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UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO 
MONTHLY 



INDEX 



VOLUME XXII 



PUBLISHED BY 
THE ALUMNI FEDERATION OF THE UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO 




T6 
INDEX 



UNIVERSITY POLICY AND FINANCE: 



PAGE 



Succession Duties and University Finance Sir Edmund Walker 9 

Sir William Mulock and University Federation James Mills 21 

The Need of the Hour Sir Robert Falconer 57 

Does Higher Education Pay the Province? , . . . John R. Bone 100 

Why University Education at Less than Cost? 

George F. Kay, S. Silcox, and Clark E. Locke 146 

Governors' Requests to be Presented to Cabinet 194 

Immediate Financial Needs of the University Sir Robert Falconer 196 

The Village Pump Conception of a University Education E. W. Beatty 197 

Is the University of Toronto a Democratic Failure? Main Johnson 198 

University Professors as Luncheon Club Speakers E. P. Brown 199 

The Plight of University College Principal Maurice Hutton 200 

Why Not More Generous Support for the University W. C. Good 241 

The University's Need of a Reasonably Permanent Income T. A. Russell 242 

University Publicity Clark E. Locke 248 

The Pros and Cons of the Full-Time System in Medicine 256 

The Need of a Canadian Graduate School 305 

The New Entrance Requirements in Arts W. J. Dunlop 306 

Mr Marshall Suggests Changes in Administration of the University 337 

Victoria and Knox Take Momentous Step 

The Provincial University's Need of New Buildings 358 

Graduates and the University Thomas Gibson 

Graduate Participation in University Affairs W. J. Alexander 385 

NEWS OF THE UNIVERSITY: 

The University at the Exhibition 

The President's Opening Address 

Another Session Opens 

President Falconer Attends University Congress 18 

Victoria's New Wesley Library /. Hugh Michael 58 

Freshmen, Yesterday and To-day Principal Maurice Hutton 

University Settlement 64, 397 

The Fifth Provost of Trinity A.H. Young 

An Innovation .W. J. Dunlop 69 

Social Service Department Forms Link with Masses 71 

Dr Seager Installed as Provost of Trinity 98 

Records Office Keeps Track of 30,000 Alumni . . 

Graduate Work in Medicine 

Hart House Theatre .. 19, 111, 208, 313, 360, 406 

Graduate Facilities in Hart House J.B.. Bickersteth 115 

Graduate Studies Show Promising Development 154 

The Gull Lake Survey Camp J. W. Melson 

Engineering Research Shows Healthy Growth 195 

Scientists of America Meet at University 

Medical Extension Work Develops ". V. E. Henderson 203 

Periodical Publications of the University .W. S. Wallace 204 



Military Studies and the C.O.T.C 205 

Professor McMurrich Honoured by A.A.A.S Alexander Primrose 209 

Toronto Conservatory of Music 243 

The President's Report 244 

The Department of Chemical Engineering //. M . Lancaster 246 

The Veterinary College to be Moved to Guelph 247 

The Second Short Course for Farmers 255 / 

University College Women's Union 260, 404 

Preserving the Health of the Student Body G. D. Porter. 289 

The Training of Architects 297 

Psychology in the University. . . G. S. Brett. 298 

College of Education Grows on Graduate Side Peter Sandiford 300 

Research Activities in the University 303 

The Changes of Forty Years Principal Maurice Button 344 

Medical Research Results in Important Discovery 346 

The Varsity Veterans' Association is Disbanded 347 

Educational Association Agajn Meets at University. 348 

St Michael's Enjoys Singular Growth 351 

Connaught Laboratories Publish Research Papers : 352 

Early Days of the S.P.S J. L. Morris 355 

Dr. Chant to Visit Australia J.A.P. 359 

The Royal Canadian Institute and the University D. R. Keys 398 

Athletics 217, 263 

Commencement Functions and Class Reunions 349, 402, 405 

ALUMNI ACTIVITIES: 

Minutes of the Twenty-First Annual Meeting 11 

General Meeting of Alumni Called L 56 

Graduate Organizations in the University of Toronto John Squair 61, 102, 149 

What the Alumni Federation Means Mr Justice C. A . Masten 99 

General Meeting Approves Reorganization of Association 109 

Federation Directors' Meetings 360, 407 

Federation Directors' Report, 1921-1922 388 

Alumni Lecture Series 143, 261, 313 

Alumni News ". . .28, 73, 121, 169, 219, 265, 314, 361, 407 

Victoria Alumni Association . 23, 70, 395 

Engineering Alumni Association , . 24, 112 

University College Alumni Association. .."... 26, 113, 302 

Medical Alumni Association s 336 

BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF ALUMNI: 

Herbert Symonds . .R.W. Dickie 22 

Alfred Henry Reynar F. II . Wallace 108 

J. E. Brownlee 116 

Harry Rolph , Howard W. Fairlie 117 

J. H. Kennedy P. H. Buchan 119 

W. L. Mackenzie King 145 

T. R. Deacon George E. Silvester 164 

Gertrude Lawler Emmy Lou Carter 166 

James Ballantyne Richard Davidson 167 

Charles W. Flint R. P. Stouffer J213 

Margaret E. T. Addison Edith F. Adams ^15 

A. H. Young Lloyd Hodgins 253 

Edward L. Cousins. ' George T. Clark 259 

Ruby, Mason ... Emmy Lou Carter 308 

R. WXDickie .- E. J. Archibald 309 

Daniel p'Connell : 357- 

L i 



GENERAL ARTICLES: 

News and Comments 5, 53, 93, 141, 189, 237, 285, 331, 37C 

My Life . R.C. Reade 65 

Toronto Graduates in the House of Commons 144 

The Cambridge Appointments Board C. R. Fay 158 

A Trip to the Fort Norman Oil Fields W. S. Dyer 160 

The Workers' Educational Association W. S. Milner 162 

Forty Years of the Engineering Society Peter Gillespie 206 

U.C. Women in Social Service Work Emmy Lou Career 214 

Extension Work in American Universities 250 

Professors on the Squash Courts F.A .M. 251 

Working Their W 7 ay Through 290 

Why We Need Trained Foresters Dean C. D. Howe 291 

Recent Developments in Western Universities II. S. Patton 294 

Osier Hall Dedicated 340 

The Edward Kylie Scholarship Vincent Massey 341 

Does the English Course in Arts Stifle Creative Faculties? 350 

Nearly a Century of Service 352 

Administrative Systems of Other Universities 386 

Additions to the Roll of Service 396 

Book Reviews 28, 73, 168, 314 

Correspondence - .72, 167, 314 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



COMPLETE BANKING SERVICE 

In every Department of Domestic and 
International Banking the Bank of 
Montreal is fully equipped to meet the 
needs of Canadians adequately and 
promptly. 

Each Branch has behind it the full 
facilities and resources of the entire 
organization. In every Branch there is 
a Savings Department where accounts 
may be opened in amounts of $ 1 .00 
and upwards. Interest is paid at highest 
current rates. 

BANK OF MONTREAL 

ESTABLISHED OVER 100 YEARS 
Total Assets over $500,000,000 

SIR VINCENT MEREDITH, Bart., President 
SIR FREDERICK WILLIAMS-TAYLOR, General Manager 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



H&nibtv&ity of Toronto 

(The Provincial University of Ontario) 



With its federated and affiliated colleges, its various faculties, and 
its special departments, offers courses or grants degrees in: 

ARTS leading to the degree of B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. 
COMMERCE ................ Bachelor of Commerce. 

APPLIED SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING. .B.A.Sc., M.A.Sc., 
C.E., M.E., E.E., Chem.E. 

MEDICINE ........... . ...... M.B., B.Sc. (Med.), and M.D. 

EDUCATION. . .............. B.Paed. and D.Paed. 

FORESTRY. ..... ........... B.Sc.F. and F.E. 

MUSIC ........ ............. Mus. Bac. and Mus. Doc. 

HOUSEHOLD SCIENCE AND SOCIAL SERVICE. 
PUBLIC HEALTH ........... D.P.H. 

PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING. 

LAW ........................ LL.B., LL.M. and LL.D. (Hon.). 

DENTISTRY ................ D.D.S. 

AGRICULTURE ............. B.S.A. 

VETERINARY SCIENCE. .. .B.V.S. and D.V.S. 

PHARMACY .............. . .Phm.B. 

TEACHERS' CLASSES, CORRESPONDENCE WORK, 
SUMMER SESSIONS, SHORT COURSES for FARMERS, 
for JOURNALISTS, in TOWN-PLANNING and in HOUSE- 
HOLD SCIENCE, University Classes in various cities and towns, 
Tutorial Classes in rural and urban communities, single lectures 
and courses of lectures are arranged and conducted by the 
Department of University Extension. (Eor information, write 
the Director.) 

For general information and copies of calendars write the 
Registrar, University of Toronto, or the Secretaries of the Colleges 
or Faculties. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



THE DOMINION BANK 

% 

HEAD OFFICE - - TORONTO 

ESTABLISHED 1871 



COMPLETE BANKING SERVICE 

Every Branch of this Bank is equipped 
and prepared to render complete banking 
service. 

Interest paid on Savings Deposits at the 
current rate. 

Careful attention given to the accounts of 
small and large depositors a//e. 



28 Branches in the City of Toronto 



C A. BOGERT, General Manager. 



ntoeritj> of Toronto Jfflontfjlp 

Vol. XXII. TORONTO, OCTOBER, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND TWENTY-ONE No. I 

News and Comments 



NEW PROVOST AT 
TRINITY 



Rev Dr Charles Allen 
Seager, B.A. (T.) '95, 
M.A. '97, has accept- 
ed the post of provost and vice-chancellor 
of Trinity College to which he was elected 
by unanimous vote of the Corporation. 
He took up his new duties at the beginning 
of October. 

Dr Seager was ordained by the Arch- 
bishop of Toronto twenty-five years ago 
and until 1911 was rector of St. Cyprian's 
Church, Toronto, and rector of St. 
Matthew's Church since 1917. He guided 
the destinies of St. Mark's Hall, Vancouver, 
for some years with great success, was 
appointed a member of the Church of 
England War Service Commission, and has 
served on many important commissions of 
the diocese of Toronto. He is much inter- 
ested in social service and educational work 
and is a theologian of exceptional ability. 
These merits, together with his recognized 
broadminded sympathy with every form 
of human activity will combine to make 
him a very able head of Trinity College. 



DR STARR 
APPOINTED 
TO CHAIR OF 
SURGERY 



Dr Clarence L. Starr, 
'90, has been ap- 
pointed to the Chair 
of Surgery to succeed 
Mr I. H. Cameron. 
Dr Starr is one of the outstanding surgeons 
of the Dominion. For many years he has 
been head of the Surgical staff at the 
Hospital for Sick Children. He served 
overseas from 1916 to 1918, first as head 
of the Surgical Staff at Orpington Hospital 
and later as officer commanding the 
Canadian Orthopaedic Hospital at Rams- 
gate. 



Professor J. W. Brid- 
ges, of the University 
of Ohio, has been ap- 
pointed assistant pro- 
fessor in the Depart- 
ment of Psychology. 



PROFESSOR 
BRIDGES 
APPOINTED TO 
PSYCHOLOGY 
DEPARTMENT 

Professor Bridges is a Canadian by birth, 
educated at Prince of Wales College, 
Charlottetown, P.E.I., and McGill Univer- 
sity, from which he graduated with honours 



in Philosophy. He proceeded to Harvard 
on a scholarship, obtained the degrees of 
A.M. and Ph.D., being awarded theThayer 
Fellowship. While at Harvard he was 
assistant to the late Professor Munsterberg. 
He spent a year as psychological interne 
at the Psychopathic Hospital, Boston, 
studying problems of abnormal psychology 
and in conjunction with Professor Yerkes 
developed the " Yerkes- Bridges Point Scale 
Examination" for measuring mental 
ability. 

He was lecturer in Psychology at Alberta 
University 1914-1915, and for the past six 
years has been attached to the Department 
of Psychology at the University of Ohio. 
From 1917 to 1919 he was on the Head- 
quarters Staff, Washington, engaged on 
psychological tests for soldiers. 




DR CLARENCE L. STARR 
New Professor of Surgery 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



Dn . . nF The final edition of 

ocm/i or the Roll of Service has 

PUBL SHED been Punished and 

may be secured on 

application to Mr R. J. Hamilton, Manager 
of the University Press. The price in paper 
binding is fifty cents to ex-service men and 
seventy-five cents to others. For cloth- 
bound copies there. is an additional charge 
of twenty-five cents in each case. 

The volume contains the names of all 
graduates, undergraduates, and former 
students, of whose active service during 
the war, information was received at the 
University. A brief personal history is 
given of those who laid down their lives, 
and the details of service of the others. 
The work of compilation has been ad- 
mirably done and great credit is due, the 
editor, Professor G. O. Smith. A worthy 
record of the war services of the graduates 
and undergraduates of the University, it is 
probably one of the best of its kind in 
existence. 



NEW WARDEN 

AT 

HART HOUSE 



On September 15, the 
retiring warden of 
Hart House, Walter 
F Bowles, handed 
over the keys of the institution to J. Burgon 
Bickersteth, the new warden. Mr Bicker- 
steth is an Englishman by birth, a son of 
Dr Bickersteth, the Canon of Canterbury, 
but declares himself a Canadian by adop- 
tion. He was educated at Charterhouse 
and Christ Church, Oxford, and came to 
Canada eleven years ago. Since then he 
has published a book on his experiences in 
the far northwest under the title of The 
Land of Open Doors. In 1913 he took up 
graduate work in the University of Sor- 
bonne, France, and at the outbreak of 
war enlisted in the Royal Dragoons. 
During his four years in France he earned 
the Military Cross and Bar and has 
written a history of the 6th Cavalry 
Brigade to which Lord Haig contributed 
a foreword. 

For the last two years Mr Bickersteth 
has been a member of the staff of the 
University of Alberta, but he has spent 
the summer in England. He is very much 
interested in athletics, particularly in asso- 
ciation football, and is outspoken in his 
appreciation of Hart House. 



THE ( UmVERS,TY 

LAM IDII AI I HE TV-,- ,. IT- v't_',' 
Q jsj JNational Exhibition 

this year constituted 

a unique and interesting departure from the 
ordinary activities of the University. 

It was a step in the right direction, a 
move toward bringing the University into 
closer contact with the people of the Pro- 
vince. Of the many hundreds of thousands 
who saw the exhibit there must have been 
a very great number who received there, 
their first direct information of the work of 
the University. 

A graduate said, "This is a great idea. 
The University might well have a building 
of its own. It has a hundred things of 
interest to show. And why should not 
lectures be given here by members of the 
staff on subjects of interest to the general 
public. There must be thousands of people 
come here every year who would be only too 
glad to hear educational addresses of this 
kind." 

Other graduates will agree and hope that 
from this year's excellent start, great things 
may result. 



THE SUMMER 
SESSION 



At the regular Com- 
mencement in June, 
the first graduates 
under the University Extension Course for 
teachers eleven in all received degrees. 

The work in this course is done by means 
of correspondence courses for out of town 
students, and late afternoon lectures for 
those resident in the city, during the term 
and by summer sessions. This year the 
attendance at the summer session was the 
highest on record, there being eighty-nine 
enrolled in the Arts Course and seventy- 
two in Pedagogy. x 

As the arrangement under which teachers 
may secure a University degree without 
giving up their teaching positions becomes 
better known, the attendance at these 
Extension courses is bound to increase. 



In the year which has 
passed since Mr 
Dunlop assumed the 
position of director of 
University Extension, many changes and 
expansions have been introduced into the 
department. The second week of Sep- 



THE SHORT 
COURSE FOR 
JOURNALISTS 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



tember saw another innovation in the form 
of a short course for journalists, intended 
primarily for the editors of country week- 
lies. The course lasted from September 5 
until September 17 and was attended by 
128 newspaper men and women including 
a large number of editors. Lectures in 
editorial writing and newsgathering were 
given by J. E. Atkinson and John R. Bone 
of the Toronto Daily Star, and J. C. Ross 
of the Farmers Sun. Professor Alexander 
gave lectures on English Composition, 
Professor Wrong on Constitutional His- 
tory, Dr J. G. Fitzgerald, Dr J. S. Middle- 
ton, and Dr G. O. Porter on Public Health 
and Hygiene, and J. R. Clute on Newspaper 
Jurisprudence. 

The course was accounted a success in 
every way and it is probable that it will 
become annual. 



THE LATE 
DR GRANGE 



Dr E. A. A. Grange, 
former principal of 
^^ the Ontario Veteri- 

nary College, died at his home in Toronto, 
July 25, at the age of seventy-three years. 
Dr Grange graduated from the Ontario 
Veterinary College in 1873. He was a 
lecturer in the College from 1873 until 1882 
when he accepted the position of professor 
of Veterinary Science at the Michigan 
Agricultural College. In 1871 he was 
appointed principal of the Detroit Veteri- 
nary College, and from 1899 until 1908 
conducted Veterinary research work in 
New York state. He was then appointed 
principal of the Ontario Veterinary College, 
which position he held until 1919 when he 
retired. 



STANDING 

COMMITTEES 

APPOINTED 



At a recent meeting 
of the Alumni Board 
of Directors, Mr 
Angus MacMurchy 
was chosen chairman of the Board, and the 
following standing committees appointed: 
Extension Committee: Mr Justice 
Masten, Chairman, Mrs J. P. McRae, Miss 
Laura Denton, W. A. Bucke, W. K. Fraser, 
H. F. Gooderham, W. C. James, C. S. 
Maclnnes, Rev Father Oliver, J. L. Ross, 
Harry Sifton, J. R. L. Starr, Dr W. C. 
Trotter, Professor A. H. Young. 

Publicity Committee: John R. Bone, 
Chairman, E. P. Brown, W. A. Craick, 
J. C. Ross, C. L. Wilson. 




ANGUS MACMURCHY, K.C. 

Recently appointed Chairman of the Alumini 
Board of Directors 

Finance Committee: John J. Gibson, 
Chairman, D. B. Gillies, F. P. Megan, 
Dr D. Bruce MacDonald, C. E. Macdone Id. 

Bureau of Appointments Committee: F. P. 
Megan, Chairman, W. J. Dunlop, H. T. 
Hunter, R. J. Marshall. 

Publication Committee: D. B. Gillies, 
Chairman, W. A. Craick, W. J. Dunlop, 
Professor W. A. Kirkwood, Dr George H. 
Locke, Dr Alex. Mackenzie, J. V. 
McKenzie, W. C. McNaught, R. J. 
Marshall, F. P. Megan. 



The Varsity rugby-football fans are 
optimistic even though many of last year's 
players are not back and consequently 
many changes in the team have been 
necessary. Joe Breen, "Red" MacKenzie, 
Wallace, Earle, and others of last year's 
team have left college, and "Laddie" 
Cassells has found himself unable to coach 
the team this year. Dr Jack Maynard is 
the new coach and he is trying to whip 
into shape the old players who have 
returned and to inject some wholesome 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



"pep" and Varsity spirit into the new 
recruits. The old players who form the 
nucleus of this year's team include Duncan, 
captain; Fisher and Ernie Rolph, outside, 
wings; Snyder, Hugh Ketcheson and Joe 
Taylor, half-backs; Murray and Harry 
Hobbs, quarters; N. W. Taylor, line; Hyde, 
and Westman, inside wing; and Dick 
Weaver, centre scrim. 

The season opened with the Old Boys 

game on October 1. Dr Smirlie Lawson 

captained the team and those who played 

included Hume Crawford, R. D. Huestis, 

Dr J. W. McKenzie, Wesley F. Maunders, 

"Red" MacKenzie, D. H. Storms, Frank 

G. Sullivan, T. W. McDowell, W. W. 

Stratton, D. Gardiner, H. Cassels, L. 

Saunders, M. W. Earle, and H. G. 

Kennedy. The schedule for the season is: 

Oct. 1 Old Boys 

Oct. 8 Toronto at Queen's 

Oct. 15 Toronto at McGill 

Oct. 22 Queen's at McGill 

Oct. 29 McGill at Toronto 

Nov. 5 Queen's at Toronto 

Nov. 12 McGill at Queen's 



The Fayolle Mission, appointed by the 
French Government to convey to Canada 
the thanks of the French nation for our 
participation in the war, spent July 1 in 
Toronto. The delegation contained some 
forty persons, ladies and gentlemen, who 
represented the great departments of the 
national activities of France, the army, the 
navy, the Chamber of Deputies and the 
Senate, the University, the Fine Arts, the 
Red Cross, etc., etc. 

The Mission was entertained by the 
Mayor of Toronto, and the Ontario Govern- 
ment, but unfortunately, the shortness of 
the visit and the fact that it fell on a public 
holiday during the long vacation, made it 
impossible for the University to participate 
in the affair, which was a matter of deep 
regret to the Mission. A very sad occur- 
rence marked the return journey, in the 
death of Professor Lippmann, a distin- 
guished physicist of the University of Paris, 
who died on shipboard shortly before the 
arrival in France. 



A re-organization of the pedagogical 
department of Laval University, Quebec, 
has taken place, by the establishment of 
the Ecole Normale Superieure in the autumn 
of 1920. There is to be a very close con- 



nection between this Ecole and the graduate 
school of the Faculty of Arts, inasmuch as 
many of the courses will be the same for 
both. The regular time required for pre- 
paration for the licence will be two years, 
but it may be reduced to one year for those 
who have already done a sufficient amount 
of advanced work. Evidently much more 
weight is to be laid on learning than on 
mere pedagogy. The Head of the Ecole will 
be Mgr F. Pelletier, formerly Recteur of 
Laval, whose place as Recteur will be taken 
by Rev Abbe Gariepy of the Faculty of 
Theology. 

In April of this year appeared the first 
number of the new Dalhousie Review. 
What the new quarterly has in mind is the 
need of the public that is "concerned about 
the things of the intellect and the spirit, 
which desires to be addressed on problems 
of general import". This is a worthy aim 
and it is to be hoped that the enterprise 
will meet with hearty support, not only 
in the Maritime Provinces, but also in other 
parts of Canada. We note in the first 
number an excellent article on the poetry 
of George Meredith by Dr W. T. Herridge 
(U. '80), and another in the second number 
(July) in memory of Scott by Professor 
Archibald MacMechan (U. '84). 

During the second week of August the 
campus was visited by the Imperial Con- 
ference of the Teachers Association, the 
majority of the meetings being held in 
Convocation Hall. Teachers were present 
from all parts of the Empire. 

On August 13 at a special Convocation, 
the degree of Doctor of Laws, honoris causa 
was conferred on Sir Harry Reichel, Vice- 
Chancellor of the University of Wales; 
M. J. Randall, Headmaster of Winchester 
College; B. J. Allen, Deputy Education 
Officer of London County Council; and 
Professor Rev. A. Moffatt, of Madras 
Christian College, India. 

Rev F. H. Cosgrave, professor of Hebrew 
at Trinity College, has gone to England to 
undertake special work for the College. He 
will make a study of the special problems 
connected with theological training which 
have risen out of the war. 



G. Oswald Smith, associate professor of 
Latin, has been appointed registrar of 
University College to succeed Professor F. 
C. A. Jeanneret. 



Succession Duties and University Finance 



I AM asked why the so-called share in the 
Succession Duties is considered to be 
the best available plan of finance for 
the University. 

When the writer first took charge of the 
finances of the University it received no 
financial aid from the Government and 
when after a long and weary struggle, the 
first aid was given, it was upon the theory 
that the Government could not yet under- 
take to regularly support the University, 
and ingenious reasons for any grants of 
money were afforded, always calculated to 
deny the admission of the principle of 
support. On the other hand we were, 
whenever opportunity occurred, demanding 
that the relation of the Province to its 
University be recognized similarly to that 
of the many state universities in the United 
States. Now the usual form of state aid is 
by a tax levied directly for the university 
upon the people, collected by the state 
treasurer and handed by him to the univer- 
sity. (See University Commission, 1906, 
p. LVI). This has two great advantages 
so far as the state university is concerned. 
First: The sum thus raised by taxation 
does not become a part of the revenues of 
the state which the government have the 
power to spend, and is therefore of no 
interest to the state government apart 
from its goodwill towards the university. 
Second: The sum thus raised is bound to 
increase in due relation to the increase in 
the assessed values of the property owned 
by the people. At this point I wish par- 
ticularly to urge that it is a fair presump- 
tion that there will be a reasonable relation 
between the growth of the state university 
with its financial needs and this growth of 
the wealth of the people, and the annual 
incomes from this source and the increase 
in the needs of the various state universities 
bear this out. 

This being our opinion we urged repeat- 
edly upon the Governments of Mr Hardy 
and Sir George Ross that a direct tax be 
levied for the benefit of the University. It 
was urged in reply that the people would 
not stand a direct tax. We begged the 
Government to levy the tax, calling it, if 
they chose, the University tax, and we 
undertook to stand or fall by the result, 
feeling assured that we could by a cam- 
paign show that the people of Ontario did 
desire to support their University. Need- 



less to say we failed to have the opportunity 
because we were always met by this fear of 
direct taxation. 

When we found that we could not obtain 
help by a direct tax we sought some form 
of aid which would probably grow in fair 
proportion to the needs of the University, 
and the Succession Duties was the only 
form of government revenue which gave 
this assurance. The Government of Sir 
George Ross, to whom such proposals were 
first made, however, refused to consider 
giving us aid in this manner, but for reasons 
which while very interesting historically, 
need not be entered upon here, we were 
aided for a few years by the payment of 
our annual deficits by special grants from 
the Government. 

Aid in this form meant that when the 
necessity arose for any new expenditure, 
caused by the growth of the University, 
we were met by the fact that we had no 
money with which to make it and could 
not be sure that the Government would 
grant it. Planning adequately for the 
future of a great university under such 
conditions was impossible and the history 
of the University at this time is the best 
evidence of this. 

When the Royal Commission on the 
University sat in 1906 the financial support 
of the University naturally gave them 
much thought, and that section of the 
Report should be read by anyone interested 
in this article. I shall give here but one 
short extract: 

"In determining the question of income, the 
amount and the method of providing it are both of 
moment. We believe that some means of fixing 
. the income upon a definite basis should be found. 
It has been proposed that a certain percentage of 
some item of the Provincial revenue should be 
allotted to the University, and that the sum that 
this percentage yielded from year to year would 
form the amount to be voted annually by the Legis- 
lature. It must be borne in mind that the financial 
needs of the University will grow greater from year 
to year both because of the increase of the popula- 
tion of Ontario and the growth of knowledge in the 
world at large. The item of Provincial revenue, 
therefore, from which that portion of tHfe income 
furnished by the state is to come, must also be one 
which will grow greater from year to year in at least 
as large a ratio as that of the increase in population. 
For this purpose the revenue from succession duties 
has been suggested. It is true that this is a tax 



10 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



which has aroused much opposition and which may 
be subject to change in the future, but it has been 
selected because it is at present a tax which grows 
in some relation to the growth of the Province and 
therefore to the growth of the University require- 
ments. The Provincial revenue from this source 
during the past six years has been as follows: 

. 1900 $228,360 

1901 376,661 

1902 236,169 

1903 386,948 

1904 458,699 

1905 684,143 

or an average for the six years of $395,163. As this 
particular source of revenue is supposed to be 
allocated under the Act to the discharge of certain 
Provincial expenditures, we have thought that the 
University income might be fixed by statute at a 
sum equal to a certain percentage of the revenue 
from succession duties. In order that this system 
might not introduce an element of inconvenient 
fluctuation, seeing that the revenue from succession 
duties varies considerably from year to year, we 
recommend that the percentage be calculated upon 
the average of three years' receipts. We believe 
that the income under this system or any other that 
may be selected ought not to be less than $275,000 
at the inception." 

In the University Act which was passed 
after the reception of the report of the 
Commission the aid asked for was granted, 
as follows: 

(1) For the purpose of making provision for the 
maintenance and support of the University and of 
University College, there shall be paid to the Board 
out of the Consolidated Revenue of the Province 
yearly and every year a sum equal to fifty per 
centum of the average yearly gross receipts of the 
Province from succession duties. 

(2) The said annual sums shall be paid in equal 
half-yearly instalments on the first day of July and 
the first day of January in each year, the first of 
which shall be paid on the first day of July next, and 
the average yearly gross receipts of the Province 
from succession duties shall be determined by and 
be based upon the gross receipts from such duties 
of the three years ended on the 31st day of December 
next preceding the day on which the first instalment 
of the year is to be paid. 

(3) If in any year the amount which shall be 
payable to the Board under the provisions of sub- 
sections 1 and 2 shall exceed the amount of the 
estimated expenditure for the maintenance and 
support of the University and of University College 
for the academic year in respect of which such sum 
is payable, it shall be lawful for the Lieutenant- 
Governor in Council to direct that the excess shall 



be added to the permanent endowment of the Uni- 
versity and University College, or that the same 
shall be set apart by the Board as a contingent fund 
to provide for the event of the amount which shall 
be payable to the Board as aforesaid being in any 
future year or years insufficient to defray the cost 
of such maintenance and support as aforesaid; or 
that the same be applied in expenditures on capital 
account; or that such excess shall be applied or 
dealt with wholly or in part in each or any or either 
of the said ways, and to direct if it shall be deemed 
proper to do so, that except in so far as such excess 
shall not be directed to be applied or dealt with in 
manner aforesaid that the same shall not be paid 
to the Board and in every such case the sum which 
would otherwise be payable to the Board shall be 
reduced accordingly." 

This was in my opinion the wisest act 
connected with the University passed by 
the Government, since the University Con- 
federation Act. Under it we were able to 
plan for the future both as to buildings, 
salaries of the faculties, and the cost of 
a steady expansion, caused not by the 
University authorities but by the people 
of the Province in their natural desire to 
make use of their University. 

Aid by direct taxation in the United 
States generally meant maintenance alone 
of the state universities, special grants 
being made for buildings. In Ontario the 
policy which either refused altogether or 
helped so inadequately left the University 
in 1906 with very large necessities in build- 
ings. After very full discussion with the 
Government it was understood that a 
programme of building involving about two 
million dollars could be proceeded with. 
The money was to be secured by the issue 
of long-dated annuities the amortization 
of which would be made out of our annual 
income. When we had proceeded a certain 
degree with our programme of building we 
were called upon to stop because of the fear 
that the amortizations would become large 
enough to more than exhaust the income 
from the Succession Duties. Money at that 
time could be secured on a four per cent 
basis and building costs were probably 
lower than we shall soon, if ever, see them 
again. The history of the Succession 
Duties shows that the halt in our building 
should not have been called, and altogether 
this was a most unfortunate mistake in 
Government policy. But a much greater 
and more vital error was made in 1914 
when, without any intimation to the 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



11 



University either before or after the action 
by the Government, the following amend- 
ment to the University Act was passed: 

"64. Subsection 1 of section 128 of The University 
Act is amended by adding at the end thereof the- 
following words: 'But such sum shall not exceed 
$500,000 in any year'." 

In the very year that this change was made 
the necessities of the University required 
the Government to provide nearly $600,000 
instead of $500,000. This change in the 
fortunes of the University came just as the 
enormous increase in the cost of everything 
caused by the war was about to occur. 

While I cannot speak with precision I 
am reasonably sure that had the share in 



the Succession Dues remained unaltered 
there would have been no deficits during 
the last six or seven years and much, if not 
all, of our building programme could have 
been undertaken. It is quite natural, there- 
fore, in my opinion that the Report of the 
Royal Commission on University Finances 
of 1921 at page 26 et seq advocates that the 
Government should again return to the 
principle of paying "yearly to the Board of 
Governors a sum equal to fifty per cent of 
the average yearly gross receipts of the 
Province from Succession Duties, the 
average being calculated on the receipts of 
the three preceding years". 

B. E. WALKER. 



Minutes of the Twenty-First Annual Meeting 



THE Twenty-First Annual Meeting of 
the University of Toronto Alumni 
Association was held in the Lecture 
Room, Hart House, on Thursday, June 9, 
at 4 p.m., the President of the Association, 
Hon. Mr Justice Masten, occupying the 
chair. 

On motion of Dr Gibb Wishart and Mr 
J. R. L. Starr, the Minutes of the previous 
meeting as published in THE UNIVERSITY 
OF TORONTO MONTHLY, June 1920, were 
taken as read and confirmed. 

On motion of Professor J. J. MacKenzie 
and Mr Samuel King, the Report of the 
Board of Directors for 1920-1921 as pub- 
lished in THE UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO 
MONTHLY, June 1921, was taken as read. 

In moving the adoption of the Report, 
Mr Justice Masten outlined the year's 
work. He pointed out that the Memorial 
Fund had increased by the addition of 
$50,000 in subscriptions during the year; 
that the Loan Fund was serving a very 
important part in affording assistance to 
returned soldier-students who could not 
otherwise continue their University 
courses ; that THE MONTHLY had increased 
in interest, and 415 subscriptions had been 
added to the list during the year, while the 
receipts from advertising had increased by 
$1,054.35. He announced that according 
to the Secretary-Treasurer's statement the 
Association had a debit balance of $1,873.89 
for the eleven months ending May 31, but 
to offset this the guarantee of the Univer- 
sity against certain deficits amounted to 



$2,300 payable at the end of the financial 
year, June 30. He also drew attention to 
the work of the Bureau of Appointments 
which, in spite of the lack of a staff 
adequate to carry on the work, had placed 
forty-three students in summer positions. 

He stated that there were three im- 
portant tasks to be carried out by the 
Association during the coming year. First, 
the education of the people of Ontario 
toward a realization of the fact that the 
University must receive adequate support 
if the progress and welfare of the Province 
were not to suffer. Second, the securing of 
a considerable increase in the paid member- 
ship of the Association in order to accom- 
plish a substantial advance toward making 
the Association financially independent. 
Third, the re-organization and incorpora- 
tion of the Association so as to facilitate 
the organized co-operation in a federated 
body of the alumni organizations now 
existing in the various Faculties and 
Colleges of the University. 

Mr Graham Campbell suggested that a 
card authorizing banks to pay the alumni 
membership fee on a certain date each 
year, be prepared, so that alumni might be 
relieved from the necessity of writing small 
cheques for membership fees. Thi will be 
taken up by the Board. 

President Falconer was then called upon 
and spoke on the finances of the University. 
He reviewed the developments of the past 
year and spoke of the necessity of securing 
larger support from the Government if the 



12 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



work of the University were to be con- 
tinued on an efficient basis, pointing out 
that money was required for additional 
buildings, staff, and equipment. 

Sir Edmund Walker, Chairman of the 
Governors of the University, followed, 
declaring that the Succession Dues plan was 
the best because it provided an arrangement 
whereby the income of the University 
would increase with the wealth of the 
Province. He argued that a fixed statu- 
tory grant would not provide for the neces- 
sary extensions of the University, and 
stated that if the University has to go each 
year to the Government, the Governors 
will be left in a state of uncertainty, 
detrimental to the best interests of the 
University. 

Mr Justice Masten pointed out that if 
the institution were to continue as the 
Provincial University it should receive an 
assured statutory allowance so that it 
would not be competing annually with 
Queen's and Western Universities for an 
allowance from the Consolidated Revenue 
Fund. -.'-.; . 

The motion to adopt the Report was 
carried unanimously. 

Mr Angus MacMurchy then took the 
Chair and Mr Justice Masten moved, 
seconded by Mr King, that: (1) This 
Association do re-organize and become in- 
corporated as hereinafter mentioned; (2) 
For the above purpose the whole assets and 
undertakings of this Association as a going 
concern, including the Memorial Fund and 
all other trust funds if any, held by it, be 
transferred and assigned to the Corporation 
heretofore incorporated as the Alumni 
Federation of the University of Toronto; 
(3) The Directors and the proper Officers 
of the Association be and they are hereby 
authorized and empowered to carry out 
such transfer and to execute all documents 
and do all other things necessary or ex- 
pedient to complete such transfer. 

After some discussion the motion was 
put and carried. 

On motion of Mr J. R. L. Starr and Pro- 
fessor J. P. McMurrich the report of the 
Nominating Committee was unanimously 
adopted and the following Officers, Direc- 
tors, and Councillors declared elected: 

Honorary President Sir John Gibson 
President Hon. Mr Justice Masten 

Vice-P residents: G. W. Ballard, Hamil- 



ton; Brig. Gen. J. A. Clark, Vancouver; J. 
A. Dickson, Niagara Falls; David Forsyth, 
Kitchener; W. J. Francis, Montreal; A. M. 
Harley, Brantford; Dr C. G. Heyd, New 
York; A. C. Kingstone, St. Catharines; 
Angus MacMurchy, Toronto; S. J. 
McLean, Ottawa; J. M. Robertson, Mon- 
treal; A. A. Thibaudeau, Buffalo. 

Board of Directors: J. R. Bone, W. A. 
Bucke, Miss Laura Denton, J. J. Gibson, 

D. B. Gillies, H. F. Gooderham, W. C. 
James, Samuel King, Dr George H. Locke, 
F. P. Megan, C. E. Macdonald, C. S. 
Maclnnes, Angus MacMurchy, Professor 
J. J. MacKenzie, Mrs J. P. McRae, H. D. 
Scully, Dr George E. Wilson. 

Alumni Council: H. G. Acres, I. H. 
Cameron, Mrs M. H. V. Cameron, J. B. 
Challies, Df H. J. Cody, Hume Cronyn, 
Miss Helen Dafoe, S. Eisen, E. R. Gray, 
Dr W. B. Hendry, John Jennings, Pro- 
fessor W. A. Kirkwood, Professor A. E. 
Lang, Dr D. Bruce MacDonald, R. J. 
Marshall, Thomas Marshall, Professor J. P. 
McMurrich, P. H. Mitchell, W. R. P. Par- 
ker, E. E. Reid, Miss Helen St. John, 
Professor Peter Sandiford, Miss Shirley 
Saul, Miss Laila Scott, J. R. L. Starr, 
W. G. Swan, Professor M. W. Wallace, 
C. Lesslie Wilson, Professor A. H. Young. 

On motion of Mr A. F. Barr and Miss 

E. McDonald, Messrs Clarkson, Gordon 
and Dilworth were appointed auditors for 
the year ending June 30, 1921. 

On motion of Mr H. F. Gooderham and 
Mr Graham Campbell, Mr John J. Gibson 
was appointed to the Alumni Scholarship 
Board for the year 1921-1922. 

It was moved by Professor Squair, 
seconded by Mr C. E. Macdonald, that the 
action of the Board of Directors and the 
Alumni Scholarship Board in loaning 
Memorial Funds to returned soldier- 
students be sanctioned and confirmed, and 
that the continuance of the policy as out- 
lined in the Directors' Report be authorized 
for the year 1921-1922. Carried. 

On motion of Col. W. N. Ponton and Mr 
John R. Bone, the meeting went on record 
as being in favour of the adoption of the 
recommendations of the University Com- 
mission or of some other plan equally 
favourable to the University. 

There being no other business presented, 
the meeting adjourned. 



The University at the Exhibition 



" IF the mountain will not go to Mahomet, 
1 Mahomet must go to the mountain." 
This was the motto adopted by the 
University of Toronto and demonstrated at 
the Canadian National Exhibition, when 
the University came down to the people, 
became acquainted with them, regardless 
of class, colour, or condition, and gave 
them the opportunity to see and under- 
stand at first hand something of what the 
University is and for what it stands. 

The first thing that greeted the eye of the 
casual visitor to the Government Building, 
was the familiar colours of the blue and 
white, the broad white arch, lettered in 
royal blue with the words "University of 
Toronto". The white panels behind, with 
the blue writing on the wall, made an 
effective background, and banks of ferns, 
gay banners and blue and white bunting 
were merely part of the trappings that 
made the whole exhibit so attractive. 

Nearest the entrance was the astro- 
nomical display. Here were photographic 
plates of the moon and the other planets, 



globes of various kinds, telescopes of 
different sizes, and a complicated model of 
the second largest telescope in the world, 
with its enveloping dome. Clusters of 
people gathered around this part of the 
exhibit at every hour of the day, amateur 
astronomers, visitors from American uni- 
versities', and the inevitable small boys, to 
whom the large eight-inch telescope was 
an unending fascination and sometimes a 
fatal temptation to disregard the warning 
words "Do Not Handle". 

Next to that came the Extension Depart- 
ment of the University. On its counters 
were spread literature and pamphlets 
giving" all sorts of information about the 
Extension courses and a watchful presence 
was' Always behind the counter to give a 
wbrti of help or advice. Everybody paused 
there and everybody passed on satisfied. 
Some stopped for curiosity and went away 
with a larger idea of the activities of the 
University. Some stopped to inquire about 
the different courses farmers, teachers, 
journalists, housewives, social service 




BIOLOGICAL BUILDING, from Queen's Park 
The new Anatomy Building is to be erected on the. right 



14 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



workers, or prospective students in any 
Faculty. There was a pamphlet or a 
calendar for each one. Even the small boy 
was not forgotten and his insatiable request 
"Any samples?" was rewarded by a 
blotter, bearing an imprint of the main 
doorway. 

In the centre of the exhibit and at the 
very front was a map of the world where 
electric bulbs flickering on and off, showed 
how antitoxin from the Connaught Labora- 
tories is distributed to all parts of the 
Empire. A moving picture machine, 
stationed beside, the map, flashed on its 
slides, ampler information about the very 
important work performed by the Depart- 
ment of Hygiene. 

Farther on, the display of the Physics 
Department contested with the highly 
salaried clown at the Provincial Public 
Health Exhibit, the claim of being the 
most popular exhibit , in 'the Government 
Building. To the scientifically inclined as 
well as to the merely curious, every bit of 
apparatus on the counter was a drawing 
card. Through ultra-microscopes one 
looked at cigarette smoke and saw the 
tiny white particles of which it is com- 
posed and which settle in the lungs when 
inhaled. Electrical apparatus and rare 
gases received their share of attention, but 
there was no doubt about it, the centre of 
attraction was the demonstration of the 
properties of liquid air. Gleaming silver 
thermos tubes with vapour rising from 
them drew the crowd and when the special 
experiments were performed in the after- 
noon and evening, the people would gather 
so thickly that the passageways became 
obstructed. The experiments were simple 
enough for anyone to understand, yet 
interesting enough for all to appreciate. 
A rubber ball was dropped into the thermos 
tube, taken out, thrown on the floor, where 
it broke into splinters. A flower was dipped 
in liquid air and frozen. Fire was pro- 
duced at 300 below zero. It was all very 
simple but it was unusual and rather 



amusing and time after time it got the 
crowd. Every person who visited the 
booth came back a second time and brought 
a friend with him. Probably the magic 
words, three hundred degrees below zero, 
carried an appeal of their own on those 
sweltering days of early September. 

The last and least spectacular point of 
interest was intended chiefly for the 
graduates. It was the table of the Alumni 
Association, and on it was displayed the 
Visitors' Book, a register for the alumni 
and alumnae who passed through the 
exhibit, and copies of THE MONTHLY and 
Goblin. "I just want to see who has been 
here from my year", was the usual apology 
for stopping to peruse the names on the 
register and the preliminary to affixing 
one's own signature. It was interesting 
to see the names of class-mates of years 
ago and to discover where they lived and 
what they were doing. A tinge of cos- 
mopolitanism was contributed in the ad- 
dresses which embraced places extending 
from Mexico to the Yukon, from New 
Brunswick to California, with Japan, 
China, and India, the most frequent names 
outside our own continent. Although 
primarily for the graduates, here again the 
public was not neglected, for pamphlets 
were distributed, gaily-coloured outside 
and crowded inside with facts about the 
University and its finances. 

The final impression made by the Uni- 
versity probably varied. The graduate 
passed on with a sense of renewed sym- 
pathy and perhaps a glow of pride for his 
Alma Mater. The visitor from the country 
felt that he had a better realization of the 
necessity and the achievements of the 
Provincial University. To him it had now 
become something living, tangible. The 
small boy, rushing off with several pamph- 
lets stuffed in his paper bag was wholly 
unable to analyze his impressions. Pro- 
bably the title on the yellow pamphlet 
summarized the general opinion in these 
words "Higher Education Pays". 



The President's Opening Address 



ON Tuesday, September 27, the Presi- 
dent's opening address to students 
was delivered in Convocation Hall. 
In his opening remarks Sir Robert 
welcomed the students to the University 
and expressed the hope that this year might 



be as satisfactory as the last and carry on 
the tradition that had grown and developed 
around the institution. He referred to the 
changes that had taken place during the 
summer. The deaths of Dr Grange, for 
many years principal of the Veterinary 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



15 



College, and Dr Reynar, of Victoria 
College, had removed two very kindly, 
effective gentlemen from the staff of the 
University. After mentioning the large 
number of students who had gone abroad 
to pursue their studies, and the high stand- 
ing of those who had returned from the 
Universities of Great Britain, Sir Robert 
went on to discuss the various changes in 
the curriculum and the extensive develop- 
ment in the Faculty of Medicine, due to 
the gift of the Rockefeller Foundation. 
Continuing, he said in part: 
^ As a result of the Rockefeller gift a so-called full- 
time professorship of Surgery has been established, 
the occupant of ^the chair to devote all, except a 
very few hours in each day, to the work of the 
University and the Hospital. He becomes also 
chief surgeon in the Toronto General Hospital. 
Dr Clarence Starr has been appointed to the chair, 
I am glad so say with the cordial concurrence of his 
fellow surgeons in the University. This city is 
fortunate in the number of excellent surgeons 
who practise here, and their acceptance of Dr 
Starr with such unanimity means that the 
University is to be congratulated upon this 
appointment. As an orthopaedic surgeon he has 
an international reputation and his work both as 
operator and administrator in the Hospital for 
Sick Children, and during the War in England 
and in Canada, ensures his success in this new 
position. The gift of Sir John and Lady Eaton 
two years ago for the establishnemt of a chair 
of Medicine has been working out very success- 
fully, and I heard this summer that our experi- 
ments are being watched with a good deal of 
interest by the medical world both of Britain and 
America. Developments in other departments 
of Medicine will follow and the future in this 
faculty is bright. 

Everywhere the medical schools are full, and 
it has been found necessary in Toronto also to 
limit the number of those who will be allowed 
to enter this Faculty. The last three first years 
have been so large that if this condition were 
continued there would be grave danger of injus- 
tice being done to students. Laboratories are too 
crowded; clinical facilities are insufficient. So it 
has become inevitable that we shall not admit 
more than about 140 entrants. The selection 
has been a difficult task but the principle adopted 
was to take none with merely Junior Matricula- 
tion who are under nineteen years of age. How- 
ever, those rejected will have the first chance 
next year if they are successful in the subjects 
of Senior Matriculation or of the first year in 
Arts. By this method of selection a uniform 
principle has been established and the rejection 
falls upon the youngest, most of whom will pro- 
bably benefit by another preparatory year. 

A new system for the supervision of the health 
of both men and women students has been in- 
stituted, Dr G. D. Porter and Dr Edith Gordon 
having been appointed for this purpose. Both 
have been trained for such work and have had wide 
experience in it. That the University has a duty 
of this kind towards its students is being recognized 
more and more. Education should develop the 



whole person; a healthy i -cly not only makes its 
possessor a moio useful member of society, but 
brings happiness and helps to keep the mind clear 
so that one s powers may be used to better ad- 
vantage. The health, the intelligence, and the 
morals of a people go hand in hand. It is noteworthy 
that to-day Governments also are accepting it as 
one of their functions to have oversight of health. 
In Britain there is the Ministry of Health, of wide 
scope; in Canada one of our former professors, Dr 
Amyot, has been made Deputy-Minister of Health, 
and in the province and city the Health Depart- 
ments have assumed large proportions. I am 
confident that Dr Porter and Dr Gordon will be 
very influential in our academic life and will tone 
it up, most students being in the formative stage 
need advice leading to the growth of healthful habits 
which make all the difference between a successful 
and an unhappy life. Those of us who have now 
most of our years behind us can tell you, as was told 
to us though alas! we did not always give heed, 
that the practice of seemingly trifling habits grows 
insensibly into second nature, resulting on the one 
hand in vigour, endurance, and courage, or on the 




other in sluggishness, indolence, and a shrinking 
from effort. I often ask myself how much of one's 
reluctance to face difficulties is due to general 
physical lassitude brought on by haying neglected 



16 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



to keep the body fit. Undoubtedly many so-called 
"moral" or "immoral" failures are to be set to the 
account of physical defects. That is not to say that 
those who are in the pink of condition will always 
have sensitive consciences and wills responsive to 
the best; but they can keep themselves under 
greater control, which is a primary factor in the 
formation of moral character I linger upon this 
because this University now offers you a golden 
opportunity for gaining mastery of yourself. Here 
we will help you to realize your powers, or at least 
to make a good beginning. 

Associated with this is the rule as to physical 
training. Unfortunately we are not yet in a position 
to make it a requirement for women students, and 
I deeply regret that we have not been able to secure 
from the Government the money for the new 
women's building. But though physical training 
is not compulsory for women, we lay upon you a 
moral responsibility to devote a good deal of your 
time to healthful exercise. 

This leads me to speak of sport. I do not need 
to remind you of the record of this University last 
year in football, hockey, and indeed .almost every 
line. We were all very proud of our teams and you 
remember the receptions they were given, and the 
triumphant progress they made through the city. 
With this memory let us face the coming season, 
also with the best expectations, and we have good 
reason for so doing. Loyalty and encouragement 
of our teams will not be lacking. But even more 
important than that you should idly cheer a vic- 
torious team is it that you should all engage in some 
sport or exercise. When the University at large so 
orders itself that everyone plays a game or takes 
some exercise it will get the healthiest spirit. You 
will cheer the victors more heartily because you 
yourselves know something of the zest of the game. 
It is the best golfers who watch with most earnest- 
ness the game of the champions. And such partici- 
pation will be the most effective corrective to the 
overgrowth of sport. That this is a real danger no 
one who looks at the r, atter seriously will deny. 
In England I heard it said more than once that 
devotion to sport had almost become a passion 
which is sapping the energies of the people and 
usurping the place of work. By this was meant 
not that too many people were playing cricket, or 
football, or tennis, or golf, but that multitudes who 
do not play stand round the newspaper announce- 
ments to get the results, or crowd into the arenas 
and grounds merely to watch the game. It is in 
the watching of the game and the betting on the 
results that the danger lies, not in the playing. The 
more people play the fewer will there be to watch, 
and as a rule one's own body, itself healthily satisfied 
will be a good governor to shut off steam in time. 

Last year I spoke to you about the meaning of 
university sport and about the part that the 
University should play in keeping up its tone and 
character. Let me refer briefly to this subject again. 
Here we play for the play itself not primarily to win 
the game. We play also in the University as re- 
membering that students come here first and fore- 
most to do their work in their classes, to secure an 
intellectual or professional education, and not to get 
the best chance in the country for football and 
hockey. A university is primarily a body of stu- 
dents. You come here to study. If you do not you 
are a nuisance to teachers and a burden upon the 
public. Therefore you are student-sports; men and 
women who find in sport a relaxation, a supple- 



mental pleasure, who enjoy an all-round life here 
because you can fill in your spare hours in playing 
with your fellows in this University and in the 
other Universities of this country who join with you 
in the same spirit. Your sport is not your pro- 
fession; it is your play which helps you to prepare 
yourselves better for your profession. Therefore the 
winning of the game is worth anything only when 
it is a sport. According to definition that is a 
pastime, some occupation so agreeable that it 
makes the time pass quickly arid is thus a diversion 
from strenuous or serious work or thought, becoming 
a recreation which refreshes the tired person and 
makes him as good as new. If that is so, while the 
winning of the game is very important, it is secon- 
dary. It is no good at all unless one strives accord- 
ing to the rules and the game is not won in reality 
if the rules are not observed during the play. I have 
lingered upon this at length because I believe that 
the playing of games is an important part of your 
university life, but also because there are such 
strong tendencies to pervert their uses into evils, 
and it is our duty in this place to exhibit to the 
country, which follows our doings very closely, what 
the true spirit of games should be. 

A great University like Toronto is one of the most 
healthful communities in this land none more so. 
Our students are drawn from the best homes in the 
country and from every class of society. This was 
shown clearly by the statistics which we published 
for presentation to the University Commission last 
year. It is a great, variegated, and variously com- 
pacted society in which young men and women come 
together with ideas supplied from the experience 
in the home of the farmer, the artisan, the business- 
man, the lawyer, doctor, clergyman, indeed almost 
every class the well-to-do, the rich, the merely 
comfortable, the poor all thrown together without 
distinction, each one taken on his or her merits 
but altogether a society, wholesome and earnest. 
Also, those who direct the life and thought of the 
University its teaching staff are earnest men and 
women with minds set upon those things the pursuit 
of which rrakes a healthful society. Moreover, the 
courses in the curricula of the different faculties 
must enlarge the mind and stimulate those who 
participate in them to high purposes. A university 
is then a healthy community. We believe that its 
atmosphere will brace you and that its influences 
will act as a beneficial tonic in you. 

This is realized by the advanced nations every- 
where. In Britain the universities are thronged 
to overflowing. Commissions of all kinds to report 
upon different phases of education have been 
appointed by the Government, and the publication 
of these reports calls forth much comment in the 
press. Literary, scientific, and professional educa- 
tion gets widespread attention. Men are eagerly 
asking one another what is to be done to improve 
standards. Moreover, so convinced are they that 
the welfare of the State depends upon the cultivation 
of the intelligence of the people, that beginning in 
the elementary schools a search is made for boys 
and girls of promise, who by scholarships or other- 
wise are given a chance of showing what is in them 
with the object of securing for the benefit of the 
people as a whole the trained skill and intelligence 
of those who may be best suited to take higher 
technical or farming training, professional educa- 
tion, scientific or literary discipline. It is recog- 
nized that education must be differentiated that 
it must be adapted to the ability, aptitude and aims 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



17 



of the individual. Indiscriminate education might 
be overdone. Selective education will give the 
state fewer misfits and a smaller residue of incom- 
petency. 

During some weeks of last summer a correspond- 
ence was carried on in the columns of The London 
Times on the question as to whether or not the 
young men and women of England are deteriorating. 
The controversy, for such it came to be, was started 
by a letter from an old Etonian who lamented the 
rude manners of the youth of to-day as compared 
with those of his contemporaries in school. Young 
men, he said, strut around with their hands in their 
pockets and keep them there when they are speaking 
to their elders; they puff their cigarettes in any 
company whatever, they wear any hat, or no hat 
at all, they come into a lady's parlour dressed in a 
rough and unbrushed tweed suit, and in general 
they set^at defiance the rules of what used to be 
good society. Such conduct, he held, is a sign of 
the independence and self-regarding attitude of the 
rising generation. Etonian made a lamentable 
plaint. His letter called forth many replies, some 
in support and some against his opinions. Those 
in opposition pointed to what these youths had 
done in the war; to the splendid showing they had 
made when put to the proof. They explained the 
free and easy attitude of the young man of to-day as 
being due to indifference to externals, a frame of 
mind created first when they had been brought face 
to face with the grim realities of war. To some 
extent it may be a revolt against the conventional 
and may be an exaggerated reaction by sincere 
minds against formal insincerities. This corre- 
spondence was symptomatic of what is going on in 
England. That there is a spirit of revolt is manifest 
in labour not only against capital, but against 
their leaders; in religion and morals against what 
is claimed to be formalism or immoral rigidity; in 



social affairs against what is merely proper. So 
employers are alarmed, religious leaders are dis- 
tressed, society is shocked. Everything is being 
challenged. Whither are we bound? Of course 
part of the alarm is due to these folk having for- 
gotten the terrible unheaval in which the world 
lived for over four years. How could such a cata- 
clysm have taken place without causing cracks and 
fissures in the system of ideas which hold society 
together? It was to be expected that there would 
be a change in levels and that permanent disloca- 
tions like geological faults might occur. Geologists 
tell us that the River St. Lawrence is due to a 
fault. Some tremendous shock once created the 
channel along which flows for hundreds of miles 
the mighty river which not only is a glory to 
Canada and makes her famous in the world for its 
beauty, but constitutes a superb waterway along 
which commerce may be brought into the heart of 
a great nation. 

The real point is this. Does this revolt, in so far 
as it exists, mean that our youth have thrown from 
them all moral sanctions and, having broken away 
from conventions that once hemmed them in, are 
to-day Ishmaelites wandering upon the face of the 
earth without landmarks or home? Are these 
aberrations, if you so call them, the result of lack 
of principle? The complaint of "Old Etonian" 
seemed to me to be trivial. He was one of those 
people for whom convention and an accepted order 
is the same as a divine law. Good form, i.e., the 
practices of a certain section of society established 
by years of precedent, has for such as he, almost 
the validity of a moral precept. Breach of such 
conventions is almost worse than that of funda- 
mental law. "Old Etonian", however, is not such 
a rare bird. Others of the same family and plumage 
have their habitat in Canada. 



Another Session Opens 



T 



1HE University has again thrown 
off the mantle of somnolence with 
which it shrouds itself during the 
summer months and is once more the 
centre of busy life. 

The passage of years has but little effect 
on the atmosphere of the University. In 
I these opening days of the 1921-2 session 
there is abroad the same spirit of restless- 
ness and carefree happiness which has 
always characterized the opening days. 

All is bustle, noise and activity around 
the different buildings. The sidewalks are 
filled, with a steady stream of students; 
sporadic groups are stationed here and 
there; the omnipresent note-book and 
fountain pen are already visible. The 
freshman is everywhere, on the thresh- 
olds, on the lawns, in the corridors, easily 
recognizable by his youth, hesitance and 
awkward attempts to appear familiar with 
his surroundings. 



From all accounts the University is going 
to be even more crowded this year than 
previously. The enrolment figures are not 
yet complete but they point to an increase 
in attendance at nearly all the Faculties. 
Medicine seems to be the most popular, for 
despite the fact that the number of first 
year students is being limited to 140 there 
are already 1,055 registered as compared 
with 1,108 last year. Probably the ex- 
tensive developments in the Faculty of 
Medicine which are being carried on as a 
result of the gift of the Rockefeller Founda- 
tion has something to do with the large 
enrolment. 

In the other Faculties the same tendency 
is reported. In Applied Science the regis- 
trations will probably be just the same as 
last year. At present there are some 700 
enrolled as compared with a total regis- 
tration of 806 for the year 1920-1. The 
figures are as yet incomplete as many of 



18 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



the students have not returned. At the 
Dental College and Forestry there promises 
to be a slight increase. There are 795 en- 
rolled in Dents of whom 100 are freshmen; 
and there are already 53 enrolled in 
Forestry as compared with 55 of last year. 
The ranks of the students in Arts have 
also been increase 1 . At Trinity College 
the number is about the same as last year. 
St. Michael's shows an increase of 25% in 
the first year and a total registration of 
225 as compared with 206 for 1920-1. 
Victoria and University College have 
registrations of 408 and 1,042, approxi- 
mately the same figures as last year. The 
first year in Arts is going to be even larger 
than in 1920-1, but the second year is 



relatively smaller, probably as a result of 
the large percentage of failures at the end 
of the first year. 

Present indications certainly point to a 
successful year. Already great interest 
seems to be taken in the various activities 
around College and the constant line-up 
at the Bursar's office evidences the keen 
desire to take immediate advantage of 
the opportunities afforded by Hart House. 
A few more weeks and the heterogeneous, 
unwieldy mob of freshmen will have been 
assimilated into the corporative life of the 
University, will have become part of the 
University itself. One more academic year 
will be fairly launched. 



President Falconer Attends University Congress 



CANADIAN universities are not the only 
ones that are facing very serious pro- 
blems to-day. Sir Robert Falconer, 
who attended the Congress of the Univer- 
sities of the British Empire last summer, 
reports that the British universities are 
facing the same conditions only in a more 
aggravated form as are the universities on 
this continent. The Congress occupied 
itself with the various problems and phases 
of university life that seem to be wide- 
spread , the financial question, heavy en- 
rolment, extension and extra-mural work, 
technological education, the position of the 
sciences, and international relations. 

The representatives at the conference 
visited first the Irish universities at Dublin 
and Belfast and then went over to London 
where nearly a week was spent inspecting 
the various educational institutions, hold- 
ing meetings, and reading papers. One of 
the evidences of the widespread interest 
taken in the Congress was the large attend- 
ance at the banquet given in London, where 
many notable figures in English political 
and literary life were present. At this 
dinner Mr Arthur Balfour presided, and 
the honour fell upon Sir Robert of respond- 
ing to the toast which he proposed. 

The conference spent several days at 
each of the Universities of Oxford and 
Cambridge and then went up to Scotland 
where some of the representatives visited 
Edinburgh and others went to Glasgow, 
Aberdeen, and Dundee. Some of the 



representatives went on to the other 
English universities which they had not 
previously visited. At each place some 
time was spent in studying the problems 
and achievements of the different univer- 
sities. At Cambridge a special address was 
given by Sir Ernest Rutherford on new 
developments in Science. During the four 
days in which the Congress was in session 
in Oxford, many papers were read dealing 
with the financial, research and extra-mural 
work of the university; in this series Sir 
Robert contributed a paper on "the 
Balance of Studies at the University". 
While he was attending the conference, 
Oxford University conferred on him the 
honorary degree of D.C.L. ; Trinity College, 
Dublin, honoured him with an LL.D.; 
and Edinburgh University, of which he is 
a graduate, bestowed on him the degree of 
Doctor of Divinity. 

Sir Robert remarked particularly on the 
widespread impetus that has been given 
to education by H. A. L. Fisher, the presi- 
dent of the Board of Education. Through- 
out the country great interest is shown in 
educational concerns. Students throng the 
universities for admission and the situation 
is becoming difficult on account of the lack 
of accommodation. A striking feature of 
the system in England, and one which 
Sir Robert emphasized as showing the 
democratic spirit that prevails, is the large 
number of bursaries and scholarships pro- 
vided by municipalities so that no boy of 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



19 



character and brains need be handicapped 
by lack of money in securing a good educa- 
tion. Another thing that particularly drew 
his attention was the very effective work 
done by the Public Health department in 
England. The local operations of this 
department are extremely advanced, and 
in view of the extensive increase in the 
activity of the Public Health Bureau in 
Ontario in the past few years an insight 
into its development was very interesting. 
The problem of nationalizing the univer- 
sities was one that was discussed very 
vehemently at the conference and was 
bitterly opposed by the majority of the 
English universities, which are supported 
chiefly by private bequests and local en- 



dowments. Sir Robert upheld the idea of 
national universities and cited the progress 
of Toronto as the Provincial University 
of Ontario. Despite their private funds 
and higher fees, the English universities 
are obliged to depend on the Government 
for support. Their financial problems have 
become more and more acute because of 
the heavy taxation, widespread unem- 
ployment, and the general period of strain 
through which Great Britain is passing. 
In spite of these drawbacks, the universities 
in England are adjusting themselves 
rapidly to new conditions and are making 
plans for extending their work in the 
future. 



New Director Takes Over At Hart House Theatre 



'' I 'HE last generation were educated in 
1 an atmosphere of Bach and Bee- 
thoven, and they knew and appre- 
ciated Bach and Beethoven. Our age is 
an age of jazz and the people like nothing 
but jazz". Such is the dictum of Bertram 
Forsyth, the new director of the little 
theatre at Hart House, and in a negative 
fashion he outlines his own future policy in 
the words " I don't believe in playing down 
to the public". 

The aim of the community theatre is to 
counteract the degrading effect of the 
melodramatic and jazzy tendencies of the 
modern stage by introducing to the public 
plays that have interest, charm, and 
appeal, and above all a certain literary 
value. It educates the people to know and 
appreciate "the best that is known and 
thought in the world". Mr Forsyth con- 
ceives of the theatre at Hart House as 
essentially a community theatre. The 
ideal theatre building, of course, is a large 
auditorium with low-priced seats. But 
Hart House with its marvellous mechanical 
equipment, about which the new Director 
is very enthusiastic, offers facilities for the 
more finished production of plays rarely 
found in the regular community theatre. 

The programme of the Players' Club for 
the coming year further portrays Mr 
Forsyth 's ideas. He is a firm believer in 
the intelligence of the average individual 
to value a play for the good that is in it, 
and not to regard it merely as a prop for 



spectacular effects, vivid scenic arrange- 
ments, gorgeous costumes, and the other 
arts of mechanical stage-craft. The most 
important thing for Mr Forsyth is the 
play; secondary only to that is the indi- 
vidual interpretation of the actor. Good 
characterization and well-finished voice 
production are the main necessities for a 
play. All else is subsidiary. One feels 
that he relies on none of the "purple 
passages " of stage-craft to obtain a mastery 
over his audience, but trusts to the even, 
sustained quality of the whole production. 
The programme for the year is as follows: 
NOVEMBER 1 

A Night at an Inn. . Dunsany 

Pantaloon Barrie 

White Magic Algernon Blackwood 

and Bertram Forsyth 

This triple bill promises to afford a 
delightful evening's entertainment. The 
Dunsay play created a sensation when it 
was first produced in New York, and 
although basically not unlike a "shilling- 
shocker", it has an imaginative horror that 
grips the audience. Pantaloon is a play of 
Barrie's that has never yet been produced, 
but one can expect it to be charming, like 
Barrie's other plays. If White Magic is 
anything like Algernon BlackwoocP s stories 
it will be a fairy-like, fascinating thing. Mr 
Blackwood himself is not an unfamiliar 
figure in Canada. He lived here himself 
some thirty years ago, when he farmed, 
worked in the Rainy River goldfields, ran 



20 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



a hotel, and later was connected with the 
New York Sun and the New York Timers. 
DECEMBER 6 

Candida. . G. B. Shaw 

We have come to expect a Shaw pro- 
duction each year, and Candida is so well 
known that it needs no introduction, save 
its own merits, to a Toronto audience. 
DECEMBER 22 

Chester Mysteries 

This appealing Christmas performance 
which has so delighted Toronto audiences 
the last two years, has been selected again 
for this season. 




SETTING FOR THE CHESTER MYSTERIES. 
Designed by J. E. H. MacDonald 



JANUARY 17 

Magic G. K. Chesterton 

"A mad play, but with great charm", is 
how Mr Forsyth characterized Magic the 
only play that Chesterton has ever written. 
He also recalled that it was produced the 
same season as Shaw's Fanny's First Play 
and promptly earned from Shaw the title 
"Fatty's First Play". 
FEBRUARY 21 

Playbills . . arranged by Bertram Forsyth 
This is described as a " Georgian Revue ". 
It was produced in London in 1914 and 
consists of a revue of episodes as they 
might have been performed in 1800. 
MARCH 21 

Rosmersholm Isben 

The play of Ibsen is not by any means 
his masterpiece but is one that seems 



always chosen to i>3 produced on the 
English stage. It is, in fact, rather weird, 
with its central character a modern Lady 
Macbeth, but it is nevertheless a gripping 
play from its gloomy tragic force. 
APRIL 18 

,God of Gods Carroll Aikins 

This is a Canadian play by a Western 
author, which has been produced in 
Birmingham. Mr Forsyth has made him- 
self the sponsor of Canadian playwrights 
and it is to be hoped his spirit will do much 
to encourage the literary activities of our 
country. 

JUNE 8 

The Tempest .... Shakespeare 
The season closes as usual 
with a Shakespearian play in 
Convocation week. The 
Tempest is a favourite of the 
new Director's and is a play 
that is particularly delight- 
ful when well-produced. 

The year at Hart House, 
according to this pro- 
gramme, promises to be 
profitable as well as enter- 
taining. No mention has 
been made as yet of Mr 
Forsyth's qualifications for 
his new office; but they are 
undisputed. For years he 
has followed the triple 
metier of actor, producer, and 
playwright, but he had just decided to 
forsake the more active life of the stage 
and to devote his time wholly to writing 
when this opportunity came his way. If 
he has accepted without qualms it is be- 
cause he sees its tremendous possibilities 
and realizes so well the achievements that 
lie before it in the future. "It may 
develop into anything", he said enthusi- 
astically. "It may even become a school 
of Dramatic Art". He himself wants to 
branch out into the operatic field and try 
a little Mozart. The difficulties that beset 
the path of the producer, he knows, none 
better, but Mr Forsyth is possessed of an 
incurable optimism and one may presage 
that his determination plus his own ex- 
tremely likeable personality may smooth 
away some of the obstacles and make the 
season at Hart House a very successful one. 



Sir William Mulock and University Federation 



HONOUR to whom honour is due. At 
the recent reunion dinner in Great 
Hall, Hart House, I was delighted 
to have an opportunity of meeting in that 
splendid university dining hall so large a 
number of university graduates, many of 
them distinguished men in this country, 
and not a few equally distinguished and 
more highly honoured beyond our borders ; 
and, while enjoying the dinner and turning 
over in my mind some of the events and 
incidents in the history of the 
University during the last two 
or three decades, I felt that I 
should not leave the Hall with- 
out saying a word regarding cer- 
tain special and very important 
services rendered to the Univer- 
sity by one of her distinguished 
graduates one to whom great 
credit is due. I mean Sir 
William Mulock; but the singing 
of college songs, the constant 
conversation with occasional 
bursts of laughter of college 
friends and chums of bygone 
days, and the august presence of 
those at the head table well, I 
presume I should not say fright- 
ened me, but prevented me 
from attempting to make even a 
single observation. Hence this 
note. 

When the question of Univer- 
sity Federation was before the 
Provincial University, the Gov- 
ernment, and the non-provincial 
Universities of Ontario, we 
found the President of the Pro- 
vincial University sympathetic 
and willing to do what he could, 
and the Government (of which 
Sir John Gibson was a member) 
much interested and always 
ready to remove difficulties and 
deal generously with the out- 
lying institutions; but the chief 
factor in the negotiations was Sir William 
Mulock, Vice-Chancellor of the Provincial 
University at the time in question. 

Sir William seemed to have come to the 
conclusion that it would be a good thing to 
buttress and thereby strengthen the Pro- 
vincial University, if at all possible, some- 
what after the manner of Oxford Univer- 
sity, with its twenty-one colleges. Those 



of us who fought long and persistently for 
University Federation know something of 
what the University and the Province owe 
to Sir William Mulock. I knew every step 
in the negotiations; and I have no hesita- 
tion in saying that but for Sir William's 
attitude and action, his statesmanlike 
breadth of view, his wise and sympathetic 
counsel, his never-failing tact, his long- 
continued patience and perseverance, but 
for these important factors operating 




SIR WILLIAM MULOCK, '63 

throughout the negotiations there would 
have been no University Federation then 
or since; and I may add that, if it l^d not 
been for Sir William's strong personal 
influence with the late lamented Father 
Teefy and some other prominent members 
in the governing body of St. Michael's 
College, St. Michael's would not, I think, 
have been in Federation to-day. 



21 



22 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



No doubt the President of the University 
and the heads of the four colleges directly 
interested have found difficulties in carry- 
ing out the provisions of the Federation 
Act; but patience and sane judgment have 
overcome these difficulties, and I think we 
are now warranted in speaking of Federa- 
tion as a great success, a real benefit to 
the University and to the institutions 
which decided to avail themselves of the 
generous provisions set out in the Federa- 
tion Pact. 

In the recent appeal to the Government 
and members of the Legislature, so well 
and ably made by our President, Sir 
Robert Falconer, it was a matter of some 
importance to have strong support instead 
of opposition from Victoria College, Trinity 



College, St. Michael's College, and the 
special constituencies which these Colleges 
represent; and it may not be amiss to 
mention Hart House, the splendid Massey- 
Treble building and equipment for house- 
hold science, and the half-million gift of 
Sir John Eaton to the Medical Department 
of the University, with other splendid 
benefactions of recent date, as among the 
fruits of Federation. 

So I would say palmam qui meruit feral, 
and would join many friends in conveying 
to Sir William a sincere expression of 
gratitude for his eminent and distinguished 
services to the cause of education in the 
banner Province of the Dominion. 

JAMES MILLS. 
Ottawa, June 24, 1921 



Herbert Symonds An Appreciation 



DOCTOR SYMONDS, as we all loved to 
call him, was known throughout 
Canada, but we in Montreal knew 
him best and perhaps appreciated him 
most. He had been so long with us and 
meant so much to our common life that 




THE LATE HERBERT SYMONDS, 
B.A. (T.) '86. M.A. '87 



his passing has left a more than common 
gap. His peculiar work was in the pulpit 
and parish of Christ Church Cathedral; 
but he was so much more than a clergyman 
that we had come to think of him more as 
a citizen, even if we did recognize in him 
the finest type of churchman. For fifteen 
years he was a leader in every humanizing 
and liberalizing movement in our midst. 
One wonders if in that time there was a 
solitary good cause in our city to which he 
did not put his hand with a right good will 
and give it a lift. How he found time to 
help so many educational and charitable 
organizations and always be willing to take 
on more, was a wonder to all his friends. 
Indeed the wonder is that he was able to 
keep it up so long. When he went from us 
it was felt in every quarter that the better 
life of our city had lost one of its wisest 
and best friends as well as one of its finest 
ornaments. By common consent he was 
the most respected and best loved citizen 
of our English-speaking community. 

One could not help asking in the pre- 
sence of the many thousands who came 
that beautiful May day to pay their 
respects to his memory and they were all 
classes, rich folk and poor folk, Jews and 
Gentiles, believers and unbelievers what 
it was that gave Doctor Symonds such a 
peculiar place in our common life. Perhaps 
it was his simple and unselfish devotion to 
the common good. He seemed to have no 
other ambition than to serve the larger life 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



23 



to which he belonged. Perhaps it was his 
serenity of temper. How often he fell 
foul of the sectaries on the one hand and 
the vested interests of public evil on the 
other; but no one ever saw him out of 
temper or heard an impatient word from 
his lips. Perhaps it was that authentic 
mark of the true university man which 
he had as few have the catholic spirit. 
How he pleaded for unity among the vari- 
ous Christian communions and for unity 



among the various sections of our citizen- 
ship. He reminded one of the saying of 
Professor Blackie that he would give his 
right hand to the Protestants, his left hand 
to the Catholics, his heart to both but his 
head he would keep to himself; only 
Doctor Symonds did not keep his head to 
himself. But after all has been said he was 
best described as a Christian gentleman 
a worthy son of the University and the 
Church. R. W. DICKIE. 



Victoria Alumni Association to be Revived 



FOR some time there has been a very 
pronounced feeling among the men 
graduates of Victoria College that 
something should be done to revive the 
Victoria College Alumni Association which 
became quiescent during the war. Definite 
steps to this end have now been taken. On 
September 23, a group of some twenty 
class secretaries and representatives met 
and appointed an interim committee to 
take charge of a reunion banquet to be 
held on October 13 in Burwash Hall. 
Former students as well as graduates are 
invited. 

A letter has been sent to all the men 
graduates of the College announcing the 
plans of the interim committee and calling 
for co-operation. At the dinner it is 
planned to form an Alumni Association 
which will keep the alumni in touch with 
Victoria activities and work for the 
mutual benefit of the College and its 
graduates. The committee thus expresses 
its purpose: "If there is any campaign for 
further financial assistance we want to take 
our part in the organization; we want to 
see that we are properly represented upon 
the Senate of Victoria College and any 
Committees that are appointed. We feel 
that Victoria College cannot afford to get 
out of touch with its graduates and former 
students and we feel just as much that 
we cannot must not get out of touch 
with old Vic." It adds: "Further aims 
and aspirations will be discussed at the 
October 13 jamboree". 

Those who are resident in Toronto or the 
vicinity are asked to attend the banquet, 



and those who are too far removed for this 
are asked to show their support by sending 
messages and suggestions. 

To date, the movement has been confined 
to men of more recent years. This does 
not mean, however, that the older gradu- 
ates are not to be asked to have a part in 
the organization ; it simply means that the 
younger men have taken upon themselves 
the work of organizing the first meeting. 

The members of the Interim Organiza- 
tion Committee are as follows: C. E. Locke 
Chairman, C. B. Sissons, J. V. McKenzie, 
E. J. Pratt, W. T. Brown, J. L. Rutledge, 
W. J. Little Secretary. Class Representa- 
tives: 1900, Manson Doyle; 1901, E. A. 
McCullough; 1902, C. E. Auger; 1903, R. G. 
Dingman; 1904, S. W. Eakins; 1905, 
C. M. Hincks; 1906, C. D. Henderson; 
1907, E. J. Moore; 1908, W. W. Davidson; 
1909, J. E. Lovering; 1910, L. M. Green; 
1911, H. B. Van Wyck; 1912, H. W. 
Manning; 1913, H. C. Jeffries; 1914, R. P. 
Stouffer; 1915, R. H. Rickard; 1916, C. L. 
White; 1917, D. O. Arnold; 1918, R. Green- 
away; 1919, W. H. Bouck; 1920, L. G. 
Smith; 1921, J. G. H. Linton. Provincial 
Secretaries: New Brunswick and Nova 
Scotia, R. B. Liddy, Mount Allison 
University, Sackville, N.B.; Quebec, W. C. 
Graham, 756 University St., Montreal, 
Que.; Manitoba, W. A. Deacon, 9flO Bank 
of Hamilton Chambers, Winnipeg, Man.; 
Saskatchewan, M. A. Miller, Weyburn, 
Sask ; Alberta, J. E. Brownlee, Parliament 
Bldgs., Edmonton, Alta. ; British Columbia, 
Rev. J. G. Davidson, Publicity Commis- 
sioner, Vancouver, B.C. 



Annual Engineering Reunion, November 4, 5 



THE Third Annual Reunion of the 
Engineering alumni will be celebrated 
in true " School" spirit, Friday and 
Saturday, November 4 and 5, at the Uni- 
versity, where so many of the graduates' 
lasting friendships have been made. 

The call has gone out in the form of a 
partial calendar which terminates with the 
above dates. Up to that time there will 
be days of preparation and after that date 
well nothing matters until the next 
reunion. Capable committees are working 




C. E. MACDONALD 

The energetic secretary of the Engineering Alumni 
Association. "Chuck" has recently resigned his 
position as sales manager of the International 
Nickle Co. to handle the Canadian business of the 
Electrical Alloy Company. His address is Bank 
of Hamilton Blkg., Toronto 



on each item of the programme and each 
committee is trying to make its particular 
part the most successful feature of the 
reunion. 

November 4 might almost be called 
"Ladies Day". Starting at 4 p.m. there 
is to be an official opening of the new 
building which is to house the Electrical 



and Applied Mechanics Departments. It 
is expected that invitations will be sent to 
Mr and Mrs Toike Oike. Perhaps in the 
past the graduates have been too reticent 
about celebrating the opening of new 
buildings, which might explain in part why 
the opportunity so seldom happens. Let 
us, therefore, show our appreciation this 
time and see if it has any better result. 

The dinner dance follows at 7 p.m. in 
the Pompeian Room, of the King Edward 
Hotel Romanelli's orchestra. In previous 
years the alumni dance has been spoken of 
as one of the most enjoyable functions of 
the reunion. Those who can't dance 
should learn and those who know how 
should not miss the good time which the 
committee has arranged. 

Saturday morning is to be given over to 
the business of the Association. Many 
items of interest and importance are to be 
discussed. One of the most important of 
these discussions will relate to the attitude 
the Association will take towards the pro- 
posed Alumni Federation of the University 
of Toronto. Elections also are essential 
to the democratic control of the Associa- 
tion. 

Nearly all of the years are arranging to 
hold class luncheons at noon. All plans 
as to the place and menu are in the hands 
of the class executive. 

At 3 o'clock Queens vs Varsity is an 
attraction which will be of interest to the 
alumni. Last year we had the double 
misfortune of having inclement weather 
and open stand accommodation. The 
committee has arranged this year for 
accommodation in the covered stand and 
on the "Theory of Probability" we should 
get fair weather. 

After the game there will be a reception 
and tea where Mr and Mrs Toike Oike, or 
Mr Toike Oike and Mrs Toike Oike to be, 
will have the chance of getting acquainted 
with the other members of the large family. 

The banquet at Hart House at 7.30 p.m. 
is the focusing point of the reunion. That 
there will be a large crowd present is 
certain. That we will have accommodation 
for all who want to come is doubtful. Two 
men of outstanding international reputa- 
tion are being secured as speakers, and a 
suitable and appropriate entertainment will 
be given. 

R. J. MARSHALL. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



25 



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SCHOOLMAN'S CALENDAR 



U. C. Alumni to Hold Organization Reunion on Oct. 28 



ON Thursday, September 22, thirty-five 
graduates of Universjty College, 
chiefly presidents and secretaries of 
classes, met for dinner in Hart House, and 
launched a movement to form an alumni 
organization of the College. The meeting 
was presided over by Harry Gooderham, 
secretary of the 1900 Class. 

Canon Cody was the first speaker. He 
outlined the history of Univers ty College, 
telling of how from being the sole teaching 
body of the University of Toronto, the 
College had, through the developments 
following Federation, become simply one 
of a number of Arts Colleges. Not only 
this but the College had lost its habitation. 
What was historically University College 
had now become the Main Building, with 
a very large proportion of its space taken 
up by administration offices. College 
classes were being relegated to abandoned 
kitchens and sculleries, and to rooms in 
medical, science, and other buildings. It 
was small wonder, he declared, that the 
students of University College had lost 
their sense of solidarity. 

This condition, he said, was affecting ad- 
versely, the whole University. University 
College being the state's chief effort in 
Arts education, the success of the entire 
Federation system depended on its stan- 
dard. Not only for the good of University 
College, but also for the well being of the 
whole University, the College must be 
restored to its original building. 

Dr Cody also laid emphasis on the need 
of residences for University College. The 
friendships and associations resulting from 
residence life, he declared, were among the 
finest benefits of unive sity education. 
The other Arts Colleges all had dormitories 
in which to house their students, and he 
hoped that in the very near future Univer- 
sity College might have suitable residence 
buildings for both men and women 
students. 

Referring to the need of an organization 
of University College graduates to have 
at heart the interests of the College, Dr 
Cody said that he believed the best type 
of cosmopolitanism was impossible without 
strong local patriotism. College loyalty 
would increase University loyalty. He felt 
confident that the graduates of University 
College would rally to their College at this 



time when their interest and active assist- 
ance were so much needed. 

Angus MacMurchy, K.C., spoke next, 
likening University College to the pelican, 
fabled to nourish its young with its own 
blood. University College, the mother of 
all, had sacrificed herself for the benefit of 
other parts of the University. 

He spoke of the work of the University 
Alumni Association and the necessity of 
becoming incorporated, which arose 
through the Memorial Fund project. While 
this incorporation was being effected it had 
been deemed advisable to re-organize the 
Association to a certain extent with a view 
to securing the organic co-operation of 
alumni organizations existing in the 
Colleges and Faculties. The general 
scheme was that each College and Faculty 
should have an association to be concerned 
directly with the affairs of the various units 
of the University, and that these should be 
united in a Federation. 

In closing he made an appeal for the dis- 
interested service of the graduates. " Noth- 
ing prospers", he declared, "without 
sacrifice". 

Following brief addresses, supporting th e 
idea of a University College Alumni Associ" 
ation, by Daniel O'Connell, '90, Magis- 
trate J. Edmund Jones, '88, W. A. Lam- 
port, '88, and D. B. Gillies, '03, a general 
discussion took place. It was decided that 
a general meeting should be held as soon 
as possible and a definite organization 
effected. The consensus of opinion was 
that the best method of securing a good 
attendance would be to secure the co- 
operation of the class secretaries. A com- 
mittee was then appointed to arrange for 
such a meeting, to draft a constitution, end 
to suggest officers for the organization. 

The members of the committee are: 
Daniel O'Connell, '90 ; A. F. Barr, '96 ; H. F. 
Gooderham, '00; Professor E. F. Burton, 
'01; Rev. J. B. Paulin, '04; W. S. Wallace, 
'06 ; Dr Frank Hassard, ' 10 ; Alex. Marshall, 
'12; R. G. McClelland, '14; W. J. Mc- 
Kenna, '16; C. C. Downey, '19; G. D. 
Little, '21. 

The meeting will take the form of a 
dinner and smoker in Hart House on the 
evening preceeding the Varsity-McGill 
game Friday, October 28. 



26 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



27 



U. C MEN! 

BE LOYAL 

TO THE 

OLD 
COLLEGE 



Dinner, Smoker 
and Meeting 

to organize a 

U. C. Alumni 

Association 

HART HOUSE 

Friday, Oct. 28th 

7 p.m. 




Book Reviews 



The Revd. John Stuart, D.D., U.E.L., of Kingston, 
U.C. and his family, pp. 64, and The Parish Register 
of Kingston, Upper Canada, 1785-1811, pp. 207, by 
A. H. Young of Trinity College, Toronto. (The 
Whig Press, Kingston, 1921.) 

The two books from the pen of Professor A. H. 
Young ((U. '87) which have just appeared will be 
received with the greatest satisfaction by all those 
i nterested in the history of the Province of Ontario. 
As we are informed by the author, the books are 
"a by-product, so to speak, of studies for the Life 
of Bishop Strachan, which is presently to appear". 
The chief character of the books is "the Rev John 
Stuart, the first missionary of the Church of England 
in this Province", who was Rector of Kingston from 
1788 to 1811,- and since Dr Stuart was a remarkable 
man and Kingston 'was an important place, the 
persons we meet are interesting individuals. Mili- 
tary men, Naval officers, judges, members of the 
Legislature, doctors, merchants, etc., all pass before 



us, and by the author's sympathetic treatment they 
seem to live again. The notes contain a most re- 
markable collection of information regarding the 
numerous descendants of Dr Stuart. And it was no 
ordinary family. In it are to be found the names of 
some of the most distinguished citizens of Ontario 
and of other Provinces of Canada. The smaller 
volume contains also a sermon by Dr Stuart 
preached on April 1, 1793, and another by Dr John 
Strachan, on August 25, 1811, at Kingston, on the 
death of Dr Stuart. 

In the larger volume there is an extremely well- 
made index of all the proper names in the book, 
which will be consulted with profit by all those' 
interested in Canadian history. The quality of the 
work in these two volumes is so high that we are 
impatient to enjoy the good things which we shall 
find in the Life of John Strachan, now promised us 
by Professor Young. 



With the Alumni 



Ube 
of Toronto 

Published by the University of Toronto Alumni 

Association 
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE $3.00 PER ANNUM 

including Membership dues of the Alumni Association. 

Publication Committee: 
D. B. GILLIES, Chairman 
GEORGE H. LOCKE J. V. MCKENZIE 

W. J. DUNLOP F. P. MEGAN 

W. A. CRAICK R. J. MARSHALL 

DR ALEX. MACKENZIE W. C. MCNAUGHT * 
W. A. KIRKWOOD 

Editor and Business Manager 
W. N. MACQUEEN 

Montreal Toike Oikes Dine 

On June 24 the Toike Oikes of Montreal gave a 
dinner in honour of the four Engineering graduates 
on whom the University has conferred the honorary 
degree of Doctor of Science, namely, T. Kennard 
Thomson, George H. Duggan, R. A. Ross, and J. M. 
R. Fairbairn. 

The retiring President, J. M. Robertson occupied 
the Chair. Harold S. Rolph took charge after his 
appointment as president, and H. W. Fairlie as 
secretary-treasurer of the Association. W. J. Francis 
was then called upon to act as toast-master. 

The toast of "It" was proposed by Arthur Sur- 
veyor, one of the Governors of the University of 
Montreal, who referred to the bonne entente that 
existed between the two Universities and the honours 
conferred on Sir George Garneau and Premier 
Taschereau recently. The Rev Dr Dickie, replying, 
said the honours conferred were an evidence of the 
growing appreciation of the life of Quebec province 
by Varsity. In recent years they had come to 
realize the solidity of the social structure of the 
people of Quebec which was somewhat envied by 
other provinces. Walter J. Francis proposed 
the 



'Them", paying tribute to the engineering skill of 



the four Doctors of Science and to the honour done 
the profession by the University of Toronto in 
conferring the degrees. Mr Francis briefly reviewed 
the history of each of the guests from the time they 
graduated from the School of Practical Science, and 
each one made a brief speech in reply, after having 
been introduced by humorous slides on the screen. 
Professor C. McKergow, of McGill, proposed 
"Us", and spoke of the esteem in which McGill 
graduates held the three engineers in Montreal 
who had been honoured by Varsity. President 
Rolph briefly replied and the remainder of the even- 
ing was_ pleasantly passed in singing Varsity songs, 
concluding with Auld Lang Syne and the National 
Anthem. 

The Arts Reunions 

During the past few years Hart House has been 
the scene of many splendid graduate re-unions, but 
none finer or more enjoyable than the Arts' gather- 
ing held on the evening of June 10. The classes 
represented ranged from 1863 to 1916 and included 
University College classes of 1876, 1881, 1886, 1888 
1895, 1896, 1900, 1901, 1906, 1916, and Victoria 
College classes of 1881, 1896, 1901, 1906, 1911, and 
1916. At dinner the Great Hall was filled to 
capacity and the Faculty Union Dining-room used 
for the overflow. Following dinner brief addresses 
were made by Sir John Gibson, Sir William Mulock, 
Sir Robert Falconer and Mr Justice Masten, after 
which the classes adjourned to various rooms in 
Hart House for class meetings. 

The 1863 Class of University College held the 
place of honour at the head table in the centre of 
which was a large floral "1863". Sir John Gibson 
and Sir William Mulock were hosts of those in this 
group which included: Sir Robert Falconer, Sir 
William Meredith, Sir Edmund Walker, Sir A. B. 
Aylesworth, Sir Walter Cassels, Rev George Grant, 
Messrs E,dgar Frisby, H. B. Spotton, H. H. Langton, 
John J. Wilson, J. A. Farewell, John A. Paterson, 
William Davidson, James H. Coyne, James Brebner, 
John R. Wightman, W. H. Ballard, John Henderson, 



28 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



29 



W. Houston, G. H. Levy, R. S. Waldie; Professors 
W. J. Alexander, J. C. McClennan, W. H. van der 
Smissen, J. C. Fields, John Squair, J. P. McMurrich, 
Alfred Baker, D. R. Keys; Mr Justice Duff, Mr 
Justice Sutherland, Mr Justice Kelly, Mr Justice 
Idington, Judge Snider, Hon. Featherstone Osier, 
Dr James Mills, Dr Herbert E. Bruce, Rev Canon 
Cody, Rev John A. Jewell, Rev John McColl, and 
Col. A. Fraser. 

Mr Justice Masten presided over a table of senior 
Victoria College graduates ranging from 1881 
backward. Sir Clifford Sifton, Messrs L. W. Hill, 
G. G. Mills, and T. E. Williams were among those 
at this table. 

Next in order of seniority came the 1876 U.C. 
Class which had been called together by the Rev 
John Ross. With Mr Ross were: Rev R. H. 
Abraham, 67 Winchester St., Toronto, who spent 
most of his life in the ministry of the Presbyterian 
Church and is now retired from active service; P. 
H. Bryce, 612 Hope Chambers, Ottawa, a medical 
specialist who is still pursuing his profession; and 
Alfred K. Blackader, Britannia Bay, R.R. 1, an 
actuary in the Federal Service, now retired. Mr 
Ross is a retired Presbyterian minister. 

University College Class of 1881 

More than half of our class which graduated 
forty years ago, attended the reunion. Following 
the dinner we adjourned to the Faculty Union 
sitting room and spent a very enjoyable evening 
renewing acquaintances and recalling half-for- 
gotten incidents of our university days. Those 
present were*: Messrs A. G. Campbell, John 
Douglas, W. D. Gwynne, M. Hutton, A. G. F. 
Lawrence, I. W. Levan, J. A. McAndrew, Joseph 
Nason, Frank Nelson, S. F. Passmore; Doctors G. 
H. Carveth, George R. Cruickshanks, Levi Lapp, 
J. M. MacCallum, Sam Stewart; Rev P. K. Dayfoot, 
Rev W. G. Hanna, Rev A. Henderson, Rev Walter 
Laidlaw, and Professor W. S. Milner. J.A. M. 



*A complete list of the 1881 U.C. Class, their 
addresses and occupations, will be found in the 
Notes by Classes section. 

University College Class of 1896 

Thirty-four members of the Class of '96 cele- 
brated the twenty-fifth anniversary of graduation 
when they dined together in the Great Hall of Hart 
House on the evening of Commencement Day. As 
many more had written expressing their regrets at 
their inability to join in the festivities. The Right 
Honourable Arthur Meighen, who was then on his 
way to England to the Imperial Conference, did not 
forget his classmates and sent a wireless from the 
steamer in mid ocean. J. S. McLean, who, too, on 
his way to England on the same vessel, also sent 
his greetings by wireless. 

Those who were present were: Mrs N. W. Rowell, 
Toronto; Mrs F. G. Illar, Brantford; Miss E. R. 
Laird, South Hadley, Mass.; Miss F. Neelands, 
Toronto; Rev R. G. Scott, Wakaw, Sask.; Messrs 
W. B. Wyndham, Oakville; F. J. Wyndham, 
Waterloo; Donald McFadyen, Lincoln, Neb.; Arch. 
McVicar, Grimsby; R. H. Coats, Ottawa; W. E. N. 
Sinclair, Oshawa; John McLeish, Ottawa; F.' S. 
Wrinch, Visalia, Cal., and H. W. Gundy, Detroit; 
from Toronto were: Rev. A. P. C. Addison, Messrs 



R. W. Allin, Percy Robinson, J. D. Falconbridge, 
John Jennings, A. R. Clute, J. M. Foster, W. J. 
Lander, W. C. Laidlaw, George S. Henry, N. Sin- 
clair, John A. Rowland, W. A. P. Wood, M. W. 
Wallace, F. W. C. McCutcheon, W. R. Carr, W. 
Nackman, J. F. VanEvery, A. F. Barr, and Dr A. J. 
MacKenzie. 

After dinner the members gathered in the library 
and spent the evening recalling incidents of their 
college days and exchanging information regarding 
some of the absent members. There was a unani- 
mous desire to have a re-union every year on the 
evening of Commencement. 

The officers elected were: Chairman, A. F. Barr, 
43 Admiral Rd., Toronto; Secretary, John A. Row- 
land, 370 Walmer Rd., Toronto; Treasurer, John 
Jennings, 169 LowtherAve., Toronto. A. F. B. 




J. M. ROBERTSON 
President of the Montreal Branch 



Victoria College Class of 1910 

The Victoria College '01 reunion was a very suc- 
cessful one. There were thirteen present. The first 
part of the evening was spent with the '01 U.C. 
Class, and following this the Class adjourned to 
another room and heard messages from absent 
members and accounts of what the class members 
present were doing. Later in the evening, the Class 
went in a body to Annssley Hall to the reception to 
graduates. During the summer, Dr and Mrs E. A. 
McCulloch sent a newsy account of the reunion 
with an admirably compiled history of the Class 
to all the members. 



30 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



Montreal Plans Dinner 

The Montreal alumni are planning big things for 
the week end, October 14 and 15. On the evening 
of the 14th the annual meeting and dinner will be 
held in the Windsor Hotel. It is expected that Sir 
Robert Falconer will be the principal speaker and 
that there will be two or three other guests of 
prominence in university affairs. It is anticipated 
that a number of the Varsity men from outside 
points will be on hand as the Varsity- McGill football 
game is to be played the following day. 

The football game on Saturday afternoon, October 
15, is to be one of the feature events of McGill's big 
Centennial Reunion. Before the game the Montreal 
Alumni Branch will organize a demonstration in 
which a parade and decorative features will play 
an important part. The Athletic Directorate of 
the University is co-operating and assisting. A 
special section of 700 of the best seats in the Molson 
Stadium have been set aside for Varsity supporters. 
Graduates from points outside of Montreal who 
wish to attend either the banquet or the football 
game, should notify Mr Roy Campbell, 355 Beaver 
Hall Square, Montreal. 



W. H. Henderson succumbs to long illness 

The late W. H. Henderson, B.A. (U.C.) '06 died 
at Rockton on Saturday, September J7. He had 
been ailing for some time, having been obliged to 
resign from the secretaryship of the Halifax 
Y.M.C.A. nearly a year ago. Mr Henderson was 
for some years engaged in Y.M.C.A. work in 
Montreal, first as director of educational work and 
later as general secretary of the Central Branch. 
His pleasing personality and his genius for friend- 
ship endeared him to a very wide circle of friends. 



Dr Gallic receives important 
appointment 

Dr W. E. Gallic, '03, has been appointed head of 
the Surgical department at the Hospital for Sick 
Children, Toronto. Dr Gallic is well equipped for 
his new post having had an extensive experience 
in hospital Surgery. From 1903 until 1906 he served 
as house surgeon in hospitals in Toronto and New 
York. In 1906 he was appointed to the Surgical 
staff of the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto 
and shortly after to the staff of the Toronto General 
Hospital. From 1915 until 1917 he was in charge of 
Surgery at the Davisville Military Hospital and 
during the following two years served overseas in the 
Grenville Canadian Special Hospital. 

Since 1919 Dr Gallie has been associate surgeon 
with Dr C. L. Starr at the Hospital for Sick Chil- 
dren. 

Deaths 

HILL In Toronto, August 22, Charles Arundel 

Hill, B.A. (U.C.) '67, a veteran of Ridgeway, and 

for thirty years rector of Trinity Church, St. 

Thomas, and later archdeacon of Elgin. 
FOTHERINGHAM At Orlando, California, the 

Rev. Thomas Francis Fotheringham, B.A. (U.C.) 

71. 
HAMILTON On July 4, Jennie Smith, wife of the 

Rev. Alexander Morton Hamilton, *B.A. (U.C.) 

73. 



CLUTE On August 31, at his residence 19 Walmer 
Road, Toronto, Roger Conger Clute, LL.B. 73, 
Justice of the Supreme Court. 
GRANGE At his home in Toronto, Edward 
Alexander Grange, V.S., M.Sc., former principal 
of Ontario Veterinary College. 
BENTLEY At Brougham, on August 15 

Lafayette Bentley, M.B. '80, M.D., C.M. '81. 
ALLAN After an illness of two years, James 
Alexander Allan, LL.B. '85, one of Regina's best 
known citizens. 
BRAY In June, William John Bray, M.D., C.M. 

'94, in the General Hospital, Toronto. 
ROSS At Fergus, on September 5, James Stewart 

Ross, B.A. (Vic.) 75, D.D. '94. 
WEEKS As the result of an operation at Toledo, 

Ohio, John Pearson Weeks, B.A. (Vic.) '96. 
STRATTON On August 10, at Toronto, William 

Aikens Stratton, B.A. (U.C.) '99. 
FITZGERALD At London, July 13, William 
George Fitzgerald, B.A. '00, formerly of Toronto. 
ROBERTSON At his late residence in Peter- 
borough on July 30, Alexander James Robertson, 
D.D.S. '02. 
DUNCAN At Minot, North Dakota, in August, 

John Alexander Duncan, M.B. '04. 
REA At the Misericordia Hospital, Edmonton, 
Alta., on March 14, 1920, Mrs William Rea (Alice 
Blanche W 7 ooster). Mrs Rea was in the Mathe- 
matics and Physics Course and graduated with 
the class of 1905. 

MUNN At the Wellesley Hospital, of typhoid 
fever, Frederick James Munn, B.A. (U.C.) '03, 
M.B. '06, of Toronto. 

YOUNG On August 9, Ernest Herbert Young, 
M.B. '07, assistant superintendent of the Hospital 
for the Insane at Windsor. He had been formerly 
connected with the Cobourg Asylum and had 
served overseas with the Western Ontario Hospital 
Corps. 

HOOPER On August 8, at St. Lukes Military 
Hospital, Ottawa, William Greaves Hooper, 
Phm.B. '08. 

HARRISON On August 29, Howard Davidson 
Harrison, M.B. '10, from typhoid, of the staff of 
the Western Hospital, Toronto. 
SCOTT On July 12, Madeline Christine Gold, wife 

of John W. Scott, B.A.Sc. '12, of Toronto. 
LEE Suddenly on September 5, at Niagara Falls 
Memorial Hospital, of pneumonia, Percival Alder 
Lee, M.B. '21. 



Notes by Classes 

'72 M. There has recently been published in the 
Fortnightly Review an essay by the late John 
Crozier, LL.D., entitled "The Key to Emerson". 
The essay was written, probably about 1888 but was 
never published, although the author considered it 
his most thoughtful piece of work. It is an attempt 
to rehabilitate and vindicate the Concord philo- 
sopher. 

'75 U.C. At the convention of the Canadian Bar 
Association held in Ottawa in September, the presi- 
dential address was delivered by Sir James Aikins, 
lieutenant-governor of Manitoba and president of 
the Association. 

'78 U.C. During Old Home Week at Walkerton, 
a presentation was made to Joseph Morgan who 
for thirty-nine years was principal of the school 
there and who has just retired. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



31 



'81 U.C R.obert Fulford Ruttan presided over 
the meeting of the Society of Chemical Industry, 
which was held at Montreal on August 29, and was 
the first meeting ever held in Canada. 

University College Class of 1881 

Douglas Armour, barrister, 626 Fender St., 
Vancouver, B.C. 

Robert A. Barren, teacher, Chatsworth; Thomas 
J. Blain, district court judge, Melville, Sask. 

Rev. J. W. Cameron, clergyman, West Hamilton; 
A. G. Campbell, barrister, 19 Summerhill Gardens, 
Toronto; Dr George H. Carveth, physician, 178 
Huron St., Toronto; Dr George R. Cruickshanks, 
physician, Windsor; Hugh St. Q. Cayley, county 
court judge, Court House, Vancouver, B.C.; 
Benjamin E. Chaffey, secretary, Law Society, Law 
Courts, Winnipeg, Man.; H. H. Collier, K.C., 
barrister, 27 Queen St., St. Catharines. 

John Douglas, barrister, 1275 Queen St. W., 
Toronto. 

W. D. Gwynne, barrister, 123 Bay St., Toronto. 

Rev W. G. Hanna, clergyman, 209 Bay St., 
Toronto; T. McK. Henry, high school master, 
Almonte; Rev A. Henderson, clergyman, Vandura, 
Sask.; M. Hutton, principal of University College. 

Rev. C. J. James, rector, Church of Redeemer, 
457 Huron St., Toronto. 

Frank H. Keefer, K.C., barrister, Berkenfels, 
Rockcliffe, Ottawa. 

Rev Walter Laidlaw, community service, 200 
Fifth Ave., New York; DrLevi Lapp, physician, 
773 Dufferin St., Toronto; A. G. F. Lawrence, 
barrister, 22 Roxborough Drive, Toronto; I. W. 
Levan, high school inspector, 144 Balmoral Ave., 
Toronto. 

C. J. Mickle, barrister, Chesley; W. S. Milner, 
professor, University College, 74 Grenville St., 
Toronto; J. A. McAndrew, barrister, 80 Binscarth 
Rd., Toronto; Dr J. M. MacCallum, physician, 
13 Bloor St. W., Toronto. 

Joseph Nason, barrister, 157 Bay St., Toronto; 
Frank Nelson, civil service, 65 Frank St., Ottawa. 

S. E. Passmore, high school master, 97 Charlotte 
St., Brantford; Arthur W. Peart, farmer, Burlington; 
Wm. A. Proudfoot, barrister, London. 

R. F. Ruttan, director, Department of Chemistry, 
McGill University, Montreal. 

Dr Sam Stewart, physician, Thamesville. 

'84 Vic. Dean Thomas F. Holgate of North- 
western University has been invited by the Uni- 
versity of Nanking, Nanking, China, to spend his 
sabbatical year at that institution lecturing on 
mathematical subjects and assisting in the general 
organization of the University. He sailed for China 
on August 18 on the Empress of Asia. 

'85 M. Dr Perry E. Doolittle, president of the 
Canadian Automobile Association, was one of the 
outstanding Canadian exponents of good roads with 
the Michigan Pikers on the "Around Lake Superior 
Tour", during the summer. 

'86 U.C. The wedding was announced in August 
of Wilfrid Peart Mustard, professor of Latin at 
Johns Hopkins University, and Mrs Charlotte 
Rogers Smith, widow of the late Professor Kirby 
Flower Smith. 

'87 T. Thomas Clark Street Macklem, former 
provost of Trinity College has received an invitation 
from the Bishop of Honduras to undertake import- 
ant work in Central America. He has not yet 
decided whether to accept this offer. 



'87 U.C. W. H. Hunter of Toronto has been 
unanimously re-elected Supreme Chief Ranger of the 
Independent Order of Foresters. 

'89 T. The Rev John Gage Waller has returned 
to the city on furlough. He has been stationed at 
Nagayo, Japan, and returned to Canada by way of 
Europe and England. 

'89 M. The wedding took place in July of William 
H. Groves and Ethel Grace Birkett, both of Dixie. 

'90 M. John W. S. McCullough, Chief Officer of 
Health for Ontario, has issued a booklet reviewing 
the work of the Provincial Board of Health for the 
past ten years. 

'90 M. The marriage took place in August of 
Frank Zwick and Nellie Mae Ketcheson. Dr and 
Mrs Zwick are living in Sterling. 

'92 Vic. The marriage took place during the 
summer of Rev Albert George Hudson and Anjnie 
Carroll Wilson, of Toronto. 

'92 Vic. Rev Dr H. S. Dougall has assumed the 
pastorate of Oakville Methodist Church, Toronto. 

'93 S. Albert Thomas Laing is giving up his 
position as registrar and librarian in the Faculty of 
Applied Science to become associate professor of 
Highways in the Department of Civil Engineering 
and Applied Mechanics. 

'93 S. J. M. R. Fairbairn, Chief Engineer of 
the Canadian Pacific Railway, Montreal, who was 
seriously ill in the General Hospital -during the 
summer, has now recovered. 

'93 U.C. The marriage took place during the 
summer of Helen Brady and Lawrence Vincent 
O'Connor, of Lindsay. 

'93 M. P. J. Moloney is demonstrator in Hy- 
giene at the University. 

'94 M. George Washington Badgerow, C.M.G., 
is visiting Mr and Mrs Badgerow, 106 Bedford Rd., 
Toronto. 

'94 P. The wedding took place on August 17, 
of Mary Douglas Barnes, Toronto, and Robert Peel 
Leslie. Mr and Mrs Leslie are living at 56 West 
54th St., New York City. 

'94 M. George Dana Porter has been appointed 
special lecturer on Health Education, attached to 
the Department of Hygiene .at the University of 
Toronto. 

'95 T. Rev Charles Allen Seager has definitely 
accepted the post of provost and vice-chancellor 
of Trinity College. Dr Seager assumes his new post 
at the beginning of October. 

'96 U.C. J. F. Van Every has been appointed a 
lecturer in the course in English and Philosophy at 
the University. 

'96 M. Among those who addressed the Fifty- 
Second Annual Convention of the Canadian Medical 
Association at Halifax, was Dr Norman Beechey 
Gwyn, of Toronto. 

'96 Vic. During the summer months Rev. Eber 
Eldon Craig, pastor of Central Congregational 
Church, Attleborough Falls, Man., was married to 
Audie Bertha Conley. 

'97 U.C. H. M. Little has quite recovered from 
the effects of an operation for mastoid, performed 
in Montreal in April. 

'97 U.C. Joseph Stanley Will has left for an ex- 
tended trip to England and France and will be 
abroad for a year. 

'97 U.C., '06 M. George Wilbur Graham has 
been appointed chief coroner for the city of Toronto. 

'99 U.C. Eric Armour, K.C., has been appointed 
crown attorney for Toronto and York County. 



32 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



'99 U.C., '95 U.C. The new address of Rev. John 
Gibson Inkster and Mrs Inkster (Alice Rowson) is 
407 Brunswick Ave., Toronto. 

'99 P. At Grimsby on September 12, a son was 
born to Major and Mrs George Alexander Ramsden. 

'99 U.C. Wm. Wycliffe Anson Trench has re- 
signed the principalship of the Perth Collegiate 
Institute in order to accept the position of Public 
School Inspector in the county of York. 

'99 U.C. The marriage took place in August of 
Silas Henry Armstrong, supervisor of city play- 
grounds, and Dorothy Lilian Goode. 

'99 U.C. The wedding took place early in August 
of Robert Gregg Hunter and Blair Athole Hunter of 
Toronto. 

'99 M. Dr David Bradley Neely, formerly of 
Humboldt, Sask., has been overseas in Paris and 
London specializing in eye, ear, nose and throat 
work and has located in Whitby. 

'99 U.C. On August 10, the marriage took place 
of Alexander Clark Casselman ('95-'98 U.C. '08 
U.C.), principal of the Normal School, North Bay, 
and Clara Evelyn Knisily ('00- '01 U.C.). 

'09 U.C., '10 T. A son was born in August to the 
Rev Richard and Mrs Haines (Jean Houston 
Fechnay). 

'00 S. E, G. R. Ardagh has been appointed 
associate professor of Chemical Engineering. 

'00 Vic. Mary Louise Bollert, formerly head of 
Sherbourne House, Toronto, has left for Vancouver 
to become Dean of Women, and professor of English 
in the University of British Columbia. 

'01 U.C. Rev Robert J. Campbell was married 
in August to Ellen Agnew Brown. Mr and Mrs 
Campbell are travelling abroad for a few months 
and on their return will live at Poplar Plains 
Crescent, Toronto. 

'02 M. On Friday, September 2, a daughter was 
born to Dr and Mrs Wm. Henry Butt, at 864 Keele 
St., Toronto. 

'02 U.C. Rev and Mrs Allan Egbert Armstrong 
left in September for a visit to the Presbyterian 
Missions in India. 

'02 M. The appointment has recently been 
made of James Johnston Fraser as provincial health 
officer for Medical District No 2. 

'03 M. At the General Hospital, Toronto, a 
daughter was born to Dr and Mrs John Vassie 
Brown, 77 Peter St., Orillia. 

'03 Vic. Rev Newton E. Bowles and Mrs 
Bowles and their family sailed on September 14, for 
their mission field in West China. 

'03 U.C., '06 M., '21 M. The wedding took 
place during the summer, of Julian Derwent Loudon, 
and Esther Dean Harrison, of Toronto. 

'03 M. To Dr and Mrs Wm. Edward Gallic, 
Toronto, a son was born early in July. 

'03 P. The wedding took place at Smith's Falls 
of Vivian Hannah Hambleton and Arthur J. J. 
Brennan, formerly mayor of Welland. Mr and Mrs 
Brennan are living in Port Nelson. 

'03 U.C. On August 3 a daughter was born to 
Mr and Mrs Wm. Martin Treadgold, Toronto. 

'03 D. A daughter was born on September 14 to 
Hugh Edwin Wesley Richardson and Mrs Richard- 
son, 708 Dovercourt Rd., Toronto. 

'03 Vic. Miss Edith Campbell, who has been 
in Tokio for the last six years as head of the English 
department of the Women's Christian College of 
Japan, has returned to Toronto to spend a year's 
furlong. 



'04 T. On September 10, a daughter was born 
to Mr and Mrs William Sharp Greening, 51 Dun- 
vegan Rd., Toronto. 

'05 M. After spending a furlough with her family 
in Toronto, Dr Jessie MacBean left in August for 
Kongmoon, South China, where she has been in 
charge of the Women's Hospital under the Canadian 
Presbyterian Mission Board for the past fifteen 
years. 

'05 S. A daughter was born to Mr and Mrs 
Robert Elmer Mortimer, on August 11, at Honey- 
wood. 

'05 S. F. A. McGivern has left the Canadian Steel 
Foundries Corporation, Montreal, and is connected 
with H. Turnbull & Company, Excelsior Life 
Building, Toronto. 

'05 S. G. H. Ferguson has left the Department 
of Railways and Canals, Drummond Building, 
Montreal, and is now located in Toronto. 

'05 T. At Hamburg, N.J., on September 4, a 
son was born to the wife of the Rev. Jerrald Cleve- 
land Potts. 

'05 T. On July 6, a daughter was born to Mr and 
Mrs Molyneux Lockhart Gordon. 

'05 M. At Toronto on September 15, a daughter 
was born to Lieut-Col, and Mrs Charles McMane. 

'06 M. Donald McEdward Kilgour, a former 
Toronto physician, has been recently admitted by 
examination as a member of the Royal College of 
Physicians, London, Eng. 

'06 M. At the Mountain Sanatarium, Hamilton, 
in August, a daughter was born to Dr and Mrs John 
Howard Holbrook. 

'06 M. George B. Archer is in charge of the 
medical mission of the Church Missionary Society, 
at Ranaghat, Bengal. 

'06 S. H. M. Lancaster has been appointed 
demonstrator in Sanitary Chemistry and Hygiene. 

'06 S. Owing to the depression in the pulp and 
paper trade and the consequent cessation of con- 
struction in the business, John P. Watson has 
severed his connection with the Wayagamack Pulp 
and Paper Co., Three Rivers, Que., and is now with 
the Canadian Pacific Railway Co. in their motive 
power department. His address is 1101 Windsor 
Street Station, Montreal, Que. 

'06 D. At Wellesley Hospital, Toronto, a 
daughter was born to Dr. and Mrs Alexander S. 
Elliott, 70 Rowanwood Ave., Toronto. 

'06 T. Rev Arthur Huffman McGreer, M.C., 
has just obtained at Oxford the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts with honours in Theology and an exhibition 
of 50 for the next academic year. 

'07 S. On September 15, at the Wellesley Hos- 
pital, twin boys were born to Mr and Mrs Robert 
Holmes Hopkins, Toronto. 

'07 M. To Dr and Mrs Elmer Francis Richard- 
son, a son was born on July 10, at Campbellford. 

'07 M. On August 13, the wedding took place of 
Dorothy Margaret Sawdy, formerly of Plymouth, 
Eng., and Gordon Bates, of Toronto. 

'07 U.C. A son, Richard Montross, was born in 
July to Mr and Mrs Charles Russell Gundy, 
Windsor. 

'07 Vic. Rev David Wren has been transferred 
from Mount Forest to Elm Street Methodist 
Church, Toronto. 

'07 M. At Brampton.on September 11, a daughter 
was born to Dr and Mrs Wm. H. Brydon. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



33 



'07 Vic., '09 M. Herbert Wm. Baker, M.B., was 
married in August to Ruth Ford. Dr and Mrs Baker 
are living at 606 Spadina Ave., Toronto. 

'07 S. A daughter was born to Mr and Mrs John 
H. Caster, 255 Lauder Ave., Toronto. 

'07 U.C., '09 M. On September 9, a daughter 
was born to Dr and Mrs Herbert Richard Holme, 
Toronto. 

'08 S. A daughter, Erma Audrey, was born in 
July to Mr and Mrs Frederick Algernon Robertson, 
Toronto. 

'08 S. At the Private Patients' Pavilion, 
Toronto General Hospital, on August 28, a son was 
born to Douglas Herbert Campbell Mason and 
Mrs Mason. 

'09 P. A daughter was born in August to Mr and 
Mrs John Percy Bond. 

'08 U.C., '15 U.C. At Truro, N.S., on Sep- 
tember 13, a son was born to Rev John Mutch and 
Mrs Mutch (Marjorie McCurdy Fraser). 

'08 T. At Brantford, a son was born to Rev. 
Canon and Mrs James Booth Fotheringham. 

'08 IT.C. The birth is announced of a daughter 
to Mr and Mrs Erell Chester Ironside, Toronto. 

'08 U.C. On July 30, a son was born to Mr and 
Mrs Norman H. Campbell, Toronto. 

'08 T. At 14 Glencairn Ave., Toronto, on 
August 6, a son was born to Mr and Mrs Archibald 
Cameron MacNaughton. 

'09 U.C., '15 M. Edith Gordon has been ap- 
pointed medical adviser for the women students 
at the University. 

'09 M. A daughter, Helen Eastwood, was 
recently born to Dr and Mrs Joseph Charles 
Gandier, of Clinton. 

'09 S. A son was born to Mr and Mrs Leroy 
John Duthie, 102 Colbeck St., Toronto, on August 
13. 

'09 S. R. A. Sara has left Montreal for Winnipeg. 

'09 U.C., '11 M. At Waterloo, September 3, a 
daughter was born to Dr and Mrs John Milton 
Livingston. 

'09 U.C. A daughter was born in July to Harry 
Comfort Hindmarsh and Mrs Hindmarsh (Ruth 
Atkinson '14 H.Sc.). 

'09 Vic. Miss Pearl Madden has been ap- 
pointed general treasurer for the Women's Foreign 
Missionary Society of the Methodist Episcopal 
Church of the United States operating in India. Her 
address will be Isabel Thoburn College, Lucknow, 
India. 

'09 S. The announcement is made of the birth 
of a daughter, Dorothy Kathryn, to Mr and Mrs 
Oscar W. Martyn, Graf ton Ave., Toronto. 

'10 U.C., '12 M. At Point Pleasant, Long Is- 
land, the wedding took place of Janet Randolph 
Grace and Frederick Maurice McPhedran, of 
Toronto. 

'10 M. A daughter was born on September 6, 
at Mount Hamilton Hospital, to Dr and Mrs O. W. 
Niemeier. 

'10 S. D. W. Harvey has been appointed 
assistant manager of the Toronto Transportation 
Commission. 

'10 S. On July 24, at Winnipeg, a daughter was 
born to Charles Raymond Redfern and Mrs Redfern. 

'10 S. At Mount Hamilton Hospital, Sep- 
tember 14, a son was born to Mr and Mrs Norman 
Wagner, 40 Mount Royal Ave., Hamilton. 

'10 S. L. A Wright, who was purchasing agent 
and p]ant superintendent of the Foundation Com- 



pany of Canada in Montreal, is now occupying an 
important position with the Fletcher Manufacturing 
Co., Toronto. 

'10 U.C. W. H. King. On August 20, 1921, at 
Montreal Maternity Hospital, to W. H. King and 
Mrs King (nee Kathleen Broderick, Toronto) a 
daughter (Mary Elizabeth). 

'10 U.C. On September 16 at the Wellesley 
Hospital, a daughter was born to Dr and Mrs 
Arthur M. Goulding, 88 Warren Rd., Toronto. 

'10 T. Rev. Seymour Foss Tackaberry, of New- 
borough, has been granted one year's leave of 
absence and expects to visit the West. 

'10 M., '10 U.C. On July 30, a daughter was 
born to Dr and Mrs Philip Douglas Spohn (Maud 
Edith Potvin). 

'10 U.C. Early in July the marriage was cele- 
brated of Alan Collingwood Bell and Mary Georgina 
Kontze, of Windsor. 

'10 U.C. Miss Mary Agnes Gillespie is at pre- 
sent teaching in the High School, Fergus. 

'10 U.C., '20 S. The marriage took place in 
July, of Ruby Eleanor Connolly and Clarence 
William Graham, formerly of Aurora. 

'10 U.C. Rev Ernest Lloyd Morrow has re- 
signed the pastorate of St. John's Church and ex- 
pects to devote the next two or three years doing 
post-graduate work at the University of Chicago 
in the Department of Systematic Theology and 
Philosophy. 

'11 S. A son was born to Mr and Mrs Royden 
John Fuller at 413 West Marion St., Toronto. 

'11 U.C. Rev Benjamin Stewart Smillie, who has 
been a missionary to Central India for seven years, 
was home on furlough in Toronto. 

'11 M. A daughter was born on August 6 to Dr 
amd Mrs Wm. Morley Wilkinson, Oakville. 

'11 Vic. Mrs G. Stanley Russell (Ethel Margaret 
Tait) was in town in August, while her husband who 
is the pastor of Grafton Square Congregational 
Church, Clapham Common, London, Eng., was 
occupying the pulpit of Bloor Street Presbyterian 
Church. 

'11 S. On September 15, a daughter was born to 
Mr and Mrs George Cecil Thomas, Toronto. 

'11 U.C. The marriage was celebrated on Sep- 
tember 15 of Lulu May Domm and George Edward 
Edmonds, Toronto. They will live at 311 Beech 
Ave., Toronto. 

'11 M., '09 U.C. At the General Hospital, 
Toronto, on September 16, a son was born to Dr 
and Mrs Fred T. Bryans (Barbara Winnifred 
McKelvey). 

'11 S. A daughter was born in July to Mr and 
Mrs Clarence Lundy Pearson, Powell River, B.C. 

"11 Vic. E. L. Daniher has been appointed 
lecturer in English Expression at the University. 

'11 Vic. A son was born to Mr and Mrs Frank 
Clarke Asbury, of Toronto, in July. 

'11 Vic. At Victoria Beach, Colborne, the 
marriage took place of Ethel Blanche Bartlett and 
Raymond Ellsworth Ives. * 

'11 S. On August 27, a son was born to Mr and 
Mrs Alexander Stanley McArthur, of Keswick. 

'11 S. The marriage took place of Alice Marie 
Rafter and Milton Berkeley Hastings, of Midland, 
on September 7. 

'12 M. On Friday, September 2, a daughter was 
born to Dr and Mrs Wm. Henry Butt. 



34 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



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UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



35 



'12 T. The wedding of Mabel Herbert Smith and 
William Lunan, took place on September 3, in 
Toronto. 

'12 TJ.C. At Wellesley Hospital, on September 8, 
a son was born to Mr and Mrs Joseph Everard Gray, 
116 Sherwood Ave., Toronto. 

12 U.C., '15 M. Donald Fraser has been ap- 
pointed assistant professor of Hygiene and Pre- 
ventive Medicine. 

'13 S. The announcement is made of the birth of 
a daughter to Mr and Mrs John Stupart Galbraith. 

'12 U.C. At Toronto, Wm. Donald Trench 
Atkinson was married to Marguerite Fleming 
(18-'21 U.C.). 

'12 Vic. A daughter was born at Welland 
County Hospital on September 13 to Mr and Mrs 
Guy E. Johnson (Kathleen Annie Byram). 

'12 S. On September 15, Henry Harrison Madill 
was married to Marjorie Mary Knox, of Toronto. 

'12 TT.C. At Grant Avenue Hospital, Hamilton, 
August 16, a son was born to Mr and Mrs Clive 
Harcourt Carruthers. 

'12 Vic. The marriage took place in August of 
Marian Dobson and Daniel Henry Connor, of 
Aylmer. 

'12 U.C. A son was born in July to Mr and Mrs 
William Edgar Bastedo, of Toronto. 

'12 TT.C. The wedding took place early in July 
of Charles Roy McGillivray, director of Religious 
Education for Deer Park Presbyterian Church, 
Toronto, and Jean Ferguson, of Vancouver. 

'12 S. At woodstock, a son was born in July to 
Mr and Mrs W. Clifford Shaw. 

'12 D. In August, Ren Sheek Robertson was 
married to Agnes Jean Hodge, of Cornwall. 

'12 T. J. B. Collip has been appointed professor 
of Pathological Chemistry. 

'13 U.C. A son was born, August 10, to Mr and 
Mrs Robert Everett Grass, 119 Crescent Rd., 
Toronto. 

'13 U.C. At the Cottage Hospital, on August 17, 
a daughter was born to Frank Walter McHugh 
Callaghan and Mrs Callaghan, Toronto. 

'13 U.C. The marriage took place recently of 
Margery Evan Ross and John Russell Scott. Mr 
and Mrs Scott will live in Welland. 

'13 Vic. A son was born to Mr and Mrs Frede- 
rick Taylor Graham, in July. 

'13 U.C. At Grace Hospital, Winnipeg, a 
daughter, Mary Elizabeth, was born to Rev. James 
R. and Mrs Mutchmor. 

'13 U.C., '20 M. The wedding took place in the 
early summer of Nelson F. W. Graham and Gwy- 
nethe Marie Tuttle. Their address is 197 McGregor 
Ave., Sault Ste Marie. 

'13 S. At Walkerville, July 27, Eva L. Ard was 
married to William Middleton Brock of Walkerville. 

'13 U.C., '16. The wedding took place at Mount 
Forest of Eatha Gardiner and Harvey Basil Setter- 
ington. Mr and Mrs Setterington will live at 32 
Arlington Ave., Toronto. 

'13 U.C. On Tuesday, August 16, a son was born 
to Mr and Mrs Arthur Scott Winchester, 163 
Pearson Ave., Toronto. 

'13 S. The wedding took place quietly of Otto 
Holden and Florence Hill, of Toronto. Mr and 
Mrs Holden are living at 251 Welland Ave., Toronto. 

'14 M. At Swift Current, on July 4, a son was 
born to Dr Donald E. Ross and Mrs Ross. 



'14 U.C. On August 3, at Hamilton, Margaret 
Holbrook was married to Luther Sawyer Hope, of 
Hamilton. 

'14 S., '11 Vic. On July 23, a son was born to 
Mr and Mrs Frank Stewart Rutherford (Clara Alice 
Pennington), of Toronto. 

'14 Vic. The marriage of Marie Marguerite 
Daltry and Clarence Elliott Willows, took place in 
Toronto in the summer. 

'14 U.C. At Amasa Wood Hospital, St Thomas, 
a son was born to Mr and Mrs J. A. Wallace (Muriel 
Frances Cameron) on August 27. 

'14 U.C. H. M. Taylor has moved from Mon- 
treal to Cornwall, where he is identified with the 
Canadian Linoleums & Oilcloths, Limited. 

'14 M. The marriage took place in the summer, of 
Bertha Alice Harvey and John Reginald Beaven, 
Hespeler. 

'14 M. A daughter, Margaret Biette, was born 
to Dr and Mrs Kenneth George McKenzie, 1017 
Bathurst St., Toronto. 

'14 M., '15 U.C. The wedding took place in 
July, of Oswald John Day and Florence Mabel 
Stirrett. Dr and Mrs Day will live in Winnipeg. 

'14 M. A daughter was born in August to Dr and 
Mrs John Albert Duck. 

'14 U.C. Lou Cory, former star of the Varsity 
rugby team, has been appointed coach of the Ottawa 
Big Four squad. 

'14 T., '15 T. At St. George's Church, Blooms- 
bury Square, London, Eng., Leila Van Zant was 
married to Arthur Kent Griffin, of Toronto. 

'14 U.C. A daughter, Frances Beatrice, was born 
on August 5, to Mr and Mrs Roland B. Ferris, 
80 Pinewood Ave., Toronto. 

'14 U.C. On September 7, at "The Willows", 
Cobourg, Amy Plunkett Rooney was married to 
Sidney J. Cook, chief of the Mining, Metallurgical, 
and Chemical Branch of the Dominion Bureau of 
Statistics, Ottawa. 

'14 Vic. At 112 Soudan Ave., Toronto, a son 
was born on September 8 to Mr and Mrs Charles 
Frederick Watson. 

'14 U.C., '21 M. James K. Latchford is ap- 
pointed fellow in Physiology at the University. 

'14 U.C. Olive Ziegler has received an appoint- 
ment for India under the Foreign Department of 
the American Young Women's Christian Associa- 
tion. She leaves early in October, going by way of 
England and the Mediterranean. 

'14 M. Ada B. Speers, medical missionary under 
the Methodist Church has returned to China after 
a furlough of one and a half years in which she took 
post-graduate work in Toronto, New York, and 
Rochester. Dr Speers has been appointed to the 
Hospital for Women and Children at Chengtu, 
Szechewan, West China. 

'15 S. A daughter, Kathleen Boyle, was born to 
Mr and Mrs Charles Russell Ferguson, of Brantford, 
in July. 

'15 S. C. R. McCort, has moved to Montreal, 
upon the completion of his work with Laurentide 
Company, Limited, Grand'Mere, Que. ^ 

'15 U.C. The marriage of Frances Wilhelmine 
Austen and Charles Courtland Martin, of Toronto, 
took place on August 31, at Niagara-on-the-Lake. 

'15 Vic. John Howard Hardy has been appointed 
principal of the Perth Collegiate Institute. 

'15 U.C. Early in September, the wedding took 
place of Mary Katherine Rodden, Toronto, and 
Frank J. Noonan, of Mount Forest. 



36 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



'15 U.C., '17 Vic. A daughter was born on July 
9, to Mr and Mrs Joseph Harris (Beatrice Jane 
Corrigan). 

'15 U.C., '16 Vic. The marriage was celebrated 
in Calgary, of Arthur Justin Cowan and Helen 
Javiera Kerby. Mr and Mrs Cowan are living in 
Vancouver. 

'15 F. A son was born on September 9 to Mr and 
Mrs Thomas Francis Ranee, 135 Tyndall Ave., 
Toronto. 

'15 U.C. On July 7, Maurice Rooks Kingsford 
was married to Mary Constance Eugenia Ryder in 
London, England. Mr Kingsford returned to 
Toronto to be on the staff of Upper Canada College. 

'15 U.C. Miss Anna Kennedy has been ap- 
pointed teacher of Mathematics' at Simcoe High 
School. 

'15 P. At Stratford, on August 2, Floyd Ed- 
munds Snetsinger of Toronto was married to Nellie 
Swales. 

'15 St.M. Rev. Father Austin Malone, C.S.P., 
who has been attached to St. Peter's Catholic 
Church here, has been appointed to the staff of St. 
Paul's College, Washington, which is affiliated with 
Washington University. 

Medicine 1915 

Addresses of graduates in Medicine of 1915 from 
the index of the Secretary, R. H. Fraser, 14 Green- 
wood Ave., Battle Creek, Mich. Those marked 
with asterisk have been recently verified by direct 
correspondence ; the others given are believed to be 
correct. In the remainder of the roll of 102 there 



is considerable uncertainty and information will be 
most welcome. 

*W. H. T. Baillie, 53 Boon Ave., Toronto; Roy 
Ball, 1799 Dufferin St., Toronto; J. D. H. Barnett, 
248 Danforth Ave., Toronto; *S. S'. Ball, Stouffville; 
*E. G. Berry, 55 Dixon Ave., Toronto; A. McK. 
Bell, Toronto General Hospital, Toronto; Roy Bond, 
18 College St., Toronto; J. R. Boyd, Thorold; *C. O. 
Broad, 480 Danforth Ave., Toronto. 

W. R. Campbell, Toronto General Hospital, 
Toronto; *T. A. Carpenter, Mildmay; *L. A. Carr, 
415 King St. E., Hamilton; H. A. Cates, Weston; 
*W. A. Cathcart, Port Lambton; *Bessie C. Cath- 
cart, Port Lambton; John Chassels, 121 Eglington 
Ave. E., Toronto; *F. W. Clement, 440 Shaw St., 
Toronto; R. C. Coatsworth, Toronto General 
Hospital, Toronto; W. G. Cosbie, Toronto General 
Hospital, Toronto; J. H. Cotton, 12 Bloor St. E., 
Toronto; H. D. Courtenay, 189 Metcalfe St., 
Ottawa; E. D. Coutts, 65 Gothic Ave., Toronto; 
*R. D. Cowan, R.R. 4, Gait; *C. R. B. Crompton, 
Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn.; J. G. Cunningham, 
Ellsworth Ave., Toronto. 

*G. M. Dale, 591 Church St., Toronto; *J. H. 
Duncan, 124 Church St., Sault Ste. Marie. 

L. C. Fallis, Shelbourne;*D. H. Fauman, 308 
Dundas St. W., Toronto; *G. J. Ferrier, Hillside 
and Church Sts., Mimico; *D. T. Fraser, York Mills; 
*R. H. Fraser, Nose and Throat Department, 
Battle Creek Sanitarium, Mich. 

*F.R.Gillrie, 320 Barton St. E., Hamilton ;T. E. P. 
Gocher, N. Vancouver, B.C.; *E. H. Gordon, 
467 Spadina Ave., Toronto; M. E. Gorman, 14 



CHARTERED TRUST AND EXECUTOR COMPANY 

46 KING STREET WEST, TORONTO 

Fills, among others, the following functions: 

(1) Executor of Wills 

(2) Administrator of Intestate Estates 

(3) Trustee under Settlement Agreement 

(4) Investing Agent 

(5) Transfer Agent 

(6) Trustee under Bond Mortgage 

(7) Agent for Sale or Purchase of Real Estate 

(8) Agent for Management of Property 

(9) Custodian of Safe Deposit boxes. 

The proper performance of the great variety of duties requires an organization of skilled 
and experienced men. The Company's organization includes men with the best 
qualifications at the head of each Department. 

INQUIRY INVITED 

HON. W. A. CHARLTON, M.P., JOHN J. GIBSON, 

President. Managing Director. 

W. S. MORDEN, K.C., FRANK McLAUGHLIN, 

Vice- President and Estates Manager. Supt. Real Estate Dept. 

E. W. McNEILL, 
Secretary. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



Bedford Place, London, Eng.; P. V. Graham, Rane- 
lagh Ave., Toronto; D. H. Guy, Singhampton. 

H. P. Hamilton, Kitchener; J. B. Hanley, 
Toronto General Hospital ; *R. I. Harris, 31 1 Avenue 
Rd., Toronto; *H. C. P. Hazlewood, Muskoka 
Hospital, Gravenhurst; *P. Hearn, 65 Runnymede 
Rd., Toronto; M. R. Helliwell, Kincardine; W. R. 
Hodge, Toronto General Hospital, Toronto; *A. B. 
Holmes, Bracebridge: *J. R. Howitt, 104 George St., 
Hamilton. 

E. S. Jeffrey, Toronto General Hospital, Toronto; 
H. G. Joyce, Freelton. 

W. T. Kennedy, 163 East 61st St., New York 
City; H. I. Kinsey, 634 Christie St., Toronto; F. R. 
Kirkham, 12 Lowther Ave., Toronto. 

*G. A.Lamont, 234 Vancouver Block, Vancouver, 
B.C.; D. E. Lang, Nestorville; *F. L. Letts, 14 
Irving Place, New, York City; A. G. Ley, 354 
Danforth Ave., Toronto; *G. C. Livingstone, 
457 Dovercourt Rd., Toronto; *L. B. Lyon, St. 
Ann's Bay, Jamaica. 

*F. C. Marlow, 647 Broadview Ave., Toronto; 
*W. M. Martyn, 538 St. Clair Ave., Toronto; A. J. 
McGanity, Kitchener; W. R. Maclaren, 142 Davis 
St., Sarnia; G. W. MacNeil, Grace Hospital, 
Toronto; G. C. Mclntyre, 469 Parliament St., 
Toronto; G. A. McLarty, 546 Palmerston Blvd., 
Toronto; *H. B. Moffat, 1028 Logan Ave., Toronto; 
A. A. Moon, Erie St., Windsor. 

*R. W. Naylor, 425 Bloor St. W., Toronto; C. 
Newell, 467 Woodbine Ave., Toronto; W. R. 
Newman, 160 Oakwood Ave., Toronto. 

*P. M. O'Sullivan, 313 Brunswick Ave., Toronto. 
R. Paul, Sunderland. 

A. R. Riddel), 72 St. Clair Ave. W., Toronto ; *J. W. 
Ross, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minn; T. C. Routley, 
127 Oakwood Ave., Toronto. 

*T. J. Simpson, Collingwood; *W. B. Stark, 85 
Lynwood Ave., Toronto; V. F. Stock, 166 George 
St., Toronto; Hilda Smith, Women's Christian 
Medical College, Ludhiana, India; *V. H. Storey, 
Bowmanville; *T. H. D. Storms, 53 Bay St., 
Hamilton. 

*H. B. Vanwyck, Toronto General Hospital, 
Toronto. 

*S. Y. Walsh, Keen; G. M. Watt, 132 Park Ave., 
Brantford; C. E. Wilson, Oshawa; *W. N. Winkler, 
393 Dundas St. W., Toronto; D. E. S. Wishart, 
Massachusetts Charitable Eye and Ear Infirmary, 
Boston. 

'16 U.C., '16 Vic. The wedding took place on 
September 6, of William Meredith Hugill, assistant 
professor of Classics, in the University of Manitoba, 
and Lyla May Guest. Mr and Mrs Hugill will live 
in Winnipeg. 

'16 Vic. The announcement is made of the 
marriage on September 11, of David Halliday 
Porter and Jennie D. Ranson. They will live at 
Copper Cliff. 

'16 M. A son was born on September 2, to Dr 
and Mrs Russell Beattie Robson, of Walkerville. 

'16 S. The marriage of Paul Hubert Mills, 
O.B.E., to Clara Isabel Chisholm, took place at 
St John's Presbyterian Church, Toronto, on 
September 14. 

'16 U.C. The birth of a daughter Ruth Lane, 
is announced to Mr and Mrs Brock Lane Batten, 
Montreal. 

'16 D. At St. Michael's Episcopal Church, New 
York, the wedding was celebrated on August 11, of 
Una Margaret Smith and Howard B. James, 
formerly of Oshawa. 



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38 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 




Where "Salada" 
Sells 

WE can give the public 
no better proof on 
paper (the real proof 
lies in a personal test) of the 
popularity of "SALADA," 
than to say that great quan- 
tities are being shipped all 
the time to almost all parts 
of the world. These sales 
made solely as a result 



are 



of cup test." 

It's the Flavour that counts 

Here are some of the 
places where 'SALADA" 
went during the past few 
months: 
Algeria 

Antigua.B.w.i. 
Argentina 
Bahamas 
Barbados, B.w.i 
Belgium 
Bermuda 
Brazil 
British 

Honduras 
Bolivia 

Canary Islands 
Chile 
Colombia 
Costa Rica 
Cuba 

Dutch Guiana 
Dutch West 

Indies 
Ecuador 



France 
Greece 

Grenada.B.w.l. 
Iceland 
.Martinique 
Montserrat 
Morocco 
Panama 
Porto Rico 
Portugal 
Spain 
Sweden 
Switzerland 
St. Vincent B.W.I. 
St. Lucia, B.W.I. 
Trinidad, B.W.I. 
Turkey 
Uruguay 
Venezuela 
W. Coast Africa 



'SALADA* 



'16 Vic. E. H. Moss is research assistant in 
Botany at the University. 

'16 P. The present address of Melvin Aldrich 
Craven is 1630 Rosselle St., Jacksonville, Florida. 

'16 P. A daughter was born on August 25 to Mr 
and Mrs Clark Power Taylor, 203 Concord Ave., 
Toronto. 

'16 D. The marriage of Susie Irene Pizer and 
John Glenney Pilkey took place in August. They 
are living in Toronto. 

'16 T. At the rectory, Bancroft, a son was born 
to Rev and Mrs Harry Aikins Reginald Pettem. 

'16 M. Frederick Macnab Johnson is practising 
in New York as assistant-surgeon at the Memorial 
Hospital for Cancer Research. His address is 
400 Riverside Drive, New York. 

'16 U.C. A daughter was born in July to Mr and 
Mrs E. B. Monroe (Muriel Lee). 

'17 IT.C. E. W. Park is appointed instructor in 
Household Science. 

'17 D. The marriage took place in Toronto of 
Clara Rutherford and Avan Elmer Cavanagh, of 
Toronto. 

'17. On September 13 at Wellesley Hospital a 
son was born to Dr and Mrs Henry Ralph Hargrave. 

'17 S. At Toronto, on September 14, Alfred 
Barnard Harris was married to Mary Glenny. They 
will live on Monarch Park Ave., Toronto. 

'17 U.C., '20 M. A son was born on August 31, 
to Mr and Mrs G. E. McConney (Florence Spauld- 
ing Hardy). 

'17 U.C. Miss C. J. Eraser has been appointed 
special research assistant in Dentistry. 

'17 Vic. The wedding took place at Scarborough, 
of Ernestine Dutton and Clarence Wilmott Learoyd, 
on August 23. They will live in Brockville where 
Mr Learoyd is on the staff of th^e Collegiate Institute. 

'17 S. On July 15, a son was born to Mr and 
Mrs Earl Wesley Smithson, Toronto. 

. '17 U.C. Miss Helen Walton is office assistant 
in the Department of Public Health Nursing, 
Toronto. 

'17 Vic. At St. Andrews Church, Cambridge, 
Eng., A. Roger Self, of the staff of the Toronto 
Central Technical School, was married to Stella E. 
T. Stubbins. They are living at 299 Sumach St., 
Toronto. 

'17 S. In Chungking, Chjna, in June, twin boys 
(Charles Edward and Stephen Harry) were born 
to Mr and Mrs Gordon Rosebrugh Jones. 

'17 S. A. F. Hanley, who was with the Montreal 
Sales Department of the Canadian Ingersoll Rand 
Company, has left for the Maritime Provinces. 

'17 U.C. Recent appointments to the staff in 
Modern History are John Bartlett Brebner, B.A. 
(Oxon.) and Hume Humphrey Wrong, of Toronto. 

'97 U.C. Mr and Mrs Harvey O'Higgins 
visited Toronto this summer after spending the 
winter in California where Mr O'Higgins has been 
writing scenarios for film artists. 

'17 U.C. Rev P. Caigar Watson, of Shannon- 
ville, has accepted the rectorship of Sioux Falls, 
Mich. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



39 



[17 U.C., '18 U.C. Miss Leila B. Maxwell and 
Miss Isabelle Yotirex sailed from Vancouver by the 
Mikura for Australia and New Zealand. They 
expect to visit Honolulu and the Figi Islands on 
route. 

'18 Ag. Early in September, at Kemptville, the 
wedding took place of Blanche MacLeod and Lou 
Gerbig Hempel. Mr and Mrs Hempel will live at 
Macdonald College, St. Anne de Bellevue, Quebec. 

'18 M., '18 U.C. At Arkona, on July 10, a son 
was born to Dr and Mrs Wm. Patterson Boles. 
(Florence Gertrude MacTavish). 

'18 TT.C. Norma Henrietta Carswell Ford was 
one of the lecturers at the training course for Girl 
Guides which was held at Havergal College. 

'18 D. In July, the wedding took place of Herbert 
Lindsay Field, Strathroy, and Hazel Alice Brown, 
of Toronto. 

'18 IT.C. The wedding took place in July, in 
Glasgow, Scotland, of Hugh Reid and Mary Camp- 
bell Hardie. Mr and Mrs Reid were in Toronto for 
a short time but have returned to their new home in 
Scotland. 

'18 Vic. A daughter, Doreen Mary, was born 
to Rev and Mrs Robert Knox Burnside, of Webb- 
wood. 

'18 U.C. The wedding of Vernon Walter Arm- 
strong and Helen Mary Cockburn took place, 
September 8. Mr and Mrs Armstrong are living at 
93 Farnham Ave., Toronto. 

'19 Vic. The wedding took place in August of 
Lewis Calvin Walmsley and Constance Ellen 
Kilborn. Mr and Mrs Walmsley left in September 
for China. 

'19 U.C. Evangeline Harris has returned from 
Oxford where she obtained her degree with first 
class honours, and has been appointed instructor in 
Latin at the University. 

'19 S. A daughter was born at the Royal Vic- 
toria Hospital, Barrie, August 13, to Mr and Mrs 
Russell D. Jones. 

'19 S. John Rome McColl, of New York, was 
recently married to Ellena McKenzie Heddle, of 
Caledonia. 

'19 U.C. At Aberdeen, South Dakota, a son was 
born to Dr and Mrs Thomas Jones (Dorothy Smith) 
on July 28. 



'19 D. At Smith's Hill the wedding was solem- 
nized of Minerva Elizabeth MacPhee and Alexander 
Ernest Barnby, of Hamilton. 

'19 Vic. On July 30, a daughter was born to Mr 
and Mrs C. E. Whitehouse (Beatrice Helen Stewart). 

'20 D., '20 Vic. At Cedar Springs, on August 27, 
the wedding of Nelson Willard Haynes and Eliza- 
beth Sterling, took place. They will live in Toronto. 

'20 D. The marriage took place in September, of 
Rose Mabel St. George and William Wallace Speers, 
Toronto. 

'20 U.C. The wedding took place in July, of 
Edward Ormiston T. Norval, and Grace Mooney, 
Toronto. 

'20 Vet. James A. Campbell, of Toronto, was 
re-elected president of the Ontario Veterinary 
Association 

'20 S. The marriage took place in Toronto of 
Laura McCarthy, of Ottawa, and Lyman I. Play fair. 

'20 T. The wedding took place in Trinity College 
Chapel, on August 20, of Meta Aileen Boyd and 
Thomas Oakley, formerly of Bobcaygeon. They 
will live at 661 Broadview Ave., Toronto. 

'20 D. At Dresden, on August 25, Frank A. 
Weese, of Wallaceburg, was married to M. Grace 
Carscallen. 

'20 S. The wedding of Constance Kathleen 
Hunter, of Brampton, and William Percival Dale, 
was solemnized September 9. Mr and Mrs Dale 
will live at Niagara Falls. 

'20 M. . On September 9, William David Stanley 
Cross was married to Sylvia Christine Milhausen. 
They will live in Elmwood. 

'20 D. The wedding took place in September, 
of Sidney A. Milburn and Jean Galloway. Dr and 
Mrs Milburn will reside at 119 A. St. Clement's Ave., 
Toronto. 

'20 D. The wedding of Marie Louise Smellie and 
Ernest Arthur Sadler, of Lucan, took place on 
September 10, at Wineva Avenue Presbyterian 
Church, Toronto. 

'20 D. The marriage took place on August 31 
of Rose Mabel St. George and William Wallace 
Speers. 

'20 S. At Zenia, Ohio, the marriage was cele- 
brated of Mary Katherine Geyer and Lesslie Earl 
Wilmott. 




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Universities, Royal 

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Business. 



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For Boys 

UPPER SCHOOL LOWER SCHOOL 

Calendar Sent on Application. 
REV. D. BRUCE MACDONALD, M.A., LL.D. Headmaster. 



40 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



They will live at 209 Madison 



'20 D. The wedding took place on September 14 
of Velvin May Potter and William Randall Richard- 
son. They will live in Barrie. 

'20 U.C. On September 16 the wedding took 
place at Stratford, jof Dorothy McLagan and James 
Emanuel Hahn. 
Ave., Toronto. 

'1 IT.C. Two of the coveted posts open to 
British students in the French lycees have been 
secured by Noreen Porter, of Toronto, Marguerite 
Gamble, of Brantford. Miss Porter goes to Le Mans 
and Miss Gamble to Grenoble. 

| '21 M. Alice Mooney- Wells is practising Medi- 
cine at 1234 Danforth Ave., Toronto. 

'21 17. C. Mary Millen is the new assistant die- 
titian in the University College Women's Union. 

'21 S. Gordon F. Tracy has been appointed 
research assistant in Electrical Engineering for the 
session 1921-1922. 

'21 Vic. The appointment has been made of Miss 
M. C. Gait as instructor in Food Chemistry in 
Household Science. 

'21 T. Miss C. M. Harwood is appointed in- 
structor in Food Chemistry in Household Science. 

'21 U.C. Lillian M. Phillips is appointed fellow 
in Mathematics at the University. 

'21 U.C. The Rhodes Scholar from Ontario, 
John Ross Stirrett, has left for Oxford where he will 
continue his course of studies for three years. 

'21 U.C. A son, James Emerson, was born at 
Preston, to Mr and Mrs George Shearer Hammond. 

'21 M. The marriage of Roderick Thomas 
Smylie to Mary Margaret Black took place recently 
in Toronto. 

'21 S. The new address of Peter Findlay Mcln- 
tyre is the Consolidated M.S. Co., Traill, B.C. 

'21 Vic., '17 U.C. At Toronto the wedding took 
place in August, of Harold Duke Brown and 
Marguerite Lola Wessels. 

'21 T. Miss R. M. Nevill is appointed assistant 
instructor in Food Chemistry at the University. 

'21 Ag. Cyril Leggatt who headed his class this 
year at O.A.C. sailed on August 27 for Paris to take 
a post-graduate course in Agriculture. 

'21 S. The wedding took place on September 9 
of Joseph Melville Breen, and Winnifred Westman, 
of Toronto. 

'21 M. The wedding took place on September 14 
of Rachel Geldzaeler and Isidore W. Ruskin. They 
will live at 405 Dundas St. W., Toronto. 

'22 U.C. Allan R. Crawford, of Toronto, has 
been chosen by Stefanson, the Arctic explorer, to 
take charge of the advance party of his next expedi- 
tion to the Polar regions. The advance party will 
winter on one of the Canadian islands in the arctic 
doing scientific and exploratory work and trapping 
for the Stefansson Arctic Exploration and Develop- 
ment Company. In July of next year they will be 
joined by Stefansson himself. 



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UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



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42 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



WESTERN ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Fire, Automobile, Hail, Marine, Explosion, Riots, Civil Commotions and Strikes Insurance 
Head Offices: Corner Wellington and Scott Streets, Toronto 

Assets, Ovei $7,900,000.00 

Losses paid since organization of the Company in 1851, Over $81,300,000.00 
Board of Directors 

W. B. MEIKLE, President and General Manager 

John H. Fulton (New York) Geo. A. Morrow, 

Lt.-Col. the Hon. Frederic Nicholls 
Major-Gen'l Sir Henry Pellatt, C.V.O. 



Sir John Aird 

Robt. Bickerdike (Montreal) 

Lt.-Col. Henry Brock 

Alfred Cooper (London, Eng.) 

H. C. Cox 



D. B. Hanna 

John Hoskin, K.C., LL.D. 

Miller Lash 



E. R. Wood 




Hockey and Racing 
Skates, Boots, Sweaters, 

Sweater Coats, 

Cushion Covers and, 

Pennants* 



COLLEGE OUTFITTERS FOR ALL SPORTS 

J. BROTHERTON 



Phone N. 2092 



578 and 580 Yonge Street 



LOOSE 1.1'. LEAF 



Students 9 Note 
Physicians 9 and Dentists 9 

Ledgers 

Memo and Price Booths 
Professional Booths 



BROWN BROS., Limited 

SIMCOE and PEARL STS. 
TORONTO 



Toronto 
Conservatory of Music 

(University of Toronto) 

SIR EDMUND WALKER. C.V.O.. LL.D.. D.C.L.. PRESIDENT. 
A. S. VOGT. MUS. DOC.. MUSICAL DIRECTOR. 
HEALEY WILLAN. MUS. DOC.. F.R.C.O.. ASSISTANT MUSICAL 
DIRECTOR. 



Highest Artistic Standards. Faculty 
of International Reputation. 

The Conservatory affords unrivalled facili- 
ties for complete courses of instruction in all 
branches of music, for both professional and 
amateur students. 



PUPILS MAY ENTER AT ANY TIME 



Year Book and Examination Syllabus 
forwarded to any address on request to 
the Registrar. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



43 




The "Mogul' 

Makes good every time 



you consider that manufactiu'ng Boilers 
and Radiators is our first and biggest responsi- 
bilityWhen you bear in mind that we are the largest 
manufacturers of Boilers and Radiators in the Dominion 
of Canada. Is it any wonder that the SAFFORD 
MOGUL line is the last word in heating boilers ? 

Every MOGUL leaving our plant is inspected by a 
staff of specialists, men who know the manufacture of 
boilers from A to Z, and that is why the SAFFORD 
MOGUL makes good every time and all the time. 

Dominion Radiator Company 



Low-Base Safford Mogul (sectional view) 



Hamilton, Ont. 
St. John, N.B. 
Calgary, Alta. 



TORONTO 

OTTAWA 



Montreal, Que. 
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Vancouver, B.C. 



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for All Ages 

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Used in training 
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digestion 



IN LUNCH TABLET FORM READY TO EAT 



R. LAIDLAW LUMBER CO. 

LIMITED 



HEAD OFFICE 



65 YONGE STREET 



TORONTO 



EVERYTHING IN 

LUMBER AND MILLWORK 



44 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



DOMINION TEXTILE COMPANY LIMITED 

of CANADA 

President Vice- President General Manager and Director 

SIR CHARLES GORDON SIR HERBERT S. HOLT F. G. DANIELS 



HEAD OFFICE: MONTREAL, P.Q. 



MILLS IN MONTREAL, MAGOG AND MONTMORENCY FALLS, P.Q 
AND IN KINGSTON, ONT. 

COTTON FABRICS 

of every description 

PRINTED, DYED, BLEACHED or in the GREY 

for jobbing and cuiling-up trades 



CASAVANT ORGANS 



ARE SUPERIOR IN 



Quality, Design and Workmanship 



Over 800 pipe organs built 
by this firm in 

Canada, United States and 
South America. 



CASAVANT FRERES 

LIMITED 

ST. HYACINTHE 



EIMER & AMEND 

FOUNDED 1851 

Manufacturers, Exporters and 

Importers of 

LABORATORY APPARATUS 
CHEMICALS and SUPPLIES 




NEW YORK 

3rd AVE., 18th to 19th STREETS 

PITTSBURGH BRANCH 

2011 JENKINS ARCADE 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 45 



MASSEY-HARRIS Co., Ltd. 

The largest Manufacturers 

OF 

FARM IMPLEMENTS 
under the British Flag 

Head Offices - TORONTO 

FACTORIES AT 

TORONTO, BRANTFORD (2), WOODSTOCK and WESTON 

AGENCIES EVERYWHERE 



Henry Sproatt, LL.D., R.C.A. Ernest R. Rolph 

Sproatt and Rolph 

Architects 

36 North Street, Toronto 



PAGE & COMPANY 

Cut Stone and Masonry Contractors 

TORONTO 

Contractors on Hart House and Burwash Hall 



46 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



ALUMNI PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY 



ARMOUR & MICKLE 

BARRISTERS, Etc. 

E. DOUGLAS ARMOUR, K.C. 

HENRY W. MICKLE 

A. D. ARMOUR 

CONFEDERATION LIFE BUILDING 

Richmond & Tonge Streets, TORONTO 



STARR, SPENCE, COOPER and ERASER 

BARRISTERS, SOLICITORS, Etc. 

J. R. L. STARR, K .C. J. H. SPENCE 

GRANT COOPER W. KASPAR FRASER 

RUSSELL P. LOCKE HOWARD A. HALL 

Trust and Guarantee Building 
120 BAY ST. - TORONTO 



WILLIAM COOK 

Barrister, Solicitor, Notary, Etc. 

33 RICHMOND ST. WEST 
TORONTO 

Telephone: Main 3898 Cable Address: "Maco" 



ROSS & HOLMSTED 

Barristers, Solicitors, Notaries, Etc. 

NATIONAL TRUST CHAMBERS 

20 King Street East, TORONTO 
JAMES LEITH Ross ARTHUR W. HOLMSTED 



Aylesworth, Wright, Thompson & Lawr 

BARRISTERS, &c. 

SIR ALLEN AYLESWORTH, K.C. 

HENRY J. WRIGHT JOSEPH THOMPSON 

WALTER LAWR 

Traders Bank Building, TORONTO 



TYRRELL, J. B. 

MINING ENGINEER 

534 Confederation Life Building 
TORONTO, CANADA 



Kerr, Davidson, Paterson & McFarland 

Barristers, Solicitors, Etc. 
EXCELSIOR LIFE BUILDING 

Cable Address "Kerdason." Toronto 



W. Davidson. K.C. 

G. F. McFarland. LL.B. 



John A. Paterson, K.C. 
A. T. Davidson, LL.B. 



Solicitors for the University. 



OSLER, HOSKIN and HARCOURT 

Barristers, Solicitors, Etc. 
THE DOMINION BANK BUILDING 



John Hoskin, K.C. 
H. S. Osier, K.C. 
W. A. Cameron 



F. W. Harcourt, K.C. 
Britton Osier 
A. W. Langmuir 



Counsel Wallace Nesbitt, K.C. 



C. H. and P. H. MITCHELL 

CONSULTING AND SUPERVISING ENGINEERS 
CIVIL, HYDRAULIC, MECHANICAL AND ELECTRICAL 

1003 Bank ct Hamilton Building 
TORONTO. Cnt. 



Gregory, Gooderham & Campbell 

BARRISTERS. SOLICITORS. NOTARIES. CONVEYANCERS, &C. 

701 Continental Life Building 
167 Bay Street Toronto 

TELEPHONE MAIN 6070 

Walter Dymond Gregory Henry Folwell Gooderham 

Frederick A. A. Campbell Arthur Ernest Langman 

Goldwin Gregory Vernon Walton Armstrong 

Frederick Wismer Kemp 



WALTER J. FRANCIS & COMPANY 

CONSULTING ENGINEERS 
MONTREAL 

WALTER J. FRANCIS, C.E. 
FREDERICK B. BROWN, M.Sc. 

R. J. EDWARDS & EDWARDS 

ARCHITECTS 

18 Toronto St. : Toronto 



R. J. EDWARDS 



G. R. EDWARDS. B.A.Sc. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



47 



BRITISH AMERICA ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Fire, Marine, Hail and Automobile Insurance 
HEAD OFFICES: COR. FRONT AND SCOTT STS., TORONTO 

Incorporated A.D. 1833 

Assets, Over $4,300,000 

Losses Paid since Organization in 1833, Over $47,500,000 



FRANK DARLING, LL.D.. F.R.I.B.A. 



JOHN A. PEARSON 



DARLING & PEARSON 

Hrcbttects 

MEMBERS OF THE ROYAL ARCHITECTURAL INSTITUTE OF CANADA 
MEMBERS ONTARIO ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS 
MEMBERS QUEBEC ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS 

MANITOBA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS 



IMPERIAL BANK CHAMBERS 

2 LEADER LANE TORONTO 



The best flour and highest quality of ingredients 

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The choice of 
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MONET 
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There is no better way to send money 
by mail. If lost or stolen, your 
money refunded or a new order issued 
free of charge. 



48 UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



Department of Education for Ontario 

SCHOOL AGES 

AND 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



In the educational system of Ontario provision is made in the Courses 
of Study for instruction to the child of four years of age in the Kinder- 
garten up to the person of unstated age who desires a Technical or 
Industrial Course as a preparation for special fitness in a trade or pro- 
fession. 

All schools established under the Public Schools Act shall be free 
Public Schools, and every perspn between the ages of five and twenty- 
one years, except persons whose parents or guardians are Separate 
School supporters., shall have the right to attend some such school in the 
urban municipality or rural school section in which he resides. Children 
between the ages of four and seven years may attend Kindergarten 
schools, subject to the payment of such fees as to the Board may seem 
expedient. Children of Separate School supporters attend the Separate 
Schools. 

The compulsory ages of attendance are from eight to fourteen years 
and provision is made in the Statutes for extending the time to sixteen 
years of age, and also to eighteen years of age, under conditions stated 
in The Adolescent School Attendance Act of 1919. 

The several Courses of Study in the educational system under the 
Department of Education are taken up in the Kindergarten, Public, 
Separate, Continuation and High Schools and Collegiate Institutes, and 
in Industrial and Technical Schools Copies of the Regulations regard- 
ing each may be obtained by application to the Deputy Minister of 
Education, Parliament Buildings, Toronto. 
13th May, 1921 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 49 



Untoergttp of Toronto 

(The Provincial University of Ontario) 



With its federated and affiliated colleges, its various faculties, and 
its special departments, offers courses or grants degrees in: 

ARTS leading to the degree of B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. 

COMMERCE . Bachelor of Commerce. 

APPLIED SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING. .B.A.Sc., M.A.Sc., 
C.E., M.E., E.E., Chem.E. 

MEDICINE M.B., B.Sc. (Med.), and M.D. 

EDUCATION B.Paed. and D.Paed. 

FORESTRY. B.Sc.F. and F.E. 

MUSIC . Mus. Bac. and Mus. Doc. 

HOUSEHOLD SCIENCE AND SOCIAL SERVICE. 

PUBLIC HEALTH D.P.H. (Diploma), 

PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING. 

LAW LL.B., LL.M. and LL.D. (Hon.). 

DENTISTRY D.D.S. 

AGRICULTURE B.S.A. 

VETERINARY SCIENCE .... B.V.S. and D.V.S. 
PHARMACY Phm.B. 

TEACHERS' CLASSES, CORRESPONDENCE WORK, 
SUMMER SESSIONS, SHORT COURSES for FARMERS, 
for JOURNALISTS, in TOWN-PLANNING and in HOUSE- 
HOLD SCIENCE, University Classes in various cities and towns, 
Tutorial Classes hi rural and urban communities, single lectures 
and courses of lectures are arranged and conducted by the 
Department of University Extension. (For information, write 
the Director.) 

For general information and copies of calendars write the 
Registrar, University of Toronto, or the Secretaries of the Colleges 
or Faculties. 



50 UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



Department- of Education for Ontario 

SCHOOL AGES 

AND 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



In the educational system of Ontario provision is made in the Courses 
of Study for instruction to the child of four years of age in the Kinder- 
garten up to the person of unstated age who desires a Technical or 
Industrial Course as a preparation for special fitness in a trade or pro- 
fession. 

All schools established under the Public Schools Act shall be free 
Public Schools, and every person between the ages of five and twenty- 
one years, except persons whose parents or guardians are Separate 
School supporters, shall have the right to attend some such school in the 
urban municipality or rural school section in which he resides. Children 
between the ages of four and seven years ' may attend Kindergarten 
schools, subject to the payment of such fees as to the Board may seem 
expedient. Children of Separate School supporters attend the Separate 
Schools. 

The compulsory ages of attendance are from eight to fourteen years 
and provision is made in the Statutes for extending the time to sixteen 
years of age, and also to eighteen years of age, under conditions stated 
in The Adolescent School Attendance Act of 1919. 

The several Courses of Study in the educational system under the 
Department of Education are taken up in the Kindergarten, Public, 
Separate, Continuation and High Schools and Collegiate Institutes, and 
in Industrial and Technical Schools. Copies of the Regulations regard- 
ing each may be obtained by application to the Deputy Minister of 
Education, Parliament Buildings, Toronto. 
13th May, 1921 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



ALUMNI PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY 



ARMOUR & MICKLE 

BARRISTERS. Etc. 

E. DOUGLAS ARMOUR, K.C. 

HENRY W. MICKLE 

A. D. ARMOUR 

CONFEDERATION LIFE BUILDING 

Richmond & Yonge Streets, TORONTO 



STARR, SPENCE, COOPER and FRASER 

BARRISTERS, SOLICITORS, Etc. 

J. R. L. STARR, K .C. J. H. SPENCE 

GRANT COOPER W. KASPAR FRASER 

RUSSELL P. LOCKE HOWARD A. HALL 

Trust and Guarantee Building 
120 BAY ST. - TORONTO 



WILLIAM COOK 

Barrister, Solicitor, Notary, Etc. 

33 RICHMOND ST. WEST 
TORONTO 

Telephone: Main 3898 Cable Address: "Maco' 



ROSS & HOLMSTED 

Barristers, Solicitors, Notaries, Etc. 

NATIONAL TRUST CHAMBERS 

20 King Street East, TORONTO 
JAMBS LEITH Ross ARTHUR W. HOLMSTED 



Aylesworth, Wright, Thompson & Lawr 

BARRISTERS, &c. 

SIR ALLEN AYLESWORTH. K.C. 

HENRY J. WRIGHT JOSEPH THOMPSON 

WALTER LAWR 

Traders Bank Building, TORONTO 



TYRRELL, J. B. 

i 

MINING ENGINEER 

634 Confederation Life Building 

TORONTO, CANADA 



Kerr, Davidson, Paterson & McFarland 

Barristers, Solicitors, Etc. 
EXCELSIOR LIFE BUILDING 

Cable Address "Kerdason," Toronto 



W. Davidson, K.C. 

G. F. McFarland. LL.B. 



John A. Paterson, K.C. 
A. T. Davidson, LL.B. 



Solicitors for the University. 



OSLER, HOSKIN and HARCOURT 

Barristers, Solicitors, Etc. 
THE DOMINION BANK BUILDING 



John Hoskin, K.C. 
H. S. Osier. K.C. 
W. A. Cameron 



F. W. Harcourt. K.C. 
Britton Osier 
A. W. Langmuir 



Counsel Wallace Nesbitt, K.C. 



C. H. and P. H. MITCHELL 

CONSULTING AND SUPERVISING ENGINEERS 
CIVIL, HYDRAULIC, MECHANICAL AND ELECTRICAL 

1003 Bank of Hamilton Building 
TORONTO, Cnt. 



Gregory, Gooderham & Campbell 

BARRISTERS. SOLICITORS, NOTARIES. CONVEYANCERS. &C. 

701 Continental Life Building 
167 Bay Street - Toronto 

TELEPHONE MAIN 6070 

Walter Dymond Gregory Henry Folwell Gooderham 
Frederick A. A. Campbell Arthur Ernest Lang-man 

Goldwin Gregory Vernon Walton Armstrong- 

Frederick Wismer Kemp 



WALTER J. FRANCIS & COMPANY 

CONSULTING ENGINEERS 
MONTREAL 

WALTER J. FRANCIS, C.E. 
FREDERICK B. BROWN, M.Sc. 

R. J. EDWARDS & EDWARDS 

ARCHITECTS 

18 Toronto St. : Toronto 



R. J. EDWARDS 



G. R. EDWARDS. B.A.Sc. 



52 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 





per 
Two 4or 35? 

and in tins of 50 & 100 



PLAYER'S 



NAVY CUT 

CIGARETTES 



Sintoersttp of Toronto 



Vol. XXII. TORONTO, NOVEMBER, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND TWENTY-ONE No. 2 



News and Comments 



i nAMc XA/CI i The statement of the 

LOANS WELL Honorary Treasurer 

of the Memorial 

Fund, of October 15, shows a most en- 
couraging condition in regard to the repay- 
ment of loans. There are no notes overdue, 
and already $9,525 has been repaid by 
members of the 1920 and 1921 graduating 
classes. The majority of the 1920 men 
have paid in full their debt to the fund, and 
$1,600 has been returned by graduates of 
last June. 

In spite of the unfavourable earning con- 
ditions of the past summer and the fact that 
there are still in the neighbourhood of 1,200 
ex-service men attending the University, 
the demands on the Fund for the current 
year have been to date, much lower than 
last year. 

Applications have been received as 
follows : 



Faculty or 
College Ap 

Applied Science .... 
Dentistry 
Medicine 


No. of Amount 
plications 

43 $7,767.00 
67 10,300.00 
57 10,386.00 
12 2,690.00 
3 600.00 

1 100.00 
2 400.00 


Arts 


Forestry 


College of Educa- 
tion 


Veterinary 





Totals 



185 $32,243.00 



As students desiring assistance are 
asked to file their applications by October 
15, it is not likely that there will be many 
further requests this year. 

The majority of the applications come 
from students who entered the University 
immediately following the close of the war 
and are now in the third year. With the 
graduation of the 1923 class, returned 
soldier-students w r ill largely disappear from 
the University. 



ROYAL GIFTS 
RECEIVED BY 
VICTORIA 
COLLEGE 



Royal gifts of unusual 
magnificence present- 
ed by King George 
were officially receiv- 
ed by Victoria Col- 
lege on its Charter Day, October 13, the 
occasion of the eighty-fourth anniversary 
of the foundation of the College. The 
gifts were: the Royal Standard which flew 
over Osborne Castle and which covered the 
casket of the late Queen Victoria; a crown 
from the masthead of the Royal Yacht; a 
silver mug used by the Queen in her child- 
hood days; and a portfolio of drawings 
made by the queen and Pr'nce Consort. 
The gifts were unveiled in the presence of 
a large number of graduates and under- 
graduates. Chancellor Bowles in a brief 
address reviewed the history of the College 
from the time of its foundation in 1837 as 
the Upper Canada Academy until later in 
the last century when it became affiliated 
with the University of Toronto. 



ANATOMICAL 

BUILDING 

STARTED 



The Anatomical 
Building is at last in 
the course of erection. 
Behind the Medical 
Building and overlooking the heating plant 
is a scene of much commotion as the new 
building is gradually getting under way. 
It is to be five stories high and its stone 
front and Norman design, with the rounded 
window arches will present a more pleasing 
appearance for the strollers in Queen's 
Park than the unlovely back of the Medical 
Building. 

There are to be two lecture rooms, one 
a very large one with seating capacity for 
about 220, -and a smaller one, to hold about 
100. The remainder of the space will be 
occupied mainly by laboratories, a museum, 
a library, and quarters for the staff. The 
only part of the building that will not be 
devoted exclusively to the use of the 
Anatomy Department, will be a suite of 
rooms for experimental surgery. 



53 



54 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



The new building is going to seem a 
palace to the staff and students of Anat- 
omy. After the cramped and dingy 
quarters in the Biological Building where 
they have previously been housed, Pro- 
fessor McMurrich fears that they will need 
a guide-book to find their way around the 
new Laboratories. For many years the 
staff in Anatomy have waited for their 
building, and during this time they have 
been unable to increase their numbers or 
to enlarge the work of the department as 
was required. 

Owing to its site, on the ravine over- 
looking the heating plant, it was necessary 
to ensure an exceedingly stable foundation, 
and to dig some thirty-odd feet down to a 
bed of clay, on which concrete pillars were 
laid, and these pillars form the supports of 
the building. 



Doctor of Philosophy. Throughout his 
long connection with the University and 
Victoria College he has shown himself a 
staunch and fearless advocate of the 
highest standards of scholarship. The 
Oxford Press will shortly publish for him 
an important work on the interpretation 
of obscure passages in Latin Literature. 



ENROLMENT 
UP AGAIN 
THIS YEAR 



PROFESSOR 
BELL RESIGNS 



A. J. Bell, professor 
of Comparative Phil- 
ology in the Univer- 
sity of Toronto, and John Macdonald pro- 
fessor of Latin in Victoria College, has 
announced his retirement from active 
teaching work. He will henceforth devote 
his energies to writing. 

Dr Bell graduated from the University 
in 1878 and for a short time taught school 
in St. Thomas. He then joined the Staff 
of Victoria University in Cobourg. Later 
he studied in Germany and received from 
the University of Breslau the degree of 



The enrolment figures 
for the current year 
show an increase in 
attendance of approxi- 
mately 550 over that of last year. In- 
cluding the affiliated Colleges there are 
5,873 in attendance. The enrolment in 
Faculties and Colleges is as follows: 
Arts 

University College 1205 

Victoria College 540 

St. Michael's College 236 

Trinity College 140 2121 

Summer Session and Teachers' 

Course 157 

Medicine 1073 

Applied Science 804 

Graduate Studies 175 

Forestry 61 

Music 11 

Social Service 286 

Education 142 

Dentistry 818 

Pharmacy 137 

Veterinary 88 

5873 



~^y" V^^* V 1 7T l'St i tf^ ' ~' V-n-J 'tfTTj ?^ yjJ3 




ARCHITECT'S DRAWING OF FRONT ELEVATION, ANATOMICAL BUILDING. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



55 



THE McGILL 
CENTENARY 



On October 11 to 15 
McGill University 
celebrated the one 
hundredth anniversary of the receipt of its 
charter as an institution qualified to 
organize higher educational work. Nearly 
fifty per cent of McGill's 6,000 living 
graduates were present on the occasion. 
The programme included class and faculty 
reunions, a special convocation for the 
installation of the new Chancellor, E. W. 
Beatty, and for the conferring of honorary 
degrees, lectures by members of the staff, 
the McGill-Varsity football game, and 
other special features. 

In the will of the Hon. James McGill who 
died in 1813, 10,000 and a large tract of 
land were placed in trust for the foundation 
of a university or college in Montreal. A 
Royal Charter was secured on March 21, 
1821, but it was not until 1829 that active 
teaching was done. For twenty-five years 
teaching was confined chiefly to Medicine. 
The Arts Faculty was established in 1843 
but had, on the appointment of Sir William 
Dawson as President in 1855, only four 
professors, a lecturer, and fifteen students. 
A Faculty of Law was established in 1855 
and in 1857 a beginning was made in the 
organization of a Faculty of Science, but 
the University was greatly handicapped 
in these years by lack of funds. Little 
support had been received from the Pro- 
vincial Legislature and it was not until the 
eighties that private munificence gave the 
University an endowment nearly adequate 
for its needs. To-day McGill has some 
4,000 students in attendance 
and courses are given in all 
branches of university work. 

The University of Toronto 
centenary falls in 1927. 



various problems of food and diet are 
discussed, and the laboratory work, which 
is optional and limited to 70, deals with 
food values. As a result of its popularity 
the course may possibly be repeated after 
Christmas. 



The Marfleet Lectures on the Evolution 
of the Canadian Constitution were deliv- 
ered by Sir Robert Borden in Convocation 
Hall on October 5, 6, and 7. The first 
lecture sketched the constitutional de- 
velopment in Canada up to 1867. The 
second and third dealt with the period 
between Confederation to the world war 
and from the beginning of the war until 
the present time, together with specula- 
tions into Canada's future. One of the 
noticeable features was Sir Robert's de- 
tached and altogether unbiased presenta- 
tion of a period of history in which he 
himself as premier was burdened with such 
heavy responsibility. 



The inauguration of the Literary and 
Athletic Society of University College took 
place on October 11 in West Hall. The 
old "Lit" is dead and from its ashes has 
arisen a new "Lit" full of the life and vigour 
of youth. The chief speakers of the evening 
were the retiring Honorary President, 
Professor Jackson, the new Honorary 
President, Professor Cochrane, Principal 
Hutton, and the President of the Society, 
F. L. Hutchison. In all their speeches the 
same tone was manifested a belief that 



A practical course in 
Household Science that may 
be useful to the average 
house-wife in the city in her 
everyday life is being offered 
by the Extension Department 
of the University under the 
direction of Miss A. L. Laird. 

Although it was tried to 
limit the registration to 70, 
about 82 are at present in 
attendance. In the lectures, 
which are given twice weekly 




McGILL COLLEGE IN 1845. 

The building on the right is now used for administration purposes; that 
l^on the left forms part of the Arts Building. 



56 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



the new Lit, in combining the literary and 
athletic activities of the College would 
more adequately meet the needs of the 
average and the all-round student, who 
should be a combination of the "semi- 
scholastic and athletic" type. 



The prizes offered by J. L. Counsell, 
B.A. (U.C.) '97 for the Fabian Competition 
last year were won by G. R. F. Troop, B.A. 
(U.C.) '21 and C. S. Brubacher, a student 



of the present fourth year. Arrangements 
are already being made for the competition 
of 1321-22 although it is not definitely 
known what form the competition will 
take, but the announcement will be made 
at the earliest possible date. Mr. Counsell 
was justly proud of the work brought out 
last year and will donate the same sub- 
stantial prizes in an effort to direct student 
thought towards the vital issues of the day 
in the Social and Economic world. 



General Meeting of Alumni Called 



AT the meeting of the Board of Directors 
of the Alumni Association held on the 
19th of October, the committee deal- 
ing with the re-organization of the Associa- 
tion reported that The Alumni Federation 
of the University of Toronto had been duly 
incorporated and organized, and that a 
form of transfer of all the undertaking and 
assets of the Alumni Association, including 
the Memorial Fund, from the Association 
to the new Federation had been prepared 
and approved by the Board of the Federa- 
tion. The form of transfer was submitted 



to the Board of Directors of the Association 
and approved by them and the President 
and Secretary were authorized to execute 
the same. A general, joint meeting of the 
members of The University of Toronto 
Alumni Association and of the members 
of The Alumni Federation of the University 
of Toronto, to confirm the above transfer 
and to elect the Board of Directors for the 
new Federation, to be held in the Lecture 
Room, Hart House, on Friday, November 
11, at 8 p.m. was directed to be called. 
Formal notices appear below. 



The University of Toronto Alumni 
Association 

NOTICE is hereby given that a special, 
general meeting of all the members of 
The University of Toronto Alumni 
Association will be held in the Lecture 
Room, Hart House, on Friday, Novem- 
ber 11, at 8 p.m., for the purpose of con- 
sidering, and if approved, of confirming 
a transfer of all the assets and under- 
taking of the Association, including the 
Memorial Fund, to The Alumni Federa- 
tion of the University of Toronto, and 
for the purpose of winding up the 
Association. 

Dated at Toronto 19th of October, 1921 
By Order of the Board of Directors 

C. A. MASTEN, 

President 

W. N. MACQUEEN, 

Secretary 



The Alumni Federation of the 
University of Toronto 

NOTICE is hereby given to all the 
alumni of the University of Toronto: 

(1) That they are members of The 
Alumni Federation of the University of 
Toronto. 

(2) That a special, general meeting of 
all the members of the Federation is 
hereby called, to be held in the Lecture 
Room, Hart House, on Friday, Novem- 
ber 11, at 8 p.m., for the purpose of con- 
sidering, and if approved, of confirming 
a transfer of all the assets and under- 
taking of the University of Toronto 
Alumni Association, including the Me- 
morial Fund, to The Alumni Federation 
of the University of Toronto. 

(3) The meeting is further called for 
the purpose of electing a permanent 
Board of Directors of the Federation. 
Dated at Toronto 19th of October, 1921 

By Order of the Board of Directors 
C. A. MASTEN, 

President 

W. N. MACQUEEN, 

Secretary 



The Need of the Hour 



whom, if not to its alumni, may a 
1 University look for support in the 
hour of its necessity? At this time 
the University of Toronto requires the 
help of its Alumni and its Alumnae more, 
perhaps, than ever before in its history. 

The Report of the Royal Commission 
on University Finances which was laid 
before the Legislature of Ontario at last 
year's session is, though it does not recom- 
mend all that this University needs, an ex- 
ceedingly able, comprehensive, and satis- 
factory Report. Prepared by gentlemen 
who know the requirements as well as the 
possibilities of the three Universities con- 
cerned, this Report places the Provincial 
University on the plane to which its long 
history and its effective work have entitled 
it; at the same time the Report deals 
generously with the other two Universities 
and is quite satisfactory to them. 

No better policy for the support of higher 
education in this Province than that laid 
down in the Report has, as yet, been 
enunciated. Objections have, it is true, 
been raised to making the Provincial 
University dependent on the revenue from 
succession duties, variable as this revenue 
may conceivably be ; but the disadvantages 
of this probability of variation have been 
very largely overcome by the system of 
computation suggested. Moreover, the 
great advantage of this scheme an ad- 
vantage which overshadows any seeming 
disadvantage is that the University could 
be assured in advance of the amount of its 
income over a period of years and could 
plan its expansion accordingly. The lack 
of funds on which it could rely, the im- 
possibility of planning for the year ahead, 
the uncertainty as to probable revenue 
these handicaps have retarded the^develop- 
ment of the University more than most 
people realize. 

Though it was widely accepted through- 
out the Province, without any serious 
criticism of it in any quarter, and though 
it was accepted almost without reservation 
by all three Universities, the Government 
was obliged, because of lack of time for its 
consideration, to postpone action on the 
Commission's Report until the session of 
1922. Under all the circumstances it would 
therefore seem advisable that the graduates 
and friends of the Provincial University 
should adopt as their own the policy laid 
down in this Report and should advocate 



it and "push" it with their utmost energy, 
until it has been accepted by the Govern- 
ment of Ontario or until a better policy has 
been adopted in its stead. This is a need 
of the hour. 

There is a danger that, because the 
Report is now some months old, enthusiasm 
for its adoption may have waned. Such a 
relaxation of effort would be fatal. The 
people of the Province must be supplied 
with complete information so that their 
support of the University's position may 
be secured. No Government can go 
beyond public opinion but the alumni 
of the University can mould an intelligent 
public opinion. This, again, is a need of 
the hour. 

When a friend of the University of 
Toronto discusses with one unfamiliar 
with present conditions the urgent needs 
that are now so hampering the University's 
development, he may be met with the 
reply that the Provincial University is 
asking for a very large sum of money. But 
what commercial undertaking, whether 
farm or shop or factory, having been 
cramped for seven years and having been 
denied the means of development necessary 
for" the expansion which came upon us so 
suddenly on the conclusion of the war, 
would not now, after such lean years, re- 
quire a large sum for justifiable expansion? 
Just this is the situation of our University; 
it must overtake the arrearages in develop- 
ment that seven years of inadequate 
revenue have brought. 

The University of Toronto appeals, then, 
to its graduates and friends for their 
assistance in making known to the citizens 
f Ontario, whose property this University 
is, the facts on which its case rests. Gener- 
ally, these may be said to be as follows: 
need for new buildings, for an increased 
and better paid staff, and for a larger 
revenue in order that graduate and re- 
search work may be prosecuted more 
vigorously. Our necessities are based 
mainly upon present conditions and not 
on prospective increases in numbers. The 
students we have must be provided for. 
By raising our standards we are limiting our 
numbers as much as we can safely do. At 
present these cannot be taken care of satis- 
factorily without additions to our buildings 
and without increases to the staff. There 
is no likelihood that, even when standards 
are raised, the attendance will be reduced 



57 



8 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



below what it was before the war, and at 
that time the accommodation and the 
teaching staff were quite inadequate. 
Should other universities be developed and 
new colleges be established, this University 
would not be relieved of the necessity of 
providing for the large numbers who will 
undoubtedly desire to receive their educa- 
tion in the Provincial University. Besides, 
there is the necessity of so providing for 
the Provincial University that it will not 



be necessary for any boy or girl of Ontario 
to go to the United States in order to 
obtain an education equal to the best that 
is offered on this continent; also of de- 
veloping research and graduate work if 
we are to maintain our self-respect and 
serve our own people as we should. This 
means greatly enlarged support at the 
present time. 

R. A. FALCONER. 



Victoria's New Wesley Library 



r I *O his numerous benefactions to the 
1 University and other institutions of 
the city of Toronto Sir John Eaton 
has just added another which makes Vic- 
toria College the proud and fortunate 
possessor of a unique Wesley Library. It is 
not probable that there exists anywhere else 
as notable a collection of the works of John 
and Charles Wesley, and the probability 
is very remote that another collection will 
ever be formed to rob it of its pre-eminence. 
The Library consists of well-nigh six 
hundred publications, all of them issued 
by the Brothers Wesley in their lifetime. 
The volumes are well and beautifully bound, 
and with the exception of a few so small 
a number that they can be counted on the- 
ringers of both hands all are first editions! 
Some of them, it is true, are tiny pamphlets 
of but few pages, needing the support of 
blank leaves between the boards to 
enable them to be bound in uniform 
fashion with the less meagre members of 
the collection. The value of the Library, 
however, is due in no small measure to the 
presence of these brief messages in the 
form in which they were first issued. 

The Library was formed by the late 
Rev. Richard Green, one of the founders 
of the Wesley Historical Society and well- 
known for his untiring and studious re- 
search into all matters pertaining to the 
Wesleys and their writings. For twelve 
years he was Governor of Didsbury 
College, Manchester, retiring in 1900 and 
passing the remaining seven years of his 
life in his native city of Birmingham, 
where the Wesley Library, to the collecting 
of which much of the time and thought of 
his best years had been devoted, had its 
home up to the time of its recent trans- 
ference to Toronto. Mr. Green published 



a Bibliography of the Works of John and 
Charles Wesley a volume of three hun- 
dred pages which is virtually a descrip- 
tive catalogue of the Library now housed 
in Victoria College. 

A vast majority of the six hundred vol- 
umes are from the pen of John Wesley, and 
a mere glance at them as they stand on 
their shelves brings home to one the 
astounding industry of the great eighteenth 
century reformer. Had his whole time 
been spent in writing, the output would 
have been amazing; but when we remind 
ourselves of his never-ceasing journeymgs, 
his incessant preaching, the multifarious 
and oftentimes harassing details of admin- 
istration making their demands upon his 
time and attention the amount of his 
literary work is almost staggering. 

With equal force the Library brings 
home to us the amazing versatility of 
John Wesley. In addition to his more 
directly religious writings here are works 
bearing such varied titles as Primitive 
Physick, The Cause and Cure of Earth- 
quakes, A Compendium of Logick, Thoughts 
on the Present Scarcity of Provisions, A 
Short Roman History, A Concise History of 
England, An Estimate of the Manners of 
the Present Times; here are also short 
Hebrew, Greek, Latin and French Gram- 
mars. Wesley's writings touched the life 
of eighteenth century England at almost 
every point, and in them all his sole purpose 
was the elevation of the people. His 
record of industrious self-devotion is per- 
haps unparalleled in the history of man- 
kind. The presence of this Library at 
Victoria cannot fail to make for the en- 
richment of the life of the University. 

J. HUGH MICHAEL. 



Freshmen, Yesterday and To-Day 

An Address to the First Year 



I CAN look back over forty years of fresh- 
men now. What differences are there? 
The differences are due to political 
conditions, chiefly to the growth of de- 
mocracy and the spread of public and 
general education. The growth of de- 
mocracy has increased very greatly the 
attendance at University College. Forty 
years ago, perhaps the number 340 repre- 
sents fairly well the attendance of men in 
all years, and there were no women. 
To-day there are 600 men alone registered 
in the College and almost as many women. 
Democracy like every other system and 
like every individual soul has the qualities 
of its defects and the defects of its quali- 
ties. What are the qualities of its defects? 
The aristocratic vices the vices of an 
upper class with money to burn are not 
conspicuous. There is no drinking com- 
pared with what there was, and this is 
not due wholly or solely to the enforced 
temperance of Ontario. Enforced tem- 
perance is not a very valuable virtue 
obviously, nor a very safe virtue; it is 
easily upset by "opportunity," if oppor- 
tunity arises. Some people have said, 
"there is no such thing as virtue; it is 
only want of opportunity." They would 
say that this temperance of our students 
was only lack of opportunity; but it is 
not so. I have seen the spirit of temper- 
ance promoted by the undergraduates 
against the graduate element during the 
last twenty years and before temperance 
was compulsory. Temperance was due 
to the prevalence of a class not influenced 
by aristocratic vices. "As drunk as a 
lord," illustrates what I mean. Our stud- 
ents are less and less like lords; for better 
or for worse, alike less lordly. "Every 
gentleman has been drunk; no gentleman 
gets drunk" is another, more subtle and 
less equivocal, aristocratic maxim. I have 
often winced when I heard it. I have 
been too busy with books and thoughts 
to have had time to become a gentleman, 
and now it looks as if I should never have 
the opportunity. I think our students 
are more temperate and virtuous in this 
matter of temperance more temperate 
in all branches of temperance than their 
predecessors forty years ago. This is 
all to the good. All temperance is good 
though compulsory temperance is an 




By order of the Sophomores of Queen's Hall, the First Year 

girls were required to wear odd hose; after two days, by order 

of the College authorities the practice was discontinued. 

inferior goodness. But no human system 
is wholly good. Every system has the 
defects of its qualities and now I come to 
the drawbacks of our system. 

The defects of its qualities! A democ- 
cracy is governed by the average man with 
his defects no less than his qualities. 
It is not likely to have aristocratic vices; 
or to have aristocratic virtues. The virtues 
of a university are rather aristocratic 
the virtues of a leisured class such as 
thought, reading and intellectual interests. 
I don't say intellectual power; intellectual 
power may be equally distributed in all 



59 



60 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



classes and orders, professions and occu- 
pations; but reading, thought, and in- 
tellectual interests are not equally dis- 
tributed, and are not very common 
especially in a material age and in a young 
country developing its material wealth. 
I think intellectual standards are lower 
than they were forty years ago. I think 
our students read less, know less, and are 
less accustomed to thinking seriously; 
have less intellectual interests. They read 
newspapers instead of books, and they 
prefer social functions even to the poor 
reading supplied by our second-rate news- 
papers. 

A democracy is the government of the 
average man. He is a simpler and more 
childish creature than the men of an 
upper class who have seen more of the 
world, travelled more, read more, thought 
more, Our students are much more child- 
ish than their predecessors. They are 
boys and girls; their predecessors some- 
times called themselves "the boys," but 
they were men mainly in mind, for good 
or for evil. 

I will take an illustration. I wish you 
would remember it next year when you 
are sophomores though I don't suppose 
one among you knows what "sophomore" 
means and yet you ought to know, for it 
is not half as Greek as it looks. You are 
not really much handicapped for knowing 
it by your ignorance of Greek. It is as 
much English as it is Greek. Yet, I 
venture to guess that no one of you knows. 

The initiations of forty years ago were 
just as violent more violent than those 
of to day but they were much less childish 
and silly ; much less vulgar and democratic. 

In this matter of initiation our men have 
become women I feel inclined to say 
interested in clothes and hats and our 
women foolish children practising nursery 
"stunts." And though present fashions 
of initiation are in some way better than 
the old less violent they are rather 
worse in another way more silly, more 
vulgar, and also so much more public and 
spectacular. In this age of false publicity 
and excessive organization and foolish 
propaganda and inordinate social functions, 
more people are offended and scandalized 
by University initiations than ever were 



offended in the old days when these things 
were not thrust upon their notice, but were 
kept quiet and not obtruded. 

Only very fresh freshmen were offended 
in the old days. To-day all freshmen and 
still more all "freshettes" may be offended, 
and the great public. Many mature men 
and women are offended and the University 
loses caste and many people scoff at it as 
only a silly school of children. The whole 
age, the whole world is supremely silly. 
Look at Charlie Chaplin's reception in 
London. But a University is expected to 
be less silly than a big city of four million 
people, two million of whom do not know 
their right hand from their left, and are 
prepared to go out into the wilderness, 
that is, into the streets, after any false 
prophet however cheap. 

I will make one more observation about 
these initiations. If you only knew a 
little more biology you would drop them. 
They have no real occasion in this country. 
There is a biological -law that each indi- 
vidual goes through very briefly and 
quickly and even before birth the stages 
through which his ancestors have passed 
slowly. Initiation in the United States 
is an illustration of that biological law. 
That country is based on insurrection. 
It was born in insurrection. Every gener- 
ation of students therefore, when it comes 
first to college starts rebelling against the 
other students against the second, third 
and fourth years, and has to be reduced 
to order. Hence the elaborate initiations 
of the United States very violent some- 
times, very foolish often, but yet explicable 
biologically. This country which did not 
arise out of insurrection but even in some 
measure out of the opposite out of 
respect for old ties; out of affection for 
old memories ; this country had no occasion 
to expect insurrection from its freshmen 
and no need for elaborate repression. 
It is all a foolishness here with no historical 
explanation or historical justification; just 
an uncalled for and quite unnecessary 
imitation of the United States; just a 
gratuitous piece of folly for us; just a 
"superfluity of naughtiness" in the lan- 
guage of theology. 

MAURICE HUTTON. 
Oct. 1, 1921. 



s 

Graduate Organizations in the University of Toronto 



HPHE importance of graduate organiza- 
1 tions in the life of a university is 
very great, and their complete history 
in the University of Toronto would be 
most interesting. Such a work ought to 
be undertaken and some day, perhaps, 
someone brave enough to face it may be 
found. In the present paper, however, 
no such ambitious enterprise is contem- 
plated. Attention will not now be directed 
to the mere special groupings of graduates 
as we find them in fraternities, in the 
various faculties, and in federating colleges, 
but we shall confine ourselves to such 
organizations as Convocation and the more 
comprehensive Alumni Associations. 

The royal charter granted by King 
George IV, dated at Westminster, March 
15, 1827, the parchment original of which 
is in the Bursar's possession, and a copy 
of which may be found in the Journal of 
the House of Assembly of Upper Canada 
for 1828, contains a clause providing for 
the institution of a body to be called Con- 
vocation. Convocation was to be com- 
posed of the Chancellor, President and 
Professors, and all those who had been 
admitted to the degree of Master of Arts, 
or to any degree in Divinity, Law, or 
Medicine, and who had paid an annual 
fee of twenty shillings, sterling money. The 
members of Convocation were to enjoy 
the like privileges as were enjoyed by the 
members of the Convocation of the Uni- 
versity of Oxford. 

In the University Acts passed subse- 
quently, up to the year 1853, these pro- 
visions were retained. But in the Act of 
that year all reference to the rights of 
graduates in Convocation disappears. 

For twenty years the law was silent re- 
garding Convocation. But in this period 
there were important changes in the situa- 
tion of the University. It was gradually 
acquiring strength in numbers of students 
and of graduates, and although they had 
no legally authorized organization they 
seem to have made their influence felt 
when they thought there was need of 
action. For instance in the year 1862 
there was activity amongst the graduates 
under the leadership of men like Edward 
Blake (B.A. 1854) in opposing the adoption 
of the Report of the Royal Commission, 
consisting of the Hon. James Patton, Dr 
John Beatty, and Mr John Paton, which 
recommended that the endowment of the 



University should be shared with the 
denominational colleges. Later, in 1866 
and in 1872 there were meetings of gradu- 
ates and the formation of organizations 
for the purpose of impressing upon Parlia- 
ment the needs of the University. 

In the second parliament of the Ontario 
Legislature, elected in 1871, there was a 
group of able and active graduates who 
made themselves felt in University affairs. 
During the session of 1873, the Hon. Adam 
Crooks (B.A. 1852), at that time Pro- 
vincial Treasurer and later Minister of 
Education (1876-1883), brought in a Bill 
to amend the University Act. One of the 
principal items of the bill was that relating 
to the resuscitation of Convocation. In 
his speech on the second reading of the 
bill (Jan. 21, 1873) he stated in reply to 
an objection of Mr A. W. Lauder, who 
claimed that the graduates did not desire 
the change, that in 1866 and also in 1872 
this very amendment had been asked for 
by a Graduates' Association. Mr Crooks 
was ably supported in the debate by such 
graduates as Mr James Bethune (LL.B. 
1861), Mr H. M. Deroche (B.A. 1868), 
and Mr Thomas Hodgins (B.A. 1856, 
LL.B. 1858). The bill was supported 
also by the Hon. Oliver Mowat, at that 
time Attorney General and leader of the 
Government. 

The bill passed the House and received 
the royal assent, March 29. But, although 
there seemed to be enthusiasm amongst 
the graduates at this attempt to popu- 
larize the government of the University, 
very little came of the movement, except 
the direct election of the Chancellor and 
a certain number of members of the Senate 
by the alumni. There was no devolution 
of the powers of the Provincial Govern- 
ment to the Senate, or other body, in 
matters pertaining to university finance. 
All appointments to the Staff remained 
in the hands of the Government and after 
1876 these appointments were made on 
the recommendation of the Minister of 
Education, naturally generally after consul- 
tation with the President, Chancellor, and 
Vice-Chancellor, or other persons who 
might have the confidence of the Minister 
or his colleagues. It apparently did not 
occur to the Legislature that it made little 
difference how the Senate was elected, in 
so far as its effect on the minds of the 
graduates was concerned. 



61 



62 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



But there were other clauses in this Act 
which were intended to give the alumni 
an opportunity to organize themselves 
and thus bring their influence to bear on 
"the well-being and prosperity of the 
University". Provision was made for 
the appointment of a Chairman and Clerk 
of Convocation, and it was enacted that, 
"once at least in every year, and as often 
as they may think fit, the Senate shall 
convene a meeting of Convocation". 

But in spite of what seemed wise and 
liberal provisions, practically nothing was 
done to make Convocation a real force 
in the life of the University. It is true 
that Convocation was organized and met 
June 10, 1873, with thirty-two persons 
present and proceeded to elect the Hon. 
Thomas Moss (B.A. 1858) Chairman, and 
Mr W. Fitzgerald (B.A. 1866) Clerk of 
Convocation, and in subsequent years 
up to 1899 it met some twenty times, busy- 
ing itself mostly with questions regarding 
its own constitution and that of the 
Senate. After the death of Mr Moss in 
1881, the Hon. J. A. Boyd (B.A. 1860) 
became Chairman and remained so for 
a number of years. In 1886 Mr Fitzgerald 
resigned as Clerk and Mr W. F. W. Creel- 
man (B.A. 1882) took his place, after 
which Mr F. N. Kennin (B.A. 1873) acted 
for a time. The last manifestation of 
energy exhibited by Convocation was its 
protest against the abolition of the old 
Residence in 1899. But it had lost any 
hold it had on the graduates long before 
that date. A writer signing himself 
"M.A." in Varsity of October 30, 1880, 
in discussing the question of the imposition 
of a fee of a dollar expressed the opinion 
of most people when he spoke thus, "I 
believe that the imposition at the present 
time of a fee that has to be paid under 
penalty of loss of membership would have 
the effect of knocking out of Convocation 
what flickering life has been recently in- 
fused into it. This body was created 
nearly eight years ago, and, during the 
first seven of these years, nothing was 
done to justify its existence". There seem 
to have been occasional flutters of excite- 
ment, and measures of various kinds were 
proposed and amendments to the Univer- 
sity Act, as for instance in the session of 
1881, were passed by the Legislature but 
the machine refused to function properly. 
One hears vaguely eminent names in 



connection with the offices of Chairman 
and Clerk of Convocation but nothing 
worth while is done. And so it went on. 
The law constantly provided for the exist- 
ence of Convocation but its meetings were 
irregular and its influence nil. It is curious, 
however, to note that even in the Act of 
1906 the existence of this venerable body 
is solemnly perpetuated in sections 57-66, 
but its real activities have been limited 
to the election of the Chancellor and a 
certain number of members of Senate. 

But time moved on. The University 
began to grow more rapidly, and as the 
numbers of students and of graduates 
increased, the need of some vital organiza- 
tion of alumni was more keenly felt. Con- 
currently with the growth of this feeling, 
the conviction deepened in the minds of 
many that Convocation could never be 
developed into an organ for the defence 
and strengthening of the University. Var- 
ious plans were talked of and finally in the 
spring of 1892 a group of graduates in 
Arts of University College, who were 
gathered in Toronto at the time of the 
Easter teachers' meetings, met to con- 
sider the situation. Sir Daniel Wilson 
was chosen chairman and the present 
writer acted as secretary of the meeting. 
William Dale (B.A. 1871) made a speech 
setting forth the needs of University 
College, forced to develop upon a very 
limited budget and in the midst of hostile 
rival interests. It was decided by the 
meeting to organize an Alumni Associa- 
tion for University College and a committee 
was chosen to draft a constitution and 
nominate officers. 

The first meeting of the Association was 
called for the evening of University 
Commencement, June 10, and it was very 
successful. Professor James Loudon 
(B.A. 1862) was made president and 
William Dale secretary. A second meet- 
ing was held on August 4 with a large 
attendance and a good deal of excitement, 
caused to some extent by the strenuous 
election campaign then being carried on 
for members of the Senate. Indeed, one 
party of the time charged the founders 
of the Association with creating it as an 
engine for election purposes and pro- 
phesied that it would disappear as soon 
as the elections were over. But these 
prophecies were not fulfilled. The Associ- 
ation lived on for a couple of years. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



63 



But soon an important change in its con- 
stitution occurred. On August 7, Sir 
Daniel Wilson died, and on September 13, 
Professor James Loudon was appointed 
President of the University in his stead. 
He thereupon retired from the presidency 
of the Alumni Association of University 
College, and the Hon. S. H. Blake (B.A. 
1858) was elected as his successor. Meet- 
ings of the Association were held, one of 
which at least was rather important. It 
was a meeting with two sessions, one for 
business in the afternoon of March 30, 
1894, and the other a large public meeting 
in the evening of the same day. At the 
evening meeting Dr James B. Angell, 
President of the University of Michigan, 
made a very eloquent and inspiring 
address. 

The Association was never formally 
dissolved, but it ceased activities on ac- 
count of the removal of Mr William Dale 
from his place in the Staff of University 
College as associate professor of Latin. 
Mr Dale had written a letter which ap- 
peared in the Globe on February 9, 1895. 
In this letter he criticized various Uni- 
versity people in such a caustic fashion as 
to produce anger and indignation in the 
University and his demission followed a 
few days after. A strike of the students 
was declared and an investigation by a 
Royal Commission was ordered, all of 
which produced much excitement and 
confusion. 

The graduates were again without any 
vital organization, but on the part of 
several, there was a firm determination to 
found an Alumni Association. One of 
the most firm in this resolve was President 
Loudon. He never abandoned the con- 
viction of the necessity for such an organ- 
ization. Fortunately for" him and for the 
idea of an Association he had about him 
in the various Faculties, a number of 
colleagues equally convinced of the need 
of such a body. Amongst these two of 
the most enthusiastic and resourceful 
were R. A. Reeve (B.A. 1862) and J. C. 
McLennan (B.A. 1892). The decisive 
impulse to action seems to have come from 
the University Club of Ottawa which in 
the month of March, 1900, issued a 
circular urging that some practical step 
should be taken towards founding a 
general Alumni Association. The meet- 
ing for organization took place on April 17. 



A constitution was adopted and officers 
were elected. President Loudon was 
chosen Honorary President, Dr Reeve, 
President and Dr McLennan, Secretary. 

The Constitution was brief but ex- 
tremely wide and comprehensive. The 
membership was to consist of all graduates 
and undergraduates in any Faculty of 
the University, and of all persons holding 
official positions in any part of the 
University. 

The Association was very fortunate in 
its choice of President and Secretary. 
No two persons could have been found 
who would devote themselves with more 
fidelity and intelligence to the interests 
of the Association. The Secretary proved 
himself to be a prince among Secretaries 
and rapid progress was made. Among the 
notable occurrences of the first year's 
existence of the Association was the 
organization of a monster deputation of 
Alumni which visited the Government on 
March 13, 1901, and laid before it the 
claims of the University. It was perhaps, 
the most notable popular demonstration 
which had ever been seen in the University 
and its success was due to the energy of 
the Secretary in founding branches all 
over the Province. 

The organization of local branches of 
the Association was vigorously prose- 
cuted and at the end of the first year the 
Secretary was able to report that there 
were seventeen of them in existence. 
They were located as follows: in Barrie, 
British Columbia, Elgin Co., Grey and 
Bruce, Hastings Co., Huron Co., Lennox 
and Addington, Lincoln Co., Middlesex 
Co., Ottawa, Perth Co., Peterborough Co., 
Prince Edward Co., Victoria Co., Waterloo 
Co., Wellington Co., and Wentworth Co. 

But the present is not a convenient 
moment for telling the story of the Asso- 
ciation during the first twenty years of 
its life. That must be postponed just 
now. But when the time comes it will 
be seen how useful to the highest interests 
of the University it has been, and how 
desirable it is that it should go* on with 
unimpaired strength in the accomplish- 
ment of its proper functions. The day 
will probably never come when it can be 
dispensed with. It will be more and more 
needed in the struggles of the future. 

In this sketch many humorous and 
pathetic incidents have been touched on, 



64 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



but lessons are to be learned from it as 
well. We know better now what an 
Alumni Association is useful for. We 
may learn that its chief function is not to 
control university policy, so much as it 
is to keep alive in the hearts of the people 
a love for learning and for the institutions 
where learning is fostered. An Alumni 
Association is not a place for formulating 
scholarly curricula, but rather for pro- 
moting goodfellowship amongst old friends 
who meet now and then. It is not a 
place for discussing legislative measures, 



so much as it is a place for reviving the 
memory of the days of youth and of its 
escapades. Let us not forget that care- 
fully-worded, logically-developed constit- 
utions and regulations will not save an 
Association from dying of dry-rot. Success 
will depend on the intelligence and de- 
votion of the graduates who guide the 
Alumni groups. These must be carefully 
tended and nurtured. A University should 
never allow its sons and daughters to forget 
their alma mater. 

J. SQUAIR. 



University Settlement Continues its Good Work 



A CHEERY "Hello" greeted us as we 
entered one of the playrooms at the 
University Settlement after a tour of 
inspection one Saturday morning. It came 
from one of the smallest of a group of 
youngsters playing with blocks on 'the 
floor, a yellow-haired, fair-skinned child 
with alert, bright blue eyes. Any attempts 
to elicit further conversation from him were 
in vain; he smiled, but remained mute., 
Later on we heard the child's story and we 
understood the reason of his silence. Little 
John is the son of Austrian and Russian 
parents, and he speaks only the two or three 
words of English which he has picked up 
from his playmates at the settlement. He 
is learning more every day, however, and 
in a few years he will be speaking English 
as fluently as all the bigger boys around 
the place. In the meantime he is learning 
the games and imbibing the spirit of 
Canadian boys and eventually he will 
develop into a full-fledged citizen. This 
Canadianization of the foreigner is one of 
the important phases of settlement work. 

"We want to emphasize the fact that we 
are a friendly group, a recreational, social 
and educational centre, and not a charit- 
able institution", said Miss Campbell, the 
supervisor at the settlement. This spirit 
is developed in the club system. There are 
clubs for all the different groups, for 
mothers, for boys and for girls. Even the 
babies are not forgotten, for every week 
there is a well-baby clinic, to which every 
baby brings its mother and tea is served 



and babies and mothers have a sociable 
time. Then there are two libraries, one of 
them a branch of the Public Library, 
where books are given out twice a week, and 
the well-thumbed volumes give evidence 
as to how much this is appreciated. In two 
of the club-rooms there are pianos so that 
the children can sing and dance, and several 
of them are learning how to play. The 
billiard-room, judging by its appearance 
is heartily enjoyed by the boys and looks 
accustomed to hard usage. Everything 
around the house bears witness to the fact 
that swarms of children haunt the place 
and the cosy and attractive club-rooms 
provide a comfortable background. Every 
year the children give plays, and their own 
dramatic instincts fostered by the poise 
and self-control gained in organizing and 
running clubs makes the plays well-acted 
and genuinely interesting. 

Every year the work of the Settlement 
increases. This summer they held a camp 
up on Lake Simcoe, at which some 232 
people visited. More helpers are required 
yearly and these are obtained chiefly from 
the ranks of University students and 
University graduates of the Social Service 
and other courses. In helping the Univer- 
sity settlement to teach little foreigners 
like John to play and exercise their minds 
and bodies, and to grow up into sturdy 
Canadian citizens, they are helping to forge 
another link between the University and 
the nation. 



: - ; My Life 

Fragments from an as yet unpublished Autobiography of Stephen Leacock 



ALL my life I have lived in fear that, 
sooner or later I always hoped it 
would be later some one would tell 
the truth about me. 

Whenever I signed an Hotel Register, 



down the nights and down the days and 
around the block by some imaginary canine 
phantasm. I simply had to find some 
way of poisoning that dog; At last I had 
it. My great idea was to write my own 



I fully expected to feel a clammy hand on biography and prove that my life is a 

biological necessity. 

"When they arrest me," said I to myself, 
"I shall whip out my confessions and show 
that I have beaten them to it and scooped 
their entire reportorial staff. Gentlemen 
of the jury, I shall say, or better still, 
beautiful ladies .of the jury, I am a victim 
of extenuating circumstances. I am guilt- 
less of false pretences. Observe me care- 
fully. My sleeves are empty. I haven't 
a rabbit or even a rabbit's foot concealed 
about me anywhere. I wrote the miser- 
able stuff. I don't deny it. I confess it. 
I even deplore it. If you must indict 
something, indict the soulless University 
which by giving me one tenth of a 
scavenger's wage, drove me into a life of 
shame and ignominy." 



the nape of my neck, and to hear a voice 
cry out, "Stephen Butler Leacock, alias 
Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Lowest Common 
Multiple, I arrest you as a Literary 
Fraud." 

As a result, I had to stop wearing coat 
collars and other points d'appui and pieces 
de resistance. 

Again, whenever I heard people in the 
street say "We've got you Steve," I 
trembled all over. 

I really thought they had. 

After all, why shouldn't they get me? 
There was I going abroad brazenly with 
the goods on me. All they had to do was 
to shake the Nonsense Novels out of my 
pocket and they would have found my 
union card in the Grand Army of Respect- 
able Citizens and Perfectly Safe Plati- 
tudinizers. Strip- 
ped to my under- 
clothing I was 
about as Bohemian 
as a Bohemian 
orchestra or aMeth- 
odist Chautauqua. 
In puris naturalibus 
I was -- well, just 
like everybody else 
or nearly so. 

I am a man who 
finds it hard to get 
away with any- 
thing. The hotel 
porter always 
searches my lug- 
gage-ALWAYS. 
When I dropped a 
workingman 's 
ticket in the fare- 
box, the conductor 
always stared at me. 
Often he sneered 
openly. Once he 
spat in disgust. 
Fortunately he 
.missed me. 

It is a terrible 
thing to be chased 




Whenever I signed an Hotel Register, I fully expected to feel a clammy hand on 

the nape of my neck, and to hear a voice cry out, "Stephen Butler Leacock, 

alias Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Lowest Common Multiple, I arrest 

you as a Literary Fraud.' 1 

65 



66 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



This Burke's Irish rhapsody will, I 
flatter myself, do the trick. Provided that 
the ladies of the harem I mean jury 
are sufficiently unattractive to appreciate 
my eulogy of their pulchritude. 

Here then is my sole true and authorized 
biography, my veritable felo de se. All 
others are NOT the genuine aspirin. I 
am writing it sound in wind and limb, and 
as sober as I ever again expect to be, in 
solemn consciousness that I must shortly 
face my Publisher, very shortly and very 
short, in fact stoney broke. 

A qualification is first necessary. There 
are many biographical details scattered 
throughout my published works. Let it 
be understood that this present statement 
cancels them. For instance, I have spoken 
at times of my wife and five children. I 
have spoken elsewhere of my wife pre- 
sumably the same wife and ten, children. 
I have referred in other passages to the 
twenty little mouths that look to me for 
bread. These children are purely apocry- 
phal. As Professor of Political Economy 
I claim the benefit of Clergy for my 
statistics. These wives are, to put it 
plainly, in my eye. As one who is neither 
a Pluralist nor a Communist, I repudiate 
them. Again, shallow critics on the internal 
evidence of some of my books have jumped 
to the rash conclusion that I occasionally 
take a drink. How grossly they err will 
appear sub finem where I shall reveal the 
tragic secret of my life. 

To begin with, I was born somewhere 
and some time. I have no personal 
recollection of it myself, but, hang it all, 
one must have faith, one must have 
vision to bind together this contradictory 
world of reality. Let scientific deter- 
minism accuse me, if it will, of superstition, 
of vvrepov irporepov, or even of lucus a 
non lucendo, I have a vision of myself 
being born. That is sufficient in my eyes 
to establish the fact. 

Over the events of my early childhood, I 
will draw a veil. They need it. Of my 
precocity I will say only this, that my 
father considered me at the age of ten an 
absolute idiot. The dear old man lived 
to see his diagnosis confirmed, and to 
share with tears of joy a part, a very, 
very small part, of my monetary success 
with the public. Of my adolescence I 
may remark that I was considered by a 
great grandmother who had cataracts on 
both eyes to be an extremely beautiful 
youth. You would hardly believe it if 



you could see me now. Other times, 
other warts and waist measurements. 

I shall never forget my first love affair. 
Nimium te amavi, as John Wesley has it. 
It was a terrible case of infatuation. I 
seemed to be hooked for Time and Eternity 
principally Eternity. In spite of the 
entreaties of my friends, in spite of the 
dictates of my own reason, I clung 
passionately to the object of my affection. 
Playing those four aces against a straight 
flush cost me $1.65 in coin of the realm 
plus an LO.U. for $13.50, which I have 
never yet redeemed. This was my first 
warning of that hereditary frenzy which 
ended at last in fiction. 

At the age of eighteen, I realized the 
marvellous opportunities of our splendid 
material civilization. I went into a bank 
at the monthly wage of $2.50 payable 
monthly. I would now be General Mana- 
ger and would long ago have cleaned up 
millions in Wall Street with the bank's 
money those kind of millions certainly 
do need cleaning had it not been for the 
hand of Fate, the finger of Destiny and 
the brutal toe of Dismissal. No one knows 
how bitterly I resent this constant intrusion 
of Destiny in my domestic affairs. 

I was short two cents one year end in 
my stamp account, and the Bank mag- 
nanimously gave me the choice of capital 
punishment or exile. The President's 
name was well, any name will do. 
Needless to say, I chose exile. I went to 
New York. Why New York? Why not 
South Bend, or Topeka, Kan., or Bangor, 
Me.? Surely, reader, you are not so 
obtuse as to have failed to realize with what 
miraculous genius I incarnate the aver- 
age American mentality. I went to New 
York because everybody was doing it and 
being done by it. 

There I found salvation. There I first 
saw light or rather darkness. There I 
first met Bosh, the great Bosh, the only 
Bosh, the unrivalled Central African phil- 
osopher whose system is bound sooner or 
later to revolutionize all human thought, 
in fact, to dispense with it entirely. 

He had come to America on a little 
matter of copyright. He found that the 
entire populace had stolen or rather 
travestied his discoveries. Bosh, in a 
spurious and degraded form, was being 
openly peddled everywhere. He could get 
no redress. He had been in his youth 
chef d'orchestre to the most polyphonic 






UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



67 



monarch Dahomey ever knew. So he 
entered a jazz band. But his delicate 
Mozartian, Zanzibarian nuances were too 
subtle for the neo-barbarians of Broadway. 
They fired him for not making enough 
noise! 

He was starving when I met him. He 
asked me for bread and I gave him a 
plugged quarter. 

Tears of gratitude welled in his eyes. 
"Young man," he sobbed, "I shall never 
forget this." 

He spoke the truth. He never did get 
rid of it. 

"I must make you some return," he 
went on. 

Personally I never could understand 
some people's mad impulse to pay their 
debts. 

" I will give you my system. I will 
make you my American agent. I will 
initiate you into the mysteries of Bosh, 
including its sub-varieties of Bunk, Piffle 
and Twaddle. First of all you must grasp 
firmly the primary principle of my cosmic 
philosophy. ALL, ALL is BOSH. 

"What!" said I. "All?" 

"Yes," he replied solemnly and sadly, 
"ALL, every bit of it. ' 

I thanked him. It was the first time 
in my life that I had ever given thanks 
and meant it. I saw in a flash the clue 
to all the riddles of the universe, including 
Chief Justice Riddell. I had now the 
key to occult literature and could con- 
verse at ease, in astral googoo, with the 
illustrious dead. In a word I twigged 
that there was oodles of coin in it. 

"But, master," I expostulated timidly, 
"there is Bosh everywhere." He re- 
torted savagely, "Bosh! Do you call 
the ordinary magazine stuff, Bosh? Give 
them the real thing. You can do it. 
As a starter take to Political Economy." 

I took to it. Likewise it took to me. 
I found it the royal road to Bosh, the 
A. B.C. of Bosh, Bosh in its simplest and 
most easily digested form. It gave me 
my first glimmerings of the Larger Lunacy. 
It was the first lap in my Literary Lapses. 
It was my ^first stumble Behind the 
Beyond. 

I kept up a correspondence with Bosh 
after his return to Africa. He sent me 
his manuscripts in the original Bunkum. 
By some kind of intuitive knowledge I 
was able to read them at sight. With 
this unique access to the original sources, 
I easily out distanced all competitors and 



became the foremost exponent of Bosh on 
the North American continent. Bosh 
and Political Economy' Polit'cal Econo- 
my and Bosh! These two will be found 
tattooed on my heart when the surgeons 
dissect me. 

No, never shall I forget Bosh, the source 
of all my prosperity. Since our first 
fateful meeting, many another plugged 
quarter have I slipped to Foreign Missions, 
in the hope that, in the shape of a bottle 
of trade rum, they might somehow find their 
way to that venerable and sublime spirit, 
in his peaceful hermitage on the shores of 
tranquil Lake Tanganyika, or under some 
spreading Bunkum tree on the 'banks of 
the Upper Congo. 

This is a most momentous literary 
confession. It is the TRUTH. Let me 
recapitulate it. 

Bernard Shaw has said, "To those who 
know, it has long been apparent that my 
plays are all Dickens." Personally I 
would say that they are much worse than 
that. Anyway, in my turn I declare that 
by this time it must be obvious, even to 
Professors of English Literature, that my 
works are all Bosh, with a dash of Bunk, 
and a faint trickle of PifHe. But never 
any Twaddle! No, thank Heaven, with 
all my sins I have never descended to 

Twaddle. I leave that to No, I'll be 

hanged if I will. If there is any money in 
Twaddle, I, the sole literary executor of Bosh, 
have as much right to it as anybody. . . . 

This is the tragic secret I promised 
earlier to reveal. 

I am a PROHIBITIONIST. 

Not the ordinary kind of Prohibitionist 
who prohibits others, but a prohibitionist 
who prohibits himself from truck or trade 
or intercourse with prohibitionists. 

Confound this Prohibition, anyway. 
It is a better line of Bosh than anything 
I have done myself. People are beginning 
to realize it. My sales are falling off. 

In a book store, only the other day, I 
heard a customer ask for the funniest thing 
in stock. 

Did the clerk recommend "Frenzied 
Fiction," by Stephen Leacock? 

He did not. 

He handed out "Bone Dry America," 
by the Rev. Mr. Fuller Than Ever. 

No wonder that I'm a Prohibitionist 
with a difference a very considerable 
difference in my income! 

R. C. READE 



The Fifth Provost of Trinity 



WHEN Dr Macklem became fourth 
Provost of Trinity, he was ac- 
claimed as a Canadian. To Dr 
Seager accrues the additional advantage of 
being a Trinity man, steeped in the best 
traditions of the College. 

Dr Seager was born and educated in 
Goderich, where his father, the Crown 
Attorney for the County of Huron, still 
lives. In his native town he was prepared 
for matriculation by that prince of teachers, 
Dr Strang, who followed his boys with 
interest wherever they went. 

Trinity had' as Provost during Dr 
Seager's first two years Dr Body, a man 
of great learning, great executive ability, 




DR. SEAGER 

and great energy, who not only enlarged 
the buildings and increased the endow- 
ments, but who also reformed the educa- 
tional programme, widened the outlook, 
brought the College into co-operation with 
Queen's and Victoria, and earnestly ad- 
vocated federation with the University of 
Toronto. 

Dr Welch, who alone suffered through 
his advocacy of federation, was Provost in 
Dr Seager's final year in Arts and through- 
out his Divinity course. His influence as 
a theologian and as a teacher lives on in 
Dr Seager and in several other men now 
prominent in the councils of the Church of 



England in Canada, notably Dr Owen, 
Dean of Niagara, who was also seriously 
considered in connection with the provost- 
ship. 

Besides these two Provosts, the late 
Professor Clark, as Professor of Philosophy, 
and the late Dr Cayley, as Professor of 
Divinity, had much to do with the training 
of Dr Seager. That training was happily 
continued in the cura,cy at St. Thomas' 
Church, Toronto, in which he served im- 
mediately after ordination, Dr Roper, the 
present Bishop of Ottawa, being at the 
time vicar. 

At St. Cyprian's Church, Toronto, 
which was then in its infancy, Dr Seager 
gave proof of his ministry, his organizing 
gifts being called into play. His sympathy 
and his manhood, his preaching and his 
spititual power not only endeared him 
to his own parishioners but also attracted 
other people. 

No wonder was it therefore that at the 
instance of his classmate at College Dr de 
Pencier, Bishop of New Westminster, he 
was drawn to the West, first as rector of 
Vernon and later as Principal of St. 
Mark's Hall, in the Anglican Theological 
College, Vancouver. Representing in the 
latter capacity what is popularly called 
the High Church wing, he lived on terms 
of friendly regard with Principal Vance, 
of Latimer Hall, co-operating heartily with 
him for the good of their common Church. 

The war drained St. Mark's of students 
and Dr Seager resigned his post in spite 
of the entreaties of his Board. He did not 
wish to take a salary he was not earning and 
he did not wish to be idle. 

Appointed to the rectory of St. Mat- 
thew's Church, Toronto, he has built up 
a strong parish to the east of the Don. 
He has received his reward in the affection 
of his people, the regard of his fellow 
clergy, who trust his sanity and his chanty, 
and the approval of his Bishop, who has 
made him a Canon of St. Alban's Cathedral. 

Notwithstanding the heavy demands of 
his parish, Dr Seager has, for two years 
past, unselfishly given lectures at Trinity. 
Thus he is no stranger to the present 
students and the present staff. 

Besides his own experience of educa- 
tional work Dr Seager has behind him that 
of his maternal grandfather, the Rev J. W. 
Padfield, who was from 1830 to 1833 a 
Master of Upper Canada College. He 



68 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



69 



resigned his post in the College to be 
ordained and to take a mission. 

Of the large committee on union ap- 
pointed at the meeting of the General 
Synod of the Church of England at 
Hamilton, Dr Seager is a member. He has 
a place also on the executive committee 
formed in the same connection. 



Because of his varied gifts Dr Seager 
seems to be the best man to succeed Dr 
Macklem, who resigned eighteen months 
ago, and to carry on to completion the 
erection of the new buildings and the 
removal to Queen's Park. 



A. H. YOUNG. 



An Innovation 



OBVIOUS it is that in all parts of 
Ontario people have heard that a 
great forward movement is taking 
place in the work of the Provincial Univer- 
sity and most of them, it would appear, 
are anxious to take advantage of what the 
University offers them. In arranging ex- 
tension classes it is essential, as a matter of 
policy, that the demand should come from 
outside rather than from inside the Uni- 
versity, because only then does a class 
contain within itself the element of perma- 
nence. People who ask for university 
service are likely to be sufficiently inter- 
ested to persist in attendance on the class 
for which they have asked while those who 
might be dragooned into taking some 
special study must, at best, be indifferent 
students. * For this reason the Department 
of University Extension offers facilities for 
study but does not urge anyone to accept 
its offer. 

This principle is well illustrated in what 
has taken place in Hamilton. The teachers 
in that city heard of a new arrangement 
that had been made to provide for extra- 
mural classes to be held in the evenings 
in cities or towns where the number of 
prospective students was sufficient to make 
these classes worth while. They asked for 
particulars regarding this new scheme and 
secured the following: 

At the March meeting of the Senate of the 
University of Toronto the following important 
principle was laid down. This was done on the 
recommendation of the Extension Committee and 
of the Council of the Faculty of Arts. 

The University of Toronto is very anxious, up to 
the limit of its powers as determined by its finances 
and the size of its staff, to aid persons who are in 
employment during the day to secure education 
of university grade and will go a long way to provide 
credit for those proceeding to a degree, provided 
always, however, that the University retains full 
control of its own standards and of its staff. There- 
fore, the University is prepared to offer instruction 
and admission to examinations to students belonging 
to any organization in any locality in the Province 
under the following conditions: (1) the class must 



consist of riot fewer than twenty members; (2) the 
fees paid by each student must be the same as those 
paid by students in the Teachers' Course; (3) the 
organization making application for such a class 
must collect the fees from every student and forward 
these fees to the University within the time limit 
stipulated in the case of students in the Teachers' 
Course; (4) the University will select and pay the 
members of its staff who give the tuition; (5) such 
class or classes may be held in classrooms supplied 
by the organization concerned, provided the equip- 
ment and library facilities are suitable, in the judg- 
ment of the University, for the work of such class, or 
classes; (6) the tuition given to such class or classes 
shall be of the same character as that given to 
students in the Teachers' Course; (7) the number of 
such classes shall be determined by the ability of the 
University to provide this instruction; (8) unless 
otherwise expressly stated in this section such class 
or classes shall be governed by the regulations at the 
time governing classes in the Teachers' Course. 
THE COURSE GIVEN UNDER THIS 

ARRANGEMENT 

The Pass Course, leading to the B.A. degree, 
according to the following scheme will be the basis 
of instruction: 

First Year English, Latin, French, Elemen- 
tary Science, Mathematics (Alge- 
bra and Geometry), Trigono- 
metry. 

Second Year. . ^English, French, Science", Two of 
Third Year . . . < History, Political Economy, 
Fourth Year. . (Psychology. 

1. This scheme is intended for persons who are 
employed during the day. 

2. The class must be under the general direction 
of some responsible organization. The local Alumni 
Association of the University of Toronto, the Board 
of Education, the High School Board, the Advisory 
Educational Committee, the Y.M.C.A., the 
Y.W.C.A., or some similar organization might take 
this work in its charge. 

3. The tuition fees at present in force are: one 
subject, $10.00; two subjects, $18.00; three subjects, 
$24.00. Examinations, $2.00 per subject. For 
admission by certificate to the Second Year, $15.00. 
In some localities there might be additional expense 
for rooms, heat, light, etc. 

4. The equivalent of at least two houors of tuition 
per week from the first of October until the end of 
April is in most cases the minimum requirement of 
work; in some subjects three hours per week would 
be necessary. 

5. The work up to the end of the First Year might 
well be conducted either by, or in co-operation with 
the local Collegiate Institute or High School without 



70 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



reference to the University because the First Year 
of the Pass Course may be taken as Senior Matricu- 
lation or Honour Matriculation. The University's 
work begins, in these courses, with the Second Year 
subjects. 

A committee of these teachers then ap- 
proached the Board of Education, outlined 
their proposals and their hopes, and asked 
for the Board's co-operation. This was 
very readily granted and enrolment for the 
classes commenced. 

At the time of writing a class in Second 
Year English is being conducted in the 
Hamilton Collegiate Institute by Professor 
R. S. Knox of the Department of English ; 
a class in Second Year Botany studies 
every Saturday forenoon under Professor 
H. B. Sifton of the Department of Botany; 
and a class in Second Year French is about 
to begin work. 

This is rather a unique departure but 



it is a very logical development of the 
system of Teachers' Classes which has 
been in operation in Toronto for some 
years. For instance, this year one hundred 
and fourteen Toronto teachers are studying 
in the late afternoons and on Saturday 
forenoons and are proceeding to the B.A. 
degree by this means. Since the University 
is a Provincial institution, how can the 
same privilege be denied the teachers of 
Hamilton or of any other centre where the 
conditions can be met? Next year Strat- 
ford and Fort William hope to be able to 
do exactly what Hamilton is doing this 
year. To meet the needs of these cities 
will, because of the distances involved, 
produce knotty problems but the existence 
of such difficulties should not, and cannot 
prevent the Provincial University doing 
its whole duty to its whole constituency. 

W. J. DUNLOP. 



Victoria Graduates Organize 



A MOVEMENT which will facilitate 
JT\ Victoria co-operation in university 
activities was launched last month at 
an alumni dinner in Burwash Hall. The 
occasion was the 80th anniversary of the 
granting of the royal charter to Victoria 
University. The dinner followed the un- 
veiling of gifts from His Majesty the King 
and a special convocation in arts. 

At the dinner the Victoria College 
Alumni Association took on a new lease 
of life, being in effect reconstituted after 
having lain dormant since some years 
prior to the war. The appointment of 
vocational and publicity committees were 
features of the new organization. The 
following officers were elected: Honorary 
President, Chancellor Bowles; President 
C. Douglas Henderson, '06; Vice-President, 
Clarke E. Locke, '11; Secretary-Treasurer, 
W. J. Little, '13 (address, Victoria College) ; 
Executive, H. P. Edge, '09; George H. 
Locke, '93; J. C. Eastcott, '21; S. W. 
Eakins, '04. 

Attendance of more than two hundred 
graduates at the inaugural dinner was 
taken by all speakers as a happy augury 
of success. Preliminary plans for a monster 
reunion of all Victoria graduates, to be 
held in the autumn of 1922, were announced 
to the gathering and received enthusiasti- 
cally. It also developed that plans for a 



closer connection of graduates with under- 
graduate activities, such as athletics and 
the college monthly, Acta Victoriana, were 
in the making. The advisory vocational 
committee will provide facilities by which 
men on graduation will be assisted in 
rinding suitable avenues of work. Pub- 
licity for the college as well as for the 
association itself will come within the 
province of the publicity committee. 

While the newer graduates were elected 
to the offices of the association, great 
pleasure was taken in the presence of dis- 
tinguished senior graduates, such as Dr 
Hamilton Fisk Biggar, '63, of Cleveland, 
Ohio, and Mr Justice J. J. Maclaren, '62, 
and in messages from even older graduates 
who were unable to attend. Each decade 
from the sixties down was represented by 
a speaker in response to the toast to the 
college, which was proposed by Mr A. E. 
Ames, chairman of the executive of the 
Board of Regents. For the 60's Justice 
Maclaren was the spokesman; for the 
70's, Prof A. P. Coleman, dean of the 
faculty of arts, University of Toronto; 
for the 80's, J. R. L. Starr, K.C.; for the 
90's, Prof C. T. Currelly, curator of the 
Royal Ontario Museum; for the 'OO's, 
Rev C. R. Carscallen, West China mission- 
ary; for the '10's, Major T. W. MacDowell, 
V.C., and for the 20's, J. C. Eastcott, 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



71 



editor of Acta Victoriana. Dr George H. 
Locke presided and was supported at tru 
head table by Mr C. Vincent Massey, dea*. 
of residence; Hon. N. W. Rowell, K.C., 
the Chancellor; Mr Justice Maclaren, Dr 
Biggar, A. E. Ames, G. H. Wood and 
Rev J. W. Graham, D.D. 



Greetings "from the oldest college in 
Ontario to the oldest college in Quebec" 
,vere telega ~heJ to Sir Arthur W. Currie, 
principal ot ... 'cGill University, in recog- 
nition of the McGill centenary, on motion 
of Mr Justice W. R. Riddell. Sir Arthur 
has since sent a telegram of thanks. 



Social Service Department Forms Link With Masses 



THE half-way house between the Uni- 
versity and the people." That is 
a phrase that has been applied, not 
inaptly, to the Social Service Department. 
It is a stepping-stone between the more 
purely academic and literary atmosphere 
that envelops an institution of learning, 
and the heart of the masses, on whom it is 
hoped that that learning will ultimately 
react to their own best interests. In 
these days when the L T niversity is striving 
to strengthen her connection with the 
people of Ontario, the value of a depart- 
ment like that in Social Service is inestim- 
able. 

It is only seven years since the 
department was first established, under the 
aegis of the Staff in Political Economy, 
and under the direction 'of Professor 
Maclver. The rapid development of the 
new course eventually led to its separation 
from the Political Economy department 
and the establishemnt of a separate de- 
partment. A year ago Professor J. A. 
Dale assumed the position of head of the 
new Social Service Department. At pre- 
sent there are three full-time members 
of the staff and fourteen others, who are 
either professors at -the University or 
prominent workers in the social service 
field down- town. 

The course of training is essentially a 
practical one. The students devote their 
time evenly between lectures on Hygiene, 
Psychology, Economics and kindred sub- 
jects, and field work, the practical or 
laboratory end of their course. During 
the time devoted to the latter, the 
students visit the various institutions of 
the city where they observe the particular 
form of work undertaken by each institu- 
tion. This part of their work is called 
observation. The second part is the 
really practical end. Each student is 
attached to some institution, perhaps a 
settlement house or a hospital, where he 
is in the care of a supervisor, under whom 




J. A. DALE 
Director, Social Service Department 

he learns the rudiments of case-work or 
group-work, through personal experience. 
Both the supervisor and the student make 
out reports which are sent on to the 
field-work instructor, who can in this way 
keep in touch with the individual student. 
The first year is purely vocational, but 
the second becomes more specialized as the 
student shows an aptitude for case-work 
or for group-work, in clubs or other lines. 
At the end of two years a diploma is 
granted. 

The war opened the eyes of me people 
to the necessity of training for social 
service workers. The aim of a Social 
Service course is to educate the people to 
know the resources of the community and 
the needs of the community and to bring 



72 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



the two together. The graduates from 
the department go out into many different 
fields, settlement-houses, Board of Health 
work, Soldiers' Aid Commissions, hospitals, 
rehabilitation work, work among the 
immigrants and in women's police courts. 
Another important feature is the close 
connection between the Social Service 
Department and the Neighbourhood Work- 
ers' Association of which Professor Dale is 
President. The Neighbourhood Workers 
is a federation of 187 charitable associa- 
tions which works through one central offce 
which has district offices throughout the 
city. The value of such an organization 
is obvious. It minimizes work, makes 
duplication or overlapping practically im- 
possible, and it makes the work of the 
allied associations as speedy and efficient 
as possible. 

More than anything else the Social 
Service Department counts itself fortunate 
in its connection with the University. 
In the United States the schools of social 
service have not flourished as a general 
rule in University grounds. At first glance 
the advantage of being under the wing of 
the University might not be apparent, 
yet there are at least two good results. 
Besides the more utilitarian advantages of 
being able to secure the best professors and 
lecturers in certain subjects through the 
University they have gained something 
else, more intangible, less explicit, they 
have gained a philosophy of life. 



Correspondence 



The Editor, 

THE UNIVERSITY MONTHLY. 

Sir: I have already been notified of some 
additions and corrections that should be made 
in the Roll of Service. It will not be possible to 
issue a second edition of the Roll, but I shall be 
grateful if, somewhat later in the session, you will 
allow me to publish these in THE MONTHLY. In 
this way many of those who have the Roll can be 
notified of the changes. Readers are asked to 
inform me without delay of any errors or omissions. 

As it is especially important that there should 
be no mistakes in the Roll of Honour when it is 
recorded on the permanent Memorial, any errors 
in the spelling of the names, both Christian and 
surnames, or in the dates, etc., as they now appear 
in the Roll, should be reported to me as soon as 
possible. 

Yours, etc., 

G. O. Smith, 

Editor, Roll of Service. 



Dates to Remember 

November 12 Royal Canadian Institute Lec- 
ture, Physics Bldg. "The Foremost Civilization of 
Ancient America: The Maya" (illustrated by lantern 
slides and charcoal drawings) by Dr Sylvanus G. 
Morley. Dr Morley is in charge of the Carnegie 
Institution's Explorations in Central America. He 
is an authority on the Maya hieroglyphics and on 
problems connected with Middle American Archae- 
ology. He will give a fascinating account of a 
wonderful civilization which has passed. 

November 19 Royal Canadian Institute Lec- 
ture, Physics Bldg. "Fluorescence and Phos- 
phorescence" (with striking demonstrations) by 
Professor J. C. McLennan, F.R.S. Professor 
McLennan is well known to Toronto audiences as 
a brilliant lecturer and expositor of scientific sub- 
jects. 

November 22-25 Hon. N. W. Rowell will 
deliver the first series of lectures offered by the 
Burwash Lectureship Fund in Convocation Hall 
November 22, 23, 24, 25. The subjects of the four 
lectures are "World Peace and the League of 
Nations", "World Peace and the British Empire", 
' ' World Peace and Canada ' ' , and ' ' World Peace and 
the Church". The Burwash Lectures were made 
possible by the collection of $5,000 in celebration of 
the fiftieth anniversary in the Methodist ministry 
of Nathaniel Burwash, late Chancellor of Victoria 
College. The intention is to arrange a course of 
lectures biennially or whenever a prominent speaker 
is available. 

November 26 The University of Toronto will 
celebrate the sixth hundred anniversary of the 
death of Dante on November 26. Professor 
Grandgent of Harvard who has edited Dante's works 
and is one of the most noted living authorities on 
Dante will be present. The programme will be 
given in Hart House Theatre and will be partly in 
English and partly in Italian and will take a musical 
and literary form. It is expected that the Dante 
Society of Toronto will participate. 

November 26 Royal Canadian Institute Lec- 
ture, Physics Bldg. "Speaking Crystals" (demon- 
strations) by Dr Alexander M. Nicolson, Research 
Laboratories, Western Electric Company. Dr 
Nicolson is a distinguished research worker on 
whose discoveries in the physical sciences many 
patents have been based. He will bring considerable 
equipment with him and his audience will be treated 
to some weird effects. 

College Sermons The College Sermons are 
being given as usual at Convocation Hall each 
Sunday at 11 a.m. The list of speakers for the 
remainder of the Michaelmas term is as follows: 

Nov. 6 Thanksgiving Sunday. 
13 Canon F. G. Scott. 
20 Dr Wilfrid Grenfell. 
27 Rev Dr W. J. Clarke, St. Andrew's 

Church, Westmount. 
Dec. 4 Prof. Shailer Matthews, Chicago. 

" 11 Rev Dr C. W. Gordon, Moderator of 
the Presbyterian General Assembly. 



Book Reviews 

The Psychology of Adolescence by Frederick 
Tracy, Ph.D. (New York, The Macmillan Co. 1920). 

This is an age of special interests and the con- 
sequent multiplication of subjects, more or less 
adequately denned. Education, sociology, and 
religion are three typical fields, all marked by the 
same tendency to become eclectic and all equally 
sub-divided so as to embrace whatever the sciences 
can contribute to their ijue d'ensemble. Without 
requiring new facts these subjects call for special 
treatment of the data and, above all, for such a 
presentation of the subject as will attract and- 
edify earnest readers. This probably explains the 
modern method of organizing a series of works to 
meet such demands; for the focus of the subject 
is a little indefinite and its limits may be left to the 
writer's option. To a series of this kind, namely, 
Handbooks of Moral and Religious Education, 
edited by Professor Sneath of Yale University, this 
bock has been contributed by Professor Tracy. 

The class of readers ("teachers in the field of 
moral and religious education") for whom the book 
is written will find it admirably adapted to their 
needs. In respect of style it is eminently readable 
and will set before the teachers a standard of ex- 
position which they may well try to attain. In 
respect of matter, the selection of topics is at all 
times judicious. Though the majcr part of the 
book is psychological, the reader will probably 
think that the work as a whole adds one more 
tribute to the flexibility of that term. A chapter 
of physiology, is of course, a recognized element 
in modern works on psychology, and the author 
is justified in making his idea of education include 
care for the body at the critical period which he 
describes. On the other hand it may not be 
unnecessary or ungrateful to suggest that ethical 
and teleological elements in the treatment of the 
general subject seem to obscure the scientific 
outlook. Sexual criminality is a wide and import- 
ant field of which it is hardly sufficient to say 
(p. 147) that "one records with deep pain the 
facts," when in the text the facts are not further 
stated and painful is not as such a scientific category. 
Similarly Professor Tracy tells us thjat "strong 
religious convictions, deep religious feelings, and 
pronounced religious decisions are more likely to 
occur in adolescence than in any other period of 
life" (p. 200), without removing the possible 
ambiguity. In fact, as the discussion proceeds, 
it seems possible tht the author omitted to con- 
sider a type known to Aristotle and to Milton, 
namely those who reach an abiding peace by 
adopting the principle, "Evil be thou my good." 
Yet these also are genuine specimens, psycho- 
logically! 

But the interested reader is always too much 
inclined to discuss only the points that are contro- 
versial, and so leave on the minds of others a false 
impression. It is certain that all interested in 
moral and religious education will appreciate this 
work as a survey of the field. A fairly extensive 
bibliography is appended. 

G.S.B. 



With the Alumni 



ttbe 
of Uotonto 

Published by the University of Toronto Alumni 

Association 
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE $3.00 PER ANNUM 

including Membership dues of the Alumni Association. 

Publication Committee: 
D. B. GILLIES, Chairman 
GEORGE H. LOCKE J. V. MCKENZIE 

W. J. DUNLOP F. P. MEGAN 

W. A. CRAICK R. J. MARSHALL 

DR ALEX. MACKENZIE W. C. MCNAUGHT 
W. A. KIRKWOOD 

Editor and Business Manager 

W. N. MACQUEEN 

Sir George Foster speaks to U.C. Alumnae 

Sir George Foster delivered an address to 'the 
University College Alumnae Association at the 
Mining Building on October 21, which might be 
taken as a guide for women in their new political 
status. He stated the importance of democracy 
and emphasized the fact that if it fell short of its 
full achievement it was due to the apathy and 
indifference of the public in regard to the adminis- 
tration of public affairs. He then went on to point 
out the various considerations which were involved 
in coming to a decision on a political question. 
Finally he discussed such problems as the national 
debt and the tariff, and alluded to the three political 
parties and their leaders with a political detach- 
ment quite remarkable from one who for so long 
has had such strong partisan affiliations. 

Sir George stressed the point that in the coming 
elections there would be an addition of nearly half 
the voting power to the electorate, which would 
therefore be to a large extent an untrained and un- 
informed body. The duty of the new electors, he 
said, was to make up for their deficiencies; women 
must study, must think, and must submit their 
theories to the test of the practical experience of 
the world. He concluded by pointing out that the 
people of to-day are responsible for the condition 
of the next generation. In working out legislation 
it is, therefore, important to realize that we are 
building paths in which future generations must 
tread. 



Montreal Alumni Hold Successful Annual 
Meeting 

President Falconer, Brig. Gen. Mitchell, Prof. 
DeLury and E. W. Beatty, Arts '98, Chancellor of 
Queen's and McGill, were the principal speakers at 
the Annual Dinner Meeting of the University of 
Toronto Alumni Association, Montreal Branch, held 
in the Windsor Hotel, Montreal, oji Friday evening, 
October 14th. In addition to these guests, the 
eighty men present heard with pleasure from Dr 
Jack Maynard, Coach of the Varsity Team, and 
from Mr E. R. Cameron, Arts 79, representing the 
Ottawa alumni. Addresses were made also by J. M. 
Robertson, S.P.S. '93, retiring Chairman; Rev R. 
W. Dickie, Arts '94, incoming Chairman; W. F. 
Tye, S.P.S. '81, who was elected Vice-Chair man for 
the coming year and who proposed a resolution, 



73 



74 



UNIVERSITY OK TORONTO MONTHLY 



enthusiastically adopted, extending congratulations 
and good wishes to McGill, upon her Centenary 
celebrations; and Dr Jos. A. Corcoran, Med. '98, 
who expressed the appreciation of the gathering of 
the efforts of the retiring Chairman and of the 
honour and pleasure extended by the guests of the 
evening. Roy Campbell, Arts and Forestry '14, 
was re-elected Secretary-Treasurer for the coming 
year. A series of parodies composed and accom- 
panied on the piano by Prof. C. H. Carruthers, 
Arts '12, were projected on the screen for all to 
sing and went far to enliven the evening. Among 
those present were members of the Executive of the 
Engineering Alumni Association. Subsequent com- 
ment indicated that the affair was one of genuine 
enjoyment to all who attended. 



The late John Hoskin 

Following an illness that lasted for the greater 
part of ten years, Dr John Hoskin died at his home 
in Toronto on October 6, in his eighty-sixth year. 

Dr Hoskin was a native of Devonshire, England, 
and came to Canada in his eighteenth year. He 
studied Law and was called to the Bar in 1863. Dr 
Hoskin was chairman of the Board of Trustees of 
the University until 1906 and was chairman of the 
Board of Governors from that date until 1910. 
His long service to the University was recognized 
in 1889 when the University conferred on him the 
honorary degree of Doctor of Laws, and in 1910 on 
his retiring from the Board of Governors his portrait 
was painted and added to the University gallery. 



Rev John Munro Gibson Dead 
The death of the Rev John Monro Gibson in 
London, England, on October 13, removed one of 
the senior graduates of the University. 

Dr Gibson graduated from the University in 1862 
and later received his theological education in Knox 
College. For a number of years he held a pastorate 
in Montreal and a professorship in Montreal 
Theological College. In 1880 he moved to London, 
England, to become pastor of St. John's Wood 
Presbyterian Church. He was ex-moderator of the 
Presbyterian Church in England, and the author 
of many books on religious subjects. In 1902 the 
University conferred on him the honorary degree of 
Doctor of Laws. 



The Late James McCaig. 

The death took place in Edmonton on October 8, 
of James McCaig, B.A. (U.C.) '94, M.A. '97, LL.B. 
He had not been well for some time, and had been 
forced last May to resign his duties as editorial 
director of the publications of the Provincial 
Government of Alberta. 

After a brilliant course at the University, he 
taught school for several years at Morrisburg and 
Pete rborough.be fore going West. HewasSuperin 
tendent of Education during the formative period 
of education in Alberta. Mr McCaig was also a 
regular correspondent to leading newspapers, 
among others the Montreal Star and the Mani- 
toba Free Press. He was a recognized authority 
on sheep raising and other branches of agriculture. 
He wrote, besides this, a volume on "Civics" 



which was accepted by many of the Provincial 
educational departments. His death at the age 
of fifty-seven removes one of the strong figures who 
have contributed so much to the building up of the 
great Western Provinces. 



Through 'Varsity and Through Life Together 

Those alumni who know Eldred Archibald, B.A. 
'05, and Mrs Archibald (Irene Love, B.A. '05), 
will be interested to learn that Mr Archibald was 
last month made executive editor of the Montreal 
Star, and that Mrs Archibald is rapidly recovering 
from a serious operation performed in the Royal 
Victoria Hospital, Montreal. 

After graduation, Mr Archibald was in France 
and Germany until 1907; was with the Toronto 
Star until 1909, during the last two years of which 
he was legislative correspondent; was in the "Gal- 
lery" at Ottawa in 1910-1912; joined the Montreal 
Herald in 1913, following which he was on the 
Montreal Star staff as special writer, literary 
editor, and later, associate editor, before being 
appointed to his present post. 

Mrs Archibald, whom he married in 1912, has 
had a most interesting career in journalistic work, 
closely associated with her husband, having been 
with the Toronto Star and World 1906-1907. 
After studying music in New York in 1908, she 
took charge of the Women's Department of the 
Hamilton Spectator; was associate editor of the 
Canada Monthly in 1909; was special writer with 
the Canadian Pacific Colonization and Immigration 
Department at Calgary and was assistant manager 
of the Publicity Department; spoke and wrote in 
England in 1910 on Canadian opportunities for 
British women; was musical editor of the Montreal 
Sunday Herald in 1913, and since 1914 has con- 
ducted the Women's Page of the Montreal Star. 

R.L.C. 



Deaths 

GIBSON On October 13, John Munro Gibson, 
B.A. (U.C.) '62, M.A. '66, LL.D. (Hon.) '02, for 
many years minister of the St. John's Wood 
Presbyterian Church. 

HOSKIN At his residence 214 St. George St., after 
a long illness, John Hoskin, LL.D. '89, D.C.L. '04 
(Hon.) treasurer of the Law Society of Upper 
Canada, in his eighty-sixth year. 

BRAY At Chatham, on October 3, from pneu- 
monia, Reginald Vavasour Bray, M.D. (Vic.) '90, 
Coroner of the county, physician to the Grand 
Trunk and Wabash Railways, county physician 
and Chairman of the Chatham Board of Health. 

BELL In the Smith's Falls Hospital, where he had 
been a patient for four years, Henry Wallace Bell, 
D.D.S. (T.) '95 of Merrickville. 

McCAIG At Edmonton, on October 8, James 
McCaig, B.A. (U.C.) '94, M.A. '97, after an illness 
of some months. 

THORNE At the residence of bis uncle A. E. 
Osier, 36 Summerhill Gardens, on October 3, 
Stuart Mills Thorne, B.A.Sc. '01, M.C., Croix de 
Guerre, from heart trouble, the result of exposure 
on active service. 

FOWLER At London, on October 12, John Harry 
Fowler, B.A. (Vic.) '02, after a few days illness. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 75 



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76 UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



A I II SUI N I V ^ y u know ^at Students of your 
ft L U Ifl II I own University publish the third 
largest humorous magazine on the continent; that this same 
magazine has the largest paid circulation of any under- 
graduate monthly in the world? 

And its name is 

GOBLIN 

"THE CANADIAN NATIONAL COMIC" 

You have seen extracts and drawings from GOBLIN 

in the pages of THE UNIVERSITY MONTHLY. 

If you haven't laughed at them, go and see an under taker 
you're dead! The magazine itself is as funny as a fish with 
fur, and as original as a Chinaman on skis. It has all the 
kick of a cocktail, with none of the come-back! 

DONT BE A PIKER! 

Don't content yourself with reading the extracts in THE MONTHLY; 
sign and mail the attached blank, or buy a GOBLIN on any newstand 
and fill in the blank on page 4 of the magazine. 

How about sending in the odd contribution! 

Two of the drawings in this issue of THE MONTHLY were done 
by graduates. GOBLIN needs your help Old Timers! He's going to 
bring out an alumni number one of these days, and will want material. 

For the enclosed $1.25 send me seven numbers of GOBLIN beginning 
December, 1921. 

Name ........................................ . ............... '. ..................... Address .................................................. 

To GOBLIN, 8 University Avenue, Toronto 



Notes by Classes 



'67 U.C. McLeod Stewart has filed a circular 
stating that he will be a candidate at the coming 
Federal elections for the Dominion Parliament. 

'79 T. Re'v Charles H. Shortt, Warden of the 
Anglican Theological college, Vancouver, was stay- 
ing with his sister Mrs Willoughby Cummings 
during the meeting of the General Synod to which 
he was a delegate. 

'80 Vic. Jeffries Wellington Dowler is living at 
1418 Cook St., Victoria, B.C. 

'81 M. (T.) Richard Raikes was unanimously 
tendered the nomination for East Simcoe for the 
Meighen Government. 

'82 U.C., '86 M. James Wright Mustard is the 
city analyst at Chatham. He is a Fellow of the 
Canadian Institute of Chemistry. 

'85 U.C., '91 M. Charles Alexander Webster is 
engaged in hospital work at Beirut, Lebanon, where 
he is attached to the American University. 

'85 M. Charles Augustus Krick is practising his 
profession as chemist at Niagara Falls, N.Y. 

'87 U.C. Peter J. McLaren, formerly of Russell 
has moved to 22 Rose Hill Avenue, Toronto. 

'88 M. Opie Sisley has resigned his duties as 
coroner because they interfered with his private 
medical practice. 

'88 U.C. Joachim H. Hunter is at present living 
at 56 Drummond Street, Sherbrooke, Que. 

'88 M. (T.). Michael Steele, of Tavistock, was 
unanimously chosen by the nominating convention, 
to carry again the Conservative banner for South 
Perth in the coming Federal elections. 

'90 M. Professor Thomas Cullen was a visitor 
in Toronto in September. He is now professor of 
abdominal surgery in Johns Hopkins University, 
Baltimore. 

'91 U.C. The Board of Governors of McGill 
University have appointed Gordon Jennings Laing 
to the deanship of the Faculty of Arts and head of 
the department of classics. Until recently Mr. Laing 
has been attached to the staff of the University of 
Chicago. 

'91 U.C., '95 M. The new address of Thomas 
McCrae is 1929 Spruce Street, Philadelphia. 

'91 M. John Emil Hett, former mayor of Kit- 
chener, has been unanimously selected as Labour- 
Farmer candidate for North Waterloo. 

'92 M. (T.). Bertha Dymond is practising her 
profession at 2900 Victoria Ave., Regina, Sask. 

'93 Vic. William Robert Liddy is the Public 
School Inspector, for the County of Dufferin. 

'93 Vic. Isaac Graham Bowles is now pastor of 
the Wesley Methodist Church, Toronto. His ad- 
dress is 238 Crawford Street. 

'95 U.C. William Tier is Dean of the Faculty of 
Arts and Science at the University of Manitoba, 
Winnipeg. 

'96 U.C. William Wallace Nichol is Principal of 
the Ottawa Technical School at the corner of Albert 
and Bay Streets. 

'96 Vic. The present -address of Archibald 
Gordon Sinclair is Bloomfield, N.J. 

'96 D. George Henry Henderson has resigned 
his position as Librarian of the Illinois State Dental 
Society in order to devote his time demonstrating 
Everett's Fluid Impression Compound for DrG. E. 
Everett, Chicago. His address is 3156 Warren 
Avenue, Chicago. 

'98 U.C. At the recent convention of Canadian 
Clubs in Winnipeg, Grace Hunter, Toronto, was 
one of the women -delegates. 



'99 U.C. Richard V. Le Suer has been appointed 
solicitor for the British Government in an arbitra- 
tion between Great Britain and Peru which will be 
held in Lausanne, Switzerland, next fall. Mr Le 
Sueur has spent much time in Peru and is well 
versed in the situation there as it applies to British 
interests. 

'00 U.C. Rev William George Wilson has been 
moved from Moose Jaw to First Church, Victoria, 
B.C. 

'00 U.C. William Charles Good is the Progres- 
sive candidate in the Brant riding in the coming 
Federal elections. 

'02 D. Alfred D. A. Mason has been appointed 
to the charge of the Clinical Department in the 
Royal College of Dental Surgeons. 

'02 U.C. At the General Hospital, Toronto, a 
son was born to Mr and Mrs George Sanderson 
Hodgson on September 21. 




A Futuristic View of an undertaker, if the en- 
rolment in the Medical College gets any larger. 

GOBLIN 



77 



78 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 




Pressing His Suit. GOBLIN 

'02 U.C. Rev Allen Egbert Armstrong left at 
the end of September for India. He expects to be 
away until spring. 

'02 M. Alexander Fisher has moved from 
Calgary to Toronto. His address is 29 Wells 
Street. 

'03 Vic. Victor Wentworth Odium has been 
chosen as Liberal candidate for South Vancouver 
in the forthcoming general election. 

'03 U.C. On September 24 at St. Paul's Presby- 
terian Church, Toronto, George Wishart Carter was 
married to Kate D. Lamont. They will reside in 
Port Rowan. 

'04 U.C. Alice Maud Hindson is teaching at the 
Polytechnic High School, Los Angeles, California. 



'04 U.C. Emma May Kells has been appointed 
to the staff at Humberside as a specialist in Moderns 
and History. 

'04 M. On September 17 at Oshawa a son, 
Francis Huteheson, was born to Dr and Mrs 
Franklin James Rundle. 

'04 Vic Charles Wallace Bishop, for the past 
nine years General Secretary of the National 
Council of the Y.M.C.A. has left for New York with 
his family. He intends to take a year's post- 
graduate work at Columbia University. 

'04 M. The marriage of Elsie Durocher, of 
Montreal, and Wallace Leighton Gilbert, of Toronto, 
took place in Montreal on Saturday, October 27. 

'06. Rev James Melton Menzies left Toronto 
in September for Changte, Honan, where he will be 
engaged in missionary work with the Presbyterian 
Foreign Missions. He served for three years in 
France with the Chinese Labor Corps, for which he 
was decorated by the Chinese Government. He 
is the author of a book on oracle bones found in a 
buried city in Honan. 

'06 U.C. John Arthur Clark was chosen by the 
convention of National Liberal and Conservative 
delegates as their candidate for Burrard riding. 

'06 D. A son was born on September 18 to Dr 
and Mrs Edmund Alexander Grant, 71 Oakmount 
Road, Toronto. 

'06 U.C. Walter Williamson Bryden has moved 
from Woodville to Melfort, Sask. 

'07 U.C. Rev Hyslop Dickson is at present living 
at Cypress River. 

'07 U.C. The present address of John Russell 
Harris is 185 Albany Avenue, Toronto. 



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UNIVERSITY FO TORONTO MONTHLY 



79 



'08 S.P.S. D. O. Wing has left the Anglin- 
Norcross Company, St. Johns, Que., and is now in 
Georgia connected with coal mining. 

'09 U.C. Violet M. Ryley has accepted the 
position of dietitian in charge of the cafeteria 
carried on by the Toronto Y.W.C.A. at 12 Adelaide 
Street W. 

'09 TT.C. The marriage took place on October 5 
of Edgar A. Cross, B.Sc. of Birmingham, England, 
and Isabel Grant Gunn of Clinton. 

'09 U.C., '15 M. David Edmund Staunton 
Wishart has returned to Boston for his final period 
of service in the Massachusets Eye and Ear In- 
firmary, after which he intends to go to Edinburgh 
for further study. 

'09 Vic. John Kent Ockley, formerly of Winni- 
peg is now living at 780 Dupont St., Toronto. 

'10 S. The wedding took place on October 26 
of Gerald Elliot Denbigh Greene and Ruth Elizabeth 
Smith. 

'10 TJ.C. William John Steven, who was for- 
merly in Claresholm, Alberta, is at present teaching 
science in the Collegiate in Calgary. 

'11 Ag. William Robert Mills Scott is teaching 
at the High School at Middletown, Ohio. 

'11 U.C. At the Coronado Hospital, Toronto, 
on September 18, a son was born to Mr and Mrs 
Reginald Goldwin Smith of Aurora. 

'11 S. A son was born October 12 to Mr and 
Mrs Kenneth Kinsman Pearce, Riverside Drive, 
Lachine, P.Q. 

'11 Vic. Samuel Ralph Lay cock has moved from 
Marmora and is attached to Albert College, Ed- 
monton, Alta. 

'11 S. On September 20 Robert Vernon Macau- 
lay was married to Edith Louise Harley. They will 
live in Montreal. 

'12 U.C. A son was born on September-17 to Mr 
and Mrs Kenneth Bruce Maclaren, of Toronto. 

'12 Vic. Elsie Taylor Mclntosh who has been 
home on a year's furlough returned in August to her 
work as Y.W.C.A. Secretary in Japan. Her address 
is 16 Itchome, Nishiricho Kanda, Tokyo, Japan. 

'12 U.C. Harold Smith Patton, formerly general 
secretary of the Y.M.C.A. at Hart House has 
accepted a position on the staff of the University 
of Alberta, Edmonton. 

'12 U.C., '12 M. John Hill White is practising 
Medicine at Brussels, Ont. 

'12 U.C. George Edwin Gollop, who has been 
living in Philadelphia, is now connected with the 
Canadian Salt Co., Windsor. 

'12 Vic. Herman Whitefield Mclntosh has been 
appointed principal of North Rosedale School. 

'13 M. The wedding took place on September 21 
of Helen Waterston Mowat and Almon Fletcher, son 
of the late Professor John Fletcher and Mrs Fletcher, 
of Toronto. Dr and Mrs Fletcher will live on 
Bedford Road. 

'13 U.C. James McQueen, formerly of Mount 
Forest is now living at 482 Brunswick Avenue, 
Toronto. 

'14 S. The marriage took place in August of John 
Manning Carter, Toronto, and Clotilde Prunty, of 
North Bay. Mr Carter has been connected with 
the Nipissing Mining Co, Cobalt, for the past few 
years. 

'14 U.C. At the General Hospital, Toronto, on 
September 18, a son was born to Mr and Mrs 
George Aitkin Johnston. 



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'14 U.C. Helen Audrey Franklin has moved 
from Brantford to Toronto to take a position on the 
staff of Oakwood Collegiate. 

'14 S. The marriage took place on September 22 
of Mary Barr and Clifford Austin Meadows, 
Toronto. 

'14 U.C. George Murray Chidley has moved 
from Kirkton to Exeter. 

'14 U.C. The present address of Lillian Mary 
Campbell is 530 Ontario Street, Toronto. 

'15 S., '14 U.C. At Toronto on September 17 
Howard M. Black was married to Jean Marguerite 
Macdonald of Toronto. 

'15 U.C. Mr and Mrs A. H. Keith Russell 
(Helen Duke Fortier) are now living at 11 Pinewood 
Road. 

'15 M. The marriage took place in Minneapolis 
in September of Charles Roderick Blackbourn 
Crompton and Harriet P. Cambie of Rochester. 
Dr Crompton is at present in the surgical depart- 
ment of the Mayo Institute at Rochester. 

'15 T. Sydney Childs has returned to Trinity 
this year as financial secretary to the College and 
also as lecturer in Philosophy. 

'15 Ag. James Mills Creelman is attached to the 
Soldiers' Settlement Board, Ottawa. 




Gwladys"But you will admit I have a pretty face?" 
Horace "Even a barn looks good when it's painted. 11 

GOBLIN 



'15 U.C. The new address of Mrs R. Melville 
(Kathleen Christina Wade) is 8 Dartmouth Cres- 
cent, Mimico. 

'15 Vic., '20 Vic. Archibald Clifford Lewis was 
married in August to Sara Evelyn Chisholm. Mr 
Lewis is instructor of Physics at the Royal Military 
College and is living at 182 Alfred Street, Kingston. 

'15 U.C. Isaac P. McNabb has moved from 
Orillia to 172 Hunter St., Peterborough, 

'16 S. The wedding took place in Toronto of 
Anna Belle Currie and Leonard Aldwyn Cole Lee, 
on September 20. Mr and Mrs Lee will live on 
Silver Birch Avenue, Toronto. 

'16 M. On September 15 at New St. Andrew's 
Church, Toronto, Anna Marjorie Stedham was 
married to Allen Young McNair, of Vancouver. 

'16 U.C. On September 18 a daughter was born 
to Mr and Mrs Earl Smith. 

'16 Vic. Evelyn Margaret McLaughlin has been 
appointed membership secretary of the Toronto 
Young Women's Christian Association. 

'16 U.C. John Douglas Peck, formerly of 
Gananoque, is living at 648 Osssington Ave., 
Toronto. 

'16 M. Eric Kent Clarke is convalescing in the 
Toronto General Hospital following an attack of 
sleeping sickness. He contracted the disease while 
doing medical work among the immigrants at ports 
of entry. 

'16 S. John Earle Pringle has been engaged on 
highway construction in Saskatchewan. 

'17 U.C. The marriage of Helen Marjorie Fergu- 
son and Arthur La Pierre Smoke took place on 
September 21. Mr and Mrs Smoke will live at 17 
Chestnut Park, Toronto. 

'17 T. The present address of Ruth Clendenning 
Eager is Ste Agathe des Moins Hospital, Que. 

'17 Vic. The present address of Ernest Walter 
Edmonds is care of the Canadian Methodist 
Mission, Chengtu, Szechwan, 

'17 T. Elida Cleuch, formerly of Saskatoon is 
now living at 72 Welland Avenue, St. Catherines. 

'17 U.C. Agnes Wright Campbell has moved 
from Toronto and is living at Santa Ana, California. 

'18 Vic. Georgia Brown, formerly of Calgary* 
is teaching in Strathroy. Her permanent address 
is 117 Macpherson Ave., Toronto. 

'19 U.C. R. S. Stone has returned to Canada 
after completing a two year term on the staff of 
the Union Medical College, Pekin, and has entered 
Third Year Medicine. 

'19 D., '19 U.C. The marriage took place in 
September of Abram Slone and Jean Goldstick, of 
Toronto. Dr. and Mrs Slone will live in Ottawa. 




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UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



81 



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UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 




Where "Salada" 
Sells 



WE can give the public 
no better proof on 
paper (the real proof 
lies in a personal test) of the 
popularity of "SALADA," 
than to say that great quan- 
tities are being shipped all 
the time to almost all parts 
of the world. These sales 
are made solely as a result 
of "cup test." 

It's the Flavour that counts 

Here are some of the 
places where 'SALADA" 
went during the past few 
months: 
Algeria 

Antigua, B.W.I. 
Argentina 
Bahamas 
Barbados, B.W.I 
Belgium 
Bermuda 
Brazil 
British 

Honduras 
Bolivia 

Canary Islands 
Chile 
Colombia 
Costa Rica 
Cuba 

Dutch Guiana 
Dutch West 

Indies 
Ecuador 



France 

Greece 

Grenada.B.w.i. 

Iceland 

Martinique 

Montserrat 

Morocco 

Panama 

Porto Rico 

Portugal 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

St. Vincent B.W.I. 

St. Lucia, B.W.I. 

Trinidad, B.W.I. 

Turkey 

Uruguay 

Venezuela 

W. Coast Africa 



'SALADA" 



'19 M. At Kamsack, Saskatchewan on July 
15 a daughter, Mary Louise was born to Dr arid 
Mrs Lionel George Brayley, of Pelly, Saskatchewan. 

'20 S. David Gordon Wilson is on the 
staff of the Mountain Sanatorium, Hamilton. 

'20 S. Victoria Young was married on Septem- 
ber 22 to Harold Franklin Coon, of Hamilton. 

'20 M. On September 20, Mary Towerley 
Burgess was married to David Gordon Wilson. Dr 
and Mrs Wilson will live on the Mountain, 
Hamilton. 

'20 T. Percy Lowe has been appointed to the 
position of instructor in mathematics at the R. 
M.C., Kingston. 

'20 U.C. Robert Alexander McKay who has 
been on the staff of Upper Canada College has been 
awarded a Fellowship at Princeton University and 
will pursue his post graduate studies there. 

'20 S. On September 19 Ernest Bruce Duncan 
was married to Margaret Elinor Laird. 

'20 TJ.C. Mary Edith Williamson, formerly of 
Toronto is living in Brampton. 

'20 U.C. Henry Downer is at presen attatched 
to the staff of Appleby School, Oakville. 

'20 U.C. The present address of Jean Mclntosh 
Stevenson is 195 Scarboro Road, Toronto. 

'20 U.C. Wilford Lome Keeling is teaching at 
the Malvern Collegiate Institute, Toronto and is 
living at 909 Bathurst Street. 

'20 D. Wallace Barrett Mitchell is practising 
his profession at 1308 King Street, Hamilton. 



*IF ANYONE HAS 

Killed a pig, 
Shot his wife, 
Got married, 
Borrowed a stamp, 
Made a speech, 
Joined the army, 
Robbed a bank, 
Bought a Ford, 
Sold a dog, 
Lost his wallet, 
Gone fishing, 
Broke his neck, 
Bought a house, 

Committed suicide, 
Shot a cat, 
Been away, 
Come Back home, 
Moved his office, 
Taken a vacation, 
Been in a fight, 
Got licked, 
Had no oil stock, 
Got rich, 
Made a bad bet, 
It's news 

SEND IT TO THE EDITOR 

*Reprinted from Mead Cc-operation, October, 1921 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



83 



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EDMONTON 



pup pour 

AT 



THE 



CONVENIENT BOOKSTORE 

WM. TYRRELL & CO., LTD. 
780-782 Yonge St. - TORONTO 



Telephone N. 5600 



COLLEGE 1752 



COLLEGE 2757 



A. W. MILES 

FUNERAL DIRECTOR 



396 COLLEGE ST. 



TORONTO. CANADA 



STUDENTS' RATES 



PHOTOGRAPHY 



COLL. 2869 



FARMER BRO;S. 

492 SPADINA AVE. 




STUDIO 

96 YONGE ST. 



MAIN 1098 



84 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



WESTERN ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Fire, Automobile, Hail, Marine, Explosion, Riots, Civil Commotions and Strikes Insurance 
Head Offices: Corner Wellington and Scott Streets, Toronto 

Assets, Ovet $7,900,000.00 

Losses paid since organization of the Company in 1851, Over $81,300,000.00 
Board of Directors 

W. B. MEIKLE, President and General Manager 

Geo. A. Morrow, 



Sir John Aird 

Robt. Bickerdike (Montreal) 

Lt.-Col. Henry Brock 

Alfred Cooper (London, Eng.) 

H. C. Cox 



John H. Fulton (New York) 
D. B. Hanna 
John Hoskin, K.C., LL.D. 
Miller Lash 



Lt.-Col. the Hon. Frederic Nicholls 
Major-Gen'l Sir Henry Pellatt, C.V.O. 
E. R. Wood 



Hockey and Racing 
Skates, Boots, Sweaters, 

Sweater Coats, 

Cushion Covers and, 

Pennants* 

COLLEGE OUTFITTERS FOR ALL SPORTS 

J. BROTHERTON 

Phone N. 2092 578 and 580 Yonge Street 




LOOSE I.P. LEAF 

Students' Note Books 
Physicians' and Dentists' 

Ledgers 

Memo and Price Books 
Professional Books 



BROWN BROS., Limited 

SIMCOE and PEARL STS. 
TORONTO 



Toronto 
Conservatory of Music 

(University of Toronto) 

SIR EDMUND WALKER. C.V.O. . LL.D., D.C.L.. PRESIDENT. 
A. S. VOGT. MUS. DOC.. MUSICAL DIRECTOR. 
HEALEY WILLAN. MUS. DOC.. F.R.C.O.. ASSISTANT MUSICAL 
DIRECTOR. 



Highest Artistic Standards. Faculty 
of International Reputation. 

The Conservatory affords unrivalled facili- 
ties for complete courses of instruction in all 
branches of music, for both professional and 
amateur students. 



PUPILS MAY ENTER AT ANY TIME 



Year Book and Examination Syllabus 
forwarded to any address on request to 
the Registrar. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



85 




The "Mogul' 

Makes good every time 



you consider that manufactui'ng Boilers 
and Radiators is our first and biggest responsi- 
bilityWhen you bear in mind that we are the largest 
manufacturers of Boilers and Radiators in the Dominion 
of Canada. Is it any wonder that the SAFFORD 
MOGUL line is the last word in heating boilers ? 

Every MOGUL leaving our plant is inspected by a 
staff of specialists men who know the manufacture of 
boilers from A to Z, and that is why the SAFFORD 
MOGUL makes good every time and all the time. 

Dominion Radiator Company 



Low-Base Safford Mogul (sectional view) 



Hamilton, Ont. 
St. John, N.B. 
Calgary, Alta. 



TORONTO 

OTTAWA 



Limited 

Montreal, Que. 
Winnipeg, Man. 
Vancouver, B.C. 



A Food Drink 
for All Ages 

The Best Diet 

for infants, 
growing children, 
invalids and the 
aged 




Highly nutritious 
and convenient 

Used in training 
Athletes 

It agrees with 

the weakest 

digestion 



IN LUNCH TABLET FORM READY TO EAT 



R. LAIDLAW LUMBER CO 

LIMITED 



HEAD OFFICE 



TORONTO 



65 YONGE STREET 

EVERYTHING IN 

LUMBER AND MILLWORK 



86 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



DOMINION TEXTILE COMPANY LIMITED 

of CANADA 

President Vice- President General Manager and Director 

SIR CHARLES GORDON SIR HERBERT S. HOLT F. G. DANIELS 



HEAD OFFICE: MONTREAL, P.Q. 



MILLS IN MONTREAL, MAGOG AND MONTMORENCY FALLS, P.Q., 
AND IN KINGSTON, ONT. 

COTTON FABRICS 

of every description 

PRINTED, DYED, BLEACHED or in the GREY 

for jobbing and cuiiing-up trades 



CASAVANT ORGANS 

ARE SUPERIOR IN 

Quality, Design and Workmanship 



Over 800 pipe organs built 
by this firm in 

Canada, United States and 
South America. 



CASAVANT FRERES 

LIMITED 

ST. HYACINTHE 



EIMER & AMEND 

FOUNDED 1851 

Manufacturers, Exporters and 

Importers of 

LABORATORY APPARATUS 
CHEMICALS and SUPPLIES 




NEW YORK 

3rd AVE., 18th to 19th STREETS 

PITTSBURGH BRANCH 

2011 JENKINS ARCADE 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



87 



BRITISH AMERICA ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Fire, Marine, Hail and Automobile Insurance 
HEAD OFFICES: COR. FRONT AND SCOTT STS., TORONTO 

Incorporated A.D. 1833 

Assets, Over $4,300,000 

Losses Paid since Organization in 1833, Over $47,500,000 



FRANK DARLING, LL.D., F.R.I.B.A. JOHN A. PEARSON 

DARLING & PEARSON 

Hrcbttects 

MEMBERS OF THE ROYAL ARCHITECTURAL INSTITUTE OF CANADA 

MEMBERS ONTARIO ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS 

MEMBERS QUEBEC ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS 

MEMBERS MANITOBA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS 

IMPERIAL BANK CHAMBERS 



2 LEADER LANE 



TORONTO 



The best flour and highest quality of ingredients 

make CANADA 

BREAD 



The choice of 
discriminating 
housewives -:- 



MONET 
.ORDERS. 



There is no better way to send money 
by mail. If lost or stolen, your 
money refunded or a new order issued 
free of charge. 



88 UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 




By Appointment *Ow&&Srunr Established 1847 



MASSEY-HARRIS COMPANY, Ltd, 

Makers of Agricultural Implements 
TORONTO 



Henry Sproatt, LL.D., R.C.A. Ernest R. Rolph 



Sproatt and Rolph 

Architects 



36 North Street, Toronto 



PAGE & COMPANY 

Cut Stone and Masonry Contractors 



TORONTO 

Contractors on Hart House and Burwash Hall 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 89 



SJntoersittp of Toronto 

(The Provincial University of Ontario) 



With its federated and affiliated colleges, its various faculties, and 
its special departments, offers courses or grants degrees in: 

ARTS leading to the degree of B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. 
COMMERCE ................ Bachelor of Commerce. 

APPLIED SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING. .B.A.Sc., M.A.Sc., 
C.E., M.E., E.E., Chem.E. 

MEDICINE .................. M.B., B.Sc. (Med.), and M.D. 

EDUCATION ............. ... B.Paed. and D.Paed. 

FORESTRY .................. B.Sc.F. and F.E. 

MUSIC ..................... Mus. Bac. and Mus. Doc. 

HOUSEHOLD SCIENCE AND SOCIAL SERVICE. 
PUBLIC HEALTH ........... D.P.H. (Diploma), 

PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING. 

LAW ........................ LL.B., LL.M. and LL.D. (Hon.). 

DENTISTRY ................ D.D.S. 

AGRICULTURE ............. B.S.A. 

VETERINARY SCIENCE. .. .B.V.S. and D.V.S. 

PHARMACY ........... ..... Phm.B. 

TEACHERS' CLASSES, CORRESPONDENCE WORK, 
SUMMER SESSIONS, SHORT COURSES for FARMERS, 
for JOURNALISTS, in TOWN-PLANNING and in HOUSE- 
HOLD SCIENCE, University Classes in various cities and towns, 
Tutorial Classes in rural and urban communities, single lectures 
and courses of lectures are arranged and conducted by the 
Department of University Extension. (For information, write 
the Director.) 

For general information and copies of calendars write the 
Registrar, University of Toronto, or the Secretaries of the Colleges 
or Faculties. 



90 UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



Department of Education for Ontario 

SCHOOL AGES 

AND 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



In the educational system of Ontario provision is made in the Courses 
of Study for instruction to the child of four years of age in the Kinder- 
garten up to the person of unstated age who desires a Technical or 
Industrial Course as a preparation for special fitness in a trade or pro- 
fession. 

" v 

All schools established under the Public Schools Act shall -be free 
Public Schools, and every person between the ages of five and twenty- 
one years, except persons whose parents or -guardians are Separate 
School supporters, shall have the right to attend some such school in the 
urban municipality or rural school section in which he resides. Children 
between the ages of four and seven years may attend Kindergarten 
schools, subject to the payment of such fees as to the Board may seem 
expedient. Children of Separate School supporters attend the Separate 
Schools. 

The compulsory ages of attendance are from eight to fourteen years 
and provision is made in the Statutes for extending the time to sixteen 
years of age, and also to eighteen years of age, under conditions stated 
in The Adolescent School Attendance Act of 1919. 

The several Courses of Study in the educational system under the 
Department of Education are taken up in_the Kindergarten, Public, 
Separate, Continuation and High Schools and Collegiate Institutes, and 
in Industrial and Technical Schools. Copies of the Regulations regard- 
ing each may be obtained by application to the Deputy Minister of 
Education, Parliament Buildings, Toronto. 
13th May, 1921 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



91 



ALUMNI PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY 



ARMOUR & MICKLE 

BARRISTERS. Etc. 

E. DOUGLAS ARMOUR, K.C. 

HENRY W. MICKLE 

A. D. ARMOUR 

CONFEDERATION LIFE BUILDING 

Richmond & Yonge Streets, TORONTO 



STARR, SPENCE, COOPER and ERASER 



J. H. SPENCE 

W, KASPAR ERASER 



BARRISTERS, SOLICITORS, Etc. 

J. R. L.STARR. K.C. 

GRANT COOPER 

RUSSELL P. LOCKE HOWARD A. HALL 

Trust and Guarantee Building 
120 BAY ST. - TORONTO 



WILLIAM COOK 

Barrister, Solicitor, Notary, Etc. 

33 RICHMOND ST. WEST 
TORONTO 

Telephone: Main 3893 Cable Address: "Maco" 



ROSS & HOLMSTED 

Barristers, Solicitors, Notaries, Etc. 

NATIONAL TRUST CHAMBERS 

20 King Street East, TORONTO 
JAMES LEITH Ross ARTHUR W. HOLMSTED 



Aylesworth, Wright, Thompson & Lawr 

BARRISTERS, &c. 

SIR ALLEN AYLESWORTH, K.C. 

HENRY J. WRIGHT JOSEPH THOMPSON 

WALTER LAWR 

Traders Bank Building, TORONTO 



TYRRELL, J. B. 

MINING ENGINEER 

634 Confederation Life Building 

TORONTO, CANADA 



Kerr, Davidson, Paterson & McFarland 

Barristers, Solicitors, Etc. 
EXCELSIOR LIFE BUILDING 

Cable Address "Kerdason," Toronto 



W. Davidson, K.C. 

G. F. McFarland. LL.B. 



John A. Paterson, K.C. 
A. T. Davidson, LL.B. 



Solicitors /or the University. 



OSLER, HOSKIN and HARCOURT 

Barristers, Solicitors, Etc. 
THE DOMINION BANK BUILDING 



John Ifoskin, KG- 
H. S. Osier, K.C. 
W. A Cameron 



F. W. Harcourt, K.C. 
Britton Osier 
A. W. Langmuir 



Counsel Wallace Nesbitt, K.C. 



C. H. and P. H. MITCHELL 

CONSULTING AND SUPERVISING ENGINEERS 
CIVIL, HYDRAULIC, MECHANICAL AND ELECTRICAL 

1003 Bank of Hamilton Building 
TORONTO, Cnt. 



Gregory, Gooderham & Campbell 

BARRISTERS. SOLICITORS. NOTARIES. CONVEYANCERS. &C. 

701 Continental Life Building 
167 Bay Street Toronto 

TELEPHONE MAIN 6070 

Walter Dymond Gregory Henry Folwell Gooderham 

Frederick A. A. Campbell Arthur Ernest Langman 

Goldwin Gregory Vernon Walton Armstrong 

Frederick Wismer Kemp 



WALTER J. FRANCIS & COMPANY 

CONSULTING ENGINEERS 

MONTREAL 

WALTER J. FRANCIS, C.E. 
FREDERICK B. BROWN, M.Sc. 

R. J. EDWARDS & EDWARDS 

ARCHITECTS 

18 Toronto St. : Toronto 



R. J.EDWARDS 



G. R. EDWARDS. B.A.Sc. 



92 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 





18? per 

Two /or 35? 

anJ in iins of SO 100 



PLAYER'S 



NAVY CUT 

CIGARETTES 



Untoersttp of Toronto JWontljlp 

Vol. XXII. TORONTO, DECEMBER, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND TWENTY-ONE No. 3 



News and Comments 



AN ATTRACTIVE 
FIELD FOR 
PRIVATE 
MUNIFICENCE 



Every year the need 
of more adequate 
dormitory accommo- 
dation becomes more 
acute. Much of the 
district surrounding the University has be- 
come very unsuitable for rooming house 
purposes, owing to the encroachment of 
the foreign population of the city. Not 
only is the accommodation offered poor, 
but it is expensive. Rents appear to be 
going up rather than down. From $4 to 
$6 per week is charged for single rooms 
and from $6 to $10 for double rooms. 

These conditions and the growth of the 
University have forced many students to 
go father afield for living quarters. One 
effect of this is to militate against the 
solidarity of the student body. It is 
increasingly difficult to secure good atten- 
dances at evening meetings because so 
many students live at a distance. 

Adequate student residence accommoda- 
tion would do away with these derogatory 
conditions and would greatly enrich the 
education of many undergraduates. The 
majority of those in attendance at the 
University are in need of the socializing 
influences such as are found in dormitory 
life the intimate acquaintanceships, the 
intermingling, and the shoulder rubbing 
which round off the corners and afford an 
education as essential to success in life 
as is class room work. 

An eloquent indication of the feeling 
of the undergraduates on the subject is 
given in the fact that the women students 
of University College secured for the U.C. 
Alumnae Building Fund $11,000, and that 
another campaign with an objective of 
$5,000 is now being carried on by the First 
and Second Year women who had not 
previously contributed. 

Residences provide a very attractive 
field for private munificence. It is unlikely 
that Government funds will ever be forth- 
coming for the purpose, as residences are 
regarded as somewhat of an "extra" by 
those not closely identified with University 
life. Yet the benefits which would accrue 
are indisputable and almost incalculable. 



Another attractive feature of residences 
as a benefaction is that when once erected 
they are self-supporting; no burden of 
maintenance falls upon the University. 



VARSITY 

WINS 

IN RUGBY 

AND SOCCER 



Varsity has com- 
pleted another suc- 
cessful season in ath- 
letics, winning the 
Senior Rugby Foot- 
ball and Soccer Championships, and as 
well the Intermediate Rugby and the 
Harrier Race. The Track and Tennis 
Championships went to McGill and the 
Junior Rugby to Queen's. 

As is usual the rugby football occupied 
the spotlight of interest. Varsity got off 
to a bad start by being defeated by 
Queen's at Kingston in the opening game 
of the series but this apparently was 
exactly what was needed to crystallize the 
Varsity fighting spirit and bring out the 
best efforts of the team. In a hard fought 
game in Montreal, McGill was held to a 
tie and both Queen's and McGill were 
defeated in Toronto. The team was 
coached by Dr Jack Maynard. 

The Intercollegiate Rugby Football 
Union was greatly strengthened this year 
by the fact that Queen's had, for the first 
time in a number of years, a team which 
made them dangerous contenders for the 
title. Queen's finished second in the 
series with two wins and two losses to 
McGill's one win, one tie, and two losses. 

Practically all the members of the Var- 
sity team are expected back next year. 
There is also some excellent senior material 
in this year's intermediate series and there 
is talk of entering a team in the Senior 
O.R.F.U. next year in addition to the 
intercollegiate series. 

The interfaculty series in all branches 
of sport were this year of a particularly 
high order. The magnificent athletic 
facilities of Hart House are doing much to 
popularize sports of all kinds and increase 
the percentage of students actively engaged 
in them. 



93 



94 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



"THE SPIRIT 
DOES IT" 



Without fear of 
contradiction it may 
be said that at the 
University of Toronto to-day there is a 
sport which, for good feeling, cleanness and 
freedom from any taint of professionalism, 
cannot be surpassed on the continent. The 
play-the-game qualities of Varsity teams 
have recently been very outstanding. The 
coaching is strictly amateur in both foot- 
ball and hockey, and yet in competition 
with professionally coached teams Varsity 
has a habit of coming out on top. "The 
spirit does it." 

The new ruling of the Intercollegiate 
Unions which prohibits a student who is 
repeating his year from playing on Varsity 
teams, has done away with the possibility 
of men attending the University for the 
sake of athletics only. Nor is any special 
consideration shown the members of senior 
teams at examination time. The con- 
sequence is that he who would be a football 
or hockey hero must be prepared for very 
strenuous work. The time which is taken 
from studies for practising and out-of- 
town games must be made up in some way. 
Last winter the captain of the hockey team 
could be seen almost any morning wending 
his way to the draughting room at an hour 
when most of his fellow students were still 
abed. Others carry note-books and study 
on trains and in hotel bed-rooms. Repre- 
senting the University in athletics is not a 
sinecure. The men understand that sport 
must not interfere with things academic. 



LOAN 

APPLICATIONS 

CONSIDERED 



The interviewing 
work in connection 
with the returned 
soldier loans has been 
completed with the exception of the 
applications from the Dental College, 
which are delayed owing to the fact that 
the College has not been able, at the time 
of writing, to complete its arrangements 
for the postponement of payment of fees. 
122 men have been recommended for loans 
from the Alumni Federation and 16 for fees 
only. 

The amounts recommended by Faculties 
and Colleges are as follows: 

T- i^ XT r Amounts 

Faculty or No of Recom . 

College Students 



Victoria College. . . 
University College 

Forestry 

Veterinary 

Ont. Coll. of Ed.. 



1,440 

1,375 

635 

550 

75 



Total , . 122 $21,341 

Applications from the Dental College 
total $10,300 from 67 students. 

Another distinguish- 

ENGLISH ed professor from 

ENGINEER England has come to 

APPOINTED join the staff of the 

TO SCIENCE Faculty of Applied 

Science. E. A. All- 
cut, a graduate of Birmingham University, 
is the newly appointed associate-professor 
in the Department of Thermodynamics. 
Professor Allcut has received the M.Sc. 
degree and was awarded the Bowen Re- 
search Scholarship and the Heslop Gold 
Medal. He is an associate member of 
both the Institute of Mechanical Engineers 
and of Civil Engineers and an associate 
fellow of the Royal Aeronautical Society. 

Professor Allcut has had much interest- 
ing practical work in connection with his 
profession. He performed the first experi- 
mental and testing work on the Humphrey 
internal combustion pump. Later he was 
manager of the engineering and testing 
machine departments of W. & T. Avery, 
Ltd., of Birmingham, the original shop of 
the old firm of James Watt and Company. 
During the war Professor Allcut designed 
a large number of special machines for 
testing the materials used in the con- 
struction of aeroplanes, aeroplane-engines 
and shells, and at the close of the war he 
was Chief Inspector of Materials for the 
Austin Motor Company of Northfield, and 
was sent last year to France to reorganize 
the tractor plant of the company near Paris. 
He had just set up a practice as consulting 
engineer, which he has given up in order 
to join the staff of the University. 



Medicine 55 

Applied Science. . . 43 



mended 
$10,535 
6,731 



Not since the year 
1889 has the Ameri- 
can Association for 
the Advancement of 
Science met in Tor- 
onto, but it returns 
here this year on the invitation of the 
University of Toronto and the Royal 
Canadian Institute and will hold its 



AMERICAN 
ASSOCIATION 
OF SCIENCE TO 
MEET AT 
UNIVERSITY 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



95 



sessions at the University from December 
27 to 31. Though this is the seventy- 
fourth meeting of the Association it has 
met only three times in Canada, once 
before in Toronto and twice (in 1859 and 
in 1882) in Montreal. This meeting will 
bring together some of the foremost 
scientists in the United States and Canada. 
The chief object of the Association is to 
promote scientific research. Realizing the 
importance of research in the welfare of a 
country's industries, both urban and rural, 
the Government of Ontario is making a 
grant of $5,000 and the City of Toronto a 
grant of $1,000 towards the expenses of 
this meeting. The Association has a 
membership of over 12,000 and this year's 
meeting, because of its international char- 
acter, will probably be attended by more 
than one thousand of these members. . The 
residences of the University of Toronto are 
being utilized for housing the members 
who come from outside of Toronto. The 
subjects that will be dealt with at these 
meetings are Mathematics, Physics, Chem- 
istry, Astronomy, Geology, Geography, 
Zoology, Botany, Anthropology, Psy- 
chology, Social and Economic Sciences, 
Engineering, Medical Sciences, Agriculture, 
Education, and Manufacturing. 

During the course of the session there 
will be on exhibition in the Examination 
Hall, at the back of Convocation Hall, a 
very interesting collection of scientific 
apparatus and products, chiefly in Physics 
and Chemistry, and a display of the most 
recent scientific books. 

The session will open on Tuesday 
evening, December 27, with a lecture 
by the retiring President, Dr L. O. Howard, 
who spoke recently in Toronto. On 
Wednesday evening there will be an address 
by Professor William Bateson, Director of 
John Innes Horticultural Institute, Mer- 
ton, England. Dr Bateson is a specialist 
in genetics. Another outstanding speaker 
will be Dr R. W. Yerkes, of the Carnegie 
Institute, Washington, who will tell of the 
workings of the National Council for Re- 
search. Sir Adam Beck will speak on the 
afternoon of Thursday, December 29, on 
the Hydro-Electric System and will illus- 
trate his address with moving pictures. 

Altogether these meetings will furnish a 
most comprehensive survey of the latest 
achievements in science and the City of 
Toronto is fortunate in having the privilege 



of being the centre chosen for this import- 
ant gathering. 



CAMPUS 

RECOVERS FROM 
WAR INJURIES 



It has gone. The 
unsightly fence a- 
round the front cam- 
pus is a thing of the 
past and for the first time in seven years 
the Varsity Lawn looks itself again. With 
the outbreak of war the Campus was 
sacrificed, along with everything else, to 
the great cause. It has taken three years 
to bring it back to its original state for 
the tramping of many feet for four years 
wrought havoc with the old Lawn. Now 
the ceaseless hurrying to and fro of the 
students replaces the steady march of the 
soldiers. It is one more sign of the gradual 
readjustment of life at Varsity and the 
tendency to return to the normal again. 




DR JACK MAYNARD 

Honorary football coach to whom much praise for the team's 
success is due. As coach he displayed the same outstanding 
"football brains" as he did in the days when he was the best 
halfback in the game. 



TOWN-PLANNING 

COURSE 

IN JANUARY 



The University Ex- 
tension Department 
announces a course 
in Town-Planning to 
be given from January 9 to 21. The course 
is designed primarily for experfs in the 
field, but is open to all those interested in 
the subject. 

Among the subjects to be discussed are: 
housing and health, recreation, economic 
aspects of housing, topography, road- 
making, legal powers of municipalities, 



96 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



treatment of open spaces and street trans- 
portation. Professors Berrington, Tread- 
gold, Dale, Maclver, and others will 
deliver the lectures. 

Full information may be secured from 
the Director of University Extension. 



STUDENTS' 
COURT IMPOSES 
FINES 



All the pomp and 
circumstance that 
surrounds a court of 
justice was noticeable 
at t he first trial held before the reorganized 
Students' Court of the University when 
$150 in fines was imposed on the First 
and Second Year in Medicine for unlaw- 
fully taking part in a street parade. After 
the preliminary convening of the court the 
ten trial Judges marched in in their 
academic robes while the audience re- 
mained standing in respectful attitude 
until they had taken their seats at the 
head of the room. Proceedings opened 
with the formal charge read by the Clerk 
of the Court to the effect that in holding 
a parade the First and Second Year of 
Medicine had set at naught the rules of 
the Students' Administrative Council. 

After the case had proceeded along these 
formal lines the verdict of "guilty" was 
finally pronounced and the fines imposed. 
It is interesting to note that the trial was 
conducted entirely by students and that 
the constitution used was drawn up by 
members of the student body. The only 
court of appeal is the Caput. The decision 
does not mean that parades cannot be 
held, but that, according to the rules of 
the University, they must be sanctioned in 
advance by the authorities. 



PROFESSOR 

WRONG 

ON INITIATIONS 



In the last issue of 
THE MONTHLY there 
appeared an article 
by Principal Hutton 
condemning initiation ceremonies as a 
practice without historical explanation or 
justification in this country, but rather an 
uncalled-for imitation of the United States, 
and a gratuitous piece of folly. Professor 
G. M. Wrong has now taken up the cudgels 
and maintains in a letter to The Varsity 
that even in the United States initiations 
have died out except in backwoods colleges. 
His informant is a Canadian professor at 
Harvard University who says: "We have 
no hazing at Harvard and no initiation 
rites for freshmen. Many years ago we 
had both, but they have been gradually 



eliminated until now the whole thing is 
merely a memory. Getting rid of these 
things was not a matter of discipline but of 
educating student opinion. ... In many 
of the small colleges on this side of the 
border and in Western institutions, these 
antics still persist." 

In concluding Professor Wrong says that 
the only influence which will stop this in 
Toronto is the public opinion of the 
students. In his opinion "every kind of 
initiation rite should go. The whole idea 
is vulgar and barbarous. Its continuance 
here has caused the University of Toronto 
to be regarded as primitive and half- 
civilized." 



UNIVERSITY 
SPIRIT COMING 
TO THE FORE 



Varsity first! Arts, 
Meds, School, or 
whatever it may be, 
second! That is the 
spirit which is coming to the fore in Uni- 
versity life to-day. The old conditions 
under which College or Faculty meant 
practically everything and University 
spirit almost nothing are passing away. 
The student body is becoming a unit. 

Formerly the playing fields and Con- 
vocation Hall provided the only common 
meeting grounds of all students. Now the 
students of different Faculties are brought 
together in many different ways. The 
Varsity has got clear from its traditional 
connection with the U.C. Lit. and is now 
a University organ, compulsorily sub- 
scribed for by every student of the Uni- 
versity and its affiliated Colleges. The 
Goblin is also common to all Colleges. 

In organizations, too, the tendency is 
toward the all-University. The Hart 
House clubs Sketch Club, Music Club, 
Camera Club, and others embrace stud- 
ents of all units of the University. The 
Glee Club, the Veterans Association, the 
Women's Press Club, all bring the students 
of different Faculties together. 

The tendency is in the right direction. 
College insularity is being wiped out and 
College rivalry is being placed on a 
broader, less petty basis. 



The December num- 
ber of the Canadian 
Historical Review, the 
quarterly review of 
historical work which is published by the 
University, has been issued and is of 
unusual interest. 



DECEMBER 
HISTORICAL 
REVIEW OUT 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



97 



It contains among other articles: "De- 
mocracy in Canada," by G. M. Wrong, 
being a survey of the questions raised by 
Lord Bryce in his Modern Democracies] 
"Some Reflections of Anonymous Icono- 
clasm," by R. Hodder Williams, referring 
to three books recently published, The 
Mirrors of Downing Street, The Mirrors of 
Washington, and The Masques of Ottawa] 
and "The Gold Colony of British Colum- 
bia," by Walter N. Sage. The number 
contains an excellent review of Sir Joseph 
Pope's "Correspondence of Sir John A. 
Macdonald," by Dr A. H. U. Colquhoun. 

Yearly subscription ($2) or single copies 
(50c.) of the Review may be obtained on 
application to the Business Manager, 
Canadian Historical Review, University of 
Toronto. 



NEWS OF 
T. KENNARD 
THOMSON 



In our last issue we 
published a moving 
appeal for alumni 
news. It met with at 
least one direct response. Dr T. Kennard 
Thomson, Science '92, prominent New 
York ^engineer, sent in the following 
replies: 

IF ANYONE HAS 
Killed a pig -Haven't got one 
Shot his wife Never! She's a Canadian 
Got married Thirty-three years ago 
Borrowed a stamp -Too small 
Made a speech Some 
Joined the army Too deaf 
Robbed a bank Don't know how 
Bought a Ford Nit 
Sold a dog -Haven't got one 
Lost his wallet Haven't got one 
Gone fishing No time 
Broken his neck Too tough 
Bought a house Years ago 
Comitted suicide Still on my feel 
Shot a cat Couldn't hit it 
Been away Some 
Come back home Always 
Moved his office Twelve years ago 
Taken a vacation Thirty-three years ago 
Been in a fight Always 
Got licked Not that I know of 
Had no oil stock Net oily enough 
Got rich Too young yet 
Made a bad bet Never 
It's news What? 
SEND IT TO THE EDITOR 

Mr Thomson has recently put forward 
an ambitious scheme for the expansion of 
New York City. His plan is to extend 
Manhattan some six miles down the bay 
from the Battery and link up by tunnel 
with Staten Island. This would not only 
add some six square miles of land to 



Manhattan but would extend to Staten 
Island, now isolated, transportation facili- 
ties similar to those at present afforded to 
Brooklyn. 

Mr Thomson's scheme has met with a 
favourable reception and a Corporation to 
advance it has been formed. 



THANKS TO 
UNIVERSITY 



PRINCIPAL CURRIE Pr , esid e nt /, alc ? ner > 
TENDERS attended the 

McGill Centenary as 
representative of the 
University of Toron- 
to, has received the following letter from 
Principal Currie: 

Dear SIR ROBERT: 

I wish, on behalf of the Board of Gover- 
nors, the Corporation, the Teaching Staff, 
and all the well-wishers of McGill Univer- 
sity, to thank most warmly and sincerely 
the University of Toronto for the good 
wishes and congratulations tendered 
McGill on the occasion of the celebration 
of her centenary. 

McGill enters the second century of her 
existence in a humble spirit, grateful for 
the blessings of the past, and trying to 
appreciate the responsibilities and privi- 
leges of the present and future. She will 
endeavour to merit in an increasing degree 
the respect and esteem of sister universities, 
and to the University of Toronto she 
extends most cordial good wishes. 
Yours faithfully, 

A. W. CURRIE, 
Principal. 

Sir Robert Falconer has just returned 
from New York, where he attended, on 
November 16, the annual meeting of the 
Board of Trustees of the Carnegie Founda- 
tion for the Advancement of Teaching. 
He was elected Vice-Chairman of the 
Board. 

Among the matters which were most 
discussed were the teaching of Medicine 
in the Universities of Canada and the 
United States, university sports, and the 
Teachers' Insurance and Annuity Associa- 
tion, which is one of the activities of the 
Foundation. This latter organization, of 
which Professor M. A. MacKenzie, of the 
University of Toronto, is Vice-President, 
offers an excellent superannuation arrange- 
ment of which three hundred colleges avail 
themselves. 



98 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



Once again the birthday of Hart House 
has been fittingly celebrated. The Mas- 
querade, which was held on November 16, 
was a triumphant success and bids fair 
to become an annual function. It is the 
one occasion in the Social Calendar of the 
University that an attempt is made on a 
large scale to unite the students of the 
different faculties. With Hart House as 
the central bond and the institution of an 
annual Hart House Masquerade or Dance 
the foundations may be laid for the building 
up of a firmer and more lively esprit de 
corps among the various Colleges of the 
University. 



An expedition of physiologists, under the 
direction of Professor Bancroft of Cam- 
bridge, England, which left recently for 
Peru will travel to the highest point of the 
Central Peruvian Railway in order to study 
the cause of mountain srckness. The 
University of Toronto is interested in this 
expedition because a large number of the 
analyses of blood and excreta are to be 
made here, and also because one of the 
members is Professor A. C. Redfield, who 
was on the staff in Physiology here last 
year. After he returns from Peru, Pro- 
fessor Bancroft will come to Toronto, 
where he is to give one of the lectures 
before the Royal Canadian Institute on 
February 4. 



The newly created fellowship in Phy- 
siology of the American Physiological 
Society, donated by Professor W. T. 
Porter, of Harvard, has been awarded to 
Dr J. Hepburn, a graduate in Medicine of 
the University of Toronto of 1921. Dr 
Hepburn received the scholarship in con- 
sideration of the high standing which he 
took as a student here. 



The members of the staff of University 
College and their wives have established 
the custom of being At Home to the 
students of the College one afternoon each 
week. Every Thursday afternoon tea is 
served in the Graduates' Room in the 
Library, formerly the old Book Room. 
These weekly informal meetings originated 
last spring in an effort to bring the staff 



and students in closer contact with each 
other and thus to remove one of the strong 
objections to a large College, where it is 
argued that the students can never get 
into personal touch with their instructors. 



Dr. Seager Installed as 
Provost of Trinity 



THE affectionate interest which the 
graduates and friends of Trinity feel 
for the College was shown by the 
large crowd which filled Convocation Hall 
on November 17 to witness the installation 
of the new Provost. There were present 
many dignitaries of the Church of England 
and numerous representatives of Canadian 
institutions of higher learning. 

Following the reading of prayers by 
Dean Duckworth, Chancellor Worrell ad- 
dressed the gathering. He gave a brief 
historical sketch of the College, outlining 
the work which had been done by the four 
Provosts who preceded Dr Seager, referring 
particularly to the great service rendered 
the College by Dr Macklem. He pointed 
out the magnitude of the task which con- 
fronted Dr Seager in transferring the 
College from its old position to the new 
site in Queen's Park and expressed un- 
bounded confidence in the new Provost's 
ability to carry the matter through success- 
fully and to lead Trinity into a sphere of 
greater usefulness and influence. 

The declarations of office were then 
made and Dr Seager was presented by 
Their Lordships, the Bishops of Toronto 
and Ottawa. As Dr Seager faced the 
audience the student body broke in with 
the Trinity College yell and two College 
songs, one of which was composed for the 
occasion. 

Dr Seager spoke of the great work which 
his predecessor in office had done in joining 
Trinity with the University, in strengthen- 
ing the financial standing of the College, 
and in gathering about him a staff of out- 
standing ability. He hoped that he might 
be able to follow in Dr Macklem's footsteps 
to the benefit of Trinity and the University. 

A number of Church and University 
representatives spoke briefly, conveying to 
Dr Seager the good wishes of the bodies 
which they represented. 



What The Alumni Federation Means 



A Letter from the President of the Federation 



Dear Mr Editor: 

I have been asked the following ques- 
tions: 

1. Why is the reorganization of the 
Alumni Association and its crystallization 
into an incorporated body necessary or 
even desirable? 

2. What does the Federation scheme 
really mean and what new purpose is it to 
serve? 

Inasmuch as the answers to these queries 
may be of interest to many of your readers 
I venture to write you this letter. 

The old Alumni Association was a 
voluntary Association of individuals con- 
sisting, according to its Constitution, of 
every man, woman, and child who at any 
time had attended the University for one 
term. When this vague and unwieldy 
body found itself the trustee of a Memorial 
Fund of more than $300,000 and began the 
administration of that Fund, inconveniences 
at once appeared. The first of these arose 
when it was desired to make a written 
agreement committing the practical in- 
vestment and management of the Fund to 
a regularly organized Trust Company as 
the agent of the Association. This situa- 
tion was the immediate cause of the deter- 
mination to incorporate. It was also 
foreseen that a problem of even greater 
difficulty would present itself when the 
question of letting the contract for building 
the Memorial Tower came up for con- 
sideration, as there was no responsible 
body which could make a firm bargain with 
the contractor, and the personal guarantee 
of a number of the members of the Board 
of Directors would have been necessary. 

These considerations gave rise to the 
view that the reorganization and the in- 
corporation of the old Association was 
desirable, and it is expected that additional 
advantages will accrue from its becoming 
a permanent body, governed by definite 
and well considered by-laws with power 
to act as a corporation, directly and legally 
through its Board of Directors. 

Turning now to the second question, 
namely, "What does the Federation idea 
really mean and what new purpose is it 
to serve?" 

I desire in the first place to make clear 
the fact that the Federation is designed 



not to eliminate or to diminish but to 
foster College, Faculty, and Local Alumni 
Associations. The function of the Federa- 
tion will be to carry on the chief executive 
operations of the Alumni body, such as 
the publication of THE MONTHLY, the 
administration of the Memorial Fund, the 
promotion of the effort to secure more 
adequate financial support for the Uni- 
versity through the adoption of the Uni- 
versity Commission's Report, and in 
general to take action on matters per- 
taining to the University as a whole. 

At the same time it is fully realized that 
while all such executive functions can best 
be performed by a central body, equipped 
with a Secretary, an office, and a regular 
staff, yet the sentimental attachment of 
the individual alumnus binds him primarily 
to his College or his Faculty. Therefore it 
is desirable that each Faculty or College 
within the University should have its own 
Alumni Association devoted to gatherings 
of its members and to the more sectional 
interests of the University unit concerned. 

It is hoped that the formation of the 
Federation will mean increased efficiency 
and increased interest in the alumni work 
in all its branches and a larger membership 
in all the associations. In the past there 
has been some lack of co-ordination among 
the alumni organizations and considerable 
duplication of fees. If there can be 
arranged a combined fee to include mem- 
bership both in College associations and in 
the Federation, and subscription to THE 
MONTHLY, the duplication of fees will be 
avoided, and it is hoped that the member- 
ship will be increased. The Federation 
will assist College Associations by keeping 
their records, doing their clerical work, 
and in many other ways placing its staff 
at their disposal. In return, the Federa- 
tion expects the College Associations to do 
their utmost to promote the objects of the 
Federation and to secure for it large 
increases in its membership. 

These are, roughly speaking, the main 
outlines of the scheme as it stands. The 
details remain as yet to be worked out 
with each of the separate Associations. 

Yours very truly, 

C. A. MASTEN. 



99 



Does Higher Education Pay the Province? 

By JOHN R. BONE '99 
MANAGING EDITOR, Toronto Daily Star 



IT costs the University of Toronto $216 
to give an Arts student one year's 
tuition, according to a recent analysis 
of University costs. 

Towards this amount the student con- 
tributes in fees the sum of, say, $50. 

There is, therefore, on each Arts student 
a deficit of $166 a year, which is contributed 
by some person or persons other than the 
student himself. 

If there are 2,000 Arts students attending 
the University simultaneously, there is a 
deficit in one year of $332,000, to be 
secured from some treasure store house. 

Similar figures can be quoted for the 
other faculties, and the aggregate of such 
deficits represents what it costs, over and 
above what the students themselves pay, 
to carry on University operations for one 
year. 

Or again, the Arts student, who becomes 
a graduate, has at the end of four years 
incurred for the University a deficit of four 
times $166, that is $664. In other words, 
the graduate has secured something for 
$664 less than cost. He has incurred a 
moral debt which can be estimated in 
terms of cash at this amount. If the staff 
which has supplied the tuition has been, 
during the process, overworked and under- 
paid the moral debt is by so much, greater. 

One wonders whether the fact ever lies 
upon the graduate's conscience. One 
wonders whether he (or she) has even 
thought about it, or whether there is on 
the contrary a disposition on the part of 
some graduates to take the view that they 
have been rather conferring a favour upon 
the University and upon the community, 
by taking the course of instruction pro- 
vided by the University. One has heard 
in gatherings of Alumni complaint made 
that the University does nothing for its 
graduates, the intimation being that the 
University owes a debt to its graduates 
which ought to be discharged. It is, of 
course, desirable from the University's 



point of view that it should attach to itself 
by every means in its power, the affection 
and loyalty of its graduates, and to that 
end it may well adopt any suggestion 
which would enable it to forge another 
bond between it and its Alumni. But 
when it comes to a question of debt, or of 
obligation, the University has no debt to 
its graduates to discharge. The obligation 
is all the other way. 

The obligation of the graduate does not 
end with the University*. Deficits are not 
supplied by the University from some 
secret source of wealth. Deficits are met 
by the Province of Ontario and it is, 
therefore, to the community as a whole, as 
organized for Provincial affairs, that the 
student and the graduate of the University 
is obligated. 

This fact suggests two questions. The 
first, a personal one; the second, general 
in its application. The first question is: 
"What benefit has it been to the Province 
to spend $664, or whatever the amount 
happens to be, in giving me a University 
degree and in giving you a University 
degree?" Have we rendered any service 
to the Province in return for that ex- 
penditure? This is a question which must 
be left to each individual to answer for 
himself or herself. 

The second question is simply the first 
question generalized but in its generalised 
form it represents the essence of the whole 
acute question of University finance. It 
may be expressed in this form: "What 
benefit is it to the Province to provide 
University education at less than cost to 
all who may apply for it?" 

This is a question that has to be answered 
and answered to the satisfaction of the 
tax-payers of the Province before the 
finances of the University will rest on a 
thoroughly substantial and permanent 
foundation. 

It is only in the last few years that the 
question has been brought home to the 



100 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



101 



public, perhaps a fortunate thing for the 
University, or perhaps unfortunate, accord- 
ing to. the point of view. Twenty years or 
so ago there were no deficits which could 
not be discharged out of the University's 
assured sources of income. The com- 
munity paid but didn't feel it. University 
expenditure in those days was like cold 
weather in Winnipeg; it was away below 
zero but one didn't feel it. Later there 
was the provision under which supple- 
mentary University revenue came from 
Succession Duties. Perhaps it was thought 
that under this arrangement also the public 
wouldn't "feel" University expenditures. 
Succession duties were at first regarded as 
a sort of windfall in State revenue. But 
now they have become standardized and 
increasingly important. There is a fairly 
strong presumption that they will continue 
to increase, not merely because of increase 
in the number of large estates but by 
increases in the scale of taxation. In 
Ontario they have already become one 
of the important sources of revenue and 
may in time become the most important. 
As this process goes on it will become 
increasingly difficult for the public to 
recognize these duties as a thing apart, a 
revenue that should be set aside for any 
particular purpose, although it might in 
passing be pointed out that some advocates 
of Succession duties extension urge, that 
the tax, being virtually a tax on capital, 
ought to be devoted not to current expenses 
but to capital improvements, such as 
permanent works. 

But the point is that now that Succession 
duties have come to be regarded as a 
regular and important source of Provincial 
revenue, and that simultaneously Uni- 
versity requirements from the Provincial 
Treasury have grown from $500,000 a year 
to three or four times that amount, it is 
not possible, even if it were desirable, to 
divert public scrutiny and questioning 
from University expenditures by simply 
linking them up with Succession Duties. 
Whether University revenue in the future 
comes from Succession Duties or not, the 
public, called on to pay $2,000,000 a year, 
is going to know about it and is going to 
want an answer to the question: "What 



benefit is it to the Province to provide 
University education at less than cost?" 
Why not spend that two million a year on 
more good roads or on taking hydro 
power to the farms, or on the less advanced 
stages of education, or in a dozen other 
enterprises that might find eager sup- 
porters? 

Perhaps it will be found to be more 
difficult to answer the problem because 
there has been such a long silence, but as 
any graduate of the University knows, or 
should know, it is not a difficult problem 
to answer. It has been answered in the 
neighbouring state of Michigan, in Wis- 
consin, in California, and in scores of other 
communities, which Ontario citizens would 
be sorry to think have a truer perception 
of what is worth while than we have. 

There is the question: "What benefit 
is it to the Province to provide University 
education at less than cost?" 

Answer it so that all may be convinced, 
and the problem of University finances 
will automatically solve itself, for this is a 
wealthy province with almost limitless 
possibilities of achievement. But the 
question must be answered. 

AND WHO IS GOING TO ANSWER 
IT IF UNIVERSITY ALUMNI DO 
NOT? 

Suppose readers of the UNIVERSITY OF 
TORONTO MONTHLY send in their answers 
for publication. 

It is not the intention of these lines to 
suggest, as the opening paragraphs might, 
that the relation of Alumni to the Uni- 
versity is a mere matter of dollars and 
cents. The real obligation, the bond which 
draws us irresistibly to the University, has 
no such sordid foundation. But the 
thought it is desired to suggest is that the 
University, having a real and acute prob- 
lem of dollars and cents, a problem incurred 
on behalf of her graduates and under- 
graduates, it is decidedly an obligation 
upon every graduate and undergraduate 
to assist the University in solving that 
problem. It can only be solved by con- 
vincing our fellow citizens that University 
education is not only a good investment, 
but the very best investment the Province 
can make. 



Graduate Organizations of the University of Toronto. II. 



By J. SQUAIR 
PROFESSOR EMERITUS OF FRENCH 



IN our first article (MONTHLY, November, 
1921, pp. 61-64) some account has 
been given of the active part of the life 
of Convocation, of the life (1892-1895) of 
the ill-fated Alumni Association of Uni- 
versity College, and of the inauguration 
(April 17, 1900) of the still existing Alumni 
Association of the University of Toronto. 
As has been mentioned, Dr R. A. Reeve 
was its first President and Dr J. C. Mc- 
Lennan its first Secretary. A word or two 
has also been said with respect to the 
interest aroused by the young Association 
among the graduates, out of which grew 
the organization of Branch Associations 
and popular demonstrations. 

One of the earliest points to be noted in 
relation to the conduct of the Association 
was the introduction of new features into 
University celebrations like Commence- 




DR R. A. REEVE 

Late Dean of the Faculty of Medicine, who, for the first seven 
years of its existence, was president of the Association. 



ment, which were apparently derived from 
new sources of inspiration. There seems 
to have been an attempt to fashion pro- 
ceedings on the model of academic in- 
stuitions of other countries where Com- 
mencement Week played a great role in 
University social life. So, in 1900 for the 
first time, there were an Alumni banquet 
on the eve of Commencement and a garden 
party after the conferring of degrees on 
Commencement Day. Another new de- 
parture is also noted in the records of the 
occasion, viz., a moonlight excursion on 
Lake Ontario on the evening of the same 
day. 

The banquet was held on June 12, the 
eve of Commencement Day, in the Gym- 
nasium, which stood on part of the site of 
Hart House. Four hundred graduates, 
men and women, sat down to dinner. 
The speaking was of a very interesting 
character. The Ontario Government was 
represented by the Hon. Richard Harcourt 
(B.A. 1870), Minister of Education, who 
proposed the toast of the "Empire and its 
Defenders," to which the response was 
given by the veteran statesman, Sir Charles 
Tupper. The brave deeds of Canadians 
in the Boer War formed part of the matter 
for these two eloquent speeches. The 
most important speech of the occasion was 
that made by Sir William Meredith, who 
was then at the opening of his brilliant 
career as Chancellor of the University 
(elected April 12, 1900). It took the form 
of a brief review of the history of the 
University during the preceding ten years, 
calling special attention to the erection of 
such important buildings as the Library, 
the Chemical Building, and the Gymnasi- 
um, and not forgetting the establishment 
of the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in 
1897. He stated that one gentleman had 
already achieved that degree and that 
another would receive it on the morrow, 
viz., J. C. McLennan, the Secretary of the 
new Alumni Association. The Chancellor 
devoted the latter part of his speech to a 
discussion of the serious financial need 



102 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



103 



with which the University was then con- 
fronted and thus opened the long and 
strenuous campaign for funds which, with 
varying degrees of intensity, has never 
ceased. 

Another new thing of great importance, 
i.e., the founding of a journal, was im- 
mediately undertaken. An editorial board 
was chosen, of which I. H. Cameron 
(M.B. 1874) became chairman and J. C. 
McLennan secretary. The board of editors 
worked hard, got "copy" together and a 
long enough list of advertisers to justify 
them in making a start, and had the first 
number out in July under the title of the 
UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY. There 
were those who murmured and prophesied 
a speedy collapse of this journalistic 
venture, but the MONTHLY lived on and 
has done good work as an exponent of 
University sentiment and a defender of the 
University's interests. 

This activity amongst the graduates was 
accompanied by useful and interesting 
movements in the administration of the 
University. During the summer it was 
decided to open the Residence Dining Hall, 
which had been closed for a year, as a 
general Dining Hall for students and staff. 
It was hailed as a boon. The students' 
paper, Varsity, said of it that it gave great 
" promise of permanent good," a prophecy 
which has been realized, for down through 
the intervening years it served a good 
purpose until it was absorbed by the 
magnificent gift of the Massey Foundation 
called Hart House. 

The Dining Hall became a centre for 
other important things. Very soon a 
Faculty Union was organized (April 15, 
1901) and was given quarters in the Dean's 
House of the former Residence, and by 
December 12 an undergraduate club was 
under way with the promise of a home in 
what was called the Third House of the 
Residence in the west wing of the Main 
Building (used for the first time on March 
13, 1901, as a meeting place for the great 
delegation). Both of these institutions, 
particularly the Faculty Union, have 
flourished and are now contained in the 
palatial Hart House. The Students' Union 
has not had such uniform prosperity as the 
Faculty Union, but both have rendered 
important service to the University. It 
was also hoped that a Graduates' Club 
would be organized and housed close to 



the Faculty Union, but the down-town 
graduate was chary of becoming too closely 
connected with the Faculty and in due 
time a University Club, open to graduates 
of all universities, was founded and took 
up its quarters in a house in King Street 
West, where it still is. It is interesting, 
however, to reflect on the fact that in Hart 
House these three clubs projected in 1900 
have found a place. The undergraduates, 
the graduates, and the Faculty all have 
splendid quarters in that finest of university 
homes. The progressives of 1900 were 
right in their plans, although the manner 
of the realization of these plans was hidden 
by the veil of the future. 




PROFESSOR J. C. McLENNAN 
First Secretary of the Alumni Association 



When lectures began in October the 
good, new spirit showed itself again in the 
presentation, on University College Con- 
vocation Day, of a flag, a fine British 
ensign, by Mr H. F. Gooderham (B.A. 
1900) on behalf of the Zeta Psi Fraternity, 
and also of two guns by the graduating 
class, represented by Mr E. F. Burton 
(B.A. 1901), and by the Engineering 
Society of the School of Practical Science 
represented by Mr F. E. Guy (B.A.Sc. 
1901). These guns, which were taken 
from the bottom of Louisbourg harbour, 
still stand on the elevation to the east 
of the Main Building. They are interest- 



104 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



ing relics of the fighting which was taking 
place between French and English in 1768. 
Another important part of the Con- 
vocation proceedings was the address on 
October 1 by President Loudon on ''School 
and University Reform." Although not a 
part of the doings of the Alumni Associa- 
tion, it had such an important bearing on 
things which happened subsequently that 
it should not be overlooked. It may be 
found in full in the University MONTHLY, 
Vol. I, pp. 41-53, and all that is needed 
here is to say that on account of the 
sharpness and directness of the criticism 
of our Public and High Schools, it proved 
distasteful to the Minister of Education 
and hfe Department generally. The Tor- 
onto newspapers raised the hue and cry. 
Journals like the World and Mail approved 
more or less definitely, whilst others took 
an opposite view. Amongst the rest there 
was an article which appeared in the Star. 
of October 6, signed J. A. M., in which 
certain platitudes were expressed in a 
grave and impressive manner. It was 
evidently intended as an attack on the 
University and the President which might 
serve as a counter thrust to the President's 
criticism of the Public and High Schools. 
It complained of the folly of the University 
of Toronto and of its low ideals. It said: 
"Toronto has added department after 
department and professor after professor, 
but the strength of one great man would 
be as the strength of ten, because in him 
the students would find life." The notes 
touched here, of Toronto's folly, the weak- 
ness of its staff, and the needed strong man 
bringing life to the students, are to be 
heard many times in the discords and 
jangles which followed. And the pro- 
vincial papers uttered, too, their jeremiads 
and warnings. 

Presently also a bomb exploded in very 
close proximity to the University. The 
Hon. S. H. Blake had been invited to 
address the Political Sciience Club at the 
regular meeting of November 22, 1900. 
He chose as his subject "Some Thoughts 
on the Ideal of our National University." 
Amongst other things he said: " How large 
a man we need, to be the ruling spirit 
through all the many activities of our 
University! We want a man! No mere 
namby-pamby professor. There must be 
a high and lofty ideal ; and we must not be 
satisfied until we obtain one who will be 



an inspiration and will breathe life and 
power through the otherwise dead walls. 
We want a strong personality one full of 
life and vigour a man of deep sympathy, 
etc., etc." Although an anonymous news 
item afterwards said that Mr Blake had 
not intended to make his remarks apply to 
any person in particular, the students, the 
staff, and the public in general, and parti- 
cularly the most of the newspapers, took 
the Address as a direct attack on the 
President and certain members of the staff. 
The echoes of the event rang loud and far 
and helped to create that sentiment of 
dissatisfaction with the University which 
prevailed so long and produced difficulties 
of many sorts. 

Nevertheless there were passages in the 
address which had a different kind of 
interest, although they were rather over- 
looked by the greater number. He spoke 
of the shamefully small revenue upon 
which the University was forced to exist. 
He declared that in addition to the income 
from the original endowment, from stu- 
dens' fees, etc., the Province of Ontario 
contributed only a paltry sum of $7,000 
out of a total provincial expenditure of 
$3,710,420, to the support of its highest 
institution of learning. The result of 
which economical policy was that for the 
then preceding year there had been a 
deficit of $14,000. In a very valuable 
passage in the address Mr Blake suggested 
that some fixed percentage of the Succes- 
sion Duty should be set apart in perpetuity 
for the income of the University. This 
seems to be one of the earliest occasions 
on which this source of income was ad- 
vocated publicly by a man of influence. 

A few days later (on December 1) an 
article signed by Jas. A. Tucker, the centre 
of the University disturbances of 1895, 
appeared in Saturday Night, in which he 
expressed his satisfaction at seeing Mr 
Blake and President Loudon at logger- 
heads, for had they not five years earlier 
been joined together in unholy alliance to 
prevent Mr Tucker and his associates 
from cleaning up the awful mess at the 
University? Mr Tucker now has his 
revenge, but en bon prince he says very 
kind things of Blake and Loudon, and he 
suggests that if Loudon were not misled 
by unworthy intriguers he would make a 
very decent sort of President. This seems 
to be the first time that there is a public 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



105 



suggestion of the theory developed five 
years later in the letters written by C. R. 
Jamieson out of which grew an investi- 
gation by a Committee of the University 
Senate, about which we shall hear more 
presently. Mr Tucker also suggests that 
Mr Blake had been led to attack President 
Loudon for the purpose of hitting back at 
Loudon for his attack on the Minister of 
Education in his Convocation address in 
October. 

While this discussion was proceeding, the 
Secretary and Executive generally were 
busy organizing Branch Associations in the 
country and preparing for the monster 
deputation which met the Government on 
March 13, 1901, during the Session of the 
Legislature. A very important sequel to 
this interview was the passing of a Uni- 
versity Act which came into force April 15, 
1901. This Act contained provisions for 
extending the powers of the Board of 
Trustees, for the appointment of a separate 
Head (Principal) for University College, 
and most important of all a substantial 
increase. of income by the, amount of "the 
salaries of all professors, lecturers, and 
other instructors in the departments of 
Chemistry, Physics, Mineralogy, and Geo- 
logy, and the cost of maintenance of said 
departments," estimated at that time to be 
about $25,000 per annum. The Govern- 
ment also agreed to put up a new building 
at the head of McCaul Street to cost 
$200,000 for the teaching of various natural 
sciences. 

Another building whose erection was 
long delayed now appears in the field of 
discussion. On December 14, 1900, a 
special meeting of the Alumni Association 
was held in the Chemical Building, at 
which was discussed the question of a 
Graduates' Club and also of a Memorial 
Hall to cost $25,000, and a committee of 
fourteen gentlemen, at whose head was 
the Hon. George A. Cox, was appointed to 
consider the matter of a Memorial Hall in 
honour of those who had fallen at Ridgeway 
and in the Boer War. This committee met 
on December 20 in the Canadian Institute 
in Richmond Street, and made arrange- 
ments for site, plans, etc., and for soliciting 
subscriptions. Before long the original 
idea of a Memorial Hall was widened into 
that of a Convocation Hall, of which the 
University had stood much in need since 
the great fire of 1890. But several years 



were to elapse before the zealous efforts of 
the Alumni Association produced a result 
in this matter. 

It would be too tedious to follow all the 
ups and downs of Convocation Hall from 
1900 to 1906. Its story would form the 
material for the plot of a sort of grim farce. 
It had always met with a certain kind of 
opposition. There were always those who 
looked upon such a thing as unnecessary. 
Then it was hard to get such a large sum as 
$50,000 in small amounts from the gradu- 
ates. And soon it was discovered that 
such an expenditure would be quite in- 
adequate. The Government was unen- 
thusiastic, perhaps hostile, and members of 
the Legislature poured cold water, and 
some contempt, on the idea. The diffi- 
culties in connection with the choice of 
site were considerable. It became neces- 
sary to negotiate with the Dominion 
Government for the site of the Meteor- 
ological Observatory, and when the busi- 
ness men of the city heard that possibly 
the Observatory would be removed to 
Ottawa, if Convocation Hall were put up 
in the southwest corner of the lawn, there 
was strong opposition. Then even the 
Toronto Branch of the Alumni Association, 
organized April 12, 1905, opposed the 
location of Convocation Hall near the lawn 
on the ground that it would be an act of 
gross vandalism. And the Press quite 
frequently made disquieting criticisms and 
suggestions, advocating such sites as the 
north side of the Quadrangle or somewhere 
in Bloor Street West. But the Secretary 
of the Association stood firm. The gradu- 
ates subscribed the sum expected of them. 
The Government lent its aid and the Board 
of Trustees helped. The corner-stone was 
laid . by the Lieutenant-Governor, Sir 
Mortimer Clark, on June 10, 1904, and 
the ceremonies of University Commence- 
ment took place in the new Convocation 
Hall on June 8, 1906, although the building 
was still three or four months from com- 
pletion. It was indeed, considering the 
circumstances, a notable achievement to 
the credit of the Association, and nobody 
to-day considers the Hall as useless, as 
many prophesied it would be. 

The Alumni Association continued to 
prosper and exert influence. At its meeting 
on June 12, 1903, the Chancellor, Sir 
William Meredith, congratulated it by 
saying: "The Alumni Association has felt 



106 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



its strength. Keep on your good work for 
you have a great power. No government 
would dare resist the demands of such a 
body of men." A proof of that power had 
just been seen that very evening in the 
reception by the Secretary of a letter from 
the Hon. Messrs Gibson and Harcourt, 
pledging the Government's support to 
Convocation Hall, when nearly everybody 
had given up hope. The meeting was very 
much cheered by the good news and 
plucked up courage for future effort. For 
the needs of the University were ever 
growing. Residences for men and women 
were being demanded. A Faculty of 
Forestry became a pressing need. Develop- 
ment of the Medical Faculty needed to be 
pressed forward, and a deficit was immin- 
ent. 

In the summer of 1903 President 
Loudon, accompanied by the Secretary 
of the Association, made a trip to the 
Western Provinces. They left Toronto 
on August 27 and were absent about five 
weeks. "The journey was broken at Port 
Arthur, Winnipeg, Brandon, Regina, Cal- 
gary, Edmonton, McLeod, Nelson, Van- 
couver, New Westminster, and Victoria. 
The schools and colleges in each of these 
cities and towns were visited, and con- 
siderable time was spent in conference at 
Regina and Victoria with the officials of 
the Departments of Education, who were 
exceedingly kind in furnishing the fullest 
information regarding their school systems 
and the standards of their examinations." 
In addition to the gathering of information 
in educational matters, they met many 
graduates and succeeded in organizing six 
Branch Alumni Associations: Victoria and 
Vancouver 'Island, Vancouver and Lower 
British Columbia, the Kootenay District, 
Edmonton, Regina, and Manitoba. It 
was a highly successful journey and did a 
good deal to stir feeling amongst the 
graduates and bind them to the University 
(see MONTHLY, Vol. 4, p. 26). 

Although the financial provisions of the 
University Act of 1901 brought relief to 
the distressed institution, it was clear to 
all that the remedy was merely a palliative, 
and early in 1904 it was decided by the 
University administration and the Alumni 
Association to renew their demands upon 
the Provincial Government for help. On 
February 24, Premier Ross and Mr Har- 
court were waited upon by a deputation 
of the Board of Trustees of the University 



urging the erection of a new Physics 
Laboratory whose estimated cost was 
$150,000. The Alumni Association began 
to prepare for another deputation to wait 
upon the Government, and the date of 
March 23 was fixed for the interview by 
the Premier. The discussion of Uni- 
versity affairs went on vigorously in the 
newspapers, some heartily defending the 
institution, some damning it with faint 
praise, and some opposing it, insomuch 
that one provincial paper forgot itself and 
called the University "the sink hole in the 
Queen's Park." It was also discussed in 
the Legislature, which had opened on 
January 14. There it gained the support 
of the Opposition under Mr J. P. W T hitney 
an Opposition strong and energetic, 
which felt that the future was on its side, 
as was made abundantly manifest in a few 
months' time. 

On the day appointed the deputation of 
alumni, over two hundred strong and 
representing some thirty centres in the 
Province, arrived and presented their 
memorandum, accompanied by able and 
enthusiastic speeches from such men as 
Rev. Dr Burwash, Sir Thomas White 
(B.A. 1895), Mr Frederick Nicholls, Mr J. 
F. Ellis, Mr J. D. Allan, Mr Justice 
Idington, etc. It was pointed out in 
general that the finances of the University 
were insufficient, and great stress was laid 
particularly on the need of a Physics 
Laboratory and the foundation of a De- 
partment of Forestry. The Premier could 
not promise any immediate help. He 
thought that soon something might be 
done for Physics, but felt convinced that 
the deputation was in the wrong in asking 
for a Department of Forestry. He coun- 
selled patience, and thought the University 
could well afford to wait until other crying 
needs of the country were satisfied. 

The deputation brought no immediate 
financial help to the University. On the 
contrary it brought a good deal of acri- 
monious newspaper and even parliament- 
ary discussion during the long session, 
which closed April 26. Some newspapers 
did not hesitate to say that the Premier 
showed a hostile spirit to the University, 
and the most important organ of the 
Government continually insisted upon the 
idea that the University needed new men 
at its head and on its staff quite as much 
as new buildings and enlarged budgets. 

Time wore on. The summer passed 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



107 



with its Commencement proceedings, with 
Garden Party, laying the corner-stone of 
Convocation Hall, Alumni Association 
meeting, banquet and eloquent speeches 
in which the needs of the University formed 
the chief topic. The Secretary was also 
able to report that "in addition to the 
General Association, with its centre at 
Toronto, there now exist twenty-three 
Branches in Ontario, one in Quebec, one 
in Manitoba, three in the Northwest 
Territories, three in British Columbia, and 
two in the United States." In the autumn 
the Senate elections for a triennial period 
were held and on October 10 the results 
were published. Sir William Meredith 
was elected Chancellor by acclamation. 
Amongst others the Secretary of the 
Association was elected a member. 

In March the Premier had counselled the 
University to have patience, and no person 
apparently was looking for financial relief 
when without warning, on November 29, 
the newspapers announced that by reason 
of an advantageous sale of Government 
property in Front Street for $180,000 to 
the Grand Trunk Railway the Government 
had decided to authorize the erection of 
the Physics Laboratory. The University 
authorities were delighted. On the same 
date it was also announced that the Alumni 
Secretary had been made Director of the 
Physics Laboratory. 

But the disagreeable was following fast 
on the heels of the agreeable. A few 
days after the announcement of the victory 
in Physics, on December 8, there appeared 
in Varsity a humorous article entitled 
''Charon Redivivus" signed by Oudeis, '05, 
in which members of the staff, actually 
named or easily identifiable, were satirized. 
Two days later a letter appeared in Satur- 
day Night, entitled "An Indictment of 
Toronto University" and signed Junius Jr. 
The writer stated that the University had 
no real head, but that the President, now 
old and feeble, was at the mercy of selfish 
intriguers who forced him to pursue an 
uncertain and ridiculous policy. At once 
there were articles in the daily papers and 
replies to Junius Jr in Saturday Night, and 
a second letter from Junius Jr in the same 
journal in its issue of January 7, 1905. 
In his second letter, Junius Jr becomes 
more definite and names Dr McLennan as 
the great intriguer who had led the Presi- 
dent astray. He was the wicked man who 
succeeded in securing wrongfully for Messrs 



Patterson and Burton on separate occasions 
the 1851 Exhibition Science Research 
Scholarship, that Dr McLennan had used the 
Alumni Association, the Dining Hall, and 
even the conferring of honorary degrees to 
his own advantage, etc., etc. 

Naturally the President and Dr Mc- 
Lennan lost no time in asking the Senate 
to institute an investigation of these 
charges, and on January 20, the Senate 
resolved to appoint a committee for that 
purpose. The committee appointed con- 
sisted of the Chancellor, Sir William 
Meredith; the Vice-Chancellor, Charles 
Moss ; Mr Justice Street ; Provost Mack- 
lem, of Trinity; and Mr A. B. Aylesworth 
(B.A. 1874). The committee met prompt- 
ly on January 28, in Osgoode Hall, and 
thereafter on Saturdays until the month of 
May. It was soon discovered that a 
student by the name of C. R. Jamieson 
was the author of the Junius Jr letters, 
of "Charon Redivivus," and of articles 
which appeared in two other evening 
papers of Toronto. A large number of 
witnesses were examined under oath by 
eminent counsel and on May 19 the com- 
mittee reported to the Senate that they 
found the President and Dr McLennan 
exonerated from all blame. The only 
point to which the committee would attach 
any blame was that in awarding the 1851 
Scholarship to Mr Patterson the Senate's 
committee on awards had not observed all 
the regulations in the case. The investi- 
gating committee expressed itself regard- 
ing Dr McLennan thus, that it found 
"no ground for the accusation that his 
activity was attributable to any undue 
desire on his part for professional advance- 
ment or personal aggrandisement." The 
case was over, but coincidently with the 
investigation there had been a change of 
Government. The Premier, feeling that 
he had no longer the confidence of the 
House, had asked for a dissolution, and 
his request was granted. The election 
was held on January 25 and the Liberal 
Party, which had been in power since 
December, 1871, more than thirty years 
before, was defeated. Mr Ross* and his 
Cabinet resigned office on February 5, 
and immediately Mr J. P. Whitney was 
called on to form a Ministry. He at once 
undertook to put the University in a 
proper financial condition and to appoint 
a Royal Commission to consider the whole 
University question. 



Alfred Henry Reynar An Appreciation 

By F. H. WALLACE 
Late DEAN OF THEOLOGY, VICTORIA COLLEGE 



VICTORIA COLLEGE has been re- 
markably fortunate in the personal- 
ities that have been connected with 
it the leonine Ryerson the subtle and 
witty Nelles the far-sighted and untiring 
Burwash -the charming and beloved 
Reynar. 

Alfred Henry Reynar was born in the 
city of Quebec in 1840, of good Irish stock, 
and this heredity showed throughout life 
in genial humour and quick repartee. He 
was educated in the High School of Quebec 
and in Victoria College, Cobourg. He 
graduated as B.A. in 1860 with the Prince 
of Wales Medal, took his M.A. in 1896, and 
received the degree of LL.D. honoris causa 
in 1889. For two years he was a tutor in 
his Alma Mater \ then for two years studied 
in the University of Berlin, Leipzig, and 
Paris; and in 1866 was appointed professor 
of Modern Languages in Victoria College. 
Later this wide field was narrowed to 
English Literature and Professor Reynar 
assumed the duties of Dean of the Faculty 
of Arts. He was also professor of Church 
History in the Faculty of Theology. The 
respect in which he was held by his fellow 
churchmen was indicated by his election 
in 1902 as president of the Bay of Quinte 
Conference of the Methodist Church. 
His reputation as an accomplished linguist 
led to his appointment about 1890 as a 
member of a small Royal Commission to 
investigate the condition of French Schools 
in Eastern Ontario. In 1910 he retired at 
a ripe old age. On the 23rd of September, 
1921, he passed peacefully away. 

When I first heard of Dr Reynar he was 
rightly described to me as an " accom- 
plished " man. His native ability, his quick 
and versatile mind had been so trained and 
informed as to make him a ripe and good 
scholar. - But he was more than that. 
Some scholars are but pedants, walking 
encyclopaedias, dry as dust and as for- 
bidding. But Dr Reynar was a courteous 
gentleman, refined in taste and manners, 
urbane, polished, attractive. He was 
thoroughly a man among men and enjoyed 
all life's varied experiences. "He warmed 
both hands at the fire of life." The most 
characteristic thing about him was his 



broad and genial sympathy with all human 
interests. 

It was this sympathetic temperament, 
this broad recognition of the best that is 
to be found in all classes, in all nations, 
in all schools and tendencies of thought, 
which qualified him to do good work in 
the teaching both of English Literature 
and of Church History. He used to dis- 
claim a knowledge of Theology. But he 
really meant that he was not a theologian 
of the old dogmatic type which knew it 
all and was ready to damn those who did 
not agree with its formulas. 

The tolerant, broad spirit of Nelles, 
Burwash, Reynar, and other Victoria pro- 
fessors has been of incalculable benefit to 
the succeeding generations of students, 
helping them while retaining the essentials 
of the Christian faith to welcome all 
necessary and reasonable changes in non- 
essentials. Instead of antagonizing the 
great truth of Evolution they welcomed 
it as helping to the understanding of God's 
way in nature and in history. So they 
guided men safely through the great 
transition from the narrower Theology of 
the past to the broader and more genial 
Gospel of the future. 

As a teacher of English Literature Dr 
Reynar was a disappointment to a certain 
class of students, those, namely, who look 
to their professor merely for notes which 
they may memorize for examination. Dr 
Reynar did not work in that great task- 
master's eye. He stood for real culture, 
the fine result of a sympathetic under- 
standing and assimilation of the master 
thoughts of the master minds of the ages. 
He loved the authors whom he expounded 
and so taught his students to love them. 
By such teaching he stimulated his students 
to high thoughts and to noble ideals to 
realize the motto of their College, Abeunt 
Studia in Mores. When he retired from 
the work of his Chair a certain student said 
to me in all earnestness: "It is a great 
mistake to let Dr Reynar go. It would 
pay the College, even if he gave no lectures, 
to retain in our halls the influence of his 
beautiful personality." 

Dr Reynar was a good man, a man "of 



108 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



109 



God, not sanctimonious but saintly. One 
never heard him making high and flam- 
boyant professions of Christian experience. 
But one saw him living so kindly, thought- 
ful, beneficent, unselfish a life, that one 
was constrained to recognize that he walked 
with God. We of Victoria can never forget 
his College prayers, so quiet, so reverent, 
so comprehensive, so instinct with reality, 



so beautiful in their simplicity, that they 
seemed to lead us up into the very presence 
of the Father in Heaven. 

I began by characterizing Dr Reynar as 
charming and beloved. And so I end. 
"And what but gentleness untired, 

And what but noble feeling warm, 
Wherever shown, howe'er inspired, 
Is grace, is charm?" 



General Meeting Approves Reorganization of Association 



By-laws Confirmed and Directors Elected 



ON Friday, November 11, a general 
meeting of alumni to complete the 
re-organization of the University of 
Toronto Alumni Association and to ap- 
prove of the transfer of the assets and 
affairs of the Association to the Alumni 
Federation of the University of Toronto 
was held in the Lecture Room, Hart House. 

The meeting was convened as one of the 
members of the Alumni Association. Mr 
Justice Masten, who was in the chair, 
outlined the purpose of the meeting, drew 
attention to the Minute of the last Annual 
Meeting which gave authority to the 
Board of Directors to complete the transfer 
and reported that the Board had drawn an 
agreement with the Federation. He out- 
lined the provisions of the agreement of 
transfer, the chief of which were that in 
consideration of the University of Toronto 
Alumni Association transferring to the 
Alumni Federation of the University of 
Toronto all its property and rights, the 
Federation should assume all liabilities of 
the Association and take in as members 
without payment of entrance fee, except 
such fees as may be payable from time to 
time by members of the Federation, all 
-existing members of the Association of 
every class. The action of the Board in 
making a transfer was then unanimously 
approved by the meeting and it was 
resolved that upon completion of the 
necessary documents the University of 
Toronto Alumni Associations be dissolved. 

The meeting then resolved itself into a 
meeting of the members of the Alumni 
Federation of the University of Toronto. 
The Chairman explained the need for 
incorporation which had arisen through 
the collection of the War Memorial Fund 
and pointed out that it was hoped that 
under the new by-laws the organic co- 



operation of Faculty and College Associa- 
tions with the University organization 
would be facilitated. 

By-laws which had been drafted and 
approved by the Board of Directors were 
then submitted. These provided for: (1) 
An annual fee of $3 with the proviso that 
in cases where this fee was collected by a 
College Alumni Association or a Local 
Alumni Club, $1 of the $3 might be retained 
by the collecting organization for its own 
use. (2) A Board of Directors which is 
to have executive control of the affairs 
of the Federation, composed of twelve 
members elected at the Annual Meeting 
for a term of three years and representa- 
tives appointed by Faculty and College 
Alumni Associations within the Federation 
(one to each Association) ; the Board to 
elect the President and Vice-President of 
the Federation. (3) An Alumni Council 
formed along the lines of the Council of 
the old Association. 

After some discussion the meeting un- 
animously approved the by-laws. 

The following Directors were then 
elected: Dr George E. Wilson, C. S. 
Maclnnes, D. B. Gillies, and Dr George 
H. Locke (for the term of one year) ; 
Mr Justice Masten, John Bone, C.E. Mac- 
donald, and H. D. Scully (for the term of 
two years); Angus MacMurchy, John J. 
Gibson, F. P. Megan, and W. A. Bucke 
(for the term of three years). This is 
practically a continuation of the Alumni 
Association Board which was elected last 
June with some omissions made necessary 
by the difference in the number of elected 
members called for in By-laws. It is 
anticipated, however, that those who were 
thus necessarily dropped from the Board 
will be returned as appointees of Faculty 
and College Associations. 



Records Office Keeps Track of 30,000 Alumni 



THIS is the University speaking! 
Could you tell me the address of 
?" This phrase, wearisome 
from interminable repetition is one of the 
incidental ways in which the Records 
Office keeps in touch with its thirty 
thousand graduates and former students. 
A chance clipping from a newspaper may 
be the thing to set the wheels in motion; 
then if the clipping gives a Toronto 
address, the phone is used, or if it is an 
out of town person, tracers are sent to his 
family, or his friends, or the minister who 
married him, in an effort to verify the 
University Records. Finally the required 
information comes in and one more name 
is taken off the list of "lost trails." 

Many people perhaps have never heard 
of the University Records Office. But 
although it is so little advertised it is one 
of the important administrative offices of 
the University, and especially so for the 
alumni. It is a branch of the Registrar's 
Office and is under his jurisdiction. 

When early in 1919, the War Memorial 
Committee started its campaign for funds, 
a re-organization of the system of maintain- 
ing alumni records was found necessary. 
A. F. Barr, acting for the Memorial 
Committee, carried out this work in co- 
operation with the Registrar, and the 
foundation of the present system was laid. 
The work is now carried on by three women 
graduates Miss Erskine Keys, Miss Agnes 
McGillivray, and Miss Freya Hahn. 

A close relationship exists between the 
Records Office and the Alumni Association, 
They occupy quarters in the same building 
at 184 College Street, and are of great 
mutual assistance to each other. The 
Alumni Association has ready access to 
the Records Office files for the verification 
of addresses, and the securing of alumni 
lists which are so often required. On the 
other hand the Association is of great 
assistance to the Records Office in provid- 
ing information regarding alumni and their 
addresses. This information incidentally is 
chiefly of a negative character, namely, 
that it has been ascertained through re- 
turned letters that certain addresses are 
wrong. 

The work of the Records Office is to 
keep track of every graduate and former 
student, and to gather as much information 
as possible about each and every one. 



The. way in which this is done is rather 
interesting. In the first place a clue comes 
from some source, a newspaper clipping, 
personal information, or a note in THE 
MONTHLY. This is verified by getting in 
touch with the graduate himself or by a 
tracer. When it is finally verified it is 
entered on the files. The name of every 
graduate appears on four separate and 
distinct files, of which the chief one is the 
alphabetical index. Here there is a card 
for every graduate, undergraduate, and 
former student, and this contains a mine 
of information such as his name, the school 
he attended, his years at College, his 
degrees, and when and at what College 
they were obtained, his home address, his 
business address and the address of his 
next of kin. Any supplementary informa- 
tion is also entered on these cards. 

The remaining two sets of card indexes 
are for convenience rather than for in- 
formation. There are the geographical 
cards which are arranged in order of 
geographical location. These are con- 
venient for organizing alumni groups in 
different centres and are, of course, avail- 
able to individuals who wish to look up 
the University of Toronto men and women 
in a certain district. In addition there are 
the lists of graduates, arranged according 
to the year of graduation and the College 
attended. On all these cards the addresses 
have to be kept constantly up-to-date and 
this means an infinite amount of work. 
Finally there is the filing cabinet, which 
holds a folder for each person whose name is 
on the records, and when the news from the 
newspaper clipping is entered on the three 
different cards the clipping itself is filed 
away into the folder. 

The Great Fire of 1890 destroyed many 
important documents, and as a result the 
records prior to that date are incomplete. 
It is needless to say that information about 
the early, as well as the more recent 
graduates, is always gratefully received, 
and out of town newspapers and old 
Torontonenses are valuable additions to 
the Records. So much for the actual 
details of the Record Office. The import- 
ant thing for every graduate to know is 
that it exists, that it is available for his 
use, and that it is in his power to keep 
it up-to-date by sending in any information 
that he collects. 



110 



Graduate Work in Medicine Triple Bill at Hart House 



Another Course Offered 

PR the third time the Faculty of 
Medicine of the University of Toronto 
is offering special courses for gradu- 
ates who wish to brush up on their work. 
From December 19 to 24 three courses, 
one in Surgery, one in Medicine, and one in 
Obstetrics and Gynaecology, similar to 
those held last December and last May, 
will be run concurrently by the Depart- 
ment of Medicine. 

This arrangement is designed for prac- 
titioners, particularly those from the 
country where hospital equipment and 
facilities are less up-to-date, and where 
there is not the same opportunity of 
meeting the men with the more up-to-date 
theories. It consists of a course of clinics, 
not lectures, designed to allow the gradu- 
ates to obtain actual practice in the wards 
according to the most modern methods. 

It is necessary to hold these clinics during 
the vacation time of the regular students 
in order that instruction may be given by 
the same corps of instructors as are used 
for students' classes. No attempt is made 
to treat the whole subject in its entirety, 
but each course consists simply of intensive 
work on one selected part of the subject. 
Certain definite diseases are taken up and 
instruction is given in every detail after 
diagnosis and treatment. In this way it 
is possible for a graduate to follow up a 
series of courses in his special line by doing 
one week's intensive work on one phase of 
the subject every six months, or whenever 
the course is offered. 

In order to secure the greatest efficiency 
it has been found necessary to limit the 
course in Medicine to thirty, in Surgery 
to thirty, andt in Obstetrics and Gynae- 
cology to sixty. The fee for each course is 
$10 payable on registration. Applications 
will be received by the Secretary of the 
Faculty until the number to which each 
course is limited is reached. The clinics 
will be held every day and all day. It is 
hoped that the week's concentrated work 
in a large hospital will produce better 
results than it is possible to obtain in the 
extension lectures which are given through- 
out the Province by the Faculty of Med- 



icine. 



Candida Presented This Week 

There was something supernatural in the air at 
the first performance at the Little Theatre this 
season. It may have been the proximity of Hallow- 
e'en when spirits are unloosed and walk abroad, 
or it may have been the character of the plays that 
had been chosen whatever it was there was some- 
thing decidedly of other worlds in the atmosphere 
when the triple bill was presented, the first offering 
of this year. A witch, a phantom child, a puppet 
Harlequin and Columbine, a gigantic heathen god 
that crossed continents to wreak its awful venge- 
ance, these all contributed to the pervading 
eeriness. 

Of the three plays, the Dunsany was dramatic, 
the Barrie, emotional and pantomimic and the last 
play purely emotional. Of them all the play by 
Barrie the pathetic love-tale of Harlequin and 
Columbine, most surely caught the imagination of 
the audience. The puppets who talked with their 
legs provided some delightful snatches of interpre- 
tive dancing and of pantomimic representation 
and the Pantaloon of Mr Vincent Massey and the 
Clown of Mr Hodder Williams furnished the two 
most satisfying bits of character delineation of the 
evening. In White Magic as in Pantaloon the 
light and the serious threads are so closely inter- 
woven that they are almost inseparable. The two 
chief roles of the childless couple were particularly 
difficult ones to sustain, as almost the whole burden 
of the play falls on them. In addition, the illusion 
of the phantom child was a difficult performance, 
but the roles were in skilful hands and were very 
well carried out. A Night at an Inn, the epitome of 
melodramatic condensation was extremely well 
executed and provided some real thrills for the 
audience. The whole bill was very worth while 
seeing. The acting was remarkably good and the 
scenes designed by Lawren Harris, Arthur Lismer 
and J. E. H. Macdonald could not have been im- 
proved and provided the finishing touch to the 
evening's enjoyment. 

Candida by George Bernard Shaw is being played 
for five days beginning Tuesday, December 6. 
Candida, "the white woman", represents the ideal 
of womanhood. Her story is the story of a woman 
and her choice between the two men who love her. 
The one, her husband, is the brusque, strong, self- 
reliant man who realizes his dependence on his 
wife only when that support seems to be taken 
away from him; the other is the weak, pliable 
stripling whose poetic tendencies make him im- 
practicable in the affairs of the world, but in whom 
love awakens the dominant human passion, the 
desire to protect the creature he loves. The role 
of Candida provides unlimited possibilities and the 
play should provide one of the most delightful 
evening's entertainment of the season. 

Each year one or two new figures have appeared 
and it is to be hoped that the Hart Hoi^e Theatre 
will continue to attract all the latent dramatic 
talent of the city, and that it will avoid that pitfall 
of the little theatre, an exclusive caste. The very 
idea of a limited band of players destroys the idea 
of a community theatre where there is no distinct 
demarcation between actors and auditors but both 
unite in the effort to elevate, to create and to pop- 
ularize the drama. 



Ill 



Engineers Stage Third Successful Reunion 





THE Third Annual 
Reunion of the 
Science Graduates 
now belongs to history. 
From point of numbers 
attending both from 
out of town and from 
the city as well as from 
the standpoint of ar- 
rangements, the Third 
Reunion was undoubt- 
edly the biggest and the 
best that has yet been 
held. The large delega- 
tions from Montreal, 
Ottawa, Niagara Falls 
and Northern Ontario, 
did much to help the 
spirit of the reunion and 
the large attendance 
from points outside of 
Toronto gave positive 
evidence that these re- 
unions are being appre- 
ciated and enjoyed. 

Another outstanding 
feature of the Third Re- 
union was the large 
number of graduates 
who lent their assist- 
ance in preparing and 
carrying the affair 
through. Upwards of 
seventy-five men, of all 
classes, acted on various 
committees and most 
of them did wor-k for 
which the Chairmen of 
Committees must ex- 
press thanks. 

About four hundred 
"School ' ' men with their 
ladies, and a large num- 
ber of distinguished 
guests, attended the 
Official Opening of the 
New School Building 
and greatly enjoyed the 
reception which was 
held afterwards. 

A short while later, 
on Friday evening, two 
hundred and fourteen 



At the Science Reunion a moving picture film entitled "Our 
Deans" prepared by the '03 Class invoked much enthusiasm. 
The above is a brief scenario. 



"School" men and their ladies sat down for 
dinner in the new Ball Room of the King 
Edward Hotel. All of them were most en- 
thusiastic in their expressions of delight at 
the arrangements which had been made 
and in the manner in which this function 
was carried through. The dinner was de- 
licious, the music delightful and one and 
all elected it a most enjoyable evening. 

The Annual Meeting held on Saturday 
morning in the Chemistry and Mining 
Building was attended by about one 
hundred and twenty-five Graduates. Con- 
siderable interest was taken in the business 
which came up for discussion and several 
projects were considered, which, if carried 
through to completion will reflect very 
creditably on our Association. During the 
coming year the Council, which will remain 
the same as during the past year, proposes 
to give these subjects their very earnest 
attention. 

Class luncheons were held as usual at 
different points all over the City and 
while we have not received definite reports 
from all of the classes we understand that 
all of the luncheons were entirely success- 
ful and greatly enjoyed. Arising out of the 
failure of the classes of '99 and '00 to 
gather a very large crowd, the '98, '99, '00, 
'01 and '02 classes combined to form the 
"Century Group" and it is expected that 
this group will be very much in evidence 
at future affairs. 

The action of the committee in choosing 
the week-end of the Queens-Varsity Game 
for the Reunion was entirely justified by 
the rugby game which was played. After 
a hard fought battle in which Varsity had 
the lead by a small margin, Queens reduced 
the lead to one and with the wind in their 
favour provided a very exciting few 
minutes before the close of the game. At 
one-half time the Engineering Society 
staged a burlesque foot-ball game. The 
referee was clothed in pink trousers and 
a silk hat. The umpire was rigged out as 
Cy Corntossle, while the referee's whistle 
was carried in a barrow on the side lines 
and operated by compressed air. All the 
members of one team were over 6' I" 
while the members of the other team were 
all under 5' 5". 

After the rugby game a reception was 
held by President and Lady Falconer in 
their home in Queens Park. The ' ' School ' ' 



112 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



113 



men completely filled the downstairs por- 
tion of the house and enjoyed very much 
the opportunity that was provided to meet 
and chat with old friends. 

In point of numbers and enthusiasm 
displayed, the banquet which was held 
in Hart House on Saturday Evening was 
a "wild" success. Never before have four 
hundred "School" men shown more un- 
controllable enthusiasm than was dis- 
played on that occasion. Short addresses 
were enthusiastically received from His 
Excellency the Lieutenant Governor -Mr 

B. K. Sandwell of Toronto and McGill; 
Mr W. F. Tye, '81; Mr J. M. R. Fair- 
bairn, '94; Mr Eraser S. Keith, '03, McGill; 
President Falconer and Dean Mitchell. We 
were particularly happy this year in being 
able to have in the Chair our honoured 
President Mr Walter J. Francis who 
carried the meeting through with much 
gusto. After a' most pleasant evening the 
Reunion ended with a most sincere and en- 
thusiastic rendering of " Auld Lang Syne". 

The following from out of town points 
were among those present at the reunion: 

C. H. Pinhey, '87, Ottawa; -W. A. B. 
Hicks, '97, Montreal; Wm. H. Sutherland, 
'02, Montreal; W. F. Tye, '81, Montreal; 
Chas. Leaver, '10, Montreal; Alex. T. 
Gray, '97, Schnectady, N.Y. ; R. A. Ross, 



'90, Montreal; J. A. DeCew, '96, New 
York, N.Y.; J. H. Brace, '08, Montreal; 
H. J. MacKenzie, '14, Basin, Montana; 
W. C. Smith, '10, Vancouver, B.C.; E. L. 
Deitch, '13, Welland; N. F. Parkinson, 
'13, Ottawa; A. F. MacCallum, '93, 
Ottawa; J. M. R. Fairbairn, '93, Montreal; 
R. H. Starr, '08, Orillia; F. F. Foote, '13, 
Port Dalhousie; J. B. Challies, '03, Ottawa; 
K. L. Newton, '10, Copper Cliff; A. N. 
Smith, '92, Youngstown, Ohio; F. W. 
Clark, '10, Niagara Falls; J. M. Robert- 
son, '93, Montreal; H. M. Stevens, '10, 
Timmins; G. L. Ramsay, '05, Sault Ste. 
Marie; R. H. Cunningham, '09, Windsor; 
G. J. E. Wyllie, '21, Kamloops, B.C.; 
G. C. Comper, '07, Ottawa; T. B. Mc- 
Carthy. '13, Niagara Falls; R. M. Cole- 
man. '07, Copper Cliff; M. L. Weir, '20, 
Buffalo, N.Y.; A. H. Munroe, '10, Peter- 
borough; W. V. Taylor, '93, Sarnia; C. W. 
Power, New York City, N.Y.; A. D. 
'Campbell, '10, Cobalt; J. L. Lang, '06, 
Sault Ste. Marie; C. W. Pennington, '14, 
Dundas; Thomas Wickett, M.D., '89, 
Hamilton; J. M. C. Moore, '07, London; 
Arch. Gillies, '07, St. Marys; W. G. Ure, 
'13, Woodstock; A. L. Malcolm, Campbell- 
ford; E. R. Frost, '09, Waterloo; A. H. 
Foster, '08, Brantford; J. C. McMordie, 
'08, Windsor. 



Songs, Speeches and Sports at U.C. Dinner 

By A. M. 



WELL, one big University night has 
helped to make history ! That was 
as far as the scribe had gotten when 
a ubiquitous friend, intermittently effer- 
verscing with enthusiastic ideas or solemnly 
oppressive with dignified gravity coloured 
by more than light touches of unintended 
intimidation, called him up with a hurry 
order for a page or two about the U.C. 
Alumni Association dinner. Most of you 
may know the chap. There is a shrewd 
suspicion that occasionally he has some- 
thing to do with getting hard-bitten, hard- 
boiled or hard-something articles prepared 
for insertion in this illustrious MONTHLY. 
''What do you want?" was a natural 
question. "Oh, fifteen hundred words or 
so." "Yes, but what like?" (I fear the 
scribe is of Scots ancestry. 'Your pardon, 
English Department!) "Oh, just light 
stuff; don't give any of the details or you 



can't get them to read it, and don't make 
it a general account of the meeting!" 

Stephen Leacock says somewhere in the 
preface of one of his better books that he 
counts it more of an achievement to write 
something out of his own head than a 
tome on economics, or words to that effect. 
Thank Providence, this scribe is no Stephen 
Leacock. It is not yet known whether 
what was wanted was bricks without straw 
or words without thought. If the detail 
straws stick out or if the riot becomes 
general, don't tell our friend described 
above and maybe he'll be too busy to 
notice it. % 

Sh-h-h! Is the Chairman a detail? He 
was as humorous as one- would desire this 
account to be, and much more so than it is. 
It is related that his aspect in business 
hours is stern and forbidding. Bereft of 
his proper prefixes and affixes he is called 



114 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



G. F. McFarland. But many before, 
during and after his display in the Chair 
found it easy to refer to him as Frank. 
We had to lose him in the middle of the 
meeting (more business), and the first 
speaker after he left us caused an unpre- 
meditated roar by observing that he was 
glad the Chairman had gone. Now as far 
as any one could gather, besides giving a 
highly good-humoured tone to the meeting, 
the Chairman had carried out his much- 
despised instructions smoothly and effec- 
tively. The joke was too good and nobody 
listened to the final clause in the sentence 
that closed the diplomatic gap so lovely. 
Professor DeLury genially succeeded to do 
the honours on short notice for the rest 
of the night. 

Most of the heavy artillery was in 
evidence. A fine barrage was laid down 
and the way well cleared. Oddly enough 
somebody had knocked together some odds 
and ends of a Constitution and had done 
some high living and plain thinking to 
produce a list of officers. 

No, No, it wasn't all business. We 
dined, we heard sweet orchestral music, 
Canon Cody gave us history, instruction 
and explanation with fluency and point, 
we got a jolt about Hart House member- 
ship, we were sung to, we sang back again, 
even "Solomon Levi." Our musicians 
couldn't play "Litoria," and though Barry 
'13 led an occasional yell, nobody had the 
nerve to strike a vocal note to lead off. 

The boxers, however, struck more than 
notes. When you get the Intercollegiate 
welterweight and lightweight champions 
together in the ring one gets action! The 
seconds, strictly amateur and impromptu, 
might have waved the towels a bit more 
though ! 

Amusement, physical and mental exer- 
cise and Rugby tickets were all promised 
and carried out in varying degrees, does 
someone say? 

Well, Principal Hutton composed a 
special poem, all for University College. 
Bobby Reade gave two, "Cargoes" and 
"Smiles," for all the world. His own, not 
Masefield's and Galsworthy's. They 
counteracted admirably W. E. Raney's 
telegram (yes, we used that old dodge) 
"trusting that too much College spirit 
would not be in evidence and that Uni- 
versity College would keep within the 
law." We did, to the letter. This 



tickled the Montreal men immensely. 



The space above should be occupied by a 
highly interesting description of a boxing 
match very different to the other. A 
University College man, who is now a 
journalist of a much too enterprising type, 
"wrote it up for the papers." Cacoethes 
scribendi is a disease much too prevalent. 
Reformers please note. Anyway, it was 
a rare bout. To paraphrase a well-known 
advertiser "Ask the man who " saw it done. 
The President laughed. The Dons roared, 
the condition of the young to less young 
graduates was indescribable and a graduate 
of 1921 was caught smiling! 

Arthur Meighen and William Lyon 
MacKenzie King, who at the moment was 
engaged in a struggle with John A. Mac- 
donald Armstrong and Ralph Waldo Emer- 
son Burnaby, both united in maintaining a 
dignified silence as a response to the general 
invitation to attend. But we heard from 
Vancouver and New York, Syracuse, 
Buffalo and Montreal, Kitchener and 
Hamilton, and all points between. 

Beautifulepistles we had, one of them, a 
full page giving rhymed reminiscences of 
U.C. and good wishes for the future. 
There was nothing else to do but put him 
on the Executive! 

Now if the scribe had not been writing 
by instruction scrupulously observed, he 
might have said here: "The meeting was 
a great success, the idealism of the speakers 
was uplifting, the size and the enthusiasm 
of the gathering was an earnest of the 
future functioning of the new organization 
and a promise of rousing activity and 
success." Whereas, as a matter of fact, 
we had a jolly good time and want more! 

An oppressive feeling comes over the 
scribe that something will be inserted here 
without his consent. 

PATRONS -Sir William Meredith, Sir 
Robert Falconer, '81 Principal Hutton, 
'83 Rev. C. W. Gordon, '89 Very Rev. 
Archdeacon H. J. Cody, '63 Sir John 
Gibson, '63 Sir William Mulock, Hon. R. 
H. Grant, '91 Stephen Leacock, 75 Sir J. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



115 



A. M. Aikins, '98 E. W. Beatty, '85 A. C. 
McKay, '88 A. C. Hardy, '86 F. F. Mc- 
Pherson. 

OFFICERS AND EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
President, H. F. Gooderham, '00; 1st Vice- 
President, D. P. O'Connell '90; 2nd Vice- 
President, E. P. Brown '01; 3rd Vice- 
President, G. W. Ballard '04, Hamilton; 
Secretary -Treasurer, G. D. Little '21. 

Principal of U.C. or hip representative; 
President of Literary and Athletic Associa- 
tion of U.C. 



Hume Cronyn '86, London, 

E. M. Ashworth '07, 
Wm. Mowbray '95, 
L. T. Acton '09, 

H. N. Barry '13, 

R. G. Beattie '14, 

D. A. Glassey '93, 

W. L. McDonald '08, Vancouver, 

F. H. Underhill '11, Saskatoon, 
H. J. Symington '02, Winnipeg, 
Graeme Stewart '02, Montreal. 



Graduate Facilities in Hart House 

By J. E. BICKERSTETH 
WARDEN OF HART HOUSE 



A 



T the formal opening of Hart House 
on November 11, 1919, the hope that 
graduates would become members 
of the House in large numbers was very 
clearly expressed "Let us hope that not 
only will the House serve the interests of 
the active members of the University of 
Toronto, teachers as well as undergradu- 
ates, but that it may help to bridge the 
gulf of time and space which too often 
separates the graduate from his university. 
Here will be a place where the present and 
the past generations may meet and here, 
let us hope, may be fostered the lasting 
loyalty and esprit de corps which are 
essential to the welfare of any seat of 
learning." 

During the first year of its existence, 
1919-1920, some two hundred graduates 
joined Hart House. In 1920-1921 the 
number rose to three hundred. This year 
so far there are about four hundred gradu- 
ate members and great efforts are now 
being made to increase that number. 

What are the advantages offered? For 
the sum of ten dollars a year, a graduate 
has all the facilities of a first rate club at 
his disposal. He has the full use of the 
House at all times of the day except the 
gymnasium and Swimming Pool and the 
rooms occupied by the Faculty Union. 
The Gymnasium and the Pool however, 
are reserved for his use on Mondays, 
Wednesdays and Fridays from six to nine 
o'clock and the service of qualified in- 
structors have been secured to direct 
classes or organize indoor baseball, basket- 
ball and other games on those evenings. 
Already twenty or thirty graduates are 



meeting in Hart House for this purpose. 
The Music Room (where recitals are held 
at 5 p.m. every two weeks) the Library, 
and the Squash Courts are available. A 
special dining room is reserved for his 
use where meals are served at a reasonable 
price. Here he has the right to entertain 
private friends and several dinners of this 
kind have already been given by those 
who prefer to entertain their friends at 
their own club rather than in an hotel in 
the city. A Common Room comfortably 
furnished and containing the current 
periodicals, is reserved for his use. 

The Committee which is directly re- 
sponsible for the management of Hart 
House is the Board of Stewards. On this 
Committee sits a graduate who is elected 
annually by and from among those gradu- 
. ates who are members of Hart House. A 
graduate member elected in the sarne way 
may also sit on the House Committee. 
Full provision has therefore been made for 
the representation of graduate interests 
and those gentlemen who have been 
chosen to sit on those Committees in the 
past have done valuable work in helping 
to frame the general policy of the House. 
Hart House is young. But already it 
has made for itself a very definite place in 
the life of the University. It is impossible 
to say what its influence may be in fifty or 
a hundred years' time when a fjody of 
sound tradition has been built up. One 
thing however is certain ; unless backed by 
a strong and enthusiastic company of 
graduate members, the House will have 
failed to fulfill all that its founders had in 
mind. 



J. E. Brownlee, New Attorney-General of Alberta 



IN the first decade of the present century 
there used to be a slogan "Go West 
Young Man", which lured many of the 
promising graduates of the University of 
Toronto to the great field of opportunity 
in the Canadian Northwest. And the 
young men went West and they made 
good, and even now the western section 
of the Dominion is known as a young man's 
country. 

In the experience of almost everyone 
there is some shining example of a young 
man of promise who found the oppor- 
tunity his ability merited by migrating. 




J. E. BROWNLEE, Vic. '08 
Attorney-General of Alberta 



Not that these same men would not have 
made good here, but in the West there 
were not so many precedents of age to be 
overcome, and a man's youth was not 
subject to the same discount as it is in our 
Eastern Provinces. Among the number 
that were thus enticed to seek fame and 
reward was the Hon. J. E. Brownlee, 
recently appointed Attorney General of 
the Province of Alberta. 

Around Victoria College in the period 
between 1905 and 1908 "Jack" Brownlee 
was regarded as a student with great 
possibilities. He had ideas and also the 
force and personality to put them into 
effect. 



In Brownlee's college obituary, Toronto- 
nensis 1908, it is recorded that he was 
chairman of a "Bob" Committee; took a 
leading part in the "Lit", and in his last 
year at college acted as business manager 
of "Acta". To this must be added also 
a very active interest in all things per- 
taining to church matters. During his 
college course and also during his student 
days in Calgary, Brownlee served as a 
preacher when occasion demanded that 
service. 

Among his close friends it was supposed 
that Brownlee would be back at Victoria 
for a Theological Course, despite the fact 
that he was known to prefer law. Just 
how successful he would have been as a 
preacher is a point that is left for debate, 
but undoubtedly he had the ability and 
personality that would have made him a 
force for good in that field. 

From college he went West and articled 
as a student in the famous firm of Lougheed 
& Bennett, both now cabinet ministers in 
the Meighen Government. Later he 
transferred his articles to the firm of 
Muir, Jepson & Adams, and this firm 
later became Muir, Jepson, Adams & 
Brownlee. 

It was while practising law with the 
above firm that he came in contact with 
the United Grain Growers, and the contact 
thus formed grew in mutual regard, so 
that when the United Grain Growers 
decided to establish their own legal depart- 
ment, Brownlee was invited to throw in 
his lot with this movement, which now 
controls the destiny of at least three of 
the provinces west of the Great Lakes, 
and may yet also have the commanding 
word in the government of the Dominion. 

A company that does a business in the 
multiple millions per year is always a 
grave legal responsibility. Such has been 
the responsibility of the subject of this 
sketch for the last five years. That his 
work was well done is proved by the fact 
that he was selected by the United Farmers 
of Alberta as their Attorney General. In 
the early stages of the formation of that 
Government rumor associated his name 
with the premiership of this, the cockiest 
province in Canada. 

Brownlee is a Lambton County boy, but 
was born in Port Ryerse, Norfolk County, 
1884. Lambton County claims him from 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



117 



the fact that he received his earlier educa- 
tion within its borders, and in the same 
way Ontario claims him as one of her 
promising sons. He is therefore a young 
man, thirty-seven years of age. In the 
decade in which he has practised law, he 
has achieved what can be modestly spoken 
of as one of the high places of the pro- 
fession in his province. 

It is a little early yet to make any pre- 
dictions regarding the new Attorney Gene- 
ral, for he has yet to be elected officially 
as a member of the new Government. But 
this will only be a formality in Alberta, 



where the United Farm movement is 
strong, and where the "Man from Mis- 
souri " has but to show how it can be done. 
We are, however, safe in assuming that 
it would be unsafe to try to tamper with 
either the laws or statutes of "Sunny 
Alberta" without coming into contact with 
a shrewd lawyer, who tempers the letter 
of the law with justice and mercy. 

John, of course, is a member of the 
Methodist Church. He is married and 
has two sons ; is also a Mason and plays an 
averagejgame of golf. 



Harry Rolph, Engineer and Adventurer 

By HOWARD W. FAIRLIE, Sci. '10 



THE harbour facilities of the Port of 
Montreal, especially for the handling 
of grain, are the wonder of every 
visitor who has a chance to inspect them. 
From the tops, of the immense grain 
elevators one gets a close-up bird's-eye 
view of the down town section and the 




harbour front, that rivals the view from 
Mount Royal. The ten miles of grain 
conveyors on many of which motor cars 
can pass easily, provide a system of trans- 
portation that permit the movement of any 
kind of grain from one extreme point in the 
harbour system to any other, or 
directly into a ship's hold at any 
grain-loading berth in the harbour. 
Montreal harbour ranks first in the 
world in efficiency of grain handling 
and no name is more , closely 
associated with this work than that 
of Harry Rolph who has been with 
the John S. Metcalf Co for nearly 
twenty years and who has carried 
the responsibility for the design of 
this work. 

Harry Rolph comes from that 
Toronto family whose name is well 
known from the work of several 
brothers still resident in that city. 
A brother Frank A. Rolph is known 
not only for his connection with 
the engraving business founded by 
the father, but as well for his 
services on the Canadian Com- 
mission at Washington during the 
war. The name of another brother 
Ernest, is closely associated with 
the design of Hart House7 while 
another brother, Albert H. is a 
member of the Medical profession 
in Toronto. 

Mr Rolph confesses to the desire 
to get beyond the smoke of his own 
city as the cause of his entering 
Engineering work, so after an ele- 
mentary school training at the 

anH C*r\]]f*crizi-tf> Tncf-Jtiif-pk in 



118 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



his home city, he entered the School of 
Practical Science. Here he was a member 
of those years of the early nineties which 
contained such a number of men who are 
to-day holding places of prominence within 
as well as without Canada. 

Public affairs during those years were 
of great interest to him and we find him 
the S.P.S. representative on the committee 
that built the first University Gymnasium. 

No better indication of the spirit of the 
future Rolph can be found than in the trip 
across Lake Ontario in a canoe by himself 
and his brother Ernie in 1892. In a spirit 
of pure bravado they set out in the morning 
and arrived at Port Dalhousie about three 
in the afternoon, having struggled for over 
four hours with a high sea and a heavy 
wind storm. As far as is known it was 
the first time white men had ever accom- 
plished the feat. Since that time it has 
only been done once. The story goes that 
the captain of the old Empress, on which 
they returned, vowed that they were either 
perverters of the truth or tenants escaped 
from a certain well-known hotel on Queen 
West. 

After graduation came the chance to 
take advantage of his desire to see the 
world and, sailing on a square rigged, four- 
masted body one of the regular old wind- 
jammers he left New York bound for 
Shanghai. Due to the fact that such a 
craft cannot beat to windward, it is neces- 
sary to lay a course by the almanac so as 
to have favourable breezes. Consequently 
this cruise around the Cape of Good Hope, 
south of the Indian Ocean, and again 
around Tasmania and Australia, lasted 
156 days with mighty little sight of land, 
in distance greater than the world's 
circumference. 

From Shanghai he moved to San Fran- 
cisco where for some time he was assistant 
to the superintendent of the Pacific Rolling 
Mills. 

In 1896 he went to the Kootenay country 
and at Kaslo pursued the vagaries of a 
mining country along with his old school- 
mate Fairbairn. 



In 1898 he went down the Yukon, really 
ahead of the great rush to the Little 
Salmon and remained in the Dawson 
District for five years. After various ex- 
periences he found himself Acting Com- 
missioner of Customs, Inland Revenue, etc., 
for the Yukon Territory. 

Returning to Toronto he came soon after 
in 1904 to Montreal in inspection work on 
the G.T.R. Elevators, passing soon after 
to the John S. Metcalf Co whose name has 
been linked with his own ever since. To-day 
this concern has to its credit probably more 
elevator work than any other similar 
company. 

Almost from the inception of the Mon- 
treal Harbour Commission, his Company 
has been responsible for the design of the 
grain handling facilities of the Port. In 
addition, they have not only done work 
in all the main grain centres of Canada 
such as at St. John, N.B., Port McNicol, 
Transcona, and Portland, but as well have 
done extensive work in the United States 
where the Canadian Company controls 
the American Company of similar name 
which built among many others, the 
elevator of the Armour Grain Company at 
Chicago. 

The foreign field as well has felt his effort, 
for with offices at London, England, Buenos 
Aires, and Melbourne, there are works of 
his company's design in all these countries. 
The Manchester elevator along with grain 
handling equipment at both Sydney and 
Buenos Aires are some of the works done 
under the supervision of this son of the old 
"School". 

Mr Rplph's home is in Lachine, Quebec, 
and he is a well-known figure at the Uni- 
versity, Winchester, Kanawaki, and Dixie 
Clubs. He is the father of two boys and 
two girls, the former of whom will be no 
doubt soon ready to get their first lessons 
in that business which their father has 
followed so successfully. 

As a crowning achievement Mr Rolph 
has lately been elected President of the 
Montreal Toike Oikes. 



J. H. Kennedy, the Schoolmen's Old-Timer 



By P. H. BUCHAN, Sci. '08 



IN my undergraduate days at the " Little 
Red Schoolhouse " I used to read the 
names of the graduates at the beginning 
of the Calendar and allow my fancy to 
picture what manner of men they were, 
who walked and talked and possibly threw 
ink at one another in the days gone by. 
Even graduation did not fail to stimulate 
the desire to watch these old-timers on 
their trails of fortune, busily causing 
wonders to grow before our eyes and mak- 
ing the world skip through a hoop at the 
snap of a finger. The graduate of the last 
few years is doubtless the willing victim 
of the same insistent curiosity attached to 
the names of the graduates of the early 
eighties as I was. Wherefore, the bonds of 
sympathy being strong, I propose to reward 
the patient seeker after knowledge with a 
glimpse of one of our trusty veterans of 
'82, with whom it has been my good fortune 
to be associated for some years in the 
Pacific Coast Branch of our Engineering 
Alumni Association. 

In the first place, imagine yourself to be 
a pedestrian in Vancouver enjoying an 
October Sunday afternoon stroll. Pre- 
sently you observe a figure of somewhat 
generous proportions, with the merest 
suggestion of a stoop, leisurely proceeding 
towards you, with hands thrust deep in the 
side-pockets of a commodious three-quarter 
length overcoat. The figure, even at a 
distance, seems to radiate an atmosphere 
of good humour and contentment borne of 
a conscience at peace with man and his 
Maker. Then you discern the pleasant 
features of Mr J. H. Kennedy, whose 
genial countenance you see in the accom- 
panying photograph. Something stirs 
within you, and quicker than thought, 
you voice the Schoolman's greeting "Toike 
Oike!" Out comes the right hand from 
the depths of the veteran's pocket to 
execute an informal salute in answer to 
your salutation, accompanied by a friendly 
smile and a cheery remark which com- 
pletely dispels your embarassment. And 
you may be certain that before the com- 
pletion of the pleasant chat which will 
surely follow, you will be fully alive to the 
genuine delight you have given Mr Ken- 
nedy by announcing yourself, because 
there is nothing he more keenly enjoys 
than meeting a fellow Schoolman, be he 
ancient or modern. 




J. H. KENNEDY, Sci. '81 

Now that you have been introduced, you 
naturally desire to hear your honourable 
veteran of '82 tell his own story, but in this 
I fear you will suffer disappointment be- 
cause his royal Canadian modesty forbids 
him. I have known Mr Kennedy for 
several years and have never yet heard a 
connected story of his life, but he has a 
great fund of interesting reminiscences, in 
the telling of which one catches glimpses 
of places he has been and things he has 
done. However, our diplomatic agent has 
prevailed upon him to supply what we 
do not already know. The record which 
Mr Kennedy has been kind enough to 
hand me resembles in its simple severity 
the industrial chronicle of the earnest 
seeker for a position in a transcontinental 
railway. 

The first important event in his long 
career which he considers worthy of ^ecord 
is his birth on 3rd March, 1852. This is a 
matter of personal vanity because he 
believes he has the distinction of being the 
oldest living graduate of the School. The 
members of the Pacific Coast Branch feel 
that they occupy a position of such un- 
assailable superiority on that account, that 



119 



120 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



they have made him their Honorary Presi- 
dent. I submit this is a pardonable 
conceit. 

Apparently his thirst for adventure 
matured in his second epoch-making event, 
when he became a student at Woodstock 
College in 1877. Two years later he 
enrolled as a freshman at the old School of 
Practical Science under the personal tutor- 
ship of the late Dean Galbraith, who 
became a life-long friend. In 1882 he 
emerged, a full-fledged graduate in Civil 
Engineering, with a shining parchment 
certificate and the world by the tail. We 
heard him make the statement at our last 
annual dinner in Vancouver, with un- 
blushing candour, that he was an " awful 
duffer" at school. We said: "Thank God, 
there is hope for us also." His academic 
achievements were all the more remarkable 
because he did not attempt to gain a higher 
education until he was twenty-five years of 
age. Up to that time he had only received 
instruction in a common school, but two 
years at Woodstock College prepared him 
for matriculation, his graduation taking 
place at thirty. 

Having now pushed our budding engineer 
out into the cold unsympathetic world I 
cannot do better than quote from his own 
chronicle: " 1882-1885, rodman, leveller 
and assistant engineer on the Lake Superior 
Division of the Canadian Pacific Railway. 
1886-1887, locating engineer on the Detroit 
extension of the Canadian Pacific, between 
Woodstock and London, Ontario." During 
the five years of service with the C.P.R. 
he evidently made considerable progress. 
Doubtless this was due to the encourage- 
ment of his wife, whom he married in 
1884. 

His next move was to become articled 
to an Ontario Land Surveyor at St. 
Thomas and qualify for his O.L.S. This 
he accomplished in 1887 and served with 
the same employer throughout the follow- 
ing year. However, his chosen vocation 
proved more attractive, and in 1888 we 
find him railroading again. His chronicle 
resumes: "1888-1889, assistant engineer 
on location and construction of -the Temi- 
sconata Railway in Quebec and New 
Brunswick. 1889-1892, assistant engineer, 
Montana Central Railway; location and 
construction of the Great Northern Rail- 
way through what is now known as 
the Glacier National Park. 1892-1894, 



assistant engineer on the Soo Line in the 
Dakotas." Here he made examinations 
and reports on all the bridges of the 
system for Capt. W. W. Rich, Chief 
Engineer of the Soo Line at that time. 
Capt. Rich afterwards went to China and 
became head of all the Chinese Railways. 

Here, it seems, the spell was broken, for 
Mr" Kennedy's next observation shows him 
practising land surveying at St. Thomas 
under his own name after an absence of six 
years full of strenuous endeavour and 
invaluable experience as a railroad builder. 
Apparently the lights of the wicked city 
of St. Thomas held him captive within the 
precincts of that semi-civilized community 
for three years because the call of the wild 
did not upset him again until 1898 when 
he went to the Stikine River, in Northern 
British Columbia, as instrument man on a 
location party for the MacKenzie and 
Mann interests in connection with the 
Vancouver, Victoria and Eastern Railway 
and Navigation Company. He remained 
there until the summer of the following 
year and then journeyed south to make 
surveys for the British American Coal 
Company in the vicinity of the Crow's Nest 
Pass, which kept him busy throughout 
1900. 

About this time he must have been 
stricken with home-sickness for his native 
Province because his chronicle shows he 
took a wild leap to Michipicoten Harbour 
to take charge of three location parties 
for the Algoma Central Railway. It was 
during the winter of 1900-1901 that he 
made a reconnaisance on snowshoes down 
the Agawa River to Agawa Bay in com- 
pany with Mr William McCarthy. This 
winter was also memorable because upon 
coming out of the woods he learned of the 
death of Queen Victoria. 

Having now reached the age of fifty 
years our veteran railroader once more 
turned his face westward and accepted a 
position as assistant chief engineer for 
MacKenzie and Mann on the construction 
of the V.V. & E. Railway from Penticton 
to Midway in British Columbia. About 
1901 this 4ine was acquired by the Great 
Northern Railway and Mr Kennedy be- 
came definitely connected with that Com- 
pany as Assistant Chief and finally as 
Chief Engineer of the V.V. & E., with 
headquarters at Vancouver, which position 
he retained until he retired in 1916. It is 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



121 



another of his vanities that he served the 
Great Northern, in all, for eighteen years. 
Westerners will know that this fact testifies 
most forcibly to his fine skill as an engineer 
and his ready understanding of human 
nature for at one time that railway had the 
reputation of being the most exacting, the 
least forgiving and the most ruthless in its 
treatment of engineers, of any corporation 
on the North American Continent. 

In addition to his O.L.S. he had the 
degree of C.E. conferred upon him in 1886. 
He is a member of the Engineering In- 
stitute of Canada and has considerable 
pride in having been elected to membership 
in the parent institution, the Canadian 
Society of Civil Engineers at its first 
meeting in 1887. His membership in the 
American Society of Civil Engineers was 
granted in 1900. 

Mr Kennedy's residence has been in 
Vancouver for several years, where he lives 
in corhpany with the life-long partner of 
his fortunes in his home at 1215 llth 
Avenue West. Notwithstanding his years 
he is in vigorous health, and is carrying 
on a Consulting Engineering practice, 
largely in connection with logging railways 
in British Columbia. He deftly describes 
this as "pottering around" which brings 
us to the end of our theme. It is my 
belief, however, that the exercise of a little 
diplomacy may persuade him to amplify 
our chronicle with some of the reminis- 
cences which, told in his own inimitable 
way, have often been the source of much 
enjoyment at our annual gatherings in 
Vancouver. 

In conclusion, I trust that every one 
who reads this humble attempt to portray 
the "Schoolmen's Old-Timer" as one sees 
him to-day, will catch, in some measure at 
least, the glow from his genial personality. 
Be it never forgotten that throughout the 
forty-three years since he became a fresh- 
man at the School, scarce five of which 
were spent outside the Dominion, the 
ideals of the late Dean have been tried in 
the fires of strenuous toil and beaten with 
the hammers of vicissitude. In him they 
have proved their sterling worth and now 
find their ultimate expression in our 
veteran of '82 as we see him a God- 
fearing Canadian gentleman. 

What more need be said? 



Dates to Remember 

December 6-11 Hart House Play, "Candida", 
by George Bernard Shaw. 

December 22-24 Hart House Play, "The 
Chester Mysteries". 

January 3, 5, 6, 9, 10 Professor William Bate- 
son, F.R.S., Director of the John Innes Horticultural 
Institution and past President of the British Associa- 
tion for the Advancement of Science, will give a 
course of lectures on the subject "Genetics and 
Heredity" in the North Lecture Room of the 
Medical Building. Professor Bateaon is recognized 
as one of the foremost biologists of modern times 
and it is hoped that all those who are in any way 
interested in this subject will' find it possible to 
attend the lectures. 

January 4, 11, 18, 25 Sir Bertram Windle will 
deliver a series of lectures in Convocation Hall at 
4.30 p.m. 

College Sermons will be continued each Sunday 
after Christmas at the regular hour, 11 a.m., in 
Convocation Hall. The list of speakers will be: 

Jan. 8 President Rush Rhees. 

15 Dr George Pidgeon, Bloor Street Presby- 
terian Church. 

22 Rev C. E. Silcox, First Congregational 
Church, Fairfield. 

With the Alumni 

ttbe 
THntv>er0tt of Toronto /Ifcontblp 

Published by the University of Toronto Alumni 

Association 
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE $3.00 PER ANNUM 

including Membership dues of the Alumni Association. 

Publication Committee: 
D. B. GILLIES, Chairman 
GEORGE H. LOCKE J. V. MCKENZIE 

W. J. DUNLOP F. P. MEGAN 

W. A. CRAICK R. J. MARSHALL 

DR ALEX. MACKENZIE W. C. McNAUGHT 
W. A. KIRKWOOD 

Editor and Business Manager 

W. N. MACQUEEN 

Trinity Convocation holds Annual Meeting 

The annual business meeting of the Convocation 
of Trinity College was held on Wednesday, Novem- 
ber 16. The question of joining the Alumni Federa- 
tion was discussed and a committee appointed to 
negotiate on the matter. It was reported that'an 
amount running well into four figures had been 
collected for a presentation to Dr Macklem the late 
Provost. % 

Dr W. H. Pepler was re-elected Chairman, and 
Professor A. H. Young, Clerk of Convocation, and 
Messrs R. W. H. White and G. B. Strathy were 
appointed to vacancies on the Executive Com- 
mittee. The following were elected members of the 
Corporation of Trinity College to represent gradu- 
ates: the Hon. Mr Justice Hodgins, Rev Dr 
Blagrave, Dr R. J. Reade, Dr F. L. Grassett, and 
Mr Johnson Reid. 



122 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



Hart House Graduates' Associations Plan to 
Increase Membership 

Over sixty graduates attended the annual dinner 
and meeting of the Graduates' Association of Hart 
House on Monday, November 21. John Jennings 
occupied the Chair. 

Mr Bickersteth addressed the meeting briefly 
outlining the facilities offered to graduates by Hart 
House, and stating that if a larger graduate member- 
ship were secured the Stewards would consider 
materially increasing these facilities. 

Plans for a membership campaign were discussed 
and A. F. Barr was appointed Chairman of a com- 
mittee to undertake a personal canvass of graduates 
resident in the city. 

A resolution was passed requesting the Hart 
House Board of Stewards to consider admitting 
Diploma graduates of the School of Practical 
Science on the same footing as graduates of the 
University of Toronto. 

The following Executive Committee was elected 
for the coming year: President, A. C. Snively; 
Secretary, Percy W. Beatty ; Arts Representative, C. S. 
Macdonald; Medicine, E. A. McCulloch; Applied 
Science, J. H. Craig; Dentistry, F. R. Mallory; 
Representative to House Committee, G. F. McFarland; 
Representative to Board of Stewards, John Jennings; 
Representative to Membership Committee, W. E. 
Douglas. 

Applied Science 11 

Among the many functions of the "School" 
alumni annual gatherings, one of the most important 
is the opportunity provided for the boys who rubbed 
shoulders in former days to again renew old friend- 
ships. The graduates of "One-ty-One" proved 
their appreciation of the fellowship offered by a 
bowl of soup and hot roast beef, by assembling 
around a well-filled table in Hunts Dining Room, 
788 Yonge St. Though a number of vacant chairs 
were noticed (unavoidable (?) absentees), all present 
seemed to fully enjoy the occasion, and though one 
decade has slipped by since our leave taking from 
the Old School, yet the "Eleven" boys are th<? same 
in spirit, if a little more experience and wisdom 
has been incidentally absorbed. 

Before dispersing for the Rugby Game, the 
President, "Billy" Wright, called the members to 
order for a few minutes for the reading of letters 
and telegrams of regret from several out of town 
who were unable to be present with the bunch. 
To those we wish to send our best regards and hope 
for further reunions later. 

The Secretary, Angus G. McLeish, would be glad 
to keep in touch with all the class, and any changes 
of locations, addresses, etc, should be sent .to him at 
159 Pacific Ave., Toronto. 



After the luncheon the President, S. G. Bennett, 
referred to the Minutes of the last two meetings, 
and interesting communications were read from 
various members of the class. 

Mr E. E. Hugli was elected Secretary for the 
following year and any communications should be 
sent to him at the Central Y.M.C.A., Toronto. 



Applied Science 14 

At the annual reunion of the Faculty of Applied 
Science and Engineering this year, the class of '14 
held its annual class Luncheon in Hart House. The 
following members were present: S. G. Bennet, 
H. J. MacKenzie, J. B. Skaith, W. G. Millar, C. N. 
Candee, D. G. Ferguson, B. N. Simpson, J. A. 
Knight, Rex Johnson, F. W. Douglas, B. MacKen- 
crick, A. S. Robertson, H. M. Campbell, C. E. 
Sinclair, J. Murray Robertson, E. E. Hugli, F. S. 
Rutherford, J. A. Kerr, G. O. Philp, and H. O. 
Waddell. 



Deaths 

RADENHURST Suddenly on October 18, of heart 
failure, George Arthur Radenhurst, B.A. (U.C.) 
'69, M.A. '74, for about twenty years Police 
Magistrate of Barrie. 

BREDIN At his home 1250 Downing Ave., 
Denver, Wilscfn Watson Bredin, M.B. (T.) '73, 
M.D.C.M. (T.) '94, on November 4, after a short 
illness. 

MILLM AN Suddenly, on November 15, at his 
residence, 490 Huron St., Thomas Millman, M.B. 
73 (T.) ,M.D. '73, in his seventy-second year. 

PINGEL At London on October 29, Albert R. 
Pingel, M.B. (T.) '76, after an illness of about 
six weeks duration. Dr Pingel had been practising 
in London for thirty-five years. 

DOBSON On November 3, at Picton, Robert 
Dobson, B.A. (Vic.) '80, principal of the High 
School in Picton where he had taught for thirty- 
two years. 

MOORHOUSE On October 24, in his eightieth 
year Walter Hoare Moorhouse, M.B. '84 (T.) 
L.R.C.P. (Edin.), L.R.C.S. (Edin.), at his resi- 
dence 249 Queen's Ave., London, Ont. after an 
illness of more than a year. 

McKAY Suddenly, on November 6, Robert 
McKay, K.C., B.A. (U.C.) '88, LL.B. '89, of 
263 Russell Hill Road. Council for the Toronto 
Street Railway Company in the arbitration pro- 
ceedings. 

YEOMANS After a brief illness, on November 1, 
Horace Augustus Yeomans, M.B. '89, M.D. (T.) 
'89, Medical Officer of Health in Belleville. 

WATT After a short illness, at Guelph on Novem- 
ber 1, Lila Guthrie Watt, B.A. '91 (U.C.), who 
was for more than twenty years connected with 
the Mission to Lexers. 

KINSMAN Suddenly, while on a hunting party, 
at Bruce Mines, Homer Franklin Kinsman, 
D.D.S. '92, of Sarnia. 

ORR After several years illness, on November 6, 
Thomas Stanley Orr, M.B. '09, of 686 Main St. E., 
Hamilton. 

SHEPPARD In Kamloops, B.C., on October 20, 
Edmund Culver Sheppard '06-'09 (U.C.), after a 
long illness of tuberculosis, contracted while 
serving in the Royal Air Force. 

GROVES At Poona, India, on November 11, Mrs 
Alfred Groves (Edith Grant) B.A. (U.C.) '17. 

LAWSON In Chicago, on October 28, John David- 
son Lawson, LL.D. (Hon) '19. Dean Emeritus of 
the Law Department of Missouri State Univer- 
sity. 

HAYES As the result of an accident on October 27, 
John Vernon Hayes, M.B. '19 of Peterborough. 

Notes by Classes 

'70 U.C. At the annual meeting at the Provin- 
cial Parliament Buildings, James Coyne, St. 
Thomas, was elected president of the Ontario 
Registrars' Association. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



123 



'78 TT.C. Joseph Morgan has moved from 
Walkerton to 24 Barton Ave., Toronto. 

'79 U.C. Rev and Mrs Gillies Eadie of Honan, 
China, are living at 141 Lawton Boulevard for the 
winter. 

'82 IT.C. Robert McKnight is connected with 
the Department of Vital Statistics, Provincial 
Government of Saskatchewan. His address is 
Y.M.C.A., Regina. 

'82 M. Thomas Francis McMahon has been 
elected president of the Association of Life Insurance 
Medical Directors of America at the Convention at 
New York. 

'83 TJ.C. George McKinnon Wrong, professor of 
History and Ethnology at the University was the 
recipient of the honorary degree of LL.D. at McGill, 
recently. 

'83 M. Dr Augusta Stowe Gullen was elected 
president of the Provincial Council of Women at 
the session at Woodstock, in November. 

'85 M. (TO William H. Pepler, L.R.C.P. 
(London), 600 Spadina Ave., has been apppointed 
by Trinity College as its representative to the 
Council of the College of Physicians and Surgeons 
of Ontario. 

'85 U.C. Mrs G. Sandeman (Catherine Edith 
Brown) is spending the winter in Italy. Her 
permanent address is 4 Church Walk, Oxford. 

'90 U.C. William G. W. Fortune is. secretary of 
the Peoples' Prohibition Association of British 
Columbia, with headquarters at Vancouver. 

'90 M. On November 5, William Henry Philp 
was married to Laura E. Milligan, of Toronto. 

'90 Vic. Rev Wm. Benjamin Tucker who has 
been superannuated from the Methodist Ministry 
is now living at 30 Tranby Ave., Toronto. 

'91 U.C. Henry Colin Pope has been appointed 
to the Bench of the District Court of the judicial 
district of Melfort, Sask. 

'92 U.C. John Calvin Cameron is engaged in 
Social Service work under the Provincial Organiza- 
tion of Saskatchewan. His address is 2060 Rae St., 
Regina. 

'93 U.C. Philip Edward S. Mackenzie, of 
Saskatoon, has been appointed a justice of the 
Court of King's Bench, of Saskatchewan. 

'94 M. Norman MacLeod Harris is living at 
Apt. 5, The Kelso, 53 MacLaren St., Ottawa, Ont. 

'95 U.C. John Lovell Murray has been ap- 
pointed director of the Canadian School of Missions, 
a school to train missionaries which has been 
founded by the Foreign Mission Boards of the 
various Protestant churches, acting in co-operation. 

'96 U.C. The address of Louise Watt is 30 
Barrackpore Trunk Road, Cassipore, Calcutta, 
India. 

'96 D. At Orillia, on September 29, a son was 
born to Dr and Mrs Jos. C. Moore. 

'96 S. On November 15, a daughter was born 
to Mr and Mrs James Samuel Dobie, Thessalon. 

'96 U.C. John W. Little is living at 2234 Elphin- 
stone St., Regina, Sask. 

'97 U.C. Alexander Eugene McNab has been 
appointed police magistrate for Bruce County. He 
is a lawyer, has been reeve of Walkerton, warden of 
Bruce and is serving his third term as mayor of 
Walkerton. 

'97 U.C. The new play Main Street which is 
being successfully produced in New York is the 
work of Harvey O'Higgins, the Canadian author 
and dramatist, and Harriet Ford. 



'99 D. Dr and Mrs George L. Palmer left in 
October for a motor trip across the continent to 
Los Angeles, Cal., where they will live in future. 

'99 Tf.C. Mrs J. A. MacKay (Mary McRae) is 
living in Seattle and is at present taking post- 
graduate work at the University of Washington, 
leading to the Ph.D. degree. 

'00 M. Everon Flath is living at 128 Lauder 
Ave., Toronto. 

'00 U.C. The present address of Sinclair Laird 
Miller is 3968 Beatrice St., Vancouver, B.C. 

'01 Mus. On November 5, a daughter was born 
to Mr and Mrs Thomas Arthur Reed, 13 Bernard 
Ave., Toronto. 

'02 U.C. Gregory S. Hodgson has become 
associated with the firm of Blake, Lash, Anglin and 
Cassels, with offices in the Bank of Commerce 
Building, 23 King St. W., Toronto. 

'02 M. The marriage took place on October 5, 
of Eugene Alexander Partick Hardy and Gretchen 
McGill Vogt. Dr and Mrs Hardy will live on 
Spadina Gardens. 




H. F. GOODERHAM, '00 
Elected President of the newly organized 
U.C. Alumni Association. 

'02 U.C. Calvin Alexander McRae is living at 
1463 Hamilton Ave., Detroit, Mich. 

'03 S. Horace L. Seymour is the Secretary of 
the Local Committee for the Toronto meeting of 
the American Association for the Advancement of 
Science, to be held here December 27-31, under 
the auspices of the University of Toronto and the 
Royal Canadian Institute. 

'04 M. The wedding took place recently of 
Wallace Leighton Gilbert and Elsie Beaton, of 
Chesley. Dr and Mrs Gilbert will reside on Sher- 
bourne Street, Toronto. 

'04 U.C., '11 U.C. At Indore, Central India, on 
September 6, a son (Peter Robinson) was born to 
Rev George P. Bryce and Mrs Bryce (Lucy Winifred 
Robinson). 

'04 U.C. The latest address of Alexander Ross 
is 210 Spockbridge Ave., Buffalo, N.Y. 

'04 U.C. On November 2, a.t 173 Coleman Ave., 
a daughter was born to Mr and Mrs Peter Taylor. 

'04 U.C. John Alfred Smith is at present In- 
spector of Schools, Calgary, Alta. 

'05 U.C. Walter Patrick Barclay is managing 
editor of the Wall Street Journal, New York City. 
N.Y. 



124 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



'05 T. At St. Glair, Mich., on October 1, the 
marriage took place of Victor Roy Smith and Jessie 
Whitman Gurd. Mr and Mrs Smith will live in 
Toronto. 

'05 M. A son, Robert Murray, was born to Dr 
and Mrs Allison Montague Rolls, 32 Biggar Ave., 
on October 9. 

'05 S. At the General Hospital, on October 6, a 
son was born to Mr and Mrs Charles S. L. Hertz- 
berg, 664 Spadina Ave. 

'06 S. Frederick W. "Casey" Baldwin, the old 
Varsity rugby halfback, was a member of the com- 
mittee in charge of the fishing schooner race held 
off Halifax in October. 

'06 U.C., '11 M. John Alexander Gardiner is 
practising his profession at 403 Viola Ave., Le 
Grange, 111. 

'07 M. The wedding took place recently of 
Grace Hodgins and Austin Birrel Shinbein. Dr and 
Mrs Shinbein will live at 3899 Marguerite Ave., 
Vancouver, B.C. 

'07 IT.C. Mary V. Burnham, of Toronto, has 
been appointed by the Civil Service Commission at 
Ottawa, as supervisor of the Women's Section of the 
Department of Immigration. 

'07 Vic. , A son was born on October 25 to Rev 
and Mrs David Wren, 42 Breadalbane St., Toronto. 

'07 U.C. Walter Charles Cain, formerly chief 
clerk in the Department of Lands and Forests of the 
Province of Ontario has been elevated to the posi- 
tion of Deputy Minister. 

'07 TJ.C. Margaret Anderson, 55 Castle Frank 
Rd., Toronto, sailed from Montreal on November 
18, for Calcutta, where she will resume her duties 
as General Secretary of Y.W.C.A. work of that city. 

'07 IT.C. John Cameron MacDonald is prac- 
tising Law at Edmonton, Alta., with the firm of 
MacKay, McDonald and Wells. His address is 
522-42 Tegler Building, Edmonton. 

'08 S. On October 21, at Toronto, a son was 
born to Mr and Mrs Kenneth Dean Marlatt. 

'08 S. On November 8, a daughter was born to 
Mr and Mrs Wesley Blaine Redfern, 167 Macdonnell 
Ave. 

'08 U.C. Robert Morrison Campbell has been 
associated with the United States Agency Omega 
Watch Company, 21-23 Maiden Lane, New York, 
since August 1918. 

'08 U.C. The wedding took place recently of 
Frederick Holmes Barlow and Marjorie Stewart 
Forsyth. Mr and Mrs Barlow will reside at 423 
Markham St., Toronto. 

'09 T. James Gillespie Widdifield, acting rector 



of St. John's Episcopal Church, Detroit; has been 
appointed Archdeacon of Detroit. 

'09 D. The wedding took place recently of 
Elsie Mary Dowdall and Calvin S. McComb. Dr 
and Mrs McComb will reside in Port Arthur. 

'09 U.C. Reynold Young is on the staff of the 
Dominion Observatory at Mt. Sanaac, Victoria, 
B.C. 

'09 U.C. A son was born on November 7, to Mr 
and Mrs Angus McKenzie Dewar, Toronto. 

'10 M., '12 V. On November 7, a daughter was 
born to Dr and Mrs Roscoe Reid Graham (Beatrice 
Maud Barry) 31 Oriole Road. 

'10 U.C. On November 1, a son was born to 
Rev and Mrs F. J. Moore (Dora Mavor). 

'10 M. The marriage was announced on 
November 26, of Donald George Sinclair McKay 
and Lillian Beatrice Hewitt of Toronto. 

'10 M., '10 U.C. On November 1, a daughter 
was born to Dr and Mrs Charles Watson Hurlburt 
(Alice A. Coon) at their home 11003 125th St., 
Edmonton, Alta. 

'10 Vic. Mr and Mrs A. E. Allen (Ruby Evelyn 
Mills) announce the birth of a daughter, at the 
Wellesley Hospital, Toronto, on October 1. 

'11 U.C. The wedding took place recently at 
Christ Church, Vancouver, of Eric Pepler, D.S.O., 
Croix de Guerre, and Betty Brough. 

'11 S. A son, Charles Willis, was born on Sep- 
tember 28, to Mr and Mrs Charles Russell Murdock, 
Dundas. 

'11 U.C. Reginald Goldwin Smith is on the Mail 
and Empire editorial staff. His address is Aurora. 

'11 U.C. At Rock Bay, B.C., on November 13, 
a son was born to Rev and Mrs Alan Dallas Greene, 
of the Columbia Coast Mission. 

'11 U.C., '16 M. Thomas Alexander Sinclair is 
practising medicine at Walkerton. 

'11 M. On October 10, a son, James Douglas, 
was born to Dr and Mrs J. D. Struthers, 667 Pape 
Ave., Toronto. 

'11 M., '09 Vic. At Grace Hospital, on Novem- 
ber 15, a daughter was born to Dr and Mrs Noble 
C. Sharpe, 102 St. Leonard's Ave., Toronto. 

'11 U.C. Harold Evans Hartney, the Executive 
Secretary of the Aero Club of America was injured 
at Loveland, Iowa, on November 3, while com- 
peting in the annual Pulitzer Silver Race for heavier- 
than-air-craft. He is suffering from fractures. 

'11 U.C. In November, a son was born to Rev 
and Mrs Samuel Aitkin Kennedy, at the Manse, 
North Portal, Saskatchewan. 

'11 U.C., '12 M. Hector Clayton Hall is prac- 



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125 



tising his profession as a doctor at Fort Qu'Appelle, 
Sask. 

'11 D. At Mount forest, on October 8, a daugh- 
ter was born to Dr and Mrs Wilbert Harold Gilroy. 
'11 U.C. John W. Deyell is the publisher of The 
Warder of Lindsay. His home address is 80 Welling- 
ton St., Lindsay. 

'11 D. On November 3, at Woodstock General 
Hospital, a son was born to Dr and Mrs H. B. 
McKay, Ingersoll. 

'12 U.C. Clarence Elmor Johnston is pro- 
fessor of Economics, St. John's College, Agra, India. 
'12 S. A son was born on September 29, to Mr 
and Mrs Wm. Edward Seymour Trent, Toronto. 

'12 S. Fred Victor Seibert is at present con- 
nected with the Topographical Surveys Branch, 
Dept. of the Interior, Ottawa. 

'12 U.C. , '15 M. A daughter was born to Dr and 
Mrs W. Ray Hodge (Mary Wright Moffat), of 
Toronto. 

'12 U.C. James Palmer Henderson is a home 
missionary for the Presbyterian Church. His ad- 
dress is Pouce Coupe, B.C., via Edmonton, Alta. 

'12 U.C. Gretta Adele Playter, who for some 
years past has been connected with the office of 
Judge Clark, of Calgary, has been appointed to the 
staff of the Attorney-General's Department. Her 
appointment is the first of its kind in Canada. 

'12 S. On November 16, the marriage took place 
of Leslie Gordon Mills and Muriel Inman Tyner. 
Mr and Mrs Mills will live at Nanton Court Apts., 
Rosedale. 

'12 T. The marriage took place in Vancouver on 
November 11, of Rev. Arthur Harding Priest, and 
Stella Bowlby. They will live at Abbotsford, B.C. 
'12 S. Thomas Holmes Bartley is connected 
with the Topographical Survey, Department of 
Interior, Ottawa. His address is 22 Willard Ave., 
Ottawa. 

'13 M., '14 U.C. On September 26, a son was 
born to Dr and Mrs Gladstone Wilfred Lougheed 
(Minnie Jane. Bright), 728 Dovercourt Road. 

'13 S. At Toronto, on October 3, a son was born 
to Mr and Mrs R. F. B. Wood, 26 Colin Ave. 

'13 P. On October 18, a son was born to Mr and 
Mrs Thomas Lloyd Dymond, 2 Maple Ave., Brant- 
ford. 

'13 U.C. At Christ Church, Ivy, Ont., the 
marriage took place of Thomas Joseph Dew and 
Lillian Marguerite Goodwin. Rev and Mrs Dew 
will live at North Essex where he is rector of the 
parish. 

'13 U.C. On October 31, a daughter, was born 
to Mr and Mrs Charles Howard Tanner, Los 
Angeles, California. 

'13 U.C. At the Jeffrey Hale Hospital, Quebec, 
on October 18, a daughter was born to Mr and Mrs 
Kenneth A. Renfrew (Elizabeth Macnab). 

'13 S. On November 4, a son (John Douglas) was 
born to Mr and James P. Hadcock, 94 Chester Ave., 
Toronto. 

'13 U.C., '10 U.C. A daughter (Ester Marion) 
was born on November 8 to Mr and Mrs James T. 
Jenkins (Maude Elizabeth Zuern), 87 Belsize Drive 
Toronto. 

'14 S. Ivan Roy Strome is still connected with 
the Reclamation Service, Department of Interior, 
Calgary, and is busily engaged in locating dam 
sites, routes and preliminary canal surveys for an 
enormous irrigation project in central Alberta and 
Western Saskatchewan. 



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UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



'14 S. Frederick William Douglas was engaged 
during the summer months as field engineer on the 
construction of the foundation of the new Statler 
Hotel in Buffalo. His mailing address is 525 West 
124th St., New York city. 

'14 U.C., '21 P. On October 25, a son, George 
Holcome, was born to Mr and. Mrs Harold Parke, 
Hamilton. 

'14 Vic., '15 Vic. On November 3, at Cornwall, 
the wedding took place of Revis Parsons Stouffer 
and Ethel Anna Robertson. Mr Stouffer is assistant 
editor of the Toronto Sunday World. 

'14 S. E. Dean W. Courtice is practising his pro- 
fession as Architect and Engineer in Chatham. His 
home address is 210 Park St. 

'14 U.C. On October 6, the marriage took place 
of John Cecil Smyth and Margaret Helen Mac- 
lennan. 

'14 S. Harold Spencer Kerby is at present com- 
mander of the aerodrome at Halton Camp. His 
address is Halton House, Halton Camp, Bucks., 
Eng. 

'14 U.C. William E. Goodearle is living at 211 
Oxford Street, Buffalo, N.Y. 

'14 D. At Wellesley Hospital, Tuesday, Novem- 
ber 8, a son was born to'Dr and Mrs Leo Dennis 
Leonard, Toronto. 

'14 S. John Davidson Peart is in the Engineering 
Department of the Northern Electric Company, 
Limited, 121 Shearer Street, Montreal. His home 
address is 627 St Joseph St., Lachine, Que. 

'14 S. At the Cottage Hospital, on October 29, 
a son, Donald Francis, was born to Mr and Mrs 
Kenneth Macpherson Clipsham, 61 Wellesley St., 
Toronto. 

'14 U.C. The address of Orwell Egbert Sharp is 
27th Squadron, R.A.F., Risalpur, India. 

'14 S. At Dundas, on October 21, a daughter, 
Betty, was born to Mr and Mrs Charles Wakley 
Pennington. 

'14 U.C. Arthur R. Marsden Lower is at present 
connected with the Department of Historical Pub- 
lications, Sussex St., Ottawa. 

'14 U.C. The marriage took place in October of 
Lewis Cory and Laura Yould, of Kentville, N.S. 

'14 U.C. Charles Alexander McConaghy is an 
actuary, attached to the Bankers Reserve Life Co., 
Omaha, Nebraska, U.S.A. 

'14 S. Charles Harvey Rogers Fuller is the City 
Engineer of Chatham. 

'14 T. On October 5, the marriage took place 
of John Roderick Bulman, Hereford, England, and 
Felicia Hannah Cook. Dr and Mrs Bulman will live 
in Hereford. 

'14 U.C. On October 26, William Geoffrey 
. Preston was married to Margaret Grace Adams of 
Brantford. They will live in Gait. 



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'14 U.C. William Clarence Laird is manager of 
an insurance business in Regina, Sask. His address 
is 2863 Retallock St. 

'14 U.C. Charles F. Lawrence is principal of the 
Grimsby High School. 

'14 S. Arthur Wesley Crawford is assistant to 
the Director of Technical Education under the 
Department of Labour, Ottawa. His address is 
132 Broadway Ave. 

'15 Ag. On October 12, a daughter was born to 
Mr and Mrs George Alvin Clark, London. 

'15 U.C. Jack Gardner Leckie was married on 
October 26 to Norah Frances Doheny, of Toronto. 
Mr and Mrs Leckie will live on Grimthorpe Rd., 
Toronto. 

'15 U.C. Robert J. Smith is practising Law at 
28 King St. E., Kitchener. 

'15 U.C. On Thursday, October 2, a daughter 
was born to Mr and Mrs Murton A. Seymour of 
St Catharines. 

'15 D. On October 5, at St. Paul's Church, 
Shelburne, John Harry Zinn was married to Dolce 
Berwick. They will live in Shelburne. 

'15 U.C. A daughter, Marian Elizabeth, was 
born to Mr and Mrs Ernest LeRoy Cody, on 
September 18, at Banff, Alta. 

'15 U.C. The marriage took place on October 6 
of Arthur Burns Smith and Margaret F. Gibson, of 
Toronto. 

'15 T. A son was born to Mr and Mrs Thomas 
Alexander Beasley, 423 Main St., Hamilton, on 
September 29. 

'15 U.C. William Ralph West is practising Law 
with the firm of McCarthy and McCarthy, Canada 
Life Building. His house address is 297 Huron St., 
Toronto. 



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UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



127 



'15 S. At Amherstburg on October 11, a daugh- 
ter was born to Mr and Mrs Edward Fraser 
Chestnut. 

'15 Vic. At Yorkton, Sask., the wedding was 
celebrated recently of George Byron Sommervill, 
of Saskatoon, and Gertrude Patrick, of Yorkton. 

'15 U.C. Harry Booker S. Hammond is prac- 
tising Law in Orlando, Florida. 

'16 M. On September 21, a son was born to Dr 
and Mrs W. Easson Brown, Toronto. 

'15 U.C. Early in October the marriage took 
place of Hugh Adams Sinclair and Dorothy Ger- 
trude Lett. Mr and Mrs Sinclair are living at 10 
Glen Grove Ave. W., Toronto. 

'15 UC. Benjamin Douglas Armstrong is a 
missionary in China. His address is c/o Rev W. R. 
McKay r Kongmoon, South China, via Hong Kong. 

'16 S. Early in October, Newton Lionel Powell 
was married to Elizabeth Youart Anderson of 
Acton. They will live in Brampton. 

'16 M. Douglas Gordon Findlay is now living 
in Tottenham. 

'16 S. The marriage took place on October 20, 
of Lionel W. Harron and Delsia Hunter, of Toronto. 

'16 St. M. Daniel Joseph Sheehan is principal 
of a public school at Weldon, Sask. 

'16 M. The wedding took place on November 1 
of Anne Cooke Wallace and William Clarke Givens, 
both of whom were on the staff of Christie Street 
Hospital, Toronto. 

'17 TJ.C. Mrs James Henry (Christiana Munro 
Sneath) is living at 93 Garfield Ave., Hamilton. 

'17 S. The marriage took place quietly in 
October, of Harold A. Babcock, and Anna Elsie 
Rayson Smith, of London. 

'17 U.C. Francis Edwin Runnalls is the minister 
in charge of the Presbyterian church at McBride, 
B.C. 



'17 U.C. On October 1, Frederick Goldwin 
Gardiner was married to Audrey Seaman of Toronto. 
Mr and Mrs Gardiner will live at 91 Willard Ave., 
Toronto. 

'17 U.C. At Poona, India, in September, a son 
was born to Mr and Mrs Alfred Groves (Edith 
Grant). 

'17 P. The marriage of Hugh Sylvester French 
and Verna E. Moorhead took place recently. Mr 
and Mrs French will live at 150 Briar Hill Road, 
Toronto. 

'17 U.C. William McG. Macdonald is practising 
Law at Port Dover. 

'17 M. On October 13, the marriage was cele- 
brated of John Leslie King and Maude A. Partridge. 
They will live in Milton. 

'17 U.C. Edith C. Findlay is living at Totten- 
ham. 

'17 St. M. The marriage took place late in 
November of John William McManamy, of Thorold, 
and Sarah M. McNulty, of St. Catharines. 

'17 U.C., '20 M. The new address of Mrs G. E. 
McConney (Florence Spaulding Hardy) is 275 
Glencairn Ave., Toronto. 

'17 D. On November 2, Frank Knight was 
married to Muriel Dunning, of 37 St. Edmund's 
Drive, Toronto. 

'17 Ag. A daughter was born on November 13, 
to Mr and Mrs William Gladstone Marritt, Hamil- 
ton. 

'17 T. Lilian Pearl McCarthy, who is engaged 
in post graduate studies in Oxford, has left there 
temporarily for three months' research work at 
Paris. Her address there is c/o Mme du Bled, 
53 Rue Claude Bernard, Paris, France. 

'17 S. A son was born to Mr and Mrs Joseph 
Bannigan, on October 29. 



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128 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



'18 M., '18 U.C. The marriage took place on 
October 5, of George Harvey Agnew and Helen 
Moore Smith. Dr and Mrs Agnew are living at 
901 Ossington Ave. 

'18 M. On October 1, the wedding was cele- 
brated of John Russell Lowell Eade and Marguerite 
Scott. Dr and Mrs Eade will live in Leamington. 

'19 U.C. Anna Munro is teaching English and 
French in the High School at Mabton, Washington. 
Her home address is still 5700 37th Ave., South, 
Seattle. 

, '19 S. Early in October the wedding took place 
of Thomas William Campbell, and Mabel Mae 
Pedwell, of Detroit, Mich. 



'19 P. Mervin Archibald Dowd, who is living at 
16 Madison Ave., Hamilton, is manager of Mills 
Drug Store, 329 King St. East, in that city. 

'19 St. M. Mathilde Teresa Zeihr is principal of 
the Ennismore Continuation School. Her home 
address is 647 Euclid Ave., Toronto. 

'19 D. The marriage was celebrated in October 
of Louis William Staples and Grace Emma Mar- 
garet McCleneghan of Woodstock. Dr and Mrs 
Staples will live in Ingersoll. 

'19 U.C. Percy Vernon Smith is teaching in the 
High School at Listowel. 




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UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



129 



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UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 




Where "Salada" 
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WE can give the public 
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"SALADA 1 



'19 D., '19 U.C. On October 21, at St. Mary's 
Hospital, Toronto, a son was born to Dr and Mrs 
Harvey George Bean (Eva Mae Murchison). 

'19 D. On October 5, the wedding took place of 
Gordon Sutherland Murray and Annie H. Davidson. 
They will live at 32 Oakdene Crescent, Toronto. 

'19 S. Thomas William Campbell is living at 
116 Boon Ave., Toronto. 

'20 P. The wedding took place in November of 
Charles Frederick Weegar and Gwladys Howells of 
Toronto. Mr and Mrs Weegar will live at 154 
Arlington Ave., Toronto. 

'20 P. Alexander Duncan Mclntosh was mar- 
ried on October 12, to Jearme McLeod of Turnberry 
Ave., Toronto. They will live in Vancouver. 

'20 Vic. Mrs Haynes (Elizabeth Sterling) is 
living at 568 W. Church St., Corry, Pa. 

'20 M., '21 U.C. On Saturday, October 15, the 
marriage took place of Lloyd E. Verity, of Battle 
Creek, Mich., and Willa Alice Young, of Brantford. 

'20 M. Bernard Charles Sullivan was married 
on October 12, to Marie Barry, of Loretto. They 
will live in Toronto. 

'21 T. Norma Irene Coulson is now studying at 
the American School of Dramatic Art in New York 
city. 

'21 D. The marriage took place in October of 
James Harold Best and Florence Elizabeth Pickles 
of Toronto. They will live in Winnipeg. 

'21 Vic. L. W. Rentner has been awarded the 
James Loudon Gold Medal in Physics. He is living 
at 23 Harbord St., Toronto. 

'21 Vic. The wedding took place in October of 
Leslie Delaval Samuel Carven and Gertrude Mary 
Harwood of Toronto. 

'21 S. Ralph Waldo Downie is working on the 
Welland Ship Canal, Welland. 

'21 Ag. The wedding took place recently of 
Andrew Fulton and Alice Hobden, Beamsville. Mr 
and Mrs Hobden will live in Brighton. 

'21 S. Peter Anderson Durbrow is living at 
467 Laurier Ave. 

'21 S. John Harold Legate is connected with the 
Canada Cement Co., Plant No. 5, Belleville. 

'21 S. The present address of Albert Pryse 
Mackenzie is Box 287, Cobalt. 

'21 U.C. John Des Parres Jennison is living at 
83 Spadina Rd., Toronto. 

'21 Vic. Stanley Rogers Johnston is the Metho- 
dist Minister at Kincardine. 

'21 S. The present address of Joseph C. Meader 
is 359 N. Syndicate St., Fort William. 

'21 Ag. The wedding took place quietly in 
November of George Arthur Elliott and Frances S. 
Smith, of Collingwood. 

'21 U.C. The present address of Alice Ann 
Grant is Box 147, Woodville. 

'21 S. Samuel Leslie Galbraith is living at 904 
Howard St., Detroit, Mich. 

'21 M. On November 12, the marriage was 
celebrated of Estelle M. McNiece and Clarence 
Edward Tipping. They will live at 218 Wright 
Ave., Toronto. 

'21 U.C. Helen Bryans, who is now attending 
the College of Education has been awarded the 
Diploma of the Royal Life Saving Society. 

'21 M. On November 1, Arthur Gordon Arm- 
strong was married to Adeline Knox, of Toronto. 
Dr and Mrs Armstrong will live at Roseneath, Ont. 

'21 Vic. Allan McN. Austin is living at Dalton 
Mills. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



131 



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UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



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UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



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Used in training 
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R. LAIDLAW LUMBER CO. 

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HEAD OFFICE 



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EVERYTHING IN 



TORONTO 



LUMBER AND MILLWORK 



134 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



DOMINION TEXTILE COMPANY LIMITED 

of CANADA 

President Vice- President General Manager and Director 

SIR CHARLES GORDON SIR HERBERT S. HOLT F. G. DANIELS 



HEAD OFFICE: MONTREAL, P.Q. 



MILLS IN MONTREAL, MAGOG AND MONTMORENCY FALLS, P.Q., 
AND IN KINGSTON, ONT. 

COTTON FABRICS 

of every description 

PRINTED, DYED, BLEACHED or in the GREY 

for jobbing and cuiiing-up trades 



CASAVANT ORGANS 

ARE SUPERIOR IN 

Quality, Design and Workmanship 



Over 800 pipe organs built 
by this firm in 

Canada, United States and 
South America. 



CASAVANT FRERES 

LIMITED 

ST. HYACINTHE 



EIMER & AMEND 

FOUNDED 1851 

Manufacturers, Exporters and 

Importers of 

LABORATORY APPARATUS 
CHEMICALS and SUPPLIES 




NEW YORK 

3rd AVE., 18th to 19th STREETS 

PITTSBURGH BRANCH 

2011 JENKINS ARCADE 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



135 



BRITISH AMERICA ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Fire, Marine, Hail and Automobile Insurance 
HEAD OFFICES: COR. FRONT AND SCOTT STS., TORONTO 

Incorporated A.D. 1833 

Assets, Over $4,300,000 

Losses Paid since Organization in 1833, Over $47,500,000 



FRANK DARLING, LL.D.. F.R.I.B.A. 



JOHN A. PEARSON 



DARLING & PEARSON 

Hrcbttectg 

MEMBERS OF THE ROYAL ARCHITECTURAL INSTITUTE OF CANADA 
MEMBERS ONTARIO ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS 
MEMBERS QUEBEC ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS 

JERS MANITOBA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS 



IMPERIAL BANK CHAMBERS 

2 LEADER LANE TORONTO 



The best flour and highest quality of ingredients 

make CANADA 

BREAD 



The choice of 
discriminating 
housewives -:- 



ORDERS 



There is no better way to send money 
by mail. If lost or stolen, your 
money refunded or a new order issued 
free of charge. 



136 UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 




By Appointment TA)^I^(*^ Established 1847 



MASSEY-HARRIS COMPANY, Ltd 

Makers of Agricultural Implements 
TORONTO 



Henry Sproatt, LL.D., R.C.A. Ernest R. Rolph 



Sproatt and Rolph 

Architects 



36 North Street, Toronto 



PAGE & COMPANY 

Cut Stone and Masonry Contractors 



TORONTO 

Contractors on Hart House and Burwash Hall 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 137 



Should a University keep in touch with its graduates or should graduates 
keep in touch with the University ? 



" It is not the intention of these lines to suggest, 
as the opening paragraphs might, that the relation 
of Alumni to the University is a mere matter of 
dollars and cents. The real obligation, the bond 
which draws us irresistibly to the University, has 
no such sordid foundation. But the thought it is 
desired to suggest is that the University, having a 
real and acute problem of dollars and cents, a prob- 
lem incurred on behalf of her graduates and under- 
graduates, it is decidedly an obligation upon 
every graduate and undergraduate to assist the 
University in solving that problem. It can only 
be solved by convincing our fellow citizens that 
University education is not only a good investment, 
but the very best investment the Province can 
make." John R, Bone, M.A., in the December 
" Monthy " 



The University of Toronto needs the support of every graduate in forming an % 
intelligent public opinion favourable to its request for increased Government 
support. 



138 . UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



Department of Education for Ontario 

SCHOOL AGES 

AND 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



In the educational system of Ontario provision is made in the Courses 
of Study for instruction to the child of four years of age in the* Kinder- 
garten up to the person of unstated age who desires a Technical or 
Industrial Course as a preparation for special fitness in a trade or pro- 
fession. 

All schools established under the Public Schools Act shall be free 
Public Schools, and every person between the ages of five and twenty- 
one years, except persons whose parents or guardians are Separate 
School supporters, shall have the right to attend some such school in the 
urban municipality or rural school section in which he resides. Children 
between the ages of four and seven years may attend Kindergarten 
schools, subject to the payment of such fees as to the Board may seem 
expedient. Children of Separate School supporters attend the Separate 
Schools. 

The compulsory ages of attendance are from eight to fourteen years 
and provision is made in the Statutes for extending the time to sixteen 
years of age, and also to eighteen years of age, under conditions stated 
in The Adolescent School Attendance Act of 1919. 

The several Courses of Study in the educational system under the 
Department of Education are taken up in the Kindergarten, Public, 
Separate, Continuation and High Schools and Collegiate Institutes, and 
in Industrial and Technical Schools. Copies of the Regulations regard- 
ing each may be obtained by application to the Deputy Minister of 
Education, Parliament Buildings, Toronto. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



139 



ALUMNI PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY 



ARMOUR & MICKLE 

BARRISTERS, Etc. 

E. DOUGLAS ARMOUR, K.C. 

HENRY W. MICKLE 

A. D. ARMOUR 

CONFEDERATION LIFE BUILDING 

Richmond & Yonge Streets, TORONTO 



STARR, SPENCE, COOPER and FRASER 

BARRISTERS, SOLICITORS, Etc. 

J. R. L. STARR, K .C. J. H. SPENCE 

GRANT COOPER W. I 



rRANT COOPER 
RUSSELL P. LOCKE 



KASPAR FRASER 
HOWARD A. HALL 



Trust and Guarantee Building 
120 BAY ST. - TORONTO 



WILLIAM COOK 

Barrister, Solicitor, Notary, Etc. 

33 RICHMOND ST. WEST 
TORONTO 

Telephone: Main 3898 Cable Address: "Maco* 



ROSS & HOLMSTED 

Barristers, Solicitors, Notaries, Etc. 

NATIONAL TRUST CHAMBERS 

20 King Street East, TORONTO 
JAMES LEITH Ross ARTHUR W. HOLMSTED 



Mclaughlin, Johnston, 
Moorhead & Macau I ay 

Barristers, Solicitors, Notaries, Etc. 

120 BAY STREET, TORONTO 
Telephone Adelaide 6467 

R. J. McLaughlin, K.C. R. L. Johnston 
R. D. Moorhead L. Macaulay 

W. T. Sinclair H. J. McLaughlin 

W. W. McLaughlin 



TYRRELL, J. B. 

MINING ENGINEER 

634 Confederation Life Building 

TORONTO, CANADA 



Kerr, Davidson, Paterson & McFarland 

Barristers, Solicitors, Etc. 
EXCELSIOR LIFE BUILDING 

Cable Address "Kerdason," Toronto 



W. Davidson, K.C. 

G. F. McFarland. LL.B. 



John A. Paterson, K.C. 
A. T. Davidson, LL.B. 



Solicitors for the University. 



OSIER, HOSKIN and HARCOURT 

Barristers, Solicitors, Etc. 
THE DOMINION BANK BUILDING 



John TlDskin, K.C. 
H. S. Osier. K.C. 
W. A Cameron 



F. W. Harcourt. K.C. 
Britton Osier 
A. W. Langmuir 



Counsel Wallace Nesbitt, K.C. 



C. H. and P. H. MITCHELL 

CONSULTING AND SUPERVISING ENGINEERS 
CIVIL. HYDRAULIC, MECHANICAL AND ELECTRICAL 

1003 Bank of Hamilton Building 
TORONTO, Cnt. 



Gregory, Gooderham & Campbell 

BARRISTERS. SOLICITORS. NOTARIES. CONVEYANCERS, ftc. 

701 Continental Life Building 
157 Bay Street Toronto 

TELEPHONE MAIN 6070 

Walter Dymond Gregory Henry Folwell Gooderham 

Frederick A. A. Campbell Arthur Ernest Langman 

Goldwin Gregory Vernon Walton Armstrong 

Frederick Wismer Kemp 



WALTER J. FRANCIS & COMPANY 

CONSULTING ENGINEERS 
MONTREAL 

WALTER J. FRANCIS, C.E. 
FREDERICK B. BROWN, M.Sc. 

R. J. EDWARDS & EDWARDS - 

ARCHITECTS 

18 Toronto St. : Toronto 



R. J. EDWARDS 



G. R. EDWARDS. B.A.Sc. 



140 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



PLAYER'S 

NAVY CUT 

CIGARETTES 



1O for 18* 
20 35* 





Jtndin tins 
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Superb 2ualih/ 
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Vol. XXII. TORONTO, JANUARY, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND TWENTY-TWO No. 4 



News and Comments 



sisting of Sir Robert 

Falconer, Mr Justice Masten, Mr Angus 
MacMurchy, Brig.-Gen, C. H. Mitchell, 
Mr John J. Gibson, and Mr Hugh D. Scully 
to enquire into the advisability of com- 
mencing construction work on the Mem- 
orial Tower during the present winter. 

The Committee went into the situation 
very thoroughly and while recognizing 
fully the sentimental advantages of erect- 
ing the Tower at an early date, reported 
against commencing construction at 
present. 

The two chief reasons given by the 
Committee for its decision were: (1) the 
likelihood that under present conditions 
the cost of the Tower as designed by the 
architects- would exceed $200,000, the 
figure originally set as a maximum and 
(2) the probability that building costs 
would decrease in the next year or two. 

The Board of Directors has accepted the 
recommendations of the Committee and 
has instructed the architects to complete 
the plans so that the inclusive cost of the 
Tower will not exceed $200,000. 



THE QUESTION OF 
AN APPOINTMENTS 
BUREAU 



of our 

1S drawn to 
on page 158 

of this issue written 
by Professor C. R. Fay and dealing with 
the work of the Cambridge Appointments 
Board. 

Professor Fay came to Toronto from 
Cambridge only last autumn and speaks 
from intimate knowledge of the workings 
of the Board. 

While conditions at Cambridge Uni- 
versity differ widely from those at the 
University of Toronto, yet there are many 
things in Professor Fay's article which 
those who are interesting themselves in a 
University of Toronto Appointments 
Bureau will find of great interest and value. 
The fundamental principle underlying the 



success at Cambridge, namely, that of 
securing the confidence of employers 
through accurate and well founded re- 
commendation of candidates, must be the 
foundation of successful work anywhere. 
It is possible, too, that a board constituted 
somewhat after the Cambridge Appoint- 
ments Board might be of great service here. 
A number of University organizations 
and a few individual professors are at 
present endeavouring to lend some assist- 
ance to graduates and undergraduates in 
securing suitable employment. But the 
efforts are on the whole not very serious 
and are characterized by lack of co-opera- 
tion. A board organized and supported 
financially by the University and having 
in its membership, representatives of 
various University units, and of the 
graduate body, should be in a position to 
co-ordinate what is now being done and 
supplement it in a way that would provide 
some adequate employment service. 

DISTINGUISHED The University had 
ATTHF the honour of enter - 

two ver dis - 



tinguished guests on 
November 28, Lord Byng and Admiral 
Beatty. 

The Governor- General spent most of 
the day at the University inspecting 
various things of interest. At 12 o'clock 
a special convocation was held and the 
honorary degree of Doctor of Laws con- 
ferred upon him. He had lunch at Hart 
House with members of the Board of 
Governors and the teaching staff. 

Admiral Beatty arrived at the University 
at 3.30 o'clock in the afternoon and spoke 
to a large gathering of students who had 
assembled to the south of Hart House. 



MOTION PICTURE 
MACHINE USED 
FOR RESEARCH 



A very interesting 
research experiment 
in which the* use of 
an ultra rapid motion 
picture camera played a prominent part 
was recently performed by Professors 
Haultain and Dyer of the Department of 
Mining Engineering. 



141 



142 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



This Department has for sometime been 
making experiments with a view to im- 
proving the efficiency of the ore crushing 
machine in common use. This machine 
consists of a large barrel in which the ore 
is placed with steel balls and the whole 
revolved. The experiments have been 
directed towards securing the maximum 
crushing effect through variation of the 
size and number of the balls and the rotary 
speed of the receptacle. Difficulty arose 
from the fact that it was not possible with 
the eye to ascertain the movement of the 
balls when the barrel was rotated. Clifford 
Sifton Jr. (U.C. '15) of the Filmcraft 
Co. came to the rescue with a camera 
capable of taking 120 photographs per 
second. 

When the film was projected at a slow 
rate of speed many interesting features 
were made clear which could not be seen 
in any other way. This ultra speed 
camera bears a relation to rapid motion 
similar to the relation of the microscope 
to minute structures. 



FEDERATION 
IDEA MAKES 
PROGRESS 



At the December 
meeting of the Alumni 
Board of Directors, 
the University Col- 
lege Alumnae Association and the Univer- 
sity College Alumni Association were 
formally admitted to affiliation with the 
Federation. 

The chief items of agreement between 
the Federation and the Association are as 
follows: (1) That the College Association 
remit $2.00 for each of its paid members 
and pay the cost of stationery, printing, 
postage, etc., incidental to its work. (2) 
That the Federation bear the cost of all 
clerical work in connection with banking 
and book-keeping, and the mailing of 
circulars and notices of meetings, and turn 
over to the College Association the list 
of members who have hitherto paid direct 
to the Federation. 



BRIEFS 

THE GRADUATES OF TRINITY MEDICAL 
COLLEGE held a reception at the Academy 
of Medicine, Queen's Park, on the evening 
of December 12, in honour of J. Algernon 
Temple, the former dean of the College. 
A portrait of Dr Temple by Mr Austin 
Shaw was presented by General J. T. 



Fotheringham as a token of the esteem of 
the graduates. 

Dr Temple graduated from McGill 
University in 1864 and began practice in 
Toronto in 1869. 



PRESIDENT FALCONER has received from 
the Colonial Office of the British Govern- 
ment, a memorandum concerning appoint- 
ments for university men in the Colonial 
Service. The positions are of an admin- 
istrative character and in most cases in- 
clude the carrying on of the functions of 
magistrate and sole representative of the 
British Government among the natives 
of colonies and protectorates. 

There are approximately 100 vacancies 
annually; the majority being in tropical 
Africa and the far East. Further informa- 
tion may be secured on application to the 
Registrar. 



PROFESSOR A. B. MACALLUM, formally 
of the University of Toronto, now of McGill 
University, spoke before the Royal Cana- 
dian Institute on December 3, on "China 
and its Problems." Dr Macallum has 
recently returned from China where he 
spent some months with the Rockefeller 
Foundation assisting in the organization 
of the Union Medical College, Peking. 
A large audience of friends and admirers 
greeted Dr Macallum. 



THIS YEAR HAS WITNESSED a revival of 
interest in University debating. Not for 
many years has there been such a large 
crowd at the debates in Convocation Hall 
as when the ancient rivals McGill and 
Toronto met on December 5 to discuss the 
subject "Resolved that a substantial 
reduction should be made in the Canadian 
Tariff by the incoming Dominion Parlia- 
ment." The University turned out en 
masse and showed that their interest was 
as keen in Varsity's success on the platform 
as on the gridiron. 

Simultaneously with this debate, Queen's 
was opposing another Varsity team at 
Kingston and another McGill team at 
Montreal. The result was a victory for 
Queen's, who succeeded in defeating both 
her opponents. 

A COMMENDABLE DECISION in regard to 
the editorship of Varsity has been reached 
by the Students' Administrative Council. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



143 



The appointment will now run for the 
calendar year in place of the University 
year. This will mean that the editor's 
duties will be distributed over two academic 
years leaving one term in each free for 
academic work. Mr Eric Druce, '23, 
Forestry, has been appointed editor for 
the coming year. 

THE MODERN LANGUAGE CLUB presented 
two French plays in Hart House Theatre 
on December 12. One of the plays, 
L'Ermite was written by a first year 
University College student, Mr John 
MacNaught. It is a brilliant piece of 
work and won the high praise of Professor 
De Champ in the remarks with which he 
opened the evening's entertainment. The 
other play was by Anatole France. 



Lecture Series for the 
Down-Town Man 



THE FACULTY OF Music has announced 
a series of eighteen lectures to be given 
after the New Year by Dr Healy Willan, 
Dr Albert Ham, Mr H. A. Fricker, and 
Mr F. A. Moure. While intended pri- 
marily for students registered for the 
Bachelor of Music degree, others may at- 
tend on payment of a small fee. Full 
information may be secured from the 
Secretary of the Faculty. 



THE FIRST COLLEGE NEWSPAPER to 
print an extra is the distinction claimed by 
the Varsity. The editorial staff published 
a special edition at 3.30 p.m. on November 
28, in order to honour the distinguished 
guests of the University, Admiral Beatty 
and Lord Byng. It consisted of a single 
sheet detailing the activities of the great 
men during their stay in Toronto. 



THE ANNUAL SCHOOL DINNER which for 
so long has occupied a place of prominence 
among the functions of the Faculty of 
Applied Science was held on December 6 
at Bingham's Cafe. Over 300 graduates 
and undergraduates were present. Among 
the speakers were, Dean Mitchell, Princi- 
pal Hutton, Professor C. H. C. Wright, 
and E. L. Cousins. 



IT is ANTICIPATED that 500 people will 
attend the Annual Farmers' Short Course 
which will be given at the University from 
February 6-17. Last year 275 were en- 
rolled. The course has been enlarged from 
thirty to forty lectures and from five to 
twelve subjects. 



COMMENCING with Tuesday, January 
V> 31, a course of weekly lectures under 
the auspices of the Alumni Federa- 
tion will be given at the University by 
prominent professors. 

The primary purpose of the series is to 
place some of the intellectually good things 
of the University at the disposal of the 
citizens of Toronto, and in this way deepen 
the interest and increase the appreciation 
of the public in the institution. 

The University is not without many very 
fine public lecture series but very often 
these are given at an hour which precludes 
the attendance of down-town workers. 
Often, too, the lectures are of a technical 
character designed to interest the academic 
person rather than the business or pro- 
fessional. 

In the Alumni Federation series an 
effort will be made to overcome these two 
objections on the part of the down-town 
man. The lectures will be given in the 
evening at 8 o'clock (in the auditorium of 
the Physics Building) and the subjects will 
be such as are discussed by men of intellec- 
tual tendencies, anywhere; moreover, the 
majority of them will be related to ques- 
tions of immediate public interest. They 
will present in popular form recent develop- 
ments and matters of perpetual interest 
in the field of knowledge. 

It is expected that the course will include 
the following: 

Professor Wrong on some phase of the 
Washington Conference. 

Professor J. C. McLennan on recent 
developments in Physics. 

Dean Mitchell . on the place of the 
hydro-electrical development in Ontario. 

President Falconer on the relation of 
the University and its staff to the oublic. 

Professor C. R. Fay on some economic 
subject. 

Principal Hutton on the art of J. M. 
Barrie. 

Professor Currelly on recent additions 
to the Museum. 



Toronto Graduates in the New House of Commons 



EIGHTEEN OUT OF THIRTY-SEVEN ARE SUCCESSFUL 



CONSIDERING the number of candi- 
V^i dates in the field, the University 
contestants in the recent general 
election fared well. Of thirty-seven can- 
didates, eighteen were returned elected. 
Of the successful candidates twelve be- 
longed to the Conservative Party, four 
to the Liberal Party, and two to the 
Progressive. Seven are graduates in 
Medicine, seven in Arts, one in Science, 
one in Law, one in Agriculture, and one^ 
in Pharmacy. Of the eighteen, sixteen 
were elected for Ontario seats. 

The Members elected are as follows: 
Faculty of Medicine: 

ROBERT KING ANDERSON, M.D. (Vic.) 
'88; Conservative, Halton County; first 
elected to the House of Commons in 1917; 
served as mayor of Milton from 1904 till 
1908; has always shown a great interest 
in public affairs. 

CHRISTOPHER FRASER CONNOLLY, M.B. 
'11; Liberal; elected from Victoria, Alta. 

JOHN CARRUTHERS, M.D. (Vic.) '88; 
Liberal; elected from Algoma. 

ROBERT JAMES MANION, M.D., C.M. 
(T.) '04; Conservative; re-elected from 
Fort William; served with the military 
forces in France; was awarded the Military 
Cross at Vimy; author of A Surgeon in 
Arms. 

PETER McGiBBON, M.B. '04; Conserva- 
tive; re-elected from Muskoka; served in 
France with the Berkshire Regiment, 
winning the Military Cross. 

JAMES PALMER RANKIN, M.D., C.M. 
(T.) 78; Liberal, North Perth; has repre- 
sented North Perth since 1908; has prac- 
tised his profession in Stratford since 1891. 

CHARLES SHEARD, M.D., C.M. (T.) 78; 
Conservative; Medical Health Officer for 
Toronto from 1893 till 1910; professor of 
Preventative Medicine, University of 
Toronto, 1906-1911; first elected to House 
of Commons in 1917. 
Arts: 

EDMUND JAMES BRISTOL, B.A. (U.C.) 
'83, K.C.; Conservative, re-elected from 
Centre Toronto; member of the Meighen 
Cabinet; lawyer; past president of the 
U.C. "Lit."; took First Class Honours in 
Classics. 



JOHN A. CLARK, B.A. (U.C.) '06; 
Conservative, Burrard, B.C.; lawyer; 
brilliant military career; commanded the 
72nd Battalion and later the 7th Infantry 
Brigade; services recognized by D.S.O. 
and C.M.G. ; is president of the Vancouver 
Branch of the Alumni Association. 

WILLIAM CHARLES GOOD, B.A. (U.C.) 
'00, Progressive from Brant; farmer; 
brilliant University career; entered with 
Edward Blake Proficiency and Prince of 
Wales Scholarships; was one of the organi- 
zers of the U.F.O., and has throughout 
been active in farmers' organizations. 

W. L. MACKENZIE KING, B.A. (U.C.) 
'95, Ph.D. (Harvard) ; Liberal, North York; 
leader of Liberal Party and premier elect. 

W. F. MACLEAN, B.A. (U.C.) '80; 
Conservative, South York, which con- 
stituency he has 'represented for nearly 
thirty years; founder and editor of the 
Toronto World. 

RICHARD V. LE SUEUR, B.A. (U.C.) '99; 
Conservative, West Lambton ; practises 
Law in Sarnia; has spent considerable time 
in Peru; appointed solicitor and agent for 
the British Government for a forthcoming 
arbitration between Great Britain and 
that country. 

EDMUND BAIRD RYCKMAN, B.A. (Vic.) 
'87; Conservative, East Toronto; senior 
partner of the legal firm, Ryckman, 
Denison, Foster and Beaton; interested in 
all University affairs and a member of 
the Senate of Victoria College. 
Applied Science: 

JOSEPH HENRY HARRIS, B.A.Sc. '11; 
Conservative, East York; manufacturer; 
wide business interests. 
Law: 

THOMAS LANGTON CHURCH, B.C.L. (T.) 
'98; Conservative, North Toronto; has had 
long successful public career; served as 
mayor of Toronto from 1915 till 1921; 
prominent sportsman and fraternalist. 
Agriculture: 

BURT WENDELL FANSHER, B.S.A. '04; 
Progressive, East Lambton. 
Pharmacy: 

W. F. GARLAND, Phm.B. '01; Conserva- 
tive, Carleton; alderman of Ottawa, 1912; 
proprietor of a drug store in Ottawa. 



144 



W. L. Mackenzie King, '95 

BY A PERSONAL FRIEND OF THE NEW PRIME MINISTER 



THE premiership of Canada has ac- 
quired the habit. It has learned to 
come to the University of Toronto 
and to stay there. 

Arthur Meighen- and now Mackenzie 
King. 

It was time for a change in this respect 
at least. The U. of T., despite our 
boastings, was not getting its share of the 
honours. 

Both in the old 
University College 
"Lit" and at Uni- 
versity sermons, we 
of this century's first 
decade were always 
being told that the 
future destiny of Can- 
ada lay in our hands 
and that graduates 
of the University of 
Toronto were the 
natural-born govern- 
ors of mankind. 

At such praise we 
naturally expanded. 
But if we stopped to 
think, which we 
scarcely ever did in 
those days, we real- 
ized that Sir Wilfrid 
Laurier, premier from 
1896 to 1911 was a 
McGill man. When 
Sir Robert Borden 
succeeded him, we had 

the chance to think once more that the 
University of Toronto had been over- 
looked again, this time in favour of a 
Maritime province college. 

True, as time went on, we developed in 
E. W. Beatty a president of the Canada 
Pacific Railway, but even that exalted 
business post hardly means as much as 
the premiership of Canada. 

Then Sir Robert Borden resigned, and 
the line of University of Toronto premiers 
began. 

Arthur Meighen graduated in 1896; 
Mackenzie King in 1895. 

Much has been written about Mr King 
in these last few weeks. Of all the things 
that can be said or speculated about him, 




Premier King with John D. Rockefeller, Jr., and a miner. 
This photograph was taken in 1915 when Mr King was 
engaged in an industrial survey in the Colorado mining 
districts for the Rockefeller industrial foundation. 



nothing is more significant than the nature 
of the training he has had for the premier- 
ship. Whether or not this training, ap- 
plied to his own personal consciousness, 
his own individual personality, means a 
notable and fruitful premiership is an 
absorbing problem. Mackenzie King's 
training has had this indubitable advan- 
tage; it is modern. It has had to do not 
so much with the old 
traditional subjects 
of romance as with 
the new crusade of 
enthusiasm, the ro- 
mance of industry. 

Laurier, Borden, 
Meighen their 
training was largely 
legal and political. 
King's largely econ- 
omic and industrial. 
There is this dif- 
ference too. The 
preliminary training 
of our last three prime 
ministers, except for 
a little teaching done 
by Borden in New 
Jersey, was exclusive- 
ly Canadian. Mac- 
kenzie King's has 
been both Canadian 
and American. He 
has had experience 
in a wider, (but, we 
think, not a better) 

field. He can bring to bear on Canadian 
questions the experience gained in the 
Republic as well as in the Dominion. 

At the University, Mackenzie King was 
in Political Science, and found his chief 
interest in the study of economics. 

This was merely the beginning of a 
thread that has run consistently through 
his career, a native and insatiable interest 
in sociological and industrial problems. 

He won a fellowship in political economy 
in the graduate school of the University 
of Chicago. During that period he lived 
at the Hull House Settlement, and con- 
tributed, to the Journal of Political Econo- 
my, theses on " Trade Union Organization 
in the United States," and on "The 



145 



146 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



International Typographical Union." 

Later on, in Toronto, he wrote a series 
of articles for the Mail and Empire, based 
on personal investigation, about the un- 
favourable living and working conditions 
of labourers and their families. 

Then he became deputy minister and 
later minister of Labour at Ottawa jn the 
Laurier Cabinet. 

Subsequently, as a private citizen, he 
made minute industrial investigations all 
over the North American continent for 
the Rockefeller Foundation, worked out 
his parallel between democracy in industry 
and in politics, and outlined in his book, 
Industry and Humanity, his scheme of 
"representation in industry." 

It was not industrial problems in a 
vacuum or in isolation, however, that held 
Mackenzie King's attention. It was in- 
dustry in relation to the people and to the 
state. 



For, with the first thread, devotion to 
sociology, was interwoven from the be- 
ginning another strand of motive and desire, 
an instinctive and unquenchable deter- 
mination to be of service to his native 
country in the broadest field of public 
affairs. 

It was this latter thread that guided 
him through all the labyrinth of American 
experience and kept leading him back to 
Canada. Time after time he refused 
offers from the Rockefellers, the Carnegies, 
and other American leaders who would 
have paid for his services whatever he 
asked. 

Mr King's career up to the present is 
a unique fusion of the sociological and 
political. The problem of chief importance 
not only to himself but more so to the 
country is what will be the practical, 
statesmanly result of this fusion, this 
intermingling of already allied strands? 



Why University Education at Less Than Cost? 



In our December issue there appeared 
an exceedingly clear and forceful article 
by Mr John R. Bone, on the fundamental 
financial problem of state-supported 
universities. 

Mr Bone points to the fact that a 
student's tuition for one year at the Uni- 
versity costs in the neighbourhood of $150 
in excess of what he pays in fees. The 
difference is paid by the Province. 

" What benefit is it to the Province to 
provide University education at less than 
cost?" Mr Bone asks; then declares, 



" Answer it so that all may be convinced and 
the problem of University finances will 
automatically solve itself." 

The suggestion was made that readers 
of THE MONTHLY should send in answers 
to the question and practical suggestions 
regarding the best methods of bringing 
home to the people, the true value of the 
University as a provincial institution. 
The three articles appearing below have 
been received. We trust with the busy 
holiday season behind us more answers 
may be forthcoming for our next issue. 



WHAT BENEFIT IS IT TO 1HE PROVINCE TO PROVIDE UNIVERSITY 
EDUCATION AT LESS THAN COST?" 

By GEORGE F. KAY, '00 
DEAN OF THE COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS, UNIVERSITY OF IOWA 



As an alumnus of the University of 
Toronto^ I am much interested in the 
question raised by Mr Bone, "What 
benefit is it to the Province to provide 
University education at less than cost?" 
This is a question which tax-payers will 
continue to ask, and they are entitled to 
receive a satisfactory answer. 

The purpose of university education is 
but an extension of the purpose of ele- 



mentary and high school education; the 
higher branches are essential to the effici- 
ency of the whole system. The aim in 
providing university training at low cost 
is to encourage and stimulate young people 
to equip themselves to do effectively the 
many kinds of service which are of funda- 
mental importance in the development 
of a province or a state. 

If the individual who receives university 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



147 



training were alone to benefit then he 
should pay in full for his education. But 
he alone does not benefit. University 
graduates go into many widely distributed 
communities and there by their expert 
knowledge, their leadership, and their 
service, raise the community to a higher 
level of citizenship than it otherwise would 
attain. Since this is true, the province 
dare not depend upon securing the leader- 
ship so necessary to its welfare from those 
alone who are able financially to bear the 
full cost of higher education. Such a 
policy would be undemocratic and un- 
thinkable. 

The hope of organized society is in 
education. Regardless of the cost, our 
citizens must be educated. Only by 
education can the safety of a people be 
insured from the intrigues of the dema- 
gogue. Economic and industrial develop- 
ment, intellectual and spiritual develop- 
ment are dependent upon our attitude 
toward education. The better educated 
the citizens of Ontario become the more 
rapid will be the development of the 
Province, and the more important will 
be the contribution of its people to the 
solution of the problems of society. 

These benefits of higher education are 
so significant and so fundamental that the 
tax-payers of Ontario, to the limit of their 
resources, must meet the educational 
needs by providing at low cost the highest 
types of technical, professional, and cul- 
tural training to all young men and women 
who desire to be educated and who are 
intellectually able to maintain high stand- 
ards of work. 

How can these benefits be so clearly 
brought home to the tax-payers that they 
will provide adequate funds to defray the 
expense? This can be done only by the 
strenuous and united efforts of all persons 
who appreciate fully the value of education. 
The task is difficult and never-ending. 
It is not necessary to emphasize the great 
responsibility which falls upon graduates. 



Unselfish lives will speak louder than 
words in winning support for university 
education. But wise leaders must devote 
much time in planning campaigns for the 
effective dissemination of information 
which tax-payers must have if they are 
expected to develop an intelligent and 
sympathetic understanding of the needs 
of their university. 

In the Mississipi Valley states, many 
millions of dollars are being spent annually 
for the support of state universities and 
agricultural colleges. In Michigan, Iowa, 
Illinois, Minnesota, and Wisconsin alone 
more than $47,000,000 has been appro- 
priated for the biennium 1921-1923. In 
these states various methods have been 
adopted to keep the tax-payers in touch 
with what is being done and to prepare 
them to co-operate in meeting the ever 
increasing needs. At the University of 
Iowa, where the enrolment this year will 
exceed 6,000 students, there is an efficient 
Publicity Bureau. Press bulletins are 
sent out almost daily to editors and to 
others who will make the proper use of 
information. Service bulletins are widely 
distributed. A well organized Extension 
department renders many different kinds 
of service to thousands of the citizens of 
the state who are not able to come to the 
University. Each year many professors 
from the university participate in the 
closing exercises of the high schools, and 
there impress upon pupils and parents the 
benefits of thorough training for the work 
of life. Appreciation of all these services 
wins friends for higher education. 

May I make a suggestion? Might' it 
not be worth while for a well chosen com- 
mittee from the University of Toronto to 
visit several of the state universities of the 
Mississippi Valley to study the methods 
there being used, and to ascertain whether 
or not any of these methods might be used 
to 'advantage in securing additional sup- 
port for our Alma Mater? 



DOES HIGHER EDUCATION PAY THE PROVINCE? 

By S. SILCOX, '93 
PRINCIPAL STRATFORD NORMAL SCHOOL 



The pioneers of this Province fought 
and won the battle of free public schools. 
The secondary schools have been made 
practically free to residents of the munici- 



pality, building and maintaining them. 

The next step towards the goal aimed 

at by the pioneers will be free University 

education for everyone showing the ability 



148 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



to profit by it. The only condition of 
admission to the University should be 
proof of the intelligence necessary to 
profit by the course. 

This principle is already recognized in 
many educational organizations in On- 
tario. There is the Ontario School for 
the Blind, in which not only is tuition 
free but board and lodging are supplied; 
so is the Deaf and Dumb School at Belle- 
ville. Mental defectives are cared for by 
the state. In all our training schools for 
teachers there are no fees, though each 
student buys his own books and pays for 
his board. 

Here come many young men and women 
with superior native intelligence who want 
higher education. Their only handicap 
is the lack of means. Why should this 
handicap be made greater by high fees? 

The educated man or woman is of more 
value to the State than to himself. True, 
he earns more as a result of his higher 
education, but is not this earning power 
a measure of his value to the community? 



Indeed, it is doubtful if there is a possible 
money value for an educated man's work; 
certainly not when it has a high moral 
value, as true education always has. My 
conclusion is that the state should provide 
higher education free. 

This, however, need not be interpreted 
as opposing the systematic contribution 
of the graduate to his University after 
graduation. It would be of inestimable 
value to the graduate and to the University 
if the graduate body would undertake to 
provide for all maintenance expenses, 
leaving only capital expenditure to be 
borne by the state. I estimate that the 
annual earning power of the graduates of 
the University of Toronto is 1100,000,000. 
One per cent, of this amount would furnish 
one million dollars annually which would 
pay the cost of tuition of five thousand 
students at the rate mentioned, $216, in 
Mr Bone's December article. In assess- 
ing graduates for maintenance a sliding 
scale, increasing with the income, would 
be the fairest way. 



'OF WHAT VALUE IS A UNIVERSITY EDUCATION TO A YOUNG MAN 
ENTERING INDUSTRIAL OR COMMERCIAL LIFE?" 

By CLARK E. LOCKE, '11 
ADVERTISING MANAGER, THE ROBERT SIMPSON COMPANY, LTD. 



Granted that the advisability of higher 
education for those contemplating busi- 
ness careers, still offers meat for contro- 
versy, there are nevertheless several dis- 
tinct contributions which modern industrial 
and commercial enterprises expect from a 
college graduate. There are several ways 
in which they plan to turn an academic 
training to practical account. 

Firstly, there is expected an ability to 
think through a project from beginning to 
end. To analyze a proposition thoroughly 
and present a carefully-considered con- 
clusion. A trained mind, they argue, is 
equipped to grasp the principles and yet 
regard the details; to consider the forest 
and to see the trees. A man who can 
produce a bomb-proof proposition is an 
asset to an institution. 

In the second place, the University man 
in business is regarded as one to whom 
opportunity means responsibility. Edu- 
cated to bear responsibility successfully 
he is prepared to accept it with confidence. 



He brings with him certain ideals of service 
and above the daily routine, sees the higher 
aims and broader conceptions of an 
organization take shape. 

Further, these men are regarded as 
"serviceable". Studies and training have 
equipped them to work independent of 
circumstances. They are adaptable. 
Their abilities can be directed in any 
desired direction to produce results. 

In summary it may be said that business 
organizations look to the universities to 
provide men who will develop rapidly into 
creative executives. Men of vision, in- 
sight and imagination; "trained to right 
thinking and sound judgment". 

But their is one proviso. The college 
man is expected to recognize that a 
practical apprenticeship is essential. A 
graduate in Arts is usually a freshman in 
business. 

His second graduation cannot be avoided. 
It may come rapidly it's true, but it must 
come surely. 



Graduate Organizations in the University of Toronto HI 



By J. SQUAIR 
PROFESSOR EMERITUS OF FRENCH 



MR G. W. ROSS and his Cabinet having to make recommendations regarding 
resigned on February 5, 1905, three changes thought desirable in the law gov- 
days later the Cabinet of Mr J. P. erning the institution. The members of 
Whitney was sworn in. The new Govern- the Commission were Goldwin Smith, 
men t met the new Legislature on March 22. W. R. Meredith, J. W. Flavelle, B. E. 
Very soon there are announcements in the Walker, A. H. U. Colquhoun, H. J. Cody, 
Press that the Government is to take up and D. Bruce Macdonald. These dis- 
University matters, and discussions of tinguished gentlemen held seventy-seven 
these are opened. 
On May 17 a University Bill 
under the care of the Premier 
himself received its first reading. 
In his speech Mr Whitney ex- 
plained that five or six years 
ago he had taken the stand 
that the University should with- 
out delay be put on a proper 
financial basis and that Queen's 
also should be treated with due 
consideration. Since that time 
his own party had approved 
his stand, and recently at the 
last election the approbation of 
the people had been unmis- 
takably pronounced. He was, 
therefore, now merely fulfilling 
the pledges so often made and 
confirmed. The present Bill, 
however, only went so far as to 
pay deficits and finish" the con- 
struction of buildings already 
under way or promised, such 
as Convocation Hall, the Physics 
Laboratory, etc. The Bill pro- 
vided for the financing of these 
projects and involved an expen- 
diture of something like $745,000 
In addition, however, the Pre- 
mier promised ~that during the 
recess the Government would 
thoroughly consider the situa- 
ation of the University and 
bring in measures for the per- SIR JOHN GIBSON, '63 




cutties. 



remedying Of itS difft- Life-long Friend and Benefa ^ o [ a t t ^ e n l {^ e gty. President of 



the Alumni 



The promise of the Premier regarding meetings, met a large number of persons 

careful consideration was kept, and on who had suggestions to offer, visited many 

October 3, a Royal Commission was institutions of learning in Canada and 

appointed to inquire into all matters per- the United States, and presented their 

taining to the constitution and government report to the Government on April 4, 1906. 

of the University of Toronto, with power A fairly large number of persons repre- 

149 



150 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



sen ting the Faculties, Senates, etc., of 
Canadian Institutions of Learning waited 
on the Commission with their suggestions 
and in addition to these the representatives 
of the following graduate and under- 
graduate groups: The Convocation of 
Trinity College, The Alumnae Association of 
the Ontario Medical College for Women, 
University of Toronto Alumni Association, 
The University Club of Ottawa, Guelph 
Alumni Association, Algoma Alum.ni Asso- 
ciation, University of Toronto Club of New 
York, The High School Teachers, and the 
Athletic Directorate of the University of 
Toronto. This regular consultation by 
the Commission of these heretofore silent 
partners in the University mechanism was 
a valuable innovation due to the influence 
of the Alumni Association, and must be 
set down to its credit. 

The report of the Commission contained 
a number of recommendations respecting 
the structure and management of the 
University and these formed the basis for 
a Draft Bill which was in substance ac- 
cepted by the Government and was in due 
time passed, with no great opposition, by 
Parliament as The University Act of 19C6. 
The changes made in the University were 
comprehensive and some were of a radical 
character. Such were the clearer defini- 
tion and extension of the powers of the 
President, the establishment of a Board of 
Governors to which the Government of 
the Province should pass over the complete 
control, even without veto, of the Uni- 
versity's affairs, and particularly the crea- 
tion of a new system of financing which 
should yield more certain and abundant 
resul'ts. 

There was some discussion over the 
powers and manner of choice of the Board 
of Governors. Some thought the Govern- 
ment should retain the right of veto. 
Some thought there should be a certain 
proportion of representatives of the alumni 
on the Board of Governors. After dis- 
cussion the view prevailed that the final 
authority of the Government would be 
best secured by leaving in its hands the 
appointment of all members of the Board 
without retaining any right of veto. The 
plan adopted has worked well and one 
may doubt whether the complications of 
popular elections, vetoes, etc., would have 
improved the situation in any respect. 

The clauses governing finance were of a 



very radical nature and are well worth 
a moment's attention. Clause 140-(1), 
in the original numbering of the Act,, says: 
"For the purpose of making provision for 
the maintenance and support of the Uni- 
versity and of University College, there 
shall be paid to the Board out of the Con- 
solidated Revenue of the Province yearly 
and every year a sum equal to fifty per 
centum of the average yearly gross re- 
ceipts of the Province from succession 
duties." The importance of this clause 
cannot be over estimated for it constituted 
a reversal of the policy pursued up to this 
time in regard to University finance. 
Hitherto the prevalent doctrine was that 
in 1828 the University had received 
through royal bounty half a million acres 
of land as a permanent endowm.ent and 
that this should be sufficient for all its 
needs for all -time. For instance, the 
Hon. Edward Blake at page three in the 
Report on Revenues and Requirements, 
dated April 13, 1891, says, " It thus appears 
that the resources of the University, apart 
from the value of the lands and buildings 
reserved for the purposes of the institution, 
are so large as to put its future, under wise 
and prudent administration, beyond all 
doubt in question ; and to enable it by the 
realization of its assets to increase its 
efficiency." This unequivocal statement 
was written four years after federation was 
* adopted, when everybody knew that in- 
creased expenditure must take place and 
certainly Mr Blake reflected quite truly 
the average governmental opinion of the 
time. 

Again when we look at the legislation 
of 1897 we see that the Government of the 
Province does not admit that the Uni- 
versity has any claim to an additional 
income from the Consolidated Revenue. 
In that year some addition was made to 
the resources of the University, viz., (a) 
six townships of six miles square of the 
Crown Lands and (b) $7,000 annually out 
of the Consolidated Revenue, but on the 
distinct understanding that these two 
items were given to quiet claims made by 
the University that the grants of land 
really made in early times were less by 
138,424 1 acres than the Crown had 



1 Note that 6 townships contain 6x6x6x640 or 
r 8,240 acres; so that the University was 184 acres 
short on the deal. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



151 



intended, and that the University was 
entitled to interest at six per cent, on the 
value of the land expropriated by the 
Province in the University Park, for the 
new Parliament Buildings (see Varsity, 
January 21, 1888, p. 105). With respect 
to the $7,000 given as interest on the value 
of the site of the Parliament Buildings 
there is a condition attached, viz., that 
the money was to be spent in making 
better provision for instruction in Miner- 
alogy, Geology, and kindred subjects. 

The Act of 1901 is also interesting in 
this connection, for it provided that the 
financial aid given at that time amounting 
to some $25,000 was for the purpose of 
encouraging the study of the mineral and 
other natural resources of the Province, and 
was to be devoted solely to the payment of 
salaries and maintenance in the depart- 
ments of Chemistry, Physics, Mineralogy, 
and Geology. 

From a consideration of these and other 
documents it would seem pretty clear that 
there had been developed since 1867 a 
theoretical system, of greater or less 
coherence, regarding University finance by 
which the Government was guided, and 
often hampered, particularly subsequently 
to 1887 when the numbers of students and 
the options o'f the curriculum were much 
increased. Stated briefly, the following 
were the chief points in this body of doc- 
trine: The University has a sufficient 
endowment; this endowment must not be 
divided with denominational colleges; nor 
with medical or other professional schools; 
schools of science, pure and applied, 
should receive special government grants. 
Persons of a later generation should not 
be too critical of the governments which 
filled the space between 1867 and 1906. 
These lived and acted in harmony with 
views which had their origin in disputes 
and discussions of a somewhat remote past, 
and which were held by the majority of 
the people. They may seem strange now 
to some, but there was nothing remarkable 
or reprehensible in Governments being 
true to these views during the forty year 
period of which we are speaking. But 
the time arrived when the expansion of the 
University became imperative. The Al- 
umni Association expressed the needs 
of higher education with insistence, and 
Mr Whitney, coming into power with an 
overwhelming majority in 1905, was given 



a mandate to do radical things which 
might have been refused if the previous 
discussion had not been energetic and 
prolonged. 

The relief given the University by Mr 
Whitney was very great, the period follow- 
ing upon 1906 was one of expansion and 
progress, and naturally the activity of the 
Alumni Association was less intense. The 
passing of the Act of 1906 and its coming 
into force on June 15, were coincident with 
some important changes in the officials 
of the University. The Board of Govern- 
ors, consisting of eighteen prominent 
gentlemen appointed by the Government 
in addition to the Chancellor and President, 
assumed full control. On July 13, James 
Loudon retired .from the Presidency 
although he remained for a year or two 
as Honorary President of the Alumni 
Association. He had been a member of 
the Staff for forty-two years, of which 
time he had been President for fourteen 
years. He spent his remaining years in 
Toronto and died December 29, 1916. 
On President Loudon's resignation the 
Governors appointed Maurice Hutton, 
Principal of University College as Presi- 
dent pro tern., and in 1907 chose the present 
scholarly incumbent of the office, Sir 
Robert Falconer. He was formally in- 
stalled as President on September 26. 
The installation was a brilliant affair, and 
a notable part of it was the opening of the 
Physics Laboratory by the Lieutenant 
Governor, Sir Mortimer Clark. Thus 
was completed what might be called the 
building programme of the Alumni Asso- 
ciation formulated in 1904. 

The activities of the Association were 
less energetic for some time, for the chief 
objectives had been attained. But it 
lived and prospered and helped to keep 
alive in the hearts of graduates, knowledge 
of, and affection for, their alma mater. 
The offices were maintained, and its 
journal THE MONTHLY went on. As 
early as November 1903, attention had 
been turned to the great need of a complete 
Register of graduates and throughout the 
intervening years down to the oresent, a 
bureau of University archives nas been 
maintained for which the Alumni Asso- 
ciation deserves some of the credit, although 
the archives form a part of the Registrar's 
Office. The Association has been re- 
markably well served by its officials, such 



152 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



as President, Secretary and Editor. The 
much beloved R. A. Reeve, (stricken by 
death while in Alumni service, January 
27, 1919) remained President from 1900 
to 1907. He was succeeded by I. H. 
Cameron, a gentleman to whom the 
Association owes much, who held the post 
for a year. Mr Barlow Cumberland 
(B.A. 1867) was President during 1908, 
and during the period 1909-1911, one of the 
University's staunchest friends and most 
distinguished sons, Sir John Gibson, (B.A. 
1863) filled the position. He was succeed- 
ed for the year 1912 by the zealous and 
vigorous Dr A. B. Macallum (B.A. 1880) 
and he was followed for three years, 
1913-1916, by the real founder of the 
Association, Dr J. C. McLennan. In 1917 
His Honour Mr Justice Masten (B.A. 1879) 
was chosen and has filled the position most 
faithfully and wisely down to the present. 
In the Secretary's office as well as in the 
Editor's office the Association has enjoyed 
the faithful services of a group of self- 
denying men of whom we cannot stop to 
speak at present, except to mention such 
as E. J. Kylie and G. S. Stevenson, former 
editors, now deceased. 

One of the things done during this 
period was to restore the memorial window, 
which had been made in honour of the 
three undergraduates who were killed at 
the battle of Ridgeway on June 2, 1866. 
The first window had decorated old 
Convocation Hall (the northern portion 
of the east wing of University College) 
and was destroyed in the great fire of 
February, 1890. In 1908 a committee was 
appointed by the Alumni Association to 
raise money and have the new window 
made and on June 20, 1910, it was un- 
veiled by Sir John Gibson, President of 
the Alumni Association, in the presence of 
a large and distinguished company of 
people, in the East Hall of University 
College, where it is still to be seen. 

The life of the Alumni Association, 
however, remained sluggish, although the 
University itself was expanding in student 
attendance, in new buildings, and the like. 
And we find in the records of meetings that 
suggestions of various kinds are made to 
give the Association greater vitality. For 
instance at the annual meeting of 1913 the 
Executive Committee complained that 
attendance at meetings and subscriptions 
had diminished. The Report also says 



that conferences had been held with the 
President of the University and the Chair- 
man of the Board of Governors, but 
that no plan had been matured for help- 
ing the Association. Visits, however, to 
alumni in various parts of Canada con- 
tinued to be made by the President of the 
University and officials of the Association. 
But not much more than marking time 
was being done. 

At the meeting held on June 4, 1914, it 
was reported that the Chicago Branch of 
the Association had been especially active 
and had increased its membership in a 
satisfactory way. It was also reported 
that the Board of Governors had con- 
sented to pay $500 a year for the work that 
the Association was doing in gathering 
information regarding the Alumni. This 
seems to have been the beginning of a 
new policy, i.e., of making the Alumni 
Association a real branch of University 
machinery. A certain feeling of regret 
was manifested that the Alumni had not 
responded more liberally to the demands 
of the Association. 

In August 1914 the Great War began, 
and the Alumni of the University were 
henceforth for over four years -to be very 
busy with things related thereto. Re- 
cruiting was actively carried on, and caring 
for those in the trenches and hospitals 
demanded attention. But the Association 
maintained its ordinary forms of activity. 
At the annual meeting held on May 18, 
1916, the Executive reported that it was 
busily occupied with promoting a scheme 
for establishing Alumni Fellowships. ^ It 
also asked authorization for the appoint- 
ment by the Governors of the University 
of an organizing secretary and at the 
meeting held on May 17, 1917, the Presi- 
dent, Mr Justice Masten, was able to 
report that Dr A. H. Abbott had been 
appointed to this position. But Dr 
Abbott's assistance had been demanded 
by the Provincial Government, and he 
had been able to do very little for the 
Association. It was also reported that 
greater attention than ever was now being 
paid to the collection of information about 
Alumni. 

At the meeting held on June 6, 1918, it 
was reported that Dr Abbott's time had 
been completely taken up by his war work, 
and so nothing had been done by him in 
the way of organizing. Hence it was 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



153 



necessary to find another secretary and 
the Executive was authorized to make a 
new appointment. A month or .two later 
(in September) the present Secretary, Mr 
W. N. MacQueen (B.A. 1912) was engaged 
and entered upon his duties. 

At the meeting held on June 5, 1919, 
the Executive reported that after the 
Armistice of November 11, 1918, on 
December 12, a large meeting of graduates, 
at which a dinner was given, had been held. 
It was decided to appoint a Memorial 
Committee to establish a material memor- 
ial as well as scholarships in honour of 
the many sons of the University who fell 
in the war. This Committee went actively 
to work. It was also reported that early 
in February, 1919, a Bureau of Appoint- 
ments had been established to assist 
returned members of the University in 
finding suitable employment. This com- 
mittee was also most energetically em- 
ployed and did much good. A Constitu- 
tion Committee was appointed at this 
meeting to consider necessary changes in 
the Constitution and report- next year. 

At the meeting held on June 3, 1920, it 
was reported that a total of $308,275.23 
had been raised for Memorial purposes. 
Out of this money a Loan Fund had been 
set aside for the relief of returned men, and 
the Scholarship Board had been authorized 
to conduct this part of the business as 
early as March 21, 1919. At this meeting 
important changes were made in the 
Constitution, the chief of which were 
provision for an Alumni Council, as well 
as for a Board of Directors. It was also 
resolved to ask for Incorporation under the 
Provincial statutes. By virtue of these 
changes the Association has become a 
Federation of the various groups of gradu- 
ates and undergraduates in all the Facul- 
ties of the University with power to trans- 
act business in a regular way. 

During the year just past, a number 
of steps have been taken to bring these 
important changes into operation. At 
page 11 of the October number of THE 
MONTHLY will be seen the report of the 
proceedings at the annual meeting held 
June 9. At page 70 in the November 
number it is announced that the graduates 
of Victoria were organized at an Alumni 
dinner on the eightieth anniversary of the 
granting of the Royal Charter to Victoria 
University. At page 113 in the December 



number it is announced that the graduates 
of University College have been organized. 
At page 109 of the same number it is 
announced that on November 11 a general 
meeting of Alumni was held to complete 
the re-organization of the University of 
Toronto Alumni Association and to approve 
of the transfer of the assets and affairs 
of the Association to the Alumni Federation 
of the University of Toronto. 

This closes the history of the Association 
as it originally was organized, but a word 
or two should be said regarding the general 
University situation as it now stands. 
From an article entitled " Succession Duties 
and University Finance" by Sir Edmund 
Walker, Chairman of the Board of Govern- 
ors, which appears at page 9 in the October 
number (1921) of THE MONTHLY we learn 
that at the 1914 session of the Legislature 
a very important change was made in the 
University Act by which the amount of 
succession duties payable to the University 
was limited to $500,000 per annum. The 
result of this amendment has been to 
prevent expansion and embarrass the 
University. And so acute.has the situation 
become that the Government on October 
27, 1920, appointed a Royal Commission 
consisting of H. J. Cody, J. S. Willison, 
J. Alex. Wallace, T. A. Russell, A. P. 
Deroche, and C. R. Somerville to consider 
the whole University question. The Com- 
mission reported on February 10, 1921, 
and recommended that the percentage 
(50 p.c.) of succession duties fixed in the 
Act of 1906 be restored, and that, if this 
be found insufficient, additional taxes be 
levied for University purposes. The Gov- 
ernment has, however, postponed the 
settlement of the question. 

Thus does history repeat itself. The 
University stands again with anxious eyes 
turned to the future. As President Fal- 
coner points out in the article "The Need 
of the Hour" (p. 57, MONTHLY, November 
1921) "the University of Toronto requires 
trie help of its Alumni and Alumnae more, 
perhaps, than ever before in its history." 
A strong Alumni Association is needed, and 
a devoted spirit of affection strong enough 
not only to urge on public bodies that they 
should do their duty, but strong enough 
to put it into the hearts of the Alumni to 
give something tangible themselves to the 
University which they have never helped 
as they ought to have done. 



Graduate Studies Show Promising Development 

ONE HUNDRED AND EIGHTY-EIGHT ENROLLED 
THIS SESSION 



WHEN Johns Hopkins University was 
established in 1876, it created a 
new ideal for universities on this 
continent. From its very initiation its 
avowed attention was to make graduate 
work its chief concern. As a result, other 
leading institutions made steps to realize 
that ideal, and now all the greater univer- 
sities of the United States have well 
organized and well equipped graduate 
faculties. In many cases the teachers 
upon their staffs are able to devote their 
entire time to research and to their gradu- 
ate students who are being trained to 
become independent research workers. 

Owing to lack of sufficient funds, the 
University of Toronto has not as yet follow- 
ed the lead of these American Universities. 
It does not possess a separate graduate 
faculty. What it does possess is a Board 
ofjji'flduate Studies, which was established 
iif 1909yn recognition of the demand for 
aoVftftCea instruction, and to encourage 
and organize graduate study. As Sir 
Robert Falconer pointed out in his state- 
ment to the University Commission last 
year, the Board of Graduate Studies is a 
nucleus from which eventually a success- 
ful graduate faculty may be developed. 

The growth of these graduate courses is 
proof enough of their need and of their 
value. From their inception in 1909 they 
steadily expanded until in 1917-1918 there 
were 73 students; in 1920-1921, 163; and 
in the present session there are already 
188 in attendance although registration is 
not yet complete. Of these the larger 
number are registered for the M.A. degree, 
while there are 44 or about 14 per cent, of 
the total number, studying for the Ph.D. 
degree. It is expected that there will be 
three candidates for the M.D. degree. 

The junior members of the staff are 
quick to realize the importance of advanced 
training and to avail themselves of the 
opportunities offered by the University 
of Toronto to indulge in research work. 
There are this year seventy members of 
the staff registered for graduate work. 

The candidates for the various courses 
are chiefly Canadians. Among the fifteen 



or more universities represented this session 
are Dalhousie and St Francois Zavier in 
NovaScotia; Mount Alison, N.B.; McGill, 
Queen's, Toronto, McMaster, Manitoba, 
Saskatchewan, and British Columbia in 
the remaining Canadian provinces; and 
Columbia, Cambridge, Cork; and St. 
Petersburg, Russia. 

Of the four fellowships granted this 
year, which include the two McKenzie 
and two open fellowships, one went to 
a candidate from British Columbia, one 
from Dalhousie, one from Saskatchewan, 
and one from Toronto. 

The graduate work at the University is 
not merely a continuation of undergraduate 
studies. It consists of highly specialized 
and original work, for which the regular 
four years' course leading to the B.A. 
degree simply provides a general back- 
ground. The three degrees offered by the 
Department of Graduate Studies are M.A., 
Ph.D., and M.D. The training for each 
of these covers one, two, three or more 
years and usually includes a special course 
of study for which the candidate is particu- 
larly fitted, and a thesis containing the 
results of this special study. It may also 
include some minor courses, which bear 
a relation to the major course. In the 
pure Arts courses, especially, critical analy- 
sis is emphasized almost as much as inde- 
pendent research, but in the scientific 
courses the big thing is research. For the 
Ph.D. degree the thesis is particularly im- 
portant as it embodies the result of a wholly 
original investigation on some topic in 
the major course approved by the depart- 
ment in which the candidate is applying 
for the degree. 

The steady growth of advanced work 
in the Provincial University is a promising 
sign. To develop graduate courses in 
Canadian Universities is to offset the 
steady drain of other countries on the best 
brains of the Dominion. It is devoutly 
to be hoped that ere long the University 
of Toronto may be so equipped for graduate 
work that no Canadian will find it necessary 
to go abroad for advanced university work. 



154 



The Gull Lake Survey Camp 

By J. W. MELSON, LECTURER IN SURVEYING 



" pADDLES up Spike," came a voice 

1 from the stern of the Peterboro 

canoe as she came around the bend 

at the head of a swift bit of river, "these 

balsams look to me like the makings of a 

pretty good bed." 

"Righto, your honour. I'm agreeable. 
By this time to-morrow we ought to make 
Varsity Bay if this map and my judgment 
are at all reliable." 

Conversation similar to the above is 
to be heard on about the nineteenth or 
twenty-ninth of August, along the canoe 
route from Bobcaygeon to Haliburton at 
a point about one day's paddle from the 
Gull Lake Surveying Camp. 

In this camp our students in Civil and 
Mining Engineering get their Third Year 
field work in Surveying for six weeks and 
a month respectively. The Haliburton 
division of the Grand Trunk Railway from 
Lindsay north is the recognized route into 



this country but the old canoe route is 
still the choice of some students who 
prefer that means of travel and also wish 
to have their canoes by them during the 
stay in camp. 

Students in Civil Engineering are re- 
quested to report at Gelert on the Railway 
on August 20, whence to travel by 
, stage eight miles to Minden on the Gull 
River and then, in a scow towed by a 
steamboat, five miles down the river and 
around the shore of Gull Lake to the 
University Camp. Students in Mining 
Engineering are expected to do likewise on 
September first; all to remain in camp till 
the Fall term opens in Toronto. 

As recently as 1919 all the Surveying 
Field Work was done i.e., what could be 
done was attempted in the University 
Grounds at Toronto, but as this had always 
seemed but a weak imitation of w^hat 
practical Surveying should be, it was 





SECONDARY TRIANGULATION FROM SAMMY'S PEAK 
155 



156 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



resolved by the staff in Surveying that 
a camp should be located somewhere in 
the country far from the inconveniences 
of the crowded city where the man behind 
the telescope could be given a chance to 
open out and use the instrument as it was 
intended it should be used and not tie 
it down to toy railway lines and imaginary 
power sites. But the trouble was not 
all with the riverless bridge-building, the 
quantity of the work was affected as much 
as the quality. Could a student be 
expected to produce results with eighty 
per cent, of his time-table taken up with 
other studies and his chances for slipping 
down town of an afternoon so easy? And, 
moreover, with co-education in full swing, 
why is a telescope anyway, and is it 
reasonable that a steel tape should always 
lie flat on the side-walk? 

The outcome of all this was a scouring 
of the north country by Professor L. B. 
Stewart and Mr Banting in search of a 
territory where many varieties of survey 
work could best be conducted. An eighty- 
acre lot was purchased on the north shore 
of Gull Lake in Haliburton between the 
points where the Gull River glides in and 
where Rackety Creek lowers its foaming 
waters, a hundred feet in 400 yards, from 
the Bob Lakes. 

As well as the actual University property, 
students have the run of the roads and 
lake shores in the neighbourhood. This 
expanded area gives opportunities for 
long-distance work such as Secondary 
Triangulation, Camera Survey, Differen- 
tial Levelling, Stadia Traverses, Shore 
Line Surveys and Highway Improvement 
Surveys. 

One of the illustrations shows a party 
on a triangulation station known as 
"Sammy's Peak" from which angles are 
measured on other stations with all the 
precision of which a small transit instru- 
ment is capable. Here the camera was 
pointing southward showing the east side 
of the Lake. High, well-wooded, rocky 
shores and deep water are its chief features. 

There is one stretch of beach, however, 
quite close to the University .which is 
admirably suited to Base Line Measure- 
ment. Hairs are split about as finely on 
this linear measurement as they are on the 
anglar measurement of the triangles. 

Hydrographic work is done in the Uni- 
versity Bay such as water lot surveys 



and spot soundings, and up Gull River 
where the amount of flow is measured. 
The illustration shows a party in the act. 
Hanging from a cable they have sounded 
the river from bank to bank and are now 
going over the course again with the cur- 
rent meter measuring the speed of the 
stream as it varies from one side to the 
other. It is proposed to use the basin 
of Rackety Creek as the site of a hydro- 
electric power development scheme next 
year, its condition being ideal for such 
work. 

Within the area of the University Lot, 
such standard surveys as, Stadia Topo- 
graphical, Micrometer, Boundary Line 
Traverse, Mine Surveys, Railway Cross 
Sections, and Spiral Curves, etc., are run. 
The Railways are now full sized and the 
vertical lines in the Mine Survey run down 
the cliffs at the foot of Varsity hill which 
rises 150 feet above the Lake instead of 
down between the steps in the Old Red 
School. These cliffs hang over about 
seven feet. Toward the end of the season 
the astronomic work is done. "Altair" 
and "Alpha Lyrae" make ideal time stars 
and of course Polaris is unfailing for 
Azimuth work. 

To encourage the beginners in Astro- 
nomical work a "Latitude with Sextant" 
observation is taken from the sand close 
to the Lake, using the real horizon of the 
Lake as a reference line and sighting the 
sun. This is the time-honoured nautical 
observation and serves to show students 
that Astronomy may not be so difficult 
after all. 

Serious work is done at Gull Lake from 
nine to five, including drafting of work 
that is done simultaneously in the field. 
Of the four University buildings, the main 
building is the one shown in the illustration 
which contains one large and four small 
rooms, used for lecturing and drafting 
principally, but also used as studies in the 
evenings and as storage for the instru- 
mental equipment. 

But all is not taken seriously at camp 
and the student is not overburdened with 
toil. After 5 o'clock he indulges himself 
in all the varieties of amusement that offer. 
Generally it is a swim and dive first. At 
the diving ladder on the point, all heights 
from two feet to eighteen can be taken 
into fifteen feet of water and within a 
few feet of the shore at that. Eating is 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



157 



not one of the least interesting pastimes 
to which the boys are given. The one 
and only call is invariably followed by a 
stampede. After supper the evening may 
be spent at baseball on the clearing in the 
middle of the lot, for this place is an 
abandoned farm, or in punt-racing, pro- 
viding the season is early and the days long. 
Should the evening be dark, then roll a 
few logs together and tune the cigar-box 
banjo. This said banjo is not such a 
musical horror as might be supposed, 
especially when the full chorus tries to 
drown it out. In fact, on a still evening 
the effect of the bon-fire and the chorus 
is very pleasing. 

When the above pleasures fail to draw 
the man, then he may be certain to find 
just the proper weight of fiction or animal 
story in the Gull Lake Branch of the 
University Library consisting of some 
hundred books. What a homelike place 
is that bunk-house with its eighty beds! 
Here are boys playing cards, there is a 
group known as the "Calculi" grinding 
for a supplemental, and everywhere else 
are the individuals each in his own setting 
of undress comfort. 

The drinking water is taken from a 
spring on the grounds. A pumping station 
supplies the buildings with water. 

Besides the main building, bunk house, 
and dining-room-kitchen, there is the 
staff cottage, containing offices for the fac- 
ulty which consists of Professors Treadgold 



and Crerar, and Messrs Banting and 
Melson. Underneath the staff building is 
the photographic dark room where the 
Camera Survey pictures are finished and 
where students are given every encourage- 
ment in amateur work, being supplied 
with the necessary equipment and having 
at their disposal a film-tank developer. 



"Well Spike Old Horse, we did that 
Lake in about half the time it took us 
coming up." 

"Quite right, Mel. I'm a new woman 
since I came to this place." 

"How do you account for it?" 

"I'll say it's partly the piny breezes, 
partly the thousand feet up, and partly 
the grub. But oh, that steady outdoor 
exercise, and that good fellowship around 
the camp fire!" 

So ends the Gull Lake season and at the 
same time so begins the life-long season 
of friendship. 

The First and Second Year's field work 
in Queen's Park serves effectively to 
prepare a student for genuine surveying in 
the Third Year, and this Third Year work 
gives him confidence to undertake a 
profession that requires a sound knowledge 
of Surveying. Those with special skill 
and tastes may perhaps devote their time 
to the subject, and take the Astronomy 
and Geodesy option in the Fourth Year. 




MAIN BUILDING AND STAFF OFFICES 



MEASUREMENT OF STREAM FLOW 
WITH CURRENT METER 



The Cambridge Appointments Board 

By C. R. FAY 
PROFESSOR OF HISTORY OF ECONOMICS, UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO 



CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY possesses 
V>i a federal constitution. There are 
no College subjects as such or 
University subjects as such. Broadly 
speaking all formal teaching, given in the 
lecture room or the laboratory, is now on a 
University basis. But the University 
itself has very little administrative 
machinery. Each department, subject to 
a very elastic control by the financial 
Board and the General Board of Studies, 
administers its own affairs, the students' 
fees being in the first instance collected 
by the College authorities and paid over 
each term to the department qua depart- 
ment or to individual lecturers in the depart- 
ment. But the College is very much more 
than a hostel and an agency for the collec- 
tion of fees. Over and above its function 
as a centre of social life, it makes itself 
responsible for the individual tuition of the 
undergraduates. This individual tuition 
has two sides to it. First of all, each 
undergraduate has a tutor to whom he 
goes for general advice. Secondly, in most 
cases each undergraduate also has a 
supervisor to whom he goes week by week 
for individual instruction. If the College 
tutor is a classic, he will, in addition to 
being the general tutor of say 100 men, 
give supervision in classics to the classical 
students in the College. If the College 
tutor is a scientist, he will similarly super- 
vise those men who are taking his branch 
of Science. It should be added that in 
some of the older subjects the financing 
and appointment of the lecturers is still in 
the hands of the colleges, but even here 
the lectures are open to all members of 
the University and the lecturers in these 
subjects, by co-operation under the Board 
of Studies to which they severally belong, 
function in very much the same way as the 
staff of a Science Department. 

This preliminary explanation is essential 
to the understanding of the way in which 
the Cambridge University Appointments 
Board has been built up and operates. It 
was formed in 1906 on the slender financial 
foundation of 100 a year granted by the 
University, but this had been supplemented 
by voluntary annual contributions from 



all the Colleges, so that in 1914, the year 
of. the war, its income from all sources was 
about 900. But this sum is an altogether 
inadequate measure of the services which 
the Board has been able to command. 
The truth is that the Secretary o( the 
Board has made the building up of it his 
life work. In his hands the element of 
officialism has been reduced to a minimum. 
He has used to the full the opportunity 
which the Cambridge system of education 
affords of going behind formal qualifications 
and of obtaining individual knowledge 
about each applicant from those who have 
come into individual contact with him. 
Any good college tutor might have done 
this, but it is safe to say that there are 
very few tutors who could also have done 
what the Secretary of the Board has done 
namely, establish individual contact with 
leading members of the business world and 
secure their personal confidence, in the 
same way as he has secured the personal 
confidence of the University and College 
authorities. Naturally these facts cannot 
be stated in any formal account of the 
Board's work, but they are all important 
in practice. 

To come now to a formal account of the 
Board's constitution, method of work and 
of the field covered by it. 

Constitution 

The Appointments Board consists of 
the Vice-Chancellor, five members ap- 
pointed by the Senate, members appointed 
by the several Colleges, and twelve 
co-opted members. The menibers appoint- 
ed by the Senate ensure the control by the 
University of the policy of the Board and 
the representatives of Colleges ensure the 
co-operation of these bodies in the selection 
and recommendation of candidates. The 
co-opted members include on the one hand 
representatives of the several departments 
of University work, and on the other hand 
persons of standing who are conversant 
with the world of business. Unlike 
Toronto, Cambridge is not a business or 
industrial centre. It was therefore found 
necessary to supplement the outside mem- 
bership on the Cambridge Board by the 



158 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



159 



creation of a London Advisory Committee 
composed of London business men. This 
Committee has been in operation since 
1911 and has given constant help and 
advice to the Board. 

Method of Work 

As far as possible every applicant is 
personally interviewed by the Secretary 
of the Board. The University and College 
authorities do not send men to the Secret- 
ary with testimonials written out in ad- 
vance and a request that the Secretary 
may find the man a job. They await a 
request for information from the Secretary 
and then state in confidence their full 
opinion of the man's general capacity and 
of his suitability for a particular type of 
work. 

The Board assumes no obligation to 
recommend any graduate on their Registers 
for any particular appointment, unless it 
is satisfied that he is a qualified and suitable 
candidate. Its recommendations are con- 
fined to Cambridge men, personally known 
to the Board or to College authorities who 
are in relation with the Board. The 
intimate knowledge it possesses of the 
graduates on its Registers gives to its 
recommendations the weight of personal 
authority, without the risk of personal 
bias. 

No fee or commission is charged either 
to employers or employed, on account of 
appointments obtained through the agency 
of the Board. A small and uniform 
registration fee is charged to candidates 
for the privilege of placing and retaining 
their names on the Registers. 

The names of principals, and the in- 
formation supplied by them, are regarded 
by the Board's Executive as strictly con- 
fidential. Candidates are furnished with 
details by the principal himself or by the 
Board's executive at his express request, 
after names have been submitted to him. 

In no circumstance is a graduate per- 
mitted to mention the name of the Board 
as supporting an application, unless he has 
been expressly authorized in writing to 
do so. 

Field Covered 

The field covered may be divided into 
four parts: (1) The Services Navy, Army, 
Diplomatic and Consular, Home, Indian, 
and Cblonial. To the extent that these 
appointments are filled by open competi- 



tion, the Board's work is, of course, con- 
fined to information and advice. (2) The 
Professions- Law, Medicine, Journalism. 
(3) Educational work at home and abroad, 
for which the Board has a special depart- 
ment. (4) Commerce and industry. 

The most distinctive achievement of the 
Board is undoubtedly the success which 
it has had in introducing Cambridge men 
into commerce and industry, thus helping 
to break down the vicious barrier which 
once existed between the University and 
the world of industry. To take one 
example, one of the largest British oil 
corporations has taken into its employ 
on the recommendation of the Board no 
less than one hundred Cambridge graduates 
in the last ten years. 

The war, which reduced the numbers of 
the University from over 3,000 to a few 
hundreds, temporarily arrested the work 
of the Board; and the situation has not 
yet returned to normal. The University 
is now nearly 50 per cent, bigger than in 
the year before the war, but the last 
published figures of the Board relate to 
the year 1920, when the numbers leaving 
the University were abnormally low. 

Appointments obtained on the introduction 
of the Board 

1914 301 

1915 218 

1916 119 

1917 90 

1918 68 

1919 340 

1920 346 

Of the total of 346, 73 were administra- 
tive appointments in commerce and indus- 
try, and 74 manufacturing and technical 
appointments. 

The number of administrative appoint- 
ments is noteworthy. This was the field 
about which the greatest scepticism was 
originally felt. But again and again it 
has been proved that a university graduate, 
provided that he does not spoil his chance 
by personal defects (brusqueness, un- 
willingness to take his share of drudgery, 
or to recognize that he must enter as a 
learner) can make good in industry and 
be a better man in industry because of his 
university training. 

In this connection the employment 
specialist of the British Westinghouse made 
the following statement to a group of 



160 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



students, pupils of the writer, a few months 
ago: "The higher education we look for 
from a university is not a preliminary 
training in business or industrial detail. 
We expect the university to lay a broad 
and sound foundation to provide good 
raw material out of which an efficient 



staff may be shaped by us to develop 
logical thinking and the ability to grasp 
facts and to face a new situation without 
requiring book rules and formulae. Such 
men will be able to hold their own in any 
circumstances. They will have a high 
saturation value." 



A Trip to the Fort Norman Oil Fields 

By W. S. DYER '17 
ASSISTANT IN GEOLOGY, UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO 



INCREASING interest is being taken in 
the McKenzie river basin from year 
to year. Settlement is gradually ex- 
tending northward through it and agri- 
cultural development will be halted only 
by climatic conditions. In the advent 
of an oil boom at Fort Norman and the 
subsequent construction of a railroad much 
excellent farming and ranching land would 
be opened up to pioneers. 

The earliest explorations in the district 
were made by the employees of the Hud- 
son's Bay Company and by the repre- 
sentatives of the Department of the 
Interior and the Geological Survey. Many 
of these men reported the occurrence of oil 
at different localities on the river but it 
remained for the geologists of the Imperial 
Oil Company to do the first development 
work of a serious nature. In the year 
1914, Dr T. O. Bosworth made an explora- 
tory trip down the McKenzie searching 
for suitable places at which to drill and 
in his report recommended Fort Norman. 
In the summer of 1919, Mr T. A. Link was 
placed at the head of a party to dp develop- 
ment work there and the following spring 
after experiencing much difficulty was 
able to get his drill in position. In 
August of the same summer on the right 
bank of the river at a depth of 783 feet a 
gusher was struck, which caused the eyes 
of the whole country to become focussed 
on this out-of-the-way spot and many 
companies were formed for the purpose of 
exploiting the new field. 

In the spring of 1921, a group of men 
gathered in Toronto to make preparations 
for sending a small party to the scene of 
operations, to take part in the venture. 
Owing to my previous experience in the 
north, I was chosen as their leader. 

May 17 saw our little party of three 
gathered at Peace River ready to make 



the long journey of 1,550 miles to the land 
of promise. A motor boat was selected in 
which to make the trip, with the hope of 
being able to reach Fort Norman before 
the steamers, which are often held up until 
late in July by ice in the lakes and rivers. 
As it was necessary to carry practically 
all our gasoline and provisions from the 
starting point two canoes were also taken. 
The weather was perfect, the scenery 
beautiful and the hours and days flew by 
as if on wings. The two portages which 
had to be made, one of four miles at 
Vermilion Chutes, and the other of sixteen 
miles at Fort Smith were passed without 
difficulty, arrangements having previously 
been made with the transportation com- 
panies, and soon we reached Great Slave 
Lake. This lake, which intervenes be- 
tween the mouth of Slave river and the 
headwaters of the McKenzie, often proves 
a stumbling block in the journeys to the 
north since the treacherous storms which 
rise so quickly on its broad expanse not 
only cause delays but often prove danger- 
ous to travellers. We reached it on a calm 
day and after a continuous trip of 38 hour.s 
filled with memorable experiences, gained 
the channel of the McKenzie. We were 
then in a good position to continue our 
way to Fort Norman in the comparatively 
peaceful but swiftly flowing waters of the 
river. 

On the evening of June 16 we reached 
Fort Norman, having made the full trip 
in exactly twenty-eight days. We found 
that we were the third party to have ar- 
rived from any outside point by water, a 
full week elapsing before the first steamer 
reached the Fort. 

The first few days were spent in gleaning 
all the information possible. We learned 
that during the winter almost the whole 
population of the McKenzie district had 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



161 



iiM IM 







FORT NORMAN 
BEAR ROCK IN THE BACKGROUND 

visited Fort Norman and that a large part 
of the available oil lands had already been 
staked. Some excellent patches were still 
to be had however, and we lost no time 
in laying claim to the choicest of these. 

Soon after our arrival other parties 
drifted gradually in, but it was not long 
before we were to learn that the great 
stampede which had been prophesied 
during the spring had its fulfilment in a 
few scattered parties only. These parties 
were well equipped and were ready to take 
advantage of the opportunities open to 
them. The small prospector had been 
held out by the stiffening up of the regu- 
lations which stated that the rental of 
50c. per acre must be paid by the locator of 
the claim at the time of registration. 

The first thing to be done was to study 
the geology of the country as thoroughly 
as possible. The structure and formations 
of the rocks about Fort Norman appear 
very favourable for the accumulation of 
pools of oil.' An immense anticline paral- 
lels the right bank of the river for more 
than a hundred miles with its crest an 
average distance of eight miles inland from 
it. The rocks dip gradually from the 
crest of the anticline to the river and do not 
flatten out until they reach a distance of 
fifteen or twenty miles to the west of it. 
On this side they are covered by very 
thick deposits of a more recent age and 
hence very little of them can be seen. 
The rocks forming the anticline are 
Devonian in age and have been sub- 
divided by Bosworth into several forma- 
tions, the most important of which are the 
Fort Creek Shales, approximately 600 feet 
thick and the Beavertail formation, bitu- 
minous limestones 400-600 feet in thickness. 
It was originally thought that the Fort 
Creek shales formed the source of the oil, 




STEAMER "DISTRIBUTOR" WHICH PLIES BETWEEN 
FORT SMITH AND THE ARCTIC OCEAN 

since it was in these shales that the first 
well made the strike. More credence is 
now given, however, to the theory that 
the very bituminous limestones below form 
the source and the impervious shales above 
merely the cap, and that the Imperial 
Oil Company's drill either encountered 
an isolated patch of oil in the Fort Creek 
formation which are bituminous in places, 
or that fracturing had opened up fissures 
in the Fort Creek through which oil had 
risen from the Beavertail below. Which- 
ever theory may prove correct the fact 
remains that the second well drilled by the 
Fort Norman Oil Company of Toronto had 
not reached the limestone at 1,550 feet. 
It was most unfortunate that drilling by 
the latter company had to be postponed 
until another summer owing to lack of 
casing and the fact that the crew were not 
prepared to stay in the country over 
winter. They were rewarded however by a 
considerable flow of gas and they are con- 
fident that in another summer's drilling they 
will reach the limestones and strike a larger 
flow of oil than has yet been obtained. 

Transportation facilities are very poor 
and the companies which are operating in 
the district have been forced to spend great 
sums of money in getting their outfits to 
such a distant point. Once the presence 
of oil in quantity has been proved however, 
the problem of getting it out to the markets 
should be readily solved.. 

The Imperial Oil Company have four 
drilling rigs in position and a crew of fifty 
men has been left in charge of them over 
winter. They hope to do some drilling 
during the winter months but at any rate 
another summer's work should bring re- 
sults which will be anxiously awaited by 
all those who have the interest of the 
country at heart. 



The Workers' Educational Association 

By W. S. MILNER 
PROFESSOR OF GREEK AND ROMAN HISTORY 



THE Editor of THE MONTHLY in asking 
for this article on the work of the 
Workers' Educational Association 
tells me that what would be most inter- 
esting to the public would be "concrete 
examples of how the work is conducted and 
what its results are". In keeping with 
the times you are to watch the process in 
the cinema and tabulate the results in 
the office. 

Well, the process is this. You are to 
imagine a group of 10 to 30 workingmen 
(with some women), coming in Toronto 
largely from the ranks of unorganized 
labour, with a sprinkling of men from 
offices, and here and there a manager of a 
business-department, working together 
with an instructor at some 'book which 
forms a core to their study and a thread 
for such talks or lectures as the instructor 
may give, for an hour in the evening once a 
week. This is followed by a second hour 
of general argument and discussion, or 
the whole two hours may be spent in 
reading, comment, and general argument, 
as in one class which I myself conducted 
for two years in Aristotle's Politics (Jow- 
ett's translation) and one year with 
Hearnshaw's "Democracy at the Cross- 
Roads" for a text. This year the number 
of applicants for my subject was not large 
enough to justify conducting a class. It 
is a friendly, sometimes eager group of men, 
about a table if possible, with pipes, if 
pipes are necessary for happiness. The 
members of the class are called to write 
essays at intervals, and books are suggested 
for reading. The Association in Toronto 
possesses a small library for the use of the 
students, and library and study groups are 
now accommodated in the Social Service 
Building. It is a lovable company. Friend- 
ships are formed and the instructor re- 
ceives an education and training for his 
own college work of a unique sort. For 
the questions asked are not those of the 
undergraduate, who, in such quantity, 
attends the University to have something 
done to him, and whose questions are so 
rare that they have something of the effect 
of a bomb exploded in the class. They 
are more apt to be the kind of question 



which your little boy puts to you at the 
dinner-table, or the man of business when 
he asks you, "What are the results?" If 
they are the former .they are "posers". 
They drive you back upon the absolute 
fundamentals and compel you to dig up 
again and again the foundations of your 
subject, to found it more solidly and to 
develop a fertility of illustration which is 
quite invaluable. If they are the latter, 
they awaken in you the complicated 
feelings which the editor's bland pre- 
scription awakened in me. But presently 
you realize that this too is part of your 
function. We have to carry the gospel to 
"pushing" newspaper and business men, 
hot "labourites," and the man in the 
street, for they too really believe that 
the world does not consist of things, they 
have only forgotten that it does not and 
it is only folly to answer that there are 
no results. 

"What are the results?" Does he ask 
this question from the point of view of 
University or church managers who care- 
fully scrutinize the additions to the mem- 
bership, the activities of the year, the state 
of the funds? Well, something of this sort 
will be included. Or is it from the point 
of view of the great business organization, 
which is concerned with "the temper of 
labour"? Knowledge will produce both 
rest and unrest. Or is it from the point 
of view of organized labour as a whole? 
It has to be recorded that in Toronto 
organized labour as a whole is not yet 
really interested in the movement, knows 
little about it, or is suspicious of it, or 
believes that it has no bearing on its 
problems. Now this should not dismay 
us, for, if labour took up the movement 
enthusiastically, from the standpoint of 
"results" and "solutions," the actual 
results might well be disastrous. For it 
is of the ver} r essence of this movement, as 
it arose in England, and as we tried to 
transplant it here in Canada, that it is 
spiritual, and that it must grow from its 
inner vitajity and from nothing else. The 
educational field is open for all sorts of 
activities, but in so far as we in our field 
depart from our original ideal and we 



162 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



163 



have made a departure from it in estab- 
lishing this year a class in "public-speak- 
ing" we err, as universities sometimes 
err. For the ideal of the W.E.A. is that 
of the University, and we so stated it in 
organizing the society. The problem which 
the original founders of the movement in 
England set themselves to solve was this: 
-Is it possible for a thoughtful man or 
woman who has not had the opportunity 
for higher education to obtain later in life 
the education which in its essence is the 
same as that obtained in a university? 
The reply made was that, in the fields of 
history, political thought, economics, Eng- 
lish literature, and philosophy, it is possible 
for groups of such men and women organ- 
ized and working under the system of the 
older English universities where the essay 
is the pivot upon which all turns. Twelve 
evenings a year were exacted from the 
English groups. It was only to be anti- 
cipated that in Toronto, where the lecture 
system is still so strong, we should fall 
away somewhat from the less rigid ad- 
herence which we gave to this ideal. But, 



in my judgment, it is essential to this adult 
education. Probably also my fellow-work- 
ers would agree that, as with our under- 
graduates, the reading of a book by our 
students is a more formidable thing than 
it is in Great Britain. We do not read 
books in North America to the same extent 
as they do in the less advanced tracts of 
cultivation. 

But if we put our editor's question to 
our classes we should probably find that 
the students who stay with us feel that 
it is worth while. They find with dis- 
appointment at times that there are no 
"solutions" such as they expected to their 
immediate problems. This is what men 
find in universities. They come to realize 
the enormous complexity of our modern 
world, and that man himself is not less 
complex. Or, if they work in such a class 
as those in English literature, or history, 
they find that their human interests and 
sympathies are greatly enlarged and that 
there are springs of happiness open to all, 
of which they were not aware, in the field 
of the spirit of man. 



Details of the W. E. A. Courses 

By W. J. DUNLOP 
DIRECTOR, UNIVERSITY EXTENSION, UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO 



Having read Professor Milner's manu- 
script on this topic, it occurred to the 
writer that readers of THE MONTHLY 
might be interested in the following details 
regarding these classes. 

In the Workers' Educational Association 
there are in Toronto this year six classes 
with an aggregate enrolment of 89. The 
attendance, largely no doubt on account 
of the general elections, has not been good 
except in the classes studying English 
Literature and Psychology. In these two 
classes women predominate in the former 
there is only one man! The classes in 
British History, International Finance, 
Public Speaking, Economics, and Trade 
Union Law are not large. 

In Hamilton there is a Workers' Edu- 
cational Association, independent entirely 
of the one in Toronto, but supported by 
the Provincial University. Here there 
are four classes, two in Economics, one in 
English Literature, and one in Psychology. 
These classes have each an enrolment of 
from 20 to 30, the attendance is good, and 
the enthusiasm at a high pitch. 



The University of Toronto supports also 
a Workers' Educational Association in 
Ottawa in which there are three classes, one 
in English Literature with an enrolment 
of 130, one in Economics with 39, and one 
in Canadian History with 53. Though 
the enrolment in Ottawa is the largest of 
the three cities and the attendance is the 
best of the three, it is not trades unionists 
who are taking most advantage of the 
instruction. The great majority of the 
students might be described as belonging 
to the general public. Workers they are, 
it is true, but not the kind of workers for 
whose benefit -the Workers' Educational 
Association was formed. 

And this is the crux of the whole problem 
of the W.E.A. in Canada as well as, it 
would seem, in the United States. The 
Workers' Educational Association was 
intended to be "a co-operation between 
labour and learning". "Labour" was 
intended to include printers, pi umbers 
locomotive engineers, brakemen, carmen 
street-railway motormen and conductors' 
carpenters, blacksmiths, brass polishers' 



164 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



mechanics of all kinds, factory workers, 
etc. But these are not the people who, 
so far, have grasped this opportunity for 
higher education of the cultural type. 
Instead, when W.E.A. classes are opened 
they are filled with stenographers, clerks, 
bookkeepers, insurance agents, social ser- 
vice workers, teachers, salespeople, with 
only a relatively small sprinkling of 
mechanics and artisans. And of the latter 
it would appear that the majority are 
British-born ! 

Why should the Canadian manual 
labourer fail to accept what the University 
offers him? It is not the cost. The fee 
is one dollar a year and books, but there 
is no cost at all to the unemployed. Is 



it the high grade of instruction? This 
is made of such a character that not 
previous education, but only mature in- 
telligence, is necessary in order to assimi- 
late it. Is it the prevalent suspicion which 
leads the labourer to feel that there is 
"something behind" every generous offer? 
Is there an idea that a university has 
"capitalistic" sympathies? Such sus- 
picions are, of course, so absurd as to be 
really ludicrous but they may, nevertheless, 
be potent factors in the situation. Is it 
the desire for "practical" rather than 
' ' cultural ' ' education ? Or is it indifference 
and lethargy and the lure of amusements 
that lie at the root of the difficulty? 



T. R. Deacon, Pioneer Manufacturing Engineer 

By GEORGE E. SILVESTER, Sci. '91 * 



It was James J. Hill who termed Civil 
Engineers "the scouts of progress path- 
finders to a new world ; indespensable when 
we step beyond the borders of civilization, 
paving the way for generations daring 
.enough to follow." 

He spoke from the fulness of his ex- 
perience as a builder of a new empire out 
of the wilderness of the North-West States. 
The engineers who inspired such a defini- 
tion must have been men of dominant 
force, dauntless courage and adventurous 
spirit, and withal endowed with vision. 

An outstanding example of the above 
type and definition of engineer is the 
subject of this sketch Thomas Russ 
Deacon, (just "Tom" to his friends). 

Born at Perth, Ontario, he graduated 
in Civil Engineering from the S.P.S. in 
1891. 

Early lumbering experiences having given 
him a knowledge of woodcraft and a love 
of the wild, and municipal engineering 
proving too tame, he took his transit into 
the wilderness more specifically to the 
Lake of the Woods district, where a gold 
boom was in the making. 

With the powerful frame and rugged 
constitution which qualified him for the 
anchor position in the invincible S.P.S. 
Tug-of-War Team, he combined an equally 
powerful and alert mental equipment. To 
the thorough professional grounding of 
"The Old Red School" he brought a cool, 
keen, native judgment. 



In those strenuous Rat Portage days he 
established a record of accomplishment 
which inevitably brought him to the 
attention of large English mining interests 
operating there. He was appointed Mana- 
ger of the Ontario Gold Concessions, and 
then Mining Director and Consulting 
Engineer of the Mikado Gold Mining 
Company. He seems, however, to have 
diagnosed with remarkable accuracy the 
first symptoms of the sleeping sickness 
which later attacked the gold mining, 
industry in the Lake of the Woods district 
and got out while the getting was good. 

Realizing that an era of rapid growth 
and expansion was developing in Western 
Canada, he decided to go into manufactur- 
ing. In conjunction with Mr H. B. Lyall 
he founded the Manitoba Bridge & Iron 
Works. Later he organized the Manitoba 
Rolling Mill Company, and built the only 
rolling mill in Western Canada. Still 
later he formed the Manitoba Steel & Iron 
Company, a wholesale jobbing and mer- 
chant business. He is President of all 
three of these Companies, and their out- 
standing success in a pioneer field is a 
monument to his untiring energy and sound 
business judgment and foresight. 

Tom Deacon early demonstrated his 
belief in the principle so widely advocated 
in engineering societies to-day that en- 
gineers should identify themselves with 
public affairs. He was Alderman and 
acting Mayor of Rat Portage. Later, in 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



165 



Winnipeg, he brought forward and advo- 
cated the great Shoal Lake Water Supply 
project for the city and district. It was 
at first rejected, but he persisted in his 
championship of the scheme, and as an 
endorsation of his policy, he was elected 
Mayor of Winnipeg. He was re-elected 
by acclamation to complete the organiza- 
tion of the Greater Winnipeg Water Dis- 
trict, and to solve the water supply problem. 
This project has been carried to successful 
completion, and the credit of this great 
and beneficial work is due almost entirely 
to Tom Deacon's initiative and courage. 

Other avenues of public service were 
the Royal Commission which drafted the 
Manitoba Workmen's Compensation Act; 
and the Good Roads Board of Manitoba. 
He is also a member of the Council of the 
Winnipeg Board of Trade and of the 
Executive of the Canadian Manufacturers' 
Association, and many other organizations. 

The above meagre outline of some of 
Tom's achievements and activities will 
show how thoroughly he has established 
himself as a dominant figure in the business 
and public life of his community. As 
such, also, he has acquired an international 
reputation as a platform and after-dinner 
speaker on public affairs, an accomplish- 
ment all too rare among engineers. 

Like so many successful men Tom keeps 
young (and he says he feels about as young 
as ever) by taking the good things of life 
as they come along, so he makes time, 
among other things, to play golf, for which 
Winnipeg now provides such exceptional 
facilities. 

His happy family circle, like so many, 
many others, was harshly invaded by the 
war, and husband and wife mourn the loss 




T. R. DEACON '91 

of their eldest sor, Lieut L. J. Deacon, 
Class 1918, S.P.S., who died in hospital in 
France, after twenty-three months' active 
service overseas. 

To sum up Tom is an all-round big 
man and a good fellow; a staunch Cana- 
dian and a sterling citizen of the type 
of modern, technically trained Empire 
builders who, inspired by the vision of a 
greater Canada, are making for her a place 
in the sun. 



ALUMNI NOTES DON'T GROW ON TREES 

BIRTHS 
MARRIAGES 
DEATHS 
NEW ADDRESSES 
NEW BUSINESS ASSOCIATIONS 

are items which one alumnus likes to read about another. 

SEND THEM IN DO IT RIGHT NOW WE NEED THEM 

THE UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY, Toronto, Canada 



Miss Gertrude Lawler, Educationalist 

By EMMY LOU CARTER '12 



ONE of the most outstanding figures in 
the educational life of Canada is a 
citizen of our own city and a gradu- 
ate of our own University, Miss Gertrude 
Lawler. 

Although her birthplace was Boston, 
Mass., her home, from an early age, has 
been in Toronto with her uncle, Rev. 
E. B. Lawler, whose scholarly influence did 
much to mould her character and tastes. 
She had every advantage in books, music 
and travel, but it is to her personal attain- 
ments that her success is due. 

Miss Lawler was the first girl to win a 
Blake General Proficiency Scholarship at 




MISS LAWLER 

matriculation for Jarvis Street Collegiate 
Institute. Then followed a university 
course whose brilliance remains unsurpass- 
ed. She was awarded a General Proficieny 
Scholarship in the Honour Courses of the 
first and second years, a Gold Medal in 
the third year, and in 1890 was the first 
woman to graduate with honours in all 
departments. Later she took her M.A. 
in Mathematics. 

In view of the struggle waged by women 
for equal pay for equal work it is interesting 
to note that Miss Lawler was accorded this 
right without hesitation. When she com- 
menced to teach in Stratford Collegiate 
Institute, after her pedagogical training, 
she was immediately placed at the head of 



the department with a salary hitherto 
given only to a man. A year later, on 
January 7, 1892, Harbord Street Collegiate 
Institute was opened, and shortly after- 
ward Miss Lawler became head of the 
English Department, where she remained 
for twenty-six years. 

To the hundreds of students with whom 
she came in contact, she was not only 
a guide and inspiration but an under- 
standing and sympathetic friend. To all 
comers, she is invariably gracious, courte- 
ous, and hospitable. The rare charm of 
her personality, a delightful sense of 
humour, a very keen discrimination of 
facts, and a broad, tolerant spirit have 
made her companionship valued so highly 
by her friends and appreciated so deeply 
by her pupils. 

Many unique honours have been con- 
ferred upon this distinguished graduate. 
She was the first lecturer, examiner and 
critic in English in the Faculty of Education 
of the University of Toronto. For ten 
years, at intervals, she was Associate 
Examiner of the Department of Education 
of Ontario under Dr Seath's direction. 
She was the first woman to be elected a 
member of the University Senate, and 
now represents University College for the 
fourth term. An evidence of her inde- 
fatigable efforts for the welfare of society 
can be seen in the various activities in 
which she is engaged. She is President 
of the Toronto Catholic Women's League, 
a Vice-president of the Catholic Women's 
League of Canada, a Vice-president of the 
Toronto University Women's Club, Sec- 
retary of the Toronto Mothers' Allowances 
Board, Secretary of the Ontario Committee 
of Education Films, a Life Member of the 
Red Cross, and a member of many other 
organizations. 

If Miss Lawler lias a hobby, it is indeed 
a patriotic -one to keep Canada truly 
British in language, education, and ideals. 
She believes that only by adhering to our 
native tongue as a uniform language, and 
by upholding the British law of justice 
as the universal law, can Canada hold her 
place among the nations of the world. 
To this end she has been a most con- 
scientious teacher and leader, making the 
study of the English language a joy and 
not a labour, a triumph and not a struggle. 



166 



James Ballantyne '80 An Appreciation 

By RICHARD DAVIDSON '99 
PROFESSOR OF OLD TESTAMENT LITERATURE, KNOX COLLEGE 



JAMES BALLANTYNE, the eldest son 
of the late Hon.. Thomas Ballantyne 
was born near Stratford, Ontario, on 
August 22, 1857. He received his edu- 
cation at Dr Tassie's famous school, at 
the University of Toronto, at Leipzig, at 
Knox College, Princeton Theological 
Seminary, and Edinburgh University. He 
was minister of Knox Church, London, 
from 1885 till 1894, and of Knox Church, 
Ottawa, from 1894 till 1896. Since 1896 
he has been Professor of Church History 
in Knox College. In 1886 he married 
Florence, daughter of the late Hon. 
Charles Clarke, of Elora. 

Within these circles Dr Ballantyne lived 
his quiet life. He was a man of rare 
geniality in his home. His students, too, 
will remember his teaching. Exact in- 
formation, precise statement, and the 
will to appraise men's deeds justly. They 
will remember his patience and his courtesy. 

As they went out from the College year 
by year they were pleased that he did not 
forget them. He followed them with 
affection and hope and bound them to 
himself afresh. To the last he was hospit- 
able to younger men's opinions; they found 
that nothing but the stronger reason would 
make him differ with them. So he held 
their good-will and confidence, and so, 
perhaps, they helped to keep him young. 
Few things could bring a man greater 
satisfaction than the loyalty with which 
his old students gathered about him last 
April to celebrate his completion of 
twenty-five years as professor in the 
College. 

Dr Ballantyne's colleagues on the staff 
will know the difference. His intimate 
knowledge of the past of the College and 
of its relation with the University, his 
instinctive understanding of higher edu- 
cation and public affairs in Ontario, and 
his clear discrimination of moral values 
are gone; and the loss is irreparable. 

Churchmen far and near have sought 
his advice. Where difference of opinion 
threatened to paralyze the common pur- 
pose he gave time and strength ungrudg- 
ingly. He joined firmness with fine feeling 
and spoke the truth in love. And his 
judgment in large questions, never lightly 



formed, carried increasing weight. In 
1920 th^ church fathers entrusted to him 
her highest and most delicate responsibili- 
ties: he was elected Moderator of the 
General Assembly at Ottawa. 

In all he has shown undeviating loyalty 
to the Church of Christ and her catholic 
tradition; and, free from sectarian spirit, 
he has magnified the common heritage 
of faith and devotion. 



Correspondence 



2 555> John Philpot burned at Smithfield. 1619, 
Prince Rupert born. 1621, House of Commons 
entered "the Great Protestation" on its records. 
/5"j5, Lyman Abbot born. 1855, Samuel Rogers, 
Banker and Poet, died. 

XII 

18 ~2T 
My dear Mr Editor: 

Imprimis let me offer felicitations upon your 
excellent December issue! 

Then let me enter a caveat or protest. On page 
95, at top of the second column, I read "Campus 
recovers from War Injuries." "It has gone. The 
unsightly fence around the front campus is a thing 
of the past and for the first time in seven years 
the Varsity Lawn looks itself again." On this let 
us all rejoice, but, for old sake's sake and goodness' 
sake let the "American" name go with the fence! 
It was only of late years that the word campus in 
this connexion, was ever heard here and, like the 
American College Yell, it grates harshly on the 
ear. Can not hazing or initiation, and the yell 
and the term campus, all Yankee notions, 
abolished together? The Press can do it, Mr Editor 
and we look to you. When Cicero wrote ' 'sit campus 
in quo exsultare possit oratio" he could never have 
conceived of such an open space being used to 
offend Minerva's ears with a "college yell" or to 
"Shout in Folly's horny tympanum Such things 
as make the wise man dumb." 

Rhodes Scholars may have carried it across the 
seas but the word has been unknown there until 
now in university parlance. Here from the begin- 
ning it was called the Lawn as you have twice 
done in your note, and the enclosed space behind 
the building the Quad. Do we gain anything by 
the change? Do not all three things diminish our 
self-respect and make us a rock of offence ^nd stone 
of stumbling or at least make us appear, very 
childish and silly to the sensible man in the com- 
munity? Unhappily during the War, the Campus 
Martins name had some significance. The exercitus 
was trained and exercised upon it. The ground 
was sacred long ago, as it were a temple, and its 
seemly appearance preserved by regulations, so, 
that a Vice-Chancellor has been known to be 
arrested for hurrying across it; and now it should 



167 



168 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



be preserved by fines from the intrusion of under- 
graduate feet which mar and deface its beauty in 
which, on the other hand, they ought to take a 
pride, for we no longer "judge all Nature by her 
feet of clay." The impress of cloven or uncloven 
hoofs upon the Lawn is well exchanged for their 
owner's names upon the Honours List. I am not 
of those, however, who think the Pyrrhic phalanx 
well exchanged for "the Pyrrhic dance as yet," 
and Mars can never be abandoned safely for 
Terpsichore. Why not have both in j ust proportion? 
The Millennium is yet far off! The return of the 
Lawn you mention as a sign of the return of the 
normal. Most welcome be it! And with the 
normal verdure of the Lawn may our normal 
speech return to the native type of the King's 
English, expressed at times, it may be, in silly 
sooth, but only in terms hallowed by long use in 
English academic phrase. Let the bejants (bees 
jaunes, indocti) learn the twitter, etjuvant meminisse 
periti. 

Yours, etc., 

I. H. CAMERON. 



Book Reviews 

Maria Chapdelaine by Louis Hemon. Translation 
by W. H. Blake '82 (Macmillan). 

Maria Chapdelaine is the work of a highly edu- 
cated young Frenchman, Louis Hemon, who came 
to Canada in 1912 and began a study of the people 
in certain rural portions of Quebec. In 1913 he 
died as the result of a railway accident at Chapleau, 
Ontario. This story of French Canadian life was 
first published in Le Temps of Paris in the early 
part of 1914. In 1916 it appeared in book form 
but has not been translated into English until now. 

The story is of French Canadian pioneers. 
Samuel Chapdelaine is one who prefers the axe 
to the plow. Having cleared his land he turns 
from it to new untouched holdings in the woods. 
His wife Laura and his daughter Maria have not 
quite the same pioneer spirit. They object to 
the frequent movings, preferring to stay where 
there are neighbours and churches and stores. 
Maria loves a trapper and guide who goes far into 
the North never to" return. It is believed that 
he perished in the snow. Later two other suitors 
come, one a neighbour who could offer only a 
continuation of the life of hardship to which she 
had been accustomed, and the other a fine beau who 
has made his home in the United States. The 
voice of Quebec speaks to her and she becomes 
the wife of the habitant. 

In attempting to give in an English version the 
shades of meaning found in the original which 
contains a great deal of colloquial vernacular, Mr 
Blake was confronted by a very difficult task. 
But by allowing himself considerable freedom in 
the handling of the text he has given us a trans- 
lation urkm which it would be very difficult to 
improve. 

Elise Le Beau, a Dramatic Idyll and Lyrics and 
Sonnets by Evelyn Durand. University of Toronto 
Press, 1921. pp. 168. 

It seems but yesterday since the first women 
students entered our University's gates and yet a 
goodly number of them have passed within the 



veil. Among these is Evelyn Durand (1870-1900), 
noted as an undergraduate (1891-1896) for an 
intense, serious spirit, never confined within the 
limits prescribed by formal curricula. We often 
had the pleasure of reading prose and verse pub- 
lished by her in University and other journals, 
and now within a few days a small volume of her 
poetry has issued from the press under the editorial 
care of her sister Laura B. Durand. 

We shall try to give at present only a word or 
two regarding the contents of this volume. The 
longest piece is Elise Le Beau, a dramatic poem 
doubtless intended more for reading than for 
acting. The mysterious poem Xouthos seems to 
breathe out despair over an empty world as well as 
yearning for the good souls who are ruined therein. 
The Judgment of Europe is, in matter, the most 
striking in the collection. It might be considered 
as a prophecy of the Great War. There is a 
touching kind of pathos running through the patri- 
otic feeling of poems such as Toronto, The Fairy 
Lake, Erie can flow to Ontario, etc. The patriotic 
feeling is, by the way, reserved and unobtrusive, 
but very real. dilectum penetrale is of beautiful, 
tender simplicity. Very clever and effective are 
the bits of song scattered through Elise Le Beau, 
such as Dance, dance, despite the reddened leaf, So 
boldly came I to the door, Snug in my little bed, and 
the like. It is with deep regret that one reflects 
on what such a poetical nature might have accom- 
plished if cruel death had not shot his bolt so early. 

It remains to be said that the mechanical exe- 
cution of the volume is of a high order and does 
credit to the University of Toronto Press. 

J. SQUAIR. 



Dates to Remember 



January 17-21 Hart House Play, "Magic", by 
G. K. Chesterton. 

January 3, 4, 5, 9 and 10 Professor William 
Ba eson, F.R.S., Director of the John Innes Horti- 
cultural Institution and past President of the 
British Association for the Advancement of Science, 
will give a course of lectures on the subject "Genetics 
and Heredity" in the North Lecture Room of the 
Medical Building. Professor Bateson is recognized 
as one of the foremost biologists of modern times 
and it is hoped that all those who are in any way 
interested in this subject will find it possible to 
attend the lectures. 

January 6, 13, 20, 27 etc. Sir Bertram Windle 
will deliver a series of lectures in Convocation Hall 
at 4.30 p.m. 

College Sermons will be continued each Sunday 
after Christmas at the regular hour, 11 a.m., in 
Convocation Hall. The list of speakers will be: 

Jan. 8 President Rush Rhees. 

15 Dr George Pidgeon, Bloor Street 

Presbyterian Church. 
22 Rev C. E. Silcox, First Congregational 

Church, Fairfield. 
29 Dr Mott. 

Feb. 5 Dr Chas. Eaton, Plainfield, NJ. 

January 31 First of the Alumni Lecture Series 
will be held in the Physics Building at 8 p.m. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



169 



With the Alumni 

ttbe 
of {Toronto 

Published by the Alumni Federation of the 

University of Toronto 
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE $3.00 PER ANNUM 

including Membership dues. 
Publication Committee: 
D. B. GILLIES, Chairman 
GEORGE H. LOCKE J. V. MCKENZIE 

W. J. DUNLOP F. P. MEGAN 

W. A. CRAICK R. J. MARSHALL 

DR ALEX. MACKENZIE W. C. MCNAUGHT 
W. A. KIRKWOOD 

Editor and Business Manager 

W. N. MACQUEEN 

The late Dr Moses Aikins, '55 

The death of Dr Moses H. Aikins at Burnham- 
thorpe on December 19, removed one of the most 
outstanding figures in Canadian Medicine, and 
one of the senior graduates of the University. He 
was in his ninetieth year. 

Dr. Aikins graduated from Victoria College in 
1855 and then studied Medicine at the Jefferson 
Medical College, Philadelphia, and in England 
where he obtained the degree of M.R.C.S. On 
completion of his studies he returned to his boyhood 
home at Burnhamthorpe and commenced a practice 
which was of large proportions and from which he 
retired only a few years ago. 

Dr Aikins was for many years identified with the 
teaching of Medicine in Toronto. He was a 
professor of Anatomy in the Toronto School of 
Medicine and associate professor in the University 
of Toronto. 

Sir James Aikins, Lieutenant Governor of Mani- 
toba, and Dr H. W. Aikins, Registrar of the College 
of Physicians and Surgeons are nephews of the 
late Dr Aikins. 



TJ.C. Women to Hear Mrs Pankhurst 

A stimulating address by Sir George E. Foster, 
an informal talk en the possibilities of the Canadian 
drama by Bertram Forsyth, and an evening with 
J. W. Beatty at "The Grange," have made the 
Fall meetings of the University College Alumnae 
Association specially attractive. With such a 
noted speaker as Mrs Pankhurst to address the 
first meeting in the New Year, the programme for 
the Spring months promises to be equally interest- 
ing. The members of the Association will have 
the privilege of hearing Mrs Pankhurst on Thursday 
evening, January 19, in Argyll House. 



The University College Alumni Association 

The hearty and enthusiastic response of the 
University College graduates to the suggestion for 
the formation of this Association, plainly shows 
the great amount of latent interest in University 
College which awaited this opportunity to express 
itself. 



The officers of the Association have prepared a 
memorandum of suggestions for the consideration 
of the Executive of the Association at a meeting 
to be held in a few days. A great many have been 
mentioned to the officers as being worthy of con- 
sideration and the difficulty at first will be to choose 
subjects of most pressing character. A circular 
letter was sent out to all men graduates of the 
College during the second week of December and 
the replies to date have been very encouraging. 
It is hoped that there will be at least one thousand 
paid members by the end of the present month. 

The usefulness of this and kindred associations 
has become manifest, and the strength of any 
representations we may make regarding the College 
and its future development will depend largely 
upon the strength of our organization. 

Matters very vitally affecting University College 
are to be taken up and, therefore, suggestions from 
members of this Association to the officers will be 
gladly received. 

Each graduate should see that he is at once on our 
member-roll and his correct address and occupation 
given. All should do^their utmost to urge their 
classmates to take part in the movement if they 
have not already joined in. 

H. F. GOODERHAM. 



Buffalo Branch Meets 

The Buffalo Branch held a very successful meeting 
on December 1, the chief speaker being E. W. Mc- 
Intyre, '90. Mr Mclntyre is President of the 
recently formed Canadian Club of Buffalo. It was 
decided to offer a trophy for athletic competition 
between the High Schools of Ontario and Buffalo. 



Death: 



COLLVER At Otterville, on December 2, 1921, 
Addison Jeff Collver, M.D. (Vic) '62. 

ROBINSON On December 12, at his residence, 
119 Collier Street, George Hunter Robinson, 
B.A. (U.C.) '69, M.A. 71, in the seventy-eighth 
year of his age. 

SUTHERLAND Following a general breakdown 
which occurred during the summer, Robert 
Gordon Sutherland, B.A. (T) 75, M.A. 79. He 
was the late rector of St. Mark's Church, canon 
of Christ Church Cathedral, Diocese of Niagara, 
and one of the foremost clergymen of the Anglican 
Church in Canada. 

TILLEY Suddenly, on December 10, of heart 
trouble, William E. Tilley, B.A. (Vic) 75, M.A. 
78, Ph.D., for 35 years Public School Inspector 
for Durham and Northumberland. 

BALLANTYNE At Toronto, on December 21, 
the Reverend Professor James Ballantyne, B.A. 
(U.C.) '80, of Knox College. . 

BURT In Honolulu, on December ^, 1921, 
Franklin Burt, M.B. 79, M.D. '89, in his sixty- 
eighth year. 

TALLING On December 13, at his residence, 91 
Lonsdale Road, Toronto, Rev Marshall P. 
Tailing, B.A. (U.C.) '88, Ph.D. 

BARBER At Simcoe Hall, Allandale, on December 

13, 1921, William Charles Barber, M.B. '88, 
M.D. (Vic) '88. 



170 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



BELL After a week's illness, following a serious 
operation, Edwin Bell, LL.B. '89, Secretary of 
the Law Society of Upper Canada and one of the 
most prominent barristers of Toronto. 

McNAUGHTON In April, as a result of broncho- 
pneumonia, John Duncan McNaughton, M.D. 
(Vic.) '90, of New Liskeard. 

HERSHEY Suddenly, of heart failure, while 
driving his car, John A. Hershey, M.B. '92, of 
Owen Sound, one of the best known medical 
practitioners in the district. 

BELL-^-After an illness of three months' duration, 
Walter Nehemiah Bell, B.A. (U.C.) '94, D.Paed. 
'18, of Paris, a prominent Ontario educationalist. 

FRALEIGH After a lingering illness, at his late 
residence, 149 Broadview Ave., Toronto, Albert 
John Fraleigh, B.A. '00 (Vic.) M.D., C.M. '04 
(T.), in his forty-eighth year. 

McEWEN On December 1, 1921, Frederick 
Frazer McEwen, M.B. '05, of Aylmer. 

ELLIS On November 19, 1921, Stayner Ellis, 
M.B. '10, in Harper Hospital, Detroit, Mich. 

MARTIN At the Toronto General Hospital, on 
November 28, Edward A. H. Martin, B.A. (T.) 
'13, from appendicitis. He had served in France 
with the Canadian Machine Gun Corps and also 
with the Headquarters staff, and was one of the 
well-known members of the legal profession in 
Toronto. 

ROBINSON At the residence of his sister, 76 
De Lisle Ave., Milton Roy Mitchell, B.A. (Vic.) 
'21, barrister-at-law with the firm of Gullen & 
Robinson. Death was due to a heart attack, the 
result of "war heart" caused by trench fever. 



Notes by Classes 

'72 M. We have received word that Joseph 
Munson is now living at 209^ Alamo Plaza, San 
Antonio, Texas. 

'75 U.C. Sir James Aikins, President of the 
Canadian Bar Association was recently made the 
recipient of a beautiful loving cup by the Bar of 
Quebec. It was accompanied by a letter from the 
Chief Justice bearing the felicitations of the Quebec 
Bar. 

'80 U.C., '87 M. Col. George Acheson, formerly 
of Hamilton, Ont., has gone to practise medicine 
in Kingston, King's County, N.B. 

'84 U.C. Thomas Cooper Boville sailed from 
Halifax on December 2, to spend the winter in 
Jamaica. His present address is c/o W. H. Silver, 
Bank of Nova Scotia, Kingston, Jamaica. His 
summer address is Chester, Nova Scotia. 

'87 U.C. Harry Bonis is at present the Classical 
Master at the Collegiate Institute, St. Mary's. 

'87 T. Arthur Henry O'Brien is living at 383 
Sherbourne Street, Toronto. 

'88 U.C. John Ormsby Miller, formerly princi- 
pal of Ridley College, who has just recently com- 
pleted a tour around the world, was the principal 
figure at the reunion dinner of the Ridley College 
old boys, where he was the recipient of an illumin- 
ated address. 

'89 U.C. Mrs Alfred Watt, M.B.E. (Madge R. 
Robertson), of Vancouver, organizer of Women's 
Institutes in the British Isles, gave an address on 
"Canada" under the auspices of the Women's 
Patriotic League, in London, England. 



'90 U.C. Mrs F. H. Sykes (Louise L. Ryckman) 
is now living at "The Hampden", 8 Plymouth St., 
Cambridge, Mass. 

'91 U.C. Mrs W. C. Hall (Mary Delia Watter- 
worth) is now living at 429 Brunswick Avenue, 
Toronto. 

'91 U.C. Archibald Ellis Morrow is now teaching 
in the secondary schools at Vancouver, B.C. 

'92 U.C. Word has been received that E. E. 
Ingall is now Headmaster of the Normal School at 
Peterborough. 

'92 U.C. Wm. Henry Bunting is living in Port 
Hope and is associated with the Port Hope Printing 
Co. 

'92 U.C., '98 M. Dr Ralph Ebenezer Hooper 
and his family sailed for Barbados in November, 
where he will engage in evangelistic mission work 
during the winter. His address is Box 49, Bridge- 
town, Barbados, B.W.I. 

'93 T. Rev James Senior has published a book 
entitled "Patrick Bronte." 

'93 U.C. Rev E. A. Henry has moved to 240 
Heath Street W., Toronto. 

'96 U.C. Wm. Andrew McKim is living at 416 
Scarboro Avenue, Calgary, where he is teaching in 
the Central High School. 

96 S. The present address of Gordon McKay 
Campbell is c/o Thomson-Houston Co., Rugby, 
England. 

'96 T. Maurice Day Baldwin is the professor 
of Mathematics at the Technical High School, 
Montreal. 

'97 U.C. John J. Carrick is at present connected 
with the firm of G. A. Stimson & Co., Bond Brokers, 
Toronto. 

'98 S. Finlay Donald McNaughton is living at 
Brooks, Alberta. 

'99 U.C. Walter Herbert Williams is on the 
staff of the Toronto Daily Globe and is living at 
264 North Lisgar Street. 

'99 U.C. T. D. Allingham who has been until 
recently Science Master at Trenton High School 
and Head Master at Vienna High School, Elgin Co., 
is now the English and History Master at the 
Hamilton Collegiate Institute. His home address 
is 69 East Avenue, South, Hamilton. 

'00 S. Reginald Erskine McArthur, formerly 
of Lethbridge, Alberta, is at present living at 
Whitby. 

'00 S. Lennox Thompson Bray, who has been 
living in Edmonton, is now living in Amherstburg, 
Ont. 

'00 U.C. At Woodbridge, on December 4, a 
son was born to Rev and Mrs Robert B. Patterson. 

'00 M. Edgar Nesbit Coutts, for fifteen years a 
leading physician of Scarboro', is leaving his former 
home in Agincourt to take up his new duties as the 
Superintendent of the Freeport Sanatorium at 
Preston. 

'01 P., '10 S. On November 30, at Victoria, 
B.C., the wedding was celebrated of James Arthur 
McKenzie Williams, of Toronto, and Ethel Victoria 
McKenzie. They will live at 39- Heath Street East, 
Toronto. 

'02 U.C. Rev A. E. Armstrong, Assistant 
Secretary of the Presbyterian Foreign Mission 
Board has arrived in Ceylon and has started on his 
tour of the mission stations of India. 

'03 U.C. At the Toronto General Hospital, on 
November 26, a son was born to Dr and Mrs 
Robert E. Gaby. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



171 



'03 U.C. Arthur W. Morris, who has been on 
the staff of the Hamilton Collegiate Institute for 
fifteen years, and for a large part of that time head 
of the department of classics has been appointed 
to the position of Public School Inspector of Hamil- 
ton. 

'04, T. Miss Theodora Hewson is on the staff 
of the Merchant's Bank, West Toronto, and is 
living at 18a Howard Street. 

'05 U.C. Wilbert Richard Williams has formed 
a connection with Clerk and Mill's Law office, 
36th St. and 7.th Ave., New York. 

'05 S. Dominic Edward O'Brien is at present 
engaged in work on the Welland Canal and is living 
in St. Catharines. 

06 S. Elliot G. Strathy, secretary of the Buffalo 
Alumni Branch has been elected Treasurer of the 
newly organized Canadian Club of Buffalo. 

'06 U.C. Joseph Wilson Firth, Science Master 
in the London Collegiate Institute, is coming to 
Toronto as Science Master at Toronto Normal 
School. 

'07 S. At the Oshawa Hospital , on November 28, 
a daughter was born to Mr and Mrs J. L. G. Stuart. 

'07 S. Norman Roy Robertson, of Hamilton, 
has been appointed an examiner at the Ontario Law 
School. 

'07 U.C. On November 19, at 152 Springhurst 
Avenue, Toronto, a son, John Palmer, was born to 
Mr and Mrs John C. M. MacBeth. 

'08 M. On November 20, a son was born to. 
Dr and Mrs Alex. Dunbar McKelvey, Toronto. 

'09 U.C. The latest address of Mrs J. Newton 
(Eleanor May Watson) is 117 Blanche Street, 
Sarnia. 

'09 S. On October 19, 1920 a son, Alexander 
Neil, was born to A. B. Manson and Mrs Manson 
at 107 Caledonia St., Stratford. 

'09 Vic. Cora E. Hewitt is teaching at the 
Collegiate Institute, at Windsor. 

'09 S. On December 15, a son was born to 
Major and Mrs Frederick H. Moody, Toronto. 

'09 U.C. The present address of Mrs Edgar A. 
Cross (Isabel Grant Gunn) is 343 Lincoln Ave., 
Williamsport, Pa. 

'10 M. Word has recently been received that 
Frank E. Pettman has left Adelphi, B.C. and is now 
practising at Barons, Alberta. 

'10 U.C., '15 M., '13 U.C. On Tuesday, 
December 6, a son was born to Dr and Mrs Paul 
M. O'Sullivan (Alma MacLaren) 313 Brunswick 
Ave., Toronto. 

'10 M. The wedding took place on November 
26 of Donald G. S. McKay and Lillian Hewitt of 
Toronto. Dr and Mrs Hewitt will live on Dufferin 
Road. 

'10 U.C. Ambrose Robert Barton is now living 
at 15 Courtleigh Road, Toronto, and is teaching 
at Oakwood Collegiate Institute. 

'10 T. At Hamilton on November 21, a son was 
born to Mr and Mrs James David Beasley. 

'10 Vic. Word has been received that Henry 
Freeborn Johnston is attached to the Department 
of Terrestrial Magnetism, 36th and Broad Branch 
Road, Washington, D.C. 

'11 D. The well-known Toronto sportsman, 
"Jerry" Laflamme has gone to Sudbury, where he 
has entered into partnership with E. A. Hill. He 
has been invited to coach the Sudbury hockey team. 

'11 Ag., '16 T. The wedding took place recently 



of Paul Allen Fisher and Eveline Jane Newham, of 
Arnprior. 

'11 U.C. The present address of Eric Pepler is 
1426-14th Avenue, West, Vancouver. 

'11 Ag., '16 T. On December 14, at Ottawa, 
the marriage took place of Paul Allen Fisher and 
Eveline Jane Newham. 

'11 U.C. The present address of John Alexander 
Donovan is 84 Hilton Avenue, Toronto. 

'11 S. Wm. Gordon McGhie is Secretary- 
Treasurer of the Guaranty Dyeing and Finishing 
Co., St. Catharine's. His address is 151 Ontario 
Street. 

'11 U.C. The wedding is announced of Hubert 
V. D. Russell, of Toledo, Ohio, and Florence-Jean 
Adams, of Essex. 

'11 S. Chas. Edward Palmer is now connected 
with the Bell Telephone Company, in Montreal. 

'11 U.C. Milton Arthur Sorsoleil, Principal of 
the Toronto Model School, has been transferred 
to the staff of the technical education branch. 

'12 U.C., '15 M. On December 18 at the 
Wellesley Hospital, a son was born to Dr and Mrs 
Andrew Rutherford Riddell, Toronto. 

'12 S. On December 15, a daughter was born 
Mr and Mrs James Clarke Acton, 298 Rushton 
Road, Toronto. 

'12 U.C. The marriage took place in December 
of Vancouver Camden Gordon and Dorothy Parker 
of Toronto. 

'12 U.C. At Toronto on November 28, a son, 
Barent Powell, was born to Mr and Mrs Harry V. 
Laughton (Mary Elizabeth Buckley). 

'12 U.C. At the Toronto General Hospital, on 
November 28, a daughter was born to Mr and Mrs 
H. J. Melville (Alice Madison.) 

'13 M., '16 M. Mr and Mrs Frank Muir Walker 
(Agnes Merle Young) are now living at Alliston. 
Their address is Box 417, Alliston, Ont. 

'13 Vic. At Wellesley Hospital, on November 
18, a son was born to Mr and Mrs Harold C. 
Jeffries, 68 Oakmount Road, Toronto. 

'13 M. On December 4, a daughter was born 
to Dr and Mrs Percival Elmore Faed, Toronto. 

'13 U.C. At the Private Patient's Pavilion, 
Toronto, a daughter was born to Rev and Mrs 
W. R. Ramsay Armitage (Mary Swanwick Ponton) 
on November 26. 

'13 S. Frederick Forster Foote is living at Port 
Dalhousie. He is with the Independent Rubber 
Co., Merritton, as assistant to the manager. 

'13 S. At Welland on November 30 a daughter 
was born to Mr and Mrs Emmet Leroy Deitch, 
20 Parkway Heights. 

13 D. At the Victoria Memorial Hospital, on 
November 21, a daughter was born to Dr and Mrs 
G. Victor Morton, 57 Sibbard Ave., Toronto. 

'13 U.C. Norman Charlton Qua is attached as 
Instructor in Science on the teaching staff of the 
Vermilion School of Agriculture, Vermilion, Alberta. 

'13 U.C. On Friday, December 2, at Barrie, a 
son was born to Mr and Mrs Ernest Albert Harris 
(Rowena Gardiner). 

'13 S. On December 16, at 11 Alhambra Avenue, 
Toronto, a son was born to Mr and Mrs Alfred 
John Wright. 

'14 S. The present address of John Austin 
Elliott is-332-6th Avenue West, Calgary, Alta. 

'14 U.C. Late in December the wedding was 
celebrated of Charles Ault Procunier, and Eva 
Marie Baker, of Chatham. 



172 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



'14 U.C. At Todmorden, on November 14, a 
son was born to Mr and Mrs J. Pulford Henderson, 
Ottawa, formerly of 232 Scarboro Road, Toronto. 

'14 D. The marriage took place in December of 
John Fulton Sebben and Vera Helen Whyte, of 
Stratford. 

'14 S. Edward Vaughan Chambers is with the 
firm of El wood, Fleming and Co., Royal Bank 
Building, Toronto. His home address is 194 
Ingle wood Drive. 

'15 T. The marriage took place on December 
22, of David A. Keys and May Freeze. They will 
live in Cambridge, England, where Dr Keys is on 
the staff of Cambridge University and is also engaged 
in research work. 

'15 S. On December 8, a son, William Starr, 
was born to Mr and Mrs- Gilbert C. Storey, 64 
Evelyn Avenue, Toronto. 

'15 S. Arthur Stuart Robertson is the sales 
manager for the Canadian Austin Machinery Co., 
Ltd., manufacturers of concrete and earth-handling 
machinery. His residence is at 46 Vansittart 
Avenue, Woodstock. 

'15 U.C. The wedding was announced late in 
December of David McLaren and Nellie Myrtle 
Flumerfelt, of Toronto. 

'15 T. At Gore Bay, on December 1, a son, 
John Henry McGregor, was born to Rev and Mrs 
H. F. Cocks (Helen Mary McGregor). 

'15 S. Arthur Carson Evans is now connected 
with the Canadian Fire Underwriters Association. 
His address is 161 Lee Avenue, Toronto. 

'15 S. The marriage took place recently of 
Alexander K. Purdy, of Toronto and Isabelle 
Saunders, of Hornby. 

'15 U.C. The birth was announced recently of 
a daughter to Mr and Mrs Arthur Dickson Lewis, 
49 Kingsmount Park Road, Toronto. 

'15 U.C., '16 Vic. The present address of 
Arthur Justin Cowan and Mrs Cowan (Helen 
Javiera Kerby) is 2965-37th Avenue West, Van- 
couver, B.C. 

'15 M. In Rochester, Minn., on November 26, 
a son was born to Dr. and Mrs James Wells Ross. 

'15 S. The wedding took place recently of 
Gordon Mitchell, and Isabel Elsie Isaac, of Toronto. 
Mr and Mrs Mitchell will live at 39 Benson Street, 
Niagara Falls, Ont. 

'16 S. Geoffrey Francis King is living at 431 
Victoria Avenue, Windsor. He is working with 
the Detroit Edison Company, Detroit, Mich. 

'16 M. On December 8, a son was born to Dr 
and Mrs Noble \Black, Howard Park Avenue, 
Toronto. 



'16 S. The marriage took place early in the 
new year of Warren Leslie Dobbin, of Toronto, and 
Tena Pitt, of Hamilton. 

'16 Vic. On November 23 a daughter was born 
to Mr and Mrs Wm. Webster McLaughlin (Erma 
McCulloch), 61 Walmer Road, Toronto. 

'16 M. Frederick t Fitzgerald Tisdall has re- 
turned from Baltimore', and is now living in Toronto 
at 4 Glenholme Avenue. 

'16 M. At Minden, on November 28, a son was 
born to Dr and Mrs Chas. Elias Frain. 

'16 S. Douglas Bankier Gardner is assistant 
manager of maintenance at the Toronto General 
Hospital. 

'16 T. The marriage took place in the latter 
part of December, of Rev Joseph Rogers, of Guelph, 
and Helen Eugenie Redhead, of Niagara-on-the- 
Lake. 

'16 Vic. Word has been received of the return 
of Miss Kathleen Tucker to Ludhiana, India, after 
a holiday spent in Great Britain and France. 

'16 S. A son was born to Mr and Mrs Wm. 
Ashton .Dean, 44 Lonsdale Road, on November 29. 

Victoria College 1916 

H. Atkinson, Male and Atkinson, Barristers, 
Toronto. 

A. H. Bell, 1009 East 60th St., Chicago, taking a 
course in Geology at the University of Chicago ; Dr 
F. J. Bell, Haliburton; R. C. Bennett, Lambier and 
Bennett, Barristers, Hamilton; Miss E. L. Bishop, 
teaching in the High School, Parkhill; Dr W. E. 
Blatz, Chicago University, Ph.D. work; W. G. 
Bowles, with the Massey-Harris Co., Ltd, Toronto; 
V. R. Butts, Chung-King, West China, accountant 
with the American Chinese Drug Co. 

Miss C. E. Cawsey, teaching in the High School, 
Dundas; Rev E. F. Church, Winnipeg, Man.; Rev 
W. P. Clark, Hepworth; Miss M. E. Clarke, now 
Mrs Stuart Laird, Essex; Miss L. C. Colbeck, 142 
St. John's Rd., Toronto, teaching Domestic Science, 
Annette St. School; K. J. Crocker, 123 Quebec Ave., 
Toronto, with Urquhart and Urquhart, Barristers; 
Miss M. Crowe, teaching in the Grimsby High 
School; Rev W. L. Cullis, Sprucedale. 

P. Daniels, teaching in the Hamilton Collegiate; 
L. W. Dippell, Walkerton, teaching; Dr J. F. 
Docherty, Dept. of Public Health, Albuquesque, 
New Mexico; G. W. Doolittle, 22 Glebeholme Ave., 
Toronto, with the Burroughes Adding Machine Co., 
Ltd. 

Miss A. Fenwick, St. John's, Newfoundland; Miss 
E. B. Finch, Wingham, teaching modern languages 
in the High School; Miss S. T. Fleming, St. Clair and 



Every Graduate Should be a Subscriber 

TO 

Gbe Canadian Ibistorical IReview 

Tflnlversftg of Toronto 

I enclose sum of $2.00 for one year's subscription to begin with December issue. 
NAME 



ADDRESS 

PUBLISHED BY THE UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



173 



Bathurst Sts., Toronto ; L. H. Floyd, 8 Webster Ave., 
Toronto, journalist. 

Miss A. Gairdner, 338 Wellesley St., Toronto, 
with McLeod, Young and Weir, Investment 
Bankers; Miss E. R. Going, teaching in the Calgary 
Collegiate; Rev S. H. Greenslade, Little Current; 
A. A. Greer, Moose Jaw, Sask; Miss L. M. Guest, 
now Mrs Hugill, Winnipeg, Man. 

Dr C. W. Harris, Grace Hospital, Toronto; Miss 

A. E. Hastie, teaching in Edmonton; Rev H. F. 
Hazlewood, 16 Burlington Cr., Toronto; Miss E. I. 
Henderson, 13 Rathnally Ave., Toronto, teaching 
Household Science, Earl Grey School; F. C. Hender- 
son, 19 Roxborough St. W., Toronto; Miss E. A. 
Henry, teaching in the Barrie Collegiate; L. J. 
Henry, 600 West 122nd St., New York, attending 
the Union Theological Seminary; H. P. Herington, 
38 Nina Ave., Toronto, with the Wm. Davies Co., 
Ltd.; Miss C. E. Hockey, now Mrs J. E. Corcoran, 
170 Glenmount Rd'., Toronto; Miss H. J. Hubbell, 
teaching Household Science, Saskatoon Collegiate; 
W. A. Hunnisett, 118 Crawford St., Toronto, with 
the Fred Victor Mission. 

W. C. James, 144 St. George St., Toronto, with 
McAndrew, James and Evans, Barristers. 

Miss H. J. Kerby, now Mrs A. J. Cowan, 2965 
37th Ave. W., Vancouver, B.C.; T. M. Kerruish, 
142 Bloor St. W., Toronto, with the Canadian 
Manufacturers' Assoc. 

H. E. Magee, Kazabazua, Que., teaching; Rev 
Fred Manning, Simcoe, County Secretary, 
Y.M.C.A.; Miss H. L. Martin, Waterloo; Rev S. 
Martin, Elmvale; Miss E. McCullough, now Mrs 
W. W. McLaughlin, 61 Walmer Rd., Toronto; Miss 

B. C. McDonald, 1327 Second Ave., W.,Pr. Albert, 
Sask.; W. M. McDonald, 100 Lippincott St., 
Toronto, Industrial Chemist with Hygiene Products 
Co.; Miss M. M. Mclntosh, 642 Wellington St. E., 
Sault Ste Marie, teaching in the High School; Miss 
E. M. McLaughlin, 58 Roxborough St. W., Toronto, 
Membership Secretary, Toronto Y.W.C.A.; W. W. 
McLaughlin, 61 Walmer Rd., Toronto, Barrister 
with McLaughlin, Johnston and Co. ; E. C. McLean, 
lecturer, O.A.C., Guelph; G. A. McMullen, 23 
Norwood Ave., Toronto; T. C. McMullen, 7 Borden 
St., Toronto, doing research work in Organic 
Chemistry; E. R. C. Meredith, 407 Agnes St., New 
Westminster, B.C.; Rev J. E. Mitchell, Teeterville; 
Miss H. J. G. Moffat, Peterborough, teaching in the 
Collegiate Inst.; R. C. Moffatt, lecturer, O.A.C., 
Guelph; E. H. Moss, lecturer in Botany, University 
of Alberta, Edmonton; Miss B. K. E. Mossop, 644 
Lome Ave., London; Miss L. R. Moyer, 48 Yale St., 
St. Catharines, teaching in the Collegiate Inst.; 
W. M. Musgrove, Niagara Falls, Barrister with 
Upper and Musgrove. 

J. P. S. Nethercott, 18 Biggar Ave., Toronto, 
teaching in Oakwood Collegiate Inst. 

Miss A. M. Oaks, teaching modern languages in 
the Sarnia Collegiate Inst. 

G. P. Pook, 861 Fleet Ave., Winnipeg, Man., 
teaching in the High School; Rev D. H. Porter, 
Copper Cliff; Dr D. S. Puffer, High Park Ave., 
Toronto. 

Miss C. L. Quance, Hagersville. 

B. J. Roberts, secretary to the Minister of Fin- 
ance, Ottawa; G. M. Rossi, Rome, Italy. 

M. L. Schultz, teaching in the Cobourg Collegiate 
Inst.; R. L. Seaman, Port Arthur, practising Law; 
Miss N. W. Spencer, now Mrs Fred McGregor, 
1628 Stevens St., Vancouver, B.C.; Miss L. M. 
Stapleford, 71 Bernard Ave., Toronto, College of 



1922 



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LONDON 



CANADA 



Policies "Good as Gold" 



174 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



Education; Miss A. F. Still, now Mrs Esch, Toronto; 
Miss B. Sutherland, Melbourne; K. V. Stratton, 
257 Symington Ave., Toronto, with Belfry and 
Stratton, Barristers. 

Miss E. M. Tuck, teaching in the Kitchener 
Collegiate Inst.; L. C. Teskey, 201 Lauder Ave., 
Toronto, with F. P. Higgins and Co., Chartered 
Accountants. 

Miss K. E. Tucker, medical missionary Women's 
Christian Medical College, Ludhiannia, Punjab, 
India. Miss Tucker will be very glad to hear from 
any member of our class. 

E. J. Walkom, teaching in North Toronto Col- 
legiate; W. F. Ward, practising Law in Bowman- 
ville; C. L. White, with the Sun Life Assurance Co., 
Toronto; Dr D. B. Witson, Health Officer, Santa Fe, 
New Mexico; N. R. Wright, with the Mutual Life 
Assurance Co., Hamilton; A. R. Willmott, Cobourg, 
practising Law. 

W. Zimmerman, 216 Rose Park Dr., Toronto, 
barrister with Wherry, Zimmerman and Osborne. 

The Secretary of pur Class will be very glad to 
receive any corrections to the above list. L. C. 
Teskey, Secretary, 201 Lauder Ave., Toronto. 

Class of 1916 U.C. 

Herschel Alt, 595 Bathurst St., Toronto; Phyllis 
A. Anderson, 55 Castle Frank Rd., Toronto; Gladys 
Angus, 67 Oakmount Rd., Toronto; H. B. Arm- 
strong, with the Civil Service of Ontario, 318 
Brunswick Ave., Toronto; Marjory Austin, teaching 
at Oakwood Collegiate Institute, 101 Oakwood Ave., 
Toronto. 

Miss G. S. F. Baillie, teaching in Gait, 241 Blythe- 
wood Rd., Toronto; Marie Bateman, dietitian for 
Canadian Business Women's Club, 361 Danforth 
Ave., Toronto; L. C. Ross Batten, lawyer, 407 29th 
St. W., Saskatoon, Sask.; Kenneth C. Bell, in 
financial work, 57 Broadway, New York; A. W. 
Bentley, 197 Wellington St., Sarnia; Olive Blackball 
(Mrs Albert Hagerman), c/o 105 Dewson St., 
Toronto; E. L. Biggar, purchasing agent for the 
United Farmers Association, Mohawk P.O., Brant 
County; Margaret C. Blagdon, c/o Royal Bank of 
Canada, Sturgeon Falls; Georgina M. Bowers (Mrs 
Wm. Kee), Cooksville; Saidee N. Boyd, analyst at 
the T. Eaton Co., 19 Wells St., Toronto; Mary 
Boyle (Mrs E. A. Gillies), 655 Broadview Ave., 
Toronto; H. A. Braendle, Waterloo; Norma P. 
Brandon, 2347 Queen St. E., Toronto; W. E. 
Brown, 745 Wellington Cresc., Winnipeg, Man.; 
Florence S. Buchner, married and living in the 
States; M. Jean Bull, teaching in the Collegiate, 
136 Prospect Ave., Port Arthur. 

Lovedy J. Campeau, lawyer, c/o Bartlett, 
Bartlett, and Urquhart, Windsor; Helen Carlyle 
417 Sherbourne St., Toronto; W. M. Garment, with 
the Canadian Consolidated Rubber Co., 905 Notre 
Dame St., Montreal; Caroline E. Carson (Mrs 
Manzer), living in British Columbia (c/o 120 
Beatrice St., Toronto); Marguerite M. Casselman, 
North Bay; Isobel Cassidy (Mrs B. Walton), 253 
South Manning Blvd., Albany, N.Y.; Hilda W. 
Christie, deceased; Gordon H. Cade, with the Civil 
Service, 159 Gilmour St., Ottawa; Christina C. 
Cooper, with the T. Eaton Co, 15 Avenue Rd., 
Toronto; Emily S. Copeland, c/o Bank of Toronto, 
Head Office, Toronto; Jessie I Cowan, teaching in 
Dundas,' Drumbo; Dr Mary L. Cowan, Lister 
Institute, London, Eng.; Dr Edward H. Craigie, 
teaching at the University, 40 Leopold St., Toronto; 
Thomas Kelso Creighton, lawyer, Oshawa; Helen 



W. Currie, lawyer, 158 Warren Rd., Toronto. 

Helen E. D'Avignon, Y.W.C.A. Secretary, 187 
King St., London; Dr Chas. S. Dickson, practising 
in Barrie; Dr Wm. B. Dickson, practising in Sault 
Ste Marie; J.St. Clair Dickson, broker, c/o Graham, 
Sanson and Co., 85 Bay St., Toronto; Dr H. V. 
Dobson, Stayner; Ann Douglas, dietitian at the 
Home for Incurable Soldiers, c/o Euclid Hall, 
Jarvis St., Toronto; Harold Drummond, lawyer, 
1 Deer Park Cresc., Toronto; George H. Duff, on 
the staff in Botany at the University of Toronto, 
South House, University Residence. 

W. D. Evans, on the staff in English at the 
University, 545 Lansdowne Ave., Toronto; Walter 
G. Evans, Port Perry. 

S. S. Fasken, Box 58, Walkerton; Lome M. 
Firthe, lawyer, c/o Mearns and Carr, 60 Victoria 
St., Toronto; Alice W. Foster, Mount Holyoke 
College, South Hadley, Mass.; Marjorie J. F. 
Fraser, with the Department of Education, 67 
Woodlawn Ave. W., Toronto. 

Elsie M. Gaiser, married; Ewart I Gale, in 
actuarial work, Alma; Sam. D. Gardner, lawyer, 
199 Euclid Ave., Toronto; H. B. Ganton, Trans- 
portation Department, Howell Warehouses, 88 Fern 
Ave., Toronto; Ina Gillies, teaching in Kitchener, 
548 Dovercourt Rd., Toronto; George E. Glover, 
512 Cambridge St., Medicine Hat, Alta; E. C. 
Gordon, lawyer, 38 Foxbar Rd., Toronto; Joseph M. 
Gordon, 176 Robert St., Toronto; M. Meyer Gordon, 
176 Robert St., Toronto; G. A. L. Gibson, with the 
Massey Harris Co., 84 De Lisle St., Toronto; R. B. 
Gibson, lawyer, 14 Chestnut Park Rd., Toronto; 
Kathleen D. Gower, with the Canadian Bank of 
Commerce, 49 Madison Ave., Toronto; Rev. J. 
Knox Graham, Mervin, Sask.; Walter P. Graham, 
teacher, 21 Delaware Ave., Toronto; Alex. M. 
Gurofsky, Steamship agent, 397 Markham St., 
Toronto. 



On rental terms 

THEATRICAL, MASQUERADE 
AND CARNIVAL COSTUMES 

MACDONALD-DAWN 

Regalia Evening Dress 

460 Spadina Ave. Phone C. 2900 



CITY OF TORONTO 
6% BONDS 

Due 1925 to 1951 

TO YE1LD 6.18% TO 6.43% 
according to maturity 

R. A. DALY & CO. 

Bank of Toronto Bldg., - Toronto 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



175 



G. C. Haddow, on the staff in English, University 
of Wisconsin, Madison, Wis. ; Marjorie Hall, 
teaching at Parkdale Collegiate Institute, Toronto; 
Dr Robert C. Hall, 52 Isabella St., Toronto; Muriel 
Hall, 697 Indian Rd., Toronto; Ethel E. M. Ham- 
mel, teaching in Napanee; ^Wm. Henry Harrison, 
c/o Southern Life and Trust Co., Greensboro, N.C., 
U.S.A.; Ida May Harvie (Mrs Thorns); Margaret 
Katfield, 617 Foster St., Evanston, 111.; Wm. I. 
Hearst, lawyer, 80 Glen Rd., Toronto; Joseph 
Hilley, lawyer, 196 Grace St., Torcnto; Wm. M. 
Hugill, c/o University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, 
Man. 

Robert F. Inch, Mount Hamilton; H. J. C. 
Ireton, Physics Building, University of Toronto. 

Thos. H. Jameson, lawyer, 2024 Mclntyre St., 
Regina, Sask. 

Joan Keeler, 201 Geoffrey St., Toronto; Myrtle 
H. Kemerer (Mrs Henry Lammerts), Niagara Falls, 
N.Y. ; Arthur Kennedy, deceased; Velma E. 
Kennedy (Mrs F. C. Moore), 69 Tremayne Ave., 
W., Buffalo, N.Y.; Herbert C. Kinnee, teaching at 
the Humberside Collegiate Institute, Toronto; 
James Kingsburgh, with the United Farmers Co- 
operative Association, 245 Pacific Ave., Toronto; 
Florence I. Knight, teaching at Petrolia. 

Muriel Lee (Mrs E. B. Munro), Port Credit; 
Oswald Lennox, lawyer, 202 Heath St., Toronto; 
Allen Lewis, lawyer, 143 Bloor St. W., Toronto; 
Dr F. P. Lloyd, Emmanuel Collegiate, Saskatoon, 
Sask. ; Dr F. A. Logan, 142 St. George St., Toronto; 
Rev James C. Lowrie, Inwood, R.R. No. 1, Lambton 
County. 

Mabel G. McCannell (Mrs Wm. J. McKenna), 
22 Tyndall Ave., Toronto; Carrie B. MacFayden, 
University Library, 76 Oakwood Ave., Toronto; 
Wm. Allison MacKague, editor, Monetary Times 
Printing Co., 62 Church St., Toronto; Dr Alex. L. 



McKay, c/o 13 Prince Arthur Ave., Toronto; 
Helen A. McMillan, on the staff of the London 
Advertiser, 295 Princess Ave., London; Vida I. 
Macaulay, 1144 Broadway W., Vancouver, B.C.; 
John F. Meek, died en active service; Agnes F. 
MacGillivray, with the Records Department, 
University of Toronto, 7 Oswald Cres., Toronto; 
Wm. James McKenna, lawyer, 22 Tyndall Ave., 
Toronto; Russell N. McKenzie, teaching at the High 
School, Cobourg; Chas. D. McLellan, lawyer, 220 
Grace St., Toronto; D. Meech, lawyer, 190 Glenrose 
Ave., Toronto; Elexey Iren McNeely, teaching, 
Carleton Place; Alice A. McRae, teaching, Beaver- 
ton; Elsie G. Mavor, c/o Dominion Life Assurance 
Co., Waterloo; Edna V. Miller, teaching at the 
Technical School, 48 Langley Ave., Toronto; T. H. 
Milne, 114 Howland Ave., Toronto; K. Stella Mott, 
Perth. 

Clarence W. Niblock, Aetna Explosives, Em- 
porium, Pa. 

Frederick Olsen, chemist, 41 North Markham St., 
Toronto. 

Thos. D. Painting, Elgin, Man.; Agnes Elsie 
Marie Parkes, University of Toronto, 120 South 
Drive, Toronto; Christine Marjorie Paterson, 88 
Heath St. W., Torcnto; Edgar Wm. Patten, killed 
in action; Hartley Earle Pearen, Weston; Jacob D. 
Pearlstein, lawyer, 127 Charlton St. W., Hamilton; 
Judith M. Pendergast, factory manager, Stillwater, 
Minn.; Mary Maria Peck, Streetsville ; Harry 
Henley Plaskett, Dominion Observatory, Victoria, 
B.C.; Dr W. Gayner Powell, Surgical Service No. 2. 
Royal Infirmary, Manchester, Eng. ; Wilhemina I, 
Pratt, en the staff at the University, 1236 Shaw St., 
Toronto; Ruggles Bernard Pritchard, Dominion 
Civil Service, North Wakefield, Que.; Horace 
Blackwood Proudlove, Oil Springs. 

Edward Wesley Rhodes, 35 Law St., Toronto; 






; Profitable Interest Rates 
and Highest Security 

Now is the time to take advantage of the unusually high interest rates 
enjoyed by investors in mortgage loans owing to the scarcity of money. Our 

GUARANTEED 

Mortae Investment Certificates 

pay the highest rate consistent with complete security. Under this plan your 
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on every due date, and the return, when due of the principal. 

CHARTERED TRUST AND EXECUTOR COMPANY . 

46 KING STREET WEST, TORONTO 

Hon. W. A. Charlton, M.P., President. 

John J. Gibson, Managing Director. 
W. S. Morden, K.C., Vice-President and Estates Manager. 



176 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



Emma May Riddell, Carlyle, Sask. ; Francis Gordon 
Ritchie, 233 Vaughan St., Winnipeg, Man. ; Dalton 
G. Robertson, Craigvale; Jessie Robinson (Mrs E. 
S. Baker), 63 Wellesley St., Toronto; John Robert- 
son Robinson, lawyer, 63 Wellesley St., Toronto; 
Marjorie Ross, London Public Library, 385 Dufferin 
St., London; Minnie C. Runians, teacher, 634 
Wellington St., London. 

E. F. Sanders, died on active service; L. E. 
Shannette, Williamsburg; Margaret M. Shortill, 
teaching at the Technical School, 143 Delaware 
Ave., Toronto; Aileen I. Silk, lawyer, 275 St. 
George St., Toronto; W. R. Slee, lawyer, Humber 
Bay; W. E. Smith, lawyer, 494 Avenue Rd., 
Toronto; M. E. J. Stalker, 134 Huron St., Toronto; 
Claire M. Stevenson, Listowel; Dr H. G. Stevenson, 
57 Dixon Ave., Toronto; F. Mabel Stirrett (Mrs 
Oswald Day), Suite 2, 883 Grosvenor Ave., Winni- 
peg, Man. ; Fannie McD. Storey, with the Ontario 
Government Employment Bureau, 90 Woodside 
Ave., Toronto; Marie Augusta Stowe (Mrs J. N. 



Wilson), 581 Jarvis St., Toronto; Hilda Isabel 
Stowe, with the Manufacturers Life Insurance Co., 
463 Spadina Ave., Toronto; Meta L. Sutton, with 
the Department of Education, 330 Huron St., 
Toronto; Monica A. Swayze (Mrs G. C. Stevenson), 
Westview Court, Christie St., Toronto. 

Rev Robert D. Tannahill, Congregational Minis- 
ter, 5 Pauline St., Toronto; Rebecca Blance Tassie 
(Mrs Karl E. Baxter), 9 Forest St., Chatham; Rev 
W. J. Taylor, Birchcliffe; M. Helena Thomson, 723 
Kingston Rd., Toronto. 

F. D. Ungaro, 5 D'Arcy St., Toronto. 

Dorothy E. Wade, 419 N. Christina St., Sarnia; 
Margaret Ethel Walker (Mrs H. A. Vanstone), 1387 
Queen St. W., Toronto; Helen C. Wigham, 24 Park- 
way Ave. Toronto; A. P. Wilson, killed in action; 
Robert H. Wilson, Imperial Bank Building, 
Windsor. 

Dr C. O. Young, Sarnia; John F. T. Young, 
Physics Department, University of Toronto, 174 
Dowling Ave., Toronto. 




{Toronto 



College 

(Tanaoa 



Boys prepared for the 

Universities, Royal 

Military College and 

Business. 



A Residential and Day School 

For Boys 

UPPER SCHOOL -- LOWER SCHOOL 

Calendar Sent on Application. 
REV. D. BRUCE MACDONALD, M.A., LL.D. Headmaster. 



CANADIAN PACIFIC 

FROM TORONTO 



DETROIT AND CHICAGO 

Lv. TORONTO (Union) *8.00 A.M. 



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MONTREAL AND EAST 

Lv. TORONTO (Union) *8.50 A.M. 
Lv. " (Yonge St.) J9.45 P.M. 

Lv. " (Union) *10.50 P.M. 



OTTAWA 



Lv. TORONTO (Union) fl.OO P.M. 
Lv. (Union) *10.25 P.M. 



SUDBURY AND NORTH BAY 

Lv. TORONTO (Union) f9.20 A.M. 
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WINNIPEG AND WEST 

Lv. TORONTO (Union) *10.00 P.M. 



* Daily. 



t Daily Exc. Sun. 



Daily Exc. Sat. 



For detailed information as to train service, fares, etc., write, call or phone 
City Ticket Office, Corner King and Yonge Phone Main 6580 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



177 



TWO NEW BOOKS ANY STUDENT 
OR ALUMNUS WILL APPRECIATE 



By Madame Pantazzi 
ROUMANIA IN LIGHT AND SHADOW 

Madame Pantazzi is a Canadian girl who, 
a number of years ago, went to find a home 
and country in Roumania. She has lived 
very closely to all classes in her adopted land 
and has had some remarkable experiences 
which are most ably portrayed in the book. 
This volume, by the way, gives probably the 
best picture extant of Roumania as it was 
before the war and to-day. 

A large book, English made, 280 pages, 
with numerous representative illustrations, 
$5.00. 



By Joseph Conrad 
NOTES OF LIFE AND LETTERS 

This book presents Conrad in something 
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inimitable. 

Standard format, substantially bound, 
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CANADIAN NATIONAL - GRAND TRUNK 



178 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 




Where "Salada" 
Sells 



WE can give the public 
no better proof on 
paper (the real proof 
lies in a personal test) of the 
popularity of "SALADA," 
than to say that great quan- 
tities are being shipped all 
the time to almost all parts 
of the world. These sales 
are made solely as a result 
of "cup test." 

It's the Flavour that counts 

Here are some of the 
places where 'SALADA" 
went during the past few 
months: 
Algeria 

Antigua, B.W.I. 
Argentina 
Bahamas 



France 

Greece 

Grenada, B, w.i. 

Iceland 
Barbados, B.W.I. Martinique 
Belgium 
Bermuda 
Brazil 
British 

Honduras 
Bolivia 

Canary Islands 
Chile 
Colombia 
Costa Rica 
Cuba 



Dutch Guiana 
Dutch West 

Indies 
Ecuador 



Montserrat 

Morocco 

Panama 

Porto Rico 

Portugal 

Spain 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

St. Vincent B.W.I. 

St. Lucia, B.W.I. 

Trinidad, B.W.I. 

Turkey 

Uruguay 

Venezuela 

W. Coast Africa 



II 



SALADA 1 



'17 M. The marriage took place on November 
30, of William Lindsey Graydon and Anne Eliza- 
beth Coyne, of Toronto. 

'18 Vic. The address of Vera Olga Sparling 
until spring will be, 512 Wellington Street, London. 

'18 M. Announcement is made of the birth of 
a son to Dr and Mrs Frank Norman Walker, 
Toronto, on November 26. 

'18 TT.C. The wedding took place on October 
22, of John Rooke Hunter and Helen McClelland 
Tate, of Toronto. Mr and Mrs Hunter are living 
at 514 King Street East, Hamilton. 

'19 U.C. Ruth M. Strong has been taking a 
library course in Toronto this year. She is living 
at 176 Madison Ave. 

'19 U.C. H. G. S. Jeffrey is still teaching in the 
Weston High School where he has been for the 
last two years. His address is 200 Church Street. 

'20 TT.C. John Franklin Anderson is now in the 
graduating year in divinity at Knox College. He 
expects next spring to be minister-in-charge at 
Kirkland Lake and Swastika. 

'20 M. At Grosvenor Square Presbyterian 
Church, Manchester, England, on December 2, 
1921, the marriage was celebrated of Peter Douglas 
Mclntosh, and Katherine Louise Maclennan, of 
Toronto. Dr and Mrs Mclntosh are living at 37 
De Lisle Avenue, Toronto. 

'20 D. G. Garnett Perdue is practising his 
profession as dentist and has opened up an office 
at 986 Bloor Street West. 

'20 M. At Brantford General Hospital on 
November 21, a daughter was born to Dr and Mrs 
Nathan Johnson Bicknell, of Port Dover. 

'20 M. Milburn Watts Kemp is at present doing 
part-time work and also undergoing treatment at 
the Mountain Sanatorium, Hamilton. He expects 
to open an office in the near future in Hamilton. 

'20 TT.C. Mrs Clarence S. McKee (Helen Ross 
Eraser) is now living at 4 South Drive, Toronto. 

'20 M. The marriage took place during Christ- 
mas week of Norman Hodgins Russell and Helen 
Margaret Hall, of Toronto. Dr Russell is on the 
staff of the Pathological Department of St. Francis' 
Hospital, Pittsburg, Pa. 

'20 D. Carl J. Mahoney has opened up an 
office at 304 Brunswick Avenue. His home address 
s 64 First Ave. 

'20 TT.C. Wm. Caven Hunter McQuarrie has 
changed his address and is now living at 231 Robert 
Street, Toronto. 

'20 TT.C. Helen Doris Howell is working in the 
Department of Medicine as a research assistant. 
She is living at 31 St. Joseph Street, Toronto. 

'21 TT.C. Mrs Wm. Willan (Helen Schafner) is 
now living at Traill, in British Columbia. 

'21 D. The wedding took place in the latter 
part of December, of Thomas Albert Robinson, of 
Brampton, and Miriam Gertrude Blain. 

'21 S. The wedding too place early in January 
of William Stewart Wilson and Eleanor Evelyn 
Willoughby, of Regina, Sask. 

'21 D. The wedding took place in December of 
Arnold Roy Kerr and Mary Trollope, of Toronto. 
Dr and Mrs Kerr will live at 33 Glevemont Road 
and Dr Kerr will keep up his office at 1204 Danforth 
Avenue. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



179 



Jfrencfr (0rganfrte 

The stationery that adds 
refinement to correspondence, 
no matter to whom it is 
sent. 

Club size specially re- 
commended for your require- 
ments. 

Ask your stationer for it. 



d. 



TORONTO 



BRANTFORD CALGARY 

WINNIPEG VANCOUVER 

EDMONTON 



pup pour poofes 

AT 



THE 



CONVENIENT BOOKSTORE 

WM. TYRRELL & CO., LTD. 
780-782 Yonge St. - TORONTO 



Telephone N. 5600 



COLLEGE 1752 



COLLEGE 2757 



A. W. MILES 

FUNERAL DIRECTOR 



396 COLLEGE ST. 



TORONTO. CANADA 




has still for sale 
A limited number of copies of the 

ROLL OF SERVICE 

at $1*00 in cloth binding or 75c. in paper* 
This is a handsome volume of about 700 
pages and is the official record of graduates 
and undergraduates in the Great War* 



Order a copy now before the supply is exhausted. 



180 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



WESTERN ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Fire, Automobile, Hail, Marine, Explosion, Riots, Civil Commotions and Strikes Insurance 
Head Offices: Corner Wellington and Scott Streets, Toronto 

Assets, Orel $7,900,000.00 

Losses paid since organization of the Company in 1851, Over $81,300,000.00 
Board of Directors 

W. B. MEIKLE, President and General Manager 
Sir John Aird John H. Fulton (New York) Geo. A. Morrow, 



Robt. Bickerdike (Montreal) 
Lt.-Col. Henry Brock 
Alfred Cooper (London, Eng.) 
H. C. Cox 



D. B. Hanna 

John Hoskin, K.C., LL.D. 

Miller Lash 



Lt.-Col. the Hon. Frederic Nicholls 
Major-Gen'l Sir Henry Pellatt, C.V.O. 
E. R. Wood 




Hockey and Racing 
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Pennants* 



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J. BROTHERTON 



Phone N. 2092 



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LOOSE I.P. LEAF 

Students 9 Note Books 
Physicians' and Dentists' 

Ledgers 

Memo and Price Books 
Professional Books 



BROWN BROS., Limited 

SIMCOE and PEARL STS. 
TORONTO 



Toronto 
Conservatory of Music 

(University of Toronto) 

SIR EDMUND WALKER. C.V.O., LL.D., D.C.L.. PRESIDENT. 
A. S. VOGT. MUS. DOC.. MUSICAL DIRECTOR. 
HEALEY WILL.AN. MUS. DOC.. F.R.C.O.. ASSISTANT MUSICAL 
DIRECTOR. 



Highest Artistic Standards. Faculty 
of International Reputation. 

The Conservatory affords unrivalled facili- 
ties for complete courses of instruction in all 
branches of music, for both professional and 
amateur students. 



PUPILS MAY ENTER AT ANY TIME 



Year Book and Examination Syllabus 
forwarded to any address on request to 
the Registrar. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



181 




The "Mogul" 

Makes good every time 

\Y/HEN you consider that manufactui ng Boilers 
and Radiators is our first and biggest responsi- 
bility When you bear in mind that we are the largest 
manufacturers of Boilers and Radiators in the Dominion 
of Canada. Is it any wonder that the SAFFORD 
MOGUL line is the last word in heating boilers ? 

Every MOGUL leaving our plant is inspected by a 
staff of specialists, men who know the manufacture of 
boilers from A to Z, and that is why the SAFFORD 
MOGUL makes good every time and all the time. 

Dominion Radiator Company 



Low-Base Sa fiord Mogul (sectional view) 



Hamilton, Ont. 
St. John, N.B. 
Calg-ary, Alta. 



TORONTO 

OTTAWA 



Limited 

Montreal, Que. 
Winnipeg", Man. 
Vancouver, B.C. 



A Food Drink 
for All Ages 

The Best Diet 

for infants, 
growing children, 
invalids and the 
aged 




Highly nutritious 
and convenient 

Used in training 
Athletes 

It agrees with 

the weakest 

digestion 



IN LUNCH TABLET FORM READY TO EAT 



R. LAIDLAW LUMBER CO 

LIMITED 



HEAD OFFICE 



65 YONGE STREET 

EVERYTHING IN 



TORONTO 



LUMBER AND MILLWORK 



182 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



DOMINION TEXTILE COMPANY LIMITED 

of CANADA 

President - Vice-President General Manager and Director 

SIR CHARLES GORDON SIR HERBERT S. HOLT F. G. DANIELS 



HEAD OFFICE: MONTREAL, P.Q. 



MILLS IN MONTREAL, MAGOG AND MONTMORENCY FALLS, P.Q., 
AND IN KINGSTON, ONT. 

COTTON FABRICS 

of every description 

PRINTED, DYED, BLEACHED or in the GREY 

for jobbing and cutting-up trades 



CASAVANT ORGANS 

ARE SUPERIOR IN 

Quality, Design and Workmanship 



Over 800 pipe organs built 
by this firm in 

Canada, United States and 
South America. 



CASAVANT FRERES 

LIMITED 

ST. HYACINTHE 



EIMER & AMEND 

FOUNDED 1851 

Manufacturers, Exporters and 

Importers of 

LABORATORY APPARATUS 
CHEMICALS and SUPPLIES 




NEW YORK 

3rd AYE., 18th to 19th STREETS 

PITTSBURGH BRANCH 

4048 JENKINS ARCADE 

Washington, D.C: Display Room, Suite 
601, Evening Star Building, Penna. Ave. 
and llth Street. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



183 



BRITISH AMERICA ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Fire, Marine, Hail and Automobile Insurance 
HEAD OFFICES: COR. FRONT AND SCOTT STS., TORONTO 

Incorporated A.D. 1833 

Aweta, Over $4,300,000 

Losses Paid since Organization in 1833, Over $47,500,000 



FRANK DARLING, LL.D.. F.R.I.B.A. 



JOHN A. PEARSON 



DARLING & PEARSON 

Hrcbttects 

MEMBERS OF THE ROYAL ARCHITECTURAL INSTITUTE OF CANADA 
MEMBERS ONTARIO ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS 
MEMBERS QUEBEC ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS 
MEMBERS MANITOBA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS 

IMPERIAL BANK CHAMBERS 

2 LEADER LANE TORONTO 



The best flour and highest quality of ingredients 

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MONET 
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184 UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 




By Appointment %Hfl96H*)' Established 1847 



MASSEY-HARRIS COMPANY, Ltd. 

Makers of Agricultural Implements 
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36 North Street, Toronto 



PAGE & COMPANY 

Cut Stone and Masonry Contractors 



TORONTO 

Contractors on Hart House and Burwash Hall 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 185 



Should a University keep in touch with its graduates or should graduates 
keep in touch with the University ? 



" It is not the intention of these lines to suggest, 
as the opening paragraphs might, that the relation 
of Alumni to the University is a mere matter of 
dollars and cents. The real obligation, the bond 
which draws us irresistibly to the University, has 
no such sordid foundation. But the thought it is 
desired to suggest is that the University, having a 
real and acute problem of dollars and cents, a prob- 
lem incurred on behalf of her graduates and under- 
graduates, it is decidedly an obligation upon 
every graduate and undergraduate to assist the 
University in solving that problem. It can only 
be solved by convincing our fellow citizens that 
University education is not only a good investment, 
but the very best investment the Province can 
make." John R. Bone, M.A., in the December 
"Monthy" 



The University of Toronto needs the support of every graduate in forming an 
intelligent public opinion favourable to its request for increased Government 
support. 



186 UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 

Department of Education for Ontario 

SCHOOL AGES 

AND 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



In the educational system of Ontario provision is made in the Courses 
of Study for instruction to the child of four years of age in the Kinder- 
garten up to the person of unstated age who desires a Technical or 
Industrial Course as a preparation for special fitness in a trade or pro- 
fession. 

All schools established under the Public Schools Act shall be free 
Public Schools, and every person between the ages of five and twenty- 
one years, except persons whose parents or guardians are Separate 
School supporters, shall have the right to attend some such school in the 
urban municipality or rural school section in which he resides. Children 
between the ages of four and seven years may attend Kindergarten 
schools, subject to the payment of such fees as to the Board may seem 
expedient. Children of Separate School supporters attend the Separate 
Schools. 

The compulsory ages of attendance are from eight to fourteen years 
and provision is made in the Statutes for extending the time to sixteen 
years of age, and also to eighteen years of age, under conditions stated 
in The Adolescent School Attendance Act of 1919. 

The several Courses of Study in the educational system under the 
Department of Education are taken up in the Kindergarten, Public, 
Separate, Continuation and High Schools and Collegiate Institutes, and 
in Industrial and Technical Schools. Copies of the Regulations regard- 
ing each may be obtained by application to the Deputy Minister of 
Education, Parliament Buildings, Toronto. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



187 



Why have 57,000 College Men 

enrolled in the 

Alexander Hamilton Institute? 



fTIHE President of the 
X largest institution of its 
kind in America a man 
still in his forties was 
commenting on his own 
experience in business. 

"When I graduated from col- 
lege I supposed I was equipped 
with the training necessary to 
business success," he said. 

"As a matter of fact I had 
nothing more than a bare foun- 
dation. I discovered that fact 
even in my first job, and for 
weeks I spent my evenings in a 
night school trying to master 
the elements of cost-finding and 
accountancy. 

"Later as I made my way up 
toward executive positions I 
found I needed to know the 
fundamentals of sales and mer- 
chandising, of advertising and 
factory management, of office 
organization and corporation 
finance. 

"These I picked up from books 
as best I could. Probably my 
college training made it easier 
for me to acquire them; but the 
college training alone certainly 
was not an adequate preparation 
for business in my case. I doubt 
if it is for any man." 

More than 155,000 men 
in 11 years 

The Alexander Hamilton Insti- 
tutte was not founded early 
enough to be of service to this 
man; but it grew out of an ap- 
preciation of the needs of men 
of just this type. 



In the eleven years of its exis- 
tence the Institute has enrolled 
more than 155,000 men who are 
today making more rapid pro- 
gress in business as a result of 
its training. 

Of these 155,000 no less than 
57,000 are graduates of colleges 
and universities. 

This is the Institute's mark 
of distinction that its appeal 
is to the unusual man. It has 
only one Course, embracing the 
fundamentals underlying all 
business, and its training fits a 
man for the sort of executive 
positions where demand always 
outruns supply. 

The splendid privilege of 
saving wasted years 

One of the tragedies of the 
business world is that so many 
college men spend so many of 
the best years of their lives in 
doing tasks which they know are 
below their real capacities. 

It is the privilege of the 
Institute to save those wasted 
years to give a man in the 
leisure moments of a few months 
the working knowl- 
edge of the various 
departments of 
modern business 
which would ordi- 
narily take him 
years to acquire. 

That the Insti- 
tute's ModernBusi- 
ness Course and 
Service actually 



achieves this splendid result, 
that its training is practical and 
immediately applicable to the 
problems of every business, 
the records of 155,000 business 
men, in every kind of business, 
prove. 

At least you will want 
the facts 

Every college man in business 
is interested in business (raining. 
He is interested- in it either as a 
factor in his own progress; or as 
a factor in the progress of the 
younger men associated with 
him, who are constantly turning 
to him for advice. 

To put all the facts regarding 
the Modern Business Course 
and Service in convenient form 
the Alexander Hamilton In- 
stitute has prepared a 120-page 
book, entitled "Forging Ahead 
in Business." It tells concisely 
and specifically what the Course 
is and what it has done for other 
men. There is a copy of this 
book free for every college man 
in business; send for your copy 
today. 

Alexander Hamilton Institute 
000 Astor Place, New York City 

Send me "Forging Ahead in Business" 
which I may keep without obligation. 




Name 

Business 
Address- 



hert 



Business 
Position ... 



Canadian Address. C.P.R. Building, Toronto: Australian Address, 42 Hunter Street, Sydney 



Copyright, IQ22, Alexander Hamilton Institute 



Wfje SJntoersrttr of Toronto 

Vol. XXII. TORONTO, FEBRUARY, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND TWENTY-TWO No. 5 



News and Comments 



Plans are being made again this year for 
a dinner on the evening of Commencement 
Day (June 9) for the 
"Twos" and reunion classes in Arts. 
" Sevens" will The reunion classes, on 
meet in June the basis established 
two years ago, are those 
which will celebrate a multiple-of-five anni- 
versary 1872, 1877, 1882, 1887, 1892, 
1897, 1902, 1907, 1912, 1917. 

Already a number of classes have their 
arrangements under way. The fifty year 
class expects to have an almost complete 
attendance of the members. S. J. McKee, 
of Brandon, has written to his classmates 
and hopes himself to be present. The 
other surviving members of the '72 class 
are: James D. Christie, Simcoe; W. 
Houston, Mimico; D. A. McMichael, New 
York; H. J.Scott, Toronto; Elliott Traver, 
Strathroy; William Williams, Collingwood. 
Dr Gibb Wishart and Mr Angus Mac- 
Murchy have for some time been working 
on the list of members of the '82 class with 
a view to having a full attendance. 

Class lists with addresses of members 
may be secured on application to the 
Alumni Federation Office, 184 College 
Street, Toronto. 

"It took civilization centuries to reach 

the point where it realized that 'every 

child has a right to be 

The Need for well born '. It is taking 

Scholarships still longer to admit that 

every child has a right 

to be well educated." 

Such is the opening declaration of an 
interesting bulletin recently issued by the 
University on "The Need for Scholar- 
ships". Comparison between conditions 
in England and in Ontario in respect to the 
educational opportunities of poor students 
is then made, much to the detriment of 
Ontario. 

In England there are a great many 
scholarships donated by local educational 
authorities. For the years 1918-20 ap- 
proximately one-third of the 246,000 stu- 
dents attending state assisted secondary 



schools received free education. Local 
authorities awarded 53,460 "free places", 
school governors 16,548 and 2,378 were 
provided out of special endowments. The 
English attitude toward the education of 
the promising is stated thus in the Educa- 
tional Act of 1918: "Adequate provision 
shall be made in order to secure that 
children and young persons shall not be 
debarred from receiving the benefit of 
any form of education by which they are 
capable of profiting, through inability to 
pay fees". 

Turning to the situation at the Univer- 
sity of Toronto it is found that scholarships 
are few and that the student dependent on 
his own personal resources is finding his 
position increasingly difficult. In the 
Faculty of Arts, with an enrolment of over 
2,000, there are only forty-eight scholar- 
ships. Not only are undergraduate scholar- 
ships required to assist needy students of 
promise but graduate scholarships and 
fellowships are urgently needed to further 
the cause of research and the building up 
in Canada of a graduate school which will 
stem the "export of brains". 

There can be no doubt that the increased 

cost of higher education is effecting great 

changes in the student 

Is Higher body of the University. 

Education The student who "works 

becoming a his way through " is fast 

Prerogative disappearing, from the 

of the Rich? more expensive faculties 

at least. 

In the Faculty of Medicine $750 may 
be regarded as a practical minimum student 
budget (fees $165, books and instruments 
$65, living expenses, clothes and incidentals 
$520.) On this basis $4,500 would be 
required to complete the six year course. 
Expenses in the faculties of Arts and 
Applied Science are somewhat iower but 
in the Dental College they are still higher 
than in Medicine. On the whole students 
to-day cannot depend on their summer 
earnings to do more than see them through 
the first three months of the session. 



189 



190 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



Those without outside sources of income 
find it necessary to break their courses 
many times before graduating. 

It is difficult to see how the problem of 
the poor man's son desirous of a university 
education can be solved unless large sums 
of money are forthcoming from private 
or public sources for the establishment of 
bursaries and scholarships. The Univer- 
sity cannot at present afford to reduce the 
tuition fees -in fact it may be necessary 
to increase them ; courses cannot be 
shortened without a serious lowering of 
standards, and the cost of living is not 
likely to decrease greatly in a city of 
Toronto's population. 

The University by reason of its poverty 
is in danger of losing something of its 
democracy. 



Conferences addressed by professors 
from other universities and designed to 

awaken the interest of 
Departmental the student body and 
Conferences sections of the public 
are Successful in specific subjects, are 

one of the recent inno- 
vations established at the University. 
Last spring a Conference in .Physics was 
held, and during the third week of January 
of this year a three days' philosophical 
conference was assembled. These con- 
ferences were very successful and it is 
likely that they will be followed by others 
of a similar nature in other subjects next 
year. 

Four out-of-town professors were present 
and gave lectures at the Conference in 
Philosophy: Professor Hocking, Harvard; 
Professor Shastri, Calcutta; Professor 
Woodbridge, Columbia; Professor Creigh- 
ton, Cornell. The primary object of the 
Conference was to give to the students in 
Honour Philosophy a new zest in their 
work, from contact with other professors; 
but of almost equal importance was the 
purpose of providing an opportunity for 
graduates and others interested in philo- 
sophical matters to hear of the latest 
developments in the subject. 

Papers were read during the regular 
lecture hours of the day, and evening 
sessions of a more popular nature were 
held in the large lecture room of the Mining 
Building. Capacity audiences were pre- 
sent at the evening sessions. 



As a result of a conference between repre- 
sentatives of Toronto, Queen's, Western 

and McM aster univer- 
Matriculation sities, the matriculation 
Standard to standard for Ontario is 
be Raised to be raised. The new 

requirements may be 
met either by taking a high standing in 
the Junior Matriculation examination or 
by securing Honour Matriculation standing 
in a number of subjects. On the Junior 
Matriculation examination, 75% must 
be secured in four subjects or 66% in six 
subjects. By this ruling the brilliant 
student may matriculate without spending 
more than four years in high school. Pupils 
who do not reach this standard on the 
Junior Matriculation examination, must 
take further high school work and secure 
Honour Matriculation standing in at least 
two subjects. The new standard will 
obtain in all faculties of the universities. 
For entrance into the honour courses in 
Arts still higher standards are required at 
Toronto. 

The raising of the Matriculation stan- 
dard is a move in the direction of relieving 
the universities of a certain amount of 
elementary teaching which can be done 
more economically and perhaps more 
efficiently in the high schools. It should 
relieve to some extent the congestion in 
the first year pass courses and enable the 
universities to confine their efforts to work 
which is of a more strictly university 
grade. 

An excellent example of what systematic 
effort can accomplish in the dissemination 
of university news is 
Publicity at found in the work car- 
Cornell ried on at Cornell Uni- 
versity in scattering 
abroad information regarding the inaugura- 
tion of President Farrand and the laying 
of the corner stone of a new Chemistry 
Building on October 20. 

From press clippings it was ascertained 
that news articles six inches or longer, had 
been published in daily papers with a com- 
bined circulation of 24,000,000. In addi- 
tion to this there were numerous shorter 
accounts in other daily papers and a two- 
thousand word article in 1,500 weekly 
papers; 125 illustrations were carried in 
103 newspapers printed in twenty-nine 
states with a total circulation of 10,000,000; 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



191 



moving picture films were distributed 
throughout the whole of the United States 
and Canada by the Pathe Weekly and by 
two film distributing companies. 

Some may ask: "To what end this wide- 
spread publicity? Of what real value was 
it to Cornell University?" 

However much opinion may vary on the. 
question of values, it is safe to say that a 
quarter of the population of the United 
States were acquainted with the fact that 
the University had chosen a man of out- 
standing scholarship and recognized ability 
as its President, and that George F. Baker, 
Chairman of the Board of Directors of the 
First National Bank, had donated a new 
$1,500,000 Chemistry Building; and that 
Cornellians the continent over, in reading 
of the proceedings, found their interest in 
the alma mater revived. 

At least as much may be said of univer- 
sity news items of a general character. 
The public are made acquainted with the 
facts and the interest of graduates and 
friends is revived. 

Further, does not a university benefit 
fundamentally when someone rendering 
an outstanding service is hailed as a 
graduate, or when some discovery is 
credited in the public mind to a member 
of its staff? Is it not well that the public 
should know of its work and accord to it 
the credit and honour, which is due it? 

Privately endowed universities find sys- 
tematic publicity the very backbone of 
their prosperity. Baker's gift to Cornell, 
widely known, inspires confidence in the 
institution and suggests to others the 
making of similar benefactions. 

State supported universities surely can- 
not afford to lag behind. To be unnoticed 
is to be for the most part forgotten, and 
to be forgotten is, for a public institution, 
disastrous. 



The Provincial Government has an- 
nounced the appointment of W. C. Good, 

of the University 

W. C. Good College class of '00 

Appointed to to the Board of 

Board of Governors Governors of the 

University. 

Following a brilliant University course 
in Chemistry and two years on the staff 
of the Ontario Agricultural College, Mr 
Good returned to his farm near Brantford 
and undertook practical farming as a 



profession. He has been very prominent 
in agricultural movements in Ontario, 
having been one of the organizers of the 
U.F.O., and since has been closely identi- 
fied with all its activities. At the recent 
elections he was 'elected to the House of 
Commons on the Progressive ticket. He 




w. c. GOOD, -oo, M.P.. 

who has recently been appointed to the Board of 
Governors of the University. 

has made special study of economic ques- 
tions viewed from the farmers' standpoint 
and has written much on the subject. 

Mr Good's appointment has been wel- 
comed at the University and will meet 
with the approval of the graduates who 
know of his sterling qualities. 



BRIEFS * 

"THE EXTENSION COURSE in town-plan- 
ning which was held in January was an 
even greater success than was anticipated. 
The course was designed to appeal first 
of all, to the expert the architect, sur- 



192 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



veyor, municipal engineer, landscape gar- 
dener, and it was also open to members of 
the town-planning commissions, civic 
guilds, and to the general public. There 
was an attendance of fifty-one, of whom 
twenty-five per cent were from out of 
town. Six Ontario municipalities outside 
Toronto were represented, and two stu- 
dents came from Alberta. The course 
consisted of lectures, discussions, the 
working of actual problems and research. 
Sir Robert Falconer and Mr J. P. Hynes, 
President of the Ontario Town Planning 
and Housing Association, addressed the 
students and lectures were given by Pro- 
fessors C. H. C. Wright, Adrian Berrington, 
W. M. Treadgold, J. A. Dale and R. M. 
Maclver. Lectures were given also by 
eminent experts from outside of the 
University. 

SIR BERTRAM WINDLE'S weekly lectures 
in the Physics Building have been re- 
markably successful. He has dealt wijh 
the influence of St. Augustine on early 
Britain, and the decline of civilization con- 
sequent to the departure of the Roman 
legions. From that point he went on to 
discuss the origin of the Norman races, 
their invasion of England and the in- 
fluence of their great organizing ability 
and building activities on England. In 
the remaining eight lectures of the series, 
Sir Bertram will discuss further steps in 
the development of mediaeval England 
until the Tudor period. The lectures 
take place every Friday afternoon at 
4.30 p.m. and are made still more instruc- 
tive by the use of admirable lantern slides. 



TRIBUTE WAS PAID to its founder, Dr 
Strachan, first Bishop of Toronto, by 
Trinity College on January 15, the occasion 
of the seventieth anniversary of the 
College's inauguration. Prayers of thanks- 
giving were said at the morning service in 
the Chapel, accompanied by special music 
throughout. In the evening at dinner 
Professor A. H. Young, dean of residence, 
in proposing the toast to the College, 
briefly sketched Bishop Strachan's career 
and aims, and pointed out the great debt 
which Trinity owes to his work. Bishop 
Strachan believed that a combination of 
religious and secular education was the 
only true ideal for a university and that 
the best results were achieved in a college 
that was essentially a home. These are 



the ideals that Trinity College has learned 
to cherish and is prepared to hand on to 
future generations as a goodly heritage. 

THREE NEW EXTENSION COURSES in 
Household Science have been arranged by 
the Department of University Extension. 
One is practically a continuation of the 
Foods and Diets course that was given last 
term. The second is a repetition of that 
course and is intended for those who, on 
account of lack of accommodation were 
unable ^ to enter those classes. The third 
course is an experiment and is being started 
at the request of an association of thirty 
Household Science teachers in the city, 
and aims to keep them in touch with new 
discoveries and developments in their work. 



ARRANGEMENTS FOR PURCHASING a per- 
manent exhibition of Canadian pictures 
for Hart House are being made by the 
Picture Committee of the Sketch Club. 
Heretofore the system of borrowing pic- 
tures which have been exhibited at the 
Toronto Art Gallery has been followed 
and if this is to be continued it seems only 
fair that one or more large canvases should 
be purchased each year. It is suggested 
that each graduating year present a picture 
to Hart House. In this way quite a notable 
collection of Canadian art may be built up 
in the course of a generation or so. 



PROFESSOR A. L. LANGFORD has resigned 
from the position of Register of Victoria 
College, a post which he has held con- 
tinuously since 1908. The appointment 
has been made of Professor C. E. Auger to 
fill the vacancy. Professor Langford will 
continue to occupy the chair of Greek 
Language and Literature and to lecture in 
this subject. 



A NEW SECTION has been started in the 
Varsity under the caption "Graduates of 
Note", the object of which apparently is 
to stimulate the undergraduate mind by 
brief sketches of the lives of prominent 
alumni. The first two men of the series 
were Sir John Gibson and Sir William 
Mulock, the two surviving members of 
the class of '63. The Varsity emphasizes 
the fact that one of the outstanding fea- 
tures of their lives is the close connection 
which they have maintained with the 
University. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



193 



THE ADVANCE REGISTRATION for the 
Farmers' Short Course which is to be held 
February 6-17, indicates that the attend- 
ance this year will be very much larger than 
last year. Household Science and Psych- 
ology are to be added to the Course. 



PROFESSOR GEORGE M. WRONG has 
written a history of Canada which has 
been published by the Ontario Department 
of Education as a public school 
text book. The book is illus- 
trated by Mr C. W. Jeffries in 
an exceedingly interesting and 
instructive manner. Professor 
Wrong traces the history of 
Canada down to the Treaty of 
Versailles, the signing of which 
by Canadian representatives, 
he hails as a mark of nationhood 
and equality. 



of Beaton. The Extension Department 
has complied with the request, but in 
order that lungs may not develop faster 
than minds, the community singing will 
be alternated with a class every other 
week in English Literature. The com- 
munity singing classes will be directed by 
Mr Earl Newton of the Toronto Con- 
servatory of ,Music, and those in English 
by Mr W. M. Whitelaw. 



A NEW AND DRASTIC REGU- 
LATION regarding the first year 
Arts will come into force next 
session. By this regulation no 
student who has failed to obtain 
standing in the Pass Course at 
the annual examinations will be 
allowed to repeat the year, 
unless his case is approved by 
the Council of the Faculty of 
Arts. Up to the present stud- 
ents have been allowed to re- 
peat the year once. The result 
of this regulation will be the 
elimination of the student who 
comes to College merely for a 
good time. 



THE NEWMAN CLUB has taken 
up its new quarters in the old 
Matthews' residence at the cor- 
ner of St. George Street and 
Hoskin Avenue. It is the in- 
tention of the directors of the 
Club that the house shall be a 
residence for students and as a 
result plans are being made for the erection 
of a suitable hall, library, chapel and 
dormitory in the near future. 




THE IMPORTANCE OF THE EXTENSION 

work of the University is being emphasized 
every day and further calls are being made 
on its resources. The latest development 
is the request for a tutorial class in com- 
munity singing which came from the people 



E. W. BEATTY, 

Graduate of Toronto and Chancellor of Queen's University, Kingston, 
andMcGill University, Montreal, who, in another section of this issue 
contributes to the discussion on "Does Higher Education Pay?". 



SIR PHILIP GIBBS was a guest at Hart 
House for luncheon on Monday, January 
23. He spoke briefly to a gathering of 
students in the Lecture Room at*1.30 p.m. 

PROFESSOR JACKMAN, of the Department 
of Political Science has been granted two 
weeks' leave to join the teaching staff of 
a Farmers' Short Course to be given at 
the University of Manitoba. He will 
lecture on Rural Economics. 



Governors' Requests to be Presented to Cabinet 



MATURE CONSIDERATION SHOWS COMMISSION'S REPORT TO BE 
BEST SCHEME FOR UNIVERSITY FINANCING. 



"THE University of Toronto will shortly 
* present its requests for the year 
1922-23 to the Government. 

All graduates who are hazy regarding 
the facts of the University's requirements 
should read carefully and fix in their minds 
the data contained in President Falconer's 
article which is printed elsewhere in this 
paper. The amounts mentioned in this 
article will form the basis of the budget 
statement for the coming year. They 
are in the nature of an irreducible minimum 
without which the University cannot 
maintain its present standards. 

In presenting its requests to the Govern- 
ment the University will urge the adoption 
of the 1921 University Commission's 
Report as a permanent solution of the 
problem. The immediate requirements 
as set forth in the President's article are 
substantially what would result from the 
adoption of this report. 

As it effects the University of Toronto 
the core of the Commission's Report is 
the recommendation that one-half the 
succession duties received by the Province 
be set aside for its maintenance. The 
only other suggestion for the maintenance 
of the University which has been put 
forward is that grants should be passed 
annually by the Legislature. In theory, 
this legislative grant proposal seems rea- 
sonable but there are at least two ineradic- 
able difficulties which stand in the way 
of its successful operation. 

One is that the work of the University 
is so complex and far-reaching that without 
a great deal of special study it is impossible 
for anyone to form intelligent opinions 
of its needs. It is unreasonable to expect 
that the members of our Legislature will 
be possessed of sufficient detailed know- 
ledge of the University to enable them to 
discuss its budget in a discerning way. 
This may sound undemocratic, but, with- 



out any disparagement to our representa- 
tives in the Legislature, it is true. 

State-Owned University must not be made 

to compete with other Universities 

for Public Funds. 

The other objection to the legislative 
grant plan has its foundation in the 
peculiar position in which Ontario finds 
itself in regard to government-aided uni- 
versities. Here we have the singular 
situation of one provincial university and 
two other universities which are fully 
entitled to assistance. What would be 
the result if all three were dependent on 
yearly legislative grants? We would have 
the impossible situation of the state-, 
owned and 'state-controlled university 
competing annually with, privately con- 
trolled universities for the goodwill of 
the Legislature. On higher educational 
matters the Province would be divided 
geographically. There would be strife 
among the universities and lobbying in 
the legislature and the bringing to bear 
of all sorts of sinister influences. No 
university wants this; and surely no 
government. 

The responsibility of the Province to 
Queen's and Western rests upon the work 
which these Universities are doing. The 
responsibility of the Province to the 
University of Toronto rests upon no such 
thing. It rests upon the fact that the Uni- 
versity of Toronto is a government institution; 
as such it is the duty of the government to 
see that it is maintained at a standard 
commensurate with the ideals of the Province. 

Coming to the question of the succession 
duties plan for maintenance of the Uni- 
versity of Toronto, as embodied in the 
University Act of 1906 and recommended 
again without the $500,000 limitation 
clause, by the Commission of 1921, we 
are of the opinion that maturer thought 



104 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



195 



will conclude that the objections to it 
are theoretical rather than practical. 

Statutory Grant does not do away with 

Governors' Immediate Responsibility 

to the Government. 

Many people seem to be of the impres- 
sion that the plan involves the Province 
turning over one half the succession duties 
to the Governors of the University to do 
what they wished with the money. This 
is entirely erroneous. Under the old Act 
the Governors had to go each year to the 
Cabinet and have their budget approved 
before money was paid over. There is 
no intention to change this arrangement. 
The University would still be directly and 
entirely responsible to the Government. 

Another objection raised was that the 
succession duties percentage was variable 
and might increase beyond or decrease 
below the University's requirements. But 
this objection is theoretical, too. The 
Legislature would always have power to 
retain the difference- if such there were 
between the amount of the approved 
University budget and the amount set 
aside from the succession duties, or on the 
other hand to supplement the succession 
duties percentage if such fell short; or 
indeed to vary the percentage allotted. 

Government financing to-day is difficult. 
Graduates and friends of the University 
will sympathize with the Ontario Govern- 
ment which has been called Upon for 
unusually large amounts of money for 
public undertakings and will laud all wise 
economies. But the majority will feel 
that a too rigid economy in matters of 
education is exceedingly dangerous. It 
may mean mortgaging the future. 

If public opinion were well informed 
regarding university matters we would 
have no occasion to worry about the 
future of the University of Toronto. The 
people of Ontario want their Provincial 
University to stand with the best. And 
this can be attained without extravagance. 

But the difficulty is that public opinion 
is not well informed. The University 
question is complex and has some rami- 
fications. The people of the Province 
are looking to those who have first hand 
knowledge of the work of the University 
for .leadership and light. The 10,000 
graduates resident in the Province have 
it in their power to solve the problem. 



Engineering Research 
Shows Healthy Growth 

SEVENTEEN PAPERS PUBLISHED 
IN BULLETIN No. 2. 

The School of Engineering Research is 
enjoying a healthy and steady growth. 
It is performing an exceedingly valuable 
service to Industry in the improvement 
of manufacturing processes, and to the 
Faculty of Applied Science in giving its 
staff and senior students the opportunity 
to do original work. 

The School is organized under the 
Faculty of Applied Science and is con- 
trolled by a committee consisting chiefly 
of the heads of departments. The re- 
searches are carried on by members of the 
staff, by graduate students, and in a lesser 
degree by undergraduates of the fourth 
year. The School receives appropriations 
from the so-called President's Research 
Fund which is administered by the Board 
of Governors. 

From time to time papers embodying 
the result of researches are printed and 
distributed, according to the subject dis- 
cussed, to scientific journals, schools, 
manufacturers, and to other interested 
individuals. Once each year a combined 
bulletin is issued containing all the papers 
which have been published during the 
previous twelve months. This bulletin 
goes chiefly to libraries and to persons who 
have a general interest in research. 

Bulletin No. 2 which contains accounts 
of the investigations carried on during 
1920-1921 has just been issued. It con- 
tains seventeen papers on six major sub- 
jects Aero Dynamics, Mechanical En- 
gineering, Sewage Disposal, Current Trans- 
formers, Structural Design, and Concrete 
Mixtures. Many of the papers have 
already received a wide distribution, re- 
quests for copies of the papers on Current 
Transformers having been received from 
almost every part of the world. 

This year some ten major investigations 
are being carried on. * 

One of the practical achievements, 
though of a minor character, of the School 
work is, the discovery of two satisfactory 
colours for the new C.E. degree hood. 
Dr Boswell in his dye experiments evolved 
a particularly fine rose tint which will be 
used along with the University blue. 



Immediate Financial Needs of the University 

By SIR ROBERT FALCONER 
PRESIDENT, UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO 



The Editor of THE UNIVERSITY OF 
TORONTO MONTHLY suggests that the 
Alumni would be interested in a brief 
answer to the question "What are the 
immediate needs of the Provincial 
University?" 

In replying to this question it must be 
said that the first, the greatest, and the 
most immediate need is an assured and 
adequate income. To plan successfully 
for the future development of a great 
university is an impossible task when 
there is no means of forecasting the amount 
of money that will be available for neces- 
sary expansion. The state universities in 
the United States, where the usual form of 
state aid is a tax levied directly for univer- 
sity purposes, can lay their plans for at 
least two years in advance because they 
have the assurance of the size of the 
revenues upon which they can rely. The 
University of Toronto has been for several 
years in the position of being able to see 
not more than one year ahead so far as 
money is concerned. This has been a 
great handicap. To overcome this handi- 
cap the Report of the Royal Commission 
on University Finances recommended last 
year that the University's income be 
based on the revenue derived from suc- 
cession duties, because it is a fair assump- 
tion that the growth of the University 
will be in direct proportion to the growth 
of the wealth of the people of the Province. 

But, it may be asked, what does the 
Provincial University need in actual money 
at the present moment? Four new build- 
ings are long overdue; they should all be 
commenced immediately. A new Forestry 
and Botany building is an urgent need. 
Canada needs foresters, needs them now, 
and will need them increasingly in the 
next decade. To train foresters for this 
great country in a few rooms of a re- 
habilitated private residence, where neither 
space nor facilities are available for the 
work, is impossible. Conditions in the 
present Forestry and Botany building are 
almost intolerable and hamper the staff 
to a disheartening degree. 

Unless some relief in accommodation 
can be provided almost immediately, 



University College must continue to exist 
under conditions that constitute, to say 
the least, a grave injustice. More class- 
rooms, larger classrooms and, perhaps most 
important of all, better- ventilated class- 
rooms are absolutely essential. 

The present heating plant is seriously 
overtaxed in heating the buildings now in 
use. A supplementary plant is needed 
and, without such addition, no new 
buildings can be heated and lighted. 

Under conditions as they exist women 
students are denied the advantages to 
which university women are entitled. They 
need a gymnasium, a women's union, and 
residences. 

The four buildings mentioned are needed 
now. To build them $1,500,000 spread 
over the next three years will be necessary. 
It is difficult to see how the University 
can attempt to do its duty to the Province 
unless these are at once provided. And 
other buildings are scarcely less urgently 
required. 

In addition to new buildings, an aug- 
mented revenue for maintenance is essen- 
tial. An increase of $200,000 per annum 
for the next three years should be available 
to meet the growing requirements. Even 
though standards are raised, a growing 
Province-will probably send more students 
each year to the Provincial University. 
Research is not yet adequately provided 
for. The recent meetings of the American 
Association for the Advancement of Science 
furnish abundant evidence of the way in 
which research contributes to every phase 
of the national life. ,More and still more 
money must be provided for this type of 
work. Many departments are under- 
staffed; the library requires a greatly 
increased revenue. The Province demands 
more university extension service of the 
type which the universities in Great 
Britain and the United States supply 
to their constituencies and extension work 
is necessarily expensive. 

Such are, in brief, the immediate and 
pressing needs of the University of Toronto. 
It may be of interest to the Alumni and 
friends of the University to know that, 
had the arrangement of 1906 regarding the 



196 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



197 



University's share of the succession duties 
been still in force, this University would 
now be receiving annually a little more 
than has been suggested above as a neces- 
sary minimum. 

And the Provincial University has a 
lower cost per student than most, if not 
all, universities of similar size. This has 
frequently been demonstrated. Sir Alfred 



Ewing, Principal and Vice-Chancellor of 
the University of Edinburgh, in an address 
delivered recently, stated that the average 
cost per student for the 26,000 students 
in Great Britain, exclusive of those in 
Oxford and Cambridge, is $293. In the 
University of Toronto this average cost 
is $279. 



The Village Pump Conception of a University 

Education. 

By E. W. BEATTY '98 
PRESIDENT, CANADIAN PACIFIC RAILWAY 



THE article "Does Higher Education 
Pay the Province?"* throws down 
a challenge to the alumni of the 
University of Toronto. As a graduate of 
that university, I am asked to take up 
that challenge. 

In the first place, the writer of the 
article seems to place a university edu- 
cation in the same category as a village 
pump, a local fixture intended for the 
villagers who have paid for it. In the 
second place it asks the alumni to perform 
a duty which is more properly that of the 
Board of Governors. The fact that a 
graduate of past years admits he has 
benefitted by his education at the Uni- 
versity of Toronto has only an indirect 
bearing on the question of whether the 
Ontario taxpayers should support that 
university now. That graduate may or 
may not have achieved financial success, 
may or may not ascribe his success to his 
university training, may or may not be 
contributing to the prosperity of Ontario, 
but the vital questions remain "Is that 
training still efficient, still up-to-date, 
still as good as that of other Canadian 
universities? Is it accessible to the poor 
man or is it the privilege of the few? Has 
it a bearing on practical life or does it 
fit a man only for life in the clouds?" 

"This article was printed in the December issue 
of THE MONTHLY. It was pointed out that Uni- 
versity education is provided at less than cost and 
that therefore a special obligation rests upon 
graduates, and argued that if it could be con- 
clusively demonstrated that it was to the benefit of 
the Province to thus provide higher education, the 
problem of University finances would automatically 
solve itself. 



As to the first point, the "village pump" 
conception of a university education surely 
fails to realize the proper function of a 
university, namely, to fit its graduates 
for professions which are of benefit to 
their fellow citizens and to humanity at 
large. Under the British North America 
Act, education was entrusted to the tender 
mercies of the Provincial Governments as 
trustees for the people within their bound- 
aries, not with the idea that they should 
educate their people merely for the benefit 
of their province, but to relieve the Federal 
Administration of duties which the pro- 
vinces had had experience in fulfilling. 
Just as a parent is expected to give his 
children a reasonable start in life, so the 
province is naturally expected to do the 
same for its citizens, providing special 
educational opportunities for those of 
special ability. The success of his child 
repays the average parent through the 
pride it inspires, infinitely more than any 
return of cash expended, and surely a 
university is considered to justify itself 
by the reputation of its degrees and the 
achievements of its graduates. The uni- 
versity that honours its graduates in 
proportion to the cash they return has 
the soul of a pawnbroker. A well 
brought up child naturally sees that its 
parents do not come to grief, and out of 
sheer affection delights to help them. 
An occasional reminder of their relation- 
ship does no harm 1 . But a parent has 
duties as well as rights, and it is the duty 
of any Government entrusted with the 
control of education in a civilized nation 
of to-day to provide education of the very 



198 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



best, or else lose the right to exercise a 
function which it has not properly fulfilled. 
As to the second point, instead of de- 
pending on the sentimental endorsation of 
graduates scattered all over the Continent, 
indeed over the world, surely the best way 
to convince the taxpayers of Ontario is to 
show them that the education provided by 
the University of Toronto is good, prac- 
tical, and accessible to all who have 
talent. If the taxpayers cannot come to 
the University and see for themselves, tell 
them the story in moving pictures, in 
the newspapers, in pamphlets, in speeches 
and addresses to clubs, churches and 
institutions. If the University can show 
it provides teaching capable of producing 
good doctors, dentists, mining, mechanical 
and civil engineers, lawyers, architects, 
teachers, out of their sons and daughters, 
the people of Ontario will not stop to ask 
whether the graduates are to give the 
benefits of their teaching to Ontario or 
to % the Yukon. Unless they have very 
much changed since I lived in Ontario 
the people of that province will be glad 
to support their universities out of patriotic 
pride and in the belief that they are doing 
the right thing. They will be perfectly 
content to see the graduates of the Uni- 
versity of Toronto go into the world, 
build bridges in Alberta, cure patients in 
British Columbia, fill teeth in Quebec, win 
cases before the Privy Council in London, 
preach the gospel to white, black or yellow 
without asking whether Ontario is getting 



a return with or without interest in its 
original investment. 

In the last analysis, the problem of 
whether it pays or not for a province to 
educate her citizens at less than cost to 
it, depends upon what value is attached to 
higher education. In my opinion, the' 
question is no longer open for argument. 
All education pays, both directly and in- 
directly; whether that payment can be 
calculated in language of financial return 
or in benefits to the community or the in- 
dividuals comprising the community is 
immaterial. Modern civilization is based 
upon the theory that the better educated 
are the citizens of any country, the better 
equipped they are to grapple with the 
problems confronting all humans, whether 
they be problems of material advancement, 
industrial development, economic con- 
ditions, or sociological or moral problems. 
The educated, trained man is considered 
an asset and to have an advantage over 
those who are not. All Canadian pro- 
vinces should be well forward in educa- 
tional facilities and the use to which those 
facilities are put. The advantages should 
be open to all and if those advantages cost 
the province heavily in money, they would 
still be more than warranted. To me it 
seems axiomatic that the more accessible 
to all classes in Ontario, poor and rich, is 
the advantage of higher education, the 
more the province can be said to be keep- 
ing pace with the necessities of present 
day life. 



Is the University of Toronto a Democratic Failure? 

By MAIN JOHNSON, '11 



IS it true that the University of Toronto 
gets all the money it deserves? 

It is a state institution. If it does 
not receive sufficient financial support, 
does not that automatically show that it 
fails to fulfil its proper function? 

If the University performed adequate 
services for the people, would not they 
vie with academic officials and organiza- 
tions in demanding adequate support 
from the Government? 

If there was pressure from members of 
the Legislature on the Government, would 
not funds be provided? 

If there was pressure from constituents 
on members, would not members urge the 
Government to act? 



Are the members of the Legislature urg- 
ing the Cabinet? Are the constituents 
pressing the members? Is there a spon- 
taneous popular demand of monetary 
support for the University? 

If not, does it not show that the people 
of the Province are indifferent about 
University finances? 

And does not that register a democratic 
failure for the University? 

The issue is not as simple as these queries 
would suggest. The problem of education 
is particularly complex even in the midst 
of prevalent modern complexity. 

But there is a seed, a considerable grain 
of truth in the viewpoint presented. 
It is a viewpoint that in the past has often 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



199 



been neglected or spurned. Even to-day 
it does not receive the attention it merits. 

The University of Toronto can ask 
for private donations. In so far as it 
receives them, it can afford to be inde- 
pendent of public opinion. But funda- 
mentally and legally it is a state university, 
one that is actually asking increased 
financial assistance from the state. In 
so far as this is the case, a policy of aloof- 
ness, of isolation from the everyday life 
of the people is obviously unwise, even if 
that obviousness remains obscure to up- 
holders of the exclusive, aristrocratic view. 

The University is moving in the right 
direction. Genuine improvements, en- 
couraging advances have been made in 
the last year or so. The Extension system 
throughout the province is being enlarged 
and more vitality shown. A course for 
farmers has become an annual event. 



Publicity for University aims, needs and 
accomplishments has improved. These 
and other signs of a desire to keep closer 
to the people are welcome. 

What needs emphasizing now, what 
needs to be shouted if necessary so that 
it will be heard, is that this IS the right 
road. If only that pathway were followed, 
with a cumulative energy and enthusiasm, 
the University would soon find itself 
coming out of the woods on to a highway 
not only of affluence but of popular in- 
fluence. 

Recent appointees to the Board of 
Governors, men like Wallace and Good, 
leaders in the farm movement, have an 
opportunity to emphasize the drastically 
democratic needs of the University. The 
situation would be still further helped if 
they had as colleagues some representatives 
of organized labour. 



University Professors as Luncheon Club Speakers. 

By E. P. BROWN, '01 
FORMER HEAD OF ONTARIO CANADIAN CLUB 



SINCE 1887 when the University Ex- 
tension movement, which had as its 
central object that of establishing an 
intimate relation between the university 
and the people, was brought to America, 
it has grown enormously in volume and 
influence. The movement had been 
launched in Oxford many years before, but 
the nature, urgency and extent of the 
instruction required in the United States 
was so different from that in England, that 
it had to be carried on there on a much 
wider basis. Lectures were supplemented 
by correspondence work and in the latter 
alone, the University of Wisconsin, a 
conspicuous pioneer in the movement, 
served more students than were in actual 
attendance within the University. Wis- 
consin was inspired by no narrow ambition. 
Its President, Dr C. R. van Hise, in the 
course of an address to the Canadian 
Club, Toronto, in October, 1913, said: 
"Everyone of us should be students in a 
continuation school throughout life; it 
is to serve this large purpose for the people 
of Wisconsin that the University Extension 
Division of the University was organized" 
and added that by the Extension work of 
his University some 200,000 Wisconsin 
people had been directly and indirectly 
reached during the preceding year. 



Since the war particularly, very notice- 
able has been the eager demand for the 
service of learning that Extension teaching 
gives. So too the large attendance at 
public lectures during the last year or 
two surprised and impressed those in 
touch with them. If the demand for 
instruction be clear and strong, as I believe 
it is, and if the university is in great part 
able to satisfy this demand, then the matter 
of ways and means becomes all essential. 

It has occurred to me that the Depart- 
ment of University Extension at the Uni- 
versity of Toronto, in addition to the 
admirably useful work which it is at 
present doing, though through lack of 
adequate funds it was only able last year 
to reach some 3,000 persons outside the 
University might well use the Canadian 
Clubs and similar organizations through- 
out the Province as centres for lectures 
and teaching and by so doing not only 
perform a large and valuable service to 
the Province generally, but increase the 
usefulness and prestige of the yniversity 
itself. These Clubs, of which there are 
about fifty in Ontario with an approximate 
membership of 20,000 men and women 
who keenly realize their need of education 
have during the past twenty-five years 
contributed not a little to quickening, 



200 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



informing, and steadying public opinion 
by inviting distinguished persons of differ- 
ent nationalities to address their members. 
In the larger cities, such as Toronto, 
Ottawa, and Hamilton, there is no great 
difficulty in obtaining speakers, but in 
smaller and especially in out of the way 
places it has often been otherwise and as a 
result some Clubs have languished, others 
ceased to exist and this difficulty has also 
acted as a deterrent in the -formation of 
new Clubs. 

Why should not the staff of the Uni- 
versity be enabled to give their assistance 
to these Clubs and like organizations? To 
do this work satisfactorily, it would be 
necessary no doubt to relieve the lecturers 
concerned, from a portion of their routine 
University duties and also to substantially 
increase the present meagre financial ap- 
propriations for that purpose. The pres- 
ent Provincial Government would, I am 
inclined to think, sympathetically con- 
sider a request for further funds, if the, 
matter was presented on the basis of a 
carefully thought out scheme covering 



among other points, lecturers, subjects, 
places, classes and number of people to be 
reached. 

The broadening out of the Extension 
movement will, I am convinced, not only 
intellectually stimulate the people of the 
Province, but will wisely enlarge the service 
of the University; this has been the general 
experience in the United States. It is 
important, vitally important from the 
standpoint of the University, that as many 
people as possible in Ontario be in direct 
personal and grateful contact with it, or 
some of its representatives, and I know 
of no better way of gaining the confidence 
and support of the people than by a 
further development of the present Uni- 
versity Extension work. If this contact 
be more generally established, it is not 
only highly probable, but I believe certain, 
that the Members of the Legislature, very 
quickly, will respond to the friendly pres- 
sure of public opinion and a more enlight- 
ened and liberal support of the L T niversity 
will be the happy result, 



The Plight of University College 

By PRINCIPAL MAURICE HUTTON 



THE congestion of University College is 
an old story, which, if it escapes be- 
coming tedious, only does so because 
the congestion increasing every session 
draws ever fresh attention to itself. 

There was nothing which impressed the 
Commissioners last winter as the round 
they made of the College one wintry 
day. I was called upon suddenly, some- 
where about ten o'clock in the morn- 
ing, to personally conduct this tour. I 
had made no strategic plans, I meditated 
no dramatic coup, but I rather expected 
that the Commissioners none the less 
would be surprised and a little shocked. 

I conducted them at once to the lower 
regions of the old Residence building, the 
long dark passage where bath rooms once 
were made for the students in Residence, 
where subsequently apples and butter 
were stored. We paced the long passage 
and I turned into a little room on the left, 
below the level of the ground, once used 
as a servants' dining room. There we 
found the third member of the staff in 
Greek conducting a seminar for a graduate 
student who was taking up some research 



work in the natural sciences in connection 
with the origin of the science in ancient 
Greece. 

In the scullery room across the passage, 
the corresponding member of the Latin 
staff, Professor Duff, meets his classes. 
Access is not necessarily by the long dark 
passage by which I took the Commis- 
sioners; there is also immediate access 
from the open air by way of some area 
steps, which descend from the. garden 
level. x In winter when snow and ice are 
coating the area, descent is none too safe 
on this side, and I saved the Commission 
from the fate which befell the fourth year 
class in Classics a few weeks earlier. 

Having inspected the classical sculleries 
we went on to the kitchen itself and in the 
kitchen we found a much larger class 
assembleol; while in the dining room above 
meets the largest Latin class which remains 
undivided. 

Now it is not merely that sculleries, 
kitchens, and dining halls are not precisely 
the natural places for classical and other 
instruction; there is the further point to 
which I desire to call, attention still more 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



201 




VIEWS SHOWING THE CONGESTION IN THE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE BUILDING 

That on the right is Lecture Room 52 which was formerly the kitchen for the University Dining Hall. It is 28' square 
and seats 54 students. The only natural light and ventilation secured is from the two small windows shown, and from 
a 9 foot skylight. The view on the left is of Professor Woodhead's room in which 12 Honour Latin students meet reg- 
ularly. This room is 18' long, 12' wide, and 9' high. Both rooms are 3' below the ground level. 



emphatically. The use of these places 
for lecture rooms leaves the students of 
this College with absolutely no place where 
they can meet out of lecture hours in a 
College building. The Literary and Ath- 
letic Society asks for some sort of common 
room. There is no common room for the 
College ; not even a subterranean and cast- 
off kitchen can be offered them. Hart 
House of course is splendid; but it is in 
no sense their building; it cannot be a 
common room for University College. 

I have dwelt perhaps upon the spectacu- 
lar features of this congestion. The less 
spectacular are perhaps the more trying. 
Many members of the staff have no 
private rooms where they can see students 
privately and revise their work. For 
example, the department of English is 
above all other departments committed 
to this task of criticism and discussion, 
but Professors Alexander and Malcolm 
Wallace have but one room between them. 
Not only can they not see students at 
one and the same time but if either of 
them is returning students' essays, the 
other has no retreat wherein to pursue 
his own work undisturbed. 

The same is true with the other members 
of the English staff; Professors Keys and 
Clawson occupy the same room; Miss 
Wookey and Miss Waddington have only 
'one room. Similarly in French, Professor 
Cameron and Monsieur Bibet share a room : 



Professors de Champ and Evans ; Professors 
McKellar and Moraud; Professors Andison 
and Tilby share Professor Will's room (in 
his absence); so in German, Professors 
Needier and Fairley; Professors Holt and 
Hedman have one room between them. 
It must be remembered that in some 
respects conditions in University College, 
in spite of the building of a separate 
Library, a separate Convocation Hall, a 
separate Museum, and a separate Physics 
Building, are even worse than when the 
College covered and included all these 
functions. 

In those days there was no Superin- 
tendent's department and no Bursar's 
offices. The Superintendent's building 
was part of the home' of the Dean of 
Residence. To-day there is no Residence 
and no Dean. The Bursar's quarters were 
down town, a couple of- miles from the 
University. To-day they cover five lecture 
rooms which once were devoted to the 
special work of University College. 

There is no item in the Commissioners' 
report of last spring which excited warmer 
approval than their recommendation of a 
new Administration Building, to embrace 
the activities of Bursar, Registrar, and 
Superintendent, and to restore the south 
eastern block of University College to its 
proper purposes. There is no *tem the 
adjournment of which is more inconvenient 
and embarrassing. 



Scientists of America Meet at University. 



18,000 DELEGATES ATTEND CONVENTION OF A.A.A.S. 



THE second Toronto meeting of the 
American Association for the Ad- 
vancement of Science has been hailed 
by many as one of the most successful 
gatherings of the Association. It was 
undoubtedly well-organized and the task 
of looking after 1,800 delegates from all 
parts of the United States and Canada, 
from the moment they detrained, was 
admirably handled. 

To go into details about the meetings 
of the different sections and sub-sections 
would be too gigantic a task to attempt in 
this small space. Some idea may be 
given, however, of the general outline of 
events. The conference was officially 
opened on Tuesday evening, December 
27, at a meeting in Convocation Hall when 
an address was given by Dr L. O. Howard, 
the retiring president of the Association. 
The second general meeting was held on 
Wednesday in order that the -members 
might have the privilege of hearing Pro- 
fessor Bateson, the eminent British Bi- 
ologist who was the guest of "the Associa- 
tion. At the third general meeting Sir 
Adam Beck gave a very interesting 
lecture on the hydro-electric development 
in Ontario, illustrating it with motion 
pictures. 

Apart from these general meetings, there 
were. a good many social entertainments. 
There was an exhibition of educational 
motion pictures of a popular character and 
a reception at the Royal Ontario Museum. 
One of the most popular features was the 
Hart House Conversazione when Hart 
House was thrown open from top to 
bottom and the students gave an exhibi- 
tion of all their activities. Water polo 
and indoor base-ball games were put on 
for the benefit of the visitors. Besides 
these entertainments there was a musical 
programme in the Music Room and several 
short performances in the Theatre. All 
this was followed by refreshments in the 
Great Hall. Later in the week there was 
an exhibit of skating and ice-hockey at 
the Arena put on by the Toronto Skating 
Club. For the women who attended the 
conference tea was served daily in the 
women's reception room in the Library, 



and the hitherto inviolable sanctity of 
Hart House was broken by a special 
dinner given in honour of the women on 
Friday, December 30. 

These were merely the added features 
of the meetings which made the conference 
so enjoyable to all. The actual work of 
the conference of course, was the dis- 
cussion of scientific questions and the 
reading of papers. There were seventeen 
sections and each member attended the 
meeting of the section or sub-section 
which dealt with the particular science in 
which he was interested. In all there 
were something like 1,000 papers read. 
Of these about fifty or sixty were given 
by graduates or members of the staff of 
the University of Toronto. 

Great credit is due Professor J. C. 
Fields and the local committee upon whose 
shoulders fell the huge task of the organ- 
ization of the convention. The publicity 
work which was in the hands of Dr A.G. 
Huntsman was particularly effective (the 
daily papers gave detailed accounts of 
the meetings) and it has been acclaimed 
by the Toronto Globe as the most efficient 
press service ever put into operation for 
any convention held in Toronto. Above 
all, Toronto was honoured by the election 
of the new president, Professor J. P. 
McMurrich, Head of the Department of 
Anatomy in the University. On the 
whole, the A.A.A.S. convention will be a 
memorable event in the annals of Toronto. 

An incomplete list of the Toronto 
graduates and members of th6 staff who 
gave papers at the conference includes 
the following: 

Members of the staff: S. Beatty, E. F. 
Burton, H. P. Bell, E. A. Bott, G. S. 
Brett, W. A. Clemens, G. H. Duff, C. R. 
Fay, R- Eraser, Miss C. W. Fritz, J. H. 
French, A. G. Huntsman, G. M. Jones, 
W. Lash Miller, J. C. McLennan, J. P. 
McMurrich, J. M. D. Olmsted, W. A. 
Parks, I. R. Pounder, J. G. Spnuv, 
Wilson Taylor, Ellis Thompson, R. B. 
Thomson, M. Walker, C. A. Zavitz. 

Other than members of the staff: G. A. 
MacCallum, F. W. Merchant, Sir Clifford 
Sifton, A. F. Hunter, W. G. Miller, R. A. 



202 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



203 



Ross, S. C. Lee, L. Caesar, Miss L. D. Motherwell, R. C. Treherne, E. G. Mc- 

Cummings, J. Patterson, R. Meldrum Dougall, J. T. Phair, R. J. McDiarmid, 

Stewart, C. C. Smith, R. E. Delury, W. H. T. W. Dwight, E. G. Whittaker, F. J. 

Collins, B. S. Pickett, C. M. Hincks, Morris, F. I. Alcook, J. P. Henderson, 

W. E. Harper, J. W. Swaine, M. E. Wilson, A. B. Connell, Mibb j. G. Wright, H. G. 

Oliver Bowles, A. H. MacLennan, R. M. Crawford, H. H. Plaskett. 



Medical Extension Work Develops 

By V. E. HENDERSON 
PROFESSOR OF PHARMACOLOGY, UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO 



ONE of the most promising of recent 
developments in the Faculty of 
Medicine is extension work. Con- 
structive efforts to help the graduate 
practitioner have led to several steps to 
aid him in his development. 

Medical Societies have grown up in all 
the counties of the Province. They re- 
quire papers for their meetings. The 
University is assisting by supplying, 
through the Ontario Medical Association, 
men to talk at such meetings. This work 
has grown astonishingly; over a hundred 
and twenty lectures have been given by 
University men before local societies out- 
side Toronto since the first of July. 

The Faculty is publishing also a bulletin 
at irregular intervals, which is sent to 
every physician in the Province. This 
contains rather didactic articles intended 
to be useful to the practitioner. It also 
serves as a vehicle for the distribution of 
information in regard to special courses. 

For the physician who can come to the 
University, several short refresher courses 
in Medicine, Surgery and Obstetrics have 
been given. Each course lasts six days. 
These courses have been deservedly popu- 
lar. On several occasions more men have 
wished to attend than could be accommo- 
dated. Unfortunately, owing to the bur- 
den of teaching, these courses have been 
given in the Christmas holidays and in 
May, times inconvenient for the practi- 
tioner. 

A month's course has twice been given 
in July in the Department of Paediatrics 
in the Sick Children's Hospital. This 
has already made a reputation for the 
Staff and the Hospital, and last year men 
came from the United States to take it. 
Diseases of children appeal so strongly 
to the physician and the advances in this 
field have been so great of recent years that 
such a course cannot fail to be a great 



boon. Nowhere on the continent are 
the facilities for such a course equal to 
Toronto. 

Several short (one month) courses in 
X-ray have been arranged at the Toronto 
General Hospital. Here, too, the ex- 
cellent facilities make condensed teaching 
easy. 

In post-graduate work proper, the 
Faculty is also advancing. Our M.D. 
degree will in the future be given only after 
a splendid course of three years spent in 
the Department of Medicine and the 
scientific laboratories. A Master of Sur- 
gery (Ch.M.) will be given at the end of an 
equally long period. These degrees will 
definitely mark their recipients as well 
qualified men in their special fields. 
The degrees will be coveted and will soon 
tend to distinguish the University of 
Toronto. 

For the Diploma of Public Health we 
have as many candidates registered as in 
any school in America and our course 
offers exceptional facilities for field and 
laboratory work, which are hardly to be 
equalled elsewhere. 

A new departure has been the institution 
of a Diploma in Radiology which will be 
given at the end of a course of nine months. 
This diploma, similar to that offered by 
Cambridge University, will give not only 
a thorough technical training in Radiology 
but also thorough training in the physical 
principles underlying the employment of 
all types of rays in diagnosis and treat- 
ment. 

That a Faculty, more over-burdened 
with undergraduate teaching than any- 
other in America, can, in acMition to 
maintaining its high undergraduate stand- 
ards, thus take practical steps to meet 
the demands of the graduate is evidence 
that the welfare of the profession is being 
jealously advanced by its efforts. 



Periodical Publications of the University, 

By W. S. WALLACE 
ASSISTANT LIBRARIAN, UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO 



University journalism has been v gorous 
for many years in the University of 
Toronto. To attempt at this date to give 
an exhaustive account of all the periodical 
publications, either graduate or under- 
graduate, which have been issued in con- 
nection with the University, would be a 
task of no small proportions; but it may 
be of interest to the readers of the UNI- 
VERSITY MONTHLY if the present article 
attempts a brief survey of these publica- 
tions, with a view to indicating the charac- 
ter and date of each. 

The first unofficial publication in con- 
nection with the University of which the 
writer has been able to obtain informa- 
tion, is a small volume entitled Fasti, 
issued in 1850. This little volume, which 
is now very rare, contains merely a list 
of the officers, graduates, and under- 
graduates of the University, together with 
other information of a semi-official sort. 
It was brought down to date by a similar 
volume published in 1887, copies of which 
are more frequently found. 

The first real adventure into University 
journalism, however, was a monthly peri- 
odical entitled White and Blue, founded in 
1879 by Mr W. F. Maclean and a group 
of his fellow-undergraduates. This journal 
existed for only one year, but it was the 
true predecessor of the Varsity, which was 
founded on October 7, 1880. The Varsity 
has had a chequered career. For five 
years, from 1880 to 1886, it described itself 
as U A Weekly Review of Education, 
University Politics, and Events". In 1886 
this sub-title was changed to "A Weekly 
Journal of Literature, University Thought, 
and Events." About the period of the 
University fire, it was issued irregularly. 
In 1908 it was changed from a weekly 
journal to a newspaper, published twice 
a week; and in 1911 the number of weekly 
issues was increased to three. This is the 
form in which, during the academic year, 
the Varsity now appears. 

During its long career, the Varsity has 
had several rivals. About 1884 a short- 
lived journal known as The Fasti made, I 
am told, its appearance. In 1897 there 
appeared a journal entitled College Topics, 
which lasted for five years, and was merged 



with the Varsity in 1902. In 1897 there 
appeared also an annual known as Sesame, 
published by the women graduates and 
undergraduates of University College, 
which continued in existence for three or 
four years. In February, 1910, a monthly 
magazine, The Arbor, which was conducted 
mainly by undergraduates, made its debut, 
and lasted until April, 1913. Four years 
later, in February, 1917, a similar monthly 
journal, The Rebel, entered the lists, and 
it pursued its rebellious career until in 
1920 it transformed into the Canadian 
Forum. But it should be distinctly under- 
stood, the Canadian Forum has no con- 
nection with the University of Toronto. 

It is perhaps worthy of note that there 
exist in the University Library no copies 
of White and Blue, or of The Fasti (the 
journal, not the annual publication), and 
no copies of College Topics. If any readers 
of these pages have in their possession even 
stray copies of any of the numbers of these 
periodicals, I need hardly say that, should 
the owners feel disposed to present them 
to the University Library, their generosity 
would be much appreciated. 

It does not seem necessary to say any- 
thing here about such College journals as 
A eta Victoriana, The Trinity University 
Review, and the old Knox College Monthly, 
which belong rather to one College than 
to the whole University. Nor is it neces- 
sary to say anything in detail about the 
annual volume Torontonensis, which began 
in 1898, though it is perhaps worthy of 
note that the Year of 1892 published a 
Class Book which would seem to have been 
the spiritual ancestor of Torontonensis. 

The history of UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO 
MONTHLY is something to which, in these 
pages, a separate, article might fittingly 
be devoted. Let it suffice to say here that 
the first publication which partook in any 
sense of the character of the UNIVERSITY OF 
TORONTO MONTHLY was the University of 
Toronto Quarterly, which was founded in 
March, 1895, and which died a natural 
death in December, 1896. The Quarterly 
existed apparently for the purpose of 
publishing the papers read before the 
departmental societies of the University, 
and in the eight numbers that were pub- 



204 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



205 



lished are contained a number of inter- 
esting first-flights by men who have since 
made reputations in quite other lines. 
The UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 
proper was founded in July, 1900. In 
1907 the name was changed to the UNIVER- 
SITY MONTHLY, and in December, 1918, 
it was changed back to its original form. 

It does not fall within the scope of this 
survey to notice separate undergraduate 
publications, such as the 'Varsity Book of 
Prose and Poetry issued in 1885, and the 
volume of Some Undergraduate Verse, 
published in 1906. To track down all the 
occasional publications of this sort would 
involve a good deal of research and enquiry. 
Indeed, it is quite possible that even 
among the periodicals listed above there 
may be omissions. If so, the writer would 



be much indebted to any correspondent 
who would have the kindness to bring these 
omissions to his attention. 

The time has come, it would seem, when 
a concerted effort should be made to gather 
together the fugitive and already fast dis- 
appearing material which should constitute 
the archives from which the detailed his- 
tory of the University may some day be 
written. There will take place within a 
few years the centenary of the founding 
of King's College that is to say, of the 
University of Toronto in 1827. Might 
I suggest that the approach of this occa- 
sion might be fittingly celebrated, inter 
alia, by the establishment in the Univer- 
sity Library of a memorial collection of 
University records and publications? 



Military Studies and the C. O. T. C. 



Squad 'SHUN! Form FOURS! 
RIGHT!.., 

As this note is being written, the 
voice of the Drill Sergeant breaks in 
between the rumblings of the street cars. 
But his tones seem milder than they used 
to be almost solicitous at times. 

In the large lot adjoining the old Schom- 
berger House at 184 College Street which 
is now occupied by the Military Studies 
Department, the Alumni Federation, and 
the Records Office, a squad of C.O.T.C. 
recruits are being drilled. Almost any 
afternoon they can be seen going through 
the manoeuvres which were so familiar 
to many during the war ; and idlers among 
the passers-by gaze over the fence and 
wonder what it is all about. 

The activities of the military department 
of the University fall into divisions, the 
study of military subjects as an academic 
requirement and the more practical work 
of the Canadian Officers Training Corps. 
In the former, courses are given which 
constitute options for pass subjects in any 
of the Arts Courses of the second, third, 
and fourth years. The work of the Officers 
Training Corps leads to a War Office 
certificate for officers and may be taken 
in lieu of the physical training which is 
ordinarily prescribed and which is com- 
pulsory for all first and second year 
students. 



In the Military Studies course, lectures 
are given on Tactics, Typography, Mus- 
ketry, Army Organization and Admini- 
istfation, and subjects relating to the 
resources and defence of the Empire. 
This session, in all three years, there are 
fifty-seven enrolled. The lectures are 
given by Col. W. R. Lang, Director of the 
Department, and Brig. -Gen. Cartwright. 
Military drill and musketry courses are 
required as practical work. 

The C.O.T.C. has this year a strength 
of 180, nearly all of whom have had previous 
training in High School Cadet Corps. 
It is organized in companies, according to 
Faculties, and is officered by members of 
the University staff under the general 
command of Col. Lang. The work of the 
Corps is set by the War Office and is 
standard among all officers' training corps 
in the universities of the Empire. The 
certificates granted, exempt the holders 
from examination for commissioned rank 
on joining a militia unit. Apart from 
military drill, the members of the Corps 
are required to take musketry training at 
the Hart House miniature ranges. 

The Department possesses fun uniform 
equipment and rifles and also a number of 
Lewis guns for instructional purposes. 
It has a reading-room and library. The 
library is entirely the gift of friends of the 
University and is constantly being added to. 



Forty Years of the Engineering Society 

By PETER GILLESPIE 
PROFESSOR OF APPLIED MECHANICS, UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO 



TO embrace in its membership, over 
800 undergraduates in addition to 
honorary and life members; to hold 
between thirty and forty meetings during 
the academic year; to conduct a supply 
department with an annual turn-over of 
nearly $15,000; to publish yearly, a 
volume of transactions; to conduct annual- 
ly an amateur vaudeville performance 
(Spasms) catering not only to students 
and graduates but the general public as 
well; to maintain an orchestra whose 
musical performances compare well with 
those of professional organizations; to 
hold annually one of the largest of Uni- 
versity dinners and one of the jolliest of 
University dances these are some of the 
privileges and responsibilities of the Engin- 
eering Society of the University of Toronto. 
It was in the winter of 1885 that this 
Society had its beginning. In that year 
Mr T. Kennard Thomson, then a second 
year student in the School of Practical 
Science, now an eminent consulting 'En- 
gineer of New York, conceived the idea 
of founding a technical society among his 
fellow students. In spite of the fact that 
the consensus of student opinion seemed 
unsympathetic Thomson was not dis- 
couraged. He invited the second and 
third year classes, Professors Galbraith 
and ElHs and a few outside friends to 
dinner on the evening of February 6 and 
took advantage of the opportunity to 
propose to them his scheme. The en- 
dorsement seems then to have been quite 
unanimous and forthwith a committee 
was formed to draft a constitution. The 
Engineering Society thus came into being 
and with John Galbraith as its first 
President and Mr Thomson as its first 
Secretary began what has since proved to 
be quite an illustrious career. Its charter 
membership numbered thirty-four. A list 
of the chief office-holders since 1885 is 
given herewith: 

ORGANIZATION COMMITTEE 
President PROFESSOR J. GALBRAITH 
Secretary T. K. THOMSON 
3rd Year Representative B. A. LUDGATE 
2nd Year_Representative J. R. GORDON 
-J. C. I 



1st Year Representative- 



BURNS 



PRESIDENTS 
1885-86 President PROFESSOR J. GALBRAITH 

Vice-President E. B. HERMON 
1886-87 President PROFESSOR J. GALBRAITH 



Vice-President J. C. BURNS 
1887-88 President PROFES? OR J. GALBRAITH 
Vice-President C. H. C. WRIGHT 

STUDENT PRESIDENTS 
1888-89 H. E. T. HAULTAIN 
1889-90 J. A. DUFF 
1890-91 J. K. ROBINSON 
1891-92 R. W. THOMSON 
1892-93 W. A. LEA 
1893-94 J. D. SHIELDS 
1894-95 A. E. BLACKWOOD 
1895-96 G. M. CAMPBELL 
1896-97 C. F. KING 
1897-98 H. S. CARPENTER 
1898-99 W. E. H. CARTER 
1899-00 THOS. SHANKS 
1900-01 F. W. THOROLD 
1901-02 R. H. BARRETT 
1Q02-03 D. SINCLAIR 
1^03-04 J. T. HAMILTON 
1904-05 E. A. JAMES 
1905-06 T. R. LOUDON 
1906-07 K. A. MACKENZIE 
1907-08 T. H. HOGG. 
1908-09 R. J. MARSHALL 
1909-10 W. D. BLACK 
1910-11 A. D. CAMPBELL 

1911-12 W. B. McPHERSON 

1912-13 J. E. RITCHIE 
1913-14 F. C. MECHIN 
1914-15 E. D. GRAY 
1915-16 C. E. HASTINGS, W. 

B. HONEYWELL 

(acting) and W. L. 

DOBBIN 

1916-17 J. BANIGAN 
1917-18 C. E. MACDONALD 
1918-19 D. K. C. STRATHEARN 
1919-20 G. C. BENNETT 
1920-21 R. W. DOWNIE 
1921-22 JACK LANGFORD 

Membership in the original organization 
was voluntary. Later it was made com- 
pulsory and to give the Society a working 
revenue, 75 per cent, of the so-called 
" library-fee " collected by the Faculty 
from the students was paid over to the 
Treasurer of the Society. This with the 
revenues obtained from advertisers in the 
Transactions was usually sufficient to 
meet all expenses including the cost of 
publication. In 1907, it was arranged 
with the Faculty to collect from each 
student direct a fee of one dollar for the 
maintenance of the Society, which fee 
in 1911, was increased to $2.00 per student. 
This method superseded the earlier plan 
of allocating 75 per cent, of the "Library 
fee" for the purposes of the Society. 

In 1908, the original constitution was 
revised in order to permit of the holding 
of sectional meetings under the auspices 
of the parent society, the members being 
grouped somewhat according to the courses 
in which they were registered. This plan 
permitted a much larger number of students 
to participate in the preparation and dis- 
cussion of papers and avoided in a measure 



206 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



207 



the unwieldliness of the larger body which, 
however, retained its original existence. 
Over the sectional meetings the presidents 
of the various clubs preside and no matters 
affecting the Society as a whole are there 
discussed. As now constituted and in 
accordance with the revised constitution 
of 1921 the Engineering Society consists 
of a federation of clubs with the following 
designations: 

The Civil Club, 

The Mining and Metallurgical Club, 

The Mechanical and Electrical Club, 

The Architectural Club, 

The Chemical Club, 

The Debating Club. 

As set forth in its constitution the 
objects of the Engineering Society are to 
encourage original research in Engineering, 
to disseminate and preserve the results of 
such research, to foster a spirit of mutual 
assistance and co-operation among its 
members both prior and subsequent to 
graduation and to constitute a medium 
of communication between the student 
body in the Engineering Faculty and the 
University authorities or others outside 
of the University. 

The chief means of securing these de- 
siderata has been through the Society's 
publications, the first of which appeared in 
1887, as a modest pamphlet bearing the 
title "Papers Read before the Engineering 
Society of the School of Practical Science." 
By 1901, this pamphlet contained over 
200 pages and in addition to papers, 
included the retiring President's address 
and a list of members. At this time life 
members were those graduates who had 
paid a fee of one dollar and in consequence 
were entitled to receive without charge 
each year a copy of the pamphlet, the 
price of which was then 50 cents. 

In 1902 the Treasurer's and Auditor's 
reports were added. In 1905 the name of 
the publication was changed to Transactions 
of the Engineering Society of the University 
of Toronto. To the contents as indicated 
above was then added a programme of 
the regular meetings, a picture of the 
executive and a short biography of one of 
the Professors. The issue for 1907 con- 
tained J250 pages. In that year the 
Transactions gave place to Applied Science 
which until 1912 appeared monthly during 
the academic year, and after that date 
and until 1915 monthly during the entire 




JACK LANGFORD, M.C. 

President of the Engineering Society. He entered with 
the 1922 Class but lost three years in war service. 

year when financial difficulties conse- 
quent on the Great War necessitated 
the suspension of its publication. In 
July 1916, a single war issue was printed 
and this was the last to appear. Applied 
Science, like its predecessors, contained 
the best papers delivered before the Society 
and its affiliated clubs together with many 
articles from non-student contributors. 
Generally speaking the matter was of a 
superior character. During later years 
items of news concerning graduates and 
students and their activities were given 
much prominence in the journal. 

The question of reviving Applied Science 
as a monthly journal has since 1915 been 
carefully considered by the various Execu- 
tives. With the knowledge that if revived 
its publication would become a heavy 
drain on the exchequer of the Society, the 
officers have felt up to the present that the 
undertaking is not warranted. Instead, 
it was in 1920-21 decided to again issue 
the yearly Transactions and this^was done 
in the spring of the past year. With 
it was included a Year Book in which was 
recorded the various activities of the 
Science undergraduates during the year. 

The Toike Oike is a newspaper publica- 
tion which made its first appearance during 
the annual elections in 1911. It came out 



208 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



on the mornings of Wednesday, Thursday 
and Friday of election week and contained 
the policies and platforms of the candidates 
seeking election. For several years it 
continued to appear at election time but 
disappeared during the war. In the fall 
of 1920, it was revived by Mr Downie, 
appearing six times during the academic 
year. There was a freshman edition and 
a graduate edition and two editions 
appeared at election time. Toike Oike is 
now an official organ of the Society. 

The School Orchestra (The "Toike- 
Oikestra") was organized in 1911 by Mr 
John Temple. For some years it played 
at the meetings of the Society and at the 
dinners and dances but became disorgan- 
ized during the war. In 1919, largely 
through the efforts of Mr G. D. Maxwell 
it was revived and is to-day a very active 
organization. Some of the instruments 
have been purchased by the Society for 
the players, although most of these are 
privately owned. 

Prior to 1908, the Society had sold to 
students in the Engineering Faculty cer- 
tain supplies, such as drafting paper, 
instruments, etc., the profits on which, 
had been used to defray the general ex- 
penses of the Society. The work entailed 
in conducting the purchase and sale of 
these supplies became so great that in the 
year referred to a permanent secretary was 
employed. The editorship of Applied 
Science, established the previous year as a 
monthly journal was also included in his 
duties.; This position, first held by Mr 
K. A. McKenzie, and afterwards by Mr 
Hyndman Irwin, Mr J. E. Ritchie and 
Mr R. G. Lye in succession was discon- 
tinued in 1915 when Applied Science ceased 
publication and the office of permanent 
secretary was abolished. It is interesting 
to note that the first half of the current 
year, the profits from the sales in the 
supply department have been sufficient 
to meet all expenses, such as salaries and 
deficits with a remaining net profit of 
over $800. 

For over thirty-six years the Engineering 
Society has served its constituents. It 
has passed through its periods of prosperity 
and adversity, its membership very closely 
responsive to the existing industrial situa- 
tion. It has fostered a most laudable 
esprit de corps among its membership; it 
has been a valuable training school for 
many students in public speaking and the 
conduct of public business; it has been 



the recognized mouthpiece of the student 
body and all in all has grown to be one of 
the most virile of student organizations 
in the Universitv of Toronto. 



The Hart House Play 

Magic, which was played at Hart House in 
January is part of the challenge that Chesterton 
hurls at those "sublimated plumbers, the intelli- 
gentia" who scoff at the supernatural and decry a 
belief in fairies. The author resents such crass 
materialism and declares his own personal belief 
in uncanny and unnatural forces. The construction 
of the play is poor; the actors are not in any sense 
real persons, they are merely type characters who 
set forth, almost in dialogue form, the various views 
about the main theme. 

The characters consist of a Duke whose motto 
is "progress", whose actions are so broadminded 
that they effectively prevent progress of any kind, 
and in whom the hereditary insanity takes the 
form of far-fetched and cryptic allusions whose 
significance he alone of all the world appreciates. 
The Duke has a niece who was brought up in 
Ireland and whose form of madness is a faculty of 
seeing fairies in the twilight, and a nephew, a 
product of America, whose similar trait is a faith 
in dollars and science as the final test. The family 
doctor and the clergyman under whose supervision 
this family come are at opposite ends of the pole, 
one an agnostic, the other a believer. In fact the 
whole play is a balance of opposites. Amongst 
these people there is introduced a conjuror who is 
no ordinary conjuror, but one who has. power over 
supernatural beings and can unloose demons. 
By the aid of the demons that he summons the 
conjuror performs magic, the sort that cannot be 
explained by science and wherein a red light can 
turn blue without any apparent cause, and the 
American boy goes mad trying to find a scientific 
solution of this miracle. In the end one wonders 
whether Chesterton really gets anywhere with his 
theory, for when the conjuror pretends to find an 
explanation for his magic as a testimony of his love 
for Patricia, like a flash our illusions vanish, and 
we begin to wonder whether all this talk of magic 
isn't a hoax after all. The introduction of the 
love-story is jarring, for, whatever else he may be, 
Chesterton is no master of romance. 

The acting was better than at any other perform- 
ance at Hart House this year. Three characters 
stood out above the rest. Mr Hodder Williams 
played the rather exaggerated part of the Duke 
particularly well, Mr A. Monro Grier invested the 
character of Dr Grimthorpe with fine human 
colour, while in Mr Bertram Forsyth's finished 
execution of the part of the conjuror the character 
was divested of most of its tendency towards the 
fantastic. 

The next performance to be given at the Hart 
House Theatre will be "Playbills", which is des- 
cribed as a Georgian revue, arranged by Bertram 
Forsyth. It consists of a number of excerpts from 
plays which were popular about 1800 and is pro- 
duced as it might be expected that they were 
produced at that .time. The play will be given 
during the week of February 21 and one may 
anticipate that it will be a novel performance. 



Professor McMurrich Honoured by A.A.A.S. 

By ALEXANDER PRIMROSE 
DEAN OF THE FACULTY OF MEDICINE 



- James Play fair McMurrich, Frofessor of 
Anatomy in the University of Toronto, 
has recently been the recipient of high 
honour in being elected President of the 
American Association for the Advance- 
ment of Science. This distinction was 
conferred upon him at the close of the 
meeting of the Association in Toronto last 
month, and is a fitting tribute to one who 
has attained a foremost place in the scien- 
tific world. 

Both in teaching and in scientific re- 
search Professor McMurrich has carried 
on his activities in a number "of different 
centres. After graduating in Arts in the 
University of Toronto (B.A., 1879, M.A., 
1881) he proceeded to Johns Hopkins 
University, Baltimore, where he obtained 
the degree of Ph.D., and became an in- 
structor in Mammalian Anatomy, sub- 
sequently he held important positions in 
Biology and Anatomy in Clark University, 
Worcester, Massachusetts, in the Univer- 
sity of Cincinnati, and in the University 
of Michigan. From Michigan, where, for 
twelve years, he was Professor of Anatomy, 
he came back to his alma mater and since 
1907 he has been head of the Anatomical 
Department in the University of Toronto. 

Professor McMurrich has been a con- 
tributor to the transactions of many 
scientific societies. He is a member of 
the Advisory Board of the Wistar Institute, 
Philadelphia, and is a past-President of 
both the American Association of Anato- 
mists and of the American Society of 
Naturalists. He is a fellow of the Royal 
Society of Canada, of the Royal Micro- 
scopical Society and corresponding member 
of the London Zoological Society. He is 
the author of several text-books and many 
scientific articles. In the University of 
Toronto his influence has been singularly 
effective in assisting to determine the 
broader principles of University Policy as 
dealt with by the Senate of which he is a 
member. He occupies a most important 
and responsible position as Chairman of the 
Committee on Post Graduate Studies. 

As a teacher in Science Professor 
McMurrich enjoys an enviable reputation. 
The students who pursue their studies 
under his direction are fortunate in having 



inculcated principles which lead them to 
cultivate the true scientific spirit and to 
acquire knowledge which is not only of 
practical service in the practice of their 
profession but is also of great cultural 
value. He lectures both in the Faculty of 
Arts and in the Faculty of Medicine. To 
medical students he gives a short course 
on the History of Medicine. His sym- 
pathies are broad and his attainments 




PROFESSOR J. PLAYFAIR McMURRICH, 
recently elected President of the American Association for 
the Advancement of Science. n^^^WUm 

cover a wide field both in science and in 
literature. In the field of Research he 
has accomplished much valuable work. 
He is a strong advocate of greater facilities 
for Research in the University of Toronto 
and his influence is felt in the effort which 
is at present being made to provide better 
equipment and greater opportunity for 
those who wish to pursue Research work. 



209 



210 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



The honour which has come to Professor 
McMurrich in thus creating him President 
of the American Association for the Ad- 
vancement of Science will be welcomed by 
his colleagues and former students who 
are unanimous in considering it a just 
recognition of the splendid work which 
he has accomplished and of the important 



position as an Educationist and Research 
Scholar which he still holds in the Univer- 
sity of Toronto. The new Laboratories 
of the Department of Anatomy, now in 
process ol erection, were planned by him 
and on their completion will stand as a 
fitting memorial of his life and work. 



Information Wanted 

The following is a list of the graduates of University College, Victoria College and 
Trinity College whose addresses are unknown. Any information which may help 
in locating any one of them will be greatly appreciated by the Records Office, 

184 College Street, Toronto. 



Graduates of University College 



Allen, Thomas Boles, '06, M.A. '07 

Allison, Henriette Elizabeth, '09, M.A. '10 

Anderson, Jessie Inglis, '04 

Angus, Olive Caroline, '09 

Arnott, James,K., '89- 

Barber, Wilbert Alexander, '14 

Barnhart, William, M.A. (ad eund.) 76 

Begg, William, '90 

Bell, Archibald Glendinning, '93 

Blackstock, Joseph, '85 

Bowerman, Lindley H., '86 

Brent, Charles, '86, M.A. '88 

Brophey, Francis Edward, '16 

Brown, James Farquharson, '84, M.D., 

C.M. (T.) 189 
Bruce, Henry Becher, '87 
Brunt, Robert Anthony, '97 
Cadow, Eva Margaret, '06 
Cameron, Clara Alice, '02 
Campbell, Kate Gertrude, '08 
Campbell, Louis Clayton, '95 
Campbell, Mary Grace (Mrs Graham 

Campbell), '17 

Campbell, Thomas Glasham, '83 
Campbell, William Aitkin, '95, M.A. '96 
Carswell, Albert, '83 
Chaisgreen, Charles, '95 
Glutton, William Frederick, '92 
Coad, Hanna Gertrude, '09, M.A. '11 
Coatsworth, Caleb Sydney, '89 
Collins, James Albert, '85 
Connell, Florence Mary (Mrs. Albert 

Thomas Fournier), '13 
Cozier, Harold Robbins, M.A. '16 
Craig, Margaret Evelyn (Mrs R. Griffith), 

'97 

Craig, Minnie, '94, M.A. '04 
Crawford, Horace Creasor, '11 
Croll, J. A., '90 
Crysler, Alexander, '76 
Dalton, Florence Emma, '03, M.A. '05 



79 
'02 



Davies, Richard Mervyn Faithful!, '93 

Davis, Eugene Charles, '10 

Dinning, William Henry, '99 

Dickson, Violet Wanless, '12 

Dingman, Edward Col ton, '97 

Douglas, John, '93 

Evans, James Fraser, '93 

Francis, Daniel, '83 

Fraser, John Henry, '94 

Frost, Francis Henry, '94 

Fry, Francis DeWitt, '94 

Gerrie, George, '92 

Gillespie, Joseph Hugh Ross, '00 

Glassford, C. Howard, '88 

Gordon, David William, '14 

Graham, George Harold, '11, M.A. '12 

Graham, William Hugh, 

Hammill, George, '91 

Harris, Rachael Hattan, 

Harvey, Archibald Lee, '99 

Haughton, Edward John, '92 

Head, George Richard Newson, 

Henderson, William Bruce, '11 

Hewson, John William, '95, LL.B. '96 

Hill, Eva Amelia, '93 

Hill, John Wilfred, '14 

Hodgins, James Isaac, '14 

Hunt, Edward Lawrence, '88 

Johnson, Alfred Sydney, '83, M.A. '85 

Johnston, William DeGeer, 77 

Kelly, Henry, '99 

Kelso, Thomas Pomeroy, '90 

Kennedy, Edgar Sylvester, '14 

Kerr, David Blain, '82 

Kerr, James Watt, '88 

Kerr, John H., '90 

Laing, Frederick William, '90 

Langley, Margaret, '85 

Langrill, Adelaide Jane (Mrs T. G. Evans), 

'97 
Leim, Alexander Henry, '19 



'92 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



211 



Lennox, Mary, '88 

Leonard, Arthur Goolden, '81 (ad eund.), 

M.A. '82 

Logie, George, '91, B.D. (Knox) '94 
Lye, Frances Mary (Mrs A. Blackmore), 

'94 

McArthur, Neil John, '95 
McCallum, John, '89 
McCallum, Kathleen, '00 
McClive, Walter Hugh, '92 
McEvoy, John Baptist, '87 
McGhee, Ebenezer B., '87 
McGirr, Victor Crossley, '85 
McKinlay, Georgie, '99 
McLachlin, William Goldsmith, '79 
McLeay, Charles William, '95 
McLennan, David, '94 
McRae, Kenneth James, '06, M.A. '07 
McTavish, Douglas Craig, '06 
Macdonald, Edward Archibald, '80 
MacKay, John Angus, '90, M.A. '92, LL.B. 

'92 

MacKay, John Gordon, '92 
MacKay, Robert Burns, '87 
MacKenzie, Alexander J. Langley, '88, 

M.D. (Vic.) '91 
MacLaren, David, 79 
Macklem, Delilah Maud, '12 
MacNamara, Francis Robert, '89 
MacTavish, Peter, '80 
Ma*lcheff, Theodore George, '91 
Mason, Mabel Catherine (Mrs Harold 

Bowdoin), '99 
Maxwell, Georgina, '14 
Mill, William Jones, '91 
Millar, Robena Elvira, '96 
Mills, Harry Parker, '08, M.A. '11 
Mills, Helene Masson (Mrs. Robt. Lee 

Ribbs), '08 
Moir, Robert G., '82 
Moore, Cunningham,- '91 
More, George, '93, M.B. '96 
Morrison, Any Mary (Mrs Frank Owen), 

'99 

Myers, Robert H., '80 
Narraway, Henry Harold, '98 
Neilson, Marion (Mrs. J. S. Wray), '11 
Nichol, Walter, '03, M.A. '04 
Nicol, William Bernard, '88 
Norman, Ernest, '91 
O'Connor, Michael Joseph, '89 
Park, Thomas Donald, '04 
Patterson, Ruth (Mrs F. Cobdan), '93, 

M.A. '05 

Pettinger, Peter James, '93 
Phelps, Frances G., '91 



Pike, William J., '02 (ad eund.), M.A. '03 
Price, Grenville Carson, '10 
Rae, William Alexander, '07 
Reid, Neil Duncan, '98 
Robinson, Margaret Alberta, '10 
Robinson, Samuel Hume Blake, '95, LL.B. 

'96 

Ronald, William Boyd, '96 
Rosenstadt, Bertha, '98, M.A. '99 
Ross, John, '83 (ae eund.) 
Rossiter, H. James, '85 
Russell, George Emery, '95 (ad eund.) 
Russell, John William, '78, M.A. '79 
Sadler, Walter Alan, '99 
Scott, William Daunt, '95 
Sellery, Bertha Gilroy (Mrs St. Clair), '05 
Shaw, William James, '92, M.A. '93 
Shearer, Charles Edward, '95 
Sheppard, Frederick Anderson, '12 
Shiel, David, '92 
Sinkins, Adelaide Gertude, '08 
Skinner, Daniel Spencer, '83 
Smellie, William King Tweedie, '80 
Steele, Robert King, '99 
Stevenson, Oscar Douglas Andrew, '14 
Straith, Rosa Isabella, '00 
Suffel, Frank Hammond, '88 
Sullivan, Edward, '79 
Summers, Edith (Mrs. Allan Updegraff), 

'03 

Sutherland, Nettie Allan, '03 
Swift, Sherman Charles, '08 
Taylor, Charles Clinton, '01, M.A. '02 
Taylor, John Albert, '87, M.A. '90 
Taylor, John Julian Wesley, '97 
Teefy, Armand Francis, '82 
Tennant, John Hunter, '92, LL.B. '94 
Tesky, Edith A., '91, M.A. '93 
Thacker, Caroline Louisa, '91 
Thackeray, Barton Earl, '00 
Thompson, George Atcheson, '02 
Tobin, Florence, '14 
Tucker, Alice Blyth, '96, M.A. '01 
Tuthill, Agnes May (Mrs Robt. Weaver), 

'12 

Waterhouse, Egerton F., '84 
Way, Vernon Elgin, '12 
Webb, Flora Mabyl, '98 
Webber, Frederick William, '81, M.A. '83 
Welwood, Daniel Lalor Leopold Augustus 

Wellesley, '95 

Wilkie, William McLaren, '03 
Wilson, Gilbert B., '94, M.A. '95, LL.B '95 
Wilson, Grace Amelia, '98 
Wilson, Henry Ernest, '92 



212 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



Graduates of Victoria College 



Austin, Edna Amelia, '12 

Aylward, Robert, '89 

Bannister, Albert Walton, 78, M.A. '86 

Barber, Ella Ursula, '89 

Barkwell, James Hooks, 77 

Bayley, Henry Edward, '90, B.D. 

Bingham, Charles Benson, '02 

Brown, J. Nelson, '92 

Buchanan, George, '10 

Campbell, Christopher George, '88 

Caskey, William D'Arcy, '98 

Gates, William George, '04 

Chisholm, Norman Starr, '14 

Connor, Josias Elliot, '88 

Dean, William Hope, '83 

Earl, Daniel, '91 

Edmunds, Frederick James, '77 

Eldridge, Gardner Spink, '83, D.D. '04 

Gardiner, William James R., '81 

Grey, Jeremiah Wilson, '84 

Hamilton, Frank Albin Ernest, '05 

Holland, Richard J., '89 

Hough, John Wesley, '80 

Hutton, Thora Evelyn (Mrs Victor Dai- 
mage), '13 

Jickling, Carrie Kathleen (Mrs H. Hebb), 
'05 

Kellington, Herbert Edgar, '01, M.A. '03 

Koyle, Charles Herschell, 77 

Law, Robert, 76 

McDonald, John Alexander, '87 

McDonnell, Adelaide Alice (Mrs H. E. 
Ridley), '93 



McKee, Kathryne Elizabeth (Mrs G. W. 

Mahon), '00 

Miller, Arnoldus, '80, M.A. '85 
Miller, William Edward Chambers, '03 
Monroe, John A., '82 
Mussill, J. A., '87 
Olds, Walter Purcell, '91 
Perrin, Evelyn May (Mrs E. A. Har- 

greaves), '96 

Rice, Lewis Melville, '11, M.B. '13 
Richardson, Lome Melville, '11 
Robertson, William, '81 
Ruddell, Ernest Victor, '05 
Ruddell, Thomas William, '97 
Schell, Marjorie May, '20 
Shipley, John Lucas, '81 
Sifton, James William, '83, LL.D. 
Smith, George (ad eund.), '92 
Stonehouse, Aaron, '87 
Taylor, Allan William, '91 
Thompson, Archibald, '89 
Tremeer, James, 79 
Wallace, Arthur Buchan, '93 
Watson, Lorenzo Dow (ad eund.), 76, 

M.A. 77, LL.B. 77, LL.D. 78 
Werry, Frederic William Orion, '97 
Westwood, G. W., '91 
White, Percival Marshall, '82, M.A. '86 
Williams, Nelson, '85 
Wilson, A., '92 
Wilson, Eli, '97 

Wood, William Hamilton, '01, B.D. 
Wortley, John Robert, 79 



Graduates of Trinity College 



Bradbury, Arthur Rhodes, '89, M.A. '90 
Campbell, William Clark, '89, M.A. '91 
Clare-Avery, Edward B. (ad eund.), '03, 

M.A. '03 

Clark, Edwin Coulson, '94, M.A. '96 
Coxe, Hanson Cleveland, '81 
Garrett, Mina (Mrs Tarrant), '98 
Hall, James McNairn, '94 
Hall, Robert Francis, '10 
Hare, Elizabeth Amelia, '97, M.A. '04 
Hunter, John Norris, '92 
Irvin, Benjamin, M.A. (ad eund.) '85 
Johnson, Cyril Paul, '94, M.A. '97 
Jones, Henry Osborne, '69 
McEwen, Kenneth Ogilvie, '98 
Macdougall, John Gladwyn, '98 



Marsden, Edith, '98 

Murray, Albert Leonard, M.A. '04 

Patterson, John Furzer Elliott, '92 

Powell, Agnes Elizabeth, '04 

Powell, George Edwin, '88 

Reeve, William Porteous, '96, M.A. '10 

Rolph, Helen Emma (Mrs Lawrence), '93 

Ruthven, Elizabeth Marie, '08 

Steams, Chilton Rupert, M.A. '97 

Studen, Alfred, 78, M.A. 79 

Summerscales, Ernest William (ad eund.), 

'03, M.A. '04 

Todd, Frainec, '04, M.A. '07 
' White, Joseph Francis, '86, M.A. '96 
Wily, Mona Louise, '06, M.A. '07 
Wismer, John Anderson, '88, M.A. '90 



Charles W. Flint Appointed Chancellor of 
Syracuse University 

By R. P. STOUFFER, ASSISTANT EDITOR, Toronto Sunday World 



ANOTHER Canadian, a graduate of the 
University of Toronto, has been 
chosen head of an American Univer- 
sity. The chancellorship of Syracuse 
University has been offered to Charles 
Wesley Flint, '00 Victoria College, now 
President of Cornell College, Iowa. 

Dr Flint is the descendant of two re- 
markable country preachers and the pupil 
of two teachers of extraordinary indi- 
viduality. His grandfather, George Flint, 
senior, a cabinetmaker by trade and an 
itinerant preacher by preference, was of 
great native ability and wit. To walk 
thirty miles, preach at three public services 
and conduct three class meetings, after a 
hard week at the bench this was quite 
the regular Sunday rest for "Father" 
Flint. George Flint, junior, of frail 
physique but a burning passion for right- 
eousness, gave a lifetime to the cause of 
prohibition and became as widely known 
throughout York and Ontario counties for 
"gospel temperance" orations as his father 
for camp meeting exhortations. Inheriting 
the robust and jovial character of his 
grandfather, Charles Wesley Flint early 
displayed pulpit gifts of no mean order. 

Corrective discipline of a sternness 
seldom found outside an English public 
school was applied by Mr James Hand, of 
the Stouffville Public School, one of the 
most lovable and yet most severe of school- 
masters. Leaving the public school in his 
native village, Flint encountered at Mark- 
ham High School the kindling enthusiasm 
of George H. Reed, principal and classical 
master, whose ability to make Latin prose 
the best-loved period of the day was 
something for all to envy. That Flint won 
the Prince of Wales scholarship on entrance 
to the University of Toronto is testimony 
as much to his teachers as to his parents. 

As Prince of Wales man from this small 
school, C. W. Flint has since been rivalled 
by Herbert Jordan, now of Lawrence, 
Kansas, and Professor Frank H. Underhill 
of the University of Saskatchewan, the 
three having been born within three miles 
of each other, while Underhill and Flint 
are from the same village. 

At Victoria College, Charlie Flint made 
many friends and his capabilities won the 
respect of all. Gifted with a wonderful 
memory and a quick mind, he took his 



honours lightly and showed an increasing 
aptitude for the pulpit. 

Following graduation he attended Drew 
Theological Seminary securing the degree 
of Bachelor of Divinity, and Columbia 
University where he took a Master of Arts 
course. For some time he was pastor of 
the First Methodist Church, Middletown, 
Connecticut, and later of New York 
Avenue Church, Brooklyn. From this 
latter position he was called to the presi- 
dency of Cornell College. 




CHARLES W. FLINT, Vic. '00 

Dr Flint will bring to his new position 
one of heavy responsibilities, for Syracuse 
is a large institution with some 5,000 
students- abilities and experience admir- 
ably suited to the task. For five years he 
has guided with outstanding success the 
destinies of one of the leading Methodist 
colleges of the Middle West. He has shown 
himself to be an administrator of high 
order. His public gifts are no less, and 
his scholarship, nurtured in Canada, is w r ell 
founded. 

President Flint has never forgotten 
Canadian associations. He was among the 
first to congratulate Victoria on the re- 
organization of her Alumni Association. 
He is a frequent visitor in Toronto. 



213 



U. C Women in Social Service Work 



BY EMMY LOU CARTER 



' I ^HE field of social service presents tre- 
1 mendous opportunities. All those 
who take the responsibility of citizen- 
ship seriously, and who would understand 
and solve the problems of the community 
effectively, are serving society. But those 
who have acquired an intimate knowledge 
of modern social and industrial conditions, 
and are using their knowledge to raise the 
standard of living are making a vital con- 
tribution to the welfare of the state. 

Although social service work as a pro- 
fession for women is a comparatively 
recent development, University College 
already has several graduates who have 
won distinction. Miss Margaret Strong 
was at first Inspector of Public Schools in 
New Westminster, an unusual post for a 
woman to hold. Later she became secre- 
tary and confidential adviser to Dr Riddell 
in the Department of Labour for the Pro- 
vince of Ontario. She made the prelimi- 
nary investigations, wrote the report and 
drafted the bill for the Mothers' Pensions 
Act. She is now secretary to Dr Riddell, 
head of the Agricultural section of the 
International Labour Office in Geneva. 

The Womens' Section of the Govern- 
ment Employment Bureau of Ontario is 
being efficiently managed by Miss Marion 
Findlay, a graduate of 1908. For some 
time she was a resident worker at Evan- 
gelea Settlement, and while there was 
correspondent for the Labour Gazette at 
Ottawa. 

Some splendid pioneer work in connec- 
tion with Women's Employment has been 
accomplished by Miss Ethel McRobert of 
'09, who was in charge of the Government 
Labour Bureau in London, Ontario. She 
was offered a scholarship by the Women's 
Educational Union of Boston. There she 
took a course in vocational guidance a 
training for social work along vocational 
lines. She is the only Canadian woman 
trained in this particular branch of social 
work. After broadening her experience 
by visiting other industrial cities she re- 
turned to Canada but so far there has been 
no opening for her. 



The Relationship between capital fid 
labour in modern industry has a very 
marked effect upon the well-being and 
prosperity of the nation. Not only has 
trade unionism and industrial legislation 
demanded certain rights for labour, but 
it is of real economic value to the employer 
to provide the best possible conditions for 
his employees, and to reduce his labour 
turnover to the minimum. To obtain satis- 
factory employees and to keep them con- 
tented is the duty of the service supervisor. 
This post in the Imperial Cotton Company, 
Ltd., of Hamilton, is held by Miss Mono 
McLaughlin of r 09. She first became 
interested in social work when she was 
appointed Secretary of the Neighbourhood 
Workers' Association by the Social Service 
Commission of Toronto. During the war 
she was official investigator for the Patriotic 
Fund. She next undertook the duties of 
Provincial Factory Inspector, seldom per- 
formed by a university woman. For the 
past three years she has been connected 
with the Imperial Cotton Co., Ltd. Asso- 
ciated with her is Miss Jean MacRae of '13, 
who was first, resident worker at the 
University Settlement for two years. For 
two years she was Employment Manager 
for the McCormack Mfg. Co. of London, 
Ontario, and is now doing employment and 
service work with the Imperial Cotton Co. 
Ltd. 

In an entirely different direction Miss 
Vera Parsons '11 has been giving her ser- 
vices to the foreign citizens of Toronto. 
After securing her M.A. from the Univer- 
sity she obtained a travelling fellowship 
from Bryn Mawr and intended to com- 
plete her Ph.D. abroad. Then war broke 
out. She took up residence in Central 
Neighbourhood House, and, being a fluent 
Italian and Russian linguist found ample 
scope for her abilities. She interpreted at 
hospital clinics, and the Juvenile and 
Women's Courts. Last year she spent in 
Italy continuing her studies. In the 
autumn of 1921 she registered at Osgoode 
Hall where she intends to specialize in 
criminal law. 



214 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



215 



Miss Gertrude Graydon of 1912 is one 
of the few women who has entered social 
service work immediately upon graduating. 
After taking her preliminary training at 
Central Neighbourhood House she became 
resident worker at Greenwich House, New 
York. She was investigator for the United 
States Department of Labour along em- 
ployment lines and is now investigating 
a special branch of industrial medicine. 

The demand for social service workers 
has become so great that, in 1914, the 
University of Toronto established the first 
training school in Social Service in Canada. 



The department is so fortunate as to have 
Professor Dale, M.A. (Oxon) as director 
and associated with him Miss Agnes 
McGregor, director of field work. The 
course of one year can touch but briefly 
the multitude of subjects bearing upon 
social service, but it helps to prepare the 
student to meet the social, industrial and 
economic conditions with which she is con- 
fronted in welfare work. After which it is 
her broad sympathy, good judgment, and 
resourcefulness which bring individual 
success. 



The Dean of Women at Victoria College 

By EDITH FRANCES ADAMS, '12 



MARGARET E. T. ADDISON is a con- 
nection of the great Joseph Addison 
of Taller fame, and the daughter of 
a Methodist minister. From an early age 
she was dedicated by her parents to a life 
of teaching, and as it happened was the 
fourth in direct line on her mother's side to 
follow that splendid profession. 

In the year 1889, while Victoria College 
was still in Cobourg, Ontario, Miss Addi- 
son, the youngest woman graduate of her 
time, took her degree of B.A. For some 
years after that, she taught in the Lindsay 
and Stratford High Schools, until in 1903 
Annesley Hall was formally opened in 
Toronto as a residence for the women of 
Victoria, and Miss Addison was chosen 
as Dean. This position she filled until 
1919-1920, when she took up the broader 
duties of Dean of Victoria women. 

During all her life in Toronto and before, 
Miss Addison 's interest in College matters 
generally has been very keen. The 
Women's Alumnae Association was formed 
in 1891, and she was its first president, and 
was instrumental in adding to it the under- 
graduate women of the College. To-day 
there ^ is a branch of this Association in 
Karnizawa in Japan; while each graduate, 
scattered far over the world, receives once 
a year a long newsy letter from her former 
Dean a letter outlining Ontario politics, 
College athletics and general news, in- 
creased enrolment and changes at Annesley 
Hall ; so that many graduates who have not 
seen Toronto for years, gain a much better 
knowledge of college events than we who 
live here. 



Miss Addison was a member of the 
Committee of United Alumnae who 
brought a protest to the President and the 
Board of Governors against the possible 
establishment of a separate College for 
women. In 1909 she assisted largely in 
compiling and distributing the Report on 
the need of a Dean of Women in residences. 
She attended the Conference of the Uni- 
versities of the Empire in England in 1912, 
reporting these meetings on her return. 
For years she has been a member of the 
Dominion Council of the Y.W.C.A. and 
the Religious Educational Conference of 
Canada; she was president of the Univer- 
sity Women's Club in 1911-1921, and is 




MISS M. E. T. ADDISON 

Photo by Partner Bros. 



216 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



now President of the Victoria Women's 
Association. 

But the interest nearest to Miss Addi- 
son's heart has always been women; their 
problems, and the solution of them; and 
in particular, the problems of girls in 
residence. For with the opening of Annes- 
ley Hall came absolutely pioneer work, 
since it was then the first women's residence 
in Canada of less than fifty population, 
that was not also a college in itself. The 
Dean's duties comprised all the nursing, 
the entertaining, and most difficult of all, 
the organization of discipline and govern- 
ment. 

At first, the seniors refused to have 
student government; but by the end of the 
year they had asked for it; so that soon 
there was drawn up a working " agree- 
ment". With modifications in 1919 and 



Tell your friends about the 

FREE PUBLIC LECTURES 

Under the auspices of the Alumni Federation 

University of Toronto 
in Convocation Hall, 8 p.m. 

Jan. 31st "The Washington Conference," 
by Professor George M. Wrong. 

The place of this epoch-marking Conference in history; 
why it was assembled; the obstacles it met; what it has 
accomplished; its probable effect on the future of the 
world. 

Feb. 7th "The Art of Lewis Carroll," by 
Principal Maurice Hutton. 

Feb. 14th "Academic Freedom," by Sir 
Robert Falconer. 

Feb. 21st "Engineering Activities in Can- 
ada," by Brigadier-General C. H. 
Mitchell. 

The place of the engineer in the development of the 
country; what important works are being undertaken this 
year; why these enterprises are going forward; what they 
mean to Canada. 

Feb. 28th "Principles of a Sound Immi- 
gration Policy," by Professor C. R. Fay. 

That Canada urgently needs more population is undeni- 
able. How can the dangers involved be avoided? Where 
and how should immigrants be selected? What assistance 
should they receive? The whole subject will be dealt with 
thoroughly. 

Physics Building, 8 p.m. 

Mar. 7th " Disruption of Atoms with a 
Consequent Release of Atomic Energy, ' ' 
by Professor J. C. McLennan. 

This lecture will be illustrated with experiments and 
diagrams. The structure of atoms, as revealed by recent 
experiments, will be described and the methods of arti- 
ficially disrupting atoms will be discussed. 

CLIP THIS AND KEEP FOR YOUR 
REFERENCE 



1921, this is now a more liberal form of 
government than that of any other resi- 
dence in Toronto. 

There are now 241 .women undergradu- 
ates at Victoria College. Sixty-six are in 
Annesley Hall, and eighty are in the four 
annexes connected with it; and so success- 
ful has student government proved among 
this steadily increasing population, that 
fourteen institutions have written to the 
Dean with inquiries and requests for advice. 

Miss Addison has always held that since 
residence life; is "simply a world in minia- 
ture, it must aim to acquire and sustain 
an atmosphere in which the problems of 
living can be most sanely solved. 

With Lord Rosebery she might remark 
"I care less for their brains than their 
character " ; for always she has endeavoured 
through her unfailing patience with per- 
sonal difficulties whether trivial or terri- 
fying, her graciousness of mind and 
manner, the ever-increasing wisdom of 
her own experience,- and above all, 
through her splendid moral courage, to 
bring out and strengthen in each under- 
graduate her best and finest quality her 
real self. 



Dates to Remember 



February 21-25 Hart House Play, "Playbills", 
arranged by Bertram Forsyth. 

February 3, 10, 17, 24, etc. Sir Bertram 
Wiridle will deliver a series of lectures in Convoca- 
tion Hall at 4.30 p.m. 

College Sermons will be continued at the regular 
hour, 11 a.m., in Convocation Hall. The list of 
speakers will be: 

Feb. 12 President McKenzie, Hartford, Conn. 
19 Principal Bruce Taylor, Queen's Uni- 
versity. 

26 Universal Day of Prayer. 
Alumni Lecture Series will be held every 
Tuesday evening at 8 p.m. in Convocation Hall. 
The lectures are free to the public. 

Feb. 7 "The Art of Lewis Carroll" by Princi- 
pal Maurice Hutton. 
14 "Academic Freedom" by Sir Robert 

Falconer. 
21 "Engineering Activities in Canada" by 

Brig.-Gen. C. H. Mitchell. 
28 "Principles of a Sound Immigration 

Policy" by Professor C. R. Fay. 
Mar. 7 Physics Building, " Disruption of Atoms 
with Consequent Release of Atomic 
Energy" by Professor J. C. McLen- 



Sport News 



ALLAN CUP HOLDERS EXPERIENCE 
DIFFICULTIES 

, Hockey predictions have again gone awry. Our 
Allan Cup holders after a brilliant tour in which 
they met the best teams of the Eastern United 
States, winning seven games in almost as many 
days, have suffered three successive defeats in the 
Senior O.H.A., the league in which they have elected 
to take their chances of reaching the 1922 Allan 
Cup series. But the night's still young. The 
O.H.A. series is a home-and-home-game one, and 
therunners-up play the winners for the champion- 
ship, so Varsity's chances are by no means hopeless 
yet. An easing up in the schedule, a break or two, 
and the old fighting spirit may keep the Canadian 
championship cup in Hart House after all. 

But no matter how the score boards read, Varsity 
may always be proud of its Hockey Team clean 
and gentlemanly players, they are ever a credit 
to the University of our affections. Of their work 
in Boston, the Transcript said: "The University 
of Toronto Hockey Team has done more for ice 
hockey in Boston in two nights than ten years of 
effort on the part of the game's supporters here. 
They are by far the best and cleanest team that 

ever played here The feature of 

*their play was always the unselfish cohesive, 
co-operative pass work of the players, no one 
seeking laurels for himself, each striving for the 
success of the team." 

Varsity should win the Intercollegiate Series 
without great effort. Queen's did not show strength 
in the game at Toronto on January 21. Varsity 
piled up a large score and then allowed a number 
of easy ones to be scored in the last period. The 
score was 12-6. 

Varsity will play McGill in Toronto on January 
28 and in Montreal on February 17; and Queen's 
in Kingston on February 10. 



PROFESSOR COCKBURN BUILDS A BOAT 
FOR ROWING CLUB 

A crypt beneath the old Red School House has 
been converted into a boat building shop. Here 
under the supervision of Roy Cockburn a fifty-five 
foot, eight-oared, work boat for the Varsity Rowing 
Club has been laid out and is rising from the earth, 
ribs first, like an ocean liner. Professor Cockburn 
admits that his experience in the building of wooden 
boats is limited but claims that by reason of his 
knowledge of steel ship construction his boat is 
going to be better than other boats of its kind, 
albeit in many ways different. It will weigh only 
about half that of the usual work boat. The work 
is being done chiefly by students. Tommy Loudon 
has had his men working on the rowing machines 
in Hart House for some time. There is a wealth 
of good material around the University and the 
Rowing Club supporters are predicting great things. 
A trip to England and a crew at the next Olympiad 
are among the projects Coach Loudon has in mind. 

Meanwhile there is the question of quarters for 
the summer. The Argonaut Club is moving and 
it may not be possible to renew the arrangement 
with them. A University boat house on the bay 
is what is needed. 



GOOD BASKETBALL TEAM THIS YEAR 

On its Christmas vacation tour the Varsity 
Basketball Team won five out of eleven games, 
which, considering the calibre of the clubs they 
engaged, is a good showing. They were beaten 
with only a small margin by the Colgate University 
team which is in line for the championship of the 
Eastern States. In a game at Toronto on January 
21, Queen's were defeated by a score of 47-17. 




JACK LANGTRY 

popular captain of the Hockey Team. In the recent war 
he won the French Medaille Militaire, the British D.C.M., 
and Military Medal. 

HOCKEY FOR WOMEN % 

Intercollegiate Hockey for women is the latest 
agitation. There have been Faculty teams for 
some years, why not a University team to play 
against Qileen's and McGill? Lack of funds is 
the great difficulty in the way. But perhaps an 
intercollege women's hockey feature in the Arena 
would draw a big gate. Who knows? We may 
see it yet. 



217 



218 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



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UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



219 



WATER POLO TO THE FORE 

Water polo has become one of the major inter- 
faculty sports. A double schedule is being played. 
It is a more strenuous game in the Hart House 
tank than it used to be in the old gymnasium tank 
in which the tall man could keep his feet on the 
bottom and his head above water without difficulty. 
The Hart House tank is six feet deep throughout, 
and is twenty- five yards in length. 

DEATH OF PROFESSOR WILLIAMS 

Hundreds of graduates will learn with regret of 
the death of Alfred Williams, affectionately known 
to many generations of students as " Prof ' ' Williams. 
Mr Williams came to the University as instructor 
in charge of the gymnasium in 1890 and for over 
twenty years was in active charge of indoor atriletics. 
His previous army experience gave him particular 
prominence in fencing and floor work. During the 
recent war he served as instructor with the 48th 
Highlanders. 

With the Alumni 

TTbe 
THntv>erstts of Toronto jflDontblp 

Published by the Alumni Federation of the 

University of Toronto 
SUBSCRIPTION PRICE $3.00 PER ANNUM 

including Membership dues. 

Publication Committee: 
D. B. GILLIES, Chairman 
GEORGE H. LOCKE J. V. MCKENZIE 

W. J. DUNLOP F. P. MEGAN 

W. A. CRAICK R. J. MARSHALL 

DR ALEX. MACKENZIE W. C. MCNAUGHT 
W. A. KIRKWOOD 

Editor and Business Manager 
W. N. MACQUEEN 



Death: 



KEFFER At Maple, in the latter part of De- 
cember, Thomas Dixon Keffer, M.B. '66, in his 
seventy-ninth year. 

SLOAN At his home, 191 Dunn Avenue, Toronto, 
on the evening of Christmas Day, 1921, William 
Sloan, M.D. '65, in his ninetieth year. 

MEEK After having been in ill-health for some 
months, Henry Meek, M.B. '78, at his residence, 
440 Queen's Avenue, London, Ont. He was one 
of the most prominent of London physicians and 
contributed greatly to the building of the medical 
department of Western University. 

CUM MINGS On December 28, at his home in 
Wayne, Michigan, Richard B. Cummings, B.A. 
(U.C.) 78, a practising physician of that village. 

ELLIOTT Suddenly, on January 3, Rev James 
J. Elliott, B.A. (U.C.) '85, pastor of Knox Pres- 
byterian Church at Midland. 

BAINES At his residence, 228 Bloor Street West, 
on January 12, 1922, Allen Mackenzie Baines, 
M.B. 78, M.D., C.M. (T.) '84, well-known for 
his connection with the Sick Children's Hospital, 
and a former lecturer at Trinity College. 



THOMSON On January 7, 1922, at Kamloops, 

B.C., Robert Walker Thomson, Dip. '92, B.A.Sc. 

'93, M.E. '09, the resident engineer of the Central 

Mineral Survey, District No. 3, British Columbia. 
WEIDENHAMMER After a week's illness, at 

his home in Waterloo, Frederick John Weiden- 

hammer, B.A. (U.C.) '96, M.B. '05. 
LOFTUS At his residence, 198 Spadina Avenue, 

after a brief illness, James J. Loftus, D.D.S. '93, 

at the age of fifty-eight years. 
LUCAS At his residence, 394 Queen Street South, 

Hamilton, Alan Stanley Bruce Lucas, B.A. (T.) 

'00, aged forty-two years. 
ABBOTT After three months' illness, Henry 

Randolph Abbott (Hon.) D.D.S. (T.) '01, a 

prominent dentist and physician of London. 



Dr Gordon Laing, New Dean of Arts at McGill 

Dr Gordon J. Laing, '91, has taken up his duties 
as Dean of the Faculty of Art,s and Head of the 
Department of Classics at McGill University. 

Following his graduation from the University 
of Toronto, Dean Laing studied at Johns Hopkins 
University and received the degree of Doctor of 
Philosophy. For a time he was lecturer at the 
University of Toronto and lately has been on the 
g taff of the University of Chicago. 




VINCENT MASSEY, '10 

who has been elected President of the Massey-Harris Co. 

New King's Counsel 

Twenty-two graduates figured in the Ontario 
list for King's Counsel honours at New Year's time. 

The Toronto men are as follows: E. P. Brown '01, 
W. J. Elliott '04; I. S. Fairty '04, J. D. Falcon- 
bridge '96, John Jennings '96, W. M. LaSh '94, 
J. W. Mallon '90, R. U. McPherson '83, H. W. 
Mickle '82, D. P. O'Connell '90, J. G. O'Donoghue, 
'01, R. H. Parmenter '99, T. N. Phelan '02, W. H. 
Price '09, Norman Somerville '99. Those in other 
parts of the Province are: H. Cleaver '17, Burling- 
ton; H. P. Cooke '05, Kenora; J. H. F. Fisher '99, 
Ottawa; A. G. Murray '99, Fort Francis; W. E. N. 
Sinclair '96, Oshawa; H. E. Stone '87, Parry Sound; 
A. B. Thompson '85, Penetang. 



220 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



U.C. Association to send Memorial to 
Governors 

A meeting of the University College Alumni 
Association Executive was held on the evening of 
January 10. Mr H. F. Gooderham, President of 
the Association, presided, and in addition to 
Toronto members of the Committee there were 
present Mr Hume Cronyn, of London, and Mr 
Graeme Stewart, of Montreal. 

Principal Hutton told of how University College 
was working under a great handicap by reason of 
the congestion existing in the College building. 
It was decided to send a memorial in the name of 
"the Association to the Board of Governors, urging 
that the administrative offices of the University 
be removed from the building at the earliest possible 
date. A discussion took place on the. advisability 
of graduates offering advice in academic matters. 
Plans were made for the continuation of the cam- 
paign for membership; and working by-laws were 
passed. 



School Men Meet at the Coast. 

The annual meeting of the Pacific Coast Branch 
of the University of Toronto Engineering Alumni 
Association was held on December 28 in the 
University Club. Officers elected for 1922 were 
as follows: Hon. President J. H. Kennedy C.E. 
'82; President W. J. Johnston '09; Vice-President, 
G. P. Stirrett, '08; Sec. -Treasurer, C. E. Webb, '09; 
Executive, Vancouver, T. H. Crosby, '09, C. T. 
Hamilton, '07, H. L. Batten, '11; Ex.-Ojfrcio, J. A. 
Walker, '08; Victoria, Major N. C. Sherman, '10; 
New Westminster, D. J. McGugan, '07; Interior, 
C. E. B. Corboufd, '14. 



L. J. Ladner Elected to House of Commons 

Our attention has been called to an omission in 
the list of "Toronto Graduates in the New House 
of Commons" published in the January issue of 
THE MONTHLY. Leon Johnson Ladner, B.A. 
(U.C.) '07, of Vancouver B.C., was another suc- 
cessful candidate at the last election. He has 
lived in British Columbia for some time and is a 
member of the legal firm of Ladner and Cantelon 
of Vancouver. 



Notes by Classes 

'60 Vic. David Wm. Dumble, K.C., has 
retired from the position of Police Magistrate of 
the City of Peterborough after thirty-nine years of 
active service in that capacity. 

'80 U.C. J. M. Lydgate, the Pastor Emeritus 
of the Lihue Union Church, is occupying himself 
as territorial land agent and 'engineer and surveyor 
in Lihue, Kanai, Hawaii. 

'80 M. Dr George B. Smith, recently of 80 Col- 
lege Street, Toronto, is spending the winter in 
California, where his address is c/o General De- 
livery, Hollywood, Cal. 

'84 U.C. John Simpson, the writer of "Sobieski 
and other Poems" which hias just recently been 
published, has moved to New York where his ad- 
dress is 359 West 55th Street. 



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UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



221 



'89 U.C. The permanent address of Mrs Alfred 
T. Watt (Madge R. Robertson) is c/o The Bank of 
Montreal, Victoria, B.C. 

'90 IT.C. The appointment has been made of 
Donald Hector Maclean, who has been practising 
law in Ottawa, as Registrar of Carleton county. 

'91 TT.C. Rev Herbert F. Thomas is the new 
pastor of the Presbyterian Church which has 
recently been opened at Todmorden. 

'93 U.C. Howard S. Rosevear, formerly science 
master of the Port Arthur Collegiate Institute has 
accepted the position of principal of the Kenora 
High School and Night School. 

'94 M. (T.) A. G. Ashton Fletcher, 37 Auburn 
Ave., Toronto, has been appointed supreme physi- 
cian of the Independent Order of Foresters. 

'95 U.C. Dr D. Bruce Macdonald has been in 
England attending the Headmasters' Convention 
and will extend an invitation on behalf of the 
Sportsman's Patriotic Association to various Eng- 
lish rowing clubs to send over crews for the aquatic 
meet at the Exhibition next fall. 

'96 U.C. Louise Duffield Cummings, who visited 
Toronto for the convention of the American Associa- 
tion of the Advancement of Science, is the associate 
professor of Mathematics at Vassar College, 
Poughkeepsie, N.Y. 

'95 U.C. Ruby E. C. Mason, Dean of 2,100 
women at the University of Illinois was in Toronto 
in December for the meeting of the American 
Association for the Advancement of Science. 

'95 U.C. Mrs F. A. Stafford (Jessie Dowd) is 
living at 102 Hamilton Avenue, Columbus, Ohio, 
where she is teaching at the Columbus School for 
Girls. 

'96 U.C. Jessie Orr White is the teacher of 
Rhetoric and English Composition at the Misses 
Masters' School, Dobbs Ferry-on-Hudson, N.Y. 

'97 Vic. Rev W. E. Gilroy, who has recently 
been at Fond-du-Lac, Wisconsin, has received the 
appointment of editor-in-chief of the Boston 
Congregationalist, 

'98 U.C., '01 M. At the Cottage Hospital, 
Toronto, a daughter was born to Dr and Mrs F. A. 
Cleland, on December 21. 

'99 D. At Simcoe, on December 29, the marriage 
took place of Lawrence Craig Wadsworth and 
Margaret McNight. Dr and Mrs Wadsworth are 
living in Simcoe. 

. '99 U.C. Mrs C. McLeod (Helen S. Woolverton) 
is now living at 1320 Lyons Street, Evanston, 111. 

'99 U.C. Professor Wrri. A. R. Kerr of the 
University of Alberta has discovered a new ether 
mixture for starting airplanes and motor car 
engines in zero weather after two years of experi- 
menting along that line. 

'99 U.C. Mr and Mrs Robert Gregg Hunter are 
living at 87 St. Clair Avenue East, Toronto. 

'00 M. Dr V. H. McWilliams has been appointed 
to the staff of the Public Health Department of 
Toronto. 

'00 D. In December a son was born to Dr and 
Mrs Stanley Floyd, at the Cottage Hospital, 
Toronto. 

'00 D. James H. Kelsey has been appointed to 
represent che University of Toronto in the Univer- 
sity Club of Erie, Pennsylvania, and is anxious to 
keep in touch with all the Toronto graduates in 
that vicinity. His address is 714 Sassafras Street, 
Erie. 



1922 



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222 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



'02 T. At the Cottage Hospital on December 26 
a son was born to Mr and Mrs Archibald Douglas 
Armour, Toronto. 

'02 U.C. The present address of Ralph Dunn 
Stratton is 1034 Fifth Street, Santa Monica, Cal., 
U.S.A. 

'04 T. Rev H. R. Mockridge has officially taken 
charge of All Hallow's Church, Main Street and 
Doncaster Avenue, East Toronto. 

'04 IT.C. Geo. Wm. Ballard, of the law firm of 
Ballardand Morrison, Hamilton, has been appointed 
crown attorney of Wentworth county. . 

'05 S. At Summerhill Gardens, on December 21, 
a son was born to Mr and Mrs Joseph Vaughan, 
Toronto. 

'05 U.C. Margaret Cowan is teaching classics 
at the High School, Paris. 

'06 Vic. Elmer L. Luck is living at 11144 87th 
Street, Edmonton, Alta. 

'08 Vic. A son was born on December 28 to Mr 
and Mrs Emerson Taylor Coatsworth, 17 Dinnick 
Crescent, Toronto. 

'07 Vic. On December 1$ a son was born to Mr 
and Mrs W. T. Brown, 398 Eglington Ave. West, 
Toronto. 

'07 Vic. Mrs B. P. Steeves (Olive Neata 
Markland) is living at present at Grand Forks, 
British Columbia. 

'07 S. At the Wellesley Hospital, Toronto, on 
December 19, a son was born to Mr and Mrs J. W. 
Melson, of 69 Walmesley Blvd. 

'08 S, Walter S. Malcomson is a superintendent 
on building construction. .His home address is 
189 Willard Avenue Toronto. 



'08 D. On January 1 a son was born to Dr and 
Mrs Earl S. Ball, 17 Glen Grove Avenue West, 
Toronto. 

'08 U.C., '13 U.C. A son (Donald Hunter) was 
born on January 2 to Mr and Mrs James Gilchrist 
(Jean Georgina Hunter), 65 Braemore Gardens, 
Toronto. 

'08 S. The present address of Ernest Wesley 
Neelands is New Liskeard, Ont. 

'08 S. At Regina, Sask., on December 21, a son 
was born to Mr and Mrs Adam P. Linton. 

'09 Vic. Reba V. Fleming, who has spent the 
past three arid a half years doing mission work in 
China, is now at home in Toronto on furlough. 

'09 S. E. R. Birchard has joined the General 
Motors, Limited, of Canada, as Factory Repre- 
sentative for the Chevrolet Motors, Limited, of 
Oshawa, Ontario. 

'09 U.C. The permanent address of John M. 
Swain is c/o Entomological Branch, Department 
of Agriculture, Ottawa. 

'09 S. The recent wedding is announced of King 
A. Farrell to Nellie Jenkins of New Orleans. He is 
with the Underwood Contracting Corporation, New 
Orleans, La. 

'09 M. At St. Catharines, on December 8, a son 
was born to Dr and Mrs Douglas V. Currey. 

'09 U.C. Rev John H. Tuer has moved from 
Chesley to take charge of St. Paul's Church, Port 
Arthur. 

'10 U.C. Rev Wm. Arthur Earp of Clarksburg 
has become the rector of All Saints' Church at 
Windsor. 

'10 U.C. Walter Ellis is Principal of the Van- 
couver Bible College. His address is Latimer Hall, 
Vancouver, B.C. 



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UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



223 



7 10 U.C. Vincent .Massey has been elected 
president of the Massey-Harris Company, of which 
he has latterly been secretary. 

'10 U.C. On January 3, a son was born to Mr 
and Mrs Walter T. Smith (Olive Bonnar). 

'10 S. Mr and Mrs W. Gordon Turnbull (Nora 
Dignum) are living at the Shorncliffe Apartments, 
"250 Heath Street West, Toronto. 

'10 M. John Edward Montgomery is practising 
at Ladysmith, B.C. 

'10 S. Charles Andrew Grassie is residing in 
Smithville and is connected with the good roads 
in the County of Lincoln. 

'10 S. At the Gladstone Private Hospital, a 
daughter was born to Mr and Mrs C. Edgar Brown, 
8 Churchill Avenue, Toronto. 

'10 M. Wm. Frederick Imrie Dey is practising 

his profession at 306 Boyd Building, Winnipeg, Man. 

'11 U.C. At Wellesley Hospital, Toronto, a 

daughter was born to Mr and Mrs A. Woodburn 

Langmuir, on December 23. 

'11 U.C. The latest address of Mrs Winfred 
G. Sells (Irene O'Neill) is 762 16th Street, Niagara 
Falls, N.Y. 

' 11 M. The appointment has been made of Frede- 
rick vStephen Baines as a full-time physician on the 
staff of the Public Health Department of Toronto. 
His home address is 876 Broadview Avenue. 

'11 U.C. At Squamish, B.C., a son was born to 
Mr and Mrs Heber H. K. Green on December 19. 

'11 M. At Cromarty, on December 28, Edwin H. 

McGarvin was married to Charlotte H. Hoggarth. 

'12 S. On December 27, a daughter was born to 

Mr and Mrs Alan E. Stewart, 308 Davenport Road, 

Toronto. 

'12 U.C. George Frederick Say well has become 
a Foreign Secretary of the Church Missionary 
Society. Hjs permanent address is 24 Norton Road, 
Wembley, Middlesex, England. 

'12 T. At St. James Rectory, Hanover, Ont., a 
son was born to Mr and Mrs C. F. Langton Gilbert 
on December 26. 

'12 U.C. Frederick James Alcock is a geologist 
with the Geological Survey of Canada, Ottawa. 

'12 Vic. A son was born in December to Mr and 
Mrs Henry Wm. Manning, 50 St. Leonards Avenue, 
Lawrence Park, Toronto. 

'12 Vic. F. A. A. Campbell, who has been for the 
last five years a member of the firm of Gregory, 
Gooderham and Campbell, has entered into a 
partnership with G. Cameron Macnaughton, for 
the practise of law. His offices will be at Room 511, 
McKinnon Building, corner of Jordan and Melinda 
Streets, Toronto. 

'12 Vic. The birth is announced of a son (Law- 
rence) to Mr and Mrs Wm. Hughes Beatty of Port 
Credit. 

'13 U.C. In New York City, on January 1, a son 
was born to Mr and Mrs Hubert W. Lofft. 

'14 U.C. Rev C. H. Quartermain has moved 
from the mission of Athabasca to take up new work 
at Grande Prairie, Alta. 

'14 U.C. John S. Reid is at the Mayo Founda- 
tion, Rochester. 

'15 U.C. Rev John Brooke Elliott, is now 
chaplain to the Woolwich Garrison Church, Wool- 
wich, Eng. 

'15 S. The marriage was celebrated in January 
of Hugh Kennedy Wyman, of Shawinigan Falls, 
Quebec, and Eva May Ransom. 




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224 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



'15 M. A son was born on December 23, at 
Wellesley Hospital, Toronto, to Dr and Mrs John 
Chassels. 

'15 M. Frank L. Letts, who has been practising 
in New York for some time, has moved from Irving 
Place to 32 Grenville Street. 

'15 S. C. Roy Keys is vice-president and general 
manager of the Curtiss Aeroplane and Motor 
Corporation, whose offices are at Garden City, Long 
Island, N.Y. His home address is 116 Shelton 
Avenue, Jamaica, Long Island. 

'15 Vic. Manton A. Wilson, a former student 
at the Inns of Court, London, England, has opened 
up an office at 411 Continental Life Building, 157 
Bay Street, Toronto, for the practice of Law. 

'16 U.C. Mrs F. A. Williams (Florence S. Buch- 
ner) is living at 5121 Spruce Street,, Philadelpnia. 

'16 IT.C. Jessie Isabel Cowan is teaching classics 
at the Dundas High School. 

'16 S. Norman Benjamin Brown is experimenting 
on electric furnaces for 1 the General Electric Com- 
pany, Pittsfield, Massachusetts. 

'17 U.C. At Toronto, on December 27, David 
Stanley Fuller was married to Grace Annie Ellerby. 
They are living in Stratford. 

'17 U.C. Mrs J. E. Wilson (Ruth Agnes Frost) 
is living at 6454 Bosworth Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

'17 S. W. A. R. Offerhouse, who has been with 
the Hydro Electric Power Commission at Niagara 
Falls, is now with the Dominion Chain Company, 
Niagara Falls. 

'17 D. The marriage took place in Wallaceburg, 
early in January, of John Warren Coates and Edna 
Albert Ronson. 

'17 U.C. The birth is announced of a daughter 
to Rev and Mrs Robert Shields Boyd. 

'17 Vic. Alfred H. Bell has left Toronto and is 
living at 5520 Blackstone Avenue, Chicago, 111. 

'17 U.C. At the Wellesley Hospital, on December 
30, a son was born to Mr and Mrs Harold Geo. Fox, 
155 Clendennan Avenue, Toronto. . 

'17 U.C. Rev James Bertram Bunting, who has 
been in Battleford, Sask., has moved to Duck Lake. 



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'18 D. A son was born in December to Mr and 
Mrs James Wesley Ingram, 82 8th Street, New 
Toronto. 

'18 M. The wedding took place quietly in the 
latter part of January of Vernon Carlisle and Helen 
Macdonald Cringan of Toronto. 

'18 D. A son was born in December at the 
Strathcona Private rjpspital to Dr and Mrs N. Basil 
Temple, 249 Quebec Avenue, Toronto. 

'18 U.C. Victor George Lewis has moved from 
Port Whitby to Holmfield, Man. 

'18 M. Early in January the wedding was 
solemnized of Frank Patrick McNevin and Kathleen 
Cecelia Moran. Dr and Mrs McNevin are living at 
1909 Queen Street East, Toronto. 

'18 U.C. Adam A. Ibsister is employed with the 
export department of the Good Year Rubber 
Company. His address is 157 Glen Holme Avenue, 
Toronto. 

'19 M. Wm. Sinclair McClinton is living at 119 
Holbein House, Chelsea, London, England. 

'19 Vic. One of the members of the Oxford 
University Hockey Team that is travelling through 
Europe is Lester B. Pearson. All the members 'of 
the team are Canadians but one, who is an Ameri- 
can. They had a victorious career, defeating 
Cambridge, the Belgian Olympic team and the 
Swiss national team. 

'19 D. At the Hotel Dieu Hospital, Windsor, on 
December 16, a son was born to Mr and Mrs Chaun- 
cey Daryaw, 36 Hall Avenue. 

'19 M. Lucy Grace Neelands is practising medi- 
cine at Forest, Ont. 

'19 M. At Grace Hospital, Toronto, on De- 
cember 23, a son was born to Dr and Mrs Francis 
Wesley Forge, Lion's Head. 

'20 D. The wedding took place late in January 
of George T. Walker and Violet Margaret Harris of 
Toronto. Dr and Mrs Walker will live in Capreol. 

'20 Ag. Harold Campbell Mason has published 
a book called "Bits of Bronze", a collection of short 
stories and poems descriptive of a private's life in 
France. 

'20 M. The wedding was celebrated in December 
of Norman Hodgins Russell and Helen Margaret 
Hall of Brampton. 

'20 M. George Stanley Jeffrey is the doctor at 
the Burwash Prison Farm where he has been since 
last June. 

'21 Vic. James T. Phillips is employed in the 
actuarial department of the New York Life In- 
surance, New York. His address is the Ampere 
Apartments, 6 North 21st Street, East Orange, New 
Jersey, U.S.A. 



On rental terms 

THEATRICAL, MASQUERADE 
AND CARNIVAL COSTUMES 

MACDONALD-DAWN 

Regalia Evening Dress 
460 Spadina Ave. Phone C. 2900 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



225 



CANADIAN PACIFIC 

FROM TORONTO 



DETROIT AND CHICAGO 

Lv. TORONTO (Union) *8.00 A.M. 
Lv. (Union) *3.20 P.M. 

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MONTREAL AND EAST 

Lv. TORONTO (Union) *8.50 A.M. 
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OTTAWA 

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SUDBURY AND NORTH BAY 

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WINNIPEG AND WEST 

Lv. TORONTO (Union) *10.00 P.M. 



* Daily. 



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For detailed information as to train service, fares, etc., write, call or phone 
City Ticket Office, Corner King and Yonge - Phone Main 6580 



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UNEXCELLED SERVICE AND EQUIPMENT BETWEEN 
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WINTER SPORTS Ideal Winter Holidays at the 
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London 

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CANADIAN NATIONAL - GRAND TRUNK 



226 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



ALUMNI PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY 



ARMOUR & MICKLE 

BARRISTERS, Etc. 

E. DOUGLAS ARMOUR, K.C. 

HENRY W. MICKLE 

A. D. ARMOUR 

CONFEDERATION LIFE BUILDING 

Richmond & Yonge Streets, TORONTO 



STARR, SPENCE, COOPER and FRASER 

BARRISTERS, SOLICITORS, Etc. 

J. R.L.STARR, K.C. J. H. SPENCE 

GRANT COOPER W. KASPAR FRASER 

RUSSELL P. LOCKE HOWARD A. HALL 

Trust and Guarantee Building 
120 BAY ST. - TORONTO 



WILLIAM COOK 

Barrister, Solicitor, Notary, Etc. 

33 RICHMOND ST. WEST 
TORONTO 

Telephone: Main 3898 Cable Address: "Maco" 



ROSS & HOLMSTED 

Barristers, Solicitors, Notaries, Etc. 

NATIONAL TRUST CHAMBERS 

20 King Street East, TORONTO 
JAMES LBITH Ross ARTHUR W. HOLMSTED 



Mclaughlin, Johnston, 
Moot-head & Macaulay 

Barristers, Solicitors, Notaries, Etc. 

120 BAY STREET, TORONTO 
Telephone Adelaide 6467 

R. J. McLaughlin, K.C. R. L. Johnston 
R. D. Moorhead L. Macaulay 

W. T. Sinclair H. J. McLaughlin 

W. W. McLaughlin 



TYRRELL, J. B. 

MINING ENGINEER 

684 Confederation Life Building 
TORONTO, CANADA 



Kerr, Davidson, Paterson & McFarland 

Barristers, Solicitors, Etc. 
EXCELSIOR LIFE BUILDING 

Cable Address "Kerdason," Toronto 



W. Davidson, K.C. 

G. F. McFarland. LL.B. 



John A. Paterson, K.C. 
A. T. Davidson, LL.B. 



Solicitors for the University. 



OSIER, HOSKIN and HARCOURT 

Barristers, Solicitors, Etc. 
THE DOMINION BANK BUILDING 



John Hoskin, K.C. 
H. S. Osier, K.C. 
W. A. Cameron 



F. W. Harcourt, K.C. 
Britton Osier 
A. W. Langmuir 



Counsel Wallace Nesbitt, K.C. 



C. H. and P. H. MITCHELL 

CONSULTING AND SUPERVISING ENGINEERS 
CIVIL. HYDRAULIC, MECHANICAL AND ELECTRICAL 

1003 Bank of Hamilton Building 
TORONTO, Cnt. 



Gregory, Gooderham & Campbell 

BARRISTERS. SOLICITORS. NOTARIES. CONVEYANCERS. &c. 

701 Continental Life Building 
167 Bay Street Toronto 

TELEPHONE MAIN 6070 

Walter Dymond Gregory Henry Folwell Gooderham 

Frederick A. A. Campbell Arthur Ernest Lang-man 

Goldwin Gregory Vernon Walton Armstrong 

Frederick Wismer Kemp 



WALTER J. FRANCIS & COMPANY 

CONSULTING ENGINEERS 
MONTREAL 

WALTER J. FRANCIS, C.E. 
FREDERICK B. BROWN. M.Sc. 

R. J. EDWARDS & EDWARDS 

ARCHITECTS 

18 Toronto St. : Toronto 



R. J. EDWARDS 



G. R. EDWARDS. B.A.Sc. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



227 



Jfrencfr 



The stationery that adds 
refinement to correspondence, 
no matter to whom it is 
sent. 

Club size specially re- 
commended for $our require- 
ments. 

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WINNIPEG VANCOUVER 

EDMONTON 



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WM. TYRRELL & CO., LTD. 
780-782 Yonge St. - TORONTO 



Telephone N. 5600 



COLLEGE 1752 



COLLEGE 2757 



A. W. MILES 

FUNERAL DIRECTOR 



396 COLLEGE ST. 



TORONTO. CANADA 




has still for sale 
A limited number of copies of the 

ROLL. OF SERVICE 

at $J*00 in cloth binding or 75c* in paper. 
This is a handsome volume of about 700 
pages and is the official record of graduates 
and undergraduates in the Great War. 



Order a copy now before the supply is exhausted. 



228 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 




Boys prepared for the 

Universities, Royal 

Military College and 

Business. 



College 

Toronto * Canaoa 

A Residential and Day School 

For Boys 

UPPER SCHOOL LOWER SCHOOL 

Calendar Sent on Application. 
REV. D. BRUCE MACDONALD, M.A., LL.D. Headmaster. 



WESTERN ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Fire, Automobile, Hail, Marine, Explosion, Riots, Civil Commotions and Strikes Insurance 
Head Offices: Corner Wellington and Scott Streets, Toronto 

Assets, Ore* $7,900,000.00 

Losses paid since organization of the Company in 1851, Over $81,300,000.00 
Board of Directors 

W. B. MEIKLE, President and General Manager 

John H. Fulton (New York) Geo. A. Morrow, 

Lt.-Col. the Hon. Frederic Nicholls 
Major-Gen'l Sir Henry Pellatt, C.V.O. 
E. R. Wood 



Sir John Aird 

Robt. Bickerdike (Montreal) 

Lt.-Col. Henry Brock 

Alfred Cooper (London, Eng.) 

H. C. Cox 



D. B. Hanna 

John Hoskin, K.C., LL.D. 

Miller Lash 



LOOSE I.P. LEAF 

Students' Note Books 
Physicians 9 and Dentists' 

Ledgers 

Memo and Price Booths 
Professional Boo^s 



BROWN BROS., Limited 

SIMCOE and PEARL STS. 
TORONTO 



Toronto 
Conservatory of Music 

UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO 



SIR EDMUND WALKER. C.V.O. , LL.D.. D.C.L.. PRESIDENT. 

A. S. VOGT. MUS. DOC.. PRINCIPAL. 

HEALEY WILLAN. MUS. DOC.. F.R.C.O.. VICE-PRINCIPAL. 



Highest Artistic Standards. Faculty 
of International Reputation. 

The Conservatory affords unrivalled facili- 
ties for complete courses of instruction in all 
branches of music, for both professional and 
amateur students. 



PUPILS MAY ENTER AT ANY TIME 



Year Book Examination Syllabus and 
Women's Residence Calendar forwarded 
to any address on request to the Registrar. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



229 




The "Mogul 

Makes good every time 



you consider that manufactui'ng Boilers 
and Radiators is our first and biggest responsi- 
bility When you bear in mind that we are the largest 
manufacturers of Boilers and Radiators in the Dominion 
of Canada. Is it any wonder that the SAFFORD 
MOGUL line is the last word in heating boilers ? 

Every MOGUL leaving our plant is inspected uy a 
staff of specialists, men who know the manufacture of 
boilers from A to Z, and that is why the SAFFORD 
MOGUL makes good every time and all the time. 

Dominion Radiator Company 



Low-Base Safford Mogul (sectional view) 



Hamilton, Ont. 
St. John, N.B. 
Calgary, Alta. 



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R. LAIDLAW LUMBER CO 

LIMITED 



HEAD OFFICE 



65 YONGE STREET 



TORONTO 



EVERYTHING IN 



LUMBER AND MILLWORK 



230 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



DOMINION TEXTILE COMPANY LIMITED 

of CANADA 

President Vice- President General Manager and Director 

SIR CHARLES GORDON SIR HERBERT S. HOLT F. G. DANIELS 



HEAD OFFICE: MONTREAL, P.Q. 

MILLS^IN MONTREAL, MAGOG AND MONTMORENCY FALLS, P.Q., 
AND IN KINGSTON, ONT. 

COTTON FABRICS 

of every description 

PRINTED, DYED, BLEACHED or in the GREY 

for jobbing and cuiiing-up trades 



CASAVANT ORGANS 



ARE SUPERIOR IN 



Quality, Design and Workmanship 



Over 800 pipe organs built 
by this firm in 

Canada, United States and 
South America. 



CASAVANT FRERES 

LIMITED 

ST. HYACINTHE 



EIMER & AMEND 

FOUNDED 1851 

Manufacturers, Exporters and 

Importers of 

LABORATORY APPARATUS 
CHEMICALS and SUPPLIES 




NEW YORK 

3rd AYE., 18th to 19th STREETS 

PITTSBURGH BRANCH 

4048 JENKINS ARCADE 

Washington, D.C: Display Room, Suite 
601, Evening Star Building, Penna. Ave. 
and llth Street. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



231 



BRITISH AMERICA ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Fire, Marine, Hail and Automobile Insurance 
HEAD OFFICES: COR. FRONT AND SCOTT STS., TORONTO 

Incorporated A.D. 1833 

Assets, Over $4,300,000 

Losses Paid since Organization in 1833, Over $47,500,000 



FRANK DARLING, LL.D.. F.R.I.B.A. 



JOHN A. PEARSON 



DARLING & PEARSON 

Hrcbttects 

MEMBERS OF THE ROYAL ARCHITECTURAL INSTITUTE OF CANADA 

MEMBERS ONTARIO ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS 

MEMBERS QUEBEC ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS 

MEMBERS MANITOBA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS 



IMPERIAL BANK CHAMBERS 



2 LEADER LANE 



TORONTO 



The best flour and highest quality of ingredients 

make CANADA 

BREAD 



The choice of 
discriminating 
housewives -:- 



MINION 



MONFYm There is no better way to send money 
llvllCl 1 by mail. If lost or stolen, your 

money refunded or a new order issued 

free of charge. 






232 UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 




By Appointment TJ?)W^(*2r Established 1847 



MASSEY-HARRIS COMPANY, Ltd. 

Makers of Agricultural Implements 
TORONTO 



Henry Sproatt, LL.D., R.C.A. Ernest R. Rolph 



Sproatt and Rolph 

Architects 



36 North Street, Toronto 



PAGE & COMPANY 

Cut Stone and Masonry Contractors 






TORONTO 

Contractors on Hart House and Burwash Hall 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 233 



mbersUtj> of Toronto 

(The Provincial University of Ontario) 



With its federated and affiliated colleges, its various faculties, and 
its special departments, offers courses or grants degrees in: 

ARTS leading to the degree of B.A., M.A., and Ph.D 
COMMERCE ................ Bachelor of Commerce. 

APPLIED SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING. .B.A.Sc., M.A.Sc., 
C.E., M.E., E.E., Chem.E. 

MEDICINE. .... ............. M.B., B.Sc. (Med.), and M.D. 

EDUCATION ................ B.Paed. and D.Paed. 

FORESTRY ................. B.Sc.F. and F.E. 

MUSIC ................. ____ Mus. Bac. and Mus. Doc. 

HOUSEHOLD SCIENCE AND SOCIAL SERVICE. 
PUBLIC HEALTH ........... D.P.H. (Diploma), 

PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING. 

LAW ............... . ........ LL.B., LL.M. and LL.D. (Hon.). 

DENTISTRY ................ D.D.S. 

AGRICULTURE ............. B.S.A. 

VETERINARY SCIENCE. .. .B.V.S. and D.V.S. 

PHARMACY ................ Phm.B. 

TEACHERS' CLASSES, CORRESPONDENCE WORK, 
SUMMER SESSIONS, SHORT COURSES for FARMERS, 
for JOURNALISTS, in TOWN-PLANNING and in HOUSE- 

HOLD SCIENCE, University Classes in various cities and towns, 
Tutorial Classes in rural and urban communities, single lectures 
and courses of lectures are arranged and conducted by the 
Department of University Extension. (For information, write 
the Director.) 

For general information and copies of calendars write the 
Registrar, University of Toronto, or the Secretaries of the Colleges 
or Faculties. 



234 UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 

Department of Education for Ontario 

SCHOOL AGES 

AND 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



In the educational system of Ontario provision is made in the Courses 
of Study for instruction to the child of four years of age in the Kinder- 
garten up to the person of unstated age who desires a Technical or 
Industrial Course as a preparation for special fitness in a trade or pro- 
fession . 

All schools established under the Public Schools Act shall be free 
Public Schools, and every person between the ages of five and twenty- 
one years, except persons whose parents or guardians are Separate 
School supporters, shall have the right to attend some such school in the 
urban municipality or rural school section in which he resides. Children 
between the ages of four and seven years may attend Kindergarten 
schools, subject to the payment of such fees as to the Board may seem 
expedient. Children of Separate School supporters attend the Separate 
Schools. 

The compulsory ages of attendance under the School Attendance 
Acts are from eight to sixteen years and provision is made in the 
Statutes for extending the time to eighteen years of age, under con- 
ditions stated in The Adolescent School Attendance Act of 1919. 

The several Courses of Study in the educational system under the 
Department of Education are taken up in the Kindergarten, Public 
Separate, Continuation and High Schools and Collegiate Institutes, and 
in Industrial and Technical Schools Copies of the Regulations regard- 
ing each may be obtained by application to the Deputy Minister of 
Education, Parliament Buildings, Toronto. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



235 



Why have 57,000 College Men 

enrolled in the 

Alexander Hamilton Institute? 



President of the 
J. largest institution of its 
kind in America a man 
still in his forties was 
commenting on his own 
experience in business. 

"When I graduated from col- 
lege I supposed I was equipped 
with the training necessary to 
business success," he said. 

"As a matter of fact I had 
nothing more than a bare foun- 
dation. I discovered that fact 
even in my first job, and for 
weeks I spent my evenings in a 
night school trying to master 
the elements of cost-finding and 
accountancy. 

"Later as I made my way up 
toward executive positions I 
found I needed to know the 
fundamentals of sales and mer- 
chandising, of advertising and 
factory management, of office 
organization and corporation 
finance. 

"These I picked up from books 
as best I could. Probably my 
college training made it easier 
for me to acquire them; but the 
college training alone certainly 
was not an adequate preparation 
for business in my case. I doubt 
if it is for any man." 

More than 155,000 men 
in 11 years 

The Alexander Hamilton Insti- 
tutte was not founded early 
enough to be of service to this 
man; but it grew out of an ap- 
preciation of the needs of men 
of just this type. 



In the eleven years of its exis- 
tence the Institute has enrolled 
more than 155,000 men who are 
today making more rapid pro- 
gress in business as a result of 
its training. 

Of these 155,000 no less than 
57,000 are graduates of colleges 
and universities. 

This is the Institute's mark 
of distinction that its appeal 
is to the unusual man. It has 
only one Course, embracing the 
fundamentals underlying all 
business, and its training fits a 
man for the sort of executive 
positions where demand always 
outruns supply. 



achieves this splendid result, 
that its training is practical and 
immediately applicable to the 
problems of every business, 
the records of 155,000 business 
men, in every kind of business, 
prove. 

At least you will want 
the facts 

Every college man in business 
is interested in business training. 
He is interested in it either as a 
factor in his own progress; or as 
a factor in the progress of the 
younger men associated with 
him, who are constantly turning 
to him for advice. 



The splendid privilege of 
saving wasted years 

One of the tragedies of the 
business world is that so many 
college men spend so many of 
the best years of their lives in 
doing tasks which they know are 
below their real capacities. 

It is the privilege of the 
Institute to save those wasted 
years to give a man in the 
leisure moments of a few months 
the working knowl- 
edge of the various 
departments of 
modern business 
which would ordi- 
narily take him 
years to acquire. 

That the Insti- 
tute's ModernBusi- 
ness Course and 
Service actually 



To put all the facts regarding 
the Modern Business Course 
and Service in convenient form 
the Alexander Hamilton In- 
stitute has prepared a 120-page 
book, entitled "Forging Ahead 
in Business." It tells concisely 
and specifically what the Course 
is and what it has done for other 
men. There is a copy of this 
book free for every college man 
in business; send for your copy 
today. 

Alexander Hamilton Institute 
375 Astor Place, New York City 

Send me "Forging Ahead in Business" 
which I may keep without obligation. 




Name 

Business 
Address. 



Print her* 



Business 
Position 



Canadian Address. C.P.R. Building, Toronto: Australian Address, 42 Hunter Street, Sydney 



Copyright, "/>--, Alexander Hamilton Institute 



236 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



PLAYER'S 

NAVY CUT 

CIGARETTES 



1O for 18* 
20 35* 





JJndin tins 
ofso&ioo 



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Finest Workmanship 
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Vol. XXII. TORONTO, MARCH, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND TWENTY-TWO No. 6 



News and Comments 



Mr E. W. Beatty has recently written 

the President offering on behalf of the 

Canadian Pacific 

Graduate Railway, three per- 

Fellowships manent graduate fel- 

Donated lowships of $500 a 

year each. The fel- 
lowships are open to graduates of Western 
universities who wish to pursue graduate 
work at Toronto. A fellowship of $500 
value for next year has also been given 
by Sir Edward Kemp. 

These fellowships were offered as a 
result of an appeal which President 
Falconer recently addressed to a number 
of industrial firms. The appeal was based 
primarily on the importance of attracting 
Western students to Eastern Canada 
rather than having them go to American 
universities for graduate work. Sir Rob- 
ert pointed out that the linking of East 
and West is one of Canada's most serious 
national problems. At the present time 
many Western students go for advanced 
work to Chicago, Wisconsin, and other 
American institutions and return to become 
leaders in their native provinces without 
having any first hand knowledge of Eastern 
Canada. If these students were to receive 
part of their education in Eastern Canada, 
they would form important links between 
the two sections of the country. American 
universities are able to offer large fellow- 
ships and unless the universities of Eastern 
Canada are able to do the same they 
cannot hope to secure graduate students 
from Western Canada. 

Under the will of the late Dr Moses 
Henry Aikins, '55, who was a member of 

the first graduating 

Victoria College class of Victoria 
Benefits Under College, the College 
Will Of Dr Aikins benefits to the extent 

of some $95,000. Dr 

Aikins left an estate of $650,000 of which 
$375,000 was willed to be divided equally 
among Victoria College, Toronto General 
Hospital, Hospital for Sick Children, and 
the Salvation Army. $20,000 is to be used 



for the establishment of matriculation 
scholarships to be designated as the Moses 
Henry Aikins Scholarships, and the balance 
as an endowment fund, the interest to 
be used for providing a retiring allowance 
for the professorial staff. 

For the first time in a number of years 
a University Theatre Night was held on. 
February 16. Theper- 
Theatre Night formance was H.M.S. 
Again Pinafore at the Prin- 

Inaugurated cess Theatre. 

It was reported that 

the audience was "exceedingly well behav- 
ed" and that the only sign of rowdiness 
was the throwing of paper between the 
acts. 

Graduates of some years back will 
remember Theatre Nights of quite a 
different order, when the patrons of the 
"gods" were wont to come armed with 
much more formidable weapons. Since 
the night when a cow bell and similar 
musical instruments proved too* much for 
Forbes Robertson, theatre managers have 
consistently shunned the approaches of 
student organizations wishing to hold a 
Theatre Night. 



The Varsity recalls the fact that it was 
thirty-two years ago on the 14th of 
February that the dis- 
U.C. Fire asterous University 

Thirty-two College fire occurred. 

Years Ago As the guests were 

gathering for the An- 
nual Conversazione of the Literary and 
Scientific Society the cry of "Fire" rang 
out and ere long the whole east end of 
the building was in flames. One of the 
employees of the University had tripped 
while carrying a tray of lamps from 
the basement to the Library with the 
result that the stairway was ignited. 
There was no fire fighting equipment 
available and nothing could be* done to 
materially stem the fire's course. It 
smouldered for nearly a fortnight. 

The students looked for a prolonged 



237 



238 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



holiday but were disappointed as accom- 
modation was secured in the School of 
Practical Science and in Moss Hall. The 
following June, Convocation exercises were 
held in a tent. 

Mr Angus MacMurchy, Chairman of 

the Directors of the Alumni Federation, 

who is spending a few 

Classical Spirit months vacation in 

Not Opposed Europe, has sent in 

To Scientific an account of Lord 

Milner's presidential 

address to the Classical Association of 

England. 

Lord Milner was of the opinion that 
there was nothing in the classical spirit 
which was in any sense opposed to the 
scientific spirit, and that if Plato and 
Aristotle were to re-appear among men 
to-day they would be the first to investi- 
gate the achievements of science. The 
whole controversy between the humanities 
and physical science was, he hoped, a 
thing of the past. A well-rounded edu- 
cation would include both. He drew 
attention to the danger involved in the 
advance of science unaccompanied by 
intellectual 'and spiritual progress. "For 
a restless and feverish age, distracted 
by a flood of new discoveries and new ideas 
which it had not time to digest, prone to 
excess and eccentricity and hasty judg- 
ments insufficiently tempered by remem- 
brance and reflection, there was balm in 
the sanity, the calmness, the balance, the 
self-possession, above all in the sense of 
proportion, which were the distinctive 
qualities of classic art and literature." 

The Directors of the Alumni Federation 
have again decided to endeavour to assist 

soldier-students who 
Summer Work are receiving assistance 
Wanted from the Memorial 

Fund, and other needy 
students, in securing work for the vacation 
period. Readers who know of employment 
openings are urged to send information of 
them to the Alumni Office. 

It is anticipated that it will be quite as 
difficult for students to secure remunera- 
tive employment this summer as last. 
There seems very little prospect of large 
industrial firms desiring temporary workers. 
The public schools in the West which 
used to absorb so many atudents as teachers 



now find sufficient teachers among the 
students of Western universities. Hard 
times, too, have fallen upon the canvassers. 
The selling of books, maps, and stereos- 
copic views has become a very hazardous 
venture. Apparently students will have 
to depart from the beaten paths to secure 
work during the coming summer. 

The Hon. N. W. Rowell has been ap- 
pointed to the Board of Governors of the 
University to fill the 
N. W. Rowell vacancy caused by the 
Appointed to resignation of Mr 
Governors Home Smith. 

Mr Rowell has been 

for many years closely identified with the 
affairs of Victoria College, having been a 
member of the Senate and Board of 
Regents. He has been prominent in 
public affairs, particularly since 1911 when 
he was chosen leader of the Liberal Op- 
position on the Ontario Legislature. In 
1917 he entered the Union Government 
at Ottawa and became president of the 
Privy Council. 

Among the international relationships 
which the World War interrupted are 
the exchange professor- 
W. A. Braun ships, which had just 
Invited as begun to serve a useful 

Fxchange purpose in promoting 

Professor to a better international 

Zurich feeling and under- 

standing. So far as 
the Central European nations are con- 
cerned, more time will have to pass before 
these faculty exchanges can be restored 
to their full pre-war basis. 

But it is an ill wind that blows nobody 
good. It was quite natural that in the 
first years after the war, numbers of 
foreign students seeking a German -speak- 
ing university should turn to the uni- 
versities of Switzerland instead of going 
to Germany. Nor were these universities 
slow to perceive this trend and to encourage 
it. 

Now the leading Swiss university, Zurich, 
has evinced a desire to enter into closer 
academic relations with America, a project 
which is being supported by the Swiss 
government through its department of 
education, and has invited Professor Wil- 
liam A. Braun, of the Department of 
Germanic Languages and Literatures in 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



239 



Columbia University, as visiting professor 
for the winter session of 1922-23, this 
being the first appointment of an American 
professor at a Swiss university. Professor 
Braun will give a course of lectures in 
the German language on conditions in the 
United States. He will begin the course 
some time in October, having been granted 
a special leave of absence for this purpose 
for the first half of the next academic year. 
Professor Braun is a graduate of Uni- 
versity College of the year 1895. Shortly 
after his graduate work at the University 
of Chicago and in Germany, he was ap- 
pointed to the staff of Columbia Univer- 
sity, where he has been for twenty years. 
Although so long expatriated and now a 
citizen of the Republic, he has kept in 
close touch with his Alma Mater, which 
he visits at least once a year on his way 
to or from his summer home in Muskoka. 

The University College Alumni Associ- 
ation is preparing a memorial to be pre- 
sented to the Board of 
U.C. Governors urging that 

Association to every effort be made to 
Present restore at an early date 

Memorial to to University College 
Governors the building now known 

as the Main Building. 

Attention will be drawn to the congested 
condition of the rooms now occupied by 
the College, both in the matter of class 
rooms and of professors' private rooms. 
It will be pointed out that until the build- 
ing is relieved of the administrative offices 
the College cannot perform its proper 
functions. The College was better off for 
space forty years ago although the building 
then harboured the Museum, Convocation 
Hall, Library, Science Departments, and a 
residence, than -it is to-day when all these 
have been moved to other buildings. 



The members of the expedition were all 
violently mountain sick. 



DR JOSEPH BARCROFT, who was a mem- 
ber of an expedition which recently visited 
the Andes with a view to investigating 
physiological effects of high altitudes, 
lectured before the Royal Canadian Insti- 
tute on February 4. 

He told of how the blood of the natives 
showed thirty-three per cent more of red 
pigment than that of those who live in 
lower altitudes. The natives were small 
in stature but had chest expansions of an 
ordinary man of six feet. 



FEBRUARY is THE GIDDY MONTH in under- 
graduate life. It is the time of relaxation 
preceding strenuous preparation for the 
spring examinations. Almost every orga- 
nization of any size has held a dance or 
some similar function during the past 
month. The "Dents" and "Meds" were 
ambitious and held their at-homes in the 
new ball-room of the King Edward Hotel. 
The other Faculty at-homes were held in 
Hart House. On the whole, however, the 
session has been characterized by a passing 
of the dance craze which during the two 
former years was evident. 



A NEW DEPARTURE IN UNIVERSITY 

DEBATING was made on February 18 when 
representatives of the McGill and Toronto 
Menorah Societies argued on "Resolved 
that the convocation of a Jewish congress 
in Canada at the present moment is both 
feasible and necessary". Toronto was 
represented by David Eisen, and J. M. 
Stuchen, '21. The decision was given in 
favour of McGill. 



DR C. E. SILCOX, U.C. '09, minister of 
First Church of Christ, Fairfield, Conn., 
preached the College sermon on January 
22. Dr Silcox will be remembered by 
many as being very prominent in under- 
graduate affairs during his time at the 
University. 



AN INDICATION OF THE GROWTH of the 

University is found in the fact that 
twenty-five years ago an appeal was made 
to the Ontario Government to make good 
a deficit of $18,000; the total revenue of 
the University at that time was $410,000, 
approximately one-fifth of what it is to-day. 



THE GRADUATE STUDENTS OF THE UNI- 
VERSITY have an organization known as 
the Graduate Students' Union. Its object 
is to create a spirit of solidarity among its 
members and to promote social intercourse 
among them. At a recent meeting Mr H. 
R. Kemp retired from the Presidency and 
Mr M. L. Stokes was elected in his place. 



THE PRESIDENT OF PRINCETON UNIVER- 
SITY has sent a letter to the parents of all 
Princeton undergraduates asking them 



240 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



to refrain from giving their sons auto- 
mobiles for use while in College. It is his 
opinion that automobiles are detriments to 
students. 



THE REGISTRAR HAS RECEIVED a letter 
from the Board of Education of Saskatche- 
wan, pointing out that it is expected that 
there will be a sufficient number of qualified 
teachers within the Province to man the 
Saskatchewan schools during the coming 
summer, and that students of Eastern 
universities who are not fully qualified 
need not apply for positions. 



DURING THE SESSION which from the 
standpoint of undergraduate extra- 
academic activities is now drawing to a 
close, the Music Committee of Hart House 
arranged a -very fine series of afternoon 
musicales. These were held in the Music 
Room, Hart House, and were largely 
attended by the music lovers of the Uni- 
versity constituency. 



H. R. CHRISTIE, B.Sc.F., Toronto, '12, 
has been appointed assistant professor in 
the Faculty of Forestry. Mr Christie is 
at present professor of Forestry at the 
University of British Columbia. He en- 
listed with the Engineers during the first 
year of the war and spent four years in 
active service. 



AT A DECENT MEETING of the University 
Senate, a resolution of sympathy with 
Mrs James Ballantyne in her bereavement 
was passed. At the next preceding meet- 
ing, Professor Ballantyne had moved a 
similar resolution in reference to the death 
of Dr John Hoskin. 



THE EXTENSION DEPARTMENT has an- 
nounced the Summer Session Course for 
Teachers which affords an opportunity for 
teachers to secure university credits on 
the course leading to the Bachelor of Arts 
degree. Any subject will be given for 
which a reasonable number of applications 
is received prior to May 1. 

THE FORESTRY CLUB of the University 
held a banquet in Hart House on February 
9. Sir Robert Falconer, Dean Howe, Mr 
W. C. Cain, Mr E. J. Zavitz, and Mr 
R. H. Campbell were among the speakers. 



AN AGITATION HAS BEEN STARTED to have 

the graduating classes present a picture 
to Hart House. Since the opening of the 
House a number of very fine pictures have 
been loaned at different times, and the 
suggestion is that at least one each year 
should be purchased. 



DURING FEBRUARY the two choral 
organizations of the University, the Uni- 
versity Glee Club and the Victoria College 
Glee Club, gave their annual concerts. 
Both Clubs gave fine concerts and were 
favoured with large and appreciative 
audiences. 



THE Varsity ADVOCATES a course in 
advertising at the University, claiming 
that students who intend entering the 
professions as well as those who are pre- 
paring for business should have some 
knowledge of advertising. 



THE FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE ar- 
ranged a course of lectures in water power 
development to be given by five eminent 
hydraulic engineers from Canada and the 
United States. It was designed to be of 
special value to fourth year men, but all 
interested in the subject were invited. 



A BRONZE MEMORIAL TABLET in honour 
of the Ontario Medical men who served 
during the war was unveiled at the Aca- 
demy of Medicine on January 31. A 
number of portraits and books were on 
the same occasion presented to the Aca- 
demy. 



ACCORDING TO THE SWIMMING INSTRUC- 
TOR at the Lillian Massey School, women 
students make splendid swimmers. He 
claims that girls are more courageous and 
daring than men, especially when it comes 
to diving. 



THE OLD BOYS ASSOCIATION of the 
University of Toronto Schools held its 
second annual dinner in the Great Hall of 
Hart House on February 15. J. B. Brebner 
was elected President, succeeding Frank 
Denton. 



THE BRITISH FEDERATION of University 
Women has offered an international fellow- 
ship of the value of 300 to be open for 
competition to women research workers. 



Why Not More Generous Support for the University 



By W. C. GOOD, '00, M.P. 



WHY, I am asked, does not the 
University of Toronto receive 
more generous support from the 
Province? Before attempting to answer 
this question I would ask another: Is it a 
fact that the Province does not support the 
University generously? In order to answer 
the latter question one must have some 
way of measuring what is called generous 
support, some way of comparing the sup- 
port which the Province gives to the Uni- 
versity with what it gives to other educa- 
tional institutions and to other causes. 
And I am not sure that, as compared with 
other educational institutions, the Uni- 
versity of Toronto has not received gener- 
ous support. I am prepared to admit, of 
course, that the Province does not attach 
sufficient importance to higher education. 
But that holds also with respect to many 
other things. Without assuming, ther*e- 
fore, that the University of Toronto is not 
getting its fair share of support, I will 
venture to make the following suggestions 
looking towards increasing the interest of 
our citizens generally in the work of the 
University. 

(1) More short courses and extension 
work could be undertaken wkh advantage. 
The experience of the O.A.C. is significant 
in this respect. For years, through 
Farmers' Institutes, the work of the O.A.C. 
was brought home to the farmers of the 
Province. For years, every summer, 
thousands of farmers with their families 
visited, and were entertained by, the 
O.A.C. And for years short winter courses 
whetted the appetites of those whose time 
and resources were limited. The experi- 
ence of many of the American universities 
in extension work is also significant. 

(2) The control of the University and its 
activities should be made thoroughly 
democratic. With all its limitations the 
principle of democracy is sound, and it 
should be applied to political, educational, 
industrial, and other social institutions. 
Without making any definite proposals I 
would suggest the propriety of overhauling 



the whole University machinery in order 
to make it conform as closely as possible 
to democratic principles and practices. 

(3) But, while success in life is generally 
measured by the accumulation of dollars, 
the two previously suggested reforms will 
fall short of attaining much. While com- 
mercialism of the modern variety remains 
dominant we may look for more or less 
popular disdain of true education. Educa- 
tion conceived of as an end in itself is, 
indeed, scarcely compatible with the pre- 
vailing materialistic ideals. Technical edu- 
cation, as a means towards money making, 
tends to be more popular than that type 
of education which Huxley so admirably 
defined a good many years ago, a type 
which had as its end and purpose, the 
development of the best qualities of body, 
mind and soul. When the principle of 
co-operation in service for a common good 
replaces the law of the jungle we may 
expect a larger and more cordial support of 
higher education of all true education. 

V 4) I would suggest finally that the 
demand for additional support might be 
lessened by carrying on some of the under- 
graduate work elsewhere in the Province. 
Something has been done in this respect 
already, in raising the standard for en- 
trance. It remains to be seen what effects 
this will have. It is quite possible that 
something may be done along other lines 
too. Frequently quality suffers from big- 
ness or too rapid growth, and I should not 
like to see any deterioration in quality 
arising from overcrowding, etc. The Uni- 
versity of Toronto might gain, rather than 
lose, by the greater development of other 
institutions which can do some of the work 
now being done in the Queen City. At all 
events the idea is worth considering. #qf 

The foregoing suggestions are sub- 
mitted for what they are worth. The 
writer professes to have no special quali- 
fications for diagnosis or prescribing a 
remedy. He feels, however, that the whole 
question is worth thorough discussion, and 
therefore submits his view of the situation. 



241 



The University's Need of a Reasonably Permanent Income 

By T. A. RUSSELL 
CHAIRMAN FINANCE COMMITTEE, BOARD OF GOVERNORS 



IN my opinion, there has never been a 
time when the general public of the 
Province had a higher appreciation of 
the University of Toronto and the work it 
is doing than at present. Not only are the 
Arts faculties (which have always fyeen 
to the fore) carrying on their work over a 
greater range and with larger attendances 
than ever before, but our Science Depart- 
ments have enlarged and touch phases of 
activity undreamed of a generation ago. 
Our Engineering Faculty is making its 
influence felt in every corner of the Pro- 
vince. Our Medical Faculty, although 
subject from time to time to criticisms in 
detail, is being more widely recognized as 
one of the great medical schools of the 
continent. 

Nor has the present Government proved 
unfriendly to the University. On the con- 
trary, it has met the representatives of the 
University with a frankness and sympathy 
that perhaps is not widely enough realized. 
Salaries, which even yet ' are perhaps 
hardly adequate, have, however, been ad- 
justed on a more equitable basis than at 
any time during the last fifteen years. 
The completion of the splendid new build- 
ing for Electrical Engineering and the 
commencement of the new Anatomy Build- 
ing, indicate that they have not, been un- 
mindful of some of the needs of the 
University in its growth. 

The recent University Commission took 
the stand that the University of Toronto 
must be regarded as the Provincial Uni- 
versity; that no aid given to other institu- 
tions must result in a withdrawal of or 
diminution of support to the Provincial 
University; that post-graduate work should 
be restricted to the University of Toronto 
and that new faculties should not be added 
in the other Universities in duplication of 
those existing at Toronto. 

What, then, is the issue to-day? Frankly, 
as I see it, it narrows itself to this: that 
the Provincial Government of the day 
desires to commit itself no further with 



regard to the University than from one 
year to another; that it has sought to 
have the estimates for the year brought 
in each Session and made a subject of 
debate in the House, if necessary, prior to 
their acceptance. 

On the contrary, the attitude of the 
Board of Governors (and on this they 
were supported by the unanimous report 
of the University Commission) was that 
the best results could not be obtained 
by the adoption of a policy of this kind, 
which looks no further than one year ahead. 
The report of the University Commission 
recommended that the 'principle of grant- 
ing to the University of Toronto an annual 
amount equal to one-half of the receipts 
from Succession Duties, be continued at 
least for another five years. It was pointed 
out that the experiences in the last fifteen 
years have shown that this sum expanded 
in about the same ratio as the needs of 
the University. The adoption of .the 
University Commission, report would en- 
able the Governors of the University to 
look farther tharr one year ahead and to 
plan their programme over a period of 
five years. In an institution so large and 
with developments of such importance, it 
must be obvious that a proper outlook of 
this kind is essential if the University is 
to attain anything like its maximum 
development. 

In making this recommendation it was 
not the thought of the Governors nor of 
the University Commission's, that the 
Governors should -have a free hand over 
any five-year period. The practice which 
has continued since 1906 of preparing 
estimates and laying sarhe before the 
Governor-in-Council each year would be 
continued, but it would enable the men 
charged with the financial responsibility 
of the University to plan for some reason- 
able period ahead, with some confidence 
as to their income, instead of being left iri 
uncertainty beyond the particular V ear 
in which they are involved. 



242 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



243 



I feel, therefore, that every effort should 
be made to convince the present Govern- 
ment not of the need to support higher 
education, because I believe they are alive 
to that; not of the soundness of regarding 
the University of Toronto as the Pro- 
vincial University, because they have 
accepted that policy; not of the need of 
liberality with regard to educational 
matters, because they have proven them- 
selves willing to consider the educational 
needs of the Province -but of the absolute 
necessity of an institution of the magnitude 



and far-reaching character of the University, 
having its policy set for more than one year 
in advance and having the sources of its 
income reasonably secure for more than one 
year in advance, so that the most efficient 
results can be obtained from its administra- 
tion. 

Surely it cannot do better than adopt 
the unanimous report of the Commission 
expressly appointed to fully consider the 
University question as a safe policy to 
pursue for at least the next five years. 



Toronto Conservatory of Music Developes as a Unit of 

the University 



H 



[ANDEL and his crew of fiddlers 
gave a performance in the 
Theatre". In this sentence, the 
Oxford University Magazine of July, 1732, 
alluded to the visit to the tlniversity of 
one of the greatest musicians of all times. 
But tempora mutantur, nos et mutamur in 
illis. The time has long passed when 
musicians as a class were looked upon as 
long-haired, irresponsible and erratic. To- 
day 'the profession is universally esteemed 
and occupies a commanding position in the 
general educational and cultural life of the 
world. Most, if not all, great British and 
the leading American universities announce 
courses of study leading to degrees in 
Music to undergraduates who have passed 
a matriculation examination, and our own 
University of Ontario has maintained for 
many years a system of local examinations. 
In 1919, a regular Faculty of Music was 
formed in the University and courses of 
lectures were announced. In 1920, a 
further and most important development 
took place, which, in effect, means the 
establishment of a state school of Music in 
Ontario. The control of the large and' 
influential school of Music known -as the 
Toronto Conservatory of Music was, in 
accordance with the terms of an Act of 
the Provincial Parliament, placed in the 
hands of a special Board of Governors 
appointed by the University and respons- 
ible to, the University Board of Governors. 
The importance of this movement it would 
be difficult to overstate. Since its founda- 



tion thirty-five years ago, with a com- 
paratively modest equipment and a roll 
of about 200 students, the Conservatory 
has develqped into the largest and one of 
the most completely appointed schools of 
Music in the British Empire, with a regis- 
tration of students drawn from all sections 
of the Dominion, Newfoundland, the West 




Dr A. S. VOGT, Dean of the Faculty of Music 



244 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



Indies and several states of the adjoining 
Republic. It has for some years occupied 
an unrivalled position in Canada as a 
Music school of the first rank, while the 
distinction of its faculty, the superior 
character and capacity of its buildings, and 
the efficiency of its general equipment are 
equalled by very few of the great schools 
of Music of either Europe or America. 
As in the case of colleges which have been 
brought into federation with the Uni- 
versity, the Conservatory retains its name, 
its distinction and its characteristics; its 
purpose being to give instruction in all 
branches of the art and science of Music. 
This it has done for many years, supplying 
a complete technical and theoretical edu- 
cation in Music, from the instruction of 
very young pupils in its preparatory de- 
partments, to the training of teachers and 
artists competent to appear as public 
performers and to assume professional 
responsibilities in a manner worthy of the 
institution and its recent formal absorption 
by the University. In Theory and Com- 
position, the courses are equally compre- 



hensive and complete. Such courses are 
not a regular part of the work of a Uni- 
versity, whose chief function is rather to 
provide lectures and to conduct examina- 
tions leading to degrees. 

That the University of Toronto has now 
under its supervision and control a 
splendidly equipped and internationally 
important school of Music is another and 
a remarkable instance of the University's 
ever-widening scope. As the Conservatory 
has long maintained throughout the 
Dominion a carefully graded and highly 
successful system of local examinations, 
whose prestige and influence has extended 
beyond the borders of Canada, the 
University's local examinations will in 
future be taken over and conducted by 
the Conservatory, an arrangement which, 
it is expected, will tend to establish and 
standardize examinations, under the super- 
vision of the Faculty of Music of the 
University of Toronto, and thus more 
than ever to advantageously affect the 
musical life of the Province and country 
generally. 



The President's Annual Report Published 



IN glancing through the President's 
Report for the year ending June 30th, 
which has recently been issued by the 
King's Printer, two things in particular 
strike the eye, first, the development of 
research work, and second, the growth of 
the Extension Department. 

No less than 112 researches conducted by 
members of the staff are enumerated. The 
subjects covered and the number of re- 
searches in each case are as follows: 
Psychology, 2; Physics, 20; Botany, 7; 
Zymology, 6; Biochemistry, 7; Physiol- 
ogy? 9; Chemistry, 10; Geology; Miner- 
alogy; Medicine, 20; School of Engineer- 
ing Research, 31. The list is a compre- 
hensive one and shows that members of the 
staff are alive to the advantages of research 
from the standpoint of undergraduate 
teaching as well as from that of the results 
of the investigations. 

A considerable part of the work was 
done by senior and graduate students in 
co-operation with members of the staff. 
Perhaps the most remarkable thing in 
regard to the entire report on research is 



that the committee in charge of the fund 
for experimental research had only $5,000 
to administer. Apparently the research 
workers had to rely on departmental 
budgets and outside contributions for the 
greater part of their financial maintenance. 

In the report of the Extension Depart- 
ment, Mr Dunlop tells of work carried on 
in ten different divisions : Summer Session ; 
Course for Teachers during the Term; 
Correspondence Courses; Extension Lec- 
tures; Workers' Educational Association; 
Tutorial Classes; Extra-mural Classes; 
Short Course for Farmers ; Short Course in 
Journalism; Household Science Short 
Course. 

The total staff of the University for the 
year was 558 of whom 68 were professors, 
48 associate professors, 41 assistant pro- 
fessors, and the remainder, lecturers, in- 
structors, and demonstrators. 

In that portion of the Report which 
appears over the President's name con- 
siderable attention is again given to the 
financial problems with which the Uni- 
versity is faced. Sir Robert says in part: 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



245 



"The problem of entrance still faces us. 
The first year of University College was so 
large that the accommodation was not 
only quite inadequate, but is such that 
there are many rooms in which students 
should not be required to take instruction. 
The situation in Economics was even worse, 
for one old dwelling-house was the head- 
quarters of a department that has to pro- 
vide instruction for 763 pass and 240 
honour students. But perhaps worst of all 
was the condition of the students in Botany. 
Not only are the laboratories of this 
rapidly growing department quite in- 
adequate for the present, but it was 
necessary to break urj the teaching museum 
in order to get space for the routine 
instruction. Graduate work is curtailed, 
and necessary additions to the staff cannot 
be secured to take care even of present 
needs as there is no place in which to 
have the teaching done. It will be difficult 
to attract good men to the staff until 
better quarters can be offered. 

"I cannot emphasize too strongly the 
fact that the delay in carrying out the 
building programme set forth by the 
Governors last year to the Commission is 
seriously crippling the efficiency of the 
University. Every indication goes to show 
that even with the rise of standards the 
numbers in Arts will not be reduced in such 
a way as to make the demands for buildings 
less urgent. The best work'cannot be done 
in the kind of space we have at our dis- 
posal." 

Residences Needed for University 
College 

"Collegiate life will never be what it 
should be in University College until 
residences for men and women with a 
Union for the latter have been provided 
in addition to proper class-room accom- 
modation. Our students, drawn as they 
are from every section of Ontario as well 
as other parts of the Dominion, and from 
all classes in society, are material of first- 
rate quality, but without suitable buildings 
to live and work in they are not getting 
what they should from their college life; 
they are not educating one another as they 
might; they do not enjoy those rich gifts 
which are so uniquely afforded in the 



English and the old American College, a 
historical institution which both branches 
of the English-speaking world have pre- 
served as distinctive in their educational 
system. It remains for us also in Canada 
to preserve as a centre of liberal education 
the college bearing our own individual 
mark and affording opportunities for inter- 
course and friendship through the constant 
commingling of students." 

"Again I cannot but refer to the effect 
in retarding the development of the Uni- 
versity which has been produced by our 
uncertainty as to what financial support 
can be relied upon. The staff are anxious 
as to their own future, it is difficult to 
make offers to men who are called to fill 
vacancies, and the youth of the country 
in attendance are not getting all that with 
some reasonable and reliable annual in- 
crease we should offer them. Nor can the 
University reach out through its extension 
to meet the opportunities which have been 
so splendidly manifested by Mr Dunlop 
even in the first year of his work. His 
report shows what lies to our own hand to 
do if only we have the financial means. 
The people, young and old, want educa- 
tion. Only in a widely cultivated and 
diversified society such as higher education 
creates will even those economic interests 
be constantly called into being which both 
make and satisfy a productive population. 
Mere material development will soon ex- 
haust itself by producing a narrow people 
with few interests, whereas a broadly and 
highly educated community will become 
not merely increasingly efficient, but will 
afford occupation for skilled workers both 
urban and rural, and will demand a more 
varied production to meet the growing 
needs of an enriched country." 

Sir Robert refers to the work of the 
Alumni Association as follows : 

"I cannot overlook the valuable co- 
operation of the Alumni Association during 
the year in making known the needs of the 
University to a very wide constituency. 
Many of our graduates devoted valuable 
time and energy when it was greatly 
needed, and without singling out any one 
above another it may be said that such a 
large number of graduates have never 
before been so actively devoted to the 
welfare of their Alma Mater. " 



The Department of Chemical Engineering 

By H. M. LANCASTER, CHIEF CHEMIST, ONTARIO PROVINCIAL BOARD OF HEALTH 



ONE of the chief characteristics of the 
late Dean Ellis was his sound judg- 
ment. With this quality of mind 
was combined an ability to adapt new 
features of scientific development to the 
requirements of the times. He had the 
opportunity of viewing chemical science 
from many angles. The speculative theo- 
ries so essential to advancement; history, 
without which no science can achieve its 
fullest development; analytical work of 
the most exacting character; chemistry 
as applied to the science and practice of 
medicine and to the industries all of 
these passed in review, as it were, in the 
experience of this wise man, whose life 
was a broadening inspiration to all who 
worked with him. 

It is most significant that of all the 
branches of chemical work with which 
he was concerned, the Department of 
Chemical Engineering and Applied Che- 
mistry held a very prominent place in his 
affections. The purpose of establishing 
such a Department was not only to present 
the applications of chemistry as a minor 
subject to classes of students in the 
several branches of engineering such as 
mining, civil, mechanical and electrical 
and to special groups of students from 
other Faculties of the University, but 
also to fit a connecting link between our 
industries and the University. The very 
existence of many of the industries of 
our country depends upon chemical pro- 
cesses conducted in some cases in wasteful 
and careless ways. On the other hand, in 
every university there is a wealth of 
information and scientific lore packed away 
in every science department which is con- 
cerned entirely with the mental training 
derived from the study of mere abstrusities 
without any regard for usefulness in the 
ordinary sense of the word "useful". The 
function served by the Department of 
Chemical Engineering, is, then, to train 
men to deal with technical industrial 
problems in a scientific way and to bring 
scientific knowledge into practical applica- 
tion on an industrial scale. 



With '.his ideal, Dr Ellis gathered about 
him men with natural ability, who have 
added to this the training and experience 
necessary to carry on successfully. The 
Department is now under the guiding hand 
of Professor J. Watson Bain. With him 
are associated Dr M. C. Boswell and Pro- 
fessor E. G. R. Ardagh, as divisional heads. 
With enthusiastic co-operation of the staff 
both senior and junior with a vigorous 
student body, the present organization is 
flourishing in every sense of the word. The 
junior staff is made up of two lecturers 
and four demonstrators. The students 
number one hundred and seventy- two. 
Some idea as to the growth of the Depart- 
ment can be obtained from the records 
which show that in the year 1910 the total 
registration of students was forty-eight. 

Indeed, the last few years have seen 
many changes in the attitude of our people 
towards many things. Of all the lessons 
learned from the recent war none was 
more definite and clear than that Chemis- 
try was of prime importance in the so called 
"key" industries without which no nation 
is on a sound economic basis. Our in- 
dustries are passing from the ultra-con- 
servative policy of cherishing traditional 
trade secrets. Those in charge have begun 
to see that the application of modern 
scientific methods brings results. Chem- 
istry is being recognized as the basis of 
industrial progress. 

In this department of Applied Chemistry 
there is no danger of education being 
sacrificed to the mere accumulation of 
practical details. The courses of instruc- 
tion are sufficiently broad to foster the 
creative spirit and to develop good judg- 
ment. The research problems in this field 
are quite sufficient to stimulate and to 
bring out the best features of pure science. 
Every student is required during the final 
year to carry on an investigation of some 
hitherto unsolved problem. Such re- 
searches deal with features of industrial 
processes. This training is most excellent 
and is useful in all walks of life. Even 
if through lack of opportunity or from 



246 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



247 



other causes the graduate does not follow 
up chemical work as a life occupation 
the value of such training will assert itself. 
A man trained to think clearly and to 
apply scientific methods to the solution 
of chemical problems will be the better 
prepared to meet the obstacles encountered 
in any other line of activity. In addition 
to these student researches, this Depart- 
ment carries on the chemical investigations 
of the School of Engineering Research, 
which is organized for research in the 
Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering. 
Three graduates are engaged in this work. 
In order to obtain best results in all 



these various lines it is necessary that 
both staff and students have contact and 
co-operation with organizations and with 
individuals who are concerned with in- 
dustrial management. The alumni can 
do a great deal in assisting such work by 
sympathetically remembering that there 
is such a department in the University 
and by giving it additional points of 
contact with the industrial world. It is 
the duty of those in charge of government 
affairs to see that such scientific depart- 
ments are provided with adequate staff 
and equipment, because the ultimate effec- 
tive results are of national value. 



The Veterinary College to be Moved to Guelph During 

the Coming Summer 



The Ontario Veterinary College which 
for sixty years has carried on its work in 
Toronto will be moved to Guelph during 
the coming summer. A new building on 
the grounds of the Experimental Farm 
and in close proximity to the Agricultural 
College is now in the course of construc- 
tion. The present Veterinary College 
building on University Avenue will be used 
for Government Offices. 

The Ontario Veterinary College was 
established in 1862 under the principalship 



of the late Dr Andrew Smith who guided 
the destinies of the institution with rare 
ability for forty-six years. Principal Smith 
was succeeded by the late Dr E. A. A. 
Grange and in 1918 the present head, 
Dr C. D. McGilvray was called to the 
principalship. The College is the only 
one in Canada which offers veterinary 
training for English speaking students. 
Its student body is probably the most 
cosmopolitan of any unit of the Univer- 
sity. This year there are students in 




Architect's drawing of Veterinary College building which is in course of construction at Guelph. 
will be fully modern with the best equipment for scientific instruction 



The building 



248 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



attendance from every province of the 
Dominion, from Newfoundland, the British 
West Indies, and the United States. 

The transfer of the College to Guelph 
will not affect its affiliation with the Uni- 
versity. The University will still have 
control over entrance requirements, ex- 
aminations, and the conferring of degrees. 
Instruction in ceitain science subjects 
which the Veterinary students now receive 
in the University will be provided by the 
Agricultural College. 

Principal McGilvray expresses himself 
as well satisfied with the change. He 
anticipates an improvement in the facilities 
for clinical teaching by reason of the close 
relationship which will exist with the 
O.A.C. On the other hand he says that 
if the University had been able to provide 
all the instruction in science which the 
College desired, he would have preferred 
to remain in Toronto. But this the Uni- 
versity, on account of lack of facilities, has 
been unable to do. 



In recent years the attendance at the 
Veterinary College has fallen off, appar- 
ently because the profession has not 
appealed to the youth of the country as 
other professions have. Dr McGilvray 
points out, however, that the profession 
to-day offers great opportunities. The 
old "horse doctor" of little or no scientific 
training is gone and in his place there is a 
man scientifically trained in all the dis- 
eases of animals. Private practice has 
greatly improved with the development 
of the stock breeding industry, and with 
the coming of the motor car which enables 
the practitioner to cover a much wider 
field. Veterinary graduates go also into 
many other lines of work government 
inspectorships in abattoir and field work, 
municipal service in safeguarding the 
supply of milk and meat, commercial 
work with firms distributing biological 
products and side lines such as fox 
farming. 



University Publicity 



By CLARK E. LOCKE, '11, ADVERTISING MANAGER, ROBERT SIMPSON Co. LTD. 



IT is generally conceded that the day has 
arrived when the University of Toronto 
should receive some tangible mani- 
festation of whole-souled sympathy and 
support. In the business world it is not 
until a great measure of public approval 
and goodwill is felt behind an enterprise 
that its directors feel free to plan con- 
fidently for the spacious days of the future. 
Such goodwill is a guarantee of success and 
progress. 

So with the University. Growing yearly 
from strength to strength on the value of 
its products, and its contribution to the 
State, it builds public sentiment and is 
nourished by it. 

Business, however, has gone much 
further in recent years. Not content with 
waiting for a gradual growth in popular 
favour, it has set out systematically to 
stimulate and develop a sustained interest in 
its existence and valuable material results 
have accrued. The instrument which 
produced these results is PUBLICITY. 

University sympathizers in Ontario to- 
day are one in agreeing that some step 
should be taken to eliminate the annual 



recurrence of financial stringencies. A 
year-to-year anxiety as to maintenance is 
no longer tolerable. Unhampered by 
embarrassments of this character the 
University should be free to step forth 
and become in greater measure a directing 
influence in the citizen life of Canada. 

To achieve this happy facility a quick- 
ened sense of loyalty and sympathy is 
required. Systematized publicity is the 
agency which will accomplish this task. 

With the object of having the University, 
its claims, its functions and its needs 
brought definitely and consistently to the 
attention of those who support it, the 
establishment of an organized Publicity 
Department is recommended. 

In the first place, the University would 
be pictured to the world as it should be 
pictured. The diffusion of useful informa- 
tion and the humanizing of the institution 
through familiarity with its operations and 
activities, would bring to the farmer in the 
back-townships, the president in his office 
and the citizen at large a new, vital realiza- 
tion of its importance as a great educational 
factor. The years of student life will then 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



249 



be regarded not merely as the finishing of 
an education, but as the fundamental 
training of men to whom will be entrusted 
in time the gravest concerns of the country. 

There are four fields in which an organ- 
ized Publicity Department could serve the 
University of Toronto to advantage, viz.: 
the Press, the Alumni Association, the 
Schools and the various Club organizations. 
Each of these, if properly utilized, would 
lend itself to the dissemination of Uni- 
versity propaganda in ways and in places 
eminently desirable. Stress should be laid, 
however, on the necessity of proper 
methods of approach. 

Take the Press, for example. The Uni- 
versity is perhaps one of the greatest 
sources of news that exists. New phases of 
thought, staff changes, 'new buildings, its 
needs and ambitions, the way students 
live, the equipment their education gives 
them here is information that the public 
thirsts for, and the Press would be glad 
to supply. But the Press demands this 
information in the shape of "news". 
Provided in interesting form, prepared 
from the standpoint of an interested public, 
university facts are welcomed by every 
newspaper and will be carried broadcast 
purely because of their news value. Such 
publicity is gratis and most valuable. 

This does not apply alone to the local 
or daily press, but to the weeklies and also 
to the press agencies and services which 
have a very wide field of circulation. 
There are farm papers which through their 
columns would become willing apostles 
spreading broadcast the gospel of university 
training. Their influences would go far 
towards creating a permanent rural en- 
thusiasm in this regard. Magazines, too, 
are seeking live, expert expositions of the 
problems which face educational authori- 
ties and the tasks to which their students 
and young men are setting their hands. 

The Alumni Association, now re-organ- 
ized and active, can well take upon its 
shoulders definite responsibilities in cry- 
stallizing a university sentiment in the 
country. Alumni scattered throughout 
various towns and cities could be enrolled as 
speakers to set forth on various occasions 
the advantages of higher education and the 
claims of the great parent institution itself. 
Organization would see that each alumnus 
should go forth as a missionary to extol 
his Alma Mater. 



Loosely-organized bodies such as Alumni 
Associations can hope to acquire strength 
and effectiveness only when charged with 
responsibilities calling for active work. An 
organized publicity endeavour would lay 
upon this body responsibilities' calculated 
to increase the value of its own organization 
and to benefit the University by enlighten- 
ing and instructing the public. 

In the high schools and collegiates of the 
Province is a field where desirable propa- 
ganda can be spread with great effect. 
Every school paper should be an agency to 
promote the value of university training 
and its significance from a national stand- 
point. At every Commencement Day pro- 
gramme the voice of the university should 
be heard from the platform. The staff 
could supply some of these speakers, the 
Alumni Association others, and definite 
request would stimulate the school authori- 
ties to emphasize the importance of the 
advanced training which comes to the 
student after he leaves the school behind. 

Not least among all the agencies which 
can be utilized to promote these aims are 
the Canadian Clubs, Boards of Trade, 
Chambers of Commerce and similar organ- 
izations which exist in practically all the 
towns and cities of the Province. Here 
would be points of contact greatly to be 
desired, for here practical support must be 
looked for. It is a fact that certain large 
business corporations to-day are inclined 
to contribute in a concrete fashion by 
endowments, the establishment of chairs, 
etc., but they are waiting to be approached 
with definite proposals. 

There are in Ontario 1,700 United 
Farmer Clubs. Periodic meetings are held 
where matters of particular interest to 
rural residents are presented and dis- 
cussed. What more effective means of 
retailing University information could be 
found than occasions of this character. 

In summary, if the University is to gain 
the support of the tax-payers which it 
merits, it should take definite steps to 
cultivate a sympathetic appreciation. 
Agencies which may be enlisted effectively 
abound in the Province. An organized 
endeavour to link them up in an active 
and consistent programme of* publicity 
would create a public sentiment which, 
guaranteeing the future, would at the same 
time ensure that year-to-year embarrass- 
ments would be minimized. 



Extension Work in American Universities 



SEVERAL writers in recent issues of 
THE MONTHLY have hinted that the 
real cause of the University's fin- 
ancial trouble lies in the fact that at the 
present time the University does not reach 
in a direct way many of the citizens of the 
Province. In order to secure some con- 
ception of what American universities are 
doing to serve their constituencies as a 
whole THE MONTHLY wrote for Extension 
work information to the University of 
Wisconsin and to the University of Iowa, 
two typical state universities of the United 
States. The following is a digest of the 
material received. 

Wisconsin Extension Activities 

Extension work of the University of 
Wisconsin falls for the most part into five 
divisions: Correspondence Study Courses, 
Package Library, Lectures and Entertain- 
ments, Municipal Information, and Motion 
Pictures and Lantern Slides. 

The Correspondence Courses have a 
wide range, covering practically every sub- 
ject in the university curriculum and are 
designed to meet the needs of any adult 
from the near illiterate to the highly 
educated person. In 1920 there were 
20,116 registrations on the active roster. 
Business and commercial studies stood 
first with 6,896 registrations, and Engineer- 
ing and Industrial studies second with 
4,998. Seventy-three per cent, of the 
registrants were men. 

Through the Package Library service 
material is sent out on request. A package 
library consists of an average of forty 
articles selected from books, current pub- 
lications, etc., chosen to answer the specific 
enquiry. During the two years ending 
July 1st, 1920, Wisconsin sent out 16,256 
such packages. They went to individuals, 
debating clubs, high schools, public lib- 
raries, rural clubs, and other organizations. 

During the 1918-1920 biennium, 1,800 
lectures and entertainments were given in 
350 different centres of the State. 

The Department of Municipal Informa- 
tion conducts researches into various 
matters of government and supplies in- 
formation on request. In the 1918-1920 
period 740 investigations were made for 
city officials, 70 conferences were held, and 
878 communities were given special ser- 
vice. 



The American State University 
Ideal 

"The campus of the state Uni- 
versity has come to be co-extensive 
with the borders of the state whose 
people tax themselves for its sup- 
port. . . . Wherever men and 
women labour in the heat, or toil in 
the shadows, in field or forest, or 
mill or shop or mine, in legislative 
halls or executive offices, in society 
or in the home, at any task requiring 
an exact knowledge of facts, prin- 
ciples or laws, there the modern 
university sees both its duty and its 
opportunity". 

P. P. CLAXTON, 
United States Commissioner 
of Education. 



The Motion Picture and Lantern Slide 
work at Wisconsin is highly developed. 
Slides and films are sent on request to 
various community organizations. In the 
1918-1920 period, 125,000 slides were 
shown 553,950 times and 3,600 films were 
shown 15,132 times. 

Wisconsin also conducts tutorial classes 
(some 3,000 enrolled in 1920), carries on 
Medical extension work (clinical courses 
held in fifteen centres in 1920), and pro- 
vides a text-book service (138,360 texts 
sold in 1918-1920). 

The Iowa Extension Division 
The Iowa Extension Division is organiz- 
ed to cover much the same ground as that 
of Wisconsin. The work is carried on in 
a somewhat different way, however, and 
emphasis is placed on different subjects. 

Iowa has done much in the field of Public 
Health and Social Welfare. Highly trained 
specialists are employed by the Division 
and placed at the disposal of organizations 
which are endeavouring to improve con- 
ditions in their local communities. For 
each session of the Legislature a study is 
made of legislation which would raise the 
standards of living in the State. Surveys 
are conducted and local conferences held. 

Aggressive educational work is carried 
on with a view to assisting the teachers of 
the State and improving pedagogical 
methods. 



250 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



251 



Business administration and accounting 
service is placed at the disposal of business 
organizations and there is a Municipal 
Information Department which is at the 
service of municipal bodies. Correspond- 
ence courses and classes are conducted 
with and without university credits. A 
Lantern Slide Department operates as at 
Wisconsin. 

An interesting and effective part of the 
Iowa Extension work is a fortnightly 
bulletin service. These bulletins range 
from 12 to 72 pages and cover a very 
wide sweep of subjects -"How to Feed 
the Baby", "Diet for the School Child", 



"Newspaper English", "Store Lighting", 
"High School Plays", "Income Tax Prob- 
lems", "School Finance in Iowa Cities", 
"Parent and Teacher," "Municipal Ac- 
counting", "Outlines of Great American 
Prob-lems", "Suggestions to Teachers of 
French and Spanish ' ' , are among some of the 
bulletins recently issued. The bulletins 
are distributed to organizations and in- 
dividuals interested in the particular sub- 
jects discussed. Of some not more than 
1,000 copies are printed while others have 
a very wide distribution. The bulletin, 
"Diet for the School Child", for example 
has exceeded 100,000 copies. 



Professors on the Squash Courts 

THE conventional cartoon, intended to trailing not "clouds of glory" but a 

portray the professor in a char- tattered gown. Around this University, 

acteristic pose, shows us a be- however, the professor would be even more 

spectacled and mortar-crowned individual readily recognized were the artist to sketch 




The sensitive professor seeks the elixir of youth upon the squash floor. 



252 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



a semi-nude figure solemnly batting a little 
ball around with a long-handled racquet. 
For the patrons of the Hart House squash 
courts are almost without exception pro- 
fessors, associate professors or lecturers and 
the challenge list posted there reads for all 
the world like those pages in the Calendar 
devoted to "Officers of Instruction". 

Why the game of squash racquets, as we 
believe it is technically called, has obtained 
such a hold upon the "members of the 
stawff" particularly, admits of several 
explanations. An incident during the 
recent visit of H.R.H. the Prince of Wales, 
when it was announced by the Press that 
he had graced our squash courts for an 
hour or so, is thought to have given the 
first impulse to that recreation's high-brow 
popularity. Our Canadian graduates, who 
have returned from Oxford with an accent 
and a superfluous lower vest-button, are 
suspected of having promptly added squash 
to their overseas affectations. 

Others again, who still believe in the 
myth of the struggling professor, would 
account for the cult of squash in intellectual 
circles upon economic grounds. What we 
mean is, there is probably no other athletic 
diversion which demands so modest an 
outlay for equipment. Apparently the 
only requisites are a racquet, running 
shoes and an utter lack of self-conscious- 
ness. It is the undress sport par excellence. 

Probably one would be nearer the mark 
though in merely ascribing to these learned 
men a pardonable ambition to keep in 
shape or rather get into shape. "One 
touch of nature makes the whole worltl 
kin", anyd the same basic element of 
personal vanity, which impells the fat 
youth who jogs his perspiring way around 
the track, brings the philosopher to the 
squash courts to reduce an expanding 
waist-line or build up dwindling calves. 

We live in an age of vitamines, Pelman- 
ism and setting-up exercises. The dullard 
athlete poring over the Keys to the classics 
envies the scholar his brain; the spindle- 
shanked lecturer sighs for the Herculean 
frame of the half-back. Until the years 
have brought indifference, all the volumes 
of ancient philosophy afford no solace for 
the nickname "Fatty" or "Slats". Ac- 
cordingly the sensitive professor seeks the 
elixir of youth upon the squash floor. 
To what avail? One is tempted to para- 
phrase words of a squash devotee given to 



epigrammatic comments on the French 
Revolution "Ten men who do nothing 
but puff! Twenty men who do nothing 
but make faces ! Futile dreams of mediocre 
intelligences!" 

We have alluded above to the primitive 
way in which the professor throws away 
most of his attire as well as his dignity 
when engaged in this pastime. There is 
apparently no standard costume. It is 
largely a matter of individual modesty. 
Out of eight squashees observed in action 
one afternoon, only two wore anything 
above the equator. They were in their 
B.V.D.'s. 

The professor is obviously not restricted 
by any regulations in the choice of his 
"shorts". While the majority wear the 
usual white gym variety, we entertain a 
sneaking suspicion that a certain lantern- 
jawed history lecturer, with an incipient 
bald spot and a mannerism of hitting the 
wall an experimental tap with his racquet 
before serving, had simply cut the legs off 
his fleece-lined at the knees. The wearing 
of socks is purely optional, but we do think 
that in the best interests of the game 
garters might very well be dispensed with. 

On the first court, a slight, blue-eyed and 
clean-shaven professor with greying hair, 
whose voice was familiar upon the campus 
in the war years of the C.O.T.C., was 
matched with a swarthy, black-haired 
young man whose modern history lectures 
the flappers declare ' ' Simply killing ' ' . The 
former was clad in a sleeveless, knee- 
combination, black socks and black slippers. 
As additional concessions to the pro- 
prieties he had left on his garters and wore 
one tan glove on his right hand. His 
opponent appeared at first in a soiled white 
jersey which he later discarded to emerge 
a veritable Esau. They played with a 
grim concentration, punctuated by dis- 
gusted grunts of "Ah, ah" from the 
younger man when his vicious left-handed 
returns struck below the red line. 

The occupants of the central court were 
a short, somewhat undernourished Greek- 
professor and a recent addition to the 
U.C. staff, a trifle inclined to embon- 
point with big, appealing blue eyes and a 
worried smile. The latter was, we pre- 
sumed, a first offender for he had retained 
his athletic underwear and cast frequent 
embarrassed glances to the gallery above. 
Exhausted by the effort of serving, he 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



253 



would collapse pathetically against the 
wall and pluck nervously at the top of his 
suit in a shivery gesture reminiscent of 
September Morn. 

After every stroke he would crouch 
defensively against either side in frequently 
ineffectual attempts to keep out of his 
classical opponent's line of fire, only 
emerging at the last moment from his 
refuge to take a frantic swipe which often 
drove the ball out of the court into the 
corridor above. The lighter and more 
active professor, however, played a more 
aggressive game, taking up an exposed 
position in the centre of the floor. There 
he waited on the alert, only an involuntary 
hunching of his neck and a visible tremor up 
his spine affording a clue to the lack of con- 
fidence he felt in the other's wild returns. 

It is typical of the professors that no 
unseemly levity marks their squash ses- 
sions. They go through the solemn ritual 
of making wicked preparatory slashes 
through the air with the same earnest 
absorption in the task to hand that they 
display in the lecture room. They take the 
game and themselves so seriously that one 
refrains from smiling at what, to our 
uninitiated gaze, appears merely a glorified 
form of "strip poker". 




As an additional concession to the proprieties he had left on 
his garters. 

So long may they enjoy their innocent 
diversion, without "let" or "hinder", as 
they say in squash parlance. May they 
shed their years like a sweater and, when 
the shadows widen round others, though 
poor and even homely may the professors 
still retain that girlish figure. A. F. MacL. 



A. H. Young Granted Leave of Absence 



By LLOYD HODGINS 



AFTER thirty years of unselfish devotion 
to the service of the University of 
Trinity College, Professor Archibald 
Hope Young has resigned his position as 
dean of Residence in order to take a well- 
earned rest. At the end of a year's leave 
of absence he will resume his duties as 
professor of German and will be freed 
from the onerous demands of adminis- 
trative detail which, for so long a time, he 
has discharged faithfully and well. 

Of necessity any estimate of Dr Young 
and his work must be incomplete but this 
brief sketch may serve in some slight 
measure to call attention to some of the 
more salient features of his long-standing 
connection with Trinity College. 

Throughout his whole collegiate career 
Dr Young has shown the deep rooted re- 
gard for ideals with which he was imbued 
in his early training at Upper Canada 



College. As a boy there he came under 
the influence of two great scholars, John 
Martland and John Buchan, both of them 
men whose lofty aims and high standards 
were a source of inspiration to so many 
students of Upper Canada College. From 
the days when he was Head Boy in 1882 
Dr Young has maintained a devoted and 
unbroken connection with his old school. 
He was a master there for five years; he 
was treasurer and later corresponding 
secretary of the Old Boys' Association and 
at the present time he is a member of the 
Board of Governors. His preparation of 
the Roll of Pupils, published in 1916, was 
an invaluable contribution to tl^e history 
of Upper Canada College and a monu- 
mental tribute of his affection for his old 
school. 

After his graduation from the Univer- 
sity of Toronto, Dr Young spent five years 






254 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



as a master in Upper Canada College and 
at the same time acted as examiner in 
Modern Languages for the University. In 
January 1892 he was appointed lecturer 
in Modern Languages and Philology in 
the University of Trinity College. In 
1900 he became professor of Modern 
Languages and three years later when 
increasing duties necessitated a division 
of his work he was made professor of 
German. Together with his professorial 
duties Dr Young has at one time or 
another held practically every office of 
administration in the College. From 1896 




PROFESSOR A. H. YOUNG 

until 1902 he was librarian and to his wise 
selection and sound literary judgment the 
library owes a great debt. From 1903 until 
1914 he was registrar of the College and 
from 1907 until 1914 he was also registrar 
of the University of Trinity College. For 
over twenty years he has been clerk of 
Convocation and during the greater part 
of that time he has acted as editor of the 
Trinity Year Book. 

In 1914 he was made dean of Residence 
and during the changing conditions of the 
past eight years he has exercised a par- 
ticularly intelligent and sympathetic over- 
sight of the students. Apart from his 
official connection with them his personal 
interest in their undertakings has been 



many-sided. He was for years honorary 
president of the Athletic Association; he 
assisted in the founding of the Glee Club 
and has acted as honorary president since 
1905; for more than thirty years he has 
been actively connected with the publica- 
tion of the Trinity University Review. In 
his dealings with the students sincerity of 
speech and courtesy of expression make 
his counsel to be sought and his opinion 
to be valued. Moreover he is not without 
the saving grace of Scotch humour which 
seasons all his pronouncements. In his 
college room many an undergraduate has 
found friendly encouragement and a stimu- 
lating influence to high endeavour. Many 
an alumnus comes from the activity of 
busy professional life to enjoy the privilege 
of companionship with one who combines 
the cultivation and the charm of scholar- 
ship with the insight of a mind excep- 
tionally well informed as to modern affairs, 
especially those of his own country. 

His keenness for Canadian History 
amounts almost to a passion. His research 
into the early chronicles of Ontario has 
resulted in the recent contributions to 
scholarship of two valuable and interesting 
publications, The Rev. John Stuart, D.D., 
U.E.L. of Kingston and his Family, and 
The Parish Register of Kingston, 1785-1811. 
For a great many years he has been accu- 
mulating material for a definitive life of 
the Hon. and Right Rev John Strachan, 
founder of the University of Trinity 
College and during the coming year he 
hopes to complete the preparations for 
publication. 

With unswerving loyalty and unob- 
trusive service, with unusual gifts of intel- 
lect and character to share with under- 
graduate and alumnus alike, Dr Young 
has spent the greater part of his life in 
contributing to Trinity that element of 
permanence which is so essential a factor 
in the successful development of an educa- 
tional institution. It is our pleasing duty 
to present this totally inadequate acknow- 
ledgement of Dr Young's services to the 
College and to the University. We wish 
him a very pleasant and restful holiday 
and shall look forward to his return to 
the institution where for so many years 
his fine intelligence, wide scholarship, and 
gracious courtesy have given such dis- 
tinction to the College and have inspired 
and developed the lives of so many young 
men and women of Canada. 



The Second Short Course for Farmers 



How long does it take to arouse class 
spirit? Often it takes a very long time, 
sometimes it can be done in two short 
weeks. With the farmers who attended 
the short winter course at the University 
it was absolutely spontaneous. From the 
moment they registered in Convocation 
Hall until the last speech was made, the 
last toast was drunk, the last song sung, 
and the final cheer given in the Great Hall 
of Hart House at the class banquet which 
officially wound up the proceedings of the 
course, the farmers demonstrated that they 
possess class spirit, enthusiasm, and a zeal 
for organization to the nth degree. 

There were two hundred and twenty-five 
registered for the course, about fifty less 
than last year, but what they lacked in 
numbers, however, they made up in 
enthusiasm. The fact that it was a poor 
year for agriculture and that the legis- 
lature opened later than it was expected 
accounts for the decreased attendance, 
but as it was, many of the U.F.O. Members 
took advantage of their presence in the 
city to attend the lectures during the 
second week of the course. That the 
same conditions prevail elsewhere is shown 
by the fact that the attendance for the 
similar course at the University of Mani- 
toba dropped from sixty- three to twenty- 
three this year. 

Seventy-five of last year's students came 
back again to continue the work they had 
started the year before. As a result the 
course was divided into two sections. The 
subjects in the first section were. Psy- 
chology, Economics, History, Biology, 
Household Science, Public Speaking, Archi- 
tecture, and Engineering. In the second 
section English, Hygiene and commercial 
Geography were substituted for History, 
Psychology and Architecture. The only 
two subjects that were compulsory were 
Public Speaking and Economics. 

The social side played no small part in 
the entertainment of the students. They 
availed themselves of the privileges of 
Hart House and the University College 
Women's Union which were thrown open 
for their use. Moreover, they were 
entertained lavishly on all sides; tea at 
the College of Education, a tour of the 
buildings of Applied Science and Engi- 
neering under the guidance of the Dean, 



several tours of inspection of the Massey- 
Harris works, and tea as guests of the 
U.F.O., winding up with an inspection of 
General Wholesalers. Besides these there 
were various lectures around the Univer- 
sity, and especially they appreciated the 
University sermon on Sunday morning, 
February 12. In fact they thoroughly 
entered into every phase of University life 
during their brief stay. 

To show that they had profited by their 
lectures in public speaking, a Farmers' 
Mock Parliament was held one evening 
in Hart House and matters of great gravity 
and importance were discussed. Formal 
parliamentary procedure was not lacking 
although various features showed an adap- 
tation to rural culture and the mace 
borne so pompously by the sergeant-at- 
arms had a suspicious resemblance to a 
pitchfork. The subject for discussion was 
a bill regarding compulsory military train- 
ing, to be given its second reading, and 
great humour and deep thought sig- 
nalized the speeches. In the end Parlia- 
ment was adjourned for a year, discussion 




M. H. STAPLES, U.C. '11, Educational Director of the 

U.F.O. , who was instrumental in organizing the Short 

Course for Farmers. 



255 



258 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



to be continued then, and the bill to be 
given its third reading. 

The curtain goes down on the .~L 
picture of the farmers at dinner in the 
sacred precincts of the Great Hall. There 
students and instructors met for the last 
time in a jovial gathering and the halls 
of learning resounded with the wit and 
merriment of the tillers of Ontario's soil, 
and perhaps its future legislators. In the 



end, they returned to their own homes to 
carry back to the thirty-four counties of 
the Prow ce which they represented, the 
story of ./hat the University had done for 
them and what it is trying to do for all 
of Ontario's citizens. Let us hope that 
both the Province and the University 
may reap the harvest of mutual under- 
standing and appreciation. 



The Pros and Cons of the Full-Time System in Medicine 



Some criticism has recently been directed 
at the administration of the Medical 
Faculty in respect to the inauguration of 
full-time professorships in the clinical 
subjects, Medicine and Surgery. A con- 
troversy which at times became quite 
vituperative began in some of the medical 
journals and spread to the daily press 
of Toronto. The present article is in no 
sense a contribution to that controversy. 
It is intended simply to give the laymen 
some idea of "what it is all about" and 
to set forth the facts of the situation. 

Inquiries were made of students who 
had experience under both systems; and 
statements secured from two prominent 
medical men, one strongly in favour of the 
full-time system, and the other fundament- 
ally opposed to it. 

For many years full-time instructors 
have been employed in Anatomy, Path- 
ology, and Biology, but it is only within 
recent years that full-time men have been 
engaged in the clinical subjects, Medicine 
and Surgery. On this continent the 
system was first installed at Johns Hopkins 
where it has been in force for some seven 
years. It is claimed, however, that even 
there it has not yet definitely passed the 
experimental stage. Some of the medical 
schools in which men are mainly and 
entirely in charge of medical and surgical 
teaching are: English, University College 
Hospital, London Hospital, St. Bartholo- 
mew's Hospital, St. Thomas' Hospital, 
St. Mary's Hospital; American, Johns 
Hopkins Medical School, Washington Uni- 
versity, St. Louis, Indiana University, 
University of Michigan, Columbia Uni- 
versity Medical School, University of 
California, Yale University. 

Before proceeding further it would be 



well to define what is meant by full time 
clinical instructors. As a matter of fact 
"full-time" is a misnomer as applied to 
the system at Toronto and in most of 
the American schools. In Toronto the 
full-time man in the Medical clinic must 
devote from 9 a.m. until 4.30 p.m. to his 
hospital and academic duties, but during 
the remainder of the day he is free to 
engage in private practice within or with- 
out the hospital. In several of the medical 
schools of the United States the full-time 
man gives all his time to hospital or 
academic duties, or if he does see other 
than public ward patients these must 
come to the private wards of .the hospital 
to which he is attached, and the fee which 
they are charged is collected by the 
hospital and used for the development of 
the clinic. In other schools the privileges 
of private practice are even less definitely 
defined, the understanding simply being 
that the full-time man will regard his 
medical school work as his chief vocation. 

At Toronto the full-time system in 
Clinical Medicine was installed two years 
ago, and last autumn it was inaugurated 
in Surgery. In Medicine there are five 
full-time instructors the head of the 
department and four assistants. In ad- 
dition to these there are thirty part time 
clinical instructors, practising physicians, 
who (at present without remuneration) 
conduct certain clinics under the direction 
of the head. 

Members of this year's graduating class 
who have had experience of both systems 
seem on the whole to be in favour of the 
full-time system. They find the work 
well organized and classroom and clinical 
teaching well correlated. On the other 
hand the majority of students express a 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTLY 



257 



preference for the teacher who is in close 
touch with private practice and can con- 
stantly draw on his experience for illus- 
trative purposes. 

Advantages of the Full -Time System 

By One in Favour of it. 

THE disadvantages of the part-time 
system in clinical subjects may be 
divided into two groups or cate- 
gories. In the one, which we may call 
general, is the indubitable fact that in- 
structors have acquired their knowledge 
of disease solely by observation of symp- 
toms, through the experience of clinical 
practice, cannot be in a position to direct 
the student's mind to seek out the under- 
lying cause of the disease which is re- 
sponsible for the symptoms. A teacher 
of this class, unless he be of exceptional 
ability, cannot expect to be able to stimu- 
late in the student that enquiring habit 
of mind which alone will enable him to 
advance abreast of medical scientific know- 
ledge, and unless our students are stimu- 
lated by their instructors in this way, we 
cannot expect them to become better 
physicians or surgeons than their in- 
structors. 

The second group of disadvantages are 
of a more practical nature and the chief 
of them may be enumerated as follows: 

1. The demands of private practice must 
as a rule take precedence to those of the 
teaching clinic if the physician or surgeon 
is to build up and retain a large clientele. 
This principle is so well recognized that 
teaching appointments must often be con- 
sidered as secondary to "urgent calls" 
from private patients. 

2. The day of the general practitioner 
is usually so completely filled with the 
duties of his practice that he has but 
little time or energy left for the perusal 
even of the general medical journals and 
still less for serious study of the special 
journals and monographs in which the 
discoveries of modern medical and surgical 
science are expounded. 

3. Under the conditions set forth above 
it is impossible for one man who is pri- 
marily engaged in practice to undertake 
control of all the teaching of medicine or 
surgery. This has to be divided among 
several, with the result, as experience 
shows, that there is but little correlation 
of instruction and the student often com- 



pletes his course with a very poorly 
balanced knowledge of disease. With no 
one of the group of senior instructors 
personally responsible for seeing to it that 
the whole vast field of medicine or surgery 
is adequately covered and the instruction 
properly graded and correlated, it is in- 
evitable that the instruction must be 
one sided. Under the part-time system, 
the hospital wards are usually divided 
into several services with a physician or 
surgeon in charge of each, and the students 
are sent either in groups throughout the 
year or as a whole at different periods of 
the year to the services with no one of the 
service heads endowed with sufficient 
authority to see that the instruction on one 
service is properly correlated with that of 
another. 

The following are among the most striking 
benefits of the full-time system: 

1. The instruction of the various parts 
of the subject is properly co-ordinated and 
systematized. Under the guidance of the 
head of the department, the various in- 
structors meet frequently to discuss ques- 
tions of policy in teaching, particularly 
with regard to nomenclature and classifi- 
cation of diseases and symptoms, theories 
of etiology, principles of treatment, etc. 
Unless someone is given paramount 
authority to require this correlation of 
teaching, it can never be successfully 
effected and without it the student is bound 
to get a poorly balanced course of instruc- 
tion and to be bewildered by the divergent 
views of his different teachers. Experience 
has shown that this can be done without 
sacrifice of individuality in teaching. 

2. The examination system is unified so 
that there is little chance of poorly trained 
students slipping through. 

3. The cases in the wards are assigned by 
a carefully administered system to those 
men who are best qualified to treat them, 
and every aid to diagnosis is provided for 
by the team work of a group of specialists 
who are constantly working together. 

4. Classes are not missed because the 
instructor is detained by a private case 
which it is impossible for him to leave. 
However well a service consisting entirely 
of part-time men be organized, this missing 
of classes is inevitable. 

5. The students are brought in contact 
with different types of teachers at proper 
stages in their educational progress. They 



258 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



are not asked to wander aimlessly in out- 
patients departments before they have 
become familiar with the principles of 
diagnosis in the wards. 

6. All the clinical material of the hospital 
being available, it is possible to show to 
the entire class, cases that are illustrative 
of all the commoner diseases. Under the 
old system it was not infrequently the case 
that many students went through their 
course in Medicine and Surgery without 
actually seeing many types of disease. 

Fundamental Weaknesses of the Full 
Time System 

By One Opposed to it. 

1. Full-time professorships and team 
or group practice are devices evolved in 
the attempt to bridge over the gap be- 
tween the man in the trenches (the doctor 
in charge of sick folk in the home- and 
95% of all sickness must be cared for in 
the home) and the G.H.Q. at the Base 
(the research laboratories on which progress 
in Medicine depends) . 

The lines of communication have been 
enormously extended in the past fifty years, 
and particularly in the past ten years, by 
the developments in Physics, in various 
branches of Chemistry, in Embryology 
and other special departments of Anatomy, 
in Physiology, in Psychology (if it can be 
called a science), and in other directions. 
, 2. Workers in these latter fields have as 
a rule no sense of proportion. They fail to 
remember that the human mind is finite, 
and that the day is long past when any 
one living man can cover more than a 
fraction of the fields they are exploring. 
Confusion of thought has arisen, and they 
have forgotten that qua Medicine their 
subjects are only a means to an end, not 
an end in themselves. They have erected 
their research, usually conducted on ab- 
stract lines, into an industry which they 
believe to have a right to exist on its own 
account. This position the physician or 
surgeon responsible for the lives of his 
fellow creatures can never admit to be 
either sound or justifiable in the relation 
between science and the healing art. 
Hippocrates, born 460 B.C. and in a pagan 
community, in one of his aphorisms puts 
the question right for all time when he says 
that "It is* the duty of the physician in 



undertaking the care of a sick person to 
place the sick man and his friends, and all 
his surroundings in train for his recovery." 
3. Another confusion of thought has 
emerged in the failure of the pure science 
school to differentiate, in the curricula 
which they prescribe, between the scope 
and methods of teaching which suit the 
ends of the investigating and ' ' researching ' ' 
graduate, and those applicable to the 
floundering undergraduate. Cognate with 
this error is the very erroneous idea that 
research work in these subjects ancillary 
to Medicine is of itself cultural, and 
humanizing, and broadening. On the 
contrary the product obtained by these 
methods is, so far as contact with the 
sick is concerned, very apt to be a mere 
arid scholasticism rather than a humane 
and helpful scholarship capable of pro- 
viding what the sick chiefly need, i.e., 
moral support and relief in their times of 
fear and pain. The system is much more 
apt to produce technicians than clinicians. 

4. This is very far from saying that re- 
search in general is not desirable ; it is both 
desirable and necessary, but must be made 
to occupy its proper place in the scheme 
of medical training. Without it, progress, 
real progress that is, in Medicine is not 
possible. But the full-time professor, and 
his adjunct, the group or team system of 
teaching and practice, not only fail to 
give to the patient what he most needs, 
moral support, but fail to provide for the 
public a type of practitioner who can, 
without the technical skill required of 
the modern physicist or physiologist or 
chemist, appropriate for clinical uses in 
his contact with the sick the useful part 
of the research man's work, and be a 
source of comfort and encouragement 
and relief to the public whom he serves. 

5. The teacher of Medicine would do 
well to note the synchronizing of the 
modern drift of the public to the irregular 
healer, to quacks and wonder workers and 
untrained pretenders, to Spiritualism and 
Christian Science (sic), with the advent 
of our modern methods of teaching, and 
present day ideas of the relative importance 
of the various subjects of the medical 
curricula of the day. There is more than 
mere coincidence in it, though it is not 
intended to imply that the one is the sole 
cause of the other. 



Edward L. Cousins 

BY GEORGE T. CLARK, '06 



BORN of Toronto parents thirty-nine 
years ago and educated in Toronto 
schools and the University of Tor- 
onto, the subject of this sketch is a purely 
Toronto product and one of whom his 
native city may well be proud. After 
matriculation from St Andrew's College he 
entered the Faculty of Applied Science and 
Engineering. Between his first and second 
years he spent two years as assistant 
engineer on the Grand Trunk Railway and 
his work while in that position was so 
satisfactory that the same Company sought 
his services as division engineer of the 
Middle and Southern Division in the 
spring of 1907 before he had completed his 
university training. This offer was a com- 
pliment not only to Mr Cousins but also 
to the University, and the latter, learning 
the circumstances, granted the degree of 
B.A.Sc., with aegrotat standing without 
requiring an examination. 

One of the important pieces of work 
carried out under his supervision as 
division engineer was grade separation be- 
tween Brantford and Paris. In connection 
with this work an interesting anecdote was 
recently told to the writer by Mr F. H. 
McGuigan, then General Superintendent 
of the Grand Trunk. On one of his tours of 
inspection of this grade separation work 
he noticed some one assisting in the opera- 
tion of a wheel scraper who did not look 
like one of the workmen. On enquiry he 
found that the teamsters had gone on 
strike and that Cousins, who had finished 
his instrument work for the day, had taken 
over a scraper for the afternoon in order 
that the grading work might not be de- 
layed. This evident enthusiasm and in- 
terest in the progress of his employer's 
work is as characteristic of the man to-day 
as it was then. 

Leaving the staff of the Grand Trunk 
Railway to become assistant city engineer, 
Department of Railways, Bridges and 
Docks, City of Toronto, in July, 1910, he 
was placed in a position where his interests 
were directly opposed to those of his 
former employer. This was in connection 
with grade separation in the City of 
Toronto between Strachan Avenue and 
the West City Limits and in the handling 
of this delicate situation there was dis- 
played that same tact and business acumen 



which won him not only the approbation 
of the City but also the respect of the 
Railway. 

It was also during his tenure of office in 
the City Hall that the City made its start 
on a publicly owned and operated trans- 
portation system, the civic car lines on 
St Clair, Gerrard and Danforth having 
been planned and constructed at that time, 
and plans and report prepared for a sub- 
way from the waterfront to St Clair 
Avenue. 




E. L. COUSINS, Sc. '07. 

The Act incorporating the present Tor- 
onto Harbour Commission was passed in 
May, 1911, and the Commissioners soon 
after their appointment were faced with 
the problem of finding a suitable chief 
engineer. They appreciated the fact that 
to make their undertaking a success they 
required a man of tact and initiative, 
imbued with the energy and enthusiasm of 
youth, with the necessary technical training 
to deal with the purely engineering prob- 
lems, yet with the vision of a crreamer and 
the experience of middle age. What a 
combination to expect in one individual ! 

Those who knew him best in the class 
of 1906 at the "Old Red School" do not 



259 



260 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



have to draw on their imagination to 
picture E. L. Cousins filling the above 
requirements to a remarkable degree. 
The same characteristic optimism in evi- 
dence the night before a stiff examination 
in the old days, the same ability to mix 
which elected him to many an office in 
undergraduate organizations, and the same 
student qualities which obtained for him a 
university degree without a final examina- 
tion, all have fulfilled their promise in the 
production of the outstanding man of his 
University year. 

The keen, hard-headed business men 
constituting the Harbour Commission were 
quick to recognize in this youthful appli- 
cant those qualities which they deemed 
necessary for the position, and it is ab- 
solutely safe to say that his choice from 
among a large number of applicants has 
never been regretted; in fact he seems to 
have been peculiarly adapted by training 
and temperament to carry out this many- 
sided development, the right man at the 
right time to plan and execute a great civic 
undertaking. 

In addition to the harbour improvements 
many other undertakings have had the 
advantage of his technical training and 
sound business judgment during the past 
nine years. He prepared a comprehensive 
plan, in conjunction with the consulting 
architect for the Federal Plan Com- 
mission of Ottawa and Hull, in connection 
with a town planning scheme for these two 



cities. During 1915 a complete plan was 
prepared, by a board of engineers with the 
subject of this sketch as engineer-in-charge, 
on rapid transit and radial railway en- 
trances for the City of Toronto. He was 
Deputy Fuel Administrator for the Pro- 
vince of Ontario during the fuel shortage 
in 1917 and 1918, and Industrial Com- 
missioner for the City of Toronto from 
December, 1918, to date. 

And the performance of all these onerous 
duties and the associations incident to them 
have resulted in what? a complete fulfil- 
ment of the promise of college days; a 
reputation among his business associates 
for broad-mindedness and soundness of 
judgment possessed by few men twenty 
years his senior; two or three breakdowns 
in health because the available supply of 
energy was not equal to the enthusiasm; 
and the creation of a feeling of intense 
loyalty on the part of all who have ever 
been in his employ, because they are in- 
variably made to feel that they are working 
with him and not for him. 

Such is E. L. Cousins, Chief Engineer 
and Manager of the Toronto Harbour 
Commission, still on the sunny side of 
forty, an outstanding figure in the life of 
his native city, possessing the entire con- 
fidence of its citizens, considered by his 
friends the whitest man they have ever 
known, and judging from past achieve- 
ments, capable of rising to almost any 
height in business life or national service. 



Additional Accommodation for U.C. Women Secured 



The first decisive step has been taken in 
overcoming the cramped and otherwise 
undesirable conditions which have hither- 
to hampered the women students at 
University College. The Ontario Govern- 
nent has approved the purchase of the old 
Nicholls residence at 79 St George Street, 
md this building, after various alterations 
md extensions, will become the Women's 
Jnion, the pivot of the women's activities 
)f University College. The building at 
$5 St. George Street, which is now used 
or that purpose, is to become a residence 
)f the same order as the one at 94 St. 
George Street, and will accommodate 
:wenty-five students. 

The Nicholls property is a fine old 
esidence although it is not much larger 



than the old Union, and has fewer rooms. 
But the rooms are larger, more attractive 
and can be more easily adapted for com- 
mon-rooms, and there is on the whole 
greater room for expansion on the new 
property. As it stands at present there are 
three large rooms, a sunroom and a large 
hall on the ground floor, and four good- 
sized rooms on each of the second and 
third floors. 

In order to make 79 St George Street 
habitable much more accommodation is 
needed and it is proposed to build an 
addition to the rear of the house. Some 
plans are on view at the office of Colonel 
Le Pan, the Superintendent of Buildings 
and Grounds of the University, but these 
are merely tentative and will probably be 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



261 



altered considerably before they reach 
their final form. As they stand at present 
the plans allow for an addition about ninety 
feet deep which will extend almost to the 
fence-line at the rear of the property. The 
main floor of the extension contains two 
dining-rooms, one considerably larger than 
the other which may be isolated for special 
purposes. In addition there will be the 
necessary kitchens and pantries. The 
dining-hall accommodation on the whole 
will be 170 for dinner in the evening and 
twice that number for the cafeteria lun- 
cheon. Above the dining-room will be a 
large lecture or assembly room, equipped 
with a stage or dressing-room which will 
be suitable for entertainments of various 
kinds. 

The great difficulty that must be faced 
is the lack of adequate servant and office 
accommodation in the new building. There 
are only seven rooms on the first and second 
floors and these are scarcely enough for 
the common rooms, library, magazine 
room, guest rooms and offices for the resi- 
dent head and dietitians, which are abso- 
lute essentials for a complete Union. The 
four rooms on the third floor are certainly 
not enough for the bedroom accommoda- 
tion for the staff and servants, and do 
not even compare favourably with the 
seven rooms used for that purpose at the 
present Union. 

The University College Alumnae have 
been for years the chief agitators for new 
buildings for women and during the last 
few years they have been raising a fund 
for this end and have been developing plans 
for the proposed building. In order to 
consider how the defects in 79 St George 
Street may be remedied, Principal Hutton 
has asked that two members from the 
Buildings Committee of the University 
College Alumnae be appointed to sit with 
the sub-committee of the University Col- 
lege Council. The Alumnae desire, above 
all, to have the new Union adequate and 
not merely another temporary makeshift 
that involves huge expense. As Mrs 
Henderson, the chairman of the Building 
Committee said, "The committee feels 
that it is a very great misfortune to have 
such a very good thing as this without 
making it better." To this end they are 
co-operating with the University College 
officials and they hope that a satisfactory 
result will be attained. 



Gems from the Alumni 
Lecture Series 



The series of public lectures arranged 
by the Alumni Federation with a view to 
interesting a larger number of Toronto 
people in the University has been pre- 
eminently successful. The lectures have 
been of a particularly high order, and 
Convocation Hall with its 1800 seats has 
been filled on nearly every occasion. Several 
hundred people were unable to gain ad- 
mittance to the first of the series. 

In the opening lecture Professor Wrong 
gave an able and brilliant review of the con- 
ditions which lead up to the calling of the 
Washington Conference and told of what 
the Conference had done. Unfortunately 
Professor Wrong spoke under the handicap 
of the fact that the Conference had not 
at that time concluded its deliberations. 
As Professor Wrong spoke from notes we 
are unable to give extracts from his address. 

The following are extracts from lectures 
which have been given previous to the 
time of going to press. 

THE ART OF LEWIS CARROLL BY 
PRINCIPAL MAURICE HUTTON 

A word of introduction. I read in the Globe, 
which has the largest circulation of any morning 
paper in Ontario with me that my valued col- 
league Professor Wrong would lecture on the Peace 
Conference in Washington and that I should follow 
I am trying to kep my "woulds" and "shoulds" 
correct a hard matter in Toronto with "Alice 
in Wonderland". And some people asked is this 
a stroke of sardonic wit in Professor Wrong or of 
cynicism in Professor Hutton; or can it even be 
a rare stroke of subtle humour on the part of the 
Globe and a few of them added academically o si 
sic omnia. But it was none of the three, just a 
piece of nonsense on the part of the committee 
organizing these lectures, as a fitting introduction 
to Lewis Carroll. . 

To return to Lewis Carroll. If only he had 
maintained that absoluteness of separation between 
Carroll and Dodgson to the end! But the devout 
clergyman in him would not down (it will not 
down in me, you will see before this lecture is over) 
and so as laughter and health failed, and they 
failed early (before he was sixty years of age), not 
unnaturally for this lonely clerical and mathematic 
don. As nonsense became unnatural and impossible, 
instead of lapsing into silence or mathematics, as 
a wiser man would have done, he allowed his newer 
sermonizing and elderly self to invade that lighter 
and more youthful and more genial sell which was 
also his only genius, and to mingle itself with books 
for children, and to well nigh spoil Sylvie and Bruno 
(I have split infinitive there, thank Heaven! I love 
them; they are very Greek). 

A little girl between seven and twelve is the 



262 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



most delightful object on this dubious and chequered 
earth, and Alice made us see it if we were too blind 
to see it of ourselves before; as Barrie also made us 
see in Dear Brutus (especially when Miss Helen 
Hayes acts the child). It even seems a pity almost 
that the development of young women cannot be 
arrested at this perfect age and stage. The half 
is greater than the whole; and let no one suspect 
here a cynicism. I am quoting Through the Looking 
Glass and Alice is never cynical. 

There is the doctrine, ancient, simple, true; girls 
should leave off growing older at seven instead of 
at twenty-seven. 

He had a sound instinct for words. Here is a 
part of the scene where Alice suddenly begins to 
grow abnormally large. " Curiouser and curiouser " 
said Alice. She was so much surprised that for the 
moment she quite forgot how to speak good English. 
"Now I'm opening out like the largest telescope 
that ever was. Good-bye feet. Oh my poor little 
feet, I wonder who will put on your shoes and 
stockings for you now dears. I shall be a great 
deal too far away to trouble myself about you. 
You must manage the best way you can." 

"But I must be kind to them" thought Alice, 
"or perhaps they won't walk the way I want to go. 
Let me see; I'll give them a new pair of boots every 
Christmas." And she went on planning to herself 
how sh!e would manage it. "They must go by 
carrier's cart" she thought, "and how funny it'll 
seem sending presents to one's own feet; and how 
odd the direction will look: Alice's Right Foot, 
Esquire, Hearthrug, near the fender, with Alice's 
love, etc." "Curiouser and curiouser" is good just 
as "nobled Queen" is good even though it be, as 
all other good modern jests are, an imitation of the 
classics, adapted obviously from Juvenal's egregius 
coenat meliusque miserrimus horum. It is good 
none the less. 

There is virtue in a pun in spite of this degenerate 
age which has lost the gift for tasting the bouquet 
of puns, as it has lost the gift for tasting the bouquet 
of wines. Lewis Carroll, by the way, was very 
proud of his gift for tasting this latter bouquet also. 
He was even appointed to choose the contents of 
the Christ Church wine cellars. I am making some 
of you feel thirsty. Here is a recipe for thirst from 
the Looking Glass. "I am so hot and thirsty", 
said Alice. "I know what you'd like" the Queen 
said goodnaturedly taking a little box out of her 
pocket. "You'd like a biscuit". But one has to be 
midly Victorian with a vivid memory of cracknels, 
to savour the full flavour of that offer. It has a 
savour, believe me, with the memory. 

ACADEMIC FREEDOM BY SIR ROBERT 
FALCONER* 

Universities are not pontificial colleges for the 
propagation of authoritative doctrines, but self- 
governing dominions inheriting assured truths 
which they test anew extending also the boundaries 
of knowledge. They cannot undertake to uphold 
orthodox creeds. The word 'orthodox" does not 
fit the place. It implies fixity, whereas the com- 
prehension of truth is always being enlarged. What 
university would adopt Marxian economics as its 
standard, or protection or free trade, or Kantian 
philosophy, or republican or monarchial govern- 

*Copies of this address may be secured on appli- 
cation to the Extension Office. 



ment? It discusses the principles of all; it must 
not be compelled to confess itself the subject of 
a-y. If Germany had had more scientific historians 
who were true to their philosophic freedom, and 
fewer Treitschkes who turned their classrooms into 
centres for patriotic propagandism, her students 
might not have had to perish on the battlefields to 
uphold a false theory of the State. 

No more valuable experience can a student get 
than from observing a professor examine the weak- 
ness^ or the strength of economic or social systems 
not in the spirit of a cynic or an optimist, but as a 
sincere seeker for the truth wherewith to improve 
human society; or in philosophy than to have been 
led by a genuine thinker below the superficial and 
unstable assumptions of the average man to the 
foundations of human reason. . . . 

"It is one of the most sacred privileges of a uni- 
versity that its professors shall enjoy academic 
freedom. In fact a university in which professors 
are overawed by political, social, or sectarian in- 
fluence, cannot aspire to an honourable position in 
the Commonwealth of Learning. Just as we 
measure the progress of democratic government by 
its freedom from the spoils system so that faithful 
servants are not dispossessed whenever a new party 
comes into power, so we can measure the rank and 
stability of a university by the security given to a 
professor to pursue and expound his investigations 
without being compelled to justify himself to those 
who differ from him. . . . 

The professor is a citizen with a right to all the 
privileges of a citizen, but at the same time like a 
judge or a great civil servant he has high functions 
the exercise of which may make it wise for him not 
to perform all the offices of the ordinary citizen. 
Especially is this the case in a state university. 
Take the question of his right to participate actively 
in politics. . . . 

The experience of the United States is that in the 
long run political influence in universities has had 
even worse effects than sectarian, and now that the 
large state universities are receiving from the, legis- 
latures such immense annual revenues, which also 
constitute the overwhelming portion of their in- 
come, it is more necessary than ever that cause 
shall not be given for any charge that the university 
furthers political partizanship. Like the courts it 
must serve the people as a whole irrespective of 
party. 

It is therefore expedient that a professor in a 
state university should take no active share in 
party-politics. But this expediency does not involve 
a limitation of academic freedom. At most it in- 
volves a limitation of his freedom as a citizen, such, 
however, as is expedient for the performance of 
certain other specialized functions of a citizen, as 
for example those of a judge or a great civil servant. 
Were he to exercise his full rights in active politics 
he might disqualify himself for his higher privileges 
of service. It must not be overlooked that the 
freedom of speech by a citizen is different from the 
freedom of investigation and exposition of his sub- 
ject by a professor in a class-room. Government 
policies are mainly matters of personal opinion, and 
as a rule are not the result of calm thought and to 
be dignified as reasoned convictions. Should a 
professor at any time feel constrained, for what he 
regards as the higher good of his country, to enter 
the field of party-politics, he should ask himsel 
whether he ought not to abandon the secure sea 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



263 



which he holds as professor. Other men who enter 
politics take the risks to their positions that their 
action involves. They have no refuge to which 
to return in case of defeat. 

Moreover, the professor is not a person who lives 
to himself; he is a member of the University com- 
munity, the welfare of which depends upon the 
good-will of a government and of the people as a 
whole. When he makes public utterances therefore 
he does not involve himself alone. The public is 
prone to assume that he has some backing in the 
University for what he says, and that he is a repre- 
sentative of a wide circle of thought. Indeed his 
views are likely to be given much more importance 
because he is a professor than if he spoke as a 
private person. His words flash with a reflected 
influence on which he cannot divest them. This 
means also that as a member of a community his 
action affects the fortunes of his fellows. 

BRIG.-GEN. MITCHELL ON "ENGINEERING 
ACTIVITIES IN CANADA" 

Well ! there is an uplift. It is the uplift and the 
objective of Canada for the Canadians. Canadian 
industries and their products for Canada first and it 
is Canadian brains for Canada. We have many 
problems. Many for the engineer, the financier and 
the statesman. I should have said when trying 
earlier to describe to you the place and functions of 
the engineer, that there was another definition one 
that linked the engineer with the financier and the 
economics of the country's development; it is "The 
engineer is one who can make a dollar do the most 
work". He is, or ought to be, a technical business 
man who can do the most, make the most, get the 
most for one dollar". So then this is the kind of 
problem that ife before Canadian engineers and 
Canadian engineering to-day. My time is up but 
just let me state in conclusion, 'some of the many 
problems that are now before us in Canada, prob- 
lems which Canadian engineering coupled with 
Canadian finance and business must endeavour to 
work out, to attack and deal with. 

1. The solution of the economic organization and 
operation of our National Railways. This is our 
key problem and its correct solution will solve many 
more with ease. 

2. The economic electrification of steam railways, 
as distinct from the construction of new electric ones. 

3. The economics of buil/iing new electric inter- 
urban and trunk railways alongside existing steam 
roads. 

4. Profitable long distance electric power trans- 
mission. It is now 250 miles, may it be 500 miles 
or 700 miles in this country? Is it going to be 
solved by direct current transmission? 

5. Consolidation of our electric power supply in 
Ontario on a permanent economic basis to stabilize 
industries with power at the lowest possible price. 
Power from Niagara Falls now appears likely to 
increase rather than decrease in price. 

6. Means of getting cheap electric power delivered 
to farming communities. 

7. The operation of Hydro Electric power plants 
in the very cold climate and frozen rivers of the far 
North from which with long transmission lines to 
centres of population we can distribute power to 
the vast West. 

8. Recovery from our low grade ores and wastes 
from mines. 

9. Electric smelting of our iron ores especially 



in Central Canada by means of water power, at very 
low costs. 

10. Continued intensive exploration, reconnais- 
sance, appraisal and research on our national re- 
sources. What more can we learn for instance 
about the possibilities of: oil in the great North- 
west, copper and gold in the central North, dia- 
monds in the clay of Northern Ontario, iron in 
Labrador? 

11. Construction and surfacing of our highways 
which will stand up under extreme traffic with our 
winter conditions. 

12. The protection of concrete structures from 
attack by the alkali waters in the Western pro- 
vinces. 

13. Electric motor cars with light weight inex- 
pensive storage batteries capable of operating over 
long distances. 

14. The construction and operation of aeroplanes 
for very cold winter conditions. 

15. The manufacture of motor fuels, as substi- 
tutes for gasoline, from agricultural products, such 
as wood, corn and potatoes. 

16. The development of apparatus for using 
electricity for heating and heat processes in the 
manufactures (based on very cheap power). 

17. Development of uses for our very large nickel 
resources, as an essentially Canadian metal. 

18. The production of nitrogen and its compounds 
from the air by electric processes with water power, 
to make Canada independent, especially for re- 
fertilizing our Western agricultural areas. 

These are some of the things which we must set 
ourselves to solve as a nation of energetic, alert 
people and it is clear that engineering plays a most 
important part and must take its active responsi- 
bility in their solution. 

It is out national duty at this time to look with 
cheerfulness on the future and to attack these 
problems with the best possible combination of our 
human and material resources. 



Sport News 



VARSITY OUT OF ALLAN CUP SERIES 

Although they have gone down to defeat in the 
Senior O.H.A. series, thereby losing the Allan Cup, 
the Varsity Hockey team hold the championship 
of the Intercollegiate Union series, which they have 
won without suffering a defeat. In this way they 
have eliminated the chance of either McGill or 
Queen's being runners-up for the Allan Cup. That 
Varsity spirit never dies was shown by the fact that 
Varsity won her last two games in the O.H.A. series, 
although she, herself was definitely out of the race. 

SWIMMING CHAMPIONSHIP TO 
TORONTO 

Varsity holds the Intercollegiate Championship 
in swimming as a result of defeating the McGill 
team 37-31 at the meet in Montreal. The teams 
were neck and neck until the last event, the relay 
race, which was so close that only the judges could 
decide the winner. Additional interest %as added 
to the meet by the fact that three intercollegiate 
records were smashed, two of them by Varsity. 
In the long plunge, Wladron of Varsity made the 
fine distance of 71 feet 3 inches, which is also a new 
Canadian record. 



264 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



LADY HOCK.EYISTS WIN FROM McGILL 

Women's Intercollegiate Hockey is an established 
thing. The Varsity women established a precedent 
at the University of Toronto when they played 
McGill in Toronto on February 24, at the Arena. 
Varsity put up a fine game and the women proved 
that they can be trusted to defend the honour of 
their College quite as well as the men, by defeating 
their opponents 4-0. The natty uniforms of the 
McGill team as well as their, good playing won the 
cheers of the 4,000 spectators but they failed to 
break through Varsity's staunch defence and score 
a tally. A number of McGill and Queen's sup- 
porters were on hand and rooted vigorously. A 
comedy interlude between the first and second 
period was an exhibition game put on by strangely 
bedenizened and beskirted figures, chiefly from 
Meds and School, of "Women's Hockey as it used 
to be". Suffice it to say that Women's Hockey as 
it is to-day, although it has lost some of the comic 
flavour makes up for it by the real thrills and the 
interest that it arouses. 




PROFESSOR "TOMMY" LOUDON, Rowing Club Coach. 

ROWING 

BY GORDON HOGARTH 

Rowing, the most recent addition to the Univer- 
sity of Toronto athletics, possesses great possi- 
bilities for furtherance of international competition 
in a way hitherto untouched by Canadian univer- 
sities, for a contest between a Canadian university 
eight-oared crew and a crew representing another 
country has yet to be witnessed. Professor T. R. 
Loudon, honorary coach of the U. of T. rowing 
association, took the first step in this direction 
when he extended, through Principal Macdonald 
of St. Andrew's College, an invitation to Oxford 
and Cambridge universities to have a composite 
crew representing the two universities meet the 



Toronto senior eight in a match race during Exhi- 
bition in August or September. It is hoped that 
a crew representing one of the American universities 
will also contest this race, and thus, for the first 
time in the history of rowing, provide a contest 
between England, America, and Canada. 

While rowing at the University may be said 
to be only commencing, yet, under the coaching 
of Professor Loudon, University oarsmen last year 
won the senior and junior eight-oared champion- 
ship of Canada, and the intermediate National 
Regatta championship of America. They came 
very close to capturing the senior National Regatta 
championship of America. The 140 pound eight 
were beaten in their race at the Canadian Henley, 
after an excellent showing, and the crew of the 
Lachine Boat Club of Montreal which they de- 
feated, won the special event for this class on the 
following day. 

The senior crew developed into one of the finest 
eights ever seen in Canada. In 1920, this crew car- 
ried off the junior and senior eight-oared events 
at the Canadian Henley, and with one or two 
exceptions again won the Hanlan Memorial trophy 
in the senior event last year. 

In the senior event at the National Regatta at 
Buffalo, they were beaten two feet by the Duluth 
Boat Club crew and rowed a masterly race. Choppy 
water, a poor position on a bad course helped to 
prevent them winning the event, although Coach 
Loudon and the crew offered no excuses for their 
loss. 

The keenest rivalry existed between these two 
crews in training, although the senior boat un- 
doubtedly was the more finished and faster of 
the two, and the intermediate boat averaged five 
pounds a man heavier than the seniors. Com- 
mencing the year, the intermediates were absolutely 
new to rowing, and their first few trials in a shell 
boat were difficult, yet they developed rapidly 
and fought hard in an effort to beat the more ex- 
perienced senior crew. Their victory in the junior 
event at the Canadian Henley was anticipated, but 
in the senior race, only those who had watched 
them at work knew how closely they would finish 
to the senior crew. The finish saw the seniors 
first, with the juniors about two lengths of open 
water behind in second place, a very good showing 
for a green crew. Coach Loudon was able to take 
them to Buffalo, where they again proved their 
speed and won the intermediate race. 

The showing of these two eights startled rowing 
circles but convinced every one that victories may 
be expected of the University of Toronto. 

The University is particularly fortunate in 
having the services as coach of Professor Loudon, 
one of the oldest members of the Argonaut Rowing 
Club, where h,e learned rowing and as coxwain, 
piloted many Argonaut crews to victory. His 
early days as coxwain were in crews stroked by 
Joe Wright, now coach of the University of Pennsyl- 
vania crews, probably the greatest oarsman ever 
produced in Canada, and whose crews hold many 
American and Canadian records. A story is related 
of an incident that happened some years back, 
when Professor Loudon was coxwain of an Argo 
crew stroked by Wright that had won an important 
event in Philadelphia. Professor Loudon had 
unstintingly, verbally flayed Wright and the other 
men of the crew throughout the race, but drove 
them to victory. After the boat crossed the finish 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



265 



line, Wright picked Coxwain Loudon from the 
, boat and dropped him into the Schuylkill river. 
Consequently, the contests between the Argonaut 
crews, coached by Wright and those of the Uni- 
versity of Toronto, coached by Loudon, last year 
were watched with interest. 

Professor Loudon's last victorious Argonaut 
crew was the junior boat of 1914 which won the 
junior event at the Canadian Henley and competed 
in the People's Regatta at Philadelphia, where, at 
the finish of the race, news of the outbreak of war 
was received. 

It is hoped that the University will now extend 



their activities to four-oared crews, doubles and 
sculling but the cost and maintenance of shell-boats, 
and the equipping of a suitable rowing quarters on 
the bay or lake front, have to be seriously considered. 

Suitable material for oarsmen and scullers abounds 
throughout the University. In an effort to unearth 
it Professor Loudon at the opening of the term had 
the faculties polled and a report made on every 
man over six feet in height. 

It brought out an excellent number of candidates 
for the junior boat who are now learning the early 
stages of the game on the rowing machines in Hart 
House. 



With the Alumni 



Death; 






McCARROLL At his home, West Palm Beach, 
Florida, John Reid McCarroll, M.B. (Vic) 79, 
M.D. '80, a former assistant rector of Grace 
Church, Toronto, and Dean of Missions for the 
diocese of Michigan. 

IVEY Suddenly, at Naples, Italy, Charles Henry 
Ivey, B.A. (Vic) '80, of London, Ont., head of 
the firm of Ivey, Elliot, and Ivey, barristers, 
president of the Dominion Manufacturers, 
Limited, and vice-president of the London Street 
Railway Company, and the Empire Brass 
Company. 

HOUGH At South Fredericksburgh, on January 
15, 1922, John Wesley Hough, B.A. (Vic) '80, 
aged seventy-three years; 

MASON At his residence, 119 Annette Street, 
West Toronto, on February 4, Homer Mason, 
M.D., C.M. (T) '89, in his fifty-eighth year. 

BAIRD At Brantford, on January 18, Andrew 
Leslie Baird, K.C., LL.B. (Vic) '89, former 
president of the Brant County Law Association. 

GRISDALE At Winnipeg in his seventy-seventh 
year, Right Rev John Grisdale, D.C.L. (Hon) 
T. '93, former Bishop of Qu'Appelle. 

FIELD At Winnipeg, as a result of pneumonia, 
Corelli Collard Field, M.D., C.M. (T) '94, head 
of the children's department of the Winnipeg 
General Hospital and a member of the staff of 
Manitoba Medical College. 

JAMIESON In Barrie, after a long illness, David 
Jamieson, M.D., C.M. (T) '96, formerly of 
Whitechurch. 

BLACK Suddenly in Moose Jaw, on January 20, 
Hally Johnston, B.A. (Vic) '12, beloved wife of 
Howard Black, M.B. '15. 

HODGSON At her late residence, 48 Gwynne 
Street, Ottawa, on January 21, 1922, after an 
illness of six months, Elizabeth M. Hodgson, 
wife of Ernest A. Hodgson, B.A. (U.C.) '12, 
M.A. '13. 

McFEETOR Suddenly, at the Royal College of 
Dental Surgeons, H. Earl McFeetor, D.D.S. '21, 
of Hespeler. 

MONTREAL ALUMNI ENTERTAIN VARSITY 
ATHLETES 

Montreal alumni took advantage of the occasion 
of the McGill-Varsity hockey match, swimming 
meet polo and basket bal'l games on Friday and 



Saturday February 17 and 18 to show thei r 
interest in the University's athletics, and to get 
together. While the hours for the various games, 
and the departure from the city on Friday night 
of the hockey team, made it impossible for a general 
measure of support to be shown, there was at least 
a good turn-out at the hockey game, and following 
the polo game on Saturday night, members of the 
teams then in the city, joined the smoker at the 
Ritz and were received with the greatest pleasure 
on the part of the Montreal men. 

Rev Dr R. W. Dickie, chairman of the Montreal 
Branch, presided, and in the course of an informal 
and thoroughly enjoyable evening, short addresses 
were made by Dr Lang, U.C. '88, dean of the Faculty 
of Arts, McGill, Dr Percival J. lllsley, Muc. Bac. 
'93, Col. J. J. Creelman, U.C. '04, Walter J. Francis, 
Sci. '93, and others. Howard Fairlie, Sci. '10, 
gave some interesting readings from poems by the 
late Dr Ellis, beloved of all "School" men. 

On behalf of the University Amateur Athletic 
Association of Montreal, Frank McGill, the noted 
swimmer, invited the co-operation of Varsity men. 

Professor C. H. Carruthers, U.C. '12, played for 
the singing of a number of college and popular 
songs, and delightful parodies, of his own com- 
position, which were sung with enthusiasm. 

F. Wood, captain of the water polo team, re- 
sponded to the congratulations of the Montreal 
members for the showing which the swimmers had 
made, and spoke with confidence of the outcome 
of the home-and-home games in water polo. 

VICTORIA AND UNIVERSITY COLLEGE 
WOMEN ENJOY JOINT MEETING 

A large and interested audience filled the drawing 
room of Argyll House on January 19, when Mrs 
Pankhurst addressed a joint meeting of the Uni- 
versity College Alumnae Association and the 
Alumnae Association of Victoria College. During 
the social hour which followed, the graduates of 
the sister colleges had an opportunity to renew old 
acquaintances and to meet the speaker of the 
evening. ^ 

Quite an innovation was introduced into the 
University College Alumnae Association this year 
when the social evening took the form of a Bridge 
party for the members and their friends, the 
Executive justifying such frivolity on the grounds 
that card playing really does demand such intelli- 
gence as the university graduate possesses. 



266 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



OTTAWA ALUMNNI HOLD BALL 
On February 17, the university alumni associa- 
tions of Ottawa gave a fashionable ball under the 
distinguished patronage of Their Excellencies the 
Governor-General and Lady Byng. The affair 
was arranged by a joint committee of which S. J. 
Cook, U.C. '14, was a member. Mrs S. J. McLean 
was one of those who received. 

COAST ENGINEERS HOLD ANNUAL DINNER 
The Pacific Coast Branch of the Engineering 
Alumni Association held its fifth annual dinner at 
the University Club in Vancouver on January^S. 
Thirty "School" men from different parts of British 
Columbia were present. 

W. J. (Ginnes) Johnston was toastmaster and a 
great deal of the success of the event was due to 
his hard work in making preparations. 

Addresses, chiefly reminiscent of undergraduate 
days at the "School", were made by J. H. Kennedy, 
'82, J. P. Stirrett, W. G. Swan, '06, and others. 
A very decorative menu card was prepared for 
the occasion and also some songs to be sung to 
old College tunes. 

NOTES BY CLASSES 

'68 U.C. John Pepper is living at 409 Stolp 
Avenue, Syracuse, N.Y. 

'75 U.C. Luther Edmund Embree has retired 
from active work and is living at 108 Argyle Avenue, 
Ottawa. 

'80 U.C. Thomas H. Gilmour is living in 
Penticton, B.C. and is carrying on a business there 
as an insurance and real estate agent. 

'84 U.C. Alex R. Bartlet, K.C. is practising 
law with the firm of Bartlet, Bartlet and Barnes, 
Davis Building, Windsor. His home is at 539 
Victoria Avenue. 

'87 U.C. Thomas E. Elliott is the principal of 
the High School at Richmond Hill. 

'88 U.C. After an active literary career which 
started with the editorship of the Varsity, and a 
clerical career extending over a period of thirty-two 
years, Rev Frederick B. Hodgins has been appointed 
to the rectorship of St Margaret's Protestant 
Episcopal Church, East 156th Street, New York. 

'89 T. Rev J. G. Waller who has been in Canada 
on furlough for the past twelve months has re- 
turned to Japan with Mrs Waller and will resume 
his work there. 

'89 U.C. Professor and Mrs William C. Fer- 
guson are settled in their new home, 42 Wychwood 
Park, Toronto. 

'91 Vic. Professor Reginald A. Daly, who has 
been professor of Physical Geology at the Massa- 
chusetts Institute of Technology since 1907, is at 
present in South Africa in command of the Harvard 
Geological expedition which is conducting important 
field investigations in all of the states and terri- 
tories of the Union of South Africa. 

'91 S. George E. Sylvester has resigned his 
position with the International Nickle Company. 
He is living at 347 Spadina Avenue. 

'91 U.C. Frances G. Phelps is teaching at the 
Technical High School, Niagara Falls. Her home 
address is 97 Sheldrake Blvd., Toronto. 

'92 M., '96 U.C. . The latest address of Mr and 
Mrs C. C. Richardson (Elizabeth Rutherford) is 
712 Victoria Avenue, Windsor. 



'92 P. Dr. J. E. Cogan is a member of the 
American College of Surgeons and is practising at 
707 Rose Building, Cleveland, Ohio, where he is 
also attached to the staff of the St. Alexis and St 
John's Hospital and is specializing in eye, ear, nose 
and throat diseases. 

'92 U.C. The address of Ezra Hamilton is 
Nestor, Californa. 

'92 U.C. Duncan C. Ross of Strathroy has been 
appointed County Court Judge of the County of 
Elgin. He will take up his residence in St. Thomas. 

'93 M. Dr William Elliott, after spending a year 
in post graduate work in London and Edinburgh, 
has resumed his practice in Wolsely, Saskatchewan. 
He has been appointed physician for the Home for 
Infirm which has recently been erected there by the 
local government. 

'93 U.C. On January 25, 1922, Edgar S. Burton 
was married to Jean Petrie, Toronto. 

'93 Vic. Dr George H. Locke, Chief Librarian 
of the Toronto Public Library has been elected a 
member of the Beard of the American Library Insti- 
tute for the three years beginning January 1, 1922. 

'94 T. On Sunday, January 29/Dr. C. C. Field, 
head of the Children's Department of the Winnipeg 
General Hospital died at his residence in Winnipeg 
following an attack of pneumonia. 

'94 T. James McNairn Hall is a Judge of the 
County Court at Sault Ste Marie. 

'94 U.C. Rev Gilbert B. Wilson is in charge of 
the 1st Congregational Church, Chicago. He lives 
at 1628 Washington Blvd., Chicago. , 

'94 U.C. Mrs George H. Mathewson has moved 
from Montreal to 464 Strathcona Avenue, West- 
mount, Quebec. 



"ELISE LE BEAU": LYRICS and SONNETS 

By EVELYN DURAND, B.A., '96 
University College 

Edited, with a Memoir, by 
LAURA B. DURAND 

Edition de luxe: 200 numbered copies 
PRICE $2.00 

University of Toronto Press 

Dec. 1921 

" It has been the good fortune of but few writers of 
either sex to leave so pure and indelible an impression 
of a beautiful and distinguished mentality . . . . . 
'Xouthos', based on a conception akin to the genius 
of William Blake, that of a disembodied spirit held 
in strong arms in the empyrian and gazing on the 
spinning earth .... will serve to show how great 
a lyrical talent was lost when Evelyn Durand passed 
away . . . . " 

"The Memoir is admirable in taste and dignity . ." 
HECTOR CHARLESWORTH in Saturday Night. 

Obtainable from 
Miss L. B. Durand, 153 University Avc., Toronto 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



267 



'95 U.C. Mrs Frederick A. Stafford (Jessie 
Dowd) has accepted a position with the Faculty of 
the Columbus School for Girls, Columbus, Ohio. 
She is teaching English and History, and is the 
supervisor of the Junior High Department. 

'92 U.C. Mrs Turville (Edith Madeline Gibbs) 
has left Port Arthur and is now living in Windsor. 

'95 U.C. John W. Forbes is the Mathematical 
Master at the Normal School, Stratford. 

'95 U.C. Charles W. McLeay has a colonial 
appointment at Jarie, Nigeria, West Africa. 

'95 U.C. Rev Wm Aitkin Campbell is the pastor 
of the Presbyterian Church in Tweed. 

'96 U.C. Robena Elvira Millar is the proprie- 
tress of several very successful tea-shops in New 
York. Her address is "The Rooftree", 5 West 8th 
Street, New York. 

'96 U.C. Agnes R. Riddell is still teaching at 
Bryn Mawr College, Bryn Mawr, Penna., where she 
is head of the Department of Italian. 

'96 U.C. Geo. Alexander Scott is with Falls, 
Scott and Company, Heintzman Building, Windsor, 
Ont. 

'96 U.C. George Young is practising law in 
Edmonton. His address is 9208-1 16th Street. 

'96 S. Harris P. Elliott is. practising as a con- 
sulting engineer in London, Ont. His offices are 
at 196 King Street. 

'97 U.C. E. C. Dingman is with the Province 
Publishing Company, Vancouver, B.C. 

'97 M. (T). William Hackney is living in 
Calgary at 3835-6A Street West. He is an eye, 
ear, nose and throat specialist and has a very 
flourishing practice. 

'98 U.C. Mrs. F. Vining (Alice K. Healy) is 
living at 245 Wood Avenue, Tottenville, New York 
City. 

'98 M. George Balmer is practising medicine 
at 135 Delaware Avenue, Toronto. 

'98 U.C. Frenk D. Woodworth is Assistant 
managing editor and news editor of the Times- 
Despatch, Richmond, Va. 

'98 U.C. Rev George Charles F. Pringle is with 
the Loggers' Mission, Vananda, Texada Island, 
B.C. 

'99 Vic. Rev Frederick E. Malott of Peter- 
borough has accepted the invitation of Bridge 
Street Church, Belleville, to be the new pastor. 
He will take up his post about June. 

'99 U.C. Helen B. Alexander is still connected 
with the Auditor General's office in Ottawa. She 
has moved from Arlington Avenue to 518 McLeod 
Street. 

'99 U.C. Mr and Mrs Frank Owen (Amy Mary 
Morrison) are living at 93 Christie Street, Toronto. 

'00 Ag. Daniel J. McCarthy is in the real 
estate, insurance and loan business in Sault Ste 
Marie. His office is at 178 McDougall Street. 

'02 Vic. Rev Thomas Green will be at Dunnville 
until July when he will take up his new duties at 
the St James Methodist Church, Simcoe. 

'02 U.C. Professor J. R. Roebuck is on the 
staff of the University of Wisconsin. 
^ '02 Vic. C. B. Bingham is connected with the 
Canadian Division of the Prudential Insurance 
Company, Newark, NJ. 

'02 M. Dr Oskar Klotz, formerly professor of 
Pathology and Bacteriology at the University of 
Pittsburgh, is at presnt Director of the Pathological 
Institute, Sao Paulo, Brazil. The work which Dr 




MISS ADELAIDE MACDONALD 

Captain and goal keeper of the University Women's : ' 
Hockey Team. 

Klotz has undertaken is in conjunction with the 
plan of the Rockefeller Foundation to assist medical 
education in Brazil, and will keep him another year 
at the medical school of Sao Paulo. 

'02 M. (T). Dr Thomas C. Clark is practising 
medicine at Clamuth Falls, Oregon, U.S.A. 



268 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



'03 P. The most recent address of Thomas M. 
Lepard is 512 West 207th Street, New York City. 

'03 IT.C. Fred M. Rutter has been appointed 
to the position of Superintendent of the London 
Division of the Canadian Pacific Railway. 

'03 S. Harold D. Robertson is a director of the 
Harbour Brick Company, 408 Lumsden Building, 
Toronto. 

'03 U.C. At Wellesley Hospital, a son, William 
Edward, was born to Mr and Mrs Edward M. 
Gladney, 16 La Plaza Apartments, Toronto. 

'03 P. Arthur Henry Dorr lives at 405 Maple 
Avenue, Hartford, Connecticut. 

'04 Vic. Wm George Gates is with the Press 
Gallery, Ottawa. 

'04 Vic. Archer H. Booth is teaching school at 
Poplar View, Sask. His post-office address is 
Raymore, Sask. 

'04 TT.C. Irving S. Fairty who was appointed 
a King's Counsel at New Year's has been elected 
President of the County of York Law Association. 

'05 Vic. Frank A. E. Hamilton is practising 
law in Winnipeg. His address is 949 MacMillan 
Avenue. 

'05 U.C. Harry R. Bray is now practising law 
in Vancouver. His address is University Club, 
Vancouver. 

'05 U.C., '13 Vic. In Mount Forest, on January 
22, a daughter was born to Mr and Mrs Thomas 
E. Spiers (Emily Irene Gilroy). 

'07 U.C. Thomas H. Stanley is the Anglican 
minister at Havelock. 

'07 D. Dr Ashley W. Lindsay, the Dean of the 
Faculty of Dentistry in West China Union Uni- 
versity, has been visiting in Toronto during the 
past month and addressed the students of the 
University on the work of the Medico-Dental 



College in training Chinese physicians, surgeons, 
dentists and nurses. 

'07 S. Norman R. Robertson is practising law 
with the firm of Chisholm, McQuesten and Rob- 
ertson. 69 James Street South, Hamilton. 

'08 S. David Ross, who is living at 21 Lawlor 
Avenue, Toronto, is assistant engineer with the 
Hydro Electric Power Commission, 190 University 
Avenue. 

'08 U.C. Harry P. Mills is the head of the Mills 
Cabinet Company, Racine, Wisconsin. 

'08 Ag. The marriage took place in February 
of Wilfred A. Barnet and Dorothy E. Whistler, of 
Leamington. 

'08 S. On Monday, January 9, a daughter was 
born to Mr and Mrs C. W. B. Richardson, 229 
Wright Avenue, Toronto. 

'08 U.C. Sherman C. Swift is the librarian for 
the Canadian National Institute for the Blind, 
College Street, Toronto. 

'08 Vic. A daughter was born in January to 
Mr and Mrs Wm Warren Davidson, 90J Spencer 
Avenue, Toronto. 

'09 U.C. Harriet E. Black is teaching French 
and German at Havergal College and is living at 
177 Leslie Street, Toronto. 

'09 U.C. H. Marjorie Bruce is a ward aid at 
the Brant Hospital, Burlington. 

'09 S. Beresford H. Segre is the Dominion land 
surveyor for the topographical surveys branch of the 
Department of the Interior at Ottawa. 

'09 U.C. At Rochester, Minnesota, a daughter 
was born to Dr and Mrs Norman M. Keith. 

'10 D. The marriage took place quietly on 
January 25, of Charles Edward Williams, Oakville, 
and Hazel Murphy, of Toronto. 




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John J. Gibson, Managing Director. 
W. S. Morden, K.C., Vice-President and Estates Manager. 






UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



269 



'10 M., '12 U.C. A son was born on January 
25 to Dr and Mrs W. G. Penney (Ellen J. Walters) 
1469 Danforth Avenue, Toronto. 

'10 U.C. Fred M. Marter is now editor of the 
Prairie Farmer as well as religious news editor of 
the Manitoba Free Press. His address is c/o Free 
Press, Winnipeg. 

'10 U.C. At Calcutta, India, on January 30 

a son was born to Rev and Mrs Leonard A. Dixon. 

'10 M., '12 U.C. Ivan Wanless Dickson and 

his sister, Violet Dickson are living at Normanhurst, 

Royston Park, Hatch End, Middlesex, England. 

'10 U.C., '17 U.C. The wedding took place on 
February 6 of Norman Alexander Keys and Alice 
Margery Lewis, Toronto. Mr and Mrs Keys are 
living at 3025 Queen Street, East. 

'10 Vic. Frederick L. Tilson is teaching school 
in Lament, Alta. 

'10 T. On January 18 a daughter was born to 
Mr and Mrs George W. Morley, 273 Russell Hill 
Road, Toronto. 

'10 T. Rev. C. J. S. Stuart has taken complete 
charge of St Thomas' Anglican Church during the 
illness of the pastor. He has been the vicar of 
the parish since 1920. 

'10 S. Kells Hall is division engineer of con- 
struction for the Canadina National Railways. 
His address is 10340 Wadhurst Road, Edmonton, 
Alta. 

'10 Vic. On Januray 26 a son was born to Mr 
and Mrs Alfred Leroy Burt, Edmonton, Alta. 

'10 Ag. William Robert Reek, former Live 
Stock Commissioner at Ottawa has been selected 
as the director of the Western Ontario Experimental 
Farm at Ridgetown. 

'11 U.C. On February 1, a daughter was born 
to Mr and Mrs Winfred G. Sells (Irene O'Neil), 
762-16th Street, Niagara Falls, N.Y. 

'11 U.C. George R. Smith has left Kingston 
and is living at 188 Second Avenue, Ottawa. 

'11 S. A son was born on January 27 to Mr and 
Mrs Herbert C. Barber, Toronto. 

'11 U.C. William Bruce Henderson is a member 
of the firm of Judd and Henderson, barristers-at-law 
London. 

'11 T. At the Wellesley Hospital on February 
7, a son was born to Mr and Mrs Austin Meredith 
(Edythe Mary Wilson), Balmoral Avenue. 

'11 Vic. Rev A. E. Marshall has accepted a 
call to become the pastor of the Methodist Church 
at Tillsonburg. 

'11 S. Harvey A. Barnett is at present located 
in Manistee, Mich. 

'11 Vic. Rev Charles A. Bridgeman is with the 
Methodist Missions in China. His address is 
FowChow, Szechwan, China. 

'12 U.C. At Dewas, Central India, a son, 
Douglas Alexander, was born to Rev and Mrs 
Charles Davidson Donald. 

'12 U.C. Reginald M. Fairbairn is living in 
Massey, Ont. 

'12 T. On February 11, John Wellington 
Beaton, of Montreal was married to Florence 
Belinda Wallace, daughter of the late Hon N 
Clarke Wallace. 

'12 S. At Timmins on February 14, a daughter 
was born to Mr and Mrs William Hamilton Wylie. 
' 12 S. The post office address of Wm Boyd Davis 
is Lakefield, Ont. 

'12 U.C. At Rio de Janeiro, a daughter was 
born to Mr and Mrs Kenneth Howard McCrimmon. 



1922 

Look Ahead 

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THE 



LONDON LIFE 

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Policies "Good as Gold"- 



270 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



Accumulative Bonds 

are a medium of investment 
especially attractive to those having 
a sum of money on which they are 
prepared to allow the interest to 
accumulate. We issue these Bonds 
for $100, or any multiple thereof. 
They bear interest at 5J^ per cent, 
per annum, COMPOUNDED HALF- 
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shows the amounts required to pur- 
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$76.24 will purchase a Bond 

for $100 

$152.48 will purchase a Bond 

for..... 200 

$381.20 will purchase a Bond 

for.. 500 

$762.40 will purchase a Bond 

for....... 1,000 

Money invested to return simple 
interest at 5> per cent, per annum, 
payable half-yearly, will double itself 
in a little over 18 years, whereas if 
invested to return the same rate 
compounded half-yearly it will double 
itself in less than 13 years. 

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will be gladly furnished on request. 



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Established 1855 



'12 U.C. George E. Gollop, who until recently 
has*been living in Philadelphia has now taken up 
his permanent residence at 417 Moy Avenue, 
Windsor. 

'12 U.C., '12 Vic. A son was born on February 
10 to Mr and Mrs Irving R. Pounder (Susie Mar- 
garet Findlay). 

'12 S. William B. Davis is the assistant engineer 
on the Trent Canal and has until recently been 
stationed at Lakefield. He is now living at Wash- 
ago. 

'13 Vic. George Clairmont Grant has been 
superannuated for a year as the result of illness and 
is at present visiting in Lakefield, Ont., for a few 
months. His permanent address is Lochlich, Ont. 

'13 Vic. A son was born to Mr and Mrs Norman 
L. Murch, 27 Northcliffe Boulevard, Toronto, on 
February 13, 1922. 

'13 M. Dr William Devonald Brace is living 
at Biggar, Sask. 

'13 U.C., '16 M. Dr William P. McCowan is 
working up a practice as physician and surgeon in 
Winnipeg. His address is 311 Balmoral Street. 

'13 S. A son was born on January 31 to Mr and 
Mrs K. S. Maclachlan of St Catherines. 

'14 M. Ralph E. Coleman is living at 996-14th 
Avenue West, Vancouver, B.C. 

'14 TT.C. J. W. Hill is associated with the firm 
of Martin, McEwen and Hill, Barristers, Leader 
Building, Regina, Sask. 

'14 U.C. Aileen Garland is living in Winnipeg, 
where her address is 67 Furby Street, and where 
she is teaching at the Kelim Technical School. 

'14 U.C. Florence B. Tobin is in the head office 
of the Royal Bank of Canada, Montreal. 

'14 Vic. Ina H. McCauley is teaching English 
and History in the Technical School, London, Ont. 

'14 Ag. Clarence W. Stanley is a chemist with 
the Corn Products Company, Dundas Street, 
Londoji. His home is at 923 Lome Avenue. 

'14 S. A daughter was born on February 11 
to Mr and Mrs Eric P. Muntz, 139 Herkimer Street, 
Hamilton. 

'14 Vic. F. James T. Maines is the general 
secretary of the Y.M.C.A. at St Catharines. 

'14 P. The marriage took place in Toronto of 
Hugh J. Henderson and Jean Elizabeth Cumming 
of Chatham. 

'14 T. A daughter was born to Mr and Mrs 
Selwyn P. Griffin, at the Wellesley Hospital, on 
January 15. 

'14 S. Bernard H. O. Hughes, formerly of 34 
Dalton Road, is now. in Emugu, Nigeria, Africa. 

'14 S. At Bishop, California, a son, James 
Morrison, was born to Mr and Mrs J. M. Carswell. 

'14 M. Dr and Mrs W. E. Sinclair are now in 
their new home, 198 Glen Rose Avenue, Moore 
Park, Toronto. 

'15 S. Clarence E. Hogarth is living at 2628a 
Waverley Street, Montreal, Quebec. 

'15 S. John W. H. Ford is living at 2553 Hutch- 
ison Street, Montreal, where he is working with 
the Roads Department of the Milton Hersey 
Company. 

'15 U.C. Robert Steele Gillesp'ie was married 
on February 8, at River John, N.S. to Amelia 
Archibald Maclennan. The address of Mr and 
Mrs Gillespie is Avonlee Apartments, Calgary, 
Alta. 

'15 St M. Gertrude Ryan is teaching at the 
Collegiate Institute, Windsor. 









UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



271 



'15 Vic. Marmaduke P. Pearson is with the 
Armour Leather Company, 6733 Clyde Avenue, 
Chicago. 

'15 Vic. Helen M. B. Carscadden is on the 
staff of the Picton Collegiate Institute. 

'15 M. Dr D. E. S. Wishart, who has been 
pursuing post graduate in oto-laryngology in 
Boston since February 1920, is now in Philadelphia 
taking Dr Chevalier Jackson's special course in 
bronchoscopy. After a short visit home he will 
proceed to England for further study. 

'15 U.C. At the Manse, Alvinston, a daughter 
was born to Rev and Mrs William Alex. Monteith. 

'16 S. James Clarence Wilson is in the Power 
branch of the civil service at Ottawa. His present 
address is 387 McLaren Street, Ottawa. 

'15 U.C. Irene V. Morgan is teaching school 
in Hamilton and is living at 85 Grant Avenue. 

'16 S. John E. Pringle is at present a super- 
intendent in building construction. He is living 
at 40 Stanley Avenue, Hamilton. 

'16 U.C. Russell W. Kirn, who has been living 
in Tecumseh, Michigan, has moved to Cedar 
Rapids, Iowa, where his address is 2700A Avenue, 
East. 

'16 St M. Charles P. McTague is practising law 
in Windsor. His offices are in the La Belle Building. 

'16 M. At the Belleville General Hospital, a 
daughter was born to Dr and Mrs George H. 
Stobie. 

'16 S. Roy S. Dale is living in London at 313 
Huron Street and carrying on a business as a 
general contractor. 

'16 U.C. Ethel Hammell is in Picton, teaching 
at the Collegiate Institute there. 

'16 M. The marriage took place in Halifax of 
Aubrey Vernon Greaves and Alys Gentle, of 
Dundee, Scotland. 

'16 U.C. L. C. R. Batten, formerly of Saska- 
toon, is practising law in Watson, Saskatchewan. 

'16 Vic. At River Bluff, Chunking, West China, 
on November 4, 1921, a son, Victor Robertson, 
junior, was born to Mr. and Mrs V. R. Butts. 

'16 M. Dr and Mrs William Clarke Givens are 
living at 51 Dawes Road, off Danforth Avenue, 
Toronto. 

'16 T. Grace Messervy is teaching at Weston 
High School. Her residence is 94 Isabella Street, 
Toronto. 

'17 D. John W. Coates is practising dentistry 
in Bothwell. 

'17 U.C. F. W. Kemp is with the legal firm of 
Gregory and Gooderham, Continental Life Build- 
ing. He is living at 741 Broadview Avenue, 
Toronto. 

'17 P. Robert J. Mayness is running a drug 
store and pharmacy at 163 St Paul Street, St 
Catharines. His home address is 29J Church 
Street. 

'17 S. A card from Joe Banigan announces that 
he is representing the Canada Life Assurance Com- 
pany in Toronto. His office is in the Canada Life 
Building, 44 King Street West. 

'17 U.C. Norma Mortimer has left Toronto to 
take up educational work in China. Her address 
there for the time being will be c-o Canadian 
Missionary Society Secretary, East Parade, Canton, 
China. 

'18 Vic. Doliglas Blatchford is the head of the 
mathematics department at Albert College, Belle- 
ville. 




From the sunny 
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fragrant flavor, 
and sealed in the 
famous air-ti^ht 
packet, comes 

"SALADA" 



44 



The Delicious Tea" 



Every Grocer has*it 
Everybody wants it 



272 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



To the Secretary-Treasurer, 

The Alumni Federation of the University of Toronto. 

Please enrol me as member of the Federation and subscriber to THE UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 
on the undertaking that I remit the fee of $3.00 on receipt of the first issue of THE MONTHLY. 

Name 



Address 

College and Year 



NOTE. The $3.00 fee includes membership in the University College Alumni Association and in 
the Victoria College, University College, and Medical Alumnae Associations. $1.00 additional is required 
to cover membership in the Engineering Alumni Association, and $1.50 additional for the Victoria College 
Alumni Association. 



'18 Vic. Olive Gale is resuming her post gradu- 
ate studies at Toronto after two years spent in 
teaching at Norway House. 

'18 U.C. Archibald F. Jamieson, a former 
member of the staff of the Toronto Mail and Empire 
has just been appointed assistant librarian of the 
Alberta provincial library. 

'18 Vic. Rev Roy W. Frid has accepted a call 
to St Paul Street Methodist Church, St Catharines, 
and is expecting to take up his duties there next 
June. 

'18 Vic. Edith E. Roach is leaving Ingersoll 
Collegiate Institute this month to join the staff 
of the Port Hope High School. 

'18 Vic. Ruth Strangways is on the staff of 
Regina College, Regina, Sask. 

'18 Vic. Georgia Brown is in charge of the 
commercial department of the Strathroy High 
School. 

'19 M. A daughter was born to Dr and Mrs 

Leon Amiable Pequegnat, Dovercoat Road, Toronto. 

'19 U.C. Marjorie Tennant has finished her 

training for a nurse. Her address is c/o Mrs F. G. 

Quick, Royal Oak, Victoria, B.C. 

'19 P. A daughter was born on January 6 to 
Mr and Mrs John Henry Prudham, 39 Landsdowne 
Road, North, Gait. 

'19 S. G. H. Hopper has moved from Niagara 
Falls to 3 Rusholme Park Crescent, Toronto. 

'20 U.C. Mr and Mrs James E. Hahn (Dorothy 
McLagan) are living at 209 Madison Avenue, 
Toronto. 

'20 Vic. Ruth B. Davison is engaged as a 
dietitian at the Victoria Hospital, London, Ont. 



'20 S. The address of Roy Alan Crysler 
formerly of Niagara Falls, is 207 Glencairn Avenue, 
Toronto. 

'20 St M. Rev W. J. Storey is attending the 
College of Education and living at St Michael's 
College. 

'20 Ag. In January a daughter, Anne Elizabeth, 
was born to Mr and Mrs Harold J. Cudmore. 

'20 U.C. Isabel Forin is living at home with 
her father, Judge Forin, Nelson, B.C. 

'20 U.C. Mrs W. H. Ford (Mary Inez Jessie 
Ford) is living with her husband at 33 St Clair 
Avenue, Hamilton. 

'20 U.C. Olive E. Parker is on the staff of the 
Picton Collegiate Institute. 

'21 Vic. Mr and Mrs Leslie D. S. Carver 
(Gertrude Harwood) are living in Toronto at 48 
Appleton Avenue. 

'21 U.C. A daughter was born on January 18 
to Mr and Mrs Thomas T. Faichney. 

'21 D. Earl Marshall is doing post graduate 
work in New York. 

'21 U.C. The wedding was celebrated on the 
18th of February of George Murray Fraser and 
Margaret S. Butler of Toronto. 

'21 S. Henry K. McLean is a demonstrator on 
the staff of the Faculty of Applied Science. 

'21 M. Walter W. Woodhouse is now on the 
staff of the Hamot Hospital, Erie, Pensylvania. 

'21 St M. Thomas S. Melady has been ap- 
pointed inspector of Separate Schools for Perth, 
Huron, Grey, Kent, Bruce, Wellington and Lambton 
counties. 



HAVE YOUR BONDS 
INCREASED IN PRINCIPAL 
VALUE RECENTLY? 

If you held stocks you would probably look at Stock 
Exchange quotations each day and trade when it 
was profitable to do so. 

Why not keep as well posted on Bond prices? Send 
us your name and we will forward to you our Current 
List of Bond prices every two weeks. This should 
help you to judge when it is good to buy and to sell. 

/?. A. DALY & CO. 

Bank of Toronto Bldg. - Toronto 



Phone Adelaide 3083 

S. El SEN & CO. 

BARRISTERS, SOLICITORS, NOTARIES 



119 BAY ST. 



TORONTO 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



273 



Appreciation Oils the Wheels 

This is one of the seven complimentary notes received on our 
February issue. We thank the writers for their courtesy. 



COLLEGE OF LITERATURE. SCIENCE-. 
AND THE ARTS 



MR. DYMENT'S OFFICE 



February 10, 1922 



My dear MacQueen: 



My compliments on the February number of The 
University Monthly, which is distinctly the best 
number I have seen in years* 



Eugene, Oregon 



Sincerely, 

W^^i 



'CO 



If THE MONTHLY has improved, its improvement is due to the 
disinterested action of the alumni who pay their fees. Increased 
circulation involves benefits all round more money from advertis- 
ing, more money from subscriptions, greater ease in securing worth- 
while editorial contributions. 

The growth in membership has recently been very satisfactory. 
Four years has witnessed an increase from 590 to over 2,400 this 
despite the fact that the fee has been raised from $1 to $3. 

But 2,400 is only a small percentage of the total alumni body. 
To approach the standards of American universities, our member- 
ship must be doubled. 

You who appreciate THE MONTHLY and believe in the useful- 
ness of the Alumni Federation, will you not speak to some non- 
member alumnus friend and secure his signature for the blank on* 
the opposite page P 



274 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



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UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



ALUMNI PROFESSIONAL DIRECTORY 



ARMOUR & MICKLE 

BARRISTERS. Etc. 

E. DOUGLAS ARMOUR, K.C. 

HENRY W. MICKLE 

A. D. ARMOUR 

CONFEDERATION LIFE BUILDING 

Richmond & Yonge Streets, TORONTO 



STARR, SPENCE, COOPER and ERASER 

BARRISTERS, SOLICITORS, Etc. 

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GRANT COOPER W. KASPAR ERASER 

RUSSELL P. LOCKE HOWARD A. HALL 

Trust and Guarantee Building 
120 BAY ST. - TORONTO 



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Barrister, Solicitor, Notary, Etc. 

33 RICHMOND ST. WEST 
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Telephone: Main 3898 Cable Address: "Maco 1 



ROSS & HOLMSTED 

Barristers, Solicitors, Notaries, Etc. 

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JAMES LEITH Ross ARTHUR W. HOLMSTED 



McLaughlin, Johnston, 
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Barristers, Solicitors, Notaries, Etc. 

120 BAY STREET, TORONTO 
Telephone Adelaide 6467 

R. J. McLaughlin, K.C. R. L. Johnston 
R. D. Moorhead L. Macaulay 

W. T. Sinclair H. J. McLaughlin 

W. W. McLaughlin 



TYRRELL, J. B. 

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Kerr, Davidson, Paterson & McFarland 

Barristers, Solicitors, Etc. 
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Cable Address "Kerdason," Toronto 



W. Davidson, K.C. 

G. F. McFarland. LL.B. 



John A. Paterson, K.C. 
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Solicitors for tht University. 



OSLER, HOSKIN and HARCOURT 

Barristers, Solicitors, Etc. 
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H. S. Osier, K.C. 
Britton Osier, K.C. 
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Morley Smith G. M. Huycke N. E. Strickland 
Counsel Wallace Nesbit, K.C., A. Monro Grier K.C. 

C. H. and P. H. MITCHELL 

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Gregory, Gooderham & Campbell 

BARRISTERS. SOLICITORS. NOTARIES. CONVEYANCERS. &c. 

701 Continental Life Building 
167 Bay Street Toronto 

TELEPHONE MAIN 6070 

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Frederick A. A. Campbell Arthur Ernest Langpman 

Goldwin Gregory Vernon Walton Armstrong 

Frederick Wismer Kemp 



WALTER J. FRANCIS & COMPANY 

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MONTREAL 

WALTER J. FRANCIS, C.E. 
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18 Toronto St. : Toronto 



R.J.EDWARDS 



G. R. EDWARDS. B.A.Sc. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



277 




Boys prepared for the 

Universities, Royal 

Military College and 

Business. 



Toronto 



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Canaoa 



A Residential and Day School 

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UPPER SCHOOL -- LOWER SCHOOL 

Calendar Sent on Application. 
REV. D. BRUCE MACDONALD, M.A., LL.D. Headmaster. 



WESTERN ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Fire, Automobile, Hail, Marine, Explosion, Riots, Civil Commotions and Strikes Insurance 
Head Offices: Corner Wellington and Scott Streets, Toronto 

Assets* Ovet $7,900,000.00 

Losses paid since organization of the Company in 1851, Over $81,300,000.00 
Board of Directors 

W. B. MEIKLE, President and General Manager 
Sir John Aird John H_. Fulton (New York) Geo. A. Morrow, 



Robt. Bickerdike (Montreal) 
Lt.-Col. Henry Brock 
Alfred Cooper (London, Eng.) 
H. C. Cox 



D. B. Hanna 

John Hoskin, K.C., LL.D. 

Miller Lash 



Lt.-Col. the Hon. Frederic Nicholls 
Major-Gen'l Sir Henry Pellatt, C.V.O. 
E R. Wood 



LOOSE I.I'. LEAF 



Students' Note 
Physicians 9 and Dentists' 

Ledgers 

Memo and Price Books 
Professional Books 



BROWN BROS., Limited 

SIMCOE and PEARL STS. 
TORONTO 



Toronto 
Conservatory of Music 

UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO 

SIR EDMUND WALKER. C.V.O.. LL.D.. D.C.L.. PRESIDENT. 

A S. VOGT. MUS. DOC.. PRINCIPAL. 

HEALEY WILLAN. MUS. DOC . F R.C.O.. VICE-PRINCIPAL. 



Highest Artistic Standards. Faculty 
of International Reputation. 

The Conservatory affords unrivalled facili- 
ties for complete courses of instruction in all 
branches of music, for both professional and 
amateur students. 



PUPILS MAY ENTER AT ANY TIIfcE 



Year Book Exa miration Syllabus and 
Women's Residence Calendar forwarded 
to any address on request to the Registrar. 



278 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 




The "Mogul" 

Makes good every time 

"YJT/HEN you consider that manufactui ng Boilers 
and Radiators is our first and biggest responsi- 
bility When you bear in mind that we are the largest 
manufacturers of Boilers and Radiators in the Dominion 
of Canada. Is it any wonder that the SAFFORD 
MOGUL line is the last word in heating boilers ? 

Every MOGUL leaving our plant is inspected uy a 
staff of specialists, men who know the manufacture of 
boilers from A to Z, and that is why the SAFFORD 
MOGUL makes good every time and all the time. 

Dominion Radiator Company 



Low-Base Safford Mogul (sectional view) 



Hamilton, Ont. 
St. John, N.B. 
Calgary, Alta. 



TORONTO 

OTTAWA 



Limited 

Montreal, Que. 
Winnipeg, Man. 
Vancouver, B.C. 



A Food Drink 
for All Ages 

The Best Diet 

for infants, 
growing children, 
invalids and the 
aged 




Highly nutritious 
and convenient 

Used in training 
Athletes 

It agrees with 

the weakest 

digestion 



IN LUNCH TABLET FORM READY TO EAT 



R. LAIDLAW LUMBER CO 

LIMITED 



HEAD OFFICE 



65 YONGE STREET 



TORONTO 



EVERYTHING IN 



LUMBER AND MILLWORK 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



279 



CASAVANT ORGANS 



ARE SUPERIOR IN 



Quality, Design and Workmanship 



Over 800 pipe organs built 
by this firm in 

Canada, United States and 
South America. 



CASAVANT FRERES 

LIMITED 

ST. HYACINTHE 



EIMER & AMEND 

FOUNDED 1851 

Manufacturers, Exporters and 

Importers of 

LABORATORY APPARATUS 
CHEMICALS and SUPPLIES 




NEW YORK 

3rd AVE, 18th to 19th STREETS 

PITTSBURGH BRANCH 

4048 JENKINS ARCADE 

Vashington, D.C: Display Room, Suite 
601, Evening Star Building, Penna. Ave. 
and llth Street. 



The best flour and highest quality of ingredients 

make CANADA 

BREAD 



The choice of 
discriminating 
housewives -:- 



IQH1N10N 



r ^~ 

MfjMCV \ There is no better way to send money 
Iv/llCl 1 by ma ii. if lost or stolen, your 
ORDERS/ mone y re f un ^ed or a new order issued 
free of charge. 



280 UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 

Henry Sproatt, LL.D., R.C.A. Ernest R. Ralph 

Sproatt and Rolph 

Architects 

36 North Street, Toronto 



FRANK DARLING, LL.D.. F.R.I.B.A. JOHN A. PEARSON 

DARLING & PEARSON 

Hrcbttectg 

MEMBERS OF THE ROYAL ARCHITECTURAL INSTITUTE OF CANADA 
MEMBERS ONTARIO ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS 
MEMBERS QUEBEC ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS 

MANITOBA ASSOCIATION OF ARCHITECTS 



IMPERIAL BANK CHAMBERS 
2 LEADER LANE TORONTO 



BRITISH AMERICA ASSURANCE COMPANY 

Fire, Marine, Hail and Automobile Insurance 
HEAD OFFICES: COR. FRONT AND SCOTT STS., TORONTO 

Incorporated A.D. 1833 

Assets, Over $4,300,000 

Losses Paid since Organization in 1833, Over $47,500,000 



PAGE & COMPANY 

Cut Stone and Masonry Contractors 

TORONTO 

Contractors on Hart House and Burwash Hall 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 281 



SJmbersttp of Toronto 

(The Provincial University of Ontario) 

With its federated and affiliated colleges, its various faculties, and 
its special departments, offers courses or grants degrees in: 

ARTS leading to the degree of B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. 
COMMERCE Bachelor of Commerce. 

APPLIED SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING. .B.A.Sc., M.A.Sc., 
C.E., M.E., E.E., Chem.E. 

MEDICINE M.B., B.Sc. (Med.), and M.D. 

EDUCATION B.Paed. and D.Paed. 

FORESTRY B.Sc.F. and F.E. 

MUSIC Mus. Bac. and Mus. Doc. 

HOUSEHOLD SCIENCE AND SOCIAL SERVICE. 

PUBLIC HEALTH D.P.H. (Diploma), 

PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING. 

LAW LL.B., LL.M. and LL.D. (Hon.). 

DENTISTRY D.D.S. 

AGRICULTURE B.S.A. 

VETERINARY SCIENCE. .. .B.V.S. and D.V.S. 
PHARMACY Phm.B. 

TEACHERS' CLASSES, CORRESPONDENCE WORK, 
SUMMER SESSIONS, SHORT COURSES for FARMERS, 
for JOURNALISTS, in TOWN-PLANNING and in HOUSE- 
HOLD SCIENCE, University Classes in various cities and towns, 
Tutorial Classes in rural and urban communities, single lectures 
and courses of lectures are arranged and conducted by the 
Department of University Extension. (For information, write 
the Director.) 

For general information and copies of calendars write the 
Registrar, University of Toronto, or the Secretaries of the Colleges 
or Faculties. 



282 UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



Department of Education for Ontario 

SCHOOL AGES 

AND 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 



In the educational system of Ontario provision is made in the Courses 
of Study for instruction to the child of four years of age in the Kinder- 
garten up to the person of unstated age who desires a Technical or 
Industrial Course as a preparation for special fitness in a trade or pro- 
fession. 

All schools established under the Public Schools Act shall be free 
Public Schools, and every person between the ages of five and twenty- 
one years, except persons whose parents or guardians are Separate 
School supporters, shall have the right to attend some such school in the 
urban municipality or rural school section in which he resides. Children 
between the ages of four and seven years may attend Kindergarten 
schools, subject to the payment of such fees as to the Board may seem 
expedient. Children of Separate School supporters attend the Separate 
Schools. 

The compulsory ages of attendance under the School Attendance 
Acts are from eight to sixteen years and provision is made in the 
Statutes for extending the time to eighteen years of age, under con- 
ditions stated in The Adolescent School Attendance Act of 1919. 

The several Courses of Study in the educational system under the 
Department of Education are taken up in the Kindergarten, Public, 
Separate, Continuation and High Schools and Collegiate Institutes, and 
in Industrial and Technical Schools. Copies of the Regulations regard- 
ing each may be obtained by application to the Deputy Minister of 
Education, Parliament Buildings, Toronto. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 283 



BANK OF MONTREAL 

Established over 100 Years 



A Complete Commercial 
Banking Service 

Domestic and Foreign 



BRANCHES THROUGHOUT CANADA 

Savings Department in each Branch 



Total Assets in Excess of $500,000,000 



284 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 




THE FACULTY UNION DINING ROOM. HART HOUSE 



BUntoersittp of Toronto Jfflontfjlp 



Vol. XXII. TORONTO, AP UL, NINETEEN HUNDRED AND TWENTY-TWO 



No. 7 



News and Comments 



The University has suffered a severe loss 
in the resignation of Dr B. P. Watson, 
Professor of Obstetrics and 
Professor and Gynaecology, who has 

Watson goes accepted a similar chair 
to Edinburgh in the University of Edin- 
burgh. 

Since coming to the University ten years 
ago Dr Watson has endeared himself to 
students and colleagues, and has rendered 
outstanding service to the University and 
the General Hospital. Dr Watson attri- 
butes his appointment to the reputation of 
the University of Toronto Medical School. 
"The eyes of the world are upon the 
scheme of re-organization which has been 
going on here for the past two or three 
years," he said, "and my experience here 
is what Edinburgh looks to, to give an 
impetus to the work there and to introduce 
the new methods which we have had an 
opportunity of trying here." 

The Department of Mechanical Engin- 
eering recently conducted a special con- 
ference on water power 
Conference development in order to 
on Water supplement the regular 

Power courses and to give practis- 

Development ing engineers an oppor- 
Held tunity of coming in contact 

with the leaders in hy- 
draulic work. Lectures were given by 
Mr Lewis Moody, consulting engineer of 
Philadelphia; Mr W. M. White, of the 
Allis Chalmers Co., Milwaukee; Mr Max 
V. Sauer and Mr T. H. Hogg, of the 
Ontario Hydro-Electric Power commission 
engineering staff; and Mr N. R. Gibson 
hydraulic engineer for the Niagara Falls 
Power Commission. Design and control of 
hydraulic turbines, power house design and 
construction, intakes and surge tanks, the 
testing of power house machinery, and the 
economic features of water power develop- 
ment were among the subjects discussed. 

Those who attended the lectures, both 
engineers and students, were highly pleased 
with the series. 



It is significant that while the majority 
of the recommendations of the Geddes 
Committee on National 
Educational Economy were hailed with 
Economy general approval by the 

Not Popular press and people of Great 
in England Britain, the recommenda- 
tions regarding cuts in 
educational expenditure raised a veritable 
storm of opposition. Army, navy and 
civil service cuts were opposed by small 
sections of the community but educational 
cuts were universally condemned. The 
loss of two bye-elections by the Govern- 
ment were in some quarters credited to the 
educational recommendations. 

The Geddes Committee recommended 
steps designed to effect in educational 
expenditures, a saving of 18,100,000 out 
of a total of ,82,500,000 spent the previous 
year by the Government and local bodies. 
Reduction of salaries, exclusion of children 
under six years of age, the closing of small 
schools and the formation of larger teaching 
classes were among the methods proposed. 
The Government, whether because of the 
popular, agitation or not, did not accept 
these recommendations. The cut of 

18,000,000 was abandoned for 6,500,000, 
and later 5,500,000 was taken as the 
saving to be effected. Nearly one-half of 
this will be secured through requiring 
teachers to contribute five per cent, of 
their salaries to their pension fund and 
the remainder by a closer scrutiny of 
general expenditures. Grants to univer- 
sities will remain unchanged. 

Critics of the Geddes proposals regarded 
them as entirely reactionary and claimed 
that if they were put into effect the 
educational development of Great Britain 
would be put back at least a decade. 
Starvation would stop all progress and 
clog the mechanism of the entire educa- 
tional system of the country. * 

Education is undoubtedly a dangerous 
thing upon which to exercise economy. 
Unless it grows it becomes spiritless and 



285 



286 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



inanimate and, as is shown many times in 
history, an unprogressive system of edu- 
cation means an unprogressive state. 

During the first week of March the 
returned soldier-students in receipt of loans 
from the Memorial Fund 
Employment were informed that the 
Work Again Federation was prepared 
Undertaken to assist them in securing 
summer work. Announce- 
ment was also made to the general student 
body that the Alumni Secretary would be 
glad to interview all seekers after work, 
although in many cases advice would be 
all he would have to offer. Since these 
announcements have been made the 
Alumni Office has been a popular student 
resort. 

In the neighbourhood of one hundred 
and seventy-five positions have been secur- 
ed, chiefly on the lake boats and in offices 
in Toronto, where extra clerks are em- 
ployed for the summer. It is a striking 
fact that at least seventy-five per cent, 
of these openings were secured as a direct 
result of the activities carried on by the 
Federation during the past two years, 
without which they would not have been 
available for any students. This is an 
indication of the service which an employ- 
ment office might render. The opinion is 
often expressed that the best way for 
students and graduates to secure jobs is to 
"get out and hustle for them". To a 
certain extent this is true, but on the other 
hand the service which an Employment 
Bureau might render in impressing upon 
employers the advisability of using uni- 
versity-trained men and women is in- 
estimable. A bureau would open up to 
graduates and undergraduates avenues of 
employment and of service which hereto- 
fore have been closed. 

Alumni, who know of openings suitable 
for graduates or undergraduates, should 
commun*' ate w'th the Alumni Federation 
Office, 184 College Street, Tel. College 5032. 

The John H. Moss Memorial Award, 
the endowment for which was raised as 

part of the Memorial Fund, 
The MOSS has been awarded for 1922 
Memorial to F. L. Hutchison, of 
Award University College. The 

Award is of the value of 
$300, and is made to one of four candidates 
eelcted as the best all round man or woman 



in the year by the graduating classes in 
each of the Arts Colleges. The Committee 
of Award for the year was: President 
Falconer, Mr Justice Masten, Mr Hume 
Blake, Mr C. S. Maclnnes, and Mr S. T. 
Blackwood. 

Mr Hutchison has occupied a very 
prominent position in undergraduate life 
during his course. He has been president 
of the U.C. Literary and Athletic Society, 
vice-r resident of the Students' Admin- 
istrative Council, and clerk of the Students' 
Court, and is permanent president of the 
1922 U.C. class. He has an enviable war 
record, having enlisted as soon as he 
reached the required age, and served with 
distinction with the Royal Naval Air 
Service. He entered the University with 
an Edward Blake Scholarship and has 
taken a good standing in the Honour 
Chemistry course. He expects to take 
post graduate work next year. 



A WOMEN'S VOCATIONAL CONFERENCE 
was held under the auspices of the Women 
Students' Administrative Council on Mon- 
day, March 13, in the Physics Building. 
The general idea of the conference as 
described by Miss Skinner of Victoria 
College, who presided, was to discuss 
openings for College women in the business 
world. Miss Jane Thomas, of Jarvis 
Collegiate Institute, spoke on " Education " 
and Miss White, of the Canadian Farmer, 
discussed "Journalism". The openings in 
the various branches of Social Service were 
considered by Professor Dale, of the Social 
Service Department. 



STRIKING EVIDENCE OF Varsity's 
athletic prowess is found in the champion- 
ship cups and shields which are now dis- 
played in glass cases on the landings in 
Hart House. Among the most prominent 
are the Intermediate International Rowing 
Cup, the Canadian Senior Challenge Cup, 
the Allan Cup, and the Intercollegiate 
Hockey Cup. -There are over twenty cups 
and shields in all displayed. 

Out of ten intercollegiate championships 
in major sports Varsity this year won six 
football, soccer, hockey, swimming, assault- 
at-arms, and harrier. Thirty-eight men 
were given their colours. 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



287 



MR J. MURRAY GIBBON, general pub- 
licity agent of the C. P. R., recently arranged 
the taking of a series of motion pictures 
of Hart House and the University build- 
ings. Among the pictures taken were the 
Great Hall with some 250 students at 
lunch, the gymnasium floor with a class at 
work, the swimming pool, the Hart House 
Theatre with a play in rehearsal, views 
from the Tower of the Main Building, and 
views of the various buildings. 

The pictures will be given wide dis- 
tribution in Great Britain, the United 
States, and Western Canada. 



TO AN EVER INCREASING EXTENT the 

graduates are making use of the Univer- 
sity Library. The privilege of borrowing 
books from the Library is open to all 
graduates on the payment of a nominal 
deposit which is held against the return 
of the books borrowed. Out-of-town 
graduates have the same privileges as 
those resident in Toronto with the differ- 
ence that the cost of postage must be 
borne by the borrower. 

The University Library now has in its 
stacks, 170,000 bound volumes and some 
55,000 pamphlets, covering all phases of 
learning. 

DR STANLEY RYERSON, Secretary of the 
Faculty of Medicine, has published a 
pamphlet entitled The Process of Study, in 
which he offers advice to students on 
methods of study. He emphasizes the 
value of studying with a purpose, of con- 
centrating the attention on the subject in 
hand, and of working systematically. 

Dr Ryerson has been adviser to the 
students of first year Medicine and in the 
course of his interviews with them has 
been much impressed with the faulty, 
indefinite methods of study which were 
employed. 



PROFESSOR J. G. FITZGERALD, director of 
the Connaught Laboratories and rrofessor 
of Hygiene and Preventive Medicine, has 
accepted an offer to occupy the chair of 
Bacteriology and Experimental Pathology 
in the University of California for the 
coming year during the absence of the 
regular professor of the department, who 
has been called to Washington on special 
duty. The appointment is considered a 
high compliment to Dr Fitzgerald and the 
University. 



PROFESSOR F. C. A. JEANNERET repre- 
sented and purchased a number of volumes 
for the University in the auction sale of 
the library of Louis Papineau, which was 
held at Papineau's old home at Montabello, 
P.Q., early in March. Some 6,000 volumes 
were sold. Many of them, collected by 
Papineau in Paris during his seven years' 
exile, were of great historical value. 



THE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE CLA ss OF 1922 
held its graduation dinner in Hart House 
on March 9. President Falconer, Sir 
Bertram Windle, Principal Hutton, and 
Professor Fay were among those who 
spoke. Mr Lome Hutchison, permanent 
president of the Year, appealed to the 
members * of the class to identify them- 
selves with the alumni organizations. 




F. L. HUTCHISON, '22 
Winner of the Moss Memorial Award 

THE FACULTY OF MEDICINE hasmrranged 
for three "refresher" courses to be given 
at the University from May 23 to 28 in 
Surgery, Medicine, Obstetrics, and Gyn- 
aecology. The courses are open to all 
doctors in the Province. 



288 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



THE FACULTY OF APPLIED SCIENCE, 
unable to enter teams in the women's 
intercollegiate athletics, is consoling itself 
by offering a cup to be emblematic of the 
Women's Intercollegiate Hockey Cham- 
pionship. The Engineering Society has 
appointed a committee to select a design 
and make the purchase. 



OSGOODE HALL won from the Dental 
College in the final debate of the Inter- 
college Union, defending the negative of 
"Resolved that Canada should have power 
to amend her own constitution". 



THE WEEKLY NEWSPAPER ASSOCIATION 
has asked that a short course in Journalism 
be given at the University again this year. 
It will probably be held in September. 



MR ROBERT NICHOLLS, prominent as 
one of the New Elizabethan poets of 
England, was a visitor at the University 
during the third week of March. He 
lectured at Victoria College. 



ANOTHER INDICATION of the spring 
examinations is the discontinuance of 
Varsity. The last number for the year 
was issued on March 10. 



THE REV. HOWARD MOWLL, Dean of 
Residence of Wycliffe College, has been 
appointed assistant bishop of West China. 



TFE Goblin STAFF were responsible for the 
second last issue of Varsity. The winning 
of a moving picture beauty contest by 
Joseph C. DePencier, an undergraduate, 
was featured. 



THE ALUMNAE ASSOCIATION of the 
University of Michigan has entered upon 
a campaign to raise $1,000,000 for a 
women's union; $750,000 is for a building 
and $250,000 for an endowment. 



MAJOR-GENERAL VICTOR WILLIAMS in- 
spected the C.O.T.C. on March 25. This 
concludes the work of the Corps for the 
session. 



Miss AGNES MCPHAIL, M.P., who was 
recently elected to the House of Commons 
on the Progressive ticket, registered for 
the Farmers' Short Course but was unable 
to attend the classes. 



As PART OF THE COURSE in physical 
training, Northwestern University, Chi- 
cago, has started a course in golf for women 
students. ^_^___ 

The Epigrapher 

By E. J. Pratt 

His head was like his lore antique, 
His face was thin and sallow-sick, 
With god-like accent he could speak 
Of Egypt's reeds or Babylon's brick 
Or sheep-skin codes in Arabic. 

To justify the ways Divine, 

He had travelled Southern Asia through 

Gezir down in Palestine, 

Lagash, Ur and Eridu, 

The banks of Nile and Tigris too. 

And every occult Hebrew tale 
He could expound with learned ease, 
From Aaron's rod to Jonah's whale. 
He had held the skull of Rameses 
The one who died from boils and fleas. 

Could tell how saving Israel's peace- 
The mighty Gabriel of the Lord 
Put sand within the axle-grease 
Of Pharoah's chariots; and his horde 
O'erwhelmed with water, fire and sword. 

And he had tried Behistun Rock, 
That Persian peak, and nearly clomb it; 
His head had suffered from the shock 
Of somersaulting from its summit 
Nor had he quite recovered from it. 

From that time onward to the end, 
His mind had had a touch of gloom; 
His hours, with jars and coins, he'd spend, 
And ashes looted from a tomb, 
Within his spare and narrow room. 

His day's work done, with the last rune 
Of a Hammurabi fragment read, 
He took some water spiced with prune 
And soda, which imbibed, he said 
A Syrian prayer and went to bed. 

And thus he trod life's narrow way, 
His soul as peaceful as a river 
His understanding heart all day 
Kept faithful to a stagnant liver. 

L' ENVOI 

When at last his stomach went by default, 
His graduate students bore him afar 
To the East where the Dead Sea waters are, 
And pickled his bones in Eternal Salt. 



Preserving the Health of the Student Body 

By GEORGE D. PORTER, DIRECTOR OF THE UNIVERSITY HEALTH SERVICE 



University Health Service aims at 
I promoting the health and physical 
fitness of the students. Its first con- 
tact with the students is in the physical 
examinations given them, for only after 
a careful examination can a proper esti- 
mate of their fitness for physical training 
be made, and so each one is classified and 
if necessary re-examined and re-classified, 
by specialists. Students are also advised 
in regard to their defects and in health 
matters generally, and supervised in their 
physical training during the term. The 
Service also endeavours to control any 
infectious diseases which may arise from 
time to time among the student body, and 
lectures are given upon the principles of 
personal hygiene. 

As physical training is made compulsory 
only for the students' benefit it is but 
reasonable that he should receive proper 
medical examination so that he may take 
the form and amount of exercise which 
will best suit his needs. For this purpose 
a staff of eight physicians chosen by the 
Professor of Medicine, and a staff of as 
many specialists, have examined the first 
.two years' students, and also the Univer- 
sity Athletic Teams, very carefully. This 
year 1450 were examined and 288 were 
called up for re-examination by specialists. 

The results of these examinations are 
most gratifying as regards the general 
health standard of our students, as it has 
been found that practically 96 J^% are able 
to take physical training, and also that 
those showing any evidence of diseases 
whose presence are generally traceable to 
immorality (venereal diseases) are less than 

1 A of 1%. 

On the other hand we have found some 
serious disabilities such as heart lesions, 
chest, kidney and surgical diseases among 
the 3}/2% not able to take gymnasium 
work. While we are not treating any of 
these fifty students in a medical or surgical 
way, they have our advice and counsel, and 
we desire the co-operation of their own 
physicians in seeing that they are pro- 
perly looked after. 

Then there are 10% of the remainder 
(146 students) who while able to take 
physical training have some disability re- 
quiring a more careful form of corrective 



exercise and supervision under the Physical 
Director. Naturally students are graded 
upwards and downwards as any changes 
in their physical condition is noted during 
the term. The desirability of changing 
courses of study owing to disabilities has 
also been discussed with a few students 
to their advantage. Students with faulty 
vision, diseased tonsils, bad teeth, etc., 
are advised to consult their physicians or 
dentists for their correction and treatment. 
Summarizing then we find that among 
the 1450 students examined there were: 
Physically fit and able to take all 
gymnasium work ........... 

Men with some disability requiring 

supervised exercises ......... 10% 

Physically unfit (some temporarily 
and a few permanently) and 
exempt from all gymnasium 
work ...................... 



Lectures on personal hygiene have also 
been delivered to first and second year 
students in all faculties. While the Health 
Service does not assume the responsibility 
of caring for the sick, it should be one of 
its functions to see that any student 
who may be ill is properly looked after by 
his own or some responsible physician. 
Already the Service has been able to help 
a number of students in this regard and 
as the co-operation of all the different 
House authorities and the Athletic Direc- 
torate has been so hearty and spontaneous 
this year, we can only hope for an increased 
all round efficiency as time goes on. The 
funds for the Service (for the first two 
years) have been furnished by the Con- 
naught Antitoxin Laboratories, and par- 
ticulars regarding medical findings will be 
tabulated later on as a demonstration of 
health conditions in our student body. 

The University has also appointed a 
very capable woman physician, Dr Edith 
Gordon, who is examining and advising 
the women students. As physical training 
is not at present compulsory among the 
women students this examination is not 
compulsory, but that it is mucfe appreci- 
ated is evidenced by the fact that over 
five hundred have already taken their 
physical examinations, and many others 
have sought her advice. 



289 



Working Their Way Through 

TOM SMITH AT YALE AND BILL JONES AT TORONTO 



When Tom Smith was in his final year 
at the Newton, N.Y., High School he 
decided that he wanted to go to Yale. 
His great problem was financial, as his 
family was not in a position to help him. 
The story of how he worked his way 
through the University is told in the Yale 
Alumni Weekly. 

Not being familiar with the conditions 
at Yale, he wrote asking for information 
and received a booklet entitled " Student 
Self-Support at Yale" and a letter from 
the Director of the Bureau of Appoint- 
ments giving full data regarding expenses 
and the amount of money which he might 
expect to earn during the course. So Tom 
decided to attempt it. He managed to 
save about two hundred dollars during the 
summer and with this amount in his 
pocket went down to Yale. On arrival he 
sought out the Bureau of Appointments, 
had a talk with the Director, and regis- 
tered. He was given a card which enabled 
him to secure the required text books on 
loan and was referred to a student boarding 
house where in return for serving as a 
waiter he secured his meals without charge. 
During the session the Bureau of Appoint- 
ments secured for him many odd jobs 
which brought in considerable money 
without making too great inroads on his 
time. He acted as usher at the football 
games and worked at the Athletic Office; 
he tended furnaces, and washed windows; 
he worked in a store on Saturday after- 
noons and as a mail clerk during the 
Christmas vacation; he found shovelling 
snow and mowing lawns healthy and not 
unremunerative pastimes. He earned a 
reputation for willingness and reliability 
which won him frequent consideration at 
the Bureau. 

An investigation was made into Tom's 
financial need, his character, and his 
ability, and these being judged entirely 
satisfactory he was -granted a tuition 
scholarship which awarded him 80% of 
the tuition charge. 

In the spring he won a place on the 
freshmen baseball team and on the recom- 
mendation of the Bureau of Appointments 



was given free board at the training table. 

As the vacation approached it became 
evident that he must earn a large sum of 
money during the summer if he were to 
get a good start in the autumn. House 
to house canvassing did not appeal to 
him but he undertook it and was able to 
save several hundred dollars. 

This was apparently the turning point 
in Tom's university career. He had estab- 
lished himself and from now on things 
were easier. He organized a table at the 
eating house and was no longer required 
to wait on tables; he left the furnaces, the 
sidewalks, and the lawns to newcomers. 
In a competition he secured the highest 
number of sales (a commission with each) 
of the Undergraduate Calendar and was 
awarded the managership for the following 
year. He won a position on the tutoring 
staff and made considerable money in this 
way. But to be on the safe side of the 
balance sheet for his third year he went 
back to the canvassing job for the vacation. 
A fatiguing summer but very satisfactory 
from the money standpoint. 

Tom's third year was a pleasant one. 
He was appointed head waiter at an 
eating house apparently very much of a 
sinecure. He made considerable money 
as manager of the Calendar, and in the 
spring made the Varsity baseball team 
which gave him free board. 

No more canvassing for Tom. At the 
end of the year he had money in the bank 
so through the Bureau of Appointments he 
secured a position as tutor and companion 
to a youthful member of a wealthy family 
and spent the summer at Murray Bay and 
other pleasurable spots. 

Thus Tom came to his senior year. He 
was made manager of his eating house 
which gave him a commission as well as 
his meals, and manager of the Tutoring 
Bureau; which two things carried him 
through the year. On his graduation the 
Bureau of Appointments arranged for 
Tom to interview a number of prospective 
employers which resulted in his securing 
a position suited to his abilities and training. 






290 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



291 



Bill Jones at the University of Toronto 

So the university history of Tom Smith. 
Bill Jones who matriculated in the Univer- 
sity of Toronto^ with a profound desire to 
take the course found his task much more 
difficult. Bill was an exceptional lad as 
was Tom and possessed of no less deter- 
mination and grit, and of no inferior 
ability, but the machinery to assist him 
was lacking. 

He wrote to an undergraduate of his 
acquaintance and was told that he would 
need about $700 each year, and that the 
chances of his earning anything during 
the term were slim. There was no fund 
through which he might secure his tuition. 
So Bill took a job as teacher in the north 
country and there spent three years, saving 
in all $1,000. 

With this on hand he registered in the 
first year Arts. He lived as cheaply as 
possible preparing many of his meals over 
the bed-room gas lamp (cooking strictly 
forbidden) and picking up what odd jobs 
he could; but at the end of the session he 
had only $350 left. He, too, took a can- 
vassing position for the summer and by 



reason of perseverance earned several 
hundred dollars. 

At the end of the second year, however, 
he found himself out of funds. So, much 
against his will, he was forced to remain 
out of the University for a year, breaking 
the continuity of his work and dropping 
the pleasant associations of his class. 

He came back the following year with a 
sum which, with the aid of two hundred 
dollars borrowed from a friend, saw him 
to the completion of the course. He got his 
parchment. 

But Bill's troubles did not end with the 
admitto te. He wanted to enter the 
manufacturing business but did not have 
the entree. He felt that if he were given 
a chance he could make good but he had 
no one to help, him gain the necessary 
foothold. He interviewed several em- 
ployment managers and was told that 
they had no openings for men of his 
training. 

Finally, by concealing the fact that he 
was a university graduate, he did get a 
job. Some day he will doubtless be manag- 
ing director of the firm. 



Why We Need Trained Foresters 

Bv C. D. HOWE, DEAN OF THE FACULTY OF FORESTRY 



I HAVE been asked briefly to state what 
the necessity is for training foresters in 
a country of such vast forested areas 
as Canada possesses. In the first place I 
will say that there are forests and forests; 
there are trees and trees. It does not 
follow that an area covered with forests 
is commercially valuable because of their 
presence, or that one tree is as good as 
another for the various purposes of the 
market. In the neighbourhood of seventy 
different kinds of trees have been used in 
this country in the wood and timber trade, 
but a very few species contribute the 
greater portion of the output. About four 
billion feet of lumber are cut in Canada 
every year. Their value as rough lumber 
is approximately $122,000,000. When 
time, labour, and thought have been 
expended upon them they become worth 
around $250,000,000. Thus our forests 
in terms of the manufactured lumber 
products increase our national wealth a 



quarter of a billion dollars each year. 
Over two-thirds of the above values are 
contributed by six different kinds of trees. 
The comparatively few kinds of trees in 
our forests that are utilized in large 
quantities are still more strikingly shown 
in the case of the pulpwood. Of this 
material around four million cords are cut 
each year, valued in the rough at $45,000,- 
000, and from which pulp and paper 
products are produced to the value of over 
$200,000,000. More than ninety per cent, 
of these values is furnished by the wood of 
four kinds of trees. 

These few trees enter so largely into the 
products of the forest not because they are 
plentiful and accessible, but because they 
meet the market requirements better than 
any others. Because of certain inherent 
mechanical and physical properties no 
Canadian wood, for example, is so well 
adapted to such a variety of uses as that 
of the white pine. The commercial supply 



292 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



of this species is fast disappearing. Owing 
to this fact, we are already using poorer 
woods as substitutes -with little or no 
difference in price. And again, no wood 
fibre is so well adapted for paper making 
as that of spruce. Notwithstanding all 
that has been said and done with regard 
to employing various vegetable fibres as 
substitutes for wood-pulp, little has been 
accomplished, or probably ever will be 
accomplished, because of the quality, 
adaptability, and cheapness of production 
of wood fibre and among wood fibres those 
of spruce stand supreme as the result of 
certain inherent characteristics. When the 
supply of spruce is gone we shall be com- 
pelled to use poorer but not cheaper- 
grades of paper. 

Let us hastily examine our forested 
areas from the standpoint of commercially 
valuable trees. In the first place, of the 
3.5 million square miles of land area in 
Canada, 1.6 million square miles, over 
forty per cent., are too cold or too high or 
too dry to produce trees of sufficient size 
to interest lumbermen. Around 100,000 
square miles should be deducted for 
agricultural lands outside the grasslands 
of the West, they having been included 
in the above. Even with these deductions 
we have enormous areas covered by 
forests, some 1,900,000 square miles (over 
a billion acres), and again, having their 
utilization value in mind, let us ask: 
What kind of forests; what kind of trees? 
On at least 500,000 square miles climatic 
conditions are such as to produce only 
trees of pulpwood size, practically no trees 
of sawlog size, that is, tw r elve inches and 
above in diameter. 

Destruction of our forests by fire has 
been incomprehensibly great. The amount 
of saw timber thus destroyed has been 
much greater than the amount removed by 
logging or farming operations since the 
settlement of the country began, in fact 
probably greater than all that has been 
cut in the past plus all that could be cut 
to-day. There is little doubt that from 
one-half to two-thirds of the forested area 
of Canada, or, in other words, around one 
million square miles (640,000,000 acres) 
have been burned within the past seventy- 
five years and because of such fires do 
not to-day contain forests of sawlog size. 
This reduces the areas containing trees of 
sawlog size to about one quarter of the 



total forested area, that is around 500,000 
square miles, or approximately twelve per 
cent, of the land area of the country. 
If we had the population of the European 
countries, or of the United States, this 
percentage would be far on the wrong side 
of the factor of safety. In fact, our 
supply of sawlogs would last the United 
States at their present rate of cutting not 
over fifteen years. 

Just a little more about forest fires and 
their effect: Much of this million square 
miles has been burned not once only, but 
two, three, or even a half dozen times. 
These repeated fires on the same area make 
abortive nature's attempt to reclothe the 
old burns with commercially valuable 
trees. Whole townships that once sup- 
ported magnificent forests of pine are now, 
because of repeated burning, covered with 
worthless brush or with trees of no market 
value. This forest devastation by fire is 
not a thing of the past; it still continues 
practically unabated, except in wet seasons, 
in some of the most valuable forest regions 
of the country. Over a million and a half 
acres of forest fell prey to the flames in 
Eastern Canada last summer. 

Even on the areas which have been 
lumbered and have escaped burning, in- 
ferior trees usually take possession after 
the removal of the valuable pine and 
spruce. Nature has no economic sense. 
She takes no thought of market require- 
ments. She accepts direction, however, 
and it has been demonstrated over and 
over again that intelligent direction of 
nature's forces in the forest while the 
lumbering operations are going on will 
lead to the replacement of the commercially 
valuable trees. 

Under normal conditions forest trees die 
of disease. Very few die of old age. 
There is scarcely a healthy tree in a 
mature forest. Unfortunately, lumbering 
methods have been such as to increase 
rather than to decrease the susceptibility 
of trees to disease. Periodically there 
comes a combination of man-made and 
nature-made conditions that produces an 
epidemic in the forest. Just now the 
Eastern forests are being swept by a real 
scourge, the spruce budworm, which has 
already destroyed, at a moderate estimate, 
over ten years' supply of pulpwood at the 
present rate of production. The destruc- 
tion of wood material through such epi- 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



293 



demies, however, cannot be adequately 
measured by the trees killed at the time 
because the after effects continue for years. 
The weakened trees become susceptible to 
fungus diseases to which they were pre- 
viously resistant. The fungus bodies are 
like cancers. They dissolve away the 
tissues of roots or stem at the base of the 
tree until it is overturned by the wind. 

We don't know as much as we should 
about the rate of growth in our forests, but 
such data as we have indicate that the 
annual toll taken by fire, disease, and wind 
far exceeds the annual accretion of wood 
by the natural processes of growth. There 
is no actual annual increase in wood 
volume in a virgin forest. . Nature's forces 
are in equilibrium; life and death are 
balanced. It has been stated that if a 
single spruce tree eight inches in diameter 
died on the average acre each year, the loss 
in wood volume thus ensuing would offset 
the average annual growth on certain cut- 
over pulpwood lands in Quebec. A similar 
statement, but involving even less annual 
growth, has been made in regard to the 
cut-over pine lands in Ontario. Recent 
studies on pulpwood lands in Ontario dis- 
closed the fact that the trees, on the average 



acre, left after the logging operations ten 
years ago, had since increased their volume 
at the rate of seven per cent, a year, but 
at the same time the loss by disease and 
wind-throwing had exceeded the annual 
growth rate, so that there was actually 
less wood material on the average acre 
than ten years ago. 

Briefly, our forest conditions present 
this problem: Shall we accept for our 
lumbering and pulpwood industries the 
wood of constantly decreasing quality 
which nature urfguided produces when the 
equilibrium in the forest has been upset by 
fire, disease, or logging operations, or shall 
we exert intelligent effort to maintain our 
pine, spruce, and other valuable forests 
and thus supply the forest industries with 
wood of incomparable quality particularly 
adapted to their needs? 

It is both a challenge to human intelli- 
gence and the part of patriotism to keep 
the natural forest areas continuously 
productive in terms of commercially valu- 
able trees trees whose products annually 
increase the wealth of the country by 
nearly a half billion dollars. Hence, the 
reason for the existence of an institution 
for the training of foresters. 




SHORTLY AFTER THE FIRE 
Timber completely destroyed and top soil burnt 



SOME YEARS LATER 

The land which once supported a magnificent stand of pine 
is covered now only with shrubs and worthless willows 



Recent Developments in Western Universities 

By HAROLD S. PATTON, 
DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS, UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA 



HARD hit as agriculture and business 
may be throughout the West this 
year, the young universities on the 
north and south Saskatchewan do not 
appear to be noticeably involved in the 
prevailing depression. The number of 
students may be somewhat restricted by 
tense conditions on the farm although 
Alberta has the largest number in her 
history but the expansion of the work 
of the prairie universities is undoubtedly 
proceeding at a more accelerated rate than 
the growth of population in Alberta and 
Saskatchewan . 

The rising universities at Edmonton 
and Saskatoon have both the advantages 
and the limitations of extreme youthful- 
ness. While tradition and associations lie 
in the formative future rather than the 
formulating past, these junior institutions 
have had the distinct advantage of launch- 
ing out, both as to polity and physical 
equipment, in accordance with the proved 
experience and experimentation of older 
academic establishments. Instead of hav- 
ing to consider the federation of existing 
educational institutions and professional 
schools, independently and diversely 
evolved, the governing bodies of the embryo 
universities which emerged three years 
after the statutory establishment of the 
Western Prairie Provinces, were able to 
plan, not only a harmonious ground and 
architectural scheme, but also an organi- 
cally unified institution of provincial higher 
education. Although the war overtook the 
Western universities while still in their 
merest infancy, and swept their under- 
graduates and handful of graduates, not 
to mention faculty members, into the 
sterner school of overseas service, the 
physical and departmental development 
was not allowed to remain stationary. 
Between 1909 and 1917 Saskatchewan had 
added to its nuclear faculty of Arts and 
Science (which opened its first classes in a 
Saskatoon business block), a splendidly 
equipped college of Agriculture, a college 
of Law, and Schools of Engineering, 
Pharmacy and Accounting. 



Alberta, starting with forty-five students 
in a rented building in the fall of 1908, had 
before the war constituted four faculties, 
Arts and Science, Law, Applied Science, 
and Medicine. The Faculty of Agriculture, 
which called for considerable addition to 
the University land, opened its doors at 
the opening of the second year of the war, 
during which the school of Pharmacy, and 
the Departments of Dentistry and House- 
hold Economics were also inaugurated. 

Both universities had the further initial 
advantage of extensive and admirably 
located ground sites, each commanding 
the respective branches of the great river 
of the prairies. The building plan pursued 
in either case was, however, essentially 
different. Saskatchewan, adopting the 
collegiate Gothic style of architecture and 
availing itself of the proximity of excellent 
gray building stone, constructed her college 
and residence buildings to a standard 
which, while architecturally pleasing, ten- 
ded by its very excellence to limit the 
rate of physical expansion if such standard 
was to be maintained. Alberta on the 
other hanol, adopting a simple, neo-classic 
style of architecture, and limited to com- 
mercial brick, gave greater attention to 
utility and internal planning (with pro- 
vision for physical extensibility), than to 
the aesthetic aspects. It is arguable that 
in a new agricultural province, service- 
ability for extending needs combined with 
adaptability to future requirements is 
more appropriate than the slow accretion 
of academic buildings which in a general 
environment of crudity and tentativeness 
give an unexpected impression of archi- 
tectural beauty, unity, and permanence. 
At any rate it is not a deplorable sign, 
that, instead of following a uniform plan, 
each institution is pursuing a policy of its 
own. Until time gives range for the de- 
velopment of distinctive esprit or academic 
traditions in each University, it is the 
physical characteristics which must serve 
to differentiate provincial institutions so 
strictly coeval and contiguous. 



294 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



295 



Universities are Distinctly Provincial 

Perhaps the most distinctive feature of 
these prairie universities is their essentially 
Provincial character the capital "P" 
is employed advisedly. They exist pri- 
marily to subserve the peculiar higher 
educational needs of their respective pro- 
vinces, rather than as institutions of pure 
learning. It is becoming, therefore, that 
the second faculty to rise at Saskatoon 
and the one to which the largest equip- 
ment is devoted should be the College of 
Agriculture, whose College Farm of 830 
acres and Experiment and Increase Plots 
of 450 acres, adjoin the University campus 
with its own substantial 300 acres, while 
the College building is used jointly for 
lecture purposes by Arts and Aggies. 
(Let Torontonians contemplate a corre- 
sponding juxtaposition of O.A.C. and 
Queen's Park!). Somewhat of a revelation 
to visitors to Saskatoon it is to find within 
a stone's throw of the handsome stone 
Gothic College Building, the three-storied, 
factory-like, Agricultural Engineering 
Building, with its concrete work, gasoline 
engine, sheet metal working, pump and 
barn construction and farm implement 
departments; while an impressive, dome- 
covered brick building adjoining turns out 
to be a spacious live stock pavilion with 
judging arena, convertible lecture rooms 
for farmers' short courses, and model 
abattoir in the (presumably) leeward 
portion of the building. While a high 
and liberal standard is set for the degree 
of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture, and 
a combined six year course in Arts and 
Agriculture is offered for the training of 
those looking forward to teaching, research, 
or administration in agriculture, the needs 
of the young landworking farmer are met 
through the three years associate course, 
for which, the entrance requirements con- 
sist not in the passing of an examination, 
but at least one year's bona fide experience 
on a farm. To serve the needs of the adult 
farmer who cannot attend even an abbre- 
viated residence course, the College of 
Agriculture carries on an aggressive ex- 
tension service which assumes manifold 
forms Farmers' short courses in selected 
provincial centres during the winter 
months; lecture demonstrations after seed- 
ing in the pioneer districts; annual farmers' 
excursions to the College Farm during 
July; judging and lecturing at district 



horse shows, plowing matches, standing 
crops competitions, agricultural society 
fairs, etc. ; organization of Farmers', Home- 
makers', and Junior Farm clubs, publica- 
tion and circulation of agricultural periodi- 
cals and bulletins, etc. The wise course 
adopted at the time of the establishment 
of the college of Agriculture, by which the 
provincial department of agriculture trans- 
ferred its educational work to the univer- 
sity, has eliminated in Saskatchewan the 
competition and overlapping, which only 
too frequently is to be found between 
provincial departments of agriculture and 
education a relationship which Alberta 
has so far less conclusively solved. 

Alberta being less completely an agra- 
rian province than her eastern twin sister, 
the agricultural faculty of the provincial 
university at Edmonton, while very effec- 
tively conducted, does not occupy quite 
the same relatively conspicuous position 
in the university scheme as does the corre- 
sponding institution at Saskatoon. Alberta, 
on the other hand has developed further 
her Faculty of Applied Science, particu- 
larly in the Civil Engineering and Mining 
departments, as befits a province whose 
coat of arms bears mountain peaks as well 
as wheat sheaves, a province which leads 
the Dominion in coal resources and 
petroleum possibilities, and which is just 
beginning to tap the great waterways of the 
North. B.A.Sc. degrees are now offered 
in Civil, Electrical, and Mining Engineer- 
ing, and in Architecture. The opening this 
year of the admirably equipped neo-classic 
Medical Building (for which $25,000 annu- 
ally has been made available from the 
Rockfeller Foundation for Medical train- 
ing) represents the only Canadian Medical 
School west of Winnipeg- While the labo- 
ratory equipment is equal to that of most 
Eastern medical schools, the limitations 
in the way of clinical work make it neces- 
sary for the present at least that the work 
of the fifth and sixth years should be com- 
pleted at Toronto or McGill (for which 
equivalent status is granted to Alberta 
students), while a similar arrangement 
applies in the case of the two senior years 
in dentistry. It is no small advantage to 
students in Alberta, Saskatchewan, and 
British Columbia, to be thus enabled to 
take more than half their professional 
work under the conditions of closer faculty 
supervision favoured by small classes, 



296 



UNIVERSITY OF TORONTO MONTHLY 



without incurring the frequently prohibi- 
tive expense of six years attendance in the 
East. 

The close relationship between the 
University of Alberta and the province of 
Alberta is well illustrated by the func- 
tioning of the Provincial Research Council, 
through which the laboratory equipment 
and the departmental researches of the 
University are directed towards the in- 
vestigation of the Natural resources of 
the Province and the related developmental 
problems. In addition to soil and genetic 
experiments of the department of agricul- 
ture, the Research Council is at present 
engaged on such practical researches as 
the economic extraction of bitumen from 
the Athabasca tar sands for road dressing 
purposes, and carboni ing and briquetting 
methods for utilising the slack which forms 
so large and so unmarketable a percentage 
of the sub-bituminous and lignite run-of- 
mine in Eastern Alberta coal fields. The 
Industrial Laboratories of the University 
are equipped to conduct Chemical, Physi- 
cal, Assay, Coal, Cement and Concrete 
tests in connection with the industries 
and resources of the province. 

Alberta Seeks to Serve People at Large 

From the very outset the policy of the 
University of Alberta has been to serve 
not only the students in full time attend- 
ance but also to take the university to 
the people of the Province at large. The 
Department of Extension which was for- 
mally established before the first class in 
Arts had graduated, reaches the scattered 
communities of the Province not merely 
through circulation of travelling libraries 
and bulletins of information and debating 
material, or by visual instruction through 
lantern slide and motion picture exchanges, 
but also by sending out a special corps of 
lecturers to meet the requests of U.F.A. 
locals, Women's Institutes, community 
leagues, G.W.V.A. branches, church guilds, 
etc. Within the past year a more in- 
tensive programme has been carried out 
through the appointment of an extension 
lecturer in Economics, who conducts weekly 
classes in Economic Principles and Institu- 
tions under the auspices of the Edmonton 
and Calgary Trade and Labour Councils 



respectively, while short term courses in 
Agriculture and Economics are being given 
in March, for U.F.A. secretaries and dele- 
gates, both at Edmonton and Calgary. 
Perhaps the most far reaching, if least 
conspicuous service rendered by the De- 
partment of Extension is the information 
and reference material supplied in re- 
sponse to inquiries from every corner of 
the Province, ranging from League of 
Nations to hardening of the arteries. 

While the faculties of the prairie univer- 
sities have been recruited in representa- 
tive proportion from the older institutions 
of eastern Canada, United States and 
Great Britain there is perhaps a larger 
percentage of Canadians among the 
younger members than is to be found in 
the faculties of the Eastern universities. 
While most of them have taken their 
graduate training in American or British 
universities, they are finding through these 
new western universities an academic 
career in their own land, and contributing 
to them an atmosphere of keenness and 
solidarity. In Alberta the infectious en- 
thusiasm and outstanding leadership of 
President Tory, and the animated and 
largely attended monthly meetings of 
the Faculty Club, serve to engender an 
esprit and an intimacy amongst the staff 
members that is less easily attainable in 
larger institutions. Moreover the recent 
arrangement by which the Universities of 
Manitoba, Saskatchewan, and Alberta send 
each year an exchange professor to visit 
the sister institutions tends to establish a 
very desirable relationship among the 
prairie universities. 

For some time to come students of 
western universities must look to eastern 
institutions for their graduate work. Un- 
doubtedly the thoughts of most turn at 
present towards Chicago, Wisconsin, or 
Minnesota, with their greater "proximity 
and accommodating system of credits. 
With the development of advanced work 
in our Eastern Canadian universities, it 
is undoubtedly in the interests of Canadian 
unity that, as President Falconer recently 
urged, substantial fellowships should be 
made available to students of the western 
universities, for advanced work in the 
historic universities of eastern Canada. 



The Training of Architects 

A THOROUGH EDUCATION IN BUILDING CONSTRUCTION A