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Full text of "University of Massachusets reports : Reports, 1956/1957-1977/1978"

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UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
LIBRARY 



Archives 



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TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Volume 1 



A Dynamic Decade (Annual Report of the President for I969-I97O) 

Financial Report 

College of Agriculture 

College of Arts and Sciences 

School of Business Administration 

School of Education 

School of Engineering 

School of Home Economics 



Volume 2 



School of Nursing 
School of Physical Education 
Department of Air Science 
Department of Military Science 
Office of Admissions and Records 
Counsel i ng Center 
Graduate Office 

Labor Relations and Research Center 
Department of Public Health 
Dean of Women 
Dean of Men 

Placement and Financial Aid Services 
University Health Services 
'Medical School (Worcester) 
Student Union - Campus Center 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

Boston Library Consortium IVIember Libraries 



http://www.archive.org/details/universityofmass69701univ 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS BULLETIN 



196()-.1970 

A Dynamic Decade 




Published eleven times a year by the Univef 
sity of Massachusetts, in February, March (3), 
June, August (2), September, November and 
December (2). Second Class postage paid at 
Amherst, Massachusetts 01002 and at addi- 
tional mailing offices. 

PAHTIALLY PRINTED WITH PRIVATE FUNDS 




THE ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT 
FOR 1969 - 1970 



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June 17, 1969 

Mr. Joseph P. Healey, Chairman 

Board of Trustees — University of Massachusetts 

14 Winchester Road 

Arhngton, Massachusetts 02174 

Dear Mr. Healey: 

When 1 came to the University of Massachusetts in 1960 I set for myself ten years as 
the outside limit of my tenure in presidential ofBce. I have always felt that a president 
makes his major contribution within his first ten years. Although there are some tasks 
that remain to be done, after ten years it is better that a board of trustees select a new 
man, one who can bring new ideas and suggest different educational paths for a uni- 
versity as called for in a day of dynamic social change. 

For some time past I have been the senior state university president in New England. 
I have already held office longer than the national norm. If I may indulge in some 
humor currently prevalent among my presidential colleagues: "It is a good idea to 
quit before one falls farther behind." 

I therefore write to apprise you, and through you the Board of Trustees, of my resigna- 
tion as President to become effective at the end of the academic year 1969-70. I give 
you this notice now so that you may have ample time in which to search for my suc- 
cessor. Pending his arrival I shall, of course, devote my full attention and energy to the 
advancement of the University system in Amherst, Boston and Worcester. 

My decision is based on my firm belief in what is good for the University. I resign with 
the highest regard for the members of the Board of Trustees and with deep apprecia- 
tion for the privilege they have afforded me. to lead the University during this period 
of rapid growth not only in size but in quality. It is hard to realize that enrollment has 
increased from slightly more than six thousand students in 1960 to a planned twenty-one 
thousand next fall. 

As I have said many times, "The University is people!" In the popular mind the President 
gets the credit, but the truth is that any success we have achieved is due to the backing 
of an outstanding faculty and of a dedicated group of administrators who have worked 
ably as my administrative team. If there is any discredit, as President I am glad to 
assume that alone. 

One of my great satisfactions and challenges as President has been the opportunity to 
work both in Boston and in Amherst with outstanding and responsible students. The 
University has pioneered in the involvement of students in the development of policy 
at all levels clear up to the Board of Trustees. We have established and will continue 
to develop a tripartite academic community in which students, faculty and administra- 
tion work cooperatively toward the common goal of academic excellence. 

I have been grateful as President for the hand of friendship extended by governors, 
state legislators, and state house administrators. Although our budget requests have 
frequently been cut and we have not received the kind of financial support which would 
put us in the forefront of public institutions, we have made tremendous progress. It is 
only because the Commonwealth started from such a low base that the very real effort 
of recent years has been obscured. 




I would be remiss if I did not express my grave concern for the thousands of quaUfied 
apphcants we must turn away each year. Without greatly increased financial support 
for public higher education — community colleges, technical institutes, state colleges 
and the University — thousands of Massachusetts youth will find the door to college 
slammed shut in the years just ahead, and our greatest natural resource will be lost to us. 

When I leave the presidency next year I should like to return to my professional field of 
political science in a faculty position where I can teach and do research. This will also 
permit closer contact with students which I have missed. I shall continue to promote 
the University's welfare, albeit in a different role. I look forward to the day when the 
University will be truly recognized as the "People's University," and I will continue to 
support the Board of Trustees in bringing this dream to fruition on behalf of the youth 
of the Commonwealth. 

Sincerely, 

John W. Lederle 
President 




t ViTHOUT QUESTION, giowth has been the dominant characteristic of John Lederle's 
presidency at the University of Massachusetts. Since 1960, President Lederle has directed 
an uncommonly impressive expansion of the Commonwealth's university; enrollments I 
have more than tripled; physical plant has increased manifold; what he took over on a " 
single campus now has three locations. Furthermore, most of these increases resulted 
from new developments, not from taking over existing projects. While such growth in 
the University of Massachusetts was necessary and apparent, it was John Lederle who 
carried it out and continued to remind us all how needed it was. 

It would be a serious mistake, however, to assume that the growth which has taken 
place over the last decade has been in size only. President Lederle has managed a 
growth in the University's quality which is equally impressive. Doctoral programs multi- j 
plied, both building upon and building improvements within faculty. Faculty recruit- | 
ment has been organized — successfully — on a nationwide basis. Grants for research 
have grown enormously; the number and variety of agencies which give them have 
expanded significantly. 

In a word, President Lederle has brought the University of Massachusetts to the thresh- 
old of unquestioned excellence. This is a very large and very significant accomplishment. 
He has earned — and deserves — our heartiest thanks. 

The Honorable Francis W. Sargent 

Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts 




JOHN W. LEDERLE DOCTOR OF LAWS 

No one can place true value on a decade of days devoted to building a major university. 

Under your leadership this institution has tripled enrollment, built seventy new build- 
ings, added two campuses, and joined the front rank of America's institutions of public 
higher education. 

Overriding the physical monuments to your presidency have been your constant faith 
in students, your commitment to good teaching and your continual advocacy of quality, 
low-cost public higher education for the youth of Massachusetts. 

For the thousands of men and women who have been graduated from this University 
during your tenure, and for those yet to come, we thank you. The Lederle years will 
now be recorded in the history of this University as its finest decade. 

I, therefore, by authority of the Board of Trustees of the University of Massachusetts, 
confer upon you the degree of Doctor of Laws, honoris causa, and admit you to all 
its rights and privileges. In token of this I present you with this diploma and invest you 
with the appropriate hood. 



Given at Amherst, Massachusetts 
May 30, 1970 



Joseph P. Healey 

Chairman 

Board of Trustees 




Intellectual interchange between faculty member and individual student continues to be stressed. 

Viewing balloon-borne telescope at 1968 opening of astronomy laboratory are Dr. John D. Strong, 
then -Provost Oswald Tippo, and President Lederle. 




I JuRiNG ITS COURSE, the dccadc of 1960 - 1970 for 
the University of Massachusetts was difficult and 
demanding. In retrospect, it was a spectacular 

success story. 

From the Fall of 1960, when John W. Lederle took 
over the presidency from Jean Paul Mather, until 
the Summer of 1970, when he relinquished it to 
Robert C. Wood, the University of Massachusetts 
passed through what might be termed an institu- 
tional adolescence. It was altered in many vital 
ways, passing from small to large, from one campus 
to three, from its first to its second century, and 
from adequacy to excellence. Accompanying this 
text are selected comments made by Dr. Lederle 
as the early years of the decade unfolded. 

The decade saw the size of the University virtually 
explode. Student enrollments tripled, the number 
of faculty, the total operating budget, and the 
number of books in the library quadrupled. The 
century-old Amherst campus was joined by cam- 
puses in Boston and Worcester. Painfully small 
faculty salaries and the number of advanced de- 
gree fields were doubled. Undergraduate, research 
and service programs grew in number and scope. 

At the same time, the University struggled success- 
fully for legislation granting a measure of fiscal 
autonomy, an approach to a state-wide system, 
and sufficient faculty salary relief to begin national 
recruitment. And through it all ran the unavoid- 
able stresses inherent in juxtaposing an immutable 
concern for the individual student with gigantic 
growing pains and the advance of computer 
technology. 

As the University of Massachusetts grew to ma- 
turity, its aims broadened, its purview enlarged, 
and its outreach extended. Successive challenges 
and problems were transformed by time and effort 
into opportunities and successes. It was a decade 
of which Massachusetts' citizens can be proud. 

The Sixties opened for the University of Massa- 
chusetts with an increased thrust for legislative 
and citizen support, coupled with an internal drive 
for qualitative improvement. New entrance re- 
quirements became effective, an Honors Program 
was initiated, and interdisciplinary sophomore 
colloquia established. The programs in Nursing 



"... these are exciting times 
for higher education on every 
campus; but for sheer excite- 
ment due to dynamic change, 
the University has few, if any, 
rivals. We are in many ways 
pioneers, and pioneering is 
always exciting." (1961) 

"As educators, we should all 
have but one aim — and that 
is to make the University of 
Massachusetts the finest state 
university in the country. We 
don't want to make it a mere 
copy of the University of 
California, or of Wisconsin, 
Minnesota or Illinois. Let us 
not be afraid to copy good 
ideas, but let us also apply 
our best talents to innova- 
tion, to experimentation — to 
building the University of 
Massachusetts as an institu- 
tion having its owti integrity 
and identity." (1963) 

"When one contemplates our 
rate of expansion in the next 
three or four years it is clear 
that the gears of our com- 
plex machine will frequently 
clash. For the number of stu- 
dents who are in the Uni- 
versity this year, we have 
adequate classrooms but in- 
adequate dormitories. We 
have a plenitude of scientific 
laboratories in Morrill Hall 
but major needs in other 
areas. We have a beautiful 
Student Union, only four 
years old, but it is already 
far too small for our student 
body. We have plenty of 
bookshelves in our new li- 
brary addition, but purchas- 
ing and cataloging hooks so 
that they will be available to 







Board of Trustees, Organization of 1963; seated from left: Robert D. Gordon, representing Governor 
Peabody; Most Reverend Christopher J. Weldon; Harry C. Solomon; Alfred L. Frechette; Fred C. 
Emerson; Joseph P. Healey; Dean Leo F. Redfern; Chrm. Frank L. Boyden; Pres. John W. Lederle; 
Alden C. Brett; John W. Haigis; George L. Pumphret; Calvin H. Plimpton; Edmund J. Croce; Hugh 
Thompson; Harry D. Brown; Frederick S. Troy. 

Seated at left, behind table: Owen B. Kieman; Dennis M. Crowley. Standing (1. to r.): Gilbert L. 
Woodside, Provost; Charles H. McNamara; and Kenneth W. Johnson, Treasurer. Members of the 
Board not shown: Mrs. Kathryn F. Furcolo, Miss Victoria Schuck, Ernest Hoftyzer, and J. John Fox. 



Chatting informally with President Lederle in his office are students Sara Vartanian, Millbury, Shawn 
Fitzgerald, North Easton, and Paul Mankowsky, Millers Falls. 




and Physical Education were formally established 
as Schools, and the new Four College Cooperative 
Ph.D. degree was authorized. The Student Health 
Services were reorganized as a new infirmary was 
being built. The Hampshire Inter-Library Center 
was transferred from Mount Holyoke College to 
the University, which had just doubled its library 
space. 

During these visible improvements, the new fif- 
teenth president of the University began working 
to bring together a new and efficient administra- 
tive team. The second year of his tenure saw ap- 
pointment of Dr. I. Moyer Hunsberger as Dean of 
the College of Arts and Sciences, of Dr. William F. 
Field as Dean of Students, and of Dr. Leo Redfern, 
initially as Director of the newly-created Office of 
Institutional Studies. 

Established in 1961 were the Research Computing 
Center, the Population Research Institute, and the 
Polymer Research Institute. The Bureau of Gov- 
ernment Research aided in establishment of the 
Massachusetts League of Cities and Towns, and 
the School of Education began study of the sub- 
sequently successful plan to establish a girls' 
school in Uganda with Federal assistance. Dr. Ar- 
less A. Spielman became Dean of the College of 
Agriculture and Director of the Experiment Station. 

Spadework was begun in depth in 1961 by Presi- 
dent Lederle for what is generally considered to 
have been the most vital single aspect of the in- 
stitution's subsequent growth — fiscal autonomy. 
Close working relationships were being built with 
key members of the Legislature; the press and 
public were made aware of the issue through the 
1961 Annual Report of the President, and strong 
organized efforts were launched by such groups 
as the University Alumni and the Massachusetts 
League of Women Voters. 

A Special Commission on Budgetary Powers, es- 
tablished through efforts of Senate Majority 
Leader Maurice Donahue, made recommendations 
supporting the University's stand that it should be 
granted fiscal authority commensurate with respon- 
sibility. Effective support was also given by Dr. 
Frank L. Boyden, chairman of the University's 
Board of Trustees, and the presidents of the private 



readers cannot be accom- 
plished simply by legislative 
appropriation. Given positive 
attitudes, however, rather 
than non-constructive nega- 
tivism, we shall reach our 
goal" (1961) 

". . . Education is our great- 
est national resource. If we 
fail to tax ourselves to exploit 
its potential, because we pre- 
fer tail fins on our automo- 
biles and new frost-free re- 
frigerators in our kitchen 
when the old ones work pret- 
ty well, we may see the day 
when we have neither auto- 
mobiles or refrigerators." 
(1961) 

"Students, let us never forget, 
are the main raw material of 
a university. Their individual 
growth and development are 
and should be the prime fo- 
cus of the entire educational 
enterprise. Let the University 
of Massachusetts continue to 
emphasize good teaching. 
Let us find and reivard the 
good teacher." (1961) 

"The University of Massachu- 
setts is deeply concerned 
about stimidating its students 

to take an active interest 
in the problems of local, 
state and national govern- 
ment. Rousseau warned: 'As 
soon as any man says of the 
ajfairs of state: What does 
it matter to me? the state is 
lost.' 

"In order that our students 
may understand why the 
state must always matter, we 
bring to our faculty scholars 



The Medical School Site — Worcester 





Model of the planned teaching hospital at Worcester is viewed by President Lederle and Dr. Lamar 
Soutter, Medical School Dean. 




Historic signing of Fiscal Autonomy Bill by Gov. John Volpe is witnessed by Senate Pres. John 
Powers, House Speaker John Thompson, Senate Majority Leader Maurice Donahue, President Lederle 
and Dr. Frank Boyden, chairman of the Board of Trustees. 




First recipient of the Distinguished 
Teacher of the Year Award (1962), 
Dr. William H. Ross bears Univer- 
sity Mace at Commencement. 



1 



colleges and universities in the Commonwealth. 
The front lines of the University's thrust toward 
implementing fiscal autonomy were manned by 
Dr. Redfern, Business Manager Gerald Grady, 
Treasurer Kenneth Johnson and Provost Gilbert 
Woodside. 

The fiscal autonomy bill, as passed in 1962, gave 
authorization to the Trustees to set professional 
staff salary ranges within state salary schedules, 
to modernize purchasing and printing procedures, 
to establish rules for tenure, to transfer funds 
within state subsidiary accounts, and to set up 
internal trust funds. 

The University's Centennial Year, 1962 - 1963, also 
witnessed major progress along two other im- 
portant paths — the establishment by statute of a 
University of Massachusetts Medical School, and 
the bringing of faculty salaries more closely in 
line with the AAUP scale through a 20 percent 
salary increase, the latter achieved the following 
year. In line with Dr. Lederle's stress on rewards 
for faculty excellence, the first Distinguished 
Teacher of the Year Award was presented. 

The same year, first plans were made for a new 
Fine Arts Center, only this year ready for bid, and 
the University of Massachusetts Press was born. 
Dr. Edward C. Moore became Dean of the Grad- 
uate School. First principles of what was to become 
the state-wide University system were published 
in the University's Long Range Planning Report, 
which also foresaw a division of continuing educa- 
tion, implemented during Dr. Lederle's final year. 

Four major appointments in 1963-64 rounded 
out the Lederle administration team. Dr. Oswald 
Tippo was named Provost, Robert J. McCartney 
became Secretary of the University and Director of 
University Relations, and Dr. William Tunis was 
appointed Dean of Admissions and Records. All 
three were University alumni. In the fourth shift. 
Dr. Redfern was named to the new post of Dean 
of Administration. Major administrative efforts 
were mounted to support the concepts of a state- 
wide University system, and development of a Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts campus in Boston. Dr. 
Lamar Soutter was named Dean of the Medical 
School. In Amherst, the first experimentation with 
the successful residential college program was 



who are expert in the field of 
parties and polities. Yet we 
don't leave this merely to he 
studied out of hooks under 
scholarly guidanee. We also 
bring to our campus for ex- 
tended periods of time noted 
practical politicians and dis- 
tinguished exponents of 
statesmanship. We abhor 
the widely held view that 
politics is a dirty business. 
Through direct personal con- 
tact, we find that our stuch'iits 
learn to appreciate and to 
Jionor the role of the poli- 
tician as he works out the 
compromises so vital to con- 
tinuation of democratic gov- 
ernment." (1961) 

"Certainly in New England, 
excellence in higher educa- 
tion has meant, by and large, 
our distinguished private in- 
stitutions. Theirs is the long, 
noble and continuing tradi- 
tion. But we in the pidAic 
institutions find that the tide 
of population is increasingly 
sweeping us toward the fore- 
front of educational activity. 
And we find more and more 
evidence, often submitted by 
the private institutions them- 
selves, that if New England 
— and indeed America — is to 
rise to new heights of educa- 
tional service for most of its 
people, then assuredly most 
of the people must turn to 
the public institutions for 
such service'' (1961) 

". . . We must not content 
ourselves with aiming at the 
average. I recognize that it 
is costly to minister to needs 




Presidents of the six New England state universities, gathered in 1969, are (from left): Werner Baum, 
Rhode Island; Homer D. Babbidge, Jr., Connecticut; John W. McConnell, New Hampshire; 
Winthrop C. Libby, Maine; Lyman S. Rowell, Vermont, and John W. Lederle, Massachusetts. 



A visible sign of growth — awesome stacks of textbooks for each semester. 




Enrollments 


* 






1959-1969 






Undergraduate 
Stockbridge 


Fall 1959 

4,911 
327 


Fall 1969 

12,745 

593 


Percent 
Increase 

160 
81 


Subtotal 
Graduate 

Total Amherst 
Boston 


5,238 

635 

5,873 

5,873 


13,338 
2,512 

15,850 
3,517 

19,367 


155 
296 
170 


Total University 


230 



"Based on Full-Time Equivalent, Totals by head count rose from 
6.131 to 22;462 for the decade, a 266 percent increase 




Numerical Growth 



in 



Major Fields of Study 





1959- 


-1969 










Fall 1959 


Fall 1969 


Arts and Sciences 






24 


31 


Agriculture 






21 


19 


Business Administration 




6 


12 


Education 






2 


2 


Engineering 






5 


7 


Home Economics 






5 


5 


Nursing 






1 


1 


Physical Education 






3 


3 


Public Health 






— 


3 


Bachelor's Degrees 


67 


83 


Master's Degrees 






38 


60 


Doctorates 






12 


46 



Total Major Degree Fields 



117 



189 



on a more individual basis, 
helping each student to 
achieve the excellence of 
which he is capable, but 
anything less means a great 
loss of those of superior tal- 
ent and of those of lesser 
talent. We cannot afford 
such loss at this stage of our 
history." (1961) 

"Whenever I go to alumni 
meetings our graduates come 
up and ask about some of 
the teachers ivho influenced 
them profoundly. Their eyes 
light up as they rememl)er 
their idiosyncrasies, their pet 
phrases, their admonitions, 
their advice and counsel. I 
say to the students here to- 
day — sometimes the profes- 
sors they remembered were 
the ones who seemed too 
hard and demanding. But in 
after years they came to real- 
ize that this very discipline 
and exactitude was the les- 
son they needed most after 
being brought up to adult- 
hood in an atmosphere of 
parental permissiveness and 
teen-age domination." (1962) 

"Instead of talking about 
corrupt government and cor- 
rupt politicians, it is high 
time we concentrated our 
talk on the corrupt private 
citizens who corrupt politi- 
cians. Some years ago one of 
my friends in the legal de- 
partment of a leading auto 
manufacturer called me ask- 
ing for suggestions for a 
speech the company presi- 
dent was scheduled to give 
on governmental ethics. I 




New Facilities 

onstruction and Acquisition 



1960 

Bartlett Hall 

Morrill Science Center I 

Dickinson Hall — ROTC 

Maintenance Physical Plant 

Goodell Library Addition 

Johnson House 

Hills House 

1961 

Addition — Worcester Dining Commons 



2,181,125 

1,941,020 
468,105 
627,000 

1,940,873 
566,530 

1,388,550 



504,475 



1962 

Maria's Meadow Lab School 1,844,690 

Morrill Science Center III 1,452,177 

Infirmary 961,459 

Cold Storage 641,191 

Engineering & Physics Labs & Classrooms 682,187 

1963 

Holdsworth Hall 1,213,340 

School of Business Administration 1,412,091 

Hasbrouck Laboratory Addition 1,899,019 

Boyden Gymnasium 2,718,112 

•Gorman House 1,019,478 

■Brett House 773,200 



The Amherst Campus — 1970 — looking West 





M 



»■ 



1965 




Mahar Auditorium 


231,117 


Observatory 


10,000 


Mobile Classrooms, 5 @ $8,265 


41,325 


Orlyte Greenhouse 


18,664 


Kiln 


14,500 


Orctiard Hill Residential College 




(Grayson, Dickinson, Field & Webster 




Houses) 


4,611,927 


Franklin Dining Hall 


1,452,964 



1966 

Engineering Building East 
Chenoweth Laboratory Addition 
Morrill Science Center IV 
Coal Handling Facilities 
"Stadium & Facilities Building 
"Low-Rise Residence Halls, Southwest 
(Thoreau, Melville, James & Emerson 
Houses) 
"Southwest Residential College Towers 
(Kennedy, Coolidge, J. Adams, J. Q. 
Adams, & Washington Towers) 
"Hampshire Dining Hall 



1,340,133 
1,372,637 
3,473,955 
231 ,764 
1,158,000 



2,699,431 



11,307,100 
2,700,000 







1^. 










->l ^'«'«-iL*' 



1967 

Poultry #1, 2, 3, 4, Tillson Farm 
Agricultural Engineering Building 
Whitmore Administration Building 
Low-Rise Residence Halls, Souttiwest 

(Patterson, MacKimmie. Crampton, & 

Prince) 
Hampden Dining Hall 

1S68 

Ptiysical Plant (Administration & Storage) 
Astronomy Laboratory 





Tillson Sheep Shed 


11,000 


343,393 


Ttiompson Hall 


2,728,640 


320,700 


Herter Hall 


3,428,448 


2,758,334 


Biology Laboratory & Classroom, E. 






Waretiam 


211,000 




Water Tank 


75,000 


4,620,600 


* Low-Rise Residence Halls, Souttiwest 




2,200,000 


(Cance, Pierpont, & Moore Houses) 


3,800,000 




"Berkshire Dining Hall 


2,080,923 


1,347,804 


1970 




205,000 


"Murray D. Lincoln Campus Center and 






Parking Garage 


18,000,000 





':^^^^%4'^ 



nil \ WTf P-/ „ ^ . -, 






r/ie Amherst Campus — 1970 — looking NortheusI 



Under Construction 

Graduate Research Center I 

Tobin Hall 

University Library 
"Brown, Cashin, & McNamara Residence 

Halls 
"North Village (Married Student Housing) 

Total, State Funds 
"Total, Building Authority 

GRAND TOTAL 



15,000,000 

5,800,000 

14,500,000 

10,600.000 
3,500,000 

73,950,278 
72,478,703 

$146,428,981 



Planned 

Graduate Research Center II 
Fine Arts Center 
Engineering Laboratory Building 
Infirmary Addition 
Life Science Building 
Medical School, Worcester 

($127,000,000 funded) 
Columbia Point Campus, Boston 

($130,000,000 funded) 

"Building Authority Projects 



10,500,000 .. 
13,800.000 ' 
18,900.000 
1,400.000 
24,000,000 

138,000,000 

355,000,0001 



mil — [■iiiiiiiiiM \[i\m II 



L^'.L^LLi.^.^'. i .-JB ' ii ' . ' .B"^^^^*!"^^ 



H,:-i 





Pres. Lederle lunches in Washington with Sen. Kennedy, Rep. Conte, and other Congressmen. 

Students gathered last spring at Alumni Stadium exemplify new active rather than passive student 
role in University governance. 



,'^ 



Average Faculty Salaries 

(Amherst Campus Only) 





Fall 1960 


Summer 1970 


Professor 


$9,942 


$21,126 


Associate Professor 


7,636 


15,926 


Assistant Professor 


6,360 


12,579 


Instructor 


5,382 


9,468 


Average, All Ranks 


7,528 


15,152 


Number of Faculty 


315 


1,031 




Operating Funds Comparison 

(All Campuses) 

Fiscal 1960 Fiscal 1970 

Total Operating Funds $13,065,845 $107,883,774 

State Appropriations 9,476,498 61,186,319 

Returned to State Treasurer 3,417,783 6,181,846 

Net from State 6,058,715 55,004,473 

Capital Outlay Comparison 

(All Campuses) 



Total Capital Appropriation 



Fiscal 1960 

$ 1,600,000 



Fiscal 1970 

$89,800,000* 



•Includes special appropriations of $50,000,000 
$19,600,000 = Medical School, Worcester- 



new Boston Campus; 



gave him a number of refer- 
ences and ideas. Then I con- 
cluded the conversation by 
saying that I would have no 
respect for his president if he 
focused exclusively on the 
ethics of public office hold- 
ers: 'Let him remind his au- 
dience that politicians don't 
bribe each other. Private citi- 
zens do the bribing and de- 
serve some of the stigma.' 
There is too much preaching 
today about governmental 
corruption which ignores 
the non-official participant. 
Whether in government or 
private enterprise, venal 
practice is equally reprehen- 
sible. We should be equally 
vehement in stamping it out. 

"Ironically, one way in which 
we tend to corrupt our pub- 
lic officials, both elected and 
appointed, is in our failure as 
a society to see to it that good 
service is adequately com- 
pensated. In a society which 
has been for over a hundred 
years industrially oriented to 
the production of material 
goods, public service — like 
public education — has fre- 
quently appeared to many to 
be a luxury or fringe benefit 
to which little material re- 
wards should be assigned. 
Thus we have tended to be 
parsimonious in salaries for 
public service, while being 
magnanimous in the high 
standards of integrity and 
service demanded of those 
serving us in a public ca- 
pacity." (1962) 

"A public official must want 
to communicate. He must 



The Changing Face of the Amherst Campus 



Aerial photographs of the University's Amherst 
Campus taken in 1960 (below) and in 1970 (at right) 
show the decade's sweeping physical changes. Be- 
low, looking southwest, Johnson House was under 
construction (lower left corner), while open fields 
along upper edge of photo give no hint of high-rise 
residences to come. At right, view toward north- 
east shows ten-year expansion, with Southwest 
Residential College in foreground. 








smi 




mmtft* 






»' 




mak^t^Mii 



M^im 



Distinguished 

Architects 

For a 

Decade of Growth 

(Listed with Selected Projects) 

Hideo Sasaki of Sasaki, Dawson, 
DeMay associates. Master Plan- 
ning Consultants to Trustees 

PiETRO Belluschi, Architectural 
Consultant to Trustees 

Breuer & Beckhard 
Campus Center 

Campbell, Aldrich, Nulty 
Graduate Research Center 

CoLETTi Brothers 

Herter Hall & Tobin Hall 

Drummey Rosane Anderson 
Engineering Laboratory Build- 
ing 

CooDY & Clancy 
Infirmary Addition 

Vincent G. Kling & Associates 
Life Science Building 

Per Neylen 

Married Student Housing 

Roche & Dinkeloo 
Fine Arts Center 

Skidmore, Owings & Merrill 
Stadium 

Edward Durell Stone 
Library 

Hugh Stubbins 

Southwest Residence Area 

J. C. Warnecke & Associates 
Brown, Cashin & McNamara 
Residence Halls 

Paul Weidlinger 
Stadium 



A- 





Dr. and Mrs. Lederle are flanked by Gov. John A. Volpe and Chrm. 
George L. Pumphret of the UM Building Authority at dedication of 
Massachusetts Alumni Stadium in 1966. 

A Phi Beta Kappa Chapter was established on the Amherst campus in 
1964 - 65. 

Watching the Redmen on the gridiron. Behind Dr. Lederle on either 
side are Gov. Endicott Peabody and the Governor's mother; beside 
him are his daughter Pamela and Mrs. Lederle (left). 



I 




^ 



begun at the new Orchard Hill facility under a 
Danforth grant, and the first students were ad- 
mitted under the now-famous swing-shift program, 
designed by President Lederle to allow full year- 
round use of University facilities. 

A substantial breakthrough on two fronts was made 
in 1964 — 65, with enactment by the Legislature 
of the provisions of the Massachusetts Higher Edu- 
cation Plan, and realization of the plans for the 
University of Massachusetts at Boston. During that 
fiscal year. Dr. John Ryan was named the first 
Chancellor of the University at Boston. Preliminary 
planning continued for the Medical School in 
Worcester. Also in 1964, the University began its 
continuing cooperative agricultural education 
effort with the African nation of Malawi, under 
auspices of the Agency for International Develop- 
ment. 

Based on the Harrington-Willis Report which the 
University Trustees had endorsed four months 
earlier, the Massachusetts Higher Education Plan 
as passed in June, 1965, set up and defined a 
state-wide University system, a state college sys- 
tem, and a community college system. These exist- 
ing segments of Massachusetts' educational enter- 
prise were placed under coordination of a newly 
created Massachusetts Board of Higher Education, 
with an Advisory Council on Education appointed 
by the Governor. Board membership consisted of 
seven members nominated by the Advisory Coun- 
cil, and one member each from the University's 
Board of Trustees and the Boards of State Colleges, 
Community Colleges, and Technical Schools and 
Institutes. Rigid control was avoided in structuring 
the new body, while new opportunity was pro- 
vided for cooperative growth. 

New arms for expanded University outreach cre- 
ated at Amherst during 1964-65 included the 
Labor Relations and Research Center, the Water 
Resources Research Center, and the Cooperative 
School Service Council in the School of Education. 
The same year, the University was elected to na- 
tional membership in Phi Beta Kappa. 

Authorized in June, 1964, the University of Mas- 
sachusetts at Boston opened its doors to 1200 
freshmen in September, 1965. The swift acquisi- 



want to go out and see for 
himself. He must believe that 
by listening, not just talk- 
ing, by seeking criticism of 
his program, not merely cor- 
roboration of its efficacy, he 
will best do his job. There is 
no place for the thin .skinned. 
Two-way communication is 
the way of democracy. There 
must be a constant struggle 
against ennui, against the 
temptation to sit in our own 
offices by day and sleep in 
our own beds each night. We 
must not assume that the era 
of personal attention is over." 
(1962) 

"Will we become a massive 
educational machine spew- 
ing out graduates according 
to the best principles of stan- 
dardized packaging? Will the 
role of teaching become simi- 
lar to that of a cog in a ma- 
chine, performing in non- 
human fashion a rigidly 
prescribed function? Or will 
ive .somehow preserve the 
essential humanity that 
must mark our educational 
activities if what we purport 
to admit to college is a hu- 
man being in the first place?" 
(1962) 

"As we grow in size, it is im- 
portant that we understand 
the prime role of a university 
. . . This role must be devoted 
to the individual, to his 
growth as a thinking and 
humane being, of intrinsic 
worth and significance to all 
society. 

"Expansion of our education- 
al community — rapid as it is 




Typical of many of the decade's dedications was this in 1969 for Herter Hall. With Pres. Lederle 
are Mrs. Christian A. Herter and Ambassador J. Graham Parsons, representing the State Department. 

Dean of Administration Leo Redfern (left) and Dr. Lederle answer questions posed in Washington in 
1967 by Reps. Edward P. Roland and Thomas P. O'Neill, Jr. (right). 




^ 



tion of the temporary site and facilities, and the 
excellent faculty and staff, remain one of the no- 
table educational achievements of the decade. 

During the second half of the decade, strong em- 
phasis on University relations through news and 
publications — combined with the massive public 
awareness generated by the struggles over fiscal 
autonomy and the Boston and Worcester cam- 
puses — created a favorable climate for additional 
salary legislation and an adequate operating budg- 
et despite great pressures for further cuts. And 
through it all, the University continued to be 
granted impressive sums in capital outlay for the 
kind of expansion the state's needs demanded. 

Another thread running through the decade, with 
the emphasis allowed by salary legislation, was the 
improvement of the overall academic structure by 
Provost Tippo, particularly that accomplished in 
the College of Arts and Sciences with the assistance 
of Dean I. Moyer Hunsberger. Fiscal autonomy 
aided immeasurably in allowing these improve- 
ments, accomplished in a dynamic manner with a 
minimum of friction. 

Faculty recruitment was given additional help in 
1966 by Legislative passage of the Salary Relief 
Bill, strongly supported by both the University 
and the new Board of Higher Education. It pro- 
vided for salaries outside the regular scale for ap- 
proximately one percent of faculty and certain 
academic administrators, allowing for competitive 
hiring of a number of internationally known 
teacher-scholars. 

Special emphasis was placed on two projects in 
1966: acceleration of the expansion of the Uni- 
versity's library resources, and further implemen- 
tation of the residential college concept to combat 
the negative aspects of greatly increasing size. The 
same year, the first Associate Alumni Award for 
outstanding scholarship was presented, and aca- 
demic programs under University auspices were 
inaugurated in England, Germany, and Italy. 

A major restructuring of Student Personnel Services 
was accomplished at Amherst in 1966-67, con- 
solidating all student activities and residence hall 
programs under the new position of associate 
dean of students, and beginning a program involv- 



and attended by mud and 
noise and confusion — can 
make us feel that we are 
dedicated to pandemonium 
rather than to this hiah aim. 
But it is precisely wlien we 
experience all this stress and 
agony of accelerated growth 
that we must be all the more 
aware of the centrality of the 
individual in what we are 
striving to do." (1962) 

"Respect for the individual 
is one of the hallmarks of a 
democratic society. Protec- 
tion of the rights of the in- 
dividual is essential, yet it is, 
I feel, a passive safeguard. I 
would hope the concern of 
society for individual dignity 
would he exhibited in a posi- 
tive fashion as well. By this 
I mean providing the oppor- 
tunity for the fullest develop- 
ment of the talents, skills and 
intelligence of each member 
of society. This is a very 
fundamental purpose of edu- 
cation. This is the reason, I 
believe, that American edu- 
cation is an inherent part of 
the democratic process." 
(1963) 

"We must always keep in 
mind that, despite the sheer 
numbers that will be in- 
volved in education, ulti- 
mately we are dealing with 
the individual student and 
his search for fulfillment as 
a human being. 

"There is much pressure to 
measure the effectiveness of 
American education in terms 
of success in reaching the 
moon, in terms of techno- 




VI 











Dr. Lederle, always a Redmen booster, stressed educational benefits of sports. 
Students and legislators engaged in important dialogue on Legislators' Day 1970. 




ing the counseling staff in selection and training 
of residence hall counselors. The University ad- 
ministration developed and refined its methods for 
dealing with student dissent. 

Also established during the year were the College 
of Arts and Sciences Information and Advising 
Center (CASIAC), and a Center for International 
Agricultural Studies. Closed-circuit television use 
was improved in the School of Education, a Proj- 
ect Themis award opened interdisciplinary Uni- 
versity work in deep-sea submersibles, and the 
Commonwealth Technical Resource Service 
(COMTECH) was established. Dr. Kenneth G. 
Picha was named Dean of the School of Engi- 
neering. 

Two new overseas programs were initiated in 
1967 - 68, in Spain by the University at Amherst 
and in France by the University of Massachusetts 
at Boston. A remote-access time-sharing computer 
program was begun at Amherst, and a new admis- 
sions program approved for students from disad- 
vantaged backgrounds. The School of Education, 
undergoing a thorough reorganization under new 
Dean Dwight W. Allen, was selected as one of 
nine institutions in the nation to develop a model 
elementary teacher education program. Dr. Wen- 
dell R. Smith was named Dean of the School of 
Business Administration. 

In 1968 - 69, the administration strengthened its 
urging that an annual growth factor be built into 
the operating budget, rather than face the pros- 
pect of cutting back on the 1500 new students per 
year quota set at Amherst. In an era of generally 
tight money, however, the Fiscal 1970 operating 
budget posted a decrease of $18 per student, caus- 
ing considerable retrenchment including a shorten- 
ing of the successful Summer Session from 12 to 
six weeks' duration. 

For the Medical School in Worcester, Federal fund 
applications totalling $35 million were approved 
and sufficient state funds provided to allow con- 
struction of the medical science building and 
planning of the teaching hospital. In Boston, land 
acquisition was begun after acceptance of Colum- 
bia Point as a permanent site of a 15,000-student 
University of Massachusetts at Boston. 



logical development, and in 
terms of the amount of money 
that graduates can make. But 
let us never forget that the 
real measure of our success 
for our educational system 
lies in its ability to develop 
individual initiative, self- 
reliance, and self-fulfillment 
in each student, regardless of 
race, creed, color or religion. 
That is the real test and the 
real measure of education." 
(1963) 

"I don't profess to he a proph- 
et, and yet I venture the 
opinion that our greatest 
challenge will be to produce, 
on the broadest possible 
scale, a modern form of the 
Classical Greek concept of 
the citizen — the enlightened, 
fully participating citizen. 
Combining within himself a 
spirit of continuing learning 
and a sense of active partici- 
pation, such a person mea- 
sures the value of his life 
and work in terms of an in- 
crement, in terms of intel- 
lectual attainments over and 
above those required for 
earning a paycheck and in 
terms of cumulative contribu- 
tions to the near and far 
communities around him." 
(1963) 

"As we begin studying Mas- 
sachusetts education under 
the leadership of the Master 
Plan Study Commission ap- 
pointed to this task, I would 
urge that the bedrock from 
which we start be quality, 
the highest possible quality, 
and not an unenlightened 
prudence and parsimony. 



■; 



1 



The New Boston Site — Colu?nbia Point 




'^C' 




Gov. Francis W. 
office. 



Sargent visits Dr. Lederle in latter's 



Planned buildings of UM/Boston at Columbia Point, with 
Morrissey Boulevard at far left and Mt. Vernon Street at 
top, include 14 major structures on 90 acres, with a tar- 
get of 1980. The 15,000-student facility is shown in archi- 
tect's conception. Approximately 2,500 commuting students 
are envisaged at each of six interrelated "colleges. " 




The attempt to cut corners 
in this very serious busi- 
ness of education in the latter 
20th century can bring us to 
disaster as far-reaching as 
any experienced in our his- 
tory." (1962) 

"Government, and its ser- 
vices, are not merehj restric- 
tive or police functions. I 
prefer to conceive of govern- 
ment as a means for coop- 
erative action in those areas 
of life where individually or 
privately we are unable to 
cope effectively with major 
problems. 

"The attitude that govern- 
ment is a negative and polic- 
ing agency adversely affect- 
ed the University when I first 
came here five years ago. 
Initiative to meet the truly 
horrendous educational chal- 
lenges of the Sixties was 
blunted by the prevailing 
need to get clearance upon 
clearance from State House 
functionaries for practically 
every management decision. 
Bureaucrats were, in effect, 
by action or by inaction, 
making educational policy 
and operational decisions for 
which they were untrained 
and for which they were not 
generally held accountable 
by the public. 

"Morale at the University 
was low under this deaden- 
ing system. The cumbersome 
red-tape in which the Uni- 
versity and other education- 
al institutions were enmeshed 
was notorious. Recruitment 
of quality staff had come to 
a virtual standstill. And, I 







Flanking Dr. Lederle at his retirement testimonial given by the General Court in the House Chambers 
in Boston are Maurice A. Donahue, Senate President, and David M. Hartley, Speaker of the House. 




^, 



In Amherst, 125 culturally deprived students were 
enrolled under the new program of the Committee 
for the Collegiate Education of Black Students, 
supported by the Legislature, the Ford Founda- 
tion, and the University at Amherst's Student 
Senate. 

Also in 1968-69, Dr. Lederle announced his in- 
tention to resign in June 1970. During the year 
several other resignations took place. Dr. Frank L. 
Boyden resigned the chairmanship of the Board of 
Trustees, Dean of Administration Redfem accepted 
the presidency of Keene State College in New 
Hampshire, and Dr. Hunsberger resigned as Dean 
of the College of Arts and Sciences. Dr. Ryan re- 
signed as Chancellor of the University of Massachu- 
setts at Boston and was succeeded by Dr. Francis 
L. Broderick. Dr. Moore resigned as Dean of the 
Graduate School, and the following February was 
named Chancellor of the Board of Higher Educa- 
tion. Dr. Marion Niederpreum resigned as Dean 
of the School of Home Economics, and was suc- 
ceeded by Dr. Helen G. Canoyer. 

In October 1969 the University Trustees approved 
a plan for system-wide reorganization, defining the 
relationships of the component parts and estab- 
lishing a central administration separate from each 
campus. In February 1970, Provost Tippo was 
appointed Chancellor of the University at Amherst. 
Secretary McCartney and Treasurer Johnson were 
absorbed into the system-wide office as Dr. Wood 
was named the University's 16th president at the 
close of Fiscal 1970. 

On balance, it was an unprecedented decade. 
Without furor or flamboyance, the University ad- 
ministration successfully rode the breaker of grow- 
ing need for public higher education despite early 
post-sputnik reaction against the humanities, and 
later curtailment of Federal assistance combined 
with a groundswell known as the taxpayers' revolt. 
Despite it all, the growth in support for public 
higher education has been most impressive. 

As the majority of University students continue to 
come from families whose incomes cannot cover 
the full cost of attending college, Massachusetts 
may view with pride the passage of ten years with 
no increase in tuition at the state University. 



might add, so widespread 
was knowledge of this sorry 
situation that most of the let- 
ters which I received upon 
my appointment as President 
were commiserative rather 
than congratulatory. 

"Fortunately, the Governor 
and General Court sensed 
the need for creating a more 
efficient method of manag- 
ing our educational institu- 
tions. The need, basically, 
was to release energy and 
initiative to meet the edu- 
cational crisis thrust upon us. 
The result was the Fiscal 
Autonomy Act of 1962. 

"Red tape and restrictive 
regulations were replaced by 
vesting in the Board of Trust- 
ees authority commensu- 
rate with their responsibility. 
This does not mean a blank 
check was issued to the Uni- 
versity. It means the Univer- 
sity must justify every dollar 
it requests from the State 
and account fully for every 
dollar appropriated to it. 
The University is subject, 
and properly, to detailed au- 
dits and must render com- 
plete reports on its fiscal and 
management operations. 

"But there is more to fiscal 
autonomy than requiring the 
University to justify its level 
of support and to as.sure legal 
accountability. The real im- 
portance of fiscal autonomy 
was to place respo7isibility 
for University management 
where it squarely belongs — 
in the hands of the Board of 
Trustees and its responsible 
administrators." (1965) 



Report of the Treasurer 

Summary of Operating Funds 
Fiscal Year Ending June 30, 1970 



' 



Where the Operating Dollar Comes From . . . Amherst, 


Boston, Worcester 






7ofa/ Amount 


Percent ot Total 


Funds from University Receipts: 






Tuition 


$ 4,275,216.06 


3.96 


Residence Halls 


548,748.76 


.51 


Sales and Services 


1,357,880.91 


1.26 


Total University Receipts 


6,181,845.73 


5.73 


Net Funds From Taxpayers of the Commonwealth 


55,004,473.39 


50.98 


Sub-Total 


61,186,319.12 


56.71 


Federal Government 


12,345,987.69 


11.45 


Student Activities 


2,130,503.76 


1.98 


Student Aid Funds 


225,264.75 


.21 


Student Loan Funds Notes Receivable 


2,893,377.29 


2.68 


Gifts and Grants 


4,474,523.27 


4.15 


Auxiliary Enterprises 


20,730,893.40 


19.21 


Endowment Income 


161,810.44 


.15 


Agency Funds 


3,735,094.21 


3.46 


Total Funds Available 


$107,883,773.93 


100.00 



How It Is Spent . . . Amherst, Boston, Worcester 





Total Amount 


Percent ot Total 


Instruction 






State Funds 


$ 29,554,927.36 


31.63 


Federal Funds 


2,787,355.00 


2.98 


Gifts and Grants 


466,558.91 


.50 


Total Instruction 


32,808,841.27 


35.11 


Library 


3,065,012.99 


3.28 


Research 


7,084,475.49 


7.58 


Public Service 






Agricultural Extension 


1,928,015.64 


2.06 


State Agricultural Control Services 


468,670.48 


.50 


Operation of Plant and Space Rentals 


11,419,830.75 


12.22 


Administration 


4,524,852.49 


4.84 


Student Service 


1,813,643.51 


1.94 


Scholarships 


1,844,293.44 


1.97 


Student Loan Funds Notes Receivable 


3,018,334.96 


3.23 


Student Activities 


2,358,591.22 


2.53 


Auxiliary Enterprises 


18,178,680.06 


19.45 


Agency and Miscellaneous 


4,939,752.81 


5.29 


Total Funds Used 


93,452,995.11 


100.00 


Balance Carried Forward (Restricted Funds*) 


14,430,778.82 




Total Funds Used and Balances 


$107,883,773.93 





'Balances, restricted funds, beginning of report year, 




n 







A 





lere is a great tendency, I am afraid, 
to categorize educational experiences. 
Students, for instance, often speak of 
their education in term,'; of individual 
coxirses or teachers. 
To me, a university education is the 
totality of four years of varied 
experiences. All learning is not in the 
classroom. Look at the variety of 
enriching experiences available in the 
residential colleges. The highlight of 
a day might he a brief visit to an art 
exhibit, an evening of relaxation 
listening to the University Symphony, 
or a furious debate in the Hatch on a 
moral or political issue. Each is 
educational in a different loay. 
The opportunity to probe the mind of 
an exciting professor in a private 
conversation in his office can be 
extremely stimulating. What makes a 
professor tick? What is he like personally 
when separated from his notes in the 
lecture hall? 

The disciplined mind of a halfback 
waiting behind his blockers until the 
last minute, the trenchant presentation 
of student senators pushing for a new 
program, a magazine editor editing 
copy and laying out pictures, are all 
educational experiences that are almost 
totally unaffected by what goes on in 
the classroom. A truly valuable 
educational experience may be simply 
learning to live harmoniously with 
others in a residence hall. 
Our bright young .students are all 
unique. They come from the cities and 
the farms, from Massachusetts, from 
other states and from overseas. Some 
are well-to-do; others have a tough 
time making ends meet. The point is 
that they rub off on one another. Each 
has something to contribute and 
.something to receive from his daily 
contacts. When we share our ideals, 
beliefs, knowledge and experiences 
through books, professors, classrooms, 
residence halls, or extracurricular 
activities in a balanced way, we are 
participating fully in education and 
developing our individual personalities 
into The Whole Man." 

John W. Lederle 
1968 




Board of Trustees 

Organization of 1969-1970 



Joseph P. Healey of Arlington 
I Frank L. Boyden of Deerfield 

Robert M. Ajbrams of Holyoke 
Edmund J. Croce of Worcester 
Dennis M. Crowley of Boston 
Robert D. Gordon of Lincoln 
John W. Haicis, Jr. of Greenfield 
Mrs. Eliot S. Knowles of South 

Dartmouth 
Lorenzo D. Lambson of Southwick 
Louis M. Lyons of Cambridge 
John J. Maginnis of Worcester 
Cynthia J. Olken '70 of Sharon 
George L. Pumphret of Dorchester 
Mrs. George R. Rowland of Osterville 
Alan Shaler of Easthampton 
Mrs. O. Phillip Snowden of Roxbury 
Frederick S . Troy of Boston 
Christopher J. Weldon of Springfield 

Ex Officio 

Francis W. Sargent of Dover 

Governor of the Commonwealth 
John W. Lederle of Amherst 

President of the University 
Nathan Chandler of Sterling Junction 

Commissioner of Agriculture 
Alfred L. Frechette, M.D. of Brookline 

Commissioner of Public Health 
Milton Greenblatt, M.D. of 'Newton 

Commissioner of Mental Health 
Neil V. Sullivan of Cambridge 

Commissioner of Education 

Officers of the Board 
Joseph P. Healey of Arlington 

Chairman 
Frank L. Boyden of Deerfield 

Honorary Chairman 
Robert J. McCartney of Amherst 

Secretary 
Kenneth W. Johnson of Amherst 

Treasurer 




^ 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



0^-M4^ 



^S^ 







AMHERST • BOSTON • WORCESTER 



FINANCIAL REPORT 1970 



_LIBRARY_ 

UNivERSiir OF 

MASSACHiJoEnS 

AMHERST, MASS. 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Amherst Boston Worcester 



FINANCIAL REPORT 



FOR THE YEAR ENDED TUNE 30, 1970 



Kenneth W. Johnson 
Treasurer 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



Robert M. Abrams 

Frank Learoyd Boyden 

Edmund J. Croce 

Dennis Michael Crowley 

Glenn Elters, Student Member 

Robert D. Gordon 

John William Haigis, Jr. 

Joseph P. Healey 

Mrs. Eliot S. Knowles 

Lorenzo D. Lambson 

Louis M. Lyons 

John J. Maginnis 

George L. Pumphret 

Mrs. George R. Rowland 

Alan Shaler 

Mrs. 0. Phillip Snowden 

Frederick S. Troy 

Most Reverend Christopher Joseph Weldon 



Holyoke 

Deerfield 

Worcester 

Boston 

Belchertown 

Lincoln 

Greenfield 

Arlington 

South Dartmouth 

Southwick 

Cambridge 

Worcester 

Dorchester 

Osterville 

Easthampton 

Roxbury 

Boston 

Springfield 



MEMBERS EX OFFICIO 



His Excellency Francis W. Sargent, Governor 

of the Commonwealth 
Robert C. Wood, President of the University 
John W. Lederle, President of the University 

to June 30, 1970 
Alfred L. Frechette, Commissioner of 

Public Health 
Milton Greenblatt, M. D. , Commissioner of 

Mental Health 
Neil V. Sullivan, Commissioner of Education 
Nathan Chandler, Commissioner of Agriculture 



Dover 
Lincoln 

Amherst 

Brookline 

Newton 
Boston 
Sterling Junction 



OFFICERS OF THE BOARD 



Joseph ?. Healey, Chairman 
Frank Learoyd Boyden, Vice Chairman 
Robert J. McCartney, Secretary 
Kenneth W. Johnson, Treasurer 



Arlington 
Deerfield 
Amherst 
Amherst 



OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY 



Robert C. Wood, President 

John W. Lederle, President to June 30, 19 70 

Oswald Tippo, Chancellor, University of Massachusetts, Amherst 

Francis L. Broderick, Chancellor, University of Massachusetts, Boston 

Lamar Soutter, Dean of the School of Medicine, Worcester 

Robert J. McCartney, Secretary 

Kenneth W. Johnson, Treasurer 

Robert H. Brand, Associate Treasurer 

William H. Maus , Controller 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Schedule 



Page 



I Balance Sheet 

II Summary of Receipts and Expenditures 

III Maintenance Appropriation - 3 Year Comparison of Expenditures 

IV Amherst 

State Funds 

Income Statements 

Appropriation Comparison by Subsidiary Account 

Capital Outlay Appropriation held by BBC 

Other State Appropriation 

Summary of Appropriations, Encumbrances, Expenditures 

and Balances by Functional Division 
Expenditure Report by Budget Division 
Capital Outlay Expenditure Report 

Federal Funds 

Statement of Income and Expenses 

Endowment Funds 

Summary of Investments 
Investment Pool 
Non-Pooled Investments 
Principal 
Income 

Student Loan Funds 

Federal and Trust Fund Loans Statement 
Building Authority 

Statement of Income and Expenses 
Trust Funds 

Statement of Income and Expenses 

Athletic Funds Statement 

Boarding Hall Statement 

Recognized Student Organizations 

Student Health Statement 

Student Union - University Store - Income and Expenditures 
University Store - Balance Sheet 
Food Service - Income and Expenses 
Food Service - Balance Sheet 
General Fund - Income and Expenses 
General Fund - Balance Sheet 
Reserve Fund - Balance Sheet 

Real Estate 

Inventory of Lands 

Inventory of Buildings and Structures 

Inventory of Improvements other than Buildings 



Al 
A2 
A3 
A4 

A5 
A6 
A7 



Bl 



CI 
C2 
C3 
Ck 
■C5 



Dl 



El 



Fl 

F2 

F3 

F4 

F5 

F6 

F7 

F8 

F9 

FIO 

Fll 

F12 



Gl 
G2 
G3 



9 
10 
11 
12 

13 
15 
23 



24 



25 
26 
28 
29 
30 



32 



33 



35 
70 
72 
73 
74 
75 
76 
77 
78 
79 
80 
81 



82 
82 
87 



Schedule 



Page 



V Boston 



State Funds 



Income Statements 

Appropriation Comparison by Subsidiary Account 

Summary of Appropriations, Encumbrances, Expenditures 

and Balances by Functional Division 
Expenditure Report by Budget Division 
Capital Outlay Expenditure Report 



A8 


89 


A9 


90 


AlO 


91 


All 


92 


A12 


92 



Endowment Funds 

Principal 
Income 



C6 
C7 



93 
93 



Student Loan Funds 



Federal and Trust Fund Loans Statement 



D2 



94 



Trust Funds 



Statement of Income and Expenses 

Student Union - University Store 

University Store 





F13 


95 


Income and Expenditures 


F14 


101 


Balance Sheet 


F15 


102 



Real Estate 



Inventory of Lands 

Inventory of Buildings and Structures 



G4 
05 



103 
103 



VI Worcester- Medical School 



State Funds 



Appropriation Comparison by Subsidiary Account 

Capital Outlay Appropriation held by BBC 

Summary of Appropriations, Encumbrances, Expenditures 

and Balances by Functional Division 
Expenditure Report by Budget Division 
Capital Outlay Expenditure Report 



A13 

A14 

A15 
A16 
A17 



105 
106 

107 
108 
109 



Trust Funds 



Statement of Income and Expenses 



F16 



110 



Real Estate 



Inventory of Lands 

Inventory of Buildings and Structures 



G6 
G7 



113 
113 



Audit 

In accordance with state law, all accounts 

of the University are examined each year by the State 

Auditor. The last audit covered the period of this 
report from July 1, 1969 to June 30, 1970. 



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-4- 



Summary of Receipts, Transfers and Balances 



I. State Appropriation 

General Maintenance 
Amherst 
Boston 
Worcester 

Sub-Total 

Other Maintenance 
Amherst 
Boston 
Worcester 

Sub-Total 

Capital Outlay 
Amherst 
Boston 
Worcester 

Sub-Total 

Total 

Less: Balances Reverted to State Treasurer 
Amherst 
Boston 

Net Total - State Appropriation 

II. Federal Appropriation 

Balance, July 1, 1969 
Current Year Receipts 

Total Federal Appropriation 

III. Endowment Income 

Balance, July 1, 1969 
University Income - Amherst 

Boston 
State Income 
Transfers 

Total Income 

IV. Student Loan Funds 

Balance, July 1, 1969 
Interest Income & Additions 

Total 

Less : Loans Cancelled 

Net Total 

V. U of M Trustee for U of M Building Authority 

Balance, July 1, 1969 
Current Year Receipts 
Transfers 

Total 



$40,525,650.00 

6,493,979.00 

909.553.21 



$ 1,910,699.62 

915,000.00 

70.000.00 



$ 1,029,255.71 

8,938,682.46 

456.160.09 



22,919.03 
39,741.94 



$47,929,182.21 



2,895,699.62 



10,424,098.26 
$61,248,980.09 



62.660.97 



$ 288,832.06 
2.421.314.78 



98,160.32 

59,267.46 

36.26 

4,346.40 

42,046.48 



$ 2,893,377.29 
237,896.92 

$ 3.131,274.21 

12,632.17 



$ 475,530.69 
4,684,959.71 
1,353,610.09 



$ 61,186,319.12 



2,710,146.84 



203,856.92 



3,118,642.04 



6,514,100.49 



VI. Trust 6. Agency Funds 

Balance, July 1. 1969 
Current Year Receipts: 

Amherst 

Boston 

Worcester 

Sub-Total 

Transfers: 
Amherst 
Boston 
Worcester 

Sub-Total 

Total 



$40,849,337.57 

331.890.33 

3.919.65 



18.666.14 
77,569.26 
45.166.61 



$ 4,481,493.83 



41,185,147.55 



141.402.01 



45.808.043.39 



Total - Receipts, Transfers, and Balances 



$119,541,108.80 



Sunraiary of Expenditures, Transfers and Balances 

Amherst Boston Worcester ' Total 

I. State Appropriation 

Administration $ 2,975,676.09 $ 765,855.95 $ 558,386.97 

Instructor 28,554,031.25 4,300,544.08 10,073.47 

Experiment Station 1,416,811.99 -0- -0- 

Extension Service '• 773,252.26 -0- -0- 

Control Service 468,670.48 -0- -0- 

Operation of Plant 6,325,487.17 1,391,282.06 -0- 

Sub-Total $40,513,929.24 $ 6,457,682.09 $ 568,460.44 $ 47,540,071.77 

Other Maintenance 1,711,645.24 636,554.97 70,000.00 2,418,200.21 

Capital Outlay 576,241.39 2,431,324.40 120,570.21 3,128,136.00 

Total State Appropriation Expenditure $42,801,815.87 $ 9,525,561.46 $ 759,030.65 $ 53,086,407.98 

Balance - State Appropriation, June 30, 1970 640,870.43 6,782,358.06 676,682.65 8,099,911.14 

Total $43,442,686.30 $16,307,919.52 $1,435,713.30 $ 61,186,319.12 

II. Federal Appropriations 

Expenditures $ 2,338,301.23 

Balance, June 30, 1970 371,845.61 

Total 2,710,146.84 

III. Endowment Income 

Expenses - Amherst $ 64,794.59 

Transfers - Amherst 42,046.48 

Balance, June 30, 1970 97,015.85 

Total 203,856.92 

IV. Student Loan Funds 

Amherst, June 30, 1970 Balance $ 3,114,396.71 

Boston, June 30, 1970 Balance 4,245.33 

Total 3,118,642.04 

V. U of M Trustee for U of M Building Authority 

Expenditures $ 5,014,686.69 

Transfers 1,353,610.09 

Balance, June 30, 1970 145,803.71 

Total ■ 6,514,100.49 

VI. Trust and Agency Funds 

Revolving Accounts - Expenditures $36,226,483.15 $ 339,821.52 $ 40,746.80 

Transfers 121,861.01 -0- -0- 

Agency Accounts Expenditures 3,476,204.84 -0- -0- 

Sub-Total $39,824,549.00 $ 339,821.52 $ 40,746.80 

Balance, June 30, 1970 5,370,719.82 216,060.04 16,146.21 

Total $45,195,268.82 $ 555,881.56 $ 56,893.01 45,808,043.39 

Total - Expenditures, Transfers and Balances $119,541,108.80 



By Budgetary Division 



State General Maintenance Appropriation 
Comparative Statement of Expenditures by Year 
Amherst - Boston - Worcester 



Total 



1968 



1969 



1970 



■ all Campuses 








% of 






% of 








% of 


Division 




Amount 




Total 


Amount 




Total 




Amount 




Total 


Administration 


$ 3 


,303,339, 


,12 


9.57 


$ 3,461,063, 


,91 


8.81 


$ 4, 


,299,919, 


,01 


9.04 


Instruction 


23 


,504,659, 


,24 


68.05 


26,753,462, 


,62 


68.12 


32 


,864,648, 


,80 


69.13 


Extension Service 




597,729, 


,74 


1.73 


626,625, 


,64 


1,60 




773,252, 


,26 


1.63 


Experiment Station 




919,421, 


.97 


2.66 


1,184,924, 


,24 


3.02 


1 


,416,811, 


,99 


2.98 


Control Service 




379,775, 


,24 


1.10 


374,404. 


,22 


.95 




468,670, 


,48 


.99 


Operation of Plant 


5 


,834,735, 


.52 


16,89 


6,871,132, 


.54 


17.50 


7 


,716,769, 


,23 


16.23 



$34,539,660.83 100.00 $39,271,613.17 100.00 $47,540,071.77 



100.00 



By Sub 


sidary Account 










for 


all Campuses 










Code 












No. 


Account 




1968 




1969 


01 


Salaries 


$19 


,201,108.47 


$21 


,720,679,98 


02 


Salaries, Other 


5 


,676,716.89 


6 


,429,341.55 


03 


Service, Non-Employees 


4 


,030,139.84 


4 


,539,571.55 


04 


Food 




759.65 




1,009.79 


05 


Clothing 




11,993,14 




5,978.59 


06 


Housekeeping Supplies 
and Expense 




83,391.00 




96,594.04 


07 


Lab. Med. and General 
Care 




12,451,80 




12,991.66 


08 


Heat and Other Plant 
Operations 




959,879,30 


1 


,287,847.59 


09 


Farm and Grounds 




86,834,04 




119,965.62 


10 


Travel and Automotive 
Expenses 




194,492,25 




223,000.64 


11 


Advertising and Printing 




130,307,40 




167,946.31 


12 


Repairs, Alterations and 
Additions 




642,521,21 




627,485.86 


13 


Special Supplies and 
Expenses 




935,076.05 




907,540.46 


14 


Office and Administrative 
Expenses 




473,882,62 




599,798.18 


15 


Equipment 




548,233,12 




659,085.87 


16 


Rentals 


1 


,551,874,05 


1 


,872,775.48 




Total 


$34 


,539,660,83 


$39 


,271,613.17 



1970 

$34,966,670.49 

594,187.63 

5,248,251.90 

1,047.41 

7,940.56 

93,029.78 

12,978.27 

1,339,270.44 

119,892.87 
240,979.08 

219,104.88 
636,378.56 

855,669.51 

661,041.19 

642,844.17 
1,936.785.03 

$47,540,071.77 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
at Amherst 



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-9- 



Schedule A-2 

State Appropriations 

Comparative Statement by Subsidiary Accounts 



Subsidiary Account 

General Maintenance ' ' ' 

1350-01-01 Salaries, Permanent Positions 

1350-01-02 Salaries, Other 

1350-01-03 Services, Non-Employees 

1350-01-04 Food for Persons 

1350-01-05 Clothing 

1350-01-06 Housekeeping Supplies and Expenses 

1350-01-07 Laboratory, Medical and General Care 

1350-01-08 Heat and Other Plant Operations 

1350-01-09 Farm and Grounds 

1350-01-10 Travel and Automotive Expenses 

1350-01-11 Advertising and Printing 

1350-01-12 Repairs, Alterations and Additions 

1350-01-13 Special Supplies and Expenses 

1350-01-14 Office and Administrative Expenses 

1350-01-15 Equipment 

1350-01-16 Rentals 

Totals 



Other Maintenance 



1968 



1969 



1970 



$17,119,140.00 


$18 


,932,000.00 


$30,630,920.00 


5,217,695.00 


5 


,911,000.00 


496,025.00 


3,455,000.00 


3 


,709,000.00 


4,384,080.00 


980.00 




1,020.00 


1,050.00 


12,000.00 




6,000.00 


8,000.00 


82,000.00 




95,000.00 


91,500.00 


10,000.00 




10,000.00 


10,000.00 


890,000.00 


1 


,200,000.00 


1,260,000.00 


86,920.00 




120,000.00 


120,000.00 


169,000.00 




188,000.00 


179,950.00 


111,000.00 




140,000.00 


150,000.00 


605,000.00 




600,000.00 


600,250.00 


665,000.00 




687,000.00 


683,975.00 


409,000.00 




513,480.00 


570,000.00 


375,000.00 




472,000.00 


389,900.00 


955,600.00 




950,000.00 


950,000.00 



$30,163,335.00 



1350-10-13 For Certain Scholarships 

1350-35-14 Entertainment of Distinguished Visitors 

1350-36-16 Rental Fee President's House 

1350-40-03 Disadvantaged Students 

1350-40-13 Disadvantaged Students 

1350-41-15 Program of Assistance to Higher Education 

1350-50-13 Library Books 

1350-70-03 Senior Internship 

1350-71-03 Legislative Internship 

1350-80-03 Technical Services 

1350-21-00 Receipts Projects 

3304-44-03 Inland Fish and Game 

3304-44-10 Inland Fish and Game 

3304-55-03 Fisheries and Cooperative Research 



Totals 



Capital Outlay 

8068-31 Roads, Sidewalks and Parking Areas 

3013-21-17 Fire Truck 

8069-66 Acquisition of Land 

8069-67 Library Books for Amherst 

8069-68 Construction of Avian Biology Building 

8364-26 Renovation of Older Classroom Buildings 

8465-12 Renovation of Older Classroom Buildings 

8056-26 Improvements and Additions to Power 
Plant 

Totals 



Grand Total 



$ 1,032,000.00 



$32,358,769.11 



$33,534,500.00 



200,000.00 
$ 1,197,895.21 



$36,357,886.93 



$40, 525, 650. 00(a) (b) (c) 



$ 600,000.00 


$ 700,000.00 


$ 850,000. 00(a) 


1,000.00 


1,000.00 


1,000. 00(a) 


1,200.00 


1,200.00 


1,200. 00(a) 


-0- 


50,000.00 


100, 000. 00(a) 


-0- 


100,000.00 


200,000. 00(a) 


m 100,000.00 


100,000.00 


100, 000. 00(a) 


200,000.00 


200,000.00 


200,000. 00(a) 


35,000.00 


35,000.00 


35, 000. 00(a) 


9,000.00 


9,000.00 


35,000. 00(a) 


25,000.00 


175,000.00 


171,038.93 


174,184.11 


235,791.72 


198,877.67 


8,050.00 


8,000.00 


8,000.00 


-0- 


500.00 


500.00 


10,000.00 


10,000.00 


10,000.00 


$ 1,163,434.11 


$ 1,625,491.72 


$ 1,910,616.60 



1,000,000 


00 


$ -0- ^ 


-0- 


32,000 


00 


-0- 


-0- 


-0- 




100,000.00 


-0- 


-0- 




500,000.00 


-0- 


-0- 




105,000.00 


-0- 


-0- 




74,895.21 


-0- 


-0- 




218,000.00 


-0- 



-0- 



$42,436,266.60 



(a) Authorized by Chapter 452 of the Acts of 1969 

(b) Authorized by Chapter 811 of the Acts of 1969 

(c) Includes transfer from Budget Bureau for upgrading and salary increase 



-10- 



Schedule A-3 
., Capital Outlay Appropriations 

Under Supervision and Control of the 
Bureau of Building Construction 

8070-07 For the construction of a classroom, laboratory and office 
building for the college of arts and sciences, Including 
the cost of furnishings, equipment, site development and 
the replacement of tennis courts, to be in addition to the 
amount appropriated in item 8069-65 of section two of 
chapter four hundred and seventy-six of the acts of 
nineteen hundred and sixty-eight 582,800.00 (a) 

8070-08 For the construction of certain additional library facilities, 
including the cost of furnishings and equipment; to be in addi- 
tion to the amount appropriated in item 8068-27 of section two 
of chapter six hundred and eighty-two of the acts of nineteen 
hundred and sixty-seven, as amended by chapter four hundred and 
seventy-six of the acts of nineteen hundred and sixty-eight; 
provided, that expenditures from this item shall be contingent 
upon prior approval of the project by the proper federal authori- 
ties and assurance by such authorities that the federal alloca- 
tion for the cost of the project will be not less than two million 
dollars 2,000,000.00 (a) 

8070-45 For the purchase and Installation of furnishings and equipment 
U64-3 for teaching and research facilities, undergraduate and graduate 

classrooms, laboratories, and faculty offices, including a 

chemistry tower with basement storage and foundations for two 

additional towers, a technical library wing and a computer center 

wing; to be in addition to the amount appropriated in item 8067-23 

of section two of chapter five hundred and ninety of the acts of 

nineteen hundred and sixty-six 1,735,000.00 (b) 

8070-46 For the construction of additional facilities to include 
U63-5 a theatre and auditorium in the classroom and laboratory 

building for the college of arts and sciences, including 

cost of furnishings and equipment, to be in addition to 

the amount appropriated in item 8069-63 of section two of 

chapter four hundred and seventy-six of the acts of nineteen 

hundred and sixty-eight; total project cost not to exceed 

thirteen million eight hundred thousand dollars 13,390,000.00 (b) 

8070-47 For the construction of an addition to the health services 

U68-3 building, including certain renovations to the existing 

building and the cost of furnishings and equipment, to be 
in addition to the amount appropriated in item 8069-97 of 
section two of chapter four hundred and seventy-six of the 
acts of nineteen hundred and sixty-eight; total project 
cost not to exceed one million three hundred and sixty- 
eight thousand dollars 1,268.000.00 (b) 



(a) Authorized by Chapter 138 of the Act of 1969 

(b) Authorized by Chapter 767 of the Acts of 1969 



-11- 



Schedule A-4 



Other Continuing State Appropriations 



Name and Account Number 

Federal Grant Held by State Treasurer 

Grant #4550-09 New Facilities for Research 
and Graduate Training - Morrill Science 
Center - Movable Property 



Grant Encumbrance Expended June 30, 1970 



$54.82 



$36.98 



$17.84 



State Technical Service Grant 

Grant #4550-00 State Technical 
Services Act of 1965 

Total 



28.20 



$83.02 



$36.98 



-0- 
-0- 



28.20 



$46.04 



-12- 



Schedule 

State General 
Expenditures by Functional 



Account Number and Name 
1350-01 

01 Salaries, Permanent 

02 Salaries, Other 

03 Services, Non-Employee 

04 Food 

05 Clothing 

06 Housekeeping Supplies & Expenses 

07 Laboratory, Medical and General Care 

08 Heat and Other Plant Operation 

09 Farm & Grounds 

10 Travel and Automotive Expenses 

11 Advertising and Printing 

12 Repairs, Alterations, & Additions 

13 Special Supplies & Expenses 

14 Office & Administrative Expense 

15 Equipment 

16 Rental 

Total 



Appropriation 




_ Expenditures and Encumbrances 


and 










Extension 


Allotment 


Administration 
$2,167,932.14 


Instruction 
$22,471,025.09 


Service 


$30,630,920.00 


$758,020.25 


496,025.00 




98,880.92 




111,883.64 


29.28 


4,384,080.00 




130,882.02 


4, 


,123,790.49 


3,708.38 


1,050.00 




-0- 




797.41 


-0- 


8,000.00 




6,308.36 




307.10 


-0- 


91,500.00 




-0- 




3,999.11 


-0- 


10,000.00 




-0- 




9,978.56 


-0- 


1,260,000.00 




-0- 




-0- 


-0- 


120,000.00 




-0- 




57,714.89 


112.85 


179,950.00 




14,834.82 




121,611.55 


1,376.53 


150,000.00 




122,851.32 




26,613.31 


-0- 


600,250.00 




15,398.20 




113,696.46 


1,118.11 


683,975.00 




66,481.07 




588,812.01 


674.61 


570,000.00 




81,103.74 




472,956.30 


8,197.25 


389,900.00 




11,256.45 




328,848.91 


-0- 


950,000.00 




259,747.05 




121,996.42 


15.00 


$40,525,650.00 


$2 


,975,676.09 


$28 


,554,031.25 


$773,252.26 



Other Maintenance 

1350-10-13 Scholarships 

1950-34-14 Ent. of Distinguished Visitors 
1350-36-16 Rent - President's House 
1350-40-03 Disadvantaged Students 
1350-40-13 Disadvantaged Students 
1350-41-15 Assistance to Higher Education 
1350-50-13 Library Books 
1350-70-03 Senior Internship 
1350-71-03 Legislative Internship 
1350-80-03 Technical Services 
3304-44 Inland Fish and Game 
3304-55 Fisheries & Coop. Res. 
1350-21 Receipts for Research 
4550-00 Technical Services Act of '65 
4550-09 Federal Grant Fund 

Total 



Grand Total 



$ 850,000.00 


$ 




-0- 




$ 


843,956.65 


-0- 


1,000.00 




1 


,000, 


,00 




-0- 


-0- 


1,200.00 




1 


,200. 


,00 




-0- 


-0- 


100,000.00 






-0- 






98,877.52 


-0- 


200,000.00 






-0- 






199,819.25 


-0- 


100,000.00 






-0- 






99,999.94 


-0- 


200,000.00 






-0- 






200,000.00 


-0- 


35,000.00 






-0- 






31,399.45 


-0- 


35,000.00 






-0- 






35,000.00 


-0- 


171,038.93 






-0- 






64,991.79 


-0- 


8,500.00 






-0- 






8,365.71 


-0- 


10,000.00 






-0- 






10,000.00 


-0- 


198,877.67 






-0- 






117,034.93 


-0- 


28.20 






-0- 






-0- 


-0- 


54.82 






-0- 






-0- 


-0- 


$ 1,910,699.62 


$ 


2 


,200, 


,00 


$ 1 


,709,445.24 


-0- 


$42,436,349.62 


$2 


,977 


,876, 


.09 


$30 


,263,476.49 


$773,252.26 





(a) 
(b) 



Balances reverted to State Treasurer 
Balances carried forward to Fiscal Year 1971 



-13- 



A- 5 

Maintenance Appropriation 
Division and Subsidiary Account 



Expenditures and Encumb 


ranees 




Total 


Ba 


ilance of 


Experiment 


Control 


( 


Operation 


Expenditure 


Appropriation 


Station 


Service 
$384,900.60 


( 
$3 


Df Plant 
,571,607.01 


and Enc. 


Jun 
$ 


le 30, 1970 


$1,276,382.82 


$30,629,867.91 


1,052.09 


76,866.63 


39,979.13 




167,840.36 


495,479.96 




545.04 


10,501.12 


16,671.04 




91,636.17 


4,377,189.22 




6,890.78 


-0- 


-0- 




250.00 


1,047.41 




2.59 


52.70 


149.68 




1,122.72 


7,940.56 




59.44 


400.00 


-0- 




86,949.07 


91,348.18 




151.82 


-0- 


-0- 




-0- 


9,978.56 




21.44 


-0- 


-0- 


1 


,259,434.18 


1,259,434.18 




565.82 


15,102.57 


906.95 




46,055.61 


119,892.87 




107.13 


3,148.56 


10.270.91 




28,707.43 


179,949.80 




.20 


8.91 


-0- 




341.20 


149,814.74 




185.26 


6,752.88 


1,584.04 




461,423.32 


599,973.01 




276.99 


3,592.27 


11,385.52 




11,400.41 


682,345.89 




1,629.11 


18,778.12 


2,563.86 




(13,635.14) 


569,964.13 




35.87 


486.18 


258.75 




49,048.35 


389,898.64 




1.36 


4,739.23 


-0- 


$6 


563,306.48 
,325,487.17 


949,804.18 
$40,513,929.24 


$ 


195.82 


$1,416,811.99 


$468,670.48 


11,720.76^' 



(a) 



-0- 
-0- 
-0- 
-0- 
-0- 
-0- 
-0- 
-0- 
-0- 
-0- 
-0- 
-0- 
-0- 
-0- 
-0- 



-0- 
-0- 
-0- 
-0- 
-0- 
-0- 
-0- 
-0- 
-0- 
-0- 
-0- 
-0- 
-0- 
-0- 
-0- 



-0- 
-0- 
-0- 
-0- 
-0- 
-0- 
-0- 
-0- 
-0- 
-0- 
-0- 
-0- 
-0- 
-0- 
-0- 



-0- 



843,956.65 


$ 6,043.35 


1,000.00 


-0- 


1,200.00 


-0- 


98,877.52 


1,122.48 


199,819.25 


180.75 


99,999.94 


.06 


200,000.00 


-0- 


31,399.45 


3,600.55 


35,000.00 


-0- 


64,991.79 


106,047.14 


8,365.71 


134.29 


10,000.00 


-0- 


117,034.93 


81,842.74 


-0- 


28.20 


-0- 


54.82 



$ 1,711,645.24 



(a) 



(a) 
(a) 
(a) 



(a) 



(b) 
(a) 

(b) 
(b) 
(b) 



$199,054.38 



$1,416,811.99 



$468,670.48 



$6,325,487.17 



$42,225,574.48 



$210,775.14 



-14- 



Schedule A-6 

1970 Fiscal Year Expenditure Report 

by Budget Divisions 



Dept. 
Code 

Central Administration 

All Trustees 

A12 Office of the President 

A13 Office of the Secretary 

A14 Office of the Dean of Administration 

Total 



Office of University Relations 

AAl News Bureau 

AA2 Publications Office 

AA3 Photographic Section 

AA4 Film Center 

AA5 Development 

AA6 Radio Station WFCR-FM 

AA7 Television 

ABl Office of Budgeting and 
Institutional Studies 

Total 

Business and Financial Management 

Bll Treasurer's Office 

B12 Business and Personnel Office 

B13 Physical Plant Dept. Executive Office 

B14 Campus Security 

B16 Duplicating Service 

B17 Central Mailing 

Total 



State Funds State Funds Other Funds 
Salaries Other Salaries 
and Wages Expenditures and Wages * 



47,783.11 $ 4,599.72 $ 



59,268.77 
49,569.26 
845.60 
38,926.05 
69,496.95 
3,276.87 

49,095.03 



113,984.40 

(1,925.38) 

9,223.26 

622.92 

10,032.40 

746.54 

6,009.98 



-0- 

150.75 

1,607.09 

323.25 

19,546.21 

18,926.03 

-0- 

-0- 



Net 
Total 



$ 


-0- $ 
81,072.35 
50,243.09 
41,861.79 

173,177.23 $ 


2,005.93 

20,655.19 

5,645.66 

3,521.84 

31,828.62 


$ 


-0- 
-0- 
-0- 
-0- 


$ 


2,005.93 

101,727.54 

55,888.75 

45,383.63 


$ 


$ 


-0- 


$ 


205,005.85 



52,382.83 
173,403.92 
49,250.97 
10,392.11 
59,095.18 
98,455.38 
4,023.41 

55,105.01 



$ 318,261.64 $ 143,293.84 $ 40,553.33 $ 502,108.81 



Residential College 

DDl Orchard Hill Residential College 
DD5 Southwest Residential College 

Total 



934,159.00 

359,693.17 

29,510.48 

441,542.75 

78,685.91 

62,664.90 



340,881.85 
18,992.41 

1,029.52 
14,599.65 

9,161.12 
18,194.00 



$ 110,458.85 $ 1,385,499.70 



48,571.71 

2,116.80 

82,981.58 

28,745.83 

1,995.29 



427,257.29 

32,656.80 

539,123.98 

116,592.86 

82,854.19 



$ 1,906,256.21 $ 402,858.55 $ 274,870.06 $ 2,583,984.82 



5,903.24 
24.214.14 



30,117.38 $ 



1,613.97 $ 
2,156.55 _ 



3,770.52 $ 



4,052.42 $ 
11,330.54 _ 



11,569.63 
37,701.23 



15,382.96 $ 



49,270.86 



Provost 



Ell Provost's Office 

E13 Four-College Programs 

E15 Schedule Office 

E17 Graduate Assistants 

E18 Nantucket Research Center 

E19 Fine Arts Council 

Total 



294,505.88 $ 24,470.48 $ 292,348.54 $ 611,324.90 



4,000.00 


6,500.00 


-0- 




10,500.00 


67,143.15 . 


3,725.86 


2,455. 


,65 


73,324.66 


1,992,947.75 


-0- 


3,590, 


.58 


1,996.538.33 


7,193.25 


645.35 


-0- 




7,838.60 


-0- 


28.25 


8,318, 


.39 


8,346.64 



$ 2,365,790.03 $ 35,369.94 $ 306,713.16 $ 2,707,873.13 



-15- 



Schedule A-6 (Continued) 
1970 Fiscal Year Expenditure Report 
by Budget Divisions 



Dept. 
Code 



State Funds State Funds Other Funds 
Salaries Other Salaries 

and Wages Expenditures and Wages * 



Net 
Total 



F21 
F22 
F23 
F24 
F26 
F27 
F28 
F29 
F30 
F42 



Student Personnel 



Dean of Students 



Dean of Men 

Dean of Women 

Placement and Financial Aid Services 

Counseling and Guidance 

Associate Dean of Students 

Summer Counseling Trust Funds 

Housing Office 

Admissions and Records 

Off-Campus Work Study (Not State Fund) 

Total 



$ 78,133.90 


$ 


4,982.84 $ 


351.75 


$ 83,468.49 


28,342.10 




2,275.82 


7,325.74 


37,943.66 


-0- 




-0- 


198.74 


198.74 


133,072.68 




9,226.42 


15,908.38 


158,207.48 


141,466.92 




7,989.06 


39,446.09 


188,902.07 


726,700.48 




20,298.22 


63,389.64 


810,388.34 


-0- 




-0- 


11,230.00 


11,230.00 


-0- 




55.66 


909.75 


965.41 


330,582.32 




44,133.19 


4,369.04 


379,084.55 


-0- 




-0- 


134,867.50 
277,996.63 


134,867.50 


$ 1,438,298.40 


$ 


88,961.21 $ 


$ 1,805,256.24 



Library 

Gil Library 

G12 Board of Higher Education 

Total 

Audio Visual Center 

Hll Audio Visual Center 

Total 

College of Arts and Sciences 



$ 1,332,871.57 $ 152,571.91 $ 
(15,841,21) 628.91 



16,429.94 $ 1,501,873.42 
-0- (15,212.30 ) 



$ 1,317,030.36 $ 153,200.82 $ 16,429.94 $ 1,486,661.12 



$ 64,407.49 $ 16,256.55 $_ 
$ 64,407.49 $ 16,256.55 $ 



28,081.11 $ 108,745.15 
28,081.11 $ 108,745.15 



Jll 


Dean of Arts and Sciences 


$ 277,287.60 $ 


32,439.22 $ 


626.65 


$ 310,353.47 


J12 


Economics 




353,950.32 


9,100.58 


7,963.71 


371,014.61 


J13 


Bureau of Government 


Research 


79,201.59 


3,343.07 


26,317.66 


108,862.32 


J14 


English 




1,512,384.51 


23,433.93 


37,085.39 


1,572,903.83 


J15 


Slavic Languages and 


Literature 


109,027.15 


1,542.38 


-0- 


110,569.53 


J16 


Germanic Languages and Literature 


329,745.10 


4,880.71 


18,898.95 


353,524.76 


J17 


Government 




469,968.77 


9,104.74 


69,191.26 


548,264.77 


J18 


History 




650,764.82 


11,675.25 


12,176.97 


674,617.04 


J19 


Music 




322,264.92 


27,586.65 


1,030.51 


350,882.08 


J20 


Philosophy 




229,271.90 


3,509.84 


16,396.12 


249,177.86 


J21 


Psychology 




650,496.16 


52,097.44 


279,036.19 


981,629.79 


J22 


Biochemistry 




122,119.44 


11,127.41 


87,167.01 


220,413.86 


J23 


Romance Languages 




797,954.80 


11,252.36 


36,300.54 


845,507.70 


J24 


Sociology 




479,928.64 


11,980.47 


94,396.91 


586,306.02 


J25 


Speech 




601.179.12 


34,145.53 


32,444.65 


667,769.30 


J26 


Art 




377,089.86 


23,399.47 


4,312.14 


404,801.47 


J27 


Anthropology 




87,496.01 


23,940.00 


1,084.25 


112,520.26 


J32 


Microbiology 




196,690.22 


29,521.13 


165,473.47 


391,684.82 


J33 


Botany 




298,477.52 


43,100.58 


95,126.38 


436,704.48 



-16- 



Schedule A-6 (Continued) 
1970 Fiscal Year Expenditure Report 
by Budget Divisions 







State Funds 


State Funds 


Other Funds 






Dept. 




Salaries 


Other 


Salaries 




Net 


Code 


College of Arts and Sciences 


and Wages 
(Continued) 


Expenditures 


and Wages* 




Total 


J34 


Chemistry 


$ 707,198.97 


$ 106,775.99 


$ 258,823.13 


$ 1 


,072,798.09 


J35 


Geography 


13,407.64 


2,112.27 


1,572.66 




17,092.57 


J36 


Geology 


321,854.85 


27,447.41 


61,400.34 




410,702.60 


J37 


Mathematics 


1,138,473.41 


19,064.24 


80,192.83 


1 


,237,730.48 


J38 


Physics 


884,473.89 


87,926.98 


569,884.87 


1 


,542,285.74 


J39 


Zoology 


483,117.93 


70,568.70 


243,228.78 




796,915.41 


J40 


Statistics 


-0- 


-0- 


-0- 




-0- 


J41 


Astronomy - Four College 


573.00 


780.87 


-0- 




1,353.87 


J42 


Comparative Literature 


88,648.13 


2,192.83 


1,206.37 




92,047.33 


J44 


Linquistics Program 


37,118.78 


2,158.30 


472.85 




39,749.93 


J50 


Black Studies Program 


4,343.19 


4,399.74 


-0- 




8,742.93 


J51 


Dept. of Asian Studies 


956.25 


611.89 


-0- 




1,568.14 



Total 



$11,625,464.49 $ 691,219.98 $ 2,201,810.59 $14,518,495.06 



College of Agriculture (Instruction ) 



KOI 


Administration 


$ 85,562.08 $ 


4,707.66 $ 


1,635. 


.00 $ 


91,904.74 


K03 


Agricultural and Food Economics 


152,989.88 


5,059.62 


237, 


.50 


158,287.00 


K04 


Agricultural Engineering 


96,799.74 


4,036.68 


153, 


.23 


100,989.65 


KG 7 


Entomology 


109,551.16 


10,058.52 


-0- 




119,609.68 


K08 


Research and Production Service 


10,893.04 


13,767.99 


-0- 




24,661.03 


K09 


Plant and Soil Sciences 


269,520.65 


29,563.22 


13,661, 


.18 


312,745.05 


KIO 


Food Science and Technology 


133,305.82 


7,732.01 


5,542, 


.11 


146,579.94 


Kll 


Forestry and Wildlife Management 


136,625.98 


14,232.46 


11,133, 


,72 


161,992.16 


K12 


Landscape Architecture 


249,069.72 


8,904.36 


3,594, 


.00 


261,568.08 


K13 


Environmental Sciences 


16,775.42 


701.97 


1,560, 


.61 


19,038.00 


K15 


Veterinary and Animal Sciences 


387,905.03 


72,380.25 


3,914, 


.73 


464,200.01 


K16 


Plant Pathology 


26,570.21 


4,880.52 


-0- 




31,450.73 


K17 


Restaurant & Hotel Administration 


91,719.24 


4,669.81 


130, 


.50 


96,519.55 



Total 



(Extension Service) 

K21 Administration 

K23 Agricultural and Food Economics 

K24 Agricultural Engineering 

K28 Cranberry Station 

K29 Entomology 

K30 Plant and Soil Sciences 

K31 Food Science and Technology 

K32 Forestry and Wildlife Management 

K33 4-H 

K35 Landscape Architecture 

K38 Veterinary and Animal Sciences 

K40 Environmental Sciences 

K41 Plant Pathology 

K42 Restaurant & Hotel Administration 

Total 



$ 1,767,287.97 $ 180,695.07 $ 



41,562.58 $ 1,989,545.62 



97,771.42 $ 


2,728.08 $ 


692,966.92 $ 


793,466.42 


89,506.24 


959.69 


51,417.45 


141,883.38 


37,861.46 


1,196.86 


13,603.67 


52,661.99 


49,657.72 


140.23 


12,811.08 


62,609.03 


17,795.09 


349.77 


15,418.93 


33,563.79 


99,868.04 


1,019.98 


28,292.31 


129,180.33 


34,370.22 


444.65 


1,608.20 


36,423.07 


22,096.15 


839.50 


16,798.63 


39,734.28 


33,087.73 


1,058.30 


30,011.17 


64,157.20 


2,999.88 


-0- 


4,220.00 


7,219.88 


62,239.61 


1,451.24 


60,342.78 


124,033.63 


175,140.01 


834.29 


84,097.58 


260,071.88 


24,565.71 


344.11 


9,991.74 


34,901.56 


14,798.63 


127.65 


20,862.31 


35,788.59 



$ 761,757.91 $ 11,494.35 $ 1,042,442.77 $ 1,815,695.03 



-17- 



Schedule A-6 (Continued) 
1970 Fiscal Year Expenditure Report 
by Budget Division 



Dept. 
Code 

(Research) 

K51 Administration 

K53 Agricultural and Food Economics 

K54 Agricultural Engineering 

K57 Environmental Sciences (Amherst) 

K60 Cranberry Station 

K62 Entomology 

K63 Research and Production Service 

K64 Plant and Soil Sciences 

K65 Food Science and Technology 

K66 Forestry and Wildlife Management 

K68 Landscape Architecture 

K71 Veterinary and Animal Sciences 

K73 Environmental Sciences (Waltham) 

K75 Natural Resources Project #3-35-R 

K76 Plant Pathology 

Total 



(Control Service) 



State Funds 
Salaries 
and Wages 



26,351.09 

59,932.61 

80,933.73 

69,378.55 

108,295.35 

33,292.71 

48,311.52 

181,458.71 

134,876.44 

177,975.88 

-0- 

242,348.19 

136,499.73 

8,504.51 

55,591.55 



State Funds Other Funds 

Other Salaries 
Expenditures and Wages * 



1,021.52 
850.28 

1,389.95 
876.88 

6,689.48 
490.42 
509.46 

2,940.80 
400.65 

2,121.83 

-0- 

14,970.95 

20,157.33 

20.00 

621.87 



14,576.22 

66,839.00 

53,254.17 

86,220.04 

57,670.08 

33,786.31 

150.00 

149,601.69 

149,773.75 

92,510.98 

2,508.00 

178,920.63 

90,812.54 

14,683.20 

30,258.84 



Net 
Total 



41,948.83 

127,621.89 

135,577.85 

156,475.47 

172,654.91 

67,569.44 

48,970.98 

334,001.20 

285,050.84 

272,608.69 

2,508.00 

436,239.77 

247,469.60 

23,207.71 

86,472.26 



$ 1,363,750.57 $ 53,061.42 $ 1,021,565.45 $ 2,438,377.44 



K81 
K82 
K84 
K85 
KB 6 
KB 7 
K88 



Lll 
L12 
L13 
L14 
L15 
L16 



Seed Law 

Mastitis Control 

Feed, Seed, Fertilizer and Dairy Law 

Shade Tree Labs 

Pullorum Control 

M. G. Control 

Environmental Science 

Total 



School of Business Administration 

Dean of Business Administration 

Accounting 

General Business and Finance 

Management 

Marketing 



Center for Business & Economic Research 
Total 



1,533.42 $ 


-0- $ 


-0- 


$ 1,533.42 


50,002.27 


1,461.44 


-0- 


51,463.71 


,37,046.94 


7,463.98 


-0- 


144,510.92 


,00,795.63 


3,969.13 


-0- 


104,764.76 


26,321.45 


13,223.83 


-0- 


139,545.28 


7,230.60 


393.58 


-0- 


7,624.18 


18,620.46 


607.75 


-0- 


19,228.21 



441,550.77 $ 27,119.71 $ 



$ 468,670.48 



$ 148,133.85 $ 
246,467.13 
338,613.60 
297,124.80 
167,752.80 
61,607.32 



30,308.97 

989.42 

1,443.74 

1,103.46 

1,007.21 

397.16 



43,486.78 $ 221,929.60 



2,799.B6 

11,428.76 

11,567.19 

1,349.90 

3,069.39 



250,256.41 
351,486.10 
309,795.45 
170,109.91 
65,073.87 



$ 1,259,699.50 $ 35,249.96 $ 73,701.88 $ 1,368,651.34 



School of Engineering 

Mil Dean of Engineering 

M12 Chemical Engineering 

M13 Civil Engineering 

M14 Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering 

M15 Electrical Engineering 

M16 Industrial Engineering 

M17 Basic Engineering 

M18 STSA-Mass 6B01-DA1 (Phase I) 

Total 



173,854.66 $ 20,589.38 $ 



263,392.06 
396,582.57 
516,216.87 
391,269.41 
196,004.25 

2,351.42 

-0- 



26,353.63 

16,006.77 

29,529.72 

35,876.44 

6,587.55 

4.20 

13.20 



27,297.91 
115,176.34 
166,109.37 
89,350.75 
73,292.69 
20,334.22 

-0- 
18,191.58 



221,741.95 
404,922.03 
578,698.71 
635,097.34 
500,438.54 
222,926.02 
2,355.62 
18,204.78 



$ 1,939.671.24 $ 134,960.89 $ 509,752.86 $ 2,584,384.99 



-18- 



Schedule A-6 (Continued) 

1970 Fiscal Year Expenditure Report 

by Budget Divisions 



Dept. 
Code 



State Funds State Funds Other Funds 

Salaries Other Salaries 

and Wages Expenditures and Wages * 



School of Home Economics 

Nil Dean of Home Economics $ 86,668.66 $ 7,874.93 $ 378.04 $ 

N12 Home Economics Extension 92,256.10 1,296.94 29,111.24 

N13 Nutrition and Food 89,576.00 4,262.97 3,662.82 

N14 Home Economics Education 30,176.72 620.49 -0- 

N15 Human Development 79,096.13 1,084.96 2,568.23 

N16 Management and Family Economics 761.15 551.35 -0- 

N17 Textiles, Clothing & Environmental Art s 96,608.35 991.14 144.75 _ 



Net 
Total 



94,921.63 
122,664.28 
97,501.79 
30,797.21 
82,749.32 
1,312.50 
97,744.24 



Total 

School of Nursing 
Oil School of Nursing 
Total 



School of Physical Education 

Pll Dean of Physical Education 

P12 Physical Education for Men 

P13 Physical Education for Women 

P14 Athletics and Intramurals 

P15 Recreation 

Total 



School of Education 

Qll School of Education 

Total 

Division of Military Science 

RAl Air ROTC 
RBI Army ROTC 

Total 



Graduate School 

511 Graduate School Office 

512 Computer Science 

513 Research Computing Center 

514 Water Resources Research Center 

515 Univ. of Massachusetts Press 



475,143.11 4 16,682.78 $ 35,865.08 $ 527,690.97 



$ 428,030.59 $ 26,738.16 $ 62,741.72 $ 517,510.4 7 
$ 428,030.59 ? 26,738.16 $ 62,741.72 $ 517,510.47 



260,218.69 $ 
274,169.52 
276,006.45 
298,905.88 
55,343.24 _ 



38,207.27 

11,517.02 

9,773.10 

9,198.55 

2,312.39 



117.60 $ 
4,096.12 
3,033.22 
507,542.84 

150.00 



298,543.56 
289,782.66 
288,812.77 
815,647.27 
57,805.63 



$ 1,164,643.78 $ 71,008.33 $ 514,939.78 S 1,750,591.89 



$ 1,213,351.03 $ 93,273.35 $ 1,285,803.81 $ 2,592,428.19 
$ 1,213,351.03 $ 93,273.35 $ 1,285,803.81 $ 2,592,428.19 



$ 


7,823.00 
19,030.15 

26,853.15 


$ 
$ 


1,106.91 
1,439.55 

2,546.46 


$ 


-0- 
-0- 


$ 


8,929.91 
20,469.70 


$ 


? 


-0- 


$ 


29,399.61 



186,578.05 

93,229.06 

92,211.72 

21,294.21 

1,656.50 



17,786.35 

36,520.23 

40,136.83 

165.06 

180.40 



107,567.27 $ 

21,516.31 

240,508.94 

215,533.00 

67,246.03 



311,931.67 
151,265.60 
372,857.49 
236,992.27 
69,082.93 



-19- 



Schedule A-6 (Continued) 

1970 Fiscal Year Expenditure Report 

by Budget Divisions 



Dept. 
Code 



State Funds 
Salaries 
and Wages 



S16 
S17 
S18 
S19 
S20 



Til 
T12 
T13 
T14 
T15 
T16 
T17 



Graduate School (Continued) 



$ 



Office of Research Services 

Polymer Science and Engineering 

Marine Sciences Program 

Graduate Assistants Faculty Replacement 

Fellowship Section _ 



Total 



Labor Relations and Research Center 

Labor Center General Fund 
Graduate Program 
Graduate Assistants 
Faculty Research 
Federal Research 
Labor Education Extension 
Library and Publications 

Total 



Summer School 
Ull Summer School 
Total 



State Funds Other Funds 

Other Salaries 
Expenditures and Wages * 



6.00 

86,983.64 

2,040.00 

44,223.49 

149,549.99 



17.40 $ 
5,949.21 
691.98 
-0- 



94,081.90 
160,558.35 
-0- 

216.42 
2,180.68 



Net 
Total 



94,105.30 

253,491.20 

2,731.98 

44,439.91 
151,730.67 



677,772.66 $ 101,447.46 $ 909,408.90 $ 1,688,629.02 



$ 115,829.08 $ 12,047.78 

-0- 1,151.72 

42,732.34 -0- 

440.00 112.70 

-0- 33.60 

7,877.50 1,786.11 

6,027.24 398.03 



$ 172,906.16 $ 15,529.94 $ 



$ 578,987.54 $_ 



11,148.45 $ 


139,025.31 


-0- 


1,151.72 


-0- 


42,732.34 


-0- 


552.70 


78,122.40 


78,156.00 


-0- 


9,663.61 


-0- 


6,425.27 



89,270.85 $ 277,706.95 



1.00 $ 19,867.78 $ 598,856.32 



$ 578,987.54 $ 



1.00 $ 19,867.78 $ 598,856.32 



Student Health Services 
Vll Student Health Services 
Total 



Public Health 

WWl Public Health 

WW2 Environmental Health and Safety 



Total 



139,244.34 $ 11,302.66 



$ 1,161,115.46 $ 1,161,115.46 
$ 1,161,115.46 $ 1,161,115.46 



$ 136,611.97 $ 10,546.69 $ 
2,632.37 755.97 _ 



30,503.59 $ 177,662.25 
582.00 3,970.34 



31,085.59 $ 181,632.59 



-20- 



Schedule A-6 (Continued) 
1970 Fiscal Year Expenditure Report 
by Budget Division 



Dept . 
Code 



State Funds 
Salaries 
and Wages 



State Funds 

Other 
Expenditures 



Other Funds 

Salaries 

and Wages * 



Net 
Total 



Operation of Plant 



XOl 
X02 
X04 
X05 
X06 
X12 
X14 
XI 5 
X16 
X20 
X21 
X22 
X23 
X24 
X31 
X32 
X40 
X41 
X42 
X43 
X44 
X45 
X46 
X47 
X50 
X51 
V52 
X60 
X61 
X62 
X63 
X64 
X65 
X70 
X71 
X72 
X73 
X74 
X75 
X76 
X77 
X78 
X79 
X92 
X93 
X94 
X96 
X99 



Contract, Maintenance and Repair 

Utility Expense 

Maintenance Contract Services 

Maintenance Force Projects 

Maintenance Contract Projects 

Materials and Supplies (Maint . & Repairs) 

Materials and Supplies (Custodial) 

College Supply 

Coal and Freight 

Administrative Division 

Division Office 

Administration Section 

Personnel/Employee Relations Section 

Comptroller Section 

Division Office 

Planning Section 

Design Engineering Division 

Division Office 

Landscape Architecture Section 

Mechanical Engineering Section 

Electrical Engineering Section 

Architectural Section 

Civil Engineering and Drafting Section 

Specifications Section 

Project Engineering Division 

Division Office 

Project Section 

Amherst Maintenance Division 

Division Office 

Technical Staff Section 

Work Control Section 

Central Stores Section 

Transportation Section 

Project Section 

Plumbing Shop 

Carpentry Shop 

Masonry Shop 

Painting Shop 

Electrical Shop 

Operation Section 

Grounds and Services Section 

Custodial Section 

Power Plant 

Nantucket Research Center 

Wareham Cranberry Station 

Waltham Field Station 

University of Massachusetts/Boston 

Dormitory Rental 



Total 



$ 15,010.00 


$ 148,173.14 $ -0- 




$ 163,183.14 


-0- 


714,649.55 


. -0- 




714,649.55 


-0- 


800.00 


-0- 




800.00 


-0- 


14.65 


-0- 




14.65 


-0- 


(7,400.00) 


-0- 




(7,400.00) 


Lrs) -0- 


330,763.84 


-0- 




330,763.84 


-0- 


78,732.39 


-0- 




78,732.39 


-0- 


(61,329.86) 


-0- 




(61,329.86) 


-0- 


531,595.62 


-0- 




531,595.62 


-0- 


35,122.93 


-0- 




35,122.93 


-0- 


17,903.84 


-0- 




17,903.84 


10,544.93 


5,562.36 


12,909, 


.70 


29,016.99 


23,743.63 


1,870.16 


18,361. 


.73 


43,975.52 


45,337.10 


2,622.93 


32,351, 


.93 


80,311.96 


-0- 


-0- 


275, 


.00 


275.00 


2,242.50 


-0- 


-0- 




2,242.50 


27,718.65 


9,126.79 


-0- 




36,845.44 


3,981.23 


6.46 


875, 


.04 


4,862.73 


32,984.42 


3,038.12 


1,334, 


.87 


37,357.41 


71,852.83 


959.00 


4,356, 


.46 


77,168.29 


24,943.64 


547.40 


14,487, 


.23 


39,978.27 


6,730.75 


-0- 


-0- 




6,730.75 


1 23,307.14 


642.36 


47,187, 


.89 


71,137.39 


144.00 


100.90 


15,389, 


.26 


15,634.16 


-0- 


53.60 


-0- 




53.60 


16,215.29 


457.97 


5,378, 


.80 


22,052.06 


33,995.16 


14.50 


22,609, 


.95 


56,619.61 


-0- 


7,881.20 


12, 


.00 


7,893.20 


28,974.15 


1,508.65 


6,149, 


.40 


36,632.20 


23,392.45 


532.11 


32,674, 


.69 


56,599.25 


83,181.93 


752.87 


44,931, 


.07 


128,865.87 


83,095.68 


1,129.08 


29,098, 


.82 


113,323.58 


97,070.45 


5,204.77 


43,571, 


.41 


145,846.63 


57.48 


246.08 


10,575, 


.93 


10,879.49 


132,732.08 


1,422.31 


20,563, 


.06 


154,717.45 


206,131.55 


349.35 


74,574, 


.25 


281,055.15 


45,324.93 


881.95 


26,411. 


.21 


72,618.09 


212,709.98 


3,858.25 


95,402, 


.47 


311,970.70 


151,193.99 


414.62 


35,561, 


.44 


187,170.05 


280,129.82 


4,256.38 


192,051, 


.11 


476,437.31 


629,109.84 


10,016.75 


116,643, 


.80 


755,770.39 


1,282,201.53 


4,161.12 


533,641, 


.18 


1,820,003.83 


237,011.41 


51,676.88 


-0- 




288,688.29 


-0- 


1,337.62 


-0- 




1,337.62 


-0- 


3,717.54 


-0- 




3,717.54 


15.00 


5,297.23 


-0- 




5,312.23 


-0- 


2.40 


-0- 




2.40 


-0- 


545,250.00 -0- 
$2,463,925.81 $ 1,437,379, 


.70 


545,250.00 


$ 3,831,083.54 


$ 7,732,389.05 



-21- 



Schedule A-6 (Continued) 
1970 Fiscal Year Expenditure Report 
by Budget Division 



Dept . 
Code 



Yll 
Y12 



Zll 
Z12 
Z13 
Z14 
Z16 
Z17 
Z18 
Z19 



Boarding Halls 

Expense 

Material and Supplies 

Total 



Student Union 

General Funds 

Food Service Fund 

University Store Fund 

Recognized Student Organizations 

UMass/Boston Bookstore 

Student Automatic Service Trust Fund 

Work Study 

Graduate Student Senate 

Total 



Miscellaneous 



500 Reserve and Undistributed 
Total 

Grand Totals 



State Funds 
Salaries 
and Wages 



-0- 



-0- 



State Funds Other Funds 

Other Salaries Net 

Expenditures and Wages * Total 



-0- 



-0- 



$ 3,105,104.52 $ 3,105,104.52 
2,175,363.58 2.175.363.58 

$ 5,280,468.10 $ 5,280,468.10 



-0- 


$ 406,172.76 $ 


406,172.76 


-0- 


309,198.23 


309,198.23 


-0- 


254,848.62 


254,848.62 


-0- 


126,408.62 


126,408.62 


-0- 


33,631.16 


33,631.16 


-0- 


19,730.25 


19,730.25 


-0- 


23,071.53 


23,071.53 


-0- 


558.00 


558.00 



$ 1,173,619.17 $ 1,173,619.17 



$ 22,000.00 $ 199,594.77 $ 



$ 22,000.00 $ 199,594.77 $ -0- 



$ 221,594.77 
$ 221,594.77 



$35,502,537.09 $5,011,392.15 $17,852,429.26 $58,366,358.50 



■^Expenditures, other than for Salaries and Wages, not distributed by departments. 



-22- 



Schedule A-7 



Capital Outlay Expenditures and Balances 



Account Name and Number 



Total 
Expire s Appropriation 



Reverted Balance of 
Expenditures to State Appropriation 
Prior Year Current Year Treasurer June 30, 1970 



8262 


12 


Land Purchase 


1968 


$ 


371,000.00 


$ 366,500.00 


$ -0- 




$-0- 




$ 4,500.00 


8064 


30 


Land Purchase 


1968 




300,000.00 


298,186.28 


353, 


.60 


-0- 




1,460.12 


8065 


28 


Sidewalks, Parking, etc. 


1969 


1 


,000,000.00 


996,473.23 


1,509, 


.20 


21. 


,60 


1,995.97 


8065 


35 


T.V., Computer, etc. 


1969 


1 


,000,000.00 


989,904.33 


9,348, 


.09 


95. 


,19 


652.39 


8364 


26 


Renov. of Older Bldgs. 


1970 




74,895.21 


18.40 


63,207, 


.30 


-0- 




11,669.51 


8465 


12 


Renov. of Older Bldgs. 


1970 




218,000.00 


43,069.39 


148,824, 


.41 


-0- 




26,106.20 


8065 


33 


Renov. of Older Bldgs. 


1970 




38,133.02 


-0- 


-0- 




-0- 




38,133.02 


8066 


26 


Impr . & Add . Power Plant 


1971 




300,000.00 


76,550.47 


13,344, 


.00 


-0- 




210,105.53 


8066 


44 


Const, of Teaching Fac. 


1971 




863,725.00 


863,580.33 


-0- 




-0- 




144.67 


8067 


26 


Replacement of Furniture 


1971 




250,000.00 


249,547.00 


154, 


.50 


-0- 




298.50 


8067 


27 


Repair & Renov. to Older 
























Bldgs. 


1971 




500,000.00 


382,115.49 


65,421, 


.66 


-0- 




52,462.85 


8067 


28 


Add. to Cranberry Station 


1971 




165,000.00 


156,719.50 


8,217, 


.20 


-0- 




63.30 


8067 


69 


Land Purchase 


1971 




300,000.00 


297,410.53 


200, 


.00 


-0- 




2,389.47 


8068 


31 


Const of Roads & Sidewalks 


1972 


1 


,000,000.00 


782,134.95 


207,549, 


.77 


-0- 




10,315.28 


8069 


66 


Land Purchase 


1973 




100,000.00 


42,125.00 


4,608 


.33 


-0- 




53,266.67 


8069 


67 


Library Books 


1973 




500,000.00 


474,013.67 


25,564 


.63 


-0- 




421.70 


8069 


68 


Avian Biology Bldg. 


1973 


$7 


105,000.00 
,085,753.23 


38,148.95 
$6,056,497.52 


27,938 
$576,241, 


.70 
.39 


-0- 




38,912.35 




$116. 


,79 


$452,897.53 



-23- 



Schedule B-1 

Federal Funds/Amherst 
Statement of Receipts, Disbursements and Balances 



Instruction 

Bankhead Jones 

Land Grant 

Morrill - Nelson 

Smith - Hughes 

Water Resources Center 

Total 



Balance 
July 1, 1969 

$ 33,665.56 

33,300.37 

36,059.43 

(8,085.15) 

7,277.14 

$102,217.35 



Receipts 

$ 272,428.00 

7,303.20 

33,333.33 

12,592.25 

100,000.00 

$ 425,656.78 



Disbursements 

$ 266,052.46 

-0- 

25,320.05 

7,900.72 

96,081.62 

$ 395,354.85 



Balance 
June 30, 1970 

$ 40,041.10 
40,603.57 
44,072.71 
(3,393.62) 
11,195.52 

$132,519.28 



Extension Service 

Smith Lever Act on Amendment 1953 $ 84,450.66 $ 707,435.00 $ 738,330.47 $ 53,555.19 

Research and Marketing -0- 53,402.00 53,402.00 -0- 

Agricultural Marketing #12-05-300-122 5,000.00 -0- 2,542.07 2,457.93 

Agricultural Marketing #12-05-300-140 -0- 1,500.00 678.91 821.09 

Nutrition Education Program 8,367.42 454,412.00 359,809.93 102,969.49 

Total $ 97,818.08 $1,216,749.00 $1,154,763.38 $159,803.70 



Experiment Station 
Hatch Amended 
Mclntire - Stennis 
Regional Research 
CSRS-716-15-14 
CSRS-12-13-67-45 

Total 



$ 56,037.94 

12,151.37 

6,487.43 

2,414.79 

11,705.10 

$ 88,796.63 



$ 538,624.00 

48,353.00 

186,932.00 

5,000.00 

-0- 

$ 778,909.00 



$ 543,412.33 

51,296.39 

178,415.70 

3,353.48 

11,705.10 

$ 788,183.00 



$ 51,249.61 

9,207.98 

15,003.73 

4,061.31 

-0- 

$ 79,522.63 



Grand Total 



$288,832.06 



$2,421,314.78 



$2,338,301.23 



$371,845.61 



-24- 



Schedule C-1 



Endowment Funds - Summary of Investments 
as of June 30, 1970 



Cost or 
Book Value 



% of Total 



Pooled Investments: 
Bonds and Notes 



Government 
Public Utilities 
Industrial 



Mortgages ' 

Preferred Stock 

Common Stock 

Financial 

Industrial 

Utilities 

Total Pooled Securities 

Cash 

Uninvested Cash 
Savings Account 

Total Cash 

Total Pooled Investments 

Non-Pooled Investments: 

Land 

Lincoln Land in Ohio 



$138,9A2.19 






11, 


.04 




212,533.99 






16, 


.89 




60,141.84 






4, 


.78 






$ 


411,618.02 

9,000.00 

30,904.89 






32.71 

.71 

2.45 



81,230.33 

480,210.24 

61,958.16 



28,149.37 
2,531.79 



623,398.73 
1,074,921.64 



30,681.16 



$1,105,602.80 



152,905.40 
$1,258,508.20 



6.45 

38.17 

4.92 



2.24 
.20 



49.54 



85.41 



2.44 



87.85 



12.15 



100.00 



-25- 



Schedule C-2 



Endowment Funds - Principal 

Statement of Pool Investments 
as of June 30, 1970 



Description 

Government Bonds and Notes 

35,000 U.S. Treasury 4 1/8's due 

February 15, 1974 
55,000 U.S. Treasury 5's due 

November 15, 1970 
25,000 Federal National Mortgage Association 

5.20's due January 19, 1977 
25,000 International Bank for Reconstruction 

and Development 4 1/2 's due February 1, 1990 

Total Government Bonds and Notes 



Public Utility Bonds 

20,000 American Telephone and Telegraph 

Company debenture 4 3/8 's due May 1, 1999 
25,000 Boston Edison Company First Mortgage 

6 1/8 due June 1, 1997, Series J 
20,000 Commonwealth Edison Company First 

Mortgage V 5 1/4 's due April 1, 1996 
25,000 Florida Power and Light Company First 

Mortgage 4 3/8 's due December 1, 1986 
25,000 Florida Power and Light Company First 

Mortgage 7's due June 1, 1998 
25,000 Philadelphia Electric Company First 

and Refunding Mortgage 4 5/8 's due 

September 1, 1987 
10,000 Public Service Electric and Gas 

Company First and Refunding Mortgage 

4 5/8 's due August 1, 1988 
25,000 Southern Bell Telephone Company 

debenture 4 3/8 's due April 1, 2001 
4,000 Southern National Gas Company First 

Mortgage Pipe Line Sinking Fund 4 3/A's 

due January 1, 1979 
20,000 Southern California Edison Company 

First Refunding 4 1/2' s due February 15, 1990 
20,000 Southwestern Bell Telephone Company 

debenture 4 3/4 's due October 1, 1992 



Total Public Utility Bonds 



Industrial Bonds 

20,000 General Motors Acceptance Corporation 

debenture 4 5/8 's due June 15, 1986 
20,000 Gulf Oil Corporation debenture 5.35's 

due June 15, 1991 
20,000 Shell Oil Corporation Sinking Fund 

debenture 4 5/8 's due August 1, 1986 

Total Industrial Bonds 



Mortgages 

Theta Corporation of Theta Chi Fraternity 4% 

Total Mortgages 



Date of 
Acquisition 


Cost or 
Book Value 


Market Value 


8/1A/67 


$ 34,792.19 


$ 30,931.25 


8/14/67 


55,000.00 


54,587.50 


9/22/67 


24,125.00 


21,312.50 


7/15/65 


25,025.00 


16,000.00 




$ 138,942.19 


$122,831.25 


7/10/63 


$ 20,040.27 


$ 12,200.00 


9/22/68 


25,562.51 


19,718.75 


7/25/66 

2/6/59 

7/16/68 


19,875.00 
21,800.00 


14,175.00 
16,656.25 


6/30/68 


25,641.68 


21,625.00 


11/26/57 

7/16/68 


22,205.62 


16,375.00 


10/6/58 


10,225.00 


6,662.50 


7/15/65 


24,437.50 


14,750.00 


4/24/59 


4,114.33 


3,035.00 


7/15/65 
10/17/58 
12/18/58 
6/30/68 


20,060.00 
18,572.08 


11,825.00 
13,575.00 




$212,533.99 


$150,597.50 


7/6/64 


$ 20,149.84 


$ 12,600.00 


7/25/66 


20,042.00 


15,000.00 


8/3/61 


19,950.00 


14,600.00 




$ 60,141.84 


$ 42,200.00 


10/9/54 


$ 9,000.00 


$ 9,000.00 




$ 9,000.00 


$ 9,000.00 



-26- 



Schedule C-2 (Continued) 



Endowment Funds - Principal 

Statement of Pool Investments 
as of June 30, 1970 



No. of 
Shares 

288 
250 



Description 
Preferred Stock 
F.A. Bartlett Tree Expert Company 
General Signal 

Total Preferred Stock 



Date of 
Acquisition 

6/20/66 
6/30/70 



Cost or 
Book Value 

7,200.00 
23,704.89 

30,094.89 



Market Value 

$ 7,200.00* 
24,062.50 

$ 31,262.50 



Common Stock 

Financial 
400 Aetna Life & Casualty Company 
223 Bankers Trust New York Corp. 
300 First National City Corp. 
500 Security Pacific National Bank 
400 Travelers Corp. 

Total Common Stock - Financial 



12/12/69 

6/20/66 

5/11/65-7/1/65 

6/30/69 

5/19/67-9/22/67 



$ 16,156.00 
14,021.13 
18,328.55 
19,818.15 
12,906.50 

$ 81,230.33 



$ 14,900.00 
13,380.00 
18,225.00 
14,875.00 
11,500.00 

$ 72,880.00 



Industrial 

300 Addressograph-Multigraph Corp. 

750 American Metal Climax, Inc. 

6 Bartlett Realty Co., Inc. 

1000 Bartlett Tree Expert Company 

300 Continental Can Company 

147 E.I. duPont de Nemours and Company 

800 Federated Department Stores 

186 General Electric Company 

300 General Foods Corporation 

301 General Motors Corp. 

800 Goodyear Tire & Rubber Company 

604 Gulf Oil Corp. 

400 Hercules, Inc. 

80 I.B.M. Corp. 

400 Magnovox 

300 Mobil Oil Corp. 

200 Minnesota Mining and Mfg. Co. 

700 Northwest Airlines 

500 J.C. Penny Company 

1050 Charles Pfizer and Company 

300 Smith, Kline and French Lab. 

800 The Southern Company 

609 Standard Oil Company of New Jersey 

400 U.S. Plywood-Champion Papers, Inc. 

Total Common Stock - Industrial 



12/18/68 

12/26/63 

6/20/66 

6/20/66 

6/30/69 

7/19/51- 

12/18/68 

7/14/61 

6/30/69 

12/31/63 

12/26/63 

7/7/61-1 

12/31/68 

5/5/65 

9/30/66 

6/30/69 

6/20/66 

10/6/67 

6/30/69 

9/30/66- 

9/30/66- 

7/26/68 

5/2/57-6 

7/19/51- 

7/26/68 



•12/18/68 



2/3/59 

6/30/69 
6/25/64-6/20/66 

-1/6/65-6/20/66 

-5/19/67 

2/29/61-6/20/66- 



9/30/67-12/18/68 



12/31/68 
12/18/68 

/20/66 
12/26/63-9/30/66 



24,403.77 
21,639.68 
13,926.00 
57,000.00 
21,138.00 
4,560.45 
28,216.65 
14,335.47 
23,803.17 
24,825.69 
17,324.31 

14,838.96 
17,914.76 
16,811.13 
18,316.76 
12,060.54 
18,021.22 
22,996.75 
14,508.44 
24,021.00 
15,357.69 
17,102.62 
25,422.30 



$ 480,210.24 



$ 7,387.50 
27,843.75 
13,926.00* 
57,000.00* 
19,012.50 
16,905.00 
23,600.00 
12,531.75 
22,237.50 
18,586.75 
19,800.00 

13,892.00 
12,600.00 
20,600.00 

9,200.00 
13,162.50 
15,200.00 
11,025.00 
20,562.50 
31,500.00 
12,262.50 
15,700.00 
33,342.75 

9,800.00 

$457,678.00 



Utility 
858 American Telephone and Telegraph Co. 
440 Baltimore Gas and Electric Company 
394 Commonwealth Edison Company 

1158 Northeast Utilities 

1200 Virginia Electric Power Company 



7/19/51-1/19/65 

5/2/57-11/24/59-6/30/69 

7/19/51-12/31/64 

12/31/68 

1/31/54-12/26/63 



25,566.43 
8,234.76 
8,141.52 

11,468.68 
8,546.77 



35,070.75 
11,550.00 
11,327.50 
14,909.25 
22,200.00 



Total Coiranon Stock - Utility 



$ 61,958.16 



$ 95,057.50 



Total Pooled Investments 



$1,074,921.64 



$981,506.75 



*Book Value - no quotation available 



-27- 



Schedule C-3 



Endowment Funds - Principal 

Statement of Investments Not in Pool Fund 
as of June 30, 1970 

Date of Cost or 

Land , Acquisition Book Value 

Murray D. Lincoln . 3/11/58 $ 41,765.00 

12/31/58 16,795.00 

2/23/60 33,600.00 

2/28/61 24,068.90 

1/17/62 36,676.50 

Total - Land $152,905.40 



-28- 



Schedule C-4 
Statement of Endowment Fund Principal 



Name of Fund 
Endowments 
Alpha Sigma Phi 
Alvord Dairy 

Oscar G. Anderson Memorial 
Ascension Farm 
Danforth Keyes Bangs 
George H. Barber 
Seymour Barowsky 
Joseph W. Bartlett 
Oswald Behrend Award 
Burnham Emergency 
John Thomas and Nancy Butterworth 
Buttrick 
Lucius Clapp 

Addison H. Clark Memorial 
Class of 1882 

George M. and Edith H. Codding 
Guy Chester Crampton Research 
Frederick G. Crane 
John C. Cutter 
Stephen Davis 

Distinguished Visitors Committee 
^Endowment from State 
E. W. Eldridge, Jr. Memorial 
George L. Farley 
Harry L. Folsom Hoo Hoo Club 
J. D. W. French 
Kathryn F. Furcolo 
Gassett 

Charles A. Gleason 
Grinnell 

Margaret Ruth Pomeroy Hamlin 
Clarence C. Hardy 
Walter H. Harrison 
Philip B. Hasbrouck 
Hills 

Mrs. Clifton Johnson 
Helen E. Knowlton 
Howard M. Lebow Memorial 
Library 
Murray D. 
Murray D. 
Albert P. 
Elizabeth 
Porter L. 
J. Clark Osterhout 
Charles A. Peters 
Betsy C. Pinkerton 
Charles S. Plumb 
Frank H. Plumb 
Robert F. Pomeroy Library 
Allan Leon Pond 
William Proctor 
Frederick H. Read 
V. A. Rice 
Mary Robinson 
Ilene Sharon Saval 
William R. Sessions 
Philip Sheinfield 
Henry Franklin Staples Memorial 
Betty Steinbugler 
Stockbridge School Alumni 
Ray E. Torrey Memorial 
Ruth J. Totman Memorial 
Frank M. West Forestry 
William Wheeler 
Whiting Street 
Helen A. Whittier 

Funds Functioning as an Endowment 
Anonymous Scholarship 
Helen Mitchell 

Totals 



and Anne M. Lincoln 

Lincoln 

Madeira 

L. McNamara 

Newton Educational 



Balance 








Balance 


July 1, 1969 


Additions 


Disbursements 


June 30, 1970 


$ 7,100.00 


$ -0- 




$ -0- 


$ 7,100.00 


4,197.15 


-0- 




-0- 


4,197.15 


1,015.00 


-0- 




-0- 


1,015.00 


119,975.79 


-0- 




-0- 


119,975.79 


5,861.58 


-0- 




-0- 


5,861.58 


5,073.86 


-0- 




-0- 


5,073.86 


5,000.00 


-0- 




-0- 


5,000.00 


-0- 


-0- 




-0- 


-0- 


950.59 


40. 


,21 


-0- 


990.80 


7,742.23 


-0- 




-0- 


7,742.23 


10,000.00 


-0- 




-0- 


10,000.00 


10,000.00 


-0- 




-0- 


10,000.00 


8,740.42 


-0- 




-0- 


8,740.42 


-0- 


-0- 




-0- 


-0- 


1,766.78 


37, 


,57 


-0- 


1,804.35 


367,264.70 


-0- 




-0- 


367,264.70 


2,539.03 


-0- 




-0- 


2,539.03 


25,518.08 


-0- 




-0- 


25,518.08 


1,098.41 


-0- 




-0- 


1,098.41 


19,175.00 


-0- 




-0- 


19,175.00 


52,066.63 


4,037, 


,20 


-0- 


56,103.83 


-0- 


-0- 




-0- 


-0- 


1,555.00 


-0- 




-0- 


1,555.00 


5,000.00 


-0- 




-0- 


5,000.00 


10,823.82 


49. 


,18 


-0- 


10,873.00 


10,743.41 


-0- 




-0- 


10,743.41 


8,409.73 


372. 


,40 


-0- 


8,782.13 


1,462.20 


-0- 




-0- 


1,462.20 


3,731.73 


-0- 




-0- 


3,731.73 


125.94 


-0- 




-0- 


125.94 


33,537.36 


-0- 




-0- 


33,537.36 


119.65 


-0- 




-0- 


119.65 


11,836.14 


-0- 




-0- 


11,836.14 


2,139.00 


-0- 




-0- 


2,139.00 


15,523.89 


-0- 




-0- 


15,523.89 


3,411.47 


-0- 




-0- 


3,411.47 


15,000.00 


-0- 




-0- 


15,000.00 


5,200.87 


297. 


,28 


-0- 


5,498.15 


11,027.85 


-0- 




-0- 


11,027.85 


11,200.00 


-0- 




-0- 


11,200.00 


152,905.40 


-0- 




-0- 


152,905.40 


11,973.76 


56. 


,58 


-0- 


12,030.34 


1,000.00 


-0- 




-0- 


1,000.00 


24,204.46 


-0- 




-0- 


24,204.46 


396.95 


-0- 




-0- 


396.95 


1,162.77 


-0- 




-0- 


1,162.77 


4,500.00 


-0- 




-0- 


4,500.00 


4,300.65 


91. 


,46 


-0- 


4,392.11 


13,427.17 


-0- 




-0- 


13,427.17 


1,535.95 


-0- 




-0- 


1,535.95 


744.78 


-0- 




-0- 


744.78 


2,000.00 


-0- 




-0- 


2,000.00 


1,699.55 


-0- 




-0- 


1,699.55 


2,684.11 


100. 


,00 


-0- 


2,784.11 


3,000.00 


-0- 




-0- 


3,000.00 


1,741.00 


818. 


,84 


-0- 


2,559.84 


4,780.97 


-0- 




-0- 


4,780.97 


5,800.00 


-0- 




-0- 


5,800.00 


51,469.82 


-0- 




-0- 


51,469.82 


200.00 


-0- 




-0- 


200.00 


1,961.38 


-0- 




-0- 


1,961.38 


808.20 


34. 


,04 


-0- 


842.24 


949.17 


-0- 




-0- 


949.17 


18,328.55 


-0- 




-0- 


18,328.55 


10,855.91 


-0- 




-0- 


10,855.91 


2,021.70 


-0- 




-0- 


2,021.70 


3,338.22 


-0- 




-0- 


3,338.22 


3,035.09 


-0- 




3,035.09 


-0- 


-0- 


6,850. 
$12,784. 


_00 
,76 


-0- 


6,850.00 


$1,136,758.87 


$3,035.09 


$1,146,508.54 



*Principal of $142,000.00 held by State Treasurer 



-29- 



Endowment Income 
Statement of Receipts, Disbursements and Balance 



Name and Purpose of Fund 

Income Designated for Student Aid, 
Scholarships and Loans : 

Alpha Sigma Phi 

Alvord Dairy 

Ascension Farm 

Danforth Keyes Bangs 

Seymour Barowsky 

John Thomas and Nancy Butterworth 

Buttrick 

Lucius Clapp 

Addison H. Clarke Memorial 

Class of 1882 

George M. and Edith H. Codding 

Frederick G. Crane 

Stephen Davis 

E. W. Eldridge, Jr. Memorial 

George L. Farley 

Harry L. Folsom Hoo Hoo Club 

Kathryn F. Furcolo 

Gassett 

Charles A. Gleason 

Margaret Ruth Pomeroy Hamlin 

Clarence C. Hardy 

Walter H. Harrison 

Philip B. Hasbrouck 

Mrs„ Clifton Johnson 

Helen E. Knowlton 

Howard M. Lebow Memorial 

Albert P. Madeira 

Porter L. Newton Educational 

J. Clark Osterhout 

Betsy C. Pinkerton 

Charles S. Plumb 

Frank H. Plumb 

V. A. Rice 

Mary Robinson 

Ilene Sharon Saval 

Philip Sheinfield 

Dr. Henry Franklin Staples Memorial 

Stockbridge School Alumni 

Ruth J. Totman Memorial 

Frank M. West Forestry 

Whiting Street 

Helen A. Whittier 

Sub- Total 



July 1, 1969 



Receipts 

from 

Investments 



Disbursements 



Balance 
June 30, 1970 



372.30 


$ 303.89 


$ 350.00 


$ 326.19 


194.50 


179.53 


175.00 


199.03 


5,709.30 


5,134.89 


5,300,00 


5,544.19 


343.63 


250.88 


300.00 


294.51 


274.00 


213.93 


250.00 


237.93 


492.51 


427.99 


450.00 


470.50 


2,424.68 


427.99 


1,300.00 


1,552.67 


873.49 


374.19 


850.00 


397.68 


-0- 


-0- 


-0- 


-0- 


41.09 


75.14 


37.57 


7K ,ii(> 


35,252.73 


15,718.47 


22,837.50 


28,133.70 


1,194.78 


1,091.99 


1,100.00 


1,186.77 


1,776.89 


820.71 


1,776.89 


820,71 


90.21 


66.60 


90.00 


66.81 


2,805.61 


213.93 


-0- 


3,019.54 


499.18 


791.36 


827.54 


463.00 


372.40 


355.62 


372.40 


355.62 


78.43 


62.51 


-0- 


140.94 


175.50 


159.86 


175.00 


160.36 


-0- 


1,435.36 


1,435.36 


-0- 


60.90 


5.04 


-0- 


65.94 


-0- 


506.48 


506.48 


-0- 


492.35 


419.81 


-0- 


912.16 


352.26 


145.85 


350.00 


148.11 


729.44 


642.02 


-0- 


1,371.46 


121.96 


223.94 


121.96 


223.94 


551.58 


512.33 


551.58 


512.33 


1,176.47 


1,036.02 


1,100.00 


1,112.49 


77.51 


16.95 


-0- 


94.46 


238.30 


192.56 


200.00 


230.86 


1,619.23 


182.93 


91.46 


1,710.70 


635.62 


574.58 


600.00 


610.20 


141,87 


115.89 


100.00 


157.76 


172.33 


128.49 


150.00 


150.82 


59.84 


90.72 


119.68 


30.88 


144.91 


248.11 


-0- 


393.02 


-0- 


2,203.02 


2,203.02 


-0- 


396.97 


81.31 


-0- 


478.28 


135.65 


40.64 


-0- 


176.29 


872.03 


784.51 


850.00 


806.54 


183.60 


86.40 


175.00 


95.00 


148.01 


142.91 


100.00 


190.92 



$61,282.06 



$ 36,485.35 $ 44,846.44 



$52,920.97 



-30- 



Schedule C-5 (Continued) 

Endowment Income 
Statement of Receipts, Disbursements and Balances 



Prizes : 

Grinnell 

Elizabeth L. McNamara 

Allan Leon Pond 

Betty Steinbugler 

Sub-Total 



Books ; 

Oscar G. Anderson Memorial 

John C. Cutter 

Library 

Robert F. Pomeroy Library 



Sub-Total 



Miscellaneous Purposes : 

George H. Barber 

Oswald Behrend Award 

Guy Chester Crampton Research 

Distinguished Visitors Committee 

J. D= W. French 

Hills 

Murray D. and Anne M. Lincoln 

Murray D. Lincoln Land 

Charles A. Peters 

William Proctor 

Ray E. Torrey Memorial 

Sub- Total 



General IHirpose (Unrestricted) ; 

Joseph W. Bartlett 

Bumham Emergency 

Frederick Ho Read 

William R. Sessions 

William Wheeler 

Sub- Total 



Undistributed Income 

Endowment from State 

Funds Functioning as an Endowment 
Anonymous Scholarship #2 
Helen Mitchell 

Sub-Total 
Total 



July 1. 1969 



129.06 
-0- 

105.43 
113.11 



347.60 



$ 3,982.41 



$16,600.91 



$ 3,651.15 

$ 9,195.31 
3,004.44 



77.84 
-0- 

77.84 



$98,141.72 



Receipts 

from 

Investments 



5.46 
42.93 
31.87 

8.53 



Disburs emen ts 



-0- 
42.93 
14.74 
42.10 



88.79 



99.77 



628.19 $ 2,263.08 



$ 4,183.01 $ 1,882.10 



$ 1,073.36 



-0- 



$ 58,647.00 $ 55,015.84 
4,346.40 2,587.71 



68.29 
139.95 



146.13 
-0- 



208.24 



146.13 



Balance 
June 30. 1970 



$ 134.52 
-0- 

122.56 
79.54 

$ 336.62 



382.86 


$ 


43.35 


$ 


165.00 


$ 


461.21 


421.19 




47.14 




-0- 




468.33 


2,513.27 




471.95 




2,098.08 




887.14 


465.09 




65.75 




-0- 




530.84 



$ 2,347.52 



$ 1,059.82 


$ 217.21 


$ -0- 


$ 1,277.03 


-0- 


40.21 


40.21 


-0- 


1,378.56 


108.81 


320.50 


1,166.87 


6,533.94 


2.186.68 


-0- 


8,720.62 


3,408.96 


459.75 


1,182.72 


2,685.99 


1,787.47 


664.33 


304.63 


2,147.17 


-0- 


336.65 


-0- 


336.65 


288.56 


-0- 


-0- 


288.56 


634.12 


49.78 


-0- 


683.90 


1,509.48 


85.55 


-0- 


1,595.03 


-0- 


34.04 


34.04 


-0- 



$18,901.82 



$ -0- 


$ 


-0- 


$ 


-0- 


$ 


-0- 


1,132.87 




331.26 




-0- 




1,464.13 


242.95 




72.70 




-0- 




315,65 


692.03 




204.68 




-0- 




896.71 


1,583.30 




464.72 




-0- 




2,048.02 



$105,660.34 $106,841.07 



$ 4,724.51 

$12,826.47 
4,763.13 



-0- 
139.95 

$ 139.95 



$96,960.99 



-31- 



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-69- 



Schedule F-2 

Athletic Trust Fund 
Statement of Receipts, Disbursements and Balances 



Balance, July 1, 1969 

Receipts : 

Student Fees 
Other Receipts 

Less : 

Refund of Student Fees 

Transfer to U.M. Bldg. Authority 

Project #4 
Transfer to Barber Scholarship Fund 



Net Receipts 
Total Available 



$ 25,231.80 



$525,085.50 
30.678.03 



$ 7,371.50 

80,000.00 
5,000.00 



$555,763.53 



!? 92.371.50 



$463,392.03 
$488,623.83 



Disbursements : 

Intercollegiate Athletics 

Intramural and Other Programs 

Athletic Injury Care 

Publicity 

Band & Cheerleaders 

Trave 1 

Operating Expenses 

Contingencies 

Capital Outlay 

Other Expenses 

Total Disbursements 

Balance, June 30, 1970 



$173,970.42 

53,541.22 

17,511.86 

5,667.20 

5,677.76 

18,194.11 

161,538.08 

7,150.00 

12,907.72 

20,451.06 



$476.609.43 
$ 12,014.40 



-70- 



Schedule F-2 ("Continued) 



Athletic Reserve Account 

Balance, July 1, 1969 , $ 33,307.48 

Interest on Savings Account 89.85 

Balance, June 30, 1970 - $ 33,397.33 



Athletic Reserve - Special 

Balance, July 1, 1969 $242,837.15 

Interest on Savings Account $ 17,249.86 

Transfers In 50.000.00 

67.249.86 

Funds Available $310,087.01 

Transfers Out 53.000.00 

Balance, June 30, 1970 $257,087.01 



George H. Barber Scholarship Fund 

Balance, July 1, 1969 $ 26,000.00 

Income from Ticket Sales, Donations 

and Miscellaneous Sources 153,478.00 

Funds Available $179,478.09 

Disbursements : 

Scholarships $178,018.50 

Less: Refunds 4.666.00 

$173.352.50 
Balance, June 30, 1970 $ 6,125.59 



-71- 



Schedule F-3 

Boarding Halls 
Statement of Receipts, Disbursements and Balances 

Balance, July 1, 1969 $ 132,401.94 

Receipts : 

Income $5,858,915.29 

Less: Student Refunds 182,282.40 
Transfer to U. of M. Building 
Authority Projects Three, 

Five, Seven and Nine 614,240.50 

Net Receipts $5.062.392.39 

$5,194,794.33 

Disbursements : 

Salaries and Wages $2,662,460.94 

Food Purchases 1,959,300.01 

Clothing 374.90 

Housekeeping Supplies 109,265.35 

Heat and Other Plant Operations 12,474.42 

Travel 540.04 

Advertising & Printing 2,864.39 

Repairs 42,529.47 

Office 5. Administration 15,366.87 

Equipment 19,229.89 

Rental 257,458.02 

Capital Outlay 39.229.31 

Total Disbursements $5.121,093.61 

Balance, June 30, 1970 $ 73,700.72 



-72- 



Schedule F-4 



Recognized Student Organizations 

Statement of Receipts, Disbursements and Balances 
Year Ended June 30, 1970 



Balance July 1, 1969 

Amherst Savings Bank 

First National Bank of Amherst 

Total 



85,466.59 
63,267.69 



$ 148,734.28 



Receipts : 

Amherst Student Fees 

Cash Receipts 

Add In-transit Items (6/30/69 
Less In-transit Items 6/30/70 



Interactivity Receipts 
Total 

Disbursements : 



Cash 



$ 537,290.21 
420.51 
(1,656.30 ) 



Add In-transit Items 6/30/69 
Less In-transit Items 6/30/70 



Interactivity Disbursements 



Balance June 30, 1970 



Amherst Savings Bank 

First National Bank of Amherst 



Total 



$ 499,582.12 



536.054.42 



$ 993,256.12 
6,681.85 
(12.199.45 ) 



$ 90,209.40 
106,422.90 



1,035,636.54 
$1.511.735.62 
$2,696,106.44 



$ 987,738.52 

1.511.735.62 
$2,499,474.14 



$ 196.632.30 
$2,696,106.44 



-73- 



Schedule F-5 



Student Health Service 
Statement of Receipts, Disbursements, and Balances 



Balance, July 1, 1969 

Receipts ; 

Student Fees 
Other Receipts 

Less: Student Refunds 

Net Receipts 

Disbursements : 

Salaries and Wages 

Food 

Clothing 

Housekeeping Supplies 

Laboratory and Medical Supplies 

Travel 

Printing and Advertising 

Repairs and Replacements 

Office and Administration Expenses 

Equipment 

Rental 

Other 

Total Disbursements 

Balance, June 30, 1970 



$ 67,363.64 



$1,091,571.21 
2,500.00 

16.504.40 



$1.077.566.81 



979,902.75 

10,412.57 

65.25 

16,438.75 

76,713.22 

7,402.15 

6,959.14 

1,955.97 

25,930.56 

12,894.13 

6,237.81 

2.76 



$1,144,930.45 



$1.144.915.06 
$ 15.39 



-74- 



Schedule F-6 



STUDENT UNION 

UNIVERSITY STORE - AMHERST 

INCOME STATEMENT 

FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1970 



Sales . ;r.f'' J. ' ' ■ ■. 

Books 

Supplies 

Lobby 

Cost of Goods Sold 

Beginning Inventory 

Purchases 

Freight In 

Less: Purchase Ret. & Allow. 
.; Less: Purchase Discounts 

Less: Ending Inventory 

Gross Profit On Sales 

Operating Expenses 

Payroll - Regular 

Payroll - Student 

Payroll - Hourly 

Employees' Group Insurance 

Insurance 

Office Supplies 

Store Supplies 

Telephone & Telegraph 

Postage 

Advertising 

Travel and Education 

Doubtful Accounts 

Repairs and Maintenance 

Lobby Counter Expenses 

Cash Shortages 

Miscellaneous 

Net Income (Loss) from Operations 

Other Income 

Laboratory Fees 

Post Office 

Cash Overages - Lobby Counter 

Miscellaneous 

Other Expenses 

Transfer to General Fund 

Net Income (Loss) for Period 



$1,309,135.57 
594,179.46 
143,838.64 



558,749.99 

2,071,937.68 

27,446.13 

2,658,133.80 

381,660.31 

2,276,473.49 

5,955.06 

2,270,518.43 

685,084.36 



159,460.09 

15,810.40 

60,413.23 

3,050.36 

5,258.66 

3,089.81 

15,277.79 

1,957.30 

2,739.13 

700.50 

693.83 

45.24 

1,973.60 

21,093.97 

850.47 

1,282.50 



14,351.48 

5,499.96 

22.32 

1,508.68 



100,000.00 



$2,047,153.67 



$1,585,434.07 
$ 461,719.60 



$ 293,696.88 
$ 168,022.72 



$ 21,382.44 

$ 100,000.00 
$ 89,405.16 



-75- 



Schedule F-7 

STUDENT UNION 

UNIVERSITY STORE - A>IHERST 

BALANCE SHEET 

AS OF JUNE 30, 1970 



A SSKTS 

Current Assets: 

Cash in Bank 

Cash in Transit 

Cash on Hand 

Accounts Receivable 

Accounts Receivable - Book Vendors 

Accounts Receivable - Supply Vendors 

Inventory - Books 

Inventory - Supplies 

Inventory - Lobby Counter 

Prepaid Expenses 

Total Current Assets 

Fixed Assets: 

DiL'ice Furniture and Fixtures 
Less: Accumulated Depreciation 

Machinery and Equipment 

Less: Accumulated Depreciation 

Automobiles and Trucks 

Less: Accumulated Depreciation 

Investment in Boston Campus Store 

Total Assets 



$ 17,084.56 
7,528.00 

24,116.40 
8,473.24 

1,974.00 
-0- 



$ 93,498.69 

4,331.56 

5,000.00 

50,150.71 

269,835.47 

4,887.50 

508,906.00 

172,655.00 

3,523.36 

555.81 

$1,113,344.10 



9,556.56 

15,643.16 

1,974.00 

107,590.96 

$1,248,108.78 



LIABILITIES AND CAPITAL 

Current Liabilities: 

Accounts Payable 

Accrued Payroll 

Accrued Taxes - Mass. Sales Tax 

Laboratory Fees 

Total Current Liabilities 

Capital : 

Retained Earnings 

Total Liabilities and Capital 



$ 295,369.56 

1,665.76 

296.88 

66,318.03 

$ 363,650.23 



$ 884,458.55 
$1,248,108.78 



Balance July 1, 1969 

Net Income (Loss) for Year 

Balance June 30, 1970 



RETAINED EARNINGS 

$795,053.39 
89,405.16 

$884,458.55 



-76- 



Schedule F-8 



STUDENT UNION FOOD SERVICE 

INCOME STATEMENT 

FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1970 

SALES : 

Hatch $565,628.96 

Commonwealth 44,206.36 

Catering 60,856.22 $670,691.54 

COST OF GOODS SOLD : 

Inventory July 1, 1969 9,188.70 

Food Purchases 298,408.12 

Freight In 11.83 

•u 307,608.65 

Less: Cash Discounts 304.04 

Total Available for Sale 307,304.61 

Less: Inventory, June 30, 1970 8,605.21 $298,699.40 

GROSS PROFIT ON SALES $371,992.14 

OPERATING EXPENSES : 

Payroll - Regular 282,153.14 

Payroll - Student 30,071.87 

Employees' Group Insurance 6,826.87 

Office Supplies - 1,178.32 

Restaurant Supplies ~ 29,634.93 

Telephone & Telegraph 784.76 

Postage 98.64 

Advertising 155.20 

Travel & Education 263.02 

Uniforms 128.38 

Linen 231.50 

Laundry 6,138.53 

China & Silver 1,206.65 

Repairs & Maintenance 3,303.93 

Heat & Utilities 223.30 

Cash Shortage 360.63 

Miscellaneous 6.50 $362,766.17 

NET OPERATING INCOME $ 9,225.97 

OTHER REVENUE : 

Vending 2,537.60 

Juke Box 1,258.30 

Cash Overages 370.24 

Miscellaneous 2,790.64 $ 6,956.78 

NET INCOME FOR YEAR $ 16,182.75 



-77- 



Schedule F-9 



STUDENT UNION FOOD SERVICE 
BALANCE SHEET 
AS OF JUNE 30, 1970 



ASSETS 



Current Assets: 

Cash in Bank 
Cash in Transit 
Cash on Hand 
Petty Cash 

Accounts Receivables 
Inventory - Food 

Total Current Assets 

Fixed Assets: 

Office Furniture 6, Fixtures 
Less: Accumulated Depreciation 

Machinery & Equipment 

Less: Accumulated Depreciation 

Total Assets 



$ 2,921.73 
1.227.01 
1,694.72 

$56,832.20 
17,934.89 



$ 20,179.81 

3,280.30 

1,600.00 

50.00 

26,373.68 

8,605.21 

$ 60,089.00 



40,592.03 
$100,681.03 



LIABILITIES AND CAPITAL 

Current Liabilities: 

Accounts Payable 

Accrued Payroll 

Accrued Taxes - Mass. Old Age Tax 

Total Current Liabilities 

Capital : 

Retained Earnings 

Total Liabilities and Capital 



$ 20,234.18 

1,820.04 

583.71 

$ 22,637.93 



$ 78,043.10 
$100,681.03 



RETAINED EARNINGS 



Balance July 1, 1969 

Net Income for the Year 
Balance June 30, 1970 



$ 61,860.35 

16,182.75 

$ 78,043.10 



-78- 



Schedule F-10 



STUDENT UNION 
GENERAL FUND 
INCOME STATEMENT 
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1970 



INCOME 

Transfer from Amortization Fund 

Transfer from Reserve Fund 

Transfer from University Store 

Transfer from Food Service 

Check Cashing Service Fees 

Custodial 

Conference Services 

Continuing Education 

Ticket Office 

Games Area 

Duplicating and Printing 

Scheduling Office 

Technical Services 

Accommodation Services 

Miscellaneous 

Total Income 



$ 83,870.00 

77,161.65 

100,000.00 

-0- 

9,333.30 

2,417.90 

221,178.58 

37,701.54 

114,390.98 

10,920.64 

5,385.44 

6,507.08 

5,614.66 

15,066.20 

5,845.73 

$695,393.70 



EXPENSES 

Administrative 
Maintenance 
Conference Service 
Continuing Education 
Ticket Office 
Games Area 

Duplicating and Printing 
Scheduling Office 
Technical Services 
Accommodation Services 

Total Expenses 

NET INCOME (LOSS) FOR THE YEAR 



$186,443.42 

156,526.91 

227,961.30 

1,302.45 

111,467.89 

11,732.68 

1,847.90 

15,546.40 

9,180.36 

12,196.21 



734,205.52 
($ 38,811.82) 



-79- 



Schedule F-11 



STUDENT UNION 

GENERAL FUND 

BALANCE SHEET 

AS OF JUNE 30, 1970 



ASSETS 

Current Assets: 

Cash in Bank 
Cash In Transit 
Cash on Hand 
Accounts Receivable 
Prepaid Expenses 

Total Current Assets 



($ 33,672.92) 

14,738.45 

15,050.00 

22,257.76 

-0- 

$ 18,373.29 



Fixed Assets: 

Office Furniture and Fixtures 
Less: Accumulated Depreciation 

Machinery and Equipment 

Less: Accumulated Depreciation 

Total Assets 



$ 45,966.96 
14,397.39 

$ 54,038.44 
14,204.49 



31,569.57 

39,833.95 
$ 89,776.81 



Liabilities and Capital 

Current Liabilities: 

Accounts Payable 
Accrued Payroll 
Key Deposits 

Total Current Liabilities 



$ 73,828.07 

4,731.78 

135.75 

$ 78,695.60 



Capital : 

Retained Earnings 

Total Liabilities and Capital 



$ 11,081.21 
89,776.81 



RETAINED EARNINGS 



Balance July 1, 1969 

Net Income (Loss) for the year 

Balance June 30, 1970 



$ 49,893.03 
( 38,811.82 ) 

$ 11,081.21 



-80- 



Schedule F-I2 



Student Union Reserve Fund 



Balance July 1, 1969 

Transferred to Student Union General 
Balance June 30, 1970 



$ 77,161.65 
77,161.65 
$ -0- 



Balance July 1, 1969 

Fees 

Less : Refunds 



Student Union Building Amortization Fund 

$339,184.96 
8,784.90 



Funds Ava i lab le 
Expenses : 

Reimbursement to Commonwealth 
Balance June 30, 1970 



$619,209.72 

330,400.06 
$949,609.78 

125,000.00 
$824,609.78 



-81- 



Location 

Amherst 

Had ley 

Amherst 

Pelham 

Pe Iham 

Belcher town 

Belchertown 

Sunderland 

Leverett 

East Wareham 

Waltham 

South Deerfield 

Nantucket Island 

Total 



Schedule G-1 
Inventory of Land 

Acreage 

751.1 

446.4 

46.0 

.5 

1,196.0 

218.0 

4.0 

726.2 

28.8 

28.6 

58.8 

358.1 

107.0 



3,969.5 



Assessed 

Valuation 

June 30. 1970 

$2,723,160.00 
284,380.00 

500.00 

100.00 
20,000.00 
17,210.00 

100.00 
17,600.00 

270.00 
12,750.00 
92,450.00 
21,020.00 
13,000.00 

$3,202,540.00 



Schedule G-2 

Inventory of Buildings and Structures 



Bldg. 






No. 


Constructed 


Location 


5 


1940 


Amherst 


6 


1947 


Amherst 


7 


1948 


Amherst 


8 


1948 


Amherst 


9 


1948 


Amherst 


24 


1946 


Amherst 


28 


1940 


Amhers t 


29 


1948 


Amherst 


30 


1935 


Amherst 


38 


1869 


Amherst 


48 


1947 


Amherst 


49 


1947 


Amherst 


50 


1947 


Amherst 


51 


1947 


Amherst 


52 


1914 


Amherst 


53 


1910 


Amherst 


54 


1922 


Amherst 


55 


1922 


Amherst 


57 


1884 


Amherst 


58 


1955 


Amherst 


59 


1939 


Amherst 


60 


1926 


Amherst 


61 


1867 


Amherst 


62 


1867 


Amherst 


63 


1911 


Amherst 


64 


1930 


Amhers t 


65 


1961 


Amherst 


66 


1918 


Sunderland 


67 


1918 


Sunderland 


68 


1961 


Pelham 


70 


1929 


Amherst 


71 


1918 


Amherst 


72 


1953 


Amherst 


73 


1957 


Amherst 


74 


1911 


Amherst 


76 


1959 


Amherst 


77 


1937 


Amherst 


79 


1950 


Amhers t 


80 


1885 


Amherst 


82 


1959 


Amherst 


83 


1907 


Amherst 


84 


1907 




85 


1953 


Amherst 



Description 

Butterfield Hall (Dormitory) 

Chadbourne House (Dormitory) 

Berkshire House (Administration) 

Hampshire House (Administration) 

Middlesex House (Administration) 

Greenough House (Dormitory) 

Lewis House (Dormitory) 

Mills House (Dormitory) 

Thatcher House (Dormitory) 

Blaisdell House 

Brooder House 

Brooder House 

Brooder House 

Brooder House 

Milker's Bungalow House 

Harlow House 

Hilton House 

Hilton Garage 

President's House 

Montague House 

Til Is on Garage 

Tillson House 

Homestead House 

Stockbridge House 

Waiting Station (Shelter) 

Scale House 

Kiln 

Shed 

House 

Radio Station 

Garage 

Grounds Tool Shed & Garage 

Animal Isolation Laboratory 

Thayer Laboratory 

Apiary Laboratory 

Power Supply Facility 

Bowditch Lodge 

Police Station Garage 

Chapel - Classrooms 

Goessmann Laboratory & Classrooms 

Clark Hall Laboratory & Classrooms 

Greenhouse 
Worcester Dining Commons 



Assessed 

Valuation 

June 30, 1970 



$ 232 
260 
165 
165 
163 
260 
177 
375 
193 
4 



2 
1 
3 
1 
2 

98 

50 

3 

3,432 
50 
63 
76 

2,896 
67 



,598.00 

,000.00 

,266.00 

,266.00 

,800.00 

,000.00 

,019.00 

,000.00 

,950.00 

,000.00 

100.00 

100.00 

100.00 

100.00 

,100.00 

,550.00 

,400.00 

300.00 

,000.00 

,000.00 

384.00 

,714.00 

,800.00 

,100.00 

500.00 

250.00 

,500.00 

,500.00 

,000.00 

,500.00 

,500.00 

245 . 00 

,500.00 

,000.00 

,000.00 

,764.00 

,000.00 

,800.00 

,288.00 

,900.00 

,400.00 



985,300.00 



-82- 



Schedule G-2 (Continued) 
Inventory of Buildings and Structures 



Bldg. 






No. 


Constructed 


Location 


86 


1961 


Amherst 


87 


1903 


Amherst 


88 


1947 




89 


1889 


Amherst 


90 


1949 


Amherst 


91 


1949 


Amherst 


92 


1950 


Amherst 


93 


1949 


Amherst 


94 


1915 


Amherst 


95 


1933 


Amherst 


96 


1955 


Amherst 


97 


1910 


Amherst 


98 


1910 


Amherst 


99 


1911 


Amherst 


100 


1912 


Amherst 


101 


1930 


Amherst 


103 


1867 


Amherst 


104 


1909 


Amherst 


105 


1908 


Amherst 


106 


1915 


Amherst 


107 


1960 


Amherst 


109 


1931 


Amherst 


110 


1923 


Amherst 


HI 


1957 


Amherst 


112 


1947 


Amherst 


113 


1915 




115 


1920 


Amherst 


116 


1898 


Amherst 


117 


1899 




118 


1891 


Amherst 


120 


1950 


Amherst 


121 


1931 


Amherst 


122 


1931 




123 


1959 


Amherst 


124 


1950 


Amherst 


125 


1907 


Amherst 


126 


1959 


Amherst 


127 


1960 


Amherst 


128 


1948 


Amherst 


129 


1885 


Amherst 


130 


1912 


Amherst 


132 


1960 


Amherst 


133 


1918 


Amherst 


134 


1952 


Amherst 


135 


1959 


Amherst 


136 


1911 


Amherst 


137 


1929 




139 


1950 




141 


1931 


Amherst 


145 


1956 


Amherst 


146 


1955 


Amherst 


147 


1956 


Amherst 


148 


1947 


Amherst 


151 


1923 


Amherst 


152 


1923 


Amherst 


153 


1957 


Amherst 


154 


1957 


Amherst 


155 


1957 


Amherst 


157 


1939 


Amherst 


158 


1947 


Amherst 


159 


1941 


Amherst 


160 


1959 


Amherst 


163 


1947 


Amherst 


164 


1947 


Amherst 


165 


1947 


Amherst 



Description 

Worcester Dining Commons (Addition) 
Draper Hall Classrooms 

Draper Hall - Annex (Storage) 
East Experiment Station Laboratory 
Shade Tree Laboratory 
Gunness Laboratory 
Engineering Classrooms 
Engineering Annex - Classrooms 
Engineering Shops - Labs. & Classrooms 
Farley 4-H Lodge 
Durfee Greenhouses 
Fernald Hall - Laboratory 
Fernald Hall Greenhouse 
Fisher Cold Storage 
Flint Laboratory 
Chenoweth Laboratory 
Forestry - Classrooms and Laboratory 
French Hall - Classrooms and Labs. 
French Hall Greenhouse 
Hospitals 

Bartlett - Classrooms and Lab. 
Storage - Lumber 
Tillson Storage 
Machmer Hall - Classrooms 
Marshall Annex - Classrooms 

Marshall Hall - Classrooms and Labs. 
Memorial Hall - Classrooms 
Munson Hall - Administration 

Munson Annex - Administration 
Hatch - Classrooms and Labs. 
Paige Laboratory 
Hicks - Physical Education (Men) 

Hicks - Physical Education (Men) 
Physical Education (Women) 
Hasbrouck - Classrooms £i Labs. 
Photography Laboratory 
Public Health - Classrooms & Labs 
Morrill Science I - Classrooms & Labs. 
Skinner Hall - Classrooms & Labs. 
South College Administration 
Stockbridge - Classrooms & Labs. 
Dickinson Hall - Classrooms & Labs. 
Power Supply Facility 
Power Supply Facility 
Bowditch - Classrooms & Labs. 
Grinnell Arena 

Abattoir Slaughter House 

Storage - Maintenance 
Ticket Booth Athletic 
Poultry House 
Poultry House 
Poultry House 
Brooder House 
Poultry House 
Poultry House 
Brooder House 
Brooder House 
Brooder House 
Storage 
Brooder House 
Storage 
Poultry House 
Brooder House 
Brooder House 
Shelters 



Assessed 

Valuation 

June 30. 1970 

$ 504,475.00 
296,529.00 



14, 
23, 

374, 
1,120, 

118, 
28, 
50, 
69, 
80, 

24, 

210, 

69, 

2, 

74, 

25, 

34, 

2,181, 

2, 

1. 

967, 

68, 



000.00 
400.00 
500.00 
753.00 
500.00 
550.00 
000.00 
684.00 
000.00 
825.00 
616.00 
723,00 
966.00 
590.00 
356.00 
500.00 
300.00 
125.00 
150.00 
574.00 
578.00 
459.00 



107,425.00 
70,127.00 

19,374.00 
487,500.00 
287,500.00 



1,716, 

501, 

12, 

1,360, 

1,941, 

596, 

100, 

417, 

468, 

17, 

263, 

293, 

38, 



581.00 
000.00 
000.00 
800.00 
020.00 
700.00 
300.00 
066.00 
105.00 
665.00 
615.00 
500.00 
000.00 



500.00 

800.00 

600.00 

800.00 

100.00 

500.00 

500.00 

100.00 

100.00 

100.00 

3,000.00 

5,000.00 

1,000.00 

8,000.00 

100.00 

100.00 

1,000.00 



-83- 



Schedule G-2 (Continued) 
Inventory of Buildings and Structures 



Bldg. 






No. 


Constructed 


Location 


166 


1894 


Amherst 


168 


1885 


Amherst 


169 


1906 


Amherst 


170 


1960 


Amherst 


171 


1934 


Amherst 


172 


1960 




173 


1960 


Amherst 


177 


1920 


Amherst 


178 


1933 


Amherst 


179 


1920 


Amherst 


181 


1918 


Amherst 


182 


1911 


Amherst 


184 


1940 


Amherst 


185 


1918 


Amherst 


186 


1915 


Amherst 


187 


1915 


Amherst 


188 


1914 


Amherst 


189 


1910 


Amherst 


190 


1910 




191 


1958 




192 


1958 


Amherst 


193 


1941 


Amherst 


194 


1910 


Amherst 


195 


1928 


Amherst 


196 


1938 


Amherst 


197 


1909 


Amherst 


198 


1939 


Amherst 


199 


1939 


Amhe r s t 


200 


1939 


Amherst 


201 


1939 


Amherst 


202 


1939 


Amherst 


203 


1939 


Amherst 


204 


1922 


Amherst 


205 


1933 


Amherst 


206 


1927 


Amherst 


207 


1929 


Amherst 


209 


1924 


Amherst 


210 


1957 


Amherst 


211 


1958 


Amherst 


212 


1958 


Amherst 


213 


1951 


Amherst 


214 


1926 


Waltham 


215 


1928 




216 


1934 




217 


1957 




218 


1924 




219 


1924 




220 


1924 




221 


1924 




222 


1924 




223 


1924 




224 


1929 




225 


1950 




226 


1929 




227 


1935 




228 


1959 




229 


1949 




230 


1949 




231 


1924 




232 


1924 




233 


1952 


E. Warehi 


234 


1957 




234 


1957 




235 


1926 




236 


1955 




237 


1957 




238 


1958 




239 


1960 




240 


1960 





Description 

Horse Barn 

West Experiment Station Laboratory 
Wilder Hall Classrooms 
Maintenance - Physical Plant 
Goodell Library 

Goodell Library - Addition 
Orlyte Greenhouse 
Horticulture Shed 
Horticulture Shed 
Center Storage Shed 
Tractor Garage 
Brooder House 
Poultry House 
Tool Shed 
Poultry House 
Shed 

Poultry House 
Dairy Building 

Dairy Building 

Silo 
Harvestore Silo 
Barn 

Machinery Shop 
Farm Horse Barn 
Dairy Barn 
Dairy Barn 
Young Stock Barn 
Silo 
Silo 

Beef Barn Unit - Barn 
Silo 

Young Stock Hay Barn 
Bull Barn 
Barn 
Sheds 

Brooks Poultry House 
Brooks Tobacco Shed 
Brooder House 
Poultry House 
Poultry House 
Comfort Station 
Laboratory 

Laboratory 

Laboratory 

Greenhouse 

Barn 

Shed 

Laboratory 

House 

Barns 

Greenhouse 

Greenhouse 

Shed 

Greenhouse 

Propagating Building 

Greenhouse 

Administration 

Power Supply Facility 

Garage 

Poultry House 
Laboratory 

Garage 

Shop 

Pumping Station 

Laboratory 

Greenhouse 

Pumping Station 

Laboratory 

Storage 



Assessed 

Valuation 

June 30. 1970 

$ 5,000.00 

27,000.00 

45,662.00 

627,000.00 

1,940,873.00 

500.00 

400.00 

1,254.00 

800.00 

73.00 

3,100.00 

10,000.00 

98.00 

50.00 

100.00 

1,250.00 

33,211.00 



2,000.00 

4,000.00 

4,000.00 

6,194.00 

8,000.00 

6,500.00 

36,837.00 

200.00 

200.00 

5,500.00 

200.00 

5,000.00 

14,041.00 

500.00 

50.00 

200.00 

3,000.00 

100.00 

2,500.00 

2,500.00 

20.00 

56,500.00 



3,050.00 



-84- 



Schedule G-2 (Continued) 
Inventory of Buildings and Structures 



Bldg. 
No. 

241 
242 
243 
244 
245 
246 
247 
248 
249 
250 
251 
252 
253 
254 
255 
256 
257 
258 
259 
260 
261 
262 
263 
264 
265 
268 
269 
270 
271 
273 
274 
275 
276 
278 
279 
280 
281 
282 
289 
290 
291 
292 
293 
296 
297 
298 
299 
300 
309 
310 
311 
312 
313 
314 
315 
315 
316 
317 
318 
319 
320 
321 
322 
328 
329 
335 



Constructed Location 



Description 



1920 
1951 
1958 
1958 
1950 
1947 
1947 
1947 
1947 
1947 
1947 
1947 
1947 
1957 
1957 
1957 
1957 
1957 
1927 
1927 
1927 
1927 
1927 
1927 
1920 
1948 
1947 
1939 
1946 
1941 
1935 
1947 
1933 
1922 
1920 
1920 
1920 
1920 
1962 
1962 
1962 
1962 
1962 
1963 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1910 
1959 
1961 
1959 
1959 
1953 
1963 
1963 
1963 
1949 
1920 
1920 
1963 
1965 
1965 



Amherst 
Amherst 
Amherst 
Amherst 
Amherst 
Amherst 
Amherst 
Amherst 
Amherst 
Amherst 
Amherst 
Amherst 
Amherst 
Amherst 
Amherst 
Amherst 
Amherst 
Amherst 
Amherst 
Amherst 
Amherst 
Amherst 
Amherst 
Amherst 
So. Deerfleld 



Belchertown 



Amherst 
Amherst 
Amherst 
Amherst 
Amherst 
Amherst 
Amherst 
Amherst 



Amherst 
Amherst 



Nantucket 
Nantucket 
Nantucket 

Nantucket 

Amherst 

Amherst 

Amherst 

Amherst 



Had ley 

Amherst 

Amherst 



Pomology Garage 
Poultry House 
Poultry House 
Poultry House 
Poultry House 
Brooder House 
Brooder House 
Brooder House 
Brooder House 
Brooder House 
Brooder House 
Brooder House 
Brooder House 
Brooder House 
Brooder House 
Brooder House 
Brooder House 
Brooder House 
Open Com Crib 

Corn 

Corn 

Corn 

Com 

Com 



Crib 
Crib 
Crib 
Crib 
Crib 



Open 
Open 
Open 
Open 
Open 
House 

Storage 

Storage 

Storage 

Storage 

Storage 

Storage 

Storage 

Storage 
House 

Barn 

Barn 

Storage 

Shed 
Marks Meadow - 



Shed 
Shed 
Shed 
Shed 
Shed 
Shed 



Laboratory 



Laboratory & Classrooms - Morrill Science Center UI 

Infirmary 

Cold Storage 

Labs. & Classroom - Engineering & Physics 

Holdsworth - Laboratory & Classroom 

House - Bigelow 

Barn - Bigelow 

Poultry House - Bigelow 

Garage - Bigelow 
House - Wysocki 
Barn - Wysocki 

Shed - Wysocki 

Shed - Wysocki 
House 
Garage 
Apartment 

Garage 
Beach House 
Classrooms & Lab. - 
Classrooms & Lab. - 
Boyden Gymnasium 
House - Holmes 

Barn - Holmes 

Barn - Holmes 
Shed 

Auditorium - Mahar 
Observatory 



Business Administration 
Hasbrouck Addition 



Assessed 

Valuation 

June 30. 1970 

$ 3,185.00 

4,127.00 

7,148.00 

7,147.00 

7,675.00 

100.00 

100.00 

100.00 

100.00 

100.00 

100.00 

100.00 

100.00 

100.00 

100.00 

100.00 

100.00 

100.00 

100.00 

100.00 

100,00 

100,00 

100.00 

100.00 

27,950.00 



21,400.00 



1,844,690.00 

1,452,177.00 

961,459.00 

641,191.00 

682,187.00 

1,213,340.00 

3,600.00 

600.00 



3,250.00 
1,250.00 



3,500.00 

700.00 

1,200.00 

600.00 

1,412,091.00 

1,899,019.00 

2,718,112.00 

4,000.00 



600.00 

231,117.00 

10,000.00 



^85- 



Schedule G-2 (Continued) 
Inventory of Buildings and Structures 



Bldg. 






No. 


Constructed 


Location 


336 


1965 


Amherst 


337 


1965 


Amherst 


338 


1965 


Amherst 


339 


1965 


Amherst 


340 


1965 


Amherst 


341 


1965 


Amherst 


342 


1965 


Amherst 


343 


1966 


Amherst 


344 


1966 


Amherst 


347 


1966 


Amherst 


358 


1966 


Amherst 


377 


1967 


Amherst 


383 


1967 


Amherst 


384 


1967 




385 


1967 




386 


1967 




387 


1967 


Amherst 


388 


1967 


Amherst 


394 


1920 


Amherst 


395 


1920 


Amherst 


396 


1965 


Amherst 


397 


1968 


Amherst 


398 


1968 




398 


1968 




403 


1968 


Amherst 


404 


1968 


Amherst 


405 


1968 


Amherst 


406 


1968 


Amherst 


407 


1925 


Amherst 


408 


1925 


Amherst 


409 


1968 


Amherst 


410 


1968 


E. Wareham 


413 


1970 


Amherst 


414 


1970 


Amherst 


422 


1968 


Amherst 


423 


1968 


Amherst 


424 


1928 


Amherst 


425 


1958 


Amherst 


430 


1969 


Amherst 


431 


1969 


Amherst 


432 


1969 


Amherst 


433 


1969 


Amherst 


434 


1969 


Amherst 


435 


1969 


Amherst 



Description 

Mobile Classroom 

Mobile Classroom 

Mobile Classroom 

Mobile Classroom 

Mobile Classroom 

Greendhouse (Orlyte) 

Kiln 

Classrooms and Laboratory - Engineering East 

Classrooms and Laboratory - Chenoweth Addition 

Classrooms and Laboratory - Morrill Science IV 

Coal Handling Facilities 

Maple Decline Lab. 

Poultry #1 Tillson 

Poultry #2 Tillson 

Poultry #3 Tillson 

Poultry #4 Tillson 
Classrooms and Laboratory - Agricultural Engineering 
Whitmore Administration 
Dzuiba House 
Dzuiba - Garage 
Dzuiba - Pool 
-Storage - Flammable 

Storage - Physical Plant 

Administration - Physical Plant 
Classrooms and Laboratory - Astronomy 
Tillson Shed - Sheep 
Administration - Thompson 
Classrooms and Laboratory - Herter 
blouse - Dickinson 
Garage - Dickinson 
Sawmill - Tillson 
Laboratory and Classroom - Biology 

Student Union - Lincoln Center 

Garage Parking - Campus Center 
Storage - Lumber - Physical Plant 
Tank - Water 
House - Mclntire 
House - Waskiewicz 
Guard House - Traffic Control #1 
Guard House - Traffic Control #2 
Guard House - Traffic Control #3 
Guard House - Traffic Control #4 
Guard House - Traffic Control #5 
Guard House - Traffic Control #6 

Total 



$ 



Assessed 

Valuation 

June 30. 1970 

8,265.00 

8,265.00 

8,265.00 

8,265.00 

8,265.00 

18,664.00 

14,500.00 

1,340,133.00 

1,372,637.00 

3,473,955.00 

231,764.00 

2,500.00 

343,393.00 



320,700.00 

2,758,334.00 

6,170.00 

1,980.00 

1,540.00 

1,337,804.00 



205,000.00 

11,000.00 

2,728,640.00 

3,428,448.00 

12,920.00 

1,370.00 

8,000.00 

211,000.00 



10,000.00 

75,000.00 

12,100.00 

8,000.00 

4,000.00 

4,000.00 

4,000.00 

4,000.00 

4,000.00 

4.000.00 

$58,893,880.00 



-86- 



Schedule G-3 



Inventory of Improvements Other Than Buildings 



Roads, Sidewalks and Parking Areas 
Sewer, Water and Drainage System 
Steam Lines 
Electric Lines 
Tennis Court 
Playing Fields 
Coal Handling 
Total 



Book Value 
June 30. 1970 

$ 3,026,671.88 

2,124,435.46 

4,958,015.05 

4,269,004.97 

90,894.25 

1,082,678.12 

444.852.43 

$15,996,552.16 



-87- 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



at Boston 



Schedule A-8 



Comparative Statement of Funds Forwarded to State Treasurer 
on account of Income from Fees, Sales and Services 



Instruction 
Tuition - 
Tuition - 



Total 



Boston 

Summer School Boston 



1969 

$617,967.50 
53.276.00 



1970 

$674,815.45 
41,247.00 



$671,243,50 



$716,062.45 



( 



-89- 



Schedule A-9 
State Appropriation 
Comparative Statement by Subsidiary Accounts 



Subsidiary Account 

General Maintenance 

1350-02-01 Salaries, Permanent Positions 

1350-02-02 Salaries, Other 

1350-02-03 Services, Non-Employees 

1350-02-04 Food for Persons 

1350-02-05 Clothing 

1350-02-06 Housekeeping Supplies and Expenses 

1350-02-07 Laboratory, Medical and General Care 

1350-02-08 Heat and Other Plant Operations 

1350-02-09 Farm and Grounds 

1350-02-10 Travel and Automotive Expenses 

1350-02-11 Advertising and Printing 

1350-02-12 Repairs, Alterations and Additions 

1350-02-13 Special Supplies and Expenses 

1350-02-14 Office and Administrative Expenses 

1350-02-15 Equipment 

1350-02-16 Rentals 

Total 



1968 



$ 1,949,000.00 
500,000.00 
535,000.00 
-0- 
-0- 

1,500.00 

2,500.00 

70,000.00 

-0- 

15,000.00 

14,500.00 

37,000.00 

268,000.00 

65,000.00 

165,000.00 

596.500.00 

$ 4,219,000.00 



1969 



$ 2,554,000.00 
518,000.00 
755,000.00 
-0- 
-0- 

1,500.00 

3,000.00 

80,000.00 

-0- 

20,000.00 

20,000.00 

25,000.00 

213,000.00 

80,000.00 

172,500.00 

922.000.00 

$ 5,364,000.00 



1970 



4.054,479.00 
15,000.00 
770,000.00 
-0- 
-0- 

1,500.00 

3,000.00 

75,500.00 

-0- 

17,500.00 

40,500.00 

36, 0(11). 00 

105,1)00.00 

79,000.00 

240,000.00 

996,500.00 



$ 6, 493, y7). Oil (a) (b) 
(c)(d) (f) 



Other Maintenance 

1350-51-13 Library 
1350-81-03 Disadvantaged Students 
1350-81-10 Disadvantaged Students 
1350-81-13 Disadvantaged Students 
7416-9102-12 Renovations 

Total 



$ 100,000.00 

-0- 

-0- 

-0- 
-0- 

$ 100,000.00 



$ 100,000.00 
-0- 
-0- 
-0- 
-0- 

$ 100,000.00 



500,000.00 

45,700.00 

300.00 

94,000.00 

275,00 0.00 



915,000.00 (a) 



Capital Outlay 

8068-28 Renovation and Improvement 

8069-70 Renovation and Improvement 

8069-71 Library Books 

8301-11 Design and Construction of New Campus 

Total 



750,000.00 


$ -0- 


-0- 


1,510,000.00 


-0- 


250,000.00 


-0- 


-0- 



$ 750,000.00 



$ 1,760,000.00 



-0- 
-0- 
-0- 
8,200,000.00 (e) 



$ 8,200,000.00 



Grand Total 



$ 5,069,000.00 



$ 7,224,000.00 



$15,608,979.00 



(a) Authorized by Chapter 452 of the Acts of 1969 

(b) Authorized by Chapter 370 of the Acts of 1970 

(c) Authorized by Chapter 811 of the Acts of 1969 

(d) Includes transfer from Budget Bureau for upgrading and salary increase 

(e) Transfer from Bureau of Building Construction 

(f) Authorized by Chapter 113 of the Acts of 1970 



-90- 



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-91- 



Schedule A-11 
1970 Fiscal Year Expenditure Report 
by Budget Divisions 



Dept . 
Code 



Boston Branch 



State Funds State Funds Other Funds 
Salaries Other Salaries 
and Wages Expenditures and Wages * 



Net 
Total 



Cll Chancellor's Office 

C21 Business and Financial Management 

C22 Matching Funds 

C31 Student Personnel 

C32 Health Service 

C33 Off Campus Work Study 

C41 Library 

C51 Art 

C52 Biology 

C53 Chemistry 

C54 Economics 

C55 English 

C56 German 

C57 Government 

C58 History 

C59 Mathematics 

C60 Music 

C61 Philosophy 

C62 Physics 

C63 Psychology 

C64 Romance Languages 

C65 Sociology 

C66 Language Laboratory 

C67 Humanities 

C68 Social Sciences 

C69 Physical Sciences 

C91 Operation of Plant 

Total 



$ 401,880.76 


$ 692,210.19 $ 


79,152.66 


$ 1,173,243.61 


111,806.60 


23,530.55 


8,366.40 


143,703.55 


-0- 


24,696.45 


-0- 


24,696.45 


232,074.87 


28,124.73 


101,272.80 


361,472.40 


-0- 


2,876.40 


64,318.34 


67,194.74 


-0- 


-0- 


33,837.55 


33,837.55 


221,621.94 


21,934.97 


23,356.70 


266,913.61 


53,161.76 


4,200.26 


2,179.20 


59,541.22 


332,662.61 


87,441.91 


26,554.43 


446,658.95 


235,276.12 


59,160.86 


34,807.10 


329,244.08 


137,108.75 


5,288.88 


6,799.32 


149,196.95 


641,351.36 


12,980.04 


12,292.37 


666,623.77 


119,478.01 


55.30 


574.00 


120,107.31 


117,015.41 


467.98 


4,080.25 


121,563.64 


399,835.76 


410.50 


6,210.55 


406,456.81 


280,847.83 


8,573.82 


4,584.62 


294,006.27 


35,492.43 


4,599.30 


1,853.75 


41,945.48 


61,578.86 


142.10 


701.40 


62,422.36 


222,577.34 


71,484.13 


28,860.14 


322,921.61 


223,412.90 


854.85 


17,964.52 


242,232.27 


427,041.60 


529.12 


2,964.60 


430,535.32 


139,820.88 


609.85 


1,528.00 


141,958.73 


22,794.81 


2,506.58 


10,241.25 


35,542.64 


41,793.42 


3,207.68 


369.95 


45,371.05 


23,346.57 


2,053.34 


742.00 


26,141.91 


14,748.25 


-0- 


-0- 


14,748.25 


321,899.44 


581,114.02 
$1,639,053.81 $ 


3,511.60 
477,123.50 


906,525.06 


$ 4,818,628.28 


$ 6,934,805.59 





"Expenditures, other than salaries and wages, not distributed by all budget departments. 



Schedule A-12 



Capital Outlay Expenditures and Balances 



Account .'Jumber and Name 

8301 00 Boston Loan 

8068 28 Renov. U Improve. 

8069 70 Renov. & Improve. 
8069 71 Library Books 
8301 11 Campus Design & Const. 1974 













Balance 




Total 




Expend 


itures 


Appropriation 


Expires 


Appropriation 
$ 2,700,000.00 


$2 


rior Year 
,695,873.88 


Current Year 
$ 4,012.24 


.June 30, 1970 


1971 


$ 113.88 


1972 


750,000.00 




652,315.03 


66,783.32 


30,901.65 


1973 


1,510,000.00 




891,687.17 


544,532.88 


73,779.95 


1973 


250,000.00 




231,441.46 


18,558.40 


.14 


. 1974 


8,200,000.00 




-0- 


1,797,437.56 


6,402,562.44 



$13,410,000.00 



$4,471,317.54 



$2,431,324.40 



$6,507,358.06 



-92- 



Schedule C-6 
Statement of Endowment Fund Principal 



Name of Fund 
Endowments 
Brian Rattigan 
John W. Ryan Faculty Convocation Award 

Total 



Balance 



Balance 



July 1, 1969 

$ -0- 
862.91 


Additions 

$481.56 
10.00 

$491.56 


Disbursements 

-0- 
-0- 


June 30, 1970 

$ 481.56 
872.91 


$862.91 


-0- 


$1,354.47 





Schedule C-7 

Endowment Income 
Statement of Receipts, Disbursements and Balances 



Name and Purpose of Fund 

Prizes : 

Brian Rattigan 

Miscellaneous Purposes : 

John W. Ryan Faculty Convocation Award 

Total 



Receipts 
Balance from Balance 

July 1, 1969 Investments Disbursements June 30, 1970 



-0- 



18.60 



18.60 $ 



36.26 



36.26 



-0- 



54.86 



54.86 



-93- 



Schedule D-2 



Statement of Student Loan Fund 



Received from Student Activities Office - Amherst $5,800.00 

Received from Student Activities Office - Boston 1,000.00 

;•";- ■ $6,800.00 

Less Uncollected Loans Cancelled .": •;■ ■'' 2,554.67 

Funds Available ■• ••• $4,245.33 

Loans Outstanding $4,245.00 

Cash on Hand to Loan . 33 

$4,245.33 



-94- 



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-100- 



Schedule F-14 



Student Union - University Store - Boston 

Income Statement For The Fiscal Year Ended 
June 30, 1970 



Sales 

Books 
Supplies 

Cost of Goods Sold 

Beginning Inventory 

Purchases 

Freight In 

Less: Purchase Returns & Allowances 

Less: Purchase Discounts 

Less: Ending Inventory 

Gross Profit on Sales 



$240,025.17 
39.211.30 



$ 78,197.00 

312,017.04 

5.258.17 

395,472.21 

95.567.31 

299,904.90 

40.32 

299,864.58 
69,960.00 



$279,236.47 



$229.904.58 
$ 49,331.89 



Operating Expenses 

Payroll - Regular 

Payroll - Student 

Payroll - Hourly 

Outside Labor 

Employees' Group Insurance 

Office Supplies 

Store Supplies 

Telephone & Telegraph 

Postage 

Advertising 

Travel & Education 

Doubtful Accounts 

Repairs & Maintenance 

Cash Shortages 

Miscellaneous 



Net Income (Loss) from Operations 

Other Income 

Laboratory Fees 
Xerox & IXiplicating 
Cash Overage 
Miscellaneous 



Other Expenses 

Xerox Service Expenses 

Net Income (Loss) for Period 



$ 21,659.48 

6,164.22 

5,108.39 

2,850.75 

556.21 

710.85 

4,012.86 

574.45 

767.40 

150.26 

416.75 

63.40 

1,350.74 

1,255.94 

317.76 



$ 2,063.90 

1,743.75 

5.38 

1.44 



$ 2.161.06 



$ 45.959.46 
$ 3,372.43 



$ 3.814.47 
$ 7,186.90 



$ 2,161.06 
$ 5,025.84 



-101- 



Schedule F-15 



Student Union - University Store - Boston 

Balance Sheet As Of 
June 30, 1970 



Book Vendors 
Supply Vendors 



ASSETS 

Current Assets: 

Cash in Bank 
Cash on Hand 
Accounts Receivable 
Accounts Receivable - 
Accounts Receivable - 
Inventory - Books 
Inventory - Supplies 
Prepaid Expenses 



Total Current Assets 

Fixed Assets: 

Office Furniture and Fixtures 
Less: Accumulated Depreciation 

Machinery and Equipment 

Less: Accumulated Depreciation 



Total Assets 

LIABILITIES AND CAPITAL 

Current Liabilities: 

Accounts Payable 

Accrued Payroll 

Accrued Taxes - Mass. Sales Tax 

Laboratory Fees 

Total Current Liabilities 

Long-term Liabilities: 

University Store - Amherst Campus 

Capital: 

Retained Earnings 

Total Liabilities and Capital 



$ 16,108.89 
1.279.05 

$ 3,917.32 
140.83 



$ 8,676.02 

1,000.00 

11,187.86 

76,915.85 

1,683.44 

58,062.00 

11,898.00 

315.00 

$169,738.17 



$ 14,829.84 



3,776.49 



$188,344.50 



$ 57,032.86 

288.28 

21.98 

5.722.81 

$ 63,065.93 



$107,590.96 

$ 17.687.61 
$188,344.50 



RETAINED EARNINGS 



Balance July 1, 1969 

Insurance Payment Covering Inventory Loss 
Net Income for the year 

Balance June 30, 1970 



$ 10,489.55 
2,172.22 
5.025.84 

$ 17,687.61 



-102- 



Schedule G-4 



Inventory of Land 



Location 

Boston 
Columbia Point 

Total 



Acreage 

.4 
192.8 



193.2 



Assessed 

Valuation 

June 30. 1970 

$ 315,900.00 
1.753.640.00 

$2,069,540.00 



Schedule G-5 



Inventory of Buildings and Structures 



Bldg. 
No. Constructed Location 



393 



1926 



Boston 



Description 
Classrooms and Laboratory 
Total 



Assessed 

Valuation 

June 30. 1970 

$1.484.100.00 

$1,484,100.00 



-103- 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
Medical School 
at Worcester 



Subsidiary Account 

General Maintenance 

1350-38-01 Salaries, Permanent Positions 

1350-38-02 Salaries, Other 

1350-38-03 Services, Non-Employees 

1350-38-04 Food for Persons 

1350-38-05 Clothing 

1350-38-06 Housekeeping Supplies and Expense 

1350-38-07 Laboratory, Medical and General Care 

1350-38-08 Heat and Other Plant Operations 

1350-38-09 Farm and Grounds 

1350-38-10 Travel and Automotive Expenses 

1350-38-11 Advertising and Printing 

1350-38-12 Repairs, Alterations and Additions 

1350-38-13 Special Supplies and Expenses 

1350-38-14 Office and Administrative Expenses 

1350-38-15 Equipment 

1350-38-16 Rental 

Total 



Schedule A- 13 

State Appropriation 
Comparative Statement by Subsidiary Account 

1968 



$ 348,391.69 



1969 



481,017.72 



1970 



251,123.84 


$ 292,081.60 


$ 401,763.85 


168.12 


15,168.12 


182,532.16 


54,443.05 


77,783.83 


157,955.37 


-0- 


-0- 


-0- 


-0- 


-0- 


-0- 


-0- 


700.00 


1,652.88 


-0- 


-0- 


-0- 


-0- 


9,000.00 


10,215.79 


-0- 


500.00 


-0- 


11,448.02 


18,711.68 


26,064.77 


5,888.00 


10,940.55 


30,603.91 


684.65 


8,274.44 


2,679.62 


10,049.94 


18,247.55 


41,409.85 


6,187.37 


. 13,543.39 


16,219.63 


8,398.70 


15,066.56 


31,220.23 


-0- 


1,000.00 


7,235.15 



$ 909,553.21 (a)(b) 



Other Maintenance 

1350-38-00 Miscellaneous 
1350-39-13 Library 

Total 



$ 113,301.50 $ 57,284.65 
-0- -0- 

$ 113,301.50 $ 57,284.65 



70.000.00 



70,000.00 (c) 



Capital Outlay 



8068-61 
8069-73 



Library Books 
Library Books 

Total 



Grand Total 



$ 200,000.00 $ -0- 
-0- 230.000.00 

$ 200,000.00 $ 230,000.00 



$ 661,693.19 $ 768,302.37 



-0- 
-0- 



-0- 



$ 979,553.21 



(a) Authorized by Chapter 452 of the Acts of 1969 

(b) Includes transfer from Budget Bureau for upgrading and salary increase 

(c) Authorized by Chapter 811 of the Acts of 1969 



-105- 



Schedule A-14 

Capital Outlay Appropriation 

Under Supervision and Control of the 

Bureau of Building Construction 



8067-98 Item 8067-98 of section two of chapter two hundred and seventy- 
six of the acts of nineteen hundred and sixty-seven is hereby 
further amended by striking out, in lines fifteen and seventeen, 
the words "twenty-two million five hundred" and inserting in 
place thereof, in each instance, the words: — eighteen million 
seven hundred and sixty. 

8070-10 For the acquisition of certain land in the city of Worcester 
for a site for the medical school, or land with buildings 
thereon, by purchase or by eminent domain under chapter seventy- 
nine of the General Laws; provided, that no payment shall be 
made for the purchase of said property until an independent 
appraisal of the value of the property has been made by a quali- 
fied, disinterested appraiser; for the preparation of a master 
plan and the necessary engineering for the development of the 
site; for the preparation of plans for medical science facili- 
ties, a teaching hospital and housing facilities; for the 
development of the site and for the construction of medical 
science facilities, including the cost of furnishings and 
equipment and necessary utility services; and, provided further, 
that except for the preparation of plans, expenditures for 
the construction of buildings shall be contingent upon the 
prior approval by the proper federal authorities and assurance 
by such authorities that the federal allocation will be not less 
than eighteen million seven hundred and sixty thousand dollars 
for the establishment of said medical school; to be in addition 
to the amount authorized in item 8067-98 of section two of said 
chapter two hundred and seventy-six 19,600,000.00 (a) 

8070-44 For certain renovations and improvements to the H. E. Shaw build- 

U66-5 ing for the medical school in the city of Worcester, including 

the cost of furnishings and equipment; total project cost not to 
exceed one million three hundred thousand dollars; to be in addi- 
tion to the amount appropriated in item 8069-72 of section two 
of chapter four hundred and seventy-six of the acts of nineteen 
hundred and sixty-eight; provided that said buildings shall be 
included in the master plan of said medical school 1,200,000.00 (b) 



(a) Authorized by Chapter 138 of the Acts of 1969 

(b) Authorized by Chapter 797 of the Acts of 1969 



-106- 



Schedule A-15 

State General Maintenance Appropriation 
Summary of Expenditures by Functional Division and Subsidiary Account 



Account Number and Name 


Appropriation 


Expend 


iture 






Balance of 






and 








Total 


Appropriation 


1350- 


-38 

Salaries, Permanent 


Allotment 


Administration 
$277,165.20 


Ins trust ion 
$ 5,607.47 


Expenditure 
$282,772.67 


June 30, 1970 


01 


$401,763.85 


$118,991.18 


02 


Salaries, Other 


182,532.16 


83,973.23 


4,466 


.00 


88,439.23 


94,092.93 


03 


Services, Non-Employee 


157,955.37 


116,732.75 


-0- 




116,732.75 


41,222.62 


04 


Food 


-0- 


-0- 


-0- 




-0- 


-0- 


05 


Clothing 


-0- 


-0- 


-0- 




-0- 


-0- 


06 


Housekeeping Supplies 
and Expenses 


1,652.88 


227.81 


-0- 




227.81 


1,425.07 


07 


Lab., Med. and General 
Care 


-0- 


-0- 


-0- 




-0- 


-0- 


08 


Heat and Other Plant 
Operations 


10,215.79 


4,367.26 


-0- 




4,367.26 


5,848.53 


09 


Farm and Grounds 


-0- 


-0- 


-0- 




-0- 


-0- 


10 


Travel and Automotive 
Expense 


26,064.77 


7,602.43 


-0- 




7,602.43 


18,462.34 


11 


Advertising and 
Printing 


30,603.91 


29,328.20 


-0- 




29,328.20 


1,275.71 


12 


Repairs, Alterations 
and Additions 


2,679.62 


856.67 


-0- 




856.67 


1,822.95 


13 


Special Supplies and 
Expenses 


41,409.85 


8,542.69 


-0- 




8,542.69 


32,867.16 


14 


Office and Adminis- 
trative Expenses 


16,219.63 


12,100.37 


-0- 




12,100.37 


4,119.26 


15 


Equipment 


31,220.23 


12,965.15 


-0- 




12,965.15 


18,255.08 


16 


Rentals 

Total 


7,235.15 
$909,553.21 


4,525.21 
$558,386.97 


-0- 




4,525.21 
$568,460.44 


2,709.94 




$10,073 


.47 


$341,092.77 



Other Maintenance 

1350-39-13 Library Books $ 70,000.00 
Grand Total $979,553.21 



-0- 



$558,386.97 



$70.000.00 
$80,073.47 



$ 70.000.00 



-0- 



$638,460.44 $341,092.77 (a) (b; 



(a) Unencumbered balances carried forward to Fiscal Year 1971 

(b) Encumbrances carried forward to Fiscal Year 1971 



$284,790.51 
56,302.26 



-107- 



Schedule A-16 
1970 Fiscal Year Expenditure Report 
by Budget Divisions 



Dept. 
Code 



Worcester Branch 

I 21 Medical School Administration 

1 41 Medical School Library 

I 51 Medical School Instruction 

Total 



State Funds State Funds Other Funds 

Salaries Other Salaries Net 
and Wages Expenditures and Wages * Total 



59,964.44 


$80,515.79 


$21,952.07 


$562,432.30 


17,906.74 


-0- 


-0- 


17,906.74 


10,073.47 


-0- 


625.00 


10,698.47 



$487,944.65 



$80,515.79 



$22,577.07 



$591,037.51 



*Expenditures, other than salaries and wages, not distributed by all budget departments. 



-108- 



Schedule A-17 



Capital Outlay Expenditures and Balances 



Balance of 















Total 






Expend: 


Ltures 






Appropriation 


Account 


Number and Name 


Expires 


Appropriation 


Prior Year 


Current Year 


June 30, 1970 


8066 


98 


Medical 


School Loan 


1970 


$ 


600, 


,000. 


.00 


$511. 


,204. 


.75 


$ 23. 


,676. 


.85 


$ 65. 


,118. 


.40 


8067 


31 


Library 


Books 


1971 




230. 


,000. 


.00 


229. 


,798. 


.29 


- 


-0- 






201. 


.71 


8068 


61 


Library 


Books 


1972 




200. 


,000. 


.00 


62. 


,836. 


.87 


75. 


,331. 


.25 


61, 


,831. 


.88 


8069 


73 


Library 


Books 


1973 


$1 


230. 
,260: 


,000. 
,000. 


,00 
.00 


- 


-0- 




21. 
$120; 


,562. 
,570. 


.11 
.21 


208. 
$335 


,437. 
,589. 


.89 




$803, 


,839. 


.91 


.88 



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-112- , 



Schedule G-6 



Inventory of Land 

Assessed 
Valuation 
Location Acreage June 30, 1970 

Worcester ;., •" 127.7 $ 198.500.00 

Total :"" 127.7 $ 198,500.00 



Bldg. 






No. 


Constructed 


Location 


370 


1930 


Worcester 


371 


1961 


Worcester 


372 


1913 


Worcester 


373 


1913 


Worcester 


376 


1894 


Worcester 


411 


1951 


Worcester 


444 


1960 


Worcester 



Schedule G-7 



Inventory of Buildings and Structures 



Assessed 
Valuation 
Description June 30, 1970 

Shelter - Bus Stop Station $ 100.00 

Greenhouse 6,500.00 

House - Maple 7,000.00 

Garage - Maple 400.00 

Apartment - Farm House 35,000.00 

Shaw Bldg. - Administration, Classroom, Labs. 230,000.00 

Anderson House 7.800.00 

Total $ 286,800.00 



-113- 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



ANNUAL REPORT 
Julyl, 1969- June 30. 1970 



A. A. Spiel man, Dean 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

I. BUDGET 1 

II. ORGANIZATIONAL CHART 2 
III. PERSONNEL - NUMBER IN EACH RANK 

A. Academic Personnel 3 

B. Non-Academic Professional Personnel .3 

C. Appointments 4 

1. Assistant Dean 4 

2. New Faculty 4 

3. Retirements 5 

IV. STUDENTS 

A. Summary of Resident Instruction - 1969-70 6 

B. Enrollment 

1. Breakdown of Student Enrollment by Majors - Fall 1969 7 

2. Undergraduate Enrollments by Major - 1962-1969 8 

3. Total Class Enrollm.ents (Graduate, Undergraduate, 
Stockbridge) 9 

4. Freshmen and Transfer Students Enrolled - Fall 1959 
(Undergraduates) 10 

5. Source of Transfer Students - 1969 11 

6. Applications for Entrance - September 1969 12 

7. Stockbridge School Enrollments by Major - 1962-69 13 

8. Number of Graduate Students and Post-Doctoral Fellows 14 

9. Graduate Enrollments by Departments - 1962-69 15 

C. Academic Honors - Class of 1970 

1. Undergraduate 16 

2. Stockbridge School 17 

D. Student Accomplishments and Recognition 17 

V. STUDENT- FACULTY INTERACTION 21 

VI. NEW COURSES, SEMINARS AND COLLOQUIA 

A. New Courses 23 

B; Course Modifications 23 

C. Seminars and Colloquia (Selected Examples) 24 

(continued) 



TABLE OF CONTENTS (continued) 



Page 



VII . FACULTY 



A. Summary of Faculty Publications 26 

B. Faculty Research Grants 27 

C. Faculty Awards, Citations and Professional Recognition 28 

D. Faculty Offices and Committee Memberships Held in 
Professional Societies 34 

E. Research Projects 44 

F. Cooperative Programs With Other Schools and Colleges 

Within and Without the University 54 

VIII. SPECIAL PROGRAMS 

A. Center for International Agricultural Studies 

1. UMass/AID/Malawi Project (AID/347) 58 

2. Regional Center for Applied Research and Technology, 
Malawi 59 

3. International Training Program (AID/399) 59 

4. Peace Corps Intern Program 60 

B. Civil Defense Training Program 60 

C. Miscellaneous 61 

IX. CONTROL PROGRAMS 

A. Pullorum Disease Eradication 63 

B. Mycoplasma gallisepticum Testing 63 

C. Mastitis Testing 63 

D. Regulatory Services (Feed, Fertilizer, Dairy Laws, and 

Seed Laboratory) 64 

E. Shade Tree Laboratories 64 

F. Diagnostic Laboratories 64 

1. Diagnostic 65 

2. Control Services (Samples Tested) 65 

X. MAJOR ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

A. Course Evaluation 66 

B. Student-Faculty Committees 66 

C. Malawi Undergraduates 66 

D. Aquacultural Engineering Laboratory 67 

E. Food Radiation Facility 67 

F. Gold Medal Award to Professor Robert E. Young 67 

G. Cooperative Extension Nutritional Education 68 
H. Wood Products Technology Office With Mt. Wachusett 

Community College 68 

I. Technical Guidance Center for Environmental Control 68 



1. 



I. BUDGET* 

1968 1969 1970 

A. INSTRUCTION $1,802,816.00 $1,655,743.00 $1,947,210.00 

B. EXPERIMENT STATION 

State 919,421.00 1,184,924.00 1,414,652.00 

Non-State 725,441.00 882,349.00 1,021,565.00 

C. COOPERATIVE EXTENSION- 

State 597,729.00 626,625.00 773,016.00 

Non-State 697,286.00 791,099.00 1,042,442.00 

D. CONTROL Program 379,775.00 374,404.00 468.641.00 

TOTALS $5,122,468.00 $5,515,144.00 $6,667,526.00 

♦Calculated from Allotment Control Register as of 6/30/70. 



2 - 



II. ORGANIZATIONAL CHART 



DEPARTMENTS 

AND 

DIVISIONS 



RESIDENT INSTRUCTION 
Associ- 
ate B.S. Gradu- 
Degree Degree ate 



EXPERIMENT COOPERATIVE CONTROL 
STATION EXTENSION PROGRAM 



Agricultural and 
Food Economics 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 




Agricultural 
Engineering 




X 


X 


X 


X 




Cranberry Station 








X 


X 




Entomology 




X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


Environmental 
Sciences 








X 


X 


X 


Food Science and 
Technology 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 




Forestry and 
Wildlife Management 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 




4-H and 

Youth Programs 










X 




*Home Economics 
Extension 










X 




Hotel and Restaurant 
Administration 


X 


X 






X 




Landscape 
Architecture 


X 


X 


X 


X 






Plant Pathology 




X 


X 


X 


\ 

X 


X 


Plant and 
Soil Sciences 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 




**Regulatory Services 








X 




X 


Veterinary and 
Animal Sciences 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 


X 



*In School of Home Economics. 
**Feed, Fertilizer, Dairy Law, and Seed Laboratory. 



- 3 



III. PERSONNEL - NUMBER IN EACH RANK 



A. ACADEMIC PERSONNEL 



September 
1967 



September 
1968 



September 
1969 



Dean 

Associate Dean and 

Director of Stockbridge School 
Associate Director of Extension 
Commonwealth Head of Department 
Head of Department "A" 
Head of Department, academic year 
Commonwealth Professor, academic year 

Professor "A" 
Professor, academic year 
Associate Professor "A" 
Associate Professor, academic year 
Assistant Professor "A". 
Assistant Professor, academic year 

Instructor "A" 
Instructor, academic year 

Visiting Lecturer 
Lecturer, "A", UM 
Lecturer, UM 
Lecturer, UM, 1/2 time 

TOTAL (does not include vacancies) 



I 
1 
1 
9 

1 
1 

41 
6 

38 
7 

29 

14 

13 
3 

3 

a 

2 





44 
8 
40 
11 
29 
19 

12 
2 



6 




171 



189 



1 
1 
1 
11 
2 
1 

41 

9 
41 
10 
27 
24 

il 
4 

2 

1 

2 

1 

191 



B. NON- ACADEMIC PROFESSIONAL PERSONNEL 



Assistant to Dean andDirector 

Assistant Director of Experiment Station 

and Extension Service 1 

Staff Associate 1 

Staff Assistant 3 

Assistant Dean 




1 
3 





1 
3 

1 



TOTAL 



C. APPOINTMENTS 

1. Dr. Ernest M. Buck was appointed Assistant Dean of the College in 
October 1969. He works with high school guidance counselors, community 
and junior colleges in improving student career opportunities in the 
food, agricultural and natural resource sciences; and assists the ad- 
ministration and department heads in improving the educational programs 
for undergraduates. 

2. New Faculty ' 

Agricultural and Food Economics 

Robert L. Vertrees, Instructor, UM 

Agricultural Engineering 

Chin Shu Chen, Assistant Professor, UM 
Mrs. Chokyun Rha, Assistant Professor, UM 

Entomology 

Gary L. Jensen, Assistant Professor, UM 

John G. Stoffolano, Jr., Assistant Professor, UM 

Environmental Sciences, Waltham 

Lyle E. Craker, Assistant Professor "A", UM 
Adrian G. Gentile, Assistant Professor "A", UM 

Forestry and Wildlife Management 

Joseph S. Larson, Associate Professor, UM 

4-H and Youth Programs 

Mrs. Janet R. Drake, Staff Assistant 

Miss Susan J. Uhlinger, Extension Specialist, UM 

Hotel and Restaurant Administration 
George R. Conrade, Instructor, UM 

Landscape Architecture 

Morton B. Braun, Lecturer, UM 
William T. Davies, Visiting Lecturer "A", UM 
Nicholas T. Dines, Assistant Professor, UM 
Victor J. Jarm, Visiting Lecturer, UM 
Harry E. Schwarz, Visiting Lecturer, UM 
David W. Sears, Lecturer, UM 

Plant and Soil Sciences 

Duane W. Greene, Assistant Professor, UM 
Paul H, Jennings, Assistant Professor, UM 

Plant Pathology 

Mark S. Mount, Assistant Professor, UM 

Veterinary and Animal Sciences 

William A. Condon, Lecturer "A", UM 



3. Retirements 

Agricultural and Food Economics 

Ellsworth W. Bell, Professor "A", UM 

Agricultural Engineering 

Gerald A. Fitzgerald, Professor "A", UM 

Entomology 

Frank R. Shaw, Professor "A", UM ' 

Ellsworth H. Wheeler, Professor "A", UM 

Landscape Architecture 

Raymond H. Otto, Professor, UM 

Regulatory Services (Feed, Fertilizer, Dairy Law, and Seed Laboratory) 
C. Tyson Smith, Associate Professor "A", UM 

Veterinary and Animal Sciences 

Richard C. Foley, Professor "A", UM 



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7 - 



B. ENROLLMENT 

1. Breakdown of Student Enrollment by Majors - Fall 1969 

Department and Major 

Agricultural and Food Economics 
General Agricultural Economics 
Agricultural Business Management 
Food Distribution 
Food Marketing Economics 6 

I Lumber and Building Materials Business 

Management ^ 13 

Natural Resource Economics 9 

International Agricultural Studies 5 



Four 


Two 


Gradu- 


Department 


Year 


Year 


ate 


Total 




144 


14 




5 




16 


21 
23 


6 


1 



Agricultural Engineering 

Entomology 

Food Science and Technology 
Dairy Technology 
Food Science and Technology 

Forestry and Wildlife Management 
Fisheries Biology 
Forestry 

Wildlife Biology 
Wood Science and Technology 
Wood Utilization 

Hotel and Restaurant Administration 

Landscape Architecture 

Aboriculture and Park Management 
Environmental Design 
Landscape Architecture 
Landscape Operations 
Park Administration 
Regional Planning 

Plant and Soil Sciences 
Floriculture 

Fruit and Vegetable Crops 
Plant Industry 
Plant Science 
Soil Science 
Turf Management 

Plant Pathology 

Veterinary and Animal Sciences 
Animal Science 
Laboratory Animal Management 



6 
7 

23 



55 



10 

8 

.1 

8 
19 
22 

42 



12 



25 
29 
74 

404 



79 




19 




81 




24 




114 




34 




23 


22 


8 




166 


129 
116 




295 
379 


120 


51 


25 





212 





34 








15 






24 




24 




12 








3 


88 


12 




3 




8 


11 

238 


105 


89 

15 


29 





TOTALS 



871 



625 



315 



1,811 



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- 9 - 

3. TOTAL CLASS ENROLLMENTS (Graduate, Undergraduate, Stockbridge) 

Department 1967-68 1968-69 1969-70 

Agricultural and 

Food Economics 1,426 1,973 1,319 

Agricultural 

Engineering 775 470 486 

Entomology 1,410* 727 805 



Environmental 








Sciences 


-- 


42 


30 


Food Science and 








Technology 


2,388** 


1,824** 


844 


Forestry and 








Wildlife Management 


1,281 


1,408 


1,556 


Hotel and Restaurant 








Administration 


" 


484 


1,253 


Landscape 








Architecture 


2,284 


1,964 


2,227 


Plant and 








Soil Sciences 


2,428 


2,242 


1,909 


Plant Pathology 


— 


182 


173 


fRegulatory Services 


18 


18 


-- 


Veterinary and 








Animal Sciences 


1,621 


1,155 


1,118 



TOTALS 13,613 12,489 11,720 



♦Includes Plant Pathology. 
**Includes Hotel and Restaurant Administration. 
***Feed, Fertilizer, Dairy Law, and Seed Laboratory. 



- 10 - 

4. Freshmen and Transfer Students Enrolled - Fall 1969 (Undergraduates) 



Department 

Agricultural and 
Food Economics 

Agricultural 
Engineering 

Entomology 

Food Science and 
Technology 

Forestry and 
Wildlife Management 



Class of 1973 
No. Enrolled* 



2 
3 



Transfer 
Students 



15 








Total New 
Students 



19 



2 
3 



Fisheries Biology 


16 


5 


21 


Forestry 


18 


10 


28 


Wildlife Biology 


32 


8 


40 


Wood Technology . 


1 


8 


9 


Hotel and Restaurant 








Administration 


29 


26 


55 



Landscape Architecture 
Environmental Design 
Park Administration 

Plant and 
Soil Sciences 

Plant Pathology 

Veterinary and 
Animal Sciences 

TOTALS 



6 


16 


22 


1 


10 


11 


6 


6 


12 


1 





1 


33 


16 


49 



155 



122 



277 



♦Includes 12 swing shift freshmen. 



- 11 - 

5. Source of Transfer Students - 1969 



Massachusetts Community Colleges 

Berkshire Community College 7 

Cape Cod Community College 4 

Greenfield Community College 2 

Holyoke Community College 5 
Massachusetts Bay Community College 4 

Mt. Wachusett Community College 5 

Northern Essex Community College 2 

North Shore Community College 3 

Quinsigamond Community College 4 

Springfield Community College 1 



No. of 

Students 

37 



Stockbridge School of Agriculture 

Paul Smith's School (New York) 

Miscellaneous Colleges 
(in and out of state) 



40 
12 

13 



TOTAL 



122 



- 12 



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- 14 - 

Number of Graduate Students and Post-Doctoral Fellows 



Department 

Agricultural and 
Food Economics 

Agricultural 
Engineering 

Cranberry Station 

Environmental 
Sciences (Amherst) 

Environmental 
Sciences (Waltham) 



M.S. PH.D. 



28 



10 



13 



Degrees Awarded 
M.S. PH.D. 



Post-Doctoral 
Fellows 



Food Science and 
Technology 


21 


26 


5 


6 


Forestry and 
Wildlife Management 


63 


22 


13 


1 


Landscape 
Architecture 


44 


- 


12 


- 


Plant and 
Soil Sciences 


17 


20 


5 


1 


Plant Pathology 


7 


4 


1 


1 


Veterinary and 
Animal Sciences 


15 


14 


5 


3 


TOTALS 


215 


100 


55 


18 



♦Included in totals of other departments. 



Degrees 



Number of Degrees Awarded 

September 1967 September 1968 September 1969 
to June 1968 to June 1969 to June 1970 



Bachelor of Science 
Master of Science 
Doctor of Philosophy 
Stockbridge School 



148 


194 


167 


63 


56 


55 


9 


14 


18 


224 


249 


240 



TOTALS 



444 



513 



480 



- 15 



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- 16 - ' 

C. ACADEMIC HONORS - CLASS OF 1970 

1, UrtderRraduate 

Magna Cum Laude 

Richard Felix Castonguay, Jr. - Forestry | 

Ron Etzion - Environmental Design 

Philip Joseph Goldberg - Environmental Design 

Robert Theodore Grow - Agricultural and Food Economics 

Michael Lawrence Kasavana - Environmental Design 

James Francis Meehan - Wildlife 

Pamela Anne Roecker - Animal Sciences 

Richard William Stanley - Forestry 

Margaret Angela Sterni - Animal Sciences 

Robert George Waltermire - Wildlife Biology 

Cum Laude 

Fourteen students graduated with academic distinction. 

Senior Honors 

Joseph R. Bohne - Wildlife Biology 

Victor Colantonio - Landscape Architecture 

Ron Etzion - Landscape Architecture 

Michael Lawrence Kasavana - Hotel Administration 

Richard William Stanley - Forestry 

American Society of Animal Science Scholarships Awards 

Students must rank scholastically among top 107.. of their class 
In the College of Agriculture: 

Mary E. Carroll Margaret A. Sterni 

Jane L. Boddy Carolyn J. Tomkiewicz 

Faye M.Allis Karen Jacobs 
Pamela A. Roecker 

Honor Societies 

PHI KAPPA PHI (Superior Scholarship) 
Raymond P. Guries - Forestry 
Robert George Waltermire - Wildlife Biology 

SIGMA XI (Scientific Research) 

James P. Olmedo, Jr. - Wood Technology 
Pedro Barbosa - Entomology 
Salman S. Wasti - Entomology 
Andrew J. Main - Entomology 



- 17 - 

Honor Societies (continued) 

XI SIGMA PI (Scholarship in Forestry) 

Twenty-nine students elected to membership. 

ALPHA ZETA (Scholarship and Leadership in Agriculture) 
Jack V. Finn - Wildlife Biology 
Lewis E. Gorman - Wildlife Biology 

2, Stockbridge School 

With Honors 

Mark S. Chomyn - Turf Management 
Michael Wallace - Turf Management 
Paul S. McCrillis - Animal Sciences 

Lear Honorary Scholastic Society 
(3.4 or Higher Cumulative Average Required) 

Thirty-four seniors qualified as members. 

D. STUDENT ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND RECOGNITION 

Department of Agricultural and Food Economics 

James R. Hurley - $500 University Scholarship. 

Ronald Robillard, Phillip Rosemeisl, Thaddeus Gwodz - $100 Educational 
Grants. 

Gerald B. Ahern - $1,000 Grocery Manufacturers Association Scholarship. 

Edward J. Walsh - $1,000 National Food Brokers Association Scholarship. 

Arnold E. Sumner - $500 Ralston Purina Scholarship. 

Mark Beaudoin - $600 Undergraduate Assistantship. 

Jerome I. Virzi and Jerry Howe - graduate research assistantships. 
University of Rhode Island and University of Massachusetts. 

Graduate Students 

H. Douglas Jose - nominated for membership in Phi Kappa Phi (Scholastic 
Honorary Society). 

Sydney Schmitchel - representative on College of Agriculture Educational 
Policies Committee, 

Eight students were co-authors with faculty of nine publications and 
technical articles. 



- 18 - 

Graduate Students (continued) 

Received assistantships for Ph.D. work - 

Cornelis Corssmit, Washington State University 
H. Douglas Jose, Oklahoma State University 
Paula Roessel, University of Connecticut 

Department of Entomology 

Stephen A. Dennis - $100 H. A. Rosenfeld Av/ard for outstanding research 
on pest control. 

Department of Food Science and Technology 

Ronald B. Townsend - Northeast Section, Institute of Food Technologists 
$75 Honorable Mention Undergraduate Award. 

Clifford Starr - Institute of Food Technologists $500 Sophomore 
Scholarship. 

Linda D. Campbell, Stephen M. Power, Clifford P. Starr, and Stuart D. 
Wilson - $400 General Foods Fund Freshman Scholarships. 

Noel E. Anderson - Institute of Food Technologists $500 Freshman 
Scholarship. 

Twenty-eight graduate students were elected to national honorary 
societies, including: Phi Kappa Phi - 4; Phi Tau Sigma - 4; Sigma Xi - 20. 

Department of Forestry and Wildlife Management 

Five students in wood technology received Outstanding Student Awards from 
the Forest Products Research Society. 

Paul Diperri, wood technology, $500 New England Kiln Drying Association 
Scholarship. 

Lewis E. Gorman - Rich Memorial Scholarship Award. 

Graduate Students 

Edwin B. Cady, forestry - New England Section, Society of American 
Foresters Essay prize. 

Jay Watson serves on Student Affairs Committee of American Fisheries 
Society. 

Patrick Fairbaim, and James Pease - developed educational program and di- 
rected seminars for Westfield school system under a Health, Education, and 
Welfare grant to update faculty of the elementary, junior and senior high 
schools in problems of the environment. 



- 19 - 

Department of Hotel and Restaurant Administration 

Kathleen Lyons '72 - $1,000 Heinz Foundation Scholarship. 

Department of Landscape Architecture 

Roger Boissoneau, David Beauregard, and Donald Vacon - Massachusetts Tree 
Wardens' and Foresters' Association Scholarships. 

Chung Ching Kuo, and Michael Talias, graduate students - $1,000 first prize 
in a national "Swimming Pool Design Competition." 

Department of Plant and Soil Sciences 

Edward H. Sauer '69 - presented a student paper concerned with flower bud 
initiation in Easter lilies at the Annual Meeting of the American Society 
of Horticultural Science at Pullman, Washington; awarded second prize in 
this national contest, and is now a graduate student at the University. 

The following graduate students presented papers at the Northeast Regional 
Meeting of the American Society for Horticultural Science, Harvard University, 
January 30-31, 1970: 

M. R. Shipway - Effects of Alar on Early Mcintosh and Puritan Apples. 

Barbara Mioduchcwska - Effect of Ammonium Salts on the Greening of 
Cucumber Seedlings. 

R. P. Creencia - Reversibility of Chilling Injury of Corn Seedlings. 

M. A. Noor - An Investigation of the Metabolic Block in Neglecta-1, a 
Tomato Mutant. 

A. T. Perez - Further Studies on the Physiological Action of the yg-6 
Gene in Tomato. 

R. Buckmire - Effect of Plastic Mulch on Soil Temperature and Growth 
of Sweet Corn. 

M. Dirr - A New Herbicide for Control of Quackgrass in Woody Ornamentals. 

A. T. Perez - presented a paper at the Annual Meeting of the Northeast 
Section of the American Society of Plant Physiologists, University of 
Vermont, May 1, 1970, on the "Role of Gibberelins in the Physiological 
Action of the yg-6 Gene in Tomato." 



- 20 - 

Department of Veterinary and Animal Sciences 

American Society of Animal Science Scholarship Awards (Students must rank 
scholastically among top 10% of their class in the College of Agriculture) 

Juniors: Alfred M. Blackmer Sophomores: Janey Barge 

Kathleen Brookman Carol Collyer 

Robert Dyer Joanna Maher 

Janis Higgins Steven Volpe , 

Margo McGowan Dean Wallace 

•Charles Burr - Ralston Purina Summer Scholarship Intern Award. 

Karl Meyer - New England Sheep and Wool Growers Scholarship. 

Robert Cox - Ralston Purina Senior Scholarship Award. 

Six public exhibitions by the Equestrian Mounted Drill Team. 

Laboratory Animal Management students have been approved as meeting the 
academic qualifications for Junior Animal Technician Certification. 



21 - 



V. STUDENT-FACULTY INTERACTION 

Innovations to the existing effort to enhance student-faculty empathy resulted 
in increased dialogue, understanding and problem solving in virtually every 
phase of academic life. 

New joint committees were formed in Forestry and Wood Technology. Dia- 
logues in the Forestry Coimittee resulted in a revision of curricular 
offerings. 

Hotel and Restaurant Administration provided an opportunity for faculty 
and students to meet in other than classroom context. Special meals at 
a faculty member's home for advisees were made a requirement m HRA 
Course 367. Sixteen such events were held with about 100 students par- 
ticipating. 

Joint committee appointed to discuss curriculum and other aspects of the 
departmental program. Two-year and four-year student coimnittee members 
met separately with faculty members on matters of mutual concern. 

Food Science and Technology added the following joint committees to 
formal undergraduate/graduate/faculty committees: Graduate Studies, 
Undergraduate Curriculum, Food Science and Technology/Agricultural 
Engineering Liaison, and Safety. 

Two undergraduate and two graduate students appointed to participate in 
all department faculty meetings. Joint department student-faculty 
meeting held during student strike to promulgate and set forth department 
policy toward strike and problems of concern. 

Plant and Soil Sciences graduate students elected two representatives to 
establish closer relationships with entire departmental faculty. 
Graduate students now on Departmental Seminar Committee will be added 
to Social Cormnittee in 1970-71. Policy changes have been made as a re- 
sult of this interaction including the dropping of a foreign language as 
a Ph.D. requirement. 

. Students appointed to departmental committees in Veterinary and Animal ^ 
Sciences. A student subconmittee of Curriculum Committee prepared, ana 
the full committee accepted, a creative new modular credit proposal. 

Use of student members of the Intercollegiate Horse Judging and Equita- 
tion Teams in statewide 4-H Horse Club events. 

. Students appointed to all departmental committees except Personnel 
Committee in Agricultural and Food Economics. 

Graduate student appointed to Department Head Selection Committee. New 
Employment Opportunities Committee formed with over-all representation. 
Agricultural Business Society weekly coffee hour set up for students 
and faculty. 



- 22 - 

New Accounting Club established to reduce gap between students and 
faculty and between textbooks and the business world. 

Student-faculty discussions begun last year have resulted in a revision 
and expansion of graduate policies, especially as they pertain to the 
Ph.D. program. 

New Graduate-Student-Faculty Committee formed to further explore im- 
provements in the graduate program. ^ 

Joint representation on Graduate Curriculum Committee in Landscape 
Architecture initiated action for revised degree requirements and dis- 
cussion on grading policies and teacher evaluation. 

Three workshops conducted on curricula and the department's relation- 
ship to the surrounding region and related environmental issues. 

Students now represented on all departmental committees except on the 
Administrative and Personnel Committees. 

The continuation of existing activities also contributed to over-all 
student-faculty communication and understanding. These joint activities 
included seminars, student organizations and societies, weekly bag 
lunches, socials, outings, policy and program committees , and field 
trips. 

There was also an increase in faculty participation on student organ- 
ization governing boards, seminar committees, in program planning, 
scholarship matters, in sponsored events, and as advisers to student 
groups. 



- 23 - 

VI. NEW COURSES. SEMINARS AND COLLOQUIA 

A. NEW COURSES 

Agricultural Engineering 

365/665 Physiological Unit Operations 

765 Engineering Analysis of Biological Systems 

Entomology 

381/681 Economic Entomology II 

Environmental Sciences 

301/601 Introductory Environmental Sciences (E) 
303/603 Air Pollution Biology 

Fisheries Biology 

267/567 Laboratory in Principles of Fishery Biology 

Food Science and Technology 

101 The Struggle for Food (E) 

860 Natural Pigments in Foods: Chemistry and Processing Implications 

Hotel and Restaurant Administration 

310 Hotel Systems and Operations 

311 Food and Beverage Systems and Operations 

Landscape Architecture 

713 Seminar in Professional Topics in Landscape Architecture 

714 Seminar in Professional Topics in Landscape Architecture 

Plant and Soil Sciences 
717 Plant-Water Relationships 

Veterinary and Animal Sciences 
361/661 Intermediate Biometry 

B. COURSE MODIFICATIONS 

Hotel and Restaurant Administration 
300 Hotel and Restaurant Merchandising 



- 24 - 

Plant Pathology 

805 Advanced Plant Pathology; Host-Parasite Relationships 

C. SEMINARS AND CX)LLOQUIA (Selected Examples) 

"WORLD FOOD PROBLEMS." Robert C. Tetro, U. S. representative to the 
Foreign Agricultural Organization. (Agricultural and Food Economics) 

"RELATIONSHIP OF ECONOMIC RESEARCH AND AGRICULTURAL POLICY FORMULATION." " 
Dr. M. L. Upchurch, Administrator, Economic Research Service, U. S. 
Department of Agriculture. Ibid. 

"NEMATODES AS A MODEL TO STUDY AGING." Dr. David Gershon, Department of 
Biochemistry, Technion, Haifa, Israel. (Cranberry Station) 

"VIRUS TRANSMISSION BY NEMATODES." Dr. Eli Cohn, National and University 
Institute of Agriculture, Bait Degan, Israel. Ibid. 

"BIOLOGY OF MOSQUITO IRIDESCEOT VIRUSES." Dr. Milan Trpis, World Health 
Organization, Dar es Sa-laam, Tanzania. (Entomology) 

"PHEROMONE COMf-IUNICATION SYSTEMS IN THE GENUS APIS." Dr. Robert Morse, 
Department of Entomology and Limnology, Cornell University. Ibid. 

"ION EXCHA1;GE chromatography PRINCIPLES AND FIELDS OF APPLICATION." 
Frederick G. Kalfour, Pharmacia Fine Chemicals, Inc. (Food Science and 
Technology) 

"PHENOLIC COMPONENTS OF HARDWOOD SAWDUST, SMOKE AND SMOKED FOODS." 
Dr. Phillip Issenberg, Department of Nutrition and Food Science, 
Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Ibid. 

"THE DOMESTICATION OF BACTERIA: A NEW SOURCE OF PROTEIN FOR MANKIND." 
Dr. Joseph R. Champagne, Nestle Co., Inc. Ibid. 

Weekly natural resource seminar with visiting speakers from industry, 
government and universities, plus faculty and graduate students. 
(Forestry and Wildlife Management) 

"POLITICAL DECISIONS ON ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES." Dr. Calvin Stillman, 
Professor of Environmental Affairs, Rutgers University. (Landscape 
Architecture) 

"NEW TO^^^S." Cy Paumier, chief landscape architect for new town of 
Colvmibia, Maryland. Ibid. 

"CROP PRODUCTION PROBLEMS WITH CHEMICAL AIR POLLUTANTS." 
Howard Haggestad, Principal Plant Pathologist, Agricultural Research 
Service, U. S. Department of Agriculture. (Plant and Soil Sciences) 



- 25 - 

"RELATIONSHIP BETOKEN VEGETATIVE AND REPRODUCTIVE DEVELOPMENT IN HIGHER 
PLANTS." Roy M. Sachs, Plant Physiology Division, Fort Detrick, 
Frederick, Maryland. Ibid, 

"THE INHIBITION AND PHOTOSYNTHESIS OF OXYGEN." Martin Gibbs, Department 
of Biology, Brandeis University. Ibid. 

"MYCOPLASMS . " Dr. Carl Maramorosch, Boyce Thompson Institute AIBS lecturer. 
(Plant Pathology) 

"DECAY OF NORTHERN HARDWOODS." Dr. Alex Chigo, U. S. Forest Service. Ibid. 



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- 28 - 

C. FACULTY AWARDS, CITATIONS AND PROFESSIONAL RECOGNITION 

Department of Agricultural and Food Economics 

Bragg, John H. 

University representative for Scholarship Award, Pioneer Valley Lumber 
Dealers Association. 

Christensen, Robert L. 

Who's Who In the East- ' 

Engel, N. Eugene 

Invited participant. Seminar Series in Quantitative Economics, 
University of Connecticut, June 1970. 

Foster, John H. 

Invited paper with Cornells Corssmit, Private Outdoor Recreation 

Development and Public Policy, Annual Meeting of New England Agri- 
cultural Economics Council, June 1969, Storrs, Connecticut. 

Fuller, Earl I. 

Consultant, VPI Remote Access Usage of Computer in Extension. 
Invited participant at Seminar Series in Quantitative Economics, 
University of Connecticut, June 1970. 

Jarvesoo, Elmar 

"Economic Environment for Carnation Production: The Massachusetts 
Case," invited paper at American Carnation Society's Annual 
Convention, March 7, 1970. 

Marion, Donald R. 

Invited by the President of the United States to participate in the 
First White House Conference on Food, Nutrition and Health, re- 
viewed working paper for Dr. Harold Breimeyer at the conference. 

"Marketing in the Inner City," invited paper for Symposium jointly 
sponsored by the University of Buffalo, American Marketing 
Association, and the Consumer Research Institute, Buffalo, 
New York, June 4-6, 1970. 

Russell, Sargent 

"The Economics of Foreign Trade in Fish," invited paper, Seminar for 
Bureau of Commercial Fisheries, Gloucester, Massachusetts, 
February 25, 1970. 

Storey, David A. 

Invited participant. Community Leaders Conference on Coastal Lands 

and Waters of New England, sponsored by League of Women Voters, 

Hyannis, Massachusetts, April 7-8, 1970. 
Invited participant. New England Coastal Zone Management Conference, 

sponsored by New England Council, Durham, New Hampshire, 

April 28-29, 1970. 



- 29 - 

Wyckoff, J. B. 

Chairman, session at Staff Training Conference for Community Resource 

Development, Cornell University, September 30-October 3, 1969. 
Invited participant at the Conference on Urban Land Economics, 

Lincoln Center for Business and Finance, Claremont Men's College, 

March 15-17, 1970. 
Invited panelist. League of Women Voters Program on Preserving Open 

Space. 
"Direction for the 70 's," invited paper for final challenge Session of 

Seminar Series, Stonehill College, April 28, 1970. ' 

Selected participant at American Water Resources Association Research 

Conference on Evaluation Process in Water Resources Planning, 

June 14-20. 
Invited participant at Seminar in Quantitative Economics, University 

of Connecticut, June 1970. 

Department of Agricultural Engineering 

Pira, Edward S. 

Invited to give keynote address at a week-long conference for vocational 
school teachers sponsored by The Electric Council of New England. 

Whitney, Lester F. 

Received a "Certificate of Service" for activities in the North Atlantic 

Region, American Society of Agricultural Engineers. 
Awarded scholarship to National Science Foundation sponsored by 

Short Course on Land Use and Systems Analysis, Rutgers University, 
June 8-26, 1970. 

Zahradnik, John W. 

Presented an invited paper, Scale-Up of Bio-Mass Production Processes, 
at the University of Rhode Island Conference on Food and Drugs from 
the Sea, August 1959. 

Cranberry Station 

Zuckerman, Bert M. 

Presented invitational paper, "Ultrastructure of Nematodes," to Faculty 
of Agriculture, Oeiras, Portugal, April 1970. 

Department of Entomology 

Becker, William B., John F. Hanson, Frank R. Shaw, and Miss Marion E. Smith 
presented plaques for professional assistance given to the National Pest 
Control Association at the Eastern Conference over a 30-year period. 

Stoffolano, John G. 

Awarded National Science Foundation Post-Doctoral Fellowship (one of 63 
awarded nationally in biology) for a one-year period at Princeton 
University. 



- 30 - 

Department of Environmental Scl.ences (Amherst) 

Gunner, Haim B. 

Invitational lecturer at McGill University, Montreal, Canada. 

Department of Environmental Sciences (Waltham) 

Feder, William A. 

Invitational paper for American Society of Horticultural Science 

Symposium on Air Pollution, Pullman, Washington. 
Invitational speaker and program leader for Session on Air Pollution 

at 18th International Horticultural Congress, Tel Aviv, Israel. 

Naegele, John A. 

Invitational paper, "Impact of Agricultural Chemicals on Ecology," 
New England Environmental Health Societies, January 21, 1970. 

Guest lecturer. Environmental Teach-In, Action for a Quality Environ- 
ment, "Air Pollution Standards," November 20, 1969. 

Guest lecturer. Joint Meeting Committee on Intergovernmental Science 
Relations and Governor's Advisory Committee on Science and Tech- 
nology, "Perspectives on the Ecological Environment in 
Massachusetts," February 10, 1970. 

Guest lecturer, Massachusetts Public Health Association, "Prospects 
for Control of Air Pollution in Massachusetts," Lynnfield, 
Massachusetts, April 22, 1970. 

Seminar speaker, Southeastern Massachusetts University, "Conservation 
of Natural Resources - Air," November 6, 1969. 

Invited testimony before the Air Quality Standards Hearing, Gardiner 
Auditorium, Boston, Massachusetts, November 25, 1969. 

Department of Food Science and Technology 

Clydesdale, Fergus M. 

Presented two invited papers on the "Chemistry of Thermal Processing" 
at: (1) Florida Citrus Experiment Station, Lake Alfred, Florida; 
and (2) Department of Food Science, University of Florida, 
Gainesville, Florida. 

Esselen, William B. 

Seminar on Aseptic Packing for R. & D. Staff, Anchor Hocking Glass 

Corporation, Lancaster, Ohio. 
Invited to participate in short course on "Food Quality Control," 

University of the West Indies, St. Augustine, Trinidad, June 29- 

July 10, 1970. 

Francis, Frederick J. 

Presented six Invited papers: (1) "Perspectives in Food Colorimetry," 
Canadian Institute of Food Technologists, Ottawa, Canada; (2) "New 
Research in Food Colorimetry," University of British Columbia, 
Vancouver, Canada; (3) "Food Colorimetry," Institute of Food Tech- 
nologists, Western New York Section, Buffalo, New York; 



- 31 - 

Francis, Frederick J. (continued) 

(4) Instrumentation for Food Color imetry, " Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts; (5) "Color Measurement as 
a Tool for the Plant Breeder," American Society of Horticultural 
Science, Pullman, Washington; and (6) "Colorimetry in the Food 
Industry," Hunterlab VJorkshop, Washington, D. C. 

Hayes, Kirby M. 

Invited lecturer, Organization of American States, Tropical Center of 
Food Research, Campinas, Sao Paulo, Brazil. ' 

Member, Advisory Committee, Massachusetts Nutrition Survey, appointed 
by Commonwealth of Public Health. 

Member, Board of Registration of Sanitarians, Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts, appointed by Governor Francis W. Sargent. 

Invited to participate in short course on "Handling, Storage, Packaging 
and Marketing Fresh Fruits and Vegetables," University of the 
West Indies, St. Augustine, Trinidad, July 20-31, 1970. 

Hultin, Herbert 0. 

Presented invited paper at the Gordon Research Conference on Food and 
Nutrition, New London, Nevj Hampshire, August 4-8, 1969, "Effect of 
Subcellular Location on the Activity of Glycolytic Enzymes in Muscle 
Tissue." 

Levin, Robert E. 

Presented invited sym'^osium ^sper at the national meeting of American 
Society for Microbiology, Boston, Massachusetts, April 26, 1970. 

Invited to participate in Conference on Fish Preservation and Sanita- 
tion, Puerto Rico, September 1970. 

Nawar, Wassef W. 

Presented three invited lectures: (1) "Identification of Radiolytic 
Products of Triglycerides," seminar talk. International Flavors and 
Fragrances, Union Beach, New Jersey, February 1970; (2) "Variables 
Affecting Headspace Composition of Aroma Components," Society of 
Flavor Chemists, New York, New York, February 1970; (3) "Flavor and 
Headspace Composition," seminar, Heublein, Inc., Hartford, Connecticut, 
May 1970. 

Sawyer, F. Miles 

Presented invited paper at Gordon Research Conference, Issaquah, 

Washington. 
Appointed Institute of Food Technologists Scientific Lecturer for second 
year and presented lectures at: (1) Maryland Section, Baltimore, 
Maryland; (2) Oregon Section, Portland, Oregon; (3) Puget Sound 
Section, Seattle, Washington; (4) Intermountain Section, Burley, 
Idaho; (5) Inland Empire Section, Pullman, Washington; 

(6) British Columbia Section, Vancouver, British Colum.bia; 

(7) Philadelphia Section, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; and (8) Indiana 
Section, Indianapolis, Indiana. 

Presented invited seminar for Washington State University, Pullman, 
Washington, and University of Idaho, Moscow, Idaho, at Pullman, 
Washington. 



- 32 - 

Department of Forestry and VJildllfe Management 

Bond, Robert S. 

Invitational paper, 13th Annual Clinic National Wooden Pallet and 
Container Association. 

Cole, Charles F. 

Lecturer, Sinmons College, Boston, Massachusetts. 
Invited participant, Virginia Polytechnic Institute, Blacksburg, 
Virginia, conference on "Distributional History of the Biota of 
the Southern Appalachians," and Joint United States-Russian Ground 
Fish Survey, aboard Russian research vessel, George's Banks. 

Gatslick, Harold B. 

Visiting scientist, Paul Smith's College, Paul Smiths, New York. 

Guest speaker, annual meeting, Empire State Forest Products Association. 

Keynote speaker. Osmose Wood Treatment Symposium. 

McCann, James A. and Roger J. Reed 

Elected members of the American Institute of Fisheries Research 
Biologists. 

McCann, James A. 

Received a plaque for service in behalf of the Massachusetts Division 
of Fisheries and Game, and a Quality Increase Award from the 
United States Bureau of Sport Fisheries. 

Noyes, John H. 

Invitational papers presented at annual meeting of Ontario Professional 
Foresters Association, and at annual meeting of the Michigan 
Conservation Department. 

Department of Hotel and Restaurant Administration 

Lundberg, Donald E. 

Principal lecturer. College Business Management Institute, July 1969. 

Accepted as a volunteer in the International Executive Service Corps, 
a quasi- government organization providing technical assistance to 
less developed nations. 

Presented invitational papers at: Club Managers Association of America 
workshops, Houston, Texas, and Chicago, Illinois; Restaurant Manage- 
ment Seminar, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts. 

Eshbach, Charles E. 

Grant of $50,000 from the U. S. Department of Agriculture to coordinate 
Seminar for School Food Service Supervisors of the Northeastern 
States, University of Massachusetts, July 1970. 

Lecturer, Maine State School Lunch Conference, Lewiston, Maine, 

October 1969, "Factors Concerned With Purchasing"; Conference of 
Culinary Arts Teachers, Westfield State College, Westfield, 
Massachusetts, July 1969; and Conference of Religious Homes and 
Centers Operators, Colebrook, Connecticut, November 1969. 



- 33 - 

Robertson, Clifford J. 

Invitational papers: New York State Milk and Food Sanitarians and Food 
Technologists Meeting, Syracuse, New York, September 1969, "Enzymes 
As They Pertain to Food Fats and Their Use"; New England Association 
of Ice Cream and Sandwich Shop Operators, Northampton, liassachusetts , 
November 1969, "New Foods of the '70's"; Hampshire County Dental 
Society, Northampton, Massachusetts, April 1970, "Cholesterol and 
You." 

Conrade, George R. < 

Invitational papers: "Computer Applications in Food Service," Seminar 

of Restaurant Executive Institute, Miami Beach, Florida, December . 

1969. 
Chairman, Computer Applications in Food Service Seminar, Restaurant 

Executive Institute, Chicago, Illinois, October 1969. 
Member of panel. Annual Meeting of Connecticut Hotel-Motel Association, 

Hartford, Connecticut, April 1970. 

Department of Landscape Architecture 

Bacon, Theodore S., Jr. 

Elected chairman. Lower Pioneer Valley Regional Planning Commission. 

Cudnohufsky, Walter 

Co-winner (with Dr. Nick Kantartzis, Thessaloniki, Greece) of a design 

competition for a 60-acre tourist park and scenic bridge, Naousa, 

Greece. 
Visiting lecturer. University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada, and The 

Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. 

Dines, Nicholas T. 

Co-recipient of American Institute of Architects' award for design 
excellence, George Patton Park, Perth Amboy, New Jersey. 

Fabos, Julius 

Visiting lecturer, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland; 

University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan; Massachusetts Institute 
of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts; and University of 
Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
Recipient, National Science Foundation Faculty Fellowship, 1970-71. 

Zube, Ervin H. 

Invitational paper, "The Future of the Profession," First Annual 

Landscape Architecture Conference, University of Guelph, Canada. 
Visiting lecturer. Ball State University, Muncie, Indiana; and The 
Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. 

Department of Plant and Soil Sciences 

Lachman, William H. 

Presented invitational seminar, "The Development of Tetrapolid 

Hemerocallis," Horticulture Department, University of Maryland, 
College Park, Maryland. 



- 34 - 

Marsh, Herbert V., Jr. 

Invitational seminar, "Some Observations and Thoughts on the Roles of 
Light and Gibberellins in Plant Grov/th," McGill University, 
Montreal, Canada. 

Maynard, Donald N. 

Invitational seminar, "Vegetable Research and Production in 

Massachusetts," Vegetable Crops Department, University of California, 

Davis, California. 
Invitational seminar, "Environmental and Genetic Factors Influencing 

Plant Nutrition," Biomedical Division, Lawrence Radiation 

Laboratory, University of California, Livermore, California. 

Rosenau, William A. 

Acceptance to National Science Foundation sponsored short course, 
"Ecology for College Teachers," North Carolina University, 
Chapel Hill, North Carolina, June 3-July 3, 1970. 

Troll, Joseph 

Recipient, "Outstanding Teacher" Award, Stockbridge School Students 

1970 Annual Progress Banquet, Amherst, Massachusetts. 
Special recognition from Region 95 (New England) for services as 

advisor to Kappa Omicron Chapter, University of Massachusetts, 

Alpha Phi Omega National Service Fraternity. 

D. FACULTY OFFICES AND COMMITTEE MEMBERSHIPS HELD IN PROFESSIONAL SOCIETIES 

Department of Agricultural and Food Economics 

Christensen, Robert L. 

Northeast Extension Farm Management Committee. 

Chairman, Resolutions Committee, New England Agricultural Economics 
Council. 

Engel, N. Eugene 

Secretary, New England Federal Milk Orders Committee. 

Chairman, New England Milk Price Forecast Committee. 

Advisory Committee of Lower Pioneer Valley Regional Planning Commission. 

Fitzpatrick, Robert A. 

Treasurer, University of Massachusetts Associate Alumni. 
Chairman, Finance Committee, Ibid. 

Foster, John H. 

Chairman, Nominating Committee, Association of U. S. University 

Directors of International Agricultural Programs. 
New England International Agricultural Development Council. 
State Conservation Needs Inventory Committee, Soil Conservation Service. 

Fuller, Earl I. 

Awards Committee, American Agricultural Economics Association. 
Northeast Farm Managem.ent Research Committee. 



- 35 - 

Jarvesoo, Elmar 

Research Planning Coinmittee, Horticultural Research Center of 

Belchertovm, University of Massachusetts. 
Marketing Committee, American Society for Horticultural Science. 

Leed, Theodore W. 

Northeast Extension Marketing Committee. 

Trustee, Western Massachusetts Economics Education Council. 

Wyckoff, Jean B. 

Elected member for Research in Northeast Region to National Agricultural 
Policy Committee. 

Program Committee, National Agricultural Policy Committee. 

Secretary, Northeast Public Affairs Committee. 

Executive Committee, New England Agricultural Economics Council. 

Co-Chairman, U. S. Department of Agriculture Science and Education 

Committee on the Use of Electronic Data Processing in Rural Develop- 
ment. 

Northeast Regional Resources Research Committee. 

Subcommittee on Outdoor Recreation, Northeast Regional Resources 
Research Committee. 

Lower Pioneer Valley Regional Planning District Advisory Committee on 
Sewer and Water. 

Department of Agricultural Engineering 

Clayton, Joe T. 

American Society of Agricultural Engineers: 
Secretary, Bio-engineering Committee. 
Chairman, Position Paper Subcommittee. 
Career Guidance Committee. 

Permanent Subcommittee for Woemn in Engineering. 
Animal Shelter Ventilation Committee. 
Department Chairman Committee. 

Executive Committee, Connecticut Valley Section. 
New England Farm Electrification Institute: 
Executive Committee. 
Chairman, Research Committee. 
Program Committee. 

Chen, Chin Shu 

EPP-49, Special Crop Processing Committee, American Society of Agri- 
cultural Engineers. 

Fletcher, Stevenson W. , III 

American Society of Agricultural Engineers: 

Executive Committee, Connecticut Valley Chapter. 
Executive Committee, North Atlantic Region. 
Chairman, Food Engineering 03 Technical Committee. 
Secretary, Food Engineering 71 Education Committee. 
Steering Committee, Food Engineering Division. 



- 36 - 

Fletcher, Stevenson W. , III (continued) 

Standards Committee, Food Engineering Division. 
Food Engineering 9 Program Committee. 
Continuing Education Committee. 

Johnson, Curtis A. 

American Society of Agricultural Engineers: 
EPP-41, Milk Handling Equipment Committee. 
SE 39, Family Housing Committee. 

Rha, Mrs. Chokyum 

Career Guidance Committee, American Society of Agricultural Engineers. 

Whitney, Lester F. 

American Society of Agricultural Engineers: 
First Vice Chairman, North Atlantic Region. 
Chairman, Elect Nominee, North Atlantic Region. 
Pov;er and Machinery Steering Committee. 
Forest Engineering Committee. 
Fruit and Vegetable Harvesting Committee. 
Subsurface Irrigation Committee. 
Program Committee, Engineering Society of New England Annual Conference. 

Zahradnik, John W. 

American Society of Agricultural Engineers: 
Food, Drug and Beverage Committee. 
Vice Chairman, Bio-engineering Committee. 

Chairman, Controlled Atmosphere Storage Technical Committee. 
Food Engineering Public Relations and Inter-Society Liaison Sub- 
committee. 

Cranberry Station 

Zuckerman, Bert M. 

Translation and Exchange Committee, American Society of Nematologists. 
Representative to A.I.B.S. Communications Committee. 

Departm.ent of Entomology 

Becker, William B. 

Vice Chairman, Northeast Forest Pest Council. 

Committee Member, Ornamental Insect Workshop of Eastern Branch, 

Entomological Society of America. 
Northeast Forest Insect Work Conference. 

Department of Environmental Sciences (Amherst) 

Gunner, Haim B. 

Associate Editor, Canadian Journal of Microbiology. 

Secretary, Northeast Regional Committee on Nitrogen Transformations. 

Presiding Officer, Pesticides and Microbial Degradation Session, 

Annual Meetings, American Society for Microbiology. 
President, Massachusetts Chapter of Sigma Xi. 



- 37 - 

Litsky, Warren 

American Public Health Association: 

Editor, Laboratory Section, NEWSLETTER. 

Program Committee. 

Committee on Food Protection, Engineers and Sanitarians Section. 

Committee on Food, Publications, Laboratory Section. 

Mueller, William S. 

Editorial Board, The Journal of Milk and Food Technology. 

» 

Walker, Robert W. 

Abstractor, American Oil Chemist Society. 

Organizer, Symposium on Hydrocarbon Degradation, American Oil Chemist 
Society. 

Department of Environmental Sciences (Waltham) 

Feder, VJilliara A. 

TR 7, Agricultural Effects Committee, Air Pollution Control Association. 
Associate Editor, ENVIRO^'MEI^AI. POLLUTION (New journal which will appear 
in June 1970 from Elsevier Publishers, London, England). 

Galinat, Walton C. 

Editorial Board of Economic Botany, Society for Economic Botany. 
Committee of Maize Germ Plasm Resources (CIMMYT). 

Manning, William J. 

Soil Microbiology Subject-Matter Committee, American Phytopathological . 
Society. 

Naegele, John A. 

Chairm.an, Technical Coromittee, Lake Cochituate Watershed Association. 
Agricultural Research Institute Committee: "Agriculture in Relation 

to the Quality of the Environment." 
Attorney General's Advisory Committee: "Environmental Problems in the 

Commonwealth." 
Commissioner of Public Health's Ad Hoc Advisory Committee: "Ambient 

Air Quality Standards for Particulates and Oxides of Sulphur." 
Liaison IR-4 Representative, Northeastern Region, Evaluation of Current 

Data and Needed Research to Determine Tolerance Limits of Chemicals 

for Minor Uses on Agricultural Products. 
Environmental Health Technology Advisory Committee, Holyoke Community 

College, Holyoke, Massachusetts. 

4-H and Youth Program 

Howell, Mildred L. 

Chairman, Legislative Committee, Massachusetts Home Economics Associ- 
ation. 
Uhlinger, Susan J. 

Chairman, Awards and Recognition Committee, Massachusetts Adult Education 
Conimittee. 



- 38 - 

Department of Food Science and Technology 

Buck, Ernest M. 

Secretary-elect, Northeastern Deans and Directors of Resident 
Instruction. 

Clydesdale, Fergus M. 

Undergraduate Awards Committee, Northeast Section, Institute of Food 
Technologists. 

> 
Esselen, William B. 

Undergraduate Awards Jury, Institute of Food Technologists. 
National Academy of Science - National ^escarch Council Advisory 
Board on Military Academy Personnel Supplies: 
General Committee on Food. 
Committee on Microbiology of Food. 

Evans, David A. 

Chairman, Subcoirimittee on Cleaning and Sanitizing Dairy Equipment, 
Northeast Dairy Practices Committee. 

Francis, Frederick J. 

Institute of Food Technologists: 

Chairman, Undergraduate Awards Jury. 
Chairman, Nominations and Elections Committee. 
Constitution and By-Laws Committee. 
Scientific Lecturers Comraittee. 
Delegate to Inter-Society Color Council. 
National Councillor. 
Editorial Committee, American Society for Horticultural Science. 

Hankinson, Denzel J. 

Editorial Board, Journal of Dairy Science. 

President, Massachusetts Dairy Technology Society. 

Program Committee, Massachusetts Milk Inspectors Association. 

Hayes, Kirby M. 

Research and Development Associates (U. S. Army, Natick Laboratories): 

Director 

Academic Activities Committee 

Isker Award Jury 
Subcommittee on Scholarships and Awards, Institute of Food Technologists. 

Hultin, Herbert 0. 

Institute of Food Technologists: . 
Program Committee. 

Samuel C. Prescott Research Award Committee. 
Councillor, Northeast Section. 

Hunting, Ward M. 

Resident Clerk, Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Phi Tau Sigma, Food 

Science Honorary Society. 
Secretary, University of Massachusetts Chapter, Fni Kappa Phi. 



- 39 - 

Levin, Robert E. 

Chairman, Atlantic Fisheries Technological Conference, 1970. 
President, University of Massachusetts Chapter, Phi Tau Sigma. 

Nawar, Wassef W. 

Committee on Communications, American Oil Chemists Society. 

potter, Frank E. 

One of three judges of graduate student papers, Annual Meeting, 

Aiierican Dairy Science Association, Gainesville, Florida. ' 

Sawyer, F. Miles 

Ccamittee on Sensory Evaluation of Foods, Institute of Food Technologists. 
American Society for Testing and Materials Coiiiraittee E-18. 

Stumbo, Charles R. 

Nicolas Appert Award Jury, Institute of Food Technologists. 
National Academy of Science - National Research Council Advisory Board 
on Military Academy Personnel Supplies: 

Food Irradiation Advisory Committee to the Armed Forces. 

Department of Forestry and Wildlife Management 

Abbott, Herschel G. 

Chairman, Nominating Committee, and Chairman, Committee to Revise By- 
Laws, New England Section, Society of American Foresters. 

Gatslick, Harold B. 

Committee on Treatment and Coatings. 

Chairman of Northeast Section, Forest Products Research Society. 
Wood Conmittee, Building Research Institute. 

Massachusetts Committee, New England Building Code Association. 
New- England Educational Committee, Building Officials Code Association. 

Greeley, Frederick 

Time and Place Committee, Northeast Section, Wildlife Society. 

Hoadley, R. Bruce 

Treasurer, Northeast Section, Forest Products Research Society. 
Treasurer and Acting Secretary, Massachusetts Chapter, Sigma Xi. 

Larson, Joseph S. 

Resolutions and Public Statements Committee, Northeast Section, 
Wildlife Society. 

Mawson, Joseph C. 

Secretary-Treasurer, Yankee Chapter, New England Section, Society of 
American Foresters. 

Noyes, John H. 

Committee on World Forestry, and General Chairman, Golden Anniversary 
Meeting, NeT.7 England Section, Society of American Foresters. 



- 40 - 

Reed, Roger J. 

Program Committee and Nominating Committee, Southern Nev7 England 
Chapter, American Fisheries Society. 

Rhodes, Arnold D. 

Massachusetts Board of Natural Resources. 

Chairman, Northeast Section, Association of State College and University 
Forestry Research Organizations. 

Rice, William W. i 

Secretary, Drying Division, Forest Products Research Society. 
Executive Secretary and Treasurer, New England Kiln Drying Association. 

Department of Hotel and Restaurant Adm.inistration 

Conrade, George R. 

Public Relations Secretary, Management Information Task Force, 

American Hotel and Motel Association. 
Credit Card Subconmittee, American Hotel-Motel Association to the 

American National Standards Institute Committee on Credit Cards. 
Council on Hotel, Restaurant and Institutional Education. 

Eshbach, Charles E. 

Vice President, Western Massachusetts Branch, Food Service Executives 

Association. 
Research Corimittee, Council on Hotel, Restaurant and Institutional 

Education. 
Secretary, Massachusetts Food Service Educational Council. 
Public Relations Coinmittee and Program Committee, Society for the 

Advancement of Food Service Research. 

Lundberg, Donald E. 

Advisory Board, Massachusetts Hospital Food Service Directors Associ- 
ation. 

Robertson, Clifford J. 

Elected Councilor, Connecticut Section, Institute of Food Technologists. 
Chairman, Council Committee on Regional Sections and Affiliated Organ- 
izations, Institute of Food Technologists. 
Moderator of "Food Update"; General Chairman, "Sections East"; Chairman, 
Subcommittee of "Dairy and Poultry Products" of the Committee on 
Stable, Compact Foods, Research and Development Associates, U. S. 
Army, Natick Laboratories. 
Chairman, Subcommittee on "Industry Action," Committee on Food and 

Nutrition, American Health Foundation. 
Chairman, Nominating Committee, and Member, Program Committee, Food 
Service Division, Institute of Food Technologists. 

Department of Landscape Architecture 

Cudnohufsky, Walter 

"Task Force '70" Committee, American Society of Landscape Architecture. 



- 41 - 

Dines, Nicholas T. 

Education Committee, Boston Society of Landscape Architects. 

Kent, Robert L. , Jr. 

Student Affiliation Committee, American Society of Landscape Architects. 

King, Gordon S. 

Tree Evaluation Committee and Policy Committee, International Shade Tree 

Conference. 
Secretary-Treasurer, Western Massachusetts Shade Tree Association. 
Chairman, Educational Committee, Massachusetts Tree Wardens' and 

Foresters' Association. 
Advisor, Massachusetts Tree and Horticulture Council. 
Chairman, Tree Wardens, Arborists and Utilities Conference. 

Zube, Ervin H. 

Executive Committee, Boston Society of Landscape Architects. 

Department of Plant and Soil Sciences 

Bramlage, William J. 

Secretary-Treasurer, .University of Massachusetts Chapter, Phi Tau Sigma. 
Ad Hoc Committee for Post-Harvest Horticulture, American Society for 
Horticultural Science, 

P/-"!^-" T,7-i 1 1 i ^™ n 

President, Northeastern Section, American Society of Agronomy. 

Drake , Mack 

Consulting Editor, Soil Science International Agronomy Committee A4121, 

American Society of Agronomy. 
Chairman, Hokkaido International School Corporation, Sapporo, Japan. 

Greene, Duane W. 

New Agricultural Chemicals Committee, American Society for Horticultural 
Science. 

Havis, John R. 

President-Elect, Northeast Region, American Society for Horticultural 
Science. 

Maynard, Donald N. 

Governing Board, American Institute of Biological Sciences. 
Board of Directors, Science Funding Policy Committee, American Society 
for Horticultural Science. 

Michelson, Louis F. 

Committee on Certification of Soil Scientists, American Society of 
Agronomy. 

Southwick, Franklin W. 

Secretary-Treasurer, Massachusetts Fruit Grov/-ers' Association, Inc. 



- 42 - 

Troll, Joseph 

Secretary, Massachusetts Turf and La\>m Grass Councile 
Green Section, U. S. Golf Association. 

Vengris, Jonas 

Chairman, Herbaceous Weeds Section, Research Coordinating Coirniittee, 

Northeastern Weed Control Conference. 
"Carrier Leaflet" Coramittee, Weed Science Society of America. 

Weeks, Martin E. 

Committee on Land Use in An Urban State, Northeast Regional Soil Survey. 
Committee on Soil Organic Matter, Northeast Regional Soil Survey. 

Zak, John M. 

Cape Cod National Seashore Scientific Advisory Committee. 

Department of Plant Pathology 

Rohde, Richard A. 

Secretary-Treasurer 1969 and Vice President 1970, Northeastern 

Division, American Phytopathological Society. 
Education Committee,- Society of Nematologists. 

Shade Tree Laboratories 

Eolmes, Francis W. 

American Phytopathological Society: 

Chairman, Committee on Regulatory Work and Foreign Plant Diseases. 
Convener, Committee on Phytopathological Translations. 

Vice President, VJestern Massachusetts Tree Wardens' and Moth Superin- 
tendents' Association. 

Member, Panel in Biology for Evaluation of Applicants for Post-Doctoral 
Fellowships in Federal Laboratories, National Academy of Sciences - 
National Research Council, 

McKenzie, Malcolm A. 

Northeastern Forest Pest Council. 

Massachusetts Forest and Park Association: 

Secretary, Committee -- 25th Annual Conference on Dutch Elm Disease. 
Vice President for Hampshire County. 

Advisory Council, TREES, "The Journal of American Arboriculture." 

Consultant, Executive Committee, Massachusetts Tree VJardens' and 
Foresters' Association. 

Honorary Member, Western Massachusetts Tree Wardens' and Moth Super- 
intendents' Association. 

Regulatory Services (Feed, Fertilizer, Dairy Law, and Seed Laboratory) 

Kuzmeski, John W. 

Association of Official Analytical Chemists. 
Association of American Feed Control Officials o 

Association of -^.erican Fertilizer Control Officials. 



- 43 - 

Morgan, Ralph M. 

Association of American Feed Control Officials. 
Association of American Fertilizer Control Officials. 
American Microscopists Association. 

Rice, William N. 

Association of Official Seed Analysts: 

Secretary-Treasurer. 

Chairman, Meeting Place Committee. 

Rules Committee. ' 

Legislative Coiruiiittee. 
Association of Seed Control Officials of the Northeastern States: 

Chairman, Noxious Weed Seed Committee. 

Administrative Committee. 
Administrative CoiTiiaittee, American Association of Seed Control Officials. 

Eiben, Carl H. 

Research Subcommittee, Association of Official Seed Analysts. 

Department of Veterinary and Animal Sciences 

Borton, Anthony 

Horse Committee, /jnerican Society of Animal Science. 

Horse Research Committee, Northeast Horse Extension Committee. 

Colby, Byron E. 

National Chairman, Extension Animal Science Committee, American Society 
of Animal Science. 

Damon, Richard A., Jr. 

Representative, Biological Science Information and Retrieval, American 

Society of Animal Science. 
President, University of Massachusetts Chapter, Sigma Xi. 

Gaunt, Stanley N. 

Milk Composition Committee, American Dairy Science Association. 

Mellen, V/illiam J. 

Poultry Science Association: 

U. S. Committee for the Tom Newman Memorial Award. 
Chairman, Physiology Section, 1969 Annual Meeting. 

Smith, Russell E. 

Chairman, Committee on Prophylaxis and Therapeutics, National Lepto- 
spirosis Conference. 
Committee on Leptospirosis, U. S. Animal Health Association. 
Committee on Standard Nomenclature of Reproductive Diseases of Domestic 
Animals, National Animal Disease Laboratory. 

Smyser, Charles F. 

Antigen Committee, Northeastern Conference of Avian Diseases. 

Pullorum- Typhoid Testing Coi-mittce, Northeastern Conference of Avian 
Diseases. 



- 44 - 

Snoeyenbos, Glenn H. 

American Association of Avian Pathologists: 
Secretary-Treasurer. 
Board of Directors. 
Salmonella Committee. 
Business Manager - Avian Diseases. 

Chairman, Antigen Committee, Permanent Secretary, Northeastern Confer- 
ence on Avian Diseases. 

Stern, Douglas N. ' 

Director, American Association of Extension Veterinarians. 
Massachusetts Veterinary Medical Association, 
Secretary-Treasurer, Western Massachusetts Veterinary Medical 
Association. 

Weinack, Mrs. Olga M. 

Mycoplasm.osis Committee, American Association of Avian Pathologists. 
Chairman, Mycoplasma Committee, Northeastern Conference on Avian 
Diseases. 

E. RESEARCH PROJECTS ■ 

Department of Agricultural and Food Economics 

Bragg, John H. 

Design and Evaluation of a Ghetto Food Store Managerial Training 

Program. 
The Impact of the Board of Directors on the Success or Failure of Farm 
Cooperatives. 

Brovm, Alfred A. 

The Efficiency of Alternative Railroad Costing Methods as a Basis of 
Rate Determination. 

Callahan, James W. 

An Analysis of Municipal Expenditures and Revenue Sources in 
Massachusetts Communities. 

Christensen, Robert L. 

An Analysis of High Yielding Rice Farms in Korea. 

Selected Interrelationships Betv/een Poultry Marketing and Other 

Sectors of the Economy. (With Alfred A. Brown) 
Impact of Insurance Companies on Rural Communities and Families, 

Crossmon, Bradford D. 

Northeast Regional Farm Labor Study. 

Engel, N. Eugene 

Spatial Analysis of the Korean Rice Economy. 

An Input-Output Analysis of Sectors of the Massachusetts Economy. 



- 45 - 

Foster, John H. 

An Economic Analysis of the Gambia Peanut Oil Marketing Board. 

Analysis of Effectiveness of Pablic Programs to Increase Rice Production. 

Private Outdoor Recreation Operations and Public Policy in the 

Connecticut Valley Region of Massachusetts. 
Complete Cost-Benefit Analysis for Public Decision Making. 

Fuller, Earl I. 

The Competitive Position of Massachusetts Agriculture: Its Preservation 
and Improvement. ' 

Jarvesoo, Elmar 

Livestock Production in the U.S.S.R. 

Analysis of Labor Utilization on Eight Dahomey Farms. 

Flower Delivery Economics. 

Leed, Theodore W. 

Development of the Wholesome Meat Act of 1967 and Its Implications for 

Meat Inspection and Distribution in the States. 
Grocery VJarehouse Damage in New England. 
Price Elasticity of Demand for One Percent Fluid Milk in Retail Food 

Stores. 
Statistical Analysis of New Equipment for Butterfat and Other Component 

Testing of Milk. 

Marion. Donald R. 

Cost of Food Distribution in Lov;- Income Areas. 

Economics of Unit Pricing in Retail Food Stores. (With Theodore V7. Leed) 

Russell, Sargent 

Farm Management of African Semi-Commercial Farms. 

Impacts of Regulations Affecting Competition, Industry Organization and 
Practice on the Performance of the Fluid Milk Industry. 

Storey, David A. 

Cost and Price Consideration in Apple Storage With Special Reference to 

the Taigue Korea Situation. 
An Analysis of Factors Affecting the Demand for Pork in Taiwan. 
Economic Analysis of the Market Structure of the Commercial Fishing 

Industry in the Northeast. 

Vertrees, Robert L. 

Economic Impact of Water Pollution Laws in Michigan. 

Wyckoff, Jean B. 

Impact of Urban Growth on the Rural Countryside. 
Economic Analysis of Coordinated Watershed Planning. 

Department of Agricultural Engineering 

Clayton, Joe T. 

Closed Systems for Animal Sewage Treatment. 

Physiological Responses of Chickens to Varying Environments. 



- 46 - 

Johnson, Ernest A. 

Control of Pests on Perishable Food Commodities in Marketing Channels. 
(V/ith Joe T. Clayton) 

Rha, Mrs. Chokyum 

Investigation of Thermal and Rheological Properties of Proteinaceous 

Materials. 
Investigation of Methods for Determining Yield Stress of Organic 

Materials. 

Whitney, Lester F. 

Improvement of Efficiency in Harvesting Apples. 

Mechanical and Physical Properties of Forage as Related to Processing, 

Preservation and Utilization. 
Mechanical Injury to Processed Fruits and Vegetables During Handling. 

Zahradnik, John W. 

Heat and Mass Transfer Studies in Food Engineering. 
Shellfish Mariculture Demonstration Pilot Plant. 

\ Cranberry Station 

Cross, Chester E., Irving E. Demoranville, Robert M. Devlin, and Bert M. 
Zuckerman 

Evaluation of Herbicides and Fungicides for Cranberries. 

Devlin, Robert M. 

The Effect of Natural and Artificial Plant Growth Regulators on Fruit 
Set and Berry Size in Vaccinium Macrocsr pon (Variety Early Black). 

and Chester E. Cross 



The Ecology of Selected Submersed Aquatic Weeds. 

Deubert, Karl H. 

Translocation of Pesticides from Cranberry Bogs to Their Surroundings. 
The Chemistry of Cranberry Bog Soils. 

Norton, John S. and Chester E. Cross 

The Mechanization of Cultural, Harvesting and Market Preparation 
Operations in Cranberries. 

Rohde, Richard A. and Bert M. Zuckerman 

Biology of the Plant - Parasitic Nematode, Pratylenchus penetrans . 

Tomlinson, William E., Jr. 

Insects Affecting Cranberries, Blueberries and Other Eracaceous Plants. 

Department of Entomology 

Becker, William B. and Walter M. Banfield (Plant Pathology) 
Etiology of Maple Tree Decline in Massachusetts. 



' - 47 - 

Edwards, Lawrence J. 

Tricarboxylic Acid Cycle Intermediates in Normal and Anethetized Insects. 
Host Selection and Feeding Responses of Insects. 

Peters, T. Michael 

Biological and Biochemical Factors Influencing the Development of Larval 
Mosquito Populations. 

Shaw, Frank R. 

Pesticide Residues In or On Raw Agricultural Commodities. 

The Role of Parasites and Predators in the Control of the Alfalfa Weevil. 

Stoffolano, John G., Jr. 

Associations Between the Plant Pathogen, Pseudomon as melophthoro Allen 
and Riker, and Rhagoletis pomonella Walsh. 

Department of Environmental Sciences (Amherst) 

Gunner, Haim B. 

Microbial Degradation of Organic Effluents of Industrial Origin. 

Biological Degradation of Agricultural Pesticides. 

Factors Affecting the Accumulation of Nitrates in Soils, V/ater and Plants. 

Lit sky, VJarren 

Bacterial Shedding. 

Fluorescent Antibody Methods for Determination of Fecal Streptococci. 

Airborne Bacteria. 

Microbial Intervention in the Eutrophication Process. 

Mueller, William S. 

Slime Infestations in the Connecticut River. 
Bactericidal Agents for Cutting and Grinding Fluids. 

Walker, Robert W. 

Investigations of Fatty Acids from Neutral Lipid and Phosphatide Fractions 
of Atypical Mycobacteria. 

Department of Environmental Sciences (Waltham) 

Campbell, Franklin J. 

Investigations of Different Commercial Formulations, Media Type and 
Growth Regulators for Lily, Pot Mums, and Bedding Plants. 

Carnation Breeding for the Production of Promising New Commercially- 
Valuable Clones. 

Environmental Adaptability Evaluations of Pre- Introductory Breeders 
Trials of Bedding Plants. 

Fader, William A. 

Air Pollution Problems in the Northeast. 

Galinat, Walton C. 

The Cytogenetics, Morphology and Evolution of Corn and Its Relatives. 



- 48 - 

Galinat, Walton C. and William H. Lachman (Plant and Soil Sciences) 
Genetics and Physiology of Sweet Corn Quality and Biological Ef- 
ficiency. 

Manning, William J. 

Control of Root Rot Diseases of Greenhouse Floricultural and 
Vegetable Crops. 

McEnroe, William D. 

American Dog Tick, Comparative Toxicology and Behavior. 

and John A. Naegele 



Biological and Chemical Studies of Mite Resistance to Chemicals. 

Naegele, John A. 

Lake Cochituate VJatershed Association As a Factor in Local Government. 

Department of Food Science and Technology 

Buck, Ernest M. 

Effect of State of Contraction on Shear Strength and Actomyosin 
Formation in Rabbit Muscle. 

Fagerson, Irving S. 

Minor Components in Grain Spirits. 

Composition of Corn Hydrolysates. 

Role of Volatile Organic Compounds as Food Flavor Components. 

Francis, Frederick J., Fergus M. Clydesdale, and William B. Esselen 
Quality Maintenance, Measurement, and Control in the Marketing of 
Vegetables, Including Potatoes. 

Hankinson, Denzel J. and Stanley N. Gaunt (Veterinary and Animal Sciences) 
Methods of Standardizing the Dye Binding Method for Measuring Protein 
in Milk. 

Hayes, Kirby M. 

Spinning of Edible Protein Fibers and Incorporation and Evaluation 
of Flavors in the Fibers. 

Hultin, Herbert 0. 

Enzymatic Control of Quality Factors in Edible Plant and Animal 
Materials. 

Levin, Robert E. 

Fisheries Sanitation- Improving Product Quality and Shelf-Life of 

Massachusetts Commercial Fishery Products. 
Phage Typing of Psychrophiles. 

Studies on the Deoxyribonuclease Produced by Pseudomonas putrefaciens . 
Characterization of Trimethylamine Reductase from Pseudomonas 
putrefaciens . 



- 49 - 

Nawar, Wassef W. 

Health Significance of Radiolytic Products. 

Effect of Thermal Processing on the Cherr.ical Composition of Foods. 

Sawyer, F. Miles 

Effect of 5 '-Ribonucleotides on Irradiation Induced Off-Flavor in Ground 

Beef. 
Effect of Low Temperatures on Quality and Marketability of Food Products. 

Stumbo, Charles R. 

Sterilization and Inhibitors in Food Processing. 

Department of Forestry and Wildl ife Management 

Abbott, Herschel G. 

Direct Seeding, and the Influence of Birds and Mammals on Forest Re- 
generation in the Northeast. 

Bond, Robert S. 

Structure of the Pallet Manufacturing Industry in the Northeast. 
Problem Analysis of the Labor Situation in the Primary Wood Processing 

Industries of the Northeast. 
Consumer Analysis for Specific Forest-Oriented Recreational Activities 
in the Northeast. 

Carlozzi, Carl A. 

Programmed Selection of Optimum Uses of a Small Water Resource Subjected 

to Complex Simultaneous Demand Stresses. 
Enhancement of Ecologic and Aesthetic Values of Wetlands Associated VJith 

Interstate Highways. 
Optimal Application of University Resources to Assist Public Agencies on 

Water Problems. 

Cole, Charles F. 

Pesticide Effects on Larval Marine Fishes. 

Gatslick, Harold B. 

Market Potential in Massachusetts for Industrial Plyv70od of Northeastern 

Species. 
Wood Properties of Red Pine. 

Greeley, Frederick 

Effects of Dietary Protein Levels on the Grov;th Rate of Wood Ducks. 
The Control of Bird Depredation. 

and Joseph S. Larson 



Food and Shelter Requirements of the Ruffed Grouse in Relation to Energy 
Regimes. 

Hoadley, R. Bruce 

Investigation of Nails and Related Wood Fasteners. 
Rheology of Wood Restrained from Swalling. 



- 50 - 

Larson, Joseph S. 

Social and Developmental Behavior of Beaver, Castor canadensis . 

Hair Root Sex Chromatin in Sex Determination of Certain Mammals. 

A Multi-Variate Model for Public Management of Fresh Water Wetlands. 

MacConnell, William P. 

Use of Aerial Photographs to Evaluate the Recreational Resources of a 
River. 

and Donald L. Mader 



Resistance of Eight Christmas Tree Species to Simazine and Atrazine. 
Management of Christmas Trees on Power Line Rights of Way. 

Mader, Donald L. 

Genetic and Environmental Adaptability of Forest Trees. 
Evapo-=transpiration, P.un-Off, Storage, and Drainage Characteristics of 
V/ater from Forest Soils. 

McCann, James A. 

Evaluation of a Method for Characterizing the Ponded Waters of 

Massachusetts. 
An Inventory of the Ponds, Lakes, and Reservoirs of Massachusetts. 
The Effects of the Holyoke Dam Fish Passage Facilities on the Mortality 

and Behavior of the American Shad. 

Reed, Roger J. 

Juvenile American Shad in the Connecticut River, Massachusetts. 

The Fishery Potential of Four Aquatic Environments Created by Inter- 
state Highway Construction in Massachusetts. 

A Biological Investigation of the Effects of Pollution on the Aquatic 
Environment and Organism in the Millers River Watershed, Franklin 
and Worcester Counties, Massachusetts. 

Rhodes, Arnold D. 

Effect of Thinning and Harvest Cuttings on the Development of Forest 
Stands in Massachusetts. 

Sheldon, William G. 

Food and Environmental Conditions As a Limiting Factor for the Black 

Duck, Anas rubripes , in Nauset Marsh, Orleans and Eastham, 

Massachusetts. 
Bobcat Behavior in a Peninsular Habitat. 
Productivity and Breeding Behavior of Canada Geese at Marshy Point, 

Manitoba. 

Wetherbee, David K. 

Ecology of Avian Sterility. 

Role of Tradition in Territoriality of Sparrow Hawks. 

Wilson, Brayton F. 

Maple Tree Root Initiation, Development and Geotropic Response. 
The Role of Mechanical Stress in Cambial Activity of Trees. 
Differentiation of Root 'r>-pes and Their Geotropic Response During 
Tree Root System Development. 



- 51 - 

Department of Hotel and Restaurant Administration 

Conrade, George R. 

Management Information System for University Campus Center. 
Computer-Assisted Kitchen Layout. 

and Warren T. Grinnan 



Computer-Using Systems for Service Areas of Nev; Campus Center. 

Cournoyer, Norman G. 

Factors Influencing Guests to Stay in Hotels and Motels in Pioneer Valley 

Area of Massachusetts. 
Sales or Occupancy Potential for Hotels and Motels As Indication of 
Efficiency. 

Wrisley, Albert J., Jr. 

Computerized Planning and Control System for Food Service Operations. 

Department of Landscape Architecture 

Fabos, Julius 

Landscape Design Criteria for Highway VJctlands and Impoundments. 

King, Gordon S. 

The Use of Polyurethane for Repairing Damaged Trees. 

Martin, John H. 

Evaluation of Riblic Policy Alternatives in Maximizing Public Benefits 
Arising from V.'ater Quality Improvement. 

Zube, Ervin H. 

Viewer Preferences of Landscape Displays, 

Department of Plant and Soil Sciences 

Baker, John H. 

Factors Controlling the Chemical Composition of the Soil Solution. 

Bramlage, William J. 

Post-Harvest Physiology of Poraological Fruits; Handling, Storage, and 
Post-Storage Problems in the Marketing Channels. 

Drake, Mack and V/illiam G. Colby 

Morphological and Physiological Responses of Perennial Forage Grasses. 

Havis, John R. 

Physiology of Low Temperature Injury on Ornamental Plants. 

Jennings, Paul H. 

Comparisons of the toylases in Maize During Seed Germination and Photo- 
synthetic Tissue. 



- 52 - 

Lachman, William H, 

Genetics and Breeding of Tomatoes. 

and Walton C. Galinat (Environmental Sciences) 

Genetics and Physiology of Sweet Corn Quality and Biological Ef- 
ficiency. 

Marsh, Herbert V. 

Effects of Certain Pesticides and Plant-Growth Regulators on Plant 
Metabolism. 

Maynard, Donald N. 

The Relationship of Nutrition to Plant Physiological Disorders. 

and Allen V. Barker 



Plant and Nutritional Variables Associated With Ammonium Assimilation 
in Plants. 

Southv/ick, Franklin W. 

Relationships of Mineral Nutrition to Physiological Disorders of Apples. 

Stewart, Gordon L. 

An Examination of Potential Tracers to Depict the Movement and Behavior 
of VJater in Soils. 

Thomson, Cecil L. 

Pickling Cucumber Research, 

Troll, Joseph 

The Effect of KNO3 on the Growth of Creeping Bentgrass, Agrostic 
palustris . 

Vengris, Jonas 

Weed Life Cycles As Related to Weed Control in the Northeast. 
Field Trials in Development of Up-to-Date Grassy Weed Control Methods 
in Field Corn. 

Zak, John M. , John R. Havis, Joseph Troll, and Hrant M. Yegian 
Roadside Development Project. 

Department of Plant Pathology 

Agrios, George N. 

Transmission and Physiological Effects of Certain Pome Fruit Viruses. 
Viruses and Virus Diseases of Forest Hardwoods. 

Banfield, Walter M. 

Lophodermium Needle Cast Disease and Ozone Damage on White Pines. 
The Role of Fruit Flies in the Transmission of Bacterial Soft Rot. 

and William B. Backer (Entomology) 



Etiology of Maple Tree Dscline in Massachusetts. 



- 53 - 

Mount, Mark S. 

The Ecology of the Leaf Surface. 

Rohde, Richard A. and Bert M. Zuckerman (Cranberry Station) 

Biology of the Plant-Parasitic Nematode, Pratylenchus penetrans . 

Shade Tree Laboratories 

Holmes, Francis W. 

Pathology of Wilt Diseases of Trees. ' 

McKenzie, Malcolm A. -■ 

Study of Fungus and Insect Pests of Trees in Massachusetts. 

Regulatory Services (F eed, Fertilizer, Dairy Law, and Seed Laboratory) 

Eiben, Carl H. , Waldo C. Lincoln, Jr. and William N. Rice 
Purity and Germination of Lawn Grass Seed. 

Kuzraeski, John U. 

Pesticide Residues In or On Raw Agricultural Products. 

Department of Veterinary and Animal Sciences 

Anderson, Donald L. 

Endocrine Physiology Associated With Nutritional-Environmental Inter- 
actions in Fowl. 
Interrelations of Intensity and Duration of Light and Nutrient Intake 
on the Reproductive Performance of Female Chickens Maintained in a 
Thermally Controlled Environment. 

Black, Donald L. and George Ro Howe 
Mammalian Reproduction. 
Endocrine Factors Affecting Reproduction in Cattle. 

Borton, Anthony 

Equine Grov/th Studies, 

Control of Ovulation in the Mare. 

Fenner, Heinrich 

The Interaction of the Acid Base Pool and the Function of Saliva in the 
Digestion Processes in the Rumen. 

Gaunt, Stanley N. and Denzel J. Hankinson 

Relationships Between Genetic Markers and Performance in Dairy Cattle. 

Howe, George R. 

Hyperbaric Effects of High Pressure Exposure on Endocrine Physiology. 

Mellen, William J. and A. Jam.es Farrington, III 

Physiological Bases of Inherited Differences in Growth Rate. 



- 54 - 

Sevoian, Martin 

Avian Lymphomatosis. 

Smith, Russell E. and lona Me Rejoiolds 

Infectious Diseases Affecting Reproduction in Cattle. 

Smyth, J. Robert, Jr. and Thomas W. Fox 

Genetic Bases for Resistance to the Avian Leukosis Complex. 

Snoeyenbos, Glenn H. 

Salmonellosis of Poultry. 

Weinack, Mrs. Olga M. and Glenn H. Snoeyenbos 
Respiratory Diseases of Poultry. 

F. COOPEPivTIVE PROGRAl-IS WITH OTHER SCHOOLS AND COLLEGES WITHIN AND WITHOUT 
THE mnVERSITY 

Depar-tment of Agricultural and Food Economics 

Bragg, John H. 

Workshops for dairy processing and distribution firms' executives on 
"Capital Budgeting" with faculty from Cornell, Rutgers, Vermont, 
Pennsylvania, and Ohio State Universities. 

Engelj N. Eugene 

With Westfield Public School System in series "Greater Springfield 
Ecology Workshops." 

Foster, John H. 

With Department of Anthropology, Seminar in Cultural Dynamics and 
Applied Anthropology. 

Jarvesoo, Elmar 

With Soviet and East European Studies Program in teaching inter- 
departmental course on Soviet Perspectives. 

Vertrees, Robert L. 

With Civil Engineering Program, teaching course in water* quality. 

Wyckoff, Jean B. 

With School of Physical Education, seminar lecture on Problems of 
Human Movement; and with School of Engineering, lecture course on 
Water Institutions and Policy. Also, with eight state universities 
and Extension Service on six- leaflet series "Agricultural Trade 
Policies: ^■Jhat Are the Choices?" 

Department of Agricultural Engineering 

Light, Robert G. 

With five other New England State Universities, in interest of co- 
operative Extension programs. 



- 55 - 

Zahradnik, John W. .... 

With College of Arts and Sciences and School of Engineering in Marine 
Science Program; and with School of Engineering in Ocean Engineering 
Program. 

With New England Marine Resources Information Program, as alternate 
planning board and Extension committee member. 

Cranberry Station , 

Experimental Biology Laboratory 

With Department of Biochemistry, Technion, Haifa, and Department of 
Ultrastructure, Weizmann Institute, Rehovot, in research on ultra- 
structural changes in Caenorhabditis. briggsae (a nematode) during aging. 

Department of Environmental Sciences (Amherst) 

Litsky, Warren ■, , ^ x. 

With Department of Public Health, teaching of Public Health Laboratory 

I and II. 

Department of Enviromr.ental Sciences (Waltham) 

Galinat, Vlalton C. ^ ^ n „j 

With Bussey Institute of Harvard University, Oswego State College, and 
University at Boston, on corn (maize) research and lectures. 

Department of Food Science and Technology 

SavTyer, F. Miles o- -i 

Cooperative research in support of M.S. graduate student m Civii 

Engineering. 

Department of Forestry and Wildlife Mana gement 

Bond, Robert S., Frederick Greeley, and Donald L. Mader 

With other New England State Universities, three regional research 
projects. 

Carlozzi, Carl A. ■, u • 

With Five Colleges, Seminar on Environmental Quality and housing. 

Cole, Charles F. , j 

With University Marine Science Program, interdisciplinary program; and 
arranged week's cruise at sea off North Carolina coast for students and 
faculty of Fisheries, Zoology and Engineering. 

Department of Hotel and Restaurant Administration 

Cournoyer, Norman G. .,,,*. v , 

With Director of Food Service, Vermont State Hospital, Waterbury, 
Veraont, in using ccraputer to effect controls at hospital and other 
locations. 



- 56 - 

Robertson, Clifford J. 

With Harvard University, Department of Nutrition, cooperated in pro- 
viding information on industry practices, and planning and conduct of 
study program on quasi-dairy products. 

Department of Landscape Architecture 

Fabos, Julius 

With Departments of Government, Industrial Engineering, Forestry and 
Wildlife Management, and Agricultural and Food Economics, inter«> 
disciplinary regional planning course. 

Department of Plant and Soil Sciences 

Colby, William G. 

With Department of Plant Pathology, University of Rhode Island, co- 
operative field experiment on carbohydrate reserves in putting green 
grasses. 

Goddard, George B. 

With the Plants In An Urban Environment Institute, Michigan State 
University, lecture series. 

Marsh, Herbert V., Jr. 

VJith Botany Department, teaching courses in plant growth regulators 
and plant metabolism. 

Vengris, Jonas 

V/ith Department of Botany, University of New Hampshire, regional re- 
search and preparation of bulletin on Portulaca oleracea life cycle 
studies. 

Stewart, Gordon L. 

With Water Resources Division, U. S. Department of Interior, assisted 
in several of their research programs. 

Department of Plant Pathology 

Gilgut, Constantine J. 

With Universities of Connecticut and PJiode Island, disease control 
recomniendations for fruit, potatoes, and tobacco prepared cooperative- 

ly. 

Shade Tree Laboratories 

VJith U. S. Forest Service, joint study of roots of sugar maples planted 
nine years ago at various depths in soil of two types for starch and 
reduction in sugar content. 



- 57 - 

Department of Veterinary and Animal Sciences 

Black, Donald L. 

With Departments of Zoology and Biochemistry, a graduate traineeship 
in mammalian reproduction in field of physiology of reproduction. 

Sevoian, Martin 

With Animal Medical Center, New York City, cooperative program in 
comparative leukemias. 



- 58 - 

VIII. SPECIAL PROGRAMS 

A. CEOTER FOR INTEPJnIATIONAL AGRICULTURAL STUDIES 

Under terras of the University contract V7ith the United States Agency for 
International Development, the Center participates in the agricultural 
development of Malawi in the following ways: 

1 . UI-Iass/AID/llalawi Project (AID/347) 

.Four students from Malawi received B.S. degrees during the year. They 
were the last of a group of nine enrolled as part of the University- 
Malawi-AID Program. All will return to their native land for teaching 
and professional assignments. The four graduates were Edward Malenga, 
Khindon Masangano, Vincent Saka, and Martin S. Mughogho. 

Bunda Agricultural College 

A second phase of this project is the furnishing of agricultural faculty 
from the University to Bunda College. Three such faculty presently at 
Bunda are: Francis G. Nentzer, Jr., lecturer in Extension and Chief-of- 
Party; Joseph A. Keohane, lecturer in agricultural biology; and 
John Smagula, lecturer in agricultural chemistry. 

Bunda College offered its first four-year degree program in agriculture 
in September 1969, in addition to continuing its curricula at the diploma 
(three-year) level, and upgrading courses for selected employees of the 
Ministry of Agriculture. A total of seven agricultural faculty have 
served at the fledgling college since its inception. 

Special Assistance Projects 

The Malav7i Government requested special assistance and consultation 
service from the College of Agriculture faculty during the year. These 
requests involving short-term visits of staff to Malawi included: 

Dr. Haim B. Gunner, Department of Environmental Sciences, and Associate 
Director of Research for the Center, who was asked by the Malawi Ministry 
of Agriculture to suggest possible solutions to microbiological problems 
affecting agricultural production, and to assist in the development of a 
Soils Microbiology Department at Bunda College. 

Dr. Mack Drake, Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, who conducted 
seminars in plant nutrition at Bunda College and also demonstrations in 
tissue for plant nutrients o 

Dr. Walton C. Gregory, Department of Crop Science, North Carolina State 
University, who ser\'ed as a consultant to the Malawi Ministry of Agri- 
culture on peanut production. 



- 59 - 

This UMass/AID/Malawi contract expires November 30, 1970. Officials at 
Bunda College, University of Malav7i, have initiated requests to the AID 
Mission in Malawi and to the U. S. Ambassador to Malawi for a continuation 
of this University support in the development of Bunda College. 

AID presently is exploring the possibility of establishing a Regional 
Training Center at Bunda College. If this materializes, the College of 
Agriculture here will furnish two to four of its faculty for three-months' 
training assignments. Trainees at the Regional Center would be selected 
from Malawi, Zambia, Botswana, Swaziland, and Lesotho. 

2. Regional Center for Applied Research and Technology, Malawi 

The University has awarded the Center for International Agricultural Studies 
a grant of $10,000 to be used in the development of a proposal for an agri- 
cultural research and technology center and the generation of the financial 
support it will require. 

The center would be located preferably at Bunda Agricultural College. 
Developmental efforts to date by the Center staff, the Government of Malawi, 
the Agency for International Development (AID) and other sources have re- 
sulted in the following progress: 

The inclusion in the 1970-71 Congressional Appropriation a request from 
AID of $50,000 for a feasibility study of the proposal; the interest of 
the Directors of the International Developm.ent Research Center being es- 
tablished by the Canadian Govemraent, and future submission of the UMass 
proposal to the Directors as a possible project. The Malawi Ambassador to 
the United States, some members of Congress, and the Food and Agriculture 
Organization in Rome, Italy, also have sho\m interest in the proposed 
center and contributed assistance, 

3. International Training Prograin (AID/399) 

This program has three functions: 

a. To train on a short-tenn basis participants with supervisory positions 
in the ministries of agriculture and education in their respective 
countries. Currently undergoing training in agricultural education 
and agronomy for one year are Emmanuel Adegbenjo, Nigeria; and 

Abdul Mannan, East Pakistan. This summer the tv;o are training at the 
Bristol County Agricultural High School, and at the Bristol and 
Middlesex County Extension Serv'^ices. 

b. To administer the graduate training, in various departments of the 
College, of degree personnel from ministries of agriculture and 
foreign research institutes. Three students from Korea completed . 
their Master's Degree studies in agricultural economics this June. 
Four others will complete work this fall and winter. 

c. To develop special programs for professional visitors from foreign 

countries who CG~ie here to consult V7ith faculty ir.ambers or adziinis- 

trators in the College of Agriculture. Such programs were developed 
for the following: 



- 60 - 

Drs. Libal Corner and Zalud, food chemists from Czechoslovakia, 
sponsored by the Food and Agriculture Organization, Rome, Italy. 
They were the first Czechoslovakian scientists to be invited to the 
United States since the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics occu- 
pation of their homeland in August 1968. 

Dr. Covert C. van Drimmelen, Agricultural Counselor at the Embassy 
of South Africa, visited vrith our Department of Veterinary and 
Animal Sciences and research personnel. An internationally kno\im 
microbiologist, he also visited the campus in 1968. ' 

Thirty-eight farmers from the Province of Quebec, Canada, v.'ere 
visitors and a three-day program was arranged for them on the campus 
and in VJorcester County. 

4. Peace Corps Intern Program 

This is the second year the Center has recruited and partially trained 
Peace Corps Volunteers. This year the group of 20 students will go 
primarily to Peace Corps positions in Botswana, Sv7aziland, and Ethiopia 
in Africa. These are all professional positions and the students have 
been recruited for specific jobs based on their training at the University. 
Jobs include fisheries and entomology research, national agricultural 
planning and ranch management, teaching biology and horticulture, a tobacco 
Extension job, and five jobs as assistant game wardens. 

As part of the development of this program. Center Director, Dr. John H. 
Foster, traveled to Kenya, Malawi, Botswana, and Sv;aziland in January 1970. 
He talked to last year's interns now in the tv;o first mentioned countries 
to evaluate last year's program. 

B. CIVIL DEFENSE TRAINING PROGRAM 

Thirteen 32-hour courses in various Civil Defense specialties vjere con- 
ducted throughout the state as one week (five consecutive days) or as 
evening courses. Types of courses and number of students in attendance 
V7ere as noted belov?: 



Shelter Management Instructor (SMI) 
Radiological Monitor Instructor (Ri-II) 
Radiological Defense Officer (RDO) 
Civil Defense Management (CDM) 
Plans and Operations (P & 0) 

TOTALS 13 235 

*Received Certificates of Completion • 



Number 


of 


Certified 


Courses 


Attendance* 


1 




14 


5 




81 


2 




42 


3 




73 


2 




25 



- 61 - 

Since 1967 the Civil Defense Program has conducted Emergency Operations 
Simulation (EOS) training in cities and tovms of the Commonv/ealth. The 
purpose of OES is to demonstrate to a local community an operations proce- 
dure and physical display that can be used effectively for any type of 
major emergency--natural or man-made. -A study of a city's personnel and 
equipment that can be brought to bear in an emergency is first made. With 
this information and the cooperation of local department heads and others, 
an emergency situation is evolved for the to^m that is realistic and re- 
quires the officials to make decisions and coordinate actions. Emergency 
Operations Simulation training programs were conducted as follows: 

Location Attendance 

Cambridge 35 

Lowell 30 

Quincy 39 

Maiden 24 

Greenfield 31 

TOTAL 159 

Two 1-day conferences for elected officials and industry were conducted in 
Medford and Framingham with 26 persons in attendance at each location. 

The Civil Defense Training Program is now being funded in nine-months' 
contract periods. This action was deemed necessary by the Office of Civil 
Defense to continue university training in the states within an austere 
budget. Funds for Fiscal 1970 totaled $71,885. 

C. MISCELIANEOUS 

A sum of $28,223 was granted by the National Science Foundation to the 
University of Massachusetts for a Cooperative College-School Science Program 
in Greenhouse Management for High School Biology Teachers in the Department 
of Plant and Soil Sciences under the direction of Dr. George B. Goddard. 
Approximately 20 teachers were involved in this five-week program. 

Dr. Joseph Troll, Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, served as coordi- 
nator and administrator of the annual eight-week Winter School for Turf 
Managers in which about 25 persons enrolled from many areas East of the 
Mississippi River. 

The Department of Landscape Architecture participated in the second year of 
a limited staff exchange with the Civil Works Division, U. S. Army Corps of 
Engineers; and a fourth student exchange with Hampton Institute, Hampton, 
Virginia (Negro). 

An Institute for the Study of Water Pollution Control was conducted for 
Junior and Senior High School Science Teachers by the Institute of Agri- 
cultural and Industrial Microbiology in cooperation with the School of 
Education. The first four V7eeks of the six-weeks' course v/as spent in 



- 62 - 

classroom study and the last tv70 in a field study of the Connecticut River 
and its tributaries from Vermont to Connecticut. The study involved not 
only the biological, chemical and engineering aspects of pollution but 
also political and economic aspects. Drs. Warren Litsky and Laverne J. 
Thelen directed the Institute attended by 21 science teachers. 

Sponsorship of the 30th Annual Eastern Conference of the National Pest 
Control Association by the Department of Entomology at which over 140 
technical experts learned of recent research findings pertinent to their 
industry. 



- 63 - 

IX. CONTROL PROGRAMS 

A. PULLORLT/i DISEASE ERADICATION 

In the 1968-69 testing season, 247 chicken, turkey, and game bird flocks 
were tested representing 375,955 samples. No pullorum or fowl typhoid in- 
fection was found among the commercial breeding flocks tested. Pullorum 
infection was detected in tv70 fancier flocks and eliminated by retesting. 

Paratyphoid infection v;as detected in seven chicken flocks tested for 
pullorum disease, Salm.o n ella typhimurium v;as isolated from three flocks, 
Salmonella enteritidis from two flocks. Salmonella Heidelberg and 
Salm.onella muenchen from one flock each. 

B. MYC0PLAS]MAGALLISEPTICU1-1 TESTING 

A total of 442,172 tests for Mycoplasma gallisepticum v/as conducted during 
the 1968-69 testing season. Forty-nine chicken breeder flocks, 301,690 
adult birds, were tested in toto and were found free of Mycoplasm.a 
gallisepticum . The m.ajority of these flocks originated from seven differ- 
ent strains of egg or meat birds. Thirty-five of these flocks v^ere 
monitored on a five percent basis one or more times at 30-90 day intervals 
and no Mycoplasma gallisepticum reactors were detected in 52,595 birds 
tested. Five turkey flocks (4,716 birds) and four pheasant flocks 
(7,680 birds) were the total tested and found free of Mycoplasma gallisepti cum . 
A total of 75,491 random tests was conducted on day-old-chicks, growing 
birds, and mature chickens of which 8,070 were positive. 

C. MASTITIS TESTING 

The major emphasis of the Mastitis Laboratory is directed toward the eradi- 
cation of Streptococcus agalactiae mastitis. Enrolled herds are intensively 
retested until declared free of this infection. Thereafter, these herds 
are retested semi-annually to monitor their status. A secondary em.phasis 
is placed on culturing milk samples from problem cows to identify the 
mastitis pathogens present. 

During 1969, 41 hards were initially tested, 27 of which were found to 
contain Streptococcus agalactiae positive cows (66%). 

A total of 20 herds containing 1,180 cattle was declared free of this dis- 
ease during the year. The mean herd size V7as 59 cows and an average of 
14.7 head were initially found infected (257o). 

Semi-annual testing in 301 herds showed that 16 had become reinfected 
(5.37o). In the majority of these cases infected replacement animals had 
not been tested prior to entering the milking line. 

Diagnostic testing was performed in 139 herds involving 949 head at the 
request of veterinary practitioners, local health boards, or dairymen. 



- 64 - 

Although Streptococcus agalactiae remained the most coii:mon pathogen 
isolated, streptococci other than Streptococcus agalactiae , staphylococci, 
conforms, Kocardia, _C. pyogenes, and yeasts were problem, organism.s. 

Testing totals included 1,125 herds, 34,297 cattle, and 140,073 milk 
samples. 

D. REGUIATORY SERVICES (FEED, FERTILIZER, DAIRY LAWS, AND SEED LABORATORY) 

Activity includes the investigation of the quality of feeds, fertilizers,' 
and seeds sold in the state; toxicological tests on viscera of animals 
suspected of being poisoned; tests for pesticide residues on animal and ■ 
plant tissues, soil and milk tests; germination and identification of 
seeds; and analytical services performed for other college departments 
in connection with research. 

The Seed Laboratory tested 2,174 samples of seed during the year of which 
964 V7ere official samples and 1,210 service and research samples. Staff 
members, also, assisted in promulgating new amendments to the Massachusetts 
Seed Act, and cooperated v;ith professional society research and referee 
projects in seed testing. 

Dr. William N. Rice taught a three-credit course in plant pathology, 
other staff taught 121 students (a unit in seed technology involving six 
lecture and demonstrations), and a three-day short course V7as given for 
market inspectors to help upgrade the Seed Inspection Program.. 

E. SHADE TREE LABORATORIES 

A second year computer program again was used to produce the annual re- 
port on tree diagnoses other than Dutch elm disease. More than 14,000 
diagnoses were siommarized. Progress was noted in tree disease control 
with a planting of 280 trees of 70 different species at the shade tree 
experimental nursery. Horticultural Research Center, Belchertovm, 
Massachusetts. Research stock in nurseries at Amherst and Belchertovm 
now totals 11,000 trees. 

The Shade Tree Laboratories do not conduct routine testing services as 
all studies are research-oriented. Outreach to the general public and 
industry is typified by the applied research program.s with 351 cities and 
to\7ns in the Commonv/ealth, state departments, and public tree officials 
on both municipal and state levels. These individuals and agencies seek 
scientific conference and counsel from Laboratory scientists. Related 
requests, other than Dutch elm disease, and studies totaled 1,569 in 1969. 

F. DIAGNOSTIC LABORATORIES 

The College of Agriculture provides veterinary diagnostic services at 

Waltham through the Department of Environmental Sciences, and at Amherst 

through the Department of Veterinary and /jiimal Sciences. Most of the 

poultry diagnostic work is performed by the Departm.ent of Environmental 

Sciences at Waltham. Poultry and large animal diagnostic services, as 



- 65 - 

well as Control Programs are conducted by the Department of Veterinary and 
Animal Sciences at Amherst. A detailed report of diagnostic and control 
work is available upon request. 

Summary 

1. Diagnostic 

During the calendar year January 1, 1969 through December 31, 1969, 
a total of 6,630 avian and mammalian specimens in 1,146 consignments 
was submitted for laboratory examination. Specimens submitted were 
as follows: 



Avian 




Amherst 


Waltham 


Chicken 




1,592 


3,788 


Turkey 




56 


187 


Pheasant 




1 


59 


Duck 




11 


32 


Pigeon 




- 


48 


Miscellaneous 


(13 species) 


20 


68 



1,680 4,182 



Mammalian 














Cattle 










295 




Sheep 










18 




Swine 










165 




Goats 










4 




Horses 










91 




Dogs 










125 




Cats 










10 




Miscellaneous 


(11 


spec: 


ies) 


— 


46 
754 


14 
14 


TOTALS 








2 


,434 


4,196 



2. Control Services (Samples Tested) 

Pullorum Disease 375,995 

Mastitis Control Service 140,073 

Mycoplasma gallisepticum Testing 442,172 2,703 

TOTALS 958,240 2,703 



- 66 - 

X. MAJOR ACCOMPLISHMENTS 

A. COURSE EVALUATION 

The Student Course Evaluation Program initiated in September on a College- 
wide basis elicited a response of 65% of the teaching faculty v7ho partici- 
pated voluntarily. Ninety courses were evaluated by 2,500 students. 

Computerized data provided each instructor with an analysis of his teach- 
ing performance along with comparisons on a department and College basis. 
■The instructor then used this information on his teaching effectiveness 
to improve and strengthen his course offerings. 

A committee of students, faculty, and administrators v7orked through 
Alpha Zeta, honorary agricultural fraternity; STOSO, Stockbridge Service 
Organization; and the College Educational Policies Committee to develop 
the program. 

The student strike in May disrupted the planned spring evaluation' but the 
evaluation will continue to be offered until such time as a University- 
wide program becomes effective. 

B. STUDENT- FACULTY COMI-IITTEES 

The College's 11 academic departments all have joint student-faculty 
committees ranging from curriculum and grading policy to departmental 
programs and general academic affairs. (Page 21, Student-Faculty Inter- 
action) 

A total of nearly 40 joint committees exist within the College including 
14 new committees added during the past year. 

These student-faculty committees, augmented by the Student Course Evalu- 
ation Program provided impetus for extensive curriculum improvements and 
new courses and/or modifications. 

Fourteen new courses were approved during the year along with two major 
course modifications. (Page 23, New Courses, Seminars and Colloquia) 

C. Malawi Undergraduates 

B.S. Degrees were awarded to the last four of nine Malawi students en- 
rolled in the agricultural sciences program. Graduates were Edward Malenga, 
Khindon Masangano, and Vincent Saka. Martin S. Mughogho completed re- 
quirements for his B.S. degree in January and during the spring semester 
attended Cornell University Graduate School. Ke earned 13 credits toward 
the Master's Degree and has returned to Bunda College, University of 
Malawi, as a junior lecturer in soil science and assistant farm manager. 

Mr. Malenga and Mr. Masangano have not yet been assigned positions in the 
Malawi Ministry of Agriculture. Mr. Saka will spend three months as a 



- 67 - 

laboratory apprentice at the Cranberry Station, East Wareham, Massacliusetts, 
specializing in the field of nematology. 

Peter Makharabera, Class of '68, a junior lecturer in animal science at 
Bunda College, has been awarded an African/American Institute Scholarship 
for graduate study in the physiology of reproduction this fall at the 
University of Minnesota. 

D. AQUACULTURAL ENGINEERING LABORATORY 

An Aquacultural Engineering Laboratory of the Massachusetts Agricultural 
Experiment Station was established in November 1969 for marine food re- ■ 
search aimed at developing new sources of food. Dr. John W. Zahradnik, 
Department of Agricultural Engineering, was designated principal scientist. 

The initial project of the Laboratory is a cooperative shellfish manage- 
ment effort with the Towns of Marion and Mattapoisett , and the Massachusetts 
Division of Fisheries, funded by the two to^^ms and the University. 

Potential oyster spavming, setting and growth areas will be identified in 
the waters of the two towns, and the growth characteristics of oysters 
evaluated in an attempt .to select the best strains for propagation by man. 
Water quality in the two areas under study also will be monitored. 

E. FOOD RADIATION FACILITY 

Three years of effort and negotiation by the Departments of Food Science 
and Technology and Agricultural Engineering reached a climax in May with 
the establishment of a Food Radiation Facility. 

The new Facility is funded by the University and the U. S. Public Health 
Seirvice with matching $25,000 grants for the purchase of a 50,000 curies 
of Cobalt-60 radiation unit, plus funds from the Agricultural Experiment 
Station. The Atomic Energy Commission will provide the Cobalt-60 source 
valued at about $50,000, The Facility will be located in the Agricultural 
Engineering Department laboratory and is scheduled for completion in 
October of this year. 

VJhile the Facility will be used primarily for research and graduate train- 
ing in the radiation of food by the two departments, it also will provide 
an effective research radiation facility for the University community. 

F. GOLD MEDAL AUARD TO PROFESSOR ROBERT E. YOWIG 

The Massachusetts Society for Promoting Agriculture, Boston, Massachusetts, 
in April 1970, presented a gold medal and $1,000 to Professor Robert E. 
Young of the Department of Environmental Sciences (VJaltham) for "his 
contributions to the prosperity of the vegetable industry with his im- 
proved varieties and his efforts to help solve the problems of growers." 

In June, Professor Young also was av7arded a $1,000 Ford Motor Company 
grant for research into squash m.osaic, a virus disorder of economic 



- 68 - 

importance. The award was made in cooperation with the University of 
New Hampshire, which received a similar amount, . 

The V'altham Butternut Squashy developed by Professor Young, received a 
1970 All America Crop Selection Award. 

G. COOPERATIVE EXTENSION NUTRITIONAL EDUCATION 

The expanded Nutrition Program for low-income families in the Commonwealth 
completed a full year of operation follov.'ing its inception in January 
1969. More than 150 nonprofessional teaching assistants are v7orking with 
over 2,000 families. 

Adult units under the supervision of the Extension Division of Home 
Economics now are located in 11 counties and the Boston area. The ob- 
jective of the program is to help disadvantaged homemakers plan, buy, 
and use food more effectively. 

The program has been further expanded with the addition of 4-H programs 
for young people in depressed urban areas. These programs are located in 
five counties and Boston. Over-all, a total of 29 statevjide programs are 
in operation. 

Seven professional home economists manage the new 4-H nutrition programs. 
Forty-eight neighborhood program assistants have been employed and 
trained thus far to serve in the follov7ing areas: Springfield, Greenfield, 
Northampton, VJorcester, Lynn, Boston, and Somerville. 

H. WOOD PRODUCTS TECHNOLOGY OFFICE WITH K£. WACHUSETT COMMUNITY COLLEGE 

A wood products technology office was established at Kt . Wachusett 
Community College, Gardner, Massachusetts, in the summer of 1969, to pro- 
vide technical and advisory services to furniture and other woodworking 
plants in the area. 

Initiation of a tv70-year degree program in wood products technology at 
Mt. VJachusett is another phase of the new office. 

Tv70 seminars were conducted for representatives of wood-using companies, 
one on "Techniques to Improve Lumber Yield in the Plant," and the other 
on "Furniture Factories of the Next Decade." 

The office was established through the efforts of the wood science and 
technology staff of the Department of Forestry and Wildlife Management, 
Mt. Wachusett Community College, and the woodworking industry. The 
Commonwealth Technical Resources Service (COMTECH) provided financial 
support. Technical assistance for the work with industry and the two-year 
course is being provided by the Cooperative Extension Service. 

I. TECHNICAL GUIDANCE CEOTER FOR ENVIRONTSENTAL CONTROL 

The Center, initiated in the Department of Environmental Sciences (Amherst) 
early in 1569, is rapidly establishing itself as a major information 



- 69 - 

source on pollution control and environmental quality for industry and 
municipalities in the Commonv7ealth. 

Activities of the Center during the year included the assembly of a di- 
rectory of engineering and consulting firms specializing in pollution 
control; the sponsorship of v7orkshops in cross-connection control and 
solid waste disposal, and the publication of the proceedings; and the 
publication of a m.onthly newsletter. 

Tlie Center, established as a clearing house of information on soil-v7ater- 
air pollution and environmental quality control, is supported by a grant 
from the Comnonwealth Technical Resources Service (CO>riEGH). 



AAS:MRE 
8/18/70 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



1969-1970 



of M4^ 







UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS AT AMHERST 



UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 
College of Arts and Sciences 



ANNUAL REPORT 
Period Covered: July 1, 1969 through June 30, 1970 
Submitted to: Chancellor Oswald Tippo 



Submitted by; 





Shapiro, Acting Dean 
of Arts and Sciences 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

Page 

I. BUDGET 1 

A. Budget Allocations (1) 

B. Funds Encumbered, Fiscal Years 1967-1970 (2) 

II. ORGANIZATIONAL CHARTS 5 

A. Departments and Administrative Units by Division (5) 

B. Degrees, Majors and Other Programs of Study (6) 

III. PERSONNEL 9 

A. Professional (9) 

1. Administration, Faculty and 

Other Professional Personnel (9) 

2. Appointments to the Rank of Professor Emeritus (11) 

3. Faculty Salaries (12) 

B. Non-professional Personnel (12) 

IV. STUDENTS 15 

A. Enrollment, Teaching Loads (15) 

B. Majors (17) 

C. Degrees Awarded (17) 

D. C.A.S.I.A.C. (17) 

E. Cumulative Averages within the College (19) 

V. FACULTY 21 

A. Publications (21) 

B. Sponsored Research and Service Projects (21) 

C. Other Professional Activities of the Faculty (21) 

VI. MAJOR ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND SPECIAL PROGRAMS 23 

A. Honors Program (23) 

B. Foreign Language Review Board (23) 

C. Report of the Curriculum Committee (24) 

D. Report of the Academic Honesty Committee (24) 



APPENDIX A 



Table Page 

1 Professional Positions (FTE) Filled by Rank A- 1 

2 Number of Faculty Positions (FTE) Filled by Division, 

Department, and Rank: Fall Semester A- 2 

3 Professional Personnel Actions A- 4 

4 Salary Ranges of Arts and Sciences Faculty by 

Rank and Year (1963-1970) A- 5 

5 Faculty Salaries (February, 1970) College of Arts 

and Sciences , Distribution by Ranks A- 6 

6 Non-professional Positions by Rank (Fall of 

each indicated year) A- 7 

7 Faculty Positions and Secretarial Positions - 

(FTE Basis), 1969-70 A- 8 

8 Ratios of Faculty Positions to Secretarial Positions and 

to Technical Positions (1) (Fall of each indicated year). ... A- 9 

9 Comparative Enrollments (Head Count) at the University of 

Massachusetts, Amherst by Classes and by Colleges 

(September of each year) A-10 

10 Comparative Enrollments in Percentages at the University 

of Massachusetts, Amherst by Classes and by Colleges 

(September of each year) A-11 

11 Teaching Load Summary, (Fall Semester 1969) A-12 

12 Student Credit Hours, Fall 1964-1969 A-13 

13 FTE Students by Department and Division (Fall Semester) A-14 

14 Student-to-Faculty Ratios (September 1969) with and 

without Teaching Assistants A-15 

15 Student Majors (Head Count) by Department and 

Division (Fall Semester) A-16 

16 Upperclass Majors by Department and 

Division (Spring Semester) A-17 

17 Degrees Awarded A-18 

17-A Percent of Students in College of Arts and Sciences with 
Cumulative Averages Equal to or Exceeding Selected 
Levels, by Class, as of February 1970 A-19 

18 Books and Monographs, by Department and Division (1969-1970) . . A-20 

19 Payroll from Research and Training Grants and Contracts 

(Fiscal Years 1969 and 1970) A-25 

20 Selected Professional Activities of the Faculty A-26 



APPENDIX B 

Page 

NEW FACULTY APPOINTMENTS FOR 1970-71 B- 1 

Humanities and Fine Arts (B-1) 
Social and Behavioral Sciences (B-10) 
Natural Sciences and Mathematics (B-18) 



I. BUDGET 



BUDGET ALLOCATIONS 



Account numbers ; 



FY 1968 FY 1969 FY 19 70 



03 - Salaries, other $ 168,000 $ 211,113 $ 251,000 

10 - Travel 37,000 42,000 42,000 

12 - Repairs and maintenance 40,000 41,787 43,000 

13 - Supplies 238,000 265,000 245,000 

14 - Postage, telephones and 

memberships 99,000 119,300 104,300 

15 - Equipment 187,000 210,000 19 3,020 

16 - Rentals 20,000 25,000 25,000 

Total 789 ,000 914,200 903.320 
Salaries: 

Accounts 01, 02 7,895,140 9,001,698 11,376,371 

Account 03 30 , 159 23,434 22,027 

Grand Total'' $8,714,299 $9,939,332 $12,301,718 



Notes ; 

(1) Figures do not include faculty salaries paid from account 03. 

(2) No allocations are made to the College or to individual departments for the 

purchase of books. 



B. FUNDS ENCUMBERED, FISCAL YEARS 1967 - 19 70 

The total funds reported by the Treasurer's Office to have been encumbered by direct 
payment or transfer in each of the several accounts during each of the past four 
years is presented in the table below. Also indicated is the "dollars per student 
credit hours (SCH)" and, for accounts 10, 14 and 14-1 the "dollors per full-time 
equivalent faculty position". Positions in the Dean's Office have been included in 
the total of faculty positions. Finally, the total encumbered for supplies, equip- 
ment, etc. (accounts 10-16) is presented as a percent of salaries and other payments 
to individuals (accounts 01, 02 and 03). 



Student credit hours 
(SCH) 

Faculty positions 




FY 1967 

138,692 
533 




FY 1968 

152,731 
606 




FY 1969 

164,288 
668 




FY 1970 

173,587 
735 




$6 






FUNDS ENCUMBERED 






Salaries : 

01 +02+03 Fac. 

Other 03 


FY 1967 

,456,621 

169,800 

1.22/SCH 


$7 


FY 1968 

,925,299 

161,169 

1.02/SCH 


$9 


FY 1969 

,025,132 

211,113 

1.29/SCH 


$11 


FY 1970 

,398,398 

252,085 

1.45/SCH 


Total 01, 02 and 03 


$6 


,626,421 


$8 


,086,468 


$9 


,236,245 


$11 


,650,483 


Other accounts : 
10 - Travel 


$ 


33,500 
0.24/SCH 
62.42/Fac. 


$ 


38,517 
0.25/SCH 
63.04/Fac. 


$ 


42,126 
0.26/SCH 
63.06/Fac. 


$ 


43,496 
0.25/SCH 
59.18/Fac. 


12 - Repairs and 
Maintenance 




38,210 
0.28/SCH 




43,031 
0.28/SCH 




44,886 
0.27/SCH 




44,109 
0.25/SCH 


13 - Supplies 




203,990 

1.47/SCH 




241,495 

1.58/SCH 




273,342 

1.66/SCH 




248,237 

1.43/SCH 


14 - Postage, 

Memberships 




22,100 
0.16/SCH 
41.08/Fac. 




27,370 
0.18/SCH 
44.79/Fac. 




22,987 
0.14/SCH 
34.41/Fac. 




18,573 
0.11/SCH 
25.27/Fac. 


14-1 - Telephone 




59,940 

0.43/SCH 
111.41/Fac. 




81,659 

0.53/SCH 
134.75/Fac. 




99,171 

0.60/SCH 
148.46/Fac. 




121,691 

0.70/SCH 
165.57/Fac. 


15 - Equipment 




243,020 

1.75/SCH 




188,236 

1.23/SCH 




210,294 

1.28/SCH 




193,698 

1.12/SCH 


16 - Rentals 




18,450 
0.13/SCH 




21,975 
0.14/SCH 




24,672 
0.15/SCH 




23,652 

0.14/SCH 



Total, accounts 10-16 

Accounts 10-16 $ 619,300 

4.47/SCH 



$ 642,283 $ 717,448 $ 693,456 
4.21/SCH 4.36/SCH 3.99/SCH 



Accts . 
10-16 



Salaries 
01, 02 & 03 



9.35% 



7.94% 



7.77% 



5.95% 



Inspection of the table on the previous page reveals a continuing increase in 
payments in Accounts 01, 02 and 03 which include funds for the salaries of both 
the professional and non-professional staff, compensation for student and other 
hourly labor, honoraria to guest speakers, etc. The increase reflects both the 
increase in the size of the staff and the effects of inflation. 

Expenditures in Accounts 10-16 provide the "things" which are required for 
teaching and research. The total sum encumbered in these accounts during the 
fiscal year is $24,000 less than in the previous year. Indeed, purchases of 
supplies and equipment were reduced approximately $46,000 while the cost of 
telephone service increased $22,000. Total encumbrances in these accounts 
amounted to only $3.99 per student credit hour as compared to $4.47 four years 
ago. That our ability to supply the "things" required for teaching and research 
has not kept pace with our growth and the effects of inflation is further em- 
phasized by the significant reduction in the ratio of expenditures in Accounts 
10 through 16 as compared to those in Accounts 01, 02 and 03. 



II. ORGANIZATIONAL CHARTS 



DEPARTMENTS AND ADMINISTRATIVE UNITS BY DIVISIONS 



DEAN'S OFFICE 



FINE ARTS AND HUMANITIES 

Afro-American Studies 

Art 

Comparative Literature (1) 

English 

French, Italian and Classics 

Germanic Languages 

History 

Music 

Philosophy 

Slavic Languages 

Spanish 



SOCIAL AND 
BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES 

Anthropology 
Asian Studies (1) 
Economics 
Government (2) 
Linguistics (1) 
Psychology 
Sociology 
Speech 



NATURAL 
SCIENCES AND MATHEMATICS 

Biochemistry 

Botany 

Chemistry 

Geology /Geography 

Mathematics /Statistics 

Microbiology 

Physics /Astronomy (3) 

Zoology 



AAA:*:**** 



Notes : 

(1) Linguistics, Comparative Literature and Asian Studies operate as separate 

units without departmental status. 

(2) The Bureau of Government Research is a part of the Government Department. 

(3) The Astronomy Program has a chairman who is also chairman of the Five-College 

Department. 



DEGREES, MAJORS MP OTHER PROGRAMS OF STUDY 
Majors for Bachelor of Arts Degree : 



Anthropology 

Art 

Astronomy (1) 

Biochemistry 

Botany 

Chemistry 

Classics 

Economics 

English 

French 

Geography 



Geology 

German 

Government 

History 

Italian 

Journalistic Studies 

Mathematics 

Microbiology 

Music 

Philosophy 

Physics 



Pre-Dental Studies 

Pre-Medical Studies 

Pre-Veterinary Studies 

Psychology 

Russian 

Sociology 

Spanish 

Speech 

Zoology 



Majors for Bachelor of Science Degree : 



Astronomy (1) 

Biochemistry 

Botany 

Chemistry 

Geology 



Mathematics 
Microbiology 
Physics 

Pre-Dental Studies 
Pre-Medical Studies 



Pre-Veterinary Studies 

Psychology 

Zoology 



Majors for Bachelor of Fine Arts : 

Art Education 
Studio Art 



Majors for Bachelor of Music : 
Music 



Programs without a Major : 

Asian Studies 

Chinese 

Comparative Literature 

Danish 

Japanese 



Linguistics 

Polish 

Portuguese 

Statistics 

Swedish 



Majors for Maste r of Art or Master of Science ; 



Anthropology 

Art History 

Biochemistry 

Botany 

Chemistry 

Comparative Literature 

Economics 

English 



French 

Geology 

German 

Government 

History 

Mathematics 

Microbiology 

Philosophy 



Physics 

Psychology 

Russian 

Sociology 

Spanish 

Speech 

Statistics 

Zoology 



Majors for Master of Fine Arts 

Art 

English 

Speech 



Master of Music: 



Music 



Majors for Doctor of Philosophy : 



Anthropology 

Astronomy 

Biochemistry 

Botany 

Chemistry 

Comparative Literature 

Economics 

English 



French 

Geology 

German 

Government 

History 

Linguistics 

Mathematics 

Microbiology 



Philosophy 

Physics 

Psychology 

Sociology 

Spanish 

Zoology 



Note; 



(1) Five-College undergraduate degree program. 



III. PERSONNEL 



A. PROFESSIONAL 

1. Administration, Faculty and Other Professional Personnel . 

Statistical data concerning the professional personnel of the College is presented 
in five tables, as follows: 

TABLE 1: PROFESSIONAL POSITIONS (FTE) FILLED BY RANK (Appendix A) 

TABLE 2: NUMBER OF FACULTY POSITIONS (FTE) FILLED BY DIVISION, 
DEPARTMENT, AND RANK: FALL SEMESTER (Appendix A) 

TABLE 3: PROFESSIONAL PERSONNEL ACTIONS (Appendix A) 

TABLE 4: SALARY RANGES OF ARTS AND SCIENCES FACULTY BY RANK AND YEAR 
(1963-1970) (Appendix A) 

TABLE 5: FACULTY SALARIES (February, 1970) COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES, 
DISTRIBUTION BY RANKS (Appendix A) 

In each of the above tables the numbers refer to full-time equivalent positions 
which are filled as of September of the indicated year. 

The administrative organization and personnel in the Dean's Office remained un- 
changed from that of March, 1969. Both Deans Wagner and McFarland, however, have 
resigned from their administrative posts, effective at the end of the year. 

Associate Dean Wagner has been responsible for most administrative details in 
the College since 1961, gradually delegating some of them to other newly appointed 
deans as the growth of the College dictated. He has served as chairman of the 
building committee for each of the new buildings assigned to the College during 
the past nine years and has been responsible for renovations and the assignment 
of space to departments. Dean Wagner has also been chairman of the College Cur- 
riculum Committee and has devoted considerable time and effort to the academic 
affairs of students. His knowledge, experience and administrative skills shall 
be greatly missed by all administrators in the University and by faculty and 
students in the College as he embarks on a sabbatical leave. 

Assistant Dean McFarland joined the Dean's staff on a half-time basis four years 
ago with particular responsibility for the academic affairs of the class of 1970. 
During the past year he has in fact served very capably as academic dean for most 
upperclassmen in the College. He has also been a member of the College Curriculum 
Committee and has contributed a great deal in discussions of a wide variety of 
other academic problems. Professor McFarland will return to full-time teaching 
and research in the Department of History. 

The number of faculty positions in the College very nearly doubled between 
September 1964 and 1969. During this interval the College has been strengthening 
its graduate programs by the recruitment of new faculty with the capability of 
directing doctoral theses. This action is largely responsible for the marked 
reduction in the percent of instructors and lecturers and the relative increase 
in the next two higher ranks over this six-year Interval. 



10 



Sept. 
of 


Instructors & 
Lecturers 




Assistant 
Professors 


Associate 
Professors 


Professors 


Total 
Faculty 




# 


% 




// 


% 


// 


% 


# 


% 




1964 


92.3 


25.0 




131.0 


35.5 


64.0 


17.3 


82.0 


22.2 


369.5 


1965 


100.8 


22.2 




175.2 


38.8 


82.0 


18.3 


93.5 


20.7 


451.5 


1966 


108.0 


20.3 




213.5 


40.1 


94.0 


17.7 


117.0 


22.0 


532.5 


1967 


119.7 


19.7 




238.3 


39.3 


125.0 


20.6 


123.0 


20.3 


606.0 


1968 


111.0 


16.6 




272.3 


40.8 


141.7 


21.2 


141.7 


21.2 


668.0 


1969 


105.0 


14.3 




279.0 


38.0 


179.7 


24.5 


170.8 


23.2 


734.5 



The distribution of faculty positions among the three divisions of the College has 
shifted slightly from the natural sciences and mathematics to the social and 
behavioral sciences. Six years ago approximately 36% of the positions were in 
the natural sciences and mathematics as compared to 33% last fall. Comparable 
values for the social and behavioral sciences are 22% and 25%. The number of 
positions in the fine arts and humanities has remained very close to 42% of the 
total each of the past six or more years. The change in distribution of positions 
probably reflects both a limitation on space for additional faculty in some of the 
science departments and a response to the increasing demands of students for 
courses in the social and behavioral sciences. 

Three named professorial chairs were approved during the year. The V. 0. Key 
Professorship of Government was occupied by Professor William C. Havard who 
resigned at the end of the academic year to become Dean of Arts and Sciences at 
Virginia Polytechnic Institute. The Joseph B. Ely Professorship of Government 
will be occupied by Dr. John W. Lederle, who resigned as President of the 
University at the end of the present year. The Ray Ethan Torrey Professorship 
of Botany will be occupied by Dr. Albert C. Smith who will join our faculty in 
the fall. Professor Smith, a member of the National Academy of Sciences, is 
widely known for his research on the systematics of higher plants and evolutionary 
biology. 

Three new non-teaching, professional positions, namely staff assistants, were 
added this year. The distribution according to departments of the thirteen 
positions of this kind was as follows: 



Staff Associates 
Staff Assistants 



Botany and Physics. 

Botany, Chemistry, Dean's Office, Geology, Govern- 
ment (Bureau of Government Research) , Language 
Laboratory, Mathematics, Psychology, Sociology, and 
Zoology. 



Professional Technician - Psychology. 



The allocation of additional non-teaching professional positions would provide 
the heads of other of the larger departments with more time for concentration 
on academic affairs as well as their own teaching and research and provide more 
significant recognition and reward for the best of our non-professional staff. 



11 



Teaching assistants numbered 545, an increase of 73 over the year before, with 
the average stipend set at $3,000. Provost 03 allocation for support of teach- 
ing assistants provided the salary of 384 of the T.A.'s. The total number of 
teaching assistantships in September, 1969 was equivalent to 74 percent of the 
number of faculty positions; the percentages for 1967 and 1968 were 67 and 71, 
respectively. 

Post-doctoral research associates numbered 31. They are supported on grant 
funds, but their contribution to the scholarly activities in the six departments 
in which they worked is significant. 

Professional personnel actions, summarized in Table 3, are more numerous each 
year because of the growth of the faculty. No further explanation of the data 
is required. 

It is with deep regret that I must note the death of three members of the pro- 
fessional staff during the year. Dr. Joe W. Swanson, Professor of Philosophy, 
joined our faculty in 1958. He maintained an active program of research with 
a number of publications, though he will be remembered particularly as an un- 
usually effective teacher. His teaching of symbolic logic and the philosophy 
of science brought wide acclaim, and his guidance of upperclassmen and graduate 
students in the individual study of particular problems was recognized to be 
outstanding. 

Mr. James Butler, Staff Assistant in the Department of Romance Languages, was 
responsible in large measure for both the design and operation of the language 
laboratories. His technical skill and sensitivity to the requirements of an 
effective teaching laboratory contributed greatly to the successful teaching 
of introductory courses in foreign language. 

Mr. Vincent F. McCormack joined our faculty as Instructor, Department of Mathe- 
matics, this fall. The enthusiastic endorsement of the department for his re- 
appointment testified of their sense of loss after only one year as a member of 
their faculty. 

2. Appointments to the Rank of Professor Emeritus . 

Three members of the faculty retired at the end of the academic year and were 
appointed Professor Emeritus. 

Professor Stowell C. Coding joined the University faculty in 1927 and was former 
Chairman of the Romance Language Department. Dr. Coding has for several years 
been director of the Summer Institute for Advanced Study for Secondary School 
French Teachers in Arcachon, France, sponsored by the University and supported 
by the U. S. Office of Education. He is a former president of the New England 
Modern Language Association. Dr. Coding has twice been decorated by the French 
government, an honor awarded for "eminent merit as professor of French languages 
and Literature in American colleges and universities." His contribution to the 
College and University is widely recognized and gratefully acknowledged. 

Professor Frederick C. Ellert began to teach at the University in 1930. From 
1951 to 1965 he served as Head of the Cerman Department which he helped develop 
and bring to prominence. He gave much thought and care to improving language 



12 



instruction and actively explored new teaching methods. During his tenure the 
Department received a grant from the Carnegie Foundation to support these efforts. 
He also initiated the University's first foreign study program in Freiburg, 
Germany; a notable experiment in international education and cultural exchange. 
In his long career Dr. Ellert brought special gifts to the teaching of language 
and poetry. Many students have benefited from his careful instruction and help- 
ful counsel, in and out of the classroom. Professor Ellert served the University 
on many important committees and spoke effectively for the humanities. As a 
co-founder and first editor of the Massachusetts Review he made a creative con- 
tribution and brought wide recognition to the University. A scholarship is being 
endowed in his name to honor his services to liberal education. 

Professor Theodore C. Caldwell, who specializes in English history, was first 
appointed to the University faculty in 19 35. In addition to his academic duties. 
Professor Caldwell was a faculty fellow for the Southwest Residential College 
and a member of the History Department Executive Committee. He also served on 
such University committees as University Affairs and the College of Arts and 
Sciences Curriculum Study Committee. Professor Caldwell is the author of "The 

Anglo-Boer War Why Was It Fought?", which was published by D. C. Heath of 

Boston as part of the "Problems in European Civilization" series. 

An endowment fund was created in honor of Professor Caldwell, the income from 
which will be used for books for the Library, awards to deserving students, 
research in history and books for the History Department library. 

3. Faculty Salaries . 

The maximum, median, and minimum salary at each rank each year from 1963-1964 to 
the present is recorded in Table 4 . The distribution of particular salaries as 
of February 1, 1970 is shown graphically in Table 5 . 

The median salary of professors, exclusive of fringe benefits, is only 3 percent 
less than the amount required for an "A" rating on the AAUP scale for total com- 
pensation. The median salaries at the lower ranks are very close to "AA" level 
of total compensation. The minimum salary, at each rank, if the lowest 2 percent 
are excluded, is equivalent to slightly less than that required for an "AA" rating 
for total compensation. The difference ranges from a high of 7.4 percent of salary 
at the rank of professor to a low of 2.1 percent of salary for instructors; fringe 
benefits surely make-up these differences. In summary then, we must continue to 
work toward improved salaries at the rank of professor and to maintain our position 
in respect to salaries at the other ranks. 

B. NON-PROFESSIONAL PERSONNEL . 

Statistical data concerning the non-professional personnel of the College is pre- 
sented in three tables, as follows: 

TABLE 6: NON-PROFESSIONAL POSITIONS BY RANK (Fall of each indicated year) 
(Appendix A) 

TABLE 7: FACULTY POSITIONS AND SECRETARIAL POSITIONS - (FTE BASIS), 
1969-70 (Appendix A) 

TABLE 8: RATIOS OF FACULTY POSITIONS TO SECRETARIAL POSITIONS AND TO 

TECHNICAL POSITIONS (Fall of each indicated year) (Appendix A) 



13 



Although most members of the non-professional staff are worthy of high praise, 
the emphasis here must again be on the inadequate number of clerical and tech- 
nical positions assigned to the College. Eight new clerical positions were 
added this year, including two "Head Clerks", the first positions at this grade 
in the College, yet this number of new positions simply maintained the 8:1 
faculty-secretarial ratio. Five new technical positions reduced the ratio of 
faculty to technical positions from a value of 15.2 last year to 14.9 this year, 
but these values were 12.7 and 13.5 in the fall of 1966 and 1967 respectively. 

Members of the faculty could devote more time to their students if they were 

freed from many of the secretarial and technical chores now forced upon them. 

One secretary for each five faculty positions is still the goal of the College 
for the near future. 



15 



IV. STUDENTS 



Both undergraduate and graduate programs are of concern to the College. This 
section of the report pertains primarily to the undergraduates, however, be- 
cause of their close association with the College as a whole; graduate students 
are generally quite closely associated with their particular departments. 

A. ENROLLMENT, TEACHING LOADS . 

Statistical data is presented in the following tables: 

TABLE 9: COMPARATIVE ENROLLMENTS (HEAD COUNT) AT THE UNIVERSITY OF 
MASSACHUSETTS, AMHERST BY CLASSES AND BY COLLEGES 
(September of each year) (Appendix A) 

TABLE 10: COMPARATIVE ENROLLMENTS IN PERCENTAGES AT THE UNIVERSITY OF 
MASSACHUSETTS, AMHERST BY CLASSES AND BY COLLEGES 
(September of each year) (Appendix A) 

TABLE 11: TEACHING LOAD SUMMARY, (Fall Semester 1969) (Appendix A) 

TABLE 12: STUDENT CREDIT HOURS, Fall 1964-1969 (Graphic Presentation) 
(Appendix A) 

TABLE 13: FTE STUDENTS BY DEPARTMENT AND DIVISION (Fall Semester) 
(Appendix A) 

TABLE 14: STUDENT-TO- FACULTY RATIOS (September 1969) WITH AND WITHOUT 
TEACHING ASSISTANTS (Appendix A) 

Total University enrollment increased by 2,335 students over the year before. 
Nearly two-thirds of this number were in the College of Arts and Sciences, i.e., 
1,234 undergraduates and 260 graduate students ( See Table 9 ) . Changes in the 
distribution of students according to class and school or college affiliation 
are most easily discerned by reference to Table 10 in which enrollments are pre- 
sented in percentages. Whereas the University as a whole continued its announced 
policy of more rapid growth of the graduate than the undergraduate schools, this 
was not true of the College. The reason for the relatively lesser growth of 
graduate enrollments in the College is uncertain; it is to be hoped that there 
will be a reversal of this situation in the year ahead. 

In the fall semester, 1969, the College provided 173,869 student credit hours 
of instruction in 2,603 sections of 815 courses ( Table 11 ) . Student contact 
hours (198,654) exceed credit hours by 14.3%; this is a rough measure of the 
laboratory work which is a part of some courses. The number of students who 
undertake "Special Problems" and "Senior Honors" (SP,H) is still small (331) 
though it is 50% greater than a year ago and three times the number in September 
1967. The number of graduate dissertations in progress is also recorded in 
Table 11 . In the fall of 1967 it was reported that 260 Ph.D. theses were in 
progress; their number last fall was 317. It is suspected that the report of 
402 in 1968 may have been in error and there has been continuing growth of the 
graduate program at the doctoral level. 



16 



The extent to which each department has participated in the ever- increasing 
teaching load is illustrated graphically for the years 1964 to date in Tab le 12 . 
Because the data is presented on a logarithmic scale, the slope of each line is 
proportional to the rate of increase in student credit hours of instruction; 
lines for 8%, 10% and 12% increase per year are drawn for purposes of comparison. 
It is apparent that the greatest increase relative to load in 1964 has been in 
the fine arts and the social sciences, though enrollment in courses in Govern- 
ment have not increased markedly. The student credit hours of instruction in 
each of the foreign languages has increased, though the effect of the change in 
the requirements of the College in this area is apparent. Similarly, enrollment 
in courses in most of the natural sciences were reduced last year reflecting, 
no doubt, the reduction of liberalization of the math-science requirements of 
the College, though the increase since 1964 is still considerable. 

Much of the instruction provided by the College is in the nature of a service 
to students with majors in other divisions of the University. It is, therefore, 
of interest to calculate the number of full-time equivalent (FTE) students en- 
rolled in our courses. Fifteen undergraduate student credit hours are calculated 
to be equivalent to one FTE student; data on FTE graduate students are provided 
by the graduate school. The data, summarized in Table 13 , indicate a 3% increase 
in September, 1969 over the year before in the total number of FTE students. 
There was a 6% increase in 1968 over 1967. Most of the increase is in the social 
and behavioral sciences though there were marked variations between departments 
in each of the divisions of the College. The ratio of FTE students to majors 
has been very close to 1.4 for each of the past three or more years, but is has 
been reduced to little more than 1.2 this year. Apparently a greater number of 
our students than heretofore carried reduced loads or took more courses outside 
the College, or the enrollment of students from other schools in our courses was 
less than in previous years . 

Student/faculty ratios , based upon full-time equivalent students and faculty 
positions, are presented in two forms in Table 14 . The calculation is first 
made using only faculty positions and then with teaching assistants counted as 
sharing the load. The teaching assistant equivalent is an approximation obtained 
by the rule that three teaching assistantships are equivalent to one FTE faculty 
position and that an assistantship results from the sum of money ($3,000) avail- 
able as an average stipend. 

Both my predecessor and I have indicated our conviction that the student/faculty 
ratio must be reduced rapidly to 15:1 if the undergraduate is to receive more 
individual attention and the graduate program is to develop. Even a 15:1 ratio 
means that the instructor who teaches only undergraduates has an average load 
of 225 student credit hours per semester; with five full-time graduate students 
his undergraduate load is still 150 student credit hours. It is, therefore, 
reassuring to recognize a continuation of the progressive lowering of the ratio 
of students to faculty positions. The ratio for the College as a whole now stands 
at 16.4 as compared to 18.7 during the academic year 1966-67. Considerable varia- 
tions exist between departments, however, and our recruiting efforts this year 
have been directed, in part, toward a reduction of the particularly high ratios 
in Anthropology, Psychology and Sociology. 



17 



B. MAJORS . 

Statistical data is presented in the following tables: 

TABLE 15: STUDENT MAJORS (HEAD COUNT) BY DEPARTMENT AND DIVISION 
(Fall Semester) (Appendix A) 

TABLE 16: UPPERCLASS MAJORS BY DEPARTMENT AND DIVISION (Spring 
Semester) (Appendix A) 

Inspection of the data on undergraduate majors presented in Table 15 reveals a 
significant increase in the social and behavioral sciences, a decrease in the 
natural sciences and mathematics and, perhaps of greatest significance, a very 
great increase in the number of undergraduates, almost exclusively freshmen and 
sophomores, who had not yet selected a major last fall so are listed under 
"CASIAC". A report on the operation of the CASIAC office appears in a sub- 
sequent section of this report. Suffice it to note here that the increase in 
numbers of undergraduates with unspecified majors masks any changes in the 
selection of undergraduate departmental and program majors. 

Changing patterns in the major selected by undergraduates may be detected by 
study of the data in Table 16 which considers only the upperclassmen. (Data is 
based on the spring semester whereas all previous tables present data for the 
fall semester.) During the past year 52% of the upperclassmen had majors in 
one of four departments, namely English (17.98%), History (11.80%), Psychology 
(11.30%) and Sociology (10.90%). This is a consequence of a continuing and 
marked growth in the latter two departments. The absolute number of students 
enrolled in almost every major has increased, but declines of probable signifi- 
cance have occurred in the percent of upperclassmen with majors in the foreign 
languages, government, chemistry, mathematics and pre-medical program. 

The number of graduate students has increased each of the past three years in 
each of the three divisions of the College. The greatest relative increase 
has been in the social sciences, though the absolute increase is very nearly 
the same as that in the fine arts and humanities. Limitations of space probably 
account for the lesser increase in the number of graduate students in the natural 
sciences. 



C. DEGREES AWARDED . 

A summary of the degrees awarded is presented in Table 17 . 

D. C.A.S.I.A.C. - COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES INFORMATION AND ADVISORY CENTER . 

During this second year of full time operation, C.A.S.I.A.C. showed a great in- 
crease in all activities. More students chose the CAS undefined major; requests 
for academic-curricular information and counsel expanded markedly; and summer 
counseling increased many-fold. 

The number of freshmen selecting the CAS undefined major status has increased 
each year since C.A.S.I.A.C. was set up. The magnitude of these trends are 
shown in the following table. 



18 



1971 



Class 
1972 



1973 



Total Arts and Sciences students: 



1,979 



1,865 2,391 



Number of CAS majors: 



Sept. 


'67 


Sept. 


'68 


Sept. 


'69 


June 


'70 



200 
175 



925 

500 1,225 

270 1,050 



These data show the increase, year by year, of freshmen selecting the CAS desig- 
nation. The increase in itself is probably desirable; however, a second trend 
appears that may be less desirable. In the class of 1972, after four semesters 
residence, 270 had not selected a major and repeated efforts encouraging these 
students to select a major gave only limited results. Perhaps among the 270 
hold-overs are many who are hopefully awaiting the often referred to (but not 
yet approved) interdisciplinary major in the College. Whatever the cause, 
continued efforts must be made to assist students in the reasonably early 
selection of a meaningful major. 



The seasonality of our work load still exists because of peak loads during pre- 
registration periods. In the fall, about 1,200 students visited our offices in 
the precounseling period. Many came to gain information about certain options 
that were presented with the passage of the math-science portion of the June 
Proposal; others came for pre-registration advice. In both fall and spring, 
over 50 percent of all CAS students appeared for pre-registration counsel and 
advice. However, many students still do not utilize any advisory service, 
departmental or C.A.S. I.A.C. , and those seeking no counsel whatsoever, are 
most frequently the students who most need this kind of service. 

The operation that expanded most notably during the year and perhaps the one 
that showed the greatest degree of improvement, was the summer pre-registragion 
counseling of freshmen and transfer students. During the summer of 1969, 
C.A.S. I.A.C. had participated in the summer orientation program in an advisory 
capacity only, but this year, we supervised and were responsible for the entire 
academic counseling program. During June and July, we handled about 3,100 
students, including some 250 swingshift freshmen, 2,300 regular freshmen and 
about 550 transfer students. The success of the program was due largely to 
effective counseling by the faculty. Dean Shapiro had made additional funds 
available for increased faculty participation and the faculty came to us gen- 
erally well informed and enthusiastic. Because of the faculty enthusiasm and 
competence, many students who came in with no well defined major were motivated 
to select a major. In consequence, the number of CAS undefined majors will be 
conspicuously lower this year than it was a year ago. Unfortunately, a second 
item may also have contributed to the decline in acceptance of CAS status. 
With the passage of the June Proposal, the College requirements were altered 
and more free electives were allowed for most students. The electives most 
frequently selected were in various fields such as Art and the Social Sciences. 
These factors led to excessive flagging of courses in the various fields and it 
has become obvious that, at times, some students selected a "tentative" major 
merely to assure enrollment into the flagged courses. 



19 



Once again, C.A.S.I.A.C. reports that it will be moving. This time the move is to 
E-22 Machmer Hall. This move is being made to allow for reallocation of space in 
South College when the College reorganization is completed. The location in 
Machmer Hall will still be on a main traffic way; thus, we will be readily avail- 
able for drop-in counseling. 

E. CUMULATIVE AVERAGES WITHIN THE COLLEGE 

Table 17-A depicts the percent of students in the College of Arts and Sciences 
with cumulative averages equal to or exceeding selected levels, by class, as 
of February 1970. 



21 



V . FACULTY 



Information concerning faculty positions and faculty salaries is presented in 
Section III, Personnel and its tables (Appendix A, Tables 1-5). 

A. PUBLICATIONS 

Sixty-eight books and monographs written by members of the faculty were pub- 
lished during the year (Table 18 ). Of these, thirteen were published by the 
presses of eight different universities. 

Several hundred articles in professional journals plus chapters in books, poems, 
and book reviews were also published, and many papers were presented at pro- 
fessional meetings by members of the faculty. Works of art were exhibited and 
concerts presented in this country and abroad by artists on the faculty. 

B. SPONSORED RESEARCH AND SERVICE PROJECTS 

Much of the research accomplished by members of the faculty is greatly facilitated 
by the award of grants for support of particular projects by both outside agencies 
and the University itself. An accurate determination of the number of awards 
and contracts consumated and the annual value of these for the State's fiscal 
year is not readily accomplished. 

Included in Table 19 is a summary from the Treasurer's report of salaries paid 
during the fiscal year from non-State funds, at least 95% of which are reported 
to be funds from research and training grants. The total of these salaries for 
each of the last four years is presented below; the figures demonstrate the 
continuing growth of research support. 



Fiscal Year 


Total Salaries from 
non-State Funds 


1967 
1968 
1969 
1970 


$1,136,715 
1,287,428 
1,489,395 
2,200,737 



C. OTHER PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES OF THE FACULTY 



A complete list of the professional activities of the faculty would be voluminous, 
yet a meaningful summary is nearly impossible because of the diversity of activi- 
ties. Many of the faculty have made significant contributions on the campus to 
their departments, the College and the University through work on a wide variety 
of committees, and through advising students and student groups. Others have 
contributed indirectly through activities associated with professional societies 
and advisory boards of federal support programs. 



22 



Table 20 is a compilation of those professional activities of the faculty which 
involve membership on editorial boards or advisory boards of national organi- 
zations, office in a regional or national professional organization, partici- 
pation in a symposium sponsored by a national agency, or other activity which 
is thought to be of national significance. 



i 



23 



VI. MAJOR ACCOMPLISHMENTS AND SPECIAL PROGRAMS 



A. HONORS PROGRAM 

The College Honors Program, having been approved by the University's Board of 
Trustees in August 1969, began operations the following month, with the begin- 
ning of the academic year. Some 120 students, three-fourths of whom were 
freshmen, were enrolled in the Program as Commonwealth Scholars at that time, 
and eight honors courses were offered. Since then two additional groups of 
students have been added, some 50 students at the beginning of the second 
semester, and some 30 students at the end of the academic year. With some 
attrition, a total of 192 Commonwealth were on campus at the end of the year. 
During the spring semester, eleven honors courses were taught, plus History 153 
(two sections) and Economics 128, both judged by the College Honors Committee 
to have the characteristics of honors courses. 

In April some one hundred high school seniors visited the campus for an intro- 
duction to the Program. Some forty of these, now admitted to the Program, have 
indicated that they will be attending the University in the fall. Most were 
attracted to the University by the opportunities of the Program. An additional 
forty will be selected during the summer counseling, and some transfer students 
as well. For the freshmen, sophomores, and juniors to be enrolled in the Pro- 
gram in the fall, sixteen honors courses will be offered, plus History 152 and 
Economics 127. 

Thus, in the second year of its operation the Honors Program will have reached 
very significant proportions: some 300 students. Although there have been 
many problems to solve, some few of which remain difficulties, the College 
Honors Program seems to be very established. Among the factors responsible for 
this situation, especially worthy of note is the willingness of many Arts and 
Sciences departments to cooperate in the development of honors courses. By 
the end of the academic year 1970-71, the following departments will have sup- 
ported the Program by providing outstanding faculty members for honors courses: 
Anthropology, Art, Asian Studies, Astronomy, Botany, Comparative Literature, 
Economics, English, French, Geology, Geography, German, Government, History, 
Slavic, Sociology, Speech and Zoology. A second significant factor has been 
the willingness of faculty members to serve as preceptors (honors program 
advisers). Third, the College Honors Committee, consisting of Professors 
Herman Cohen, Peter Lillya, Howard Quint, Ellen Reed, and T. 0. Wilkinson, 
has provided valuable assistance and guidance to the chairman of the Program. 

The Program appears to be a success if it is judged by its ability to meet 
the needs of the students it seeks to serve, but the time has not yet arrived 
when it can be adequately evaluated. 



B. FOREIGN LANGUAGE REVIEW BOARD 

The change in the Foreign Language Requirement, which became effective in 
July of 1969, provided for "an approved substitution of language related study 
if there is clearly demonstrated difficulty in language study." 



24 



The implementation of this provision was accomplished by establishing a Foreign 
Language Review Board sponsored jointly the Dean of the College and the 
Foreign Language Instruction Committee. Students submitted petitions for an 
"approved substitution" to this Board, which convened to act on petitions when- 
ever there were enough accumulated to warrent a meeting. The membership of 
the Board varied from meeting to meeting, but always had three language 
teachers and two academic deans; one of the latter acted as chairman. 

During the year there were 24 meetings at which 235 petitions were reviewed. 
Of these 161 were approved for all of the remaining work, 15 were approved for 
part of the remaining work and 59 were denied. However, 9 of the denials led 
to a new petition after more evidence had been gathered and 4 of these second 
petitions were approved. Two of the 5 second denials were re-submitted; one 
was approved and one was denied again. 

In summary, 224 students presented petitions, 181 of them finally had sub- 
stitution approved, and 43 (19 percent) did not. A reasonable estimate of 
the number of students who, by last September, had not completed the foreign 
language requirement is 2,500; using this quess, 9 percent of them sought 
relief and 7 percent got it. 



C. REPORT OF THE CURRICULUM COMMITTEE 

The first project of the Committee during this year was the development of a 
set of temporary College requirements which were quantitatively equivalent to 
the June Proposal, but which could become effective sooner. These interim 
requirements were ratified by the faculty. 

A new major program in Comparative Literature was reviewed and approved by 
the Committee. Both the Art Department and the French section of Romance 
Languages (French, Italian and Classics) proposed major revisions of their 
undergraduate course offerings. 

The Committee also reviewed 120 proposals for new courses and approved 114 of 
them. Included among these approved proposals were 16 changes which amount to 
expanding a semester course into a year course; this process amounts to a 
modification of the semester course and the addition of a new one. In addition 
33 proposals for modification of a course were received, reviewed, and approved. 
Finally, 4 courses were deleted during the year. 



D. REPORT OF THE ACADEMIC HONESTY COMMITTEE 

After nearly two years of deliberation the Committee submitted a report to the 
faculty recommending that a standing committee on Academic Honesty be established 
and used its experience during the two years to recommend procedures for the 
Committee. The faculty adopted both recommendations. 

The Committee also received seven reports of academic dishonesty. Two of 
these resulted in hearings before the Committee because the student presented 
an appeal; the others were handled between the student and the faculty member 
involved. 



APPENDIX 



1 

i 



TABLE 1 



A-1 



PROFESSIONAL POSITIONS (FTE) FILLED BY RANK 



Administration : 

Dean 

Vice-Dean 
Associate Dean 
Assistant Dean 



1967 

1 
1 
1 
2 



1968 

1 
1 
2 
1.5 



1969 

1 
1 
2 
1.5 



Totals 



5.5 



5.5 



Faculty : 

Professors 

Associate Professors 
Assistant Professors 
Instructors 
Lecturers 

Totals 



123 


(20.3%) 


141.7 


(21.2%) 


170.8 


(23.2%) 


125 


(20.6%) 


143 


(21.4%) 


179.7 


(24.4%) 


238.25 


(39.3%) 


272.3 


(40.7%) 


279 


(37.9%) 


10 3 


(17.0%) 


91.4 


(13.6%) 


84 


(11.4%) 


16.75 


( 2.8%) 


19.6 


( 2.9%) 


21 


( 2.8%) 


606 




668 




734.5 





Non-teaching : 

Staff Associates 
Staff Assistants 
Professional Technical 

Totals 



1 
7 

1 



2 
7 

1 



10 



2 
10 

1 



13 



Teaching Assistants 



,a). 



408 



472 



545 



Postdoctoral Research 
Associates (Not on 
State funds) : 



Biochemistry 


3 


Botany 


1 


Chemistry 


7 


Mathematics 


1 


Microbiology 


1 


Physics and Astronomy 


• 4 


Psychology 


- 


Sociology 


1 


Zoology 


8 



Totals 



26 



3 

14 

2 
11 

1 



40 



3 

12 

2 
5 
1 



31 



Note: 

(1) This FTE figure was obtained by dividing the total allocation for T.A. 
the budgeted average stipend. The appropriate amounts were: 

1967— $1,102,350 allocated; average stipend $2,700 
1968— $1,274,400 allocated; average stipend $2,700 
1969— $1,635,000 allocated; average stipend $3,000 



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A-4 



TABLE 3 



PROFESSIONAL PERSONNEL ACTIONS 



Promotions 

Tenure Appointments 

Resignations and Terminations 

Retirements 

Deceased 

Merit Increases 

Sabbatical Leaves taken during 
the academic year 

Leaves of Absence without pay 
taken during the academic year 



1967-68 


196 8-69 


1969-70 


42 


45 


66(1> 


20 


36 


50 


56 


50 


44 


1 


2 


5 


1 


- 


3 


452 


519 


569(2) 



21 



19 



24 



27 



30 



25 



(3) 



(4) 



Notes : 

(1) One effective September 1, 19 70. 

(2) Six effective September 1, 19 70. 

(3) Fourteen full year; 10 first semester; 6 second semester. 

(4) Fifteen full year; 6 first semester; 4 second semester. 



TABLE 4 



A- 5 



SALARY RANGES OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 
FACULTY BY RANK AND YEAR (1963-1970) 



Professors : 

1963-64 
1964-65 
1965-66 
1966-67 
1967-68 
1968-69 
1969-70 



Maximum 


Median 


Minimum 




$18,111 


$13,858 


$12,246 




19,713 


14,900 


13,098 




21,000 


15,288 


11,484 


($12,477) 


24,000 


17,000 


12,200 


( 14,200) 


26,000 


18,000 


14,500 


( 15,000) 


30,000 


19 ,000 


15,500 


( 15,500) 


33,600 


22,000 


17,000 


( 17,500) 



Associate Professors 

1963-64 
1964-65 
1965-66 
1966-67 
196 7-68 
1968-69 
1969-70 



12,719 


10,826 


9,739 






13,858 


11,484 


9,939 






15,574 


11,819 


10,168 






19,600 


13,450 


11,000 


( 


11,500) 


20,500 


14,000 


10,900 


( 


12,000) 


21,000 


14,700 


12,200 


( 


12,300) 


24,300 


16,500 


11,000 


( 


13,000) 



Assistant Professors : 

1963-64 
1964-65 
1965-66 
1966-67 
1967-68 
1968-69 
1969-70 



10,353 


8,795 


7,880 






11,819 


9,253 


7,467 






12,719 


9,596 


7,508 






13,000 


10,800 


7,800 


( 


8,600) 


13,500 


11,000 


8,100 


( 


9,100) 


14,500 


11,400 


8,100 


( 


9,200) 


19,800 


12,800 


9,000 


( 


10,000) 



Instructors : 

1963-64 
1964-65 
1965-66 
1966-67 
1967-68 
1968-69 
1969-70 



8,567 


7,165 


5,820 




8,795 


7,165 


5,964 




9,053 


7,165 


5,964 




10,000 


8,000 


6,400 ( 


6,500) 


11,500 


8,200 


6,400 ( 


6,400) 


11,900 


8,500 


6,400 ( 


6,400) 


13,700 


9,500 


6,400 ( 


7,500) 



Lecturers : 

1966-67 
196 7-68 
1968-69 
1969-70 



10,900 


9,300 


6,500 ( 


6,500) 


14,400 


10,400 


6,400 ( 


6,400) 


12,500 


11,200 


6,400 ( 


6,400) 


18,900 


10,000 


7,000 ( 


7,000) 



Notes : 

1. Computations made in the spring of each academic year. 

2. Figures in parentheses represent minimum salaries if the bottom 2% are 

eliminated. This exclusion is customary in analyses by the A.A.U.P. 



A-6 



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TABLE 6 



A- 7 



NON-PROFESSIONAL POSITIONS BY RANK 
(Fall of each indicated year) 



Grade 

(11) 
(09) 
(07) 
(06) 
(04) 
(03) 



1966 



196 7 



196 8 



1969 



Secretarial : 
Head Clerk 
Principal Clerk 
Senior Clerk Stenographer 
Senior Clerk Typist 
Junior Clerk Stenographer 
Junior Clerk Typist 

Totals 









2 


6 


7 


9 


12 


21 


21 


21 


22 


11 


13 


14 


14 


36 


36 


37 


37 


6 


6 


9 


11 



80 



83 



90 



98 



Non-Secretarial (Technical) : 

(13) Statistician 

(13) Junior Chemist 

(12) Technical Specialist 

(12) Principal Storekeeper 

(11) Machinist Foreman 

(10) Storekeeper 

(10) Electronic Technician 

(10) Senior Technical Assistant 

(10) Machinist 

(10) Carpenter 

(09) Laboratory Technician 

(08) Technical Assistant 

(0 7) Mechanical Handyman 

(0 7) Herbarium Curator 

(05) Animal Room Attendant 

(05) Laboratory Assistant 

(03) Institutional Domestic Aid 



"~ 


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— 


1 


1 


3 


3 


1 
3 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


- 


3 


3 


3 


3 


3 


4 


4 


4 
1 
2 


2 


2 


2 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


- 


1 


16 


17 


17 


20 


1 
1 
1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


9 


9 


9 


8 


1 


1 


1 


1 



Totals 



42 



45 



44 



49 



A- 8 



TABLE 7 

FACULTY POSITIONS AND SECRETARIAL 
POSITIONS - (FTE BASIS), 1969-70 



FINE ARTS AND HUMANITIES : 

Afro- American Studies 

Art 

Comparative Literature 

English 

French, Italian and Classics 

Germanic Languages 

Hispanic Languages 

History 

Music 

Philosophy 

Slavic Languages 

Total 



Faculty 
Positions 



(a) 

25 

6 

100 

38 

23 

22 

50.8 

22 

15 
7 

308.8 



Sec. 
Positions 



2. 
1 
10 
1. 
3 
3 
5 
2 
1. 
1 



Faculty/ 

Sec. 

Ratio 



Highest 
Ranking 
Position 



30.5 



10.0 


Sr. Clerk Steno. 


6.0 


Jr. Clerk Typist 


10.0 


Head Clerk 


25.3 


Principal Clerk 


7.7 


Sr. Clerk Steno. 


7.3 


Sr. Clerk Steno. 


10.2 


Principal Clerk 


11.0 


Principal Clerk 


10.0 


Sr. Clerk Typist 


7.0 


Jr. Clerk Steno. 



10.1 



(b) 



SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES : 

Anthropology 

Asian Studies 

Economics 

Government 

Linguistics 

Psychology 

Sociology 

Speech 

Total 



10 

1 

26 
34 
3 
40.5 
24 
46 


2 


5.0 


Sr. Clerk Steno. 


3 
6 


8.7 
5.7 


Principal Clerk 
Principal Clerk 


6 
3 
5 


6.8 
8.0 
9.2 


Principal Clerk 

Sr. Clerk Steno. 

Principal Clerk 


184.5 


25 


7.4 





NATURAL SCIENCES AND MATHEMATICS : 

Biochemistry 

Botany 

Chemistry 

Geology and Geography 

Mathematics and Statistics 

Microbiology 

Physics and Astronomy 

Zoology 

Total 

Departmental Total 
DEAN'S OFFICE ; 

Grand Total 



6.5 


1 


6.5 


18.7 


3 


6.2 


37 


6.5 


5.7 


19 


2.5 


7.6 


77 


7 


11.0 


10 


1.5 


6.7 


46 


7 


6.6 


27 


5 


5.4 


241.2 


33.5 


7.2 


734.5 


89 


8.3 


5.5 


gCc) 
97.0 


_ 


740.0 


7.6 



Jr. Clerk Steno. 

Sr. Clerk Steno. 
Principal Clerk 
Principal Clerk 
Principal Clerk 

Sr. Clerk Steno. 
Head Clerk 
Principal Clerk 



Sr. Clerk Steno. 



Notes : 

(a) Appointments were attached to the English Department. 

(b) The Bureau of Government Research is a part of the Government Department. 

(c) The secretary to the Pre-Medical Advisory Committee is included among those 

assigned to the Dean's Office. 



TABLE 8 



A- 9 



RATIOS OF FACULTY POSITIONS TO 
SECRETARIAL POSITIONS AND TO TECHNICAL POSITIONS 
(Fall of each indicated year) 



(1) 



Faculty Positions 
Secretarial Positions 

Faculty /Secretarial Ratio 



1966 



7.2 



196 7 



7.9 



1968 



8.0 



1969 



532.5 


606.0 


668.0 


734.5 


74.0 


77.0 


83.5 


89.0 



8.2 



Faculty Positions 
Technical Positions 

Faculty /Technical Ratio 



532.5 


606.0 


668.0 


734.5 


42.0 


45.0 


44.0 


49.0 



12.7 



13.5 



15.2 



15.0 



Note : 

(1) Computations based on total faculty positions (FTE) and do not include personnel 
in the Dean's Office. 



A-10 





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CO 




.-1 



0^ 



O "H <f On 
-* vD vC O 
O O CTn LO 

CO n cs) CM 



cyv 

CO 
CNl 



m<3-cMaNOor^cjNLO 
o<tvOvomoooocvi 
r^cN0O<Tv<fcMLntH 



<T 


CO 


r^ 


00 


m 


in 


#> 




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-* CO 



in 

CO 
00 










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CO 






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H 






C/l 


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a 


^—N, 


W 


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MH 


O 




o 


O 


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CO 


u 


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w 


W 


B 


w 


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pi 


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Cu 


w 


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0) 


H 


< 


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2 


CO 


^ 


W 


CO 






^ 


CO 

w 


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o 


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t^ 


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C^ 


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a 




l-J 


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CN CM CM I— I 



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CM Cvl CNJ >H 



CM lO "H CTi 

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LO fH r^ <f 

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C» CO CO O 
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00 a^ r^ <r 

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o 00 00 r~- 






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mooi^oo-<fvDoo<r 

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CO 


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00 


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00 


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CO 1 



r^ r-~ <3- 00 CM CO 00 
r~~ O r~~ i^ CM vo o> 
CM LO oi tX) iH II 



-* vD CM CO r^ LO 

CM O /-v (T, 00 CO vD 

CO LO CO r-~ rH II 



00 

vO 

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lO 
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m 


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1 o 
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VD 
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LO 
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CO 

CO 








00 


00 


rH 






VD 


00 


r^ 




1 


LO 




CM 

LO 







































TJ 












rH 








































CO 












CO 






















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CO 


rH 


















60 












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o 


















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o 


















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a 


















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m 


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3 


QJ 


4-1 


(U w 


C 


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■'-> 


H 


00 


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rH 


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S 


>-l 




u 


en 


ji: 


o 


o 


o 


O 


w 




O 


C 


CO 


d 


•H 


•H 


■H 


CO 




XI 




w 


<; 




H 




CO 


CO 


w 


j:: 


•H 


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Xi 


k4 




•H 


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en 


en 


rH 


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d) 


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3 


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bO S 


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4-1 


w 


r-\ 




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^ 




>. 


U 


M 


o 


(1) 


CO 


O 




00 


T) 


C 5 


D 


j2 


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^ 


CO 


J 


CO 




CO 


• • 


1 




Pm 


w 


►-1 


CO 




O 




<: 


pq 


W 


W M 


a 


Ph 


p^ 


2: 




2 


3 


hJ 


4-1 




•H 


^ 


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u 


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o 


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o 


O 




O 


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3 


pq 










pq 
























o 


CO 


ej 


H 




eu 


M 


4J 


o 




































4-1 


M 








a. 


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CO 


1L5 








CO 


5 


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A-11 



ON 

vO 

0^ 



00 



t^ 








00 


CVJ 


ON 


^ r^ 


<X) 






■ • 


n 


o 


r~~ 


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00 


CM 


iH 


-H r-H 



CM 




m 


ro r^ in 00 


m 


• • • • 


#\ 


cr\ a^ cr\ r^ 



^ 
r^ 



CO 



r^ 
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ON 



CO 

Cvl 



00 

CO 



CO 



ctn-h miH-<rcocNoo 



mo 00 r^ CO CM u~i 



CO 


r^ 


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r^ O o Lo m o 


LO 






r^ 00 -cr cN tn -h 



> 

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4-1 

u 
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ON 



CM 

o 

Cvl 



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00 
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r->. 



I^ 


CO 


T-H r-~ 


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in 


VD o 

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r^ 00 -J- CM in iH 



t3 
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in 

ON 



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o 
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w 



(U 



s 



14-1 
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0) 
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& 

0) 
CO 



pj 


■*^ 


Ol 


5^ 


^ 


w 


^ 




u 


fj 


k< 


w 


o 


o 


K- 


Pi 




H- 


a 


>-l 


o 


w 


H 


u 



W CO >-l 

> p=; M 



p. 




W 


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w 


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ffi 


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C/2 

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ON 



in 

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00 

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ON 




r~. 


O CM O -<!■ 


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ON 



ON 

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C8 

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in 


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r^ CO o O 



<l- O r~^ <!■ 

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CO 00 ON o 



r^ O 00 ~3- 

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ON <r CO -^j- 



r^ 


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CN 


Ln "H r^ ^o 


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CN CNl iH iH 



iH r^ r^ .— I 



<!■ 


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CNJ CM CNl rH 







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CO 


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3 

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0) 
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to 

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to 

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in 






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4-1 

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c« 

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CO 

<; 

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4-1 

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to 
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00 

r-H 



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u 
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to 
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a. 

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CO 



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CO 
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ON 



00 



CN 



00 

CNl 



H 

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<: 
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Pi 

w 

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CO 


r^ 


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m 
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<• 


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00 



CO 

w 
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M 

u 

CO 



CO 

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b 


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3 


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^ 


rr 


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s-s 


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K-1 


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f-l 


Pi 


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u 


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incooooocoi— icNcM 
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CM 


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00 

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O ctn in r^ o CXI CO 



\ooo r^o-cNii— i-d-^ 



00 


Cvl 


in ON 


<t \D CJN vO CO 


1^ 


CNJ 

in 


\0 t-H 


vO O CNl r-H CNl 
CM 



• 


NO 


CJN O C3N O O 00 


r^ 


CM 


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<r 


m 


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I I 



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o 
o 

u 

CO 

u 

0) 
4-1 

o 



a 
o 



CO 

u 

4-1 
W 

■H 
C 
•H 



o 

H 



to 
u 

c o 

•H C 

M o 

<u o 

0) w 
c 

•H (U 
00 g 

c o 



o 

•H 
4J 

CO 

y -^ 

3 4-1 

W to 



to 



<; cQ w w p:; 



00 to 
C tj o 

■H -H -H 

CO tn >H g 

3 j:^ 3 O 
S CM CM 2 



0) en 

4-1 QJ 

to o 

•H (11 

-a -H 

•H CO 

(-1 Xl 

to c 

0) to 

en 

0) 4-1 

S-i u 

o <; 
m 

0) c 

^ -H 

CD TS 

r-\ 0) 

^ 13 

to 3 



to 

4-1 

o 
a 

o 
o 

a 

CO 



CO 
3 
ID 



CJ 

3 

■H 
01 
0) 

4-1 
.H 
CO 
Q) 

O 

•H 
r-l 



CO Pj 
t-i 



o 

3 
•H 

tn 

0) 

u 

3 

00 o 

•H 3 

m T3 

w 

o m 

M-l o 



13 
3 
CO 

3 
O 

•H 
4-1 

CO 



3 
g 

to 



QJ CO 

^ ai 

H 



to Xi 



A-12 



TABLE 11 
TEACHING LOAD SUMMARY, (Fall Semester 1969) 



FINE ARTS & HUMANITIES : 

Afro- American Studies 

Art 

Comparative Lit. 

English 

Journalism 
French 

Italian 

Latin /Classics 
Ge rman 
History 
Philosophy 
Slavic Languages 
Spanish 
Music 

Subtotal 

SOCIAL & BEHAVIORAL 
SCIENCES: 



Anthropology 

Asian Studies 

Economics 

Government 

Linguistics 

Psychology 

Sociology 

Speech 

Comm. Disorders 
Mass Communications 
Theater 

Subtotal 

NATURAL SCIENCES & 
MATHEMATICS : 

Biochemistry 
Botany 
Chemistry 
Geology 

Geography 
Mathematics 

Statistics 
Microbiology 
Physics 

Astronomy 
Zoology 

Subtotal 

Honors Program 

COLLEGE TOTAL, 1969 

TOTALS, PREVIOUS YEAR 



Student 
Cr. Hrs. 



318 

5,943 

1,347 

25,147 

600 
4,599 

366 

899 

3,223 

13,386 

3,873 

753 
2,824 
2,727 



4,132 

105 

6,204 

6,459 

252 

17,355 

12,525 

4,569 

712 

1,060 

1.639 

55,012 



Student 

Contact 

Hours 



318 

8,361 

1,347 

25,380 

600 
5,564 

522 

958 

3,777 

13,386 

3,873 

833 
3,783 
4,814 



No. 
Courses 



5 
56 
14 
76 

2 
26 

7 
11 
26 
57 
15 
12 
22 
52 



4,158 

159 

6,204 

6,459 

252 

20,139 

12,525 

4,569 

712 

1,060 

1.639 



18 

4 

26 

39 

6 

48 

33 

15 

15 

8 

16 



57,876 228 



No. 
Sees , 



5 

90 
30 

384 
4 
80 
10 
12 
74 

186 
61 
18 
65 
54 



66,005 73,516 381 1,073 



44 

4 

96 

101 

7 

171 

108 

93 

28 

17 

31 



700 



Sr. Hnrs, 
Sp. Prob. 



18 

1 

33 



M.A. Ph.D. 



1 
28 

1 

4 
5 

98 



22 

2 

9 

2 

32 

15 

21 



103 



17 
13 

1 



31 



8 

34 

14 

3 



64 



1 
6 
3 



14 



8 

13 
26 
1 
37 
14 



99 



Fall 
SCrH. 



2.13 

1.35 

1.39 

.74 

.46 

.73 



.72 

.46 
.99 
.76 
.85 

.64 

.86 



.54 
.37 
.93 
1.05 
1.02 
1.08 
1.01 



,99 



874 


1,002 


7 


11 


12 


1 


5 


.68 


5,075 


6,342 


15 


78 


14 


18 


22 


.83 


7,455 


11,597 


28 


135 


5 


11 


86 


.75 


3,225 


4,991 


19 


68 


43 


- 


- 


.62 


567 


648 


5 


16 


5 


- 


- 


1.82 


16,780 


16,940 


59 


215 


3 


- 


2 


.86 


1,902 


1,953 


8 


15 


- 


- 


- 


.90 


1,419 


1,878 


7 


15 


5 


2 


28 


.77 


4,330 


5,174 


24 


97 


14 


1 


31 


.92 


3,024 


3,953 


7 


40 


16 


- 


- 


.49 


7,874 


12,457 


21 


134 


13 


22 


29 


.91 


52,525 


66,935 


200 


824 


130 


55 


203 


.83 


327 


327 


6 


6 


- 


- 


- 


1.49 


173,869 


198,654 


815 
689 


2,603 


331 
218 


150 
154 


316 
402 


.90 


164,288 


184,920 


2,587 





TABLE 12 
STUDENT CREDIT HOURS. FALL, 1964-1969 



A-13 



Fine 
Arts 



Humanities 

Languages 



Social 
Sciences 



Biological Physical 
Sciences Sciences 



Math. 
& Stat. 



/ 



10,000 



Art 



/ 



Englis 


h— 






Psychology — ' 












History 




/ ^ * 




.' 




, 










/ 


Rom.— 
Lang.' 


■'\ 








So 


ciology 
J— Zoolc 




_r 




Gei 


GovtT-p-'^-^' 
-man •' , 


/ 


^^ 




'gy 



Mathematics — ' 
/ _. 

/ 
, — Chemistry 

/ 



Econ 



I — Speech 



\ 



— Phil. 



Anthro 



/. 

. \ 

/— Botany / ' / 
Geolygy-' 



1,000 



- — Music 



1 



/—r Slavic 

, . I \ Langs 
Lit. — ' > ^ 



100 




— Physics 
— Astronomy / A 



Statistics-^- 
/ 

/■ / 
■^ "^ — Biochemistry 

V 



I I I I I I I M I I I I ■ ' ■ I 

64-69 64-69 64-69 



y /— Asian 
\ i Studies 



/ y 



/ 



ioiali_ 



64-69 



_j — I I I I I — i_i_ 



L 



ENTIRE COLLEGE 



200,000 



•> 



64-69 64-69 64-69 64-69 



I .... I _ ^100,000 .-:... I _ : 

64-69 64-69 



A-14 



TABLE 13 



FTE STUDENTS BY DEPARTMENT 
AND DIVISION (Fall Semester) 



FINE ARTS & HUMANITIES : 

Afro- American Studies 

Art 

Comparative Literature 

English 

Journalism 
French 

Italian 

Latin /Classics 
German 
History 
Miisic 
Philosophy 
Slavic Langs. 
Spanish 

Subtotal 

SOCIAL & BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES : 

Anthropology 

Asian Studies 

Economics 

Government 

Linguistics 

Psychology 

Sociology 

Speech 

Comm. Disorders 

Mass Communication 

Theater 

Subtotal 

NATURAL SCIENCES & MATHEMATICS : 

Biochemistry 
Botany 
Chemistry 
Geology 

Geography 
Mathematics 

Statistics 
Microbiology 
Physics 

Astronomy 
Zoology 

Subtotal 

Honors Program 

COLLEGE TOTAL 



FTE Student 


3 




Unde 


rgrad. 












Graduate 


1967 


1968 


1969 
21 


1969 


1969 






21 




290 


320 




420 




369 


51 


15 


82 




92 




88 


4 


1,648 


1,723 


1 


,774 


1 


,619 


155 


11 


29 




15 




15 


- 


394 


442 




327 




283 


44 


36 


33 




24 




24 


_ 


10 


25 




62 




59 


3 


299 


290 




231 




196 


35 


1,112 


952 




920 




861 


59 1 


338 


214 




169 




163 


6 ! 


198 


264 




270 




245 


25 


65 


50 




53 




46 


7 


257 


245 




185 




169 


16 


4,673 


4,669 


4 


,563 


4 


,158 


405 


149 


187 




285 




264 


21 


5 


4 




7 




7 


— 


378 


398 




440 




384 


56 


445 


482 




451 




408 


43 


- 


10 




19 




14 


5 


732 


9 75 


1 


,203 


1 


,105 


98 


615 


750 




855 




812 


43 


289 


244 




305 




305 


- 


43 


51 




47 




41 


6 


64 


58 




71 




71 


- 


99 


116 




109 




107 


2 


2,819 


3,275 


3 


,792 


3 


,518 


274 


41 


48 




63 




53 


10 


255 


308 




342 




334 


8 


613 


570 




533 




456 


77 


229 


229 




221 




208 


13 J 


21 


51 




38 




38 




1,096 


1,155 


1 


,157 


1 


,075 


82 


167 


170 




138 




113 


25 


95 


117 




101 




88 


13 


298 


341 




321 




252 


69 


135 


137 




201 




194 


7 


588 


640 




537 




512 


25 


3,538 


3,766 


3 


,652 


3 


,323 


329 j 


- 


- 


12 


22 
,029 


11 


22 
,021 


- 


11,030 


11,710 


1,008 



TABLE 14 
STUDENT-TO- FACULTY RATIOS (September 1969) 

With and without teaching assistants 



A-15 



FINE ARTS & HUMANITIES : 

Afro-American Studies 

Art 

Comparative Literature 

English 

Journalism 
French 

Italian 

Latin/ Classics 
German 
History 
Music 

Philosophy 
Slavic Languages 
Spanish 

Subtotal 
SOCIAL & BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES: 



FTE 


FTE 




Students* 


Fac* 


S/F* 


21 


2.5 


8.4 


420 


25 


16.8 


92 


6 


15.3 


1,774 


94 


18.9 


15 


3.5 


4.3 


327 


29.5 


11.1 


24 


5 


4.8 


62 


3.5 


17.7 


231 


23 


10.0 


920 


50.8 


18.1 


169 


22 


7.7 


270 


15 


18.0 


53 


7 


7.6 


185 


22 


8.4 



T.A. 
Equiv. * 


F* 


S/F* 


_ 


2.5 


8.4 


4.7 


29.7 


14.1 


1.3 


7.3 


12.6 


23.3 


117.3 


15.1 


- 


3.5 


4.3 


3.3 


32.8 


10.0 


- 


5.0 


4.8 


- 


3.5 


17.7 


6.3 


29.3 


7.9 


10.0 


60.8 


15.1 


2.7 


24.7 


6.8 


3.7 


18.7 


14.6 


- 


7.0 


7.6 


3.3 


25.3 


7.2 



4,563 



306.8 14.9 



58.6 



365.4 12.5 



Anthropology 




285 


10 




28.5 


2.5 


12.5 


22.8 


Asian Studies 




7 


1 




7.0 


.3 


1.3 


5.4 


Economics 




440 


26 




16.9 
14.1^-^'' 


4.7 


30.7 


14.3 


Government 




451 


34 




8.0 


42.0 


11.3(1) 


Linguistics 




19 


3 




6.3 


1.3 


4.3 


4.4 


Psychology 


1 


,203 


40. 


5 


29.8 


12.3 


52.8 


22.8 


Sociology 




855 


24 




35.6 


10.7 


34.7 


24.6 


Speech 




305 


21 




14.5 


4.0 


25.0 


12.2 


Comm. Disorders 




41 


7 




5.9 


- 


7.0 


5.9 


Mass Communications 




71 


5 




14.2 


- 


5.0 


14.2 


Theater 


3 


109 
,792 


13 
184. 


1 


8.4 
20.8(1) 


- 


13.0 
228.3 


8.4 


Subtotal 


43.8 


16.7(1) 


NATURAL SCIENCES & MATHEMATICS: 


















Biochemistry 




63 


6. 


5 


9.7 


2.3 


8.8 


7.2 


Botany 




342 


18. 


7 


18.3 


6.0 


24.7 


13.8 


Chemistry 




533 


37 




14.4 


15.7 


52.7 


10.1 


Geology 




221 


15 




14.7 


6.0 


21.0 


10.5 


Geography 




38 


4 




9.5 


.3 


4.3 


8.8 


Mathematics 


1 


,157 


71 




16.3 


13.0 


84.0 


13.8 


Statistics 




138 


6 




23.0 


2.0 


8.0 


17.3 


Microbiology 




101 


10 




10.1 


3.0 


13.0 


7.8 


Physics 




321 


38 




8.4 


12.3 


50.3 


6.4 


Astronomy 




201 


8 




25.1 


2.7 


10.7 


18.8 


Zoology 




537 


27 




19.9 


14.3 


41.3 


13.0 


Subtotal 


3 


,652 


243. 


2 


15.7 


77.6 


320.8 


11.4 


COLLEGE TOTAL 


12 


,007(2) 


734. 


_5 


16.4(1) 


180.0 


914.5 


13.2(1) 


Notes : 



















(1) 

(2) 



FTE students equal 15 undergraduate student credit hours or 8 graduate student credit 
hours. S/F is the ratio of the numbers in the two columns to the left. T.A. Equiv. 
is an arbitrarily chosen figure; $9,000 of teaching assistant funds equals one faculty 
position. F is column 2 increased by column 4. S/F is the student faculty ratio 
with teaching assistants included. 

Two non-teaching positions in the Bureau of Government discounted for the division. 
Twenty-two FTE students in the Honors Program not included. 



A-16 



TABLE 15 

STUDENT MAJORS (HEAD COUNT) 
BY DEPARTMENT AND DIVISION (Fall Semester) 



Undergraduate 
1967 1968 1969 



Graduate 



1967 1968 1969 



FINE ARTS & HUMANITIES: 














Art 




1A9 


139 


208 


52 


67 


69 


Bachelor of 


Fine Arts 


34 


76 


99 


- 


- 


- 


Music 




54 


29 


46 


23 


18 


24 


Bachelor of 


Music 


- 


34 


31 


- 


- 


- 


Comparative Literature 


- 


- 


- 


- 


7 


10 


English 




1,148 


1,038 


1,005 


217 


212 


273 


Journalism 




113 


102 


99 


- 


- 


- 


History 




687 


639 


637 


117 


96 


131 


Philosophy 




61 


54 


54 


44 


45 


33 


French (*) 




240 


188 


191 


(56) 


(48) 


76 


German 




66 


60 


42 


54 


58 


64 


Italian 




- 


- 


3 


- 


- 


- 


Latin/Classics 




13 


14 


16 


- 


24 


2 


Russian 




44 


30 


36 


3 


3 


8 


Spanish (*) 




88 


65 


86 


(20) 


(24) 


37 


Subtotal 




2,697 


2,468 


2,553 


586 


602 


727 


SOCIAL & BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES: 












Anthropology 




60 


72 


98 


- 


- 


36 


Economics 




155 


160 


179 


68 


59 


57 


Government 




548 


501 


486 


87 


89 


124 


Linguistics 




- 


- 


- 


- 


1 


15 


Psychology 




524 


539 


729 


118 


125 


143 


Sociology 




362 


400 


547 


65 


90 


74 


Speech 




124 


153 


193 


26 


35 


49 


Subtotal 




1,773 


1,825 


2,232 


364 


399 


49 8 



NATURAL SCIENCES & 
MATHEMATICS : 

Biochemistry 
Botany 
Chemistry 
Geology 

Geography 
Mathematics 

Statistics 
Microbiology 
Physics 

Astronomy 
Zoology 
Pre-medical 

Subtotal 

C.A.S.I.A.C. 

COLLEGE TOTAL 



4 


24 


42 


33 


31 


40 


212 


185 


150 


98 


94 


81 



536 



466 



450 



76 


57 


52 


85 


77 


79 


31 


27 


19 


513 


444 


357 


86 


42 


41 



1,674 


1,447 


1,311 


191 


1,118 


1,996 


6,335 


6,858 


8,092 



24 


26 


20 


41 


47 


40 


132 


121 


134 


30 


38 


44 


96 


87 


86 


11 


13 


8 


34 


33 


34 


88 


93 


109 


1 


7 


12 


64 


73 


75 


1 


1 


- 



522 


539 


562 


1,472 


1^540 


1,787 



Totals 




1967 


1968 


196 


201 


206 


2 


34 


76 




77 


47 




- 


34 




- 


7 




1,365 


1,250 


1,2 


113 


102 




804 


735 


7 


105 


99 




(296) 


(236) 


2 


120 


118 


1 


13 


38 




47 


33 




(108) 


(89) 


1 


3,283 


3,070 


3,2 


60 


72 


1 


223 


219 


2 


635 


590 


6 


- 


1 




642 


664 


6 


42 7 


490 


61 


150 


188 


2 


2,137 


2,224 


2,/ 


28 


50 


; 


74 


78 




344 


306 


2 


128 


132 


li 


632 


553 


5 


11 


13 




110 


90 


, 


173 


170 


li 


32 


34 


1 



2,196 1,9 86 l,i 



191 1,118 



7,807 8,398 9_j5 



Note : 

(*) Figures enclosed in parentheses represent the estimated split of Romance Languages 
between French and Spanish. 



TABLE 16 



A-17 



UPPERCLASS MAJORS BY DEPARTMENT 
AND DIVISION (Spring Semester) 



Head Count 



Percent of Majors 





1967 


1968 


1969 


19 70 


1967 


196 8 


1969 


19 70 


FINE ARTS & HUMANITIES: 


















Art 


74 


80 


64 


76 


2.37 


2.98 


2.16 


2.39 


Bachelor of Fine Arts 


- 


29 


61 


80 


- 


.74 


2.04 


2.41 


English 


447 


541 


616 


597 


19.32 


20.08 


20.61 


17.98 


Journalism 


43 


42 


43 


50 


1.86 


1.56 


1.44 


1.51 


French 


58 


83 


78 


68 


2.53 


3.09 


2.62 


2.05 


Italian 


- 


- 


- 


1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Latin /Classics 


2 


2 


6 


11 


.09 


.07 


.20 


.33 


German 


26 


32 


26 


21 


1.12 


1.41 


.87 


.63 


History- 


301 


331 


358 


392 


13.00 


12.31 


12.02 


11.80 


Music 


10 


5 


7 


2 


.43 


.19 


.23 


.06 


Bachelor of Music 


- 


5 


16 


27 


- 


.19 


.54 


.81 


Philosophy 


21 


31 


26 


36 


.91 


1.15 


.87 


1.08 


Slavic Languages 


17 


30 


22 


17 


.73 


.82 


.50 


.51 


Spanish 


23 


30 


22 


30 


.99 


1.11 


.74 


.90 


Subtotal 


1,022 


1,241 


1,345 


1,408 


44.10 


46.10 


45.00 


42.40 


SOCIAL & BEHAVIORAL 


















SCIENCES: 


















Anthropology 


22 


37 


43 


59 


.95 


1.23 


1.44 


1.78 


Economics 


90 


80 


129 


138 


3.88 


3.46 


4.33 


4.15 


Government 


280 


284 


269 


279 


12.09 


10.57 


9.02 


8.40 


Psychology 


173 


233 


282 


375 


7.46 


8.96 


9.45 


11.30 


Sociology 


143 


190 


250 


362 


6.17 


7.60 


8.48 


10.90 


Speech 


67* 


65* 


25 


24 


2.89* 


2.56* 


.84 


.72 


Coram. Disorders 


- 


- 


32 


44 


- 


- 


1.07 


1.38 


Mass Communications 


- 


- 


8 


29 


- 


- 


.27 


.87 


Theater 


- 


- 


15 

1,053 


25 
1,335 


- 


- 


.50 
35.20 


.75 


Subtotal 


775 


889 


33.40 


33.00 


40.20 



MTURAL SCIENCES & 
MATHEMATICS : 

Biochemistry 
Botany 
Chemistry 
Geology 

Geography 
Mathematics 
Microbiology 
Physics 

Astronomy 
Zoology 
Pre-medical 

Subtotal 

C.A.S.I.A.C. 

COLLEGE TOTAL 

Note: 



- 


1 


10 


13 


- 


.04 


.34 


.39 


19 


14 


17 


20 


.82 


.52 


.57 


.60 


59 


68 


70 


62 


2.55 


2.53 


2.34 


1.87 


31 


46 


45 


49 


1.34 


1.71 


1.51 


1.48 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


.06 


156 


158 


168 


150 


6.74 


5.87 


5.63 


4.52 


20 


28 


30 


31 


.86 


1.04 


1.01 


.93 


19 


21 


26 


31 


.82 


.78 


.87 


.93 


5 


10 


9 


5 


.22 


.37 


.30 


.15 


110 


147 


182 


155 


4.75 


5.47 


6.10 


4.67 


102 


70 


35 


37 


4.40 


2.60 


1.17 


1.11 


521 


563 


592 


555 


22.50 


20.90 


19.80 


16.70 


- 


1 
2,694 


- 


23 
3,321 


- 


.03 
100.0 


- 


.69 


2,318 


2,990 


100.0 


100.0 


100.0 



* Breakdown of figures unavailable before year indicated. 



A-18 



TABLE 17 



DEGREES AWARDED 



B. A. 
B. S. 
B. F. A. 
B. Music 

Total Bachelors 

M. A. 
M. S. 
M. F. A. 
M. Music 

Total Masters 



Ph. 



Grand Total 



1967-68 


1968-69 


1969-70 


960 


1,074 


1,208 


224 


278 


315 


5 


25 


34 


- 


- 


12 


1,189 


1,377 


1,569 


142 


170 


158 


163 


97 


71 


23 


27 


20 


10 


1 


9 


338 


295 


258 


49 (" 


94<1) 


100^1 


1^576 


1,766 


1,927 



(1) The breakdown by major departments is shown below: 



Department : 

Anthropology 

Biochemistry 

Biology 

Botany 

Chemistry 

Economics 

English 

French, Italian & Classics 

Geology 

German 

Government 

History 

Mathematics 

Microbiology 

Philosophy 

Physics 

Psychology 

Sociology 

Zoology 

Total 



1967-68 


1968-69 


1969-70 






1 


2* 


4 


5* 


1* 


- 


- 


1 


3 


5 


17 


26 


18* 


1 


2 


3 


3 


7 


12 


- 


- 


2* 


1 


- 


- 


1 


2 


2* 


4 


5 


1 


- 


- 


3 


2 


6 


6 


2 


5 


2 


- 


2 


1* 


- 


3 


3 


10 


19 


25 


- 


- 


5 


4 


6 


6* 


49 


94 


100 



*One Five-College cooperative Ph. D. is included in each total. 



TABLE 17-A A-19 



Average 
4.0 
3.8 
3.6 
3.4 
3.2 
3.0 
2.8 
2.6 
2.4 
2.2 
2.0 
1.8 
1.6 
1.4 
1.2 
1.0 



PERCENT OF STUDENTS IN COLLEGE OF ARTS AITO SCIENCES 
WITH CUMULATIVE AVERAGES EQUAL TO OR EXCEEDING 
SELECTED LEVELS, BY CLASS, AS OF FEBRUARY 19 70 





Class oi 


E 




19 70 


19 71 


19 72 


19 73 


0.1 


0.5 


0.1 


0.6 


0.7 


1.2 


0.9 


2.6 


2.9 


2.5 


2.4 


6.3 


6.2 


5.5 


6.1 


12.0 


11.5 


11.5 


10.8 


20.5 


20.0 


18.9 


18.8 


30.9 


29.9 


28.9 


28.6 


41.9 


42.9 


40.3 


40.5 


52.9 


56.5 


53.1 


53.3 


63.8 


70.1 


67.5 


65.4 


72.6 


83.6 


79.3 


77.4 


79.6 


94.4 


89.2 


86.6 


85.6 


98.8 


95.8 


92.7 


89.1 


99.7 


98.1 


96.9 


92.1 


100.0 


99.1 


98.7 


94.4 


_ 


99.4 


99.5 


96.2 



Number of students: 1,691 1,979 1,865 2,391 



A- 20 

TABLE 18 



BOOKS AND MONOGRAPHS, BY DEPARTMENT AMD DIVISION (1969-1970) 



FINE ARTS AND HUMANITIES 



Art: 



Coughlin, Jack - Grotesques . Baltimore, Maryland: Aquarius, 1970. 
35 pp. 

Norton, Paul F. (And Others) - The Arts in America: The Nineteenth 
Century . New York: Scribner's, 1969. 412 pp. 

Reutlinger, Dagmar - Collection of Contemporary Sculptures : catalog 
of exhibition. Northampton, Massachusetts: Gazette 
Publishing Co., Inc., 1970. 64 pp. 

Walker, Roslyn - African Art : catalog for exhibition. New Haven, 
Connecticut: Eastern Press Inc., 1970. 108 pp. 

Wang, Hui-Ming - The Birds and the Animals : portfolio of wood 

engravings. Northampton, Massachusetts: Gehenna Press, 
1969. 24 pp. 

Comparative Literature : 

Fleischmann, W. B. ed. - Encyclopedia of World Literature in the 
Twentieth Century : Volume II (G-N) . New York: 
Frederick Ungar, 1969. 469 pp. 

Moebius, C. William - Odes and Elegies . Chicago, Illinois: Alan 
Swallow, 1969. 57 pp. 

English : 

Bagg, Robert - Liberations, Three One-Act Plays : The Pope's Right 

Knee, The Cyclops, Nausicaa. Northampton, Massachusetts: 
Spiritus Mundi Press, 1969. 88 pp. 

Chametzky, Jules ed. (with Sidney Kaplan) - Black and White In 

American Culture . Amherst, Massachusetts: University 
of Massachusetts Press, 1969. 400 pp. 

Copeland, Thomas - Correspondence of Edmund Burke : Volume VIII. 
Chicago, Illinois and Cambridge, England, 1969. 

Cuomo, George - Sing Choir of Angels ; collection of short stories. 
New York: Doubleday, 1969. 214 pp. 

Hunt, J. William - Virgil Forms of Glory : Structure and Sense in 
Virgil's 'Aeneid'. Carbondale, Illinois: Southern 
Illinois University Press, 1969. 175 pp. 

Junkins, Donald - The Graves of Scotland Parish . Boston, Massachusetts; 
The Heron Press, 1969. 62 pp. 

Kaplan, Sidney ed. (with Jules Chametzky) - Black and White In 

American Culture . Amherst, Massachusetts: University 
of Massachusetts Press, 1969. 400 pp. 



I 



A-21 



English (continued) 



Kinney, Arthur - On Seven Shakespearean Comedies . Sterling Junction, 
Massachusetts: Scarab Press, 1969. 48 pp. +7 illus. 

- A Symposium on Love . Boston, Massachusetts: 



Houghton Mifflin, 1970. 210 pp. 

Langland, Joseph - Adlai Stevenson : book of poems. Iowa City, 
Iowa: Stone Wall Press, 1969. 40 pp. 

Mariani, Paul - A Commentary on the Complete Poems of Gerard Manley 

Hopkin s. London, England and Ithaca, New York: Cornell 
University Press, 1970. 372 pp. 

Mayer, Milton - Man vs. The State . Santa Barbara, California: Center 
for the Study of Democratic Institution, 1969. 191 pp. 

- They Thought They Were Free: The Germans 1933-4 5. 



Chicago, Illinois: Chicago University Press, 1969. 346 pp. 

(with Mortimer J. Adler) - The Revolution in Education . 

Chicago, Illinois: Chicago University Press, 5th impression, 
1970. 215 pp. 

- C ivil Disobedience, Theory and Practice . New York: 

Pegasus, 1969. 268 pp. 

Politella, Dario - Directory of the College Student Press in America . 
New York: Oxbridge, 1970. 237 pp. 

Weston, John C. - Hugh MacDiarmid 's , A Drunk Man Looks at the Thistle . 
Preston, Lancashire, England: Akros Publications, 1970. 
40 pp. 



Germanic Languages : 

Beekman, E. M. - Homeopathy of the Absurd . The Grotesque in Paul van 
Ostai.jen's Prose . The Hague: Nijhoff, 1970. 205 pp. 

Jacoby, F. R. - Van den vos Reinaerde . Legal Elements in a Netherlands 
Epic of the Thirteenth Century . Munchen, Germany: Fink 
Verlag, 1970. 116 pp. 

Paulsen, W. (with S. J. Kaplowitt, University of Connecticut) - 

A German Grammar for Review and Reference . New York: 
Ronald Press, 1970. 265 pp. 

ed. - Der Dichter und seine Zeit: Politik im Spiegel der 

Literatur : The Third Amherst Colloquium. Heidelberg, 
Germany: Stiehm Verlag, 1970. 220 pp. 

Hispanic Languages : 

Fernandez-Turienzo, Francisco, translator - W. Correll, El aprender : 

(from German). Barcelona, Spain: Herder, 1969. 310 pp. 



translator - E. Lessing, Las aventuras de 



Ulises : (from German and Greek). Barcelona, Spain: 
Herder, 1969. 78 pp. 



A-22 



Hispanic Languages (continued) ; 



translator - K. Rahner, Siervos de 



Crlsto : (from German) . Barcelona, Spain: Herder, 1970. 
265 pp. 

Soons, C. Alan, ed. - Diego Rosel y Fuenllana Obras selectas . Madrid, 
Spain: Estudios de Hispanofila, 1970. 104 pp. 



History ; 



Greenbaum, Louis - Tallyrand, Statesman Priest . Washington, D.C.: 
The Catholic University of America Press, Inc., 1970. 
293 pp. 

Hart, Robert (with Arthur Thompson) - The Uncertain Crusade, America 

and the Russian Revolution of 1905 . Amherst, Massachusetts: 
University of Massachusetts Press, 1970. 180 pp. 

Lewis, Archibald R. - The High Middle Ages, 814-1300 . Englewood Cliffs, 
New Jersey: Prentice-Hall, Inc., 1970. 174 pp. 

Richards, Leonard - Gentlemen of Property and Standing . New York: 
Oxford University Press, 1970. 196 pp. 

Wickwire, Franklin and Mary - Cornwallis, the American Adventure . 
Boston, Massachusetts: Houghton Mifflin Co., 1970. 
486 pp. 



Philosophy : 



Ackerman, Robert - Modern Deductive Logic . Garden City, Long Island, 
New York: Doubleday and Co., 1970. 261 pp. 

- The Philosoph^^ of Science . New York: Pegasus, 



1970. 166 pp. 

Aune, Bruce - Rationalism, Empiricism, and Pragmatism. New York: 
Random House, 1970. 210 pp. 

Slavic Languages ; 

Ivask, George ed. - Against the Current: Selections from the Novels , 
Essays, Notes, and Letters of Konstantin Leontiev . New 
York: Weybright and Talley, 1970. 286 pp. 

- The Egyptian Dove; The Story of a Russian . New York: 

Weybright and Talley, 1970. 250 pp. 



SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES 



Anthropology ; 



I 



Eraser, Thomas M. Jr. - Culture and Change in India; The Barpali _ 
Experiment . Amherst, Massachusetts; University of jfl 
Massachusetts Press, 1968 (hardcover), 1969 (paperbound) . 
vi , 460 pp. + 14 plates. 



I 



A-23 



Anthropology (continued) : 

Proulx, Donald A. - Nasca Gravelots from the Uhle Collection from the 
lea Valley, Peru . Amherst, Massachusetts: Research 
Reports, No. 5, Department of Anthropology, University 
of Massachusetts, 1970. vi, 103 pp, 33 plates, 2 maps, 
1 table, + 1 chart. 

Salzmann, Zdenek - Anthropology . New York: Harcourt , Brace World 
1969. xii, 308 pp. 

Economics : 

Kane, James A. - Open Space Demand Model . Pittsburg, Pennsylvania: 
Southwestern Pennsylvania Regional Planning Commission, 
1969. 67 pp. + appendix. 

Kindahl, James K. (with George J. Stigler) - The Behavior of Industrial 
Prices . New York: Columbia University Press, for 
National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc., 1970 xvi 
202 pp. 

Government ; 

Connolly, William E. ed. - The Bias of Pluralism . New York: Atherton 
1969. 261 pp. ~~ 

Fenton, John H. and Gleason, Gail - Student Power at the University of 

Massachusetts . Bureau of Government Research, 1969. 71 pp. 

Fliess, Peter J. - Freedom of the Press in the German Republic, 1918- 
1933, New York: Greenwood Press, 1969. 147 pp. 
(Reprint edition of a book previously published by 
Louisiana State University Press). 

Houn, Franklin W. - Anatomie des chines ichen Kommunismus . Bern and 
Stuggartl Verlag Hallway, 1969. 336 pp. 
Linguistics : 

Binnick, Robert I. co-ed. (with Georgia Green, Alice Davison, Jerry 
L. Morgan) - Papers from the Chicago Linguistic Society 
5th Regional Meeting . Chicago, Illinois: University of 
Chicago Department of Linguistics, 1969. 462 pp. 

Freeman, Donald C. ed. - Linguistics and Literary Style . New York: 
Holt, Rinehart, and Winston, 1970. 394 pp. 
Psychology : 

Appley, M. H. (guest editor) - The Place of Psychology in the 

University . American Psychology, 1970, 25, 5. 387- 
468 pp. 

Kanfer, F. H. and Phillips, J. S. - Learning Foundations of Behavior 
Therapy . New York: Wiley, 1970. 624 pp. 
Sociology : 

Chevan, Albert and Thomas 0. Wilkinson - A Report on Physician Manpower 
in the Tri-State Region . Boston, Massachusetts: Tri-State 
Regional Medical Program, 1970. 141 pp. 



A- 24 



Sociology (continued) : 

Park, Peter - Sociology of Tomorrow . New York: Pegasus, 1969. 
xiii + 181 pp. 

Simpson, Jon ed. (with Edward C. McDonagh) - Social Problems ; 

Persistent Challenges , second edition. New York: Holt, 
Rinehart, and Winston, Inc., 1969. 667 pp. 

Tausky, Curt - Work Organizations: Major Theoretical Perspectives . 

Itasca, Illinois: Peacock Publishers, Inc., 1970. 220 pp. 

Speech : 

Nober, E. Harris - The Development of Audiologic Criteria to 

Differentiate Between Auditory Thresholds and Cutile 
Thresholds of Deaf Children . Washington, D.C. : 
Department of Health, Education and Welfare, 1970. 
215 pp. 

Wallace, Karl R. - Understanding Discourse - The Speech Act and 

Rhetorical Action . Baton Rouge, Louisiana: Louisiana 
State University Press, 1970. 150 pp. 

NATURAL SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS 

Chemistry : 

McEwen, W. E. , VanderWerf, C. A., and Brewster, R. Q. - Unitized 
Experiments in Organic Chemistry , 3rd ed. New York: 
Van Nostrand Reinhold Co., 1970. xv + 287 pp. 

Richason, G. R. ed. - Chemistry 101-102 Work Book and Laboratory 

Manuel . Amherst, Massachusetts: Newell Printing Co., 
1969. 210 pp. 

ed. - Chemistry 111-112 Work Book and Laboratory 



Manuel . Amherst, Massachusetts: Newell Printing Co., 
1969. 314 pp. 

Geology and Geography : 

Hafner, J. A. - Transport Development and Geographic Change in 
Thailand: Research Design and Field Methodology . 
Bangkok, Thailand: Applied Scientific Research 
Corporation of Thailand, 1969. 

Mathematics : 

Foulis, D. J. - Fundamental Concepts of Mathematics . Boston, 

Massachusetts: Prindle, Weber, and Schmidt, 1969. 
212 pp. 

Oakland, G. B. - The Art of Consulting (in Statistics) . Dubuque: 
Kendall Hunt Publishing Co., 1969. iii + 141 pp. 

Physics : 

Byron, F. W. - Mathematics of Classical and Quantum Physics , Volumes 

I and II. Reading, Massachusetts: Addison-Wesley , 1970. 
Vol. I, X + 301 pp; Vol. II, xii + 354 pp. 



TABLE 19 



A-25 



PAYROLL FROM RESEARCH AND TRAINING GRANTS 
AND CONTRACTS (Fiscal Years 1969 and 1970) 



1969 



1970 



FINE ARTS AND HUMANITIES : 

Afro-American Studies 

Art 

Comparative Literature 

English 

French, Italian and assies 

Germanic Languages 

Hispanic Languages 

History 

Music 

Philosophy 

Slavic Languages 

Total 

SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES : 

Anthropology 

Asian Studies 

Economics 

Government 

Linguistics 

Psychology 

Sociology 

Speech 

Total 



(b) 



5,637 


$ 4,312 


192 


1,206 


14,677 


37,085 


6,920 


36,301 


- 


18,899 


26,816 


12,177 


- 


1,031 


485 


16,396 



54,727 



(a) 



127,407 



1,084 



$ 8,540 


7,964 


28,734 


95,062 


- 


473 


150,848 


279,036 


37, 875(c) 


94,397 


5,868 


32,445 


231,865 


510,461 



NATURAL SCIENCES AND MATHEMATICS : 



.(d) 



Biochemistry 

Botany 

Chemistry 

Geology and Geography" 

Mathematics and Statistics 

Microbiology 

Physics and Astronomy 

Zoology 

Total 
Grand Total 



$ 79,268 

70,262 

228,444 

32,650 

52,499 

124,572 

432,294 

182,814 

1,202,803 
$1,489,395 



$ 87,167 

95,126 

258,823 

62,973 

80,193 

165,473 

569,885 

243,229 

1,562,869 
$2,200,737 



Notes: 

(a) A separate total for Anthropology was unavailable as it was included in the 

Sociology Department's total prior to the split into two departments. 

(b) The totals listed represent a combination of the Government Dept. and 

the Bureau of Government Research. 

(c) Includes Anthropology funds, prior to the separation of departments. 

(d) Figures represent a combined total for Geology and Geography. 



^ TABLE 20 



SELECTED PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITIES OF THE FACULTY 



FINE ARTS AND HUMANITIES 
Art : 

Wozniak, James: President, National Council on Education for Ceramics. 

Comparative Literature : 

Fleischmann, Wolfgang B. : Editor, American Comparative Literature 
Association Newsletter. 



English : 

Emerson, Everett: Editor, Early American Literature . 

Frank, Joseph: President, Association of Departments of English. 

Gibson, Walker: Chairman, College Section, National Council of 
Teachers of English. 

Hicks, John: Editor, The Massachusetts Review 

Kinney, Arthur: Editor, Abstracts of English Studies . 

Lowance, Mason Jr.: National Consultant, Office of Education, for 
Upward Bound Program; 1969-70, University of New 
Hampshire, St. Michael's College, Gorham State 
College, Connecticut College, Mount St. Mary's. 

Politella, Dario: Editor, The Collegiate Journalist . 

Hispanic Languages : 

Rothberg, Irving P.: Editor in Chief, Hispania . 



History : 

Lewis, Archibald: Councillor of the Medieval Academy; Member of 
Committee for International Exchange of Persons 
(Fulbright Board) . 



Music: 



Humphrey, Jon: Recitalist and/or soloist in various concerts 
throughout the east and mid-west. 

Kaeser, Fernande M. : Concert tour in Sv/itzerland during the month 
of January. 

Krosnick, Joel: Recitalist in this country while on leave during 
first semester. 



A-27 



Philosophy : 



Matthews, Gareth: Featured symposiast at the American Philosophical 

Association (Western Division) and invited discussant 
at the Medieval Studies Conference at Western Michigan 
University. 



SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES 



Economics ; 



Kane, James A.: Invited participant, "Conference on Research Problems 
and Developments in Urban Land Economics and Land 
Taxation." Lincoln School of Public Finance, Claremont 
Graduate School, Claremont, California. 

Smith, Vernon L. : National Science Foundation Panelist for Evaluation 
of Research Proposals, Economics Division. 



Government : 

Beth, Loren: Managing Editor of Polity . 

Speech : 

Bevilacqua, Vincent: "Visiting Scholar in Rhetoric," Indiana State 
University at Terre Haute, November, 1969. 



NATURAL SCIENCES AND MATHEMATICS 

Botany : 

Schuster, Rudolph: member of a major expedition to the Antarctic. 

Wilce, Robert: Invited Lecturer, dedication, Northeastern University 
Marine Laboratory. 

Chemistry : 

Holmes, Robert R. : Invited Paper, Symposium on Fluorinated Organo- 
metallic Compounds, Toronto, Canada, May, 1970. 

MacKnight, William J.: Invited Paper, Symposium on Polymer Rheology, 
Prague, Czechoslovakia, September, 1969. 

Rausch, Marvin D. : Member, Planning Committee for the Fourth Symposium 
on Organometallic Chemistry, Bristol, England, August, 
1969. 

Siggia, Sidney: Chairman, Analytical Division, American Chemical 
Society, 1969-70. 

Stein, Richard S. : Principal Lecturer, Microsymposium on Light 

Scattering in Polymer Science, Prague, Czechoslovakia, 
September, 1969. 



A- 28 



Geology and Geography : 

Hartshorn, Joseph H. : Consultant and Editor, United States Geological 
Survey and State Geological and Natural History Survey 
of Connecticut. 

Smith, H. T. U. : United States Delegate to the VIII Congress of the 
International Association for Quaternary Research, 
Paris. 



Mathematics and Statistics : 

Cohen, H. : Visiting Lecturer, Mathematical Association of America. 

Stone, M. H. : Invited Participant and Lecturer, Second Comprehensive 
School Mathematics Project International Conference, 
March, 1970; Visiting Lecturer, University of Islamabad, 
West Pakistan, December- January , 1970. 



Microbiology : 

Cox, C. D. : Member, Enviromental Biology Advisory Panel for NASA. 

Physics and Astronomy : 

Dent, William A.: Member, Scientific Users' Committee, National 
Radio Astronomy Observatory. 

Huguenin, G. Richard: Member, Solar Physics Subcommittee, Space 
Science and Applications Steering Committee, 
National Aeronautics and Space Administration; 
Member, Subcommittee on Radio Astronomy, Committee 
on Radio Frequency Requirements for Scientific 
Research Council; Member, Space Astronomy Panel, 
Astronomy Survey Committee - National Academy of 
Sciences. 

Irvine, William M. : Vice-Chairman, Northeast Radio Observatory 
Corporation. 



Zoology : 

Honigberg, Bronislaw M. : Chairman, Plenary Session of 3rd Inter- 
national Congress of Protozoologists , Leningrad, 1969. 



APPENDIX 



I 






B-1 



NEW FACULTY APPOINTMENTS FOR 1970-71 



HUMANITIES AND FINE ARTS (5i; 



W.E.B. DuBois Department of Afro-American Studies (6) 

Benjamin, Play the 11 - Visiting Lecturer: African Literature and 

History 

Attended Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University 
Attended Temple University 

Extensive research in history of Africans and Afro- 
Americans 

Consul tant/Lectui'er to colleges and universities throughout 
the United States 

Cole, Johnnetta B. - Associate Professor: Anthropologv 

B.A. -Oberlin College 

M.A. -Northwestern University 

Ph.D. -Northwestern University 

Assistant Professor, Washington State University 

Associate Professor, University of California at Los 

Angeles 

Donaldson, Ivanhoe - Visiting Lecturer: Literature and Historv 

of Civil Rights Movement 

Attended Michigan State University 

Attended Columbia University 

Consultant to Park College, University of Michigan, Senate 

Committee on New Priorities, Cummins Engine Foundation 

Lecturer in the United States and several foreign countries 

Guellal, Cherif - Visiting Lecturer: Afro-Asian Studies 

Attended University of Algiers 

Attended University of Aix Marseilles 

Algeria's first Ambassador to the United States, Mexico and 

Canada 

Visiting Fellow - Institute for Policy Studies; Adlai 

Stevenson Institute for International Affairs 

Lecturer in India, United Kingdom, and United States 

Richards, J osephus 0. - Assistant Professor: African Art and 

Architecture 

Pj.A. -Ahmadu Bello University 
M.A. -Northwestern University 
Ph.D. -Northwestern University 



B-2 



Terry, Esther A. - Instructor: Introduction to Black Drama 

Masterpieces of Black Oratory 

B.A. -Bennett College 

M.A. -University of North Carolina 

Candidate for Ph.D., University of Massachusetts 

Art (5) 

Davies, Hanlyn - Assistant Professor: Drawing and Painting 

N.D.D. and A.T.D. -Swansea College of Art 
M.F.A. -Yale School of Art and Architecture 
Assistant Professor, University of Vermont 

Denny, Walter - Assistant Professor: History of Art 

A.B. -Oberlin College 
A.M. -Harvard 
Ph.D. -Harvard 

Dube , Eleanor - Assistant Professor: Painting and Drawing 

B.F.A. -Art Institute, Chicago 
M.F.A. -Yale 

Reed, Carleton L. - Professor: Art Education 

B.S. -New York University 

M.A. -Columbia University 

Diploma -Art School, Pratt Institute 

Teacher, Director of Art, Elmira College 

Teacher, Pratt Institute 

Professor, Coordinator Art Student Teaching, State 

University at New Paltz, New York 
Associate Supervisor of Art Education for New York State 
Director of Art Education, Rochester City Schools 
Professor, Southern Connecticut State College 

Reutlinger, Dagmar E. - Lecturer: Curator of Galleries and 

Graphies 

B.A. and M.A. - Harvard University 

Art Gallery Director and owner of arts intempo. 

International Contemporary Graphies, Amherst 

Curatorial Work, Rhode Island School of Design Museum of Art 

Curator of slides and photographs. University of 

Massachusetts 



B-3 



Comparative Literature (1) 

Anderson, Warren D. - Professor: Classical Tradition Studies 

History of Criticism 
Nineteenth Century Literatures 

B.A. -Haverford College 

B.A. , M.A. , Ph.D. -Harvard 

Instructor to Professor and Chairman, Wooster College 

Professor and Chairman, University of Iowa 

Phi Beta Kappa 

English (14) 

Adams, Charles - Instructor: Folklore, American Literature, 

Medieval Literature 

B.A. -Haverford College 

M.A. -Indiana University 

Candidate for Ph.D. at Indiana University 

DiMarco, Vincent J. - Instructor: Chaucer and Medieval English 

B.A. -State University of New York at Buffalo 
Candidate for Ph.D. at University of Pennsylvania 
Phi Beta Kappa 

Eidsvik, Charles - Assistant Professor: Film, Contemporary 

Literature 

B.A. -Jamestown College 

M.A. -University of South Dakota 

Ph.D. -University of Illinois 

Farrell, Kirby C. - Instructor: Shakespeare, Renaissance 

Literature, Modern Drama 

B.A. -Clark University 

M.A. -Rutgers University 

Candidate for Ph.D. at Rutgers University 

Harrington, John - Assistant Professor: Freshman Rhetoric, 

Renaissance Literature, 
Irish Literature, Film 

B.A. -Washington State University 
M.A. -Washington State University 
Ph.D. -University of Illinois 
Phi Beta Kappa 

Jayne, Edward - Assistant Professor: History of Literary Criticism, 

History of English Novel 

A.B. and M.A. - University of California at Berkeley 
Ph.D. - State University of New York at Buffalo 



B-4 



Louis, John C. - Instructor: Freshman Composition 

B.A. -Amherst College 

M.A.T. -Yale 

Candidate for Ph.D. at Harvard Graduate School of Education 

Mewshaw, Michael - Assistant Professor: American Literature, 

Contemporary Literature 
Creative Writing 

B.A. -University of Maryland 
M.A. -University of Virginia 
Ph.D. -University of Virginia 
Phi Beta Kappa 

Ostendorf, Bernhard - Exchange Professor: English and American 

Literature 

Abitur - Gymnasiiom Antonianiim Vechta 
Ph.D. - University of Freiburg 
Attended Loras College, Dubuque, Iowa 
Attended University of Munster 
Attended University of Glasgow 
Akademischer Rat, University of Freiburg 

Robinson, Fred - Instructor: American Literature and Creative 

Writing 

B.A. -University of Redlands 

M.A. -University of Washington 

Candidate for Ph.D. at University of Washington 

Shadoian, Jack - Assistant Professor: Seventeenth Century and 

Modern English Literature 

B.A. -City College of New York 

M.A. and Ph.D. - University of Connecticut 

Assistant Professor, Pennsylvania State University 

Smith, Charles Kay - Instructor: American Literature, 18th Century 

Criticism 

A.B. -Amherst College 

Candidate for Ph.D. at Brandeis University 

Swados, Harvey - Visiting Professor: Creative Writing 

A.B. -University of Michigan 

Publications, Relations, and Editorial, various agencies 

Visiting Lecturer, State University of Iowa 

Language and Literature faculty, Sarah Lawrence College 

Visiting Professor, San Francisco State College 

Visiting Professor, Columbia University 

Lectures and Readings, University of California, Princeton 



B-5 



Wolff, Michael - Professor: Victorian Studies 

B.A. and M.A. - St. John's College 

Ph.D. - Princeton 

Instructor, Assistant Professor, Associate Professor, 

Professor at Indiana University 

French, Italian and Classics (5) 

Allard, Marie Aline - Instructor: Renaissance in France, also 

medieval 

B.A., U.B.C. - Vancouver 

M.A. - University of California at Berkeley 

Candidate for Ph.D. at University of California at Berkeley 

Berwald, John P. - Instructor: French pedagogy, i.e. the teaching 

of French at the high school and 
elementary level and at the college 
level 

B.A. -University of Michigan 

M.A. -Middlebury College 

Candidate for Ph.D. at Ohio State University 

Carcich, Pierina - Instructor: French and Italian Literature 

19th and 20th Centuries 

B.A. - Hunter College 
Candidate for Ph.D. at Yale 

Fata, Frank J. - Assistant Professor: Italian Renaissance and 

Stylistics 

A.B., Columbia College 

M.A. , Ph.D. - Johns Hopkins University 
Assistant Professor, University of Michigan 
Director of Italian Study Center at Bologna, City 
University of New York 

Parry, Anne - Associate Professor 

B.A. - Vassar College 

M.A., Ph.D. - Radcliffe College 

Lecturer to Assistant Professor, University of California at 

Berkeley 
Visiting Lecturer, Yale 

Associate Professor, Connecticut College 
Phi Beta Kappa 



B-6 



Hispanic Languages and Literature (2) 

Loureiro, Consuelo M. - Instructor: Portuguese and Spanish 

Language & Literature 

B.A. -Queens College 

M.A. -University of California at Berkeley 
Candidate for Ph.D. at City University of New York 
Phi Beta Kappa 

Shakespeare, Dennis K. - Instructor: Spanish Linguistics ij 

B.A. -Brigham Young University 
Candidate for Ph.D. at Indiana University 

Germanic Languages and Literature (4) ! 

Hugus, Frank R. - Instructor: Danish; philology 

B.S. -Pennsylvania State University 
M.A. -Pennsylvania State University 
Candidate for Ph.D. at University of Chicago 

Meid, Volker - Associate Professor: Baroque Literature 

Attended Philipps University, Marburg/Lahn 

Attended Georg August University, Gottingen 

Attended Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Frankfurt/Main 

Ph.D., University of Frankfurt 

Assistant at the J.W. Goethe University, Germany 

Visiting Professor, University of North Carolina 

Von Kries, Friedrich W. - Associate Professor: Medieval Literature 

B.A. -University of British Columbia 

M.A. -University of Washington 

Ph.D. -University of Washington 

Assistant Professor, University of Washington 

Vordtriede, Werner - Visiting Professor*: Romanticism, Symbolism, 

Textual Criticism 

Attended University of Zurich, Germany, Cambridge University 

England 
Instructor, Princeton 

Assistant Professor, Professor, University of Wisconsin 
Professor, University of Munich 
Visiting Professor, Ohio State 
Visiting Professor, Bryn Mawr 
Visiting Professor, University of California, Davis 



* Fall Semester 



History (5) 

Bell Hugh F. - Assistant Professor: American Colonial History 

A.B. -Princeton 

J.D. -University of Michigan Law School 

Ph.D. -Cornell University 

John, Eric - Visiting Professor: Medieval History 

B.A. -University of Manchester, England 
M.A. -University of Manchester, England 
Assistant Lecturer, Senior Lecturer, University of Manchester 

Minear, Richard H. - Associate Professor: Japanese and Far 

Eastern History 

B.A. -Yale 

M.A. -Harvard 

Ph.D. -Harvard 

Assistant Professor, Ohio State University 

Swartz , Marvin - Assistant Professor: European Diplomatic History 

A.B. -Princeton 

M.A -Yale 

Ph.D. -Yale 

Research Fellow, University of Marburg, Germany 

Phi Beta Kappa 

White, Robert - Instructor: Brazilian History 

B.A. -Haverford College 

M.A. -University of Texas 

Candidate for Ph.D., University of Texas 

Linguistics (4) 

Akmajian, Adrian - Assistant Professor: Syntex , Non-Indo-European 

Languages (Japanese-Chinese) 

B.A. -University of Arizona 

Ph.D. -Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Phi Beta Kappa 

Bevington, Gary L. - Assistant Professor: General Linguistics, 

Phonological Theory 

A.B. -Middlebury College 
M.A. -Middlebury College 
Ph.D. -University of Massachusetts 



B-8 



Heny, Frank - Assistant Professor: Linguistics Theory, Bantu 

Linguistics, Semantics 

B.A, -Leeds University 

Ph.D. -University of California at Los Angeles 

Vetter, David C. - Instructor: Mathematical Linguistics, Non-Indo- 
European Languages, Syntex 

B.Sc, -Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Candidate for Ph.D. - Massachusetts Institute of Technology 



Philosophy (1) 



Chappell, Vere C. - Professor and Head of Department: Philosophy 

of mind. 

B.A. -Yale 

M.A. -Yale 

Ph.D. -Yale 

Instructor, Assistant Professor, Associate Professor, 

Professor, University of Chicago 

Visiting Professor, Indiana University, University of Illino 

Chicago; University of Illinois, Urbana; 

Notre Dame University; University of 

Southern California 



Music (3) 



Behm, Dennis - Visiting Instructor: Horn and Assistant Band 

Director 

B.A. -University of Iowa 

Candidate for M.F.A. at University of Iowa 

Harry, William - Lecturer: Piano Technician 

Studied piano privately in Holyoke 

Music Theory 

Studied piano tuning with Mr. Wilfred Denis, Holyoke 

Organized own music school in Holyoke 

Piano technician and manufacturing with Read & Co., Ivoryton 

Connecticut 

Piano technician privately employed in Holyoke, also 

continuing to teach and tune pianos. 



Tillis, Frederick C. - Associate Professor: Music Theory and 

Composition 

B.A. -Wiley College 

M.A. -University of Iowa 

Ph.D. -University of Iowa 

Assistant Professor, Associate Professor, Wiley College 

Professor, Head of Theory Department, Grambling College 

Professor and Head Music Department, Kentucky State College 

Slavic Languages and Literature (1) 

Ostrorog, Ludmilla - Assistant Professor: Russian Languages and 

Literature 

B.A. -College YMCA, Harbin China 
M.A. -Harbin Polytechnic, Harbin, China 
Ph.D. -University of Washington 
Assistant Professor, University of Texas 



B-1. 



SOCIAL AND BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES (4 5) 



Anthropology (3) 

Connell, Martha E. - Instructor: Physical Anthropology 

B.A. -University of Colorado 

M.A. -University of California, Davis 

Candidate for Ph.D. at University of California, Davis 

Faulkingham, Ralph H. - Assistant Professor: Anthropology 

B.A. -Wheaton College 

M.A. -Michigan State University 

Ph.D. -Michigan State University 

Ingersoll, Daniel W. , Jr. - Assistant Professor: Anthropology 

A.B. -Harvard 
Ph.D. -Harvard 

Asian Studies (2) 



Lee Francis R. - Instructor: Language Teaching and Buddhist Studie 

B.A. -University of Tokyo 

M.A. -Harvard 

Candidate for Ph.D. at Lehigh University 

Wang, Ching-hsien - Instructor: Chinese Language, Early Chinese 

Literature 

B.A. -Tunghai University 

M.F.A. -University of Iowa 

M.A. -University of California at Berkeley 

Candidate for Ph.D. at University of California, Berkeley 



Economics (6) 



Burghardt, Galen D., Jr. - Assistant Professor: Macroeconomic Thee 

A.B. and M.A. - University of Washington 
Candidate for Ph.D. - University of Washington 

Cox, James C. - Assistant Professor: Public Finance, Monetary Thee 

B.A. -University of California, Davis 
Ph.D. -Harvard 
Phi Beta Kappa 



Duston, Thomas E. - Instructor: Human Resource Economics, 

Urban Economics 

B.S. -University of Maine 

M.A. -State University of New York, Binghamton 

Candidate for the Ph.D. at Brown University 

Kihlstrom, Richard E. - Visiting Assistant Professor: Economic Theory- 

B.A. -Purdue University 
Ph.D. -University of Minnesota 

Muench, Thomas J. - Visiting Associate Professor: Economic Theory, 

Econometrics 

A.B. -Xavier University 

Ph.D. -Purdue University 

Assistant Professor, Associate Professor, University of 

Minnesota 

Sonnenschein, Hugo - Professor: Economic Theory, Mathematical 

Economics 

A.B. -University of Rochester 

M.S. -Purdue University 

Ph.D. -Purdue University 

Assistant Professor, Associate Professor, University of 

Minnesota 

Visiting Professor, University of Andes 

Visiting Scholar, University of Michigan 

Visiting Professor, The Pennsylvania State University 



Government (3) 



Bach, Stanley I. - Instructor: American Government and Politics 

B.A. -University of Chicago 
M. Phil. - Yale 
Candidate for Ph.D., Yale 

Einhorn, Eric - Instructor: Comparative/International Government 

A.B. -University of Pennsylvania 
M.A. -Harvard 
Candidate for Ph.D. - Harvard 
Phi Beta Kappa 



»-: 



Meo, Leila - Associate Professor: Middle Eastern Politics 

B.A. -American University of Cairo, Egypt 

M.A. -Syracuse University 

Ph.D. -Indiana University 

Instructor, Indiana University 

Member of Advanced Studies Group, Westinghouse Electric Corjj 

Free Lance Writer 

Journalist 



Psychology (14) 



Anderson, Daniel - Assistant Professor: Experimental Child 

Psychology 

B.S. -University of Wisconsin 
A.M. -Brown University 
Ph.D. -Brown University 

Brent, Gayle - Research Associate: Psychophysiological 

measurements . 

B.S. -University of Pittsburgh 

M.A. -Harvard 

Research, child development group at Harvard 

Research, Yale 

Eichelman, William H. - Assistant Professor: Human Cognitive Proc( 

B.A. -University of Hartford 
M.S. -University of Oregon 
Ph.D. -University of Oregon 

Fite, Kay - Assistant Professor: Biopsychology 

B.S. -Florida State University 

M.Sc. -Brown University 

Ph.D. -Brown University 

Research Associate, Brown University 

Golann, Stuart - Associate Professor: Clinical Psychology 

B.A. -Queens College 

M.A. -University of North Carolina 

Ph.D. -University of North Carolina 

Supervisory Clinical Psychologist, B.A. Hospital 

Chief Investigator, Assistant Professor, Associate Professor 

at the University of Maryland 

Associate Administrative Officer, American Psych. Associatic 

Lecturer, Catholic University 



Lieberman, Alan J. - Assistant Professor: Clinical Psychology 

B.S. -Brooklyn College 

M.A. -University of Connecticut 

Ph.D. -University of Connecticut 

Post Doctoral Fellow, The Menninqer Clinic 

Chief Psychologist, Berkshire Mental Health Center 

Visiting Lecturer, Williams College 

Clinical Psychologist, Williams College 

Instructor, Bishop Memorial School for Nursing 

Consultant, Child Guidance Center, University of Massachusetts 

Director of Counseling, Simon's Rock, Great Barrington 

Louttit, Richard T. - Professor and Head of Department of Psychology: 

Physiological Psychology 

A.B. -DePauw University 

A.M. -University of Michigan 

Ph.D. -University of Michigan 

Assistant Professor, University of the Pacific 

Grants Associate, NIH 

Scientist-Administrator, NIMH 

Chief, Behavioral Sciences Research Branch, NIMH 

Raush, Harold - Professor: Clinical Psychology 

A.B. -University of Michigan 

M.A. -University of Michigan 

Ph.D. -Stanford University 

Instructor, Lecturer, Assistant Professor, Professor, 

University of Michigan 

Chairman, Doctoral Training Program, University of Michigan 

Research and Guest Lecturer, University of Oslo, Norway 

Reisman, Stephen - Assistant Professor: Social Psychology 

B.A. -City College (City University of New York) 
M.A. -University of North Carolina 
Ph.D. -University of North Carolina 

Royer, James - Assistant Professor: Educational Psychology 

A.B. -Chico State College, Chico, California 
M.A. -University of Illinois 
Ph.D. -University of Illinois 



B-1 



Simonson, Norman - Assistant Professor: Clinical Psychology 

B.A. -University of Rochester 

Ph.D. -Pennsylvania State University 

Assistant Professor, Syracuse University 

Steiner, Ivan - Professor: Social Psychology 

A.B. -Central Michigan College 

M.A. -University of Michigan 

Ph.D. -University of Michigan 

Assistant Professor, Associate Professor, Professor at 

University of Illinois 

Associate Dean of Graduate College, University of Illinois 

Head, Division of Social and Differential Psychology, 

University of Illinois 

Todd, David - Instructor: Clinical Psychology 

B.A. -Alma College 

Candidate for Ph.D. at University of Michigan 

Watt, Norman - Associate Professor: Clinical Psychology 

B.A. -Northwestern University 

M.A. -Ohio State University 

Ph.D. -Ohio State University 

Postdoctoral research, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology 

Switzerland 

Research Fellow, University Hospital, Gootingen, Germany 

Assistant Professor, Lecturer, Harvard 



Sociology (5) 



Chilton, Roland J. - Associate Professor: Criminology, Methodology 

and Statistics 

B.A. -Monmouth College 

M.S. -University of Wisconsin 

Ph.D. -Indiana University 

Assistant Professor and Associate Professor, Florida State 

University 

Gross, George R. - Instructor: Social Stratification and Introduct' 

Sociology 

B.S. -University of Utah 

M.A. -University of Massachusetts 

Candidate for Ph.D. at University of Massachusetts 



Hewitt, John P. - Assistant Professor: Social Psychology, Social 

Stratification 

B.A. -State University of New York, Buffalo 

M.A. -Princeton 

Ph.D. -Princeton 

Assistant Professor, Oberlin College 

Assistant Professor, York University 

Phi Beta Kappa 

Roof, Wade C. - Assistant Professor: Sociology of Religion, 

Stratification, Race Relations 

A.B. -Wofford College 

B.D. -Yale University 

M.A. -University of North Carolina 

Ph.D. -University of North Carolina 

Phi Beta Kappa 

Stokes, Randall G. - Instructor: Social Psychology, Social Change, 

Social Problems 

B.A. -California State College, San Diego 

M.A. -Duke University 

Candidate for Ph.D. at Duke University 

Speech (12) 

Conville, Richard L., Jr. - Assistant Professor: Experimental Rhetor 

A.B. -Sanford University 

M.A. -Louisiana State University 

Ph.D. -Louisiana State University 

Craft, Janet - Instructor: Theatre and Oral Interpretation 

B.S. -University of Massachusetts 

Candidate for M.A.T. at University of Massachusetts 

Cronen, Vernon E. - Assistant Professor: Experimental Rhetoric 

A.B. -Ripon College 

M.A. -University of Illinois 

Ph.D. -University of Illinois 

Fiala, Jeffrey - Assistant Professor: Scene Design 

B.S. -University of Wisconsin 
M.F.A. -University of Wisconsin 

Hopkins, John W. - Instructor: Technical Theatre 

B.F.A. -University of Arizona 
M.A. -University of Michigan 



B-1 



Kraus, Sidney - Professor: Mass Communications 

B.F.A. -School of the Art Institute of Chicago i 

M.F.A. -School of the Art Institute of Chicago f| 

Ph.D. -University of lov/a 

Lecturer (part-time) , DePaul University 

Chairman, Mass Communications Program and Assistant Prof esse 

of Radio and Television, Indiana University 

Assistant to the President, Roosevelt University 

Vice President, Research, and Director, Communicators ? 

Research Center, Daniel J. Edelman and Associates 

Vice President, Research and Education Relations, Harshe- 

Rotman & Druck, Inc. 

President, Sidney Kraus & Associates 



LeGrave , Charles W. - Instructor: Rhetoric 

B.A. -University of North Dakota 

Candidate for M.A. at University of Massachusetts 

Lerea, Louis - Lecturer (part-time): Communication Disorders, 

Speech Pathology 



I 



II 



A.B. -Brooklyn College 

M.A. -State University of Iowa • 

Ph.D. -University of Pittsburgh ( 

Assistant Professor, Associate Professor, Professor and 
Head of Speech Department, Northern Illinois University 
Phi Beta Kappa 

Melrose, Jay - Professor: Speech Pathology 

B.A. -Queens College 

M.A. -University of Illinois 

Ph.D. -University of Illinois 

Assistant Professor, Director of Speech and Hearing Clinic) 

University of North Dakota 

Instructor, Speech and Hearing Therapist, Queens College 

Assistant Professor, Emerson College 

Lecturer, Boston University 

Assistant Professor, Associate Professor, University of low. 

Meyer, Timothy P. - Assistant Professor: Mass Communications 

B.A. -Wisconsin State University 
M.A. -Ohio University 
Ph.D. -Ohio University 



I 



Scott, Nicholas J.G. - Assistant Professor: Technical Theater 

B.A. -University of California, Santa Barbara 

M.A. -University of Iowa 

J,D. -University of Iowa 

Instructor, Virginia Commonwealth University 

Shelby, Maurice - Associate Professor: Mass Communications 

A.B. -University of Washington 

Ph.D. -Ohio State University 

Assistant Professor, Baylor University 

Associate Professor and Director R-TV Film, University of 

Missouri 

Phi Beta Kappa 



B-] 



NATURAL SCIENCES AND MATHEMATICS (3 9) 



Biochemistry (1) 

Barnes, Dorothy S. - Assistant Professor "A" : Enzyme Isolation 

and characterization 

B.S. -University of Massachusetts 
M.S. -University of Illinois 
Ph.D. -University of Illinois 

Botany (7) 

Barrett, Paul - Instructor: Ecology 

B.Sc. -University of New Hampshire 
M.Sc. -University of New Hampshire 
Ph.D. -University of British Columbia 

Godfrey, Paul J. - Assistant Professor: Ecology 

B.S. -University of Connecticut 
Ph.D. -Duke University 

Harper, John L. - Visiting Professor*: Ecology 

Attended Lawrence Sheriff School, Rugby 

Ph.D. -Magdalen College, Oxford 

University Demonstrator and Lecturer, Oxford 

Professor, University College of North Wales 

Head of School of Plant Biology, University College of Nort 

Wales 



Moir, David R. - Visiting Professor: Morphology, Phytogeography 



B.Sc. -University of Manitoba 
M.Sc. -University of Manitoba 
Ph.D. -University of Minnesota 
; Assistant Professor, Associate Professor, Professor, North 
Dakota State University 

Professor, Chairman of Botany Department, Dean of Science, 
at Brandon University 

Raudzens, Livija - Assistant Professor: Experimental Morphology 

B.A. -Barnard College 
M.A. -Columbia University 
Ph.D. -Columbia University 
Instructor, Columbia University 



I 



* Fall Semester 



Smith, Albert C. - Ray Ethan Torrey Professor: Systematics and 

Evolution of Higher Plants 

A.B. -Columbia College 

Ph.D. -Columbia University 

Honor Member of National Academy of Sciences 

Webster, Peter L. - Assistant Professor: Cytology 

B.Sc. -University of St. Andrews 

Ph.D. -Western Reserve University 

Postdoctoral Research Associate, Brookhaven National Laboratory 

Chemistry (5) 

Dickinson, Leonard - Assistant Professor: Physical Chemistry 

B.A. -Bellarmine College 

Ph.D. -University of Wisconsin 

Postdoctoral Study - University of Leicester, England 

Henneker, William H. - Postdoctoral Research Associate: Research in 

Atomic and Molecular Absorption 

B.Sc. -University of Western Ontario 

Ph.D. -McMaster University 

Postdoctoral Fellowship, National Research Council of Canada 

Hixson, Stephen S. - Assistant Professor: Organic Chemistry 

(Bio-organic and Photochemistry) 

B.A. -University of Pennsylvania 
Ph.D. -University of Wisconsin 
Postdoctoral, Harvard 
Phi Beta Kappa 

Uden, Peter C. - Assistant Professor: Analytical Chemistry 

(separations) 

B.S. -University of Bristol 

Ph.D. -University of Bristol 

Research Associate, Instructor, University of Illinois 

Teaching Staff, University of Birmingham, England 

Wood, John S. - Associate Professor: Inorganic Chemistry, and X-Ray 

Crystallography 

B.A. -University of Keele, England 

Ph„D. -University of Manchester, England 

Research Associate, Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Lecturer (Assistant Professor) , University of Southampton 



B-; 



Geology & Geography (3) 

Haggerty, Stephen E. - Assistant Professor*: Mineralogist and 

Electron Microprobe Specialist 

B.Sc. -Imperial College of Science & Technology, London 

University 
Ph.D. -Imperial College of Science & Technology, London 

University 
Postdoctoral Fellow, Geophysical Laboratory, Carnegie 
Institution of Washington 

Hubert, John F. - Professor: Sedimentary Petrographer and 

Statistical Geologist 

A.B. -Harvard 

M.S. -University of Colorado 

Ph.D. -Pennsylvania State University 

Assistant Professor, Associate Professor, Professor, 

University of Missouri 

Meyer, David R. - Assistant Professor: Urban and Quantitative 

Geography 

B.A. -Concordia Teachers College 
M.S. -Southern Illinois University 
Ph.D. -University of Chicago 

Mathematics & Statistics (11) 



Bennett, Mary K. - Assistant Professor: Lattice Theory, Homologic. 

Algebra, Category Theory 

B.A. -Albertus Magnus College 

M.A. -University of Massachusetts 

Ph.D. -University of Massachusetts 

Assistant Professor, University of Massachusetts 

John Wesley Young Research Instructor, Dartmouth College 

Bruns, Gunter - Professor: Lattice Theory 

Ph.D. -Free University Berlin, Germany 

Habilitation, University of Mainz, Germany 

Assistant, Technical University Berlin, Germany 

Privatdozent , University of Mainz, Germany 

Assistant Professor, Associate Professor, Professor, McMastt 

University 

Chang, Chan-nan - Assistant Professor: Algebra 

B.S. -National Taiwan University 
Ph.D. -University of Notre Dame 



* Fall Semester 



Dahiya, Ram C. - Assistant Professor: Statistics 

B.A. -Panjab University, India 

M.A. -University of Delhi, India 

M.S. -University of Wisconsin 

Ph.D. -University of Wisconsin 

Erie, Dieter - Assistant Professor: Differential and Piecewise 

Linear Topology 

B.A, -University of Bonn, Germany 
Ph.D. -University of Bonn, Germany 
Scientific Assistant, University of Bonn 
Member, Institute of Advanced Study, Princeton 

Geman, Donald - Assistant Professor: Probability 

B.A. -University of Illinois 
Ph.D. -Northwestern University 

Gleit, Alan S. - Assistant Professor: Quantum Field Theory 

B.A. -Harvard 

M.S. -Stanford 

Ph.D. -Stanford 

Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Carnegie-Mellon University 

Kalmbach, Gudrun - Assistant Professor: Topology 

Degree in Philosophy & Education, Degree in Mathematics & 

Chemistry 

Ph.D. -University of Gottingen 

Instructor and Visiting Lecturer, University of Illinois 

Assistant Professor, Pennsylvania State University 

Knightly, George H. - Associate Professor: Partial Differential 

Equations, Applied 
/: Mathematics 

B.S. -Tufts University 

M.S. -Stanford University 

Ph.D. -Stanford University 

Instructor, Assistant Professor, University of Minnesota 

Visiting Assistant Professor, University of Wisconsin 

) , - " 



B-21 



Koch, Robert J. - Professor: Topological Semigroups 

B.S. -University of Chicago 

M.S. -Tulane University 

Ph.D. -Tulane University 

Assistant Professor, Associate Professor, Professor, 

Louisiana State University 

Visiting Assistant Professor, Tulane University 

Visiting Professor, University of Wisconsin 

Schweizer, Berthold - Professor: Probabilistic Metrics 

S.B. -Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

M.S. -Illinois Institute of Technology 

Ph.D. -Illinois Institute of Technology 

Instructor, Illinois Institute of Technology 

Assistant Professor, San Diego State College 

Assistant Professor, University of California, Los Angeles 

Associate Professor, Professor, University of Arizona 

Associate Professor, University of Massachusetts 

Microbiology (1) 

Reiner, Albey M. - Assistant Professor: General Microbiology 

B.S. -Princeton 

M.Sc. -University of Wisconsin 

Ph.D -Harvard 

Postdoctoral, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel 

Postdoctoral, University of California, Berkeley 

Phi Beta Kappa 

Physics and Astronomy (8) 

Chang, Edward S. - Assistant Professor: Theoretical Atomic Physic 

B.A. -University of California, Riverside 

M.A. -University of California, Riverside 

Ph.D. -University of California, Riverside 

Resident Research Associate, Goddard Space Flight Center i 

Research Associate, University of Chicago 

Fridovich, Bernard - Visiting Lecturer: Atmospheric and Infra-Red 

Physics 

B.S. -City College of New York 

Attended University of Virginia and U.S. Naval Postgraduate 

School 

Ph.D. -University of Maryland 

Aeronautical Research Scientist, National Advisory Committeej 

for Aeronautics, Langley Field, Virginia 

Aerological Officer, U.S. Navy 

Scientific Research Engineer, Republic Aviation Corp. j 

Physicist, National Environmental Satellite Center, ESSA, 

Suitland, Maryland 



Hallock, Robert B. - Assistant Professor: Experimental Solid State 

Physics 

B.S. -University of Massachusetts 
M.S. -Stanford University 
Ph.D. -Stanford University 
Phi Beta Kappa 

Harkness, Richard - Assistant Professor: Radio Astronomy 

A.B. -Harvard 

Ph.D. -Indiana University 

Research Associate, University of Michigan 

Research Associate, University of Toronto 

Research Associate, Harvard 

Research Associate, University of Massachusetts 

Lasley, Eric - Research Associate and Lecturer: High Energy 

Theoretical Physics 

B.A. -Carleton College 
Ph.D. -Cornell University 
Phi Beta Kappa 

Meeks, M. Littleton - Visiting Professor: Radio Astronomy 

B.S. -Georgia Institute of Technology 

M.S. -Georgia Institute of Technology 

Ph.D. -Duke University 

Assistant Professor, Associate Professor, Georgia Institute of 

Technology 

Research Fellow, Harvard College Observatory 

Senior Radio Astronomer, MIT-Lincoln Laboratory 

Tucker, Robin W. - Assistant Professor: High Energy Theoretical 

Physics 

B.A. -University of Cambridge, England 

M.A. -University of Cambridge, England 

Ph.D. -University of Cambridge, England 

Research Associate-Lecturer, University of Massachusetts, 

Amherst 

van Blerkom, David J. - Assistant Professor: Astrophysics 

B.S. -City College of New York 

Ph.D. -University of Colorado 

Research Associate and Lecturer, University of Massachusetts 

Phi Beta Kappa 



JiiL. 



Zoology (3) 

Kunkel, Joseph G. - Assistant Professor: Developmental Biology 

B.A. -Columbia University 

Ph.D. -Case Western Reserve University 

Postdoctoral, Yale 

Lecturer, Yale 

Scudo, Francesco M. - Visiting Associate Professor: Mathematical 

Biology 

Degree in Theoretical Physics - University of Padova 
Ph.D. -University of Padova 

Assistant, Department of Zoology, University of Padova 
Researcher, International Laboratory of Genetics and 
Biophysics, Pavia 

Research Associate, Mathematics Department and Medical Schoo 
Stanford University 

Walkey, Michael - Visiting Associate Professor: Physiology 

B.Sc. -King's College, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, England 
Ph.D. -Dunelm, University of Glasgow 

Assistant Lecturer, Lecturer, Recognized Teacher, Queen Marv 
College, University of London 



I 



ANNUAL REPORT 



19 6 9-1970 



SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 
UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



lABLi 0£ CONTEIM_T_S 

PAGE 

PREFACE 1 
STATISTICAL IWFORMATION 

1. Appropriations " 

2. Personnel " 

3. Organization; Chart ' 

4. Students Served ° 
ACTIVITIES AND PLANS 

5. Faculty Activity " 

6. (^ajor Accomplishments 1" 

7. Special Programs 10 

8. Future Plans and Needs 12 

APPENDICES; |;;rants. Research and Faculty Activity 

(Excerpts from Departmental Reports) 16 

A, Department of Accounting 17 

B, Department of General Business and Finance 23 

C, Department of l^lanagement 25 

D, Department of (Marketing 27 

E, Center for Business and Economic Research 35 

F, Business Advisory Council ^2 



- 1 - 

ANNUAL REPORT, 1969-_1970 
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 
UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

WENDELL R. SWITH, DEAN 
PREFACE 

During the 1969-1970 academic year, the Administrative Committee 
of the School of Business Administration has developed an updated 
statement of the goals and activities of the School. The statement is 
included here as a preface to our Annual Report since it establishes 
the guidelines that will be follouied in our planning for the continued 
development of the School. 

I. GOALS OF THE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

The activities of the School of Business Administration are directed 
toward development of the understandings and capabilities necessary for 
effective management and operation of business firms and other complex 
organizations in the private, non-profit and governmental sectors of the 
socio-economic system. The goals of the Sc:l,j.cl ccn < be defined more 
specifically as they relate to the primary activities of the School — in- 
struction, research, and service. 

Instruction (Undergraduate and Masters Levels) 

In its moden context, instruction consists of teaching and other 
activities designed to enable students to learn. Through effective programs 
of instruction, the School seeks to prepare students for meaningful careers 
in management and administration. Emphasis is upon building a foundation for 
the continuing program of learning and development that is essential to effective 
contribution in an environment characterized by accelerating change. 



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- 2 - 

Instruction (Ph.D. LgvpI) 

The objective of the Doctoral Program is to prepare selected students 
to perform effectively as teachers .and/or administrators in dynamic insti- 
tutions by means of programs designed to build competence in research and 

learning oriented tftWBPd ^^^ planning, operation and control of business 
firms and related complex organizations. 

Pesearch 

To conduct research related to: 

1 . The enrichment of instruction in relevant disciplines. 

2. Maintaining and enriching the competence of the faculty, 

3. Contributing to the development of established and emerging 

disciplinesj and to do this in such ways as to reflect 
credit to the researcher and to the School, 

Service 

1 . To contribute to the development of close ties between the 
University and those elements of its constituency that identify with the 
mission that the School seeks to achieve, 

2. To contribute to the general welfare by applying the special 
capabilities of the School's faculty to the solving of pressing socio- 
economic problems, specifically to participate fully in programs, such as 
ABLE, designed to develop minority group students for effectiue careers in 
business and related areas of management and administration, 

3. To serve the University internally by involvement in its 
problems of management and administration. 

4. To offer continuing education programs designed to maintain 
and enhance the competence of non-student participants. 






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- 3 - 
II. ACTIVITIES OF THE SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADIVIINISTRATION 



The activities of the School of Business Administration are directed 
toward the development of the understanding and capabilities necessary for 
effective management and operation of business firms and other complex 
organizations in the private, non-profit and government sectors. The four • 
major activities are instruction, research, publication, and service, . 

Scholarship underlies all of these activities. Faculty members are 
assumed to be engaged continuously in study and application of new knoui- 
ledge in their respective fields. At minimum, they are expected to be 
familiar with the scholarly work of others in their fields, to discuss 
this work with colleagues, and to incorporate new knowledge into their 
courses and programs of instruction. 

By one means or another the total faculty input must be blended so as 
to achieve and maintain excellence in both undergraduate and graduate 

programs while meeting the School's service responsibilities to the Uni- 
versity and the Commonwealth, This blending is difficult. There are 
potential conflicts among the four activities, particularly as between 
undergraduate instruction on the one hand and research and publication 
on the other hand. Instructional activity, as it relates to undergraduate 
and W,B.A. courses, can easily absorb all of the scholarly input of a 
faculty member. A faculty member could conceivably devote all of his 
time to the development of those characteristics associated with excellence 
in undergraduate instruction. Mo effective faculty member ever reads as 
widely or develops as much breadth of scholarship as he would like. 
However, a School which has committed itself to M.S. and Ph.D. programs 
must direct part of the scholarly input of the faculty toward research 
and publication, because these activities are inextricably related to the 
achievement of excellence in such programs and they must be carried on at 
such a level as to provide the necessary base to support the size and 
quality targets of such programs. 

Inasmuch as the activities of the School are diverse, the composition 
of the faculty may also be diverse as long as all faculty members pursue 
excellence in their activities. Very few faculty members will excel in 
all four activities even over a lifetime. 



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- 4 - 

Thcro is scjmt- logir t.n thi; appliraticn of tho principln of 
comparatiue advantage to the allocation and appraisal of faculty. Seme 
faculty may be particularly strong in undergraduate instruction, others 

may be more effective in the graduate programs. Some may be oriented 
toward original research. All seek communication of their results in 
suitable mediae Others may be inclined toward and especially capable 
of conducting short courses or engaging in other service activities. 
The important thing is that the total collective contribution of the 
faculty promote excellence in all four activities. 

The fallowing guidelines are applicable to the four major activities 
of the School. 

Instruction 

1. Challenge and motivate undergraduate and graduate students 

to excel. 

2. Offer courses and programs that are abreast of the most recent 

knowledge. 

3. Encourage students to develop the ability to engage in independent 

and creative thinking and to obtain knowledge of progress toward 
professional development in forms that have diagnostic value 
for self-improvement. 

4. Establish a foundation for career-long professional growth and 

development. 

Research 

Provide the necessary faculty and support for graduate programs by 
developing and maintaining? 

a. A research environment capable of attracting the number and types 

of faculty necessary to guide and direct the research efforts of 
quality graduate students. 

b. A research program that will generib financial support adequate 

to fund research activities associated with the target size 
of the graduate programs. 



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Publication 

1, Achieve and maintain a floui of scholarly publications sufficient 
to attract the number and quality of prospective new faculty and graduate 
students consistent with the target size of the School's graduate 
programs. 

2. Since the University desires to establish itself both nationally 
and internationally as a first-rate institution of higher learning, all 
schools and divisions of the University should contribute to this end 

by encouraging faculty to publish scholarly works within their 
respective fields. 

Service 

1, Concentrate upon those service activities which require the 
special skills and knowledge identified with business faculty and in 
which business faculty can make unique contributions because of their 
expertise. Among these services are the following! 

a. Finding solutions to management and administrative problems 

within the University structure. 

b. Designing and offering continuing education programs in the 

field of business and administration. 

c. Contributing to the solution of socio-economic problems. 



!-:■ ). ;. •: 



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STATISTICAL INFORMATION 



1 . Appropriation For the Fiscal Year ; 



Code 


1957-1968 


03 


^21,000.00 


10 


8,000.00 


12 


1-500,00 


13 


10,750,00 


14 (14-1) 


10,000.00 


15 


2,000„00 


16 


700,00 



1968-1969 

■^31,600.00* 

10,000.00 

1,823,77 

10,000.00 

12,400.00 

3,000.00 

1,500.00 



1969-1970 

329,900.-00* 
8,000.00 
1,500.00 
11,000.00 
12,100.00 
2,700.00 
1,450.00 



2. Personnels Number in Each Rank 



Professors 

Associate Professors 
Assistant Professors 
Instructors 
Lecturer 



Total Faculty (excluding Dean) 51 



As of September 



1967 


1968 


1969 


12 


18 


19 


13 


18 


19 


21 


17 


22 


3 


2 


4 


2 


3 


3 



58 



67 



NOTE: These figures include faculty on leave of absence; 

One Professor and One Assistant Professor in 1967. 

One Professor, One Associate Professor, and One Assistant Professor in 1968. 

One Assistant Professor in 1969. 

■itlrf:ludes special allocations for recruiting and related expenses not 
included in previous years 



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129 


164 


214 


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4, Students Served ; As cf SoptDmbEr 

(a) Juniors and Seniors by Major 

Accounting 

General Business & Finance 

Management 

Marketing 

Undeclared Juniors* 

TOTAL 706 778 941 

Sophomores* 

Freshmen* 

Graduate Students on Campus 

TOTAL SBA Students on Campus 

Graduate Students at Pittsfield 

♦Students select majors not 
later than the end of the first 
semester of the Junior year. 
Statistics on Freshmen and 
Sophomores are not reliable be- 
cause of frequency of changes in 
School affiliation. 

(b) Mumber of Students Taught 3250 3891 4485 
(majors & others--class 

enrollments) 

Our upper division undergraduate and graduate programs have continued 
to grou) in spite of the fact that standards have been raised. Some of the 
fall off in freshman and sophomore identification with SBA is attributable 
to an increase in our mathematics requirements necessitated by the grou/- 
ing significance of quantitative analysis in the business disciplines. To 
date, this has been more than offset by transfers to SBA from the community 
colleges and from other U, Mass. Schools and Colleges. Additionally, more 
and more of our management courses are being elected by majors in non-business 
areas of the University. 



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ACTIVITIES AMD PLANS 

5. Faculty Publications, Research Grants, Research Proiects and 
Other Professional Activities 



The members of the faculty of the School of Business Administration 
continue to be highly productive from the point of view of publications and 
related activities. The record for 1968-69 is as follows: 

Articles Published or Accepted for Publication — 39 
Books Published — 12 

Books Under Contract — 5 

This is a conservative view of the publication output of the School. 
It takes into account only articles appearing in recognized professional or 
academic journals; and is limited to contributions that have been published, 
or barring some unforeseen development, mill be published. Other manuscripts 
are in various stages of preparation. Details regarding publications and 
research are to be found in the department reports which make-up the Appendix 
of this reporto 

The faculty of the School of Business Administration continues to become 
more visible on the State, New England, and National and International scenes. 
The reports of the departments (Appendlcies A through D) provide documentation 
on this point. Wy own activities in this area have involved continuing as 
consultant to the Secretary of Commerce as a member of the Executive Committee 
of the National Marketing Advisory Committee, participation in several 
Committee for Economic Development and National Industrial Conference Board 
Activities, in addition to appearences before business groups in New England 
and in Japan, Finland, Switzerland, and Italy. 

The majority of our senior faculty members, and a growing percentage 
of our younger men, are well recognized by their own professional groups. 
Several hold offices in their associations. Professor Litterer is currently 
President of the Academy of Management and Professor Bucll is immediate past 
President of the American Marketing Association. Wany are active on committees 
of various sorts. Examples are Professors Backer and Morrison In Accounting, 
Young and Wortman in l^^ianagement, Paul and Uenkatesen in Marketing, and Osborn 
and Balintfy in General Business and Finance. John Conlon, our Associate 
Dean, continues to be active in the area of mediation and arbitration of 
labor disputes. Assistant Dean Lawrence Johnson is much in demand as a 
speaker before groups, such as the American Management Association, with 



- 10 - 

i^ePerenco to problems in pro\/iding education end training for the -dicadvanteged. 
Bertil Liander has been working closely with New England organizations involved 
in international business. 

The faculty of the School of Business Administration continues to be 
called upon for substantial participation in University-wide activities. 
Many ^re effectively involved in University committees, and several are 
serving the University as consultants to some of its administrative activities, 
for example, Ludtke and Backer served as key members of the Senate Budget 
Committee. 

6. PHa ior Accomplishments and 7. Special Programs 

Our faculty recruiting activities this year have been successful in 
most areas. Next Fall we will welcome new faculty members from the 
Universities of Washington and Wisconsin, Tulane and Yale. We were not 
successful in finding a qualified candidate for the staff of the Center for 
Business and Economic Research to assist in its program in urban and regional 
development. Faculty members of the quality that we have been recruiting 
properly assume the availability of adequate travel allowances and support 
services to retain the cutting edge of their professional competence and to 
make their capabilities fully available to their students and colleagues of 
the University of Massachusetts, If enhanced levels of support are not 
forthcoming, we will be disadvantaged from a recruiting point of view, will 
experience an exodus of highly capable but disillusioned faculty members who 
have cast their lot with us over the last several years. 

During the year, the undergraduate. Wasters, and Doctoral Programs of 
the School of Business Administration were reviewed in some detail. Relatively 
minor changes were made to up-date the programs to keep them in line with 
the current requirements of our students. Additionally, a program leading 
to the degree of Master of Science in Urban and Regional Administration, 
was developed and submitted for approval. 

Program ABLE (Accelerated Business Leadership Education) for dis- 
advantaged MBA candidates, which was developed by Assistant Dean Lawrence Johnson 
and a sizable group of faculty volunteers, became operational during the first 
week of June 1969. Experience with the first group of 10 ABLE students has 
been good, and a second group of 10 is now on campus. The program is funded 
by industry and by EDA, The same was true of the BEST Program (Business 
Employment Skills Training) offered in the Springfield area (details of this 



..-■ I" T'V ~* 



.;t;i.-.*.r-i ;^^: r. " 



- 12 - 

On a gront from the New England Regional Commission a group of leaders 
from four universities, Boston University, Harvard, M.I.T. and U-Wass have 
initiated a pilot project in international market research. The aim of 
this project luas to stimulate export activity in New England industrial 
companies, 

Bcrtil Liander of our faculty served as the project coordinator for 
Western New England. 18 SBA graduate students worked with 17 companies 
(9 in Massachusetts, 5 in Connecticut, 2 in New Hampshire and 1 in 
Vermont) on export problems. 

Feedback from the companies involved has been excellent. 

The School of Business Administration was host to two professional 
associations which held their Spring meetings on the U, Mass Campus - 
The Academy of Management and the Teachers of Business Communications, 
In both instances members of cur faculty were responsible for arrange- 
ments and programming. 

The SBA Business Advisory Council held two meetings, the following 
new members were appointed: 

Saul B. Klaman 

E. S, GroD 

Donald B. Straus 
Wembership now stands at 14. (See Appendix F.) 

Plans are now being made to host an August conference of the Association 
for Consumer Research which will bring about 100 of the outstanding scholars 
in the consumer behavior area to our Campus Center for a two-day workshop, 

8, Future Plans and Needs 

In my report a year ago, major attention was given to plans for further 
extension of the MBA Program. Our ability to work more effectively in the 
expansion of the Masters Programs has been frustrated by the fact that the 
reduced allocation of travel funds made it impossibln for the Director of 
the Program to visit more than a few campuses for interviewing purposes. 
It is clear that this is an essential activity if the Program is to become 
established. Active conversations are now being carried on with other 
divisions of the University toward the offering of Masters level degrees that 
would involve our close collaboration. The proposed program for a M.S. in 
Hotel and Rostcurant Administration is an example of what can be done. 



IJO. . 



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tO'i:'-',-. -r.f 



- 13 - 

I etrongly suspGCt that %hie sf/ction of* ^ho ccpoptft eut>n»it%e<t ti^ «£>»< 
of the Doans will haue a common theme. It seems quite clear that the most 
serious problems on the Amherst Campus of the University of Massachusetts are 
those having to do with the inadequacy of funds for support activity and for 
the development of those new programs essential to preventing our activities 
from falling far behind the parade. While it is clear that the University 
is obligated to growth in rrder to provide ever increasing opportunities for 
the youth of the Commonwenlth, somehow it must be understood that this cannot 
be done unless the secretarial, research- and administrative support that is 
necessary is made available. At the present time a high percentage of the 
members of my faculty find it necessary to either type their own correspond- 
ence or to have it handled at their own expense outside of the School, Our 
Department Chairmen spend hours of valuable time in the handling of reports 
and records that should be handled by an administrative assistant. In my 
office there are five secretaires who are expected to serve as receptionists 
and sources of information as well as to support the activities of the 
Dean, the Associate Dean, the Assistant Deans, and the Director of the MBA 
Program. This leaves undone many things that are important to the achieve- 
ment of the development goals of the University. 

To a large extent our problem is in the inadequate number of. support 
personnel available, but it is also qualitative. So long as salary scales 
for non-professional personnel remain at their present low levels, the 
University will not compete effectively in the market for people to work 
at jobs much more requiring than is true of the State's system of employment 
as a whole. 

In the near future, the School of Business Administration will be pro- 
posing several changes designed to communicate and implement the expanding 
role that is being played by what have been traditionally called "business 
schools" across the country. Whereas most of such schools began in the 
1920s with an almost exclusive concern with preparing students for business 
careers, this is no longer the case. Our official accrediting organization, 
the Association of Collegiate Schools of Business, now identifies the goal 
of its member institutions as the "Preparation of students for the adminis- 
tration of business firms and other complex organizations." This is to c^y, 
as indicated in the preface to this report, that the competence developed 
in a Collegiate School of Business Administration has increasing .ipplicability 
to the management of non-profit institutions, educational institutions, and 
governmental organizations as well as business firms per se. 



■:^' ..-J. 



• ••f 



- 14 - 

This evolutionary chance in focus, or broadening of focus, is en 
established fact; but the inage of business schools held by the general 
public and by nany students still reflects the older orientation. It is 
because of this that soae of our four year underr^raduate schools of business 
adr.iinistration are bejinnin^ to experience declinins enrolltaonts. 

Several of the accredited schools in the Hew England area and elsewhere 
have responded by a change of nane. The School at Boston Collese, for 
example, is now officially called the "Graduate School of Kanagenent.-' The 
same is true of the School at northxiestern, while Ohio State has reorganized 
as The College of Administrative Science. These changes of nane are not 
without their disadvantages. They tend to suggest to the business corraunity 
a nove!nont away fron the real world needs and problcns of the private sector. 
Wo will probably rcconDond a less dratnatic change and suggest that our present 
School of Business Adniaistration be identified at the undergraduate level 
as the School of Business and Administration and at the Graduate level as 
the Graduate School of Management and/or Adr.iinistration. 

Attention is also being given to the dovelopniont of a one-semester 
freshnen/sophonore course that night carry sone such title as "Business 
and Society." The purpose of this course would be to counter the notion 
that nany students have that the business firtn is essentially an anti-social 
or non-social institution, to analyze it critically in view of the environ- 
nent of the present and prospective future, and denonstrate the usefulness 
of nanagenent conpetence in non-business areas. Additionally, such a course 
xjould be of use to non-business students who are interested in an objective 
analysis of how business fits into the social scheae of things. The course 
would also be helpful to SDA students, who normally have their first contact 
with the School in the Principles of Accounting course, in enabling then to 
envision tiore correctly what the various special fields in business are all 
about. This could lead to a aore effective selection of courses and programs 
and avoid a great deal of wasted tine. 

We are also in the process of revie-ring our core courses that deal in 
forthright fashion iTith the developing interface between business and 
society, so that when our graduates becone active in the business cor.-^.unity 
they will perhaps exert a greater force for social responsibility than is 
currently the case, I an encouraged to nake these changes because the 
environnent oriente" courses that we have been offering at the upper division 
level for some tine are extremely popular anong students fron all over the 
canpus. In this connection we are sorry to be losing Professor Karry Allan 



yj. 



- 15 ^ 

to the Deanship to the School of Duoiness at Syracuse University, His 
leadership in this particular area has been outstanding. The proposed 
Master of Science in Urban and Regional Administration and a shortly to 
be presented proposal for the creation of a Department of Urban and 
Envlronnental Studies will further reinforce our cotnaitnent to the view- 
points represented above and put us in the vanguard of progressive schools 
around the country = 

Another deveiopmeat that nay in tine have an effect upon the 
organizational structure of our School is the development of an operations 
Research-Management Science Progran to be administered jointly by the 
School of Industrial Engineering and the School of Business Adxninistrationo 
This proposal was an outgrowth of long-'Standing cooperation between the 
faculties of the two unitso The joint appointTnent of Professor Balintfy 
is a further evidence of this development. 

Attention is directed to AppendiK E, the report of SBA's Center for 
Business and Econonic Research, Given the resources needed, the Center 
can augment the effectiveness of teachingj research and public service on 
a canpus-wldo basis. 

In sumnary,, this has been a year of substantial planning for change and 
devcloptnent within the School of Business Administration, of concern with 
developing collaborative arrangements with other Schools and Colleges on the 
campus and with such internal change as in necessary to fulfill the School's 
responsibility to our students, the University^ and the Conrr^onwealth. A 
final exanple of such activity is to be found in our joining forces with 
the School of Engineering in connection with the ongoing Cooperative 
Education Progran, 

My 1963-69 Report dealt at length with the School's space and 
facilities requirements as we look ahead to the 1570' s and 80' s. We can 
report no progress along these lines in that our proposals to date have 
not been acted upon by the Master Planning Connitteeo Efforts in this 
direction will be intensified during the coming ycaro 



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- ^5 



APPENDICES 
Grants, Research gnd 
Faculty Activity 
(Excerpts Departmental Reports) 



- 17 - 

ApoGndix A 

Part 1 

Department of Accountinr^, Professor Carl Donnler, Jr. Chairnan 

This report consists of tuo oarts. Fart 1 iiill review the najor accon- 
plishnents of the Departnent durinc the year and make reconmendations regar- 
ding future needs. Part 11 uill list publications, research and other ac- 
tivities of DopartDent neci>erSo 

Part 1 

A. Major acconplishr.ents : 

1. The recruitnent of tuo regular facultyj Donald Stone and Martin 
Gosnan, plus the return fron leave of Robert T-ylor, considerably 
strengthens the Departnent both at the Graduate and Undergraduate 
levels. For the next year this will be a net increase in faculty 
since one faculty netiber tjill be on sabbatical for a yoarj another 
will bo on sabbatical for one senester, two will be on half -tine 
appointnents for one semester, and one instructor resigned unex- 
pectedly, 

2_. The undergraduate accounting curriculun xras revised substantially 
to alloxj greater flexibility for students x7ho wish to pursue different 
career objectiveso 

3. Financial support by txro major accounting firms, Ernst & Ernst 
and Toucho, Ross 6: Company, continued at the same level as last 
year. Prelininary discussions with Lybrand, Ross Bros. & Montgomery 
have resulted in a provisional commitnent by them to support SBA 
library acquisitionse 

ii. Participation by faculty in programs of regional and national 
character and appointments of faculty to national committees increased. 
Three faculty are currently involved in research funded by outside 
agencies (FSI and MA) o 

5. Associate Professor Krzystofik continues as Editor of the Mass . 
CPA Review , a publication of growing ivr.portanco. Miss MoteUat is 

the Associate Editor of the Woman's CPA Review and X7ill become Editor 
within txjo years. The value of these appointments to the Department 
and the School is of Considerable importance, 

6. Curriculum, development in system's courses is xjoll underway. 
This development is an expected result of the addition of John Burch 
to the staff and should result in more extensive use of computer 
facilities in all accounting courseso 

7. Members of the Department continue to provide professional services 
to University organizations such as the Associate Alumni, Human Relations 
Council, Mass, Review, Credit Union, and Faculty Club. In addition to 
professionally related activities, m.ombers of the Department have been 
appointed to a \;ide variety of School and University Committees. 






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- 18 - 

8. The Accounting Association, in cooperation ^7ith the Dcpartncntt 
sponsored an Accounting CaroorG night as ucll as other prograns during 
the year. The continued success of the organisation is, in part, a 
reflection of the activities of its faculty advisor. 

B, Special Prolccts or Pro^rans ; 

1. ThroG nenbers of the Departnont participated in the ABLE Progran 
last suTocro 

2. One nonbor taught in the Pittsfiold i-lBA Program, 

3. Two nonbors delivered papers at one-day executive training pro- 
grans sponsored by the Research Center, 

h. A conputer-based business ga.no uas developed and used on an experi- 
nental basis in several Accounting 126 sections, 

C, Future Plans and Meeds : 

1. Departnontal recruiting efforts should bo directed toward noeting 
needs in three najor areas, listed in order of priority: 

(a) Behavioral Science as it relates to accounting; 

(b) Graduate level infortiation Gystens/problens; 

(c) Continued better staffing of the Acctg, 125-126 courses. 

2. Revision of the M.S, in Accounting progran uas not coopletod this 
year and should bo continued next year, TIig objective xrill be to oaUe 

the progran loss structured, 

3. Dovelopcient and approval of courses in International Accounting and 
a graduate tax course should bo conpleted by the Spring senoster, 1971, 

4. Efforts to expand financial support of the accounting progran by 
public accounting firns should be continued. 

5. Revision of the Ph.D, courses in Accounting should bo undertaken 
in order to better organiz,^ the present coverage and to add dinensions 
not presently included. 

In conclusion, this has been an active and productive year. There 
appears to be no "unsolvablo" probloas pending and the staffing of courses 
for next year, with the possible exception of Accounting 125-126, is 
conpleted. 



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. 19 - 

Part 11 

DGpartnontal Activities ; 

Publications ; 

Articles: 
"Financial Reporting and Security Investment Decisions," to bg 
published shortly in The Financial Analysts Journal by llorton 
Backer. 

"Business Ganes C: Sinulntion Techniques," Ilana.-^onent Accounting; .. 
Dsconber 1969', by John Go Burchc 

"Applied iiatheratics and Accounting: CoTxientary on the Psychological 
Problens of Learnins the One and the Intellectual Problons of Re- 
newing the Other," nanar^onent Accountin;^ , (a reprint), August, 

1969, pp, 29"32, by A, !J-yne Corcoran. 

"Dollar-Value L170 Retail Inventory Pricing," lianarienent S erv i ce s , 
September-October 1969, pp, 46-53, (^jith R, Ageloff and R. H, 
Sinpson) by Ac Hayno Corcorano 

"The CPA Exanination in Accounting Practice" (a reprint), Oklahona 
CPA, January, 1970 by Robert W, Lentilhon. 

"Is It Rational to Assuno Rationality in Business?" The Wonan CPA » 
May 1970, pp. 5-8, by Ula i.'oteltat, 

"Wonen: The Forgotten Minority," Massachusetts CPA Reviou . May, 1970, 
by Ula MoteUat-. 

'.' An Enpirical Study of Possible Incoue Manipulation," The Account la'; 
Rf^v<r.TTj October 1989, by Richard Sinpson. 

"Dollar-Value LIFO Retail Inventory Pricing," (with R, Ageloff and 
A. II. Corcoran), HanaTOnent Services ^ Sept-Oct,, 1969, pp. 46-53 
by R, He Sir.psonn 

"A System Approach to Teaching the Accounting Process," The Accountinr: 
Review, April, 1970, pp, 351-364 by Frank Singer. 

"Educational Technology - The Road to Relevance for Business Adnlnistra- 
tion Faculty," - Journal of Business , May, 1970, pp. 2-10, by Frank A, 
Singer. 

Books: 
Financial Reoortin'^ for Credit and Security Invostoent Decisions . 
National Association of Accountants, March 1970, 271pp,, by 
Morton Backer, 

Chapter 6, "Cash and Funds Flou Reports,"' Financial Accountigi: 
(co-author^ by Schrader, Malcoln, Uillinghan, Richard D. Inrln, 

1970, pp„ 167-192 by Thorns Morrison. 



*.. ''. '- 



■■^M 



20 



ReviGXJs: 
Fortran nanuscript rovieued for Addison-Woslcy by John G. liurch. 

Other: 

Associate Professor Krzystofik continues as Editor of the Iiass « 
CPA Review ^, and has contributed seven editorials. 

Research Grants and/or Projocts ; 

Professor Backer and Associate Professor Sinpson have received a grant 
fron the Financial Executives Institute to conduct a study on "Val- 
uation Reporting,," 

Associate Professor iiorrison is currently engaged on research for the I'lAA 
on "Financial Controls of International Operations," (started last 
year) , 

Assistant Professor Janes O'Connell has couploted 21 senester hours of 
evening lau courses at Western Heu England College (presently has 39 
serjestor hours cunulative credits toxrard a J.D, degree). 

Assistant Professor Burch is currently uorking on tuo books, both deal- 
ing with conputer-assisted subjects. 

Professor Corcoran is presently xrorking on the last chapter of a nath- 
enatics-operations research text and has begun x7ork on an accounting 
text. 

Associate Professor Krzystofik is a connittee nenbor in charge of 
scheduling the Me\; England Graduate Accounting Study Conference to be 
held at Ul'.ass., Sept, 9-11, 1970 

Professor Singer supervised the collection of data on the quality- 
point status of students uho had transferred to or fron SBA x7lthin the 
University. This project X7as financed by the Dean. 

Substantial progress vas nade X7ith tx7o types of processing of the Robert 
Morris Associates data tapes and Professor Singer will soon be able to 
shou the capabilities of the Wisconsin progran to the SBA faculty. 
Professor Singer recei. od $5200 for an i8-nonth grant fror: Region 1, 
Office of Educational Research for development and evaluation of pro- 
granned lessons. Professor Singer received a $1,000 grant for the 
acadenic year 1069-70 fron the Provost's Fund for Instructional Ex- 
perinontation„ 

Other Professional Activities : 

Paoors Delivered ; 

Professor Backer: 
"Financial Reporting for Credit &. Security Investnent Decisions," 
Mid-i7ost Regional neetings of the National Association of Accountants. 
"Reporting for Diversified Conpanies," Eastern Regional aeetings 
of Acerican Accounting Association, 






:y''J 'X''^J 'Xi'! 
■■tr. ;■•. f ^ .-vi-'. 






1 



- 21 - 

"Financial Roportinc Probloas," Sprinsfieid Chanbor of Corraorce.' 

Professor Corcoran: 
"The Horizons of Accountins," Uostcrn Wgu England Collogo, Nov. 19, 1969, 

Professor Sinsor? 
"Educational TQchnolo^y-An Inportant ilcu Direction for Research by 
llana^enent Scientists 5" Institute of ilanaoonent Sciences, Atlanta, 
Georgia, Oct. ?, 1969, 

lijo Instructional Prosrans denonstrated at the KSPI National neet- 
ingsj April 29 ■^ Itoy 1, J.970o 

National Associat ion ,Cor,nittoo rieabcr ships ; 

Professor Backer is a ner.ber of the Cornittee on lianagerial Accounting, 
American Accounting Association; and Grant in Aid Connittee, Research 
Project CocaittoC; Lybrand Awards Cor.mittee of the National Association 
of Accountants o 

Professor Singer is a nenber of the Advisory Cotnnittce to the Director 
of Educations Av.iorican Ac.-jounting Associationo 

State Corinittoo lion bership; 

Associate Professor Krzystofilc is a uenber of the Mass, Society of 
CPA's Executive Connittee and Chairnan of its Publications Connitteo, 

Meetinr^s Attended ; 

Departaent nonbers attended Northeast Regional neetings of the AAA; 
Annual AAA Meetings at South Bgnd, Indiana; National and Eastern 
Regional neotings of the Convention of Avicrican Society of Wonon 
Accountants and Aaerican Wonan's Society of CPA's in Los Angeles and 
Cleveland; Boston Chapter Meetings of the Institute of Managenent 
Sciences and 10th Anerican aeeting; NSPI National neetings. 

Other ; 

Assistant Professor Bu^ch conducted three field trips to conputer 
installations for nenbers of his advanced conputer course. The 
students visited the Internal Revenue Service installation at 
Andover, Masso, and various other facilities in the Springfield 
area. 

Professor Corooran had txro course outlines published: 

BA 360/660, Inventory Control, Accounting Trends Illi Innovating 
Accounting Course Ou tlines.. McGraw-Hill, 1969 „ 

Acctg. 385j Application of MathcuatigjEand Statistics in Accounting, 
Curricula Involving Conputors in Coller;iate Schools of Dusiness , 
IBM, 1969 c 



':o -■•XCi;ft:;:"iv 



- 22 - 

AssociatG Professor Krzystof ilc taught ono class on Fund Accountlns 
for Professor Griffiths of the School of Education, Ul'-Iass. 

Professor Backer and Associate Professor Siupson attended a Syr.posiur. 
on "Valuation Roportina" at the University of Kansas, llay 21, 22, 1970. 
This syaposiuv.: uas by invitation only. 

Associate Professor Kraystofilc participated in a one ueek pilot progran 
sponsored by the Anorican Accountinc Associations "Behavioral Science 
for Accountants." 

Assistant Professor MoteUat servov-1 as Associate Editor of the Wonan's 
CPA. 



23 



APPENDIX B 



Department of General Business and Finance, James 3. Ludtke, Chairman 

Research and P'jblicationi 

A. Faculty Research Grants: Abranovic, Belovicz, Deets and Kaczka 

B. Faculty Research Projects through the Center for Business and 
Economic Research; Burak, Plattner, and Rivers were the three major 
researchers in the Lower Pioneer Ualley Regional Planning Commission 
Project. 

C. Many of the other faculty are involved in non-sponsored research. 

D. Boo'<ss Two boo'<s were published this fiscal year by members of 
the Department. 

1. Allan, Harry T. and H, Richard Hartzler, An Introduction to 

Law s A Functional Approach , Scott-Foresman, Glenview, Illinois, 1 Q69 

2. Silver, Isidore, The Law and Economics , Lerner Publications 
Company, Pflinneapolis, Minnesota, 1970. 

E. Papers presented at Professional Societies; 

1. John Bonsignore and Harry Allan presented papers at the 
American Business Law Association. Bonsignore also 9po'<e 
at the riiriutest Business Law Association. 

2. Eugene Kacz'o presented a paper at a joint meeting of the 
American Systems "lanagement Association (Data Processing 
Management Association and the Lower Connecticut Valley 
Operations Research Society) and at the Eastern Academy 
of (Management. 

F. Articless 

The faculty published or had articles accepted for publication 
in the following journals and.^or boo'c readings; Re adings in Financial 
fyi anaoement (Barges 3)| J ournal of Experiemental Social Psychology (Belovicz)! 
"'ianaqement Science (Cheng); Journal of F inan ce (Cheng and Deets); Organ - 
izational Behavior and Human Performance (Deets) I i^ragsach use tts CPA Review 
(Goldman, Hartzler, '<acz'o)? Jou rnal^_gf the American Inst itute o f Decisio n 
Scie n ces ''■<acz'<a, 2)s Quar ter ly R eview of _r_congm i cs a nd Business (Plattner)? 
Journa I g f Legal Education (Allan) 

G. Institutes; 

■<acz'<a is scheduled to attend the Summer Institute for i^anagement 
Sciences and Operations Research at Boulder, and Ludt'<e is scheduled to 
attend two short conferences on pricing and financing in the management 
of public utilities. 



24 



Major Accompl ishmentss 

A. Preparation and submission of a proposal to establish an ^.S. 
Program in Urban Studies. 

B. Successful launching of the 1.S, Program in ^Oanagement Science. 

C. Development of more effective relationships u/ith the Departments 
of -"Mathematics and Industrial Engineering, 

D. The Lauu Group, especially , Richard Hartzler, continues to 
teach a course for the Department of Public Health and taught all of the 
lauj in the 5toc'<brldge School during the spring semester. 

E. Further course development in areas of finance, ins'jrance, quanti- 
tative studies, and the laui. 

F. Recruitment of two young Ph.D.'s who show considerable promise 
and the recruitment of Professor loseph Balintfy, who has an international 
reputation in the area of mathematical programming and its application to 
the area of nutrition. 

Special Programs: 

The Department did not sponsor any special pro jects or programs, but 
many members of the Department participated in special programs sponsored 
by the School of Business Administration, including Program ABLE, the 
JET Program, the Lower Pioneer Valley Regional Planning Commission, and 
1 to 3-day seminars and conferences. 

Resources 

members of the Department have expressed a need for substantial 
increase in funds to support the research/instructional programs within 
the Department. For example, Progrssors Cheng and Deets have an immediate 
need for the University of Chicago "aster and Price-Relative Files on 
magnetic tape, which costs 18,000. Some members of the Law faculty have 
expressed a need for a much larger input in terms of visual aids, parti- 
cularly films. 

Future additions to the staff will require an increase in office 
space and secretarial support. 



fi,:>j (. 









Qri ; 






25 



Appendix C 
Department of Management, Professor George Simmons, Chairman - 

Pub) i cat ions 

Elliot Carlisle, "Leadership Styles for Foreign Operations," i ndustr ial 

Relations Q.uarterly , Accepted for publication. 

, "Affluence and the Individual," [Management of Personnel 

Quarterly . Fall 1969, pp. 31-3^. 

Gordon Chen, "Structural Constraints of Organizational Communication Systems," 
Journal of Bus i ness Admi n istrat ion , Accepted for publ ication. 

, "Business School Core Curricula," Collegiate i^ews and Views, 

October 1369, pp. 5-0, (with Edward Zane). 

Arthur Ell<ins, "Greater Springfield's Urban- I ndustr ia 1 University Complex," 
Industry . May 1970, (with Robert G. McGarrah). 

y 

Van Court Hare, Introduction to Computing , Harcourt Brace and World, 1970. 
, BASIC Programming, Harcourt Brace and World, 1970. 



Halsey Jones, "A Study of Organization Performance for Experimental Structures 
of Two, Three, and Four Levels," Journal of the Academy Management , Sept. 1969, 
pp. 351-365. 

Joseph Litterer, "Research Departments in Large Organizations." California 
Management Review , Spring 1970, pp. 77-84. 

Stephen Michael , Appra i s ing Management Practices and Performances . (Prentice- 
Hall , 1963) Translated for Japanese edition. 

Walter O'Donnell, "Management Development in the Public and Private Sectors: 
Similarities and Differences," Management International , Spring 1970. 

Max V/ortman, Emerging Concepts in Management . Macmillan, I969 (with Fred Luthans) 
, Labor Relations and Collective Bargaining, Allyn and Bacon, 



1969, (with George Wittereid)^ 

Accomplishments 

a. During this reporting period the department instituted a major review 
of curriculum at all levels of instructions. This is being conducted by a 
committee of Elkins^ Bornstein, Litterer, and McGarrah. 

b. The department has established a Personnel Policies and Review Committee 
to make recommendations on all personnel actions, which will be formulated 
independently from the recommendations of the chairman. 



r^ Jixho \ ■ , :/v.: 



26 - 



c. Experimentation with lecture and section courses in main service areas 
(Principles of Management and Personnel Management) has suggested that this 
method is basically satisfactory and that it may result in an increase in teaching 
productivity of from tuo to tnree tirnciS uvei cue craditional method of class 
assignment. 

d. individual members of the department faculty have worked with others 
both within and without the School to establish and conduct con^'erences and 
training programs for off campus groups. 

Future needs 

a. The most pressing need of the department at this time is faculty 
augmentation in two or three sensitive areas, principally production management 
and organizational behavior - personnel management, and desirably also in business 
policy. We particularly need at least one, possibly two, new men in production 
who are trained in newer quantitative methods, and who are capable of carrying 
on advanced research ,n these areas„ We are, at present, somewhat better prepared 
to carry on our program in organizational behavior and human relations, but we 
very much need more depth in the personnel management area, which services not only 
our own students, but also those from several other areas of the University. 
Business policy has not been s high priority item in the past; the current inclusion 
of the subject in the new AACS3 core, however, suggests that we should not neglect 
its development any further.. 



B'S'j'tr.' •:■': ■ \; 






- 27 - 
Appendix D 
Department of Marketing, Jgck 3. 7olf, ChairEan 

Departgiental Accorrol ishirents 

a. The implementation of the revised undergraduate iiarketing program 
during the previous year has continued to be successful. The limited 
but concentrated core has provided Che intended flexibility for our 
majors. Student feedback to date reflects satisfaction vjith the new 
prograir; although the required course in marketing I.odels, a quantitative 
offerings has met with itinor criticism. -e expected this reaction until 
the department receives those Juniors who have completed the five-course 
sequence in matheiKatics and statistics required as of September 1960 = 
During the interiri instructors in the I»;odels course take the quantitative 
backgrounds of their students into account. 

b. The arrival of Professors Barber, guiltinan, Taul, and liek in 
September 1969 has strengthened the department's instructional, research 
and service capabilities materially. The professional activities of 
these and ether departmental faculty are detailed below. The faculty 
capabilities in the department provide good coverage of the many segsients 
of the field: quantitative methods, buyer behavior, marketing management, 
international marketing, marketing theory, marketing research, and 
marketing comir,uni cat ions. Victor 3-jell, formerly Corporate Vice .resident 
of American-Standard, Inc., joined the department at mi d-s em.es ter. Mis 
arrival provides execptionally good balance especially in the area of 
marketing management. His expertise will also assist the school as it 
moves forward in its development of continuing education programs. The 
Department and the Jchool will benefit materially from his wide circle 

of business contacts. 

c. The Department TTas awarded $2,000 over the next two years by 
Stanley Home Products Company. These funds are earmarked for faculty 
research or to assist in the support of departmental programs. The 

Lass -etailing Institute continues to provide $1,000 annually for student 
scholarships. Finally, $1,000 was given to the department by Lr. Roger 
ilichards of the Celenese Corporation as a result of his being honored 
by the Chemical Larket .i.e aarch Society of .\merica. 

d. Sylvania Electric Troducts Company of ilew York City arranged an 
experiment with the Department to use their Marketing t.anagement Simulation, 
Up to this time no school has had this opportunity to employ this m;anage- 
ment game. It had been used only in-house and in a national competition 
sponsored by Lichigan State University. Sylvania has pledged its continued 
use in this School. A final report on format and educational results 

has been forwarded to Sylvania. 

e. Thom.as Parkinson, a doctoral student in ^arketing5 was invited 
to participate in the Doctoral Consortium, sponsored by the American 
Marketing Association at the University of J'orth Carolina. 



23 



f. The DepartfLsnt and the .'estern i assachusetts Chaptsr of the 
American i.arketing Association co-sponsored a n-;eeting entitled, • "That 
do students^ faculty, and businessmen expect of each other as a means 

of enhancing coiranuni cation between these groups, A panel of businessmen, 
students and faculty led the open discussion. 

g. The entire departmental faculty have shox^/n concern regarding the 
importance of quality instruction in the introductory course. Planning 
has been completed that vrill place all faculty members in the I.arketing 
201 course coriiinencing Fall, 1970, 



P rofessional Activities of the Faculty 
Jarber 



1. Independent contract research (January-July 15, 1970) on new 
product planning for the 1970's in the area of household durables. 
Research design involves the use of professional and consumer panels for 
determining housewives' evaluation of current household products and 
applignces, and for developing new product concepts of probable coirjnercial 
feasibility in the short-term future. Eir.phasis is placed on exploring 
the probable impact of changing life styles and current interest in 
environmental quality control on consumers' values and on their ordering 
of hoiTie- related problems and needs. 

2, Continued development of 1 arketing 201 as an environmentally- 
oriented introductory course, including the upgrading of instruction, more 
effective utilization of instructional time, and improving the quality 

of seminar periods. 

Victor Buell 

1. Editor-in-Chief, Handbook of lodern Marketing , i.cGraw-Hill 3ook 
Co., to be published September 1970, 120 chapters, 1400 pages 

2. 'author, ''The i'ew Marketing Man," The Arizona Review , June-July, 1969 

3. American i arketing Association, IniEiediate past president, 

member Board of Directors, Executive Committee, Finance Comrr.ittee (meetings 
Chicago, June 10-19, 1970), Chairman, Long ..ange Planning Committee and 
IJofT.inating Committee, Attended national Conference, Kansas City, March- 
April, 1970, Attended Educator's Conference, Cincinnati, August, 1969. 

4. American i-anagernent Association, Kember A11-.Uj\ Planning Council 

5. Chairman, Conference session, I^ational Industrial Conference 
Board, Annual I- .arketing Conference, October, 1959. 

6. riational iiarketing Advisory Committee, U. 3. Department of 
Commerce, member Executive Cocarattee (attended ir.eeting Washington, D. C, 
ieptember 29-30, 1969, December 4-5, 1969, June 24-25, 1970), member task 
force to identify long-range national marketing problem areas 



2: 



7. Editorial Advisory 3oard, Industri^il harketing magazine 

8. ittended eight day ITi. t-.anagement and Cociputer Seminar, Endicott, 
i'Jew York, July, 1969 

9. \ttended Kanageaent Sciences Seminar, Inartoa Schools University 
of Pennsylvanias Septecnber 25-26, 1565 

Donald Frederick 

1. 33A gr?snt last summer led to two papers; a) A Pricing Decision 
Using oayesian Multivariate Analysis, b) i.arketing E:-:peri mentation 
Within A Decision Framework 

Paper "Jo. 1 submitted to Journ^.l of Marketing .'.esearch and accepted 
for presentation at TIi-3 annual meeting in Los Angeles in October 
Paper Jo, 2 is near completion 

2. Also codpleted papers, "'Inf ormatioa Discounting"- and submitted 
to Operations Research 

3. Lecture at ul.l. graduate marketing seminar on Bayesian Multi- 
variate methods 

4. Aeferee for Journal of Airierican Statistical Association 

Joseph Guiltinan 

1. "Business Involvement in Probleias of Social Concern" with P. 
Worthing, J- Jiek, and G. Paul, a comprehensive study focusing on the 
deteriranation of ways in which business firms can and cannot deal 
successfully with social problems 

2. Article in progress "Strategy Alternatives to Market Segmentation 
and Product Differentiation" 

3. Tiesearch on Vertical Marketing networks with J. '.'iek, a study 
focusing on course development and empirical research with the final 
output expected to include articles and a textbook. 

Bertil L lander 

1. Organized a seminar for foreign executives in Cornc, Italy, 
September 1989 o Four siembers of SBA Staff constituted the faculty. 
Duration of seminar, one week. 

2. Organized a two-day Slack Management Sjrfaposiuc; at Utiass. March 
23-24, 1970. Participants from 25 leading Anierican corporations. 

3. Coordinator of an export promotion project (together with Boston 
University, Harvard and r IT) for 'Jestern Hew England. UMass graduate 
students acted as consultants to IS iJew England industrial enterprises. 
Duration of projects three raonths, sponsor! ilew England legional 
Comiriission (grant). February - May, 1970, 



- 30 



U. Org-jnized sKecutive developr4ient seininar for Gre-^ter Ilolyoke 
Chamber of Coirrierce, i ^y 22, 1Q70 

5. Coordinator of Ui ?.ss JET rrogr-:!?!! 1970; 56 foreign executives to 
participate 1070 

6. Crgnnized and developed r survey of Uii-nSG faculty interest and 
involveu'.ent in foreign projectSj, etc. j (January, 1070). The result ( < 500 
responses) to be published by the Jl ass Office of International Programs 
in 1070 

7. I^ecnber of ULass Faculty .Senate Coir.ini ttee on Foreign students 
(Chairman of sub-coEimittee for Financial ."'.id to Foreign Students) 

3, Kember ULass -'Freiburg Coaniittee" 

9. Kember of SoA, "BEST" CciT^ittee (Continuing Educ-^.tion program 
for disadvantaged in Springfield, i -ass.) 

lOo Conducted a laajor location and marUeting study in Europe for 
one of the largest U, S, packaging manufacturing corporations 

11. Organized (together with Dr. 3. Bur) and developed a survey of 
faculty's interest and involvement in international studies and projects. 

Kent 3^. Monro e 

1. Presented paper on ''The Concept of Irice LiiRits and Isycho- 
physical lieasureEent ^ A Laboratory E^cperiraent, '" at the .■iinerican 
Marketing Association Educator's Conference, Cincinnati, Ohio, August 

27, 196Q. The paper will be published in the Conference proceedings - 1570 

2. Paper on '"The Information Content of Frices" A Frcliminary 
hodel for Estiinating Buyer response ■ accepted for publication in lianage - 
ment Science Application 

3. Paper on "The .rsychophysics of "rices s A -leaporaisal , • being 
revised for re-submission to the Journal of i.arketing lesearch 

4. Presented a paper on 'EKperimental Methods for Determining Price 
Thresholds' with i . Venkatesan at Pennsylvania State University, February 
17-18, 1Q70 

5. Presented a paper on "The I easurement of Price Thresholds,'' at 
Renssalear Polytechnic Institute, 'tay 0, 1970 

6. Completed data collection on study; "Buyers" Subjective Perceptions 
of Price,"' 

7. Aeccived faculty research grant for study; "'Buyers' Subjective 
Perceptions of Price 



■;':'■ '!.'i'i'- 



- 31 - 



8. ■Jorking on a text on Information Systems Approach to h^rketing 
■lesearch with D. Frederick 

Gordon J. Paul 



1. Consuaier behavior; An Intfc.'^rr.ted .ppro?(ch , HomeHood, li chard D. 
Irwin, Inc. 5 1970, pp. 548, (with C. Glenn ;Jalters) 

2. -'A Student Assessment of Selling; Some Exploratory Findings," 
Southern Journal of Business , .\pril 1C70, (with Parker 'Jorthing) 

3. •Psychological and Socio- Economic Atypicality of Consumer Panel 
i'lecib er s , " Proceedin,:Ts of the American i-arketing 'association Fall Conference , 
I'^yO, (with 3en. i:. Enis) 

4„ Paper given to the 3Duthern Larketing Association Annual Leeting 
St. Louis, io., "Student ittitMdes Toward Selling; SoiTie Exploratory 
Findings'' 

5. Paper given to Educator's Conference of the Aaerican I.arketing 
Association (Title given above) August 26, 1969, Cincinnati 

5. Consumer Loyalty Index for P.etail Patronage (Aesearch in Progress) 

7. Proposal for lAllPOS with -Jiek, Guiltinan, 'orthing (research in 
Progress) 

S. Lobility and Purchasing Behavior (..esearch in Progress) 

George Schwartz 

1. Principal contributor on various aspects of marketing to the 
Jefferson Encyclopedia , forthcoming 

2. Discussant, consumer decision making session, National Educators 
Conference of the American i arketing Association, August, 1069 

3. Spanish edition of Development of Marketing Theory anticipated 
in suinmer of I960 

4. Principal author, in collaboration with other members of the 
Marketing Departr^ent, of Karketing and the Consumer; Long-Tern. Issues 
in an Era of Social Turbulence," This paper was prepared for the 
National Larketing advisory Commission of the U. S. Department of Coiriincrce 

5. Research activities during the year focussed on the area of 
Biarketing and society, involving the collection of E^aterials which 
hopefully can result in sorae publication 



i 



- 32 



i_. Venkatesan 

1. Four publications are in progress--rei.dy to subr:dt to profession?.! 
journals, p^hey are; \1) rricing with K. i.onroej ^2) -"ersonality vith 

i-, 'Jorthing, (3) lisk with J. Sheth ^nd (4) Lc=^.rning with J. 3heth|. 

2. 'The Concept of Irice Liiviits and .' sychophysical i sasureiiient ,' 
.\ Laboratory Experiment 5' Proceedings of the American Karlceting '.sso- 
ciation Educator's Conference,, Cincinnati, OhiOj (with Kent l.onroe) 

3. Three books are in press (Consumer jehaviora Experimentation in 
Marketing and I.arketing ...esearch) and a fourth book on marketing Research 
is ready for subirission to the publisher^ 

4. "'as axrarded a Faculty "Cesearch Grant froii; the University of 
Massachusetts for research in nonrnetric seal ing--$3l6.50. 

5. leceived a research grant for $14,135 from Consumer -Research 
Institute, partly to support the doctoral thesis of T. Tarkinson 

6„ Currently engaged in a research project involving curiosity and 
disbelievability in advertising- -with Professor \. J. Silk of I'-.I.T. 

7. Was a speaker to the doctoral students in narketing at Harvard 
Business 3chooi--0ctober 10&9, 

3. "Jas a discussant to a research paper at the '.."fi.Ao Meetings in 
Cincinnati, Ohio--\ugust 1969* 

C. 'as an invited participant and speaker at the first Consumer 
Behavior T/orkshop, ColuixbuSj Ohio--.\ugust 156D^ 

10. Invited speaker at lenn State research Program — February 1970 • 

11. .^rogras; Chairman for the first meeting of the '.ssociation for 
Consumer 3ehavior lesearch^ to be held in Amherstj Mass. in August, 1Q70 , 

12. Chaircan, Ad hoc Faculty elf are Coir-.ittee of the local AAUF 
Chapter ^ 

13. >Iov7 Treasurer, local AAU? Chapter. 

14. Involved in Personnel Policies and Aeview Comniittee of SUA, 
Scholarship Comnittee of the University and the ad hoc coiKnitteG on 
doctoral program of the marketing department , 

Jacos '^i ek 

1. Conpleted Ph.D. Dissertation, "An -\nalysis of the Aelation of 
Vertical Integration and Selected Attitudes and 3ehavioral relationships 
i Competing Channel Systems," and received Ph.D. degree from Michigan 
State University^ 



33 



2. ''inner, AIrleric^n i.nrketing association Doctornl Dissertition 
Competition, 1C6C , 

3. Donated consulting services (xrith J. Guiltinnn) to ?. loc^.l 
businessman regarding his product-r.iis: •=;nd F.arket cultivation activities, 

4. Participated Tjith a tean ( Jorthing, Paul and Builtin-an) in the 
developEient of a research proposal for the Plational Ccience Foundation's 
Interdisciplinary Research relevant to Probleins of our Society {Il.'.'PlS') . 

Our proposal is titled, '-Susiness Participation in ProbleEis of Social 
Concern. " 

Parker rl. Jor thing 

1„ '-A Student /.ssessncnt of Selling; Sorrie Exploratory Findings " (with 
Gordon J. Paul), Southern Journal of Susiness, ^pril, 1570. 

2. -Consuriers ' Images of Foreign Lade Products,'' (with L. Venkatesan), 
subizitted to Journal of liarketing ^ 

3. -Personality Dimensions and Brand Preferences (with i-o Venlcatesan), 
Data gathered and in final stage of analysis. They anticipate writing 

two articles relative to this research. One will likely be subirdtted 
to the Journal of liarketing lesearch ; another will likely be submitted 
to the Journal of Applied Psychology . 

4. "Buyers' Perceptioas of the 'Ideal" !• anuf acturer--Distributer 
l-arketing Effort." Data gathered and in first sta a of analysis. This 
material, gathered through regional trade associations, coniplen.ents 
some earlier research (Worthing's dissertation) and will hopefully be 
incorporated with earlier research results in a Konograph. 

5. Prelirainary work on the following three projects: 'Pvelation- 
ships r^etxjcen lachiavellianisu'; as a Personality Construct and Selected 
Organizational Variables (with Fred Finch). 'Ilexj Product Perspectives; 
Conceptual, E-.^pirical and Pnalytical , "' a collection of readings. A pros- 
pectus relative to this proposed readings book is currently under review 

by a :>ublishero 'A Selected and Annotated Bibliography on Product Planning, 
Development and i anagernent. ' The ilichigan State University 3ureau of 
Business Aescarch has indicated a strong interest in publishing this 
annotated bibliography xjhen it is co;:.pleted. 

6„ Guest speaker. Industrial Foru.- on Product Diversification and 
Espansion, sponsored bys 

Beverly Chamber of Comnerce Industrial Council, 

Commonwealth Technical .esource Service, University of i^assachusetts 
north Shore CoEuaunity College , 

ComTech has asked for an article covering the r.iaterial presented in 
Jorthing's talk to be included in their Timely Topics publication 
reaching ivassachusetts businessmen. 



34 



7. Guest Spe-jker, Jestinghouse Air 3nlce Cocipiny, Construction 
Equip.rent Division's 1950 2nrts Lanagers' Se-.-dnir, Leori^s Illinois , 

8. I -^.rticipr.nt in Ortho .charm=iceutical Corpcrition's Visiting 
Professors Converence de=jling with corpornte efforts to recruit college 
graduates . 

Jack S. Wolf 

1. '.rticle entitled, "SYIu^P: Cof.iputer Graphics for ivarketing Lanage- 
ment, ■■• Journal of i.arketin;^ Research , ..lUgust, 1065. 

2. 'ibstract, CoiT.puter 'ipplications Section, (Cor.putcr Jrograi." 
Abstract for A Synagraphic ilapping GystGi-n), Journal of Karketing Hesearch , 
February, 1?70, 

3. Reviewer for '.ddison-"'Gsley Publishing Company, (review of 
iTianuscript of marketing raanagenent text by Donald G. keyer, Loyola 
University) . 

4. Reviewer for D. H. lark Publishing Conpany, (review of marketing 
manuscript entitled '^The harketing Concept in ..■.ction--An Introduction 

to Marketing, 'Vauthor unknown, 



>. Paper delivered to ilationgi Ccnvontion Natitnal Bcsr Wholes-jlBrEi 
:iation entitled "Diversification Ahead--'Jhat Planning is Essential; ' 



5. 
Association entitled JJiversiticati on Ahead-- '-.'hat Ji'la.nning 
Mew York City 



6. Paper delivered and Panel i.oderator, ilaticnal Leeting, .Jine 
Spirits 'holesalers of Aaerica, Inc., Session entitled -Suppliers and 
"Jholesalers Look to the 70's ' San Francisco, California, 

7. Paper delivered to Forest Products ^^esearch Society entitled, 
'■I:-arketing Strategy; Considerations, Snags and Fallacies, LeoDinsterj 
Massachusetts , 



35 - 



AppGnrlix S 



Center for Business and Econov.iic Research, Professor Robert E, ilcGarrahs 
director. 

Mission of the Center for Business and Sconor.ic Rosearch 



The center was established to serve a tuo fold purpose; first, 
to enable faculty and students to encage in research, education, 
and consultation services for adninistrators of business, industrial, 
educational, sovernnental , or health and welfare organizations; 
second, to provide for organized f ield-projoct-experiences so that 
they ni;3ht becone intre^al parts of professional educational pro- 
3rans of the University. In keeping with those efforts to develop op- 
portunities for scholarly and professional contributions, the Center en- 
deavors to coordinate and support initiatives by all faculty and students. 

This report is divided into two parts; Jirst, a suranary ^f 
activities and acco-nplishnents toward ir.provin- outreach for ex- 
tension services by the Center. Second, a surxiary of on-canpus 
support activities by the Center. 

I. Outreach and Extension Activities 

Studies for the Lower Pioneer Regional Planninr: Conriission 

Professors Buralc, Rivers, and Plattner prepared, respectively, the 

following studies for the Loxrer Pioneer Regional Planning Cor.xdssion: 

(l) Sources and Uses of Public Funds in ^3 Toims and Cities Conpris- 

ing the Regional Planning District; (2) Study of the Econonic iiase 

in Thirteen Outlying Covx:unities of the Planning District; (3) 

Problcns and Potentials for Scononic Growth and Developnent in the 

Planning District. Assisted by several graduate students and 

supported by staff of the Regional Planning Cor.'.aission and the 

Joint Civic Agencies of Greater Springfield, our work on these 

studies gave us an important infornation about a wide variety of prograns 

for socio/oconov.:ic developnent of our oTm region. 

Business Enploynent Skills Trainin~ Pror:ran 

Under the direction of Associate Professor S, R, Michael 
about 15 S3A faculty and graduate students planned and conducted 
a 40 treek 200 class hour course in fundanontals of Business 
Adninistration for undorenploye j Blacks of Greater Springfield. 
Beginning in ilay of 1939 class sessions were continued 
through January 1970, and concluded xiith a banquet for ten par- 
ticipants xjho successfully coaploted requirer.ents of the program. 
The banquet was held at the Ullass Faculty Club in February of 1970, 

Plannin:; for Econoaic Developnent of Springfield's Central Core 

Under a^reenent trith the Springfield l.odel City Agency, Profes- 
sor Arthur Slkins developed prograr. proposals for the establishnent 



■;■. ■■ =->■•• 



■ :■ :; 



.1 • ' 



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- 36 - 

of tiro corporatG GnterprisGS to enhance oconoviic developnont of the 
Model IlGichborhooi Area of Greater Sprin^f ielJ. It is anticipated 
that this proposal will be funded during the suiTT-ier of 1C70, and 
that thG Center will be invited to assist in a joint venture with 
the Springfield ilodel Cities Arjoncy and The Greater Springfield 
Chamber of Comerce to inplenent proposals and prosr^ins for oconoaic 
developaent in Springfield's Hodel Heishborhood Area. 

Study of the Econonic Inpacts of the ilashua River Anti-pollution Pro";ran 

By invitation fron the I.assachusetts ueparfcv.ont of Coraerce 
and Developnent and the ileu England Regional CoLTnssion the 
Center prepared a proposal for U-Iiass faculty and students to 
study the social econonic iripacts of a $605000,000 progran to 
clean up the ilashua River Sasin, This prograv. involving a half- 
dozen tfowns and cities of Massachusetts and I'en Karpshiro would 
serve as a Icind of prototype for other anti-pollution prograr.s 
alnost certainly to bo ii^.ounted in the noar future throughout the 
U.S. The study would endeavor to identify primary and secondary 
effects on business, industry, e^-iployr.ent, nnnpoxrer skills, and 
land usage. In addition, the study xjould analyse and develop 
reconrf:endations with respect to regionalized approaches by 
governnent agencies of cities, counties, anJ states toward the 
achleveuent of the coauon purposes of prograns for environmental 
inprovenent and controls. 

Evaluations of State Public Investnent Flan 

3y invitation of the Hew England Regional Connission, the Center 
developed and sub:;:itted a proposal to analyze, evaluate, classify, 
and suntnarizG public investment plans prepared and subnitted to 
the Kcw England Regional Comission by each of the six Hew England 
States. The purpose of the study would be to provide conclusions 
and recomnendations enabling [^rHC to increase the effectiveness 
and reduce redundancies and thus to improve priorities of funds 
projects and programs it would support. 

Grants and Contracts xjith Federal Agencies 

In April of 1570, the Center retained, under contract, the 
services of ilacro-Systens, Inc. of Silver Springs, Maryland 
to develop contacts wad facilitate arrangements for the Center 
to engage in grant or contract agreements with various Federal 
agencies. This retainer agreement is to continue several months 
into fiscal year '71. 

Joint Seminar Greater Holyoke Chamber of Coirmerce 

The Center organized an executive seminar in cooperation 
X7ith the Greater Holyoke Chamber of Cov:nerce on May 22, 1970. 
The theme of the seminar was "S-ving in a Tight Economic Situation," 
Arrangements for this sem.inar were coordinated by Associate Director 
Liander. Professors; ^Jennler, Ludtke, Simmons, VJortman, Michael, and 
Bean Smith presented lectures and led discussions for participants. 
The sessions xrere held at the Yankee Peddler Inn in Holyoke, Massachusetts, 



- 37 - 

Greater Sprin-;fislj Chamber of Co r-JorcG Sr.ecutivG Devolopnent 
Seninar 

These SG-.iinars are to be helc' at the Kir:bal Towers in 
Sprinsfield on June llth, 1970. The therie is "Louer Costs, Greater, 
Effectiveness In Facinc Growing t-arket Uncertainties." Professors; 
Backer, Kare, Carlisle, Bornstein, Luells and Dean Srith will 
give presentations and lead discussions. 

Executive Seninar Cor.o, Italy 

Intended primarily for graduates Junior Executives in Train- 
ing (JET) Frograr:. of the University,^ this sevninar was held for 
the first tine in Septer.ber, 1Q69. fifteen participants fron 
Switzerland, Italy and Gernany xjere active in this the first of 
an annual procrav-. Professors Backer, O'Bonnell, Dean Snith and 
Associate Director Liander participated. A similar venture is in 
preparation for Septenber 1970 to be held in Switserland. Profes- 
sors O'Donnell, ITolf , Dennler, Dean Snith, and Associate Director 
Liander will participate. 

Black Mananenent Synposiur: 

A Black Ilanager.ent Synposiui: with participation fron 25 large 
Anerican Corporations as t^ell as students fron Boston University, 
Howard, Atlanta University, University of I-iassachusetts was held 
on the U-ilass canpus in Harch of 1970, Ar.ong the speakers were 
Jackie Robinson fomer advisor to Governor Rockefeller and promi- 
nent Hew York businessnan; and the Honorable Shirley Chisholn, 
Denocrat, necber of the U.S. Congress. The syr.posiun provided 
opportunities for candid discussions of recruitment, assit?.ulation, 
placement, pronotion, anong the ranks of Management. Associate 
Director Liander and Assistant Dean Johnson planned and coordin- 
ated the agenda and adninistrative aspects of this program. 

Rural Connunity pGVGlop'.nent Program 

By invitation by the Dean of the College of Agriculture, the 
Director of the Center participated on a comuittee consisting of 
field representatives of Federal agencies, (Agriculture, Interior, 
HUDy HSTJ) and corresponding agencies or commissions of the Common- 
wealth of liassachusetts. Participation on this committee may en- 
hance possibilities for the Center to "catalyze" regionalized, 
consorted efforts of towns and cities to launch urban and environ- 
raental improvement prograr.s. 

Joint ixeotin:~ of the Covmattee on Interiovernm-ental Science Relations 
Federal Council for Science anj TechnoloTs^.. anJ the Governor's Ad- 
visory Committee on Science and Technolo.^v, Cor'-ionwealth of Mass- 
achusetts, Cambridge,, liassachusetts 

In February, 1070, by invitation from, the Chairman of this 
D-eeting, the Director of the Center presented a paper describing 
the purposes and m.ethods of operation of the center for Business 
and Econoric Research. Participants included executives of 






yu -*/. 



^.v;t-;:.;:; 



federal agencies (DOTj i-:UD, DOD Connerco, PSAC, HSF) and acencies 
of state sovernncnt (G/iCSAC, CDC, CA) as well as R £: D executives ■ 
of business organisations (ADL, Raytheon, Polaroid). 

II . On Carpus Activities of the Center 

faculty StuJcnt Serinars on Urban an., Snvironr:.ental I'iprove~Gnt . 

The purpose of these seminars, which were held T7eokly ajain this 
past year, Tss to provide opportunities for faculty ancl students 
to relate their acadenic concerns to orobleis of urban and regional 
developnont and environnental it^provenont. The seninars offered a 
discussion forunj field contacts for prospective research or con- 
sulting projects, and insights to ore-or post-doctoral research 
projects. During this past acadenic year, students participated 
for acadenic credit, as a part of the require;!ents for the course 
BA 700. During the fall, two sessions xrere devoted to "teach 
ins" on Viet Ha:"! and the University involvement with policies of 
military dipioriacy. During the spring a series of sessions was 
developed to shed light on opportunities and challenges for the 
University to becone nore involved with urban and environnental 
quality. The Honorable Frank H„ Freednan nayor of the City of 
Springfield, spoke on ''Urban Problenss Challenges to Municipal 
Govcrnnent and Higher Education," During the spring, the Center 
initiated efforts to launch nore effective and consorted field 
work by the Five Colleges on problems of urban and environnental 
inprovenent. Finally during the spring, we launched a series 
concerned with issues of nanager.ent responsibility for sociologi- 
cal and ecological inprovenents (e.g. racial integration, en- 
vironnental quality, consunor health and safety). A detailed 
list of speakers and topics for the seninar sessions is offered 
in Exhibit I enclosed with this report. 

Support Services 

On request of the Faculty Research Advisory Connittec and 
Dean Snith, the Center kept tabs and published sunoary reports 
of support services for SEA faculty and students. Those services 
consisted nainly in typing, collating, duplicating and distribut- 
ing manuscripts cf reports and papers, and in recording and pro- 
cessing financial information pursuant to the procurement of 
materials, equipment, and supplies an' services by faculty members 
engaged in research. The following statistics may serve to indi- 
cate the extent of such support services. There were 43 faculty 
or students for ^mom m.anuscripts \7ore typed, collated, or edited; 
8Q different manuscripts containing 7,450 pages; also there were 
24 research accounts kept for 30 faculty, and 259 bookkeeping 
transactions were involved. 

Institute for Ilan and Mis Snvironm.ent 

The Director of the Center served on the Steering Committee 
and Chaired the sub-co-mmittee on Outreach for a major proposal 
for U-i'ass to establish an institute for m.an and his environment 
under the aegis of the Office of the Graduate School. The pro- 






• ;,r>"i-' ' ■ 



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- 39 

posal for this pro^irnr: was developed over tho last acacicnic year. 
The proposed Institute would servo to coordinate nany graduate 
an.i undcrf^raduate prograns in resident teaching and research and 
in extension educational services on problems of urban and environ- 
nental Inprovenent . The proposed institute is closely related to 
our proposed SBA Masters' Procran on Urban and Regional Adninistra- 
tion. 

Sonc Conclusions and Reconncndations 

At least four tines during the past acaJenic year tho U-Mass 
connunity ceased "business as usual." The Vict Mam Moritorin 
occurred in October and Wovenber 1969, During the spring there 
were tho April 10th and 11th Teach In, 2arth Day April 22nd, and 
finally, the Strike foUouins President Nixon's Canbodia decision. 
These significant events were all unscheduled. All are signals 
that "real-world problons" nust, somehow be addressed noro effec- 
tively by the U-IIass connunity. 

The Center for Business and Scononic Research has endeavored 
to^catalyze organized efforts of faculty and students who desire 
and who are qualifioJ to engage on real missions and problems of 
urban and environmental improvement. As a unit of the School of 
Business Administration, it seems reasonable for the Center to 
attempt to exercise initiatives for organizing m.ore widespread 
cooperation by schools and departm.ents of tho University connuni- 
ty to engage in missions and problems of urban and environmental 
improvement 

But the Center is but one of many departments attempting to 
exorcise leadership in providing the or.'zanized role needed If 
the University is to bo effective in such a service role. The 
Center and other similar units remain understaffed and underfunded 
(especially with regard to travel and promotional funds). 

Given the background and professional exoeriences of Dr. 
Robert Uood, the new U-Hass system President; given the fact that 
traditional extension services of land grant universities need 
revitalization enabling tho University to help in couping with 
urban and environmental improvement problems; given that'pressures 
from activist students and faculty for more concrete involvement 
by tho University will be continued: the Center for Business and 
Economic Research of the School of Business Adm.inistratlon stands 
as a logical choice as the agency through the University would 
promote, develop, and provide organized research, education, and 
consultations concerned with problems of urban and regional Jo- 
velopnent of environmental improvements. 



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. 1.. 



- 40 

Exhibit I 

Grnd-Foc Soninars on Urban c: Resional Developncnt 

8 Oct. '69 "Crises and BrGakthroughs on Housing" 

Mr. Herbert M. Franklin, Exec. Asst, to Dr. 
J^ Gardner for Housings L'ashinston, D.C, 

15 Oct, «69 "Readjusting National Priorities to liGot Crises of 
Internal and External Security" 

VJillian W, Ford, Brig. General, U.S. Amy (Ret.) 

29 Oct. «69 "Should the University Go Into the ^JanagGInent 
Consulting Business?" 

Professor Robert E. McGarrah 

12 Nov. '69 "U-Mass Program for Inproving Environnontal 
Qualities" 

Dr. Bernard Berger, Dir., Water Resources Center 

4 Dec. '69 "Open Space Denand Model: Recreational Land 
Planning in lietropolitan Regions" 

Professor Janes Kane, Dept, of Econoaics 

15 Dec. '69 Discussion on "The Philadelphia Plan" for Minority 
group Ecploynent 

Hon. Laurence Silbeman, The Solicitor, 
U.S. Dept. of Labor, Washington, D.C. 

17 Dec« '69 "Current Trends in the Adninistration of the 
National Labor Laws" 

Hon. Uillinn Feldosnan, Solicitor, 

National Labor Relations Board, Washington, .D-.C,. 

11 Feb. '70 nJniversity Expansion -ond Housing Supply" 
Edward Blackman, Director 
CoDnission on Housing &. Education, Roxbury, Mass* 

■18-Feb. «70 "Econor.ic &. Manpower Policies of Canada" (Tackling 
Inflation in C nada) 
Hon, Willian Dynond, Asst, Deputy Minister of 
Labor, Governncnt of Canada, Ottawa 

25 Feb. '70 "Urban Problems: Challenges to Municipal Governnent 
and Higher Education" 

Hon, Frank H, Freednan, Mayor, City of Springfield 

4 Mar '70 "Proposal for a Five College Field Station in the 
Greater Springfield Area" 

Dr. Robert C. Dirnoy, Dean of Social Sciences 
Hampshire College 

11 Mar »70 " Proposals : Institute on Man tc His Environment" 
Dr. Mortimer K. Appley, Dean, Graduate School 
Dr. Irving Howards, Professor of Government 






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41 



18 March '70 "Academic Institutions anJ Public EnvironnGnt" 

Dr. Andrew: Scheffey, Dir., Ctr, for Environnental 
Studies, lailians CoIIgjg 

8 April '70 ":)rus Industry Profits" 
Dr. AIgx DarcGS, SDA 

15 April '70 "Race Problons" 

Mr. Vernon Willians, I'EA Candidate, ABLE Prosran 
Mr, Thonas Brady, KDA CandidatG, AiJLE Prograc 






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- 42 - 



BUSINESS ADVISORY COUNCIL 



Mr. William 3urnham, Vice President 
The i'irst Wational Bank of Boston 

Mr. Roswel 1 L. Derby, Vice Presid'int 
Korbes & Wallace, Inc. 

Mr. Harold Elder 

Mutual Plumbing & Heating Company 

D.r. George Ellis, President 
Keystone Custodian Funds, Inc. 

Mr. Fred Emerson 

Mr. Robert Harper, Vice President 

and Genera] Manager 
Greenfield Tap & Die 

Dr. Saul B. Klaman, Vice President 

and Chief Economist 
National Association of Mutual 

Savings Banks 



Mr. Charles J. Meloun; General Manager 
Power Distribution Division 
General Electric 

Mr. iiobert K. Mueller 
Arthur D. Little, inc. 

Dr. Leonard Sill<, Senior Fellow 
Economic Studies Program 
The Brookings Institution 

Mr. Ph i 1 ip S ingle ton 

Mr. Herman Stuetzer, Jr. 

Lybrand koss Brothers & Montgomery 

Hr. Donald S. Straus, President 
American Arbitration Association 

Mr. E. S. Groo, Vice President 
I.B.M. World Trade Corporation 



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ANNUAL REPORT 
1970 
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 
UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 




School of Education 

University of Massachusetts 

Amherst, Massachusetts 



i » 



ANNUAL REPORT 
1970 
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 
UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 



Submitted by 
DWIGHT W. ALLEN, DEAN 
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 



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SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 



July 27, 1970 



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Chancellor Oswald Tippo 
Whitmore Administration Building 
Amherst, Massachusetts 01002 

Dear Chancellor Tippo: 

I am pleased to forward the attached Annual Report of the School of 
Education as part of your data for your Annual Report to the Board 
of Trustees. 

Though the School continues to have growing pains, our progress has 
been substantial and even dramatic. It is hoped that this Report 
will provide you with a comprehensive overview of our progress and 
objectives and will assist you in answering questions about the 
School as tyfiley arise. 



erely 





DWA/tfag 



o 



r) 



ANNUAL REPORT 
1970 
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 
UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

TABLE OF CONTENTS 

I . Evaluation by the Dean 1 

II . Future Plans and Needs 8 

III . Enrollment Statistics 11 

IV . State Appropriations 12 

V . Funded Pro j acts 14 

VI . Organizational Structure. 17 

VII. Special Projects and Programs 25 

VIII . Centers 35 

IX . Addenda 85 



§ 



V 



i 



9 



REFLECTIONS ON THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 

Since the fall of 1968, the School of Education has conmitted its 
energies to a process of experimentation within both its internal structures 
and external relationships, a process in which we have found ourselves de- 
parting from, and in certain instances challenging, the conventional wisdom 
embedded in a wide variety of educational practices. We are committed to a 
course of rational and strategic activism within the field of education. 
Although we are finding numerous allies around the nation, we are increas- 
ingly finding ourselves in the difficult position of being evaluated against 
standards of excellence based upon assumptions which we do not always hold 
within the same contexts as others do. We are, first of all, interested 
in producing a maximum positive impact upon educational thinking, training 
and practice as they obtain both within our purview as a School of Education 
and within our reach as concerned professionals aware of the educational 
crises facing our nation. In choosing such a course, we have had to leave 
the safe harbors of institutional respectability as that has been tradition- 
ally defined; thus we find ourselves attempting to pursue our mission while 
at the same time justifying our venture within an academic and institutional 
context which has not often considered such ventures appropriate. Nevertheless, 
it is apparent to us that the problems in our schools are not going to be 
remediated at a safe distance, and we have taken it upon ourselves to approach 
these issues directly. 

One of our primary assumptions from the outset — and one to which we 
remain firmly committed despite the confusion it has inevitably embroiled us 
in — has been the legitimacy and viability of alternative techniques, programs 
and strategies within a total educational system. It is our judgment that 
many of the difficulties facing schools today are in large part due to a 



€: 



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I m 

linear commitment to solitary strategies. We are not seeking to find, de- 
fine and refine the one best way to educate children. The turmoil in our 
schools and universities indicates to us that students will no longer tolerate 
a Procrustean system of education. What we seek are demonstrably useful 
educational alternatives, and, beyond them an overall educational framework 
which will allow these alternatives to exist within an atmosphere of choice. 
Our mission is not modest, and we may well fail. Others before us have tried 
and failed, and 18 months of collective effort have not brought us unqualified 
successes. Nevertheless, while we continue to seek a variety of successes, 
we remain committed above all to a full and vigorous process of experimenta- 
tion and search. 

Because of the nature of our efforts, our programs and procedures have 
taken on a substantially different cast from those typically associated with 
schools of education. We seek to challenge, for example, the assumption that 
when students do not succeed in schools it is invariably the students' fault. 
There may be substantial numbers of individuals for whom the schools as they 
exist are inappropriate. We may wish to admit into our programs some of these 
students, so that we may find if there are ways to remediate their performance — 
either within the current definitions of academic scholarship or within a new 
framework of scholarship more appropriate to such students. In such instances, 
we may have to treat these students in ways that most educational institutions 
have never deemed defensible. And as we work with these students, we may well 
begin to define standards for their success which do not translate easily into 
currently defined norms. One of our major difficulties to date has been that 
of defining our norms while in the midst of exploring those operations to which 
they will be applied. This situation has produced internal confusion and 
frustration and no little exasperation among our colleagues elsewhere in the 
University who would like to know where we are headed. That, unfortunately, 
is not easy to chart: we are in new waters, and beyond the harbor the waters 



(^ 



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the 



are deeper and tfie charts less numerous. But it is hard to study the flow 



of the tides without leaving shore. 

The first year of the School of Education's new venture was largely an 
introspective one, in which we attempted to find means of eliminating the 
unintended parts of our program which might prevent us from gaining the larger 
perspectives we sought. In that process of redefinition and design, we found 
ourselves without reliable precedents. In the process of marshalling the 
resources of people who were sought because their perspectives differed widely, 
we have found ourselves in the vulnerable position of performing erratically 
some of the more nominal operations expected of a functioning unit of the 
University. We have had difficulties counseling our students. We have had 
difficulties coordinating our programs with those in the field and with other 
units of the University. The efficiency of our administrative procedures has 
suffered in the continuing process of redefinition. Even our successes have 
proved costly. Within the space of two years, our undergraduate enrollment 
has quadrupled. As a result, courses are oversubscribed and we lack sufficient 
supervisory personnel to monitor our intern and student-teaching programs. 
The concept of synergy, it would seem, operates both ways: while we are, 
hopefully, more than a mere sum of our parts, we are also in some instances 
less. 

Our primary efforts thus far have been directed toward attracting faculty 
and graduate students whose common enthusiasm and dedication coupled with their 
widely differing backgrounds and perspectives would provide us with a critical 
mass of energy and insight; toward creating a viable model of participatory 
governance within the School which would be seen as an available instrument 
of change by the members of the School and to which they would also feel 
accountable; toward the establishment of a network of issue-oriented Centers, 
whose activities are complementary rather than exclusive, and toward selective 
involvement in field projects which will give us the opportunities we need 
to sharpen the focus of our ideas, skills and commitment. We have made 



'))) 



'))) 



considerable progress in all of these areas. Eleven Centers are now opera- 
tional, in such fields as international education, innovations in education, 
teacher education, counseling and human relations, administration and leader- 
ship, urban education, aesthetics in education, and a pioneering venture unique 
in the nation in the field of humanistic education. 

By redefining the structure of the School so as to replace traditional . 
departments with Centers, we have attempted to collect our energy around foci 
which are topical in nature and product-oriented. These Centers differ from 
departments in two crucial ways: they are temporary (each Center's charter 
expires in three years unless reasserted and reapproved) and they are non- 
exclusive in that faculty and students may be members of one or more Centers, 
or members of no Center at all. All school programs are intended to contribute 
to our total development at several levels. The Counseling Center, for example, 
in addition to developing programs to be applied in public schools, is helping 
us to redefine our own counseling procedures to make them more congruent with 
our overall objectives. The Center for Research and Evaluation is developing 
new evaluative strategies to assess existing School programs in our attempt 
to determine the generalizability of our findings. The Urban Education Center 
is developing off-campus sites, thus helping to expose our students to the 
world many of them will later confront. These staging areas are developed in 
conjunction with the Center for Teacher Education, and we now have student in- 
terns in such exploratory programs as the Parkway Program in Philadelphia and 
the Temple City, California, differentiated staff school district. Likewise, 
the Centers for Humanistic Education and Counseling and Human Relations are 
contributing to the total program of the Teacher Education Center by designing 
and staffing programs which will give our undergraduates experience in self-study 
and basic human interaction. 

One of our most promising and, at the same time, most problematic areas 
has been that of graduate study. We have been successful in attracting large 
numbers of graduate students of the very highest caliber, men and women whose 



Cj-' 



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5 



collective wealtfi of experience has strengthened the total School program. We 



consider our graduate students members of our instructional staff and we could 
not function at the same levels of breadth and depth without them. Nevertheless, 
we have not yet been able to justify within the larger University community the 
mandate we seek for the legitimacy of credentialing trained activists within 
the field of education, a mandate vjhich involved the extension of the tradition- 
al expectation that the doctorate is conferred primarily for demonstrated 
excellence in purely research-based activities. The development of standards 
of rigor which we can justify before more traditionally oriented areas of 
the academic community remains a large and beckoning task. It is one to which 
we must address ourselves if the kind of educational leaders we want to produce 
are to have the freedom to develop beyond the present limits of accepted practice. 

In the area of governance we have moved to decentralize much of the power 
vested in the School's administration, and to recentralize it within the larger 
School community. By contractual arrangement of a written School Constitution, 
a School Council has been created to oversee the total governance of the School. 
Although less than a semester old, the Council has proven itself to be direct 
and forthright in its assumption of power, and it promises to become a crucial 
instrument in coordinating the overall activities of the School. The issue of 
coordination, coupled with that of in-house communication, has proved to be 
perhaps the most abiding and most serious of those we have yet encountered. 
Because there are so few binding restrictions at the School, and because there 
are so many diversely independent people here, these twin issues have become 
increasingly difficult to resolve as time has gone by. The Dean's role as 
conceptualizing the School's direction, attracting outside resources and 
developing off-campus sites delegates to others the performance of necessary 
but more typical in-house duties of daily administration. He has indicated 
as much himself through his strong support of the School Council. We are 
hopeful that the Council, now completing its organization of committees and 



c 



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m 

procedures, will turn its attention soon to the creation of new vehicles of 
coordination and communication. It may be, for example, that we will need one 
full day every week or two for the processing of activities and concerns within 
the School, rather than waiting as we have for these concerns to either dis- 
appear of themselves or move toward crisis. 

One of the areas in which coordination has been most sorely lacking — again, 
paradoxically, because of our success in this area — is that of non-University 
programs. We have been able to attract twice as much soft-money support from 
foundation and government grants as we have been alloted in hard-money support; 
many more top-flight graduate students and faculty than we would otherwise be 
able to attract, and it has enriched the overall range of our program develop- 
ment. However, the Dean's intentional refusal to set priorities by administra- 
tive fiat for these and other commitments, coupled with the School community's 
reluctance to divert time or energy from its by now normal activities, has 
deliberately created a situation in which our processes determine our priorities- 
a situation which, while flexible, has produced difficulties of interface among 
diverse programs. An example of one unfortunate by-product has been confusion 
within our undergraduate teacher-education program. The unresolved situation 
within this major program is apparent to virtually everyone within the School, 
yet the community has thus far resisted dealing with this issue in a frontal 
way. The recent appointment of an assistant dean in charge of the coordination 
of new programs has helped to bring our efforts into sharper focus, but we have 
yet to tackle the larger internal issues of where we think we want to go and 
how we expect to get there. 

Much more could be written about both our successes and our shortcomings, 
but perhaps this is sufficient as an introduction. The School of Education 
has begun to learn just how entrenched and entangled those problems are which 
we wish to root out of our larger educational system: they exist in the system, 
in the University and within the School itself. As the above notation of our 
difficulties might suggest, we are far from claiming victory. Indeed, we are 



i 



W) 



discovering that we are, individually and collectively, as problematic as those 
institutions we would like to correct or liberate. Still, we cannot help but 
feel that our difficulties have become apparent because we have set forces in 
motion which have begun to encounter considerable resistance, and we interpret 
this resistance and these difficulties as indicators of our success in moving 
in the right directions. "Every wall a door," wrote Emerson. 



Dwight W. Allen 

Dean 

School of Education 



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I 



SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 

Future Plans and Needs 

I. Facilities 

At the present time, members of the staff of the School of Education 
are working closely with the Planning Office of the University in 
developing necessary data to initiate the first steps toward a new 
facility. By early fall, 1970, it is planned that progress will 
have been made to the point of a feasibility study for a new building 
or buildings. 

In the interim, the extraordinary growth in enrollment in the School 
has created a severe shortage in available space to house faculty, 
classes, and activities. The year 1970-1971 will see cramped condi- 
tions which will limit the implementation of important educational 
programs. Hopefully, this situation will be eased somewhat by the 
availability of new modular space units in September, 1971. 

Until a new School of Education building is available, it is hoped that 
every consideration will be given in assigning some or all space made 
available by the release of the Goodell Library building to the School. 
This, of course, would be viewed only as a temporary solution to space 
requirements . 

An additional requirement exists. If the University wishes to continue 
its association with the Amherst Public School System through its parti- 
cipation in the Marks Meadow Elementary School, consideration must be 
given to providing facilities comparable to the other elementary schools 
in the town. To accomplish this, an Instructional Materials Center must 



r 



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I 



be provided. The Superintendent of Schools and the School Committee 



have held serious discussions toward this end with the Dean and staff 
members of the School of Education. The educational needs for such a 
unit have been well documented. 
II. Personnel 

As enrollment continues to increase, current programs reach the point of 
consolidation, and new program thrusts materialize, additional faculty 
positions are mandatory. There are two basic reasons for this require- 
ment. Firstly, a major effort is currently underway to provide an 
excellent program for the approximately 900 student teachers and interns 
who must be trained each year. Meeting the expectations of this large 
number of students with quality programs demands additional staff. 

Secondly, the School of Education is carefully considering new program 
thrusts in the areas of Special Education, Early Childhood Education, and 
Vocational Education. At the present time, educational capabilities in 
these fields do not exist in acceptable dimensions. Yet, the need is 
clearly there. 

As the curricular activities of the School continues to extend beyond 
the campus, these vital programs bring a greater demand to provide 
adequate staff. In order to meet current demands and expectations, 
the present staff resources are being stretched beyond reasonable 
requirements. 

If additional faculty positions cannot be provided to carry out programs 
at a reasonable level, the alternative is a curtailment of programs for 
both undergraduates and graduates, and a limitation of enrollment, exist- 
ing educational programs, and the anticipated development of new programs. 



))) 



I 



1» 

III . Equipment 

New equipment, both functional and educational, is required to support 
both current and additional faculty needs. It is imperative that, beyond 
the usual requirements of desks, chairs, bookcases, typewriters, and 
dictation units, television equipment be provided to enable the micro- 
teaching component of the teacher education endeavor to function at an 
acceptable and meaningful level. To do this requires a much larger com- 
mitment in the budget than exists at this time. 

If the move toward computer-assisted instruction is to be realized, 
there must be a greater commitment in providing the necessary terminals 
and related equipment and materials. 

It must be recognized that lack of space, faculty and equipment will 
cause these vital programs to falter, or indeed not become reality at 
all . 



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11 



ANNUAL REPORT 

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 
UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

1969-70 



Students or Clientele Served 





Sept. '67 


Sept. '68 


Sept. '69 


Undergraduate Majors 


919 


998 


1574 


Enrollment (1st Semester) 








Undergraduates 


2005 


2101 


4489 


Graduates 


761 


946 


1960 


Total Enrollment 


2766 


3047 


6449 


Enrollment (2nd Semester) 









Undergraduates 





4224 


6000 


Graduates 





1656 


3264 


Total Enrollment 





5880 


9264 



Total Enrollment 1969-70 academic year (Fall and Spring Semester) 
Fall U.G. and Grad . 6449 

Spring U.G. and Grad. 9264 
1969-70 Total Enrollment 15,713 



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12 



ANNUAL REPORT 

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 
UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS 

1969-70 



Appropriations — Operational Budget 

03 Services, Non-Employee 

10 Travel 

12 Maintenance 

13 Special Supplies 

14 Office Expense 
14.1 Telephone 

15 Equipment 

16 Rentals 

TOTAL 
Personnel 

Faculty and Administration 
Dean 

Assistant Dean 
Professor 

Associate Professor 
Assistant Professor 
Lecturer 
Instructor 
Visiting Lecturer 
Position Vacancy 
Total 



Actual 
1967-68 


Actual 
1968-69 


Actual 
1969-70 


$56,313 


$120,542 


$165,459.13 


7,908 


11,630 


9,000 


1,908 


952 


1,968.08 


11,765 


21,570 


13,000 


4,454 


2,793 


3,000 


9,146 


18,002 


10,000 




34,502 


30,000 


$91,494 


$216,426 


$242,427.21 


September v 
1967 


September 
1968 


September 
1969 



3 
11 

10 1/2 

1 

6 1/3 

2 

_3 

37 



1 


1 


2 


3 


7 


10 


15 


23 


16 1/2 


16 


7 


10 


4 1/3 


5 


1 


1 


1 





54 



69 



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13 



Other Personnel 

Electronic Technicians 
Technical Assistant 
Principal Clerk 
Senior Clerk and Stenographer 
Junior Clerk and Stenographer 
Senior Clerk and Typist 
Junior Clerk and Typist 
Total 



September 
1967 


September 
1968 


September 
1969 


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1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


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13 



14 



18 



f. 



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3 31 '' 

GOVERNANCE 

During the past three years, the School of Education has experienced 
three different forms of governance. Prior to 1968, the School was governed 
in a traditional manner, similar to most state universities — power was cen- 
tralized in the administration, and the faculty advised the Dean in matters 
of curriculum and personnel. During the 1968-69 year, an educational revolu- 
tion occurred with the appointment of a new Dean, over thirty new faculty, 
and more than seventy-five doctoral students who were brought into all phases 
of school governance as equal participants. After an extraordinary year under 
a modified form of participatory democracy, a third phase was developed — 
governance under a Constitution which tried to find a middle ground between 
participatory democracy and traditional oligarchic rule. 

When it became clear to the majority of faculty and students that 
participatory democracy was not viable for the school, a Constitution Commit- 
tee was established to explore alternative forms of governance that have been 
tried at various major universities and schools, to determine what forms had 
been successful and why, and what in the experience of others would be relevant 
at the University of Massachusetts. The Committee explored dozens of books, 
pamphlets and articles concerning the widely publicized student revolts around 
the community student and faculty participation in governance. University 
administration, and similar topics. Yet this research was of surprisingly 
little help to the Committee. 

There was ample material on administrative theory, multiple faculty 
committee reports and recommendations on University reform, and on the aims 
and ideals of higher education, plus detailed dissertations on specific aspects 
of University administration (such as whether department chairman are chosen 
or elected, or on procedures for appeal in personnel matters). But the Committee 
found no relevant accounts that traced particular models of governance from 



€f. 






f H) ■ " 

conception through implementation and evaluation. With this type of information 
we might have built on the experience of the past and learned from the mistakes 
and successes of others. Because such information was not available, we relied 
on general principles, partial accounts, annecdotal information, hearsay, 
intuition and personal experience. 

We are now operating under a constitutional form of governance. Under 
this Constitution we have developed features for more extensive student parti- 
cipation than at any major university we know of. With students participating 
as voting members of all committees — including curriculum and personnel — and 
comprising about 50% of the school's policy making body, we are operating 
under a system that radical reformers at most state universities and colleges 
are only talking about. 

In August of 1969, the Constitution Committee published an Interim 

Report on the Proposed Constitution. This document provides an informative 

look at the evolution of the Constitution, and the problems, questions, ideas 

and alternatives the Committee faced. The Interim Report and the first draft 

of the Constitution were circulated in the School for reaction, discussion 

and suggestions. In November, the students and faculty of the School of 

Education voted by secret ballot to adopt the proposed Constitution. According 

to Article I, A: 

The broad powers conferred on the Dean by the University shall 
be exercised within the framework of this Constitution in coop- 
eration with the students, faculty and staff of the School of 
Education in accord with the rules and policies of the University 
and the Board of Trustees. 

The School Council is the primary policy-making body of the School. 
School Council elections were held in December, 1969. The first Council 



Since in this Constitution, the Dean delegates more of his power to the 
students and faculty of the School than is normal at the University, the 
Constitution would be binding only for the term of the present Dean. 



c 



■i T 

consisted of tt./f acuity , fourteen students, and the four Deans. During the 
semester, two of the three consultant representatives to the Council were 
nominated by the Dean and approved by the Council. 

The first semester of School Council operation was a hectic one. 
Constitutionally, the Council should be elected at the end of the spring 
semester and govern for a full school year. However, the first Council had 
only one semester of existence, and being first, it had a great deal of area 
to cover, had no precedents to follow and had only half the time in which to 
do it. But a remarkable amount of work was accomplished, a number of prece- 
dents were set, and a lot of lessons were learned. A solid foundation was 
built, upon which future Councils can work with more effectiveness and 
efficiency. 

The Constitution of the School attempts to provide a mechanism to allow 
for maximum participation by individuals in the policy formation process. The 
main vehicle for carrying this out is the committee system. "Special" (ad hoc) 
committees are provided to consider single issues or problems, make recommen- 
dations to the Council and then disband. There is an automatic presumption in 
favor of the committees' recommendations, since they cannot be amended at meet- 
ings of the Council unless such amendments are approved by 3/4 of the Council. 
This past semester, there were around thirty special committees or special 
reports by individuals. 

Committees contributed a good deal of effort and thought, and submitted 
reports to the Council that were of invaluable help in policy formation. 
Because of the policies and precedents set this year, there should be a reduced 
need in the future for as many committees, and the functioning, coordination 
and communications within and among the committees and the school can be more 
refined. Committees were composed of both Council members and non-members, 
students and faculty. The committee that drew up the criteria by which old 
centers are reviewed and new ones established was chaired by a student and 



i 



composed of two students and two faculty. The committee that established pro- 
cedures and policies for judicial review, arbitration and constitutional 
interpretation included two faculty and two students. A Budget Committee, 
composed of two students and three faculty members, was established to consider 
policy questions concerning allocation of school funds as suggested by members 
of the School Community for approval by the Council and recommendation to the 
administration. Going beyond what it had been asked to do, the Committee worked 
with the Assistant Dean for Administration and prepared policy guidelines for 
budget preparation and spending of funds authorized by the University. A 
committee composed entirely of students studied the problem of communications 
in the School, a vital area of concern in a School that is attempting to involve 
all members of its community in governance and in their own education. The 
committee proposed a number of excellent recommendations and then helped im- 
plement them. Each of the above mentioned committees submitted reports and 
recommendations to the Council that were discussed and enacted as policy of 
the School. These are only four examples of many excellent efforts by commit- 
tees, and are not meant to detract from the importance or contribution of other 
committees. 

The Constitution provides that a Constitution Evaluation Committee shall 
be appointed to "continually review the operation of this Constitution and to 
make recommendations for its improvement and revision". The Constitution 
Evaluation Committee was established as a subcommittee of the School Evaluation 
Committee, along with subcommittees to evaluate the Administration and the 
Centers. This Committee, and its subcommittees, will be standing committees 
involved in a continuing evaluation of the School. The past year was spent 
designing the evaluation methods, and a beginning was made in actual evaluation. 
The Center Evaluation Committee surveyed the community for its goals for Centers. 
The Constitution Evaluation Committee produced a report on the implementation 
of the Constitution. The Administration Evaluation Committee is in the process 



')) 



f H) 



22 



of defining what the Administration is. And the overall Evaluation Committee 
is involved in the first stage of developing a conceptualization of the major 
components of the School. These committees will hopefully provide continuing 
feedback on performance and expectations so as to enable the School to serve 
its members effectively. 

The Constitution states that there shall be an Executive Committee of 
the School Council composed of five persons, that "shall be the primary 
coordinating body of the School". The Executive Committee was of vital 
importance this year, since it had the major responsibility of seeing to it 
that the provisions of the Constitution were implemented. The Committee 
dealt with a wide range of School concerns and issues, formed committees 
and mandates, established what issues and problems would go to the Council, 
decided who should make decisions not specified in the Constitution, attempted 
to anticipate problems and issues before they reached a crisis stage and did 
a great many other things necessary to facilitate the implementation of the 
Constitution and the governance of the School. The committee had a close, 
but independent relationship with the Dean, something that was of great 
necessity during the period of transition in authority and power, as new 
roles and functions developed. 

The Constitution provides for a system of conflict resolution. As part 
of this system, the Judicial Committee, consisting of five persons, was 
elected by the Council this spring and is in operation. An Ombudsman was 
approved by the Council in the spring, and he has appointed a panel of con- 
sultants to assist him. Although he has been involved in some conflict 
resolution, his major focus this year has been conceptualization of the role 
and function of Ombudsman. 

The Education Assembly, composed of all faculty, doctoral students in 
residence, professional appointees, and representatives of undergraduates. 



( 



master candidates and support staff, is the "major advisory body and general 
forum of the School of Education". Before adoption of the Constitution, the 
Assembly attempted to be a participatory town meeting, decision-making body. 
But the size of the body tended to limit full discussion and consideration 
of issues, and many felt frustrated by the lack of effective decision making. 
Under the Constitution, the much smaller School Council assumes the major 
authority of the old Assembly, while the Assembly, through meetings of referenda, 
continues to play an advisory role and has legislative authority in the most 
important or controversial issues in the School. Some problems still exist 
in terms of participation in the Assembly and the effectiveness of the meetings. 
It is likely that the use of referenda will become the major focus for Assembly 
action, rather than meetings, which will serve best as forums for discussions 
of problems and concerns. , : . 

The Graduate Assembly is composed of all School members of the Graduate 
Faculty of the University and one third that number elected by and from the 
Education Assembly. It is "solely responsible for establishing School policy 
concerning graduate admissions and graduate degrees in Education, subject to 
the ratification of the School Council". The Assembly has committees dealing 
with Graduate Admissions, Advising and Student Programs, Comprehensive Examina- 
tions, Dissertations, Curriculum and Financial Aid. Policies were established 
this year in the areas of Admissions, Dissertations and Financial Aid. A 
Resolution Committee was established to mediate differences in motions and 
policies passed by the Graduate Assembly and not ratified by the School Council. 
The Graduate Assembly had problems in poor attendance and lack of involvement 
by members in policy formation, but changes will hopefully be made in the 
future concerning internal policies and procedures so as to increase the in- 
volvement and input of the members. 

The Constitution, and governance in the School, underwent its most severe 
test during the late spring, as the invasion of Cambodia, the killing of students 
at Kent State and Jackson State, and the wave of student strikes that swept the 



< 



country had their impact at the School. An Education Assembly meeting had 
previously been scheduled to occur during that time, and the emotion, shock 
and indignation over national affairs, combined with the internal dissatisfaction 
of some members of the School community to create an atmosphere of uncertainty, 
confusion and mistrust about the response of the School, and the role of and 
reason for the School. Some attempts were made to close down the School 
without following constitutional methods of decision-making. 

On the whole, however, the School recognized the right of all members to 
participate in whatever way they felt was right for them, without fear of 
punitive action. The semester ended before the School could become deeply 
involved in the self-evaluation that some wanted, but hopefully this will 
take place in the fall, when emotions are less heated, and objective, ration- 
al discussion can take place. - ■ 

The past year was one of adoption of, and adjustment to, a new form of 
governance, largely without precedent in American higher education. Much 
remains to be done in refining and completing the establishment of the con- 
stitutional provisions for governance in the School, but a strong, firm base 
was created this year, on which the School can build and restructure in the 
future. Roles, functions and authorities are still not completely defined 
and established, and perhaps they should not be too firmly established, but 
rather should remain flexible enough to meet new needs and responsibilities. 
However, the School and the University can be justifiably proud of the experi- 
ment taking place in the governance of the School of Education, an experiment 
in decentralization of authority in policy and decision-making from the 
administration to the faculty and students. 



W' 



T) 



SPECIAL PROJECTS AND PROGRAMS 

During the academic year 1969/70 the School of Education was involved 
in a great many special projects and programs. Such projects combined with 
the teacher training programs and course offerings of the School enable us 
to achieve our goal of improved education both through the preparation of 
effective, committed teachers and educational leaders and through positive 
changes in the educational system. Through a variety of programs and 
events designed primarily for students but also for educators in the field 
and through a variety of off-campus projects we are providing important 
experiential opportunities for students and we are continually suggesting 
new directions for education — new directions which will place educational 
institutions in a position from which they can anticipate and foster needed 
changes in society. 

SPECIAL EVENTS 

"Something '70 — A Modular Credit Week" is one example of a special 
event held at the School for the benefit of students and educators from the 
University as well as from other institutions throughout the country. During 
that week — February 23-27 — all normal classes at the School were suspended 
and in their place a multi-faceted series of modular credit experiences was 
offered. These experiences, totaling near 200, were conducted by faculty 
and doctoral students at the School as well as by many guest speakers from 
other institutions and educational corporations for the benefit of thousands 
of participants — students of all ages from all departments in the University 
and other schools; teachers from area schools and universities as far away 



r 



> 1 

as California and Florida; and many others interested in educational 



26 



innovations. Offerings varied widely in subject matter and mode of pre- 
sentation but the unifying factor of the week was new departures in education. 

A unique aspect of "Something '70" was the opportunity for students to 
gain modular credit through participation in events of their choice, thus 
allowing them to enrich their own academic programs . Three hundred and 
seventy students obtained over 2,000 modules of credit (the equivalent of 
more than 130 university credits) during the week. 

Due to the success of "Something '70" and the two educational marathons 
held during the 1968/69 academic year we plan to extend and diversify the 
program for next year. Scheduled at this time are two week-long events 
similar in format to "Something '70" stressing educational innovations and 
featuring multi-media presentations; four modular methods weeks offering 
teachers from throughout the state the opportunity to present their favorite 
teaching methods for the benefit of other teachers and students and allowing 
us to build a resource library of teaching methods; and two graduate student 
colloquia during which all doctoral candidates at the School will make 
presentations related to their doctoral work. All three types of events — 
marathons , methods , and colloquia — are planned to introduce present and 
future educators to new directions in education and to facilitate the intro- 
duction of these innovations into educational systems. 

S PECIAL AND OFF CAMPUS PROGRAMS 

In the fall of 1969, an assistant deanship was created for 
Special Program Development to coordinate and facilitate all special and 
off-campus programs. During the year the Assistant Dean was occupied mainly 
with coordinating and monitoring all existing projects for quality and con- 
gruence with school goals and priorities; with the dissemination of information 



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concerning existing and potential projects; with conferences with represen- 
tatives from other institutions, school systems, governmental and other 
funding agencies who presently or potentially cooperate with the School on 
special and off-campus programs; with meetings with faculty and doctoral 
students within the school, concerning proposals for special projects and 
programs; with the planning and conceptualization of new programs in areas 
of interest to the whole school; and with the establishment of guidelines for 
evaluation of all projects and programs. Such guidelines are necessary to 
insure that all special projects serve the interests of the School and its 
personnel in the most effective way and are in line with the overall pro- 
grammatic priorities of the School. 

Though varied in scope and intent, all off-campus programs — some seventy 
in number — allow for the application of university resources and talents to 
actual school environments. Through special programs and off-campus projects 
major training functions are carried out, efforts to implement important 
changes in American education are attempted and a variety of experiments are 
given an opportunity to be tested. 

Each center, the emerging centers and many individuals in the School are 
involved in off-campus projects. Such projects not only reflect the major 
teacher training function of the School but also the overall areas of concern 
as to the state of American education. Those projects which are directly 
related to teacher training such as the Model Elementary Teacher Education 
Program and a great number of internship programs are augmented by a variety 
of projects such as the Northeast Regional Media Center for the Deaf, the 
Comprehensive Achievement Monitoring Project, the Distributive Education 
Project whose indirect effects are teacher preparation. We feel strongly 
that through involvement with off-campus projects our students, both at the 



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graduate and undergraduate level are receiving an experience and preparation 
for teaching that is far more crucial and significant than has often been 
characteristic of traditional student teaching experiences. 

Another particular area of concern for the School — and in fact an area 
of concern for the whole of American society — is the area of urban education. 
It is in urban areas that the failures of the present educational system are 
most clearly visible and it is therefore in urban education where we hope to 
have major impact through providing far reaching changes. Furthermore, we 
believe that what proves beneficial to urban education will also prove 
beneficial to suburban education. 

Many of our off -campus projects such as the Teacher Corps Project, the 
Lowell Project, Teachers Inc.; relationships with the Pennsylvania Advancement 
School, the Parkway Project, the Stevens School, all in Philadelphia; relation- 
ships with the New Park School and the South Arsenal Neighborhood Development 
Project in Hartford and many other projects, not only attest to our interest 
in urban America but also reflect the interests of many centers in the School. 

In addition the School is working toward the establishment of major 
satellite centers in such cities as Philadelphia, Washington, New York and 
Temple City, California. In each city we have established special contacts 
with schools and organizations and sponsor exchanges of undergraduates, grad- 
uate students and faculty members. Our efforts with regard to urban education 
indicate the future thrust of off-campus programs. 

Another type of off-campus activity involves sponsoring or participating 
in networks of schools. By pooling our resources with colleges and universities, 
with school systems, and with individual innovative schools we hope to achieve 
the largest possible impact on the total educational system. For example, the 
School is a member of the Union for Experimenting Colleges and Universities — 
an organization of 18 institutions including, among others, Antioch, Bard, 



IJ 



1 • 

Goddard, Hofstra, the University of Minnesota and the University of the 
Pacific. Both the Union and its members are committed to continual experi- 
mentation with new educational ideas as a way of improving their educational 
programs. Union projects include: Project Change-over, seven Field Study 
Centers, a Union Graduate School and the University Without Walls. 

Within the state of Massachusetts , the School sponsors many programs all 
of which serve the community by providing better education for residents of 
Massachusetts. Head Start Training, Teacher Corps, CAM, Media Center for the 
Deaf, Career Opportunities (Springfield and Worcester), Adult Basic Education, 
and the study of all Title I projects in Massachusetts and the surrounding 
states in New England. Such projects seek changes and improvements at all 
school systems, to special education and education for the disadvantaged, to 
student teacher training at the undergraduate and graduate levels, to adult 
education. 

Additional off-campus projects range from working with small groups of 
teachers in a single school in revising the curriculum, to exchanges with other 
universities in the United States and abroad, to more extensive programs such 
as the Clearinghouse for Student Initiated Change established and run by the 
students themselves, and the Lowell Project and SAND Project both of which 
relate us directly to community agencies striving to restructure education at 
the local level. 

During the past year we have accomplished much in the area of insuring 
quality programs and off-campus activities and in the area of seeking and 
fostering new alternatives in education. We hope to do more in the years 
ahead, for through such activity we not only stimulate the imagination of the 
School as a whole but also influence positively the educational system. 



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3 1 30 

Program in Instructional Applications of Computers 

The program in Instructional Applications of Computers is designed as 
a highly specialized program of graduate study with major emphasis in the 
area of computer-assisted instruction (CAI). CAI as a field is in embryonic 
stage. Appropriately, the formal membership of the program is limited, but 
growing — one doctoral candidate in 1969-70 and a minimum of two doctoral 
students enrolled for 1970-71. 

A graduate student plans his program of study in consultation with his 
advisor and may elect interdisciplinary learning experiences from such fields 
as Computer Science, Educational Philosophy, Psychology, and Statistics. The 
portfolio system is used for recording samples of student work and letters of 
evaluation of student performance. 

While the program does not stake out claims on areas of study, current 
foci of interest are: 

Computer-Assisted Instruction 
Learning Systems Technology 
Computer Art 
Artificial Intelligence 

Its affiliation within the School of Education is with the Non-Center, 
although contacts with Media Center, Aesthetics Center, Center for Educational 
Research, Center for Urban Education and CADRE have been made. 

Direction of the program during 1969-70 has been under two persons: 
Dr. John W. Ulrich, Assistant Professor, and Howard A. Peelle, Doctoral Student. 
Three courses offered this past semester — Education 317/617 "Introduction to 
Computer Programming in APL"; Education 618 "Instruction Applications of 
Computers"; and Education 208/508 "Computer Use in the Arts" — served 23, 8 and 15 



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students, respeccively . 



31 



Numerous single seminars, demonstrations, and individual tutoring on the 
uses of computers in education were offered, some on a modular credit basis. 
Also, in February, 1970, the Computer-Assisted Instruction Laboratory was 
initiated upon the delivery of one IBM 2741 computer terminal to the School 
of Education from Research Computing Center, UMass. 

The future of this program is bright when viewed in long-range perspec- 
tives. Progress is expected to be slow at first — but quickening with time. 
Educational technology ceases to be alien to educators. Greater numbers of 
student and increased faculty staffing needs are anticipated over the next 
three years when the potential of CAI is likely to become more visible. New 
research and development thrusts are expected in the following areas: 

CAI Curriculimi Materials 
The Art of Programming 
Computer Simulation of Educational Futuristics 

Plans to expand the CAI Laboratory to three terminals have been laid 
for the purpose of providing teacher-training and in-service workshops on 
computer hardware, software, and instructional applications. 

Coordination of computer usage in teaching with Hampshire College will 
be handled by Howard Peelle. 



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EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION PROGRAM 1969-70 

The Early Childhood Education Program has been created to work in an 
area which has become increasingly significant in the light of statistical 
evidence suggesting that nearly half of the children in the U.S.A. are not 
succeeding even in the terms by which success has usually been measured. 
Thus, a special teacher education program has been initiated for those who 
will work with children aged two to eight. Proposed is a year of professional 
study integrated with direct teaching experience. The central focus of the 
year will be series of seminars and laboratory experiences built around 
and supported by two eight-week field teaching blocks. 

Early childhood education continues to be an area of concern to many 
students and faculty in the School of Education. Several important and 
significant events occured during the 1969-70 year that support this 
contention. 

The Office of Economic Opportunity awarded HEAD START a $250,000 grant 
to the School of Education for the development of a leadership training pro- 
gram for New England and New York State, This project consisted of in-field 
and five-week on-campus training for five groups of 30 persons working in 
urban and rural HEAD START Centers. Teams of trainers from northern Maine 
to Lake Erie came to the University for intensive training in early education, 
career development, community organization, and social action. All trainees 
were allowed to register for six credits of undergraduate or graduate credit. 
It seems clear that the program will continue next year, 

A very significant aspect of the leadership training program was the 
creation of a policy board that now actually controls the project. Personnel 
selection, curriculum, purpose and selection of trainees is now in the hands 



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1 > 33 

of the people f ojT whom the project was designed. It is the first leadership 

training project in the nation that has become a truly collaborative adventure 
between university and community. 

This year also saw the development of some experimental courses in early 
education. A doctoral student worked closely with David Day to develop a 
model teaching course for undergraduate students. This course required 
students to work in teams in developing lessons for young children following a 
teaching paradigm from such theorists as Piaget, Ashton-Warner , Beruter, 
Montessori, Brunner, and Deutsch. This course has been very successful and 
will be continued. 

David Day developed a course on the Early Childhood Education movement. 
This was offered during one semester for graduate students. This course 
explored the philosophical, psychological and pedagogical foundation of 
contemporary early education programs. It will be continued in 1970-71. 

In 1970-71 will be offered a three-course sequence for undergraduate 
students interested in early education. The Teacher Education Center has 
agreed to substitute these courses for its regular methods sequence. Students 
completing the courses will be assigned to student teaching situations in 
early education programs . 

A network of Head Start Centers throughout Western Massachusetts and 
Vermont has been identified as willing and eager to work with students from 
UMass . In 1969-70 we were able to place some students in HEAD START Centers 
and actually have the students live in the community. This has been a very 
valuable experience and will be expanded for both undergraduates and graduates 
in 1970-71. 



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34 



CONTEMPORARY UNIVERSITY 

The Contemporary University is a student directed program sponsored by 
the Ford Foundation and involving students from the University of Massa- 
chusetts, Federal City College of Washington, D.C. and the University of 
South Carolina. The program began in the summer of 1969 and continued 
through the 1969-70 academic year with students participating for one 
semester. The program itself was divided into two parts: a full time 
program which students were involved completely in the program in lieu 
of their regular course work and were mobile; and a part time program in 
which students continued to take courses and remained at their home school. 

Some of the student projects included a task force study of the Depart- 
ment of Health, Education, and Welfare, a music study on the life and works 
of John Coltraine, working with centers for high-school dropouts and the 
formation of new center for Springfield and many other projects. 

The students evaluated their experiences with Contemporary University 
very highly, feeling that it allowed them a strong learning and growth exper- 
ience. Many potential dropouts were accepted into Contemporary University 
and as a result of renewed Interest have now decided to continue their formal 
education. 

Although the students were scattered all over the country working on 
their projects, communication was maintained through periodic convocations 
and weekly newsletters . 



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35 

CENTER FOR THE STUDY OF AESTHETICS IN EDUCATION 

The Center for the Study of Aesthetics in Education (CSAE) is a teacher 
education center focusing on pre-service and in-service programs in curriculum 
development, innovative instructional strategies, research, and the develop- 
ment of conceptual models for utilizing creative activities in the arts to 
enhance learning. Developing alternative roles for the arts in education 
through the study and development of multi-arts activities for use as stimuli 
and reinforcement of learning skills represents a major concern of the Center. 

Through formal and informal associations with leading curriculum innova- 
tors throughout the nation and through the stimulation of interdisciplinary 
dialogues and team-teaching efforts with faculty and professional artists, 
students in the aesthetics in education programs have an unusual opportunity 
to develop improved methods of instruction based on different learning theories, 
new curriculum models, research and organization, and will have an opportunity 
to participate in the development of programs affecting the future role of the 
arts in education. 

Projects, courses, and activities sponsored by the CSAE include 
aesthetic experiences for children conducted at the University demonstration 
school, curriculum innovation courses in music and sound, visual and plastic 
arts, movement and dance, theatre and oral interpretation of literature, 
computer use in the arts, and the role of the administrator in aesthetics 
in education. A wide range of specialized modular offerings is also available. 
Summer workshops of national significance have been sponsored and conducted 
by the CSAE, including institutes in Orff, Kodaly, and Manhattanville 
Curriculum Project workshops which have attracted students from many parts 
of the nation. ' 

Undergraduate Teacher Education . Current teacher education courses offered 
by CSAE are intended to help students — 



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36 

* study and develop techniques for fostering expressive capacities 
of children through participation in art activities 

* gain confidence in abilities to work with art, music, 
dance, and theatre media 

* recognize the value of art experiences through which 
the individual can develop his own unique personality 
and ideas 

* use experiences in the arts in conjunction with 
relevant learning theory to develop competent 
learners in both cognitive and affective areas. 

* develop a theoretical basis for integrating creative 
activities into their personal philosophy of education 

* develop and understand the importance of evaluative 
criteria for arts activities and programs , 

* seek more advanced skill training through elective 
courses in the various fine arts departments 

Graduate Programs . In general, graduate programs offered by the CSAE are 
designed to prepare candidates to develop and evaluate pre-service and in- 
service programs at all levels of instruction in one or more of the follow- 
ing areas of concentration: music and sound, movement and dance, visual 
and plastic arts, or theatre and oral interpretation of literature. One 
of the unique features of the aesthetic center programs is that all candi- 
dates are exposed to and become involved in the curriculum innovations in 
all aesthetic education areas, rather than in just one or two specialties. 
Graduate programs are highly individualized and are planned within the 
framework of University requirements by the candidate in consultation with 
a Master's degree advisor or a doctoral guidance committee. Two basic 
degree programs are sponsored by the Center for the Study of Aesthetics 
in Education. 



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1 1 37 

Master of Education . This program is designed to expand the teaching 

capability of candidates and prepare them to develop and supervise pre- 
service and in-service programs in the arts at all levels of instruction 
in at least two areas of concentration: music, art, dance, or theatre. 
Candidates will have an opportunity to gain an understanding of possible 
ways in which art experiences can be integrated in order to enhance the 
development of specific cognitive abilities. Candidates are expected to 
demonstrate appropriate performance ability in two or more areas of con- 
centration as listed above. 

Doctor of Education in Curriculum Development in Applied Aesthetics 
in Education. This program is designed to prepare candidates having 
extensive experience and/or training in one or more art fields to develop 
and evaluate curricula and/or programs in applied aesthetics in education; 
to design and carry out research related to curriculum development; and to 
organize, develop, and carry out pre-service and in-service training pro- 
grams in two or more of the following: music and sound, movement and 
dance, visual and plastic arts, theatre and oral interpretation of litera- 
ture. Curriculum specialists prepared at the doctoral level in applied 
aesthetics in education will be knowledgeable about ways in which the arts 
can be integrated and will have participated in combining the fields for 
the purpose of developing specific instructional strategies thus enabling 
them to initiate and sustain productive collaboration with colleagues from 
other fields. 

Candidates will be expected to have had extensive preparation or 
experience in one area and performance ability in one or more additional 
areas. 

In addition to the two graduate degree programs offered through the 
Center, students may work on a Master of Arts in Teaching or a Certificate 
of Advanced Graduate Study in cooperation with the CSAE. Resources of the 
Five College Complex (Amherst, Hampshire, Mount Holyoke, Smith, and the 



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1 f '" 

University of Massachusetts) are available for students desiring more applied 
study in their performance fields. Additional information concerning current 
course and modular offerings are available through the Center for the Study 
of Aesthetics in Education. 

Appalachian Consortium . The School of Education has been instrumental 
in helping to form a Consortium of Appalachian colleges and universities 
which train teachers. The purpose of the Consortium is to organize and 
coordinate activities concerning improvement of teacher education through 
the implementation of many of the educational innovations being explored 
by the School of Education. The Consortium has been active in trying to 
solicit additional funds to help finance their activities and have maintained 
communications with the Appalachian Regional Commission in Washington, D. C. , 
and the Council of Southern Mountain States. University of Massachusetts 
doctoral candidate, Mr. Bill Best, has been instrumental in directing 
activities concerning the organization of the Consortium, has been elected 
one of its main officers, and has also become an officer of the Council of 
Southern Mountain States. This program was initially financed by a small 
grant from EPDA during 1969-70. 

Prison Education . Plans are underway for the development of new edu- 
cational programs within correctional institutions and advanced degree work 
which will prepare personnel for carrying out such programs. One of the 
unique features of the programs as contemplated is that they will concen- 
trate on the training of ex-offenders, on the experimental establishment 
of half-way houses for juvenile offenders, special curriculum development 
for correctional institutions, and the training of personnel for work 
in urban schools where there is a high drop-out rate. Plans are currently 
underway for holding a conference on campus, with the assistance of a 
federal grant, for the purpose of consulting on the various needs for 
extensive modification of current correctional practices and the generation 



11 

of recommendations which will be submitted to appropriate state and 
federal agencies. Mr. Larry Dye, UMass graduate student and former HEW 
staff member in Washington, is coordinator of the program. As soon as 
appropriate curricula are developed and enough funds have been accumu- 
lated to staff the program, selected courses will be offered. 

Indian Education . As an adjunct to the compensatory education program, 
the School of Education is collaborating with a privately incorporated 
organization, TRIBE, Inc. (Teaching and Research in Bi-cultural Education, 
Inc.). The Board members of this organization are made up entirely of 
American Indians from the northeastern part of the United States. School 
of Education faculty members have been serving as consultants to the or- 
ganization which has held a number of conferences during the past year. 
A summer workshop on Indian education is planned for this summer and an 
experimental school will open in the fall with about 40 Indian students. 
As this new independent Indian school becomes firmly established, the 
School of Education will collaborate with members of the faculty and 
administration of the school in the development of curriculum and the 
evaluation of their programs. Eventually, the school may become a site 
for internship training of UMass students who wish to become prepared for 
teaching in Indian schools. UMass doctoral candidate, Mr. Edward Hinckley, 
former Commissioner of Indian Affairs for the State of Maine and Chief 
Consultant to TRIBE, is in charge of coordinating this program. 

Development of the ANISA Model . As an adjunct to the compensatory 
education program and an outgrowth of the work carried out under the 
auspices of the Massachusetts Advisory Council on Education over the last 
two years, work has begun on the development of complete specifications 
for the ANISA (American National Institutes for Social Advancement) model 
for compensatory education purposes. The unique feature of this model is 
that it focuses on the development of learning competence in psycho-motor. 



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40 

perceptual, cognitive, affective, moral, volitional, and aesthetic areas. 

Development of the model will proceed largely through independent study- 
projects and educational seminars dealing with various aspects of the 
model. In April, the model was presented in Washington, D. C, to the 
staff members of Head Start, Title I ESEA, Teacher Corps, Follow-through, 
Basic Studies, Office of Child Development and Upward Bound. The model 
has also been presented to the State Departments of Education in Massachu- 
setts, Maine, and Vermont. Presentation has also been made to State 
Department Title I Directors of the New England States and most of the 
Title I Project Directors throughout the State of Massachusetts. At the 
present time, proposals are being developed for obtaining funds to finance 
the development of the model. UMass doctoral candidate, Mr. Rajmiond Shepard, 
will help to coordinate model development. , 

THE COUNSELOR EDUCATION AND HUMAN RELATIONS CENTER 
The Counselor Education and Human Relations Center this year continued 
to expand its primary focus, the development of more effective systems for 
understanding and enhancing the ways the individual functions and grows in 
his individual, group, and institutional relationships. This led to the 
generation and testing of new models for counseling and guidance, new models 
for counselor education, and new directions for the center itself. 

In response to the clear need for more effective systems of counseling 
and guidance, the staff and students of the center worked to develop new 
models in the classroom, in practicum work, and in consulting services. 
For instance, a Behavior Modification Model was used to help school children 
make better use of their educational opportunities, teachers make better use 
of their potential influence on their students, and consultants make maximum 
use of their time in the school system. A more direct, experiential mode 
of counseling was emphasized and developed. Group processes were studied. 



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1 1 41 

developed, and applied. More deliberate and sophisticated attention was 
given to the analysis of institutional systems and the ways they influence, 
and can be influenced by, both counseling and group processes. These new 
models and approaches were tested not only in local school systems, but 
also in coiranunity agencies and penal institutions. 

New models for counseling and human relations require new models for 
the counselor education process itself. We have been developing new ex- 
periential, inductive, generative models for counselor education, particu- 
larly in the counseling and group process courses. Common sense has been 
thoroughly confirmed by research regarding the ways one learns more sig- 
nificantly through experience and imitation than through traditional 
didactic tuition. Therefore, group process experiences are provided as 
the primary learning opportunity in courses on group process, and in the 
counseling courses students are given the opportunity to experience the 
same kinds of personal recognition, careful attention, and/or "systems 
of reinforcement" which are found to foster significant personal learning 
and growth in clients, teachers, colleagues, clerks, plumbers, etc. 

In developing new directions for the center itself, we are also 
moving towards a model of what we endeavor to "teach" regarding community 
development, institutional analysis and change. We are trying to develop 
the center as a model of a self-renewing community. This year we held two 
full -day retreats to examine and explore with the students the nature, 
purposes, potential, and options for the center. Students attended and 
participated in staff meetings and contributed to important committee 
work. Students also assisted in courses and offered courses of their own. 
Out of one of the more successful student-run courses came a series of 
recommendations for new developments which the students presented and 
explicated in one of our weekly staff meetings. Many of their recommenda- 
tions will be put into operation next year. More significantly, we will 



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establish a more explicit system for soliciting and utilizing student 
initiative and recommendations next year as part of our efforts to develop 
and model a self -renewing educational community. 

The major thrust of new developments in the future of the center, 
then, will involve more explicit, operational, and innovative models 
for counseling, guidance, group process, change agentry, community 
development, and institutional analysis and change. We will offer "courses" 
in these "subjects," but we will also be developing new models for teaching/ 
learning processes most appropriate and effective for the development of 
imaginative professional competence in these activities. This means, 
for one thing, practicing what we would teach in the way we "teach," in 
order to multiply and deepen the students' learning experiences. It also 
means a new orientation program for students and staff in September, new 
seminars, retreats, open weekly staff meetings, module offerings, work- 
shops, field experiences, etc. 

Under a more general "umbrella" of Human Relations the center will 
offer programs in counseling, group process, and community development, 
with opportunities to focus on work in higher education, public schools, 
and community agencies. We expect these programs to continue to evolve, 
and plan to grow with this evolution, as staff and students continue to 
work together in this self -renewing community. 

THE CENTER FOR EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH 
The Center for Educational Research (SMERD) offers educational 
experiences in educational statistics, educational measurement, educational 
evaluation, educational research, educational data, and operations research 
or any combination of these that will meet a student's career needs and interests, 
At the doctoral level such programs prepare the student for university 



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43 

faculty positions, educational research planning and execution for private 
or public research institutions, private consulting, and the like. Pro- 
grams normally consist of both course work and practice experiences. 

Once a student is admitted, he is assigned a temporary advisor who 
appears to have interests similar to the student. The student and the 
advisor jointly work out a program for the first semester and form a per- 
manent guidance committee consisting of a permanent advisor and two other 
members of the faculty. From that point on, the student's program design 
is a cooperative venture for all four. A student's program of study often 
includes course work, independent study with members of the faculty and 
guided practicum experiences. 

There are three general categories of directions for the Center for 
Educational Research: Research, Training, and Service. Many members of 
the Center are actively engaged in research in the general areas of stat- 
istics, measurement, evaluation, research, and data processing. As evi- 
dence of the competencies of the group, already a number of the members 
of the Center have published methodological articles in major journals. 
The Center for Educational Research aims to offer educational experiences 
in statistics, measurement, evaluation, research, data processing and oper- 
ations research or any combination of these that will meet a student's 
career needs and interests. At the doctoral level such programs will 
prepare the student for university faculty positions, educational research, 
planning and execution for private or public research institutions, pri- 
vate consulting, and the like. Programs normally consist of both course 
work and practical experiences. We aim to train new methodologlsts to 
contribute to the above research directions. The Center for Educational 
Research aims to provide service in the application and/or training in 
the use of statistics, measurement, evaluation, research, and data pro- 
cessing methodologies to the School, the University, the educational com- 



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munity, and to society. 

These directions may be seen in action by a sampling of Center 
activities. 

1. The establishment of an Education Research Center section 
of the reserve area of the Education Library. 

2. The initiation of an in-house publication. Technical Reports . 

3. Work on the establishment of a joint program with the Psy- 
chology Department in the area of Educational Psychology. 

4. The initiation of a colloquium series. 

5. The Comprehensive Achievement Monitoring Project. 

6. Addition to the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences 

(SPSS) to the library of the Computing Center. 

7. Simulation Modeling Grant 

8. School evaluation 

9. Formation of a joint committee with the Statistics Department 

10. The general level of consulting with students and faculty of 
other centers. 

11. Systems Team - M.E.T.E.P. Phase I 

Joint membership from Industrial Engineering and School 
of Business 

12. Simulation Team - M.E.T.E.P. Phase 2 and 
Fort Lincoln New Town Project 

Joint SBA - IE - Education participation in simulation model- 
ing (technical report near completion) 

13. U.S.O.E. - Funded projected for George Worle (Educ.) and Tom 
Richards (IE) to do thesis work with simulation model develop- 
ment and validation with data from Learning Research and Develop- 
ment Center, University of Pittsburgh (Oakleaf IPI Data) 

14. Relatively easy interchange on courses, degree committees with 
Industrial Engineering, Computer Science. 



44 



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Center for Humanistic Education 

The Center for Humanistic Education at the University of Massachusetts 
is interested in the development of curriculum and teacher training method- 
ologies which will enable students and teachers to deal more effectively 
with their feelings and emotions. Our major work is to develop structured 
and productive curriculum which can be used in classrooms at all levels 
of education. As a corollary we wish to devise teacher training curricula by 
which we can train teachers in the difficult task of aiding students in the 
emotional and behavioral work which is so much a part of student life. This 
is not a counseling curriculum for disturbed students, or non-functioning 
students, but rather a course of study to give those students who are func- 
tioning an opportunity to improve their own sense of identity, their inter- 
actions with others and their ability to have some control over their fates 
and environments. 

Strength Training . Strength Training is a laboratory experience in which 
prospective teachers are asked to teach under stressful conditions. It is 
our feeling that an opportunity to teach in a fairly threatening, labora- 
tory situation will allow teachers to expose their weakest and strongest 
behaviors. These conditions might be a first day in class, a substitute 
teaching, a fire drill, or study hall. The teacher will teach his peers, 
who are acting as students. After this role playing segment of the labora- 
tory is completed, a structured feedback period follows in which the teacher 
is told by his peers and by the trainers how his behaviors affected the 
emotions and therefore the behaviors of his students. New behaviors are 
then suggested in order to give the subject an opportunity to extend his 
repertoire of teaching skills. 

Out-of-class assignments are given which reflect the feedback given 
to the participating class. Our aim here is to give student teachers 
an understanding of what emotions they are causing in their classrooms. 



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how they are causing them, and how the teacher can control these reactions. 

Education of the Self is this Center's attempt to give to the entire 
University, a course in Humanistic Education. As was said earlier, one 
of our major concerns is that of a student's identity. The Education 
of the Self is in fact a course in identity. It is a curriculum comprised 
of many exercises and techniques garnered from the affective movements 
throughout the country. The work of William Shutz, Herbert Otto, Frederick 
Perls, Gerald Weinstein, and many others are represented in this curriculum. 
Our attempt here is to give people structured experiences in looking at 
their own identity and give them an opportunity to experiment with new 
emotions and behaviors in order to have some choice about their identity. 

The Practicum in Humanistic Curriculum Development is our course in 
which to develop actual humanistic curriculum which will be experimented 
with during the length of the course. This is the place where people who 
have experienced the Education of the Self and are interested in the theory 
and development of humanistic curriculum may gain experience in its invention 
and use. Time is given in this class to aid people in finding out what kinds 
of humanistic education teachers they are through simulations and role play- 
ing, but the major emphasis of the course is the actual development of 
humanistic curricula. 

Value Clarification is a mixture of Education of the Self and the 
Practicum of Humanistic Curriculum Development, in that it offers people 
experiences in value clarification while suggesting ways in which to apply 
these experiences to actual classroom settings. Attempts are made to give 
people methods by which to examine their values and the behaviors which 
are based in these values. 

Special Seminar in Humanistic Education - The special seminar is a 
doctoral reading seminar in humanistic education. In this course readings 
dealing with humanistic education are shared and discussed in order to gain 



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more perspectives on work in this area. Doctoral students who take this 
course should have already experienced the Education of the Self and the 
Practicum in Humanistic Curriculum Development. 

Training of Trainers - The training of humanistic education trainers 
is our most advanced course in humanistic education. In this course our 
attempt is to give people an apprenticeship in which they actually plan, 
run and evaluate their own humanistic education curriculum. Supervision 
is provided with the opportunity to discuss results at regular meetings. 
People in this course should have taken all of the other courses offered 
at the Center in order to have a background which will enable them to make 
the most use of this course. 

Masters Degree . The Masters Degree program in Humanistic Education 
involves course work in Strength Training, Education of the Self, Value 
Clarification and the Practicum in Humanistic Curriculum Development, 
and Student teaching experience. The student teaching component of the 
program need not be the teaching of Humanistic Education. In fact, we 
encourage people to teach something other than humanistic education in 
order to gain familiarity with the variables involved in classroom teach- 
ing. Our contention is that humanistic education is a very difficult and 
demanding area of education in which to teach. It demands a relaxed yet 
secure rapport in a classroom, as the content of the course involves self 
disclosure and a great deal of affective content. We therefore suggest 
that Masters candidates gain personal knowledge of their own classroom 
styles, as part of their program. They should discover which personal 
teaching alternatives are open to them while teaching in a fairly non- 
threatening academic subject area. Our Masters program probably would 
involve a time commitment of approximately one calendar year. Other 
courses that we suggest people take, are in child development, curriculum 
development, and educational psychology of some sort. 



47 



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Doctoral Program . The Doctoral Program in Humanistic Education 
involves much the same course work as that in the Masters degree program 
while also including the doctoral reading seminar in humanistic education 
and the training of humanistic education trainers. Our suggestion is that 
people entering our doctoral program already have some kind of teaching 
experience, and that they be prepared to do some extensive work in curricu- 
lum development, teacher training, and/or the implementation of humanistic 
curricula in schools. The average time requirement for this course of study 
would probably be two years. ... 

Activities . The following is a list of the major off-campus 
activities now in operation in cooperation with the Center for Humanistic 
Education: ,, • , . ■ . ^ . 

1. Mt. View High School Project . Mt. View High School in California 
now has a course in Human Relations being offered to high school 
students. The curriculum for this course was, and is, being 
developed in conjunction with the staff of the Center for 
Humanistic Education. 

2. Montgomery County, Maryland Project . Still in the preliminary 
stages, this promises to be a test area for Humanistic Education 
curriculum and evaluation procedures developed here at the Uni- 
versity of Massachusetts. Hopefully it will involve at least 
three schools in a continuing Humanistic Education program. 

3. Philadelphia Teacher Training Project . At the moment we have 

an ongoing relationship with the Philadelphia Advancement School 
in the area of inservice teacher training and staff development. 
In private consultation we are offering Strength Training and 
other group activities in which teachers in this area can gain 
experience in Humanistic Education procedures. 

4. Pensacola School District Project . As of this coming October 



48 



i 



49 



we hope to be working with a large number of schools in the ' 
Pensacola, Florida area. In conjunction with the Escarola 
Humanities Center, under the leadership of Mr. Charles Branch, 
we hope to be offering workshops and study groups in curriculiim 
for Humanistic Education. 

Dade County Program . Here, as in Philadelphia, our major 
impetus has been in the area of teacher training and staff 
development. We hope to be able to expand our work in this 
area. 

Youth Tutoring Youth (YTY) . Within the past year, members of 
the staff from the Center for Humanistic Education have been 
involved in the preparation of a manual for the training of 
cross-age tutors. They have been, and will be offering, work- 
shops in various parts of the country acquainting YTY staff 
members with the methodologies used to train tutors. 



CENTER FOR INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION 

The Center for International Education is focusing its graduate program 
around three areas of concern: development education, cross-cultural train- 
ing and internationalizing American education. The academic thrust of the 
regular courses provides the theoretical basis for research and evaluation 
in each area while on-going projects provide the Fellows with program and 
administrative experience in the field. 

Planning, budgeting, training, research and evaluation are closely tied 
to ongoing projects thereby giving reality and urgency to the academic pro- 
cess. The thrust of each area of interest is as follows: 

Development Education: 

Study and analysis of the role of education in economic, social. 



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50 

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and political development of nations; adaptation and application 
of technology and innovations to educational problems in the 
developing world; creation of new designs in education and new 
approaches to problems of developing education; training of edu- 
cational personnel in developing areas. 
Cross-cultural Training: 

Design and implementation of training procedures for people who 
are going to work or live in cross-cultural situations; Innovation 
and research in new training procedures; Application in training 
programs for Peace Corps, Bureau of American Indians, Model 
Cities, and general human relations training for personnel in 
school systems; study of non-verbal communications across cultures; 
design of behavior modification techniques for cross-cultural train- 
ing. 

Internationalizing American Education: 

Study of Overseas and minority cultures; design of curriculum 
materials to teach about "other" cultures; creating and testing 
new procedures for teaching about others including games, role- 
playing, multi-media presentations; designing training programs 
to produce teachers. Teacher Corps interns, and others who can 
effectively teach about another culture; research and evaluation 
of new materials and techniques. 

These areas overlap and complement one another. A CIE Fellow will 
usually select one of these as a major focus. Cutting across these 
dimensions are specialties such as area studies, and specific professional 
competencies in education such as teacher training, curriculum development, 
administration, and guidance and counseling. A Fellow would be expected 
to develop competencies in both a geographic and a professional area to 
round out his studies in one of the three major areas outlined above. 



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The Center's program, now in its second year, is undergoing develop- 
ment and revisions. Students entering the program are directly involved 
in the evaluation and the modification of the ongoing program. In addi- 
tion, as Fellows of the Center, they are directly involved in the various 
projects, research, and training activities. These applied programs pro- 
vide "focused environments" for student learning. Students are involved 
in creation, design, funding, implementation and evaluation of new projects 
as an integral part of their program. They are encouraged to maintain and 
develop outside contacts with overseas institutions, international organi- 
zations, and domestic institutions as part of their professional training. 
Students are expected to attend conferences, participate in negotiations 
on specific projects, and travel to institutions engaged in work relating 
to international education. 

Ongoing Projects 

Teacher Corps . The UMass Teacher Corps is comprised of 32 teachers — 
30 of whom have teaching experience in Africa and other non-Western countries. 
The public schools of Worcester, Massachusetts and the University of 
Massachusetts were awarded a joint federal grant to develop curriculum 
in African Studies, Grades K-12. 

The Corpsmembers completed a one-semester preservice period at the 
University in December and have now finished their first semester of 
internship in eight of the Worcester Schools. Curriculum guides on how 
to integrate Africa into the existing curriculum are being prepared for 
publication and dissemination to the general public. Internship will 
continue in Worcester in September, 1970, to terminate in January, 1971. 

Some unique projects in which the Corpsmembers are involved in 
addition to regular classroom teaching are the setting up of a storefront 
school, various reading and tutorial projects, a contemporary theater 
project and others. 



52 



This Teacher Corps program has provided an excellent opportunity 
for the former Peace Corps volunteers to utilize their experiences in 
Africa in a most meaningful manner, both for themselves and for American 
children. 

Uganda Project - Career Development Study . The Center is directly 
responsible for staffing and supporting the Tororo Girls' School, a 
USAID/University of Massachusetts joint project under which 620 girls 
receive a comprehensive secondary education including training in Home 
Economics, Commercial Arts, and the traditional academic subjects. During 
the year a proposal was submitted to USAID, and was funded, under which 
the CIE proposed to research the following major questions: 

1. What are the differences in home backgrounds of the 
pupils in the four forms of the lower school? 

2. What are the relations between these backgrounds and the 
career aspirations, the career valuations, and the selection 
of streams by the girls? ' 

3. What are the girls' perceptions of the desirability of the 
various streams and of the quality of the girls in them? 

4. What are the relations between being in a particular stream 
and career aspirations? 

5. What are the relations between the girls' self-images 
and their expectations for performance on examinations 
and for career choices? 

6. To what extent and in what ways has a modernization of 
the girls' attitudes taken place? 

7. How do the girls at TGS compare in attitudes and career 
choices to the girls in other, similar schools? 

8. What happened to the first graduating pupils and how do 
their current activities relate to their school experiences? 



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The research involved the administration of a questionnaire to all the 
girls in forms one through four. These results were supplemented by inter- 
views, essays, and discussion groups. The 5th form girls were used to indicate 
something about the temporary job market as shox«i by their experience during 
the four-month break. Girls who came from other schools to the 5th form at 
the Tororo Girls' School served as a control group. 

A modified version of the basic research instrimient was given to classes 
in four other girls' schools selected on the basis of their characteristics. 
Classes in these schools were chosen to provide returns from the range of 
forms and from vocational streams where they exist. Limited follow-up inter- 
views were completed with a sample of the girls who have left TGS and who had 
not entered other educational institutions. 

The analysis and the written report (scheduled for completion Fall '70) 
will focus on the policy and curriculum implications of the information 
collected. Emphasis will be placed on the comparative effects of the different 
streams at the Tororo Girls' School and on the cumulative effect of the school 
as a whole. The analysis will be set in the context of comparable data 
collected from other girls' schools. Use of that data will help to point out 
ways in which the experience at Tororo can be helpful to other schools. 
Non-Western Studies Curricula 

During the year a modest grant was awarded to the Center to develop the 
background materials and basic outline of a model course for the training of 
prospective teachers in techniques in teaching non-Western studies. This 
model curriculum would involve affective and experimental as well as content 
learning. It would be devised for use in Schools of Education and Teacher- 
Training Colleges throughout the United States and would have detailed in- 
structions for implementing the course under optimal and difficult conditions. 

The four phases in this curriculum development project would include 
research, materials development, implementation (in experimental courses) and 



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evaluation. The implementation phase would start in the Fall of 1970 with 



54 



an eight-week experimental course at the University of Massachusetts. . 

During the Spring of 1971, it is hoped that the course can be taught in 
at least one other Massachusetts School of Education. The final curriculum 
will be disseminated as widely as possible. The curriculum will be designed 
to be implemented with a minimum of assistance. 

The feasibility study was completed and has been disseminated to various 
organizations with the hope that the model curriculum development phase will 
be funded. 
Peace Corps 

While there is no direct relationship between the Center and the Peace 
Corps at the present time, negotiations have begun for a contract under which 
the Center would provide cross-cultural training for Peace Corps trainers at 
the Peace Corps Training Center in Ponce, Puerto Rico. In addition, several 
of the Fellows of the Center are providing professional support to the Peace 
Corps Training staff as Project Directors and members of Peace Corps Training 
programs . 

FUTURE DIRECTIONS 
During the coming year, the Center hopes to expand its involvement with 
various portions of the educational community by offering workshops and 
courses in Non-Western Studies as well as developing a curriculum in Non- 
Western Studies designed for utilization by other institutions. Attention will 
also be given to the Center's continued relationship with the Teacher Corps 
and an expansion of the relationship with various international organizations. 
In addition, plans have begun to implement a Master's Degree Program for 
professionals from other countries stressing the acquisition of relevant 
educational skills, the theories and modern techniques of teacher training, 
and the adaption of those skills, theories and techniques to current priorities 



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L • the country of the participant. The 



55 

and problems in ' Ehe country of the participant. The program would also 
contain a seminar dealing with alternative strategies for introducing educa- 
tional innovations into the traditional education systems of the developing 
country . - 

CENTER FOR LEADERSHIP AND ADMINISTRATION 
The Center seeks to provide each student with the opportunity to 
responsibly develop and carry out a program which will qualify him for an 
important leadership position in education. This can be accomplished through 
the dynamics inherent in: 

1. The student being responsible for his own educational destiny. 

2. The student being closely involved with his professors in a variety 
of situations . 

3. The student being an active and involved participant in one or 
more peer groups . 

As the public university in the state, the University of Massachusetts 
has the variety of personnel and educational resources to provide the state 
with a quality program of preparation for persons serving or who will be 
serving as leaders in education in the state. Other public colleges have 
not been given the full resources to do this job. There is no conflict in 
serving within the same program students with potential from both the "national" 
and Massachusetts "pools of talent." Discussions have been initiated with the 
Cooperative School Service Center Executive Board with the aim of developing 
ways to encouraging educators with leadership and administrative potential to 
seek entrance to the Center's new program. In addition, plans are underway 
to develop a new model internship which will provide valuable practical ex- 
perience as well as financial support for a student in residence. 



^ 56 

In additiorl to actively cultivating leadership talent within the Common- 
wealth, the Center will work to make it possible for any practicing adminis- 
trator to take specific courses and to participate in conference and workshops 
according to his professional needs. This would be as an "independent student" 
--the person would not have to be admitted to the Center's formal program. 

Any student admitted to the program is expected to commit himself to 
amounts of time far beyond simply "dropping in for a course a semester." We 
encourage full-time participation as soon as this is possible. For the person 
aspiring to the doctorate, residency makes a full-time commitment a necessity. 
Every effort will be made to find financial support for full-time students. 
The dynamic process 

It is the "intertwining," the "intermingling" of three basic "building 
block" ideas that provides the necessary dynamics for the Center's program. 
1. The student is responsible for his own educational destiny . If a program 

should be "individualized," if a program is supposed to fill a student's 

needs, then, that program for an adult student (especially one preparing 

himself for leadership) ought to be the responsibility of the student. 

The tangible device which has been set up to enable the student to develop 

and carry out individualized program is the portfolio . 

a. The portfolio will be the record of his work, and more important 
his impressions of the value of his work as it progresses. Included 
should be such things as: a critique of courses and books, a delinea- 
tion of plans and evaluation of efforts, and a description of par- 
ticularly significant experiences. His portfolio, less than a journal 
and more than a scrapbook, is the cumulative record of his work in 
earning a degree or certificate. 

b. There ought to be a strong thread of consistency tying together the 
experiences and interests a student brings into the program, his long- 
range career plans, the program he develops for himself, the areas he 



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57 

chooses for examination, and the problem chosen for intense research 
in his dissertation. The portfolio is the means by which a person 
can identify and develop this "thread." 

2. The student is closely involved with his professors in a variety of 
situations . A quality preparation program is one which is rich in the 
variety of contacts a student has with faculty. The following contacts 
are available at the present time: the faculty member as fellow parti- 
cipant in faculty and committee meetings, as teacher, as chairman or 
member of the student's various committees, as fellow member of the 
Center, and as director of an off-campus project. The specific respon- 
sibilities of faculty for working with students on programs, preliminary 
examinations, and dissertations is spelled out in considerable detail. 

3. The student is an active and involved participant in one or more peer 
groups . A peer group can do something for the student that the faculty 
cannot do. A peer group can do things for the individual that he cannot 
do for himself: give him identity, help him build social and awareness 
skills , provide a nonthreatening framework within which he can try out 
his leadership skills, and help him in "task-completion." It is not 
intended that a student become deeply involved with every peer group 

in which he finds himself during a two or three year period. It is the 

expressed goal of the Center that he become an involved participant in 

at least two or three small group arrangements . 
Options for learning 

The number and kinds of learning experiences from which a student might 
choose in planning his "individualized" program are almost without limit. In 
recent Center meetings, faculty and students have discussed the following kinds 
of learning opportunities, most of which are already available: 



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Basic and Introductory courses . Candidates typically will enroll in 



58 



a year-long course introducing such areas of administrative expertise 
as budgeting, community relations, computer and systems applications, 
personnel administration, and collective bargaining. In addition, a 
seminar will be offered which focuses on the relationship of administra- 
tive skills, principles, and theories to the institutional milieu. 

2. Specialized courses in the Center and the School of Education . There 
are opportunities for a person to study extensively within the Center 
and the School of Education areas in which an administrator becomes 
involved: the economics of public education, budgeting, innovations in 
curriculum and organization, personnel administration, the operation of 
schools, urban education, etc. 

3. Specialized courses within the University and other four colleges — 
Amherst College, Hampshire College, Smith College, and Mt. Holyoke College . 
Excellent offerings are available in fields related to administration 
through departments such as government, sociology, business management 

and organization, computer science, psychology, etc. 

4. Work in a discipline which may be unrelated to administration . A student 
will have an opportunity to develop as an individual who will have the 
depth of understanding which comes from pursuit of a discipline beyond 
the casual level. This may be done through: a course of action which 
may be apparently irrelevant to educational administration; organized 
work in the field of his choosing, done within and/or without the 
University. 

5. Practicums , field experiences and internships . The student should develop 
a pattern of experiences in the field which will include one or more 
opportunities for brief observation of administrative behavior and 
problems: shadowing a successful leader for a few days; responsibilities 
for a project requiring participation in a real leadership problem; and a 



1 i 

longer relationship in an institution or school system which will allow 
some perspective on a variety of leadership problems. Consideration is 
being given to developing different kinds of internship arrangements. 

6. C enter and School of Education Projects : On-Campus and Off-Campus . 
One dimension of the School of Education is the fact that there are 
many faculty and doctoral students participating in projects of pro- 
fessional interest. Seeking to solve real problems in a methodical 
manner can certainly be a legitimate part of a student's program in 
leadership preparation. 

7. Workshops, conferences, conventions, interviews, cultural events . The 
portfolio system allows a person to pursue and capitalize on opportunities 
for which he would have no time in a formal program. A portfolio entry 

on a conference might include: events, ideas discussed, controversies, 
summary of outcomes for the student, and comments by a professor who 
also participated in the conference. 

8. Independent study projects . This is no new option for learning but 
independent study does take on new significance when there is individual- 
ized program planning. 

Steps to complete the masters degree and the CAGS 

A student enters the Center's program at any point past the bachelor's 
degree. He is accepted on the basis that he has the potential and the quali- 
fications to complete the doctorate. A student may desire the master's degree 
(or the CAGS) either on the way or as a terminal point. He would receive the 
master's degree upon completion of a minimum of the equivalent of one full 
academic year's work (two for the CAGS). University limitations on amount of 
work that can be transferred in from another institution would be in effect. 
Steps to complete the doctorate 

We see a logical continuity from the student's individualized portfolio 
record program of studies and experiences to the culminating steps of the 



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preliminary comprehensive examination and dissertation. While a student is 
ultimately responsible to his faculty committees as he works on and completes 
the steps in his program, he will receive help and support throughout the 
entire process through his participation in the peer group task-oriented 
seminars . 

We elicit evidence bearing on these candidates from such preliminary 
screening devices as records of previous academic work, GRE scores, letters 
of reference, personal statements of career plans and philosophical positions 
on questions of educational and societal priorities. We conduct more intensive, 
final screening by means of personal and "stress" interviews, interaction in 
both informal and seminar discussions with faculty and students, and evidence 
of resourcefulness and poise in coping with unexpected situations. 

In addition to developing talent pools within our own predoctoral graduate 
programs and through the initiative of individual faculty members in their 
far-flung professional contacts, we recruit an integral part of special purpose, 
funded training programs and in connection with particular talent needs asso- 
ciated with funded research and development projects. An example of the first 
is the campaign currently underway to recruit three doctoral students as 
recipients of stipends offered by the National Association of Independent 
Schools to candidates within its New England membership (printed flyers and 
nominations from personal contacts are principal mechanisms in this instance) . 
Typical of the second recruiting process is our present effort to recruit 
doctoral candidates with demonstrated writing skills who can receive support 
from the exercise of this talent as they pursue doctoral study within the 
Center. 

In the awarding of the Ed.D. degree, we make no formal designation of 
general field, let alone particular specialty or level within a field; the 
doctorate is granted from the School of Education through the University 



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Graduate School. Areas of emphasis or concentration are reflected in the 



61 



wide-range documentation of the doctoral experience included in the graduate's 
course transcript and in his portfolio record and evaluation of significant 
experience, both formal and informal. The import of this non-specific degree- 
awarding procedure for our Center if reflected in our emphasis on courses and 
other experiences which develop broadly generalizable understandings and skills 
(conceptual tools, research methodologies, human relations skills, communications 
concepts and techniques, etc.). Thus we see ourselves providing preparation 
for administrators at all school levels as well as in non-school organizations. 
It is noteworthy in this connection that doctoral candidates may plan programs 
leading to jointly awarded degrees in cooperation with such other units within 
the university as the sociology and economics departments and graduate school 
of business. 

On the basis of the progress registered during the past six months of our 
Center's new life, we may cite the following potential strengths in our emergent 
doctoral program. 

A. Reappraisal of course content and method in the conventional areas of 
instruction, i.e., administrative theory, interdisciplinary approaches 
to administration (sociology, psychology, economics, political science), 
organizational theory, case study and simulation approaches, school law 
and finance , etc . 

B. Increasing responsibility placed on students for conceiving and imple- 
menting their programs of study through a reorganized individual and 
group guidance function which emphasized continual reassessment of goals 
and performance achievement and the identification of alternative routes 
for seeking goal realization. 

C. A studies proliferation of options developed by students and faculty 
providing wide parameters of choice for the achievement of common score 
objectives and for the meeting of idiosyncratic needs. 



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Active student involvement in the affairs of the Center and the affiliated 
Cooperative School Service Center at the levels of both day-to-day opera- 
tion as well as implementation of special projects, both academic and 
service. . . 

Explicit opportunities, both structured and unstructured, for doctoral 
students to interact meaningfully and continually with faculty and with 
each other, particular emphasis placed presently in organizing mechanisms 
for effective peer interaction. . ' . . 

Wide ranging opportunities for practicum and internship experiences in- 
cluding standard salaried intern appointments of a year's duration as 
well as shorter term field activities extending through as little as 
one week's time and arranged for highly specific purposes. 
Expanding facilities and support for program experimentation and re- 
search, including dissertation and collaborative study. 



3 



63 



THE CENTER FOR STUDY OF EDUCATIONAL INNOVATIONS 
The Center for Study of Educational Innovations (CSEI) Is concerned with 
systematic inquiry into educational change and school improvement. Observa- 
tions of the conditions and activities characterizing educational institutions 
today suggest that there are far too many schools either unaware or uninformed 
of current, tested, Innovative practices. It is also clear that there are many 
institutions moving precipitately into "innovation" because it is fashionable. 
An examination of public education reveals that even the less threatening 
changes in schooling are often misrepresented and are usually blunted on the 
classroom door. The importance of recognizing individual differences among 
children, for example, is central to rational curriculum development and to 
effective instruction. However, few schools in the United States generate 
educational environments designed to complement human variability among students, 
A center interested in aggressively pursuing the advancement and strategic 
diffusion of knowledge in educational innovations is needed to foster the 
development of innovative alternatives. 

The Center will develop new research models for education which insti- 
tutionalize the process of change. The processes of research and development 
will support each other. Educational research must be designed to evaluate 
innovation, while at the same time suggest new educational practices that 
should be field tested. Similarly, innovation must take its directions from 
ongoing research and suggest new areas for study. The Center will make a 
concerted effort to devise institutional structures, curricula, instructional 
strategies, and teacher education procedures that capitalize on such inter- 
action between research and innovation. 

The Center, through working relationships with different types of field 
testing schools will identify problems in education, formulate possible solu- 
tions, design strategies and techniques for implementation, analyze selected 



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processes of change, and interpret any accumulated evidence. The generation 
of this knowledge and expertise is necessarily based upon a sound under- 
standing of (1) the current state of schooling, (2) the variety of relevant 
innovations, and (3) the alternative strategies and techniques for implemen- 
tation. At the outset, CSEI will assume the function of facilitating diagnosis 
because so little is known about the degree and kind of involvement essential 
to effective implementation of innovation. As data are accumulated on tested 
hypotheses, the role and function of the Center will become more prescriptive 
in emphasis. In other words, CSEI will record and analyze data accumulated 
from hypotheses tested in actual school settings, thereby obtaining additional 
data on the multitude of forces and pressures which have relevance to the 
acceptance of innovations. 

Finally, on a long term basis, the Center must of necessity be concerned 
with success and failure. One major thrust must be towards the identification 
and understanding of cause and effect relationships. Fear of failure and the 
bogey of experimental research have far too long delayed implementation of 
innovative practice and consequently the attainment of the necessary know- 
ledge and expertise essential in facilitating educational improvement and 
understanding education change. 

A study of educational innovation is both needed and long overdue. CSEI 
will experiment with research, development, and implementation in four 
compelling areas : 

1) Institutional structures 

2) Curriculum development 

3) Instructional strategies 

4) Teacher education 
OBJECTIVES 

The high priority objectives of the Center will be: 

1) To develop and test research - innovation paradigms that will identify 



65 



needed changes in schooling. 

2) To assess the effectiveness of selected educational innovations. 

3) To devise and implement new institutional structures which make 
optimal use of individual differences among professional personnel. 

4) To construct and test innovative curriculum materials. 

5) To develop strategies and techniques for implementing innovations. 
ORGANIZATION 

The objectives of the Center can best be realized by an organizational 
pattern that has three complementing yet autonomous areas of concern. 

FIGURE 1 In Figure 1, these dimensions 

are illustrated as three interlocking 
spheres. One represents conceptuali- 
zation, another research and evaluation 
and the third depicts an element for 
diffusion. Within this structure there 
exists no internal divisions, thus 
allowing participants unrestricted 
movement and communication among the 
units of activity. A general description of each unit follows: 
Conceptualization - A group of individuals within the Center continually con- 
ceptualize the directions of individual projects and determine the best 
allocation of energies and resources. This unit serves as a place for inquiry 
and exploration unattached from the ongoing activities of CSEI. Tn this way 
it is possible for individuals and small groups to pursue pet ideas or to 
investigate knowledge generated by a project. The existence of a conceptuali- 
zation unit insures an outlet for creativity and provides a breath of fresh 
air for current and future Center endeavors. 

The conceptualization unit has a function of determining the nature of 
existing innovations in school organization, curriculum development, instruc- 




;■'- ) 



tional strategies, and teacher education. Knowledge of the status of innova- 
tions provides the Center with a necessary awareness of the trends and problems 
characteristic of the field. Such data are necessary to keep Center activities 
relevant and to generate new projects. The conceptualization unit then provides 
for curiosity, investigation and exchange of ideas and opinions — creative 
efforts necessary for a salient organization. 

Research and Evaluation - This unit is devoted to studying and improving the 
evaluation of selected innovations. The research evaluation unit will clarify 
the process of evaluating innovations by formulating appropriate theory; iden- 
tify, measure, and study variables relevant to the evaluation of selected 
innovations; and develop and field test systems for evaluating programs and 
institutions. Also, attention is given to multiple consequences produced by a 
particular innovation interacting with elements of the total school enterprise. 

H}rpotheses about strategies and techniques for implementing educational 
change will be investigated by the research and evaluation unit. Also, this 
group will determine whether strategies and techniques for fostering change 
are sufficiently developed for dissemination to a wider audience. 
Diffusion - This unit of the Center is responsible for informing educators 
of current, clinicaly-tested innovations. The dissemination of such information 
will be followed up with strategies and techniques designed to help public 
schools accept and implement innovations. Further, the diffusion unit formu- 
lates practical solutions to problems existing in schools, makes innovations 
understandable to the practitioner, and provides back-up services to schools 
that are in the process of adapting innovations. The creation of strategies 
and techniques for implementing innovations in schools that have diversified 
demographic features and unique educational settings is a major priority of 
this unit . 

CSEI wants to avoid rigidity and be freed from the paraphenalia of 
conventional bureaucratic structure. Some organizational models, with their 



r 



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3 ^ 

chartered lines of authority and restrictive domains of influence frequently 
do real harm to the life of the young institution they were designed to help. 
The Center's three dimensional organization however, generates a healthy 
institutional environment. The organization is built on an organic structure 
which facilitates free communication between every unit of the Center. In 
all phases of involvement, knowledge about innovative practices must be 
current. Yet avenues for an exchange of ideas and opinions must constantly 
remain open if a climate where individuals can thrive and remain productive 
is to be established. It is likely that the unique organizational structure 
of CSEI will result in fluid internal communication, and will provide the 
action necessary to make the major objectives of the Center a reality. 

CURRENT PROJECTS . ■ 

Bellows Falls, Vermont — ^Members of CSEI are working with the staff at Bellows 
Falls in developing an individualized program for students. 

Boston Globe — CSEI and the Boston Globe are working on a special curriculum 
involving the use of newspapers in education. The pilot program will 
involve five different schools, but it is hoped that it can be expanded 
at a later date. 

Keene Project — Under contract from Keene, New Hampshire, CSEI is studying 

the school system, will make recommendations on what the schools should 
be like in twenty years, and recommend procedures that can be used to 
bring about these changes. Through questionnaires to students, parents, 
teachers and administrators, measures are being made regarding the in- 
fluence of the school on students' self -perception. 

Manchester, Connecticut — If funding can be arranged, CSEI will implement a 

multi-media package in Manchester. The target will be the whole community, 
students, teachers and parents. One idea is to conduct drug seminars 
for everyone and try to arrive at communication by this means. 



(k 



Montclair, New Jersey — CSEI has entered into a contractual relationship with 
the Montclair School District in which people from the School are 
conducting awareness sessions with teachers and other school personnel 
with a view toward long range programming. The program may be expanded 
to involve other areas in New Jersey and a long term technical assistance 
relationship. 

Montpelier Elementary Science Project — CSEI is consulting with the Montpelier 
School System in choosing and implementing a new science program in the 
elementary schools — Involves meetings and workshops with curriculum 
committee and teachers to help them implement new elementary science 
curriculum. 

Network of Innovative Schools — The network of innovative schools will represent 
a cross section of all schools in the Commonwealth — public, private, 
parochial, elementary and secondary — and will provide a means of en- 
couraging and developing maximum coordination of innovations in order to 
improve education in the Commonwealth. Cooperating schools will channel 
information and evaluation of innovations to other schools. The major 
thrust of the Network is the cooperation among schools toward change. 

Project ECCO, Syracuse, N.Y. — An inservice relationship has been established 
with Bishop Grimes High School in Syracuse. CSEI staff members are 
working with 25 of their teachers to improve instruction, specifically 
in the area of large group/small group instruction. 

Prince William County, Virginia — Prince William County is presently working 

on a total renewal of their educational program and have contracted with 
CSEI to provide technical assistance. We are training change agents 
within the system and tackling the whole school system with a three year 
lead time in preparing staff and teachers and 1 1/2 year lead time for 
instructional leaders. 

Stamford, Vermont — In the small Stamford elementary school, members from CSEI 



4 



are working with individual teachers helping them Identify and use 



69 



resources to initiate change. 

Toy Library — A joint program between the Product Research Department, Milton 
Bradley Co. and CSEI. The major thrust is to evaluate toys in relation 
to their usefulness in the improvement of education and enrichment of 
the educational environment of children. 

West Springfield Project — Under contract with West Springfield, CSEI has been 
involved in curriculum work there for the last seven months. They are 
trying to create a paradigm to the curriculum development in West Spring- 
field that can be used in other places. Beginning with social studies 
they have also incorporated a black studies package and other curriculum 
innovations. -; ., 

THE CENTER FOR EDUCATIONAL MEDIA AND TECHNOLOGY 
The Center for Educational Media and Technology offers learning, service 
and research opportunities in conventional audio-visual media and library 
areas as well as in the newer areas of television, film and systems technology. 
The Center's programs are inter-disciplinary in nature and uses the facilities 
of the University to implement its courses of study. The programs are designed 
to : provide an environment in which individuals can learn about the charac- 
teristics, capabilities, applications and implications of media, technology 
and systems; conduct research and evaluation activities in Media and systems; 
serve the surrounding educational community by making available for its use 
the appropriate hardware, software and media techniques; encourage the incor- 
poration of appropriate media, technology and systems into a broader range of 
educational programs than is now the case. 
Program 

Scope : The Educational Media, Technology, and Systems Programs (EMTS) of 
the School of Education offers learning, service, and research opportunities 



1 > 

in conventional audio-visual media and library areas as well as the newer areas 
of television, film, computers, and systems technology. 

Goal: The goal of the EMTS program is the preparation of teachers 
(broadly conceived), administrators, and educational specialists with com- 
petency and potential for leadership in the areas of media, technology, and 
systems. This goal will be attained through: 

1. Providing an environment in which individuals can learn about the 
characteristics, capabilities, applications and implications of 
media, technology and systems. 

2. Conducting research and evaluation activities in media and systems. 

3. Serving the educational community by making available appropriate 
hardware, software, and techniques for its use. 

4. Encouraging the incorporation of appropriate Media, Technology, 
and systems into all educational programs. 

5. Investigating the effects on educational outcomes of individual 
differences in learning. 

The Media Center has completed a year of implementation after a year of 
planning. Our efforts over this two-year period in Educational Media and 
Technology have led to the conviction that a student should have the oppor- 
tunity to select from a wide variety of activities that which is most meaning- 
ful and relevant to his own development. We are committed to designing programs 
which maximize freedom and exposure, which provide a rich and exciting learning 
climate, and which offer multiple options for intellectual and personal growth. 

The projects which the Media Center have become involved with include: 
the Lowell Project, which will lead to an experimental school under the control 
of the people through a unique Model Cities Program; Research under the rubric 
of Aptitude-Treatment-Interaction which is currently concentrating on the 
analysis of Eye Movements preferences as predictors of learning styles; and 
the development of Media Application for learning environments. 



1 1 

THE CENTER FOR FOUNDATIONS OF EDUCATION 



71 



The Center for Foundations of Education is devoted to the development 
of a comprehensive academic program for undergraduates and graduates. It 
endeavors to promote the academic study of the educative process and the school 
as a fundamental societal institution. The Center utilizes an inter-disciplinary 
approach in an attempt to study education as a discipline with a multi-sided 
perspective. Included in the interests of the Center are attempts to: 

a. Place educational problems in context; 

b. Enhance the perspective of professional educators; 

c. Stimulate inquiry and analysis; 

d. Examine educational objectives and basic assumptions upon which they rest; 

e. Re-examine values and provide the arena for testing of them against the 
realities of the present. 

At the undergraduate level, courses in the Foundations of Education are a 
component of the total professional training program in education. An attempt 
is made to give prospective teachers an understanding of the fundamental pur- 
pose and theory of education as well as an exposure to those forces in society 
which influence the educational process. It is assumed by the Center that the 
goal of teacher preparation is not only the production of a good technician 
with classroom skills, but the development of a professional educator who is 
knowledgeable about the purpose and scope of the nation's educational enter- 
prise. 

The Masters Program offers a sequence of courses and experiences to 
broaden basic understandings of the sociological, historical, philosophical, 
social psychological and comparative foundations of education. The focus is 
general rather than specific with successful completion providing serious 
students of education with the opportunity to embark upon a reflective approach 
to the practice and study of education, or entry to further study with greater 
specialization . 



The Doctoral Program offers specialized programs in Educational Philos- 
ophy; Educational History; Educational Sociology and Anthropology and Compara- 
tive Education. Programs are structured to meet the needs and desires of 
individual students. Doctoral candidates work in concert with faculty members 
in organizing individual programs. The career destination of the average 
student completing a graduate program is college teaching. This career goal, 
however, is not an exclusive one and graduates with doctorates in educational 
foundations can be found in a wide spectrum of educational occupations. 

Although the Center has been more program-oriented than project-oriented, 
some projects have been undertaken. Projects include: 

(1) a member of the Center is chairman of a planning committee to examine 

the possibility of a joint doctoral program between the School of Education 
and the Department of Anthropology. This is in its preliminary planning 
state. A Center member has also been invited to participate in a graduate 
course in the Department of Anthropology; 

(2) the Center has had continuous contact and dialogue with Mt. Holyoke and 
Smith College faculty, who are concerned with the social foundations of 
education. Guest lectures have been given. Their help was solicited in 
the development of the doctoral program. A faculty member from Mt . Holyoke 
will be involved in our modular credit week; 

(3) a member of the Center has been involved with the State Department of 
Education as project director for a study of disadvantaged urban youth. 
Emanating from the project is a published document; 

(4) a member of the Center has been instrumental at the State level in 
formulating the new State kindergarten curriculum guide. Further involve- 
ment with the State Department of Education is anticipated, 

THE CENTER FOR URBAN EDUCATION 
The Center for Urban Education (CUE) at the School of Education, University 



w 



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1 ^ 

of Massachusetts, is a planning, research and training center focusing on 



73 



education in urban areas. Our tasks: to develop new models for urban schools 
that will bring real changes in curriculum, teacher attitudes, and school 
structure; to develop tools for community involvement to help bring about these 
changes; to discover ways to sensitize teachers, students, parents, and adminis- 
trators to the needs and feelings of each other. 

The Center for Urban Education developed in 1958-69 under the leadership 
of Atron Gentry during the first planning year of a new School of Education. 
The excitement of that year has attracted hundreds of applicants to the School 
ready to try new approaches to education. The members of CUE, over half of 
whom are Black, bring from their personal and professional experiences a dedi- 
cation to improving urban education. 

The Center for Urban Education has established working relationships in 
Pasadena and Temple City, California; Hartford, Connecticut; Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania; New York, N.Y.; Wilmington, Delaware; and in Springfield, Holyoke, 
Pittsfield, and Worcester, Massachusetts. No one city presents all the problems 
and possibilities for change. Yet the symptoms and causes of poor education 
in one city often look remarkably like the symptoms and causes in another. CUE 
believes that multi-urban involvements can best provide a theater for researching 
urban school problems and suggesting generalizable solutions. 

CUE supports the concept of reality-based education and research. Existing 
research paradigms lack organizing categories which fit urban schools or 
schools in general. Too little has been done in institutions of higher educa- 
tion to make the vital connection between research and the patent needs in urban 
schools. CUE faculty and student interns research urban problems in the cities 
themselves and develop strategies for change from their actual experience. The 
curriculum at CUE for undergraduate and graduate programs evolves from our on- 
going programs and projects in various cities. 

CUE recognizes that improving urban schools involves an understanding of 



1 ^ 

the total urban environment. No single key explains the working of a city; 



74 



a city is an ecological system. Politicians, businessmen, social workers, 
ghetto residents; smog, noise, transportation systems, housing and landscaping, 
job opportunities, church groups, racial and ethnic loyalties and antagonisms — 
all affect the urban school. CUE has a staff of experienced urban specialists, 
each of whom understands the ecology of urban environments as well as his 
special area. Community organizers, political scientists, curriculum experts, 
economists, specialists in differentiated staffing and flexible scheduling, 
Blacks and Whites experienced in working with human relations make up the task 
force at CUE. . . , . , . .- 

CUE believes that changes in urban schools can only be relevant and 
enduring when such changes have support from those concerned — parents, teachers, 
and students. Rather than develop one ideal curriculum package, CUE stimulates 
the development of resources from within. The tragedy in urban schools is that 
so many want change and yet feel powerless. Community leaders want it, but 
often are disenchanted with the educational establishment and hostile to new 
"projects and programs." Parents want their children to learn, but too often 
they are alienated from the schools. Many students and teachers know the 
shortcomings of their schools but feel helpless. 

CUE believes improving urban schools must start with these frustrations 
and desires — they are our prime resource. Community involvement, sensitizing 
teachers to Black/White attitudes, student-centered learning — all can be 
built from the common awareness of the failure of traditional urban schools. 

Within this general approach, CUE offers specific tools for facilitating 
change and draws on the skills developed at the School of Education. Student- 
centered curricula with an emphasis on humanistic education and the basic 
skills can replace outmoded, irrelevant curricula. In-service training for 
teachers can support them in developing new curricula, in learning tools for 
communicating with the communities they serve, and in being sensitized to the 



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particular problems and strengths of urban children. 



75 



Differentiated staffing and flexible scheduling are models which can 
loosen the rigid structure of traditional schools and encourage innovation. 
Teachers become well-paid professionals in a differentiated staff, taking a 
direct role in curriculum development and school and community policies. The 
employment of paraprof essionals supports teachers and students and provides a 
real career ladder by which community people become a part of the schools and 
improve their economic situation. A flexible schedule frees the rigid time 
and space structure of the traditional urban schools. Opportunities are made 
for a vast variety of time and class size allocation, including individualized 
instruction and cross-age tutoring. . ' ■ 

Members of CUE share the excitement of sensing that something is happening — 
doors are opening for urban children. But the changes are slow and require a 
united effort of educators, agencies, businessmen, parents and community leaders. 
cue's input is increasingly effective as we gain experience and the confidence 
of our working partners — increasingly frustrating as we see opportunities for 
greater efforts pass by because our personnel and resources cannot stretch 
that far. CUE strives for continual growth balanced by tangible achievements 
and self-evaluation. 

During the past academic year, CUE off-campus projects focused on estab- 
lishing on-site teacher training programs. Three schools — Parkway Project and 
Thaddeus Stevens School in Philadelphia and New Park School in Hartford — 
participated. Thirty interns lived on site and taught for one semester super- 
vised by doctoral students in CUE. Next year the on-site teacher training 
will be expanded. 

On an informal consultant basis, several doctoral students in CUE worked 
with South Arsenal Neighborhood Development Corporation in Hartford in pre- 
paring curriculum for their Everywhere School. The project was completed in 
early spring. 



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In July and August, 1970, CUE will coordinate a Project Broad Jump, on the 
campus at UMass for inner-city children from New York. The project will con- 
tinue for six weeks of classes and enrichment experiences for the children 
during the summer. Some follow-up responsibility during next year will also 
fall to CUE. . . 

During this summer and the following academic year, CUE and the School 
of Education as a whole will probably be involved in two Career Opportunities 
Programs. These federally-funded programs are designed to provide academic 
courses and practicum credit for paraprof essionals from Model Cities Areas. 
Within four to six years, the paraprof essionals will receive B.A.s and teacher 
certification. - 

One COP Program, in Springfield and Worcester, Massachusetts will involve 
about 150 paraprof essionals, 20 of whom will reside on-site at the University 
of Massachusetts as trainers of teachers and trainers of trainers. The second 
COP Program will involve about 200 paraprof essionals in Brooklyn Model Cities 
Area who will be provided with on-site courses and practicum credit toward their 
degree and certification in education. 

TEACHER EDUCATION 
The Teacher Education Center is responsible for the preparation of 
approximately 400 elementary and 500 secondary school teachers each year. 
The bulk of the center's effort thus goes toward undergraduate teacher educa- 
tion, although there is also an M.A.T. Program for approximately 40 students. 
In addition, the center has graduate programs for the professional improvement 
of experienced elementary and secondary school teachers leading to an M.Ed. 
degree and a Certificate of Advanced Graduate Study in the areas of reading, 
science, mathematics, social studies and English. The center also offers Ed.D. 
programs for potential teacher educators in the above curriculum and instruc- 
tion areas as well as programs for those interested in the general field of 



f 77 

teacher education. 

The teacher preparation program is moving toward a modularized, in- 
dividualized K-12 program based upon concepts developed as a part of a 
federally funded Model Elementary Teacher Education Program. METEP is a new 
approach to the preparation of elementary school teachers. Utilizing a 
performance based curriculum design as a central planning principle, the 
program utilizes a systems approach for organizing an individualized pro- 
gram. Characteristics of the program include variable entry and exit points, 
performance criteria, multiple instructional routes for individualized instruc- 
tion, differentiated staffing patterns, microteaching experiences, continual 
in-service training programs and responsiveness to client demands. The 
structure of the education component is designed to allow for constant re- 
vision and upgrading. . . . . . 

Beginning in the fall of 1969, the Teacher Education Center offered an 
intern teaching program which differed substantially from the regular student 
teaching experience. The basic format of the program provided the following: 

1. Pre-service teachers were placed in field classrooms for an entire 
university semester. 

2. The special methods class was taught as an integral part of the 
field classroom experience by the supervising teacher with the 
assistance of the School of Education. 

3. A practicum experience was required prior to the interning semester. 
Using the above as the basic format of the intern program, partici- 
pating school districts are free to work out programs with the Univer- 
sity which are designed to meet the particular needs of both the 
school, the teachers, and the interns. By combining the field ex- 
perience and the special methods class, and by placing the super- 
vising teacher in charge of both, we hope to increase the effective 
supervision the intern receives, and to make the special methods an 



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ongoing, relevant experience. Interns were placed mainly in schools 
in the surrounding area — Amherst, Northampton, Easthampton — but also 
in schools at a greater distance to allow placement in innovative 
schools. For example some interns were placed at Lincoln- Sudbury 
and some in Temple City, California as well as in many other loca- 
tions. A sizable number of interns were placed in innercity schools 
such as the New Park School in Hartford, and the Parkway Project in 
Philadelphia. ■ , : • 

Off campus activities of the Teacher Education Center include a coopera- 
tive program with Teachers, Inc. of New York. The project is an attempt to 
develop a teacher-training program that has a large community input and 
community involvement as part of its training procedures. 



^^^\ 



79 



HIGHER EDUCATION 

The Center for Higher Education offers an unusual opportunity for 
graduate study in the field of Higher Education. The purpose of this 
program is to assist intelligent, sensitive, and creative individuals 
to develop the knowledge and experience to effect and implement change 
within the several institutions of higher learning (community college, 
four-year liberal arts college, and university). In order to develop 
an understanding of the individual, while at the same time expanding a- 
wareness of group and social structure, the programs in Higher Education 
are coordinated with the programs in Human Relations, the primary emphasis 
of which is directed toward maximizing human potential and freeing the 
individual. These programs are based on the premise that both subject 
matter study and experience at several levels of human interaction are 
necessary in the development of individuals interested in the "humanization" 
of institutions of higher education. 

Another area of concern is the study of alternatives to current 
faculty/student reward systems, and the organizational and curricular 
structures in the universities. 

The doctoral program is characterized by several unique qualities 
The Doctor of Education degree is based on "credit experiences" consisting 
of traditional courses and specific disciplines, research, "lab" and field 
study, tutorials, and intern or practicum experiences. The emphasis cf 
most programs will be in humanistic education and human relations, includ- 
ing experiences and study in several areas of human development, human 
interaction, and organizational theory and change. 



1 1 

Each program is individually negotiated by the candiate with the 



80 



faculty coinmittee. In cooperation with his committee, the student can 
create an interdisciplinary program, drawing on the talents of individuals 
from other disciplines such as psychology, philosophy, sociology, and 
business administration. In addition, the program involves the combined 
interinstitutional resources of colleges in the surrounding area: Mount 
Holyoke, Smith, Amherst, and Hampshire Colleges, ,. 

Specific degree requirements in addition to the individually negotiated 
course of studies are: (1) One year of "full-time" study in residence, 
(2) A negotiable intern or practicum experience (in teaching, research, 
or administration), and (3) A creative research project, which may be 
presented in a variety of formats (e.g., dissertation, novel, play, film). 

The Community College Affairs area of the Center for Higher Education 
is involved in several special programs off campus. Under a Title III grant 
from the U.S. Office of Education they are working with Greenfield Community 
College in the implementation of an advising-counseling model. A living- 
learning workshop was designed and carried out in June, 1970 for advising 
counseling teams consisting of students, teaching faculty and members of 
the professional counseling staff. These teams will be using their skills 
during the month of July and the 1970/71 academic year. Center participation 
in the project will continue throughout the 19 70/71 academic year, and it is 
one expectation that we will offer an institute in the summer of 1971 for 
New England Community Colleges wishing to improve their advising-counseling 
practices. 

The Center for Community College Affairs is also offering a summer 
program in curriculum and instruction for community college instructors 
in an effort to provide inservice instructional staff development as well 
as preservice preparation of teachers. The first five weeks of this pro- 
gram will be devoted to learning ways of developing appropriate learning 
environments, designing curriculum so that it will make contact with students 



Ci!' 



where they are, and utilizing teaching strategies that increase effectiveness 
of presentation and classroom interaction. The last week of the program will 
be devoted to a simulated community college in which participants will "try 
on" what they learned in the earlier part of the summer program. 

Participants in the summer program will be offered encouragement for 
Implementing and reinforcing the skills acquired when they return to their 
posts, and they will be asked to recruit one or two other faculty members 
interested in improvement of instruction. By working in the field of these 
small groups, we are confident that we can get a toe hold and begin to develop 
interest in improved instruction. 

The School of Education is a member of the Union for Experimenting Colleges 
and Universities. By pooling our resources with other innovative colleges and 
universities, we hope to achieve the largest possible impact on the total 
educational system. One of the most innovative and far-reaching projects 
sponsored by the Union is the University Without Walls. Although still in 
the planning stage, the University Without Walls will allow for the expansion 
of traditional education on three levels: the university is expanded from 
the traditional campus setting to where the student wishes to be — at home, 
abroad, or in any city or area appropriate to his educational goals. In- 
structional personnel are expanded from the single campus faculty to include 
any person with expertise in the chosen field, and the range of student ages 
is expanded from the traditional 18-22 range to include persons from 16-60. 



1 , '' 



The Center for Occupational Education 

Constant technological and social change makes it imperative that 
occupational educators strive to provide all citizens with an equal 
opportunity for maximum occupational and social development. One purpose 
of the Occupational Education Center is to prepare sensitive and imagina- 
tive individuals who will assume leadership in the solution of these 
problems through researching existing knowledge, developing new knowledge, 
and implementing innovative programs in the field of vocational and technical 
education. '■'-''. 

The Occupational Education Center is cognizant of, and resolute in 
the belief that the social, educational, and occupational problems of the 
future requires that individuals in leadership positions cannot be isolated 
in the knowledge of occupational education but must be concerned with every 
aspect of education. This philosophic belief necessitates that close 
coordination be established with all the resources of the University and 
other Centers of the School of Education, particularly the Urban Education 
Center, the Higher Education Center, the Administration Center, and the 
Research Center. 

Graduate Programs 

The Occupation Education Center affords unique and diverse opportunities 
for students at the graduate level to prepare for leadership roles. Analogous 
features of the Doctoral, C.A.G.S., M.A.T., or Master's programs are: 
1. Constant monitoring by the student, in conjunction with 
professional staff members of the School of Education and 
the Occupation Education Center, to assure that the indivi- 
dual's needs are being met. 



Sj) 



^ 1 

2. Alternate routes to insure that the individual is provided 
at least two equal opportunities for accomplishing the same 
objective. 

3. Flexible exit and entry points are offered to provide for 
time and competency variances. 

4. A constant intercourse with other Centers of the School 
of Education. 

5. A pass-fail system of grading. 

The Doctoral Program 

This program is characterized by the emphasis placed on student 
initiative and imaginativeness, in concurrence with his self-selected 
guidance committee, in designing and negotiating a program of study which 
will be meaningful to his professional aspirations. The program may con- 
sist of lecture courses, field and laboratory experiences, intern experience, 
programmed instruction, independent study, or negotiated alternatives. 

Upon program approval, the candidate determines the speed and resources 
he will incorporate in meeting his objectives and procedes until an evaluation 
of his progress is deemed necessary. One evaluation technique used is the 
guidance committee, which serves not only in the role of assisting the 
candidate operationalize his educational concepts, but also an evaluation 
body continually monitoring the candidate's growth. A second method of 
evaluating the candidate's progress is his portfolio which is originated at 
program entry and is a record of the candidate's learning experiences, and 
his evaluation of these experiences. If at this point performance criteria 
are being met, the candiate is encouraged to continue. 

Other criteria for attaining the doctorate are the comprehensive 
examination and the dissertation or creative project. The candidate is 
encouraged to exert initiative in determining the format and his readiness 



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84 



for evaluation, and decided (with the approval of his committee) either to 
submit a dissertation and defense or an original project. 



'" The C.A.G.S. 

The Certificate of Advanced Graduate Studies Program is designed to 
prepare individuals for community college teaching, for leadership roles 
in public school education, or to meet other educational goals of those 
who may not desire to enter the Doctoral Program. 

The C.A.G.S. Program incorporates the same unique features of the 
Doctoral Program exclusive of the guidance committee — ^which is replaced 
by a single advisor from the Graduate School staff, and the dissertation — 
which is replaced by an internship or appropriate project. 

The Master's Degree 

This program emphasized a primary objective of the Occupational Education 
Center, which is to provide an individual at least two different modes of 
attaining his educational objective. A familiar route provides the conven- 
tional program of established performance criteria which when successfully 
met qualifies the individual for the Master's Degree. An alternate avenue 
provides the individual with the opportunity for constructing a program which 
he determines to be the most meaningful to his educational aspirations. An 
individual opting this type of experience negotiates a program of study with 
an Occupational Education Center staff member and precedes to meet agreed 
criteria at a pace determined by his own initiative and energy. Successfully 
meeting the criteria for this option also qualifies the student for the 
Master's Degree. 



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85 



FACULTY PUBLICATIONS 



Allen, Dwight W. , (vi/ith Peter H. Wagschal) "A New Look in Credentialing, " 

The Clearing House , Vol. 44, No. 3, November 1969, pp. 137-140. 
Allen, Dwight W. , (with Peter H. Wagschal) "Bridging the Great Divide," 

The Massachusetts Teacl _ , April 1969, pp. 3-6. 
Allen, Dwight W. , (with Lloyd Kline) "Change Agent: The Administrator in 

'New' Education," Today 's Catholi c Te acher , March 28, 1969, pp. 30-38. 
Allen, Dwight W. , "Jazz Up Education," Pace Magazine , November 1969, pp. 58-59. 
Allen, D\i7ight W. , (with Leon M. Lessinger) "Performance Proposals for Educational 

Funding: A New Approach to Federal Resource Allocation," Phi Delta Kappan , 

Vol. LI, No. 3, November 1969, pp. 136-137. 
Allen, Dwight W. , "Teacher Education — Academic and Continuing," The Ideal School , 

October 1969, pp. 158-185. 
Allen, Dwight W. , Teaching Skills for Elementary and Secondary Teachers , 

General Learning Corporation, New York, A Multi-Media Learning Package 

containing ^^7ritten pamphlets and 16 mm films, 1969. 
Allen, Dwight W. , (with R.N. Bush, J.M. Cooper and K.A.Ryan) "Team Research in 

Education," Educational Technology , Vol. IX, No. 4, April 1969, pp. 17-21. 



Anderson, G. E. , Jr. , 
1969, p. 90-92. 

Anderson, G. E. , Jr., 
Nation's Schools , 

Anderson, G. E. , Jr. , 
p. 66. 

Anderson, G. E. , Jr., 



General Learning Corporation. 



Anderson, G. E. , Jr. , 



'Simulation Model Helps Training," Nation's Schools , April 

'Four Questions to Answer Before Hiring Consultants," 

October 1969, p. 98-101. 

'Rating the E.P.D. Manager," Nation's Schools , Dec. 1969, 

' Simplified University Registration ." Monograph, 210 pages. 



'WTiat EDP Coordinators can do for your district," Nation' s 



Schools , Vol. 83, No. 2, February 1969, pp. 110-112. 

Cooper, J.M. , (with Dwight W. Allen, Kevin A. Ryan and Robert N. Bush) 

"Teaching Skills for Elementary and Secondary Teachers," General Learning 

Corporation, New York, A Multi-Media Learning Package containing written 

pamphlets and 16 mm films, 1969. 
Cooper, J.M. , (v/ith Earl Seidman) "From Supervision to Self-Vision," Journal of 

Secondary Education , Vol. 44, No. 1, January, 1969, pp. 19-24. 
Cooper, J.M. , (with Earl Seidman) "Helping Teachers Focus on Behavioral Change," 

The Clearing House , Vol. 43, No. 5, January 1969, pp. 19-24. 
Cooper, J.M., (with Dwight W. Allen) "Massachusetts Model Elementary Teacher 

Education Program," Journal of Research and Development in Education , Vol. 2, 

No. 3, Spring 1969, pp. 31-35. 
Cooper, J.M. , "A Guide to the University of Massachusetts' Model Elementary Teacher 

Education Program," A Readers' Guide to the Comprehensive Models for Preparing 

Elementary Teache rs, ERIC on Teacher Education, Washington, D.C., November 1969. 
Cooper, J.M. , A Feasibility Study of the Model Elementary Teacher Education Program 

(Phase II) . U.S. Office of Education Contract No. OEC-0-9-310417-4040(010) . 

January 1, 1970. (Project Director) 



c 



I 



Cooper, J.M., (co-author) "A Feasibility Study of the Model Elementary Teacher 

Education," Journal of Research and Development in Education , Vol. 3, No. 3, 
Spring, 1970. 

Edgecomb, P.L., "Urban Frontier in Vocational Agriculture, Agri. Educ. , Vol. 42, 
No. 1, July 1969, pp. 18-19. 

Evans, D.R. , "Attitudes and Behavior of Secondary School Teachers in Uganda: 

An Aspect of the Process of National Development," Stanford International 
Development Education Center, Stanford University Litho-of f set , January 1969, 
420 pp. 

Flight, D.S., Book Review: Stoops and Johnson, Elementary School Administration , 
in Adult Education , Vol. XX, Fall 1969, pp. 46-50. 

Gorth & Grayson, "A Program to Compose and Print Tests for Instructional Testing 

Using Item Sampling," Educational and Psychological Measurement , 1969, 29, 

pp. 173-174. 
Gorth, Grayson, Lindeman , "A Computer Program to Evaluate Item Performance By 

Internal and External Criteria in a Longitudinal Testing Program Using Item 

Sampling," Educational and Psychological Measurement , 1969, 29, pp. 181-183. 
Gorth, Grayson, Stroud, "A Computer Program To Tabulate and Plot Achievement 

Profiles of Longitudinal Achievement Testing Using Item Sampling," Educational 

and Psychological Measurement , 1969, 29, pp. 179-180. 
Gorth, Allen, Popejoy, Stroud, "A Comparison of Comprehensive Versus Unit 

Pretesting as Related to Student Achievement," Psychology in the School , 

1969, 6, pp. 391-393. 
Gorth, Grayson, Popejoy, Stroud, "A Tape-Based Data Band for Educational Research 

or Instructional Testing Using Longitudinal Item Sampling," Educational and 

Psychological Measurement , 1969, 29, pp. 175-177. 
Gorth & Wightman, "CAM: The New Look in Classroom Testing," Trend , Spring 1969, 

pp. 56-57. 

Hakstian, A.R. , (with Gene V. Glass) "Measures of Association in Comparative 

Experiments: Their Development and Interpretation," Paper read at AERA 

Meeting, February 1969. 
Hakstian, A.R., "A Comparison of the Effects on Study Methods and Test Performance 

of Objective, Essay and Combined Examinations," Paper read at AERA Annual 

Meeting, February 1969. 
Hakstian, A.R., "Review of the Pimsleur Foreign Language Proficiency Tests," 

Journal of Educational Measurement , Vol. 6, 1969, pp. 44-46. 
Hakstian, A.R., (with Gene V. Glass) "Measures of Association in Comparative 

Experiments: Their Development and Interpretation," American Educational 

Research Journal , Vol. 6, 1969, pp. 403-414. 
Hakstian, A.R., "Methods of Oblique Factor Transformation," Research Paper No. 31 , 

Laboratory of Educational Research, University of Colorado, August 1969. 
Hakstian, A.R., "Methods of Oblique Factor Transformation: I. A Comparative 

Evaluation of Four Prominent Methods," Technical Report No. 1 , School of 

Education, University of Massachusetts, December 1969. 



f 



Hambleton, R.K. , (with Ross E. Traub and Balwant Singh) "Effects of Promised 

Reward and Threatened Penalty on Performance of a Multi-Choice Vocabulary 
Test," Educational and Psychological Measurement , 1969, pp. 847-861. 

Hutchinson, T.E., "A Numerical Example of Contour Analysis Among Flexibly 

Determined Sub-Groups," American Educational Research Journal , Vol. 6, 

No. 1, 1969, pp. 91-103. 
Hutchinson, T.E., (with A. Roe) "Studies of Occupational History, Part III: 

The Stability of Occupational Groups of the Roe System," Journal of 

Counseling Psychology , Vol. 16, No. 5, 1969, pp. 390-395. 
Hutchinson, T.E., "Computer Programs in ISVD, in U.S. Office of Education," 

Computer-based Vocational Guidance Systems , OE-25053, U.S. Government 

Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 1%9, pp. 103-108. 

Ivey, A., and Hinkle, J., "Rural Attitudes Toward Mental Health," Mental Hygiene , 
1970, 53, pp. 295-297. 

Jones, B.L., "A Plan for Planning in the New Deal," Social Science Quarterly , 
Vol. 50, No. 3, December 1969, pp. 525-534. 

Jordan, D.C., "New Perspectives on Relevance in Education," The Teacher and His 
Staff: Differentiating Teaching Roles , Report of the 1968 Regional TEPS 
Conferences, National Education Association, Washington, D.C., 1969, p. 16. 

Jordan, D.C., "People with Answers Needed to Educate the Disadvantaged," Trend , 
Vol. V, No. 3, Spring 1969, p. 52. 

Konicek, R.D. , (with J. Ahern, M. Rudman, W. Masalski, D. Streets) "A Team Approach 
to Higher Education," Trend, Vol. 3, Spring 1969, p. 33. 

Rudman, M. , "The Learning Theater," Trend , Vol. V, No. 3, Spring 1969, pp. 29-30. 
Rudman, M. , (with J. Ahern, R. Konicek, W. Masalski, D. Streets) "A Team Approach 
to Higher Education," Trend , Vol. 3, Spring 1969, p. 32-33. 

Seidman, E. , (with James Cooper) "From Supervision to Self-Vision," Journal of 

Secondary Education , January 1969, pp. 19-29. 
Seidman, E. , "Micro-teaching in English Education: Some Basic Questions," 

Revisiting Basic Issues in English Education , N.C.T.E., March 1969. 
Seidman, E. , (with Jam.es Cooper) "Helping Teachers Focus on Academic Change," 

The Clearing House , January 1969, pp. 301-306. 

Simon, S., "Grades Must Go," Moderator , Vol. VIII, No. 2, March 1969, pp. 20-21. 
Simon, S., "The Grading Travesty," About Education , Vol. 1, No. 3, Spring 1969, 

p. 3-5. 
Simon, S., "Down With Grades," Today's Education , Vol. 58, No. 4, April 1969, 

p. 24. 



1 



Simon, S. , (with Phyllis Lieberman) "Reviving a Proud Idea: Youth Has a Part 

to Play, Changing Education , Vol. 4, No. 2, Fall 1969, pp. 28-29. 
Simon, S. , (with Alice Games) "Teaching Afro-American History with a Focus on 

Values," Educational Leadership , Vol. 27, No. 3, December. 1969, pp. 222-224. 
Simon, S. , (with Merrill Harmin and Howard Kirschenbaum) "Teaching Science with 

a Focus on Values," Science Teacher , Vol. 37, No. 1, January 1970, pp. 16-20. 
Simon, S., "Your Values Are Showing," Colloquy , Vol. 3, No. 1, January 1970, 

pp. 20-32. 
Simon, S. , "Three Ways to Teach Church School," Colloquy , Vol. 3, No. 1, January 

1970, pp. 37-38. 
Simon, S., (with Merrill Harmin) "The Years the Schools Taught the Telephone 

Directory," National Elementary Principal , Vol. 49, No. 5, April 1970, 

pp. 14-18. 
Simon, S., "Promoting the Search for Values," Educational Opportunity Forum , 

Vol. 1, No. 4, Fall 1969, pp. 75-84. 
Simon, S. , (with Marianne Simon) "Sexuality and School," Colloquy , Vol. 3, No. 5, 

May 1970, pp. 21, 24-25. 
Simon, S., (with Howard Kirschenbaum and Rodney Napier) "The Day the Consultant 

Looked at Our Grading System," Phi Delta Kappan , Vol. 51, No. 9, May 1970, 

pp. 476-479. 

Thelen, L.J. , (with John F. Davidson) "Let's Stop Teaching about Sex (of the 

Flowering Plants)," The American Biology Teacher, Vol. 31, No. 12, December 
1969, pp. 563-566. 

Ulin, R.O. , "Linguistics: Mission Impossible," Educational Forum , XXXIII, March 

1969, pp. 329-335. 
Ulin, R.O., (Book Review) Squire, J.R. and Applebee, R.K., High School English 

Instruction Today , Appleton, Century, Crafts, 1968 in Choice , VI, September 

1969, p. 883. 
Ulin, R.O., (Book Review) Wise, A.E., Rich Schools, Poor Schools , University of 

Chicago, 1968, in Choice , VI, October 1969, p. 1079. 

Urch, G.E., "Africanization and Socialization of the Education in Kenya," 
Pan-African Journal , Vol. II, No. 1, Winter 1969, pp. 50-63. 

Urch, G.E., (with E.J. Doubleday) "University of Massachusetts in Uganda: 
Tororo Girls' School," Trend, Vol. V, No. 3, pp. 46-47. 

Urch, G.E., (with E.J. Doubleday) "UMass in Africa," The Massachusetts Teacher , 
Vol. XLIX, No. 3, November 1969, pp. 9-12. 

Urch, G.E., "Africanization of Schools in Kenya," The Educational Forum, March 1970 

pp. 371-377. ~ ' 

Wagschal, P.H., (with D.W. Allen) "Bridging the Great Divide," The Massachusetts 

Teacher , April 1969. 
Wagschal, P.H. , "The Cycle of Self-Contempt," Journal of Secondary Education , 

April 1969. 
Wagschal, P.H., "Education: Can You Get There from Here?" Spectrum , Fall 1969. 
Wagschal, P.H. , (with D.W. Allen) "Flexibility in Credentialing, " The Clearing 

House , November 1969. 



i 



Wagschal, P.H., "The Free Enterprise Teacher," School and Society , April 1969. 
Wagschal, P.H., (with Jim Cooper) "The K-12 Program," Trend , Spring 1969. 
Wagschal, P.H. , "On the Irrelevance of Relevance," Phi Delta Kappan , November 1969. 
Wagschal, P.H., "Performance, vs . Experience Based Curricula," High School Journal , 

April 1969. 
Wagschal, P.H., "Psychology-The Classroom," Journal of Teacher Education , Fall 1969. 
Wagschal, P.H., "Psychology and Model Building - The Orienting Response," Journal 

of Biological Psych ology, September 1969. ,, 

Wagschal, P.H. , "Rationality Revisited," Nation's Schools , April 1969. 
Wagschal, P.H. , (with E. Seidman and C. Osborne) "Student Interest and Judgement: 

Base for Teacher Education, Trend , Spring 1969. 
Wagschal, P.H. , (Book Review) Dennison, G. , The Live's of Children , Saturday 

Review, November 15, 1969. 

Weinstein, G. and Fantini, M. , "Radical School Reform," (A Chapter) (In Press). 

Weinstein, G. and Fantini, M. "Curriculum of Affect," Praeger Press, Ford Foundation 

1970. 

Weinstein, G. , et. al. , "Strength Training for Beginning Teachers, 1969. 

Wolf, W.C., Jr., "Educator's Conception of Contemporary Innovation in Teacher 

Training," School and Society , October 1969, pp. 378-380. 
Wolf, W.C., Jr., Specialist in Continuing Education , Cooperative Educational 

Research Laboratory, Inc., chapter entitled "Change Agent Strategies in 

Perspective," U.S.D.E. December 3-7 D61391 3060. 
Wolf, W.C., Jr., Education in the U.S. Today , U.S. Information Agency, chapter 

entitled "The American Elementary School," Washington D.C.: Government 

Printing Office, Summer 1969, pp. 14-21. 

Woodbury, R.C., (with Atron Gentry) "Why Black History?" The New England Social 
Studies Bulletin , Vol. XXVI, No. 1, Winter 1969, pp. 10-13. 

Wyman, R. , "Fact and Fancy about Brnm Sound Films," The Instructor , January 1969, 

pp. 133-134. 
Wyman, R. , "A Visual Response System for Teacher-Group Interaction in the Education 

of the Deaf Children," The Volta Review , March 1969, pp. 155-160. 
Wyman, R. , "The Overhead Projector in the U.S.A.," Audio-Visual Media (London), 

Spring 1969, p. 9-12. 
Wyman, R. , (Reprint) "A Visual Response System for Small Group Interactions," 

Audio-Visual Media (London), Spring 1969, pp. 21-26. 
Wyman, R. , "The Overhead Projector in Education — A Series of Short Reports on Some 

Aspects of its Use," (Edited versions of several articles written for The 

Instructor ) Audio-Visual Media (London), Spring 1969, pp. 27-37. 
Wyman, R. , "Mediaware: Selection, Operation and Maintenance," Wm. C. Brown Company 

Publishers , 1969, 188 pgs. 
Wyman, R. , "Progress Report on the Visual Response System," Symposium on Research 

and Utilization of Educational Media for Teaching the Deaf , 1969, pp. 838-840. 
Wyman, R. , "A Bimedia Compromise," Educational Screen and Audiovisual Guid e, March 

1970, p. 12. 



I 



Yarington, D. J. , "A Performance Curriculum for Training Reading Teachers," Journal 
of Reading , Vol. 13, No. 1, Oct. 1969, pp. 21-24. 



DOCTORAL STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 



Evans, J.L., (with Marshall H. Segall) "Learning to Classify by color and by 
function: a Study of Concept-Discovery by Ganda Children," Journal of 
Social Psychology , Vol. 77, 1969, pp. 35-53. 

Kline, L.W. , (with Dwight W. Allen) "Change Agent: The Administrator in the 

'New' Education," Today's Catholic Teacher , February ' 1969, pp. 30. 
Kline, L.W. , "Pedagogians , and Anarchists: Educational Change and the Teacher," 

The Clearing House , May 1969, pp. 527-529. Reprinted in The Education 

Digest , November 1969, pp. 16-18. 
Kline, L.W. , (with Dwight W. Allen) "A Differentiated Teaching Staff," National 

Business Education Quarterly , Summer 1969, pp. 25-29. 

Lacey, R. , "What do you do when the lights go on?" Educator's Guide to Media 
and Methods , November 1969, pp. 38-40, 77, 

Masalski, W.J., Visual Approach to Mathematics, Rational Numbers , Science 

Research Associates, Inc., A six-level transparency program with detailed 
teacher's notes for use in elementary schools and elementary teacher 
education. 



Morgan, H. , "Demands for recognition and beyond," Educational Leadership , 

Vol. 27, No. 3, December 1969, pp. 229-231. 
Morgan, H. , "If you can hear us we apologize," Downbeat , September 18, 

1970, pp. 16-18. 

Rojas, B., "The Saint-Simonians, " World Order , Vol. 3, No. 4, Summer 1969, 

pp. 29-37. 
Rojas, B., "The Millerites," World Order , Vol. 4, No. 1, Fall 1969, pp. 15-25. 

Solo, L. , (with Stanley Barondes) "The Teacher Drop-Out Center," Manas , 

Vol. XXIII, No. 50, December 1969, pp. 5-8. Reprinted in New Schools 
Exchange Newsletter #25, p. 2. 

Solo, L. , "Explication-With-Soul: The Art of Reading Fiction," English Leaflet , 
November 1969. 



Spiess, K.H., "Improving Compensatory Education in Massachusetts," Trend, Spring 
1969, p. 41. 



Constitution 

School of Education 
University of Massachusetts 
Amherst, Massachusetts 
December 1969 



Article I. The Dean 



A. General Powers and Responsibilities: The Dean is charged by the 
University of Massachusetts with administering the School of Edu- 
cation and promoting its development and effectiveness. Accordingly, 

he is the chief representative of the School externally and the academic 
and administrative leader of the School internally. The broad powers 
conferred on the Dean by the University shall be exercised within the 
framework of this Constitution in cooperation with the students, faculty 

and staff of the School of Education in accord with the rules and 

1 
policies of the University and the Board of Trustees. 

B. Budget; The Dean shall make recommendations to the School Council 
concerning the School's budget, substantial reallocations that may 
be required, and guidelines for the expenditure of state funds. 

He shall also be responsible for reporting to the School Council how 

state funds were spent and any proposed budget cuts which might 

2 
jeopardize approved programs. In addition, the Dean shall have the 

responsibility to approve the budget of all projects administered by 

the School that are not funded out of state appropriations. 



1 

Since in this Constitution, the Dean delegates more of his power 
to the students and faculty of the School than is normal at this 
University, the Constitution would be binding only for the term of 
the present Dean. Subsequent Deans would have the right to ratify, 
renegotiate or reject the Constitution unless it is approved by the 
Board of Trustees. See Interim Report On the Constitution, August, 
1969, hereafter cited as Interim Report, pp. 8-10. (Copies of the 
Interim Report are available at the School of Education Library.) 

2 

It is recommended that the proposed budget be in program terms as 
well as line items. While the Dean's office should approve budgets, 
it should not be able to expend project funds without the approval 
of the project director. 



.;■') ■■ ;■' I I'/v'K 



2 

C. Representat ion ; The Dean will assist faculty and students in the 
development and funding of educational projects in cooperation 
with government agencies, foundations, and university officials. 
To insure appropriate coordination, quality, and communication 
concerning proposals and commitments by the School; 

(1) Requests and proposals up to $200,000 must be approved by the 
Dean and reported to the School Council. 

(2) Request and proposals for amounts over $200,000 must be approved 

1 
by the Dean and the School Council. 

(3) Any requests or proposals that are substantially changed in, regard 
to budget or program must be reapproved by the Dean and/or School 
Council as required above. 

D. Discretionary Authority 

1. Executive Budget ; The Dean shall have an executive budget to be 
used at his discretion for general support purposes. The amount 

of the Budget shall be negotiated each year between thfc l>ean and the. 
School Council or its designated committee, but it shall not exceed 
10% of the School's general support funds. The Dean shall account 
to the School Council each year for his expenditures under his budget. 

2. Faculty and Graduate Students : The Dean shall have a percentage of 
the faculty positions alloted to the School by the University to be 



1 

This procedure would give the Dean and those designated by him to 
Xjepresent the School discretion and flexibility concerning smaller 
commitments and insure fuller review and coordination concerning 
larger amounts . The idea is to make the review procedure commen- 
surate with the size of the potential commitment. 



3 

used at his discretion. The number of such appointments to be 

made by the Dean shall be negotiated each year with the School 

Council or its designated committee but shall not exceed 20% 

1 
of the positions available. 

In addition the Dean shall be authorized to admit a certain 

number of graduate students at his discretion. The number shall 

be negotiated each year with the School Council or its designated 

committee but shall not exceed 15% of the number admitted. 

Article II. School Council 

A. Responsibility : The School Council shall be the primary policy- 
making body of the School. It shall have specific responsibility 
for personnel policy, academic matters (not assigned to the Graduate 
Assembly), program development, priorities, and resource allocation. 
In addition jit shall undertake a continuing review and evaluation of 

the school administration, and shall report on this matter to the 

2 
Education Assembly at least once each semester. 

B. Membership : The members of the Council shall include: 

(1) A representative from each center elected in accordance 
with procedures determined by each center and filed with 
the Executive Committee. Center directors may not serve as 
representatives of their centers. 



1 

In any year when there are fewer than 5 faculty appointments allocated 
to the school 5 -the <luestion of whether any of these appointments should be 
made at the discretion of the Dean will be a matter of negotiation between 
the Dean and the School Council . 
2 

By ratifying this Constitution, the Dean would agree to recognize the 
School Council as the primary policy-making body of the School in accordance 
with the authority granted him by the Trustees of the University. This, however, 
would not relieve the Dean of his responsibility to the Trustees. Furthermore, 
nothing in this Constitution supersedes any rules or policies of the University 
or the Board of Trustees. 



3 



(2) A representative of those not affiliated with any center 

until an Experimental Center is established and a representative 
Is elected. 

(3) At-large representatives equal to the total number of center 
representatives, half students and half faculty. The faculty 
representatives shall be elected by the faculty. Half the 
student representatives shall be elected by the graduate 
students in full-time residences snd half shall be elected by the 
undergrad-uate representatives in the Education Assembly. 

(4) The Dean and Assistant Deans. 

(5) Three consultant representatives from outside the School of Education 
to be appointed by the Dean and approved by the Council. •*■ 

C. Alternates ; Each Council member shall appoint an alternate who shall 
be approved at a Council meeting one week before he may serve. 
The alternate shall have the full rights of a member at 



■'■A. This body seeks to accommodate the conflicting goals of broad repre- 
sentation and effective operation. The Councils as provided above, 
would be composed of 31 people-11 center representatives, 1 non-center 
representative 5 12 at-large representatives, 4 deans and 3 consultant 
members. This size is recomrended as perhaps the largest group that could 
allow its members to fully discuss critical issues and perhaps the 
smallest group that could adequately represent the students, faculty, 
administration and the larger coxmimnity. Representatives from each center 
would insure a diversity of views; an equal number of at-large repre- 
sentatives would insure popular representation by faculty and students. 
For a fuller consideration of the alternatives considered and the rationale 
for these recommendations, see Interim Report, "Decision Making at the 
School of Educations Alternative Forms and Forums," pp. 11-22. 

B. Concerning at-large representatives: If the total number of centers 
is not even (e.g. 11), at'-large representatives should be increased by one 
Cl.e. 12). If the number of student representatives is not even (e.g. 7), 
the larger number of student representatives should be assigned to the 
doctoral students (i.e. 4). 

C. The 3 (non-voting) consultant members, might, for example, consist 
of 2 representatives of the University (1 faculty and 1 administrator) 
and 1 representative of the Amherst public schools. 



mJ 



5 

1 
Council meetings when the regular member is not present. 

D. Elections ; Elections for Council membership shall be held in the 

2 
spring, and members will serve for a one year term. 

E. Chairman : A chairman shall be elected by the School Council to 
preside over its meetings. With the approval of the Council, 
the chairman shall determine Council procedures and may appoint a 
parliamentarian. 

F. Quorum ; 2/3 of the voting members of the School Council or their al- 
ternatives will constitute a Quorum. If a representative or his 
alternate is not present for 2 consecutive meetings, that position 
may be declared vacant by the Council. 

G. Executive Committee : There shall be an Executive Committee of the Council 
composed of five persons elected by the aew Council in the spring. 

The Committee shall be the primary coordinating body of the school and 
shall: 

(1) Organize and coordinate the scanding and special committees 

of the Council and coordinate the committees established by 

3 
the Graduate Assembly c 

(2) Coordinate the conflict resolution system with the Om.budsman. 



1 
The purpose ri requiring public appointment and approval is to en- 
courage a more careful decision by the Council member and alternate, 
establish continuity, and guard against a member asking the first 
person he sees in the hall to represent him. 

2 

Elections to the School Council and the Executive Committee should be 
held at least 6 x^?eeks before the end of the spring term to allow ample 
time for a smooth and informed transition. 

3 
This Constitution v/ill use the term "Special Committees" rather than 
"Ad Hoc Committees.'' 



c 



(3) Consult with the Dean on urgent matters. When consulting with the 
Dean on matters that are considered urgent by the Dean and at least 

3 members of the Executive Committee, the Committee may act on behalf 
of the School Council. 

(4) Establish and coordinate a communications and feedback system for the 

1 
School. 

(5) Serve as an Election Board to establish an election calendar and 
coordinate elections provided for under this Constitution. 

(6) Determine who shall make any decisions not clearly established by the 

2 
Constitution or the School Council. 

(7) Prepare the agenda for School Council meetings in consultation with the 
Council chairman. 

There shall be a chairman of the Executive Committee who shall be elected 

3 
by the Executive Committee. 

And the Committee shall be allocated sufficient secretarial and administra- 

4 
tive assistance as determined by the School Council. 



1 
This Committee and its staff would be responsible for disseminating 

information on major decisions, policies and proposals of the Dean's of fie 

the committees, the Council and other groups and establishing a procedure 

for providing those groups with feedback from the Community. 

2 

While the Executive Committee is not prohibited from making substantive 
decisions, this should not be its role. Instead it should decide who 
should best make the substantive decisions rather than deciding on or recoi 
mending decisions or policy itself. 

3 

It is recommened that the Chairman be relieved of at least part of his 
regular School duties to enable him to carry out his responsibilities — 
especially those of coordinating the Committee staff. 

It is recommended that at least two doctoral students and one secretary 
be assigned to assist the Committee initially. 



i 



i 



Article III. Mutual Responsibility and Review 

A. The Dean and the School Council shall be jointly responsible for 
making .recoiaiaes4a£<ions concerning planning, evaluation, general 
administration 5 public relations, new programs, and other areas of 
school-wide concern not; otherwise assigned. • 

B. To encourage close cooperation in the formulation of school policy and 
in making major decisions, the Dean and the School Council shall be 

granted the right to review the major policies and decisions of the other 
except where discretionary authority is assigned. 

To implement this policy , major decisions by the Council or its 

Committees shall be submitted to the Dean for review, and major decisions 
of the Dean or his staff shall be submitted to the School Council for 
review. Decisions 5 to which there is no objection within 5 school days 
after they are communicated, become final. The reviewing party must 
submit his objections in writing to the other party and the Ombudsman. 
If a compromise can not be negotiated by the parties and the Ombudsman, 
the initiating party may appeal to the Judicial Committee. The Judicial 
Committee shall resolve the issue. The Dean and the Council shall 
jointly establish criteria for determining which decisions are of sufficient 
importance or controversy to be submitted for review. They may also agree 
upon additional procedures to expedite mutual review. 

Article IV. The Committe System 
A. Standing Committees 

1. Personnel Committee . The Executive Committee shall nominate the 
chairman and the members of the Personnel Committee. Each nomination 
shall be submitted to the School Council and the Dean for approval. 
Approval by the School Council requires a 4/5 favorable vote on each 



f 



8 

1 

nomination. A majority of the members of this committee shall 

be members of the School faculty and the Assistant Dean for Academic 

2 
Affairs shall also be a member.' In accordance irith University regu- 
lations, the faculty shall vote every two years to determine whether 
the School shall continue to have a Personnel Committee, and if so, 
its composition and method of selection. 

2. Judicial Committee . The Executive Committee shall nominate the chairman 

and members of the Judicial Committee. Each nomination shall be submit- 
ted to the School Council and the Dean for approval. Approval by the 
School Council requires a 4/5 favorable vote on each nomination. 

3. Evaluation Committee . The Executive Committee in consultation with the 

Dean, shall appoint a Constitution Evaluation Committee to continually 
review the operation of this Constitution and- to make recommendations 
for its improvement and revision. 



1 

The intent is to insure that each member of this committee (as well as 
the Judicial Committee) is not opposed by any substantial minority of the 
School Council and is also acceptable to the Dean. Rather than seeking 
"political balance." the idea is to seek people acceptable to all major 
factions in the School and to prevert the committee from turning into a 
political arena at the expense of the issue or person to be judged. 
2 

The Personnel Committee thus selected would be concerned with promotion, 
contract renewal, tenure and related matters. It is recommended that the 
School Council determine how faculty allocated by the University should be 
allocated within the School ,.- and that faculty recruitment ajid selection bfc 
coordinated by the Assistant Dean for Aca«l2i9ie. ikftaltQ m cooperation with 
the relevant center, program or designated group. After the designated 
group and the Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs agree on the nomination, 
it should be approved by the Personnel Committee, except in cases of temporary 
appointments below the Assistant Professor level and visiting or part-time 
faculty which should be approved by the Dean. 



Other Conmlttees ; The Executive Committee iray establish any other 
standing or special comniittees as it sees fit and as requested by the 
the School Council > the Dean or other bodies provided for in the Con- 
stitution. 

A. Chairman and Members ; Committee chairman shall be selected by 

1 
the Executive Committee in consultation with the Dean. 

Committee memberships not otherwise provided for in the Con- 
stitution, shall be determined by the Executive Committee in 
consultation with the committe chairman and the Dean and shall be 
based on the expressed interest of the members of the Education 

Assembly and on the need for balance. Membership on School Com- 

2 
mittees need not be limited to members of the Education Assembly. 

B. Committee I4aridate ; Each committee shall be given a (landate which 
shall be formulated by the Executive Committee with the committee 
chairman. The Mandate should include the scope of the committee's 
responsibility and authority, to whom and when it shall report, the 
names of its members and their term of office. The mandate should be 
published in the Tabula Rasa or otherwise communicated to the Ed- 
ucation Assembly, 

C. Procedures and Reports ? To insure that all members of the community 
have a right to be heard, all committees considering important or 
controversial issues (as determined" by the committee, the Executive 
Committee or the Dean) shall announce 5 days in advance at least one 



1 

Selection of chairmen by the Dean and Executive Committee (rather 
than election by the Committee) is intended to insure that the chairmen 
are selected carefully and that the best person will be sought for the 
job. This should guard against the practice of committees electing the 
least busy or least unwilling member as chairman. 
2 

The need for balance i<rould not only require a balance of students 
and faculty but also include members with new perspectives as well as 
expertise and members with direct involvement as well as, those with 
objectivity. In addition ^ these factors shall be weighed against pre- 
sumption in favor of smaller committees. 



10 



open hearing on each such issue before the committee, and publish 
a sunnnary of its recommendations before they are submitted to the 
School Council. Furthermore, each committee shall submit a brief, 
informal report to the School Council each semester for publication 
in Tabula Rasa . ^ • 

D. Authority; To insure that commifcte reports are given substantial 
weight, committee recomendations shall not be amended at meetings 

of the School Council unless such amendments are approved by 3/4 of the 

1 
Council . 



Article V. Education Assembly 



A. Responsibility ; The Education Assembly shall be the major advisory 
body and general forijm of the School of Education. In addition, it 
shall have legislative authority in the most important and contro- 

versial policy issues, as determined by the School Council or through 

2 
referendum. When considering such issues, the moderator of the 

Education Assembly, in consultation with the Executive Committee, 

3 
shall invoke special procedures to promote maximum participation. 

The Dean shall call open meetings of the Education Assembly at 

least 2 times each semester at which he will report on the state of 

the school and answer questions by members of the Community. 



This would insure that changes would be based on the committee's 
study and deliberation as well as Council objections, not on a hasty 
amendment from the floor that might be passed by a narrow majority. 

2 

"Controversial" issues would be those about which 2/3 of the Council 

did not agree. The "most importantf' issues would be those which had 

major, long term impact on the School. 

3 

These woujd include "procedures for participatory decision making" 

outlined in the Interim Report (pp. 21-22) or similar procedures 
designed to insure general participation in discussing and deciding 
major issues. 

4 
It is recommended that questions requiring detailed or precise 

information not readily available should be submitted in advance and 
should receive priority. 



11 

B. Membership ; The Education Assembly shall be composed of all mem- 
bers of the instructional staff. This shall include all persons 
holding faculty appointments (including lecturers, instructors, and 
faculty of the Marks Meadow Laboratory School) ; persons holding pro- 
fessional appointments; and doctoral candidates' in full-time residence. 
In addition, the Education Assembly shall include 30 undergraduate 
representatives > 10 .representatives of Master's candidates and part-time 
graduate students, and 5 representatives of the school support staff 
elected by their respective constituencies. The number of undergraduate 

representatives shall be increased by the Executive Committee if they do 

1 
not constitute at least 10% of the Assembly membership. 

The Education Assembly shall also include 12 representatives from 

outside the School of Education who will be nominated by the Dean and 

2 
approved by the Assembly. 

Representatives shall be selected for a I year teirm in the spring. 

C. Moderator ; A moderator shall be elected by the Education Assembly in 
the spring to preside over its meetings. The moderator shall determine 
the Assembly rules of procedure with the approval of the Executive Com- 
mittee. In addition, he may appoint a parliamentarian and shall estab- 
lish the Assembly agenda in consultation with the Executive Committee 
and the Dean. 

D. Quorum : When meeting as a decision making body, 40% of the members of 
the Education Assembly shall constitute a quorurn. t.Jhen deciding by 
ballot, a vote by 50% of the Assembly members will be required. 



1 
"Support staff" should include all full time employees of the School 
who are not members of the Education Assembly. "Undergraduate representatives" 
should be elected by undergraduates who are majoring in education or enrolled 
in teacher certification programs. 

2 
This group for example, might consist of A representatives from the 
University (3 faculty and 1 administrator) and 8 representatives of the Massachu 
setts School System (2 teachers, 2 students, 2 parents, 1 superintendent and 
1 principal.) 



3f' 



J ... 



I ^12 

Article VI. The Graduate /^ssegbly 

The Graduate Assembly of the School of Education shall be com- 
posed of all School members of the Graduate Faculty of the University 
and one third that number, not already members of the Graduate 
Faculty;- elected by and from the Education Assembly. This Graduate As- 
sembly shall be solely responsible for establishing School policy 
concerning graduate, admissions and graduate degrees in Education, 
subject to the ratification of the School Council. In cases where new 
policy of this Assembly is not ratified by the School Council, present 
policy s as interpreted by the Assistant Dean for Academic Affairs, 

shall govern. The Graduate Assembly shall determine its own internal 

1 
policies and procedures. 

Article VII. Consultant Assembly 

In consultation with the School Council,, the Dean shall establish a 
Consultant Assembly for the School of Education. This Assembly shall 
Include representatives of the educational community of the Conanonwealth 
and of other groups who will influence the effectiveness of the School 
and will be influenced by our students, faculty and programs. 

The Consultant Assembly shall meet at least once a year to hear a 
report by the Dean on the state of the School and to be consulted con- 
cerning major programs and plans of the School. The establishment of 
this Assembly shall be viewed as an experiment which shall be evaluated 
after 2 years by the Dean, the School Council and the Consultant Assembly. 



1 
The Graduate Assembly would be expected to deal with broad academic 
questions and set minimum standards xvhich would leave each center con- 
siderable latitude for determining their own diverse standards and procedures 
in such matters as admissions and academic programs. 



ini; r!_i 



:i?:L::U 



F 9'' .•» 

The School Council shall then determine whether this Assembly shall 

1 
continue to meet . ■ 

Article VIII. Centers and Special Programs 

A. Centers: The learning Centers represent a major commitment of the 
School of Education to the pi rposes of these centers. To further 
{hese purposes and to promote diversity and experimentation, each 
center shall have substantial autonomy in organization and gover- 
nance and in the development „ evaluation, and revision of its programs, 
except as they significantly affect other centers or the school as a 
whole. 

To promote quality programs and to justify the School's Commitment 
to them, centers shall: 

1. Report to the School Council and the Dean concerning proposed 

new programs and rules of governance . 

2. Submit an annual self -evaluation to the School Council and be 
evaluated annually by a Council and/or outside evaluation com- 
mittee, 

3. Operate under a three-year School Charter that automatically 
expires unless renewed by the Council. 

The Council shall establish procedures and criteria for Annual and 
Charter review of existing centers and for the establishment of new centers. 
B. Experimental Center ; It shall be the policy of the School of Education 
to encourage the establishment of an Experimental Center supported by or 
affiliated with the School of Education. This Center should coordinate 
the offering of spontaneous and experimental educational experiences by 
students and faculty and should facilitate the testing of new courses. 
The Experimental Center should establish procedures and criteria for 



1 

Concerning the rationale for the Consultant Assembly, see Interim 
Report pp. 58-60. It is recommended that this Assembly be consulted and 
kept informed more frequently in writing. 



u 

offering "provisional credits" for educational experiences which 

may be awarded post hoc when such experience meets the standards of 

a school evaluation cominitteeo The Council and the Dean shall be 

1 
responsible for establishing an Experimental Center. 

C. Special Programs ; Special Programs are small or experimental educa- 
tional ventures by student/faculty interest groups that are given 
provisional recognition by the School of Education for up to two 
years. The School Council shall publish flexible procedures and 

•^guidelines for the establishment of such programs which shall operate 
under a renewable charter. The Council shall also establish procedures 
and criteria for the annual evaluation of Special Programs and for 
determining when Special Programs can qualify for center status. 

D. An Experimental Fund ; To encourage continuing experimentation and 
innovation at the School of Education, the Dean shall budget a sum 
each year to support experimental programs that could not find sup- 
port in any of the established centers. Procedures and criteria for 

making grants from the Experimental Fund shall be recommended by a 

2 
special School committee. 

3 
Article IX. Conflict Resolution 

A. An Ombudsman shall be nominated by the Executive Committee and approved 



1 

See p. 50 of the Interim Report. It is recommended that an Experimental 
Center be the focus of members of the School of Education Community who 
wish to associate with others interested in experimental educational act- 
ivities rather than with any of the established centers or programs. 
2 

If centers are allocated support budgets,, the Experimental Fund should 
be budgeted a sura equal to at least 10% of the total support budget of all 
the centers. Until such time, it is recommended that the Experimental Fund 
be allocated a minimum of $10,000 each year. I-Jhile center members should 
not be prohibited from receiving grants from the Fund, it is recommended that 
a majority of the committee that recommends procedures for the operation 
of the Fund should not be members of any center. 
3 

See Interim Report pp. 52-57, especially "The Case for Options," 
pp. 52-53. 



15 

by the Dean and 4/5 of the School Council. He shall assist the 

Executive Committee in coordinating the conflict resolution system - 

especially in mediation and in developing procedures for affective 

resolution. He shall assist individuals in the Community in resolving 

any academic and administrative problems and disputes associated with 

the School of Education, To serve effectively, he should be relieved 

of part of his responsibilities and be given appropriate secretarial 

and administrative assistance, and he shall have the right to serve 

ex officio on any School Committee, Council or Assembly. He shall be 

1 
appointed in the spring to a one year term. 

B. Mediation and Affective Resolution . 

1. Role of Ombudsman ; In consultation with the Executive Com- 
mittee, the Ombudsman shall have primary responsibility for 
facilitating mediation and affective resolution. He shall 
appoint a panel of consultants to assist him in developing 
procedures and in serving as mediators and facilitators as 
needed. 

2. Mediation ; This process shall be a prerequisite to judicial 

2 
resolution, except as otherwise provided. 



1 
Initially he should devote at least half time to his duties as Ombuds- 
man and should be assisted by a full time secretary/ administrative assistant 
and/or one or two graduate assistants. See Interim Report pp. 53-54. 
2 

Mediation (or Affective Resolution) should be the primary and prefer- 
able way of resolving conflicts between individuals or groups in the 
School of Education. Because of the problems involved in "going to 
court" (discussed in the Interim Report pp. 54-55.), this section requires 
parties to disputetto first attempt to negotiate their differences with the 
assistance of a mediator. The mediator could be the Ombudsman or other 
skilled persons (within or outside the School), and mediation would bd a private 
and 'inf oirmal process. Every member of the School community would be expected 
fto participate in mediation procedures, if requested to do so. 



(j^ 



■ja;-?jj' ■ 



I 



"^ 15 

0, Affective Resolution ; This is an experimental approach to conflict 

resolution that requires the consent of both parties. It places greater 
weight on more recent psychological/emotional approaches and seeks to 
help 'he parties find a creative solution to their conflict through 



i a deeper understanding of themselves, the other party and the 

basis of their conflict. 

C. Arbitration; This is a less formal alternative to judicial resolu- 
tion requiring the consent of both parties. Arbitration decisions 
shall be final. In consultation with the Dean and the Executive 

Committee, the Judicial CoEsnittee shall establish arbitration pro- 

1 
cedures for the School. 

D. Judicial Resolution ; This will provide members of the School commun- 
ity the opportunity to have their case fully and publicly heard and 
finally resolved. The Judicial Committee shall recommend rules and 
guidelines for judicial procedures for approval by the Dean and the 
School Council. These procedures shall allow parties to the dispute 
the right to representation j to call and question witnesses, and to 
present relevant evidence on their behalf. 

Article X. Referendum 

The Dean or 15% of the members of the Education Assembly may call a 
referendum. A majority vote of the total membership of the Education 
Assembly will carry a referendum. The Executive Committee shall decide 



on procedures for the referendum. A referendum supersedes any policy 

2 
of the Dean or School Council. 



Article XI. Ratification 



This Constitution shall be ratified when a majority of the faculty 



1 

Arbitration would be an alternative method of resolving "review 
disputes" between the Dean and the School Council, if both agreed. 
2 

A Referendum may be called to establish or change any policy in the 
area of mutual responsibility or within the general responsibility of the 
Dean or the School Council, 



17 

and non-faculty members of the Education Assembly, voting separately , 

have approved it by secret written ballot and the Dean has concurred 

1 
in writing. 

Article XII. Interpretation 

The Judicial Committee shall serve as the interpreter of this 

Constitution. During the first year this shall be done in consultation 

with the Chairman of the Constitution Committee. 

Article XIII. A mendments 

Constitutional iVtnendnients may ba proposed by the Dean, the School 

Council or by petition of 20% of the Education A.ssembly. Amendments 

may be approved by 4/5 of the total membership of the School Council 

2 
or by 2/3 of the total membership of the Education Assembly. 



1 
The rationale for separate voting is presented in the Interim 
Report p. 61 and pp. 8-10. 
2 
Normally, amendments x^ould be submitted to the Education Assembly. 
Ajtiendment by 4/5 of the School Council provides a more flexible and 
economical alternative for non-controversial amendments. In case of 
possible conflict, amendments by the Education Assembly would supersede 
an amendment by the School Council. 



u 



.^lONS PASSED BY THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 
SCHOOL COUNCIL 

SPRING 1970 



January 29, 1970 

It was moved and passed that the chairman of the School Council should be 
a member of the Executive Committee. 

Procedure for election of the Executive Committee: Nominations from the 
floor with plurality vote by members. 

February 5, 1970 

MOVED TO SEND A LETTER STATING THE COUNCIL'S POSITION ON THE GRIEVANCE 
COMMITTEE TO DEAN ALLEN. (Appendix A) 

Lloyd Kline gave a brief explanation on the "Mass. series for Ed.". Dave 
Schimmel moved that "The School Council approve in principle the Mass. 
series project." The motion was passed. 

February 12, 1970 

Earl Seidman gave an explanation of the withdrawal of proposed courses. 
After some discussion, Tom Hutchinson made a motion that the Executive 
Committee be directed to establish an Academic Matters Committee to deal 
with Earl's suggestion. Dave Crandall seconded the motion. The motion 
was passed. 

February 19, 1970 

I WOULD LIKE TO PROPOSE INTERIM GUIDELINES FOR REFINEMENT IN THE FUTURE 
BY THE GRADUATE FACULTY ASSEMBLY AND THE SCHOOL COUNCIL. 

1) DOCTORAL STUDENTS SHOULD NORMALLY TEACH NO MORE THAN ONE COURSE A 
SEMESTER. 

2) DOCTORAL STUDENTS SHOULD NORMALLY TEACH UNDERGRADUATE COURSES ONLY. 

3) IN ORDER TO TEACH A GRADUATE COURSE A FACULTY MEMBER MUST BE WORKING 
DIRECTLY WITH THE GRADUATE STUDENT IN THE COURSE. 

4) IF A DOCTORAL STUDENT PROPOSES TO TEACH A COURSE THAT IS PART OF THE 
REGULAR CURRICULUM OF THE SCHOOL, HE MUST HAVE THE APPROVAL OF THE 
DIRECTOR OF THE CENTER OR PROGRAM UNDER WHICH THAT COURSE IS NORMALLY 
OFFERED . 

5) IN DEVELOPING A NEW OR EXPERIMENTAL COURSE, THE DOCTORAL STUDENT SHOULD 
DEVELOP A COURSE OUTLINE AND BIBLIOGRAPHY, WHICH HE THEN PRESENTS TO A 
FACULTY MEMBER WHO AGREES TO SERIOUSLY WORK WITH THE DOCTORAL CANDIDATE 
IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE COURSE, OR AN ALTERNATIVE WOULD BE FOR THE 
SCHOOL COUNCIL TO APPOINT A COMMITTEE FOR THE PURPOSE OF SUPERVISING 
THE ESTABLISHMENT OF COURSES. THE POINT IS THAT THE ASSISTANT DEAN OF 
ACADEMIC AFFAIRS WOULD LIKE THE ADVICE OF EITHER A COMMITTEE OR A FACULIT 
MEMBER ON THE SUITABILITY OF A PROPOSED COURSE. 

Executive Committee policy concerning committee appointments and mandates. 
Committees must organize and develop policy to be presented to the Council 
for approval and implementation. Opportunities for participation will be 
insured through being able to present ideas to committee members, through 
public hearings on all controversial issues, through discussion in the 



(t 



o 



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Council when committee proposals are submitted and through conflict 
resolution procedures available to all members of the School Community. 
Gabe Heilig moved a vote of confidence in the procedures outlined by 
Schimmel, Ed Budelmann seconded. The motion was passed with one dissent- 
ing vote. 

Joyce Hinckley asked if Tab Raz should be published while the decision 
of whether it should be discontinued or not is being made by the Communi- 
cations Committee. A revision of Ed's motion was made - that the Communi- 
cations Committee report on March 5th. The motion was PASSED. 

March 5. 1970 

Tom Hutchinson moved that the Executive Committee draft a letter of thanks 
to Glenn Hawkes for Something '70 and the motion was PASSED unanimously. 

MOVED THAT THE SCHOOL COUNCIL PROCEDURES BE ACCEPTED. (see Appendix B) 

March 12, 1970 

Dave Flight was elected unanimously as Ombudsman. 

MOVED: THAT TWO NEW, HARD MONEY POSITIONS BE ALLOCATED FOR UNDERGRADUATE 
TEACHER EDUCATION FOR THE 1970-71 ACADEMIC YEAR. 

MOVED: THAT SHOULD AN ADDITIONAL POSITION BECOME AVAILABLE FOR A FACULTY 
MEMBER WHO WILL SERVE AS DIRECTOR OF CCEBS , THE DEAN MAY, AT HIS 
DISCRETION, APPOINT HIM TO A POSITION ON THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 
FACULTY . 

MOVED: THAT THE FACULTY APPOINTMENTS NOT ALLOCATED TO THE BLACK AND 

MINORITY RECRUITMENT COMMITTEE FOR 1970-71 MAY BE MADE SIMULTANEOUS 
WITH OR PRIOR TO THE BLACK AND MINORITY FACULTY APPOINTMENTS. 

MOVED: THAT IF THE THREE MINORITY APPOINTMENTS ARE NOT FILLED FOR 1970-71 
BY MINORITY FACULTY, THEY SHOULD REMAIN UNFILLED. 

MOVED: THAT PHYLLIS ROOP BE GIVEN THE MANDATE TO PROCEED WITH THE SCHOOL 
OF EDUCATION BULLETIN. 

A quorum was not present to vote on the motion, but it was the 
unanimous spirit of those present that PhyllLs should proceed 
with the Bulletin. 

March 19, 1970 

Professor Harry Schumer from the Psychology Department was approved as a 
consultant representative. 

MOVED: THAT THE COMMUNICATIONS COMMITTEE SHALL BE GIVEN THE MANDATE TO 

STIMULATE, COORDINATE, AND ASSIST IN THE IMPLEMENTATION OF INTERIM 
REPORT — COMMUNICATIONS COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS NUMBERED: 1, 
3-12, 14-19, 22-25, 30. 



MOVED: THAT THE COMMUNICATIONS COMMITTEE SHALL BE GIVEN THE M/VNDATE TO 

STUDY FURTHER THE INTERIM REPORT ~ COMMUNICATIONS COMMITTEE RECOM- 
MENDATIONS NUMBERED: 2, 13, 12a, 20, 21, 26-29, 31-32. AND TO 
REFER THEM TO OTHER COMMITTEES AND/OR OFFICES WHERE APPROPRIATE. 



rf. 



a 



-3- 



9 



MOVED: THAT THE COMMUNICATIONS COMMITTEE SHALL REPORT TO THE SCHOOL 

COUNCIL ON APRIL 9, 1970, ON THE PROGRESS CONCERNING THE ABOVE 
TWO MOTIONS. (see Appendix C) 

MOVED: IF AN ADDITIONAL FACULTY POSITION (BEYOND 3 BLACKS, 2 TEACHER 
EDUCATION, AND POSSIBLE CCEBS POSITION) BE ALLOCATED TO THE 
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION (FOR THE 1970-71 ACADEMIC YEAR), THAT 
POSITION MAY BE FILLED BY THE DEAN AT HIS DISCRETION. 

MOVED: THAT ANY FACULTY POSITIONS ALLOCATED TO THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION 
(IN ADDITION TO THOSE SPECIFIED IN THE MOTION ABOVE) WILL BE 
FILLED BY THE DEAN ACCORDING TO PRIORITIES PROPOSED BY HIM AND 
APPROVED BY THE SCHOOL COUNCIL. 

MOVED: THAT FOR THE 1970-71 ACADEMIC YEAR, ANY REPLACEMENT POSITIONS 

BE MADE BY THE DEAN IN CONSULTATION WITH THE CENTER IN WHICH THE 
RESIGNATION OCCURS AND THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE, AND REPORTED TO 
THE SCHOOL COUNCIL. 

MOVED: THAT THE CENTER (NON-CENTER, OR EMERGING CENTERS — HIGHER EDUCA- 
TION, VOCATIONAL EDUCATION AND EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION) DECIDES 
(INTERNALLY DECIDES RECOMMENDATIONS IN LINE WITH UNIVERSITY POLICY) 
ON ADMISSION TO A PROGRAM OF GRADUATE STUDY AND ATTACHES A MEMO OF 
ACCEPTANCE OR NO ACCEPTANCE. IF ADMITTED, A MAJOR ADVISOR IS 
SELECTED BY EACH CENTER OR NON-CENTER ADMISSIONS COMMITTEE, WHO 
WILL SO SERVE UNTIL SUCH TIME AS THE STUDENT OR ADVISOR MIGHT BE- 
COME INCOMPATIBLE, OR UNTIL THE STUDENT'S INTERESTS MIGHT CHANGE, 
IN WHICH CASE A NEW ADVISOR MUST BE FOUND. (THE ADVISOR MUST 
AGREE TO THE ASSIGNMENT) . 

MOVED: THAT EACH PROGRAM AND CENTER SHOULD PETITION A COMMITTEE (ACADEMIC 
DEAN, DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE STUDIES, CHAIRMAN G. A. ADMISSIONS 
COMMITTEE) FOR ADMITTEES BY SHOWING EVIDENCE THAT IT HAS THE 
CAPABILITY OF PROVIDING ADEQUATE FACULTY AND OTHER SUPPORT, AND 
THAT IT WOULD NOT PUT UNDUE BURDEN ON THE TOTAL RESOURCES OF THE 
SCHOOL. 

MOVED: THAT EACH PROGRAM AND CENTER HAVE THE RIGHT TO DETERMINE THE 
PREFERENTIAL ORDER IN WHICH ITS QUOTA OF APPLICANTS IS TO BE 
ADMITTED. 

MOVED: THAT THE DEAN BE GRANTED THE PRIVILEGE OF FIVE "WILD CARD" ADMISSIONS. 

April 2, 1970 

MOVED: THAT THE SCHOOL COUNCIL ENDORSE THE NOTION OF A GRADUATE STUDENT 
COLLOQUIUM AS DESCRIBED IN DICK ULIN'S MEMO. 

MOVED: THAT THE SECOND CONSECUTIVE TIME EITHER THE MEMBER OR HIS ALTER- 
NATE IS ABSENT, THE SEAT WILL BE DECLARED VACANT UNLESS THE 
DELEGATE PETITIONS, WITHIN A WEEK, FOR REINSTATEMENT AND THE 
PETITION IS APPROVED BY THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 



MOVED: THAT A RESOLUTION COMMITTEE BE ESTABLISHED TO MEDJATl', DIFFERKNCKS 
IN MOTIONS PASSED BY THE GRADUATE ASSEMIM.Y AND ACTED UPON BY Till': 
SCHOOL COUNCIL. THE COMMITTEE WILL BE COMPOSED OF: 



It, 



t- 



-4- 



9 



1. THE DIRECTOR OF GRADUATE STUDIES, AS THE PERMANENT MEMBER 
OF THE RESOLUTION COMMITTEE. 

2. SOMEONE ELECTED BY THE GRADUATE ASSEMBLY TO REPRESENT IT ON 
EVERY MOTION PASSED AND SENT TO THE SCHOOL COUNCIL (THIS 
COULD BE A DIFFERENT PERSON FOR EVERY MOTION) . THE PERSON 
CHOSEN WILL REPRESENT THE GRADUATE ASSEMBLY AT THE SCHOOL 
COUNCIL IN DEFENSE OF THE MOTION, AND WILL SERVE ON THE 
RESOLUTION COMMITTEE IF THE MOTION IS REFERRED THERE. 

3. THE CHAIRMAN OF THE SCHOOL COUNCIL OR SOMEONE DESIGNATED BY 

HIM TO REPRESENT THE VIEWS OF THE SCHOOL COUNCIL ON THE MOTIONS. 

IF A GRADUATE ASSEMBLY MOTION IS DEFEATED BY THE SCHOOL COUNCIL, 
IT WILL BE SENT BACK TO THE GRADUATE ASSEMBLY. 

IF A MOTION IS APPROVED IN PRINCIPLE BY THE SCHOOL COUNCIL, 
BUT SPECIFIC CHANGES ARE REQUESTED, THE MOTION WILL BE SENT 
TO THE RESOLUTION COMMITTEE. THE UNANIMOUS DECISION OF THE 
RESOLUTION COMMITTEE IS REQUIRED FOR APPROVAL OF CHANGES. 
THAT DECISION WILL STAND UNLESS TEN (10) MEMBERS FROM EITHER 
THE GRADUATE ASSEMBLY OR THE SCHOOL COUNCIL OBJECT, WITHIN 
FIVE (5) SCHOOL DAYS OF THE COMflUNICATION OF THE RESOLUTION 
COMMITTEE DECISION, TO THE CHAIRMAN OF THE SCHOOL COUNCIL OR 
THE CHAIRMAN OF THE GRADUATE ASSEMBLY. 

IF A GRADUATE ASSEMBLY MOTION IS RATIFIED BY THE SCHOOL COUNCIL, 
IT WILL STAND AS POLICY. 

MOVED: THAT IN GENERAL, 90% OF ADMISSION DECISIONS ON ENTRANCE INTO DEGREE 
PROGRAMS WILL BE ANNOUNCED BY EACH CENTER AND SUBSEQUENTLY BY THE 
GRADUATE SCHOOL, AT THREE TIMES DURING THE ACADEMIC YEAR, BY: 
DECEMBER 1, MARCH 15, AND AUGUST 1. 

This motion was agreed upon in principle. 

MOVED: THAT IN GENERAL, ADMISSION DECISIONS ON ENTRANCE INTO DEGREE PRO- 
GRAMS WILL BE ANNOUNCED BY THE SCHOOL AT THREE TIMES DURING THE 
ACADEMIC YEAR. 

1. 90% OF THE SPRING SEMESTER ADMISSIONS BY DECEMBER 1. 

2. 75% OF THE FALL SEMESTER ADMISSIONS BY MARCH 15. 

3. 90% OF THE FALL SEMESTER ADMISSIONS BY AUGUST 1. 

This motion was suggested for clarification. 



April 9, 1970 
MOVED 



MOVED : 



THAT PREPARATION BE MADE AND NECESSARY STEPS TAKEN TO EXPEDITE THE 
RELOCATION OF THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION LIBRARY TO THE GFJ^DUATE RE- 
SEARCH CENTER (PROVIDING THE MOVE IS PAID FROM THE EDUCATFON FUNDS) 
AND THAT OF THE SPACE MADE AVAILABLE WITHIN THE SCHOOL OF E.DUCATION, 
AN ADEQUATE AREA BE SET ASIDE, FOR A COMMUNITY READING ROOM. 

THAT THE SCHOOL COUNCIL RECOMMEND THAT THE UNDERGRADUATE COUNCIL 
MEMBERS HAVE A BUDGET OF AT LEAST $50.00 FOR THE PURPOSE OF COM- 
MUNICATION, SUBJECT ONLY TO THE AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS AS DETERMINED 
BY THE ADMINISTRATIVE DEAN, AND THAT THIS SMALL FUND BE AVAILABLE 
UNTIL MORE MONEY CAN BE SECURED. 



« 



I 



-5- 







It was moved, seconded, and PASSED to accept and adopt the Judicial Com- 
mittee recommendations presented to the School Council. (see Appendix D) 

MOVED: THAT IN PRINCIPLE, THE SCHOOL COUNCIL SUPPORTS THE EFFORT TO 
ESTABLISH BOTH UNDERGRADUATE AND GRADUATE PROGRAMS IN SPECIAL 
EDUCATION, 



MOVED: THAT ALL APPROVED GRADUATE STUDENT PROGRAMS AND DISSERTATION 
PROPOSALS ARE PUBLIC, AND UPON SUBMISSION TO THE DIRECTOR OF 
GRADUATE STUDIES, ONE COPY OF EACH WILL BE KEPT ON RESERVE IN 
THE LIBRARY. 

MOVED: THAT THE SCHOOL COUNCIL APPROVE THE MOTIONS PASSED BY THE GRADUATE 
ASSEMBLY CONCERNING THE PROPOSED PhD AND REVISED EdD DEGREES. 
(see Appendix E) 

April 16, 1970 

MOVED: THAT THE SCHOOL COUNCIL ACCEPT THE ADMISSIONS COMMITTEE REPORT 
AS ACTING IN GOOD FAITH, AND THAT SECTION C OF THE COMMITTEE 
REPORT, CONCERNING UNFILLED QUOTAS, WHICH READ, "THAT THE COM- 
MITTEE ACT IN ITS BEST JUDGEMENT WITHOUT EXPLICIT GUIDELINES 
FROM THE SCHOOL COUNCIL ON THIS MATTER", BE ADOPTED, 
(see Appendix F) 

Donald Frizzle, Assistant Superintendent of Amherst-Pelham Regional School 
District was approved as a consultant representative. 

MOVED: THAT THE FOLLOWING WORDING OF ARTICLE II B (1) WHICH NOW READS, 

"CENTER DIRECTORS MAY NOT SERVE AS REPRESENTATIVES OF THEIR CENTER", 
BE ELIMINATED. 

MOVED: THAT THE WORDING OF ARTICLE II B (5) FOOTNOTE^ (C) WHICH NOW READS 
THAT, "THE 3 (NON- VOTING) CONSULTANT MEMBERS..." BE AMENDED TO READ 
"THE 3 (VOTING) CONSULTANT MEMBERS..." 

MOVED: THAT ARTICLE V B, WHICH NOW READS IN PART THAT "IN ADDITION, THE 

EDUCATION ASSEMBLY SHALL INCLUDE 30 UNDERGRADUATE REPRESENTATIVES, 
10 REPRESENTATIVES OF MASTER'S CANDIDATES AND PART-TIME GRADUATE 
STUDENTS, AND FIVE REPRESENTATIVES OF THE SCHOOL SUPPORT STAFF 
ELECTED BY THEIR RESPECTIVE CONSTITUENCIES," BE AMENDED TO READ 
THAT "IN ADDITION, THE EDUCATION ASSEMBLY SHALL INCLUDE 5 REPRE- 
SENTATIVES OF THE SCHOOL SUPPORT STAFF ELECTED BY ITS CONSTITUENCY, 
10 REPRESENTATIVES OF MASTER'S CANDIDATES AND PART-TIME GRADUATE 
STUDENTS, AND 30 UNDERGRADUATE REPRESENTATIVES." 

MOVED: THAT THE WORDING OF ARTICLE IV A. 4 (C) WHICH NOW READS THAT 

"...EACH COMMITTEE SHALL SUBMIT A BRIEF, INFORMAL REPORT TO THE 
SCHOOL COUNCIL EACH SEMESTER FOR PUBLICATION IN TABULA RAS A", 
BE AMENDED TO READ THAT "...EACH COMMITTEE SHALL SUBMIT A BRIEF, 
INFORMAL REPORT TO THE SCHOOL COUNCIL EACH SEMI'.STER FOR PUBLICATION." 

The Center Criteria Committee recommendations. (See Appendix G) 



I 



-6- 



The Headstart Project proposal. The new proposal is a continuation of 
the project now in existence, with requested funding of around $250,000. 
The Project covers seven northeastern states, and involves 150 people a 
year, with groups on campus for 5 week cycles. The new Project would 
require no additional level of support from the School, except that the 
School must commit one classroom for the Project. There may be a need 
for 3 additional doctoral candidates to help run the program. 

It was MOVED, SECONDED, and PASSED to approve the whole Project. 

MOVED: THAT AN EXECUTIVE COUNCIL OF 7-9 MEMBERS FROM THE NEW SCHOOL 
COUNCIL BE ESTABLISHED, THAT WOULD ACT AS A COMBINED SCHOOL 
COUNCIL AND EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE FOR THE SUMMER. IT IS UNDER- 
STOOD THAT IfflERE FEASIBLE, THE EXECUTIVE COUNCIL WILL DEFER 
MAJOR POLICY DECISIONS UNTIL THE FULL SCHOOL COUNCIL AND EXECU- 
TIVE COMMITTEE RECONVENE IN THE FALL. 

MOVED: THAT WHEN THE DEAN DEEMS IT IN THE BEST INTEREST OF THE SCHOOL 
TO MAKE CHANGES IN CENTER DIRECTORSHIP, HE IS OBLIGATED, AFTER 
CONSULTATION WITH THE CENTER DIRECTOR, AND THEN THE CENTER MEM- 
BERS AND THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE, TO TAKE APPROPRIATE ACTION, 
WHICH CAN INCLUDE REMOVAL OF A CENTER DIRECTOR AND THE APPOINT- 
MENT OF AN INTERIM DIRECTOR. THE NEW CENTER DIRECTOR WOULD BE 
APPOINTED BY THE DEAN, WITH THE ADVICE AND CONSENT OF THE SCHOOL 
COUNCIL. 

MOVED: THAT THE ASSISTANT DEAN FOR ACADEMIC AFFAIRS BE CHARGED WITH THE 
OVERALL COORDINATION RESPONSIBILITY FOR THE MAY 6TH PRE-REGISTRA- 
TION PROCESS. 

THAT THE ASSISTANT DEAN FOR ACADEMIC AFFAIRS BE GIVEN A MANDATE 
TO REQUEST AND RECEIVE WHATEVER COMMUNITY SUPPORT THAT HE DEEMS 
NECESSARY FOR THE PROPER EXECUTION OF THIS RESPONSIBILITY. 

A partial example of the type of mobilization that we desire would 
be the following: 

All centers and programs would have representation in the advising 
area (probably the library). At established locations, there would 
be information on Center/Program courses, projects, faculty, etc. 
There would be available at these locations authorized personnel 
who could sign for "By Permission Only" courses. 

Our emphasis will be on faculty participation through the Center/ 
Program structure. The Undergraduate Advising Office is responsible 
for the training of the necessary staff components who will man the 
actual registration process. It is, however, our feeling that it is 
in the area of programmatic information that previous counseling 
attempts have failed. We look to the strong support from faculty/ 
center efforts to correct this condition. 

April 23, 1970 

It was MOVED and SECONDED to accept the budget guidelines as amended and 
revised. The motion PASSED. (See Appendix H) 



MOVED: THAT A COMMITTEE BE FORMED IMMEDIATELY TO INVESTIGATE THE STATUS 
OF FEMALE DOCTORAL CANDIDATES IN THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION. 



i 



1 



MOVED: THAT THE SCHOOL COUNCIL SHOULD APPOINT A RESEARCH COUNCIL COMPOSED 

OF FOUR TO SIX MEMBERS WITH A RELATIVELY STABLE COMPOSITION TO INSURE 
CONSISTENTLY IMPARTIAL POLICY. THIS COUNCIL'S FUNDING SHOULD BE A 
MATTER OF NEGOTIATION BETWEEN IT AND THE ASSISTANT DEAN OF ADMINIS- 
TRATION UNTIL SUCH TIME THAT THIS TYPE OF EXPENDITURE MAY BE RE- 
QUESTED DIRECTLY IN THE Q-11 DEPARTMENTAL BUDGET. 

THIS COUNCIL SHOULD BE EMPOWERED TO GRANT SMALL SUMS OF MONEY FOR 
MINOR NON- RECURRENT EXPENSES RELATING TO NEW RESEARCH BY MEMBERS 
OF THIS EDUCATION COMMUNITY. 

THE COUNCIL SHALL DEVELOP CRITERIA AND GUIDELINES FOR MAKING GRANTS, 
WHICH SHOULD BE PROVIDED TO THE SCHOOL COUNCIL FOR ITS APPROVAL. 

MOVED: 1) THAT ELEMENTARY EDUCATION MAJORS RECEIVE FIRST PRIORITY IN 
ADMISSION TO SCHOOL OF EDUCATION COURSES. 

2) THAT STUDENTS PREPARING TO TEACH ON THE SECONDARY LEVEL RE- 
CEIVE SECOND PRIORITY IN SCHOOL OF EDUCATION COURSES. 

3) THAT WITHIN EACH CATEGORY SENIORS HAVE FIRST PRIORITY, JUNIORS 
SECOND, SOPHOMORES THIRD, AND FRESHMEN FOURTH. 

The Financial Aid Committee Report and recommendations were PASSED by the 
Graduate Assembly. It was clarified that the motion on General Policy on 
page 2 covered all hard and soft money assistantship positions. 

It was MOVED to ratify the actions of the Graduate Assembly in passing the 
Financial Aid Committee Report. (See Appendix I) 



May 7, 1970 
MOVED : 



THAT THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION ENDORSE THE FOLLOWING STATEMENT OF THE 
NON-PROFESSIONAL SUPPORT STAFF: 

AS NON-PROFESSIONAL EMPLOYEES OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MASSACHUSETTS, 
WE, THE UNDERSIGNED, STRONGLY SUPPORT THE STRIKE EFFORT ON THIS 
CAMPUS AND PLAN TO USE OUR WORKTIME NOT FOR BUSINESS AS USUAL BUT 
FOR PARTICIPATING ACTIVELY IN THOSE WORKSHOPS DESIGNED TO GIVE US 
AN OPPORTUNITY TO JOIN NATIONALLY WITH OTHERS WHO WANT TO MAKE 
OUR VOICES HEARD TO STOP THE WIDENING WAR, POLITICAL REPRESSION 
AT HOME AND THE UNIVERSITY'S COMPLICITY IN THE MILITARY-INDUSTRIAL 
ESTABLISHMENT. WE FEEL THAT THE UNIVERSITY HAS AN OBLIGATION TO 
ALLOW FOR THE OPINIONS OF THOSE EMPLOYEES WHO JOIN THE STRIKE AND 
NOT TO TAKE REPRESSIVE ACTION. WE URGE THE STUDENTS TO SUPPORT 
OUR ACTION. 



MOVED: THE EDUCATION ASSEMBLY SHALL ISSUE A STATEMENT RECOMMENDING TO AIJ. 

MEMBERS OF THE EDUCATION COMMUNITY THAT THEY PARTICIPATE IN SPECIAL, 
EDUCATIONAL AND NON- VIOLENT ACTIVITIES WHICH SHALL HELP THEM TO 
EXPRESS THEIR VIEWS, LISTEN TO OTHERS, AND TAKE RESPONSIBLE EFFECTIVE 
ACTION. 

IT IS THE POLICY OF THE SCHOOL THAT NO PUNITIVE ACTION WILL BE TAKEN 
AGAINST ANY INDIVIDUAL. IN SUCH CASE AS ANY MEMBER OF THE COMMUNITY 
ENCOUNTERS ANY PUNITIVE ACTION, HE MAY SEEK REDRESS FROM THE OMBUDS- 
MAN OR JUDICIAL COMMITTEE. 

WE HOPE THAT STUDENT TEACHERS AND INTERNS WILL FOLLOW THE GUIDELINES 
LAID DOWN BY THE STUDENT TEACHING OFFICE. 



-8- 



MOVED: RECENT EVENTS IN CAMBODIA HAVE SERVED TO FORCE OUR SOCIETY TO FACE 

THE CONSEQUENCES OF THE WAR IN SOUTH EAST ASIA, POLITICAL REPRESSION 
AND RACISM AT HOME, AND INSTITUTIONAL COMPLICITY IN THESE ACTIVITIES. 

THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION FEELS THAT IT IS TIME FOR INSTITUTIONS TO 
DECLARE THEIR LIBERTY FROM SUCH COMPLICITY. CONSEQUENTLY, THE 
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION STATES ITS INTENTION TO ENGAGE IN A PROCESS OF 
SELF-EVALUATION FOR THE PURPOSE OF DETERMINING HOW WE CAN BEST END 
COMPLICITY AND BEGIN SERVING OUR PRIMARY FUNCTION — THAT OF RE- 
MEDIATING INTERNAL, NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL DILEMMAS WHICH MAKE 
THE ECOLOGICAL MATRIX OF AN EDUCATIONAL SYSTEM ANTITHETICAL TO THE 
PURPOSES OF EDUCATION ~ HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT. THE SCHOOL 
OF EDUCATION IN NO WAY CONSTRIVES THE ACTIVITIES OF ANY STUDENTS, 
FACULTY, OR NON-PROFESSIONAL STAFF INVOLVED IN THE PROCESS OF SELF- 
EVALUATION AS A DERELICTION OF DUTY, BREACH OF CONTRACT, OR IN ANY 
OTHER WAY A FAILURE TO MEET INSTITUTIONAL COMMITMENTS . 

THEREFORE, THE SCHOOL COUNCIL DECLARES A PERIOD OF MOUPJ^ING, TO 
LAST AT LEAST A WEEK, DURING WHICH BUSINESS AS IT HAS BEEN CONDUCTED 
WITHIN THE SCHOOL WILL NOT BE CONDUCTED. 

May 21, 1970 

MOVED: THAT THE SUMMER COUNCIL WILL CONSIST OF MEMBERS OF THE SCHOOL 

COUNCIL WHO ARE PRESENT AT THE TIME A MEETING IS CALLED. A QUORUM 
FOR THE SUMMER COUNCIL IS SEVEN MEMBERS. IT IS UNDERSTOOD THAT 
WHERE FEASIBLE, THE SUMMER COUNCIL WILL DEFER MAJOR POLICY DECI- 
SIONS UNTIL THE FULL SCHOOL COUNCIL AND EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE RECON- 
VENE IN THE FALL. 

MOVED: THAT THE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION DETERMINE THE EXTENT OF ITS COMMIT- 
MENT TO PROVIDING A VIABLE PROGRAM FOR THE UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS 
AND THAT AN OFFICIAL POLICY CONCERNING THIS COMMITMENT BE DEFINED. 

MOVED: THAT IF A VACANCY AS DEFINED BY THE UNIVERSITY OCCURS IN A NON- 
CENTER FACULTY POSITION, A COMMITTEE, WITH A MAJORITY OF NON-CENTER 
MEMBERS, WILL BE APPOINTED BY THE DEAN AND THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
TO RECRUIT FOR THE POSITION. THE APPOINTMENT WILL BE MADE BY THE 
DEAN IN CONSULTATION WITH THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE, AND THE APPROVAL 
OF THE RECRUITING COMMITTEE. 



May 28, 1970 



A motion was made to support a new proposal for the MACE Project, 
motion was carried. 



The 



A suggestion was made and it was VOTED, to have the Dean present to the 
School Council in the fall the restraints that he feels each of the Center's 
are, or should be, operating under. 



APPENDIX A 



MEMORANDUM 



From: School Council 

To: Dean Allen 

Ref: Grievance Hearings 

Date: February 6, 1970 

In response to your request(Ref. Jan. 28), that the School Council 
take an official position on the grievances raised against Dean Seidman 
and yourself, we have decided not to take such position. 

Since the legitimacy of the constitution and the council have been 
questioned in the grievance, it is the opinion of the Council that any 
official position we take might therefore, appear self-serving and suspect. 

The above position, however, does not mean that we are uninterested 
or unconcerned about the grievances. We are willing individually or as 
a body to respond and/or assist the grievance committee in any way 
we can. 



Dick Clark 



Chairman, School Council. 



» 



APPENDIX B 



J. 



SCHOOL COu^'CIL PROCEDURES 



1. Attendance will be taken at each meeting by the secretary. Three 
categories: (1) members present; (2) alternates ( and whcm they re- 
present) present and acting; (3) unrepresented (by alternates) mem- 
bers absent. Attendance will be reported in the minutes. 

2. Minutes will be taken at each meeting and distributed to all members 
of the Education Assembly. Minutes will show attendance all actions 
taken, and provide sufficient detail to summarize views expressed on 
all issues. At each meeting, minutes from the previous meeting will 
be reviewed, corrected if necessary, and approved. 

3. Participation : all members of or visitors to the University are wel- 
comed at Schcol Council meetings as observers except duriiig tl^e ,innouni.c- 
ment and question periods. Participation in discussior. aru: vi) : . ■' is 
limited to members of the School Council, or their a.j.jrovcJ aiLernaie.> 
when the member is absent, except when the chairman or the Executive 
Committee explicity requests non-member participation. 

4. Agenda : The Executive Committee prepares School Council agendas; 
thus, any matter to be brought before the School Council must be sub- 
mitted to the Executive Committee the week prior to the School Council 
meeting at which the matter will be raised. Agendas will be published 
and distributed in advance of the meeting to ail members and alternates. 

Agenda Categories and Rules 

The agenda will follow the outlined format, and the chairman will be 
responsible for enforcing the rules governing each section. Rules may 
be suspended by a 2/3 vote of the quorum, present in such a motion by 
the chairman or from the floor. 

(1) Roll call - by the secretary at announced starting time. 

(2) Announcements and answers to previous questions - these nee«l not 
be announced on the agenda. Thry are for infoi-mation, limited to 
a maximum of five minutes each for both presentation and disc nfsi en . 

(3) Questions - same rationale and rules as tor #2. Often, answers 
will necessarily be deferred to a subsequent meeting. 

(4) Business - all motions to be acted upon will be published in ad- 
vance of the meeting on or with the council agenda. Any motion 
from the floor will only be discussed if rules are saspendcd.. 
Discussion will start after a motion is made and seconded, .ind 
discussion will continue tintil the question Is called, seconded, 
and voted by a majority at whit-h time discussion will sLop, aiul 
voting will occur. 

The meeting will close when the last published item of business i ■- 
concludud. 



i 



^ APPENDIX C f\ 

INTERIM REPORT - COa-rjNICATIONS COMMITTEE 

Mandate: To investigate coiranunication problems in the School of Educa- 
tion on a terminal basis. 



Basically, the School of Education needs ir.ore and discriminate and econ - 
omic communications. The recoinmendations following this report were 
arrived at with these criteria in mind. It should be mentioned however, 
not all the communication problems of the school are a matter of communica- 
tion — but of structure. Change certain structures — facilitate communica- 
tions. 

Communication systems have input, processing and output components in 
common. Input systems should be accessable, simple, efficient, visible 
and in a constant process of evaluation. Processing should be quick, 
efficient and inexpensive. Output should be discriminate, simple, efficient 
and inexpensive. 

A single means of instantaneously reaching any one or number of indivi- 
duals in the education community would be ideal. The committee has not 
developed an ideal system during the past 15 days. SoBie systems are 
instantaneous and individualized (e.g. telephone), but they cannot deal 
with large volumes. Others can handle the masses but aren't individualized 
or specific enough. 

This report is at best inadequate. Continued study is necessary. Any 
future efforts must look at the interest groups, existing and potential 
systems, types of information, plus the quantity and quality of information 
desirable. Some information should be filtered, other information should 
not. 



^ ^ 



Early In its efforts, the committee set about identifying interest groups 
and existing systems in the education community. It then proposed and 
solicited suggestions for new communication systems. 

The committee's recommendations may not be completely coherent. This is 
the phenotypic effect of too little time and the need to propose solutions 
for the more pressing problems (given that some are only stop-gap measures), 



i 



4 



I 



i 



SHORT TERM RECOHSENDATIONS 



Calendar 



1. A Kiosk should be permanently established and located in the front 
foyer of the school. It would have six sides: 5 to display events 
occurring on working days; 1 for weekend events. 

It should be checked and kept current daily. 

It should be the responsibility of a specific secretary or office. 
This office will design policies and regulations regarding the adminis- 
tration of the Kiosk, Some recommended policies and rules are: 

1. Top part would be structured for typed (primer) calendar data 

2. 3" or so should be reserved just below strutured section for 
special events. 

3. Bottom would be reserved for small signs and posters for coming 
or current events which would be removed daily unless ot'ner 
agreements are made with the responsible office,. 

2. A " Barge in Telephone Line " be installed which would play a continous 

3 minute tape loop. "Barge in" implies an ability to handle any nuirier 
of callers simultaneously. Both Calendar and limited Administrative 
Information could be placed on it. 

It would need daily updating 

It would be highly accessible (undergrads?) 

Editing policies will have to be developed. 

3. The "Tele-Tabula " system employed during "Something '70" be continued 
on a regular basis. Besides augmenting calendar publicity, andplaying 
music in the halls, it could also be rigged to serve as a P. A. or paging 
system. Placement of monitors is suggested in front and auditorium 
foyers and perhaps room 126. Available immediately- -eventually it will 
cost about $600.00 for purchase of T.V. camera solely for this purpose. 

4. A limited number of printe d calondarti should be printed weekly on the 
offset press and left in the hall for interested persons. 

5. Presently one fifteen hour per week work-s tudy student is available to 
aid in the implem.entation of recoriimendations 1-4. He would actively 
solicit and compile items to be entered. 

6. Forms to schedule events should be developed and made available in 
the School Council Office and other key areas. 

7. One telephone number should be publicized as the appropriate place to 
schedule events on the calendar. 







INFOR>iATION 

8. Area should be made more visible with large receptionist sign . 

9. Signs should be painted on doors or placed at other entrances directing 
visitors toward the reception desk ( RECEPTIONIST^^ ). 

10. The receptionist's chai r behind the counter in roomiZl should be higher 
so she is at t-ko. "eye level" with visitors. 

11. A short aeminar on phone answering practices and techniques should be 
conducted for the appropriate staff members by the Telephone Company . 

12. The undergraduate representatives to the School Council should have a 
desk located in room 126. 

PUBLICATIONS 

Tab-Ra?. - should serve as a forum for the exchange of ideas relevant to 
education. 

13. It should be a semi-monthly publication . 

The first issue in a given month would be an "in house" publication for 
internal distribution to the School of Education community only (no copies 
would be mailed). There would be _no censorship of content. Fewer 
issues would be printed. 

The second issue in a given month would be edited in such a manner that 
it still serve its prime purpose but, be screened from materials 
deemed deleterious from a "public relations" point of view. The 
Assistant Dean's office would approve before any copies were mailed. 

ADMINISTRATIVE BULLETIN 

14. This would be a weekly publication similar to the University Bulletin 
composed of: 

1. pertinent extracts from the University Bulletin 

2. Compiled School of Ed. "Mass Memoranda". 

The intent here is to eliminate waste of paper and distribution time. 
BULLETIN BOARDS 

15. A permanent directory should be established on the glass covered bulletin 
boards in the front and auditorium foyers, information displayed should 
include: 

1. Faculty members w/room #3 

2. Prospect w/room #3 

3. Centers w/room #3 

4. Administrative and service functions w/room #s 

5. Map of School 



£) 



6. Map of campus 

7. Locations of Center bulletin boards 

16. Centers should each have a designated bulletin board. 

17i Additional bulletin boards should be designated for undergrad info., 
grad info., placement info, for B.A. , M.A. & M.A.T. students and 
social activities. 

SHORT TERM REPORTS 

18. A course description catalog should be published listing all 
Fall '70 courses including : 

1. The type of descriptive material currently available 

2. Materials and books required 

3. Components, form and content of subject matter 

4. Nuaiiber of students to be enrolled (maximum). 

5. Prerequisites if any 

6. A brief statement about the teacher 
Deadline for contents April 5. 

Release April 15. 

19. Centers, Projects j &. Program s Report to School Council 

All activities should submit to the Council by April 15 a report 
including the following information; 

1. Demography 

2. Projects 

3. Financial status (soft and hard money) 

4. Evaluative status 

5. Learning resources 

6. Future projections 

20. Public- Relations brochures should be developed and published by 
appropriate activities. 

21. The administration should submit an Annual Deans' Repor t in September 
of each year regarding the status of the Community. It iihould include 
the following information: 

1. Political status of the School. 

2. Academic status of School. 

3. Achievements. 

4. Resources — available and needed. 

5. Demography. 

6. Evaluative status of School. 

7. Projections. 

8. Projects and activities. 

9. Financial status of School. 

Also quarterly revisions should be made on Nov. 15, Jan. 15 and March 15 
of each year followed by a summary. on June 1. 

23. The School Council should publish monthly a brief sunuiiary of its 
activities in Tab Raz. 



• 



MISCELLANEOUS 

24. A publicized Open Door Day should be held at the beginning of each 
semester and during Pre-registration. Its prime function would be 
counseling. Demonstrations could also be put on in addition to 
short (30 minute) large group presentations in the Auditorium. 

25. An accurate mai ling list of all persons in the Education Community 
should be established and maintained. 

26. The interest group taxonoii\y should be completed and maintained. 



r 



APPENDIX D 







JUDICIAL PLANNING COMMITTEE RECOMMENDATIONS 

Selection Procedures 

The Judicial Planning Committee recommends that: 

1. The Executive Committee shall nominate the chairman and members of 
the Judicial Committee, subject to the approval of the School Council 
and the Dean. A 4/5 favorable vote of the Council is required on 
each nomination. The following criteria will be used in making the 
nominations: 

a. That the size of the Committee be five (5) members. 

b. That a majority of these be faculty members. 

c. That such skills as legal expertise and human relations and 
communications be represented. 

d. That insofar as possible the various generalizable styles, 
concerns, and attitudes present in the School be also represented. 

2. The terms of Judicial Committee members be two-year terms, staggered 
in such a way as to insure a sense of continuity. 

Judicial Review of Personnel Decisi