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University of Florida 



GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA 




Annual Catalogue 1926-1927 

Announcements 1927-1928 



CONTENTS P'STfl. 

PART ONE Y^^ ^^^ 

ADMINISTRATIVE AND EXECUTIVE BOARDS 3 

UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 5 

OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY 6 

COxMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY „ 17 

PART TWO 

GENERAL INFORMATION _ 18 

Historical Statement ~ _ - 18 

Location — - - 20 

Equipment '. — — ~ 20 

Recent Gifts — — — 28 

Income - - 28 

Government - - — 29 

Fellowships, Scholarships, and Loan Funds — - 39 

Honors ~ 42 

Alumni Association _ _ 43 

Student Organizations and Publications ..._ _ - 44 

Admission _ 46 

PART THREE 

ORGANIZATION _ 51 

GRADUATE SCHOOL 52 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 54 

School of Business Administration and Journalism _ 92 

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 109 

College 109 

Experiment Station „ „ _ _ 134 

Agricultural Extension Division ..._ _ - - 136 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND ARCHITECTURE _ 141 

School of Architecture _ _ 160 

COLLEGE OF LAW : „ 166 

TEACHERS COLLEGE AND NORMAL SCHOOL _ 177 

College _ _ -.r/.'.^u .'X.]^^.}....^S....^.^i...%l^^.. „ 177 

-Normal School, .il.'.:^....\....'i .'.....! ! .'...a..;,'..-..i'r— ••'•- 189 

University Summ,V StfiboL !..tl,...,.'._4'...... _ 193 

High School Visitation .ll..^^^Ljil.^ _ 195 

Teacher's Empj^oyment Eubh?W .J.. {.'.^..^LL.!, ' .•^l.^.C,. 195 

COLLEGE OF PHARMACY '....■. L.>:.r.:,...::.L^::..J. : Hi... - 196 

DIVISION OF ATHLETICS AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 208 

DIVISION OF MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS 211 

DIVISION OF MUSIC 215 

GENERAL EXTENSION DIVISION _ 216 

PART FOUR 

COMMENCEMENT _ „ 220 

LISTS OF STUDENTS 226 

SUMMARY OF ENROLLMENT 263 

INDEX ..._ „.._ _.._ 266 



fatoT 



PART ONE - OFFICERS 

BOARD OF CONTROL 

p. K. YoNGE, Chairman _ Pensacola 

E. L. Wartmann Citra 

Albert H. Blanding Leesburg 

W. B. Davis - Perry 

Edward W. Lane - Jacksonville 

J. T. Diamond, Secretary, Tallahassee 



STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

John W. Martin, Chairman Governor 

H. Clay Crawford _ _ Secretary of State 

J. C. LuNiNG - State Treasurer 

J. B. Johnson - Attorney General 

W. S. Cawthon, Secretary State SuperintendeTU of Public Instruction 



UNIVERSITY COUNCIL 

Albert A, Murphree, LL.D _ _ President of the University 

Jas. M. Farr, Ph.D „ Vice-President of the University 

Jas. N. Anderson, Ph.D „ Dean of the College of Arti and Sciences 

WiLMON Newell, D.Sc J)ean of the College of Agriculture 

J. R. Benton, Ph.D _ _ Dean of the College of Engineering 

Harry R. Trusler, LL.B _ _ ^..Dean of the College of Law 

Jas. W. Norman, Ph.D _ _ Dean of the Teachers College 

TowNES R. Leigh, Ph.D _ ^J)ean of the College of Pharmacy 



37'g^9 



. 1927 . 1 


. 1927 • 


. 1928 • 


• 1928 • 


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UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 

1927-1928 

1927 — June 14, Tuesday Summer School begins. 

August 5, Friday Summer School Commencement. 

September 12, Monday First Semester begins. 

October 1, Saturday, 2:00 p. m Re-examinations. 

2:00 p. m Meeting of General Faculty, 

October 3-8 Annual Meeting of Extension 

Agents. 

November 11, Friday Armistice Day. 

November 24, Thursday Thanksgiving Day. 

December 16, Friday, 12:00 noon Christmas Recess begins. 

1928— January 3, Tuesday Resumption of Classes. 

January 28, Saturday First Semester ends. 

January 30, Monday Second Semester begins. 

February 4, Saturday, 2:00 p. m Meeting of General Faculty. 

March 3, Saturday, 2:00 p. m Re-examinations. 

May 26, Saturday, 2:00 p. m Meeting of General Faculty. 

May 27-29 Commencement Exercises. 

May 27, Sunday, 11:00 a. m _ Baccalaureate Sermon. 

May 28, Monday Annual Alumni Meeting. 

Class Day Exercises. 
Oratorical Contests. 

May 29, Tuesday. 10:00 a. m,..._ _ Graduating Exercises. 

June 12, Tuesday _ Summer School begins. 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY 



Albert Alexander Murphree, A.M., LL.D ...J'resident 

James Marion Farr, A.M., Ph.D _ Vice-President 



(Names listed alphabetically in four eroape.) 

James Nesbitt Anderson, A.M., Ph.D. (Hopkins) _ Language Hall 

Professor of Ancient Languages 

Frankun James Bacon, Ph.G., M.S., Ph.D. (Wisconsin) Peabody Hall 

Professor of Pharmacognosy and Pharmacology 

"Walter Herman Beisler, M.S., D.Sc. (Princeton) Science Hall 

Professor of Chemical Engineering 

John Robert Benton, Ph.D. (Gottingen) Engineering Building 

Professor of Physics and Electrical Engineering 

Alvin Percy Black, A.B Science Hall 

Professor of Agricultural Chemistry 

Lucius Moody Bristol, A.M., Ph.D. (Harvard) Peabody Hall 

Professor of Economics and Sociology 

Ollie Clifton Bryan, M.S., Ph.D. (Wisconsin) Agriculture Building 

Professor of Agronomy 

Paul Stuart Buchanan, A.M Auditorium 

* Professor of Speech 

LUDWIG William Buchholz, A.M Agriculture Building 

Professor of Education and School Management 
Counselor, Division of Rehabilitation, World War Veterans 

Owen Francis Burger, M.S., D.Sc. (Harvard) Expt. Station Building 

Plant Pathologist, Experiment Station 

Robert Spratt Cockrell, A.M., LL.B Law Building 

Professor of Law 

Madison Derrell Cody, A.M Science Hall 

Professor of Botany and Bacteriology 

Clifford Waldorf C^iandall, B.S., LL.B Law Building 

Professor of Law 

Charles Langley Crow, A.M., Ph.D. (Gottingen) language Hall 

Professor of German and Spanish 

Hasse Octavius Enwall, S.T.B., Ph.D. (Boston) „ Peabody Hall 

Professor of Philosophy and Psychology 



"Tenure of rank begins September, 1927. 



OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY 7 

Henry Clay Evans, Jr., Ph.D. (Columbia) Language Hall 

Professor of History 

James Marion Farr, A.M., Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins) Language Hall 

Professor of English Language and Literature 

Wilbur Leonidas Floyd, M.S Agriculture Building 

Professor of Horticulture 
Assistant Dean, College of Agriculture 

Joseph Richard Fulk, A.M., Ph.D. (Nebraska) Peabody Hall 

Professor of Education 

James Gh^liam Gee, B.S Peabody Hall 

Professor of Agricultural Education 

F. Archibald Gilfillan, Ph.C, B.S., Ph.D. (Yale) Science Hall 

Professor of Pharmacy 

John Gray, A.B., M.S Agriculture Building 

Professor of Entomology and Plant Pathology 

Lyman George Haskell, M.D Gymnasium 

Professor of Physical Education 

Fred Harvey Heath, B.S., Ph.D. (Yale) Science Hall 

Professor of Chemistry 

William John Husa, Ph.C, A.M., Ph.D. (Iowa) Science Hall 

Professor of Pharmacy 

James Miller Leake, Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins) Language Hall 

Professor of History and Political Science 

Townes Randolph Leigh, A.M., Ph.D. (Chicago) Science Hall 

Professor of Chemistry 

Earll Leslie Lord, B.S.A _ Agriculture Building 

Professor of Horticulture 

Benjamin Franklin Luker, A.M., Ph.D. (Columbia) Language Hall 

Professor of French 

Walter Jefferies Matherly, A.M Language Hall 

Director, School of Business Administration and Journalism 

Wilmon Newell, M.S., D.Sc. (Iowa State College) Expt. Station Building 

Director, Experiment Station and Agricultural Extension Division 

Clarence Vernon Noble, B.S., Ph.D. (Cornell) Expt. Station Building 

Agricultural Economics Investigator, Experiment Station 

James Wiluam Norman, A.M., Ph.D. (Columbia) Peabody Hall 

Professor of Education 



4040 



8 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

Melvin Price, E.E., A.M Engineering Building 

Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

Percy Lawrence Reed, C.E., M.S Engineering Building 

Professor of Civil Engineering 

Bert Clair Riley, A.B., B.S.A Language Hall 

Director, General Extension Division 

Joseph Roemer, A.M., Ph.D. (Peabody) Peabody Hall 

Professor of Secondary Education 

Frazier Rogers. B.S.A Agricultural Building 

Professor of Agricultural Engineering 

James Speed Rogers, A.M Science Hall 

Professor of Biology and Geology 

Rudolph William Ruprecht, A.M., Ph.D. (Mass. Agri. Col.) Expt. Station Bldg. 

Chemist, Experiment Station 

Nathan Willard Sanborn, M.D Agriculture Building 

Professor of Poultry Husbandry 

John Marcus Scott, B.S Expt. Station Building 

Vice Director and Animal Industrialist, Experiment Station 

Arthur Liston Shealy, B.S., D.V.M Agriculture Building 

Professor of Veterinary Science 
Veterinarian, Experiment Station 

Thomas Marshall Simpson, A.M., Ph.D. (Wisconsin) Peabody Hall 

Professor of Mathematics 

Dean Slagle, A.M., LL.B _ „ Law Building 

Professor of Law 

Arthur Perceval Spencer, M.S.A Expt. Station Building 

Vice Director, Agricultural Extension Division 

Albert J. Strong, B.S.M.E Engineering Building 

Professor of Drawing and Mechanic Arts 

Albert Whitman Sweet, A.M., Ph.D. (Brown) Science Hall 

Professor of Bacteriology and Director of Health 

George W. Thompson, LL.B Law Building 

Professor of Law 

Wiluam Burleigh Tisdale, B.S., Ph.D. (Wisconsin) Quincy, Fla. 

Plant Pathologist, in Charge Tobacco Experiment Station 

Arthur Charles Tipton, Major, Infantry, U. S. Army Engineering Building 

Professor of Military Science and Tactics 
Commandant of Cadets 



OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY 9 

Harry Raymond Trusler, A.M., LL.B Law Building 

Professor of Law 

John Edwin Turlington, M.S., Ph.D. (Cornell) Agriculture Building 

Professor of Agronomy and Agricultural Economics 

Leslie Morton Turner, A.M., Dr. (Paris) Language Hall 

* Professor of French 

Joseph Ralph Watson, A.M Expt. Station Building 

Entomologist, Experiment Station 

Rudolph Weaver, B.S., A.LA Peabody Hall 

Professor of Architecture 
Director, School of Architecture 

Claude Houston Willoughby, B.Ag., A.M Agriculture Building 

Professor of Animal Husbandry and Dairying 



OuiDA Davis Abbott, A.M., Ph.D. (Missouri) Expt. Station Building 

Home Economics Investigator, Experiment Station 

George Eric Barnes, B.S.C.E Engineering Building 

*Associate Professor of Civil Engineering 

Arthur Forrest Camp, Ph.D. (Washington) Expt. Station Building 

* Associate Horticulturist, Experiment Station 

Harley Willard Chandler, M.S Peabody Hall 

* Associate Professor of Mathematics 

Lester Colons Farris, A.M Language Hall 

* Associate Professor of English 

Benjamin Franklin Gaines, M.S Engineering Building 

* Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

Howard William Gray, M.S., C.P.A Language Hall 

* Associate Professor of Accounting 

William Byron Hathaway, B.D., A.M Peabody Hall 

*Associate Professor of Spanish 

Theodore Huntington Hubbell, A.B Science Hall 

* Associate Professor of Biology 

Vestus Twiggs Jackson, M.S., Ph.D. (Chicago) Science Hall 

* Associate Professor of Chemistry 

WiLBERT Alva Little, A.M Peabody Hall 

* Associate Professor of Languages and Mathematics 

William Sanford Perry, M.S Engineering Building 

* Associate Professor of Physics and Electrical Engineering 

* Tenure of rank begins September, 1927. 



10 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

Walter Petersen, A.M., Ph.D. (Yale) Language Hall 

* Associate Professor of Ancient Languages 

Charles Archibald Robertson, A.M Language Hall 

* Associate Professor of English 

George Frederick Weber, M.S., Ph.D. (Wisconsin) ExpL Station Building 

Associate Plant Pathologist, Experiment Station 

Joseph Weil, B.S.E.E., M.S Engineering Building 

* Associate Professor of Physics and Electrical Engineering 



Orland Kay Armstrong, B.J., L.B., A.M Language Hall 

Assistant Professor of Journalism 

Robert Marlin Barnette, B.S., Ph.D. (Rutgers) Expt. Station Building 

Assistant Chemist, Experiment Station 

Robert Colder Beaty. A.M ^ Y. M. C. A. Building 

Assistant Secretary, Y. M. C. A. 

Charles Edward Bell, M.S Expt. Station Building 

Assistant Chemist, Experiment Station 

Raymond William Blacklock, A.B Expt. Station Building 

Boys' Club Agent, Agricultural Extension Division 

Gulie Hargrove Blackmon, B.S.A Expt. Station Building 

Pecan Culturist, Experiment Station 

Francis Michael Brennan, Captain, Infantry, U. S. Army Engineering Building 

Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics 

A. Nelson Brooks, A.M., Ph.D. (Wisconsin) Plant City, Fla. 

Assistant Plant Pathologist, Experiment Station 

Hamlin L. Brown, B.S.A ExpL Station Building 

Extension Dairyman, Agricultural Extension Division 

Richard DeWitt Brown Auditorium 

Director of Music 

WiLUAM Angus Carver, M.S., Ph.D. (Iowa State Col.) Expt. Station Building 

Assistant Cotton Specialist, Experiment Station 

Harold Gray Clayton, M.S.A _ Expt. Station Building 

District Agent, Agricultural Extension Division 

John Melton Coleman, B.S Expt. Station Building 

Assistant Chemist, Experiment Station 

Eugene Woodville Cowan, A.M Expt. Station Building 

Assistant Chemist, Experiment Station 



♦Tenure of rank begins September, 1927. 



OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY 11 

Warren Cassius Cowell, B.S Engineering Building 

Assistant Director, Physical Education and Major Sports 

Clifford Austin Curtis, Ph.D. (Chicago) Language Hall 

Assistant Professor of Business Administration 

Ezra Franklin DeBusk, B.S _ Expt. Station Building 

Extension Citrus Pathologist, Agricultural Extension Division 

Martin Russell Ensign, M.S Expt. Station Building 

Assistant Horticulturist 

Silas K. Eshleman, Jr., M.E Engineering Building 

Assistant Professor of Drawing and Mechanic Arts 

Samuel Todd Fleming, A.B Expt. Station Building 

Assistant to the Director, Experiment Station 

Robert Cabaniss Goodwin, A.M Science Hall 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

Levi Otto Gratz, A.B., Ph.D. (Cornell) Hastings, Fla. 

Assistant Plant Pathologist, Experiment Station 

Edgar Frederick Grossman, M.S Expt. Station Building 

Assistant Entomologist, Experiment Station 

Warren Sneden Higgins, E.E., M.E.E Engineering Building 

Assistant Professor of Physics and Electrical Engineering 

Elmer D. Hinckley, A.B Peabody Hall 

* Assistant Professor of Psychology 

William W. Hollingsworth, A.M., Ph.D. (Pennsylvania)...- Language Hall 

Assistant Professor of History and Political Science 

James Horace Hunter, M.S Belle Glade, Fla. 

Assistant Agronomist, Everglades Experiment Station 

John Evander Johnson, B.D., A.M Y. M. C. A. Building 

General Secretary, Y. M. C. A., Instructor in Bible 

William A. Kuntz, A.M Lake Alfred, Fla. 

Assistant Plant Pathologist, Citrus Experiment Station 

Walter Anthony Leukel, B.S.A., Ph.D. (Wisconsin) Expt. Station Building 

Assistant Grass and Forage Crops Investigator, Experiment Station 

Norman Ripley Mehrhof, B.S _ Expt. Station Building 

Extension Poultryman, Agricultural Extension Division 

Cora Miltimore, B.S Library Building 

Librarian 



'Tenure of rank begins September, 1927. 



12 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



Harold Mowry Expt. Station Building 

Assistant Horticulturist, Experiment Station 

Bruce McKinley, B.S.A Expt. Station Building 

Assistant Agricultural Economics Investigator, Experiment Station 

Cecil G. Phipps,* A.M Peabody Hall 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

Ford L. Prescott, M.E Engineering Building 

Assistant Professor of Physics and Electrical Engineering 

Franklin Embry Poindexter, Ph.D. (Washington Univ.) Engineering Building 

Assistant Professor of Physics and Electrical Engineering 

William Andrew Rawls, Jr., Captain, Infantry, U. S. Army Engineering Building 

Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics 

Arthur Stevens Rhoads, M.S., Ph.D. (Syracuse) Cocoa, Fla. 

Assistant Plant Pathologist, Experiment Station 

DoRSEY Addren Sanders, B.S., D.V.M Expt. Station Building 

Assistant Veterinarian, Experiment Station 

James Lewis Seal, M.S Expt. Station Building 

Assistant Plant Pathologist, Experiment Station 

Harold Leonidas Sebrtng, B.S Engineering Building 

Assistant Director, Physical Education and Major Sports 

Harley Bakewell Sherman, M.S Science Hall 

Assistant Professor of Biology 

Elizabeth Skinner, A.B Y. M. C. A. Building 

Assistant Secretary, Y. M. C. A. 

Stanley Simonds, Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins) Language Hall 

Lecturer on Roman Law 

Samuel Asa Small, A.M., Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins) Language Hall 

Assistant Professor of English 

Jesse Lee Smith Expt. Station Building 

District Agent, Agricultural Extension Division 

William Eugene Stokes, M.S Expt. Station Building 

Grass and Forage Crops Investigator, Experiment Station 

Archie N. Tissot, M.Sc Expt. Station Building 

Assistant Entomologist, Experiment Station 

Thompson Van Hyning Science Hall 

Director, Florida State Museum 

Clayton Seareska Whitehead, Captain, Infantry, U. S. Army....Engineering Building 
Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics 



♦Absent on leave, 1927-1928. 



OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY 13 

M. M. Walker, M.S., Ph.D. (Wisconsin) Expt. Station Building 

Assistant Cotton Specialist 

Everett Marion Yon, Captain, Infantry, U. S. Army Engineering Building 

Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics 



Charles E. Abbott, B.S.A Jnstructor in Horticulture 

R. V. Allison, Ph.D Soils Specialist, Everglades Experiment Station, Belle Glade 

Charles H. Bell Sergeant, Inf. U. S. A., Instructor in M. S. 

O. M. Berg, B.S Assistant Chemist 

Homer E. Bratley, M.S.A Assistant in Entomology, Expt. Station 

Alvin L. Browne Assistant in Major Sports 

F. W. Brumley _ _ Instructor in Economics 

Joseph S. Bueno, A.M Instructor in Spanish 

E. Walter Burkhardt, A.M Instructor in Architecture 

Alfred F. Cooke, Jr., B.S. „ Jnstructor in Horticulture 

J. Francis Cooper, B.S.A. 

— Editor, Experiment Station and Agricultural Extension Division 

Mrs. Ida Keeling Cresap Librarian, Experiment Station 

Raymond Crown Field Assistant in Plant Physiology, Expt. Station 

James W. Day, B.S., A.M Instructor in Business Law 

John W. DeBruyn, A.M ..Instructor in Voice 

John G. Eldridce, A.M ' Instructor in Economics 

Lyman D. Fonda, B.S Instructor in Pharmacy 

William A. Fuller, A.M Instructor in History and Political Science 

Leonard W. Gaddum, Ph.D Assistant in Home Economics 

Frank C. Gilson, B.S Instructor in Architecture 

James D. Glunt, A.B Instructor in History and Political Science 

Fred T. Hannaford, A.B Instructor in Architecture 

Stacy Hawkins, A.B J'ield Asst. in Plant Pathology, Homestead, Fla. 

Dallas B. Hundley, Sergt. U. S. Army Instructor in Military Science and Tactics 

Margaret Johnson _ Assistant Librarian 

David G. A. Kelbert, B.S.A Field Assistant in Plant Pathology, Bradenton, Fla. 

WiLLMM D. Klinepeter, Sergt., U. S. Army-Instructor in Military Science and Tactics 

Joseph Harrison Kusner, A.B _ Instructor in Mathematics 

John P. Little, B.S.E.E,, M.S Instructor in Physics and Electrical Engineering 

Kennneth W. Loucks, B.S _ Asst. in Plant Pathology, Expt. Station 

Thomas Marvel Lowe, B.S.C.E „ _ _ Instructor in Civil Engineering 

Kay McCallister, 1st Sergt., U. S. Army. ...Instructor in Military Science and Tactics 

Freeman G. Martin, M.S Instructor in Dairying 

Charlotte Newton, A.B _ „ Assistant Librarian 

Robert E. Nolen, M.S.A ^55/. in Plant Pathology, Expt. Station 



14 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

Burton J. H. Otte, A.B _ ~ Curator in Chemistry 

Merton Ogden Phillips, A.M ^.Instructor in Economics 

A. P. PiERSON, B.S - Jnstructor in Physical Education 

Arnold R. Southwell, B.S _ ~ -...Instructor in Architecture 

EIrnst T. Stuhr, B.S „ Instructor in Pharmacognosy 

Ross F. Wadkins, M.S .....Field Asst., Everglades Expt. Station (Belle Glade) 

Edgar Smith Walker, Colonel, U. S. Army (Retired) 

— Instructor in Drawing and Descriptive Geometry 

Erdman West, B.S Assistant in Plant Pathology, Expt. Station 

J. Hooper Wise, A.M _ _ Instructor in English 

OTHER OFFICERS 

Klein H. Graham - business Manager 

Ethel Lorraine Cowan _ _ Registrar 

James B. Goodson _ _ Cashier and Bookkeeper 

HuBER C. Hurst, A.B .Auditor 

Robert T. Irving Supt. of Buildings 

Ruth Adair .Secretary, School of Architecture 

Madge F. Baker _ _ Secretary to Business Manager 

Pauline Collins - Assistant to Cashier 

Ruth Harris _ Secretary to Registrar 

J. H. Jefferies -...Supt. Citrus Experiment Station, Lake Alfred, Fla. 

Priscilla McCall Kennedy ....Secretary and Librarian, College of Law 

A. W. Leland _ Farm Foreman, College of Agriculture 

Myra McMillan _ Secretary, College of Pharmacy 

Rachel Thompson McQuarrie _ _ Assistant to Auditor 

Ruby Newhall Secretary of Experiment Station 

Mary Evelyn Parrott Secretary to the President 

Jesse Reeves Foreman, Tobacco Experiment Station, Quincy, Fla. 

Elizabeth Rountree, B.S Secretary, Teachers College 

Mrs. G. M. Sessions _ _ _ Secretary, College of Engineering 

Eleanor G. Shaw Secretary, College of Agriculture 

George E. Tedder loreman. Everglades Expt. Station, Belle Glade, Fla. 

Robert T. Turner.- Mechanician, College of Engineering 

Lillian Whitley _ .Secretary, College of Arts and Sciences 

Henry Zeicler _ -...Farm Foreman, Experiment Station 

Mrs. B. G. McGarrah _ Dietitian, Commons 

Mrs. J. F. Badger _ _ Asst. to Dietitian, Commons 

Mrs. M. Peeler ..._ -...Housekeeper, Dormitories 

Miss H. Rathburn „ Chief Clerk, Bookstore 

Miss M. Swearingen Asst. Clerk, Bookstore 



OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY 



15 



HOSPITAL STAFF 

Albert W. Sweet, Ph.D „_ _.._ Director of Health 

George C. Tillman, M.D._ _ -...University Physician 

James Maxey Dell, M.D _ Consulting Physician 

DeWitt T. Smith, M.D Consulting Physician 

Rosa Grimes, R.N. ._ _ _ _ liurse in Charge of Infirmary 

Etta J. Dickey, R.N.„ _ ^..Assistant Nurse 



GENERAL EXTENSION DIVISION 

Headquarters, Language Hall 

B. C. Riley, A.B., B.S.A _ Director 

Burton W. Ames, B.S.A _ Reading Courses 

Ella M. Aluson, Ph.B _ _ _ Review Courses 

Alice L. Allison, A.B ^Mathematics 

Earl C. Beck, A.M _ _ _ English 

Orton W. Boyd, A.M Commercial Courses 

Maude Beatrice Davis, A.B Heading Courses 

Mary Ellen Foley, A.B., B.J „ English 

James D. Glunt, A.B _ _ „„ _ _ Jiistory 

Albert R. Halley, A.M., Ph.D English and German 

Nina McAllister Harris, A.B _ _ Speech 

Henry C. Johnson, B.S.E „ _.._ _ Civil Service 

Julia Annette Keeler, B.S _ _ .....Industrial Art 

David F. McDowell, A.B ^...French and Spanish 

Paul T. Manchester, A.M _ Spanish 

W. S. Middleton, A.B _ Jrench 

Mrs. Joseph Roemer, B.S _ _ Elementary Education 

Ralph Stoutamire, B.S.A _„ Journalism 

Louise E. Tewksbury „ Music 



16 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



SUMMER SCHOOL, 1926 

(In addition to 35 members of the regular faculty.) 

Clarence A. Ackley, A.M _ Education 

Charles Forrest Allen, A.M _ Secondary Education 

Mrs. Mabel F. Altstetter Mementary Education 

Ralph E. Barnes, M.D Public Health 

Miss Georgia Borger, B.S Biology 

Fritz W. Buchholz, A.B _ Latin 

Mrs. Alice Bingham Carrier Elementary Education 

Miss Ruth Cazier Public School Music 

Miss Katherine J. Densford, A.M., R.N Nursing Education 

J. D. Falls, Ph.D Secondary Education 

Miss Myrtle Farnham J'rimary Education 

W. L. Goette, B.S Director Employment Bureau 

Murphy Roy Hinson, M.S Child Psychology 

Mrs. Louise H. Mahan _ -...Demonstration School 

Mrs. Willia A. Metcalfe Pedagogy 

Claude Murphree Organist 

1. R. Obenchain, B.S - Tests and Measurements 

Mrs. J. Reid Ramsay, A.B English 

Miss Lucy Salter, B.P _ Drawing and Industrial Arts 

Miss Mary Sheppard, A.M : English 

G. Ballard Simmons, A.M History 

Mrs. T. J. Smart, A.M Ulementary Education 

Miss Mabel E. Swanson, A.M Health Education 

Mrs. Lila Terhune -...Social Case Work 

Miss Ruth Upson Demonstration School 

Richard W. Van Brunt, A.B _ Mathematics 

JUDSON B. Walker, A.B.E Mathematics 

Mrs. Florence V. Watkins _ _ J*arent-Teacher Association 



OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY 17 

FACULTY COMMITTEES 

The President of the University is a member ex-officio of all Committees 



ADMISSION 

Professors Simpson, Fuller, Hubbell, Petersen, Robertson, Roemer, Turner. 

ALUMNI 

Professors Floyd, Abbott, Hathaway, Hamilton, Hinckley, Prescott, Strong. 

ATHLETICS 

Professors Reed, Armstrong, Gee, F. Rogers, Tipton, Whitehead, Yon. 

Alumni Representatives: Harry Wells, Chipley, Florida; Stanton Walker, Jacksonville, 

Florida; J. Rex Farrior, Tampa, Florida. 

BUILDINGS 

Professors Weaver, Barnes. Higgins, Gaines, Phillips, Strong. 

CAMPUS SANITATION 

Professors Sweet, Cody, Haskell, Jackson, Kusner, J. S. Rogers. 

DISCIPLINE 

Professors Crandall, Enwall, Price, Tipton, Walker. 

FOREIGN STUDENTS 

Professors Crow, Buchholz, Bueno, Luker. 

GRADUATE WORK 

Professors Anderson, Benton, Farr, Leigh, Newell, Norman, Trusler. 

LIBRARY 

Professors Leake, Enwall, Farr, Husa, Miltimore, Price, Turlington. 

MILITARY AFFAIRS 

Professors Shealy, Beisler, Black, Brennan, Bryan, Whitehead. 

PUBLIC DEBATING 

Professors Bristol, Bacon, Buchanan, Eldridge, Farris, Hollingsworth, 

Slagle, Thompson. 

PUBLICITY 

Professors Riley, Armstrong, W. A. Little, Sharpe, Sherman. 

PUBLIC FUNCTIONS 

Professors Lord, Brown, Bueno, J. Gray, Phipps, Rawls, Weil. 

SCHEDULE 

Professors Chandler, H. W. Gray, J. P. Little, Lowe, Perry, Tipton. 

SELF-HELP 

Professors Turlington, Eshleman, Fulk, Goodwin, Martin, Sanborn. 

STUDENT FUNCTIONS 

Professors Cockrell, Buchholz, Curtis, Gaines, Gilfillan, Johnson. 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 

(1) Alligator: Professors Trusler, Benton, Crow, Farr. 

(2) Other Publications: Professors Farr, Robertson, Simpson. 

UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS 

Professors Small, Heath, Willoughby, Fulk, Evans. 



18 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



PART TWO-GENERAL INFORMATION 



HISTORICAL STATEMENT 

Florida has always shown a deep interest in higher education, hav- 
ing formulated many plans and established a number of institutions. As 
early as 1824 the foundation of a university was discussed by the Legis- 
lative Council. In 1836 trustees were named for a proposed university, 
but apparently nothing was accomplished. (Memoirs of Florida, 1,168. J 

Upon its admission to the Union in 1845, the State was granted by the 
General Government nearly a hundred thousand acres of land, the pro- 
ceeds from which were to be used to establish two seminaries, one east 
and one west of the Suwannee River. This led to the foundation of the 
East Florida Seminary at Ocala in 1852, and of the West Florida Seminary 
at Tallahassee, in 1856. The East Florida Seminary was moved to Gaines- 
ville in 1866. 

The State Constitution of 1868 contained provisions for establishing 
and maintaining a university (Art. VIII, Sec. 2), and the next year the 
Legislature passed "An Act to Establish a Uniform System of Common 
Schools and a University". Other attempts to establish a university were 
made in 1883 by the State Board of Education and in 1885 by the Legis- 
lature. The State Constitution of 1885 also expressly permitted special 
legislation with regard to a university. 

Meanwhile, in 1870, the Legislature passed "An Act to Establish the 
Florida Agricultural College". As this did not fully meet the terms 
of the "Land-Grant College" Act of Congress of 1862, the Legislature 
passed a supplementary Act in 1872 and the State then received from the 
General Government ninety thousand acres of land in support of the pro- 
posed college. A site was selected in 1873, in 1875 and again in 1883 — 
the third being at Lake City, and in the fall of 1884 the work of instruc- 
tion was begun. 

In 1887 the Florida Agricultural Experiment Station was established 
as a department of the College, under the terms of the Hatch Act of Con- 
gress. The name of the College was changed by Legislative Act of 1903 
to the University of Florida. 

During these years, in addition to the two Seminaries and the Uni- 
versity, there had come into existence three other State institutions of 
higher education, the State Normal School at DeFuniak Springs, the 



HISTORICAL STATEMENT 19 

South Florida Military College at Bartow, and the Agricultural Institute 
in Osceola County. 

Inasmuch as these six institutions failed to make satisfactory differ- 
entiation among themselves and to separate their work sufficiently from 
that of the high schools of the State, and as the cost of maintaining all 
seemed disproportionate to the results obtained, the Legislature of 1905 
passed the "Buckman Act", the effect of which was to merge the six 
schools into two, the "Florida Female College" and the "University of the 
State of Florida". In 1909, the Legislature changed the names to the 
"Florida State College for Women," and the "University of Florida". 

During the first session of the University a distinct Normal School 
was maintained, including two years of sub-freshman grade. Instruction 
was given in agriculture and engineering, as well as the usual collegiate 
branches. Candidates were admitted to the freshman class after finishing 
the eleventh grade of high school. The Agricultural Experiment Station 
was a separate division, although the staff members gave instruction to 
students, and the President of the University acted as Director. The next 
year a special Director was elected, and the staff members were required 
to devote their entire time to Station activities. The Normal School was 
abolished and instruction in pedagogy was transferred to the University 
proper. Two years of sub-freshman work were, however, still offered. 

Upon the election in 1909 of Dr. A. A. Murphree as President, steps 
were taken to reorganize the University. The present organization dates 
from 1910. The College of Law was added in 1909, and the departments 
offering instruction mainly to normal students were organized into a Col- 
lege in 1912. In 1913 the present entrance requirements went into effect. 
The same year a Summer School was established at the University by the 
Act of the Legislature, and the Farmers' Institute Work of the Uni- 
versity was combined with the Cooperative Demonstration Work of the 
U. S. Department of Agriculture. In 1915 all the agricultural activities of 
the University were placed under the direction of the Dean of the College 
of Agriculture. 

When the United States entered the World War, the equipment of the 
University was placed at the disposal of the Government. During the 
summer of 1918 the College of Engineering was operated as the "Uni- 
versity of Florida Army School", for the vocational training of soldiers. 
At the opening of the session of 1918-1919, all the regular activities of 
the University were subordinated to the task of training men for the armed 
forces of the United States. On December 14, 1918, upon mustering out 
the Student Army Training Corps, the University again took up its reg- 
ular work. 



20 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

During the summer of 1919 the General Extension Division was estab- 
lished. The University also entered into contract with the United States 
Government to assist in the work of rehabilitating disabled veterans of the 
World War. 

In September, 1925, a School of Business Administration and Journal- 
ism was opened in the College of Arts and Sciences, and a School of 
Architecture in the College of Engineering. 

In the period following the World War the enrollment at the Uni- 
versity increased rapidly. Old buildings have become inadequate, espe- 
cially for the sciences where new and modern buildings are needed. The 
School of Pharmacy opened in September, 1923, and became the College 
of Pharmacy in 1925. A new chemistry building, to be known as the 
Chemistry-Pharmacy Building, began construction in 1926, to relieve 
crowded and inadequate conditions. 

A new Horticultural building will be completed in the fall of 1927. 

LOCATION 

On the 6th day of July, 1905, acting under powers conferred by the 
Buckman Act, the State Board of Education and the Board of Control, in 
joint session, selected Gainesville as the location of the University. Dur- 
ing the scholastic year of 1905-06, it was found necessary to continue the 
work of the University at Lake City. Since the summer of 1906 the insti- 
tution has occupied its present location. 

The advantages of Gainesville as the seat of the University are numer- 
ous. It is centrally located and easy of access; it has an exceptionally 
pure water supply, and a good sewer system; its streets are well lighted, 
shaded and paved. The citizens are energetic, progressive, and hospitable. 
The moral atmosphere is wholesome, and the leading religious denomina- 
tions have attractive places of worship. 

EQUIPMENT 
GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS 

The University occupies a tract of nine hundred and fifty-three acres 
situated in the western extremity of Gainesville. Ninety acres of this 
tract are devoted to campus, drillgrounds, and athletic fields; the re- 
mainder is used by the College of Agriculture and Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station. 

The University is one of the few institutions in the United States that 
made plans before laying the foimdation of a single building for all fu- 
ture development of the campus, as far as this could be foreseen. Con- 
sequently the campus presents a harmonious appearance. The liberality 



EQUIPMENT 21 

of the State has permitted the erection of substantial and attractive modern 
buildings as fast as they were needed. 

The present buildings are: 

The two Dormitories, Thomas Hall and Buckman Hall, brick and con- 
crete structures, three stories in height, sixty feet in width and three hun- 
dred and two hundred and forty feet respectively, in length. They are 
built in fireproof sections, each containing twelve suites of dormitory- 
rooms and on each floor of each section a shower-bath, lavatory, and 
toilet. 

Science Hall, a brick and concrete building of two stories and a fin- 
ished basement, one hundred and thirty-five feet long and sixty-six feet 
wide. It contains the classrooms and laboratories of the Departments of 
Chemistry, Pharmacy, Biology and Geology, as well as the Florida State 
Museum. 

The Agricultural Experiment Station Building, a brick and concrete 
structure of three stories and a finished basement, one hundred and twenty- 
five feet long and sixty feet wide. It contains the offices and laboratories 
of the Station, and offices of the Agricultural Extension Division. 

The Engineering Building, a brick and terra-cotta structure, three 
stories high, one hundred and twenty-two feet long and seventy-three feet 
wide, with two one-story wings. One wing is used for boilers and 
machine-shop, the other (one hundred and sixty-three feet long by forty- 
one feet wide) is used for wood-shop, blacksmith-shop, and foundry. 
The building provides offices, classrooms, laboratories, and drafting- 
rooms for the Departments of Civil, Electrical, and Mechanical Engi- 
neering, Mechanic Arts, Physics and Military Science. 

The Agriculture Building, a brick and concrete structure, three stories 
high, one hundred and fifteen feet long and sixty-five feet wide. It pro- 
vides classrooms, laboratories, and offices for the instruction departments 
of the College. 

The University Commons, a brick building of one story and basement, 
one hundred and fourteen feet long and forty-two feet wide, with a wing 
forty-nine feet long and twenty-seven feet wide. It provides a large 
dining-hall and kitchen. A wooden annex, one hundred and twenty feet 
long by sixty feet wide, is now used as Y. M. C. A. headquarters. 

Language Hall, a brick and stone structure of three stories, one hun- 
dred and thirty-ifive feet long and sixty-six feet wide. It is the home of 
the College of Arts and Sciences and provides classrooms and offices for 
the Departments of Languages, History and Political Science, Business 
Administration and Journalism, together with the administrative offices 



22 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

of the University. In the basement are the bookstore and the offices and 
presses of the Alligator. 

George Peabody Hall, Teachers College, erected at a cost of forty 
thousand dollars ($40,000), the gift of the Peabody Board of Trust. 
It is a brick building, three stories high, one hundred and thirty-five 
feet long and seventy-two feet wide. It provides for the Departments of 
Education and Philosophy, Economics, Sociology, Mathematics, Pharma- 
cology and Pharmacognosy, and for Teacher-Training Work. 

The Law Building, a brick and stone structure of two stories, one 
hundred and twenty feet long and seventy feet wide. It contains an audi- 
torium, model courtroom, lecture-rooms and offices, library, reading and 
consultation rooms, cataloguing room, and quarters for the Marshall De- 
bating Society. 

The Gymnasium, a brick and stone structure of two stories (one of 
which is mezzanine) and basement, one hundred and six feet long and 
fifty-three feet wide. It is heated by steam, is fully supplied with hot 
water, and is well lighted and ventilated. The main floor is used as an 
auditorium and gymnasium. A gallery extending around the whole room 
provides space for the spectators at gymnastic exhibitions. The base- 
ment contains rooms for the director and for University and visiting 
teams, and for lockers and shower-baths. 

Administrative Building. When completed it will be the outstanding 
architectural feature of the campus, and will cost $800,000. The first 
unit, costing $200,000, includes an auditorium which accommodates 
2,200 persons. In this magnificent cathedral auditorium is the great An- 
drew Anderson Memorial organ. 

Library Building. A brick and terra-cotta structure two stories high, 
one hundred and forty-six by one hundred and sixty-seven feet containing 
a large reference room, a reserve book reading room and offices. 

Chemistry-Pharmacy Building. This is a conveniently arranged, brick 
and concrete structure, and, when completed, it will be in the form of 
a hollow square 204' 6" x 145' 11". A portion of the center of the 
square will be occupied by the main stock room and the large lecture 
hall. The large lecture hall will have a seating capacity of 375 students. 
All class rooms, laboratories, and offices for the department of chemistry 
and the college of pharmacy will be located in this building. 

Basket Ball Court. A steel structure, one hundred forty-six feet by 
one hundred ten feet, with a playing floor sixty by ninety feet, will be 
ready for use in September. 

Barracks. During the World War period, the Vocational Unit erected 
two Barracks, each of two stories, sixty feet long and forty feet wide, each 



EQUIPMENT 23 

accommodating sixty men; and a Garage, one hundred and twenty feet 
long, well arranged for repair work. 

University Infirmary, One of the barracks buildings has been used 
as the infirmary for the students. Each year new facilities have been 
added until now the equipment is as complete as can be made in the 
present structure. Facilities include, modern operating room, wards, nurses' 
quarters, laboratory, consultation room, dispensing room, etc. It is hoped 
that within the near future a permanent and fully equipped building will 
be erected. 

Value. The value of the property used for the work of the University 
is $2,110,000. The grounds are valued at $190,000. 

UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 

The University Library contains about 50,000 volumes. New books 
are purchased as rapidly as funds permit, and many gifts are received 
each year. 

The books are classified according to the Dewey Decimal Classifica- 
tion. All students are encouraged to use the dictionary catalog, the in- 
dexes to periodical literature, and by free access to the shelves to become 
familiar with the books themselves. A taste for good literature is being 
developed in many students who before entering the University have not 
had access to a good library. 

As a designated depository of the United States government, the 
Library receives annually several hundred titles. In addition much valu- 
able material is received from the Various state universities, colleges and 
experiment stations. 

The Library receives about two hundred and eighty-five general and 
technical periodicals, the current numbers of which are to be found on 
the reading tables. The periodicals are bound as rapidly as the volumes 
are completed, and are particularly valuable for reference work. 
Through the courtesy of the editors a large number of the daily and 
weekly newspapers of Florida are sent to the Library for the use of the 
students. 

The University Library is glad to be of assistance to the teachers 
and high school students of the State. Under reasonable regulations 
books are lent upon request. When it is impossible to send the material 
desired bibliographies with suggested sources of material are gladly 
furnished. 

The library now occupies the first part of the first unit of the Library 
Building. The Building is a brick and terra-cotta structure forty-six by 
one hundred and sixty-eight feet, three stories in two. The main reading 



24 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

room is on the second floor and has a seating capacity of 336. The light- 
ing is semi-indirect with approximately ten foot candle on the reading 
tables. The room is completely equipped with electric fans to make it 
more comfortable in warm weather. The furniture is oak, finished to 
match the wood work in the building, and is standard library equipment 
throughout. The offices are on the second floor. The first floor is 
being used temporarily for a stack room, with tables and chairs to accom- 
modate sixty students. The Library is open Monday to Friday from 7:50 
A.M. to 10 P.M.; Saturday 7:50 A.M. to 5 P.M.; Sunday from 2 to 4 P.M. 

DEPARTMENT LIBRARIES 

The technical departments possess special libraries, housed in their 
respective buildings, but accessible to all members of the University. 

FLORIDA STATE MUSEUM 

By Act of the Legislature of 1917 the University was made the home of 

The Florida State Museum. The Act further provides for: 

A natural history and ethnological survey of the State; for scientific investiga- 
tions looking towards the further development of its natural resources for the collect- 
ing of material of scientific, economic and civic value, whether pertaining to the 
mineral, vegetable, and animal kingdoms or to the aboriginal tribes and the early 
explorations and settlements; for a library; and for traveling exhibits to be kept in 
circulation among the schools of the State. 

Adequate funds for carrying out all the provisions of this Act have 
not as yet been provided; but, largely through the generosity of some of 
our citizens, enough specimens and data are already in hand to permit 
the Director to announce that the museum is open from eight to five every 
day in the year. 

The Museum contains at the present time about five hundred thousand 
specimens, one-half of which have been carefully catalogued. Among the 
fifteen hundred accessions are perhaps most worthy of mention an her- 
barium of four thousand and eight hundred sheets presented by Dr. Sam- 
uel C. Hood, of Orlando; the R. D. Hoyt collection of more than eight 
hundred birds and four hundred sets of bird eggs; the John J. Ryman 
collection of more than two hundred birds and eight hundred sets of bird 
eggs; a complete collection of the mollusca of Alabama, presented by the 
late Dr. Herbert H. Smith, curator of the Alabama Geological Survey 
Museum; a large number of bird plumes, presented through Secretary 
Gilbert J. Pearson, of New York, by the National Association of Audubon 
Societies; and the "Loring Memorial Collection", presented by General 
Loring's heirs, Mrs. William Loring Spencer and Mrs. M. C. Royston, 
of St. Petersburg. This last collection is of great historical and artistic 
value, besides being intrinsically worth many thousands of dollars. The 



EQUIPMENT 25 

von Noszky collection, presented by Mrs. Rosa von Noszky, is now safely 
housed in the Museum. Colonel and Mrs, E. S. Walker of Gainesville 
have recently made important contributions. 

Other valuable donations can, it is believed, be announced soon. Even 
now much material of historic and artistic interest is under consideration 
for the Museum, and other negotiations are under way for securing large 
exhibits. 

In addition to the above the Museum has a fair collection of the 
mollusca of Florida, containing more than eighteen thousand specimens; 
about nine thousand Florida fossils; more than five hundred Florida 
reptiles; more than ten thousand specimens of stone implements and pot- 
tery of the aborigines of Florida; besides thousands of specimens of his- 
toric articles, minerals, etc. The library of the Museum numbers about 
five thousand volumes and pamphlets. 

Unfortunately, owing to the lack of rooms and cases, only a small part 
of this material is now on exhibition and of this but few specimens are 
arranged to the best advantage. 

Plans are now completed for remodeling the second floor of Science 
Hall and converting the entire floor into exhibitions. A plan for estab- 
lishing a Hall of Ornithology, for tlje birds of Florida is completed and 
work now under heafiwoy. .A,skJileJ, ariist ^^ijid^ preparator (Mr. 0, F. von 
Fuehrer, of Vienna) has been secured for ihi^.a^d ^iipilar work. 

,' \' L4^BORATORH:S, ' ' 

For the Laboratories' -and- other equipment of the College of Agri- 
culture, see that College. 

1. The Biological Laboratories are located in Science Hall. They are 
equipped with individual microscopes and other essential apparatus for 
each student in all the courses offered. In addition there is considerable 
equipment of special apparatus for use of the instructional staff and ad- 
vanced students. 

2. The Biological Station on Newnan's Lake, six miles east of the 
campus, is available for field work on the animals and plants of the 
region. The area about the station provides virgin or nearly virgin con- 
ditions of land and fresh-water life. Equipment for class and research 
work is provided. 

3. The Botanical and Bacteriological Laboratories are located in 
Science Hall. They are well equipped for undergraduate and to some 
degree for research work. Projects can be carried on at the Green House 
and at the Biological Station on Newnan's Lake on the plants of this 
region. 



26 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

4. The Chemical Laboratories are equipped with the apparatus and 
chemicals required for instruction in general, inorganic, organic, analyti- 
cal, physical, agricultural and industrial chemistry, and considerable 
special equipment which is necessary in the more advanced courses. 

5. The Psychological Laboratory, on the first floor of Peabody Hall, 
is well equipped for class demonstrations, and for carrying on experi- 
mental and research work. In addition to the apparatus for the regular 
experimental work, the laboratory is equipped for carrying on mental 
and physical tests in connection with the work in educational psychology 
offered by the Teachers College. 

6. The Physical Laboratories are equipped with apparatus for meet- 
ing the needs of undergraduate work in physics as usually given in the 
best American colleges. In addition to a lecture room on the second 
floor, the entire floor of the Engineering Building is devoted to this 
department, including a main laboratory, an electrical laboratory, an 
optical room, workshop and apparatus room, and several offices and 
store-rooms. 

7. The Dynamo Laboratory is located on the ground floor of the 
Engineering Building, and provides a floor area of 30 feet by 90 feet, 
including rooms accessory to the main laboratory. It is equipped with 
electrical machinery suitable . for ,tbe undergraduate work in electrical 
engineering which is oistomary in American engineering colleges. This 
laboratory has benefited by the generosity of a number of ipanufacturers 
of electrical appliances, who have kindly given or loaned miic'ri valuable 
equipment. 

The laboratory is equipped with special apparatus for the calibration 
of electrical measuring instruments, and is prepared to conduct tests for 
residents of this State at nominal charges. 

8. The Testing Laboratory has a 50,000-pound Riehle machine for 
testing the tensile, compressive, and transverse strength of materials, and 
a cement-testing machine with the necessary accessories. These machines 
are useful for testing materials used in road construction. 

9. The Hydraulic Laboratory is equipped with apparatus for use in 
connection with the undergraduate courses in Hydraulics. 

10. The Instrument Room contains three surveyor's compasses; three 
wye and two dumpy levels, and one precision level; two plain and five 
stadia transits, of which three are equipped with attachments for solar 
and star observations; four complete plane tables; one sextant; one 
aneroid barometer; one Price current meter; and the necessary rods, 
chains, tapes and minor instruments. Blue-printing apparatus also is 
included. 



EQUIPMENT 27 

11. The Drafting Room is equipped with substantial oak desks and 
possesses the necessary minor equipment to accommodate twenty-four 
students at a time. 

12. Shops. The Wood Shop is equipped with full sets of hand tools, 
benches and lockers for work and tools. The wood working machinery 
includes a surfacer, jointer, universal saw table, band-saw, mortiser, borer, 
disk Sander, four lathes and a universal grinder. 

The Machine Shop is equipped with an 18-inch Cady, a 16-inch Reed, 
a 16-inch Bradford, an 11-inch Star, and a Rivett lathe; a drill press; 
a Gray planer; a No. 1 Brown and Sharp miller; a Springfield shaper; 
a No. 2 Marvel hack saw; emery wheels; vises and tools. 

The Forge Shop is equipped with twenty-four down-draft forges, with 
anvil and a set of hand tools for each forge, six bench-vises, a trip ham- 
mer, punch and shear, drill-press, emery wheel stand and individual lock- 
ers for work. 

ATHLETICS 

The equipment for athletics has been greatly improved in the past 
few years, now including Fleming Field, with two football gridirons, a 
baseball diamond, grand-stand and new steel bleachers seating about 
8,000 people. Murphree Field is located near the Gymnasium, with an 
excellent cinder track and facilities for many outdoor sports. The new 
Basketball Court will have a maximum playing floor and will seat over 
2,000 spectators. New tennis courts have been added during the year, 
making a total of six. The golf links of the Gainesville Country Club 
are near the University farms. 

MILITARY 

Military equipment of a value of more than $100,000 is available for 
military instruction. A standard target range is located on the University 
farm. 

STATED OCCASIONS 

Commencement exercises are held in the spring after the termination 
of the regular academic year. As this occasion is formal, the usual col- 
legiate tradition is followed by members of the graduating class of wear- 
ing caps and gowns. These costumes are generally rented at a very mod- 
erate expense to the candidates. Since 1925, it has been mandatory upon 
the faculty to wear academic robes at all formal university functions. 

Since 1924, Dad's and Alumni Days have been celebrated each year 
in the fall on the University Campus. The purpose of the occasion is to 
let fathers and friends observe student life. 



28 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

RECENT GIFTS 

Many of the State educational institutions of the South — among 
them those of Florida — have in recent years received substantial gifts. 
The University feels confident that its friends will continue to help in its 
upbuilding. All gifts, of whatever nature or value, will be gratefully 
acknowledged, and used to the greatest possible advantage. 

The University will be glad to consult with prospective donors at any 
time, on methods of gifts or endowment, through trust funds, wills, or 
insurance. 

The Andrew Anderson Memorial Organ — ^The most useful gift in 
recent years is that of the late Dr. Andrew Anderson, of St. Augustine, 
who generously gave $50,000,00 for a pipe organ to be installed in the 
new University Auditorium. A Skinner organ that has few equals in the 
South has been erected on the Auditorium stage, and is used to splendid 
advantage at all assemblies of students and public occasions. The Uni- 
versity greatly regrets that Dr. Anderson died before having opportunity 
to see the completion of his gift but his memory will live long in the 
hearts of those who will be cheered and inspired by the power of music 
from this wonderful organ. 

Scholarships — No method of contributing to the spread of higher 
education is more beneficial than to make it possible for a worthy but 
poor young man to attend his state university. Such provision is a debt 
the present generation rightfully owes to posterity. The establishment 
of several scholarships is gratefully acknowledged; see pages 40 to 42. 

INCOME 

The annual income of the University, apart from Legislative appro- 
priations, is derived principally from the following Federal grants: (a) 
The "East Florida Seminary Fund" — about two thousand dollars ($2,000) ; 
(b) the "Agricultural College Fund" bonds — about seventy-seven hun- 
dred dollars ($7,700) ; (c) one-half of the "Morrill Fund"— twelve thou- 
sand five hundred dollars ($12,500) ; (d) one-half of the "Nelson Fund" 
— twelve thousand five hundred dollars ($12,500). The total income thus 
derived amounts to thirty-four thousand seven hundred dollars ($34,700). 

For the support of the Agricultural Experiment Station the Federal 
government makes three annual grants: (a) the "Hatch Fund", fifteen 
thousand dollars ($15,000) ; (b) the "Adams Fund", fifteen thousand 
dollars ($15,000) ; and (c) the "Purnell Fund", beginning in 1926 with 



GOVERNMENT 29 

twenty thousand dollars ($20,000) and increasing ten thousand dollars 
per year until the maximum of sixty thousand dollars ($60,000) per year 
is reached in 1930, and continuing thereafter. 

See also Recent Gifts, Fellowships, Scholarships, Loan Funds and 
Agricultural Extension Division. 

GOVERNMENT 

ADMINISTRATION 

Board of Control — The general government of the University is 
vested by law in a Board of Control consisting of five members from va- 
rious parts of the State, appointed by the Governor of Florida for terms 
of four years each. 

The Board of Control appoints the President and, upon his nomina- 
tion, elects members of the Faculties, directs the general policies of the 
University, and supervises the expenditure of its funds. The Board also 
prescribes the requirements for admission, with the advice of the Presi- 
dent and Faculties, and upon their recommendation confers degrees. 

President — The direct administration of all affairs of the University 
is in the hands of the President. 

Deans — As executive head each college of the University has a Dean, 
appointed from the Faculty of that college. These officers are responsi- 
ble to the President. 

University Council — ^The President and the Vice-President of the 
University and the Deans of the several colleges form a council of admin- 
istration, with the following functions: 

To lay out new lines of work, inaugurate new enterprises in general, and to 
prepare the annual budget; and to act as the judicial body of the General Faculty 
■on cases of general discipline not under the authority of the colleges, on new courses 
of study and changes in existing courses, bringing these matters before the Board of 
Control, and on questions of college action referred to it by any member of the> 
General Faculty. 

Faculties — The General Faculty includes all persons, except labora- 
tory and undergraduate assistants, engaged in the work of instruction 
in the University, Under the leadership of the President, it forms the 
governing body in all general matters of instruction and discipline. 

The Faculty of each college consists of those members of the General 
Faculty who give instruction therein. Under the leadership of the Dean, 
it forms the governing body in matters of instruction and discipline for 
the college. 



30 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

REGULATIONS 

Supervision — An Officer in Charge, occupying quarters in one of 
the dormitories, has immediate supervision of the general life of the stu- 
dent-body. 

Offenses Against Good Conduct — Any offense against good con- 
duct, in the ordinary meaning of the word, renders a student liable to 
discipline, whether or not a formal rule against the offense has been 
published. 

The following offenses will be treated with special severity: Disre- 
spect to an officer of the University; wanton destruction of property; 
gambling; having revolvers in possession on the University grounds. 

Hazing — No student will be assigned to a room in a dormitory until 
he has been matriculated and has signed the following pledge: 

"/ hereby promise upon my word of honor, without any mental reser- 
vation whatsoever, to refrain from all forms of hazing while I am con- 
nected with the University of Florida." 

Attendance Upon University Duties — Regular and punctual at- 
tendance upon University duties is required. A student who accumulates 
three unexcused absences from drill, or three consecutive unexcused ab- 
sences from any class, will be given a severe reprimand and his parent or 
guardian will be notified. Persistent absence from duties will cause the 
dismissal of a student from the University for the remainder of the 
academic year. Ordinarily twelve unexcused absences from duty in one 
semester, or two unexcused absences after a reprimand, will be considered 
as constituting persistent absence. 

Students and faculty are expected to attend the weekly assemblies 
at the Auditorium each Tuesday and Thursday. However, attendance of 
juniors, seniors and graduates may be optional on Thursday. Four un- 
excused absences from these assemblies per semester will endanger the 
student's position in the University. 

A student who finds it impossible to be regular in his attendance upon 
University duties, because of ill health or of outside demands upon his 
time, is requested to withdraw; but this does not in any way reflect upon 
his good standing. 

Intelligence Test — All freshmen are required to take an intelligence 
test early in the first semester. 



GOVERNMENT 31 

STUDIES 

Assignment to Classes — Every student must appear before the Dean 
of his college at the beginning of each academic year for assignment to 
classes. No instructor has authority to enroll a student in any course, ex- 
cept as authorized by the Dean of his college. 

Choice of Studies — ^The choice, subject to considerations of proper 
preparation, as to which one of the various curricula will be pursued rests 
with the individual student; but the group of studies selected must belong 
to one of the regular years in the chosen curriculum exactly as announced 
in the catalog for the year in which the student entered — ^unless special 
reasons exist for deviating from this arrangement. 

No applicant for a Bachelor's degree shall be allowed to make a 
change in the curriculum selected, unless such change be submitted to the 
faculty of his college at its first meeting in the semester in which the 
change is desired and be approved by a two-thirds vote of those present. 

Conditions — A student prepared to take up most of the studies of a 
certain year in a regular curriculum, but deficient in some, will be per- 
mitted to proceed with the work of that year subject to the condition that 
he make up the deficiency. In the event of conflicts in the schedule or 
of excessive quantity of work, higher studies must give way to lower. 

Quantity of Work — Minimum and maximum numbers of recitation 
hours (or equivalent time in laboratory courses) per week are prescribed 
in each college, according to the following table: 

Freshman-Sophomore Junior-Senior 

College Minimum Maximum Minimum Maximum 

Arts and Sciences 14 19 14 19 

Agriculture _ 18 25 16 23 

Engineering 18 23 16 21 

Law 15 18 15 21 

Teachers 17 21 15 19 

Pharmacy 18 23 16 23 

In all the above colleges, except Law, the basic training course of the 
Reserve Officers' Training Corps, amounting to two credit hours in the 
freshman and sophomore years, is included. 

Laboratory Work — Two hours of laboratory work are considered 
equivalent to one hour of recitation. 

Changes in Studies — A student once registered is not permitted to 
discontinue a class or to begin an additional one without written permis- 
sion from the Dean of his college, which must be shown to the instructor 
involved; and if he is undergoing military training, he will not be per- 
mitted to discontinue that work on account of transferring, within a par- 
ticular year, to a college in which military instruction is not compulsory. 



32 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

A student who has been registered for two weeks will not be permitted to 
make any change in studies, except during the first two days of the second 
semester, without the payment of a fee of five dollars ($5.00). 

Grades and Reports — Each instructor keeps a record of the quality 
of work done in his classes and monthly assigns each student a grade, on 
the scale of 100. This grade is reported to the Registrar for permanent 
record and for entry upon a monthly report to the student's parent or 
guardian. 

If the monthly grades of a student are unsatisfactory, he may be re- 
quired to drop some of his studies and substitute those of a lower class, 
or he may be required to withdraw from the University. 

Examinations — Examinations on the ground covered are held at the 
end of each semester. 

Failure in Studies — A final grade, based upon the examination and 
the monthly grades, is assigned for each semester's work. If this grade 
falls below 75, the student is considered to have failed and may proceed 
only subject to a condition in the study in which failure has occurred. 

A student who fails in more than fifty per cent of his class hours or 
who obtains an average grade less than 60 in all subjects for two consecu- 
tive months, will be dropped for the remainder of the College year. Stu- 
dents so dropped will be entitled to honorable dismissal, unless their 
failure is clearly due to negligence. Upon petition, such a student may, at 
the discretion of the President of the University and the Dean of his 
College, be reinstated upon such terms as to them may seem best. 

Re-examinations — A student who has made a semester grade of 60 
or more, but less than 75, in any subject shall be entitled to a re-examina- 
tion in that subject on the first Saturday of March, or of October; although 
a senior failing on an examination at the end of the second semester shall 
be allowed a re-examination during the week preceding commencement. 
Only one re-examination in any subject is permitted; in case of failure 
to pass this, with a mark of 85, the student must repeat the semester's work 
in that subject. 

Degrees — ^The special requirements for the various degrees offered 
by the University will be found under the general statement of the Grad- 
uate School and of each of the six colleges. The following regulations 
apply to all colleges: 

While pursuing studies leading to a degree a student must be registered in the 
college offering that degree. 

Two degrees of the same rank, as, e.g., B.S.C.E. and B.S.E.E., will not be con- 
ferred upon the same individual, unless the second degree represents at least fifteen 
year-hours of additional work. 



GOVERNMENT 33 

Special Students — Students desiring to take special courses will be 
allowed to take those classes for which they may be prepared. The 
number of such students in a college is, however, restricted to an extremely 
small per cent of the total enrollment. These students are subject to all 
the laws and regulations of the University. Special courses do not 
lead to a degree. 

The University permits special courses to be taken solely in order to 
provide for the occasional exceptional requirements of individual stu- 
dents. Abuse of this privilege, for the sake of avoiding studies that may 
be distasteful, cannot be tolerated. Accordingly, no minor is permitted 
to enter as a special student except upon written request of his parent or 
guardian. Minor special students must, except as provided for in the 
College of Agriculture, offer fifteen entrance units. 

As a rule the student will be required to pursue a regular course, even 
though he may expect to attend the University only a year or two. No 
student should come with the expectation that he will be permitted to 
register as a special student and take an irregular course to suit his own 
wishes. 

Adult Specials — Persons twenty-one or more years of age who can- 
not satisfy the entrance requirements, but who give evidence of ability 
to profit by the courses they may take, may, under exceptional circum- 
stances, be admitted as "Adult Specials". Such students appear before 
the Committee on Admission for enrollment and are not excused from 
Military duty; although, if more than twenty-two years of age, they may, 
under certain conditions, secure exemption. 

Classification of Irregular Students — Until all entrance credits 
have been satisfied a student shall not rank higher than a freshman; 
a student deficient in any freshman work shall not rank higher than a 
sophomore; and one deficient in sophomore work not higher than a junior. 
But a special student is not considered as belonging to any of the regular 
classes. 

When special students make up their deficiencies they may become 
regular students and candidates for a degree. 

ATHLETIC TEAMS, MUSICAL AND OTHER CLUBS 

Absences on Account of Athletics, Etc. — The members of regular 
athletic teams, of musical and of other student organizations, together 
with necessary substitutes and managers, are permitted to be absent from 
their University duties for such time, not to exceed nine days per se- 
mester, as may be necessary to take part in games, concerts, etc., away from 
Gainesville. All classwork missed on account of such trips must be made 



34 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

up, as promptly as possible, at such hours as may be arranged by the 
professors concerned. All drills missed, which so reduce the semester 
total that it averages less than three hours per week, must be made up be- 
fore semester credits can be given. 

Schedules — Schedules of games, concerts, etc., must be arranged so 
as to interfere as little as possible with University duties. Schedules of 
games must receive the approval of the Committee on Athletics; schedules 
of concerts, of dramatic entertainments, etc., the approval of the Com- 
mittee on Student Organizations. 

All regular games will be played under the rules of the Southern 
Intercollegiate Conference. 

Eligibility to Athletic Teams, Musical Clubs, Etc. — Any team or 
club representing the University must be composed exclusively of stu- 
dents in good standing. Negligence of duties, or failure in studies, ex- 
cludes a student from membership in all such organizations. 

No minor student is permitted to play on any regular athletic team, 
if his parent or guardian objects. A list of players and substitutes must 
be submitted to the Committee on Athletics before each game and must 
receive its approval. 

Finances — ^The general Faculty has made the following rules: 

All student organizations desiring to collect funds for any purpose whatsoever on 
the campus must, unless such organizations be under other Faculty control, first 
secure written permission from the Committee on Student Organizations. 

No profits are to be taken by the officers of any student organization that makes 
its appeal for funds on the basis of its being a University enterprise, except such as 
may be duly authorized by the President or by the Committee on Student Publications. 

At least once a year student organizations engaging in financial operations must 
have their accounts audited by the Committee on Student Organizations and must 
publish in the Alligator a statement of their receipts and expenditures. 

EXPENSES 

University Charges — Tuition — In the College of Law a regular tui- 
tion fee of forty dollars ($40.00) per year is charged every student; and 
an additional charge of one hundred dollars ($100.00) per year is re- 
quired of all non-resident students. In the other Colleges of the Uni- 
versity a student who is a permanent legal resident of Florida is subject 
to no charge for tuition; a student who is not a permanent legal resident 
of the State is required to pay a tuition fee of one hundred dollars 
($100.00) per year. During the year 1927-28 a special fee of ten dollars 
($10.00) will be charged all students registered in the School of Busi- 
ness Administration and Journalism and a fee of one dollar ($1.00) per 
semester-hour to other students who elect technical courses in this school. 



EXPENSES 35 

The burden of proof as to residence is with the student. Any student 
who registers improperly under the above rule will be required to pay 
the non-resident tuition, and also a penalty of ten dollars ($10.00) . 

Registration and Contingent Fee — This fee of seven and one-half 
dollars ($7.50) per year is charged all students; except those regularl;^ 
enrolled in the Graduate School, who pay a fee of five dollars ($5.00) 
per year. 

An additional fee of five dollars ($5.00) is required of students who 
enter after September 15th and February 1st, 1928. Registration is 
not complete until all University bills are paid, and any who fail to 
meet their obligations are not regarded as members of the University. 

Laboratory Fees — A small fee is required in advance for each course 
that includes laboratory work, to cover cost of consumable material, wear 
and tear of apparatus, and similar items. The amount of the fee varies 
with the different courses, in no case exceeding $6.00 per semester for 
any one course. 

A Breakage Fee of $5.00 will be required of each student using a 
locker and laboratory apparatus in the departments of Chemistry and 
Pharmacy. This deposit will be made at the Auditor's office, and refunds 
on same will be made once a year when the student has checked in his 
apparatus to the satisfaction of the department concerned. No charge 
will be made from this fee for materials used or for normal wear and 
tear, as this is covered in the general laboratory fee. 

Infirmary Fee— All students are charged an infirmary fee of six 
dollars ($6.00) per year. This secures for the student in case of illness, 
the privilege of a bed in the infirmary and the services of professional 
nurses and the University physician except in cases involving major oper- 
ations. To secure this medical service, students must report in person to 
the nurse in charge of the infirmary. The University physician will be at 
the infirmary daily from 12 to 1 o'clock for consultation and treatment. 
A fee of $5.00 is charged for the use of the operating room. Board in 
the infirmary is charged at the rate of one dollar a day, and a refund of 
fifty cents a day is allowed if the student has already paid board at the 
Commons. All students will be given a careful physical examination at 
the beginning of the session, and such advice given as may seem best in 
each case. 

StudeiU Activity Fee — This fee of twenty-six dollars and twenty-five 
cents ($26.25), payable on entrance, was voted by the students and ap- 
proved by the Board of Control. These funds are used to foster and 
maintain athletic sports, student publications, literary and debating so- 
cieties, and other student activities. All students are required to pay this 



36 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

fee; except that students regularly enrolled in the Graduate School may 
be excused if they do not wish to participate in any of the student privi- 
leges covered by this fee. 

Diploma Fee — A diploma fee of five dollars ($5.00), payable on or 
before April 1st of the year of graduation, is charged all candidates for 
degrees. 

Refunds — No refunds of any fees will be made after three days from 
date of the student's registration. The Auditor is not permitted to extend 
credit on fees. Positively no exceptions will be made to this rule of the 
Board of Control. 

Student Employees — Students who are assigned to student service will 
be required to pay their fees at the beginning of the semester in cash; 
and at the end of the semester, or at such time as the service to which they 
are assigned is completed, the University will pay them in cash for the 
work done. 

Living Expenses — Board and Lodging — Board, lodging and janitor 
service will be furnished by the University at a cost of eighty-seven dol- 
lars and fifty cents ($87.50) per semester (not including the Christmas 
vacation) . To take advantage of this rate, payment must be made at the 
beginning of each semester. No refund will be made for less than a 
month's absence. When not engaged by the semester, board and lodging 
will be furnished, if paid monthly in advance, according to the following 
schedule: 

First Semester Second Semester 

Sept. 12 to Oct. 12 $22.50 Feb. 1 to Feb. 28 $22.50 

Oct. 12 to Nov. 12 22.50 Mar. 1 to Mar. 31 22.50 

Nov. 12 to Dec. 16 25.00 April 1 to AprU 30 „ 22.50 

Jan. 3 to Jan. 31 21.00 May 1 to June 1 22.50 

Under Board and Lodging are included meals in the commons and 
room, with heat, light, janitor service, and access to a bathroom. The 
doors of the rooms are provided with Yale locks. A deposit of 50 cents 
is required for each key, which will be returned when the key is sur- 
rendered. Janitor service includes the care of rooms by maids, under the 
supervision of a competent housekeeper. 

OPENING AND CLOSING OF THE COMMONS 
The dining room will be open for the first meal on Monday evening, 
September 12, 1927. The last meal served for the scholastic year will 
be dinner on Tuesday, May 29th, 1928. Keep these dates in mind. 

All rooms are partly furnished and adjoin bathrooms equipped with 
marble basin and shower with both hot and cold water. The furniture 
consists of two iron bedsteads and mattresses, chiffonier or bureau, table, 



EXPENSES 37 

washstand, and chairs. The students are required to provide pillows, bed- 
ding, towels and toilet articles for their own use. 

Board without Lodging — Board without lodging will be furnished at 
the rate of $20.00 per calendar month, payable in advance. No part of 
this sum will be refunded. 

The University does not furnish lodging without board. 

Board and Rooms Near the Campus — Board and rooms in private 
homes of Gainesville may be secured at rates of thirty-five to forty-five 
dollars ($35.00-S45.00) per month, depending upon the accommodations 
and proximity to the campus. A large number of rooming houses, as 
well as cafeterias, lunch rooms and dining rooms are located within 
walking distance, and students may secure any class of accommodations 
they desire. The University Y. M. C. A. maintains a list of boarding and 
rooming houses near the campus and in the city, and will cheerfully 
assist students in securing a comfortable location. For copy of lists 
and advance information, address the General Secretary, Y. M. C. A., 
University of Florida, Gainesville. 

Books — The cost of books depends largely upon the course pursued. 
In the upper classes, the student is encouraged to acquire works of per- 
manent value, or reference manuals for use in the professions. Students 
of engineering need a first-class set of drawing instruments for use during 
and following their college course. 

SUMMARY OF EXPENSES 

The following table shows the minimum necessary expenses of a stu- 
dent in the different colleges, for laboratory fees and books. 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 
Freshman Year: Totals 

A. B. Course; Military fee $1.00; Books $25.00 $26.00 

B. S. Course; Military $L00; Chemistry $10.00; Books $25.00 36.00 

Pre-Medical; Military $1.00; Biology $7.00; Chemistry $10.00; Books 

$25.00 43.00 

Sophomore Year: 

A. B. Course; Military $1.00; Physics $3.00, or Biology $7.00, or Chemistry 
$10.00; Books $29.00 33.00 

B. S. Course; Military $1.00; Physics $3.00, or Biology $7.00; Books $32.00 36.00 
Pre-Medical; Military $1.00; Physics $4.50; Books $32.00 37.50 

Junior Year: Lab. work elective; Books $40.00 40.00 

Senior Year: Lab. work elective; Books $42.00 - 42.00 

THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

Freshman Year: Military $1.00; Biology $3.50; Chemistry $10.00; Hort. and 

Agronomy $2.00; Books $22.00 38.50 

Sophomore Year: Military $1.00; Chemistry $5.00; Entomology $3.00; Agrl. 

Sciences $5.00; Books $30.00 44.00 

Junior Year: Lab. work elective; Books $29.50 29.50 

Senior Year: Lab. work elective; Books $19.00 19.00 



38 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

Totals 
Freshman Year: Military $L0O; Physics $1.50; Surveying $3:00; Woodwork- 
ing $3.00; Drawing Instruments for 4 years $22.00; Books $2L00 $51.50 

Sophomore Year: 

C. E. Course; Military $1.00; Physics $3.00; Chemistry $10.00; Surveying 

$6.00; Books $22.00 _ 42.00 

E. E. & M. E. Courses; Military $1.00; Physics $3.00; Chemistry $10.00; 

Forge $3.00; Books $24.00 _ 41.00 

Ch. E. Course; Military $1.00; Physics $3.00; Chemistry (2) $20.00; Forge 

$3.00 ; Books $22.50 - 49.50 

Junior Year: Lab. work elective; Books $28.50 28.50 

Senior Year: 

C. E. & Ch. E. Courses; Lab. work elective; Books $42.00 42.00 

E. E. & M. E. Courses; Lab. work elective; Books $28.00 28.00 

THE TEACHERS COLLEGE 
Freshman Year: 

A. B. E. & B. S. E. Courses; Military $1.00; Books $25.00 26.00 

B. S. A. E. Course; Military $1.00; Biology $3.50; Chemistry $10.00; Hort. 

and Agronomy $2.00; Books $22.00 38.50 

Sophomore Year: 

A. B. E. & B. S. E. Courses; Military $1.00; Books $25.00 _ 26.00 

B. S. A. E. Course; Military $1.00; Biology $3.50; Agrl. Sciences $5.00; 
Books $30.00 ~ — . 39.50 

Junior Year: Lab. work elective; Books $25.00 „ 25.00 

THE COLLEGE OF PHARMACY 

Freshman Year: Military $1.00; Biology $10.00; Chemistry $10.00; Pharmacy 

$5.00; Books $25.00 51.00 

Sophomore Year: Military $1.00; Biology $2.00; Chemistry $15.00; Pharma- 
cognosy $10.00; Pharmacy $10.00; Books $25.00 _... 63.00 

Junior Year: Biology $5.00; Pharmacognosy $3.00; Pharmacology $5.00; 

Pharmacy $25.00; Books $25.00 63.00 

Senior Year: Chemistry $5.00; Pharmacy $17.00; Books $25.00 _ 47.00 

THE COLLEGE OF LAW 

First Year; Tuition $40.00; Books $60.00 $100.00 

Second Year; Tuition $40.00; Books $73.00 113.00 

Third Year; Tuition $40.00; Books $63.00 103.00 

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION AND JOURNALISM 

Freshman Year: Military $1.00; Special registration fee $10; Books $25.00 $36.00 

Sophomore Year: Military $1.00; Special registration fee $10.00; Physics 

$3.00, or Biology $7.00 or Chemistry $10.00; Books $25.00 - 39.00 

Junior Year: Special registration fee $10.00; Books $35.00 45.00 

Senior Tear: Special registration fee $10.00; Books $40.00 50.00 

The annual necessary expenses of the average Florida student would 
figure approximately as follows: 

Tuition $ 00.00 

Registration and Student Activity fees - 39.75 

Laboratory fees and Books, average .— 37.75 

Board and Lodging in Commons and Dormitory (if paid by the semester in 

advance - 175.00 

Laundry (about) 18.00 

270.50 



FELLOWSHIPS. SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOAN FUNDS 39 

Law students should add about S68.00 to this estimate to cover tuition 
and extra cost of books. 

All students who are not permanent legal residents of Florida will 
add to these estimates a tuition fee of one hundred dollars ($100.00). 
Cost of clothing, recreation and other incidentals are subject to the wishes 
of the individual. 

Remittances — All remittances should be made to the Auditor, Uni- 
versity of Florida, Gainesville, Florida. 

Opportunities for Earning Expenses— It is often possible for a stu- 
dent to earn a part of his expenses by working during hours not required 
for his University duties. 

A few students are employed as waiters, as janitors, and in other ca- 
pacities. Such employment is not, as a rule, given to a student otherwise 
financially able to attend the University, nor is it given to one who fails 
in any study. Application for employment should be made to Dr. J. E. 
Turlington, Chairman of Selp-Help Committee, Gainesville, Fla. 

Although the employment of students is designed to assist those in 
need of funds, the payment for their services is in no sense a charity. The 
rate of remuneration is no higher and the standard of service demanded is 
no lower than would be the case if the work were done by others than 
students. If a student employee fails to give satisfaction, he is discharged. 
Otherwise, provided the work does not interfere with reasonable success 
in his studies and provided he does not commit any breach of good 
conduct, he is continued in his position as long as he cares to hold it. 

Great credit is due those willing to make the necessary sacrifices, never- 
theless students are advised not to undertake to earn money while pur- 
suing their studies, unless such action is unavoidable. Proper attention 
to studies makes sufficient demand upon the time and energy of a student, 
without the burden of outside duties; such time as the studies leave free 
can be spent more profitably in recreation. 

FELLOWSHIPS, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND LOAN FUNDS 

Fellowships — In order to encourage young teachers to prepare them- 
selves further for their work, three Teaching Fellowships, each paying 
$200.00 annually, have been established in the Teachers College. Appli- 
cation for a fellowship must be made in writing to the Dean of the 
Teachers College or to the President of the University. It must show that 
the applicant is a college graduate and has ability to profit by the work 
offered, and must be accompanied by testimonials as to his character. 

A Fellow must devote himself to studies leading to the Master's degree 
in Education. He will be expected to teach four or five hours per week 



40 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

in the Normal School under the direction and supervision of the 
Teachers College. He may be called upon for minor services, such 
as conducting examinations, but not for anything that would interfere with 
his graduate work. 

L. P. Moore Fellowship — Established and maintained by Mr. L. P. 
Moore, of New York, in the interest of forwarding horticultural research 
in connection with the production of tung-oil trees and seed in America. 
Open only to graduates of a four-year agricultural course. Value, $750.00 
per year; may be held for two successive years. Application for this Fel- 
lowship should be made through the Dean of the College of Agriculture, 
University of Florida. 

Scholarships — Through the generosity of friends, the University is 
able to offer several scholarships. (See also College of Agriculture 
and Teachers College.) Application for a scholarship should be made 
to the President of the University and should be accompanied by a record 
of the student's work, statement of his need, and testimonials as to his 
character. To secure a scholarship: 

(a) The student must actually need this financial help to enable him to attend 
the University. 

(b) He must be of good character and habits and sufficiently far advanced to 
enter not lower than the freshman class. 

1. United Daughters of the Confederacy Scholarship — Established 
and maintained by the U. D. C. of the State at large. For a grandson of 
a Confederate soldier. Value $180.00. 

2. Kirby Smith Chapter, U. D. C, Scholarship — Established and 
maintained by the Kirby Smith Chapter, U. D. C, of Gainesville. For a 
lineal descendant of a Confederate veteran. Value, $90.00. 

3. Jacksonville Chapter, U. D. C, Scholarship — Established and 
maintained by the Jacksonville Chapter, U. D. C. For a lineal descendant 
of a Confederate veteran. Value, $180.00. 

4. Tampa Chapter, U. D. C, Scholarship — Established and main- 
tained by the Tampa Chapter, U. D. C. For a lineal descendant of a 
Confederate veteran. Value, $180.00. 

5. Katherine Livingstone Chapter, D. A. R., Scholarship — Estab- 
lished and maintained by the Katherine Livingstone Chapter, D. A. R., of 
Jacksonville. Value, $250.00. 

6. Knight and Wall Scholarship — Established and maintained by the 
Knight & Wall Company, hardware dealers, of Tampa. Value, $245.00. 
For full particulars, address the Superintendent of Public Instruction, 
Hillsboro County, at Tampa, Florida. 



FELLOWSHIPS, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND LOAN FUNDS 41 

7. Arthur Ellis Ham Memorial Scholarship — Established in 1919 
by Mrs. Elizabeth C. Ham, in accordance with the last will and in memory 
of her husband, Capt. Arthur Ellis Ham, a former student of the Uni- 
versity who fell in battle at St. Mihiel, France, on Sept. 14, 1918. Value, 
the income from a fund of $5,000.00. 

8. John B. Sutton Scholarship — Established and maintained by a 
loyal alumnus and former member of the Board of Control, Mr. John B. 
Sutton, LL.B., 1914, of Tampa, Florida. Value, $250.00. 

9. Loring Memorial Scholarship — ^Maintained by Mrs. William Lor- 
ing Spencer, in memory of her distinguished uncle. General Loring. 
Value, $250.00. 

10. /. B. Dell, Jr., Memorial Scholarship — Established by Mrs. J. 
B. Dell, of Gainesville, Florida, in memory of her son, James B. Dell, Jr., 
and awarded to a worthy student. Value, $300. 

11. Scottish Rites Scholarships — Maintained by the Scottish Rites 
Bodies of Jacksonville, Florida. Two scholarships, valued at $240.00 
each. 

12. Knights of Pythias Scholarships — ^The University hereby ac- 
knowledges its profound gratitude to the Grand Lodge of the Knights 
of Pythias of Florida, which by the establishment of twelve scholarships 
makes it possible each year for twelve young men to pursue their studies. 

Applications for one of these scholarships should be made to Dr. J. 
H. Coffee, Arcadia, Florida. 

13. Groover-Stewart Scholarships — ^The Groover-Stewart Drug Com- 
pany of Jacksonville, has indicated its interest in the University by the 
establishment of an annual award of a three-year scholarship in the Col- 
lege of Pharmacy, awarded on the basis of a competitive examination. 
The value of the scholarship is $1,000, one-third of this amount being 
paid each year to the recipient. Further information concerning the con- 
ditions of award may be obtained from the Dean of the College of 
Pharmacy. 

Loan Funds — The generosity of friends enables the University to 
lend a few needy students money with which to help defray their ex- 
penses. A joint note is required from the recipient of a loan and one 
responsible holder of property valued at not less than $1,000 over and 
above the exemption privilege. Interest on such loans is at the rate of 
7% and is payable yearly, but does not begin until the first of July after 
graduation, or until one month after a non-graduating recipient has sev- 
ered his connection with the University. The principal is to be repaid in 
annual instalments of $100 each, due at the time of interest payments. 



42 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

William Wilson Finley Foundation — See statement under College of 
Agriculture. 

State U. D. C. Foundation — Loan to a lineal descendant of a Con- 
federate soldier to an amount not exceeding $100 per year. 

Guffey Scholarship Fund — A loan fund available to advanced students 
of Philosophy and Ethics. Amount, $200 per year for each recipient 
Application for full particulars should be made to L. D. Householder, 
Gainesville, Florida. 

C. J. Hardee Scholarship Funds — A loan fund established by a loyal 
alumnus of the University, C. J. Hardee, LL.B., 1921, of Tampa, Florida. 
Amount, $350.00 per year. 

Rotary Loan Fund — The University here wishes to record its apprecia- 
tion of the great interest shown in higher education by the Rotarians of 
Florida, who have set aside a considerable sum of money to be used in 
making loans to poor boys who otherwise would not be able to attend 
college. This loan fund was not established in order to benefit the Uni- 
versity of Florida as such, but to advance the whole State by helping in 
the development of such of its youth as are capable of leadership. No 
action could be more patriotic, none more worthy of praise. 

Applications for loans should not be made to the University, but to 
the President of the Gainesville Rotary Club or to Mr. Ken Guernsey, 
District Governor International Rotary, Orlando, Florida, on or before 
September 1st. 

HONORS 

Phi Kappa Phi — A chapter of the Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi 
was established at the University during the spring of 1912. To be eligi- 
ble for membership a student must have been in attendance at the Uni- 
versity for at least one year, have been guilty of no serious breaches of 
discipline, have had at least three years of collegiate training, be within 
one year of finishing a course leading to a degree, and stand among the 
first five of the senior class of the University. The numerical grade which 
must be attained is based on all college work, wherever done, for which 
the student receives credit towards a degree. 

Medals — Medals are offered (1) to the best declaimer in the fresh- 
man and sophomore classes and for the best original orations delivered 
(2) by a member of the junior, and (3) by a member of the senior class. 
The contests are decided by public competition during Commencement 
week. The speakers are limited to four from each class and are selected 
by the faculty. 



ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 43 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

At the close of their Commencement exercises the class of 1906 or- 
ganized itself into an Alumni Association. All graduates of the University 
and the graduates of the former institutions who have had their diplomas 
confirmed by the University are eligible for "active" membership. Re- 
cently the Association's constitution was so amended that former students, 
who had attended the University as much as one academic semester and 
left in good standing without having received a degree, are automatically 
"associate" members. At the last annual meeting in June, 1926, the doors 
of the Association were thrown open to all friends of the University who 
desire to unite with this organization for the furtherance of this institu- 
tion and who now may become "sustaining" members by paying into the 
treasury a sum at least equal to active and associate membership dues. 

The Association holds its annual meeting during Commencement week 
at the University; and usually a business meeting is held on the occasion 
of Home-Coming. Most Association business is conducted by the Executive 
Council, composed of a board of eight men, two of which are the presi- 
dent and vice-president. This Council meets at infrequent intervals, each 
member paying his own expenses and giving his own time without remun- 
eration. The Association now employs a full-time executive secretary 
and maintains a suite of offices in the Law building. 

In the spring of 1926 the Executive Council undertook to raise 
$150,000 to build a swimming pool, complete the basketball stadium be- 
gun by the students, and encase the Dr. Andrew Anderson memorial pipe 
organ. Many discouragements have beset that effort, but the Council 
is determined to carry it through to a satisfactory finish, since the main 
objective of the campaign is to organize the alumni and arouse the gen- 
eral public as to the needs of the University. 

The Association is now publishing a monthly alumni periodical, known 
as The Florida Alumnus, the first issue appearing September 1. All de- 
siring further information pertaining to Florida alumni may secure same 
by writing to the Alumni Association, University of Florida, Gainesville. 

Officers for 1926-27 are: President, Raymer F. Maguire, '15; vice- 
president, Philip S. May, '11; secretary, Archer E. Carpenter, '21; execu- 
tive secretary and treasurer, Ralph Stoutamire, '19. In addition to 
Messrs. Maguire and May, the following comprise the Executive Council: 
Geo. R. McKean, '96; Paul D. Barnes, '20; F. M. O'Byrne, '13; Dr. T. Z. 
Cason, '08; Watt Lawler, 13; Romero M. Sealey, '11. 



44 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS AND PUBLICATIONS 

Organizations — Practically every interest of the student-body has a 
student-controlled organization, but with faculty supervision, for its 
support. Some of these organizations are mainly religious in character, 
some social, others purely literary or scientific; still others combine social 
with other features. Hence there are athletic clubs, in addition to the 
general Athletic Association of the University; associations of men who 
have distinguished themselves or who are greatly interested in some 
activity or study. 

NOTE: The general faculty has ruled that no social functions shall be given 
under the auspices of any student organization except with the permission of the 
Committee on Student Organizations. 

Athletic Association — ^This association, composed of the entire stu- 
dent body, has charge of all major and minor sports, under faculty 
supervision and subject to the rules and regulations of the Southern 
Intercollegiate Conference. 

Y. M. C. A. — The purpose of the Young Men's Christian Association 
is to provide a medium through which the highest ideals of education 
and religion may be expressed in terms of service. 

The program of the Association is planned to meet definite needs as 
these are apparent, including: 

a. Student Center — The Y Rooms are open every day in the week, and are 
furnished with magazines, daily papers, Edison, piano, telephone, 
games and other conveniences. 

b. Social Life — A definite effort is made to create a wholesome social 
life which may be participated in by every student. 

c. Religious Activities — Voluntary Bible study groups, special meetings, 
life work talks, church cooperation and conferences. 

d. Secretaries — Three secretaries having extensive experience with the 
problems of students are available at all times for counsel and help. 
There is no membership fee. The organization is supported by 

voluntary contributions, and any student may become a member by sub- 
scribing to its purpose. 

Fraternities — ^Twenty national fraternities have established chapters 
at the University; eight of these have already built handsome chapter 
houses for their members, and several others are renting homes near the 
University campus. The general work of the fraternities is controlled by 
the Pan-Hellenic Council, composed of two delegates from each organi- 
zation, supervised by a Committee of the Faculty. 



STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS AND PUBLICATIONS 45 

Honor societies or fraternities have been established in the Colleges 
of Agriculture, Engineering, Law, Teachers College, and in Debating, 
Chemistry, Military Science, Commerce, and Journalism. These organi- 
zations have high moral and inspirational purposes, and assist in de- 
veloping leadership and service. 

Literary and Scientific Societies — See description under General State- 
ment of each of the colleges of the University. 

Cosmopolitan Club — An organization of foreign students enrolled in 
the University, to promote helpful friendship and better understanding 
of American ideals and international relations. 

Honor Committee — In order to carry out the spirit of the "Honor Sys- 
tem", which has been in operation at the University for years, each class 
elects one of its members to represent it on the Student Honor Com- 
mittee. This committee strives in every way possible to promote among 
the students honesty in all their work and conducts a fair trial in the 
rare cases of breaches of the system. Its verdict is final, but is kept 
secret from all save those concerned. 

Debating Council — The Debating Council, composed of one repre- 
sentative from each of the Literary Societies, has general charge both of 
intersociety and of intercollegiate debates. Under its direction a debating 
contest is held annually between members of each of the colleges of the 
University, The winning team gains possession of the Faculty Loving 
Cup for the ensuing year; three successive victories entitle the successful 
society to permanent ownership. Certain inter-university debates have 
grown into a tradition. The home teams debate annually against teams 
from the University of South Carolina, the University of Tennessee, and 
the Louisiana State University. An annual debate is held by the College 
of Agriculture with the College of Agriculture of the University of 
Georgia. Those students desiring credit for work in debating must con- 
sult and make arrangements with the head of the Department of Speech. 
Masqueraders — This dramatic group fosters in its members an ap- 
preciation of the drama, and seeks to develop personal power in expres- 
sion. It stages annually at Gainesville, and at other points in the State, 
an original play. 

FOUR MUSICAL ORGANIZATIONS 

1. The Chapel Orchestra offers musical entertainment at many Uni- 
versity functions. Its organization is one of the largest in the South. Stu- 
dents with ordinary talent in the handling of orchestral instruments are 
invited to present their names for membership. 



46 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

2. The Glee Club is under the direction of a special teacher of vocal 
music. Programs are given on the campus and about the middle of the 
year a tour is made to nearby towns. Membership is selective. 

3. The Chapel Choir is a more recent organization, open only to 
those who have interest in voice culture. See the head of the Division 
of Music. No college credit is given for work connected with the Chapel 
Choir. 

4. The Military Band adds much to the effectiveness of parades. 
It makes several excursions during the year to neighboring towns. The 
instruments, valued at over $6,000, are furnished by the War Department. 

Publications — Beginning with the session of 1909-10 each junior (or 
senior) class has published an illustrated annual, known as the "Semi- 
nole". 

The "Florida Alligator" is a weekly newspaper owned and controlled 
by the student-body. Its editorial articles discuss University problems 
from the viewpoint of the undergraduates. It seeks the support of the 
alumni, who find in it the best means of keeping in touch with the 
University. 

ADMISSION 

Terms — A candidate for admission must present, along with his 
scholastic record, a certificate of good moral character. If he comes 
from another college or university, this certificate must show that he was 
honorably discharged. 

Age — No candidate under sixteen years of age (eighteen years in the 
College of Law) will be admitted. 

Vaccination — Every student preparing to enter the University should 
be vaccinated against small-pox; or bring a certificate of successful vac- 
cination within three years. 

Methods — ^There are two methods of gaining admission: 

( 1 ) By Certificate — The University will accept certificates only from 
standard Florida high schools, grouped by the State Department of Pub- 
lic Instruction under Classes A and B. Certificates will also be accepted 
from Florida high schools that are members of the Southern Association 
of Secondary Schools, and from any secondary school elsewhere which is 
accredited by its State university. 

The certificate must be officially signed by the principal of the school 
attended, and must be mailed or presented to the Committee on Admission 
on or before the date on which the candidate wishes to register. It must 
state in detail the work of preparation and, in the case of Florida high 
schools, that the course through the twelfth grade has been satisfactorily 
completed. 



ADMISSION 47 

Blank certificates, conveniently arranged for the desired data, will be 
sent to all high-school principals and, upon application, to prospective 
students. 

(2) By Examination — Candidates not admitted by certificate will be 
required to stand written examinations upon the entrance subjects. For 
dates of these examinations, see University Calendar, page 4. 

Limitation on Enrollment of Freshmen in Engineering — Pending 
the provision of enlarged facilities for instruction, the right is reserved to 
limit the number of freshmen admitted to the College of Engineering 
and Architecture to such number as can be properly accommodated with 
the present facilities. 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 

The requirements for admission are measured in "Entrance Units", 
based upon the curriculum of the high schools of Florida. A unit rep- 
resents a course of study pursued throughout one school year with reci- 
tation periods (two laboratory periods being counted as one recitation 
period) of at least forty-five minutes each per week, four courses being 
taken during each of the four years. Thus the curriculum of the stand- 
ard senior high school of Florida is equivalent to sixteen units. 

Admission to the freshman class will be granted to candidates who 
present evidence of having completed courses amounting to sixteen such 
units. In no case will credit for more than sixteen units be given for 
work done at a high school. 

A deficiency of one unit may be allowed, but this must be removed by 
the end of the first year after admission. For admission to the College of 
Arts and Sciences, the College of Engineering, and the School of Archi- 
tecture, however, no deficiency will be allowed in any required entrance 
units. These fixed requirements are: In the Arts and Science, for the A.B. 
course: 3 in English, 1 in History, 2 in Mathematics, 1 in Science, and 2 in 
Latin; for the B.S. course: 2 in a foreign language, or 2 in History and 
Science; a foreign language for the School of Business Administration 
and Journalism; in Engineering and Architecture: 3 in English, 1 in 
History, 4 in Mathematics, and 1 in Physics. 

Unless the examination be taken on the first Saturday in October of the 
same school year students who have registered for a University study 
will not be allowed to make up an entrance condition by examination in 
this subject. The University credit may, however, be used as a substitute 
for entrance credit, a three-hour course continued throughout the year 
counting as one unit. 



48 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

Distribution of Units — Seven specified units are required in com- 
mon by all the colleges of the University; other specified units are given 
below; the remaining units are elective. 

Units Required for all Colleges 

English 3 units 

History 1 unit 

Mathematics* (One unit must be Plane Geometry) 2 units 

Science 1 unit 

Additional units required: College of Arts and Sciences 

In A.B. Course, Latin 2 units 

In School of Business Administration and Journalism, One Foreign 

Language 2 units 

In B.S. Course, One Foreign Language, or History and Science.... 2 units 

Additional Units Required: College of Agriculture, Teachers College, 

and College of Pharmacy 

One Foreign Language, or History and Science 2 units 

Additional units required: College of Engineering and Architecture 

Mathematics! 2 units 

Elective Units — Seven elective units may be chosen from among the 
subjects regularly taught in a standard high school, although not more 
than four will be accepted in vocational subjects — agriculture, mechanic 
arts, stenography, typewriting, etc. Under exceptional circumstances prac- 
tical experience in engineering work may be accepted by the College of 
Engineering and Architecture in lieu of not more than four elective units. 

DESCRIPTION OF UNIT COURSES 

The minimum requirements for the specified units, and for the elective 
units most frequently offered, are as follows : 

Botany — One-half of one unit — Antaomy and morphology; physiol- 
ogy; ecology; natural history; and classification of plant groups. At 
least twice as much time should be given by the student to laboratory 
work as that devoted to recitation. 

* Students taking their work in the College of Arts and Science or in the School 
of Business Administration are urged to present not less than 3 units of Mathematics: 
1 in Plane Geometry, l^A in Algebra, and IV2. in Trigonometry. Unless Trigonometry 
is presented for entrance, it must be taken in addition to the regular course in 
Mathematics. 

fThe total requirements in Mathematics for the College of Engineering and 
Architecture are: Algebra, 2 units; Plane Geometry, 1 unit; Solid Geometry, ^2 
unit; Plane Trigonometry, ^2 unit. 



ADMISSION 49 

Chemistry (Physics) — One unit — Study of a standard high-school 
text; lecture-table demonstrations; individual laboratory work, compris- 
ing at least thirty exercises from a recognized manual. 

Engineering Practice — Four units — Regular commercial remunera- 
tive work in engineering, or in related subjects, will be considered for 
entrance credit only when recognized by the faculty of the College of 
Engineering and Architecture. The candidate must submit a written 
statement from his employer, describing the nature and quality of the work 
done and bearing the dates of the extent of employment. It will be esti- 
mated on the basis that twelve months of work constitute one unit. 

English — Four units — The exercises in Composition and the use of 
the Classics should be continued throughout the whole period of prepara- 
tion. No candidate will be accepted whose work is notably defective in 
spelling, punctuation, division into paragraphs, or idiom. 

(1) Grammar — English Grammar both in its technical aspects and 
in its bearings upon speech and writing. 

(2) Composition and Rhetoric — The fundamental principles of 
Rhetoric as given in any standard high-school text; practice in Composi- 
tion, oral and written. 

(3) Classics — The English Classics generally adopted by schools 
and colloges. 

(4) History of American Literature; History of English Literature — 
One unit — Supposed to represent the work of the fourth year in English 
in the high school. 

History — Four imits. 

(1) One unit — American History, with particular reference to 
Greece and Rome. 

(2) One unit — European History, since Charlemagne. 

(3) One unit — English History. 

(4) One unit — American History. 

A year's work based on a textbook of at least 300 pages is required for 
each unit. The student should know something of the author of the 
textbook used and give evidence of having consulted some works of 
reference. 

Latin — Four units — ^The minimum work required is: 

(1) First Year — One unit — Beginner's Book. 

(2) Second Year — One unit — Four books of Caesar's Gallic War, or 
the equivalent; grammar and prose composition throughout the year. 

(3) Third Year — One unit — Six of Cicero's Orations, or the equiva- 
lent; grammar and prose composition throughout the year. 



50 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

(4) Fourth Year — One unit — ^The first six books of the Aeneid, or 
the equivalent and as much prosody as relates to accent, versification in 
general, and to dactylic hexameter. 

Mathematics — Four units. 

(1) Algebra — First Year — One unit — Elementary operations: factor- 
ing, highest common factor, least common multiple, fractions, simple 
equations, inequalities, involution, evolution, and numerical quadratics. 

(2) Algebra — Second Year — One unit — Quadratic equations, ratio 
and proportion, the progressions, imaginary quantities, the binomial 
theorem, logarithms, and graphic algebra. 

(3) Plane Geometry — One unit. 

(4) Solid Geometry — One-half unit. 

(5) Plane Trigonometry — One-half unit. 

Modern Languages — ^Two units — If the student offers only one unit, 
he must study the language a second year in the University. 

First Year — One unit — Pronunciation; grammar; from 100 to 175 
pages of graduated texts, with practice in translating into the foreign 
language variations of sentences read; dictation; memorizing of short 
selections. 

Second Year — From 250 to 400 pages of easy prose; translation into 
the foreign language of variations upon the texts; abstracts; gram- 
mar; exercises; memorizing of short poems. 

Physical Geography — One unit — Study of a standard high-school 
text, together with laboratory and field course. 

Physics — Same requirements as for chemistry, which see. 

Zoology — One-half or one unt — Study of a standard high-school text 
and dissection of at least ten specimens. Notebooks with drawings, show- 
ing the character of the work completed, must be presented on entrance 
to the University. 

ADVANCED STANDING 

Advanced standing will be granted only upon recommendation of the 
heads of the departments concerned. Fitness for advanced work may be 
determined by examination or by trial. Students from other institutions 
of like standing will ordinarily be classified according to the ground al- 
ready covered. 



ORGANIZATION 51 



PART THREE - ORGANIZATION 



I. The Graduate School, 

Rules for work leading to Master's degrees. 
II. The College of Arts and Sciences: 

A Curriculum leading to the A.B. degree. 
A Curriculum leading to the B.S. degree. 
A Pre-Medical Course. 
School of Business Administration and Journalism: 

A Curriculum leading to the degree B.S. in Business Administration. 

III. The College of Agriculture: 
Instruction Division: 

A Curriculum leading to the degree B.S. in Agriculture. 

Four-Months, One-Year and Two-Year Courses, with certificates. 
Experiment Station Division. 
Agricultural Extension Division. 

IV. The College of Engineering and Architecture: 

A Curriculum leading to the degree B.S. in Civil Engineering. 
A Curriculum leading to the degree B.S. in Electrical Engineering. 
A Curriculum leading to the degree B.S. in Mechanical Engineering. 
A Curriculum leading to the degree B.S. in Chemical Engineering. 
School of Architecture: 

A Curriculum leading to the degree B.S. in Architecture. 

V. The College of Lavf: 

A Curriculum leading to the degree of LL.B. or J.D. 
VI. The Teachers College and Normal School: 

A Curriculum leading to the degree A.B. or B.S. in Education. 
A Curriculum leading to the degree B.S. in Agricultural Education. 
A Normal Course leading to a Diploma. 
The University Summer School. 
VII. The College of Pharmacy: 

A Curriculum leading to the degree B.S. in Pharmacy. 
A Curriculum leading to the title Graduate in Pharmacy. 

VIII. General (Connected with at least four Colleges) : 
Division of Athletics. 
Division of Military Science and Tactics. 
Division of Music 

IX. The General Extension Division: 

Correspondence Courses, Extension Classes. 



52 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Organization — This School is under the direction of the Committee 
on Graduate Studies, which consists of Professors Anderson, Benton, Farr, 
Newell, Norman, Trusler and Leigh. 

Graduate students should register with the Chairman of this Com- 
mittee, 

Degrees Offered — Courses are offered leading to the degrees of 
Master of Arts, Master of Arts in Education, Master of Science, Master 
of Science in Agriculture, Master of Science in Education, and Master of 
Science in Pharmacy. 

Prerequisite Degree — Candidates for the Master's degree must pos- 
sess the Bachelor's degree from this institution or one of like standing. 
If the degree offered is not acceptable, the student may be required to 
obtain a satisfactory Bachelor's degree or he may be permitted to make 
good his deficiency by additional work and a longer residence at the 
University. 

Applications — Candidates for the Master's degree must present to 
the Chairman of the Committee on Graduate Studies a written application 
for the degree not later than the first of November of the first year's 
residence. This application must name the major and minor subjects 
offered for the degree and must contain the signed approval of the heads 
of the departments concerned. In case the student comes from another 
institution, a transcript of his college work is required. 

When a candidate offers as a part of his work any course not suffi- 
ciently described in the catalog, he must include in his application an out- 
line or description of that course. 

Time Required — The student must spend at least one entire academic 
year in residence at the University as a graduate student, devoting his full 
time to the pursuit of his studies. 

Work Required — The work is twelve hours per week. Six hours of 
this work must be in one subject (the major) and of a higher grade than 
any course offered for undergraduate students in that subject. The other 
six hours (the minor or minors) are to be determined and distributed by 
the professor in charge of the department in which the major subject is 
selected. No course designed primarily for students of a lower grade 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 53 

than the junior class will be acceptable as a minor. While the major 
course is six hours, these hours are not the same as in undergraduate 
work, for in general the major work will require at least two-thirds of the 
student's time. 

As a rule the student will have had four years of work or its equiva- 
lent in the subject selected for his major, and two or three years in the 
subjects selected as minors. 

To obtain credit for a minor the student must attain a grade of not 
less than eighty-five per cent. Re-examinations are not permitted. As a 
rule it is not permissible to select a minor in the same department as the 
major. 

Dissertation — It is customary to require a dissertation showing orig- 
inal research and independent thinking on some subject accepted by the 
professor under whom the major work is taken. This dissertation must 
be in the hands of the committee not later than two weeks before Com- 
mencement Day. Two copies are required to be deposited in the library 
if the dissertation is accepted. 

Summer School — Four complete summer terms devoted entirely to 
graduate work will satisfy the time requirement. 

The application must be presented not later than four weeks after 
the beginning of the first term. Application blanks are to be obtained 
from the chairman of the committee. 

Approval of the Committee — The majors and minors, the subject 
of the thesis, and the thesis itself are all subject to the approval of the 
Committee on Graduate Studies. 



54 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Jas. N. Anderson, Dean 

Faculty — J. N. Anderson, J. R. Benton, L. M. Bristol, P. S. Buchanan, 
L. W. Buchholz, J. S. Bueno, H. W. Chandler, M. D. Cody, C. L. Crow, 
H. 0. Enwall, H. C. Evans, Jr., J. M. Farr, L. C. Farris, W. A. Fuller, J. D. 
Glunt, W. B. Hathaway, F. H. Heath, E. D. Hinckley, W. W. Hollings- 
worth, T. H. Hubbell, V. T. Jackson, J. H. Kusner, J. M. Leake, T. R. 
Leigh, J. P. Little, W. A. Little, B. F. Luker, W. J. Matherly, W. S. Perry, 
W. Petersen, C. G. Phipps, C. A. Robertson, J. S. Rogers, H. B. Sherman, 
S. Simonds, T. M. Simpson, S. A. Small, A. W. Sweet, L. M. Turner, J. H. 
Wise. 

GENERAL STATEMENT 

Aim and Scope — The tendency of universities at the present time seems 
to be to reach out their arms farther and farther into the domain of knowl- 
edge and to become more and more places where the student may expect 
to be able to acquire any form of useful knowledge in which he may 
be interested. In the center, however, there is still found the College of 
Arts and Sciences, the pulsating heart, as it were, sending its vivifying 
streams to the outermost tips of the institution. 

The aim of the College is to prepare for life, it is true, but not so 
directly and immediately as do the professional schools. It is a longer, 
but a better road, for those who are able to travel it, to distinction and 
ultimate success in almost any calling. Especially in the case of the 
learned professions, it is becoming clearer that a man must first get a 
liberal education, if possible, before entering upon his professional 
studies. 

The purpose and aim of the College of Arts and Sciences is to im- 
part culture and refinement, to train the mind and strengthen the intel- 
lect, to build up ideals and establish the character, to enlarge the vision, 
to ennoble the thoughts, to increase the appreciation of the beautiful and 
the true, to add charm to life and piquancy to companionship, to make 
the man a decent fellow, a useful citizen, an influential member of society 
in whatever community he may be thrown, in whatever field his life- 
course may be run. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES _ 55 

But if the student wishes to examine the practical side exclusively, 
he will find that there is also something practical in all these courses. 
I For instance, they are all valuable for him who wishes to learn to teach 
those subjects. Moreover, the use of electives gives the student an oppor- 
tunity to specialize in some branch according to his inclination and in 
furtherance of his plans. 

' Literary Societies — The Literary Societies are valuable adjuncts to 
I the educational work of the College. They are conducted entirely by the 
i students and maintain a high level of endeavor. The members obtain 
j much practical experience in the conduct of public assemblies. They 
i assimilate knowledge of parliamentary law, acquire ease and grace of 
delivery, learn to argue with coolness of thought and courtesy of manner, 
1 and are trained in thinking and in presenting their thoughts clearly 
! and effectively while facing an audience. All students are earnestly ad- 
vised to connect themselves with one of these societies and to take a 
constant and active part in its work. 

Farr Literary Society — This is the oldest society on the campus, and 
has provided opportunity for training in debate and oratory for many 
classes of college men. Meetings are held weekly. 

The Simpson Mathematical Club — Conducted by students in the de- 
partment of mathematics. It meets twice a month on Wednesday evening. 
All students interested in mathematics are invited to become members 
of the club. 

The Leigh Chemical Society — Organized by and for the students of 
the department of Chemistry, from all Colleges, for the purpose of stimu- 
lating interest of beginners and giving a view of the importance of the 
industry. It meets monthly, with programs aided by faculty members 
and advanced students. 

Commerce Club — ^This organization was instituted in 1924 by stu- 
dents majoring in economics and business administration. Meetings are 
held fortnightly for encouraging and developing critical interest in cur- 
rent problems in the fields of commerce and industry, special attention 
being given to the economic progress of Florida, 

Admission — For full description of requirements for admission and 
of unit courses, see pages 46 to 50, inclusive. 

Degrees — The College of Arts and Sciences offers courses leading to 
the degrees of Bachelor of Arts (A.B.) and Bachelor of Science (B.S.)- 



56 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

Subjects of Study — ^The subjects of study leading towards the de- 
grees offered by the College of Arts and Sciences are divided into the 
following four groups: 



I. 


11. 


III. 


IV. 


Military Science 


French 


Bible 


Astronomy 


Physical Education 


German 


Economics 


Bacteriology 




Greek 


Education 


Biology 




Latin 


English Language 


Botany 




Spanish 


and Literature 


Chemistry 






History 


Geology 






Philosophy 


Mathematics 






Political Science 


Meteorology 






Psychology 


Physics 






Sociology 


Physiology 
Zoology 



Requirements for Degrees — For each of the degrees offered, a total 
of sixty-eight hours is required, of which at least the last fifteen hours 
must be pursued in residence at this University. 

For the A.B. degree six hours must be taken in Group I, twelve hours 
in each of Groups II and IV, and eighteen hours in Group III; four hours 
may be taken in any Group; the remaining sixteen hours (including the 
"major") must be chosen from Groups II and III and (pure) mathe- 
matics. In Group II, two courses of a grade as high as 100 must be taken. 

For the B.S. degree six hours must be taken in Group I, nine hours 
in Group II (three of which must be in a course as high as 100), fifteen 
hours in Group III, and twenty-four hours (including the "major") from 
Group IV; the remaining twelve may be chosen from any Group or 
Groups. 

The "major" must consist of nine hours in one department (not 
counting the freshman work) and must be approved by the head of the 
department chosen. The choice of electives must meet with the approval 
of the Dean. 

Combined Academic and Law Course — For not more than twelve 
of the free elective hours required for either of the Bachelor's degrees con- 
ferred by the College of Arts and Sciences there may be substituted an 
equal number of hours from the first year of the College of Law. 

The Bachelor's degree in Arts or Science will not be conferred, how- 
ever, upon a candidate offering twelve hours in Law until he has satis- 
factorily completed the second year of the course in the College of Law. 

Minimum an6 Maximum Hours — The student must take at least 
fourteen hours of work, and in general will not be permitted to take 
more than nineteen; but if in the preceding semester he has attained an 
average of eighty-seven or more and has not failed in any subject he may 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 57 

be permitted to take as many as twenty-one hours, and if he has attained 
an average of ninety with no failures he may be permitted to take as many 
as twenty-three hours. 

Pre-Medical Course — Students intending to study medicine are ad- 
vised to take the regular B.S. course. Inasmuch, however, as many 
students are unable to spend four years on a non-professional course, the 
University offers a Two-Year Pre-Medical course. 

CURRICULUM 

Course Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Arts 
Freshman Year 

Names of Courses Nature of Work Hours per Week 

English 101-102 Rhetoric 3 

English 103-104 _ Introduction to Literature 2 

Foreign Language Greek, Latin, or Modern Language 3 

fHistory 101-102 .Medieval History 3 

Mathematics 101-102 College Algebra, Analytic Geometry 3 

♦Military Science 101-102 _ -- 2 

Physical Education 101-102 1 

17 

Sophomore Year 

Names of Courses Nature of Work Hours per Week 

Biology 111 and 116 (or 118) ] 

Or Chemistry 101-102 [ 5 

Or Physics 105-106 

Or Physics 203-204 J 

Group n 3 

Group III _ 3 

Group II or III or IV 3 

♦Military Science 201-202 _ 2 

Physical Education 201-202 1 

17 

♦Students excused from Military Science and Drill must substitute for it some two- 
hour course to be approved by the Dean. 

fGreek 21-22 may be substituted. Then History 101-102 will be taken the sophomore 
year. 



58 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

CURRICULUM 

Course Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science 
Freshman Year 

Names of Courses Nature of Work Hoinis per Week 

Chemistry 101-102 General Chemistry 5 

English 101-102 Jlhetoric 3 

Foreign Language Greek, Latin, or Modern Language 3 

Mathematics 101-102 College Algebra, Analytic Geometry 3 

* Military Science 101-102 2 

Physical Education 101-102 _ 1 

17 

Sophomore Year 

*Biology 111 and 116 (or 118) 1 

Or Physics 105-106 \ 5 

Or Physics 203-204 J 

Group II 3 

Group III _ _ 3 

Group II, III, or IV _ 3 

* Military Science 201-202 2 

Physical Education 201-202 1 

17 

*If the student elects Biology in his sophomore year, he must take Physics the fol- 
lowing year or vice versa. Both these subjects are required in the B. S. Course. 

In the Junior and Senior years candidates for either of the degrees 
offered must choose their studies so as to conform to the general "Re- 
quirements for Degrees" of this college, see page 56. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 59 

CURRICULUM 

Two-Year Pre-Medical Course 
First Year 

Names of Courses Nature of Work Hours per Week 

Biology 111 and 116 General Course 5 

Chemistry 101-102 „General Chemistry — - 5 

English 101-102 Rhetoric 3 

Foreign Language _ Elementary Course 3 

* Military Science 101-102 „ 2 

Physical Education 101-102 _ - 1 

19 

Second Year 

Chemistry 201-202 3 

Chemistry 251-252 - -— 5 

Physics 105-106 1 r 

Or Physics 203-204 j 

Elective - - 3 

* MUitary Science 201-202 —- 2 

Physical Education 201-202 1 

^__ 19 

*Student excused from Military Science and Drill must substitute for it some two-hour 
course to be approved by the Dean. 



60 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 



THE DEPARTMENT OF ANCIENT LANGUAGES 

Professor Anderson Associate Professor Petersen 

Professor Simonds 

NOTE: Not all of the courses will be given in any one year but only those 
which are most in demand. 

LATIN 

21-22. First Year Latin — Based on a book for beginners. (Both semes- 
ters; 3 hours. Credit, 3 year-hours. Petersen.) 

31-32. Caesar — ^With grammar and prose composition. (Both semesters; 
3 hours. Credit, 3 year-hours. Petersen.) 

41-42. Cicero and Virgil — With grammar and prose composition. 
(Both semesters; 3 hours. Credit, 3 year-hours. Petersen.) 

101. Ovid — About 2,000 verses selected from his various works, but 
mainly from the Metamorphoses; Versification, with especial refer- 
ence to the Dactylic Hexameter and Pentameter. A rapid review of 
forms and the principal rules of Syntax; a short weekly exercise in 
prose composition. (First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year- 
hours. Petersen.) 

102. Cicero or Livy. — Cicero's De Senectute and De Amicitia or 
Selections from Livy. (Second semester; 3 hours. Credit, 1 1-2 
year-hours. Petersen.) 

201. Pliny — Selections from Pliny's Letters. (First semester; 3 hours. 
Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Anderson.) 

202. Horace — Selections from the Satires, Epistles, Odes, and Episodes, 
with a study of the Horation Metres. (Second semester; 3 hours. 
Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Anderson.) 

203-204. Grammar and Prose Composition — An intermediate course 
in Prose Composition adapted to the needs of students taking Latin 
101-102 or 201-202 and consisting of weekly written exercises and 
some oral work; in connection with this there will be a general re- 
view of Latin Grammar with some more advanced work, both in 
forms and syntax. (Both semesters; 2 hours. Credit, 2 year-hours. 
Petersen.) 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 61 

206. History of Roman Literature — Preceded by a short study of 
Roman Life and Customs. (Second semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 
year-hours. Simonds.) 

SOL Juvenal and Tacitus — Selections from the Satires and from the 
Histories or Annals of Tacitus. (First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 
11-2 year -hours. Anderson.) 

302. The Elegy — Selections from Catullus, Propertius, and Ovid. (Sec- 
ond semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Anderson.) 

401. Plautus — Selected comedies. (First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 
1 1-2 year-hours. Anderson.) 

402. Terence and Seneca — Selected plays. (Second semester; 3 hours. 
Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Anderson.) 

303-304. Advanced Prose Composition — A continuation of Latin 203- 
204, open only to those students who have completed Latin 203-204 
or equivalent. (Both semesters; 2 hours. Credit, 2 year-hours. 
Petersen.) 

ROMAN LAW 

253. Latin — The fundamental legal conceptions which are found in 
Roman Law. Readings in the Institutes of Gains and Justinian (Rob- 
inson's Selections), and constant reference to Sohm — Institutes of 
Roman Law — translated by Ledley. Topics assigned for reports. 
Lectures, with chief stress on Private Law. (Prerequisite desirable: 
at least two years of Latin. First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 
year-hours. Simonds.) This course will be repeated the second se- 
mester as Latin 0253. 

255. Latin — An extension of preceding course but independent of it, 
so that a student need not necessarily have had Latin 253. Read- 
ings in Robinson's Selections. References and reports. Lectures 
on Roman Public Law, Roman International Law, Inheritance, Con- 
tracts, and the Philosophy of Roman Law. (First semester; 3 hours. 
Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Simonds.) 

GREEK 

21-22. Beginning Greek, Based on Homer— All the forms and the 
essential syntactical facts of the earliest stage of the language, with 



62 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

oral and written exercises, and prosody. Reading of the Iliad, Book I. 
(Both semesters; 3 hours. Credit, 3 year-hours. Petersen.) 

101-102. Homer, Continued — Selected Books from the Iliad or Odyssee 
or both. Continued study of grammar and prosody. Sight transla- 
tion. History of Epic Poetry. Homeric life and society. (Both se- 
mesters; 3 hours. Credit, 3 year-hours. Petersen.) 

103-104. Grammar and Prose Composition — An intermediate course 
in Prose Composition adapted to the needs of students taking Greek 
201-202 or 301-302 and consisting of weekly written exercises and 
some oral work; in connection with this there will be a general re- 
view of Greek Grammar with some more advanced work, both in 
forms and syntax. (Both semesters, 2 hours. Credit, 2 year-hours. 
Petersen.) 

201. Xenophon — First four books of the Anabasis. (First semester; 
3 hours. Credit, 12-2 year-hours. Anderson.) 

202. Lysias — Selected orations from Lysias and other Attic orators. 
(Second semester; 3 hours. Credit, 1 1-2 year-hours. Anderson.) 

203-204. Septuagint and New Testament — Class and parallel trans- 
lations; vocabulary, grammar, and stylistic features stressed. (Both 
semesters; 3 hours. Credit, 3 year-hours. Anderson.) 

205. Greek History — Political History and History of Greek Civiliza- 
tion during the creative period of ancient Hellas, with emphasis on 
its influence on the development of modern institutions. (First 
semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Petersen.) 

206 — ^History of Greek Literature — Preceded by a short study of 
Greek Life and Customs. A knowledge of the Greek language is 
highly desirable, but is not required for this course. (Second se- 
mester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year -hours. Petersen.) 

301. Herodotus and Thucydides — Selections from the Greek histor- 
ians. {First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Ander- 
son.) 

302. Euripides and Sophocles — Selections from the Greek dramatists. 
(Second semester; 3 hours. Credit, 1 1-2 year-hours. Anderson.) 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 63 

THE DEPARTMENT OF BIBLICAL INSTRUCTION 

Professor Buchholz Professor Farr 

Professor Anderson 

NOTE: The following courses are offered to Sophomores, Juniors and Seniors 
embracing such aspects of Biblical study as the University is prepared to give, with a 
view to providing a major subject in the Bachelor of Arts Curriculum that will permit 
students to begin preparation for work as secretary or physical director of the Y. M. 
C. A^ for welfare work in mills or social settlements, or for the ministry. The 
courses offered will be conducted by the instructors in the departments under which 
the various aspects of the subject naturally fall, and will be given in a spirit free 
from sectarianism. 

201-202. Old Testament History — The history of the Israelitish nation 
as narrated in the books of the Old Testament; the connections be- 
tween sacred and profane history. The aim is to give the student 
some conception of the development of the cultural, ethical and 
spiritual life of the nation. (Both semesters; 3 hours. Credit, 3 
year-hours. Buchholz.) 

203-204. New Testament History — The period from Herod the Great 
to the death of John the Evangelist, with special attention to the life 
of Christ and the development of the early church. Lectures, Bible 
readings, text-book. (Both semesters; 3 hours. Credit, 3 year-hours. 
Buchholz.) 

205-206. Old and New Testament Greek— See Greek 203-204. 
(Anderson.) 

301. The Engush Bible as Literature — Literary types found in the 
Bible and the excellence of the work as compared with other great 
examples of literature. The diction of the 1611 version will be con- 
trasted with that of other translations and its effects upon English 
literature will be demonstrated. (Hours to be arranged. Farr.) 

305-306. The Bible as an Ethical and Religious Guide — Those parts 
of the Old and New Testament which bring out most vividly and 
directly the moral and religious elements will receive most attention. 
The aim is to give the student a keen appreciation of the Bible as the 
best guide for human conduct. Lectures, Bible readings, studies of 
great sermons, text-books on Evidences of Christianity. (Both se- 
mesters; 3 hours. Credit, 3 year-hours. Buchholz.) 

307-308. The History of the Christian Church — ^The aim of this 
course is to bring out the circumstances of the origin, the early de- 
velopment, the conditions that led to the Reformation, and the growth 



64 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

and influence of the Christian Church to the present time. To show 
the work of the Christian Religion in the History of the World. 
(Both semesters; 3 hours. Credit, 3 year-hours. Buchholz.) 

309. The Pedagogy of Jesus — Learning to teach from the Master. (For 
Juniors and Seniors. First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year- 
hours. Buchholz.) 

THE DEPARTMENT OF BOTANY AND BACTERIOLOGY 

Professor Cody Assistant Professor Sweet 

BOTANY 

101-102. General Botany — Structure and life histories of spore and 
seed plants; environment and classification of plants. A requisite to 
all botanical courses in this department. (Laboratory fee, $5.00; 2 
class and 2 laboratory periods per week. Credit, 2 year-hours. 
Cody.) 

103. Botany for Pharmacists — Structure and importance of tissues 
of vascular and non-vascular plants; principles of classification of 
plants. (Laboratory fee, $5.00; 2 class and 2 laboratory periods 
per week. Admission by permission. Sweet.) 

201. Plant Physiology — The functioning of plants with relation to 
absorption, transpiration, assimilation, respiration and growth. 
(Prerequisites: Botany 101, 102 or equivalent; a knowledge of 
chemistry, physics and agronomy. Laboratory fee, $5.00; 2 class and 
2 laboratory periods per week. Credit, 2 year-hours. Cody.) 

202. Plant Physiology — This course is the same as Botany 201 ; given 
the second semester. (It carries the same schedule, prerequisites, lab- 
oratory fee and credit.) 

204. Taxonomy — Identification of the common seed plants of the 
Gainesville region; many of the ferns. (Prerequisite: Botany 101, 
102 or equivalent. Laboratory fee, $5.00; 2 class and 2 laboratory 
periods per week. Credit, 2 year-hours. Cody, Sweet.) 

208. General Morphology of Spermatophytes — The structure and 
life histories of seed plants; processes of fertilization. (Prerequisites: 
Botany 101, 102 or equivalent; laboratory fee, $5.00; 2 class and 2 
laboratory periods per week. Credit, 2 year-hours.) 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 65 

I 302. Advance Plant Physiology — Special physiological processes, 
enzymic activities and metabolic products. Preliminary course to 
research in plant physiology. (Prerequisite: Botany 201 or 202 or its 
equivalent. Laboratory fee, $5.00; 2 class and 2 laboratory periods 
per week. Credit, 2 year-hours. Cody.) 

304. Problems in Taxonomy — A critical study of a plant family or 
genus. Field excursions. (Prerequisite: Botany 204 or equivalent. 
1 class per week; much time in the field. Laboratory fee and credit 
to be arranged. Credit, 2 or 2 1-2 year-hours. Cody.) 

310. Methods in Plant Histology — Principles and practice in killing, 
fixing, sectioning and staining of plant materials. (Prerequisite: 
Botany 101, 102 or equivalent; organic chemistry. Laboratory fee, 
$5.00; 1 class and 2 laboratory periods per week. Credit, 1 1-2 or 2 
year-hours. Cody.) 

402. Problems in Plant Physiology — Special problems assigned in 
nutrition, respiration, metabolism, growth, etc. of plants. (Prere- 
quisite: Botany 302 or equivalent. Credit, 2 or 2 1-2 year-hours. 
Laboratory fee to be arranged. Cody.) 

412. Ecology — The relation of plants to their environment with special 
reference to soil, light and moisture. Credit and schedule to be ar- 
ranged. (Prerequisite: Botany 204 and a knowledge of agronomy; 
geology desired. Cody.) 

500-504. Research in BoTAfiY— (Laboratory fee, $5.00 for each semes- 
ter; 6 laboratory hours per week. Credit, 1 1-2 to 2 1-2 year -hours. 
Cody.) 

BACTERIOLOGY 

301. General Bacteriology— The morphology, physiology and culti- 
vation of bacteria and related microorganisms. Prerequisite to all 
courses in bacteriology offered by this department. (Prerequisite: 
College botany or biology; a knowledge of chemistry desired. Lab- 
oratory fee, $5.00. Credit, 2 year-hours. Sweet.) 

302. Agricultural Bacteriology — Bacteria and associated micro- 
organisms in relation to agriculture, the farm, etc. Bacteriology 301 
is a prerequisite to this course. (Laboratory fee, $5.00; 2 class and 
2 laboratory periods per week. Credit, 2 year-hours. Sweet.) 

304. Pathogenic Bacteriology— The recognition, culture and special 
laboratory technique of handling pathogenic bacteria. Theories and 



66 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

principles of immunity and infection. Given alternate years with 
Bact. 306. Will be given 1928-30. (Laboratory fee, $5.00; 2 class and 
2 laboratory periods per week. Credit, 2 year-hours. Sweet.) 

306. Bacteriology of Foods — The relation of bacteria, molds, and 
yeasts to foods; modes of handling and preservation of foods. This 
course alternates with Bacteriology 304. (1929.) (Laboratory fee, 
$5.00; 2 class and 2 laboratory periods per week. Credit, 2 year- 
hours. Sweet.) 

308. Sanitary Laboratory Practice — Problems in sewage and public 
sanitation; field work; designed for students in sanitary engineering. 
(Laboratory fee, $5.00; 1 lecture and 2 laboratory periods per week. 
Credit, 11-2 year-hours (1:0:4-5). Sweet.) 

401. CuNicAL Bacteriology — Laboratory work upon special problems 
preparing for technical expert in field of biological activities of 
bacteria. Animal experimentation and immunology upon pathogens. 
Work assigned to particular organisms. (Prerequisite: Bacteriology 
304. Hours to be arranged. A prerequisite to research in bacteriology. 
Sweet.) 

501. Research in Bacteriology — (Six laboratory hours or equivalent, 
per week. Credit, 1 1-2 to 2 1-2 year-hours. Sweet.) 

THE DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY AND GEOLOGY 

Professor Rogers Associate Professor Hubbell 

Assistant Professor Sherman 

NOTE: For a description of the laboratories, biological station and general 
equipment of this department see page 25. 

BIOLOGY 

101. Principles of Animal Biology — An introduction to the subject 
matter and principles of zoology or animal biology. (A prerequisite 
for all other courses, save Biology 105. Laboratory fee, $5.00. First 
semester; 2 lecture, 2 laboratory and 1 quiz period per week. Credit, 
2 1-2 year -hours. Rogers.) 

103. Principles of Animal Biology — A special section of Biology 101, 
for sophomore Agricultural students. (Laboratory fee, $5.00. First 
semester; 2 lectures and 2 laboratory periods per week. Credit, 2 
year-hours. Rogers.) 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 67 

104. Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy — A comparative study of the 
structure of the main classes of vertebrates. (Required of Pre-Medi- 
cal students. Prerequisite: Biology 101. Laboratory fee, $5.00. Sec- 
ond semester; 2 lecture, 2 laboratory and 1 quiz period per week. 
Credit, 2 1-2 year-hours. Sherman.) 

105. Elementary Anatomy and Physiology — The elements of verte- 
brate anatomy with an introduction to the physiological systems of 
man. (Open to Pharmacy students only. First semester; 2 class and 
demonstration periods per week. Fee for demonstration material, 
$2.00. Credit, 1 year-hour. Sherman.) 

106. Genetics and Evolution — An introduction to the study of varia- 
tion, selection and inheritance in animals. The last weeks of the 
course deal with some of the data of human heredity. (Prerequisite: 
Biology 101 or an equivalent. With Biology 101, this course meets 
the requirement of 4 year-hours in Biology. Second semester; 2 
lectures and 1 quiz per week. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Rogers.) 

201. Invertebrate Zoology — The comparative morphology and natural 
history of the invertebrates, exclusive of insects. (Prerequisite: Biol- 
ogy 101. Laboratory fee, $5.00. First semester; 3 class arui 2 labora- 
tory periods per week. Credit, 21-2 year-hours. Hubbell.) 

202. Entomoloogy— The classification, structure and biology of the in- 
sects. (Prerequisite: Biology 101. Laboratory fee, $5.00. Second 
semester; 3 class and 2 laboratory periods per week. Credit, 2 1-2 
year-hours. Hubbell.) 

211. Embryology — ^The principles of general embryology followed by 
special attention to the development of the vertebrates. (Prerequisite: 
Biology 101. Laboratory fee, $5.00. First semester; 3 class and 2 
laboratory periods per week. Credit, 2 1-2 year-hours. Sherman.) 

212. MAMMALL4.N Anatomy — The detailed anatomy of some typical 
mammal. (Prerequisite: Biology 104 and Biology 211. Laboratory 
fee, $5.00. Second semester; 1 class and 2 laboratory periods per 
week. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Sherman.) 

301. Advanced Invertebrate Zoology— Problems and special studies 
on the local invertebrate fauna. (Prerequisite: Biology 201. Labora- 
tory fee, $5.00. First semester. Hours and credit to be arranged. 
Hubbell.) 



63 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

302. Advanced Entomology — ^The taxonomy and biology of certain se- 
lected groups of insects. (Prerequisite: Biology 202. Laboratory 
fee, $5.00. Second semester; hours and credit to be arranged. 
Hubbell.) 

311-312. Vertebrate Zoology — The classification and natural history 
of vertebrate animals with special attention to the recognition and 
habits of the local fauna. (Prerequisite: Biology 104. Laboratory 
fee, $3.00 per semester. First and second semesters; 1 class and 1 
field or laboratory period per week. Credit, 2 year-hours. Sherman, 
Rogers.) 

322. Laboratory Methods and Management — The technique of micro- 
scopic and macroscopic preparations, photography and the care of 
laboratory materials and apparatus. (Prerequisites: Biology 101 
and 201 or 211. Laboratory fee, $3.00 per semester. First and 
second semesters; 1 class and 2 laboratory periods per week. Credit, 
3 year-hours. Rogers, Sherman, Hubbell.) 

402. Animal Ecology — Studies on the local fauna as an introduction 
to the methods of animal ecology. (Prerequisite: Biology 201, 202 
or Laboratory fee, $5.00. Second semester; 3 class and 2 after- 
noons work at Biological Station per week. Credit, 2 1-2 year-hours. 
Rogers.) 

420. The History and Literature of Biology — An outline of the de- 
velopment of the modern content and theories of biology. (Prere- 
quisites: Biology 101 and either 104 or 106. Second semester; 2 
class periods per week. Credit, 1 year-hour. Rogers, Sherman, 
Hubbell.) 

510 or 511. Problems in Animal Ecology — (Prerequisite: a major in 
Biology including Biol. 402. First or second semester. Hours and 
credit to be arranged. Rogers.) 

512 or 513. Problems in Invertebrate Zoology or Entomology — 
(Prerequisite: a major in Biology including Biol. 201 and 202. First 
or second semester; hours and credit to be arranged. Hubbell.) 

514 or 515. Problems in Vertebrate Zoology — (Prerequisite: a ma- 
jor in Biology. First or second semester; hours and credit to be 
arranged. Sherman.) 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 69 



GEOLOGY 



201. Physical Geology — The origin, materials and structure of the 
earth; the agencies which produce geological changes. (First se- 
mester; 3 class periods per week. Credit, I 1-2 year-hours. Hubbell,) 

202. Historical Geology — An introductory course in historical and 
stratigraphical geology. (Prerequisite: Geology 201. Second se- 
mester; 3 class periods per iveeh Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Hub- 
bell.) 

THE DEPARTMEIVT OF CHEMISTRY 

Professor Leigh Professor Black 

Professor Beisler Professor Heath 

Associate Professor Jackson Assistant Professor Goodwin 

(iirator Otte 
Fellows: Ilatlack, Boyd and Flood. 

NOTE: The Leigh Chemica! Society is composed of those students from all 
the colleges who are working in th Department of Chemistry and who wish to derive 
benefits from general lectures ad papers. Its special function is to stimulate the 
interest of beginners in the imortance of chemical industries. Monthly meetings 
are held. Addresses are given by advanced students, faculty members, and promi- 
nent visiting chemists. 

101-102. General Chei*'Stry — The fundamental laws and theories of 
chemistry, and the preparation and properties of the common ele- 
ments and their compounds. Students may begin this course either 
the first or seconr semester. (Laboratory fee, $5.00 for each semes- 
ter. Both semestfs; 3 class and 4 laboratory hours per iveek. Credit, 
5 year-hours. Ueath in charge; Black, Beisler, Jackson and Good- 
win.) 

101-104. Geneb^- Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis — See Chem- 
istry underCollege of Pharmacy. 

201-202. Qu.-iTATiVE Analysis — ^This course includes the general re- 
actions ' the metals and acids, with their qualitative separation and 
identifi-itioi^- (Prerequisite: Chemistry 101-102. Laboratory fee, 
$5.00 ^^ ^<^cA. semester. Both semesters; 1 class and 5 laboratory 
hour P^^ week. Credit, 3 year-hours. Jackson.) 

206. QiLiTATivE Analysis — See Agricultural Chemistry. 

212. ^qualitative Analysis. — See Chemical Engineering. 

215. Water and Sewage — See Chemical Engineering. 



70 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

251-252. Organic Chemistry— A study of the preparation and prop- 
erties of various aliphatic and aromatic compounds. (Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 101-102, or 101-104. Laboratory fee, $5.00 for each se- 
mester. Both semesters; 2 class and 4 laboratory hours per week. 
Credit, 5 year-hours. Leigk and Goodwin.) 

253. Elementary Agricultura:. Chemistry — See Agricultural Chem- 
istry. 

255-256. Organic Agricultural "hemistry— See Agricultural Chem- 
istry. 

301. Quantitative Analysis — GraVmetric analysis of simple com- 
pounds, followed by the analysis of such materials as phosphate 
rock, simple alloys, limestone a^d Portland cement. (Prerequi- 
sites: Chemistry 101-102 and 201-202. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 
First semester; 6 laboratory hours or its equivalent per week. Credit, 
11-2 year-hours. Black.) 

302. Quantitative Analysis— Volumetriv methods in acidimetry and 
alkalimetry, oxidation and reduction, 'odimetry and precipitation. 
(Prerequisites: Chemistry 101-102 ana 201-202. Laboratory fee, 
$5.00. Second semester; 6 laboratory tours or its equivalent per 
week. Credit, 1 1-2 year-hours. Black.) 

304. Quantitative Analysis. — See Chemistry mder College of Phar- 
macy. 

321-322. Physical Chemistry — ^This course incides a study of the 
three phases of matter — gas, liquid and solid; he properties of so- 
lutions; colloids; equilibrium; velocity of reation; thermochem- 
istry; thermodynamics; atomic structure. (Prerefjisites: Chemistry 
201-202 and 251-252. Prerequisite or corequisite: 301, 302 or 304. 
Laboratory fee, $5.00 for each semester. Both semoers; 2 class and 
2 laboratory hours per week. Credit, 3 year-hours, ackson.) 

341-342. Industrial Chemistry — See Chemical EngineCng. 

344. Industrial Chemistry Laboratory — See Chemical "jigineering. 

351. Metallurgy — See Chemical Engineering. 

401-402. Agricultural Analysis — See Agricultural Chemistr, 

403. Water Analysis — The analysis of waters to determine thy pota- 
bility and fitness for steam raising and other purposes. (P'requi- 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 71 

site: Chemistry 301-302. Laboratory fee, $2.50. First semester; 6 
laboratory hours or its equivalent per week. Credit, 11-2 year- 
hours. Goodwin.) 

405. Gas Analysis — See Chemical Engineering. 

406. Physiological Chemistry — See Chemistry under College of 
Pharmacy. 

408. Toxicology — See Chemistry under College of Pharmacy. 

410. Historical Chemistry — The historical development of the more 
important chemical theories and their influence on the develop- 
ment of the science. (Prerequisites: Chemistry 251-252 and 301- 
302. Second semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Not 
given in 1927-1928.) 

413414. Engineering Chemistry — See Chemical Engineering. 

[ GRADUATE COURSES 

501. Organic Preparations — The preparation of some typical com- 
pounds. Occasional discussions of principles and theories. A read- 
ing knowledge of French and German desired. (Prerequisite: Chem- 
istry 251-252. Laboratory fee, $5.00. First semester; 6 laboratory 
hours or its equivalent per week. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Leigh.) 

504. Inorganic Preparations — ^The course consists of laboratory work, 
involving the preparation of a number of typical inorganic com- 
pounds in addition to collateral reading and discussions. A read- 
ing knowledge of French and German desired. (Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 301. Laboratory fee, $5.00. Second semester; 6 labora- 
tory hours or its equivalent per week. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. 
Leigh.) 

505. Organic Nitrogen Compounds — Special lectures and collateral 
reading relative to the electronic and other theoretical conceptions 
of organic compounds containing nitrogen. Explosives; pseudo- 
acids; certain dyes; alkaloids; proteins; etc. (First semester; 3 
hours or its equivalent. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Leigh.) Given 
alternate years. Offered in 1927-28. 

506. Special Chapters in Organic Chemistry — Lectures and collat- 
eral reading. In general the topics to be studied will be chosen from 
the following lists: stereochemistry, tautomerism, the configuration 



72 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

of the sugars, acetoacetic ester syntheses, malonic ester syntheses, 
the Grignard reaction, benzene theories, diazo compounds and dyes. 
(Second semester; 3 hoars or its equivalent. Credit, 11-2 year- 
hours. Beisler.) Given alternate years. Not offered in 1927-28. 

509. Advanced Physical Chemistry — The historical development of 
electrochemistry. Theoretical and practical applications of electro- 
chemical principles. (Laboratory fee, $5.00. First semester; 1 
class and 4 laboratory hours per week. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. 
Jackson.) Given alternate years. Offered in 1927-28. 

513. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry — ^The theories, practice and ap- 
plications of colloid chemistry. (Laboratory fee, $5.00; first semes- 
ter; 2 class and 2 laboratory hours per week. Credit, 11-2 year- 
hours. Beisler.) Given alternate years. Offered in 1927-28. 

516, Chemistry of the Rare Elements — Deals with the mineral oc- 
currences, preparation, properties, and uses of the rarer elements 
and their compounds. Relations to the more common elements will 
be clearly shown as well as methods for separation and purification, 
(First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 1 1-2 year-hours. Heath.) 
Given alternate years. Not offered in 1927-28. 

517. Biochemical Preparations — The preparation of physiologically 
important compounds from plant and animal material. (Laboratory 
fee, $5.00; first semester; 6 laboratory hours or its equivalent per 
week. Credit, 1 1-2 year-hours. Black.) Given alternate years. 
Offered in 1927-28. 

519. Atomic Structure — A graduate course of special lectures and 
collateral reading dealing with modern theories of the structure of 
the atom. The Journal literature is largely used as the basis of 
study. (First semester; 3 hours or its equivalent. Credit, 1 1-2 
year-hours. Black.) Given alternate years. Not offered in 1927-28. 

522. Photographic Chemistry — Deals with the chemical action of 
light, the preparation, properties, and uses of photographic mate- 
rials. The practical applications of photography will be shown, 
as well as the theory of the subject. (Second semester; 3 hours or 
its equivalent. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Heath.) Given alternate 
years. Offered in 1927-28. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 73 

551-552. Chemical Research — (Laboratory fee, $5.00 for each semes- 
ter. 3 to 5 hours. Credit, 1 1-2 to 2 1-2 year-hours. Leigh, Black, 
Beisler, Heath, Jackson and Oddy.) 

NOTE: For details of courses in Agricultural Chemistry, Chemical Engineering, 
and Pharmaceutical Chemistry, see pages devoted to Colleges of Agriculture, Engi- 
neering, and Pharmacy, or consult index. 

THE DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS 

Professor Matherly Instructor Eldridge 

Assistant Professor Curtis Instructor Phillips 

NOTE 1: The courses in economics are given by the Department of Economics 
and Business Administration, instructors in this department dividing their time 
between economics and business administration. The courses in business administra- 
tion are described under the School of Business Administration and Journalism. 

NOTE 2: While all courses in economics are open to, and in many cases re- 
quired of, students in business administration, they are not offered primarily for 
such students. On the contrary, they are offered primarily for students in the arts 
and sciences— students interested either in the purely cultural values attaching to 
economics or in preparing themselves to become economic experts and teachers. 

101. Economic History of England — A survey of economic history; 
the evolution of capitalistic economy in England; the origin and 
development of the wage system; the Industrial Revolution; the 
growth of British trade; the relation of economic development to 
political policy; the effect of England's industrial progress on the 
United States. (First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. 
) 

102. Economic History of the United States— The industrial devel- 
opment of America; the exploitation of natural resources; the history 
of manufacturing, of banking, of trade, of transportation, etc.; the 
evolution of industrial centers; the historical factors contributing to 
the industrial growth of the United States. (Second semester; 3 
hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours ) 

201-202. Principles of Economics — The purpose of this course is to 
give a general understanding of present-day economic organization. 
An analysis is made of production, distribution, and consumption. In 
addition, attention is devoted to the principles governing value and 
market price with a brief introduction to money, banking and credit, 
industrial combinations, transportation and communication, labor 
problems, and economic reform. (Both semesters; 3 hours. Credit, 
3 year-hours. Matherly, Curtis, Eldridge.) 



74 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

302. Elements of Statistics — An introduction to statistics; brief con- 
sideration of statistical theory; collection, classification and presenta- 
tion of economic data; construction of graphs and charts; study of 
index numbers; problems of statistical research. Each student is 
required to complete one or more projects in statistical investigation. 
(Prerequisite; Economics 201-202. Second semester; 3 hours. Credit, 
11-2 year-fiouTS. Curtis.) 

307. Introduction to Economics — A brief study of our economic or- 
ganization and the principles involved in economic activities. (Pri- 
marily for juniors and seniors in the Colleges of Agriculture, En- 
gineering and Pharmacy. First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 
year-hours. Curtis.) 

321. Financial Organization of Society — ^The purpose of this course 
is to introduce the student to the field of finance. Consideration is 
given to the pecuniary organization of society, to the functions per- 
formed by financial institutions, and to the relationships between 
finance and business administration. (Prerequisite: Economics 201- 
202. First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Curtis.) 

331. Principles of Marketing — A survey of the marketing structure of 
industrial society; fundamental functions performed in the market- 
ing process and the various methods, agencies and factors responsible 
for the development and execution of these functions; marketing 
functions of the manufacturer, wholesaler, and different types of 
retailers; the marketing function in business management. (Prere- 
quisite: Economics 201-202. First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 
year-hours. Eldridge.) 

351. Transportation and Communication — Railways; inland and 
ocean waterways; highways; the organization of transportatiop 
service; brief consideration of rate making; government control; 
telegraph, telephone, cable, and postal communication. (Prerequisite: 
Economics 201-202. First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year- 
hours. Phillips.) 

404. Social Control of Business Enterprise — A general survey of 
the field of social control; purposes of social control; formal and 
informal types of social control; control of accounts, prices and 
capitalization; government policy toward business, current govern- 
ment regulation; services and agencies which modern governments 
undertake to provide for business enterprises. (Prerequisite: Eco~ 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 75 

nomics 201-202. Second semester; 3 hours. Credit, 1 1-2 year- 
hours. Curtis.) 

423. Money — The subject matter of this course is monetary and price 
theory. It is concerned with the evolution of monetary systems, and 
the nature and causes of some of the important monetary controver- 
sies of the past, as well as some of the present unsettled monetary 
problems. Emphasis is placed upon the relationship between money 
and credit and the general price level under the existing financial 
structure, which involves some consideration of the business cycle. 
The problem of controlling the general level of prices through the 
monetary system is also considered. (Prerequisite: Economics 321. 
First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Curtis.) 

424. Banking — Beginning with a survey of the leading countries of the 
world, this course develops into a consideration of the effectiveness 
with which the various institutions perform their functions. An at- 
tempt is made to show the close relationship between the financial 
system and general economic organization, and in particular to point 
out, in connection with the business cycle, how the financial structure 
imposes limits upon the entire economic organization. (Prerequisite: 
Economics 321. Second semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. 
Curtis.) 

429. Government Finance — Principles governing expenditures of mod- 
ern governments; sources of revenue; public credit; principles and 
methods of taxation and of financial administration as revealed in 
the fiscal systems of leading countries. (Prerequisite: Economics 
201-202. First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Eldridge.) 

473. Labor Problems — Human nature and industry; evolution of our 
present wage system. Standards of living; security and risk; sick- 
ness, old age, unemployment. The workers' side of the problem; 
the problem from the side of the employer; the community's side 
of the problem. (Prerequisite: Economics 201-202. First semester; 
3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Curtis.) 

501. History of Economic Thought — (For qualified seniors and grad- 
uate students. First semester; two 11-2 hour periods. Credit, 11-2 
year-hours ) Omitted in 1927-28. 

502. Advanced Economics — An intensive study of the principles gov- 
erning value, market price and distribution as set forth by selected 
present-day authorities. (For qualified seniors and graduate stu- 



76 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

dents. Second semester; two 1 1-2 hour periods. Credit, 11-2 
year-hours ) Omitted in 1927-28. 

503-504 Seminar in Economics — Students individually and in groups 
will be directed in special projects of economic research; reports 
and discussion. (Both semesters; one two-hour period per week. 
Credit, 3 year-hours. Motherly, Curtis.) 

THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY 

Professor Bristol Assistant Professor 



NOTE: For courses in the related field of Social Administration, see School of 
Business Administration and Journalism, Department of Social Administration. 

102. Introduction to Sociology — An approach to a study of modern 
social problems through Geology, Biology, Psychology and An- 
thropology together with a brief study of some of the problems con- 
nected with increase of population, family life, migration, racial 
differences, rural isolation, urban congestion, leisure-time, poverty 
and crime. (Second semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. 
Bristol.) 

301. History of Modern Philanthropy — (First semester; 2 hours. 
Credit, 1 year-hour ) 

322. Rural Sociology — A broad survey of the field of rural life in 
its social aspects. (Second semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year- 
hours. Bristol.) 

323. Introduction to Social Administration — A case method of ap- 
proach to a study of social problems and approved methods of social 
action. (Should be preceded by Sociology 102 and Social Adminis- 
tration 122. First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 1 1-2 year-hours. 
Bristol.) 

324. Criminology and Penology — Nature and causes of crime; pun- 
ishment, correction, prevention. Sociological aspects of criminal 
law and criminal procedure. Constructive proposals. (Prerequisite: 
Sociology 102 or 323 or consent of instructor. Second semester; 3 
hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Bristol.) 

441. Principles of Sociology — A brief study of the principles of social 
evolution, social organization, social control and social progress. 
(First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Bristol.) 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 77 

443. Race PROBLEMS-^Causes of race antagonism; racial inequality. 
History, causes and effects of Immigration. The Negro problem. 
(Prerequisite: One course in Sociology or consent of instructor. 
First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 1 1-2 year-hours. Bristol.) Given 
alternate years. 

541-542. Seminar in Sociology— ffirsf and second semesters. One two- 
hour period a week. Credit, 3 year-hours. Bristol.) 

THE DEPARTMENT OF ENGUSH 

Professor Farr Associate Professor Little 

Associate Professor Robertson Associate Professor Fams 

Assistant Professor Small 

Instructor Wise; Messrs. Pierce, Mounts and Piper 

101-102. Rhetoric and Composition— To train students in methods of 
clear and forceful expression. Instruction is carried on simultane- 
ously in formal rhetoric, in rhetorical analysis, and in theme writing, 
the constant correlation of the three as methods of approach to 
the desired goal being kept in view. In addition a reading course 
is assigned each student. (Required of all freshmen. Both semesters; 
3 hours. Credit, 3 year-hours. Farr and Staff.) 
103-104. Introduction to Literature— Survey course in the progress 
of human thought as expressed in literary form from its earliest 
manifestations to the present; concerned chiefly with Greek, Latin, 
and mediaeval literatures, as a background to English and Ameri- 
can literary history. (Required of freshmen in A.B. course both se- 
mesters; 3 hours. Credit, 2 year-hours. Farr, Small, F arris, Robert- 
son.) 
201-202. History of Literature — An outline course in the historical 
development of the English literature and language. Selections from 
important prose writers and poets; lectures on the history of the 
language and literature; a manual for reference; frequent reports 
from the individual students; constant use of the University library. 
(Both semesters; 3 hours. Credit, 3 year-hours. Farr, Robertson, 
Small.) 
203. The Short Story— Work will be largely by lectures and applica- 
tion of principles. Narrative practice will include the anecdote, tale, 
and particular attention will be paid to the technique and develop- 
ment of the short story. (Prerequisite: English 101-102. First semes- 
ter; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. F arris.) 



78 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

204. The English Essay — The various types of exposition with special 
attention to the essay. The work is largely practical, with outside 
reading and written reports. (Second semester; 3 hours. Credit^ 
11-2 year-hours. Farris.) 

301. Shakespeare and the Drama — Three Shakespearian plays are 
read in class. On eight others a written review each fortnight, and 
on the alternate week essays from the students and lectures by the 
instructor. Readings in drama are assigned. (First semester; 3 
hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Farr.) 

302. The Drama Before Shakespeare — The classical drama, the re- 
ligious play, the beginnings of the secular play in England, and the 
dramatic productions of Shakespeare's predecessors are studied by 
means of text-book, lectures, reports on special topics, extensive read- 
ings and essays on assigned subjects. (Second semester; 3 hours. 
Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Farr.) 

303-304. Engush Poetry of the Nineteenth Century — Thorough 
discussion of the roots of the Romantic Revival; study of the works 
of Wordsworth, Byron, Shelley, and Keats; poetry of the Victorian 
age, especially Tennyson and Browning. (Both semesters; 3 hours. 
Credit, 3 year-hours. Smull, Farris.) 

401. American Poetry — A rapid survey of the development of poetry 
in the United States; critical study of a few important authors. 
(First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Farr.) 

402. Southern Literature — A detailed study, with extensive reading 
and essay work; examination of the claims of Florida authors. 
(Second semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Farr.) 

403-404. The English Novel — The student reads a list of novels chosen 
to illustrate chronology and variety of species; analyzes minutely 
one novel from the technical side; and masters the entire work and 
life of one novelist. (Both semesters; 3 hours. Credit, 3 year- 
hours. Farr.) 

405. Modern Drama — Reading and discussion of recent and contempor- 
ary playwrights, from Ibsen to Eugene O'Neill. Representative plays 
of the principal Continental, English, Irish, and American dramatists. 
(First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year -hours. Robertson.) 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 79 

406. Modern Novel — Reading and discussion of the work of important 
English and American novelists of the present, with some attention to 
recent Continental fiction. (Second semester; 3 hours. Credit, 
11-2 year -hours. Robertson.) 

408. Contemporary Poets — Contemporary English and American 
poetry is studied, with special emphasis on Walt Whitman, and 
the significance of his influence on recent poets. (Second semester; 
3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Robertson.) 

409-410. Chaucer — Extensive reading in the "Canterbury Tales", 
^Troilus", and minor works. Lectures and assigned essays. (Both 
semesters; 3 hours. Credit, 3 year-hours. Robertson.) 

411-412. Engineering Exposition — A special course for Engineering 
students in the various kinds of writing needed in their profession. 
(Engineering seniors. Both semesters; 1 hour. Credit, 1 year-hour. 
Farr.) 

413-414. Anglo-Saxon — Drill in the forms of the early language and 
an elementary view of its relation to the other members of the Aryan 
family and of its development into Modern English. Texts used: 
Bright's Anglo-Saxon Reader, and Cook's Judith. (Both semesters; 
3 hours. Credit, 3 year-hours. Robertson.) 

THE DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Professor Leake Professor Evans 

Assistant Professor HoUingsworth 

Instructor Glunt; Mr. Mason. 

HISTORY 

101-102. Europe During the Middle Ages — A general course in the his- 
tory of Western Europe from the Teutonic migrations to the close 
of the Seven Years' War. (Prerequisite for all higher courses. Both 
semesters; 3 hours. Credit, 3 year-hours. Leake, Hollingsworth, 
Evans, Fuller, and Mason.) Given each year. 

201-202. Modern European History — ^The characteristic features of the 
Old Regime, the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Periods and 
the development of Europe from the Congress of Vienna to the Con- 
gress of Versailles. (Both semesters; 3 hours. Credit, 3 year-hours. 
Leake.) Given 1927-28. 



80 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

203-204. Latin American History. — (Both semesters; 3 hours. Cred- 
it, 3 year-hours. Evans.) Given 1927-28. 

301-302, American History, 1492 to 1830 — History of America and of 
American institutions. Beginning with the period of discovery and 
colonization a detailed study is made of each colony. The Revolu- 
tionary movement, the period of the Articles of Confederation, the 
adoption of the Federation Constitution, and the social, political, and 
economic development of the United States up to 1830 are subjected 
to close analysis. (Both semesters; 3 hours. Credit, 3 year-hours. 
Leake.) Given 1927-28. 

303-304. American History, 1830 to the Present — The background 
and causes of the War between the States, the rise and fall of the 
Confederacy, the Reconstruction Period, the industrial expansion of 
the United States, and America as a world-power. Especial emphasis 
is laid on our international relations. (Both semesters; 3 hours. 
Credit, 3 year-hours. Leake.) Given 1928-29. 

305-306. English History — A brief survey of English History from the 
Anglo-Saxon invasions to the Norman Conquest, and a more detailed 
study of the period from 1066 to the present. (Both semesters; 3 
hours. Credit, 3 year-hours. Evans.) Given 1928-29. 

307-308. The Renaissance and the Reformation — Study of the causes, 
development and results of these great intellectual and religious 
movements. (For advanced students only. Both semesters; 3 hours. 
Credit, 3 year-hours. Evans.) Given 1927-28. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

101-102. (a) American Government and Politics — A study of the 
structure and functions of our national and state governments. 
Throughout the course present-day political problems of national 
and local interest will be made subjects of class discussion, (b) 
State and Municipal Government — An outline of the growth of 
American municipalities and a study of the organs and functional 
mechanism of modern cities of the United States and Europe. Em- 
phasis is laid upon the newer tendencies in municipal government, 
including the commission form and city-manager plan. (Prerequi- 
site for all higher courses. Both semesters; 3 hours. Credit, 3 year- 
hours. Leake, Hollingsivorth, Fuller, and Mason.) Given each year. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 8J 

201-202 (a). Comparative Government; (b) Government and Or- 
ganization OF Great Britain. — (Both semesters; 3 hours. Credit, 
3 year-hours. Hollingsworth.) Given 1928-29. 

203-204. American State and Municipal Administration. — (Both se- 
mesters; 3 hours. Credit, 3 year-hours. Hollingsworth.) Given 
1927-28. 

205-206. (a) Principles of Political Science; (b) World Poli- 
tics and International Organization. — (Both semesters; 3 hours. 
Credit, 3 year-hours. Hollingsworth.) Given 1927-28. 

301-302. — American Constitutional Law. — (Both semesters; 3 hours. 
Credit, 3 year -hours. Leake.) Given 1928-29. 

303-304. — International Law.— (Both semesters; 3 hours. Credit, 3 
year-hours. Hollingsworth.) Given 1927-28. 

305-306. Political Tueories.— (Both semesters; 3 hours. Credit, 3 
year-hours. Hollingsworth.) Given 1928-29. 

THE DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS 

Professor Simpson Associate Professor Chandler 

Assistant Professor Phipps Instructor Kusner 

Messrs. Pirenian, Huffman and Craig 

NOTE: Not all of the courses numbered above 200 are given in any one year. 
Course 85, if not taken for entrance unit, may apply toward college credit. 

85. Plane Trigonometry and Logarithms— This course is a prerequi- 
site to Mathematics 101 for students who do not present Trigonometry 
for entrance. (Repeated each semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year- 
hours. Simpson and staff.) 

101. College Algebra — (Repeated each semester; 3 hours. Credit, 
11-2 year-hours. Simpson and staff.) 

102. Plane Analytic Geometry— (Prerequisites: Mathematics 85 and 
Mathematics 101. Repeated each semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 
year-hours. Simpson and staff.) 

108. Business Mathematics— The application of Mathematics to the 
study of problems in Interest, Annuities, Depreciation of Assets, 
Purchase price of Bonds, Building and Loan Associations, etc. (For 
students in Business Administration. Second semester; 3 hours. 
Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Kusner, Phipps.) 



82 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

151-152. Elementary Mathematical Analysis — (For Engineering 
students. Both semesters; 3 hours. Credit, 3 year-hours. Chandler, 
Kusner, Phipps, Pirenian.) 

204. Mathematics for Students of Agriculture — (Required of Soph- 
omores in the College of Agriculture. Second semester; 3 hours. 
Credit, 1 1-2 year hours ) 

208. The Mathematics of Life Insurance — (Second semester; 3 hours. 
Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Phipps.) 

211. Advanced College Algebra — A continuation of course 101. (First 
semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours.) 

220. The Elements of Statistical Theory — (Second semester; 3 
hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Phipps.) 

231. College Geometry — A direct extension of Plane Geometry, deal- 
ing with such topics as Geometric Construction, Properties of the 
Triangle, Quadrilateral and Circle, Similar Figures, etc. An intro- 
duction to the beautiful developments of Modern Geometry. Related 
to the Plane Geometry of the High School as College Algebra is 
related to High School Algebra. Teachers of Geometry will find this 
course exceedingly helpful. (First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 
year-hours. Simpson.) 

251-252. Differential and Integral Calculus — (Both semesters; 3 
hours. Credit, 3 year-hours. Simpson, Kusner, Phipps.) 

320. Theory of Algebraic Equations, Complex Numbers and Deter- 
minants — (Second semester; 3 hours. Credit, 1 1-2 year-hours. 
Chandler.) 

334. Modern Projective Geometry — (Second semester; 3 hours. 
Credit, 11-2 year-hours ) 

351-352. Advanced Calculus and Solid Analytic Geometry — (Both 
semesters; 2 hours. Credit, 2 year-hours. Simpson, Chandler.) 

361. The Teaching of Mathematics, with particular attention to the 
Content of Secondary School Mathematics. (First semester; 3 hours. 
Credit, 11-2 year -hours. Chandler.) 

364. History of Mathematics — (Prerequisite: A certain amount of 
Mathematical experience, to be determined by the instructor. Second 
semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Kusner.) 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 83 

412. Introduction to Higher Algebra, based on the texts by Bocher 
or Dickson. (Second semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. 
Simpson.) 

420. Differential Equations — (Second semester; 3 hours. Credit, 
11-2 year-hours. Kusner.) 

440. Fourier's Series and Harmonic Analysis — (Second semester; 
3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year -hours. Simpson.) 

457. Differential Geometry — ^The application of Calculus to the 
Geometry of Curves and Surfaces. (First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 
1 1-2 year-hours ) 

455. The Functions of a Complex Variable — (First semester; 3 hours. 
Credit, 11-2 year-hours ) 

THE DEPARTMENT OF FRENCH 

Professor Luker Professor Turner 

21-22. Elementary French — (Both semesters; 3 hours. Credit, 3 year- 
hours.) 

101-102. Intermediate Course — Second year college French. (Both 
semesters; 3 hours. Credit, 3 year-hours.) 

103-104 Elementary French Composition — (Prerequisite: Same as 
for French 101-102. Both semesters; 2 hours. Credit, 2 year-hours.) 

201-202. Rapid Reading Course — (Prerequisite: French 101-102 or 
equivalent, and permission of the instructor. Both semesters; 2 hours. 
Credit, 2 year-hours. Luker.) 

203-204. French Conversation — (Permission of instructor required. 
Both semesters; 2 hours. Credit, 1 year-hour. Turner.) 

205-206. Intermediate French Composition — Oral and written exer- 
cises, original themes. (Permission of instructor required. Both se- 
mesters; 2 hours. Credit, 2 year-hours. Luker.) 

207-208. An Outline of French Literature — (Prerequisite: Ability to 
read French easily. Both semesters; 2 hours. Credit, 2 year-hours. 
Turner.) 

301-302. The French Drama — A study of typical dramas exemplifying 
the main literary movements. (Both semesters; 2 hours. Credit, 2 
year-hours. Turner.) 



84 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

303-304. The Nineteenth Century — From Chateaubriand to Anatole 
France. Analyses of selected plays, novels, and stories, with col- 
lateral readings from Taine, Renan, Faguet, Lanson. (Prerequisite: 
from 5 to 10 hours of French. Both semesters, 2 hours. Credit, 2 
year-hours. Turner.) 

401-402. Advanced Course in French Composition — (Both semesters; 
2 hours. Credit, 2 year-hours. Luker.) 

403. French Pronunciation — Advanced course. (Primarily for teach- 
ing candidates of French. First semester; 1 hour. Credit, 1-2 year- 
hour. Luker.) 

404. Advanced Course in French Grammar — (Primarily for teaching 
candidates of French. Second semester; 1 hour. Credit, 1-2 year- 
hour. Luker.) 

405. The Plays of Moliere — (First semester; 2 hours. Credit, 1 
year-hour. Luker.) 

407-408. French Thought — A survey of philosophical ideas and ten- 
dencies: Descartes, Malebranche, and seventeenth century authors; 
Montesquieu, Condillac, and eighteenth century authors; Auguste 
Comte, Claude Bernard, Taine, Bergson, and nineteenth century au- 
thors. (Prerequisite: ability to read French easily. Both semesters; 
2 hours. Credit, 2 year-hours. Turner.) 

501-502. The French Short Story — Seminar. Technique; literary 
values; evolution. (Both semesters; 2 hours. Credit, 2 year-hours. 
Turner.) 

503-504. Old French — Phonology, morphology, and readings from Old 
French texts. (Both semesters; 2 hours. Credit, 2 year-hours. Luker.) 

THE DEPARTMENT OF GERMAN AND SPANISH 
GERMAN 

Professor Crow 

21-22. Elementary Course — Pronunciation, forms, elementary syntax, 
dictation, written exercises, memorizing of vocabularies and short 
poems, translation. (Both semesters; 3 hours. Credit, 3 year-hours.) 

101-102. Intermediate Course — Work of elementary course contin- 
ued, advanced grammar, including syntax, prose composition, trans- 
lation, sight reading, parallel. (Both semesters; 3 hours. Credit, 3 
year-hours.) 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 85 

201-202. Advanced Course— Syntax, stylistic composition, translation, 
parallel. (Both semesters; 3 hours. Credit, 3 year-hours.) 

301-302. History of German Literature, Classics, or Philology, the 
choice depending upon the demand. (Hours to be arranged.) 

SPANISH 

Professor Crow Associate Professor Hathaway 

Instructors Bueno and Wise. Messrs. Mounts, Mason and Campbell. 

21-22. Elementary Course— Pronunciation, elementary syntax, dicta- 
tion, written exercises, memorizing of vocabularies and short poems, 
translation. (Both semesters; 3 hours. Credit, 3 year-hours.) 

101-102. Intermediate Course— Work of elementary course continued, 
advanced grammar, including syntax, prose composition, translation, 
parallel. (Both semesters; 3 hours. Credit, 3 year-hours.) 

201-202. Commercial Correspondence.— rO/?en upon permission of 
instructor. Both semesters; 3 hours. Credit, 3 year-hours.) 

301-302. Advanced Course— Syntax, stylistic composition, translation, 
parallel. (Both semesters; 3 hours. Credit, 3 year-hours.) 

401-402. History of Spanish Literature— Classics, or Philology, the 
choice depending upon the demand. (Hours to be arranged.) 

THE DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY 

Professor Enwall Assistant Professor Hinckley 

NOTE: Students may begin with Courses 201, 203 and 301, 303. 

201. General Psychology— Facts and theories current in general psy- 
chology discussion; the sensations, the sense organs, the functions of 
the brain, the higher mental functions— attention, perception, memory, 
emotion, volition, the self; and like topics. (First semester; 3 hours. 
Credit, 1 1-2 year-hours. Hinckley.) This course will be repeated the 
second semester as Philosophy 0201. 

202. Experimental Psychology— Mainly laboratory work with stand- 
ard apparatus on the current problems in Experimental Psychology. 
Special attention given to methods of psychological investigation and 
the collection and treatment of data. (Prerequisite: Phil. 201. Lab- 
oratory fee, $2.00. Second semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year- 
hours. Hinckley.) 



86 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

203. Logic, Inductive and Deductive — ^The use of syllogisms, induc- 
tive methods, logical analysis, and criticisms of fallacies. (First se- 
mester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year -hours. Enwall.) 

204. Business Psychology — Salesmanship and Management — The 
main facts of theoretical, experimental, and social psychology will 
be presented in such manner as to make obvious their application to 
modern business. (Prerequisite: Philosophy 201. Second semester; 
3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Hinckley.) 

301. Ethics — Principles of Ethics: Study of such topics as goodness, 
happiness, virtue, duty, freedom, civilization, and progress. (First 
semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Enwall.) 

302. Advanced Ethics — The history of the various ethical systems. 
Theism and Agnosticism. (Prerequisite: Philosophy 301. Second 
semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Enwall.) 

303. History of Ancient Philosophy — The development of philoso- 
phic thought from its appearance among the Ionic Greeks to the time 
of Descartes. Special attention will be given to the philosophy of 
Plato and Aristotle. (First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year- 
hours. Enwall.) 

304. History of Modern Philosophy — A continuation of 303. Spe- 
cial attention will be given to the works of Descartes, Spinoza, Lieb- 
nitz, Kant, Hume, etc. (Second semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 
year-hours. Enwall.) 

304. Social Psychology — Influences of the social environment upon 
the mental and moral development of the individual. (Prerequisite: 
Philosophy 201. First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. 
Hinckley.) 

306. Abnormal Psychology— Abnormal phases of mental life; dreams, 
illusions, hallucinations, suggestions, hypnotism, hysteria, diseases 
of the memory, diseases of the will, etc. Special attention given to 
mental hygiene. (Prerequisite: Philosophy 201. Open to seniors, 
advanced pre-medical and law students only. Second semester; 3 
hours. Credit, 11-2 year -hours. Enwall.) 

401-402. Advanced Logic— Seminar. Theories of thought and knowl- 
edge. (Prerequisite: Philosophy 203, 303-304. Given with Philoso- 
phy 403-404 in alternate years. Both semesters; 3 hours. Credit, 3 
year-hours. Enwall.) Offered 1927-1928. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 87 

403404. Philosophy of Nature — Seminar. Man's relation to Nature; 
the various philosophical doctrines: Animism, Pantheism, Material- 
ism, Realism, Agnosticism, Humanism, Idealism, etc. (Prerequisite- 
Philosophy 203, 303-304. Given with Philosophy 401-402 in alter- 
nate years. Both semesters; 3 hours. Credit, 3 year-hours. Enwall.) 

501-502. .\dvanced Experimental Psychology — Lectures. Special 
problems will be assigned to advanced students. (Prerequisite: Phil- 
osophy 201-202, 306. Both semesters; 3 hours. Credit, 3 year-hours. 
HincMey.) 

503-504. Hume, Kant — Seminar. — The works of these men will be read, 
selected topics assigned for papers and discussion. A thesis will be 
required. (Prerequisite: Philosophy 201, 203, 301, 302, 303, 304, 
401-402, 403-404. Both semesters; 3 hours. Credit, 3 year-hours. 
Enwall.) 

505. The Philosophic Conceptions of the Great English Poets — 
(Prerequisite: English 103-104, 201-202. First semester; 3 hours. 
Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Enwall.) 

506. The Philosophic Conceptions of the Great American Poets — 
(Prerequisite: English 103-104, 201-202. Second semester; 3 hours. 
Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Enwall.) 

THE DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS 

Professor Benton Associate Professor Perry 

Associate Professor Weil Assistant Professor Higgins 

Assistant Professor Poindexter Instructor Little 

NOTE 1: The courses in physics are given as part of the work of the Depart- 
ment of Physics and Electrical Engineering. The instructoj-s in this department 
divide their time between physics and electrical engineering. The courses in elec- 
trical engineering are described under the College of Engineering and Architecture. 

NOTE 2: The courses offered in this department fall into three groups. (1) 
Physics 203-204 is a standard college course in general physics, which does not pre- 
suppose any previous knowledge of physics, and Physics 201-202 is an abbreviated 
college course in general physics; (2) Physics 205-209 (or 105-108 and 209) form a 
longer and more advanced course in general physics, pre-supposing a knowledge of 
the physics taught in the high schools and of trigonometry; (3) the remaimng 
courses deal more fully with special branches of physics, pre-supposmg a college 
course in general physics, and appropriate mathematical preparation. 

105-106. General Physics, including mechanics, heat, acoustics, and 
optics, but not electricity and magnetism. Text-book used in 1926- 
1927: Duff's College Physics. (Prerequisites: High School Physics 
and Plane Trigonometry. Required of freshmen in engineering and 
architecture. Both semesters; 3 hours. Credit, 3 year-hours. Benton.) 



88 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

107-108. General Laboratory Physics, to Accompany Piiysics 105- 
106 — (Laboratory fee, $1.50 per semester. Both semester! ; 2 labora- 
tory periods. Credit, 2 year-hours. Higgins.) 

201-202. A Brief Course in General Physics — (Laboratory fee, $1.50 
per semester. Required of agricultural students, sophomore year. 
Both semesters; 2 class and 1 laboratory periods. Credit, 3 year- 
hours. Benton.) 

203. Mechanics and Heat — General physics designed to meet the needs 
of the general student, and of those taking the Pre-Medical course. 
Text-book used in 1926-1927: Stewart's Physics. (Laboratory fee, 
$1.50. First semester; 3 class and 2 laboratory periods. Credit, 
2 1-2 year -hours. Little.) 

204. Sound, Light, Electricity and Magnetism — General physics 
designed to meet the needs of the general student, and of those 
taking the Pre-Medical course. (Laboratory fee, $1.50. Second se- 
mester; 3 class and 2 laboratory periods. Credit, 2 1-2 year-hours. 
Little.) 

205-206. General Physics, including mechanics, heat, acoustics, and 
optics, but not electricity and magnetism. (Prerequisites: High 
School Physics and Plane Trigonometry. Both semesters; 3 hours. 
Credit, 3 year-hours. Benton.) 

207-208. General Laboratory Physics, to Accompany Physics 205- 
206 — (Laboratory fee, $1.50 per semester. Both semesters; 2 labora- 
tory periods. Credit, 2 year-hours. Higgins.) 

209. General Electricity and Magnetism, being a continuation of 
Physics 205-208 (or Physics 105-108). Text-book used in 1926-1927: 
Franklin and MacNutt's Lessons in Electricity and Magnetism. 
(Laboratory fee, $1.50. First semesoer; 2 class and 1 laboratory pe- 
riods. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Perry.) 

301. Meteorology— A brief general course. Text-book used in 1926- 
1927: Milham's Meteorology. (Prerequisite: One year of college 
physics. First semester; 2 class and 1 laboratory periods. Credit, 
11-2 year-hours. Benton.) 

302. Astronomy — A brief general course on descriptive astronomy. 
Text-book used in 1926-1927: Moulton's Introduction to Astronomy. 
(Prerequisite: One year of college physics. Second semester; 2 class 
and 1 observation periods. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Perry.) 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 89 

3Cc^-304. Advanced Experimental Physics — This course consists of ex- 
periments of more advanced type than those of Physics 203-204, 207- 
208, or 209, together with study of the theory of the experiments and 
assigned reading. The particular experiments assigned vary with the 
needs and interest of the individual students. (Prerequisites: Mathe- 
matics and Physics 203-204 or 209. Both semesters; 1 class and 4 
j laboratory hours. Credit, 3 year-hours. Benton, Perry.) 

306. Electrical Measurements — The theory and practice of methods 
of measurement of resistance, current, electromotive force, power and 
energy. This course is planned primarily for advanced students in 
physics, chemistry, and electrical engineering. Laboratory work 
will be adjusted to meet the needs and interests of the individual 
student. (Prerequisites: Mathematics and Physics 209. Second se- 
mester; 1 class and 4 laboratory hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. 
Weil.) 

307-308. Theory of Heat — (2 class and 2 laboratory hours. Given 
upon sufficient demand. Poindexter.) 

309-310. Theory of Optics — (2 class and 2 laboratory hours. Given 
upon sufficient demand. Perry.) 

311. Advanced Electricty and Magnetism — (Laboratory fee, $1.50. 
First semester; 2 class and 1 laboratory periods. Credit, 11-2 year- 
hours. Perry.) 

401. Theoretical Mechanics — A course in theoretical mechanics cov- 
ering topics which do not enter the course in applied mechanics of- 
fered in the Mechanical Engineering Department; such as theory of 
attractions, potential, and vector analysis. (Prerequisites: Mathe- 
matics and Physics 203-204 or 205-209. First semester; 3 hours. 
Credit, 11-2 year -hours. Given upon sufficient demand. Perry.) 

402. Mathematical Physics — An introductory course to general mathe- 
matical physics. (Prerequisites: Mathematics and Physics 203-204 
or 205-209. Second semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. 
Given upon sufficient demand. Benton.) 



90 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

\ 

THE DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH 

Professor Buchanan 

Prerequisite — All students taking work in the Department of Speeci 
must have completed English 101-102. 

201, Effective Speaking — A gradual development of various types ol 
public addresses, leading up to group meetings for discussion of 
important topics of the day; practice in speaking to public groups 
other than the class; study of Parliamentary Law. The aim of this 
course is to train the student in preparing, arranging and presenting 
his material in the most interesting and convincing way to an audi- 
ence. (First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 1 1-2 year-hours.) This 
course will be repeated in second semester as Speech 0201; same 
hours and credit, 

203. Interpretation of Literature — The aim is to throw new light 
upon literature and its value by showing how the spoken voice can 
make great literature interesting and delightful. Both prose and 
poetry will be studied, and part of the time will be devoted to the 
reading of Robert Browning's dramatic monologues. Some atten- 
tion will be paid to voice defects, proper use of the voice, articula- 
tion and pronunciation drills and other mechanical necessities, but 
only so far as they are needed by the particular students in the group. 
(First semester; 2 hours. Credit, 1 year-hour.) 

204. Debate — A class primarily for intercollegiate debaters. Any one 
who enters the class and does the required work, whether he makes 
the debating team or not, will be given full credit. (Second semester; 
2 hours. Credit, 1 year-hour.) 

205. Argumentation— A theoretical and practical study of argumenta- 
tion leading to intercollegiate debating; detailed study of all types 
of arguments; comprehensive study of logic. Each student will pre- 
pare at least two complete briefs during the semester. This course 
will not be a required prerequisite for intercollegiate debating, but it 
is urged that students without debating experience take the course if 
they intend to debate. The chief value of the course is to teach the 
student to make logical preparation on any subject, and to systematic- 
ally arrange and preset speeich material. (First semester; 3 
hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours.) This course will be repeated sec- 
ond semester as 0205. Same hours and credit. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 91 

303. The One Act Play— This course will include the study of the 
one act play as a type; the reading and criticism of a large number 
of the best one act plays. Each, student will be required to write an 
original one act play during the semester. The course will also take 
into consideration the problem of staging plays, with all relative 
problems such as stage equipment, costuming, and make-up. (First 
semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours.) 

306. Impersonation — A course intended for those who wish to study 
characterization from the angles of reading and acting. (Prerequi- 
site: Either Speech 203 or 303. Second semester; 2 hours. Credit, 
1 year-hour.) 

Credit will also be given for work in the University dramatic produc- 
tions, upon recommendation of the instructor in charge and with the 
consent of the dean of the college in which the student is enrolled. 



92 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 
AND JOURNALISM 

Walter J. Matherly, Director 

Special Faculty — Walter J, Matherly, L. M. Bristol, 0. K. Arm- 
strong, J. G. Eldridge, J. W. Day, C. A. Curtis, H. W. Gray, M. O. Phillips. 

GENERAL STATEMENT 

Aim and Scope — ^The School of Business Administration and Jour- 
nalism was established in 1925. It offers instruction in three distinct 
fields of professional or semi-professional effort: 

I. Business Administration 
II. Journalism 
III. Social Administration 

Instruction in Business Administration is designed to provide scien- 
tific analysis of the basic principles of business. Its general purpose is 
to prepare students to become business executives. Expressed more spe- 
cifically, its aim.s are to provide familiarity with the fundamental ele- 
ments of business management; to develop facility in the use of quantita- 
tive instruments in the determination of business policies; and to assure 
recognition of the larger relationships between business leadership and 
social well-being or community interests. 

Instruction in Journalism proceeds upon the theory that the press is 
a public utility and that the increasing appreciation of its functions as an 
educational agency creates a demand for thorough preparation, ethically 
as well as educationally, for journalistic endeavor. The makers of 
modern newspapers and periodicals require knowledge of comprehensive 
and far-reaching character. They are compelled to deal with almost every 
phase of modern life and civilization. Those who would participate in 
journalistic activities as purveyors of news, as creators of public opin- 
ion, or as owners or managers of newspaper properties, must be trained— 
m English, history, economics, business management, sociology, govern- 
ment, and so on, as well as in the technique of journalistic procedure. 
The purpose of university instruction in journalism is to accomplish, if 
possible, these difficult objectives. 

Instruction in Social Administration is intended to prepare students 
for social service. Social work is a vital part of present-day community 
organization. Organized philanthropy is a characteristic of the age. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 93 

Charity dictated by the heart rather than the head is passing into the 
discard. Social administration is becoming a profession. The super- 
vision of community welfare requires executives thoroughly trained in 
social technology, family relationships, public health, eugenics, psychol- 
ogy, institutional management; in fact the very foundations of modern 
society itself. 

Special Registration Fee — The Board of Control has authorized a 
special registration fee of ten ($10.00) dollars for all regular students 
in the School of Business Administration and Journalism, and one (Sl.OO) 
dollar per semester-hour for oil other students taking technical courses 
listed under Business Administration, Journalism and Social Administra- 
tion. (The term "technical courses" is interpreted here as meaning those 
courses in Business Administration not marked "E", and those courses in 
Social Administration not marked "S".) For details of expenses see 
page 38. 

Degrees — Three undergraduate degrees are given in the School of 
Business Administration and Journalism; Bachelor of Science in Business 
Administration, Bachelor of Science in Journalism, and Bachelor of 
Science in Social Administration. 

For each of the degrees offered a total of seventy year-hours is 
required. 

In offering curricula leading to these degrees, the School's facilities 
during 1926-27 have been limited in terms of both teaching staff and 
equipment. But with its increased appropriations and with its develop- 
ment into a separate college in the fall of 1927, adequate provisions will 
be made for presenting all the courses herein described. 

Curricula — Business Administration — The curriculum in Business 
Administration contains both cultural and technical courses. The first 
two years are devoted to subjects largely cultural in nature and are in- 
tended to provide the student with a broad intellectual foundation. The 
last two years, with one or two exceptions, are concerned with special- 
ization, but not specialization of the narrower type. There are several 
required specialized courses, but these courses are of a pervasive character 
and are designed to acquaint the student with the underlying principles 
of modern business organization and management. 

In developing the curriculum in Business Administration, the School 
had proceeded upon the basis of the outstanding functions of business. 
Specialized courses have been developed more with reference to the major 
functions or relationships of the modern business manager than with 



94 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

reference to particular types of business. These functions or relation- 
ships, as developed by one American university, may be sub-sumttied under 
the following heads: (1) Relationship to physical and social environment, 
(2) relationship to finance, (3) relationship to marketing, (4) relation- 
ship to production, (5) relationship to personnel, (6) relationship to 
transportation and communication, (7) relationship to accounting and 
statistical measurements, and (8) relationship to risk. Careful study of 
the curriculum will show how these various relations are considered in 
the required specialized courses. 

In addition to these required courses, the student is given an oppor- 
tunity to specialize in his chosen field or function. For example, if he 
desires to specialize in marketing with the idea of becoming a sales 
manager, he may be permitted to take for his electives in the Junior year, 
two of the required courses, or six semester hours listed in the Senior 
year. This will enable him to elect nineteen semester hours in his Senior 
year. If a student wants to specialize in accounting, he may take his 
electives of six semester hours in accounting in his Junior year, and 
in his Senior year elect thirteen semester hours in accounting. 

Electives are confined largely to courses given by the special faculty 
of the School. In the choice of these electives, students must consult the 
Director. Each student will, at the beginning of his Junior year, be re- 
quired to present in writing the various courses which he proposes to 
elect, stating his reasons for electing each course. When these courses are 
approved by the Director, they become binding on the student. No 
changes will be allowed without adequate cause. 

Journalism — The curriculum in Journalism extends over a period 
of four years. Courses in the first two years are of basic nature; they 
are intended to give the student depth and to prepare him for later years 
of study. Freshmen are required to adhere rigidly to prescribed courses. 
Sophomores are given the opportunity to pursue one course in Journalism 
throughout the year. 

The last two years are designed to give both breadth and specializa- 
tion. In addition to six semester hours in Journalism taken in the second 
year, the student is required to take twenty-two semester hours in his 
third and fourth years. The minimum number of semester hours in 
Journalism required for graduation is twenty-eight. 

In the Junior and Senior years provision is made for twenty-three 
semester hours of electives. These electives must be taken largely from the 
following departments: English, business administration, history, eco- 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 95 

nomics, political science, sociology, social administration, and Germanic 
or Romanic languages. All electives must be approved by the Director 
of the School. 

Social Administration — The curriculum in Social Administration 
has been established in the School of Business Administration and Jour- 
nalism to meet the increasing need for trained executives in various lines 
of welfare activity; to develop the scientific spirit and give some practice 
in the use of scientific methods in dealing with social conditions and 
problems as the basis for intelligent citizenship; and to provide the back- 
ground for volunteer service and leadership in community welfare 
activities. 

Since training for social work is not offered in any other institution 
in Florida, the University has decided to undertake the task of meeting the 
demand for this type of education. Consequently, a beginning was made 
in 1926-27. It is planned to develop and enlarge further this curriculum 
just as rapidly as the demand therefor manifests itself and as funds are 
made available by legislative appropriations or otherwise. 

The first two years of the curriculum in Social Administration are 
devoted to courses of broad cultural value, while the last two years are 
concerned with courses more technical in character. Rather liberal allow- 
ance has been made for electives; but these electives must be selected 
primarily from courses in business administration and social administra- 
tion. Courses in related fields will be allowed where cause for the election 
thereof is shown. All electives must be approved by the Director of the 
School. 

Attention is called to the course in scoutcraft in the College of Agri- 
culture, the course in play and playgrounds in the Department of Physical 
Education, and the courses in social psychology, social ethics and abnor- 
mal psychology in the Department of Philosophy. 

Thirty hours in Social Administration, including 240 hours of field 
work under supervision, will be required for the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Social Administration. The field work may be taken in con- 
nection with any approved agency in Florida or in some other state. 



96 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

CURRICULUM 

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Business Administration. 

Name of Course Nature of Work Hours per Week 

Freshman Year 1 2 

Business Administration 103 Economic Geography 3 

Business Administration 104 Resources and Industries 3 

English 101-102 Rhetoric and Composition 3 3 

Mathematics 101 College Algebra 3 

Mathematics 108 Business Mathematics 3 

Foreign Language 3 3 

Business Administration 101E....Economic History of England 3 

Business Administration 102E.... Economic History of the United States 3 

Military Science 101-102 _ 2 2 

Physical Education 101-102 1 1 

^ 18 18 

Sophomore Year 1 2 

Business Administration 211-212 Principles of Accounting 3 3 

Business Administration 201-202E.... Principles of Economics 3 3 

Foreign Language — Continuation of Course Commenced in Freshman Year... .3 3 

Laboratory Science Physics, Chemistry, or Biology 5 5 

Military Science 201-202 2 2 

Physical Education 201-202 1 1 

17 17 

Junior Year I 2 

Political Science 101-102 American Government and Politics 3 3 

Philosophy 201 General Psychology 3 

Philosophy 204 Business Psychology ...„ 3 

Business Administration 302E Elements of Statistics 3 

Business Administration 321E Financial Organization of Society 3 

Business Administration 322 Financial Management 3 

Business Administration 331E..; Principles of Marketing 3 

Business Administration 341 Fundamentals of Manufacturing Admin- 
istration 3 

Business Administration 372 Personnel Management 3 

Approved elective 3 3 

18 18 

Senior Year 1 2 

Business Administration 351E Transportation and Communication 3 

Business Administration 361 Risk-bearing and Insurance 3 

Business Administration 401 Business Law 3 

Business Administration 402 Advanced Business Law 3 

Business Administration 404E Social Control of Business Enterprise 3 

Business Administration 409-10 Business Policy 3 3 

Approved electives _ 5 8 

17 17 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 97 

CURRICULUM 

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Journalism. 

Name of Course Nature of Work Hours per Week 

Freshman Year 1 2 

English 101-102 Rhetoric and Composition 3 3 

English 103-104 Introduction to English Literature 2 2 

Foreign Language 3 3 

Mathematics 101 College Algebra 3 

Business Administration lOlE* Economic History of England 3 

Business Administration 102E* Economic History of the United States 3 

Business Administration 104 Resources and Industries 3 

Military Science 101-102 „ 2 2 

Physical Education 101-102 1 1 

17 17 

Sophomore Year 1 2 

Journalism 201-202 History and Principles of Journalism 3 3 

Business Administration 201-202E.... Principles of Economics 3 3 

Foreign Language — Continuation of Course Commenced in Freshman Year 3 3 

Laboratory Science Chemistry, Physics, or Biology 5 5 

Military Science 201-202 2 2 

Physical Education 201-202 1 1 



17 17 



Junior Year 



Journalism 301 News — Principles of Reporting 3 

Journalism 302 News — Practice of Reporting 3 

Journalism 303-304 Newspaper Production 3 3 

Political Science 101-102 American Government and Politics 3 3 

Philosophy 201 General Psychology 3 

Philosophy 203 Xogic 3 

Approved electives 3 9 



18 18 



Senior Year 



Journalism 305-306 Feature Writing 3 3 

Journalism 403 Editorials 2 

Journalism 404 Law of the Press 2 

Business Administration 321E Financial Organization of Society 3 

Business Administration 404E Social Control of Business Enterprise 3 

Business Administration 433 Advertising 3 

Business Administration 434 Advanced Advertising 3 

Social Administration 441S Principles of Sociology 3 

Approved electives 4 7 



18 18 



* History 101-102 may be substituted for Business Administration 101E-102E. 



96 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

CURRICULUM 

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Social Administration. 

Name of Course Nature of Work Hours per Week 

Freshman Year 1 2 

English 101-102 Rhetoric and Composition 3 3 

English 103-104* Jntroduction to English Literature...^ 2 2 

Foreign Language „ 3 3 

Mathematics 101 College Algebra 3 

Business Administration lOlE** Economic History of England 3 

Business Administration 102E** Economic History of the United States 3 

Social Administration 122 .The Field of Social Work 1 

Social Administration 102 Introduction to Sociology 3 

Military Science 101-102 _ 2 2 

Physical Education 101-102 „ 1 1 

17 18 

Sophomore Year 1 2 

Biology 111*** Principles of Animal Biology 5 

Biology 118 Genetics and Evolution 4 

Business Administration 201-202E Principles of Economics _ 3 3 

Foreign Language — Continuation of Course Commenced in Freshman Year 3 3 

Philosophy 201 General Psychology 3 

Speech 201 Effective Speaking _0 3 

Social Administration 332**** Public Health 2 

Military Science 201-202 2 2 

Physical Education 201-202 _ 1 1 

17 18 

Junior Year 1 2 

Political Science 101-102 American Government and Politics _ 3 3 

Business Administration 211-212 Principles of Accounting 3 3 

Social Administration 301S History of Modern Philanthropy 2 

Business Administration 302E Elements of Statistics 3 

Social Administration 323S Introduction to Social Administration 3 

Social Administration 324S Criminology and Penology 3 

Social Administration 361-362 Elementary and Advanced Case Work 2 2 

Approved Electives 5 3 

18 17 

Senior Year 1 2 

Social Administration 366 Psychiatric Social Work 1 

Social Administration 372 Social Law and Social Legislation 3 

Social Administration 424 Community Organization 2 

Social Administration 441S Principles of Sociology 3 

Social Administration 465-466 Field Work 2 2 

Aproved Electives 13 9 

^ 18 17 

* Business Administration 103-104 may be substituted for English 103-104. 
* 'History 101-102 may be substituted for Business Administration 101E:-102E, 
♦•♦Chemistry or Physics may be substituted for Biology 111, 118. 
** ••Those going into Law may substitute Criminology and Penology. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 99 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 



THE DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Professor Matherly Associate Professor Gray 

Assistant Professor Curtis Instructor Eldridge 

Instructor Day Instructor Phillips 

NOTE 1: The courses in Business Administration are given by the Department 
of Economics and Business Administration, instructors in this department dividing 
their time between economics and business administration. The courses in economics 
are described under the College of Arts and Sciences, page 73. 

NOTE 2: The courses in Business Administration marked E are the same 
courses as those in Economics. For example Business Administration lOlE is the 
same as Economics 101, or Business Administration 302E is the same as Economics 302. 

GENERAL BUSINESS 

lOlE. Economic History of England — (First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 
1 1-2 year-hours ) 

102E. Economic History of the United States — (Second semester; 
3 hours. Credit, 1 1-2 year-hours ) 

103. Economic Geography — This course deals with the adjustments 
to natural environment which man makes in his effort to secure a liv- 
ing. The subject-matter consists of climate, soils, products of land 
and sea, natural divisions of the world, trade routes, and commer- 
cial centers. (First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 1 1-2 year-hours. 
Phillips, Eldridge.) 

104. Resources and Industries — A study of the economic resources of 
the world; sources and economic importance of principal commodi- 
ties; types of basic industries, including processes of production, 
localizing factors and relative positions of various geographical 
territories. Special attention will be devoted to the South in general 
and to Florida in particular. (Prerequisite: Business Administra- 
tion 103. Second semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Phil- 
lips, Eldridge.) 

201-202E. Principles of Economics — (Both semesters; 3 hours. Credit, 
3 year-hours. Matherly, Curtis, Eldridge.) 

302E. Elements of Statistics — (Prerequisite: Business Administration 
201 -202 E. Second semester; 3 hours. Credit, 1 1-2 year-hours. 
Curtis.) 



100 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

308. Business Organization and Management — The forms of business 
organization with emphasis on the corporation. The external rela- 
tions of a business organization and the internal coordination of the 
factors in production with a view to the establishment of effective con- 
trol and definite responsibility for results. Special attention will be 
directed to the various functions to be performed such as, production, 
finance, personnel, marketing, risk-taking, and records and standards. 
(Primarily for students in Engineering and Pharmacy. Prerequisite: 
Economics 201-202 or Economics 307. Second semester; 3 hours. 
Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Eldridge.) 

401. Business Law — Contracts and agency; the formation, operation, in- 
terpretation, and discharge of binding agreements; creation of the 
relation of agency; types of agents; rights and obligations of the 
agent, principal, and third party; termination of the relationship of 
agency. (Required of Seniors in Business Administration. First se- 
mester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Day.) 

402. Advanced Business Law — Conveyances and mortgages of real 
property ; sales and mortgages of personal property ; the law of nego 
tiable instruments; partnership. (Required of Seniors in Business 
Administration. Second semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours 
Day.) 

404E. Social Control of Business Enterprise — (Prerequisite: Busi 
ness Administration 201-202E. Second semester; 3 hours. Credit 
11-2 year-hours. Curtis.) 

409-410. Business Policy — The purpose of this course is to correlate 
coordinate and tie together the various specialized courses in business 
administration. The point of view is that of the chief executive 
Consideration is given to the forms of organization, external and 
internal relationships of the business, lines of authority, duties and 
responsibilities of functional departments, methods of determining 
policies, and standards of operating efficiency. Various faculty 
members and outside business executives assist the instructor in 
charge in the presentation of specific business cases and problems. 
Students are required to apply business principles to these cases 
and problems and make written reports thereon. (Required of Sen- 
iors in Business Administration. Both semesters; 3 hours. Credit, 
3 year-hours. Matherly.) 

503-504, Seminar in Business Administration — Students individually 
and in groups will be directed in special projects of business research 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 101 

with repoits and discussion. (Both semesters; one tivo-hour period a 
week. Credit, 3 year-hours. Matherly, Curtis.) 

ACCOUNTING 

211-212. Principles of Accounting — Lectures with laboratory assign- 
ments. An introductory survey of the accounting process ; the under- 
lying principles of double-entry record making; basic types of rec- 
ords and reports; accounting procedure and technique — during the 
first semester. The work of the second semester is concerned pri- 
marily with a study of the balance sheet and the statement of profit 
and loss, their form and content, and the related problems of valua- 
tion, depreciation, reserves, profits, etc. Laboratory exercises. 
(Both semesters; two lectures and two laboratory hours a week. 
Credit, 3 year-hours. Gray.) 

311-312. Advanced Accounting — Lectures and problems. An advanced 
study in accounting theory and practicCi. Special types of problems 
together with forma," records, and reports peculiar to each. Applica- 
tion of theory in the solution of practical problems will be empha- 
sized. (Prerequisite: Business . Administration 211-212. Both semes- 
ters; 3 hojjs. Credit, 3^ ycar-aours. Gray.) 

411. Cost Accounting — Lectures and problems. A study of the meth- 
ods of collection, compilation and interpretation of cost data for 
industrial and commercial enterprises; preparation of records and 
reports; uses of cost data in business control. Principles and pro- 
cedure illustrated by typical problems. (Prerequisite: Business 
Administration 211-212. First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 
year-hours. Gray.) 

412. Auditing — Lectures and problems. A study of the various types 
of audits, the methods of conducting each, and the preparation of 
reports. Principles illustrated by problems. (Prerequisite: Business 
Administration 311-312. Second semester; 3 hours. Credit, 1 1-2 
year-hours. Gray.) Omitted in 1926-27. 

414. Income Tax Procedure — Lectures and Problems. A study of the 
Federal Income Tax law and the related accounting problems. Ex- 
ercises in the preparation of returns, claims for refunds and abate- 
ments. (Prerequisite: Business Administration 211-212. Second se- 
mester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Gray.) 



102 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

FINANCE 

321E. Financial Organization of Society — (Prerequisite: Business 
Administration 201-202E. First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 
year-hours. Curtis.) 

322. Financial Management — This course is concerned with the finan- 
cial manager's task in an operating business enterprise. It deals 
with financial policies and practices, with control of financial activi- 
ties, and with the management of the financial function in business 
administration. (Prerequisite: Business Administration 321E. Sec- 
ond semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Curtis.) 

422. Principles of Investment — A study of the various forms of invest- 
ments with reference to their suitability for the different types of 
investors; the money market, its nature and the financial factors which 
influence the price movements of securities; elements of sound in- 
vestment and methods of f.omputing net earnings, amortization, rights 
and convertibles.' T^ie aim wi!l be ;tf> • tram . the student to act effi- 
ciently in a fipdricial capacity either as a borrower or lender, as in- 
vestor or'ti'ustee, or as. fiscal agent of a corporation. (Prerequisite: 
BusiTiess Administrntiori, 321 Ev SpcoiuI semester; 3 hours. Credit, 
11-2 year-hours. Eldridge.) 

423E. Money — (Prerequisite: Business Administration 321E. First se- 
mester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Curtis.) 

424E. Banking — (Prerequisite: Business Administration 321E. Sec- 
ond semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Curtis.) 

429E. Government Finance — (Prerequisite: Business Administration 
201-202E. First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. El- 
dridge.) 

MARKETING 

331E. Principles of Marketing — A survey of the marketing structure 
of industrial society; fundamental functions performed in the mar- 
keting process and the various methods, agencies and factors re- 
sponsible for the development and execution of these functions; 
marketing problems of the manufacturer, wholesaler, and different 
types of retailers; the marketing function in business management. 
(Prerequisite: Business Administration 201-202E. First semester; 3 
hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Eldridge.) 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 103 

332. Market Management — A study of the function of marketing in 
the operation of business enterprises. The point of view is that of 
the sales manager and the purchasing agent. The course provides an 
introduction to the following: Market analysis, market research, 
formulation of marketing policies, choice of channels of distribu- 
tion, methods of advertising and administrative control of marketing 
activities. (Prerequisite: Business Administration 331E. Second se- 
mester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Curtis.) 

431. Principles of Salesmanship — Actual practice in sales methods, 
including preparation for and obtaining the interview; presenting 
the sales talk; meeting and overcoming objections; detailed study of 
the stages of the sale; attention, interest, desire and action; sales 
tactics; sales personality. Principles covered apply to all kinds 
of selling specialties, styles, etc. (Prerequisite: Business Administra- 
tion 201-202E or Economics 307. First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 
1 1-2 year-hours ) 

432. Retail Store Management — A study of retail store problems; 
types of stores; executive control; purchasing; accounts; location; 
service; organization; management of employees; and price poli- 
cies. (Prerequisite: Business Administration 201-202E or Economics 
307. Second semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours ) 

433. Advertising — The course consists of a study of the history and eco- 
nomics of advertising. Attention is also devoted to the types of ad- 
vertising and their adaptation to the various lines of business, to 
the relative value of various advertising media, to the psychological 
principles underlying advertising, and to the administrative control 
of advertising expenditures. (Prerequisite: Business Administration 
201-202E. First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours J 

434. Advanced Advertising — The technique of advertising. Considera- 
tion is given to the mechanics of advertising, types of advertising 
copy, theories of literary style as applied to copy writing, advertising 
policies, and methods of testing the effectiveness of advertising activ- 
ities. (Prerequisite: Business Administration 433. Second semester; 
3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours ) 

435. International Trade — A study in world economics involving the 
principles and policies of international trade. Particular attention 
is given to the international aspects of the economic policies and ac- 
tivities of modem nations. (Prerequisite: Business Administration 
201-202E. First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 1 1-2 year hours. 
Phillips.) 



104 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

436. Foreign Trade Technique — This course treats foreign trade as a 
business profession and serves to familiarize the student with the 
problems and practices involved in exporting and importing. (Pre- 
requisite: Business Administration 201-202E. Second semester; 3 
hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Phillips.) 

PRODUCTION 

341. Fundamentals of Manufacturing Administration — This course 
covers the problems involved in the construction, equipment and ad- 
ministration of a manufacturing enterprise. The unit of study is 
the factory. The subject matter is treated under four heads: the 
underlying principles of production, the agencies of production, the 
control of production operations, and the establishment of production 
standards. (Prerequisite: Business Administration 201-202E. First 
semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Gray.) 

TRANSPORTATION AND COMMUNICATION 

351E. Transportation and Communication — (Prerequisite: Business 
Administration 201-202E. First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 1 1-2 
year-hours. Phillips.) 

355. Elements of Business English — ^The use of English in business; 
analysis and writing of letters of application, collection, credit, in- 
quiry, adjustment, acknowledgment and sales; the grammatical con- 
struction of letters; the preparation of professional forms; the writ- 
ing of business reports. (First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 
year-hours ) 

RISK-BEARING AND INSURANCE 

361. Principles of Risk-bearing and Insurance — A general introduc- 
tion to risk, risk-bearing and insurance; the risk element in modern 
industry; forms of risk; the business manager's methods of handling 
risk. Special study is made of life insurance, fire insurance, marine 
insurance, and other types of insurance. (Prerequisite: Business Ad- 
ministration 201-202E. First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year- 
hours. Matherly.) 

369. Business Forecasting — This course aims to survey the problem of 
the reduction of business risk through the collection and interpreta- 
tion of information. The work deals with the problems of general 
prosperity and depression, and is a quantitative approach to the gen- 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 105 

eral problem of economic cycles. The statistical methods used in 
analysing economic data, with special emphasis upon the methods of 
forecasting the business cycle, will be examined. A consideration of 
existing barometers will be included. (Prerequisite: Business Admin- 
istration 302E. First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. 

) 

PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT 

372. Personnel Management — A scientific study of the methods of 
hiring and handling personnel in the various lines of industry. The 
supply, selection, training, promotion, transfer and discharge of em- 
ployees; the computation and significance of labor turnover; hous- 
ing, educational and recreational facilities; the functions of a per- 
sonnel department with reference to efficiency and maintenance of 
good will between employees and employers. (Prerequisite: Busi- 
ness Administration 201-202E. Second semester; 3 hours. Credit, 
11-2 year-hours. Motherly.) 

473E. Labor Problems — (Prerequisite: Business Administration 201- 
202E. First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Curtis.) 

THE DEPARTMENT OF JOURNALISM 

Professor Armstrong Assistant Professor 

201-202. History and Principles of Journalism — The history of Jour- 
nalism from its earliest forms down to the present time. Emphasis 
will be placed upon American Journalism, considered by periods of 
time, and through biographical studies of leading journalists. Dis- 
cussion of the principles of modern journalism. (Both semesters; 3 
hours. Credit, 3 year-hours.) 

SOL News — Principles of Reporting — ^What constitutes news; the 
gathering of news; some practical laboratory work in the writing, 
copyreading and editing of news. (Prerequisite: Journalism 201-202. 
First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours.) 

302. News — Practice in Reporting — Laboratory work in the writing, 
copyreading and editing of news. (Prerequisite: Journalism 201-202. 
Second semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours.) 

303-304. Newspaper Production — A consideration of all the factors 
involved in issuing a newspaper; editorial, business and mechanical; 
personnel, organization and material. (Prerequisite: Journalism 201- 
202. Both semesters; 3 hours. Credit, 3 year-hours.) 



106 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

305. Principles of Feature Writing — A study of the principles under- 
lying the writing of special feature articles. (Prerequisite: Jour- 
nalism 201-202. First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year -hours.) 

306. Practice in Feature Writing — Laboratory work in the writing of 
feature articles with a view to publishing them in newspapers and 
magazines. (Prerequisite: Journalism 201-202. Second semester; 3 
hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours.) 

307. Agricultural Journalism — A study of Journalism from the stand- 
point of country newspapers and agricultural publications, state and 
national. (Prerequisite: Journalism 201-202. First semester; 3 
hours. Credit, 11-2 year -hours.) 

308. Country Newspaper Production — The editorial, mechanical and 
business phases of country newspaper production. (Prerequisite: 
Journalism 201-202. Second semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year- 
hours.) 

403. Law of the Press — A consideration of the laws governing the 
public press, with special study of the law of libel. (Prerequisite: 
Journalism 201-202. First semester; 2 hours. Credit, 1 year-hour.) 

404. Editorials — The principles and practice of editorial writing. (Pre- 
requisite: Journalism 201-202. Second semester; 2 hours. Credit, 
1 year-hour.) 

THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL ADMINISTRATION 

Professor Bristol Instructor Carlton 

NOTE 1: The courses in Social Administration are given by the Department of 
Sociology and Social Administration, instructors dividing their time between sociology 
and social administration. The courses in sociology are described under the College 
of Arts and Sciences, page 76. 

NOTE 2: The courses in Social Administration marked S are the same courses 
as those in Sociology. For example. Social Administration 102S is the same as 
Sociology 102 or Social Administration 323S is the same as Sociology 323. 

102S. Introductory to Sociology — (Second semester; 3 hours. Credit, 
11-2 year-hours. Bristol.) 

122. The Field of Social Work — An orientation course presenting a 
general view of the following fields of social work; family, medi- 
cal, educational, recreational, industrial, correctional and religious. 
(Second semester; 1 hour. Credit, 1-2 year-hour. Bristol, special 
lecturers.) 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 107 

301S. History of Modern Philanthropy — A historical approach to 
an understanding of modem scientific philanthropy. (First semes- 
ter; 2 hours. Credit, 1 year-hour ) 

322S. Rural Sociology — (Second semester; 3 hours. Credit, 1 1-2 
year-hours. Bristol.) 

323S, Introduction to Social Administration — A case method of 
approach to a study of social problems and approved methods of 
social action. (Should be preceded by Social Administration 102S 
and 122. First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 1 1-2 year-hours. Bristol.) 

324S. Criminology and Penology — Nature and causes of crime; pun- 
ishment, correction, prevention. Sociological aspects of criminal law 
and procedure. Constructive proposals. (Prerequisite: Social Ad- 
ministration 102S and 323S, or special permission. Second semester; 
3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Bristol.) 

332. Public Health — History of preventive medicine; personal hygiene; 
community hygiene; the recognition of the ordinary communicable 
diseases; sanitation; a constructive health program. (Second semes- 
ter; 2 hours. Credit, 1 year -hour. Lecturers provided by the State 
Board of Health and the Florida Public Health Association.) 

361. Elementary Case Work — The methods of case work as applied to 
the treatment of the socially inadequate. (Prerequisite: One course 
in Social Administration, or consent of instructor. First semester; 2 
hours. Credit, 1 year-hour ) 

362. Advanced Case Work — ^Continuation of preceding with special 
emphasis on the technique of case work and office management. 
(Prerequisite: Social Administration 361, or consent of instruc- 
tor. Second semester; 2 hours. Credit, 1 year-hour ) 

366. Psychiatric Social Work — A course of eight two-hour lectures 
and clinics at the State Farm Colony for the Epileptic and Feeble- 
minded on the psychology of sub-normal, abnormal, and psycho- 
pathic children, together with clinical diagnosis, treatment and train- 
ing. (Prerequisite: General Psychology. Second semester. Credit, 
1-2 year-hour. Dr. Walsh.) 

367. Correctional Social Work — A study of the principles and tech- 
nique of probation and parole based on actual experience in the 
courts and in the field, and on recent extensive literature of the sub- 
ject. Intended primarily for those who plan to become probation or 
parole officers, juvenile court judges, or social workers in the field 



108 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

of delinquency. (Prerequisite: One course in Social Administration 
or consent of instructor. First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year- 
hours ) Given alternate years. 

372. Social Law and Social Legislation — A study of the Laws of Flor- 
ida pertaining to social welfare and comparison with those of other 
states. Principles of social legislation. Suggestions as to improve- 
ment. (Prerequisite: Social Administration 323S. Second semester; 
3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Bristol.) Given alternate years. 

424. Community Organization — ^Theory of community; process of 
community organization; formation of community ideals and cooper- 
ative activities. Formal organization of forces and agencies; health, 
business, philanthropic, and their federation. The Community Chest 
Movement. (Second semester; 2 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. 
) Given alternate years. 

441S. Principles of Sociology — (First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 1 1-2 
year-hours. Bristol.) 

443S. Race Problems — (Prerequisite: One course in sociology or con- 
sent of instructor. First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. 
Bristol.) Alternate years. 

465-466. Field Work — At least 240 hours of supervised field work will 
be required of all candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Social Administration. This may be taken either with University 
class work or summers in connection with approved agencies in 
Florida or other states. (Prerequisite: Social Administraion 361. 
First and second semesters. Credit according to hours in field and 
results, not to exceed three year-hours ) 

541-542S. Seminar in Sociology. 

561-562. Seminar: Case Work Discussion — (For advanced students, 
primarily graduates, doing advanced work in case problems and 
methods. First and second semesters. One two-hour period a week. 
Credit, 2 year-hours.) 

571-572. Seminar in Social Research and Investigation — Students in- 
dividually and in groups will be directed in the investigation of so- 
cial and industrial conditions with reports and discussions. (For 
graduate students majoring in Social Administration. First and 
second semesters; one two-hour period a week. Credit, 3 year-hours. 
Matherly, Bristol.) 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 109 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

WiLMON Newell, Dean and Director 
GENERAL STATEMENT 

The College of Agriculture has three divisions: 

1. Instruction Division (the College proper) 

2. Research Division (Experiment Station) 

3. Agricultural Extension Division. 

THE COLLEGE 

W. L. Floyd, Assistant Dean 

Faculty— C. E. Abbott, W. H. Beisler, J. R. Benton, A. P. Black, F. 
M. Brennan, F. W. Brumley, L. M. Bristol, 0. C. Bryan, H. W. Chandler, 
M. D. Cody, A. F. Cooke, C. L. Crow, C. A. Curtis, S. K. Eshleman, J. M. 
Fair, L. C. Farris, W. L. Floyd, J. G. Gee, John Gray, R. C. Goodwin, 
H. E. Hammar, L. G. Haskell, F. H. Heath, V. T. Jackson, T. R. Leigh, 
E. L. Lord, B. F. Luker, F. G. Martin, Wilmon Newell, C. G. Phipps, W. 
A. Rawls, P. L. Reed, F. Rogers, J. S. Rogers, C. A Robertson, N. W. 
Sanborn, C. A. Scarborough, A, L. Shealy, T. T. Shoot, T. M. Simpson, 
S. A. Small, A. P. Spencer, A. W. Sweet, A. C. Tipton, J. E, Turlington, 
Rudolph Weaver, C. S. Whitehead, C. H. Willoughby, E. M. Yon. 

Aim and Scope — The College was established under the Acts of 
Congress creating and endowing institutions for the liberal and practical 
education of the industrial classes. Recognition of agriculture as a branch 
of collegiate instruction is a distinctive feature of schools thus founded. 

The aim of the College is to afford young men the best possible op- 
portunity for gaining technical knowledge and training in the art and 
science of agriculture. About one-third of the student's time is devoted 
to technical studies, the other two-thirds to cultural studies and basic 
sciences. A foundation is thus laid which will enable graduates to become 
leaders in educational work or effective producing agriculturists. 

Buildings and Equipment — Agricultural Hall, described on page 
21, is the principal building for the college. The offices, class-rooms and 
laboratories for the departments of agronomy, agricultural engineering, 
animal husbandry and dairying, horticulture, poultry husbandry and 
veterinary science are located in this building. 



110 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

A horticulture building is in process of construction which will pro- 
vide additional class-room and laboratory space. 

Arrangements are made for outside instruction in the different de- 
partments on the college farm which consists of 135 acres. The farm is 
equipped with a foreman's home, general barn for work stock, modern 
dairy barn, veterinary hospital, sweet potato storage house, propagating 
house, corn crib, farm machinery and implements, several stock lots and 
sheds, poultry houses and irrigating systems, and a number of types and 
breeds of cattle, hogs and other farm animals. The Experiment Station 
farm containing about 500 acres joins the College farm and is also accessi- 
ble for instructional purposes. 

Libraries — Many works on agriculture and horticulture have re- 
cently been added to the general library. A trained librarian aids students 
in finding needed references. Each department has, furthermore, a small 
collection of well selected volumes, which are always accessible. The Ex- 
periment Station library contains a very complete set of bulletins from 
the experiment stations of the world and from the United States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, all fully indexed and carefully filed. 

The Agricultural Club — This is a voluntary association of students 
in the college. Its purpose is to give training in public speaking and in 
preparation for leadership. The programs consist mainly of speeches, 
essays and of debates on agricultural or civic topics. Meetings are held 
weekly. 

Fellowship — L. P. Moore Fellowship, for graduate students. See 
page 40. 

Scholarships — County Scholarships — Provision has been made by a 
legislative act for a scholarship, sufficient to pay the board of a student in 
the College of Agriculture, from each county, to be provided for at their 
discretion by the various Boards of County Commissioners. The recipient 
is to be selected by competitive examination from among the qualified 
applicants. 

Whether such a scholarship has been provided for may be learned 
from the Clerk of the Board of County Commissioners or the County 
Agent of the county in question. Other information may be obtained from 
the College of Agriculture. 

Boys' Club Scholarships — The Florida Bankers' Association offers 
club boys three prize scholarships, of ^100 each, in the College of Agri- 
culture: one for the western, one for the central and one for the southern 
areas of the State. 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 111 

Frank E. Dennis, of Jacksonville, offers a scholarship of $250 in the 
College of Agriculture to the State Pig Club champion. 

Loan Funds— Wiluam Wilson Finley Foundation — As a memorial 
to the late President Finley and in recognition of his interest in agricul- 
tural education, the Southern Railway Company has donated to the Uni- 
versity the sum of one thousand dollars ($1,000), to be used as a loan 
fund. No loan from this fund to an individual is to exceed $150 per 
year. Recipients are selected by the Dean of the College of Agriculture, 
to whom all applications should be directed. 

NOTE: Loan funds available for students in any college of the University, as 
well as the conditions under which loans are made, will be found described on 
page 41. 

Remunerative and Instructive Labor — Opportunities frequently 
occur for students to work in the fields and truck gardens, about the 
barns, in the buildings, and at the Agricultural Experiment Station, Those 
who engage in agricultural pursuits during vacation periods will be 
markedly benefited and after graduation will command more desirable po- 
sitions or find their efforts on the farm more effective. See also Oppor- 
tunities for Earning Expenses, page 39. 

Donations and Loans — The laboratories have been supplied with 
much of their farm machinery for instructional purposes through the gen- 
erosity of the following manufacturers and distributors: 

McCormick-Deering Co., Jacksonville. 
Gulf Fertilizer Co., Tampa. 

Florida Agricultural Supply Co., Jacksonville. 
Southern States Lumber Company, Pensacola. 
Peninsula Chemical Co., Orlando. 
Gould Pump Co., Seneca Falls, N. Y. 
Owensboro Ditcher Co., Owensboro, Ky. 
Oliver Chilled Plow Works, South Bend, Ind. 
Skinner Machinery Co., Dunedin. 
DeLaval Separator Co., New York. 

THE FOUR-YEAR COURSE 

NOTE: See page 47 for entrance requirements. 

Groups — The group courses offered afford the individual student 
opportunity for preparing for that branch of agriculture in which he is 
most interested. The Agronomy Group should be selected by those wish- 
ing to pursue general farming; the Animal Husbandry Group by those 



112 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

interested in stock raising; the Chemistry Group by those desiring to spe- 
cialize in Agricultural Chemistry, and others in like manner. 

A course called Orientation is given in the first year, to assist stu- 
dents in deciding what special line they will follow. This includes talks 
by representatives from the different groups and specialties in agricul- 
ture. 

Quantity of Work — No student will be allowed to take more than 
twenty hours of work, unless his general average during the previous 
year was at least 87, with no failure in any study; or more than twenty- 
two hours, unless the previous year's average was at least 90, with no 
failure. 

By previous arrangement with the head of a department and the 
Dean, students may do practical work under competent supervision in 
any recognized agricultural pursuit during their course of study, and 
upon returning to College and rendering a satisfactory written report 
showing faithful service, will be entitled to one semester-hour of credit 
for each month of such work; such credits shall not total more than six 
semester-hours in the one-year and four-year courses. 

Degree — The work outlined in the following tables, whatever the 
major subject, leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture 
(B.S.A.). Seventy-two year-hours are required for graduation in all 
groups. 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 113 

CURRICULUM OF FRESHMAN AND SOPHOMORE YEARS, AND SUB- 

JECTS REQUIRED IN JUNIOR AND SENIOR YEARS 

FOR ALL FOUR-YEAR AGRICULTURE STUDENTS 

(Except those taking Landscape Design.) 

Names of Courses Nature of Work Hours per Week 

Freshman Year 1 2 

Agrl. Engineering 104 Wood Work, etc 2 

Animal Husbandry 102 Farm Animals 3 

Botany 101-102 General Botany 4 4 

Chemistry 101-102 General Chemistry 5 5 

English 101-102 Riietoric and Composition 3 3 

Horticulture 101 Elements of Horticulture 3 

Orientation 101 Freshman Orientation 1 

Mil. Science 101-102 _ 2 2 

Phys. Education 101-102 1 1 

19 20 

Sophomore Year 

Agrl. Engineering 202 Farm Machinery 4 

Agronomy 201 Farm Crops 3 

Biology 113 Animal Biology 4 

♦Chemistry 206 Qualitative Analysis 3 

English 203 1 The Short Story ] 

or \ or [ 3 

Journalism 203 J Agricultural Journalism ] 

Geology 201 Physical Geology 3 

Mathematics 85 Trigonometry or Applied Math 3 

Physics 201-202 Brief course in General Physics 3 3 

♦♦Poultry Husbandry 202 Farm Poultry 3 

Mil. Science 201-202 „ 2 2 

Phys. Education 201-202 1 1 

19 19 

Junior and Senior Years 

Agronomy 302 Nature and Properties of Soils 5 

Agronomy 308 Farm Management 3 

Bacteriology 301 General Bacteriology 4 

♦♦♦Chemistry 253 El. Agricultural Chemistry 3 

Economics 307 _ Introduction to Economics 3 

Entomology 302 Economic Entomology 4 

Vet. Science 201 Veterinary Elements 2 

Electives from Economics, Education, History, Language, 

or Sociology, subject to approval 3 3 

Group Requirements See below 19 19 

__^ 34 34 

NOTE: At the beginning of his Junior year, each student will enter the Group 

which he prefers, and, in addition to the subjects specified above for the Junior and 
Senior years, must take the subjects required in his chosen Group. 

*For Chem. Group take instead Chem. 201-202 3 3 

♦♦Those specializing in Pomology take instead Hort. 202; Poul. Husb. will 

be taken later. 

^♦♦For Chem. Group take instead Chem. 255-256 5 5 



114 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

Group Requirements — Junior and Senior Years 
Agricultural Engineering Group 

Names of Courses Nature of Work * Hours per Week 

Agronomy 303 fertilizers _ 3 

Agronomy 310 Marketing 3 

Horticulture 305 Citrus Culture „ 3 

Agricultural Engineering subjects 9 6 

Electives 4 10 

19 19 

Agronomy Group 

Agrl. Engineering 301 .Irrigation and Drainage 3 

Botany 202 Plant Physiology 4 

Bacteriology 302 Agricultural Bacteriology 4 

Plant Pathology 301 General Pathology 4 

Agronomy subjects „ 8 6 

Electives 4 - - 4 5 

19 19 

Animal Husbandry Group 

Bacteriology 302 Agricultural Bacteriology 4 

Poultry Husb. 301 Commercial Poultry 3 

Vet. Science 301-302 Anatomy and Physiology 3 3 

Vet. Science 304 Farm Sanitation 2 

Animal Industry subjects „ „ .9 7 

Electives _ „... „ _.._ _ _..„ , 4 3 



19 19 



Chemistry Group 



Chemistry 255-256 Organic Agricultural Chemistry 5 5 

Chemistry 301-302 „ Quantitative Analysis 3 3 

Chemistry 321-322 _ _ Physical Chemistry 3 3 

Chemistry 401-402 Agricultural Analysis 3 3 

German or French ....Elementary „ .3 3 

Electives „ „ „ _ 2 2 



19 19 



Entomology and Plant Pathology Group 



Bacteriology 302 Agricultural Bacteriology „ _ 4 

Entomology 303-304 ] Insectary Practice ] 

or \ or \ 4 4 

Plant Path. 401402 J Lab. Technique in Plant Path. J 

Plant Path. 301 „..General Pathology _ 4 

Plant Path. 303-304 „ Diseases of Florida Crops 3 3 

Plant Path. 405-406 Fungicides and Insecticides „ 3 3 

Electives „ ^ 5 



19 19 



*The first column gives the hours per week for the first semester, the second colt 
the hours per week for the second semester. 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 115 

Horticulture Group 
Names of Courses Nature of Work *Hours per Wefjc 

Agronomy 303 Fertilizers „ 3 

Botany 202 Plant Physiology 4 

Plant Path, 301 General Pathology 4 

Poultry Husb, 202 Farm Poultry „ „ 3 

Horticultural subjects 9 8 

Electives ^ _ „ „ 3 4 

19 19 

Smith-Hughes Group 

Agronomy 303 Fertilizers , „ 3 

Education 207 Educational Psychology 3 

Education 303-304 Methods of Teaching Voc. AgrI 3 3 

Education 306 _ Vocational Education 3 

Education 403 _ Principles of Education „ „ 3 

Education 409-410 Supervised Teaching of Voc. Agrl 3 3 

Plant Path. 301 General Pathology 4 

Sociology 306 _ Rural Sociology 3 

Electives in Agriculture _ 3 4 

19 19 



116 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

CURRICULUM FOR FOUR-YEAR COURSE IN 

LANDSCAPE DESIGN 

Names of Courses Nature of Work Hours per Week 

Freshman Year 1 2 

Architecture 101-102 Architectural Design 3 2 

Architecture 112 Elements of Beauty 1 

Architecture 121-122 Freehand Drawing _ 2 2 

Botany 101-102 General Botany _ 4 4 

Chemistry 101-102 General Chemistry 5 5 

English 101-102 Rhetoric and Composition 3 3 

Military Science 101-102 2 2 

Physical Education 101-102 „ 1 1 

^ 20 20 

Sophomore Year 

Architecture 226 Water Colors 2 

Architecture 227 Perspective Drawing 2 

Civil Engineering 101 Surveying Practice 2 

Geology 201 Physical Geology 3 

Horticulture 101 Elements of Horticulture 3 

Horticulture 204 Pruning 3 

Horticulture 207-208 Elements of Landscape Design 3 3 

Horticulture 210 History of Landscape Design 3 

Mathematics 85 Trigonometry 3 

Physics 201-202 Brief Course in General Physics 3 3 

Military Science 201-202 2 2 

Physical Education 201-202 „ 1 1 

20 19 

Junior Year 

Agric. Engineering 301 Irrigation and Drainage 3 

Agronomy 302 Soils _ 5 

Botany 202 Plant Physiology 4 

Botany 204 Local Flora 3 

Civil Engineering 303 , Highway Theory and Design 3 

Horticulture 303 Floriculture 3 

Horticulture 309-310 Landscape Design 3 3 

Horticulture 312 Plant Materials 3 

Plant Pathology 301 General Pathology 4 

16 18 

Senior Year 

Agronomy 311 _ Rural Law 2 

Economics 307 Introduction to Economics 3 

Horticulture 405-406 Advanced Planting Composition & Design..3 3 

Horticulture 408 Suburban and Rural Planting 3 

Horticulture 409 City and Town Planning 3 

Horticulture 410 General Forestry _ 3 

Plant Pathology 405-406 Fungicides and Insecticides 3 3 

Electives 3 5 

17 17 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 117 



THE DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 



THE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 

Professor Turlington Instructor Brumley 

Professor Messrs. Scarborough and Shoot 

54. Farm Management — An elementary course in organization of the 
farm business as a unit. The laying out of fields, location of build- 
ings, farm accounting and important factors affecting profits will be 
considered. (Short Courses and Normal School. Second semester; 3 
hours. Turlington, Scarborough.) 

301. Fundamental Principles — The fundamental principles of eco- 
nomics in their relation to Agriculture. (First semester; 3 hours. 
Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Turlington, Brumley.) 

303. Farm Records — Methods and practice of making and keeping farm 
inventories, feed records, crop records, and a study of statistical 
methods. (Prerequisite: Sophomore year. First semester; 2 class 
and 1 laboratory periods. Credit, 1 1-2 year-hours ) 

306. Farm Management — The factors of production; systems of farm- 
ing, their distribution and adaptation, problems of labor, machinery, 
laying out of farms and rotation systems. (Prerequisite: Sophomore 
year. Second semester; 2 class and 1 laboratory periods. Credit, 
11-2 year-hours. Turlington.) 

308. Marketing — Marketing and distributing farm products; market- 
ing organizations and laws under which they are operated. The rela- 
tion of foreign trade and general business conditions to the farmers' 
market. (Prerequisite: Sophomore year. Second semester; 2 class 
and 1 laboratory periods. Credit, 1 1-2 year-hours ) 

311. Rural Law — Classification of property, boundaries, fences, stock 
laws, rents, contracts, deeds, abstracts, mortgages, taxes, laws govern- 
ing shipping, etc. (Prerequisite: Sophomore year. First semester; 2 
hours. Credit, 1 year-hour. Turlington.) 

403. Advanced Farm Management — Special stress given to laying out 
and locating various buildings, lots, fields and crops; cropping sys- 
tems; farm surveys, and a study of successful Florida farms. (Pre- 
requisite: Agric. Econ. 301 and 306. First semester; 2 class and 1 
laboratory periods. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Turlington.) 



118 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

405. Agricultural Prices — A study of prices of farm products and the 
factors affecting them. (First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 1 1-2 
year-hours ) 

408. Marketing Fruits and Vegetables — ^The marketing of citrus, to- 
matoes, beans, potatoes and other Florida products. (Second semes- 
ter; 2 class and 1 laboratory periods. Credit, 1 1-2 year-hours. 

; 

409. Cooperative Marketing — A study of cooperative selling organi- 
zations, their successes and failures. Methods of organization, financ- 
ing and business management. (First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 
1 1-2 year-hours ) 

501-502. Farm Management — Seminar — A study of recent literature 
and research work. For graduate students; elective for seniors on 
approval. (Both semesters. Credit, 2 year-hours. Turlington, 
Brumley.) 

503-504. Marketing Seminar — A review of recent literature and re- 
search work in marketing. For graduate students; elective for sen- 
iors on approval. (Both semesters. Credit, 2 year-hours. Turling- 
ton, Brumley.) 

505-506. Research Problems— Thesis problems may be taken up upon 
approval of the head of the department. (Hours and credit to he ar- 
ranged.) 

THE DEPARTMENT OF AGRONOMY 

Professor Bryan Instructor 

Messrs. Hammar and Camp. 

21-22. Elements of Agronomy— A practical course in farm crops and 
soil fertility, designed to meet the needs of special students. (Labora- 
tory fee, $1.00. Both semesters; 3 hours. Hammar.) 

31. Fertilizers and Manures— An elementary study of the various 
commercial fertilizers; their sources, nature and effect of the soil 
and crop; the fertilizer requirements for different crops, fertilizer 
formulas, home mixing, and farm manures. (First semester; 3 
hours ) 



< 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE IW 

201. Farm Crops— The fundamental factors of field crop production, 
including the history, characteristics, adaptations, fertility require- 
ments, cultural practices and uses of the leading field crops. (Labora- 
tory fee, $1.00. 2 class and 1 laboratory periods. Credit, 11-2 year- 
hours ) 

302. Soils— The nature and properties of the soil as related to fertility 
and crop production. (Prerequisite: Chemistry 101-102, Biology 
201-202. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 4 class and 1 laboratory periods. 
Credit, 2 1-2 year -hours. Bryan.) 

303. Fertilizers and Manures— The nature, source and composition of 
the various fertilizer materials, and their influence on the crop and 
soil; the fertilizer requirements for various crops; economical use of 
farm manures; formulas; home mixing, etc. (Prerequisite: Agron- 
omy 302. 2 class and 1 laboratory periods. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. 
Bryan.) 

304. Forage Crops— The plants that produce feed for livestock; their 
characteristics, composition, adaptations and cultural methods. (Pre- 
requisite: Agronomy 201. 3 hours. Credit, 1 1-2 year-hours. 

; 

402. Advanced Crops— The fundamental principles of crop improve- 
ment, including experimental methods, breeding, selection, adapta- 
tions and a review of the more recent literature dealing with farm 
crops. (Prerequisite: Agronomy 201. 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year- 
hours ) 

405. Soil Fertility— The factors involved in crop production; source 
and loss of plant nutrients; methods and results obtained by labora- 
tory and field experiments. (Prerequisite: Agronomy 303. 3 hours. 
Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Bryan.) 

406. Origin and Classification of Soil— The origin and principles of 
land classification as related to Agriculture. Detailed maps of cer- 
tain areas will be required. (Prerequisite: Agronomy 302. 2 class 
and 1 laboratory periods. Credit, 1 1-2 year-hours. Bryan.) 

407. Special Crops— A study of the nature, classification, adaptations, 
cultural practices, uses, etc., of tobacco, sweet potatoes, watermelons 
and other minor crops. (Prerequisite: Agronomy 101. 2 hours. 
Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Hammar.) 



120 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

409. Grasses and Pasture Plants— The nature, characteristics, history 
and cultural practices of the important sod-forming grasses, as re- 
lated to pastured lawns, meadows, etc. (Prerequisite: Agronomy 101. 
2 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours ) 

411. Soil Biology— The micro-organisms in the soil, their effect on the 
fertility of the soil and plant growth. (Prerequisite: Agronomy 303, 
Biology 322. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 2 class and 1 laboratory pe- 
riods. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Bryan.) 

500-501. Agronomy Seminar— A review of the scientific literature deal- 
ing with the soil and farm crops. (1 hour. Credit, 1 year-hour. 
Bryan.) 

505-506. Research Work— Special problems in soils and farm crops. 
(Credit, 1-4 year-hour. Bryan.) 

THE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY 

Professor Leigh Professor Black 

Professor Beisler Professor Heath 

Assistant Professor Jackson Assistant Professor Goodwin 

NOTE: The instruction in this department is designed primarily to fit the 
needs of agricultural students. By means of lectures, recitations and laboratory 
work the student is taught the fundamental chemical principles underlying and con- 
troinng all plant and animal life. Laboratory courses are provided covering the 
quantitative analysis of agricultural products. 

101-102. General Chemistry— See Chemistry, page 69. 

206. QuAUTATiVE Analysis — A brief course dealing with the the- 
ory and practice of the qualitative separation of the metals and acid 
radicals. (Prerequisite: Chemistry 101-102. Laboratory fee $5.00. 
Second semester; six laboratory hours or its equivalent per week. 
Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Black.) 

253. Elementary Agricultural Chemistry — An introductory 
course presenting the important relationships of chemistry to plant 
and animal life. Students who expect to take Chemistry 255-256 
should not take this course. (Prerequisite: Chemistry 101-102. 
Laboratory fee $5.00. First semester; 2 class and 1 laboratory peri- 
ods per week. Credit, 1 1-2 year-hours. Black.) 

255-256. Organic Agricultural Chemistry - The relationships of 
chemistry to plant and animal life. A study of the fundamentals of 



< 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 121 

organic chemistry is included. This course may be elected instead 
of Chemistry 253 requirement if desired. (Prerequisite: Chemistry 
101-102. Laboratory fee $5.00 for each semester. Both semesters; 
3 class and 4 laboratory hours per week. Credit, 5 year-hours. 
Black.) 

301-302. Quantitative Analysis — See Chemistry. 
321-322. Physical Chemistry — See Chemistry. 

401. Agricultural Analysis — The quantitative analysis of milk and 
its products, vegetable oils, cereals and other food materials. (Pre- 
requisites: Chemistry 255-256 or 251-252 and 301-302. Laboratory 
fee, $5.00. First semester; 6 laboratory hours or its equivalent per 
week. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Black.) 

402. Agricultural Analysis — The quantitative analysis of mixed fer- 
tilizers, of some of the raw materials used in mixed fertilizers, and of 
soils. (Prerequisites: Chemistry, 255-256 or 251-252 and 301-302. 
Laboratory fee, $5.00. Second semester; 6 laboratory hours or its 
equivalent per week. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Black.) 

403. Water Analysis — See Chemistry. 

517. Biochemical Preparations — See Chemistry. 

THE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

Professor Rogers Instructor Eshleman 

21. Farm Machinery — Care, construction, operation and selection of 
farm machinery. (Short Course, Normal School. Laboratory fee, 
$1.00. First semester; 1 class and 2 laboratory periods. Rogers.) 

102. Wood Work — Practice in adjustment, care and use of wood work- 
ing tools, exercises in bench work, farm equipment and farm build- 
ing construction. (Laboratory fee, $1.00. Second semester; 2 lab- 
oratory periods. Credit, 1 year-hour. Eshleman.) 

202. Farm Machinery — Construction, operation and selection of har- 
vesting, seeding, spraying and tilling machinery. (Laboratory fee, 
$1.00. Second semester; 2 class and 2 laboratory periods. Credit, 
2 year-hours. Rogers.) 



122 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

301. Drainage and Irrigation — Farm surveying, drainage and irriga- 
tion systems; field practice in surveying and designing systems. 
(First semester; 2 class and 1 laboratory periods. Credit, 11-2 year- 
hours. Rogers.) 

302. Farm Motors — The sources of power on the farm; automobile, 
tractor and stationary gasoline engines; electric motors and wind- 
mills. (Laboratory fee, $2.00. Second semester; 2 class and 1 
laboratory periods. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Rogers.) 

303. Farm Shop — Belt lacing, carpentry, concrete construction, soldering 
and other farm shop operations; specially useful for students intend- 
ing to teach agricultural engineering in vocational schools. (First 
semester; 1 class and 2 laboratory periods. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. 
Rogers.) 

401. Farm Buildings — Construction, cost, management, sanitation and 
ventilation of farm buildings; laboratory exercises in designing and 
estimating of cost. (First semester; 2 class and 1 laboratory periods. 
Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Rogers.) 

402. Farm Concrete — Selection of materials; curing, mixing, placing, 
reinforcing, testing and waterproofing concrete. (Second semester; 
1 class and 1 laboratory periods. Credit, 1 year-hour. Rogers.) 

204. Agricultural Organization — The organization and proceedings 
of agricultural societies. (Second semester; 1 hour. Credit, 1-2 
year-hour. Rogers.) 

THE DEPARTMENT OF ANIMAL HUSBANDRY AND DAIRYING 

Professor Willoughby Instructor Martin 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

21. Elements of Animal Husbandry — ^Types and breeds of farm ani- 
mals, principles of feeding, breeding and management. (Short 
Courses and Normal School. First semester; 3 hours. Willoughby.) 

102. Types and Breeds of Animals — The breeds and classes of horses, 
cattle, sheep and swine; score-card and comparative judging. (Sec- 
ond semester; 2 class and 1 laboratory periods. Credit, 11-2 year- 
hours. Willoughby.) 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 123 

201. Animal Feeding — Composition of plants and animals; feeding 
standards and rations for farm animals. (First semester; 3 hours. 
Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Martin.) 

202. Animal Breeding — History and principles of the breeding of ani- 
mals; foundation and management of a breeding enterprise. (Second 
semester; 2 hours. Credit, 1 year -hour. Willoughhy.) 

203. Beef Production — Selection, feeding and management of beef 
cattle; marketing and slaughtering. Brief study of mutton produc- 
tion. (Prerequisite: Animal Husbandry 102. First semester; 3 
hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Willoughby.) 

204. Swine Production — Selection, feeding and management of swine; 
location and equipment of hog farm; marketing and slaughtering. 
(Prerequisite: Animal Husbandry 102. Second semester; 2 hours. 
Credit, 1 year-hour. Martin.) 

205. Advanced Stock Judging — Special training in live stock judging, 
showing practice and contests at fairs. (Prerequisite: Animal Hus- 
bandry 102. First semester; 1 class and 2 laboratory periods. Credit, 
11-2 year-hours. Willoughby.) 

302. Breed History — History of breeds; pedigrees and registration 
methods. (Prerequisites: Animal Husbandry 102 and 202. Second 
semester; 2 hours. Credit, 1 year-hour. Willoughby.) 

303. Meat Products — Farm slaughtering and packinghouse methods; 
preservation, curing, processing and marketing of meat and special 
products. (Prerequisites: Animal Husbandry 102, 203, 204. First 
semester; 2 hours, with occasional laboratory periods. Credit, 1 
year-hour. Willoughby, Martin.) 

401402. Seminar — History of live stock industry in America; special 
live stock topics; review of recent research. (For seniors and gradu- 
ates. First or second semester; hours and credit to be arranged. 
Willoughby.) 

DAIRYING 

22. Elements of Dairying — Composition and testing of milk; farm but- 
ter making; care of the dairy herd. (Short Courses and Normal 
School. Second semester; 3 hours. Laboratory fee, $1.00. Martin.) 

201. Farm Dairying — Secretion and composition of milk; testing milk 
and its products; farm butter making, ice cream and soft cheese mak- 



124 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

ing. (First semester; 2 class and 1 laboratory periods. Credit, 
11-2 year-hours. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Martin.) 

202. Dairy Management — Selection, feeding and management of a 
dairy herd; barns, equipment, marketing methods. (Second semester; 
3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year -hours. Martin.) 

301. Dairy Manufactures — Buying and testing cream; pasteuriza- 
tion; cream ripening and butter making; preparing the mix, freez- 
ing and hardening ice cream. (Prerequisite: Dairying 201. First 
semester; 3 class and 1 laboratory periods. Credit, 2 year-hours. 
Laboratory fee, $3.00. Martin.) 

302. City Milk Supply — Methods of producing sanitary milk; opera- 
tion of milk plants; duties of milk inspector, practice on local dairies. 
(Prerequisites: Dairying 201, 202, and Bacteriology. Second semes- 
ter; 2 hours. Credit, 1 year-hour. Martin, Willoughby.) 

303-304. Creamery Management — Creamery construction, sewage dis- 
posal, refrigeration; creamery calculation and bookkeeping; mar- 
keting. (Prerequisites: Dairying 201 and 202. First or second se- 
mester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Martin.) 

THE DEPARTMENT OF HORTICULTURE 

Professor Floyd Professor Lord 

Instructor Abbott Instructor Cooke 

21. Introduction to Horticulture — ^The fundamental principles of 
horticulture; practice in the culture, propagation, pruning and train- 
ing of the important fruit and ornamental plants of Florida. (Short 
courses and Normal School. Laboratory fee, $1.00. First semester; 
2 class and 1 laboratory periods. Abbott.) 

101. Elements of Horticulture — ^The fundamental activities of plant 
life with reference to the growth of orchard and garden crops. A 
study of propagation by budding, grafting, cuttings, etc., seed selec- 
tion, transplanting, pruning, spraying, frost protection, etc. (Lab- 
oratory fee, $1.00. First semester; 2 class and 1 laboratory periods. 
Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Abbott.) 

202. Fundamentals of Fruit Production — A general introductory 
course in the theory and practice of fruit growing. A detailed study 
of the nature of the responses of fruit trees. (Laboratory fee, $2.00. 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 125 

Second semester; 2 class and 1 laboratory periods. Credit, 11-2 
year-hours. Abbott.) 

204. Pruning — Principles of pruning and training; the physiological 
principles involved; practice in pruning and training fruit and orna- 
mental plants. (Laboratory fee, $1.00. Second semester; 2 class 
and 1 laboratory periods. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Abbott.) 

206, Trucking — Origin, relationship and classification of different truck 
crops, varieties, cultural methods in different sections, fertilizing, irri- 
gating and harvesting. Planning the home garden. (Laboratory fee, 
$1.00. Second semester; 2 class and 1 laboratory periods. Credit, 
11-2 year-hours. Abbott.) 

207-208. Elements of Landscape Design — Scope, methods and appli- 
cation to simple problems in design. (1 class and 2 laboratory pe- 
riods. Credit, 3 year-hours. ..._ ) 

210. History of Landscape Design — Development from early to mod- 
ern times. Relation to other arts and their influence. (3 hours. 
Credit, 1 1-2 year-hours ) 

301. Advanced Trucking — Soils suited to the leading commercial truck 
crops of Florida, cultural methods, fertilizing, irrigating, controlling 
insects and diseases, harvesting, packing and marketing. (Prere- 
quisiie: Biology 101-102. Laboratory fee, $2.00. First semester; 2 
class and 1 laboratory periods. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Abbott.) 

303. Floriculture — ^The growing of flowers upon the home grounds, 
pot plants, greenhouse crops and their cultural requirements, includ- 
ing ventilation, watering and heating. (Prerequisites: Horticulture 
101, Biology 101-102. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Second semester; 2 
class and 1 laboratory periods. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Cooke.) 

304. Commercial Floriculture — A study of commercial flower crops 
grown either in the open, under lath, or in greenhouse. Methods of 
packing and marketing will receive attention. (Prerequisites: Horti- 
culture 101 and 303. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Second semester; 1 
class and 2 laboratory periods. Credit, 11-2 year -hours. Cooke.) 

305. Citrus Culture — ^The citrus grove; site and soil selection; prepar- 
ation, planting and management; selection of varieties and stocks, 
and the use of cover crops. (Prerequisite: Horticulture 202. Lab- 
oratory fee, $1.00. First semester; 2 class and 1 laboratory periods. 
Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Lord.) 



126 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

306. Citrus Harvesting, Marketing and Judging — Methods of picking, 
handling, washing, drying, packing and shipping citrus fruits; iden- 
tification and judging of varieties. (Prerequisite: Horticulture 305. 
Laboratory fee, $1.00. Second semester; 2 class and 1 laboratory 
periods. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Lord.) 

307. Subtropical Fruits — ^Avocados, mangoes, pineapples and other 
tropical and subtropical fruits particularly adapted to Florida; cul- 
ture, varieties, insects, diseases, etc. (Prerequisites: Horticulture 101 
and 202. Laboratory fee, $1.00. First semester; 2 class and 1 labora- 
tory periods. Credit, 11-2 year -hours. Lord.) 

308. Deciduous Fruits — Peaches, pears, grapes, pecans, and other de- 
ciduous fruits with special reference to Florida conditions, culture, 
varieties, insects, diseases, etc. (Prerequisites: Horticulture 101 and 
202. Laboratory fee, $1.00. Second semester; 2 class and 1 labora- 
tory periods. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Lord.) 

309-310. Landscape Design — Design of home grounds, estates and pub- 
lic properties based on definite surveys. (1 class and 2 laboratory 
periods. Credit, 3 year-hours ) 

312. Plant Materials — The study of trees, shrubs and herbaceous 
plants suited to Florida conditions, their characteristics and land- 
scape values. (Prerequisites: Horticulture 101 and Biology 118. 
1 class and 2 laboratory periods. Credit, 3 year-hours. Floyd.) 

401. Advanced Citrus Problems — An advanced course especially em- 
phasizing the problems set by varying sites, soils, climates, stocks, 
varieties, etc. (Prerequisite: Horticulture 305. Laboratory fee, $1.00. 
First semester; 2 class and 1 laboratory periods. Credit, 11-2 year- 
hours. Lord.) 

402. Breeding Horticultural Plants — The application of the princi- 
ples of genetics to the breeding and improvement of horticultural 
plants. Methods of successful breeders of horticultural plants. Field 
work. (Prerequisites: Horticulture 202 and Biology 118. Labora- 
tory fee, $1.00. 2 class and 1 laboratory periods. Credit, 11-2 
year-hours. Lord.) 

403-404. Pomology Seminar — Study of advanced problems in fruit 
growing; review of current pomological literature; assigned topics 
and discussion. (Prerequisites: Horticulture 306 and 307. Senior 
year; first and second semesters; hours and credit to be arranged. 
Lord.) 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 127 

405-406. Advanced Planting, Composition and Design — ^The use of 
plants in various types of landscape problems, including design of 
public, semi-public and private properties. (1 class and 2 labora- 
tory periods. Credit, 3 year-hours ) 

408. Suburban and Rural Planning — The design of subdivisions, farm- 
steads, schools and rural centers. (1 class and 2 laboratory periods. 
Credit, 1 1-2 year-hours ) 

409. City and Town Planning — The underlying ideas of civic design, 
historic development, and broader phases of city planning. (3 hours. 
Credit, 11-2 year-hours ) 

411. General Forestry — The principles of forestry, forest cropping, 
protecting the home wood lot, use of Florida woods, varieties of tim- 
ber trees, and the influences of the forests on other industries of the 
State. (First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Floyd.) 

22. Agricultural Botany — The relationship, habits, characteristics and 
environmental relations of the important crop plants, with laboratory 
study of principal types. (Short Courses and Normal School. Lab- 
oratory fee, $2.00. Second semester; 2 class and 1 laboratory pe- 
riods. Abbott.) 

THE DEPARTMENT OF ENTOMOLOGY 
AND PLANT PATHOLOGY 

Professor Gray 
ENTOMOLOGY 

21. Farm, Garden and Orchard Insects — A general survey of some 
of the economic insects of Florida in reference to their distribution, 
life history, injury and control on the principal agricultural crops of 
the State. (Short Courses and Normal School. Laboratory fee, 
$2.00. First semester; 2 class and 1 laboratory periods.) 

302. Economic Entomology — An introduction to applied entomology 
based on the structure, classification, life histories, recognition and 
control of the injurious insects of Florida. (Laboratory fee, $3.50. 
Prerequisite: Biology 113. Second semester; 2 class and 2 labora- 
tory periods. Credit, 4 year-hours.) 



128 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

303-304. Advanced Economic Entomology — Field and laboratory 
problem work and insectary work in the rearing of some of the more 
common Florida insects. The study of natural parasites and the 
special technique required by professional workers in this line will 
be given. (Laboratory fee, $3.50. Prerequisite: Entomology 302. 
Both semesters; 4 hours. Credit, 4 year-hours.) 

401. Taxonomy — ^The collection, study and classification of local eco- 
nomic insects with special emphasis on some one group. (Prerequi- 
site: 302. Hours and credit to be arranged.) 

402. Fruit Insects — A study of pests encountered in deciduous, tropi- 
cal and citrus fruits, with detailed study of representative life his- 
tories and measures adapted to their control. (Laboratory fee, $3.50. 
Prerequisite: Entomology 302. Second semester; 2 class and 1 
laboratory periods. Credit, 11-2 year-hours.) 

403. Garden and Greenhouse Pests — The study of insects encoun- 
tered in the home, commercial garden and greenhouse. A detailed 
study of life history and specific control measures adapted to these 
conditions. (Laboratory fee, $3.50. Prerequisite: Entomology 302. 
First semester; 2 class and 1 laboratory periods. Credit, 11-2 year- 
hours.) 

501. Thesis — Senior and graduate problems in the various phases of en- 
tomology as shall be selected on approval of the instructor in charge. 
Required of graduate students registered for degree in the depart- 
ment. (Laboratory fee to depend on problem. Hours and credit to 
be arranged.) 

PLANT PATHOLOGY 

22. Diseases and Insects of Citrus — The important physiological and 
fungous diseases with a survey of the major injurious insects and 
methods for control. (Short Courses, Normal School. Labora- 
tory fee, $2.00. Second semester; 2 class and 1 laboratory hours.) 

301. General Pathology— The morphology and life histories of the 
principal fungi and lower bryophytes that are associated with plant 
diseases. Diagnosis and treatment of plant diseases. (Laboratory 
fee, $3.50. First semester; 2 class and 2 laboratory periods. Credit, 
2 year-hours.) 

303-304. Diseases of Florida Crops — Practical methods of combating 
fungous and bacterial diseases of Florida grove, truck and field 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 129 

plants. Signs of infection, diagnosis, means of transmission and 
miethods of control. (Prerequisites: Plant Pathology 301 or equiva- 
lent. Laboratory fee, $3.50 each semester. Both semesters; 1 class 
and 2 field or laboratory periods. Credit, 3 year-hours.) 

401-402. Laboratory Technique in Plant Pathology — Preparation 
of culture media, isolation, cultivation and physiological study of 
plant pathogenes; inoculation of host plants, relation to disease and 
the preparation of histological material. (Laboratory fee, $5.00. 
Both semesters; 1 class and 3 laboratory periods. Credit, 4 year- 
hours or more, to be arranged.) 

403-404. Mycology — Detailed study of fungi in reference to origin, 
systematic relationships, cytology and economic bearing in refer- 
ence to plant disease work. Collection and classification of local 
fimgi. (Both semesters; 2 class and 1 laboratory periods. Credit, 3 
year-hours.) 

405-406. Fungicides and Insecticides — Origin and history of fungicides 
and insecticides; systematic survey of mixtures now used. Chemical 
and physical reactions of same. Class, laboratory and field work. 
(Laboratory fee, $3.50 each semester. Both semesters; 1 class and 2 
laboratory periods. Credit, 3 year-hours,) 

501-502. Thesis — Problems for advanced degrees to be selected on ap- 
proval of instructor. Required of graduate students registered for 
degree in the department. (Laboratory fee to depend on problem. 
Hours and credit to be arranged.) 

THE DEPARTMENT OF POULTRY HUSBANDRY 

Professor Sanborn 

21. Poultry Essentials — Culling, feeding, housing, breeding, etc. 
(Short courses and Normal School. Laboratory fee, $1.00. First 
semester; 2 class and 1 laboratory periods.) 

202. Farm Poultry — Poultry as a modest sideline on the farm. Breeds 
and varieties; location and construction of buildings; feeding and 
management; incubation, breeding, rearing, care of adult birds on 
the farm. (Laboratory fee, $1.00. Second semester; 2 class and 1 
laboratory periods. Credit, 11-2 year-hours.) 

301. Commercial Poultry Keeping — Growing and maturing pullets, 
fall and winter eggs, feeding and care, houses and yards, showing and 



130 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

advertising. (Laboratory fee, $2.00. First semester; 2 class and 1 
laboratory periods. Credit, 11-2 year-hours.) 

302. Commercial Poultry Keeping — Incubation, breeding, rearing, 
spring and summer work, culling, farm grown feeds and poultry pas- 
tures, marketing. (Laboratory fee, $2.00. Second semester; 2 class 
and 1 laboratory periods. Credit, 11-2 year-hours.) 

401. Advanced Poultry Culture — Origin and study of breeds and va- 
rieties; score card and comparison judging; latest methods of select- 
ing high and low producing hens; mating for producing breeders and 
winners; practice judging. (Prerequisites : Poultry Husbandry 301 
and 302. Laboratory fee, $1.00. First semester; 2 hours. Credit, 1 
year -hour.) 

402. Poultry Management — Study of large farms, equipment of poul- 
try plants, planning of various buildings, laying out and conducting 
poultry farms. (Prerequisites: Poultry Husbandry 301 and 302. 
Laboratory fee, $1.00. Second semester, 2 hours. Credit, 1 year- 
hour.) 

403. Project Problems — To be arranged with instructor. Egg hatch- 
ing, investigations, poultry feeding, artificial lighting, chicken pox, 
etc. (Prerequisites: Poultry Husbandry 301 and 302. First semes- 
ter; 2 hours. Credit, 1 year-hour.) 

404. Pathology — Anatomy, physiology, diseases, parasites, sanitation. 
(Prerequisites: Poultry Husbandry 301 and 302. Second semester; 2 
hours. Credit, 1 year-hour.) 

THE DEPARTMENT OF VETERINARY SCIENCE 

Professor Shealy 

201. Veterinary Elements — ^Elementary anatomy and physiology of the 
domestic animals; causes and symptoms of common diseases of ani- 
mals; methods of prevention. (Prerequisite: Animal Husbandry 102. 
For groups other than Animal Husbandry. First semester; 2 hours. 
Credit, 1 year-hour.) 

301-302. Veterinary Anatomy and Physiology — ^The skeleton, articu- 
lations, muscles, circulation, respiration, digestion, absorption, and 
the nervous system. (Prerequisites: Animal Husbandry 102 and 201. 
Laboratory fee $2.50 per semester. Both semesters; 2 class and 1 
laboratory periods. Credit, 3 year-hours.) 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 131 

401-402. Diseases of Farm Animals — Causes, symptoms, treatment and 
prevention of common diseases of farm animals. (Prerequisite: 
Veterinary Science 301-302. Laboratory fee, $1.00 per semester. 
Both semesters; 2 class and 1 clinic periods. Credit, 3 year -hours.) 

304. Farm Sanitation and Animal Hygiene — ^Water sources and im- 
purities; food; air; ventilation; disposal of excreta; disposal of car- 
casses; disinfection; sanitation following infectious diseases; inter- 
nal parasites and their control. (Second semester; 2 hours. Credit, 
1 year -hour.) 

OTHER DEPARTMENTS 

Descriptions of other subjects required in the various courses or elec- 
tives that may be taken by students in the College of Agriculture can be 
found by referring to the index. 

FOUR-MONTHS, ONE YEAR, AND TWO-YEAR COURSES 

Mature students who desire more knowledge in Agriculture either 
along general lines or in some special field such as Dairying, Poultry 
Husbandry, Fruit Growing, etc., may enter at the beginning of either the 
first or second semester, and select from the list of subjects below such 
as they think will be of greatest value to them. They are expected to take 
not less than 18 nor more than 21 hours per week. 

Those having only a knowledge of common school branches should 
select first the subjects numbered below 100. Those with High School 
or College training may at once select those marked above 100. 

Eadi semester is, as nearly as possible, complete in itself; a student 
may, therefore, attend but one semester a year and continue doing so till 
four semesters have been completed. 

Certificates will be granted on completion of courses undertaken. 



132 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



Name of Course Nature of Work Hours per Week 

First Semester 



Agronomy 21 Elements of Agronomy ..._ 3 

Agronomy 31 Fertilizers _ - 3 

Agronomy 101 Farm Crops 3 

Agronomy 409 Grasses and Pastures - 2 

Agrl. Engineering 21 Farm Machinery 3 

Agrl. Engineering 301 Drainage and Irrigation _ - 3 

Agrl. Engineering 401 Farm Buildings 3 

Animal Husbandry 21 Elements of Animal Husbandry 3 

Animal Husbandry 201 Animal Feeding - 3 

Animal Husbandry 203 Beef Production 3 

Dairying 201 Farm Dairying - 3 

Poultry Husbandry 21 Poultry Essentials 3 

Poultry Husbandry 301 Commercial Poultry Keeping - 3 

Veterinary Science 201 Veterinary Elements 2 

Horticulture 21 ElemenU of Horticulture 3 

Horticulture 101 Plant Propagation 3 

Horticulture 301 Advanced Trucking - 3 

Horticulture 303 floriculture _ 3 

Horticulture 305 _...Citrus Culture — ■ 3 

Horticulture 307 Subtropical Fruits 3 

Entomology 21 Farm, Garden and Orchard Insects 3 

Entomology 303 Insectary Practice ~ 3 

Plant Pathology 301 General Pathology 4 

Plant Pathology 303 Diseases of Florida Crops 3 

Plant Pathology 405 Fungicides and Insecticides 3 

Chemi stry 101 General Chemistry 5 

Second Semester 

Agronomy 22 Elements of Agronomy 3 

Agronomy 54 Farm Management - 3 

Agronomy 304 Forage Crops 3 

Agronomy 306 Advanced Crops 3 

Agrl. Engineering 202 Farm Machinery 3 

Agrl. Engineering 302 Farm Motors _ „ — - 3 

Agrl. Engineering 402 Farm Concrete 3 

Animal Husbandry 102 Types and Breeds of Animals 3 

Animal Husbandry 202 jAnimal Breeding _ 3 

Animal Husbandry 204 Swine Production 2 

Dairying 102 Elements of Dairying 3 

Dairying 202 Dairy Management 3 

Poultry Husbandry 202 Farm Poultry 3 

Poultry Husbandry 302 Commercial Poultry Keeping 3 

Veterinary Science 304' Farm Sanitation and Animal Hygiene 2 

Horticulture 202 fundamentals of Fruit Production 3 

Horticulture 204 Pruning 3 

Horticulture 206 Trucking _ 3 

Horticulture 306 Citrus Han'esting, Marketing, etc 3 

Horticulture 308 Deciduous Fruits 3 

Botany 22 Agricultural Botany _ 3 

Entomology 302 ....Economic Entomology 4 

Entomology 304 Insectary Practice 3 

Plant Pathology 22 _ Diseases and Insects of Citrus 3 

Plant Pathology 304 _ Diseases of Florida Crops 3 

Plant Pathology 406 Fungicides and Insecticides 3 

Chemistry 102 General Chemistry 5 



I 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 133 

FARMERS WEEK 



Beginning August 15, 1927; ending August 20, 1927. 

Farmers Week is especially suited to the needs of the following 
classes: Farm men and farm women of all ages who recognize their 
need for some training in scientific agriculture in order to render more 
effective the practical knowledge they have already gained; young men 
who are compelled to drop out of school and yet desire to devote a 
short time to special preparation for work on the farm; city students 
who wish to fit themselves for farm life; colonists who wish information 
regarding Florida conditions and methods. 

The laboratory equipment, the purebred livestock, and the farms 
will be available for instruction; the Agricultural Experiment Station 
and State Plant Board will afford opportunity for observation and in- 
quiry. Care has been taken to meet the needs of practical farmers. The 
courses consist of lectures, laboratory work, and field observations and 
demonstrations in general field crops, soils, vegetable gardening, citrus, 
animal husbandry, dairying, poultry, veterinary science, bee culture, and 
agricultural engineering. 

There are no age limits and no education requirements for admis- 
sion. No tuition fee is charged. 

Expenses — The necessary expenses for room and board will ap- 
proximate Si. 50 per day. 

The University dormitories and dining room are available to those 
attending Farmers Week. 

CORRESPONDENCE COURSES 

Correspondence courses in agriculture are offered under the General 
Extension Division. See page 136. 

AGRICULTURAL MEETINGS 

A number of meetings of people interested in agriculture are held 
annually at the University. These find excellent accommodations and 
facilities, better for their purpose than anywhere else in the State. Lab- 
oratories, classrooms, and exhibits, as well as growing crops, barns and 
other equipment are placed freely at their service. 



134 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



THE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION 

WiLMON Newell, Director 

Staff— Wilmon Newell, Ouida D. Abbott, R. V. Allison, E. D. Ball, 
R. M. Barnette, C. E. Bell, G. H. Blackmon, H. E. Bratley,* A. N. Brooks, 
O. F. Burger, A. F. Camp, W. A. Carver, J. M. Coleman, J. F. Cooper, 
Ida K. Cresap, Raymond Crown, M. R. Ensign, Sam T. Fleming, L. W. 
Gaddum, L. 0. Gratz, E. F. Grossman, H. G. Hamilton,* Stacy Hawkins, 
J. H. Hunter, J. H. Jefferies, D. G. A. Kelbert, J. G. Kelley, W. A. Kuntz, 
W. A. Leukel, K. W. Loucks, R. L. Miller, Bruce McKinley, Harold 
Mowry, C. V. Noble, Ruby Newhall, R. E. Nolen, Jesse Reeves, A. S. 
Rhoads, R. W. Ruprecht, D. A. Sanders, J. M. Scott, J. L. Seal, A. L. 
Shealy, W. E. Stokes, G. E. Tedder, W. B. Tisdale, A. N. Tis^^ot, R. F. 
Wadkins, J. R. Watson, G. F, Weber, E. West, Henry Zeigler. 

Aim and Scope — The Agricultural Experiment Station is an institu- 
tion founded by Congressional act, for the purpose of acquiring and dif- 
fusing agricultural knowledge. From the enacting clause it is evident 
that Congress intended to establish in connection with every college and 
university receiving the benefits of the original "Land-Grant Act" an in- 
stitution for purely investigational work. 

The Florida Agricultural Experiment Station was founded in 1887 
and has continued without interruption since that time. As a part of its 
funds are obtained from Federal sources, it must comply with the Fed- 
eral law and use its income for acquiring new and important knowledge 
in regard to crops, soils and livestock, and for research in agriculture 
and home economics. No funds can be expended, either directly or in- 
directly, for teaching purposes or for holding farmers' institutes, and 
only 5 per cent for buildings or repairs. In order to receive the bene- 
fits of the Adams, Hatch and Purnell funds, the Station must, before any 
money is spent in investigation, submit plans or projects for proposed 
experiments to the United States Department of Agriculture for approval. 

Location — The advantages of having the Agricultural Experiment 
Station at the University are obvious. The research workers deliver 
popular and technical lectures, either to the student-body as a whole 
or to special clubs and local organizations. The experimental fields 
and orchards as well as the research laboratories contribute to the op- 



^Absent on leave 1926-27. 



AGRICULTURAL EXPERLMENT STATION 135 

portunities of students for studying methods of scientific investigation. 
Some with special aptitude have an opportunity of assisting the special- 
ists in charge. Minor positions, such as those of laboratory assistants, 
are occasionally open, and whenever practicable are given to students of 
the University. 

Equipment — The Station occupies most of the space in the three- 
story Agricultural Experiment Station Building, including research lab- 
oratories of Agronomy, Chemistry, Entomology, Home Economics, Plant 
Pathology and Physiology, and Veterinary Science. Approximately one 
floor is used for offices of the staff members, a library, and a mailing 
room. 

Lines of Investigation — The lines of investigation conducted by 
the station fall naturally into several departments: Agronomy, Agricul- 
tural Economics, Animal Industry, Chemistry, Cotton Investigations, En- 
tomology, Home Economics, Horticulture, Plant Pathology and Veter- 
inary Science. The work of the Station is, however, not sharply divided 
among th«se different departments. The staff formulates what are known 
as projects, the work of which is continued regardless of whether its 
ramifications take it into one or another department, and frequently two 
or more departments are engaged in the solution of the same problem. 

Projects — Some of the more important projects are: 

The study of soils and fertilizers on citrus, pecans, farm and truck 
crops, in relation to plant growth and development. 

The study of citrus diseases. 

The study of vegetable diseases. 

The study of the control of root-knot and vegetable insects. 

The study of pecan diseases, insects, varieties and cultural methods. 

Control of aphids and other citrus insects. 

Comparison of rations for economical milk and pork production. 

The study of tobacco diseases and insects. 

Cooperative experiments with farmers in various sections of the 
State to ascertain lie value of new forage crops and grasses. 

Testing native and newly introduced grasses to determine their value 
as permanent pastures. 

Citrus breeding work. 

Adaptation test plots of fruits, vegetables, cereals, grass and forage 
crops on muck soils. 

The study of livestock and poultry diseases. 

The study of the control of cotton diseases and insect pests. 

Cotton breeding work. 



136 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

The study of the limiting factor in the production of Vitamin A. 
Economic study for potato production. 

Branch Stations — Branch stations have been established at the fol- 
lowing locations and for the indicated purposes: at Lake Alfred for the 
special study of problems of the citrus grower; at Quincy for the study 
of the problems of particular interest to the tobacco grower; and at 
Belle Glade for the purpose of making investigations, tests and experi- 
ments in agricultural problems as applied to conditions of the Everglades. 

Field Laboratories— Field laboratories have been established at 
Hastings for the study of Irish potato diseases, at Cocoa for certain cit- 
rus investigations, at Sanford for investigation of celery problems, at 
Plant City for the study of strawberry diseases, and at Homestead and 
Bradenton for the study of Tomato Nail Head Rust Disease. 

Publications— The publications fall into three classes: Bulletins, 
Press Bulletins and Annual Reports. The bulletins contain more or less 
complete results of particular investigations. At least four are issued 
annually: 184 have appeared to date. The press bulletins are prepared 
in order to bring to the citizens of Florida information connected with 
the investigations that are being carried on, before all the work neces- 
sary for the publishing of a bulletin has been completed. They are is- 
sued at short intervals, 392 having already appeared. The annual re- 
ports contain a brief statement of the work done, as well as of the ex- 
penditure of funds. Thirty seven have been published. All of these 
publications are distributed free upon request to the Director. 

THE AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION DIVISION 

WiLMON Newell, Director 

Staff— A. With headquarters at Gainesville: Wilmon Newell, A. 
P. Spencer, H. G. Clayton, R. W. Blacklock, John M. Scott, Hamlin L. 
Brown, E. F. DeBusk, N. R. Mehrhof, J. F. Cooper, L. Lee Smith. 

B. With headquarters at Tallahassee: Flavia Gleason, Virginia P. 
Moore, Lucy Belle Settle, Ruby McDavid, Isabelle S. Thursby, Mary A. 
Stennis, Mary E. Keown, Eloise McGriflF. 

C. With headquarters at Tallahassee (Negro A. & M. College) : A. 
A. Turner. 



AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION DIVISION 137 



D. County and Home Demonstration Agents. 

County County Agent Addrees Home Dem. Agent 

Alachua F. L. Craft _ ^Gainesville Mrs. Grace F. Warren 

Baker „..."."!.1~..1""."-R'- F. Ward ...._ Macclenny ...._ _ 

Bay .R. R- Whittington ...^.Panama City - 

Brevard ...._ _ W. R. Briggs _Cocoa .. - - - 

Broward C. E. Matthews Ft. Lauderdale — - 

CitjTjg S. H. Rountree _._Invernes« . Mrs. Elizabeth W. Moore 

Collier "'"" _ _ Everglade Mrs. B. L. Vaden 

Columbia .'.""".""c. A. Fulford -Lake City „...Mrs. Lassie Black 

Dade J. S. Rainey ...._ - Miami Miss Pansy Norton 

Dade ( AsstJ C. A. Steffani Miami . ^. .._........-.. 

Duval W. L. Watson ....Jacksonville Miss Pearl Laffitte 

Duval (Asst) J. O. Traxler _ Jadksonville Miss Louise Pickens 

Duval (Asst) H. B. Lansden Jacksonville - - - 

Escambia __W. W. Green _ Pensacola Miss Josephine Nimmo 

Gadsden '. — Quincy Miss Elise Laffitte 

Flagler ..!!!"."!L"r.„.""_L. T. Nieland __Bunnell ...._ _... _. .. _ _ _ 

Hamilton __J. J. Sechrest ...._ Jasper - _. .. _ . ._ ., 

Hardee _ J. A. Shealy Wauchula ...._ . _. .. - - . 

Highlands ..._ _L. H. Allsmeyer Sebring 

Hillsboro „ _R. T. Kelley ...._ Plant City 

Hillsboro (East) _ - Plant City Miss Motelle Madole 

Hillsboro (West) . - - Tampa _ Mrs. Mary S. Allen 

Holmes _ - Bonifay Mrs. Bettie A. Caudle 

Indian River _W. E. Evans Vero Beach _ _ 

Jaokson _E. P. Scott Marianna ..._ —Miss Mary Sue Wiggley 

Jefferson E. H. Finlayson _„Monticello _ „ 

Lafayette ..._ _.. D. C. Geiger _Mayo 

Lake E. W. Jenkins Tavares _ Miss Marie Cox 

Lee C. P. Wright Ft. Myers _Miss Sallie B. Lindsey 

Leon .............7'.1.......T.....G. C. Hodge Tallahassee Mrs. Ruth C. Kellum 

Levy .."!™!!!"™!."!"™1n. J. Allbritton ...._ Bronson _ _ 

Liberty A. W. Turner Bristol ...._ 

Madison _ B. E. Lawton _Madison — - 

Manatee . . L H. Wilson _Bradenton _Miss Margaret Cobb 

Marion C. R. Hiatt Ocala _ Miss Christine McFerron 

Martin C. P. Heuck _ Stuart _ - 

Nassau ..._ A. S. Lawton Fernandina 3Iiss Pearl Jordan 

Okaloosa R. J. Hart _ Laurel Hill 

Okaloosa Crestview _ Miss Bertha Henry 

Okeechobee -_S. H. Sherard Okeechobee 

Orange „ K. C. Moore Orlando Mrs. Nellie W. Taylor 

Osceola J. R. Gunn _ Kissimmee Miss Albina Smith 

Palm Beach S. W Hiatt W. Palm Beach Miss Edith Y. Morgan 

Palm Beach (Asst).._M. U. Mounts ...._ W. Palm Beach _ 

Pasco W. T. Nettles Dade City _ _Miss Harriette Ticknor 

Pinellas _ E. H. Hurlebaus Clearwater Miss Helen Kennedy 

Polk F. L. Holland .Bartow Miss Lois Godbey 

Polk (Asst) _ _ - Bartow „ Miss Mosel Preston 

Polk (Asst) Bartow _ Miss Bernice Lyle 

St. Johns J. L. Scribner _ Hastings 

St. Johns ...._ St. Augustine Miss Anna E. Heist 

St. Lucie ..._ A. Warren _ _..Ft. Pierce _ 

Santa Rosa -John G. Hudson Milton ...._ „...Miss Ethyl Holloway 

Suwannee - Live Oak _ Miss Corinne Barker 

Taylor R. J. Dorsett -..Perry Miss Ada L. Simpson 

Union L. T. Dyer _ Lake Butler _ - - 

Volusia T. A. Brown ..._ _..DeLand _ _Miss Orphd Cole 

Volusia (Asst) C. D. Case DeLand _ _ - 

Wakulla E. W. Ingle _ Crawfordville - 

Walton _ _ DeFuniak Springs ....Miss Agnes D. Yeamans 

Washington Gus York Chipley _ - - 



138 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

Negro Local Farm and Home Demonstration Agents 

County County Agent Address Home Dem. Agent 

Alachua S. H. Hendley Gainesville _ 

Bradford J. W. Keller „ -Starke _ _ 

Columbia . E. S. Belvin — Lake City 

Jackson J. E. Cranberry Marianna _ — „ 

Jefferson M. E. Groover Monticello 

Leon . Tallahassee Amanda W. Parish 

Levy „ - - Archer Nancy Henderson 

Marion Wm. B. Young Ocala _ 

Idella Ransom 

Madison - Madison _ Althea Ayer 

Orange _ _ Orlando Mamie E. Wright 

Putnam & St. Johns-.H. H. Williams -Hastings 

Suwannee C. T. Evans Live Oak „ 

St. Johns _ , - St. Augustine Mary A. Caldwell 

Sumter Webster Diana Finlayson 

Cooperative Agricultural Extension Work — The Agricultural 
Extension Division supports a system of practical education. It teaches 
the results of scientific experiments to the present and future farmer and 
housewife. A synopsis of this work includes: 

(A) Demonstrations in agricultural and horticultural crops, dairying, hog 
raising, poultry raising, cooperative organizations, insect and disease control. 

(B) Boys' agricultural clubs, including corn, pig and fat barrow, peanut, calf, 
potato, bee and citrus clubs. 

(C) Home demonstration work including gardening, poultry, bee keeping, food 
conservation, nutrition, clothing and home improvement clubs. 

(D) Extension schools, including Farmers Week held annually at the Uni- 
versity, County and Home Demonstration Agents' annual meeting, boys' and girls' 
annual club meetings, and Extension Schools arranged by county agents. 

(E) Demonstration work with colored farmers, including club work for boys 
and girls, and demonstration work with men and women. 

Smith-Lever Act — In accordance with the terms of the Smith- 
Lever Act, effective July 1, 1914, agricultural extension work is carried 
on cooperatively by the United States Department of Agriculture and 
the State of Florida. In addition to this, in 1919 Congress passed the 
Smith-Lever Supplementary Act appropriating an additional sum for 
the same purpose. 

The purpose of these Acts may be seen from the following quotation: 

'That cooperative agricultural extension work shall consist of giv- 
ing of instruction and practical demonstration in agriculture and home 
economics to persons not attending or resident in said colleges in the 
several communities, and imparting to such persons information on said 
subjects through field demonstrations, publications, and otherwise; and 
this work shall be carried on in such a manner as may be mutually 
agreed upon by the Secretary of Agriculture and the State agricultural 
college or colleges receiving the benefits of this act." 



AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION DIVISION 139 

Funds Available— By the terms of the Smith-Lever Act the College 
of Agriculture receives from Congressional appropriations $10,000 an- 
nually and an additional sum which increased annually until 1922, the 
State each year appropriating an equal amount. The Legislature has 
enacted laws enabling the State to secure the benefits of both the original 
Smith-Lever and the Supplementary Acts as well as making a direct State 
appropriation for placing agents in additional counties. The total amount 
of State and Federal funds available for the fiscal year ending June 30, 
1927, is $166,815.58. 

SCHOOLS OF INSTRUCTION FOR EXTENSION WORKERS 

The annual meeting of the County and Home Demonstration Agents is 
held at the University of Florida. The purpose of this meeting is to 
give instruction and make plans for future work. 

This is the one meeting of the year when all extension workers from 
the United States Department of Agriculture and the State of Florida 
assemble for joint sessions to discuss the work with county and home 
demonstration agents. 

As Agricultural Extension work in Florida is conducted according to 
a joint agreement with the federal government, is is very important that 
the Extension work in Florida should harmonize closely with that of 
other states. 

This meeting is largely a series of conferences. Committees are 
appointed to make recommendations for the conduct of the work through- 
out the coming year. 

BOYS' AGRICULTURAL CLUBS AND SHORT COURSES 

Agricultural clubs are organized among the boys on the farms for 
the purpose of teaching them by practical demonstrations better methods 
of farming. Business men and agricultural organizations annually give 
successful boys free trips to the University to attend the Short Courses 
in Agriculture. This is done to stimulate greater interest in club work 
and has caused many boys to enter college for a four-year course. The 
Short Course is held from May 30 to June 4. 

Frank E. Dennis of Jacksonville offers a $250 scholarship in the Col- 
lege of Agriculture to the State Pig Club Champion. Three $100 schol- 
arships are also offered by the Florida Bankers' Association. 



140 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



HOME DEMONSTRATION WORK 



Girls' Clubs — Girls between the ages of ten and eighteen are eli- 
gible for membership. Each member is required to undertake a defi- 
nite piece of work under the leadership of her home demonstration agent. 
This club work enters into many phases of home life and is intended to 
teach the girls the best practices for the improvement and development 
of the rural home. 

Women's Home Demonstration Clubs — Home demonstration clubs 
are organized by home demonstration agents for the benefit of the women 
of rural communities. These clubs have definite programs and stated 
intervals for meeting and, under the leadership of the agent, undertake 
to carry out such programs as will improve home life. 

Club Contests — Contests are conducted for the purpose of giving 
credit to club members for the work they have accomplished, to display 
the year's work so that it will be educational, and to stimulate interest in 
every phase of farm and home life. Exhibits are placed on display, rec- 
ord books are examined and rewards are based on quality, record and 
financial showing. Substantial prizes are offered to club members, such 
as scholarships to the University and to the Slate College for Women, 
and money or merchandise. The State Fair, Jacksonville, and South' 
Florida Fair, Tampa, allot space for the products of boys' and girls' 
clubs, and provide liberal cash prizes to stimulate interest in these con- 
tests. 

Publications— The publications of the Division include bulletins, 
circulars, annual reports, a club paper, a weekly clip-sheet for news- 
papers, and an annual calendar. The bulletins and circulars contain 
useful information on farm and home subjects, while the annual reports 
give details of the work accomplished by the staff and the county repre- 
sentatives. The club paper, Florida Pepper, is issued bi-monthly, and 
sent to all club members in the State. The weekly clip-sheet, or Agri- 
cultural News Service, contains items of news from the Agricultural 
Experiment Station, Extension Division and College of Agriculture, as 
well as timely information on varied agricultural topics. This sheet is 
sent to about 250 daily and weekly papers of Florida. The calendar 
contains suggestions on farm work in Florida for each month of the year. 

These publications are free to citizens of the state, upon request to 
the Director. 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND ARCHITECTURE 141 



THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 
AND ARCHITECTURE 

J. R. Benton, Dean 

Faculty— G. E. Barnes, W. H. Beisler, J. R. Benton, F. M. Brennan, 
L. M. Bristol, H. W. Chandler, C. A. Curtis, S. K. Eshleman, J. M. Farr, 
B. F. Gaines, H. A. Hall, W. B. Hathaway, F. H. Heath, W. S. Higgins, 
T. H. Hubbell, V. T. Jackson, J. H. Kusner, T. R. Leigh, J. P. Little, Jr., 
T. M. Lowe, W. S. Perry, C. G. Phipps, F. E. Poindexter, F. K Prescott, 
M. Price, W. A. Rawls, P. L. Reed, T. M. Simpson, A. J. Strong, A. W. 
Sweet, A. C. Tipton, E. S. Walker, R. Weaver, J. Weil, C. S. Whitehead, 
J. H. Wise, E. M. Yon. 

GENERAL STATEMENT 

The statement made here applies more particularly to Engineering; 
a corresponding statement is made later for the School of Architecture. 

Aim and Scop&— It is the aim of the College of Engineering and 
Architecture to furnish training such as will be useful to its graduates in 
the profession of engineering or related occupations. Its courses of in- 
struction are similar to those of other American engineering schools of 
college grade; its graduates are prepared to fill such positions as are usu- 
ally allotted to young engineers. 

Scholastic training alone cannot make a competent engineer, any 
more than it can make a competent physician or lawyer. It can, how- 
ever, fit a man to enter the profession of engineering; and it is an im- 
portant element in ultimate success in that profession. 

The work of the College is divided among courses of study of the 
following types: (1) Courses in the sciences fundamental to the prac- 
tice of engineering, of which mathematics, physics, and chemistry are the 
most important; (2) courses in various branches of engineering practice 
in which these sciences are applied, such as structural, steam, or electri- 
cal engineering; (3) courses in practical work, such as mechanic arts, 
drafting, or surveying; and (4) courses contributing primarily to gen- 
eral culture, such as those in English. 

Building and Equipment— The headquarters and principal build- 
ing of the College is Engineering Hall, described on page 21. The De- 
partments of Mechanical Engineering and of Drawing and Mechanic 



142 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

Arts, are housed in the new building immediately east of Engineering 
Hall. Shop vrork is provided for in the south wing of Engineering Hall. 

Part of the work of the College of Engineering and Architecture coin- 
cides with that of other colleges of the University; for such work the 
class-rooms and laboratories of the other colleges are utilized. 

Admission — See pages 46 ff. No students except adult special stu- 
dents are admitted with entrance conditions in any required entrance 
units. 

Pending the provision of enlarged facilities for instruction, the 
right is reserved to limit the number of freshmen admitted to the College 
of Engineering, to such number as can be properly accommodated with 
present facilities. 

Admission after the work of a semester has begun is not ordinarily 
permitted, but will be allowed in cases of unavoidable emergency, up 
to two weeks after the opening of a semester. 

Orientation — During the first semester of the freshman year, a 
course known as Orientation is required. This consists of lectures by 
practicing engineers and by members of the faculty, about the work of 
engineers engaged in practice in the various branches of engineering. 
The purpose is to acquaint the students, early in their course, with the 
nature, ideals and status of the engineering profession; and to assist 
them in deciding what branch of engineering to follow. 

The lectures given in 1926-1927, were as follows: 

September 20 — Dean Benton: "The Profession of Engineering." 

September 27 — Professor Weil : "The Work of the Electrical Engineer." 

October 4 — Mr. R. T. Hargrave, City Engineer of Gainesville: "Oppor- 
tunities for Engineering Graduates in Municipal Engineering." 

October 11 — Professor Enwall: "How to Study." 

October 18 — Mr. W. D. Hearne, of the Tampa Electric Company: "Op- 
portunities for Technical Graduates in the Electric Utility Field." 

November 1— Mr. W. W. Fineren, Chief Engineer, The Gulf-Okeecho- 
bee-Atlantic Waterway Association: "The Work and Ideals of the Gvil 
Engineer." 

November 8 — Mr. J. L. Cobbs, Jr., Director of Public Relations, At- 
lantic Coast Line Railway: "Opportunities for Technical Graduates with 
the Railroads." 

November 15 — Professor Gaines: "The Work of the Mechanical En- 
gineer." 

November 22 — Professor Weaver: "The Profession of Architecture." 

December 6— Professor Goodwin: "The Work of the Chemist and 
Chemical Engineer." 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND ARCHITECTURE 143 

December 13 — Mr. J. E. Walker, Chief Engineer, Marion County Road 
Department: 'The Nature of Work and Opportunities in Highway En- 
gineering." 

ENGINEERING SOCIETIES 

Benton Engineering Society — The meetings of this society are de- 
voted to addresses or discussions on technical subjects, or on affairs of 
general interest. This society also serves as the medium through which 
the student body of the College of Engineering and Architecture takes part 
in debates and athletic contests with other colleges of the University, and 
in other student enterprises. Every student registered in the College 
of Engineering and Architecture is eligible to membership and is expected 
to join. 

Student Branch of the American Institute of Electrical En- 
gineers — Monthly meetings are held, for the discussion of topics in elec- 
trical science and its applications. Membership is open to seniors, juniors 
and sophomores in the electrical engineering course, under rules estab- 
lished by the American Institute. Members receive the Journal of the 
American Institute of Electrical Engineers, and enjoy other privileges 
of that national organization. 

Student Chapter of the American Society of Civil Engineers — 
Monthly meetings are held. Membership is open to seniors, juniors, and 
sophomores in civil engineering, under rules established by the American 
Society of Civil Engineers. Members receive the monthly Journal of 
that Society, and enjoy other privileges. 

Student Branch of the American Society of Mechanical Engi- 
neers — Monthly meetings are held. Under rules established by the Ameri- 
can Society of Mechanical Engineers, membership is open to students who 
expect to go into the field of mechanical engineering. Members receive 
the Journal of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, and en- 
joy other privileges of that society. 

Expenses — See pages 34 £f. 

Curricula and Degrees — Four curricula, each requiring four years, 
are offered in engineering. They lead to the degrees of Bachelor of Sci- 
ence in Civil Engineering (B.S.C.E.), in Electrical Engineering (B.S.E.E.), 
in Mechanical Engineering (B.S.M.E.), and in Chemical Engineering 
(B.S.Ch.E.), respectively, A curriculum is offered in architecture, re- 
quiring four years, and leading to the degree Bachelor of Science in 
Architecture. 

The work of the Freshman year is the same for all engineering stu- 
dents, and nearly the same for architectural students. The work in Eng- 



144 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

lish, economics, mathematics, mechanics, and physics is the same through- 
out the curriculum for all engineering students, and nearly the same for 
architectural students. All engineering students take some work in chem- 
istry, drawing, surveying, and shop practice, but the time devoted to 
these subjects varies in the different curricula. 

The degree Civil Engineer (C.E.), Electrical Engineer (E.E.), Me- 
chanical Engineer (M.E.), or Chemical Engineer (Ch.E.), may be granted 
to a graduate of the College of Engineering upon recommendation of 
the head of the department in which it is sought, and with the concurrence 
of the faculty of the College, provided the candidate submits evidence that 
he has had at least four years of practical engineering experience, of which 
two years must be responsible experience after graduation. By responsi- 
ble experience is meant work in which the candidate has to use his own 
initiative, as distinguished from the mere rendering of routine assistance. 
To obtain one of these degrees application should be made to the Dean 
of the College not later than April 1st preceding the Commencement at 
which the degree may be awarded. 

The Bachelor degree (B.S.C.E., B.S.E.E., B.S.M.E., or B.S.Ch.E.) indi- 
cates merely the completion of a course of study in the theory of engineer- 
ing; while the engineer degree (C.E., E.E., M.E,, or Ch.E.) indicates 
demonstrated proficiency in the practice of some branch of engineering. 
Every student of engineering should look forward to obtaining one of 
these higher degrees eventually. 

ENGINEERING CURRICULUM 

(The Freshman Year is the same for all Engineering Students) 

Names of Courses Hours per Week 

; Is^ Semester \ 2nd Semester 

* * t T 
2 3 2 7 



Freshman Year * ** f T 

Descriptive Geom. 101-102 2 3 5 

Drawing 101-102 5 5 

English 101-102 3 6 9 

Mathematics 151-152 3 6 9 

Military Science 101-102 2 2 4 8 

Physics 105-106 3 4 7 

Physics 107-108 4 4 

Shop 101 6 6 

Surveying 101 



13 21 19 53 



3 3 

3 6 9 

3 6 9 

2 2 4 8 

3 4 7 
4 4 



14 22 16 53 



NOTE: Freshmen are required to take one semester each of Surveying and of 
Woodworking, but these two courses may be given in reverse order to that shown 
here, at the convenience of the departments concerned. 



"Hours of recitation or lecture. ** Estimated hours necessary for preparation. fHours 
of laboratory, shop, field, or drafting-room work. T — Total hours. 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND ARCHITECTURE 



145 



CIVIL EIHGINEERING CURRICULUM 



Names of Courses 



Hours per Week 



Sophomore Year 



1st Semester 



2nd Semester 



Chemistry 101-102 3 

Electrical Engineering 202 -- 

Electrical Engineering 204 

Mathematics 251-252 3 

MiUtary Science 201-202 2 

Physics 209 -, 2 

Shop 204 

Surveying 201-202 2 



12 21 16 49 



Junior Year 



Applied Mechanics 315-316 - 4 

Bacteriology 303 (b) - 

Economics 307 - 3 

Graphic Statics 308 - - 

Highways 303-304 2 

Mathematics 351-352 2 

Materials of Engineering 319 2 

Railroads 301-302 - - 2 

Testing Laboratory 310 



Senior Year 



Chemistry 215 2 

Concrete Design 412 - 

Contracts and Specifications 405 ^ 

English 411-412 

Geology 201 ^ 

Human Engineering 410 - 

Hydraulics 407 2 

Hydraulic Engineering 408 - 

Municipal Sanitation 409 2 

Structural Engineering 403-404 2 

Water Supply 410 



13 23 11 47 



11 20 13 



12 21 16 49 



** t T 

8 2 14 

4 5 

2 4 8 

2 3 6 

4 6 



15 29 4 48 I 11 17 18 46 



*Hours of recitation or lecture. ^'Estimated hours necessary for preparation. fHours 
of laboratory, shop, field, or drafting-room vrork. .T-Jotal hours. 

(b) The clas8 to graduate in 1929 will substitute Electrical Engineering 202 and 204, 
with hours 2-4r2. 



146 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM 



Names of Courses 


Hours per Week 


Sophomore Year 


1st Semester | 2nd Semester 



Chemistry 101-102 

Drawing 201-202 

Electrical Engineering 202 . 
Electrical Engineering 204 

Mathematics 251-252 

Mechanism 201-202 

Military Science 201-202 

Physics 209 

Shop 201-202 



12 21 16 49 



12 21 16 49 



Junior Year 



* ** t T 

Applied Mechanics 315-316 4 8 2 14 

Economics 307 3 6 9 

Electrical Engineering 311-302 (e) 2 4 6 

Electrical Engineering 313-304 (e) 2 2 

Machine Elements 301-302 3 3 

Materials of Engineering 319 2 4 6 

Mathematics 351-352 2 4 6 

Thermodynamics 310 



13 26 



46 



8 



3 6 9 
4 4 
2 2 3 7 



14 26 9 49 



Senior Year 



Contracts and Specifications 405 2 

Elective (c) 

Electrical Engineering 401-402 3 

Electrical Engineering 403-404 

Electrical Engineering 405-406 (d) 1 

English 411-412 ...„ 

Human Engineering 410 

Hydraulics 407 2 

Mechanical Laboratory 420 

Power Engineering 419 3 

Power Engineering 424 „ 

Shop 401 



11 23 13 47 



11 23 



43 



(c) (d) The class to graduate in 1928 will substitute Machine Elements 301-302 
(hours 0-0-3 and 2-2-3) for Electrical Engineering 405 and the elective. 

(e) The class to graduate in 1929 will substitute Electrical Engineering 301-302 and 
303-304. 



*Hours of recitation or lecture. ** Estimated hours necessary for preparation. fHours 
of laboratory, shop, field, or drafting-room work. T — Total hours. 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND ARCHITECTURE 



147 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING CURRICULUM 



Names of Courses 


Hours per Week 


Sophomore Year 




1st Semester \ 2nd Semester 



Chemistry 101-102 3 

Drawing 201-202 

Electrical Engineering 202 

Electrical Engineering 204 

Mathematics 251-252 3 

Mechanism 201-202 2 

Military Science 201-202 2 

Physics 209 2 

Shop 201-202 



12 21 16 49 12 21 16 49 





Junior Year 


















* 


*♦ 


t 


T 


* 


*♦ 


t 


T 


Applied Mechanics 315-316 


4 


8 


2 


14 


4 


8 


2 


14 


Economics 307 


3 


6 





9 










Kinematic Drawing 305-306 








3 


3 


b 


6 


3 


3 


Machine Elements 301-302 








3 


3 


2 


2 


3 


7 


Materials of Engineering 319-320 


2 


4 





6 


2 


4 





6 


Mathematics 351-352 


2 


4 





6 


2 


4 





6 


Shop 301-304 








4 


4 



3 



6 


4 



4 


Thermodynamics 310 




9 




11 


22 


12 


45 


13 


24 


12 


49 



Senior Year 



Contracts and Specifications 405 2 

Electrical Engineering 417418 3 

Human Engineering 410 

Hydraulics 407 2 

Hydraulic Engineering 408 

Mechanical Design 411412 2 

Mechanical Laboratory 417-418 

Power Engineering 421422 3 

Power Engineering 424 



12 20 13 45 



12 30 11 43 



* Hours of recitation or lecture. ** Estimated hours necessary for preparation. fHours 
of laboratory, shop, field, or drafting-room work T — Total hours. 



148 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



CHEMICAL ENGHVEERING CURRICULUM 



Names of Courses 


Hours per Week 


Sophomore Year 


1st Semester \ 2nd Semester 



Chemistry 101-102 

Chemistry 212 

German or French 

Mathematics 251-252 

Military Science 201-202 
Physics 209 



13 24 10 47 



12 20 15 47 



Junior Year 



Applied Mechanics 315-316 

Chemistry 251-252 

Chemistry 301-302 

Economics 307 

Electrical Engineering 202 
Electrical Engineering 204 . 
Mathematics 351-352 



(f) 



12 24 12 48 11 22 14 47 



* ** t T 

4 8 2 14 

3 6 4 13 

6 6 



4 6 
2 2 
4 6 



Senior Year 



Chemistry 321-322 2 4 

Chemistry 341-342 3 6 

Chemistry 344 

Chemistry 351 3 6 

Chemistry 413414 

Contracts and Specifications 405 2 2 

English 411-412 _ _ 3 

Human Engineering 410 _ 

Hydraulics 407 2 4 

Thermodynamics 310 



12 25 10 47 



10 21 12 43 



(f) The class to graduate in 1929 will add Chemistry 202 (hours 0-0-3). 
* Hours of recitation or lecture. ** Estimated hours necessary for preparation, 
of laboratory, shop, field, or drafting-room work. T — Total hours. 



fHours 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND ARCHITECTURE 149 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTIOIN 



THE DEPARTMENT OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

Professor Leigh Professor Black 

Professor Beisler Professor Heath 

Associate Professor Jackson Assistant Professor Goodwin 

101-102. General Chemistry — See Chemistry. (Required of all engi- 
neering students; sophomore year. Both semesters. Heath, Black, 
Beisler, Jackson and Goodwin.) 

212. Qualitative Analysis — The theory and practice of the qualitative 
separation of the metals and acid radicals. (Prerequisite: Chemistry 
101-102. Laboratory fee, $5.00. Required of chemical engineers; 
sophomore year, second semester; 1 class and 7 laboratory hours per 
week. Credit, 2 1-4 year-hours. Jackson.) 

215. Water and Sewage — A theoretical and practical study of the ex- 
amination and treatment of water and sewage. (Prerequisite: Chem- 
istry 101-102. Laboratory fee, $5.00. Required of civil engineers; 
senior year, first semester; 2 class hours and 3 laboratory hours per 
week. Credit, 1 3-4 year-hours. Beisler.) 

251-252. Organic Chemistry — See Chemistry. (Required of chemical 
engineers; junior year, both semesters. Leigh and Goodwin.) 

301-302. Quantitative Analysis — See Chemistry. (Required of chemi- 
cal engineers; junior year, both semesters. Black.) 

321-322, Physical Chemistry — See Chemistry. (Required of chemical 
engineers; senior year, both semesters. Jackson.) 

341-342. Industrial Chemistry — Consideration of chemical principles 
involved in manufacturing and refining inorganic and organic prod- 
ucts of commercial importance. Visits are made to such factories 
and chemical plants £is may be accessible. (Prerequisites: Chemistry 
101-102 and 251-252. Required of chemical engineers; senior year; 
elective to non-engineering students; both semesters; 3 hours. Credit, 
3 year-hours. Beisler.) 



150 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

344. Industrial Chemistry Laboratory — A practical study of the 
commercial methods of manufacture and purification of important 
chemicals. (Prerequisite: Chemistry 341-342. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 
Required of chemical engineers; senior year, second semester; 6 
laboratory hours per week. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Beisler.) 

351. Metallurgy— A study of the preparation, properties, structure and 
uses of the more important metals and alloys. (Prerequisite: Chem-' 
istry 101-102. Required of chemical engineers; senior year, first 
semester; 3 class hours per week. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Beisler.) 

405. Gas Analysis — The analysis of fuel and illuminating gases and 
products of combustion. Some attention is given to the theory and 
use of automatic gas recorders. (Prerequisite: Chemistry 301-302. 
Laboratory fee, $5.00. Elective. First semester; 1 class and 4 lab- 
oratory hours per week. Credit, 11-2 year-hours.) Not given 1927- 
1928. 

413-414. Engineering Chemistry— Analysis of organic and inorganic 
materials used in engineering. (Prerequisite: Chemistry 301-302. 
Laboratory fee, $5.00 for each semester. Required of chemical en- 
gineers; senior year; 6 laboratory hours per week during the first 
semester, 4 laboratory hours per week during the second semester. 
Credit, 2 1-2 year-hours. Beisler.) 

THE DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING 

Professor Reed Assistant Professor * 

Associate Professor Barnes Instructor Lowe 

Surveying— Recitations on the use of chain, compass, transit, and 
level; determination of areas, and instrumental adjustments. Field 
work in chaining, leveling, compass and transit surveys. Drawing 
room work in calculations from field notes, and map-drawing. Text- 
book: Breed and Hosmer, Vol. I. (Prerequisite: Trigonometry. 
Laboratory fee, $3.00. Required of all engineering students in 
Freshman year. Elective for non-engineering students. Recitation, 1 
hour per week; field and drawing-room work, 3 hours per week for 
one semester. Credit, 1 year-hour. Lowe.) 



101. 



*To be appointed. 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND ARCHITECTURE 151 

201-202. Surveying — Recitations on balancing of surveys and calculat- 
ing of areas; methods of making topographical surveys, including the 
use of the stadia and plane table; methods of solving other problems 
in land, topographical, and city surveying and problems involving 
the principles of precise leveling, base-line measurement, triangula- 
tion, and determination of meridian, latitude and time. Field work: 
the making of a complete topographical survey; tests and adjust- 
ments of instruments; precise leveling; base-line work; meridian and 
latitude observations. Drawing-room work on balancing surveys, 
calculating areas and reducing field notes; plotting maps and pro- 
files; contour problems; triangulation computations. Textbooks: 
Breed and Hosmer, Vols. I and II. (Prerequisite: Surveying 101. 
Laboratory fee, $3.00 per semester. Required of all civil engineering 
sophomores ; recitations, 2 hours both semesters; field and drawing- 
room work, first semester 6 hours per week; second semester 3 hours 
per week. Credit, 3 1-2 year-hours. Lowe.) 

301-302. Railroads — Recitations on simple, compound, reversed, verti- 
cal, and transition curves, turnouts and earthwork. Field problems in 
curve layouts. Drawing-room work in the paper layout of a rail- 
road line. Field and drawing-room work in the preliminary and final 
location of a railroad; plotting of lines and profiles; earthwork com- 
putations. Theory of mass diagram. Textbook: Allen's Curves and 
Earthwork. (Prerequisite: Surveying 101. Laboratory fee, $1.50 
per semester. Required of civil engineering juniors. First semester; 
recitations 2 hours; field and drawing-room work 2 hours per week. 
Second semester; recitation 1 hour per week; field and drawing-room 
work 3 hours per week. Credit, 2 1-2 year-hours. Lowe.) 

303-304. Highway Theory and Design — Lectures and recitations on the 
economics of location, highway systems, design, drainage, founda- 
tions, classes of roads and pavements, their materials and methods 
of construction, highway structures. Legislation and finance. Field 
inspections of local roads. Drafting room design involving the 
relocation of an existing road with improved alignment, grades and 
new pavement suitable for assumed traffic, the computation of quan- 
tities, estimate of costs and specification. Textbook: Construction of 
Roads and Pavements by Agg. (Prerequisites: Surveying 101, Rail- 
roads 301. Required of civil engineering juniors. First semester; 
recitations 2 hours per week. Second semester; recitation 1 hour per 
week; field and drawing work 3 hours per week. Credit, 2 year- 
hours. Barnes.) 



152 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

308. Graphic Statics — Recitations and drawing-room exercises in the 
computation of forces; the plotting of diagrams in elementary graph- 
ics and roof -truss, bridge and masonry problems; design of a roof- 
truss. Textbook: Howe's Simple Roof Trusses in Wood and Steel. 
(Prerequisite: Applied Mechanics 315. Required of civil engineering 
and architectural juniors. Second semester; recitations 2 hours per 
week; drawing-room work, 4 hours per week. CrecUt, 2 year-hours. 
Reed.) "^^ 

310. Testing Laboratory — Laboratory work in the testing of stone, 
brick, asphalt, and other road materials and in cement, sand, con- 
crete, timber, steel and other materials used in construction. (Prere- 
quisite: Applied Mechanics 315. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Required 
of civil engineering juniors. Second semester; 2 hours per week. 
Credit, 1-2 year-hour. Reed.) 

403-404. Structural Engineering — Recitations and drawing-room work 
in the graphic analysis of girders and bridge trusses. Theory and de- 
sign of wooden and steel roof trusses; highway and railroad bridges; 
foundations. Theory and computations of stresses in various types 
of bridges and buildings. Drawing-room design. Textbook: Kirk- 
ham's Structural Engineering. (Prerequisite: Applied Mechanics 
315-316 and Graphic Statics 308. Required of civil engineering and 
architectural seniors; first semester; recitations, 2 hours per week; 
drawing room work, 3 hours per week. Second semester; recitations, 

2 hours per week; drawing-room work 6 hours per week. Credit, 

3 1-2 year-hours. Reed.) 

405. Contracts and Specifications— The contract in its relation to the 
engineer. Specifications. Textbook: "Contracts and Specifications 
and Engineering Relations," by D. W. Mead. (Required of all en- 
gineering seniors. Elective for non-engineering students. First se- 
mester; 2 hours. Credit, 1 year-hour. Reed.) 

407. Hydraulics — Recitations and laboratory work on the elements of 
hydraulics; the principles of hydrostatic and hydrodynamic pressure; 
the measurement of water by orifices, short tubes, nozzles, weirs, and 
other measuring instruments; flow through pipes and open channels; 
losses from friction and other sources; and other related topics. Text- 
book: Hydraulics, by Daugherty. (Prerequisite: Applied Mechanics 
315-316. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Required of all engineering seniors; 
first semester; recitations, 2 hours per week; laboratory exercises, 2 
hours per week. Credit, 11-2 year -hours. Barnes.) 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND ARCHITECTURE 153 

408. Hydraulic Engineering — Recitations on stream gaging and 
hydrographic surveying; water power, hydraulic turbines and im- 
pulse wheels; pumps and hydraulic machinery. Textbooks: 
"Hydraulics," by Daugherty; Notes on Hydraulic Engineering. (Pre- 
requisite: Hydraulics 407. Required of civil and mecfumical engi- 
neering seniors; second semester; 2 hours per week. Credit, 1 year- 
hour. Barnes.) 

409. Municipal Sanitation — Recitations on the design and construc- 
tion of sewerage systems and sewage disposal plants. Drawing- 
room work in the design of sanitary and storm sewers, and of a com- 
plete sewage treatment plant, together with estimates of cost. Text- 
book: Babbitt's Sewerage and Sewage Treatment. (Prerequisites: 
Applied Mechanics 315-316. Required of civil engineering seniors; 
first semester. Recitations, 2 hours; drawing-room work, 3 hours 
per week. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Barnes.) 

410. Water Supply — Recitations on sources of supply, purification, fil- 
ters, pumps, systems of supply, and fire supply. A short time is 
devoted to drainage and irrigation engineering. Drawing-room work 
in the design of a complete water supply system, a large gravity dam 
and a large masonry conduit. Textbooks: Turneaure and Russell's 
Public Water Supplies; Williams and Hazen's Hydraulic Tables; 
Elliot's Engineering for Land Drainage. (Prerequisite: Municipal 
Sanitation 409 and Hydraulics 407. Required of civil engineering 
seniors; second semester; recitations, 3 hours, drawing-room, 4 hours 
per week. Credit, 21-2 year-hours. Barnes.) 

412. Concrete Design— Recitations and drawing-room work on the 
theory and design of reinforced concrete structures. Textbook: "Re- 
inforced Concrete Design", by Sutherland and Clifford. (Prere- 
quisite: Applied Mechanics 315-316. Required of seniors in Civil 
Engineering and Architecture; second semester; recitations, 2 hours 
per week; drawing-room, 3 hours per week. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. 
Barnes.) 



154 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

THE DEPARTMENT OF DRAWING AND MECHANIC ARTS 

Professor Strong Colonel Walker 

Assistant Professor Eshleman 

DRAWING 

101-102. Mechanical Drawing — Geometrical problems, lettering, ortho- 
graphic and isometric drawings, tracing and sketching. A text book 
is used. (Required of all engineering freshmen, both semesters; elec- 
tive for non-engineering students. One 2 hour period and one 3 hour 
period, first semester; and one 3 hour period second semester, of 
drafting-room work per week. Credit, 2 year-hours. Walker.) 

201-202. Machine Drawing — Interpreting and reading drawings. Accu- 
rate, dimensioned working drawings made to scale, assembly draw- 

t ings and some tracing required. (Prerequisite: Drawing 101-102. 
Required of electrical and mechanical engineering sophomores; elec- 
tive for non- engineering students. Both semesters; one 3 hour period 
of drafting room work per week. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Strong.) 

MECHANIC ARTS 

101. Wood Working — Exercises in joinery and machine work. (Shop 
fee, $3.00. Required of all engineering freshmen, one semester; two 
3 hour periods of shop work per week. Eshleman.) This course is re- 
peated each semester. 

104. Wood Shop for Agricultural Students — Instruction and prac- 
tice in the care and use of hand tools in working wood. (Shop fee, 
$1.00. Required of Agricultural freshmen; two 2-hour periods of 
shop work per week. Eshleman.) 

201. Forge Shop — Practice in hand and machine forging, welding and 
tempering. (Shop fee, $3.00. Required of electrical and mechanical 
engineering sophomores; first semester; one 3 hour period of shop 
work per week. Strong.) 

202. Foundry — Practice in molding, core making and in melting and 
pouring metal, using standard foundry equipment. (Shop fee, $3.00. 
Required of electrical and mechanical engineering sophomores ; sec- 
ond semester; one 3 hour period of shop work per week. Strong.) 

204. Metalworking — Forging and tempering followed by bench and 
machine work in the machine shop. (Prerequisite: Shop 101. Shop 
fee, $5.00. Required of civil engineering sophomores, second semes- 
ter; one 3 hour period per week. Strong.) 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND ARCHITECTURE 155 

301. Machine Shop — All-around experience in bench and machine 
work. (Prerequisites: Shop 101 and Shop 201. Shop fee, $5.00. Re- 
quired of mechanical engineering juniors; first semester; two 2 hour 
periods per week. Strong.) 

304 Patternmaking — Study and practice of the principles underlying 
the construction of wooden patterns and core boxes for machine parts 
and other articles of cast metal. (Prerequisites: Shop 101 and 
Shop 202. Shop fee, $3.00. Required of mechanical engineering 
juniors; second semester; two 2 hour periods or one 4 hour period 
per week. Strong.) 

401. Machine Shop — Same as 301 except that it is required of electrical 
engineering seniors. (Shop fee, $5.00. First semester; two 3 hour 
periods per week. Strong.) 

THE DEPARTME>T OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING* 

Professor Benton Associate Professor Perry 
Associate Professor Weil Assistant Professor Higgins 
Assistant Professor Poindexter Instructor Little. 
Instructor t 

202. A Short Elementary Course in General Electrical Engi- 
neering — (Prerequisites: Mathematics 251 and Physics 209. Re- 
quired of all sophomores in civil, electrical, and mechanical engi- 
neering, and juniors in chemical engineering; 2 recitations or lec- 
tures per week. Benton.) 

204. Laboratory Work to Accompany Electrical Engineering 
301 — (Laboratory fee, $3.00. Required of sophomores in civil, elec- 
trical and mechanical engineering, and juniors in chemical engineer- 
ing; 1 two-hour laboratory period per week. Weil.) 

302. Direct-Current Theory and Application — Text-books used 
in 1926-1927: Langsdorf's Direct-Current Machinery, and Karape- 
tofif's Experimental Electrical Engineering. (Prerequisites: Electri- 
cal Engineering 311 and 313. Required of electrical engineering 
juniors; 3 hours. Weil.) 



*The courses in Electrical Engineering are given as part of the work of the 
Department of Physics and Electrical Engineering, the instructors in this depart- 
ment dividing their time between physics and electrical engineering. The courses 
in physics are described under the College of Arts and Sciences, pages 87 ff. 

fTo be appointed. 



156 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

304. Laboratory Work to Accompany Electrical Engineering 
302 — (Laboratory fee, $3.00. Required of electrical engineering 
juniors; 2 two-hour laboratory periods. Weil.) 

306. Radio Communication — Lectures, recitations, and laboratory- 
work on circuits and elementary radio measurements. Text-book 
used in 1926-27: Lauer and Broun's Radio Engineering Principles. 
(Prerequisite: 1 year of College Physics. Laboratory fee, $5,00. 
Elective for engineering students; open to non-engineering students; 
2 classes and 1 two-hour laboratory period. Credit, 11-2 year- 
hours. Higgins.) 

311. Electrical Theory — The work of this course is the same as that 
of Physics 311. (Prerequisites: Physics 209 and Mathematics 251- 
252. Required of electrical engineering juniors; 2 class periods per 
week. Benton.) 

313. Laboratory Work to Accompany Electrical Engineering 
311 — (Laboratory fee, $1.50. Required of electrical engineering 
juniors; 1 two-hour laboratory period per week. Weil.) 

401-402. Alternating - Current Theory and Applications — Text- 
books used in 1926-1927: Timbie and Higbie's Alternating-Current 
Electricity, Second Course; and Magnusson's Alternating Currents. 
(Prerequisites: Electrical Engineering 202-204 and 311-313. Re- 
quired of electrical engineering seniors: both semesters; 3 hours. 
Weil.) 

403-404. Dynamo Laboratory Work to Accompany Electrical En- 
gineering 401-2— Text-book used in 1926-1927. Karapetoff's Ex- 
perimental Electrical Engineering. (Prerequisite: Electrical Engi- 
neering 301 and 303. Laboratory fee, $3.00 per semester. Required 
of electrical engineering seniors, both semesters. 1 three-hour lab- 
oratory period per week. Weil.) 

405. Telegraph Engineering — Text-book used in 1926-1927: Haus- 
mann's Telegraph Engineering. (Prerequisites: Electrical Engineer- 
ing 311-313. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Required of electrical engineer- 
ing seniors, first semester; 1 recitation and 1 two-hour laboratory pe- 
riod. Higgins.) 

406. Telephone Engineering— Text-book used in 1926-1927: Kloeffer's 
Telephone Communication Systems. (Prerequisites: Electrical En- 
gineering 311-313, 405. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Required of elec- 
trical engineering seniors, second semester; 1 class and 1 two-hour 
laboratory period per week. Benton.) 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND ARCHITECTURE 157 

417-418. A General Course on Electrical Engineering, more ad- 
vanced in scope than the introductory course, 202-204, but not as 
complete as the courses 302-4 and 401-4. (Prerequisite: Electrical En- 
gineering 202-204. Laboratory fee, $3.00 per semester. Required 
of mechanical engineering seniors. Weil.) 

430. Optional Courses — In case of sufficient demand, any one of the 
following optional courses will be offered to electrical engineering 
seniors: Electrical Power Measurements; Electrical Power Transmis- 
sion; Electric Railways; Elementary Electrical Design. (Prereqid- 
k sites: Electrical Engineering 302-304 and 401-403. Second semes- 
ter; 2 hours. Weil.) 

456. Illumination and Wiring of Buildings — (Prerequisite: Physics 
105-108. Required of architectural seniors; 1 lecture or recitation 
per week. Benton.) 

THE DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

Professor Price Assistant Professor Prescott 

Associate Professor Gaines 

101-102. Descriptive Geometry — Methods of representing points, lines, 
surfaces and solids in space by their projections; the careful solu- 
tion of many original problems on the drawing-board. (Required of 
all engineering and achitectural freshmen; two recitations both semes- 
ters, and two hours of drawing per week the second semester. Walker.) 

201-202. Mechanism — Investigation of link-work, construction of gears 
and cams, belt and pulley drives, trains of mechanism, the velocity 
ratio and directional relation of the moving parts of various ma- 
chines. (Required of electrical and mechanical engineering sopho- 
mores; 2 hours, both semesters. Prescott.) 

301-302. Machine Elements — Sizes and proportions of standard ma- 
chine details, screw-threads, bolts and nuts, pipes and fittings, shaft- 
ing and shaft mountings, bearings, etc., as approved by practice; 
design of simple machines, working drawings. (Required of elec- 
trical and mechanical engineering juniors; 3 hours of drawing per 
week, both semesters, and 2 lectures per week the second semester. 
Prescott.) 

305-306. Kinematic Drawing — Drawing-board solutions of problems in 
link-work, cams, toothed gears, slider-crank and other mechanisms, 



158 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

with velocity and acceleration diagrams. (Prerequisite: Mechanism 
201-202. Required of mechanical engineering juniors; 3 hours of 
drawing per week, both semesters. Prescott.) 

310. Thermodynamics — The laws governing the emission and reception 
of heat, and the transformation of heat into mechanical energy. A 
study of the pressure-volume diagrams and the temperature-entropy 
diagrams of various theoretical and practical cycles. (Prerequisites: 
Mathematics 251-252, Physics 209 and Chemistry 101-102. Required 
of electrical and mechanical engineering juniors, second semester; 3 
hours. Price.) 

315-316. Applied Mechanics— (a) Statics, embracing the resolution 
of forces and moments; equilibrium as applied to trusses, machines, 
etc., centers of gravity and moments of inertia of areas, (b) Mechan- 
ics of materials; stresses and deformations in beams, columns, pipes, 
machine and structural parts, with various methods of loading, (c) 
Kinetics, embracing friction, inertia, centrifugal force, kinetic and po- 
tential energy. (Prerequisite: Mathematics 251-252. Laboratory fee, 
$1.00. Required of engineering and architectural juniors, both se- 
mesters; 4 hours; also a two-hour laboratory period each week, both 
semesters. Gaines.) m 

319. Materials of Engineering— A study of the properties, manufac- ' 
ture, and testing of brick, concrete, timber, iron, steel, alloys and 
non-ferrous metals; heat treatment and modifying processes. (Prere- 
quisites: Physics 105-106 and Chemistry 101-102. Required of civil, 
electrical and mechanical engineering juniors, first semester; 2 
hours. Gaines.) 

320. Materials of ENGiNEERiN(^-Continuation of course 319. (Re- 
quired of mechanical engineering juniors; second semester; 2 hours. 
Gaines.) 

410. Human Engineering— This course combines a study of some of the 
problems of production engineering with a study of certain questions 
of personnel management. (Prerequisite: Economics 307. Required 
of all engineering seniors, second semester; 2 hours; elective for non- 
engineering students. Credit, 1 year-hour. Price.) 

411-412. Mechanical Design— The calculation, proportioning and de- 
tailing of machine parts, and the design of machines to perform 
certain functions. Steel structures, reinforced concrete, piping, and 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND ARCHITECTURE 159 

mechanical equipment of power and manufacturing plants. (Pre- 
requisites: Mechanism 201-202, Kinematic Drawing 305-306, Ma- 
chine Elements 301-302 and Applied Mechanics 315-316. Required 
of mechanical engineering seniors; both semesters, 2 hours; also 4 
hours of drafting both semesters. Price.) 

417-418. Mechanical Laboratory — Study of gauges, thermometers, cal- 
orimeters, flow meters, indicators, dynamometers, flue-gas apparatus 
and other instruments and their use in conducting tests of engines, 
turbines, boilers and other mechanical equipment. Boiler trials, 
valve setting, power measurement, fuel tests, refrigeration tests, effi- 
ciency and heat balance calculations, with complete reports of experi- 
ments. (Laboratory fee, $5.00 each semester. Prerequisite: Ther- 
modynamics 310. Required of mechanical engineering seniors, both 
semesters; 4 hours. Gaines and Prescott.) 

420. Mechanical Laboratory — The same as Mechanical Laboratory 
417. (Laboratory fee, $5.00. Required of electrical engineering sen- 
iors, second semester; 4 hours. Gaines and Prescott.) 

421. Power Engineering — The steam boiler, fuels and combustion, en- 
gines and turbines, condensing apparatus and boiler plant auxiliar- 
ies. (Prerequisite: Thermodynamics 310. Required of electrical and 
mechanical engineering seniors, first semester; 3 hours. Price.) 

422. Power Engineering — Chimneys and breeching; pipe systems; 
valve gears; regulating and governing; heat transmission and refrig- 
eration. The economics of power and refrigerating plants. (Prere- 
quisites: Thermodynamics 310 and Power Engineering 419. Required 
of mechanical engineering seniors, second semester; 3 hours. Price.) 

424. Power Engineering — Gas and liquid fuel internal combustion en- 
gines; hot-air engines; gas producers. (Prerequisite: Thermodyna- 
mics 310. Required of mechanical and electrical engineering seniors: 
second semester; 3 hours. Prescott.) 



160 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

THE SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE 

J. R. Benton, Dean Rudolph Weaver, Director. 

Faculty— R. Weaver, G. E. Barnes, J. R. Benton, F. M. Brennan, W. 
E. Burkhardt, H. W. Chandler, J. M. Farr, B. F. Gaines, W. B. Hathaway, 
W. S. Higgins, J. P. Little, T. M. Lowe, W. S. Perry, C. G. Phipps, F. L. 
Prescott, M. Price, P. L. Reed, W. A. Rawls, T. M. Simpson, A. R. South- 
well, A. J. Strong, A. C. Tipton, E. S. Walker, J. Weil, C. S. Whitehead, 
J. H. Wise, E. M. Yon. 

Aim and Scope — The School of Architecture has been established to- 
furnish training in Architecture and the Allied Arts. The work in Archi- 
tecture is well begun and is of four years duration, leading to the 
bachelor's degree. Courses in the Allied Arts are being organized and 
information may be obtained by writing the Director. 

The courses are designed to prepare graduates for those fields of 
endeavor in which utility is combined with beauty. The unprecedented 
activity in Florida in building and beautifying cities has opened unusual 
opportunities to young men and women in the useful arts. Not only 
Florida, but all America is rapidly demanding the services of those who 
can design and build. It is the aim of the school to train students to meet 
these demands and enter the field of architecture and its numerous allied 
arts as designers, draftsmen, teachers, superintendents, constructors, etc., 
and ultimately as general practitioners or specialists in their chosen field. 

For requirements for admission to the regular four year course, see 
page 47. 

Special two or three year courses may be arranged by consultation 
with the Director of the School of Architecture. 

The Florida Chapter of the American Institute of Architects has voted 
funds for providing the School of Architecture with special lecturers 
selected from among its own ranks, and other prominent men in related 
fields. 

The Florida State Board of Architects has accumulated a fund out 
of which it has given the School of Architecture three thousand dollars 
this year for the purpose of purchasing books for the library of archi- 
tecture. 

The Florida Association of Architects has awarded a gold medal 
annually to the architectural student doing the best work throughout 
the year, and has also created a loan fund for deserving and needy stu- 
dents. 



I 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND ARCHITECTURE 



161 



Names of Courses 








Hours 


PER 


Week 








Freshman 


Year 






















1st Semester 


2nd Semester 




Architecture 101-102 







3 
6 
6 
4 

2 

21 


t 
9 
4 




4 
4 

21 


T 
9 
4 
5 
9 
9 
7 
4 
8 

55 


*** 
3 
2 
2 
3 
3 
3 
2 
2 

20 


* 


2 
3 
3 
3 

2 
1 

14 


♦ * 


3 
6 
6 
4 

2 
2 

23 


t 
6 
4 




4 
4 


18 


T * 
6 

4 
5 
9 
9 

7 
4 
8 
3 

55 




Architecture 121-122 





? 


Descriptive Geometry 101-102 . 
English 101-102 


3 


2 


Mathematics 151-152 


3 


s 


Physics 105-106 

Physics 107-108 


3 




3 

? 


Military Science 101-102 

Architecture 112 


2 


2 
T 




13 


20 




Sophomore 


Year 




















1st Semester 


2nd Semester 




Architecture 203-204 _ 

Architecture 223-224 

Architecture 229-230 


* 


ZZZZ" 2 


** 


4 


6 

5 
2 
3 

20 


t 
9 
6 

3 



6 
4 


22 


T 
9 
6 
6 
4 

9 

8 
8 
5 

55 


*** 
3 
2 
2 
2 

3 

3 

2 
2 

19 


* 


2 

i 

3 

1 

3 

2 

12 





4 

6 

6 
2 
5 
2 

19 


t 
9 
6 


3 

3 


4 

25 


T * 
9 
6 
6 

4 
9 
6 
8 
8 

56 


3 

2 


Architecture 227 


1 




Architecture 226 




^ 


Mathematics 251-252 


._ 3 


3 






2 


Modem Language 


.„ 3 


3 


Military Science 201-202 

Elective 


2 

2 


2 




13 


w 



162 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



Names of Courses 








Hours 


PER 


Week 




Junior Year 






1st Semester 


2nd Semester 


Architecture 305-306 

Architecture 325 

Architecture 331-332 


* 





2 


*m 




4 

3 
6 

5 
3 

21 


.1 

6 



6 

2 




20 


T 

12 
6 
6 

5 

li 

8 
5 

53 


4 
2 
2 

2 

3 

3 
2 

18 


* 


2 


2 

3 

1 
3 

n 


** t 
9 

4 b 
6 

3 b 

6 2 
iVo 3 

5 

19y220 


T *** 
9 3 

6 2 


Architecture 310 

Architecture 351 

Architecture 352 


ZZ'Z 2 


6 2 
5 2 


Applied Mechanics 305 

Mechanics of Materials 308 

Graphic Statics 306 


3 


11 4 

5V> 2 


Modem Language 

Electives 


3 

2 


8 3 




12 


501/218 


Senior Year 


' 




1st Semester 


2nd Semester 


Architecture 407-408 

Architecture 413 

English 412 


* 



- 1 


♦ * 

2 



3 

2 

6 
2 
15 


t 
15 


6 

3 




b 

24 


T 
15 
3 

7 

9 
3 

9 

3 

49 


*** 


1 

3 

4 
1 

3 

i 

18 


* 


b 
i 

3 

i 
i 

2 
8 


** 


3 

2 
6 

2 

b 

3 
16 


t 
15 

b 
b 

6 

b 

3 
3 


24 


15 5 
3 2 


Architecture 455 . 


1 




Architecture 458 




3 1 


Structural Engineering 403-404 .. 

Architecture 457 

Architecture 456 

Economics 307 


3 

1 

"~"Z 3 


15 5 

3 1 

4 2 


Concrete Design 406 

Elective 


ZZIZ i 

10 


4 2 

5 2 

48 18 



*Hours of recitation or lecture. **Estimated hours necessary for preparation. fHours 
of laboratory, shop, field, or drafting-room work. ***Number Semester Credit 
Hours. T— Total hours. 



II 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND ARCHITECTURE 163 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 



ARCHITECTURE 

101-102. Architectural Design — This course treats of simple shapes 
and masses, space relationship, groups of elements, logically and 
beautifully composed. The student is made familiar with the ele- 
ments of buildings derived from classical precedent, with the intro- 
duction of principles and methods of architectural drawing and 
rendering. (First semester, 3 three-hour drafting-room periods; 
second semester, 2 three-hour drafting-room periods. Credit, 2 1-2 
year-hours.) 

203-204. Architectural Design — A continuation of Architecture 101- 
102, with advanced problems and elements of architectural compo- 
sition. (Both semesters, 3 three-hour drafting-room periods. Credit, 
3 year-hours.) 

305-306. Architectural Design — ^The third year of architectural de- 
sign with preliminary sketches, rendered studies, final drawings and 
additional sketch problems. (First semester, 3 four-hour drafting- 
room periods; second semester, 3 three-hour drafting-room periods. 
Credit, 3 1-2 year-hours.) 

407-408. Architectural Design — Advanced Architectural Design cov- 
ering the more complex problems of planning and designing, a con- 
tinuation of the work and experience gained in the preceding three 
years of Architectural Design. (Both semesters, 3 four-hour and 1 
three-hour drafting-room periods. Credit, 5 year-hours.) 

310. Residence Design — A study of residence problems through plans, 
section and elevation, parallel to regular design course. (Second 
semester, 3 two-hour drafting-room periods. Credit, 1 year-hour.) 

112. Elements of Beauty — A discussion of the manifestations of beauty 
in nature with lectures on the various modes of its expression in the 
arts, particularly in architecture. Special lectures are given by in- 
structors in other departments on the drama, poetry, music and other 
arts. Assigned reading and problems. (Second semester, 1 hour. 
Credit, 1-2 year -hour.) 



164 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

121-122. Freehand Drawing — Elementary instruction in careful obser- 
vation and accurate sketching in pencil and charcoal from simple 
casts and simple architectural details. Accuracy of proportion, sim- 
plicity of presentation and unity of the whole are emphasized. (Both 
semesters, 3 two-hour drawing periods. Credit, 2 year-hours.) 

223-224. Freehand Drawing — A continuation of Architecture 121-122, 
with more advanced studies in charcoal, and an introduction of direct 
pen and ink sketching. (Both semesters, 3 two-hour drawing periods. 
Credit, 2 year-hours.) 

325. Freehand Drawing — Advanced Freehand Drawing, studies in char- 
coal, pen and ink and in wash. (First semester, 3 two-hour drawing 
periods. Credit, 1 year-hour.) 

226. Elementary Water Color — Color theory and various methods of 
applying water color. The expression of distance, sky and cloud 
effects, foreground and foliage. Simple landscapes. (Second semes- 
ter, 2 three-hour drawing periods. Credit, 1 year-hour.) 

227. Perspective — A discussion of the phenomena of perspective and 
methods of representing distance, followed by exercises in drawing 
architectural perspectives. (First semester, 2 three-hour drafting- 
room periods. Credit, 1 year-hour.) 

229-230. Architectural History— A series of lectures with stereopticon 
slides covering Egyptian, Assyrian, Persian, Greek, Roman, Early 
Christian, and Byzantine Architecture. Historical and other influ- 
ences, building materials, and methods of construction. Compari- 
son of the styles. Supplemented by reference reading and sketching. 
(Both semesters, 2 one-hour lectures. Credit, 2 year-hours.) 

331-332. Architectural History — A continuation of Architecture 229- 
230, covering Romanesque, Gothic, Renaissance, and Modern Archi- 
tecture. Supplemented by reference reading and sketching. (Both 
semesters, 2 one-hour lectures. Credit, 2 year-hours.) 

351. Frame Construction— The nature and properties of woods used in 
building construction. Methods of construction. (First semester, 2 
lectures and drawings. Credit, 1 year-hour.) 

352. Masonry Construction— Building materials and processes other 
than those included in Frame Construction. (Second semester, 2 lec- 
tures and drawings. Credit, 1 year-hour.) 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING AND ARCHITECTURE 165 

454. Concrete Design — A course in reinforced concrete design, primar- 
ily intended for architectural students. (Second semester, 1 lecture 
and 1 three-hour drafting-room period. Credit, 1 year-hour.) 

455. Working Drawings — The preparation of scale drawings and de- 
tails as are issued to the builder in actual practice. (First semester, 
2 three-hour drafting-room periods. Credit, 11-2 year-hours.) 

457. Heating and Ventilating — A course in Heating and Ventilating 
given in the Engineering College especially arranged for architec- 
tural students. (First semester, 1 one-hour lecture. Credit, 1-2 
year-hour.) 

456. Electric Lighting — Illumination and wiring of buildings, given 
in the Electrical Engineering Department for architectural students. 
(Second semester, 1 hour. Credit, 1-2 year-hour.) 

458. Professional Practice — Lectures on the ethics and professional 
methods of modern practice. (Second semester, 1 hour. Credit, 1-2 
year-hour.) 

413. Decorative Arts — A study of the decorative arts related to Archi- 
tecture. (First semester, 1 hour. Credit, 1-2 year-hour.) 

OTHER DEPARTMENTS 

For description of other courses required of students in Architecture, 
see other departments in Engineering work on preceding pages; for elec- 
tive courses, consult the Index. 



166 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



THE COLLEGE OF LAW 

Harry R. Trusler, Dean 

Faculty — H. R. Trusler, R. S. Cockrell, C. W. Crandall, S. Simonds, 
D. Slagle, G. W. Thompson. 

GENERAL STATEMENT 

Aim and Scope — In 1891, the American Bar Association declared that 
in its opinion it was a part of the highest duty and interest of every 
civilized state to make provision for maintaining schools of law for the 
thorough legal education of all who are licensed to practice law. Recog- 
nizing the soundness of this statement and desiring to discharge this 
duty, the State Board of Education and the Board of Control provided for 
the opening of the College of Law in the University in September, 1909. 
The advantages accruing to the State from having, as a part of its educa- 
tional system, a thorough and systematic course of instruction in the 
common law, with special consideration of the peculiarities and exceptions 
applicable in Florida, are many and evident. 

It was the purpose of the Board of Control to establish a law school 
which, by the quality of its work and character of its equipment, would 
merit and command the confidence and support of the bench and bar. 
That the hope of accomplishing these results was well founded is shown 
by the number and character of those who have availed themselves of the 
advantages offered. 

Requirements for Admission — Those entering as candidates for de- 
grees must present, in addition to the requirement of sixteen entrance units 
(see pages 47 ff.), two years of college work. Students will be con- 
ditionally admitted with a deficiency of not over three semester-hours of 
college work. 

No specific course of studies is prescribed for the college work re- 
quired for admission; but, in general, students are advised to pursue the 
course offered by the College of Arts and Sciences. Thereby it will be 
easier for them to complete the combined academic and law course should 
they so desire. 

Special Students — The number of special students admitted each 
year (in compliance with the rules of the Association of American Law 
Schools) is restricted to not more than ten per cent of the average of 
entering students for the two years previous. Those wishing to enter as 



COLLEGE OF LAW 167 

special students should apply to the Dean, stating age, preparation and 
experience. 

Advanced Standing — No work in law done in other institutions will 
be accepted towards a degree, unless the applicant passes satisfactorily 
the examinations held in the subjects in question in this College, or unless 
credit is given without examination. Credit for work not meeting the 
requirements of the Association of American Law Schools, of which this 
College is a member, will not be accepted. 

Examinations — The last week of each semester is devoted to examina- 
tions covering the work of the semester. These examinations are in writ- 
ing and are rigid and searching, but are not necessarily final. 

All students, unless excused by the Dean, must present themselves for 
the regular examination in all the subjects for which they are registered. 
A student who has made a semester grade of 60 or more in any subject is 
entitled to a re-examination in that subject; only one re-examination in 
any subject is permitted. 

University Practice Courts — Thoroughly organized practice courts 
are regular features of the third year of the curriculum. The object is to 
give the student practical instruction in pleading and practice at law and 
in equity, and experience in the preparation and trial of cases. The work 
is arranged as follows: 

First — Cases arising upon prepared statements of fact are assigned, 
upon which the students are to determine what proceedings to bring and 
how to bring them, issue, serve, and return process, prepare the pleadings, 
and to bring the case to an issue on a question of law. The case is heard 
on the sufficiency of the form and the structure of the pleadings; when 
'' these are approved the issue of law is argued and decided, the students 
acting as attorneys drawing the order, judgment, or decree to which they 
deem themselves entitled. 

Second — In the second class of cases, actual controversies are arranged 
and assigned for trial in the Circuit Court as issues of fact. After deter- 
mining what action to bring, the students assigned to the case are required 
to issue the proper process and prepare and file the necessary pleadings, 
subpoena the witnesses, select the jury, examine and cross-examine the 
witnesses, and argue the case to the jury. Each student is required to 
participate in the trial of at least one common-law, one equity, and one 
criminal case, and is instructed in appellate procedure. 

The Practice Court is conducted by Professors Cockrell and Crandall. 



1^ UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

Library — ^The Law Library contains: 

Three sets of Florida Reports with Wurts' Digest (both editions) ; Shepard's 
Florida Citations; The Session Laws of Florida from 1822 to 1921, except from 1828 
to 1834; McClellan's Digest and Duval's Compilation of the Laws of Florida; Revised 
Statutes of 1898, three sets of the General Statutes of 1906; two sets of Florida Com- 
piled Laws of 1914; eight sets of the Revised General Statutes of Florida, 1920; 
Reports of the Florida Railroad Commission, the Attorney General of Florida, the 
Interstate Commerce Commission, and the Land Decisions of the Department of the 
Interior; Federal Statutes Annotated; Thorpe's American Charters, Constitutions and 
Organic Laws; Hinds' Precedents of the House of Representatives; the Northwestern, 
Southwestern, Northeastern, Southeastern, Atlantic, Pacific, and Southern Reporters; 
the American Decisions, American Reports, and American State Reports, with digests ; 
the American Annotated Cases, with digests; the American and English Annotated 
Cases, with digests; the Lawyers' Reports Annotated, old and new series, with digests; 
American Annotated Cases; American Law Reports; the United States Supreme 
Court Reports, with digests; Rose's Notes; Federal Cases; Federal Reporter; Shep- 
ard's Federal, Florida, and Southern Citations; Stimson's American Statute Laws; 
the State Reports to the Reporters of Alabama, Arkansas, Connecticut, Delaware, 
Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachu- 
setts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New 
Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, 
Texas, Vermont, Virginia, West Virginia, and Wisconsin; the Porto Rico Federal 
Reports; the Hawaii Reports; the New York Court of Appeals Reports; the New 
York Common Law and Chancery Reports, with digests; the New York Supplement; 
the New York Supreme Court, Practice and Code, Surrogate, Superior Court, Com- 
mon Pleas, and Criminal Reports; the Pacific State Reports, with digests, which in- 
clude the California Reports, the Colorado Supreme Reports, the Colorado Appeals, 
the Idaho Reports, the Kansas Reports, the Montana Reports, the Nevada Reports, 
the New Mexico Reports, the Oregon Reports, the Utah Reports, the Washington 
Reports, and the Wyoming Reports to the Reporters; the Alaska Reports; the Re- 
print of the English Reports; the English Law Reports; Law Journal Reports; the 
British Ruling Cases, The English Ruling Cases; Dominion Law Reports; Mew's Eng- 
lish Digest; English and Empire Digest; Halsbury's Laws of England; the Century, 
the Decennial, the Second Decennial, and the Key Number Digests; the Encyclopedia 
of Law Procedure; Corpus Juris; the Encyclopedia of Forms; the Standard Ency- 
clopedia of Procedure; two sets of Ruling Case Law; Words and Phrases; the Har- 
vard, Pennsylvania, Columbia and Michigan Law Reviews, the Central Law Journal 
and Yale Law Journal; more than one hundred selected volumes for the class in 
Brief Making and the use of Law Books; and more than two hundred of the lead- 
ing textbooks and books of reference. 

A course of instruction is given in legal bibliography and the use 
of law books. Every facility, also, is offered law students to make use 
of the general library of the University, in which are included many works 
of interest and information to lawyers. 

Both libraries are open during the academic year on every secular 
day between the hours of 8:00 a. m. and 10:00 p. m., and are in charge of 
trained librarians, who render needed aid to students. 

Marshall Debating Society — Early in the first year of the College 
the students organized a society that would secure to its members practice 
in debating and public speaking and experience in arguing legal questions, 
as well as drill in parliamentary law. The society was fittingly named 
*The Marshall Debating Society", in honor of the memory of the dis- 



I 



COLLEGE OF LAW 169 

tinguished Southern jurist, John Marshall. Membership and work in 
the society are limited to students in the College of Law, but the Faculty 
give all possible assistance and encouragement. 

University Privileges — The advantages of the other colleges of the 
University are open to such students in the College of Law as desire and 
iare able to accept them. Courses in History, Economics, Sociology, Psy- 
ichology, Logic, and English are particularly recommended. 

Degrees — ^The degree of Bachelor of Laws (LL.B.) will be con- 
iferred upon those who satisfactorily complete eighty-five semester hours 
of law studies, which must include all of the first year subjects. Students 
admitted to advanced standing may receive the degree after one year's 
residence, but in no case will the degree be granted unless the graduate is 
in actual residence during all of the third year and passes in this College 
at least twenty-two semester hours of law. 

Students who have complied with all the requirements for the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Laws (LL.B.), who have maintained an average 
standing in their law studies 10 percent above the passing mark, and who 
have obtained the degree of A.B., or an equivalent degree, from an ap- 
proved college or university, or who secure such degree the same year 
they complete their law course, will be awarded the degree of Juris Doctor 
(J.D.). 

Combined Academic and Law Course — See page 56. 

Expenses — A tuition fee of $20.00 per semester, payable in advance 

is charged all law students, except those taking less than eleven hours 

i of work, who are charged a proportional part of the full tuition. An addi- 

1 tional fee of $100.00 is charged non-resident students. The cost of books 

for the first year will approximate $60.00; for the second, $65-$75, de- 

I pending on the electives taken; for the third, $63.00. Students are 

I urged to provide themselves with the statutes of their own state and a 

1 law dictionary. These books will form a nucleus for the student's future 

library; and by the purchase of second-hand books the cost may be mate- 

I rially reduced. See also pages 34 ff . 

Admission to the Bar — Upon presenting their diplomas, duly issued 
by the proper authorities, and upon furnishing satisfactory evidence that 
they are twenty-one years of age and of good moral character, the gradu- 
ates of the College are licensed without examination, to practice in the 
courts of Florida. They also are admitted without examination to the 
United States District Court for the Northern District of Florida. 



170 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



THE CURRICULUM 



FIRST YEAR 



FIRST SEMESTER 



301. Torts — History and definitions; elements of torts; conflicting 
rights; mental anguish; parties to tort actions; remedies; damages; 
conflict of laws; methods of discharge; comprehensive study of par- 
ticular torts; false imprisonment, malicious prosecution, abuse of 
process, conspiracy, slander and libel, trespass, conversion, deceit, 
nuisance, negligence, and others. Textbooks: Burdick on Torts and 
Burdick's Cases on Torts, fourth edition. (5 hours. Truster.) 

303. Contracts — Formation of contract; offer and acceptance; form 
and consideration; reality of consent; legality of object; operation 
of contract; limits of the contract obligation; assignment of contract; 
joint obligations; interpretation of contract. Textbooks: Clark on 
Contracts, third edition; Williston's Cases on Contract, second edition. 
(4 hours. Thompson.) 

305. Criminal Law — Sources of criminal law; nature and elements of 
crime; criminal intent; insanity; intoxication; duress; mistake of 
fact or law; justification; parties in crime; offenses against the 
person, habitation, property, public health and morals, public justice 
and authority, government, and the law of nations. Textbook: Clark 
on Criminal Law, third edition; selected cases. (2 hours. Cockrell.) 

307. Criminal Procedure— Jurisdiction ; arrest; preliminary examina- 
tion and bail; grand jury, indictment and information and their 
sufficiency in form and substance; arraignment, pleas, and motions; 
nolle prosequi and motions to quash; jeopardy; presence of de- 
fendant at the trial; verdict; new trial; arrest of judgment; judg- 
ment, sentence, and execution. Textbook: Clark's Criminal Procedure, 
second edition; selected cases. (2 hours. Cockrell.) 

309. Property— Personal property ; possession and rights based thereon ; 
acquisition of title; liens and pledges; conversion. Textbook: War- 
ren's Cases on Property. (2 hours. Crandall.) 



COLLEGE OF LAW 171 



SECOND SEMESTER 



302. Equity Jurisprudence — History and definition; jurisdiction; max- 
ims; accident, mistake, fraud; penalties and forfeitures; priorities 
and notice; bona fide purchasers, estoppel; election; satisfaction and 
performance; conversion; equitable estates, interest, primary rights; 
trusts; powers, duties, and liabilities of trustees; mortgages; equit- 
able liens; assignments; specific performance; injunction; reforma- 
tion; cancellation; cloud on titles; ancillary remedies. Textbook: 
Eaton on Equity, second edition; selected cases. (5 hours. Truster.) 

304. Contracts and Quasi Contracts — Rules relating to evidence and 
construction; discharge of contract. Origin and nature of quasi con- 
tract; benefits conferred in misreliance on rights or duty, from 
mistake of law, and on invalid, unenforceable, illegal, or impossible 
contract; benefits conferred through dutiful intervention in another's 
affairs; benefits conferred under constraint; action for restitution as 
alternative remedy for breach of contract and for tort. Textbooks: 
Williston's Cases on Contract, second edition; Woodruff's Cases on 
Quasi Contracts. (3 hours. Thompson.) 

306. Marriage and Divorce — Marriage in general; nature of the rela- 
tion; capacity of parties; annulment; divorce; suit, jurisdiction, 
grounds; defenses; alimony; effect on property rights; custody and 
support of children; agreements of separation. Textbook: Vernier's 
Cases on Marriage and Divorce. (1 hour. Cockrell.) 

308. Common Law Pleading — History and development of the personal 
actions at common law; theory of pleading and its peculiar features 
as developed by the jury trial; demurrers, general and special; pleas 
in discharge, in excuse, and by way of traverse; replication de injuria; 
duplicity; departure; new assignment; motions based on pleadings; 
general rules of pleadings. Textbook: Keigwin's Cases on Common 
Law Pleading. (3 hours. Crandall.) 

310. Sales — Sale and contract to sell; statute of frauds; illegality; con- 
ditions and warranties; delivery; acceptance and receipt; vendor's 
lien; stoppage in transitu; bills of lading; remedies of seller and 
buyer. Textbook: Waite's Law of Sales; selected cases. (1 hour. 
Thompson.) 

312. Property — Introduction to the law of conveyancing; rights inci- 
dent to the ownership of land, and estates therein, including the land 



172 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

itself, air, water, fixtures, emblements, waste; profits; easements; 
licenses; covenants running with the land. Textbook: Warren's 
Case on Property. (2 hours. Crandall.) 

SECOND YEAR 
FIRST SEMESTER 

401. United States Constitutional Law— General principles; distri- 
bution of governmental powers; congress; the chief executive; the 
judiciary; police powers; eminent domain; checks and balances; 
guarantee of republican government; civil rights; political privileges J 
guarantee in criminal cases; impairment of contractual obligations'. 
Textbook: Hall's Cases on Constitutional Law. (4 hours. Slagle.) 

403. Agency— Nature of the relation; purposes and manner of crea- 
tion; who may be principal or agent; ratification; delegation of au- 
thority; general and special agents; rights and duties of agents; 
termination, nature, extent, construction, and execution of authority 
of agents; rights, duties, and liabilities of agents; principal and 
third persons inter se; particular classes of agents. Textbook: 
Mechem's Cases on Agency, second edition. (2 hours. Thompson.) 
405. Equity Pleading— Nature and object of pleading in equity; parties 
to a suit in equity; proceedings in a suit in equity; bills in equity, 
disclaimer; demurrers and pleas; answer and replication; prepara- 
tion of bills, demurrers, pleas, answers. Textbooks: Keigwin's Cases 
m Equity Pleading; Rules of the Circuit Court in Chancery in Flor- 
ida; Rules of the Federal Court; Statutes of Florida. (3 hours 
Cockrell.) 

407. Brief Making and the Use of Law BooK^Where to find the 
law; how to use statutes and decisions; how to find the law; the trial 
brief; die brief on appeal and its preparation. Textbook: Cooley's 
Brief Making and the Use of Law Books. (1 hour. Crandall.) 

409. PROPERTY-Titles and conveyancing, including acquisition of titles 
by possession, modes of conveyance at common law, under the statute 
of uses, and by statutory grant; the execution of deeds; estates cre- 
ated ,-^ covenants for titles; estoppel by deed; priorities among titles. 
Textbook: Warren's Cases on Conveyances. (3 hours. Crandall.) 

4n. Florida Constitutional LAW*-Declaration of rights; depart- 

^' "^ government; suffrage and eligibility; census and apportion- 

♦For students intendmg to practice in Florida. 



I 



COLLEGE OF LAW 173 

ment; counties and cities; taxation and finance; homestead and ex- 
emption; married women's property; education; public institutions; 
miscellaneous provisions. Textbooks: Constitution, statutes and ju- 
dicial decisions of Florida. (2 hours. Trusler.) 

413. Code Pleading* — Changes introduced by the codes; forms of ac- 
tion; necessary allegations; the complaint; prayer for relief, includ- 
ing general and special denials; new matter; equitable defenses; 
counter claims; pleading several defenses; replies and demurrers. 
Textbook : Keigwin's Cases in Code Pleading. (2 hours. Thompson.) 

SECOND SEMESTER 

402 — Evidence — Judicial notice; kinds of evidence; burden of proof; 
presumptions of law and fact; judge and jury; best evidence rule; 
hearsay rule and its exceptions; admissions; confessions; exclusions 
based on public policy and privilege; corroboration; parol evidence 
rule; witnesses; attendance in court; examination, cross examina- 
tion, privilege; public documents; records and judicial writings; 
private writings. Textbook : Greenleaf on Evidence, sixteenth edition. 
Volume 1; selected cases. (4 hours. Cockrell.) 

404. Private Corporations — Nature; creation and citizenship; defective 
organization; promotors; powers and liabilities; corporations and the 
State; dissolution; membership; management; creditors; foreign 
corporations; practice in forming corporations, preparing by-laws, 
electing officers, and in conducting corporate business. Textbooks: 
Clark on Private Corporations, and Wormser's Cases on Corporations. 
(4 hours. Slagle.) 

406. Legal Ethics — Admission of attorneys to practice; taxation; privi- 
leges and exemptions; authority; liability to clients and to third 
parties; compensation; liens; suspension and disbarment; duties to 
clients, courts, professional brethren, and to society. Textbooks: At- 
torneys at Law in Ruling Case Law and the Code of Ethics adopted 
by the American Bar Association. (1 hour. Trusler.) 

408. Property — History of the law of wills and testaments; testament- 
ary capacity and intent; kind of wills and testaments; execution, 
revocation, republication, revival of wills; descent; probate of wills 
and the administration of estates. Textbook: Warren's Cases on 
Wills. (3 hours. Thompson.) 



'For students not intending to practice in Florida. 



174 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

410. Florida Civil Practice* — Organization of courts; parties; joinder 
and consolidation of actions; issuance, service, and return of process; 
appearance; trial; verdict; proceedings after verdict; appellate pro- 
ceedings; peculiar characteristics of the common law actions; special 
proceedings including certiorari, mandamus, prohibition, quo war- 
ranto, habeas corpus, attachment, garnishment, statutory liens, forci- 
ble entry and detainer, landlord and tenant. Textbook: Crandall's 
Florida Civil Practice. (3 hours. Cockrell.) 

412. General Civil Procedure** — The court; parties; forms of ac- 
tion; the trial; selection of jury and procedure in jury trial; judg- 
ment; execution; appeal and error. Textbook: Loyd's Cases on Civil 
Procedure. (3 hours. Crandall.) 

TfflRD YEAR 

FIRST SEMESTER 

501. Insurance — Theory, history, significance; insurable interest; con- 
cealment, representations, warranties; subrogation; waiver and estop- 
pel; assignees, beneficiaries; creditors; fire, life, marine, accident, 
guarantee, liability insurance. Textbooks: Humble's Law of Insur- 
ance and Humble's Cases on Insurance. (1 hour. Truster.) 

503. Public Service Corporations — Nature of public utilities; rail- 
roads and other common carriers of goods and passengers; tele- 
graphs and telephones; light and water companies; inns; warehouses; 
elevators; stockyards; methods of incorporation; public control; 
rights and obligations at common law and under federal and state 
statutes. Textbook: Wyman's Cases on Public Service Companies, 
third edition. (2 hours. Slagle.) 

505. Federal Procedure and Bankruptcy — System of courts created 
under the authority of the United States, jurisdiction of the several 
courts and procedure therein; federal and state bankruptcy legisla- 
tion; who may become bankrupt; prerequisites to adjudication; re- 
ceivers; trustees; provable claims; exemptions; composition; dis- 
charge. Textbooks: Rose on Federal Jurisdiction and Procedure, 
third student's edition; Black on Bankruptcy. (3 hours. Slagle.) 

507. Partnership — Creation, nature, characteristics of a partnership; 
nature of a partner's interest; nature, extent, duration of the part- 

•For students intending to practice in Florida. 
**For students not intending to practice in Florida. 



COLLEGE OF LAW 175 

nership liability; powers of partners; rights, duties, remedies of 
partners inter se; rights and remedies of creditors; termination of 
partnership. Textbook: Gilmore's Cases on Partnership. (2 hours. 
Thompson.) 

509. Admiralty — Jurisdiction; contracts, torts, crimes; maritime liens, 
ex contractu, ex delicto, priorities, discharge; bottomry and respon- 
dentia obligations; salvage; general average. Textbook: Hughes on 
Admiralty. (1 hour. Slagle.) 

511. Property — Conditional estates; licenses and waivers; reversions 
and remainders; rule in Shelley's Case; future uses; future interests; 
executory devises and bequests; vesting of legacies; cross limita- 
tions; gifts; failure of issue; determination of classes; powers; rule 
against perpetuities; restraints on alienation. Textbook: Kale's 
Cases on Future Interests. (3 hours. Crandall.) 

513. Mortgages — Nature; elements; ijncidents of the relation; dis- 
charge; assignment; redemption; foreclosure; injunction and ac- 
count; extent of the lien; priority between mortgage liens and com- 
peting claims; equity of redemption. Textbook: Durfee's Cases on 
Mortgages. (2 hours. Cockrell.) 

515. Roman Law — ^The fundamental legal conceptions which are found 
in Roman Law. Readings in the Institutes of Gaius and Justinian 
(Robinson's Selections), with constant reference to Sohm — Institutes 
of Roman Law — translated by Ledley. Topics assigned for reports. 
Lectures with chief stress on Private Law. (3 hours. Professor 
Simonds.) 

517. Practice Court — (1 hour.) 

SECOND SEMESTER 

502. Damages — General principles; nominal; compensatory; exemp- 
lary; liquidated; direct and consequential; proximate and remote; 
general and special; measure in contract and tort actions; entire 
damages in one action; mental suffering; avoidable consequences; 
value; interest; lateral support; counsel fees and expenses of litiga- 
tion; injuries to real property and limited interests; death by wrong- 
ful act; breaches of warranty. Textbook: Rogers' Law of Dam- 
ages; selected cases. (2 hours. Trusler.) 

504. Municipal Corporations — Creation of cities and towns; powers 
of a municipality, including public powers, power of taxation, power 



176 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

over streets and alleys, etc.; obligations and liabilities of municipal 
corporations; powers and liabilities of officers. Textbook: Elliott 
on Municipal Corporations, second edition. (1 hour. Cockrell.) 

506. Negotiable Instruments — Law merchant; definitions and general 
doctrines; contract of the maker, acceptor, certifier, drawer, indorser, 
vendor, accommodater, assurer; proceedings before and after dis- 
honor of negotiable instruments; absolute defenses; equities; pay- 
ments; conflict of laws. Textbook: Britton's Cases on Bills and 
Notes. (3 hours. Slagle.) 

508. Conflict of Laws — Jurisdiction; sources of law and comity; ter- 
ritorial jurisdiction; jurisdiction in rem and in personam; remedies, 
rights of action, procedure; creation of rights; property rights; per- 
sonal rights; inheritance; obligations ex delicto and ex contractu; 
recognition and enforcement of rights; personal relations; property; 
inheritance; administration of estates; judgments and obligations. 
Textbook: Lorenzen's Cases on Conflict of Laws, second edition. 
(3 hours. Slagle.) 

510. Abstracts — Practical problems covering the interpretation of maps 
and the plotting of lots described by metes and bounds; the formal 
requisites of the different conveyances in use in Florida; deeds exe- 
cuted by public and judicial officers; liens and contracts for the 
sale of lands. Textbooks: Florida Statutes and selected Florida 
Cases. (1 hour. Thompson.) 

512. Trusts — The Anglo-American system of uses and trusts; creation, 
transfer, extinguishment of trust interests; priorities between com- 
peting equities; construction of trust dispositions; charitable trusts. 
Textbook: Boger on Trusts; selected cases. (2 hours. Thompson.) 

514. Judgment — Nature and essentials; kinds; record; vacation; amend- 
ment; modification; satisfaction. Textbooks: Rood's Cases on Judg- 
ments. (2 hours. Crandall.) 

516. Roman Law* — Readings, references, and reports. Subjects treated: 
Roman Public Law; Roman International Law; Stoic Philosophy and 
the Jus Gentium; Christianity and the Roman Law; Roman Law in 
Mediaeval Europe; The Revival of Roman Law; The Roman Element 
in Modern Jurisprudence. (3 hours. Professor Simonds.) 

518. Practice Court — (1 hour.) 



"Only three semester hours of Roman Law will be counted toward a degre 



TEACHERS COLLEGE 177 



TEACHERS COLLEGE AND NORMAL SCHOOL 

J. W. Norman, Dean 

Faculty — J, W. Norman, J. N. Anderson, J. R. Benton, A. P. Black, 
L. M. Bristol, L. W. Buchholz, C. L. Crow, J. M. Farr, J. R. Fulk, J. G. 
Gee, L. G. Haskell, W. B. Hathaway, J. M. Leake, T. R. Leigh, W. A. 
Little, B. F. Luker, W. J. Matherly, J. S. Rogers, Jos. Roemer, T. M. Simp- 
son, A. J. Strong, A. W. Sweet, A. C. Tipton, J. E. Turlington, E. M. Yon. 

Teaching Fellows — A. R. Morrow, A. M. Singletary. 

GENERAL STATEMENT 

Aim and Scope — The main purpose of the Teachers College and Nor- 
mal School is to furnish such training as will be most useful to its stu- 
dents in the profession of teaching. It is the policy of Teachers College, 
emphasized on many occasions, that its graduates shall know much about 
the subjects they expect to teach, but it is equally as important that they 
should be resourceful in teaching a class and skillful in managing a school, 
or a system of schools. This College attempts to give both kinds of train- 
ing. More specifically, it prepares its students for positions as teachers, 
principals, supervisors and county or city superintendents of public in- 
struction. It strives also to develop in its students a keen insight into hu- 
man affairs, human relationships and human problems. About one-fourth 
of a student's time is devoted to professional subjects in Education, the 
other three-fourths to Arts and Science subjects. 

Degrees — Courses are offered leading to the degrees of Bachelor of 
Arts in Education, Bachelor of Science in Education, and Bachelor of Sci- 
ence in Agricultural Education. For the Bachelor of Arts degree the 
major elective work must be chosen in Groups A, B, C and F; for the 
Bachelor of Science degree, from Groups D and E. (See page 181.) 

In addition to these degrees, the Normal Diploma, sometimes called 
the L. I. degree, is granted to those students who have finished two years 
in the Teachers College as specified on page 182. 

Two years of college work is considered all over the United States 
as the very minimum training that any teacher should possess even if he 
expects to teach in the elementary grades. All students are urged, there- 
fore, by all means to complete at least the requirements for the Normal 
Diploma, which may be taken at the end of the Sophomore year. More 



178 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

should be done if possible. Students who expect to teach in high schools 
should remember that the Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools 
of the Southern States will not accredit any high school unless seventy-five 
percent of its faculty hold a bachelor's degree. It is to the student's ad- 
vantage therefore to hold at least this degree. 

Exemption From Military Science — Students who are more than 
twenty-one (21) years of age at date of original entry to the University 
may be exempt from Military Science. All such students must, however, 
take four (4) year-hours in other subjects as substitutes for Military Sci- 
ence 101-102 and 201-202. 

Residence Requirement — In order to receive a degree, or Normal 
Diploma, from Teachers College, students must have spent at least one 
scholastic year in residence (three summer schools may be considered 
equivalent to a year in residence), and must have completed fifteen (15) 
year-hours of college work in residence. These fifteen (15) year-hours, 
except in one condition, must be the last which one takes immediately prior 
to graduation. The exception is the case of students who take their de- 
grees by attendance at the Summer School, in which case six (6), but 
never more, year-hours of work by correspondence may be taken during 
the ten (10) months just prior to the summer session in which the degree 
is received. In every case, students must have completed fifteen (15) 
year-hours of work in residence and must have been in attendance at the 
summer session or scholastic term immediately prior to receiving the 
degree. 

Amount of Correspondence Work Permitted — Students are not 
permitted to complete more than fifty percent (50%) of the work toward 
a degree by correspondence. 

Correspondence study courses may not at any time be offered to satisfy 
the residence requirements. 

Students will not be permitted to take work by correspondence while 
they are in residence, without the consent of the Dean of Teachers 
College. 

State Certificates — Graduates of the Teachers College and Normal 
School are granted Graduate State Certificates without further examina- 
tions. It is well for the student to note that a Graduate State Certificate 
permits him to teach only those subjects in which he has specialized in his 
college course. This will ordinarily mean that a subject must have been 
pursued for at least two years in college before a certificate to teach that 



TEACHERS COLLEGE 179 

subject will be granted. In case a student has pursued a subject for three 
or four years in high school, however, this rule may sometimes be abro- 
gated. 

Graduate State Certificates may be converted into Life Certificates by 
"presenting satisfactory evidence of having taught successfully for a 
period of twenty-four months under a Graduate State Certificate, and pre- 
senting endorsement of three holders of Life State, Life Graduate State, or 
Life Professional Certificates." 

Vocational Education — By act of the Legislature of 1917 the Uni- 
versity was designated as the institution, under the Smith-Hughes Act, 
for training teachers for Agriculture and for Trades and Industries. A 
curriculum for Agricultural Education has been outlined. It is hoped 
that a large number of students will register for these courses, as many 
teachers of these subjects are needed in Florida at present and good sal- 
aries are paid. 

Peabody Hall — A description of Peabody Hall, the home of the 
College, is to be found on page 22. 

Peabody Club — This club meets once a week to discuss educational 
problems, especially those that confront the young teacher. It also brings 
out the advantages of holding teachers' meetings and conferences. All 
students of the College are urged to become members and to take an active 
interest. 

Organization — The Teachers College and Normal School has the 
following divisions: 

(1) The Teachers College. 

(2) The Normal School including Normal Training School. 

(3) The University Summer School. 

(4) High School Visitation. 

(5) The Teachers' Employment Bureau. 

THE TEACHERS COLLEGE 

Admission — See pages 46 ff. 

Teaching Fellovv^ships — See pages 39 ff. 

Scholarships — The Legislature of 1923 passed a scholarship law 
providing for two scholarships from each county in the State, one to the 
Teachers College of the University of Florida, and one to the School of 
Education at the State College for Women. Each of these scholarships 
may be held for four years by the successful applicant and carries a 
stipend of $200.00 per year. Examinations are held in each county on 



180 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



the first Thursday in February and June and the third Thursday in August 
under the supervision of the county superintendent. A student to be con- 
sidered as an applicant for a scholarship must present sixteen college en- 
trance units. These scholarships are awarded upon competitive examina- 
tions to persons satisfying the entrance requirements of the University of 
Florida and of the Florida State College for Women. A student who de- 
sires to be considered as an applicant for a scholarship should make his 
desire known to his county superintendent before the first of May of each 
year. He should also write to the State Superintendent of Public In- 
struction telling him of his application for the scholarship. 

At the present time the following counties have no representative at 
the Teachers College: 



Brevard 


Flagler 


Levy 


Pinellas 


Broward 


Gilchrist 


Marion 


Putnam 


Citrus 


Glades 


Martin 


St. Lucie 


DeSoto 


Hamilton 


Monroe 


Sarasota 


Dixie 


Highlands 


Nassau 


Seminole 


Escambia 


Indian River 


Orange 


Taylor 






Pasco 


Union 



THE CURRICULA IN EDUCATION 

Leading to the Degrees of Bachelor of Arts in Education and 
Bachelor of Science in Education 

Constants — Subjects required of all students enrolled in Teachers 
College. 



Phys. Education 101-102 1 hr. ; required of Freshmen 

Phys. Education 201-202 1 1 hr. ; required of Sophomores 

Military Science 101-102 2 hrs.; required of Freshmen 

Military Science 201-202 2 hrs.; required of Sophomores 

English 101-102 _ 3 hrs.; required of Freshmen 

Education 101 VA hrs.; required of Freshmen 

Education 102 "] 

or >• _ V/2 hrs; required of Freshmen 

Education 103 J 

Philosophy 201 1% hrs.; required of Sophomores 

Education 207 V/2 hrs.; required of Sophomores 

Education 203 1^^ hrs;. required of Sophomores 

Education 301 l^/^ hrs.; required of Juniors 

Education 308 V/2 hrs.; required of Juniors 

Education 401 ...„ _ 1% hrs.; required of Seniors 

Education 403 _ 11/2 hrs.; required of Seniors 

Education 405 li^ hrg.; required of Seniors 

Required of all students whe expect to be principals: 

Education 404 ly^ his. 

Education 408 _ ly^ hrs. 



TEACHERS COLLEGE 



181 



Groups — Each student must select three and may omit three of the 
following six groups of studies. 



A— Ancient Languages B — Modern Languages 



C— English 



Required courses; 

Latin 101-102 

Latin 203-204 
or 201-202 
Recommended courses ; 

Latin 301-302 

Latin 401-402 

Greek 21-22 

Greek 101-102 

French 21-22 

French 101-102 

Spanish 21-22 

Spanish 101-102 



Required courses: 
French 21-22 
hrs. French 101-102 
or 
Span. 21-22 ) ] 
Span. 101-102 f J 
Recommended courses: 
French 201-202 
Spanish 201-202 
German 21-22 
Latin 
History 101-102 or 

305-306 
English 203-204 or 
301-302 



Required courses: 

English 101-102 (includ- 
ed among constants) 
6 hrs. English, 6 hrs. 1 
6 hrs. from 

Latin, j- 12 hrs. 

French, or 
Spanish J 

Recommended courses: 
Other courses in lang- 
uages, and History 
305-306 



D — Mathematics 



E — Natural Science 



F — Socid Science 



Required courses : 

Math. 101-102 ] 
and } 6 hrs, 

251-252 J 

Recommended courses: 

Math. 351-352 

3 hrs. from a Science 

Surveying 



Required courses: 

Biol. 101 

Botany 101-102 

Biol. 106 

Chem. 101-102 I 

Phys. 203-204 J 
Recommended courses 

Advanced Physics 

Chem. 201-202 
251-252 



Required courses: 
Hist. 101-102 1 
Hist. 301-302 I 
16 hrs. Hist. 303-304 > 15 hrs. 
Sociology, 3 hrs. 1 
Econ. 201-202 J 
Recommended courses: 
Social Science 
Biology 

Psychology and 
Philosophy 



Regulations: 

1. All students must take all Constants. 

2. Each student must complete the required courses in three of the 
six groups given above. In order to become proficient in teaching the 
subjects of their preference, students are advised to choose their electives 
from the recommended courses in their groups. After completing six 
hours in three of the groups, worthy students may sometimes be permitted 
to concentrate on two groups by permission of the Dean of Teachers Col- 
lege. This means that students must take more than the required work in 
these two groups. 

3. Where the total number of hours of the three Groups combined 
does not equal 24, additional hours must be taken from the recommended 
courses in these Groups to make the total 24 or more. 

4. A total of 66 year-hours is required for graduation. 

5. In case a student is exempt from Military Science subjects (see 
page 178), he must substitute an equal number of hours from other de- 
partments. 



182 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

Requirements for the Normal Diploma — The Normal Diploma is 
awarded to those students who have completed the following requirements : 

The student must first offer sixteen units for entrance to the Freshman 
class, as specified under the general requirements for admission. In the 
two years of the course (the Freshman and Sophomore years) he must 
complete at least one credit hour of Physical Education and two credit 
hours of Military Science. In addition, the student must complete thirty 
academic and professional year-hours, or sixty semester-hours. Of these, 
the following are required: English 101-102, 3 hrs. ; Psychology, 1% hrs.; 
Educational Psychology, 1^2 hrs.; Education 101-102, 3 hrs.; Education 
405, 1^/2 hrs., and Education 203, 1^/2 hrs. In addition, the student must 
elect three of the groups described under the requirements for the bach- 
elor's degree, and so far as possible complete the "required" courses in 
these three groups. On account of the large number of hours required in 
two of the groups, it may be impossible for students who elect these groups 
to complete all of the required courses in three groups. In that case, they 
should divide their time about equally among the groups chosen, bearing 
in mind the fact that the student will not be certificated to teach subjects 
in which he has not completed at least six college year-hours of work. 



TEACHERS COLLEGE 183 

THE CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Education 



Names of Courses Nature of Work Hours fer Week 



Freshman Year 



Agrl. Engineering 104 Wood Work etc 2 

Animal Husbandry 102 Farm Animals " ^ 

Biology 101-102 General Botany * * 

Chemistry 101-102 General Chemistry ^ ^ 

English 101-102 Rhetoric and Composition 6 ^ 

Horticulture 101 Elements of Horticulture ^ ^ 



Orientation 101 Freshman Orientation 1 

Military Science 101-102 f 

Physical Education 101-102 _^ 



1 
19 20 



Sophomore Year 



Agrl. Engineering 202 Farm Machinery 4 

Agrl. Engineering 302 Farm Motors " ^ 

Agronomy 201 - Farm Crops ^ " 

Biology 113 Anima Biology * " 

Chemistry 253 Agricuhural Chemistry 6 U 

■ ' ' ^ '— ti 

3 



Journalism 203 Agricultural Journalism 3 

Geology 201 Physical Geology :•■"■. •.■ "^ " 

Physics 201-202 Brief Course in General Physic 

Poultry 202 Farm Poultry ^ ^ 



Military Science 201-202 1; 

Physical Education 201-202 ^ 



1 
19 19 



Junior Year 



Agrl. Engineering 303 ~ Farm Shop 3 

Agronomy 303 Fertilizers ^ -.- ^ " 

Education 101 Introduction to Teaching 6 u 

Education 306 Vocational Education U o 

Education 303-304 Methods in Vocational Agriculture 3 3 

Education 207 Educational Psychology U 6 

Poultry Husbandry Commercial Poultry Keeping U J 

Elective 

16 16 



Senior Year 



Agronomy 308 Farm Management 3 

Agronomy 310 Marketing . --; - 6 

Education 409-410 Supervised Teaching of Vocational 

Agriculture ^ ^ 

Education 401 Public School Administration and 

Supervision 3 

Plant Pathology General Pathology 3 

Electives in Agriculture - ^" 



16 16 



1«4 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 



EDUCATION 



Professor Norman Professor Roemer 

Professor Fnlk Professor Gee 

Professor Buchholz Professor Little 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

101. How TO Teach. — An Introduction to the Study of Classroom Teach- 
ing. — ^What makes a good teacher? What makes a good school? 
When may it be said that one is educated? Such questions as these 
will be studied in the course. (Required of all freshmen, first semes- 
ter; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Norman.) 

102. History and Principles of Education — A study of the historical 
background of education, and of the fundamental principles which 
should guide educational procedure, and give appreciation of edu- 
cational conditions of today. (Freshmen may choose between Edu- 
cation 102 and Education 103, second semester; 3 hours. Credit, 
11-2 year-hours. Fulk.) 

103. Health Education — Conditions and forces that affect the physical 
and mental vigor of children and teachers, and relate the school to 
the health of the home and community; location and sanitation of 
school buildings; hygienic furniture; diseases and physical defects; 
medical inspection; mental hygiene; community hygiene; the teach- 
er's health; play and recreation; teaching of hygiene. (Students may 
choose between Education 102 and Education 103; 3 hours. Credit, 
11-2 year-hours. Fulk.) 

201. Reviews and Methods of Teaching Arithmetic and Grammar— 
A review of arithmetic and grammar, to acquaint the student with the 
fundamental principles of the subjects, followed immediately by 
methods of teaching them. (First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 1 1-2 
year-hours. Buchholz.) 

202. Reviews and Methods of Teaching Reading, Geography, and 
History — Mastery of each subject from the teacher's point of view, 
followed immediately by the best methods of teaching the subject. 
(Second semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Buchholz.) 



TEACHERS COLLEGE 185 

203. Child and Adolescent Psychology— The nature, growth and de- 
velopment of the child from birth through adolescence with refer- 
ence to education; the original nature of the child and his education; 
the meaning of protracted infancy; training in recognition of types 
and individual differences, of common defects and how to deal with 
them; cultivation of intelligent sympathy with children; the effect of 
Child and Adolescent Psychology on the practices of elementary and 
secondary schools. (Required of sophomores; first semester; 3 hours. 
Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Fulk.) 

207. Educational Psychology — Psychology applied to Education, the 
learning process, acquisition of skill, etc. (Required of all students 
in Teachers College, preferably during the sophomore year, second 
semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Roemer.) 

301. High School Curriculum — This course is designed to consider 
the problems of the curriculum of the high school in its organization. 
Among the topics treated are: Standards for the selection of the cur- 
riculum; factors to be considered — age of pupils, social standing, 
probable school life, probable vocation; traditional subjects and 
their possible variations; new subjects and their values; systems of 
organization, election and prescription ; problems of articulation with 
the elementary school, the college, the vocational school, and com- 
munity. (Required of juniors, first semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 
year-hours. Roemer.) 

303-304. Methods and Materials in Vocational Agriculture— The 
selection and organization of subject matter from the vocational point 
of view; the home project and supervised practice work; the selection, 
arrangement, and classification of bulletins, books, and periodicals; 
methods to be employed in the recitation, the laboratory, the field 
trip, the farm shop, and the supervised study period; lesson plan- 
ning; assignment making; the farm job as the teaching unit; the 
teaching of the various branches of agriculture; the selection and use 
of objective materials; the necessary plant and equipment; commun- 
ity and promotional work; and the organization and conduct of part- 
time and evening classes. (Both semesters; 3 hours. Credit, 3 year- 
hours. Gee.) 

306. Vocational Education — This course includes a consideration of 
the development, function and scope of vocational education of vari- 
ous kinds, particular attention being given to agricultural education. 
A study is made of the aims and purposes of rural education and the 



186 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

important problems connected with it. (Second semester; 3 hours. 
Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Gee.) 

308. The Elementary School Curriculum — An attempt to formulate 
a curriculum based on social conditions, and social needs; selection 
and evaluation of material in the light of aims and activities of the 
present social situation, and the nature and needs of child life; the 
curriculum as a group of related problems and projects; the place of 
the kindergarten; the six or eight year curriculum. (Required of 
juniors, second semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Fulk.) 

401. Administration and Supervision of Village and Consolidated 
Schools — A course stressing in a practical way problems peculiar to 
these schools in Florida; the supervising principal, qualifications, 
relation to superintendent, boards, teachers, pupils, patrons and com- 
munity; adapting the school to the child's needs; business practices. 
(Required of seniors, first semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year- 
hours. Fulk.) 

402. Problems in Public School Administration and Supervision — 
This course will include an intensive study of the supervision of in- 
struction. Visits will be made to schools for the study of adminis- 
trative and supervising practice. A survey will be made of one 
school system. (Elective for juniors and seniors, second semester; 3 
hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Fulk.) 

403. Principles of Education — The relation of educational method to 
democracy. Such topics as the laws of learning, the socialized recita- 
tion, democracy in the classroom as a preparation for democracy in 
life, will find a prominent place in the course. (Required of seniors; 
juniors admitted by permission, first semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 
year-hours. Norman.) 

404. History and Philosophy of Education — Standards in education, 
past and present; the development and present meaning of the con- 
cept of culture, humanism, utility, growth, mental discipline, activity 
leading to further activity, education according to nature, the signifi- 
cance of child life in education. Textbook: Dewey's "Democracy and 
Education." (Required of seniors who expect to be principals, second 
semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year -hours. Norman.) 

405. Supervised Teaching — Knowledge of the principles, theory and 
history of education will better fit any teacher for his work, but these 
without concrete experience and supervision will not give best results. 



TEACHERS COLLEGE 18? 



This course is planned to give the student practice in conducting recita- 
tions under close supervision. Lesson plans will be required for all 
recitations and the manner of teaching will be subject to criticism. 
Students preparing to teach agriculture must do their supervised 
teaching in that subject, and four (4) hours will be required. (See 
Education 409-410. (Required of seniors, first semester; 3 hours. 
Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Norman, Fulk, Roemer, Little.) 

407. Junior High School— The purpose of this course is to give princi- 
pals and teachers a knowledge of the Junior High School and its 
organization. Since the movement is in its formative period in Flor- 
ida, much attention and study will be given to concrete cases and 
local conditions. Topics: Need of reorganization of the traditional 
high school; changes needed in the program of studies, discipline, 
methods of teaching, etc.; development of the Junior High School; 
special function of the Junior High School; organization, curricula 
and courses of study, etc., of the Junior High School. (First semester; 
3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Roemer.) 

408. High School Administration— This course is designed to study 
the practical management and administration of the modern high 
school. It will consider such topics as: duties of principal as head 
of school; relation of principal to board of education, superintendent, 
teachers, pupils and community; legal status of high school; systems 
of financing; selection, supervision, promotion, retention and dismis- 
sal of teachers; adjustment of teaching load; testing and grading of 
pupils; problem of discipline; pupil guidance, activities, teachers' 
meetings, etc. (Required of seniors who expect to be principals, sec- 
ond semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Roemer.) 

409-410. Supervised Teaching of Vocational Agriculture— Students 
in this course first observe instruction carried on by the instructor 
of Vocational Agriculture in a nearby high school. Such observation 
is to familiarize students with the duties and activities they will be 
expected to perform as an instructor of Vocational Agriculture in 
the high schools of the state. Next, the students teach, under super- 
vision, the class which they have under observation. This super- 
vised instruction is carried out under conditions identical with those 
found in the Smith-Hughes agricultural schools of the state. Lesson 
planning, class management, supervision of project and home prac- 
tice work are required. Other activities of the teacher of Vocational 
Agriculture are carried on under supervision. (Both semesters; 3 
hours. Credit, 3 year-hours. Gee.) 



188 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

501. The Elementary School Curriculum — Seminar — An intensive 
study of the development, and present content of the elementary 
school curriculum, including the kindergarten; the selection and eval- 
uation of material; the importance of the classroom teacher. (First 
semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Fulk.) 

503. Educational Tests and Measurements— Seminar— This is an in- 
tensive study of intelligence and educational tests. A thorough and 
systematic study is made of all the chief tests in both fields with lab- 
oratory material for class use so as to familiarize the student with 
the process of actually handling tests. (First semester; 3 hours. 
Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Roemer.) 

504. The School Survey— Seminar— A study of the history and func- 
tions of the school survey; organizing and making a survey; collect- 
ing, interpreting and reporting data; the survey as a diagnostic instru- 
ment. Each student chooses some phase of the survey for special 
study, and gives the results of his study in the form of a thesis. 
(Second semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Fulk.) 

505. The Organization and Administration of Extra Curricular Ac- 
tivities IN Junior and Senior High Schools— An attempt will be 
made in this course to work out constructive school policies having 
to do with the developing of the pupils' initiative, leadership, cooper- 
ation, etc. Plans will be studied that are now in operation in pro- 
gressive schools. Special study will be made of Florida high schools, 
with reference to developing as a vital part of the school program 
such extra curricular activities as: School pageants, plays, excursions, 
celebration of special days; high school chambers of commerce; honor 
societies; assemblies; athletics and sports; literary, musical, debat- 
ing, and departmental clubs; class organizations; county and state 
systems of organizing and administering extra curricular activities; 
Boy Scouts of America, Girl Scouts, Camp Fire Girls, Woodcraft 
League, Junior Red Cross; student participation in government; 
school publications, including school newspaper, magazine, annual, 
and pupils' handbook; fraternities and sororities; a point system for 
stimulating and limiting participation in school activities; pupil 
advisers; records and reports on school activities; and a scientific 
system of financing a well-rounded extra curricular activities' pro- 
gram. (First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 1 1-2 year-hours. Roemer.) 

508. Democracy and EDUCATION-Seminar-The nature of experience, 
the nature of mstitutions, the social inheritance, the individual, so- 



NORMAL SCHOOL 189 

ciety, socialization, social control, dynamic and static societies, edu- 
cation its own end. (Second semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year- 
hours. Norman.) 

509. Problems in the Administration of a School System — Seminar 
— Open to graduate students who are qualified by experience and 
training to pursue advanced study on selected problems in adminis- 
tration. As far as possible problems will be selected to meet individ- 
ual needs. Each student selects some problem for special study and 
presents the results of his study in the form of a thesis. Students 
may work on chosen problems either singly or in small groups. 
(First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year -hours. Fulk.) 

OTHER DEPARTMENTS 

Descriptions of other subjects that may be taken by students in 
Teachers College may be found by reference to the Index. 

NORMAL SCHOOL 

COURSES AND REQUIREMENTS 

The Normal School offers a four-year normal curriculum. Applicants 
who have finished the first two years of a high school will be admitted to 
the first year of this curriculum. High school graduates will be allowed 
to enter the third year. Teachers with experience and mature persons may 
be admitted as "Adult Specials" without meeting these requirements. 
Graduates of the Normal School will be admitted to the junior class of the 
Teachers College and will be granted a State Certificate, provided they 
have the recommendation of the Teachers College faculty. 

Studies — ^The work of the first two years of the Normal School is 
equivalent to that of the eleventh and twelfth grades of the standard high 
schools of Florida. Not less than 15 nor more than 20 hours may be 
taken in any one year except by special permission. All choice is sub- 
ject to the approval of the Dean of Teachers College. The work is ar- 
ranged so that students may enter at any time, but it would be more con- 
venient both to the student and to the Normal School for entrance to be 
made at the first of the year, at Thanksgiving, the first of the second semes- 
ter, or the first of April. Students who enter at these times may secure 
credit for the quarter in which they are registered. 

NOTE: — Students below the Freshman class are not reqmred to register for 
Military Science. 



190 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

CURRICULUM FOR THE FOUR-YEAR NORMAL COURSE 

First Year 

Names of Courses Nature of Work Hours fer Week 

English 11 Rhetoric, Composition and Classics 4 

History 11 - Modern European History 4 

Mathematics 11 Plane Geometry 4 

Take 5 hours of the following: 

Agriculture ..._ | Horticulture 21, first semester 

\ Agronomy 22, second semester 3 

Latin 9 Beginner's Course 4 

Mechanic Arts 101 Wood Work 3 

Science 10 Biology 4 

Science 11 Chemistry 4 

Required 20 

Second Year 

English 12 Rhetoric, Composition and Classics 4 

History 12 American History and Civics 4 

Take 10 hours of the following: 

Agriculture | Animal Husbandry 21, first semester 

\ Agrl. Engineering 21, second semester.. 3 

Latin 10 Caesar (3 books) and Composition 4 

Mathematics 12-13 Plane Trigonometry and solid Geometry.. 4 

Mechanic Arts, 201-202 Forge and Foundry Work 4% 

Science 12 Physics 4 

Required 20 

Third Year 

(Same as Fresliman year in Teachers College.) 

Fourth Year 

(Same as Sophomore year in Teachers College, except that Education 405 is required 
in the Sophomore year instead of the Senior year, and the Junior courses in 
Education may be substituted for the Sophomore courses.) 



NORMAL SCHOOL 191 

DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 

AGRICULTURE 

Horticulture 21. Introduction to Horticulture— See page 124. 

Agronomy 21-22. Elements of Agronomy — See page 118. 

Animal Husbandry 21. Elements of Animal Husbandry — See page 

122. 
Agricultural Engineering 21. Farm Machinery— See page 121. 

ENGLISH 

Professor Little 

11-12. Composition and Rhetoric — Grammar reviewed; elements of 
composition emphasized; much written work required; classics read 
and studied; structure of the sentence and paragraph; word study. 
(First year; 4 hours.) 

21-22. English and American Literature — Periods and representative 
writers; history as connected with literature; a carefully selected list 
of classics for reading and study; appreciation of the best in litera- 
ture; memory gems. Presuppose Eng. 11 or its equivalent. (Second 
year; 4 hours.) 

HISTORY 
Professor Fulk 

11-12. Modern European History — Medieval history touched lightly, 
stress being placed upon modern European history. Textbook and 
reference reading. (First year; 4 hours.) 

21-22. American History and Civics — Early discoveries to the present 
time; civics in connection with the history. Stress will be laid upon 
local history, geography and industries, transportation and commun- 
ication, organized community life and public health, local, state, and 
national governments. Textbook and reference reading. (Second 
year; 4 hours.) 

LATIN 
Professor Little 

21-22. For description see page 60. 
31-32. For description see page 60. 

MANUAL TRAINING 

Professor Strong 
Mechanic Arts 101-102— See Shop 101-102, page 154. 
Mechanic Arts 201 — See Forge Shop, page 154. 
Mechanic Arts 202 — See Foundry, page 154. 



192 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

MATHEMATICS 

Professor Norman 

11-12. Second Year Algebra — Second half of the State adopted text- 
book. (First year; 4 hours.) 

31-32. Plane Geometry— First five books in Plane Geometry. (First 
year; 4 hours.) 

41-42. Solid Geometry and Plane Trigonometry — Study of the topics 
covered by standard high schools. (Second year; 4 hours.) 

SCIENCE 

Professor Roemer 

11-12. Biology — Essentials of plant, animal and human biology; text- 
book and laboratory work. (First year; 4 hours.) 

21-2. Chemistry— Elementary principles of chemistry; textbook and 
laboratory work. (First year; 4 hours.) 

31-32. Physics— Elements of physics; textbook and laboratory work. 
(Second year; 4 hours.) 



SUUMMER SCHOOL 193 



UNIVERSITY SUMMER SCHOOL 

(CO-EDUCATIONAL) 
June 13-August 6th, 1927 

Faculty (1926)— A. A. Murphree, J. W. Norman, J. N. Anderson, J. 
R. Fulk, W. A. Little, Jos. Roemer, Miss Elizabeth Skinner, C. A. Ackley, 
C. F. Allen, Mrs. Mabel F. Altstetter, R. E. Barnes, R. C. Beatty, A. P. 
Black, Miss Georgia Borger, L. M. Bristol, F. W. Buchholz, Mrs. A. B. 
Carrier, Miss Ruth Cazier, H. W. Chandler, J. M. Chapman, M. D. Cody, 
W. C. Cowell, Miss Katherine J. Densford, H. O. Enwall, J. D. Falls, Miss 
Myrtle Farnham, J. M. Farr, W. A. Fuller, J. G. Gee, W. L. Goette, L. G. 
Haskell, W. B. Hathaway, F. H. Heath, M. R. Hinson, W. W. Hollings- 
worth, V. T. Jackson, J. E. Johnson, J. M. Leake, T. R. Leigh, Mrs. Louise 
H. Mahan, Mrs. Willie A. Metcalfe, Miss Cora Miltimore, Claude Mur- 
phree, L R. Obenchain, W. S. Perry, Mrs. J. R. Ramsay, C. A. Robertson, 
Miss Lucy Salter, H. L. Sebring, Miss Mary Sheppard, G. B. Simmons, T. 
M. Simpson, Mrs. T. J. Smart, Miss Mabel E. Swanson, Mrs. Leila Ter- 
hune, J. E. Turlington, L. M. Turner, Miss Ruth Upson, R. W. Van Brunt, 
J. B. Walker, Mrs. Florence V. Watkins, J. W. Weil, J. H. Wise. 

GENERAL STATEMENT 

The University Summer School was provided for by the "Summer 
School Act" passed by the Legislature of 1913. It is co-educational and 
maintained primarily for the benefit of the teachers of the state, but other 
courses are offered. 

The entire equipment of the University is at the service of the faculty 
and students. Ample provision is made for intellectual recreation and 
physical exercise. The Peabody Literary Society meets weekly; lectures 
or concerts are given frequently; the gymnasium, baseball grounds, and 
tennis courts are at the disposition of the students, and instructors are at 
hand to direct athletic activities. 

Regulations — To fulfill its highest mission the Summer School should 
not be utilized merely for the purpose of "cramming" for examinations. 
It is therefore hoped that all teachers will recognize the wisdom of the 
Summer School Board in establishing the following regulations: 

1. No teacher will be allowed to take more than twenty hours per week. 

2. No teacher will take less than five hours per week of professional work. 



194 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

Credit for Work — Attention is directed to the following sections of 
the "Summer School Act": 

Sec. 5. — "All work conducted at the said Summer Schools shall be of such char- 
acter as to entitle the students doing the same to collegiate, normal, or professional 
credit therefor, and may be applied towards making a degree." 

In order to carry out the spirit of this provision, the University allows, 
under restrictions, a maximum of four and a half credit hours for work 
done at any one session of the Summer School. Attendance at three sum- 
mer sessions satisfies the residence requirements for securing a Normal 
Diploma or an undergraduate degree from the Teachers College. For 
an advanced degree four sessions are required. By combining credits 
gained at the Summer School with those gained in the General Extension 
Division of the University, it is possible for a teacher to secure a certifi- 
cate or a degree without losing a prohibitive amount of time from his 
work. Certificates and degrees secured in this way are awarded, when 
so desired, on the last day of a session of the Summer School. 

Sec. 6. — "All teachers attending any of the Summer Schools herein created and 
whose work entitles them to credit therefor, upon making proof of the same to the 
State Superintendent of Public Instruction, are hereby entitled to one year's extension 
on any Florida teacher's certificate they may hold and which has not fully expired, 
and such certificate may be extended one year for each succeeding session attended by 
the said teacher." 

Certificates of credit making proof of the work done will be granted 
by the State Superintendent only to those teachers who attend the full 
term and whose work is satisfactory. 

Expenses — ^There is no charge for tuition. Board and lodging (includ- 
ing lights, but not pillows, bed linen, or towels) will be offered at $21.00 
for half term, or $40.00 for the entire session of eight weeks; board with- 
out lodging at $17.00 per half term or $32.00 per session. Children under 
eight years of age will not be admitted to the dormitories, but may dine 
with their parents in the Commons at $16.00 for the term or $9.00 for the 
half term. Children above eight, full charge. All accounts are payable 
in advance. 

COURSES OF STUDY 

The courses given during the session of 1926 were fully described in 
the Summer School Bulletin of that year and were, furthermore, for the 
most part very similar in character to the corresponding ones of the 
Teachers College and Normal School. In view of these facts, and inas- 
much as a detailed program for the session of 1927 will be published 
separately, it is thought unnecessary here to make more than mere mention 



TEACHERS' EMPLOYMENT BUREAU 195 

of the courses in question. The work to be offered in the Summer School 
of 1927 will be divided into five separate and distinct groups, each serving 
a specific purpose: 

1. Review Courses in all subjects required for county, state and spe- 
cial certificates. 

2. Professional Courses meeting the requirements for the extension 
of teachers' certificates without examination. 

3. Normal Courses leading to the normal diploma. 

4. College Courses leading to standard bachelor's degrees. 

5. Graduate Courses leading to advanced degrees. 

A complete catalog of all the work of the Summer School will be 
issued. For reservation of rooms and other information address Dr. J. W. 
Norman, Dean, Gainesville, Fla. 

HIGH SCHOOL VISITATION 

Through Dr. Joseph Roemer, Professor of Secondary Education, the 
University strives to keep in close touch with the high schools of the state. 
Part of his time is taken up with visiting the high schools and lending 
such aid and encouragement as will be productive of stronger high schools 
and a closer connection between them and the University. 

TEACHERS' EMPLOYMENT BUREAU 

Teachers College and Normal School desires to serve the whole state 
in every possible way. For this purpose a Teachers' Employment Bureau 
has been instituted and is open throughout the year. From school officials 
it receives requests for teachers. From teachers it receives requests for 
information as to vacancies. It files such information and tries, when 
called upon, to meet the needs of both teachers and school officials. To 
be of greatest service it invites the cooperation of superintendents, princi- 
pals, and teachers. Officials needing trained men or women, and teachers 
desiring promotion or change, are asked to call upon the Bureau for its 
aid. No charges are made for services. For information, address Dr. 
Joseph Roemer, Director of the Employment Bureau, or Dr. J. W. Nor- 
man, Dean of Teachers College, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida. 



196 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



COLLEGE OF PHARMACY 

TowNES Randolph Leigh, Dean 

Faculty— F. J. Bacon, A. P. Black, M. D. Cody, C. L. Crow, C. A. 
Curtis, J. G. Eldridge, J. M. Farr, L. D. Fonda, F. A. Gilfillan, R. C. Good- 
win, H. G. Gray, F. H. Headi, W. J. Husa, V. T. Jackson, T. R. Leigh, B. F. 
Luker, W. J. Matherly, J. S. Rogers, H. B. Sherman, E. T. Stuhr, A. W. 
Sweet, A. C. Tipton, E. M. Yon. 

GENERAL STATEMENT 

As an integral part of the University, the College is governed by the 
same general policy, and maintains the same high standard of require- 
ments, as do the other colleges in the institution. In common with the 
other natural sciences, it requires a large amount of laboratory instruction. 

Degrees and Curricula — Two undergraduate degrees are given in 
pharmacy. The College offers a three-year curriculum leading to the de- 
gree of Graduate in Pharmacy (Ph.G.), and an additional year's work, 
upon completion of which the degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy 
(B.S. in Phar.) is conferred. In the work of the fourth year opportunity 
is given for specialization in Commercial Pharmacy, in Pharmaceutical 
Chemistry, or in Pharmacognosy and Pharmacology. 

The degree of Master of Science in Pharmacy (M.S. in Phar.) is given 
under the supervision of Lhe Graduate School of the University. 

Standard of Work — All work offered in the College of Pharmacy 
meets the highest requirements of pharmaceutical instruction in this coun- 
try. As an associate member of the American Association of Colleges of 
Pharmacy, the College receives full recognition for its courses from all 
state boards requiring attendance in a school of pharmacy as a prere- 
quisite for examination and registration. Although all schools of the 
Association are required to maintain certain minimum requirements for 
entrance and for graduation, the College prides itself on the fact that all 
of its requirements are far in excess of this minimum. 

Methods of Instruction — Lecture and recitation periods are fifty- 
five minutes in length, laboratory periods, two or three hours, depending 
upon the character of the work. 

Courses designated by odd numbers are given the first semester, those 
with even numbers being given the second semester, but whenever there 
is a sufficient demand, a course is repeated the following semester. 



COLLEGE OF PHARMACY 197 

Registration and Reciprocity — Before any person is permitted to 
practice pharmacy in the state of Florida, he is required to become a regis- 
tered pharmacist, which registration may be secured by examination or by 
reciprocity. A candidate for examination must be at least eighteen years 
of age, must have completed at least two years of high school, and must 
have had at least forty-eight months of practical experience under the 
supervision of a registered pharmacist, provided that the actual time spent 
in a recognized college of pharmacy may be credited as the same amount 
of experience. A person qualified as above is permitted to take the 
examinations given at stated times by the Florida State Board of Pharmacy, 
and if successful in these examinations, he is then licensed to practice 
pharmacy in the State. 

A reciprocity agreement has been reached between forty-five of the 
states of the Union, whereby a pharmacist registered in any one of these 
states may become registered in any other one without taking further exam- 
inations, provided that his training and experience meet the requirements 
of the particular state in which he wishes to register. Since many of these 
states require as a minimum, graduation from a three-year pharmacy 
curriculum, it is strongly urged that all candidates for the Florida State 
Board examinations secure at least the Ph.G. degree. 

Further information concerning registration in Florida may be ob- 
tained by writing Mr. J. H. Haughton, Secretary of the State Board of 
Pharmacy, Palatka, Florida. 

Opportunities for Graduates — The three-year curriculum is designed 
primarily to train retail pharmacists. Only a small amount of latitude 
can be allowed in the selection of courses, since the minimuin requirements 
of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy must be met. But 
the four-year curriculum offers an opportunity for specialization, either 
in Commercial Pharmacy, in Pharmaceutical Chemistry, or in Pharmacog- 
nosy and Pharmacology. The course in Commercial Pharmacy should 
qualify a man for a position as manager in a drug store, or as a salesman 
of drugs and chemicals. The work in Pharmaceutical Chemistry is de- 
signed to train men for positions in food and drug laboratories, or as 
manufacturing pharmacists. The completion of the work of the fourth 
year in pharmacognosy or pharmacology should qualify one to act in the 
capacity of pharmacognocist or inspector of crude drugs with a manufac- 
turing concern, or with the Federal Customs Service, or as pharmacologist 
for manufacturing houses or for hospitals. The above-named positions 
are only a few of the many open to men who possess training along any 
of the above lines. At the present time the difficulty is not to find a po- 



198 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

sition for the trained man, but to find sufficient men with adequate train- 
ing for the technical positions now open. 

Equipment — The College of Pharmacy is housed in the new Chemis- 
try-Pharmacy Hall, one of the most modern laboratories in the South. 
The laboratories of the College of Pharmacy are especially well provided 
with all equipment required by students for elementary work as well as 
for advanced work and scientific investigation. 

The drug garden, covering some ten acres, is used for the cultivation 
and study of all medicinal plants which occur in Florida or may be grown 
here. Thus it is possible for students to become familiar with the ap- 
pearance and properties of drug plants from the growing state until they 
are prepared and compounded into prescriptions. 

Entrance Requirements — Each student is expected to be in attend- 
ance on the day scheduled for registration. By permission of the Dean 
and of all instructors concerned, and on payment of a special fee, a stu- 
dent may be allowed to enter subsequent to this date, but in no case will 
he be admitted after the first two weeks of any semester. 

Although it is often possible by special arrangement for a beginning 
student to enter the College at the commencement of the second semester, 
such arrangement is rarely satisfactory, as very few beginning courses 
are started at that time. It is therefore urged that such students enter 
only at the beginning of the first semester. 

Drug store experience is not required for entrance into the College of 
Pharmacy. Such experience is very desirable, however, since many states 
require a certain amount of experience before registration can be granted. 

A student registered for one or more laboratory courses in the De- 
partment of Pharmacy is required to present a card indicating that he has 
deposited $5.00 with the Auditor to cover laboratory breakage. Upon re- 
turn of the apparatus at the end of the course, the student receives a 
refund. 

For general entrance requirements, see page 47. 

Mortar and Pestle Society — The Mortar and Pestle Society is an or-J 
ganization maintained by the student body of the College of Pharmacy.] 
Its monthly meetings are devoted to general discussions or to addresses by ] 
state and national leaders of the profession. 



COLLEGE OF PHARMACY 199 

THE THREE-YEAR CURRICULUM 

Leading to the Degree of Graduate in Pharmacy 
Name of Course Nature of Work Hours per Week 

First Year 

English 101-102 Rhetoric and Composition 3 3 

Biology 103-204 Botany 4 3 

Chemistry 101-104 General Chemistry and Qualitative Analy. 5 5 

Pharmacog. 112 .Elementary Pharmacognosy 1 

Pharmacy 101 Pharmaceutical Arithmetic 3 

Pharmacy 102 Theoretical Pharmacy 3 

Military Science 101-102 2 2 

Physical Education 101-102 : 1 1 

18 18 

Second Year 

Chemistry 251-252 Organic Chemistry 5 5 

Chemistry 304 Quantitative Analysis 2 

Biology 115 Human Physiology 2 

Pharmacog. 221-222 Practical Pharmacognosy 3 3 

Pharmacy 211 Inorganic Pharmacy 5 

Pharmacy 222 „ Galenical Pharmacy 5 

Military Science 201-202 2 2 

Physical Education 201-202 1 1 

18 18 

Third Year 

Biology 321 General Bacteriology 4 

Phar. 372 Commercial Pharmacy 4 

*Pharmacog. 342 Microscopic Examination of Drugs 3 

Pharmacol. 351 Intermediate Pharmacology 3 

Pharmacol. 362 Pharmacological Standardization 4 

Pharmacy 351 Organic Pharmacy 5 

•* Pharmacy 331 ^.Qualitative Drug Analysis 3 

** Pharmacy 332 Quantitative Drug Analysis 2 

Pharmacy 361-362 Prescriptions and Dispensing 3 3 

Pharmacy 382 Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence 2 

18 18 

NOTES: 
*With the approval of the Dean, students may substitute Chem. 406, Physiological 
Chemistry for this course. 

**Students contemplating the four-year course majoring in Commercial Pharmacy 

should substitute Economics 307, Introduction to Economics, and Business Ad- 
ministration 308, Business Organization and Management, for these two courses. 



200 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

THE FOUR-YEAR CURRICULUM 

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy 
The first three years of the four-year curriculum are identical with 
the three-year curriculum as outlined above. In the senior year a major 
may be selected in Commercial Pharmacy, in Pharmaceutical Chemistry, 
or in Pharmacognosy and Pharmacology. 

Senior Year 
Commercial Pharmacy Major 

Names of Courses Nature of Work Hours per Week 

Pharmacy 471-472 Advanced Commercial Pharmacy 2 2 

Pharmacy 491-492 Thesis or Approved Elective 2 2 

Business Administration 211-212 Accounting 3 3 

Business Administration 431 Principles of Salesmanship 3 

Business Administration 432 Retail Store Management 3 

French, German or Spanish 3 3 

Approved Elective 3 3 

16 16 

Pharmaceutical Chemistry Major 

Chemistry 406 Physiological Chemistry 3 

Pharmacy 451 Synthetic Pharmaceuticals 5 

Pharmacy 431-432 Advanced Drug Analysis 3 3 

Pharmacy 491-492 Thesis or approved Elective 2 2 

French or German 3 3 

Approved Electives 3 5 

16 16 

Pharmacognosy and Pharmacology Major 

*Major Subjects within Department 8 8 

Thesis or Approved Elective 2 2 

French or German 3 3 

Approved Elective outside the Department 3 3 

16 16 

NOTE: *Major subjects shall be selected from the following: 
Pharmacog. 423-424, Advanced Pharmacognosy. 
Pharmacol. 451-452, Advanced Pharmacology. 



COLLEGE OF PHARMACY 201 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 



THE DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACY 

Professor Husa Professor Gilfillan 

Instructor Fonda 

101. Pharmaceutical Arithmetic — This course teaches the application 
of arithmetic to pharmacy, and includes a thorough study of the sys- 
tems of weight and measure in use in the United States, and their re- 
lation to each other. Laboratory work is given to acquaint the stu- 
dent with the weights and measures studied, and experiments are 
carried out on specific gravity, percentage solutions, thermometry, etc. 
(Laboratory fee, $2.50. First semester; 2 class and 1 laboratory 
periods. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Husa, Fonda.) 

102. Theoretical Pharmacy — A study of the history and nomenclature 
of the United States Pharmacopoeia and the National Formulary, and 
of the apparatus and processes of operative pharmacy. Students 
conduct in the laboratory operations illustrating the principles con- 
sidered in lecture, and perform the simpler pharmaceutical operations 
into which chemical reactions do not enter. (Laboratory fee, $2.50. 
Second semester; 2 class and 1 laboratory periods. Credit, 11-2 year- 
hours. Gilfillan, Fonda.) 

211. Inorganic Pharmacy — The consideration of such inorganic com- 
pounds as are used in medicine — their origin and preparation, and 
their physical, chemical, and physiological properties. The labora- 
tory work involves the preparation and the detection of these inor- 
ganic substances, and their use in compounding remedies. (Prere- 
quisite; Chem. 104 and Phar. 102. Laboratory fee, $5.00. First 
semester; 3 class and 2 laboratory periods. Credit, 2 1-2 year-hours. 
Gilfillan, Fonda.) 

222. Galenical Pharmacy — The study of galenical preparations, in- 
cluding syrups, spirits, tinctures, extracts, and emulsions. Work in 
the laboratory covers the preparation of these materials extemporan- 
eously on a small scale, and also their manufacture in larger 
amoimts by use of pharmaceutical machinery. (Prerequisites: Chem. 
251 and Phar. 102. Laboratory fee, $5.00. Second semester; 3 
class and 2 laboratory periods. Credit, 2 1-2 year-hours. Gilfillan, 
Fonda.) 



202 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

331. Qualitative Drug Analysis — The detection of the common synthe- 
tics, glucosides, and alkaloids in pharmaceutical preparations, par- 
ticularly those of high toxicity. The tests used are those commonly 
accepted as evidence in medico-legal cases. Laboratory work is done 
upon powders, solutions, emulsions, and the bodies of poisoned ani- 
mals. (Prerequisite: Chem. 252. Co-requisite: Phar. 351. Labora- 
tory fee, $5.00. First semester; 1 class and 2 laboratory periods. 
Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Gil f Ulan, Fonda.) 

332. Quantitative Drug Analysis — The quantitative analysis of medic- 
inal preparations by physical means or by chemical methods. Certain 
analyses are made by use of the polariscope and the refractometer, 
while alkaloids are determined both gravimetrically and volumetri- 
cally. (Prerequisites: Chem. 252 and 304, Phar. 351. Laboratory 
fee, $5.00. Second semester; 2 laboratory periods. Credit, 1 year- 
hour. Gilfillan, Fonda.) 

351. Organic Pharmacy — The preparation of natural and synthetic 
substances, and their use in medicine. Laboratory work involves the 
production of these materials on a semi-conmiercial scale, and also 
the common tests which may be applied for their detection in a pre- 
scription. (Prerequisites: Chem. 252 and Phar. 222. Laboratory fee, 
$5.00. First semester; 3 class and 2 laboratory periods. Credit, 2 1-2 
year-hours. Gilfillan, Fonda.) 

361-362. Prescriptions and Dispensing — The aim of this course is to 
train the student for the practical and efficient work at the prescrip- 
tion counter. Each student is given extensive practice in filling pre- 
scriptions. Incompatibilities are studied, with emphasis on the meth- 
ods of overcoming apparent incompatibilities. Attention is given to 
prescription reading, translation of prescription Latin, accepted 
methods of checking and filing prescriptions, and prescription pricing. 
(Prerequisites: Phar. 211 and 222. Laboratory fee, $5.00 per 
semester. Both semesters; lectures, recitations, and laboratory ivork. 
Credit, 3 year-hours. Husa, Fonda.) 

372. Commercial Pharmacy — A course dealing with the management 
of the retail pharmacy. A study is made of business management, 
including merchandise information, retail buying, advertising, sales- 
manship, and accounting. (Prerequisites: Phar. 211 and 222. Sec- 
ond semester; 4 hours. Credit, 2 year-hours. Husa.) 



COLLEGE OF PHARMACY 203 

382. Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence — A study is made of national, 
state and local laws and regulations governing the practice of phar- 
macy, and of the pharmacist's liability, both criminal and civil, for 
his own violations of laws and for violations on the part of his 
agents. (Prerequisites: Phar. 211 and 222. Second semester; 2 
hours. Credit, 1 year-hour. Husa.) 

431-432. Advanced Drug Analysis — A course based on the more diffi- 
cult analytical methods of the United States Pharmacopoeia, sup- 
plemented by other methods recommended by the Bureau of Chemis- 
try. Determinations are both qualitative and quantitative. (Prere- 
quisites: Phar. 331-332. Laboratory fee, $6.00 per semester. Both 
semesters, 3 laboratory periods. Credit, 3 year-hours. Gilfillan.) 

451. Synthetic Pharmaceuticals — The manufacture and use of the 
newer synthetic remedies. A comparative study is made of the dif- 
ferent manufacturing methods for each product. The laboratory 
work consists of the preparation of these products by one or more 
methods. (Prerequisite: Phar. 351. Laboratory fee, $5.00. First 
semester; 3 class and 2 laboratory periods. Credit, 2 1-2 year-hours. 
Gilfillan.) 

471-472. Advanced Commercial Pharmacy — A study of the commer- 
cial problems and business methods of the manufacturer, wholesaler, 
and retail chain store executive. The course includes the funda- 
mentals of commercial law, banking, and insurance. (Prerequisite: 
Phar. 372. Both semesters; 2 hours. Credit, 2 year-hours. Husa.) 

491-492. Thesis — By arrangement, senior students may be assigned to 
research problems in Commercial Pharmacy or in Pharmaceutical 
Chemistry, a senior thesis being written on the results of the re- 
search. (Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Laboratory fee is de- 
termined by nature of problem undertaken. Both semesters. Credit, 
2 year-hours. Husa, Gilfillan.) 

GRADUATE COURSES 

501. Chemical Constitution and Physiological Action — A course 
based largely upon the researches of Ehrlich, Hans, Meyer, Jacobi, 
and Pictet. Collateral reading is required. (Prerequisites: Phar. 
331-451, Pharmacol. 362, and a reading knowledge of German. First 
semester; 2 hours. Credit, 1 year-hour. Gilfillan.) 



204 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

502. Selected Topics in Pharmacy — A general study of the newer 
types of pharmaceuticals, such as vitamine preparations, enzyme 
preparations, newer solvents, etc. A detailed study, with assigned 
reading is made of selected problems of current interest, whose solu- 
tion depends in part on metabolic considerations, (Second semester; 
2 hours. Credit, 1 year-hour. Husa.) 

541. Manufacturing Pharmacy — A general study is made of the ap- 
paratus and processes used in the manufacture of pharmaceuticals on 
a factory scale. A detailed study is made of selected technical prob- 
lems of current interest to those engaged in pharmaceutical manu- 
facturing operations. (First semester; 2 hours. Credit, 1 year-hour. 
Husa.) 

552. Advanced Synthetic Pharmaceuticals — The methods used in the 
synthesis of the more complex organic remedies, with particular refer- 
ence to those methods given in patent literature, both American and 
foreign. (Prerequisites: Phar. 451 and a reading knowledge of Ger- 
man. Laboratory fee, $6.00. Second semester; 2 class and 3 labora- 
tory periods. Credit, 2 1-2 year-hours. Gil f Ulan.) 

591-592. Thesis — Work and credit for graduate thesis in Commercial 
Pharmacy and in Pharmaceutical Chemistry to be arranged upon con- 
sultation. (Husa, Gilfillan.) 

THE DEPARTMENT OF PHARMACOGNOSY 
AND PHARMACOLOGY 

Professor Bacon Instructor Stuhr 

The Department of Pharmacognosy and Pharmacology offers all 
courses in Pharmacognosy and in Materia Medica required by the Phar- 
maceutical Syllabus in the three-year curriculum, and in addition, num- 
erous elective courses for the third and fourth year of ungergraduate 
work. All courses in Pharmacognosy are supplemented with field work 
in the pharmaceutical garden conducted by the Department. The lab- 
oratories are well equipped for graduate work, and both major and minor 
courses are offered to candidates for the degree of Master of Science. 

112. Elementary Pharmacognosy — Sources and collection of crude 
vegetable and animal drugs. Laboratory and field work in the 
pharmaceutical garden and in natural habitats, supplemented by 
lectures and recitations. (Second semester; 1 hour. Credit, 1-2 
year-hour. Bacon.) 



COLLEGE OF PHARMACY 205 

211-222. Practical Pharmacognosy — Systematic study of the vege- 
table and animal drugs of the United States Pharmacopoeia and the 
National Formulary. Laboratory work on the methods of identify- 
ing the crude drugs, illustrated with authentic specimens. (Prereq- 
uisite: Pharmacog. 112. Laboratory fee, $5.00 per semester. Both 
semesters. 3 hours. Credit, 3 year-hours. Bacon, Stuhr.) 

231-232. Cultivation of Medicinal Plants — A study of medicinal 
plants that are being cultivated, methods of cultivation, harvesting, 
curing, and preparation for market. Field work with plants that 
can be successfully grown in the pharmaceutical garden. (Prereq- 
uisite: Pharmacog. 112. Both semesters; lectures and field periods 
to be arranged according to credit, ivhich may vary from 2 to 5 
year-hours. Bacon, Stuhr.) 

342. Microscopy of Drugs — Microscopic structure and characteristics 
of types of drugs, methods of identifying powdered drugs and food 
products, and of detecting adulterations. (Prerequisite: Pharmacog. 
222. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Second semester; 3 hours. Credit, 
11-2 year-hours. Bacon, Stuhr.) 

351. Pharmacology — A study of the pharmacological action, dosage, 
uses, and toxicology of official and non-official drugs and poisons. 
Illustrated with carefully planned demonstrations. (Prerequisite: 
Pharmacog. 222. First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. 
Bacon.) 

362. Pharmacological Standardization — A course in biological as- 
saying, employing the official methods of the United States Pharma- 
copoeia. (Prerequisite: Pharmacol. 351. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 
Second semester; 2 class and 2 laboratory periods. Credit, 2 year- 
hours. Bacon, Stuhr.) 

423-424. Advanced Pharmacognosy — Special problems in drug cul- 
ture and in the isolation of plant constituents. (Prerequisite: 
Pharmacog. 222. Both semesters; fees and credits (2 to 5 hours), 
to be arranged upon consultation. Bacon.) 

451-452. Advanced Pharmacology — Advanced study of the pharma- 
cology of drugs and pharmacological standardization. (Prerequi- 
site: Pharmacol. 362. Both semesters; fees and credits (2 to 5 
year-hours) to be arranged upon consultation. Bacon.) 



206 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

491-492. Pharmacognosy and 491-492. Pharmacology Thesis — 
Work for senior thesis may be arranged upon consultation. (Both 
semesters; 2 laboratory periods. Credit, 2 year-hours. Bacon.) 

GRADUATE COURSES 

521-522. Special Problems in Pharmacognosy — (Credit, 2 to 5 year- 
hours. Work and credit to be arranged. Bacon.) 

551-552. Special Problems in Pharmacology — (Credit, 2 to 5 year- 
hours. Work and credit to be arranged. Bacon.) 

591-592. Pharmacognosy and 591-592. Pharmacology Thesis — 
(Work and credit for graduate thesis in Pharmacognosy or Pharma- 
cology to be arranged upon consultation. Bacon.) 

THE DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY 

Professor Leigh Professor Black 

Professor Beisler Professor Heath 

Associate Professor Jackson Assistant Professor Goodwin 

101-104. General Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis — ^The first 
semester is devoted to a study of the laws, theories, and problems of 
chemistry; the non-metallic elements and their simple compounds 
During the second semester, the metallic elements are studied, to 
gether with the qualitative analysis of the metals and the acid radi 
cals. (Required. Laboratory fee, $5.00 per semester. Both semes 
ters; 3 class and 2 laboratory periods. Credit, 2 1-2 year-hours. 
Heath, Black, Beisler, Jackson, Goodwin.) 

251-252. Organic Chemistry — (Required.) 

304. Quantitative Analysis— A brief survey of the fundamental meth- 
ods of gravimetric and volumetric analysis. The laboratory work 
is selected especially for students of pharmacy. (Required. Pre- 
requisite: Chem. 104. Laboratory fee, $5.00. Second semester; 2 
laboratory periods or its equivalent. Credit, 1 year-hour. Black.) 

321-322. Physical Chemistry— (Elective.) 

341-342. Industrial Chemistry— (Elective.) 



COLLEGE OF PHARMACY 207 

406. Physiological Chemistry — The chemistry and physiology of 
carbohydrates, fats, proteins, and body tissues. The examination of 
body fluids such as milk, blood, urine, etc. Course includes routine 
analyses of value to pharmacists and physicians. (Required of 
fourth year students specializing in pharmaceutical chemistry. Pre- 
requisites: Chem. 252 or 256. Laboratory fee, $5.00. Second se- 
mester; 2 class and 1 laboratory periods. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. 
Goodwin.) 

522. Photographic Chemistry — (Elective.) 



208 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



DIVISION OF ATHLETICS AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Everett M. Yon, Director, Physical Education and Athletics. 

Lyman G. Haskell, M. D., Professor of Physical Education. 

H. L. Sebring, B. S., Assistant Director, Physical Education and Ma- 
jor Sports. 

W. C. Cowell, B. S., Assistant Director, Physical Education and Fresh- 
man Sports. 

A. P. Pierson, Instructor in Physical Education and Major Sports. 

Alvin L. Browne, Assistant in Major Sports. 

The Department has been reorganized and is conducted for the pur- 
pose of giving every student a thorough course in general physical train- 
ing under proper supervision and expert teachers, and to give opportun- 
ity and encouragement to participate under the direction of skilled 
coaches in various forms of competitive athletics, for the educational 
and training values that come from such experience. Every effort is 
made to conserve the time required of candidates for intercollegiate 
teams and to promote in practice and contests, ideals of sportsmanship 
and fair play. At the same time the extension among all students of 
participation in various forms of competitive athletics is vigorously pro- 
moted through a large variety of intra-mural and minor sports contests, in- 
door and out. Great emphasis is placed upon outdoor work in Florida's 
wonderful climate. 

A thorough physical examination is made of each student on enter- 
ing the University, on the basis of which he is given advice and direc- 
tion as to his physical activities during his college course. This enables 
the student to secure the greatest values from this phase of his college 
work. This physical examination is supplemented by periodical exam- 
inations required of all those students who are candidates for competi- 
tive teams and of those who are below par physically as a result of either 
illness, improper development, or some other physical handicap. Year- 
ly examinations are optional to upper classmen. Special classes are ar- 
ranged for those needing special work of a corrective nature, and for 
those having physical disabilities. No violent or dangerous exercises are 
permitted. 

Every Freshman and Sophomore is required to take a course in phy- 
sical education for two periods a week throughout the year, for which 
college credit is given. One year consists of gymnasium work, includ- 



DIVISION OF ATHLETICS AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 209 

ing calisthenics, introductory apparatus work, advanced apparatus work, 
group games and mass athletics. The gymnasium work can either be 
taken for one semester in each year, or it can all be taken in one year. 
This course is designed to improve body control and physical alertness; 
to establish habits of regular exercise, and to give experience in various 
kinds of recreative sports that will be useful in later life. 

The second year work consists of games and outdoor activities. The 
following are some of the athletic games the students can elect: football, 
tennis, basketball, soccer, baseball, swimming, track, volley ball, hand 
ball, boxing, wrestling, speed ball, etc. Groups will be formed and each 
student can elect his group of games, and as far as possible special in- 
struction will be given each group while actively engaged in that sport. 

Every encouragement and facility is placed at the disposal of the 
upper class students to take part in the intra-mural and inter-collegiate 
athletic sports on account of their body-building, social and character- 
forming values. 

ATHLETIC COACHING 

In order to meet the increased demand for competent coaches in our 
State High Schools, students who are interested, are allowed to attend 
the regular "chalk talks" and theoretical discussions held for the Uni- 
versity teams in football, basketball, track, and baseball. During the 
first month of Summer School, the department conducts thorough coach- 
ing courses in the four major sports. These courses have proved very 
beneficial to young coaches just entering the field and to experienced 
coaches looking for new ideas and methods. The Summer School allows 
one-half hour credit for each of these courses. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

101. Elementary Gymnastics — Instruction given in free exercises for 
general development and muscular co-ordination. Elementary work 
on apparatus, emphasizing form, approach, and execution. (First 
semester; 2 hours. Credit, 1-2 year-hour.) 

102. Outdoor Activities — Instruction and play in soccer, tennis, foot- 
ball, speed ball, basketball, playground ball, track and baseball. 
(Second semester; 2 hours. Credit, 1-2 year -hour.) 

201. Advanced Gymnastics — Advanced work on mat, ring, heavy ap- 
paratus, nomenclature, emphasizing skill, form, and accuracy of exe- 
cution. Practice work in leading classes. (First semester; 2 hours. 
Credit, 1-2 year-hour.) 



210 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

202. Outdoor Activities— Instruction and play in swimming, hockey, 
golf, volley ball, hand ball, boxing, wrestling and cage ball. (Second 
semester; 2 hours. Credit, 1-2 year-hour.) 

301-302. Leaders Class— Special instruction to those showing profi- 
ciency in Courses 101 and 201, preparing them in the more advanced 
gymnastic work. Theory and practice in class management and 
working out programs in physical education. Around this class 
as a nucleus is formed the gymnastic team which gives an annual 
exhibition, and from this class is chosen the team for intercollegiate 
competition in gymnastics. (Both semesters; 2 hours. Credit, 1 
year-hour.) 



DIVISION OF MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS 211 



DIVISION OF MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS 

RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS 

SENIOR INFANTRY UNIT 

A. C. Tipton, Major, Infantry, U. S. Army, Commandant of Cadets and 
Professor of Military Science and Tactics. 
W. A. Rawls, Captain, Infantry, U. S. Army. 
F. M, Brennan, Captain, Infantry, U. S. Army. 
E. M. Yon, Captain, Infantry, U. S. Army. 
C. S. Whitehead, Captain, Infantry, U. S. Army. 

Assistant Professors of Military Science and Tactics. 
Kay McCallister, 1st Sergeant, Infantry, U. S. Army. 
Dallas B. Hundley, Sergeant, Infantry, U. S. Army. 
William DeL. Klinepeter, Sergeant, Infantry, U. S. Army. 

Authority — Under the terms of the Land Grant Act of 1862 the State 
received certain grants of Federal lands, the income of which must be 
devoted to the maintenance of colleges of Agricultural and Mechanical 
Arts including a course in Military Training. The Reserve Officers' Train- 
ing Corps was established by the National Defense Act, of June 3, 1916, as 
amended by the Act of June 4, 1920. This Act authorized the Secretary 
of War to provide the necessary instructors and equipment and to pre- 
scribe a standard course of instruction. 

Object — ^These units were authorized by Congress for the purpose 
of providing a corps of reserve officers to lead our augmented armed 
forces in time of war. The war with Germany has shown conclusively 
that we must depend upon college men for our additional officers. It 
is a part of the approved military policy of the people of the United States 
to maintain a small standing army. When the nation is drawn into war 
and large additional armed forces are raised it is necessary that they be 
provided with trained officers. A study of our military history shows 
that many lives have been sacrificed in the past because of the scarcity 
of officers capable of leading men in combat. Our Government has at- 
tempted to rectify this by training young men in college so that if war 
comes they may step into positions of leadership and acquit themselves 
creditably. 

The University of Florida feels that in case war should come it is 
preferable for its graduates to serve as officers rather than in the ranks. 



212 - UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

Registration for Military Training — All students, except law stu- 
dents and those taking vocational training, are required to register in Mili- 
tary Science 101-102 and 201-202. Cards for that purpose can be ob- 
tained from the office of the Professor of Military Science and Tactics, 
and should be filled out and returned to the same office on the day of 
registration. Requests for exemption in military training may be made 
in the proper space on the card and will be acted upon by the Professor 
of Military Science and Tactics. Exemptions will be granted to graduate 
students, juniors, and seniors who have completed the basic course, citi- 
zens of foreign countries, students taking the short courses in Agriculture 
of one year or less, the physically disqualified, and those who are more 
than 21 years of age at date of original entry into the University. All 
students so excused, who are taking a course leading to a degree, must 
take additional academic work to compensate for the loss of credits in 
military training. A physical examination is given to all students in the 
fall of the year and exemplions on account of physical disability will be 
granted only as recommended by the college physician conducting this 
examination. The regulations of the University permit only four unex- 
cused absences from drill during any semester. Five unexcused absences 
ivill cause the dismissal of the student. 

Accepted Credits — Credit for work in a Reserve Officers' Training 
Corps unit similar to the one at the University of Florida will be given 
all students who present duly authenticated credentials. Those students 
from senior units of the Reserve Officers' Training Corps will be given the 
full equivalent credit; those from junior units, partial credit for two or 
more years of military training as determined by their standing in the 
Junior unit and their demonstrated ability. Duly authenticated credentials 
must be presented in every case before credits can be given. 

Organization — Equipment, Camps — The War Department furnishes 
the necessary equipment and has laid out a standard course of instruction 
covering a period of four years. This is divided into the basic and ad- 
vanced courses, each covering a period of two years. 

The basic course is compulsory as outlined above, and is usually pur- 
sued during the Freshman and Sophomore years, but must be taken prior 
to graduation and in two consecutive years. 

Students who complete the basic course and are selected by the Pro- 
fessor of Military Science and Tactics and the President of the University, 
may elect the advanced course. Students electing this course are expected 
to carry it to completion as a prerequisite to graduation. Upon its com- 
pletion those students recommended by the Professor of Military Science 



DIVISION OF MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS 213 

and Tactics and the President of the University, will upon their own appli- 
cation be offered a commission in the Infantry Reserve Corps, United 
States Army. Students in the advanced course are given the same allow- 
ance as the basic course students and in addition, commutation of the 
garrison ration. An advanced course Summer Camp is compulsory usu- 
ally between the Junior and Senior years. These camps afford a fine 
opportunity for the student to improve his military knowledge and to 
engage in healthful recreation. He is surrounded by every moral safe- 
guard and provided with every recreation and healthful amusement that 
a young man could wish. Chaplains look after his moral welfare, and 
every effort is made to improve him mentally, morally and physically. 
The War Department pays all expenses, including mileage, rations, medi- 
cal attendance, clothing and laundry service and in addition the pay of 
the seventh grade, U. S. Army. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

BASIC COURSE— INFANTRY 

101-102. Military Science — Freshman year, compulsory. Lectures, 
recitations, drill, calisthenics, and ceremonies. (Both semesters; 
6 hours a week. Credit, 2 year-hours.) 

The work is divided as follows: 

(a) Practical — Infantry drill, school of the soldier, squad, platoon, 
company and ceremonies; gallery and rifle firing; scouting and patrolling; 
setting up exercises and mass play; organization; infantry equipment. 

(b) Theoretical — Infantry drill regulations and ceremonies; theory 
of rifle marksmanship ; hygiene, first aid and military courtesy. 
201-202. Military Science — Sophomore year, compulsory. Lectures, 

recitations, drills, calisthenics, and ceremonies. (Prerequisite: Mili- 
tary Science 101-102. Both semesters; 6 hours per week. Credit, 2 
year-hours.) 
The work is divided as follows: 

(a) Practical — Command and leadership; ceremonies; setting up ex- 
ercises and mass play; rifle and automatic rifle firing; rifle and hand gre- 
nades; scouting and patrolling, and combat principles of the squad. 

(b) Theoretical— Map reading; scouting and patrolling; musketry; 
interior guard duty; automatic rifle. 



214 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

ADVANCED COURSE— INFANTRY 

301-302. Military Science — Junior year, elective. Lectures, recitations, 
command and leadership. (Prerequisite: Military Science 201-202. 
Both semesters; 6 hours per week. Credit, 2 year-hours.) 

The work is divided as follows: 

(a) Practical — Command and leadership; rifle, machine gun firing; 
field engineering. 

(b) Theoretical — Field Engineering, defense, obstacles, demolitions, 
roads, bridges; machine guns, platoon drill and mechanism, theory of 
direct and indirect fire; elements of international law; military law, mili- 
tary sketching, map reading. 

401-402. Military Science — Senior year, elective. Lectures, recitations, 
command and leadership. (Prerequisite: Military Science 301-302. 
Both semesters; 6 hours per week. Credit, 2 year-hours.) 

The work is divided as follows : 

(a) Practical — Command and leadership; rifle and pistol firing; 
tactical walks, patrols, security detachments, offensive and defensive oper- 
ations, 37 mm gun, trench mortar firing. 

(b) Theoretical — Military history and policy of the United States; 
administration; combat principles 37 mm gun and trench mortar. 



THE DIVISION OF MUSIC 215 



THE DIVISION OF MUSIC 

Director Brown Instructor DeBruyn 

This department aims to foster a love for good music and to encour- 
age students to use their musical abilities and training for the benefit of 
themselves and others. It trains and directs the student chorus, the chapel 
choir, the glee and mandolin and guitar clubs, the orchestra, and the Uni- 
versity band, and offers private instruction in voice and in violin and other 
instruments. It seeks to cooperate with the musical organizations of 
Gainesville and in conjunction with them to give several public entertain- 
ments during the year. See above, page 45. Courses are given by special 
arrangement with the Director, but no college credit is allowed for work 
in this department. 

Owing to the lack of funds for the department, a small tuition fee is 
charged for private instruction. 



216 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



GENEEIAL EXTENSION DIVISION 

Bert Clair Riley, Director 

Faculty — Burton W. Ames, Ella M. Allison, Ralph Stoutamire, Mary 
Ellen Foley, Julia Annette Keeler, Alice L. Allison, Earl C. Beck, Paul 
T. Manchester, W. S. Middleton, H. C. Johnson, Orton W. Boyd, Louise E. 
Tewkesbury, D. F. McDowell, James D. Glunt, A. R. Halley, Mrs. Joseph 
Roemer, Maude Beatrice Davis, Nina McAllister Harris. 

Regular Faculties of the University of Florida and the State Col- 
lege for Women cooperate. 

Special Lecturers and Instructors employed for Class Work and 
Short Courses. 

The General Extension Division carries on extension activities for 
the Colleges of Arts and Sciences, Education, Engineering, and Law, of the 
University, and the College of Arts and Sciences and the Schools of Edu- 
cation, Physical Education, and Music, of the State College for Women. 
The work has been divided into four departments: 
L Extension Teaching. 

n. Public Welfare. 

III. Instruction by Lectures and Public Discussion. 

IV. General Information and Public Service. 

EXTENSION TEACHING 

The Extension Teaching Department has been designed to give to all 
who cannot attend the University or College an opportunity to secure 
instruction which may be a help and pleasure to them. This work is car- 
ried on through (1) correspondence, (2) class, and (3) club study. 

Correspondence — Correspondence study offers to everyone an excel- 
lent opportunity to advance in his vocation, obtain a degree, or to take 
courses for culture. 

Review courses for teachers, high school work for students in rural 
communities, college work for busy men and women, special vocational 
and trade courses for those who wish to advance in their line of work, 
and reading courses for those on the farm, in the shop, office, and home 
are offered. Many courses are given by the University through the Col- 
leges of Arts and Sciences, Education, Engineering, and Law; while spe- 
cial work is given in Journalism and Business. At the College for Women, 



GENERAL EXTENSION DIVISION 217 

the College of Arts and Sciences and the Schools of Education, Physical 
Culture, and Music also offer correspondence courses. 

Class — ^Wherever advisable, extension classes are organized. The 
work is conducted by faculty members of the University or of the State 
College for Women. 

Club — Through club-study associated groups of people are given an 
opportunity to study and to keep in touch with the latest thought on cul- 
tural and professional subjects. A definite plan for cooperative study un- 
der a faculty member is provided. 

PUBLIC WELFARE 

Through the Public Welfare Department short courses, community 
institutes, conferences and surveys are directed by the General Exten- 
sion Division. Assistance is given to all clubs, societies, public boards, 
and other agencies working for the public good and community advance- 
ment. 

Short Courses — Courses are conducted for the benefit of all inter- 
ested citizens. 

Community Institutes and Conferences — ^Through the conference 
and the community institute an opportunity is given to make systematic in- 
vestigation, and to carry on necessary discussion concerning problems 
interesting the entire community. 

INSTRUCTION BY LECTURES AND PUBLIC DISCUSSION 

Since the mass of our citizens must get much of their instruction and 
information and must formulate their opinions on present-day questions 
concerning the community, state, and nation through lectures and public 
discussion, a lecture bureau is maintained by the Division and every effort 
is made to encourage people to get together in a community forum, in 
order that a majority decision may be reached and action may be taken. 

Lecture Bureau— The University offers through this Bureau lectures 
by prominent citizens, faculty members, and speakers from other universi- 
ties and states. These lectures are technical, informational, or inspirational 
in character. When ample notification is given, speakers will be fur- 
nished to women's clubs, commercial clubs, for teachers' institutes, com- 
mencement addresses, and other special occasions. 

Public Discussion Bureau — To assist in the development of the com- 
munity forum, material will be lent on current questions and present-day 



218 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

problems and suggestions will be given for organization and program 
building. 

High School Debating League — Debate is one of the best methods 
of presenting problems of the present day; consequently, a High School 
Debating League is conducted annually by the General Extension Division. 

State Declamatory Contest — Since 1925, the Declamation Contest 
for all high school students in the state has been conducted by the General 
Extension Division. This contest is held annually in connection with the 
High School Debating League. 

GENERAL INFORMATION AND PUBLIC SERVICE 

In addition to disseminating the stores of information obtainable 
through the faculties of the University of Florida and of the State College 
for Women, the General Extension Division will otherwise help individuals 
and communities solve their present-day problems. 

Every effective means of assisting the people will be employed. Under 
this Department are found (1) the Bureau of Public Information and 
Library Service, (2) the Public School and Community Center Bureau, 
(3) the Bureau of Visual Instruction, and (4) the Publications Bureau. 

Bureau of Public Information and Library Service — ^This Bureau 
will, in answer to reasonable requests for help on any problem confront- 
ing the individual or community, act as a clearing-house for all kinds of 
information. 

Package libraries and reference books are lent to citizens. 

Story books suitable for children of all grades are sent to teachers 
to read to their students. 

Traveling libraries are being furnished to schools. 

Current events and circulating book-clubs are suggested and aided. 

Club study outlines and guides for home reading are offered. 

Public School and Community Center Bureau — This Bureau assists 
teachers and citizens, and organizations who realize the value and neces- 
sity of developing the school house or some other central place of meet- 
ing as a Community Center, and of offering the proper kind of play and 
recreation for children of all ages as well as adults. 

The services of a specialist for advice on public recreation and play- 
ground equipment is offered free to interested communities and teachers, 
and others are given every necessary help in becoming local leaders. 



GENERAL EXTENSION DIVISION 219 

Aid is given in putting on community programs. Plays, recitations 
and pageants are lent to societies, clubs and schools. Talking machine 
records in sets making up complete programs, accompanied by lecture ma- 
terial, will be furnished to clubs, women's organizations, churches and 
schools. 

Teachers are furnished educational magazines of value to them in 
their profession. 

Questions will be answered and special effort will be made to render 
service to officials, parent-teacher associations and other organizations 
seeking information on school problems. 

Visual Instruction Bureau — Instruction through the medium of the 
eye is known to be one of the most effective ways of reaching many 
people; therefore, by cooperating with the large corporations, bureaus, 
and departments of the United States Government, the General Extension 
Division can supply clubs, schools, and communities with slides and mo- 
tion-picture reels for instruction and entertainment. Lecture outlines 
accompany the slides. 

Collections of prints, charts and pictures are also lent. 

Publications Bureau — Informational bulletins and articles on sub- 
jects of general interest are published and distributed. 

Address all communications to the Director, General Extension Divi- 
sion, University of Florida. 



220 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



PART FOUR — COMMENCEMENT 



GRADUATING EXERCISES 

JUNE 8, 1926 

PROGRAM 

9:45 A. M. — Organ Prelude Caprice Viennois Kreisler 

Grand March from "Aida" Verdi 

University Orchestra 

Invocation Rev. Wiluam S. Stoney 

Visions F. D. St. Clair 

University Orchestra 

Baccalaureate Address Dr. John Holladay Latane 

Vocal Solo Selected 

Mrs. David Worth 
Presentation American Legion Endowment W. E. Kay 

State Chairman American Legion Endowment Campaign 
General Solicitor Atlantic Coast Line Railroad 

Acceptance General A. H. Blanding 

Member State Board of Control 

Selection from the Opera "Amorita".. Czibulka 

University Orchestra 

AWARDING OF MEDALS AND PRIZES 

Dr. Melton Clark, Professor of English, 

Columbia Theological Seminary, Columbia, S. C. 

Administration of Oath to Reserve Officers 

—Major Arthur C. Tipton, U. S. A. 

Presentation of Commissions Captain Everett M. Yon, U. S. A. 

Address— Charge Colonel C. R. Layton, U. S. R. C. 

The Star Spangled Banner University Orchestra 

awarding of certificates 
CONFERRING OF DEGREES 

announcements 
Benediction Dr. Melton Clark 

Postlude— Organ: March Militaire Scotson Clark 

Claude L. Murphree 

University Organist 



DEGREES AND CERTIFICATES 221 

CANDIDATES FOR DEGREES 

Master of Arts 
John Roy Brokenshire, A. B., University of Michigan 1916 

Master of Science 
Louis E. Dupont, B. S. A., University of Florida 1924 

Master of Science in Agriculture 
Clinton B. Van Cleef, B. S. A., University of Florida 1924 

Civil Engineer 

Van Ellis Huff, B. S. C. E, University of Florida 1921 

Arthur Neyle Sollee, B. S. C. E., University of Florida 1922 

Bachelor of Arts 
Hal Nawton Black David Lanier 

Joseph Wheeler Frazier, Jr. Frank Cooper Pelot 

Wilbur Garland Hiatt Thomas Winston Ramsey 

Robert Leo Hodges Dalton Jennings Shapo 

Donald Russell Judkins Hugh Lee Thompson 

Bachelor of Arts in the Social Sciences 
Virgil Miller Newton, Jr. Wilbur Ritchie Smith 

Walter Garrett Troxler 

Bachelor of Science 

William Farris Anderson Russell Lowell Laymen 

Frank Hubert Babers John Robert McClure 

Frank Leslie Burnett Lehnholf Spiller Marshall 

Joseph Bryson Copeland James Arlos Ogg 

Dwight William Crane Max Pepper 

Nicholas Hodsdon Paul Orlando Wiig 

I Bachelor of Science in Business Administration 

Charles Olin Barnes Silas Morton Creech 

James Edwin Graves, Jr. . Philip Jameson Mank 

Bachelor of Science in Agriculture 

Preston Robinson Bishop Hubert Graves 

Frank Warner Brumley Leland Edward Je£Feries 

Harry Carl Bucha Jesse Wilder Johnson 

Marvin Adel Brooker Addison Shuler Laird 

John Perlin Camp Mont Broderick Moore 

John Thomas Creighton William Orton Pearce 

Raymond Merchant Crown Lawrence Theodore Pendarvis 

Roy Lewis Cunningham Richard Henry Simpson 

Robert Dekle Etzler Charles Henry Taylor, Jr. 
Martin Greene Young 

Bachelor of Arts in Education 
Lothair Benjamin Andrews Carl Clinton Carnes 

Edgar White Carter Charles A. H. Frensdorf 



222 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

Bachelor of Science in Education 
VanEss Reynolds Butler Parke Roland Lewis 

Gurdon Dwight Hamilton Orion Alfred Mann 

Timothy Augustin Johnson Rollin Herbert Poston 

John Pearl Prevatt 

Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Education 
Samuel Cliff Means Doyal Edgar Timmons 

Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering 

Gerald B. Briggs Fay Allan Lossing 

Louis DeWitt Brown Martin Alexander Milling 

John Norton Christie John Edwin Pearce 

Walter Franklin Emmons, Jr. Lawrence Brownell Reed 

William Douglas Henderson Arthur Lowell West 

Harold William Hills Alva Harry Wilson 
John Richard Leonard 

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering 
Elmer Maynard Adkins Albert Donald Hutson 

William John Fowler Otho Benjamin Turbyfill 

Harold Anson Ward, Jr. 

Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering 
Anthony William Stumpe 

Bachelor of Science in Chemical Engineering 
Donald Carr Booth William Edward Flood 

John Mann Boyd Roland Eugene Miller 

William Hyde Fisher Zareh Meguerditch Pirenian 

Juris Doctor 
William James Lake John Campbell Watson 

Bachelor of Laws 

Donald James Baird Forest Hoffman 

Curtis Basch Frederick Malcolm Ivey 

Robert Seabrook Baynard John Wright Jennings 

Edgar Samuel Blake Edgar Charles Jones 

Lincoln Chapman Bogue • Charles James Regero 

John Henry Bowman Lawrence William Rogers 

John Oliver Brown, Jr. Marion Bennett Sessions 

Lawrence Chapman Case Jefferson D. Sibert, Jr. 

Arthur Reese Clonts John Milton Bryan Simpson 

John Dickinson John William Usher, Jr. 

Franklin Harper Elmore, Jr. David Weintraub 

Erving Max Goldstein Lovick Donald Pierce Williams 

Ben Soule Hancock, Jr. William David Wilson 
William Hannah Wolfe 

Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy 
Lloyd Maury Chew Staten Hardee Chance 

Thomas Jefferson Edwards, Jr. Burton Nathaniel Work 

CANDIDATE FOR CERTIFICATE 

Normal Diploma 
Harry EUden McMullen 



DEGREES AND CERTIFICATES 



RESERVE CORPS COMMISSIONS 



Second Lieutenant Infantry 



William Faris Anderson 
Frank Hubert Babers 
Preston Robinson Bishop 
Claude Barmer Black 
■ Gerald Brewer Briggs 
'Marvin Adel Brooker 
Joseph Shirey Butts 
John Perlin Camp 
Ralph Comstock Champlin 
iStaten Hardee Chance 
John Norton Christie 
Henry Louis Connell 
Si] as Morton Creech 
Albert Heyward Davis 
Thomas Jefferson Edwards, Jr. 
Walter Franklin Emmons, Jr. 
William Hyde Fisher 



William John Fowler 
Gurdon Dwight Hamilton 
William Douglas Henderson 
Metzgar Elroy Josey 
Russell Lowell Laymen 
PhUip Jameson Mank 
Lehnholf Spiller Marshall 
Edmund Robert McGill 
Rolland Eugene Miller 
Francis Cooper Pelot 
Ellis Gardner Piper 
Clarence Victor Rahner 
Thomas Winston Ramsey 
Wilburn Frank Robinson 
Heybum Dale Smith 
Anthony William Stumpe 
Hugh Lee Thomson 
Frank Sumner Wright 



Certificate in Lieu of Commissions 



Robert Lucas Black, Jr. 
Louis DeWitt Brown 
Fay Allan Lossing 
Glenn Tillman Magill 



Dalton Jennings Shape 
Arthur Lowell West 
Alva Harry Wilson 
Martin Greene Young 



224 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



SUMMER SCHOOL COMMENCEMENT 

CANDIDATES FOR DEGREES 

AUGUST 4, 1926 

Master of Arts in Education 
Sister Catherine Semmes 

Master of Science in Education 
Rudolph Henry Schild 

Master of Science in Agriculture 
Frank Warner Brumley 

Bachelor of Arts 
Ellis Gardner Piper 

Bachelor of Science 
Joseph Shirey Butts 

Bachelor of Arts in the Social Sciences 
Edmund Robert McGill 

Bachelor of Science in Agriculture 
Henry Kenneth Winters 

Bachelor of Arts in Education 
John Mayes Hudnall Charles Eugene Mounts 

William Oscar Smith 

Bachelor of Science in Education 
James Homer Kelley Mrs. Alma McCook Rembert 

Normal Diploma 
Mrs. Esther Shaw Bradbury Adam Albert Merbler 

Mrs. Annabelle Abney Branning Iva Niswonger 

Clarence Arthur Harrison Horace Edgar Richey 

Mrs. Ida B. Smith 



DEGREES AND CERTIFICATES 



225 



PHI KAPPA PHI HONOR SOCIETY 

OFFICERS 1926-27 

T. M. Simpson President 

A. P. Black Vice-President 

B. W. Ames Secretary 

0. F. Burger Treasurer 



ELECTED DURING THE SUMMER SESSION, 1926 

W. 0. Smith 

UNDERGRADUATES ELECTED, 1926-27 

Arts and Science 



A. T. Craig 
Kermit Hart 
William Hawkins 



T. L. Barrineau 



L. C. Cartwright 
W. R. Clary 
F. P. Dean 
R. N. Ellis 



J. M. Allison 
H. Dublirer 



S. H. Huffman 
R. S. Knowles 



A. R. Jackley 
Angus Laird 



Agricltlture 
R. D. Dickey 

Engineering 

T. S. Johnson 
R. T. Lundy 



Law 

C. G. Gridley 
J. H. Markham 

Teachers 

A. C. Morris 
A. R. Morrow 



S. K. Love 
E. B. Mann 
E. P. Tyler 



L. B. Troxler 



D. G. McMillan 
R. D. Ross 

E. F. Smith 

R. L. Wilkerson 



R. C. Parker 
R. S. Pierce 



A. M. Singletary 
J. H. Wyse 



ORATORICAL HONORS 

1926 

Freshman-Sophomore Declamation Contest Charles S. Wax 

Junior Oratorical Contest Claude J. Sparkman 

Senior Oratorical Contest Edward R. McGill 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



STUDENT ROLL, 1926-27 

ISame Class Postoffice County or State 

Aaskeim, Maurice Ivan Bus. Adm. Fresh Clermont ..._ Lake 

Abbott, Calvin Pinkney Bus. Adm. Fresh Apalachicola — — _ Franklin 

Abbott, James Carl _.Bus. Adm. Soph. Apalachicola _ _ Franklin 

Abernathy, James Greenwood f 1st year Law ) Ft. Lauderdale - Broward 

\ Arts Jr. ) 

Acosta, AUen Raphael Bus. Adm. Spec Jacksonville DuvaJ 

Adams, Gordon Stewart - Arts Soph _..Gaineaville _ Alachur" 

Adams, Mark Elbert Arts Fresh Jacksonville .■'^'^^^ ■ 

Adams, William McCarroll....Bus. Adm. Fresh. -Gainesville _ Alachua 

Addington, Jack Ensign ..._ Arts Fresh Jacksonville _ • .^",T*' 

Aikin Horace Dean _...Law 1st year St. Petersburg _ _ Pmellaa 

Airth, Alfred Thomas _ Arts Soph Live Oak _..- - Suwannee 

Airth, George Edward „..Law 1st year Live Oak _ _ Suwanne* 

Akei-man, Emory Speer Law 3rd year Orlando - ..- - Orange 

Akin, Van Hood Arts Soph _ St. Petersburg -.... Pinellas 

Akridge. Nicholas Jordan Arts Fresh Cocoa Brevard 

Akridgc, William Greenberry Arts Soph Cocoa _ Brevarti 

Alchediak, Michael Karam Arts Fresh Tampa -... Hi Isborough 

Alderman, Chester Arlington Arts Fresh Plant City _.. Hillsborough 

Alderman, David O'Neal Teach. Soph Arcadia --...... DeSotO 

Alexander, Thomas _ Arts Fresh Tampa Hillsborough 

Allen, Chester Robinson _ Engr. Soph Auburndale - "V.vrr- I' 

Allen, John Edward Law Spec Tampa _ -...- HiUsborough 

Allen, Jay W. Arts Fresh Gasperilla Charlotte 

Allen, Ralph Thomas Arts Fresh Miami — ;^ Dade 

Allen, William Dawson Bus. Adm. Spec Palatka Putnam 

Allison, John Gloyd Arts Fresh Orlando ^^^^% 

Allison, John McLean Law 3rd year Jacksonville „. ,T " 

Allyn, Charles Lewllyn Teach. Soph St. Petersburg — Pinellas 

Ames, Burton Weber Law 1st year Kissimmee — . Osceola 

Amos, John Ernest . Bus. Adm. Soph Tallahassee ...._ Leoi 

Amrein, Wenier Charles E Engr. Soph Clearwater — Pmellai 

Anderson, Arthur Lochridge Arts Soph Tampa - Hillsborougl 

Anderson, Clyde Oscar Arts Fresh Sebring Highlands 

Anderson, Frank Marvin _ Arts Soph Orlando grange 

Anderson, Hans Olaf Arts Freeh Pierson - ,V j "f 

Anderson, Harry Walker .... Bus. Adm. Fresh Greensboro - Gadsdei 

Andei-son, James Loomis Arts Jr Mayo ^ Lafayette 

Anderson, Joseph Burwick Arts Soph. Pensacola _ _ Escambis 

Anderson, Irving Barnard Arts Jr St. Petersburg Pinellas 

Anderson, Thomas EMward Arts Fresh Birmingham ._ Alabama 

Anderson, WiOiam Oliver Law 3rd year Orlando - Orange 

Andrews, Merrill H. ..._ Arts Fresh Jacksonville ..._ _ Duval 

Andrews, Robert Walton Engr. Soph Titusville ...._ Brevard 

Ansley, William Bonneau .... Bus. Adm. Soph St. Petersburg Pinellas 

Anthony, Henry Duncan .... Bus. Adm. Fresh Jacksonville Duval 

Arant, Carl P _ Pre-Med. 1st year Palatka _ Putnam 

Arden, John Freeman Pre-Med. 1st year Jacksonville Duval 

Armstead, J. A Teach. Spec Gainesville - _ Alachua 

Arnett, William Tobias Arch, Jr Clermont _ - Lake 

Arnold, William Howe Engr. Sr Eustis Lake 

Arnow, Carlton C. _ Arts Fresh. Hawthorne — _ Alachua 

Arnow, Leslie Earl Arts Fresh Gainesville Alachua 

Ashmead, F'orrest Graham Bus. Adm. Soph So. Jacksonville Duval 

Afihmore, Freeman Winton Arts Fresh Gainesville Alachua 

Ashmore, Wayne Varriel Bus. Adm. Fresh. Gainesville Alachua 

Atkins, George Wesley ...._ Arts Fresh Blountstown Calhoun 

Atkinson, Clyde William. Law 3rd year Tallahassee Leon 

Auger, Francis Paul Law 1st year Orlando Orange 

Ausley, Charles Saxon Bus. Adm. Soph. Tallahassee Leon 

Austin, Archie Boyd ..._ _ Graduate Gainesville Alachua 

Austin, H. Stuart _ _ _ Arts Soph Orlando Orange 

Avary, Thomas Scott...... Bus. Adm. Fresh Orlando _ _ Orange 

Ajctell, Reginald Randall Arts. Fresh Jacksonville Duval 

Ayers, Fred Donald _ Arts Soph Gainesville Alachua 

Babers, Frank Hubert Graduate Gainesville Alachua 

Bachlott, Maurice Randolph Engr. Soph Campville Alachua 

Baden, Earl Walter Bus. Adm. Soph Bradenton _ Manatee 

Baetzmann, Frederick Ernest Agric. Jr Gainesville - Alachua 

Baggett, Arthur Edward _.. Teach. Fresh Mims _ ~ Brevard 

Baggott, Charles Edward _ „ Agric Sr. Dover HiUsborough 

Eaghdoian, Yervant Hany Law 2nd year Jacksonville Duval 

Eagley. Allan Beecher __ Arts Soph W. Palm Beach _ Palm Beach 

Bailey. Charles Albert Bus. Adm. Soph Orlando „ Orange 



REGISTER 227 

Name Class Postoffice County or State 

S! Bailey, Wilfred George Arts Soph Port Eichie _ _ _ Pasco 

Bainum, Charles Joseph Arts Soph _ St. Petersburg Pinellas 

. Baisden, Fred Randolph Law 2nd year Gainesville _ Alachua 

Baker, Beverly Hines Arts Fresh Campbellton Jackson 

B;il<er, Dallas Roy Arts Fresh Sarasota S'aiaseta 

Paker, Gordon AJoneo Pharm. Soph Lakeland : Polk 

Baker, Raleigh Duncan, Jr Arts Fresh Tavaree ... _ I^ake 

Baldwin, Lloyd Lavelle _.... Arts Fresh. Buena Vista _ _- Dade 

Ball, Charles Arthur Law 3rd year Montgomery Alatjajna 

Bancroft, Ted A Teach. Sr Port St. Joe ..._ „ _ WSS. 

Bancroft, Winthrop _ Law 1st year Jacksonville Dnval 

Barber, Charles Arthur Bus. Adm. Soph. Windermere _ Orange 

Barker, George Anderson Bus. Adm. Fresh Orlando Orange 

Baiker, John Francis Arts Jr _..Kansa3 City Kansas 

Barnd, Merle Oliver Bus. Adm. Jr St. Petersburg Pinellas 

Barnhill, William Benjamin Teach. Spec Gainesville _ Alachua 

Barrineau, Thomas Lorren, Jr Agri. Sr ....Gonzalez Escambia 

Barrow, Douglas Henry Arts Fresh Sherman Okeechobee 

Barrow, James Malcolm, Jr _A.rts Fresh Sherman Okeechobee 

Baitlett, Stuart E Bus. Adm. Soph Vero Beach Indian River 

Bashaw, William Niles Arts Soph Bradenton Manatee 

Baskin, Norris Frederick Law 3rd year Dunnellon Marion 

Bass, Clayton Claude Arts Fresh Live Oak Suwannee 

Bass, Henry Carson, Jr Arts Fresh _...New Smyrna - - Volusia 

Bass, Tobe Agri. Fresh St. Cloud Osceola 

Bnssett, Lloyd Ross Engr. Fresh. St. Petersburg Pinellas 

Bateman, Robert Edward . Agri. Soph __.Wauchula . Hardee 

Bates, Donald Marston _ Arts Sr Ft, Lauderdale _ Broward 

Bauer, Albert Frederick Agri. Fresh Groveland Lake 

BauKhman, Charles Fred _ Arts Fresh Erwln Tennessee 

Baujrhman, Harry Luther Arts FVesh. Erwin ._ Tennessee 

Baum^artner, Dorst Fred Bus. Adm. Soph Sarasota Sarasota 

Baxter, Louis Morgan Teach. Fresh Crystal River Citrus 

Baya, Joseph Francis _.. Law 2nd year Tampa Hillsborough 

Bayley, Cyril _ Arch. Soph. Clearwrater ..._ PineUaa 

Baynard, Henry Swinton Law 1st year._ St. Petersburg PineUas 

Beachem, Joseph William Engr. Fresh Ana^tasia _ _ St. Johns 

Beardsley, Edward Henry Bus. Adm. Soph. Jacksonville Duval 

Beardsley, Randall Andrew Teach. Fresh Rockledge Brevard 

Beasley, Edwin King _ Engr. Fresh. Winter Haven Polk 

Beasley, Jesse Bryant Engr. Jr. . Umatilla Lake 

Beck, Arnold _ Agri. Fresh Chiefland Levy 

Beck, Cecil Dupuis _ Arts Jr New Smyrna _ Volusia 

Beckwith, Donald William _ Engr. Soph Jacksonville Duval 

Bedsole, Malcolm Roy Agri. Soph Graceville _ Jackson 

Bepgs, Elmore Dixie Arts Fresh _ Pensacola Escambia 

Bell, Adrian Washington Teach. Fresh Brooksville .._ Hemanda 

Bell, Walter Blaisdell _ Pre-Med. 1st year Daytona Beach Volusia 

Belt, Carl Overton ..._ _ Arch. Fresh. Bartow Po'k 

' Bennett, James F. _ Teach. Fresh _Arcadia DeSoto 

Bennett, Maurice Charles ...._ Pharm. Jr Tampa Hillsborough 

Benson, Robert Thomas Teach. Soph Manatee Manatee 

Benton, Felix ....„ _ „ Arch. Fresh. .Tampa Hillsborough 

Bergman, Sam „ Arts Soph..._ „.Tanxpa Hillsborough 

' Berry, Albert Evermont ...._ Arts Sr Tampa Hillsborough 

Bigger, Ralph Wendell _.... Arts Fresh Jacksonville 5" , 

i Bird, James Lawless Bus. Adm. Fresh Jacksonville J'*^, 

Bird, Paul Delmas ...._ _ Arts Soph Peri-y ^^^°\ 

Bisant, Oscar Melville .._ _.... Arts Fresh Jacksonville R^ , 

- Bisbee, Charles L _ „ Teach. Fresh .Jacksonville - Duval 

Bisbee, Hamilton J _.... Teach. Fresh Jacksonville _ Daval 

I Bishop, Howard Wayne Law 1st year Gainesville Alachua 

: Black, David William _ Arts Soph - -.Lakeland Folk 

Black, Jonathan A _ Pharm. Soph Palatka Putnam 

Black, Kenneth L Bus. Adm. Soph JWinneola --.■ Lake 

' Black, Kermit Kellog ...._ _ Arts. Soph Tampa „ Hillsborouzh 

Black, Robert Arch. Fresh Minneola --■ Lake 

Black, Robert Lucas. Jr Law 1st year _ Gainesvilte -Mf*?"^ 

i Blackmon, Gulie Hargrave „ Graduate Gainesville - Alachua 

Blackwell, Donald William Arts. Soph — Cleveland T;..®""* 

Blair, Luther Clarke ...._ Engr. Fresh _Orlando Orange 

; Blair, Paul McCreary _ Engr. Jr — _.Clear%vater S- .1 

Blake, James Yarborough.._ _.. Pharm. Jr Tarpon Springs _ — S-° ,1 

Blakeley, Henry Hilbum _ Arts Sr - -Safety Harbor VmsUaa 

Blalock. Lewis Bus. Adm. Fresh Ocala ■™^^°,r 

Blanchard, Randall Howard. Jr....Arts Fresh Winter Haven --- Polk 

Blanchett, William Beucler Arts Fresh Tampa Hillsborough 

; Blanck, Bernard G Bus. Adm. Fresh Miami — - Dade 



228 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



Name Class Postoffice County or State 

Blanton, Frank Sylvester Agri. Soph Pensacola Escambia 

Blasingame, Powell Newton. ...Engr. Soph Gainesville Alachua 

Elate, Aaron Herbert Arts Fresh Lakeland Polk 

Blue, Neil Douglas Teach. Jr Vernon Washington 

Boardman, Edward Thorpe Arts Soph Coral Gables _ Dade 

Boardman, Paul K Bus. Adm. Soph St. Petersburg Pinellas 

Bochterle, Charles Frederick. .Bus. Adm. Soph St. Petersburg _ Pinellas 

Bogan, Lester Eugene Bus. Adm. Soph. Pensacola Escambia 

Bogart, John Allen Calhoun Enar. Spec. Edmonton _ Canada 

Bogert, Eugene P Bus. Adm. Fresh St. Petersburg _ Pinellas 

Bog.crs, Frank Dean Law 2nd year Jacksonville _ Duval 

Bogrrs, Vincent M „ Arts Fresh. Blountstown Calhoun 

Bohen, William Henry Engr. Sr Live Oak Suwannee 

Boltin, William G , Arts Fresh Gainesville Alachua 

Bonrl, William B Arts Fresh Jacksonville Duval 

Boney, Henry Tate Teach. Soph Wauchula _ Hardee 

Boney, Robert C Bus. Adm. Fresh Wauchula _ Hardee 

Bono, Louis J Teach. Fresh Jacksonville Duval 

Boone, Archie Altman Arch. Soph Gainesville _... Alachua 

Boone, Earle Alpha Arts Fresh Panama City Bay 

Boone, William Kenneth, Jr Arts Fresh Ocklawaha Marion 

Boozer. Elwin Claude Law 1st year W. Palm Beach Palm Beach 

Borders, Huey Ingles Agri. Soph Jacksonville Duval 

Borland, James Louden Arts Jr Oeala Marion 

Bosse, Omar Rufus Teach Sr. Lake Hamilton _ Polk 

Boote, Joseph Owen, Jr Engr. Fresh Jacksonville Duval 

Boswell, William Chalmers.. Bus. Adm. Fresh Inverness Citrus 

Boulware, John Hamilton Arts Fresh Lakeland Polk 

Bouvier, John A, Jr Law 1st year, Arts Sr Jacksonville Duval 

Bowen, Jerry Tucker Arts Fresh Gainesville Alachua 

Bowers, Oliver Lorn Teach. Fresh Miami Dade 

Bowman, Clarence James Teach. Fresh Wauchula Hardee 

Bowyer, Ernest Jerome Teach. Soph Lakeland _ Polk 

Boyd, James Cody Bus. Adm. Soph Tavares _ Lake 

Boyd, John Davis Teach. FVesh Jackson Mississippi 

Boyd, John Mann Graduate Clermont Lake 

Boyd, Randolph Wilson Arts Fresh Jacksonville Duval 

Boyd, Thomas Decker Law 2nd year Gainesville Alachua 

Boyd, William Burke Bus. Adm. Fresh Miami Dade 

Boyd, William Daniel Agri. Sr. Jacksonville _... Duval 

Boyd, William Wallace Engr. Fresh Clermont _ Lake 

Boydston, George L Agri. Fresh. Lake Worth Palm Beach 

Braden. Walter Hopkins Law 3rd year St. Petersburg Pinellas 

Bradford, A. Lee Law 1st year Miami _ Dade 

Bradford, Matchett Pharm. Fresh. St. Petersburg Pinellas 

Bradley, Cale Everett Pharm. Spec Lake City ...._ _ Columbia 

Branch, Charles H. H Arts Jr Tampa Hillsborough 

Branch, Warren Frank .... Pre-Med. 1st year Jacksonville Duval 

Brandt, Christian Rowland Teach. Soph. Gainesville Alachua 

Brandt, Edward Frederick Law 1st year Gainesville Alachua 

Brannon, James Nelson Pharm. Fresh St. Petersburg ...._ Pinellas 

Bratley, Forrest Groves Arts Soph Miami Dade 

Bridges, Edward L Arts Jr Orlando Orange 

Bridwell, Ray Edgar Pre-Med. 1st year Key West Monroe 

Brill, Harry Lee Arts Fresh Tampa Hillsborough 

Brinson, James Hertle Arts Soph Gainesville _.... Alachua 

Broadway, Frank Rushing Arts Fresh Cecil Alabama 

Brodie, Judson Allen Teach. Fresh Gainesville Alachua J 

Brodmerkel, Alexander H Teach. Jr. Jacksonville Duval] 

Brogdon, Martin Bus. Adm. Spec Miami Dade' 

Brooker, Layton R Bus. Adm. Soph Bell Gilchrist 

Brooker, Marvin Adel Graduate Bell Gilchrist 

Brooks, George Gray, Jr Law 3rd year Key West Monroe 

Brook.s. Roy Ray Arts Jr. Tampa _ Hillsborough 

Broome, Stockton, Jr f Law 2nd year } Jacksonville Duval ' 

1 Arts Soph, j I 

Brothers, Lionel Raymond Arts Sr. .. Reddick Marion 1 

Brov/der, David Arts Fresh Leesburg Lake 1 

Brown, Arrington Oglesby Arts Soph Leesburg Lake 

Brown, Byron R Arts Fresh Quincy Gadsden 

Brown, Clyde Ree Arts Soph Graceville Jackson' 

Brown, George Barricman Pharm. Spec Crestview Okaloosa 

Brown, Jack Bus. Adm. Fresh Miami D.^de 

Brown, James Norman Bus. Adm. Fresh Jacksonville Duval 

Brown, Newton Walker Engr. Soph W. Palm Beach Palm Beach 

Brown, Robert Crutchfield....Bus. Adm. Fresh Lakeland Polk 

Brown, Robert Hamilton, Jr Arch. Jr Bartow „ _ Polk 

Brown, William Franklin Arts Soph Miami _ Dade 



REGISTER 229 

Name Class Postoffice County or State 

Browne, Phillip Farris Teach. Fresh Apalachicola _.... Franklin 

Brownell, Paul Granger Arts Soph New Smyrna Volusia 

Browning, John O'Donald Teach. FVesh Bradenton ..._ Manatee 

Browning, Ralph Raymond Engr. Sr. Gainesville Alachua 

Brownlee, William Thomas.. ..Bus. Adm. Fresh Jacksonville Duval 

Bi-uce, Hugh Ashley Bus. Adm. Soph Kelsey City PaJm Beach 

Brumbaugh, Carl Lowry _ Teach. Soph Gainesville Alachua 

Brunk, Lloyd Sandy Agri. Fresh Sebring Highlands 

Brunson, David Sinclair Bus. Adm. Fresh St. Petersburg Pinellas 

Bruton, James DeWitt, Jr Teach. Fresh Plant City Hiilsborough 

Bryant, Granville Robert Arts Soph Ft. Myers Lee 

Bryant, Sylvester Langley Nor. II Gainesville Alachua 

Bryan, Johnson Hamlin Law Spec Jacksonville Duval 

Bryan, Lemuel Campbell Bus. Adm. Fresh Jacksonville Duval 

Bryan, Pauline (Miss) _ Bus. Adm. Jr Gainesville Alachua 

Bryan, Roland William Law 3rd year Tampa _ Hillsborough 

Bryan, Thomas Barnes Engr. Fresh Greenwood _ Jackson 

Bryan, William Allan Law 1st year Jacksonville Duval 

Buchan, William Harton Engr. Soph Tallahassee _ Leon 

Buckley, John Albert Bus. Adm. Fresh St. Petersburg Pinellas 

Budd, Garland Moseley Law 3rd year Miami Dade 

Buell, Harry Clark ...._ Engr. Fresh St. Augustine St. Johns 

Buhner, William Ainsley Arts F'resh St. Petersburg Pinelllas 

Buie, George Archibald Law 1st year Lake City Columbia 

Bullard, William Jennings.. ..Bus. Adm. Fresh Gainesville Alachua 

Bulloch, William Jerrold Bus. Adm. Jr Monticello Jefferson 

Burch, Amos W Law 1st year Ocala Marion 

Burch, William George Law 1st year St. Petersburg „... Pinellas 

Burke, Charles Worth Bus. Adm. Soph Tampa Hillsborough 

Burke, William Henry Bus. Adm. Fresh Gainesville _ Alachua 

Burnett, Paul Cecil Arts Jr Tampa Hillsborough 

Burts, Wilbur F'rancis Bus. Adm. Soph Tarpon Springs Pinellas 

Busbee, Ethert Ambrose Arts Sr Brooksville Hernando 

Bushnell, William P Engr. Soph Dade City _ Pasco 

Butler, Byron Neal Arts Soph Chipley Washington 

Butler, Everett Hill Law 3rd year Miami Dade 

Butler, George Revis Arts Fresh. Live Oak Suwannee 

Butler, John Otis Arts Fresh. Leesburg _ Lake 

Butler, Mark Dupuy Arts Soph... Miami _ Dade 

Butterworth, Herbert S Agri. Fresh Macon Georgia 

Byrd, James Curtis Arts Fresh. Lakeland Polk 

Byrd, Oscar Engr. Sr Lakeland Polk 

Byrd, Samuel A Arts Soph Sanford Seminole 

Byrd, William Boarman Arts Fresh Hollywood Broward 

Cadman, Phillip Biddle Arts Jr DeLand Volusia 

Cain, Thomas Leonard Agri. Fresh Cocoa Brevard 

Caldwell, John Erwin Engr. Fresh Orange City Volusia 

Caldwell, William Earl Bus. Adm. Fresh Jacksonville _ Duval 

Calhoun, Paul Arts Fresh Perry Taylor 

Calhoun, Paul White Arts Fresh Madison _ Madison 

Callahan, Kermit W Bus. Adm. Jr Coral Gables Dade 

Cameron, Thomas W Agri. 1 year Jacksonville Duval 

Camp, Henry Nurney Law 1st year Ocala Marion 

Camp, John Berlin Graduate Okeechobee Okeechobee 

Camp, Norman Duke Agri. 2 year W. Palm Beach Palm Beach 

Campas, Joseph John Bus. Adm. Soph Ft. Meade Polk 

Campbell, Byron Fred Law 1st year Hilliard Nassau 

Campbell, John Alton Arts Fresh Seminole _ Pinellas 

Campbell, John Baxter Law 2nd year Quincy Gadsden 

Campbell, Monroe, Jr Arts Sr Pensacola Escambia 

Campbell, Olen Engr. Jr Tampa Hillsborough 

Campbell, Vernon George Arch. Fresh Tampa Hillsborough 

Campbell, William Bruce Teach. Fresh Tampa _ Hillsborough 

Canriella, Felix _ Pre-Med. 1st year Tampa Hillsborough 

Cannon, Frank T Law 1st year Falmouth _ Suwannee 

Cantey, Thomas William Arts Jr Quincy Gadsden 

Cargell, Robert Monroe Law 3rd year Gainesville Alachua 

Carithers, Wm. Anderson....Bus. Adm. Fresh Ft. Valley _ Georgia 

Carleton, William Graves Law 1st year Evansville _ Indiana 

Carlstein, Martin Golden Bus. Adm. Soph Tampa Hillsborough 

Carlton, Dan Bus. Adm. Spec Ft. Pierce St. Lucie 

Carlton. Thad Hudson Bus. Adm. Soph Ft. Pierce ...._ St. Lucie 

Carmichael, Parks Mason Engr. Fresh Monticello _ Jefferson 

Carraher, John Joseph Arts Fresh St. Petersburg Pinellas 

Carranza. Manuel Sama Pharm. Spec Tampa Hillsborough 

Carraway, Andrew McGilbrey Arts Fresh Sanford - Seminole 

Carri"-an, Richard Alfred Arts Jr Coral Gables Dade 

Carruthers, John McCullers Arts Fresh Ft. Meade Polk 



230 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

Name Class Postoffice County or State 

Carson. Russell Barrington..Bus. Adm. FVesh Orlando Orange 

Carswell, William Albert Arts Fresh Palatka _ Putnam 

Carter, George Lewis Law Spec Tampa „ Hillsborough 

Carter, Graham, Jr Arts Soph Chifeland Levy 

Carter, Raymond Andrews Engr. Fresh Miami _ Dade 

Cartwright, Leonard Carl Engr. Sr _... South Miami _ Dade 

Caruthers, Chas. Randolph....Bu8. Adm. Fresh Webster _ Sumter 

Gary, George A -.- Arts Fresh Pensacola ..„ Escambia 

Casebier, H. N Law 1st year Kathleen „ Polk 

Casey, Wilbur Joseph Teach. Soph. Plant City Hillsborough 

Cassady, Reginald Guy _ _ Bus. Adm. Jr Tavares ...._ Lake 

Cassells, William Lawson Engr. Soph. Plant City „ — Hillsborough 

Gate, Wilbur Seymour _ Pharm. Jr St. Augustine St. John* 

Causseaux, Stephen K Arts Soph Tallahasssee _ Leon 

Cawthon, John Russell Teach. Soph DeFuniak Sprgs _„_ Walton 

Cawthon, Joseph Ashley Bus. Adm. Jr Tallahassee Leon 

Cawthon, Rainey Blackwell Arts Fresh Tallahassee _ _ _ Leon 

Cellar, George Gray _ Arch. Fresh Jacksonville _ Duval 

Chace, Thomas Stephen _ _ Arts Jr. Tampa Hillsborough 

Chadwick. Ralph Willis Arts Fresh Punta Gorda _ Charlotte 

Chaires, Hal Martin Arts Fresh Oldtown Dixie 

Chambers, Harley P Teach. Soph Ocala _ _ __ Marion 

Chambliss, James Walker Law 1st year Tampa _ Hillsborough 

Chaplin, James B Bus. Adm. Sr Miami Dade 

Chapman, John Wilbur ...._ Arts Fresh Winter Garden __ Orange 

Chase, FVank Kneeland Arts Soph Lakeland Polk 

Chase, John Frank, Jr Bus. Adm. Fresh St. Petersburg Pinellaa 

Childs, Laurence D _....ArtB Jr St. Petersburg Pinellas 

Chilson, Lee Dahl _....Pre-Med. 1st year Bradenton _ Manatee 

Chipley, Edmund L _ Engr. Fresh Punta Gorda - Charlotte 

Chittenden, Simeon Dudley Engr. Jr Tallahassee Leon 

Christiancy, Cornelius Arts Fresh Daytona Beach _ Volusia 

Chryst, John M Arts Soph Orlando Orange 

Churchill, Franklin Davis Law 1st year Evansville _._ - Indiana 

Clark, C. L _ Arts Soph Blountatown _ Calhoun 

Clark, Frank Wellington Arts Fresh Indian River City ._ - Brevard 

Clark, Hadley G _ Bus. Adm. Fresh Miami Dade 

Clark, Monroe E Teach. Jr. Micanopy ...._ Alachua 

Clark, Perry Dudley Arts Fresh Jacksonville Duval 

Clark. William Winfred _ Engr. Sr. St. Augustine St. Johns 

Clarke, Alfred Wesley Law 3rd year Bee Ridge . — Sarasota 

Clark, William Richard, Jr Engr. Fresh Orlando Orange 

Clarkson, Theodore Washington.._Arts FVesh St. Petersburg Pinellas 

Cleary, William Raymond Engr. Sr Auburndale _ Polk 

Clayton, Archibald Lewis, Jr Engr. Jr Jacksonville ..._ - Duval 

Clayton, Erwin Americus Law 3rd year Gainesville ..._ Alachu* 

Cleare, Allan Bruce, Jr Law 1st year Key West _ Monroe 

Clemens, Justin H Agri. Spec. Plant City _ Hillsborough 

Cleveland, W. Augustine, Jr Law ' 1st year Jacksonville ..._ Duval 

Clevenger, Earl Clay Teach. Jr St. Cloud .._ _. Osceola 

Clevenger, Ray Allison Arts Fresh St. Cloud „_ Osceola 

Click, Gustavo Neri Pre-Med. 1st year Pensacola .„ „ Escambia 

Clifton, Henry Bertie Engr. Freeh DeLand Volusia 

Clifton, William Marvin Law 3rd year Palm Beach Palm Beach 

Clough, Charles Evans ...._ Arts Sr Jacksonvillo Duval 

Clyatt. Orlando S., Jr _ Law Srd year Lakeland ...._ Polk 

Clyatt, Sheldon Teach Sr Ft. Meade _.._ - Polk 

Cobb, John McDavid „ Agri. Soph Gainesville Alachua 

Cobb, Samuel Exum _ Arts Sr Gainesville „ Alachua 

Cockrell, Robert Spratt „ Arts Fresh Gainesville Alachua 

Cockrell, William _ Engr. Jr Gainesville Alachua 

Cogdill, John Lincoln _ Law Srd year Ft. Myers . Lee 

Cohen, Murray Golden _ Arts Jr Miami Dade 

Coleman, Bumis Theodore Arts Soph Hosford Liberty 

Coleman, Donald James Arts Jr Tampa Shores Hillsborough 

CoUany, Walter V Agri. 1 year St. Petersburg _ Pinellaa 

Collier, Erwin _ Engr. Soph Tampa Hillsborough 

Collier, Oliver B Arts Soph Tampa _ Hillsborough 

Collin, Frederic _ Engr. Soph Elmira New York 

Collins, Carlton, Jr _ Teach. Fresh Jacksonville Duval 

Collins, Cecil Farnez Bus. Adm. Soph Lake City Columbia 

Colllins, Edward John Teach. Fresh Pensacola Escambia 

Collins, Prank Leslie _ i. Arts Jr. Crystal Beach Pinella* 

Collins, Leo Vaster Bus. Adm. Soph. Lake City _ Columbia 

Colson, J. Grady Law 2nd year Gainesville Alachua 

Colvin, Henry Hoawrd ( Teach. Jr., ) Perry Taylor 

( Law 1st year j 



REGISTER 231 



Name Class Postoffice County or State 

Comer. Charles McCalla Bus. Adm. Fresh. Ft. Meade ...._ _ Polk 

Conduitte, Arthur Owen Bu3. Adm. Spec Tampa Hillsborough 

Cone, Edward Elbert Bus. Adm. Fresh Tampa Hillsborough 

Connolly, Allen Bernard _ Arts Fresh. Tarpon Springs Pinellas 

Connor, Henry „ Teach. Fresh Inverness _ Citrus 

Connor, Jerome Alton Arts. Soph Pensacola _ Escambia 

Connor, Warren William Arts Soph Pensacola Escambia 

Coosler, Monroe Alvin Law 1st year Brooksville Hernando 

Cook, A. F Graduate Edgewood Pannsylvania 

Cook, Fredrick Edward _ Arts Soph Ocala Marion 

Cook, LeRoy, Jr Agri. Fresh Miami _ Dade 

Cook, Thomas Albert Bus. Adm. Fresh Umatilla _ Lake 

Cooper, Benjamin Franklin. .Bus. Adm. Fresh Sharpes Brevard 

Cooper, J. Francis Graduate School Gainesville _ Alachua 

Cooper, Lawrence J., Jr Arts Freah Waycross Georgia 

Cooper, Samuel Luther Pre.-Med. 2nd year Little River Dade 

Cooperman, Leonard William Arts Fresh St. Petersburg Pinellas 

Copoland, Dewberry James... .Bus. Adm. Fresh Gainesville „ Alachua 

Copeland, Jasper Newton Teach. Spec Alachua Alachua 

Copeland, Gaylon Roy Bus. Adm. Fresh Melbourne _ Brevard 

Copening, Howard Pharm. Fresh Gainesville Alachua 

Corbett, Delovan Dempsey Arts Fresh St. Augustine _ St. Johns 

Corr, Alys Mae (Miss) Teach. Sr Gainesville _ _ Alachua 

Corser, Calvin George T«ach. Fresh Bagdad „Sants Rosa 

Cornwall, Robert E Bus. Adm. Soph Ormond Volusia 

Corwin, Sam. J Arch. Frssh Palmetto Manatee 

Cotton, Richard Ernest Bus. Adm. Soph Miami Dade 

Coulter, Clinton Charles Arts Fresh Orlando _ Orange 

CoTode, William Marshall Bus. Adm. FVe.sh Tampa _.... Hillsborough 

Covrart, V/alter James Bus. Adm. Soph. Sarasota _ Sarasota 

Cox, Allan B Bus. Adm. Fresh Hollywood _ Broward 

Cox, Arthur Slater Engr. Soph Palmetto Manatee 

Cox. Cecil Charles Arts Soph Jacksonville _ Duval 

Cox, James Bryant Teach. Sr Ft. Myers Lee 

Cox, John Charles Arch. Fresh Clearwater — _ Pinellas 

Cox, Leon Ross _ Temch. Jr Wausau Washington 

Cox, Mercer _ Arts Soph.- Wausau Washington 

Cox, Ray Donald Engr. Fresh Clermont Lake 

Cox, Walter Muse Teach. Fresh Cocoa Brevard 

Crabtree, Clyde _ .Teach. Fresh Haines City Polk 

Craig, Allan Thornton ..„ Arts Sr Dade City _ - Pasco 

Craig, Francis Whitcomb Arch. Soph DeLand Volusia 

Craig, James Conover Arts Fresh Jacksonville Duval 

Grain, Joseph Parrott Engr. Fresh So. Jacksonville Duval 

Cramer, Richard Byron Arts Fresh _ Jacksonville Duval 

Crane, Leslie Burdick .._ _ Engr. Fresh Lake Worth Palm Beach 

Crapps, Porter Claude _ Engr. Soph Gainesville _ - Alachua 

Crary, Lawrence Evans Law 3rd year Tampa Hillsborough 

Craven, Mark Quentin Arts Soph St. Petersburg Pinellas 

Crenshaw, Carlton C _ Engr. Sr. Jacksonville Duval 

Crevasse, James Holland Law 3rd year Lakeland - Polk 

Crews, Normand Cecil Bus. Adm. Soph Zolfo Springs ...._ - Hardee 

Crippen, Roy Edward „....Bus. Adm. Soph Jacksonville „ ^ „ 

Crisp, Ralph Lee Bus. Adm. Spec Davenport Polk 

Cristol, Nathan ...._ Pharm. Fresh Lake City _ Columbia 

Crom, Frank Russell _. Law 3rd year Gainesville -... Alachua 

Crown, Raymond Merchant Graduate Gainesville _ - Alachua 

Crozier, Charles Edward ._ Arts Jr Clermont ~ Lake 

Crum, Dana Swearingen Arts Senior Bartow Polk 

Crumpton, John Mabrey Arch. Soph Ocala - t?^"'',',''" 

Cryan, Howard Thomas ...._ Bus. Adm. Fresh _ St. Petersburg Pinel as 

Culpepper, John Broward Arts Soph _ Perry _....Taylor 

Cunningham, Paul Valletta Arts Soph New Smyrna Volusia 

Currie, Francis Angevine. Bus. Adm. Fresh W. Palm Beach Palm Beach 

Currie, Howard Fletcher Bus. Adm. Fresh DeFuniak Springs -Walton 

Curry, Edgar Hayden - Arts Soph Nakomis — - Sarasota 

Curry, Henry Franklin Engr. Fresh Bradcnton „ _ Manatee 

Curry, Richard Orion Engr. Soph St. Petersburg .Pinellas 

Curtis, Fred Arch. Fresh - Tampa _ Hillsborough 

Cushman, Donald S -.Bus. Adm. Soph -.St. Petersburg Pinellas 

Dahl, John Edgar Agri. Fresh „ Jacksonville - „.. Duval 

Daily, Victor Louis Bus. Adm. Fresh -..Clearwater ...._ — Pinellas 

Dale, Wayne Byron Arts Jr -....Franklin Pennsylvania 

D'Alemberte, Daniel W Bus. Adm. Soph Pensacola Escambia 

D-Alemberte, WiUoughby A.-Bus. Adm. Fresh Pensacola Escambia 

Dalton, H. W....- - Arts Fresh Ft. Meade ...Polk 

Daniel, Henry Lee —..Arts Fresh _ Gainesville - Alachua 

Daniel, William I _. ...Bus. Adm. Soph Clearwater _- -..-.Pinellas 



232 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



...-Engr. Fresh... 
.Pharm. Soph.. 
..Teach. Fresh... 
....Arch. Fresh.. 
...Law 1st year. 
..Law 2nd Yr.. 



Name Class 

Dansby, Bradley Lanier Pharm. Sr... 

Darby, Charles Arthur Arts Fresh... 

Darling, Donald P Bus. Adm. Fresh... 

Daughtrey, Cecil _ Teach. Fresh... 

Daugherty, Fred Ma* Bus. Adm. Soph.. 

Daugherty, Ralph Edgar Arts Fresh... 

Davidson, Charles Bouram Bus. Adm. Jr... 

Davidson, Earl Bus. Adm. Soph... 

Davidson. William Harper Engr. Jr... 

Davies, John Marshall Teach. Soph... 

Davis, Bobbie Charles Engr. Fresh... 

Davis, Carl - Agri. Fresh... 

Davis, Clyde Engr. Sr... 

Davis, Harold Gilbert Arts Soph... 

Davis, Joseph Israel Bus. Adm. Fresh... 

Davis, Leonard C Arts Fresh... 

Davis, Lynn R. M „ Arts Fresh... 

Davis, Thenton Lowell Engr. Jr... 

Davis, Thomas Smith Arts Fresh... 

Davis, William Maklon Law 1st year.. 

Dawson, Charles Ralph Agri. Spec... 

Dawson, Taylor Arts Fresh... 

Day, Donald Alphonzo Engr. Soph.. 

Day, James Westbay Law 3rd year.. 

Dayton, Orville Limbaugh Arts Fresh... 

Dean, Albert Clarke Engr. Jr.. 

Dean, Arnold Walker Arts Jr.. 

Dean, Francis Paul Engr. Sr... 

Dean, George Hamlet Agri. 2 year.. 

De Boer, Richard Harry Pharm. Soph.. 

Decker, William Marion Bus. Adm. Fresh.. 

Deem, Howard Raymond 

Deen, Albert Colcord 

DeGaetani, Francis Marion 

Degtoff, Valdimer Alexander.. 

DeHofF, Philip Donald 

DeHoff, William Joseph 

Dell, James Maxie Pre-Med. 2nd year.. 

DeMasters, Clarence Ulysses Agri. 1 year.. 

Denham, George Leitner Arts Jr... 

Denton, C. W., Jr Pre-Med. 1st year.. 

DeRousse, William Joseph Arts Fresh... 

Devineaux, Lawrence V Teach. Fresh... 

DeVore, William Elbert Bus. Adm. Fresh... 

Dewees, Carroll Fontaine Law 2nd year.. 

DeWitt, Marshall Manley Bus. Adm. Fresh... 

Dial, William Henry Arts Fresh... 

Dickey, Ralph Davis Agri. Sr... 

Dickson, John Harold Bus. Adm. Fresh... 

Dickson, Raleigh Eldon Bus. Adm. Soph... 

Dillon, John Robert, Jr Bus. Adm. Jr... 

Dinkins, Ambrose Bus. Adm. Fresh... 

Dinning, William L Arts Soph... 

Dishong, William Ward Arts Fresh... 

Dock, Samuel Arts Fresh... 

Dodge, William Henry Arts Fresh... 

Dodson. Charles Lewis Teach. Sr... 

Doggett, Frank Aristides Arts Fresh... 

Dohme, Charles Louis Jr Teach. FVesh... 

Donahoo, John William Arts Fresh... 

Dongo, Joseph Harry Bus. Adm. Fresh... 

Dopier, Richard F Bus. Adm. Fresh... 

Dopson, Clark William Agri. Soph... 

Dorsey, Richard Edward Arts Fresh... 

Doss, Luther Thomas Arts Jr... 

Doss, William Denver Law 3rd year.. 

Doty, Wiley T Bus. Adm. Fresh.. 

Doub, Thurman Engr. Soph.. 

Douglas, Barton Thrasher Arts Fresh... 

Douglass, Clark Palmer Bus. Adm. Soph... 

Douglass, George McKenzie..Bus. Adm. Fresh.. 

Dowdell, Samuel Hosmer Engr. Fresh... 

Dowling, Frank Butt Law 2nd year. 

Drake, Edward _ Arch. Soph.. 

Drake, Trusten Polk Agri. Jr.. 

Driggers, Albert Gilchrist Agri. Jr... 

Driggers, Clyde Littleton Engr. Soph... 

Drumm, Dale Leslie Bus. Adm. Spec... 



Postoffice 



County or State 



Reddick Marion 

Sitarke Bradford 

Lake Wales Polk 

Bradenton Manatee 

Jacksonville Duval 

Lakeland Polk 

Jacksonville Duval 

Sebring Highlands 

Tallahassee Leon 

Gainesville Alachua 

Tampa Hillsborough 

Bartow Polk 

Jacksonville Duval 

St. Petersbburg Pinellas 

Miami Dade 

Miami Dade 

Lake Helen Volusia 

Lakeland Polk 

Fernandina Nassau 

St. Petersburg Pinellas 

Gainesville Alachua 

Brooksville Hernando 

Miami Dade 

Gainesville Alachua 

Dade City Pasco 

Whitney Lake 

Whitney Lake 

Delray _ Palm Beach 

Tampa Hillsborough 

New Pt. Richie Pasco 

Jacksonville Duval 

Jacksonville Duval 

Watertown Columbia 

Tampa Hillsborough 

Miami Dade 

Jacksonville Duval 

Jacksonville Duval 

Gainesville Alachua 

Gainesville Alachua 

Bartow Polk 

Jacksonville Duval 

Ft. Meade Polk 

Homeland Polk 

Reddick Marion 

W. Palm Beach Palm Beach 

W. Palm Beach Palm Beach 

Gainesville Alachua 

Auburndale Polk 

St. Petersburg Pinellas 

Rutherford Tennessee 

Atlanta Georgia 

Dunnellon Marion 

Tampa Hillsborough 

Arcadia DeSoto 

Miami Dade 

Jacksonville Duval 

Gainesville Alachua 

Jacksonville Duval 

Atlantic Beach Duval 

Jacksonville Duval 

Key West Monroe 

Lake Wales Polk 

Lakeland Polk 

Miami Dade 

Hinson Gadsden 

Hinson Gadsden 

Valdosta _ Georgia 

Dade City Pasco 

Gainesville ~ Alachua 

Jacksonville : Duval 

Orlando Orange 

Wimauma Hillsborough 

Miami Dade 

Ocala _ Marion 

Ocala Marion 

Wauchula _ Hardee 

Leesburg Lake 

Gainesville Alachiia 



REGISTER 233 

Name Class Postoffice County or State 

Drydale, Richard Daniel Law Spec Jacksonville Duval 

Dubbin, Albert Samuel Arts Soph Miami Dade 

Dubler, Nathan Torrence Bus. Adm .Fresh Miami Dade 

Dubler, Sheldon _ Arts Soph Jacksonville Duval 

Dublier, Harold Law 3rd year Miami l»aue 

Duckwall, Lewis Lawrence Teach. I-resh Sarasota Sarasota 

Duckwall, William David Arts Soph Bradenton Manatee 

Duell, Glenn Joseph Bus. Adm. Soph Haines City Polk 

Dugger, Lonnie Lee Teach. Soph Macclenny Baker 

Duke, Stephen Marks Bus. Adm. Soph Gainesville Alachua 

Duncan, Forrest Banks Bus. Adm. Jr Tavares Lake 

Duncan, Lucius Aubrey Teach. Fresh Lake Butler Union 

DuPree, John LaFayette, Jr Arts Soph Miami DaJe 

Dunscombe, Aubrey Elsworth Agri. Soph Lynn Haven Bay 

Durham. Wallace Clarence Teach. Soph Bristol Liberty 

Durrance, Oscar L Teach. Jr Gainesville Alachua 

Dyer, Borden McLeod Law 2nd year W. Palm Beach Palm Beach 

Easton, William Harrison Engr. Jr Tampa Hillsborough 

Eberlein, Fred E Agri. Sr Gainesville Alachua 

Ebsen, Christian Ludolf Pre-Med. 1st year Orlando Orange 

Echols, Louis Samuel Teach. Fresh St. Petersburg Pinellas 

Eddy, Byron Lilius Law 1st year St. Petersburg Pinellas 

Edelstein, Marcus Law 1st year Gainesville Alachua 

Edelstein, William Engr. Sr Gainesville Alachua 

Edse, Walter Maltman Arts Fresh Melbourne Brevard 

Edsail, Robert Spencer Agri. Fresh Bradenton Manatee 

Edson, Cyrus Melvin Arts Fresh Ocala Marion 

Edwards, Carlos LeRoy Arts Soph Miami Dade 

Edwards, Henry Higdon Engr. Fresh Cleveland Charlotte 

Edwards, Julian Clifford Bus. Adm. Soph Pensacola Escambia 

Edwards, Terry Warren Law 1st year Lakeland _ Polk 

Eff, Samuel Teach. Soph St. Augustine St. Johns 

Elam, John Schlamp Engr. FVesh Bradenton Manatee 

Ellett, Claude Erwin Teach. Fresh Orlando _ Orange 

Ellis, Gordon B Agri. Jr. Callahan Nassau 

Ellis, Robert Naudaim Engr. Sr Jacksonville Duval 

Elms, Geortre Edward Bus. Adm. Fresh Jacksonville Duval 

Emerson, Francis Horton Arch. Soph. Gainesville Alachua 

EnEarl, Keith Whitm.an Bus. Adm. Soph Daytona Beach Volusia 

Engel, Monte Leon Bus. Adm. Soph W. Palm Beach Palm Beach 

English, Bernard Henry Law 1st year Lake City Columbia 

Entz, Noel Webster „ Arts Soph Leesburg Lake 

Enwall, Hayford Octavius Law 1st year Gainesville Alachua 

Erickson, Gustus Thomas Agri. Spec Gainesville Alachua 

Erwin, Arthur Garner Agri. Sr Tampa Hillsborough 

Ervin, Richard William Law 2nd year Tallahhassee Leon 

Eshleman, Silas Kendrick f Law 1st year ) Gainesville Alachua 

\ Graduate J 

Espinosa, William J Arch. Fresh. Tampa Hillsborough 

Estes, Edgar Stuart, Jr Arts Soph St. Augustine St. Johns 

Evers, Joel Arts Fresh. Mulberry Polk 

Everts, Wm. Hillebrand....Pre-Med. 2nd year Lake Worth Palm Beach 

Eyster, William Westley Pre-Med. 1st year Miami Dade 

Ezell, Franklin Badger Bus. Adm. Fresh Leesburg Lake 

Fabrega, Justo Jose Agri. Jr Panama City Republic of Panama 

Fagan, Heni-y L. Agri. Fresh Hardeetown Levy 

Fahrney, Byron W Teach. Spec Gainesville Alachua 

Fant, Julian Earle Law 2nd year Jacksonville Duval 

Farnsworth, Harold Charles Arts Soph.. Tampa Hillsborough 

Farrell, William Joseph Engr. Jr W. Palm Beach Palm Beach 

Farris, James Liddell Arts Fresh Jacksonville Duval 

Faucette, Robert Edward Bus. Adm. Spec Bristol Virginia 

Faulkner, John Barrett — .. Arts Fresh Ft. Myers Lee 

Featherstone, Leland Blane Arts Soph Miami Dade 

Felson, Martin Arts Soph Jacksonville Duval 

Ferguson, Chester Howard Law 1st year Wauchula Hardee 

Ferguson, James Alfred Arts Fresh St. Petersburg Pinellas 

Ferguson, Robert Henry Bus. Adm. Spec Wollaston Massachusetts 

Ferguson, Sidney Johnson Arts Fresh Gainesville - Alachua 

Ferguson, Stanley Hugh, Jr Law 1st year Wauchula _ Hardee 

Ferlita, Americo James Pre-Med. 1st year Tampa Hillsborough 

Ferlita, John S Arts Fresh Tampa Hilsborough 

Femald, Leon F _ Arts Jr Tarpon Springs Pinellas 

Fernald, William Irvin Teach. Soph Tarpon Springs Pinellas 

Ferrell, Collier Pennington Engr. Sr Lake Wales iV.V.Y^^- ^°^^ 

Ferris, Bemie Lee Engr. Jr. Tampa ...._ _ Hillsborough 



234 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

f^ame Class Postoffice County or State 

Feuer, Gus Bus. Adm. Fresh — Miami Dade 

Fields', Harold Thomas Bus. Adm. Jr Hollywood _ Broward 

Fifield, Willard M Agri. Fresh Bradenton _ Manatee 

Filson, Georpje Robert Arts Fresh Sarasota _ Sarasota 

Finneren, William Warrick, Jr Engr. Soph. Jacksonville Duval 

Finney, Glenn Douglas Agri. Fresh Elizabeth _ Pennsylvania 

Finney, Leo Peter Bus. Adm. Spec Jacksonville _ _ Duval 

Flore, Dante M Teach. Soph Gainesville Alachua 

Fiore,' Hannibal Massa Law Ist year Gainesville Alachua 

First, Milton Malcolm Teach. Fresh. St. Petersburg Pinellas 

Fisher, Augustus Alston Law 1st year Pensacola _ Escambia 

Fisher, Charles Elton Law 3rd year St. Petersburg Pinellas 

Fisher, Danny S Teach. Fresh Tampa Hillsborough 

Fisher, Eugene Vemadoe Arts Fresh Cross City _ _._ Di:xie 

Fisher, Gordon F Arts Fresh Crescent City Putnam 

Fisher, LeRoy Tilson Pharm. Fresh. Tampa _ Hillsborough 

Fisher, Robert Inman Pre-Med. 1st year Tampa _ Hillsborough 

Fisher, William, Jr Arts Soph. Pensacola _... Escambia 

Fishier, Heimey Teach. Soph Fernandina _ _ Nassau 

Fitzgerald, Harry Bus. Adm. Fresh Miami „ Dade 

Fltzsimmons, William J Teach. Fresh Jacksonville Duval 

Flaherty, James Loysius _... Arts Jr St. Augustine St. Johns 

Fleming, Richard Marion Arts Fresh. Pensacola _ Escambia 

Fletcher. Eliot Chapin Arch. Fresh Tampa Hillsborough 

Fletcher, Fred. Wartman, Jr Law 3rd year GainesTille Alachua 

Fletcher, Ward Thomas ...._ Teach. Soph Juniper _ Gadsden 

Flood, William Edward Graduate W. Palm Beach Palm Beach 

Flournoy, John Thomas Teach. Fresh DeFuniak Springs Walton 

Flournoy, William Walton Teach. Sr DeFuniak Springs Walton 

Flowers, Marshall Karnegy Teach. Fresh Gainesville Alachua 

Floyd, Frank Wise Bus. Adm. Fresh. Jacksonville Duval 

Folsom, Dan Pouncey - Teach. Jr Wauchula Hardee 

Fonda, Lyman David Graduate Gainesville Alachua 

Ford, Joseph Scott Engr. Fresh. Dania Broward 

Ford, Raymond Edmund Arts Soph Ft. Pierce St. Lucie 

Ford, Theodore Leo Law 3rd year Bradenton Manatee 

Fordham, Malcolm LaMar Bus. Adm. Jr Bradenton Manatee 

Foster, Eleazar Kingsbury Arts Soph Jacksonville _ Duval 

Foster, George Adair Arts Fresh DeFHiniak Springs Walton 

Foster, Ira Jackson Arts Fresh Madison _. Madison 

Fox, John Willis Bus Adm. Soph Crystal River Citrus 

Foy, William Edward Pre-Med. 1st year St. Augustine St. Johns 

Fralick, Clayton Harold Law 2nd year Winter Park _ Orange 

Frank, David Law 1st year Miami Dade 

Frank, Laurence Kellar Arts Soph. Miami Dade 

Fraser, D. H Law 3rd year Hinesville Georgia 

Fraser, Louis Julian Agri. Soph New Port Richey Pasco 

Frater, Henry Bus. Adm. Jr Sherman Okeechobee 

FVaze, Richard Hetsler Bus. Adm. Soph St. Petersburg Pinellas 

Frazee, Andrew Bradford Teach. "Fresh Lake City Columbia 

Frazier, Herbert Bus. Adm. Soph Mulberry _ Polk 

Frecker, William Hubert Arts Fresh Tampa Hillsborough 

Frederick, Albert Roland Arts Soph Jacksonville „ Duval 

Fredericksen, Chas. Willard.. Bus. Adm. Fresh. Rockford Illinois 

French, John Compton Arts Soph Tampa Hillsborough 

Fresh, Jesse Logan Teach. Soph Lakeland Polk 

FVichs, Richard William Arts Fresh Homestead _ Dade 

Fudger, William Bert Law 2nd year Jacksonville Duval 

Fueyo, Elio Engr. Fresh Tampa Hillsborough 

Fuller, Herbert Francis Arts Soph St. Augustine St. Johns 

Fuller, Russell Louis Arts Soph Winter Park Orange 

Fuller, Thomas Engr. Soph Clearwater _ Pinellas 

Furman, Abraham Gordon... Bus. Adm. Fresh Jacksonville Duval 

Fussell, David Donald Bus. Adm. Fresh Webster _ Sumter 

Gamble, William David Bus. Adm. Sr Miami Dade 

Gardner, James L Bus. Adm. Fresh Sarasota - Sarasota 

Gardner, Milton Cook, Jr Law 1st year Camilla - Georgia 

Garner, James Franklin, Jr Law 1st year Ft. Myers Lee 

Garrard, Gerald Arts Soph Bradenton _ Manatee 

Garrett, Lee Lawrence Engr. Soph Orlando Orange 

Garrison, Hubert Fryer Engr. Fresh Moultrie - St. Johns 

Gary, Wilbur Yocum Arts Fresh Ocala Marion 

Gary, Tom Porter Arts Fresh Brooksville Hernando 

Gay, Arthur Bartley Arts Soph Brooklyn New York 

Geeslin, Louis E., Jr Bus. Adm. Fresh Orlando Orange 

Gelston, John Hubert Agri. Sr Gainesville — Alachua 

Gex, Lucien Marion Lavr Ist year Bay St. Louis Mississippi 



REGISTER 235 

Name Class Postofjice County or State 

Gibbons, Arthur ..._ Arts Fresh Tampa Hillsborough 

Gibbons, Gordon Lorraine Law 2nd year Tampa Hillsboroujfh 

Gibson, H. B Bus. Adm. Soph Jupiter Palm Beach 

Gibson, James D _ Bus. Adm. Fresh St. Petersburg Pinellas 

Gibson, Herbert Tuttle ...._ Law 1st year W. Palm Beach Palm Beach 

Gibson, Walter Terry Law Spec W. Palm Beach Palm Beach 

Gillon, William Russell Normal II Mayo _ Dixie 

Girard, Hubert Henry Engr. Fresh Gainesville Alachua 

Givens, John Jasper Arts Soph Key West Monroe 

Glass, Nelson Sanford Bus. Adm. Soph Winter Park Orange 

Glass, Robert Herman Engr. Soph Winter Park Orange 

Godfrey, James Edwin Teach. Fresh Orlando Orantrc 

Godwin, Aubert Leland Engr. Soph Bonifay Holmes 

Goldsby, Joe Cecil Engr. Soph Dade City Pasco 

Goldstein, Mark Jean _ Arts Soph Jacksonville _ Duval 

Goldy, Irving Pharm. Fresh Tampa Hillsborough 

Gomez, Joseph Maria Law 2nd year Tampa „ Hillsborough 

Gonzalez, Manuel F Arts Soph Pensacola Escambia 

Goodbread, James T Normal II Lake City Columbia 

Goodbread, Royce Ethelbert ....Teach. Fresh St. Petersburg „ Pinellas 

Goode, William Guerry Pre-Med. 2nd year St. Augustine St. Johns 

Gordon, Allan Fred Pre-Med. 1st year High Springs Alachua 

Goss, Russell Alexander Arts Fresh Tampa Hillsborough 

Goss. Wilton Earle Engr. Fresh Tampa Hillsborough 

Graff. Joseph Wilsford Engr. Sr Coral Gables Dade 

Graham, Dillon Lorentus Arts Soph Lakeland Polk. 

Gi-aham, George B Law 2nd year Tampa Hillsborough 

Graham, John Louis Law 1st year. Arts Jr Florida City Dade 

Graham, Shelby Liles Arts Fresh Tampa Hillsborough 

Graham, William Carl Arts Soph Howey _ Lake 

Gramling, Charlie Arenis Bus. Adm. Fresh Marianna Jackson 

Gramling, William Sanders Law 1st year Miami Dade 

Grandoff, John Bertrum...._Bus. Adm. FVesh Tampa Hillsborough 

Granger, Stanley _. Law 1st year Miami Dade 

Granich, Fred N .Teach. Soph Brooklyn _ New York 

Grant, Ben Joseph Arts Fresh. Jacksonville Duval 

Grant, James Wesley Bus. Adm. Fresh Tampa Hillsborough 

Gratigny, Jerome Albert Arts Jr Miami Dade 

Gravely, Louis O., Jr Engr. Soph Ft. Myers _ Lee 

Graves, John Calvin _ Agri. Soph Tampa Hillsborough 

Graves, J. R Bus. Adm. Soph Quincy _ Gadsden 

Graves, Robert Wilhoite Arts Fresh Quincy Gadsden 

Gray, John Graduate Gainesville Alachua 

Gray, Lafayette William Law 3rd year Gainesville _ Alachua 

Grazier, Joseph Albert Law 2nd year St. Petersburg Pinellas 

Green, Arthur Sylvester Teach. Jr Perry Taylor 

Green, Benjamin Ernest Bus. Adm. Fresh Tampa _ Hillsborough 

Green, Carl Rodger Law 1st year St. Petersburg Pinellas 

Green, George Marvin Law 1st year Tampa Hillsborough 

Green, Harry Arts Soph St. Petersburg Pinellas 

Green, William Clinton Arts Fresh W. Palm Beach Palm Beach 

Green, Wilson Payne _ Arts Fresh Reddick Marion 

Green, Harry Sumpter Arts Fresh Gainesville Alachua 

Greene, Jesse L _ Teach. Fresh Ft. Myers Lee 

Greene, Lorin Arthur Arts Soph Gainesville ...._ Alachua 

Greene, Tom Underwood Teach. Sr Gainesville ...._ Alachua 

Greer, William Boyd Arts Fresh Quincy Gadsden 

Gregory, Louis Carl Bus. Adm. Fresh Havana Gadsden 

Greiffenberg, Roger Ayers Arts Fresh Tampa - Hillsborough 

Crenelle, Edward William Arts Jr Clearwater Pinellas 

Gressitt, Samuel H Teach. Spec Gainesville ...._ - Alachua 

Griffin, Edward Chelsea Engr. Fresh Manatee _ Manatee 

Griggs, Hubert E _ Arts Soph Rockledge 5F^\, 

Gross, Arthur Houston Bus. Adm. Jr Clearwater -.... Pinellas 

Grout, Edwin Morse Engr. Fresh Jacksonville ...._ ^.^^Y**' 

Grovenstein. Sidney Angus Arts Fresh St. Petersburg Pinellas 

Guard, Carl Jackson _ Engr. Fresh Miami Dade 

Guessaz, Louis Alexander Teach. Soph.. Dade City ...._ „V*^° 

Guirkin, Charles Henry Arts Fresh Melbourne -^.... Volusia 

Gunter, Frederick Louis Arts Freeh W. Palm Beach Palm Beach 

Gurganious, Allen P Pre-Med. 2nd year Lacoochee -■•■■ Pasco 

Guy. Hubert Graham Agri. Jr St. Augustine bt Johns 

Guyton, Charles Moses Law 1st year Marianna Jackson 

Haggart, Kenneth Greig Bus. Adm. Jr Coral Gables ■ • • • Dade 

Hagan, Robert Lester Arts Soph Sanford 0!^°^'"° ! 

Hale, Bernard Hitchings Engr. Fresh Fellsmere ....- t>t. l.ucie 

Hall, Charles Reade, Jr Arts Fresh Mobile - Alabama 



236 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



Name Class 

Hall, David Collin Arts Jr. 

Hall, Jay Long Bus. Adm. Soph 

Hall, John Lewis Teach, Sr 

Hall, Lucien Denner Bus. Adm. Soph 

Hall, Malcolm Jackson Law 1st year 

Hall, Whiting Arts Fresh 

Hamilton, George Creary Pharm. Soph 

Hammer, Harold Edwin Graduate 

Hamner, B. Lathan, Jr Bus. Adm. Fresh. 

Hampton, William Frank. ...Pre-Med. 1st year 

Hamrick, William Jared Arts Fresh 

Hancock, Coy Jackson Bus. Adm. Soph 

Hancock, Kenneth Milton Bus. Adm. Soph. 

Hancy, S. Foster Teach. Soph 

Hankins, James Garland Engr. Fresh. 

Hannum, F'rank William, Jr Arts Fresh 

Hardeman, Dorsey Brodie Law 1st year 

Hardin, Charley Clawson Arts Fresh 

Hardy, Albert L Teach. Sr 

Harkness, Robert John Bus. Adm. Fresh 

Harllee, John Polk, Jr Arts Fresh 

Harper, Clements Latimer Arts Fresh 

Harper, Gerald Taylor Arts Soph. 

Harrington, Lawrence Tracy Teach. Jr. 

Harris, Clyde Edison Arts Soph 

Harris, Clyde Seymour Teach. Soph 

Harris, DeLa Fletcher, Jr Teach. Fresh 

Harris, Ed William Law 3rd year 

Harris, Frank Pierce Law 1st year 

Harris, John Francis Arts FVesh 

Harris, Richard Kendrick....Bus. Adm. FVesh 

Harris, William Curry Law 1st year 

Harrison, Charles E Pre-Med. 1st year 

Harrison, Clyde Pharm. Fresh 

Harrison, George Lester Pharm. Soph 

Harrison, George Max Teach. Fresh 

Harrison, Louis Stanley Arts Fresh 

Harrison, Micajah Berry Arts Soph 

Harrison, Thomas Wade Law 1st year 

Harrod, Merlin Frederick Engr. Sr. 

Harry, John McDowell Arts. Sr. 

Hart, Kermit Thomas Bus. Adm. Sr 

Hart, Robert Winston Engr. Fresh 

Karter, Addison Jacob Bus. Adm. Fresh 

Hartley, Charles Edward Arts Fresh 

Hartley, Raymond Winfield Arts FVesh 

Hartsfield, Keith McRoy Engr. Soph 

Harvey, Bernard Scott Arts Fresh 

Harvey, Norman Cormstock Engr. Fresh 

Harwood, John Henry Teach. Soph. 

Haskell, Harold Notman Agri. Sr 

Hatfield, Cortland Mueller Arts Fresh 

Hawkins, Durward E Arts Fresh 

Hawkins, Ellis Stephen Agri. Fresh 

Hawkins, George Alma Teach. Soph 

Hawkins, William Jr Arts Sr 

Haworth, Oscar Stuart Bus. Adm. Soph 

Hayman, Lee Whitford Bus. Adm. Fresh 

Haynes, John Milner Teach. Soph 

Hays, Homer Lavoizier Arts Fresh 

Head, Francis B Engr. Fresh. 

Hcarn, John Melven Law 2nd year 

Hcarn, Vernice Law Arts Fresh. 

Hefty, Caspar, Jr _ Teach. Fresh 

Helseth, Will John Engr. Jr. 

Helvenston, George Rudolph Arts Jr 

Hemphill, John DePass Engr. Jr 

Hemphill, William Albert Agri. Sr 

Henderley, Karl Daniel Engr. Jr 

Henderson, H. H Teach. Fresh 

Henderson, L. N Teach. Fresh 

Henderson, Roscoe Bush Pharm. Jr 

Hendricks, Benjamin Edgar Law 2nd year 

Hendricks, William Gillman . .Bus. Adm. Fresh 

Hendrix, Julian David Pre-Med. 1st year 

Hendry, Henry Asberry Law 1st year 

Hendry, John Burton Engr. Sr 

Henkel, Miller S Arch. Fresh 

Henry, Clarence Raymer Arts Fresh 



Postoffice County or State 

Bradenton Manatee 

Pensacola Escambia 

Woodville _ Leon 

St. Petersburg Pinellas 

Tampa Hillsborough 

Tampa Hillsborough 

Ft. Lauderdale Broward 

Miami Dade 

Tampa Hillsborough 

Gainesville Alachua 

Aucilla Jefferson 

Palatka Putnam 

Casco Maine 

Clearwater Pinellas 

Kissimmee Osceola 

Eustis Lake 

Gainesville Alachua 

Lakeland Polk 

Vernon Washington 

Tampa Hillsborough 

Palmetto Manatee 

Perry Taylor 

Perry Taylor 

Jacksonville Duval 

Lake Worth Palm Beach 

Kissimmee Osceola 

Sanford N. Carolina 

...St. Petersburg Pinellas 

Ft. Myers Lee 

San Bias Bay 

W. Palm Beach Palm Beach 

Key West Monroe 

Jacksonville Duval 

Bushnell Sumter 

Anthony Marion 

Plant City Hillsborough 

Tampa Hillsborough 

Palmetto Manatee 

Palmetto Manatee 

Orlando Orange 

Pompano Broward 

Tampa Hillsborough 

Key West Monroe 

Wescopeck Pennsylvania 

St. Cloud Osceola 

Boynton Palm Beach 

Ft. Myers Lee 

Crystal River _ Citrus 

Miami Dade 

Tampa Hillsborough 

Gainesville Alachua 

Ft. Pierce St. Lucie 

Tampa Hillsborough 

Plant City Hillsborough 

Bay Harbor Bay 

Gainesville Alachua 

Lakeland Polk 

St. Petersburg Pinellas 

Crystal River Citrus 

Perry Taylor 

Tallahassee Leon 

Miami Dade 

Miami Dade 

Miami Dade 

Vero Beach _ St. Lucie 

Jacksonville Duval 

Dunnellon Marion 

Tampa Hillsborough 

Ocala Marion 

Little River _ Dade 

Baker Okaloosa 

Elfers Pasco 

Miami Dade 

Pensacola Escambia 

Pensacola Escambia 

Tampa Hillsborough 

Arcadia DeSoto 

Winter Park Orange 

F^. Lauderdale „ Broward 



REGISTER 



237 



Name 



Class 



Postofjice 



County or State 



Henry, David W. Jr Arts FVesh... 

Henry, Mercer Jackson Arts Fresh... 

Henry, Mervin James Bus. Adm. Soph... 

Hensley, Robert Burns Teach. Soph... 

Hentz, James I _ Bus. Adm. Fresh... 

Herlong, Albert Sidney Arts Soph... 

Herlong, V. J _ Arts Fresh... 

Herlong, William Frederick....Bus. Adm. Fresh... 

Herrick, Rowland Joseph Engr. Sr... 

Hester, Jackson Boling Graduate.. 

Heusted, Wellington Victor Engr. Sr... 

Hewitt, Oliver William _ Teach. Sr... 

Heymann, Andrew Phillip Engr. Fresh... 

Hickenlooper, Irby James Engr. Fresh. .. 

Hicks, Henry Leon Pharm. Fresh... 

Hicks, William Trotter Bus. Adm. Jr... 

Hiers, Bryant D.. Jr Arts Soph... 

Hill, Arthur Mayfield, Jr Agri. Fresh... 

Hill, Robert Stevenson Bus. Adm. Fresh... 

Hill, William Logan Law 1st year.. 

Hills, Alfred Eniest, Jr Engr. Soph... 

Hingson, Harry Lucius Arts Soph... 

Hitchcock, William Stanley Law 2nd year.. 

Hobbs, John Dixon Bus. Adm. Fresh. . 

Hobbs, William Franklin Law 2nd year.. 

Hodges, Herbert Lloyd Engr. Fresh... 

Hodges, Robert Leo Law 3rd year. 

Hoffman, Jesse Max Arts Fresh... 

Hogan, Cecil Malcom Arts Soph... 

Hollingsworth, Jesse LaMar Arts Soph.. 

Holman, Leslie DaCosta Bus. Adm. Soph... 

Holsberry, John Edwin Law 1st year- 
Holt, John Robert Bus. Adm. Sr. . 

Hooks, Hugh Kaigler, Jr Arts Fresh... 

Hooper, Edward Wellington Engr. Soph... 

Hooten, Jean W Pharm. Spec... 

Horrell, James Gordon Teach. Fresh... 

Horrell, Merton Stuart Law 2nd year.. 

Horrell, Robert Paul Arts Soph... 

Hosford, Buford Munroe Arts Soph.. 

Hotchkiss, Howard Elmer Engr. Fresh... 

Hough, Nelson Morrison Bus. Adm. Soph... 

Houk, Dean Charles Arts Jr... 

House, Ono L Teach. Sr... 

Householder, Bayless Guffy Arts Fresh... 

Houser, Mike Samuel Teach. Fresh... 

Houston, Arnold Easton Engr. Fresh... 

Houston, Harry Orland Bus. Adm. Soph... 

Howard, Julian Durham Bus. Adm. FVesh... 

Howard, Raymond Holt Agri. Jr... 

Howe, Gains Winchester Teach. Jr... 

Howell. Lauriston Van Lieu Engr. Spec... 

Howze, Thomas Alton Arts Soph... 

Hubbard, Thomas Brewer Law 1st year.. 

Huddleston, George Adam Arts Fresh... 

Hucldleston, John Fleming, Jr Engr. Jr... 

Hudson, Earl J Arts Fresh... 

Hudson, Henry E Teach. Sr... 

Hudson, Jewell Hicks Arts Fresh... 

Huff, Lloyd Owen Engr. Spec... 

Huffman, Samuel Houston Teach. Sr... 

Hugbes, Dan, Jr Agri. Fresh... 

Hughes, Robert Bassett Engr. Soph... 

Hughes, Robert L., Jr Law 1st year.. 

Hunnicutt, Milton Reese Bus. Adm. Jr... 

Hurlebaus, Kenneth Davis Agri. Soph... 

Hursey, Frank Hampton, Jr Law 3rd year.. 

Hurst, Huber Christian Law 3rd year.. 

Igou, Hugh McEwen Teach. Soph... 

Ihrig, Chester Alva Teach. Fresh. . 

Ikrig, Elmer Wood Arch. Soph... 

Tnglis, Clifford Thomas Law 3rd year.. 

Inman, Rudolph Joe Law 1st year.. 

Irish, James Potter Arts Soph... 

Ives, Halbert Strawn _....Arts Soph... 

Ives, Selwyn Callaway Arts Fresh... 

Ivey, FVancis Marion „ Agri. Freeh... 

Izor, Herschel Prince Bus. Adm. Soph. 



..Live Oak Suwannee 

-Orlando Orange 

..Gainesville . — _ Alachua 

Tampa Hillsborough 

..Blountstown Calhoun 

-.Leesburg Lake 

.Micanopy _ Alachua 

..Leesburg Lake 

W. Palm Beach....- Palm Beach 

..Easley „ S. Carolina 

..Sarasota Sarasota 

St. Petersburg Pinellas 

..Orlando .Orange 

Palatka Putnam 

..Orlando „ Orange 

..Pensacola „ Escambia 

..Gainesville Alachua 

Vero Beach Indian River 

..Cocoa Brevard 

.-Gainesville Alachua 

-Winter Haven Polk 

..Live Oak Suwannee 

..Ellenton _ Manatee 

..Tampa Hillsborough 

-Tampa Hillsborough 

-St. Augustine _ St. Johns 

..Orlando Orange 

-Miami „ Dade 

..Brandon Hillsborough 

..Arcadia DeSoto 

Bradenton Manatee 

Peneacola Escambia 

-Aurora Illinois 

-Lakeland Polk 

-Hernando Citrus 

Busnnell _ Sumter 

Gainesville Alachua 

Gainesville Alachua 

Gainesville Alachua 

..Miami Dade 

Lake Worth Palm Beach 

Ft. Myers Lee 

..St. Petersburg Pinellas 

.White Springs _ Columbia 

..Gainesville _ Alachua 

..Jacksonville Duval 

..Winter Park Orange 

..Miami Dade 

Orlando _ Orange 

Gainesville Alachua 

Burlington Vermont 

Gainesville _ Alachua 

Palmetto Manatee 

Lakeland Polk 

Sanford Seminole 

..Sanford Seminole 

Chiefland Levy 

Jay Santa Rosa 

..Jay _ Santa Rosa 

..Miami Dade 

..Cleveland Charlotte 

Ponce De Leon Holmes 

..Miami ^ Dade 

.Bartow „ Polk 

Ocala Marion 

Clearwater Pinellas 

Lakeland Polk 

Gainesville Alachua 



Lake 

Ft. Myers Lee 

Ft. Myers Lee 

. DeLand - Volusia 

..Lake City Columbia 

..Tampa Hillsborough 

Lake City ...._ Columbia 

..Lake City Columbia 

..Ft. Meade Polk 

..Miami Dade 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



Nmme Class 

Jackley. Arthur Randall Arts Sr... 

Jackson, Samuel Jr. _ .Teach. Freeh... 

Jackaon, Walter Herbert _Bu3. Adm. Jr... 

Jaokgon, William Thomas _ Arts Soph... 

Jacabs, David B. Bus. Adm. Fresh... 

Jacobus, Robert Carey JEngr. Soph... 

Janea, Chester Howell Engr. Soph... 

Janes, Francia G., Jr. Law 3rd year.. 

Jacques, Will Raymond ._ Agri. Fresh... 

Jaudon, Mayson JEngr. Fresh... 

Jei'ferson, Wayne Otto _Engr. Fresh- 
Jenkins, Jet McLauren — _ Engr. Jr... 

Jennings, Charles Watson Arts Fresh... 

Jernigan, Claude Hagen Teach. Fresh... 

Jobe, Wilbur Donald Law 2nd year.. 

Johansen, Beppo Rolff Arts Fresh... 

Johnson, Albert Morse _ Engr. Fresh... 

Johnson, Arrie Lee _ Arts Soph... 

Johnson, Calvin Morris Arts Soph... 

Johnsen, Frank Newton Bus. Adm. Fresh... 

Johnson, G. F Bus. Adm. Soph... 

Johnson, Dewey Macon _.Bus. Adm. Soph... 

Johnson, Howard Bradley — Agri. Soph... 

Johnson, J. Malcolm, Jr _ Law 2nd year. 

Johnson, James Marshall, Jr„ Law 1st year.. 

Johnson, Joseph Pickett Arts Jr... 

Johnson, Minton Hollingsworth Teach. Jr... 

Johnson, Nathan Arts Freeh... 

Johnson, Paul Colquitt _ Arts Soph... 

Johnson, Robert Milton Engr. Spec... 

Johnson, Theodore Somers __Engr. Sr... 

Johnson, Thomas Preston _.Bus. Adm. Fresh... 

Johnson, William H._ ^.Jlngr. Jr... 

Johnson, William Munsom Engr. Fresh... 

Johnston, Maynard _ _ Engr. Jr... 

Johnston, Nathan Jordan Arts Sr... 



Postofjice 



County or State 



..Auburndale .... 
.Winter Haven 

..DeLand 

..Gainesville 

-Daytona 



Polk 

Polk 

Volusia 

Alachua 

.Volusia 



Johnwick, Edgar Bernard.. 

Jones, Abram Tillman 

Jones, Erwin Beck _ 

Jones, George Dyson _ 

Jones, John Kenneth 

Jones, Loren Floyd 

Jones, Reginald M. 



Arts Fresh... 

.._ Engr. Soph.. 

Arts Fresh... 

.._ Engr. Fresh... 

Pre-Med. 1st year.: 
.Pre-Med. 1st year. 
.Agri. Jr... 



Jones, William Ellis Engr. FVesh.. 

Jones, William Eugene Teach. Fresh.. 

Jordan, Birkett Fry Law 2nd year. 

Jordan, Darrell Bums ..._ Arts Fiesh.. 

Jordan, Edward Bryant Arts Fresh... 



Jordan, Hari-y Lee 

Jordan, Mark Bartley 

Jordan. William Douglas. 

Josey, M. Elroy 

Judge, William W 

July, Jackson Knight 

Julian, Ronald Arthur 

Jun, Erwin Thomas 



_Agri. Fresh.. 

Arts Fresh... 

Law 1st year. 

Law 1st year. 

Law 1st year. 

..Bus. Adm. Soph.. 

Law 2nd year. 

.Bus. Adm. Fresh. 



..St. Petersburg Pinellas 

..Wauchula _ Hardee 

..Wauchula „ _ Hardee 

..Miami Dade 

..Elberton „ _ Georgia 

-.Pensacola _ Escambia 

..Green Cove Springs...- _ Clay 

..St. Petersburg _ Pinellas 

..Monticello Jefferson 

..Beaver Falls _ Pennsylvania 

..Clearwater Pinellas 

..Orlando Orange 

..Jay Santa Rosa 

..Plymouth _ Oran.ge 

..Hawthorne _ Alachua 

..Stuart Martin 

..Gretna ..._ _ Gadsden 

-.Windermere _ _ Orange 

..Monticello _ Jefferson 

..Orlando Orange 

..Gainesville „ Alachua 

..Gainesville Alachua 

..White Springs _ ^Hamilton 

..Tarpon Springs Pinellas 

.JHardeetown Levy 

..Windermere _ _ _ Orange 

..St. Petersburg Pinellas 

..Tampa Hillsborough 

..Key West Monroe 

...Miami ^ Dade 

..Gainesville Alachua 

. .Sarasota Sarasota 

..Miami Dade 

-Daytona Beach _ _ Volusia 

.Orlando _... Orange 

..St. Petersburg Pinellas 

..St. Petersburg _ Pinellas 

..Lake Wales _ Polk 

..DeFuniak Springs Walton 

..St. Petersburg _ Pinellas 

..Gainesville Alachua 

..St. Petersburg Pinellas 

..Live Oak Suwannee 

..Boynton _ Palm Beach 

..Gainesville Alachua 

..New Smyrna _ - Volusia 

West Palm Beach Palm Beach 

-Daj^ona Beach _ Volusia 

Jacksonville _ Duval 

..Lakeland Polk 

..Vero Beach Indian River 



Kanner, Aaron Mitchell Law 3rd year. 

Kaplin, Harry Maurice Arts Soph... 

Keck, James Gaylord Engr. Sr... 

Keel, Wilfred Leonai-d Engr. Spec... 

Keezel, James Edward _ Arts Soph... 

Keezel. Joseph Otto Arts Jr. 

Kehler, John Wesley _Bus. Adm. Fresh. . 

Kelbert, David Gustaf Alfred -A.gri. Spec. . 

Kelley, Ausley Calvin Teach. Soph... 

Kelley, James Keels ..._ Arts Fresh.. 

Kelley, Roland Robert Arts S«ph... 

Kelley, Sumter Martin Law 1st year.. 

Kelley, William Joseph Engr. Jr... 

Kelly, Daniel Anthony, Jr.....Bus. Adm. Fresh. 

Kelly. John R _ _Engr. Freah... 

Kendnck, Hilary Herbert Arts Soph.. 

Kennedy, Robert Holloway „ J^rts Freeh 

Kennedy, Roger Arch. Fresh.. 

Kennedy, W. P .Teach. Fresh... 

Kent, Norman Taylor Arts Fresh... 

Keaiyon, Amil John Arts Fresh... 

Kerr, Jimmie Wright Arts Jr... 



Orlando 

..Mian*i 

.Gainesville 

Jacksonville 

Winter Park „.. 

Winter Park .... 

St. Petersburg 



..Orange 

Dade 

.Alachua 

Duval 

...Orange 
..Oran.ge 
.Pinellas 



..Gainesville _ Alachua 

..Thomasville _ _ Georgia 

.Inverness _ .Citrus 

Ft. Lauderdale _ Broward 

..Bradenton „ _ Manatee 

..Ft. Lauderdale — _ Broward 

..Fernandina Nassau 

..Archer _ Alachua 

..Georgianna Alabama 

..Sarasota Sarasota 

..Jacksonville _ Duval 

. Quincy Gadsden 

..Tampa _ _ Hillsborough 

..Jacksonville _ Duval 

..Crystal Beach „ Pinellas 



REGISTER 



^'arne Class Postoffice County or State 

Kilrntr James Delos _ _. Arts Fresh LaBelle _ .Hendry 

Iv. John Robert ...„ - Arts Fresh Ft. Lauderdale Broward 

KiJrce, Steiner Clive Agri. Soph Baker Okaloo»a 

Kilam, John Grant _ _....Arts Fresh St. Augustine _ St. Johns 

Ki,. -, Bertram Carlyle Engr. Soph Jt. Myers -Lee 

K'uv, Charles Bryan Engr. Fresh Grandridge JacKB^n 

Kii.u'ofe, John M. ._ Law 3rd year Camden Ohio 

Ki My Kay Davis Bus. Adm. Soph Mt. Dora Lake 

Kiri.y' William Gilchrist Bus. Adm. Soph Mt. Dora -^^ 

I.inhner, Clarence George Teach. Fresh _ St. Petersburg J»inellas 

Klein Joseph A Bus. Adm. Soph..._ Bradenton Manatee 

Kiikpatrick, George Grier Engr. Spec Gainesville .Alachua 

Kniuht, Hollis Vaughn Law 3rd year StaAe Bradford 

Kiii' ht. Louis LaFontaisee Arch. Soph Ocala . .JVIarion 

ICii ht, Tom Dewey _ Arts Soph Tampa JiiUsborough 

K: wies, Norman Whitfield Arts Fresh Winter Park P/^?^^ 

Ki.oules, Robert Samuel Teach. Sr „Gainesville t.1?"E* 

).<i!l^e, Harold Henry _.. Law 1st year Waukegan IlhlJ^ 

Kotkin Max Arts Soph Coconut Grove Dade 

Kriue,' Orvilie Albert ...._ Arts Soph Miami "^T-^Sf* 

Rummer, John Frederick ._ Engr. Fresh St. Petersburg Pinellas 

Kurka, FVank Gustan Agri. Fresh Jacksonville - — "r, T' 

Kustolf, Michael Ivanovich Law 3rd year Gainesville Alachua 

LaBiant, Donald - Arts Fresh St. Petersburg _ Pinellas 

La( ne, Wallace James Bus. Adm. Soph Gainesville ^^^.. Aladuia 

Lad.! Joseph H - Arts Fresh - Tampa ._ ^illsboroHgh 

LaFuze, George Leighton Arts Jr Clermont - VT -^^^ 

La.ano, Albert Aloysius - Arts Soph Ft. Lauderdale ...Broward 

Laird Addison Shuler _ Graduate St. Matthews S. Carolina 

Laiiri, Angus McKenzie Arts Sr Panama City _ _ .^y 

Laird, Donald Clifton ...._ Law. 3rd year Lakeland „.. 



PoUc 



Lake, Edmond Alexander Law 2nd year - Laurens S. Carolina 

Lally, Thomas Beck Law 3rd year Gainesville S^"*",."^ 

Lambur, Neil Edwin Bus. Adm. Fresh St. Petersburg _ .Pinellas 

LaNasa, Matthew James Arts Soph .Tampa Hillsborough 

Lancaster, Lewis Allen ..._ Bus. Adm. Jr St. Petersburg Amelias 

Lane, William Thomas Law 3rd year Americus . Georgia 

Langford, Herman Teach. Sr Cookeville Tennessee 

Lanier. David Law 1st year Madison *^q°t° 

Lanier, Henry Madison „....Arts Fresh Arcadra "^ j 

Lansdell, Frederick Dudley Arch. Fresh J^'f,"".. "" nt^f 

Lapham, Harry Houston Bus. Adm. Jr Fulford - uaae 

Large, William Edward Teach. Fresh Avon Park ..Highlands 

Larson, Lawrence John Agri. Jr Tanripa . -..- Hillsborou-h 

Lasseter, James Teach. Fresh. Jacksonville -M^^Tf! 

Lathrop, William U Bus. Adm. Fresh Bradenton n^^^^ 

Latta, Marion R Agri. Fresh Orlando — - •*^'^P^W 

Lawzence, Charles Wyman Law 3rd year £a^^°" ^^^^ "R;^„r«1 

Lawrence, Richard Abbott J^rts Jr _ Melbourne .Brevard 

Lawrence. Robert Paul Law 3rd year Tampa Hdlsborou^h 

Lawrie, David Edward - Engr. Fresh Hollyh.ll --- ™^ f^ 

Lawton, Thomas Kirk Arts Soph Gainesville P^^u«^ 

Leach, Robert, Jr -...Law 1st year ?'.!f,''^S*^^ ■- ^ide 

Lee, Clarence Joseph Pharm. Fresh Little River - Oade 

Lee, James Ai-thur Arts Fresh Leesburg Lake 

Lee, John Levy Arts Fresh Live Oak 

Lee, Rex Eton Engr. Jr Center Hill Manatee 

Lefkowitz, Bertram Teach. Fresh R^^'^"*"" ,-"-■■ pfnellas 

Leggett. Frederick Earl Engr. Fresh St PetersbniK oSe 

■r ■ . T^ 1-- T._.-i.i T^^^y, QnriV. Orlando urange 



..Suvrannee 
Sumter 



Leigh, Douglas Britton Teach. Soph Si" Ji*^" Tvv. 

Leitner, Lewis Earl Bus. Adm. Fresh Ft. Myers - pTneH^ 

Leivonen. Pete Alton - Agri. Fresh St. Petersburg rXoun 

Leonard. Samuel Anders, Jr Arts Soph Blountstawn _.... .Calhoun 

Lester George Henry Arts Soph Tampa - .HillsborouTh 

LlszcVynsH loman'^Casimir JEngr. Spec W. Palm Beach._„ ^f.^l.^^f'^^:^^ 

Letzkus. Joseph William : Arts Soph Tampa -• ^,^°™ bia 

Leuthner. Herbert J - Arts Jr Millview l^c'aSwa 

Levey. Charles S - Arts Soph Pensacola -- ■*^«<=^™^« 

Lewis Edward Clay. Jr _ Law Spec Wewahitchka „_.._ _ T",<.Wn 

Lewis, Henry Hays. Jr _._ Law 1st year 1^^'"^"'^ 1^ 

Lewis. James Leland Teach^ Sr ...Ft. llyer^ -- --^ 

Lewis, Irving Ellsworth...- Arts Fresh **'^°?' mV^- " Lean 

Lewis, Lawrence Leonard Agri. Spec Woodville N«l^ 

, I^^as, Orlen B __Pharm. Fresh .Fernandina HnUbS^ 

i Licta, Anthony Joseph _._..Arts Fresh .Tampa "^ Os^^la 

i Li-r.^itt. Robert Cooke _ Arts Jr....._ St. Cloud - - ^!fp^^ 

■ Lindellie. Henry Osborne Agri. 1 year St. Petersburg - Pinellas 



240 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



Name Class 

Lindelie, Mario M Arts Soph... 

Lindenfeld, Bela G Arts Fresh... 

Litherland, Gerald Jerome Teach. Fresh... 

Littell, Bartow Stubbs Engr. Freah... 

Little, Charles Holmes Teach. Fresh... 

Livesay, Joe Stuart Aii3 Fresh... 

Ijivingston, Archie Teach. Spec... 

Livingrston, Howard Gordan Arts Fresh... 

Livingston, Junious Bishop Law 2nd year.. 

Lockett, Norwood Alexander Teach. Fresh... 

Loessner, Ernest Joseph Bus. Adm. Fresh... 

Loewenkopf, Jack Bus. Adm. Fresh... 

Long, Latimer Ashley Law 1st year.. 

Long, Noyes Capehart Agri. Soph... 

Longee, Nelson Charles Engr. Spec... 

Lord, Berry Johnathon Teach. Fresh. . 

Lord, Ralph Waldo Arts Soph... 

Lorraine, Charles Cabell Arts Soph... 

Loucks, Kenneth Wilfred Graduate.. 

Love, Francis Edmond Arts Soph... 

Love, Lamar Homer Arts Fresh... 

Love, S. Kenneth _ Arts Sr... 

Love, William Lawson, Jr Engr. Fresh. - 

Lovell, Perry Bryan Arts Soph.. 

Lovell, Broward Napoleon Bus. Adm. Fresh... 

Lovvorn, Charles Jason Law 1st year 

Lowe, Earl Stowell Teach. Jr... 

Lowe, Maxy Benjamin Teach. Soph... 

Lowry, Elbert Lawrence Agri. Fresh... 

Lowry, George Alfred Arts Fresh... 

Ludwig, Gerald Edward Bus. Adm. Soph... 

Lundy, Richard Theodore Engr. Sr. .. 

Lupfer, Ferdinand Green Engr. Soph... 

Lyle, Clifford Aukincloss _ Engr. Jr... 

Lyle, William R. Agri. Fresh... 

Lytle, Carl Samuel Pre-Med. 2nd year.. 

McAdam, Charles Bernard Engr. Jr... 

McAdam, Edward Haywood Engr. Sr... 

McAden, John Henry Arts Fresh... 

McAllister, Kenneth Campbell.. ..Law 1st year.. 

McArthur, Hugh Lynn Teach. Soph... 

McCall, Fred Wallace, Jr Arts Jr... 

McCall, Hugh Bus. Adm. Jr... 

McCardell, Harry Emmette, Jr Arts Fresh... 

McCaskill, John Edward Arts Fresh... 

McClnmroch, James Milton Arts Jr... 

McClellan, Ammon Bus. Adm. Soph.. 

McClellan, Irvine Teach. Fresh... 

McClung, Marshall Linwood Engr. Fresh.. 

McCollough, Claud Thomas Arts Fresh... 

McCollough, Robert Walter ....Bus. Adm. Soph... 

McCollum, Edward Benjamin Law Spec... 

McCormick, Sam C Bus. Adm. Sr. . 

McCranie, Joseph Jackson Arts Jr... 

McCraw, John Carey, Jr Arts Soph. . 

McDonald, Robert Ernest Law 1st year 

McDonald, Venton Bus. Adm. Fresh.. 

McDonald, William Drury... Pre-Med. 2nd year. 

McDowall, Charles James Engr. Sr... 

McEldowney, Lawrence Edward Arts Fresh... 

McEwen, James Milton Arts Fresh... 

McEwen, R. O Teach. Jr... 

McFarland, Earley DeWitt Bus. Adm. Jr... 

McGee, William Lanier Engr. Fresh. 

McGovern, Donald Conrad Arts Fresh.. 

McGregor, R. McA.ndrew Pre-Med. 1st year 

Mclntire, James Edgar Agri. Fresh... 

Mcintosh. Harry David Law 1st year . 

McKay, John Wilkes Engr. Fresh... 

McKinnon, Daniel A., Jr Pre-Med. 2nd year.. 

McKinstry, James T Teach. Fresh... 

McLain, Herman Engr. Fresh. 

McLanahan, Clarence Rhodes Arts Fresh... 

McLanahan, Julius Pope Arch. Soph... 

McLaughlin, Hugh E Teach. Jr... 

McLendon, William Allen Engr. Jr... 

McLeod, Norman Wightman Arts Soph... 



Postoffice County or State 

...St. Petersburg Pinellas 

...Ft. Myers Lee 

...Ocoee Orange 

...Hudson Pasco 

....Jacksonville Duval 

...Jacksonville Duval 

...Madison Madison 

...Orlando Orange 

. ...St. Petersburg Pinellas 

...Cocoa Brevard 

...Lake City Columbia 

...Jacksonville Duval 

...Haines City Polk 

...Gainesville Alachua 

...Daytona Beach Volusia 

...Orlando Orange 

...Orlando Orange 

..Jacksonville _ Duval 

...Gainesville Alschua 

...Lake Worth Palm Beach 

...Alachua Alachua 

...St. Petersburg Pinellas 

...Mulberry Polk 

...Summerfield Marion 

...Summerfield Marion 

...Okeechobee Okeechobee 

...Tarpon Springs Pinellas 

...Dunnellon Marion 

...Plant City Hillsborough 

...St. Petersburg Pinellas 

...Sarasota Sarasota 

...Bradenton Manatee 

...Kissimmee Osceola 

...Pensacola Escambia 

...Bartow Polk 

...Bartow Polk 

...Pensacola Escambia 

...Pensacola Escambia 

...Jacksonville Duval 

...Miami _ Dade 

...Tampa Hillsborough 

...Miami Dade 

..Tampa Hillsborough 

...St. Petersburg Pinellas 

...DeFuniak Springs Walton 

...Gainesville Alachua 

...Wewahitchka Gulf 

...St. Petersburg Pinellas 

...Jacksonville Duval 

...Atlanta _ Georgia 

...Atlanta Georgia 

. Tavares Lake 

..Gainesville Alachua 

Jacksonville Duval 

-Gainesville Alachua 

...Fulford Dade 

...Miami Dade 

...Pensacola Escambia 

...Gainesville Alachua 

...Tampa Hillsborough 

...Wauchula Hardee 

...Gainesville Alachua 

...Odessa Pasco 

...Century Escambia 

...Jacksonville Duval 

...Tampa Hillsborough 

...Clearwater Pinellas 

.St. Petersburg Pinellas 

...Tampa _ Hillsborough 

...Marianna Jackson 

...Gainesville Alachua 

. Auburndale Polk 

..Bunnell _ Flagler 

Bunnell _ Flagler 

...Okeechobee Okeechobee 

...Lakeland Polk 

...Aucilla Jefferson 



REGISTER 



241 



Name Class Postoffice 

McLucas, Leonard Lee Bus. Adm. Fresh Sanford 

McMillan, David Glenn Engr. Sr Okeechobee 

McMullen, Harry Eldon Arts Sr. Clearwater 

McMullen, William Eugene Teach. Soph Gainesville 

McMurray, James Willard Arts Soph Bartow 

McQuitty, John Vredenburgh Arts Soph Ft. Myers 

McRae, Charles Perrin Law Spec Lake City 

Mc Williams, Hugh Coleman. —Bus. Adm. Fresh Tampa 

MacCarthy, Parker Wardrope Engr. Fresh Neuva Gerona, Isle 

Mace, Harold Loring _ Engr. Fresh Lake Helen 

MacKenzie, Edward S Arts Soph Leesburg 

Mackey, Jesse Key Arch. Fresh Tampa 

Mackey, John Goldsberry Bus. Adm. FVesh Tampa 

Maddox, John Clyde Arts Fresh Felda 

Magaha, James Thomas Arts Soph. Ft. Myers 

Magill, Glenn Tillman Engr. Sr La Belle 

Magruder, Richard Scott Teach. Fresh Orlando 

Mahannah, Charles Mark Arts Jr Ft. Lauderdale 

Mahorner, Bernard Teague Arts Soph Inverness 

Mahorner, Louis Dabney Arts Fresh Inverness 

Majors, Robert Powell Bus. Adm. Jr. St. Petersburg 

Maness, Lucian Engr. Soph Tampa 

Manning, William Dudley Arts Fresh Jacksonville 

Mann, Edward Beverly . Arts Sr St. Cloud 

Marasales, Hercules Pharm. Jr. Pensacola 

Marasales, John „ Arts Fresh Pensacola 

Markett, Davis Lane Arts Fresh Arcadia 

Markham, Joseph Henson Law 3rd year Lake City 

Markham, Julian Elmo Arts Soph Lake City 

Marks. Charles Alfred, Jr Teach. Fresh. Tampa 

Marks, Paul .• Arts Soph Miami 

Marsh, Raymond Bartlett Bus. Adm. Jr Pensacola 

Marshall, Addison FVanklin Engr. Sr Tallahassee 

Marshall, James Edmonds Law 3rd year Winter Haven 

Marshall, Tom Law 2nd year Jacksor\ille 

Marshick, Herbert Andrew... .Bus. Adm. Soph St. Petersburg 

Martin, Freeman G Graduate Greenwood 

Martin, Geor.Q:e N., Jr Engr. Soph Tampa 

Martin, William Marion Arts Soph Tampa 

Martin- Vegue, Jabez Arts Fresh Miami 

Mason, Ernest Edward Law 2nd year Century 

Mason, Joe Madison Bus. Adm. Soph Tampa 

Mason, Thomas Leonard Bus. Adm. Fresh Sarasota 

Mason, Wayne _ Arts Fresh. Auburndale 

Mason, William Gray Bus. Adm. Jr. Tampa 

Massey, Fred Ferguson Bus. Adm. Soph Pensacola 

Massey, Hollis Arts Soph Lake Wales 

Matheny, Candler Calhoun Teach. Soph... Madison 

Mathis, Charles Carvel, Jr Engr. Soph. Hastings 

Mathis, Charles Robert, Jr Arts Soph Bonifay 

Matlack, Marion Brooks Graduate Sorrento 

Matthews, Donald Ray Arts Jr Hawthorne 

Maultsby, John Camp Arts Jr Gainesville 

Maxwell, James Elton Arts Soph Gretna 

Mayers, Jack .Teach. Fresh Miami 

Maynard, William R Arts Soph. Newberry 

Mayo, William Thomas Arts Jr So. Jaoksonville 

Meade, Glenn Edward Arts Soph Jacksonville 

Meador, Henry Harris -Arts Jr Burlington 

Meadows, Marshall Dillon Arts Jr Jacksonville 

Means, James Drayton _ Agri. Fresh Mcintosh 

Mears. George Hiram Teach. Jr Cypress ^ 

Medard, Edward Engr. Fresh Tampa 

Meeker, Thomas Rusley _ Engr. Fresh. Bonifay 

Meeks, Leon Aubrey Arts Fresh. Lake City 

Meeks, Jack Leroy Bus. Adm. Soph. Chiefland 

Meeth, Lewis Henry Arts Soph New PI Richie 

Meffert, John Michael .Teach. Fresh. Ocala . 

Mearathlin, Everett Lewis Teach. Jr Miami 

Meioy, Henry Joseph Law Spec Ft. Dodge 

Melvin. Perry David Arts Fresh Milton 

Menendez. Ramon Alfonso Engr. Soph Tampa 

Merrill, George Bates Agri. Spec. Gainesville 

Merrin, George Alfred Agri. Sr Plant City 

Merrin, Philip F Agri. Soph Plant City 

Merritt, J. Webster Pharm. Jr Gainesville 

Merritt, Ralph Dawson Arts Soph Miami 

Messer, James, Jr Law 1st year Tallahassee 

Messer, William Herbert Arts Soph Sanford 



County or State 

Seminole 

Okeechobee 

Pinellas 

Alachua 

.Polk 

...Lee 

Columbia 

-Hillsborough 

of Pines W Indies 

Volusia 

.Lake 

Hillsborough 

Hillsborough 

Hendry 

...Lee 

Hendry 

Orange 

Broward 

Citrus 

Citrus 

Pinellas 

Hillsborough 

Duval 

O iceola 

Escambia 

Escambia 

DeSoto 

Columbia 

Columbia 

Hillsborough 

Dade 

Escambia 

Leon 

Polk 

Duval 

Pinellas 

So Carolina 

Hillsborough 

Hillsborough 

Dade 

Escambia 

Hillsborough 

Sarasota 

.Polk 

Hillsborough 

Escambia 

Polk 

Madison 

St Johns 

Holmes 

.Lake 

Al ichua 

Alachua 

Gadsden 

Dade 

Alichua 

Duval 

Duval 

N Carolina 

Duval 

Marion 

Jackson 

Hillsborough 

Holmes 

Columbia 

Levy 

Pasco 

Marion 

Dade 

Iowa 

Santa Rosa 

Hillsborough 

Alachua 

Hillsborough 

Hillsborough 

Alachua 

Dade 

Leon 

_ Seminole 



242 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



Name Class 

Middlekauff, Willis William Law 1st year. 

Mikell, William Owen Arts Fresh... 

Miley, Horace Agri. Fresh... 

Miller, Cecil Sidney Bus. Adm. Fresh... 

Miller, Edwin Lee Bus. Adm. Soph... 

Miller, Hamner J. B Bus. Adm. Fresh.. 

Miller, Harry Bernard Pre-Med. 2nd year. 

Miller, Henry Broward Teach. Fresh... 

Miller, Jefferson Brown Bus. Adm. Fresh.. 

Miller, John Donald Engr. Soph... 

Miller, Maxwell Victor Law 1st year.. 

Miller, Perry Patton Arts Fresh... 

Miller, Ralph William Bus. Adm. Fresh... 

Miller, Roy Amos Arts Soph... 

Miller, Robert Park Bus. Adm. Soph... 

Miller, Robert Thomas Teach. Jr... 

Miller, Russell Eugene Normal ir.. 

Miller, Saul D Arts Soph... 

Miller, Theodore Worrall Arts Soph. . 

Millman, Emanuel Law 2nd year.. 

Mines, Chester Eugene Engr. Soph... 

Mitchell, George Harrison Engr. Fresh. . 

Mitchell, Milton Warner Arts Fresh... 

Mitchell, Robert Lee Arts Fresh. . 

Mizell, Albert DeWitt Engr. Fresh... 

Mizell, Bascon Fernando Bus. Adm. Jr... 

Mizell, John Keener Bus. Adm. Jr... 

Mobley, Gordon Simpkins, Jr Engr. Soph... 

Model, Jacob Pre-Med. 1st year.. 

Montfort, Eugene Earl, Jr Arts Fresh... 

Montgomery, James Roland Arts Soph... 

Mont.gomei-y, Stephen Miles Arts Soph.. 

Moomaw, David Eugene Agri. Fresh... 

Moon, Leland Willis Teach. Jr. . 

Moore, Clifford Arwid ...._ Teach. Fresh... 

Moore, Eugene Louis Agri. Fresh.. 

Moore, Guy Robertson Arts Soph... 

Moore, Leonida Calvert, Jr Engr. Soph... 

Moore, Maurice Lee Arts Fresh... 

Moore, William Gerald Bus. Adm. Soph... 

Morant, Charles Bus. Adm. Fresh... 

Morgan, Arvel Lewis Teach. Jr... 

Morgan, John Hulan Bus. Adm. Fresh... 

Morgan, Wynne Harold Arts Jr... 

Morris, Alton Chester Teach. Sr... 

Morris, Charles Franklin Teach. Fresh... 

Morris, John Eugene Bus. Adm. Fresh... 

Morris, William Erskine Engr. FVesh... 

Morrow, Albert Roy Teach. Sr... 

Morrow, William Bovee Arts Jr... 

Morse, Harley Gerald Arts Soph... 

Morway, Jesse Arnold Arts Soph... 

Moss, William Paxton Engr. Fresh... 

Motsinger, Harry Cecil Arts Soph... 

Mounts, Charles Eugene Graduate.. 

Mowry, Harold A.gri. Spec... 

Moyer, Wayne DeWitt Bus. Adm. Fresh... 

Mullikin, Orville Wright Arts Fresh... 

Munger, Forest Harold Arts Soph... 

Munoz, Vedasto Cabala Agri. Sr... 

Murphree, Albert Alexander, Jr Arts Soph... 

Murphree, Claude Leonidas Arts Jr. . 

Murphree, John A. H Law 2nd year.. 

Murphree, Walter Ellis Arts Fresh... 

Murphy, Denzil R Bus. Adm. Spec... 

Musgrave, Robert Williams Engr. Fresh... 

Muskoff, John William Law 3rd year.. 

Muzzy, Edward John Bus. Adm. Fresh... 

Myers, Harold Wilbur Teach. Soph... 

Nasrallah, Samuel Andrew.... Bus. Adm. Fresh... 

Naylor, Richard Morris Law 2nd year.. 

Nelson, Claude Edwin, Jr Teach. Fresh... 

Neuwirth, Phillip Alvin Arts Soph... 

Newlands, Anthony Edgar Bus. Adm. Soph... 

Newnan, Thomas F Bus. Adm. Jr... 

Newsom, Wendell Gray Bus. Adm. Soph... 

Nimmons, Ralph Wilson Arts Sr. . 



Postoffice County or State 

...Orlando _ Orange 

....Ft. Meade Polk 

...Lithia Hillsborough 

...Haines City ^. Polk 

...Orlando Orange 

...Tampa Hillsborough 

....Tampa Hillsborough 

...Bushnell Sumter 

...DeFuniak Springs Walton 

...W. Palm Beach Palm Beach 

...Miami Beach Dade 

...Key West Monroe 

...Orlando Orange 

...Orlando Orange 

...Freedom Pennsylvania 

...Wellborn Suwannee 

...Wellborn Suwannee 

...New York City New York 

...Bunnell Flagler 

...Newark New Jersey 

...Miami Dade 

...Dade City Pasco 

...Lakeland Polk 

....Mulberry Polk 

...Baldwin Duval 

...Gainesville Alachua 

...Gainesville Alachua 

...Jacksonville Duval 

...Gainesville , Alachua 

...Beaufort S. Carolina 

...Camden _ S. Carolina 

...St. Petersburg Pinellas 

...Miami Beach Dade 

...Wewahitchka Gulf 

...Sidney _ Nebraska 

...Miami Dade 

...Lakeland Polk 

...Jacksonville Duval 

...Laurel Hill Okaloosa 

...Ocala Marion 

...Jacksonville Duval 

...Mayo LaFayette 

...Madison Madison 

...Miami Dade 

...W. Palm Beach Palm Beach 

...Baker Okaloosa 

...Leesburg Lake 

...Leesburg Lake 

...Mcdison Madison 

...Lake Worth Palm Beach 

...Eustis _ Lake 

...Jacksonville Duval 

....Lakeland Polk 

...Plant City Hillsborough 

...Gainesville Alachua 

...Gainesville Alachua 

...St. Petersburg Pinellas 

...Ft. Lauderdale Broward 

...S. Palm Beach Palm Beach 

...Dagopan Pagisinan P. I. 

...Gainesville Alachua 

....•Gadsden Alabama 

...Gainesville _ Alachua 

...Gadsden Alabama 

...Arcadia _ DeSoto 

...St. Augustine St. Johns 

...Navarre Ohio 

...Ft. Myers Lee 

....Mascotte Lake 

...Jacksonville Duval 

....Lakeland Polk 

...Jacksonville Duval 

...Tampa Hillsborough 

...Tampa _ _ Hillsborough 

...Tallahassee _ Leon 

...Tampa Hillsborough 

...St. Petersburg Pinellas 



REGISTER 243 



Name Class Postojfice County or State 

Nobles, James Edwards Bus. Adm. Fresh Titusville Brevard 

Noordam, Gerald Pre-Med. 1st year Gainesville Alachua 

Norflett, Joe Henry Agri. Fresh Newberry Alachua 

Norman, Grover Cleveland Teach. Fresh Starke Bradford 

Northam, Harold Kimberley Arts Fresh Tampa Hillsborough 

Norton, Edward F Law 3rd year Jacksonville Duval 

Norvelle, William Cook., Jr Law 2nd year Lakeland Polk 

Nourse, Ronald John Engr. Fresh Fellsmere St. Lucie 

O'Connell, Phillip Dillon Arts Fresh West Palm Beach Palm Beach 

Odom, Albert Brooks _ Agri. Sr Munson Santa Rosa 

Odom, Luther A _ Arts Fresh Jacksonville Duval 

O'Donald, Ed Todd _ Arts Jr Jacksonville Duval 

Ogg, James Arlos _ Graduate Clearwater „ Pinellas 

Oliver, Alfred Lester Engr. Fresh Jacksonville Duval 

Oliver, Robert Joseph II Arts Fresh St. Augustine _ St. Johns 

Oliver, Robert Edmond, Jr Bus. Adm. Soph West Palm Beach Palm Beach 

Oosterhoudt, Frank Samuel Teach. Spec Gainesville Alachua 

Oppenheim, Harry Leonard Arts Soph Brooklyn New York 

Orcutt, Harry Philos Teach. Fresh Palm Beach Palm Beach 

Orr, Reuben Bennett ..._ Teach. Fresh St. Augustine _ St. Johns 

Osteen, Osmond Lee Engr. Fresh Ft. Myers Lee 

Otte, Burton J. H _ Graduate Gainesville Alachua 

Otto, Joseph Arts Fresh., & Law 3rd year Key West Monroe 

Overtstreet, Henry Wilbur Engr. Soph Jamieson Gadsden 

Overstreet, Murray W Law 3rd year Kissimmee Osceola 

Owen, Marcus Nance ...„ Bus. Adm. Fresh Tampa Hillsborough 

Owenby, Carl Lester Arts Soph Lakeland _ Polk 

Owens, Tom Andrew Teach. Soph Port St. Joe Gulf 

Oxley, Edward Granville Arts Fresh St. Augustine St. Johns 

Ozmer, Thomas Gunby Arts Fresh F'ernandina _ Nassau 

Pacetti, Orrin Damon Teach. Spec W. Palm Beach Palm Beach 

Padgett, Burness Vernon Pharm. Fresh St. Cloud Osceola 

Padgett, Elwood Pillsbury Arts Jr .Jacksonville Duval 

Page, Edward Eugene Arts Soph .'Wakulla Wakulla 

Pardue, Walter Wesley Arts Fresh St. Petersburg Pinellas 

Parker, Boyd Roscoe Arch. Soph Ft. Myers Lee 

Parker, Robert Claybourne Law 3rd year Tallahassee Leon 

Parks, George W., Jr Law 1st year Stuart Martin 

Parsons, Carlos Theodore Bus. Adm. Jr Gainesville Alachua 

Parsons, Charles Cephas _ Arts Fresh Tampa Hillsborough 

Parsons, Hugh Earle Pre-Med 1st year Tampa Hillsborough 

Patrick, William Washington Arts Jr .Umatilla Lake 

Patronis, Allen Gregory Bus. Adm. Jr Quincy Gadsden 

Patterson, L. J Agri. Fresh JNJaranja - Dade 

Pattillo, Andrew Gramling Law 3rd year Port Orange Volusia 

Payne, Aimar Waldemar Engr. Soph Jacksonville Duval 

Payne, John Harlston Teach. Sr. Dowling Park Suwannee 

Peacock, Alton Theodore Arts Fresh Tampa Hillsborough 

Pearce, Burt Morrison Arts Soph St. Petersburg Pinellas 

Pearce, Joseph Huske Pharm. Soph Tampa ....Hillsborough 

Pedrick, John Maxwell Arts Soph Orlando Orange 

Pegg. John William Bus. Adm. Fresh Hernando - ,', "^ 

Pelot, Frank Cooper Law 1st year Manatee Manatee 

Pepper, Louis Calvert Normal II Gainesville Alachua 

Perez, Angel P Arts Fresh Tampa Hillsborough 

Perkins, Gordon Dana Teach. Fresh Jacksonville Duval 

Perkins, Marion Deming Bus. Adm. Jr Orlando Orange 

Perloff, Ben Arts Soph Jacksonville Duval 

Permenter, Marion Mitchell Teach. Soph Jacksonville ^a 

Perrine, George A „ Bus. Adm. FVesh Miami - l^aae 

Perry, Chesley Francis Engr. Fresh Ft. Myers _ - ^ l^e 

Perrv, Sidney Rawson Law 1st year Sarasota v;:;;^**^^ u 

Perzia, Tom P Arts Soph Tampa Hillsborough 

Peters, Stanley B Pre-Med. 1st year Winter Haven ;Polk 

Peterson. Frank Lon Arts Soph Miami uaae 

Petris, Willis Edward Pre-Med. 1st year Oakland Orange 

Petrousta, Anthony John Teach. Fresh Jacksonville a, T^fj 

Petteway, Gordon Powell Law 3rd year Gainesville Aiacnua 

Pharmer, Lamont Howard Teach. Soph Miami Vi-' ii f 

Pheil,_Harvey William Bus. Adm. Soph St. Petersburg Pinellas 

Phelps, Leonard C Engr. Fresh Orlando p"iv 

Phillips, George Whitfield, Jr Arts Soph Lakeland ni^fno-^ 

Phillips, Roeer Earle Arts Jr Orlando cV T^i,„: 

Phillips, Walter Myles Normal II Mineral City w-ii=Wo,,?h 

Phillips, William Sigmon Law 1st year ^ampa r^^J^l^l^ 

Phillips, William Taylor Bus. Adm. Sr. Lake City Columma 



244 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



Name Class 

Phipps, E. G Graduate.. 

Phipps, Frank Bus. Adm. Spec. 

Pierce, Robert Samuel, Jr Law 3rd year.. 

Pierson, Alvin P Law 1st year.. 

Pilland, Charles Palmer Arts Fresh... 

Pillsbury, Hugh Augustus Arch. Fresh... 

Pinaire, John Sherman Engr. Jr. . 

Pinkoson, Abie Samuel Teach. Fresh. . 

Piper, Ellis Gardner Graduate. 

Pirenien, Zara Maguerditch Graduate . 

Pitchford, Robert M Bus. Adm. Soph... 

Pless, Asbury Glenn Teach. Soph... 

Popue, Cyril E Law 1st year 

Pocrue, Hanley W Bus. Adm. Fresh... 

Pomeroy, Joseph D _ Law Spec. . 

Porter, Joseph Yatis Bus. Adm. Fresh. . 

Potter, Eugene Newsom Bus. Adm. Soph... 

Potter, Martin Engr. Fresh. . 

Potter, Nelson Augustine Law 2nd year.. 

Potter, Paul William Law 3rd year . 

Povrell, William Holleman Law 1st year.. 

Powers, William Harris Arts S'r. 

Powell, Zeb Vance Arts Fresh... 

Pratt, Charles Kenneth Bus. Adm. Jr... 

Pratt, Stuart Arthur Bus. Adm. Sr. 

Prost, Kenneth W Engr. Jr... 

Price, Carl Alva Teach. Jr.. 

Price, Joseph Edwin Teach. Fresh.. 

Price, Newton Bus. Adm. Fresh. . 

Prime, George Benjamin Engr. Soph. 

Prime, Levingston Carl, Jr.. .Bus. Adm. Fresh... 

Pritchard, James Wesley Law 3rd year 

Pritchard, Julian Morris Arch. Soph... 

Proctor, Lorman Fletcher Arts Fresh... 

Provost, Marshall Breese Bus. Adm. Jr... 

Purvis, John Smith Arts Soph. 

Pyles, Marshall A Teach. Spec... 

Quade, Edward Schaumberg Arts Soph... 

Quinn, John Martin Arts Jr... 

Radney, Ralph Gordon Agri. Fresh... 

Rahner, Clarence V Bus. Adm. Sr... 

Rainey, F'rancis Bartow, Jr Arts Fresh... 

Rainey, Morton Henry Pre-Med. 2nd year.. 

Ramage, Robert Hayes Arts Soph.. 

Rambo, Edwin Cyrenius. .Pre- Med. 2nd year.. 

Ramsey, Allan Collier Law 1st year. 

Ramsey, Francis Henry Bus. Adm. Soph... 

Randolph, James Henry Arch. Soph. . 

Randolph, John Winthrop Engr. Soph... 

Raulerson, Leamon William Agri. Fresh... 

Rawls. Charles Vernon Law 1st year.. 

Ray, William Newton Bus. Adm. Soph. . 

Read, Ralph Russell Arts Jr... 

Reardon, John Donald Bus. Adm. Fresh... 

Recker, Kenneth Hover Bus. Adm. Freah. . 

Recker, Lewis Leland Law 3rd year.. 

Rector, Percy Milton Pharm. Fresh... 

Redding, Wesley Albert Bus. Adm. Fresh... 

Redell, Archibald Emil Arts Soph... 

Reece, Nathan Elwood Bus. Adm. Soph... 

Reeder, Franklin Bryant Engr. Soph... 

Rees, Howard Francis Engr. Jr... 

Reese, John Lewis Law 1st year.. 

Reeves, Alex D Arts Fresh... 

Register, William Alonzo Arts Fresh.... 

Rehwinkel, Jennings A Teach. Jr... 

Reiber, Fane Anthony Agri. Fresh... 

Reid, Adam Edward Bus. Adm. Jr.... 

Reid, Alex Dodge Bus. Adm. Jr. .. 

Reid, John Arthur Arch. Spec... 

Remington, Daniel Dorst Agri. Jr.... 

Renfroe, James David Engr. Jr.... 

Revell, Alton P Agri. Fresh.... 

Revels, Percy B Law 2nd year... 

Reynolds, Marion Wadley....Bus. Adm. Fresh.... 

Reynolds, Walter Lee Bus. Adm. Fresh... 

Rhodes, Francis Arlis Arts Fresh.... 

Rhudy, Ralph Columbus Arts Sopr. ... 

Rice, Elmer Clemen Arts Fresh... 



Postoffice County or State 

...Gainesville AJachua 

...St. Petersburg Pinellas 

...Marianna _ Jackson 

...Hastings St. Johns 

...Melbourne Brevard 

....Jacksonville Duval 

...Lake Hamilton Polk 

...St. Augustine St. Johns 

...Ft. Lauderdale Broward 

.. -Gainesville Alachua 

...Jensen St. Lucie 

...Gainesville Alachua 

.. .Orlando Orange 

...Orlando Orange 

..Jacksonville Duval 

...Key West Monroe 

-Ocala Marion 

...Lake Weir Marion 

...Ft. Lauderdale Broward 

.West Palm Beach Palm Beach 

...Gainesville Alachua 

...Ocala Marion 

...Red Springs No. Carolina 

...Williamson New York 

...Parker Bay 

...Tampa Hillsborough 

. West Palm Beach Palm Beach 

St. Petersburg Pinellas 

...Jamaica New York 

...Sarasota Sarasota 

...Winter Park Orange 

...Gainesville Alachua 

...Jacksonville Duval 

...Orlando Orange 

...Cocoa Brevard 

.. ..St. Petersburg Pinellas 

...Pence Springs W. Virginia 

.. Jacksonville Duval 

...St. Petersburg Pinellas 

...Century Escambia 

...Gainesville Alachua 

...Wauchula Hardee 

...Jacksonville Duval 

...St. Petersburg Pinellas 

..Orlando Orbnge 

...Tampa Hillsborousrh 

...Valdosta Georgia 

...Tallahassee Leon 

...Tallahassee Leon 

...Seville Volusia 

...Lakeland Polk 

...Pensacola Escambia 

...Keystone Heights Clay 

...Port Sewall Palm Beach 

...Winter Haven Polk 

...Winter Haven Polk 

...Fellsmere St. Lucie 

...Jacksonville Duval 

...Palatka Putnam 

...Arcadia DeSoto 

...Welaka _ Putnam 

...St. Petersburg Pinellas 

...Pensacola Escambia 

..Jacksonville Duval 

...Woodville Leon 

...Crawfordville Wakulla 

.. Jacksonville Duval 

-Orlando Orange 

-Orlando Orange 

-Miami Dade 

...Glenmont Ohio 

...Lake City Columbia 

...Bristol Liberty 

...Florahome Putnam 

-Jacksonville Duval 

...Gainesville Alachua 

Woodville _ Leon 

Galax Virginia 

-W. Palm Beacli Palm Beach 



REGISTER 245 

Name Class Postoffice County or State 

Rice, Horace D Teach. Soph Groveland Lake 

Rice, James Mitchell Engr. Spec Gainesville Alachua 

Richards, Howthorne Howe Law 3rd year Gainesville _ Alachua 

Richards, John Lawler Law 1st year Carrollton _ Ohio 

Richards, Joseph Vincent Arts Fresh Carrollton Ohio 

Richards, Potter Abraham Arts Jr Pensacola Escambia 

Richards, Virgil Long Bus. Adm. Fresh Orlando _ Orange 

Richards, Linton A Agri. Sr O'Brien Suwannee 

Richardson, Huffh B Arts Fresh Sarasota Sarasota 

Ridenour, Benjamin Franklin. ...Bus. Adm. Jr Gainesville Alachua 

Ridenour, Hawley Ernest Bus. Adm. Soph Gainesville Alachua 

Rifkin, Louis Burney Law 1st year Miami Dade 

Rider, Manning C Bus. Adm. Soph Gainesville Alachua 

Riley, Charles F Bus. Adm. Fbresh. Hollywood _ Broward 

Rinpling, Henry Ellsworth Bus. Adm. Jr. Gainesville Alachua 

Ripley, Wayne Eugene Law 1st year So. Jacksonville Duval 

Rivers, Glenn L Engr. Soph Kissimmee Osceola 

Rivers, Thomas Judson Law 1st year Green Cove Springs Clay 

Robarts, Frank Stewart, Jr Arts Fresh Largo Pinellas 

Robarts, Russell Henry Bus. Adm. Fresh. Alachua Alachua 

Robb, Allen Thomas Engr. Soph. Ft. Pierce St. Lucie 

Robbins, John Alfred Arts Fresh Cocoa Brevard 

Roberts, Emert Edward Law 1st year Miami Dade 

Roberts, B. K Law 2nd year Sopchoppy Wakulla 

Roberts, Joseph Leon Law 1st year Miami _ Dade 

Roberts, Mason Lee Agri. Fresh... ...Homestead Dade 

Roberts, Nathan J Law Ist year Daytona Beach Volusia 

Roberts, William Harold Law 1st year Homestead Dade 

Robertson, Charles Sidney, Jr Teach. Fresh Gainesville Alachua 

Robertson, George Corwin Engr. Sr Ortega Duval 

Robertson, Paul R Arts Jr Vero Beach St. Lhcie 

Robinson, Harvey Arthur Arts Fresh. Miami Dade 

Robinson, Henrich S Agri. Soph. Ft. Pierce St. Lucie 

Robinson, Raymond Harold Engr. Fresh St. Petersburg Pinellas 

Robinson, Thomas Osborne.. ..Bus. Adm. Soph. Palatka Putnam 

Robinson, Wilburn Frank Law 2nd year Leesburg Lake 

Robson, Alfred Hart Arts Fresh Tampa Hillsborough 

Rodgers, James Warfield Agri. Fresh Memphis Tennessee 

Rogers, Edward Cecil Teach. Spec Pensacola Escambia 

Ro<iers, Hoyt H Engr. Jr Brooksville Hernando 

Rogers, Nathan Jewett Engr. Soph DeFuniak Springs Walton 

Rogers, Wilson Bus. Adm. Fresh Clearwater Pinellas 

Root, Louis John Pre-Med. 1st year St. Petersburg Pinellas 

Roper, Paul Felton Bus. Adm. Fresh St. Petersburg Pinellas 

Rogue, Raul Arts Fresh Tampa Hillsborough 

Rorabaugh, John Rittgers Engr. Fresh Clermont Lake 

Rosasco, Walter Llnnel Bus. Adm. Jr Pensacola Escambia 

Rose, John Tilden Teach. Jr Punta Gorda Charlotte 

Rosenhouse, David Lazar Law 1st year.. Miami -t^^^**^ 

Rosin, Marcus Ansel Law 2nd year Arcadia DeSoto 

Ross, C. B., Jr Teach. Sr., Agri. Sr Tullahoma Tennessee 

Ross, David Phillips Arts Fresh St. Petersburg - Pinellas 

Ross, Donald N Agri. Fresh St. Petersburg Pinellas 

Ross, John Alexander Agri. Fresh St. Petersburg Pinellas 

Ross, John Henry ...._ Agri. Fresh St. Petersburg Pinellas 

Ross, Robert Donald _ Engr. Sr Norfolk Virginia 

Ross, Stoyte Ogleby Engr. Soph Jacksonville Duval 

Rosser, Harwood _ Arts Fresh Jacksonville Duval 

Rosser, John Barkley Arts Soph Jacksonville _.. Duval 

Rossetter, Appleton Thomalson....Arts Fresh Eau Gallie Brevard 

Rossetter, James Wadsworth Engr. Fresh Eau Gallie Brevard 

Roth, Lester Louis Arts Soph Tampa Hillsborough 

Rothfuss, Richard R Arts Fresh Bradenton _ Manatee 

Rothstein, Abe Arts Soph Jacksonville - Duval 

Rowe, Aubrey Law 3rd year Social Circle Georgia 

I Rowe, David Corbin ...._ Teach. Soph Ft. Myers _ --...- Lee 

! Rowe, Eugene Lyman Arts Fresh Melbourne ...._ Brevard 

' Rowell, John Theron Teach. Fresh Perry "^ylor 

i Royce, Wendell H.... Bus. Adm. Fresh Lake Worth _ Palm Beach 

Rozear, Robert Lamar Bus. Adm. Fresh Pensacola - Escambia 

Rufly, Henry Eugene _ Engr. Fresh Ft. Pierce .--St Lucie 

i Russ, Sam Wallace Law 2nd year Tampa Hillsborough 

i Russell, Emil Richard . . Pharm. Jr Key West Monroe 

1 Russell, Joseph Hutton Arts Jr Sanford Semmole 

Saarinen, Albert E Teach. Fresh Newberry Alachua 

Safer, Moses Benjamin Teach. Fresh Jacksonville Duval 

i Salomon, Morris Seymour Arts Jr. Orlando Orange 



246 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



Name 



Class 



Postoffice 



Sale, James Lee Bus. Adm. Soph... 

Sample, Richard Lardner Arts Soph... 

Sample, Tom Edward Arts Fresh... 

Sanders, Ernest Joseph Engr. Fresh... 

Sands, Charles D., Jr Arts Fresh... 

Sands, Orilas Leslie Bus. Adm. Fresh... 

Sanford, Nat Tipton Arts Soph... 

Sanger, Johnnie Lonas _... Engr. Fresh... 

Sarra, Rowland A Teach. FVesh... 

Sarra. Ernest LaMar Law 1st year.. 

Saulnier, Jean Mande Engr. Soph... 

Sauls, Byron Tewilliger Law 3rd year.. 

Sawyer, Aubrey Dane Arch. Fresh... 

Sawyer, James Eldridge Agri. Soph... 

Say lor, Robert Lee, Jr Engr. Fresh... 

Scadron, Ivis Josef Arts Fresh... 

Sca.fflione, Peter C Bus. Adm. Soph... 

Scarborough, Chaflfie Aldred Graduate.. 

Scher, George Teach. Fresh... 

Schiller, Carl Parker Teach. Fresh... 

Schirard, John Rogers Arts Soph... 

Schofield, George Walter, Jr Arts Fresh... 

Scholze, Robert Ellis Arts Soph... 

Schuler, William B., Jr Engr. Spec... 

Schulting, Louis Bird _ Arts Jr... 

Schwartz, Dan Richard Bus. Adm. Soph... 

Schwartz, George W _ Agri. Fresh... 

Schwartz, Joe Law 2nd year.. 

Sco.ggan, Warner Edward Bus. Adm. Soph... 

Scott, James Andrew Arts Soph... 

Scott, Russell Morgan Bus. Adm. Fresh... 

Scott, William Curtis Bus. Adm. Fresh... 

Scribner, Nelson Joseph Bus. Adm. Spec.. 

Scruggs, George Stewart Arts FVesh... 

Scuitti, Walter John Engr. Jr... 

Sczudlo, Walter „ Arts Fresh. . 

Seale, James Galloway Teach. Fresh... 

Seay, Erwin Mason Pharm. Soph!.. 

Sebring, Harold L Law 3rd year 

Se.eall, Sidney Arts Soph... 

Seth, John Randall Teach. Fresh... 

Sewell, Robert Oliver Arts Soph... 

Shafer, William Wallace Law 2nd year.. 

Shands, William A Law 1st year.. 

Shannon, S. M Bus. Adm. Fresh... 

Shahinian, Manoug H _ _.... Normal II.. 

Sharon, James Gibson, Jr Law 3rd year.. 

Sharp, Hiram Felix Engr. Fresh... 

Shaw. James Martin Arts Soph... 

Sheffield, Lexington O. ...„ Bus. Adm. Soph .. 

Shelfer, Elbert B Bus. Adm. Soph... 

Shelfer, Tyler Kennedy Arts Fresh... 

Shepard, Clyde Russell Agri. Fresh. 

Shelley, Walter Andrew Arts Soph... 

Shepard, George Quinn Arts Soph... 

Sheritz, Marvin Leroy Arts Fresh... 

Shipp, Claude Lee Engr. Soph. 

Shipp, Edward Cravirford Engr. Sr... 

Shipp, Robert Charles _ Engr. Jr.. 

Shirley. John Jasper Agri. Fresh... 

Shollar, Martin Bus. Adm. Fresh... 

Shoot, Tilford Taylor Graduate.. 

Shorstein, Barney Bus. Adm. Soph. 

Shopiro, Joe Law 1st year.. 

Shuler, Jay Alfred Bus. Adm. Fresh... 

Sias, Frederick Ralph Engr. Jr... 

Sigman, Edmund Ball _.Bus. Adm. Fresh... 

Silverman, Sam Law 1st year 

Simmons, John Andrew Pre-Med 1st year . 

Simmons, John Humphries Law 1st year.. 

Simmons, Robert Clyde Law 1st year.. 

Simmons, Stephen Emery Law 3rd year.. 

Simpson, Arthur Allen Law 1st year.. 

Simpson, Stuart Charles Agri. Jr... 

Sims, Guy Mclntyre Teach. Fresh... 

Sims, William Harris _ Arts Jr... 

Singletary, Albert Marvin Teach. Sr... 

Singletary, James Russell Agri. Fresh... 

Singletary, Roy Porter Bus. Adm. Fresh... 



County or State 

Shellman Georgia 

.Ft. Pierce St. Lucie 

Haines City ...._ „ Polk 

.Orange City Volusia 

St. Petersburg Pinellas 

.Orlando _ Orange 

.Gainesville Alachua 

..Minneola Lake 

.Gainesville _ Alachua 

Gainesville Alachua 

Lake Worth Palm Beach 

.Wauchula _ Hardee 

..Jacksonville Duval 

..St. Petersburg Pinellas 

.St. Petersburg Pinellas 

Tampa Hillsborough 

.Tampa _ Hillsborough 

.White Springs Hamilton 

Miami Beach Dade 

.St. Petersburg Pinellas 

..Sanford _ Seminole 

Inverness _ Citrus 

..Miami _ Dade 

Tampa Hillsborough 

.So. Jacksonville Duval 

.Jacksonville Duval 

.Kenosha Wisconsin 

..Miami Dade 

..Sanford Seminole 

Arcadia DeSoto 

.Sebring Highlands 

..Haines City Polk 

Miami Dade 

.Aucilla Jefferson 

Jacksonville Duval 

..Umatilla _ Lake 

Milton Santa Rosa 

Dade City Pasco 

..Gainesville _ Alachua 

.Miami Dade 

Orlando Orange 

Gainesville Alachua 

Haines City _ Polk 

Gainesville _ Alachua 

.St. Petersburg _. Pinellas 

Gainesville Alachua 

Sanford _ Seminole 

..Jacksonville Duval 

..Tampa _ Hillsborough 

Gainesville Alachua 

.Quincy Gadsden 

..Havana _ Gadsden 

Wauchula Hardee 

.Palatka Putnam 

Bagdad _ Santa Rosa 

Ft. Meade Polk 

Tallahassee ...._ Leon 

Tallahassee Leon 

..Jacksonville Duval 

Bradenton Manatee 

Charleston Illinois 

..Ocala _ Marion 

..Jacksonville Duval 

Miami Beach Dade 

.Hosford Liberty 

Orlando ; Orange 

Lake Worth Palm Beach 

Miami _ Dade 

Miami Dade 

.Arcadia DeSoto 

Wauchula Hardee 

.Bradenton Manatee 

..Jacksonville Duval 

.Monticello Jefferson 

.Madison _ Madison 

.Fernandina Nassau 

Gainesville _ Alachua 

..Gainesville _.., Alachua 

-Marianna „ - Jackson 



REGISTER 247 



Name Class Postoffice County or State 

Sipprell, Murray C Agri. Fresh. Palatka ...._ Putnam 

Sirmans, Walter Eustace, Jr Teach. F"resh. Leesburg Lake 

Skeels, Norman Arthur Arch. Jr DeLand Volusia 

Slade, Richard Kirven _.... Arts Sr Jacksonville Duval 

Slade, Thomas Boggs, Jr Arts Soph Jacksonville Duval 

SlaRle, Mrs. Alma Spencer Law 2nd year Gainesville Alachua 

Slatten, John Wieber Teach. Fresh Pensacola Escambia 

Sleeth, Fred Howard Agri. 1 year Vero Beach St. Lucie 

Slone, Denny Wood Arts Fresh Mascotte Lake 

Slough, Sam Osborne -... Arch. Fresh Dade City Pasco 

Smedley, William George Engr. Fresh Jacksonville Duval 

Smith, Alden C Bus. Adm. Jr Miami Dade 

Smith, Alfonso Clifton Bus. Adm. Fresh Palmetto Manatee 

Smith, Allen Lowde Law 1st year New Smyrna _ Volusia 

Smith', Alfred William Bus. Adm. Sr. Fruitland Park Lake 

Smith, Bernys Holland Arts Fresh. Lakeland _ Polk 

Smith Byron Gaylord Arts FVesh. St. Petersburg „ Pinellas 

Smith, Cecil Lee ..— Arts Fresh Dade City _ Pasco 

Smith, Cecil Mills Teach. Fresh Jacksonville Duval 

Smith, Claude Harris Arts Soph. Milton _ Santa Rosa 

Smith, David Clair Law 1st year Wabasso Indian River 

Smith, Edmond Henderson, Jr Arts Soph. Quitman Georgia 

Smith, Edward Frank Engr. Sr So. Jacksonville Duval 

Smith, Elmer Fleming Bus. Adm. Fresh. Jacksonville Duval 

Sm'th Foster Shi Law 2nd year Hawthorne _ Alachua 

Smith, Frank Garver Engr. Soph. Sarasota Sarasota 

Smith, George Garrison Arts Fresh. Sanford Seminole 

Smith, Georie Hoffman Engr. Jr Gainesville „ Alachua 

Smith, George Richard Bus. Adm. Fresh. Quincy Gadsden 

Smith, George Thomas ...._ Arts Fresh. Winter Garden _ Polk 

Smith, George William Teach. FVesh. Gainesville Alachua 

Smith Guy F _ Teach. Fresh. Mascotte Lake 

Smith, Harold Benton Bus. Adm. Jr Cocoa ... _ Brevard 

Smith, Helman Pharm. Fresh. Jacksonville _ Duval 

Smith, Heyburn Dale -.... Teach. Sr. Oneco _ Manatee 

Smith, James Emery - Arts Jr. Cypress Jackson 

Smith Kary L Agri. 4 Months Palma Sala _ Manatee 

Smith', Lester Arts Fresh Tarpon Springs Pinellas 

Smith, Nedam Eugene Arts Fresh Live Oak _ Suwannee 

Smith Ollie S. .- Bus. Adm. Fresh Jacksonville Duval 

Smith' P J O - Engr. Soph Lakeland •. Polk 

Smith! Randall Pope ...._ Bus. Adm. Soph Madison Madison 

Smith, Raymond Leroy Engr. Fresh So. Jacksonville „ PV^^ 

Smith, Robert Henry Bus. Adm. Fresh Gainesville _..._ Alachua 

Smith, Robert Horace Bus. Adm. Soph Bradenton Manatee 

Smith, Walter Avant Bus. Adm. Soph Mananna Jackson 

Smith, William Sharp ...._ Arts Fresh Bradenton Manatee 

Smithdeal, Cyrus Hamlin, Jr Law 2nd year Washington D. C. 

Smook, Edgar James - Arts Jr Pompano Broward 

Smysor, Paul Allen Law 3rd year Cozaddale .„ Ohio 

Srell, Farley B Pharm. Fresh Eau Gallie ... Brevard 

Snyder, Russell Edward Law 1st year Wilkinsburg Pennsylvania 

Sparkman, Claude Jefffferson....Law 2nd year Miami ^. Dade 

Sparks, Merlin Lewis Bus. Adm. Spec Sarasota . ^^'■^f°*^ 

Spear, Mercer Patton -.... Arts Fresh Apalachicola Franklin 

Spofford, Ber^vyn Reed Arts Fresh Jacksonville .^. Duval 

Spoto. Frank P Pre-Med. 1st year Tampa Hi sborou-h 

Spoto, Ignatius C Law 2nd year Tampa Hillsborough 

Spradley, James Edwin Pre-Med. 1st year Crestview_ ^ n=H« 

Stadler, John Buchan Bus. Adm. Fresh Coral Gables Dade 

Spurck, Hiram Austill Pre-Med. 1st year Jacksonville nr^^^l 

Stafford Arthur Henry Arts Fresh Orlando ^'^^P,^^ 

Stembaugh Carl ArThur Bus. Adm. Spec St. Petersburg P.nel^s 

Stanley, Dennis Keith Teach. Soph Ocala . r™°5 

Stanly. George Booth,..Arts Sr., Law 1st year Ft. Lauderdale M«Xm 

Stanly Richard Lee Law 1st year Gainesville Alachua 

; Stanlv, William Alfred Law 3rd year Ft. Lauderdale wVluWon^h 

< Stansfield, William Ashton Engr. Soph Tampa Hillsborough 

: Stanwix-Hay, Walter Harry Engr. Sr Jacksonvi e Duval 

I Stearns, George Leslie Agri Jr Jacksonville Duval 

I Steen, George Edgar _ Teach. Soph St. Cloud Alarhua 

: Steen, Vernon Calhoun Engr. Sr Gainesville HilUhorou^h 

' Steine, Moses Harry Pre-Med. 1st year Tampa "'^ Hardee 

Stenstrom, Eric Carr Teach. Fresh Wauchula, Hardee 



Stephens, Alexander Hamilton....Law 1st year Jacksonville H^rdl^ 

Stephens, Carl Wilson Teach. Fresh Ona Sardee 

Stephens, Alexander Hicklen Teach .Spec Ona . .. -■- "f.^°^ 

Stephens! Ladue Emil ...._ Pharm. Fresh Springfiejd^ JiVl°f 



Ona 

Fresh 

Stevens, ' Larry Crane Arts 



248 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



Name 



Class 



Postoffice 



County or State 



Stevens, William Gerritt Arts Soph... 

Stewart, Arthur Edward Law 2nd year.. 

Stewart, Charles Francis Bus. Adm. Soph. 

Stewart, Francis Laird Pharm. Fresh... 

Stewart, Horace Floyd Teach. Soph... 

Stewart, Jackson Ernest Agri. Sr... 

Stinson, William B., Jr Bus. Adm. Fresh... 

Stith, Milton Chandler Arts Jr... 

Stone, Alden George Engr. Fresh.. 

Stone, M. L Teach. Jr... 

Stoner, Wilmer M Arts Soph.. 

Stones, Fred Maxwell Bus. Adm. Soph... 

Strawn, Theodore Richey Arts Soph... 

Strickland, Jack Pharm. Fresh... 

Strode, Carl Clay Teach. Sr... 

Stuhr, Ernest T Graduate . 

Sturges, Walter Armstrong Arch. F'resh... 

Summers, Adolphus Eugene Arts Fresh... 

Sumner, Francis Vernon Engr. Fresh... 

Sutton, Hugh Monroe, Jr Law 3rd year.. 

Swaine, Richard Harrison Pharm. Soph... 

Sweat, Wesley Albert Engr. Soph... 

Sweotintr, Benjamin, Jr Teach. Fresh. . 

Swidler, Joseph Charles Arts Soph... 

Swift, Mangus T Bus. Adm. Soph... 

Swindle, William Herbert Teach. Jr... 

Swinnington, Carey Ellis Teach. Jr... 

Swoope, William Edward, Jr Engr. Jr... 

Tannehill, Joseph Francis Law 1st year.. 

Taylor, Calffrey Wilder Bus. Adm. Fresh... 

Taylor, Charles Henry, Jr Graduate. . 

Taylor, David Baldwin Agri. Soph... 

Taylor, Ernest Lyman Arts Fresh. 

Taylor, Evan Pre-Med. 1st year.. 

Taylor, Phillip Emmett Teach. Fresh.. 

Taylor, Powei-s Agri. Spec. 

Tedder, Warren Louis Arts Fresh.. 

Templeton, Charles Robert Arts Fresh... 

Thacker, Orner Stephen Law 1st year.. 

Theobold, William F'. Pre-Med. 1st year.. 

Thomas, Bradley Morris Law 3rd year.. 

Thomas, Enoch Everett Bus. Adm. Soph... 

Thomas, George Walker Agri. Spec... 

Thomas, Geo. Wellington, Jr.. .Bus. Adm. Soph... 

Thomas, Robert Y. H Pre-Med. 1st year.. 

Thomas, Walter Lawrence Agri. Soph... 

Thompson, Arthur R., Jr Arts Fresh... 

Thompson, Cecil Asbury Arts Jr... 

Thompson, Hal Jack _ Arts Fresh... 

Thompson, J. Allen Engr. Fresh... 

Thompson, John Graves Teach. Soph... 

Thornal, Benjamin Campbell, Jr Arts Soph... 

Thorpe, George Wing Arts Fresh... 

Thrower, Frank Briggs Law 1st year.. 

Tice, James Thompson, Jr Arts Jr... 

Tidwell, William Jones Pharm. Fresh... 

Todd, Edgar Russell Bus. Adm. Jr... 

Tolbert, Benjamin Arthur Teach. Spec... 

Toole, Rex Foster Agri. Soph... 

Tomlinson, Lawrence Wells Arts Soph.. 

Torriente de la Jorge Jose Agri. 1 year.. 

Townsend, Burton E Arts Fresh... 

Townsend, Lisle Stephen Agri. Soph.. 

Toy, Leonard Raymond Agri. Jr. 

Trafton, David Calvin Engr. Fresh... 

Trainor, Charles Franklin Engr. Soph!.. 

Tramel, James Willard Teach. Jr... 

Traxler, Leon William Law 1st year.. 

Trebes, Edward Julian Bus. Adm. Soph... 

Triplett, Oliver Beaman Law 2nd year. 

Trogdon, George Richard Arts Soph... 

Trogdon, Richard Page Arts Soph... 

Troxler, John Wallace Bus. Adm. Soph... 

Troxler, Lindsay Boyd Agri. Sr... 

Troxler, Walter Garrett Graduate.. 

Truby, William Irving Bus. Adm. Fresh... 

Tuck, John Carson Engr. Soph... 



..Samson Alabama 

..Cocoanut Grove Dade 

Naples Collier 

..DeLand _ Volusia 

..Daytona Beach Volusia 

..Frostproof Polk 

.-Bradenton Manatee 

-Starke Bradford 

..Tampa Hillsborough 

..Blountstown Calhoun 

..St. Petersburg Pinellas 

..Daytona Beach Volusia 

..DeLand Volusia 

-Ft. Meade Polk 

..Green Cove Springs Clay 

..Gainesville _ Alachua 

..Orlando _ Orange 

-High Springs Alachua 

..Bonita Springs Lee 

-Pompano Broward 

..Pensacola Escambia 

..Mulberry Polk 

W. Palm Beach Palm Beach 

..Miami Dade 

..Miami Dade 

..Chipley Washin.gton 

-Bradenton Manatee 

..New Smyrna Volusia 

..Miami Dade 

..Plant City Hillsborough 

..Plant City Hillsborough 

..Chicago Illinois 

..Eau Gallic Brevard 

-Gainesville Alachua 

St. Petersburg Pinellas 

..Gainesville Alachua 

.Live Oak Suwannee 

..St. Petersburg Pinellas 

..Kissimmee Osceola 

..Orlando Orange 

Gainesville Alachua 

..Winter Haven Polk 

..Plant City Hillsborough 

..Stuart Martin 

..Jacksonville Duval 

Palm Harbor Pinellas 

..St. Petersburg Pinellas 

..Gainesville Alachua 

..Tampa Hillsborough 

..Oviedo Seminole 

..Miami Dade 

..Orlando Orange 

..Jacksonville Duval 

..Quincy Gadsden 

..Bartow Polk 

..Malone Jackson 

..St. Petersburg Pinellas 

..Jacksonville Duval 

..Graceville Jackson 

..Lake Wales Polk 

..Havana Cuba 

..DeFuniak Springs Walton 

..W. Palm Beach Palm Beach 

..Gainesville Alachua 

..St. Petersburg Pinellas 

..Daytona Beach Volusia 

..Alachua Alachua 

..Alachua Alachua 

-.Tampa Hillsborough 

..Forrest Mississippi 

..St. Augustine St. Johns 

..Melbourne Brevard 

..Ocala Marion 

Ocala Marion 

..Ocala Marion 

..Gainesville Alachua 

..Tampa Hillsborough 



REGISTER 249 

^"'"^ Class Postojfice County or State 

Tucker. Charles Weston, Jr. Arts Jr Jacksonville _ Duval 

Tucker, Woodston Coleman, Jr Arts Soph Miami Dade 

Turner, Edward Eugene Law 1st year Stuart Martin 

Turner, Glover Manuel Law 1st year So. Jacksonville ZZZZ'Z" Duval 

Turner, James Arts Fresh Decatur "'"'Illinois 

Turner, John Francis, Jr Pre-Med. 1st year Lakeland Polk 

Turner, Kenneth Edward Arts Soph Orlando ""'Oranee 

Turner, Oris«n Athos Agri. Spec Miami . Dade 

Turner, Robert Lee, Jr Engr. Fresh Clearwater Pinellas 

Turnor, William Deane, Jr Arts Fresh Ft Myers Lei 

Turner, William Huger, Jr Arts Fresh Miami ... . Dade 

Turner, William Rudolph Arts Soph Pelham Georgia 

Tutewiler, Charley Albert Bus. Adm. Soph Jacksonville Duval 

Tye, William Gosper Arts Fresh Ft. Pierce "Z'si. Lucie 

Tyler, E. Palmer Arts Sr Jacksonville Duval 

Ufford, Joel Curtis Arts Fresh Winter Park Orange 

Underbill, Marion Reeves Arts Fresh. Barberville .. ._ Volusia 

Untreiner, Royal J Bus. Adm. Soph Pensacola Escambia 

Upshaw, James Renfroe, Jr Arts FVesh Birmingham Alabama 

Usina, Frederick Charles Bus. Adm. Spec St. Augustine St. Johns 

Vaccaro, Joseph A Arts Fresh Tampa Hillsborough 

Vanderipe, John Fish, Jr Law 1st year Bradenton Manatee 

VanDerlip, Garfield Henry.. ..Bus. Adm. Soph St. Petersburg Pinellas 

Vanlandingham, Ernest M Pre-Med. 2nd yr. W. Palm Beach Palm Beach 

Vann, Charles Eldred Engr. Soph Miami Dade 

Vansickel, Dale Harris Bus. Adm. FVesh Gainesville Alachua 

VanValkenburg, Orren Lee Engr. Jr W. Palm Beach ...Palm Beach 

Vam, Myron M Agri. Fresh Ft. Meade Polk 

Varn, William Morris Engr. Fresh. Lake Wales Polk 

Veal, William Edwin, Jr Bus. Adm. Fresh Wildwood Sumter 

Veal, William Robert Overton Arts Fresh Ocala _ Marion 

Verney, FVank Stanley Bus. Adm. Jr Sanford Seminole 

VeVerka, Richard Dale Teach. Soph. Manatee Manatee 

Visserine, Norman Hayden Agri. 4 months Kenilworth Illinois 

Voelkel, Richard Talham Bus. Adm. Fresh Apopka Orange 

VonKaenel, Cecil Gordon Arch. Soph St. Petersburg Pinellas 

Voorhees, Richard Kenneth Arts Fresh. Cantonment Escambia 

Vrieze, Edwin Herman Arch. Spec Jacksonville Duval 

Waddell, Joseph Addison Engr. Soph Leesburg Lake 

Wahl, Harold B Arts Fresh Cocoa Brevard 

Wahlberg, Joel Frederick Arts Fresh Groveland Lake 

Walden, Robert Lee Arch. Soph. Ft. Meade ...._ Polk 

Waldron, Jesse Calvin, Jr Bus. Adm. Fresh Chiefland Levy 

Waldron, Marcus DeVoe Pharm. Soph Chiefland Levy 

Walker, Charles Frantz Agri. Fresh Miami Dade 

Walker, Ion Sessions Bus. Adm. Soph Tampa Hillsborough 

Walker, John Jay, Jr Engr. Fresh St. Petersburg Pinellas 

Walker, Joseph Fussel Arts Soph Eustis Lake 

Wall, Sameul Maupin Engr. Spec Miami Dade 

Wallace, Howard Keefer Arts Soph St. Petersburg Pinellas 

Wallace, Julian Howard Agri. Spec Hartsville So. Caiolina 

Wallace, Samuel DelMar Law 1st year Gainesville Alachua 

Walsh, Tracy Ryan Engr. Fresh Pensacola Escambia 

Waltmire, Jerome Bus. Adm. Soph Punta Gorda _ Charlotte 

Walton, Bertram David Pharm. Jr Little River _ Dade 

Wansker, Williams Law Spec Jacksonville _ Duval 

Ward, Fred Curtis Bus. Adm. Jr Eustis _ Lake 

Ward, John Green, Jr Arts Soph Gainesville _ Alachua 

Warlow, Thomas Picton, Jr Teach. Fresh Orlando Orange 

Warman, Ralph Arts Fresh Miami Dade 

Warman, Russell Arts Fresh Miami Dade 

Warren, Fliller Law 1st year Blountstown Calhoun 

Wasdin, John Alvin Teach. Fresh Graham Bradford 

Wass, Howard Frederick Bus. Adm. Fresh Miami Dade 

Watkins, John Vertrees Agri. Spec Lakeland Polk 

Watrous, Harry James, Jr Arts Sr Tampa _ Hillsborough 

Watrous, Tom M Arts Soph Tampa Hillsborough 

Watson, Clarence Newton Agri. Soph Miami Dade 

Watson, James Brent Bus. Adm. Soph Pensacola Escambia 

Watson, Ray Marcus Law 1st year Miami Dade 

Watson, Thomas Campbell.. ..Bus. Adm. Soph Pensacola Escambia 

Watson, William Beaford Arts Fresh Jacksonville Duval 

Watters, James I Arts Fresh Millview Bay 

Wattles, Robert Starr Teach. Fresh Jacksonville Duval 

Watts, Olin Ethredge, Jr Law 2nd year Gainesville _ Alachua 

Waugh, Joseph Edward, Jr Engr. Soph Gainesville Alachua 






250 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

Name Class Postoffice County or State 

Wax, Charles Samuel Arts Soph Palm Beach Palm Beach 

Way, Raymond Clayton Law 3rd year Ea.tjle Lake Polk 

Weaver, Richard Allen Arts Fresh. Gainesville „. Alachua 

Weaver, William S Teach. Jr Bristol _ Liberty 

Webb, Alexander Lee, Jr Engr. Fresh. Jacksonville Duval 

Webb, Sam Graham Agri. Sr Clearwater Pinellas 

Webb, Thomas Roba Arts Fresh. Oakland Orange 

Webber, William Leonard Arts Fresh Miami Dade 

Wedler, Fred Charles Arts Soph Melbourne Brevard 

Weeks, William Tucker Arts Fresh Newberry Alachua 

Wehner, Eric Arts Fresh Daytona Beach _ Volusia 

Weisinger, Irving I Arts Fresh. Brooklyn New York 

Weiss, Charles Socrates Arts Soph Brooklyn _ New York 

Weiss, Israel Lewis Arts Fresh. Sarasota Sarasota 

Weiss, Phillip _ Bus. Adm. Jr Miami Dade 

Weissinger, Arthur Bingham Engr. Soph Orlando Orange 

Welch, Arnold D Pharm. Fresh Zephyrhills _ Pasco 

Welch, Gardiner Warren Arts Jr. Gainesville Alachua 

Welch, Herbert Morrison Agri. Jr St. Petersburg Pinellas 

Welch, John William Teach. Fresh Melbourne Brevard 

Welles, Gurdon Henry Engr. Soph Miami Dade 

Welsh, Dale Helwick Arts Fresh. Alliance Jackson 

West, Erdman Graduate Gainesville _ Alachua 

West, Marian Huguenin Law 2nd year Marianna _ Jackson 

Westbrook, Albert Theodore Law Spec Clermont _ Lake 

Wheeler. Chadbom O., Jr Arts Soph Lakeland _ Polk 

Wheeler, Lucius Curtis Bus. Adm. Fresh St. Petersburg Pinellas 

Whisenant, Robert B Engr. Jr. Palmetto Manatee 

White, Amos Burdett Law 1st year St. Petersburg Pinellas 

White, Walter Hugh Arts Soph Pensacola _ _. Escambia 

Whitely, Miles Jonathan Engr. Jr Lemon City _.. Dade 

Whitton, Hiram Allen Teach. Soph Ponce de Leon Holmes 

Wiard, David Kyle Arts Fresh Sullivan Illinois 

Wicks, Harold Richard Pharm. Fresh Miami Dade 

Widell, Carl Aroyde Law Ist year W. Palm Beach Palm Beach 

Wiernstiener, Conrad Joseph.. ..Law 2nd year St. Petersburg Pinellas 

Wirrgert, Dohren William Bus. Adm. Soph Ft. Lauderdale Broward 

Wiggington, John Talbot Teach. Fresh. Miami _ Dade 

Wiig, Howard Edgerton Law 1st year Ft. Lauderdale Broward 

Wiig, Laurence Maxon _ Arts Soph Ft. Lauderdale Broward 

Wilder, Calffrey Dana Agri. Sr Tampa Hillsborough 

Wilder, George Walling _ Arts Jr Plant City Hillsborough 

Wilder, Wallace Livingston.. Bus. Adm. Soph Knights Hillsborough 

Wilensky, Joseph Solomon Arts Fresh Jacksonville _ Duval 

Wilkerson, James William Teach. Soph Jacksonville _ Duval 

Wilkerson, Robert Lathair Engr. Sr. Bushnell _ Sumter 

Williams, Buford Ellis Bus. Adm. Fresh. Quincy Gadsden 

Williams, Charles Ashton Arts Fresh Miami _ Dade 

Williams, Edwin Lacy _ Arts Fresh Ft. Meade _ Polk 

Williams, Floyd Ellsworth Arts Fresh I^esburg Lake 

Williams, Jack Davis Arts Fresh Tampa Hillsborough 

Williams, Joseph Edward _ Graduate Lake Helen Volusia 

Williams, Kenneth Rust Teach. Soph Monticello Jefferson 

Williams, Nat Lawrence Law 1st year Miami Dade 

Williams, Norman Eric Arts Fresh Seville Volusia^ 

Williams, Thomas Harold Pharm. Soph Watertown Columbia 

Williams, William Bertrand Law 1st year St. Petersburg Pinellas 

Williamson, Bailey Finley....Bus. Adm. Soph Gainesville Alachua 

Williamson, Horace Smith Engr. Soph. Lakeland Polk 

Willes, Errol Shippen Bus. Adm. Soph Jensen St. Lucie 

Willis, Jesse Mercer Bus. Adm. Fresh Williston Levy 

Willits, Franklin Bosley Bus. Adm. Fresh South Bay Palm Beach 

Wilson, Bushrod Eliot Bus. Adm. Soph W. Palm Beach Palm Beach 

Wilson, George Thomas Engr. Fresh Sanford Seminole 

Wilson, James Charlton Arts Fresh. Tampa Hillsborough 

Wilson, John Wesley Engr. Spec Sanford — . Seminole 

Wilson, Lloyd Bus. Adm. Fresh. Tampa Hillsborouirh 

Wilson, Maurice James Law 3rd year Bartow _ Polk 

Wilson, Parker Thomas Pharm. Fresh Frostproof Polk 

Wilson, Pat Bus. Adm. Spec Tallahassee _ Leon 

Wilson, Pettus Kinnebrew, Jr Engr. Soph Jacksonville - Duval 

Wilson. William Horace, Jr Law 3rd year Lake City Columbia 

Wilson, William Sidney, Jr Law 3rd year Tampa Hillsborough 

Wilt, Donald Frank ...._ Arts Fresh Eustis Lake 

Wilt, Edward James Arts Fresh Eustis Lake 

Windham, Joe Perry Engr. Jr ...Gor.zalez Escambia 

Windsor, Alfred Lester Pharm. Fresh Winter Haven Polk 

Wingate, Homer D Bus. Adm. Spec St. Petersburg Pinellas 

Wingert, Charles Hawk _ Law 2nd year Gainesville _ Alachua 



REGISTER 



251 



Name Class Postoffice County or State 

\V.:r eit, Earl Perry _ Engr. Soph Punxsutawney Pennsylvania 

Wiiner, Roy Payne Arts Fresh St. Petersburg Pinellas 

W;>o, Jack Lincoln Bus. Adm. Soph Sarasota ..._ Sarasota 

; Wise, Jacob Hooper Law 1st year Gainesville _ Alachua 

j Witt, Currie Butler „ Teach. Soph Tampa Hillsborough 

Wolcott, John Lucien Engr. Soph. Orlando _ Orange 

1 Wolfe, Stanley Reid Law 1st year Pensacola Escambia 

1 Wolff, George Raymond Arts Fresh Orlando Orange 

i Wood, Frank Ernest, Jr Teach. Fresh. Jacksonville Duval 



i Wood, Harold Russell Bus. Adm. Fresh.. 

• Wood, Robert Garland Arts Soph... 

I Woodbery, Robert McTyer Arts Fresh. 

I Woodruff, Richard Starkey Law 2nd year.. 

I Woods, James Pasco Arts Fresh... 

! Woodward, William Edward Teach. Soph... 

' Woolslair, John Kneeland, Jr Engr. Fresh. . 

i Woltz, Jack D Arts Fresh. 

Workizer, John C. W Engr. Fresh... 

Worth, David Gaston Agri. Spec. 

Wratlen, Albert Edward Engr. Soph... 

I Wray, F. Ellis Engr. Jr... 

; Wray, Lewis Thomas Law 2nd year.. 



..St. Petersburg Pinellas 

. Lithia Hillsborough 

Orlando _ Orange 

Orl.nndo Orange 

Perry Taylor 

. Quincy Gadsden 

Ft. Myers Lee 

..Jacksonville Duval 

St. Petersburg Pinellas 

..Courtenay Brevard 

..Archer Alachua 

Avon Park „ Highlands 

..Miami Dade 

Pinellas 

Hendry 



I W^yatt, John Spencer Teach. Fresh Clearwater 

Wyse, John Hope Law 1st year. Teach. Sr Clewiston _ 

' Yancey, Hurvey Hall Arts Fresh Tampa _ Hillsborough 

: Yarnall, Frank Dent Engr. Fresh. Winter Park Orange 

Yawn, Cecil Parker ...._ Teach. Fresh. Graceville Jackson 

Yawn, Donald Hunter Agri. Soph Graceville Jackson 

Yeager, Claude J Pre-Med. 1st year Melbourne Brevard 

Yeats. Robert Sheppard _ Arts Soph Tampa Hillsborough 

Yenawine, George Bourne Law 2nd year Jacksonville Duval 

i Young, Harold Buckley Arts Jr Middletown Connecticut 

! Young, Harry Irwin Law 2nd year Tarpon Springs Pinellas 

Young, V. P Bus. Adm. Fresh Bradenton _ Manatee 

Ziebe, Otto Edward ...._ .-. Engr. Sr Jacksonville Duval 

Ziegler, Frederick Ernest....- Teach. Fresh Pensacola Escambia 

Ziegler, Louis Williams ..._ Agri. 2 year Orlando Orange 

Zumwalt, FVank Irwin ...._ Pharm. Jr Miami Dade 

Zurovsky, Louis _ Arts Soph Brooklyn - New York 



Name 
j Abbott, Chas. K ., 
Adams, Mrs. B. D. 



SUMMER SCHOOL, 1926 

Postoffice County or State 

_ „ Fort Green Springs ..._ Hardee 

_ Gainesville ...- - Alachua 

Adkina, Dorothy C Hawthorne - Alachua 

1 Albritton, Kathleen _ Wauchula ...._ - Hardee 

Albury, Mrs. Beulah - Key West _ _. ~ Monroe 

Albury, Sadelle L _ Key West Monroe 

Alexander, Grace E _ - -Dade City — ~ Pasco 

Alexander, Mrs Louie ...._ ~ -Sorrento - L,ajce 

Alexander, Nell M _ _ Sorrento - Lake 

Allen, Viviene Grace _ Miami - "^<^^ 

I Allen. Wm. F Ft. Valley Georgia 

Allison, Maud - Moore Haven 

Anderson, Mrs. Emma R - - Little River 

Anderson, Ewing ...._ Gainesville 



Glades 

... Dade 

Alachua 

.... Polk 

Suwannee 



Anderson, Ida M _ _ Mulberry 

i Anderson. Lucretia S' Live Oak _ 

Anderson, Margaret E _ Jacksonville - - ■■ iJuvai 

Anderson, Marion H Madison Madison 

Anderson, Mrs. Rose M Jacksonville ..— - „ i '^ 

I Andrews, Lothair B _ _ _ Bonifay ■; Holmes 

Andrews, Viola M Live Oak ...._ Suwannee 

Arnold. Lucretia E _ _ - Jacksonville ,, 

Arnold. Wm. M Key West Monroe 



ZZ'''Z'"'"'Z'"j^renton '. Gilchrist 

_ ..Tampa - Hillsborough 

'....Z Eustis - • Lak« 

_ Bushnell ...._ Sumter 

Umatilla ...- ■„ La^^ 

. .„ -Daytona Beach Volusia 

„ Palatka Putnam 

„ ...Cedar Keys - Levy 

Aubuchon, Mrs. Gwendola ....- - Lakeland iioM?,,^ 

Ayer, Walter M _ _ _ Gainesville - - •- Aiacnua 



Arrington, Mary 

Arrojo, Minnie C -.. 

Ashmore, Annie L , 

Asson, Thos. M., Jr. ... 
Atkinson. Alexander ..... 
Atkinson, Mrs. Ethel M 

Atkinson. Hazelle E 

Atkinson, Hollis E. 



252 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



Name 

Babich, Peter 

Bailey, Annie Beatrice .... 

Baisden, Fred R 

Baker, Celestia A _ 

B.-iker, Effie E 

Baker, Grace Lou 

Baldwin, Mrs. Annie 

Bnllou, Amelia 

Bancroft. G. A 

Bandel, Louie „ 

Barnett, Margaret 

Barnett, Mildred A 

Barnhill. Wm. B 

Barrett, Emily H 

Barton, Bertha E 

Barton, Mrs. Elsie W 

Bassett, Edna Louise 

Bates, Darrell H 

Pauchman, Gussie L 

Bayly, Cyril _ 

Beach, Lillie Mae 

Beasley, Alice V _ 

Beaver, Dorothy M 

Bell, Mrs. Elizabeth S 

Bell, Mrs. Hennie Lou 

Belton, Mrs. Lena F 

Bennett, Elsie Marie 

Bennett, Jim Isaac 

Berkstresser, Mary E 

Bernhardt, Sarah 

Best, Florence Adeline 

Bettes, Irene Jewel 

Beyers, Mrs. Florence G. 

B-'=!bce, Charles L 

Bixler, Mrs. Maud 

Blackburn, Faith M 

Blacklock, Mrs. R. W 

Blair, Mrs. Alice Mary ... 

Blanton, Ellis M 

Blanton, Franklin S 

Blanton, Mrs. J. Drew 

Blnunt, Marion Cuthbert . 

Blount, Olney Cuthbert 

Blue, Neil Douglas 

Blue, Willie Exa (Miss) ... 

Borland, Jas. Louden 

Bower, Marie 

Boyatt, Frances Marie 

Bradbury, Mrs. Esther 

Braddock, Heyward M 

Bradford, Grace 

Bradley (Miss) Willie 

Brady, Ruth Violet 

Branning, Mrs. Annabelle 

Bridges. Eloise 

Bridges, Evelyne B 

Brodnax, Mrs. Stella B. . 

Broer, Dullye 

Brooker, Marvin A 

Brothers, Lionel R 

Brown, Benny Arden 

Brown, Mrs. Clara M 

Brown, Ethel 

Brown, J. Colvin 

Brown, Marcus Gordon ... 

Brown, Mary Lorena 

Brown, Mary Parker 

Brown, Mattie Lou 

Brown, Minnie Ruth 

Brown, Rebecca H 

Brown, Ruby Lenora 

Brownlee, Hugh L 

Brumley, Frank Warner . 
Brummette, Mrs. E. T. ... 

Brunk, Lloyd S 

Bryan, Mrs. Clara 

Bryant, Eleanor Stone 

Bryant, Ila Mae 

Bryant, Lorene Clara 



Postoffice 

Winter Park 

Port Tampa City 

Ft. Lauderdale 

Tampa 

St. Augustine 

Arcadia 

Alachua 

Palm Bay 

Pt. St. Joe 

— Miami 

_ -Hawthorne 

-O'Brien 

Gainesville 

St. Augustine 

-Gainesville 

Lady Lake 

Tampa 

_ Ft. Lauderdale .... 

Cross City 

Clearwater 

Webster 

_ Barber ville 

Key West 

Barberville 

- Arlington 

Coleman 

Port Orange 

Arcadia 

Hawthorne 

_ Coleman 

Fairfield 

St. Augustine 

Miami '. 

Orlando 

St. Petersburg 

St. Petersburg 

Gainesville 

.Tacksonville 

Lee 

Atmore 

Lake City 

Arcadia 

LaBelle 

- Vernon 

Vernon 

_ Ocala 

Dixie 

, - Oneida 

Lake City 

, Crescent City 

St. Petersburg 

- - Claxton 

Orlando 

St. Petersburg 

Coleman 

Coleman , 

Daytona Beach .... 

Wauchula 

- Bell 

Reddick 

Miami 

Bartow 

Reddick 

_ Gainesville 

So. Jacksonville ... 

Plant City 

Arcadia 

Odessa 

Lake Park 

Pinemount 

Pinemount 

Starke 

Gainesville 

Tampa 

Sebring 

Tampa 

Gainesville 

Gainesville 

Bowling Green 



County or State 

_ Orange 

Hillsborough 

Broward 

Hillsborough 

St. Johns 

DeSoto 

Alachua 

Brevard 

Calhoun 

Dade 

Alachua 

Suwannee 

Alachua 

St. Johns 

Alachua 

Lake 

Hillsborough 

Broward 

Dixie 

Pinellas 

Sumter 

Volusia 

Monroe 

Volusia 

Georgia 

Sumter 

Volusia 

DeSoto 

Alachua 

Sumter 

Marion 

St. Johns 

Dade 

Orange 

, Pinellas 

Pinellas 

Alachua 

Duval 

Madison 

Alabama 

Columbia 

DeSoto 

Hendry 

Washington 

Washington 

Marion 

Georgia 

Tennessee 

Columbia 

Putnam 

Pinellas 

Georgia 

Orange 

Pinellas 

Sumter 

Sumter 

Volusia 

Hardee 

Gilchrist 

Marion 

Dade 

Polk 

Marion 

Alachua 

Duval 

Hillsborough 

_ DeSoto 

Pasco 

Georgia 

Suwannee 

Suwannee 

Bradford 

Alachua 

Hillsborough 

Highlands 

Hillsborough 

Alachua 

Alachua 

Hardee 



Name 

Buchholz, F. W 

Buckels. Lucille _ 

Burdette, Claire 

Burgess, Josephine S _ 

Burke, Emma G 

Burnham, Mary Martha 


REGISTER 

Postoffice 

Gainesville 

Jasper 

Auburndale 

-.- St. Augustine 

Gainesville 

Clermont 


253 

County or State 

Alachua 

Hamilton 

Polk 

St. Johns 

Alachua 

Lake 


Burr, Raymond O 

Burry, Minnie Estelle 

Furry, Hattie 


Tallahassee 

Orange Lake 

Orange Lake 


Leon 

Marion 

Marion 


Bussell, Mrs. G. L 

Butler, Estelle D 

Butler, Miss Willie Mae 

Butts, Jos. S _ 

Byrons, Mrs. Frances 

Caldwell, Mrs. Leonard 

Camp, Henry Nurmey _.. 


Jacksonville 

Lakeland 

Gainesville 

Dade City 

Pomona 

Mulberry 

Ocala 


Duval 

Polk 

- Alat hua 

?a=.co 

Putnam 

Polk 

Marion 


Campas, Joseph John 

Campbell, Irene 


Ft. Meade _ 

DeLand 


Polk 


Campbell, Monroe, Jr 

Canney, Mrs. Ida G _ 


- Pensacola 

Live Oak 


Escambia 

„ Suwannee 


Cannon, Frank T _ 

Caraway, Mary Louise 

Carey, Miriam Elaine 

Carmichael, Parks M 

Games, Carl C 

Carraway, Mrs. Lily M 

Carroll, Geo. W 


Falmouth 

_ .Sanford 

Key West 

Gainesville 

Florahome ....j 

Gainesville 

Ojus 


Suwannee 

Seminole 

Monroe 

- Alachua 

Putnam 

- Alachua 

Dade 


Carson Colletta N 


Stuart 


Martin 


Carewell, Clara Belle 

Carter, Clio Belle 


Tampa 

_ Dover 


iSilisborough 

Hillsborough 


Carter, Jessie Lucile 


Miami 


Dade 


Carter, Myrtle Alice , 


Mulberry 


._ Polk 


Carter, Wm. Clifton 

Caton, Elizabeth 

Cason, Ernest Wesley 

Cawthen, Mattie Lee 

Chadwick, Mildred 


Gainesville 

Gainesville 

Lake Worth ...._ 

Leesburg 

Daytona Beach 


_ Georgia 

- Alachua 

- Palm Beach 

_ Lake 

_ Volusia 


Chaffee, Mrs. Sadie R 

Chaires, Clara 


_Lake City 

_01d Town 


Columbia 

Dixie 


Chambers, Harley P 

Chandler, Mrs. Helen 

Chapman, Violet L 


Mcintosh _.. 




Jacksonville 

„ Orlando 


Duval 

_ _ Orange 


Church, Alice L 

Clark, Mrs. Mamie R _ , 

Clark, Monroe E 


Eustis 

..._ Micanopy 

_Micanopy 


- Lake 

Alachua 

Alachua 


Clvmore, Isabelle A _ 

Colib, John M 


Gainesville 

Gainesville 


- Alachua 

Alachua 


Crffin, Emma Ives 

Coffin, Mrs. Josie L 

Coker, Zella Z 


Lake City 

Winter Haven 

.Limestone 


Columbia 

Polk 

Hardee 


Coleman Burnis Theo .. . . .. 


Hosford 


Liberty 


Connell, Margaret E 

Corbett, Mary FVances 

Core, Charles F _ 


Manatee 

_ Jasper 

Jacksonville 


- - Manatee 

Hamilton 

._ Duval 


Corwin. Mrs. Viola L. 

Cothron, Beulah 

Cox, Ray Donald _ 


Tampa 

Alton 

. .Clermont 


_ Hillsborough 

Lafayette 

_ Lake 


Craig, Mrs. Addie E 

Craig, Allen Thornton ....„ 

Craig, Vivia 


."..1 Odessa 


, Pasco 


Dade City 

Dade City _ 


Pasco 


Cripe, Grace Virginia _ 

Criswell, Mabel 


Dade City 

..._ Lake City 


„ Pasco 

Columbia 


Crook Mrs. Kate 


Jacksonville 


Duv^l 


Crosby, Margaret Alice 

Cross, Kilpatrick, Jr _ 

Crowell, Mrs. Jno. M 


Tampa 

Inverness _.. 


Hillsborough 

Citrus 


Arcadia 


DeSoto 


Crowell, Jno. M 


Arcadia 


DeSoto 


Crozier,' Rachel Flagg 

Crumpecker, (Miss) Billy 

Culbertson, Jno. Robt 

Cumbie, Marjorie C 


Okeechobee 

Jacksonville 

W. Palm Beach 

Jacksonville 


...„ Okeechobee 

Duval 

Palm Beach 

Duval 


Cumbie, Myrtle E 


_ Clarcona 


Orange 


Cumming, Fannie 


Tampa 


Hillsborough 


Cunnin^^ham, Roy L. 


Gainesville 


Alachua 


Curry, Lucile 


Gainesville 


Alachua 


Curry, Roy Givens 

Curtis. Fred 


Key West 

Tampa 


Monroe 

Hillsborough 



254 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



Name 

DaCosta, Annie Eliz 

Dailey, Betty Grace 
Dampier, Lora M 
Davis, Annie Lucille 
Davis, Mrs. Bruc e L 
Davis, Eva Matilda 
Davis, Mrs. Martruerite 
Davis, Orville Rhoads 
Davis, Mrs. Pearl R 
Davis, Theuton Lowell 

Deen, Carrie 

Dees, Clayton Clyatte 
DesChamps, Blanche 
Devineaux, Goldie E 
Dieffenwierth, Julia M 
Dodson, Chas. L 
Donaldson, M. G 
Donovan, Mrs. Rose Gray 

Dopp, Lena 

Dorsey, Emily Alice 
Doss, Luther Thomas 
Douthit, Senie Evelyn 
Drawdy, Eva ... _ 
Drawdy, Pearle B 
Dreher, Mary Z. 
D riggers, Albert G 
Drum, Geneva Gay 
Dudley, Edna ... 
Dunham, Lloyd Ulysses 
Durham, Edna Viola 
Durham, Wallace C 
Dyson, Annie Belle 

Eason, Mrs. Vivian D 
Echols, Frances Lucile 
Ector, Julia Gatewood 

Edson, Sarah 

Edwards, Henry Leitner 
Edwards, Jacqueline 
Edward.s, Wm. T 
Eikel, Sadie Elizabeth 
Ellis, Mrs. Grace 
Emerson, Francis H 
English, Bernard Henry .... 
English, Mabel Rowena .... 

Ennis, DoUie 

Eshleman, S. Kendrick 
Ethridge, Noma Virginia 

Evans, Lilly 

Evrard, Elizabeth F 

Fagan, Earle Donald 
Faircloth, E. A. 
Fant. Maude Eloise 
Farmer, Mrs. Jno Wm 

Farr, Gene 

Fausett, Grace D 
Fay, Mrs. Orra M 
F'erguson, Thelma Earle 
Fleshman, Aquila Dura 
Fletcher, Mrs. H. B 
Fletcher, Horace B 
Fletcher, Velta L 
Florence, Mrs. Frances M. 
Fogg, Grace Dell 
Fogg, Leola Belle 

F'olks, Rae 

Forbes, Florence E 
Forman, Lucille D 
Fort, Mrs. Mae Dely 
Fortune, Allen M 
Fortune, Mrs. M. A 
Fryar, Frances E 
Futch, Mrs. Mae 

Galloway, Mrs. Beatrice W 
Galloway, Clifton 
Gant, Mrs. Violet 
Garcia, Angle Geraldine 



Postoffice County or State 

....Gainesville Alachua 

Mt. Dora Lake 

M lyo LaFayette 

Eldorendo Georgia 

Arcadia DeSoto 

B^rtow Polk 

Coconut Grove Dade 

_ Miami Dade 

Miami Dade 

Lakeland _ „ Polk 

Gainesville Alachua 

Dny LaFayette 

Bishopville _ South Carolina 

Homeland Polk 

St. Petersburg Pinellas 

Gainesville Alachua 

I amont Jefferson 

Micanopy Alachua 

Limona Hillsborough 

Gainesville Alachua 

Hinson Gadsden 

Peters Dade 

-Mascotte Lake 

Mascotte Lake 

Micanopy Alachua 

Wauchula Hardee 

Miami _ Dade 

Newberry Alachua 

Gainesville Alachua 

Odessa Pasco 

Bristol _ _ Liberty 

Sanford Seminole 

-Summerfield Marion 

Sanford _ Seminole 

Columbus Georgia 

Ocala _ Marion 

Daytona Beach Volusia 

Florida City Dade 

Bartow Polk 

_EI fers Pasco 

-Sulphur Springs Hillsborough 

-Gainesville Alachua 

...Lake City _ _ Columbia 

...Plant City Hillsborough 

-Lake Wales Polk 

Gainesville Alachua 

Hardee Town Levy 

Tampa _ _ Hillsborough 

Ti tusville Bretvard 

Gainesville Alachua 

lay Santa Rosa 

Morriston _ Levy 

Ocoee Orange 

Gainesville _ - Alachua 

Ocala Marion 

Panama City ,. Bay 

Newberry Alachua 

. New Albany Indiana 

Homestead - Dade 

Ojus Dade 

Dawson _... Georgia 

Freeport Walton 

-Graham Bradford 

Graham Bradford 

Tampa Hillsborough 

Ta mpa Hillsborough 

Winter Park Orange 

Sinford Seminole 

Milton _ Santa Rosa 

Milton Santa Rosa 

Miami - Dade 

Tampa Hillsborough 

DeSoto City Highlands 

Darlington Holmes 

Greenfield Pasco 

Tampa _ Hillsborough 



REGISTER 



255 



Natne 

Garcia. Evelyn Balbina 

Gardnei-. Ella G 

Ga?kin, Mary FVancis 

Gates, Ora M , 

Gates, Mrs. Kenneth L 

Geiger, Albert James 

Geifrer, Marion Percy 

GeorKe, Emmanual P 

Getch, Lucy Belle 

Glass, Albert Daniel 

Glass, Kathleen Camille .... 
Glidewell, Grace Melvine ... 

Goddard, Mrs. Olive W 

Goette, Mrs. William L 

Golden, Lafayette 

Golden, Maree 

Grable, Fern Louisia , 

Gray, Ida May _ 

Gray, Mrs. Alice B 

Gray, Millie B 

Green, Arthur S 

Greene, Doris Willie 

Grenelle, Edwin Wm 

Groff, Dorothy H , 

Guess, Mary Campbell 

Gulley, Annie Lee 

Gunn, Annie Mae 

Hadden, Madelin Leona 

Hapreman, Mrs. Vada F 

Hait, Kenneth Blaisdell 

Hall, Edna 

Hall, Janie Pauline 

Hall, John Lewis 

Hall, Mrs. Pearl Futch 

Hamilton, Earl Elmer 

Hammock, Lucy Hoyt 

Hampton, Nettie Eunice .... 

Hancock, Mattie 

Hardee, Vida 

Harden, Thressia K 

Hardy, Mrs. Olgra E 

Hai'<rrove, Juanita Cole 

Harllee, Eleanor S 

Harman, Mrs. Mary B 

Harrell, Mrs. Leslie Wilder 
Herrell, Mattie Florelle .... 

Harrington, Austa 

Harris, Arthur Small 

Harris, Charles J 

Harris, Ruth 

Harrison, Mrs. C. A 

Harrison, C. A 

Harry, Edward Perin 

Hart, Ellen Bonn 

Hart, Ollie 

Harvey, Edith Eleanor 

Harwell, Hettie Redford 

Haskell, Gladys 

Hathaway, Edith _ „ 

Hawk, LeRoy 

Hawkins, Susie 



Hayden, Dorothy Quine 

Hayes, Braden Hurst 

Haynes, Jessie Mildred 

Head, Grace Olen 

Head, Mrs. Riley E 

Healy, Mrs. Ethel D _.. 

Helveston, Lucile 

Hemphill, Kate _.. 

Henderson, Edwin L , 

Henderson, Leon N , 

Henderson, Ralph W , 

HeTidry, Mrs. Ethel D 

Herald, Rudolph, Jr 

Herrinpr, Elsie Ray 

Hewlett, Norma Clara , 

Hewlett, Virginia Lee 

Hiatt, Wilbur Garland .... 



Postofjice 

...Tampa 

....Tampa City 

...Like Oak 

.-..Tampa 

..-Manatee 

-.St. Clcud 

....Zephyrhills 

....Gainesville 

....Tampa 

....Lee 

....Gainesville 

....Jacksonville , 

.—Gainesville 

....Eustis 

....Gainesville 

....Ocala 

....Haines City .... 

—.Salem 

....Des Moines 

....Ocala 

....Perry 

....Live Oak 

....Palm Harbor 

....Oxford 

....Williston 

—.Tampa 

.—Gainesville 

....Madison , 

....Tampa 

Wauchula 

....Ocaia 

....Orlando 

....Woodville 

....Gainesville 

....Pierson 

....Pinetta 

....LaBelle 

....Lake City 

Hardeetown 

....High Springs ... 

— Orlando 

...Tampa 

— Tampa 

Bartow 

....Lakeland 

....High Springs 

....St. Petersburg .. 

....Jacksonville 

....Gainesville 

....Gainesville 

....Gainesville 

....Gainesville 

....Pompano 

....Hastings 

....Lakeland , 

.-Jacksonville 

...Anthony 

....Gainesville 

...Gainesville 

...Gainesville 

...Alachua „ 

...Jacksonville 

...Larkin 

...New Smyrna 

...Plant City 

...Lakeport 

...St. Petersburg .. 

...Tampa 

...Micanopy 

...Wacissa 

...Galliver 

...Shady Grove 

...Arcadia 

...Miccosukee 

...Fernandina 

...Sulphur Springs 

...Tampa 

...Gainesville 



County or State 

Hillsborough 

Hillsborough 

Suwannee 

Hillsborough 

Manatee 

Osceola 

Pasco 

Alachua 

Hillsborough 

Madison 

Alachua 

Duval 

Alachua 

Lake 

Alachua 

Marion 

Polk 

Hlinois 

Iowa 

Marion 

Taylor 

Suwannee 

Pinellas 

Sumter 

Levy 

Hillsborough 

Alachua 



Madison 

Hillsborough 

Hardee 

Marion 

Orange 

Leon 

Alachua 

Volusia 

. Madison 

Hendry 

Columbia 

Levy 

, Alachua 

Orange 

Hillsborough 

Hillsborough 

Polk 

Polk 

Alachua 

Pinellas 

Duval 

Alachua 

Alachua 

Alachua 

Alachua 

Broward 

St. Johns 

Polk 

Duval 

Marion 

Alachua 

Alachua 

Alachua 

Alachua 

Duval 

Dade 

Volusia 

Hillsborough 

Glades 

Pinellas 

Hillsborough 

Alachua 

Jefferson 

Okaloosa 

Madison 

DeSoto 

Leon 

Nassau 

Hillsborough 

Hillsborough 

Alachua 



256 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



Name Postoffice County or State 

Hieronymus, Elva Hawthorne Alachua 

Hill, Carrie _ Lakeland Polk 

Hitchcock, Mary B Elkton St. Johns 

Hodge, Mrs. Frances H Tampa Hillsborough 

Hodge, J. Perry Tampa Hillsborough 

Hodges, Mrs. Dora B Orange City Volusia 

Hogan, Cecil Malcolm Brandon Hillsborough 

Hotran, Delia Trenton Gilchrist 

Hollingsworth, J. L., Jr Arcadia _ DeSoto 

Holt, Eva Ellen _ Ft. Meade Polk 

Holton, Mrs. Bessie C Miami Dade 

Holton, Mildred Eliz Miami Dade 

Home, Jack _ _ Blountstown _ Calhoun 

Home, James Arthur Live Oak Suwannee 

Horrell, Merton Stuart Gainesville Alachua 

Horrell, Robert Paul Gainesville Alachua 

Howard, Bertha Mae Tasmania Glades 

Howard, Mrs. Esther Hardeetown Levy 

Howard, Mabel J. (Mrs.) _ Eustis Lake 

Hudnall, Frank S Arlington Duval 

Hudnall, John Mayes _ Gainesville Alachua 

Humphries, Mrs. Hazel High Springs Alachua 

Hunt, Vernon Lester Leesburg I^ake 

Hunter, Marcia Belle _ Tampa Hillsborough 

Ingalls, Nellie Margaret Groveland Lake 

Ingalls, Sylvia A Zephyrhills Pasco 

Ingraham, Mary Louise Key West Monroe 

Isaac, Mrs. Agnes Helseth Coconut Grove Dade 

Isaac, Albert L _ Coconut Grove Dade 



Jeffries, Ross Everett _ Melrose 

Jernigan, Effie Lee _ Wellborn , 

Jernigan, Ella Mae _ Tampa 

Johns. Henry Lamar Wellborn 

Johnson, Arrie Lee Jay 

Johnson, Bertha Hardeetown 

Johnson, Dora Raiford 

Johnson, Jewell Hardeetown 

Johnson, Jimmie W Palatka 

Johnson, Mrs. K. B Little River 

Johnson, Minton H _ Ringgold 

Johnson, Roy E _ Milton 

Johnston, Edith W _ Coral Gables Dade 

Jones, Anna Ethel Jay Santa Rosa 

Jones, Bessie Lee _ Alma Georgia 

Jones, Bibb E Port Orange Volusia 

Jones, Listen Stephen Pensacola Escambia 

Jones, Percy Trenton _ Gilchrist 

Jordan, Marie A _ Milledgeville Georgia 

Justen, Mrs. Mary Louise -Tampa Hillsborough 



Alachua 

... Suwannee 

Hillsborough 

.... Suwannee 

Santa Rosa 

Levy 

Union 

Levy 

Putnam 

Dade 

Georgia 



Keck, John H 
Keene, Veda 

Keith, Kale _ . 

Keith, Violet I 
Kellogg, Mrs Edna Sweet 
Kelly, Mrs Birdie L 
Kelly, Jas. Homer 
Kelly, Joseph Eddie 
Kemp, Mrs Cecile McK 
Kennedy, May 
Kenniston, Mrs B 
Kickiightei, LolaDai 
Kight, Artis Albeit 
King, Catherine M 
King, Floy Grace 
Knight, Mrs T S 
Knight, Thomas J 
Knowles, Robert S 
Knowlton, Edna Pearl 
Korp, John William 

LaFuze. Geo. L. 
Lancester, N. R 

Lane, Stella 

Langston, Carris E 
Langston, Mrs. Margaret 
Langston, Thos. Hill 
Larkin, Hoke ... 



High Springs Alachua 

Wauchula Hardee 

_ Lakeland Polk 

Tarpon Springs Pinellas 

[■"■t. Myers _ Lee 

Archer _ Alachua 

Archer Alachua 

Glen St. Mary Baker 

Miami Dade 

Lake Geneva Clay 

Jacksonville Duval 

_ Kissimmee Osceola 

Center Hill Sumter 

Coconut Grove Dade 

Lake Worth Palm Beach 

-Charlotte Harbor _ Charlotte 

Altoona _ Lake 

Gainesville _ Alachua 

Pomona Putnam 

Lakeland Polk 

.Clermont _ - - Lake 

Trenton Gilchrist 

Tampa Hillsborough 

Cross City Dixie 

Tampa Hillsborough 

Tampa _ Hillsborough 

..Sumatra Liberty 



REGISTER 



257 



Name 

Larson, Lawrence John 

Lawhorne, Carl T 

Leckey, Louise 

Ledbetter, Clara Belle ..._ 



Lee, Mrs. Ruby M. 

Leitner, Almena „ 

Leitner, Annie Ophelia 

Leitner, Ethel Agusta 

Lester, Geo. Henry 

Lewis, Lawrence L. 

Lewis, R. Ruth 

Liles, Mrs. Wanda M 

Lindsey, Georgia M _ 

Lindstedt, Alice Marie 

Lites, Lila Mae 

Lockwood, Ida Florence 

Loften, Wm. Travis _.... 

Long, Clarice Mona 

Long, Lillian L 

Long, Noyes C 

Lord, Mrs. Annie Bates 

Lord, Mrs. Ruth _ 

Love, Marian 

Lovell, Claude Robert 

Lovvorn, Charles J 

Lowery, Mrs. Harris 

Luflfman, Ida Lena 

Lunn, Mrs. Annie Lee 

McCain, Carrie Ava Lee.. 

McCaghren, Rachael I 

McCall, Allen Duncan 

McCall. Georgie E _.. 

McCallister, Hazel I 

McCallister, Lottie Mae 

McCauley, Myra Maude 

McClamroch, Frances 

McClellan, Amnion 

McClellan, B. T 

McClellan, Broward 

McClelland, Leola Belle 

McComjick, Harry W 

McConnick. Mrs. Mary B. 

McDonald, Howard A 

McEwen, Raleigh O 

McFadden, Mary Lou 

McFarland, Everette 

McFarland, Margaret E 

McGarrah, Nell 

McGill, Edmund Robert 

McGough, Mrs. Louise 

McGarth, Blanche B 

McGarth, Ethel B 

Mclntire, Mrs. Mildred L. .. 

Mclnnis, Mrs. Sam W 

Mclnnis, Sam W 

McKinney, Eula Lee 

McKinnon, Nan _ 

McLane, Eldridge F „ 

McLeod, Irma Louise 

McLin, Vivian „.._ 

McMillan, Ann Averil 

McMullen, Daniel G _ 

MacNeill, Foda M _.... 

McNicoll, Mrs. Fannie E. .. 

McRae, Bemice Allie 

MacVicar, Alice Marion 

Maddox, Russell Calvin 

Mahon, Edna _ 

Mahoney, Mrs. Edwina Ray 

Mahood, Mrs. Mildred H 

Malakowsky, Alice Ruth 

Malcolm, Gladys Lucinda 

Mallory, Gladys AJyne 

Mallory, Naomi 

Mann, Orion Alfred 

Marasales, Hercules 

Marchman, Mrs. Eleanor .... 
Martin, Mrs. Grace H 



Postoffice County or State 

..Tampa Hillsborough 

..Hampton _ Bradford 

..Waynesboro Virginia 

-Coleman Sumter 

..Homosassa Citrus 

..Kissimmee ..„ _„.„.„„ _™. Osceola 

..Micanopy Marion 

..M icanopy Marion 

..Tampa Hillsborough 

-Woodville Leon 

..Ft. Myers Lee 

-Tarpon Springs , _ Pinellas 

..Geneva Seminole 

..Hallandale _ Broward 

..High Springs _ Alachua 

..Tampa Hillsborough 

..Summerfield Marion 

..Tampa Hillsborough 

..Gainesville _ Alachua 

.Gainesville Alachua 

Orlando Orange 

..Larkin _ Dade 

..Meridian Mississippi 

..Summerfield Marion 

..Okeechobee Okeechobee 

..Stuart Martin 

..Ocala _ Marion 

..Brewster Polk 

-Cedar Key Levy 

..Branford _ Suwannee 

-Milton Santa Rosa 

-Lake City Suwannee 

..Branford Dixie 

..Branford Dixie 

-Durham North Carolina 

-Parrish „ Manatee 

-Wewahitchka Gulf 

-Blountstown _ Calhoun 

..Blountstown Calhoun 

-Tampa _ Hillsborough 

-Gainesville Alachua 

-Lake Alfred Polk 

-Ft. Myers _ Lee 

-Newberry A lachua 

-Alachua _ Alachua 

-Blountstovm Calhoun 

-Ocoee - Orange 

-Gainesville Alachua 

-Waldo Alachua 

-Winter Park Orange 

-St. Petersburg _ Pinellas 

-St. Petersburg Pinellas 

-Clearwater Pinellas 

-Micanopy Alaohua 

-O'Brien - Suwannee 

-Micanopy Alachua 

-Williston Levy 

-Palatka Putnam 

-Arcadia DeSoto 

-Knights --_ Hillsborough 

-Gainesville Alachua 

,.Lee Madison 

..Kissimmee _ .'- Osceola 

-Hollywood Broward 

-Ona _ - Hardee 

..Miami Dade 

..Clearwater _ Pinellas 

..Arcadia DeSoto 

..Leesburg _ ~.~ Lake 

..Miami Shores ...- Dade 

-Alva - - Lee 

-Jacksonville _ _ Duval 

-Lakeland _ Polk 

-Wellborn _ Suwannee 

-Ft. Meade - Polk 

..Pensacola Escambia 

..Inverness - Citrus 

..Beresford Lake 



258 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



Name Postoffice County or State 

Martin. Larrie Carl _..Lake Wales _ Polk 

Mashburn, Mansel M Blountstown Calhoun 

Mason, Mrs. Horace Geo Gainesville Alachua 

Massey, Euda _ New Smyrna _ „ Volusia 

Matheny, Candler C Madison Madison 

Mathews, Eulalie V Key West Monroe 

Mathis, Eula Elizabeth _.Indiantown _ _ Martin 

Matlack, Marion Brooks Sorrento _ _ Lake 

Maultsby, John Camp .Gainesville Alachua 

Maxwell, Alfred E _ Eustis _ _ Lake 

Maxwell, James Elton „.Gretna _ Gadsden 

Maxwell, Susie Irene Pahokee _ _ Palm Beach 

May. Anffus Edward St. Petersburg _ Pinellas 

May, Juanita Ella _ Tampa Hillsborough 

May, Selina Aernes Micanopy Alachua 

Maynard, Mrs. Helen Emma Rochelle — Alachua 

Maynard, Thomas Pickens Rochelle — — _ Alachua 

Maynard, Wm. Robert _... Rochelle — Alachua 

Meadows, Mrs. Carolyn H Umatilla _ Lake 

Mears, Geo. Hiram Cypress _ _ Jackson 

Medlock, Lurline C Green Cove Springs , Clay 

Meeks, F. B Falmouth Suwannee 

Meiere, Pattie Lorine Atlanta _ Georgia 

Merbler, A. A Pensacola Escambia 

Miles, Mrs. Lorene S Hialeah „ _ Dade 

Millard, Lillian M Lake Worth, _ Palm Beach 

Miller, Mrs. Albert R Kissimmee _ Osceola 

Miller, E. H Melbourne Brevard 

Miller, Mrs. Joe C „ Laurel „ Mississippi 

Miller, Robert Thomas Wellborn _ Suwannee 

MiDer, Russell Eugene Wellborn _ Suwannee 

Miller, Saul D Brooklyn _ New York 

Miller, Wm. R _ Bonifay _ Holmes 

Milton, Hattie .Jacksonville _ Duval 

Milton, Wm. Harold _ Macclenny „ Baker 

Mims, Beatrice J _ Anthony _ Marion 

Mima, Emma Lee _ Williston Marion 

Moody, Mattie _ _ Green Cove Springs _ Clay 

Moon, Leland Wills Pt. St. Joe „ Gulf 

Moore, Ellis _ Umatilla Lake 

Moore, Floyce Estelle Dixie _ „ _ _ Georgia 

Moore, Mrs. Jennie Higgins Belleview Marion 

Moore, Wilma Dixie Georgia 

Morford, Cora _ _ _ „Port Orange Volusia 

Morgan, Bertha Alvetta Holly Hill _ Volusia 

Morsan, Marj^aret E _ Mulberry Polk 

Morgan, Mary E Ft. Meade Polk 

Morsran. Wynne Harold Miami Dade 

Morris, Evelyn Ashton Staunton Virginia 

Morris, Irene Elizabeth Jacksonville Duval 

Moseley, Mrs. Rebecca S Sulphur Springs Hillsborou^ch 

Moses, Judson Eckford _Greensboro Gadsden 

Motes, Christine Ida Orlando _ Orange 

Mott, Sara Myrtle Ellaville _ _ Georgia 

Mounts, Chas. Eugene Gainesville Alachua 

Murphree, Claude Leon _ _ Gainesville „„ _ Alachua 

Nash, Louise Jacksonville _ Duval 

Nash, Viola Elizabeth Ha-svthorne Alachua 

Nation, Mrs. Clyde H Ft. Myers Lee 

Nelson, Emma Lou Plant City Hillsborough 

Nesbitt, Mrs. Roella M T.^mpa Hillsborough 

Newsome, Wm. Thomas Wellborn Suwannee 

Nichols, Wesley Ward -..^''elbourne Bch Brevard 

Nimmons, Ralph Wilson St. Petersburg Pinellas 

Niswonger, Iva Helena Kissimmiee Osceola 

Nordman, Leo B _ New Smyrna Volusia 

Norfleet. Mrs. Ellen K Aripeka _ Pasco 

Norris, Garnett Marie _Ashland Kentucky 

Ober, Beatrice Helen St. Petersburg Pinellas 

O'Donald, Ed Todd Jacksonville _ Duval 

O'Hara, Mrs. Sallie R _.Live Oak _ _ Suwannee 

Olson, Emma Olivia _ _ Punta Gorda Charlotte 

Oppenheim, Harry L Brooklyn _ _ New York 

Osteen, Mrs. Eva _ _ Ft. Myers Lee 

Osteen, Osmond Lee Ft. Myers Lee 

Otte, Burton J. H _ „ Gainesville _ Alaolhua 

Overten, Frances V Gainesville Alachua 

Owens. Helen — „ Gordon _ _ Alabama 



REGISTER 259 



Name Postoffice County or State 

Parham, Janice Gainesville _ Alachua 

Parker, Mrs. Mary L Ft. Meade ...._ Polk 

Parrish, Susie Ella Parrish _ Manatee 

Parrish, Mrs. Will _ Pan-ish _ Manatee 

Parsons, Carlos Theodore _ Gainesville Alachua 

Partin, Lucille J _ _ Oviedo Seminole 

Patterson, Elizabeth Bartow _ „ Polk 

Pedioro, FVances Mitchell _ Tampa Hillsboroufrh 

Perkins, Eunice _ Starke - Bradford 

Persons, Chas. Wright _ Trenton Gilchrist 

Perviss, Ethel Delaine Tasmania _ - Glades 

Peterson, Grace Estelle _ _ O'Brien Suwannee 

Pickren, Mrs. Daisy Palatka Putnam 

Pierce, Mrs. Edith R St. Petersburpr Pinellas 

Piper, Ellis Gardner „ Ft. Lauderdale Broward 

Pitts. Kinzy _ _ Blountstown Calhoun 

Pogrue, Cyril Eric _ Orlando _ Oranpre 

Ponder. Maidie _ Miami _ Dade 

Portner, Alice Regina Okahumpka Lake 

Powell, Grace - Lake Wales Polk 

Powell, Helen Jacksonville - Duval 

Powers, Wm. Harris _ Ocala - Marion 

Preuitt, Frances Virginia Gainesville _ Alachua 

Prevatt. Ethel Mary Jacksonville Duval 

Price, Mildred Caldwell Tampa „ - Hillsborouorh 

Priest, Fannie Belle Sapl'ord Seminole 

Prine, Asrnes Inez Kathleen _ _ Polk 

Prine, Claudia Aletta Citronelle Alabama 

Prine, Louise _ Citronelle - Alabama 

Proctor, Mrs. R. F Ocala Marion 

Proctor, Mrs. Suelow L Siimmerfield Marion 

Puckett, Atlee Meares Orlando Orange 

Qui-rley, Margaret Eliz Tampa Hillsborough 

Quinn, Adna Auburndale Polk 

Rader, Rachel Eliz Lakeland Polk 

Rarer, Ruth Marie Jliami Dade 

Ralls, Ella „ Arcadia DeSoto 

Rambo, Edwin C Orlando - Orange 

Ramsey, Louie Randall Lemon City Dade 

Faquet, Susan Jane Miami Dade 

Read, Alice Margaret _ New Smyrna _ Volusia 

Read, Mrs. Anna Laura Jacksonville - Duval 

Reeder, Edmund Maurice Palmetto Manatee 

Reeder, Mrs. Lenna B Palmetto - Manatee 

P.ees, Howard Francis St. Petersburg - Pinellas 

Register, Ada Eugenia Lake Butler ...._ Union 

Rehwinkel. Jennings A Crawfordville _ Wakulla 

Reid, Adam Edward Gainesville Alachua 

Reid, Alex Dodge _ Gainesville Alachua 

Reithmeier, Amandus ...._ Brandon Hillsborough 

Rembert, Mrs. Alma McC —Jensen - Martin 

Rembert, Alma Omerea Jensen ~ Martm 

Rencher, Mrs. Mamie Lee ...- Winter Park _ Orange 

Revels, Percy B _ Florahome Putnam 

Revels, Mrs. Talitha E _ Elfers ...._ - ~ Pasco 

Rhudy, Ralph Columbus Gainesville Alachua 

Richardson, Leitha J _ _ High Springs - Alachua 

Richardson, B. Lois High Springs Alachua 

Richey, Horace Edgar Coral Gables ...._ - - Dade 

Riggins, Mrs. Kate L _ Tampa Hillsborough 

Rinaman, James Curtis _ Lemon City - Dade 

Rivers, Glenn Lewis Gainesville - Alachua 

Roberts, Mrs. Dorothy B „ Arlington ...._ _ Duval 

Robinson, Anniebelle - Melrose _ Alachaa 

Robinson, Helen (Mrs.) _ Tampa - _ Hillsborough 

Robinson, Mrs. O. T _ Melrose Alachua 

Robinson, Raymond Harold -St. Petersburg - — - Pmellas 

Pvohinson, Reda Melrose ...._ - Alachua 

Robinson, Thomas R _ _ __ Tampa Hillsborough 

Rogers, Mi-s. E. E Hastings St. Johns 

Rogers, Little Mae _ „ Clearwater Pinellas 

Rollins. Mrs. Ruby S Umatilla _ Lake 

Roof (Miss), Joe S Gainesville Alachua 

Rorabaugh, John R _ Clermont - Lake 

Rosenberry, Mrs. Alice L _ St. Petersburg Pinellas 

Rosin, Marcus Aurel _ _ Arcadia _ DeSoto 

Ross, Mrs. F. L _ Pineland Lee 



260 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



Name 



Postoffice 



County or State 



Ross, Stoyte - 


Stuart 


Palm Beach 


Rosser, Mrs. Katie C 


Ft. Myers ."......1 ..... 


Lee 


Roth, Henry Dale 

Royal, Ruth Laverne 

Russ, Ashley Roche 


Gainesville 

-.- Kelsey City 

St. Petersburg 


Alachua 

Palm Beach 
Pinellas 


Russ, F. G 

Russ, Mrs. F. G 

Ryan, Wm. James 

Ryland, Lelia 


St. Petersburg 

St. Peters-burg 

Coatesville 

Orange City 


Pinellas 

Pinellas 

Pennsylvania 
Volusia 


St. Clair, Jas. H _ 


Elfers 


Pasco 


St. Clair, Mary Lou 


Elfers - 


Pasco 


Saffold, Beulah Louise ...._ 

Salas, Mrs. Zoila Aracelia _ 

Salomon, Morris S 


Wimauma — 

Tampa 

Orlando 


. Hillsborough 
. Hillsborough 
Orange 


Sams, Celestina R 


Courtenay 


Brevard 


Sanders, Mrs. Florence 

Sargent, Mrs. Eva 

Sarns, Chas. Lorenzo 


Pomona 

Oak Hill .. - „ 

Largo 


Putnam 

Volusia 

Pinellas 


Saunders. Harold R _ 

Sawyer, Roy Geo 

Scarborough, Chaffee A 

Schild, Rudolph Henry 

Schaefer, Helen Alene 

Scharfschwerdt. Mrs. A 

Scotten, John Lewis 


Orlando 

Jacksonville 

White Springs 

Gainesville 

Gainesville 

-Ft. Pierce 

Gainesville _ 


Orange 

Duval 

Hamilton 

Alachua 

Alachua 

St Lucie 

_ Alachua 


Searle, Mrs. Leola T 


Ft. Myers _. 


Lee 


Sears, Wm. Joseph „ 


Kissimmee _ 


Osceola 


Sensabaugh, Mrs. Effie R 

Sharp, May Florence 

Shaw, Eleanor G 

Shaw, Eula Hensley 

Shaw, Mamie 

Shearon, Cassie Mae 


Winter Haven _ 

- Gainesville 

- ZephyrhUls _. 

Gainesville 

Tampa 


Polk 

Martin 

Alachua 

Pasco 

- Alachua 

.. Hillsborough 


Sheets, Clyde Rachel 

Sheffield, Lexington O 

Sheldon, Mrs. Jennie G _ 

Shipp, Claude Lee _ 

Shockley, Beulah T „ 


Hastings _ 

Dover 

Elfers - 

- Tallaha.ssee 

Altoona 


St. Johns 

. Hillsborough 

Pasco 

Leon 

Lake 


Shockley, Mrs. Maude 

Siedenburg, Hilda May 

Sikes, Mrs. Annie F _ 

Silva, Hazel Donita 


Altoona _ 

Oneco _ _... 

—.Grandin 

Stuart 


- Lake 

Manatee 

Putnam 

Martin 


Silverman, Miriam R 

Simmons, Jno. H 

Simmons, Wilfred 


Ybor CiiyZZZZZZZZZlL 

- Arcadia 

DeFuniak Springs 


. Hillsborough 

DeSoto 

Walton 


Simmons, Wilma 


-DeFuniak Springs 


Walton 


Simpson, Gladys Maxine 


_ Mt. Dora 


Lake 


Singletary, Albert M 

Sioux, Elizabeth Inez _.... 

Sister Anna Maria 


Gainesville 

Trenton 

St Augustine 


Alachua 

Gilchrist 

St. Johns 


Sister Catherine Semmes 

Sister M. Agnita ...._ _.... 

Sister M. Alberta 


- Key West „ .'. 

Jacksonville 

- St. Augustine 


Monroe 

Duval 

.... St. Johns 


Sister M. Brendan _ _... 


Jacksonville 


Duval 


Sister M. Finbarr _ 

Sister M. Paul 

Sister St. John 


St. Augustine' 

Jacksonville 

_ Jacksonville 


St. Johns 

Duval 

Duval 


Sjoberg, Anna Edith D 


-Belleview 


Marion 


Slack, Ida Mary 

Slade, Richard Kirven 


..- Lake Worth 

_ Jacksonville _ 


.. Palm Beach 
Duval 


Sledge, Mildred C. _ 

Slocum, Freda Mae „ 

Slone, Carrie Laura 


Jacksonville 

Branford 

Mascotte - 


Duval 

Suwannee 

Lake 


Slone, Denny W 


Mascotte 


Lake 


Smith, Eleanor lona 

Smith, Elizabeth McD _ 


-....Ft. Myers 

Tampa - 


- Lee 

. Hillsborough 


Smith, James Emery 






Smith, Madison L _. 

Smith, Margaret McM. _ 

Smith, Myrtle Irene _ 


..'. Gainesville -Z--~!Z!i!!3 

Largo - 


."-'.'.'Lafayette 

Alachua 

Pinellas 


Smith, Ruth _ 


Allenhurst - 


Brevard 


Smith, Ruth Elizabeth 


_ Ft. Myers 


Lee 


Smith, Wade H _ 


Gretna _ 


Gadsden 


Smith, Mrs. Wm. Oscar 

Smith, Wm. Oscar _... 

Smoak, Nina Mcintosh ...„ „.... 

Scares, Jose Lacerda 


Umatilla -. 

-Umatilla 

Crescent City 

Sao Paulo _ 


Lake 

Lake 

- Putnam 

Brazil 


Sparkman, Claude J 


Miami „ 


Dade 



REGISTER 



261 



Name 

Sparks, Clara M. (Mrs.) .... 

Spence, Maude 

Spier, Mattye Perle 

Spivey, Elizabeth 

Spivey, Mrs. Horace Gould 

Springer, Mrs. Lena D 

Stafford, Lila -... 

Standley, Graynella E 
Standley, Mildred Alice 
Starratt, Louise Grace 
Steele, Mrs. Ollie Mae 
Stephens, Alexander H 
Stephens, Carl Wilson 
Stephens, Doris 
Stephens, Florence 
Stephens, Ona Eliz 
Stephenson, Patrick H 
Stewart, Annie Belle 
Stewart, Edwin Everette 
Stokes, Dorothy Louise 

Stokes, Iva B 

Storms, Muriel May 
Strode, Mary Marjorie 
Stubbs, Elsie M. 
Summerlin, Mildred 
Surrency, D. Ailen 
Swank, Mary Eli: abeth 
Sweat, Millie Lee 
Sweet, (Dot) Margaret L 
Swindle, Wm. Herbert 
Swords, Mary Ellen 
Syfrett, Helena .. 

Tasker, Margaret Alice 
Taylor, Dorothy .. _ 
Taylor, Emmett .. 
Taylor, Martha E 
Tedder, Doris M. 
Thomas, Mrs. Grey D 
Thomas, Mrs. Murray Geo 
Thompson, Mrs. Annis C 
Thompson, Henry S , Jr 
Thompson, John Graves 
Thompson, Mrs. Tnxie 
Thomson, Anna Blair 
Thorpe, Elizabeth 

Tice, James T 

Tichenor, Altha C 
Tiller, Ida Katherine 
Tillis, Mrs. Kathryn G 
Timmons, Doyal Edgar 
Timmons, Mrs. D. E 
Tipton, M. Lucelia 
Tompkins, Sue Mae 
Torlay, Clarice Annie 

Travis, Marge 

Trottman, Mrs. Rosemary 
Troxler, Walter G 
Truby, Wm. Irving 
Trump, Mrs. Mary A 
Tucker, Mrs. Leona C. 
Turner, Ernest Pomeroy 
Turner, Francis E S 
Turner, Lilla Agnes 
Tyler, Emma Pearl 

Van Slyke, Mrs. Mary L 
Varnes, Clifford Lucile 
Vassie, Marie Abigail 

Waddy, Evelyn E, 

Waits, Zell 

Wall, Ethel L 

Wallace, Mrs. Ruby 
Wallace, Rubye . 
Waller, Mrs. Mattie 
Walsingham, Gladys A 
Walter. Flora Eveline 



Postoffice County or State 

.Tampa _ _ Hillsborough 

..Largo _ Pinellas 

-Ft. Meade Polk 

.Wauchula _ Hardee 

..Safety Harbor Pinellas 

..Jacksonville _ Duval 

.-Leesburg . Lake 

Hague . ._ Alachua 

Hague ....- Alachua 

Jacksonville Duval 

Sanford _ _ Seminole 

Ona _ Hardee 

Ona _ Hardee 

Jasper _ Hamilton 

Ona _ Hardee 

Jennings Hamilton 

_St Petersburg Pinellas 

Tampa Hillsborough 

Lakeland Polk 

Sanford Seminole 

Wauchula _ Hardee 

.Tampa Hillsborough 

Doctors Inlet - Clay 

Anthony _ - Marion 

Ft Pierce St. Lucie 

Jacksonville _ Duval 

Sebring — - Highlands 

Ov ledo Seminole 

Jacksonville _ Duval 

Chipley - Washington 

Gainesville Alachua 

Green Cove Springs Clay 

\namosa Iowa 

Tampa _ Highlands 

Ft Pierce St. Lucie 

Gainesville Alachua 

Port Orange Volusia 

Belleview Marion 

West Tampa Hillsborough 

Oviedo _ Seminole 

O'Brien Suwannee 

Miami Dade 

O'Brien - Suwannee 

Gainesville - Alachua 

Wimauma Hillsborough 

Bartow ...._ Polk 

Orlando Orange 

-Kissimmee Osceola 

Tampa - Hillsborough 

Gainesville ..._ Alachua 

Gainesville Alachua 

Tampa Hillsborough 

. Coleman Sumter 

Melrose - Alachua 

Fayetteville Georgia 

Zephyrhills Pasco 

Ocala Marion 

Gainesville Alachua 

Arcadia - DeSoto 

Miami - Dade 

-Trenton _ Gilchrist 

St Petersburg ...._ - Pinellas 

Lansing DeSoto 

Ellenton - Manatee 

Jacksonville _..- - Duval 

Jacksonville - Duval 

Mulberry _ - Polk 

Elfers Pasco 

Ocoee _ Orange 

_Gai nesville - Alachua 

Wo rthington ...._ Union 

-Panama City - Bay 

-Plant City Hillsborough 

Largo - Pinellas 

Orlando - Orange 



262 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



Name 



Postoff, 



ice 



County or State 



Walter, Mary Agnes _ Keystone Heights Clay 

Ward, Annie Maye Clearwater Pinellas 

Warner, Lena Mae Live Oak _ Suwannee 

Warner, Mary Edna Gainesville Alachua 

Warnock, Elizabeth A Inverness _ Citrus 

Warren. Mrs. Grace F - Gainesville Alachua 

Warren, Richard „ Blountstown _ _ Calhoun 

Warren, Wm. Curtis Tampa Hillsborough 

Watkins, Mrs. Flora J Alva _ _ Lee 

Watkins, Mary E Wauchula Hardee 

Watson, Madison A _ _ Darlington _ Holmes 

Watson, Mrs. Nannie H. „ Coleman . Sumter 

Watson, Wilma Ruth -Gainesville Alachua 

Weatherford, Bersa _ Zolfo Springs _ Hardee 

Weaver, Wm. S Bristol _ Liberty 

Webb, Mrs. Janie F _ _ Tampa Hillsborough 

Weinkle, Charlotte _ Jacksonville _ Duval 

Weiss, Chas. S Brooklyn New York 

Welch, Mrs. Cordie Vera „ - Winter Haven Polk 

Wells, Dewey M _ Port Orange „ Volusia 

Wetherbee, Mrs. Nora ..._ _ Taft _ Orange 

Whatley, Elta M Ft. Meade _ Polk 

Wheeler, Ada Katherine _ -Ft. Valley „ Georgia 

Wheeler, Jos. A -Miami Dade 

Whidden, Florence B Mulberry Polk 

Whipple, Mabel Abbie - Jacksonville _ - Duval 

White, Mrs. Rosa Bell Ocoee _ Orange 

White, Selina - - Kissimmee Osceola 

Whitener, Norma Gladyn Bowling Green „ Hardee 

Whittle, Clemmie Eliz _ Clearwater Pinellas 

Whitton, Hiram Allen _ _ Ponce de Leon „ Holmes 

Wicker, Mrs. Emma Dyer - Coleman „ Sumter 

Wicks, Mrs. Eva A Miami - _ Dade 

Wiggins, Effie Louise Romeo - Marion 

Wiggins, Nancy Leola -Brewster _ Polk 

Wilder, Jennie B _ „ Knights - Hillsborough 

Wilder, Mrs. Marilu _ Tampa Hillsborough 

Wilder, Maude _ Branford Suwannee 

Wilkerson, Mrs. Evelyn B Jacksonville _ Duval 



Willard, Theodore H 
Williams, Jno. P., Jr 
Williams, Jos. Edward 
Willis, Claudelle . 
Willis, Susie B. 
Wilson, Mrs. Ruth D 
Wilson, Verde .... 
Wingate, Homer D 
Winter, Henry Kenneth 
Winter, Thurston P 
Wise, Lou Anne 
Witt, Mrs. Leola 
Witt, Myrtice Lenorah 
Witt, Percy C. 
Wood, Mrs. Mary B 
Woodham, Claudia 
Woodham, Gertrude 
Wooley, Florence P 
Woolf, Madula ... 
Worrell, Louise Juanita 
Wray, Frederick Ellis 
Wright, Dorothy Harris 
Wright, Miriam R 
Wynn, Free Joyce 
Wyse, John Hope 

Yawn, Mrs. Maude A ^ 
Yeagle, Mrs. Mildred J 

Yon, Sallie 

York, Earl Hill .„ 
Young, Mattie E. 

Zeeman, Raymond 

Zetrourer, Alberta May 



Alachua Alachua 

-Chief land - Levy 

Lake Helen Volusia 

New Smyrna Volusia 

New Smyrna Volusia 

- Largo Pinellas 

Washington _ _ D. C. 

Barney „ „ Georgia 

_ Oakland _ Orange 

- Barberville _ _ Volusia 

St. Petersburg _ Pinellas 

- Lake City _ Columbia 

-Lake City _ Columbia 

-Lake City Columbia 

Ortega - Duval 

Benson Springs _ _ Volusia 

- Benson Springs Volusia 

Live Oak Suwannee 

_ Gainesville Alachua 

-St. Petersburg - _ Pinellas 

- A.von Park _ - Highlands 

Jacksonville Duval 

Jacksonville Duval 

Hampton Bradford 

-Clewiston Hendry 

Tampa Hillsborough 

Hallandale Broward 

Gainesville - Alachua 

Oxford Sumter 

_ Tampa Hillsborough 

Newark New Jersey 

Rochelle ...._ Alachua 



REGISTER 263 



SUMMARY OF ENROLLMENT 

192627 

Graduate School _ - 33 

College of Arts and Sciences - 644 

College of Agriculture — 

CoUege - - - 112 

One Year Course ..._ - - - 6 

Two Year Course - 3 

Four Months' Course 2 

123 123 

College of Engineering and Architecture — 

Engineering Courses _ 253 

School of Architecture - 39 

292 292 

College of Law - 268 

Teachers College and Normal School — 

CoUege - 218 

Normal School - "^ 

225 225 

School of Business Administration 344 

College of Pharmacy _ 47 

University Summer School - 988 

Total Enrollment for 1926:27 - 2,884 

Less Duplicates - — 8 

Net Total 2,876 

Attendance at Farmers' Week, August, 1926 — 1,248 



264 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



SUMMARY BY STATES AND FOREIGN COUNTRIES 

Regular 
Session 
1926-27 

Alabama .„ 9 

Canada 1 

Connecticut - i 1 

Cuba 1 

District of Columbia _ 1 

Florida 1,866 

Georgia „ 17 

Illinois 9 

Indiana 2 

Iowa _ 1 

Kansas j _ 1 

Maine 1 

Massachusetts 1 

Mississippi 3 

Nebraska 1 

New Jersey 1 

New York 10 

North Carolina 3 

Ohio 7 

Pennsylvania 8 

Philippine Islands „ 1 

Republic of Panama _ 1 

South Carolina 7 

Tennessee 6 

Vermont 1 

Virginia 3 

West Indies 1 

West Virginia _ 1 

Wisconsin 1 

Grand Total „ 1,968 

SUMMARY BY COUNTIES 

Regular 
Session 
1926-27 

Alachua 200 

Baker _ 1 

Bay 7 

Bradford _ _ 5 

Brevard 31 

Broward 25 

Calhoun _ „ 7 

Charlotte _ 7 

Citrus 12 

Clay _ „.._ _ . .._ _. 4 

Collier _ 1 

Columbia _ _ 22 

Dade 138 

DeSoto 12 

Dixie , 3 

Duval _ „ 175 

Escambia _ _ „ 55 

Flagler „ 3 



SUMMARY 265 



Regular 
Session 
1926-27 

Franklin 4 

Gadsden „ 23 

Gilchrist 2 

Gulf - - 5 

Hamilton - 2 

Hardee „ 19 

Hendry _ 3 

Hernando 6 

Highlands 6 

Hillsborough 172 

Holmes _ 5 

Indian River _ 4 

Jackson 20 

Jefferson 9 

Lafayette 2 

Lake 56 

Lee 26 

Leon 24 

Levy 10 

Liberty _ _ 5 

Madison „ ._ 9 

Manatee 44 

Marion 36 

Martin „ _ 4 

Monroe 12 

Nassau 8 

Okaloosa 7 

Okeechobee 7 

Orange 89 

Osceola _ _ _ _ 15 

Palm Beach 53 

Pasco 19 

Pinellas 156 

Polk _ _ _ „ 106 

Putnam 13 

St. Johns , 26 

St. Lucie „ 16 

Santa Rosa 9 

Sarasota „ „ 20 

Seminole 16 

Sumter 8 

Suwannee 15 

Taylor _ „.._ 10 

Union 1 

Volusia _ 39 

Wakulla „ 3 

Walton 10 

Washington 6 

Totals from sixty-six Florida Counties 1,868 

Totals from Other States and Foreign Countries 100 

Net Totals 1,968 

Grand Total Summer School and Regular Session 2,876 



266 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

BVDEX 

A Page 

A. B. Curriculum 57 

A. B. Curriculum in Education 180 

Absences - - 30, 33 

Academic and Law Degrees, Combined 56 

Accounting 101 

Administration - 29 

Admission - 46 

Admission to the Bar - 169 

Adult Specials - — _ 33 

Advanced Standing _ 50, 167 

Agents, Cooperatire Demonstration Work 137 

Agriculture _ ~ - 191 

Agricultural Chemistry 120 

Agricultural Club _— 110 

Agricultural Economics 117 

Agricultural Education ..._ „ _ _ 183 

Agricultural Engineering _ 121 

Agricultural Experiment Station 134 

Agricultural Extension Division 136 

Agricultural Journalism 106 

Agriculture, College of _ _ _ 109 

Agriculture, Short Courses _ 131 

Agronomy 118 

Alligator, Florida 46 

Alumni Association „ _ 43 

A. M. Degree 52 

Ancient Languages _ 60 

Animal Husbandry 122 

Appointments to Army _ 212 

Architecture 163 

Arts and Science, College of 54 

Assignment to Classes 31 

Athletics 27, 208 

Athletic Association 44 

Athletic Coaching 209 

Auditorium 22 

B 

Bacteriology „ „ 65 

Band 46 

Bar, Admission to _ _ 169 

Barracks _ 22 

Biblical Instruction „ _ 63 

Biology 66 

Board and Lodging _ _ 36 

Board of Control 3, 29 

Board of Education _ _ 3 

Books „ 37 

Botany _ _ _ „ .48, 64 

Boys Clubs, etc 139 

Breakage Fee 35 

B. S. Curriculum 58 

B. S. Curriculum in Agriculture _ 113, 114 

B. S. Curriculum in Business Administration _ 96 

B. S. Curriculum in Education _ 180 

B. S. Curriculum in Journalism _ „ „ 97 

B. S. Curriculum in Pharmacy 200 

B. S. Curriculum in Social Administration _ 98 

B. S. C. E. Curriculum „ _ 145 



l^DEX 267 

Page 

B. S. Ch. E. Curriculum - 148 

B. S. E. E. Curriculum _ - 146 

B. S. M. E. Curriculum _ 147 

Branch Stations ~ 136 

BuUdings * -.- 20 

Bureau, Teachers' Employment 195 

Business Administration _ _ - 20, 92 

C 

Calendar r 5 

Camps, Summer (Military) 212 

Campus 20 

Candidates for Degrees _ _ _ 221 

C. E. Degree 145 

Certificates, Teachers _ 194 

Ch. E. Degree 148 

Change in Studies _ 31 

Chapel Choir „ _ _ 46 

Charges, University 34 

Chemical Engineering _ _ 149 

Chemical Society 55 

Chemistry 49, 69, 206 

Choice of Studies ...„ 31 

Civil Engineering 150 

Classes, Assignment to _ _ 31 

Classification of Irregular Students 33 

Clubs „ _ 139 

College of Agriculture 51, 109 

College of Arts and Science _ 51, 54 

College of Engineering _ _ _ 51, 141 

College of Law 51, 166 

College of Pharmacy _ _ 51, 196 

College, Teachers 177 

Combined Academic and Law Course 56 

Commencement „ 27 

Commencement Program 220 

Commission in Reserve Corps „ 223 

Committees of the Faculty 17 

Commerce Club „ 55 

Community Institutes and Conferences 217 

Conditions _ „ _ „ 31 

Conduct, Student 29 

Contents 2 

Control, Board of 29 

Cooperative Agricultural Extension Work _ „ „ 137 

Cooperative Demonstration Farmers 137 

Correspondence Courses _ _ _ 133 

Correspondence Work, Amount of _ 178 

Council, University „ _ 3, 29 

County Agents ' 137 

County Certificates, Teachers _ _ 194 

Credit of Work I94 

Credits for Practical Work ..._ _..„ 112, 144 

Curriculum, Pre Medical 59 

D 

Dad's and Alumni Days 27 

Dairy Equipment „ _ _ _ _ . HQ 

Dairying "' I.'I~Z"'I 123 

Deans _ _ _ _ 29 

Debating Council „ _ 45 



268 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

Page 

Declamatory Contest, State 218 

Deficiency, One Unit 47 

Degrees 32, 55, 112, 177, 196 

Degrees, Conferring of 220 

Delinquencies : 32 

Demonstration Agents - 137 

Demonstration Work, Cooperative 139 

Department of Business Administration 99 

Diploma Fee 36 

Dissertation 53 

Division of Athletics and Physical Education 208 

Division of Military Science and Tactics - _ 211 

Division of Music 215 

Donations and Loans _ Ill 

Dormitories - 21 

Dramatic Association _ — . 45 

Drawing 154 

Drill 213 

E 

Earning Expenses, Opportunities for 39 

Economics ^ 73 

Education 184 

Education, Agricultural _ - 183 

Education, Vocational 185 

Educational Information Bureau 218 

E. E. Degree 146 

Elective Units 48 

Electrical Engineering 155 

Eligibility to Athletic Teams, etc 34 

Employment Bureau, Teachers 195 

Engineering Chemistry „ 149 

Engineering, College of 141 

Engineering Practice _ _ 49 

Engineering Societies 143 

English _ _ 49, 77, 191 

Enrollment of Students, summary by colleges 263 

Enrollment of Students, summary by counties, states and foreign countries 264 

Entomology 127 

Entrance Requirements 47, 198 

Entrance Units „ _ 48 

Equipment _ 20, 109, 198 

Examinations _ 32, 47, 167 

Expenses 34, 37, 169, 194 

Experiment Station, Agricultural 134 

Extension of Teachers Certificates _ 194 

Extension Division, General 216 

Extension Division, Agricultural 136 

Extension Teaching 216 

Extension Workers, Schools for 138 

F 

Faculty 3, 29 

Failure in Studies _ „ 32 

Farmers Cooperative Demonstration Work 137 

Farmers Four Month Course 131 

Farmers Week „ „ 133 

Farms 110 

Fees „ 34 

Fellowships 39 

Field Laboratories 136 

Fertilizers 118 



INDEX 269 

Pace 

"Fifty-per-cent" Rule _ 32 

Finance , 102 

Finances (Student organization) _ _ 34 

Floriculture _ 125 

Florida Alligator 46 

Florida State Museum 24 

Forestry „ „ _ _ 127 

Fraternities 44 

French „ 83 

Furniture in Dormitories 36 

G 

Games Schedule 34 

General 51 

General Extension Division _ 51, 216 

General Information and Public Service 218 

Geology _ „ ^ 69 

Gferman _ 84 

Gifts _ 28 

Girls Club 139 

Glee Club 46 

Government of the University _ 29 

Grades and Reports _ 32 

Graduate Courses 203, 206 

Graduate Course, Chemistry 71 

Graduate School 51, 52 

Graduating Exercises _ 220 

Greek _ „ „ ^ 61 

Grounds 20 

Groups _ _ _ „.._ 56, 114, 181 

Gymnasium 22 

Gymnastics _ „ „ _ 208 

H 

Halls 21 

Hazing _.... 30 

High School Curriculum 185 

High School Debating League _ 218 

High School Visitation 195 

History _ _ _ 49, 79, 191 

History, University _ 18 

Home Demonstration Agents „ 137 

Home Demonstration Work „ 139 

Honor Committee _ 45 

Honors _ 42 

Honor Societies _ _ 42 

Horticulture „ 124 

Horticulture Building _ _ 110 

Hospital w. _ 23, 35 

Hospital Staff _ 15 

Hours, Minimum and Maximum _ 31 

Income 28 

Infirmary 23 

Infirmary Fee 35 

Intelligence Tests _ _ 30 

Irregular Students _ 33 

J 

Journalism _ 92, 94, 105 

J. D. Degree 169 



270 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

L Page 

Laboratories 25 

Laboratory Fees _ 35 

Landscape Gardening „ 126 

Latin _ 49, 60, 191 

Law, College of _ „ _ 166 

Law College, Admission to _ 166 

Law Course, Combined Academic and _ _ _ 56 

Lecture Bureau _ _ 217 

Legal Residence _ _ 34 

Libraries, Department 24 

Library, University _ _ _ _ 23 

Literary Societies 55 

Literature, English 77 

LL.B. Degree „ 169 

Loan Funds „ 41 

Loan and Donation of Farm Machinery „ Ill 

Location of University „ _ _ 20 

Lodging 36 

M 

M. E. Degree 147 

M. S. Degree 52 

Major Subject of Study _ „ 52, 56 

Manual Training 191 

Marketing _ _ _... 102 

Marshall Debating Society 168 

Masqueraders _ _ „ _ _ 45 

Mathematics 50, 81, 192 

Mathematical Club „.._ _ 55 

Mechanic Arts 154 

Mechanical Drawing _ 157, 191 

Mechanical Engineering 157 

Medals „ 42 

Medical Treatment 35 

Medicine _ _ _ 57, 59 

Military Science 211 

Military Science, Exemption from 178 

Military Science and Tactics _ 211 

Minor Studies 52 

Modern Languages -. 50 

Mortar & Pestle Society „ 198 

Museum, Florida State 24 

Music, Division of _ _ 215 

N 

Normal Curriculum 190 

Normal Diploma, Requirements for ..._ _ 182 

Normal School 189 

O 

Offenses against Good Conduct 30 

Officers of the University _ 3, 6 

Opportunities for Earning Expenses _ 39 

Opportunity for Graduates _ 197 

Oratorical Honors _ 225 

Oratory „ _ _ _ _ _ 90 

Orchestra _ _ _ 45 

Organ, Andrew Anderson Memorial _ 28 

Organization _ _ _ 51 

Organizations, Student, etc _... 44 

Orientation _ „ „ _ _ _ _ _ 142 



INDEX 271 

P Pace 

Peabody Club 179 

Personnel Management 105 

Pharmacy, Department _ 201 

Pharmacy, Curricula in 199, 200 

Pharmacognosy 204 

Pharmacology 205 

Phi Kappa Phi - 42, 225 

Ph.G. Degree 199 

Philosophy _ _ _ 85 

Physical Education _ 208, 209 

Physical Examination „ 208 

Physical Geography 50 

Physician, University _ _ . 35 

Physics _ _ 50, 87 

Physiology 67, 130 

Plant Breeding _ 125 

Plant Pathology 128 

Political Science 80 

Poultry Husbandry 129 

Practical Work, Credits for 112, 114 

Practice Courts 167 

Pre-Medical Course _ _ _ 57, 59 

President 19, 29 

Property, Value of Unirersity _ 23 

Psychology 85 

Production _... 104 

Public Discussion, (Information, Welfare) 218 

Public Speaking 90 

Public Welfare 217 

Publication Bureau _ 219 

Q 

Quantity of Work 31, 57, 112 

R 

Recent Gifts _ „ 28 

Re-Examinations 32 

Refunds of fees _ 36 

Registration 197 

Registration and Contingent fee 35 

Regulation 30, 181 

Reinstatement of Suspended Students 32 

Remittances 39 

Remunerative Labor _ _ 39, 111 

Reports, Monthly 32 

Reserve Officers Training Corps _ 211 

Residence Requirements 178 

Residence, Legal „ 34 

Resources 28 

Reviews and Methods „ 184 

Rhethoric 49, 77 

Risk-Bearing and Insurance 104 

Roman Law 61 

Rooming Houses 37 

Rural Law _ 118 

S 

Scholarships „ 28, 40, 110 

School of Architecture _ _ „ _ 160 

School of Business Administration 92 

Science _ 192 

Sciences, College of Arts and _ 51 



272 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA ' 

Pace 

Self Help Committee 39 

Seminole 45 

Shops 28 

Short Course in Agriculture 131 

Smith-Hughes Course 115, 179 

Smith-Lever Act 138 

Social Administration 106 

Societies _ 44 

Sociology _ 76 

Southern Literature 78 

Spanish 85 

Speaking, Public 90 

Special Students 33, 51, 131 

Sports 44, 208 

Standards and Records 103 

State Certificate _ 178 

State Declamatory Contest — . 218 

State High School Visitation 195 

Student Activity Fee ■. 35 

Student Employees _ 36 

Student Organization and Publication 44 

Student Roll 226 

Student, Regulation Concerning 31 

Summary of Attendance 263 

Summer School Commencement _ 224 

Summer School, University 193 

Supervised Teaching 187, 188 

Supervision of Dormitories 30 

Suspension 30, 32 

T 

Tactics, Military 211 

Teachers Certificate 194 

Teachers College 177, 179 

Teachers College and Normal School 51 

Teacher's Employment Bureau 195 

Training Corps, Reserve Officers 211 

Transportation and Communication 104 

Tuition fee 34 

U 

Uniform 212 

Unit Courses 48 

Units, Entrance 47 

University Charges 34 

University Council 29 

University, Extension 51 

University History „ 18 

V 

Vaccination „ 46 

Value of University Property 23 

Veterinary Science 130 

Visitation of High School 195 

Visual Instruction, Bureau of _ 219 

Vocational Education 179, 185, 188 

Y 

Y. M. C. A „ 44 

Z 

Zoology , 50 



i^ :'V.Y^ \ p.'l • N 



University of Florida 

GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA 






University Summer School 

Co-Educational 



June 13 to August 5, 1927 

Announcement 





Library 




Plan of Campus 



SUMMER SCHOOL 



BOARD OF CONTROL 

P. K. YONGE, Chairman Manager, Southern States Lbr. Co., Pensacola 

E. L. Wartmann Planter and Stock Raiser, Citra 

E. W. Lane..._ President, Atlantic National Bank, Jacksonville 

General A. H. Blanding Florida Citrus Exchange, Tampa 

Judge W. B, Davis Perry 

J. T. Diamond, Sea-etary to the Board Tallahassee 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



ALBERT A. MURPHREE, A.M., LL.D. 
President and Director of Summer School 

JAMES WILLIAM NORMAN, Ph.D. 
Dea7i of Sitnimer School 

JAMES N. ANDERSON, Ph.D. 

Dean of College of Arts and Sciences and Chairman 

of Graduate Committee 

JOSEPH RICHARD FULK, Ph.D. 
Acting Dean of Teachers College in Summer School 

WILBERT A. LITTLE, A.M. 
Director of Review Courses and Teachers Certification 

ELIZABETH SKINNER, A.B. 

Dean of Women 

ALVIN PERCY BLACK, A.B. 
Dean of Men 



University of Florida 
elizabeth rountree, b.s, 

Registrar of the Summer School 

KLINE H. GRAHAM 
Business Manager 

J. B. GOODSON 

Cashier 

HUBER a HURST 
Auditor 

JOHN EVANDER JOHNSON, A.M., B.D. 
Y. M. C. A. Secretary 

CORA MILTIMORE, A.B. 
Librarian 

PEGGY JOHNSON 
Assistant Librarian 

CHARLOTTE NEWTON, A.B. 
Assistant Librarian 

W. L. GOETTE, A.B.E. 
Director of Employment Bureau 

CLAUDE MURPHREE 

University Organist 

DR. G. C. TILLMAN, M.D. 
Resident Physician 

ROSA GRIMES, R.N. 

Nurse 



Nurse 

MRS. B. C. McGARRAH, B.S. 

Dietitian 

MRS. MARGARET PEELER 
Housekeeper 



Summer School 



FACULTY 



CHARLES FORREST ALLEN, M.A. 
Secondary Education 

MRS. MABEL F. ALTSTETTER 
Elementary Education 

JAMES NESBITT ANDERSON, Ph.D. 
Latin 

MARY AVRIETT 
Teaching Fellow in English 

ALVIN PERCY BLACK, A.B. 

Chemistry 

MRS. R. W. BLACKLOCK 

Teaching Fellow in Geography 

LUCIUS MOODY BRISTOL, Ph.D. 
Sociology 

F. W. BUCHHOLZ, A.B. 

Teaching Felloiv in Latin 

MRS. ALICE BINGHAM CARRIER 
Elementary Education 

RUTH CAZIER 

Public School Music 

HARLEY WILLARD CHANDLER, M.S. 
Mathematics 

LOTUS DELTA COFFMAN, Ph.D. 
Special Lecturer 

WARREN CASSIUS COWELL, B.S. 

Athletic Coaching 



Drawing and IndustHal Arts 



University of Florida 



Educatioti 



Elementary Education , 

ANNE D. ENGLAND, A.M. 
Latin and English 

HASSE OCTAVIUS ENWALL, Ph.D. 
Philosophy 

J. D. FALLS, Ph.D. 
Secondary Education 

MYRTLE FARNHAM 
Primary Education 

JAMES MARION FARR, Ph.D. 

English 

LESTER COLLINS FARRIS, M.A. 

English 

JOSEPH RICHARD FULK, Ph.D. 
Education 

JAMES GILLIAM GEE, B.S. 

Agricultural Education 

KENNETH B. HAIT, A.B. 
Teaching Fellow in English 

LYMAN G. HASKELL, M.D. 
Physical Education 

WILLIAM BYRON HATHAWAY, M.A. 
Spanish 

MURPHY ROY HINSON, M.S. 
Child Psychology 



Teaching Fellow in History 

WILLIAM WILEY HOLLINGSWORTH, Ph.D. 
History and Political Science 



Summer School 
albert l. issacs 

Teaching Fellow in Mathematics 

VESTUS T. JACKSON, Ph.D. 
History 

JOHN EVANDER JOHNSON, M.A., B.D. 
Bible and Religiotcs Education 

JAMES HOMER KELLY, B.S. 
Teaching Fellow in History 

JAMES MILLER LEAKE, Ph.D. 
History 

TOWNES RANDOLPH LEIGH, Ph.D. 

Chemistry 

WILBERT A. LITTLE, A.M. 
Theory arid Practice of Teaching 

MRS. ANNIE B. LORD 

Teaching Fellow in History 

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN LUKER, Ph.D. 
French 

MRS. LOUISE H. MAHAN 
Demonstration School 

WALTER JEFFRIES MATHERLY, M.A. 
Economics 

MRS. WILLIE A. METCALFE 
Pedagogy 

CLAUDE MURPHREE 
Organ 

JAMES WILLIAM NORMAN, Ph.D. 
Education 

I. R. OBENCHAIN 

Tests and Measurements 

BURTON J. H. OTTE, A.B. 
Curator in Chemistry 

WILLIAM SANFORD PERRY, M.S. 
Physics 



University of Florida 
mrs. k. w. robison 

Teaching Fellow in Geography 

FRAZIER ROGERS, B.S.A. 

Agricultural Engineering 

JAMES SPEED ROGERS, M.A. 
Biology 

ASHLEY R. RUSS 

Teaching Fellotv in Mathematics 

H. R. SAUNDERS 

Teaching Fellow in English 

HAROLD LEONIDAS SEBRING, B.S. 

Athletic Coaching 

HARLEY BAKEWELL SHERMAN, M.S. 
Biology 

GLENN BALLARD SIMMONS, A.M. 
History and Civics 

THOMAS MARSHALL SIMPSON, Ph.D. 

Mathematics 

MABEL E. SWANSON, M.A. 
Health Education 



Trades and Industries 

JOHN EDWIN TURLINGTON, Ph.D. 
Agriculture 

FRANCIS EDWIN S. TURNER 

Teaching Fellow in English 

RUTH NEWELL UPSON 

Demonstration School 

RICHARD W. VAN BRUNT, A.B. 
Mathematics 

JUDSON BURON WALKER, A.B.E. 
Mathematics 



Summer School 
rudolph weaver, a.la. 

Architecture 

MRS. ALICE WALDEN WEAVER 
Piano 

JOSEPH W. WEIL, B.S.E.E. 

Physics 

EDGAR G. WELLER 

Parent-Teacher Association 

WILLIAM JAMES WELLS, JR. 
Teaching Fellow in History 

JACOB HOOPER WISE, M.A. 
English 

MRS. ALBERTA MURPHREE WORTH 
Voice 



10 University of Florida 



HISTORICAL NOTE 

The University of Florida Summer School is now a part of 
our educational program so well established as to be taken for 
granted. It may not be wise, however, to forget the early 
stages, the pioneer work from which came our present fa- 
vored condition. 

The enactment of a uniform examination and certification 
law in 1893 forced teachers and aspirants to prepare them- 
selves for the examinations. At first principals in the larger 
places held private schools with courses to the purpose. Nec- 
essarily the fees were low, the term short, the method intensive 
cramming, the venture precarious. 

During this period, the number of public schools increased 
rapidly, courses were enlarged, standards raised. To meet 
this situation the State began to employ the more able teachers 
to conduct summer schools at centers most suitable, the terms 
being from four to six weeks, depending upon attendance. 
The private "teacher-training" schools continued, some even 
flourished for a season. Standards continued to be raised, 
however, and needs increased so rapidly that the State began 
to support more liberally summer schools, no longer conducted 
here and there, but at Tallahassee and Gainesville. 

A steady growth of the University Summer School has re- 
sulted naturally from this putting of the training of teachers 
upon a more dignified and dependable basis. From an en- 
rollment of 140 in 1913, the attendance increased to 908 last 
summer. There has been, of course, corresponding expansion 
in every phase and feature of the Summer School, as may be 
seen by a perusal of this Bulletin. 



Summer School 11 



GENERAL STATEMENT 



The eighteenth annual session of the Summer School of 
; the University of Florida will open Monday, June 13 and 
j close Saturday, August 5, the session lasting eight weeks. 

Summer study is growing in popularity all over the United 
; States, Each year a greater majority of teachers are seeing 
I the importance of summer study. 

What is more, the Summer School, generally speaking, has 
come to be recognized as an annual event of real and increas- 
ing importance to higher education, and the University Sum- 
mer School has accordingly, become an established feature 
of the work of the University of Florida. The cordial re- 
ception and generous commendations of the work of previ- 
ous summer sessions encourages us to put forth still greater 
efforts to make the session of 1927 an improvement over all 
those that have preceded it. 

The University City. — There are many features of the 
Summer School other than classroom work that will prove 
to be conducive to that larger life which should permeate all 
citizens, especially that of teachers. The advantages that 
Gainesville presents as the seat of the Summer School are nu- 
merous. It is centrally located and easy of access. It has well- 
paved, lighted and shaded streets, an exceptionally pure water 
supply, and a good sewerage system. The citizens are ener- 
getic, progressive, and hospitable. 

Buildings and Equipment. — The entire equipment of 
the University is at the service of faculty and students. 
The buildings are for the most part magnificent three-story 
brick and stone structures. They are modern in every respect 
as to equipment and arrangements. They contain the kind of 
lecture rooms, laboratories and libraries that a modern college 
needs. Attention is called to the accommodations in the dormi- 
tories and commons below under "Rooming Facilities" and 
"Expenses." 

For Whom the Summer School is Intended. — Work may 
be taken in the Summer Session for either undergraduate or 
graduate credit, and a special effort is being made to offer 
teachers every opportunity for professional improvement and 
to qualify for higher types of certificates and for the extension 



12 University of Florida 

of certificates. More specifically, the courses in the summer 
session are designed to meet the needs of the following per- 
sons: 

1. Teachers who wish to increase their professional skill, 
to revise and extend their knowledge of a chosen field, or to 
qualify in new subjects, preparing to meet special demands in 
the profession of teaching. 

2. School superintendents, principals, supervisors, and 
other officers. Teachers and supervisors of agricultural ed- 
ucation, drawing and art, music, public speaking, physical ed- 
ucation and coaching, as well as of the regular academic sub- 
jects, will find work especially suited to their needs. 

3. Teachers and prospective teachers who desire to secure 
a high grade teacher's certificate. Extensive opportunities are 
offered for the review of all subjects required in the state 
teachers' examinations. 

4. Graduate students, especially in the field of Education, 
though graduate students may major in other departments of 
the University. 

5. Undergraduate students, and especially those register- 
ed in the fall and spring semesters of the University. Such 
students may use to advantage a portion of the vacation per- 
iod to take up studies which they are unable to include in their 
regular programs, or to make up deficiencies, or to shorten 
their courses. 

6. High school graduates who are about to enter upon 
regular university courses and who desire to broaden their 
preparation for university work. 

7. High school students who are not graduates. Such stu- 
dents are sometimes able to make up deficiencies in their 
high school work. It should be understood, however, that 
they must make arrangements with their high school 
principals for receiving credit for work covered. The Summer 
School does not grant high school credit, and in no case should 
high school principals grant more than a fourth of a year's 
credit for work covered in one Summer School. 

Special arrangements may be made for college entrance 
examinations. 



Summer School 13 

The Library. — The general library of the University 
is now located in its magnificent new structure, well equipped 
for all library purposes. It contains about 43,000 volumes of 
well-selected books to which the Summer School students have 
free access. The Pedagogical library will be of especial in- 
terest to them, for it contains many books on educational the- 
ory, general and special methods, history of education, psy- 
chology and philosophy. In the reading room are more than 
a hundred of the best general and technical periodicals. Here 
also are received the leading newspapers of the state and na- 
tion. 

Attention is called to the courses in Library Science (p. 58) 
for the benefit of those teachers who wish better to equip 
themselves for managing the libraries in their own schools. 

The library will be open week days from 7:50 A. M. to 
10:00 P. M., except that on Saturdays it will close for the day 
at 5:00. 

The Auditorium. — This magnificent building is consid- 
ered by many to be the most commodius structure of its kind 
on any campus in the South. The Anderson Memorial 
pipe organ is installed in this building. It is hoped that ex- 
tensive use may be made of the organ during the Sum- 
mer School. In addition to the organ, a Steinway concert 
grand piano has been placed in the auditorium. All of this 
makes it possible for all entertainm,ents, plays and recitals 
to be held on the campus this summer. 

Lectures and Entertainments. — The Auditorium with a 
seating capacity of 1800, the magnificent pipe organ and the 
Steinway concert grand piano make the facilities for lectures 
! and musical entertainments unsurpassed. A splendid pro- 
gram is being arranged, including the Devereux Players, V. L. 
Granville and other artists. At least one entertainment of 
this character is planned for each week. At the close of the 
session, the Department of Music, featuring the pupils in 
Voice, the Glee Club and the Orchestra, will put on a pro- 
duction of Gilbert & Sullivan's light opera, The Mikado. It is 
hoped that a large number of good voices, both male and fe- 
male will try for this production. 



14 University of Florida 

Religious and Social Life. — The moral and religious at- 
mosphere at the Summer School is wholesome. The leading 
religious denominations have attractive places of worship and 
students are welcome at every service. Transportation is 
provided for those students who will attend. Twice each week 
a devotional service is held in connection with the Student 
Assembly. 

The Y.M.-W.C.A. — In connection with the regular student 
council a program of service will be carried on under the name 
of the "Y". The entire student body is served through this 
organization. Offices are in the "Y" Building and the secre- 
taries in charge may be found there. 

The principal points in the program are: Operating the 
"Y" building as a home or club including piano, Edison, read- 
ing matter including the best dailies and magazines, commit- 
tee room, kitchenette, telephone for local and long distance 
calls, ice water and games. 

Service is given through an Information and Lost and 
Found Bureau. A student directory is kept of all faculty and 
students enrolled in the Summer School. Lost and Found ar- 
ticles may be turned in and efforts made to locate the owners. 

An effort will be made to serve the many visitors who 
come to the campus throughout the summer. Report at the 
"Y" and ask for your friend. 

Hikes, picnics and other socials are promoted during the 
session. 

The Honor System. — All class work at the University is 
on the honor basis. No espionage is practiced by teachers, and 
students will unanimously condemn and punish cheating. 

Cooperative Government. — Government of student life 
on the campus is cooperative between students and faculty. 
Cooperative government for the past few summers has proven 
successful because of the splendid spirit existing between 
faculty and students. Representatives elected from each sec- 
tion of the dormitories, and from the larger boarding houses 
together with a faculty committee meet weekly to plan con- 
structively for the benefit of student life, and University in- 
terests. Suggestions from any member of the student body or 
faculty are welcomed at all times. 



Summer School 15 



FACULTY ADVISERS 



Members of the Summer School faculty will give every pos- 
sible aid to students in helping them select wisely their courses. 
A wide variety of courses is offered so that each teacher may 
find that which he needs most. Any member of the faculty 
will gladly advise with students, but certain ones are desig- 
nated to be of help to certain classes of students. 

Prof. W. A. Little has been designated as the adviser for 
all students who wish to review for the State teachers' exam- 
inations, and others who are doing pre-college work. Such 
students should register with him. 

Dr. Joseph R. Fulk, Acting Dean of the Teachers College 
during the Summer School, will advise and register all teach- 
ers who wish to pursue courses for college credit. 

Dean J. N. Anderson should be consulted by all students 
who wish to pursue work towards the masters degrees. Also 
all those Arts and Science students from the winter session 
who remain for work during the Summer School should reg- 
ister with him. 

The heads of departments of the college should be consulted 
about all matters concerning the work of their respective 
divisions. 

Dean Skinner and Dean Black will advise any students who 
desire their services regarding any other matters concerning 
their comfort and welfare. 

Student Health and Medical Advice. — The Summer 
School is making greater efforts this summer than ever 
before to conserve the health of the students. The services of 
Dr. Barnes, of the Florida Public Health Association, Dr. 
Brink, of the State Board of Health, and others have been 
secured to give a course on public health. These eminent 
physicians will also assist the University physician in making 
physical examinations and prescribing means for remedying 
physical defects. Courses in Health Education are listed 
below under "Courses of Instruction." It is urged that early 
in the session all students apply at the infirmary for a 
thorough physical examination. Especially does this apply 
to those who must present health certificates when they apply 
for permission to take the state teachers' examinations. Here- 



16 University of Florida 

tofore many students have deferred this examination so lat« 
in the session of the Summer School that much overcrowding 
resulted. This should be attended to in the first two or thre< 
weeks of Summer School. The University maintains a well 
equipped infirmary and has professional nurses constantly ir 
attendance for those who may be ill during the Summei 
School. Regular physical examination and medical advice 
are offered to all students on any day at the regular hours of 
consultation in the infirmary. Opportunity is offered for in- 
dividual and private conference with the University Physi- 
cian, Director of the Department, or assistants. 

The University Physician keeps hours daily at University 
Infirmary for purposes of consultation. Infirmary care is 
provided for those requiring it. Constant bedside care is given 
by resident registered nurses. Students must furnish their 
own transportation to the Infirmary. 

Athletics. — The gymnasium, basketball court, the base- 
ball grounds and tennis courts are at the disposition 
of the students, and instructors are at hand to direct athletic 
activities. A well-kept golf course is near the University 
and for a nominal fee students of the Summer School are 
permitted to play on the course. 

The General Assembly. — All students and faculty 
members are expected to attend the General Assembly on 
Tuesdays and Fridays at 10:00 o'clock. The completion of 
the new Auditorium, makes it possible without crowding to 
accommodate all those who may wish to attend. The Audito- 
rium will seat about 1,900, and is near enough to the main 
lecture halls to make it easily accessible to all students. 

Many important announcements will be made at the Gen- 
eral Assembly, for the observance of which students will 
be held responsible, even though they may not be in attend- 
ance at the time. 

Societies and Clubs. — The Peabody Literary Society 
meets weekly in the auditorium. Delightful and instructive 
programs are rendered at each meeting. All students of the 
Summer School are eligible for membership. 

Phi Kappa Phi. — A chapter of the Honor Society of Phi 
Kappa Phi was established at the University during the spring 



Summer School 17 

of 1912. To be eligible for membership a student must have 
been in attendance at the University for at least one year, or 
three summer sessions, have been guilty of no serious breaches 
of discipline, have had at least three years of collegiate train- 
ing, be v^ithin one year of finishing a course leading to a de- 
gree, and stand among the first fourth of the senior class of 
the University. The numerical grade v^hich must be attained 
is based on all college work, v^herever done, for which the 
student receives credit towards a degree. 

Kappa Delta Pi. — Kappa Delta Pi is an honorary fra- 
ternity, similar to Phi Kappa Phi, except that only Juniors 
and Seniors in the Teachers College are eligible for member- 
ship. This fraternity plays an important part in the life of 
the Summer School. 

Clubs are formed each summer from each county, and 
many interesting and delightful associations are formed 
among the students and the members of the faculty. 

The Summer School News. — The Summer School News 
is published by the students in cooperation with the De- 
partment of English and a committee from the faculty. 
Through its columns the more important news of the campus 
is disseminated. Every registered student is automatically a 
subscriber and entitled to every issue from the date of regis- 
tration. 

Demonstration School. — As in the past three years it 
is planned to include a Demonstration School in the program 
of the University Summer School, consisting of one primary 
grade and one intermediate grade. The primary grade will 
include a class of beginners and a first-grade class combined. 
The intermediate grade will be composed of fourth and fifth 
grade pupils, or fifth and sixth grade pupils, depending upon 
the number of applications. 

The very best teachers in the state for this work will be 
employed, in order that the children may be given the best 
instruction possible. A busy child is a happy child, and it is 
our plan that these children have three hours each morning 
of delightful employment in music, organized play, stimu- 
lating handwork, as well as splendid work in reading, history, 
arithmetic, geography and other school subjects. 



18 University of Florida 

The children who attended last year were delighted with 
Lhe work. The sixth grade children were taught how to use 
the library for reference ; they organized a club among them- 
selves, carried on their own meetings and worked out a play 
which they presented at the close of the term. The smaller 
children delighted their mothers at the close with a puppet 
show. 

We can take care of only a limited number of children, and 
if you wish to enroll your child this should be attended to at 
once. The term lasts for six weeks, beginning Monday, June 
20. Daily sessions extend from 8 :30 to 11 :30. A fee of $6.00 
will be charged. 

The Employment Bureau. — As the Teachers College 
and the Summer School wishes to serve the whole state 
in every possible way, a Teachers' Employment Bureau was 
established several years ago. It is open throughout the year, 
except during the first week of the Summer School (students 
are particularly requested not to ask for conferences during 
the first week of Summer School, as the Director will be very 
busy with other duties during that week), and the vacation 
period immediately following the Summer School. Its duties 
are to assist students and graduates of the University to ob- 
tain positions in the teaching profession. From school offi- 
cials it receives requests for teachers. From teachers it re- 
ceives requests for information as to vacancies. It keeps on 
file both information as to vacancies and as to available teach- 
ers. When called upon the Bureau tries to meet the needs of 
both teachers and school officials. 

The Director of the Bureau will be glad to be informed of 
present or prospective vacancies in positions for which col- 
lege-trained men or women are eligible. No charges are made 
for services, though students are required to pay for all tele- 
grams and telephone calls made in their behalf. 

The aggregate yearly salaries of all teachers who secured 
positions through the Bureau in a recent summer was in excess 
of $324,675.00. Had the same positions been obtained through 
professional agencies, fees in excess of $16,233.75 would have 
been collected from the teachers. As the Employment Bureau 
made no charges whatever, it is readily seen that no small 
amount was saved the teachers of the state. 



Summer School 19 

Communications in regard to teaching positions should 
be addressed to Dean J. W. Norman, University of Florida, 
Gainesville, Florida. 

The Bulletin Boards. — Read the bulletin boards daily. 

Reduced Railroad Rates. — The Southeastern Passenger 
Association has authorized reduced rates on the round trip 
identification plan from all stations except stations on N. 0. 
G. R., R. F. & P., and W.-S. S. B. railways. The rates are 
based on fare and one-half for the round trip, the minimum 
excursion fare being one dollar. Round trip tickets will be 
sold students and members of their families only upon pre- 
sentation of identification certificates to ticket agent at time 
of purchase of tickets. The identification certificates will be 
furnished by the Dean of the Summer School on application. 

Tickets will be sold from June 10th to June 16th, inclusive, 
and the final limit of all tickets will be August 12th. All round 
trip reduced rate tickets must be validated by the regular 
ticket agent at Gainesville before the return journey is com- 
menced. 

In order that the nearest railroad ticket agent may have 
a supply of tickets on hand, students should make inquiry of 
him concerning these rates at least a week before purchasing 
tickets to Gainesville. Railroad ticket agents will not be able 
to supply the necessary "identification certificate". This can 
be secured only from the Dean of the Summer School. 

Students are urged to avail themselves of the reduced rates 
by obtaining in advance from the Dean of the Summer School 
an identification certificate or carefully preserving the one 
which will be enclosed in the letters written to prospective 
students. 

COURSES IN ATHLETIC COACHING 

The department of athletic coaching established as a part 
of the University Summer School, has proved one of the most 
successful departments in the session and has met a felt need 
among the teachers in the State. The chief purpose of the 
department is to meet a widespread demand for high school 
teachers who combine a knowledge of athletic coaching with 
their scholastic training. The department this year will be 
under the direction of Mr. H. L. Sebring, Head Coach of the 



20 University of Florida 

University of Florida, with the assistance of Mr. W. C. 
Cowell, also of the University coaching staff. University gym- 
nasium and equipment will be at the disposal of the students 
who register for this work. 

COURSES IN NURSING EDUCATION 

For the past two summers the University has offered 
courses in Nursing Education. These have proved very suc- 
cessful, and we are planning this summer to expand the work 
still more. Miss Katherine J. Densford, of the Illinois Train- 
ing School for Nurses, Chicago, will return this summer to 
offer the work. The courses are designed to train graduate 
nurses for administrative work in hospitals and training 
schools. This is a comparatively new line of work, and is gain- 
ing in prestige all over the United States. We are indeed 
fortunate to have such a leader as Miss Densford in the Uni- 
versity Summer School. 

MUSIC DEPARTMENT 

The Department of Music has been much broadened for 
this summer. Besides the work in Public School Music and 
Glee Club, we are offering special opportunity for private les- 
sons in voice, piano and organ under most excellent teachers. 
As a culmination to the work of the Department, at the close 
of the Summer School a presentation of Gilbert and Sulli- 
van's light opera, 'The Mikado," will be given. It is espe- 
cially desired that good voices, both male and female, will try 
out at the beginning of the session for parts in this opera. 

Mrs. Alberta Murphree Worth will have charge of the 
Voice Department. Mrs. Worth received her musical train- 
ing at the Peabody Conservatory of Music in Baltimore, where 
she held a scholarship in voice under Baron Berthold, later 
studying with eminent teachers of this country and abroad. 
She studied for two seasons with Conrad Murphree, of Tampa, 
Florida, who is one of the most prominent voice teachers of 
the south. Mrs. Worth has had wide success as a teacher and 
concert artist, and the University is fortunate in having her 
this year for the third summer. Mrs. Worth will offer two 
scholarships in voice this summer, one full scholarship paying 
tuition for two lessons per week for eight weeks, value, $25.00, 



Summer School 21 

and one partial scholarship paying tuition for one lesson per 
week, value $12.50, the student to pay for one lesson per week. 
These scholarships will be awarded by competitive examina- 
tion which will be held in the Auditorium immediately follow- 
ing the first Assembly period. 

Mrs. Alice Walden Weaver will give private instruction in 
piano. She received her early musical training at the Univers- 
ity of Wisconsin, School of Music, where she was a scholarship 
pupil in piano. She later studied at the Royal Conservatory of 
Music at Leipzig, Germany, under the celebrated master, Rob- 
ert Teichmuller. Mrs. Weaver taught in the State College of 
Washington before coming to Florida, and is an experienced 
teacher and a concert artist of wide reputation. Special ar- 
rangements for lessons must be made with Mrs. Weaver. 

Mr. Claude Murphree, University organist, will give private 
lessons in organ by special arrangement. 

PARENT-TEACHER ASSOCIATION COURSE 

Following up the work begun last summer, there will be 
a course for two weeks, July 11th to 22nd, offered at the 
Summer School. This course is designed for those interested 
in the work of the Parent-Teacher Associations, and will con- 
tain much that is valuable and interesting in organizing and 
carrying on the work of these associations. 

We are very fortunate in having Mr. Edgar G. Weller, well 
trained in the splendid work of the National Congress of Par- 
ents and Teachers, to offer this work to our students. 



22 University of Florida 

EXPENSES 

The cost of attending the Summer School is very moderate 
when compared with that at many other institutions. There is 
no charge for tuition and fees are very low. The combined 
cost for a room on the campus and meals in the Commons is 
only $40.00 for the session. The cost of meals alone is $32.00 
for the session. For laundry, incidentals and books, expendi- 
tures vary, but necessary expenditures are not very high. The 
estimate of the cost to a student living on the campus follows : 

High Low 

Tuition $00.00 $00.00 

Registration fee 6.00 6.00 

Board and lodging in Dormitory: 

In advance for the term 40.00 40.00 

In advance for the half term 21.00 21.00 

Board in Dormitory without lodging : 

In advance for the term 32.00 32.00 

In advance for the half term 17.00 17.00 

Board for children under eight: 

In advance for the term 16.00 16.00 

In advance for the half term 9.00 9.00 

Chemistry laboratory fee 5.00 5.00 

Physics laboratory fee 2.50 2.50 

Tests and Measurements fee 1.50 1.50 

Biology Laboratory fee 5.00 5.00 

Drawing fee (for materials used) 1.00 1.00 

Primary Handwork fee (for materials used) 75 .75 

Glee Club (music scores) 1.00 1.00 

Voice tuition per term (2 lessons per week) 25.00 25.00 

Physical Education fee 50 .50 

Demonstration School fee ....^ 6.00 6.00 

Laundry 12.00 4.00 

Incidentals 16.00 8.00 

Books 8.00 3.00 

For students living off the campus, the estimated expense 
is the same except that rooms and board will be somewhat 
higher. However, good rooms adjacent to the campus can be 
obtained at from $6.00 to $12.00 a month per student, and 
board off the campus will cost about $6.00 a week. (See 
pp. 71-73.) 

Only students will be admitted to the dormitories, but 
children may take meals with their parents in the Commons 
at the rates given in the above list. All accounts are payable 
in advance. 



Summer School 23 

Money. — 1. Students may deposit their money with the 
Auditor of the University and draw it out as needed. 

2. The $5.00 sent to reserve dormitory room is applied 
on the payment for room and board. It is not a registration 
fee. 

3. The registration fee is $6.00 and is paid at the time of 
registration. 

Refund of Fees. — 1. Fees paid in advance for room 
reservation will be refunded on application up to and including 
June 1st but not after that date. 

2. If by Friday of the first week students for any reason 
wish to withdraw from the University, the registration fee 
less a flat overhead fee of $3.00, will be refunded. After this 
time there will be no refund of the registration fee. 

3. A refund on the amount paid for room in the dormi- 
tories and board in the University Dining Hall, will be made 
on even weeks, and then only when cashier of commons is 
notified of date of departure. No refund will be made on frac- 
tions or parts of the week. 

Textbooks. — The University maintains a depository for 
the convenience of students where all necessary books may be 
had at list prices. Students may well bring English diction- 
aries and other useful books of reference. Those studying 
courses for intermediate or grammar grade teachers should 
bring copies of the State-adopted supplementary texts in the 
subjects to be studied. All teachers should be supplied with 
copies of the Florida State Course of Study. These may be 
secured from the State Department of Education, Tallahassee, 
Florida. 

Students in Education courses should bring with them pro- 
fessional books and textbooks related to the courses they plan 
to take. 

Scholarships. — At the meeting of the Legislature in 1923, 
a scholarship law was passed providing for two scholarships 
from each county in the State, one to the Teachers College of 
the University of Florida, and one to the School of Education 
at the State College for Women. Each of these scholarships 
may be held for four years by the successful applicant and 
carries a stipend of $200.00 per year. Examinations are 



24 



University of Florida 



held in each county on the first Thursday in June and third 
Thursday in August under the supervision of the county su- 
perintendent. A student to be considered as an applicant for 
a scholarship must present sixteen college entrance units. 
These scholarships are awarded upon competitive examina- 
tions to persons satisfying the entrance requirements of the 
University of Florida and of the Florida State College for 
Women. A student vi^ho desires to be considered as an appli- 
cant for a scholarship should make his desire known to his 
county superintendent before the first of May of each year. 
He should also write to the State Superintendent of Public 
Instruction telling him of his application for the scholarship. 
At the present time the following counties have no rep- 
resentative at the Teachers College : 



Bay 


Glades 


Orange 


Brevard 


Hamilton 


Pasco 


Broward 


Highlands 


Pinellas 


Citrus 


Indian River 


Putnam 


DeSoto 


Levy 


St. Lucie 


Dixie 


Marion 


Sarasota 


Escambia 


Martin 


Seminole 


Flagler 


Monroe 


Taylor 


Gilchrist 


Nassau 


Union 



Two scholarships in Voice will be offered, by competitive 
examination. See Music Department, p. 20. 



Summer School 25 

ADMISSION 

Admission to Summer School. — Those who have finished 
the tenth grade of a Senior High School, or equivalent, and 
teachers who hold a First Grade Certificate, are admitted to 
the first year of the Four- Year Normal Curriculum, which 
comprises the equivalent of the last two years of high school 
and the Freshman and Sophomore years in college. Grad- 
uates of Senior High Schools who can offer sixteen entrance 
units, including three (3) of English, two and one-half (21/2) 
of mathematics, one (1) of history and one (1) of Science, are 
admitted to the Freshman year of the Collegiate course. 

Students are urged to pursue courses leading to a degree 
and to have themselves classified when they register. To facili- 
tate proper classification, all students are requested to bring 
with them a certified transcript of the work they have com- 
pleted in high school or in other colleges. Blanks conven- 
iently arranged for this data will be sent to prospective stu- 
dents upon application. 

Persons twenty-one or more years of age who cannot sat- 
isfy the entrance requirements, but who give evidence of abil- 
ity to profit by the courses they may take, may, under excep- 
tional circumstances, be admitted as "adult specials". 

No one under sixteen years of age will be admitted unless 
he is a graduate of a senior high school. 

There are no academic requirements for admission for 
those who register merely for review courses. 

Entrance Examinations. — For the large number of sum- 
mer school students who have not finished high school and, 
hence, do not have sufficient entrance units to enable them to 
enter the Freshman class, but yet are mature enough to profit 
by regular college work, entrance examinations will be ar- 
ranged. All students should file with the Dean of the Summer 
School not later than May 20th petitions for examinations in 
each subject in which they wish to be examined. 

Admission to Advanced Standing. — Oifice hours will be 
held daily by the Committee on Advanced Standing in Room 
110, Peabody Hall, to evaluate the credits of those students 
who have attended other colleges and universities and who 
wish to receive advanced standing at the University of Flor- 



26 University of Florida 

ida. This office will, however, not be open after Saturday, 
August 1, as this Committee will have other duties during the 
last week of the Summer School. Students are, therefore, 
cautioned not to delay attention to this important matter 
later than this date. 

DEGREES 

Degrees. — Courses are offered leading to the degrees of 
Bachelor of Arts in Education, Bachelor of Science in Educa- 
tion, and Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Education. For 
the Bachelor of Arts degree the major elective work must be 
chosen in Groups A, B, C and F ; for the Bachelor of Science 
degree, from Groups D, E, and one other (see page 29) . In ad- 
dition to these degrees, the Normal Diploma, sometimes called 
the L. I. degree, is granted to those students who have finished 
the second year's work in Teachers College, with the excep- 
tion that in the Sophomore year Education 405 is required. 
There is considerable agitation in the United States at pres- 
ent to make two years of training beyond high school a mini- 
mum requirement for teaching even in the elementary schools. 
All students are therefore urged by all means to complete the 
requirements which are necessary to receive the Normal Di- 
ploma. Students who expect to teach in high school should 
possess a Bachelor's Degree. 

Authority for the above is provided in Section 5 of Summer 
School Act as follows : 

"All work conducted at the said Summer School shall be 
of such character as to entitle the students doing the same to 
collegiate, normal or professional credit therefor, and may be 
applied towards making a degree." 

Residence Requirement. — In order to receive a degree, 
or Normal Diploma, from Teachers College, students must 
have spent at least one scholastic year in residence (three 
summer schools may be considered equivalent to a year in 
residence), and must have completed fifteen (15) year-hours 
of college work in residence. These fifteen (15) year-hours, 
except in one condition, must be the last which one takes 
immediately prior to graduation. The exception is the case of 
students who take their degrees by attendance at the Summer 
School, in which case six (6), but never more, year-hours of 



Summer School 27 

work by correspondence may be taken during the ten (10) 
months just prior to the Summer Session in which the degree 
is received. In every case, students must have completed 
fifteen (15) year-hours of work in residence and must have 
been in attendance at the summer session or scholastic term 
immediately prior to the reception of a degree. 

Amount of Correspondence Work Permitted. — Stu- 
dents are not permitted to complete more than fifty per cent 
(50%) of the work toward a degree by correspondence. 

Correspondence study courses may not at any time be 
offered to satisfy the residence requirements. 

Students will not be permitted to take work by correspond- 
ence while they are in residence without the consent of the 
Dean of Teachers College. 

Requirements for the Master's Degree. 

1. A candidate for the Master's Degree must be in resi- 
dence for at least one scholastic year, or four summer terms, 
devoting his entire time during this period to study and re- 
search. 

2. He must complete two majors and two minors. A major 
IS a three year-hour course of rank above the Senior Class. A 
minor is a three year-hour course of rank above the Sopho- 
more Class. 

3. A thesis is required of all candidates. This thesis should 
be closely allied to the major subjects. The title of the thesis 
should be submitted by the end of the first summer and com- 
pleted by the beginning of the fourth summer. 

4. All students who hold the bachelor's degree are urged 
to register for Education 527. 

5. All students who wish to pursue work leading to the 
Master's degree must register with the Chairman of the Grad- 
uate Committee as well as with the Dean of the Summer 
School as soon as possible, so that plans for giving the work 
which they desire may be perfected before the opening of the 
Summer School. In the communication, state what subjects are 
desired. 



I 



28 University of Florida 

OPPORTUNITIES FOR GRADUATE STUDY 

As stated above, any course that is above the Sophomore 
class in rank may be taken to satisfy the requirements for 
minors. Any course that is numbered above 300 may be 
counted as a minor subject. Any course that is numbered 
above 500 may be counted as a major. As a usual thing, 
undergraduate students are not permitted to register for 
courses that are numbered above 500. 

A number of courses have already been arranged that may 
count as majors. Efforts will be made to arrange still others 
upon request. If the major work wished is not listed, re- 
quests for it should be made at an early date. 

Requirements for the Bachelor's Degrees. — The follow- 
ing curriculum has been designed to meet the requirements 
for the degrees of A.B.E. and B.S.E. (For the req-uirements 
for the B.S.A.E. degree, see General Catalog of the Univer- 
S7*ty.) 

CURRICULUM 

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Arts in Education and 
Bachelor of Science in Education 

Constants. — i. e., subjects required of all students en- 
rolled in Teachers College. 



Required of all students in Teachers College: 

Physical Education 101-2 1 hr. ; required of Freshmen 

Physical Education 201-2 1 hr. ; required of Sophomores 

Military Science 101-2.... 2 hrs. ; required of Freshmen 

Military Science 201-2.... 2 hrs.; required of Sophomores 

English 101-102 3 hrs.; required of Freshmen 

Philosophy 201 Wz hrs.; required of Sophomores 

Education 207 IVz hrs.; required of Sophomores 

Education 101 IVz hrs.; required of Freshmen 

Education 102] 

or \ l^i hrs.; required of Freshmen 

Education 103 J 

Education 203 1% hrs.; required of Sophomores 

Education 301 Wz hrs.; required of Juniors 

Education 308 l^z hrs.; required of Juniors 

Education 401 Wz hrs.; required of Seniors 

Education 403 lYz hrs.; required of Seniors 

Education 405 li^ hrs.; required of Seniors 

Required of all students who expect to be principals: 

Education 404 l^^ hrs. 

Education 408 l^^ hrs. 



Summer School 



29 



Each student must select courses from three of the follow- 
ing Groups. (See Regulation 2 below.) 



A — Ancient Languages 


B — Modern Languages 


C— English 


Required courses: 


Required courses: 


Required courses: 


Latin 101-102 




Fr. 21-22 ) 
Fr. 101-102 5 




Eng. 101-102 (in- 


Latin 203-204 


6 hrs. 




cluded among con- 


or 




or 


[e hrs. 


stants) 


Latin 201-202 




Span. 21-22 1 
Span. 101-102} 




English, 6 1 


Recommended courses: 




hrs. 


Latin 301-302 


Recommended courses: 


6 hrs from r 12 hrs. 


Latin 401-402 


French 201-202 


Latin 




Greek 21-22 ) 


Spanish 201-202 


French or 




Greek 101-102 


German 21-22 


Spanish 




French 21-22 


Latin 


Recommended courses: 


French 101-102J 


History 101-102 or 


Other courss in lan- 


Spanish 21-22 1 
Spanish 101-102 j 


305-306 


guages, and His- 


English 203-204, 


tory 305-306. 




or 301-302 





D — Mathematics 



Required courses: 
Math. 101-102 )6 hrs. 
and 251-252 j 
Recommended courses : 
Mathematics 351-352 
3 hours from a 
Science 
Surveymg 



E — Natural Science 



Required courses: 

Biol. 101 1 

Bot. 101-102 I 

Biol. 106 ^16 hrs. 

Chem. 101-1021 

Phys. 203-204J 
Recommended courses : 

Advanced Physics 

Chem. 201-202 

Chem. 201-202, or 
251-252. 



F — Social Science 

Required courses: 

Hist. 101-102 1 

Hist. 301-302 I 

Hist. 303-304 j-15 hrs. 

Sociology, 3 
hrs. 

Econ. 20-202 
202 J' 

Recommended courses : 

Social Science 

Biology 

Psychology and 

Philosophy 



Regulations : 

1. All students must take all Constants. 

2. Each student must select from three Groups of Studies 
from A to F, and must continue in those selected until com- 
pletion of sophomore year ; at which time a student may con- 
centrate upon two of these Groups by permission of the Dean. 

It is urged that they select their electives from closely 
related subjects in order that they may become proficient in 
teaching these subjects. 

3. Where the total number of hours of the three Groups 
combined does not equal 24, additional hours must be taken 
from the recommended courses in these Groups to make the 
total 24 or more. 

4. A total of 66 year-hours is required for graduation. 



30 University of Florida 

5. In case a student is exempt from Military Science 101-2 
and 201-2, he must substitute an equal number of hours from 
other departments. 

Substitutions Permitted : 

(1) Summer School students may substitute another course 
in Education for Education 101 with the consent of the Dean. 

(2) Summer School students may substitute Education 
124 or Education 123 for Education 201, except that 
Education 123 gives only one year hour of credit. The addi- 
tional half hour must be made up elsewhere. 

(3) Summer School students may substitute Education 
122 for Education 202. 

(4) Summer School students may choose among Educa- 
tion 407, Education 408, and Education 321. 

Requirements for the Normal Diploma. — The Normal 
Diploma is awarded to those students who have completed the 
Four- Year Normal Curriculum (see General Catalog). 

This curriculum comprises the last two years of standard 
high school work, and the freshman and sophomore years in 
college. 

The student must offer either sixteen units for entrance 
to the third year of the Four- Year Normal Curriculum (i. e., 
freshman year in college), or he must have completed sixteen 
units by the end of the second year of this curriculum. In the 
next two years (the freshman and sophomore years) he must 
complete at least one. credit hour of Physical Education and 
two credit hours of Military Science. In addition, the student 
must complete thirty academic and professional year-hours, 
or sixty semester-hours. Of these, the following are required : 
English 101-102, 3 hrs.; Philosophy 201, II/2 h^s.; Education 
207, 11/2 hrs.; Education 101-102, 3 hrs.; Education 405, II/2 
hrs. ; and Education 203, II/2 hrs. The student may then choose 
three of the groups described under the requirements for the 
bachelor's degree, and so far as possible complete the "re- 
quired" courses in these three groups. On account of the large 
number of hours required in two of the groups, it may be im- 
possible for students who elect these groups to complete all 
of the "required" courses in three groups. In that case, they 
should divide their time about equally among the groups 
chosen. 



Summer School 31 

CREDIT 

Summer School Credit. — Students will ordinarily be able 
to complete about one-fourth as much work in a session of the 
Summer School as they do in the regular annual session. By 
reciting six times per week, however, it is possible for college 
students to complete a full semester's work in three courses. 
The amount of credit, stated in year-hours, to which the com- 
pletion of each course will entitle one, is given in the descrip- 
tion of the various courses of instruction. 

No high school credit is given, but students taking work 
of pre-college grade may arrange for entrance examinations 
in these subjects, if they wish to enter the University. 

MAXIMUM AND MINIMUM CREDIT 

I. For College Students. — ^Without special permission 
of the Teachers College Faculty, college students must take 
courses aggregating as many as 3i/^ college credits, but not 
more than 4^2 college credits. Under some circumstances, 
students may petition the faculty to waive the above regula- 
tion. The following regulation governs such cases : 

1. Students must first petition the Teachers College Fac- 
ulty for permission to register for more than the usual amount 
of work, presenting this petition to the Dean of the Summer 
School. 

2. Before being allowed to register for more than 41/2 
year hours credit, or more than 20 recitations per week in 
pre-college work, the student must show that he has attained 
an average of 90 in the term or Summer School immediately 
preceding, in which case he may be permitted to take 5i/^ 
credits. In like manner, the student must show an average 
of 93 before he will be permitted to take as much as 6 credit 
hours. The faculty reserves the right to reduce the amount 
of credit received to 4I/2 credits even if all subjects should be 
passed- unless the same high averages, respectively, are main- 
tained. 

3. Those who wish more than required amount of work 
must have a thorough physical examination by the University 
physician. 



32 University of Florida 

4. Students will not be permitted to register for more 
than the usual number of hours until their petitions have been 
granted. 

5. On account of the large number of regularly registered 
students in the classes, it has been found necessary to dis- 
courage visiting. Therefore, the faculty has ruled that stu- 
dents wishing to attend classes as visitors may be admitted 
only upon the presentation of a permission card issued by the 
Dean. 

II. For Students in Review Courses Preparatory to 
THE Teachers Examinations. — Students preparing for the 
First Grade Certificate may register for Advanced Algebra, 
General Biology, Elementary Psychology, Rhetoric and Gen- 
eral History, an aggregate of 25 hours. 

Students preparing for the Second Grade Certificate may 
register for Elementary Agriculture, Civics, First Year Alge- 
bra, Arithmetic, Elementary United States History, and seven 
hours of electives, an aggregate of 25 hours. 

Students preparing for the Third Grade Certificate may 
register for Spelling, Constitution of the United States, Arith- 
metic, Grammar, Composition, Geography, Elementary United 
States History and Theory and Practice, an aggregate of 25 
hours. 

CERTIFICATES 

Graduate State Certificates. — Graduates of the Teach- 
ers College and Normal School are granted Graduate State 
Certificates without further examination, provided that one- 
fifth of their work has been devoted to professional training 
and provided that they have the recommendation of the Teach- 
ers College Faculty. It is well for the student to note that a 
Graduate State Certificate permits him to teach only those 
subjects that are listed on such certificate, and that only those 
subjects will be placed on his certificate in which he has spe- 
cialized in his college course. This will ordinarily mean that a 
subject must have been pursued for at least two years in col- 
lege before a certificate to teach that subject will be granted. 
In case a student has pursued a subject for three or four years 
in high school, however, this rule may sometimes be abro- 
gated. 



Summer School 33 

Graduate State Certificates may be converted into Life 
Certificates by "presenting satisfactory evidence of having 
taught successfully for a period of twenty-four months under 
a Graduate State Certificate, and presenting endorsement of 
three holders of Life State, Life Graduate State, or Life Pro- 
II fessional Certificates." 

I Requirements for Other Teachers' Certificates. — The fol- 
I lowing are the subjects in which applicants for Third Grade 
; Certificates will be examined : Orthography, reading, arith- 
metic, English Grammar, composition, geography, United 
\ States history, including the Constitution of the United States, 
! physiology and theory and practice of teaching. 
I Applicants for Second Grade Certificates will be examined 
in the subjects prescribed for the Third Grade Certificate, and 
in Agriculture, Civil Government, and Algebra to Quadratics. 
"Applicants for Second Grade Certificates who submit unex- 
pired Third Grade Certificates as parts of their examinations 
may be exempt from tests on Orthography, reading and physi- 
ology." 

In addition to the subjects prescribed for the Second Grade 
Certificate, applicants for First Grade Certificates must be 
examined in Algebra, quadratics and beyond, Biology, Psy- 
chology, General History and Rhetoric, and by submitting an- 
unexpired Second Grade Certificate may be exempt from all 
subjects covered by that certificate, provided the grades at- 
tained on the Second Grade Certificate are equal to those re- 
quired for the First Grade Certificate. 



34 University of Florida 

REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE EXTENSION OF 
CERTIFICATES 

When credit for the extension of certificate is desired, 
regulations in addition to those mentioned under the heading 
"Maximum and Minimum Hours" must be observed. 

1. Every applicant for extension must take at least a 
four-hour course in Education (but not in Pedagogy) or 
Psychology, in order to satisfy the professional requirements 
for extension of certificate. 

2. The repetition of courses in Education or Psychology 
previously taken will not satisfy the professional require- 
ment for extension. 

3. Students who desire an extension of a third grade cer- 
tificate may not register for orthography, arithmetic, english 
grammar, english composition, geography. United States his- 
tory, physiology and pedagogy. 

4. Students who desire an extension of a second grade 
certificate may not register in the subjects enumerated in the 
preceding paragraph, or in agriculture, civics and first year 
algebra. 

5. Students who desire extension of a first grade cer- 
tificate may not register in the subjects enumerated in the 
preceding two paragraphs or for second year algebra, biol- 
ogy, elementary psychology, general history and rhetoric. 

6. No applicant for extension shall take less than 15 
hours per week without special permission, and at least 10 
hours of this amount shall be in courses not covered by the 
certificate held, or by courses previously taken. 

7. No student will be granted an extension of certificate 
who does not apply for the same on the student REGISTRA- 
TION CARD. A list of those who have applied will be posted 
on the Bulletin Board in Peabody Hall not later than July 1st 
for correction, and no student will be recommended for ex- 
tension of certificate whose name does not appear on this list 
by August 1. Students should register under exactly the 
same name that appears on the certificate which they wish 
to have extended. 



Summer School 35 

8. An extra fee of one dollar will be charged for any 
change of registration after Friday of the first week. 

9. To be granted extension, students must be recom- 
mended for diligence and accomplishment. Usually a passing 
grade is required. 

10. Certificates to be extended must be sent by Registered 
mail to W. S. Cawthon, State Superintendent of Public In- 
struction, at Tallahassee, Florida, immediately after the Sum- 
mer Session. Those who expect to take the state examinations 
immediately after the Summer School, however, should retain 
their certificates until they have adjusted their exemptions 
with the county superintendent. They should then send their 
certificates as directed above. This may be done as soon as 
possible, as there is a time limit and delay may cause the 
student to lose the extension. 

The Summer School faculty will not recommend students 
for extension of certificate for repeating courses which they 
have taken in previous summer sessions, or those who are 
not pursuing courses in order to raise the grade of certificate 
already held. At the end of the term the faculty will recom- 
mend for extension those that meet the above conditions. 

GENERAL DIRECTIONS FOR REGISTRATION 

Please observe the following directions ! It will be a great 
time-saver to you and your instructors if you will read and 
understand these directions before you come to register. 

1. Get your registration right the first time. Remember 
the proverb, ''Haste makes waste." Don't hurry. Be accur- 
ate. Make up your mind to take not less than one nor more 
than three hours in registering. 

2. Study the registration blanks reproduced immediately 
after these directions. 

3. Fill out the REGISTRATION CARD in complete detail 
down to the word "COURSES." Answer every question if 
possible. 

4. Study the Bulletin and the daily program until you 
know or at least think you know, what subjects you desire to 
study. See that there are no conflicts in your class hours. 

5. Consult freely with members of the faculty about your 
schedule. 



36 University of Florida 

6. Students who are taking courses that require observa- 
tion in the Demonstration School should reserve time for this 
purpose betv^een 8 :30 and 11 :30 A. M. 

7. After you have decided which subjects you expect to 
take, list them on the large REGISTRATION CARD under 
the word "COURSES." 

8. You are now ready to fill out the INSTRUCTOR'S 
COURSE CARDS. Make out one of these cards for each sub- 
ject you are taking. For instance, if you are taking three sub- 
jects, you will need three Course Cards, four subjects, four 
cards, etc. 

9. Do not register for more than 41/2 college credits or 
more than 20 recitation hours per week of review work. 

10. Secure the signature on your REGISTRATION CARD 
of each of your instructors and leave with him the INSTRUC- 
TOR'S COURSE CARD made out for the subject which he 
teaches. 

11. Be sure you have your registration as you want it. Do 
not change courses unnecessarily. 

12. Present the REGISTRATION CARD to the Dean or 
one of his assistants for approval. 

13. An extra fee of one dollar will be charged for any 
change in registration after Friday of the first week. Drop- 
ping a course, adding a course, or exchanging one course for 
another, each constitutes a change. 

14. Graduate students must register both with the Chair- 
man of the Graduate Committee, and with the Dean of the 
Summer School. 

When and Where to Register. — ^Students who live in 
or near Gainesville should register on Friday or Saturday, 
June 10th and 11th, in the Dean's office in Peabody Hall. 
Those who can reach Gainesville on the morning trains on 
Monday, June 13th, should register on that day to relieve the 
congestion on Tuesday, June 14th. All others should register 
on Tuesday, June 14th. No effort will be made to meet 
trains or to transfer trunks on Sunday. In fact, students are 
urged not to arrive on Sunday, as the dormitory rooms will not 
be open until Monday. 





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Summer School 39 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

The following abbreviations used in connection with the 
courses, indicate the buildings in which the courses are held, 
and the numbers after such abbreviations indicate rooms in 
which they are held: 

A — Agricultural Building; S — Science; P — Peabody; E — 
Engineering; L — Language; G — Gymnasium. 

AGRICULTURE 

Elementary Agriculture. — A general course in agricul- 
ture. — This will introduce the student to the study of soils, 
plants, common diseases of plants, insects, farm crops, domes- 
tic animals and the like. Methods of teaching agriculture in 
rural schools will be stressed. Review. Extension credit only. 
W. F. 10:00 A. 205. Mr. Walker. 

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 

Agricultural Economics 308. — Marketing and distribut- 
ing farm products; marketing organizations and laws under 
which they are operated. The relation of foreign trade and 
general business conditions to the farmers' market. I14 col- 
lege credits. Daily 9:00. A. 205. Mr. Turlington. 

Agricultural Economics 402. — Farm Management. — A 
study of the methods of making farm organization and farm 
enterprize studies, and of assembling and interpreting the 
data. Special studies will be made of labor, material and costs 
requirements for Florida crops, li/^ college credits. Daily 
11 :00. A. 205. Mr. Turlington. 

Agricultural Economics 501. — Agricultural Economics 
Seminar. — A study of the recent literature and scientific pub- 
lications in Agricultural Economics. For graduate students; 
elective for seniors on approval. 1 college credit. T. Th. 3 :00- 
5 :00. A. 205. Mr. Turlington. 

Agricultural Economics 505. — Research in Farm Man- 
agement and Marketing. — Open only to graduate students. 
One to five hours by appointment, place to be arranged. Mr. 
Turlington. 



40 University of Florida 

agricultural engineering 

Agricultural Engineering 301. — Drainage and Irriga- 
tion. — Farm surveying, drainage and irrigation systems, prac- 
tice making surveys and designing systems. II/2 college 
credits. Daily 12 :00. A. 206. Mr. Frazier Rogers. 

Agricultural Engineering 302. — Farm Motors. — The 
sources of power on the farm; windmills, gasoline and kero- 
sene engines; special attention given to farm tractors. II/2 
college credits. Daily 11 :00. A. 106. Mr. Frazier Rogers. 

Agricultural Engineering 303. — Farm Shop Work. — 
This course is based upon the need for training in the custom- 
ary farm-shop jobs as shown by a survey of the farms in 
Florida adjacent to departments of Vocational Agriculture. 
The course is designed primarily with the intent of developing 
proficient doing-ability in these jobs. Some of the specific 
jobs treated are: Saw-filing, farm forge work, rafter cutting, 
harness repairing, elementary sheet-metal work, soldering, 
construction and hanging a farm gate, rope splicing, belt-lac- 
ing, the use of pulleys, construction of farm home conven- 
iences, figuring bill of materials for farm buildings, repairing 
farm machinery, the care of farm tools, etc. I14 college 
credits. Daily 3:00. A. 106. Mr. Frazier Rogers. 

ARCHITECTURE 

Architecture.— The new School of Architecture will offer 
courses in Freehand Drawing and Elementary Architectural 
Design which may be taken in Summer School by making ar- 
rangements with the Director of the Department. This work 
will be in the nature of personal instruction and a fee will 
be charged. P. 200. Mr. Weaver. 

ATHLETIC COACHING 

Coaching 101. — Football. — Theory and Practice. — The 
course will include the theories of fundamentals, their de- 
velopment and relation to team play, with special emphasis 
laid upon drills to perfect fundamentals. The several styles 
of offense and defense, with consideration of their special 
strength and weakness; generalship and strategy; train- 
ing, conditioning and player's equipment will be discussed. 



Summer School 41 

Special emphasis will be given to forward-pass attack and 
its defense. The practical work will include punting, place- 
kicking, drop-kicking, kick-off and forward passing; tackling 
dummy and charging sled ; special drill for linemen, ends and 
backs ; interference and team work ; fundamental plays, break 
plays, and signal systems. Textbook, "Football, Technique 
and Tactics," by Zuppke. 2 college credits. M. T. W. Th. F. 
8.00. Laboratory M. W. F. 4:00-6:00. Basketball Court. 
Mr. Sebring. 

Note — All students must equip themselves with suitable 
uniforms to participate in the laboratory work. This work 
will' not be rough or strenuous but is designed with the pur- 
pose of acquainting the coach with field problems. 

Coaching 102. — Baseball. — The fundamentals of the game 
as applied to the individual ; the defensive game, the battery ; 
the basemen; the outfielders; the defensive team as a unit 
with emphasis upon the finer points of "inside" defense ; the 
offensive game; the batsman, the runner, the base coaches; 
types of offense to be used in particular stages of the game ; 
the team coach and his duties to his team. Textbook, "The 
Science of Baseball," by Byrd Douglas. 1 college credit. T, 
Th. 2:00-4:00. Basketball Court. Mr. Cowell. 

Coaching 103. — Track and Field. — The theory of starting, 
finishing, sprinting, distance-running, hurdling, high and 
broad jumping, pole vaulting, shot putting, discus and javelin 
throwing. Demonstrations will be given in connection with 
lectures. Textbooks, "Spalding Athletic Library, Buff Series, 
500B, 501B, 502B, 503B, 504B, 505B, 506B." Price 50c each. 
1 college credit. T. Th. 4:00-6:00. Basketball Court. Mr. 
Sebring. 

Coaching 104. — Basketball (men). — The fundamentals 
of the game; passing, receiving, pivots, shooting; the de- 
fense; of the individual, of the team, the five man defense 
showing the different types employed and emphasizing the 
most successful. The offense, as applied to the individual, 
team offense, different types employed, special attention given 
to the types of offense to break through a five man defense. 
Practices to employ in developing a strong offense. Textbook, 



42 University of Florida 

"My Basketball Bible," by Forrest C. Allen. 2 college credits. 
M. T. W. Th. F. 9 :00. Laboratory M. W. F. 2 :00-4:00. Bas- 
ketball Court. Mr. Cowell. 

Coaching 105.— Basketball (women). — The fundamentals 
of the game; passing, receiving, the pivots, shooting; the 
defense, of the individual guards; centres; team work 
on defense. The offense, individual play, offense on team 
work, guards, centres and forwards. Practices employed 
to develop a strong offense. Given as an aid to coaches of 
girls' teams. 14 college credit. W. Th. 10:00. Basketball 
Court. Mr. Cowell. 

Coaching 107.— Athletic Training Theory. — Theories of 
training, massage, treatment of sprains, bruises, etc. ; training 
room sanitation and care of equipment; bandaging and first 
aid. Textbook, "My Basketball Bible," by Forrest C. Allen. 
1/2 college credit. T. Th. 3:00. Basketball Court. Mr. Se- 
bring. 

BIOLOGY 

General Biology. — General introduction to the structure 
and classification with special reference to the flowering plants, 
the insects and vertebrates. Designed to prepare for state ex- 
aminations. Three recitations and three laboratory periods 
per week. No credit but arrangements may be made for a 
college entrance examination. 

Two sections: 

Section 1. M. W. Th. 10:00. S. 205. Laboratory M. T 
F. 3:00-5:00. Mr. Sherman. 

Section 2. M. T. F. 2:00. S. 205. Laboratory M. T. 
F. 3:00-4:00. S. 21. Mr. Sherman. 

Biology 111. — Principles of Animal Biology. — ^An intro- 
duction to the structure of animals and the problems and rela- 
tionships of animal life. 2i/^ college credits. Daily 9 :00. S. 
205. Lab. T. Th. 1 :00-5 :00. Mr. J. S. Rogers. 

Biology 115. — Elementary Anatomy and Physiology .r— An 
introduction to the study of the structure and physiology of 
man. 1 college credit. M. T. Th. F. 8:00. S. 205. Mr. 
Sherman. 



Summer School 43 

Biology 118. — Genetics and Evolution. — A brief review of 
the history and theories of organic evolution, followed by an 
outline of the development and concepts of heredity. The last 
of the course attempts to examine some of the data and claims 
of eugenics, li^ college credits. Daily 11 :00. S. 205. Mr. 
J. S. Rogers. 

Biology 130. — Laboratory Methods and Management. — 
Macroscopic and microscopic preparations for demonstrations, 
laboratory work and the teaching museum; photographic 
methods ; sources of materials and information ; care of labora- 
tory equipment. 14 college credit. One recitation and one 
laboratory period per week. Hours to be arranged. S. 205. 
Mr. J. S. Rogers. 

CHEMISTRY 

Chemistry 101-102. — General Chemistry. — A course de- 
signed for those who wish to prepare for science teaching in 
the high school. This course can be taken by those who have 
never taken chemistry, or by those who have had a course 
before and wish to review it. There will be two courses in 
General Chemistry, one embracing non-metals and one em- 
bracing metals. The former is a prerequisite to the latter. 

Chemistry 101. — First Semester. A study of the non- 
metals. 21/2 college credits. Daily 9:00 S. 104. Lab. M. 
T. Th. F. 2:00-4:00. Mr. Leigh. 

Chemistry 102. — Second Semester. A study of the metals. 
21/2 college credits. Daily 11 :00 S. 105. Lab. M. T. Th. F. 
2:00-4:00. Mr. Black. 

Chemistry 201. — Qualitative Analysis. — Lectures and lab- 
oratory course in this subject offered to those who have had 
general chemistry. II/2 college credits. T. Th. 2 :00 S. 104. Lab. 
M. T. Th. F. 2 :00-5 :00. Mr. Jackson. 

Chemistry 251. — Organic Chemistry. — This course is de- 
signed to present the fundamentals of chemistry of the com- 
pounds of carbon. The work in the classroom is presented by 
means of lectures, quizzes, and oral and written recitations. 
21/2 college credits. Daily 11 :00 S. 104. Laboratory 2 :00-6 :00. 
Days to be arranged. Mr. Leigh. 



44 University of Florida 

Chemistry 301. — Volumetric Analysis. — A laboratory 
course offered to those who have had qualitative analysis. II/2 
college credits. Laboratory 2:00-5:00, days to be arranged. 
12 hours per week. Mr, Black. 

Chemistry 302. — Gravimetric Analysis. — A laboratory 
course offered to those who have had qualitative analysis, li/^ 
college credits. Laboratory 2:00-5:00, days to be arranged. 
12 hours per week. Mr. Black. 

Chemistry 551. — Chemical Research. — Organic Chem- 
istry ; Inorganic Chemistry ; Physical Chemistry, and Agricul- 
tural Chemistry. 21/^ to 5 hours. Hours and place to be 
arranged. Messrs. Leigh and Black. 

CIVICS 

Civics. — Special attention will be given to school laws of 
Florida and to local, town, city and county governments. Re-* 
view. Extension credit only. Two sections : 

Section 1. M. Th. 11:00. E. 208. Mr. Hollingsworth. 

Section 2. W. F. 12:00. E. 208. Mr. Hollingsworth. 

Constitution. — A short course designed to prepare for 
the State Teachers Examination in the Constitution of the 
United States. Review. Extension credit only. Schedule to 
be arranged. Mr. Hollingsworth. 

DRAWING, CONSTRUCTIVE WORK AND INDUSTRIAL ART 

Drawing 1. — Grades I-III, inclusive. Application of Art 
to everyday studies ; construction work and design ; paper cut- 
ting, illustration; free-hand drawing; nature study in colors. 
i^ college credit. Two sections : 

Section 1. M. W. Th. S. 10:00 E. 215. Miss 

Section 2. M. T. Th. F. 3:00 E. 215. Miss 

Drawing IL — Grades IV-VH, inclusive. Design and ap- 
plied design ; line and shade ; theory of color and study of water 
colors ; nature study and still life in color ; notebooks kept up 
to date each week. 1/2 college credit. M. T. Th. F. 2 :00 E. 215. 
Miss 

Drawing IV. — Grades I to XII, inclusive. Decorative work 
in enamels ; stencilling and handwork that can be useful thru- 



Summer School 45 

out the grades and high school. 1/2 college credit. M. T. Th. 
F. 9:00. E. 215. Miss 

ECONOMICS 

Economics 102. — Economic History of the United 
States. — The industrial development of America ; the exploit- 
ation of natural resources; the history of manufacturing, 
banking, trade, transportation, etc.; the evolution of indus- 
trial centers ; the historical factors contributing to the indus- 
trial growth of the United States. II/2 college credits. Daily 
8 :00. L. 3. Mr. Matherly. 

Economics 201. — Principles of Economics. — The purpose 
of this course is to give the student a general understanding of 
present day economic organization. A brief analysis is made 
of production, distribution and consumption. Chief considera- 
tion is given to the functions of economic institutions, li/^ 
college credits. Daily 9 :00. L. 3. Mr. Matherly. 

Economics 202. — Principles of Economics. — This is a con- 
tinuation of Economics 201. Attention is devoted chiefly to 
the principles governing value and market price. With the 
permission of the instructor, students may take this course 
along with Economics 201. li/^ college credits. Daily 11:00. 
L. 3. Mr. Matherly. 

EDUCATION 

Any 4 or 6 hour course in Education, but not in Theory 
and Practice will meet the professional requirement for the 
extension of certificates. Students in Education courses 
should bring with them professional books and textbooks re- 
lated to the courses they plan to take. 

Theory and Practice, — School management, general and 
special methods of teaching, elementary principles of child na- 
ture, school hygiene and sanitation, personality of teacher, 
relation of school and community, and other practical peda- 
gogical questions. Review. Designed to prepare teachers for 
Second and Third Grade Teachers Certificate examinations. 
No credit, but arrangements may be made for a college en- 
trance examination. Two sections : 



46 University of Florida 

Section 1. For beginners, and those who have taught one 
year or less. M. T. W. F. 12 :00. A. 204. Mrs. Metcalfe. 

Section 2. For principals, and those who have taught 
more than one year. M. T. Th. F. 3:00. A. 204. Mrs. Met- 
calfe. 

Education 101. — How to Teach. — An introduction to the 
Study of Classroom Teaching. What makes a good teacher? 
What makes a good school? When may it be said that one is 
educated? Such questions as these will be taken up in the 
course. This course designed primarily for those who have 
not taught and teachers who are just beginning their profes- 
sional training. II/2 college credits. Two sections: 

Section 1. Daily 11 :00. P. 205. Mr. Norman. 

Section 2. Daily 9:00. A. 204. Mr. Falls. 

Education 102. — History and Principles of Education. — A 
study of the historical background of education, and of the 
fundamental principles which should guide educational pro- 
cedure and give appreciation of educational conditions of 
today. 11/2 college credits. Daily 12:00. P. 204. Mr. Oben- 
chain. 

Education 103. — Health Education. — Conditions and 
forces that affect the physical and mental vigor of children, 
youth and teachers, and relate the school to the health of the 
home and community; the teacher's health; sanitation of 
school buildings ; hygienic equipment ; common diseases and 
physical defects; mental hygiene; play and recreation; com- 
munity hygiene; teaching of health education in elementary 
and high schools ; the Florida health program. Two sections : 

Section 1. For teachers in primary and middle elementary 
grades. II/2 college credits. Daily 8:00. L. 212. Miss 
Swanson. 

Section 2. For principals and teachers not included in 
Section 1. II/2 college credits. Daily 12:00. L. 210. Miss 
Swanson. 

Education 121. — Primary Methods. — Arithmetic, Lan- 
guage, Writing and Spelling in the first three grades. Pre- 
requisites or parallel courses: Education 101, Education 207, 
or any methods course. Daily 12:00. P. 101. Mrs. Mahan. 



Summer School 47 

Education 122. — The Teaching of Reading and Litera- 
ture in the First Six Grades. — The basic importance of read- 
ing in the elementary school, reading as a tool study, the vari- 
ous methods of teaching reading, etc., will constitute the 
course. Methods of teaching phonics, appreciation, memoriz- 
ation and dramatization will be presented. Observation of 
demonstration lessons and criticisms will be required. Pre- 
requisite or parallel courses: Education 101 or Education 
207. Three sections : 

Section 1. This section will be confined largely to the 
teaching of the mechanics of reading as a tool study, li/^ col- 
lege credits. Daily 9:00. P. 2. Mrs. Carrier. 

Section 2. The same as Section 1. li/^ college credits. 
Daily 11 :00. P. 2. Mrs. Carrier. 

Section 3. This section is designed for those teachers who 
will teach in the middle elementary grades. I14 college credits. 
Daily 8:00. P. 2. Mrs. Carrier. 

Education 123. — Hand-work for Elementary Grades. — 
The purpose of this course is to develop the real function of 
handwork in the elementary grades. The various types of 
hand work will be discussed, paper cutting, free hand draw- 
ing, clay modeling, etc. A constructive project for each grade 
will be developed during the course. This course counts as a 
four-hour course toward the extension of certificates. Two 
sections : 

Section 1. Designed for teachers of the early elementary 
grades. 1 college credit. M. T. W. Th. F. 2 :00 A. 206. Miss 
Farnham. 

Section 2. Designed for teachers of the upper elementary 
grades. 1 college credit. M. T. W. Th. F. 3 :00 A. 206. Miss 
Farnham. 

Education 124. — The Teaching of Arithmetic in the Later 
Elementary School. The broad concept of number as it relates 
to child life and the means of working out definite standards 
of measurements are stressed. The four fundamental opera- 
tions and how to teach them, fractions, decimal fractions and 
denominate numbers, will be taken up. Emphasis will be 
laid on careful gradation in the teaching, the use of problems 
and drill within the limits of life use. A course of study for 



48 University of Florida 

the elementary school will be worked out. Observation of 
demonstration lessons, and criticisms of these lessons will be 
required. Prerequisite or parallel courses: Education 101 
or Education 207, or equivalent. II/2 college credits. Daily 
12:00. P. 4. Miss Upson. 

Education 201. — The Social Studies in the Elementary 
School. — A course in methods of teaching geography, history 
and civics from the standpoint of human relationships. This 
includes lesson planning and criticism and observation in the 
Demonstration School. Two sections : 

Section 1. Daily 9:00. P. 205. Mrs. Altstetter. 

Section 2. Daily 8 :00. P. 205. Mrs. Altstetter. 

Education 202. — Teaching of English in the Later Ele- 
mentary Grades and Junior High School. This course deals 
with sources of composition material, socializing the English 
recitation, correcting of papers, teaching of poetry, the corre- 
lation of English with other subjects. Daily 12 :00. P. 112. 
Mrs. Altstetter. 

Education 203.— Child Study. — The nature, growth and 
development of the child from birth to adolescence with refer- 
ence to education ; the original nature of the child and his edu- 
cation ; the meaning of protracted infancy ; training in recog- 
nition of types and individual differences, of common defects 
and how to deal with them ; the cultivation of intelligent sym- 
pathy with children ; the effect of Child Study on the practices 
of elementary and secondary education, li/^ college credits. 
Two sections : 

Section 1. Daily 11:00. A. 104. Mr. Hinson. 

Section 2. Daily 12:00. A. 104. Mr. Hinson. 

Education 207. — Educational Psychology. — Psychology 
applied to Education, the learning process, acquisition of skill, 
etc. 11/2 college credits. Daily 8:00 A. 104. Mr. Hinson. 

Education 301. — High School Curriculum. — This course 
is designed for the consideration of the high school curri- 
culum. Standards for the selection and organization of the 
curriculum will be considered with much detail. II/2 college 
credits. Daily 12 :00 P. 209. Mr. 



Summer School 49 

Education 308. — The Elementary School Curriculum. — 
The curriculum as a group of related problems and projects 
(!if vital interest to children. An attempt to formulate a cur- 
riculum based on social conditions and social needs. IV2 col- 
lege credits. Daily 8:00. P. 7. Mr 

Education 317. — Tests and Measurements. — An element- 
ary course confined mainly to achievement tests. I14 college 
credits. Daily 11 :00. L. 209. Mr. Obenchain. 

Education 321. — Newer Type of Early Elementary 
School. — This course will take up the basic principles under- 
lying the organization of the primary school. The modern 
theories of education concerning the part the curriculum plays 
in the conduct of the child will be discussed and an effort made 
to show how these may be made workable. This course is 
especially planned for principals and supervisors. Prerequi- 
site: Three or four years' experience teaching in primary 
school or Education 122, Education 123, and Education 
124. 11/2 college credits. Daily 11:00. A. 206. Miss Farnham. 

Education 401. — Public School Administration. — Stresses 
in a practical way problems peculiar to Florida schools; the 
supervising principal, relation to superintendent, boards, 
teachers and community; consolidation and transportation; 
adapting the school to the child's needs, promotions, tests, 
extra-curricular activities ; school finance ; records and re- 
ports. 11/2 college credits. Daily 9:00. P. 201. Mr. Fulk. 

Education 403. — The Problem-Project Method. — The laws 
of learning, lesson-planning, thinking, questioning, the prob- 
lem-project method, the socialized recitation, democracy in 
the classroom as a preparation for democracy in life. IV2 col- 
lege credits. Daily 12:00. P. 205. Mr. Norman. 

Education 405. — Supervised Teaching. — This course is 
planned to give the student practice in conducting recitations 
under close supervision. A study will be made of the develop- 
ment of courses, and the present status of the subject taught. 
Lesson plans will be required for all recitations, and the man- 
ner of teaching will be subject to criticism. Teaching 4 hours 
a week; conferences 2 hours a week, li/o college credits. 
Three sections: 



50 University of Florida 

Section 1. For those who expect to teach in the lower 
grades. Daily 9 :00. P. 4. 

Section 2. For those who expect to teach in the upper 
grades. Daily 8 :00. P. 4. 

Section 3. For those who expect to teach in high school. 
Daily 8:00. P. 114. 

Education 407.— Junior High School. — The purpose of 
this course is to give principals and teachers a knowledge of 
the junior high school and its organization. IV^ college cred- 
its. Daily 9:00. E. 208. Mr. Allen. 

Education 408. — High School Administration. — This 
course is designed to study the practical management and ad- 
ministration of the modern high school. (Junior students 
may choose between Education 408 and Education 402.) li/^ 
college credits. Daily 8 :00. A. 204. Mr. Falls. 

GRADUATE COURSES IN EDUCATION 

It is planned to offer five semester courses of graduate 
rank in Education. It is impossible to offer all the courses 
during any one Summer School, but by taking one each summer 
a student can complete four in four summers, which will 
equal the two majors required for the Master's Degree. 

Education 501. — The Elementary School Curriculum. 
Seminar. — An intensive study of the development, and pres- 
ent content of the elementary school curriculum, including the 
kindergarten; the selection and evaluation of material; the 
importance of the classroom teacher. (Not offered in the 
summer of 1927.) 

Education 502. — The Elementary Curriculum from the 
standpoint of the teacher of teacher-training departments in 
high schools; history, function, organization and equipment 
of these departments; content of the "Tentative Course in 
Teacher Training for Florida High Schools." For teacher- 
training teachers and principals of teacher-training high 
schools. 11/2 college credits. Daily 9:00. L. 209. Miss 
Swanson. 

Education 503. — Eduational Tests and Measurements. 
Seminar. — This is an intensive study of intelligence and edu- 



Summer School 51 

cational tests. A thorough and systematic study is made of 
all the chief tests in both fields with laboratory material for 
class use so as to familiarize the student with the process of 
actually handling tests. II/2 college credits. Daily 8:00 P. 
206. Mr. Obenchain. 

Education 505. — The Organization and Administration 
of Extra Curricular Activities in Junior and Senior High 
Schools. — An attempt will be made in this course to work out 
constructive school policies having to do with the developing 
of the pupils' initiative, leadership, cooperation, etc. II/2 
college credits. Daily 11:00. P. 201. Mr. Allen. 

Education 506. — Methods in Teaching Farm Shop Work. 
— This course deals with the methods used in teaching farm 
shop work in connection with the classes in vocational agricul- 
ture. It is especially designed for those who expect to teach 
vocational agriculture in the high schools of the State. Edu- 
cation 303-304 or their equivalents are prerequisites to this 
course. Teachers of vocational agriculture may enter by ar- 
rangement with the instructor. II/2 college credits. Daily 
8:00. P. 208. Mr. Gee. 

Education 508. — Democracy and Education. Seminar. — 
The nature of experience, the nature of institutions, the social 
inheritance, the individual, society, socialization, social con- 
trol, dynamic and static societies, education its own end. II/2 
college credits. Mr. Norman. (Not offered in the summer of 
1927.) 

Education 509. — Problems in the Administration of a 
School System. — Seminar. — Open to graduate students who 
are qualified by experience and training to pursue advanced 
study on selected problems in administration. As far as pos- 
sible problems will be selected to meet individual needs. Each 
student selects some problem for special study and presents 
the results of his study in the form of a thesis. Students 
may work on chosen problems either singly or in small groups. 
11/2 college credits. Daily 11 :00 P. 4. 

Education 511. — Methods and Materials in Vocational Ag- 
riculture. — The selection and organization of subject matter 
from the vocational point of view; the home project and su- 



52 University of Florida 

pervised practice work ; the selection, arrangement, and classi- 
fication of bulletins, books, and periodicals; methods to be 
employed in the recitation, the laboratory, the field trip, the 
farm shop, and the supervised study period ; lesson planning ; 
assignment making; the farm job as the teaching unit; the 
teaching of the various branches of agriculture ; the selection 
and use of objective materials; the necessary plant and equip- 
ment; community and promotional work; and the organiza- 
tion and conduct of part-time and evening classes. II/2 college 
credits. Daily 9:00. P. 208. Mr. Gee. 

Education 520.— The Social Studies. Seminar.— Materials 
and outcomes of these subjects in high schools, with some at- 
tention to the elementary background, culminating in a bulle- 
tin on the teaching of the social studies in the high schools of 
Florida. This bulletin, prepared for the State Department of 
Public Instruction, is to be published and used as the State 
course in the social studies. Open to graduates, and by per- 
mission to experienced teachers of social studies in secondary 
schools. 11/2 college credits. Daily 8:00. P. 201. Mr. Fulk. 

Education 527. — How to Write a Thesis. — Designed to 
stimulate, guide, and help graduate students in writing their 
theses. Required of all students majoring in Education. Open 
to all other graduate students. No college credit. W. Th. 
10 :00. P. 201. Mr. Gee. 

Education 528. — A graduate course in the Supervision of 
Instruction. Designed for principals, supervisors and teach- 
ers. 11/2 college credits. Daily 8:00. E. 208. Mr. Allen. 

COURSES FOR TEACHERS OF TRADES AND INDUSTRIES 

Education 455. — Organization and Methods for the part- 
time general continuation school. Designed for teachers en- 
gaged in part-time general continuation schools. 1 college 
credit. M. T. W. Th. 9:00. P. 1. Mr. 

Education 456. — Psychology of Adolescence with definite 
application to boys and girls in employment. 1 college credit. 
M. T. W. Th. 8:00. E. 303. Mr 



Summer School 53 

Education 457. — Classroom management as applied to 
Trade Teaching. 1 college credit. M. T. W. Th. 11:00. P. 1. 

Mr 

SHORT COURSE 

Short course for local directors of trade and industrial 
education. This will be conducted on the conference basis 
and will be run the full day for the six days of the week, be- 
ginning June 13th. Mr. J. M. Hall. 

ENGLISH 

English Grammar. — This course is designed for those 
who are preparing for the examinations for third and second 
grade certificates. Review. Extension credit only. Three 
sections : 

Section 1. M.Th. F. 9 :00. A. 104. Miss Avrett. 

Section 2. M. W. Th. 10 :00. E. 203. Miss England. 

Section 3. T. Th. F. 12:00. L. 5. Miss England. 

Composition. — This is for those who are preparing to take 
the teachers examinations for third and second grade certifi- 
cates. Review. Extension credit only. Two sections : 

Section 1. T. W. Th. 3:00. P. 112. Miss England. 

Section 2. T. W. Th. 8:00. L. 8. Miss England. 

Rhetoric. — Designed to prepare teachers for the examina- 
tion for first grade certificate. Review. No credit, but. ar- 
rangements may be made to take entrance examination. Two 
sections : 

Section 1. T. W. Th. F. 8:00. E. 203. Mr. Turner. 

Section 2. T. W. Th. F. 9:00. P. 114. Miss England. 

American Literature. — The study of American Litera- 
ture as outlined in Metcalf's "American Literature." No 
credit, but arrangements may be made for a college entrance 
examination. M. T. W. Th. 11 :00. L. 8. Mr. Halt. 

English Literature. — The history of English Literature 
as outlined in Metcalf's "English Literature" will be given. 
No credit, but arrangements may be made for a college en- 
trance examination. M. T. Th. F. 2 :00. L. 209. Mr. Sanders. 



54 University of Florida 

Spelling. — A thorough review of prefixes, suffixes, ab- 
breviations, syllabication, diacritical marks, and rules of spell- 
ing will be given. In every class period there will be spelling 
exercises and drills in the meaning and use of synonyms, anto- 
nyms, and homonyms. There will be a study of how to make 
the spelling period most interesting and helpful. At the close 
of the summer school a spelling tournament, open to all ambi- 
tious spellers, will be held. A copy of Webster's "Blue-Back 
Speller," suitably autographed and inscribed, will be given to 
the winner of the tournament. Hours to be arranged. Mr. 
Little. 

COLLEGE ENGLISH 

English 101-2, — Rhetoric and Composition. — Designed to 
train students in methods of clear and forceful expression. 
Instruction is carried on simultaneously in formal rhetoric, in 
rhetorical analysis, and in theme writing, the constant corre- 
lation of the three as methods of approach to the desired goal 
being kept in view. In addition, a reading course is assigned 
each student. Both semesters will be oifered : 

English 101. — The iirst half of Genung's Working Princi- 
ples of Rhetoric v/ill be covered the first semester, li/^ college 
credits. Two sections. 

Section 1. Daily 8:00. P. 112. Mr. Wise. 

Section 2. Daily 9:00. P. 112. Mr. Wise. 

English 102. — The second half of the rhetoric, "Inven- 
tion," will be completed the second semester. II/2 college 
credits. Daily 11 :00. P. 112. Mr. Wise. 

English 202. — A course based on Lounsbury's English 
Language designed to give the student some knowledge of the 
historical development of the English language, with a view 
especially of giving insight into modern English grammar. 
11/2 college credits. Daily 9:00 L. 210. Mr. Farr. 

English 204. — Expository Writing. — A practical study 
and application of the principles involved in the effective or- 
ganization of expository thought-material, resulting in the 
writing of the different types of exposition. Lectures; dis- 
cussions; oral and written reports; formal papers. Texts: 
Curl, Expository Writing, and Baugh, Writing by Types, ly^ 
college credits. Daily 9:00. L. 212. Mr. Farris. 



Summer School 55 

English 301. — Shakespeare. — The life and earlier work, 
including the history plays, romantic comedies and non-dra- 
matic poetry. . Three plays will be read in class. Written 
reviews on plays read outside the class will alternate with 
essays from the students and lectures by the instructor. This 
course is open to those who have had English 201-202 or 
equivalent work in English literature. V/2 college credits. 
Daily 11:00 L. 210. Mr. Farr. 

English 303. — American Literature. — A survey of Amer- 
ican Literature from its beginnings down to 1900. Lectures; 
discussions; extensive reading; reports; papers. Pattee's 
Century Readings in American Literature (third edition) will 
serve as illustrative material for study in class. II/2 college 
credits. Daily 11:00. L. 212. Mr. Farris. 

English 403. — The English Novel. — The student reads 
a list of novels chosen to illustrate chronology and variety of 
species, analyzes minutely one novel from the technical side, 
masters the entire work and life of one novelist, and compares 
closely a novel and a dramatized version of it. 11/2 college 
credits. Daily 8 :00. L. 210. Mr. Farr. 

English 413. — Tennyson and Browning. — An intensive 
study of the forces that went into the making of English liter- 
ature of the Victorian era, culminating in a careful study of 
Tennyson and Browning. Texts: Thomdike, The Literature 
of a Changing Age; Tennyson and Browning, to be selected. 
11/2 college credits. Daily 12:00. L. 212. Mr. Farris. 

Graduate students desiring to major in English will make 
special arrangements with the department. Students major- 
ing in other departments may take courses 301, 403 and 413 
as minors if there is sufficient demand. Other courses may be 
arranged by consulting the Head of the Department of Eng- 
lish. 

FRENCH 

French 21. — Elementary French, first semester of first 
year; grammar, pronunciation, dictation, easy conversation, 
oral and aural practice, reading, li/^ college credits. Daily 
8:00. L. 112. Mr. Luker. 



56 University of Florida 

French 22. — Elementary French, second semester of first 
year; continuation of French 21. IV2 college credits. Daily 
11:00. L. 112. Mr. Luker. 

French 101. — Second year French, first semester; gram- 
mar review, pronunciation, conversation, reading, etc. Pre- 
requisite: French 21-22 or equivalent. IV2 college credits. 
Daily 9 :00. L. 112. Mr. Luker. 

GENERAL SCIENCE 

General Science. — A course designed especially to meet] 
the needs of high school teachers. Laboratory work and 
material to use with the Guide will be emphasized. No credit, 
but arrangements may be made for a college entrance exam- 
ination. M. T. W. F. 8:00. P. 1. Laboratory T. F. 4:00- 
6 :00. Mr. Van Brunt. 

GEOGRAPHY 

Political Geography. — Special attention will be given to 
Florida and its relation to other states. A thoro review of the 
geography of the United States and the world. Instruction 
will be given in the use of textbooks, maps, globes, industrial 
products as a help and guide for the teaching of the subject. 
Review and extension credit only. Two sections : 

Section 1. M. W. Th. 10:00. L. 3. Mrs. Blacklock. 

Section 2. M. W. F. 8 :00. L. 111. Mrs. Robison. 

HISTORY and political SCIENCE 

Elementary United States and Florida History. Four 
sections, each covering thoro review of state adopted text book. 
Review and extension credit only. Three sections : 

Section 1. M. T. Th. F. 11 :00. L. 110. Mr. Wells. 

Section 2. M. W. Th. S. 10:00. Mrs. Lord. 

Section 3. M. T. Th. F. 12 :00. L. 111. Mr. Kelly. 

History. — General. — This course is designed to prepare 
for the teachers examination for first grade. No credit, but 
arrangements may be made for a college entrance examina- 
tion. Two sections : 

Section 1. Daily 12 :00. L. 109. 

Section 2. Daily 8 :00. L. 209. Mr. Simmons. 



Summer School 57 

History. — Ancient. No credit, but arrangements may be 
made for a college entrance examination. Daily 8 :00. L. 110. 
Mr. Jackson. 

History. — Medieval and Modern. — From the 12th century 
to the French Revolution. No credit, but arrangements may 
be made for a college entrance examination. (Will not be 
offered in the summer of 1927.) 

History. — Medieval and Modern. — From the French Rev- 
olution to the present time. No credit, but arrangements may 
be made for a college entrance examination. (Will not be 
offered in the summer of 1928.) Daily 12:00. L. 110. Mr. 
Jackson. 

History. — American. — A detailed study of American his- 
tory from the period of discovery and colonization to Jackson's 
administration. No credit, but arrangements may be made 
for a college entrance examination. M. W. Th. S. 10:00. 
E. 208. Mr. Simmons. 

Seminar in American History. — For graduate students 
only. Major and minor credit. 1 college credit. W. S. 10 :00- 
12:00. L. 109. Mr. Leake. 

History 201. — Modern European History — li/^ college 
credits. Daily 8 :00. L. 109. Mr. Leake. 

Federal Government of the United States. — IV2 col- 
lege credits. Daily 9 :00. L. 109. Mr. Leake. 

Political Science 102. — State and Municipal Govern- 
ment. — An outline of the growth of American municipalities 
and a study of the organs and functional mechanism of mod- 
em cities of the United States and Europe. Emphasis is laid 
upon the newer tendencies in municipal government, including 
the commission form and city-manager plan. 1^/^ college 
credits. Daily 8:00. A. 205. Mr. Hollingsworth. 

Political Science 201. — Comparative Government. — A 
study of the constitutional structure and organization of the 
governments of the more important European countries. The 



58 University of Florida 

object of the course is to enable the student to compare these 
governments, both in theory and in their practical workings, 
with each other and with our own. 11/4 college credits. Daily 
9:00. E. 203. Mr. Hollingsworth. 

LATIN 

Beginner's Latin. — Review. No credit is granted for 
this course, but arrangements may be made for an entrance 
examination. Daily 3:00. L. 112. Mr. Buchholz. 

Caesar. — Review. — In this course three books will be 
studied; composition. No credit is granted for this course, 
but arrangements may be made for an entrance examination. 
Daily 4:00. L. 112. Miss England. 

Latin 101. — Selections from Ovid. First semester of 
Freshman Latin. Prerequisite: Four years of High School 
Latin, li/^ college credits. Daily 9:00. L. 111. Mr. Anderson. 

Latin 201. — Selections from Pliny's Letters. First se- 
mester Sophomore Latin. Prerequisite: Freshman Latin or 
equivalent, li/^ college credits. Daily 11 :00 L. 111. Mr. 
Anderson. 

Latin 501. — Graduate Course. — Seminar. — Cicero's Corre- 
spondence. Papers on assigned subjects. Parallel readings 
in English and Latin. Students should provide themselves 
beforehand with the complete Teubner text in two volumes. 
Hours to be arranged. IV2 hours graduate credit. L. 111. 
Mr. Anderson. 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 

Library Science I. — Cataloging, classification, etc., for 
school, special and small public libraries. Principles of library 
classification and cataloging and practice work. Requirement 
for admission: graduation from an approved high school. 1 
college credit. M. W. Th. S. 10:00. L. 112. Miss Newton. 

Library Science III. — The place, function, administration 
and opportunity of the library in the modern school. This 
course will include a study of the general principles of school 
library management, including order work, circulation, simple 
reference work and selection of books. As a final project the 



Summer School 59 

class will make up a model list of books for a school library. 
Requirement for admission : graduation from an approved 
high school. 1 college credit. M. T. Th. F. 9:00. L. 110. 
Miss Miltimore, Miss Newton and Miss Johnson. 

MATHEMATICS 

Arithmetic. — A thoro review of Arithmetic is made, that 
the student may view it from both the teacher's and child's 
point of view. Common and decimal fractions, denominate 
numbers, percentage and all other subjects covered by the 
textbooks adopted by the state. Principles and methods of 
teaching arithmetic are thoroly covered. Review and exten- 
sion credit only. Three sections: 

Section 1. M. T. W. Th. F. 11 :00. P. 204. Mr. Little. 

Section 2. M. T. W. Th. F. 8 :00. P. 204. Mr. Little. 

Section 3. M. T. W. Th. F. 9 :00. P. 204. Mr. Little. 

Algebra B. — Review of first year Algebra. No one ad- 
mitted who does not have a rather thoro knowledge of first 
semester first year Algebra. Review and extension credit only. 
Two sections: 

Section 1. M. T. W. Th. F. 12 :00. E. 210. Mr. Isaacs. 

Section 2. M. T. W. Th. F. 8 :00. E. 209. Mr. Russ. 

Algebra C. — Advanced Algebra. — Involution, Evolution, 
quadratic equations, progressions, ratio and proportion. No 
one admitted who has not a rather thoro knowledge of first 
year Algebra. No credit, but arrangements may be made for 
college entrance examination. Three sections : 

Section 1. M. T. W. Th. F. 11 :00. E. 209. Mr. Van Brunt. 

Section 2. M. T. W. Th. F. 9 :00. E. 209. Mr. Van Brunt. 

Section 3. M. T. W. Th. F. 12 :00. E. 209. Mr. Van Brunt. 

Plane Geometry I. — Books I and II. No credit, but ar- 
rangements may be made for college entrance examination. 
Daily 8 :00. E. 210. Mr. Walker. 

Plane Geometry II. — Books III to V. Those desiring to 
review all of Plane Geometry should either take both Geometry 

I and Geometry II, or Geometry II. Prerequisite to Geometry 

II is Geometry I. No credit, but arrangements may be made 



60 University of Florida 

j 

for college entrance examinations. Daily 11:00. E. 210. Mr. 
Walker. 

Solid Geometry. — No credit, but arrangements may be 
made for college entrance examination. Daily 9 :00. E. 210. 
Mr. Walker. 

Mathematics 85.^Plane Trigonometry. — 1^2 college 
credits. Daily 9 :00. P. 102. Mr. Simpson. 

Mathematics 101.— College Algebra.— Selected topics in 
Hart's "College Algebra," D. C. Heath & Co., 1926. II/2 col- 
lege credits. Daily 12:00. P. 102. Mr. Chandler. 

Mathematics 102. — Plane Analytical Geometry. — Text, 
Ford's "Brief Course in Analytic Geometry," Henry Holt and 
Co., 1925. 11/2 college credits. Daily 9:00. P. 206. Mr. 
Chandler. 

Mathematics 231. — College Geometry.— A direct exten- 
sion of Plane Geometry, dealing with such topics as Geometric 
Construction, Properties of the triangle, quadrilateral, and cir- 
cle, similar figures, etc. This course introduces the student to 
the beautiful modern development of Plane Geometery. It is 
related to the Plane Geometry of the high school in much the 
same way as College Algebra is related to high school Algebra. 
Teachers of Geometry will find this course exceedingly help- 
ful to their teaching. II/2 college credits. Daily 8 :00. P. 102. 
Mr. Simpson. I 

Mathematics 251. — Elementary Calculus. — IV2 college 
credits. Daily 11 :00. P. 206. Mr. Chandler. 

Mathematics 320.— Algebraic Equations.— Text, Dick- 
son's "Elementary Theory of Equations," John Wiley and Co. 
Some of the topics treated are: The Graph of an Equation, 
Imaginary Numbers, the Fundamental Theorem of Algebra, 
Trisection of an Angle, Solution of Numerical Equations. A 
valuable course for teachers of Algebra. Prerequisites: 
Mathematics 101 and 102. IV2 college credits. Daily 11:00. 
P. 102. Mr. Simpson. 



Summer School 61 

MUSIC 

Music 101. — Note singing; sight singing; child voice; art 
and rhythmic songs; Dalcroze Eurythmics. Designed for 
Grades I-IV. 11/2 college credit. Two sections : 

Section 1. M. T. Th. F. 9:00. Stage of Auditorium. Miss 
Cazier. 

Section 2. M. T. Th. F. 3 :00. Stage of Auditorium. Miss 
Cazier. 

Music 102. — Development of sight singing; ear training; 
part singing; changing voice. Designed for Grades V-XII. i/^ 
college credit. M. T. Th. F. 4:00. Stage of Auditorium. Miss 
Cazier. 

Music 201. — Appreciation and History of Music. Designed 
for all grades. 1/2 college credit. M. Th. 10:00. Stage of 
Auditorium. Miss Cazier. 

Music 202. — Harmony. 1/2 college credit. Two sections : 
Section 1. Beginning Harmony. M. Th. 8 :00. Stage of 

Auditorium. Miss Cazier. 

Section 2. Intermediate Harmony. T. F. 8:00. Stage of 

Auditorium. Miss Cazier. 

Music 203. — Supervised Teaching in Music. Class for 
those who are especially interested in teaching and supervis- 
ing music in the schools. This is in cooperation with the 
Demonstration School. V2 college credit. M. Th. 11:00. 
Stage of Auditorium. Miss Cazier. 

Music 301.— Glee Club. A fee of $1.00 will be charged 
each student registering for the Glee Club to cover cost of 
music. 1^ college credit. M. T. Th. F. Hours to be arranged. 
Stage of Auditorium. Miss Cazier. 

Voice. — Private lessons in voice. Hours to be arranged 
with the instructor. Two scholarships in voice will be given 
(see p. 20). Two lessons per week unless otherwise ar- 
ranged. 

Course I. — Theory of Voice Building, breathing, tone plac- 
ing, simple songs, i/^ college credit. Mrs. Worth. 



62 University of Florida 

Course II. — For advanced students. A continuation of 
Course I, and coaching in songs. Students registering in this 
course will be expected to appear in the closing concert of the 
term. % college credit. Mrs. Worth. 

Piano. — Private lessons in piano may be had by special ar- 
rangement with the instructor, i/^ college credit. Mrs. 
Weaver. 

Organ. — Private lessons in pipe organ will be given by 
special arrangement, i^ college credit. Mr. Murphree. 

NATURE STUDY 

A course for teachers wishing to prepare themselves bet- 
ter for teaching nature study. A study of the classification 
of plants, and the study of insects and small animals. Bird 
protection will be a special feature. Three recitations and 
three laboratory periods per week. II/2 pre-college credits. 
M. W. Th. 10:00. S. 104; Laboratory M. T. W. 4:00-6:00. 

NURSING EDUCATION ' 

Administration in Schools of Nursing. — The course in- 
cludes a brief history of the origin and development of schools 
of nursing; organization and management of schools of nurs- 
ing; budgets; catalogs; libraries; affiliation; student activi- 
ties ; publicity ; university schools of nursing ; group and hourly 
nursing; present day problems and tendencies, etc. 1 college 
credit. M. W. T. S. 10 :00. P. 301. Miss Densford. 

Nursing Education. — This course includes a study of 
such topics as : curricula in schools of nursing ; the teaching of 
different types of nursing; the selection and use of text and 
reference books; preparation for special fields of nursing; 
grading of schools of nursing; etc. li/^ college credit. Daily 
9 :00. P. 301. Miss Densford. 

Public Health Nursing. — In this course the aim is two- 
fold : first, to make a brief survey of the field of Public Health 
Nursing; second, to study the problems, present status and 
tendencies in this field. IV2 college credits. Daily 11:00. 
P. 301. Miss Densford. 



Summer School 63 

philosophy and psychology 

Elementary Psychology. — A beginner's course in psy- 
chology with applications to teaching. No credit, but arrange- 
ments may be made for a college entrance examination. Two 
sections : 

Section 1. M. W. Th. S. 12:00 A. 204. Mrs. Metcalfe. 

Section 2. M. W. Th. F. 11:00 A. 204. Mrs. Metcalfe. 

Philosophy 201. — General Psychology. — Facts and theo- 
ries current in general psychological discussion: the sensa- 
tions, the sense organs, and the functions of the brain; the 
higher mental functions — attention, perception, memory, 
feeling, emotion, volition, the self; and like topics. This 
course satisfies the professional requirement for the exten- 
sion of certificates. II/2 college credits. Daily 11 :00. E. 203. 
Mr. Falls. 

Philosophy 301. — Ethics. — Principles of Ethics; study of 
such topics as goodness, happiness, virtue, duty, freedom, civil- 
ization and progress. 11/^ college credits. Daily 11 :00. P. 114. 
Mr. Enwall. 

Philosophy 302. — Advanced Ethics. — The history of v\ 
rious ethical systems. Theism and Agnosticism. Seminar. 
11/^ college credits. Hours to be arranged. Mr. Enwall. 

Philosophy 304. — History of Modern Philosophy. A con- 
tinuation of Philosophy 303. Special attention will be given 
to the works of Descartes, Spinoza, Leibnitz, Kant and Hume. 
Given in alternate years with Philosophy 303, The History of 
Ancient Philosophy. lU, college credits. Daily 12:00. P. 114. 
Mr. Enwall. 

PHYSICS 

High School Physics. — A general course, such as is usual- 
ly given in standard secondary schools — lectures, recitations, 
demonstrations, and a limited amount of individual laboratory 
work. No credit, but arrangements may be made for a col- 
lege entrance examination. M. W. Th. S. 10:00. E. 303. 
Laboratory W. F. 2:00-4:00 E. 303. Mr. Perry. 

General Physics. — A course designed for those who wish 
to prepare for science teaching in the high school or for those 
who wish to take a course in general physics more extensive 



64 University of Florida 

and more mature than that offered in the elementary course. 
This course may be taken by those who have had no previous 
work in physics, but in that case, Physics 203 must be taken 
as a prerequisite to Physics 204. The course is divided into 
two parts as follows: 

Physics 203. — Mechanics and Heat. 21/2 college credits. 
Daily 11 :00 E. 303. Lab. T. W. Th. F. 2 :00-4:00. Mr. Perry. 

Physics 204. — Sound, Light and Electricity. — 2V2 college 
credits. Daily 9:00 E. 303; Lab. T. W. Th. 2:00-4:00. Mr. 
Perry. 

Longer Course in General Physics. — A course designed 
for students prepared to do more advanced work than in 
Physics 203-4, and desiring to spend more time on the sub- 
ject. A knowledge of high school physics, and of mathe- 
matics through trigonometry, is presupposed, and is a pre- 
requisite for admission to the longer course. The course is 
given in three parts, called Physics 105-6, 107-8, 209-10. 

♦Physics 105. — Mechanics. 11/2 college credits. Daily 
8:00 E. 303. Mr. Weil. 

♦Physics 106. — Heat, Sound, and Light. II/2 college 
credits. Daily 11 :00 E. 209. Mr. Weil. 

Physics 107. — General Laboratory Physics to accompany 
Physics 105. 1 college credit. Lab. T. W. Th. F. 2:00-4:00. 
Mr. Weil. 

Physics 108. — General Laboratory Physics to accompany 
Physics 106. 1 college credit. Lab. T. W. Th. F. 2:00-4:00. 
Mr. Weil. 

♦Physics 209. — Electricity and Magnetism, li/^ college 
credits. E. 209. Laboratory E. 307. Mr. Weil. Hours to be 
arranged. 

♦Physics 210. — Electricity and Magnetism. A continua- 
tion of Physics 209. II/2 college credits. E. 209. Labora- 
tory E. 307. Mr. Weil. Hours to be arranged. 



*Only four of the courses starred will be given during the summer 
of 1927. 



Summer School 65 

♦Graduate Work in Physics.— If sufficient demand ex- 
ists, a course in Electrical Measurements will be given. This 
course should be of particular value to students majoring in 
Chemistry. Subjects covered include the theory, use and cali- 
bration of electrical meters and instruments, potentiometers, 
bridges, and galvanometers. Physics 105-6, 107-8, and 209-10, 
or Physics 203-4, are prerequisites for this course. 

Physics 306. — Electrical Measurements. II/2 college 
credits. Hours to be arranged. Mr. Weil. 

*Physics 311. — Demonstrational Physics. — A course de- 
signed primarily for teachers of science in the high school. 
Problems from every day life will be selected and the laws of 
Physics pertaining to them will be applied. Many lecture 
demonstrations will accompany the course, many of which 
can be used in the teaching of Physics in the high school to 
create interest in the subject. One year of college physics is 
presupposed and is a prerequisite for this course. II/2 col- 
lege credits. Daily E. 209. Mr. Weil. Hours to be arranged. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

The courses in this department are designed to meet the 
needs of teachers, who, even though not graduates of Physical 
Education, are nevertheless expected to have a practical know- 
ledge of physical training, gymnastics, plays and games, and 
are expected to teach them in the public schools. All teachers 
preparing to qualify under the new State law regarding Physi- 
cal Education will find these courses particularly to their 
needs. Local problems of the members of the classes will be 
met as far as possible. Plans will be formulated whereby un- 
healthy physical conditions may be eradicated from the en- 
vironment of the schools and physical defects found among 
school children properly handled. The aim of the department 
is to have in every community as many trained leaders in play- 
ground and school athletic activities as possible. 

Physical Education 101 — Elementary Gymnastics. — This 
class is for beginners and consists mainly of marching, calis- 
thenics and simple apparatus work. Exercises applicable for 



*Only four of the courses starred will be given during the summer 
of 1927. 



66 University of Florida 

schoolroom will be given in graduated scale leading up to the 
more advanced form of exercise, i/^ college credit. Two 
sections : 

Section 1. For women. M. T. Th. F. 4:00 Gymnasium. 
Mr. Haskell. 

Section 2. For men. M. W. Th. S. 10:00 Gymnasium. 
Mr. Haskell. 

Physical Education 102. — Corrective Exercise. — A 
course to enable the teacher to recognize physical defects and 
to have an intelligent use in the natural and artificial methods 
for correction through exercise. Action, use and relation of 
different organs of body and exercise to stimulate and nor- 
malize them. General laws governing the body and health. 
1/2 college credit. M. T. Th. F. 2 :00 Gymnasium. Mr. Has- 
kell. 

Physical Education 103— Plays and games for the Early 
Elementary Grades. — ^A course giving Story Plays, Rythmic 
Plays, Folk Dancing, Mimetic Plays and the theory and prac- 
tice of outlining exercises for the early elementary grades. 
1/2 college credit. M. T. W. Th. 11:00 Gymnasium. Mr. 
Haskell. 

Physical Education 104. — Minor Sports. — This course 
will include interpretation of rules, organization, promotion, 
and competition in the following : playground ball, volley ball, 
playground games, indoor games, tennis, swimming, and mass 
play games. The importance of mass play in the school and 
playground curriculum, i/^ college credit. M. T. Th. F. 3 :00. 
Gymnasium. Mr. Haskell. 

Physical Education 105.— Playground and Play.— The- 
ory and practice in planning playground activities and arrang- 
ing games suitable for age and environment. i/| college credit. 
Hours to be arranged. Mr. Haskell. 

Physical Education 201.^A.dvanced Gymnastics. — This 
class is especially designed for those who have had elementary 
gymnastics and consists mainly of conducting the elementary 
classes and advanced calisthenics and gymnastics, i/^ college 
credit. Two sections: 



Summer School 67 

Section 1. For women. M. T. Th. F. 4:00. Gymnasium. 
Mr. Haskell. 

Section 2. For men. M. W. Th. S. 10 :00. Gymnasium. 
Mr. Haskell. 

Physical Education 204. — Minor Sports. — This course is 
for those who have completed an elementary course and will 
consist mainly of the finer points of the games, and practical 
work in coaching- the elementary classes, l/^ college credit. 
M. T. Th. F. 3:00. Gymnasium. Mr. Haskell. 

SOCIOLOGY 

Sociology 102. — Introduction to Sociology. — A brief study 
of some of the fundamental factors and problems of social 
welfare and social progress. 1^2 college credits. Daily 8:00. 
L. 5. Mr. Bristol. 

Social Administration 122. — The Field of Social Work. 
— An orientation course giving an insight into the various 
fields of professional social work. Sixteen lectures during the 
weeks not included in courses 251a and 251b, with visits to 
state institutions and welfare agencies in the vicinity of 
Gainesville. 1/4 college credit. 12 :00. Days to be arranged. 
L. 3. Mr. Bristol and special lecturers. 

Social Administration 251a. — The Visiting Teacher 
Movement. — A two weeks' institute of about 24 recitation pe- 
riods on the Visiting Teacher Movement. 1/2 college credit. 
Daily 12:00, 4:00. L. 5. 

Social Administration 251b. — Parent-Teachers' Associa- 
tion Institute. — A course of about 24 recitation periods during 
the two weeks beginning July 11th, supplemented by addresses 
in related fields. 1/2 college credit. Daily 12:00, 4:00. L. 3. 
Mr. Weller. 

Social Administration 251a. — First Aid. — A standard 
Red Cross Training course. About 24 lectures and demonstra- 
tions given during the first four weeks of the Summer School. 
1/2 college credit. W. Th. 10:00-12:00. F. 11:00. S. 10:00. 
W. Th. F. 2:00-4:00. L. 5. Dr. William Redden, Medical 
Advisor, American Red Cross. 



68 University of Florida 

Social Administration 291b. — Home Hygiene and Care 
of the Sick. — A standard Red Cross Training course. About 
24 lectures and demonstrations given during the second four 
M^eeks of the Summer School, i/o college credit. W. Th. 
10:00-12:00, F. 11:00, S. 10:00, W. Th. F. 2:00-4:00. L. 5. 
Mrs. Charlotte Heilman. 

Social Administration 323S. — Introduction to Social Ad- 
ministration. — A case-method of approach to the study of 
problems connected with social mal-adjustment, with special 
emphasis on the causes, relief and prevention of poverty. II/2 
college credits. Daily 9 :00. L. 5. Mr. Bristol. 

Social Administration 332. — Public Health. — Four reci- 
tations a week. 1 college credit. M. T. 2:00-4:00. L. 5. Mem- 
bers of the staff of the State Board of Health, Florida Public 
Health Association, and others. 

Social Administration 361. — Principles of Social Case 
Work.— 1 college credit. M. T. 2 :00-4 :00. L. 5. Mr. Henry 
T. Reed. » i 

Social Administration 465. — Field Work. — Practical ex- 
perience in Family Case Work. 1 college credit. Hours to be 
arranged. L. 5. Mr. Reed and Mrs. Terhune. 

Social Administration 424. — Community Organization. 
— Four recitation periods a week. 1 college credit. M. 10:00- 
12 :00, T. 11 :00-12 :00, fourth hour to be arranged. L. 5. Mr. 
Reed. 

SPANISH 

Spanish 21. — This is the first semester of beginners' Span- 
ish, and will cover such matters as pronunciation, forms, ele- 
mentary syntax, vocabulary, dictation, and written exercises. 
Textbook: Manfred's "Practical Spanish Grammar for Begin- 
ners" (Scribners, Atlanta). II/2 college credits. Daily 8:00. 
P. 209. Mr. Hathaway. 

Spanish 22. — Second semester of beginners' Spanish ; con- 
tinues course above described ; uses same grammar ; adds as 
a reader "Cuentos Contados" (Heath, New York). Prere- 
quisite: Spanish 21, or its equivalent. IY2 college credits. 
Daily 9:00. P. 209. Mr. Hathaway. 



Summer School 69 

Spanish 102. — This is the second semester of second year 
Spanish ; like the first in matters covered, except that second 
year requires more in the quantity and the quality of the 
work. Textbooks: Seymour and Carnahan's "Short Spanish 
Review Grammar" (Heath, New York) ; Rosenberg and Bai- 
liff's edition of Baroja's "Zalacain el Aventurero", and pos- 
sibly other selections. Prerequisite: Spanish 21, 22 and 101 
or their equivalent. II/2 college credits. Daily 11 :00. P. 209. 
Mr. Hathaway. 

ROOMING FAQLITIES 

All rooms in Buckman Hall, Thomas Hall and the barracks 
are reserved for women in the summer. These rooms, which 
in every case are comfortable and commodious, are supplied 
with two good iron bedsteads and mattresses, chiffonier or 
bureau, a table, washstand and chairs. All students are re- 
quired to provide for themselves a pillow, bed linen, towels, 
and other things as they may want for their own special con- 
venience. 

All who expect to occupy dormitory rooms, which have in 
previous years usually been reserved by May 1, should make 
reservations as soon as possible. If for sickness or other rea- 
sons a student finds it impossible to come to the Summer 
School, reservation should be cancelled so that other students 
may have an opportunity to occupy the room that has been re- 
served. A fee of $5.00 should be sent with request for reser- 
vation, but may be sent as late as May 1. If reservations are 
made without the payment of this fee (which is the regular 
Registration Fee required of all students) these reservations 
will be automatically cancelled on May 1. In case a student 
deposits this fee and reserves space in the dormitories, then 
finds it impossible to attend the Summer School, she will of 
course, have the money refunded to her, provided cancellation 
of her reservation is made by June 1. 

Those who cannot be accommodated in the dormitories can 
obtain good rooms adjacent to the campus at a moderate price. 
Within the past two years several large rooming houses and 
private dwellings have been built within three blocks of the 
campus, which will greatly increase the rooming facilities for 
those who cannot obtain rooms in the dormitory. 



70 University of Florida 

Students should engage rooms in approved rooming houses 
only, a list of which will be found on p. 71. Rooming houses 
for girls will not be approved unless their owners have ar- 
ranged for house mothers for the entire summer session. 

BAGGAGE DELIVERY 

Students who engage rooms in the dormitories in advance 
will receive notice of the room to which they have been 
assigned. 

To secure prompt delivery of baggage the student should 
place her name and room address on each piece of baggage, 
and on arrival in Gainesville give baggage checks to authorized 
transfer agents, who will meet all trains. Students are urged 
not to arrive on Sunday as dormitory rooms will not be open 
until Monday. 

For room reservations and general information as to the 
Summer School, address, 

J. W. Norman, 
Dean of Teachers College, 

Gainesville, Fla. 



Summer School 



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INDEX 

Page 

Abbreviations 39 

Administration of Public Schools 49 

Admission 25 

Advanced Standing 25 

Advisers, Faculty 15 

Agriculture 39 

Agricultural Economics 39 

Agricultural Engineering 40 

Algebra 59, 60 

American Government and Politics 57 

Analytical Geometry ^ 60 

Announcements 16 

Apartments 73 

Architecture 40 

Arithmetic ^ 59 

Arithmetic in Elementary School 47 

Athletic Coaching 19, 40 

Athletics 16 

Auditorium 13 

Bachelor's Degrees 26, 28 

Baggage , 70 

Biology 42 

Board 22 

Board of Control 3 

Boarding Houses ^ 71 

Buildings and Equipment 11 

Bulletin Boards 19 

Calculus 60 

Certificates, Teachers ^ 32 

Certificates, Extension of 34 

Chapel (General Assembly) 16 

Chemistry 43 

Child Study 48 

Cicero ; , 58 

Civics 44 

Clubs 16 

Coaching 40 

Composition 53 

Constants 28 

Cooperative Government ^ -- 14 

Correspondence Work .^ 27 

Courses of Instruction 39 

Credit 31 

Curriculum , 28 

Degrees 26 

Democracy and Education 51 

Demonstration School 17 

Deposit, Required ^ 69 

Drawing and Industrial Arts 44 

Economics 45 

Education 45 

Educational Psychology 48 

Electives ^ 29 

Elementary School Curriculum 47, 48, 49, 50 

Employment Bureau 18 

English , 53, 54 

English, Teaching of 48 

Entertainments 13 



Summer School 75 



Page 

Entrance Examinations 25 

Equipment and Buildings 11 

Ethics , 63 

Expenses 22 

Extension of Certificates 34 

Extra-Curricular Activities 51 

Faculty 5, 15 

Farm Shop Work ^ 51 

Federal Government of the United States 57 

Fees ^ 22 

First Grade Certificate 33 

French 55 

General Assembly , 16 

General Science 56 

Geography , 56 

Geography, Teaching of 48 

Geometry ^ 59 

Government 57 

Graduate Courses in Education 50 

Graduate State Certificate 32 

Graduate Study 27, 28, 55 

Grammar ^... 53 

Gymnastics 65 

Handwork ^ 47 

Health and Medical Advice 15 

Health Education 46 

High School Curriculum 48 

Historical Note ^ 10 

History and Political Science 56 

History, American 57 

History, General ^ 56 

History and Principles of Education 46 

History, Medieval and Modern 57 

History, Modern European 57 

Honor System 14 

Infirmary 16 

Junior High School 50 

Kappa Delta Pi 17 

Latin ^ 58 

Lectures and Entertainments 13 

Library 13 

Library Science 58 

Litenature 53, 55 

Location 11 

Masters Degrees 27 

Mathematics 59 

Maximum and Minimum Hours , 31 

Mechanics 64 

Money 23 

Music 20, 61 

Nature Study 62 

Newer Type of Elementary School 49 

Normal Diploma 25, 26, 30 

Novel 55 

Nursing Education 20, 62 

Officers of Administration 3 

Organ 21, 62 

Organizations 16 

Ovid r 58 

Parent-Teacher Associations 21, 67 



76 University of Florida 



Page 

Peabody Club 16 

Pedagogy 45 

Phi Kappa Phi 16 

Philosophy and Psychology 63 

Physical Education 65 

Physical Examinations ...^ 15 

Physician 16 

Physics, College 63 

Physics, High School , 63 

Piano 21, 62 

Plays and Games ^ 66 

Pliny's Letters 58 

Political Science ■. 57 

Primary Education 46, 49 

Primary Handwork ^ 47 

Primary Reading and Literature 47 

Problem-Project Method 49 

Problems of Administration ^ 49, 51 

Psychology 48, 52, 63 

Public Health 68 

Public Health Nursing , 62 

Purpose 11 

Railroad Rates 19 

Reading and Literature 47 

Refunds 23, 69 

Registration 35 

Regulations Governing Curriculum 28, 29 

Religious and Social Life 14 

Residence Requirement 26 

Rhetoric , 53 

Rooms 69, 71 

Scholarships 20, 23 

Second Grade Certificate 33 

Shakespeare ^ 55 

Social Problems 67 

Social Life 14 

Social Work 67 

Societies and Clubs 16 

Sociology 67 

Spanish 68 

Spelling , 54 

Substitutions Permitted 29 

Summer School News : 17 

Supervised Teaching 49 

Supervision of Instruction 52 

Tennyson and Browning 55 

Tests and Measurements 49, 50 

Textbooks 23 

Theory and Practice 45 

Theses 27, 52 

Third Grade Certificate 33 

Trades and Industries 52 

Trigonometry 60 

Visiting Teacher 67 

Vocational Education 51 

Voice 20, 61 

When and Where to Register 36 

Young Men's Christian Association 14 

Young Women's Christian Association 14 



University Record 



Published quarterly by the University of Florida 
Gainesville, Florida 



Vol. XXII APRIL, 1927 No. 2 

Preliminary Report on 

LABOR AND MATERIALS REQUIRED 

For Some Florida Crops 

By J. E. Turlington and Frank W. Brumley 




Published by 

The College of Agriculture 

Unlversilty of Florida 
Gainesville, Florida 



Sntered September 6, 1906, at the Postoffice at Gainesville. Florida, as second- 
class mail matter, under Act of Congress, July 16. 18!''» 



PRELIMINARY REPORT ON 
LABOR AND MATERIALS REQUIRED 
FOR SOME FLORIDA CROPS 

By J. E. Turlington and Frank W. Brumley 

Students and teachers of agriculture, new settlers, developers, 
farmers considering the planting of new crops, and others are 
interested in the labor and materials required for different 
crops. The information may be used in figuring costs of grow- 
ing the crops, in determining how various crops compete with 
each other for labor, and in calculating the area that may be 
grown with a given amount of labor. 

It is recognized that both labor and material requirements 
may vary from season to season, from farm to farm, and from 
section to section. In case of certain materials like poisons and 
fertilizers, they may vary from zero on some farms to quite 
large amounts on others. The labor requirements also may vary 
greatly, as in cases where the crop was a partial or total failure 
due to climatic conditions, or where a part or all of the crop 
was left unharvested because the price was too low to pay for 
the harvesting and shipping costs. Notwithstanding these vari- 
ations which are inevitable, it is believed that the results pre- 
sented in tables I and II represent the average labor require- 
ments for the various crops in the communities studied; excep- 
tions occur in the cases of fall and spring beans and peanuts, as 
these crops were low in man labor because of the low yields, 
which influenced the harvest labor and therefore the total labor 
required. The figures presented are for the year 1926 for all 
crops, except that fall beans, fall peppers, and potatoes are for 
1925, and cucumbers at Wilhston for 1923. 

The number of farms, acres studied, and yield per acre for 
each crop is presented in table II and also in the paragraph de- 
voted to each crop under "Materials Required." 

The survey method was used in collecting the information. 
The figures were secured by personal interviews with the farm- 
ers, obtaining in each case a record by half months of the man, 
horse, truck, and tractor labor spent on each operation for the 
crop under investigation. A record of the materials used was 
also taken at the same time. 



Labor and Materials Required for Some Florida Crops 3 

Men trained in agriculture and who are familiar with practi- 
cal phases of farming secured the figures. The records taken 
during each day were exchanged at night and checked for any 
errors or omissions. In cases of any question of error or omis- 
sion, the farmers were interviewed again and proper corrections 
made. These field records were then brought into the office, 
rechecked and summarized. The results of these summaries 
are presented on the following pages. 

LABOR DISTRIBUTION BY OPERATIONS 

In table I is given the average number of hours per acre of 
man, horse, truck, and tractor labor for each of the important 
operations, as well as the total labor required per acre for each 

crop. . 

It should be noted that no distinction has been made m the 
tables between men, women, and children, but almost without 
exception work done by women was rated fully equal to that 
of men. Some shght allowance should be made for children, 
whose rate of work generally averaged about three-fourths that 
of the women, as in the case of picking strawberries, where ap- 
proximately one-third of the harvesting labor was done by 
children. On a man or woman equivalent basis therefore, the 
harvesting labor for strawberries would have been about fifty 
hours less per acre, or five hundred thirty-five hours instead 
of five hundred eighty-five. 

Another point to which attention should be called is that 
throughout the tables the labor requirements are based on the 
average amount of work done per acre for the entire acreage 
studied. In a number of instances, therefore, the labor re- 
quired for certain operations may appear small— for example: 
under fall beans we have'.S of an hour per acre for spraying 
and dusting, for the reason that seventy acres out of the three 
hundred fifteen acres studied were sprayed or dusted, thereby 
requiring about 1.4 hours per acre for the area that was actu- 
ally dusted. 

By referring to the paragraph on material requirements lor 
each crop, it will be possible to determine the area covered by 
anv material; this will not, however, give the area hoed nor the 
number of times hoed, etc. It is expected to give this informa- 
tion in detail for each crop in a later report, not only for the 





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Labor and Materials Required for Some Florida Crops 5 

crops here presented but also for a number of other crops. In 
this brief preliminary report we must content oursleves with 
averages for the farms studied. 

By referring to table I, it may be seen that the man labor 
requirements vary from 21.5 hours per acre for corn in Sumter 
County to 1196.4 hours per acre for strawberries in Hillsborough 
County. In Sumter County, corn followed cabbage, beans and 
other truck crops with little or no extra preparation of the 
land; therefore the labor for preparation was much less for 
corn in Sumter County than in Jackson County, where it was 
necessary to plow the land in preparation for planting. Spring 
beans, fall beans, cotton, open cucumbers, eg^ plant, cane, pota- 
toes, strawberries, bright tobacco, and shade tobacco required 
more man labor for harvesting and hauling to market than for 
preparation, planting and all the cultural operations combined. 
Cane was the only crop studied which required more than half 
of the total horse labor per acre at harvesting time. 

Trucks were used largely for hauling the crop to market, and 
to some extent for hauling fertilizer and other materials. Trac- 
tors were used almost exclusively in the preparation of the land. 

SEASONAL DISTRIBUTION OF LABOR 

Table II presents the distribution of man and horse labor 
by half months for each of the crops. By reference to this 
table, one should be able to determine the number of workers 
necessary for any particular period of the year, with given areas 
in specific crops. 

For fall beans the horse labor was heaviest in September, and 
man labor in November; while for spring beans, horse labor 
was heaviest in February and man labor in April. For straw- 
berries some work was done every month in the year, although 
it was by no means evenly distributed. On the other hand with 
spring beans, all the work was done the first four months of 
the year, and practically all the work on fall beans was in the 
last four months of the year. Celery, cotton, eggplant, straw- 
berries, and shade tobacco were the only crops studied which 
did not have at least three months during which no work was 
done in connection with the crop on any of the farms. Egg- 
plants would have fallen in this group also but for the fact that 
one farmer out of eight began his preparation a half month ear- 





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8 College of Agriciilture, University of Florida 

lier than the others. Fall beans, spring beans, trough cucum- 
bers, lettuce, and peppers had five months or more in which no 
work was done in connection with the crop. 

In the cases of eggplant, lettuce, peppers, and tomatoes the 
distribution of seed bed labor was not included in table II and 
therefore the total labor shown in table II for these four crops 
is short by the amount of the seed bed labor, found in table I. 

MATERIALS REQUIRED 

The number of farms, acres covered, and materials required 
per acre are hsted below under the head of each crop. Each 
material used in producing the crop is hsted as the average 
amount used per acre on the entire acreage studied for the par- 
ticular crop. But in many instances certain materials were ap- 
plied to only a part of the acreage. In such cases the number 
of acres on which the material was applied and the amounts 
actually applied per acre are given in parenthesis following the 
amount for the entire acreage. This may be illustrated by the 
dust applied to fall beans : though there was an average of only 
3.1 lbs. of dust for the 315 acres, it was all applied to 70 acres 
at the rate of 14.2 lbs. per acre. 

The crops of eggplants, peppers, and tomatoes were packed 
in packing houses at a contract price to cover labor and mate- 
rials. Therefore the materials listed herein for these three 
crops do not include materials for packing, but do include all 
other materials up to dehvery of the crop in field boxes to the 
packing house. 

Gasoline and oil used by trucks for hauhng materials and 
hauling the crop to market are not given, but the time required 
per acre is given in table I. Gasoline and oil used by tractors 
for plowing and harrowing, and by engines for irrigation was 
included and is listed with the other materials. 

Most farmers prepared their own seed beds when plants were 
to be transplanted to the field, as in the case of celery, cabbage, 
eggplant, lettuce, peppers, strawberries, bright and shade to- 
bacco, and tomatoes. In some instances the materials used upon 
the seed bed are listed separately from those applied to the field 
crop, but are based upon the same number of acres. Some ma- 
terials, such as cloth, frames, wire and lumber were difficult 



Labor and Materials Required for Some Florida Crops 9 

to obtain in uniform units, therefore the vakie per acre with 
the annual depreciation is given instead. 

BEANS: Sumter County. — Twelve farms were studied near 
Center Hill, eleven of which grew 397.5 acres of spring beans 
yielding an average of 48 hampers (28 qt.), and nine that grew 
315 acres of fall beans with an average yield of 61 hampers. 
The yield on spring beans was low because of heavy spring 
rains, while the fall beans were badly damaged by frosts. Had 
the yield been normal the principal effect upon materials would 
have been an increase in the number of hampers. 

For 397.5 acres planted in spring beans the materials per 
acre were as follows : seed .5 bu. ; fertilizer 301 lbs. ; hampers 48 
(on 374 acres harvested, the average was 51 hampers) ; gaso- 
line 2.1 gal. and oil .1 gal. for tractor. (369 acres averaged 2.3 
gal. of gasoline and .1 gal of oil.) 

Fall beans required the following materials per acre for 315 
acres : seed .52 bu. ; fertilizer 376 lbs. ; hampers 61 ; lime sul- 
phur dust 3.1 lbs. (70 acres averaged 14.2 lbs.) ; gasoline 3.9 
gal. and oil .2 gal. for tractor. (285 acres averaged 4.3 gal. gaso- 
line and .2 gal. oil.) 

CABBAGE : Sumter County. — Information was obtained 
from 13 farms near Coleman, covering 163 acres of cabbage 
with an average yield of 163 crates (3.2 bu.) per acre. 
About 43% of the crop was shipped in hampers approximately 
one-half the size of the crates. Some, of the farmers used both 
crates and hampers. The materials below also include the ma- 
terials used on the seed bed, which was usually a part of the 
final acreage. Seed were planted thick at first either in hills 
or in the drill, and later thinned to secure plants for the re- 
maining acres. 

The materials used per acre were: seed 1.5 lbs.; nitrate of 
soda 91.3 lbs. (on 158 acres where used the average was 94.2 
lbs.) ; complete fertihzer 1072 lbs.; nails .1 keg (93 acres aver- 
aged .14 keg) ; poison* 5.8 lbs. (119 acres averaged 7.9 lbs.) ; 
gasoline 2.5 gal. and oil .13 gal. for tractor, (48 acres averaged 
8.5 gal. gasoline and .43 gal. of oil) ; crates 93, (93 acres aver- 
aged 163 crates) ; hampers 140 (70 acres averaged 326 ham- 
pers). 



* Poison throughout this report refers to a mixture of paris green, 
>horts and molasses for poisoning worms. 



10 College of Agriculture, University of Florida 

CELERY: Seminole County. — The study on celery covered 
13 farms near Sanford including 187.5 acres with an average 
yield of 642 crates (2 bu.). The same paper and wire for 
bleaching was used on an average about three times during 
the year. This was possible because the period of maturity was 
spread over a number of weeks. It was necessary therefore 
for the farmers to own only about enough paper and wire to 
cover one-third of the total acreage. 

Seed bed materials include the following: seed .4 lbs.; man- 
ure 346 lbs. (on the 27.5 acres where used the average was 2363 
lbs.) ; fertilizer 138 lbs. (158 acres averaged 163 lbs.) ; ashes 81 
lbs. (143.5 acres averaged 105 lbs.) ; castor pomace 65 lbs. (137.5 
acres averaged 89 lbs.); Hme for bordeaux 4.2 lbs.; bluestone 
for bordeaux 3.7 lbs.; bordeaux dust 1.5 lbs. (19.5 acres aver- 
aged 15 lbs.) ; cloth valued at $17.52 with 38% depreciation an- 
nually; frames and wire valued at $5.98 with 28%. depreciation; 
clothes pins 144 with 30% depreciation. 

The following materials were used per acre on the field crop: 
complete fertilizer (usually a 5-5-5 formula) 7180 lbs.; wood 
ashes 1061 lbs. (on 98.5 acres where used the average was 2020 
lbs.) ; goat manure 325 lbs. (44 acres averaged 1386 lbs.) ; cas- 
tor pomace 1473 lbs. (140.5 acres averaged 1967 lbs.) ; tankage 
183 lbs. (54 acres averaged 635 lbs.) ; nitrate of soda 428 lbs. 
(176.5 acres averaged 458 lbs.) ; potash 141 lbs. (66 acres aver- 
aged 400 lbs.) ; Kainit 40 lbs. (15 acres averaged 500 lbs.) ; 
nails .67 keg; crates 642; gasoline 14.2 gal., and oil .9 gal., for 
tractor, (160.5 acres averaged 16.5 gals, gasoline and 1.1 gal. 
oil) ; poison 33 lbs. (128 acres averaged 49 lbs.) paris green 
.5 lb., (21 acres averaged 4.5 lbs.) ; lime sulphur dust 8 lbs., (19 
acres averaged 79 lbs.) ; lime sulphur spray 2.5 gal., (102.5 
acres averaged 4.6 gal.) ; lime for bordeaux 182 lbs.; bluestone 
for bordeaux 162 lbs.; bleaching paper 35.5 rolls (60.2 acres 
averaged 110.2 rolls) ; with annual depreciation of 37%. ; wire 
for bleaching 302 lbs. (67.5 acres averaged 839 lbs.) with de- 
preciation of 12.5%. 

CORN AND PEANUTS: Gilchrist County.— Materials were 
obtained for this crop from eleven farms at Trenton covering 
575 acres. The corn yielded an average of 11.3 bu. The pea- 
nuts were harvested by hogs except 5 acres which averaged 45 
bu. per acre. Seeds used per acre were .45 bushel of peanuts 



Labor and Mate^nals Required for Some Florida Crops 11 

and .12 peck of corn. The seed peanuts for 233 acres were 
shelled for planting while 342 acres were planted in the hull. 

COTTON: Jackson County. — Fourteen farms containing 293 
acres near Greenwood and Malone produced an average yield of 
169 lbs. of lint cotton and 323 lbs. of seed per acre. The ma- 
terials apphed per acre were: seed .85 bu. ; fertilizer 495 lbs.; 
manure 259 lbs. (on 83 acres where applied the average was 
915 lbs.) ; nitrate of soda 15 lbs. (22 acres averaged 200 lbs.) ; 
bagging and ties $ .66 per acre or |1.95 per bale; ginning $ .84 
per acre or $2.48 per bale. 

CUCUMBERS: Levy County.— Cucumbers were studied at 
Williston and covered 698.35 acres on 100 farms with an aver- 
age yield of 120 hampers (28 qt.). 

The following materials were used per acre : seed 3.2 lbs. ; 
manure 247 lbs. (on 34.5 acres where applied the average was 
5001 lbs.) ; fertilizer 1503 lbs. (694 acres averaged 1513 lbs.) ; 
hampers 120; nitrate of soda 45 lbs. (325 acres averaged 96 
lbs.) ; and a cost for spray materials of % .96, (122 acres aver- 
aged $5.49). 

CUCUMBERS: Sumter County. — Cucumbers were also stud- 
ied at Webster where they were grown more intensively than at 
Williston. Troughs were used to protect the young plants from 
cold and frosts. Twelve farms with a total of 85.75 acres gave 
an average yield of 297 hampers, (28 qt.) per acre. 

The materials used per acre were: seed 9 lbs.; fertilizer 1672 
lbs. ; cotton seed meal 391 lbs. (on 32.75 acres where applied the 
average was 1023 lbs.); hme for bordeaux 29.4 lbs.; bluestone 
for bordeaux 14.4 lbs. ; black leaf-40, .37 gal. (50.75 acres aver- 
aged .63 gal.) ; lead arsenate .2 lb. (1.75 acres averaged 8.5 
lbs.) ; sulphur 1 lb. (3 acres averaged 33 lbs.) ; gasoHne 3.1 gal. 
and oil .2 gal., for tractor, (62 acres averaged 4.3 gal. of gasoline 
and .3 gal. of oil) ; gasoline 5.8 gals., and oil .3 gal. for irriga- 
tion, (19.75 acres averaged 25.1 gal. of gasoline and 1.2 gals, of 
oil) ; hampers 297. 

Besides the above materials wooden troughs were used that 
were valued at $323.60 per acre with a yearly depreciation, in- 
cluding repairs, of about 9 percent. 

EGGPLANT: Manatee County. — An average yield per acre 
of 528 crates (1.6 bu.) was obtained for 29 acres on eight farms 
near Palmetto. 



12 College of Agriculture, Uyiiversity of Florida 

The seed bed materials were as follows : Seed .38 lbs. ; fertilizer 
117 lbs.; ashes 13.7 lbs. (on 8 acres where applied the average 
was 50 lbs.) ; lime for bordeaux .5 lbs. (6 acres averaged 2.4 lbs.) ; 
bluestone for bordeaux .5 lbs. (6 acres averaged 2.4 lbs.) ; dust 
2.2 lbs. (6 acres averaged 10.9 lbs.) ; cloth 7.3 yds., (3 acres 
averaged 71 yds.) ; and frames valued at $1.38 per acre with a 
yearly depreciation of 13.3%, (3 acres averaged $13.33). 

The materials applied to the field were: Fertilizer before 
planting 803 lbs. (on 26 acres where used the average was 896 i 
lbs.); fertihzer after planting 2414 lbs.; ashes 121 lbs. (2.5 
acres averaged 1400 lbs.) ; nitrate of soda 134 lbs. (6.5 acres | 
averaged 600 lbs.) ; hme 48 lbs., and bluestone 26 lbs., for bor- \ 
deaux (15.5 acres averaged 89 lbs. and 48 lbs. respectively) ; ! 
lime sulphur dust 19 lbs., (7.5 acres averaged 73 lbs.) ; miscellan- j 
ecus dusts 204 lbs. (22 acres averaged 269 lbs.) ; and poison | 
54 lbs. 

CANE : Jackson County. — An imported variety of East India 
cane known as Cayenna No. 10 (sometimes called improved Jap), 
because of its immunity to mosaic disease and its ability to stub- 
ble over from year to year is fast replacing sugar cane in this 
county. Of the 117.75 acres studied on thirteen farms around 
Sneads 47.9 acres were stubble cane and 69.85 acres were planted 
in 1926. The average yield was 275 gallons of syrup per acre. 

Materials used per acre were: Seed canes 980, (on 69.85 acres ; 
planted in 1926 the average was 1653 canes) ; manure 1546 lbs. I 
(12.25 acres averaged 14,858 lbs.) ; complete fertihzer 797 lbs. i 
(115.25 acres averaged 814 lbs.) ; barrels 8.6 (32 gal.) ; wood for I 
cooking 3.3 cords; gasoline 3.5 gal., and oil .1 gal., for grinding | 
(18.75 acres averaged 22.2 gals, of gasoline and .5 gal. of oil). I 

LETTUCE : Manatee County.— The Big Boston variety was I 
studied and gave an average yield of 360 hampers, (48 qt.) per i 
acre for the 111 acres on eleven farms near Palmetto. j 

The seed bed materials per acre were: Seed .8 lb.; fertihzer j 
60 lbs.; lead arsenate .4 lbs. (37 acres averaged 1.2 lbs.) ; poison : 
3.7 lbs. (25 acres averaged 16.4 lbs). i 

The materials used per acre upon the field crop were: Com- i 
plete fertilizer 1189 lbs.* (on 79 acres where applied the average '[ 



'"On 32 acres receiving no complete fertilizer, castor pomace was ap- 
plied at the rate of 1 ton per acre. On 45 acres on which both were used 
only 602 lbs. of pomace was used per acre. 



Labor and Materials Required for Some Florida Crops 13 

was 1671 lbs.) ; castor pomace 1077 lbs. (77 acres averaged 1552 
lbs.) ; cotton seed meal 59 lbs. (15 acres averaged 433 lbs.) ; 
hampers 360; gasoline 1 gal., and oil ,1 gal. for tractor, (44 
acres averaged 2.6 gal. of gasoline and .2 gal. of oil). 

SPANISH PEANUTS: Jackson County.— For 349 acres of 
Spanish peanuts studied on eleven farms near Greenwood and 
Malone the average yield was 16.2 bu., of peanuts and 400 lbs. 
of peanut hay per acre. The yield was lower than the average 
for other years due to a storm in September. 

The following materials were used per acre: Seed 1.6 bu. ; 
fertilizer 138 lbs. (on 179 acres where applied the average was 
269 lbs.) ; posts for stacking 10.7; sacks 1.1 (27 acres averaged 
15). 

PEPPERS: Manatee County. — Peppers can be picked for a 
long period in this area if given the proper care. The average 
yield per acre was 282 crates (1.6 bu.) for 44.5 acres on nine 
farms at Palmetto. 

The seed bed materials used per acre were: Seed .9 lb.; 
fertilizer 92 lbs.; Pyrox dust .24 lbs. (on 3.5 acres where used 
the average was 3.1 lbs.) ; cloth 16 yards (2 acres averaged 360 
yds. at a value of 6c per yd.) ; frames valued at $.67 per acre 
with a yearly depreciation of 10% (2 acres averaged $15). 

The materials applied to the field crop were : Fertilizer before 
planting 648 lbs. (on 38 acres where used the average was 759 
lbs.) ; fertihzer after planting 2707 lbs.; nitrate of soda 129 lbs. 
(38 acres averaged 151 lbs.) ; poison 43 lbs. (40 acres averaged 
48 lbs.) ; hme 27.3 lbs., bluestone 18 lbs., for bordeaux (17 acres 
averaged 71 lbs., and 46 lbs.) ; lead arsenate .6 lbs., (9 acres 
averaged 2.9 lbs.) ; nicotine sulphate dust 19.7 lbs., (16.5 acres 
averaged 53 lbs.) ; gasoline 2 gal., and oil .1 gal., for tractor, 
(20 acres averaged 4.5 gal., of gasoKne and .2 gal. of oil). 

POTATOES: St. Johns County.— Two hundred farms near 
Hastings covering 9084 acres of white potatoes gave an average 
yield of 52 bbls., (11 pks.) per acre for the year 1925. The fol- 
lowing materials were required per acre : Seed 5.2 sacks (about 
165 lbs. per sack) ; barrels 52; fertilizer 2107 lbs.; and copper 
sulphate dust 40.8 lbs., (on 7494 acres where used the average 
was 49.5 lbs., per acre). 



14 College of Agriculture, University of Florida 

STRAWBERRIES : Hillsborough County. — Fifteen farms 
were studied near Plant City which grew 81 acres of strawber- 
ries with an average yield of 2439 qts. per acre. 

The average farmer usually bought enough plants, from 
Maryland or other northern points, about February to set a 
small plant bed. An average of 799 plants per acre were bought 
(on 66 acres where plants were used the average was 981 plants). 
By July these plants had produced enough runners to set an 
additional plant bed. On 15 acres the runners for the summer 
plantings were obtained from plants on the home farm which 
had been worked out after the picking season was over. About 
October the runners are gathered from both the February and 
summer beds to set the main crop. The summer planting is 
kept and allowed to produce berries, while the February plant- 
ing is destroyed. Fertilizer amounting to 129 lbs. per acre was 
used (69.75 acres averaged 150 lbs.) upon the plant bed. 

The materials used per acre for the field crop were as fol- 
lows: Additional plants purchased for setting, 2333 (on 11.5 
acres where planted the average was 16,434) ; manure 12 lbs., 
(1.75 acres averaged 571 lbs.) ; ashes 205 lbs., (21 acres averaged 
790 lbs.) ; hme for neutralizing soil 131.5 lbs. (26.5 acres aver- 
aged 402 lbs.) ; complete fertilizer before planting 400 lbs., (47 
acres averaged 689 lbs.) ; complete fertilizer after planting 1464 
lbs.; cups (qt.) 2439; crates* 8.7; poison 16.5 lbs. (68.5 acres 
averaged 19.5 lbs.) ; lime sulphur spray .35 gal., (13 acres aver- 
aged 2.2 gal.) ; lime sulphur dust 33 lbs. (30.5 acres averaged 
89 lbs.) ; hme 2.6 lbs., and bluestone 1.2 lbs., for bordeaux (26 
acres averaged 8.1 lbs., and 3.7 lbs.) ; gasohne 2.3 gal., and oil .1 
gal., for tractor, (49.75 acres averaged 3.8 gal., of gasohne and .2 
gal, of oil). 

BRIGHT TOBACCO: Madison County.— The study of this 
crop covered 81 acres on eight farms at Madison with an aver- 
age yield of 865 lbs., of cured tobacco. 

Materials used per acre for the seed bed were- Seed .37 oz. 
(on 73 acres where used the average was .41 oz.) ; fertilizer 52 
lbs. (73 acres averaged 57 lbs.) ; manure 49 lbs. (11 acres aver- 
aged 363 lbs.) ; cottonseed meal 12 lbs. (26 acres averaged 38 



^'^ Since the quart cups are removed from the crates at the shipping point 
and placed in refrigerator boxes, it is only necessary for each farmer to 
buy crates enough to deliver his berries each day at the shipping point. 



Labor and Materials Required for Some Florida Crops 15 

lbs.) ; dust $.02 per acre (4 acres averaged $.45) ; wood .61 
cords (73 acres averaged .68 cords) ; cloth 51 yards (73 acres 
averaged 57 yards). 

The materials applied per acre to the field crop were: Plants 
bought, 493 (on 8 acres where planted the average was 5000 
plants per acre) ; manure 210 lbs. (8 acres averaged 2125 lbs.) ; 
complete fertilizer 827 lbs.; cottonseed meal 24 lbs., (8 acres 
averaged 250 lbs.) ; paris green 2 lbs. (58 acres averaged 2.7 
lbs.) ; lead arsenate 8.3 lbs.; twine for stringing 3.5 lbs.; wood 
for curing 1.5 cords; lime 24.7 lbs. (22 acres averaged 90 lbs.). 

SHADE TOBACCO: Madison County.— The yield for this 
crop was heavy being 1110 lbs. per acre for the 189 acres studied 
on nine farms at Madison. This is one of the best grades of 
tobacco used for cigar wrappers. 

The seed bed materials used per acre were: Seed .42 oz., 
(on 153 acres where used the average was .52 oz.) ; manure 113 
lbs., (147 acres averaged 145 lbs.) ; fertilizer 17 lbs. (41 acres 
averaged 78 lbs.) ; cottonseed meal 58 lbs., (153 acres averaged 
72 lbs.) ; lime 2.6 lbs., (35 acres averaged 14 lbs.) ; cloth 102 
yards (153 acres averaged 126 yards) ; wood .8 cords (118 acres 
averaged 1.3 cords). 

The materials used per acre on the field crop including those 
for curing were: Plants purchased 476 (on 9 acres where used 
the average was 10,000 plants) ; manure 12,698 lbs., (on 130 
acres where used the average was 18,461 lbs.) ; acid phosphate 57 
lbs., (34 acres averaged 320 lbs.) ; cottonseed meal 1280 lbs., 
(174 acres averaged 1391 lbs.); complete fertilizer 1177 lbs.; 
paris green 15.1 lbs.; lead arsenate 11.8 lbs.; lime for poisoning 
112 lbs.; twine for tying up and stringing 27.2 lbs.; wood for 
curing .44 cord, (134 acres averaged .62 cord) ; charcoal 418 lbs., 
(159 acres averaged 497 lbs.) ; corn meal for poisoning 4.4 lbs. 
(9 acres averaged 93 lbs.) ; there was an average investment in 
tobacco shades of about 8290.00 per acre with an annual de- 
preciation of 15%. 

TOMATOES : Manatee County.— This is one of the leading 
crops in this county. Practically all of the farmers prune and 
irrigate their tomatoes. Of 250.5 acres studied on fourteen 
farms, 117 acres were staked and tied. There was an average 
yield of 212 (24 qt.) crates on the entire 250.5 acres. 



16 College of Agricidtyre, University of Florida 

Each farm had its own seed bed for plants, which required 
the following materials per acre ; seed .34 lbs. ; complete fertilizer 
20 lbs., (on 228.5 acres where used the average was 22 lbs.) ; 
castor pomace 11 lbs., (141 acres averaged 20 lbs.) ; manure 40 
lbs., (9 acres averaged 1111 pounds) ; lime and bluestone for 
bordeaux .2 lb. each, (171 acres averaged .3 lbs.) ; poison .3 lb., 
(15 acres averaged 5 lbs.) ; wooden frames valued at $2.00 per 
acre (179 acres averaged $2.79), depreciating 15.6% annually; 
cloth 32 yards (143 acres averaged 56 yds.). 

The materials appHed to the field crop per acre were: Castor 
pomace 291 lbs. (on 65 acres where used the average was 1123 
lbs.) ; complete fertilizer before planting, 524 lbs. (182.5 acres 
averaged 719 lbs.) ; complete fertilizer after planting 1654 lbs.; 
nitrate of soda, 32 lbs. (65.5 acres averaged 122 lbs.) ; twine for 
tying, 4.4 lbs. (117 acres averaged 9.5 lbs.) ; lime 6.4 lbs. and 
bluestone 5 lbs. for bordeaux. (157.5 acres averaged 10.1 lbs. 
and 7.9 lbs.) ; lead arsenate 1.6 lbs. (149.5 acres averaged 2.7 
lbs.) ; dust 13.8 lbs. (47 acres averaged 73.7 lbs.) ; poison 28.4 
lbs.; gasoline 5.8 gal., and oil .2 gal., for tractor (197 acres aver- 
aged 7.4 gal. of gasoline and .3 gal. of oil) ; stakes 2876 (117 
acres averaged 6157) with an annual depreciation of 13%. 

WATERMELONS: Gilchrist County.— Fourteen farms near 
Trenton, covering 372 acres of watermelons were studied that 
produced an average yield of .34 cars per acre. The amount of 
seed required was relatively high due to unfavorable weather at 
planting time which made several replantings necessary. The 
usual amount of seed needed per acre is about 1 lb. 

The following materials were apphed per acre: Seed 1.7 lbs.; 
fertihzers 813 lbs. ; nicotine sulphate dust .6 lbs. ; (on 172 acres 
where used the average was 1.3 lbs.) ; paste $.165; paper .25 
roll; excelsior .6 bale; lumber valued at $.28. 

WATERMELONS: Jackson County.— Six farms were stu-^ 
died near Sneads, that grew 104 acres with an average yield oi 
.28 car per acre. 

The materials used per acre were: Seed 1 lb.; fertilizer 476| 
lbs. ; manure 1423 lbs., (on 21 acres where used the average was 
7047 lbs.) ; paper .2 roll; excelsior .2 bale (58 acres averaged 
bale) ; cane pomace for shipping, 269 lbs. (46 acres averaged 609| 
lbs.); paste $.07; lumber $.12; gasoline $.13 and oil $.01 foi 
tractor, (26 acres averaged $.53 for gasoline and $.03 for oil). I 



.] UVM 



No's 



The College of Commerce and Journalism 
University of Florida 



Gainesville, Florida 




Catalog and Announcements 

1927-28 



WE BELIEVE that business enterprise justi- 
fies its existence by the service it renders 
to mankind. The best business man is the 
man who serves society best. Other things being 
equal, the best society is the society that has the 
best businesses. Wealth is not an end ; it is a means 
to an end. Man does not exist for business. Busi- 
ness exists for man. 

We believe that the press is an agency second to 
none as a chronicler of events; as a broadcaster of 
news; as a herald of achievement; as a creator of 
public opinion; as an educator of the masses; as a 
conservative leader of human progress. 

We believe that successful living is an art based 
on principles that may be understood and applied; 
that national greatness depends less on wealth and 
numbers than on intelligent cooperation of great- 
hearted, broad-visioned men and women; that edu- 
cation should train for social efficiency — for the 
art of living and helping others to live ; that social 
groups by taking thought can add many cubits to 
their social stature. 



CONTENTS 

Pace 

University Calendar 4 

Administrative and Executive Boards 5 

Faculty 6 

General Statement 9 

Equipment 10 

Regulations 12 

Studies _ 12 

Expenses 15 

Student Organizations 18 

Awards and Medals 19 

Bureau of Appointments 20 

Admission 21 

Entrance Requirements 21 

Advanced Standing 21 

Stenography 21 

Degrees 23 

Curriculum in Business Administration 23 

Professional Specialization in Business 25 

Curriculum in Business Administration in Combination with Law 28 

currculom in journalism 29 

Curriculum in Social Administration 31 

Departments of Instruction 33 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 



1927-1928 



1927— September 12, Monday First Semester begins. 

October 1, Saturday, 2:00 p. m Re-examinations. 

2:00 p. m Meeting of General Faculty. 

October 3-8 Annual Meeting of Extension 

Agents. 

November 11, Friday .Armistice Day. 

November 24, Thursday Thanksgiving Day. 

December 16, Friday, 12:00 noon Christmas Recess begins. 

1928— January 3, Tuesday Resumption of Classes. 

January 28, Saturday First Semester ends. 

January 30, Monday _ Second Semester begins. 

February 4, Saturday, 2:00 p. m Meeting of General Faculty. 

March 3, Saturday, 2:00 p. m Re-examinations. 

May 26, Saturday, 2:00 p. m Meeting of General Faculty. 

May 27-29 _ Commencement Exercises. 

May 27, Sunday, 11:00 a. m _ „.„ Baccalaureate Sermon. 

May 28, Monday, Annual Alumni Meeting. 

Class Day Exercises. 
Oratorical Contests. 

May 29, Tuesday, 10:00 a. m Graduating Exercises. 

June 12, Tuesday _ _ _ Summer School begins. 



f 



THE COLLEGE OF COMMERCE AND JOURNALISM 



BOARD OF CONTROL 

p. K. YoNCE, Chairman Pensacola 

E. L. Wartmann Citra 

Albert H. Blandinc Leesburg 

W. B. Davis Perry 

Edward W. Lane Jacksonville 

J. T. Diamond, Secretary, Tallahassee 



STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

John W. Martin, Chairman Governor 

H. Clay Crawford Secretary of State 

J. C. Luning State Treasurer 

Fred H. Davis Attorney General 

W. S. Cawthon, Secretary State Superintendent of Public Instruction 



UNIVERSITY COUNCIL 

Albert A. Murphree, LL.D President of the University 

Jas. M. Farr, Ph.D Vice-President of the University 

Jas. N. Anderson, Ph.D Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences 

WiLMON Newell, D.Sc Dean of the College of Agriculture 

'■ J. R. Benton, Ph.D Dean of the College of Engineering 

j Harry R. Trusler, LL.B Dean of the College of Law 

i Jas. W. Norman, Ph.D Dean of the Teachers College 

' TowNES R. Leigh, Ph.D Dean of the College of Pharmacy 

i Walter J. ^Matherly, A.M., Dean of the College of Commerce and Journalism 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

THE COLLEGE OF COMMERCE AND JOURNALISM 



FACULTY 

ALBERT ALEXANDER MURPHREE, A.M., LL.D. 

President 

JAMES MARION FARR, A.M., Ph.D. (John Hopkins) 
Vice-President 

Professor of English Language and Literature 

WALTER JEFFRIES MATHERLY, A.M. 
Dean, College of Commerce and Journalism and Professor of Economics 

NANNIE BELLE WHITAKER, A.B. 
Secretary to the Dean 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

WALTER JEFFRIES MATHERLY, A.M. (Washington Univ.) 
Professor of Economics 

MONTGOMERY DRUMMOND ANDERSON, B.S., Ph.D. (Robert Brookings) 
Professor of Business Statistics and Economics 

HOWARD WILLIAM GRAY, M.S., C.P.A. (Illinois) 
Associate Professor of Accounting 

CLIFFORD AUSTIN CURTIS, A.B., Ph.D. (Chicago) 
Associate Professor of Finance 

JOHN GRADY ELDRIDGE, A.M. (North Carolina) 
Assistant Professor of Economics 

MERTON OGDEN PHILLIPS, JR., A.M. (North Carolina) 
Assistant Professor of Economic Resources and Foreign Trade 

HAROLD BARTON MYERS, A.B. (Washburn) 
Assistant Professor of Economic History 

JOSEPH PORTER WILSON, M.B.A. (Harvard) 
Assistant Professor of Marketing and Salesmanship 

TERRY WARREN EDWARDS, B.S. (Illinois) 
Instructor in Production Management 

HUBER CHRISTIAN HURST, B.S., LL.B. (Florida) 
Instructor in Business Law 



THE COLLEGE OF COMMERCE AND JOURNALISM 

WILBUR GARLAND HIATT, A.B. (Florida) 
Graduate Assistant 

HOWARD LUTHER HOAG, A.B. 
Graduate Assistant 

FRANK PHIPPS 

HENRY FRATER 

THOMAS F. NEWMAN 

FRED C. WARD 

Student Assistants 



JOURNALISM 

ORLAND K. ARMSTRONG, B.J., LL.B., A.M. (Missouri) 
Associate Professor of Journalism 

ELMER JACOB EMIG, A.M. (Wisconsin) 
Assistant Professor of Journalism 

WILLIAM JENNINGS BULLARD 

Student Assistant 

SOCIAL ADMINISTRATION 

LUCIUS MOODY BRISTOL, A.M., Ph.D. (Harvard) 
Professor of Sociology and Social Administration 

WILLIAM GRAVES CARLETON, A.B. (Indiana) 
Instructor in Social Administration 



ANCIENT LANGUAGES 

JAMES NESBITT ANDERSON, A.M., Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins) 

Professor of Ancient Languages 

and other Instructors in the Department 

BIOLOGY 

JAMES SPEED ROGERS, M.A. 

Professor of Biology and Geology 
and other Instructors in the Department 



CHEMISTRY 

TOWNES RANDOLPH LEIGH, A.M., Ph.D. (Chicago) 

Professor of Chemistry 

and other Instructors in the Department 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 

JAMES MARION FARR, A.M., Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins) 

Professor of English Language and Literature 

and other Instructors in the Department 

HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

JAMES MILLER LEAKE, A.B., Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins) 

Professor of History and Political Science 

and other Instructors in the Department 

MATHEMATICS 

THOMAS MARSHALL SIMPSON, M.A., Ph.D. (Wisconsin) 

Professor of Mathematics 

and other Instructors in the Department 

MODERN LANGUAGES 

CHARLES LANGLEY CROW, M.A., Ph.D. (Giittingen) 

Professor of Modern Languages 

and other Instructors in the Department 

PHYSICS 

JOHN ROBERT BENTON, B.A., Ph.D. (Giittingen) 

Professor of Physics 

and other Instructors in the Department 

PSYCHOLOGY 

HASSE OCTAVIUS EN WALL, Ph.D. (Boston) 
Professor of Philosophy and Psychology 
and other Instructors in the Department 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

EVERETT MARION YON 

Director of Physical Education and Athletics 

and other Instructors in the Department 



MILITARY SCIENCE 

ARTHUR C. TIPTON, Major, Infantry-. United States Army 

Commandant of Cadets, and Professor of Military Science and Tactics 

and other Instructors in the Department 



I THE COLLEGE OF COMMERCE A^D JOURNALISM 9 

I GENERAL STATEMENT 

The College of Commerce and Journalism was established as the 
School of Business Administration and Journalism in 1925. For the 
first year it operated under the College of Arts and Sciences with the 
Dean of that College in charge. Beginning with the first semester of 
1926 a special director was appointed and the School began to operate 
as a unit separate and distinct from the College of Arts and Sciences. 
In the Spring of 1927 the Board of Control created die College of Com- 
merce and Journalism out of this unit with a dean and faculty of its own 
and made it co-equal in every respect with the other colleges of the 
University. 

The College of Commerce and Journalism offers instruction in three 
distinct fields of professional or semi-professional effort: 
I. Business Administration 
I II. Journalism 

III. Social Administration 

Instruction in Business Administration is designed to provide scien- 
tific analysis of the basic principles of business. Its general purpose is 
to prepare students to become business executives. Expressed more spe- 
cifically, its aims are to provide familiarity with the fundamental ele- 
ments of business management; to develop facility in the use of quantita- 
tive instruments in the determination of business policies; and to assure 
recognition of the larger relationships between business leadership and 
social well-being or community interests. 

Instruction in Journalism proceeds upon the theory that the press is 
a public utility and that the increasing appreciation of its functions as an 
educational agency creates a demand for thorough preparation, ethically 
as well as educationally, for journalistic endeavor. The makers of 
modern newspapers and periodicals require knowledge of comprehensive 
and far-reaching character. They are compelled to deal with almost every 
phase of modern life and civilization. Those who would participate in 
journalistic activities as purveyors of news, as creators of public opin- 
ion, or as owners or managers of newspaper properties, must be trained — 
in English, history, economics, business management, sociology, govern- 
ment, and so on, as well as in the technique of journalistic procedure. 
The purpose of university instruction in journalism is to accomplish, if 
possible, these difficult objectives. 

Instruction in Social Administration is intended to prepare students 
for social service. Social work is a vital part of present-day community 
organization. Organized philanthropy is a characteristic of the age. 



10 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

Charity dictated by the heart rather than the head is passing into the 
discard. Social administration is becoming a profession. The super- 
vision of community welfare requires executives thoroughly trained in 
social technology, family relationships, public health, eugenics, psychol- 
ogy, institutional management; in fact the very foundations of modern 
society itself. 

EQUIPMENT 

The University occupies a tract of nine hundred and fifty-three acres 
situated in the western extremity of Gainesville. Ninety acres of this 
tract are devoted to campus, drillgrounds, and athletic fields; the re- 
mainder is used by the College of Agriculture and Agricultural Experi- 
ment Station. 

The University is one of the few institutions in the United States that 
made plans before laying the foundation of a single building for all fu- 
ture development of the campus, as far as this could be foreseen. Con- 
sequently the campus presents a harmonious appearance. The liberality 
of the State has permitted the erection of substantial and attractive modern 
buildings as fast as they were needed. 

The present buildings are: 

The two Dormitories, Thomas Hall and Buckman Hall, brick and con- 
crete structures, three stories in height, sixty feet in width and three hun- 
dred and two hundred and forty feet respectively, in length. They are 
built in fireproof sections, each containing twelve suites of dormitory- 
rooms and on each floor of each section a shower-bath, lavatory, and 
toilet. 

Science Hall, a brick and concrete building of two stories and a fin- 
ished basement, one hundred and thirty-five feet long and sixty-six feet 
wide. It contains the classrooms and laboratories of the Departments of 
Chemistry, Pharmacy, Biology and Geology, as well as the Florida State 
Museum. 

The Agricultural Experiment Station Building, a brick and concrete 
structure of three stories and a finished basement, one hundred and twenty- 
five feet long and sixty feet wide. It contains the offices and laboratories 
of the Station, and offices of the Agricultural Extension Division. 

The Engineering Building, a brick and terra-cotta structure, three 
stories high, one hundred and twenty-two feet long and seventy-three feet 
Avide, with two one-story wings. One wing is used for boilers and 
machine-shop, the other (one hundred and sixty-three feet long by forty- 
one feet wide) is used for wood-shop, blacksmith-shop, and foundry. 
The building provides offices, classrooms, laboratories, and drafting- 



THE COLLEGE OF COMMERCE AND JOURNALISM 11 

rooms for the Departments of Civil, Electrical, and Mechanical Engi- 
neering, Mechanic Arts, Physics and Military Science. 

The Agriculture Building, a brick and concrete structure, three stories 
high, one hundred and fifteen feet long and sixty-five feet wide. It pro- 
vides classrooms, laboratories, and offices for the instruction departments 
of the College. 

The University Commons, a brick building of one story and basement, 
one hundred and fourteen feet long and forty-two feet wide, with a wing 
forty-nine feet long and twenty-seven feet wide. It provides a large 
dining-hall and kitchen. A wooden annex, one hundred and twenty feet 
long by sixty feet wide, is now used as Y. M. C. A. headquarters. 

Language Hall, a brick and stone structure of three stories, one hun- 
dred and thirty-five feet long and sixty-six feet wide. It is the home of 
the College of Arts and Sciences and the College of Commerce and 
Journalism, and provides classrooms and offices for the Departments of 
Languages, History and Political Science, Business Administration and 
Journalism, together with the administrative offices of the University. 
In the basement are the bookstore and offices and presses of the Alligator. 

George Peabody Hall, Teachers College, erected at a cost of forty 
thousand dollars ($40,000), the gift of the Peabody Board of Trust. 
It is a brick building, three stories high, one hundred and thirty-five 
feet long and seventy-two feet wide. It provides for the Departments of 
Education and Philosophy, Economics, Sociology, Mathematics, Pharma- 
cology and Pharmacognosy, and for Teacher-Training Work. 

The Law Building, a brick and stone structure of two stories, one 
hundred and twenty feet long and seventy feet wide. It contains an audi- 
torium, model courtroom, lecture-rooms and offices, library, reading and 
consultation rooms, cataloguing room, and quarters for the Marshall De- 
bating Society. 

The Gymnasium, a brick and stone structure of two stories (one of 
which is mezzanine) and basement, one hundred and six feet long and 
fifty-three feet wide. It is heated by steam, is fully supplied with hot 
water, and is well lighted and ventilated. The main floor is used as an 
auditorium and gymnasium. A gallery extending around the whole room 
provides space for the spectators at gymnastic exhibitions. The base- 
ment contains rooms for the director and for University and visiting 
teams, and for lockers and shower-baths. 

Administrative Building. When completed it will be the outstanding 
architectural feature of the campus, and will cost $800,000. The first 



12 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

unit, costing $200,000, includes an auditorium which accommodates 
2,200 persons. In this magnificent cathedral auditorium is the great An- 
drew Anderson Memorial organ. 

Library Building. A brick and terra-cotta structure two stories high, 
one hundred and forty-six by one hundred and sixty-seven feet containing 
a large reference room, a reserve book reading room and offices. 

Chemistry-Pharmacy Building. This is a conveniently arranged, brick 
and concrete structure, and, when completed, it will be in the form of 
a hollow square 204' 6" x 145' 11". A portion of the center of the 
square will be occupied by the main stock room and the large lecture 
hall. The large lecture hall will have a seating capacity of 375 students. 
All class rooms, laboratories, and offices for the department of chemistry 
and the college of pharmacy will be located in this building. 

Basket Ball Court. A steel structure, one hundred forty-six feet by 
one hundred ten feet, with a playing floor sixty by ninety feet, will be 
ready for use in September. 

Barracks. During the World War period, the Vocational Unit erected 
two Barracks, each of two stories, sixty feet long and forty feet wide, each 
accommodating sixty men; and a Garage, one hundred and twenty feet 
long, well arranged for repair work. 

University Infirmary. One of the barracks buildings has been used 
as the infirmary for the students. Each year new facilities have been 
added until now the equipment is as complete as can be made in the 
present structure. Facilities include, modern operating room, wards, nurses' 
quarters, laboratory, consultation room, dispensing room, etc. It is hoped 
that within the near future a permanent and fully equipped building will 
be erected. 

REGULATIONS 

Students in the College of Commerce and Journalism are subject to 
the same general regulations as students in other departments of the 
University. For a statement of these regulations, see the General Cata- 
log, page 30. 

STUDIES 

Assignment to Classes — Every student must appear before the Dean 
of his college at the beginning of each academic year for assignment to 
classes. No instructor has authority to enroll a student in any course, ex- 
cept as authorized by the Dean of his college. 

Choice of Studies — The choice, subject to considerations of proper 
preparation, as to which one of the various curricula will be pursued rests 



THE COLLEGE OF COMMERCE AND JOURNALISM 13 

with the individual student; but the group of studies selected must belong 
to one of the regular years in the chosen curriculum exactly as announced 
in the catalog for the year in which the student entered — unless special 
reasons exist for deviating from this arrangement. 

No applicant for a Bachelor's degree shall be allowed to make a 
change in the curriculum selected, unless such change be submitted to the 
faculty of his college at its first meeting in the semester in which the 
change is desired and be approved by a two-thirds vote of those present. 

Conditions — A student prepared to take up most of the studies of a 
certain year in a regular curriculum, but deficient in some, will be per- 
mitted to proceed with the work of that year subject to the condition that 
he make up the deficiency. In the event of conflicts in the schedule or 
of excessive quantity of work, higher studies must give way to lower. 

Maximum and Minimum Hours. — The student must take at least 
fourteen hours and in general will not be permitted to take more than 
twenty; but if in the preceding semester he has attained an average of 
eighty-seven or more and has not failed in any subject he may be per- 
mitted to take as many as twenty-one hours, and if he has attained an 
average of ninety with no failures he may be permitted to take as many 
as twenty-three hours. 

Laboratory Work — Two hours of laboratory work are considered 
equivalent to one hour of recitation. 

Changes in Studies — A student once registered is not permitted to 
discontinue a class or to begin an additional one without written permis- 
sion from the Dean of his college, which must be shown to the instructor 
involved; and if he is undergoing military training, he will not be per- 
mitted to discontinue that work on account of transferring, within a par- 
ticular year, to a college in which military instruction is not compulsory. 
A student who has been registered for two weeks will not be permitted to 
make any change in studies, except during the first two days of the second 
semester, without the payment of a fee of five dollars ($5.00). 

Grades and Reports — Each instructor keeps a record of the quality 
of work done in his classes and monthly assigns each student a grade, on 
the scale of 100. This grade is reported to the Registrar for permanent 
record and for entry upon a monthly report to the student's parent or 
guardian. 

If the monthly grades of a student are unsatisfactory, he may be re- 
quired to drop some of his studies and substitute those of a lower class, 
or he may be required to withdraw from the University. 



14 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

Examinations — Examinations on the ground covered are held at the 
end of each semester. 

Failure in Studies — A final grade, based upon the examination and 
the monthly grades, is assigned for each semester's work. If this grade 
falls below 75, the student is considered to have failed and may proceed 
only subject to a condition in the study in which failure has occurred. 

A student who fails in more than fifty per cent of his class hours or 
who obtains an average grade less than 60 in all subjects for two consecu- 
tive months, will be dropped for the remainder of the College year. Stu- 
dents so dropped will be entitled to honorable dismissal, unless their 
failure is clearly due to negligence. Upon petition, such a student may, at 
the discretion of the President of the University and the Dean of his 
College, be reinstated upon such terms as to them may seem best. 

Re-examinations — A student who has made a semester grade of 60 
or more, but less than 75, in any subject shall be entitled to a re-examina- 
tion in that subject on the first Saturday of March, or of October; although 
a senior failing on an examination at the end of the second semester shall 
be allowed a re-examination during the week preceding commencement. 
Only one re-examination in any subject is permitted; in case of failure 
to pass this, with a mark of 85, the student must repeat the semester's work 
in that subject. 

Adult Specials — Persons twenty-one or more years of age who can- 
not satisfy the entrance requirements, but who give evidence of ability 
to profit by the courses they may take, may, under exceptional circum- 
stances, be admitted as "Adult Specials". Such students appear before 
the Committee on Admission for enrollment and are not excused from 
Military duty; although, if more than twenty-two years of age, they may, 
under certain conditions, secure exemption. 

Classification of Irregular Students — Until all entrance credits 
have been satisfied a student shall not rank higher than a freshman; 
a student deficient in any freshman work shall not rank higher than a 
sophomore; and one deficient in sophomore work not higher than a junior. 
But a special student is not considered as belonging to any of the regular 
classes. 

When special students make up their deficiencies they may become 
regular students and candidates for a degree. 



THE COLLEGE OF COMMERCE AND JOURNALISM 15 

EXPENSES 

University Charges.— rui/iare.— In the College of Commerce and 
Journalism a student who is a permanent legal resident of Florida is sub- 
ject to no charge for tuition; a student who is not a permanent legal 
resident of the State is required to pay a tuition fee of one hundred dol- 
lars (SIOO.OO) per year. 

The burden of proof as to residence is with the student. Any student 
who registers improperly under the above rule will be required to pay 
the non-resident tuition, and also a penalty of ten dollars ($10.00). 

Registration and Contingent Fee— This fee of seven and one-half 
dollars ($7.50) per year is charged all students; except those regularly 
enrolled in the Graduate School, who pay a fee of five dollars ($5.00) 
per year. 

An additional fee of five dollars ($5.00) is required of students who 
enter after September 15th and February 1st, 1928. Registration is 
not complete until all University bills are paid, and any who fail to 
meet their obligations are not regarded as members of the University. 

Laboratory Fees— A small fee is required in advance for each course 
that includes laboratory work, to cover cost of consumable material, wear 
and tear of apparatus, and similar items. The amount of the fee varies 
with the different courses, in no case exceeding $6.00 per semester for 
any one course. 

A Breakage Fee of $5.00 will be required of each student using a 
locker and laboratory apparatus in the departments of Chemistry and 
Pharmacy. This deposit will be made at the Auditor's office, and refunds 
on same will be made once a year when the student has checked in his 
apparatus to the satisfaction of the department concerned. No charge 
will be made from this fee for materials used or for normal wear and 
tear, as this is covered in the general laboratory fee. 

Infirmary Fee — All students are charged an infirmary fee of six 
dollars ($6.00) per year. This secures for the student in case of illness, 
the privilege of a bed in the infirmary and the services of professional 
nurses and the University physician except in cases involving major oper- 
ations. To secure this medical service, students must report in person to 
the nurse in charge of the infirmary. The University physician will be at 
the infirmary daily from 12 to 1 o'clock for consultation and treatment. 
A fee of $5.00 is charged for the use of the operating room. Board in 



16 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

the infirmary is charged at the rate of one dollar a day, and a refund of 
fifty cents a day is allowed if the student has already paid board at the 
Commons. All students will be given a careful physical examination at 
the beginning of the session, and such advice given as may seem best in 
each case. 

Student Activity Fee — This fee of twenty-six dollars and twenty-five 
cents (S26.25), payable on entrance, was voted by the students and ap- 
proved by the Board of Control. These funds are used to foster and 
maintain athletic sports, student publications, literary and debating so- 
cieties, and other student activities. All students are required to pay this 
fee; except that students regularly enrolled in the Graduate School may 
be excused if they do not wish to participate in any of the student privi- 
leges covered by this fee. 

Special Registration Fee — The Board of Control has authorized a 
special registration fee of ten ($10.00) dollars for all regular students 
in the College of Commerce and Journalism, and one (Sl.OO) dollar 
per semester-hour for all other students taking technical courses listed 
under Business Administration, Journalism and Social Administration. 
(The term "technical courses" is interpreted here as meaning those courses 
in Business Administration not marked "E", and those courses in Social 
Administration not marked "S".) 

Diploma Fee — A diploma fee of five dollars ($5.00), payable on or 
before April 1st of the year of graduation, is charged all candidates for 
degrees. 

Refunds — No refunds of any fees will he made after three days from 
date of the student's registration. The Auditor is not permitted to extend 
credit on fees. Positively no exceptions will be made to this rule of the 
Board of Control. 

Student Employees — Students who are assigned to student service will 
be required to pay their fees at the beginning of the semester in cash; 
and at the end of the semester, or at such time as the service to which they 
are assigned is completed, the University will pay them in cash for the 
work done. 

Living Expenses — Board and Lodging — Board, lodging and janitor 
service will be furnished by the University at a cost of eighty-seven dol- 
lars and fifty cents ($87.50) per semester (not including the Christmas 
vacation). To take advantage of this rate, payment must be made at the 
beginning of each semester. No refund will be made for less than a 



THE COLLEGE OF COMMERCE AND JOURNALISM 17 

month's absence. When not engaged by the semester, board and lodging 
will be furnished, if paid monthly in advance, according to the following 
schedule: 

First Semester Second Semester 

Sept. 12 to Oct. 12 $22.50 Feb. 1 to Feb. 28 $22.50 

Oct. 12 to Nov. 12 22.50 Mar. 1 to Mar. 31 22.50 

Nov. 12 to Dec. 16 25.00 April 1 to April 30 22.50 

Jan. 3 to Jan. 31 21.00 May 1 to June 1 22.50 

Under Board and Lodging are included meals in the commons and 
room, with heat, light, janitor service, and access to a bathroom. The 
doors of the rooms are provided with Yale locks. A deposit of 50 cents 
is required for each key, which will be returned when the key is sur- 
rendered. Janitor service includes the care of rooms by maids, under the 
supervision of a competent housekeeper. 

OPENING AND CLOSING OF THE COMMONS 

The dining room will be open for the first meal on Monday evening, 
September 12, 1927. The last meal served for the scholastic year will 
be dinner on Tuesday, May 29th, 1928. Keep these dates in mind. 

All rooms are partly furnished and adjoin bathrooms equipped with 
marble basin and shower with both hot and cold water. The furniture 
consists of two iron bedsteads and mattresses, chiffonier or bureau, table, 
washstand, and chairs. The students are required to provide pillows, bed- 
ding, towels and toilet articles for their own use. 

Board without Lodging — Board without lodging will be furnished at 
the rate of $20.00 per calendar month, payable in advance. No part of 
this sum will be refunded. 

The University does not furnish lodging without board. 

Board and Rooms Near the Campus — Board and rooms in private 
homes of Gainesville may be secured at rates of thirty-five to forty-five 
dollars ($35.00-$45.00) per month, depending upon the accommodations 
and proximity to the campus. A large number of rooming houses, as 
well as cafeterias, lunch rooms and dining rooms are located within 
walking distance, and students may secure any class of accommodations 
they desire. The University Y. M. C. A. maintains a list of boarding and 
rooming houses near the campus and in the city, and will cheerfully 
assist students in securing a comfortable location. For copy of lists 
and advance information, address the General Secretary, Y. M. C. A., 
University of Florida, Gainesville. 



18 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

Books and Fees. — The minimum necessary expenses of a student in 
the College of Commerce and Journalism for books and fees are approxi- 
mately as follows: 

Freshman Year: Military $1.00; Special registration fee $10; Books $25.00 $36.00 

Sophomore Year: Military $1.00; Special registration fee $10.00; Physics 

$3.00, or Biology $7.00 or Chemistry $10.00; Books $25.00 _ 39.00 

Junior Year: Special registration fee $10.00; Books $35.00 45.00 

Senior Year: Special registration fee $10.00; Books $40.00 50.00 

Summary of Expenses. — The following table summarizes the mini- 
mum expenses for a Florida student registered in the College of Com- 
merce and Journalism: 

Tuition $000.00 

Registration and Contingent fee 7.50 

Student Activity fee 26.25 

Infirmary fee 6.00 

Special registration fee 10.00 

Board and Lodging (if paid by the semester in advance) 175.00 

Books (about ) 30.00 

Laundry (about ) 20.00 

Total $274.75 

Remittances — All remittances should be made to the Auditor, Uni- 
versity of Florida, Gainesville, Florida. 

Opportunities for Earning Expenses — It is often possible for a stu- 
dent to earn a part of his expenses by working during hours not required 
for his University duties. 

A few students are employed as waiters, as janitors, and in other ca- 
pacities. Such employment is not, as a rule, given to a student otherwise 
financially able to attend the University, nor is it given to one who fails 
in any study. Application for employment should be made to Dr. J. E. 
Turlington, Chairman of Selp-Help Committee, Gainesville, Fla. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

Commerce Club — This club was founded in 1924 by a group of stu- 
dents majoring in economics and business administration. Meetings 
are held fortnightly for encouraging and developing critical interest in 
current problems in the fields of commerce and industry, special atten- 
tion being given to the economic progress of Florida. The Commerce 
Club has been recognized by the Debating Council of the University and 
has a representative on the Council. The club competes with the vari- 
ous Colleges on the campus for debating honors and won the freshman 
championship in 1925-26. There were thirty-six active members dur- 



THE COLLEGE OF COMMERCE AND JOURNALISM 19 

ing the past year. Membership is restricted to students registered for 
the degree Bachelor of Science in Business Administration. 

Alpha Kappa Psi — The Alpha Phi Chapter of Alpha Kappa Psi, a 
national professional commerce fraternity was established at the Uni- 
versity of Florida in January, 1926. Its purpose is to afford a social 
and professional contact among the students of business administration, 
and to cooperate with the faculty in furthering the interests of the Col- 
lege of Commerce and Journalism. The membership is made up of men 
whose interests are broader than the classroom, and whose personality 
and individual character give promise of business success. Only those 
students of the Sophomore class or above are eligible. At present the 
active members number nineteen. 

Pi Delta Epsilon — Pi Delta Epsilon is a national honorary collegi- 
ate journalistic fraternity. It was founded at Syracuse University in 
1909. It is the oldest non-professional journalism fraternity in America. 
Pi Delta Epsilon has as its aim and purpose the stimulating of interest in 
college journalism, and the raising of the standards of college publica- 
tions. The University of Florida chapter of Pi Delta Epsilon fraternity 
was installed on Thanksgiving day, 1926, at Jacksonville. The chapter 
has a roll of eighteen active members and four honorary members. The 
fraternity includes among its members the heads of every official pub- 
lication on the campus, and is already exerting considerable influence 
upon campus journalism. 

Beta Sigma — This is a local honorary commerce fraternity. It was 
organized in January, 1927. Its purpose is to foster high standards of 
scholarship in the College of Commerce and Journalism. Members are 
chosen from the fifteen percent ranking highest in scholarship in the 
Junior and Senior classes. Plans are under way to petition one of the 
large national honorary fraternities in this field. 

AWARDS AND MEDALS 

Mr. Edward W. Lane, one of the outstanding bankers of Florida, a 
member of the Board of Control and President of the Atlantic National 
Bank of Jacksonville, one of the largest banks in the state, announced 
at Conmiencement on May 31, 1927 that he would offer a gold medal 
every year in the College of Commerce and Journalism for which mem- 
bers of the Senior class in business administration would be eligible to 
compete. He stated that the terms upon which the medal is to be award- 
ed would be determined later. He announced also that the winner of 



20 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

this medal would be given a position in the Atlantic National Bank upon 
his graduation from the College of Commerce and Journalism, 

The Dean of the College of Commerce and Journalism offers a gold 
medal every year to that member of the Senior class in business admin- 
istration who possesses in the greatest degree the following personal and 
mental qualities: initiative, personality, reliability, soundness of judg- 
ment, industry, cooperation and native ability. This medal is awarded 
by the Faculty of the College through the use of rating scales. Every 
Senior is rated in these qualities by the Faculty and that Senior rating 
the highest is awarded the medal. 

The Florida Public Health Association offers prizes of $50.00, 
$25.00, $15.00 and $10.00 for the best group of health items and stories 
totaling 2,000 words, but none exceeding five hundred words, to students 
taking, either by correspondence or in class, the course in Public Health 
offered by the Department of Social Administration. The contest closes 
March 1, 1928. 

BUREAU OF APPOINTMENTS 

The College of Commerce and Journalism maintains a Bureau of Ap- 
pointments. This Bureau exists for the purpose of assisting graduates 
in securing positions. While appointments are not guaranteed, every 
effort will be made to place those who make worthy records. 

Already several business enterprises have signified their intentions 
of offering positions to graduates in business administration. Mention 
has already been made, in connection with the awarding of medals, of 
the position offered by the Atlantic National Bank of Jacksonville. The 
Barnett National Bank of Jacksonville, another leading financial insti- 
tution in Florida, has also offered to take one member of the graduating 
class into its organization each year. Mr. L. A. Perkins, Assistant Cash- 
ier, has set forth in a letter to the Dean the terms of this offer in the 
following language: 

"We will take into our bank one of the members of the graduating 
class of the College of Commerce and Journalism. This does not neces- 
sarily have to be the man making the highest grade. You and vour Fac- 
ulty would select a graduate who in your opinion is the best qualified for 
the opening here. Character, energy, and the desire to advance himself 
in banking should be among the principal qualifications. We will pay 
the young man $100.00 a month to start with, and will move him from 
department to department in the bank, giving him the opportunity to 
become familiar with the entire practical operation of our institution. 
During this apprenticeship, ability will be recognized and rewarded." 



THE COLLEGE OF COMMERCE AND JOURNALISM 21 

ADMISSION 

Terms — A candidate for admission must present, along with his 
scholastic record, a certificate of good moral character. If he comes 
from another college or university, this certificate must show that he was 
honorably discharged. 

Age — No candidate under sixteen years of age (eighteen years in the 
College of Law) will be admitted. 

Vaccination — Every student preparing to enter the University should 
be vaccinated against small-pox; or bring a certificate of successful vac- 
cination within three years. 

Methods — There are two methods of gaining admission: 

( 1 ) By Certificate — The University will accept certificates only from 
standard Florida high schools, grouped by the State Department of Pub- 
lic Instruction under Classes A and B. Certificates will also be accepted 
from Florida high schools that are members of the Southern Association 
of Secondary Schools, and from any secondary school elsewhere which is 
accredited by its State university. 

The certificate must be officially signed by the principal of the school 
attended, and must be mailed or presented to the Committee on Admission 
on or before the date on which the candidate wishes to register. It must 
state in detail the work of preparation and, in the case of Florida high 
schools, that the course through the twelfth grade has been satisfactorily 
completed. 

Blank certificates, conveniently arranged for the desired data, will be 
sent to all high-school principals and, upon application, to prospective 
students. 

(2) By Examination — Candidates not admitted by certificate will be 
required to stand written examinations upon the entrance subjects. For 
dates of these examinations, see University Calendar, page 4. 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 

The requirements for admission are measured in "Entrance Units", 
based upon the curriculum of the high schools of Florida. A unit rep- 
resents a course of study pursued throughout one school year with reci- 
tation periods (two laboratory periods being counted as one recitation 
period) of at least forty-five minutes each per week, four courses being 
taken during each of the four years. Thus the curriculum of the stand- 
ard senior high school of Florida is equivalent to sixteen units. 

Admission to the freshman class will be granted to candidates who 
present evidence of having completed courses amounting to sixteen such 



22 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

units. In no case will credit for more than sixteen units be given for 
work done at a high school. 

A deficiency of one unit may be allowed, but this must be removed by 
the end of the first year after admission. 

Unless the examination be taken on the first Saturday in October of the 
same school year students who have registered for a University study 
will not be allowed to make up an entrance condition by examination in 
this subject. The University credit may, however, be used as a substitute 
for entrance credit, a three-hour course continued throughout the year 
counting as one unit. 

Distribution of Units. — Seven specified units are required in common 
by all the colleges of the University; other specified units are given be- 
low; the remaining units are elective. 

UNIVERSITY 

English 3 units 

History 1 unit 

Mathematics (including one unit Plane Geometry) 2 units 

Science 1 unit 

COLLEGE OF COMMERCE AND JOURNALISM 
One foreign Language 2 units 

Elective Units — Seven elective units may be chosen from among 
the subjects regularly taught in a standard high school, although not 
more than four will be accepted in vocational subjects — agriculture, me- 
chanic arts, stenography, typewriting, etc. 

ADVANCED STANDING 

Advanced standing will be granted only upon recommendation of the 
heads of the departments concerned. Fitness for advanced work may be 
determined by examination or by trial. Students from other institutions 
of like standing will ordinarily be classified according to the ground al- 
ready covered. 

STENOGRAPHY 

No credit toward a degree is given for stenography, but every stu- 
dent is urged to acquire facility in the use of it before graduation. By 
the payment of a reasonable fee students may make arrangements to se- 
cure courses in shorthand and typewriting at the Gainesville High School. 



THE COLLEGE OF COMMERCE AND JOURNALISM 23 

DEGREES 

Three undergraduate degrees are given in the College of Commerce 
and Journalism; Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, Bach- 
elor of Science in Journalism, and Bachelor of Science in Social Admin- 
istration. 

For each of the degrees offered a total of sixty-eight year-hours is 
required. 

THE CURRICULUM IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

In developing the Curriculum in Business Administration, the Col- 
lege has proceeded upon the basis of the outstanding functions of busi- 
ness. Courses have been developed more with reference to the major func- 
tions or relationships of the modern business manager than with refer- 
ence to particular types of business. These functions or relationships, as 
developed bv one American university, may be sub-summed under the 
following heads: (1) Relationship to physical and social environment, 
(2) relationship to finance, (3) relationship to marketing, (4) relation- 
ship to production, (5) relationship to personnel, (6) relationship to 
transportation and communication, (7) relationship to accounting and 
statistical measurements, and (8) relationship to risk. Careful study of 
the curriculum will show how these various relationships are considered. 

The Curriculum in Business Administration contains both cultural 
courses and professional courses. The first two years are devoted wholly 
to required subjects largely cultural in nature and are intended to pro- 
vide the student with a broad intellectual foundation. The last two years, 
with one or two exceptions, are concerned with courses directly in the 
field of business administration. These required courses in business ad- 
ministration are courses of a pervasive character and are designed to ac- 
quaint the student with the underlying principles of business organiza- 
tion and operation rather than with the specific problems of specific 
business enterprises. 



24 



UMVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



CURRICULUM 

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Business Administration. 



Name of Course 



Nature of Work 



Hours per Week 



Freshman Year 



Business Administration 103 Economic Geography 

Business Administration 104 Resources and Industries 

English 101-102 Rhetoric and Composition 

Mathematics 101 College Algebra 

Mathematics 108 Business Mathematics 

Foreign Language 

Business Administration 101E....Economic History of England 

Business Administration 102E....Economic History of the United States. 
Military Science 101-102. 



Physical Education 101-102 1 



18 18 



Sophomore Year 



Business Administration 211-212 Principles of Accounting 3 3 

Business Administration 201-202E.... Principles of Economics 3 3 

Foreign Language — Continuation of Course Commenced in Freshman Year.. .3 3 

Laboratory Science Physics, Chemistry, or Biology 5 5 

Military Science 201-202 2 2 

Physical Education 201-202 1 



17 17 



Junior Year 



Political Science 101-102 

Philosophy 201 

Philosophy 204 

Business Administration 302E.. 
Business Administration 321E.. 

Business Administration 322 

Business Administration 331E.. 

Business Administration 341 

Business Administration 372 .... 
Approved elective 



.American Government and Politics 

.General Psychology 

. Business Psychology 

.Elements of Statistics 

.Financial Organization of Society.. 

.Financial Management 

.Principles of Marketing 

.Production Management 

.Personal Management 



17 17 



Senior Year 



Business Administration 351E... 

Business Administration 362 

Business Administration 401 

Business Administration 402 

Business Administration 409-10. 
Approved Electives 



.Transportation and Communication 3 

.Risk and Risk-Bearing 

. Business Law 3 

.Advanced Business Law 

.Business Policy 3 



16 16 



THE COLLEGE OF COMMERCE AND JOURNALISM 25 

PROFESSIONAL SPECIALIZATION IN BUSINESS 

In addition to the required courses in business administration, the 
student is offered an opportunity to specialize in certain professional 
fields of business by the choice of electives. If he desires, for example, 
to specialize in marketing with the idea of becoming a sales manager, 
he may be permitted to take for his electives in the Junior year, two of 
the required courses, or six semester hours listed in the Senior year. 
This will enable him to elect twenty semester hours in his Senior year. 
If a student wants to specialize in accounting, he may take his electives 
of six semester hours in accounting in his Junior year, and in his Senior 
year elect fourteen semester hours in accounting and allied courses. 

In order that electives may be chosen in such a way as to con- 
stitute a coherent and comprehensive whole rather than as a scattered 
and unrelated series, suggested types of professional specialization are 
set forth below and the electives which should be pursued under each 
type are specified. Every student is required at the beginning of his jun- 
ior year to select the group of electives under that particular field of 
professional specialization which best fits his needs and desires and 
adhere to that group. No changes will be allowed without the specific 
approval of the Dean. 



I. ACCOUNTING 

Business Administralion 311-312 Advanced Accounting 

Business Administration 411 Cost Accounting 

Business Administration 414 Income Tax Procedure 

Business Administration 422 Investments 

Business Administration 423E Money 

Business Administration 424E Bankine 



II. MARKETING 

Business Administration 332 Market Management 

Business Administration 431 Principles of Salesmanship 

Business Administration 432 Retail Store Management 

Business Administration 433 Advertising 

Business Administration 434 Advanced Advertising 

Business Administration 435E International Trade 

Business Administration 469 Business Forecasting 



26 



UNIVEkSITY OF FLORIDA 



III. BANKING AND FINANCE 

Business Administration 422 Investments 

Business Administration 423E ivioney 

Business Administration 424E Banking 

Business Administration 429E Government Finance 

Business Administration 469 Business Forecasting 

Business Administration 411 Cost Accounting 

Business Administration 404E Social Control of Business Eaterprise 

or 

Business Administration 456 Business English 

IV. PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT 

Business Administration 473E Labor Problems 

Business Administration 469 Business Forecasting 

Business Administration 411 Cost Accounting 

Business Administration 332 Market Management 

Business Administration 456 Business English 

or 

Business Administration 422 .Investments 

Journalism 303-304 „Newspaper Production 

V. TRANSPORTATION AND COMMUNICATION 

Business Administration 456 Business English 

Business Administration 469 Business Forecasting 

Business Administration 404E Social Control of Business Enterprise 

Business Administration 435E International Trade 

Business Administration 332 Market Management 

Business Administration 422 Investments 

and 

Business Administration 473E Labor Problems 

or 

Business Administration 423E Money 

and 
Busines Administration 424E Banking 

VI. RISK-BEARING AND INSURANCE 

Business Administration 363 Insurance Principles and Practices 

Business Administration 469 Business Forecasting 

Business Administration 461 .Real Estate Principles and Practices 

Business Administration 332 Market Management 

Business Administration 423E Money 

Business Administration 424E Banking 

Business Administration 404E Social Control of Business Enterprise 



THE COLLEGE OF COMMERCE AND JOURNALISM 27 



Ml. PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT 

Business Administration 469 Business Forecasting 

Business Administration 473E Labor Problems 

Business Administration 404E Social Control of Business Enterprise 

Philosophy 304 Social Psychology 

Social Administration 323S Introduction to Social Administration 

Social Administration 424 Community Organization 

Social Administration 441S Principles of Sociology 



Vm. FOREIGN TRADE AND CONSULAR SERVICE 

Business Administration 456 -...Business English 

Busines Administration 435E. -International Trade 

Business Administration 436 Foreign Trade Technique 

Political Science 303-304 International Law 

History 203-204 Latin American History 

or 
Additional Foreign Language French, Spanish or German 



IX. COMMERCIAL TEACHING 

Business Administration 422 Investments 

Business Administration 456 Business English 

Education 101 _ How to Teach 

Education 301 High School Curriculum 

Education 401 Administration of Village and Consol. Schools 

Education 404 History and Philosophy of Education 

Education 407 Junior High School 

Education 408 High School Administration 



28 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

CURRICULUM 

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Business Administration 
in Combination with Law 

The College of Commerce and Journalism combines with the College of Law 
in offering a six-year program of study for students who desire ultimately to enter 
the College of Law. The first three years are spent directly in the College of Com- 
merce and Journalism; the last three years are devoted to the regular course in 
the College of Law. When the student has satisfactorily completed the first two 
years of the course in the College of Law he may offer these two years of law as 
a substitute for the fourth year in the College of Commerce and Journalism and 
receive the degree of Bachelor of Science in Business Administration. 

Name of Course Nature of Work Hours per Week 



Freshman Year 1 



English 101-102 Rhetoric and Composition 3 3 

English 103-104 Introduction to English Literature 2 2 

Business Administration 104 Resources and Industries 3 

Mathematics 101 College Algebra 3 

Foreign Language 3 3 

Business Administration lOlE* Economic History of Europe 3 

Business Administration 102E Economic History of the United States 3 

Military Science 101-102 2 2 

Physical Education 101-102 1 1 



17 17 



Sophomore Year 1 



Business Administration 211-212 Principles of Accounting 3 3 

Business Administration 201-202E Principles of Economics 3 3 

Foreign Language — Continuation of Course Commenced in Freshman Year 3 3 

Laborator>^ Science Physics, Chemistry, or Biology 5 5 

Military Science 201-202 ^ 2 2 

Physical Education 201-202 1 1 



17 17 



Junior Year 1 



Political Science 101-102 American Government and Politics. .3 3 

Philosophy 201 General Psychology 3 

Philosophy 203 Logic 3 

Business Administration 321E Financial Organization of Society 3 

Business Administration 322 Financial Management 3 

Business Administration 404E Social Control of Business EnterpriscO 3 

Business Administration 409-10 Business Policy 3 3 

Business Administration 302E Elements of Statistics 3 

Approved Electives 3 3 



18 18 



^History 101-102 may be substituted for Business Administration 101E-102E. 



THE COLLEGE OF COMMERCE AND JOURNALISM 29 

THE CURRICULUM IN JOURNALISM 

The Curriculum in Journalism extends over a period of four year?. 
Courses in the first two years are of basic nature; they are intended to 
give the student depth and to prepare him for later years of study. 
Freshmen are required to adhere rigidly to prescribed courses. Sopho- 
mores are given the opportunity to pursue one course in Journalism 
throughout the year. 

The last two years are designed to give both breadth and specializa- 
tion. In addition to six semester hours in Journalism taken in the sec- 
ond year, the student is required to take twenty-two semester hours in 
his third and fourth years. The minimum number of semester hours in 
J9urnalism required for graduation is twenty-eight, while the maximum 
number which any student will be allowed to offer is thirty-three. 

In the Junior and Senior years provision is made for eighteen se- 
mester hours of electives. These electives must be taken largely in the 
following departments: English, business administration, history, eco- 
nomics, political science, sociology, social administration, and Germanic 
or Romanic languages. All electives must be approved by the Dean. 



30 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

CURRICULUM 

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Journalism. 

Name of Course Nature of Work Hours per Week 

Freshman Year 1 2 

English 101-102 Rhetoric and Composition 3 3 

English 103-104 Introduction to English Literature 2 2 

Foreign Language _ 3 3 

Mathematics 101 College Algebra 3 

Business Administration lOlE* Economic History of England 3 

Business Administration 102E* Economic History of the United States 3 

Business Administration 104 Resources and Industries 3 

Military Science 101-102 2 2 

Physical Education 101-102 _ 1 1 

17 17 

Sophomore Year 1 2 

Journalism 201-202 History and Principles of Journalism 3 3 

Business Administration 201-202E.... Principles of Economics 3 3 

Foreign Language — Continuation of Course Commenced in Freshman Year 3 3 

Laboratory Science Chemistry, Physics, or Biology 5 5 

Military Science 201-202 2 2 

Physical Education 201-202 1 1 

17 17 

Junior Year 1 2 

Journalism 301 News — Principles of Reporting 3 

Journalism 302 News — Practice of Reporting 3 

Journalism 303-304 Newspaper Production 3 3 

Political Science 101-102 American Government and Politics 3 3 

Philosophy 201 General Psychology 3 

Philosophy 203 Logic 3 

Approved Electives 2 8 

17 17 

Senior Year 1 2 

Journalism 305 Principles of Feature Writing 3 

Journalism 306 Practice of Feature Writing 3 

Journalism 403 Editorials 3 

Journalism 404 Law of the Press 2 

Business Administration 321E Financial Organization of Society 3 

Business Administration 404E Social Control of Business Enterprise 3 

Business Administration 433 Advertising 3 

Business Administration 434 ^Advanced Advertising 

Social Administration 441S Principles of Sociology 3 

Approved Electives 2 

17_ 17] 

* History 101-102 may be substituted for Business Administration 101E-102E. 



THE COLLEGE OF COMMERCE AND JOURNALISM 31 

THE CURRICULUM IN SOCIAL ADMINISTRATION 

The Curriculum in Social Administration has been established in the 
College of Commerce and Journalism to meet the increasing need for 
trained executives in various lines of welfare activity; to develop the 
scientific spirit and give some practice in the use of scientific methods 
in dealing with social conditions and problems as the basis for intelli- 
gent citizenship; and to provide the background for volunteer service 
and leadership in community welfare activities. 

Since training for social work is not offered in any other institution 
in Florida, the University has decided to undertake the task of meeting the 
demand for this type of education. Consequently, a beginning was made 
in 1926-27. It is planned to develop and enlarge further this curriculum 
just as rapidly as the demand therefor manifests itself and as funds are 
made available by legislative appropriations or otherwise. 

The first two years of the Curriculum in Social Administration are 
devoted to courses of broad cultural value, while the last two years are 
concerned with courses more technical in character. Rather liberal allow- 
ance has been made for electives; but these electives must be selected 
primarily from courses in business administration and social administra- 
tion. Courses in related fields will be allowed where cause for the election 
thereof is shown. All electives must be approved by the Dean. 

Attention is called to the course in scoutcraft in the College of Agri- 
culture, the course in play and playgrounds in the Department of Physical 
Education, and the courses in social psychology, social ethics and abnor- 
mal psychology in the Department of Philosophy. 

Thirty hours in Social Administration, including 240 hours of field 
work under supervision, will be required for the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Social Administration. The field work may be taken in con- 
nection with any approved agency in Florida or in some other state. 



32 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



CURRICULUM 

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Social Administration. 



Name of Course Nature of Work Hours per Week 

Freshman Year 1 2 

English 101-102 Rhetoric and Composition 3 3 

English 103-104* Introduction to English Literature 2 2 

Foreign Language 3 

Mathematics 101 College Algebra 3 

Business Administration lOlE** Economic History of England 3 

Business Administration 102E** Economic History of the United States 

Social Administration 122 The Field of Social Work 

Social Administration 102 Introduction to Sociology 

Military Science 101-102 _ 2 

Physical Education 101-102 1 

17_ 

Sophomore Year 1 

Biology 103*** Principles of Animal Biology 5 

Biology 106 Genetics and Evolution 

Business Administration 201-202E Principles of Economics 3 

Foreign Language — Continuation of Course Commenced in Freshman Year 3 

Philosophy 201 General Psychology 8 

Speech 201 Effective Speaking 

Social Administration 332**** Public Health 

Military Science 201-202 2 

Physical Education 201-202 _ 1 



17 18 



Junior Year 1 



Political Science 101-102 American Government and Politics 3 3 

Business Administration 211-212 Principles of Accounting 3 3 

Social Administration 301S History of Modern Philanthropy 2 

Business Administration 302E Elements of Statistics 3 

Social Administration 323S Introduction to Social Administration 3 

Social Administration 324S Crinunology and Penology 3 

Social Administration 361-362 Elementary and Advanced Case Work 2 2 

Approved Electives 4 3 



17 17 



Senior Year I 



Social Administration 366 Psychiatric Social Work 1 

Social Administration 372 Social Law and Social Legislation 3 

Social Administration 424 Community Organization 2 

Social Administration 441S Principles of Sociology 3 

Social Administration 465-466 Field Work 2 2 

Approved Electives 11 7 



16 16 



* Business Administration 103-104 may be substituted for English 103-104. 
**Hi6tory 101-102 may be substituted for Business Administration 101E-102E. 
***Chemistry or Physics may be substituted for Biology 103, 106. 
****Those going into Law may substitute Criminology and Penology. 



THE COLLEGE OF COMMERCE A\D JOURNALISM 33 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 



THE DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Professor Matherly Professor Anderson 

Associate Professor Curtis Associate Professor Gray 

Assistant Professor Eldridge Assistant Professor Phillips 

Assistant Professor Myers Assistant Professor Wilson 

Instructor Hurst Instructor Edwards 

Instructor Hiatt Graduate Assistant Hoag 

Student Assistants: 
Ward, Frater, Phipps and Newman 

NOTE 1: The courses in Business Administration are given by the Department 
of Economics and Business Administration, instructors in this department dividing 
their time between economics and business administration. The courses in economics 
are described under the College of Arts and Sciences, in the General Catalog, p. 
73-77. 

NOTE 2: The courses in Business Administration marked E are the same 
courses as those in Economics. For example Business Administration lOlE is the 
same as Economics 101, or Business Administration 302E is the same as Economics 302. 

GENERAL BUSINESS 

lOlE. Economic History of England — A survey of economic history; 
the evolution of capitalistic economy in England; the origin and 
development of the wage system; the Industrial Revolution; the 
growth of British trade; the relation of economic development to 
political policy; the effect of England's industrial progress on the 
United States. (First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. 
Myers, Carleton, Wilson.) 

102E. Economic History of the United States — The industrial de- 
velopment of America; the exploitation of natural resources; the 
history of manufacturing, of banking, of trade, of transportation, 
etc.; the evolution of industrial centers; the historical factors con- 
tributing to the industrial growth of the United States. (Second se- 
mester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Myers, Carleton, Wil- 
son.) 

103. Economic Geography — This course deals with the adjustments 
to natural environment which man makes in his effort to secure a liv- 
ing. The subject-matter consists of climate, soils, products of land 
and sea, natural divisions of the world, trade routes, and commer- 
cial centers. (First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 1 1-2 year-hours. 
Phillips, Eldridge, Wilson.) 



34 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA \ 

104. Resources and Industries — A study of the economic resources of 
the world; sources and economic importance of principal commodi- 
ties; types of basic industries, including processes of production, 
localizing factors and relative positions of various geographical 
territories. Special attention will be devoted to the South in general 
and to Florida in particular. (Second semester; 3 hours. Credit, 
11-2 year-hours. Phillips, Eldridge, Wilson.) 

201-202E. Principles of Economics — The purpose of this course is to 
give a general understanding of present-day economic organiza- 
tion. An analysis is made of production, distribution, and consump- 
tion. In addition, attention is devoted to the principles governing 
value and market price with a brief introduction to money, bank- 
ing and credit, industrial combinations, transportation and com- 
munication, labor problems, and economic reform. (Both semes- 
ters; 3 hours. Credit, 3 year-hours. Anderson, Curtis, Eldridge, 
Myers, Hurst.) 

302E. Elements of Statistscs — An introduction to statistics; brief 
consideration of statistical theory; collection, classification and pre- 
sentation of economic data; construction of graphs and charts; study 
of index numbers; problems of statistical research. Each student 
is required to complete one or more projects in statistical investiga- 
tion. (Prerequisite: Business Administration 201-202E. Second 
semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Anderson.) 

308. Business Organization and Management — The forms of business 
organization with emphasis on the corporation. The external rela- 
tions of a business organization and the internal coordination of the 
factors in production with a view to the establishment of effective con- 
trol and definite responsibility for results. Special attention will be 
directed to the various functions to be performed such as, production, 
finance, personnel, marketing, risk-taking, and records and standards. 
(Primarily for students in Engineering and Pharmacy. Prerequisite: 
Economics 307. Second semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. 
Edwards.) 

401. Business Law — Contracts and agency; the formation, operation, in- 
terpretation, and discharge of binding agreements; creation of the 
relation of agency; types of agents; rights and obligations of the 
agent, principal, and third party; termination of the relationship of 
agency. (First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 1 1-2 year-hours. Hurst.) 



THE COLLEGE OF COMMERCE AND JOURNALISM 35 

402. Advanced Business Law — Conveyances and mortgages of real 
property; sales and mortgages of personal property; the law of nego- 
tiable instruments; partnership, (Second semester; 3 hours. Credit, 
11-2 year-hours. Hurst.) 

404E, Social Control of Business Enterprise — A general survey of 
the field of social control; purposes of social control; formal and 
informal types of social control; control of accounts, prices and 
capitalization; government policy toward business, current govern- 
ment regulation; services and agencies which modern governments 
undertake to provide for business enterprises. (Prerequisite: Busi- 
ness Administration 201-202E. Second semester; 3 hours. Credit, 
11-2 year-hours. Myers.) 

409-410. Business Policy — The purpose of this course is to correlate, 
coordinate and tie together the various specialized courses in business 
administration. The point of view is that of the chief executive. 
Consideration is given to the forms of organization, external and 
internal relationships of the business, lines of authority, duties and 
responsibilities of functional departments, methods of determining 
policies, and standards of operating efficiency. Various faculty 
members and outside business executives assist the instructor in 
charge in the presentation of specific business cases and problems. 
Students are required to apply business principles to these cases 
and problems and make written reports thereon. (Both semesters; 
3 hours. Credit, 3 year-hours. Motherly.) 

461. Real Estate Principles and Practices — (First semester; 3 hours. 
Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Wilson.) Not given 1927-28. 

503-504. Seminar in Business Administration — Students individually 
and in groups will be directed in special projects of business research 
with reports and discussion. (Both semesters; one two-hour period a 
week. Credit, 3 year-hours. Matherly, Anderson, Curtis, Myers.) 

ACCOUNTING 

211-212. Principles of Accounting — Lectures, problems, and labora- 
tory practice. An introductory study of the underlying principles 
of double entry records; basic types of records and reports; ac- 
counting procedure and technique; the outstanding features of part- 
nerships and corporations; the form and content of the balance 



36 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

sheet and the statement of profit and loss. (Both semesters; two 
lectures and two laboratory hours a iveek. Credit, 3 year-hours. 
Gray.) 

311-312. Advanced Accounting — Lectures and problems. An ad- 
vanced study in accounting theory and practice. Special types of 
problems involving partnerships, corporations, agencies and branches, 
consignments, insolvent concerns, valuation of various types of as- 
sets, analyses of financial statements, etc. (Prerequisite: Business 
Administration 211-212. Both semesters; 3 hours. Credit, 3 year- 
hours. Gray.) 

411. Cost Accounting — Lectures, problems and laboratory practice. 
A study of the methods of collection, compilation and interpreta- 
tion of cost data for industrial enterprises; preparation of records 
and reports; uses of cost data in business control. Principles and 
procedure illustrated by typical problems and practice sets. (Pre- 
requisite: Business Administration 211-212. First semester; 3 
hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Gray.) 

414. Income Tax Procedure — Lectures and problems. A study of 
the Federal Income Tax law and the related accounting problems. 
Exercises in the preparation of tax returns for individuals and cor- 
porations. (Prerequisite: Business Administration 211-212. Sec- 
ond semester; 3 hours. Credit, 1 1-2 year-hours. Gray.) 

FINANCE 

32 IE. Financial Organization of Society — The purpose of this course 
is to introduce the student to the field of finance. Consideration is 
given to the pecuniary. organization of society, to the functions per- 
formed by financial institutions, and to the relationships between 
finance and business administration. (Prerequisite: Business Ad- 
ministration 201-202E. First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 1 1-2 
year-hours. Curtis, Eldridge.) 

322. Financial Management — This course is concerned with the finan- 
cial manager's task in an operating business enterprise. It deals 
with financial policies and practices, with control of financial activi- 
ties, and with the management of the financial function in business 
administration. (Prerequisite: Business Administration 321 E. Sec- 
ond semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Curtis.) 



THE COLLEGE OF COMMERCE AND JOURNALISM 37 

422. Investments — A study of the various forms of investments with 
reference to their suitability for the different types of investors; 
the money market, its nature and the financial factors which influ- 
ence the price movements of securities; elements of sound invest- 
ment and methods of computing net earnings, amortization, rights 
and convertibles. The aim will be to train the student to act effi- 
ciently in a financial capacity either as a borrower or lender, as in- 
vestor or trustee, or as fiscal agent of a corporation. (Prerequi- 
site: Business Administration 321 E. Second semester; 3 hours. 
Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Eldridge.) 

423E. Money — The subject matter of this course is monetary and price 
theory. It is concerned with the evolution of monetary systems, and 
the nature and causes of some of the important monetary controver- 
sies of the past, as well as some of the present unsettled monetary 
problems. Emphasis is placed upon the relationship between money 
and credit and the general price level under the existing financial 
structure, which involves some consideration of the business cycle. 
The problem of controlling the general level of prices through the 
monetary system is also considered. (Prerequisite: Business Ad- 
ministration 321 E. First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 1 1-2 year- 
hours. Curtis.) 

424E. Banking — Beginning with a survey of the leading countries of the 
world, this course develops into a consideration of the effectiveness 
with which the various institutions perform their functions. An at- 
tempt is made to show the close relationship between the financial 
sys'icm and general economic organization, and in particular to point 
out, in connection with the business cycle, how the financial structure 
imposes limits upon the entire economic organization. (Prerequisite: 
Business Administration 321E. Second semester; 3 hours. Credit, 
11-2 year-hours. Curtis.) 

429E. Government Finance — Principles governing expenditures of 
modern governments; sources of revenue; public credit; principles 
and methods of taxation and of financial administration as revealed 
in the fiscal systems of leading countries. (Prerequisite: Business 
Administration 201-202E. First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 1 1-2 
year-hours. Anderson.) 



38 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

MARKETING 

331E. Principles of Marketing — A survey of the marketing structure 
of industrial society; fundamental functions performed in the mar- 
keting process and the various methods, agencies and factors re- 
sponsible for the development and execution of these functions; 
marketing problems of the manufacturer, wholesaler, and different 
types of retailers; the marketing function in business management. 
(Prerequisite: Business Administration 201-202E. First semester; 3 
hours. Credit, 11-2 year -hours. Wilson.) 

332. Market Management — A study of the function of marketing in 
the operation of business enterprises. The point of view is that of 
the sales manager and the purchasing agent. The course provides an 
introduction to the following: Market analysis, market research, 
formulation of marketing policies, choice of channels of distribu- 
tion, methods of advertising and administrative control of marketing 
activities. (Prerequisite: Business Administration 331 E. Second se- 
mester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Wilson.) 

431. Principles of Salesmanship — Actual practice in sales methods, 
including preparation for and obtaining the interview; presenting 
the sales talk; meeting and overcoming objections; detailed study of 
the stages of the sale; attention, interest, desire and action; sales 
tactics; sales personality. Principles covered apply to all kinds 
of selling specialties, styles, etc. (Prerequisite: Business Administra- 
tion 201-202E or Economics 307. First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 
11-2 year-hours. Wilson.) 

432. Retail Store Management — A study of retail store problems; 
types of stores; executive control; purchasing; accounts; location; 
service; organization; management of employees; and price poli- 
cies. (Prerequisite: Business Administration 201-202E or Economics 
307. Second semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Wilson.) 

433. Advertising — The course consists of a study of the history and eco- 
nomics of advertising. Attention is also devoted to the types of ad- 
vertising and their adaptation to the various lines of business, toj 
the relative value of various advertising media, to the psychological 
principles underlying advertising, and to the administrative control 
of advertising expenditures. (Prerequisite: Business Administrationl 
201-202E. First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 1 1-2 year-hours. Emig.)\ 

434. Advanced Advertising — The technique of advertising. Considera- 
tion is given to the mechanics of advertising, types of advertising 



THE COLLEGE OF COMMERCE AND JOURNALISM 39 

copy, theories of literary style as applied to copy writing, advertising 
policies, and methods of testing the effectiveness of advertising activ- 
ities. (Prerequisite: Business Administration 433. Second semester; 
3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Emig.) 

435E. International Trade — A study in world economics involving the 
principles and policies of international trade. Particular attention 
is given to the international aspects of the economic policies and ac- 
tivities of modern nations. (Prerequisite: Business Administration 
201-202E. First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 1 1-2 year hours. 
Phillips.) 

436. Foreign Trade Technique — This course treats foreign trade as a 
business profession and serves to familiarize the student with the 
problems and practices involved in exporting and importing. (Pre- 
requisite: Business Administration 201-202E. Second semester; 3 
hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Phillips.) 

PRODUCTION 

341. Production Management — This course covers the problems in- 
volved in the construction, equipment and administration of a manu- 
facturing enterprise. The unit of study is the factory. The sub- 
ject matter is treated under four heads: the underlying principles 
of production, the agencies of production, the control of production 
operations, and the establishment of production standards. (Pre- 
requisite: Business Administration 201-202E. First semester; 2 
hours. Credit, 1 year-hour. Edwards.) 

TRANSPORTATION AND COMMUNICATION 

351E. Transportation and Communication — Railways; inland and 
ocean waterways; highways; the organization of transportation ser- 
vice; brief consideration of rate making; government control; tele- 
graph, telephone, cable, and postal communication. (Prerequisite: 
Business Administration 201-202E. First semester; 3 hours. Cred- 
it, 11-2 year-hours. Anderson.) 

456. Business Engush — The use of English in business; analysis and 
writing of letters of application, collection, credit, inquiry, adjust- 
ment, acknowledgment and sales; the grammatical construction of 
letters; the preparation of professional forms; the writing of busi- 
ness reports. (First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. 

; 



40 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



RISK AND RISK-BEARING 



362E, Risk and Risk-Bearing — A general introduction to risk, risk- 
bearing and insurance; the risk element in modern industry; forms 
of risk; the business manager's methods of handling risk. (Pre- 
requisite: Business Administration 201-202E. First semester; 3 
hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Anderson.) 

363. Insurance Principles and Practices — The forms of insurance; 
life insurance, fire insurance, title and bond insurance; functions of 
insurance companies; shifting of risks to insurance companies; the 

I practices of insurance companies. (Prerequisite: Business Admin- 
istration 362E. Second semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. 
Wilson.) Not given 1927-28. 

469. Business Forecasting — This course aims to survey the problem of 
the reduction of business risk through the collection and interpreta- 
tion of information. The work deals with the problems of general 
prosperity and depression, and is a quantitative approach to the gen- 
eral problem of economic cycles. The statistical methods used in 
analysing economic data, with special emphasis upon the methods of 
forecasting the business cycle, will be examined. A consideration of 
existing barometers will be included. (Prerequisite: Business Admin- 
istration 302E. First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. 
Anderson.) 

PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT 

372. Personnel Management — A scientific study of the methods of 
hiring and handling personnel in the various lines of industry. The 
supply, selection, training, promotion, transfer and discharge of em- 
ployees; the computation and significance of labor turnover; hous- ; 
ing, educational and recreational facilities; the functions of a per- 
sonnel department with reference to efficiency and maintenance of 
good will between employees and employers. (Prerequisite: Busi- 
ness Administration 201-202E. Second semester; 2 hours. Credit, \ 
1 year-hour. Edwards.) 

473E. Labor Problems — Human nature and industry; evolution of our 
present wage system. Standards of living; security and risk; sick-j 
ness, old age, unemployment. The workers' side of the problem ;| 
the problem from the side of the employer; the community's side 
of the problem. (Prerequisite: Business Administration 201-202E} 
First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Myers.) Not 
given 1927-28. 



THE COLLEGE OF COMMERCE AND JOURNALISM 41 

THE DEPARTMENT OF JOURNALISM 

Associate Professor Armstrong Assistant Professor Emig 

Student Assistant Bullock 

201-202. History and Principles of Journalism — The history of Jour- 
nalism from its earliest forms down to the present time. Emphasis 
will be placed upon American Journalism, considered by periods of 
time, and through biographical studies of leading journalists. Dis- 
cussion of the principles of modern journalism. (Both semesters; 3 
hours. Credit, 3 year-hours. Armstrong.) 

301. News — Principles of Reporting — What constitutes news; the 
gathering of news; some practical laboratory work in the writing, 
copyreading and editing of news. (Prerequisite: Journalism 201-202. 
First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Emig.) 

302. News — Practice in Reporting — Laboratory work in the writing, 
copyreading and editing of news. (Prerequisite: Journalism 301. 
Second semester; 3 hours. Credit, 1 1-2 year-hours. Emig.) 

303-304. Newspaper Production — A consideration of all the factors 
involved in issuing a newspaper; editorial, business and mechanical; 
personnel, organization and material. (Prerequisite: Journalism 201- 
202. Both semesters; 3 hours. Credit, 3 year-hours. Emig.) 

305. Principles of Feature Writing — A study of the principles under- 
lying the writing of special feature articles. (Prerequisite: Jour- 
nalism 201-202. First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. 
Armstrong.) 

306. Practice in Feature Writing — Laboratory work in the writing of 
feature articles with a view to publishing them in newspapers and 
magazines. (Prerequisite: Journalism 305. Second semester; 3 
hours. Credit, 1 1-2 year-hours. Armstrong.) 

307. Agricultural Journalism — A study of Journalism from the stand- 
point of country newspapers and agricultural publications, state and 
national. (Prerequisite: Journalism 201-202. First semester; 3 
hours. Credit, 1 1-2 year-hours. Armstrong.) 

308. Country Newspaper Production — The editorial, mechanical and 
business phases of country newspaper production. (Prerequisite: 
Journalism 201-202. Second semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year- 
hours. Emig.) 



42 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

403. Law of the Press — A consideration of the laws governing the 
public press, with special study of the law of libel. (Prerequisite: 
Journalism 201-202. First semester; 2 hours. Credit, 1 year-hour. 
Armstrong.) 

404. Editorials — The principles and practice of editorial writing. (Pre- 
requisite: Journalism 201-202. Second semester; 3 hours. Credit, 
11-2 year-hours. Armstrong.) 

THE DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL ADMINISTRATION 

Professor Bristol Instructor Carleton 

NOTE 1: The courses in Social Administration are given by the Department of 
Sociology and Social Administration, instructors dividing their time between sociology 
and social administration. The courses in sociology are described under the College 
of Arts and Sciences, in the General Catalog, p. 76. 

NOTE 2: The courses in Social Administration marked S are the same courses 
as those in Sociology. For example. Social Administration 102S is the same as 
Sociology 102 or Social Administration 323S is the same as Sociology 323. 

102S. Introduction to Sociology — An approach to a study of modern 
social problems through Geology, Biology, Psychology and Anthro- 
pology together with a brief study of some of the problems con- 
nected with increase of population, family life, migration, racial 
differences, rural isolation, urban congestion, leisure-time, poverty 
and crime. (Second semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. 
Bristol.) 

122. The Field of Social Work — An orientation course presenting a 
general view of the following fields of social work; family, medi- 
cal, educational, recreational, industrial, correctional and religious. 
(Second semester; 1 hour. Credit, 1-2 year-hour. Bristol, special 
lecturers.) 

301S. History of Modern Philanthropy — A historical approach to 
an understanding of modern scientific philanthropy. (First semes- 
ter; 2 hours. Credit, 1 year-hour. Carleton.) 

322. RUR.4L Sociology — A broad survey of the field of rural life in 
its social aspects. (Second semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year- 
hours. Bristol.) 

323S. Introduction to Social Administration — A case method of 
approach to a study of social problems and approved methods of 
social action. (Should be preceded by Social Administration 102Si 
and 122. First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Bristol.)t 



THE COLLEGE OF COMMERCE AND JOURNALISM 43 

324S. Criminology and Penology — Nature and causes of crime; pun- 
ishment, correction, prevention. Sociological aspects of criminal law 
and procedure. Constructive proposals. (Prerequisite: Social Ad- 
ministration 102S and 323S, or special permission. Second semester; 
3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Bristol.) 

332. Public Health — History of preventive medicine; personal hygiene; 
community hygiene; the recognition of the ordinary communicable 
diseases; sanitation; a constructive health program. (Second semes- 
ter; 2 hours. Credit, 1 year -hour. Lecturers provided by the State 
Board of Health and the Florida Public Health Association.) This 
course is also offered the first semester. 

361. Elementary Case Work — The methods of case work as applied to 
the treatment of the socially inadequate. (Prerequisite: One course 
in Social Administration, or consent of instructor. First semester; 2 
hours. Credit, 1 year-hour. Bristol.) 

362. Advanced Case Work — Continuation of preceding with special 
emphasis on the technique of case work and office management. 
(Prerequisite: Social Administration 361, or consent of instruc- 
tor. Second semester; 2 hours. Credit, 1 year-hour. Bristol.) 

366. Psychiatric Social Work — A course of eight two-hour lectures 
and clinics at the State Farm Colony for the Epileptic and Feeble- 
minded on the psychology of sub-normal, abnormal, and psycho- 
pathic children, together with clinical diagnosis, treatment and train- 
ing. (Prerequisite: General Psychology. Second semester. Credit, 
1-2 year-hour. Dr. Walsh.) 

367. Correctional Social Work — A study of the principles and tech- 
nique of probation and parole based on actual experience in the 
courts and in the field, and on recent extensive literature of the sub- 
ject. Intended primarily for those who plan to become probation or 
parole officers, juvenile court judges, or social workers in the field 
of delinquency. (Prerequisite: One course in Social Administration 
or consent of instructor. First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year- 
hours. Bristol.) Given alternate years. 

372. Social Law and Social Legislation — A study of the Laws of Flor- 
ida pertaining to social welfare and comparison with those of other 
states. Principles of social legislation. Suggestions as to improve- 
ment. (Prerequisite: Social Administration 323S. Second semester; 
3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Bristol.) Given alternate years. 



44 UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

424. Community Organization — Theory of community; process of. 
community organization; formation of community ideals and cooper- 
ative activities. Formal organization of forces and agencies; health, 
business, philanthropic, and their federation. The Community Chest 
Movement. (Second semester; 2 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. 
Bristol.) Given alternate years. 

441S. Principles of Sociology — (First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 1 1-2 
year-hours. Bristol.) 

443S. Race Problems — (Prerequisite: One course in sociology or con- 
sent of instructor. First semester; 3 hours. Credit, 1 1-2 year-hours. 
Bristol.) Alternate years. 

465-466. Field Work — At least 240 hours of supervised field work will 
be required of all candidates for the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Social Administration. This may be taken either with University 
class work or summers in connection with approved agencies in 
Florida or other states. (Prerequisite: Social Administration 361. 
First and second semesters. Credit according to hours in field and 
results, not to exceed three year-hours. Bristol.) 

561-562. Seminar: Case Work Discussion — (For advanced students, 
primarily graduates, doing advanced work in case problems and 
methods. First and second semesters. One tivo-hour period a week. 
Credit, 2 year-hours.) 

571-572. Seminar in Social Research and Investigation — Students in- 
dividually and in groups will be directed in the investigation of so- 
cial and industrial conditions with reports and discussions. (For 
graduate students majoring in Social Administration. First and 
second semesters; one two-hour period a week. Credit, 3 year-hours. 
Matherly, Bristol.) 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

College of Law 

GAINESVILLE 




NINETEENTH 

ANNUAL ANNOUNCEMENT 

1927-1928 



UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 

1927-1928 

1927~June 13, Monday Summer School begins. 

August 5, Friday _ Summer School Commencement. 

September 12, Monday First Semester begins. 

October 1, Saturday, 2:00 p. m Re-examinations. 

2:00 p. m. Meeting of General Faculty. 

October 3-8 Annual Meeting of Extension 

Agents. 

November 11, Friday Armistice Day. 

November 24, Thursday Thanksgiving Day. 

December 16, Friday, 12:00 noon Christmas Recess begins. 

1928— January 3, Tuesday Resumption of Classes. 

January 28, Saturday First Semester ends. 

January 30, Monday Second Semester begins. 

February 4, Saturday, 2:00 p. m Meeting of General Faculty. 

March 3, Saturday, 2:00 p. m Re-examinations. 

May 26, Saturday, 2:00 p. m Meeting of General Faculty. 

May 27-29 „ Commencement Exercises. 

May 27. Sunday, 11:00 a. m _ Baccalaureate Sermon. 

May 28, Monday Annual Alumni Meeting. 

Class Day Exercises. 
Oratorical Contests. 

May 29, Tuesday, 10:00 a. m _ Graduating Exercises. 

June 12, Tuesday _ _ _ Summer School begins. 



BOARD OF CONTROL 

p. K. YoNGE, Chairman Pensacola 

E. L. Wartmann Citra 

Albert H. Blanding Leesburg 

W. B. Davis Perry 

Edward W. Lane Jacksonville 

J. T. Diamond, Secretary, Tallahassee 



STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

John W. Martin, Chairman Governor 

H. Clay Crawford Secretary of State 

J. C. Luning „ State Treasurer 

Fred H. Davis Attorney General 

W. S. Cawthon, Secretary State Superintendent of Public Instruction 



UNIVERSITY COUNCIL 

Albert A. Murphree, LL.D President of the University 

Jas. M. Farr, Ph.D Vice-President of the University 

Jas. N. Anderson, Ph.D Dean of the College of Arti and Sciences 

WiLMON Newell, D.Sc Dean of the College of Agriculture 

J. R. Benton, Ph.D Dean of the College of Engineering 

Harry R. Trusler, LL.B Dean of the College of Law 

Jas. W. Norman, Ph.D Dean of the Teachers College 

Townes R. Leigh, Ph.D Dean of the College of Pharmacy 

Walter J. Matherly, A.M., Dean of the College of Commerce and Journalism 



RESIDENT FACULTY 

ALBERT ALEXANDER MURPHREE, A.M., LL.D., 
President of the University 

HARRY RAYMOND TRUSLER, A.M., LL.B. (Michigan) 
Dea7i and Professor of Law 

CLIFFORD WALDORF CRANDALL, B.S., LL.B. (Michigan) 
Professor of Law 

ROBERT SPRATT COCKRELL, M.A., B.L. (Virginia) 
Professor of Law 

DEAN SLAGLE, A.M., LL.B. (Yale) 
Professor of Laio 

GEORGE WASHINGTON THOMPSON, B.S., LL.B, (Michigan) 
Professor of Law 

WILLIAM ARMSTRONG HUNTER, A.B., LL.M. (George Washington) 
Associate Professor of Laio 

STANLEY SIMONDS, A.B., Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins) 
Lecturer on Roman Laio 

PRISCILLA McCALL KENNEDY 
Librarian and Secretary 



Three classes of men should read law — the lawyer for his profession, 
the business man for business reasons, and every man for increased 
efficiency and his own protection. — Blackstone. 



College of Law 5 

HISTORY 

Largely thru the influence of Hon. Nathan P. Bryan, 
then a member of the Board of Control, the College of Law 
was established in 1909. From this time until 1917 the course 
comprised the work of two years. With the session of 1917-18 
the present three-year course was inaugurated. 

At first the College was quartered in Thomas Hall, one of 
the dormitories. At the opening of the session of 1913-14 
more spacious rooms were provided in Language Hall. During 
the following summer and fall the present structure was 
erected and on Thanksgiving Day, 1914, the College, with 
fitting ceremonies, took possession of its own home, one of the 
finest law school buildings in the South. 

PURPOSE 

It is the purpose of the College to impart a thoro, scientific, 
and practical knowledge of the law, and thus to equip its 
students to take advantage of the splendid opportunities the 
present readjustments in business and social life are creating. 
It aims to develop keen, efficient lawyers, conversant with the 
ideals and traditions of the profession. Its policy is character- 
ized by the emphasis of practice as well as theory; pleading 
as well as historical perspective ; skill in brief making as well 
as legal information. 

EQUIPMENT 

Building. — This splendid structure is one hundred seventy- 
two feet long, seventy feet wide, and two and one-half stories 
high. It contains a large, well-lighted library, furnished with 
bookstacks, library tables, librarian's office, and consultation 
rooms for students and faculty. It has three commodious 
lecture-rooms, together with the offices of administration, and 
the offices of the several resident professors. It contains, 
also, a handsomely paneled courtroom and auditorium. The 
courtroom has all the usual accessories, jury box, witness 
stand, judge's office, and jury room, and is connected with 
the library below by a circular stairway. Every interest of 
the College has been provided for, including attractive quar- 
ters for the Marshall Debating Society. The building is steam- 
heated, lighted by electricity, and equipped thruout with a 
superior grade of furniture. It is devoted exclusively to the 



6 University of Florida 

uses of the College of Law and furnishes accommodations as 
comfortable and as convenient as can be found in the country. 

Library. — The Law Library contains all the published 
reports of the courts of last resort of every State in the Union 
and of the Federal Courts, the full English Reprints, the Eng- 
lish Law Reports, the reports of the Interstate Commerce 
Commission and the Land Decisions of the Department of 
the Interior besides an excellent collection of digests, encyclo- 
pedias, series of selected cases, treatises and text books, both 
English and American. The Library also contains the Stat- 
utes of several of the States besides those of the Federal Gov- 
ernment, and is a subscriber to the leading legal periodicals. 
A course of instruction is given in legal bibliography and the 
use of law books. Every facility also is offered law students 
to make use of the General Library, in which are included 
works of interest and information to the la\\yer. Both 
libraries are open during the academic year on every secular 
day between the hours of 8:00 A. M. and 10:00 P. M. and are 
in charge of trained librarians, who will render such aid as the 
students may need in their use of the books. 

Gymnasium. — A brick and stone structure of two stories 
and basement, one hundred and six feet long and fifty-three 
wide. It is steam-heated, supplied with hot water, and well- 
lighted and ventilated. A gallery around the main floor pro- 
vides space for spectators at gymnastic exhibitions. The base- 
ment contains lockers, shower baths and toilets. Adjacent is 
a swimming-pool, thirty-six feet long and twenty-four feet 
wide, and from four and one half to seven feet deep. Organized 
classes are conducted by the Professor of Physical Culture. 

Fleming Field. — A large and well-kept athletic field 
equipped for the various outdoor games and sports which in 
this climate are carried on the year round. In 1919 this 
field was used by the New York Giants for their spring 
training and in 1921 by the Philadelphia Nationals. 

ADMISSION 

Requirements for Admission. — Those entering as candi- 
dates for degrees must be eighteen years of age and must 
present, in addition to sixteen high school units, two years of 
college work of not less than sixty-eight semester hours. Evi- 



College of Law 7 

dence of this work must be presented on or before the date 
on which the candidate wishes to register. 

A high school unit represents a course of study pursued 
thruout the school year with five recitation periods of at least 
forty-five minutes per week, four courses being taken during 
each of the four years. Fifteen units as defined by the Car- 
negie Foundation or the National Educational Association 
will be accepted. 

Seven and a half of the high school units are prescribed, 
viz: English 3; Mathematics 2; History 1; Science 1. The 
remaining units may be chosen from the following electives: 
Botany 1/2 or 1 ; Chemistry 1 ; English 1 ; Latin 4 ; History 2 ; 
Mathematics 1; Modern Languages (French, German, or 
Spanish) 2 ; Physical Geography 1 ; Physics 1 ; Zoology 1/2 or 
1 ; vocational subjects (Typewriting, Stenography, Mechanic 
Arts, Agriculture, etc.) 4. 

The University will accept certificates only from standard 
Florida high schools, grouped by the State Department of 
Public Instruction under Classes A and B. Certificates will 
also be accepted from Florida High Schools that are members 
of the Southern Association of Secondary Schools, and from 
any secondary school elsewhere which is accredited by its 
State university. 

The certificate must be officially signed by the principal 
of the school attended, and must be presented to the Committee 
on admission on or before the date on which the candidate 
wishes to be matriculated. It must state in detail the work of 
preparation and, in the case of Florida high schools, that the 
course thru the tivelfth grade has been satisfactorily com- 
pleted. 

Blank certificates, conveniently arranged for the desired 
data, will be sent to all high-school principals and, upon 
application, to prospective students. 

No specific course of studies is prescribed for the college 
work required for admission; but, in general, students are 
advised to pursue the course offered by the College of Arts 
and Sciences. Thereby it will be easier for them to complete 
the combined academic and law course should they so desire. 

Women Students. — By an Act of the Legislature of 1925, 
women who are twenty-one years of age, who have credit in 



8 University of Florida 

sixty semester hours of academic College work, and who 
otherwise fully meet the entrance requirements of the College 
may enter as candidates for degrees. 

Special Students. — In keeping with the opinion of the As- 
sociation of American Law Schools and of the American Bar 
Association, the practice of admitting special students (i. e., 
those not meeting the requirements for admission) has been 
discontinued. 

Advanced Standing. — No work in law done in other in- 
stitutions will be accepted towards a degree, unless the appli- 
cant passes satisfactorily the examinations held in the sub- 
jects in question in this College, or unless credit is given with- 
out examination. Credit for work not meeting the require- 
ments of the Association of American Law Schools, of which 
this College is a member, will not be accepted. Where a school 
is known to have made relaxing departures from its published 
entrance requirements or course of study, the acceptance of 
credit from such institution will not be considered. In no case 
will credit be given for work not done in residence at an 
approved law school. Students who are candidates for a de- 
gree from schools that were members of the Association of 
American Law Schools at the time of their matriculation will 
be accepted as candidates for a degree here, provided they 
meet the entrance requirements of the class here in which they 
are graduated. 

EXPENSES 

The yearly expenses. of a law student who is a legal resi- 
dent, exclusive of incidentals, may be summarized as follows : 

Tuition $40.00 

Registration Fee and Contingent Fee 7.50 

Student Activity Fee 26.25 

Infirmary Fee 6.00 

Board and Lodging (in advance) 175.00 

Books (about) 65.00 

$319.75 

An additional fee of five dollars ($5.00) is required of 
students who enter after Sept. 15th and Feb. 1st, 1928. 



College of Law 9 

Reg-istration is not complete until all University bills are 
paid. Those who fail to meet this obligation are not regarded 
as members of the University. 

Each student should file his registration card with the 
Registrar not later than two weeks after the date of his en- 
rollment. Failure to do this will cause his name to be dropped 
from the student roll. 

Students ivho are assigned to student service ivill he rr- 
quired to pay their fees at the beginning of the semester in 
cash; and at the end of the semester, or at such time a^ the 
service to which they are assigned is completed, the Unit ersity 
ivill pay them in cash for the ivork done. The Auditor is not 
permitted to extend credit on fees. No exception ivill be made 
to this rule by the Board of Control. 

No refund of any fees will be made after ten days from date 
of registration. Positively no exception to this rule ivill be 
permitted. 

Tuition is payable in advance, $20.00 each semester. 
Students taking less than eleven hours of work are charged 
a proportionate part of the full tuition. 

Non-resident students will pay an additional tuition fee of 
$100.00 for the year, $50.00 per semester in advance. The 
burden of proof as to residence is with the student. Any stu- 
dent who registers improperly under the above rule will be 
required to pay the non-resident tuition and also a penalty 
of $10.00. 

A diploma fee of five dollars ($5.00), payable on or before 
April 1st of the year of graduation, is charged all candidates 
for degrees. 

Students are urged to provide themselves with the Statutes 
of their state and a law dictionary. These books will form a 
nucleus for the student's future library, and by the purchase 
of second-hand books the cost may be materially reduced. 

The charge for board, lodging and janitor service if paid 
monthly in advance is as follows : 

First Semester Second Semester 

Sept. 12 to Oct. 12 $22.50 Feb. 1 to Feb. 28 $22.50 

Oct. 12 to Nov. 12 22.50 Mar. 1 to Mar. 31 22.50 

Nov. 12 to Dec. 16 25.00 Apr. 1 to Apr. 30 22.50 

Jan. 3 to Jan. 31 21.00 May 1 to June 1 22.50 



10 University of Florida 

Board without lodging will be furnished at the rate of 
$20.00 per calendar month, payable in advance. No part of 
this sum will be refunded. 

For more detailed statements reference is made to the 
University catalog, pp. 34-39. 

Board and lodging in private homes may be secured at the 
rate of thirty-five to forty-five dollars ($35.-$45.00) per 
month. For copy of lists and advance information, address 
the General Secretary, Y.M.C.A., University of Florida. 

As the dormitories are inadequate, students wishing to 
stay in them are urged to reserve their rooms at the earliest 
possible date. Application should be made to Mr. K. H. Gra- 
ham, Business Manager. A deposit of $10.00, which will be 
credited on fees, must accompany the application; but this 
deposit will not be returned in case the student does not re- 
port for matriculation during the year. 

UNIVERSITY PRIVILEGES 

Electives in Other Colleges. — The advantages of the 
other colleges of the University are open to such students in 
the College of Law as desire and are able to accept them. 
Courses in History, Economics, Sociology, Psychology, Logic, 
English, and Speech are particularly recommended. No extra 
charge is made for such courses, but they can be taken only 
with the consent of the Law Faculty and of the professors 
concerned. 

Military Science and Tactics. — The University has an 
Infantry Unit, Senior Division of the Reserve Officers' Train- 
ing Corps, to membership in which law students are eligible. 
They are not required, however, to join this organization or 
to take any other military drill. 

Marshall Debating Society. — Early in the first year of 
the College the students organized a society that would secure 
to its members practice in debating and public speaking and 
experience in arguing legal questions, as well as drill in parlia- 
mentary law. The society was fittingly named 'The Marshall 
Debating Society", in honor of the distinguished Southern 
jurist, John Marshall. 



College of Law 11 

PRIZES 

Thru the generosity of The American Law Book Com- 
pany a Corpus Juris-Cyc prize is offered, under certain con- 
ditions, for the best work in legal research. Excellency in this 
work also will be considered in computing the grade of students 
taking Brief Making. 

DEGREES 

Bachelor of Laws. — The degree of Bachelor of Laws 
(LL.B.) is conferred upon those students who satisfactorily 
complete eighty-five semester hours of law. Students admit- 
ted to advanced standing may receive the degree after one 
year's residence, but in no case will the degree be granted 
unless the candidate is in actual residence during all of the 
third year and passes in this College at least twenty-eight se- 
mester hours of law. 

Juris Doctor. — Students who have complied with all the 
requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Laws (LL.B.), 
who have maintained an average standing in their law studies 
of 10% above the passing mark, and who have obtained the 
degree of A.B., or an equivalent degree, from an approved 
College or University, or who secure such degree the same 
year they complete their law course, will be awarded the degree 
of Juris Doctor (J.D.). 

Combined Academic and Law Course. — By pursuing an 
approved course of collegiate and law studies a student may 
earn both the academic and the legal degree in six years. 
Candidates for either the A.B. or the B.S. degree may elect 
twelve year-hours of work from the first year of the course 
of the College of Law and count the same as credits toward 
the aforesaid degrees. Such degrees will not be conferred, 
however, until after the completion of the second year of the 
law work. 

Master of Arts.— Candidates for the degree of Master 
of Arts are permitted to take a portion of their work under the 
Faculty of Law. 



12 University of Florida 

ADMISSION TO THE BAR 

Upon presenting their diplomas, duly issued by the proper 
authorities, and upon furnishing satisfactory evidence that 
they are twenty-one years of age and of good moral character, 
the graduates of the College are licensed, without examina- 
tion, to practice in the courts of Florida. They also are ad- 
mitted without examination to the United States District 
Court for the Northern District of Florida. 

EXAMINATIONS 

The last week of each semester is devoted to examinations 
covering the work of the semester. These examinations are 
in writing and are rigid and searching, but are not necessarily 
final. 

A delinquent examination is allowed for the removal of 
conditions, except in subjects where the semester grade falls 
below 60. This examination, in first and second year sub- 
jects, must be taken during the week preceding the opening 
of the session. All students, unless excused by the Dean, must 
present themselves for the regular examination in all the 
subjects for which they are registered. 

A student failing in more than fifty per cent of his class 
hours for two consecutive months, will be dropped for the re- 
mainder of the College year. Students so dropped will be en- 
titled to honorable dismissal, unless their failure is clearly due 
to negligence. Upon petition, such a student may, at the dis- 
cretion of the President of the University and the Dean of 
the College, be reinstated upon such terms as to them may 
seem best. 

LECTURES 

In addition to the courses given by the regular Faculty, 
lectures are given by eminent specialists in the profession, 
both at the bar and on the bench. The Justices of the Supreme 
Court of the State especially have been generous in giving of 
their time and services in this way. 



College of Law 13 

PLEADING AND PRACTICE 

Courses. — Differing from some other law schools, this 
College is convinced that an intensive knowledge of pleading 
and practice should be secured by the student, since legal 
rights cannot be well understood without a mastery of the 
rules of pleading whereby they are enforced. As Lord Coke 
declared: "Good pleading is the touchstone of the true sense 
and knowledge of the common law." The development of 
right has depended upon the development of actions ; the rule 
of law was the rule of writs and in large measure remains so 
today. Consequently the College offers thoro courses in Crimi- 
nal Pleading and Procedure, Common Law Pleading, Equity 
Pleading, Code Pleading, Florida Civil Practice, General 
Practice, and Federal Procedure. Thus the student on gradu- 
ation is enabled to enter understandingly upon the practice of 
law ; and to this fact the College attributes much of the rapid 
advancement of its Alumni. 

As young men from all parts of the country in increasing 
numbers are attending the University, combining the ad- 
vantages of travel, new associations, and salubrious climate 
with those of the superior educational facilities here afforded, 
the College has arranged to serve those who intend to practice 
elsewhere as efficiently as those who expect to locate in this 
State. Students preparing for the practice in other states are 
offered Code Pleading and General Practice instead of Florida 
Constitutional Law and Florida Civil Practice, as shown in 
the course of study. Such students also are required to sub- 
mit an acceptable dissertation showing the peculiarities of 
pleading and practice of the State in which they expect to 
locate. 

The Practice Court. — Believing the students obtain in 
the Practice Court a better practical knowledge of pleading 
and practice than can be acquired in any other way, aside from 
the trial of actual cases, the Faculty lay special emphasis upon 
this work. Sessions of the Practice Court are held thruout 
the year in an admirably equipped courtroom. A clerk and a 
sheriff are appointed from the Senior class, and regular records 
of the court are kept. Each student is required to participate in 
the trial of at least one common law, one equity, and one crimi- 
nal case, and is instructed in appellate procedure. 



14 University of Florida 

CURRICULUM 

FIRST YEAR 
FIRST SEMESTER 

301. Torts. — History and definitions; elements of torts; 
conflicting rights; mental anguish; parties to tort actions; 
remedies; damages; conflict of laws; methods of discharge; 
comprehensive study of particular torts; false imprisonment, 
malicious prosecution, abuse of process, conspiracy, slander 
and libel, trespass, conversion, deceit, nuisance, negligence, 
and others. Textbooks: Burdick on Torts and Burdick's 
Cases on Torts, fourth edition. (5 hours. Professor Tnis- 
ler.) 

303. Contracts. — Formation of contract; offer and ac- 
ceptance ; form and consideration ; reality of consent ; legality 
of object; operation of contract; limits of the contract obliga- 
tion; assignment of contract. Textbooks: Clark on Con- 
tracts, third edition; Woodruff's Cases on Contract, fourth 
edition. (3 hours. Professor Thompson.) 

305. Criminal Law. — Sources of criminal law ; nature and 
elements of crime; criminal intent; insanity; intoxication; 
duress; mistake of fact or law; justification; parties in crime; 
offenses against the person, habitation, property, public health 
and morals, public justice and authority, government, and 
the law of nations. Textbook : Clark on Criminal Law, third 
edition; selected cases. (2 hours. Professor Cockrell.) 

307. Criminal Procedure. — Jurisdiction ; arrest ; prelim- 
inary examination and bail; grand jury, indictment and infor- 
mation and their sufficiency in form and substance; arraign- 
ment, pleas, and motions ; nolle prosequi and motions to quash ; 
jeopardy; presence of defendant at the trial; verdict; new 
trial; arrest of judgment; judgment, sentence, and execuition. 
Textbook: Clark's Criminal Procedure, second edition; selec- 
ted cases. (2 hours. Professor Cockrell.) 

309. Property. — Personal property ; possession and rights 
based thereon ; acquisition of title ; liens and pledges ; conver- 
sion. Textbook: Warren's Cases on Property. (2 hours. 
Professor Crandall.) 



College of Law 15 

second semester 

302. Equity Jurisprudence. — History and definition; 
jurisdiction; maxims; accident, mistake, fraud; penalties and 
forfeitures ; priorities and notice ; bona fide purchasers, estop- 
pel ; election ; satisfaction and performance ; conversion ; equit- 
able estates, interest, primary rights; trusts; powers, duties, 
and liabilities of trustees ; mortgages ; equitable liens ; assign- 
ments; specific performance; injunction; reformation; can- 
cellation; cloud on titles; ancillary remedies. Textbook: 
Eaton on Equity, second edition ; selected cases. (5 hours. 
Professor Trusler.) 

304, Contracts. — Joint obligations; interpretation of 
contracts; rules relating to evidence and construction; dis- 
charge of contract. Textbook : Huf fcut and Woodruff's Cases 
on Contract, fourth edition. (3 hours. Professor Thompson.) 

306. Marriage and Divorce. — Marriage in general; na- 
ture of the relation ; capacity of parties ; annulment ; divorce ; 
suit, jurisdiction, grounds; defenses; alimony; effect on prop- 
erty rights; custody and support of children; agreements of 
separation. Textbook: Vernier's Cases on Marriage and Di- 
vorce. (1 hour. Professor Cockrell.) 

308. Common Law Pleading. — History and development 
of the personal actions at common law ; theory of pleading and 
its peculiar features as developed by the jury trial; demur- 
rers, general and special; pleas in discharge, in excuse, and 
by way of traverse ; replication de injuria; duplicity ; depart- 
ure; new assignment; motions based on pleadings; general 
rules of pleadings. Textbook: Keigwin's Cases on Common 
Law Pleading. (Two sections. 3 hours. Professor Cran- 
dall.) 

310. Sales. — Sale and contract to sell; statute of frauds; 
illegality; conditions and warranties; delivery; acceptance 
and receipt; vendor's lien; stoppage in transitu; bills of lad- 
ing; remedies of seller and buyer. Textbook: Tiffany on 
Sales, second edition. (1 hour. Professor Hunter.) 

312. Property. — Introduction to the law of conveyanc- 
ing; rights incident to the ownership of land, and estates 
therein, including the land itself, air, water, fixtures, emble- 
ments, waste; profits; easements; licenses; covenants run- 
ning with the land. Textbook: Warren's Cases on Property. 
(2 hours. Professor Crandall.) 



16 University of Florida 

SECOND YEAR 

FIRST SEMESTER 

401. United States Constitutional Law. — General 
principles; distribution of governmental powers; congress; 
the chief executive; the judiciary; police powers; eminent do- 
main; checks and balances; guarantee of republican govern- 
ment; civil rights; political privileges; guarantee in criminal 
cases; impairment of contractual obligations. Textbook: 
Hall's Cases on Constitutional Law\ (U hours. Professor 
Slagle.) 

403. Agency. — Nature of the relation; purposes and 
manner of creation ; who may be principal or agent ; ratifica- 
tion; delegation of authority; general and special agents; 
rights and duties of agents ; termination, nature, extent, con- 
struction, and execution of authority of agents ; rights, duties, 
and liabilities of agents ; principal and third persons inter se; 
particular classes of agents. Textbook: Mechem's Cases on 
Agency, second edition. (2 hours. Professor Thoynpson.) 

405. Equity Pleading. — Nature and object of pleading 
in equity ; parties to a suit in equity ; proceedings in a suit in 
equity; bills in equity, disclaimer; demurrers and pleas; 
answer and replication ; preparation of bills, demurrers, pleas, 
answers. Textbooks: Keigwin's Cases in Equity Pleading; 
Rules of the Circuit Court in Chancery in Florida; Rules of 
the Federal Court; Statutes of Florida. (3 hours. Professor 
Hunter.) 

407. Brief Making and the Use of Law Books. — Where 
to find the law; how to use statutes and decisions; how to 
find the law ; the trial brief ; the brief on appeal and its prepa- 
ration. Textbook: Cooley's Brief Making and the Use of 
Law Books. (Ttvo sections. 1 hour. Professor Crandall.) 

409. Property. — Titles and conveyancing, including ac- 
quisition of titles by possession, modes of conveyance at 
common law, under the statute of uses, and by statutory 
grant; the execution of deeds; estates created; covenants for 
titles; estoppel by deed; priorities among titles. Textbook: 
Warren's Cases on Conveyances. (3 hours. Professor Cran- 
dall.) 



College of Law 17 

411. Florida Constitutional Law.* — Declaration of 
rights; departments of government; suffrage and eligibility; 
census and apportionment; counties and cities; taxation and 
finance; homestead and exemption; married women's prop- 
erty; education; public institutions; miscellaneous provisions. 
Textbooks: Constitution, statutes, and judicial decisions of 
Florida. (2 hours. Professor Trusler.) 

413. Florida Civil Practice.* — Organization of courts; 
parties ; joinder and consolidation of actions ; issuance, ser- 
vice, and return of process ; appearance ; trial ; verdict ; pro- 
ceedings after verdict; appellate proceedings; peculiar char- 
acteristics of the common law actions; special proceedings 
including certiorari, mandamus, prohibition, quo warranto, 
habeas corpus, attachment, garnishment, statutory liens, for- 
cible entry and detainer, landlord and tenant. Textbook: 
Crandall's Florida Civil Practice. (Section A. 3 hours. Pro- 
fessor Cockrell.) 

415. Code Pleading.** — Changes introduced by the 
codes; forms of action; necessary allegations; the complaint; 
prayer for relief, including general and special denials; new 
matter; equitable defenses; counter claims; pleading several 
defenses; replies and demurrers. Textbook: Keigwin's Cases 
in Code Pleading. (2 hours. Professor Thompson.) 

SECOND SEMESTER 

402. Evidence. — Judicial notice; kinds of evidence; bur- 
den of proof; presumptions of law and fact; judge and jury; 
best evidence rule; hearsay rule and its exceptions; admis- 
sions ; confessions ; exclusions based on public policy and priv- 
ilege; corroboration; parol evidence rule; witnesses; attend- 
ance in court ; examination, cross examination, privilege ; pub- 
lic documents; records and judicial writings; private writ- 
ings. Textbook: Greenleaf on Evidence, sixteenth edition, 
Volume 1 ; selected cases. (I^ hours. Professor Cockrell.) 

404. Quasi Contracts. — Origin and nature of quasi 
contract; benefits conferred in misreliance on rights or duty, 
from mistake of law, and on invalid, unenforceable, illegal, 
or impossible contract; benefits conferred through dutiful in- 
tervention in another's affairs; benefits conferred under con- 



*For students intending to practice in Florida. 
**For students not intending to practice in Florida. 



18 University of Florida 

straint; action for restitution as alternative remedy for 
breach of contract and for tort. Textbook: Woodruff's 
Cases on Quasi Contracts. (2 hours. Professor Hunter.) 

406. Private Corporations. — Nature; creation and citi- 
zenship; defective organization; promotors; powers and lia- 
bilities ; corporations and the State ; dissolution ; membership ; 
management; creditors; foreign corporations; practice in 
forming corporations, preparing by-laws, electing officers, 
and in conducting corporate business. Textbooks: Clark on 
Private Corporations, and Wormser's Cases on Corporations. 
(3 hours. Professor Slagle.) 

408. Legal Ethics. — Admission of attorneys to practice ; 
taxation; privileges and exemptions; authority; liability to 
clients and to third parties; compensation; liens; suspension 
and disbarment; duties to clients, courts, professional breth- 
ren, and to society. Textbooks: Attorneys at Law in Ruling 
Case Law and the Code of Ethics adopted by the American 
Bar Association. (1 hour. Professor Hunter.) 

410. Property. — History of the law of wills and testa- 
ments; testamentary capacity and intent; kind of wills and 
testaments; execution, revocation, republication, revival of 
wills; descent; probate of wills and the administration of es- 
tates. Textbook: Warren's Cases on Wills. (3 hours. Pro- 
fessor Thompson.) 

412. Florida Civil Practice.* — Organization of courts; 
parties; joinder and consolidation of actions; issuance, ser- 
vice, and return of process; appearance; trial; verdict; pro- 
ceedings after verdict; appellate proceedings; peculiar char- 
acteristics of the common law actions; special proceedings 
including certiorari, mandamus, prohibition, quo warranto, 
habeas corpus, attachment, garnishment, statutory liens, for- 
cible entry and detainer, landlord and tenant. Textbook: 
Crandall's Florida Civil Practice. (Section B. 3 hours. 
Professor Cockrell.) 

414. General Civil Procedure.**— The court; parties; 
forms of action; the trial; selection of jury and procedure in 
jury trial; judgment; execution; appeal and error. Text- 
book: Loyd's Cases on Civil Procedure. (3 hours. Professor 
Hunter.) 



''For students intending to practice in Florida. 
''For students not intending to practice in Florida. 



College of Law 19 

THIRD YEAR 

FIRST SEMESTER 

501. Insurance. — Theory, history, significance; insur- 
able interest; concealment, representations, warranties; sub- 
rogation; waiver and estoppel; assignees, beneficiaries; cred- 
itors; fire, life, marine, accident, guarantee, liability insur- 
ance. Textbooks: Humble's Law of Insurance and Humble's 
Cases on Insurance. (1 hour. Professor Hunter.) 

503. Public Service Corporations. — Nature of public 
utilities; railroads and other common carriers of goods and 
passengers; telegraphs and telephones; light and water com- 
panies; inns; warehouses; elevators; stockyards; methods of 
incorporation ; public control ; rights and obligations at com- 
mon law and under federal and state statutes. Textbook : Wy 
man's Cases on Public Service Companies, third edition. (2 
hours. Professor Slagle.) 

505. Federal Procedure. — System of courts created 
under the authority of the United States, jurisdiction of the 
several courts and procedure therein ; removal of cases from 
state courts; substantive law applied by federal courts; ap- 
pellate jurisdiction. Textbook: Rose on Federal Jurisdic- 
tion and Procedure, third students' edition. (2 hours. Pro- 
fessor Slagle.) 

507. Bankruptcy. — Federal and state bankruptcy legis- 
lation; who may become bankrupt; prerequisites to adjudica- 
tion; receivers; trustees; provable claims; exemptions; com- 
position; discharge; appeals. Textbook: Black on Bank- 
ruptcy. (2 hours. Pr'ofessor Hunter.) 

509. Partnership. — Creation, nature, characteristics of 
a partnership; nature of a partner's interest; nature, extent, 
duration of the partnership liability; powers of partners; 
rights, duties, remedies of partners inter se; rights and reme- 
dies of creditors; termination of partnership. Textbook: 
Gilmore's Cases on Partnership, (2 hours. Professor 
Thompson.) 

511. Admiralty. — Jurisdiction; contracts, torts, crimes; 
maritime liens, ex contractu, ex delicto, priorities, discharge; 



20 University of Florida 

bottomry and respondentia obligations; salvage; general av- 
erage. Textbook: Hughes on Admiralty. (1 hour. Profes- 
sor Slagle.) 

513. Property. — Conditional estates; licenses and waiv- 
ers; reversions and remainders; rule in Shelley's Case; fu- 
ture uses; future interests; executory devises and bequests; 
vesting of legacies ; cross limitations ; gifts ; failure of issue ; 
determination of classes; powers; rule against perpetuities; 
restraints on alienation. Textbook: Kale's Cases on Future 
Interests. (2 hows. Professor Crandall.) 

515. Mortgages. — Nature ; elements ; incidents of the re- 
lation; discharge; assignment; redemption; foreclosure; in- 
junction and account; extent of the lien; priority between 
mortgage liens and competing claims; equity of redemption. 
Textbook: Durfee's Cases on Mortgages. (2 hours. Profes- 
sor Cockrell.) 

517. Roman Law. — The fundamental legal conceptions 
which are found in Roman Law. Readings in the Institutes 
of Gaius and Justinian (Robinson's Selections), with con- 
stant reference to Sohm — Institutes of Roman Law — trans- 
lated by Ledley. Topics assigned for reports. Lectures with 
chief stress on Private Law. (3 hours. Professor Simonds.) 

519. Practice Court.— ("i hour. Professor Hunter.) 

SECOND SEMESTER 

502. Damages. — General principles; nominal; compensa- 
tory; exemplary; liquidated; direct and consequential; proxi- 
mate and remote; general and special; measure in contract 
and tort actions ; entire damages in one action ; mental suffer- 
ing; avoidable consequences; value; interest; lateral support; 
counsel fees and expenses of litigation; injuries to real prop- 
erty and limited interests; death by wrongful act; breaches 
of warranty. Textbook: Rogers' Law of Damages; selected 
cases. (2 hours. Pi^ofessor Trusler.) 

504. Municipal Corporations. — Creation of cities and 
towns; powers of a municipality, including public powers, 
power of taxation, power over streets and alleys, etc. ; obliga- 



College of Law 21 

tions and liabilities of municipal corporations; powers and 
liabilities of officers. Textbook : Elliott on Municipal Corpo- 
rations, second edition. (1 hour. Professo7' CockrelL) 

506. Negotiable Instruments. — Law merchant; defini- 
tions and general doctrines; contract of the maker, acceptor, 
certifier, drawer, indorser, vendor, accommodater, assurer; 
proceedings before and after dishonor of negotiable instru- 
ments; absolute defenses; equities; payments; conflict of 
laws. Textbook: Britton's Cases on Bills and Notes. (3 
hours. Professor Slagle.) 

508. Conflict of Laws. — Jurisdiction; sources of law 
and comity; territorial jurisdiction; jurisdiction in rem and 
in personam; remedies, rights of action, procedure ; creation of 
rights; property rights; personal rights; inheritance; obliga- 
tions ex delicto and ex contractu; recognition and enforcement 
of rights; personal relations; property; inheritance; admin- 
istration of estates; judgments and obligations. Textbook: 
Lorenzen's Cases on Conflict of Laws, second edition. (3 
hours. Professor Slagle.) 

510. Abstracts. — Practical problems covering the inter- 
pretation of maps and the plotting of lots described by metes 
and bounds; the formal requisites of the different convey- 
ances in use in Florida; deeds executed by public and judi- 
cial officers; liens and contracts for the sale of lands. Text- 
books: Florida Statutes and selected Florida cases. (1 hour. 
Professor Thompson.) 

512. Trusts. — The Anglo-American system of uses and 
trusts; creation, transfer, extinguishment of trust interests; 
priorities between competing equities; construction of trust 
dispositions; charitable trusts. Textbook: Boger on Trusts; 
selected cases. (2 hours. Professor Thompson.) 

514. Judgments. — Nature and essentials; kinds; record; 
vacation; amendment; modification; satisfaction. Textbooks: 
Rood's Cases on Judgments. (2 hours. Profssor CrandaXl.) 

516. Roman Law.* — Readings, references, and reports. 



*Only three semester hours of Roman Law will be counted toward a 
degree. 



22 University of Florida 

Subjects treated: Roman Public Law; Roman International 
Law ; Stoic Philosophy and the Jus Gentium ; Christianity and 
the Roman Law; Roman Law in Mediaeval Europe; The Re- 
vival of Roman Law; The Roman Element in Modern Juris- 
prudence. (3 hours. Professor Simonds.) 

518. Practice Court. — (l hour. Professor Hunter.) 



Those who desire further information concerning the 
College of Law may address letters of inquiry to Harry R. 
Trusler, Dean of the College of Law, Gainesville, Florida. 



College of Law 
REGISTER 



23 



DEGREES CONFERRED 
May 31, 1927 



Juris Doctor 

Clayton, Erwin Americus ^In^'vlllp' ?la* 

Day, James Westbay ^r S^'"^ u ' So" 

Harris, Ed William'. St. Petersburg, F la. 

Markham, Joseph Henson Mo^;.^'?' v\l' 

Pierce, Jr., Robert Samuel Marianna, Fla. 

Bachelor of Latvs 

Akerman, Emory Speer CaPneSe lla 

Allison, John McLean T^Sarsee Fa' 

Atkinson, Clyde William M^Smerv A a' 

Ball, Charles Arthur ^ Sev West Fa' 

Brooks, Jr., George Gray Tamna Fa' 

Bryan, Roland William . Tampa Ma. 

Budd, Jr., ..Garland Mosely r'ainesiX Fa 

Cargell, Robert Monroe Srmdie' Ala 

Clarke, Alfred Wesley TamSa Fla 

Crary, Lawrence Evans TaktESd Fa 

Crevasse, Ja-es H f „d :::;::::::G^nefvme: Fla. 

Crom, Frank Russell Hinson Fla 

Doss, William Denver ;.;:;:;:;;;:;;:.iiTami; ¥i. 

Dubhrer, Harold c^ Pptersbure- Fla 

Fisher, Charles Elton St. Petersb-^g Fla. 

Ford, Theodore Leo - . ' . 

Gex, Jr., Walter Joseph Bay St. Loms, Mis^. 

Gray, Jr. William Lafayette ZZ^matma, Fla! 

Gridley, Chester Gard -—- Orlando, Fla. 



Gex, Jr., waiter dosepn - t „„„„„<, g q 

Gray, Jr. William Lafayette ZZ^matma, Fla! 

G^dley, Chester Gard Orlando Fla. 

Hodges, Robert Leo j _upi„„j tt'Io 

Hurley, Jr., Frank Hampton G^nesviHe Fa'. 

Hurst, Huber Christian SeLand Fa 

Inglis, Clifford Thomas -.-Z-zS^^ando, fI". 

Kanner, Aaron Mitchel Starke Fla 

Knight Hollis Vajjghn 'ZZZL^S^, It 

Laird, Donald Clifton Gainesville, Fla. 

Lally, Thomas Beck Americus, Ga. 

Lane, Jr., William Thomas R;;bsor pS Fla 

Lawrence, Jr., Charles Wyman Tamja' Fla 

Lawrence, Robert Paul Winter Haven' Fla. 

Marshall, James Edmonds Navarre Ohio 

Muskoff , John William key West, Fla 

8^sSWa7wharton-::::::::::::::::::=::=::::::::::^^ 

Parker, Robert Clayborne pLt Oiange' Fa 

Pattillo, Andrew Gramling "^BrooSe; Fla: 

Petteway, Gordon Powell West' 'Palm Beach, Fla. 

Potter, Paul Willson .. vve ^^.^^^^^^1^^ ^^^ 

Pritchard, James Wesley Winter Haven, Fla. 

Recker Lewis Leland . ..^. ....Gainesville, Fla. 

Richards, Hawthorne Howe g^^^^^ ^^^^^^^ Ga. 

Rowe, Aubrey •"■.■■"-- Z Sanford, Fla. 

Sharon, Jr., James Gibson 



24 University of Florida 

Simmons, Stephen Emery Manatee, Fla. 

Stanly, William Alfred Ft. Lauderdale] Fla. 

Thomas, Bradley Morris Charlotte, N. C. 

Way, Raymond Clayton Winter Haven, Fla. 

Wilson, Maurice James Bartow, Fla. 

Wilson, Jr., William Horace Lake City, Fla. 

THIRD YEAR CLASS 

Akerman, Emory Speer Orlando, Fla. 

Allison, John McLean Gainesville, Fla. 

Anderson, William Oliver Orlando, Fla. 

Atkinson, Clyde William Tallahassee, Fla. 

Ball, Charles Arthur - Montgomery, Ala. 

Baskin, Norris Frederick Dunnellon, Fla. 

Braden, Walter Hopkins St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Brooks, Jr., George Gray Key West, Fia. 

Bryan, Roland William Tampa, Fla. 

Budd, Jr., Garland Mosely Miami, Fla. 

Butler, Everett Hill Miami, Fla. 

Campbell, John Baxter Quincy, Fla. 

Cargell, Robert Monroe Gainesville, Fla. 

Clarke, Alfred Wesley Bee Ridge, Fla. 

Clayton, Erw^in Americus Gainesville, Fla. 

Clifton, William Marvin West Palm Beach, Fla. 

Clyatt, Jr., Orlando S Lakeland, Fla. 

Cogdill, John Lincoln Fort Myers, Fla. 

Crary, Lawrence Evans Tampa, Fla. 

Crevasse, James Holland Lakeland, Fla. 

Crom, Frank Russell Gainesville, Fla. 

Day, James Westbay Gainesville, Fla. 

Doss, William Denver Hinson, Fla. 

Dublirer, Harold Miami, Fla. 

Fisher, Charles Elton St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Fletcher, Jr., Frederick Wartman Sarasota, Fla. 

Ford, Theodore Leo Bradenton, Fla. 

Eraser, Donald Hines Hinesville, Ga. 

Gray, Jr., William Lafayette Laurens, S. C. 

Harris, Ed William St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Hodges, Robert Leo Orlando, Fla. 

Hursey, Frank Hampton Lakeland, Fla. 

Hurst, Huber Christian .• Gainesville, Fla. 

Inglis, Clifford Thomas DeLand, Fla. 

Janes, Jr., Francis G Wauchula, Fla. 

Kanner, Aaron Mitchel Orlando, Fla. 

Kiracofe, John M Camden, Ohio 

Knight, Hollis Vaughn Starke, Fla. 

Kustoff, Michael Ivanovich Gainesville, Fla. 

Laird, Donald Clifton Lakeland, Fla. 

Lally, Thomas Beck Gainesville, Fla. 

Lane, Jr., William Thomas Americus, Ga. 

Lawrence, Jr., Charles Wyman Babson Park, Fla. 

Lawrence, Robert Paul Tampa, Fla. 

Markham, Joseph Henson Lake City, Fla. 

Marshall, James Edmonds Winter Haven, Fla. 

Muskoff, John William Navarre, Ohio 

Norton, Edward F Jacksonville, Fla. 

Otto, Joseph Key West, Fla. 

Overstreet, Murray Wharton Kissimmee, Fla. 

Parker, Robert Clayborne Tallahassee, Fla. 

Pattillo, Andrew Gramling Port Orange, Fla. 



College of Law 25 



Petteway, Gordon Powell Brooksville, Fla. 

Pierce, Jr., Robert Samuel Marianna, Fla. 

Potter, Paul Willson West Palm Beach, Fla. 

Pritchard, James Wesley Gainesville, Fla. 

Recker, Lewis Leland Winter Haven, Fla. 

Richards, Hawthorne Howe Gainesville, Fla. 

Rowe, Aubrey Social Circle, Ga. 

Sauls, Byron Tewilliger Wauchula, Fla. 

Sebring, Harold Leon Gainesville, Fla. 

Sharon, Jr., James Gibson Sanford, Fla. 

Simmons, Stephen Emery Manatee, Fla. 

Smysor, Paul Allen Cozaddale, Ohio 

Stanly, William Alfred Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. 

Stewart, Arthur Edward Coconut Grove, Fla. 

Sutton, Jr., Hugh Monroe Pompano, Fla. 

Thomas, Bradley Morris Charlotte, N. C. 

Way, Raymond Clayton Winter Haven, Fla. 

Wilson, Maurice James Bartow, Fla. 

Wilson, Jr., William Horace Lake City, Fla. 

Wilson, Jr., William Sidney Tampa, Fla. 

Woodruff, Richard Starkey Orlando, Fla. 

SECOND YEAR CLASS 

Baghdoian, Yervant Harry Gainesville, Fla. 

Baisden, Fred Randolph Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. 

Baya, Joseph Francis - Tampa, Fla. 

Boggs, Frank Dean Jacksonville, Fla. 

Boyd, Thomas Decker Gainesville, Fla. 

Broome, Jr., Stockton Jacksonville, Fla. 

Colson, John Grady Gainesville, Fla. 

DeHoff, William Joseph Jacksonville, Fla. 

Dewees, Carroll Fontaine West Palm Beach, Fla. 

Dowling, Frank Butt, Miami, Fla. 

Dyer, Borden McLeod West Palm Beach, Fla. 

Ervin, Jr., Richard William Tallahassee, Fla. 

Fant, Julian Earle Jacksonville, Fla. 

Fralick, Clayton Harold Winter Park, Fla. 

Fudger, William Burt Jacksonville, Fla. 

Gibbons, Gordon Lorraine Tampa, Fla. 

Gomez, Joseph Maria Tampa, Fla. 

Graham, George Boyington Tampa, Fla. 

Grazier, Joseph Albert Tyrone, Pa. 

Hearn, John Melvin Little River, Fla. 

Hendricks, Benjamin E Miami, Fla. 

Hitchcock, William Stanley Ellenton, Fla. 

Hobbs, William Franklin Tampa, Fla. 

Horrell, Merton Stuart Gainesville, Fla. 

Jobe, Wilbur Donald Beaver Falls, Pa. 

Johnson, Jr., J. Malcolm Monticello, Fla. 

Jordan, Birkett Fry Gainesville, Fla. 

Julian, Ronald Arthur _ Lakeland, Fla. 

Lake, Edmund Alexander Laurens, S. C. 

Livingston, Junious Bishop St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Marshall, Tom Jacksonville, Fla. 

Mason, Ernest Edward Century, Fla. 

Millman, Emanuel Newark, N. J. 

Murphree, John A. H Gainesville, Fla. 

Naylor, Richard Morris Lakeland, Fla. 

Norvell, Jr., William Cook Lakeland, Fla. 

Revels, Percy B Florahome, Fla. 



26 University of Florida 

Roberts, B. K Sopchoppy, Fla. 

Robinson, Wilburn Frank Leesburg, Fla. 

Rosin, Marcus Ansel Arcadia, Fla. 

Russ, Sam Wallace Tampa, Fla. 

Schwartz, Joseph Miami, Fla. 

Shafer, William Wallace Haines City, Fla. 

Slagle, (Mrs.) Alma Spencer Gainesville, Fla. 

Smith, Foster Shi Hawthorne, Fla. 

Smithdeal, Jr., Cyrus Hamlin Gainesville, Fla. 

Sparkman, Claude Jefferson Miami, Fla. 

Spoto, Ignatius C Tampa, Fla. 

Triplett, Oliver Beaman Forest, Miss. 

Watts, jr., Olin Ethredge Gainesville, Fla. 

West, Marion Huguenin Marianna, Fla. 

Wingert, Charles Hawk Funxsutawney, Pa. 

Wray, Lewis Thomas Owensboro, Ky. 

Yenawine, Jr., George Bourne Jacksonville, Fla. 

Young, Harry Irwin Tarpon Springs, Fla. 

FIRST YEAR CLASS 

Abernathy, James Greenwood Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. 

Aikin, Horace Dean St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Airth, George Edward Live Oak, Fla. 

Auger, Francis Paul Orlando, Fla. 

Bancroft, Winthrop Jacksonville, Fla. 

Baynard, Henry Swinton St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Bishop, Howard Wayne Gainesville, Fla. 

Black, Jr., Robert Lucas Gainesville, Fla. 

Boozer, Elwin Claude West Palm Beach, Fla. 

Bouvier, Jr., John Andre Jacksonville, Fla. 

Bradford, Aimer Lee Miami, Fla. 

Brandt, Jr.. Edward Frederick Gainesville, Fla. 

Bryan, William Allen Charlotte, N. C. 

Buie, Jr., George Archibald Lake City, Fla. 

Burch, Ernest W Ocala, Fla. 

Burch, William George St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Camp, Henry Nurney Ocala, Fla, 

Campbell. Byron Fred Hilliard, Fla. 

Cannon, Frank T Falmouth, Fla. 

Carleton, William Graves , Evansville, Ind. 

Casebier, H. N Kathleen, Fla. 

Chambliss, James Walter Tampa, Fla. 

Churchill, Franklin Davis Evansville, Ind. 

Cleare, Jr., Allan Bruce Key West, Fla. 

Cleveland, Jr., Wilburn Augustine Jacksonville, Fla. 

Colvin, Henry Howard Perry, Fla. 

Coogler, Monroe Alvin Brooksville, Fla. 

Davis, William Maklon St. Petersburg, Fla. 

DeHoff, Philip Donald Jacksonville, Fla. 

Eddy, Byi-on Lillius St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Edelstein, Marcus Gainesville, Fla. 

Edwards, Terry Warren Lakeland, Fla. 

English, Bernard Henry Lake City, Fla. 

Enwall, Hayford Octavius Gainesville, Fla. 

Ferguson, Chester Howell Wauchula, Fla. 

Ferguson, Jr., Stanley Hugh Wauchula, Fla. 

Fiore, Hannibal Massa Gainesville, Fla. 

Fisher, Augustus Alston Pensacola, Fla. 

Frank, David Miami, Fla. 

Gardner, Jr., Milton Cook Camilla, Ga. 



College of Law 27 

Gamer, James Franklin Fort Myers, Fla. 

Gex, Lucien Marion Bay St. Louis, Miss. 

Gibson, Herbert Tuttle West Palm Beach, Fla. 

Graham, John Louis Florida City, Fla. 

Gramling, William Sanders Miami, Fla. 

Granger, Stanley Miami, Fla. 

Green, Carl Rodger St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Green, George Marvin Tampa, Fla. 

Guyton, Charles Moses Marianna, Fla. 

Hall, Malcolm Jackson Tampa, Fla. 

Hardeman, Dorsey Bradie Henderson, Tenn. 

Harris, Frank Pierce Fort Myers, Fla. 

Harris, William Curry Key West, Fla. 

Harrison, Thomas Wade Palmetto, Fla. 

Hendrv, Jr., Henry Asberry Tampa, Fla. 

Hill, William Logan Washington, D. C. 

Holsberry, John Edwin Pensacola, Fla. 

Hubbard, Thomas Brewer Lakeland, Fla. 

Hughes, Jr.. Robert L Bartow, Fla. 

Inman, Rudolph Joe Crescent City, Fla. 

Johnson, Jr., James Marshall Orlando, Fla. 

Jordan, William Douglass New Smyrna, Fla. 

Josey, M. Elroy West Palm Beach, Fla. 

Judge, William W Daytona Beach, Fla. 

Kelly, Sumter Martin Bradenton, Fla. 

Kolbe, Harold Henry Waukegan, lU. 

Lanier, David Madison, Fla. 

Leach, Jr., Robert Clearwater, Fla. 

Lewis, Jr., Henry Hays Marianna, Fla. 

Long, Latimer Ashley Haines City, Fla. 

Loworn, Charles Jason Okeechobee, Fla. 

McAlister, Kenneth Campbell Miami, Fla. 

McDonald, Robert Ernest Fulford, Fla. 

Mcintosh, Jr., Harry David St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Messer, Jr., James Tallahassee, Fla. 

Middlekauff, Willis William Orlando, Fla. 

Miller, Maxwell Victor Miami, Beach, Fla. 

Parks, Jr., George W Stuart, Fla. 

Pelot, Frank Cooper Manatee, Fla. 

Perry, Jr., Sidney Rawson Sarasota, Fla. 

Phillips, William Sigmon Tampa, Fla. 

Pierson, Alvin P Trulock, CaL 

Powell, Jr., William Harmon Gainesville, Fla. 

Ramsey, Allan Collier Tampa, Fla. 

Rawls, Charles Vernon Lakeland, Fla. 

Reese, John Lewis Pensacola, Fla. 

Richards, John Lawler Carrollton, Ohio 

Rifkin, Louis Burney Miami, Fla. 

Ripley, Wayne Eugene Jacksonville, Fla. 

Rivers, Thompson Judson Green Cove Springs, Fla. 

Roberts, Ernest Edward Homestead, Fla. 

Roberts, Joseph Leon Miami, Fla. 

Roberts, Nathan J Daytona Beach, Fla. 

Roberts, William Harold Homestead, Fla. 

Rosenhouse, David Lazar Miami, Fla. 

Sarra, Ernest LaMar Gainesville, Fla. 

Shands, William Augustine Gainesville, Fla. 

Shopiro, Joe Miami Beach, Fla. 

Silverman, Sam Florida City, Fla. 

Simmons, John Humphries Arcadia, Fla. 



28 University of Florida 

Simmons, Robert Clyde Wauchula, Fla. 

Simpson, Arthur Allen Jacksonville, Fla. 

Smith, Allen Lowde New Smyi-na, Fla. 

Smith, David Clair Wabasso, Fla. 

Snyder, Russell Edw^ard Wilkinsburg, Pa. 

Stanly, George Booth Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. 

Stanly, Richard Lee Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. 

Stephens, Alexander Hamilton Jacksonville, Fla. 

Tannehill, Joseph Francis Coconut Grove, Fla. 

Thacker, Omer Stephen Kissimmee, Fla. 

Thrower, Frank Briggs Quincy, Fla. 

Traxler, Leon William Alachua, Fla. 

Turner, Edward Eugene Lecanto, Fla. 

Turner, Glover Manuel Jacksonville, Fla. 

Vanderipe, Jr., John Fisk Bradenton, Fla. 

Wallace, Samuel DelMar Gainesville, Fla. 

Warren, Fuller Blountstown, Fla. 

Watson, Ray Marcus Coral Gables, Fla. 

White, Amos Burdett St, Petersburg, Fla. 

Widell, Carl Aroyde West Palm Beach, Fla. 

Wiig, Howard Edgerton Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. 

Williams, Nat Lawrence Miami, Fla. 

Williams, William Bertrand St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Wise, Jacob Hooper Gainesville, Fla. 

Wolfe, Stanley Reid Pensacola, Fla. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS (Second Year) 

Allen, John Edward Tampa, Fla. 

McCollum, Edward Benjamin Tavares, Fla. 

Pomeroy, Joseph D Jacksonville, Fla. 

Potter, Nelson Augustine Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. 

Westbrook, Albert Theodore Clermont, Fla. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS (First Year) 

Bryan, Johnson Hamlin Jacksonville, Fla. 

Carter, George Lewis Tampa, Fla. 

Drysdale, Richard Daniel Jacksonville, Fla. 

Gibson, Walter Terry West Palm Beach, Fla. 

Lewis, Jr., Edward Clay Marianna, Fla. 

McRae, Charles Perrin Lake City, Fla. 

Meloy, Henry Joseph : Ft. Dodge, Iowa 

Wansker, William Jacksonville, Fla. 

STUDENTS FROM OTHER COLLEGES TAKING ONE OR TWO 
SUBJECTS 

Ames Burton Weber Kissimmee, Fla. 

Eshleman, Silas Kendrick Gainesville, Fla. 

Wyse, John Hope Clewiston, Fla. 



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