are offered higher starting 
salaries after graduation. Meaningful, "real 
world" work experience often improves 
learning by providing practical connections 
for classroom theory. Technical work 
experiences can also help students make 
better choices of courses or career paths. 

Eligible Students 

Civil and Environmental Engineering, 
Computer Engineering, Computer Science, 
Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineer- 
ing, and Physics students are eligible to 
participate in the Cooperative Education 
Program. Students who meet specific 
academic standards defined by their 
respective department are invited to enroll 
in the program. All students are expected to 
attend special seminars which prepare them 
for interviewing and for working in industry. 

Those who choose to participate in co-op 
arrange interviews with co-op companies in 
March and April. Selection for work 
assignments is made by the employers and 
therefore cannot be guaranteed. However, 
students who are somewhat flexible about 
the nature and location of the assignment 
usually will not have difficulty obtaining 
one. Faculty make every effort to see that 
each student is placed. 

In order to remain in the co-op option, 
students must maintain acceptable 
academic and work performance while 
making satisfactory progress toward their 
degree. While working for a company, 
students must abide by the rules and 
regulations of their employer. In addition, 
students on work assignment must have 



appropriate health insurance as specified by 
the university. 

Schedule 

Co-op students alternate work and school 
every other session until the first semester of 
the senior year. The structure of the 
program allows for an employer to hire 
student "pairs," with each student 
employee following an alternating schedule. 
While one student is out on a work session 
[A], the other is taking courses [B], There is 
an "early start" option - Tracks 1 A and 1 B, 
and a "late start" option - Tracks 2 A and 2 
B. 

Track 1 A 



fall 


sprg 


sumr 


F1 


F2 


w 


Sol 


W 


So2 


W 


J1 


W 


J2 


w 


E 


Sri 


Sr2 





Track 1 B 



fall 


sprg 


sumr 


F1 


F2 


So1 


W 


So2 


W 


Jr1 


W 


E 


W 


J2 


W 


Sri 


Sr2 





Late Start Option 
Track 2 A 



fall 


sprg 


sumr 


F1 


F2 





SI 


W 


S2 


W 


J1 


W 


J2 


W 


E 


Sri 


Sr2 





Track 2 B 



fall 


sprg 


sumr 


F1 


F2 





S1 


S2 


W 


J1 


W 


E 


W 


J2 


W 


Sr1 


Sr2 





Key 

W Co-op work session 

F1 , F2 Fresh, semester 1 & 2 

S1, S2 Soph, semester 1 & 2 

J1,J2 Junior semester 1 & 2 

Sri , Sr2 Senior semester 1 & 2 

Open 

E Extra sessions, for electives 
or to fill in requirements 

Because of the enforced schedule, students 
should plan their programs of study carefully 
in order to get the courses they want. Any 



204 



modification to the above schedules 
requires approval of a co-op faculty 
coordinator and the co-op director. Most 
students complete five work sessions. To 
receive co-op certification upon graduation 
students must complete a minimum of four 
work sessions and satisfactorily meet all co- 
op requirements. Co-op certification will be 
documented on students' transcripts. 



Internships 

Many faculty in the College of Engineering 
at UMass Dartmouth have excellent 
relationships with engineering employers in 
the region and nation, generating many 
opportunities for engineering internships. In 
addition, students often contact employers 
directly and arrange internships with the 
assistance of faculty advisors. 

An internship is a supervised, practical 
learning experience, usually occurring 
during the last two years of the student's 
program. For students in the College of 
Engineering, an intern would be employed 
to do engineering work with a company or 
government agency while earning university 
credit. Supervision would be provided by 
the company or agency, and the work 
would be done outside the university except 
in unusual circumstances. A faculty advisor 
monitors the internship and works with the 
company or agency to see that the work is 
appropriate for the course credit being 
given. 

Each department in the college of 
engineering has an Engineering Internship 
course which can be used as at least 3 
credits of technical electives (CEN 400, ECE 
400, or MNE 400). In order for a student to 
enroll in one of these courses, the work 
activity must provide a learning experience 
equivalent to that obtained in a typical 
technical elective. The student must file a 
proposal detailing the work and learning 
experience for approval by their internship 
advisor before the experience begins. The 
student should keep a daily journal history 
of the work done and send copies or a 
written summary report to the advisor each 
week. The student must submit a summary 
report on the work experience before credit 
can be given. The individual courses may 
have other requirements which also must 
be met, as found in the course listings. Co- 
op students can use one of these engineer- 
ing internship courses to obtain credit for a 
qualified work session experience. 



A work experience which does not qualify 
for technical elective credit may be able to 
qualify as an Experiential Learning 
Internship and earn free elective credit 
under the rules of the Experiential Learning 
Program administered through the Office of 
Career Services. College of Engineering 
interns in this program must meet the 
advising, proposal and report writing 
requirements of the previous paragraph in 
addition to the requirements of Experiential 
Learning. 

Internships are usually done part time while 
the student continues taking classes; 
however, some internships are full time for 
a semester or more and may be far from 
campus. In those cases the intern may not 
be able to enroll in other courses. However, 
students enrolled in a university-recognized 
internship must have appropriate health 
insurance as specified by the university 
regardless of internship work location and 
the number of credits. 



205 



College of Engineering 



Engineering Core Courses 



Engineering Courses for all UMass 
Dartmouth Students 



The following courses are taken in common 
by students in some of the majors in the 
college. 

EGR 105 two credits 
Introduction to Engineering 

1 .5 hours lecture, 1 .5 hours laboratory 
Pre- or corequisites: PHY 1 1 1 or PHY 1 1 3 

EGR 107 three credits 

Introduction to Engineering Through 

Applied Science I 

Corequisites: PHY 111, MTH 113 
An introduction to engineering and applied 
science that emphasizes development of 
engineering problem-solving skills through 
work on team projects in engineering 
mechanics. The course applies calculus and 
physics problem-solving skills to projects that 
are directed by faculty from the Mechanical 
Engineering department. The course 
develops team work, written, oral and 
graphical communication skills and uses 
computer assistance with an emphasis on 
engineering graphics. 

EGR 108 two credits 

Introduction to Engineering Through 

Applied Science II 

Corequisites: PHY 112, MTH 114 
An introduction to engineering and applied 
science that emphasizes development of 
engineering problem-solving skills through 
work on team projects in DC and AC circuits, 
electromagnetics, and computer measure- 
ment and control. The course applies 
calculus and physics problem solving skills to 
projects in the Computer Engineering, 
Electrical Engineering and Mechanical 
Engineering disciplines. The course develops 
teamwork, written and oral communication 
skills, and uses computer tools (Electronic 
Workbench and MATLAB) for analysis and 
simulation. 

EGR 131 1 credit 
Introduction to Design 

.5 hours lecture, 1 .5 hours laboratory 
For students not in the IMPULSE program, 
covers the design fundamentals portion of 
EGR 107. 

EGR 232 three credits 
Principles of Thermodynamics 

3 hours lecture 

Pre- or corequisites: CHM 152, MTH 211 
A single semester comprehensive course in 
thermodynamics for non-Mechanical 
Engineering majors. The fundamentals of 
classical thermodynamics are presented. The 
first and second laws are formulated and 
applied to basic engineering systems. 



Properties of pure substances, their 
calculation and measurement are explored. 
Formulae and concepts for evaluating 
efficiency are derived. The combined first 
and second laws are used to develop the 
concepts of useful work, availability and 
exergy. Engineering applications are 
discussed and studied as time allows. 

EGR 241 three credits 
Engineering Mechanics I: Statics 

3 hours lecture 

Prerequisites: PHY 111 or PHY 1 13, MTH 
112 or MTH 1 14 

The first course in engineering mechanics, 
with two major objectives: first, to 
introduce the student to the science of 
engineering mechanics and second to 
introduce the student to the art of applying 
science to the solution of engineering 
problems. The specific vehicle or curriculum 
to accomplish these objectives will be a 
study of the statics of rigid bodies. 

EGR 242 three credits 

Engineering Mechanics II: Dynamics 

3 hours lecture 

Prerequisites: EGR 241, MTH 21 1 or MTH 
213 

Corequisite: MTH 212 or MNE 212 
A continuation of the study of mechanics 
initiated in EGR 241 . Work and energy 
methods are emphasized. Motion in 
accelerating coordinate systems and 
dynamics of system particles lead to the 
discussion of rigid body dynamics in three 
dimensions. A number of examples of rigid 
body motion are discussed. Free and forced 
vibrations of one degree of freedom, and 
free vibrations of multi-degree of freedom 
systems, are studied. The principle of virtual 
work is introduced and used to briefly 
discuss stability of equilibrium. 

EGR 301 three credits 

Applied Engineering Mathematics 

3 hours lecture 

Prerequisite: MTH 212 or MNE 212 
Mathematical methods useful to all 
engineering students. They include: 
elements of linear algebra, matrices, 
eigenvalue problems, systems of ordinary 
differential equations, Fourier series, partial 
differential equations, probability theory, 
mathematical statistics, and a brief 
introduction to complex numbers. 



The following courses are offered by the 
College of Engineering as interdisciplinary 
courses or as courses that may satisfy 
distribution and science requirements. 

EGR 101 three credits S 

The Technical Nature of the Human 

Environment 

3 hours lecture 

Three consecutive five-week mini-courses, 
primarily for non-engineers, designed to 
develop an understanding of the technical 
nature of structures such as buildings and 
bridges, transportation systems, and 
environmental systems. (Formerly EGR 100.) 

EGR 157 three credits S, O 
Science of Engineering 

2 hours lecture, 1 hour laboratory 
Prerequisite: honors requirements 
(3.2 G.P.A. or by invitation) 

The scientific principles underlying the 
practice of various engineering disciplines. 
This honors-level course is for non-science 
and non-engineering majors. 

EGR 203 three credits S 
Environmental Geology 

3 hours lecture 

A brief outline of earth's development to 
the present and basic materials of geol- 
ogy — rocks, minerals, and geological 
processes. The course examines how 
geologic processes and hazards influence 
human activities, the geologic aspects of 
pollution and waste disposal problems, etc. 
Prior exposure to geology or college-level 
math or science is not necessary 



Gen Ed note: Engineering courses satisfy 
the Natural Science and Technology 
requirement. Those marked S are appropri- 
ate for non-science/engineering majors. 



206 



Civil and Environmental Engineering 



Faculty and Fields of Interest Civil Engineering Major 

BS degree 



Civil and environmental engineering is 
the engineering of constructed facilities; of 
buildings, bridges, tunnels, and dams; of 
harbors and airports; of waterways, 
railways, and highways; of water power, 
irrigation, drainage, and water supply; of 
wastewater and hazardous waste disposal 
and environmental health systems. Civil 
Engineers are the professionals who plan, 
design, direct the construction, and often 
maintain these facilities. 

The program is accredited by the Engineer- 
ing Accreditation Commission of the 
Accreditation Board of Engineering and 
Technology. The department also partici- 
pates in the college's co-op program. 

Goals 

The primary goal of the Civil Engineering 
Program at UMass Dartmouth is to provide 
the academic preparation necessary for 
students to be able to enter the profession 
at the engineer intern level and continue in 
the practice of civil and environmental 
engineering. The program also has the goal 
of providing the necessary academic 
preparation for students to be able to 
continue their education at the graduate 
level. 

Objectives 

To meet the above goals, the Department 
has the following program objectives: 

• To provide each student with a thorough 
grounding in mathematics, the basic 
sciences, and the engineering sciences. 

• To provide each student with a broad 
background in civil and environmental 
engineering by introducing each of the 
engineering specialties within civil and 
environmental engineering. 

• To provide each student with the 
opportunity to gain some depth of 
understanding in two or more of the 
following specialties: environmental 
engineering; geotechnical engineering; 
structural engineering; transportation 
engineering or water resources engineering. 

• To provide each student with the 
opportunity to undertake a major design 
project while working in a team environ- 
ment with peers. 

• To provide each student with an 
understanding of the social implications and 
humanistic meanings of his or her place in 
society as both a citizen and a professional. 



Neil Fennessey hydrology, water resources 
engineering 

Thomas Paul Jackivicz environmental 
engineering, surveying 

MadhusudanJhaveri geotechnical 
engineering, solid mechanics 

Heather J. Miller geotechnical 
engineering 

WalaaS. Mogawer (acting chairperson) 

transportation engineering 

SukalyanSengupta environmental 
engineering 



The academic preparation for a profession 
which is as varied as civil and environmental 
engineering requires considerable breadth as 
well as depth. The department provides this 
breadth and depth through its stated goals 
and objectives. Each student's program 
includes a sequence of technical electives 
which are a combination of engineering 
sciences and engineering design that 
culminates in a meaningful major design 
experience. To better prepare the student to 
take his or her place as a citizen as well as a 
professional, the curriculum is also designed 
to include a number of courses in the 
humanities and social sciences. 



Civil Engineering Certificate Programs 

The UMass Dartmouth Department of Civil 
and Environmental Engineering participates 
along with Massachusetts Maritime 
Academy and Cape Cod Community 
College in four Certificate programs: 

• Environmental Site Assessment 
Certificate 

• Wastewater Management Certificate 

• Coastal Zone Management Certificate 

• Geographical Information Systems (GIS) 
Certificate 

For further information, contact the UMass 
Dartmouth Continuing Education Office, 
extension 8071, or Environmental Technol- 
ogy Program, Cape Cod Community 
College, West Barnstable, MA 02668; 
phone 508 362-2131. 



General Education Departmental Requirements 

Students majoring in Civil and Environmental Engineering will meet their departmentally- 
controlled General Education requirements as follows: 

Area E: CEN 252 
Area I, Tier 2: CIS 261 
Area W, Tier 2: ENL 266 
Area 0: CEN 491 



207 



College of Engineering 



Requirements 



Technical Electives 



Semester Credits 



First Year 

ENL 101, 102 
CHM 151, 152 
CHM 161, 
MTH 111, 
PHY 1 13 
CEN 161 
CEN 252 



162 
112 



Critical Writing and Reading I, II 
Principles of Modern Chemistry I, II 
Intro Applied Chemistry Engineers I, II 
Analytical Geometry and Calculus I, II 
Classical Physics I 
Civil Engineering Design Graphics 
Ethical, Professional, and Safety Issues 



First 



14 



Second 



3 
3 
1 
4 
4 

1 

16 



All Civil Engineering majors must complete a 
minimum of 5 technical elective courses. 
They will select these courses from the lists 
below, according to a plan that is developed 
in consultation with the departmental 
advisor. Each student's plan must reflect a 
balance between Group I and Group II 
courses. The plan will also reflect an 
appropriate selection within five areas of 
emphasis. 



Second Year 

EGR 241, 242 
MTH 211, 212 
CEN 201 
CEN 21 1 
CEN 302 
CEN 312 
PHY 114 
CIS 261 
ENL 266 



Third Year 

CEN 303 
CEN 313 
CEN 307 
CEN 309 
CEN 403 
CEN 413 
ECE 21 1 
CEN 304 
CEN 310 
CEN 314 
CEN 308 
EGR 232 



Engineering Mechanics, I, II 
Calculus III, Differential Equations 
Surveying 

Surveying Laboratory 
Mechanics of Materials 
Mechanics of Materials Lab 
Classical Physics II 
Computer Programming FORTRAN 
Technical Communications 
General Education Elective 



Fluid Mechanics 

Fluid Mechanics Laboratory 

Structural Theory 

Introduction to Transportation 

Soil Mechanics 

Soil Mechanics Laboratory 

Elements of Electrical Engineering I 

Introduction to Environmental Engineering 

Construction Materials Lab 

Environmental Engineering Lab 

Structural Engineering 

Engineering Thermodynamics 

Technical Elective 

General Education Elective 



17 



3 
3 
3 
1 
3 

0.5 



3 

16.5 



17 



3 

0.5 

3 
3 
3 
3 
16.5 



Areas of Emphasis 

water resources 

environmental 

structural 

transportation 

geotechnical 



Group I Electives 

CEN 31 1 Water Resources Engineering 
CEN 321 Structural Analysis 
CEN 411 Water Quality Engineering 
CEN 421 Matrix Methods of Structural 
Analysis 

CEN 433 Special Topics in Geotechnical 

Engineering 
CEN 434 Traffic Engineering 

Group II Electives 

CEN 41 2 Pollution Control of Wastes 
CEN 422 Design of Structural Systems 
CEN 423 Design of Foundations and Earth 

Structures 
CEN 432 Pavement Design 
CEN 443 Computer-Aided Water Resources 

Design 



Fourth Year 

CEN 402 

MTH 331 
CEN 491 



Engineering Economy 
Technical Electives 
Probability 

Civil Engineering Project* 
General Education Requirements (C) 
General Education Requirements (D) 
General Education Requirements (G) 



16 



6 

2 

3 
3 
14 



Total Credits: 



127 



* two semester course, grades awarded in spring semester; one credit first semester; two 
credits second semester 



208 



Gen Ed note: Civil Engineering courses 
satisfy the Natural Science and Technology 
requirement. 



Civil and Environmental Engineering Courses 



CEN 161 three credits 

Civil Engineering Design Graphics 

3 hours lecture, 3 hours laboratory 
The standard graphical means of communi- 
cation between the civil engineer and the 
constructor are introduced. The students' 
graphic communication skills are developed 
including the ability to use computer-aided 
graphic systems. 

CEN 201 three credits 
Surveying 

3 hours lecture 

A study of the theory and practice of plane 
surveying as applied to property, topo- 
graphic, and engineering surveys, including 
curves, error theory and earth-work as 
related to civil engineering projects. 

CEN 211 one credit 
Surveying Laboratory 

3 hours laboratory 
Corequisite: CEN 201 

Consists of field practice to understand and 
supplement the CEN 201 course contents. 

CEN 252 one credit 

Ethical, Professional, and Safety Issues 

1 hour lecture 

The professional nature of engineering and 
the code of ethics which governs its practice. 
Safety issues pertaining to field practice by 
civil engineers will be covered. Students will 
learn to make competent on-the-job 
decisions and improve professional practice 
with an emphasis on safety for workers in the 
field. 

CEN 298 one to six credits 
Experiential Learning 

Prerequisites: At least sophomore standing; 
permission of the instructor, department 
chairperson, and college dean 
Work experience at an elective level 
supervised for academic credit by a faculty 
member in an appropriate academic field. 
Conditions and hours to be arranged. 
Graded CR/NC. For specific procedures and 
regulations, see section of catalogue on 
Other Learning Experiences. 

CEN 302 three credits 
Mechanics of Materials 

3 hours lecture 
Prerequisite: EGR 241 
The behavior of materials and members 
under axial load, torsion, flexure, shear and 
combined loads, including the deflection of 
beams and buckling of columns. The 
relationship between stress and strain, 
principal stresses and strains and yield and 
fracture criteria are discussed. 



CEN 303 three credits 
Fluid Mechanics 

3 hours lecture 
Prerequisite: EGR 242 
The mechanics of fluids, fluid properties, 
fluid statics. Kinematics and dynamics of 
flow fields are developed. Dimensional 
analysis, metering, laminar and turbulent 
flows will also be discussed. Emphasis is 
placed on energy equations with applica- 
tions to closed conduit and open channel 
flow problems. Boundary layer concepts and 
drag and lift forces on submerged bodies are 
also considered. 

CEN 304 three credits 
Introduction to Environmental 
Engineering 

3 hours lecture 

Prerequisites: CEN 303, CHM 152 
Introduction to the sanitary engineering 
field. The environmental problems of 
urbanization and the natural cycle of water 
are discussed. Elementary hydrology, 
physical, chemical and biological principles 
of the treatment of water and wastewater 
are covered. Municipal services — water 
mains, sanitary sewers and storm water 
drainage, layout and operation of purifica- 
tion and treatment works are studied in 
detail. In addition, state and federal 
regulatory standards are introduced and 
discussed. 

CEN 307 three credits 
Structural Theory 

3 hours lecture 
Prerequisite: CEN 302 
The methods of structural analysis and 
design of reinforced concrete beams, 
columns, frames, and one-and two-way 
slabs are formulated and discussed. 
Emphasis is placed on giving the student an 
understanding of the general behavior of 
statically indeterminate structures as well as 
the specific behavior of reinforced concrete 
members. 

CEN 308 three credits 
Structural Engineering 

3 hours lecture 
Prerequisite: CEN 307 
The field of structural engineering is 
introduced through a study of the methods 
of structural analysis and design of steel 
structures using the Load and Resistance 
Factor Design Method. Emphasis is placed 
on giving the student an understanding of 
the general behavior of all structures as well 
as the specific behavior of structural steel 
members. 



CEN 309 three credits 
Introduction to Transportation 
Engineering Systems 

3 hours lecture 

Prerequisites: PHY 113, CEN 201 
A comprehensive overview of the character- 
istics of transportation systems. Concepts in 
major areas such as geometric design, 
human factors, traffic engineering simula- 
tion, and transportation planning and 
evaluation, including travel behavior and 
socioeconomic effects, will be introduced. 
Principles of highway construction and 
design will be included. 

CEN 310 one-half credit 
Construction Materials Lab 

3 hours laboratory 
Corequisite: CEN 309 

A series of laboratory experiments aimed at 
measuring the engineering properties of 
asphalt, asphalt concrete and concrete to 
supplement the theory covered in CEN 309. 

CEN 311 three credits 
Water Resources Engineering 

3 hours lecture 
Prerequisite: CEN 303 
Elementary surface and groundwater 
hydrology, pressure flow and open channel 
flow fundamentals. Topics include basic 
probability and statistics with a water 
resources emphasis, watershed based and 
site drainage concepts, natural and 
constructed open channel systems, reservoir 
routing and design, analysis and manage- 
ment issues. Also covered are the analysis 
and design of pressure flow systems, dam 
spillways, energy dissipaters and stilling 
basins. An integrated, systems analyses 
approach to water resources engineering is 
emphasized. 

CEN 312 one half credit 
Mechanics of Materials Laboratory 

3 hours laboratory 

Corequisite: CEN 302 

Laboratory experiments conducted to 

investigate the physical characteristics of 

materials and to verify the assumptions 

made in the course Mechanics of Materials, 

CEN 302. 

CEN 313 one credit 

Fluid Mechanics Laboratory 

3 hours laboratory 
Corequisite: CEN 303 

Laboratory experiments supplementing the 
theory course CEN 303 Fluid Mechanics, 
with the objective of introducing the 
student to the field of fluid observations and 
experimentation. 



209 



College of Engineering 



CEN 314 one credit 
Introduction to Environmental 
Engineering Laboratory 

3 hours laboratory 

Corequisite: CEN 304 

Laboratory experiments in the testing of 

water and wastewater. Supplements the 

theory course CEN 304. 

CEN 321 three credits 
Structural Analysis 

3 hours lecture 
Prerequisite: CEN 307 
Deflections by singularity function, method 
of conjugate beams, influence lines of 
determinate and indeterminate beams and 
trusses, approximate analysis of indetermi- 
nate structures, analysis of beams and 
frames of non-prismatic members. 

CEN 400 three credits 

Civil Engineering Internship 

Training experience for civil engineering 
majors at various institutions/agencies 
recognized by the department. Internship 
proposals must be approved by the 
department chair. 

CEN 402 three credits 
Engineering Economy 

3 hours lecture 
Prerequisite: MTH 1 12 
A study of the principles involved in the 
analysis of proposed investment in capital 
assets for decision-making. Emphasis is 
placed on techniques for economy studies 
of multiple alternatives, uncertainties in 
forecasts, increment costs, taxes, retirement 
and replacement. Current economic issues, 
overview of economic decision-making and 
investment are also discussed. Enrollment is 
normally limited to engineering seniors. 

CEN 403 three credits 
Soil Mechanics 

3 hours lecture 
Prerequisite: CEN 302 
Corequisite: CEN 303 
Physical and mechanical properties of soils 
including weight-volume relationships, index 
and classification properties, compaction, 
permeability and consolidation characteris- 
tics. Effective stresses and soil strength 
parameters are also discussed. 

CEN 411 three credits 
Water Quality Engineering 

3 hours lecture 

Prerequisite: CEN 304 

Factors influencing the physical, chemical, 

and biological characteristics of surface and 

ground waters. Unit operations and 



processes related to water treatment are 
emphasized. 

CEN 412 three credits 
Pollution Control of Wastes 

3 hours lecture 
Prerequisite: CEN 41 1 
The nature and causes of wastewater 
pollutants and the biological, chemical, and 
physical characteristics of these wastes. The 
analysis, treatment, and disposal of 
domestic, municipal, and industrial wastes 
are studied. Design of wastewater collec- 
tion, pumping, and treatment facilities are 
practiced. 

CEN 413 one credit 

Soil Mechanics Laboratory 

3 hours laboratory 
Corequisite: CEN 403 

Laboratory experiments in testing of various 
types of soils. Supplements the theory 
course CEN 403. 

CEN 421 three credits 

Matrix Methods of Structural Analysis 

3 hours lecture 
Prerequisite: CEN 307 
Fundamental matrix algebra including 
inversion of matrices. Stiffness matrices for 
spring assemblages, trusses, beams, and 
planar frames. Introduction to flexibility 
method. Computer programs are used by 
students to solve matrix equations. 

CEN 422 three credits 
Design of Structural Systems 

3 hours lecture 
Prerequisite: CEN 308 
For students interested in a career in 
structural engineering, gives a basic 
understanding of the behavior of various 
two and three dimensional load carrying 
structural systems and also some means by 
which they can compare alternate structural 
systems. Design concepts, design assump- 
tions, and methods of analysis are stressed. 
The selection of the optimum system for a 
particular type structure is also discussed. 

CEN 423 three credits 

Design of Foundations and Earth 

Structures 

3 hours lecture 
Prerequisites: CEN 307, 403 
The design of shallow foundations (spread 
footings and mat foundations), deep 
foundations (piles and drilled shafts), and 
retaining walls. Emphasis is placed on 
considerations of bearing capacity and, 
settlement and stability. The design of 
braced cuts and lateral earth support 



systems is also discussed. 

CEN 432 three credits 
Pavement Design 

3 hours lecture 
Prerequisite: CEN 309 

Provides a comprehensive understanding of 
pavement design. Basic principles and 
various design methods of pavements will 
be introduced. Major topics to be covered 
are stresses in flexible and rigid pavements, 
AASHTO design method for flexible and 
rigid pavements, design of overlays, design 
of airports, and other design methods of 
flexible and rigid pavements. 

CEN 433 three credits 
Special Topics in Geotechnical 
Engineering 

3 hours lecture 
Prerequisite: CEN 403 
Selected topics of special interest in 
geotechnical and geoenvironmental 
engineering. Topics will include geotechnical 
aspects of landfill design, design principals 
and uses of geosynthetics for drainage 
systems, separation, and soil reinforcement, 
slope stability analysis, and various other 
techniques for soil stabilization and site 
improvement. 

CEN 434 three credits 
Traffic Engineering 

3 hours lecture 
Prerequisite: CEN 309 
Introduction to the concepts of movement 
control. Discussion and quantitative 
appraisal of the characteristics of the 
transport user, the vehicle, the road, the 
navigation and control systems. Written and 
oral reports are assigned on field data 
collections and evaluations of typical control 
problems, traffic studies, road user 
reactions, and potential future transport 
systems. 

CEN 443 three credits 
Computer-Aided Water Resources 
Design 

3 hours lecture 
Prerequisite: CEN 31 1 
Explores the relationship of hydrology and 
hydraulics, with the ultimate goal of 
designing a project. The concepts of 
precipitation, runoff, and hydrograph 
analysis and synthesis are emphasized. 
Additional topics include frequency analysis, 
flood routing, hydrologic synthesis and 
simulation techniques for large basins as 
well as urban and small watersheds. Topics 
also included are: backwater curves, 
submerged weirs, and water hammer. All 



210 



subjects are primarily focused in developing 
and designing a comprehensive hypothetical 
water-resources project with computer use 
as cornerstone. 

CEN 491 one credit in fall, two in spring 
Civil Engineering Project 

Prerequisites: Senior status 

One credit in fall, two in spring 

Final design experience requiring practitioner 

involvement, student reports, and oral 

presentations. An interdisciplinary, team 

approach is emphasized. Graded IP in fall. 

CEN 495 variable credit 
Independent Study 

Prerequisites: Upper-division standing; 
permission of instructor, department 
chairperson, and college dean 
Study under the supervision of a faculty 
member in an area not otherwise part of 
the discipline's course offerings. Conditions 
and hours to be arranged. 

CEN 196. 296, 396, 496 three credits 
Directed Study 

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor, 
department chairperson, and college dean 
Study under the supervision of a faculty 
member in an area covered in a regular 
course not currently being offered. 
Conditions and hours to be arranged. 



211 



College of Engineering 



Computer and Information Science 

Faculty and Fields of Interest 



Students who major in computer science are 
given a strong background in computer 
hardware and software, as well as a 
substantial amount of "hands-on" 
experience. They are prepared to work both 
in computer industry and business as well as 
pursue graduate studies in the discipline. 
Both major and minor programs are offered. 

The undergraduate program is accredited by 
the Accreditation Board for Engineering and 
Technology (ABET). 

Qualified computer science majors can 
benefit from the Cooperative Education 
program offered in cooperation with the 
local computer industry. 

The CIS department also offers a Master of 
Science Degree in Computer Science with a 
broad range of required and elective courses 
in theoretical computer science, computer 
systems, software engineering, parallel and 
distributed computing, and computer 
networks. See the Graduate Catalogue for 
information. 



Emad H. Aboelela computer networks, 
fuzzy systems 

Ramprasad Balasubramanian computer 
vision, motion detection, image processing 

Jan Bergandy distributed systems, software 
engineering, theoretical computer science 

Paul Bergstein object-oriented program- 
ming, databases 

Eugene Eberbach evolutionary computing, 
concurrent systems, artificial intelligence 

Robert Green software engineering, 
parallel architectures (on leave, associate 
provost for computer and information 
technology) 

Adam O. Hausknecht symbolic manipula- 
tors, foundations of computer science 

Anish Mathuria communication protocols, 
computer networks 

Boleslaw Mikolajczak (chairperson) 

algorithms and complexity, parallel and 
distributed processing, computer architec- 
ture, theoretical computer science 

Edmund B. Staples analysis of algorithms, 
mathematical applications, logical methods, 
and complexity theory 

Richard Upchurch social implications, 
software engineering, human-computer 
interaction 

Iren Valova artificial intelligence, neural 
networks, image processing 



Faculty with Computer and Information 
Science Joint Appointment 

Primary Department 

Adam Hausnecht 

Mathematics 



212 



Department Mission 

• To offer the strongest Bachelor of 
Science degree program in Computer 
Science in the state of Massachusetts 

• To define and develop graduate 
programs in Computer Science of 
intellectual rigor which meet regional 
needs 

• To develop a Computer and Information 
Science research program appropriate to 
the University 

• To meet regional and state needs 
through education, and industrial and 
community outreach 

• To build a satisfying and career 
enhancing environment at UMD 

• To help build an interdisciplinary 
intellectual environment at UMD 

• To develop curricula to meet the 
computer fluency needs of all UMD 
students. 



Program Goals 

Graduates who succeed as practicing 
computer scientists. 

Graduates who succeed in advanced study 
in computer science. 

Graduates who adapt and evolve in complex 
technological environments such 
as those found in the workplace. 
Graduates who influence the development 
of professional, ethical and legal 
aspects of computing. 



Program Outcomes 

To meet the program goals the Computer 
and Information Science Department, 
through its major in computer science, 
produce graduates who: 

• are able to individually solve problems in 
algorithmic manner with given computer 
resources and constraints; 

• apply their knowledge of mathematics, 
science and computer science to solve 
technical problems; 

• apply analytic and empirical techniques 
to evaluate technical problems and their 
solutions; 

• design system, component, or process to 
meet specified requirements; 

• participate as a member of a multidisci- 
plinary, problem solving team; 

• identify, formulate, and solve problems 
encountered when constructing 
solutions involving information technol- 
ogy; 

• articulate the social, professional, ethical 
and legal aspects of a computing milieu; 

• evaluate the impact of computing and 
information technology at the global/ 
societal level; 

• analyze contemporary issues related to 
the evolving discipline of computer 
science; 

• communicate effectively (needs to be 
understood as involving both orally and 
written, and include choosing and using 
the appropriate representations and/or 
media); 

• apply modern skills, techniques, and 
tools during professional practice. 



213 



College of Engineering 



Computer Science Major 

BS degree 



Requirements 



Semester Credits 



A wide selection of courses offers experi- Computer Science majors must fulfill the following requirements, in addition, all Computer 
ence in software engineering, computer Science majors must complete the CIS Department Exit Survey in their final semester, 

languages, artificial intelligence, compilers, 
computer networks, operating systems, *• 

computer architecture, computer graphics, Complete the following CIS core courses, each with a grade of X" or better 

parallel computing, human computer CIS 180 Object-Oriented Programming 4 

interaction and data bases, as well as CIS 181 Programming Paradigms 4 

theoretical aspects. The undergraduate CIS 190 Introduction to Procedural Programming 4 

computer science curriculum is object- CIS 272 Introduction to Computing Systems 4 

oriented, lab intensive, and directed toward CIS 273 Computer Organization and Design 4 

software development. The courses are CIS 280 Software Specification and Design 4 

supported by a network of state-of-the-art CIS 360 Algorithms and Data Structures 3 

workstations and various specialized CIS 361 Models of Computation 3 

laboratories CIS 370 Design of Operating Systems 4 

CIS 480 Software Engineering 4 

The Computer Science bachelor's degree CIS481 Parallel & Distnb Software Systems 3 
program is accredited by the Computing 2 

Accreditation Commission of the Accredita- Comp / efe four additional courses from the following CIS technical electives, 
tion Board of Engineering and Technology each wjth a grade of , Q or better 

(CAC/ABET, www.abet.org). C , S314 Computer Architecture 4 

CIS 410 Programming Language Design 3 

CIS 412 Found. Artificial Intelligence 3 

CIS 421 Intro. Theory of Computing 3 

CIS 422 Design of Parallel Algorithms 4 

CIS 431 Human-Computer Interaction 4 

CIS 443 Process-Based Design 3 

CIS 452 Database Systems 3 

CIS 454 Computer Graphics 3 

CIS 465 Topics in Computer Vision 3 

CIS 467 Image Analysis and Processing 3 

CIS 471 Compiler Design 3 

CIS 475 Computer Networks 3 

3. 

Complete the following Mathematics Requirements: 

MTH 1 1 1 Analytical Geometry & Calculus I 4 

MTH112 Analytical Geometry & Calculus II 4 

MTH 181 Discrete Structures I 3 

MTH 182 Discrete Structures II 3 

MTH 331 Probability 3 

4. 

Complete the following Science/Quantitative courses: 

PHY 113 Classical Physics I 4 

PHY 114 Classical Physics II 4 

CIS 362 Empirical Methods for Computer Science 3 

Science/Quantitative course 3 

5. 

Complete the General Education requirements: 

General Education Departmental Writing, Tier 1 and Tier 2; Information, Tier 7 

Requirements ENL 1 1 Critical Writing and Reading I 3 

ENL 102 Critical Writing and Reading II 3 

Students majoring in Computer Science will ENL 266 Technical Communications 3 
meet their departmentally-controlled Ethics and Cultural Responsibility 

General Education requirements as follows: CIS 381 Social and Ethical Aspects of Computing 3 

Cultural and Artistic Literacy 9 

Area E: Satisfied by CIS 381 Global Awareness 3 

Area I, Tier 2: Satisfied by any CIS course Diversity 3 

above CIS 110 6 . 

Area W, Tier 2: Satisfied by ENL 266 Complete 9 hours of free electives 9 

Area O: Satisfied by CIS Technical Electives, 

CIS 362 and 480 Program Total atleast120 



214 



Computer Science Minors 



Students interested in a minor should contact the CIS department for an application and admission requirements. The department offers 
three different minors, each with the emphasis indicated. Each requires credits as specified below. 

Admission to one of the minors 

Students must meet the university's admission requirements for a minor, which include having completed 54 credits. For computer science, 
prospective minors are encouraged to inquire and plan their minor program prior to earning 54 credits, because the structure of require- 
ments could necessitate the use of more than four semesters. Courses completed prior to formal declaration will count toward the minor 
program. 

Admission to the minor is accomplished through an application form available in the office of the chairperson of the department accompa- 
nied by current transcript(s). Upon acceptance the student is assigned an advisor, who works with the student to design an individual minor 
program that meets the stated requirements. Study plans are to be approved by the department chairperson. 



Computer Science 
Objectives 

1. To develop in the student an under- 
standing of computer science as a 
discipline, its structure, methodologies, 
and trends. 

2. To use the computer as a tool to solve 
problems. 

3. To give the student a sufficient 
background in computer science to 
continue his/her study of the discipline 
independently. 

4. To give students a sufficient knowl- 
edge in computer science to gain an 
advantage when entering the current 
job market. 



Requirements 

credits 

Complete the following courses with a 
grade of C or better: 

CIS 180 Object-Oriented Programming 
CIS 181 Programming Paradigms 
CIS 280 Software Specif. & Design 
CIS 360 Algorithms & Data Structures 
CIS 361 Models of Computation 
CIS One additional 300/400 course 
Total 

Students with prior experience in 
programming can substitute CIS 183 
Object Paradigm for the sequence of 
courses CIS 1 80/1 81 . Students can 
substitute the sequence CIS 1 1 5 Computer 
Programming in C / CIS 21 5 Program 
Design and Data Structures for the 
sequence CIS 180/181. 



Software Engineering 

Objectives 



1. 



2. 



To develop in the student the ability to 
use software development methodolo- 
gies and software processes to 
participate in the design and imple- 
mentation of software systems. 
To teach the student how to design 
and implement software. 
To give the student a sufficient 
background in software engineering to 
continue his/her study of the discipline 
independently. 

To give students a sufficient knowl- 
edge in software engineering to gain 
an advantage when entering the 
current job market. 



Requirements 



credits 



4 


CIS 180 


4 


CIS 181 


4 


CIS 280 


3 


CIS 480 


3 


CIS 481 


3 


CIS 


21 





Complete the following courses with a 
grade of C or better: 



Object-Oriented Programming 
Programming Paradigms 
Software Specif. & Design 
Software Engineering 
Parallel & Distr. Softw. Systems 
One additional 300/400 course 
Total 



CIS 480 has as a prerequisite CIS 362 
Empirical Methods. Students without a 
knowledge of empirical methods equivalent 
to CIS 362 must take that prerequisite 
course. 

Students with prior experience in program- 
ming can substitute CIS 183 Object 
Paradigm for the sequence of courses CIS 
180/181. 



System Software 
Objectives 

1. To develop in the student the ability to 
use computer systems and system 
software and participate in the design 
and implementation of operating 
systems and computer networks. 

2. To give the student a sufficient 
background in systems software to 
continue his/her study of the discipline 
independently. 

3. To give students a sufficient knowl- 
edge in operating software and 
computer networks to gain an 
advantage when entering the current 
job market. 



Requirements 



credits 



Complete the following courses with a 
grade of C or better: 



Computer Programming with C 3 

Program Design/Data Str. w/ C 3 

Intro, to Computing Systems 4 
Computer Organization and 

design 4 

Design of Operating Systems 4 

Computer Networks 3 

One additional 300/400 course 3 
Total 24 



4 


CIS 115 


4 


CIS 215 


4 


CIS 272 


4 


CIS 273 


3 




3 


CIS 370 


22 


CIS 475 




CIS 



215 



College of Engineering 



Gen Ed note: Computer Science courses 
satisfy the Natural Science and Technology 
requirement. 



Computer and Information Science Courses 



CIS 110 three credits 
Computer Literacy 

An introduction to computers, evolution of 
computer systems and the impact of 
computers on the society. In this hands-on 
laboratory course, students will use 
Macintosh computers to learn about 
components of computer systems and study 
various applications including word 
processing, spreadsheet, database, 
presentation and internet browsing 
software. With the HyperCard, students will 
learn how to design and program in the 
multimedia environment. Each student will 
then use this knowledge to develop an 
individual final project for the course. 

CIS 115 three credits 
Computer Programming with C 

Algorithm development, syntax and 
semantics of a high level programming 
language, debugging and verification of 
programs. Concepts of structured program- 
ming. Arrays, subroutines. Elementary 
system concepts (compilation, time-sharing). 

CIS 161 three credits 
Computer Programming BASIC 

An elementary programming course in the 
BASIC programming language, designed for 
the student with no prior experience in data 
processing. 

CIS 120 three credits 
Web Page Development 

An introduction to the theory and applica- 
tion of creating web pages using HTML and 
JavaScript. HTML is the underlying structure 
used by the World Wide Web and will be 
used in this course along with JavaScript to 
assist students in building a foundation to 
become proficient in designing web pages. 
The primary theme of the course is learning 
how to create web pages that are attractive, 
meaningful, and well designed. Assessment 
of achieving these goals also will be 
addressed. As time allows, DHTML (Dynamic 
HTML), XML and Java applets may be used. 

CIS 180 four credits 
Object-Oriented Programming 

3 hours lecture; 2 hours laboratory 
Basic concepts in programming, and 
introduction to the object paradigm. The 
course introduces the concept of the object 
paradigm and teaches how to design and 
implement simple programs in an object- 
oriented language. The course also covers 
the basics of how to use a computer and 
basic software tools in the process of 
developing programs. The honors version of 
the course, in addition to the above 



contents, covers issues of human-computer 
interface design and the introduction to 
dynamic models in object-oriented software 
designs. 

CIS 181 four credits 
Programming Paradigms 

3 hours lecture; 2 hours laboratory 
Prerequisite: CIS 180 
Software development using advanced 
object paradigm concepts; procedural 
paradigm; introduction to concurrency and 
fault tolerance. The course covers in depth 
the advanced topics of object paradigm 
such as inheritance polymorphism, and 
parametric polymorphism. These concepts 
are introduced in the context of developing 
software using software tools including the 
libraries of components. The procedural 
paradigm is introduced and compared with 
the object paradigm. The issues of program- 
ming with multiple processes, and program- 
ming of systems with exception handling 
capabilities are also addressed by this 
course. 

CIS 183 four credits 
Object-Oriented Paradigm 

3 hours lecture; 2 hours laboratory 
Introduction to the object paradigm. 
Software development using advanced 
object paradigm concepts of inheritance and 
polymorphism. Introduction to concurrency, 
and faulty tolerance. Developing software 
using software tools including the libraries 
of components. Comparison of procedural 
and object paradigms. Introduction to 
programming with multiple processes and 
with exception handling. 

CIS 190 four credits 

Introduction to Procedural Programming 

3 hours lecture; 2 hours laboratory 
Prerequisite: CIS major 
Procedural Programming (C/C++) under 
Unix. Data types, variable declarations, 
arithmetic expressions, conditional 
statements, macros, function prototypes, 
standard libraries, file processing, pointers, 
structures, unions, and dynamic memory 
management are discussed. Unix file system, 
shell scripts, input/output redirection, 
piping, programming with standard I/O, and 
unix system calls are covered. 

CIS 215 three credits 

Program Design and Data Structures 

WithC 

Prerequisite: CIS 1 1 5 

Program design issues, abstract data types, 
procedural and data abstraction issues. The 
following data structures are explored: 



linked lists, stacks, queues, binary trees, 
tables. Procedural abstractions such as: 
functions, recursive functions with variable 
number of parameters, are further dis- 
cussed. Features of the C programming 
language such as: preprocessor, macros, 
standard libraries, and programs with files 
are discussed. 

CIS 261 three credits 

Computer Programming, FORTRAN 

An intensive course in the FORTRAN 
programming language. 

CIS 265 three credits 

Program Design and Data Structures 

writhC 

Prerequisite: Any Programming Course 
An intensive course in the "C" program- 
ming language with introduction to UNIX 
for students who are already proficient in 
another high-level programming language 
such as BASIC, FORTRAN, or PASCAL. 

CIS 266 three credits 
Object-Oriented Programming in C++ 

Prerequisite: Any programming course 
Fundamental conceptual tools and their 
implementation of object-oriented design 
and programming such as: object, type, 
class, implementation hiding, inheritance, 
parametric typing, function overloading, 
polymorphism, source code reusability, and 
object code reusability. Object-Oriented 
Analysis/Design for problem solving. 
Implementation of Object-Oriented 
Programming paradigm is illustrated by 
program development in C++. 

CIS 272 four credits 

Introduction to Computing Systems 

3 hours lecture; 2 hours laboratory 
Prerequisite: CIS 190 
Corequisite: MTH 181 
Introduction to major components of 
computer system software. The course 
introduces fundamental concepts of 
computing systems, such as binary 
arithmetic and data representation, the Von 
Neumann model for processing computer 
programs, the operation of memory, 
instruction set, and machine and assembly 
language programming. It systematically 
presents the levels of transformations from 
machine language to assembly language to 
high level language. The role of such 
systems software components as assem- 
blers, compilers, linkers, loaders, and 
operating systems is studied. The course has 
a strong project component. 

CIS 273 four credits 



216 



ComputerOrganization and Design 

3 hours lecture; 2 hours laboratory 
Prerequisite: CIS 190 
Corequisite: MTH 181 
Laws of computer organization and design 
for RISC architectures. Interfaces between 
hardware and software are studied. 
Influence of instruction set on performance 
is presented. Design of a processor with 
pipelining is analyzed. Computer arithmetic 
is studied. Memory hierarchy and their 
influence on performance is documented. 
Elements of interfacing and I/O organization 
are included. The course has a design, 
implementation, and analytical components. 
(Formerly offered as CIS 270) 

CIS 280 four credits 

Software Specification and Design 

3 hours lecture; 2 hours laboratory 
Prerequisite: CIS 272 
Object-oriented analysis and design: 
methodologies and tools. The course 
focuses on methodologies of specification 
and design of software systems. It addresses 
the issues of user interface design and 
software prototyping. The course also 
presents the state of the art in the tool and 
environments supporting the front end of 
the software development cycle. 

CIS 298 one to six credits 
Experiential Learning 

Prerequisites: At least sophomore standing; 
permission of the instructor, department 
chairperson, and college dean 
Work experience at an elective level 
supervised for academic credit by a faculty 
member in an appropriate academic field. 
Conditions and hours to be arranged. 
Graded CR/NC. For specific procedures and 
regulations, see section of catalogue on 
Other Learning Experiences. 

CIS 314 four credits 
Computer Architecture 

Prerequisite: CIS 273, 360 
General organization of a computer system. 
Memory hierarchy. Emphasis on memory 
organization and management implementa- 
tion. Local and long distance communica- 
tion, bus, input-output organization and 
control. Programmed I/O and I/O processors. 
Interrupt handling. Processor organization; 
instruction set; arithmetic-logic unit; parallel 
and stack processors. Programmed and 
hardwired, central and distributed control. 

CIS 360 three credits 
Algorithms and Data Structures 

Prerequisite: CIS 181 
Comprehensive coverage of all major 



groups of algorithms, including divide-and- 
conquer, dynamic programming, greedy, 
backtracking, branch-and-bound, and 
parallel algorithms. Discussion of the design 
and implementation of complex, dynamic 
data structures. The course also covers an 
introduction to the functional paradigm. 

CIS 361 three credits 
Models of Computation 

Prerequisites: CIS 181, MTH 182 
Models of sequential, parallel, and distrib- 
uted computations. The Chomsky hierarchy 
of formal languages and their accepting 
machines are studied in detail. The relation- 
ship of these languages and machines to 
computer programs is presented. Influence 
of a Turing machine and related formalisms 
on modern computing are studied. 
Decidability of decision problems is 
explained. Several models of parallel and 
distributed computations are introduced and 
compared. 

CIS 362 three credits 

Empirical Methods for Computer Science 

Prerequisite: MTH 331 
Topics and methods supporting an experi- 
mental approach to the study of issues in 
computer science and software engineering. 
Course covers the basic principles of 
experimental design and case study 
construction. Emphasis in the course is on 
the use of empirical methods for decision 
making and the evaluation of research in 
computer science and software engineering 
that employ empirical methods. 

CIS 370 four credits 

Design of Operating Systems 

3 hours lecture; 2 hours laboratory 
Prerequisite: CIS 273 

Principles of modern operating systems and 
their design. Scientific principles and 
engineering rules of operating systems are 
explored. Process and storage management 
subsystems are analyzed in detail. Protection 
and security are taken into account in 
design. An introduction to distributed 
operating systems is also presented. This is a 
design and project based course with a 
laboratory component. 

CIS 381 three credits E 

Social and Ethical Aspects of Computing 

Prerequisite: Junior standing 
Introduction to the social, legal, and ethical 
issues of computing. Topics include how 
computer use affects social and work 
relationships and the uses of computers in 
society. These will be reviewed in the 
context of risks, privacy and intrusion, 



computer crime, intellectual property, and 
professional decision-making. Students 
analyze scenarios that allow them to view 
ethical decision-making as a crucial part of 
understanding the world of computing. 

CIS 410 three credits 
Programming Language Design 

Prerequisite: CIS 360 
Fundamental concepts and general 
principles underlying current programming 
languages and models. Topics include 
control and data abstractions, language 
processing and binding, the relationship 
between language design and language 
implementation. A variety of computational 
paradigms are discussed: functional 
programming, logic programming, object- 
oriented programming, and procedural 
programming. 

CIS 411 three credits 
Seminar 

Prerequisite: Senior CIS standing 
Advanced topics in Computer Science. 

CIS 412 three credits 
Artificial Intelligence 

Prerequisite: CIS 360 or permission of 
instructor 

Artificial intelligence problem-solving 
paradigms. The course covers heuristic 
versus algorithmic methods, rational and 
heuristic approaches, and description of 
cognitive processes; and objectives of work 
in artificial intelligence, the mid-brain 
problem and nature of intelligence, 
simulation of cognitive behavior, and self- 
organizing systems. Examples are given of 
representative applications. 

CIS 421 three credits 
Introduction to the Theory of 
Computing 

3 hours lecture 
Prerequisite: CIS 361 

Several of the most significant models of 
computation will be reviewed, i.e., Turing 
machines, 1 -calculus, predicate calculus. The 
traditional undecidibility results will be 
covered, along with the attempts to 
overcome the resulting limitations in 
restricted situations. Mechanical theorem 
provers will be considered. The resolution 
and unification predicate calculus methods 
will be discussed along with appropriate 
PROLOG programming assignments. The 
Boyer-Moore approach will be discussed, 
along with LISP programming assignments. 

CIS 422 four credits 

Design of Parallel Algorithms 



217 



College of Engineering 



3 hours lecture, 2 hours laboratory 
Prerequisite: CIS 360 or permission of 
instructor 

Design and analysis of algorithms for parallel 
computers with two modes of operation: 
shared memory, and message passing. 
Synchronous and asynchronous parallel 
algorithms for the following problems will 
be designed and implemented: selection, 
merging, sorting, searching, generating 
permutations and combinations, and matrix 
operations. Parallel computational complex- 
ity of these algorithms will be analyzed. 

CIS 430 three credits 

Data Mining and Knowledge Discovery 

Prerequisite: CIS 360 

Designed to provide students with a solid 
background in data mining and knowledge 
discovery concepts, tools, and methodology, 
as well as their applicability to real world 
problems. A variety of data mining 
techniques will be explored including 
memory-based reasoning, cluster detection, 
classification, neural networks, and finding 
understandable knowledge in large sets of 
real world examples. Some related topics 
such as web and multimedia mining will be 
discussed. Students will gam hands-on 
experience in data mining techniques using 
various data mining software packages and 
tools. 

CIS 431 four credits 
Human-Computer Interaction 

3 hours lecture; 3 hours laboratory 
Prerequisite: CIS 362 or permission of 
instructor 

Theory and principles for constructing 
usable software systems. Cognitive and 
effective aspects of users. The impact of 
user characteristics on design decisions. The 
construction and evaluation of the user 
interface. Sensory and perceptual aspects of 
interfaces, task structure, input modalities, 
screen layout, and user documentation. 
Individual concerns for systems such as 
personal productivity tools, real-time control 
systems, instructional software, and games. 

CIS 443 three credits 
Process-Based Design 

Prerequisite: CIS 480 or permission of 
instructor 

Design of systems composed of multiple, 
communicating processes (tasks), including 
distributed systems and real-time systems. 
Programming with ADA. 

CIS 452 three credits 
Database Systems 

Prerequisite: CIS 280 



Use of DBMS software m the development 
of an information system Overview of the 
ANSI/SPARC Study Group on Database 
Management Systems model. Relational 
database model techniques. Emphasis on 
user views necessary to support data 
management and retrieval. 

CIS 454 three credits 
ComputerGraphics 

Prerequisite: At least junior CIS standing 
Graphics devices. Two dimensional and 
three dimensional image representations 
and transformations. Graphics systems 
software architecture; graphics standards; 
packages. 

CIS 465 three credits 
Topics in Computer Vision 

Prerequisite: CIS 360 or permission of the 
instructor 

Foundations of computer vision. Image 
formats, projection models, regions, filters, 
edge detection, segmentation, shape 
description and representation, object 
recognition and understanding, and stereo- 
vision are discussed. 

CIS 467 three credits 

Image Analysis and Processing 

Prerequisite: CIS 360 or permission of the 
instructor 

Fundamentals in image analysis and 
processing. Topics in image processing such 
as display and filtering, image restoration, 
segmentation, compression of image 
information, warping, morphological 
processing of images, wavelets, multi- 
resolution imaging and unitary transforms 
are discussed. 

CIS 471 three credits 
Compiler Design 

Prerequisite: CIS 361 

Organization of a compiler including lexical 
and syntax analysis, symbol tables, object 
code generation, error detection and 
recovery, code optimization techniques, and 
overall design. Compilation techniques and 
run-time structures in block-structured 
language. 

CIS 475 three credits 
Computer Networks 

Prerequisites: CIS 370 
Topology of computer networks. Physical 
transmission. Error handling. Protocols. 
Satellite, packet radio, and local networks. 
Network interconnection. Security. 
Applications of computer networks. 

CIS 476 three credits 



Network Programming 

Prerequisite: CIS 370 
Introduction to computer networks, and 
methods for programming network services 
and applications. The course covers the 
Internet protocol suite (e.g. IP, TCP, UDP). 
socket programming, and client-server design 
(e g connectionless, connection oriented, 
multiprotocol). The course discusses the 
implementation of real-time applications (e.g. 
streaming audio and video), and application - 
level gateways and tunneling. In addition, the 
course addresses protocol implementation 
using routing sockets and raw sockets 
Programming projects represent a significant 
component of the course. 

CIS4S0 four credits 
Software Engineering 

3 hours lecture; 2 hours laboratory 
Prerequisite: CIS 280, 362 
Software engineering models and processes, 
total quality management. The course will 
address the technical, logistical, and social 
issues associated with the software 
development process, it will cover the issues 
of total quality management at the team 
and enterprise levels. 

CIS 481 three credits 

Parallel and Distributed Software 

Systems 

Prerequisite: CIS 280, 370 
Parallelism and distribution of processing; 
software bus concept; patterns m software 
design. The course provides an m-depth 
discussion of the software systems wit 
multiple processes and of the relationship 
between concurrency and distribution of 
processes. The concept of the software bus, 
the existing standards, and the issues 
associated with their implementation are 
covered 

CIS 490 :- r ee ceo ~s 
Machine Learning 

Prerequisite: CIS 360 
Constructing computer programs that 
automatically improve with expenence is the 
mam task of machine learning. The key 
algorithms in the area are presented. 
Learning concepts as decision trees, artrfiaal 
neural networks and Bayesian approach are 
discussed. The standard iterative 
dichotomizer (ID3) is presented, the issues of 
overfitting, attribute selection and handling 
missing data are discussed. Neural nets are 
discussed in detail, examples of supervised 
and unsupervised learning are presented. 
Instance-based learning, i.e. k-nearest 
neighbor learning, case-based reasoning are 
introduced. Genetic algonthms are discussed 



218 



Note: Some graduate courses may be open 
to undergraduates. Please consult your 
department chairperson. See the Graduate 
Catalogue for graduate general and program 
requirements. 



on introductory level. 

CIS 491, 492 three credits each 
Honors Project I, II 

Prerequisites: Junior standing, eligible for 
department honors program 
The project courses required for completion 
of the departmental honors program. A 
significant experience in developing a 
computer system (typically), but equivalent 
alternatives are allowed. This system should 
require an extensive design effort prior to 
implementation and a serious effort for this 
implementation. It should have scholarly 
and/or practical value and might well profit 
by being interdisciplinary in nature. 

CIS 495 variable credit 
Independent Study 

Prerequisites: Upper-division standing; 
permission of instructor, department 
chairperson, and college dean 
Study under the supervision of a faculty 
member in an area not otherwise part of 
the discipline's course offerings. Conditions 
and hours to be arranged. 

CIS 196, 296, 396, 496 three credits 
Directed Study 

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor, 
department chairperson, and college dean 
Study under the supervision of a faculty 
member in an area covered in a regular 
course not currently being offered. 
Conditions and hours to be arranged. 



Graduate Courses in Computer 
Science 

CIS 521 three credits 
Computability Theory 

Prerequisite: CIS 361 or permission of 
instructor 

Computability of sets and functions in terms 
of various computation models, Church- 
Turing thesis. Systems of recursion equations 
and Post canonical systems are studied. 
Properties of the classes of recursive 
functions, recursive sets, and recursively 
enumerable sets are also covered. 

CIS 522 three credits 
Algorithms and Complexity 

Prerequisite: CIS 360 or permission of 
instructor 

Evaluation of algorithms concerning their 
time and space complexity. Complexity hier- 
archies, axiomatic approach to computational 
complexity, NP complete problems, approxi- 
mation algorithms for these problems. 

CIS 525 three credits 

Parallel and Distributed Software 

Development 

Prerequisite: CIS 361 or permission of 
instructor 

Design and development of parallel and 
distributed systems. This course provides 
state-of-the art presentation of software 
development for parallel and distributed 
systems. A systematic model-based approach 
has been applied across stages of software 
development. Various versions of Petri nets 
are used to model , specify, validate, and 
verify correctness of parallel and distributed 
systems. Performance is also assessed based 
on stochastic Petri nets. Rapid prototyping of 
parallel and distributed systems with 
automatic code generation is an ultimate goal 
of his course. Comparison with other 
approaches is also provided. 

CIS 526 three credits 

Functional Programming and Type 

Theory 

Prerequisite: CIS 360 or permission of 
instructor 

Introduction to logic, type theory, and the 
lambda calculus. The course examines LISP as 
a first application of these ideas, consistency 
proofs using cut elimination and type theory, 
and constructive type of theory in functional 
programming languages in attempts to 
achieve program verification and automatic 
code generation. 



CIS 531 three credits 
Software System Specification 

Prerequisite: CIS 480 or equivalent 
Formal foundation of the theory and practice 
of software specification; production of 
correct, consistent, and reliable software 
systems by expressing the requirements of 
the system in formal ways. Formal and 
informal requirements analysis and specifica- 
tion techniques, the relation of analysis and 
specification to concerns of validation and 
verification, maintenance, and reusability. 

CIS 532 three credits 
Software Systems Design 

Prerequisite: CIS 480 or equivalent 
Principles and techniques for obtaining an 
architectural design from a system specifica- 
tion. Where appropriate, automated software 
design tools are used to demonstrate 
particular methodology. The relation of 
various design methods to the production of 
quality software that meets its specification, 
and the relation of design method to other 
life-cycle aspects. Design methods, design 
tools, the design process, and particular 
application domains for design techniques. 

CIS 543 three credits' 

Software Systems Design with ADA 

Prerequisite: CIS 443 or permission of 
instructor 

Software engineering principles and 
methodologies. Also considered are issues 
related to the life cycle of large systems 
developed in ADA, software engineering of 
real-time, fault-tolerant and distributed 
systems, and software reuse. 

CIS 545 three credits 
Programming Languages 

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor 
Techniques of formal definition of program- 
ming languages, semantics of programming 
languages, programming styles, and 
language effects on software production. 
Introduces current trends in programming 
such as language features of problem- 
oriented and object-oriented programming, 
and analysis and design of user-oriented 
application languages. 

CIS 552 three credits 
Database Design 

Prerequisite: CIS 452 or permission of 
instructor 

The relational, hierarchical, and network 
approaches to database systems, including 
relational algebra and calculus, data 
dependencies, normal forms, data semantics, 
query optimization, and concurrency control 
on distributed database systems. 



219 



College of Engineering 



CIS 554 three credits 
Advanced Computer Graphics 

Prerequisite: CIS 454 or permission of 
instructor 

Three-dimensional graphics including: color, 
shading, shadowing and texture, hidden 
surface algorithms. An extensive project will 
be assigned, including documentation and 
presentation. 

CIS 560 three credits 
Theoretical Computer Science 

Prerequisites: CIS 360, 361, or equivalents 
Theoretical basis of the development of 
computer science. The course details 
particular formalisms used in the design of 
hardware and software systems. Intrinsic 
limitations of computation are described. 
Advanced topics of automata theory and 
analysis of algorithms are included. The 
course also covers Turing machines, the 
halting problem, models of computation, 
intractable computations, polynomial 
reductions, P vs. NP, parallel algorithms, 
various formal descriptions and specifications 
of programs and computations, and proofs 
of program correctness and interactive proof 
systems. 

CIS 561 three credits 
Artificial Intelligence 

Expert system architectures: forward- 
production, logic programming, deductive 
retrieval, and semantic network systems. The 
course also treats natural language systems, 
illustrative working systems, and Al pro- 
gramming. 

CIS 564 three credits 
Mobile Robotics 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 
The theory, software and hardware for 
autonomous mobile robots. Reactive 
behavior-based, deliberative goal-based, and 
utility-based robotic architectures will be 
presented. Control and planning under 
bounded resources will be covered. 
Interaction with environment using sensors 
and actuators, robot kinematics and 
dynamics, reinforcement and evolutionary 
learning techniques for intelligent robots, 
interaction of competing and cooperating 
multi-robot systems will be presented. 
Various applications of mobile robots will be 
explored. 

CIS 565 three credits 
Evolutionary Computation 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing 
Presentation of evolutionary algorithms and 
comparison to traditional solving techniques. 
This course deals with a powerful new 



technique for solution of hard, intractable 
real-world problems, based on principles of 
natural evolution. Four main areas of 
evolutionary computation will be explored: 
genetic algorithms, genetic programming, 
evolution strategies, and evolutionary 
programming. Applications of evolutionary 
computation to related areas of computer 
science will be discussed. 

CIS 566 three credits 

Theory of Linear and Integer Program- 
ming and Computer Applications 

Prerequisite: CIS 360 or permission of 
instructor 

Basics of the simplex algorithm, tableaux, 
artificial variables, the two-phase method, 
the dual problem and its economic interpre- 
tation, primal-dual relationships and method. 
Also studied are applications to transporta- 
tion problems and network flows, the 
polynomial methods of Khachiyan and 
Karmarkar, and integer programming. 
Computer methods and exercises will be 
employed throughout. 

CIS 570 three credits 
Advanced Computer Systems 

Prerequisite: CIS 314 or equivalent 
In depth treatment of current computer 
systems, with performance issues at the 
center of an analytical approach. The course 
explores operating system software and the 
interrelation between architecture and 
system software. Advanced topics of 
compiling, assembly, linking and loading of 
high-level language software are included. 
The course treats mechanisms of IO and the 
memory hierarchy, various features of 
traditional machines, advanced features of 
modern machines such as RISC and multi- 
processor machines, and file systems and 
networked and distributed systems such as 
inter- and intra-nets. Throughout, perfor- 
mance issues are at the center of an 
analytical approach. 

CIS 571 three credits 
Compiler Construction 

Prerequisite: CIS 471 or permission of 
instructor 

Different techniques for lexical analysis, 
syntax analysis, and object code generation. 
Emphasis on code optimization techniques 
and compiler-construction tools. The course 
will include a significant project. 

CIS 572 three credits 
Real Time Systems 

Prerequisite: CIS 481 or permission of 
instructor 

Design and implementation of real-time 



systems. Implementation of real-time system 
m ADA, scheduling, fault tolerance, and 
distributed real-time systems are also studied 

CIS 573 three credits 
Operating Systems 

Prerequisite: CIS 370 or permission of 
instructor 

The methodologies of operating systems 
design and implementation. Concurrency, 
synchronization, process communication, 
switching control, deadlocks, implementation 
of dynamic structures, design of operating 
systems modules and interfaces, system 
security and integrity, and system updating 
and documentation are also studied. 

CIS 574 three credits 

Advanced Computer Architectures 

Prerequisite: CIS 314 or permission of 
instructor 

Study of recent advances in computer 
organization. Parallel processors, pipelined 
processors, modular and network architec- 
tures data-flow machines, fault-tolerant 
systems, language-directed, object-based, 
capability-based, and message-based 
processor organizations. 

CIS 575 three credits 

Parallel Algorithms and Parallel 

Architectures 

Prerequisites: CIS 314, 360; or permission of 
instructor 

Parallel algorithms and their implementations 
in parallel architectures. In the first part of 
the course parallel algorithms are analyzed 
for problems in graph theory, algebra, FFT, 
and artificial intelligence. The second part 
presents implementations of these algorithms 
in various parallel architectures. 

CIS 577 three credits 
Computer Networks 

Prerequisite: CIS 475 or permission of 
instructor 

Analysis and modeling of centralized and 
distributed computer networks. Queuing 
network analysis, principles of network 
design, software considerations, and design 
of computer networks are also studied. 

CIS 578 three credits 

Evaluation of Computer Systems 

Performance 

Prerequisite: MTH 331 , CIS 314; or per- 
mission of instructor. 
Techniques of analysis and simulation for 
evaluation of computer systems performance. 
Queuing systems, Poisson processes, 
scheduling, service distribution, conservation 
laws, queuing networks, and discrete 



220 



simulations are also studied. 

CIS 580 three credits 

Paradigmatic Software Development 

Prerequisite: CIS 31 1 or equivalent 
Software development in the context of 
various paradigms. The strategies and 
methods of the procedural, object-oriented, 
and functional paradigms are studied and 
practiced. The modeling of software 
processes will be considered from both the 
process and product views, as will the 
appropriateness and measures of effective- 
ness of these processes in the design of 
software systems. Students will apply these 
measures to the course exercises, determin- 
ing and reviewing the impact of these 
methods on individual design. 

CIS 581 three credits 

Design and Verification of Information 
Systems 

Prerequisite: CIS 580 or permission of 
instructor 

Sound design methodologies and technolo- 
gies in development and maintenance of 
information systems/business systems with 
special emphasis on workflow management 
systems. An applied course that emphasizes 
the formal approach, this course also 
addresses issues of adaptability and flexibility 
of information systems and their evaluation. 
The course supports concurrent execution of 
information systems during the design stage 
and adopts and applies various forms of Petri 
nets. 

CIS 585 three credits 

Image Processing and Machine Vision 

Prerequisite: Graduate standing and 
permission of the instructor 
Foundations of image processing and 
machine vision. Students apply and evaluate 
topics such as edge detection, segmentation, 
shape representation, and object recognition. 
Stereo vision and motion analysis will be 
covered in detail including calibration, range 
images, change detection, motion correspon- 
dence, and 2-D and 3-D tracking. Important 
research papers will be discussed in class. 

CIS 588 three credits 
Neural Computing 

Prerequisite: Any course in programming 
languages and data structures 
Fundamentals of artificial neural networks 
including application needs for neural 
networks, discussing the various architec- 
tures, learning algorithms and examples of 
applications. The standard neural networks 
are discussed in greater details, which allows 
for branching of architectures and combining 



of strategies for growing and/or constructing 
neural networks. 

CIS 595 three credits 
Independent Study 

Prerequisites: Upper-division standing; 
permission of instructor, graduate director, 
and college dean 

Study under the supervision of a faculty 
member in an area not otherwise part of the 
discipline's course offerings. Conditions and 
hours to be arranged. 

CIS 596 three credits 
Directed Study 

Prerequisites: Permission of the instructor, 
graduate director, and college dean 
Study under the supervision of a faculty 
member in an area covered in a regular 
course not currently being offered. 
Conditions and hours to be arranged. 

CIS 600 three credits 
Master's Project 

Prerequisites: CIS 560, 570, and 580 
Provides an experience in the development of 
a detailed, significant project in computer 
science under the close supervision of a 
faculty member, perhaps as one member of a 
student team. This project may be a software 
implementation, a design effort, or a 
theoretical or practical written analysis. Public 
presentation of the master's project and 
evaluation by two faculty other than the 
project supervisor are required. 

CIS 601, 602, 603 three credits each 
Special Topics 

Offered as needed to present advanced 
material to graduate students. 

CIS 690 three credits 
Master's Thesis 

Prerequisite: Permission of the Graduate 
Program Committee, based on performance 
in CIS 600, approval of proposed topic, and 
support of a faculty advisor and two faculty 
readers. 

Research leading to submission of a formal 
thesis. This course provides an optional thesis 
experience, which may be based on the 
student's Project in a more intense form or 
be a sequel effort of a different character. In 
exceptional circumstances, the student may 
earn up to six thesis credits, if approved by 
the Graduate Program Committee. Graded 
A-F. 



221 



College of Engineering 



Electrical and Computer Engineering 

Faculty and Fields of Interest 



Two undergraduate majors are offered by 
the department: Electrical Engineering and 
Computer Engineering. Both of these 
programs are accredited by the Engineering 
Accreditation Commission of the Accredita- 
tion Board for Engineering and Technology. 

The department also offers graduate 
programs leading to the MS and PhD. 
degrees in Electrical Engineering. For details 
consult the Bulletin of the Graduate School. 

Educational Objectives: Undergraduate 
Programs in Electrical Engineering and 
Computer Engineering 

The educational objectives of these programs 

are: 

1. 

To graduate students trained in the 
fundamental sciences and mathematics with 
the general breadth and depth necessary for 
engineering and engineering design. 
2. 

To graduate students possessing effective 
communications, teamwork, and leadership 
skills. 
3. 

To graduate students able to adapt to and 
influence the future technological 
environment in response to industrial and 
global changes. 
4. 

To graduate students aware of the ethical, 
social, and environmental impact of their 
professional actions. 
5. 

To graduate students prepared for computer 
or electrical engineering careers and 
continuing education including graduate 
school, self study, and industrial short 
courses. 



David A. Brown acoustic transduction, 
transducer devices and arrays, underwater 
acoustics, fiber optic sensors and systems, 
acoustic properties of materials, ocean and 
marine science and technology 

John R. Buck underwater acoustics, signal 
processing, marine mammal bioacoustics 

Chi-Hau Chen pattern recognition, neural 
networks, image processing and machine 
vision, communications theory, ultrasonic 
NDE 

Lester W. Cory rehabilitation engineering, 
small computer systems, HFA/HF communica- 
tions 

Antonio H. Costa (chairperson) time- 
frequency representations, spectral estima- 
tion, signal processing, image processing, 
digital communications 

Thomas J. Curry (provost/vice chancellor 
for academic affairs) signal processing, 
computer systems, underwater systems 

Lee E. Estes electro-optics, underwater 
systems, ocean optics, remote sensing 

Gilbert Fain ocean systems, underwater 
communication and tracking, instrumentation 
measurement systems 

Paul J. Fortier database systems, real-time 
systems, operating systems, computer 
architecture, computer networks, computer 
performance evaluation 

Robert C. Helgeland marine electronic 
systems, computer-aided circuit analysis 

Dayalan P. Kasilingam remote sensing, 
applied electromagnetics, wireless communi- 
cations, adaptive signal processing 

Gerald J. Lemay power systems, 
sustamability, renewable energy 

Hong Liu computer networks, compilers, 
programming languages 

Howard E. Michel distributed artificial 
intelligence, artificial neural networks, 
distributed computing, computer vision, 
computer networks 

Steven C. Nardone systems theory, control 
and estimation theory, fuzzy systems, 
applications to target tracking 



Branislav M. Notaros computational 
electromagnetics, antennas, microwaves 

Karen L. Payton digital signal processing, 
speech processing, speech acoustics, auditory 
perception 

Nixon A. Pendergrass digital signal 
processing, adaptive signal processing, 
communications theory, estimation theory 

David Rancour semiconductor devices, VLSI, 
quantum mechanics 

Roman Rutman control theory, systems 
analysis 

Dean J. Schmidlin digital signal processing, 
linear discrete-time systems (both time- 
varying and time-invariant) 

Philip H. Viall computer networks, assembly 
languages, rehabilitation engineering 



222 



Electrical Engineering Major 

BS degree 



Requirements 



Semester Credits 



The Electrical Engineering program prepares 
students to meet the changing high- 
technology needs in the electrical engineer- 
ing area, and for graduate study in electrical 
engineering, by imparting a strong back- 
ground in science and mathematics along 
with engineering skills. 

Electrical Engineering encompasses a broad 
spectrum of specialties including communica- 
tions, signal processing, instrumentation, 
control and automation, power conversion 
and distribution, RF and microwave devices 
and systems, and digital and analog 
techniques. In all of these specialties, 
electrical engineers must be familiar with 
devices and systems to perform various 
functions such as research and development, 
systems analysis, management, production, 
testing, quality control, and sales. They may 
pursue careers in many areas including 
monitoring and control of the environment, 
space exploration, aerospace and defense, 
ocean engineering, energy resources, 
biomedical engineering, and information 
technology. 

The program consists of a core of basic 
science and mathematical courses interwoven 
throughout the four years of study. The 
student also selects 18 credit hours in general 
education. Students begin to identify with 
their field in the first and second year of 
study. In the junior year, students gain a 
foundation for further study in particular 
branches of electrical engineering. A senior 
year composed primarily of elective courses 
and a capstone design project allows the 
students to concentrate their studies in one 
or more areas of their choice, and hone their 
skills for the real world. A co-op experience is 
also available for qualified students in 
cooperation with regional industries. 

The Electrical Engineering program is 
accredited by the Engineering Accreditation 
Commission of the Accreditation Board for 
Engineering and Technology. Students may 
join the IEEE, a professional society with its 
local chapter at the Department. Qualified 
students can join the Zeta Xi Chapter of the 
Electrical Engineering National Honor Society, 
Eta Kappa Nu. 







First 


Second 


riial i car 








FTF 1fi0 1fi1 


Fni i nH^tinn<; nf Cnmnutpr Fnninpprinn 1 

1 UUI lUallUI Ij Ul ^_ UI I iuu LCI Lliyil ICCI Illy 1, II 


3 


j 


FfiR 107 10R 
C \3 r\ 1 U / , 1 uo 


Intrn Fnninpprinn thrniinh AnnlipH ^ri 1 II 
ii i u u. r_ i iy 1 1 icti 1 1 1 y uiiuuyii ^uuucu jli. t, n 


3 
3 




PHY 1 1 1 


Ph\/c;irc fnr ^npnrp & Fnninpprinn 1 
riiyiici i ui _>cici ice ot ci lyn iccri ii ly i 


4 




PHY 1 1 ? 
r n t i i z. 


Phv/circ for ^/~ionr~o & Fnninoonnn II 
riiyjiLi lui jv.ici ilc ot ci iy ii icci ii iy n 




A 


MTH 1 1 3 


C ^ In 1 1 1 1 c; fnr AnnlipH anH Fnninpprinn 1 

^ a 1 L U 1 U j IUI rAJJUIICU JLI. 0IIU L 1 1 y 1 II KZ C 1 1 1 1 L) 1 


4 




MTH 1 14 

I VI I M I It 


f"alf*ulitc fnr AnnlipH ^ri ^inH Fnninpprinn II 

V_Oll_UILO IUI AAfJUIICU J\_l. CJIIU ci iyii icci "iy ii 




A 


FMI 101 10? 


C r\\\r^\ \A/ntinn anH RoaHinn 1 

\_IIUCal VVIILIliy allU IxCaUII iy 1, II 


3 
3 


J 






17 


16 

lw 


Qof nnd Yoar 








ECE 201 202 


Circuit Th6ory 1, II 


3.5 


3.5 


ECE 260 


Digital Logic and Computer Design 


3.5 




ECE 263 


Dp^inninn with Mirrnnrnrp^nr^ 
Ls c j i y 1 1 1 1 1 y vviiii ivnv_iu|Jiuccrjjuij 




3.5 


MTH 1 1 9 

ivi i n z i z 


Pi i f f o ronti a 1 Fni latinnc 
L/lllcitrllUdl CyUdUUilj 


j 




ivi i n z i j 


C alfiiluc fnr AnnlioH Qr*i anH Fnninoonnn III 
l jiLUiu-' iui Muuiicu jv_i . aiiu ciiyu i trtri 1 1 iy 1 1 1 




A 
H 


r HM 1 53 

V_ 1 1 1 VI 1 J J 


Pnnrinlp^ nf MnHprn fnr Fnninpprinn 
r 1 1 1 1 c i u i c j ui iviuucriii iui i_iiyiinrdiiiy 


3 




PHY 21 3 


AnnlipH Moriprn Phw^ir*; 
aauuiicu iviuuci 1 1 r i iy jilj 




3 

J 


FNI 266 


Tprhnir^l (^nrnrniinir^tinn^ 

1 CLI II IH.OI ^ UI 1 il 1 1 UI 1 ILO UUI 1 J 


3 






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•OCIICIal LUULaLIUI 1 LltrLLIVt. 




■3 
-> 






16 




Third Year 

1 1 III U 1 Cu 1 








ECE 311 312 


Dinit^l Flprtmnir^/An^lnn Flprtrnnir^ 

L^iyilOl LICk_LIUIIICj/ rA llCHUy LICt_LIUIII\_j 


4 


4 


ECE 321 


Continuous-Time Linear Systems 


3 




ECE 322 


Discrete-Time Linear Systems 




3 


ECE 335, 336 


Electromagnetic Theory 1, II 


3 


3 


ECE 384 


Random Signals and Noise 




3 




General Education Electives 1 


3 






Ethics 2 /General Education Electives 1 


3 


3 






16 


16 


Fourth Year 








ECE 457, 458 


Design Project 1, II 


2 


3 


ECE 471 


Communication Theory 


3 






Engineering Mathematics 3 


3 






Technical Electives 4 


6 


6 




General Education Electives 1 


3 


3 






17 


12 




Total Credits: 




128 


1 See General Education requirements (Areas C, D, and G). 






2 Must be taken from this list: CIS 381, PHL215, SOC 164, SOC 323, or TES 350. Mu 


taken before the student's senior year. 






3 Must be taken from this list: ECE 455, ECE 485, MTH 221, MTH 421, or MTH 441. 


4 Must be taken from approved list of EE Technical Electives (see next page). 



223 



College of Engineering 



Technical Electives in Electrical Engineering 



Advanced Electrical Engineering 
Sequences 



All Electrical Engineering students must 
choose technical electives from this list. 
Students graduating in 2003 or later must 
complete at least one Advanced Electrical 
Engineering Sequence in their electives as 
listed below. 

ECE 367 Operating systems 
ECE 401 , 402 Undergraduate Research 
and Independent Study 
ECE 403 Special Topics in Electrical 

Engineering 
ECE 41 1, 412 Active Circuits I, II 
ECE 41 3 Introduction to VLSI Design 
ECE 414 VLSI Design 
ECE 431 Antennas and Propagation 
ECE 433 Advanced Electromagnetic Theory 
ECE 435, 436 Microwave Theory I, II 
ECE 438 Optical Devices 
ECE 441 Electromechanical Energy 

Conversion 
ECE 442 Power Electronics 
ECE 443, 444 Power Systems I, II 
ECE 450 Algorithms 
ECE 460 Computer Systems Performance 

Evaluation 

ECE 461, 462 Applied PC Architecture I, II 
ECE 463 Computer Engineering 

Mathematics 
ECE 464 Digital Design 
ECE 465, 468 Microprogrammed Design, 

Advanced Computer 

Architecture 



ECE 466, 467 Database Programming, 

Advanced Database Design 
ECE 469, 470 Computer Networks, 
Network Application 
Programming 
Advanced Communications 
Systems 

Digital Signal Processing 
Digital Processing of Speech 
Signals 
482 Control Theory I, II 
Advanced Engineering 
Mathematics 
ECE 491, 493 Intro, to Ocean Engineering, 
Principles of Underwater 
Systems 
Robotics 
342 Modern Physics and 

Quantum Mechanics I, II 
Statistical Thermodynamics 
Elements of Solid State Physics 
MTH 311,312 Advanced Calculus I, II 
MTH331 Probability 
MTH 332 Mathematical Statistics 
MTH 353 Applied Linear Algebra 
MTH 361, 362 Numerical Analysis I, II 
Any 400- or 500-level MTH or CIS course 
except seminars or individual study 



ECE 472 

ECE 475 
ECE 477 

ECE 481, 
ECE 485 



MNE 482 
PHY 341, 

PHY 441 
PHY 442 



ECE 411, 412 
ECE 413, 414 

ECE 435, 436 
ECE 443, 444 
ECE 461, 462 
ECE 465, 468 



ECE 466. 467 



ECE 469, 470 



ECE 475, 477 



ECE 481, 482 
ECE 491, 493 



Active Circuits I, II 

Introduction to VLSI Design, 

VLSI Design 

Microwave Theory I, II 

Power Systems I, II 

Applied PC Architecture I, II 

Microprogrammed Design, 

Advanced Computer 

Architecture 

Database Programming, 

Advanced Computer 

Architecture 

Computer Networks, 

Network Application 

Programming 

Digital Signal Processing, 

Digital Processing of Speech 

Signals 

Control Theory I, II 
Introduction to Ocean 
Engineering, Principles of 
Underwater Systems 



Notel: 

ECE graduate courses at the 500 level are 
available as electives for advanced seniors 
with written permission of the instructor 
and the student's advisor. 

Note 2: 

Some technical electives may not be offered 
every year. 



General Education Departmental Requirements 

Students majoring in Electrical Engineering will meet their departmentally-controlled 
General Education requirements as follows: 

Area E: Satisfied by CIS 381 , PHL215, SOC 164, SOC 323, orTES350 
Area I, Tier 2: Satisfied by ECE 160 
Area W, Tier 2: Satisfied by ENL 266 
Area O: Satisfied by ECE 457 



224 



Computer Engineering Major 

BS degree 



Requirements 



Semester Credits 



Computer Engineering encompasses a broad 
spectrum of challenging activities including 
research, design, and development of 
computer systems hardware and software, as 
well as the electronic or software 
components that comprise these systems. 
The Computer Engineering program prepares 
students to meet the changing high- 
technology needs in the computer 
engineering area, and for graduate study in 
computer engineering, by imparting a strong 
background in science and mathematics 
along with engineering skills. 

The program consists of a core of basic 
science and mathematical courses interwoven 
throughout the four years of study. The 
student also selects 18 credit hours in general 
education. Students begin taking computer 
programming courses in their freshman year 
and broaden the curriculum in their 
sophomore year to include hardware courses. 
In the junior year, students gain a foundation 
in computer systems. A senior year composed 
primarily of elective courses and a capstone 
design project allows the students to 
concentrate their studies in one or more 
areas of their choice, and hone their skills for 
the real world. A co-op experience is also 
available for qualified students in cooperation 
with regional industries. 

Specialization opportunities are offered in 
microprocessors and microcomputer systems, 
computer networks, and database systems. 

The Computer Engineering program is 
accredited by the Engineering Accreditation 
Commission of the Accreditation Board for 
Engineering and Technology. Students may 
join the IEEE Computer Society, a profes- 
sional society with its local chapter at the 
Department. 



First Year 

ECE 160, 161 
EGR 107, 108 
PHY 1 1 1, 1 12 
MTH 1 13, 1 14 
ENL 101, 102 

Second Year 

ECE 201, 202 
ECE 257 
ECE 260 
ECE 263 
ECE 264 
MTH 212 
MTH 213 
ENL 266 



Third Year 

ECE 311 
ECE 367 
ECE 450 
ECE 461 
ECE 464 
MTH 181 
MTH 331 



Fourth Year 

ECE 457, 458 
ECE 460 
CIS 480 



Foundations of Computer Engineering I, II 
Intro. Engineering through Applied Sci. I, I 
Physics for Science & Engineering I, II 
Calculus for Applied Sci. and Engineering 
Critical Writing and Reading I, II 



Circuit Theory I, II 

Fundamentals of UNIX 

Digital logic and Computer Design 

Embedded System Design 

Object-Oriented Software Development 

Differential Equations 

Calculus for Applied Sci. and Engineering III 
Technical Communications 
General Education Electives 1 



Digital Electronics 
Operating Systems 
Algorithms 

Applied PC Architecture I 
Digital Design 

Introduction to Discrete Structures I 
Probability 

Ethics 2 /General Education Electives 1 
General Education Elective 1 



Design Project I, II 

Computer System Performance Evaluation 
Software Engineering 
Restricted CPE Elective 3 
Technical Electives 3 
General Education Elective 



First 

3 
3 
4 
4 
3 
17 



3.5 
1 

3.5 



3 
3 
17 



3 
3 

3 

16 

2 

4 
3 
6 

15 



Total credits: 



Second 

3 
2 
4 
4 
3 
16 



3.5 



3.5 
3 



3 
17 



3 
3 
3 
15 

3 

3.5 



6 
3 
15.5 

128.5 



See General Education requirements (Areas C, D, and G). 

2 Must betaken from this list: CIS 381, PHL215, SOC 164, SOC 323, or TES 350. Must be 
taken before the student's senior year. 

3 Must be taken from this list: ECE 455, ECE 485, MTH 221, MTH 421, or MTH 441. 
4 Must be taken from approved list of EE Technical Electives