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Full text of "University record"

UNIVERSITY 
OF FLORIDA 
LIBRARY 




University i\rcfiives 

George A. Smalhers Libraries 
University of Florida 




H 






University of Florida 



GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA 




Anniial Caiaiog. r^28-;i929 

Arinouncements for 1929-1630 



CONTENTS 

PART ONE 

ADMINISTRATIVE AND EXECUTIVE BOARDS 3 

UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 6 

OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY 8 

COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 26 

PART TWO 

GENERAL INFORMATION 29 

Historical Statement 30 

Location 31 

Equipment 32 

Recent Gifts 39 

Government and Regulations 40 

Income 41 

Expenses 42 

Fellowships, Scholarships and Loan Funds 46 

Honors 49 

Alumni Association 50 

Student Organizations and Publications 51 

Admission 53 

PART THREE 

THE COLLEGES 59 

Graduate School 60 

College of Arts and Sciences 62 

College of Agriculture 67 

College 67 

Experiment Station 76 

Agricultural Extension Division 78 

College of Engineering and Architecture 84 

Engineering 84 

School of Architecture 91 

Engineering Experiment Station 94 

College of Law 95 

Teachers College 99 

College 99 

University Summer School 107 

College of Pharmacy _ 109 

College of Commerce and Journalism 114 

Division of Athletics and Physical Education 126 

Division of Military Sci^Nev.\Ai(u^TACfiL$.:..c....... 128 

Division of Music .....C.^ *!...!,.,.-'......'; A...4..J.$.i...;.\i.., 130 

General ExTENsipN'.DiVisibN ..—'..".'!.«.'.}!....«/.,■: 131 

..;■'•" PART FOUR '':•*'/,• 

DEP/RTMfi?iXS" OF INSTR'UC(ri0'N..;'.;-.vi ; I It.'.!*?.;!.'. 135 

\" ' '* ' 'PART'FiVfi ' -^ 

DEGREES CONFERRED 1928 229 

STUDENT ROLL ? 236 

SUMMARY OF ENROLLMENT 263 

INDEX 266 



PART I— OFFICERS 

BOARD OF CONTROL 

P. K. YONCE, Chairman _ Pensacolc 

Albert H. Blanding Bartow 

W. B. Davis „ Perry 

Edward W. Lane _ Jacksonville 

Frank J. Wideman West Palm Beach 

J. T. Dlamond, Secretary, Tallahassee 



STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

Doyle E. Carlton Governor 

H. Clay Crawford Secretary of State 

W. V. Knott State Treasurer 

Fred H. Davis Attorney General 

W. S. Cawthon, Secretary.^ ^...State Superintendent of Public Instruction 



UNIVERSITY COUNCIL 

John James Tigert, M.A. (Oxon.), Ed.D., D.C.L., LL.D President of the University 

Jas. M. Farr, Ph.D Vice President of the University 

Jas. N. Anderson, Ph.D _ Dean ef the College of Arts and Sciences 

WiLMON Newell, D.Sc Dean of the College of Agriculture 

J. R. Benton, Ph.D Dean of the College of Engineering and Architecture 

Harry R. Trusler, LL.B ^..JDean of the College of Law 

Jas. W. Norman, Ph.D Dean of the Teachers College 

TowNEs R. Leigh. Ph.D Dean of the College of Pharmacy 

Walter J. Matherly, M.A Dean of the College of Commerce and Journalism 

Bert Clair Riley, B.A Dean of the General Extension Division 

Harley Willard Chandler, M.S Secretary, Registrar 

Benjamin Arthur Tolbert, B.A Dean of Men 



\v^%\ 



FRESHMAN WEEK 

(September 16 to 20, 1929) 

Freshmen entering the University for the first time 
are required to report at the University Auditorium, Mon- 
day, September 16, at 11:00 A.M. Those appearing at 
any later time will be subject to the penalty for late 
registration. 

During this week the Freshman will hear lectures on 
important University customs and regulations, will meet 
members of the faculty and will become acquainted with 
the University campus and buildings. He will also take 
a number of tests for the purpose of enabling the Uni- 
versity to advise him relative to his work. In short, the 
purpose of the week is to prepare each student as far 
as possible, for the work that is expected of him and 
to start him right at the beginning of his University life. 

ALL HIGH SCHOOL ENTRANCE UNITS SHOULD 
BE PRESENTED TO THE REGISTRAR OF THE UNI- 
VERSITY BY SEPTEMBER 1, 1929. BE SURE TO 
BRING THE ADMISSION SLIP FURNISHED YOU 
BY THE REGISTRAR WITH YOU ON SEPTEM- 
BER 16. 



6 UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 

THE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 

1929-1930 

1929 

June 10, Monday Summer Session begins. 

June 22, Saturday Last day for filing application for degrees 

at the end of the Summer Session. 

July 4, Thursday Independence Day. 

July 8, Monday Last day to make Graduate applications. 

July 17, Wednesday Last day for submitting theses to the 

Graduate Committee. 

July 31, Wednesday, 8:00 p. m Summer Session Commencement Convo- 
cation. 

August 2, Friday, 5:00 p. m. Summer Session ends. 

August 12, Monday Farmers' Week begins. 

August 31, Saturday Last day for filing applications for fall 

re-examinations. 

First Semester 

September 12-14, Thursday to Satortfay.... Re-examinations and Entrance Examina- 
tions. 

September 16-20, Monday thru Friday Freshman registration and Orientation, 

including engineering qualifying exam- 
ination and other tests. (A special pro- 
gram of the routine of this week will 
be available by June 1, 1929.) All 
Freshmen must be present at the Uni- 
versity Auditorium at 11:00 o'clock 
a. m., Monday, September 16, or they 
will not be registered during that week, 
and will be required to pay the fees for 
late registration. 

September 19-20, Thursday and Friday Registration of Upperclassmen. 

September 21, Saturday All classes will meet for the assignment of 

work for classes on Monday and Tues- 
day of the succeeding week. Late reg- 
istration fee for all students. 

September 30, Monday Changes in courses— fee $5.00. 

Annual meeting of Extension Agents. 

October 5, Saturday Meeting of the General Faculty. 

October 16, Wednesday, 8:00 a. m Registration for classes in the first sem- 
ester closes. Final date for making 
applications for degrees at the end of 
the first semester. 

October 19, Saturday Last day for dropping courses without 

grade. 

October 24, Thursday...^ „ All Freshman grades are due. 

November 1, Friday Last day for Graduate applications. 

November 11, Monday Armistice Day. 

November 21, Thursday Midsemester grades are due. 

November 24, Saturday, 12:00 noon Midsemester grades are delinquent. 



UNIVERSITY CALENDAR " 

November 28, Thursday Thanksgiving Day. 

December 18, Wednesday Freshman grades are due. 

December 20, Friday, 5:00 p. m Christmas recess begins. 

1930 , 

January 6, Monday, 8:00 a. m Christmas recess ends. 

January 6, Monday and continuing for 

three weeks Students file registration cards for tho 

second semester with the Registrar, fol- 
lowing the schedule as posted on the 
bulletin boards. 

January 18, Saturday Last date for submitting theses to Gradu- 

ate Committee. 

January 24, Friday, 9 a. m Final examinations for the first semester 

begin. 
January 31-February 1, Friday and Sat- 
urday Registration of new students for the sec- 
ond semester. 
All semester grades are due 5:00 p. m., 
Saturday. 
February 1, Saturday, 8:00 p. m Commencement convocation. 

Second Semester 

February 3, Monday Second semester begins. 

Changes in registration due to first sem- 
ester failures. Late registration fee be- 
gins. 

February 4, Tuesday Second semester classes begin. Change in 

courses — fee $5.00. 

February 8, Saturday Meeting of the General Faculty. 

February 15, Saturday Registration for second semester closes. 

March 1, Saturday Last date for applications for degrees at 

the end of the second semester. 
Last date for filing Graduate applications 
for those entering the second semester. 

March 8, Saturday Last day for dropping a course without 

grade. 

April 3, Thursday .-Midsemester grades are due. 

April 5, Saturday, 12:00 noon Midsemester grades are delinquent. 

May 20, Tuesday Last day for submitting theses to Graduate 

Committee. 

May 23, Friday Final examinations begin. 

May 31, Saturday Meeting of the General Faculty. 

June 1-3, Sunday to Tuesday Commencement exercises. 

June 1, Sunday, 11:00 a. m Baccalaureate Sermon. 

June 2, Monday Annual Alumni Meeting. 

Class Day Exercises. 
Oratorical Contests. 

June 3, Tuesday Commencement Convocation. 

June 2, Monday Boys' Club Week begins. 

June 16, Monday Summer Session begins. 

August 8, Friday Summer Session ends. 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

UNIVERSITY 

John James Tigert, M.A. (Oxon.), Ed.D., D.C.L., LL.D J'residen.t 

James Marion Farr, M.A., Ph.D Vice-President 

Charles Langley Crow, M.A., Ph.D Secretary of the General Faculty 

Klein Harrison Graham Business Manager 

Harley Willard Chandler, M.S Registrar 

Cora Miltimore, B.S Xibrarian 

Benjamin Arthur Tolbert, B.A Dean of Men 

COLLEGES 

James Nesbitt Anderson, M.A., Ph.D — Dean of the College of Arts and 

Sciences 

William Harold Wilson, M.A., Ph.D Assistant Dean of the College of Arts 

and Sciences 

WiLMON Newell, M.S., D.Sc Dean of the College of Agriculture, Di- 
rector of the Experiment Station and 
the Agricultural Extension Division. 

Wilbur Leonidas Floyd, M.S Assistant Dean of the College of Agri- 
culture 

John Robert Benton, B.A., Ph.D Dean of the College of Engineering and 

Architecture 

Harry Raymond Trusler, M.A., LL.B Dean of the College of Law 

James William Norman, M.A., Ph.D Dean of the Teachers College and Di- 
rector of the Summer Session 

TowNES Randolph Leigh, M.A., Ph.D Dean of the College of Pharmacy 

Walter Jeffries Matherly, M. A Dean of the College of Commerce and 

Journalism 

Rudolph Weaver, B.S., A.LA Architect for Board of Control, Director 

of School of Architecture 

OTHER ADMINISTRATIVE UNITS 

Bert Clair Riley, B.A., B.S.A Dean of the General Extension Division 

George C. Tillman, M.D University Physician 

Thompson Van Hyning Director of Florida State Museum 



OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY 9 

OFFICERS OF INSTRUCTION AND RESEARCH 

John James Tigert, M.A. (Oxon.), Ed.D., D.C.L., LL.D., President 

Charles Eluott Abbott, M.S Agriculture Building 

Assistant Professor of Horticulture 

OuiDA Davis Abbott, M.A., Ph.D. (Missouri) Expt. Station Building 

Chief, Home Economics Research, Experiment Station 

Chester Frederick Ahmann, B.A., Ph.D. (Missouri)...- Expt. Station Building 

Physiologist, Home Economics Research, Experiment Station 

Robert Verrill Aluson, M.S., Ph.D. (Rutgers) Belle Glade, Florida 

Soils Specialist, Everglades Experiment Station 

Clyde C. Alexander, Capt., Field Artillery, U. S. Army Engineering Bldg. 

Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics 

Burton Weber Ames, B.S.A Language Hall 

Head of Correspondence Study, General Extension Division 

James Nesbitt Anderson, M.A., Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins) Language Hall 

Dean of College of Arts and Sciences, Professor of Ancient Languages 

Montgomery Drummond Anderson, B.S., Ph.D. (Robert Brookings). ...Language Hall 
Professor of Business Statistics and Economics 

Ernest George Atkin, M.A., Ph.D. (Harvard) Language Hall 

Professor of French 

RoLLiN Salisbury Atwood, M.A., Ph.D. (Clark) Language Hall 

Assistant Professor of Economic Geography 

Charles W. Bachman, LL.B Basket Ball Court 

Director of Physical Education and Athletics 

Ei. iEST T. Barco, Capt., Field Artillery, U. S. Army Engineering Bldg. 

Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics 

George Eric Barnes, B.S.C.E Engineering Building 

Associate Professor of Civil Engineering 

Robert Marlin Barnette, B.S., Ph.D. (Rutgers) Expt. Station Building 

Associate Chemist, Experiment Station 

Robert Colder Beaty, M.A Y. M. C. A. Building 

Associate Professor of Religious Education 

Frank F. Becker, Capt., Infantry, U. S. Army Engineering Bldg. 

Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics 

Raymond Brown Becker, M.S., Ph.D. (Minnesota) Expt. Station Building 

Associate in Dairy Husbandry, Experiment Station 



10 OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY 

Francis Joseph Bedenk, B.A Basket Ball Court 

Associate Professor of Physical Education 

Walter Herman Beisler, M.S.. D.Sc. (Princeton) 101 Chemistry Building 

Professor of Chemical Engineering 

Charles Edward Bell, M.S Expt. Station Building 

Assistant Chemist, Experiment Station 

Charles Homer Bell, Staff Sergeant, Infantry, U. S. Army....204 Engineering Bldg, 
Instructor in Military Science and Tactics 

Gilmer M. Bell, Capt., Infantry, U. S. Army Engineering Building 

Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics 

Claudius Edmund Bennett, M.S.E.E. (Illinois) Mechanical Engineering Bldg. 

Instructor in Electrical Engineering 

John Robert Benton, B.A., Ph.D. (Gottingen) Engineering Building 

Dean of the College of Engineering and Architecture, 
Professor of Physics 

Alvin Percy Black, B.A 114 Chemistry Building 

Professor of Agricultural Chemistry 

Raymond William Blacklock, B.A Horticulture Building 

Boys' Club Agent, Agricultural Extension Division 

Gulie Hargrove Blackmon, M.S.A Expt. Station Building 

Pecan Culturist, Experiment Station 

Arthur Aaron Bless, M.S., Ph.D. (Cornell) Mechanical Engr. Building 

Assistant Professor of Physics 

James Robert Boyd, Jr Basket Ball Court 

Assistant Director of Physical Education 

Joseph C. Brandkamp, Sergeant, Field Artillery, U. S. Army.. ..Engineering Building 
Instructor in Military Science and Tactics 

Homer Eells Bratley, M.S.A Expt. Station Building 

Assistant in Entomology, Experiment Station 

Lucius Moody Bristol, M.A., Ph.D. (Harvard) Peabody Hall 

Professor of Sociology 

Marvin Adel Brooker, M.S.A Expt. Station Building 

Assistant in Agricultural Economics, Experiment Station 

Albert Nelson Brooks, B.A., Ph.D. (Wisconsin) Plant City, Florida 

Associate Plant Pathologist, Experiment Station 

Charles Carroll Brown, C.E., M.A Engineering Building 

Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering 



OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY 11 

Hamlin L. Brown, B.S.A Horticulture Building 

Extension Dairyman, Agricultural Extension Division 

Richard DeWitt Brown Auditorium 

Director of Music 

Alvin Lowell Browne, B.A Basket Ball Court 

Associate Professor of Physical Education 

Frank Warner Brumley, M.S.A Horticulture Building 

Instructor in Farm Management 

Joseph Brunet, Ph.D. (Stanford) 301 Language HaU 

Assistant Professor of French 

Ollie Clifton Bryan, M.S., Ph.D. (Wisconsin) Agriculture Building 

Professor of Agronomy 

LuDwiG William Buchholz, M.A. 50 Thomas HaU 

Professor of Bible 

E. Walter Burkhardt, B.S., M. Arch Peabody Hall 

Instructor in Architecture 

Alan Beverly Burritt, B.A., M.L.A Agriculture Building 

Associate Professor of Horticulture 

Charles Francis Byers, M.A Science Hall 

Assistant Professor of Biology 

Henry Holland Caldwell, M.A _ Language Hall 

Assistant Professor of English 

Arthur Forrest Camp, B.A., Ph.D. (Washington Univ.) Expt. Station Building 

Horticulturist, Experiment Station 

William Graves Carleton, B.A Peabody Hall 

Instructor in Sociology 

William Richard Carroll, M.S. Science Hall 

Assistant Professor of Botany and Bacteriology 

William Angus Carver, M.S., Ph.D. (Iowa State Col.) Expt. Station Building 

Assistant Cotton Specialist, Experiment Station 

Bernard V. Christensen, M.S. Pharm., Ph.D. (Wisconsin). ...314 Chemistry Building 
Professor of Pharmacognosy and Pharmacology 

Harley Willard Chandler, M.S 105 Language Hall 

Registrar 

Harold Gray Clayton, M.S.A Horticulture Building 

District Agent, Agricultural Extension Division 

Robert Spratt Cockrell, M.A., LL.B. (Virginia) 104 Law Building 

Professor of Laiv 



12 OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY 

Madison Derrell Cody, M.A Science Hdl 

Professor of Botany and Bacteriology 

John Melton Coleman, B.S Expt. Station Building 

Assistant Chemist, Experiment Station 

John Francis Cooper, B.S.A Horticulture Building 

Editor, Experiment Station and Agricultural Extension Division 

Warben Cassius Cowell, B.S Basket Ball Court 

Associate Professor of Physical Education 

Allen Thornton Craig, M.A Peabody Hall 

Instructor in Mathematics 

Clifford Waldorf Crandall, B.S., LL.B. (Michigan) 205 Law Building 

Professor of Law 

Ida Keeling Cresap _ Horticulture Building 

Librarian, Experiment Station 

Charles Langley Crow, M.A., Ph.D. (Gottingen) Language Hall 

Professor of German and Spanish 

Raymond Merchant Crown, B.S.A Expt. Station Building 

Field Assistant in Plant Physiology, Experiment Station 

Charles Ralph Dawson, B.S.A Expt. Station Building 

Assistant in Dairy Investigation, Experiment Station 

John William DeBruyn, M.A Auditorium 

Instructor in Music 

Ezra Frankun DeBusk, B.S Horticulture Building 

Extension Citrus Entomologist-Pathologist, Agricultural Extension Division 

Ralph Davis Dickey, B.S.A Agriculture Building 

Acting Professor of Entomology and Plant Pathology 

Harwood Burrows Dolbeare, B.A Language Hall 

Associate Professor of Finance 

Bernard Francis Dostal, M.A Mechanical Engineering Building 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

Howard Dykman, B.A., LL.B Language Hall 

Associate Professor of Economics and Insurance 

Auther H. Eddins, PhJ). (Iowa State College) Expt. Station Building 

Assistant Plant Pathologist, Experiment Station 

John Grady Eldridge, M.A Language Hall 

Assistant Professor of Economics 

Elmer Jacob Emig, M.A Language Hall 

Professor of Journalism 



OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY 13 

Charles Ranger Enlow, M.S.A., Expt. Station Building 

Assistant Agronomist, Experiment Station (Cooperation with U.S.D.A.) 

Martin Russell Ensign, M.S Expt. Station Building 

Assistant Horticulturist, Experiment Station 

Hasse Octavius Enwall, S.T.B., Ph.D. (Boston) 108 Peabody Hall 

Professor of Psychology and Philosophy 

Walter William Fred Enz, B.S. Pharm 304 Chemistry Building 

Instructor in Pharmacy 

Silas Kendrick Eshleman, Jr., M.S., M.E Engineering Building 

Assistant Professor of Drawing and Mechanic Arts 

Henry Clay Evans, Jr., M.A., Ph.D. (Columbia) 3 Peabody Hall 

Professor of History 

Lester Collins Farris, M.A. Language Hall 

Associate Professor of English 

Samuel Todd Fleming, B.A Horticulture Building 

Director, Experiment Station 

Wilbur Leonidas Floyd, M.S Agriculture Building 

Assistant Dean of College of Agriculture, Professor of Horticulture 

Perry Albert Foote, M.S. (Pharm.) Ph.D. (Wisconsin) Chemistry Building 

Associate Professor of Pharmacy 

J. Franklin Fudge, Ph.D Lake Alfred, Florida 

Assistant Chemist, Experiment Station 

Joseph Richard Fulk, M.A., Ph.D. (Nebraska) Peabody Hall 

Professor of Education 

Leonard William Gaddum, B.A., Ph.D. (Missouri) Expt. Station Building 

Biochemist, Home Economics Research, Experiment Station 

Edward Walter Garris, M.A., Ph.D. (Peabody) Peabody Hall 

Professor of Agricultural Education 

William Teague Gay, B.S., LL.B Language Hall 

Instructor in English 

Maurice Bernard Gill Peabody Hall 

Instructor in Architecture 

Flavia Gleason Tallahassee, Florida 

State Home Demonstration Agent 

James David Glunt, M.A Peabody Hall 

Instructor in History and Political Science 

Robert Cabaniss Goodv?in, M.A., Ph.D. (Harvard) 130 Chemistry Building 

Assistant Professor of Chemistry 



14 OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY 

Howard William Gray, M.S., C.P.A. (Illinois) Language Hall 

Associate Professor of Accounting 

John Gray, B.A., M.S Agriculture Building 

Professor of Entomology and Plant Pathology 
Absent on leave 1929-30 

Levi Otto Gratz, B.A., Ph.D. (Cornell) Hastings, Florida 

Associate Plant Pathologist, Experiment Station 

Edgar Frederick Grossman, M.A _ Expt. Station Building 

Assistant Entomologist, Experiment Station 

Henry Glenn Hamilton, Ph.D. (Cornell) Horticulture Building 

Associate Professor of Marketing Agricultural Products 

Fred T. Hannaford, B.A Peabody Hall 

Instructor in Architecture 

Lyman George Haskell, M.D Gymnasium 

Associate Professor of Gymnastics 

William Byron Hathaway, M.A Peabody Hall 

Associate Professor of Spanish 

Oliver Howard Hauptmann, M.A _ Language Hall 

Instructor in Spanish 
Absent on leave 1928-29 

Stacy Hawkins, B.A Homestead, Florida 

Field Assistant in Plant Pathology, Experiment Station 

Fred Harvey Heath, B.S., Ph.D. (Yale) 102 Chemistry Building 

Professor of Chemistry 

John F. Hefner, Capt., Infantry, U. S. Army Engineering Building 

Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics 

Jackson Doling Hester, B.S ~ Expt. Station Building 

Assistant Chemist, Experiment Station 

Alfred Nash Higgins, B.A Basket Ball Court 

Associate Professor of Physical Education 

Elmer Dumond Hinkley, B.A 110 Peabody Hall 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 

Theodore Huntington Hubbell, B.A Science Hall 

Associate Professor of Biology 

Fred Harold Hull, M.S Expt. Station Building 

Assistant Agronomist, Experiment Station 

Dallas Burnett Hundley, Staff Sergeant, Infantry, U. S. Army 204 Eng. Building 

Instructor in Military Science and Tactics 



OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY 15 

HuBER Christian Hurst, B.A., LL.B Language Hall 

Assistant Professor of Economics and Business Law 

William John Husa, Ph.G., Ph.D. (Iowa) 302 Chemistry Building 

Professor of Pharmacy 

Robert William Huston, M.A 302 Language Hall 

Instructor in French 

Edward Thornton Ingle, B.A Language Hall 

Assistant Professor of Journalism 

Vestus Twiggs Jackson, M.S., Ph.D. (Chicago) 210 Chemistry Building 

Associate Professor of Chemistry 

Hampton McNeely Jarrell, M.A Language Hall 

Instructor in English 

Eli Johnofski Johns, Ph.D. (Havana) Language Hall 

Instructor in Spanish 

John Evander Johnson, B.D., M.A Y. M. C. A. Building 

General Secretary, Y.M.C.A., Instructor in Bible 

John Henry Jefferies Lake Alfred, Florida 

Superintendent, Citrus Experiment Station 

Henry Norton June, B.S. Arch., A. LA Peabody Hall 

Instructor in Architecture 

Lloyd August Kasten, M.A Language Hall 

Instructor in Spanish 
On leave 1928-29 

David G. A. Kelbert Bradenton, Florida 

Field Assistant in Plant Pathology, Experiment Station 

Mary Ellen Keown, M.S Tallahassee, Florida 

District Agent, Home Demonstration Work 

William DeLancey Klinepeter, Sergeant, U. S. Army 204 Engineering Building 

Chief Clerk and Instructor in Military Science and Tactics 

Franklin Wesley Kokomoor, M.A., Ph.D. (Michigan) Mech. Engr. Building 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

William Abraham Kuntz, M.S Lake Alfred, Florida 

Assistant Plant Pathologist, Experiment Station 

Joseph Harrison Kusner, B.A Peabody Hall 

Instructor in Mathematics 

James Miller Leake, B.A., Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins) 107 Language Hall 

Professor of Americanism and Southern History, 
Professor of History and Political Science 



16 OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY 

TowNEs Randoph Leigh, M.A., Ph.D. (Chicago) 200 Chemistry Building 

Dean of the College of Pharmacy, Professor of Chemistry 

Aaron Whitney Leland Agriculture Building 

Farm Foreman, College of Agriculture 

Walter Anthony Leukel, B.S.A., Ph.D. (Wisconsin) Expt. Station Building 

Associate Agronomist, Experiment Station 

John Peyton Little, Jr., B.S.E.E., M.S Engineering Building 

Instructor in Physics 
Absent on leave 1928-29 

Wilbert Alva Little, M.A Peabody Hall 

Associate Professor of Languages and Mathematics 

Walter K. Long, B.F.A Peabody Hall 

Instructor in Architecture and Drawing 

Earll Leslie Lord, B.A Agriculture Building 

Professor of Horticulture 

Kenneth Wilfred Loucks, B.S Ebcpt. Station Building 

Assistant in Plant Pathology, Experiment Station 

Thomas Marvel Lowe, B.S.C.E Engineering Building 

Instructor in Civil Engineering 

Ruby McDavid Tallahassee, Florida 

District Agent, Home Demonstration Work 

Bruce McKinley, B.S.A Expt. Station Building 

Assistant Agricultural Economist, Experiment Station 

Nicholas A. Magaro, B.A Language Hall 

Instructor in Spanish 

Housden Lane Marshall, M.S Expt. Station Building 

Assistant Chemist, Experiment Station 

Freeman Goode Martin, M.S .Agriculture Building 

Instructor in Animal Husbandry and Dairying 

Walter Jefferies Matherly, M.A Language Hall 

Dean of College of Commerce and Journalism, Professor of Economics 

Norman Ripley Mehrhof, B.S., M.Agr Horticulture Building 

Extension Poultryman, Agricultural Extension Division 

Charles Arthur Messick, M.A. Peabody Hall 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

Ralph L. Miller, M.S., Ph.D. (Ohio State) Sanford, Florida 

Associate Entomologist, Experiment Station 



/ 



OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY 17 

Cora Miltimore, B.S _ Library 

Librarian 

EIrnest George Moorje, M-S^ -...Horticulture Building 

Assistant Editor, Experiment Station 

Virginia Pearl Moore Tallahassee, Florida 

Assistant State Home Demonstration Agent 

William C. Moore, Capt., Infantry, U. S. Army Engineering Building 

Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics 

James Monroe Morris, Captain, Infantry, U. S. Army Engineering Building 

Adjutant and Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics 

Charles Eugene Mounts, B.A.E Language Hall 

Instructor in English 

Harold Mowry Expt. Station Building 

Assistant Horticulturist, Experiment Station 

Allen Paul Mullins Agriculture Building 

Herdsman, College of Agriculture 

Howard Barton Myers, B.A Language Hall 

Associate Professor of Economic History 

William Thomas Nettles, B.S Horticulture Building 

District Agent, Agricultural Extension Division 

WiLMON Newell. M.S., D.Sc. (Iowa State Col.) Horticulture Building 

Dean of College of Agriculture 
Director of Experiment Station and Agricultural Extension Division 

Clarence Vernon Noble, B.S., Ph.D. (Cornell) Expt. Station BuUding 

Agricultural Economist, Experiment Station 

Robert Emmett Nolen, M.S.A Monticello, Florida 

Field Assistant in Plant Pathology, Experiment Station 

James William Norman, M.A., Ph.D. (Columbia) Peabody Hall 

Dean of Teachers College, Professor of Education, Director of the Summer Session 

Burton J. H. Otte, B.A 116 Chemistry Building 

Curator in Chemistry 

William Sanford Perry, M.S Engineering Building 

Associate Professor of Physics 

Walter Petersen, M.A., Ph.D. (Yale) 305 Language Hall 

Associate Professor of Ancient Languages 

Jesse Lee Peterson, M.A Language Hall 

Instructor in English 



18 OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY 

Cecil Glenn Phipps, M.A., Ph.D. (Minnesota) Peabody Hall 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

John Piombo Gymnasium 

Associate Professor of Physical Training 

Ford Lewis Prescott, M.E Mechanical Engr. Building 

Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

Melvin Price, E.E., M.A. Mechanical Engr. Building 

Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

Percy Lawrence Reed, C.E., M.S Engineering Building 

Professor of Civil Engineering 

Jesse Reeves Quincy, Florida 

Foreman, Tobacco Experiment Station 

Arthur Stevens Rhoads, M.S., Ph.D. (Syracuse) Cocoa, Florida 

Associate Plant Pathologist, Experiment Station 

Bert Clair Riley, B.A., B.S.A 107 Language Hall 

Dean of General Extension Division 

George Edgar Ritchey, M.S.A Agriculture Building 

Assistant Professor of Agronomy 

Charles Archibald Robertson, M. A Language Hall 

Professor of English 

Joseph Roemer, M.A., Ph.D. (Peabody) Peabody Hall 

Professor of Secondary Education 

Frazier Rogers, B.S.A Agriculture Building 

Professor of Agricultural Engineering 

James Speed Rogers, M.A Science Hall 

Professor of Biology and Geology 

Rudolph William Ruprecht, M.S., Ph.D. (Mass. Agrl. Col.)..Expt. Station Building 
Chemist, Experiment Station 

Nathan Willard Sanborn, M.D Horticulture Building 

Professor of Poultry Husbandry 

Dorsey Addren Sanders, B.S., D.V.M Experiment Station Building 

Assistant Veterinarian, Experiment Station 

Lucy Belle Settle, B.S Horticulture Building 

District Agent, Home Demonstration Work 

Arthur Liston Shealy, B.S., D.V.M., Expt. Station Building 

Head of Animal Husbandry, Veterinarian, Experiment Station 
Professor of Veterinary Science 

Harley Bakewell Sherman, M.S Science Hall 

Associate Professor of Biology 



OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY 19 

Glenn Ballard Simmons, B.A.E Peabody Hall 

Assistant Professor of Education, Assistant Dean of the Teachers College 

Stanley Simonds, B.A., Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins) 105 Law Building 

Part Time Professor of Roman Latv 

Thomas Marshall Simpson, M.A., Ph.D. (Wisconsin) Peabody Hall 

Professor of Mathematics 

Alfred Melvin Skellett, M.S. (Washington Univ.) Mechanical Engr. Building 

Assistant Professor of Physics 

Dean Slacle, M.A., LL.B. (Yale) 203 Law Building 

Professor of Law 

Jesse Lee Smith Horticulture Building 

District Agent, Agricultural Extension Division 

Arthur Perceval Spencer, M.S.A Horticulture Building 

Vice Director, Agricultural Extension Division 

Mary Adams Stennis, M.A Tallahassee, Florida 

Home Dairy and Nutrition Agent 

Daniel Sheldon Stevens, M.S Engineering Building 

Instructor in Physics 

Linton Cooke Stevens, M.A Language Hall 

Instructor in French 

William Eugene Stokes, M.S Expt. Station Building 

Agronomist, Experiment Station 

Albert J. Strong, B.S.M.E Mechanical Engr. Building 

Professor of Drawing and Mechanic Arts 

George E. Tedder Belle Glade, Florida 

Foreman, Everglades Experiment Station 

Clarence John Te Selle, M.A., LL.B. (Wisconsin) Law Building 

Associate Professor of Law 

Ezekiel Fred Thomas, D.V.M Expt. Station Building 

Assistant Veterinarian, Experiment Station 

Ivor W. Thomas, Sergeant, Field Artillery, U. S. Army Engineering Building 

.Instructor in Military Science and Tactics 

George Washington Thompson, B.S., LL.B. (Michigan) „ Law Building 

Professor of Law 

WiLLLAM L. Thompson, B.S Lake Alfred, Florida 

Assistant Entomologist, Experiment Station 



20 , OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY 

ISABEXLE S. Thursby Tallahassee, Florida 

Foods and Marketing Agent 

DoYAL Edgar Timmons, M.S.A Horticulture Building 

Instructor in Farm Records 

William Burleigh Tisdale, M.S., Ph.D. (Wisconsin) Quincy, Florida 

Plant Pathologist, Experiment Station 

Archie N. Tissot, M.Sc Expt. Station Building 

Assistant Entomologist, Experiment Station 

Benjamin Arthur Tolbert, A.B.E Peabody Hall 

Assistant Professor of Education, Dean of Men 

Leslie Bennett Tribolet, Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins) Language Hall 

Assistant Professor of Political Science 

Harry Raymond Trusler, M.A., LL.B. (Michigan) 103 Law Building 

Dean of College of Law, Professor of Law 

John Edwin Turlington, M.S., Ph.D. (Cornell) Horticulture Building 

Professor of Agricultural Economics 

Clinton Burton VanCleef, M.S.A Expt. Station Building 

Foreman of Greenhouse, Experiment Station 

James A. VanFleet, Major, Infantry, U. S. Army Engineering Building 

Commandant of Cadets and Professor of Military Science and Tactics 

Jesse A. Vitatoe, Sergeant, Infantry, U. S. Army Engineering Building 

Instructor in Military Science and Tactics 

Ross F. Wadkins, M.S Quincy, Florida 

Laboratory Assistant, Tobacco Experiment Station 

Edgar Smith Walker, Colonel, U. S. Army (Retired) Mechanical Engr. Bldg. 

Instructor in Drawing 

Fred W. Walker , Monticello, Florida 

Assistant Entomologist, Experiment Station 

Marion Newman Walker, M.S., Ph.D. (Wisconsin) Expt. Station Building 

Assistant Cotton Specialist. Experiment Station 

Fred Curtis Ward, B.S Language Hall 

Instructor in Accounting 

John Vertrees Watkins, B.S Agriculture Building 

Assistant in Horticulture 

Joseph Ralph Watson, M.A Expt. Station Building 

Entomologist, Experiment Station 



OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY 21 

Rudolph Weaver, B.S., A.I.A Peabody Hall 

Director of School of Architecture, Professor of Architecture 

George Frederick Weber, M.S., Ph.D. (Wisconsin) Expt. Station Building 

Associate Plant Pathologist, Experiment Station 

Joseph Weil, B.S.E.E., M.S Engineering Building 

Acting Professor of Electrical Engineering 

Harold Willard Werner, B.S 318 Chemistry Building 

Instructor in Pharmacognosy and Pharmacology 

Erdman West, B.S Horticulture Building 

Mycologist, Experiment Station 

Clayton Seareska Whitehead, Captain, Infantry, U. S. Army Engr, Building 

Assistant Professor of Military Science and Tactics 

Osborne Williams, B.A., Ph.D. (Chicago) 114 Peabody Hall 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 

Claude Houston Willoughby, M.A Agriculture Building 

Professor of Animal Husbandry and Dairying 

Joseph Porter Wilson, M.B.A Language Hall 

Assistant Professor of Marketing and Salesmanship 

William Harold Wilson, M.A., Ph.D. (Illinois) Peabody Hall 

Associate Professor of Mathematics 
Assistant Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences 

Jacob Hooper Wise, M.A. Language Hall 

Instructor in English 

Harry Evins Wood, B.S.A High School, Alachua, Florida 

Assistant Professor of Agricultural Education 

Philip Osborne Yeaton, B.S.M.E Mechanical Engr. Building 

Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering 

Henry Zeicler _ Expt. Station Building 

Farm Foreman, Experiment Station 

MUSEUM STAFF 

Thompson Van Hyning Science Hall 

Director, The Florida State Museum 

Genevra G. Burke Secretary and Librarian 

C. R. Aschemeier Preparator 

0. C. Van Hyning Collector 



22 OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY 

LIBRARY STAFF 

Cora Miltimore, B.S Library Building 

Librarian 

Charlotte Newton, B.A Library Building 

Head of Catalog Department 
Absent on leave 1928-29 

Jane A. Craig, B.A., B.L.S Library Building 

Acting Head of Catalog Department 

Margaret Hemsley Johnson, B.A Library Building 

Head of Circulation Department 

Henrie May Eddy, B.A Library Building 

Head of Reference Department 

Janice Parham, B.A., B.S Library Building 

Assistant Catalog Department 

INFIRMARY STAFF 

George C. Tillman, M.D University Physician 

Lyman G. Haskell, M.D Assistant University Physician 

James Maxey Dell, M.D Consulting Physician 

DeWitt T. Smith, M.D Consulting Physician 

Rosa Grimes, R.N Superintendent of Infirmary 

Laura Belle Jeffreys, R.N _ Laboratory Technician and Nurse 

Margaret Hogg, R.N Nurse 

Myrtle S. McCarthy, R.N Nurse 

Belle Jernigan Hogan, R.N Nurse 

ASSISTANTS IN ADMINISTRATION 

Ruth M. Adair, LL.B Secretary, School of Architecture 

Mrs. J. F. Badger Assistant Dietician of Commons 

Madge F. Baker Secretary, Business Manager's Office 

Doris Black Secretary, Registrar's Office 

Pauline Collins Assistant Cashier and Bookkeeper 

Mrs. Lucile Davies Switchboard Operator 

Mrs. Frances Gibson Clerk, Book Store 

James B. Goodson Cashier 

Ruth Harris Recorder, Registrar's Office 

Wilbur Garland Hiatt „ Auditor, Budgetary Accounts 

Robert T. Irving Superintendent of Buildings 

Mrs. J. B. Jernigan Secretary, College of Engineering 

Stanley Johnwick.... Custodian of Military Property and Superintendent of Janitors 

Priscilla Kennedy Secretary and Librarian, College of Law 

Thelma Kent Assistant Accountant, Experiment Station 

Mrs. B. G. McGarrah Dietician of Commons 

Miriam McKinstry _ Registration Clerk, Registrar's Office 

Myra McMillan Secretary, College of Pharmacy 



OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY 23 

Rachel Thomson McQuarrie Accountant, Experiment Station 

Mrs. Lee Madden Post Office Clerk and Special Stenographer 

Ruby Newhall Secretary, Experiment Station 

Helen Parker Absence Clerk, Registrar's Office 

Mary Evelyn Parrott Secretary to the President 

Mrs. Margaret Peeler Housekeeper of Dormitories 

Thomas J. Price Head Bookkeeper 

Irene E. Perry Bookkeeper and Requisition Clerk 

Hellice Rathbun Manager, Book Store 

Eleanor Gwynneth Shaw Secretary, College of Agriculture 

Myra Swearingen Assistant Manager, Book Store 

Lilll\n Whitley Secretary, College of Arts and Sciences 

Nannie Belle Whitaker, B.A Secretary, College of Commerce and Journalism 

Homer D. Wingate Auditor, Custodian Accounts 

Frank S. Wright Executive Secretary of Alumni Association 

and Director of Publicity of University 
Mrs. Elizabeth R. Yeats, B.S Secretary, Teachers College 

SUMMER SCHOOL FACULTY, 1928 

(In addition to 40 members of the regular faculty.) 

Clarence E. Ackley, M.A Secondary Education 

Mrs. Mabel F. Altstetter Elementary Education 

M. L. Altstetter, M.A Secondary Education 

Mrs. Adelia J. Blacklock Fellow in Geography 

Mrs. Annabelle Abney Branning, A.B.E Fellow in Education 

F. W. Buchholz, B.A Latin 

Omer Carmichael, M.A Secondary Education 

Mrs. Alice Bingham Carrier Primary Education 

C. C. Carson, B.A Secondary Education 

Ada D. Causey Supervised Teaching 

Ruth Cazier Public School Music 

Maxie Collins Glee Club 

Allen Thornton Craig, B.A Fellow in Mathematics 

Rachel F. Crozier, B.S.E Fellow in English 

Anne D. England, M.A Latin and English 

Anna L. Fetting, R.N Home Nursing 

Alma Gault, R.N Nursing Education 

Mrs. Nannie Harris Goette, B.A Fellow in English 

Lenore Graham Fellow in English 

Arthur S. Green, A.B.E Fellow in Political Science 

Kenneth B. Hait, B.A Fellow in English 

Albert L. Isaac Fellow in Mathematics 

Emily Jones, B.A Fellow in English 

Mrs. Annie Bates Lord Fellow in History 

Edward Lee Lounsbury, A.M.E Education 

H. S. McCoy, M.A Parent Teacher Association 

Edwin Franklin McLane, B.S.E Fellow in History 

Mrs. Louise H. Mahan Primary Education 



24 OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY 

Orion Alfred Mann, A.B.E Fellow in History 

George Hiram Mears, A.B.E Fellow in Education 

Mrs. Willie A. Metcalfe Elementary Psychology 

Alton Chester Morris, A.B.E English 

Nora Norton Primary Handwork 

I. R. Obenchain, B.S _ - _ Tests and Measurements 

Mrs. Clara McDonald Olson, B.A lellow in English 

Ruth Peeler Demonstration School 

Sue Proctor Demonstration School 

William Ritchie, M.A - Education 

Mrs. Irma J. Robison Fellow in Geography 

Ashley R. Russ Fellow in Mathematics 

Harold Rinaulden Saunders, B.A JFellow in English 

Fannie B. Shaw Health Education 

Mary Sheppard, M.A. Education 

Mrs. Evalyn McNeil Simmons, A.B.E Fellow in Education 

Glenn Ballard Simmons, A.B.E Education 

Lucia Simpson Drawing and Industrial Arts 

Bess W. Timmerman, B.A Library Science 

Ruth Newell Upson Demonstration School 

Richard W. Van Brunt, B.A - Mathematics 

JuDsoN BuRON Walker, A.M.E Mathematics 

Mrs. Ruby Ware Wallace, A.B.E Fellow in History 

Mrs. Alberta Murphree Worth Voice 

Robert Louis Zentcraf, B.S.E Elementary Agriculture 

GENERAL EXTENSION DIVISION 

Headquarters, Language Hall 

Bert Clair Riley, B.A., B.S.A Dean 

Burton W. Ames, B.S.A Head, Correspondence Study 

Clarence E. Ackley, M.A Education 

Ella M. Allison, Ph.B _ Jieview Courses 

Alice L. Allison, B.A Mathematics 

Mabel F. Altstetter, B.S.E Elementary Education 

Bernice Ashburn, B.O.E Extra-Curricular Activities 

Thomas P. Bailey, Ph.D Psychology 

Earl C. Beck, Ph.D English 

Annie Laurie Brackett, M.A English 

Annabelle a. Branning, B.A _ Education 

Edith McBride Cameron, B.A., B.J Head, Department of Citizenship Training 

Alice B. Carrier Elementary Education 

Ruth Cazier _.._ P. T. A. Work 

Maude B. Davis, B.A Reading Courses 

William A. Gager, M.S Mathematics 

Artley T. Glisson, B.A Spanish 

W. L. Goette, A.B.E Education 

Ed Wiluam Harris, LL.B., J.D Business Law 



OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY 25 

Nina McAllister Harris, B.A Head, Extension Classes 

Arthur K. Hartzell, B.A Public Speaking 

Oliver H. Hauptmann, M.A Spanish 

Marguerite Blocker Homes, M.A - English 

Albert D. Hutson, B.S.E.E Mechanical Drawing 

Mrs. Hampton M. Jarrell, B.A Xatin 

Henry C. Johnson, B.S.E Civil Service 

Lloyd A. Kasten, M.A Spanish 

JuuA Annette Keeler, B.S ^''^ 

Angus M. Laird, M.A History 

David F. McDowell, M.A French and Spanish 

Louise H. Mahan Primary Education 

Paul T. Manchester, M.A., Ph.D Spanish 

Ernest E. Mason, B.A., LL.B Political Science 

W. S. Middleton, Jr., B.A French 

Jean 0. Mitchell Industrial Art 

William K. Mitchell, B.S., M.E Head, Auditory Department 

Alton C. Morris, M.A English 

William K. Mullen Spanish 

Ora B. Nicholson, B.S Architectural Draiving 

Ralph W. Nimmons, B.A Asst., Correspondence Study 

James L. Orr, B.A., M.A Recreational Engineer 

C. Phil Peters, B.A Vocational Education 

Nelson P. Poynter, B.A., M.A Economics 

W. L. Quinlan, B.A Physical Education 

Robert B. Reed, B.A., M.A History 

Mrs. Joseph Roemer, B.S Elementary Education 

Fannie B. Shaw Health Education 

C. V. Shoppe, M.A Education 

Samuel A. Small, Ph.D English 

Ethel C. Thompson, B.A History 

Felicia Williams Traxler, M.A English 

Ruth Newell Upson Eiementary Education 

Hazel Williams Commercial Courses 

Olin E. Watts, B.A., J.D Business Law 

FELLOWS AND GRADUATE ASSISTANTS 

William T. Arnett ...^ ..1 Teaching Assistant in Architecture 

Maynard L. Bowen, B.S....... .....^.... feiloj' in Chemistry 

Leon F. Fernald, B.S.. Graduate Assistaai i.i Chemistry 

Archibald Clayton Lfw^s, B.S.C.E Fellow in Civil Engineering 

Ernest M. Parrot, £S \..\:..,..\il....:..Gra.ii,uctc Assistant in Chemistry 

Henry Peel, B.S Graduate Assistant in Business Admirdstration 

Clahence V. Rahner, B.S Graduate Assistant in Business Administration 

Walter J. Squtti, B.S.Ch.E Fellow in Chemical Engineering 

Robert C. Shimp, B.S.Ch.E Fellow in Chemistry 

Wayne R. Wenger, B.A Felloiv in Chemistry 



26 OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY 

STANDING COMMITTEES OF THE FACULTY 
1929-1930 

ACCREDITING OF COLLEGES 

Roemer, Farr, Simpson, Heath, Leake, Chandler. 

ADMISSION 

Simpson, M. D. Anderson, Carroll, Chandler, Leake, Roemer, Willoughby, W. H. 
Wilson, Robertson. 

ALUMNI 

Floyd, Abbott, Hamilton, Hinckley, Hurst, Prescott, Simmons, Wright. 

ATHLETICS 

Reed, Bachman, Graham, Matherly, Norman, F. Rogers. 

ATTENDANCE 

W. H. Wilson, Goodwin, Prescott, Myers, Sherman. The Registrar is ex-officio 
Secretary to the Committee. 

BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS 

Weaver, C. C. Brown, Burritt, Strong, Thompson, Weil 

CORRELATION WITH HIGH SCHOOLS 

Roemer, Leigh, Phipps, Farr, Evans, Atkin, Atwood. 

DISCIPLINE 

Crandall, Enwall, Price, Walker. 

GLEE AND DRAMATIC CLUBS 

Johnson, Hurst, Lord. 

GRADUATE WORK 

J. N. Anderson, Benton, Farr, Leigh, Matherly, Newell, Norman, Trusler. 

GILCHRIST SCHOLARSHIP 

Simpson, M. D. Anderson, Leake, Tolbert. 

LIBRARY 

Leake, Enwall, Farr. Husa, W. A. Little, Miltimore, Myers, Price, Turlington. 

MEMORIALS 

Willoughby, Carroll, Chr?&tcnsen, Gaiiis, J. (.'. Goodwin, Heath, Perry, Van Fleet, 
Wise. 

MILITARY AFFAIRS ' 

Black, Alexander, J. S. Rogers- Shezily, Whitehead. 

PUBLIC DEBATING 

Bristol, Bachman, Eldridge, Farris, Slagle, Thompson 

PUBLIC FUNCTIONS 

Lord, DeW. Brown, Bryan, Goodwin, Morris, Phipps, Weil, Williams. 



OFFICERS OF THE UNIVERSITY 27 

PUBLICITY 

C. C. Brown, Cooper, Emig, Goodwin, June, Morris, Riley, TeSelle, Simmons, 
W. H. Wilson, Wright. 

RELIGIOUS WELFARE 

W. A. Little, Bucliholz, Johnson, Kokomoor, Shealy, Simpson. 

SELF-HELP 

Turlington, Beaty, Black, Buchholz, Dolbeare, Fulk, Shealy, Tolbert. 

STUDENT HEALTH 

J. S. Rogers, C. C. Brown, Haskell, Jackson, Jarrett, Sanborn, Tillman. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

Cody, Beisler, Cockrell, Goodwin, W. H. Wilson. 

STUDENT PUBLICATIONS 

Emig, Crow, Robertson, Simpson, Trusler, Wright. 

STUDENT REGULATIONS 

Tolbert, Black, Carleton, Chandler, Myers, Norman. 

UNIVERSITY PUBLICATIONS 

Emig, Chandler, Caldwell, Graham, Wright. 

UNIVERSITY REGULATIONS AND BY-LAWS 

Matherly, Farr, Crow, Benton, Trusler, Chandler. 

YULEE SCHOLARSHIP 

Leigh, Crow, L. M. Drake, Norman. 



PART II 

GENERAL 
INFORMATION 



30 HISTORICAL STATEMENT 



HISTORICAL STATEMENT 

Florida has always shown a deep interest in higher education, hav- 
ing formulated many plans and established a number of institutions. As 
early as 1824 the foundation of a university was discussed by the Legis- 
lative Council. In 1836 trustees were named for a proposed university, 
but apparently nothing was accomplished. (Memoirs of Florida, 1,168.) 

Upon its admission to the Union in 1845, the State was granted by the 
General Government nearly 100,000 acres of land, the proceeds from 
which were to be used to establish two seminaries, one east and one west 
of the Suwannee River. This led to the foundation of the East Florida 
Seminary at Ocala in 1852, and the West Florida Seminary at Talla- 
hassee in 1856. The East Florida Seminary was moved to Gainesville in 
1866. 

The State Constitution of 1868 contained provisions for establishing 
and maintaining a university (Art. VIII, Sec. 2), and the next year the 
Legislature passed "An Act to Establish a Uniform System of Common 
Schools and a University". Other attempts to establish a university were 
made in 1883 by the State Board of Education and in 1885 by the Legis- 
lature. The State Constitution of 1885 also expressly permitted special 
legislation mth regard to a university. 

Meanwhile, in 1870, the Legislature passed "An Act to Establish the 
Florida Agricultural College." As this did not fully meet the terms 
of the "Land-Grant College" Act of Congress of 1862, the Legislature 
passed a supplementary Act in 1872 and the State then received from the 
General Government 90,000 acres of land in support of the proposed 
college. A site was selected in 1873, in 1875, and again in 1883 — the 
third being at Lake City, and in the fall of 1884 the work of instruction 
was begun. 

In 1887 the Florida Agricultural Experiment Station was established 
as a department of the College, under the terms of the Hatch Act of Con- 
gress. The name of the College was changed by Legislative Act of 1903 
to the University of Florida. 

During these years, in addition to the two Seminaries and the Uni- 
versity, there had come into existence three other State institutions of 
higher education, the State Normal School at De Funiak Springs, the 
South Florida Military College at Bartow, and the Agricultural Institute 
in Osceola County. 



LOCATION 31 

Inasmuch as these six institutions failed to make satisfactory differ- 
entiation among themselves and to separate their work sufficiently from 
that of the high schools of the State, and as the cost of maintaining all 
seemed disproportionate to the results obtained, the Legislature of 1905 
passed the "Buckman Act," the effect of which was to merge the six 
schools into two, the "Florida Female College" and the "University of the 
State of Florida." In 1909, the Legislature changed the names to the 
"Florida State College for Women," and the "University of Florida". 

Upon the election of Dr. A. A. Murphree as President in 1909, the 
University was organized under the present system of colleges. Tlie Col- 
lege of Law was organized in 1909, and the departments offering instruc- 
tion mainly to normal students became the Teachers College in 1912. 
The Summer School was established by the Legislature in 1913, and the 
Farmers Institute work merged into the Cooperative Demonstration Work 
of the U. S. Department of Agriculture. In 1915 all the agricultural ac- 
tivities of the University were placed under the direction of the Dean of 
the College of Agriculture. 

When the United States entered the World War in 1918, all equip- 
ment of the University was placed at the disposal of the Government. 
The College of Engineering operated as a vocational training school, 
and all other divisions of the institution assisted with the work of the 
Student Army Training Corps until the close of the war. For five years 
following the war, the University made a very creditable record in train- 
ing and rehabilitation of disabled war veterans. 

The General Extension Division was established by the Legislature in 
1919. The School of Pharmacy was opened in 1923, and became the 
College of Pharmacy in 1925. The same year a School of Architecture 
was added in the College of Engineering. In 1925 a School of Business 
Administration and Journalism was opened in the College of Arts and 
Sciences, and in 1927 was changed into a separate College of Commerce 
and Journalism. 

LOCATION 

On the 6th day of July, 1905, acting under powers conferred by the 
Buckman Act, the State Board of Education and the Board of Control, in 
joint session, selected Gainesville as the location of the University. Dur- 
ing the scholastic year of 1905-06, it was found necessary to continue the 
work of the University at Lake City. Since the summer of 1906 the insti- 
tution has occupied its present location. 

The advantages of Gainesville as the seat of the University are numer- 
ous. It is centrally located and easy of access; it has an exceptionally 



32 EQUIPMENT 

pure water supply, and a good sewer system; its streets are well lighted, 
shaded and paved. The citizens are energetic, progressive, and hospitable. 
The moral atmosphere is wholesome, and the leading religious denomina- 
tions have attractive places of worship. 

EQUIPMENT 
GROUNDS AND BUILDINGS 

The University occupies a tract of nine hundred and fifty -three acres 
situated in the western part of Gainesville. Ninety acres of this tract are 
devoted to campus, drill grounds, and athletic fields; the remainder is 
used by the College of Agriculture and Agricultural Experiment Station. 

The University is one of the few institutions in the United States that 
made plans for all future development of the campus, as far as this could 
be foreseen, before laying the foundation of a single building. 

The liberality of the State has permitted the erection of substantial 
and attractive modern buildings as they were needed. The present build- 
ings on the campus are: 

The two Dormitories, Thomas Hall, 60 by 300, and Buckman Hall, 
60 by 240, three stories high, built of brick and concrete, in fireproof 
sections. Each section contains twelve suites of dormitory rooms, with 
ample bath and toilet facilities on every floor. 

Science Hall, 66 by 135, two stories and basement, built of brick 
and concrete, contains the classrooms and laboratories of the depart- 
ments of Biology, Geology, Botany and Bacteriology, with the Florida 
State Museum on the second floor. 

The Agricultural Experiment Station Building, 60 by 120, three 
stories and basement, built of brick and concrete, contains the offices and 
laboratories of the Station, devoted entirely to research work in agricul- 
ture. 

The Engineering Building, 73 by 122, built of brick and tile, three 
stories high, provides offices and class facilities for the departments of 
Civil and Electrical Engineering, Physics and Military Science. A one- 
story wing on the south, 40 by 163, is used for wood-shop, blacksmith- 
shop, and foundry work. 

The Agriculture Building, a brick and concrete structure 65 by 115, 
three stories high, provides offices, classrooms and laboratories for sev- 
eral instruction departments of the College, including Agronomy, Agri- 
cultural Engineering, Animal Husbandry and Dairying, Horticulture, 
Landscape Design, Entomology and Plant Pathology. 



EQUIPMENT 33 

Language Hall, 66 by 135, three stories high, built of brick and 
stone, is headquarters for the College of Arts and Sciences, the College 
of Commerce and Journalism, and the General Extension Division. It 
provides offices and class rooms for the departments of Languages, Eco- 
nomics, History and Political Science, Business Administration, and 
Journalism. The offices of the President, Business Manager and Registrar 
are at present located on the first floor. In the basement are the book- 
store, postoffice, telephone exchange, student-body offices, and press for 
campus publications. 

George Peabody Hall, the Teachers College building, 72 by 135, three 
stories high, brick and concrete, was erected by a gift of $40,000 from 
the Peabody Board of Trust. It provides for the departments of Educa- 
tion and Philosophy, Sociology, Mathematics, and for Teacher-Training 
work. The School of Architecture occupies the third floor at present, 
and the Architect for the Board of Control has offices on the second floor. 

The Law Building, 70 by 120, a brick and stone structure two stories 
high, contains offices and lecture rooms, a model courtroom, library, 
reading and consultation rooms, and quarters for the Marshall Debating 
Society. 

The University Commons, a brick building of one story and basement, 
42 by 114, with a wing 27 by 50, contains a large dining hall and kitchen. 
A wooden annex, 60 by 120, is now used as Y. M. C. A. headquarters. 

The Gymnasium is a brick and stone building two stories high, 53 by 
106. The main practice floor is well lighted, and supplied with com- 
plete gymnasium apparatus. The basement contains locker rooms and 
showers. 

The Library Building, brick and tile, 46 by 168, with three stories 
in two, contains a large reading room, a reference room with temporary 
stacks, and necessary offices. 

The Administration Building when completed will be the most com- 
manding structure on the campus, the estimated cost being $800,000. The 
first unit erected comprises the Auditorium, brick and concrete, 100 by 
150, costing $200,000, with seating capacity of 2,200 people. It contains 
the splendid Anderson Memorial Organ, and useful stage arrangements 
for large assemblies. 

The Mechanical Engineering Building, brick and concrete, three 
stories high, the portion completed being 42 by 118 with a wing 32 by 
50, provides offices, class rooms and laboratories for the departments 
of Mechanical Engineering, Drawing and Mechanic Arts. 



34 EQUIPMENT 

The Chemistry Building, a brick and concrete structure three stories 
high, is valued at about $350,000 with equipment. The complete plans 
contemplate a building of hollow square formation, 145 by 205, with 
main stock room and large lecture hall in the center of the square. The 
first unit now in use contains all the offices, class rooms, and laboratories 
of the various departments of Chemistry, and the College of Pharmacy. 

The Horticulture Building, of brick and concrete, 52 by 110 with a 
wing 26 by 52, three stories and attic, contains the offices of the Dean 
of the College of Agriculture, the Agricultural Extension Division, and 
the Florida State Plant Board. The departments of Agricultural Eco- 
nomics, Poultry Husbandry, and Veterinary Science are housed on the 
second floor. The Experiment Station Library and mailing rooms are 
included in the building. 

The Basket Ball Court is a wood and steel structure, 110 by 146, with 
a playing floor 60 by 90, and bleacher seats and galleries for about 
1,500 people. It contains offices for the Director and coaching staff, 
and dressing locker and shower rooms for teams. 

A new dormitory building will be completed for the beginning of the 
first semester, of the 1929-30 term. This building is four stories high, 
with a brick and stone exterior and entirely fireproof interior construc- 
tion. The building is divided into sections with four study rooms and 
four bedrooms per floor. Each section has a separate entrance and stair- 
way. The total capacity will be 182 students. In general each two students 
have a study room and an adjoining bedroom, though there are a limited 
number of single rooms. Each room has built-in dressers and clothes 
closets and is equipped with a lavatory. The room charge in this new 
dormitory is higher than in the old dormitories. 

The University Infirmary is a wooden building, erected for barracks 
during the war, which has been altered and improved until the equip- 
ment is fairly complete for student purposes. Facilities include a mod- 
ern operating room, hospital wards, nurses quarters, laboratory, consul- 
tation room, dispensing room, etc. It is hoped that in the near future 
a permanent and fully equipped hospital building will be erected. 

Other minor buildings include the Barracks, 40 by 60, used as a 
dormitory, University Station postoffice building, several residences for 
foremen of the farms and manager of the Commons, and a new central 
heating plant. 

Value. The value of the property used for the work of the Univer- 
sity is $3,500,000. The grounds and farms are valued at $900,000. 



MUSEUM 35 

UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 

The University Library contains about 60,000 volumes, arranged ac- 
cording to the Dewey Decimal classification. New books are purchased 
as rapidly as funds permit, and many gifts are received each year. 

As a designated depository of the United States government, the 
Library receives annually several hundred titles. In addition much valu- 
able material is received from the various state universities, colleges, and 
experiment stations. 

The Library receives four hundred and twenty general and tech- 
nical periodicals, the current numbers of which are to be found on the 
reading tables. The periodicals are bound as rapidly as the volumes are 
completed, and are particularly valuable for reference work. Through 
the courtesy of the editors a large number of the daily and weekly news- 
papers of Florida are sent to the Library for the use of the students. 

The Library is glad to be of assistance to the teachers and high school 
students of the State. Under reasonable regulations books are lent upon 
request. When it is impossible to send the material desired, bibliographies 
with suggested sources of material are gladly furnished. 

The Library now occupies the first unit of the Library Building. The 
main reading room on the second floor has a seating capacity of 340, 
and is equipped with electric fans and semi-indirect lighting system. 
The furniture is oak, in standard library equipment throughout. 

FLORIDA STATE MUSEUM 

By Act of the Legislature of 1917 the University was made the home of 
The Florida State Museum. The Act further provides for: 

A natural history and ethnological survey of the State; for scientific investiga- 
tions looking towards the further development of its natural resources for the collect- 
ing of material of scientific, economic and civic value, whether pertaining to the 
mineral, vegetable, and animal kingdoms or to the aboriginal tribes and the early 
explorations and settlements; for a library; and for traveling exhibits to be kept in 
circulation among the schools of the State. 

Adequate funds for carrying out all the provisions of this Act have 
not as yet been provided; but, largely through the generosity of some of 
our citizens, enough specimens and data are already in hand to permit 
the Director to announce that the museum is open from eight to five every 
day in the year. 

The Museum contains at the present time about five hundred thousand 
specimens, one-half of which have been carefully catalogued. Among the 
eighteen hundred accessions are perhaps most worthy of mention an her- 
barium of four thousand and eight hundred sheets presented by Dr. Sam- 
uel C. Hood of Orlando; the R. D. Hoyt collection of more than eight 



36 LABORATORIES 

hundred birds and four hundred sets of bird eggs; the John J. Ryman 
collection of more than two hundred birds and eight hundred sets of bird 
eggs; a complete collection of the mollusca of Alabama, presented by the 
late Dr. Herbert H. Smith, curator of the Alabama Geological Survey 
Museum; the "Loring Memorial Collection," presented by General Lor- 
ing's heirs, Mrs. William Loring Spencer and Mrs. M. C. Royston of 
St. Petersburg. This last collection is of great historical and artistic 
value, besides being intrinsically worth many thousands of dollars. The 
von Noszky collection, presented by Mrs. Rosa von Noszky, is now safely 
housed in the Museum; the Colonel and Mrs. E. S. Walker collection of 
Gainesville has recently been increased to thousands of specimens of 
ethnological material and books; the Mr. and Mrs. John Y. Detwiler 
collection of New Smyrna, consisting of art and historical specimens; 
and the F. E. Aspinwall collection of Miami, containing thousands of 
specimens of coins, art and history material and books. 

Other valuable contributions, it is believed, can be announced soon. 
Even now much material of historic and artistic interest is under consider- 
ation for the Museum, and other negotiations are under way for securing 
large exhibits. 

In addition to the above, the Museum has a fair collection of the 
mollusca of Florida, containing more than eighteen thousand specimens; 
about nine thousand Florida fossils; more than five hundred Florida 
reptiles; more than ten thousand specimens of stone implements and pot- 
tery of the aborigines of Florida; besides thousands of specimens of his- 
toric articles, minerals, etc. The library of the Museum numbers about 
five thousand volumes and pamphlets. 

Unfortunately, owing to the lack of rooms and cases, only a small part 
of this material is now on exhibition. 

LABORATORIES 

For the Laboratories and other equipment of the College of Agri- 
culture, see that College. 

1. The Biological Laboratories are located in Science Hall. They are 
equipped with individual microscopes and other essential apparatus for 
each student in all the courses offered. In addition there is considerable 
equipment of special apparatus for use of the instructional staff and ad- 
vanced students. 

2. The Biological Station on Newnan's Lake, six miles east of the 
campus, is available for field work on the animals and plants of the 
region. The area about the station provides virgin or nearly virgin con- 



LABORATORIES 37 

ditions of land and fresh-water life. Equipment for class and research 
work is provided. 

3. The Botanical and Bacteriological Laboratories are located in 
Science Hall. They are well equipped for undergraduate and to some 
degree for research work. Projects can be carried on at the Green House 
and at the Biological Station on Newnan's Lake on the plants of this 
region. 

4. The Chemical Laboratories are equipped with the chemicals and 
apparatus required for instruction in general, inorganic, organic, analyti- 
cal, physical and agricultural chemistry, and chemical engineering. They 
are well supplied with the equipment necessary for graduate and re- 
search work in pure chemistry, agricultural chemistry, and chemical 
engineering. 

5. The Psychological Laboratory, on the first floor of Peabody 
Hall, is well equipped for class demonstrations and for carrying on ex- 
perimental and research work. In addition to the apparatus for the reg- 
ular experimental work, the laboratory is equipped for carrying on 
mental and physical tests in connection with the work in educational 
psychology offered by the Teachers College. 

6. The Physical Laboratories are equipped with apparatus for meet- 
ing the needs of undergraduate work in physics as usually given in 
American colleges. In addition to rooms on the second floor, the 
entire third floor of the Engineering Building is devoted to this depart- 
ment, including a main laboratory, an electrical laboratory, an optical 
room, workshop and apparatus room, and several offices and store-rooms. 

It is prepared to conduct tests for residents of Florida at nominal 
charges. 

7. The Dynamo Laboratory is located on the ground floor of the 
Engineering Building, and provides a floor area of 30 feet by 90 feet, 
including rooms accessory to the main laboratory. It is equipped with 
electrical machinery suitable for the undergraduate work in electrical 
engineering which is customary in American engineering colleges. This 
laboratory has benefited by the generosity of a number of manufacturers 
of electrical appliances, who have kindly given or loaned much valuable 
equipment. 

The laboratory is equipped with special apparatus for the calibration 
of electrical measuring instruments, and is prepared to conduct tests for 
residents of this State at nominal charges. 

8. The Testing Laboratory has one 50,000-pound Riehle machine 
and one 400,000-pound Riehle machine for testing the tensile, compres- 



38 ATHLETICS 

sive, and transverse strength of materials; cement-testing machines with 
the necessary accessories; and apparatus for making special tests on 
materials used in the various kinds of road and building construction. 

9. The Hydraulic Laboratory is equipped with apparatus for use 
in connection with the undergraduate courses in Hydraulics, 

10. The Surveying Instrument Room contains compasses; levels; 
transits, of which three are equipped with attachments for solar and star 
observations; plane tables; sextant; barometers; and the necessary 
minor instruments. Blueprinting apparatus also is included. 

11. The Sanitary Laboratory is equipped for engineering research 
on water and sewage. 

12. The Department of Drawing has two Drafting Rooms, equipped 
with substantial oak desks and possessing the necessary minor equip- 
ment to accommodate forty-eight students at a time. 

13. Shops. The Wood Shop is equipped with full sets of hand tools, 
benches and lockers for work and tools. The wood working machinery 
includes a surfacer, jointer, universal saw table, band-saw, mortiser, 
borer, disk sander, four lathes and a universal grinder. 

The Machine Shop is equipped with the most generally used standard 
machine tools. 

The Forge Shop is equipped with twenty-four down-draft forges, with 
anvil and a set of hand tools for each forge, six bench-vises, a trip ham- 
mer, punch and shear, drill-press, emery wheel stand, and individual 
lockers for work. 

The Foundry is equipped for making moulds and melting and pouring 
metal for castings. 

14. The Mechanical Engineering Laboratories occupy the ground 
floor of the Mechanical Engineering Building. The steam and internal 
combustion power plants and the ice and refrigeration plants occupy a 
space 38 x 96 feet, served by electric power circuits and an overhead 
traveling crane. 

The materials laboratory occupies a room 18 x 21 feet in the west 
wing of the building. This room contains a large metallurgical micro- 
scope and other fine instruments for examining and testing the physical 
properties of engineering materials. 

ATHLETICS 

The equipment for athletics has been greatly increased and improved 
in the past few years, now including Fleming Field, with two excellently 
turfed football gridirons, a baseball diamond, grandstand and steel 
bleachers seating 8,000 persons. Murphree Field is located near the 



GIFTS 39 

Gymnasium, with an excellent cinder track, and facilities for many out- 
door sports. The new Basketball Court has a maximum playing floor 
and accommodates 2,000 spectators. Two new clay tennis courts were 
constructed this year, in addition to six fine concrete courts. The golf 
links of the Gainesville Country Club are but a mile distant from the 
campus. 

RECENT GIFTS 

Many of the State educational institutions of the South — among 
them those of Florida — have, in recent years, received substantial gifts. 
The University feels confident that its friends will continue to help in its 
upbuilding. All gifts, of whatever nature or value, will be gratefully 
acknowledged, and used to the greatest possible advantage. 

The University will be glad to consult with prospective donors at any 
time, on methods of gifts or endowment, through trust funds, wills, or 
insurance. 

The Andrew Anderson Memorial Organ — ^The most useful gift in 
recent years is that of the late Dr. Andrew Anderson of St. Augustine, 
who generously gave $50,000.00 for a pipe organ to be installed in the 
new University Auditorium. A Skinner organ that has few equals in the 
South has been erected on the Auditorium stage, and is used to splendid 
advantage at all assemblies of students and public occasions. 

Scholarships — No method of contributing to the spread of higher 
education is more beneficial than to make it possible for a worthy but 
poor young man to attend his state university. Such provision is a debt 
the present generation rightfully owes to posterity. The establishment 
of several scholarships is gratefully acknowledged; see pages 46 to 48. 

Chair of Americanism and Southern History — Through the gen- 
erosity of the American Legion, Department of Florida, which has pro- 
vided a fund of $40,000 for this purpose, supplemented by legislative 
appropriation, there has been created a Professorship in the University 
known as the "Chair of Americanism and Southern History." The holder 
of this professorship is head of the department of History and Political 
Science, and the courses in American History, Government, and Constitu- 
tional Law are given in connection with this Chair. 

Haisley Lynch Medal — The University is grateful to Mr. and Mrs. 
L. C. Lynch of Gainesville for their gift of the Haisley Lynch Medal for 
the best essay in American History. This medal is awarded annually by 
them in loving memory of their son, Haisley Lynch, a former student of 
the University, who was killed in action in France during the World War. 



40 GOVERNMENT 

GOVERNMENT AND REGULATIONS OF THE UNIVERSITY 

The regulations of the University, and the organization as approved 
by the Board of Control will be published as a separate bulletin. This 
bulletin will be available to students and faculty at the beginning of the 
session 1929-30. 

A few of the more important regulations are listed below. 

Grades and Reports — Grades are recorded by use of the letters 
A, B, C, D, E, in order of excellence. D is the lowest passing grade. E 
is failure. Other special grades are: I, incomplete; X, missed examina- 
tion; R, conditional failure with re-examination privilege. 

The grade of I must be removed within two months or it will be re- 
corded E. 

In addition to passing the required courses, students must average C 
in all courses used for meeting the requirements of a degree. In com- 
puting an average, each semester hour with A gives three points, each 
hour of B, two points, each hour of C, one point. Other grades give no 
points. 

Failure in Studies — A final grade, based upon the examination and 
the monthly grades, is assigned for each semester's work. If this grade 
falls below D, the student is considered to have failed and may proceed 
only subject to a condition in the study in which failure has occurred. 

A student who jails in fifty per cent or more of his class hours for two 
consecutive months, or for the semester, will be dropped for the remain- 
der of the College year. Students so dropped will be entitled to honor- 
able dismissal, unless their failure is clearly due to negligence. Upon 
petition to the Dean of his College, such a student may be reinstated 
upon such terms as may seem best. 

Complete Failure in One or More Subjects — // at any time a stu- 
dent is failing completely in any subject, if he fails repeatedly to hand 
in the written work, if he absents himself without satisfactory excuse from 
the tests, or if in general he shows no disposition or capacity to do the 
work required, he may be compelled to pay the fee for change of course 
and drop the course; and if thereby his total number of hours falls below 
the minimum required, he may be dropped from the University, and 
his record marked "dropped for failure in studies." 

Degrees — The special requirements for the various degrees offered 
by the University will be found under the general statement of the Grad- 
uate School and of each of the colleges. The following regulations apply 
to all colleges: 



INCOME 41 

While pursuing studies leading to a degree a student must be registered in the 
college offering that degree. 

Two degrees of the same rank, as, e.g., B.S.C.E. and B.S.E.E., will not be con- 
ferred upon the same individual, unless the second degree represents at least thirty 
credits of additional work. 

Special Students — Students desiring to take special courses may be 
allowed to take those classes for which they are prepared. The number 
of such students in a college is, however, restricted to an extremely small 
per cent of the total enrollment. These students are subject to all the 
laws and regulations of the University. Special courses do not lead to a 
degree. The College of Law does not admit special students. 

The University permits special courses to be taken solely in order to 
provide for the occasional exceptional requirements of individual stu- 
dents. Accordingly, no minor is permitted to enter as a special student 
except in the College of Agriculture. A special student will be required 
to pursue a regular course, even though he may expect to attend the 
University only a year or two. 

Adult Specials — Persons twenty-one or more years of age who can- 
not satisfy the entrance requirements, but who give evidence of ability 
to profit by the courses they may take, may, under exceptional circum- 
stances, be admitted as "Adult Specials." 

INCOME 

The annual income of the University, apart from Legislative appro- 
priations, is derived principally from the following Federal grants: (a) 
The "East Florida Seminary Fund" — about two thousand dollars (S2,000) ; 
(b) the "Agricultural College Fund" bonds — about seventy-seven hun- 
dred dollars ($7,700) ; (c) one-half of the "Morrill Fund"— twelve thou- 
sand five hundred dollars ($12,500) ; (d) one-half of the "Nelson Fund" 
— twelve thousand five hundred dollars ($12,500). The total income thus 
derived amounts to thirty-four thousand seven hundred dollars ($34,700). 

For the support of the Agricultural Experiment Station the Federal 
government makes three annual grants: (a) the "Hatch Fund", fifteen 
thousand dollars ($15,000) ; (b) the "Adams Fund," fifteen thousand 
dollars ($15,000) ; and (c) the "Purnell Fund", beginning in 1926 with 
twenty thousand dollars ($20,000) and increasing ten thousand dollars 
per year until the maximmn of sixty thousand dollars ($60,000) per year 
is reached in 1930, and continuing thereafter. 

See also Recent Gifts, Fellowships, Scholarships, Loan Funds and 
Agricultural Extension Division. 



42 FEES 



FEES 



University Charges — Tuition — In the College of Law a regular tui- 
tion fee of forty dollars ($40.00) per year— $20.00 payable at the be- 
ginning of each semester, is charged every student; and an additional 
charge of one hundred dollars ($100.00) per year — $50.00 payable at 
the beginning of each semester, is required of all non-resident students. 
In the other Colleges of the University a student who is a permanent 
legal resident of Florida is subject to no charge for tuition; a student who 
is not a permanent legal resident of the State is required to pay a tuition 
fee of one hundred dollars ($100.00) per year, payable $50.00 per 
semester. A special fee of ten dollars ($10.00) will be charged all stu- 
dents registered in the College of Commerce and Journalism and a fee of 
one dollar ($1.00) per semester hour to other students who elect technical 
courses in this college. 

The burden of proof as to residence is with the student. Any student 
who registers improperly under the above rule will be required to pay 
the non-resident tuition, and also a penalty of ten dollars ($10.00) . 

Registration and Contingent Fee — This fee of seven and one-half 
dollars ($7.50) per year is charged all students, including those regularly 
enrolled in the Graduate School. 

Late Registration Fee — A fee of $5.00 is charged all students who 
do not complete their registration on the dates set by the council and 
published in the calendar. Registration is not complete until all Uni- 
versity bills are paid, and any who fail to meet their obligations are not 
regarded as students of the University. 

Laboratory Fees — A small fee is required in advance for each course 
that includes laboratory work, to cover cost of consumable material, wear 
and tear of apparatus, and similar items. The amount of the fee varies 
with the different courses, in no case exceeding $5.00 per semester for 
any one course. 

A Breakage Fee of $5.00 will be required of each student using a 
locker and laboratory apparatus in the departments of Chemistry, Phar- 
macy and Electrical Engineering. This deposit will be made at the Busi- 
ness Manager's office, and refunds on same will be made once a year 
when the student has checked in his apparatus to the satisfaction of the 
department concerned. No charge will be made from this fee for mate- 
rials used or for normal wear and tear, as this is covered in the general 
laboratory fee. 

Infirmary Fee — All students are charged an infirmary fee of nine 
dollars ($9.00) per year. This secures for the student in case of illness 



FEES 43 

the privilege of a bed in the Infirmary and the services of professional 
nurses" and the University physician except in cases involving major oper- 
ations. To secure this medical service, students must report in person to 
the nurse in charge of the Infirmary. A fee of $5.00 is charged for the 
use of the operating room. Board in the Infirmary is charged at the rate 
of SI.50 a day, and a refund of fifty cents a day is allowed if the student 
has already paid board at the Commons. All students will be given a 
careful physical examination at the beginning of the session. 

Student Activity Fee — This fee of twenty-three dollars and sixty 
cents ($23.60), payable on entrance, was voted by the students and ap- 
proved by the Board of Control. These funds are used to foster and 
maintain athletic sports, student publications, literary and debating so- 
cieties, and other student activities. All students are required to pay this 
fee, except that students regularly enrolled in the Graduate School may 
be excused if they do not wish to participate in any of the student privi- 
leges covered by this fee. 

Diploma Fee — A diploma fee of five dollars ($5.00) is charged all 
candidates for degrees. This fee must be paid by the date as published 
in the calendar or the student will not receive the degree sought. 

Refunds — No refund of any fees, except unused portions of labora- 
tory fees, will be made after the student has attended classes for threr, 
days. 

Living Expenses — Board and Lodging — Board, lodging and janitor 
service will be furnished by the University at a cost of one hundred 
dollars ($100.00) per semester in the old dormitories, and $116.00 in 
the new dormitory. This does not include the Christmas vacation. Board 
only will be furnished at eighty-five dollars ($85.00) per semester. To 
take advantage of these rates, payment must be made at the beginning of 
each semester. No refund will be made for less than a month's absence. 
When not engaged by the semester, board and lodging, and board only, 
will be furnished, if paid monthly in advance, according to the following 
schedule: 

Board and Room — New Dormitory Board and Room — Buckman and 

Semester Rate $116.00 Thomas Halls 

Monthly Rates: Semester Rate $100.00 

Sept. 16 to Oct. 15 $29.50 Monthly Rates: 

Oct. 16 to Nov. 15 29.50 Sept. 16 to Oct. 15 25.50 

Nov. 16 to Dec. 21 35.00 Oct. 16 to Nov. 15 25 50 

Jan. 6 to Jan. 31 25.85 Nov. 16 to Dec. 21 30.6!) 

Jan. 6 to Jan. 31 22.10 



February 29.50 

March 29.50 February 25.50 

April 29.50 March 25.50 

May 1st to June 3rd 32.00 April 25.50 

May 1 to June 3 28.00 



44 FEES 

Board in University Commons 

Semester Rate $85.00 

Monthly Rates: 

Sept. 16 to Oct. 15 21.50 February 21.50 

Oct. 16 to Nov. 15 21.50 March 21.50 

Nov. 16 to Dec. 21 25.80 April 21.50 

Jan. 6 to Jan. 31 18.65 May 1 to June 3 23.50 



Under Board and Lodging are included meals in the Commons and 
room, with heat, light, janitor service, and access to a bathroom. The 
doors of the rooms are provided with Yale locks. Keys for Dormitory 
rooms will be issued student on memo charge against Damage Fund. If 
not returned fifty cents will be forfeited. Janitor service includes the care 
of rooms by maids, under the supervision of a competent housekeeper. 

All rooms are partly furnished and adjoin bathrooms equipped with 
marble basin and shower with both hot and cold' water. The furniture 
consists of two bedsteads and mattresses, chiffonier or bureau, table, 
washstand, and chairs. The students are required to provide pillows, bed- 
ding, towels and toilet articles for their own use. 

A room reservation fee of $10.00 is charged for dormitory space, and 
is payable in advance. This fee is retained as a deposit until the student 
gives up his room, when refund, less any charges for damages incurred 
during his residence there, is made. 

The Board of Control has ruled that Freshmen be given preference in 
Dormitory reservations. Upper classmen reservations will be accepted 
with this understanding. We urge that applications be made immediately. 
They must be accompanied by the Room Reservation Fee of $10.00. If a 
room has been assigned, no refund of the reservation fee will be made 
later than September 10th. Students not assigned to a room, will be en- 
titled to a refund upon request. 

Students to whom rooms are assigned will not be allowed to withdraw 
from the Dormitories during the first semester. 

The University does not furnish lodging without board. 

Opening and Closing of the Commons — The dining room will be open 
for the first meal on Manday noon, September 16, 1929. The last meal 
served for the scholastic year will be dinner on Tuesday, June 3, 1930. 
Keep these dates in mind. 

Board and Rooms Near the Campus — Board and rooms in private 
homes of Gainesville may be secured at rates of thirty-five to forty-five 



FEES 45 

dollars ($35.00-$45.00) per month, depending upon the accommodations 
and proximity to the campus. A large number of rooming houses, as 
well as cafeterias, lunch rooms, and dining rooms are located within 
walking distance, and students may secure any class of accommodations 
they desire. The University Y. M. C. A. maintains a list of boarding and 
rooming houses near the campus and in the city, and will cheerfully 
assist students in securing a comfortable location. For copy of lists 
and advance information, address the General Secretary, Y. M. C. A., 
University of Florida, Gainesville. 

Books — ^The cost of books depends largely upon the course pursued. 
In the upper classes, the student is encouraged to acquire works of per- 
manent value, or reference manuals for use in the professions. Students 
of engineering need a first-class set of drawing instruments for use during 
and following their college course. 

The annual necessary expenses of the average Florida student would 
figure approximately as follows: 

Tuition % 00.00 

Registration and Student Activity fees 40.10 

Laboratory fees and Books, average _ 37.75 

Board and Lodging in Commons and Dormitory (if paid by the semester in 

advance ) Old dormitory 200.00 

New dormitory _ 232.00 

Laundry (about) 18.00 

Law students should add about $68.00 to this estimate to cover tuition 
and extra cost of books. 

All students who are not permanent legal residents of Florida will 
add to these estimates a tuition fee of one hundred dollars ($100.00). 
Cost of clothing, recreation and other incidentals are subject to the wishes 
of the individual. 

Remittances — All remittances should be made to the Business Man- 
ager, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida. 

Opportunities for Earning Expenses — It is often possible for a stu- 
dent to earn a part of his expenses by working during hours not required 
for his University duties. 

A few students are employed as waiters, as janitors, and in other ca- 
pacities. Such employment is not, as a rule, given to a student otherwise 
financially able to attend the University, nor is it given to one who fails 
in any study. Application for employment should be made to Mr. R. C. 
Beaty, Assistant to the Dean of Men, Gainesville, Fla. 



46 FELLOWSHIPS, SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOAN FUNDS 

FELLOWSHIPS, SCHOLARSHIPS, AND LOAN FUNDS 

Fellowships — In order to encourage young teachers to prepare them- 
selves further for their work, three Teaching Fellowships, each paying 
$200.00 annually, have been established in the Teachers College. Appli- 
cation for a fellowship must be made in writing to the Dean of the 
Teachers College or to the President of the University. It must show that 
the applicant is a college graduate and has ability to profit by the work 
offered, and must be accompanied by testimonials as to his character. 

A Fellow must devote himself to studies leading to the Master's degree 
in Education. He will be expected to teach four or five hours per week 
in the Normal School under the direction and supervision of the 
Teachers College. He may be called upon for minor services, such 
as conducting examinations, but not for anything that would interfere with 
his graduate work. 

L. P. Moore Fellowship — Established and maintained by Mr. L. P. 
Moore, of New York, in the interest of forwarding horticultural research 
in connection with the production of tung-oil trees and seed in America. 
Open only to graduates of a four-year agricultural course. Value, $750.00 
per year; may be held for two successive years. Application for this Fel- 
lowship should be made through the Dean of the College of Agriculture, 
University of Florida. 

Chilean Nitrate of Soda Fellowship — Established by the Chilean 
Nitrate of Soda Educational Bureau for the purpose of forwarding re- 
search in citrus fertilizers in Florida. Open only to graduates of a four- 
year agricultural course. Value, $2,400 — salary $1,200 and expenses 
$1,200 per year. Application for this Fellowship should be made through 
the Dean of the College of Agriculture, University of Florida. 

Penney -Gwinn Fellowship — Established and maintained by the J. C. 
Penney-Gwinn Corporation of New York, for the purpose of forwarding 
research in: (a) the residual effects of Nitrogen fertilizers in Florida; (b) 
the economic value of green manures in Florida. Value $1,000 each per 
year. Open to graduate students only. Application for either of these 
fellowships should be made through the Dean of the College of Agri- 
culture, University of Florida. 

SENATORIAL AND TEACHERS SCHOLARSHIPS 

The Legislature has provided that every Senatorial District of the 
State shall be allowed annually one scholarship for men at the Univer- 
sity of Florida, and that every County of the State shall be allowed as 



SCHOLARSHIPS 47 

many scholarships in the Teachers College of the University of Florida 
as that County has Representatives in the House of Representatives. These 
latter scholarships shall be awarded only to such residents of the sev- 
eral Counties as intend to make teaching in this State their occupation. 
The scholarships are awarded after a competitive examination, taken pur- 
suant to the provisions of the act and to appropriate rules and regulations 
prescribed by the State Board of Education. Scholarships from Sena- 
torial Districts are designated as Senatorial State Scholarships and are 
awarded after a competitive examination. The holder may register for 
any of the regular courses at the University of Florida and is not required 
to teach after graduation. The value of each of these scholarships is 
$200.00 a year. 

Students desiring to take these competitive examinations should com- 
municate with the State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Tallahassee, 
Florida. 

Scholarships — ^Through the generosity of friends, the University is 
able to offer several scholarships. (See also College of Agriculture 
and Teachers College.) Application for a scholarship should be made 
to the President of the University and should be accompanied by a record 
of the student's work, statement of his need, and testimonials as to his 
character. To secure a scholarship: 

(a) The student must actually need this financial help to enable him to attend 
the University. 

(b) He must be of good character and habits and sufficiently far advanced to 
enter not lower than the freshman class. 

1. United Daughters of the Confederacy Scholarships given by the 
Chapters of the Florida Division U. D. C. for the term 1927-28: 

a. Kirby Smith Chapter, Gainesville— one student, value (Loan) $100.00 

b. Lakeland Chapter, Lakeland — one student, value 200.00 

c. Southern Cross Chapter, Miami — one student, value 180.00 

d. Annie Coleman Chapter, Orlando — two students, value 400.00 

e. Four Chapters of Jacksonville — one student (entered late), value 187.50 

f. J. J. Dickinson Camp of Tampa — one student (1st. sem.), value 75.00 

Applications relative to scholarships offered by the different chap- 
ters of the U. D. C. should be made to Mrs. J. C. Blocker, Chairman of 
Education, 600 Fourth Street North, St. Petersburg, Florida. 

2. Knight and Wall Scholarship — Established and maintained by the 
Knight & Wall Company, hardware dealers, of Tampa. Value, $245.00. 
For full particulars, address the Superintendent of Public Instruction, 
Hillsboro County, at Tampa, Florida. 



48 SCHOLARSHIPS 

3. Arthur Ellis Ham Memorial Scholarship — Established in 1919 
by Mrs. Elizabeth C. Ham, in accordance with the last will and in memory 
of her husband, Capt. Arthur Ellis Ham, a former student of the Uni- 
versity who fell in battle at St. Mihiel, France, on Sept. 14, 1918. Value, 
the income from a fund of $5,000.00. 

4. John B. Sutton Scholarship — Established and maintained by a 
loyal alumnus and former member of the Board of Control, Mr. John B. 
Sutton, LL.B., 1914, of Tampa, Florida. Value, $250.00. 

5. Loring Memorial Scholarship — Maintained by Mrs. William Lor- 
ing Spencer, in memory of her distinguished uncle, General Loring. 
Value, $250.00. 

6. /. B. Dell, Jr., Memorial Scholarship — Established by Mrs. J. 
B. Dell, of Gainesville, Florida, in memory of her son, James B. Dell, Jr., 
and awarded to a worthy student. Value, $300. 

7. Scottish Rite Scholarships — Maintained by the Scottish Rite Bodies 
of Jacksonville, Florida. Two scholarships, valued at $240.00 each. 

8. Knights of Pythias Scholarships — The University hereby ac- 
knowledges its profound gratitude to the Grand Lodge of the Knights 
of Pythias of Florida, which by the establishment of twelve scholarships 
makes it possible each year for twelve young men to pursue their studies. 

Applications for one of these scholarships should be made to Dr. J. 
H. Coffee, Arcadia, Florida. 

9. William Wilson Finley Foundation — See statement under College 
of Agriculture. 

10. State U. D. C. Foundation — Loan to a lineal descendent of a Con- 
federate soldier to an amount not exceeding $100 per year. 

11. Rotary Loan Fund — The University here wishes to record its 
appreciation of the great interest shown in higher education by the 
Rotarians of Florida, who have set aside a considerable sum of money to 
be used in making loans to worthy boys, who otherwise would not be able 
to attend college. 

Applications for loans should not be made to the University, but to 
the President of the Rotary Club of the city from which the prospective 
student registers, or to Mr. F. 0. Miller, President, Jacksonville, Florida, 
on or before September 1st. 

12. Duval High Memorial Scholarship — An act creating the Memo- 
rial Duval High School Scholarship and authorizing and appropriating 
annually $275.00 of the Duval County funds as financial assistance for 



HONORS 49 

one worthy high school graduate is covered by House Bill No. 823, and 
was approved May 20, 1927. 

This scholarship is created to memorialize and assist in preserving 
the high standards and traditions of the Duval High School where many 
of Florida's worthy citizens are educated, and was established by the 
Board of County Commissioners of Duval County, Florida. 

13. Jacksonville Rotary Club Scholarship — ^The Jacksonville Rotary 
Club maintains a scholarship of two hundred and fifty dollars which is 
given, at their discretion, to a student meeting such requirements as they 
may make pertaining to the scholarship. 

14. Tampa Alumni Scholarship Loans — Provide for several students, 
the estimated allowance being two hundred and fifty dollars each for the 
scholastic year. These scholarship loans are made available through the 
generosity of the Tampa Alumni, the Tampa Electric Company, Tampa 
Coca Cola Company, Lykes Brothers and others. Information as to these 
loans may be secured from Mr. J. L. Hearin, Secretary, 607 First National 
Bank Building, Tampa, Florida. 

15. Knights Templar Scholarship — The Grand Lodge of Knighls 
Templar in the State of Florida has arranged a number of loans in 
amounts of two hundred dollars to each student, for high school students 
pursuing a course at this institution. 

These loans are made available through application to the Knights 
Templar Lodge in the various cities of the state, and are handled by 
the Grand Lodge Officers. It is estimated that thirty students received 
aid from this scholarship during the present scholastic year. 

16. Student Aid Society — A number of students have been helped by 
loans from the University of Florida Student Aid Society. 

This Society was organized in Jacksonville, through the efforts of 
Frank Rogers and W. M. McCrory, who serve as Secretary and Treasurer, 
respectively. 

Money has been raised through the sale of non-profit stock certifi- 
cates, at $10.00 each, and over six thousand dollars has been given in 
scholarship loans this year. 

HONORS 

Phi Kappa Phi — A chapter of the Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi 
was established at the University during the spring of 1912. To be eligi- 
ble for membership a student must have been in attendance at the Uni- 
versity for at least one year, have been guilty of no serious breaches of 
discipline, have had at least three years of collegiate training, be within 



50 ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

one year of finishing a course leading to a degree, and stand among the 
first fifth of the senior class of the University. The grade which must be 
attained is based on ail college work, wherever done, for which the stu- 
dent receives credit towards a degree. 

Medals — Medals are offered (1) to the best declaimer in the fresh- 
man and sophomore classes and for the best original orations delivered 
(2) by a member of the junior and (3) the senior class. The contests are 
decided by public competition during Commencement week. The speak- 
ers are limited to four from each class and are selected by the faculty. 

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

At the close of their Commencement exercises the class of 1906 or- 
ganized an Alumni Association. All graduates of the University and the 
graduates of the former institutions ivho have had their diplomas con- 
firmed by the University are eligible for "active" membership. Recently 
the Association's constitution was so amended that former students, who 
had attended the University as much as one academic year and left in 
good standing without having received a degree, are automatically "asso- 
ciate" members. At the annual meeting in June, 1926, the doors of 
the Association were thrown open to all friends of the University who 
desire to unite with this organization for the furtherance of this institu- 
tion, and they may now become "sustaining" members by paying into the 
treasury a sum at least equal to active and associate membership dues. 

The Association holds its annual meeting during Commencement week 
at the University; and usually a business meeting is held on the occasion 
of Home-Coming. Most Association business is conducted by the Executive 
Council, composed at this time of ten men. This Council meets on call, 
each member paying his own expenses and giving his own time without 
remuneration. The Association now employs a full-time executive secre- 
tary and maintains a suite of offices in the Law Building on the campus. 

The Association publishes a monthly alumni periodical, known as 
The Florida Alumnus, the first issue having appeared September 1, 1926. 
All desiring further information pertaining to Florida alumni should 
write to the Alumni Association, University of Florida, Gainesville, 

Offices for the year 1928-29 are: 
Dr. T. Z. Cason, B.S. '08, Jacksonville, President. 
Judges S. L. Holland, LL.B. '16, Bartow, Vice-President. 
Frank Wright, Executive Secretary and Treasurer. 



STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS AND PUBLICATIONS 51 

Other members of the Executive Council: Geo. R. McKean, B.A. '96, 
Tampa; Raymer F. Maguire, LL.B. '15, Orlando; Phil S. May, B.A. '11, 
LL.B. '15, Jacksonville; M. Roy Hinson, A.B.E. '24, Tallahassee; Gordon 
B. Knowles, B.A. '15, LL.B. '16, Bradenton; Norris McElya, B.S. '16, LL.B. 
'17; Erwin A. Clayton, A.B.E. '24, J.D. '27. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS AND PUBLICATIONS 

Organizations — Practically every interest of the student-body has a 
student-controlled organization, but with faculty supervision, for its 
support. Some of these organizations are mainly religious in character, 
some social, others purely literary or scientific; still others combine social 
with other features. Hence there are athletic clubs, in addition to the 
general Athletic Association of the University; associations of men who 
have distinguished themselves or who are greatly interested in some 
activity or study. 

NOTE: The general faculty has ruled that no social functions shall be given 
under the auspices of any student organization except with the permission of the 
Committee on Student Organizations. 

Athletic Association — This association, composed of the entire stu- 
dent body, has charge of all major and minor sports, under faculty 
supervision and subject to the rules and regulations of the Southern 
Intercollegiate Conference. 

y. M. C. A. — The purpose of the Young Men's Christian Association 
is to provide a medium through which the highest ideals of education 
and religion may be expressed in terms of service. 

The program of the Association is planned to meet definite needs as 
these are apparent, including: 

Student Center — The Y Rooms are open every day in the week, and are 

furnished with magazines, daily papers, Edison, piano, telephone, 

games, and other conveniences. 

Social Life — A definite effort is made to create a wholesome social 

life which may be participated in by every student. 

Religious Activities — Voluntary Bible study groups, special meetings, 

life work talks, church cooperation and conferences. 

Secretaries — Two secretaries having extensive experience with the 

problems of students are available at all times for counsel and help. 

There is no membership fee. The organization is supported by 
voluntary contributions, and any student may become a member by sub- 
scribing to its purpose. 



52 STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS AND PUBLICATIONS 

Fraternities — *Nineteen national fraternities have established chapters 
at the University; most of these have already built handsome chapter 
houses for their members, and several others are renting homes near the 
University campus. The general work of the fraternities is controlled by 
the Inter fraternity Conference, composed of two delegates from each 
organization, supervised by a Committee of the General Faculty. 

Honor societies or fraternities have been established in the Colleges 
of Agriculture, Engineering, Law, Teachers College, and in Debating, 
Chemistry, Military Science, Commerce and Journalism. These organi- 
zations have high moral and inspirational purposes, and assist in de- 
veloping leadership and service. 

Literary and Scientific Societies — See description under General State- 
ment of each of the colleges of the University. 

Honor Committee — In order to carry out the spirit of the "Honor Sys- 
tem," which has been in operation at the University for years, nine men 
are elected from the student body to serve on the Student Honor Court. 
This Honor Court strives in every way possible to promote among 
the students honesty in all their work and conducts a fair trial in the 
rare cases of breaches of the system. Its verdict is final, but is kept 
secret from all save those concerned. 

Debating Council — The Debating Council, composed of one repre- 
sentative from each of the Literary Societies, has general charge both of 
intersociety and intercollegiate debates. Under its direction a debating 
contest is held annually between each of the colleges of the University. 
The winning team gains possession of the Faculty Loving Cup for the 
ensuing year; three successive victories entitle the successful society to 
a permanent ownership. Certain inter-university debates have grown 
into a tradition. The home teams debate annually against teams from 
the University of South Carolina, University of Tennessee, and Louisiana 
State University. Some forty intercollegiate debates have been held 
annually for the past few years. 



* Alpha Gamma Rho Phi Delta Theta Sigma Iota 

Alpha Tau Omega Phi Kappa Tau Sigma Nu 

Delta Chi Pi Kappa Alpha Sigma Phi Epsilon 

Delta Tau Delta Pi Kappa Phi Tau Epsilon Phi 

Kappa Alpha Sigma Alpha Epsilon Theta Chi 

Kappa Sigma Sigma Chi Theta Kappa Nu 
Phi Beta Delta 



ADMISSION 53 

MUSICAL ORGANIZATIONS 

The Chapel Orchestra offers musical entertainment at many Uni- 
versity functions. Its organization is one of the largest in the South. Stu- 
dents with ordinary talent in the handling of orchestral instruments are 
invited to present their names for membership. 

The Glee Club is under the direction of a special teacher of vocal 
music. Programs are given on the campus and about the middle of the 
year a tour is made to nearby towns. Membership is selective. 

The Military Band adds much to the effectiveness of parades. It 
makes several excursions during the year to neighboring towns. The 
instruments, valued at over S6,000, are furnished by the War Department. 

PUBLICATIONS 

Beginning with the session of 1909-10 each junior (or senior) class 
has published an illustrated annual, known as the "Seminole." 

The "Florida Alligator" is a weekly newspaper owned and controlled 
by the student-body. Its editorial articles discuss University problems 
from the viewpoint of the undergraduates. 

ADMISSION 

The Classification of students admitted will be according to their 
previous training — to the freshman class, to advanced standing, as special 
students, or as graduate students. 

Vaccination — All students preparing to enter the University of Florida 
should be vaccinated against small-pox; they must bring a certificate of 
successful vaccination or be vaccinated after their arrival by the University 
Physician. Certificates presented must show successful vaccination 
within five years. 

Students are also advised to be inoculated against typhoid fever. 

Procedure — Students desiring to enter the University of Florida should 
write to the Registrar stating the course they desire and asking that an 
entrance blank be sent to the principal of the high school which they at- 
tended. In the case of Florida high schools, the student may ask the 
principal to send the records on the blanks with which the principal will 
be supplied. In no case will credits be accepted unless they come direct 
from the principal to the Registrar. No student will be registered until 
his credits have been received and accepted. 



54 ADMISSION 

Students presenting credits for advanced standing should have the 
registrar of the institution which they last attended send a transcript of 
their record to the Registrar of the University of Florida. This transcript 
must show that the student has honorable dismissal, and that he was suc- 
cessfully passing his courses at the institution that he last attended. 
Students who because of failure in studies are not allowed to return to the 
institution they last attended ordinarily will be denied admission to the 
University of Florida. 

Upon receipt of the record of previous training the credits will be 
evaluated, the student notified by the Registrar as to his eligibility for 
entrance, and as to the amount of advanced standing, if any. 

LAWS GOVERNING ADMISSION 

To the Freshman Class — Sixteen High School units are required for 
non-conditional entrance to the University. Applicants are admitted to 
the regular freshman class as follows: 

1. Graduates of accredited High Schools are admitted without exami- 
nation, provided they offer the nine required units : — 3 English ; 1 Algebra ; 
1 Plane Geometry; 1 History; 1 Science; 2 as specified by the individual 
colleges (see section 4 below), and offer at least 15 acceptable units. 
Candidates offering only 15 units will be conditioned 1 unit in entrance 
and must take six semester hours in addition to the required work for 
any degree, unless this condition is removed within one year. 

No condition will be permitted in any of the nine required units. 
A single unit in any foreign language will not be accepted. 

2. Non-graduates of accredited or non-accredited high schools pre- 
senting at least 15 acceptable units, including the nine required units 
listed in (1.) above, are admitted provided they successfully pass the en- 
trance examinations in the subjects presented for admission. 

3. Graduates of non-accredited high schools presenting the specified 
units are admitted provided they successfully pass entrance examinations 
in the following subjects: 

English — Rhetoric and Composition; American and English Literature. 
Mathematics — First Year Algebra, Plane Geometry. 
History — one unit. 
Science — one unit. 

4. The specific requirements for each course are as follows: 



ADMISSION 



55 



Arts and Sciences — AB* Course: 

English 3 

Algebra 1 

Plane Geometry 1 

History 1 

Science 1 

Latin 2 

Approved electives 7 



Commerce and Journalism:* 

English 3 

Algebra 1 

Plane Geometry 1 

History 1 

Science 1 

One Foreign Language 2 

Approved electives 7 



Total 



.16 



Total 



.16 



Engineering and Architecture: 

English 3 

Algebra 2 

History 1 

Plane Geometry 1 

Solid Geometry V2 

Trigonometry V2 

Physics 1 

Approved electives 7 



All others, viz: College of Agriculture, 

Teachers College, College of Pharmacy, 

College of Arts and Sciences: — BS* 

and Pre-Medical courses: 

English 3 

Algebra 1 

Plane Geometry 1 

History 1 

Science 1 

Foreign Languagef 2 

Approved electives 7 



Total 



.16 



Total 



.16 



Entrance Examinations — Entrance examinations will be given on the 
dates published in the University calendar. Students failing to take the 
examinations on these dates will be required to pay the special examina- 
tion fee of five dollars (1^5.00) . 

Registration — No student will be registered until he has had his prin- 
cipal file with the Registrar a certified copy of his high school record show- 
ing that the candidate has the required units for admission ; or until the stu- 
dent has otherwise fulfilled all the requirements for admission. Students 
presenting credits for advanced standing will not be registered until they 
file a transcript from the isstitution they last attended. 

Responsibility for Entrance — The University will accept all graduates 
from accredited institutions, and report on their work to the Southern 
Association. Students entering by entrance examinations are not reported 
to the Association. 

Short Courses in Agriculture — Students 18 years of age and over, may 
enter the four month and one year courses offered in the College of Agri- 
culture, without the required high school entrance units. 



* Students taking work in the College of Arts and Sciences or in the College 
of Commerce and Journalism are urged to present not less than three units (3) in 
Mathematics: — one unit (1) in Plane Geometry; one and one-half (1%) units of 
Algebra. Unless one-half (%) unit of Trigonometry is taken in high school and pre- 
sented for entrance it must be taken in addition to the regular course in Mathematics. 

fThis may be waived by presenting 2 extra units in History or Science, or one 
extra in each. 



56 



ADMISSION 



Engineering Students — Pending the provision of enlarged facilities 
for instruction the right is reserved to limit the number of freshmen ad- 
mitted to the College of Engineering and Architecture to such number as 
can be properly accommodated with the present facilities. A qualifying 
examination will be given to all applicants and must be passed before a 
student will be registered in these courses. Students having successfully 
completed a year's course in another college will be exempt from this 
examination. 

College of Law — Sixty-eight (68) semester hours of college credit 
are required for admission to the College of Law. Usually two years are 
needed to obtain these credits. They must all be applicable toward a 
degree in the college from which they are offered. 

Teachers' Certificates — Special examinations given by the State De- 
partment of Education for Teachers' Certificates are equivalent to entrance 
examination units as indicated below: 



First Grade Certificate: 
English (Rhetoric and 

Composition) 2 

General History 1 

Physiology 1 

Biology (omitted from 

old First) 1 

U. S. History^, Civics 

"A 1 

Theory and Practice^^, 

Agrictulture % 1 

Algebra 2 

Total imits 9 



Second Grade Certificate: 
English Composition.... 1 

Civics % 

U. S. History V2 

Agriculture V2 

Theory and Practice ....^^ 
Algebra 1 

Total units 4 



Primary Certificate: 

U. S. History and Con- 
stitution 

Psychology 

Manual Arts 

Nature Study 

Drawing 

English (Rhetoric and 
Composition) 2 

Public School Music .. 1 

Total units 8 



Other certificates will be considered on their merits. 



ADMISSION 



57 



MAXIMUM AND MINIMUM CREDITS ALLOWED FOR ENTRANCE 

Following is a list of subjects with the maximum and minimum num- 
ber of units allowed for entrance. Entrance units will not be allowed in 
subjects not listed without special approval of the Committee on 
Admissions : 



Courses 



English, three yrs. 
English, fourth yr. 
Germ., two yrs.** 
German, third yr. 
German, fourth yr 
French, two yrs.** 
French, third yr... 
French, fourth yr. 
Span., two yrs.** 
Spanish, third yr. 
Span., fourth yr. 
Latin, 2 yrs.**.... 
Latin, tliird yr. . 
Latin, fourth yr. 
History, Ancient 
History, English 



Uni 



Courses 



Units* 



History, Mod. & 

Med 

History, American 

Civicsf 

Algebra, elem 

Algebra, intermed- 
Algebra, advanced 
Geometry, plane .. 
Geometry, solid .... 

Trigonometry 

Physics 

Chemistry 

General Science.. 

BiologyJ 

BotanyJ 

ZoologyJ 



1 

iV2) (1) 
(1/2) (1) 
1 
V2 
V2 
1 
1/2 
1/2 
1 
1 
1 
1 
(1/2) (1) 
(I/2) (1) 



Courses | 

Physiology 

Physical Geog 

AgricultureJt 

Economics 

Sociology 

Drawing 

Music Theory and 

History§ 

Business Englishf 

Bookkeepingf 

Com'l Arithmeticf 
Commercial Lawf 
Com'l Geographyf 

Shorthandf 

Typewriting 

Manual Training.. 
Bible 



Units* 



(1/2) (1) 

1 
1 ( ) 
1/2 
1/2 
(I/2) (1) 

(1/2) (1) 

1 
(1/2) (1) 
(1/2) (1) 
1/2 
1/2 
1 
1/2 

(y2)(i) 
(1/2) (1) 



*A unit is equivalent to five recitations a week for a year in one branch of study. 
Two or three hours of laboratory work count as equivalent to one hour of recitation. 
**Two units is the minimum credit allowed in a foreign language. 

fA maximum of 4 units is allowed in English, Mathematics, History and Civics, 
Vocational subjects or Commercial subjects. 

JIf one unit of Biology is offered, neither Botany (V2 unit) nor Zoology (^ 
unit) may be counted. » 

IJAs many as four units in Agriculture will be allowed to applicants for a degree 
in Agriculture. 

§ Credit not allowed in Band, Glee Club, etc. 



PART III 

THE 
COLLEGES 



60 THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

Organization — This School is under the direction of the Committee 
on Graduate Studies, which consists of Professors Anderson, Benton, Farr, 
Newell, Norman, Trusler, Leigh, and Matherly, 

Graduate students should register with the Chairman of this Com- 
mittee. 

Degrees Offered — Courses are offered leading to the degrees of 
Master of Arts, Master of Arts in Education, Master of Science, Master 
of Science in Agriculture, Master of Science in Engineering, and Master 
of Science in Pharmacy. 

Prerequisite Degree — Candidates for the Master's degree must pos- 
sess the Bachelor's degree from this institution or one of like standing. 
If the degree offered is not acceptable, the student may be required to 
obtain a satisfactory Bachelor's degree or he may be permitted to make 
good his deficiency by additional work and a longer residence at the 
University. 

Applications — Candidates for the Master's degree must present to 
the Chairman of the Committee on Graduate Studies a written application 
for the degree not later than the first of November of the first year's 
residence. This application must name the major and minor subjects 
offered for the degree and must contain the signed approval of the heads 
of the departments concerned. In case the student comes from another 
institution, a transcript of his college work is required. 

When a candidate offers as a part of his work any course not suffi- 
ciently described in the catalog, he must include in his application an out- 
line or description of that course. 

Time Required — ^The student must spend at least one entire academic 
year in residence at the University as a graduate student, devoting his full 
time to the pursuit of his studies. 

Work Required — The work is twelve hours per week. Six hours of 
this work must be in one subject (the major) and of a higher grade than 
any course offered for undergraduate students in that subject. The other 
six hours (the minor or minors) are to be determined and distributed by 
the professor in charge of the department in which the major subject is 
selected. No course designed primarily for students of a lower grade 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 61 

than the junior class will be acceptable as a minor. While the major 
course is six hours, these hours are not the same as in undergraduate 
work, for in general the major work will require at least two-thirds of the 
student's time. 

As a rule the student will have had four years of work or its equiva- 
lent in the subject selected for his major, and two or three years in the 
subjects selected as minors. 

To obtain credit for a graduate course the student must attain a grade 
of not less than B. Re-examinations are not permitted. As a rule it is 
not permissible to select a minor in the same department as the major. 

Dissertation — It is customary to require a dissertation showing orig- 
inal research and independent thinking on some subject accepted by the 
professor under whom the major work is taken. This dissertation must 
be in the hands of the committee not later than two weeks before Com- 
mencement Day. Two copies are required to be deposited in the library 
if the dissertation is accepted. 

Summer School — Four complete summer terms devoted entirely to 
graduate work will satisfy the time requirement. 

The application must be presented not later than four weeks after 
the beginning of the first term. Application blanks are to be obtained 
from the chairman of the committee. 

Approval of the Committee — The majors and minors, the subject 
of the thesis, and the thesis itself are all subject to the approval of the 
Committee on Graduate Studies. 

COURSES OF STUDY 

For description of courses offered see Departments of Instruction 
section. 



62 COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Jas. N. Anderson, Dean 
William Harold Wilson, Assistant Dean 

GENERAL STATEMENT 

Aim and Scope — The tendency of universities at the present time seems 
to be to reach out farther and farther into the domain of knowledge and 
to become more and more places where the student may expect to ac- 
quire any form of useful knowledge in which he may be interested. In 
the center, however, there is still found the College of Arts and Sciences, 
the pulsating heart, as it were, sending its vivifying streams to the outer- 
most tips of the institution. 

The aim of the College is to prepare for life, it is true, but not so 
directly and immediately as do the professional schools. It is a longer, 
but a better road, for those who are able to travel it, to distinction and 
ultimate success in almost any calling. Especially in the case of the 
learned professions, it is becoming clearer that a man must first get a 
liberal education, if possible, before entering upon his professional 
studies. 

The purpose and aim of the College of Arts and Sciences is to im- 
part culture and refinement, to train the mind and strengthen the intel- 
lect, to build up ideals and establish character, to enlarge the vision, 
to ennoble the thoughts, to increase the appreciation of the beautiful and 
the true, to add charm to life and piquancy to companionship, to make 
the man a decent fellow, a useful citizen, an influential member of society 
in whatever community he may be thrown, in whatever field his life- 
course may be run. 

But if the student wishes to examine the practical side exclusively, 
he will find that there is also something practical in all the courses. For 
instance, they are all valuable for those who wish to learn to teach the 
subjects. Moreover, the use of electives gives the student an opportunity 
to specialize in some branch according to his inclination and in further- 
ance of his plans. 

SOCIETIES 

Farr Literary Society — This is the oldest society on the campus, and 
has provided opportunity for training in debate and oratory for many 
classes of college men. Meetings are held weekly. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 63 

The Leigh Chemical Society — Organized by and for the students of 
the department of Chemistry, from all Colleges, for the purpose of stimu- 
lating interest of beginners and giving a view of the importance of the 
industry. It meets monthly, with programs aided by faculty members 
and advanced students. 

Admission — For full description of requirements for admission and 
of unit courses, see pages 53 to 57, inclusive. 

Degrees — ^The College of Arts and Sciences offers courses leading to 
the degrees of Bachelor of Arts (A.B.) and Bachelor of Science (B.S.). 

Subjects of Study — The subjects of study leading towards the de- 
grees offered by the College of Arts and Sciences are divided into the 
following four groups: 



I. 


11. 


III. 


IV. 


Military Science 


French 


Bible 


Astronomy 


Physical Education 


German 


Economics 


Bacteriology 




Greek 


Education 


Biology 




Latin 


English Language 


Botany 




Spanish 


and Literature 


Chemistry 






History 


Geology 






Philosophy 


Mathematics 






Political Science 


Meteorology 






Psychology 


Physics 






Sociology 


Physiology 
Zoology 



Requirements for Degrees — For each of the degrees offered, a total 
of 134 credits is required, of which at least the last 30 credits must be 
pursued in residence at this University. 

For the A.B. degree 10 credits must be earned in Group I, 24 credits 
in each of Groups II and IV, and 36 credits in Group III; 8 credits 
may be taken in any Group; the remaining 56 credits (including the 
"major") must be earned in Groups II and III and (pure) mathematics. 
In Group II, two courses of a grade as high as 100 must be taken. 

For the B.S. degree 10 credits must be earned in Group I, 18 credits 
in Group II (6 of which must be in a course as high as 100), 30 credits 
in Group III, and 54 credits (including the "major") from Group IV; 
the remaining 22 may be earned in any Group or Groups. 

The "major" must consist of 18 credits in one department (not 
counting the freshman work or a foundation course) and must be ap- 
proved by the head of the department chosen. The choice of electives 
must meet with the approval of the Dean. 

Combined Academic and Law Course — For not more than 24 of the 
free elective credits required for either of the Bachelor's degrees con- 



64 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



ferred by the College of Arts and Sciences there may be substituted an 
equal number of credits from the first year of the College of Law. 

The Bachelor's degree in Arts or Science will not be conferred, how- 
ever, upon a candidate offering 24 credits in Law until he has satisfac- 
torily completed the second year of the course in the College of Law. 

Minimum and Maximum Hours — The student must take at least 
fourteen hours of work, and in general will not be permitted to take 
more than nineteen; but if in the preceding semester he has attained an 
honor point average of 2 or more and has not failed in any subject he 
may be permitted to take as many as twenty-one hours, and if he has 
attained an honor point average of 2.5 with no failures he may be per- 
mitted to take as many as twenty-three hours. 

Pre-Medical Course — Students intending to study medicine are ad- 
vised to take the regular B.S. course. Inasmuch, however, as many 
students are unable to spend four years on a non-professional course, the 
University offers a Two-Year Pre-Medical course. 

CURRICULUM 

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Arts 
Freshman Year 
First Semester - Second Semester 



Names of Courses 



Credits Names of Courses 



Credits 



English 101 

English 103 

Foreign Language 

♦History 101 

Mathematics 101 

Military Science 101 

Physical Education 101 



3 English 102 

2 English 104 

3 Foreign Language 

3 History 102 

3 Mathematics 102 

2 Military Science 102 

1 Physical Education 102 





17 


17 


First Semester 


Sophomore Year 

Second Semester 




Names of Courses 


Credits Names of Courses 


Credits- 



Biology 101 ] 

Or Chemistry 101 \ 5 

Or Physics 105 & 107 
Or Physics 203 J 

Group n 3 

Group III 3 

Group II or III or IV 3 

Military Science 201 2 



16 



Biology 104 (or 106) 
Or Chemistry 102 
Or Physics 106 & 108 
Or Physics 204 

Group II 3- 

Group III i 

Group II or HI or IV S 

Military Science 202 2 



16 



*Greek 21-22 may be substituted. Then History 101-102 will be taken the sopho- 
more year. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



65 



First Semester 



CURRICULUM 

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science 

Freshman Year 

Second Semester 



Names of Courses 



Credits Names of Courses 



Credits 



Chemistry 101 5 

English 101 3 

Foreign Language 3 

Mathematics 101 3 

Military Science 101 2 

Physical Education 101 1 



Chemistry 102 5 

English 102 3 

Foreign Language 3 

Mathematics 102 3 

Military Science 102 2 

Physical Education 102 1 





17 


17 


First Semester 


Sophomore Year 

Second Semester 




Names of Courses 


Credits Names of Courses 


Credits 



* Biology 101 1 

Or Physics 105 and 107 \ 5 

Or Physics 203 J 

Group II 3 

Group III 3 

Group II, III, or IV 3 

Military Science 201 2 



16 



Biology 104 (or 106) '| 

Or Physics 106 and 108 )■ 5 

Or Physics 204 J 

Group II 3 

Group III 3 

Group II, III, or IV 3 

Military Science 202 2 



15 



*If the student elects Biology in his sophomore year, he must take Physics the fol- 
lowing year or vice versa. Both these subjects are required in the B. S. Course. 

Junior and Senior Years — In the Junior and Senior years candidates 
for either of the degrees offered must choose their studies so as to conform 
to the general "Requirements for Degree" of this college, see page 63. 



66 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



First Semester 



CURRICULUM 

Two- Year Pre-Medical Course 
First Year 

Second Semester 



Names of Courses 



Credits Names of Courses 



Credits 



Biology 101 5 

Chemistry 101 5 

English 101 3 

Foreign Language 3 

Military Science 101 2 

Physical Education 101 1 



Biology 104 5 

Chemistry 102 5 

English 102 3 

Foreign Language 3 

Military Science 102 2 

Physical Education 102 1 





19 


19 


First Semester 


Second Year 

Second Semester 




Names of Courses 


Credits Names ok Courses 


Credits 



Chemistry 201 3 

Chemistry 251 5 

Physics 105 and 107 | d 

Or Physics 203 \ 

Electiye 3 

Military Science 201 2 



18 



Chemistry 202 3 

Chemistry 252 5 

Physics 106 and 108 ) ,- 

Or Physics 204 j ^ 

Elective 3 

Military Science 202 2 



18 



COURSES OF STUDY 

For description of courses offered by the College of Arts and Science, 
see Departments of Instruction section. 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 67 



THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

WiLMON Newell, Dean and Director 
GENERAL STATEMENT 

The College of Agriculture has three divisions: 

1. Instruction Division (the College proper) 

2. Research Division (Experiment Station) 

3. Agricultural Extension Division. 

THE COLLEGE 

W. L. Floyd, Assistant Dean 

Aim and Scope — The College was established under the Acts of 
Congress creating and endowing institutions for the liberal and practical 
education of the industrial classes. Recognition of agriculture as a branch 
of collegiate instruction is a distinctive feature of schools thus founded. 

The aim of the College is to afford young men the best possible op- 
portunity for gaining technical knowledge and training in the art and 
science of agriculture. About one-third of the student's time is devoted 
to technical studies, the other two-thirds to cultural studies, and basic 
sciences. A foundation is thus laid which will enable graduates to become 
leaders in educational work or effective producing agriculturists. 

Buildings and Equipment — The Agriculture Building, described on 
page 32 is the principal building for the College. Three departments are 
housed in the new Horticulture Building. 

Arrangements are made for outside instruction in the different de- 
partments on the College farm which consists of 135 acres. The farm is 
equipped with a foreman's home, general bam for work stock, modern 
dairy barn, veterinary hospital, sweet potato storage house, propagating 
house, greenhouses, corn crib, farm machinery and implements, several 
stock lots and sheds, poultry houses, irrigating systems, and a number of 
types and breeds of cattle, hogs, and other farm animals. The Experiment 
Station farm containing about 700 acres joins the College farm and is 
also accessible for instructional purposes. 

Libraries — Many works on agriculture and horticulture have re- 
cently been added to the general library. A trained librarian aids students 
in finding needed references. Each department has, furthermore, a small 



68 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

collection of well selected volumes, which are always accessible. The Ex- 
periment Station library contains a very complete set of bulletins from 
the experiment stations of the world and from the United States Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, all fully indexed and carefully filed. 

The Agricultural Club — This is a voluntary association of students 
in the College. Its purpose is to give training in public speaking and in 
preparation for leadership. The programs consist mainly of essays and 
debates on agricultural or civic topics, or speeches by members and vis- 
itors. Meetings are held weekly. 

Fellowship — L. P. Moore Fellowship, for graduate students. See 
page 46. 

Scholarships — County Scholarships — Provision has been made by a 
legislative act for a scholarship, sufficient to pay the board of a student in 
the College of Agriculture, from each county, to be provided for at their 
discretion by the various Boards of County Commissioners. The recipient 
is to be selected by competitive examination from among the qualified 
applicants. 

Whether such a scholarship has been provided for may be learned 
from the Clerk of the Board of County Commissioners or the County 
Agent of the county in question. Other information may be obtained from 
the College of Agriculture. 

Boys' Club Scholarships — The Florida Bankers' Association offers 
club boys three prize scholarships, of SlOO each, in the College of Agri- 
culture: one for the western, one for the central and one for the southern 
areas of the State. 

Chilean Nitrate of Soda Educational Bureau offers a scholarship 
of SIOO. 

Frank E. Dennis, of Jacksonville, offers a scholarship of $250 in the 
College of Agriculture to the State Pig Club champion. 

Loan Funds — William Wilson Finley Foundation — As a memorial 
to the late President Finley and in recognition of his interest in agricul- 
tural education, the Southern Railway Company has donated to the Uni- 
versity the sum of one thousand dollars ($1,000), to be used as a loan 
fund. No loan from this fund to an individual is to exceed $150 per 
year. Recipients are selected by the Dean of the College of Agriculture, 
to whom all applications should be directed. 

NOTE: Loan funds available for students in any college of the University, as 
well as the conditions under which loans are made, will be found described ou 
page 46. 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 69 

Remunerative and Instructive Labor — Opportunities frequently 
occur for students to work in the fields and truck gardens, about the 
barns, in the buildings, and at the Agricultural Experiment Station. Those 
who engage in agricultural pursuits during vacation periods will be 
markedly benefited and after graduation will command more desirable po- 
sitions or find their efforts on the farm more effective. See also Oppor- 
tunities for Earning Expenses, page 45. 

Donations and Loans — The laboratories have been supplied with 
much of their farm machinery for instructional purposes through the gen- 
erosity of the following manufacturers and distributors: 

McCormick-Deering Co., Jacksonville. 

Gulf Fertilizer Co., Tampa. 

Florida Agricultural Supply Co., Jacksonville. 

Southern States Lumber Company, Pensacola. 

Peninsula Chemical Co., Orlando. 

Gould Pump Co., Seneca Falls, N. Y. 

Ov^ensboro Ditcher Co., Owensboro, Ky. 

Oliver Chilled Plow Works, South Bend. Ind. 

Challenge Co., Batavia, III. 

DeLaval Separator Co., New York. 

Plow Mate Inc., Cleveland, 0. 

THE FOUR-YEAR COURSE 

NOTE: See page 54 for entrance requirements. 

Groups — ^The group courses offered afford the individual student 
opportunity for preparing for that branch of agriculture in which he is 
most interested. The Agronomy Group should be selected by those wish- 
ing to pursue general farming; the Animal Husbandry Group by those 
interested in stock raising; the Chemistry Group by those desiring to spe- 
cialize in agricultural chemistry, and others in like manner. 

Quantity of Work — No student will be allowed to take more than 
twenty hours of work, unless his general average during the previous 
year was at least 2 honor points, with no failure in any study; or more 
than twenty-two hours, unless the previous year's average was at least 2.5 
honor points, with no failure. 

Credit for Practical Work — By previous arrangement with the 
head of a department and the Dean, students may do practical work 
under competent supervision in any recognized agricultural pursuit dur- 
ing their course of study, and upon returning to College and rendering 
a satisfactory written report showing faithful service, will be entitled to 



70 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



one credit tor each month of such work; such credits shall not total 
more than six in the one-year and four-year courses. 

Degree — The work outlined in the following tables, whatever the 
major subject, leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture 
(B.S.A.). One hundred forty credits are required for graduation in all 
groups. 



CURRICULUM FOR FOUR-YEAR COURSE IN AGRICULTURE 
(Except those taking Landscape Design.) 



First Semester 



Freshman Year 

Second Semester 



Names of Courses 



Credits Names of Courses 



Credits 



Horticulture 101 _ 3 

Botany 101 „ „ 4 

Chemistry 101 „ 5 

English 101 3 

Military Science 101 _. 2 

Physical Education 101 1 



18 



Animal Husbandry 102 3 

Botany 102 4 

Chemistry 104 5 

English 102 _ 3 

Military Science 102 2 

Physical Education 102 1 



18 



First Semester 



Sophomore Year 

Second Semester 



Agronomy 201 3 

Biology 101 5 

Geology 201 3 

Mathematics 85 3 

Physics 201 3 

Military Science 201 2 



19 



Agric. Engineering 104 2 

Agric. Engineering 202 4 

*Chemistry 254 „ 4 

** Poultry Husbandry 202 3 

Physics 202 3 

Military Science 202 2 



18 



First Semester 



Junior and Senior Years 

Second Semester 



Agronomy 301 5 

Bacteriology 301 4 

Agric. Economics 301 3 

Elective „ 2 

Group Requirements 19 



(See next pages.) 



Agric. Economics 306 3 

Entomology 302 _ 4 

Journalism 316 ) n 

Or a Modem Language j 

Veterinary Science 302 2 

Elective 3 

Group Requirements 19 

(See next pages.) — 

34 



NOTE: At the beginning of his Junior year, each student will enter the Group 
which he prefers, and, in addition to the subjects specified above for the Junior and 
Senior years, must take the subjects required in his chosen Group. 

*For Chemistry Group take 201-202. 

**Those specializing in Pomology take instead Hort. 202; Poul. Husb. will be 
taken later. 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



71 



First Semester 



Group Requirements — Junior and Senior Years 
Second Semester 



Names of Courses 



Credits Names of Courses 



Credits 



Agricultural Economics Group 



Agricultural Economics 303 3 

Agricultural Economics Subjects 6 

Electives (Approved) 10 



19 



Agricultural Economics 308 3 

Agricultural Economics Subjects 6 

Electives (Approved) 10 



19 



Agricultural Engineering Group 



Horticulture 305 3 

Agricultural Engineering Subjects.... 9 
Electives 7 



Agronomy 302 3 

Agricultural Economics 308 3 

Agricultural Engineering Subjects.... 6 

Electives 7 



19 



19 



Agronomy Group 



Agricultural Engineering 301 3 Botany 202 

Plant Pathology 301 4 Bacteriology 302 ... 

Agronomy Subjects _ 8 Agronomy Subjects 

Electives 4 Electives 

19 

Animal Husbandry Group 



4 

4 

f. 

. S 

19 



Poultry Husbandry 301 3 

Veterinary Science 301 3 

Veterinary Science 401 2 

Animal Industry Subjects 8 

Electives „ 3 



Bacteriology 302 

Veterinary Science 302 

Animal Industry Subjects 
Electives 



19 



19 



Chemistry Group 



Chemistry 255 5 

Chemistry 301 3 

Chemistry 321 3 

Chemistry 401 3 

German or French 3 

Electives 2 



Chemistry 256 

Chemistry 302 

Chemistry 322 

Chemistry 402 

German or French 
Electives 



19 



19 



72 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



First Semester 


Second Semester 




Names of Courses 


Credits Names of Courses 


Credits 


Entomology and Plant Pathology Group 



Entomology 303 1 . Entomology 304 ] . 

Or Plant Pathology 401 | * Or Plant Pathology 402 ] * 

Plant Pathology 301 4 Plant Pathology 304 3 

Plant Pathology 303 3 Entomology 406 3 

Entomology 405 3 Electives 9 

Electives 5 

19 19 

Horticulture Group 

Botany 201 4 Agronomy 302 3 

Plant Pathology 301 4 Poultry Husbandry 202 3 

Horticultural Subjects 9 Horticultural Subjects 9 

Electives 2 Electives 4 

19 19 

Smith-Hughes Group 

Agricultural Engineering 303 3 Agronomy 302 3 

Plant Pathology 301 4 Agricultural Organization 204 1 

Political Science 101 3 Political Science 102 3 

Education 303 3 Education 0207 3 

Education 403 3 Education 304 3 

Education 409 3 Education 306 3 

Education 410 3 

19 19 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



73 



CURRICULUM FOR FOUR-YEAR COURSE IN 
LANDSCAPE DESIGN 



First Semester 



Freshman Year 

Second Semester 



Names of Courses 



Credits Names of Courses 



Credits 



Architecture 101 3 

Botany 101 4 

Chemistry 101 5 

English 101 3 

Military Science 101 2 

Physical Education 101 1 



Architecture 102 2 

Botany 102 4 

Chemistry 102 5 

English 102 3 

Military Science 102 2 

Physical Education 102 1 

Architecture 112 1 



18 



18 



Sophomore Year 



Architecture 121 2 

Horticulture 101 3 

Horticulture 207 3 

Mathematics 85 3 

Physics 201 3 

Military Science 201 2 

Modern Language 3 



19 



Architecture 122 2 

Architecture 226 2 

Horticulture 208 3 

Horticulture 210 3 

Horticulture 212 3 

Physics 202 3 

Military Science 202 2 



18 



Junior Year 



Geology 201 3 

Agricultural Engineering 301 3 

Agronomy 301 „ 5 

Horticulture 309 3 

Architecture 227 2 



16 



Botany 202 4 

Horticulture 310 3 

Entomology 302 4 

Electives 3 

Modern Language 3 



17 



Senior Year 



Agricultural Economics 301 3 

Horticulture 405 3 

Horticulture 411 3 

Plant Pathology 405 3 

English 201 3 

Modern Language 3 



Horticulture 406 3 

Horticulture 408 3 

Plant Pathology 406 3 

English 202 3 

Electives 1 

Modern Language 3 



18 



16 



74 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



OTHER DEPARTMENTS 

Descriptions of other subjects required in the various courses or elec- 
tives that may be taken by students in the College of Agriculture can be 
found by referring to the index. 

FOUR-MONTHS AND ONE-YEAR COURSES 

Students 18 years old or over, who desire more knowledge in Agri- 
culture either along general lines or in some special field such as Dairy- 
ing, Poultry Husbandry, Fruit Growing, etc., may enter at the beginning 
of either the first or second semester, and select from the list of subjects 
below such as they think will be of greatest value to them. They are 
expected to take not less than 18 nor more than 21 hours per week. 

Those having only a knowledge of common school branches should 
select first the subjects numbered below 100. Those with High School 
or College training may at once select those marked above 100. 

Each semester is, as nearly as possible, complete in itself; a student 
may, therefore, attend but one semester a year and continue doing so till 
four semesters have been completed. 

Certificates will be granted on completion of courses undertaken. 



Name of Course 



Nature of Work 



Hours per Week 



First Semester 



Agricultural Economics 301 . 
Agricultural Engineering 21 . 
Agricultural Engineering 301 
Agricultural Engineering 303 
Agricultural Engineering 401 

Agronomy 21 

Agronomy 201 

Animal Husbandry 21 

Animal Husbandry 201 

Animal Husbandry 203 

Chemistry 101 

Dairying 201 

Entomology 21 

Entomology 405 

Horticulture 21 

101 

301 

303 

305 

307 



Horticulture 

Horticulture 

Horticulture 

Horticulture 

Horticulture 

Plant Pathology 301 .... 

Plant Pathology 303 ... 

Poultry Husbandry 21 

Poultry Husbandry 301 

Veterinary Science 301 



Fundamental Principles 3 

Farm Machinery 3 

Drainage and Irrigation 3 

Farm Shop 3 

Farm Buildings 3 

Elements of Agronomy 2 

Farm Crops 3 

Elements of Animal Husbandly.. 3 

Animal Feeding 2 

Beef Production 3 

General Chemistry . 5 

Farm Dairying 3 

Farm, Garden and Orchard Insects 3 

Insecticides and Fungicides 3 

Elements of Horticulture 3 

Plant Propagation 3 

Advanced Trucking 3 

JFloriculture 3 

Citrus Culture 3 

Subtropical Fruits 3 

General Pathology 4 

Diseases of florida Crops 3 

Poultry Essentials 3 

Commercial Poultry Keeping .... 3 

Farm Sanitation 2 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 75 

Second Semester 

Agricultural Economics 54 Farm Management 3 

Agricultural Engineering 202 Farm Machinery 4 

Agricultural Engineering 302 Farm Motors 3 

Agricultural Engineering 402 Farm Concrete 2 

Agronomy 22 Elements of Agronomy 2 

Agronomy 304 Forage Crops 3 

Animal Husbandry 102 Types and Breeds of Animals 3 

Animal Husbandry 202 Animal Breeding 2 

Animal Husbandry 204 Swine Production 2 

Botany 22 Agricultural Botany 3 

Chemistry 104 General Chemistry 5 

Dairying 22 Elements of Dairying 3 

Dairying 202 Dairy Management 3 

Entomology 302 Economic Entomology 4 

Entomology 406 Fungicides and Insecticides 3 

Horticulture 202 Fundamentals of Fruit Production 3 

Horticulture 204 Pruning 3 

Horticulture 206 Trucking 3 

Horticulture 306 _ Citrus Harvesting, Marketing, etc. 3 

Horticulture 308 Deciduous Fruits 3 

Plant Pathology 22 Diseases and Insects of Citrus.... 3 

Plant Pathology 304 Diseases of Florida Crops 3 

Poultry Husbandry 202 Farm Poultry 3 

Poultry Husbandry 303 Commercial Poultry Keeping 3 

Veterinary Science 302 Veterinary Elements 2 

COURSES OF STUDY 

For description of courses offered by the College of Agriculture, see 
Departments of Instruction section. 



76 AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION 



THE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION 

WiLMON Newell, Director 

Aim and Scope — The Agricultural Experiment Station is an institu- 
tion founded by Congressional act, for the purpose of acquiring and dif- 
fusing agricultural knowledge. From the enacting clause it is evident 
that Congress intended to establish in connection with every college and 
university receiving the benefits of the original "Land-Grant Act" an in- 
stitution for purely investigational work. 

The Florida Agricultural Experiment Station was founded in 1887 
and has continued without interruption since that time. As a part of its 
funds are obtained from Federal sources, it must comply with the Fed- 
eral law and use its income for acquiring new and important knowledge 
in regard to crops, soils and livestock, and for research in agriculture 
and home economics. No funds can be expended, either directly or in- 
directly, for teaching purposes or for holding farmers' institutes, and 
only 5 per cent for buildings or repairs. In order to receive the bene- 
fits of the Adams, Hatch and Purnell funds, the Station must, before any 
money is spent in investigation, submit plans or projects for proposed 
experiments to the United States Department of Agriculture for approval. 

Location — The advantages of having the Agricultural Experiment 
Station at the University are obvious. The research workers deliver 
popular and technical lectures, either to the student-body as a whole 
or to special clubs and local organizations. The experimental fields 
and orchards as well as the research laboratories contribute to the op- 
portunities of students for studying methods of scientific investigation. 
Some with special aptitude have an opportunity of assisting the special- 
ists in charge. Minor positions, such as those of laboratory assistants, 
are occasionally open, and whenever practicable are given to students of 
the University. 

Equipment — The Station occupies all the space in the three-story 
Agricultural Experiment Station Building, including research laboratories 
of Agronomy, Animal Husbandry, Chemistry, Entomology, Agricultural 
Economics, Home Economics, Plant Pathology and Physiology. The 
library and mailing rooms are located in the Horticulture Building. 

Lines of Investigation — The lines of investigation conducted by 
the station fall naturally into several departments: Agronomy, Agricul- 



AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION 77 

tural Economics, Animal Husbandry, Chemistry, Cotton Investigations, En- 
tomology, Home Economics, Horticulture, Plant Pathology and Veter- 
inary Science. The work of the Station is, however, not sharply divided 
among these different departments. The staff formulates what are known 
as projects, the work of which is continued regardless of whether its 
ramifications take it into one or another department, and frequently two 
or more departments are engaged in the solution of the same problem. 

Projects — Some of the more important projects are: 

The study of soils and fertilizers on citrus, pecans, farm and truck 
crops, in relation to plant growth and development. 

The study of citrus diseases. 

The study of vegetable diseases. 

The study of the control of root-knot and vegetable insects. 

The study of pecan diseases, insects, varieties and cultural methods. 

Control of aphids and other citrus insects. 

Comparison of rations for economical milk and pork production. 

The study of tobacco diseases and insects. 

Cooperative experiments with farmers in various sections of the 
State to ascertain the value of new forage crops and grasses. 

Testing native and newly introduced grasses to determine their value 
as permanent pastures. 

Citrus breeding work. 

Adaptation test plots of fruits, vegetables, cereals, grass and forage 
crops on muck soils. 

The study of livestock and poultry diseases. 

The study of the control of cotton diseases and insect pests. 

Cotton breeding work. 

Corn breeding and variety tests. 

Phonological studies on truck crops in Florida. 

Physiology of Fruit Production. 

The study of the limiting factor in the production of Vitamin A. 

Economic studies of various crops and farming areas. 

Branch Stations — Branch stations have been established at the fol- 
lowing locations and for the indicated purposes: at Lake Alfred for the 
special study of problems of the citrus grower; at Quincy for the study 
of the problems of particular interest to the tobacco grower; and at 
Belle Glade for the purpose of making investigations, tests and experi- 
ments in agricultural problems as applied to conditions of the Everglades. 



78 AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION DIVISION 

Field Laboratories — Field laboratories have been established at 
Hastings for the study of Irish potato diseases, at Cocoa for certain cit- 
rus investigations, at Sanford for investigation of celery problems, at 
Plant City for the study of strawberry diseases, at Homestead and Braden- 
ton for the study of Tomato Nail Head Rust Disease, and at Monticello 
for study of pecan insects and diseases. 

Publications — The publications fall into three classes: Bulletins, 
Press Bulletins and Annual Reports. The bulletins contain more or less 
complete results of particular investigations. At least four are issued 
annually: 201 have appeared to date. The press bulletins are prepared 
in order to bring to Lhe citizens of Florida information connected with 
the investigations that are being carried on, before all the work neces- 
sary for the publishing of a bulletin has been completed. They are is- 
sued at short intervals, 408 having already appeared. The annual re- 
ports contain a brief statement of the work done, as well as of the ex- 
penditure of funds. Thirty-nine have been published. All of these publi- 
cations are distributed free upon request to the Director. 

THE AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION DIVISION 

WiLMON Newell, Director 

Staff — A. With headquarters at Gainesville: Wilmon Newell, A. 
P. Spencer, H. G. Clayton, R. W. Blacklock, Hamlin L. Brown, E. F. De- 
Busk, N. R. Mehrhof, J. F. Cooper, J. Lee Smith, W. T. Nettles, Lucy 
Belle Settle. 

B. With headquarters at Tallahassee: Flavia Gleason, Virginia P. 
Moore, Ruby McDavid, Isabelle S. Thursby, Mary A. Stennis, Mary E. 
Keown. 

C. With headquarters at Tallahassee (A. & M. College for Negroes) : 
A. A. Turner, Julia A. Miller. 

D. Revised list of County and Home Demonstration Agents. 

County County Agents Address Home Dem. Agents 

Alachua F. L. Craft Gainesville Mrs. Grace F. Warren 

Bradford T. D. Rikenbaker Starke - 

Brevard W. R. Briggs _Cocoa _ 

Broward ..._ C. E. Matthews Ft. Lauderdale Miss Ethyl HoHovvay 

Calhoun J. G. Kelley -Blountstown Miss Josephine Nimmo 

Charlotte _ Punta Gorda Miss May Winfield 

Citrus I. R. Nolen Inverness Mrs. Elizabeth W. Moore 

Dade J. S. Rainey Miami Miss Pansy Norton 

Dade (Asst.) C. A. Steffani Homestead 

Dade (Asst.) _ _ Miami _ Miss Carrie Torbert 

Duval W. L. Watson Jacksonville JVIias Pearl Laffitte 

Duval (Asst.) J. O. Traxler Jaaksonville _ _ 

Duval (Asst.) __C. H. Magoon _ -Jacksonville _ - 



DEMONSTRATION AGENTS 19 

Connty County Agents Address Home Dem. Agents 

Escambia E. P. Scott Pensacola Miss Delia Stroud 

Flagler L. T. Nieland — Bunnell _ - - 

Gadsden „Quincy Miss Elise Laffitte 

Hamilton _ _J. J. Sechrest Jasper - 

Hernando John H. Logan Brooksville 31r8. Florence Albert 

Highlands _L. H. Allsmeyer Sebring - 

Highlands - Punta Gorda Miss May Winfield 

Hillsboro _C. P. Wright Plant City _ - 

Hillsboro (East) - - Plant City —Miss Motelle Madole 

Hillsboro (West) Tampa Mrs. Mary S. Allen 

Holmes _ „ _ _Bonifay Mrs. Bettie A. Caudle 

Indian River _W. E. Evans Vero Beach ..._ _ - - 

JacQcson S. H. Rountree Marianna Miss Mary Sue Wigley 

Jefferson E. H. Finlayson Monticello Miss Ruby Brown 

Lafayette D. C. Geiger _Mayo _ - 

Lake C. R. Hiatt „ Tavares Miss Christine McFerron 

Lee _ W. P. Hayman Ft. Myers -Miss Anna Mae Sikes 

Leon G. C. Hodge Tallahassee „ Mrs. Ruth C. Kellum 

Levy __N. J. AUbritton Bronson „ 

Madison _.B. E. Lawton Madison ™ - — 

Manatee L. H. Wilson -Bradenton . _MisB Margaret Cobb 

Marion Clyde H. Norton Ocala _ _Miss Tillie Roesell 

Martin C. P. Heuck _ Stuart „ _ 

Nassau _ „A. S. Lawton Fernandina Miss Pearl Jordan 

Okaloosa J. W. Malone Crestview Miss Bertha Henry 

Okeechobee __C. A. Fulford Okeechobee 

Orange K. C. Moore Orlando „ Mrs. Nellie W. Taylor 

Osceola J. R. Gunn Kissimnaee _ Miss Albina Smith 

Palm Beach M. U. Mounts _ _W. Palm Beach Miss Edith Y. Morgan 

Palm Beach (Asst.) _ _ _ W. Palm Beach Miss Bernice Lyle 

Pinellas Wm. Gomme -Clearwater ..... Mrs. Joy Belle Hess 

Polk _F. L. Holland _Bartow Miss Lois Godbey 

Polk (Asst) _ _ _ _ —Bartow _Mis8 Mosel Preston 

Putnam _ _ _ „Palatka Miss Bertha L. Vaden 

St. Johns E. H. Vance St. Augustine Miss Anna E. Heist 

St. Lucie „ „A. Warren Ft. Pierce _ __ 

Santa Rosa John G. Hudson Milton Miss Martha Moore 

Sarasota -P. M. Childers _Sarasota _ _ 

Sumter I. R. Nolen „ Inverness - 

Suwannee W. W. Green Live Oak 

Taylor __R. S. Dennis _Perry Mrs. Annabel Powell 

Union _ L. T. Dyer Lake Butler _ _ _ „. 

Volusia _ _T. A. Brown ..._ DeLand _ _Miss Orpha Cole 

Wakulla D. M. Treadwell _Crawfordville _ _ 

Walton _Mitchell Wilkins DeFuniak Springs Miss Eloise McGriflt 

Washington Gus York Chipley _ 

Negro Local Farm and Home Demonstration Agents 

County Farm Agent Address Home Dem. Agent 

Alachua W. P. Stockton Gainesville _ 

Bradford J. W. Keller __Starke _ 

Columbia E. S. Belvin Lake City _ 

Duval .._ _ _ „ Jacksonville Olive L. Smith 

Jackson _J. E. Cranberry Marianna 

Jefferson M. E. Groover Monticello 

Leon Tallahassee Alice W. Poole 

Levy _ _ Archer ..Nancy Henderson 

Marion „.Wm. B. Young Ocala _ 

Marion Reddick Idella Ransom 

Madison _ _ Madison _Althea Ayer 

Orange _ Orlando _Mamie E. Wright 

Suwannee C. T. Evans Live Oak 

St. Johns „ - _ St. Augustine Mary A. Caldwell 

Sumter _ _ Webster Diana H. Finlayson 



80 . AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION DIVISION 

Cooperative Agricultural Extension Work — The Agricultural 
Extension Division supports a system of practical education. It teaches 
the results of scientific experiments to the present and future farmer and 
housewife. A synopsis of this work includes: 

(A) Demonstrations in agricultural and horticultural crops, dairying, hog 
raising, poultry raising, cooperative organizations, insect and disease control. 

(B) Boys' agricultural clubs, including corn, pig and fat barrow, peanut, calf, 
potato, bee and citrus clubs. 

(C) Home demonstration work including gardening, poultry, bee keeping, food 
conservation, nutrition, clothing, home improvement clubs, and civic improvement 
clubs. 

(D) Extension schools, including Farmers Week held annually at the Uni- 
versity, County and Home Demonstration Agents' annual meeting, boys' and girls' 
annual club meetings, and Extension Schools arranged by county agents. 

(E) Demonstration work with colored farmers, including club work for boys 
and girls, and demonstration work with men and women. 

Smith-Lever Act — In accordance with the terms of the Smith- 
Lever Act, effective July 1, 1914, agricultural extension work is carried 
on cooperatively by the United States Department of Agriculture and 
the State of Florida. In addition to this, in 1919 Congress passed the 
Smith-Lever Supplementary Act appropriating an additional sum for 
the same purpose. 

The purpose of these Acts may be seen from the following quotation: 
"That cooperative agricultural extension work shall consist of giv- 
ing of instruction and practical demonstration in agriculture and home 
economics to persons not attending or resident in said colleges in the 
several communities, and imparting to such persons information on said 
subjects through field demonstrations, publications, and otherwise; and 
this work shall be carried on in such a manner as may be mutually 
agreed upon by the Secretary of Agriculture and the State agricultural 
college or colleges receiving the benefits of this act." 

Funds Available — By the terms of the Smith-Lever Act the College 
of Agriculture receives from Congressional appropriations $10,000 an- 
nually and an additional sum which increased annually until 1922, the 
State each year appropriating an equal amount. The Legislature has 
enacted laws enabling the State to secure the benefits of both the original 
Smith-Lever, the Capper-Ketcham and the Supplementary Acts as well 
as making a direct State appropriation for placing agents in additional 
counties. The total amount of State and Federal funds available for the 
fiscal year ending June 30, 1929, is $205,073.96. 



AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION DIVISION 81 

SCHOOLS OF INSTRUCTION FOR EXTENSION WORKERS 

The annual meeting of the County and Home Demonstration Agents is 
held at the University of Florida. The purpose of this meeting is to 
give instruction and make plans for future work. 

This is the one meeting of the year when extension workers from 
the United States Department of Agriculture and the State of Florida 
assemble for joint sessions to discuss the work with county and home 
demonstration agents. 

As Agricultural Extension work in Florida is conducted according to 
a joint agreement with the federal government, it is very important that 
the Extension work in Florida should harmonize closely with that of 
other states. 

This meeting is largely a series of conferences. Committees are 
appointed to make recommendations for the conduct of the work through- 
out the coming year. 

BOYS' AGRICULTURAL CLUBS AND SHORT COURSES 

Agricultural clubs are organized among the boys on the farms for 
the purpose of teaching them by practical demonstrations better methods 
of farming. Business men and agricultural organizations annually give 
successful boys free trips to the University to attend the Short Courses 
in Agriculture. This is done to stimulate greater interest in club work 
and has caused many boys to enter college for a four-year course. The 
Short Course is held from May 27 to June 1. 

Frank E. Dennis of Jacksonville offers a $250 scholarship in the Col- 
lege of Agriculture to the State Pig Club Champion. Three $100 schol- 
arships have been given annually by the Florida Bankers' Association. 

The Chilean Nitrate of Soda Educational Bureau of New York offers 
a $100 scholarship for award in a corn club contest. 

HOME DEMONSTRATION WORK 

Girls' Clubs — Girls between the ages of ten and eighteen are eli- 
gible for membership. Each member is required to undertake a defi- 
nite piece of work under the leadership of her home demonstration agent. 
This club work enters into many phases of home life and is intended to 
teach the girls the best practices for the improvement and development 
of the rural home. 

Women's Home Demonstration Clubs— Home demonstration clubs 
are organized by home demonstration agents for the benefit of the women 
of rural communities. These clubs have definite programs and, under 



82 AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION DIVISION 

the leadership of the County Home Demonstration agent, undertake 
to carry out such programs as will improve home life. 

Club Contests — Contests are conducted for the purpose of giving 
credit to club members for the work they have accomplished, to display 
the year's work so that it will be educational, and to stimulate interest in 
every phase of farm and home life. Exhibits are placed on display, rec- 
ord books are examined and rewards are based on quality, record and 
financial showing. Substantial prizes are offered to club members, such 
as scholarships to the University and to the Slate College for Women, 
and money or merchandise. The State Fair, Jacksonville, and South 
Florida Fair, Tampa, allot space for the products of boys' and girls' 
clubs, and provide liberal cash prizes to stimulate interest in these con- 
tests. 

Publications — The publications of the Division include bulletins, 
circulars, annual reports, a club paper, a weekly clip-sheet for news- 
papers, and an annual calendar. The bulletins and circulars contain 
useful information on farm and home subjects, while the annual reports 
give details of the work accomplished by the staff and the county repre- 
sentatives. The weekly clip-sheet, or Agricultural News Service, contains 
items of news from the Agricultural Experiment Station, Extension Di- 
vision and College of Agriculture, as well as timely information on varied 
agricultural topics. This sheet is sent to about 200 daily and weekly 
papers of Florida. The calendar contains suggestions on farm work in 
Florida for each month of the year. 

These publications are free to citizens of the state, upon request to 
the Director. 

Agricultural programs are put on the air over Station WRUF every 
Monday, Wednesday, and Saturday night from 6:30 to 7 o'clock. Talks 
are made by members of the College Agriculture faculty and the Experi- 
ment Station and Agricultural Extension Division staffs. Material sup- 
plied by the United States Department of Agriculture, and copies of 
questions received and answered by staff workers are read by the Assistant 
Agricultural Editor, who has charge of the agricultural programs. 

The Florida National Egg Laying Contest — ^This contest is con- 
ducted under the supervision of the Agricultural Extension Division of 
the University. It is located at Chipley, Florida, and has capacity for 
housing 100 pens of contest birds. The purpose of the contest is to 
secure records on the production of breeding stock so that poultrymen of 
Florida will have the benefit of these records with a view of securing high 
producing breeding stock. 



AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION DIVISION 83 

The contest is authorized by an Act of the legislature which provided 
for its establishment, maintenance, and upkeep, and which placed it under 
the supervision of the Agricultural Extension Division. 

FARMERS WEEK 

Beginning August 12, 1929; ending August 17, 1929. 

Farmers Week is especially suited to the needs of the following 
classes: Farm men and farm women of all ages who recognize their 
need for some training in scientific agriculture in order to render more 
effective the practical knowledge they have already gained; young men 
who are compelled to drop out of school and yet desire to devote a 
short time to special preparation for work on the farm; city students 
who wish to fit themselves for farm life; colonists who wish information 
regarding Florida conditions and methods. 

The laboratory equipment, the purebred livestock, and the farms 
will be available for instruction; the Agricultural Experiment Station 
and State Plant Board will afford opportunity for observation and in- 
quiry. Care has been taken to meet the needs of practical farmers. The 
courses consist of lectures, laboratory work, and field observations and 
demonstrations in general field crops, soils, vegetable gardening, citrus, 
animal husbandry, dairying, poultry, veterinary science, bee culture, and 
agricultural engineering. 

There are no age limits and no education requirements for admis- 
sion. No tuition fee is charged. 

Expenses — The necessary expenses for room and board will ap- 
proximate $1.50 per day. 

The University dormitories and dining room are available to those 
attending Farmers Week. 

CORRESPONDENCE COURSES 

Correspondence courses in agriculture are offered under the General 
Extension Division. See page 131. 

AGRICULTURAL MEETINGS 

A number of meetings of people interested in agriculture are held 
annually at the University. These find excellent accommodations and 
facilities, better for their purpose than anywhere else in the State. Lab- 
oratories, classrooms, and exhibits, as well as growing crops, barns and 
other equipment are placed freely at their service. 



84 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 
AND ARCHITECTURE 

J. R. Benton, Dean 

GENERAL STATEMENT 

The statement made here applies more particularly to Engineering; 
a corresponding statement is made later for the School of Architecture. 

Aim and Scope — It is the aim of the College of Engineering and 
Architecture to furnish training such as will be useful to its graduates in 
the profession of engineering or related occupations. Its courses of in- 
struction are similar to those of other American engineering schools of 
college grade; its graduates are prepared to fill such positions as are usu- 
ally allotted to young engineers. 

Scholastic training alone cannot make a competent engineer, any 
more than it can make a competent physician or lawyer. It can, how- 
ever, fit a man to enter the profession of engineering; and it is an im- 
portant element in ultimate success in that profession. 

The work of the College is divided among courses of study of the 
following types: (1) Courses in the sciences fundamental to the prac- 
tice of engineering, of which mathematics, physics, and chemistry are the 
most important; (2) courses in various branches of engineering practice 
in which these sciences are applied, such as structural, steam, or electri- 
cal engineering; (3) courses in practical work, such as mechanic arts, 
drafting, or surveying; and (4) courses contributing primarily to gen- 
eral culture, such as those in English. 

Buildings and Equipment — The headquarters and principal build- 
ing of the College is Engineering Hall, described on page 32. The De- 
partments of Mechanical Engineering and of Drawing and Mechanic 
Arts, are housed in the Mechanical Engineering Building immediately 
east of Engineering Hall. Shop work is provided for in the south wing 
of Engineering Hall. 

Part of the work of the College of Engineering and Architecture coin- 
cides with that of other colleges of the University; for such work the 
class-rooms and laboratories of the other colleges are utilized. 

Admission — See pages 53-57. No students except adult special stu- 
dents are admitted with entrance conditions in any required entrance 
units. 

Before registration all new students will be required to pass a quali- 
fying examination, except those who have successfully completed a year's 
work of a regular curriculum in any recognized college, without any 
omission or change. 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 85 

Pending the provision of enlarged facilities for instruction, the 
right is reserved to limit the number of freshmen admitted to the College 
of Engineering, to such number as can be properly accommodated with 
present facilities. 

Admission after the work of a semester has begun is not ordinarily 
permitted, but will be allowed in cases of unavoidable emergency, up 
to two weeks after the opening of a semester. 

Benton Engineering Society — The meetings of this society are de- 
voted to addresses or discussions on technical subjects, or on affairs of 
general interest. This society also serves as the medium through which 
the student body of the College of Engineering and Architecture takes part 
in debates and athletic contests with other colleges of the University, and 
in other student enterprises. Every student registered in the College 
of Engineering and Architecture is eligible to membership and is expected 
to join. 

Student Branch of the American Institute of Electrical En- 
gineers — Monthly meetings are held, for the discussion of topics in elec- 
trical science and its applications. Membership is open to seniors, juniors 
and sophomores in the electrical engineering course, under rules estab- 
lished by the American Institute. Members receive the Journal of the 
American Institute of Electrical Engineers, and enjoy other privileges 
of that national organization. 

Student Chapter of the American Society of Civil Engineers — 
Monthly meetings are held. Membership is open to seniors, juniors, and 
sophomores in civil engineering, under rules established by the American 
Society of Civil Engineers. Members receive the monthly Journal of 
that Society, and enjoy other privileges. 

Student Branch of the American Society of Mechanical Engi- 
neers — Monthly meetings are held. Under rules established by the Ameri- 
can Society of Mechanical Engineers, membership is open to students who 
expect to go into the field of mechanical engineering. Members receive 
the Journal of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, and en- 
joy other privileges of that society. 

Expenses — See pages 42-45. 

Curricula and Degrees — Four curricula, each requiring four years, 
are offered in engineering. They lead to the degrees of Bachelor of Sci- 
ence in Civil Engineering (B.S.C.E.), in Electrical Engineering (B.S.E.E.), 
in Mechanical Engineering (B.S.M.E.), and in Chemical Engineering 
(B.S.Ch.E.), respectively. A curriculum is offered in architecture, re- 
quiring four years, and leading to the degree Bachelor of Science in 
Architecture. 



86 COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

The work of the Freshman year is the same for all engineering stu- 
dents, and nearly the same for architectural students. The work in Eng- 
lish, economics, mathematics, mechanics, and physics is the same through- 
out the curriculum for all engineering students, and nearly the same for 
architectural students. All engineering students take some work in chem- 
istry, drawing, surveying, and shop practice, but the time devoted to 
these subjects varies in the different curricula. 

The degree Civil Engineer (C.E.), Electrical Engineer (E.E.), Me- 
chanical Engineer (M.E.), or Chemical Engineer (Ch.E.), may be granted 
to a graduate of the College of Engineering upon recommendation of 
the head of the department in which it is sought, and with the concurrence 
of the faculty of the College, provided the candidate submits evidence that 
he has had at least four years of practical engineering experience, of which 
two years must be responsible experience after graduation. By responsi- 
ble experience is meant work in which the candidate must use his own 
initiative, as distinguished from the mere rendering of routine assistance. 
To obtain one of these degrees application should be made to the Dean 
of the College not later than April 1st preceding the Commencement at 
which the degree may be awarded. 

The Bachelor degree (B.S.C.E., B.S.E.E., B.S.M.E., or B.S.Ch.E.) indi- 
cates m.erely the completion of a course of study in the theory of engineer- 
ing; while the engineer degree (C.E., E.E., M.E., or Ch.E.) indicates 
demonstrated proficiency in the practice of some branch of engineering. 
Every student of engineering should look forward to obtaining one of 
these higher degrees eventually. 

CURRICULUM FOR ENGINEERING 

(The Freshman Year is the same for all Engineering Students > 



Names of Courses Hours per Week 



1st Semester 2nd Semester 

Freshman Year * ** f T * ** t T 

Descriptive Geom. 101-102 2305 2327 

Drawing 101-102 0055 0033 

English 101-102 3609 3609 

Mathematics 151-152 3609 3609 

Military Science 101-102 2248 2248 

Physics 105-106 3407 3407 

Physics 107-108 0044|0044 

Shop 101 6 6 

Surveying 101 



13 21 19 53 



14 22 16 53 



NOTE: Freshmen are required to take one semester each of Surveying and of 
Woodworking, but these two courses may be given in reverse order to that shown 
here, at the convenience of the departments concerned. 
* Hours of recitation or lecture. **Estimated hours necessary for preparation. fHours 

of laboratory, shop, field, or drafting-room worL T — Total hours. 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



87 



CURRICULUM FOR CIVIL ENGINERING 



Names of Courses 


Hours per Week 


Sophomore Year 


1st Semester | 2nd Semester 



Chemistry 101-102 

Electrical Engineering 202 
Electrical Engineering 204 

Mathematics 251-252 

Military Science 201-202 ... 

Physics 209 

Shop 204 _ 

Surveying 201-202 



6 



6 
4 

6 



12 21 16 49 12 21 



3 
16 



T 
13 
6 
2 
9 
8 



49 



Junior Year 



Applied Mechanics 315-316 4 

Bacteriology 308 

Economics 307 3 

Graphic Statics 306 

Highways 303-304 2 

Mathematics 351-352 2 

Materials of Engineering 319 2 

Railroads 301-302 _ 2 

Testing Laboratory 310 



15 29 



T 

14 



48 



2 4 
2 3 
4 



14 
5 

8 
6 
6 



11 17 18 46 



Senior Year 



Chemistry 215 2 

Concrete Design 412 

Contracts and Specifications 405 2 

English 411-412 ..._ 

Geology 201 3 

Human Engineering 410 

Hydraulics 407 2 

Hydraulic Engineering 408 

Municipal Sanitation 409 2 

Structural Engineering 403-404 2 

Water Supply 410 





2 
3 
6 



T 

5 

4 
3 
9 

8 

10 



13 23 11 47 



11 20 13 



T 

7 

3 

4 

6 

11 
13 

44 



* Hours of recitation or lecture. ** Estimated hours necessary for preparation. fHours 
of laboratory, shop, field, or drafting-room work. T — Total hours. 



88 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



CURRICULUM FOR ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 



Names of Courses 



Hours per Week 



Sophomore Year 



1st Semester 



2nd Semester 



Chemistry 101-102 

Drawing 201-202 

EHectrical Engineering 202 . 
Electrical Engineering 204 

Mathematics 251-252 

Mechanism 201-202 

Military Science 201-202 

Physics 209 

Shop 201-202 



** t 
6 4 
3 



T 

13 

3 



12 21 16 49 



T 

13 
3 
6 
2 
9 
5 
8 



3 3 
12 21 16 49 



Junior Year 



Applied Mechanics 315-316 4 8 2 14 

Economics 307 3 6 9 

Electrical Engineering 311-302 _ 2 4 6 

Electrical Engineering 313-304 _ 2 2 

Machine Elements 301-302 3 3 

Materials of Engineering 319 2 4 6 

Mathematics 351-352 2 4 6 

Thermodynamics 310 



13 26 



46 



14 26 



T 
14 

9 

4 

7 

6 
9 



49 



Senior Year 



Contracts and Specifications 405 2 

Elective - 

Electrical Engineering 401402 3 

Electrical Engineering 403-404 

Electrical Engineering 405-406 1 

English 411-412 

Human Engineering 410 

Hydraulics 407 2 

Mechanical Laboratory 420 

Power Engineering 421 3 

Power Engineering 424 

Shop 401 



11 23 13 47 



4 4 
3 6 9 



11 23 



43 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



89 



CURRICULUM FOR MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 



Names of Courses 



Hours per Week 



Sophomore Year 



1st Semester 



2nd Semester 



Chemistry 101-102 3 6 

Drawing 201-202 

Electrical Engineering 202 

Electrical Engineering 204 

Mathematics 251-252 3 6 

Mechanism 201-202 2 3 

Military Science 201-202 2 2 

Physics 209 2 4 

Shop 201-202 



T 

13 

3 







12 21 16 49 



T 
13 
3 
6 
2 
9 
5 



12 21 16 49 





Junior Year 


















* 


** 


t 


T 


* 


** 


t 


T 


Applied Mechanics 315-316 


4 


8 


2 


14 


4 


8 


2 


14 


Economics 307 


3 


6 





9 










Kinematic Drawing 305-306 








3 


3 








3 


3 


Machine Elements 301-302 








3 


3 


2 


2 


3 


7 


Materials of Engineering 319-320 


2 


4 





6 


2 


4 





6 


Mathematics 351-352 


2 


4 





6 


2 


4 





6 


Shop 301-304 








4 


4 








4 


4 


Thermodynamics 310 










3 


6 





9 




11 


22 


12 


45 


13 


24 


12 


49 



Senior Year 



Contracts and Specifications 405 2 

Electrical Engineering 417-418 3 

Human Engineering 410 

Hydraulics 407 2 

Hydraulic Engineering 408 

Mechanical Design 411412 2 

Mechanical Laboratory 417-418 

Power Engineering 421-422 3 

Power Engineering 424 



T 

4 

12 



12 20 13 45 



12 30 11 43 



•Hours of recitation or lecture. ** Estimated hours necessary for preparation. fHours 
of laboratory, shop, field, or drafting-room work. T — Total hours. 



90 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



CURRICULUM FOR CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 



Names of Courses 



Hours per Week 



Sophomore Year 



1st Semester 



Chemistry 101-102 

Chemistry 212 

German or French 

Mathematics 251-252 

Military Science 201-202 2 

Physics 209 2 



6 



T 

13 



2rid Semester 



6 





9 


6 


n 


9 


2 


4 


8 


4 


2 


8 



13 24 10 47 ! 12 20 15 47 



Junior Year 



* ** t Tl* ** t T 

Applied Mechanics 315-316 4 8 2 14 | 4 8 2 14 

Chemistry 251-252 3 6 4 13 | 3 6 4 13 

Chemistry 301-302 0066 10066 

Economics 307 3 6 9 1 

Electrical Engineering 202 | 2 I 6 

Electrical Engineering 204 .. | 2 2 

Mathematics 351-352 2 40612406 

12 24 12 48 ! II 22 14 47 

Senior Year 

Chemistry 321-322 24 2 8]2428 

Chemistry 341-342 3 6 9 13 6 9 

Chemistry 344 6 6 

Chemistry 351 3 6 9 | 

Chemistry 413-414 6 6 j 4 4 

Contracts and Specifications 405 2 _' 4 i 

English 411412 3 3 1 3 3 

Human Engineering 410 j 2 2 4 

Hydraulics 407 2 4 2 « | 

Thermodynamics 310 i 3 6 9 

12 25 10 47 I 10 21 12 43 

•Hours of recitation or lecture. ** Estimated hours necessary for preparation. fHours 
of laboratory, shop, field, or drafting-room work. T — Total hours. 



COURSES OF STUDY 

For description of courses offered by the College of Engineering and 
Architecture, see Departments of Instruction section. 



SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE 91 

THE SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE 

Rudolph Weaver, Director 

Aim and Scope — The School of Architecture has been established to 
furnish training in Architecture and Allied Arts. The work in Archi- 
tecture is of four years duration, leading to the bachelor's degree. 

The demand for courses in Commercial Art has been met by the intro- 
duction of a curriculum which, in progressive stages, would prepare a 
student to enter the fields of Advertising Design, Illustration and Mural 
Painting. 

The courses are designed to prepare graduates for those fields of en- 
deavor in which utility is combined with beauty. The demand for build- 
ings for many uses, their decoration and furnishing, has always been one 
of the major activities of the human race and this demand increases as 
civilization becomes more complex. This need requires a continuous 
supply of trained designers and craftsmen in the major and minor arts of 
building and in the related or allied arts. The American is requiring that 
buildings and articles of use shall be made beautiful as well as useful. 
It is the aim of the School of Architecture of the University of Florida 
to train students to meet these demands as designers, draftsmen, super- 
intendents, constructors, teachers, etc., and ultimately as general prac- 
titioners or as specialists in their chosen field. 

Due to the unusual climatic conditions which prevail in Florida it is 
possible to conduct out door classes in pencil, charcoal, and water color. 

For requirements for admission to the regular four-year course, see 
page 55. 

Special two or three-year courses may be arranged by consultation with 
the Director of the School of Architecture. 

The Florida Qiapter of the American Institute of Architects has voted 
funds for providing the School of Architecture with special lecturers 
selected from among its own ranks, and other prominent men in related 
fields. 

The Florida Association of Architects has awarded a gold medal an- 
nually to the architectural student doing the best work throughout the year, 
and has also created a loan fund for deserving and needy students. 

The Florida State Board of Architecture turns over to the School of 
Architecture the surplus funds derived from fees paid l>y those who take 
the examination to practice in Florida. This fund is a great aid in making 



92 



SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE 



the library a first class research library for both students and practicing 
architects of Florida whose personal libraries may be inadequate for their 
uses. 

Students who complete the full four-year course in Architecture are 
exempt from the examination of the Florida State Board of Architecture. 



CURRICULUM FOR ARCHICTECTURE 

Freshman Year 



First Semester 



Second Semester 



Course 



Number 



Subject 



** T Credit 



** T Credit 



Arch. 

Arch. 

Arch. 

*M. E. 

Physics 

Physics 

Math. 

English 

Mil. Sci. 



101-102 Architectural Design 9 3 

112 Elements of Beauty 

121-122 Freehand Drawing 6 2 

101-102 Descriptive Geometry 3 5 2 

105-106 General Physics 4 7 3 

107-108 General Physics Lab 4 2 

151-152 Elementary Math. Analysis 6 9 3 

101-102 Rhetoric and Composition 6 9 3 

101-102 Military Science 2 8 2 



21 57 20 



23 57 20 



Sophomore Year 



Arch. 

Arch. 

Arch. 

Arch. 

Arch. 

C. E. 

Math. 

Mod. Lang. 

fElective ... 

Mil. Sci. 



201-202 Architectural Design 9 3 

221-222 Freehand Drawing 6 2 

226 Elementary Water Color.... 

227 Perspective 6 2 

231-232 Architectural History 4 6 2 

101 Surveying 2 6 2 

251-252 Dif. and Int. Calculus 6 9 3 

5 8 3 



2 



201-202 Military Science 2 



19_ 

Junior Year 



58 19 



17 58 19 



Arch. 


301-302 


Architectural Design .... 


... 


12 


4 





9 


3 


§Arch. 


310 


Residence Design 


... 











3 


1 


Arch. 


314 


Theory of Composition 


... 








2 


3 


1 


Arch. 


321 


Freehand Drawing 


... 


6 


2 











Arch. 


331-332 


Architectural History .. 


... 4 


6 


2 


4 


6 


2 


Arch. 


351 


Frame Construction 


... 3 


5 


2 











Arch. 


352 


Masonry Construction .. 


... 








3 


5 


2 


^M. E. 


315-316 


Applied Mechanics 


... 8 


14 


5 


8 


14 


4 


C. E. 


308 


Graphic Statics 


... 








2 


6 


2 


Mod. Lang 






... 5 


8 


3 


5 


8 


3 


Elective 






... 


6 


2 

















20 


57 


20 


24 


54 


18 



SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE 



93 



Arch. 

Arch. 

Arch. 

Arch. 

Arch. 

tArch. 

JArch. 

$Arch. 

C. E. 

Economics 

English 

Elective 



Senior Year 

401-402 Architectural Design 

416 Professional Practice 

435 Decorative Arts 2 

454 Concrete Design 

455 Working Drawings 

r 464 Heating and Ventilating 1 

■j 466 Electric Lighting [ 

[ 468 Plumbing J 

403-404 Structural Engineering .... 3 

307 Introduction to Econ. 6 

412 Engineering Exposition .... 



15 

3 

6 







9 



12 



19 53 18 



15 
3 

6 




11 

3 
6 



23 53 18 



BASIC COURSE PREPARATORY TO ADVERTISING DESIGN, 
ILLUSTRATION AND MURAL PAINTING 

Freshman Year 



First Semester 



Second Semester 



Course 



Number 



Subject 



** T Credit 



* * T Credit 



Arch. 

Arch. 

Arch. 

Painting 

Painting 

Painting 

Painting 

English 

History 

Mod. Lang. 



121-122 Freehand Drawing 6 

0228-228 Modeling 6 

112 Elements of Beauty 

103-104 Pictorial Composition 5 6 

107 Abstract Design 3 

115-116 Poster Design 3 6 

117-118 Advertising Design 6 

101-102 Rhetoric and Comp 6 9 

101-102 Europe during Mid. Ages.. 6 9 
6 9 



26 60 20 



28 60 20 



Sophomore Year 



Arch. 

Arch. 

Arch. 

Painting 

Painting 

Painting 

Painting 

Painting 

History 

Mod. Lang. 



221-222 Freehand Drawing 6 2 

226 Water Color 

227 Perspective 6 2 

203-204 Pictorial Composition 5 6 2 

207-208 Abstract Design 3 1 

211-212 OU Painting 9 3 

215-216 Poster Design 3 6 2 

219-220 Illustration 6 2 

201-202 Mod. European History.... 6 9 3 
6 9 3 



20 60 20 



20 60 20 



** Estimated hours per week necessary for preparation. 

T — Total estimated hours per week, lecture, laboratory and preparation. 

*When the class in Descriptive Geometry arrives at the subject of shades and 
shadows Architectural students are given this instruction in the School of Archi- 
tecture. 

fElective. Students are advised to take Arch. 228, Modeling, for their elective. 

JOne-third of the semester is given to each of these subjects in succession. 

§Arch. 302 and 310 are taught at the same period in succession. 

^[Omitting that part of the second semester that deals with dynamics. 

COURSES OF STUDY 

For description of courses offered by the School of Architecture, see 
Departments of Instruction section. 



94 ENGINEERING EXPERIMENT STATION 

ENGINEERING EXPERIMENT STATION 

J. R. Benton, Director 

The Engineering Experiment Station is an organization in the College 
of Engineering for the purpose of investigating problems of importance 
to professional engineers and to the industries of manufacturing, trans- 
portation and public utilities. The station had its inception by an act 
of the Board of Control on February 11, 1929. 

Researches may be carried on either by full time research workers 
or by the use of part of the time of the members of the teaching staff, or 
by graduate assistants under the direction of the heads of the engineering 
departments. 

The Engineering Experiment Station is prepared to undertake research 
investigations under cooperative arrangements with outside industries, by 
which the expense of the work will be shared between the interested in- 
dustry and the Engineering Experiment Station. Further information can 
be obtained by addressing J. R. Benton, Engineering Experiment Station, 
University of Florida. 

Some of the research projects now being prosecuted are: Bearing 
value of Florida soils for highways; study of utilization of some Florida 
clays; heat transmission through palmetto wall board; heating value of 
Florida peats; efificiency and performance of solar heaters; study of 
operation of Imhofif method of sewage; and, the study of Tung oil in 
lacquers. 



COLLEGE OF LAW MS 



THE COLLEGE OF LAW 

Harry R. Trusler, Dean 

GENERAL STATEMENT 

Aim and Scope — In 1891, the American Bar Association declared that 
in its opinion it was a part of the highest duty and interest of every 
civilized state to make provision for maintaining schools of law for the 
thorough legal education of all who are licensed to practice law. Recog- 
nizing the soundness of this statement and desiring to discharge this 
duty, the State Board of Education and the Board of Control provided for 
the opening of the College of Law in the University in September, 1909. 
The advantages accruing to the State from having, as a part of its educa- 
tional system, a thorough and systematic course of instruction in the 
common law, with special consideration of the peculiarities and exceptions 
applicable in Florida, are many and evident. 

It was the purpose of the Board of Control to establish a law school 
which, by the quality of its work and character of its equipment, would 
merit and command the confidence and support of the bench and bar. 
That the hope of accomplishing these results was well founded is shown 
by the number and character of those who have availed themselves of the 
advantages offered. 

Requirements for Admission — In addition to the requirement of six- 
teen entrance units (see page 54), two years of college work, defined 
as sixty-eight credits acceptable for a bachelor's degree, must be presented 
by candidates. Evidence of this work must be furnished on or before 
the date of admission. One credit is equivalent to one semester hour. 

No specific course of studies is prescribed for the college work re- 
quired for admission; but, in general, students are advised to pursue the 
course offered by the College of Arts and Sciences. Thereby it will be 
easier for them to complete the combined academic and law course should 
they so desire. 

Special Students — ^The practice of admitting special students (i. e., 
those not meeting the requirements for admission) has been discontinued. 

Women Students — By an Act of the Legislature of 1925, women 
who are twenty-one years of age and who fully meet the entrance require- 
ments above mentioned may enter as candidates for degrees. 

Advanced Standing — No work in law done in other institutions will 
be accepted towards a degree, unless the applicant passes satisfactorily 



96 COLLEGE OF LAW 

the examinations held in the subjects in question in this College, or unless 
credit is given without examination. Credit from schools which are mem- 
bers of the Association of American Law Schools, of which this College is 
a member, will be accepted without examination. 

Examinations — The last week of each semester is devoted to search- 
ing examinations covering the work of the semester. 

All students, unless excused by the Dean, must present themselves for 
the regular examination in all the subjects for which they are registered. 
A student who has made a semester grade of R is entitled to a re-exam- 
ination in that subject under the rules as printed on page 40. 

University Practice Courts — Thoroughly organized practice courts 
are regular features of the third year of the curriculum. The object is to 
give the student practical instruction in pleading and practice at law and 
in equity, and experience in the preparation and trial of cases. The work 
is arranged as follows: 

First — Cases arising upon prepared statements of fact are assigned, 
upon which the students are to determine what proceedings to bring and 
how to bring them, issue, serve, and return process, prepare the pleadings, 
and to bring the case to an issue on a question of law. The case is heard 
on the sufficiency of the form and the structure of the pleadings; when 
these are approved the issue of law is argued and decided, the students 
acting as attorneys drawing the order, judgment, or decree to which they 
deem themselves entitled. 

Second — In the second class of cases, actual controversies are arranged 
and assigned for trial in the Circuit Court as issues of fact. After deter- 
mining what action to bring, the students assigned to the case are required 
to issue the proper process and prepare and file the necessary pleadings, 
subpoena the witnesses, select the jury, examine and cross-examine the 
witnesses, and argue the case to the jury. Each student is required to 
participate in the trial of at least one common-law, one equity, and one 
criminal case, and is instructed in appellate procedure. 

The Practice Court is conducted by Professor TeSelle. 

Library — ^The Law Library contains: 

Three sets of Florida Reports with Wurts' Digest (both editions) ; Shepard's 
Florida Citations; The Session Laws of Florida from 1822 to 1921, except from 1828 
to 1834; McClellan's Digest and Duval's Compilation of the Laws of Florida; Revised 
Statutes of 1898, three sets of the General Statutes of 1906; two sets of Florida Com- 
piled Laws of 1914; eight sets of the Revised General Statutes of Florida, 1920; 
Florida Cumulative Statutes, 1925; Reports of the Florida Railroad Commission, the 
Attorney General of Florida, the Interstate Commerce Commission, and the Land 
Decisions of the Department of the Interior; Federal Statutes Annotated; Thorpe's 
American Charters, Constitutions and Organic Laws; Hinds' Precedents of the House 



COLLEGE OF LAW 97 

of Representatives; the Northwestern, Southwestern, Northeastern, Southeastern, Atlan- 
tic, Pacific, and Southern Reporters; the American Decisions, American Reports, and 
American State Reports, with digests; the American Annotated Cases, with digests; 
the American and English Annotated Cases, with digests; the Lawyers' Reports An- 
notated, old and new series, with digests; American Annotated Cases; American Law 
Reports; American Criminal Reports; the United States Supreme Court Reports, with 
digests; Rose's Notes; Federal Cases; Federal Reporter; Shepard's Federal, Florida, 
and Southern Citations; Stimson's American Statute Laws; the State Reports to the 
Reporters of Alabama, Arkansas, Connecticut, Delaware, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, 
Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, 
Mississippi, Missouri, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, 
Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Vermont, Virginia, West 
Virginia and Wisconsin; the District of Columbia Appeal Reports; the Porto Rico Fed- 
eral Reports; the Hawaii Reports; the New York Court of Appeals Reports; the New 
York Common Law and Chancery Reports, with digests; the New York Supplement; 
the New York Supreme Court, Practice and Code, Surrogate, Superior Court, Com- 
mon Pleas, and Criminal Reports; the Pacific State Reports, with digests, which in- 
clude the California Reports, the Colorado Supreme Reports, the Colorado Appeals, 
the Idaho Reports, the Kansas Reports, the Montana Reports, the Nevada Reports, 
the New Mexico Reports, the Oregon Reports, the Utah Reports, the Washington 
Reports, and the Wyoming Reports to the Reporters; the Alaska Reports; the Re- 
print of the English Reports; the English Law Reports; Law Journal Reports; the 
British Ruling Cases, The English Ruling Cases; Dominion Law Reports; Mew's Eng- 
lish Digest; English and Empire Digest; Halsbury's Laws of England; Upper Can- 
ada Reports; the Century, the Decennial, the Second Decennial, and the Key Num- 
ber Digests; the Encyclopedia of Law and Procedure; Corpus Juris; the Encyclo- 
pedia of Forms; the Standard Encyclopedia of Procedure; two sets of Ruling Case 
Law; Words and Phrases; the Harvard, Pennsylvania, Columbia and Michigan Law 
Reviews, the Central Law Journal and Yale Law Journal; more than one hundred 
selected volumes for the class in Brief Making and the use of Law Books; and more 
than four hundred of the leading textbooks and books of reference. 

A course of instruction is given in legal bibliography and the use 
of law books. Every facility, also, is offered law students to make use 
of the general library of the University, which contains many works 
of interest and information to lawyers. 

Both libraries are open during the academic year on every secular 
day between the hours of 8:00 a. m. and 10:00 p. m., and are in charge of 
trained librarians, who render needed aid to students. 

Henderson Memorial Library — The College gratefully acknowledges 
the gift of the library of the late John W. Henderson of Tallahassee. This 
splendid collection of law books, containing volumes of rare value and 
historical importance, will be maintained intact in memory of its donor. 

Marshall Debating Society — Early in the first year of the College 
the students organized a society that would secure to its members practice 
in debating and public speaking and experience in arguing legal questions, 
as well as drill in parliamentary law. The society was fittingly named 
"The Marshall Debating Society", in honor of the memory of the dis- 
tinguished Southern jurist, John Marshall. Membership and work in 
the society are limited to students in the College of Law, but the Faculty 
give all possible assistance and encouragement. 



98 COLLEGE OF LAW 

University Privileges — The advantages of the other colleges of the 
University are open to such students in the College of Law as desire and 
are able to accept them. Courses in History, Economics, Sociology, Psy- 
chology, Logic, and English are particularly recommended. 

Degrees — The degree of Bachelor of Laws (LL.B.) will be con- 
ferred upon those who satisfactorily complete eighty-five semester hours in 
law studies, which must include all of the first year subjects. Students ad- 
mitted to advanced standing may receive the degree after one year's resi- 
dence, but in no case will the degree be granted unless the graduate is 
in actual residence during all of the third year and obtains in this Col- 
lege credit for at least twenty-eight semester hours in law. 

Students who have complied with all the requirements for the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Laws (LL.B.), who have maintained an average 
standing in their law studies 10 percent above the passing mark, and who 
have obtained the degree of A.B., or an equivalent degree, from an ap- 
proved college or university, or who secure such degree the same year 
they complete their law course, will be awarded the degree of Juris Doctor 
(J.D.). 

Combined Academic and Law Course — See page 63. 

Combined Business and Law Course — See page 122. 

Expenses — A tuition fee of S20.00 per semester, payable in advance 
is charged all law students, except those taking less than eleven hours 
of work, who are charged a proportional part of the full tuition. An addi- 
tional fee of $100.00 is charged non-resident students. The cost of books 
for the first year will approximate $60.00; for the second, $65-$75, de- 
pending on the electives taken; for the third, $63.00. Students are 
urged to provide themselves with the statutes of their own state and a 
law dictionary. These books will form a nucleus for the student's future 
library; and by the purchase of second-hand books the cost may be mate- 
rially reduced. See also pages 42-45. 

Admission to the Bar — Upon presenting their diplomas, duly issued 
by the proper authorities, and upon furnishing satisfactory evidence that 
they are twenty-one years of age and of good moral character, the gradu- 
ates of the College are licensed without examination, to practice in the 
courts of Florida. They also are admitted without examination to the 
United States District Court for the Northern District of Florida. 

COURSES OF STUDY 

For description of courses offered by the College of Law, see Depart- 
ments of Instruction section. 



TEACHERS COLLEGE 99 



TEACHERS COLLEGE 

J. W. Norman, Dean 
G. B. Simmons, Assistant Dean 

GENERAL STATEMENT 

Aim and Scope — The main purpose of the Teachers College is to 
furnish such training as will be most useful to its students in the pro- 
fession of teaching. It is the policy of Teachers College, emphasized on 
many occasions, that its graduates shall know much about the sub- 
jects they expect to teach, but it is equally as important that they should 
be resourceful in teaching a class and skilful in managing a school 
or a system of schools. This College attempts to give both kinds of train 
ing. More specifically, it prepares its students for positions as teachers, 
principals, supervisors and county or city superintendents of public in 
struction. It strives also to develop in its students a keen insight into hu 
man affairs, human relationships and human problems. About one-fourth 
of a student's time is devoted to professional subjects in Education, the 
other three-fourths to Arts and Science subjects. 

Admission — For a complete explanation of admission requirements, 
see page 54. 

Residence Requirement — In order to receive a degree, or Normal 
Diploma, from Teachers College, students must have spent at least one 
scholastic year in residence (three summer schools may be considered 
equivalent to a year in residence), and must have completed 30 credits 
of college work in residence. These 30 credits, except on one condition, 
must be the last which one takes immediately prior to graduation. The 
exception is the case of students who take their degrees by attendance at 
the Summer School, in which case 12, but never more, credits of work by 
correspondence may be taken during the ten (10) months just prior to 
the summer session in which the degree is received. In every case, stu- 
dents must have completed 30 credits of work in residence and must have 
been in attendance at the summer session or scholastic term immediately 
prior to receiving the degree. 

Amount of Correspondence Work Permitted — Students are not 
permitted to complete more than fifty percent (50%) of the work toward 
a degree by correspondence. 



100 TEACHERS COLLEGE 

Correspondence study courses may not at any time be offered to satisfy 
the residence requirements. 

Students will not be permitted to take work by correspondence while 
they are in residence, without the consent of the Dean of Teachers 
College. 

Vocational Education — By act of the Legislature of 1917 the Uni- 
versity was designated as the institution, under the Smith-Hughes Act, 
for training teachers for Agriculture and for Trades and Industries. A 
curriculum for Agricultural Education has been outlined. It is hoped 
that a large number of students will register for these courses, as many 
teachers of these subjects are needed in Florida at present and good sal- 
aries are paid. 

Peabody Hall — A description of Peabody Hall, the home of the 
College, is to be found on page 33. 

Peabody Club — This club meets once a week to discuss educational 
problems, especially those that confront the young teacher. It also brings 
out the advantages of holding teachers' meetings and conferences. All 
students of the College are urged to become members and to take an active 
interest. 

Scholarships — The Legislature in 1923, enacted a scholarship law 
providing for two scholarships from each county in the State, one to the 
Teachers College of the University of Florida, and one to the School 
of Education at the Florida State College for Women. At the 1927 
session of the Legislature, this Act was amended to provide as many 
scholarships as there are legislators and senators in the State Legis- 
lature. Each of these scholarships may be held for four years by 
the successful applicant and carries a stipend of $200.00 per year. These 
scholarships may be applied for summer school, paying $50.00 per sum- 
mer, to regularly enrolled Teachers College students. Examinations are 
held in each county on the first Thursday in June and the third Thursday 
in September, under the supervision of the county superintendent. A stu- 
dent to be considered as an applicant for a scholarship must present 
sixteen college entrance units. These scholarships are awarded upon com- 
petitive examinations to persons satisfying the entrance requirements of 
the University of Florida and of the Florida State College for Women. 
A student who desires to be considered as an applicant for a scholarship 
should make his desire known to his county superintendent before the 
first of May of each year. He should also write to the State Superin- 
tendent of Public Instruction at Tallahassee, telling him of his appli- 
cation for the scholarship. 



TEACHERS COLLEGE 101 

Teaching Fellowships — For a complete statement about teaching 
fellowships, see page 46. 

High School Visitation — Through Dr. Joseph Roemer, Professor 
of Secondary Education, the University strives to keep in close touch with 
the high schools of the state. Part of his time is taken up with visiting 
the high schools and lending such aid and encouragement as will be pro- 
ductive of stronger high schools and a closer connection between them 
and the University. 

Teachers Employment Bureau — The Teachers College desires to 
serve the whole state in every possible way. • For this purpose a Teachers' 
Employment Bureau has been instituted and is open throughout the 
year. From school officials it receives requests for teachers. From 
teachers it receives requests for information as to vacancies. It files such 
information and tries, when called upon, to meet the needs of both teach- 
ers and school officials. To be of greatest service it invites the coopera- 
tion of superintendents, principals, and teachers. Officials needing 
trained men or women, and teachers desiring promotion or change, are 
asked to call upon the Bureau for its aid. No charges are made for 
services. For information, address Director of the Employment Bureau, 
or Dean of Teachers College, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida. 

State Certificates — Graduates of the Teachers College are 
granted Graduate State Certificates without further examinations. 
It is well for the student to note that a Gradutae State Certificate 
permits him to teach only those subjects in which he has specialized in his 
college course. This will ordinarily mean that a subject must have been 
pursued for at least two years in college before a certificate to teach that 
subject will be granted. In case a student has pursued a subject for three 
or four years in high school, however, this rule may sometimes be abro- 
gated. 

Graduate State Certificates may be converted into Life Certificates by 
"presenting satisfactory evidence of having taught successfully for a 
period of twenty-four months under a Graduate State Certificate, and pre- 
senting endorsement of three holders ov Life Stat*;. LiCc Graduate State, or 

Life Professional Certificates." .' >'\ , 

^ ' > "* ^ > ' 
Degrees — Four bachelor degrees are granted upon the! completion 

of four years of college work. They Hi 3: Bachelor of Arts in Education, 

Bachelor of Science in Educatioo, Bricht;lor of Science in Agricultural 

Education, and Bachelor of Science in Physical Education. In addition 

the Normal Diploma, sometimes called the L. I. Degree, is granted upon 

the completion of the two years of required work for this degree. 



102 TEACHERS COLLEGE 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS IN 
EDUCATION AND BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 

One hundred and thirty-two (132) credits are required for either the 
Bachelor of Arts in Education or the Bachelor of Science in Education. 
These credits consist of the following divisions: 

(1) Constants which are required of all applicants for these degrees; 

(2) Group requirements, among which the student has considerable 
choice ; 

(3) Free electives. 

Constants — In further explanation of the first of these divisions the 
following constants are required of applicants for these two degrees: 

For Freshmen: 

Physical Education 101-102 2 credits 

♦Military Science 101-102 4 " 

English 101-102 6 " 

Education 101 3 " 

Education 102 ] 

or I- 3 « 

Education 103 J 

For Sophomores: ^, 

♦Military Science 201-202 4 ,, 

PhUosophy 201 ^ „ 

Education 203 J „ 

Education 207 ^ 

For Juniors: „ 

Education 301 J „ 

Education 308 ^ 

For Seniors: „ 

Education 401 ^ „ 

Education 403 ^ « 

Education 405 ^ „ 

** Education 404 ^ „ 

* *Education 408 "* 

Groups— In addition to the constants, each applicant for the degree 
of Bachelor of Arts in Education must complete the required courses in 
two of the following groups, one of which must be Group A, B, or C; 
and each applicant for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Education 
must select Group F and one other, c.onipleting the required courses in 
these two 'groups.' (For the alternative cuxriculuiij for those specializing 
in Physical Education, see pfige 105.) ,•'.'>' 

""^t'udents who are more than twenty-one (21) years of age ^t date of ori^nal 
entry to the University may be exempt from Military Science All such students 
S, however, take eight (8) credits in other subjects as substitutes for Mditary 
Science 101-102 and 201-202. 

** Required of all students who expect to be principals. 



TEACHERS COLLEGE 



103 



A — Ancient Language Croup 


B — Modem Language Croup 


Latin 101-102 ] 


French 21-22 T 




Latin 201-202 \ 18 
Latin 203-204 J credits 


French 101-102 [ 
French 201-202 J 








Span. 21-22 "1 






Span. 101-102 [ 


^ 18 




Span. 3rd year J 


credits 




German 21-22 ] 






German 101-1021 






German 201-202J 




C — English Croup 


D — Mathematics Croup 


English 101-102 




Math. 101-102 ] 


English 103-104 




Math. 231 18 


English 201-202 




Math. 251-252 f credits 


English 301-302 




Math. 364 


and 






Foreign Lang., 6 




\ 34 




credits 




credits 




and 


12 






English or For- 


credits 






eign Language, 








6 credits 


J 






E — Natural Science 


F — Social Science 


C — Commercial 


Croup 


Croup 


Education 


Biol. 101 1 


History 101-102 ] 




Bus. Ad. 81-82 1 




Bot. 101-102 

Biol. 106 1- 36 


History 301-302 




Bus. Ad. 103-104 




History 303-304 


36 


Bus. Ad. 211-212 


29 


Chem. 101-102 | credits 


Soc. 6 credits 


credits 


Bus. Ad. 401-402 


|- crediu 


Phys. 203-204 J 


Econ. 201-202 
Pol. Sci. 101-102. 




Econ. 101-102 
English 355 





Free Electives — The student may choose his elective subjects as he 
wishes, but is advised to elect subjects as closely correlated with his 
Group requirements as possible. 



104 TEACHERS COLLEGE 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE NORMAL DIPLOMA 

The Normal Diploma, sometimes called the L. I. Degree, is awarded 
to those students who shall have completed certain constants and group 
requirements. Except for students who are exempt from Military Science, 
there is little if any opportunity for free electives in the requirements 
for the Normal Diploma. 

The constant requirements for the Diploma are as follows: 

Constants 
For Freshmen: 

Physical Education 101-102 2 credits 

Military Science 101-102 4 " 

English 101-102 6 " 

Education 101 3 " 

Education 102 1 

or [ 3 " 

Education 103 J 

For Sophomores: 

Philosophy 201 3 " 

Education 203 3 " 

Education 207 3 " 

Education 405 3 " 

Group Requirements — ^Twelve credits from each of three subjects 
included in the Groups given on page 103, must be completed. 
A total of 66 credits is required for this diploma. 



TEACHERS COLLEGE 



103 



CURRICULUM IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Leading to degree of Bachelor of Science in Physical Education* 
For those specializing in Physical Education and Coaching 

Freshman Year 



First Semester 



Credit 



Second Semester 



Credit 



English 101 3 

Biology 101 5 

Select One Group 3 

Military Science 101 2 

Coaching 101, Football (1st half 

sem.) 2 

Coaching 111, Basketball (2nd half 

sem.) 2 



17 



English 102 3 

Biology 107 5 

Continue One Group 3 

Military Science 102 2 

Phys. Educ. 112, Calisthenics, March- 
ing and Gymnastic Dancing 2 

Phys. Educ. 114, Elem. & Adv. Gym. 2 



17 



Sophomore Year 



Education 101 3 

Continue Group Selected 5 

Military Science 201 2 

English 201 3 

Phys. Educ. 231, First Aid & Train- 
ing 1 

Coaching 201, Football (1st half 

sem.) 2 

Coaching 251 (Boxing), 241 (Wrest- 
ling), or 261 (Fencing) (2nd 
half sem.) 1 



Education 0103 3 

English 202 3 

Continue Group Selected 5 

Military Science 202 2 

Phys. Educ. 232, First Aid & Condi- 
tioning 1 

Coaching 204, Track and Field 3 



17 



17 



Junior Year 



Education 301 3 

Philosophy 201 3 

Journalism 311, Sports Writing 3 

Phys. Educ. 341, Programs 1 

Phys. Educ. 351, Intramurals 2 

Coaching 301, Football (1st half 

sem.) 1 

Coaching 302, Basketball (2nd half 

sem.) 1 

Sociology 332, Public Health 2 



Sociology 102 3 

Education 0207 3 

Phys. Educ. 372, Organ. & Admin. 

of Ath 1 

Phys. Educ. 362, Phys. Diagonsis & 

Corrective Gym 3 

Coaching 344, Baseball 3 

Coaching 32, Coaching & Officiating 2 
Elective 1 



16 16 

Senior Year 

Education 405 3 Education 0401 or 408 3 

Phil. 405, Physical & Mental Tests.... 3 Psychology of Athletics 3 

Phys. Educ. 481, Community Recrea- Phys. Educ. 422, Athletic & Gymna- 

tion and Playgrounds 1 slum Construction and Equipment 1 

Public Speaking 201 3 Phys. Educ. 492, Practice Teaching.. 2 

Phys. Educ. 491, Practice Teaching.. 2 Coaching 472, Officiating (Practice) 1 

Coaching 471, Officiating (Practice) 1 Continue Group Selected 6 

Continue Group Selected 3 



16 



16 



*Students who elect Group E may take the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Education if they prefer. 



106 



TEACHERS COLLEGE 



THE CURRICULUM IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Education 

Freshman Year 
First Semester Second Semester 



Names of Courses 



Credits Names of Courses 



Credits 



English 101 3 

Botany 101 4 

Chemistry 101 5 

Horticulture 101 3 

Military Science 101 2 

Physical Education 101 1 



18 



English 102 3 

Botany 102 4 

Chemistry 102 5 

Education 0101 3 

Military Science 102 2 

Physical Education 102 1 



18 



Sophomore Year 



Physics 201 3 

Biology 101 5 

Agronomy 201 3 

Education 207 3 

Elective in Agriculture 2 

Military Science 201 2 

Physical Education 201 1 



19 



Physics 202 3 

Chemistry 254 _ 4 

Agricultural Engineering 202 4 

Poultry Husbandry 202 3 

Animal Husbandry 102 3 

Military Science 202 2 

Physical Education 202 1 



20 



Junior Year 



Agricultural Engineering 303 3 

Agronomy 301 5 

Education 303 3 

Political Science 101 3 

Electives 3 



17 



Agronomy 302 3 

Education 306 3 

Education 304 3 

Veterinary Science 302 2 

Entomology 302 4 

Political Science 102 3 



18 



Senior Year 



Plant Pathology 301 4 

Education 409 3 

Education 401 3 

Electives in Agriculture 5 



15 



Agricultural Economics 306 3 

Agricultural Economics 308 3 

Journalism 316 3 

Education 410 , _ 3 

Electives in Agriculture 3 



15 



COURSES OF STUDY 

For description of courses offered by the Teachers College, see De- 
partments of Instruction section. 



SUMMER SCHOOL 107 

UNIVERSITY SUMMER SCHOOL 

(CO-EDUCATIONAL) 

June 10-August 2, 1929 

GENERAL STATEMENT 

The University Summer School was provided for by the "Summer 
School Act" passed by the Legislature of 1913. It is co-educational and 
maintained primarily for the benefit of the teachers of the state, but other 
courses are offered. 

The entire equipment of the University is at the service of the faculty 
and students. Ample provision is made for intellectual recreation and 
physical exercise. The Peabody Literary Society meets weekly; lectures 
or concerts are given frequently; the gymnasium, baseball grounds, and 
tennis courts are at the disposition of the students, and instructors are at 
hand to direct athletic activities. 

Regulations — To fulfill its highest mission the Summer School should 
not be utilized merely for the purpose of "cramming" for examinations. 
It is therefore hoped that all teachers will recognize the wisdom of the 
Summer School Board in establishing the following regulations: 

1. No teacher will be allowed to take more than twenty hours per week. 

2. No teacher will take less than five hours per week of professional work. 
Credit for Work — Attention is directed to the following sections of 

the "Summer School Act": 

Sec. 5. — "All work conducted at the said Summer Schools shall be of such char- 
acter as to entitle the students doing the same to collegiate, normal, or professional 
credit therefor, and may be applied towards making a degree." 

In order to carry out the spirit of this provision, the University allows, 
under restrictions, a maximum of nine credit hours for work done 
at any one session of the Summer School. Attendance at three summer 
sessions satisfies the residence requirements for securing a Normal 
Diploma or an undergraduate degree from the Teachers College. For 
an advanced degree four sessions are required. By combining credits 
gained at the Summer School with those gained in the General Extension 
Division of the University, it is possible for a teacher to secure a certifi- 
cate or a degree without losing a prohibitive amount of time from his 
work. Certificates and degrees secured in this way are awarded, when 
so desired, on the last day of a session of the Summer School. 



108 SUMMER SCHOOL 

Sec. 6. — "All teachers attending any of the Summer Schools herein created and 
whose work entitles them to credit therefor, upon making proof of the same to the 
State Superintendent of Public Instruction, are hereby entitled to one year's extension 
on any Florida teacher's certificate they may hold and which has not fully expired, 
and such certificate may be extended one year for each succeeding session attended by 
the said teacher." 

Certificates of credit making proof of the work done will be granted 
by the State Superintendent only to those teachers who attend the full 
term and whose work is satisfactory. 

Expenses — There is no charge for tuition. Board and lodging (includ- 
ing lights, but not pillows, bed linen, or towels) will be offered at $21.00 
for half term, or $40.00 for the entire session of eight weeks; board with- 
out lodging at $17.00 per half term or $32.00 per session. Children under 
eight years of age will not be admitted to the dormitories, but may dine 
with their parents in the Commons at $16.00 for the term or $9.00 for the 
half term. Children above eight, full charge. All accounts are payable 
in advance. 

COURSES OF STUDY 

The courses given during the session of 1929 were fully described in 
the Summer School Bulletin of that year and were, furthermore, for the 
most part very similar in character to the corresponding ones of the 
Teachers College. In view of these facts, and inasmuch as a detailed 
program for the session of 1929 was published separately, it is thought 
unnecessary here to make more than mere mention of the courses in 
question. The work to be offered in the Summer School of 1929 will be 
divided into five separate and distinct groups, each serving a specific 
purpose: 

1. Review Courses in all subjects required for teachers' certificates. 

2. Professional Courses meeting the requirements for the extension 
of teachers' certificates without examination. 

3. Normal Courses leading to the normal diploma. 

4. College Courses leading to standard bachelor's degrees. 

5. Graduate Courses leading to advanced degrees. 

A complete catalog of all the work of the Summer School will be 
issued. For reservation of rooms and other information address Dr. J. W. 
Norman, Dean, Gainesville, Fla. 



COLLEGE OF PHARMACY 109 



COLLEGE OF PHARMACY 

TowNES Randolph Leigh, Dean 
GENERAL STATEMENT 

As an integral part of the University, the College is governed by the 
same general policy, and maintains the same high standard of require- 
ments, as do the other colleges in the institution. In common with the 
other natural sciences, it requires a large amount of laboratory instruction. 

Degrees and Curricula — Two undergraduate degrees are given in 
pharmacy. The College offers a three-year curriculum leading to the 
certificate of Graduate in Pharmacy (Ph.G.), and an additional year's, 
work, upon completion of which the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Pharmacy (B.S. in Phar.) is conferred. In the work of the fourth year 
opportunity is given for specialization in Commercial Pharmacy, in 
Pharmaceutical Chemistry, or in Pharmacognosy and Pharmacology. 

The degree of Master of Science in Pharmacy (M.S. in Phar.) is given 
under the supervision of the Graduate School of the University. 

Standard of Work — All work offered in the College of Pharmacy 
meets the highest requirements of pharmaceutical instruction in this coun- 
try. As an associate member of the American Association of Colleges of 
Pharmacy, the College receives full recognition for its courses from all 
state boards requiring attendance in a school of pharmacy as a prere- 
quisite for examination and registration. Although all schools of the 
Association are required to maintain certain minimum requirements for 
entrance and for graduation, the College prides itself on the fact that all 
of its requirements are in excess of this minimum. 

Methods of Instruction — Lecture and recitation periods are fifty- 
five minutes in length, laboratory periods, two or three hours, depending 
upon the character of the work. 

Registration and Reciprocity — Before any person is permitted to 
practice pharmacy in the State of Florida, he is required to become 
a registered pharmacist, which registration is secured by examination or 
by reciprocity. Every applicant applying to the Florida State Board of 
Pharmacy for examination must submit the written statement of at least 
two reputable citizens, who shall not be related to the applicant by either 
consanguinity or affinity, certifying that the applicant is a person of good 
moral character. 



110 COLLEGE OF PHARMACY 

"The applicant shall furnish a certificate ii: writing that he is over 
the age of twenty-one years, 

"The applicant shall present to the Board through its Secretary, a 
diploma from an accredited school or college of pharmacy, such accred- 
ited school being a school or college of pharmacy holding a membership 
in the American Conference of Pharmaceutical Faculties provided that 
a diploma of any other school or college of pharmacy not a member 
of said American Conference of Pharmaceutical Faculties but whose 
standard of requirements for the issuance of its diploma are equal or 
equivalent to the requirements of an accredited school as now established 
by said American Conference of Pharmaceutical Faculties shall be rec- 
ognized by this Board as a diploma sufficient to entitle the applicant to 
be examined by this Board. And further provided that the requirements 
herein provided shall not apply to any person who has been apprenticed 
for a period of one year or more under the provisions of the Laws of 
this State as the same existed prior to the passage of said Chapter 10201 
Laws of Florida, etc." 

Further information concerning registration in Florida may be ob- 
tained by writing to Mr. J. H. Haughton, Secretary of the State Board 
of Pharmacy, Palatka, Florida. 

Opportunities for Graduates — ^The three-year curriculum is designed 
primarily to train retail pharmacists. Only a small amount of latitude 
can be allowed in the selection of courses, since the minimum requirements 
of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy must be met. But 
the four-year curriculum offers an opportunity for specialization, either 
in Commercial Pharmacy, in Pharmaceutical Chemistry, or in Pharmacog- 
nosy and Pharmacology. The course in Commercial Pharmacy should 
qualify a man for a position as manager in a drug store, or as a salesman 
of drugs and chemicals. The work in Pharmaceutical Chemistry is de- 
signed to train men for positions in food and drug laboratories, or as 
manufacturing pharmacists. The completion of the work of the fourth 
year in pharmacognosy or pharmacology should qualify one to act in the 
capacity of pharmacognocist or inspector of crude drugs with a manufac- 
turing concern, or with the Federal Customs Service, or as pharmacologist 
for manufacturing houses or for hospitals. The above-named positions 
are only a few of the many open to men who possess training along any 
of the above lines. At the present time the difficulty is not to find a po- 
sition for the trained man, but to find sufficient men with adequate train- 
ing for the technical positions now open. 



COLLEGE OF PHARMACY 111 

Equipment — The College of Pharmacy is housed in the new Chemis- 
try-Pharmacy Hall, one of the most modern laboratories in the South. 
The laboratories of the College of Pharmacy are especially well provided 
with all equipment required by students for elementary work as well as 
for advanced work and scientific investigation. 

The drug garden, covering some ten acres, is used for the cultivation 
and study of all medicinal plants which occur in Florida or may be grown 
here. Thus it is possible for students to become familiar with the ap- 
pearance and properties of drug plants from the growing state until they 
are prepared and compounded into prescriptions. 

Entrance Requirements — Each student is expected to be in attend- 
ance on the day scheduled for registration. By permission of the Dean 
and of all instructors concerned, and on payment of a special fee, a stu- 
dent may be allowed to enter subsequent to this date, but in no case will 
he be admitted after the first two weeks of any semester. 

Although it is often possible by special arrangement for a beginning 
student to enter the College at the commencement of the second semester, 
such arrangement is rarely satisfactory, as very few beginning courses 
are started at that time. It is therefore urged that such students enter 
only at the beginning of the first semester. 

Drug store experience is not required for entrance into the College of 
Pharmacy. Such experience is very desirable, however, since many states 
require a certain amount of experience before registration can be granted. 

A student registered for one or more laboratory courses in the De- 
partment of Pharmacy is required to present a card indicating that he has 
deposited $5.00 with the Auditor to cover laboratory breakage. Upon re- 
turn of the apparatus at the end of the course, the student receives a 
refund. 

For General Entrance Requirements see page 54. 

Rho Chi Honorary Fraternity — Rho Chi is the only National 
Honorary Pharmaceutical Fraternity in existence at the present time. 
Chapters are established only at colleges that are members in good stand- 
ing of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. Iota Chapter 
was established at Florida in 1928. 

Membership is based primarily on scholastic ability as indicated by 
average percentage of grade, participation in student activities and gen- 
eral gentlemanly qualities. All candidates for membership must have 
completed at least sixty hours of scholastic work and be recommended 
by the dean or secretary of the pharmacy faculty. 



112 



COLLEGE OF PHARMACY 



Mortar and Pestle Society — The Mortar and Pestle Society is an or- 
ganization maintained by the student body of the College of Pharmacy. 
Its monthly meetings are devoted to general discussions or to addresses by 
state and national leaders of the profession. 

THE THREE-YEAR CURRICULUM 

Leading to the Degree of Graduate in Pharmacy 



First Semester 


Second Semester 




Names of Courses 


Credits Names of Courses 


Credits 




First Year 





English 101 3 

Botany 101 4 

Ciiemistry 101 5 

Pharmacy 101 3 

Military Science 101 2 

Physical Education 101 1 



18 



English 102 3 

Botany 102 4 

Chemistry 104 5 

Pharmacy 102 3 

Military Science 102 2 

Physical Education 102 1 



18 



Second Year 



Chemistry 251 5 

Biology 105 2 

Pharmacognosy 221 3 

Pharmacy 211 5 

Military Science 201 2 

Physical Education 201 1 



18 



Chemistry 252 5 

Chemistry 304 2 

Pharmacognosy 222 3 

Pharmacy 222 5 

Military Science 202 2 

Physical Education 202 1 



18 



Third Year 



Pharmacology 351 3 

Pharmacy 351 5 

Pharmacy 331 3 

Pharmacy 361 3 

Pharmacy 381 2 



Pharmacy 372 4 

Pharmacognosy 342 3 

Pharmacology 362 4 

Pharmacy 332 2 

Pharmacy 362 3 



16 



16 



COLLEGE OF PHARMACY 113 

THE FOUR-YEAR CURRICULUM 

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy 

The first three years of the four-year curriculum are identical with 
the three-year curriculum as outlined above. In the senior year a major 
may be selected in Commercial Pharmacy, Pharmaceutical Chemistry, 
Pharmacognosy, or Pharmacology. 

Senior Year 

First Semester Second Semester 

Names of Courses Credits Names of Courses Credits 

Commercial Pharmacy Major 

Pharmacy 471 2 Pharmacy 472 2 

Pharmacy 491 2 Pharmacy 492 2 

Business Administration 211 3 Business Administration 212 3 

Business Administration 331 3 Business Administration 332 3 

French, German or Spanish 3 French, German, or Spanish 3 

Business Administration 401 ) o Business Administration 402 | „ 

Or Approved Elective j Or Approved Elective J 

16 16 

Pharmaceutical Chemistry Major 

Pharmacy 451 5 Chemistry 406 3 

Pharmacy 431 3 Pharmacy 432 3 

Pharamacy 492, or Approved Elective 2 Pharmacy 492. or Approved Elective 2 

French or German 3 French or German 3 

Approved Electives 3 Approved Electives 5 

16 16 

Pharmacognosy Major 

Pharmacognosy 423 4 Pharmacognosy 424 4 

* Pharmacognosy 435 4 Pharmacognosy 436 4 

Pharmacognosy 491 2 Pharmacognasy 492 2 

French or German 3 French or German 3 

Approved Electives outside Dept 3 Approved Elective outside Dept 3 

16 16 

Pharmacology Major 

Pharmacology 451 4 Pharmacology 452 4 

Pharmacology 455 4 Pharmacology 456 4 

Pharmacology 491 2 Pharmacology 492 2 

French or German 3 French or German 3 

Approved Elective outside Dept 3 Approved Elective outside DepL 3 

16 16 

* Pharmacognosy 231-232 may be substituted if student has not already com- 
pleted this course. 

COURSES OF STUDY 

For description of courses offered by the College of Pharmacy, see 
Departments of Instruction section. 



114 COLLEGE OF COMMERCE AND JOURNALISM 



COLLEGE OF COMMERCE AND JOURNALISM 

Walter J. Matherly, Dean 

GENERAL STATEMENT 

The College of Commerce and Journalism was established as the 
School of Business Administration and Journalism in 1925. For the 
first year it operated under the College of Arts and Sciences with the 
Dean of that College in charge. Beginning with the first semester of 
1926 a special director was appointed and the School began to operate 
as a unit separate and distinct from the College of Arts and Sciences. In 
the Spring of 1927 the Board of Control created the College of Commerce 
and Journalism out of this unit with a dean and faculty of its own and 
made it co-equal in every respect with the other colleges of the University. 

The College of Commerce and Journalism offers instruction in two 
distinct fields of professional or semi-professional effort; 

I. Business Administration 
II. Journalism 

Instruction in Business Administration is designed to provide scien- 
tific analysis of the basic principles of business. Its purposes are to pre- 
pare students — to become business executives; to assume the increasing 
responnbilities of business ownership; and to act in the capacity of busi- 
ness specialists. Expressed more specifically, its aims are to provide 
familiarity with the fundamental elements of business management; to 
develop facility in the use of quantitative instruments in the determination 
of business policies and in the solution of business problems; and to 
assure recognition of the larger relationships between business leadership 
and social well-being. 

Instruction in Journalism proceeds upon the theory that the press is 
a public utility and that the increasing appreciation of its functions as an 
educational agency creates a demand for thorough preparation, ethically 
as well as educationally, for journalistic endeavor. The makers of 
modem newspapers and periodicals require knowledge of comprehensive 
and far-reaching character. They are compelled to deal with almost every 
phase of modern life and civilization. Those who would participate in 
journalistic activities as purveyors of news, as creators of public opin- 
ion, or as owners or managers of newspaper properties, must be trained — 



COLLEGE OF COMMERCE AND JOURNALISM 115 

in English, history, economics, business management, sociology, govern- 
ment, and so on, as well as in the technique of journalistic procedure. 
The purpose of university instruction in journalism is to accomplish, if 
possible, these difficult objectives. 

Special Registration Fee — ^The Board of Control has authorized a 
special registration fee of ten ($10.00) dollars for all regular students 
registered in the College of Commerce and Journalism, and a fee of one 
($1.00) dollar per semester-hour for all other students taking the fol- 
lowing courses: all courses in Journalism, except Journalism 316; all 
courses in Business Administration not marked E. For details of expenses 
see pages 42-45. 

Minimum and Maximum Hours — The student must take at least 
fourteen hours of work, and in general will not be permitted to take 
more than nineteen; but if in the preceding semester he has attained an 
honor point average of 2 or more and has not failed in any subject he 
may be permitted to take as many as twenty hours, and if he has attained 
an honor point average of 2.5 with no failures he may be permitted to take 
as many as twenty-three hours. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 

Commerce Club — ^This club was founded in 1924 by a group of stu- 
dents majoring in economics and business administration. Meetings 
are held fortnightly for encouraging and developing critical interest in 
current problems in the fields of conmierce and industry, special atten- 
tion being given to the economic progress of Florida. 

Alpha Kappa Psi — The Alpha Phi Chapter of Alpha Kappa Psi, a 
national professional commerce fraternity was established at the Uni- 
versity of Florida in January, 1926. Its purpose is to afford a social 
and professional contact among the students of business administration, 
and to cooperate with the faculty in furthering the interests of the Col- 
lege of Commerce and Journalism. The membership is made up of men 
whose interests are broader than the classroom, and whose personality 
and individual character give promise of business success. Only those 
students of the Sophomore class or above are eligible. At present the 
active members number nineteen. 

Pi Delta Epsilon — Pi Delta Epsilon is a national honorary collegi- 
ate journalistic fraternity. It was founded at Syracuse University in 
1909. It is the oldest non-professional journalism fraternity in America. 



116 COLLEGE OF COMMERCE AND JOURNALISM 

Pi Delta Epsilon has as its aim and purpose the stimulating of interest in 
college journalism, and the raising of the standards of college publica- 
tions. The University of Florida chapter of Pi Delta Epsilon fraternity 
was installed on Thanksgiving day, 1926, at Jacksonville. The chapter 
has a roll of eighteen active members and four honorary members. The 
fraternity includes among its members the heads of every official pub- 
lication on the campus, and is already exerting considerable influence 
upon campus journalism. 

Beta Sigma — This is a local honorary commerce fraternity. It was 
organized in January, 1927. Its purpose is to foster high standards of 
scholarship in the College of Commerce and Journalism. Members are 
chosen from the fifteen percent ranking highest in scholarship in the 
Junior and Senior classes. Plans are under way to petition one of the 
large national honorary fraternities in this field. 

Sigma Delta Chi — ^The Florida Chapter of Sigma Delta Chi, inter- 
national professional journalism fraternity, was installed at the University 
on February 9, 1929. It seeks to promote the welfare and highest ideals of 
newspapers and magazines. The personnel bureau of the fraternity at- 
tempts to obtain positions for members and to find better positions for 
those already engaged in the profession. Membership in the fraternity is 
the highest honor to which a journalism student can attain. 

AWARDS AND MEDALS 

Mr. Edward W. Lane, one of the outstanding bankers of Florida, a 
member of the Board of Control and President of the Atlantic National 
Bank of Jacksonville, offers a gold medal each year in the College of 
Commerce and Journalism to that member of the Senior Class in busi- 
ness administration who is best equipped for the profession of banking. 
The winner of this medal is also given a position in the Atlantic National 
Bank upon his graduation from the College of Commerce and Journalism. 

The Dean of the College of Commerce and Journalism offers a gold 
medal every year to that member of the Senior class in business admin- 
istration who possesses in the greatest degree the following personal and 
mental qualities: initiative, personality, reliability, soundness of judg- 
ment, industry, cooperation and native ability. This medal is awarded 
by the Faculty of the College through the use of rating scales. Every 
Senior is rated in these qualities by the Faculty and that Senior rating 
the highest is awarded the medal. 



COLLEGE OF COMMERCE AND JOURNALISM 117 

BUREAU OF APPOINTMENTS 

The College of Commerce and Journalism maintains a Bureau of Ap- 
pointments. This Bureau exists for the purpose of assisting graduates 
in securing positions. While appointments are not guaranteed, every 
effort will be made to place those who make worthy records. 

GRADUATE STUDY 

The College of Commerce and Journalism under the jurisdiction of 
the Graduate School of the University offers graduate courses leading to 
the degrees of Master of Arts, Master of Science in Business Administra- 
tion and Master of Science in Journalism. Students may major in eco- 
nomics and minor in business administration or vice versa. Ordinarily re- 
quirements for the above degrees may be completed in one regular aca- 
demic year. 

ASSISTANTSHIPS AND FELLOWSHIPS 

The College of Commerce and Journalism has made provisions for 
two graduate assistantships each year carrying a stipend of $400 each. 
For undergraduates there are two student assistantships paying $200 each. 
The American Bankers' Association Foundation for Education in Eco- 
nomics offers one annual loan scholarship amounting to $250. Students 
must have an honor-point average of two or more to apply for and hold 
any of these fellowships or assistantships. Those interested apply to the 
Dean before March 1st of each year. 

DEGREES 

Two undergraduate degrees are given in the College of Commerce 
and Journalism; Bachelor of Science in Business Administration, Bach- 
elor of Science in Journalism. 

For each of the degrees offered a total of one hundred and thirty-four 
credits are required of which ten credits are non-academic. 

THE CURRICULUM IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

In developing the curriculum in Business Administration, the Col- 
lege has proceeded upon the basis of the outstanding functions of busi- 
ness. Courses have been developed more with reference to the major 
relationships of the modern business manager than with reference to 
particular types of business. These relationships, as developed by one 



118 COLLEGE OF COMMERCE AND JOURNALISM 

American university, may be sub-summed under the following heads: 
(1) Relationship to physical and social environment, (2) relationship 
to finance, (3) relationship to marketing, (4) relationship to production, 
(5) relationship to personnel, (6) relationship to transportation and com- 
mimication, (7) relationship to accounting and statistical measurements, 
and (8) relationship to risk. Careful study of the curriculum will show 
how these various relationships are considered. 

The curriculum in Business Administration contains both cultural 
courses and professional courses. The first two years are devoted wholly 
to required subjects largely cultural in nature and are intended to pro- 
vide the student with a broad intellectual foundation. The last two years, 
with one or two exceptions, are concerned with courses directly in the 
field of business administration.. These required courses in business ad- 
ministration are courses of a pervasive character and are designed to ac- 
quaint the student with the underlying principles of business organiza- 
tion and operation rather than with the specific problems of specific 
business enterprises. 



COLLEGE OF COMMERCE AND JOURNALISM 



119 



CURRICULUM 

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Business Administration. 
First Semester Second Semester 



Names of Courses 



Credits Names of Courses 



Credits 



Freshman Year 



Business Administration 103 3 

English 101 3 

Mathematics 101 „ 3 

Foreign Language 3 

Business Administration lOlK 3 

Military Science 101 2 

Physical Education 101 1 



18 



Business Administration 104 3 

English 102 3 

Mathematics 108 3 

Foreign Language 3 

Business Administration 102E 3 

Military Science 102 2 

Physical Education 102 _... 1 



18 



Sophomore Year 



Business Administration 211 3 

Business Administration 201E 3 

*Foreign Language 3 

**Laboratory Science 5 

Military Science 201 2 



16 



Business Administration 212 3 

Business Administration 202E 3 

Foreign Language 3 

Laboratory Science 5 

Military Science 202 2 



16 



Junior Year 



Political Science 101 3 

Philosophy 201 3 

Business Administration 321E 3 

Business Administration 355 3 

Business Administration 341 2 

Approved Elective 3 



17 



Political Science 102 3 

Philosophy 206 3 

Business Administration 302E. 3 

Business Administration 322 3 

Business Administration 372 2 

Approved Elective 3 



17 



Senior Year 



Business Administration 351E 3 

Business Administration 401 3 

Business Administration 409 2 

Approved Electives 8 



16 



Business Administration 0431 3 

Business Administration 402 3 

Business Administration 410 2 

Approved Electives „ 8 



16 



* Continuation of course begun in Freshman year. 
••Physics, Chemistry, or Biology. 



120 COLLEGE OF COMMERCE AND JOURNALISM 

PROFESSIONAL SPECIALIZATION IN BUSINESS 

In addition to the required courses in business administration, the 
student is offered an opportunity to specialize in certain professional 
fields of business by the choice of electives. If he desires, for example, 
to specialize in marketing with the idea of becoming a sales manager, 
he may be permitted to take for his electives in the Junior year, two of 
the required courses, or six semester hours listed in the Senior year. 
This will enable him to elect twenty semester hours in his Senior year. 
If a student wants to specialize in accounting, he may take his electives 
of six semester hours in accounting in his Junior year, and in his Senior 
year elect fourteen semester hours in accounting and allied courses. 

In order that electives may be chosen in such a way as to con- 
stitute a coherent and comprehensive whole rather than as a scattered 
and unrelated series, suggested types of professional specialization are 
set forth below and the electives which should be pursued under each 
type are specified. Every student is expected at the beginning of his jun- 
ior year to select the group of electives under that particular field of 
professional specialization which best fits his needs and desires and 
adhere to that group. No changes will be allowed without the approval 
of the Dean. 

I. GENERAL BUSINESS 

Business Administration 469470 Business Forecasting 

Business Administration 331 ..Principles of Salesmanship 

Business Administration 422 Investments 

Business Administration 311-312 Advanced Accounting 

Business Administration 404 Social Control of Business Enterprise 

II. ACCOUNTING 

Business Administration 311-312 Advanced Accounting 

Business Administration 411 Cost Accounting 

Business Administration 414 Income Tax Procedure 

Business Administration 422 _ Investments 

Business Administration 412 Auditing 

Business Administration 413 Advanced Accounting 

III. MARKETING 

Business Administration 432 Market Management 

Business Administration 331 Principles of Salesmanship 

Business Administration 332 Retail Store Management 

Business Administration 433 Advertising 

Business Administration 434 Advanced Advertising 

Business Administration 435E International Trade 

Business Administration 436 Foreign Trade Technique 

and 

Business Administration 352 Ocean Transportation 

or 
Business Administration 438E Trade Horizons in Latin America 



COLLEGE OF COMMERCE AND JOURNALISM 



121 



IV. BANKING AND FINANCE 

Business Administration 422 Investments 

Business Administration 423 Banking 

Business Administration 424E Money 

Business Administration 429E Government Finance 

Business Administration 469-470 Business Forecasting 

Business Administration 404E Social Control of Business Enterprise 



V. PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT 

Business Administration 473E —Labor Problems 

Business Administration 469-470 Business Forecasting 

Business Administration 411 Cost Accounting 

Business Administration 432 Market Management 

Business Administration 422 Investments 

Journalism 318 Newspaper Management 



VI. TRANSPORTATION AND COMMUNICATION 

Business Administration 352E Ocean Transportation 

Business Administration 469-470 Business Forecasting 

Business Administration 432 Market Management 

Business Administration 311-312 Advanced Accounting 

Business Administration 473E Labor Problems 

Business Administration 435E Principles of International Trade 

VII. RISK-BEARING AND INSURANCE 

Business Administration 361 Property Insurance: Fire and Marine 

Business Administration 362 Property Insurance: Bond, Title and Casualty 

Business Administration 461 Life Insurance 

Business Administration 469-470 Business Forecasting 

Business Administration 331 Principles of Salesmanship 

Business Administration 422 Investments 



VIII. PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT 

Business Administration 469-470 Business Forecasting 

Business Administration 473E Labor Problems 

Philosophy 405 Psychological Tests 

Sociology 323 Social Pathology 

Sociology 424 Community Organization 

Sociology 441 Principles of Sociology 



IX. FOREIGN TRADE AND CONSULAR SERVICE 

Business Administration 352E Ocean Transportation 

Business Administration 436 Foreign Trade Technique 

Political Science 303-304 International Law 

Business Administration 438E Trade Horizons in Latin America 

Business Administration 435E Principles of International Trade 

Business Administration 381E Economic Geography of North America 

or 

Business Adminsitration 383E Economic Geography of Northwest Europe 



122 



COLLEGE OF COMMERCE AND JOURNALISM 



CUKmCULUM 

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Business Administration 
in Combination with Law 

The College of Commerce and Journalism combines with the College of Law 
in offering a six-year program of study for students in Business Administration who 
desire ultimately to enter the College of Law. The first three years are spent directly 
in the College of Commerce and Journalism; the last three years are devoted to the 
regular course in the College of Law. When the student has satisfactorily completed 
the first two years of the course in the College of Law he may offer these two yeara 
of law as a substitute for the fourth year in the College of Commerce and Journalism 
and receive the degree of Bachelor of Science in Business Administration. 



First Semester 


Second Semester 




Names of Courses 


Credits Names of Courses 


Credits 


Freshman Year 



English 101 3 

Journalism 103 3 

Mathematics 101 3 

Foreign Language 3 

Business Administration lOlE* 3 

Military Science 101 2 

Physical Education 101 1 



English 102 3 

Journalism 104 3 

Business Administration 104 3 

Foreign Language 3 

Business Administration 102E* 3 

Military Science 102 2 

Physical Education 102 1 



18 



18 



Sophomore Year 



Business Administration 211 3 

Business Administration 201E 3 

Foreign Language 3 

Laboratory Science 5 

Military Science 201 2 



Business Administration 212 3 

Business Administration 202E 3 

Foreign Language 3 

Laboratory Science 5 

Military Science 202 2 



16 



16 



Junior Year 



Political Science 101 3 

Philosophy 201 3 

Business Administration 431E 3 

Business Administration 321E 3 

Business Administration 409 2 

Approved Electives** 4 



Political Science 102 3 

Business Administration 322 3 

Business Administration 404E 3 

Business Administration 410 2 

Business Administration 302E 3 

Approved Electives** 4 



18 



18 



* History 101-102 may be substituted for Business Administration 101E-102E. 
•* Approved electives must be courses in Business Administration. 



COLLEGE OF COMMERCE AND JOURNALISM 123 

THE CURRICULUM IN JOURNALISM 

The curriculum in Journalism, extending over a period of four years, 
has been arranged with the primary aim of preparing students to meet 
successfully the exacting demands of the most successful newspaper men. 
Courses have been developed in accordance with the major purpose of 
training students to become efficient newspaper workers. 

The minimum number of credits required for the degree in Journalism 
is thirty-six. Beginning with an introductory course in the first year, 
the required courses in Journalism are scattered throughout the four years. 
Provision is made for eighteen credits of electives, four in the jimior year, 
and fourteen in the senior year. 

The curriculum contains the cultural courses necessary to provide a 
solid foundation for the professional courses. The first two years are 
devoted largely to subjects of a cultural nature in order to provide the 
student with a deep and broad intellectual background. Considerable 
emphasis is given to courses in Economics, Political Science, Business 
Administration, Psychology, History, English, Sociology, and Germanic 
and Romance languages. 

In addition to the courses prescribed for the degree in Journalism, 
the student is given an opportunity to specialize in that field of Journal- 
ism in which he is most interested, i. e.. Advertising, Financial Writing, 
Short Story Writing, Circulation Management, Newspaper Ownership 
and Management, and Agricultural Journalism. If the student desires 
to specialize, he must elect at the beginning of his junior year, with the 
approval of the Dean, the professional group which best fits his needs 
and desires and adhere to that group. 



124 



COLLEGE OF COMMERCE AND JOURNALISM 



CURRICULUM 

Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Science in Journalism. 
First Semester Second Semester 



Names of Courses 



Credits Names of Courses 



Credits 



Freshman Year 



Journalism 103 3 

English 101 3 

Foreign Language 3 

Mathematics 101 3 

Business Administration lOlE* 3 

Military Science 101 2 

Physical Education 101 1 

18 



Journalism 104 3 

English 102 3 

Foreign Language 3 

Sociology 102 3 

Business Administration 102E* 3 

Military Science 102 2 

Physical Education 102 1 



18 



Sophomore Year 



Journalism 205 3 

Foreign Language 3 

Laboratory Science 201 5 

Business Administration 201E 3 

Military Science 201 2 



16 



Journalism 206 3 

Foreign Language 3 

Laboratory Science 202 5 

Business Administration 202E 3 

Military Science 202 2 



16 



Junior Year 



Journalism 301 3 

Journalism 309 3 

Journalism 313 3 

Political Science 101 3 

Philosophy 201 3 

Approved Electives 2 



17 



Journalism 302 3 

Journalism 310 3 

Journalism 318 3 

Political Science 102 3 

English 204 3 

Approved Electives 2 



17 



Senior Year 



Journalism 407 3 

Sociology 441 3 

Political Science 205** 3 

Approved Electives 7 



16 



Journalism 409 3 

Journalism 404 3 

Political Science 206** 3 

Approved Electives 7 

16 



* History 101-102 may be substituted for Business Administration 101-102. 
**Political Science 305-306 may be substituted for Political Science 205-206. 



COLLEGE OF COMMERCE AND JOURNALISM 



125 



SUGGESTED TYPES OF PROFESSIONAL SPECIALIZATION 

I. ADVERTISING 

Journalism 403 The Press in World Society 

Business Administration 433 Advertising 

Business Administration 434 Advanced Advertising 

Business Administration 431E Principles of Marketing 

Philosophy 204 Business Psychology 

Journalism 405 Industrial and Trade Journalism 

Journalism 406 Mechanics of Publishing 

XL FINANCIAL WRITING 

Journalism 314 The Writing of Special Articles 

Business Administration 321E Financial Organization 

Business Administration 322 Financial Management 

Business Administration 422 Investments 

Business Administration 423 Banking 

Business Administration 424E Money 

Business Administration 429E Government Finance 

III. SHORT STORY WRITING 

Journalism 314 The Writing of Special Articles 

Journalism 408 Literary Criticism 

English 203 The Short Story 

English 301 Shakespeare and the Drama 

English 403404 English Novel 

English 406 Modern Novel 

IV. CIRCULATION MANAGEMENT 

Journalism 315 Community Newspaper Management 

Journalism 405 Industrial and Trade Journalism 

Journalism 406 Mechanics of Publishing 

Journalism 403 The Press in World Society 

Business Administration 372 Personnel Management 

Business Administration 433 Advertising 

Philosophy 204 Business Psychology 

V. NEWSPAPER OWNERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT 

Journalism 315 Community Newspaper Management 

Journalism 406 Mechanics of Publishing 

Journalism 403 The Press in World Society 

Business Administration 341 Production Management 

Business Administration 422 Investments 

Business Administration 409-410 Business Policy 

VI. AGRICULTURAL JOURNALISM 

Journalism 314 The Writing of Special Articles 

Journalism 315 Community Newspaper Management 

Journalism 316 Agricultural News Writing 

Journalism 405 Industrial and Trade Journalism 

Journalism 406 Mechanics of Publishing 

Journalism 403 The Press in World Society 

Agricultural Economics 301 Fundamental Principles 



COURSES OF STUDY 

For description of courses of study offered by the College of Com- 
merce and Journalism, see Departments of Instruction section. 



126 PHYSICAL EDUCATION 



DIVISION OF ATHLETICS AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

The Department is conducted for the purpose of giving every student 
a thorough course in general physical training under proper supervision 
and expert teachers, and to give opportunity and encouragement to parti- 
cipate, under the direction of skilled coaches, in various forms of competi- 
tive athletics, for the educational and training values that come from such 
experience. Every effort is made to conserve the time required of can- 
didates for intercollegiate teams and to promote in practice and contests, 
ideals of sportsmanship and fair play. At the same time the extension 
among all students of participation in various forms of competitive ath- 
letics is vigorously promoted through a large variety of intra-mural and 
minor sports contests, indoor and out. Great emphasis is placed upon 
outdoor work in Florida's wonderful climate. 

A thorough physical examination is made of each student on enter- 
ing the University, on the basis of which he is given advice and direc- 
tion as to his physical activities during his college course. This enables 
the student to secure the greatest values from this phase of his college 
work. This physical examination is supplemented by periodical exam- 
inations required of all those students who are candidates for competi- 
tive teams and of those who are below par physically as a result of either 
illness, improper development, or some other physical handicap. Year- 
ly examinations are optional to upper classmen. Special classes are ar- 
ranged for those needing special work of a corrective nature, and for 
those having physical disabilities. No violent or dangerous exercises are 
permitted. 

Every Freshman and Sophomore is required to take a course in phy- 
sical education for two periods a week throughout the year, for which 
college credit is given. This consists of gymnasium work, including calis- 
thenics, introductory apparatus work, advanced apparatus work, group 
games and mass athletics. This course is designed to improve body con- 
trol and physical alertness; to establish habits of regular exercise, and 
to give experience in various kinds of recreative sports that will be use- 
ful in later life. 

The second semester's work consists mostly of games and outdoor ac- 
tivities. A thorough knowledge of one major sport is required each se- 
mester. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 127 

Every encouragement and facility is placed at the disposal of the 
upper class students to take part in the intra-mural and inter-collegiate 
athletic sports on account of their body-building, social and character- 
forming values. 

ATHLETIC COACHING 

In order to meet the increased demand for competent coaches in our 
state high schools the faculty of the Teachers College unanimously voted 
to establish a four-year course leading to the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Education, allowing the students to major in athletic coaching 
and playground management. The course is meeting with much success 
its first year. 

COURSES OF STUDY 

For description of courses offered, see Departments of Instruction 
section. 



128 DIVISION OF MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS 



DIVISION OF MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS 

RESERVE OFFICERS' TRAINING CORPS 

SENIOR INFANTRY AND FIELD ARTILLERY UNITS 

Professor of Military Science and Tactics, and Commandant of 
Cadets, James A. VanFleet, Major, Infantry, U. S. Army; Assistant Pro- 
fessors of Military Science and Tactics: William C. Moore, Captain, In- 
fantry, U. S. Army; Gilmer M. Bell, Captain, Infantry, U. S. Army: 
Clyde C. Alexander, Captain, Field Artillery, U. S. Army; Ernest T. 
Barco, Captain, Field Artillery, U. S. Army; John F. Hepner, Captain, 
Field Artillery, U. S. Army; Clayton S. Whitehead, Captain, Infantry, 
U. S. Army; Frank F. Becker, Captain, Infantry, U. S. Army; James M. 
Morris, Captain, Infantry, U. S. Army. 

Instructors in Military Science and Tactics: Dallas B. Hundley, Staff 
Sergeant, Infantry, U. S. Army; William D. Klinepeter, Staff Sergeant, 
Infantry, U. S. Army; Charles H. Bell, Sergeant, Infantry, U. S. Army; 
Joseph C. Brandkamp, Sergeant, Field Artillery, U. S. Army; Ivor W. 
Thomas, Sergeant, Field Artillery, U. S. Army; Jesse A. Vitatoe, Sergeant, 
Infantry, U. S. Army; Joseph P. Donnovin, First Lieut., Field Artillery. 

Authority — Under the terms of the Land Grant Act of 1862 the State 
received certain grants of Federal lands, the income of which must be 
devoted to the maintenance of colleges of Agricultural and Mechanical 
Arts including a course in Military Training. The Reserve Officers' Train- 
ing Corps was established by the National Defense Act of June 3, 1916, as 
amended by the Act of June 4, 1920. This Act authorized the Secretary 
of War to provide the necessary instructors and equipment and to pre- 
scribe a standard course of instruction. 

Object — ^These units were authorized by Congress for the purpose 
of providing a corps of reserve officers to lead our augmented armed 
forces in time of war. The war with Germany has shown conclusively 
that we must depend upon college men for our additional officers. It 
is a part of the approved military policy of the people of the United States 
to maintain a small standing army. When the nation is drawn into war, 
and large additional arn\ed forces are raised, it is necessary that they be 
provided with trained officers. A study of our military history shows 
that many lives have been sacrificed in the past because of the scarcity 
of officers capable of leading men in combat. Our Government has at- 



DIVISION OF MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS 129 

tempted to rectify this by training young men in college so that if war 
comes they may step into positions of leadership and acquit themselves 
creditably. 

Students who complete the basic courses and are selected by the Pro- 
fessor of Military Science and Tactics and the President of the University, 
may elect the advanced courses. Students electing these courses must 
carry them to completion as a prerequisite to graduation. Upon their com- 
pletion those students recommended by the Professor of Military Science 
and Tactics and the President of the University, will upon their own appli- 
cation be offered a commission in the Officers Reserve Corps, United 
States Army. An advanced course Summer Camp is compulsory usu- 
ally between the Junior and Senior years. These camps afford a fine 
opportunity for the student to improve his military knowledge and to 
engage in healthful recreation. He is surrounded by every moral safe- 
guard and provided with every recreation and healthful amusement that 
a young man could wish. Chaplains look after his moral welfare, and 
every effort is made to improve him mentally, morally and physically. 
The War Department pays all expenses, including mileage, rations, medi- 
cal attendance, clothing and laundry service and in addition the pay of 
the seventh grade, U. S. Army. 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

For Courses of Instruction, see Departments of Instruction section. 



130 DIVISION OF MUSIC 

DIVISION OF MUSIC 

Instructors: R. DeWitt Brown (Director), John W. DeBruyn, Claude 
L. Murphree. 

This department aims to create and foster a love for and an apprecia- 
tion of good music and to encourage students to use their musical abilities 
and training for the benefit of themselves and others. It trains and directs 
the University band, the orchestra, and the glee club and offers private in- 
struction in voice and in violin and other instruments used in the band 
and orchestra and also in organ and piano. It seeks to cooperate with 
the musical organizations and churches of Gainesville and with the radio 
station located on the grounds of the University. Courses are given by 
special arrangement with the Director, but no college credit is allowed for 
work in this department. 

Owing to lack of funds for the department, a small tuition fee is 
charged for private instruction. 

ORGANIZATIONS AND COURSES IN THE DIVISION OF MUSIC 

The University Orchestra offers musical entertainment at many Uni- 
versity functions. Its organization is one of the largest in the South. 
Students with ordinary talent in the handling of orchestral instruments are 
invited to present their names for membership. Mr. Brown. 

The Military Band adds much to the effectiveness of parades. It makes 
several excursions during the year to neighboring towns and plays at 
many of the athletic contests held on and off the campus. 

The Glee Club was organized in 1926. During its existence trips have 
been taken to Georgia, Alabama, and throughout Florida. Membership 
is selective and requires a knowledge of note reading and four-part sing- 
ing. Try-outs are held in the early part of the first semester. Applicants 
are tested as to their ability to read easy music at sight, blend, voice, ap- 
pearance, and pitch. The Glee Club already has begun to mean much as 
a source of culture, recreation, and advancement in the art of music. A 
teacher of voice acts as the director. Mr. DeBruyn. 

Private lessons in violin and other orchestral instruments may be ar- 
ranged with Mr. Brown. 

Private lessons in voice may be arranged with Mr. DeBruyn. 

Private lessons in organ and piano may be arranged with Mr. 
Murphree. 

A course in Rudimentary Sight Singing will be given during the first 
semester. This course is intended for students who have had little or no 
training in the reading of notes. One hour a week. A small tuition 
charge is made for this course. Mr. DeBruyn. 



GENERAL EXTENSION DIVISION 131 



GENERAL EXTENSION DIVISION 

Bert Clair Riley, Dean 

Regular Faculties of the University of Florida and the State Col- 
lege for Women co-operate. 

Special Lecturers and Teachers are employed for Class Work and 
Short Courses. 

The General Extension Division represents the Colleges of Arts and 
Science, Education, Engineering, Law, Pharmacy and Commerce and 
Journalism, of the University, and the Colleges of Arts and Sciences and 
the Schools of Education and Music of the State College for Women. 
The work has been divided into six departments: 

1. Extension Teaching 

2. Auditory Instruction 

3. Citizenship Training 

4. Visual Instruction 

5. General Information and Service 

6. Extension Research 

Each department is divided into several bureaus. 

DEPARTMENT OF EXTENSION TEACHING 

Correspondence Study Bureau — Correspondence study offers to 
everyone an excellent opportunity to advance in his vocation, obtain a 
degree, or take courses for culture. 

Review courses for teachers, high school work for students in rural 
communities, college work for busy men and women, special vocational 
courses for those who wish to advance in their line of work, and reading 
courses for those on the farm, in the shop, office and home are offered. 
Many courses are given by the University through the Colleges of Arts 
and Sciences, Education, Engineering, and Commerce and Journalism. 
The Division also offers correspondence courses through the State Col- 
lege for Women in the Schools of Education and Music and the College 
of Arts and Sciences. 

Extension Class Bureau — Wherever advisable, extension classes are 
organized to meet the special needs of interested groups. 

Institutes and Short Course Bureau — ^Through this Bureau short 
courses, community institutes and conferences are held to give instruc- 



132 GENERAL EXTENSION DIVISION 

tion or an opportunity for discussion on problems confronting groups 
or communities. 

DEPARTMENT OF AUDITORY INSTRUCTION 

The department of Auditory Instruction has charge of the radio pro- 
grams put on over WRUF, the State and University broadcasting station, 
located at Gainesville. In addition to cultural programs, instruction, 
information and entertainment by lectures and discussion are offered for 
the benefit of special groups, schools and individuals by radio or directly. 

DEPARTMENT OF CITIZENSHIP TRAINING 

Citizens Military Training Camps Bureau — Recognizing the educa- 
tional value of the Citizens Military Training Camps, this Department 
assists the Military Training Camps Association and the War Department 
in enrolling young men for this training. 

Americanization Bureau — Training for naturalization, citizenship 
schools and co-operation with patriotic societies are carried on through 
this Bureau. 

DEPARTMENT OF VISUAL INSTRUCTION 

This department has a large library of visual aids, owned by the state, 
and lent to clubs, schools, and communities for purposes of cultural en- 
tertainment and instruction. This library is supplemented with materials 
secured by co-operating with large corporations and the Departments 
and Bureaus of the United States Government. Motion picture films, 
slides, collections of reproductions of masterpieces, prints, charts and 
graphs, accompanied by lecture notes are available. 

DEPARTMENT OF GENERAL INFORMATION AND SERVICE 

Bureau of Public Information and Library Service — This Bureau 
acts as a clearing house for all kinds of information upon request for 
help on any problem confronting the individual or community. 

Package libraries and reference books are lent to citizens. 

Story books suitable for children of all grades are sent to teachers 
to read to their students. 

Traveling libraries are furnished to schools. 

Club study outlines and guides for home reading are offered. 

PuBUC School and Community Center Bureau — This Bureau su- 
pervises the high school interscholastic academic and forensic contests. 



GENERAL EXTENSION DIVISION 133 

culminating in a state contest held annually at the University. This work 
includes the state high school debating contest, the state Oratorical con- 
test, held in co-operation with the National Oratorical Association; a de- 
clamatory contest; a series of contests in academic subjects; and a con- 
test among high school newspapers and annuals. A state convention of 
journalism teachers, staff officers, and supervisors is held in connection 
with the state contest. 

The Bureau also offers the services of a Recreational Engineer to 
schools and communities to assist them in their physical training and 
outdoor recreational program. Work in health education is conducted, a 
library of plays, recitations and talking machine records is maintained 
for the use of the schools, and co-operation is given Parent-Teachers 
Associations. 

Student Extension Activities Bureau — Through this bureau, stu- 
dents at the University of Florida offer to assist schools and communities 
by giving commencement addresses, illustrated lectures, open forum de- 
bates and by acting as judges and coaches in athletic and forensic con- 
tests, and dramatics. 

In the interest of student activities and welfare at the University of 
Florida, contact is maintained with numerous American colleges and 
universities. 

Publications Bureau — The Publications Bureau publishes articles 
and bulletins concerning extension work. Technical and informational 
bulletins on subjects of interest to the public are also published and dis- 
tributed. 

DEPARTMENT OF EXTENSION RESEARCH 

The act of the Legislature creating the General Extension Division 
states that the Division "shall gather information on subjects useful to 
the people of the state, and carry it to them." To fulfill more nearly the 
provisions of this act, the Extension Research Department conducts in- 
vestigations relative to economic, educational and public welfare problems 
of general interest. 

Municipal Reference and Social Service Bureau — The Bureau 
promotes study of the problems of municipal government and social ad- 
ministration. A reference library is maintained and informational articles, 
bulletins and books are lent upon request. 

Address all communications to the Dean, General Extension Divi- 
sion, University of Florida, Gainesville. 



PART IV 

DEPARTMENTS 

OF 
INSTRUCTION 



136 DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 



THE DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 



Course numbers have the following meanings: 

1. Courses with odd numbers are given in the first semester; with even 
numbers, in the second semester; 

2. Courses with second number in parenthesis, e. g. 21 (22) are year 
courses and may not be divided without permission; 

3. Courses with numbers separated by hyphens, e. g. 21-22, are year 
courses but may be divided; 

4. A "0" preceding a number, as 21-021, is to indicate that the course 
is a semester course which may be given either or both semesters. 

5. Courses with a single number, e. g. 21, or 22, are semester courses. 

6. The hours indicated are the number of hours the class meets each week, 

7. The credits indicated are the number of semester credits earned when 
the course is completed. 



AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 137 

AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY 

Professor Leigh, Professor Black, Professor Beisler, Professor Heath, Associate Pro- 
fessor Jackson, Assistant Professor Goodwin. 

NOTE: The instruction in this department is designed primarily to fit the 
needs of agricultural students. By means of lectures, recitations and laboratory 
work the student is taught the fundamental chemical principles underlying and 
controlling all plant and animal life. Laboratory courses are provided covering the 
quantitative analysis of agricultural products. 

( For courses offered in Agricultural Chemistry, see Chemistry, page 159. ) 
AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 

Professor Turlington, Associate Professor Hamilton, Instructor Brumley, Instructor 
Timmons, Mr. Haskell, Mr. Zentgraf. 

54. Farm Management — An elementary course in organization of the 
farm business. The laying out of fields, location of buildings, farm 
accounting, and important factors affecting profits. (Short courses. 
3 hours. No credit. Timmons, Turlington.) 

301. Fundamental Principles — The fundamental principles of eco- 
nomics in their relation to agriculture. (3 hours. 3 credits. Tur- 
lington.) 

303. Farm Records — Methods and practice of making and keeping 
farm inventories, feed records, crop records, and a study of statisti- 
cal methods. (Prerequisite: Sophomore year. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

2 class and 1 laboratory periods. 3 credits. Timmons, Turlington.) 

306. Farm Management — The factors of production; systems of farm- 
ing, their distribution and adaptation; problems of labor, machin- 
ery, laying out of farms and rotation systems. (Prerequisite: Sopho- 
more year. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 2 class and 1 laboratory periods. 

3 credits. Turlington, Brumley.) 

308. Marketing — Marketing and distributing farm products; marketing 
organizations and laws governing them; the relation of foreign trade 
and general business conditions to the farmer's market. (Prerequi- 
site: Sophomore year. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 2 class and 1 labora- 
tory periods. 3 credits. Hamilton.) 

311. Rural Lavv^ — Classification of property, boundaries, fences, stock 
laws, rents, contracts, deeds, abstracts, mortgages, taxes, laws govern- 
ing shipping, etc. (Prerequisite: Sophomore year. 2 hours. 2 credits. 
Turlington.) 



138 AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

403ii Advanced Farm Management — Laying out and locating various 
buildings, lots, fields and crops; cropping systems; farm surveys, 
and a study of successful Florida farms. (Prerequisite: Agricultural 
Economics 301 and 306. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 3 hours. 3 credits. 
Turlington, Brumley.) 

405. Agricultural Prices — Prices of farm products and the factors 
affecting them. (Laboratory fee, $3.00. 2 class and 1 laboratory pe- 
riods. 3 credits. Hamilton.) 

408. Marketing Fruits and Vegetables — The marketing of citrus, to- 
matoes, beans, potatoes and other Florida products. (Laboratory 
fee, $3.00. 2 class and 1 laboratory periods. 3 credits. Hamilton.) 

409. Cooperative Marketing — Cooperative buying and selling organi- 
zations, their successes and failures; methods of organization, financ- 
ing and business management. (Laboratory fee, $3.00. 3 hours. 3 
credits. Hamilton.) 

410. Statistics — The principles involved in the collection, tabulation 
and interpretation of agricultural statistics. (Laboratory fee, $3.00. 
2 class and 1 laboratory periods. 3 credits. Brumley, Hamilton.) 

501-502. Farm Management Seminar — Study of recent literature and 
research work. For graduate students; elective for seniors on ap- 
proval. (2 credits. Turlington, Brumley.) 

503-504. Marketing Seminar — Review of recent literature and research 
work in marketing. For graduate students; elective for seniors on 
approval. (2 credits. Hamilton, Turlington.) 

505-506. Research Problems — Thesis problems, with approval of the 
head of the department. (Hours and credit to be arranged.) 

508. Land Economics — Rural taxation, colonization and adjustments of 
riu-al lands to their best uses. Open to seniors by permission of the 
Dean and head of the department. (Hamilton, Turlington.) 

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

Professor Rogers, Assistant Professor Eshleman, Mr. Woodruff. 

21. Farm Machinery — Care, construction, operation and selection of 
farm machinery. (Short courses. Laboratory fee, $1.00. 1 class and 
2 laboratory periods. No credit. Rogers.) 



AGRONOMY 139 

104. Wood Work — Practice in adjustment, care and use of wood work- 
ing tools, exercises in bench work, farm equipment and farm build- 
ing construction. (Laboratory fee, $1.00. 2 laboratory periods. 2 
credits. Eshleman.) 

202. Farm Machinery — Construction, operation and selection of har- 
vesting, seeding, spraying and tilling machinery. (Laboratory fee, 
$1.00. 2 class and 2 laboratory periods. 4 credits. Rogers.) 

204. Agricultural Organization — The organization and proceedings of 
agricultural societies. (1 class period. 1 credit. Rogers.) 

301. Drainage and Irrigation — Farm surveying, drainage and irriga- 
tion systems; field practice in surveying and designing systems. 
(2 class and 1 laboratory periods. 3 credits. Rogers.) 

302. Farm Motors — ^The sources of power on the farm; automobile, 
tractor and stationary gasoline engines; electric motors and wind- 
mills. (Laboratory fee, $2.00. 2 class and 1 laboratory periods. 3 
credits. Rogers.) 

303. Farm Shop — Belt lacing, carpentry, concrete construction, soldering 
and other farm shop operations; specially useful for students intend- 
ing to teach agricultural engineering in vocational schools. (1 class 
and 2 laboratory periods. 3 credits. Rogers.) 

401. Farm Buildings — Construction, cost, management, sanitation and 
ventilation of farm buildings; laboratory exercises in designing and 
estimating costs. (2 class and 1 laboratory periods. 3 credits. Rogers.) 

402. Farm Concrete — Selection of materials; curing, mixing, placing, 
reinforcing, testing and waterproofing concrete. (1 class and 1 lab- 
oratory periods. 2 credits. Rogers.) 

501-502. Agricultural Engineering Seminar. — Review of the literature 
on agricultural engineering subjects. For graduate students; elective 
for seniors on approval. (2 credits. Rogers.) 

503-504. Research Work — Special problems in agricultural engineer- 
ing. (2 to 6 credits. Rogers.) 

AGRONOMY 

Professor Bryan, Instructor Ritchey, Mr. Camp, Mr. Richardson. 

21-22. Elements of Agronomy — A practical course in farm crops, fer- 
tilizers and soil fertility. Designed to meet the needs of special stu- 
dents. (2 hours. No credit. Bryan.) 



140 AGRONOMY 

201. Farm Crops — The history, characteristics, adaptations, fertility 
requirements, cultural practices and uses of the leading field crops. 
(Laboratory fee, $1.00. 2 class and 1 laboratory periods. 3 credits. 
Ritchey.) 

301. Soils — The nature and properties of the soil as related to fertility 
and crop production. (Prerequisite: Chemistry 101-102. Laboratory 
fee, $2.00. 3 class and 2 laboratory periods. 5 credits. Bryan.) 

302. Fertilizers and Manures — The nature, source and composition 
of various fertilizer materials, their influence on crops and soils; 
fertilizer requirements for various crops; use of farm manures; 
formulas; home mixing, etc. (Prerequisite: Agronomy 301. 2 class 
and 1 laboratory periods. 3 credits. Bryan.) 

304. Forage Crops — ^The plants that produce feed for livestock, includ- 
ing pasture grasses, legumes, etc.; their characteristics, composition, 
adaptations and cultural methods. (Prerequisite: Agronomy 201. 2 
class and 1 laboratory period. 3 credits. Ritchey.) 

307. Agricultural Genetics — A general course in Genetics as applied 
to heredity and variation in plants and animals. Practice in calcu- 
lating ratios, tabulating and interpreting data obtained from plant 
and animal breeding. (Prerequisite: Botany 101-102. Laboratory 
fee, $2.00. 2 class and 1 laboratory periods. 3 credits. Ritchey.) 

402. Breeding Crop Plants — The fundamental principles of crop im- 
provement, including experimental methods, breeding, selection, pure 
seed production and distribution. Practice will be given in plant 
breeding garden. (Prerequisite: Agronomy 201. 2 class and 1 lab- 
oratory periods. 3 credits. Ritchey.) 

405. Soil Fertility — The factors involved in crop production; source 
and loss of plant nutrients; methods and results obtained by labora- 
tory and field experiments. (Prerequisite: Agronomy 303. 3 hours. 
3 credits. Bryan.) 

407. Special Crops — Study of the nature, classification, adaptations, 
cultural practices, and uses of tobacco, sweet potatoes, and other 
minor crops. (Prerequisite: Agronomy 201. 2 hours. 2 credits. 
Ritchey.) 

500-501. Agronomy Seminar — A review of the scientific literature deal- 
ing with soils and farm crops. (2 credits. Bryan.) 



ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 141 

504. Origin and Classification of Soils — The origin and principles of 
soil classification. Detailed maps of certain areas will be required. 
(Prerequisite: Agronomy 302. 2 class and 1 laboratory period. 3 
credits. Bryan.) 

505-506. Research Work — Special problems in soils and farm crops. 
(2 to 10 credits. Bryan, Ritchey.) 

507. Advanced Soil — The mineral and organic components of the 
soil and their physico-chemical properties, including the origin, na- 
ture and significance of soil colloids; soil reaction, repacable bases 
and plant responses. (2 classes and 1 laboratory period. 3 credits* 
Laboratory fee $3.00. Bryan.) 

508. Methods of Crop Investigation — Study of the experimental tech- 
nique in connection with field plot variation, seasonal influences, 
etc., with methods of minimizing their effects on results; assimilat- 
ing, summarizing and interpreting data. (Prerequisite: Agronomy 
201. 2 class and 1 laboratory periods. 3 credits. Ritchey.) 

510. Soil Biology — ^The micro-organisms in the soil, their effect on 
the fertility of the soil and plant growth. (Prerequisites: Agronomy 
303, Bacteriology 302. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 2 class and 1 laboratory 
periods. 3 credits. Bryan.) 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY AND DAIRYING 

(For courses in Dairying, see page 169.) 

Professor Willoughby, Instructor Martin. 

ANIMAL HUSBANDRY 

21. Elements of Animal Husbandry — Breeds of farm animals, prin- 
ciples of feeding, breeding and management. (Four-months course. 
3 hours. No credit. Willoughby.) 

102. Types and Breeds of Animals — Types, breeds and classes of 
horses, cattle, sheep and swine; score-card and comparative judging. 
(2 classes and 1 laboratory period. 3 credits. Martin, Willoughby.) 

201. Animal Feeding — Composition of plants and animals; feeding 
standards and rations for farm animals. (2 hours. 2 credits. Martin.) 

202. Animal Breeding — History and principles of the breeding of ani- 
mals; foundation and management of a breeding business. (2 hours. 
2 credits. Willoughby.) 



142 ARCHITECTURE 

203. Beef Production — Selection, feeding and management of beef 
cattle; finishing and marketing. Brief study of mutton production. 
(Prerequisite: Animal Husbanrdy 102. 3 hours. 3 credits. Wil- 
loughby.) 

204. Swine Production — Selection, feeding and management of swine; 
equipment for hog farm; slaughtering and marketing. (Prerequi- 
site: Animal Husbandry 102. 2 hours. 2 credits. Martin.) 

205. Advanced Stock Judging — Special training in live stock judging, 
show ring practice and contests at fairs. (Prerequisite: Animal Hus- 
bandry 102. 1 class and 2 laboratory periods; 3 credits. Willoughby.) 

301. Breed History — History of breeds; pedigrees and registration 
methods. (Prerequisites: Animal Husbandry 101, 202. 2 hours. 2 
credits. Willoughby.) 

303. Meat Products — Farm slaughtering and packinghouse methods; 
curing, processing and marketing of meats and special products. 
(Prerequisites: Animal Husbandry 203, 204. 2 hours. 2 credits. 
Willoughby.) 

305-306. Animal Nutrition — Feeds, feeding and management of farm 
live stock. (Prerequisites: Animal Husbandry 101, 201. 2 hours. 4 
credits. Martin.) 

401-402. Seminar — History of live stock industry in America; special 
dairy and live stock topics; review of recent research. (For seniors 
and graduates. Hours and credit to be arranged. Martin, Wil- 
loughby.) 

ARCHITECTURE 

(Including Mural Painting) 

Professor Weaver, Instructor Long, Instructor Larson, Instructor Burkhart, 
Instructor Hannaford, Instructor Gill, Mr. Amett 

The courses in Architecture and Painting are divided in sections as 

follows: 

ARCHITECTURE 



Design 


Delineation 


Construction 


Arch. 101-102 


Arch. 121-122 


Arch. 151-152 


Arch. 201-202 


Arch. 221-222 


Arch. 454-455 


Arch. 301-302 


Arch. 226-227 




Arch. 401-402 


Arch. 228 




Arch. 310 


Arch. 321 
Arch. 521-526 





ARCHITECTURE 143 

Theory History Mechanical Equipment 

Arch. 112 Arch. 231-232 Arch. 464 

Arch. 314 Arch. 331-332 Arch. 466 

Arch. 416 Arch. 435 Arch. 468 

MURAL PAINTING 

Painting 103-104 Painting 203-204 

Painting 107 Painting 207-208 

Painting 115-116 Painting 211-212 

Painting 117-118 Painting 219-220 

For description of courses in Painting, see page 209. 

101. Architectural Design — This is the beginning course in architec- 
tural design and consists of lectures and small problems in plan and 
elevation employing only the wall, roof, beam and pier as structural 
elements, with mouldings and simple belt courses as decorative ele- 
ments. The orders are not introduced, either as structural or decor- 
ative elements, until the second semester. 

Plan and elevation are studied without reference to historic prece- 
dent. The student is encouraged to use his own judgment, without 
reference to books in this course; the development of initiative and 
the creative faculties being placed above draftsmanship and conven- 
tionality of result. (First semester, three three-hour drafting-room 
periods with occasional lectures. 3 credits.) 

102. Architectural Design — A continuation of 101. Small buildings 
are desi^yied and the orders are introduced as both structural and 
decorative elements. Research is encouraged and draftsmanship em- 
phasized, but the arrangement of plan and fitness to its use, appro- 
priate expression of elevation, proportion and scale, are given major 
emphasis. (Second semester, three three-hour drafting-room periods. 
2 credits.) 

112. Elements of Beauty — A discussion of the manifestations of beauty 
in nature with lectures on the various modes of its expression in the 
arts, particularly in architecture. Special lectures are given by in- 
structors in other departments on the drama, poetry, music and other 
arts. Assigned reading and problems. (Second semester, 1 hour. 
1 credit.) 

121-122. Freehand Drawing — An introduction to perspective with out- 
door sketching in pencil occupies the first third. The remaining 
two-thirds is given to charcoal drawing from casts and from still life 
groups. (Two three-hour periods. 2 credits each semester.) 



144 ARCHITECTURE 

201-202. Architectural Design — A continuation of 101-102 with larger 
types of buildings and more emphasis placed upon research, drafts- 
manship and rendering. Use of the more complex structural fea- 
tures is encouraged and problems are given which include interior 
furnishing, mural decoration, sculpture and landscape gardening. 
(Three three-hour drafting-room periods. 3 credits each semester.) 

221-222. Freehand Drawing — Outdoor sketching is resumed during 
the first third of the semester. The remaining time is given to cast 
drawing in charcoal. In the second semester, cast drawing is con- 
tinued except during the last third which is devoted to compositions 
of archaeological material, drawn in charcoal. (Three two-hour 
drawing periods. 2 credits each semester.) 

226. Elementary Water Color — Color theory and various methods 
of applying water color. Still life and simple landscapes. (Second 
semester, two three-hour drawing periods. 2 credits.) 

227. Perspective — A discussion of the phenomena of perspective and 
methods of representing distance, followed by exercises in drawing 
architectural perspectives. (First semester, two three-hour periods. 
2 credits.) 

228. Modeling — Modeling architectural forms in clay. Original prob- 
lems in mass composition are given. Elective for the present. (Two 
three-hour periods. 2 credits.) 

231-232. Architectural History — A series of lectures with stereop- 
ticon slides covering Egyptian, Assyrian, Persian, Greek, Roman, 
Early Christian, and Byzantine Architecture. Historical and other 
influences, materials and methods of construction. Comparison of the 
styles. Supplemented by reference reading and sketching. (Two 
lectures. 2 credits each semester.) 

301-302. Architectural Design — The third year of architectural design 
with preliminary sketches, rendered studies, final drawings and ad- 
ditional sketch problems. (First semester, three four-hour drafting- 
room periods. 4 credits. Second semester, three three-hour drafting- 
room periods. 3 credits.) 

310. Residence Design — An effort is made to teach the students to plan 
houses from the point of view of use according to the social habits 
of the owner, recognizing the requirements of efficiency in the work- 
ing parts and the behaviorism of the occupants in the living parts. 
Consideration is given to furniture placement, location of kitchen 



ARCHITECTURE 145 

equipment and other considerations too often neglected in house 
design. (Second semester given with Arch. 302 during the second 
third of the semester. Six lectures and 40 hours of drafting given 
with 302. 1 credit.) 

314. Theory of Composition — Lectures on Architectural Composition 
with assigned reading and required sketches. (Second semester, 1 
hour. 1 credit.) 

321. Freehand Drawing — Life. Charcoal sketching alternating with 
quick pencil sketching from action poses. The greater portion of 
time is given to careful charcoal studies of the figure, (First semester, 
three two-hour drawing periods. 2 credits.) 

331-332. Architectural History — A continuation of Arch. 231-232, 
covering Romanesque, Gothic, Renaissance, and Modem Architecture. 
Supplemented by reference reading and sketching. (Two lectures. 
2 credits each semester.) 

351. Frame Construction — The nature and properties of woods used 
in building construction. Methods of construction. (First semester, 
two lectures and drawings. 2 credits.) 

352. Masonry Construction — Building materials and methods other 
than those included in Frame Construction. (Second semester, two 
lectures and drawings. 2 credits.) 

401-402. Architectural Design — Advanced Architectural Design cover- 
ing the more complex problems of planning and composition, a con- 
tinuation of the work and experience gained in the preceding three 
years. (Three four-hour and one three-hour drafting-room periods. 
5 credits each semester.) 

416. Professional Practice — Lectures on the ethics and methods of 
modern practice. (Second semester, 1 hour. 1 credit.) 

435. Decorative Arts — A brief study of the decorative arts allied with 
architecture. Lectures with assigned reading and research plates. 
(First semester. 1 credit.) 

454. Concrete Design — A course in reinforced concrete design, pri- 
marily intended for architectural students. (Second semester, two 
lectures and problems. 2 credits.) 

455. Working Drawings — ^The preparation of scale drawings and de- 
tails as issued to the builder in actual practice. (First semester, two 
three-hour drafting-room periods. 3 credits.) 



146 BACTERIOLOGY 

464. Heating and Ventilating — A course in Heating and Ventilating 
given in the Mechanical Engineering Department especially arranged 
for architectural students. (Second semester, one one-hour lecture. 

1 credit.) 

466. Electric Lighting — Hlumination and wiring of buildings, given in 
the Electrical Engineering Department for architectural students. 
(Second semester. 1 credit.) 

468, Plumbing — A study of hot and cold water supply; drainage and 
sewage disposal; plumbing methods, materials and fixtures. (Second 
semester. One lecture each week with outside drafting. 1 credit.), 

521. Freehand Drawing — A continuation of Arch. 321. Advanced life 
drawing. Refinement of proportion and the use of the human figure 
in architectural decoration are emphasized. (Second semester, two 
three-hour periods. 2 credits.) 

526. Water Color — Continuation of Arch. 226. Color sketches and 
studies. Rendering architectural exterior and interior perspectives in 
water color and other mediums. (First semester. Two three-hour 
periods. 2 credits.) 

BACTERIOLOGY 

(Administered under the Department of Botany and Bacteriology) 
Assistant Professor Carroll 

301. General Bacteriology — ^The morphology, physiology and culti- 
vation of bacteria and related microorganisms. Prerequisite to all 
courses in bacteriology offered by this department. (Prerequisite: 
College botany or biology; a knowledge of chemistry desired. Lab- 
oratory fee, $5.00. 2 class and 2 laboratory periods. 4 credits. 
Carroll.) 

302. Agricultural Bacteriology — ^Bacteria and associated micro- 
organisms in relation to agriculture, the farm, etc. (Prerequisite: 
Bacteriology 301. Laboratory fee, $5.00; 2 class and 2 laboratory 
periods. 4 credits. Carroll.) 

304. Pathogenic Bacteriology — ^The recognition, culture and special 
laboratory technique of handling pathogenic bacteria. Theories and 
principles of immunity and infection. Given alternate years with 
Bact. 306. Will be given 1929-30. (Laboratory fee, $5.00; 2 class and 

2 laboratory periods. 4 credits. Carroll.) 



BIBLE 147 

306. Bacteriology of Foods — ^The relation of bacteria, molds, and 
yeasts to foods; modes of handling and preservation of foods. This 
course alternates with Bacteriology 304. (1929.) (Laboratory fee, 
$5.00; 2 class and 2 laboratory periods. 4 credits. Carroll. 

308. Sanitary Laboratory Practice — Problems in sewage and public 
sanitation; field work; designed for students in sanitary engineering. 
(Laboratory fee, $5.00; 1 lecture and 2 laboratory periods per week. 
3 credits. Carroll.) 

401. Clinical Bacteriology — Laboratory work upon special problems 
preparing for technical expert in field of biological activities of 
bacteria. Animal experimentation and immunology upon pathogens. 
Work assigned to particular organisms. (Prerequisite: Bacteriology 
304. Hours to be arranged. A prerequisite to research in bacteriology. 
Carroll.) 

501-502. Problems in Soil Bacteriology — (Laboratory fee, $5.00. 8 
or 10 credits.) 

503-504. Problems in Dairy Bacteriology — (Laboratory fee, $5.00. 
8 or 10 credits.) 

505-506. Problems in Pathogenic Bacteriology — (Laboratory fee, 
$5.00. 8 or 10 credits.) 

BIBLE 

Professor Buchholz, Professor Farr, Professor Anderson 

NOTE: The following courses are offered to Sophomores, Juniors, and Seniors, 
embracing such aspects of Biblical study as the University is prepared to give, with a 
view to providing a major subject in the Bachelor of Arts Curriculum that will permit 
students to begin preparation for work as secretary or physical director of the Y. M. 
C. A., for welfare work in mills or social settlements, or for the ministry. The 
courses offered will be conducted by the instructors in the departments under which 
the various aspects of the subject naturally fall, and will be given in a spirit free 
from sectarianism. 

201-202. Old Testament History — (3 hours. 6 credits. Buchholz.) 

203-204. New Testament History — Lectures, Bible readings, text- 
book. (3 hours. 6 credits. Buchholz.) 

205 (206). Old and New Testament Greek— See Greek 203 (204). 

208. Outstanding Characters of the Old Testament. — (3 hours. 3 
credits. Buchholz.) 



14S BIOLOGY 

301. The Engush Bible as Literature — Literary types found in the 
Bible and the excellence of the work as compared with other great 
examples of literature. (Hours to be arranged. Farr.) 

305-306. The Bible as an Ethical and Religious Guide — Lectures, 
Bible readings, studies of great sermons, text-books on Evidences of 
Christianity. (3 hours. 6 credits. Buchholz.) 

307-308. The History of the Christian Church — (3 hours. 6 cred- 
its. Buchholz.) 

309. The Pedagogy of Jesus — Learning to teach from the Master. (For 
Juniors and Seniors. 3 hours. 3 credits. Buchholz.) 

BIOLOGY AND GEOLOGY 

(For courses in Geology, see page 185.) 

Professor Rogers, Associate Professor Hubbell, Associate Professor Sherman, 
Assistant Professor Byers. 

NOTE: For a description of the laboratories, biological station, and general 
equipment of this department see page 36. 

BIOLOGY 

101. Principles of Animal Biology — An introduction to the subject 
matter and principles of zoology. (A prerequisite for all other 
courses, except Biology 105. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 2 lecture, 2 lab- 
oratory and 1 quiz periods. 5 credits. Rogers, Hubbell, Byers.) 

104. Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy — A comparative study of the 
structure of the main classes of vertebrates. (Required of Pre-Medi- 
cal students. Prerequisite: Biology 101. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 
2 lecture, 2 laboratory and 1 quiz periods. 5 credits. Sherman.) 

0105. Elementary Anatomy and Physiology — The elements of verte- 
brate anatomy with an introduction to the physiological systems of 
man. (Open to Pharmacy students only. 2 class and demonstration 
periods. Fee for demonstration material, $2.00. 2 credits. Sherman.) 

106. Genetics and Evolution — An introduction to the study of varia- 
tion, selection, and inheritance in animals. The last weeks of the 
course deal with some of the data of human heredity. (Prerequisite: 
Biology 101. 2 lectures and 1 quiz period. 3 credits. Rogers.) 

108. Mammalian Anatomy and Physiology — An introduction to the 
structure and functioning of the mammalian body with special ref- 



BIOLOGY 149 

erence to man. Individual laboratory dissection of the cat is ac- 
companied by lectures on the human body and physiological demon- 
strations. (Primarily for freshmen in Physical Education. Prere- 
quisite: Biol. 101. Laboratory fee $5.00. 2 class and 2 laboratory 
periods. 5 credits. Sherman.) 

0201. Invertebrate Zoology — The comparative morphology and phy- 
logeny and natural history of the invertebrates, exclusive of insects. 
(Prerequisite: Biology 101. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 3 class and 2 
laboratory periods. 5 credits. Byers.) 

0202. Entomology — The classification, structure and biology of the in- 
sects. (Prerequisite: Biology 101. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 3 class 
and 2 laboratory periods. 5 credits. Hubbell.) 

211. Embryology — ^The principles of general embryology followed by 
special attention to the development of the vertebrates. (Prerequisite: 
Biology 101 and 104. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 3 class and 2 labora- 
tory periods. 5 credits. Sherman.) 

0301. Advanced Invertebrate Zoology — Problems and special studies 
on the local invertebrate fauna. (Prerequisite: Biology 201. Labora- 
tory fee, $5.00. Hours ajid credit to be arranged. Byers.) 

0302. Advanced Entomology — The taxonomy and biology of certain se- 
lected groups of insects. (Prerequisite: Biology 202. Laboratory 
fee, $5.00. Hours and credit to be arranged. Hubbell.) 

311 (312). Vertebrate Zoology — ^The classification and natural his- 
tory of vertebrate animals with special attention to the recognition 
and habits of the local fauna. (Prerequisite : Biology 104. Labora- 
tory fee, $3.00 per semester. 1 class and 1 field or laboratory period. 
4 credits. Sherman, Rogers.) 

321. Zoological Laboratory Technique — Methods of macroscopic 
preparations; collecting and culturing of laboratory material; photo- 
graphic procedures and the care of zoological equipment. {Prerequi- 
sites: Biology 101 and 104. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 1 class and 2 
laboratory periods. 3 credits. Rogers, Byers, Sherman.) 

322. Animal Histology and Micro-Technique — An introduction to 
the subject matter and methods of histology. (Prerequisites: Biol- 
ogy 101 cmd 104 or 201. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 1 class and 2 lab- 
oratory periods. 3 credits. Byers.) 



150 BOTANY 

402. Animal Ecology — Studies on the local fauna as an introduction 
to the methods of animal ecology. (Prerequisite: Biology 201, 202 
or 311 (312). Laboratory fee, $5.00. 3 classes and 2 afternoons of 
work at Biological Station. 5 credits. Rogers.) 

403. Zoogeography — The distribution of animals in space and time. 
(Prerequisites: Biology 201, 202 and 311-312; Geology 202. 3 
hours. 3 credits. Hubbell.) 

415. Medical Zoology — The animal organisms, especially the Proto- 
zoa, worms, and Arthropods, producing pathogenic conditions in 
man and the higher vertebrates. (Prerequisite: Biology 201. Labora- 
tory fee, $5.00. 3 class and 2 laboratory periods. 5 credits. Byers.) 
Not given in 1928-29. 

421. The History and Literature of Biology — An outline of the de- 
velopment of the modern content and theories of biology. (Prerequi- 
sites: Biology 104, 106. 2 hours. 2 credits. Rogers, Hubbell, Byers.) 

510 or 0510. Problems in Animal Ecology — (Prerequisite: a major in 
Biology including Biol. W2. Hours and credit to be arranged. 
Rogers.) 

512 or 0512. Problems in Invertebrate Zoology or Entomology — 
(Prerequisite: a major in Biology including Biol. 201 and 202. 
Hours and credit to be arranged. Hubbell or Byers.) 

514 or 0514. F^roblems in Vertebrate Zoology — (Prerequisite: a ma- 
jor in Biology. Hours and credits to be arranged. Sherman.) 

BOTANY AND BACTERIOLOGY 

(For courses in Bacteriology, see page 146.) 

Professor Cody, Assistant Professor Carroll. 

BOTANY 

General Botany is a prerequisite to all botanical courses in this de- 
partment. 

101. General Botany — ^The plant cell; structure and life histories of 
spore plants. (Laboratory fee, $5.00. 2 class and 2 laboratory pe- 
riods per week. 4 credits. Cody, Carroll.) 

102. General Botany — Structure, life histories and principles of class- 
ification of seed plants. (Laboratory fee, $5.00. 2 class and 2 lab- 
oratory periods. 4 credits. Cody, Carroll.) 



BOTANY 151 

201-0201. Plant Physiology — ^The functioning of plants with relation 
to absorption, transpiration, assimilation, respiration and growth. 
(Desired prerequisites: Chemistry 253 or equivalent. Physics 105- 
106 or equivalent. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 2 class and 2 laboratory 
periods. 4 credits. Cody.) 

210. Taxonomy — Identification of common seed plants and ferns of 
Gainesville region. (Laboratory fee, $5.00. 1 class and 3 laboratory 
periods. 4 credits. Cody.) 

302. Advanced Plant Physiology — Special physiological processes, 
enaymic activities and metabolism. Preliminary work to research in 
plant physiology. (Prerequisite: Botany 201. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 
2 class and 2 laboratory periods. 4 credits. Cody.) 

310. Problems in Taxonomy — A critical study of a plant family or 
genus. (Prerequisite: Botany 210. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 1 class 
and 3 laboratory periods. Much time spent in field. 4 or 5 credits. 
Cody.) 

320. General Morphology of Seed Plants — Structure and life his- 
tories of seed plants; process of fertilization. (Laboratory fee, 
$5.00. 2 class and 2 laboratory periods. 4 credits. Cody.) 

330. Methods in Plant Histology — Principles and practice in killing, 
fixing, sectioning and staining plant materials. (Desired requisite: 
Chemistry 251 or equivalent. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 1 class and 3 
laboratory periods. 4 or 5 credits. Cody.) 

333. Plant Anatomy — Structure and function of principal tissues and 
organs of plants. (Desired prerequisite: Botany 330. Laboratory 
fee, $5.00. 1 class and 3 laboratory periods. 4 or 5 credits. Cody.) 

401. Ecology — ^The relation of plants to their environment with special 
reference to soil, light and moisture. (Prerequisites: Botany 210, 
some knowledge of agronomy and geology desired. 4 or 5 credits. 
Cody.) 

COURSES FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS 

(Laboratory fee, $5.00 per semester; credit, 4 to 5 hours per se- 
mester.) 

501. Problems in Taxonomy — Research. 

503. Problems in Plant Physiology — (Nutrition, assimilation, etc.) 
505. Problems in Plant Histology — Comparative methods in killing, 
fixing, sectioning and staining plant tissues. 



152 BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Professor Matherly, Professor Anderson, Associate Professor Gray, Associate Pro- 
fessor Dolbeare, Associate Professor Dykman, Associate Professor Myers, Assis- 
tant Professor Hurst, Assistant Professor Atwood, Assistant Professor Eldridge, 
Assistant Professor Wilson, Instructor Ward, Graduate Assistant Rahner, Gradu- 
ate Asistant Peel. 

Student Assistants: Boyd, Davidson, Putnam, and Scaglione. 

NOTE 1: The courses in Business Administration are given by the Department 
of Economics and Business Administration, instructors in this department dividing 
their time between economics and business administration. The courses in economics 
are listed under the Department of Economics, page 170. 

NOTE 2: The courses in Business Administration marked E are the same 
courses as those in Economics. For example Business Administration lOlE is the 
aame as Economics 101, or Business Administration 302E is the same as Economics 302. 

81. Business Administrarion — Office Management: Office organiza- 
tion; office functions; duties of office manager; the modern secretary 
in relation to office operation. Proficiency in the use of the type- 
writer will be required. Typing room with typewriters will be pro- 
vided for the use of students. (Laboratory fee, $20.00. 1 lecture and 
4 laboratory hours. 1 credit ) 

82. Business Administration — Office Management: Office appliances; 
handling correspondence; office records; methods of filing. The 
student will be required to attain proficiency in shorthand. (Labora- 
tory fee, $20.00. 1 lecture and 4 laboratory hours. 1 credit ) 

lOlE. Economic History of England — See Economics 101. (3 hours. 
3 credits. Myers, Hurst, Dykman.) 

102E. Economic History of the United States — See Economics 102. 
(3 hours. 3 credits. Myers, Dykman, Hurst.) 

103. Principles of Economic Geography — A study dealing with the 
geographic factors and geographic principles necessary to the under- 
standing of the relationships existing between man and his natural 
environment. A world wide survey of the distribution and character- 
istics of surface features, climate, soils, vegetation, and animal life 
and the adjustments man has made to them to secure a living. (3 
hours. 3 credits. Atwood and Eldridge.) 

104. Principles of Economic Geography — This course deals primarily 
with the occupations of man and the geographic factors which con- 
dition these activities. The resources and production of the various 
commodities are linked with the demand for them. The interdepend- 
ance of the nations of the world is stressed, and the need of a better 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 153 

understanding of the problems confronting the people in other 
countries. (3 hours. 3 credits. Atwood and Eldridge.) 

201 (202) E. Principles of Economics — See Economics 201 (202.) 
(3 hours. 6 credits. Dolbeare, Anderson, Eldridge, Myers.) 

211 (212). Principles of Accounting — Lectures, problems, and lab- 
oratory practice. An introductory study of the underlying principles 
of double entry records; basic types of records and reports; account- 
ing procedure and technique; the outstanding features of partner- 
ships and corporations; the form and content of the balance sheet 
and the statement of profit and loss. (2 lectures and 2 laboratory 
hours. 6 credits. Gray and others.) 

302E. Elements of Statistics — See Economics 302. (Prerequisite: 
Business Administration 201-202E. 3 hours. 3 credits. Anderson.) 

311 (312). Advanced Accounting — Lectures and problems. An ad- 
vanced study in accounting theory and practice. Special types of 
problems involving partnerships; corporations; agencies and 
branches; consignments; insolvent concerns; valuation of various 
types of assets; analysis of financial statements; etc. (Prerequisite: 
Business Administration 211-212. 3 hours. 6 credits. Gray.) 

321E. Financial Organization of Society — See Economics 321. 
(Prerequisite: Business Administration 201 -202E. 3 hours. 3 credits. 
Dolbeare, Eldridge.) 

322. Financial Management — The financial manager's task in an oper- 
ating business enterprise; the financial policies, methods, and prac- 
tices in raising both fixed and working capital; internal organization 
and procedure for financial control; the financial function in busi- 
ness administration. (Prerequisite: Business Administration 321E. 
3 hours. 3 credits. Dolbeare, Dykman.) 

331. Principles of Salesmanship — Actual practice in sales methods, 
including preparation for and obtaining the interview; presenting 
the sales talk; meeting and overcoming objections; detailed study 
of the stages of the sale; attention, interest, desire and action; sales 
tactics; sales personality. Principles covered apply to all kinds of 
selling specialties, styles, etc. (3 hours. 3 credits. Wilson.) 

332. Retail Store Management — Retail store problems; types of 
stores; executive control; purchasing; accounts; location; service; 



154 BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

organization; management of employees and price policies. (3 
hours. 3 credits. Wilson.) 

341. Production Management — The problems involved in the construc- 
tion, equipment and administration of a manufacturing enterprise. 
The unit of study is the factory. The subject matter is treated under 
four heads: the underlying principles of production, the agencies of 
production, the control of production operations, and the establish- 
ment of production standards. (Prerequisite: Business Administra- 
tion 201-202E. 2 credits. Wilson.) 

351E. Railway Transportation — See Economics 351. (Prerequisite: 
Business Administration 201-202E. 3 hours. 3 credits. Anderson.) 

352E. Ocean Transportation — See Economics 352. (Prerequisite: 
Business Administration 201-202E. 3 hours. 3 credits. Atwood.) 
Not given 1929-30. 

355.* Business Writing — Rapid review of basic principles of English 
composition; study of stylistic qualities demanded in the best mod- 
ern business writing; extensive reading, analysis, and construction 
of the common types of business letters and reports. No credit will 
be allowed until the student has attained a definite objective standard 
in English minimum essentials. (Prerequisite: English 101-102. Re- 
quired of all juniors. One semester; 3 hours. 3 credits. Repeated 
second semester. Mounts.) 

361. Property Insurance: Fire and Marine — Introduction to property 
insurance; careful analysis of fire and marine insurance; the na- 
ture of fire and marine risks; fire and marine companies and their 
operations; premiums; local agents and their functions; selling fire 
and marine insurance. (Prerequisites: Business Administration 201- 
202E. 3 hours. 3 credits. Dykman.) 

362. Property Insurance: Bond, Title and Casualty — Continuation of 
property insurance; the nature of bonding, premiums charged and 
companies underwriting; the principles of title and casualty insur- 
ance. (Prerequisites: Business Administration 201-202E. 3 hours. 3 
credits. Dykman.) 

372. Personnel Management — The problems of labor adjustment, 
and various methods of dealing with them; an examination of the 
functions of a personnel department, methods of supply, selection. 



*Business Administration 355 is the same as English 355. 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 155 

training, promotion, and discharge of employees, and various meth- 
ods of maintaining industrial good will, as works councils, profit- 
sharing, etc. (Prerequisite: Business Administration 201-202E. 2 
hours. 2 credits. Myers.) 

381E. Economic Geography of North America — See Economics 381. 
(Prerequisites: Business Administration 103-104 and 201-202E. 3 
hours. 3 credits. Atwood.) Not given 1929-30. 

401. Business Law — Contracts and agency; the formation, operation, in- 
terpretation, and discharge of binding agreements; creation of the 
relation of agency; types of agents; rights and obligations of the 
agent, principal, and third party; termination of the relationship of 
agency. (3 hours. 3 credits. Hurst.) 

402. Advanced Business Law — Conveyances and mortgages of real 
property ; sales and mortgages of personal property ; the law of nego- 
tiable instruments; partnership. (3 hours. 3 credits. Hurst.) 

404E. Social Control of Business Enterprise — See Economics 404. 
(Prerequisite: Business Administration 201-202E. 3 hours. 3 credits. 
Hurst.) 

409 (410). Business Policy — Correlation, coordination and tieing to- 
gether of the various specialized courses in business administration. 
The point of view is that of the chief executive. The forms of organi- 
zation, external and internal relationships of the business, lines of 
authority, duties and responsibilities of functional departments, 
methods of determining policies, and standards of operating effi- 
ciency. Various faculty members and outside business executives 
assist the instructor in charge in the presentation of specific busi- 
ness cases and problems. Students are required to apply business prin- 
ciples to these cases and problems and make written reports thereon. 
(2 hours. 4 credits. Motherly.) 

411. Cost Accounting — Lectures and problems. A study of the meth- 
ods of collection, compilation, and interpretation of cost data for 
industrial enterprises; preparation of records and reports; uses of 
cost data in business control. (Prerequisite: Business Administra- 
tion 211-212. 3 hours. 3 credits. Gray.) 

412. Auditing — Lectures and problems. A study of auditing theory 
and practice, principal kinds of audits, and the solution of illustra- 
tive problems. (Prerequisite: Business Administration 311-312. 3 
hours. 3 credits. Gray.) 



156 BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

413. Advanced Accounting — Lectures and problems. A continuation of 
Business Administration 311-312. TVn advanced study in accounting 
theory and practice. (Prerequisite: Business Administration 311- 
312. 3 hours. 3 credits. Gray.) 

414. Income Tax Procedure — Lectures and problems. A study of the 
Federal Income Tax law and the related accounting problems. Ex- 
ercises in the preparation of tax returns for individuals and cor- 
porations. (Prerequisite: Business Administration 311-312. 3 hours. 
3 credits. Gray.) 

422. Investments — The various forms of investments with reference to 
their suitability for the different types of investors; the money mar- 
ket, its nature and the financial factors which influence the price 
movements of securities; elements of sound investment and methods 
of computing net earnings, amortization, rights and convertibles. 
The aim will be to train the student to act efficiently in a financial 
capacity either as a borrower or lender, as investor or trustee, or as 
fiscal agent of a corporation. (Prerequisite: Business Administra- 
tion 321E. 3 hours. 3 credits. Eldridge.) 

423. Banking — The theory, organization, and practice of commercial 
banking: the theory and principles involved; the banking system of 
the United States compared with other leading countries; and a sur- 
vey of banking practice as regards internal organization and opera- 
tion of an individual bank. (Prerequisite: Business Administration 
321E. 3 hours. 3 credits. Dolbeare.) 

424E. Money — See Economics 424. (Prerequisite: Business Adminis- 
tration 321E. 3 hours. 3 credits. Dolbeare.) 

429E. Government Finance — See Economics 429. (Prerequisite: Busi- 
ness Administration 201-202E. 3 hours. 3 credits. Anderson.) 

431E. Principles of Marketing — See Economics 431. (Prerequisite: 
Business Administration 201-202E. First semester. 3 hours. 11-2 
credits. Wilson.) 

432. Market Management — The function of marketing in the opera- 
tion of business enterprise from the point of view of the sales man- 
ager and the purchasing agent. An introduction to market analysis, 
market research, formulation of marketing policies, choice of chan- 
nels of distribution, methods of advertising and administrative con- 
trol of marketing activities. (Prerequisite: Business Administration 
331E. 3 hours. 3 credits. Wilson.) 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 157 

433. Advertising — A study of the purposes of Advertising; the tools of 
advertising expression, copy, display, visualization, and layout; the 
placing of advertising as to media; the placing of all these elements 
together. How advertising gets its facts through research; how it 
creates vital ideas around which campaigns are built; how entire 
campaigns are put together and are carried out. (3 hours. 3 credits. 
Wilson.) 

434. Advanced Advertising — The technique of advertising. Considera- 
tion of the mechanics of advertising, types of advertising copy, theo- 
ries of literary style as applied to copy writing, advertising policies, 
and methods of testing the effectiveness of advertising activities. 
(3 hours. 3 credits. Wilson.) 

435E. Principles of International Trade — See Economics 435. (Pre- 
requisites: Business Administration 103-104 and 201-202E. 3 hours. 
3 credits. Atwood.) 

436. Foreign Trade Technique — See Economics 436. (Prerequisite: 
Business Administration 103-104 and 201-202E. 3 hours. 3 credits. 
Atwood.) 

438E. Trade Horizons in Latin America — An analysis of the indus- 
trial and commercial development in Latin America and its direct 
and indirect effects on trade with the United States. A study of the 
economic and geographic factors that affect Latin American countries 
as a market for United States' products and as a source of raw ma- 
terials. (Prerequisite: Business Administration 435E. 3 hours. 3 
credits. Atwood.) 

461. Life Insurance — The functions of life insurance; the science of 
life insurance and the computation of premiums; types of life com- 
panies; life insurance law; the selling of life insurance. (Prerequi- 
sites: Business Administration 201 -202 E. 3 hours. 3 credits. Dyk- 
man.) 

469 (470). Business Forecasting — This course aims to survey the 
problem of the reduction of business risk through the interpretation 
of statistics. The statistical methods used by the leading commercial 
agencies in forecasting the business cycle will be examined and some 
attention will also be given to methods of forecasting the market 
for particular commodities. A quantitative approach to the general 
problem of economic equilibrium will constitute the nucleus of the 



158 BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

course. (Prerequisite: Business Administration 302E. 3 hours. 6 
credits. Anderson.) 

473E. Labor Problems — See Economics 473. (Prerequisites: Business 
Administration 201-202E. 3 hours. 3 credits. Myers.) 

GRADUATE COURSES 

504E. Problems in Trust Regulation — See Economics 504. (3 hours. 
3 credits. Hurst.) 

509-510. Seminar in Business Management — Special studies in the 
management theory and practice. (2 hours. 4 credits. Matherly.) 

511-512. Seminar in Accounting — Special problems and investigations 
will be assigned to individual students. (3 hours. 6 credits. Gray.) 

522. Problems in Investments — Problems, investigations, and analy- 
ses in the field of investments. (Prerequisites: Business Administra- 
tion 321E. 3 hours. 3 credits. Eldridge.) 

523. Seminar in Banking — Individual and group studies of special 
phases and problems of banking. (3 hours. 3 credits. Dolbeare.) 

524E. Seminar in Money — A critical study of past and present mone- 
tary problems and theories. (3 hours. 3 credits. Dolbeare.) 

529E. Problems in Government Finance — See Economics 529. (3 
hours. 3 credits. Anderson.) 

531-532. Seminar in Marketing — Investigation of special problems in 
marketing. (3 hours. 6 credits. Wilson.) 

535E. Seminar in International Trade — See Economics 535. (3 
hours. 3 credits. Atwood.) 

536. Seminar in Foreign Trade Technique — A detailed individual 
study of selected problems in Foreign Trade. (3 hours. 3 credits. 
Atwood.) 

569-570E. Seminar in Statistics and Business Forecasting — See Eco- 
nomics 569-570. (3 hours. 6 credits. Anderson.) 

573-574E. Seminar in Labor Problems — See Economics 573-574. (3 
hours. 6 credits. Myers.) 



CHEMISTRY 159 

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

Professor Leigh, Professor Black, Professor Beisler, Professor Heath, Associate Pro- 
fessor Jackson, Assistant Professor Goodwin. 

The courses in Chemical Engineering are given as part of the work of the De- 
partment of Chemistry in the College of Engineering, the instructors in Chemistry 
giving part of their time to Chemical Engineering. 

CHEMISTRY 

(Including Agricultural Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Pharmaceutical 

Chemistry) 

Professor Leigh, Professor Black, Professor Beisler, Professor Heath, Associate 
Professor Jackson, Assistant Professor Goodwin, Curator Otte. 

Fellows: Bowen, Sciutti, Shimp and Wenger. 

101 (102). General Chemistry — The fundamental laws and theories of 
chemistry, and the preparation and properties of the common ele- 
ments and their compounds. Students may begin this course either 
the first or second semester. (Laboratory fee, $5.00 for each semes- 
ter. 3 class and 4 laboratory hours. 10 credits. Heath in charge; 
Black, Beisler, Jackson and Goodwin.) 

101-104. General Chemistry and Quautative Analysis — ^The first 
semester is devoted to a study of the laws, theories, and problems of 
chemistry; the non-metallic elements and their simple compounds. 
During the second semester, the metallic elements are studied, to- 
gether with the qualitative analysis of the metals and the acid radi- 
cals. (Laboratory fee, $5.00 per semester. 3 class and 4 laboratory 
hours. 10 credits. Heath, Black, Beisler, Jackson, Goodwin.) 

201 (202), Qualitative Analysis — This course includes the general re- 
actions of the metals and acids, with their qualitative separation and 
identification. (Prerequisite: Chemistry 101-102. Laboratory fee, 
$5.00 for each semester. 1 class and 5 laboratory hours. 6 credits. 
Jackson.) 

212. Qualitative Analysis — The theory and practice of the qualitative 
separation of the metals and acid radicals. (Prerequisite: Chemistry 
101-102. Laboratory fee, $5.00. Required of chemical engineers; 
sophomore year, second semester; 1 class and 7 laboratory hours. 
4 1-2 credits. Jackson.) 

215. Water and Sewage — A theoretical and practical study of the ex- 
amination and treatment of water and sewage. (Prerequisite: Chem- 
istry 101-102. Laboratory fee, $5.00. Required of civil engineering 
seniors. 2 class and 3 laboratory hours. 3 1-2 credits. Goodwin.) 



160 CHEMISTRY 

251 (252). Organic Chemistry — A study of the preparation and prop- 
erties of various aliphatic and aromatic compounds. (Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 101 (102), or 101 (104). Laboratory fee, $5.00 for 
each semester. 3 class and 4 laboratory hours. 10 credits. Leigh 
and Goodwin.) 

258. Organic Chemistry — A brief course embracing the more important 
aliphatic and aromatic compounds designed chiefly for students in 
applied biological fields. (Prerequisite: Chemistry 101-102 or 101- 
104. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 3 class and 2 laboratory hours. 4 credits^ 
Black.) 

301. Quantitative Analysis — Volumetric methods in acidimetry and 
alkalimetry, oxidation and reduction, iodimetry and precipitation.. 
(Prerequisites: Chemistry 101-102 and 201-202. Laboratory fee, 
$5.00. 6 laboratory hours or its equivalent. 3 credits. Black.) 

302. Quantitative Analysis — Gravimetric analysis of simple com- 
pounds, followed by the analysis of such materials as phosphate 
rock, simple alloys, limestone, and Portland cement. (Prerequi- 
sites: Chemistry 101-102 and 201-202. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 
6 laboratory hours or its equivalent. 3 credits. Black.) 

303. Quantitative Analysis — A brief survey of the fundamental meth- 
ods of gravimetric and volumetric analysis. The laboratory work 
is selected especially for students of pharmacy. (Required. Pre- 
requisite: Chemistry 104. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 4 laboratory hours 
or its equivalent. 2 credits. Black.) 

321 (322). Physical Chemistry — This course includes a study of the 
three phases of matter — gas, liquid and solid; the properties of so- 
lutions; colloids; equilibrium; velocity of reaction; thermochem- 
istry; thermodynamics; atomic structure. (Prerequisites: Chemistry 
201-202 and 251-252. Prerequisite or corequisite: 301, 302 or 304. 
Laboratory fee, $5.00 for each semester. 2 class and 2 laboratory 
hours. 6 credits. Jackson.) 

341 (342). Industrial Chemistry — Consideration of chemical prin- 
ciples involved in manufacturing and refining inorganic and organic 
products of commercial importance. Visits are made to such factories 
and chemical plants as may be accessible. (Prerequisites: Chemistry 
101-102 and 251-252. Required of chemical engineering seniors; 
elective to non-engineering students. 3 hours. 6 credits. Beisler.) 



CHEMISTRY 161 

344. Industrial Chemistry Laboratory — A practical study of the 
commercial methods of manufacture and purification of important 
chemicals. (Prerequisite: Chemistry 341-342. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 
Required of chemical engineering seniors. 6 laboratory hours. 3 
credits. Beisler.) 

351. Metallurgy — A study of the preparation, properties, structure and 
uses of the more important metals and alloys. (Prerequisite: Chem- 
istry 101-102. Required of chemical engineering seniors. 3 hours. 3 
credits. Beisler.) 

401. Agricultural Analysis — The quantitative analysis of milk and 
its products, vegetable oils, cereals and other food materials. (Pre- 
requisites: Chemistry 255-256 or 251-252 and 301-302. Laboratory 
fee, $5.00. 6 laboratory hours or its equivalent. 3 credits. Black.) 

402. Agricultural Analysis — The quantitative analysis of mixed fer- 
tilizers, of some of the raw materials used in mixed fertilizers, and of 
soils. (Prerequisites: Chemistry, 255-256 or 251-252 and 301-302. 
Laboratory fee, $5.00. 6 laboratory hours or its equivalent. 3 credits. 
Black.) 

403. Water Analysis — The analysis of waters to determine their pota- 
bility and fitness for steam raising and other purposes. (Prerequi- 
site: Chemistry 301-302. Laboratory fee, $2.50. 6 laboratory hours 
or its equivalent. 3 credits. Goodwin.) 

405. Gas Analysis — The analysis of fuel and illuminating gases and 
products of combustion. Some attention is given to the theory and 
use of automatic gas recorders. (Prerequisite: Chemistry 301-302. 
Laboratory fee, $5.00. Elective. 1 class and 4 laboratory hours. 3 
credits.) Not given 1929-30. 

406. Physiological Chemistry — The chemistry and physiology of 
carbohydrates, fats, proteins, and body tissues. The examination of 
body fluids such as milk, blood, urine, etc. Course includes routine 
analyses of value to pharmacists and physicians. (Required of 
fourth year students specializing in pharmaceutical chemistry. Pre' 
requisites: Chemistry 252 or 256. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 2 class 
and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Goodwin.) 

410. Historical Chemistry — The historical development of the more 
important chemical theories and their influence on the develop- 
ment of the science. (Prerequisites: Chemistry 251-252 and 301- 
302. 3 hours. 3 credits.) Not given in 1929-30. 



162 CHEMISTRY 

412. Organic Analysis — The ultimate analysis of organic compounds. 
(Prerequisites : Chemistry 251-252 and 301-302. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 
6 laboratory hours or its equivalent. 3 credits. Goodwin.) 

413 (414). Technical Analysis — Analysis of organic and inorganic 
materials used in engineering. (Prerequisite: Chemistry 301-302. 
Laboratory fee, $5.00 for each semester. Required of chemical 
engineering seniors. 6 laboratory hours per week during the first 
semester, 4 laboratory hours per week during the second semester. 
5 credits, divided 3-2. Beisler.) 

GRADUATE COURSES 

501. Organic Preparations — The preparation of some typical com- 
pounds. Occasional discussions of principles and theories. A read- 
ing knowledge of French and German desired. (Prerequisite: Chem- 
istry 251-252. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 6 laboratory hours or its 
equivalent per week. 3 credits. Leigh.) 

504. Inorganic Preparations — The course consists of laboratory work, 
involving the preparation of a number of typical inorganic com- 
pounds in addition to collateral reading and discussions. A read- 
ing knowledge of French and German desired. (Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 302. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 6 laboratory hours or its 
equivalent. 3 credits. Leigh.) 

505. Organic Nitrogen Compounds — Special lectures and collateral 
reading relative to the electronic and other theoretical conceptions 
of organic compounds containing nitrogen. Explosives; pseudo- 
acids; certain dyes; alkaloids; proteins; etc. (3 hours or its equiva- 
lent. 3 credits. Leigh.) Given alternate years. Offered in 1929-30. 

506. Special Chapters in Organic Chemistry — Lectures and collat- 
eral reading. In general the topics to be studied will be chosen from 
the following list: stereochemistry, tautomerism, the configuration 
of the sugars, acetoacetic ester syntheses, malonic ester syntheses, 
the Grignard reaction, benzene theories, diazo compounds and dyes. 
(Second semester; 3 hours or its equivalent. 3 credits. Beisler.) 
Given alternate years. Not offered in 1929-30. 

509. Advanced Physical Chemistry — The historical development of 
electrochemistry. Theoretical and practical applications of electro- 
chemical principles. (Laboratory fee, $5.00. 1 class and 4 labora- 
tory hours. 3 credits. Jackson.) Given alternate years. Not offered 
in 1929-30. 



CIVIL ENGINEERING 163 

513. Advanced Inorganic Chemistry — The theories, practice, and ap- 
plications of colloid chemistry. (Laboratory fee, $5.00; 2 class and 

I 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Beisler.) Given alternate years. Of- 
fered in 1929-30. 

516. Chemistry of the Rare Elements — Deals with the mineral oc- 
currences, preparation, properties, and uses of the rarer elements 
and their compounds. Relations to the more common elements will 
be clearly shown as well as methods for separation and purification. 
(3 hours. 3 credits. Heath.) Given alternate years. Not offered in 
1929-30. 

517. Biochemical Preparations — The preparation of physiologically 
important compounds from plant and animal material. (Laboratory 
fee, $5.00; 6 laboratory hours or its equivalent. 3 credits. Black.) 
Given alternate years. Offered in 1929-30. 

519. Atomic Structure — A graduate course of special lectures and 
collateral reading dealing with modem theories of the structure of 
the atom. The Journal literature is largely used as the basis of 
study. (3 hours or its equivalent. 3 credits. Black.) Given alter- 
nate years. Not offered in 1929-30. 

522. Photographic Chemistry — Deals with the chemical action of 
light, the preparation, properties, and uses of photographic mate- 
rials. The practical applications of photography will be shown, 
as well as the theory of the subject. (3 hours or its equivalent. 3 
credits. Heath.) Given alternate years. Offered in 1929-30. 

551-552. Chemical Research — (Laboratory fee, $5.00 for each semes- 
ter. 3 to 8 hours. 3 to 5 credits. Leigh, Black, Beisler, Heath, Jack- 
son, and Goodwin.) 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 

Profes.-or Keed, Assuciate Prof;ssor Harnes, Assistant Professor Br.iwii, Iiis;ruclor Lowe 

101-0101. Surveying — Recitations on the use of chain, compass, transit, 
and level; determination of areas, and instrumental adjustments. Field 
work in chaining, leveling, compass and transit surveys. Drawing 
room work in calculations from field notes, and map-drawing. Text- 
book: Breed and Hosmer, Vol. I. (Prerequisite: Trigonometry. 
Laboratory fee, $3.00. Required of all engineering students in 
Freshman year. Elective for non-engineering students. Recitation, 1 
hour; field and drawing-room work, 3 hours. 2 credits. Lowe.) 



164 CIVIL ENGINEERING 

201 (202). Surveying — Recitations on balancing of surveys and calcu- 
lating of areas; methods of making topographical surveys, including 
the use of the stadia and plane table; methods of solving other prob- 
lems in land, topographical, and city surveying and problems involving 
the principles of precise leveling, base-line measurement, triangula- 
tion, and determination of meridian, latitude and time. Field work: 
the making of a complete topographical survey; tests and adjust- 
ments of instruments; precise leveling; base-line work; meridian and 
latitude observations. Drawing-room work on balancing surveys, 
calculating areas and reducing field notes; plotting maps and pro- 
files; contour problems; triangulation computations. Textbooks; 
Breed and Hosmer, Vols. I and II. (Prerequisite: Surveying 101. 
Laboratory fee, $3.00 per semester. Required of all civil engineering 
sophomores; recitations, 2 hours; field and drawing-room ivork, first 
semester 6 hours; second semester 3 hours. 7 credits, divided 4-3. 
Lowe.) 

301 (302). Railroads — Recitations on simple, compound, reversed, verti- 
cal, and transition curves, turnouts and earthwork. Field problems in 
curve layouts. Drawing-room work in the paper layout of a rail- 
road line. Field and drawing-room work in the preliminary and final 
location of a railroad; plotting of lines and profiles; earthwork com- 
putations. Theory of mass diagram. Textbook: Allen's Curves and 
Earthwork. (Prerequisite: Surveying 101. Laboratory fee, $1.50 
per semester. Required of civil engineering juniors. First semester; 
recitations 2 hours; field and drawing-room work 2 hours. Second 
semester; recitation 1 hour; field and drawing-room work 3 hours. 
5 credits, divided 3-2. Lowe.) 

303 (304). Highway Theory and Design — Lectures and recitations on 
the economics of location, highway systems, design, drainage, founda- 
tions, classes of roads and pavements, their materials and methods 
of construction, highway structures. Legislation and finance. Field 
inspections of local roads. Drafting room design involving the 
relocation of an existing road with improved alignment, grades and 
new pavement suitable for assumed traffic, the computation of quan- 
tities, estimate of costs and specification. Textbook: Harger and 
Bonney, Highway Engineers' Handbook. (Prerequisites: Surveying 
101, Railroads 301. Required of civil engineering juniors. First se- 
mester; recitations 2 hours. Second semester; recitation 1 hour; field 
and drawing work 3 hours. 4 credits. Brown.) 



CIVIL ENGINEERING 165 

306. Graphic Statics — Recitations and drawing-room exercises in the 
computation of forces; the plotting of diagrams in elementary graph- 
ics and roof -truss, bridge and masonry problems; design of a roof- 
truss. Textbook: Howe's Simple Roof Trusses in Wood and Steel. 
(Prerequisite: Applied Mechanics 315. Required of civil engineering 
juniors; recitations 2 hours; drowing-rooin ivork, 4 hours. 4 credits. 
Reed.) 

308. Graphic Statics — Similar to 306 except the work concerning 
bridges. (Required of architectural juniors; recitation 1 hour; draw- 
ing-room work, 3 hours. 2 1-2 credits. Reed.) 

310. Testing Laboratory — Laboratory work in the testing of stone, 
brick, asphalt, and other road materials and in cement, sand, con- 
crete, timber, steel and other materials used in construction. (Prere- 
quisite: Applied Mechanics 315. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Required 
of civil engineering juniors. 2 hours. 1 credit. Brown.) 

403-404. Structural Engineering — Recitations and drawing-room work 
in the graphic analysis of girders and bridge trusses. Theory and de- 
sign of wooden and steel roof trusses; highway and railroad bridges; 
foundations. Theory and computations of stresses in various types 
of bridges and buildings. Drawing-room design. Textbook: Kirk- 
ham's Structural Engineering. (Prerequisite: Applied Mechanics 
315-316 and Graphic Statics 308. Required of civil engineering and 
architectural seniors; first semester; recitations, 2 hours; drawing 
room work, 3 hours. Second semester; recitations, 2 hours; drawing- 
room work 6 hours. 7 credits, divided 3-4. Reed.) 

405. Contracts and Specifications — The contract in its relation to the 
engineer. Specifications. Textbook: "Contracts and Specifications 
and Engineering Relations," by D. W. Mead. (Required of all en- 
gineering seniors. Elective for non-engineering students. 2 hours. 2 
credits. Broivn.) 

407. Hydraulics — Recitations and laboratory work on the elements of 
hydraulics; the principles of hydrostatic and hydrodynamic pressure; 
the measurement of water by orifices, short tubes, nozzles, weirs, and 
other measuring instruments; flow through pipes and open channels; 
losses from friction and other sources; and other related topics. Text- 
book: Hydraulics, by Daugherty. (Prerequisite: Applied Mechanics 
315-316. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Required of all engineering seniors; 
recitations, 2 hours; laboratory exercises, 2 hours. 3 credits. Barnes.) 



166 CO ACHING 

408. Hydraulic Engineering — Recitations on stream gaging and 
hydrographic surveying; water power, hydraulic turbines and im- 
pulse wheels; pumps and hydraulic machinery. Textbooks: 
Hydraulics, by Daugherly; Notes on Hydraulic Engineering. (Pre- 
requisite: Hydraulics 407. Required of civil and mechanical engi- 
neering seniors; 2 hours. 2 credits. Barnes.) 

409. Municipal Sanitation — Recitations on the design and construc- 
tion of sewerage systems and sewage disposal plants. Drawing- 
room work in the design of sanitary and storm sewers, and of a com- 
plete sewage treatment plant, together with estimates of cost. Text- 
book: Babbitt's Seweiage and Sewage Treatment. (Prerequisites: 
Applied Mechanics 315-316. Required of civil engineering seniors. 
Recitations, 2 hours; drawing-room work, 3 hours. 3 credits. Barnes.) 

410. Water Supply — Recitations on sources of supply, purification, fil- 
ters, pumps, systems of supply, and fire supply. A short time is 
devoted to drainage and irrigation engineering. Drawing-room work 
in the design of a complete water supply system, a large gravity dam 
and a large masonry conduit. Textbooks: Turneaure and Russell's 
Public Water Supplies; Williams and Hazen's Hydraulic Tables; 
Elliot's Engineering for Land Drainage. (Prerequisite: Municipal 
Sanitation 409 and Hydraulics 407. Required of civil engineering 
seniors; second semester; recitations, 3 hours; drawing-room, 4 hours. 
5 credits. Barnes.) 

412. Concrete Design — Recitations and drawing-room work on the 
theory and design of reinforced concrete structures. Textbook: Re- 
inforced Concrete Design, by Sutherland and Clifford. (Prerequi- 
site: Applied Mechanics 315-316. Required of seniors in Civil 
Engineering and Architecture; recitations, 2 hours; drawing-room. 
3 hours. 3 credits. Barnes.) 

COACHING 

(Administered under the Department of Physical Education and Coaching) 

Mr. Bachman, Dr. Haskell, and Athletic StaflF. 

101. Football — Lectures, discussions, demonstrations and practice on 
the field. A combined lecture and practice course given largely on 
the practice field. Lectures are followed by actual demonstrations by 
the instructor, and students then put into practice the various funda- 
mentals taught them. Course stresses individual play, and its rela- 
tion to team play. Students are thoroughly drilled in offensive and 



COACHING 167 

defensive tactics, each position on the team being analyzed. Funda- 
mentals receive special attention, such as falling on the ball correctly, 
blocking and tackling, passing and kicking. Stress is placed upon the 
desirous qualities of a player for the various positions, and the 
manner in which men are selected is thoroughly grounded into the 
course. (10 hours. 2 credits. First half first semester. Bedenk and 
Holsinger.) 

111. Basketball — Lectures, discussions and demonstrations on the 
basketball court. A complete study is made of the game of basket- 
ball from an offensive and defensive point of view. The play of the 
individual is stressed. Fundamentals such as passing, dribbling, 
shooting, stops and pivots, are given special emphasis. Anaylsis is 
made of the systems of play used by leading coaches of the country. 
Students are assigned positions in actual scrimmage and practice 
games, the practical work being stressed as much as the theoretical. 
(10 hours. 2 credits. Second half first semester. Cowell and Hol- 
singer.) 

201. Football — Discussions, lectures and demonstrations by students 
on the field. Course covers the technique of playing the various 
positions on the team, both offense and defense, under actual game 
conditions. Various systems of play employed by celebrated coaches 
are discussed and analyzed. A sequence of plays from standard 
formations are worked out in signal drills and actual scrimmages. 
Special emphasis is laid upon team play. (10 hours. 2 credits. First 
half first semester. Bedenk and Higgins.) 

241. Wrestling — Course covers a complete discussion of the rules, with 
personal instruction and demonstration of the footwork, various holds 
as related to offense and defense. Special attention is given to funda- 
mentals. (2 hours. 1 credit.) 

251. Boxing — Scientific boxing. Course includes position of on guard, 
footwork, how to step and duck, how to block or guard the different 
blows. Instruction given in all attacks from the simple left lead at 
head to counters and cross counters on head or body. Feints and 
shifts. Teaching rules governing bouts, what is a foul blow, how to 
judge a bout. (2 hours. 1 credit. Piombo.) 

261. Fencing — (a) Foils. Instruction in elementary positions of on 
guard, advance and retreat; thrust and lunge; also all parries. Dif- 
ferent attacks from the simple to the most advanced; direct attacks, 
indirect attacks, counter attacks, return attacks, time attacks; remise 



168 COACHING 

or renewed attacks; stop thrusts, (b) Sabres. Instruction in ele- 
mentary positions of on guard, advancing and retreating; thrusting; 
cuts and lunging. All the parries or guards; all attacks and returns; 
disengages; cut overs. (2 hours. 1 credit. Burdett.) 

301. Football — Advanced theory course for those who have had Coach- 
ing 101 and Coaching 201. Course deals with the science and general- 
ship of the game from the point of view of the coach. The psychology 
of the game, rules, scouting, an intensive study of the strength and 
weakness of various systems as related to one another, all have their 
place in this advanced study of the game. (2 hours. 1 credit. First 
half first semester. Bachman.) 

344. Baseball — Lectures, discussions and demonstrations on the practice 
field. A complete discussion of the rules and a study of the funda- 
mentals as applied to each department of the game is offered. Prac- 
tical demonstrations in the theory of pitching, with special emphasis 
on delivery and a study of batters' weaknesses, are frequent. Batting, 
base-running, and the art of playing each position under actual game 
conditions is stressed. Individual and team play is correlated on the 
field so that a student becomes acquainted with the fundamentals of 
the game as applied to technique and strategy. (6 hours. 3 credits. 
Bedenk.) 

372. Coaching and Officiating — Objectives of physical education; de- 
partment organization and administration; programs; teaching and 
supervising qualifications; supervision of gymnasiums, pools and 
playgrounds. (2 hours. 2 credits. Haskell.) 

471 (472). Coaching and Officiating — In this course students are 
assigned to the varions phases of coaching and physical education 
training. Students assist with the coaching of the classes in athletic 
coaching, assist in coaching the freshman and varsity football teams 
and intra-mural teams, and conduct the required gymnasium classes 
of the University. Students are thus given practical training under 
supervision of instructors in the actual coaching of all the major 
sports. The major sports, football, basketball, baseball and track, 
and such minor sports as boxing, wrestling and physical education, 
are utilized in affording this valuable and practical training. (2 hours. 
1 credit. Haskell and Higgins.) 



DRAWING 169 



DAIRYING 



(Administered under the Department of Animal Husbandry and Dairying) 
Professor Willoughby, Instructor Martin. 

22. Elements of Dairying — Composition and testing of milk; farm 
butter making; care of the dairy herd. (3 hours. No credit. Labora- 
tory fee, $1.00. Martin.) 

201. Farm Dairying — Secretion and composition of milk; testing milk 
and its products; farm butter making, ice cream and soft cheese 
making. (2 class and 1 laboratory periods. 3 credits. Laboratory 
fee, $2.00. Martin.) 

202. Dairy Management — Selection, feeding and management of a 
dairy herd; barns, equipment, marketing methods. (3 hours. 3 credits. 
Martin.) 

301. Dairy Manufactures — Buying and testing cream; pasteuriza- 
tion; cream ripening and butter making; preparing the mix, freez- 
ing and hardening ice cream. (Prerequisite: Dairying 201. (3 class 
and 1 laboratory periods. 4 credits. Laboratory fee, $3.00. Martin.) 

302. City Milk Supply — Methods of producing sanitary milk; opera- 
tion of milk plants; duties of milk inspector, practice on local dairies. 
(Prerequisites: Dairying 201, 202, and Bacteriology. 2 hours. 2 
credits. Martin, Willoughby.) 

303-304. Creamery Management — Creamery construction, sewage dis- 
posal, refrigeration; creamery calculation and bookkeeping; mar- 
keting. (Prerequisites: Dairying 201 and 202. First or second 
semester; 3 hours. Credit, 11-2 year-hours. Martin.) 

DRAWING AND MECHANIC ARTS 

(For courses in Mechanic Arts, see page 203.) 

DRAWING 

Professor Strong, Instructor Walker 

101 (102). Mechanical Drawing — Geometrical problems, lettering, or- 
thographic and isometric drawings, tracing and sketching. A text book 
is used. (Required of all engineering freshmen, both semesters; elec- 
tive for non-engineering students. One 2 hour period and one 3 hour 
period, first semester; and one 3 hour period second semester, of 
drafting-room work. 4 credits, divided 2V2-IV2. Walker.) 



170 ECONOMICS 

201 (202). Machine Drawing — Accurate, dimensioned working draw- 
ings made to scale, assembly drawings and some tracing required. 
(Prerequisite: Draiving 101-102. Required of electrical and me- 
chanical engineering sophomores; elective for non-engineering stu- 
dents. One 3 hour period of drafting-room work. 3 credits. Strong.) 

ECONOMICS 

Professor Matherly, Professor Anderson, Associate Professor Dolbeare, Associate 
Professor Myers, Associate Professor Dykman, Assistant Professor Hurst, As- 
sistant Professor Atwood, Assistant Professor Eidridge, Assistant Professor Wil- 
son, Graduate Assistant Peel. 

Student Assistants: Boyd, Davidson and Putnam. 

NOTE 1: The courses in economics are given by the Department of Economic* 
and Business Administration, instructors in this department dividing their time 
between economics and business administration. The courses in business administra- 
tion are described under the College of Commerce and Journalism. 

NOTE 2: While all courses in economics are open to, and in many cases re- 
quired of, students in business administration, they are not offered primarily for 
such students. On the contrary, they are offered primarily for students in the arta 
and sciences — students interested either in the purely cultural values attaching to 
economics or in preparing themselves to become economic experts and teachers. 

101. Economic History of England — Survey and interpretation with 
brief reference to France and Germany; the origin and development 
of economic institutions; the manor; Industrial Revolution; com- 
merce; transport; labor; agriculture; finance; etc.; effects on social 
and political development, and on development in the United States. 
(3 hours. 3 credits. Myers, Dykman, Hurst.) 

102. Economic History of the United States — Interpretative survey 
of industrial development; consideration of the development of in- 
dustry, agriculture, trade and transportation, labor, banking, finance, 
population, etc., the influence of economic development on political 
and social development, and of foreign economic development on the 
United States. (3 hours. 3 credits. Myers, Dykman, Hurst.) 

201 (202). Principles of Economics — An analysis of production, dis- 
tribution, and consumption. Attention is devoted to the principles 
governing value and market price with a brief introduction to money, 
banking and credit, industrial combinations, transportation and com- 
munication, labor problems, and economic reform. (3 hours. 6 
credits. Anderson, Myers, Dolbeare, Eldridge.) 



ECONOMICS 171 

302. Elements of Statistics — An introduction to statistics; brief 
consideration of statistical theory; collection, classification and pre- 
sentation of economic data; construction of graphs and charts; study 
of index numbers; problems of statistical research. Each student is 
required to complete one or more projects in statistical investigation. 
(Prerequisite: Economics 201-202. 3 hours. 3 credits. Anderson.) 

307. Introduction to Economics — A brief study of our economic or- 
ganization and the principles involved in economic activities. (Pri- 
marily for juniors and seniors in the Colleges of Agriculture, En- 
gineering and Pharmacy. 3 hours. 3 credits. Dolbeare.) 

321. Financial Organization of Society — An introduction to the 
field of finance. Consideration of the pecuniary organization of so- 
ciety, to the functions performed by financial institutions, and to the 
relationship between finance and business administration. (Prerequi- 
site: Economics 201-202. 3 hours. 3 credits. Dolbeare, Eldridge.) 

351. Railway Transportation — The development of railway trans- 
portation; the organization of transportation service; rate making; 
government regulation of railroads. (Prerequisite: Economics 201- 
202. 3 hours. 3 credits. Anderson.) 

352. Ocean Transportation — A survey of present day overseas com- 
merce and transportation together with an analysis of the underlying 
economic and geographic principles involved. Particular attention 
is given to the major commercial regions of the world, ocean trade 
routes, port and terminal facilities, ocean carriers and their cargoes, 
ship operation and management, ocean freight service and rates, 
marine insurance, and the merchant marine problems and policies of 
the chief maritime nations. (Prerequisite: Economics 201-202. 3 
hours. 3 credits. Atwood.) Not given 1929-30. 

381. Economic Geography of North America — A detailed study of 
the principal economic activities in each of the major geographic 
regions of North America involving an analysis of these activities 
from the standpoint of their relation to the natural environmental 
complex. (Prerequisites: Business Administration 103-104 and 
Economics 201-202. 3 hours. 3 credits. Atwood.) Not given 1929-30. 

383. Economic Geography of Northwest Europe — A detailed study 
of the economic activities in the chief countries of Northwestern 
Europe. An analysis of these activities in relation to the natural 



172 ECONOMICS 

geographic environment, and to the superimposed political complex. 
(Prerequisites: Business Administration 103-104 and Economics 201- 
202. Atwood.) 

404. Social Control of Business Enterprise — General survey of 
the field of social control; purposes of social control; formal and 
informal types of social control; control of accounts, prices and 
capitalization; government policy toward business, current govern- 
ment regulation; services and agencies which modern governments 
undertake to provide for business enterprises. (Prerequisite: Eco- 
nomics 201-202. 3 hours. 3 credits. Hurst.) 

424. Money — Monetary and price theory; the evolution of monetary 
systems, and the nature and causes of some of the important 
monetary controversies of the past; present unsettled monetary prob- 
lems; relationship between money and credit and the general price 
level under the existing financial structure; some consideration of 
the business cycle; controlling the general level of prices through 
the monetary system. (Prerequisite: Economics 321. 3 hours. 3 
credits. Dolbeare.) 

429. Government Finance — Principles governing expenditures of mod- 
ern governments; sources of revenue; public credit; principles 
and methods of taxation and of financial administration as revealed 
in the fiscal systems of leading countries. (Prerequisite: Economics 
201-202. 3 hours. 3 credits. Anderson.) 

431. Principles of Marketing — A survey of the marketing structure 
of industrial society; fundamental functions performed in the mar- 
keting process and the various methods, agencies and factors re- 
sponsible for the development and execution of these functions; 
marketing problems of the manufacturer, wholesaler, and different 
types of retailers; the marketing function in business management. 
(Prerequisite: Economics 201-202. First semester, 3 hours. 1 1-2 
credits. Wilson.) 

435. Principles of International Trade — A survey of the underlying 
economic and geographic principles involved in international trade. 
A study of the visible and invisible ties that bind the citizens of one 
country to another. To show how factors such as location, climate, 
natural resources, economic development, racial characteristics, and 
social customs have determined the present economic interdependence 
of the nations of the world. (Prerequisites: Business Administration 
103-104 and Economics 201-202. 3 hours. 3 credits. Atwood.) 



EDUCATION 173 

436. Foreign Trade Technique — A study of the specific problems and 
practices involved in exporting and importing. Particular attention 
is given to ocean trade routes, port and terminal facilities, ocean car- 
riers and their cargoes, marine insurance and the merchant marine 
problems and policies of the chief maritime nations. (Prerequisites: 
Business Administration 103-104 and Economics 201-202. 3 hours. 
3 credits. Atwood.) 

473. Labor Problems — A survey of the background, causes, history, 
activities, philosophies, and problems of the labor movement in the 
United States, with some reference to England. Trade unions, labor 
legislation, and collective bargaining are discussed, and also prob- 
lems of labor, such as unemployment, industrial unrest, wage deter- 
mination, political and social policies, etc. (Prerequisite: Economics 
201-202. 3 hours. 3 credits. Myers.) 

GRADUATE COURSES 

504. Problems in Trust Regulation — A critical study of industrial 
combinations. (3 hours. 3 credits. Hurst.) 

524. Seminar in Money — A critical study of past and present monetary 
problems and theories. (3 hours. 3 credits. Dolbeare.) 

529. Problems in Government Finance — Special studies in federal, 
state and local taxation. (3 hours. 3 credits. Anderson.) 

535. Seminar in International Trade — Advanced work dealing with 
the development of International Trade. (3 hours. 3 credits. Atwood.) 

569-570. Seminar in Statistics and Business Forecasting — (3 hours. 
6 credits. Anderson.) 

573-574. Seminar in Labor Problems — Special problems are taken 
up for investigation and report. The student will have regular, indi- 
vidual appointments with the instructor, for the consideration of his 
individual problem. (3 hours. 6 credits. Myers.) 

EDUCATION 

Professor Norman, Professor Fulk, Professor Garris, Professor Roemer, Assistant 
Professor Tolbert, Assistant Professor Simmons. 

101-0101. How TO Teach — An Introduction to the Study of Classroom 
Teaching. — What makes a good teacher? What makes a good school? 
When may it be said that one is educated? Such questions as these 
will be studied in the course, (Required of all freshmen. 3 hours. 
3 credits. Norman.) 



174 EDUCATION 

102-0102. History and Principles of Education — A study of the 
historical background of education, and of the fundamental prin- 
ciples which should guide educational procedure, and give apprecia- 
tion of educational conditions of today. (Freshmen may choose be- 
tween Education 102 and Education 103. 3 hours. 3 credits. Sim- 
mons.) 

103-0103. Health Education — Conditions and forces that affect the 
physical and mental vigor of children and teachers, and relate the 
school to the home and community; location and sanitation of the 
school plant; diseases and physical defects; mental hygiene; com- 
munity hygiene; the teacher's health; teaching of Health Education. 
(Students may choose between Education 102 and Education 103. 
3 hours. 3 credits. Fulk.) 

203-0203. Child and Adolescent Psychology — The nature, growth and 
development of the child from birth through adolescence with refer- 
ence to education; the original nature of the child and his educa- 
tion; cultivation of intelligent sympathy with children; the effect 
of Child and Adolescent Psychology on the practices of elementary 
and secondary schools. (Required of sophomores. 3 hours. 3 cred- 
its. Fulk.) 

0207. Educational Psychology — Psychology applied to Education, 
the learning process, acquisition of skill, etc. (Required of all stu- 
dents in Teachers College, preferably during the sophomore year. 
3 hours. 3 credits. Roemer.) 

301. High School Curriculum — The problems of the curriculum of 
the high school in its organization; standards for the selection of 
the curriculum; factors to be considered — age of pupils, social 
standing, probable school life, probable vocation; traditional sub- 
jects and their possible variations; new subjects and their values, 
systems of organization, election and prescription; problems of 
articulation with the elementary school, the college, the vocational 
school, and community. (Required of juniors; 3 hours. 3 credits. 
Roemer.) 

303-304. Methods of Teaching Vocational Agriculture — The or- 
ganization of a long time teaching program; selection of proper 
equipment, and the arrangement of the classroom and farm shop; 
organization of all day, day unit, part time and evening classes; 



EDUCATION 175 

and methods employed in teaching these various groups. (3 hours. 6 
credits. Garris.J 

306. \ OCATIONAL Education — The development, function and scope of 
vocational education; agricultural education, home economics edu- 
cation, trade and industrial education, and commercial education as 
provided for by the National Vocational Education Act of Congress. 
(3 hours. 3 credits. Garris.) 

308. The Elementary School Curriculum — The present status of the 
elementary curriculum; an attempt to select and evaluate materials 
in terms of the nature and needs of child life, and the present social 
situation. (Required of juniors. 3 hours. 3 credits. Simmons.) 

401-0401. Administration and Supervision of Village and Consoli- 
dated Schools — Problems peculiar to schools in Florida; tlie su- 
pervising principal, qualifications, relation to superintendent, boards, 
teachers, pupils, patrons and community; adapting the school to the 
child's needs; business practices. (Required of seniors. 3 hours. 3 
credits. Fulk.) 

402. Problems in Public School Administration and Supervision — 
An intensive study of the supervision of instruction; visits to schools 
for the study of administrative and supervising practice; a survey of 
one school system. (Elective for juniors and seniors. 3 hours. 3 
credits. Fulk.) 

403. Principles of Education — ^The relation of educational method to 
democracy; the laws of learning; socialized recitation; democracy 
in the classroom as a preparation for democracy in life. (Required 
of seniors; juniors admitted by permission. 3 hours. 3 credits. Nor- 
man.) 

404. History and Philosophy of Education — Standards in education, 
past and present; the development and present meaning of the con- 
cept of culture, humanism, utility, growth, mental discipline, activity 
leading to further activity, education according to nature, the signifi- 
cance of child life in education. Textbook: Dewey's "Democracy and 
Education." (Required of seniors wJw expect to be principals. 3 
hours. 3 credits. Norman.) 

405. 0405. Supervised Teaching — Practice in conducting recitations 
under close supervision. Lesson plans will be required for all reci- 



176 EDUCATION 

tations and the manner of teaching will be subject to criticism. 
Teaching under supervision will be done in the Gainesville High 
School. Each student will be required to work in at least two high 
school subjects. Students preparing to teach agriculture must do their 
supervised teaching in that subject, and four (4) hours will be re- 
quired. (See Education 409-410.) (Required of seniors. 3 hours. 
3 credits. Simmons.) 

407. Junior High School — To give principals and teachers a knowl- 
edge of the Junior High School and its organization. Topics: Need 
of reorganization of the traditional high school; changes needed in 
the program of studies, discipline, methods of teaching, etc.; devel- 
opment of the Junior High School; special function of the Junior 
High School; organization, curricula and courses of study, etc., of 
the Junior High School. (3 hours. 3 credits. Roemer.) 

408. High School Administration — The practical management and 
administration of the modern high school; duties of principal as 
head of school; relation of principal to board of education, super- 
intendent, teachers, pupils and community; legal status of high 
school; systems of financing, supervision, promotion, retention and 
dismissal of teachers; adjustment of teaching load; testing and grad- 
ing of pupils; problem of discipline; pupil guidance, activities, 
teachers' meetings, etc. (Required of seniors who expect to he prin- 
cipals. 3 hours. 3 credits. Roemer.) 

409-410. Supervised Teaching of Vocational Agriculture — Under 
supervision, students observe the teaching and all other duties of 
the agricultural instructor at Alachua during the first semester, and 
during the second semester each student participates in all of these 
activities taking the place of the regular instructor. (3 hours. 6 
credits. Garris.) 

501. The Elementary School Curriculum — Seminar — An intensive 
study of the development, and present content of the elementary 
school curriculum, including the kindergarten; the selection and eval- 
uation of material; the importance of the classroom teacher. (3 
hours. 3 credits. Fulk.) 

503. Educational Tests and Measurements — Seminar — An intensive 
study of intelligence and educational tests. A thorough and systematic 
study of all the chief tests in both fields with laboratory material 
for class use so as to familiarize the student with the process of actu- 
ally handling tests. (3 hours. 3 credits. Roemer.) 



EDUCATION ni 

504. The School Survey — Seminar — The history and functions of the 
school survey; organizing and making a survey; collecting, inter- 
preting and reporting data; the survey as a diagnostic instrument. 
Each student chooses some phase of the survey for special study, and 
gives the results of his study in the form of a thesis. (3 hours. 3 
credits. Fulk.) 

505. The Organization and Administration of Extra Curricular Ac- 
tivities IN Junior and Senior High Schools — Constructive school 
policies having to do with the developing of the pupil's initiative, 
leadership, cooperation, etc. Plans that are now in operation in 
progressive schools. Special study of Florida high schools with ref- 
erence to developing as a vital part of the school program extra 
curricular activities. (3 hours. 3 credits. Roemer.) 

507. Advanced Educational Psychology — This course deals with the 
problems of Educational Psychology in the more advanced stages of 
development. (3 hours. 3 credits. Norman.) 

508. Democracy and Education — Seminar — The nature of experience, 
the nature of institutions, the social inheritance, the individual, socie- 
ty, socialization, social control, dynamic and static societies, educa- 
tion its own end. (3 hours. 3 credits. Norman.) 

509. Problems in the Administration of a School System — Seminar 
— Open to graduate students who are qualified by experience and 
training to pursue advanced study on selected problems in adminis- 
tration. Problems will be selected to meet individual needs. Each 
student selects some problem for special study and presents the re- 
sults of his study in the form of a thesis. Students may work on 
chosen problems either singly or in small groups. (3 hours. 3 
credits. Fulk.) 

510. The History of Education — Seminar — An attempt to interpret 
and evaluate present-day education by tracing its dominant factors — 
the teacher (including the educational theorist, philosopher, reformer 
and statesman), the pupil and student, the curriculum, the educa- 
tional plant, the means of control and the sources of support back 
to their beginnings; and in the light of the facts found, to point out 
present tendencies, and possible developments. (3 hours. 3 credits. 
Fulk.) 



178 ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

561. Visual Methods in Vocational Agriculture — The preparation 
of charts, maps, placards, lantern slides, and other visual materials 
used in teaching vocational agriculture. (1 recitation, 2 laboratory 
periods. 3 credits. Garris.) 

562. Vocational Guidance — Analysis of vocations, occupational infor- 
mation, choosing a vocation, preparing for a vocation, placement 
of students, supervision of students placed on the job, and the or- 
ganization necessary for carrying out a vocational guidance program. 
(3 hours. 3 credits. Garris.) 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Acting Professor Weil, Instructor Bennett. 

202. A Short Elementary Course in General Electrical Engi- 
neering — Textbook used in 1928-1929: Benton: An Introductory 
Text on Electrical Engineering. (Prerequisites: Mathematics 251 and 
Physics 209. Required of all sophomores in civil, electrical, and me- 
chanical engineering, and juniors in chemical engineering; 2 recita- 
tions or lectures. 2 credits. Benton, Bennett.) 

204. Laboratory Work to Accompany Electrical Engineering 
202 — (Laboratory fee, $3.00. Required of sophomores in civil, elec- 
trical and mechanical engineering, and juniors in chemical engineer- 
ing; 1 two-hour laboratory period. 1 credit. Weil, Bennett.) 

302. Direct-Current Theory and Application — Text-books used 
in 1928-1929: Langsdorf's Direct-Current Machinery, and Karape- 
tofif's Experimental Electrical Engineering. (Prerequisites: Electri- 
cal Engineering 311 and 313. Required of electrical engineering 
juniors; 3 hours. 3 credits. Weil.) 

304 Laboratory Work to Accompany Electrical Engineering 

302 — (Laboratory fee, $5.00. Required of electrical engineering 
juniors; 2 two-hour laboratory periods. 2 credits. Weil, Bennett.) 

306. Radio Communication — Lectures, recitations, and laboratory 
work on circuits and elementary radio measurements. Text-book 
used in 1928-1929: Lauer and Broun's Radio Engineering Principles. 
(Prerequisite: 1 year of College Physics. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 
Elective for engineering students; open to non-engineering students; 
2 classes and 1 two-hour laboratory period. 3 credits. Skellett.) 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 179 

311. Electrical Theory — The work of this course is the same as that 
of Physics 311. Textbook used in 1928-1929: Starling: Electricity 
and Magnetism. (Prerequisites: Physics 209 and Mathematics 251- 
252. Required of electrical engineering juniors; 2 class periods. 2 
credits. Weil.) 

313. Laboratory Work to Accoimpany Electrical Engineering 
311 — (Laboratory fee, $1.50. Required of electrical engineering 
juniors; 1 two-hour laboratory period. 1 credit. Weil.) 

401 (402). Alternating-Current Theory and Applications — Text- 
books used in 1928-1929: Magnusson's Alternating Currents. (Pre- 
requisites: Electrical Engineering 202-204 and 311-313. Required of 
electrical engineering seniors; 3 hours. 6 credits. Weil.) 

403 (404). Dynamo Laboratory Work to Accompany Electrical 
Engineering 401-2— Text-book used in 1928-1929: Karapetoff's Ex- 
perimental Electrical Engineering. (Prerequisite: Electrical Engi- 
neering 301 and 303. Laboratory fee, $5.00 per semester. Required 
of electrical engineering seniors. 1 three-hour laboratory period. 3 
credits. Weil.) 

405. Telegraph Engineering — Text-book used in 1928-1929: Haus- 
mann's Telegraph Engineering. (Prerequisites: Electrical Engineer- 
ing 311-313. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Required of electrical engineer- 
ing seniors. 1 recitation and 1 tivo-hour laboratory period. 2 cred- 
its. Skellett.) 

406. Telephone Engineering — ^Text-book used in 1928-1929: Kloeff- 
ler's Telephone Communication Systems. (Prerequisites: Electrical 
Engineering 311-313, 405. Laboratory fee, $2.00. Required of elec- 
trical engineering seniors. 1 class and 1 two-hour laboratory period. 
2 credits. Benton.) 

417 (418). A General Course on Electrical Engineering, more ad- 
vanced in scope than the introductory course, 202-204, but not as 
complete as the courses 302-4 and 401-4. (Prerequisite: Electrical En- 
gineering 202-204. Laboratory fee, $5.00 per semester. Required of 
mechanical engineering seniors. 3 class and 3 laboratory hours first 
semester; 3 laboratory hours second semester. 6 credits, divided 4^2* 
i^/^. 6 credits. Bennett.) 



180 ENGLISH 

430. Optional Courses — In case of sufficient demand, any one of the 
following optional courses will be offered to electrical engineering 
seniors: Electrical Power Measurements; Electrical Power Transmis- 
sion; Electric Railways; Elementary Electrical Design, Central Sta- 
tion Design. (Prerequisites : Electrical Engineering 302-304 and 401- 
403. 3 hours. 3 credits. Weil, Bennett.) 

456. Illumination and Wiring of Buildings — (Prerequisite: Physics 
105-108. Required of architectural seniors; 1 lecture or recitation. 
1 credit. Benton.) May be arranged to last only a part of a semes- 
ter, with corresponding increase in the hours per week. 

(501) (502). Advanced Experimental Electrical Engineering — 
(Primarily for graduate students. Given upon demand. Credit vari- 
able. Weil, Bennett.) 

ENGLISH 

Professor Farr (Head of Department), Professor Robertson (Director of Freshman 
English), Associate Professor Little, Associate Professor Farris, Assistant Pro- 
fessor Caldwell, Instructors Wise, Jarrell, Peterson, Gay, Mounts. 

21. Minimum Essentials of English — An elementary course in funda- 
mentals of grammar, punctuation and sentence construction, designed 
to meet the needs of freshmen deficient in preparatory English. For 
such deficient students this course is prerequisite to English 101. 
Entry to the course will be determined by examinations to be given 
all entering freshmen during Freshman Week. (Required of all fresh- 
men who, upon entering the University, are found deficient in 
minimum essentials of high school English. 3 hours. No credit.) 

101 (102). Rhetoric and Composition — To train students in methods 
of clear and forceful expression. Instruction is carried on simultane- 
ously in formal rhetoric, and in theme writing. (Required of all 
freshmen. 3 hours. 6 credits. Robertson and Staff.) 

103 (104). Introduction to Literature — A survey of the literatures 
of the Western world from the beginnings to the Renaissance. (Re- 
quired of freshmen in A.B. course. 3 hours. U credits. Farr, Farris, 
Robertson, Caldwell, Peterson.) 

201-202. History of Literature — A basic course in the historical de- 
velopment of English literature. (3 hours. 6 credits. Farr, Robert- 
son, Caldwell, Gay.) 



ENGLISH 181 

203. The Short Story — Narrative practice in the anecdote and tale, 
with particular attention to the technique and development of the 
short story. (Prerequisite: English 101-102. 3 hours. 3 credits. 
Farris.) 

204. The English Essay — A practical study of the various types of ex- 
position, with special attention to the essay. (3 hours. 3 credits. 
Farris.) 

301. Shakespeare and the Drama — A study of principal Shakes- 
pearean plays, through lectures, essays, and readings. (3 hours. 
3 credits. Farr.) 

302. The Drama Before Shakespeare — The classical drama, the re- 
ligious play, the beginnings of secular drama, and Shakespeare's 
predecessors. (3 hours, 3 credits. Farr.) 

303 (304). English Poetry of the Nineteenth Century — Discus- 
sion of the roots of the Romantic Revival ; the work of Wordsworth, 
Byron, Shelley, and Keats; poetry of the Victorian age. (3 hours. 
6 credits. Farris.) 

355. Businesss Writing — A practical study of the principal types of 
business letters and reports. Required of students in Business Admin- 
istration. See Business Administration 355. (Prerequisite: English 
101-102. 3 hours. 3 credits. Mounts.) 

401. American Poetry — A rapid survey of the development of poetry 
in the United States. (3 hours. 3 credits. Farris.) 

402. Southern Literature — A detailed study, with extensive reading 
and essay work; examination of the claims of Florida authors. 
3 hours. 3 credits. Farris.) 

403 (404). The English Novel — The historical development and 
technique of the English Novel. (3 hours. 6 credits. Farr.) 

405. English Drama from Shakespeare to Sheridan — The decline 
of drama after Shakespeare; Restoration drama; eighteenth cen- 

K tury comedy. (3 hours. 3 credits. Robertson.) 

406. Modern Drama — Recent and contemporary playwrights, from Ib- 
sen to Eugene O'Neill. (3 hours. 3 credits. Robertson.) 



182 ENTOMOLOGY 

407. Modern Novel — Reading and discussion of the work of English 
and American novelists of the present, with some attention to conti- 
nental influences. (3 hours. 3 credits. Robertson.) 

408. Contemporary Poetry — The influence of Whitman; contempor- 
ary English and American poets. (3 hours. 3 credits. Robertson.) > 

409 (410). Chaucer — Extensive reading in the "Canterbury Tales", 
"Troilus," and minor works. (3 hours. 6 credits. Robertson.) 

411 (412). Engineering Exposition — A special course for Engineering 
students in the various kinds of writing needed in their profession.. 
(Engineering seniors. 1 hour. 2 credits. Farris.) 

413-414. Anglo-Saxon — Anglo-Saxon grammar; reading of Alfredian 1 
prose, "Beowolf," and other Anglo-Saxon literature. (3 hours. 6 
credits. Farr, Robertson.) 

503-504. Seminar — Reading course for graduate students. (6 hours. 
6 credits. Farr, Robertson.) 

ENTOMOLOGY AND PLANT PATHOLOGY 

(For Plant Pathology see page 223.) 

Professor Gray, Instructor Dickey, Mr. Creighton. 

ENTOMOLOGY 

21. Farm, Garden and Orchard Insects — A general survey of some 
of the economic insects of Florida in reference to their distribution, 
life history, injury and control on the principal agricultural crops of 
the State. (Short Courses. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 2 class and 1 lab- 
oratory periods. No credit. Dickey.) 

302. Economic Entomology — An introduction to applied entomology 
based on the structure, classification, life histories, recognition and 
control of the injurious insects of Florida. (Laboratory fee, $3.50. 
2 class and 2 laboratory periods. 4 credits. Gray, Dickey, Creigh- 
ton.) 

303-304. Advanced Economic Entomology — Field and laboratory 
problem work and insectary work in the rearing of some of the more 
common Florida insects. The study of natural parasites and the 
special technique required by professional workers in this line will 
be given. (Laboratory fee, $3.50. Prerequisite: Entomology 302. 
4 hours. 8 credits. Gray.) 



ENTOMOLOGY 183 

401. Taxonomy — The collection, study and classification of local eco- 
nomic insects with special emphasis on some one group. (Prerequi- 
site: Entomology 302. Hours and credit to be arranged. Grav.) 

402. Fruit Insects — A study of pests encountered in deciduous, tropi- 
cal and citrus fruits, with detailed study of representative life his- 
tories and measures adapted to their control. (Laboratory fee, $3.50. 
Prerequisite: Entomology 302. 2 class and 1 laboratory periods. 3 
credits. Gray, Dickey.) 

403. Garden and Greenhouse Pests — The study of insects encoun- 
tered in the home, commercial garden and greenhouse. A detailed 
study of life history and specific control measures adapted to these 
conditions. (Laboratory fee, $3.50. Prerequisite: Entomology 302. 
2 class and 1 laboratory periods. 3 credits. Gray, Dickey.) 

405. Insecticides and Fungicides — Origin and history of insecticides 
and fungicides; systematic survey of mixtures now used. Chemical 
and physical reactions of same. Special emphasis on soaps, oils, 
coppers, etc. Class, laboratory and field work. (Laboratory fee, 
$3.50. 1 class and 2 laboratory periods. 3 credits. Gray, Dickey.) 

406. Insecticides and Fungicides — A special study of lime sulphur, 
arsenates, dusts, etc. Practical problems that apply to Florida and 
the Southeast. Class, laboratory and field work. (Laboratory fee, 
$3.50. 1 class and 2 laboratory periods. 3 credits. Gray, Dickey.) 

407-408. Advanced Insect Morphology — (Hours and credit to be ar- 
ranged. Gray.) 

501-502. Research — Course in special laboratory, insectary and field 
methods. For graduate students. A survey of the leading problems 
and methods in certain laboratories and practice in the more com- 
plicated methods of technique will be undertaken. (Hours arul 
credit to be arranged. Gray.) 

503-504. Problems in Entomology — Senior and graduate problems in 
the various phases of Entomology, as shall be selected on approval 
of the instructor in charge. Required of graduate students registered 
for degree in the department. (Hours and credit to be arranged. 
Gray.) ' i 



184 FRENCH 

FRENCH 

Professor Atkin, Assistant Professor Brunet, Instructor Stevens, Instructor Huston. 

21 (22). Elementary French — Course for beginners. (3 hours. 6 
credits.) 

101 (102). Third and Fourth Semester French — Second year col- 
lege French. (3 hours. 6 credits.) 

103-104. Elementary Conversation and Composition — (Prerequisite: 
French 21-22 or equivalent. 2 hours, 4 credits. Brunet.) 

*201-202. Third Year Reading— (Prerequisite: French 101-102. 3 
hours. 6 credits. Stevens.) 

205-206. Intermediate Conversation and Composition — (Prerequi- 
site: French 104; or equivalent and permission of instructor. 2 hours. 
4 credits. Atkin.) 

*207-208. Survey of French Literature — An outline course based 
on the reading and discussion of representative selections from im- 
portant prose writers and poets. (Prerequisite: French 102 with 
grade of A or B; or equivalent and permission of the instructor. 
3 hours. 6 credits. Brunet.) 

303-304. Nineteenth Century French Literature — Literary move- 
ments and tendencies; leading authors studied in representative 
works. (Prerequisite: French 207-208; or equivalent and permission 
of instructor. 3 hours. 6 credits. Atkin.) 

305-306. Advanced Conversation and Composition — (Prerequisite: 
French 206; or equivalent and permission of instructor. 2 hours. 4 
credits. Brunet.) 

409-410. Contemporary French Literature — Modern tendencies as 
revealed in outstanding authors. Lectures, readings and reports. 
(3 hours. 6 credits. Atkin.) 

505-506. The French Novel — Its evolution, from the seventeenth cen- 
tury to the present, with special emphasis on the nineteenth century; 
reading of representative novels; reports. (3 hours. 6 credits. Atkin.) 



*NOTE: 201-202 and 207-208 are parallel courses of third-year college grade, 
and ordinarily students may not take both courses for credit. Those who received a 
grade of A or B in 102 should take 207-208; those who received a lower grade should 
take 201-202, 



GERMAN 185 

I 

507-508. Special Study in French Literature — Individual reading 
and reports, in some definite field or period, under supervision of 
the instructor. (3 hours. 6 credits. Atkin, Brunet.) 

GEOLOGY 

(Administered under the Department of Biology and Geology) 
Associate Professor Hubbell 

201. Physical Geology — The origin, materials, and structure of the 
earth; the agencies which produce geological changes. (3 hours. 
3 credits. Hubbell.) 

202. Historical Geology — An introductory course in historical and 
stratigraphical geology, (Prerequisite: Geology 201. 3 hours. 3 
credits. Hubbell.) 

GERMAN 

(Administered under the Department of Spanish and German) 
Professor Crow, 

21 (22). Elementary Course — Pronunciation, forms, elementary syn- 
tax, dictation, written exercises, memorizing of vocabularies and 
short poems, translation. (3 hours. 6 credits.) 

101-102. Intermediate Course — Work of elementary course contin- 
ued, advanced grammar, including syntax, prose composition, trans- 
lation, sight reading, parallel. (3 hours. 6 credits.) 

201-202. Advanced Course — Syntax, stylistic, composition, translation, 
parallel. (3 hours. 6 credits.) 

301-0301. Readings in Scientific German — (Prerequisite: German 102. 
3 hours. 3 credits.) 

401-402. General Survey of German Literature — (Prerequisite: Ger- 
man 102. 2 hours. 4 or 6 credits.) 

403-404. Literature of the Classic Period — (Prerequisite: German 
402. 2 hours. 4 or 6 credits.) 

405-406. Philology — A study of historical grammar and readings 
from Old and Middle High German texts. (Prerequisite: Consent of 
instructor. 2 hours. 4 or 6 credits.) 



186 GREEK 



GREEK 



(Administered under the Department of Ancient Languages) 
Professor Anderson, Associate Professor Petersen. 

21 (22). First Year Greek — Based on a book for beginners. Anabasis 
Book I with grammar and prose composition. (3 hours. 6 credits. 
Petersen.) 

103 (104). Grammar and Prose Composition — An intermediate course 
in Prose Composition. A systematic study of Greek Grammar. (2 
hours. 4 credits. Petersen.) 

105 (106). Xenophon and Plato-Anabasis Continued — The easier 
dialogues of Plato, Prose Composition, Grammar. (3 hours. 6 cred- 
its. Anderson.) 

0202. Lysias — Selected Orations of Lysias or other Attic Orators. (3 
hours. 3 credits. Anderson.) 

203. Biblical Greek — Selections from the Septuagint and New Testa- 
ment. (3 hours. 3 credits. Anderson.) 

205. Greek History — Political History and History of Greek Civiliza- 
tion during the creative period of ancient Hellas, with emphasis on 
its influence on the development of modern institutions. (3 hours, 
(3 credits. Petersen.) 

206 — History of Greek Literature — Preceded by a short study of 
Greek Life and Customs. A knowledge of the Greek language is 
highly desirable, but it is not required for this course. (3 hours. 3 
credits. Petersen.) 

207. Homer — Selections from the Iliad and the Odyssey. (3 hours. 3 
credits. Anderson.) 

301. Herodotus and Thucydides — Selections from the Greek histor- 
ians. (3 hours. 3 credits. Anderson.) 

302. Euripides and Sophocles — Selections from the Greek dramatists. 
(3 hours. 3 credits. Anderson.) 



HISTORY 187 

HISTORY AND POLITICAL SCIENCE 

(For courses in Political Science see page 224.) 

Professor Leake, Professor Evans, Assistant Professor Tribolet, Instructor Glunt, 

Instructor Carleton. 

The courses in American History and in American Government and Consti- 
tutional Law are made possible by the Chair of Americanism and Southern History — 
endowed by the American Legion, Department of Florida. 

HISTORY 

101 (102). Europe During THE Middle Ages — A general course in the 
history of Western Europe from the Teutonic migrations to the 
Reformation. (Prerequisite for all higher courses. 3 hours. 6 cred- 
its. Leake, Evans.) 

201 (202). Modern European History — The characteristic features of 
the Old Regime, the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Periods 
and the development of Europe from the Congress of Vienna to the 
Congress of Versailles. (3 hours. 6 credits. Leake.) Given 1929-30. 

203 (204). Latin American History — (3 hours. 6 credits. Evans.) 
Given 1929-30. 

208. History of Rome — (Same as Latin 208). 

209 (210). French Revolution and Napoleon — (3 hours. 6 credits. 
Leake.) Given 1930-31. 

301 (302). American History, 1492 to 1830— (3 hours. 6 credits. 
Leake.) Given 1929-30. 

303 (304). American History, 1830 to the Present — (3 hours. 6 
credits. Leake.) Given 1928-29. 

305 (306). English History — (3 hours. 6 credits. Evans.) Given 
1928-29. 

307 (308). The Renaissance and the Reformation — Study of the 
causes, development and results of these great intellectual and reli- 
gious movements. (For advanced students only. 3 hours. 6 credits. 
Evans.) Given 1929-30. 



188 HORTICULTURE 

HORTICULTURE 

Professor Floyd, Professor Lord, Assistant Professor Abbott. 

21. Introduction to Horticulture — The fundamental principles of 
horticulture; practice in the culture, propagation, pruning and train- 
ing of the important fruit and ornamental plants of Florida. (Short 
Courses. Laboratory fee, $1.00. 2 class and 1 laboratory periods. 
No credit. Abbott.) 

22. Agricultural Botany — The relationship, habits, characteristics and 
environmental relations of the important crop plants, with labora- 
tory study of principal types. (Short Courses. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 
2 class and 1 laboratory periods. No credit. Deonir.) 

101. Elements of Horticulture — ^The fundamental activities of plant 
life with reference to the growth of orchard and garden crops. A 
study of propagation by budding, grafting, cuttings, etc., seed selec- 
tion, transplanting, pruning, spraying, frost protection, etc. (Lab- 
oratory fee, $1.00. 2 class and 1 laboratory periods. 3 credits. 
Abbott.) 

202. Fundamentals of Fruit Production — A general introductory 
course in the theory and practice of fruit growing. A detailed study 
of the nature of the responses of fruit trees. (3 hours. 3 credits. 
Abbott.) 

204. Pruning — Principles of pruning and training; the physiological 
principles involved; practice in pruning and training fruit and orna- 
mental plants. (Laboratory fee, $1.00. 2 class and 1 laboratory pe- 
riods. 3 credits. Abbott.) 

206. Trucking — Origin, relationship and classification of different truck 
crops, varieties, cultural methods in different sections, fertilizing, irri- 
gating and harvesting. Planning the home garden. (Laboratory fee, 
$1.00. 2 class and 1 laboratory periods. 3 credits. Abbott.) 

301. Advanced Trucking — Soils suited to the leading commercial truck 
crops of Florida, cultural methods, fertilizing, irrigating, controlling 
insects and diseases, harvesting, packing and marketing. (Prere- 
quisite: Biology 101-102. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 2 class and 1 lab- 
oratory periods. 3 credits. Abbott.) 

303. Floriculture — The growing of flowers upon the home grounds, 
pot plants, greenhouse crops and their cultural requirements, includ- 



HORTICULTURE 189 

ing ventilation, watering and heating. (Prerequisites: Horticulture 
101. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 2 cluss and 1 laboratory periods. 3 
credits. Floyd.) 

304. Commercial Floriculture — A study of commercial flower crops 
grown either in the open, under lath, or in greenhouse. Methods of 
packing and marketing will receive attention. (Prerequisites: Horti- 
culture 101 and 303. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 1 class arul 2 labora- 
tory periods. 3 credits. Floyd.) 

305. Citrus Culture — The citrus grove; site and soil selection; prepar- 
ation, planting and management; selection of varieties and stocks, 
and the use of cover crops. (Prerequisite: Horticulture 202. Lab- 
oratory fee, $1.00. 2 class and 1 laboratory periods. 3 credits. 
Lord.) 

306. Citrus Harvesting, Marketing and Judging — Methods of picking, 
handling, washing, drying, packing and shipping citrus fruits; iden- 
tification and judging of varieties. (Prerequisite: Horticulture 305. 
Laboratory fee, $1.00. 2 class and 1 laboratory periods. 3 credits. 
Lord.) 

307. Subtropical Fruits — Avocados, mangoes, pineapples and other 
tropical and subtropical fruits particularly adapted to Florida; cul- 
ture, varieties, insects, diseases, etc. (Prerequisites: Horticulture 101 
and 202. Laboratory fee, $1.00. 2 class and 1 laboratory periods. 3 
credits. Lord.) 

308. Deciduous Fruits — Peaches, pears, grapes, pecans, and other de- 
ciduous fruits with special reference to Florida conditions, culture, 
varieties, insects, diseases, etc. (Prerequisites: Horticulture 101 and 
202. Laboratory fee, $1.00. 2 class and 1 laboratory periods. 3 
credits. Lord.) 

401. Advanced Citrus Problems — An advanced course especially em- 
phasizing the problems offered by varying sites, soils, climates, stocks, 
varieties, etc. (Prerequisite: Horticulture 305. Laboratory fee, $1.00. 
2 class and 1 laboratory periods. 3 credits. Lord.) 

402. Breeding Horticultural Plants — The application of the princi- 
ples of genetics to the breeding and improvement of horticultural 
plants. Methods of successful breeders of horticultural plants. Field 
work. (Prerequisites: Horticulture 202 and Biology 106. Labora- 
tory fee, $1.00. 2 class and 1 laboratory periods. 3 credits. Lord.) 



190 JOURNALISM 

411. General Forestry — The principles of forestry, forest cropping, 
protecting the home wood lot, use of Florida woods, varieties of tim- 
ber trees, and the influences of the forests on other industries of the 
State. (3 hours. 3 credits. Floyd.) 

503-504. Horticulture Seminar — A study of current horticultural lit- 
erature and practice, assigned topics and discussion. (1 hour. 2 
credits. Lord, Abbott.) 

505-506. Horticultural Problems — A critical study of advanced 
problems in horticulture as given in recent literature; methods used 
in experimental horticulture; results of experiments and their appli- 
cation. (2 hours. 4 credits. Lord.) 

507-508. Research Work — Specific problems in horticulture. (3 hours. 
6 credits. Floyd, Lord, Abbott.) 

JOURNALISM 

Professor Emig, Assistant Professor Ingle, Assistant Professor Hurst, 
Student Assistant Notley. 

103 (104). Introduction to Journalism — A general survey of the 
broad field of journalistic activities, and a detailed study of literature 
in its relation to the press. Intensive practice in the technique of 
forceful writing for newspapers and magazines. (3 hours. 6 credits. 
Emig.) 

205. History of American Journalism — A study of the evolution of 
the newspaper with special emphasis on the relation of the press to 
the dominant economic, political, and social problems of the various 
periods in American history. (Prerequisite: Journalism 101-102. 3 
hours. 3 credits. Emig.) 

206. Principles of Journalism — Lectures, readings, and discussion of 
the relation of the newspaper to government and society, and the 
ethics and psychology of journalism; editorials, and advertising; 
questions of stories relating to crime, labor, religion, politics, news- 
suppression, propaganda, and publicity. (3 hours. 3 credits. Emig.) 

301 (302). Newspaper Reporting and Writing — Lectures, and inten- 
sive practice in news-gathering and writing. Students are taught by 
practice, followed by class discussion and a weekly conference with 
the instructor. (3 hours. 6 credits. Emig.) 



JOURNALISM 191 

309 (310). Newspaper and Magazine Editing — Instruction and prac- 
tice in editing copy, correcting proof, writing headlines, and other 
details of editing. (3 hours. 6 credits. Emig.) Offered in alternate 
years after 1929-30. 

311. Sports Writing — A study of the fundamental principles of news 
writing as applied to sports writing. Lectures, and intensive prac- 
tice in gathering and writing stories of athletic events. Designed es- 
pecially for those majoring in Physical Education, but open to any 
junior. Offered annually, beginning 1930. (3 hours. 3 credits. 
Ingle.) 

313. The Writing of Special Feature Articles — Lectures and prac- 
tice in preparing special feature articles for newspaper and maga- 
zine publication. Analysis of style and appeals of various types of 
articles. (3 hours. 3 credits. Ingle.) 

314. The Writing of Special Articles — Instruction and practice in 
methods of popularizing scientific and technical material relating to 
government and politics, economics, education, and social service 
for publication in newspapers and magazines. (3 hours. 3 credits. 
Ingle.) 

315. Community Newspaper Management — A study of the editorial, 
advertising, and circulation problems peculiar to the community or 
small-town weekly and daily newspapers. (3 hours. 3 credits. Ingle.) 
Offered in alternate years after 1930-31. 

316. Agricultural News Writing — A course in journalistic writing ap- 
plied to agricultural subjects. It requires no previous study or ex- 
perience in journalism on the part of the student. Instruction in col- 
lecting and writing agricultural news and special articles for the 
press. (3 hours. 3 credits. Ingle.) 

313. Newspaper Management — A critical study of the principles and 
problems of circulation, advertising, business, and editorial manage- 
ment of newspapers; cost finding, accounting systems, and business 
policy. (3 hours. 3 credits. Ingle.) Not given 1929-30. 

403. The Press in World Society — A study of the press in an effort 
to coordinate the student's knowledge of journalism with the broad 
sweep of civilization; the relation of the press to world problems, 
education, progress, and contemporary thought and literature. (3 
hours. 3 credits. Emig.) Not given 1929-30. 



192 JOURNALISM 

404. The Development of Public Opinion — A study of the elements 
and factors entering into the formation of public opinion, with es- 
pecial emphasis on the press; the relation of the press to sound 
government. Also, a study of principles of publicity, and practice in 
writing publicity articles. (3 hours. 3 credits. Emig.) Not given 
1929-30. 

405. Industrial and Trade Journalism — An analysis of the leading 
business publications, their history, standards, and style. Practice 
in gathering, writing, and editing of news and special articles for 
publication. Editorial and business problems involved in the man- 
agement of industrial and trade publications, (3 hours. 3 credits^ 
Ingle.) Offered in alternate years after 1929-30. 

406. Mechanics of Publishing — A study of the best standards of prac- 
tice in typography from the standpoint of purpose, legibility, con- 
trast, form, and balance; the processes and costs of mechanical equip- 
ment for engraving, electrotyping, stereotyping, and printing. (3 
hours. 3 credits. Ingle.) Offered in alternate years after 1929-30. 

407. Editorial Writing — The theory and practice of editorial writing; 
the analysis of editorial policies; the interpretation of current events 
and contemporary thought. (3 hours. 3 credits. Ingle.) 

408. Literary Criticism — This course is intended to prepare students 
for writing critical reviews for publication. It involves an intensive 
survey of all literature, poetry, fiction, essays, history, biography, 
motion picture plays, drama, and an appraisement in terms of the 
highest literary standards. A wide range of intensive reading is re- 
quired. (Open to any senior. 3 hours. 3 credits. Ingle.) 

409. Law of the Press — Instruction and practice in the methods of 
handling news of the courts; municipal and state administration; 
finance, bankruptcy, and politics. A study of libel, contempt of 
court, and other phases of the law of the press. (3 hours. 3 credits. 
Hurst.) 

GRADUATE COURSES 

501-502. Special Studies in Journaustic Writing — (3 hours. 6 cred- 
its. Ingle.) 

.503-504. Special Studies in Newspaper Production — (3 hours. 6 
credits. Emig.) 



LATIN 193 

LANDSCAPE DESIGN 

Professor Floyd, Associate Professor Burritt. 

207-208. Elements of Landscape Design — Scope, methods and appli- 
cation to simple problems in design. (1 class and 2 laboratory pe- 
riods. 6 credits. Burritt.) 

210. History of Landscape Design — Development from early to mod- 
ern times. Relation to other arts and their influence. (3 hours. 
3 credits. Burritt.) 

212. Plant Materials — The study of trees, shrubs and herbaceous 
plants suited to Florida conditions, their characteristics, landscape 
values, and their arrangement. (Prerequisites: Horticulture 101 and 
Botany 101-102. 1 class and 2 laboratory periods. 3 credits. Floyd.) 

309-310. Landscape Design — Design of home grounds, estates and pub- 
lic properties based on definite surveys. (1 class and 2 laboratory 
periods. 6 credits. Burritt.) 

405-406. Advanced Planting, Composition and Design — The use of 
plants in various types of landscape problems, including design of 
public, semi-public and private properties. (1 class and 2 labora- 
tory periods. 6 credits. Burritt.) 

403. City and Town Planning — The underlying ideas of civic design, 
historic development, and broader phases of city planning. (3 hours. 
3 credits. Burritt.) 

LATIN 

Professor Anderson, Professor Simonds, Associate Professor Petersen. 
(Administered under the Department of Ancient Languages) 

21 (22). First Year Latin — Based on a book for beginners. (3 hours. 
6 credits. Petersen.) 

31 (32). Caesar — With grammar and prose composition. (3 hours. 6 
credits. Petersen.) 

41 (42). Cicero and Virgil — With grammar and prose composition. 
(3 hours. 6 credits. Petersen.) 

(101). Ovid — Selections; Review of Grammar; Prose Composition; 
Prosody. (3 hours; 3 credits. Petersen.) 

(102). Cicero or Livy — Cicero's De Senectute and De Amicitia or 
Selections from Livy. (3 hours. 3 credits. Petersen.) 



194 LA IF 

201. Pliny — Selections from Pliny's Letters. (3 hours. 3 credits. 
Anderson.) 

202. Horace — Selections from the Satires, Epistles, Odes, and Epodes, 
with a study of the Horatian Metres. (3 hours. 3 credits. Anderson.) 

203 (204) . Grammar and Prose Composition — An intermediate course 
in Prose Composition in connection with a systematic study of Latin 
grammar. (2 hours. 4 credits. Petersen.) 

206. History of Roman Literature — Preceded by a short study of 
Roman Life and Customs. (3 hours. 3 credits. Simonds.) 

208. History of Rome — (3 hours. 3 credits. Simonds.) 

253. Roman Law — The fundamental legal conceptions which are found 
in Roman Law. (Prerequisite desirable: at least two years of Latin. 
3 hours. 3 credits. Simonds.) 

255. Roman Law — An extension of preceding course but independent 
of it; course 253 not a prerequisite. (3 hours. 3 credits. Simonds.) 

SOL Juvenal and Tacitus — Selections from the Satires of Juvenal and 
from the Histories or Annals of Tacitus. (3 hours. 3 credits. Ander- 
son.) 

302. The Elegy — Selections from Catullus, Tibullus, Propertius, and 
Ovid. (3 hours. 3 credits. Anderson.) 

303 (304). Advanced Prose Composition — A continuation of Latin 
203-204, open only to those students who have completed Latin 203- 
204 or equivalent. (2 hours. 4 credits. Petersen.) 

40L Plautus — Selected comedies. (3 hours. 3 credits. Anderson.) 

402. Terence and Seneca — Selected plays. (3 hours. 3 credits. Ander- 
son.) 

LAW 

Dean Trusler, Professor Cockrell, Professor Crandall, Professor Slagle, 
Professor Thompson, Associate Professor Te Selle. 

301. Torts — History and definitions; elements of torts; conflicting 
rights; mental anguish; parties to tort actions; remedies; damages; 
conflict of laws; methods of discharge; comprehensive study of par- 
ticular torts; false imprisonment, malicious prosecution, abuse of 
process, conspiracy, slander and libel, trespass, conversion, deceit, 
nuisance, negligence, and others. Textbooks: Burdick on Torts and 
Burdick's Cases on Torts, fourth edition. (5 credits. Trusler.) 



LAfF 195 

302. Equity Jurisprudence — History and definition; jurisdiction; max- 
ims; accident, mistake, fraud; penalties and forfeitures; priorities 
and notice; bona fide purchasers, estoppel; election; satisfaction and 
performance; conversion; equitable estates, interest, primary rights; 
trusts; powers, duties, and liabilities of trustees; mortgages; equit- 
able liens; assignments; specific performance; injunction; reforma- 
tion; cancellation; cloud on titles; ancillary remedies. Textbook: 
Eaton on Equity, second edition; selected cases. (5 credits. Truster. ) 

303. Contracts — Formation of contract; offer and acceptance; form 
and consideration; reality of consent; legality of object; operation 
of contract; limits of the contract obligation; assignment of contract. 
Textbooks: Clark on Contracts, third edition; Woodruff's Cases on 
Contract, fourth edition. (3 credits. Thompson.) 

304. Contracts — Joint obligations; interpretation of contracts; rules 
relating to evidence and construction; discharge of contract. Text- 
book: Huff cut and Woodruff's Cases on Contract, fourth edition. 
(3 credits. Thompson.) 

305. Criminal Law — Sources of criminal law; nature and elements of 
crime; criminal intent; insanity; intoxication; duress; mistake of 
fact or law; justification; parties in crime; offenses against the 
person, habitation, property, public health and morals, public justice 
and authority, government, and the law of nations. Textbook: Clark 
on Criminal Law, third edition; selected cases. (2 credits. Cockrell.) 

306. Marriage and Divorce — Marriage in general; nature of the rela- 
tion; capacity of parties; annulment; divorce; suit, jurisdiction, 
grounds; defenses; alimony; effect on property rights; custody and 
support of children; agreements of separation. Textbook: Vernier's 
Cases on Marriage and Divorce. (1 credit. Cockrell.) 

307. Criminal Procedure — Jurisdiction; arrest; preliminary examina- 
tion and bail; grand jury, indictment and information and their 
sufficiency in form and substance; arraignment, pleas, and motions; 
nolle prosequi and motions to quash; jeopardy; presence of de- 
fendant at the trial; verdict; new trial; arrest of judgment; judg- 
ment, sentence, and execution. Textbook: Clark's Criminal Procedure, 
second edition; selected cases. (2 credits. Cockrell.) 

308. Common Law Pleading — History and development of the personal 
actions at common law; theory of pleading and its peculiar features 
as developed by the jury trial; demurrers, general and special; pleas 



196 LA r 

in discharge, in excuse, and by way of traverse; replication de injuria; 
duplicity; departure; new assignment; motions based on pleadings; 
general rules of pleadings. Textbook: Keigwin's Cases on Common 
Law Pleading. (Two sections. 3 credits. Crandall.) 

309. Property — Personal property; possession and rights based thereon; 
acquisition of title; liens and pledges; conversion. Textbook: War- 
ren's Cases on Property. (2 credits. Crandall.) 

310. Sales — Sale and contract to sell; statute of frauds; illegality; con- 
ditions and warranties; delivery; acceptance and receipt; vendor's 
lien; stoppage in transitu; bills of lading; remedies of seller and 
buyer. Textbook: Tiffany on Sales, second edition. (1 credit. 
Te Selle.) 

312. Property — Introduction to the law of conveyancing; rights inci- 
dent to the ownership of land, and estates therein, including the land 
itself, air, water, fixtures, emblements, waste; profits; easements; 
licenses; covenants running with the land. Textbook: Warren's 
Cases on Property. (2 credits. Crandall.) 

401. United States Constitutional Law — General principles; distri- 
bution of governmental powers; congress; the chief executive; the 
judiciary; police powers; eminent domain; checks and balances; 
guarantee of republican government; civil rights; political privileges; 
guarantee in criminal cases; impairment of contractual obligations. 
Textbook: Hall's Cases on Constitutional Law. (4 credits. Slagle.) 

402 — Evidence — Judicial notice; kinds of evidence; burden of proof; 
presumptions of law and fact; judge and jury; best evidence rule; 
hearsay rule and its exceptions; admissions; confessions; exclusions 
based on public policy and privilege; corroboration; parol evidence 
rule; witnesses; attendance in court; examination, cross examina- 
tion, privilege; public documents; records and judicial writings; 
private writings. Textbook: Greenleaf on Evidence, sixteenth edition, 
Volume 1; selected cases. (4 credits. Cockrell.) 

403. Agency — Nature of the relation; purposes and manner of crea- 
tion; who may be principal or agent; ratification; delegation of au- 
thority; general and special agents; rights and duties of agents; 
termination, nature, extent, construction, and execution of authority 
of agents; rights, duties, and liabilities of agents; principal and 
third persons inter se; particular classes of agents. Textbook: 
Mechem's Cases on Agency, second edition. (2 credits. Thompson.) 



LAf^ 197 

404. Quasi Contracts — Origin and nature of quasi contract; benefits 
conferred in misreliance on rights or duty, from mistake of law, and 
on invalid, unenforceable, illegal, or impossible contract; benefits 
conferred through dutiful intervention in another's affairs; benefits 
conferred under constraint; action for restitution as alternative 
remedy for breach of contract and for tort. Textbook: Woodruff's 
Cases on Quasi Contracts. (2 credits. Crandall.) 

405. Equity Pleading — Nature and object of pleading in equity; parties 
to a suit in equity; proceedings in a suit in equity; bills in equity, 
disclaimer; demurrers and pleas; answer and replication; prepara- 
tion of bills, demurrers, pleas, answers. Textbooks: Keigwin's Cases 
in Equity Pleading; Rules of the Circuit Court in Chancery in Flor- 
ida; Rules of the Federal Court; Statutes of Florida. (3 credits. 
Te Selle.) 

406. Private Corporations — Nature; creation and citizenship; defective 
organization; promotors; powers and liabilities; corporations and tlie 
State; dissolution; membership; management; creditors; foreign 
corporations; practice in forming corporations, preparing by-laws, 
electing officers, and in conducting corporate business. Textbooks: 
Clark on Private Corporations, and Wormser's Cases on Corpora- 
tions. (3 credits. Slagle.) 

407. Brief Making and the Use of Law Books — Where to find the 
law; how to use statutes and decisions; how to find the law; the trial 
brief; the brief on appeal and its preparation. Textbook: Cooley's 
Brief Making and the Use of Law Books. (Two sections. 1 credit. 
Crandall.) 

408. Legal Ethics — Admission of attorneys to practice; taxation; privi- 
leges and exemptions; authority; liability to clients and to third 
parties; compensation; liens; suspension and disbarment; duties to 
clients, courts, professional brethren, and to society. Textbooks: At- 
torneys at Law in Ruling Case Law and the Code of Ethics adopted 
by the American Bar Association. (1 credit. Te Selle.) 

409. Property — Titles and conveyancing, including acquisition of titles 
by possession, modes of conveyance at common law, under the statute 
of uses, and by statutory grant; the execution of deeds; estates cre- 
ated; covenants for titles; estoppel by deed; priorities among titles. 
Textbook: Warren's Cases on Conveyances. (3 credits. Crandall.) 



198 LAW 

410 Property — History of the law of wills and testaments; testament- 
ary capacity and intent; kind of wills and testaments; execution, 
revocation, republication, revival of wills; descent; probate of wills 
and the administration of estates. Textbook: Warren's Cases on 
Wills. (3 credits. Thompson.) 

4W. Florida Constitutional Law* — Declaration of rights; depart- 
ments of government; suffrage and eligibility; census and apportion- 
ment; counties and cities; taxation and finance; homestead and ex- 
emption; married women's property; education; public institutions; 
miscellaneous provisions. Textbooks: Constitution, statutes and ju- 
dicial decisions of Florida. (2 credits. Trusler.) 

412. Florida Civil Practice* — Organization of courts; parties; joinder 
and consolidation of actions; issuance, service, and return of process; 
appearance; trial; verdict; proceedings after verdict; appellate pro- 
ceedings; peculiar characteristics of the common law actions; special 
proceedings including certiorari, mandamus, prohibition, quo war- 
ranto, habeas corpus, attachment, garnishment, statutory liens, forci- 
ble entry and detainer, landlord and tenant. Textbook: Crandall's 
Florida Civil Practice. (Section B. 3 credits. Cockrell.) 

413. Code Pleading* — Changes introduced by the codes; forms of ac- 
tion; necessary allegations; the complaint; prayer for relief, includ- 
ing general and special denials; new matter; equitable defenses; 
counter claims; pleading several defenses; replies and demurrers. 
Textbook: Keigwin's Cases in Code Pleading. (2 credits. Thompson.) 

414. Trial Practice** — Jurisdiction; process; the jury; instructions; 
trials; verdicts; judgments; new trials; bills of exceptions. Text- 
book: McBaine's Cases on Trial Practice. (3 credits. Te Selle.) 

501. Insurance — Theory, history, significance; insurable interest; con- 
cealment, representations, warranties; subrogation; waiver and estop- 
pel; assignees, beneficiaries; creditors; fire, life, marine, accident, 
guarantee, liability insurance. Textbooks: Humble's Law of Insur- 
ance and Humble's Cases on Insurance. (1 credit. Te Selle.) 

502. Damages — General principles; nominal; compensatory; exemp- 
lary; liquidated; direct and consequential; proximate and remote; 
general and special; measure in contract and tort actions; entire 
damages in one action; mental suffering; avoidable consequences; 

*For students , intending to practice in Florida. 
**For students not intending to practice in Florida. 



LAW 199 

value; interest; lateral support; counsel fees and expenses of litiga- 
tion; injuries to real property and limited interests; death by wrong- 
ful act; breaches of warranty. Textbook: Rogers' Law of Dam- 
ages; selected cases. (2 credits. Truster.) 

503. Public Service Corporations — Nature of public utilities; rail- 
roads and other common carriers of goods and passengers; tele- 
graphs and telephones; light and water companies; inns; warehouses; 
elevators; stockyards; methods of incorporation; public control; 
rights and obligations at common law and under federal and state 
statutes. Textbook: Wyman's Cases on Public Service Companies, 
third edition. (2 credits. Slagle.) 

504. Municipal Corporations — Creation of cities and towns; powers 
of a municipality, including public powers, power of taxation, power 
over streets and alleys, etc.; obligations and liabilities of municipal 
corporations; powers and liabilities of officers. Textbook: Elliott 
on Municipal Corporations, third edition. (1 credit. Cockrell.) 

505. Federal Procedure — System of courts created under the author- 
ity of the United States, jurisdiction of the several courts and pro- 
cedure therein; removal of cases from state courts; substantive law 
applied by federal courts; appellate jurisdiction. Textbook: Rose 
on Federal Jurisdiction and Procedure, third students' edition. (2 
credits. Slagle.) 

506. Negotiable Instruments — Law merchant; definitions and general 
doctrines; contract of the maker, acceptor, certifier, drawer, indorser, 
vendor, accommodater, assurer; proceedings before and after dis- 
honor of negotiable instruments; absolute defenses; equities; pay- 
ments; conflict of laws. Textbook: Britton's Cases on Bills and 
Notes. (3 credits. Slagle.) 

507. Bankruptcy — Federal and state bankruptcy legislation; who may 
become bankrupt; prerequisites to adjudication; receivers; trustees; 
provable claims; exemptions; composition; discharge; appeals. Text- 
book: Britton's Cases on Bankruptcy. (2 credits. Te Selle.) 

508. Conflict of Laws — Jurisdiction; sources of law and comity; ter- 
ritorial jurisdiction; jurisdiction in rem and in personam; remedies, 
rights of action, procedure; creation of rights; property rights; per- 
sonal rights; inheritance; obligations ex delicto and ex contractu; 
recognition and enforcement of rights; personal relations; property; 
inheritance; administration of estates; judgments and obligations. 



200 LAW 

Textbook: Lorenzen's Cases on Conflict of Laws, second edition. 

(3 credits. Single.) 

509. Partnership — Creation, nature, characteristics of a partnership; 
nature of a partner's interest; nature, extent, duration of the part- 
nership liability; powers of partners; rights, duties, remedies of 
partners inter se; rights and remedies of creditors; termination of 
partnership. Textbook: Gilmore's Cases on Partnership. (2 credits. 
Thompson.) 

510. Abstracts — Practical problems covering the interpretation of maps 
and the plotting of lots described by metes and bounds; the formal 
requisites of the different conveyances in use in Florida; deeds exe- 
cuted by public and judicial officers; liens and contracts for the 
sale of lands. Textbooks: Thompson's Examination of Titles; Flor- 
ida Statutes and selected Florida cases. (1 credit. Thompson.) 

511. Admiralty— Jurisdiction; contracts, torts, crimes; maritime liens, 
ex contractu, ex delicto, priorities, discharge; bottomry and respon- 
dentia obligations; salvage; general average. Textbook: Hughes on 
Admiralty. (1 credit. Slagle.) 

512. Trusts — The Anglo-American system of uses and trusts; creation, 
transfer, extinguishment of trust interests; priorities between com- 
peting equities; construction of trust dispositions; charitable trusts. 
Textbook: Boger on Trusts; selected cases. (2 credits. Thompson.) 

513. Property — Conditional estates; licenses and waivers; reversions 
and remainders; rule in Shelley's Case; future uses; future interests; 
executory devises and bequests; vesting of legacies; cross limita- 
tions; gifts; failure of issue; determination of classes; powers; rule 
against perpetuities; restraints on alienation. Textbook: Kale's 
Cases on Future Interests. (3 credits. Crandall.) 

515. Mortgages — Nature; elements; incidents of the relation; dis- 
charge; assignment; redemption; foreclosure; injunction and ac- 
count; extent of the lien; priority between mortgage liens and com- 
peting claims; equity of redemption. Textbook: Durfee's Cases on 
Mortgages. 2 credits. Cockrell.) 

516. Roman Law* — Readings, references, and reports. Subjects treated: 
Roman Public Law; Roman International Law; Stoic Philosophy and 



*Only three semester hours of Roman Law will be counted toward a degree. 



MATHEMATICS 201 

the Jus Gentium; Christianity and the Roman Law; Roman Law in 
Mediaeval Europe; The Revival of Roman Law; The Roman Element 
in Modern Jurisprudence. (3 credits. Simonds.) 

517. Roman Law — The fundamental legal conceptions which are found 
in Roman Law. Readings in the Institutes of Gains and Justinian 
(Robinson's Selections) , with constant reference to Sohm — Institutes 
of Roman Law — translated by Ledley. Topics assigned for reports. 
Lectures with chief stress on Private Law. (3 credits. Simonds.) 

518. Practice Court — (1 credit. Te Selle.) 

519. Practice Court — (1 credit. Te Selle.) 

MATHEMATICS 

Professor Simpson, Associate Professor Wilson, Associate Professor Little,* Assistant 
Professor Phipps, Assistant Professor Kokomoor. Assistant Professor Dostal, 
Assistant Professor Messick, Instructor Kusner, Instructor Craig.** 

NOTE: Not all of the courses numbered above 200 are given any one year. 
Course 85, if not taken for entrance unit, may apply toward college credit. 

85-085. Plane Trigonometry and Logarithms — A study of the triangle 
and its practical uses. Theory and application of logarithms as an 
aid to computation. This course is a prerequisite to all other Mathe- 
matics courses for students who do not present Trigonometry for 
entrance. (3 hours. 3 credits.) 

101-0101. College Algebra — An elementary treatment of the nature of 
Mathematics and a somewhat detailed study of a few of the simpler 
branches of Algebra. (3 hours. 3 credits.) 

102-0102. Plane Analytic Geometry — A modern approach to the 
ancient science of Geometry. Geometric concepts expressed in alge- 
braic language, with a study of rectilinear figures and the plane sec- 
tions of a cone. (Prerequisites: Mathematics 85 and Mathematics 
101. 3 hours. 3 credits.) 

108-0108. Business Mathematics — Application of algebraic methods 
to a study of simple and compound interest in connection with funda- 
mental financial problems of banking and the business world. (For 
students in Business Administration. 3 hours. 3 credits. Kusner, 
Phipps, Simpson.) 

*Part time only. 
**0n leave 1928-29. 



202 MATHEMATICS 

151 (152). Elementary Mathematical Analysis — Substantially the 
same subject matter as that of Mathematics 101 and 102, but espe- 
cially arranged for engineering students. (3 hours. 6 credits. Phipps, 
Kusner, Messick, Dostal.) 

251 (252). Differential and Integral Calculus — The mathematical 
theory of rates of change, with applications to problems in the sci- 
ences. Measurement of irregular magnitudes by the method of in- 
finitesimal subdivision. (3 hours. 6 credits. Dostal, Kusner, Messick, 
Kokomoor, Pfiipps, Wilson.) 

311. Advanced College Algebra — A more careful study of the sub- 
ject matter in Mathematics 101 and an introduction to some of the 
more advanced topics in Algebra. (3 hours. 3 credits. Wilson.) 

320. Theory of Equations, Complex Numbers and Determinants — 
Treats of methods of solution of equations of higher degree. (3 hours. 
3 credits. Wilson.) 

331. College Geometry — A direct continuation of High School Geom- 
etry. (3 hours. 3 credits. Kokomoor.) 

351 (352). Calculus and Solid Analytic Geometry — A continuation 
of 251 and 252, together with a brief study of straight lines, planes 
and surfaces by algebraic methods. (2 hours. 4 credits. Simpson, 
Wilson.) 

361. The Teaching of Mathematics, with particular attention to the 
content of secondary school Mathematics. Registration for course 
only by permission of instructor. (3 hours. 3 credits. Wilson.) 

364. History of Mathematics — A survey of the development of mathe- 
matical science from the earliest times to the present. (Prerequisite: 
A certain degree of mathematical maturity to be determined by the in- 
structor. 3 hours. 3 credits. Kokomoor.) 

420, Differential Equations — Methods of solution and physical appli- 
cations of equations containing derivatives as variables. (3 hours. 
3 credits.) 

512. Introduction to Higher Algebra — A study of advanced topics in 
Algebra for students of a considerable degree of mathematical ma- 
turity. (3 hours. 3 credits. Simpson.) 

518. Theory of Groups of Finite Order — The group concept and the 
properties of groups together with some applications. (3 hours. 3 
credits.) 



MECHANIC ARTS 203 

520. Mathematical Statistics — The mathematical principles under- 
lying modern statistical studies. (3 hours. 3 credits. Wilson.) 

540. Fourier's Series and Harmonic Analysis — The use of series of 
terms involving sines and cosines in the solution of physical prob- 
lems, such as flow of heat, conduction of electricity, vibrating strings. 
(3 hours. 3 credits. Simpson.) 

555. Functions of a Complex Variable — The functions of a variable 
x-f- iy, where i is the square root of — 1. A course bringing out 
deeper meanings in Trigonometry, Algebra, and Calculus. Applica- 
tions to map making and problems in science. (3 hours. 3 credits. 
Simpson.) 

MECHANIC ARTS 

(Administered under the Department of Drawing and Mechanic Arts) 
Professor Strong, Assistant Professor Eshleman. 

101-0101. Wood Working — Exercises in joinery and machine work. 
(Shop fee, $3.00. Required of all engineering freshmen, one semes- 
ter; two 3 hour periods of shop work. 3 credits. Eshleman.) 

104. Wood Shop for Agricultural Students — Instruction and prac- 
tice in the care and use of hand tools in working wood. (Shop fee, 
$1.00. Required of sophomores in agriculture; two 2 hour periods 
of shop work. 2 credits. Eshleman.) 

201. Forge Shop — Practice in hand and machine forging, welding and 
tempering. (Shop fee, $3.00. Required of electrical and mechanical 
engineering sophomores; one 3 hour period of shop work. iV2 
credits. Strong.) 

202. Foundry — Practice in molding, core making and in melting and 
pouring metal, using standard foundry equipment. (Shop fee, $3.00. 
Required of electrical and mechanical engineering sophomores; one 
3 hour period of shop ivork. 7^2 credits. Strong.) 

204. Metalworking — Work in forge shop, foundry, and machine shop. 
(Prerequisite: Shop 101. Shop fee, $3.00. Required of civil engi- 
neering sophomores; one 3 hour period. 7^2 credits. Strong.) 

301. Machine Shop — All-around experience in bench and machine 
work. (Prerequisites: Shop 101 and Shop 201. Shop fee, $5.00. Re- 
quired of mechanical engineering juniors; two 2 hour periods. 2 
credits. Strong.) 



204 MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

304. Patternmaking — Study and practice of the principles underlying 
the construction of wooden patterns and core boxes for machine parts 
and other articles of cast metal. (Prerequisites: Shop 101 and 
Shop 202. Shop fee, $3.00. Required of mechanical engineering 
juniors; two 2 hour periods or one 4 hour period. 2 credits. Strong.) 

401. Machine Shop — Same as 301 except that it is required of electrical 
engineering seniors. (Shop fee, $5.00. Two 3 hour periods. 3 cred- 
its. Strong.) 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

Professor Price, Associate Professor Prescott, Assistant Professor Yeaton. 
101 (102). Descriptive Geometry — Methods of representing points, 
lines, surfaces and solids in space by their projections; the careful 
solution of many original problems on the drawing-board. (Re- 
quired of all engineering and architectural freshmen; two recitations 
both semesters, and two hours of drawing per week the second se- 
mester. 5 credits, divided 2-3. Walker.) 

201 (202). Mechanism — Investigation of link-work, construction of 
gears and cams, belt and pulley drives, trains of mechanism, the ve- 
locity ratio and directional relation of the moving parts of various 
machines. (Required of electrical and mechanical engineering sopho- 
mores; 2 hours. 4 credits. Prescott.) 

301 (302). Machine Elements — Sizes and proportions of standard ma- 
chine details, screw-threads, bolts and nuts, pipes and fittings, shaft- 
ing and shaft mountings, bearings, etc., as approved by practice; 
design of simple machines, working drawings. (Required of elec- 
trical and mechanical engineering juniors; 3 hours of drawing per 
week, both semesters, and 2 lectures per week the second semester. 
4 credits, divided 1-3. Prescott.) 

305 (306). Kinematic Drawing — Drawing-board solutions of problems 
in link-work, cams, toothed gears, slider-crank and other mechanisms, 
with velocity and acceleration diagrams. (Prerequisite: Mechanism 
201-202. Required of mechanical engineering juniors; 3 hours of 
drawing per week. 2 credits. Prescott.) 

310. Thermodynamics — The laws governing the emission and reception 
of heat, and the transformation of heat into mechanical energy. A 
study of the pressure-volume diagrams and the temperature-entropy 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 205 

diagrams of various theoretical and practical cycles. (Prerequisites: 
Mathematics 251-252, Physics 209 and Chemistry 101-102. Required 
of electrical and mechanical engineering juniors. 3 hours. 3 cred- 
its. Price.) 

315 (316). Applied Mechanics — (a) Static, embracing the resolution 
of forces and moments; equilibrium as applied to trusses, machines, 
etc., centers of gravity and moments of inertia of areas, (b) Mechan- 
ics of materials; stresses and deformations in beams, columns, pipes, 
machine and structural parts, with various methods of loading, (c) 
Kinetics, embracing friction, inertia, centrifugal force, kinetic and po- 
tential energy. (Prerequisite: Mathematics 251-252. Laboratory fee, 
$1.00. Required of engineering and architectural juniors, both se- 
mesters; 4 hours; also a two-hour laboratory period each week, both 
semesters. 10 credits. Yeaton.) 

319. Materials of Engineering — A study of the properties, manufac- 
ture, and testing of brick, concrete, timber, iron, steel, alloys and 
non-ferrous metals; heat treatment and modifying processes. (Prere- 
quisites: Physics 105-106 and Chemistry 101-102. Required of civil, 
electrical and mechanical engineering juniors. 2 hours. 2 credits. 
Yeaton.) 

320. Materials of Engineering — Continuation of course 319. (Re- 
quired of mechanical engineering juniors. 2 hours. 2 credits. Yea- 
ton.) 

410. Human Engineering — This course combines a study of some of the 
problems of production engineering with a study of certain questions 
of personnel management. (Prerequisite: Economics 307. Required 
of all engineering seniors, second semester; 2 hours; elective for non- 
engineering students. 2 credits. Price.) 

411 (412). Mechanical Design — The calculation, proportioning and 
detailing of machine parts, and the design of machines to perform 
certain functions. Steel structures, reinforced concrete, piping, and 
mechanical equipment of power and manufacturing plants. (Pre- 
requisites: Mechanism 201-202, Kinematic Drawing 305-306, Ma- 
chine Elements 301-302 and Applied Mechanics 315-316. Required 
of mechanical engineering seniors. 2 hours; also 4 hours of draft- 
ing. 8 credits. Price.) 



206 MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

417 (418). Mechanical Laboratory — Study of gauges, thermometers, 
calorimeters, flow meters, indicators, dynamometers, flue-gas appara- 
tus and other instruments and their use in conducting tests of engines, 
turbines, boilers and other mechanical equipment. Boiler trials, 
valve setting, power measurement, fuel tests, refrigeration tests, effi- 
ciency and heat balance calculations, with complete reports of experi- 
ments. (Laboratory fee, $5.00 each semester. Prerequisite: Ther- 
modynamics 310. Required of mechanical engineering seniors. 4 
hours. 4 credits. Yeaton and Prescott.) 

420. Mechanical Laboratory — ^The same as Mechanical Laboratory 
417. (Laboratory fee, $5.00. Required of electrical engineering sen- 
iors. 4 hours. 2 credits. Yeaton and Prescott.) 

421. Power Engineering — The steam boiler, fuels and combustion, en- 
gines and turbines, condensing apparatus and boiler plant auxiliar- 
ies. (Prerequisite: Thermodynamics 310. Required of electrical and 
mechanical engineering seniors. 3 hours. 3 credits. Price.) 

422. Power Engineering — Chimneys and breeching; pipe systems; 
valve gears; regulating and governing; heat transmission and refrig- 
eration. The economics of power and refrigerating plants. (Prere- 
quisites: Thermodynamics 310 and Power Engineering 419. Required 
of mechanical engineering seniors. 3 hours. 3 credits. Price.) 

424. Power Engineering — Gas and liquid fuel internal combustion en- 
gines; hot-air engines; gas producers. (Prerequisite: Thermodyna- 
mics 310. Required of mechanical and electrical engineering seniors. 
3 hours. 3 credits. Prescott.) 

426. Aeronautics — A general course covering the fundamentals of air- 
plane construction and the dynamics of the airfoil with a study of 
internal combustion engines as used in aeronautical work. Airplane 
control and performance. (Prerequisite: One year of college phy- 
sics. 3 hours. 11-2 credits. Prescott.) 

464. Heating and Ventilating — May be arranged to last only a part 
of a semester with corresponding increase in the hours per week. 
(Required of architectural seniors; 1 lecture per week. 1 credit. 
Yeaton.) 

501-502. Advanced Mechanical Design — ^The design of some machine 
with critical attention to some phase thereof, usually accompanied 
by laboratory work illustrative of the application of theory or of 



INFANTRY 207 

the behavior of materials under assumed special working conditions. 
(For graduate students only. 6 hours laboratory work. 6 credits. 
Price.) 

MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS 

Professor Van Fleet and Staff 

INFANTRY 

BASIC COURSE 

101-102. Military Science — Freshman year, compulsory. Lectures, 
recitations, drill, calisthenics, and ceremonies. (6 hours. 4 credits.) 

The work is divided as follows: 

(a) Practical — Infantry drill, school of the soldier, squad, platoon, 
company and ceremonies; gallery and rifle firing; scouting and patrolling; 
setting up exercises and mass play; organization; infantry equipment. 

(b) Theoretical — Infantry drill regulations and ceremonies; theory 
of rifle marksmanship; hygiene, first aid and military courtesy. 

201-202. Military Science — Sophomore year, compulsory. Lectures, 
recitations, drills, calisthenics, and ceremonies. (Prerequisite: Mili- 
tary Science 101-102. 6 hours. 4 credits.) 

The work is divided as follows: 

(a) Practical — Command and leadership; ceremonies; setting up ex- 
ercises and mass play; rifle and automatic rifle firing; rifle and hand gre- 
nades; scouting and patrolling, and combat principles of the squad. 

(b) Theoretical — Map reading; scouting and patrolling; musketry; 
interior guard duty; automatic rifle. 

ADVANCED COURSE 

301-302. Military Science — Junior year, elective. Lectures, recitations, 
command and leadership. (Prerequisite: Military Science 201-202. 
6 hours. 4 credits.) 

The work is divided as follows: 

(a) Practical — Command and leadership; rifle, machine gun firing; 
field engineering. 

(b) Theoretical — Field Engineering, defense, obstacles, demolitions, 
roads, bridges; machine guns, platoon drill and mechanism, theory of 



208 FIELD ARTILLERY 

direct and indirect fire; elements of international law; military law, mili- 
tary sketching, map reading. 

401-402. Military Science — Senior year, elective. Lectures, recitations, 
command and leadership. (Prerequisite: Military Science 301-302. 
Both semesters; 6 hours per iveek. 4 credits.) 

The work is divided as follows: 

(a) Practical — Command and leadership; rifle and pistol firing; 
tactical walks, patrols, security detachments, offensive and defensive oper- 
ations, 37 mm gun, trench mortar firing. 

(b) Theoretical — Military history and policy of the United States; 
administration; combat principles 37 mm gun and trench mortar. 

FIELD ARTILLERY 

BASIC COURSE 

103-104. Military Science — Freshman year, compulsory. Lectures, 
recitations, drills, calisthenics, and ceremonies. (6 hours. 4 credits.) 

The work is divided as follows: 

(a) Practical — Field Artillery dismounted drill (school of the sol- 
dier, squad, platoon, and battery) ; ceremonies; setting up exercises; 
pistol instruction; care and display of equipment; nomenclature oi 
the French 75 m.m. gun; gun drill; gunners' examination. 

(b) Theoretical- — Field Artillery drill regulations and ceremonies; 
military courtesy; elementary gunnery; material; duties of the 
cannoneers. 

203-204. Military Science — Sophomore year, compulsory. Lectures, 
recitations, drills, calisthenics, and ceremonies. (Prerequisite: Mili- 
tary Science 103-104. 6 hours. 4 credits.) 

The work is divided as follows: 

(a) Practical — Command and leadership; ceremonies; setting up 
exercises; military sketching; topography and orientation; signal 
communications; equitation and horsemanship; mounted drill. 

(b) Theoretical — Field Artillery drill regulations; map reading; 
topography and orientation; signal communications; care of animals 
and stable management. 



PHARMACOGNOSY AND PHARMACOLOGY 209 

PAINTING 

(Administered under the Department of Architecture) 
Instructor Long 

103-104. Pictorial Composition — Principles of picture building in 
black and white. Beginning with simple arrangements of lines, 
spaces, and dark and light. Problems are assigned and the solutions 
criticised during the classroom hour. (One hour criticism. Five 
hours outside work. 4 credits.) 

107. Abstract Design — Principles of design; problems in space fill- 
ing; developing of simple decorative units; balance of areas; values 
of light and dark; color problems. (First semester. 3 hours. 1 
credit.) 

115-116. Poster Design — Analysis of the essentials of a good poster. 
Methods of handling tempera color and other mediums. Practical 
designing of posters for commercial purposes. (Three class hours, 
3 hours preparation. 4 credits.) 

117-118. Advertising Design — Designing of original advertisements 
and a study of the methods and mediums employed in making draw- 
ings for reproduction. (Three two-hour periods. 4 credits.) 

203-204. Pictorial Composition — Continuation of Painting 103-104. 
Attention is given to figures and interiors. Color is introduced with 
problems in color harmony, balance, rhythm and contrast. (One 
hour criticism. 5 hours outside work. 4 credits.) 

207-208. Abstract Design — Continuation of principles of design with 
problems developed to give experience in three dimensional design 
and with color as related to areas. (Three hours. 2 credits.) 

211-212. Oil Painting — Theory of pigment color. Still life studies in 
full color. Arrangement and character of various objects used. 
Simple landscape studies. (Three three-hour periods. 6 credits.) 

219-220. Illustration — Book and magazine illustration employing 
figures. Design and technique. (Three two-hour periods. 4 credits.) 

PHARMACOGNOSY AND PHARMACOLOGY 

Professor Christensen, Instructor Werner 

The Department of Pharmacognosy and Pharmacology offers all 
courses in Pharmacognosy and in Materia Medica required by the Phar- 
maceutical Syllabus in the three-year curriculum, and in addition, num- 



210 PHARMACOGNOSY AND PHARMACOLOGY 

erous elective courses for the third and fourth year of undergraduate 
work. All courses in Pharmacognosy are supplemented with field work 
in the pharmaceutical garden conducted by the Department. The lab- 
oratories are well equipped for graduate work, and both major and minor 
courses are offered to candidates for the degree of Master of Science. 

221-222. Practical Pharmacognosy — Systematic study of the vege- 
table and animal drugs of the United States Pharmacopoeia and the 
National Formulary. Laboratory work on the methods of identify- 
ing the crude drugs, illustrated with authentic specimens. (Labora- 
tory fee, $5.00 per semester. 6 hours. 6 credits. Christensen, 
Werner.) 

231-232. Cultivation of Medicinal Plants — Medicinal plants that 
are being cultivated, methods of cultivation, harvesting, curing, and 
preparation for market. Field work with plants that can be suc- 
cessfully grown in the pharmaceutical garden. (Lectures and field 
periods to be arranged according to credit, which may vary from 4 
to 10 credits. Christensen, Werner.) 

342. Microscopy of Drugs — Microscopic structure and characteristics 
of types of drugs, methods of identifying powdered drugs and food 
products, and of detecting adulterations. (Prerequisite: Pharmacog- 
nosy 222. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 1 class and 2 laboratory hours. 3 
credits. Christensen, fferner.) 

351. Pharmacology — The therapeutic action, dosage, uses, and toxi- 
cology of official and non-official drugs and poisons. Illustrated 
with carefully planned demonstrations. (Prerequisite: Pharmacog- 
nosy 222. 3 hours. 3 credits. Christensen.) 

362. Pharmacological Standardization — Biological assaying, em- 
ploying the official methods of the United States Pharmacopoeia. 
(Prerequisite: Pharmacology 351. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 2 class 
and 2 laboratory periods. 4 credits. Christensen, Werner.) 

423-424. Advanced Pharmacognosy' — A history of the propagation and 
development of drugs under cultivation with special emphasis on 
methods employed, climatic and soil features and effect on plant 
constituents. Special problems on drug culture and in the isolation 
of plant constituents. Lectures, laboratory and field work. (Pre- 
requisite: Pharmacognosy 221-222. Fees and credits (6 to 10) to be 
arranged. Christensen.) 



PHARMACOGNOSY AND PHARMACOLOGY 211 

435-436. Comminution of Crude Drugs — Types of milling machinery 
and milling processes. Legal standards for powdered drugs. De- 
terioration of drugs, causes and prevention. Preservation from in- 
sects. Lectures and laboratory, collateral reading, oral and written 
reports. (Prerequisite: Pharmacognosy 221-222. Fees and credits 
(6 to 10) to be arranged. Christensen.) 

451-452. Advanced Pharmacology — Advanced study of the pharma- 
cology of drugs and pharmacological standardization with special 
reference to serums, vaccines, antitoxins, enzymes, pollen extracts, 
and gland products. Lectures and laboratory. (Prerequisite: Phar- 
macology 362. Fees and credits (4 to 10) to be arranged. Christensen.) 

455-456. New Remedies — A brief history of the organization, policies 
and accomplishments of the Council on Pharmacy and Chemistry of 
the American Medical Association. The pharmacology of new 
remedies accepted and placed on the market. Lectures, discussions, 
collateral reading, oral and written reports. Open to seniors and 
graduates. (Prerequisite: Pharmacology 362. Credits (4 to 6) to 
be arranged. Christensen.) 

491-492. Pharmacognosy Thesis or Pharmacology Thesis — Work 
for senior thesis may be arranged upon consultation. Students are 
assigned to problems in Pharmacognosy or Pharmacology for in- 
vestigation and research. Conferences, library, laboratory and field 
work. (4 credits. Christensen.) 

GRADUATE COURSES 

521-522. Special Problems in Pharmacognosy — Identification, classi- 
fication, determination of constituents and properties of drug plants; 
special experiments in the propagation, cultivation, harvesting and 
curing of native and exotic plants; field work in the collecting of 
drug plants native to Florida. (4 to 10 credits. Christensen.) 

533-534. Seminar in Pharmacognosy — Sources of information on crude 
drugs and a study of current plant literature. Special written and 
oral reports. (2 to 8 credits. Christensen.) 

551-552. Special Problems in Pharmacology — A comparison of meth- 
ods of biological assaying. Special lectures, collateral reading, lab- 
oratory experiments, oral and written reports. (4 to 10 credits. 
Christensen.) 



212 PHARMACY 

555-556. Pharmacological Testing — Determination of the therapeutic 
properties of drugs by means of animal experimentation, using 
special types of recording apparatus. (2 to 8 credits. Christensen.) 

591-592. Pharmacognosy Thesis or Pharmacology Thesis — (Work 
and credit for graduate thesis in Pharmacognosy or Pharmacology 
to be arranged upon consultation. Christensen.) 

PHARMACY 

Professor Husa, Associate Professor Foote, Instructor Enz 

101. Pharmaceutical Arithmetic — ^The application of arithmetic to 
pharmacy; a thorough study of the systems of weight and measure 
in use in the United States, and their relation to each other. Labora- 
tory work acquaints the student with the weights and measures stud- 
ied, and experiments are carried out on specific gravity, percentage 
solutions, thermometry, etc. (Laboratory fee, $2.50. 2 class and 1 
laboratory periods. 3 credits. Husa, Enz.) 

102. Theoretical Pharmacy — The history and nomenclature of the 
United States Pharmacopoeia and the National Formulary, and of 
the apparatus and processes of operative pharmacy. Students con- 
duct in the laboratory operations illustrating the principles consid- 
ered in lecture, and perform the simpler pharmaceutical operations 
into which chemical reactions do not enter. (Laboratory fee, $2.50. 
2 class and 1 laboratory periods. 3 credits. Foote, Enz.) 

211. Inorganic Pharmacy — The consideration of such inorganic com- 
pounds as are used in medicine — their origin and preparation, and 
their physical, chemical, and physiological properties; the prepara- 
tion and the detection of these inorganic substances, and their use in 
compounding remedies. (Prerequisite: Chemistry 104 and Phar- 
macy 102. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 3 class and 2 laboratory periods. 
5 credits. Foote.) 

222. Galenical Pharmacy — Galenical preparations, including syrups, 
spirits, tinctures, extracts, and emulsions. The preparation of these 
materials extemporaneously on a small scale, and also their manu- 
facture in larger amounts by use of pharmaceutical machinery. 
(Prerequisites: Chemistry 251 and Pharmacy 102. Laboratory fee, 
$5.00. 3 class and 2 laboratory periods. 5 credits. Foote.) 



PHARMACY 213 

331. Qualitative Drug Analysis — The detection of the common synthe- 
tics, glucosides, and alkaloids in pharmaceutical preparations, par- 
ticularly those of high toxicity. The tests used are those commonly 
accepted as evidence in medico-legal cases. Laboratory work upon 
powders, solutions, emulsions, etc. (Prerequisite: Chemistry 252. 
Co-requisite: Pharmacy 351. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 1 class and 2 
laboratory periods. 3 credits. Foote.) 

332, Quantitative Drug Analysis — The quantitative analysis of medic- 
inal preparations by physical means or by chemical methods. Certain 
analyses are made by use of the polariscope and the refractometer, 
while alkaloids are determined both gravimetrically and volumetri- 
cally. (Prerequisites: Chem. 252 and 304, Phar. 351. Laboratory 
fee, $5.00. 2 laboratory periods. 2 credits. Foote.) 

351. Organic Pharmacy — The preparation of natural and synthetic 
substances, and their use in medicine; the production of these mate- 
rials on a semi-commercial scale and also the common tests which 
may be applied for their detection in a prescription. (Prerequisites: 
Chemistry 252 and Pharmacy 222. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 3 class 
and 2 laboratory periods. 5 credits. Foote.) 

361-362. Prescriptions and Dispensing — To train the student for prac- 
tical and efficient work at the prescription counter, each student is 
given extensive practice in filling prescriptions. Incompatibilities, 
with emphasis on the methods of overcoming apparent incompati- 
bilities. Prescription reading, translation of prescription Latin, ac- 
cepted methods of checking and filing prescriptions, and prescrip- 
tion pricing. (Prerequisites: Pharmacy 211 and 222. Laboratory 
fee, $5.00 per semester. Lectures, recitations, and laboratory work. 
6 credits. Husa, Enz.) 

372. Commercial Pharmacy — The management of the retail phar- 
macy; business management, including merchandise information, 
retail buying, advertising, salesmanship, and accounting. (Pre- 
requisites: Pharmacy 211 and 222. 4 hours. 4 credits. Husa.) 

381. Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence — National, state and local laws 
and regulations governing the practice of pharmacy, and the phar- 
macist's liability, both criminal and civil, for his own violations 
of laws and for violations on the part of his agents. (Prerequisites: 
Pharmacy 211 and 222. 2 hours. 2 credits. Husa.) 



214 PHARMACY 

431-432. Advanced Drug Analysis — The more difficult analytical 
methods of the United States Pharmacopoeia, supplemented by other 
methods recommended by the Bureau of Chemistry. Determinations 
are both qualitative and quantitative. (Prerequisites: Pharmacy 
331-332. Laboratory fee, $6.00 per semester. 3 laboratory periods. 
6 credits. Husa, Enz.) 

451. Synthetic Pharmaceuticals — The manufacture and use of the 
newer synthetic remedies. A comparative study of the different manu- 
facturing methods for each product. The laboratory work consists 
of the preparation of these products by one or more methods. (Pre- 
requisite: Pharmacy 351. Laboratory fee, $5.00. 3 class and 2 lab- 
oratory periods. 5 credits. Foole.) 

471-472. Advanced Commercial Pharmacy — A study of the commer- 
cial problems and business methods of the manufacturer, wholesaler, 
and retail chain store executive. (Prerequisite: Pharmacy 372. 2 
hours. 4 credits. Husa.) 

491-492. Thesis — By arrangement, senior students may be assigned to 
research problems in Pharmacy, a senior thesis being written on the 
results of the research. (Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. Lab- 
oratory fee is determined by nature of problem undertaken. 4 credits. 
Husa, Foote.) 

GRADUATE COURSES 

502. Selected Topics in Pharmacy — A general study of the newer 
types of pharmaceuticals, such as vitamine preparations, newer sol- 
vents, etc. A detailed study with assigned readings is made of se- 
lected problems of current interest, whose solution depends in part 
on metabolic considerations. (2 hours. 2 credits. Husa.) Given 
alternate years. Offered in 1929-30. 

503. Advanced Pharmacy — Lectures and assigned readings on impor- 
tant pharmaceutical preparations, particularly those involving chem- 
ical changes. (2 hours. 2 credits. Husa.) Offered alternate years. 
Not offered in 1929-30. 

504. Advanced Galenical Pharmacy — A detailed study of the funda- 
mental research work on which formulas for various galenicals are 
based. (2 hours. 2 credits. Husa.) Offered alternate years. Not of- 
fered in 1929-30. 



PHILOSOPHY 215 

541. Manufacturing Pharmacy — A general study of the apparatus 
and processes used in the manufacture of pharmaceuticals on a fac- 
tory scale. A detailed study of selected technical problems of cur- 
rent interest to those engaged in pharmaceutical manufacturing 
operations. (2 hours. 2 credits. Husa.) Given alternate years. Of- 
fered in 1929-30. 

551. Advanced Synthetic Pharmaceuticals — Laboratory work and a 
study of the literature dealing with the methods used in the syn- 
thesis of the more complex organic remedies. (Prerequisites: Phar- 
macy 451 and a reading knowledge of German. 2 laboratory periods. 

2 credits. Foote.) 

554. Advanced Pharmacy — Lectures and assigned reading on the 
pharmacy and chemistry of vegetable drugs. (2 hours. 2 credits. 
Foote.) 

PHILOSOPHY 

Professor Enwall, Assistant Professor Hinckley. Assistant Professor Williams. 
NOTE: Students may begin with courses 201, 205. 301, and 303. 

201-0201. General Psychology — Facts and theories current in gen- 
eral psychological discussion; the sensations, the sense organs, the 
functions of the brain, the higher mental processes — attention, per- 
ception, memory, emotion, volition, the self; and like topics. (3 
hours. 3 credits. Hinckley, Williams.) 

203. Elementary Experimental Psychology — Lectures and labora- 
tory work in connection with the nervous system, the sense organs, 
muscles, glands, reflexes, emotions, instincts, and simple habits. 
(Prerequisite: Phil. 201, or this course may be taken along with 
Phil. 201. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 3 hours. 3 credits. Williams.) 

204. Experimental Psychology — Mainly laboratory work with stand- 
ard apparatus on the current problems in Experimental Psychology. 
Special attention given to methods of psychological investigation 
and the collection and treatment of data. (Prerequisite: Phil. 201. 
Phil. 203 is strongly recommended. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 5 hours. 

3 credits. Williams.) 

205. Logic, Inductive and Deductive — The use of syllogisms, induc- 
tive methods, logical analysis, and criticisms of fallacies. (3 hours. 
3 credits. Enwall.) 



216 PHILOSOPHY 

206-0206. Business Psychology — The main facts of theoretical, ex- 
perimental, and social psychology will be presented and applied to 
the fields of business problems; especially, advertising, selling, em- 
ployment, and efficiency in work. (Prerequisite: Phil. 201. 3 hours. 
3 credits. Hinckley.) 

301. Ethics — Principles of Ethics: Study of such topics as goodness, 
happiness, virtue, duty, freedom, civilization, and progress. (3 hours. 
3 credits. Enwall.) 

302. Advanced Ethics — The history of the various ethical systems. 
Theism and Agnosticism. (Prerequisite: Phil. 301. 3 hours. 3 
credits. Enwall.) 

303. History of Ancient Philosophy — The development of philo- 
sophic thought from its appearance among the Ionic Greeks to the 
time of Descartes. Special attention will be given to the philosophy 
of Plato and Aristotle. (3 hours. 3 credits. Enwall.) 

304. History of Modern Philosophy — A continuation of Phil. 303. 
Special attention will be given to the works of Descartes, Spinoza, 
Leibnitz, Kant, Hume, etc. (3 hours. 3 credits. Enwall.) 

305. Social Psychology — Influences of the social environment upon 
the mental and moral development of the individual. (Prerequisite: 
Phil. 201. 3 hours. 3 credits. Williams.) 

306. Abnormal Psychology — Abnormal phases of mental life; dreams, 
illusions, hallucinations, suggestions, hypnotism, hysteria, diseases 
of the memory, diseases of the will, mental hygiene, etc. (Prerequi- 
site: Phil. 201. Open to seniors, advanced pre-medical and laiv 
students only. 3 hours. 3 credits. Enivall.) 

308. Comparative Psychology — A review of the psychological experi- 
ments in which animals were employed as subjects with an attempt 
to trace the phylogenetic development of human intelligence. (Pre- 
requisite: Philosophy 201. Given with Philosophy 310 in alternate 
years. 3 hours. 3 credits. Williams.) 

310. History of Psychology — A survey of the historical development 
of psychology with special emphasis on the more recent programs of 
the subject. A critical expository examination of representative 
writers. (Prerequisite: Phil. 201. Given with Phil. 308 in alternate 
years. 3 hours. 3 credits. Williams.) Offered 1929-1930. 



PHILOSOPHY 217 

401 (402). Advanced Logic — Seminar. Theories of thought and 
knowledge. (Prerequisite: Phil. 205, 303, 304. Given with Phil. 
403 (404) in alternate years. 3 hours. 6 credits. Enwall.) 

403 (404). Philosophy of Nature — Seminar. Man's relation to Na- 
ture; the various philosophical doctrines: Animism, Pantheism, Ma- 
terialism, Realism, Agnosticism, Humanism, Idealism, etc. (Pre- 
requisites: Phil. 205, 303, 304. Given with Phil. 401 (402) in alter- 
nate years. 3 hours. 6 credits. Enwall.) Offered 1928-1929. 

405. Psychological Tests — Tests of general intelligence, special apti- 
tude, personality traits, business ability, organization and admin- 
istration; critical evaluation of methods and results; theory of test 
construction and scoring; and practical uses of tests. (Prerequisite: 
Phil. 201. 3 hours. 3 credits. Hinckley.) 

406. Theory of Psychological Measurement — Quantitative methods 
of experimental psychology; collection and treatment of data; meth- 
od of least squares; correlation; prediction, and probability. (Pre- 
requisites: Phil. 201, 405. 3 hours. 3 credits. Hinckley.) 

501 (502). Advanced Experimental Psychology — Lectures and class 
demonstrations on the sensory processes, learning, attention, thought 
activities, space perception, emotion, and the relation of mind to 
body. (Prerequisites: Phil. 201, 204. 3 hours. 6 credits. Hinckley.) 

503. Theories of Personality — The more inevitable problems of hu- 
man life and their normal and abnormal solutions. Consideration 
of the self, conduct, and the individually developed personal organi- 
zation. (Prerequisites: Phil. 201, 303, 304. 3 hours. 3 credits. 
Hinckley.) 

505 (506). Hume, Kant — Seminar. The works of these men will be 
read, selected topics assigned for papers and discussion. A thesis 
will be required. (Prerequisites: Phil. 201, 205, 301, 302, 303, 
304, 401 (402), 403 (404). 3 hours. 6 credits. Enwall.) 

507-508. The Philosophic Conceptions of the Great English 
Poets — (Prerequisites: English 103-104, 201-202. 3 hours. 6 cred- 
its. Enwall.) 



218 PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND COACHING 

Mr. Bachman, Dr. Haskell, and Athletic StafiF 
(For courses in Coaching, see page 166.) 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

101. Elementary Gymnastics — Instruction given in free exercises for 
general development and muscular co-ordination. Elementary work 
on apparatus, emphasizing form, approach, and execution. (2 hours. 
1 credit.) 

102. Outdoor Activities — Instruction and play in tennis, football, 
basketball, playground ball, track and baseball. (2 hours. 1 credit.) 

112. Calisthenics, Marching and Gymnastic Dancing — Principles of 
construction of calisthenic drills for different age groups. Theory 
and practice in conducting classes. Marching for rhythm discipline 
and coordination. Fancy marching, folk dancing, and gymnastic 
dancing. (4 hours in Gymnasium. 2 credits. Haskell.) 

114. Elementary and Advanced Gymnastics — Gymnastic nomencla- 
ture, practice on elementary and advanced apparatus work. Plan- 
ning and conducting classes; tumbling and stunts. Massed class- 
work and gymnastic games. (4 hours in Gymnasium. 2 credits. Has- 
kell.) 

201. Advanced Gymnastics — Advanced work on mat, ring, heavy ap- 
paratus, nomenclature, emphasizing skill, form, and accuracy of exe- 
cution. Practice work in leading classes. (2 hours. 1 credit.) 

202. Outdoor Activities — Instruction and play in boxing, wrestling, 
fencing and cage ball. (2 hours. 1 credit.) 

231 (232). First Aid and Training — The American Red Cross ad- 
vanced course in first aid to the injured. General rules for condition- 
ing, diet, bathing, hydrotheraphy, massage, prevention and treat- 
ment of athletic injuries. (1 hour. 1 credit. Haskell.) 

301-302. Leaders Class — Special instruction to those showing profi- 
ciency in Courses 101 and 201, preparing them in the more advanced 
gymnastic work. Theory and practice in class management and 
working out programs in physical education. (2 hours. 2 credits.) 

341. Programs — Objectives of physical education; department organiza- 
tion and administration; programs; teaching and supervising quali- 



PHYSICS 219' 

fications; supervision of gymnasiums, pools, and playground. (1 
hour. 1 credit. Haskell.) 

351. Intramural — Aims and purposes, organization, control, schedules, 
sports, publicity, awards. Theory and Practical Application. (2 
hours. 2 credits. Brown.) 

362. Physical Diagnosis and Corrective Gymnastics — Physical ex- 
amination for postural, physical defects and deformities. Active and 
passive exercises, its application to corrective work; use of exercise 
in disease. (3 hours. 3 credits. Haskell.) 

422. Athletic and Gymnasium Construction and Equipment — Ath- 
letic field, selection of site; planning and construction of track and 
field; surfacing and laying out field for major sports and other ac- 
tivities. Field house; stadium and swimming pool construction and 
maintenance. Gymnasium and locker room construction and equip- 
ment. (1 hour. 1 credit. Haskell, Higgins, and others.) 

481. Community Recreation and Playgrounds — Community recrea- 
tion, its scope and activities. The function of play and its objectives. 
Facilities for recreation, location, and planning of the play grounds. 
The school as a neighborhood recreation center; public baths; com- 
munity buildings. Organization and administration. (1 hour. 1 
credit. Haskell.) 

491 (492). Practice Teaching — Students in this course will be as- 
signed to a section of freshman physical education and teach this 
under the supervision of the Physical Education Director twice a 
week. (2 hours. 2 credits. Haskell.) 

PHYSICS 

Professor Benton, Associate Professor Perry, Assistant Professor Bless, Assistant 
Professor Skellett, Instructor Little*, Instructor Stevens. 

The courses offered in this department fall into three groups. (1) Physics 203- 
204 is a standard college course in general physics, which does not presuppose any pre- 
vious knowledge of Physics, and Physics 201-202 is an abbreviated college course 
in general physics; (2) Physics 205-209 (or 105-108 and 209) form a longer and more 
advanced course in general physics, pre-supposing a knowledge of the physics taught 
in the high schools and of trigonometry; (3) the remaining courses deal more fully 
with special branches of physics, pre-supposing a college course in general physics, 
and appropriate mathematical preparation. Courses numbered 307 or higher (ex- 
cept 313 to 317) presuppose Calculus. 

105-106. General Physics, including mechanics, heat, acoustics, and 
optics, but not electricity and magnetism. Text-book used in 1928- 



I 



♦Absent on leave, 1928-29. 



220 PHYSICS 

1929; Kimball's College Physics. (Prerequisites: High School Phy- 
sics and Plane Trigonometry. Required of freshmen in engineering 
and architecture. 3 hours. 6 credits. Benton.) 

107-108. General Laboratory Physics, to Accompany Physics 105- 
106 — Laboratory fee, $1.50 per semester. 2 two-hour laboratory 
periods. 4 credits. Skellett.) 

201-202. A Brief Course in General Physics — Text-book used in 
1928-1929: Merchant and Chant's Elements of Physics. (Laboratory 
fee, $1.50 per semester. Required of Agricultural students, sopho- 
more year. 2 class and 1 laboratory periods. 6 credits. Benton.) 

203. Mechanics and Heat — General physics designed to meet the needs 
of the general student, and of those taking the Pre-Medical course. 
Text-book used in 1928-1929: Smith's Elements of Physics. (Lab- 
oratory fee, $1.50. 3 class and 2 two-hour laboratory periods. 5 
credits. Perry.) 

204. Sound, Light, Electricity and Magnetism — General physics 
designed to meet the needs of the general student, and of those 
taking the Pre-Medical course. (Laboratory fee, $1.50. 3 class and 
2 two-hour laboratory periods.^ 5 credits. Perry.) 

205-206. General Physics, including mechanics, heat, acoustics, and 
optics, but not electricity and magnetism. (Prerequisite: High 
School Physics and Plane Trigonometry. 3 hours. 6 credits. Benton.) 

207-208. General Laboratory Physics, to Accompany Physics 205- 
206 — (Laboratory fee, $1.50 per semester. 2 two-hour laboratory 
periods. 4 credits. Skellett.) 

209. General Electricity and Magnetism, being a continuation of 
Physics 205-208 (or Physics 105-108) .—Text-book used in 1928- 
1929: Kimball's College Physics. (Laboratory fee, $1.50. 2 class and 

1 two-hour laboratory periods. 3 credits. Perry.) 

212. Applied Electricity and Magnetism — This course is also given 
under the name Electrical Engineering 202-204. (Prerequisites: 
Mathematics 251 and Physics 209 or 203-204. Laboratory fee, $3.00. 

2 class and 1 two-hour laboratory periods per week. 3 credits. Benton 
and Weil.) 

301. Meteorology — A brief general course. Text-book used in 1928- 
1929: Milham's Meteorology. (Prerequisite: One year of college 
physics. 2 class and 1 two-hour laboratory periods. 3 credits. Ben- 
ton.) 



PHYSICS 221 

302. Astronomy — A brief general course on descriptive astronomy. 
Text-book used in 1928-1929: Faith's Elements of Astronomy. (Pre- 
requisite: One year of college physics. 2 class and 1 two-hour obser- 
vation periods. 3 credits. Perry.) 

303-304. Advanced Experimental Physics — Experiments of more ad- 
vanced type than those of Physics 203-204, 207-208, or 209, to- 
gether with study of the theory of the experiments and assigned read- 
ing. The particular experiments assigned vary with the needs and 
interests of the individual student. (Prerequisites: Mathematics 101- 
102 or 151-152 and Physics 203-204 or 209. 1 class and 4 labora^ 
tory hours. 6 credits. Benton, Perry, Bless.) 

306. Electrical Measurements — The theory and practice of methods 
of measurement of resistance, current, electromotive force, power and 
energy. Planned primarily for advanced students in physics, chem- 
istry, and electrical engineering. Laboratory work will be adjusted to 
meet the needs and interests of the individual student. (Prerequi 
sites: Mathematics and Physics 209. 1 class and 4 laboratory hours. 
3 credits. Weil.) 

307. Heat — A general survey of this branch of physics from the theo- 
retical as well as from the experimental point of view. The labora- 
tory work will include accurate measurements of the heat of com- 
bustion of materials, thermal conductivity of metals, melting point 
of metals and specific heats of gases. (2 class and 2 laboratory 
hours. 3 credits. Bless.) Given alternate years. Not offered in 1929- 
1930. 

309. Theoretical Optics — The study of the phenomena of refraction, 
interference, diffraction and polarization. (3 hours. 3 credits. Perry.) 
Given alternate years. Offered in 1929-1930. 

310. Experimental Optics — Laboratory work with the spectrometer, 
interferometer, diffraction grating and polarimeter. (1 class and 3 
laboratory hours. 2 credits. Perry.) Given alternate years. Offered 
in 1929-1930. 

311. Electricity and Magnetism — The theory of magnetism and 
electrostatics, the electric current and its effects, thermoelectricity, 
electromagnetism, the elementary theory of alternating currents. 
(Prerequisites: Mathematics 252 and Physics 209 (or 203-204). 
Laboratory fee, $1.50. Required of juniors in electrical engineering; 
elective for others. 2 class and 2 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Perry.) 



222 PHYSICS 

312. Experimental Electricity and Magnetism — The theory and the 
actual determination of the electric quantities in terms of absolute 
units, the study of the effects of inductances and condensers in direct 
and alternating circuits, the magnetic circuit. (1 class and 3 labora- 
tory hours. 2 credits. Perry.) Given alternate years. Not offered in 
1929-1930. 

313. Glass Blowing — (3 laboratory hours. 1 credit. Skellett.) 

314. High Vacuum Technique — (Prerequisite: Glass Blowing. 3 lab- 
oratory hours. 1 credit. Skellett.) 

315. Demonstration Physics — A course in the use of physical appara- 
tus in teaching. Given in summer school only. 

317. Modern Theories of Physics — Given in summer school only. 

402. Mathematical Physics — An introductory course to general mathe- 
matical physics. (3 hours. 3 credits. Benton.) Given upon suffi- 
cient demand. 

405-406. Theoretical Mechanics — Statics of systems of particles and 
of rigid bodies. Motion of particles and of rigid bodies under 
constant and under variable forces. Generalized coordinates. (3 
hours. 3 credits. Bless.) Given alternate years. Offered in 1929- 
1930. 

412. Advanced Electricity and Magnetism — A continuation of 311. 
The theory of alternating circuits, electromagnetic radiation, conduc- 
tion of electricity in gases. (3 hours. 3 credits. Perry.) Given al* 
ternate years. Offered in 1929-1930. 

503-504. Kinetic Theory of Gases — The elements of the kinetic theory, 
the application of the theory to gases and liquids, the electrical and 
m.agnetic properties of the molecules from the standpoint of the 
theory. (3 hours. 6 credits. Bless.) Given in alternate years. Not 
offered in 1929-1930. 

508. Thermodynamics — The theory of thermodynamics, the applica- 
tions to fluids, the application to electric circuits, the phase rule. 
(3 hours. 3 credits. Bless.) Given alternate years. Not offered in 
1929-1930. 

510. Spectroscopy — -The phenomena and theories of spectroscopy, the 
methods of excitation and of observation of the line spectra of ele- 
ments, the analysis and interpretation of the emission and absorp- 



PLANT PATHOLOGY 223 

lion spectra of elements, precision wave length determination. (2 
class and 3 laboratory hours. 3 credits. Bless.) Given alternate 
years. Not offered in 1929-1930. 

517-518. Modern Physics — Production, properties and effects of X-ray?, 
radioactivity, theories of atomic structure, the physical and chemical 
properties of elements in the light of these theories. (3 hours. Ct 
credits. Bless.) Given alternate years. Offered in 1929-1930. 

PLANT PATHOLOGY 

(Administered under the Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology) 
Professor Gray, Instructor Dickey, Mr. Creighton. 

22. Diseases and Insects of Citrus — The important physiological and 
fungous diseases with a survey of the major injurious insects and 
methods for control. (Short Courses. Laboratory fee, $2.00. 2 class 
and 1 laboratory periods. No credit. Dickey.) 

301. General Pathology — A study of the principal causal agents that 
produce disease in plants. Diagnosis and treatment of plant dis- 
eases. (Laboratory fee, $3.50. 2 class and 2 laboratory periods. 4 
credits. Gray, Dickey, Creighton.) 

303. Diseases of Florida Crops — Practical methods of combatting 
fungus and bacterial diseases of Florida crops. Signs of infection, 
diagnosis, means of transmission and methods of control. A study 
of citrus, cotton, grape and certain vegetable diseases, etc. (Pre- 
requisite: Plant Pathology 301 or equivalent. Laboratory fee, $3.50. 
1 class and 2 laboratory periods. 3 credits. Dickey, Gray.) 

304. Diseases of Florida Crops — A survey of the diseases of subtrop- 
ical and ornamental plants with the introduction of certain vegetable 
diseases when available. (Prerequisite: Plant Pathology 301 or 
equivalent. Laboratory fee, $3.50. 1 class and 2 laboratory periods. 
3 credits. Dickey, Gray.) 

401-402. Laboratory Technique in Plant Pathology — Preparation 
of culture media, isolation, cultivation and physiological study of 
plant pathogenes; inoculation of host plants, relation to disease and 
the preparation of histological material. (Laboratory fee, $5.00. 
1 class and 3 laboratory periods. 8 credits, or more, to be arranged. 
Gray.) 



224 POLITICAL SCIENCE 

403-404. Mycology — Detailed study of fungi in reference to origin, 
systematic relationships, cytology and economic bearing on plant 
disease work. Collection and classification of local fungi. (2 class 
and 1 laboratory periods. 6 credits. Gray.) 

501-502. Research — Course in special laboratory and field methods. 
For graduate students, (Hours and credit to be arranged. Gray and 
Dickey.) | 

503-504. Problems in Plant Pathology — Problems to be selected on 
approval of the instructor. Required of graduate students registered 
for degree in the department. (Hours and credit to be arranged. 
Gray.) 

POLITICAL SOENCE 

(Administered under the Department of History and Political Science) 
Professor Leake, Assistant Professor Tribolet, Instructor Glunt, Instructor Carleton. 

101 (102). (a) American Government and Politics — A study of 
the structure and functions of our American national, state, local, 
and municipal governments. J 

(b) State and Municipal Government — An outline of the growth 
of American municipalities and a study of the organs and functional 
mechanism of modern cities of the United States and Europe. Em- 
phasis is laid upon the newer tendencies in municipal government, 
including the commission form and city-manager plan. (Prerequi- 
site for all higher courses. 3 hours. 6 credits. Leake.) 

201 (202). (a) Comparative Government; (b) Government and 
Organization of Great Britain — (3 hours. 6 credits.) Given 
1929-30. 

203 (204). American State and Municipal Administration — (3 
hours. 3 credits.) Given 1929-30. 

205 (206). (a) Principles of Political Science; (b) World Poli- 
tics and International Organization — (3 hours. 3 credits.) Given 
1929-30. 

301 (302), American Constitutional Law — (3 hours. 3 credits. 
Leake.) Given 1930-31. 

303 (304). International Law — (3 hours. 3 credits.) Given 1929-30. 

305 (306), Political Theories — (3 hours. 3 credits.) Given 1930-31, 



SOCIOLOGY 223 

POULTRY HUSBANDRY 

Professor Sanborn 

21. Poultry Essentials — Culling, feeding, housing, breeding, etc. 
(Short Courses. Laboratory fee, $1.00. 2 class and 1 laboratory 
periods. No credit.) 

202. Farm Poultry — Poultry as a modest sideline on the farm. Breeds 
and varieties; location and construction of buildings; feeding and 
management; incubation, breeding, rearing, care of adult birds on 
the farm. (Laboratory fee, $1.00. 2 class and 1 laboratory periods. 
3 credits.) 

301. Commercial Poultry Keeping — Growing and maturing pullets, 
fall and winter eggs, feeding and care, houses and yards, showing and 
advertising. (Laboratory fee, $2.00. 2 class and 1 laboratory pe- 
riods. 3 credits.) 

302. Commercial Poultry Keeping — Incubation, breeding, rearing, 
spring and summer work, culling, farm grown feeds and poultry pas- 
tures, marketing. (Laboratory fee, $2.00. 2 class and 1 laboratory 
periods. 3 credits.) 

401. Advanced Poultry Culture — Origin and study of breeds and va- 
rieties; score card and comparison judging; latest methods of select- 
ing high and low producing hens; mating for producing breeders and 
winners; practice judging. (^Prerequisites : Poultry Husbandry 301 
and 302. Laboratory fee, $1.00. 2 hours. 2 credits.) 

402. Poultry Management — Study of large farms, equipment of poul- 
try plants, planning of various buildings, laying out and conducting 
poultry farms. (Prerequisites: Poultry Husbandry 301 and 302. 
Laboratory fee, $1.00. 2 hours. 2 credits.) 

403. Project Problems — ^To be arranged with instructor. Egg hatch- 
ing, investigations, poultry feeding, artificial lighting, chicken pox, 
etc. (Prerequisites: Poultry Husbandry 301 and 302. 2 hours. 2 
credits.) 

SOCIOLOGY 

Professor Bristol, Instructor Carleton 

102. Development of Social Institutions— The development of such 
social institutions as the family, private property, the state, morals, 
religion, education. (3 hours. 3 credits. Bristol.) 



8 



^ 



226 SOCIOLOGY 

111-112. Introduction to Social Studies — An approach to the social 
sciences through biology and psychology; early man; landmarks in 
the history of civilization; problems of American citizenship. (Re- 
quired of freshmen in Teachers College not electing the Social Sci- 
ence Group. 2 hours. 4 credits. Bristol.) 

322. Rural Sociology — A broad survey of the field of rural life in 
its social aspects. (3 hours. 3 credits. Bristol.) 

323. Social Pathology — A case method of approach to a study of so- 
cial problems and approved methods of social action. (Should be 
preceded by Sociology 102 and 301 or Sociology 111-112. 3 hours. 
3 credits. Bristol.) 

324. Crime and Punishment — Nature and causes of crime; punish- 
ment, correction, prevention. Sociological aspects of criminal law 
and criminal procedure. Constructive proposals. (Prerequisite: one 
of the preceding courses in Sociology or consent of instructor. 3 
hours. 3 credits. Bristol.) 

332. Public Health — History of preventive medicine; personal hygiene; 
community hygiene; the recognition of the ordinary communicable 
diseases; sanitation; a constructive health program. (2 hours. 2 
credits. Lecturers provided by University of Florida, the State Board 
of Health and the Florida Public Health Association.) Given alter- 
nate years. ■ 

341. Social Progress — Goals and tests of social progress. Factors in 
social progress. Suggested programs of social reform such as Com- 
munism, Anarchism, Socialism. Constructive proposals. (3 hours. 
3 credits. Bristol.) Given alternate years. J 

424. Community Organization — Theory of community; process of 
community organization; formation of community ideals and cooper- 
ative activities. Formal organization of forces and agencies: health, 
business, philanthropic. The Community Chest Movement. (2 hours. 
2 credits. Bristol.) Given alternate years. Ji 

441. Principles of Sociology — A brief study of the principles of so- 
cial evolution, social organization, social control, and social progress. 
(3 hours. 3 credits. Bristol.) 

443. Race Problems — Causes of race antagonism; racial inequality. 
History, causes and effects of immigration. The Negro problem. 



i 



SPANISH 227 

(Prerequisite: One course in Sociology or consent of instructor. 3 
hours. 3 credits. Bristol.) Given alternate years. 
541-542. Seminar in Social Theory — For advanced students primarily 
graduates. (One 2 hour period per week. 6 credits. Bristol.) 

571-572. Seminar in Social Research and Investigation — Students 
individually and in groups will be directed in the investigation of 
social and industrial conditions with reports and discussions. For 
graduate students majoring in Sociology. (One two-hour period per 
week. 6 credits. Matherly, Bristol.) 

SPANISH AND GERMAN 

(For courses in German, see page 185.) 

Professor Crow, Associate Professor Hathaway, Instructor Hauptmann,* 
Instructor Johns, Instructor Kasten,* Instructor Magaro. 

SPANISH 

21 (22). Elementary Course — Pronunciation, grammar, dictation, ac- 
quisition of vocabulary, written exercises, and translation. (3 hours. 
6 credits.) 

101-102. Intermediate Course — Advanced grammar, composition, and 
translation. (Prerequisite: Spanish 22 or equivalent. 3 hours. 6 
credits.) 

201-202. Composition and Conversation — (Prerequisite: Spanish 102 
or equivalent and consent of Head of Department. 3 hours. 6 credits.) 

301-302. General Survey of Spanish Literature — A study of the 
history of Spanish literature supplemented by the reading of texts, 
emphasis being laid on the modern period. (Prerequisite: Spanish 
102 or equivalent. 2 hours. 4 or 6 credits.) 

303-304. General Survey of Spanish-American Literature — A study 
of the development of Spanish-American literature. Texts will be 
read to illustrate the various periods and nations. (Prerequisite: 
Spanish 102 or equivalent. 2 hours. 4 or 6 credits.) 

401-402. Literature of the Golden Age — A study of the drama, novel, 
and poetry of the Golden Age in Spanish literature. (Prerequisite: 
Spanish 302 or equivalent. 2 hours. 4 or 6 credits.) 

403-404. Old Spanish — A study of historical grammar and readings 
from old Spanish texts. (Prerequisite: Consent of instructor. 2 hours. 
4 credits.) 



♦Absent on leave 1928-1929. 



228 VETERINARY SCIENCE 

VETERINARY SCIENCE 

Professor Shealy 

301. Farm Sanitation — ^Water; sources and impurities; food; air; 
ventilation; disposal of excreta; disposal of carcasses; disinfection; 
sanitation following infectious diseases; internal parasites and their 
control. (2 hours. 2 credits.) 

302. Veterinary Elements — Elementary anatomy and physiology of 
the domestic animals; causes and symptoms of common diseases of 
animals; methods of prevention. (Prerequisite: Animal Husbandry 
102. For groups other than Animal Husbandry. 2 hours. 2 credits.) 

303 (304). Veterinary Anatomy and Physiology — The skeleton, ar- 
ticulations, muscles, circulation, respiration, digestion, absorption and 
the nervous system. (Prerequisite: Animal Husbandry 102. Labora- 
tory fee, $2.00 per semester. 2 class and 1 laboratory periods. 6 
credits.) 

401. Animal Diseases — Causes, symptoms, treatment and methods of 
prevention of common diseases of farm animals. (Prerequisites: 
Veterinary Science 302 or 303-304. 2 hours. 2 credits.) 

402. Poultry Diseases — Causes, symptoms, post mortem examinations, 
methods of prevention, and treatment for diseases of poultry. (2 
hours. 2 credits.) 



PART V 

DEGREES 

CONFERRED 

1928 



230 



DEGREES CONFERRED 



Richard S. Berrey 



John Mann Boyd 
William Edward Flood 



Jomes Robert Moorehead 



DEGREES CONFERRED 

MAY 29, 1928 

Master of Arts 

David Franklin McDowell 
Charles Vernon Schoppe 

Master of Arts in Education 
Vedasto Zabala Munoz 

Master of Science 

Mont Broderick Moore 
Mamie Shaw* 
Charles C. Swoope 

Master of Science in Agriculture 
Henry Trask Cowles 

Master of Science in Business Administration 
Edward Hutchings Anderson 

Civil Engineer 

Alexander Angus Gillis 
Joseph Neilson Watkins 

Electrical Engineer 
Nelson Drennan Cooper 

Mechanical Engineer 
John Capron Babson 

Bachelor of Arts 



Irwin Barnard Anderson* 
Cecil Dupuis Beck 
Louis Spencer Bonsteel 
John Andre Bouvier, Jr.* 
Chas. Henry Hardin Branch, Jr. 
Monroe Campbell, Jr. 
Thomas William Cantey* 
Murray Golden Cohen 
Wayne Byron Dale 
Wilbur Y. Gary 
Jerome Albert Gratigny 
William Curry Harris* 

Gardiner 



William Logan Hill* 
Merton Stuart Horrell 
George Leighton LaFuze* 
Richard Abbott Lawrence 
John Camp Maultsby 
Henry Harris Meador 
Claude L. Murphree 
Elwood Pillsbury Padgett 
Joseph Hutton Russell 
Berwyn Reed Spofford* 
Cecil Asbury Thompson 
Charles Weston Tucker, Jr. 
Warren Welch 



Bachelor of Science 



James Louden Borland 
Leslie CoUins 
Joseph Otto Keezel 
James Milton McClamroch 



Roger Earle Phillips 
Edgar James Smoak 
George Walling Wilder 
Harold Buckley Young 



Bachelor of Science in Agriculture 

John McDavid Cobb James Andrews Hudson 

Trusten Polk Drake, Jr. Reginald Max Jones 

Albert Gilchrist Driggers Lawrence John Larson* 

Arthur Garner Erwin Vedasto Zabala Munoz 

Justo Jose Fabrega Leonard Raymond Toy* 

Raymond Holt Howard David Gasston Worth 



"Member Phi Kappa Phi, Honorary Fraternity. 



DEGREES CONFERRED 



231 



Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering 

Paul McCreary Blair William Allen McLendon 

Olen Campbell* Kenneth Wallace Prest 

Archibald Lewis Clayton, Jr.* William Edward Swoope 

Karl Daniel Henderly* Orren Lee Van Valkenburg* 

John Fleming Huddleston* Arthur Bingham Weissinger 

Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering 



Jesse Bryant Beasley 
William David Cockrell* 
Albert Clarke Dean 
William Edelstein 
Jett McLauren Jenkins 
William Hughes Johnson" 



James Gaylord Keck 
Rex Eytong Lee* 
Qifford Aukincloss Lyle 
Frederick Ralph Sias 
Joe Perry Windham 
Frederick Ellis Wray 



Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering 

William Harrison Easton George Corwin Robertson 

George Hoffman Smith 

Bachelor of Suence in Chemical Engineering 
Walter John Sciutti* Robert Charles Shimp 



Yervant Harry Baghdoian* 
Robert Edward Cope, Jr. 
Merton Stuart Horrell* 



William Oliver Anderson 
Fred Randolph Baisden 
Norris Frederick Baskin 
Chester Leigh Benedict, Jr. 
Frank Dean Boggs 
Everett Hill Butler 
William Marvin Clifton 
John Lincoln Cogdill 
William Joseph DeHoff 
Carroll Fontaine Dewees 
Frank Britt Dowling* 
Borden McLeod Dyer 
Julian Earle Fant 
John Melvin Hearn 
Benjamin Edgar Hendricks 
William Franklin Hobbs 
Francis Gresham Janes, Jr. 
Wilbur Donald Jobe 
Birkett Fry Jordan 
Ronald Arthur Julian 



Juris Doctor 

J. Malcolm Johnson, Jr. 
Ernest Edward Mason 
Alma Spencer Slagle* 
Olin Ethredge Watts, Jr.* 

Bachelor of Laws 

Edmund Alexander Leike 
Emanuel Millman 
John A. Henderson Murphree 
Richard Morris Naylor 
William Cook Norvell, Jr. 
Francis Cooper Pelot 
Bonny Kas!o Roberts 
Marcus Aurel Rosin 
Sam Wallace Russ 
Byron Tewilliger Sauls 
Harold Leon Sebring 
William Wsdlace Shafer 
Foster Shi Smith 
Cyrus Hamlin Smithdeal, Jr. 
Ignatius C. Spoto 
Hugh Monroe Sutton, Jr. 
Marion Huguenin West* 
Conrad Joseph Weirsteiner 
William Sidney Wilson, Jr. 
Richard Starkey Woodruff 

Lewis Thomas Wray 



Bachelor of Arts in Education 



Jasper Newton Copeland 
Lonnie Lee Dugger 
Wallace Clarence Durham 
William Walter Flournoy 
Arthur Sylvester Green* 
Lawrence Tracy Harrington 



Herbert Joseph Leuthner 
Arvel Lewis Morgan* 
Leland Wills Moon 
Jennings Alligood Rehwinkel* 
James Willard Trammel 
Hiram Allen Whitton 
Angelo David Williams 



* Member Phi Kappa Phi, Honorary Fraternity. 



232 



RESERVE CORPS COMMISSIONS 



Bachelor of Science in Education 
Alexanler Hamilton Brodmerkel Ross Everett Jeffries 

Earl Clay Clevenger* James Emery Smith 

Oscar Leon Durrance Mode Lee Stone 

Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy 
Bertram D. Walton 



Bachelor of 
Merle Oliver Bamd 
Reginald Guy Cassady 
Joseph Ashley Cawthon 
Charles B. Davidson, Jr. 
John Robert Dillon, Jr. 
Kenneth Greig Haggart 
Richard Moir Mulchings 



Science in Business Administration 
Walter Herbert Jackson* 
Lewis Allen Lancaster* 
Robert Powell Majors 
Hugh McCall 

Thomas Franklin Newman 
Alden C. Smith 
Benjamin Franklin Ridenour 
Fred Curtis Ward* 



Jr. 



Bachelor of Science in Journalism 
William Jerrold Bulloch Malcolm LaMar Fordham 

Paul Rutherford Robertson 

Bachelor of Science in Social Administration 
Eleanor Rowena Marchman 



CERTIFICATES CONFERRED 



Carl Parmely Arant 
Clarence Jessee Bowman 



Gordon Alonzo Baker 
Jonathen A. Black 
Richard Harry DeBoer 
Chancey George Hamilton 



Normal Diploma 

Mason Wayne Morrow 
Carey Ellis Swinington 

Pharmaceutical Chemist 

Joseph Huske Pearce* 
Erwin M. Seay 
Richard Harrison Swaine 
Marcus D. Waldron 



Graduate in Pharmacy 
Frank L Zumwalt 

RESERVE CORPS COMMISSIONS 

Second Lieutenant Infantry 



Abernathy, James Greenwood, Jr. 

Anderson, Irwin Barnard 

Arnett, William Tobias 

Bell, Walter Blaisdell 

Blair, Paul McCreary 

Brooks, Roy Ray 

Brown, Newton Walker 

Brown, Robert Hamilton, Jr. 

Cawthon, Joseph Ashley 

Cox, Arthur Slater 

Curtis, Fred 

Davidson, Charles Borum, Jr. 

Dillon, John Robert, Jr. 

Ferris, Bernhardt Lee 

Fuller, Thomas 

Gravely, Louis Overton, Jr. 

Green, Carl Roger 

Green, George Marvin 



Hunnicutt, Milton Reese, Jr. 
Jordan, William Douglas 
Lawrence, Richard Abbott 
Leszczynski, Roman Casimer 
Majors, Robert Powell 
Miller, Robert Thomas 
Mizell, Bascom Fernando 
Mizell, John Keener 
Morgan, Arvel Lewis 
O'Donald, Edward Todd 
Ridenour, Benjamin Franklin 
Smoak, Edgar James 
Walker, Ion Sessions 
Walton, Bertran David 
Ward, Fred Curtis 
Wilder, George Walling 
Windham, Joseph Perry 
Wray, Frederick Ellis 



"Member Phi Kappa Phi, Honorary Fraternity. 



DEGREES CONFERRED SUMMER SCHOOL 233 

Certificates in Lieu of Commissions 
Bullock, William Jerrold Ramsey, Allan Collier 

Denham, George Leitner Sims, William Harris, Jr. 

Crenelle, Edwin William Smith, George Hoffman 

Hughes, Robert Lawrence, Jr. Watrous, Thomas Monroe 

Matthews, Donald Ray Welles, Gurdon Henry 

SUMMER SCHOOL COMMENCEMENT 
DEGREES CONFERRED 

SUMMER SCHOOL 1928 

Master of Arts 
Allen Thornton Craig Angus McKenzie Laird 

Alton Chester Morris 

Master of Arts in Education 
Ellis Moore 

Master of Science 

Donald Carr Booth Roy Lewis Cunningham 

Wendell Creager Setzer 

Master of Science in Business Administration 
William Trotter Hicks 

Bachelor of Science 

* Edward Thorpe Boardman Leon Fitzpatrick Fernald 

Bachelor of Science in Agriculture 

Frederick Ernest Baetzman Herbert Graham Guy 

Charles Ralph Dawson Rex Foster Toole 

Bachelor of Laws 

Richard William Ervin * William Stanley Hitchcock 

William Burch Fudger Thomas Marshall 

Joseph Maria Gomez Harry Irwin Young 

Bachelor of Arts in Education 

* George Arbic William Homer Potter 
*John Russell Clayton Cawthon Amandus Reithmeier 
Carl Henly Harris Wilfred Simmons 
Sarah Satterwhite Harris Wilma Simmons 
Frank Samuel Hudnall Sister Anna Maria 
*Albert Louis Isaac *Annie Belle Stewart 
Thomas Hill Langston Lida Tulane 

Carolyn Harris Meadows Andrew Jackson G. Wells 

*William Simpson Weaver 

* Member Phi Kappa Phi, Honorary Fraternity. 



234 



DEGREES CONFERRED SUMMER SCHOOL 



Dan Pouncey Folsom 
John Christian Leps 



Bachelor of Science in Education 
Memory Martin 
Horace Edgar Richey 



Bachelor of Science in Business Administration 
Henry Frater Charles Jason Loworn 

Metzgar Elroy Josey Bascom Fernando Mizell 

* Henry Peel 



Thomas Asson 
Dorothy Mary Beaver 
Adelia Johnson Blacklock 
Ida Gertrude Canney 
Alice Love Church 
Fannie Camming 
Annie Elizabeth DaCosta 
William Thomas Edwards 
Hettie Bedford Harwell 
Kate Miles Hemphill 
Jay Derieux Hobbs 
Clara Belle Ledbetter 
Broward Napoleon Lovell 



Normal Diploma 

Jacob Henderson Marshburn, Jr. 
Robert Thomas Miller 
Irene Elizabeth Morris 
Harold Wilbur Myers 
Lavinia B. Peterson 
Daisie Poole 
Edward Right Poppell 
Anna Laura Read 
Ashley Roche Russ 
Sarah Harrison Semmes 
Flora Eveline Walter 
Bureon Kylus Wheeler 
Rosa Belle White 
Emma Dyer Wicker 



*Member Phi Kappa Phi, Honorary' Fraternity. 



PHI KAPPA PHI 



235 



PHI KAPPA PHI HONOR SOCIETY 

OFFICERS 1928-1929 

A. P. Black President 

J. W. Norman Vice-President 

B. W. Ames Secretary 

Cora Miltimore Treasurer 

C. L. Crow Historian 



ELECTED DURING THE SUMMER SESSION 1928 



Carie-Benie Boyd 
John R. Cawthon 
George Arbic 



E. T. Boardman 
W. S. Hitchcock 
Albert L. Isaac 



Henry Peel 

Annie Belle Stewart 

W. S. Weaver 



UNDERGRADUATES ELECTED 1928-29 

Arts and Sqences 



L. R. Bristol 
Fred D. Ayers 
J. Webster Merritt 



J. E. Mclntyre 



C. E. Mines 
A. E. Hills 
R. H. Brown 



M. M. Kendall 
A. D. Brown 
N. J. Roberts 



F. M. DeGaetani 
L. N. Henderson 



J. R. Graves 
J. D. Copeland 



Ben PerlofiF 
Barkley Rosser 

Agriculture 
M. R. Bedsole 

Engineering 
P. C. Crapps 
W. T. Amett 

Law 

J. L. Graham 

J. M. Atwater, Jr. 

Teachers 
L. A. Guessez 
C. J. Bowman 

Commerce and Journalism 
P. C. Scaglione 
H. Frazier 



J. A. Connor 
J. V. McQuitty 



J. E. Sawyer 



A. W. Payne 
N. A. Skeels 
L H. Smith 



Sam Silverman 
Marcus Edelstein 
0. S. Thacker 



Samuel Eff 
J. L. Scolten 



C. T. Parsons 
W. L. Wilder 



ORATORICAL HONORS 
1928 

Freshman- Sophomore Declamation Contest Alvin Bearing 

Junior Oratorical Contest Benjamin Thornal 

Senior Oratorical Contest George H. Smith 



236 



REGISTER 



STUDENT ROLL, 1928-29 



The classification of students is indicated by the following abbreviations: 
AB or BS — College of Arts and Sciences; Ag — College of Agriculture; BA — College of 
Commerce; ChEI — Chemical Engineering; CE — Civil Engineering; J — Journalism; E — College 
of Engineering; EE — Electrical Engineering; A — Architecture; G — Graduate School; L — Col- 
lege of Law; ME — Mechanical Engineering; P — College of Pharmacy; PM — Pre Medical: 
T — Teachers College; 1, 2, 3, 4 — First, Second, Third and Fourth years, respectively; 5 — 
Adult Special Students. 



Name and Classification Address 

Abbott, Charles Elliott, G Gainesville 

Abernathy, James Greenwood, L 4 

— Ft. Lauderdale 
Adams, Charles Raymond, BS 1 Hastings 

Adams, Clarence Edgar, AB 2 Warner, N. H. 
Adams, Gordon Stewart, J 3 Gainesville 

Adams, Jean Stacey, E 1 ; BS 1 Sanford 

Adams, John Franklin, EE 2 Jacksonville 
Adams, John Quincy, Ag 1 Crystal River 
Adams, LeRoy, PM 1 Jasper 

Adams, Mark Elbert, BS 3 Jacksonville 

Adams, Robert, T 1 Jacksonville 

Adams, Samuel Hugh, P 1 Freeport 

Addison, Joe, G., PM 1 Punta Gorda 

Adelson, David, BS 1 Tampa 

Agerton, Thomas Bush, AB 1 Auburndale 
Ahmann, Chester Frederick, G Gainesville 
Ahrano, Jean Pierre, BA 2 Tampa 

Aikin, Horace Dean, L 4 St. Petersburg 

Aikin, Winton James, E 1 Toledo, Ohio 

Airth, Alfred Thomas, L 3 Live Oak 

Airth, George Edward, L 4 Live Oak 

Akin. Elisha Gunter, AB 2 Dade City 

Akridge, William Greenberry, L 3 Cocoa 

Albritton, Robert Bruce, P 1 Mulberry 

Alchediak, Mike Karam, EE 2 Tampa 

Alexander, Robert Kenneth, BA 1 Tampa 
Alexander, Thomas, L 1 Tampa 

Alexander, Thomas Ley, BS 2 Tampa 

Allan, Addison Lazear, J 2 Jacksonville 

Allen, Chester Robinson, T 4 Auburndale 
Allen, John Edward, L 5 Tampa 

Allen, J. W., BS 3 Manatee 

Allen, Ralph Fred, BA 1 ; BS 1 Milton 

Allen, Theodore, PM 2 Manatee 

Alonzo, Wesley Jenkins, P 1 Gainesville 

Alvarez, Lawrence, T 1 Jacksonville 

Ames, Burton Weber, G Loughman 

Amos, John Ernest, BA 3 Tallahassee 

Amrein, Werner Charles Ernest, E 3 

— St. Petersburg 
Anchors, Garner Beauford, AB 1 Niceville 
Anderson, Arthur Lochridge, L 1 Tampa 

Anderson, Charles B., L 4 Tampa 

Anderson, Frank Cellon, BA 1 Bradenton 

Anderson, Frank Marvin, BS 4 Orlando 
Anderson, Frank Newton, BS 2 Gainesville 
Anderson, Hans Olaf, Ag 2 Pierson 

Anderson, Hugh B., BS 1 Ft. Meade 

Anderson, Oliver Wendell, Ag 1 Dade City 
Anderson, Richard Aubrey, BS 1 

— Crystal River 
Anderson, Thomas Edward, BA 2 

— Jacksonville 
Anderson, William Farris. L 1 Orlando 

Andreas, Robert Alan, AB 2 

— New Phila., Ohio 
Andrews, Charles Forrest, BA 1 Gainesville 
Andrews, Charles Lester, T 3 Darlington 
Andrews, John McCall, AB 1 Jacksonville 
Angle, Allie Bayard, PM 2 St. Petersburg 
Anglin, Edgar Edward, T 2 Bunnell 

Anthony, Henry Duncan, BA 3 Jacksonville 
Anthony, James Rembert, BA 2 

— Jacksonville 
Arango, Joseph Lawrence, T 1 Tampa 

Archibald, Robert Burns, BA 2 Jacksonville 
Armistead, Austin Bernice, BS 1 

—Laurel Hill 



Name and Classification Address 

Armstrong, Leo Henry, CE 2 Manatee 

Arnett, William Tobias, A 4 Clermont 

Arnold, Laurie James, T 2 Lake City 

Arnow, Carlton Columbus, L 1 Hawthorne 
Arnow, Leslie Earle, P 3 Gainesville 

Arnow, Robert E., CE 2 Hawthorne 

Arnow, Winston Eugene, AB 2 Gainesville 
Arrington, Briggs, T 2 Sanford 

Ash, Albert Lynn, AB 1 Tarpon Springs 
Ashkenazy, Irving, J 1 Tallahassee 

Ashmead, Forrest Graham, BA 4 

— Jacksonville 
Ashmore, Freeman Winton, BS 3 

— Gainesville 
Ashmore, Wayne Verriel, BA 2 Gainesville 
Atkins, George Wesley, L 1 Blountstown 
Atkinson, Meldrum Williams, T 1 

— Panama City 
Atwater, James M , L 4 

— Burlington, N. C. 
Augat, John G., BS 1 Attleboro, Mass. 

Ausley, Charles Saxon, L 3 Tallahassee 

Austin, Archie Boyd, G Wingo, Ky. 

Austin, Elmer Dale, T 1 Umatilla 

Austin, Hugh Stewart, AB 4 Orlando 

Austin, Marion Fontain, Ag 1 Leesburg 
Auvil, Colon Sealey, AB 2 Dade City 

Axtell, Reginald Randall, L 1 Jacksonville 
Ayers, Fred Donald, BS 4 Gainesville 

Ayres, Willard Wood, T 1 Miami 

Babcock, Claude Guthrie, BA 2 Key West 
Babloozian, Levon Megrditch, BS 1 

— Gainesville 
Bachlott, Maurice Randolph, ME 4 

— Gainesville 
Baer, Allan Oliver, BA 2 Lakeland 

Baggott, Charles Edward, G Plant City 

Baggs, David Frederick, P 2 Tallahassee 
Bailey, Kenneth G., BS 1 Hastings 

Bailey, Wilfred George, L 3 Port Richey 
Baker, Donald Felter, Ag 4 Coral Gables 
Baker, Ira Lee, T 1 Delray Beach 

Baker, Robert Britton, E 1 Hawthorne 

Baketel, Sherman Tenney, PM 2 

— Mathuen, Mass. 
Baldwin, Donald Morrison, PM 2 

— Jacksonville 
Baldwin, Hildreth Clarence, AB 2 

— Tampa 
Baldwin, James Clinton, BS 1 Chipley 

Baldwin, Lloyd, BS 3 Miami 

Bancroft, Winthrop, L 4 Gainesville 

Bannerman, Robert Charles, CE 2 

— Tallahassee 
Baque, Frank, BA 1 Miami 

Barber, Merrill Phillip, AB 1 Vero Beach 
Barber, Walter Lanier, T 1 Sanford 

Barcus, Harry, BS 1 Leesburg 

Barker, Albert Edward, AB 2 Jacksonville 
Barker, Howard, T 2 Ft. Meade 

Barker, John Shearer, T 2 Gainesville 

Barker, Quentin Hansen, BA 1 Wildwood 
Barnes, Charles Olin, G Plant City 

Barnett, Lucian Phillips, BS 1 Gainesville 
Barnhill, William Benjamin, Ag 5 

— Gainesville 
Barnum, John Merton, AB 1 Miami 



REGISTER 



y p(r , I JL-- 



237 



Name and Classification Address 
Barrineau, James Archibald, Ag 2 Gonzalez 
Barrow, David Crenshaw, BS 1 DeSota City 
Barrow, Jospeh Reneay, Ag 2 Arcadia 

Barshell, Frederick Herbert, T 2 Avon Park 
Bartleson, Warren K., E 2 Lake Wales 

Bartlett, Stuart Ellis, Ag 2 Vero Beach 
BaBhaw, William Niles, AB 3 Gainesville 
Bass, Clayton Claude, L 1 Live Oak 

Bass, Joe, BA 3 Tampa 

Bass, Tobe Ackies, Ag 2 St. Cloud 

Bassett, Henry D, T 2 Tampa 

Bassett, Lloyd Ross, E 3 St. Petersburg 

Batchelor, Donald Laveen, BS 1 

— Homestead 
Bateman, Robert Edward, Apr 4 Wauchula 
Bates, Mortimer Boler, BA 2 Quincy 

Bauer, Albert Frederick, Ag 3 Groveland 
Bauer, George Frederick, Ag 1 Warrington 
Baumgartner, Dorst Frederick, BA 4 Sarasota 
Baur, William Hugh, PM 1 Quincy 

Bayly, Cyril, A 4 Gainesville 

Baynard, Henry Swinton, L 4 St. Petersburg 
Beach, George M., PM 1 Hastings 

Beachem, Joseph William, CE 3 

— Anastasia Island 
Beardsley, Edward Henry, BA 4 Jacksonville 
Beasley, Clarence White, T 1 Gainesville 
Beasley, Ivy E., T 2 Umatilla 

Beasley, Robert G., EE 3 Umatilla 

Becker, Harold Melvin, PM 2 

— Las Animas, Colo. 
Beckwith, Donald William, ME 4 

— ^Jacksonville 
Bedsole, Malcolm Roy, Ag 4 Graceville 

Beggs, Elmer Dixie, AB 3 Pensacola 

Beldner, Leonard Kelman, T 1 Miami 

Bell, Charles Edward, G Gainesville 

Bell, Fred Vincent, AB 1 Atlanta, Ga. 

Bell, Stuart Craig, Ag 1 Barberville 

Bell, Tom Devereaux, E 1 Arcadia 

Bell, Walter Blaisdell, BA 2 

— Daytona Beach 
Bendle, Harold Wright, BA 1 Miami 

Benjamin, Morris, BA 2 Sanford 

Bennett, Breece Erin, BS 1 Oak Hill 

Bennett, Charles Edward, BS 1 Tampa 

Bennett, Harold Phillip, PM 1 

— St. Petersburg 
Bennett, Joel Willard, A 5 

— Charlotte Harbor 
Bennett, Robert Broadhurst, ChE 2 Tampa 
Bennett, Stanley LeRoy L 4 

— Prospect Plains, N. Y. 
Benson, Robert Thomas, T 4 Manatee 

Benton, Felix, A 2 Tampa 

Bergert, John Frederick, BA 3 Loughman 
Berlack, Laurence Harold, BA 2 

— Jack son vi lie 
Berner, Leander W., ME 2 Sanford 

Berry, Flournoy James, BA 2 ; BS 1 

— Pierce 
Berryhill, Thomas Oscar, L 1 

— Ft. Lauderdale 
Bethea, Lee Roy, T 2 Gainesville 

Bevan, Jospeh, AB 2 Madison 

Bevington, Myron Thomas, T 2 

—Lake Worth 
Biggers, Willard Brady, BS 1 Miami 

Biilingham, Frank Edwin, BA 1 

— Winter Park 
Bir, George P., BA 1 Huntington, Ind. 

Bisant, Oscar Melville, BS 3 Jacksonville 

Bishop, Donald Emery, AB 3 Gainesville 
Bishop, Homer Gould, Ag 5 Oshkosh, Wis. 
Bishop, Howard Wayne, L 4 Gainesville 

Bishop, Wilbur, PM 2 Gainesville 

Black, Arthur Keith, L 4 Gainesville 

Black, Kermit Kellog, L 1 Tampa 

Black, Kermit Lamar, BA 3 Minneola 

Black, Lassie Goodbread, Ag 2 Lake City 



Name and Classification Address 
Blackwell, Jacob Beck, BS 2 Panama City 
Blair, Luther C, ChE 2 Orlando 

Blair, William Stuart, BA 2 Clearwater 

Blalock, Lewis F., BA 3 Ocala 

Blalock, Maury Jelks, T 2 Madison 

Blalock, Thomas Lewis, AB 2 Jacksonville 
Blanck, Bernard G., BA 3 Miami 

Blanton, Franklin Sylvester, Ag 4 

— Atmore, Ala. 
Blanton, Lane, T 1 Wauchula 

Blasingame, Powell Newton, CE 4 

— Gainesville 
Blocker, William Michel, A 2 Tampa 

Blow, John Nichols, BA 2 Montgomery, Ala. 
Bludworth, William Howard, BS 1 Argyle 
Blue, William Floyd, T 1 Perry 

Boales, Maxwell Lee, BA 2 Daytona Beach 
Boardman, Edward Tliorp, G Gainesville 

Bogan, Leslie E., BA 4 Pensacola 

Bogart, John Allen Calhoun, CE 2 

— Fernandina 
Bogle, James Huflf, BA 2 Sebring 

Boley, Robert Clyde, T 2 Tampa 

Bolton, Charles Houston, BS 1 Palm Beach 
Bond, William Bours, L 1 Jacksonville 

Bondi. Joe Charles, PM 2 Tampa 

Bono, Louis J., T 2 Jacksonville 

Bonsteel, Louis Spencer, L 3 Gainesville 

Boone, Archie Altman, A 4 Gainesville 

Boone, Jarrett Potter, AB 1 Miami 

Boote, Joseph Owen, BA 3 Jacksonville 

Booth, Clyde W., E 5 Sanford 

Boozer, Elwin Claude, L 4 W. Palm Beach 
Borders, Huey Ingles, Ag 4 Jacksonville 

Bostick, John Nathaniel, PM 2 Gainesville 
Bostwick, Robert Sturgeon, E 1 Jacksonville 
Bostwick, Thomas, E 1 Jacksonville 

Botts, Ralph Rudolph, E 1 ; BA 1 Tampa 
Boudet, Marcel Anselme, Ag 1 Lake Worth 
Bouvier, John Andre, L 4 Gainesville 

Bowen, Elton Lee, BA 2 Chipley 

Bowen, Maynard Lea, G 

— Albuquerque, N. Mexico 
Bowersox, William, T 1 Cottage Hill 

Bowman, Clarence James, T 4 Wauchula 
Bowyer, Ernest Jerome, T 3 Gainesville 
Boyce, William Hazen, E 1 Sebring 

Boyd, Crowther Mann, BA 2 Jacksonville 

Boyd, James Cody, BA 4 Tavares 

Boyd, John William, BA 1 ; BS 1 

— Ft. Lauderdale 
Boyd, Randolph Wilson, T 3 Jacksonville 
Boyd, Robert William, BA 3 Orlando 

Boyd, William Daniel, G Jacksonville 

Boyd, William Wallace, EE 3 Clermont 

Boyette, James Ancil, T 1 Lake Wales 

Boyts, Joseph Eugene, BA 3 Gainesville 

Bradford, A. Lee, L 4 Miami 

Bradshaw, Donald Gregory, ChE 2 ; BA 1 

— Lake Jovita 
Brady, Robert Converse, Ag 1 Titusville 

Branch, Garland Marion, T 3 Plant City 

Brand, Fred Perkins, BS 1 Clermont 

Brandon, Clarence William, AB 2 Groveland 
Brandon, J. Davis, EE 2 Brandon 

Brandt, Edward Frederick, L 3 Gainesville 
Brannon, William Brantley, L 1 Lake City 
Brant, Ishmael Winfred, T 1 Oklawaha 

Brantley, James Worth, PM 1 Grandin 

Brantley, Thomas Bruce, BA 1 Ft. Pierce 
Brasfield, Herbert, AB 1 Clearwater 

Braswell, Thomas Mills, T 1 Monticello 

Bratley, Forrest Groves, BS 4 Miami 

Brenan, George Francis, BA 1 Orlando 

Brennan, Philip Kenneth, BS 1 Delray Beach 
Brick, Edward J., BS 2 Marianna 

Bridges, Thomas William, BA 1 

• — Chattanooga, Tenn. 



238 



REGISTER 



Name and Classification Address 
Brinkley, Harry John, Ag 1 Jacksonville 

Bristol, Loris R., AB 4 Gainesville 

Brockman, Alfred Eugene, AB 2 

— 3t. Petersburg 
Brogdon, Wright Martin, L 1 Miami 

Brooker, Layton Robert, BA 3 Tampa 

Brooks, Richard Lee. Ag 1 Montreal, Quebec 
Brooks, Robert Luther, Ag 1 Montbrook 

Brooks, Roy Bay, L 3 Tampa 

Brothers, Shelby Lee, Ag 2 Reddick 

Brough, Ronald Claude, BA 1 ; T 1 

— Jacksonville 
Browder, David, AB 2 ; T 2 Leesburg 

Brown, A. Dana, L 4 St. Petersburg 

Brown, Arthur Dunning, AB 2 Tampa 

Brown, Broadus Gate, EE 2 Gainesville 

Brown, Charles Albert, T 1 Jacksonville 

Brown, Clyde Ree, LI W. Palm Beach 
Brown, George Rodney, J 5 Daytona Beach 
Brown, Harvey Drennen, T 1 Leesburg 

Brown, Marvin Augustus, BS 1 

— Manchester, N. H. 
Brown, Newton Walker, CE 3 

— W. Palm Beach 
Brown, Merritt, T 1 Panama City 

Brown, Oren, Ag 1 Kissimmee 

Brown, Robert Hamilton, A 4 Bartow 

Brown, Sheldon Webb, AB 2 Palatka 

Brown, William Franklin, L 1 Miami 

Brownett, Francis Harold, A 1 Jacksonville 
Browning, John O'Donnell, T 3 Miami 

Browning, Louis Park, E 1 Gainesville 

Brumbaugh, Carl Lowry, T 4 Gainesville 
Brumley, Frank Warren, G Gainesville 

Bruner, Gerald James, T 1 Stuart 

Brunk, Lloyd Sandy, Ag 3 Sebring 

Bruton, James DeWitt, L 1 Plant City 

Bryan, Johnson Hamlin, L 4 Jacksonville 
Bryan, Perry N., T 3 Ft. Lauderdale 

Bryan, Thomas Barnes, CE 3 Greenwood 
Bryan, William Allan, L 4 Charlotte, N. C. 
Bryant, Bronson Worthington, T 5 

— Gainesville 
Bryson, John Angus, T 2 Jacksonville 

Buck, K. v., L 3 Miami 

Buckley, John Albert, T 2 St. Petersburg 
Buckley, Thomas Hartwell, J 1 Miami 

Budington, Julian Paul, BA 2 Daytona 

Buel, Clark Harry, CE 3 St. Augustine 

Buel, Ernest McClung, BS 1 Jacksonville 
Buie, George Archie, L 4 Lake City 

Bull, John Francis, L 1 Gainesville 

Bullard, William J., BA 3 Gainesville 

Bullock, Roy Leighton, PM 1 Graceville 
Burch, Earl, BS 1 Palmetto 

Burch. Ernest William, L 3 Ocala 

Burger, Alfred Grant, PM 1 Jacksonville 

Burke, William Henry, J 3 Gainesville 

Burnett, William, Ag 1 Bradenton 

Burns, Paul McKinnon, PM 2 Graceville 

Burr, Raymond O., L 4 Gainesville 

Burton, Louise Screven, Ag 3 Leesburg 

Burton, Walter Garland, E 1 Jacksonville 
Burton, William Mosby, BS 3 Madison 

Butler, Byron Neel, L 1 Chipley 

Butler, Dantzler Albert, T 2 Daytona 

Butler, Mark D., BS 4 Miami 

Butler, Robert Dopson, BS 1 Sneads 

Butler, Valery Dekle, BA 1 Chipley 

Butt, Thomas Cecil, PM 2 Orlando 

Butts, John L., G Artesia, Miss. 

Byrd, William Boardman, J 3 Hollywood 

Byrnes, Robert Edward, BA 2 Jacksonville 

Cain, Thomas Leonard, Ag 3 

— St. Simons Island, Ga. 
Caldwell, John Erwin, ME 3 DeLand 

Caldwell, William Earl, T 3 Jacksonville 



Name and Classification Address 
Calhoun, Paul White, BS 3 Madison 

Calmes, Glenn B., BA 2 Daytona Beach 

Calvert, Donald Ellwood, L 3 Hamilton, Pa. 
Calvin, William John, BS 1 Eustis 

Camp, Clarence, T 1 Ocala 

Camp, Henry Nurney, L 3 Ocala 

Camp, John Perlin, G Gainesville 

Campas, Joseph John, BA 4 F^. Meade 

Campbell, Byron Fred, L 3 Hilliard 

Campbell, James Theodore, T 1 Zephyrhills 
Campbell, Jean Ingram, E 1 Ft. Pierce 
Campbell, Vernon George, CE 3 Tampa 

Campbell, Wilbur Ray, AB 1 Orlando 

Campbell, William Lambert, P 1 Kissimmee 
Campo, John Recca, P 2 Stamford, Conn. 

Cannon, Frank, L 4 Falmouth 

Cantey, Francis Fleming, BA 1 Madison 

Caplan, Salem David, E 5 Miami Beach 

Caraballo, Julian Evans, E 1 Tampa 

Caraballo, Martin, AB 2 Tampa 

Carbonell, Fred Segundo, PM 1 Key West 
Carleton, William Graves, L 3 

— Evansville, Ind. 
Carlisle, Charles Stanley, BS 1 Jacksonville 
Carlton, Doyle Ivan, AB 2 Ft. Meade 

Carlton, Ernest Odell, BS 1 : T 1 Wauchula 
Carlton, Marby A., L 3 Gainesville 

Carlton, Thad H., L 3 Ft. Pierce 

Carlton, Winston Broaddus, T 1 Wauchula 
Carmichael, Parks Mason, L 1 Gainesville 
Carmichael, Scobey Kustin, Ag 1 

— W. Palm Beach 
Carney, Jimmie I., PM 1 Bradenton 

Carraher, John Joseph, L 1 St. Petersburg 
Carranza, Manuel Sama, P 3 Tampa 

Carraway, Andrew McGilbrey, BS 2 Sanford 
Carson, Robert Paul, BA 2 Jacksonville 

Carter, Henry Hensford, AB 2 Reddick 
Carter, Ira J., PM 1 Newberry 

Carter, Jerry William, T 1 Tallahassee 

Carter, Joseph Martin, P 2 Ehren 

Carter, Julian Maxwell, PM 1 Hastings 

Carter, Ralph Edward, T 3 Hialeah 

Carter, Ray Andrew, AB 1 Jacksonville 

Carter, William P^letcher, BS 1 Lakeland 
Cartwright, Morgan Rouse, AB 1 Stuart 

Caruthers, Robert Mays, Ag 1 Orlando 

Carvalho, Joaquin Ferreira, Ag 5 

— De Setembio Paraizopolos, Minas, Brazil 
Casebier, H. N., L 4 Gainesville 

Cason, Roy Sloan, L 1 Delray Beach 

Gate, Wilbur Seymour, P 3 Gainesville 

Cauthen, James Edwin, BS 1 Leesburg 

Cauthen, Robert Irwin, BS 1 Leesburg 

Cawthon, Rainey, T 3 Tallahassee 

Chace, Thomas Stephen, L 1 Tampa 

Chadwich, Ralph Willis. BS 2 Punta Gorda 
Chambers, Harley P., T 1 Plant City 

Chambliss, James Walter, L 4 Tampa 

Chambliss, Robert Flake, E 1 Tampa 

Chaplin, Charles F., BA 2 Miami 

Chapman, John W., CE 2 Winter Garden 
Charles, William Wilkins, AB 1 Ortega 
Chase, John Frank, BA 3 St. Petersburg 
Chatham, Joshua David, J 3 DeLand 

Cheatham, Benjamin Ballard, BS 2 

— Jacksonville 
Chewning, George Chandler, CE 2 Gainesville 
Childers, Ronald Wayne, E 1 Port St. Joe 
Childs, Lawrence David, L 3 St. Petersburg 
Chilson, Francis A., BS 1 Bradenton 

Chilson, Lee Dake, BS 3 Bradenton 

Chipley, Edmund Lee, ChE 3 Bokeelia 

Chittenden, Simeon Dudley, CE 4 Tallahassee 
Chittenden, William Rawls, EE 2 Tallahassee 
Church, Al Convers, CE 2 Gainesville 

Church, Daniel Duncan, J 2 Gainesville 

Ciaravella, James M., T 1 ; PM 1 Tampa 



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239 



Name and Classification Address 
Clark, Charles Cuthbert, BS 1 Plant City 
Clark, Charles L, L 1 Blountstown 

Clark. Frank Wellington, BA 2 ; T 2 

— Titusville 
Clark, Harry Albright, BA 1 Mt. Dora 

Clark, James Eugene, E 1 St. Petersburg 

Clark, John Dexter, Jr., E 1 Bartow 

Clark, Judson Douglas, T 1 Mt. Pleasant 
Clark, Perry Dudley, BA 3 Pensacola 

Clark, Vernon Wilmot, T 1 Bradenton 

Clark, Walton Bryant, BA 2 Bartow 

Clarke, Edwin Meredith, T 2 Gainesville 

Clarke, William Lee, A 5 Tallahassee 

Clarke, William Richard, ChE 3 Orlando 
Clarkson, Harry Beecher, E 1 ; BA 1 Ocala 
Clayton, Archibald Lewis, G Jacksonville 
Cleare, Allan Bruce, L 4 Key West 

demons, Justin, T 3 Plant City 

demons, Walter Nickolson, T 2 Tallahassee 
Cleveland, Wilburn Augustine, L 4 

— Jacksonville 
Click, Gustavo Neri, BS 3 Pensacola 

Clifton, Malcolm Merrill, BS 1 Evanston, 111. 
Close, Bass, BS 1 Wauchula 

Clyatt, Pele, PM 1 Lakeland 

Clymore, William Vane, J 1 Gainesville 

Coates, Edward, BS 1 Tampa 

Coates, James Greene, AB 1 Ft. Pierce 

Cobb, William Alfred, L 1 Gainesville 

Cockrell, Robert Spratt, AB 3 Gainesville 
Cody, James Alden, BA 2 Penny Farms 

Cofran, Everett Smith, G Gainesville 

Cohen, Edward Jacob, E 1 Jacksonville 

Cohen, Reid Augustus, AB 2 Tampa 

Coker, John Alexander, Ag 1 

• — Birmingham, Ala. 
Cole, Manly Alvin, BS 3 Tampa 

Cole, Robert Bates, AB 1 Orlando 

Coleman, Burnis Theo, L 3 Lacoochee 

Coleman, John Melton, G Eupora, Miss. 

Collier, Erwin Tilden, CE 4 Wauchula 

Collin, Fredric James, CE 4 Miami 

Collins, Cecil Farnez, BA 3 Lake City 

Collins, James Harry, T 1 Miami 

Collins, Thomas Edward, E 1 : T 1 Bartow 
Colson, King David, AB 2 Jacksonville 

Combs, John Bert, BS 1 : E 1 Deerfield 

Comer, Charles McCalla, BA 3 Ft. Meade 
Cone, Fred M., T 1 Gainesville 

Cone, Roy Davis, E 5 Jacksonville 

Conkling, Donald Herbert, J 1 

— W. Palm Beach 
Conlan, Frank Lowell, BA 1 Miami 

Connable, Horace Peck, Ag 5 

— Kalamazoo, Mich. 
Connolly. William Clifton, T 1 Gainesville 
Connor. Henry, L 1 Inverness 

Connor, Jerome Alton, AB 4 Pensacola 

Connor, Warren William. L 3 Pensacola 

Conway, Claude L., BS 3 Palatka 

Coogler, Monroe Alvin, L 3 Brooksville 

Cook, David C, AB 2 La Belle 

Cook, Frederick Edward, AB 3 Ocala 

Coomes, Charles Spalding, E 1 

— St. Augustine 
Cooper. John Francis, G Echola, Ala. 

Cooperman, Leonard William, L 1 

• — St. Petersburg 
Copeland, Anderson Webb, E 1 Tampa 

Copeland, James Dewberry, BA 4 Gainesville 
Copening, Howard C, T 1 Gainesville 

Corbett, Deloren Dempsey, L 1 St. Augustine 
Cordell, James Edward, E 1 Jacksonville 
Cordell, John Robert, A 1 Arlington 

Corr, Alys May. T 4 Gainesville 

Corrigan. Francis Hughes, Ag 5 Sarasota 
Corwin. Sam Joel, Ag 2 Palmetto 

Couch, Lester Grey, T 1 Plant City 



Name and Classification Address 

Coulter, George Shrader, AB 2 Jacksonville 
Cowart, Walter James, BA 4 Gainesville 
Cox, Allyn B., BA 2 Hollywood 

Cox, Arthur Slater. CE 4 Palmetto 

Cox, Guy, G Woodruff, S. C. 

Cox. James Calhoun. Ag 1 Lake Alfred 

Cox. Mercer, AB 4 ; T 4 Wausau 

Cox. Ray Donald, E 3 Clermont 

Crabtree, Clyde, T 3 Gainesville 

Craft, Donald Goddard. AB 2 Live Oak 

Craig, Francis Whitcomb, A 3 DeLand 

Craig, James Conover, J 3 Jacksonville 

Craig, Joseph Alexander, E 1 Jacksonville 
Crain, Joseph Parrott, J 3 Jacksonville 

Crapps, Porter Claude, ChE 4 Gainesville 
Crawley, David Wall, P 2 Danville, 111. 

Creighton, John Thomas. G Augusta, Ga. 
Crews, Elton Winthrop, BA 2 Zolfo Springs 
Crews. Norman Cecil. BA 4 Zolfo Springs 
Crofton, George Russell. AB 2 Titusville 
Crotty, George Sturges. AB 1 Crescent City 
Crownover, Robert Louis, BS 1 ; E 1 

— Coral Gables 
Crozier. Orville Louis, Ag 1 Ft. Pierce 
Culbertson, Raymond Eugene, G Gainesville 
Culpepper, John Broward, AB 4 Perry 

Cummings, Christy Isaiah, PM 1 

— St. Augustine 
Currie, F. A., LI W. Palm Beach 

Curry, Henry Franklin, CE 3 Bradenton 

Currie, Howard Fletcher, BS 3 Freeport 
Curry. Edgar Hayden, L 3 Nakomis 

Curry, William Clark, BA 1 Bradenton 

Curtin, James Edward. AB 2 Miami 

Curtis, Fred, A 3 Tampa 

Curtis, Russell Emmett, ME 2 Lake Worth 

Daffin, Robert Linwood. J 1 Marianna 

Dahl. John Edgar, A 2 Jacksonville 

Dale, Glenn Robert. AB 2 Franklin, Penn. 
Dale, Thomas Bertram, CE 2 ^t. Augustine 
D'Alemberte, Daniel Willoughby, L 3 

Dalton, Herschell Wallace. BS 3 Arcadia 
Dalton, Jack P., T 1 Arcadia 

Dameron, Albert Martin, E 5 Wabasso 

Daniel, William Russell, AB 1 Plant City 
Danielson, George, AB 2 St. Petersburg 

Dansby, Edwin Herman, E 1 Pensacola 

Dansby. George William, G Reddick 

Darby. Charles Arthur. PM 1 Gainesville 
Darby. Dean, T 3 Urbana. Mo. 

Darlington, Benjamin Nicholsen, BS 1 

— Tarpon Springs 
Darlington, Wayne. Ag 1 Tarpon Springs 

Dauer. Manning Julian, T 2 Tampa 

Daugherty, Ralph Edgar, AB 3 Lakeland 
Davenport, Ben. CE 2 Long Island. N. Y. 
David. James B., EE 2 Jacksonville 

Davidson, Earl, BA 4 Greensborough. Md. 
Davidson, Watson Perry, T 3 Baker 

Davies, John Marshall, T 4 Gainesville 

Davis, Albert Gibson, T 2 Jacksonville 

Davis, Bobbie Charles, E 6 Tampa 

Davis, David Miles, Ag 1 Frostproof 

Davis, Darry Adkins. BA 1 Miami 

Davis. Griflfin D., T 1 Tampa 

Davis, Harold Gilbert, L 3 St. Petersburg 
Davis. Joseph Israel. BA 3 Miami 

Davis. Lawrence Oliver. BS 2 St. Augustine 
Davis, Lynn Roy Munn, T 8 Key West 

Davis, Malc«Im Mitchell, BS 1 Ocala 

Davis. Norman West, BS 3 DeLand 

Davis, Norton. Dewitt, AB 2 Jacksonville 
Davis, Oliver Preston. J 1 Winter Haven 

Davis. Ralph Clarence. AB 2 ; J 2 Lakeland 
Davis. Robert Stewart, CE 2 Lakeland 

Davis, William Arthur, BA 1 Frostproof 



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Name and Classification Address 

Davis, William Lane, BA 1 Rome, Ga. 

Davis, William Mahlon, L 4 St. Petersburg 
Davis, William Tillie, AB 1 Orlando 

Davitt, John Edmond, T 3 Miami Beach 
Dawkins, William Francis, Ag 1 Bradenton 
Dawson, Taylor, J 3 Tallahassee 

Day, Richard Bennett, AB 2 Tampa 

Day, William Chilton, BA 5 Tampa 

Dean, Arnold Walker, BS 4 Whitney 

Dean, William Ennels, CE 2 Monticello 

DeArmas, Charles Robert, BS 2 Tampa 

Deck, Don Wayne, T 2 Daytona Beach 

Deckman, Dan W., BS 2 Jacksonville 

Dedge, Alwin Elliot, T 1 Miami 

Deen, Albert Colcord, P 4 Watertown 

Dees, Cecil Thomas, J 2 Mayo 

DeFord, Deane Corwin, T 1 Miami 

DeGaetani, Francis Marion, T 4 Tampa 
Degrove, Russell H., E 5 Palm Valley 

Degtoff, Walter Alexander, A 3 Miami 

De Hoff, William Joseph, GL Jacksonville 
De Hoff, Philip Donald, L 4 Jacksonville 

Delany, Daniel, BA 2 Ormond Beach 

Dell, Lartigue, BA 1 Gainesville 

DeLoach, J. Bennett. J 1 Lakeland 

De Masters, Clarence Ulysses, Ag 3 

—Biggs, Cal. 
Denham, George Leitner, L 3 Bartow 

Denison, Edward O'Grady, L 2 Chicago, 111. 
Denmark, Ewell Thomas, T 2 Gainesville 
Denmark, Thomas Irving, BA 1 

— Bainbrid^e, Ga. 
Dent, Hugh Townsend, T 1 Umatilla 

Denton, Frank P., J 2 Tampa 

Deonier, Marshall Tracy, G Hariah, Okla. 
De Ring, John S., P 2 Tampa 

Derr, Norman Henry, PM 2 Jacksonville 

De Vore, William Elbert, Ag 2 Citra 

DeWitt, Lyman Basil, BA 2 Jacksonville 

Dial, William Henry, L 1 Gainesville 

Dickinson, Clarence Leroy, T 1 Alachua 
Diddell, Frank William, E 1 Jacksonville 

Dinning, William Layton, L 1 Tampa 

Dishong, William W., L 1 Arcadia 

Dixon, Glen Allen, BA 1 : T 1 Hollywood 
Dixon, Norman Kemp, PM 2 Petersburg, Va. 
Dobbins, Elmer Wiley, BA 1 Gainesville 
Dobbins, Francis Igon, BS 1 Miami 

Dodd, Allen Caussey, Ag 5 Largo 

Doggett, Frank Aristides, AB 2 Jacksonville 
Dolive, Clark, AB 2 Tampa 

D'Olive, Reginald Rex, BS 1 Pensacola 

Donahoo, John William, L 1 Jacksonville 
Donahue, Cecil W., T 4 Valdosta, Ga. 

Donaldson, Dean Le Roy, A 3 Troy, Idaho 
Dongo, Joseph Harry, L 1 Key West 

Donnelly, Wallace Oliver, AB 2 Gainesville 
Dopier, Richard F'urnival, BA 3 ; Ag 5 

— Lake Wales 
Dopson, Clark William, Ag 3 Gainesville 

Dorsett, Luke Monk, T 1 Jacksonville 

Doub, Thurman, EE 4 Dade City 

Dougherty, Harry Lawrence, BA 2 Sebring 
Douglas, Barton Thrasher, BS 2 Gainesville 
Douglas, Lawrence Young, T 1 Dunedin 
Douglass, Clark Palmer, Ag 4 Jacksonville 
Dowdell, Samuel Hasmer, ME 3 Wimauma 
Downing, David William, BS 1 Tampa 

Downs, William Harvey, BS 1 Jacksonville 
Dozier, Harry Cuttino, BA 1 Ocala 

Drake, Louis Melton, BS 1 Ocala 

Drake, William Hocker, AB 2 Ocala 

Dreblow, Charles Julius, BS 1 Monticello 
Dresbach, Richard Emmanuel, AB 1 

— Ft. Lauderdale 
Drew, Leland Fitzgerald, BS 1 Clearwater 
DriggerB, Albert Gilchrist, G Wauchula 



Name and Classification Address 

Driggers, Charles Ellis, AB 1 Leesburg 

Driggers, Clyde Littleton, CE 4 Gainesville 

Driggers, Vaughan Wendell, G Wauchula 

Dubler, Sheldon, L 1 Miami 

DuBose, William W., AB 1 Sanford 

Duckwall, William D., L 1 Bradenton 

Dugan, Auldon Berge, L 1 Gainesville 

Duncan, Thomas Eldred, T 2 Lake Butler 

Dunkle, William Frederick, T 1 Ocala 

Dunn, Philip Edgar, PM 1 Daytona 

Dunn, Robert Joseph, T 1 Jacksonville 

Dunn, William Tillman, Ag 1 Gainesville 

Dunscombe, Aubrey Elsworth, Ag 4 

— Lynn Haven 

Dunwoody, Henry Atwood, AB 1 Arcadia 

Dunwoody, William Elliot, AB 1 Arcadia 
Durrance, Carl Theodore, AB 2 Okeechobee 

Durrance, Oscar Leon, G Gainesville 

Dyer, Harry Frazier, BA 1 Stewart 

Dykes, George Middleton, BA 1 Miami 

Dyson, Rowland Edward, T 1 Jacksonville 

Easterling, Dilworth Quillian, P 1 

— Jacksonville 
Eastland, Mark Wilson, BA 1 Tampa 

Eberhart, Joseph Jackson, PM 1 Orlando 
Edelstein, Marcus, L 4 Gainesville 

Edenfield, Calder M., AB 1 Elfers 

Edenfield, Lawrence Eugene, T 2 

— Grand Ridge 
Edmundson, Benjamin Rufus, T 2 

— Pensacola 
Edris, Edwin Nichol, T 2 Winter Park 
Edsall, Robert Spencer, Ag 3 Bradenton 

Edwards, Carlos Leroy, L 3 Miami 

Edwards, Charles Leroy, EE 2 Tampa 

Edwards, Franklin Dozier, BS 1 Kissimmee 
Edwards, Henry Higdon, ChE 3 Cleveland 
Edwards, Howard Keay, PM 1 Coral Gables 
Edwards, Marion Joseph, BA 1 Titusville 
Edwards, Mounger Duke, BS 2 Chattahoochee 
Edwards, Ordie Morton, G Gainesville 

Edwards, Robert, T 1 Camden, Ala. 

Edwards, William, BS 1 Ocala 

Eff, Samuel, T 4 St. Augustine 

Efird, Lester Julian, PM 1 Tampa 

Eigle, Donald John, A 1 Arcadia 

Ellinor, Merrill Floyd, BA 2 Havana 

Elliot, James Nicholson, AB 3 

— Da F'uniak Springs 
Elms, George Edward, BA 3 Jacksonville 
Elsberry, Harvey Henry, BA 1 Wimauma 
Ely, Leon Lowell, P 2 Louisville, 111. 

Emanuel, Lawrence Martin, E 1 Ocala 

Emerson, Francis Horton, A 3 Gainesville 
Emmelhainz, Edgar Allen, BS 1 Bradenton 
En Earl, Keith Whitman, BA 4 

— Daytona Beach 
English, Brenard Henry, L 4 Gainesville 
English, Clyde Phillips, Ag 1 Winter Park 
English, William Kamar, Ag 1 Plant City 
Ennis, William D., BA 1 Tampa 

Enwall, Hayford Octavius, L 4 Gainesville 
Enz, Walter Fred, G Ft. Wayne, Ind. 

Erickson, Floyd Arthur, E 1 ; T 1 

— Canal Point 
Eshleman, Silas Kendrick, L 1 Gainesville 
Estes, Edgar Stuart, BS 3 St. Augustine 
Estridge, Luther Lucius, BS 2 Mulberry 
Evans, Adolphus Ross, BS 1 Lake City 

Evans, Glynn Carlyle, T 2 DeLand 

Evans, Lewis A., L 3 Gainesville 

Evans, Robert C, BA 2 Perry 

Everett, Edward Franklin, AB 2 Orlando 
Evers, Joel, L 1 Mulberry 

Everts, Richard Frederick, BS 1 Lake Worth 
Eyater. William Westley, T 5 Jacksonville 



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241 



Name and Classification Address 
Fagan. Earle Donald, T 2 Gainesville 

Falsone, Nick Joseph, BA 1 Tampa 

Fanus, Herbert Wesley, EE 2 Daytona Beach 
Farabee, Thomas N., T 2 Wauchula 

Farnsworth, Harold Charles, L 3 Tampa 
Farris, Sam, BA 2 Jacksonville 

Farrior, Joseph Brown, BS 1 Tampa 

Featherstone, Leland Brown, BS 3 Miami 
Felson, Edgar Martin, L 3 Jacksonville 

Fenn, Thomas Jos., T 2 Monticello 

Fenn, William Browning, T 1 Miami 

Fenton, Harry Porter, T 2 Arcadia 

Ferguson, Chester H., L 3 Wauchula 

Ferguson, James Alfred, AB 3 Gainesville 
F'erguson, Olin S., T 2 Gainesville 

Ferguson, W. J., T 1 Lake City 

Ferguson, William McCague, BA 1 Orlando 
Ferlita, John F., BS 3 Tampa 

Fernald, Leon Fitzpatrick, G Tarpon Springs 
Fernald, William Irwin, T 3 Tarpon Springs 
Fernandez, Raymond, PM 1 Ybor City 

Ferrante, Gaetano Cacciotore, PM 2 Tampa 
Ferris, Bernie Lee, EE 4 Tampa 

Ferreira, Charles William, E 5 Miami 

Fessenden, John Henry, EE 3 Tampa 

Feuer, Gus, L 1 Miami 

Fielding, Samuel Wista, T 2 Pine Mount 

Fifield, Willard Merwin, Ag 3 Bradenton 
Filson, George Robert, J 5 Sarasota 

Fineren, William Warrick, ME 3 Jacksonville 
F^nkleslein, Harold X., PM 1 Jacksonville 
Fiore, Danta Massa, T 4 Gainesville 

Fish, Wilmont Sidell, P 1 Tarpon Springs 
Fisher, Augustus Alston, L 4 Pensacola 
Fisher, Eugene Varnadoe, BA 3 Cross City 
Fisher John Logan, BA 1 Tampa 

Fisher, Justine Robert, BS 2 Jacksonville 

Fisher, Leroy Tilson, P 3 Tampa 

Fisher, Olger Otis, PM 1 Tampa 

Fisher. Robert I., BS 3 Tampa 

Fisher, William, L 1 Pensacola 

Fisher, H. W., L 3 Fernandina 

Fiske, John Arnold, T 1 Cocoa 

Fitts, Emory Hinely, E 1 Mulberry 

Flaherty, James Aloysius, AB 4 Ocala 

Flanagan, John B., BS 1 Lakeland 

Fleisher, Manuel Harold, BS 1 Orlando 

Fleischer, Sam, AB 2 Rye Beach, N. Y. 
Fleming, Samuel Todd, G Gainesville 

Fletcher, Eliot Chapin, A 3 Tampa 

Fletcher, Markwell Ashby, P 1 Ft. Myers 
Fletcher, Thomas Council, P 1 Williston 
Fletcher, Ward Thomas, T 4 Greensboro 

Flournoy, John Thomas, T 3 

— De Funiak Springs 
Flowers, Marshall Karnegy, T 2 Gainesville 
Fokes, Richard Ealy, BA 2 Lake City 

Fokes, William Robert, T 1 Lake City 

Ford, Henry Milton, Ag 2 Gainesville 

F'ord, Joseph Scott, EE 3 Dania 

F'ord, Raymond Edmund, L 1 Ft. Pierce 

Forster, Davis Miller, E 1 New Sraiyma 

Forsyth, Donald Walter, J 1 Coral Gables 
Forum, Charles Walter, PM 1 Pensacola 
Foster, Charles M., PM 1 De Funiak Springs 
Foster, George Adair, AB 3 

— De FHiniak Springs 
Foster, Ira Jackson, T 3 Gainesville 

Fowler, Arthur Leonard, BA 1 Atlanta, Ga. 
Fowler, Benjamin Bourland, G Waverly, Ky. 
Foy, William Edward, PM 2 St. Augustine 
Foxworth, Merritt Milton, AB 2 Live Oak 
Frank, David, L 4 Miami 

Fraze, Richard Hetsler, J 4 St. Petersburg 
F'razier, Edward Hendry, BS 2 Tampa 

Frazier, Frank James, BS 1 W. Palm Beach 
Frazier, Herbert, BA 4 Mulberry 

Frazier, Joseph Wheeler, L 4 Tampa 



Name and Classification Address 
Frecker, William Hubert, L 1 Tampa 

Frederickson, Sophis N., BA 2 Jensen 

Frederick, Albert Roland, BS 4 Jacksonville 
Freehling, Arthur, PM 1 Jacksonville 

Freeman, George Chandler, T 2 Wauchula 
Freeman, George Doane, E 1 St. Augustine 
Freeman, Hiram Dwight, Ag 2 Tampa 

French, John Compton, L 3 Tampa 

Frick, Robert Weckler, Ag 1 Tampa 

FVierson, Paul Edward, Ag 1 Ft. Lauderdale 
Fripp, Ethel lone, Ag 5 Bluffton, S. C. 

Frison, Carroll Gerard, T 2 Titusville 

Fritz, Raymond P., BA 1 McKeesport, Pa. 
Frye, David Bartlett, BA 1 Tampa 

Frye, Hall Hathway, BA 3 Tampa 

Frye, James Lawrence, BS 1 Mulberry 

Fuchs, Richard William, L 1 Homestead 

Fueyo, Elio, EE 3 Tampa 

Fuller, Herbert Francis, L 3 New Smyrna 
Furman, Abraham Gordon, L 1 Jacksonville 
Furman, Irving Edmond, C 2 Jacksonville 
Fuqua, Ben Henslee, PM 1 Palmetto 

Gabel, Percival Ernest, BS 2 Tampa 

Gaines, Frank Brown T 1 Sarasota 

Gardner, J. Harry, BA 2 Jacksonville 

Garner, James Franklin, L 4 Fort Myers 

Garren, Edward Voltaire, BA 1 Tampa 

Garrison, Archie William, BA 2 Miami 

Garrison, Hubert Fryer, E 2 Moultrie 

Gary, Thomas Porter, AB 3 Brooksville 

Gary, Witherspoon Martin, BS 2 Brooksville 
Gasque, William Byron, T 2 Jacksonville 

Gatchell, Robert Edward, T 1 St. Ausrustine 
Gates, James Hurley, ChE 2 DeLand 

Gay, James Edwin, BA 2 Jacksonville 

Gaylord, Frank Ward, E 5 Tampa 

Gaylord, Herbert Russell, E 1 Tampa 

Geeslin, Louis Emerson, BS 3 Orlando 

Gehan, Frederick Edward, T 2 Tallahassee 
Getzen, James Calbert, L 3 Webster 

Gibbons, Arthur, T 3 Tampa 

Gibbs, Robert Lewis, T 1 Live Oak 

Gideons, Stanton Marcus, T 1 Bushnell 

Gilbert, Edwin Algernon, A 5 Gainesville 
Gildersleeve, Thomas Duane, CE 2 Live Oak 
Gill, Robert Daniel, Ag 1 Zephyrhills 

Gill, Jo Dozier, L 1 Sarasota 

Gillis, Alva Knox, T 4 Ponce de Leon 

Gingrass, Hugh Emile, E 1 Rockledge 

Glass, Nelson Sanford, BA 4 Winter Park 
Glass, Robert Heman, CE 4 Winter Park 

Goble, Arthur John, BS 1 Tampa 

Godfrey, James Ervin, BA 5 Orlando 

Godwin, Owen Luther, BA 1 Sebring 

Godwyn, Sidney Weltmer, AB 1 Orlando 
Goggins, Steve Clay, P 1 Jacksonville 

Golden, Lafayette, G. Gainesville 

Goldman, Leon Herman, AB 1 Ocala 

Goldsby, Joe Cecil. CE 4 Dade City 

Goldstein, Kessler M., LI La Grange, Ga. 
Goldstein, Mark Jean, BA 4 Jacksonville 

Gonzalez, George, E 1 ; T 1 Tampa 

Gonzalez, Leo Cao, PM 2 Tampa 

Goodbread, Royce Ethelbert, T 3 

— St. Petersburg 
Goode, William Guerry, T 1 St, Augustine 
Gordon, Irving, BS 2 Tampa 

Graham, Austin Estell, Ag 5 Mulberry 

Graham, Dillon Lorentus, J 5 Lakeland 

Graham, George Boyington, L 4 Tampa 

Graham, George Ransom, G Ft. White 

Graham, John Louis, L 4 DeLand 

Graham, Marion Webster, T 1 Daytona Beach 
Graham, Rudolph Newton, BS 1 

— Daytona Beach 
Gramigna, Victor Raphael, CE 2 Tampa 

Gramling, Lea Gene, P 1 Plant City 



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Name and Classification Address 

Gramling:, William Sanders, L 4 Miami 

Grandoff, John Bertrum, BA 3 Tampa 

Granger, Stanley, L 4 Gainesville 

Grant, Ben Joseph, BA 2 Jacksonville 

Grant, William Dobbins, PM 1 Jacksonville 
Gravely, Louis Overton. L 3 Labelle 

Graves, John Calvin, Ag 3 Tampa 

Graves, J. R., BA 4 Quincy 

Gray, Henry, AB 1 Millville 

Green, Carl Roger, L 3 St. Petersburg 

Green, George Marvin, L 3 Tampa 

Green, Harry, L 1 St. Petersburg 

Green, Sam, C 2 St. Petersburg 

Green, Wilson Payne, ME 2 Reddick 

Greenberg, Max Ervin, AJi 2 Gainesville 
Greene, Edgar Wilson, T 2 Stuart 

Greene, Harry Sumpter, T 3 Gainesville 

Greene, Lorin Arthur, AB 4 

— Indianapolis, Ind. 
Greene, Ralph Burton, T 1 Indianapolis, Ind. 
Greene, Thomas Underwood, G Gainesville 
Greenman, John Roosevelt, Ag 2 Gainesville 
Greer, Dolph, Ag 1 Miami 

Greer, Paul Ecoff, BA 1 Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Crenelle, Edvcin William, L 3 Palm Harbor 
Grider, Harold Lonzo, Ag 5 Palm Harbor 
Griggs, Hubert Eugene, L 3 Rockledge 

Griley, George Edmund, PM 1 Miami 

Grout, Edward Morse, EE 3 Jacksonville 
Guard, Carl Jackson, CE 2 Orlando 

Guessaz, Louis Alexander, T 4 Dade City 
Guise, Witt Orison, T 1 Magazine, Ark. 

Gulick, H. Marion, E 1 Tampa 

Gunn, James Rutland, AB 2 Jacksonville 

Guyton, Charles Moses, L 4 Marianna 

Haas, Widmer Edward, EE 2 Tampa 

Hackney, Gallic Thomas, BA 3 Ft. Pierce 
Hadiield, R. W., BS 1 Gainesville 

Hafner, Edward Robert, J 2 Brooksville 

Haft, Albert Mathew, BA 5 Jacksonville 

Hagan, L. P., AB 1 Sanford 

Haines, Lewis DeMaugh, PM 2 

— Altamonte Springs 
Haines, Webber Bly, L 1 Altamonte Springs 
Hall, Charles Reade, L 1 Mobile, Ala 

Hall, Franklin Dudley, BA 1 St. Petersburg 
Hall, Henry Harrington, Ag 2 Ocala 

Hall, James Elwood, BS 2 Cantonment 

Hall, John Kingston, BA 5 St. Petersburg 
Hall, Joe Tilden, E 1 Hollywood 

Hall, John L., BS 1 Leesburg 

Hall, Josiah Calvin, T 2 Dunedin 

Hall, Leland Gwynn, BA 3 Tampa 

Hall, Lyman, T 3 Miami 

Hall, Malcolm Jackson, L 4 Tampa 

Hall, Thomas Gordon, BA 2 Femandina 

Halsey, Earl William, BA 1 W. Palm Beach 
Hamilton, George Bruce, BA 1 Tampa 

Hamm, Donald Loren, BA 3 Gainesville 
Hamm, Harold Albert, BA 1 Gainesville 
Hammack, James Albert, CE 2 Leesburg 

Hammer, Burks Latham, T 1 Tampa 

Hampton, William Franklin, PM 2 

— Gainesville 
Hancock, Kenneth Milton, BA 4 

■ — Casco, Maine 
Hancy, Stephen Foster, T 4 Clearwater 

Hankins, James Garland, ChE 3 Kissimmee 
Hardee, Bascom Owen, BA 2 Bronson 

Hardee, James Edward, L 1 Madison 

Harding, John, AB 1 Babson Park 

Harllee, John Pope, AB 3 Palmetto 

Harrell, Maurice Ticer, L 1 Noblesville, Ind. 
Harrell, William Keener, T 1 Marianna 

Harris, Clyde Eugene, A 1 Jacksonville 

Harris, John Frank, T 3 Gainesville 

Harris, William Curry, L 4 Key West 



Name and Classification Address 
Harrison, Arthur Clarence, G Gainesville 
Harrison, Clyde, BA 2 Bushnell 

Harrison, Grady, T 3 Anthony 

Harrison, Howard Watt, BS 1 Pensacola 
Harrison, Louis Stanley, L 1 Tampa 

Harrison, William Franklin, T 1 

— Panama City 
Hart, Robert Winston, CE 3 Key West 

Hart, Screven Thomas, AB 1 Jacksonville 
Hartley, Charles Edward, T 3 St. Cloud 

Harvard, Virgil Winfield, BA 1 Tampa 

Harvey, Norman Comstock, CE 3 Miami 
Harvey. William Walter, AB 2 ; T 2 Chipley 
Haseltine, Hubert Arthur, G Gainesville 

Haskell, Harold Notman, G Gainesville 

Hatfield, Cortland Mueller, E 5 Ft. Pierce 
Hawkins, Ben Sanford, BS 1 Miami 

Hawkins, Durward E., L 1 Tampa 

Hawkins, George A., T 4 Bay Harbor 

Hawkins, William, A 3 Gainesville 

Haw ley, Clifford, D., L 4 Lakeland 

Haworth, Chester, BS 1 High Springs 

Hayes, Charles Hugh, BS 2 Cleai-water 

Haynes, Charles L., E 1 Crystal River 

Haynes, Gerritt Frederick, BA 3 Clearwater 
Hazeldine, Kenneth Edward, A 2 

— Terre Haute, Ind. 
Head, Francis Best, A2 Tallahassee 

Hearn, Vernice Law, T 3 Miami 

Hedberg, Roland Leonard, Ag 2 

— St. Petersburg 
Heffner, Harry, Ag 1 Gainesville 

Heitman, Gilmar McCrary, BS 1 Ft. Myers 
Heller, Simeon, BS 1 Jacksonville 

Helvenston, (Jeorge Rudolph, L 3 

— Jacksonville 
Hemming, Elwood Daniel, PM 2 Jacksonville 
Henderson, Edwin Lloyd, T 2 Ebb 

Henderson, John Ward, AB 1 Tallahassee 
Henderson, Joseph Russell, Ag 2 Lee 

Henderson, Leon N., T 4 Galliver 

Hendricks, Ernest Leroy, CE 2 Island Grove 
Hendrix, Hugh Milton, BS 1 Gainesville 

Hendry, Asbury Henry, L 3 Tampa 

Henley, William Walton, T 1 

— De Funiak Springs 
Hennessee, Earl Eric, T 3 Lakeland 

Henry, Clarence Raimer, BS 3 

— Ft. Lauderdale 
Henry, John Logan, PM 2 Tampa 

Hentz, James I., T 2 Blountstown 

Herin, William Abner, AB 3 Miami 

Herlong, Albert Sydney, L 3 Leesburg 

Herlong, Charlie Wheeler, AB 2 Jacksonville 
Herminghaus, Charles, Ag 5 Mims 

Hester, Jackson Baling, G Easley, S. C. 
Hester, Robert Lewis, BA 1 Miami 

Hett, Charles Edward, A 1 Columbus, Ga, 
Hiatt, Lyle Steven, BA 5 W. Palm Beach 
Hickenlooper, Irby James, EE 3 Palatka 
Hickman, Jack, E 1 Orlando 

Hicks, Dashwood, BA 2 Tampa 

Hicks, Henry Leon, P 2 Orlando 

Hicks, William Trotter, G Pensacola 

Hiers, Bryant Dickinson, L 1 Gainesville 
Hiers, Milton, BA 1 Wauchula 

Hiers, William Ardis, E 1 Miami 

Higgins, Edward Gardiner, BS 1 Pensacola 
Higgins, John Edward, AB 1 Sanford 

Highleyman, Robert Igou, AB 1 ; E 1 Sanford 
Hildebrand, Boyd, L, BS 1 Indrio 

Hill, Arthur Mayflower, Ag 3 Vero Beach 
Hill, Edward Joel, ME 2 Tallahassee 

Hill, Robert Stevenson, BA S Cocoa 

Hill, Sue, Ag 5 Gainesville 

Hill, William Logan, L 4 Washington, D. C. 
Hills, Alfred Ernest, CE 4 Winter Haven 



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243 



Name and Classification Address 

Himes, Samuel Hilburn, AB 2 

— West Palm Beach 
Hinson, John Clayton. BA 2 Qunicy 

Hinton, John. T 1 Everglades 

Hintz, Russell, William. BS 1 Miami 

Hirsh, Bennett Marcus, L 1 Jacksonville 
Hirsh, Earl, T 1 Jacksonville 

Hjmerstad, Lars B.. BA 2 

— Green Cove Springs 
Hobbs, Forrest O'Leary, AB 2 Tampa 

Hobbs, Walter Bascome, T 1 Panama City 
Hobgood, Thomas Shannon, PM I Pensacola 
Hodes, Herbert, T 1 Miami 

Hodges, Herbert Lloyd, CE 3 St. Augustine 
Hogan, Ivey William, Ag 2 Trenton 

Holland, HiUiard Calliver, BS 1 

— St. Petersburg 
Holland, Jefferson Wesley, PM 1 Bartow 
Holland, Walter Coutts, Ag 1 Leesburg 

Holland, Zachary Dean, PM 1 Bunnell 

Holmes, Arthur Adrian, AB 1 Millville 

Holmes, John Arthur, T 5 O'Brien 

Holsberry, John Edvyin, L 4 Pensacola 

Holsinger, Joe, E 5 Kansas City. Kansas 
Honeywell, Owen Daniel, AB 2 Vero Beach 
Hood, Ralph Kenneth, BS 1 Crystal River 
Hopper, Roland Otha, Ag 2 Cleveland 

Horne, Sidney Linton, AB 2 Monticello 

Horovitz, Abraham, E 1 Jacksonville 

Horovitz, Jules Joseph, BS 3 Tampa 

Horrell, James Gordon, T 2 Titusville 

Horrell, Robert Paul, L 1 Gainesville 

Houck, John Blakemore, AB 1 Bradenton 
Houk, Dean Charles, L 3 St. Petersburg 
Hourihan, Richard Patrick. A 2 Miami 

Houser, Mike Samuel, T 3 Jacksonville 

Houston, Turner O., PM 1 Jacksonville 

Howard, Grady, AB 1 Leesburg: 

Howard, John T., T 2 Bristol 

Howard, Julian D., BA 3 Orlando 

Howard, Raymond Holt, G Gainesville 

Howard, Walter Burt, E 1 Jacksonville 

Howe, Gaius Winchester, E 3 Burlington, Vt. 
Howell, Marion Elroy, E 1 Inglis 

Howell. Marshall Francis, T 1 New Smyrna 
Howell, William Douglas, AB 2 

— Lakewood, Ohio 
Howze, James L., PM 2 Palmetto 

Howze, Thomas Alston, L 1 Palmetto 

Hubbard, Harold Elbert, BA 1 St. Augustine 
Hubbell, Roger Shelton, A 2 Milford, Mich. 
Huddleston, George Adam. L 1 Sanford 

Hudson, Henry E., G Gainesville 

Hudson, J. H., L 1 Key West 

Huffer, John Craig, EE 2 Orlando 

Huffman, Robert Campbell, T 1 Miami 

Hughes, Charles Roy, AB 2 Lake Hamilton 
Hughes, Edward Hanley, BS 1 Palatka 
Hughes, Jackson, J 1 St. Petersburg 

Hughes, Robert Lawrence, L 4 Bartow 

Hughey, Francis Drew, BS 1 Clearwater 

Humphrey, Duncan McNair, BS 1 Gretna 
Hunter, Walton Broward, AB 2 Tavares 
Hurlebaus, Kenneth Davis, Ag 2 Clearwater 
Hussey, Thomas Goldsmith, BS 2 

— West Palm Beach 
Hutchings, Richard Moir, G Riverview 

Igou, Hugh McEwen, T 2 Eustis 

Lhrig, Elmer W., T 3 F^. Myers 

Imeson, John G., BA 2 Jacksonville 

Inman, Rudolph Joe, L 4 Lake City 

Irwin, Thomas Melbourne, PM 1 Jacksonville 

Ives, Selwyn Callaway, T 3 Lake City 

Jack, Bernard William, BA 1 Tampa 

Jackson, Charles Edward, Ag 3 Clearwater 



Name and Classification Address 

Jackson, Wesley, Benjamin, BA 1 

— West Palm Beach 
Jacobs, David Barney, T 2 Daytona Beach 
Jacobus, Robert Carey. EE 2 : BA 2 

— St. Petersburg 
Jahn, Fred S., AB 2 New Port Richey 

James, Jack, T 1 Bartow 

James, John Wilbur, BA 2 Orlando 

James, Russell Hayward, BA 2 St. Petersburg 
James, Thomas Herschel, BA 3 

— St. Petersburg 
Jammesson, Charlton Lionel, BS 1 

— McKeesport, Pa. 
Janison, James Robert, AB 2 ; Ag 2 

— Wabasso 
Janes, C. Howell, ME 2 Wauchula 

Janes, Marion McKinney, T 2 Wauchula 
Jaramilla, Louis Sierra, Ag 5 

—New York, N. Y. 
Jefferson, Wayne O., EE 3 Pensacola 

Jennings, William Logan, PM 1 Jennings 
Jernigan, Claude Hagen, EE 3 Monticello 
Jernigan, Harvey Jordon, BA 2 Lake Wales 
Jernigan, Jack Webster, E 1 Gainesville 

Jernigan, William Clarence, Ag 2 Gainesville 
Johansen, Beppo Rolff, AB 3 Clearwater 
Johansen, Hans Rolff, BS 1 Clearwater 

Johns, Eli Johnofski, G Grajewo, Poland 
Johnson, Albert M., EE 3 Orlando 

Johnson, Arrie Lee, L 3 Jay 

Johnson, Carl Erik, CE 2 Sarasota 

Johnson, Charles Johannas, CE 2 Pensacola 
Johnson, Dewey Macon. L 3 Quincy 

Johnson, Frank Newton, BA 3 Hawthorne 
Johnson, Fred Vaughn. BS 1 Miami 

Johnson, Howard Bradley, Ag 4 Windermere 
Johnson, Jack Frank, BA 5 Jacksonville 
Johnson, James Howard. E 1 ; T 1 Trenton 
Johnson, Levi Mott, Ag 1 Miami 

Johnson, Nathan, BA 2 White Springs 

Johnson, Oliver Preston, BS 2 St. Cloud 

Johnson, Richard Sadler, P 1 Daytona Beach 
Johnson, Robert Milton, CE 4 Hardeetown 
Johnson, Rollie Edward, BA 2 Bradenton 
Johnson, Thomas H., AB 2 Jacksonville 

Johnson, Thomas Preston, BA 3 

— St. Petersburg 
Johnson, Thomas Theodore, BA 1 

— St. Petersburg 
Johnson, William Longley, PM 1 Key West 
Johnson, W. Munson, EE 3 Key West 

Johnston, Excell Ronald, AB 2 Clermont 

Johnwick, Edgar Bernard, BS 3 Gainesville 
Johnwick, Erwin Frederick. T 1 Gainesville 
Jones. Arthur Heath. AB 1 Pensacola 

Jones. Edwin Ladd, BA 1 Jacksonville 

Jones. E. Ulman, AB 2 High Springs 

Jones, Henry Grady, T 5 Gainesville 

Jones, Herbert Charles, BS 1 Ocala 

Jones, Hugh Ballinger, PM 2 Gainesville 
Jones, John Batts, P 2 Oviedo 

Jones, Leon Broward, BS 2 Century 

Jones. Paul. BS 1 WesfPalm Beach 

Jones, Thomas Capers, BS 2 Old Town 

Jones, Thomas John, Ag 2 Sarasota 

Jones, William Ellis, BA 2 DeFuniak Springs 
Jordan, Burwell Luvius. T 2 Tampa 

Jordan. Mark Bartley. Ag 3 Gainesville 

Jordan. William Douglas. L 4 Gainesville 
Josey. Metzger Elroy. L 3 Gainesville 

Judtfe. William William. L 4 Daytona Beach 
Judy, Dick Woodson, AB 1 W. Palm Beach 
Judy, Jackson Knight, BA 3 W. Palm Beach 

Kaminis, Peter Clifton. BS 1 Tarpon Springs 
Kaplan, Harvey Maurice. L 3 Miami 

Kazarian, Carl, P 2 Orlando 

Kazarian, Harry. P 2 Orlando 



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Name and Classification Address 
Kea, John Wesley, Ag 1 Hawthorne 

Keck, Harold Irving, BA 1 Orlando 

Keel, Wilfred Leonard, A 5 Ortega 

Keeler, Emerson Martin, E 1 Miami 

Keen, John Burger, BS 2 Graceville 

Keep, Oscar Joseph, AB 1 ; T 1 Jacksonville 
Keezel, James Edward, L 1 Winter Park 

Kehoe, Emmett Wilson, AB 2 Coral Gables 
Keith, James Anthony, T 1 ; E 1 Tampa 
Kelley, Welcom Tol, PM 1 Lake Mary 

Kelly, Daniel Anthony, L 1 Fernandina 

Kelly, James Eddie, T 1 Glen St. Mary 

Kelly, John R., EE 3 Live Oak 

Kelly, William J., J 2 Miami 

Kemp, Paul Sadler, PM 2 Miami 

Kempton, James Harvey, BA 1 Rockledge 
Kendall, Michael M., L 4 Winter Haven 
Kennedy, Gurney William, T 1 Tallahassee 
Kennedy, Kenneth Keith, BA 1 Ocala 

Kennedy, Robert Chaplin, Ch E 2 

— Winter Park 
Kennon, Gordon Elwell, AB 2 Daytona Beach 
Kent, Artis Lane, BA 2 Lee 

Kenton, William G., T 1 St. Cloud 

Kepler, Charles Jasper, BS 1 Palatka 

Kester, Edson Eugene, E 1 Jacksonville 
Ketler, Ralph Henry, T 1 W. Palm Beach 
Kibler, John Marlen, BS 2 Lakeland 

Kickliter, Grady H., T 5 Ft. Green 

Kierce, Steiner Clive, Ag 4 Baker 

Killam, John Grant, AB 2 St. Augustine 

Killinger, Clarence Eugene, ME 2 Gainesville 
Kimball, Millard Fillmore, AB 2 Umatilla 
Kimble, Charles Francis, BS 2 Bronson 

King, Bertram Carlyle, EE 2 Ft. Myers 

King, Carl Daniell, BA 2 Bradenton 

King, Charles Bryan, CE 3 Sneads 

King, Davis Douet, PM 2 Tavares 

King, Fletcher Gordon, PM 1 St. Augustine 
King, Isaac Godfrey, T 1 Sneads 

Kinzie, George Reinbolt, BA 2 Ft. Myers 

Kirby, William Gilchrist, BA 4 Orlando 

Kirker, Eugene Albert, BS 2 Jacksonville 
Kirkland, Charles Orian, T 1 Laurel Hill 
Kirkpartick, John Watt, BS 1 Gainesville 
Kirkpatrick, Lee Wesley, BA 2 

— Ft. Lauderdale 
Kirton, Joe Scott, AB 2 Winter Garden 

Kiser, Randolph Lee, P 2 Key West 

Knight, Claude Mitchell, BS 1 Bunnell 

Knight, Frank Tyler, PM 1 Jacksonville 

Knight, FVed Key, G Crescent City 

Knight, Harold Anthony, J 1 Ocala 

Knight, Louis LaFontisee, A 3 Ocala 

Knight, Robert Luther, T 1 Miami 

Knight, Ross James, T 1 Vero Beach 

Knowles, Norman Whitfield, BA 2 

— Winter Park 
Kolbe, H. Harold, L 4 Waukesan, 111. 

Korst, Ernest Bladon, BA 1 St. Augustine 
Kovach, Peter Milton, Ag 1 Zolfo Springs 
Kriger, Dan, BA 1 Jacksonville 

Kubesserian, Garabed Gughmess, A 2 

— Gainesville 
Kulujian, Bedras H., Ag 1 Gainesville 

Kupper, Leo Rome, AB 1 Miami 

Laffitte. Roundean Garvin, P 2 Lloyd 

LaFuze, George Leighton, G Clermont 

Lagano, Albert Aloysius, BS 2 Gainesville 
Lamborn, Albert Gallatin, BA 2 Tampa 

Lamborn, Bert L., BA 2 Tampa 

Landrum, T. Frank, T 2 Inverness 

Laney, Edward Earl, T 1 Tampa 

Langbehn, Franklin Peter, A 2 Miami 

Langford, Richard Hickson, E 1 Ft. Meade 
Langston, Herbert Anthony, T 2 Cross City 
Lanier, David, L 4 Madison 



Name and Classification Address 
Lansdell, Fred Dudley, A 3 Miami 

Largue, James, BA 1 Pensacola 

Larimore, Granville W., PM 2 Tampa 

Larson, John Edwin, L 4 Brookston, Pa. 
Lastinger, Samuel Thomas, T 2 Gainesville 
Latham, Herbert Saunders, AB 1 Pensacola 
Lawless, William Walter, Ag 1 Lake Alfred 
Lawrence, Richard Abbott, L 1 Melbourne 
Lawrie, David Edward, EE 3 Holly Hill 
Lawshe, Philip R., BA 1 Jacksonville 

Lawton, Alfred James, BA 2 St. Augustine 
Laycock, Ernest Harold, E 1 Tampa 

Layne, Raymond Lee, AB 1 Alachua 

Lazonby, Joseph Lancelot, T 2 

Ft. Lauderdale 
Leahy, Edward FVancis, BA 1 Gainesville 
Lee, Clarence Joseph, P 3 Miami 

Lee, Charles Raymond, BS 1 Clearwater 

Lee, David, EE 2 Gainesville 

Lee, John Levi, BS 1 Live Oak 

Leddy, William Braxton, BA 1 Miami Beach 
Leggett, Frederick Earl, EE 3 St. Petersburg 
Leland, Aaron Whitney, Ag 5 Gainesville 
Lemen, Larry Light, E 1 Jacksonville 

Leonard, Sam A., T 4 Blountstown 

Lerner, Jules, BA 1 W. Palm Beach 

Lesley, John T., AB 2 Haines City 

Levey, Bernard Frank, ChE 2 Pensacola 

Lewis, Edward Clay, L 4 Marianna 

Lewis, Francis Scott Key, EE 2 Miami Beach 
Lewis, Gardner La Motte, T 2 St. Petersburg 
Lewis, Henry Hays, L 4 Marianna 

Lewis, Orlen B., P 3 Gainesville 

Licata, Anthony Joseph, BS 2 Tampa 

Liddon, Ben Sullivan, BA 1 Marianna 

Lindsey, Kirby Stewart, BS 1 Archer 

Lindsey, X. L., T 2 Archer 

Lindsley, Augustus R., A 2 Dania 

Linebaugh, Charles David, L 4 Tampa 

Linebaugh. F. Marion, PM 2 Tampa 

Lipsitz, William, BA 1 Leesburg 

Littell, Bartow Stubbs, CE 2 Hudson 

Littig, Sherman Kent, T 1 Tallahassee 

Little, Jesse Latimer, BA 3 Columbus, Ga. 
Livingston, Howard Gordon, L 1 Orlando 
Livesay, Joseph Stuart, AB 3 Jacksonville 
Lloyd, William Folwell, T 3 Tampa 

Lockett, Norwood Alexander, Ag 2 Cocoa 
Lockhart, Stuart, Ag 2 Yukon 

Loewenkopf, Jack, L 1 Jacksonville 

Loften, William T., Ag. 2 Summerfield 

Lokey, Hulsey, BA 1 Tampa 

Long, Latimer Ashlay, L 4 Polk City 

Lopez, Aquilino, AB 1 Key West 

Lord, Earl L., G Gainesville 

Lord, Mills Minton, T 1 Sanford 

Lord, Richard Purdie, Ag 2 Gainesville 

Lorraine, Charles Cabell, L 1 Jacksonville 
Lotspeich, Lowell Wilson, BA 1 Miami 

Lotspeich, Walter Wiley, BA 1 Miami 

Loucks, Ivan H,, EE 3 Gainesville 

Loucks, Kenneth Wilfred, G Gainesville 

Loucks, Merle Kenneth, BS 1 Tampa 

Love, Francis Edmond, L 3 Lake Worth 

Love, H. A., L 3 DeFtiniak Springs 

Love, William Lawson, ChE 3 Mulberry 

Lowe, Frank Ewing, BA 1 Tampa 

Lowenherz, Louis Lawrence, T 2 Arcadia 
Lowery, FVancis Richard, BS 1 Holopaw 

Ludwig, Andrew George, T 1 Gainesville 
Ludwig, Gerald Edward, BA 4 Sarasota 

Lupfer, Alexander McClure, Ag 1 Kissimmee 
Luther, Charles William, L 3 Daytona 

Lybass, James H., Ag 2 Tampa 

Lyell, John Middleton, A 1 Miami 

Lyle, William Raymond, Ag 3 Bartow 
Lynch, S. John, Ag 1 Lake Jovita 

Lyon, James, PM 1 Caribou, Maine 



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245 



Name and Classification Address 
Lyon, S. C, T 1 Gainesville 

Lytal, Lake Hensy, BA 3 Gainesville 

McArthur, Hugh Lynn, T 4 Tampa 

McArthur, James Alta, T 1 Crestview 

MeCall, Eugene Franklin, PM 1 Monticello 
McCall, Fred Wallace, AB 4 Miami 

McCall, Oliver Winston, T 2 Madison 

McCall, Ralph Duncan, AB 1 ; T 1 Jasper 
McCallister, George Lee, BS 1 Tampa 

McCarthy, Parker Wardrope, ME 3 

— Isle of Pines, Cuba 
McCarty, William A., E 1 Gainesville 

McCaskill, Herbert L., A 2 Lakeland 

McCaskill, John Edward, AB 3 

— DeFuniak Springs 
McCaughan, James Russell, AB 2 Pensacola 
McCaul, Thomas Vaden, AB 1 Gainesville 
McClain, Will Kelly, L 4 Lebanon, Tenn. 
McClane, Thomas Kindred, AB 1 Wauchula 
McClellan, Broward, T 2 Frink 

McClellan, Roby B., AB 2 Jacksonville 

McClung, Marshall Linwood, CE 2 ; PM 2 

— Miami 
McClure, Jack Wilson, BA 1 Palmetto 

McColskey, John Stuart, CE 2 Lake City 
McCormick, Charles Evileth, Ag 2 Bartow 
McCormick, Fenwick Taylor, Ag 5 

— Gainesville 
McCormick, Gordon James, AB 1 Gainesville 
McCormick, Harry W., Ag 2 Gainesville 
McCormick, Lucius Raines, T 1 Gainesville 
McCormick, Rayford Charles, T 1 Gainesville 
McCranie, Alvin Franklin, BA 1 Jacksonville 
McCranie, John Joseph, AB 4 Jacksonville 
McCraw, John Carey, CE 2 Gainesville 

McCrea, William James, T 1 St. Petersburg 
McCune, Marion Clyde, C 1 St. Petersburg 
MacCubrey, Gerald Malcolm, PM 1 

— Coconut Grove 
McDonald, Thomas J., E 5 Jamestown, N. Y. 
MacDonald, Alden Farrington, EE 2 Archer 
McDonald, Venton O., BA 2 Miami 

McDavid, Rudolph Shelley, AB 1 

• — Miami Beach 
McEldowney, Lawrence Edward, BS 3 

— Tampa 
McEldowney, Walter Hiett, AB 2 Tampa 
McElveen, Richard Charles, PM 1 ; T 1 

— Hastings 
McEwen, James Milton, AB 3 Wauchula 

MacFarlan, Nolan Henry, PM 2 Inverness 
McF'arlin, William Murray, AB 1 

— West Palm Beach 
McGee, William Lanier, ME 3 Century 

McGinnis, Willard Dean, A 1 Lakeland 

McGovern, Donald Conrad, AB 3 Jacksonville 
McGrath, Joe McDonald, BA 1 

— Ormond Beach 
McGucken, Thomas Eugene, E 1 Tampa 

Mclntire, James Edgar, Ag 4 Gainesville 
Mcintosh, Clyde Anderson, P 1 Dowling Park 
Mcintosh, Malcolm, T 1 Tallahassee 

McKay, John Wilkes, E 3 Tampa 

McKay, Richard Struss, T 1 Tampa 

MacKenzie, Edward S., L 1 Leesburg 

McKethan, Alfred Augustus, BA 3 

— Brooksville 
McKinnon, Daniel Angus, BS 4 Marianna 
McLanahan, Clarence Rhodes, L 1 Bunnell 
McLanahan, Julius Pope, A 3 Bunnell 

McLaughlin, Mike Jones, BA 2 Tampa 

McLean, Andrew Parks, P 1 Pensacola 

McLean, Donald Shelton, Ag 1 Bartow 

McLean, Leon Shepard, P 2 Dunedin 

McLeod, Norman Wightman, BS 4 Aucilla 
McLeod, Wallace LeRoy, AB 1 Aucilla 

McLucas, Leonard Lee, T 3 Sanford 



Name and Classification Address 

McMullen, Daniel Guy, BS 1 Safety Harbor 
McMullen, Kenneth Smith, Ag 2 Lee 

McNatt, John Mathews, L 3 Uvalda, Ga. 

McPherson, Guy Alexander, Ag 2 Havana 
McQuitty, John Vrendenburgh, AB 4 

— Ft. Myers 
McRae, William Allan, AB 2 

—West Palm Beach 
McWhorter, Robert Olin, BA 1 Sarasota 
McWilliams, Hugh Coleman, T 3 Tampa 

Mc Williams, Lauren Elton, P 2 ; T 2 

— Frostproof 
Machen, James Thomas, BA 4 Laurens, S. C. 
Mack, Richard Alfred, BA 1 Miami Beach 
Mackey, John Goldsberry, BA 3 Tampa 
Maddox, John Clyde, L 1 Wauchula 

Magee, William H., BA 2 Tampa 

Magid, Louis, P 2 Tampa 

Magruder, Charles Lawson, A 5 Tampa 

Mahaffy, Conrad Brickw^edel, BA 1 

— Jacksonville 
Mahone, John Thomas, BS 1 Jacksonville 

Mahorner, Bernard Teague, L 1 Inverness 
Maines, Orlando Melvin, Ag 1 Gainesville 
Makinson, William Burroughs, T 1 

— Kissimmee 
Malmborg, Harold Eric, E 1 DeLand 

Mann, Albert Catherwood, BS 1 

— W. La Fayette, Ind. 
Mann, Earle La Vern, BA 2 Orlando 

Mantey, Wallace Frederick, EE 2 Eustis 

Manucy, Albert Clement, T 1 St. Augustine 
Marsales, John, BA 3 Cantonment 

Marchman, Fred, BS 2 Punta Gorda 

Markett, Davis Lane, T 2 Arcadia 

Markham, Julian E., BS 3 Lake City 

Marks, Charles Alfred, T 2 Tampa 

Marks, Paul Harold, L 3 Miami 

Marlett, Neuman Clyde, PM 2 Gainesville 

Marsh, Horace G., T 1 Jacksonville 

Marsh, John Duffey, BA 1 Yonkers, N. Y. 
Marshall, Thomas Horace, E 1 Lakeland 
Martin, Freeman Goode, G Ninety-Six, S. C. 
Martin, Henry A., AB 1 Jacksonville 

Martin, James Christopher, P 1 Moss Bluff 
Martin, Laurence Sherman, CE 2 Warner 
Martin, Roe Millege, T 2 Gainesville 

Martineau, James Anthony, L 1 

— Marinette, Wis. 
Mason, Lass Albert, EE 2 Jacksonville 

Mason, Thomas Leo, BA 2 Sarasota 

Massari, Frank, AB 1 Tampa 

Massey, Fred Ferguson, BA 3 Pensacola 

Massey, Hollis, L 1 Gainesville 

Masters, Charles Andrew, BS 1 St. Augustine 
Mathers, Alex Pickens, BA 2 Pensacola 

Mathews, Reynolds Reuben, BA 1 Leesburg 
Mathiasen, Bennett E., AB 1 Melrose 

Mathis, Charles Carvel, L 3 Hastings 

Mathis, Charles Robert, L 1 Panama City 
Mathis, Leon Edward, J 1 Panama City 
Matthews, Donald Ray, AB 4 Hawthorne 
Matthews, Earle Dwight, Ag 2 Homestead 
Mauck, R. Eldridge, T 1 Jacksonville 

Maxwell, Ernest B., A 2 Jacksonville 

Maxwell, Frank F'lagg, BA 1 Tallahasse* 
Maxw^ell, Lewis Samuel, T 1 Eustis 

May, George Lamar, BA 2 Quincy 

Mayes, William Kingsbery, BA 1 Pensacola 
Meadows, Washington Julian, Ag 5 Ft. Pierce 
Means, James Duval, Ag 5 Gainesville 

Means, Sam Barnett, BS 1 ; E 1 Gainesville 
Mears, John Miriam, T 1 Cypress 

Meeker, Thomas Busley, EE 3 Bonifay 

Meeth, Louis Henry, L 3 New Port Richey 
Mehlman, George Black, AB 1 Jacksonville 
Mehrtens, William Osborne, T 2 Jacksonville 
Meigel, Harry, E 1 Jacksonville 



246 



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Name and Classification Address 
Melvin, Perry David, BS 3 Milton 

Menendez, Earnest, EE 2 Tampa 

Menendez, Ramon, EE 4 Tampa 

Merchant, Jay, AB 2 Clearwater 

Merrill, G. B., Ag 5 Gainesville 

Merrin, George Alfred, G Plant City 

Merrin, Phil F., Ag 3 Plant City 

Merritt, Charles Coe, BS 2 Richmond, Va. 
Merritt, J. Webster, BS 4 Gainesville 

Merryday, Lewinton A., BS 1 Palatka 

Messer, James, L 4 Tallahassee 

Messer, William Herbert. L 1 Samord 

Messier, Arthur Abbott, BS 1 ; E 1 Miami 
Metts, Allan Farris, BA 1 Marston, Mo. 
Middleton, Gerald E.. BS 1 Starke 

Mikell, William Owen, BA 3 Olustee 

Milam, George Baxter, E 5 Miami 

Milbrath, Harry Simmons, T 2 Fort Ogden 
Milian, Rene Joseph, BA 1 Tampa 

Millen, William David, ChE 2 Jacksonville 
Miller, Carlos, BS 1 ; E 1 Coral Gables 

Miller, Charles, T 2 Jacksonville 

Miller, Edwin Lee, L 3 Orlando 

Miller, Jack, AB 2 St. Petersburg 

Miller, John Donald, CE 4 W. Palm Beach 
Miller, Henry Broward, T 3 Bushnell 

Miller, Kenneth Wilber, A 1 Black Mt., N. C. 
Miller, J. B. Hamner, L 1 Tampa 

Miller, Jefferson Brovni, BA 2 Gainesville 
Miller, Perry Patten, BA 2 Key West 

Miller, Ralph William, BA 3 Orlando 

Miller, Robert Henry, BA 3 Bradenton 

Miller, Theo Worrall, T 3 Bunnell 

Millican, James Henry, AB 3 Palatka 

Mills, James Raymond, BS 1 Archer 

Mims, William Elliott, EE 2 Ft. Pierce 

Minardi, John Battista, AB 1 Tampa 

Miner, Jack Harding, CE 2 Daytona Beach 
Mines, Chester Eugene, ME 4 Miami 

Mitchell, James Edward, E 1 Ortega 

Mitchell, Robert Lee, BS 3 Mulberry 

Mitchell, William FVanklin, Ag 1 Lakeland 
Mize, Arthur Glenn, BA 1 W. Palm Beach 
Mize, Hilton Roy, PM 1 Daytona Beach 

Mizell, John Keener, BA 4 Gainesville 

Mizarahi, Ralph Simon, A 1 Jacksonville 

Mobley, Gordon Simpkins, CE 3 Jacksonville 
Model. Jacob, L 3 Gainesville 

Monteiro, George Louis, AB 2 St. Petersburg 
Montgomery, James Douglas, T 1 Gainesville 
Montgomery, Stephen Miles, L 1 Gainesville 
Montgomery, William Earl, BA 1 

— Miami Beach 
Moomaw, David Eugene, Ag 3 Miami 

Moore, Ernest G., G Newbern, N. C. 

Moore, Frederick A., BA 1 

— McKeesport, Penn. 
Moore, John Robert, CE 4 St. Petersburg 
Moore, Kingman Colquitt, A 1 Orlando 

Moore, Leonidas C, EE 3 Jacksonville 

Moore, Maurice Lee, BS 3 Laurel Hill 

Morgan, Curtis Dietrich, BA 3 St. Petersburg 
Morgan, Joseph, T 1 Jasper 

Morgan, Kenneth Oscar, T 1 Miami 

Morgan, Ned Harle, E 1 Jacksonville 

Morris, Charles F., T 3 Baker 

Morris, James Edward, E 1 New Smyrna 

Morris, William Emory, BA 1 Homestead 

Morris, William Erskine, ChE 2 Leesburg 
Morway, Jesse Arnold, BS 4 Jacksonville 
Mosier, Charles, AB 1 Miami 

Motts, George Newton, G Lakewood, Ohio 
Mounts, Charles Eugene, G Gainesville 

Moulsatsos, Vasilios Costas, BA 1 

— Tarpon Springs 
Mowry, Harold, Ag 4 Gainesville 

Moyer, Martin Hartwell, L 8 Ft. White 

Moyers, Edward Badger, A 1 Orlando 



Name and Classification Address 

Mullins, Archie G., G Tallahassee 

Mulrennan, John Andrew, Ag 1 Sydney 
Mulrennan, Joseph Bernard, T 1 Sydney 

Mumma, Jacob Ames, AB 2 Jacksonville 

Munger, Forest Harrold, L 1 Rivera 

Murphree, Albert A., AB 4 Gainesville 

Murphree, Claude Leon, G Gadsden, Ala. 
Murphree, Walter Ellis, BS 3 Gainesville 
Murphy, Sam Garret, BA 1 Bradenton 

Musser, Marshall Clemson, AB 2 

— St. Petersburg 
Mutispaugh, Harrold Leroy, BA 3 

—Plant City 
Myers, Robert Roy, BA 1 Des Moines, Iowa 

Napier, Thomas Swint, Ag 1 Miami 

Nasrallah, Samuel Andrew, BA 3 

— Jacksonville 
Neel, John Stephens, AB 1 High Springs 
Neflf, Thomas O'Neil, T 2 Jacksonville 

Nelson, Floyd James, E 5 Wiersdale 

Nelson, John Marion, BA 1 Tampa 

Nettles, Nadine, G Gainesville 

Nettles, William Thomas, J 1 Gainesville 
Neuwirth, Phillip Alvin, L 1 Tampa 

Neuwirth. Sidney, PM 2 Tampa 

Neville, Joseph Hugh, BS 3 Lakeland 

Newbold, John R., E 1 Crescent City 

Newcome, Ed., T 2 Ocala 

Newkirk, B. Fred, E 1 Tampa 

Newton, George Byrd, BS 1 Palatka 

Newton, Walter Phillip, BA 2 St. Petersburg 
Nichols, Arthur Wellington, A 2 Palatka 
Nichols, John H., ChE 2 Palatka 

Nimmons, Ralph Wilson. G St. Petersburg 
Nixon, Erby Millard, PM 1 Archer 

Nobles, James Edward. BA 3 Titusville 
Nolan, James Henry, BA 2 Jacksonville 

Norcissa, Emilio C, PM 1 Key West 

Norfleet, Joe H., Ag 3 Newberry 

Norfleet, Paul Judson, BS 2 Newberry 

Norman. Grover Cleveland, Ag 3 Starke 

Norris, Edward Robinson, AB 1 Jacksonville 
North, Merle Vinton, T 2 Wauchula 

Notley, Elon John, J 3 Syracuse, N. Y. 
Nunez, G2orge Tierso, BA 2 Panama City 
Nuzum, Russell Kraft, PM 1 St. Augustine 

O'Berry, Karlyle, L 1 Tampa 

O'Connell, Phillip Dillon, L 1 Gainesville 
Oliver, Alfred Lester, CE 3 Gainesville 

Oliver, Don, BA 2 ; T 2 Kissimmee 

Oliver, Wayne Carter, CE 2 Dunedin 

O'Mahoney, Jeremiah Patrick, L 1 

— Gainesville 
O'Niell, John Belton, A 2 Palatka 

O'Quinn, Charles Augustus, BS 2 Gainesville 
O'Reair, Henry Garritson, BS 1 

— Winter Haven 
Orr, Reuben Bennett, T 3 Hartsell, Ala. 
Otte, Burton John Henry, G 

— Northfield, Minn. 
Overstreet, Henry Wilbur, CE 3 Jamison 
Owen, Marcus N., BA 3 Tampa 

Owenby, Carl I^ester, L 3 Lakeland 

Owens, Thomas Andrew, T 4 Port St. Joe 



Paderewski, Arthur Harold, 

Padgett, Bumess Vernon, P 
Padgett, Hanaford Duncan, 

Page, Charles Van Buren, T 
Palmour, Charles E., T 1 
Pardue, Walter Wesley, EE 2 
Paris, Redmon Tracy, J 1 
Park, Robert Howard, T 2 
Parker, Boyd Rescoe, A 4 



BS 1 
— Jacksonville 
3 St. Cloud 
BA 2 

— Ruffin, S. C. 

1 Tallahassee 

Anthony 

St. Petersburg 

Jacksonville 

Atlanta, Ga. 

Ft. Myers 



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247 



Name and Classification, Address 
Parker, Jack Wilmer, BA 1 Sebring 

Parker, James Perkina, L 1 Jacksonville 
Parnell, Edward Nelson, T 1 Jensen 

Parrott, Ernest Milford, G Cardova, Tenn. 
Parsons, Carlos Theodore, J 4 Gainesville 
Parsons, Tunice, Waldon, T 2 Gainesville 
Partin, Charles Sharrol, T 1 Graceville 

Pasco, Samuel, AB 2 Pensacola 

Patrick, James Fairchild, T 1 I-t. Myers 
Patten, George Lloyd, T 2 Bushnell 

Patterson, Dan Enock, T 1 Auburndale 

Patterson, John Gordon, BS 1 Dunnellon 
Patterson, Russell Andrew, E 1 

— New Port Richey 
Payne, Aimar Waldemar, EE 4 Quincy 

Peacock, Albert Junior, BS 1 Coconut Grove 
Peacock, Alton Theodor, T 2 Tampa 

Peacock, J. Troy, T 2 Marianna 

Peacock, Otis Lee, PM 2 Altha 

Peacock, Wilburn Hiram, PM 2 Perry 

Peacon, Oscar Lee, PM 1 Miami 

Pearce, Fred Wayne, A 1 Tampa 

Pearce, Leighton Huske, P. M. 1 

— St. Petersburg 
Pearson, Siebert Clinton, BS 2 Alachua 

Pease, Theodore Kenneth, Ag 2 Okeechobee 
Pederson, Robert William, BA 1 Bartow 
Peel, Henry, G Mt. Rainier, Md. 

PcRg, John William, L 1 Hernando 

Pence, Leland Hadley, AB 1 Jacksonville 
Pendergrass, Sanford Harvey, T 1 ; E 1 

- — Macon, Ga. 
Pendino, Joseph Achille, PM 1 Tampa 

Pepper, Louis Calvert, T 2 Gainesville 

Pepper, William Mullin, L 4 Gainesville 
Perkins, Marion D., BA 4 Gainesville 

Perlman, Soloman Jay, ChE 2 Jacksonville 
Perloff, Ben, AB 4 Jacksonville 

Perloff, Lewis, BS 1 Jacksonville 

Permenter, Eugene Lawrence, PM 1 

— Jacksonville 
Perrine, George Alden, BA 3 Miami 

Perry, Gaylord D., AB 1 Haines City 

Perry, James Roe, AB 3 Live Oak 

Perry, Thomas Edwin, T 2 Daytona 

Perry, Vergil M., BA 2 Jacksonville 

Perry, William Geddes, E 1 Miami 

Pert, Raleigh Bethel, E 6 Palatka 

Peters, Paul Edward. T 2 Chipley 

Peterson, Frank Lon, AB 3 Miami 

Peterson, Laurence Roland, Ag 1 

— Ft. Lauderdale 
Petray, Forrest Lee, AB 1 Miami Beach 
Petris, Willis Edward, BS 3 Oakland 

Petroutsa, Anthony John, T 2 Jacksonville 
Pfaff, Edward Piatt, PM 2 Jacksonville 
Pheil, Harvey William, BA 3 St. Petersburg 
Pheil, Clarence Elmer, T 1 St. Petersburg 
Phillips, Cecil Robert, L 1 Live Oak 

Phillips, Enoch Bothwell, L 1 Bartow 

Phillips. George Whitfield, BS 3 Lakeland 
Phillips, Jack Orison, T 1 Jacksonville 

Phillips, Mile Marion, AB 2 Jobstown, N. J, 
Phillips, William S., L 3 Tampa 

Philpott, Frank Excell, T 1 St. Cloud 

Pierce, Harvey Fenn, E 1 W. Palm Beach 
Pilcher, Ray, T 1 DeFuniak Springs 

Pillsbury, Hugh Augusta, A 2 Jacksonville 
Pinney, Charles Bartlett, AB 1 Ft. Myers 
Piatt, William Zachary, L 3 Arcadia 

Pogue, Cyril E., L 4 Orlando 

Poleman, Theodore Edward, PM 1 Miami 
Politee, Nicholas, PM 2 Jacksonville 

Pond, Johnathon, Ag 1 Frost Proof 

Pooser, William Elmer, AB 2 Lake Wales 
Pope, Willard Marion, T 2 Ft. Lauderdale 
Poppell, Edgar Broward, BS 1 Ft. Pierce 
Porter, Joseph Yates, BA 3 Key West 



Name and Classification Address 
Portwood, Delmar Leo, T 2 Ft. Lauderdale 
Potter, David Wilfred, A 3 St. Augustine 
Potts, Joseph Dascomb, AB 1 Gainesville 

Pound, Aubrey James, EE 2 St. Augustine 
Powell, Charles Arthur, BA 1 Ft. Myers 

Powell, Thomas Cole, BS 2 Jacksonville 

Powell, Zeb Vance, BS 2 Red Springs, N. C. 
Pratt. James Clifford, P 2 Tallahassee 

Presley. John Thomas, T 2 Miami 

Presstman. George. T 1 St. Petersburg 

Presstman. Peter Stoner, E 1 St. Petersburg 
Prevatt, Myron Chalker. AB 2 Jacksonville 
Price, Edward Theodore, BS 2 Tampa 

Price, Hal, E 1 Gainesville 

Price, Herman Charles, BA 5 Orlando 

Price, Joseph Edwin, T 3 St. Petersburg 
Pricer, William Edgar, BS 1 Winter Haven 
Preister, Harold F., T 1 Lake Butler 

Prior, Horace, BS 1 W. Palm Beach 

Pritchard, George Edward, E 1 Plant City 
Pritchard, Julian Morris, A 4 Jacksonville 
Proctor. Carlos Ray, T 1 Tampa 

Proctor, John Hillary, Ag 5 Conway, S. C. 
Provost, Marshall Breese, BA 4 Cocoa 

Prunty, John William, AB 2 Miami 

Pugh, Frank Henry, PM 2 Laurel Hill 

Pullen, Charles Thomas, BA 1 Gainesville 
Pumpelly, Jack Willett, CE 3 Jacksonville 
Purcell, Wallace J., P 1 Ball Ground, Ga, 
Purcell, Woodson Nicholas, P 5 

• — St. Petersburg 
Purvis, Ernest R., G Florence, S. C. 

Putnam. Howard Line. BA 3 Miami 

Qually, Rueben Orlando, BA 2 

— Daytona Beach 
Quillian, Claude Bernard, BA 1 Coral Gables 
Quinlan, Thomas Settle, BA 2 Gainesville 

Rabinowitz, Leon, AB 1 Gainesville 

Ragans, James Raleigh, BA 1 Madison 

Ragans, Waldron Carlyle, BA 1 Lee 

Rahner, Clarence Victoe, G Akron, Ohio 
Rainey, Morton Henry, L 1 Jacksonville 

Rains, Baxter Smith, BA 1 Atlanta, Ga. 

Ramsey, Allan Collier, L 4 Tampa 

Ramsey, James Andrew, T 1 Bristol 

Rape, Vernon J., T 2 Gainesville 

Rasch. Delmar Albert, T 2 Lake Worth 

Rasmussen, Gene Scott, T 1 

— W. Palm Beach 
Raulerson, Leamon William, Ag 3 ; T 3 

— Crescent City 
Rauzin, Moses, AB 1 Miami 

Rawls, Vernon Charles, L 1 Gainesville 

Ray, William Newton, L 3 Pensacola 

Rayburn, James Ghostly, BA 1 St. Augtistine 
Raysor, Clifford Royston, AB 1 Loughman 
Reaves, F'red Charles, EE 2 Jacksonville 

Redding, Robert Lovis, AB 1 Orlando 

Redell, Archibald E., AB 2 Palatka 

Reece, John William, T 1 Tallahassee 

Reed, Howard Vincent, BS 1 Tampa 

Reeder, William Richey, BS 1 Miami 

Reese, John Lewis, L 4 Gainesville 

Reeves, Alex Donald. T 3 Gainesville 

Reeves, Louie Milford, BS 1 Miami 

Register, Alton Au;/U3tus, CE 4 Ft. Pierce 
Register, Oliver Clingmon, PM 1 

— High Springs 
Reiber, Felix Anthony, Ag 3 Jacksonville 

Reid, John Arthur, A 5 Miami 

Reitz, Fred Jerome, Ag 1 Tavares 

Rencher, Robert Crawford, T 2 

—Winter Park 
Renfro, Ray Hornor, A 1 Tampa 

Renfroe, James David, ME 4 Lake City 
Reynolds, Frank J., Ag 4 Marshall, 111. 



248 



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Name and Classification Address 

Reynolds, Howard Clark, J 2 Vero Beach 
Rhea, William Alexander, Ag 1 Umatilla 
Rice, Carl Thomas, E 1 Umatilla 

Rice, George Tullius, PM 1 Miami 

Rice, James Gordon, BS 1 Monticello 

Rice, James Mitchell, CE 4 Welch, W. Va. 
Rice, Jefferson L., BA 4 Bradenton 

Rice, Joseph Davies, BA 3 Gainesville 

Rice, Owen ChE 2 Orlando 

Rice, William Parke, PM 2 Pensacola 

Richards, Benjamin Pierpont, L 3 

— Gainesville 
Richards, Bennett Wyman, J 2 Orlando 

Richards, J. L., L 4 Tampa 

Richards, James Wilson, Ag 2 Baker 

Richards, Virgil Long, BS 3 Orlando 

Richardson, Horace Edward, E 1 

— Miami Beach 
Richardson, Hugh Bracey, L 1 Sarasota 
Richardson, Linton A., G O'Brien 

Richbourg, Clinton Cyrus, Ag 1 Crestview 
Richeson, Stuart Hord, AB 2 Jacksonville 
Ridenour, Hawley Ernest, BA 4 Gainesville 
Rider, Manning C, T 4 Gainesville 

Ridge, William Monteith, Ag 5 Bartow 

Rifkin, Louis B., L 4 Miami 

Rigby, William Orville, BS 1 Coconut Grove 
Ringling, Henry Ellsworth, BA 4 Gainesville 
Ripley, Wayne Eugene, L 4 Jacksonville 
Rippey, Andrew Douglas, PM 1 Gainesville 
Rish, Herbert, P 1 Winahitchson 

Rivers, Byron Tedd, A 1 Kissimmee 

Rivers, Thomas Judson, L 3 

— Green Cove Springs 
Rivers, William Jones, BA 2 Lakeland 

Robb, Allen Thomas, CE 4 Ft. Pierce 

Robbins, Arnold Irving, BS 2 Gainesville 
Robbins, John Alfred, T 3 Sydney 

Roberts, Clayton Tunstable, T 2 Gainesville 
Roberts, Marvis, P 1 Trenton 

Roberts, Nathan J., L 4 Daytona Beach 

Roberts, William Harold, AB 4 Homestead 
Robertson, William D., AB 2 Milton 

Robinson, Hendrix S., Ag 4 Ft. Pierce 

Robinson, Jack Finley, PM 1 

— Blytheville, Ark. 
Robinson, Lewis William, CE 2 Coral Gables 
Robinson, William Everett, T 2 Palmetto 
Robson, FVank Young, PM 1 Tampa 

Robuck, Ernest P., BA 1 Jacksonville 

Roche, Irving Monrose, BA 1 Vernon 

Rockwell, Daniel Thomas, A 5 Gainesville 
Roe, Wilson Singleton, ME 2 Gainesville 
Roe, Wesley William, Ag 1 Plant City 

Rogers, Frazier, G Gainesville 

Rogers, John Tilden, BS 2 Gainesville 

Rogers, Lewis Henry, E 1 DeFuniak Springs 
Rogers, Nathan Jewett, EE 4 

— DeFuniak Springs 
Rogers, Norman Beldin, BA 2 Jacksonville 
Rogers, Thomas Albuertus, BS 1 Hastings 
Rogers, Wilson N., BA 2 Clearwater 

Rollins, De Witt F., G Gainesville 

Romph, Edward, Coleman, AB 2 Miami 

Romph, William Culbertson, BA 4 Miami 
Rosenberg, Morris, L 1 St. Petersburg 
Ross, John A., Ag 3 St. Petersburg 

Ross, N. Donald, Ag 3 St. Petersburg 

Rosser, John Barkley, BS 4 Jacksonville 

Rossetter, Appleton Thomalson, AB 3 

■ — Eau Gallie 
Rossetter, James Wadsworth, T 2 Eau Gallie 
Rothfuss, Richard Russell, T 3 Bradenton 
Rothstein, Abe, L 3 Jacksonville 

Rou, Leonard L., Ag 1 Lowell 

Rozear, Robert L., BA 3 Pensacola 

Roundtree, James Barney, BA 1 Chipley 

Rowan, Fred, PM 1 Ft. Pierce 



Name and Classification Address 

Rowe, Walter Thompson, T 2 Jacksonville 

Rowell, John Theron, T 3 Perry 

Royce, Wilbur E., T 1 Lake Worth 

Russ, Chester Alton, J 1 Orlando 

Russell, Carlos Lee, BS 1 Miami 

Ruth, Paul, PM 1 Gainesville 
Ryan, Henry Ward, AB 1 Trenton, N. J. 

Ryboldt, Howard Roy, E 1 Orlando 

Ryder, Ralph Bennett, E 1 Miami 

Safer, Moe Ben, L 1 Jacksonville 

Saghatelian, Barkev Krikor, A 1 Gainesville 
Sage, Andrew H., AB 2 ; Ag 2 

— Tarpon Springs 
Sale, E. Hewett, P 1 Melbourne 

Salley, George Lawrence, AB 2 Tallahassee 
Saloman, Morris Seymour, L 3 Orlando 
Salzer, George Victor, Ag 2 Jacksonville 
Salzer, William Wechsler, BS 2 ; T 2 

— Jacksonville 
Sammons, Harold Douglas, BA 1 Tampa 
Sample, Richard Lardner, BA 3 Ft. Pierce 
Sanchez, George Warren, BA 1 Live Oak 
Sanders, J. L., EE 2 Tampa 

Sanderson, David William, T 1 

— W. Palm Beach 
Sands, James Alexander, EE 2 Sanford 

Sands, Orilas Leslie, BA 3 Orlando 

Sanford, Ralph Shelby, BS 1 Quincy 

Sanger, Johnnie Lonas, ME 3 Minneola 

Sansbury, Walter Ewing, BS 2 

— W. Palm Beach 
Sapp, Benjamin James, T 2 Mulberry 

Sapp, Herbert Patton, E 1 ; T 1 Panama City 
Sargeant, Jos. Chester, P 1 Lakeland 

Sarra, Ernest Lamar, L 4 Pensacola 

Sasnett, Henry Harris, AB 1 Jacksonville 
Sauls, Charles Edward, T 2 Tallahassee 

Savage, Francis Church, E 1 Eustis 

Sawyer, Aubrey Dane, A 3 Jacksonville 

Sawyer, James E., Ag 4 

—Mont St. Clair, N. J. 
Scadron, Ivis Josef, L 1 Tampa 

Scaglione, James T., P 2 Tampa 

Scaglione, Peter Cammaratta, BA 4 Tampa 
Sciutti, Walter John, G Jacksonville 

Schiller, Carl Parker, T 3 St. Petersburg 
Schirard, John Rogero, L 1 Sanford 

Schirmer, Ernest Edward, AB 1 Miami 

Schmidt, Jule Erhardt, CE 2 St. Petersburg 
Schoenborn, Robert Morton, E 1 Tampa 
Scholze, Robert Ellis, L 3 Miami 

Schuler, Paul Edward, EE 2 Branford 

Schulting, Louis B., J 3 Gainesville 

Schwab, Walter Henry, BA 1 Miami 

Schwartz, Dan Richard, L 1 Jacksonville 
Schwartz, Harold, BA 1 Jacksonville 

Schwartz, Joe, L 4 Miami 

Schwartz, Leon Julius, PM 2 Tampa 

Schweitzer, Edward Oscar, T 1 Homestead 
Scofield, George Walter, T 3 Inverness 

Scofield, Orlando F'rank, BS 1 Inverness 
Scott, Felton Winfield, AB 1 Luverne Park 
Scott, John Marcus, G Gainesville 

Scott, Russell Morgan, BA 3 Sebring 

Scott, William Curtis, BA 1 ; Ag 1 

— Haines City 
Scotten, John Lewis, T 4 Gainesville 

Sears, William Joseph, L 4 Gainesville 

Seasted, Harold Frederick, BS 2 

— Eveleth, Minn. 
Seay, Homer Houston, J 1 W. Palm Beach 
Seely, H. J., BA 1 Tampa 

Seivert, Ernest E., BS 1 Winter Park 

Seivert, Hugh Augustus. AB 2 Orlando 

Selle, Paul Theodore, BS 1 Gainesville 

Sellers, Glennan David, BS 2 Miami 

Setz, Thomas Burke, EE 2 Tampa 



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249 



Name and Classification Address 
Sewell, Robert Oliver, BS 4 Gainesville 

Shafer, Paul Lamarr, BA 2 Daytona Beach 
Shahinian, Manoug Haroutune, EE 2 

— Gainesville 
Shannon, G. Melvin, J 3 St. Petersburg 

Sharp, Hiram Felix, CE 3 Jacksonville 

Shaw, LeRoy, BA 1 DeFuniak Springs 

Shaw, William Henry, T 4 Adairsville. Ga. 
Sheffield, Lexington Odette, BA 4 Dover 

Shelfer, Jefferson Bates, BA 1 Quincy 

Shepard, Clyde Russell, Ag 3 Wauchula 

Sheppard, Charles Richard, AB 1 

— Jacksonville 
Sher, Paul Joseph, BS 1 Sarasota 

Sherman, John Henry, BA 2 Panama City 
Sherry, Byron Paul, BS 1 Waverly 

Shimp, Robert Charles, G Jacksonville 

Shipp, Alvin Campbell, BA 1 

— Chattanooga, Tenn. 
Shirley, John Jasper, Ag 3 Bradenton 

Shiver, Kenneth Edgar, E 1 Pompano 

Shook, Robert Leroy, EE 2 Stuart 

Shoun, Herbert, E 5 Tampa 

Shrigley, James William, P 1 Lake Wales 
Shuler, Jay Alfred, L 1 Hosford 

Shuman, Leland Jackson, EE 2 Lakeland 
Sigmann, Edmund Ball, AB 2 Lake Worth 
Sikes, Ardry Lyon, PM 2 Tampa 

Sikes, Robert Fulton, G Sylvester, Ga. 
Silsby, Harry Z., BS 2 Gainesville 

Silsby, Lincoln Washington, T 1 

— Coronado Beach 
Silverman, Sam, L 4 Miami Beach 

Simmons, G. Ballard, G Ponce De Leon 
Simmons, Louis Winford, P 1 Daytona Beach 
Simmons, William P., AB 1 Jacksonville 

Simpson, Arthur Allen, L 3 Jacksonville 
Sims, Charles Owsley, EE 2 Miami 

Sims, William Harris, EE " F'ernandina 
Singletary, George Lee. AB 2 Kissimmee 
Singletary, James R., T 3 High Springs 
Sinquefield, James Rufus, BA 1 Ocala 

Sipperell, Murray Clayton, Ati 3 Palatka 
Skaggs, Kenneth Gordon, BS 1 Sarasota 
Skeels, Norman Arthur, A 4 DeLand 

Skipper, Joseph Kingston, BA 2 Jacksonville 
Slavin, Sam, T 2 Miami 

Slough, Sam Osborne, Ag 2 Dade City 
Small, Arthur Polhill, BA 1 Jacksonville 
Smedley, William George, CE 3 ; T 3 

— Jacksonville 
Smith, Allen Lowd, L 4 New Smyrna 

Smith, Bernys Holland, J 3 Lakeland 

Smith, Clarence Edward, BS 1 Jacksonville 
Smith, Daniel Carl, BA 1 Center Hill 

Smith, David Clair, L 4 Wabasso 

Smith, Donald William, PM 2 Miami 

Smith, Elmer Fleming, BA 3 Jacksonville 
Smith, Elton, AB 2 Jacksonville 

Smith, George Garrison, P 4 Sanford 

Smith, George Hoffman, G Gainesville 

Smith, George Rosse, CE 2 Coronado Beach 
Smith, Guy Frederick, T 3 Altoona 

Smith, George Thomas, Ag 2 Winter Garden 
Smith, Helman, P 3 Jacksonville 

Smith, Ivan Huron, A 4 Hastings 

Smith, James Madison, AB 2 Reddick 

Smith, Joseph G., G Plant City 

Smith, J. Wallace, T 2 Wauchula 

Smith, Kenneth Hartman, P 1 Lakeland 

Smith, M. M., T 2 Winter Park 

Smith, Nedam Eugene, BS 2 Gainesville 

Smith, Ottis Effler, Ag 1 Oneca 

Smith, Piatt Thadeus, BA 1 Mulberry 

Smith, Raymond Leroy, EE 3 Jacksonville 
Smith, Robert Edward, E 1 Miami 

Smith, Thomas Elzie, AB 1 Panama City 

Smith, Walter Earl, Ag 1 Delray 



Name and Classification Address 
Smith, William Jordon, Ag 1 Winter Haven 
Snyder, Harry Maurice, BA 1 St. Augustine 
Snyder, Louis Frank. E 1 Miami 

Snyder, John Lynn, BA 1 Tampa 

Soar William Stanton, AB 1 Miami 

Sobol, Hyman Burton, T 2 Gainesville 

Sompayrac, Lauren McCall, BS 2 

— Jacksonville 
Spann, Emmett Britton, E 1 Holopaw 

Spann, Herbert W., E 1 Mananna 

Sparkman, Heyward, BA 1 Plant City 

Sparkman, W. B., BS 1 Plant City 

Speh Paul Edward, E 1 Jacksonville 

Spencer, Allen William, P 1 Sarasota 

Sperling, Max Franklin, PM 1 Miami 

Spradley, James Edwin, PM 2 Crestview 

Spurlock, Alvin Harold, T 2 Munson 

Stadler, John Buchan, BA 3 Jacksonville 

Stadel, Harold Orrin, BA 1 Bradenton 

Stamp, Thomas Leroy, E 1 Sanford 

Stanley, Richard Hopkins, E 1 Orlando 

Stanley, Dennis Keith, T 4 St. Cloud 

Stanly, George Booth, L 3 Ft. Lauderdale 
Stanly, Richard Lee, L 4 Ft. Lauderdale 
Stansfield, Charles Alfred, P 1 Wauchula 
Stanfield, William Ashton, ME 2 Tampa 
Starling, Sylvester Samuel, BS 1 Orlando 
Starnes, Finis E., L 1 Ft. Myers 

Stearns, George Leslie, Ag 4 Jacksonville 
Steed, Arthur Lee, AB 2 Kissimmee 

Steele, James Henry, BA 2 Tampa 

Steen, John Probert, BA 2 St. Cloud 

Steen, Vernon C, G Gainesville 

Stenstrom, Amialer, G Wauchula 

Stenstrom, Eric Corr, L 1 Wauchula 

Stephens, Bunyan McClure, T 1 Tallahassee 
Stephens, Carl Wilson, T 4 Ona 

Stephens, Henry Adolph, BA 2 Sarasota 

Stephens, Norbert, T 1 Monticello 

Stephens, Willis Little, AB 1 Jacksonville 
Stephenson, Ray W., PM 2 Pittsburgh, Kan. 
Sternberg, Sam, PM 2 Starke 

Stevens, Larry C, AB 2 Springfield, 111. 
Stevens, Luther Davis, AB 1 

— Homosassa Springs 
Stevens, William Garrett, BS 2 Gainesville 
Stewart, A. Courtney, A 3 Ft. Lauderdale 
Stewart, Arthur Edward, L 4 Coconut Grove 
Stewart, James Arthur, T 1 Naples 

Stewart, Harry W., T 2 Jacksonville 

Stewart, Robert Wilson, Ag 1 Leesburg 

Stewart, Selden Lewis, ME 2 La Belle 

Stewart, Thomas Nichols, AB 2 Vero Beach 
Stock, Joseph Clyde, T 2 Interlachen 

Stoddard, Guy Russell, PM 1 Miami 

Stokes. J. P., L 1 Miami 

Stokes, William Ellis, BS 1 Moultrie, Ga. 
Stone, Alden George, ME 3 Tampa 

Stone, Bryant Mason, P 2 St. Petersburg 
Stone, Leo Kalervo, PM 1 Pierson 

Stone, Nobbie Higdon, AB 2 Port St. Joe 
Stone, Ralph Robertson, CE 2 Miami 

Stone, Wilbur Charles, L 3 St. Petersburg 
Stowers, Joseph Mahlon, T 1 Waldo 

Strickland, Edgar Vann, P 2 Colquilt, Ga. 
Strickland, Wilbur Hague, ME 2 Pierce 

Strickler, Ira Wilbur, E 1 Miami 

Stringer, Orum K., P 2 Lakeland 

Strode, Harmon E., T 2 Green Cove Springs 
Strom, William Wilfred, BA 2 Quincy 

Strout, Randolph Ernest C 2 St. Petersburg 
Sturges, Wilton, BS 1 Ft. Lauderdale 

Sturn, Gerald Wilson, AB 2 Sarasota 

Sullivan, Dwight Lyman, BA 5 

St. Matthews, S. C. 
Suit, William Marion, L 1 Lakeland 

Summers, Adolphus Eugene, L 1 

— High Springs 
Sutcliffe, Roland Alton, BA 2 Miami 



250 



REGISTER 



Name and Classification Address 
Swaine, Jack Robert, E 1 Pensacola 

Swaya, Sam Jonathan, BA 1 Jacksonville 
Swearingen, William Bailey, AB 1 Bartow 
Sweat, Thomas William, T 1 O'Brien 

Sweat, Wesley Albert, CE 3 Mulberry 

Sweeting, Benjamin, A 2 W. Palm Beach 
Swett, Charles Reavis, BS 1 Warrington 
Swink, William Marion, L 4 Woodruff, S. C. 
Swoope, Henry Corbin, BS 1 New Smyrna 

Takahashi, Nelson, ChE 3 Gainesville 

Talbert, Merrill Edgar, AB 1 Vero Beach 
Taylor, Andy Dewey, T 1 Ft. Green 

Taylor, Calffrey Wilder, BA 3 Plant City 
Tedder, Warren Louis, L 1 Live Oak 

Tedder, Paul Matthew, E 1 Canal Point 
Tenncy, A. Webster, T 2 Ten Mile, W. Va. 
Theobald, F. William, PM 2 Orlando 

Thoburn, Robert, P 1 Daytona Beach 

Thomas, Carey Judson, BA 2 Jacksonville 
Thomas, John Henry, BS 2 Gainesville 

Thomas, John Washington, P 1 High Springs 
Thomas, Phillip Everett, BA 1 Gainesville 
Thomas, Richard Greene, Ag 2 Palm Harbor 
Thomas, Walter Lawrence, L 3 Palm Harbor 
Thomas, William Reuben, BA 1 Gainesville 
Thompson, Arthur Rumford, AB 3 

— St. Petersburg 
Thompson, Pierce John, BS 1 Gainesville 

Thompson, Robert Alden, E 1 Miami 

Thornal, Benjamin Campbell, L 3 Orlando 
Thornhill, James Washington, BA 2 

— Lake Wales 
Thornton, Albert Sharp, BA 1 Tampa 

Thorp, Rebetha Frank, PM 2 Lakeland 

Thrower, Frank Briggs, L 4 Quincy 

Thurston, Joe Marion, T 1 St. Petersburg 
Tilden, Frederick Theodore, BA 1 

— Winter Garden 
Toffaletti, Louis, BS 1 Ocala 

Tolbert, Benjamin Arthur, G Gainesville 
Tomlinson, Laurence Wells, L 1 Lake Wales 
Tompkins, Harold Irwin, BS 2 Tampa 

Tooke, Harry Eugene, BS 1 Clearwater 

Toole, John Cleghorn, T 1 Tampa 

Toomer, Chester Holmes, T 1 Jacksonville 
Toomer, Jack, AB 1 Jacksonville 

Torian, Frank Fleming, AB 1 Miami 

Tower, John Ballard, PM 2 Homestead 

Towles, Alton Myers, L 3 Crawl'ordville 
Tovvles, Dan Q., BS 1 Meggetts, S. C. 

Trafton, David Calvin, EE 3 St. Petersburg 
Trainor, Charles FVanklin, CE 4 

— Daytona Beach 
Traxler, Leon William, L 4 Alachua 

Traylor, Charles Simcox, BA 2 Jacksonville 
Tredwell. Thus Andrew, G Aucilla 

Trice, William Walter, BA 1 Tampa 

Trogden, Richard P., BS 4 Melbourne 

Trottman, Warren Ellis, T 3 Gainesville 

Troxler, Lanas Farlan, AB 1 Ocala 

Troxler, Walter Garett. L 3 Ocala 

True, Bert, G Buffalo, Mo. 

Tucker, Cecil Argyle, T 1 Christmas 

Tucker, Woodson C, BS 4 Miami 

Tugwell. Wilton, PM 1 Pensacola 

TuJy, Albert Paul, T 2 Tallahassee 

Tunnell, Jack H., T 1 Palatka 

Turner, Drew Henry, PM 1 Ocala 

Turner, Edward Eugene, L 4 Lecanto 

Turner, Glover Manuel, L 4 Jacksonville 
Turner, James Wilcox, P 2 Cedar Keys 

Turner, Jesse Lee, T 2 Jacksonville 

Tye. William Gosper, AB 3 Ft. Pierce 

Tyson, Walter Leon, BS 1 Narcoossee 

Uchoa, Jose Mendonca, Ag 5 

— San Paylo, Brazil 
Ufford, Joel Curtis, EE 3 Winter Park 



Name and Classification Address 
Underbill, Marion Reeves, BA 3 Barberville 
Underwood, Robert Fryer, AB 1 

— Winter Garden 
Unrich, Robert Clinton, BA 2 

— Daytona Beach 
Untreiner, Royal J., L 3 Pensacola 

Uaborne, Albert F., T 1 Miami 

Vaccaro, Joseph Anthony, L 1 Tampa 

Valdes, Joseph Anthony, PM 1 Key West 
Van Brunt, William Oscar, BS 2 Tallahassee 
Van Brunt, Richard Henry, T 1 Tallahassee 
Vandergrift, Henry Flagler, T 1 

— Crescent City 
Van Hyning, Gather C, BS 4 Gainesville 

Vanderhulse, Kenneth Inman, AB 1 

— Auburndale 
Vanderipe, John Fisk, L 4 Bradenton 

Van Sickle, Dale Harris, T 3 Gainesville 
Vam, Myron Macfie, Ag 3 St. Augustine 
Vaughan, Harold Eugene, BA 2 Gainesville 
Vaughan, Sam D., BS 1 Tampa 

Vega, Celestino Camilo, L 4 Tampa 

Verri, Joe, T 1 Tampa 

Ve Verka, Richard Dale, T 4 Manatee 

Vickery, Charles Lelon, BA 1 Panama City 
Vincent, Wirt Jackson, EE 2 Lecanto 

Vining, Eugene Tovimsend, PM 1 Tampa 
Vogler, William Charles, T 5 Gainesville 

Volley, Karl Warren, BS 1 ; BA 1 

—St. Petersburg 
Voorhees, Richard Kenneth, Ag 3 

■ — Cantonment 

Wade, Edie Berry, BS 1 Tampa 

Wahl, Harold Barksey, AB 3 Cocoa 

Wahl, John H., AB 2 : T 2 Cocoa 

Wagner, Marion L., A 1 Chuluota 

Waid, Donald Kellan, A 1 Palatka 

Wakefield, George Norton, G Apalachicola 
Wakefield, John Wesley, E 1 Apalachicola 
Walcutt, Henry Leeds, Ag 5 St. Augustine 
Walcutt, William Child, E 1 St. Augustine 
Walden, Robert Lee, A 3 Ft. Meade 

Waldron, Jesse Calvin, T 1 Chiefland 

Walker, Charles FVantz, Ag 3 Miami 

Walker, Charles Hamilton, BA 1 Pensacola 
Walker, Clifford Julius, J 1 Bradenton 

Walker, Robert Ellsworth, CE 2 Whitney 
Walker, Shade Wilson, L 1 Tampa 

Walker, Solomon Lloyd, T 5 Perry 

Wall, Samuel Maupin, E 5 Gainesville 

Wallace, Howard Keefer, BS 4 St. Petersburg 
Wallace, Julian Howard, G Gainesville 

Wallace, Samuel D., AB 4 ; L 4 Gainesville 
Walrath, Laurence Kaye, AB 2 

— Keystone Heights 
Walsh. Stephen Eldon, T 1 Davis Island 
Walsh, Tracy Ryan, EE 3 Pensacola 

Walters, Velton, T 1 Holopaw 

Walton, Fred James, T 1 St. Augustine 

Walton, William Marion, E 1 Pompano 
Wampler, Sam, T 1 Miami Beach 

Ward, Ernest Marvin, Ag 1 Winter Park 

Ward, Fred Curtis, G Eustia 

Warfield, Wayne, PM 1 Tampa 

Warren, DeWitt Eckler, BA 2 Sarasota 

Warren, Frank M., T 1 Perry 

Warren, Richard, T 2 Wewahitchka 

Waring, Charles William, E 1 Tampa 

Warnock, Harry C, BA 1 Jacksonville 

Washer, FVank Kern, BA 2 Lakewood, Ohio 
Wass, Howard Frederick, BA 3 Miami 

Waters, Dale Bernard, T 2 Titusville 

Waters, John Douglas, Ag 2 Muscogee 

Watford, Glen Angus, P 1 Graceville 

Watkins, Jim, BA 2 Llano, Texas 

Watkins, John V., G Lakeland 

Watroxis, Charles W., BS 1 Des Moines, Iowa 



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251 



Name and Classification Address 
Watrous, Thomas M., L 1 Tampa 

Watson, Clare John, T 5 Ft. Meade 

Watson, Clarence Newton, Ak 4 

— St. Elmo, Tenn. 
Watson, Forrest Edward, T 1 Clearwater 
Watson, J. E., BS 1 Pensacola 

Watson, William Bedford, L 1 Jacksonville 
Waugh, Joseph Edward, CE 4 Gainesville 
Way, Caryle Symons, Ag 1 

—South Euclid, Ohio 
Weaver, Richard Allen, T 1 Gainesville 

Webb, Alex Lee, EE 3 Tallahassee 

Webb, Herbert Mitchell, AB 1 Lakeland 

Webb, Robert Hamilton. A? 1 Winter Haven 
Webb, Thomas Roba, EE 3 Winter Garden 
Weeks. Howell Tucker, T 1 Trenton 

Weeks, William Tucker, J 1 Newberry 

Weinstein, Julian Joseph, PM 1 

— St. Augustine 
Weis, Henry Mahlon, BA 1 Pensacola 

Welch, Arnold DeMerritt, P 3 Zephyrhills 
Welles, Benjamin, BA 2 Arcadia 

Welling, Frederick A., BA 3 Babson Park 
Wells, Gurdon Henry, T 4 Gainesville 

Wells, Mrs. Idella, T 4 Gainesville 

Wells, Sidney Wilson, Ag 2 Winter Haven 
Wenger, Wayne Rice, G Saginau, Mich. 
Werner, Harold Willard, G 

— New London, Wis. 
Wernokoff, Leonial X., BS 1 Jacksonville 
West, Erdman, G Gainesville 

West, James Walton, T 1 Bushnell 

West, Thomas Franklin, L 3 Gainesville 

Westbury, Harry Alonzo, T 1 Gainesville 
Westmoreland, Wade Heiskell, PM 2 

— Los Angeles, Calif. 
Wettstein, Max Elbert, BA 2 Orlando 

Wettstein, Otto, AB 4 Orlando 

Wheaton, Frank Remington, BS 2 

—Painted Post, N. Y. 
Wheeler, Joseph Augxistus, T 3 Gainesville 
Whidden, Ossie Lamar, Ag 1 Wauchula 

Whiddon, Jimmie Clayton, BA 3 

— Chattahoochee 
Whiddon, Russell Dyal. T 1 Gainesville 

White, Al Ray, BA 1 Tampa 

White, James E., T 1 Tampa 

White, Millard Brown, PM 1 Bradenton 
White, Richard Willis, AB 2 Sebring 

White, Robert Norman, BA 2 Mt. Dora 

Whiteley, Miles J., EE 4 Miami 

Whitesides, Thurman Andrew, T 1 Miami 
Whitesides, William Robert, P 1 

— Ft. Lauderdale 
Whitfield, William Knott, T 1 Tallahassee 
Whiting, Wallace Lionel, E 1 Ocala 

Whittam, Benjamin, BA 2 Bradenton 

Wiggert, Dohren William, BA 1 Chicago, 111. 
Wigginton, A. Murray, BA 3 Miami 

Wigginton, John T., T 3 Miami 

Wiig, Lawrence Maron, BS 4 Ft. Lauderdale 
Wilder, Wallace Livingston, BA 4 Knights 
Wilensky, Joseph S., AB 3 Jacksonville 

Wilkinson, Carroll Warren, T 1 Hastings 
Wilkinson, Robert William, T 1 Jasper 
Will, George Arthur, PM 2 Keystone Heights 
Willes, Errol Shippen, L 3 Jensen 

Williams, Ashbel Gotten, BS 2 Jacksonville 
Williams, Bruce Wade, T 2 PunU Gorda 

Williams, Charles Ashton, AB 3 Miami 

Williams, Clemmie Banks, Ag 2 Sebring 

Williams, David, BA 1 Jacksonville 

Williams, Donald Grant, PM 1 Tampa 

Williams, Donald Kistler, BA 1 Tampa 

Williams, Edwin L., T 3 Fu Meade 

Williams, Edwin Lacy, T 2 Williston 

Williams, Gordon Lee, E 1 Jupiter 



Name and Classification Address 
Williams, Herbert Leroy, T 1 Jacksonville 
Williams, Jack Davis, L 1 Tampa 

Williams, John Franklin, G Monticello 

Williams, Kenneth Rast, T 4 ; G Monticello 
Williams, James Monroe, T 1 Graceville 

Williams, Nat Lawrence, L 4 Miami 

Williams, Norman Eric, BS 3 Seville 

Williams, Richard Sugden, J 2 

— Toronto, Canada 
Williamson, Ferdinand Leroy, T 1 WoodviUe 
Williamson, J. D., T 1 Chattahoochee 

Willis, Walker Dorr, A 2 Pensacola 

Willits, Hewitt Wilson, BA 1 Orlando 

Willits, Ralph C , CE 2 Stuart 

Wilmot, Royal James, G Loughman 

Wilson, A. E.. AB 3 Bradenton 

Wilson, Donald Powell, G Hettinger, N. D. 
Wilson, George Thomas, CE 3 Sanford 

Wilson, Horace S., L 4 Gainesville 

Wilson, John W., E 5 Sanford 

Wilson, Lloyd, J 2 Tampa 

Wilson, Parker Thomas, P 2 Frost Proof 
Wilson, Pettus Kinnebrew. E 4 Jacksonville 
Wilson, Verne Edmund, PM 2 

—Hettinger, N. D. 
Wind, Andrew Elmer, T 1 Sarasota 

Winderweedle, William Elbert, L 1 Mayo 

Wingate, Homer Dewitt, BA 5 Barney, Ga. 
Wingert, Earl Perry, ChE 4 

— Punxsutawney, Pa. 
Windhovel, Carl Ernest, BS 1 Lake City 
Wing, Kenneth Milam, T 1 Bayard 

Winston, Cornelius Ellis, E 1 Ocala 

Wise, Jacob Hooper, L 4 Gainesville 

Wolbert, Frank, BS 3 Winter Park 

Wolf, George Raymond, BS 2 Orlando 

Wolfe, Jospeh Emmet, L 1 Miami 

Wolfe, William Calvin, BS 1 Jacksonville 
Wood, Harry Evans, G Evinston 

Wood, Oresta Lee, BS 1 Baker 

Woodberry, Nixon Lester, BA 2 Quincy 
Woodberry, Robert McTyer, AB 3 Orlando 
Woodruff, Hiram Toliver, G Louisville, Miss. 
Woods, James Pasco, L 1 Perry 

Woodward, William Edward, L 1 Quincy 

Woodward, Walter Howell, AB 1 Marianna 
Weoten, J. D., T 1 DeFuniak Springs 

Wooten, Robert Carter, BA 1 Tampa 

Workizer, John Charles, T 2 St. Petersburg 
Worthington, Howey Rice, EE 2 JacksonviUe 
Wright, Wallace Murphy, A 2 Lakeland 

Wu, Nien Chi, Ag 5 Canton, China 

Wulf. Robert Fischer, PM 1 

—White Plains, N. Y. 
Wynns, Robert Kilgore, Ag 1 Montverde 

Yancey, Charles Bernard, AB 3 Umatilla 

Yancey, Hervey Hall, L 1 Tampa 

Yancey, William Benjamin, BA 2 Umatilla 
Yarbrough, Lucien Bell, L 1 Nashville, Tenn. 
Yarnall, Frank Dent, ME 3 Winter Park 

Yarnall, William Dent, T 1 Winter Park 

Yates, Chester, T 1 Plant City 

Yawn, Cecil Parker, T 3 Graceville 

Yawn, Donald Hunter, Ag 4 Graceville 

Yeats, Robert Sheppard, A 4 Tampa 

York, Thomas Joseph, BA 2 Tampa 

Young, Hugh, J 1 Everglades 

Young, Rogers White, T 2 Tallahassee 

Young, Vespucius Peniston, BA 2 Bradenton 

Ziebe, Richard Andrew, T 1 Jacksonville 

Zemp, Sidney Thornton, P 2 Camden, S. C. 
Zentgraf, Robert Louis, G New York, N. Y. 
Ziegler, Louis William, Ag 3 Orlando 

Zimmerman, Paul Arihur, PM 1 Miami 



252 



REGISTER 



LIST OF STUDENTS, SUMMER 1928 



Name Address 

Abbott, Chas. E. Gainesville 

Abbott, Edward Richard Gainesville 

Ackley, Vivien Lucile Ashland, Ky. 

Adams, Lola Louise Ocala 

Alexander, Jas. Chester Dade City 

Alexander, Mrs. Louie Lakeland 

Alexander, Nell Mitchell Lakeland 

Allen, Georgia Bradenton 

Allen, Marvis T. Tampa 

Allison, Emma Wilma Ft. Myers 

Allison, Maud Moore Haven 

Allyn, C. L. Raskin 

Altstetter, Mrs. Mabel F. Orlando 

Amerine, Nellie R. Arcadia 

Ames, Burton Weber Gainesville 

Amick, George Gainesville 

Amrein, Werner Charles St. Petersburg 
Anderson, Mrs. Edith L. Sulphur Springs 

Anderson, Edith N. Lake Wales 

Anderson, Ewing Gainesville 

Anderson, Irwin B. St. Petersburg 

Anderson, Margaret Edith Jacksonville 

Anderson, Robert T. Gainesville 

Anderson, Mrs. Rose M. Jacksonville 
Anderson, Wm. Robert Sulphur Springs 

Andrews, Mrs. Lula E. Gainesville 

Arbic, George Gainesville 

Archibald, Robert B. Jacksonville 

Argo, Mary Emma Ocoee 

Asson, Thomas M. Bushnell 

Atkinson, A. W. Gainesville 
Atkinson, Dean D. West Palm Beach 

Atkinson, Mrs. Ethel May Daytona Beach 

Augustine, Max D. Miami 

Austin, H. Stuart Orlando 

Ayers, Fred Donald Gainesville 

Backus, Mrs. Leola Coral Gables 

Baetzman, Fred Ernest Gainesville 

Baggett, Grace Jane Williston 

Baggott, Mrs. Myrtle Marie Gainesville 
Bailey, Annie Beatrice Port Tampa City 

Bailey, Mrs. Miriam H. P. Ft. Myers 

Bailey, Mrs. Ruby St. Cloud 

Bain, Homer Andrew Dundee 

Bain, Mrs. Leila Daniels Dundee 

Bair, Russell Owen Ft. Lauderdale 

Baker, Celestea Althea Tampa 

Baker, Mrs. Genevieve Lake Worth 

Baker, Grace Lou Arcadia 

Baker, Milledge A. Chiefiand 

Baker, Mrs. Roberta Lee Leesburg 

Baldwin, Mrs. Annie Alachua 

Ball, Mrs. Rebecca B. St. Petersburg 

Ballard, Elizabeth A. Geneva 

Bancroft, Theodore A. Port St. Joe 

Barco, Lottie Louise Tallahassee 

Barker, Genevieve Mead Orlando 

Barker, John Shearer Miami 

Barnes, Grace Miami 

Barnhill, Mrs. Lemma Mabel Gainesville 

Barnhill, Wm. Benjamin Gainesville 
Barnes, Mrs. Carmen Sparks St. Petersburg 

Barrineau, James Archibald Gonzalez 

Baser, Clyde J. Myakka City 

Baser, Mrs. Hazel K. Myakka City 

Bass, Joe Tampa 

Bass, Nellie Live Oak 

Bass, Nettie May Live Oak 

Bassett, Henry Tampa 

Bateman, Robert Edward Wauchula 

Baugher, Arthur Lorraine Tampa 

Baxter, Mrs Ruth H. Gainesville 

Bayly, Cyril Clearwater 

Beach, Lillie Mae Webster 

Beachem, Joe Wm. Anastasia 



Name Address 

Beacon, Mrs. Esther Bremer Callahan 

Beacom, Wesley Linn Callahan 

Beasley, Alice Ellen Hawthorne 

Beasley, Bryant Umatilla 

Beaty, Robert C. Gainesville 

Beaver, Dorothy Mary Key West 

Behrens, Henry Princeton 

Bell, Mrs. Hennie Lou Gainesville 

Bell, Lois Lake City 

Bell, Stuart C. Barberville 

Bell, Winifred Jacksonville 

Bellamy, Zita Charlotte Eustis 
Bellerby, Mrs. Katherina Charles 

— St. Petersburg 

Belton, Mrs. Lena FVank Coleman 

Bennett, Martha A. Lakeland 
Bennett, Mickie Regina Pelham, Georgia 

Benton, Mrs. Edna Irene Plant City 
Berkstresser, Mary Elizabeth Hawthorne 

Berry, Mrs. Lily May Clarcona 

Bevis, Myrtle Bascom 

Billings, Emily N. Ocala 

Bir, George P. Miami 

Bishop, Rebecca Reddick 

Bishop, Shirley Gainesville 

Bishop, Wilbur Gainesville 
Black, Mrs. Edna Mae Coconut Grove 

Blackburn, Mrs. Georgia E. Gainesville 

Blackburn, Marion Eflfie Orlando 

Blacklock, Mrs. Adelia J. Gainesville 

Blair, Clarice E. Jennings 

Blair, Collie Jennings 

Blair, Lottie Lee Jennings 

Blair, Wm. Stuart Clearwater 

Black, Robert Geo. Brooksville 

Blanton, Mrs. Chloe Wellborn 

Blanton, Ellis M. Miami 

Bledsoe, Ann Lorena Tampa 

Bledsoe, Mrs. Debbie E. Lithia 

BIythe, Ruth Erma Sebring 

Boardman, Edward Thorpe Coral Gables 
Boardman, Mrs. Ona Kenney Gainesville 

Bogus, Dorothy Eleanor Ocala 

Bohannon, Erma Lee Port Orange 

Booth, Donald Carr Miami 

Bosch, Mrs. Esther Olivia Coral Gables 

Bostick, Mary L. Havana 

Bowen, James Thomas, Jr. Chipley 

Bowman, Clarence Jessee Wauchula 

Boyd, Carrie Benie Chipley 

Boyd, John Mann Clermont 

Boyles, Carlos LaCrosse 

Bracewell, Louise Ocoee 

Bradshaw, Mrs. Ethel I. Gainesville 

Brady, Florence E. East Palatka 

Branch, Ada Lenora Bushnell 
Branning, Mrs. Annabelle A. St. Petersburg 

Brannon, Annie Laurie Lake City 

Brantly, Evan Thomas Clermont 

Brash, Ruth Tampa 

Braswell, Tom Mills Monticello 

Bratley, Forrest G. Miami 
Bridges, Ernest Greenville, S. C. 

Bridges, Martha Coleman 

Brinson, Verna Live Oak 

Bristol, Loris Rood Gainesville 

Bristol, Wilma Harriet Gainesville 

Brittle, George Wm. Brooksville 

Brockington, Mrs. Alma I. Alachua 

Brookins, Mrs. Grace E. Okeechobee 

Brooks, Wilma Doris Gainesville 

Brothers, Etta Reddick 

Brothers, Shelby Lee Reddick 

Brown, Benny Arden Coral Gables 

Brown, Beulah Mae Groveland 

Brown, Elizabeth Nance Dade City 



REGISTER 



253 



Name 
Brown, Eva lona 
Brown, J. Colvin 
Brown, Jeanette 
Brown, Joram Elbert 
Brown, Joseph P. 
Brown, Marcus Gordon 
Brown, Rae Marguerite 
Brown, Rebecca Henrietta 
Brown, Ruby Lenora 
Brown, (Miss) Tommy 
Brown, Violet Rowena 
Brown, Wm. Osborn 
Browne, Alice Marian 
Browning, Mrs. Alma B. 
Brownlowe.'Dora Alma 
Bruner, Olaf Ve 
Bryan, Thomas Barnes 
Bryant, Susie 
Bryant, Sylvester Langley 
Buchanan, Frances Webb 
Buckels, Lucille 
Bulford, Amy 
Bullard, Mrs. Fannie A. 
Bullard, Newton Hudson 
Bullard, Ryan Joyce 
Bullock, Era Mae 
Bunch, Kathleen 
Eurford, Florence Ann 
Burnett, Minnie Mae 
Bushnell, Marjorie Ethel 
Butt, Thomas Cecil 

Byrd, Lillian Mae 
Byrnes, Hazel Irene 



So 



Address 

Jacksonville 

Barberville 

Lake Butler 

Ocala 

Mascotte 

So. Jacksonville 

Tangerine 

Live Oak 

Live Oak 

Dade City 

Jacksonville 

High Springs 

Romeo 

Johnson 

Palm Harbor 

Vero Beach 

Marianna 

Gainesville 

Gainesville 

Sarasota 

Jasper 

Hilliard 

F*^^. Pierce 

Ft. Pierce 

Gainesville 

Nocatee 

Daytona Beach 

Quincy, W. Va. 

New Smyrna 

Dade City 

Orlando 

Haines City 
St. Cloud 



Cable, Mrs. Edith Ethel Ft. Pierce 

Cabrera, Mary Key West 
Caldwell, Leah Miriam Coconut Grove 

Caldwell, Mrs. Margaret I. Gainesville 

Camp, George Burdette Gainesville 

Campbell, Erma Leona DeLand 

Campbell, Hazel Aline Hastings 

Campbell, Irene Juanita DeLand 

Campbell, Mrs. Opal R. Sarasota 

Canney, Mrs. Ida Gertrude Live Oak 

Carlisle, Mrs. Annie M. Sneads 

Carlisle, Ralph Cary Sneads 
Carlson, Mrs. Nellie P. Green Cove Springs 

Carmichael, Mrs. Elnora B. Tampa 



Carmichael, May 

Carroll, Mrs. Ruby Lane 

Carter, Annie Lou 

Carter, Mrs. Bessie Lett 

Carter, Clio Belle 

Carter. Edgar W. 

Carter, Mrs. Florrie Mae 

Carter, Ralph Edward 

Carter, Wm. LaFayette 

Caruthers, Ruby Mae 

Casey, Elizabeth Dolores 

Cason, Ernest Wesley 

Cason, Henry Vasco 

Cason, Juanita E. 

Cason, Virgie Mae 

Causey, Ada Drusilla 

Cauthen, Mattie Lee 

Cawthon, John Russell 

Chaires, Myldred Finley 

Chafin, Wylene Jessie 

Chamberlain, Mrs. Ruth Fertic Mount Dora 

Chambers, Harley Pleasant Plant City 

Chamblin, John Anderson Gainesville 

Chandler, Frances Pauline Cross City 

Chapman, Excelle Webster 

Chastain, Bernice Ruth Tampa 

Chavers, Mrs. Lily Ethel Gainesville 

Chestnut, Daisy Paula Gainesville 

Church, Alice L. Eustis 

Clark, Helen Davis Miami 



Hollins 

Pinemount 

Orlando 

Dade City 

Tarpon Springs 

Oxford 

Ft. Pierce 

Ft. Pierce 

Dade City 

Oxford 

Jacksonville 

Lake Worth 

Chiefland 

Bartow 

Wellborn 

Millry, Ala. 

Leesburg 

DeFuniak Springs 

Palm Harbor 

Ocoee 



Name 
Clark, Laura Sole 
Clark, Marguerite Jennie 
Clark, Myrtle 
Clark, Walton Bryant 
Clement, Gertrude 
Clements, Lemuel Cecil 



Address 

Roseland 

Miami 

Englewood 

Bartow 

Bartow 

Fitzgerald, Ga. 



demons, Mrs. Marguerite R. 

Clifton, Hilburn H. 

Clubbs, Occie 

Cobb, Wm. Alfred, Jr. 

Cobia, Mary Louise 

Cochran, Mary Sheffield 

Cochran, Mrs. Maude A. 

Cockrell, Wm. Davis 

Coffee, Lois Elizabeth 

Coffin, Emma Ives 

Cogburn, Park Harry 

Coil, Hugh 

Cole, Bessie Marie 

Coleman, Donald J. 

Collier, Bernice M. 

Collier, Fannye Emily 

Collin, Frederic James 

Collins, Mrs. J. E. 

Collins, Mary Elizabeth 

Collins, Vesta Elithe 

Cone, Mrs. Elizabeth 

Conners, Mrs. Eva S. 

Conway, Mrs. Nina B. 

Coody, Willie Mae 

Cook, Mrs. Eddie Rawls 

Cook, Ruth 

Cooksey, Juanita Frances 

Cooper, Mary Arden 

Corbitt, Deloren Dempsey, Jr. St. Augustine 

Cordell, Jos. J. Wauchula 

Core, Charles Frederic Jacksonville 

Cormack, Mrs. Clara Hammer 

-West Palm Beach 



Clewiston 

Barberville 

Pensacola 

West Palm Beach 

Lake City 

Bunnell 

Miami 

Gainesville 

Altoona 

Lake City 

Cottondale 

Clearwater 

Bartow 

Tampa Shores 

Ocala 

Oxford 

Miami Shores 

Oneco 

Oneco 

Gainesville 

Tampa 

Plant City 

Palatka 

Lemturner 

Gainesville 

LaBelle 

Lamont 

Jacksonville 



Corser, Mildred Dolores 
Covington, Rachel Everett 
Cowan, Ettie 
Cox, Ray Donald 
Cracowauer, Minnie 
Craig, Mrs. Addie P. 
Craig, Allen Thornton 
Crawford, Essie 
Creel, Eugene Mathew 
Crews, Pauline 
Crowell, Mrs. Bessie M. 
Crowell, John M. 
Crowson, Athel 
Crozier, Rachel F. 
Culbertson, Raymond E. 
Culbreth, Sara Pattie 
Cumbee, Carroll F. 
Cumbie, Myrtle Estelle 
Gumming, Fannie 
Cunningham, Roy Lewis 
Curry, Hazel Olive 

Dacosta, Annie Elizabeth 
Dale, Mrs. Alice Prine 
Daley, Mrs. Sarah Louise 
Dancy, Robert Campbell 
Daniel, Romie Lee 
Dansby, George Wm. 
Dauer, Manning Julian, J 
Dauer, Mrs. Martha Fitts 
Davidson, Mrs. Evelyn 
Davidson, Watson Perry 
Daview, Harold Marvin 
Davies, John Marshall 
Davis, Mrs. Aurelia B. 
Davis, Mrs. Eleanor 
Davis, Mrs. Elizabeth E. 
Davis, Elizabeth Frank 
Davis, Mrs. Emma 
Davis, Mrs. James Ross 



Bagdad 

Plant City 

Lakeland 

Clermont 

Tampa 

Zephyrhills 

Gainesville 

Pinecastle 

Milton 

Jacksonville 

Arcadia 

Arcadia 

Milton 

Okeechobee 

Gainesville 

Oneco 

Perry 

Clarcona 

Tampa 

Madison 

Nokomis 

Gainesville 

Terra Ceia 

West Palm Beach 

Melbourne 

Dade City 

Summerfield 

Tampa 

Tampa 

Gainesville 

Gainesville 

Orlando 

Gainesville 

Miami 

Farmdale 

Daytona Beach 

Daytona Beach 

Miami 

Lake Wales 



254 



REGISTER 



Name 

Davis, Joe Irving 
Davis, Lawrence O., Jr. 
Davis, Lysbeth 
Davis, Mary Elois« 
Davis, Norman West 
Davis, Orville Rhoads 
Davis, U. P. 
Davis, Wm. M., Jr. 
Davis, Mrs. Willie Emma 
Dawson, Alma C. 
Dawson, Anne Lyde 
Dawson, Charles Ralph 
Dawson, Ethel 
Dawson, Gamma 
Deen, Carrie 
Dees, Cecil Thomas 
DeGaetani, FVank Marion 
DeGrove, Mrs. Edythe Helen 
DeGrove, Russell Henry 
DegLoff, Walter A. 
DeLeon, Magdelin E. 
DeMasters, Clarence U. 
DeMotsis, Mrs. Esther 
DeMuro, Josephine Irma 
Devore, Wm. Elbert 
Dew, Joanna 
Dew, Zelle Avon 
Dickenson, Mrs. T. E. 
Dickson, Lucille Mary 
Dieffenwierth, Julia McG. 
Dishong, Wm. W. 
Dodson, Chas. L. 
Donahue, Cecil W. 
Donaldson, Malcolm Gilbert 
Donnelly, Wallace Oliver 
Doty, Julia 
Douglas, Barton T. 
Douglas, Lawrence Y. 
Dowdell, Samuel H. 
Downer, Mrs. Ruth B. 
Drake, Edw., Jr. 
Draper, Stephen A. 
Dreher, Mrs. Mary Z. 
Driggers, Charles E. 
Driggers, Mrs. Ina Stapp 
Driggers, Laudy Henderson 
Driggei-s, Vaughan Wendell 
Driscoll, Gertrude Madeleine 
Dukes, Carrie Bell 
Dunn, Mrs. Inez L. 
Durrance, Chas. L. 
Durrance, Mildred C. 
Dyess, Myra 

Easterlin, Juanita 
Ebinger, Rollin J. 
Edwards, Mrs. Bertie H. 
Edwards, Joyce 
Edwards, Ordie Morton 
Edwards, Ruth Evelyn 
Edwards, Wm. T. 
E.kel, Sadie E. 
Ellis, Lucile 
Ellis, Sybel Belle 
Ellzey, Ruby 
Elmore, Martha 
Emerson, Francis H. 
English, Charles L. 
Entz, Allan Lamar 
Epling, Evelyn Ennis 
Epperson, Kathryne E. 
Erickson, Floyd Arthur 
Espinosa, Wm. J. 
Evans, Eleanor D. 
Evans, Frances Louise 
Eyster, Wm. W. 

Pagan, Artoise D. 
Faircloth, Esker Andrew 



St 



St. 



Address 

Miami 

St. Augustine 

St. Petersburg 

Tallahassee 

Petersburg 

Miami 

Mayo 

Orlando 

Tampa 

Munson 

Tampa 

Gainesville 

Tampa 

Tampa 

Gainesville 

Mayo 

Tampa 

Palm Valley 

Palm Valley 

Miami 

Key West 

Gainesville 

DeLand 

Inverness 

Citra 

Alachua 

Alachua 

Ocala 

Mcintosh 

Petersburg 

Arcadia 

Gainesville 

ValdosU, Ga. 

Shady Grove 

Gainesville 

DeLand 

Gainesville 

Dunedin 

Wimauma 

St. Petersburg 

Ocala 

Milton 

Micanopy 

Gainesville 

Oxford 

Bowling Green 

Eustis 

Tampa 

Cross City 

Gainesville 

Pinecastle 

Limona 

Campville 

High Springs 

Tampa 

Hawthorne 

Alachua 

Hawthorne 

Cleveland 

Eau Gallie 

Elfers 

Alachua 

Fort White 

Aucilla 

Bradenton 

Gainesville 

Coral Gables 

Leesburg 

Lake City 

Lake Butler 

Canal Point 

Tampa 

Arcadia 

Tampa 

Jacksonville 

Gainesville 
Milton 



Name Address 

Farabee, Thos. N. 

Fariss, Julia Lucretia 

F'armer, Mrs. Mattie Hugh 

Farnsworth, Lucile S. 

Faulds, Nerval M. 

Faulk, Edna Mae 

Fay, Cora 

Fay, Mrs. Orra M. 

Feagin, Thelma 

Feagle, Mrs. Edna Peeplea 

F'eagle, Wm. Barnett 

Felton, Mrs. Laura J. 

Fernald, Mrs. Inez G. 

Fernald, Leon F. 

Ferris, Catherine Norman 

Fetting, Anna Louise 

Fetzer, Mrs. Amy Steen 

Fenman, Mrs. Miriam Rachel Tampa 

First, Malcolm M. St. Petersburg 

Fish, John Sterling Glen St. Mary's 

Fisher, Dan S. Tampa 

Fitzgerald, Mrs. Louise Ma this Palmetto 

Flaherty, James A. 

Fletcher, Mrs. Harriet B. 

Fletcher, Horace B. 

Fletcher, Nell Gregory 

Florence, Mrs. Frances Miller 

Flournoy, John Thomas DeF^iniak Springs 

Flowers, Mrs. Madie Martin Campville 



Wauchula 

Orlando 

Ocoee 

Plant City 

Clearwater 

Lake City 

Panama City 

Panama City 

Eagle Lake 

Wildwood 

Wildwood 

Mayo 

Tarpon Springs 

Tarpon Springs 

Tampa 

Lakeland 

Gainesville 



Ocala 
Ojus 
Ojus 
Ojus 

Freeport 



Floyd, Chas. Henry 

Floyd, Clara B. 

Flynn, Merle 

F'ogg, Grace Dell 

Folsom, Dan Pouncey 

Forbes, Mary Jane 

Ford, Henry M. 

Ford, Jos. Scott 

Fore, Dorothy Elouise 

Fortune, Allen M. 

Foster, Mrs. Harriet 

Foster, Ira J. 

F'oulks, Frank Marshall 

Fowler, B. B. 

Fowler, Mrs. Mabel Posey 

Fowler, Nina Fern 

Franke, Vera L. 

Eraser, Lora 

Fraser, RuLh 

FVeeberg, Mrs. Mae D. 

Freeman, Jack Thomas 

Freeman, Leila L. 

French, Mrs. Katherine Farr 

Fripp, Ethel lone 

Frisbee, Selma Ellen 

Fugate, Lena 

Fugate, Mamie L. 

F-ulford, John C. 

Fuller, Frances 

Fuqua, Claire Juanita 

Fuqua, Katherine Jessie 

Furen, Elizabeth M. 

Futch, Melvin Brown 



Apalachicola 

Havrthorne 

Gainesville 

Graham 

Wauchula 

Ocala 

Gainesville 

Diana 

Zolfo Springs 

Milton 

Glenwood 

Madison 

Tampa 

Miami 

Miami 

Miami 

Vero Beach 

Ft. Myers 

Lakeland 

Chicago, 111. 

Plant Cfty 

Largo 

St. Cloud 

BlufTton, S. C. 

Miami 

Orlando 

Orlando 

Ebb 

Orlando 

Ojus 

Ojus 

Sanford 

Lawtey 



Gallardo, Fernando R. 
Galloway. Athey Jane 
Galloway, Clifton L. 
Gammage, Lois 
Gant, Mrs. Gertrude 
Gant, John Elmo 
Garcia, Angle G. 
Garcia, Evelyn B. 
Garcia, Marion E. 
Gardner, Ella G. 
Gardner, John H. 
Garner, Maude Louise 
Garrison, Allen M. 
Gaskill, Reba Clair 
Gates, Eva May 
Gay, Gussye 



Ybor City 

Darlington 

Holly Hill 

Sylvester, Ga. 

Bell 

Brooksville 

Tampa 

Tampa 

Tampa 

Port Tampa City 

Jacksonville 

Arcadia 

Eustis 

Charlotte Harbor 

Tampa 

LaCrosse 



I 



REGISTER 



255 



Name 
Gaylord, Mrs. Eleanor M. 
Cfeiger, Lorenzo Dow 
Geiger, Ula L. 
George, Gertrude 
Getch, Bertha 
Gilbert, Bonnie 
Gill, Jo Dozier 
Gillis, Orene 
Gillman, Da]la3 L. 
Goddard, Alida Clementine 
Godwin, Jewel E. 
Godwyn, Sidney W. 
Goette, Mrs. Nannie H. 
Goette, Wm. Louis 
Golden, Maree 
•Goldstein, Mark J. 
Gooding, Mrs. Claudia 
Gooding, Nell 
Gooding, Richard Elmer 
Goolsby, Mrs. Louis C. 
Graham, Geo. R. 
Graham, Gladys G. 
Graham, Lenore M. 
Gramling, Carlena E. 
Grant, Grace 
Graves, John C. 
Graves, Thelma G. 
Gray, Leon A. 
Green, Arthur S. 
Green, Harry 
Green, Wilson P. 
Greene, Cynthia Jane 
Greene, Edgar W. 
Greene, Eustis E. 
Greene, Isla 

Greene, Lorin Arthur, Jr. 
Gregory, R. H. 
Grimm, Mrs. Phyllis J. 
Groff, Mrs. Rose Ann 
Guess, Mary C. 
Guito, Mrs. Anna Shepherd 
Gulley, Annie Lee 
Gunnels, Lila Belle 
Gurr, Mrs. Olive V. 

Hadsock, Mrs. Ethel L. 
Haft, A. M. 
Haines, Agatha Jessie 
Hait, "Kenneth B. 
Hall, Amy Christel 
Hall, Anna Mae 
Hall, Mrs. Beulah T. 
Hall, Charles R., Jr. 
Hall. Edna 
Hall, Inez 
Hall, James Elwood 
Hall, Janie Pauline 
Hall, Mary Louise 
Hall. Mildred 
Hall, Mrs. Pearl Futch 
Hall, Thelma Esther 
Hamon, Mrs. Alberta L. 
Hampton, Nettie E. 
Hampton, Wm. I'Vanklin 
Hancock, Mattie 
Hanselman, B. L. 
Hardaker, Marjorie Ella 
Hardee, Sherley Lena 
Hardeman, Mrs. Maud P. 
Hardy. Albert L. 
Hardy, Bernice Gladys 
Harlan, Mrs. Estelle E. 
Harllee, Asa Lamb 
Harllee, Eleanor S. 
Harper, Mrs. Vivian H. 
Harre, Mrs. Lisle M. 
Harrington, Mabelle 
Harris, Carl Henley 



Address 

Tampa 

Zephyrhills 

Stuart 

Morriston 

Orlando 

Graceville 

Sarasota 

Ponce de Leon 

Dady 

Lakeland 

Bonifay 

Orlando 

Eustis 

Eustis 

Leesburs 

Jacksonville 

Tampa 

Tampa 

Leesburg 

Gainesville 

Lake City 

Tampa 

Jacksonville 

Madison 

Sopchoppy 

Tampa 

Jennings 

Hinson 

Perry 

Gainesville 

Reddick 

Pinemount 

Stuart 

McAlpin 

McAlpin 

Gainesville 

Yulee 

Gainesville 

Boynton 

Williston 

Key West 

Tampa 

Williston 

Chiefland 

Micanopy 

Gainesville 

Oneco 

Brooksville 

Lowell 

Lake Alfred 

Cross City 

Gainesville 

Ocala 

Bushnell 

Cantonment 

Orlando 

Citra 

Tampa 

Gainesville 

Citra 

Miami 

LaBelle 

Gainesville 

Lake City 

Auburndale 

Galloway 

Gainesville 

Little River 

Vernon 

Palatka 

Gainesville 

High Springs 

Tampa 

Gainesville 

Tampa 

St. Petersburg 

Chipley 



Name 



Harris, Mrs. E. J. 

Harris, Mrs. Jennie N. 

Harris, M. Ruth 

Harris, Robert E. 

Harris, Mrs. Sarah S. 

Harrison, Clarence Arthur 

Harrison, George Lester 

Harrison, Grady 

Hartsfield, C. Kathleen 

Harwell, Hettie Redford 

Haseltine, Mrs. Adaline Jane 

Haseltine, H. A. 

Haskin, Elizabeth Ann 

Haskins, Charlotte Lunn (Mrs.) 

Hatch, Dorothy Lois 

Hathaway, Anne 

Hawkins, Edward Meredith 

Hawkins, George Alma 

Hawthorne, Nellie Alice 

Hayman, lone 

Haymans, Alvin 

Haynes, John Milner 

Hays, Mrs. Helen Neibert 

Hays, Mrs. John Allen 

Hazen, Georgia M. 

Head, Grace 

Head, Mabel Ann 

Head, Mrs. R. E. 

Heath, Mrs. Florence B. 

Heath, Jessie A. 

Hedden, Henry George 

Hedden, Mrs. Margaret Evelyn 

Helveston, Lucile M. 

Helwig, Esther Mae 

Hemphill, Kate Miles 

Henderson, Edwin Lloyd 

Henderson, Mrs. Julia Frier 

Henderson, Leon N. 

Henderson, Major J. 

Henderson, Ralph W. 

Henderson, Vera Leone 

Hendley, Sara Eugenia 

Hendrick, Jennie B. 

Hendricks. Janie Mae 

Hendrix. Floride 

Hendrix, Hugh M. 

Hendry. Mrs. Ethel D. 

Hendry, Harry Frierson 

Henley, Wm. Walter 

Hennessee, Earl Eric 

Hennessey, Martina 

Herndon, Nora Mae 

Herring, Ida Dove 

Hester, Jackson B. 

Hewett, Oraleze Ann 

Hewitt, Mrs. Hazel C. 

Hewitt, Oliver Wm. 

Hiatt, Lyle Steven 

Hickman, Doris 

Hicks, Mary 

Hicks, Wm. T. 

Higgs, Lyman Williard 

Higgs. Mrs. Rubye Lee 

Hill, Mrs. E. P. 

Hill. Maoma Frances 

Hill, Mildred 

Hill, Trixie 

Hillstead, Mrs. Ida Gowdy 

Himes, Alice Margaret 

Himrod, Maud Allman 

Hinson, Ola 

Hobbs, Forrest O'Leary 

Hobbs, Mrs. Jay D. 

Hodges, Julia Jeanette 

Hoffman, George P. 

Hoffman, Mrs. Vida Pearl 

Hogan, Delia 

Hogan, Fauniece Grace 



Address 

West Palm Beach 

Orlando 

Gainesville 

Ft. Lauderdale 

Chipley 

Gainesville 

Anthony 

Anthony 

Gardner 

Anthony 

Tampa 

Tampa 

St. Petersburg 

Key West 

Lake Worth 

Brooksville 

Gainesville 

Bay Harbor 

Apopka 

Punta Gorda 

Gainesville 

Crystal River 

Tampa 

Fort Myers 

Plant City 

Plant City 

Plant City 

Lakeport 

Arcadia 



White Springs 

Gotha 

Gotha 

Tampa 

Tampa 

Gainesville 

Wacissa 

Seffner 

Baker 

Baker 

Shady Grove 

Shady Grove 

South Miami 

Palm Harbor 

Clearwater 

Leesville, S. C. 

Gainesville 

Arcadia 

Fort Myers 

DeFuniak Springs 

Lakeland 

Hawthorne 

Jasper 

Fort Meade 

Easley, S. C. 

Oakland 

St. Petersburg 

St. Petersburg 

West Palm Beach 

Arcadia 

Gainesville 

Gainesville 

Arcadia 

Arcadia 

Winter Park 

Dade City 

Homestead 

Gainesville 

Miami 

Bushnell 

Wauchula 

Gainesville 

Tampa 

Key West 

Miami 

St. Petersburg 

St. Petersburg 

Trenton 

Brandon 



256 



REGISTER 



Name 



Address 



Hogg, Mildred Lee Jacksonville 

HoUiday, Mrs. Zola Padgett Coral Gables 

Hollingsworth, Mrs. Ruth H. Lake Worth 

Holmes, Cicely Abernathy Miami Beach 

Holt, Eva Ellen Fort Meade 
Hood, Myrtle Allyne So. Jacksonville 

Hooten, Mrs. Mary M. Jacksonville 

Hornbaker, Betty Anne St. Petersburg 

Horovitz, Jules Joseph Tampa 

Horrell, Elizabeth Gainesville 

Housman, Bessie Bradenton 

Howard, Eugenia Coral Gables 

Howard, Mrs. Mabel J. Eustis 

Howard, Ona Lee Miami 

Howard, Raymond Holt Gainesville 

Howell, Esther Melbourne 

Howell, Olive Mildred Melbourne 

Huddleston, Paul Jay 

Hudnall, Mrs. Edith Graham Baldwin 

Hudnall, F. S. Baldwin 

Hudnall, John Mayes Gainesville 

Hudson, Mrs. Edna Frankie Trenton 

Hudson, James Andrews Miami 

Hudson, Sara Elizabeth Lake City 

Hughes, Florence L. Jacksonville 

Hunt, Mrs. Jean Partin Ft. Christmas 

Hunter, Marcia B. Tampa 

Hutcherson, Ethel Madge Okeechobee 

Hutcherson, Thelma Jasper 
Hutchinson, Mrs. Ruby Evelyn Lakeland 



Imeson, John G. 
Irwin, Tom Melbourne 
Isaac, Albert L. 
Isbill, Clarence W. 



Jacksonville 

Jacksonville 

Coconut Grove 

Lake Mary 



Jackson, Charles Edward, Jr. Clearwater 

Jackson, Wm. Thomas Gainesville 

Jacobi, Gertrude F. Jacksonville 

Jacobs, J. Tilden Sanford 

Jacobs, Mrs. Minnette B. Sanford 

James, Emma W. (Mrs.) White Springs 

Jaques, Mrs. Irma Jean Miami 

Jefferson, Wayne O. Pensacola 

Jennings, Leonorah Dean Jacksonville 

Jennings, Ruth Marion Jacksonville 

Jennings, Mrs. Susan Jane Miami 

Jerkins, Mrs. Anne E. St. Petersburg 

Jemigan, Claude H. Monticello 

Johns, Henry Lamar Wellborn 

Johns, Mrs. Susie E. Lake Placid 

Johns, Thomas M. Lake Placid 

Johnson, Albert M. Orlando 

Johnson, Alice Viola Arcadia 

Johnson, Alma Elizabeth Sydney 

Johnson, Annette White Springs 

Johnson, Mrs. Ethel Annie Chiefland 

Johnson, Eva Crawford Evinston 

Johnson, Gordon R. Ft. Ogden 

Johnson, Mrs. Ida Penelope Tampa 

Johnson, Mrs. Ivey Mary Mt. Dora 

Johnson, Mrs. J. G. F'l. Ogden 

Johnson, Mrs. Marie Wolfe Tampa 

Johnson, Martha Clough Leesburg 
Johnson, Minton Hollingsworth Gainesville 

Johnson, Robert Milton Hardeetown 

Johnson, Rossie Lee Alturas 
Johnson, Thelma Jane West Palm Beach 

Johnson, Mrs. Willie C. Evinston 

Johnston, Alma May Jacksonville 

Johnston, Edith Winnifred Monticello 

Jones, Anna Ethel Jay 

Jones, Emily Capers Crescent City 

Jones, Henry Grady Jacksonville 

Jones, Homer Florala, Ala. 

Jones, Mary Mertie Bronson 

Jones, Patricia Niles Crescent City 

Jones, Rubye Lee 



Name Address 

Jones, Mrs. Ruby S. Tampa 

Jones, Thomas John Sarasota 

Jones, Wm. Eugene Gainesville 

Jones, Wm. W. Malone 

Jordan, M. B. Gainesville 

Josey, Metzgar Elroy Gainesville 

Justen, Mrs. Mary Louise Tampa 

Kaplan, David Hollywood 

Kaul, Jennie Catherine Palmetto 

Kazarian, Carl Orlando 
Keaton, Mrs. Carrie Brantley St. Petersburg 

Keezel, James Edward Winter Park 

Keith, Geraldine V. Lake Worth 

Kelbert, David G. A. Gainesville 

Keller, Cale Ralph Ft. Meade 

Kellogg. Mrs. Edna Sweet Ft. Myers 

Kelly, Mrs. Birdie L. Live Oak 

Kelly, Cornelia Eleanor Live Oak 

Kelly, Hazel Live Oak 

Kelly, James Homer Live Oak 
Kelly, Joseph Eddie Glen St. Mary 

Kelly, Mildred Perry 

Kelsey, Geo. A. Lake Placid 
Kennington, Lyndoll Ponce de Leon 

Kicklighter, Mrs. Materia F. Sarasota 

Kidwell, L. Dale Coral Gables 

Kierce, Steiner Clive Baker 

Kimbrough, Martha Blanche Chipley 
King, Albert Foster Terre Haute, Ind. 

King, Mrs. Annie L. Mayo 

King, Julian Holt Lakeland 

King, Linda Lee Sarasota 

King, Mrs. Myra Nell Bowling Green 

Klett, Mrs. Charlotte Emma Tampa 
Knight, Mrs. Mary Charlotte Harbor 
Knight, Thos. J. Green Cove Springs 

Kovarik, Florence Charlotte Tampa 
Kubesserian, Garabed Gughmess Gainesville 

Kyle, Mrs. Mary Winter Haven 

Kyle, Tessie Mae Pidgeon Key 

Laird, Angus McKenzie St. Andrews 

Lamb, Mrs. Dorothy Anthony 

Laney, Edward Earl Tampa 

Laney, Mrs. Johnnie Louise Tampa 

Langford, Mrs. Lota B. Lake Butler 

Langford, Maurice G. Lake Butler 

Langston, Mrs. Margaret Lessie Tampa 

Langston, Thomas Hill Tampa 

Lanneaux, Gertrude Tampa 

Lansden, Elizabeth Penny F'arms 

Larsen, Elizabeth E. Jacksonville 

Larson, Anna Bodell Tallahassee 

Larson, Lawrence John Lakeland 

LaRue, Rosalie Lanier Eustis 

Lau, Lorene Clarice Gotha 

Layfield, Addie Belle Ft. White 

LeCroix, Iwanna Yvonne Leesburg 

Ledbetter, Clara B. Jennings 

Lee, Mrs. Clara E. Brandon 

Lee, Edna Irene Dade City 

Lee, John Levi Live Oak 

Lee, Wm. I. Munson 

Lee, Winnie Belle Marion, Ala. 

Leggett, Frederick Earl St. Petersburg 

Leitner, Edna L. Micanopy 

Leitner, Mary Ft. Myers 

Leitner, Sarah Ft. Myers 

Lence, Mrs. Marie Griese Arcadia 

Leps, John Christian Winter Haven 

Leto, Aurora Tampa 

Levey, Bernard Frank Pensacola 

Lewis, Mrs. Claire Coleman 

Lewis, R. Ruth Orlando 

Lewis, Ruth Esther Waldo 

Liddon, Benjamin Sullivan Marianna 

Lightfoot, Mrs. Lilla C. Tangerine 



REGISTER 



257 



Name 



Address 



Lilly, Laura Elizabeth Quitman, Ga. 

Lincoln, Mrs. Lillian W. Elfers 

Lindsey, Margaret Georgia Geneva 

Lipscombe, Mary Berta Jacksonville 

Lites, Bernice Irene F^. White 

Litherland, Edna Mae Ocoee 
Little, Sara Grand Island 

Livingston, Katharine Ocala 

Livingston, Mattie Carbur 

Lloyd, Wm. F. Tampa 

Lock, Dorothy Louisa Dade City 

Long, Mrs. Mary G. Jacksonville 

Long, Clarice Mona Tampa 

Lord, Mrs Annie Bates Orlando 

Lord, Dorothy C. Gainesville 

Lord, Earll Leslie Gainesville 

Lord, Richard P. Gainesville 

Loring, Mrs. Ethel Jones Cocoa 

Lorraine, Charles Cabell Jacksonville 

Lot, Mrs. Imogene Miami 

Loucks, Ivan H. Gainesville 

Loudermilk, Mrs. Heila Irene Pierce 

Lovell, Broward Summerfield 

Lovell, Mrs. Flora Ester Plant City 

Lovvorn, Charles Jason Okeechobee 

Lowery, Mrs. Harris R. Stuart 

Lucas, Marie Wildwood 

Luffman, Ida Lena Ocala 

Lunn, Mrs. Annie Lee Brewster 

LuLer, Leila Miami 

Lybass, Jas. H. Tampa 

Lyle, Mrs. Ethel J. Dundee 
Lyman, Mrs. Daisy Emma West Palm Keach 
Lyman, Mrs. Emma Abbott 

— Altamonte Springs 

Lynn, James Waldon, Jr. Tampa 

Lynn, R. Kathleen Tampa 

Lyon, S. C. Gainesville 
Lytal, Luke Henry West Palm Beach 

Lyde, Mrs. E. J. East Lake 



McAloon, Evelyn Agnes 
McArthur, High Lynn 
McAulay, Annie Lucy 
McCall, Georgia E. 
McCall, Maud Bryant 
McCall, Virginia Tejas 
McCaul, Thomas Vaden, Jr. 
McClellan, Mrs. Essie 
McClinton, Annie Louise 
McCorkle, Helen Louise 
McCormick, Charles 
McCormick, F'enwick T. 
McCormick, Harry W. 
McCormick, Lucius Raines 
McCoy, Hazele Lydia 
McCrea, Blanche 
McDonald, Alice Bradford 
McDonald, Bessie 
McDonald, Gladys Eleanor 
McDonald, Grace Frances 
McDonald, Mrs. Ida 
McDonald, Jackson H. 
McDonald, Pauline Fern 
McDonald, Thelma 
McDonell, Carrie Bertha 
McElroy, Charles G. 
McEwen, Raleigh Odell 
McFadden, Mary Lou 
McFarland, Martha Jane 
McFarland, Martha Nelle 



St. AurTUstine 

Tampa 

Ft. Meade 

Lake City 

Wildwood 

Willistoci 

Gainesville 

Canal Point 

Gainesville 

Manatee 

Bartow 

Gainesville 

Gainesville 

Gainesville 

Alachua 

Bartow 

Archer 

White Springs 

Wauchula 

Archer 

Gainesville 

Stuart 

New Smyrna 

Wellborn 

Williston 

Tampa 

Gainesville 

Alachua 

Ocoee 

Orlando 



Name 

McKinney, Eula Lee 
McKinnon, Daniel Angus 
McKinnon, Nan 
McLanahan, Julius Pope 
McLane, Eldridge Franklin 
McLaughlin, H. E. 
McLean, Helene Claire 
McLean, Nora E. 
McLendon, Ida Ruth 



McGarity, Mrs. Carol Virginia Fort Pierce 

McGarrah, Nell Gainesville 

McGee, Wm. Lanier Century 

McGrath, Blanche B. St. Petersburg 

McGrath, Ethel B. St. Petersburg 

Mclntire, James Edgar Clearwater 

Mclntire, Mrs. Mildred Louise Clearwater 



Address 

Micanopy 
Marianna 
Williston 
Bunnell 
Lake City 
Branford 
Cross City 
Winter Haven 
Jacksonville 
McLeod, Mrs. Hortense H. W. Palm Beach 
McLeod, Norman Wightman, Jr. Aucilla 

McMakin, Dorothy Primrose Orlando 

McMichen, Virginia Dare Waldo 

McMillan, Ann Averil Gainesville 

McMullen, Danial G. Lee 

McPherson, Guy A. Havana 

McPherson, Mrs. Ruth Adams Gainesville 

McQuitty, John V. ft. Myers 

McRae, Anderson Cook Chipley 

McRae, Bernice Palatka 

McRae, Elizabeth K. Gainesville 

McWhorter, Benj. Casiiels Umatilla 

McWhorter, Robert Olen Sarasota 

Macy, Kate Lillian Orlando 

Maddox, Russell C. Estero 

Maddrey, Jocie Lee Gainesville 

Magee, Mrs. Alyce June Weirsdale 

Magruder, Charles Tampa 

Mahan, Mrs. Louise H. Tampa 

Mahood, Mrs. Mildred H. Miami Shores 

Mallory, Gladys V. Wellborn 

Mann, Mrs. Allie Dean Lakeland 

Mann, Orion Alfred Lakeland 

Mansell, Mrs. Avis Audry Frostproof 

Mansell, Marguerite E. F^rostproof 

Manstine, Mrs. Agnes L. Green Cove Springs 
Marchman, Frederick Minacopy 

Martin, Annie Mae Hawthorne 

Martin, Mrs. Clara E. Island Grove 

Martin, D. A. Gainesville 

Martin, Freeman G. Ninety Six, S. C. 

Martin, Mrs. Geraldine Miami 

Martin, Inez Greexville 

Martin, Memory Gainesville 

Martin, Olive F'rances Orange City 

Martin, Roe Millege Gainesville 

Martin, Swan Gainesville 

Mashburn, Ara Lee Bay Head 

Mashburn, Mansel Malone Blountstown 

Massengill, Mrs. Clara M. Alachua 

Massengill, Joseph Warren Alachua 

Matchett, Dallas M. Citra 

Matchett, Josephine G. Citra 

Matheny, Candler Calhoun Madison 

Mathews, Mary BelJe Gainesville 

Matteson, Laura Maxine W. Palm Beach 

Matthews, Melba Ponce de Leon 

Maultsby, John Camp Gainesville 

Maxwell, Thelma Isabelle 

— Green Cove Springs 
May, Jnanita Ella Tampa 

Mayo, Gertrude Summerfield 

Meacham, Mrs. Clara McDowell St. Cloud 
Meadows, Mrs. Carolyn H. Umatilla 

Meadows, Claire Citra 

Mears, Mrs. Frank ie R. Cypress 

Mears, George Hiram Cypress 

Mears, John Miriam Cypress 

Meeks, Cherry A. Crystal River 

Meeks, Joyce E. CiTstal River 

Melvin, Perry David Milton 

Merbler, Adam Albert Pensacola 

Mercer, Laurita Wauchula 

Meredith, Margaret Grace Avon Park 

Merritt, J. Webster Gainesville 

Metcalfe, Mrs. Willie A. Gainesville 

Metzger, Mrs. Hattie Cain Sarasota 

Michael, Mrs. Ethel Wolfe Gainesville 



258 



REGISTER 



Name 
Michael, Kenneth E. 
Middleton, Lillie Mae 
Mikell, E. M. 
Milbrath, Harry Simmons 
Miles, Mrs. Lorene S. 
Miller, Charles 
Miller, Mrs. Edna Johns 
Miller, E. H. 
Miller, James Frank, Jr. 
Miller, L. D. 
Miller, Robert Thomas 
Miller, Mrs. Ruby 
Miller, Sail Dixie 
Miller, Saul D. 
Mills, Mrs. Ruth Ora 
Milteer, Mrs. Lillie F'air 
Mims, Beatrice J. 
Mims, Emma Lee 
Miner, Jack Harding 
Miner, Ruby G. 
Minor, Leonidas Corbly 
Minter. Mary Elizabeth 
Minton, Eunice Lucile 
Mires, Mrs. Frankie M. 
Mires, John J. 
Mires, Lassa lona 
Mitchell, Thelma Lula 
Mixon, Kathryn Lena 
Mizell, Bascom Fernando 
Mizel), Mellie 
Mobley, Mrs. Callje Mai 
Moger, Mrs. Eleanor Smith 



Address 

Gainesville 

Gainesville 

Gainesville 

Ft. Ogdcn 

Hialeah 

Jacksonville 

Micanopy 

Melbourne 

Sarasota 

Palatka 

Wellborn 

Gainesville 

Enterprise, Ala. 

Gainesville 

O'Brien 

Ft. Myers 

Anthony 

Williston 

Daytona Beach 

Tampa 

St. Petersburg 

Live Oak 

Palatka 

DeLand 

DeLand 

DeLand 

Dowling Park 

Clearwater 

Gainesville 

Fort Ogden 

Monterey 

Ft. Myers 



Montgomery, Stephen Milea St. Petersburg 

Moody, Mrs. Pauline Gainesville 

Moon, Robert Gary St. Andrews 

Moore, Ellis Umatilla 

Moore, Mrs. Lou'se Dickie Clearwater 

Moore, Maurice Lee Laurel Hill 

Moore, Sallie Jim Brooksville 

Moore, Sarah Alice Lake City 

Moore, Wilma Knotts Dixie, Ga. 

Moore, Mrs. Winona S. Daytona Beach 

Moran, Mrs. Alva Betts Chattahoochee 

Moran, Edith Claire Waldo 

Morford, Cora E. Port Orange 

Morgan, Grace Edna Miami 

Morgan, John W. Mayo 
Morris, Alton Chester West Palm Beach 

Morris, Mrs. Harold A. Largo 

Morris, Irene ElizabeLh Jacksonville 

Morris, Wm. Erskine Leesburg 

Morris, Lila Rebecca Inverness 

Morrow, Albert Roy Waldo 

Morrow, Mrs. A. R. Waldo 

Morrow, Mason Wayne Ft. Pierce 

Morse, E. Louise Greenville 

Morse, Gladys Alma Perry 

Mott, Catherine Antionette Tampa 

Mounts, Charles Eu rene Gainesville 

Moyer, Mrs. Oda Wright Tampa 

Moyers, Tillie Leaville Orlando 

Mullins, Mrs. Carrie T. Gainesville 

Munn, Mrs. Luellen Jones Miami 

Murphree, Albert Alexander Gainesville 

Murphy, Mrs. Minnie Teresa St. Pecersbrug 

Murray, Robert Daniel Ponce de Leon 

Myers, Mrs. Minnie May Rockledge 

Nash, Mrs. Gladys Margaret Clearwater 

Nash, Viola Elizabeth Jacksonville 

Nation, Mrs. Clyde Hicks Ft. Myers 

Nelson, Floyd James Tampashores 

Nesmith, Nora Lourie Plant City 

Newell, Henry Arthur Starke 

Newsome, Jewel Souihport 

Newton, Nelle Live Oak 

Nicholas, Louis King, Jr. Miami 

Nightingale, Harry Alfred Orlando 

Nolan, Mrs. Gladys Milton Macciuuny 



Name 

Norfleet, Paul Judson 
Norman, Grover Cleveland 
Norton, Bessie Amanda 
Nunez, Geo. Tierso 

Ober, Beatrice Helen 

O'Bryant, Violet 

O'Donald, Ed Todd 

Ogg, J. A. 

O'Hara, Mrs. Emma 

O'Hara, Milbrey E. 

Oliver, Leo (Miss) 

Olsen, lona 

Olsen, Emma Olivia 

Olson, Mrs. Clara McDonald 

Otte, Burton J. H. 

Ousley, Nona Elethia 

Ouizs, Mrs. Eunice A. 

Overhultz, John Nelson 

Owen, Mildred Evona 

Pacetti, Mrs. Macy Marion 
Padgett, Faith Florence 
Park, Alice Margaret 
Parker, Fronia E. 
Parker, Helen 
Parker, Mary Blanche 
Parker, Pearl 
Parnell, Gwendolyn 
Parrott, Ernest Milford 



Address 

Newberry 

Starke 

Panama City 

Perry 

St. Petersburg 

Oxford 

Gainesville 

Gainesville 

Gainesville 

Ellaville 

Gainesville 

Punta Gorda 

Punta Gorda 

Gainesville 

Gainesville 

Coconut Grove 

Madison 

Bushnell 

Webster 

St. Augustine 

Gainesville 

St. Petersburg 

Live Oak 

Gainesville 

Quitman, Ga. 

Bunnell 

Live Oak 

Cordova, Tenu. 



Parrott, Mrs. Rachel Adeline Cordova, Tenn. 

Patten, Mary Tampa 

Payne, Alva Lake City 

Payne, Irene Marie Inverness 

Peacock, Audrey C. Perry 

Peacock, Joseph Troy Marianna 

Pearson, Mrs. Vera Hialeah 

Peck, Mrs. Maude Wilson Bay Lake 

Peek, H. E. Jacksonville 

Peek, Mrs. Mary Elizabeth .Jacksonville 

Peel, Henry Sarasota 

Peeler, Mrs. Casper S. Gainesville 

Peeples, Benjamin Franklin Winter Haven 

Peeples, Vasco E. McAipin 

Pentreath, Ada Constance Miami 

Pepper, Louis Calvert Gainesville 

Percival, Nina I. Dade City 

Perkins, Carroll C. Gainesville 

Perkins, Marion Denning Gainesville 

Perkins, Mrs. Ruth H. Wildwood 

Perlman, Sol Jay Jacksonville 

Perloff, Ben Jacksonville 

Perry, Clara Louise Summerfield 

Perry, (Miss) Eddie Barberville 

Perry, Mildred E. Gainesville 

Perry, Mrs. Sue Mae Punta Gorda 

Perryman, Vivian Irene Lecanto 

Peters, Clara Lea Wauchula 

Peters, Paul Edward Chipley 

Peterson, Frank Lon Miami 

Petroutsa, Anthony John Jacksonville 

Pettit, Effie Doan Waldo 

Phillips, (Miss) Johnnie G. Wauchula 

Phillips, Mrs. Theresa Frances Orlando 

Phinney, Jessie Wheelock Palatka 

Pickering, Mrs. Rebecca L. Eastport 

Pickett, Erma May Jacksonville 

Pickren, Mrs. Daisy Gainesville 

Piekren, Pansy Gainesville 

Pilkenton, Fannie Belle Mcintosh 

Pinder, Mary Louise Key West 

Pinholster, Geo. Dewey Bunnell 

Pinholster, Mrs. Geo. D. Ormond 

Pinkham, Katherine Agatha St. Augustine 

Pinney, Mrs. Lois Brewster 

Pirenian, Zareh M. Gainesville 

Piatt, Mrs. Irene S. Boca Raton 

Polk, Mrs. Harriet Poyntz Jacksonville 

Poole, Daisie Miami 



REGISTER 



259 



Name 

Poppell, Edward R. 
Poppell, Rubie Mae 
Poppell, Thos. Jay 
Portner, Alice Regina 
Potter, David Wilfred 
Potter, Wm. Homer 
Powell, Marie 
Powell, Mrs. Stella Mae 
Powers, John Lay 
Powers, Keitha Rose 
Prevatt, John Pearl 
Price, Mildred Caldwell 
Price, Robert Lee 
Priest, Clarence Patrick 
Prince, Thomas Chafer 
Proctor, Mrs. Suelaw 
Pryor, George W. 
Pugh, Elizabeth 
Pyle, Winifred Faustine 

Quarles, Mrs. Sue Pritchett 
Quinn, Adna 

Radd, Lucian 
Rader. Rachel E. 
Ralls, Ella 
Ransone, Ruth 
Raulerson, Annabel 
Raulerson, Isabel Louise 
Rawls, Agnes Donia 
Read, Mrs. Anna L. 
Read, Helen M. 
Read, Paul 
Reddick, Elizabeth 
Reed, Betty Woodworth 
Rehwinkel, Jennings A. 
Reichelderfer, Mrs. Mabel 
Reithmeier, Amandus 
Rembert, Mrs. Alma McCook 
Rembert, Alma Omerea 
Rencher, Mrs. Mamie Lee 
Reuben, Victor Marvin 
Revels, Alice Irene 
Reynolds, Frank 
Reynolds, Frederick R. 
Rhoden, Lucille Marie 
Rice, Joseph Daview 
Rice, Mrs. Ora Stamps 
Richards, Virgil Long 
Richards, Wilson James 

Richardson, Elvira A. 

Richardson, Leitha James 

Richardson, Lois B. 

Richey, Horace Edgar 

Richey, Mrs. Tommie Lee 

Ridenour, H. E., Jr. 

Ridenour, Mrs. Janet Marie 

Rider, A. Leech 

Ridgell, Sadie A. 

Riker, Iva Pearl 

Rimel, Mary Dice 

Rivers, Jeannette 

Roadman, Nannette 

Roberts, Clara Lucretia 

Roberts, Zola Louise 

Robertson, Ella Fleming 

Robertson, Mrs. Isla Mae 

Robinson, Anniebelle 

Robinson, Carolina A. 

Robinson, Henrik S. 

Robinson, Reda 

Robinson, Robert W. 

Robinson, Verlie Thelma 

Robinson, Elizabeth D. 

Robison, Mrs. Irma J. 

Rogers, Dora Eula 

Rogers, Edra 

Rogers, Frazier 

Rollins, Mrs. Ruby S. 



Address 

New Smyrna 

Starke 

Groveland 

Winter Park 

St. Au-rustine 

Vernon 

Jacksonville 

Miami 

Wabasso 

Lakeland 

Valdosia, Ga. 

Tampa 

Gr^ceville 

Sanford 

Jacksonville 

Summorfield 

Laurel Hill 

Haines City 

DeLand 

Ojus 

Polk City 

Palmetto 

Lakeland 

Arcadia 

Wimauma 

Waldo 

Waldo 

Tampa 

Jacksonville 

Quincy, W. Va. 

Jacksonville 

Williston 

Jacksonville 

Crawfordville 

Raleigh 

Brandon 

Stuart 

Stuart 

Winter Park 

Coral Gables 

Florahome 

Citra 

Gainesville 

Gainesville 

Gainesville 

Sarasota 

Orlando 

Baker 

Madison 

High Springs 

High Springs 

Coral Gables 

Tampa 

Gainesville 

Archer 

Tallahassee 

Gainesville 

Sparr 

Apopka 

Ft. Meade 

Manatee 

Shady Grove 

Ona 

Gainesville 

Live Oak 

Melrose 

Chiefland 

Ft. Pierce 

Melrose 

Ft. Pierce 

Milton 

Gainesville 

Orlando 

Wellborn 

River Junction 

Gainesville 

Umatilla 



Name 
Romfh, Edward Coleman, 
Rose, Mrs. Mason H. 
Rowell, Mrs. Bess W. 
Rowland, Mrs. Lela Mae 
Royal, Ruth Laveme 
Russ, Ashley Roche 
Russ, Mrs. Bessie Mae 
Russ, Mrs. Ila C. 
Russell, Medora E. 
Rutherford, Nelle 
Rutherford, Sue Mae 
Ryan, Mrs. Mabel 



Jr. 



Address 

Miami 

Sarasota 

Trenton 

Gainesville 

Kelsey City 

St. Petersburg 

Petersburg 

Petersburg 

Kissimmee 

Wildwood 

Wildwood 

Arcadia 



St. 

St. 



St. Clair, Mary Lou Elfers 

Salas, Mrs. Zoila Aracelia Tampa 

Sandlin, John Henry Lake City 

Sanford, Lois Greene Estero 

Sargent, Mrs. Eva Oak Hill 

Sarns, Charles L. Largo 

Saunders, Harold R. Pinecastle 

Saunders, Mrs. Magdalen V. Pinecastle 

Sawyer, Wanda Camilla, Ga. 

Scadron, Ives Josef Tampa 

Scarborough, Chaffee A. Stuart 

Scarborough, Georgia Etta Sarasota 

Scharfschwerdt, Mrs. Adelaide Ft. Pierce 
Schiller, Charles C. St. Petersburg 

Schiller, Carl Parker St. Petersburg 

Schindler, Mrs. Errah D. Tampa 

Schnadt, Clarence A. Wright City, Mo. 

Schoppe, Charles Vernon Ft. Lauderdale 

Schuyler, Edwin H. Coral Gables 

Scofield, George Walter, Jr. Inverness 

Scotten, John Lewis 
Sellers, Linda Frances 
Sellers, Myrtle Mildred 
Sellers, Sarah Gladys 
Semmes, Sarah H. 
Sensabaugh, Mrs. Effie R. 
Setzer, Wendell C. 
Shahinian, Manoug H. 
Shaw, Mrs. Bertha Mae 
Shaw, Jeannette 
Shaw, LeRoy 



Shaw, William Henry 
Shearon, Cassie Mae 
Sheeley, Mrs. Erma Cleo 
Sheeley, Loran Leroy 
Sheffield, Apsie Esther 
Sheffield, L. Odette 
Shepard, Clyde Russell 
Shiner, Mildred 
Shireman, Hazel P. 
Shockley, Anna Maude 
Shockley, Beulah 
Shouse, Gladstone Arthur 
Siedenburg, Hilda Mae 
Sikes, Mrs. Annie Fennell 
Sikes, Grace Olis 
Silsby, Harry Z. 
Silva, Hazel Danita 
Silverman, Millie Gertrude 
Simmons, Wilfred 
Siinmons, Wilma 
Simonton, Lillian 
Sims, Ella Brainerd 
Singleton, Cora Lee 
Sipprell, Clayton Murray 
Sister Mary Agatha 
Sister Anna Maria 
Sister M. Augustin 
Sister M. Clementina 
Sister M. Boniface 
Sister M. Thecla 
Sister M. Theophane 
Sistrunk, Georgia 
Skaley, Mrs. Charlotte C. 
Skinner, Blanche Estelle 
Skinner, Evelyn Van 



Gainesville 

Wauchula 

Wauchula 

Wauchula 

Tampa 

Winter Haven 

Gainesville 

Gainesville 

Raiford 

Gainesville 

DeFuniak Springs 



Raiford 

Tampa 

Palmetto 

Palmetto 

Brinson, Ga. 

Gainesville 

Wauchula 

Jennings 

Orlando 

Altoona 

Altoona 

High Springs 

Oneco 

Grandin 

Palmetto 

Gainesville 

Stuart 

Tampa 

DeFuniak Springs 

DeFuniak Springs 

Live Oak 

Miami 

Bartow 

Palatka 

Orlando 

St. Augustine 

Coral Gables 

Tampa 

Jacksonville 

Jacksonville 

St. Augustine 

Williston 

Tampa 

Jacksonville 

Archer 



260 



REGISTER 



Name 

Slater, Rubye Christeen 
Slaughter, Hattie D. 
Slocum, Edna Woodrow 
Slocum, Ruby Irene 
Slone, Evelyn Amanda 
Slott, Minnie Lucille 
Smith, Addie 
Smith, Bertie 
Smith. Cecil Lee 
Smrth, Mrs. Chloe 
Smith, Christine 
Smith, Daisy Rae 
Smith, Don W. 
Smith, Doris Anne 
Smith, Dorothea Hopkins 
Smith, Elizabeth McDaniel 
Smith, Mrs. Eula LeCroy 
Smith, Fannie Olivia 
Smith, Flossie M. 
Smith, Glenn Earl 
Smith, Heyburn Dale 
Smith, Inez Lavinia 
Smith, James Emery 
Smith, Margaret McMillan 
Smith, Marian M. 
Smith, Moering Wright 
Smith, Myrtle Davis 
Smith, M. Mac 
Smith, Nellie J. 
Smith, Pearl Gertrude 
Smith, Ruth Elizabeth 
Smith, Wilma 

Solomons, Mrs. Bama Louise 
Sparkman, Mary Catherine 
Sparks, Milbra A. 
Spradley, James Edwin 
S-afford, Doris Isabel 
Stalker, Ethel Mae 
Stallings, Anne H. 
Stalney, Lillie 
Standley, Graynella Ethel 
Stanfill, Maurice Edward 
Stanford, Bessie L. 
Stanford, Miriam 011a 



St<ip!eton, Mrs. Gladys Emma 



Address 

Graceville 

Groveland 

Branford 

Branford 

Ocoee 

Ocala 

Lakeland 

Pensacola 

Dade City 

Oxford 

Oxford 

Tampa 

Gainesville 

Oakland 

Gainesville 

Tampa 

Gainesville 

Winter Haven 

Webster 

Tarpon Springs 

Oneco 

HardeetowTi 

Cypress 

Gainesville 

Gainesville 

Parriah 

Largo 

Winter Park 

Summerfield 

Jacksonville 

Ft. Myers 

Orange 

Perry 

Plant City 

Aucilla 

Crestview 

St. Petersburg 

Seffner 

DeLand 

Branford 

Jacksonville 

Lake Butler 

Arcadia 

Ocoee 



Starke, Wilma 
Stearns, George Leslie 
Stebbins, Mrs. Gladys Mae 
Steen, Mittie C. 
Si.een, Vernon C. 
Steffee, Mary S. 
Steele, Leola 
Steele, Mrs. Rea 
Steinmetz, Richard C. 
Stephens, Carl Wilson 
Stephens, Mrs. Elsie Grace 
Stephens, Eugene N. 
Stephens, Mildred Emily 
Stephenson, Ray W. 
Stephenson, Mrs. Ray W. 
Stevens, Wm. D. 
Stevens, Wm. Garrett 
Stewart, Annie Belle 
Stewart, Mrs. Ella 
Stewart, Evelyn K. 
Stewart, Mrs. Kathleen 
Stewart, Robert Wilson 
Stokes, John P., Jr. 
Stone, M. L. 



Tampa 



Bowling Green 
Jacksonville 
Tampa 
Saint Cloud 
Gainesville 
Kissimmee 
Winter Park 
Panama City 
Allentown, Pa. 
Ona 
Bradenton 
Monticello 
Lakeland 
Gainesville 
Gainesville 
So. Jacksonville 
Gainesville 
Tampa 
Wildwood 
Kissimmee 
Rencher Apopka 
Leesburg 
jVli.ami 
Blountstown 
S.rachan, Mrs. Clyde Richards Tampa 

Strange, Lois Dunnellon 

Stringer, Helen J. Lakeland 

Stringer, Oi-um Himes Lakeland 

Strother, Lydia Orange Lake 

Stubbs, Lorraine Claxton, Ga. 

Suggs, Ola Mae Lake Worth 

Summerlin, Mildred Evelyn Ft. Pierce 

Sumner, Mrs. Irene W. Summerfield 

Sumner, Robert Glen Summerfield 



Name Address 

Surrency, Aileen Jacksonville 

Sutton, Merle Palm Harbor 

Swann, Louella Ruth Palmetto 

Swearingen, Mrs. T. J., Jr. Gainesville 

Sweat, Elva Elizabeth O'Brien 

Sweat, Mrs. Grace H. Wimauma 

Sweat, Samuel David Branford 

Sweat, Mrs. Virginia Live Oak 

Swinington, Carey Ellis Bradenton 

Swords, Mary Ellen Gainesville 

Syfrett, Jesse M. Green Cove Springs 



Takahashi, Nelson 
Taylor, Andy D. 
Taylor, Calflfrey W. 
Taylor, Mrs. Dorothy lone 
Taylor, Lilla Bess 
Taylor, Martha 
Taylor, Maurice Enoch 
Taylor, Mrs. Maurice E. 
Tedder, Paul Matthew 
Tenney, A. W. 
Teston, Clarice 
Tharp, Mrs. Mamie L. 
Thomas, Mrs. Elizabeth H. 
Thomas, Harvey Lee 
Thomas, J. Harry Preston 



Gainesville 

Ft. Green 

Plant City 

Cordele, Ga. 

Jacksonville 

Gainesville 

Dade City 

Dade City 

Canal Point 

Gainesville 

Bunnell 

Tampa 

W. Palm Beach 

Brooksville 

Bostwick 



Thomas, Mrs. J. Harry P. Bostwick 

Thomas, Mrs. Jessie Turner W. Palm Beach 
Thomas, Mrs. Lamirah Florence Ft. Pierce 
Thomas, Margaret Omerea Gainesville 

Thomas, Robert Y. H., Jr. Jacksonville 

Thomas, Susie Mary Gainesville 

Thomas, Mrs. Vera Mae Center Hill 

Thomasson, Clinton Marvin Andalusia, Ala. 
Thompson, Mrs. Hattie B. Tampa 

Thompson, Henry S. Kenansville 

Thompson, Mrs. H. S. Kenansville 

Thompson, Laudious Lawrence Panama City 



Thornhill, Mary Jane 
Tichenor, Obelia A. 
Tiller, Laure Virginia 
Timmons, Mrs. Alma 
Tipton, Mary Lucelia 
Toole, Elizabeth Eleanor 
Toole, Rex Foster 
Touchton, May Lillie 
Touchton, Virginia Camilla 



Eagle Lake 

Tampa 

Kissimmee 

Gainesville 

Tampa 

St. Petersburg 

Cottondale 

Lake Park, Ga. 

Valdosta, Ga. 



Towles, Mrs. Emma Pauline Fulford 

Trapnell, Lota M. Metter, Ga. 

Trapnell, Ouida Metter, Ga. 

Treadwell, Thomas Andrew Aucilla 

Trottman, Mrs. Rosemary W. Zephyrhills 
Trottman^ Warren Ellis Zephyrhills 

Tulane, Lida St. Petersburg 

Turlington, Francis Wm. Gainesville 

Turner, Mrs. Dorothy Scharf St. Petersburg 



Turner, Ernest Pomeroy 
Turner, Francis Edwin S. 
Tyler, Dora J. 
Tyler, Mrs. Jul:a C. 
Tyler, Mrs. Nora M. 
Tyndall, Vivian Elizabeth 
Tyree, Mrs. Annie May 

Upson, Ruth Newell 
Usborne, Albert FVary 



Trenton 

St. Petersburg 

Newberry 

Jacksonville 

Dunnellon 

Winter Garden 

Tampashores 

Jacksonville 
Albany, Ga. 



Vahey, Wilma Joy New Port Richey 

Van Antwerp, Mrs. Marie K. Tampa 

Van Fleet, Mrs. Flossie S. St. Petersburg 

Van Fleet, Ralph Bruce St. Petersburg 

Van Valkenburg, Mabel Umatilla 

Vassie, Marie Abigail Mulberry 

Vaughn, Lila Gray Lake City 

Veber, Mrs. Iva C. Coral Gables 

Von Harten, Lillie Jacksonville 

Voorhees, Richard Kenneth Cantonment 



REGISTER 



261 



Name 

Wade, Eva Louise 
Wadley. Etta 
Wakefield, Homer E. 
Wakefield, John W. 
Waldron, Bessie Lee 
Waldron, Nellie Evelyn 
Walker, Allen 
Walker, Mrs. Herman 
Walker, Ion Sessions 
Walker, Solomon Lloyd 
Walker, Thomas George 
Walker, Mrs. Una 



Address 
Charlotte Harbor 
Tampa 
Madison 

Apalachicola 

Chiefland 

Bradenton 

Fort White 

Bradenton 

Tampa 

Perry 

Everglades 

Fort White 
Wallace, Howard Keefer St. Petersburg 

Wallace, Julian Howard Gainesville 

Wallace, Mrs. Ruby Ware Worthington 

Walsingham, Gladys A. Largo 

Walter, Flora Eveline Orlando 

Walters, Edna Marguerite Vero Beach 

Walton, Peter Wyche Sarasota 

Wamble, Minnie Lee Estero 

Wampler, Ruth T. Hastings 

Ward, Annie Mae Clearwater 

Warnock, Elizabeth Alice Inverness 

Warren, Frank Melton Perry 

Warren, Lamar Gordon Palatka 

Warren, Richard Gainesville 

Warriner, Mrs. Agnes P. St. Petersburg 

Wasdin, John Alvin Graham 

Wasson, Mrs. Lacy Fenwick Ocala 

Waters, May Alachua 

Watkins, Jim Gaine3ville 

Watrous, Thos. M. Tampa 

Watson, Clare John Ft. Meade 

Watson, Mrs. Florence Hill Tarpon Springs 
Watson, James Franklin Milton 

Watson, Lucy Agnes Trenton 

Watson, Mrs. Nannie Coleman 

Watson, Wilma Ruth Gainesville 

Weaver, Mrs. Thelma McD. Cottondale 

Weaver, Wm. S. Bristol 

Webb, Thomas Roba Winter Garden 

Welborn, Elizabeth Charles Jacksonville 

Wells, Andrew J. G. Crystal River 

Wells, Bertha Alma Waycross, Ga. 

Wells, Idella Ellen Crystal River 

Wells, Mrs. Idella Crystal River 

Wende, Agnes Carrie Havana 

Wentworth, Alton H. Carbur 

Wentworth, Mrs. Ethel H. Shady Grove 

West, Grace Scott Ocoee 

Westbury, Harry E. Gainesville 

Westbury, Smith David Grover, S. C. 

Weston, Mary Elizabeth Gainesville 

Wetmore, Mildred Jaunita Lake Wales 

Whatley, Mrs. Minnie W. Clearwater 

Wheeler, Bureon Kylus Montverde 

Wheeler, Mrs. Isabel S. Miami 

Wheeler, Joseph Augustus Miami 

Wheeler, Joseph Drew Micco 

Wheeler, Mrs. Nora Jacksonville 

Whidden, Asie Lamar Wauchula 

Whiddon, J. Pauline AsJiburn, Ga. 

Whilden, Seta E. Plant City 

Whitaker, Mildred Rebecca Ocoee 

White, Paul E. Sebring 

White, Mrs. Rosa Belle Ocoee 

White, Ruth Gainesville 

Whitehead, Mildred H. Hollister 

Whitehead, Nora Milton 

Whitehead, Ruth H. Hollister 

Whitelaw, Dave Floral City 



Name Address 

Whitelaw, lone Floral City 

Whittle, Clemmie Elizabeth Clearwater 

Whitton, H. A. Ponce de Leon 

Wicker, Mrs. Emma D. Coleman 

Wier, Sarah Lanier Tampa 

Wiggins, Wilma LaForest Plant City 

Wike, Rufus Long Miami 

Wilby, Anne Lake City 

Wilcox, Flora Belle Avon Park 

Wilder, Jennie B. Knights 

Wilder, Maude Gainesville 

Wilkins, James Alvin Ft. Green 

Willey, Ronald T. Coral Gables 

Williams, Alta Christine Arcadia 

Williams, Angelo David Gainesville 

Williams, Chas. A. Miami 

Williams, Chas. M. Trenton 

Williams, Mrs. C. M. Trenton 

Williams, Hugh Lee 
Williams, John Franklin, Jr. Tallahassee 

Williams, John Wm. F'airbanks 

Williams, Lera Marie Perry 

Williams, Loys Helga Odessa 

Williams, Marie Amelia Dunnellon 

Williams, Mrs. Maxine F. Gainesville 

Williams, Mrs. Rosabelle Dunnellon 

Williams, Thomas Harold Lake City 

Williams, Vera Anna Jacksonville 

Willis, Claudelle New Smyrna 

Willis, Mrs. Flora B. Gainesville 

Willis, Katy Largo 

Willis, Susie B. New Smyrna 

Wilsey, Mrs. Jeannette Miami 
Wilson, Bertha Green Cove Springs 

Wingert, Earl Perry Gainesville 

Winston, Frances Gainesville 

Winter, Thurston P. Oakland 

Wise, Anne Tampa 

Wisenbaker, Clifford (Miss) High Springs 

Wisenbaker, Mae Belle Valdosta, Ga. 

Witt, Myrtice Lenorah Lake City 

Witt, Otto Valentine Lake City 

Wood, Harry Evins Alachua 

Wood, Myrtle Lee Alachua 

Woodard, Willie Mae Gainesville 

Woodberry, Robert McTyer Orlando 

Woods, Bertha J. Bowling Green 

Woodwell, Ruth Adams Madison 

Wooley, Florence Live Oak 

Word, Frances Shawmut, Ala. 

Wray, Irene Haines City 

Wynn, Free Joyce Hampton 

Wyse, John Hope Longwood 



Yamall, Frank Dent 
Yawn, Cecil P. 
Yeagle, Mrs. Mildred J. 
Yongue, Ann Laura 
Yongue, Edna Elizabeth 
Yongue, Mrs. Leila O. 
Young, Catherine M. 
Young, Eddie Louis 
Young, Ha Maxine 



Winter Park 

Graceville 

Hallandale 

Fairfield 

Fairfield 

Fairfield 

Oviedo 

Lake City 

Oviedo 



Zeder, H. Haild Delray Beach 

Zentgraf, Robert Louis Gainesville 

Zimmerman, Mrs. Addie McCormick Lakeland 
Zimmerman, Daniel Earl St. Petersburg 

Zipperer, Penny Well Madison 

Zorn, Ruth Pauline Ludowici, Ga. 



262 



GEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTION 



GEOGRAPHIC DISTRIBUTION OF STUDENTS BY COUNTIES, 

STATES AND FOREIGN COUNTRIES 

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

1928-29 



Counties: 

Alachua 275 

Baker 2 

Bay 17 

Bradford 4 

Brevard 34 

Broward 24 

Calhoun , 10 

Charlotte 8 

Citrus 14 

Clay 6 

Collier 3 

Columbia 18 

Dade 158 

DeSoto 14 

Dixie 3 

Duval 226 

Escambia 51 

Flagler 6 

Franklin 2 

Gadsden 22 

Gilchrist 3 

Gulf 4 

Hamilton 6 

Hardee 29 

Hendry 3 

Hernando 5 

Higlilands 11 

HUlsborough 229 

Holmes 4 

Indian River 3 

Jackson 26 

Jefferson 13 

Lafayette 3 

Lake 55 

Lee 12 

Leon _ 35 

Levy 10 

Liberty 3 

Madison 14 

Manatee 45 

Marion 42 

Martin _ _ 8 

Monroe 16 

Nassau 6 

Okaloosa 15 

Okeechobee 5 

Orange 79 

Osceola 22 

Palm Beach 45 

Pasco 21 

PineUas 100 

Polk 105 

Putnam 25 

St. Johns 41 

St. Lucie 18 



Santa Rosa 5 

Sarasota 18 

Seminole 25 

Sumter 9 

Suwanee 19 

Taylor 8 

Union 2 

Volusia 53 

Wakulla 2 

Walton 16 

Washington 6 

States: 

Alabama 8 

Arkansas 

California 

Colorado 

Connecticut 

District of Columbia 



2 

2 

'Z'ZIZ 1 

1 

1 

Florida 2121 

Georgia 20 

Idaho 1 

Illinois 8 

Indiana „ 8 

Iowa 2 

Kansas 2 

Kentucky 2 

Maine 2 

Maryland 2 

Massachusetts 2 

Michigan 3 

Minnesota 2 

Mississippi 3 

Missouri 3 

New Hampshire 2 

New Jersey _ 4 

New Mexico 1 

New York 11 

North Carolina 5 

North Dakota 2 

Ohio 7 

Oklahoma 1 

Pennsylvania 7 

South Carolina 12 

Tennessee 6 

Texas 1 

Vermont 1 

Virginia 2 

West Virginia 2 

Wisconsin 3 

Foreign Countries: 

Canada 2 

China 1 

Brazil 2 

Cuba 1 

Poland 1 



ENROLLMENT SUMMARY 263 

REPORT OF ENROLLMENT AT THE UNIVERSITY OF 

FLORIDA 

192829 

College of Arts and Sciences: 

Freshmen, A. B 88 

Freshmen, B. S 156 

Freshmen, Pre Med 73 317 

Sophomore, A. B 94 

Sophomore, B. S 55 

Sophomore, Pre Med 46 195 

Junior, A. B 35 

Junior, B. S 33 68 

Senior, A. B 19 

Senior, B. S 18 37 617 

College of Commerce and Journalism: 

Freshmen, Bus. Adm „ 141 

Freshmen, Journ 18 

Freshmen, Soc. Adm 2 161 

Sophomore, Bus. Adm 108 

Sophomore, Journ 12 120 

Junior, Bus. Adm 63 

Junior, Journ 11 

Junior, Soc. Adm 1 75 

Senior, Bus. Adm 29 

Senior, Journ 2 31 

Special, Bus. Adm 10 

Special, Journ 3 13 400 

College of Engineering and Architecture: 

(Engr.) Freshmen 101 101 

Sophomore, Civil Engr 33 

Sophomore, Elec. Engr 32 

Sophomore, Mech. Engr 10 

Sophomore, Chem. Engr 9 84 

Junior, Civil Engr 18 

Junior, Elec. Engr 26 

Junior, Mech. Engr _ 9 

Junior, Chem. Engr _... 6 59 

Senior, Civil Engr 17 

Senior, Elec. Engr 7 

Senior, Mech. Engr 4 

Senior, Chem. Engr _ „ 2 30 

Special Students _ _..._ 19 19 293 



264 ENROLLMENT SUMMARY 



(Arch.) Freshmen 18 

Sophomores 19 

Juniors _ 16 

Seniors _ _ _ 9 

Special Students — _ 7 69 362 

Teachers College: 

Freshmen 176 

Sophomores 105 

Juniors - 56 

Seniors 31 

Specials 10 378 

COU.EGE OF Law: 

First Year 112 

Third Year 76 

Fourth Year 82 

Graduates . 1 

Specials 2 273 

College of Agriculture: 

Freshmen _ 60 

Sophomores _ 40 

Juniors 27 

Seniors 17 

Special Students - 26 170 

Graduates : 90 90 

College of Pharmacy: 

Freshmen 29 

Sophomores 23 

Juniors ..._ _ 9 

Seniors _ -- 2 

Special Student - 1 64 

Total - - - 2354 

Less duplicates: 

Double registrations _ 8 

Because of transfers from one college to another 

at beginning of second semester 76 84 

Gkand Total _ - -- - — 2270 



ENROLLMENT SUMMARY 265 



COMPOSITE OF ALL COLLEGES 

Freshmen 862 

Sophomores _ „ 586 

Juniors 310 

Seniors 157 

Special Students 76 

Law Students - 273 

Graduates 90 

Total „ 2354 

Less duplicates as above 84 

Grand Total Regular Session _ 2270 



Women students (included in the above total) 

Graduates 2 

Agriculture 3 

Teachers 2 



SUMMARY OF ENTIRE YEAR 

Regular Session 192^9 „ 2354 

Summer Session 192c 1617 

Total Registrations _ _ 3971 

Less all duplications 297 

Grand Total for Year. _ „ _ 3674 



266 



INDEX 



I\DEX 



A 

A. B. Curriculum 64 

A. B. Curriculum in Education 102 

A. B. Degree Arts and Sciences, Require- 
ments for 63 

Academic and Law Course Combined 63 

Accounting (See Business Administration) 

Activity Fee, Student 43 

Administration, Assistants in 22 

Administration Building 33 

Administration, Officers of 8 

Admission 53-57 

Admission by Certificate 53 

Admission by Examination 54 

Admission, Conditional 54 

Admission, Laws Governing 54 

Admission to Bar 98 

Admission to Freshman Class 54 

Adult Specials 41 

Advanced Standing 54 

Advanced Standing, Law 95 

Advertising Design, Basic Course 93 

Agents, County 78, 79 

Agents, Home Demonstration 78, 79 

Agriculture Building 32 

Agricultural Chemistry, Courses in 137 

Agricultural Club _ -. 68 

Agriculture, College of — General State- 
ment 67 

Agricultural Economics, Courses in 137 

Agricultural Education, Curriculum in ... 106 

Agricultural Engineering, Courses in 138 

Agricultural Experiment Station 76 

Agricultural Experiment Station Build- 
ing 32 

Agricultural Extension Division 78 

Agricultural Four Months Course 74 

Agricultural Meetings 83 

Agricultural Scholarships, County 68 

Agriculture, Four Year Course 69 

Agriculture One Year Course 74 

Agriculture Short Courses, Admission to 55 

Agronomy, Courses in 139 

"Alligator, Florida" 53 

Alpha Kappa Psi 115 

Alumni Association 50 

Alumni Association, Executive Council 

50, "^1 

American Institute of Electrical Engi- 
neers — Student Branch 85 

American Society of Civil Engineers — 

Student Branch 85 

American Society of Mechanical Engi- 
neers — Student Branch 85 

Americanism and Southern History, 

Chair of 39 

Ancient Languages (See Latin and 
Greek) 

Animal Husbandry, Courses in 141 

Andrew Anderson Memorial Organ 39 

Appointments, Bureau of — College of 

Commerce and Journalism 117 

Architecture, College of Engineering and 84 

Architecture, Courses in 142 

Architecture, Curriculum for 92 

Architecture, School of 91 

Artillery, Field — Courses in 208 

Art, Commercial 91 

Arts and Sciences, College of 62 

Assistants, Graduate 25 

Assistants in Administration 22 

Assistantships, Commerce and Journalism 117 

Athletic Association 51 

Athletic Coaching 127 

Athletic Equipment 126 

Athletics, Division of _ 38 



Auditorium (See Administration Build- 
ing) 

Auditory Instruction 132 

Awards, College of Commerce and Journ- 
alism 116 

B 

B.A. (Bachelor of Arts) Curriculum 64 

B.A. (Bachelor of Arts) Degree 63 

B.A.E. (Bachelor of Arts in Education) 

Curriculum 103 

B.A.E. (Bachelor of Arts in Education) 

Degree 101 

B.S. (Bachelor of Science) Curriculum.... 65 

B.S. (Bachelor of Science) Degree 63 

B.S. A. (Bachelor of Science in Agricul- 
ture) Curriculum 70 

B.S. A. (Bachelor of Science in Agricul- 
ture) Degree 70 

B.S.A.E. (Bachelor of Science in Agri- 
cultural Education) Curriculum 106 

B.S.A.E. (Bachelor of Science in Agri- 
cultural Education) Degree 101 

B.S. B.A. (Bachelor of Science in Busi- 
ness Administration) Curriculum 119 

B.S. B.A. (Bachelor of Science in Busi- 
ness Administration) Degree 117 

B.S.Ch.E. (Bachelor of Science in Chem- 
ical Engineering) Curriculum 90 

B.S.Ch.E. (Bachelor of Science in Chem- 
ical Engineering) Degree 85 

B.S.C.E. (Bachelor of Science in Civil 

Engineering) Curriculum 87 

B.S.C.E. (Bachelor of Science in Civil 

Engineering) Degree 85 

B.S.E. (Bachelor of Science in Educa- 
tion) Curriculum 103 

B.S.E. (Bachelor of Science in Educa- 
tion) Degree _ 101 

B.S.E.E. (Bachelor of Science in Elec- 
trical Engineering) Curriculum, 88 

B.S.E.E. (Bachelor of Science in Elec- 
trical Engineering) Degree 85 

B.S.J. (Bachelor of Science in Journal- 
ism) Curriculum 123 

B.S.J. (Bachelor of Science in Journal- 
ism) Degree 117 

B.S.M.E. (Bachelor of Science in Me- 
chanical Engineering) Curriculum.... 89 
B.S.M.E. (Bachelor of Science in Me- 
chanical Engineering) Degree 85 

B.S. P. (Bachelor of Science in Phar- 
macy) Curriculum 113 

B.S. P. (Bachelor of Science in Phar- 
macy) Degree 109 

B.S.P.E. (Bachelor of Science in Physical 

Education) Curriculum. 105 

B.S.P.E. (Bachelor of Science in Physical 

Education) Degree 101 

Bacteriological Laboratories 37 

Bacteriology, Courses in 146 

Band, Military _ 130 

Bar, Admission to _ 98 

Barracks 34 

Basketball Court 34 

Benton Engineering Society 85 

Beta Sigma 116 

Bible, Courses in 147 

Biological Laboratories 36 

Biological Station 36 

Biology, Courses in 148 

Board 43. 44 

Board of Control 3 

Board of Education, State 3 

Books, Cost of 45 

Botanical Laboratories _ 37 



INDEX 



267 



Botany, Courses in 150 

Boys' Clubs, Agricultural 81 

Boys' Club Scholarships „ 68 

Breakage F'ee 42 

Branch Stations, Experiment Station 77 

Buildings 32 

Bureau, Appointments — College of Com- 
merce and Journalism 117 

Bureau, Employment of Teachers 101 

Bureau, Extension Class 131 

Bureau, Municipal Reference and Social 

Service 133 

Bureau of Public Information and Li- 
brary Service 132 

Bureau of Public School and County 

Center __ 132 

Bureau, Publication 133 

Bureau, Student Extension Activities 133 

Business Administration, Courses in 152 

Business Administration, Cun-iculum in 

117-120 

Business Administration and Law, Cur- 
riculum combined 122 

Business, Professional Specialization in.... 120 

c 

C.E. (Civil Engineer) Degree 86 

Calendar, University 6, 7 

Camps, Summer Military 128 

Certificate, Ph.G. (Graduate in Pharmacy) 109 

Certificates Conferred 1928 232 

Certificates, State 101 

Certificates, Teachers — used for entrance 56 
Chair of Americanism and Southern His- 
tory 89 

Charges (See Fees) 

Ch.E. (Chemical Engineer) Degree 86 

Chemical Engineering 159 

Chemical Engineering Curriculum 90 

Chemical Engineer, Degree 86 

Chemical Laboratories 37 

Chemical Society, Leigh 63 

Chemistry Building 34 

Chemistry, Courses in 159 

Chilean Nitrate of Soda Fellowship 46 

Civil Engineering, Courses in 163 

Civil Engineering, Curriculum 87 

Civil Engineer, Degree _ 86 

Citizenship Training „ 132 

Club, Commerce „ 115 

Club, Contests 82 

Club, Peabody 100 

Clubs, Boys' Agricultural 81 

Clubs, Girls 81 

Clubs, Women's Home Demonstration 

Clubs 81 

Coaching, Athletic 127 

Coaching, Courses in 168 

College Courses, Summer Session 108 

College of Agriculture 67 

College of Arts and Sciences 62 

College of Commerce and Journalism 114 

College of Engineering and Architecture 84 

College of Law 95 

College of Pharmacy 109 

College, The Teachers 99 

Combined Course, Academic and Law.... 63 
Combined Course, Business Administra- 
tion and Law — Curriculum 122 

Combined Course, Law 98 

Commencement, Summer School 233 

Commerce and Journalism, College of.... 114 

Commerce Club 115 

Commercial Art 91 

Commissions in Reserve Corps 232 

Committees of the Faculty 25 

Commons, University 33 

Community Center Bureau 132 

Complete Failure 40 

Contents 2 



Contest, Florida National Exg Laying.... 82 

Contests, Club 82 

Contingent Fee 42 

Control, Board of 3 

Cooperative Agricultural Extension Work 80 

Correspondence Courses, Agriculture 8'.{ 

Correspondence Study 131 

Correspondence work permitted. Teachers 

College 99 

Council, Debating _ 52 

Council, University 3 

County Agents „ 78, 79 

County Scholarships, Agriculture 68 

Course Numbers, Meaning of 136 

Courses of Study for Summer Session 108 

Courts, Practice — College of Law 96 

Credit for Practical Work, College of 

Agriculture 69 

Credit for Summer Session Work 108 

Credits Allowed for Entrance 57 

Curricula for Education 102-106 

Curricula for Engineering 85-90 

Curricula for Law 98 

Curriculum for the B.A. (Bachelor of 

Arts) Degree _ 64 

Curriculum for Agricultural Education.. 106 

Curriculum for Agriculture 70-73 

Curriculum for Architecture 92 

Curriculum for the B.S. (Bachelor of 

Science) Degree 65 

Curriculum for Business Administration 

117-119 

Curriculum for Chemical Engineering.... 90 

Curriculum for Civil Engineering 87 

Curriculum for Combined Course — Busi- 
ness Administration, Law 122 

Curriculum for Electrical Engineering.... 88 
Curriculum for Four Year Course in 

Agriculture 70 

Curriculum for Four Year Course in 

Landscape Design 73 

Curriculum for Journalism 123, 124 

Curriculum for the "L.I. Degree" 104 

Curriculum for Mechanical Engineering 89 

Curriculum for Normal Diploma 104 

Curriculum for Pre-Medical Course 66 

Curriculum for Pharmacy 112, 113 

Curriculum for Physical Education 105 

D 

Dairying, Courses in 169 

Debating Council _ 52 

Degree B.A. (Bachelor of Arts) 63 

Degree B.A.E. (Bachelor of Arts in Edu- 
cation) 101 

Degree B.S. (Bachelor of Science) 63 

Degree B.S. A. (Bachelor of Science in 

Agriculture) 70 

Degree B.S.A.E. (Bachelor of Science in 

Agricultural Education) 101 

Degree B.S. B.A. (Bachelor of Science in 

Business Administration) 117 

Degree B.S. C.E. (Bachelor of Science in 

Civil Engineering) 85 

Degree B.S.Ch.E. (Bachelor of Science in 

Chemical Engineering) 85 

Degree B.S.E. (Bachelor of Science in 

Education) 101 

Degree B.S.E.E. (Bachelor of Science in 

Electrical Engineering) 85 

Degree B.S.J. (Bachelor of Science in 

Journalism) 117 

Degree B.S.M.E. (Bachelor of Science in 

Mechanical Engineering) 85 

Degree B.S. P. (Bachelor of Science in 

Pharmacy) 109 

Degree B.S.P.E. (Bachelor of Science 

in Physical Education) 101 

Degree C.E. (Civil Engineer) 86 

Degree Ch.E. (Chemical Engineer) 86 



268 



INDEX 



Degree E.E. (Electrical Engineer) _ 86 

Degrree J.D. (Juris Doctor) _ 98 

Deuree "L.I." 101 

De'jree L.L.B. (Bachelor of Laws) 98 

Degree M.A. (Master of Arts) 60 

Degree M.A.E. (Master of Arts in Edu- 
cation) 60 

Degree M.E. (Mechanical Engineer) 86 

Degree M.S. (Master of Science) 60 

Degree M.S. A. (Master of Science in 

Agriculture) 60 

Degree M.S.B.A. (Master of Science in 

Business Administration) 60 

Degree M.S.E. (Master of Science in 

Education) 60 

Degree M.S. Pharm. (Master of Science 

in Pharmacy) 60 

Degrees, College of Arts and Sciences.... 63 

Degrees Conferred 1928 230 

Degrees Conferred Summer Session 1928 233 

Degrees Offered, Graduate 60 

Der'rees, Regulations Concerning 40 

Dell, J. B. Jr., Memorial Scholarship 48 

Demonstration Agents 78 

Dennis, F"ranke E. Scholarship 68 

Dining Room 33 

Diploma Fee 43 

Diploma, Normal 101 

Dissertation, Graduate School 61 

Division of Athletics and Physical Edu- 
cation 126 

Division of Military Science and Tactics 128 

Division of Music 130 

Donations, College of Agriculture 69 

Dormitories _ _ 32 

Dormitory, New _. 34 

Drafting Rooms 38 

Drawing, Courses in _ „ 169 

Drill _ 128 

Duval High Memorial Scholarships „ 48 

Dynamo Laboratory „ 37 

E 

E.E. (Electrical Engineer) Degree 86 

Earning Expenses, Opportunities for 45 

Economics, Agricultural — Courses in 137 

Economics, Courses in 170 

Education, Agricultural _ 106 

Education, Courses in _ 173 

Education, Curricula 102-106 

Education, State Board of 3 

Egg Laying Contest, Florida National 82 

Elections to Phi Kappa Phi 235 

Elective, Entrance Units 57 

Electives, Teachers College 103 

Electrical Engineer, Degree 86 

Electrical Engineering, Courses in 178 

Electrical Engineering Curriculum 88 

Employees, Student 27 

Employment Bureau, Teachers 101 

Engineering, Agricultural, Courses in.... 138 
Engineering and Architecture, College of 84 

Engineering Building 32 

Engineering, Chemical 159 

Elngineering, Civil Courses in 163 

Engineering Curricula 85-89 

Engineering, Electrical, Courses in 178 

Engineering Experiment Station 94 

Engineering, Freshman Qualifying 

Examination 56 

Engineering, Mechanical 204 

English, Courses in 180 

Enrollment, Composite of all Colleges.... 265 
Enrollment, Geographic Distribution .... 262 

Enrollment, Summary 263 

Eniomology, Courses in 182 

Entrance, Credits Allowed for „ 57 

Entrance Examinations 55 

Entrance Examinations, Engineering 

Students _ 56 



Entrance to Graduate School _ 60 

Entrance Requirements, Pharmacy Ill 

Equipment 32 

Equipment, College of Pharmacy Ill 

Examinations, Entrance 55 

Examinations, Law „ 96 

Executive Council, Alumni Association.. 51 

Exemption from Mil. Sci 128 

Expenses 42-'?5 

Expenses, Law 98 

Expenses, Opportunities for Earning 45 

Expenses, Summer Session 108 

Experiment Station, Agricultural 76 

Extension Division, Agricultural 78 

Extension, Division General 131 

Experiment Station, Engineering 94 

Extension Research _ 133 

Extension Teaching 131 

Extension Activities Bureau 133 

Extension Class Bureau 131 

Extension Workei-s, School of Instruc- 
tion 81 

F 

Faculty Committees 26 

Faculty, General Extension Division 24 

Faculty, Regular Session 9-25 

Faculty, Standing Committees 26 

Faculty, Summer Session „ 23 

Failure, Complete _ 40 

Failure in Studies 40 

Farmers Week _ _ 83 

Farms _ 67 

Farr Literary Society 62 

Fee, Special Registration, College of 

Commerce and Journalism 115 

Fees _ _ 42-45 

Fellows 25 

Fellowships 46-49 

Fellowships, Commerce and Journalism.. 117 

Fellowships, Teachers College 101 

Field Artillery, Courses in _ 208 

Field Artillery Unit 128 

Field Laboratories, Experiment Station- 78 

"Fifty Per Cent" Rule 40 

Finley, William Wilson, Foundation 

Loan Fund 48. 68 

"Florida Alligator" 53 

Florida National Egg Laying Contest.... 82 

Florida State Museum 35 

Forestry, Courses in _ 190 

Forge Shop 38 

Foundry 38 

Four Months Course, Agriculture 74 

Four Year Course in Agriculture 69 

Fraternities, Social 52 

French, Courses in 184 

Freshman Week _ 5 

Funds, Agricultural Extension Division.... 80 

Funds, Loan 46 

F^imiture in Dormotories 44 

G 

General Extension Division 131 

General Extension Division Faculty 24 

Geographic Distribution of Enrollment.... 262 

Geology, Courses in 185 

German, Courses in 185 

Gifts 39 

Girls Clubs - 81 

Glee Club _ 130 

Government 40 

Grades ~ 40 

Graduate Assistants 25 

Graduate Committee 61 

Graduate Courses, Summer Session 108 

Graduate Degrees Offered 60 

Graduate in Pharm., Curriculum 112 

Graduate School 60 



INDEX 



269 



Graduate School, Applications for En- 
trance 60 

Graduate State Certificates -.. 101 

Graduate Study, College of Commerce 

and Journalism IIV 

Greek, Courses in 186 

Grounds 32 

Group Requirements, Agriculture 69 

Group Requirements, Arts and Sciences.. 63 

Group Requirements, B.S.A. Degree ...71, 72 
Group Requirements, Commerce and 

Journalism 120, 121 

Group Requirements, Journalism 125 

Group Requirements, Teachers College.... 103 

Gymnasium 33 

Gymnastics (See Division of Athletics 
and Phy. Ed.) 

H 

Haisley Lynch Medal 39 

Hamm, Arthur Ellis, Memorial Scholar- 

sJiip 48 

Henderson Memorial Library 97 

H;s,'h School Visitation 101 

Historical Statement 30 

History, Courses in 187 

History, University 30 

Home Demonstration Agents 78, 79 

Home Demonstration, Wonaen's Clubs 81 

Home Demonstration Work 81 

Honor Court .- 52 

Honors _ 49 

Horticulture Building 34 

Horticulture, Courses in 188 

Hydraulic Laboratory 38 

I 

Illustration, Basic Course 93 

Income 41 

Infantry, Courses in 207 

Infantry, Artillery ._ 128 

Infirmary 34 

Infimiary Fee — 42 

Infirmary Staff 22 

Information, Public — Bureau of 132 

Inoculation — 53 

Institute Bureau 131 

Instruction, Auditory 132 

Instruction, Officers of 9-25 

Instruction Schools for Extension Work- 
ers _ - 81 

Instruction, Visual _ 132 

Instrument Room, Surveying 38 

Interfraternity Conference 52 

Irregular Students, Classification of 41 

J 

J.D. (Juris Doctor) Decree 98 

Jacksonville Rotary Club Scholarship 49 

Journalism, Colle.ge of Commerce and... 114 

Journalism, Courses in 190 

Journalism, Curriculum 123, 124 

Journalism, Specialization in 125 

Juris Doctor Degree 98 

K 

Knight and Wall Scholarship 47 

Knighta of Pythias Scholarships 48 

Knights Templar Scholarship 49 

L 

"L.I." Degree 101 

"L.I." Curriculum 104 

LL.B. (Bachelor of Laws) Degree 98 

Labor, Remuneration and Instruction 69 

Laboratories _ 36 



Laboratories, Field, Experiment Station 78 

Laboratory Fees 42 

Landscape Design, Courses in 193 

Landscape Design, Four Year Course 

Curriculum 7"? 

Language Hall 33 

Languages, Ancient (See Latin and 

Greek) 

Late Registration Fee 42 

Latin, Courses in 193 

Law Building 33 

Law College, Admission to 56 

Law Course, Combined Academic and 63 

Law, Courses in 194 

Law, College of 95 

Law, Combined Course with Business 

Administration and 122 

Law, Entrance to 56 

Law Library _ 96 

Leigh Chemical Society 63 

Library, Agricultural 67 

Library Building 33 

Library, Henderson Memorial 97 

Library, Law 96 

Library Service, Bureau of 132 

Library Staff 22 

Library, University 35 

Limitation on Enrollment of Engineering 

Freshmen 56 

Literary Societies - 52 

Literary Society, Farr 62 

Living Expenses — 43 

Loan Fund — William Wilson Finley 

Foundation 68 

Loan Funds 46 

Loans, College of Agriculture 69 

Location 30 

Lodging 43, 44 

Loring Memorial Scholarship 48 

M 

M.A. (Master of Arts) Degree 60 

M.A.E. (Master of Arts in Education) 

Degree 60 

M.E. (Mechanical Engineering) Dejjree 86 

M.S. (Master of Science) Degree 60 

M.S. A. (Master of Science in Agricul- 
ture) Degree 60 

M.S.B.A. (Master of Science in Business 

Administration) Degree 60 

M.S.E. (Master of Science in Engineer- 
ing) Degree GO 

M.S. P. (Master of Science in Pharmacy) 

Degree 60 

Machine Shop 38 

Marshall Debating Society 97 

Mathematics, Courses in 201 

Mechanic Arts, Courses in 203 

Mechanical Engineering 204 

Mechanical Engineer, Degree 86 

Mechanical Engineering Curriculum 89 

Mechanical Engineering Building 33 

Mechanical Engineering Laboratories .... 38 

Medal, Haisley Lynch 39 

Medals, College of Commerce and Journ- 
alism 116 

Medical Treatment 42 

Meetings, Agricultural 83 

Memorial, Henderson Library 97 

Memorials 39 

Military Band 130 

Military Science and Tactics, Courses in 207 

Military Science and Taccics, Division of 128 

Military Science, Exemption fi'om 128 

Military Summer Camps 128 

Military Training Requirement 128 

Moore, L. P. Fellowship 46 

Mortar and Pestle Society 112 

Municipal Reference Bureau 133 

Mural Painting, Basic Course 93 



270 



INDEX 



Museum, Florida State 35 

Museum Staff 21 

Music, Division of 130 

Musical Organizations 53 

N 

Nitrate of Soda Fellowship 46 

Non-Resident Tuition 42 

Normal Courses, Summer Session 108 

Normal Diploma 101 

Normal Diploma Curriculum 104 

o 

Officers, Alumni Association 50 

Officers of Administration 8 

Officers of Instruction and Research 9-25 

One Year Course, Agriculture 74 

Opportunities for Earning Expenses 45 

Opportunities in Pharmacy 110 

Oratorical Honors 235 

Orchestra, University 130 

Orsran, Andrew Anderson Memorial 39 

Organizations, Musical 53 

Organizations, Student 51 

P 

Painting, Courses in 209 

Painting, Mural — -Basic Courses 93 

Peabody Club 100 

Peabody Hall 33 

Penney-Gwin Fellowship 46 

Ph.G. (Graduate in Pharmacy) Certifi- 
cate 109 

Ph.G. (Graduate in Pharmacy) Curri- 
culum (3 Year Course) 112 

Pharmacognosy, Courses in 209 

Pharmacology, Courses in 209 

Pnarmacy, College of 109 

Pharmacy, Courses in 212 

Pharmacy, Four Year Curriculum 113 

Phannacy, Three Year Curriculum 112 

Phi Kappa Phi 49 

Phi Kappa Phi, Elections to 235 

Phi Kappa Phi, Officers of 235 

Philosophy, Courses in 215 

Physical Education, Courses in 218 

Physical Education, Division of 126 

Physical Laboratories 37 

Physics, Courses in 219 

Pi Delta Epsilon 115 

Plant Pathology, Courses in 223 

Political Science, Courses in 224 

Poultry Husbandry, Courses in 225 

Practical Work, Credit for College of 

Agriculture 69 

Practice Courts, College of Law 96 

Pie-Medical Course 64 

Proceedure, Admission 53 

Professional Courses, Summer Session. .. 108 
Professional Specialization in Business.. 120 
Projects, Agricultural Experiment Sta- 
tion 77 

Property Value 34 

Psychology, Courses in 215 

Psychological Laboratory 37 

Public School Bureau 132 

Publications, Agricultural Experiment 

Station 78 

Publications, Agricultural Extension Di- 
vision 82 

Publications Bureau 133 

Publications, Student 53 

Q 

Quantity of Work, College of Agricul- 
ture 69 



Quantity of Work, College of Arts and 

Sciences 64 

Quantity of Work, College of Commerce 

and Journalism 115 

R 

Recent Gifts 39 

Reciprocity, Pharmacy 109 

Refunds 43 

Register of Students 236 

Register of Students, Summer 1928 252 

Registration 5t 

Registration F'ee 42 

Registration Fee, Special, College of 

Commerce and Journalism 115 

Registration, Pharmacy 109 

Regulations 40 

Regulations. Summer Session 107 

Remittances 45 

Required Credits for Entrance 55 

Requirements for Degrees, Arts and 

Sciences 63 

Requirement for Entrance 53-57 

Requirements for Normal Diploma 104 

Research, Extension 133 

Research, Officers of 9-25 

Reserve Corps Commissions 232 

Residence Requirements — Teachers Col- 
lege 99 

Review Courses, Summer Session 108 

Rho Chi Fraternity Ill 

Roll, Student 236 

Rotary Loan Fund 48 

s 

Sanitary Laboratory 38 

Scholarships 39, 46-49 

Scholarships, Boys Club _ 68 

Scholarships, County Agricultural 68 

Scholarships, Teachers College 100 

School of Architecture 91 

School of Instruction for Extension 

Workers 81 

Science Hall 32 

Sciences, College of Arts and 62 

Scientific Societies 52 

Self Help Committee 27 

Seminole, The 53 

Senatorial Scholarships 46 

Seniors Field Artillery Unit _ 128 

Senior Infantry Unit 128 

Shop, Courses in 203 

Shops 38 

Short Course Bureau _ 131 

Short Courses in Agriculture, Admission 

to 55 

Sigma Delta Chi -.. 116 

Smith-Hughes Course 72 

Smith Lever Act 80 

Social Fraternities 52 

Social Service Bureau 133 

Societies, Arts and Science College. -.62, 63 

Sociology, Courses in 225 

Southern History, Chair of Americanism 

and, 39 

Spanish, Courses in 227 

Special Registration Fee — Commerce and 

Journalism 115 

Special Students 41 

Special Students, Law 95 

Specialization in Business 120 

Specialization in Journalism 125 

Specials, Adult 41 

Standard of Work, Pharmacy 109 

Standing Committees of the Faculty 26 

State Board of Education 3 

State Certificates 101 

State High School Visitation 101 

State U. D. C. Foundation 48 



INDEX 



271 



Stations, Branch — Experiment Station... 77 

Student Activity Fee 43 

Student Aid Society 49 

Student Organizations 51, 52 

Student Publications 51, 52 

Student Roll 236 

Students, Regulations Concerning 40 

Students, Special 41 

Studies, Failure in 40 

Subjects of Study, College of Arts and 

Sciences 63 

Summer Session 107 

Summer Session Expenses 108 

Summer Session, Faculty 23 

Summer Session, Graduate School 61 

Summer Session Regulations 107 

Surveying, Instrument Room 38 

Sutton, John B., Scholarship 48 

T 

Tampa Alumni Scholarship 49 

Teachers' Certificates for Entrance 

Credits 56 

Teachers College 99 

Teachers Employment Bureau 101 

Teachers Scholarships 46 

Teaching Fellowships, Teachers College.... 101 

Testing Laboratory 37 

Thesis, Graduate School 61 

Three Year Pharmacy Curriculum 112 

Time Requirement, Graduate School 60 

Training, Citizenship _ _ 132 

Tuition _ _ 42 



u 

United Daughters of the Confederacy 

Scholarship 47 

Units, Entrance 57 

Units Required for Entrance 55 

University Calendar 6, 7 

University Council 3 

University History 30 

University Library 35 

University Orchestra 130 

V 

Vaccination 53 

Value, Property 34 

Veterinary Science, Courses in 228 

Visitation, High School 101 

Visual Instruction 132 

Vocational Education 100 

w 

WRUF Agricultural Programs 82 

Women Students, Law 95 

Wood Shop 38 

Work Required, Graduate School 60 

Work, Standard of Pharmacy _ 109 

Y 

Y. M. C. A 51 



Zoology (See Biology) 






University of Florida 

GAINESVILLE, FLORIDA 



^ if 



University Summer School 

Co-Educational 



June 10 to August 3, 1929 

Announcement 




John James Tigert, A.M. (OXON), D.Ed., Ph.D., LL.D. 
New President of the Univerity of Florida 



SUMMER SCHOOL 



BOARD OF CONTROL 

P. K. YONGE, Chairman Pensacola 

Frank J. Wideman West Palm Beach 

E. W. Lane Jacksonville 

General A. H. Blanding Tampa 

Judge W. B. Davis Perry 

J. T. Diamond, Secretary to the Board Tallahassee 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 



JOHN JAMES TIGERT, A.M. (OXON), D.Ed., Ph.D., LL.D. 
President 

JAMES WILLIAM NORMAN, Ph.D. 

Director of Sumvier School 

JAMES NESBITT ANDERSON, Ph.D. 

Dean of College of Arts and Sciences and Chairman 

of Graduate Committee 

WILBUR LEONIDAS FLOYD, M.S. 
Assistant Dean College of Agriculture 

HARRY RAYMOND TRUSLER, A.M., LL.B. 
Dean of College of Laiv 

BENJAMIN ARTHUR TOLBERT, A.B.E. 
Acting Dean of Teachers College 

WALTER JEFFRIES MATHERLY, A.M. 
Dean of College of Commerce and Journalism 

' WILBERT ALVA LITTLE, A.M. 

Director of Review Courses and Teachers Certification 

SUE H'lLL, B.S. 
Dean of Women 

ALVIN PERCY BLACK, A.B. 

Dean of Men 

KLINE H. GRAHAM 

Business Manager 



Summer School 
harley willard chandler, m.s. 

Registrar 

J. B. GOODSON 

Cashier 

GARLAND HIATT 

Auditor 

JOHN EVANDER JOHNSON, A.M., B.D. 
Y. M. C. A. Secretary 

CORA MILTIMORE, B.S. 
Librarian 

W. L. GOETTE, A.B.E. 

Director of Employment Bureau 

ELIZABETH ROUNTREE YEATS, B.S. 
Secretary to Teachers College 

JANE A. CRAIG, A.B., B.L.S. 
Acting Head Catalog Department 

MARGARET H. JOHNSON, A.B. 
Head Circulation Department 

HENRIE MAY EDDY, A.B. 
Head Reference Department 

JANICE PARHAM, A.B., B.S. 

Assistant Catalog Department 

CLAUDE LEONIDAS MURPHREE, A.B. 

University Organist 

G. C. TILLMAN, M.D. 
Resident Physician 

ROSA GRIMES, R.N. 
Nurse 

MRS. B. C. McGARRAH, B.S. 
Dietitian 

MRS. MARGARET PEELER 

Housekeeper 



University of Florida 

FACULTY 



CLARENCE E. ACKLEY, M.A. 

Education 

MRS. MABEL F. ALTSTETTER 
Primary Education 

M. L, ALTSTETTER, A.M. 
Elementary Education 

JAMES NESBITT ANDERSON, Ph.D. 
Latin 

ERNEST GEORGE ATKIN, Ph.D. 

French 

CHARLES W. BACHMAN, LL.B. 

Athletic Coaching 

MARTHA JANE BALLARD, A.B. 
Drawing and Industrial Arts 

WALTER HERMAN BEISLER, M.S., D.Sc. 
Chemistry 

ALVIN PERCY BLACK, A.B. 

Chemistry 

MRS. ADELIA JOHNSON BLACKLOCK 

Teaching Fellow in Geography - 

ARTHUR AARON BLESS, M.S., Ph.D. 
Physics 

EDWARD THORPE BOARDMAN 

Nature Study 

MRS. ANNABELLE ABNEY BRANNING, A.B.E. 

Education 

LUCIUS MOODY BRISTOL, Ph.D. 

Sociology 

F. W. BUCHHOLZ, A.B. 

History 

WILLIAM GRAVES CARLETON, A.B. 

General Social Science 



Summer School 
omer carmichael, m.a. 

Education 

ROBERT SPRATT COCKRELL, M.A., B.L. 

Law 

MAXIE COLLINS 
Glee Chib 

RACHEL F. CROZIER, B.S.E. 
Teaching Fellow in English 

ANN D. ENGLAND, A.M. 
English 

HASSE OCTAVIUS ENWALL, Ph.D. 
Philosophy 

ROBERT M. EVANS, A.M. 
Education 

JAMES MARION FARR, Ph.D. 

English 

ANNA L. PETTING, R.N. 
Home Nursing 

LILLIAN FOULKS 

Kindergarten 

JOSEPH RICHARD FULK, Ph.D. 

Education f 

EDWARD WALTER GARRIS, Ph.D. * 

Agricultural Education 

ALMA GAULT, R.N. 

Nursing Education 

LENORE GRAHAM 

Teaching Fellow in English 

KENNETH BLAISDELL HAIT, A.B. 

Teaching Fellow in English 

H. A. HASELTINE, A.B. 
Political Science 



University of Florida 
lyman george haskell, m.d. 

Physical Education 

WILLIAM BYRON HATHAWAY, A.M. 
Spanish 

ALFRED NASH HIGGINS 

Athletic Coaching 

MURPHY ROY HINSON, A.M. 
Education 

VESTUS TWIGGS JACKSON, M.S., Ph.D. 
Chemistry 

HAMPTON McNEELY JARRELL, M.A. 

English 

EMILY JONES, A.B. 

Teaching Fellow in Mathematics 

MRS. BIRDIE L. KELLY 
Teaching Fellow iyi Geography 

FRANKLIN WESLEY KOKOMOOR, A.M., Ph.D. 

Mathei7iatics 

JAMES MILLER LEAKE, Ph.D. 
History and Political Science 

WILBERT ALVA LITTLE, A.M. 

Arithmetic 

WALTER K. LONG, B.F.A. 
Fine Arts 

MRS. ANNIE BATES LORD 
Primary Education 

EARLL LESLIE LORD, A.B. 
Horticidture 

EDWIN FRANKLIN McLANE, B.S.E. 
Teaching Fellow in History 

FREEMAN GOODE MARTIN, M.S. 
Animal Husbandry 



Summer School 
walter jeffries matherly, a.m. 

Economics and Busiyiess Administration 

GEORGE HIRAM MEARS, A.B.E. 
Teaching Fellow in Education 

MILDRED A. MERCIER, B.S.E. 
Library Science 

MRS. WILLIE B. METCALFE 
Psychology 

CHARLES EUGENE MOUNTS, A.M. 
English 

JAMES WILLIAM NORMAN, Ph.D. 
Education 

NORA NORTON 

Primary Education 



Tests and Measurements 

MRS. CLARA McD. OLSON, A.B. 

Teaching Fellow in Education 

SARAH PAYNE, A.M. 
Speech 

RUTH PEELER 

Demonstration School 

CECIL GLENN PHIPPS, Ph.D. 

Mathematics 

MARGUERITE STRATFORD PORTER, B.S., Mus. B. 

Public School Music 

ALICE REGINA PORTNER, B.S. 

Teaching Fellow in Mathematics 

GEORGE EDGAR RITCHEY, M.S.A. 
Agronomy 

CHARLES ARCHIBALD ROBERTSON, A.M. 
English 



10 University of Florida 

mrs. irma j. robison 

Primary Education 

JAMES SPEED ROGERS, A.M. 
Biology 

NATHAN WILLARD SANBORN, M.D. 

Poultry Husbandry 

FANNIE B. SHAW 
Health Education 

HARLEY BAKEWELL SHERMAN, M.S. 
Biology 

GLENN BALLARD SIMMONS, A.M. 

Education 

THOMAS MARSHALL SIMPSON, Ph.D. 
Mathematics 

DEAN SLAGLE, A.M., LL.B. 
Law 

VERNON STEEN, B.S. 
Teaching Fellow in Mathematics 

ANNIE BELLE STEWART, A.B.E. 
Teaching Fellow in Mathematics 

DORA A. TAYLOR 

Visiting Teacher 

CLARENCE J. TeSELLE, A.M., LL.B. 

Laiv 

LAUDIOUS LAWRENCE THOMPSON, A.B.E. 
Teaching Fellow in English 

BESS W. TIMMERMAN, A.B. 

Library Science 

BENJAMIN ARTHUR TOLBERT, A.B.E. 
Education 

LESLIE BENNETT TRIBOLET, Ph.D. 

Political Science 



Summer School 11 

warren ellis trottman 

Teaching Felloiu in Civics 

HARRY RAYMOND TRUSLER, A.M., LL.B. 
Law 

ERNEST POMEROY TURNER, A.B.E. 

Teaching Fellotv in Civics 

RUTH NEWELL UPSON 

Detnonstration School 

FRED CURTIS WARD, A.B. 

Accounting 

RUDOLPH WEAVER, B.S., A.I.A. 

Architecture 

JOSEPH WEIL, B.S.E.E., M.S. 
Physics 

C. M. WILLIAMS 
Teaching Felloiv in Mathematics 

JOSEPH EDWARD WILLIAMS, A.B.E. 

Teaching Fellow in History 

OSBORNE WILLIAMS, Ph.D. 

Psychology 

WILLIAM HAROLD WILSON, Ph.D. 

Education 

JACOB HOOPER WISE, A.M. 

English 

NORA WOODARD, A.M. 
Deinoristration School 

MRS. ALBERTA MURPHREE WORTH 
Voice 

HORACE FEASTER ZETROUER, A.B.E. 
Teaching Fellow in History 



12 University of Florida 



HISTORICAL NOTE 

The University of Florida Summer School is now a part of 
our educational program so well established as to be taken for 
granted. It may not be wise, however, to forget the early 
stages, the pioneer work from which came our present fa- 
vored condition. 

The enactment of a uniform examination and certification 
law in 1893 forced teachers and aspirants to prepare them- 
selves for the examinations. At first principals in the larger 
places held private schools with courses to the purpose. Nec- 
essarily the fees were low, the term short, the method intensive 
cramming, the venture precarious. 

During this period, the number of public schools increased 
rapidly, courses were enlarged, standards raised. To meet 
this situation the State began to employ the more able teachers 
to conduct summer schools at centers most suitable, the terms 
being from four to six weeks, depending upon attendance. 
The private "teacher-training" schools continued, some even 
flourished for a season. Standards continued to be raised, 
however, and needs increased so rapidly that the State began 
to support more liberally summer schools, no longer conducted 
here and there, but at Tallahassee and Gainesville. 

A steady growth of the University Summer School has re- 
sulted naturally from this putting of the training of teachers 
upon a more dignified and dependable basis. From an en- 
rollment of 140 in 1913, the attendance increased to 1,686 
last summer. There has been, of course, corresponding expan- 
sion in every phase and feature of the Summer School, as may 
be seen by a perusal of this Bulletin. 



Summer School 13 

GENERAL STATEMENT 

The twentieth annual session of the Summer School of 
the University of Florida will open Monday, June 10 and 
close Friday, August 2, the session lasting eight weeks. 

Summer study is growing in popularity all over the United 
States. Each year a greater majority of teachers are seeing 
the importance of summer study. 

What is more, the Summer School, generally speaking, has 
come to be recognized as an annual event of real and increas- 
ing importance to higher education, and the University Sum- 
mer School has accordingly, become an established feature 
of the work of the University of Florida. The cordial re- 
ception and generous commendations of the work of previ- 
ous summer sessions encourages us to put forth still greater 
efforts to make the session of 1929 an improvement over all 
those that have preceded it. 

The University City. — There are many features of the 
Summer School other than classroom work that will prove 
to be conducive to that larger life which should permeate all 
citizens, especially that of teachers. The advantages that 
Gainesville presents as the seat of the Summer School are nu- 
merous. It is centrally located and easy of access. It has well- 
paved, lighted and shaded streets, an exceptionally pure water 
supply, and a good sewerage system. The citizens are ener- 
getic, progressive, and hospitable. 

Buildings and Equipment. — The entire equipment of 
the University is at the service of faculty and students. 
The buildings are for the most part magnificent three-story 
brick and stone structures. They are modern in every respect 
as to equipment and arrangements. They contain the kind of 
lecture rooms, laboratories and libraries that a modern college 
needs. Below under "Rooming Facilities" and "Expenses," at- 
tention is called to the accommodations in the dormitories and 
Commons. 

For Whom the Summer School is Intended. — Work may 
be taken in the Summer Session for either undergraduate or 
graduate credit, A special effort is being made to offer 
teachers every opportunity for professional improvement and 
to help them to qualify for higher types of certificates and for 



14 University of Florida 

the extension of certificates. More specifically, the courses in 
the summer session are designed to meet the needs of the fol- 
lowing persons : 

1. Teachers who wish to increase their professional skill, 
to revise and extend their knowledge of a chosen field, or to 
qualify in new subjects, preparing to meet special demands in 
the profession of teaching. 

2. School superintendents, principals, supervisors, and 
other officers. Teachers and supervisors of agricultural ed- 
ucation, drawing and art, music, nursing education, physical 
education and coaching, and the usual academic subjects, will 
find work especially suited to their needs. 

3. Teachers and prospective teachers who desire to secure 
a high grade teacher's certificate. Extensive opportunities are 
offered for the review of all subjects required in the state 
teachers' examinations. 

4. Graduate students, especially in the field of Education, 
though graduate students may major in other departments of 
the University. 

5. Undergraduate students, and especially those register- 
ed in the fall and spring semesters of the University. Such 
students may use to advantage a portion of the vacation per- 
iod to take up studies which they are unable to include in their 
regular programs, or to make up deficiencies, or to shorten 
their courses. 

6. High school graduates who are about to enter upon 
regular university courses and who desire to broaden their 
preparation for university work. 

7. High school students who are not graduates. Such stu- 
dents are sometimes able to make up deficiencies in their 
high school work. It should be understood, however, that 
they must make arrangements with their high school 
principals for receiving credit for work covered. The Summer 
School doeff not grant high school credit, and in no case should 
high school principals grant more than a fourth of a year's 
credit for work covered in one Summer School, 

Special arrangements may be made for college entrance 
examinations. 



Summer School 15 

The Library. — The University Library contains about 
60,000 volumes. Many new titles have been added during the 
past year. The Pedagogical library will be of especial interest 
to the Summer School students for it contains many books on 
educational theory, general and special methods, history of 
education, psychology and philosophy. All books are classified 
according to the Dewey Decimal Classification. The catalog 
is a dictionary catalog of authors, subjects and titles in one 
alphabetical arrangement. 

The library receives 420 general and technical periodicals, 
the current numbers of which are to be found in the reading 
room. The files of bound periodicals are particularly valuable 
for use in reference work. Many of the daily and weekly state 
papers are donated by the publishers. 

The Library now occupies the first part of the first unit 
of the Library Building. The main reading room is on the 
second floor and has a seating capacity of 336. The lighting 
is semi-indirect with approximately ten foot candle on the 
reading tables. The room is completely equipped with electric 
fans to make it more comfortable in warm weather. 

Attention is called to the courses in Library Science for 
the benefit of those teachers who wish to equip themselves 
better for managing the libraries of their own schools. 

The Library will be open week days from 7:50 A.M. to 
10:00 P.M., except that on Saturday it will close for the day 
at 5 :00 P. M. 

The Auditorium. — This magnificent building is consid- 
ered by many to be the most commodious structure of its kind 
on any campus in the South. The Anderson Memorial 
pipe organ is installed in this building. It is hoped that ex- 
tensive use may be made of the organ during the Sum- 
mer School. In addition to the organ, a Steinway concert 
grand piano has been placed in the auditorium. All of this 
makes it possible for all entertainments, plays and recitals 
to be held on the campus this summer. 

' Lectures and Entertainments. — The Auditorium with a 
seating capacity of 1800, the magnificent pipe organ and the 
Steinway concert grand piano make the facilities for lectures 
and musical entertainments unsurpassed. A splendid program 




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Summer School 17 

is being arranged. At least one entertainment of this charac- 
ter is planned for each week. At the close of the session, the 
Department of Music, featuring the pupils in Voice, the Glee 
Club and the Orchestra, will put on a production of some 
popular light opera. It is hoped that a large number of good 
voices, both male and female will try out for this production. 
A feature of the Summer School of 1928 was the produc- 
tion of Gilbert & Sullivan's comic opera, "The Pirates of 
Penzance," by students in the Voice Department and the Glee 
Club. The opera was produced under the able direction of 
Mrs. Alberta M. Worth, Head of the Voice Department, with 
the assistance of the Glee Club. It was elaborately staged, 
decorations and advertising being made by the Handwork 
classes and the classes in Art. The entire cast and chorus of 
fifty persons was beautifully costumed by Van Horn and 
Company of Philadelphia. No production has even been given 
in the University Auditorium which surpassed that of 1928 
in beauty of detail and artistic presentation. 

Religious and Social Life. — The moral and religious at- 
mosphere at the Summer School is wholesome. The leading 
religious denominations have attractive places of worship and 
students are welcome at every service. Transportation is 
provided for those students who will attend. Twice each week 
a devotional service is held in connection with the Student 
Assembly. 

The Y.M.-W.C.A. — In connection with the regular student 
council a program of service will be carried on under the name 
of the "Y". The entire student body is served through this 
organization. Offices are in the "Y" Building and the secre- 
taries in charge may be found there. 

The principal points in the program are: Operating the 
"Y" building as a home or club including piano, Edison, read- 
ing matter, including the best dailies and magazines, commit- 
tee room, kitchenette, telephone for local and long distance 
calls, ice water and games. 

Service is given through an Information and Lost and 
Found Bureau. A student directory is kept of all faculty and 
students enrolled in the Summer School. Lost and Found ar- 
ticles may be turned in and efforts made to locate the owners. 



18 University of Florida 

An effort will be made to serve the many visitors who 
come to the campus throughout the summer. Report at the 
"Y" and ask for your friend. 

Hikes, picnics and other socials are promoted during the 
session. 

The Honor System. — All class work at the University is 
on the honor basis. No espionage is practiced by teachers, and 
students will unanimously condemn and punish cheating. 

Cooperative Government. — Government of student life 
on the campus is cooperative between students and faculty. 
Cooperative government for the past few summers has proven 
successful because of the splendid spirit existing between 
faculty and students. Representatives elected from each sec- 
tion of the dormitories, and from the larger boarding houses 
together with a faculty committee meet weekly to plan con- 
structively for the benefit of student life, and University in- 
terests. Suggestions from any member of the student body or 
faculty are welcomed at all times. 

FACULTY ADVISERS 

Members of the Summer School faculty will give every pos- 
sible aid to students in helping them select their courses wisely. 
A wide variety of courses is offered so that each teacher may 
find that which he needs most. Any member of the faculty 
will gladly advise with students, but certain ones are desig- 
nated to be of help to certain classes of students. 

Professor B. A. Tolbert, Acting Dean of Teachers Col- 
lege, will advise with and register all teachers who wish to 
pursue courses in the Teachers College for college credit. 

Professor W. A. Little will advise with all students who- 
register for review courses and for extension of certificate. 

Dean J. N. Anderson, Dean of the College of Arts and 
Sciences and Chairman of the Graduate Committee, will ad- 
vise with and register all students in the Arts and Science. 
College and all persons who are working on their master's, 
degrees. 

Dean H. R. Trusler, of the College of Law, will consult 
with all students who wish to pursue courses leading to de- 
grees in Law. 



Summer School 19 

Dean Walter J. Matherly will advise with all students pur- 
suing courses in the College of Commerce and Journalism. 

Major W. L, Floyd will advise with all students who de- 
sire credit for work done in the Agricultural College during 
the summer. 

The heads of departments of the college should be consulted 
about all matters concerning the work of their respective 
divisions. 

The Dean of Women and the Dean of Men will gladly ad- 
vise with any students who desire their services regarding any 
other matters concerning their comfort and welfare. 

Student Health and Medical Advice. — The Summer 
School makes diligent effort to conserve the health of its stu- 
dents. The services of a resident physician assisted by con- 
sulting physicians of Gainesville have been secured for the 
Summer School of 1929. These eminent physicians will make 
free physical examinations and prescribe means for remedy- 
ing physical defects. It is urged that early in the session all 
students apply at the infirmary for a thorough physical ex- 
amination. Especially does this apply to those who must pre- 
sent health certificates when they apply for permission to 
take the state teachers' examinations. Heretofore many stu- 
dents have deferred this examination until so late in the ses- 
sion of the Summer School that much overcrowding has re- 
sulted. This should be attended to in the first two or three 
weeks of Summer School. The University maintains a well 
equipped infirmary and has professional nurses constantly 
in attendance for those who may be ill during the Summer 
Session. Opportunity is offered for individual and private 
conference with the University Physician or assistants. 

Courses in Health Education are listed below under 
"Courses of Instruction." 

Athletics. — The gymnasium, basketball court, the base- 
ball grounds and tennis courts are at the disposition 
of the students, and instructors are at hand to direct athletic 
activities. A well-kept golf course is near the University 
and for a nominal fee students of the Summer School are 
permitted to play on the course. 

The General Assembly. — All students and faculty 
members are expected to attend the General Assembly on 



20 University of Florida 

Tuesdays and Fridays at 10:00 o'clock. The Auditorium will 
seat about 1,800, and is near enough to the main lecture halls 
to make it easily accessible to all students. 

Many important announcements will be made at the Gen- 
eral Assembly, for the observance of which students will 
be held responsible, even though they may not be in attend- 
ance at the time. 

Societies and Clubs. — The Peabody Literary Society 
meets weekly in the auditorium. Delightful and instructive 
programs are rendered at each meeting. All students of the 
Summer School are eligible for membership. 

Phi Kappa Phi. — A chapter of the Honor Society of Phi 
Kappa Phi was established at the University during the spring 
of 1912. To be eligible for membership a student must have 
been in attendance at the University for at least one year, or 
three summer sessions, have been guilty of no serious breaches 
of discipline, have had at least three years of collegiate train- 
ing, be within one year of finishing a course leading to a de- 
gree, and stand among the first tenth of the senior class of 
the University. The numerical grade which must be attained 
is based on all college work, wherever done, for which the 
student receives credit towards a degree. 

Kappa Delta Pi. — Kappa Delta Pi is an honorary fra- 
ternity, similar to Phi Kappa Phi, except that only Juniors 
and Seniors in the Teachers College are eligible for member- 
ship. This fraternity plays an important part in the life of 
the Summer School. 

Clubs are formed each summer from each county, and 
many interesting and delightful associations are formed 
among the students and the members of the faculty. 

University Club. — The University Club, opposite Lan- 
guage Hall, is open to faculty and graduate students. A social 
program is arranged for every week end. 

The Summer School News. — The Summer School News 
is published by the students in cooperation with the De- 
partment of English and a committee from the faculty. 
Through its columns the more important news of the campus 
is disseminated. Every registered student is automatically a 
subscriber and entitled to every issue from the date of regis- 
tration. 



I 



Summer School 21 

Demonstration School. — As in the past three years it 
is planned to include a Demonstration School in the program 
of the University Summer School. This summer it will con- 
sist of four grades as follows : a kindergarten, a combined 
first and second grade, a combined third and fourth grade, 
and a fifth and sixth grade. 

The very best teachers in the state for this work will be 
employed, in order that the children may be given the best 
instruction possible. A busy child is a happy child, and it is 
our plan that these children have three hours each morning 
of delightful employment in music, organized play, stimu- 
lating handwork, as well as splendid work in reading, history, 
arithmetic, geography and other school subjects. 

The children who attended last year were delighted with 
the work. The fifth grade children were taught how to use 
the library for reference ; they organized a club among them- 
selves, carried on their own meetings and worked out a play 
which they presented at the close of the term. The smaller 
children delighted their mothers at the close with a puppet 
show. 

We can take care of only a limited number of children, and 
if you wish to enroll your child this should be attended to at 
once. The term lasts for six weeks, beginning Monday, June 
18. Daily sessions extend from 8:30 to 11:30. A fee of $6.00 
will be charged each child, which fee will cover only the ac- 
tual materials used. 

The Employment Bureau. — As the Teachers College 
and the Summer School wish to serve the whole state in 
every possible way, a Teachers' Employment Bureau was 
established several years ago. It is open throughout the year, 
except the vacation period immediately following the Summer 
School. Its duties are to assist students and graduates of the 
University to obtain positions in the teaching profession. 
From school officials it receives requests for teachers. From 
teachers it receives requests for information as to vacancies. 
It keeps on file both information as to vacancies and as to 
available teachers. When called upon the Bureau tries to meet 
the needs of both teachers and school officials. 

The Director of the Bureau will be glad to be informed of 
present or prospective vacancies in positions for which col- 



22 University of Florida 

lege-trained men or women are eligible. No charges are made 
for services, though students are required to pay for all tele- 
grams and telephone calls made in their behalf. 

The aggregate yearly salaries of all teachers who secured 
positions through the Bureau in a recent summer was in excess 
of $324,675.00. Had the same positions been obtained through 
professional agencies, fees in excess of $16,233.75 would have 
been collected from the teachers. As the Employment Bureau 
made no charges whatever, it is readily seen that no small 
amount was saved the teachers of the state. 

Communications in regard to teaching positions should 
be addressed to Dean J. W. Norman, University of Florida, 
Gainesville, Florida. 

The Bulletin Boards. — Read the bulletin boards daily. 
Students and faculty members will be responsible for all no- 
tices appearing on the Bulletin Boards and in the Daily 
Summer School Bulletin Sheet. 

Reduced Railroad Rates. — The Southeastern Passenger 
Association has authorized reduced rates on the round trip 
identification plan from all stations except stations on N. 0. 
G. R., R. F. & P., and W.-S. S. B. railways. The rates are 
based on fare and one-half for the round trip, the minimum 
excursion fare being one dollar. Round trip tickets will be 
sold students and members of their families only upon pre- 
sentation of identification certificates to ticket agent at time 
of purchase of tickets. The identification certificates will be 
furnished by the Dean of the Summer School on application. 

Tickets will be sold from June 6th to June 12th, inclusive, 
and the final limit of all tickets will be August 8th. All round 
trip reduced rate tickets must be validated by the regular 
ticket agent at Gainesville before the return journey is com- 
menced. 

In order that the nearest railroad ticket agent may have 
a supply of tickets on hand, students should make inquiry of 
him concerning these rates at least a week before purchasing 
tickets to Gainesville. Railroad ticket agents will not be able 
to supply the necessary "identification certificate". This can 
be secured only from the Dean of the Summer School. 

Students are urged to avail themselves of the reduced rates 
by obtaining in advance from the Dean of the Summer School 



^ 



► 



Summer School 23 

an identification certificate or carefully preserving the one 
which will be enclosed in the letters written to prospective 
students. 

COURSES IN ATHLETIC COACHING 

The department of athletic coaching established as a part 
of the University Summer School, has proved one of the most 
successful departments in the session and has met a felt need 
among the teachers in the State. The chief purpose of the 
department is to meet a widespread demand for high school 
teachers who combine a knowledge of athletic coaching with 
their scholastic training. The department this year will be 
under the direction of Mr. C. W. Bachman, Coach of the Uni- 
versity of Florida, with the assistance of Mr. A. N. Higgins, 
also of the University coaching staff. University gymnasium 
and equipment will be at the disposal of the students who reg- 
ister for this work. 

LIBRARY SCIENCE 

Libraries are more and more being regarded as educa- 
tional institutions. Perhaps the most remarkable development 
in the field of modern secondary education is the rapid growth 
of the high school library in recent years. The administrative 
department and the library are the only two agencies in the 
high school that come in contact with all of the pupils. The 
school library is not, as many people think, a separate and 
independent organization in the school. It is a definite part 
of the school system and has something to contribute to all 
of the departments of the school. 

The new Library Standards for Secondary Schools accred- 
ited by the Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools of 
the Southern States were adopted December 4, 1927. These 
Standards are to become effective at the beginning of the 
school year 1930-31. The demand for trained librarians is 
already greater than the supply. The question of where this 
additional training is to be given is a very important one. If 
given as summer school work in colleges and universities four 
summers will be required to meet type three in the Standards. 
The courses given must also follow the same requirements 
and give the same grade of work and the same amount of 



24 University of Florida 

credit as the established library schools is those taking the 
courses are to qualify for positions under the new Standards. 
For this reason the entrance requirements must be two years 
in an accredited college or the equivalent. 

The cost of books will probably not exceed $5.00. A fee 
of $1.50 will be charged for Cataloging I and $1.50 for Book 
Selection I. These fees will be used to help cover the expense 
of supplies and mimeographing. 

MUSIC DEPARTMENT 

The Department of Music has been much broadened for 
this summer. Besides the work in Public School Music and 
Glee Club, we are offering special opportunity for private les- 
sons in voice, piano and organ under most excellent teachers. 
As a culmination to the work of the Department, at the close 
of the Summer School a presentation of some popular light 
opera will be given. It is especially desired that good voices, 
both male and female, will try out at the beginning of the 
session for parts in this opera. 

Mrs. Alberta Murphree Worth will have charge of the 
Voice Department. Mrs. Worth received her musical train- 
ing at the Peabody Conservatory of Music in Baltimore, where 
she held a scholarship in voice under Baron Berthold, later 
studying with eminent teachers of this country and abroad. 
She studied for two seasons with Conrad Murphree, of Tampa, 
Florida, who is one of the most prominent voice teachers of 
the south. Mrs. Worth has had wide success as a teacher and 
concert artist, and the University is fortunate in having her 
this year for the fifth summer. The Department will offer 
two scholarships in voice this summer, one full scholarship 
paying tuition for two lessons per week for eight weeks, value 
$25.00, and one partial scholarship paying tuition for one les- 
son per week, value $12.50, the student to pay for one lesson 
per week. These scholarships will be awarded by competitive 
examination which will be held in the Auditorium immediate- 
ly following the first Assembly period. 

Mr. Claude Murphree, University organist, will give private 
lessons in organ by special arrangement. 



f 



Summer School 25 

courses in nursing education 

For the past three summers the University has offered 
courses in Nursing Education. These have proved very suc- 
cessful, and we are planning this summer to expand the work 
still more. Miss Alma Gault, of the Illinois Training School 
for Nurses, Chicago, will return this summer to offer the 
work. The courses are designed to train graduate nurses for 
administrative work in hospitals and training schools. This 
is a comparatively new line of work, and is gaining in pres- 
tige all over the United States. 

EXPENSES 

The cost of attending the Summer School is very moderate 
when compared with that at many other institutions. There is 
no charge for tuition and fees are very low. The combined 
cost for a room on the campus and meals in the Commons is 
only $40.00 for the session. The cost of meals alone is $32.00 
for the session. For laundry, incidentals and books, expendi- 
tures vary, but necessary expenditures are not very high. The 
estimate of the cost to a student living on the campus follows : 

High Low 

Tuition $00.00 $00.00 

Registration fee, residents of Florida 15.00 15.00 

Registration fee, non-residents of Florida 17.50 17.50 

Board and Lodging in Dormitory: 

In advance for the half term 21.00 21.00 

In advance for the term 40.00 40.00 

Board in Dormitory without lodging: 

In advance for the term 32.00 32.00 

In advance for the half term 17.00 17.00 

Board for children under eight: 

In advance for the term 16.00 16.00 

In advance for the half term 9.00 9.00 

Fees and Special Tuition: 

Fine Arts Courses per semester hour 4.00 4.00 

Biology laboratory fee 5.00 5.00 

Business Administration 211-212, per semester 

hour 1.00 1.00 

Chemistry laboratory fee 5.00 5.00 

Demonstration School fee 6.00 6.00 

Kindergarten fee 9.00 9.00 

Drawing fee (for materials used) 1.00 1.00 

General Natural Science fee 3.00 3.00 

Glee Club (music scores) 1.00 1.00 



26 University of Florida 

Library Science: Cataloging I fee 1.50 1.50 

Book Selection I fee 1.50 1.50 

Physical Education and Coaching fee 50 .50 

Physics laboratory fee 2.50 2.50 

Primary Handwork fee (for materials used).... 1.00 1.00 

Tests and Measurements fee 1.50 1.50 

Voice tuition per term (2 lessons per week) 25.00 25.00 

Voice tuition per term (1 lesson per week) 16.00 16.00 

Personal expenses: 

Books 8.00 3.00 

Incidentals 16.00 8.00 

Laundry 12.00 4.00 

For students living off the campus, the estimated expense 
is the same except that room and board will be somewhat 
higher. However, good rooms adjacent to the campus can be 
obtained at from $6.00 to $12.00 a month per student, and 
board off the campus will cost about $7.00 a week. (See pp. 
82-84.) 

Only students will be admitted to the dormitories, but 
children may take meals with their parents in the Commons 
at the rates given in the above list. All accounts are payable 
in advance. 

Money. — 1. Students may deposit their money with the 
Auditor of the University and draw it out as needed. 

2. The $5.00 sent to reserve dormitory room is not a 
registration fee. It is held as a breakage fee, and will be re- 
turned at close of term if no damage by student has been re- 
ported from dormitory. 

3. The registration fee is paid at the time of registration. 
Law College Fees. — The registration fee for those taking 

law is the same as that paid by other students. Any student 
in the Summer School who meets the entrance requirements 
of the College of Law will be permitted to take law courses 
without extra charge; but the combined academic and law 
work must not exceed nine semester hours. 

Refund of Fees. — 1. Fees paid in advance for room 
reservation will be refunded on application up to and including 
June 1st but not after that date. 

2. If by Friday of the first week students for any reason 
wish to withdraw from the University, the fees paid less a 
flat overhead fee of $3.00, will be refunded. After this time 
there will be no refund of any fee. 






Summer School 27 

3. A refund on the amount paid for room in the dormi- 
tories and board in the University Dining Hall, will be made 
on even weeks, and then only when cashier of commons is 
notified of date of departure. No refund will be made on frac- 
tions or parts of the week. 

What to Bring. — All dormitory rooms are comfortably 
furnished with single iron bedsteads and mattresses, chif- 
fonier or bureau, a table, washstand and chairs. All students 
are required to provide for themselves a pillow, bed linen, 
towels, and other things as they may want for their own spe- 
cial comfort and convenience. Dormitory rooms may be re- 
served at any time, and the deposit of $5.00 is payable by 
each student reserving dormitory space. This must be in 
hand before May 1st, or reservations made prior to that time 
will be cancelled and given to later applicants. 

Students who prefer to room off the campus, may secure 
good rooms and board at a reasonable rate. Only women stu- 
dents may be admitted to the dormitories. Married couples 
will not be permitted to room on the campus. 

Textbooks. — The University maintains a depository for 
the convenience of students where all necessary books may be 
had at list prices. Students may well bring English diction- 
aries and other useful books of reference. Those studying 
courses for intermediate or grammar grade teachers should 
bring copies of the State-adopted supplementary texts in the 
subjects to be studied. All teachers should be supplied with 
copies of the Florida State Course of Study. These may be 
secured from the Pepper Printing Co., Gainesville, Florida. 

Students in Education courses should bring with them pro- 
fessional books and textbooks related to the courses they plan 
to take. 

Scholarships. — County and Senatorial Scholarships. — 
At the meeting of the Legislature in 1923, a scholarship law 
was passed providing for two scholarships from each county 
in the State, one to the Teachers College of the University 
of Florida, and one to the School of Education at the State 
College for Women. At the 1927 session of the Legislature, 
this Act was amended to provide as many scholarships as 
there are legislators and senators. Each of these scholar- 
ships may be held for four years by the successful applicant 



•::» University of Florida 

and carries a stipend of $200.00 per year. These scholar- 
ships may be applied for Summer School, paying $50.00 per 
summer to regularly enrolled Teachers College students. Ex- 
aminations are held in each county on the first Thursday in 
June and third Thursday in September under the supervision 
of the county superintendent. A student to be considered as 
an applicant for a scholarship must present sixteen college 
entrance units. These scholarships are awarded upon competi- 
tive examinations to persons satisfying the entrance require- 
ments of the University of Florida and of the Florida State 
College for Women. A student v^ho desires to be considered 
as an applicant for a scholarship should make his desire 
known to his county superintendent before the first of May 
of each year. He should also write to the State Superintendent 
of Public Instruction at Tallahassee, telling him of his appli- 
cation for the scholarship. 

Voice Scholarships. — Two scholarships in Voice will be 
offered by competitive examination. See Music Department, 
p. 24. 

Loan Funds.— On June 27, 1927, the "Florida State Schol- 
arship Fund" was approved and established by the Student 
Council of the University of Florida Summer School, and on 
August 2, 1927, the "College Girls Club Scholarship Loan 
Fund" was approved and established by the College Girls Club 
of the University of Florida Summer School. In order to be 
eligible to share in these funds, the following regulations must 
be adhered to : 

(1) Applicant must be a teacher in the State of Florida. 

(2) Applicant must have a position for succeeding term 
of school. 

(3) Applicant must be in need of aid. 

(4) Applicant must apply for Scholarship Loan at least 
two weeks before opening of the Summer School. 

(5) Application must be made direct to Dean of Sum- 
mer School. 

(6) Applicant must be recommended by two school of- 
ficials of the county in which he or she is teaching at the time 
of application. 

(7) Loans are to be used for attendance at the Univer- 
sity of Florida Summer School. 



Summer School 29 

(8) Loan will be for a period not to exceed nine months 
from the date on which Summer School begins. 

(9) Loan is to bear interest at the rate of 87c, which 
will be added to the main fund. 

Blank form for application for a scholarship loan will be 
furnished upon application to the Director of the Summer 
School. 

Admission to Summer School. — Graduates of Senior 
High Schools who can offer sixteen entrance units, including 
three (3) of English, two (2) of mathematics, one (1) of his- 
tory and one (1) of Science, are admitted to the Freshman 
year of the Collegiate course. 

Students under 21 years of age who register for college 
courses must present their high school credits to the Entrance 
Committee at time of registration. 

Students are urged to pursue courses leading to a degree 
and to have themselves classified when they register. To facili- 
tate proper classification, all students are requested to bring 
with them a certified transcript of the work they have com- 
pleted in high school or in other colleges. Blanks conven- 
iently arranged for this data will be sent to prospective stu- 
dents upon application. 

Persons twenty-one or more years of age who cannot sat- 
isfy the entrance requirements, but who give evidence of abil- 
ity to profit by the courses they may take, may be admitted 
as "adult specials." 

No one under sixteen years of age will be admitted unless 
he is a graduate of a senior high school. 

There are no academic requirements for admission for 
those who register merely for review courses. 

Admission to Law College. — Students already admitted 
to the College of Law and those presenting sixty-eight (68) 
semester hours of academic college work acceptable for a de- 
gree, are eligible to attend. Those taking law for the first 
time should present certificates showing the completion of 
the above work. See p. 68 for description of courses in Law 
to be offered in the Summer School. 

Entrance Examinations. — For the large number of sum- 
mer school students who have not finished high school and, 
hence, do not have sufficient entrance units to enable them ta 



30 University of Florida 

enter the Freshman class, but yet are mature enough to profit 
by regular college work, entrance examinations will be ar- 
ranged. All students should file with the Dean of the Summer 
School not later than May 20th petitions for examinations in 
each subject in which they wish to be examined. 

Admission to Advanced Standing. — Office hours will be 
held daily by the Committee on Advanced Standing in Room 
105E, Language Hall, to evaluate the credits of those students 
who have attended other colleges and universities and who 
wish to receive advanced standing at the University of Flor- 
ida. This office will, however, not be open after Saturday, 
July 27, as this Committee will have other duties during the 
last week of the Summer School. Students are, therefore, 
cautioned not to delay attention to this important matter 
later than this date. 

DEGREES IN TEACHERS COLLEGE 

Degrees. — Courses are offered in Teachers College leading 
to the degrees of Bachelor of Arts in Education, Bachelor of 
Science in Education, and Bachelor of Science in Agricultural 
Education. In addition to these degrees, the Normal Diploma, 
sometimes called the L. L degree, is granted to those students 
who have finished the second year's work in Teachers College. 
There is considerable agitation in the United States at present 
to make two years of training beyond the high school a mini- 
mum requirement for teaching even in the elementary schools. 
All students are therefore urged by all means to complete 
the requirements which are necessary to receive the Normal 
Diploma. Students who expect to teach in high school should 
possess a Bachelor's Degree. 

Curricula. — On December 14, 1927, the Teachers College 
Faculty adopted four curricula for students in the Summer 
School, leading to the Normal Diploma and the bachelor's 
degrees. 

1. A curriculum leading to the Normal Diploma and 
bachelor's degree for those who expect to teach in the pri- 
mary grades. (See p. 32 for detailed curriculum.) 

2. A curriculum leading to the Normal Diploma and 
bachelor's degree for those who expect to teach in the inter- 
mediate grades. (See p. 33 for detailed curriculum.) 



Summer School 31 

3. A curriculum leading to the Normal Diploma and 
bachelor's degree for those who expect to teach in the Jun- 
ior High School. (See p. 34 for detailed curriculum.) 

4. A curriculum leading to the Normal Diploma and 
bachelor's degree for those who expect to teach in the Senior 
High School. (See p. 35 for detailed curriculum.) 

5. On May 7, 1928, an alternate curriculum leading to 
Bachelor of Science in Education was adopted. This curricu- 
lum is particularly designed for those who are specializing 
in Physical Education and Coaching. (See General Catalog 
for detailed curriculum.) 

Group Requirements. — Each student in the Freshman 
year must select two of the six groups of studies as given on 
p. 36. In order to receive the Bachelor of Science in Education, 
the student must select and complete the required courses in 
Group E. It is recommended that Group D (Mathematics) 
be selected by these students for their second group. 

Requirements for the Bachelor's Degrees. — The fol- 
lowing curriculum has been designed to meet the requirements 
for the degrees of Bachelor of Arts in Education and Bach- 
elor of Science in Education. (For the requirements for the 
Bachelor of Science in Agricultural Education degree, see 
General Catalog of the University.) 



32 



University of Florida 



CURRICULA 

Curriculum Leading to Normal Diploma and Bachelor's Degree for Those 
Who Expect to Teach in the Primary Grades 



Freshman Year 

♦Physical Education 101-102 1 1 

fMilitary Science 101-102.... 2 2 

English 101-102 3 3 

{General Natural Science.... 4 4 

IJGeneral Social Science .... 2 2 

Education 101 3 

Education 122 3 

Begin one Group (see p. 36) 3 3 



Junior Year 

Education 308 3 

Education 317 3 

Continue two Groups 6 6 

(See p. 36) 

Electives 6 6 



15 15 



Senior Year 



18 18 



Sophomore Year 



♦Physical Educ. 201-202 1 1 

tfMilitary Science 201-202.. 2 2 

English 201-202 3 3 

Education 121 3 

Education 207 3 

Education 203 3 

**Philosophy 201 3 

Courses in two Groups 6 6 

(See p. 36) 

18 18 



Education 403 3 Q 

Education 405 3 

Finish two Groups 6 6 

(See p. 36) 

Electives 6 6 

15 15 



♦Instead of Physical Education, women students may take Health 
Work (Education 103), which includes plays and games. 

fWomen students must take an equal number of credit hours in 
Drawing and Industrial Arts, or Education 123, for Military Science 
101-102. 

tfWomen students must take an equal number of hours in Public 
School Music. 

♦♦Students who expect to take the Normal Diploma must take Edu- 
cation 405 instead of Philosophy 201, in which case they must take 
Philosophy 201 in Junior Year. 

{Students who elect Group E are not required to take General Nat- 
ural Science. 

{{Students who elect Group F are not required to take General So- 
cial Science. 



Summer School 



33 



Curriculum Leading to Normal Diploma and Bachelor's Degree for Those 
Who Expect to Teach in the Intermediate Grades 



Freshman Year 

♦Physical Education 101-102 1 1 

fMilitary Science 101-102.... 2 2 

English 101-102 3 3 

JGeneral Natural Science.... 4 4 

JJGeneral Social Science 2 2 

Education 101 3 

Education 122 3 

Begin one group 3 3 

(See p. 36) 

18 18 

Sophomore Year 

♦Physical Education 201-202 1 1 

ttMilitary Science 201-202.. 2 2 

English 201-202 3 3 

Education 203 3 

Education 207 3 

**Philosophy 201 3 

Two Groups (see p. 36) 6 6 

Education 121 3 

18 18 



Junior Year 

Education 317 3 

Education 308 

Complete two Groups 6 

(See p. 36) 
Electives 6 



15 15 

Senior Year 

Education 403 3 

Education 405 3 

Complete two Groups 6 6 

(See p. 36) 

Electives 6 6 

15 15 



♦Instead of Physical Education, women students may take Health 
Work, which includes plays and games, 

fWomen students must take an equal number of credit hours in 
Drawyig and Industrial Arts, or Education 123, for Military Science 
101-102. 

tfWomen students must take an equal number of hours in Public 
School Music. 

** Students who expect to take the Normal Diploma must take Edu- 
cation 405 instead of Philosophy 201, in which case they must take 
Philosophy 201 in Junior Year. 

JStudents who elect Group E are not required to take General Nat- 
ural Science. 

JlStudents who elect Group F are not required to take General So- 
cial Science. 



34 



University of Florida 



Curriculum Leading to Normal Diploma and Bachelor's Degree for Those 
Who Expect to Teach in the Junior High School 



Freshman Year 

Physical Education 101-102.. 1 1 

Military Science 101-102 2 2 

Education 101-102 3 3 

English 101-102 3 3 

JGeneral Natural Science.... 4 4 

$JGeneral Social Science 2 2 

Begin one Group (see p. 36) 3 3 



19 19 



Sophomore Year 



Physical Education 201-202.. 1 

Military Science 201-202 2 

Education 203 3 

Philosophy 201 3 

Education 207 

English 201-202 3 

Education (this must be 405 

if student expects Normal 

Diploma) 

Continue Group elected 1st 

year 3 

Begin second Group 3 

(See p. 36) 



18 18 



Junior Year 

Education 301 3 

Education 408 3 

Two Groups (see p. 36) 6 G 

Electives 6 6 



15 15 



Senior Year 



Education 403 3 

Education 405 3 

Education 401 3 

Complete two Groups 6 6 

(See p. 36) 

Electives 3 6 



IT 



15 15 



{Students who elect Group E are not required to take General Nat- 
ural Science. 

tJStudents who elect Group F are not required to take General So- 
cial Science. 

NOTE: Students who expect to be recommended as principals must 
take Education 308. 



Summer School 



35 



Curriculum Leading to Normal Diploma and Bachelor's Degree for Those 
Who Expect to Teach in the Senior High School 



Freshman Year 

Physical Education 101-102 1 1 

Military Science 101-102 .... 2 2 

{General Natural Science.... 4 4 

JJGeneral Social Science 2 2 

English 101-102 3 3 

Education 101-102 3 3 

Begin one Group 3 3 

(See p. 36) 



Junior Year 

Education 301 3 

Education 408 3 

Two Groups (see p. 36) -6 6 

Electives 6 6 



15 15 



Senior Year 



18 18 



Sophomore Year 



Physical Education 201-202 1 1 

Military Science 201-202 2 2 

Education 203 3 

Philosophy 201 3 

Education 207 3 

Education 3 

English 201-202 3 3 

Two Groups (see p. 36) 6 6 

18 18 



Education 401 3 

Education 403 3 

Education 405 3 

Two Groups (see p. 36) 6 6 

Electives 3 6 

15 15 



IStudents who elect Group E are not required to take General Nat- 
ural Science, 

{{Students who elect Group F are not required to take General So- 
cial Science. 

NOTE: Students who expect to be recommended las principals must take 
Education 308. i 



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36 



University of Florida 



GROUPS 

Each student must select two of the following groups of 
studies and complete the required courses in those two groups. 
For the Bachelor of Science in Education degree, Group E 
must be selected and completed. 



A — Ancient Languages 


B — Modern Languages 


C— English 


Latin 101-1021 18 
Latin 201-202 )> sem. 
Latin 203-204J hrs. 


Fr. 21-22 1 
Fr. 101-102 1- 
Fr. 201-202 J 




Eng. 101-102 ■ 
Eng. 103-104 22 
Eng. 201-202 [ sem. 
Eng. 301-302 J hrs. 




or 
Span. 21-22 ] 


18 




Span. 101-102^ 


>■ sem. 


Foreign Lang., 






Span. 201-202J 


hrs. 


6 sem. hrs. 


12 




or 




Eng. or For- 


sem. 




Germ. 21-22 ] 
Germ. 101-102 
Germ. 201-202]^ 




eign Lang., 
6 sem. hrs. 


hrs. 














D — Mathematics 


E — Natural Science 


F — Social Science 


Math. 101-102] 


Biol. 101 1 


Hist. 101-102 ' 




Math. 331 \ 18 


Bot. 101-102 32 


Hist. 301-302 




Math. 251-252 sem. 
Math. 568 hrs. 


Biol. 106 1-sem. 


Hist. 303-304 


36 


Chem. 101-102 hrs. 


Sociology, 6 


[ sem. 




Phys. 203-204 J 


hrs. 
Econ. 201-202 
Pol. Sci. 101- 

102 


hrs. 


G — Commercial 






Education 






Econ. 101-102 1 






Bus. Ad. 81- 








82 








Bus. Ad. 103- 








104 


29 






Bus. Ad. 211- 


}■ sem. 






212 


hrs. 






Bus. Ad. 401 








402 








English 355 









Regulations : 

1. A total of 132 semester-hours is required for gradua- 
tion. 

2. In case a student is exempt from Military Science 101- 
102 and 201-202, he must substitute an equal number of 
hours from other departments. 

Requirements for the Normal Diploma. — A student 
who finishes the first two years of any one of the foregoing 
curricula may receive the Normal Diploma (sometimes called 



Summer School 37 

the L. I. Degree), except that Education 405 must be taken 
before completing this work. 

Degrees from Other Colleges 

For a description of the courses leading to degrees in all 
the other colleges on the campus, see the General Catalog of 
the University, or write to the Dean of the College in which 
you are interested. 

OPPORTUNITIES FOR GRADUATE STUDY 

As stated above, any course that is numbered above 300 
may be counted as a minor subject. Any course that is num- 
bered above 500 may be counted as a major. As a usual thing, 
undergraduate students are not permitted to register for 
courses that are numbered above 500. 

A number of courses have already been arranged that may 
count as majors. Efforts will be made to arrange still others 
upon request. If the major work wished is not listed, re- 
quests for it should be made at an early date. 

Requirements for the Master's Degree. 

1. A candidate for the Master's Degree must be in resi- 
dence for at least one scholastic year, or four summer terms, 
devoting his entire time during this period to study and re- 
search. 

2. In addition to registration for the courses which a 
graduate student wishes to take, he must have an application 
blank properly filled out and presented to the Chairman of 
the Graduate Committee not later than July 10th. These 
blanks may be secured at the time of registration from Dean 
J. N. Anderson, Chairman of the Committee on Graduate 
Studies. 

3. He must complete one major and two minors. A major 
is a twelve semester-hour course of rank above the Senior 
Class. A minor is a six semester-hour course of rank above 
the Sophomore Class. 

4. A thesis is required of all candidates. This thesis 
should be closely allied to the major subject. The title of the 
thesis should be submitted by the end of the first summer. 
The thesis itself should be completed and submitted by July 



38 University of Florida 

17th of the summer session in which the student expects to 
receive his degree. 

5. All students vv^ho hold the bachelor's degree are urged 
to register for Education 527. 

6. Passing grade for graduate students is B. 
Residence Requirement. — In order to receive a degree, 

or Normal Diploma, from Teachers College, students must 
have spent at least one scholastic year in residence (three 
summer schools may be considered equivalent to a year in 
residence), and must have completed thirty (30) semester 
hours of college w^ork in residence. In the case of candidates 
for the Normal Diploma twenty-seven (27) semester hours 
in residence will satisfy this requirement. These hours in 
residence, except in one condition, must be the last which one 
takes immediately prior to graduation. The exception is the 
case of students who take their degrees by attendance at the 
Summer School, in which case twelve (12), but never more, 
semester-hours of work by correspondence may be taken dur- 
ing the ten (10) months just prior to the Summer Session in 
which the degree is received. In every case, students must 
have completed thirty (30) semester-hours of work in resi- 
dence and must have been in attendance at the summer session 
or scholastic term immediately prior to the reception of a de- 
gree. 

Amount of Correspondence Work Permitted. — Stu- 
dents are not permitted to complete more than fifty per cent 
(50%) of the work toward a degree by correspondence. 

Correspondence study courses may not at any time be 
offered to satisfy the residence requirements. 

Students will not be permitted to take work by correspond- 
ence while they are in residence without the consent of the 
Dean of Teachers College. 

CREDIT 

Summer School Credit. — The schedule of classes has 
been so arranged that a full semester's work may be completed 
in each course. The student will find the amount of credit 
which will be given for each course in the description of the 
various courses. 



Summer School 39 

No high school credit is given, but students taking work of 
pre-college rank may arrange for entrance examinations in 
these subjects, if they wish to enter the University. 

MAXIMUM AND MINIMUM HOURS 

I. For College Students. — Without special permission 
of the Teachers College Faculty, college students must take 
courses aggregating as many as 7 semester hours, but not 
more than 9 semester hours credit. Under some circumstances, 
students may petition the faculty to waive the above regula- 
tion. The following regulation governs such cases: 

1. Students must first petition the Teachers College Fac- 
ulty for permission to register for more than the usual amount 
of work, presenting this petition to the Dean of the Summer 
School. 

2. Before being allowed to register for more than 9 se- 
mester hours credit, the student must show that he has at- 
tained an average of B in the term or Summer School imme- 
diately preceding, in which case he may be permitted to take 
11 semester hours credit. In like manner, the student must 
show an average of A before he will be permitted to take as 
much as 12 semester hours credit. The faculty reserves the 
right to reduce the amount of credit received to 9 semester 
hours even if the subjects should be passed, unless the same 
high averages, respectively, are maintained. 

3. Those who wish more than the required amount of 
work must have a thorough physical examination by the Uni- 
versity physician. 

4. Students will not be permitted to register for more 
than the usual number of hours until their petitions have been 
granted. 

5. On account of the large number of regularly registered 
students in the classes, it has been found necessary to dis- 
courage visiting. Therefore, the faculty has ruled that stu- 
dents wishing to attend classes as visitors may be admitted 
only upon the presentation of a permission card issued by the 
Dean. 

II. For Students in Review Courses Preparatory to 
THE Teachers Examinations. — Students preparing for the 



40 University of Florida 

First Grade Certificate may register for Advanced Algebra, 
General Biology, Elementary Psychology, Rhetoric and Gen- 
eral History, an aggregate of 25 hours. 

Students preparing for the Second Grade Certificate may 
register for Elementary Agriculture, Civics, First Year Alge- 
bra, Arithmetic, Elementary United States History, and seven 
hours of electives, an aggregate of 25 hours. 

Students preparing for the Third Grade Certificate may 
register for Spelling, Constitution of the United States, Arith- 
metic, Grammar, Composition, Geography, Elementary United 
States History and Education 101, an aggregate of 27 hours. 

CERTIFICATES 

Graduate State Certificates. — Graduates of the Teach- 
ers College are granted Graduate State Certificates w^ithout 
further examination, provided that one-fifth of their work 
has been devoted to professional training and provided that 
they have the recommendation of the Teachers College fac- 
ulty. It is well for the student to note that a Graduate State 
Certificate permits him to teach only those subjects that are 
listed on such certificate, and that only those subjects will 
be placed on his certificate in which he has specialized in his 
college course. This will ordinarily mean that a subject must 
have been pursued at least two years in college before a cer- 
tificate to teach that subject will be granted. Applicants for 
the Graduate State Certificate must apply to Supt. W. S. 
Cawthon, Tallahassee, for application blanks. 

Graduate State Certificates may be converted into Life 
Certificates by "presenting satisfactory evidence of having 
taught successfully for a period of twenty-four months under 
a Graduate State Certificate, and presenting endorsement of 
three holders of Life State, Life Graduate State, or Life Pro- 
fessional Certificates." 

Requirements for Other Teachers' Certificates. — The fol- 
lowing are the subjects in which applicants for Third Grade 
Certificates will be examined: Orthography, reading, arith- 
metic, English Grammar, composition, geography, United 
States history, including the Constitution of the United States^ 
physiology and theory and practice of teaching. 



Summer School 41 

Applicants for Second Grade Certificates will be examined 
in the subjects prescribed for the Third Grade Certificate, and 
in Agriculture, Civil Government, and Algebra to Quadratics. 
"Applicants for Second Grade Certificates who submit unex- 
pired Third Grade Certificates as parts of their examinations 
may be exempt from tests on Orthography, reading and physi- 
ology." 

In addition to the subjects prescribed for the Second Grade 
Certificate, applicants for First Grade Certificates must be 
examined in Algebra, quadratics and beyond. Biology, Psy- 
chology, General History and Rhetoric, and by submitting an 
unexpired Second Grade Certificate may be exempt from all 
subjects covered by that certificate, provided the grades at- 
tained on the Second Grade Certificate are equal to those re- 
quired for the First Grade Certificate. 

REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE EXTENSION OF 
CERTIFICATES 

When credit for the extension of certificate is desired, 
regulations in addition to those mentioned under the heading 
"Maximum and Minimum Hours" must be observed. 

1. Every applicant for extension must take at least a 
four-hour course in Education (but not in Pedagogy) or 
Psychology, in order to satisfy the professional requirements 
for extension of certificato. 

2. The repetition of courses in Education or Psychology 
previously taken will not satisfy the professional require- 
ment for extension. 

3. Students who desire an extension of a third grade cer- 
tificate may not register for orthography, arithmetic, English 
grammar, English composition, geography. United States his- 
tory, and physiology. 

4. Students who desire an extension of a second grade 
certificate may not register in the subjects enumerated in the 
preceding paragraph, or in agriculture, civics and first year 
algebra. 

5. Students who desire extension of a first grade cer- 
tificate may not register in the subjects enumerated in the 
preceding two paragraphs or for second year algebra, biol- 
ogy, elementary psychology, general history and rhetoric. 



42 University of Florida 

6. No applicant for extension shall take less than 15 
hours per week without special permission, and at least 10 
hours of this amount shall be in courses not covered by the 
certificate held, or by courses previously taken. 

7. No student will be granted an extension of certificate 
who does not apply for the same on the student REGISTRA- 
TION CARD. A list of those who have applied will be posted 
on the Bulletin Board in Peabody Hall not later than July 1 
for correction, and no student will be recommended for ex- 
tension of certificate whose name does not appear on this list 
by August 1. Students should register under exactly the 
same name that appears on the certificate which they wish 
to have extended. 

8. An extra fee of one dollar will be charged for any 
change of registration after Friday of the first week. 

9. To be granted extension, students must be recom- 
mended for diligence and accomplishment. Usually a passing 
grade is required. 

10. Certificates to be extended must be sent by Registered 
mail to W. S. Cawthon, State Superintendent of Public In- 
struction, at Tallahassee, Florida, immediately after the Sum- 
mer Session. Those who expect to take the state examinations 
immediately after the Summer School, however, should retain 
their certificates until they have adjusted their exemption:* 
with the county superintendent. They should then ^iid their 
certificates as directed above. This must be done as soon as 
possible, as there is a time limit and delay may cause the 
student to lose the extension. 

The Summer School faculty will not recommend students 
for extension of certificate for repeating courses which they 
have taken in previous summer sessions, or those who are 
not pursuing courses in order to raise the grade of certificate 
already held. At the end of the term the faculty will recom- 
mend for extension those that meet the above conditions. 

GENERAL DIRECTIONS FOR REGISTRATION 

Please stop, look, listen, and observe the following direc- 
tions! It will be a great time-saver to you and your instruc- 
tors if you will read and understand these directions before 
you come to register. 



Summer School 43 

1. Get your registration right the first time. Remember 
the proverb, "Haste makes waste." More than 500 students 
every year find it necessary to re-register. Don't hurry. Be 
accurate. Make up your mind to take not less than one nor 
more than three hours in registering. 

2. Study the registration blanks. 

3. Fill out the REGISTRATION CARDS II and III in 
complete detail DOWN TO the word "COURSES." Answer 
every question if possible. 

4. Study the Bulletin and the daily program until you 
know or at least think you know, what subjects you desire to 
study. See that there are no conflicts in your class hours. 

5. Consult freely with members of the faculty about your 
schedule. 

6. Students who are taking courses that require observa- 
tion in the Demonstration School should reserve some time 
for this purpose between 8:30 and 11:30 A. M. 

7. After you have decided which subjects you expect to 
take, list them on REGISTRATION CARD No. I under the 
words "TRIAL COURSES." 

8. Do not register for more than 9 semester hours col- 
lege credit. 

9. Have this trial study list approved by the Dean of 
the college in which you are registering — Teachers, Arts and 
Science, Commerce and Journalism, Agriculture, etc. 

10. You are now ready to fill out the INSTRUCTOR'S 
COURSE CARDS. Make out one of these cards for each sub- 
ject you are taking. For instance, if you are taking three sub- 
jects, you will need three Course Cards, four subjects, four 
cards, etc. 

11. Secure the signature on your REGISTRATION CARD 
of each of your instructors and leave with him the INSTRUC- 
TOR'S COURSE CARD made out for the subject which he 
teaches. 

12. Be sure you have your registration as you want it. Do 
not change courses unnecessarily. 

13. When your trial courses are approved by the Dean and 
ALL your instructors, fill in the bottoms of cards II and III 
and card IV EXACTLY in same order and spaces as on card I. 

14. An extra fee of one dollar will be charged for any 
change in registration after Friday of the first week. Drop- 



44 University of Florida 

ping a course, adding a course, or exchanging one course for 
another, each constitutes a change. 

15. Graduate students register with the Chairman of the 
Graduate Committee in Language Hall. 

When and Where to Register. — Students who live in 
or near Gainesville should register on Friday or Saturday, 
June 7th and 8th, in the Dean's office in Peabody Hall. 
Those who can reach Gainesville on the morning trains on 
Monday, June 10th, should register on that day to relieve the 
congestion on Tuesday, June 11th. All others should register 
on Tuesday, June 11th. No effort will be made to meet 
trains or to transfer trunks on Sunday. In fact, students are 
urged not to arrive on Sunday, as the dormitory rooms will not 
be open until Monday. 















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Summer School 47 

COURSES OF INSTRUCTION 

The following abbreviations used in connection with the 
courses, indicate the buildings in which the courses are held, 
and the numbers after such abbreviations indicate rooms in 
which they are held, for instance P. 112 means Peabody 112. 

A — Agricultural Building; S — Science; P — Peabody; E — 
Engineering; L — Language; G — Gymnasium; C — Chemistry; 
H — Horticulture. 

AGRICULTURE 

Elementary Agriculture. — A general course in agricul- 
ture. — This will introduce the student to the study of soils, 
plants, common diseases of plants, insects, farm crops, domes- 
tic animals and the like. Methods of teaching agriculture in 
rural schools will be stressed. Review. Extension credit only. 
M. Th. 10:00 A. 106 (13). Mr. Ritchey. 

Agronomy 301. — Soils, — The nature and properties of the 
soil as related to fertility and crop production. (Prerequisite 
Chemistry 101-102.) 5 semester hours credit. Daily 11:00; 
Lab. M. W. 1:00-5.00. A. 106 (13). Mr. Ritchey. 

Animal Husbandry 305. — Animal Nutrition. — Feeds, 
feeding and management of farm live stock. (Prerequisites 
Animal Husbandry 101, 201.) 2 semester hours credit. M. 
T. Th. F. 9:00. A. 103 (17). Mr. Martin. 

Dairying 305. — Advanced Dairy Farming. — Testing milk 
products, butter, ice cream, and cheese making; selection, 
feeding and management of a dairy herd ; herd and advanced 
registry testing. 3 semester hours credit. M. W. Th. S. 10:00; 
Lab. T. Th. 1:00-3:00. A. 103 (17). Mr. Martin. 

Horticulture 305. — Citrus Culture. — The citrus grove; 
site and soil selection; preparation, planting and manage- 
ment; selection of varieties and stocks, and the use of cover 
crops. (Prerequisite Horticulture 202.) 3 semester hours 
credit. M. W. Th. F. 8 :00. Lab. T. 1 :00-5 :00. A. 205. Mr. 
Lord. 

Horticulture 308. — Deciduous Fruits. — Peaches, pears, 
grapes, pecans, and other deciduous fruits with special refer- 
ence to Florida conditions, culture, varieties, insects, diseases,. 



48 University of Florida 

etc. (Prerequisites: Horticulture 101, 102.) 3 semester 
hours credit. M. W. Th. F. 9:00. Lab. Th. 1:00-5:00. A. 205. 
Mr. Lord. \ 

Poultry Husbandry 202. — Farm Poultry. — Poultry as a 
modest sideline on the farm. Breeds and varieties; location 
and construction of buildings, feeding and management; in- 
cubation, breeding, rearing, care of adult birds on the farm. 
11/2 semester hours credit. M. W. 12:00. Lab. F. 1:00-3:00. 
H. 205. Mr. Sanborn. 

Poultry Husbandry 302. — Commercial Poultry Keep- 
ing. — Incubation, breeding, rearing, spring and summer work, 
culling, farm grown feeds and pastures, marketing. 3 semes- 
ter hours credit. M. W. Th. S. 10:00. Lab. T. Th. 1:00-3:00. 
H. 205. Mr. Sanborn. 

BIOLOGY 

General Biology. — General introduction to the structure 
and classification with special reference to the flowering plants, 
the insects and vertebrates. Designed to prepare for state ex- 
aminations. Three recitations and three laboratory periods 
per week. No credit but arrangements may be made for a 
college entrance examination. M. W. Th. 10:00. S. 111. Lab- 
oratory M. T. F. 3 :00-5 :00. Mr. Sherman. 

Biology 101. — Principles of Animal Biology. — An intro- 
duction to the subject matter and principles of zoology. 5 se- 
mester hours credit. Daily 8:00 S. 101. Laboratory to be 
arranged. Mr. Rogers. 

Biology 104. — Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy. — A 
comparative study of the structure of the main classes of ver- 
tebrates. 5 semester hours credit. Daily 9:00 S. 111. Labora- 
tory to be arranged. Mr. Sherman. 

Biology 106. — Genetics and Evolution. — An introduction 
to the study of variation, selection, and inheritance in ani- 
mals. 3 semester hours credit. Daily 11 :00. S. 101. Mr. 
Rogers. 

BUSINESS administration 

(See Economics) 



Summer School 49 

chemistry 

Chemistry 101-102. — General Chemistry. — A course de- 
signed for those who wish to prepare for science teaching in 
the high school. This course can be taken by those who have 
never taken chemistry, or by those who have had a course 
before and wish to review it. There will be two courses in 
General Chemistry, one embracing non-metals and one em- 
bracing metals. The former is a prerequisite to the latter. 

Chemistry 101. — First Semester. A study of the non- 
metals. 5 semester hours credit. Daily 9:00. C. 212. Lab. M. 
T. Th. F. 2:00-4:00. Mr. Beisler. 

Chemistry 102. — Second Semester. A study of the metals. 
5 semester hours credit. Daily 11 :00. C. 110. Lab. M. T. Th. F. 
2:00-4:00. Mr. Jackson. 

Chemistry 201. — Qualitative Analysis. — Lectures and lab- 
oratory course in this subject offered to those who have had 
general chemistry. 3 semester hours credit. T. Th. 2:00. C. 
110. Lab. M. T. Th. F. 2:00-5:00. Mr. Jackson. 

Chemistry 251. — Organic Chemistry. — This course is de- 
signed to present the fundamentals of chemistry of the com- 
pounds of carbon. The work in the classroom is presented by 
means of lectures, quizzes, and oral and written recitations. 
5 semester hours credit. Daily 11 :00. C. 212. Laboratory 2:00- 
6 :00. Days to be arranged. Mr. Beisler. 

Chemistry 301. — Volumetric Analysis. — A laboratory 
course offered to those who have had qualitative analysis. 3 
semester hours credit. Laboratory 2:00-5:00, days to be ar- 
ranged. 12 hours per week. Mr. Jackson. 

Chemistry 302. — Gravimetric Analysis. — A laboratory 
course offered to those who have had qualitative analysis. 3 
semester hours credit. Laboratory 2:00-5:00, days to be ar- 
ranged. 12 hours per week. Mr. Jackson. 

Chemistry 513. — Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. The 
theory, practice and applications of colloid chemistry. 3 se- 
mester hours credit. 4 hours of lecture and 4 hours of lab- 
oratory per week. Hours to be arranged. Mr. Beisler, 



50 University of Florida 

Chemistry 551. — Chemical Research. — Organic Chem- 
istry ; Inorganic Chemistry ; Physical Chemistry, and Agricul- 
tural Chemistry. 5 to 10 semester hours. Hours and place to 
be arranged. Messrs. Beisler and Jackson. 

CIVICS 

Civics. — Designed to prepare students for the state teach- 
ers examination on the Constitution of the United States and 
for the examination in Civil Government in the Second Grade 
Certificate. Special attention will be given to school laws of 
Florida and to local, town, city, and county governments. Re- 
view. No credit except for extension of third grade certifi- 
cate. Three sections : 

Section 1. M. Th. 8 :00. L. 307. Mr. Turner. 

Section 2. W. F. 12 :00. L. 307. Mr. Turner. 

Section 3. M. W. 10:00. L. 307. Mr. Trottman. 

ATHLETIC COACHING 

Coaching 101-102.— Football. — Theory and Practice.— The 
course will include the theories of fundamentals, their de- 
velopment and relation to team play, with special emphasis 
laid upon drills to perfect fundamentals. The several styles 
of offense and defense, with consideration of their special 
strength and weakness; generalship and strategy; train- 
ing, conditioning and player's equipment will be discussed. 
Special emphasis will be given to forward-pass attack and 
its defense. The practical work will include punting, place- 
kicking, drop-kicking, kick-off and forward passing; tackling 
dummy and charging sled ; special drill for linemen, ends and 
backs ; interference and team work ; fundamental plays, break 
plays, and signal systems. Textbook, "Coaching," by Rockne. 
4 semester hours credit. M. T. W. Th. F. 8:00. Laboratory M. 
W. F. 4:00-6:00. Basketball Court. Mr. Bachman. 

Note: Students in this course are required to furnish 
their own uniforms or they may rent them from the Athletic 
Department. A charge of $5.00 will be made for such equip- 
ment. When this is returned $3.00 of this amount will be re- 
funded. 

Coaching 111-112 (formerly 104). — Basketball (men). — 
The fundamentals of the game; passing, receiving, pivots. 



Summer School 51 

shooting ; the defense, of the individual, of the- team, the five 
man defense showing the different types employed and em- 
phasizing the most successful. The offense, as applied to the 
individual, team offense, different types employed, special at- 
tention given to the types of offense to break through a five 
man defense. Practices to employ in developing a strong of- 
fense. Textbook, "My Basketball Bible," by Forrest C. Allen. 
4 semester hours credit. M. T. W. Th. F. 9:00. Laboratory 
M. W. F. 2:00-4:00. Basketball Court. Mr. Higgins. 

Note: Students in this course may furnish their own 
equipment or rent it from the Athletic Department for $3.00. 
When it is returned, $2.00 of this amount will be refunded. 

Coaching 113-114 (formerly 105). — Basketball (women). 
— The fundamentals of the game; passing, receiving, the 
pivots, shooting; the defense, of the individual guards; cen- 
tres; team work on defense. The offense, individual play, of- 
fense on team work, guards, centres and forwards. Practices 
employed to develop a strong offense. Given as an aid to 
coaches of girls' teams. 1 semester hour credit. M, W. Th. 
S. 10:00. Basketball court. Mr. Higgins. 

Coaching 121 (formerly 103).— Track and Field.— The 
theory of starting, finishing, sprinting, distance-running, 
hurdling, high and broad jumping, pole vaulting, shot putting, 
discus and javelin throwing. Demonstrations will be given in 
connection with lectures. Textbooks, "Spalding Athletic Li- 
brary, Buff Series, 500B, 501B, 502B, 503B, 504B, 505B. 
506B." Price 50c each. 2 semester hours credit. T. Th. 4:00- 
6:00. Basketball Court. Mr. Higgins. 

Coaching 131 (formerly 102).— Baseball.— The funda- 
mentals of the game as applied to the individual ; the defensive 
game, the battery ; the basemen ; the outfielders ; the defensive 
team as a unit with emphasis upon the finer points of "inside" 
defense; the offensive game; the batsman, the runner, the 
base coaches ; types of offense to be used in particular stages 
of the game ; the team coach and his duties to his team. Text- 
book, "The Science of Baseball," by Byrd Douglas. 2 semes- 
ter hours credit. T. Th. 2 :00-4:00. Basketball Court. Mr. 
Bachman. 

Note: Students in this course are required to furnish 
their own uniforms or they may rent them from the Athletic 



52 University of Florida 

Department. A charge of $5.00 will be made for such equip- 
ment. When this is returned $3.00 of this amount will be re- 
funded. 

DRAWING, CONSTRUCTIVE WORK AND INDUSTRIAL ART 

Drawing 101. — Grades I-III, inclusive. Application of Art 
to everyday studies ; construction work and design ; paper cut- 
ting, illustration; free-hand drawing; nature study in colors. 
1 semester hour credit. Two sections: 

Section 1. M. W. Th. S. 10:00. P. 302. Miss Ballard. 

Section 2. M. T. Th. F. 3 :00. P. 302. Miss Ballard. 

Drawing 102. — Grades IV-VII, inclusive. Design and ap- 
plied design ; line and shade ; theory of color and study of 
water colors; nature study and still life in color; notebooks 
kept up to date each week. 1 semester hour credit. M. T. Th. 
F. 2:00. P. 302. Miss Ballard. 

Drawing 201. — A course in craft and design embodying 
a thorough course in color and design applied to articles con- 
structed of wood, tin, etc.; dying, block-printing and other 
forms of craft work suitable for junior and senior high 
schools. 1 semester hour credit. M. T. Th. F. 9:00. P. 302. 
Miss Ballard. 

ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Economics 101 (Business Administration lOlE). — Eco- 
nomic History of England. — A survey of economic history; 
the evolution of capitalistic economy in England; the origin 
and development of the wage system; the Industrial Revolu- 
tion; the growth of British trade; the relation of economic 
development to political policy ; the effect of England's Indus- 
trial progress on the United States. 3 semester hours credit. 
Daily 8:00. L. 204. Mr. Myers. 

Economics 102 (Business Administration 102E). — 
Economic History of the United States. — The industrial devel- 
opment of America ; the exploitation of natural resources ; the 
history of manufacturing, of banking, of trade, of transporta- 
tion, etc.; the evolution of industrial centers; the historical 
factors contributing to the industrial growth of the United 
States. 3 semester hours credit. Daily 9:00. L. 202. Mr. 
Matherly. 



Summer School 53 

Economics 103 (Business Administration 103E). — Eco- 
nomic Geography. — This course deals with the adjustments 
to natural environment which man makes in his effort to se- 
cure a living. The subject-matter consists of climate, soils, 
products of land and sea, natural divisions of the world, trade 
routes, and commercial centers. 3 semester hours credit. 
Daily 8 :00. L. 202. Mr. Matherly. 

Economics 201 (Business Administration 201E). — 
Principles of Economics. — The purpose of this course is to 
give the student a general understanding of present day eco- 
nomic organization. A brief analysis is made of production, 
distribution and consumption. Chief consideration is given to 
the functions of economic institutions. 3 semester hours 
credit. Daily 9:00. L. 204. Mr. Myers. 

Economics 202 (Business Administration 202E). — 
Principles of Economics. — This is a continuation of Eco- 
nomics 201. Attention is devoted chiefly to the principles gov- 
erning value and market price. With the permission of the 
instructor, students may take this course along with Eco- 
nomics 201. 3 semester hours credit. Daily 11 :00. L. 202. 
Mr. Matherly. 

Economics 302 (Business Administration 302E). — Ele- 
ments of Statistics. — An introduction to statistics; brief con- 
sideration of statistical theory; collection, classification, pre- 
sentation of economic data; construction of graphs and 
charts; study of index numbers; problems of statistical re- 
search. Each student is required to complete one or more 
projects in statistical investigation. 3 semester hours credit. 
Daily 11:00. L. 201. Mr. Myers. 

Business Administration 81. — Office Management. — Of- 
fice organization; office functions; duties of office manager; 
the modern secretary in relation to office operation. Profi- 
ciency in the use of the typewriter will be required. Typing 
room with typewriters will be provided for the use of stu- 
dents. (Laboratory fee to be arranged.) 1 lecture and 4 lab- 
oratory hours. 1 semester hour credit. L. 201. 

Business Administration 82. — Office Management. — Of- 
fice appliances; handling correspondence; office records; 



54 University of Florida 

methods of filing. The student will be required to attain pro- 
ficiency in shorthand. (Laboratory fee to be arranged.) 1 lec- 
ture and 4 laboratory hours. 1 semester hour credit. L. 201. 

Business Administration 211-212. — Principles of Ac- 
counting. — Lectures, problems, and laboratory practice. An 
introductory study of the underlying principles of double en- 
try records; basic types of records and reports; accounting 
procedure and technique ; the outstanding features of partner- 
ships and corporations ; the form and content of the balance 
sheet and the statement of profit and loss. This course will 
meet two hours a day. Business Administration 211 will be 
completed the first four weeks and Business Administration 
212 the second four. Laboratory fee $1.00 per semester hour. 
6 semester hours credit. Daily 8:00 to 10:00. L. 201. Mr. 
Ward. 

EDUCATION 

Any 4 or 6 hour course in Education or Psychology will 
meet the professional requirement for the extension of certifi- 
cates. Students in Education courses should bring with them 
professional books and textbooks related to the courses they 
plan to take. 

Education 101. — Students who have not taken any course 
in Education should begin with this one. The purpose of the 
course is to give an introduction to the study of classroom 
teaching. What makes a good teacher, the improvement of 
personality, how to study, the art of questioning, reflective 
thinking, elimination of waste in classroom management, the 
importance of education, such questions as these will be cov- 
ered by the course. 3 semester hours credit. Eight sections; 

Section 1. Daily 8 :00. L. 5. Mr. Altstetter. 

Section 2. Daily 9:00. H. 207. Mr. Ackley. 

Section 3. Daily 11 :00. P. 4. Mrs. Altstetter. 

Section 4. Daily 12 :00. H. 215. Mrs. Branning. 

Sections. Daily 8:00. H. 215. Mrs. Branning. 

Section 6. Daily 9:00. H. 215. Mrs. Branning. 

Section 7. Daily 11:00. P. 101. Mr. Tolbert. 

Section 8. Designed for those who expect to teach in the 
lower grades and are preparing to take the State teachers' 
examinations. Daily 12:00. P. 206. Mr. Mears. '^-^ - - - 



Summer School 55 

Education 102. — History and Principles of Education. — A 
study of the historical background of education, and of the 
fundamental principles which should guide educational pro- 
cedure and give appreciation of educational conditions of 
today. 3 semester hours credit. Daily 12:00. L. 209. Mr. 



Education 103. — Health Education. — Conditions and 
forces that affect the physical and mental vigor of children, 
youth and teachers, and relate the school to the health of the 
home and community; the teacher's health; sanitation of 
school buildings; hygienic equipment; common diseases and 
physical defects; mental hygiene; play and recreation; com- 
munity hygiene; teaching of health education in elementary 
and high schools; the Florida health program. 3 semester 
hours credit. Three sections : 

Section 1. For teachers in primary and middle elementary 
grades. Daily 9:00. A. 303. Miss Shaver. 

Section 2. Same as Section 1. Daily 11 :00. A. 303. Miss 
Shaw. 

Section 3. For principals and teachers not included in Sec- 
tions 1 and 2. Daily 12:00. A. 303. Miss Shaw. 

Education 121. — Primary Methods. — Arithmetic, Lan- 
guage, Writing and Spelling in the first three grades. Pre- 
requisites or parallel courses: Education 101, Education 207, 
or any methods course. 3 semester hours credit. Three sec- 
tions : 

Section 1. For teachers of the First Grade. Daily 9:00. 
H. 205. Mrs. Lord. 

Section 2. For teachers of the first three grades. Daily 
11 :00. H. 205. Mrs. Lord. 

Section 3. The same as Section 2. Daily 8 :00. H. 205. Mrs. 
Lord. 

Education 122. — The Teaching of Reading and Litera- 
ture in the First Six Grades. — The basic importance of read- 
ing in the elementary school, reading as a tool study, the vari- 
ous methods of teaching reading, etc., will constitute the 
course. Methods of teaching phonics, appreciation, memoriz- 
ation and dramatization will be presented. Observation of 
demonstration lessons and criticisms will be required. Pre- 



56 University of Florida 

requisite or parallel courses: Education 101 or Education 
207. 3 semester hours credit. Three sections: 

Section 1. This section will be confined largely to the 
teaching of the mechanics of reading as a tool study. Daily 
9:00. P. 4. Mrs. Robison. 

Section 2. The same as Section 1. Daily 11 :00. H. 207. Mrs. 
Robison. 

Section 3. This section is designed for those teachers who 
will teach in the middle elementary grades. Daily 12:00. H. 
207. Mrs. Robison. 

Education 123. — Hand-work for Elementary Grades. — 
The purpose of this course is to develop the real function of 
handwork in the elementary grades. The various types of 
hand work will be discussed, paper cutting, free hand draw- 
ing, clay modeling, etc. A constructive project for each grade 
will be developed during the course. This course counts as a 
four-hour course toward the extension of certificates. 2 se- 
mester hours credit. Three sections: 

Section 1. Designed for teachers of the primary and early 
elementary grades. M. T. W. Th. F. 2 :00. A. 206. Miss Nor- 
ton. 

Section 2. The same as Section 1. M. T. W. Th. F. 11 :00. 
A. 206. Miss Norton. 

Section 3. Designed for teachers of the upper elementary 
grades. M. T. W. Th. F. 3:00. A. 206. Miss Norton. 

Education 201. — The Social Studies in the Elementary 
School. — A course in methods of teaching geography, history 
and civics from the standpoint of human relationships. This 
includes lesson planning and criticism and observation in the 
Demonstration School. 3 semester hours credit. Daily 8:00. 
P. 4. Mrs. Altstetter. 

Education 203. — Child and Adolescent Psychology. — The 
nature, growth and development of the child from birth to 
adolescence with reference to education; the original nature 
of the child and his education ; the meaning of protracted in- 
fancy; training in recognition of types and individual differ- 
ences, of common defects and how to deal with them ; the cul- 
tivation of intelligent sympathy with children; the effect of 



Summer School 57 

Child Study on the practices of elementary and secondary 
education. 3 semester hours credit. Three sections: 

Section 1. Daily 11:00. P. 205. Mr 

Section 2. Daily 12 :00. P. 112. Mr 

Section 3. Daily 8:00. A. 303. Mrs. Metcalfe. 

Education 207. — Educational Psychology. — Psychology 
applied to Education, the learning process, acquisition of skill, 
etc. 3 semester hours credit. Three sections : 

Section 1. Daily 11:00. P. 102. Mr. Wilson. 

Section 2. Daily 9:00. P. 205. Mr. Tolbert. 

Section 3. Daily 9:00. P. 101. Mr 

Education 301. — High School Curriculum. — This course 
is designed for the consideration of the high school curri- 
culum. Standards for the selection and organization of the 
curriculum will be considered with much detail. 3 semester 
hours credit. Daily 11:00. P. 201. Mr. Carmichael. 

Education 308. — The Elementary School Curriculum. — 
The curriculum as a group of related problems and projects 
of vital interest to children. An attempt to formulate a cur- 
riculum based on social conditions and social needs. 3 semes- 
ter hours credit. Daily 11:00. L. 209. Mr. Altstetter. 

Education 317. — Tests and Measurements. — An element- 
ary course confined mainly to achievement tests. 3 semester 
hours credit. Daily 11:00. L. 204. Mr. Evans. 

Education 361. — Teaching of Mathematics. — See Mathe- 
matics 361. 

Education 401. — Public School Administration. — Stresses 
in a practical way problems peculiar to Florida schools; the 
supervising principal, relation to superintendent, boards, 
teachers and community; consolidation and transportation; 
adapting the school to the child's needs, promotions, tests, 
extra-curricular activities; school finance; records and re- 
ports. 3 semester hours credit. Daily 9:00. P. 201. Mr. Car- 
michael. 

Education 403. — The Problem-Project Method. — The laws 
of learning, lesson-planning, thinking, questioning, the prob- 
lem-project method, the socialized recitation, democracy in 



58 University of Florida 

the classroom as a preparation for democracy in life. 3 semes- 
ter hours credit. Daily 8 :00. P. 205. Mr. Norman. 

Education 405. — Supervised Teaching. — This course is 
planned to give the student practice in conducting recitations 
under close supervision. A study v^ill be made of the develop- 
ment of courses, and the present status of the subject taught. 
Lesson plans will be required for all recitations, and the man- 
ner of teaching v^^ill be subject to criticism. Teaching 4 hours 
a M^eek; conferences 2 hours a week. 3 semester hours credit. 
Three sections: 

Section 1. Designed for those who expect to teach in the 
primary grades. Daily 12:00. P. 2. Miss Peeler. 

Section 2. Designed for those who expect to teach in the 
third and fourth grades. Daily 12 :00. P. 11. Miss Woodard. 

Section 3. Designed for those who expect to teach in the 
fifth and sixth grades. Daily 12:00. P. 10. Miss Upson. 

Section 4. Designed for those who expect to teach in the 
high school. Daily 12:00. P. 201. Mr. Simmons. 

Education 406. — The Elementary School Principal. — The 
problems that usually confront the elementary school princi- 
pal will be stressed in this course. Daily 8:00. L. 209. Mr. 
Evans. 

Education 408. — High School Administration. — This 
course is designed to study the practical management and ad- 
ministration of the modern high school. (Junior students 
may choose between Education 408 and Education 402.) 3 se- 
mester hours credit. Daily 8:00. P. 101. Mr. Hinson. 

graduate courses in education 

Education 502. — The Elementary School Curriculum. — 
An intensive study of the development, and present content of 
the elementary school curriculum, including kindergarten ; the 
selection and evaluation of material ; the importance of the 
classroom teacher. This course will be especially beneficial 
to teachers in the teacher-training departments of the Florida 
high schools. 3 semester hours credit. Daily 9 :00. L. 209. 
Mr. Altstetter. 

Education 503. — Educational Tests and Measurements. 
Seminar. — This is an intensive study of intelligence and edu- 



Summer School 59 

cational tests. A thorough and systematic study is made of 
all the chief tests in both fields with laboratory material for 
class use so as to familiarize the student with the process of 
actually handling tests. It is recommended that Education 517 
be taken before this course. 2 semester hours credit. M. W. Th. 
S. 10:00. L. 209. 

Education 505. — The Organization and Administration 
of Extra Curricular Activities in Junior and Senior High 
Schools. — An attempt will be made in this course to work out 
constructive school policies having to do with the developing 
of the pupil's initiative, leadership, cooperation, etc. 2 semes- 
ter hours credit. M. W. Th. S. 10:00. P. 112. Mr. Carmichael. 

Education 506. — Methods of Teaching Farm Shop Work. 
— The selection and organization of subject matter or jobs in 
farm shop work to be included in a course given in the high 
school to vocational agricultural students, and the methods 
to be used in the teaching of these jobs. The course is designed 
for those who are teaching vocational agriculture or for those 
preparing for this field. Education 303-304 or their equiva- 
lents are required as prerequisites to this course. 2 semester 
hours credit. M. T. W. Th. 11:00. P. 208. Mr. Garris. 

Education 509. — Problems in the Administration of a 
School System. — Seminar. — Open to graduate students who 
are qualified by experience and training to pursue advanced 
study on selected problems in administration. As far as pos- 
sible problems will be selected to meet individual needs. Each 
student selects some problem for special study and presents 
the results of his study in the form of a thesis. Students 
may work on chosen problems either singly or in small groups. 
3 semester hours credit. Daily 8:00. P. 201. Mr. Fulk. 

Education 511. — Methods and Materials in Vocational 
Agriculture. — The organization of subject matter for a long 
time teaching program; the analysis and teaching layout of 
a farm job; the selection of teaching devices; the organiza- 
tion for and supervision of supervised practice work ; and the 
selection of proper classroom equipment. 2 semester hours 
credit. Daily 8 :00. P. 208. Mr. Garris. 

Education 512. — A continuation of Education 511. (Not 
offered in summer of 1929.) 



60 University of Florida 

Education 517. — The chief purpose of this course is to 
acquaint students with statistical methods as applied to edu- 
cation. The chief topics to be discussed are: advantages of 
statistical methods; methods of collecting educational data, 
and tabulations; the calculation of median, mode, mean; the 
mean and standard deviations; variabilities; correlations; 
regressions; probabilities; reliabilities; graphs and the like. 
A knowledge of the above topics will enable one to read 
educational literature more intelligently. It is recommended 
that this course be taken before Education 503. 2 semester 
hours credit. M. W. Th. S. 10:00. H. 207. Mr. Ackley. 

Education 519. — The purpose of this course is to give a 
comprehensive view of the basic principles in curriculum 
construction; compare the curricula of various secondary- 
schools; terminologists ; tendencies in curriculum making; 
constants; electives, and the like. This course should enable 
both principals and teachers to understand better the objec- 
tives of secondary education. 3 semester hours credit. Daily 
12:00. P. 101. Mr. Hinson. 

Education 527. — Research in Education. — Seminar and 
Individual Conferences. — A course designed primarily to give 
individual guidance to graduate students majoring in Educa- 
tion, selection and definition of problems suitable for master's 
theses ; collection, analysis and organization of data ; the me- 
chanics of thesis construction. Every student majoring in 
Education should enroll in this course. Open to all other 
graduate students. No college credit. 

Sections (Students choose one) : 

Seminar (for all) M. W. 10:00. P. 201. 

Section 1. T. Th. 9:00. P. 203. 

Section 2. M. W. 2 :00. P. 201. 

Section 3. T. Th. 2 :00. P. 201. Mr. Fulk. 

Education 528. — A graduate course in the Supervision of 
Instruction. Designed for principals, supervisors and teach- 
ers. 3 semester hours credit. Daily 8:00. H. 207. Mr. Ackley. 

Education 563. — Vocational Education. — The meaning, 
principles and development of vocational education. Special 
stress will be given to agricultural education, home economics 



Summer School 6J 

education, trade and industrial education, and commercial 
education as provided for by the National Vocational Educa- 
tion Act of Congress. 2 semester hours credit. M. T. W. F. 
9 :00. P. 208. Mr. Garris. 

ENGLISH 

English Grammar. — This course is designed for those 
who are preparing for the examinations for third and second 
grade certificates. Texts: Kingsley, Mason and Rogers, "A 
Brief Review of English Grammar with Supplementary Ex- 
ercises;" Sharp's "English Exercises Book V." Review. No 
extension credit. Two sections : 

Section 1. M. W. Th. 10:00. E. 203. Miss England. 

Section 2. T. Th. F. 12:00. E. 203. Miss England. 

Composition. — This course is designed for those who are 
preparing for the teachers examinations for third and second 
grade certificates. The work is so arranged that there will be 
no duplication of the material covered in the Grammar course. 
Texts : Lewis and Hosic's "Practical English for High 
School," Sharp's "English Exercises, Book V." Review. No 
extension credit. Two sections : 

Section 1. M. T. Th. 3 :00. P. 112. Miss Graham. 

Section 2. M. T. Th. 8:00. E. 203. Miss England. 

Rhetoric. — Designed to prepare teachers for the exam- 
ination for first grade certificate. No one enrolling for this 
course should take Composition. A rapid review of narration, 
description, exposition, argument, drama and other literary 
forms ; poetry, diction, punctuation and figures of speech will 
be given. Texts: Brooks' "English Book II (Revised)?" 
Sharp's "English Exercises, Book V." Review. Extension 
credit for second and third grade certificates. No high school 
credit, but arrangements may be made to take entrance exam- 
inations. Three sections : 

Section 1. T. W. Th. F. 11:00. E. 203. Miss England. 

Section 2. T. W. Th. F. 9 :00. E. 203. Miss England. 

Section 3. M. W. Th. S. 10:00. L. 5. Miss Crozier. 

American Literature. — The study of American Litera- 
ture as outlined in Metcalf's "American Literature." No 



62 University of Florida 

credit, but arrangements may be made for a college entrance 
examination. M. T. W. Th. 11:00. L. 5. Mr. Hait. 

English Literature. — The history of English Literature 
as outlined in Metcalf's "English Literature" will be given. 
No credit, but arrangements may be made for a college en- 
trance examination. M. T. Th. F. 2 :00. L. 209. Mr. Thomp- 
son. 

Spelling. — A thorough review of prefixes, suffixes, ab- 
breviations, syllabication, diacritical marks, and rules of spell- 
ing will be given. In every class period there will be spelling 
exercises and drills in the meaning and use of synonyms, anto- 
nyms, and homonyms. There will be a study of how to make 
the spelling period most interesting and helpful. At the close 
of the summer school a spelling tournament, open to all ambi- 
tious spellers, will be held. A copy of Webster's "Blue-Back 
Speller," suitably autographed and inscribed, will be given to 
the winner of the tournament. Hours to be arranged. Mr. 
Little. 

COLLEGE ENGLISH 

English 101. — Rhetoric and Composition. — Designed to 
train students in methods of clear and forceful expression. 
Instruction is carried on simultaneously in formal rhetoric, in 
rhetorical analysis, and in theme writing, the constant corre- 
lation of the three as methods of approach to the desired goal 
being kept in view. In addition, a reading course is assigned 
each student. Textbook, Genung's "Working Principles of 
Rhetoric," first half. 3 semester hours credit. Four sections : 

Section 1. Daily 8:00. L. 203. Mr. Mounts. 

Section 2. Daily 9:00. L. 211. Mr. Wise. 

Section 3. Daily 11 :00. L. 211. Mr. Wise. 

Section 4. Daily 12:00. L. 203. Mr. Mounts. 

English 102. — A continuation of English 101. The sec- 
ond half of the rhetoric, "Invention," will be completed. 3 se- 
mester hours credit. Two sections: 

Section 1. Daily 11 :00. L. 203. Mr. Mounts. 

Section 2. Daily 12:00. L. 211. Mr. Wise. 

English 103. — Introduction to Literature. — A survey of 
the literature of the Western world from the beginnings to 



Summer School 63 

the Renaissance. 2 semester hours credit. Daily 12:00. S. 111. 
Mr. Jarrell. 

English 201. — History of Literature. — An outline course 
in the historical development of the English literature and 
language. Selections from important prose writers and poets; 
lectures on the history of the language and literature ; a man- 
ual for reference; frequent reports from the individual stu- 
dents; constant use of the University library. 3 semester 
hours credit. Daily 11 :00. S. 111. Mr. Jarrell. 

English 206. — Historical Grammar. — A course based on 
Lounsbury's English Language designed to give the student 
some knowledge of the historical development of the English 
language, with a view especially of giving insight into modern 
English grammar. 3 semester hours credit. Daily 9:00. L. 
210. Mr. Farr. 

English 301. — Shakespeare. — The life and earlier work, 
including the history plays, romantic comedies and non-dra- 
matic poetry. Three plays will be read in class. Written 
reviews on plays read outside the class will alternate with 
essays from the students and lectures by the instructor. This 
course is open to those who have had English 201-202 or 
equivalent work in English literature. 3 semester hours credit. 
Daily 11:00. L. 210. Mr. Farr. 

English 408. — Contemporary Poetry. — The influence of 
Whitman; contemporary English and American poets. 3 se- 
mester hours credit. Daily 11 :00. L. 212. Mr. Robertson. 

English 409. — Chaucer. — Extensive reading in the 
''Canterbury Tales," "Troilus," and minor works. 3 semester 
hours credit. Daily 8 :00. L. 212. Mr. Robertson. 

English 501. — Anglo-Saxon. — Anglo-Saxon grammar, 
reading of Alfredian prose, "Beowolf," and other Anglo- 
Saxon literature. 3 semester hours credit. Daily 8:00. L. 
210. Mr. Farr and Mr. Robertson. 

FINE ARTS 

In addition to the University registration fee, in the fol- 
lowing courses there is a fee of $4.00 for each semester hour 
credit. 



64 University of Florida 

Students may take the following courses without college 
credit in which case the University registration fee is not re- 
quired. 

ARCHITECTURE 

Special arrangement can be made for students desiring to 
take Architectural Design. Architecture 101 is the beginning 
course in Architectural Design and consists of small problems 
in plan and elevation employing only wall, roof, beam and pier 
as structural elements, with mouldings and simple belt courses 
as decorative elements. Make arrangements for this course 
with the Director of the School of Architecture. Mr. Weaver, 

PAINTING 

Art 121. — Freehand Drawing. — An introduction to per- 
spective with outdoor sketching in pencil. Occupies the first 
third. The remaining two-thirds is given to charcoal draw- 
ing from casts and from still life groups. Teachers taking 
this course are given, in addition to the above, the methods 
of teaching Freehand Drawing, 2 semester hours credit, M, 
T. W. Th. 8:00-10:00. P. 301. Mr. Long. 

Art 226, — Water Color Painting, — Color theory and vari- 
ous methods of applying water color. Still life painting. 
Landscape painting from nature. Methods of teaching water 
color will be given to teachers taking this course, 2 semester 
hours credit, M, W, 1:00-5:00, P, 301. Mr. Long. 

Art M-211. — Oil Painting. — Theory of pigment color. 
Still life studies in full color. A major part of this course will 
be given over to landscape painting from nature. This course 
will allow for individual development by creative and imagi- 
native effort on the part of the student. Especially valuable 
for teachers who wish to strengthen their work. 2 semester 
hours credit. T. Th, 1:00-5:00, P, 306, Mr. Long. 

COMMERCIAL ART 

Art M-117. — Advertising Design. — Designing of original 
advertisements and a study of the methods and mediums em- 
ployed in making drawings for reproduction, A major part 
of the work will be in pen and ink. 2 semester hours credit, 
M. T. W. Th. 10 :00-12 :00. P. 301. Mr. Long. 



Summer School 65 

Art M-115. — Poster Design. — Analysis of the essentials 
of a good poster. Methods of handling tempera color and 
other mediums. Poster lettering. Practical designing of 
posters for all uses. Teachers will find this course valuable in 
that it meets the constant demand for posters in the school. 
A method of teaching poster design will also be covered. 2 
semester hours credit. M. T. W. Th. 10:00-12:00. P. 306. Mr. 
Long. 

FRENCH 

French 21. — Elementary French, first semester of first 
year; grammar, pronunciation, dictation, easy conversation, 
oral and aural practice, reading. 3 semester hours credit. 
Daily 8:00. L. 207. Mr. Atkin. 

French 22. — Elementary French, second semester of first 
year; continuation of French 21. 3 semester hours credit. 
Daily 11 :00. L. 207. Mr. Atkin. 

French 101. — Third semester French; prerequisites: 
French 21 and French 22. 3 semester hours credit. Daily 
9 :00. L. 207. Mr. Atkin. 

GENERAL NATURAL SCIENCE 

We are living in a scientific age and some knowledge of 
the principles of science and their application to everyday life 
has become an essential part of a well rounded education. 
But the field of science has become so broad and far reaching, 
and it has been so sub-divided, that it is almost if not alto- 
gether impossible for students majoring in other fields to 
take even a beginning course in all of its branches. There 
would seem to be need, then, for a broad, general course which 
would present an outline of our knowledge of the physical and 
biological world and show the position of man in the universe 
in which he lives. Such a course would not only give the stu- 
dent something of the fundamentals of all the sciences, but 
would serve the further purpose of weaving them together 
into a unified whole. The course outlined below is an attempt 
to fill this need and attain this end. 

General Science 101. — The course begins with a study of 
the earth as an astronomical body ; of the sun, moon, planets, 
and stars. Following this comes a study of the theories as to 



66 University of Florida 

the origin of the earth ; its early stages ; geological processes 
and earth history; the laws of physics with special emphasis 
on energy ; the nature of chemical processes ; the nature and 
origin of life; the bacteria and other micro-organisms; the 
plant kingdom ; interaction between plants and their environ- 
ment. 4 semester hours credit. Daily 8:00. C. 110. Labora- 
tory and conference hours to be arranged. Mr. Black. 

General Science 102. — A continuation of General Sci- 
ence 101. — The invertebrates; the vertebrates; human physi- 
ology; the dynamics of living processes; digestion, food, and 
nutrition ; the vitamines ; the nervous system and conscious- 
ness; elementary psychology. 4 semester hours credit. Daily 
9:00. C. 110. Laboratory and conference hours to be ar- 
ranged. Mr. Black. 

GEOGRAPHY 

Political Geography. — Special attention will be given to 
Florida and its relation to other states. A thoro review of the 
geography of the United States and the world. Instruction 
will be given in the use of textbooks, maps, globes, industrial 
products as a help and guide for the teaching of the subject. 
Review and extension credit only. Two sections : 

Section 1. M. W. Th. 9:00. L. 5. Mrs. Blacklock. 

Section 2. M. W. Th. 10:00. L. 201. Mrs. Kelly. 

history 

Elementary United States and Florida History. Three 
sections, each covering thoro review of state adopted text 
book. Review and extension credit only. Two sections: 

Section 1. M. T. Th. F. 11 :00. A. 204. Mr. Buchholz. 

Section 2. M. W. Th. S. 10 :00. A. 204. Mr. Buchholz. 

History. — General. — This course is designed to prepare 
for the teachers examination for first grade. No credit, but 
arrangements may be made for a college entrance examina- 
tion. Four sections: 

Section 1. Daily 12:00. A. 104. Mr. McLane. 

Section 2. Daily 11 :00. A. 104. Mr. Zetrouer. 

Section 3. Daily 9:00. A. 204. Mr. J. E. Williams. 

Section 4. Daily 8:00. A. 204. Mr. Buchholz. 



Summer School 67 

History. — American. — A detailed study of American his- 
tory from the period ©f discovery and colonization to Jackson's 
administration. No credit, but arrangements may be made 
for a college entrance examination. M. T. W. F. 12 :00. A. 205. 
Mr. Buchholz. 

COLLEGE HISTORY 

History 101. — Europe During the Middle Ages. — A gen- 
eral course in the history of Western Europe from the Teu- 
tonic migrations to the close of the Seven Years' War. 3 se- 
mester hours credit. Daily 8:00. A. 104. Mr. Tribolet. 

History 102. — Europe During the Middle Ages. — A con- 
tinuation of History 101. 3 semester hours credit. Daily 
12:00. L. 202. Mr. Haseltine. 

History 302. — American History Close of Revolution to 
1830. — A continuation of History 301. 3 semester hours 
credit. Daily 9:00. L. 109. Mr. Leake. 

History 304. — American History 1876 to Present. — A 
continuation of History 303. 3 semester hours credit. Daily 
8:00. L. 109. Mr. Leake. 

History 308. — Renaissance and the Reformation. — Study 
of the causes, development and results of these great intel- 
lectual and religious movements. A continuation of History 
307. 3 semester hours credit. Daily 11 :00. L. 311. Mr. Carle- 
ton. 

Graduate Seminar in History. — 2 semester hours credit. 
Hours to be arranged. Mr. Leake. 

LATIN 

Latin 101. — Selections from Ovid. — First semester of 
Freshman Latin. Prerequisite: Three years of High School 
Latin. 3 semester hours credit. Daily 9 :00. L. 111. Mr. 
Anderson. 

Latin 305. — Virgil. — An intensive study of the works of 
Virgil with emphasis on the less read portions. Prerequisite : 
Two years of College Latin. 3 semester hours credit. Daily 
11:00. L. 111. Mr. Anderson. 



68 University of Florida 

LAW 

The following courses are offered and carry credit to- 
wards a law degree as indicated : 

Administrative Law. — 3 semester hours credit. Daily.. 
Hours to be arranged. Mr. Slagle. 

Law 308. — Common Law Pleading. — 3 semester hours 
credit. Daily. Hours to be arranged. Mr. Cockrell. 

Law 405. — Equity Pleading. — 3 semester hours credit. 
Daily. Hours to be arranged. Mr. TeSelle. 

Law 402S. — Evidence. — 3 semester hours credit. Daily.. 
Hours to be arranged. Mr. TeSelle. 

Law 412. — Florida Civil Practice. — 3 semester hours 
credit. Daily. Hours to be arranged. Mr. Cockrell. 

School Law. — 2 semester hours credit. Four recitations 
per week. Hours to be arranged. Mr. Trusler. 

Law 301S. — Torts. — 4 semester hours credit. Daily (70- 
minute periods.) Hours to be arranged. Mr. Trusler. 

Trade Regulations. — 3 semester hours credit. Daily.. 
Hours to be arranged. Mr, Slagle. 

library science 

Library Science 101. — Cataloging L — A study of the 
principles and methods of the simpler forms of cataloging. 
Two hours supervised practice work will follow each lecture. 
The cards will be revised and form a sample catalog for the 
use of the student. Three semester hours credit. Daily 8 :00. 
P. 1. Laboratory hours to be arranged. Miss Mercier. 

Library Science 102. — Classification L — The Dewey Deci- 
mal system is used as the basis of the instruction. The study 
of book numbers is included. Problems will be given with 
each lecture. Two semester hours credit. M. W. Th. S. 10:00. 
P. 1. Miss Mercier. 

Library Science 103. — Library Economy. — This course 
includes the general routine of adding books to the library 
with instruction in order work, accessioning, mechanical prep- 



Summer School 69 

aration and care of books and the checking of periodicals. 
Simple charging systems and various circulation records will 
be studied. Two semester hours credit. M. T. Th. F. 11 :00. 
P. 1. Miss Timmerman. 

Library Science 104. — Book Selection I. — This course in- 
cludes lectures covering the general principles of book selec- 
tion, with the needs of the high school library particularly in 
view, the examination and discussion of selected books in the 
various fields of literature and the writing of annotations. 
Problems involving the use of standard guides to book selec- 
tion and reading lists will be,.i^quired of each student. As a 
final project the class will make up a list of books for a school 
library. Three semester hours credit. Daily 9:00. P.l. Miss 
Timmerman. 

MATHEMATICS 

Arithmetic. — A thoro review of Arithmetic is made, that 
the student may view it from both the teacher's and child's 
point of view. Common and decimal fractions, denominate 
numbers, percentage and all other subjects covered by the 
textbooks adopted by the state. Principles and methods of 
teaching Arithmetic are thoroly covered. Review. Extension 
credit only. Three sections: 

Section 1. M. T. W. Th. F. 12 :00. S. 101. Mr. C. M. Wil- 
liams. 

Section 2. M. T. W. Th. F. 8 :00. P. 206. Mr. Little. 

Section 3. M. T. W. Th. F. 9:00. P. 206. Mr. Little. 

Algebra B. — Review of first year Algebra. No one ad- 
mitted who does not have a rather thoro knowledge of first 
semester first year Algebra. Review. Extension credit only. 
M. T. W. Th. F. 12:00. E. 210. Mr. Stone. 

Algebra C. — Advanced Algebra. — Involution, Evolution, 
Quadratic Equations, Progressions, Ratio and Proportion. No 
one admitted who has not a rather thoro knowledge of first 
year Algebra. No credit, but arrangement may be made for 
college entrance examination. Four sections: 

Section 1. M. T. W. Th. F. 11 :00. P. 206. Mr. Little. 

Section 2. M. T. W. Th. F. 9:00. E. 209. Mr. Steen. 

Section 3. M. T. W. Th. F. 12 :00. E. 209. Miss Jones. 

Section 4. M. T. W. Th. F- 8 :00. E. 209. Miss Portner. 



70 University of Florida 

Plane Geometry I. — Books I and II. No credit, but ar- 
rangements may be made for college entrance examination. 
Daily 8:00. L. 314. Miss Stewart. 

Plane Geometry II. — Books III to V. Those desiring to 
review all of Plane Geometry should either take both Geom- 
etry I and Geometry II, or Geometry II. Prerequisite to Ge- 
ometry II is Geometry I. No credit but arrangements may be 
made for college entrance examination. Daily 11 :00. E. 208. 
Mr. Phipps. 

COLLEGE MATHEMATICS 

Mathematics 83. — Solid Geometry. — 3 semester hours 
credit. Daily 12:00. E. 208. Mr. Phipps. 

Mathematics 85. — Plane Trigonometry. — 3 semester 
hours credit. Daily 9:00. P. 102. Mr. Simpson. 

Mathematics 101. — College Algebra. — A continuation of 
high school Algebra together with a study of Functions and 
Graphs, Inequalities, Theory of Equations, Permutations and 
Combinations, Probability and Determinants. 3 semester 
hours credit. Daily 8:00. P. 102. Mr. Simpson. 

Mathematics 102. — Plane Analytic Geometry. — Text, 
Roberts and Colpitt's ''Analytic Geometry" (Second edition), 
John Wiley and Sons. 3 semester hours credit. Daily 9 :00. 
E. 210. Mr. Kokomoor. 

Mathematics 251. — Elementary Calculus. — 3 semester 
hours credit. Daily 8 :00. E. 210. Mr. Kokomoor. 

Mathematics 252. — Calculus. — A continuation of course 
251, by which it must be preceded. 3 semester hours credit. 
Daily 9:00. E. 208. Mr. Phipps. 

Mathematics 361. — The Teaching of Mathematics. — The 
teaching of mathematics with particular attention to the con- 
tent of secondary school mathematics. This course may be 
substituted for Education 405 by teachers of mathematics. 
Registration for course only by permission of instructor. 3 
semester hours credit. Daily 12:00. P. 102. Mr. Wilson. 

Mathematics 568. — History of Elementary Mathematics. 
— A study of the development of Arithmetic, Algebra, Geom- 



Summer School 71 

etry, Trigonometry and the beginnings of Analytic Geometry 
and Calculus, with special emphasis upon the changes of pro- 
cesses of operations and methods of teaching. Valuable for 
teachers and prospective teachers. Open to students taking 
or having had Mathematics 251, or by special permission of 
instructor. Daily 11:00. E. 210. Mr. Kokomoor. 

Mathematics 575. — Fundamental Concepts of Modern 
Mathematics. — An introduction to such topics as the Number 
System of Algebra, Sets of Points, Group Theory, Theories of 
Integration, Postulational Systems and Non-Euclidean Geom- 
etry. Prerequisites : A course in Calculus and a certain 
amount of mathematical maturity to be determined by the in- 
structor. 3 semester hours credit. Hours to be arranged. P. 
102. Mr. Simpson. 

MUSIC 

Music 101. — Note singing; sight singing; child voice; art 
and rhythmic songs; Dalcroze Eurythmics. Designed for 
Grades I-IV. 1 semester hour credit. Three sections : 

Section 1. M. T. Th. F. 9:00. C. 112. Miss Porter. 

Section 2. M. T. Th. F. 10:00. C. 112. Miss Porter. 

Section 3. M. T. Th. F. 4:00. C. 112. Miss Porter. 

Music 102. — Development of sight singing; ear training; 
part singing; changing voice. Designed for Grades V-XII. 
1 semester hour credit. M. T. Th. F. 11:00. C. 112. Miss 
Porter. 

Music 201. — Appreciation and History of Music. Designed 
for all grades. 1 semester hour credit. M. Th. 3:00. C. 112. 
Miss Porter. 

Music 202. — Harmony. — Beginning Harmony. 1 semester 
hour credit. W. F. 3:00. C. 112. Miss Porter. 

Music 203. — Supervised Teaching in Music. Class for 
those who are especially interested in teaching and supervis- 
ing music in the schools. This is in cooperation with the 
Demonstration School. 1 semester hour credit. M. Th. 12:00. 
C. 112. Miss Porter. 

Music 301.— Glee Club. A fee of $1.00 will be charged 
each student registering for the Glee Club to cover cost of 



72 University of Florida 

music. 1 semester hour credit. M. T. Th. F. 5:00. Stage of 
Auditorium. Mr. Collins. 

Voice. — Private lessons in voice. Hours to be arranged 
with the instructor. Two scholarships in voice will be given 
(see p. 28). Two lessons per week unless otherwise arranged. 

Course I. — Theory of Voice Building, breathing, tone plac- 
ing, simple songs. 1 semester hour credit. Stage of Audito- 
rium. Mrs. Worth. 

Course II. — For advanced students. A continuation of 
Course I, and coaching in songs. Students registering in this 
course will be expected to appear in the opera at the close of 
the term. 1 semester hour credit. Stage of Auditorium. Mrs. 
Worth. 

Organ. — Private lessons in pipe organ will be given by 
special arrangement. 1 semester hour credit. Auditorium. Mr. 
Murphree. 

NATURE STUDY 

A course for teachers wishing to prepare themselves bet- 
ter for teaching nature study. A study of the classification 
of plants, and the study of insects and small animals. Bird 
protection will be a special feature. Three recitations and 
three laboratory periods per week. M. W. Th. 8:00. S. 111. 
Laboratory M. T. W. 4:00-6:00. Mr. Boardman. 

NURSING EDUCATION 

Administration in Schools of Nursing. — The course in- 
cludes a brief history of the origin and development of schools 
of nursing ; organization and management of schools of nurs- 
ing; budgets; catalogs; libraries; affiliation; student activi- 
ties ; publicity ; university schools of nursing ; group and hourly 
nursing; present day problems and tendencies, etc. 2 semester 
hours credit. M. W. Th. S. 10 :00. A. 304. Miss Gault. 

Nursing Education. — This course includes a study of 
such topics as, curricula in schools of nursing ; the teaching of 
different types of nursing; the selection and use of text and 
reference books; preparation for special fields of nursing; 
grading of schools of nursing; etc. 3 semester hours credit 
Daily 9 :00. A. 304. Miss Gault. 



Summer School 73 

Public Health Nursing. — In this course the aim is two- 
fold : first, to make a brief survey of the field of Public Health 
Nursing; second, to study the problems, present status and 
tendencies in this field. 3 semester hours credit. Daily 11 :00. 
A. 304. Miss Gault. 

Home Nursing. — Home Hygiene and Care of the Sick. — 
A standard Red Cross Training course. About 24 lectures and 
demonstrations given during the second four weeks of the 
Summer School. This course is not for nurses, but is designed 
for people who have had no hospital training. 1 semester hour 
credit. M. T. W. Th. F. 2:00. A. 304. Miss Fetting. 

PHILOSOPHY AND PSYCHOLOGY 

Elementary Psychology. — A beginner's course in psy- 
chology with applications to teaching. No credit, but arrange- 
ments may be made for a college entrance examination. Three 
sections : 

Section 1. M. T. Th. F. 12:00. A. 204. Mrs. Metcalfe. 

Section 2. M. W. Th. F. 11:00. A. 205. Mrs. Metcalfe. 

Section 3. M. W. Th. S. 10 :00. A. 205. Mrs. Metcalfe. 

Philosophy 201. — General Psychology. — Facts and theo- 
ries current in general psychological discussion: the sensa- 
tions, the sense organs, and the functions of the brain; the 
higher mental functions — attention, perception, memory, 
feeling, emotion, volition, the self, and like topics. This 
course satisfies the professional requirement for the exten- 
sion of certificates. 3 semester hours credit. Three sections : 

Section 1. Daily 8:00. P. 112. Mr. Osborne Williams. 

Section 2. Daily 11:00. P. 112. Mr. Osborne Williams. 

Philosophy 301. — Ethics. — Principles of Ethics : Study of 
such topics as goodness, happiness, virtue, duty, freedom, civi- 
lization, and progress. 3 semester hours credit. Daily 11 :00. 
P. 114. Mr. Enwall. 

Philosophy 304. — History of Modern Philosophy. — A 
continuation of Philosophy 303. Special attention will be giv- 
en to the works of Descartes, Spinoza, Leibnitz, Kant, Hume, 
etc. 3 semester hours credit. Daily 12:00. P. 114. Mr. En- 
«vall. 



74 University of Florida 

Philosophy 312.— Psychology of Abnormal Children.— 
This course deals with, psychopathic, retarded, and mentally 
defective children; causes, types, characteristics and treat- 
ment. 3 semester hours credit. Daily 9:00. P. 112. Mr. Wil- 
liams. 

Philosophy 507. — The Philosophic Conceptions of the 
Great English Poets. — (Prerequisite: English 103-104, 201- 
202.) 3 semester hours credit. Seminar. Hours to be arranged. 
Mr. Enwall. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

The courses in this department are designed to meet the 
needs of teachers, w^ho, even though not graduates of Physical 
Education, are nevertheless expected to have a practical know- 
ledge of physical training, gymnastics, plays and games, and 
are expected to teach them in the public schools. All teachers 
preparing to qualify under the new State law regarding Physi- 
cal Education will find these courses particularly to their 
needs. Local problems of the members of the classes will be 
met as far as possible. Plans will be formulated whereby un- 
healthy physical conditions may be eradicated from the en- 
vironment of the schools and physical defects found among 
school children properly handled. The aim of the department 
is to have in every community as many trained leaders in play- 
ground and school athletic activities as possible. All students 
registering for courses in Physical Education will be required 
to furnish gymnasium suits and shoes. 

Physical Education 101. — Elementary Gymnastics. — This 
class is for beginners and consists mainly of marching, calis- 
thenics and simple apparatus work. Exercises applicable for 
schoolroom will be given in graduated scale leading up to the 
more advanced form of exercise. 1 semester hour credit. Two 
sections : 

Section 1. For women. M. T. Th. F. 4:00 Gymnasium. 
Mr. Haskell. 

'Section 2. For men. M. W. Th. S. 10:00 Gymnasium. 
Mr. Haskell. 

Physical Education 102. — Corrective Exercise. — A 
course to enable the teacher to recognize physical defects and 
to have an intelligent use in the natural and artificial methods 



Summer School 75 

for correction through exercise. Action, use and relation of 
-different organs of body and exercise to stimulate and nor- 
malize them. General laws governing the body and health. 
1 semester hour credit. M. T. Th. F. 2:00 Gymnasium. Mr. 
Haskell. 

Physical Education 103. — Plays and Games for the Early 
Elementary Grades. — A course giving Story Plays, Rythmic 
Plays, Folk Dancing, Mimetic Plays and the theory and prac- 
tice of outlining exercises for the early elementary grades. 
1 semester hour credit. M. T. W. Th. 11 :00 Gymnasium. Mr. 
Haskell. 

Physical Education 104. — Minor Sports. — This course 
will include interpretation of rules, organization, promotion, 
and competition in the following : playground ball, volley ball, 
playground games, indoor games, tennis, swimming, and mass 
play games. The importance of mass play in the school and 
playground curriculum. 1 semester hour credit. M. T. Th. F. 
3:00. Gymnasium. Mr. Haskell. 

Physical Education 201. — Advanced Gymnastics. — This 
class is especially designed for those who have had elementary 
gymnastics and consists mainly of conducting the elementary 
■classes and advanced calisthenics and gymnastics. 1 semester 
hour credit. Two sections: 

Section 1. For women. M. T. Th. F. 4:00. Gymnasium. 
Mr. Haskell. 

Section 2. For men. M. W. Th. S. 10:00. Gymnasium. 
Mr. Haskell. 

Physical Education 204. — Minor Sports. — This course is 
for those who have completed an elementary course and will 
consist mainly of the finer points of the games, and practical 
work in coaching the elementary classes. 1 semester hour 
credit. M. T. Th. F. 3:00. Gymnasium. Mr. Haskell. 

Physical Education 231-232 (formerly Coaching 107). — 
Athletic Training Theory. — Theories of training, massage, 
treatment of sprains, bruises, etc ; training room sanitation 
and care of equipment ; bandaging and first aid. Textbook, 
"My Basketball Bible," by Forrest C. Allen. 2 semester hours 
credit. M. T. Th. F. 3:00. Basketball Court. Mr. Bachman. 



76 University of Florida 

PHYSICS 

*HiGH School Physics. — A general course, such as is usu- 
ally given in standard secondary schools — lectures, recitations, 
demonstrations, and a limited amount of individual laboratory 
work. No credit, but arrangements may be made for a col- 
lege entrance examination. M. W. Th. S. 10:00. E. 303. 
Laboratory W. F. 2:00-4:00. E. 303. Mr. Bless. 

General Physics. — The courses described below fall into 
two groups: Physics 203-204 (a total of 10 semester hours 
credit) is a general course in Physics; Physics 105-106, 107- 
108, 209 (a total of 13 semester hours credit) are a group of 
courses in which the subject is taken up with greater thor- 
oughness and detail. Those who plan to teach physics are 
advised to take this group. It should be noted, however, that 
a course in high school physics is a prerequisite for the latter. 

Physics 203. — Mechanics and Heat. — 5 semester hours 
credit. Daily 11:00. E. 303. Lab. 8 hours, schedule to be ar- 
ranged. Mr. Weil. 

Physics 204. — Sound, Light and Electricity. — 5 semester 
hours credit. Daily 9 :00. E. 303. Laboratory 8 hours, sched- 
ule to be arranged. Mr. Weil. 

Longer Course in General Physics. — A course designed 
for students prepared to do more advanced work than in Phy- 
sics 203-204, and desiring to spend more time on the subject. 
A knowledge of high school physics, and of mathematics 
through trigonometry, is presupposed, and is a prerequisite 
for admission to the longer course. The course is given in 
three parts, called Physics 105-6, 107-8, 209-10. 

*Physics 105. — Mechanics. — 3 semester hours credit. 
Daily. E. 303. Mr. Weil. 

*Physics 106. — Heat, Sound, and Light. — 3 semester 
hours credit. Daily. E. 209. Mr. Weil. 

Physics 107. — General Laboratory Physics to accompany 
Physics 105. 2 semester hours credit. Laboratory 8 hours, 
schedule to be arranged. Mr. Weil and Mr. Bless. 



*Only four of the courses starred will be given during the summer 
of 1929. 



Summer School 77 

Physics 108. — General Laboratory Physics to accompany 
Physics 106. 2 semester hours credit. Lab. 8 hours, schedule 
to be arranged. Mr. Weil and Mr. Bless. 

Graduate Courses in Physics. — A college course in phy- 
sics is a necessary prerequisite for any of the following 
courses. 

*Physics 301. — Meteorology. — A brief general course. 
Textbook Milham's Meteorology. 3 semester hours credit. 
Hours to be arranged. Mr. Weil. 

*Physics 302. — Astronomy. — A brief general course in 
descriptive astronomy. Textbook : Path's Elements of Astron- 
omy. 3 semester hours credit. Hours to be arranged. Mr. 
Bless. 

*Physics 303-304. — Advanced Experimental Physics. — 
Experiments of more advanced type than those of Physics 
203-204, 207-208, or 209, together with study of the theory of 
the experiments and assigned reading. The particular experi- 
ments assigned vary with the needs and interests of the indi- 
vidual student. 3 semester hours credit. Hours to be ar- 
ranged. Mr. Weil and Mr. Bless. 

*Physics 306. — Electrical Measurements. — The theory 
and practice of methods of measurement of resistance, cur- 
rent, electromotive force, power and energy. Planned pri- 
marily for advanced students in physics, chemistry, and elec- 
trical engineering. Laboratory work will be adjusted to meet 
the needs and interests of the individual student. 3 semester 
hours credit. Hours to be arranged. Mr. Weil. 

*Physics 315. — Demonstrational Physics. — A course de- 
signed primarily for teachers of science in the high school. 
Problems from every day life will be selected and the laws of 
physics pertaining to them will be applied. Many lecture dem- 
onstrations will accompany the course, many of which can be 
used in the teaching of Physics in the high school to create 
interest in the subject. One year of college physics is pre- 
supposed and is a prerequisite for this course. 2 semester 
hours credit. Daily. E. 209. Hours to be arranged. Mr. Weil. 



*Only four of the courses starred will be given during the summer 
of 1929." 



78 University of Florida 

*Physics 317. — Modern Theories of Physics. — The aim 
of this course is to acquaint the student with the extraordi- 
nary advances made in physics during the last few years. 
X-Rays, radioactivity and the theories of atomic structure 
will be taken up in this course. The classroom discussions 
will be supplemented by demonstrations wherever possible. 
3 semester hours credit. Hours to be arranged. Mr. Bless. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Political Science 101. — American Government and Poli- 
tics. — A study of the structure and functions of our national 
and state governments. Throughout the course present-day 
political problems of national and local interest will be made 
subjects of class discussion. 3 semester hours credit. Daily 
9:00. A. 104. Mr. Tribolet. 

Political Science 102. — State and Municipal Govern- 
ment. — An outline of the growth of American municipalities 
and a study of the organs and functional mechanism of mod- 
ern cities of the United States and Europe. Emphasis is laid 
upon the newer tendencies in municipal government, includ- 
ing the commission form and city-manager plan. 3 semester 
hours credit. Daily 12:00. L. 210. Mr. Tribolet. 

sociology and social administration 

Sociology lllS. — General Social Science. — Designed to 
help students to understand themselves and to give some in- 
sight into the problems of human living together. A non- 
technical, genetic approach, and an extensive study of the in- 
dividual and of social relations. Required of Freshmen in 
Teachers College who do not elect the Social Science Group. 
2 semester hours credit. Two sections : 

Section 1. M. T. Th. F. 8:00. L. 211. Mr. Carleton. 

Section 2. M. T. Th. F. 12 :00. L. 212. Mr. Carleton. 

Sociology 112S. — General Social Science. — A continua- 
tion of Sociology Ills. 2 semester hours credit. M. W. Th. 
S. 10:00. L. 211. Mr. Carleton. 



I 



*Only four of the courses starred will be given during the summer 
of 1929. 



Summer School 79 

Sociology 231. — Community Recreation. — A course of 
practical training in community leadership ; evaluation of in- 
door and outdoor recreational programs ; various games and 
stunts ; methods of organizing and promoting social entertain- 
ments for all occasions. 1 semester hour credit. M. Th. 9 :00. 
Gymnasium. Miss Hill. 

Sociology 259. — The Visiting Teacher. — The Visiting 
Teacher Movement with special emphasis on the problem 
child. 1 semester hour credit. First two weeks of session. M. 
T. W. Th. F. 2:00-4:00. L. 109. Miss Taylor. 

Sociology 311. — Problems of Child Welfare. — Conserva- 
tion of life; health and physique; training and education in- 
cluding industrial and moral; child labor; juvenile delin- 
quency; problems of dependent children. 2 semester hours 
credit. M. W. Th. S. 10:00. L. 109. Mr. Bristol. 

Sociology 313. — Florida Laws Affecting Child Welfare. — 
A study of the laws of Florida affecting child welfare and 
needed changes. Classes during the second two weeks of 
Summer School. 1 semester hour credit. M. T. Th. F. 2 :00- 
4:00. L. 109. Mr. Bristol. 

Sociology 441. — Principles of Sociology. — A brief study 
of the principles of social evolution, social organization, social 
control and social progress. 3 semester hours credit. Daily 
9:00. L. 203. Mr. Bristol. 

Sociology 442. — Applied Sociology. — The principles of 
efficient living together in society developed in the preceding 
course will be applied to concrete problems in the interest of 
social progress. Special consideration will be given to increas- 
ing the span of productive life, to increasing the production 
and diffusion of the social income and to the diffusion of effi- 
cient socialized education. Prerequisite: Consent of instruc- 
tor. 3 semester hours credit. Daily 12:00. L. 109. Mr. Bris- 
tol. 

Sociology 545. — Seminar in Methods of Social Progress. — 
For graduate students. To be taken in connection with Soci- 
ology 442 with occasional meetings for special reports. 3 se- 
mester hours credit. P. 106. Mr. Bristol. 



80 University of Florida 

V 

SPANISH 

Spanish 21. — This is the first semester of beginners' 
Spanish, and will cover such matters as pronunciation, forms, 
elementary syntax, vocabulary, diction, and written exercises. 
Textbook: Harder and Tarr, "A First Spanish Grammar" 
(Gill and Co., Atlanta). 3 semester hours credit. Daily 11 :00. 
P. 209. Mr. Hathaway. 

Spanish 22. — Second semester of beginners' Spanish; 
continues course above described, using the same grammar as 
Spanish 21. Adds as a reader, "Cuentos Contados" (Heath 
and Co., New York) . Prerequisite : Spanish 21, or its equiva- 
lent. 3 semester hours credit. Daily 9 :00. P. 209. Mr. Hath- 
away. 

Spanish 102. — This is the second semester of second year 
Spanish ; like the first in matters covered, except that the sec- 
ond year requires more in the quantity and the quality of the 
work. Textbooks: Galland and Brenes-Meser's, "Spanish 
Grammar Review" (Allyn and Bacon, Atlanta). For reading 
and study in class Owen's edition of Baroja's "Zalocain el 
Aventurero" (Heath and Co., New York). Prerequisites: 
Spanish 21, 22 and 101, or their equivalent. 3 semester hours 
credit. Daily 8:00. P. 209. Mr. Hathaway. 

SPEECH 

Speech 332. — The Speaking Voice. — The aim of this 
course is to enable students to acquire for themselves attrac- 
tive voices and to equip teachers to develop in their pupils 
pleasing and attractive voices. Affords much practice in 
speaking and in oral reading under careful, constructive criti- 
cism. 2 semester hours credit. M. W. Th. F. 12 :00. P. 205. 
Miss Payne. 

Speech 333. — Story-Telling. — The art of telling stories 
aloud to children. The principles are carefully studied and 
much practice is given. Constructive analysis is afforded of 
the performance of each student. 2 semester hours credit. 
M. T. Th. F. 2:00. P. 205. Miss Payne. 

Speech 433. — The Conduct of Dramatics in the Public 
School. — The principles and practices of staging plays under 



Summer School 81 

school conditions. One long play and several short plays are 
actually produced, in public performance, by the class. Ele- 
ments of the technique of coaching and of staging; lighting, 
backgrounds; inexpensive furnishings and costumes. 2 se- 
mester hours credit. M. W. Th. S. 10:00. P. 205. Miss Payne. 



82 



University of Florida 



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Summer School 85 

INDEX 

Page 

Accounting ^^ 

Admission ^^ 

Advanced Standing ^" 

47 
Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Anglo-Saxon 

47 
Animal Husbandry 

Announcements „ , 

84 
Apartments 

Architecture 

Arts, Fine 

Art, Public School "" °^ 

Athletic Coaching - 23, 50 

Athletics J^ 

Auditorium 

Bachelor's Degrees, Requirements 

Baseball ^J 

Basketball ^™ 

Biology 

Board ^^ 

Boarding Houses ^^'^^ 

Books 2'^ 

Buildings and Equipment ^^ 

Bulletin Boards ^^ 

Business Administration Courses 52-54 

Calculus ^^ 

o 

Campus, Plan 

Certificates 

Chaucer ^^ 

Chemistry ^^'^^ 

Child Study ^^ 

City, University • ■'^ 

Civics ^^ 

Clubs 20 

Coaching 23, 50 

Commercial Art "'* 

Correspondence Work Permitted 38 

Courses 47-81 

Credit ^^ 

Curricula 30-36 

Dairying ^' 

Deans ^° 

Degrees 30-37 

Demonstration School 21 

Design 64-65 

Dormitory Rooms 27 



86 University of Florida 

Page 

Dramatics 80-81 

Drawing 52 

Economics 52 

Education 54-61 

Employment Bureau 21 

English 61-63 

Entrance 29 

Entrance Examinations 29-30 

Equipment, Buildings 13 

Evaluation of Credits 30 

Expenses 25 

Extension of Certificates - 41 

Faculty 6 

Faculty Advisers - 18 

Fees 25 

First Grade Certificate 41 

Football 50 

French 65 

General Assembly 19 

General Natural Science 65 

General Social Science 78 

General Statement 13 

Geography 66 

Glee Club 71 

Government, Cooperative 18 

Graduate Courses, Education 58 

Graduate State Certificate 40 

Graduate Study 37 

Group Requirements 31-36 

Handwork, Primary 56 

Harmony 71 

Health Education 55 

Health and Medical Advice 19 

High School Credit 14, 39 

Historical Note 12 

History 66-67 

Home Nursing 73 

Honor System IS 

Horticulture 47 

Infirmary 19 

Kappa Delta Pi 20 

Kindergarten 21 

Laboratory fees 25-26 

Latin 67 

Law 68 

Law College 26, 29 

Library 15 

Library Science 15, 23, 68 



Summer School 87 

Page 

Literature 62, 63 

Loan Fund 28 

Master's Degree, Requirements 37 

Mathematics 69-71 

Maximum and Minimum Hours 39 

Medical Advice 19 

Minor Sports 75 

Money 26 

Music 24, 71 

Nature Study 72 

Normal Diploma 30-38 

Nursing Education 25, 72-73 

Office Management 53-54 

Officers of Administration 4 

Organ 24, 72 

Painting : 64 

Philosophy 73-74 

Phi Kappa Phi 20 

Physical Education - 74-75 

Physics 76-78 

Pirates of Penzance 16, 17 

Placement Bureau 21 

Play Production 80-81 

Political Science 78 

Poultry Husbandry 48 

Project Method 57 

Psychology 56, 57, 74 

Railroad Rates 22 

Refund of Fees 26 

Registration 42-46 

Registration Fee 25 

Religious and Social Life 17 

Requirements for Admission 29 

Reservation of Room 27 

Residence Requirement 38 

Rooming Houses 82-83 

Second Grade Certificate 41 

Scholarships 24, 27-28 

Shakespeare 63 

Shop, Farm 59 

Shorthand 53-54 

Societies 20 

Sociology 78-79 

Spanish 80 

Speech 80-81 

Supervised Teaching , 58 

Summer School News 20 

Tests and Measurements 57, 58 



88 University of Florida 

Page 

Textbooks 27 

Third Grade Certificate 40 

Track 51 

Typing 53-54 

University Club 20 

Voice 24, 72 

Y. M.-W. C. A 17 



V 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

College of Law 



GAINESVILLE 




TWENTY-FIRST 

ANNUAL ANNOUNCEMENT 

1929-30 



THE UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 

1929-1930 

1929 

June 10, Monday Summer Session begins. 

June 22, Saturday - Last day for filing application for degrees 

at the end of the Summer Session. 

July 4, Thursday Independence Day. 

July 8, Monday Last day to make Graduate applications. 

July 17, Wednesday _ - Last day for submitting theses to the 

Graduate Committee. 

July 31, Wednesday, 8:00 p. m Summer Session Commencement Convo- 
cation. 

August 2, Friday, 5:00 p. m Summer Session ends. 

August 12, Monday Farmers' Week begins. 

August 31, Saturday Last day for filing applications for fall 

re-examinations. 

First Semester 

September 12-14, Thursday to Sofurday.... Re-examinations and Entrance Examina- 
tions. 

September 16-20, Monday thru Friday Freshman registration and Orientation, 

including engineering qualifying exam- 
ination and other tests. (A special pro- 
gram of the routine of this week wiU 
be available by June 1, 1929.) All 
Freshmen must be present at the Uni- 
versity Auditorium at 11:00 o'clock 
a. m., Monday, September 16, or they 
will not be registered during that week, 
and will be required to pay the fees for 
late registration. 

September 19-20, Thursday and Friday Registration of Upperclassmen. 

September 21, Saturday AU classes will meet for the assignment of 

work for classes on Monday and Tues- 
day of the succeeding week. Late reg- 
istration fee for all students. 

September 30, Monday „ Changes in courses — fee $5.00. 

Annual meeting of Extension Agents. 

October 5, Saturday _ Meeting of the General Faculty. 

October 16, Wednesday, 8:00 a. m Registration for classes in the first seni' 

ester closes. Final date for making 
applications for degrees at the end of 
the first semester. 

October 19, Saturday _ Last day for dropping courses without 

grade. 

October 24, Thursday...- _ All Freshman grades are due. 

November 1, Friday Last day for Graduate applications. 

November 11, Monday Armistice Day. 

November 21, Thursday _ Midsemester grades are due. 

November 24, Saturday, 12:00 noon Midsemester grades are delinquent. 



I 



' November 28, Thursday Thanksgiving Day. 

\ December 18, Wednesday Freshman grades are due. 

December 20, Friday, 5:00 p. m Christmas recess begins. 

1930 

January 6, Monday, 8:00 a. m Christmas recess ends. 

January 6, Monday and continuing for 

three weeks Students file registration cards for the 

second semester with the Registrar, fol- 
lowing the schedule as posted on the 
bulletin boards. 
January 18, Saturday Last date for submitting theses to Gradu- 
ate Committee. 

January 24, Friday, 9 a. m Final examinations for the first semester 

begin. 
January 31-February 1, Friday and Sat- 

f^^day Registration of new students for the sec- 
ond semester. 
All semester grades are due 5:00 p. m., 
Saturday. 
February 1, Saturday, 8:00 p. m Commencement convocation. 

Second Semester 

February 3, Monday Second semester begins. 

Changes in registration due to first sem- 
ester failures. Late registration fee be- 
gins. 

February 4, Tuesday Second semester classes begin. Change in 

courses — fee $5.00. 

February 8, Saturday Meeting of the General Faculty. 

February 15, Saturday Registration for second semester closes. 

March 1, Saturday Last date for applications for degrees at 

the end of the second semester. 
Last date for filing Graduate applications 
for those entering the second semester. 

March 8, Saturday Last day for dropping a course without 

grade. 

AprU 3, Thursday Midsemester grades are due. 

April 5, Saturday, 12:00 noon Midsemester grades are delinquent. 

May 20, Tuesday Last day for submitting theses to Graduate 

Committee. 

May 23, Friday Final examinations begin. 

May 31, Saturday Meeting of the General Faculty. 

June 1-3, Sunday to Tuesday Commencement exercises. 

June 1, Sunday, 11:00 a. m Baccalaureate Sermon. 

June 2, Monday Annual Alumni Meeting. 

Class Day Exercises. 
Oratorical Contests. 

June 3, Tuesday Commencement Convocation. 

June 2, Monday _ Boys' Club Week begins. 

June 16, Monday Summer Session begins. 

August 8, Friday Summer Session ends. 



BOARD OF CONTROL 

p. K. YoNCE, Chairman Pensacola 

Albert H. Blanding Bartow 

W. B. Davis Perry 

Edward W. Lane - Jacksonville 

Frank J. Wideman West Palm Beach 

J. T. Diamond, Secretary, Tallahassee 



STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

Doyle E. Carlton Governor 

H. Clay Crawford Secretary of State 

W. V. Knott State Treasurer 

Fred H. Davis Attorney General 

W. S. Cawthon, Secretary.^ ^...State Superintendent of Public Instruction 



UNIVERSITY COUNCIL 

John James Tigert, M.A. (Oxon.), Ed.D., D.C.L., LL.D President of the University 

Jas. M. Farr, Ph.D Vice President of the University 

Jas. N. Anderson, Ph.D _ Dean «/ the College of Arts and Sciences 

WiLMON Newell, D.Sc Dean of the College of Agriculture 

J. R. Benton, Ph.D Dean of the College of Engineering and Architecture 

Harry R. Trusler, LL.B _ Dean of the College of Law 

Jas. W. Norman, Ph.D _ Dean of the Teachers College 

TowNES R. Leigh, Ph.D Dean of the College of Pharmacy 

Walter J. Matherly, M.A Dean of the College of Commerce and Journalism 

Bert Clair Riley, B.A. Dean of the General Extension Division 

Harley Willard Chandler, M.S Secretary, Registrar 

Benjamin Arthur Tolbert, B.A Dean of Students 



RESIDENT FACULTY 



JOHN JAMES TIGERT, M.A. (Oxon.), Ed.D., D.C.L., LL.D. 
President of the University 

HARRY RAYMOND TRUSLER, A.M., LL.B. (Michigan) 
Dean and Professor of Law 

CLIFFORD WALDORF CRANDALL, B.S., LL.B. (Michigan) 
Professor of Law 

ROBERT SPRATT COCKRELL, M.A., B.L. (Virginia) 
Professor of Law 

DEAN SLAGLE, A.M., LL.B. (Yale) 
Professor of Law 

GEORGE WASHINGTON THOMPSON, B.S., LL.B. (Michigan) 
Professor of Law 

CLARENCE JOHN TE SELLE, M.A., LL.B. (Wisconsin) 
Professor of Law 

JAMES WESTBAY DAY, A.M., J.D. (Florida) 
Assistant Professor of Law 

STANLEY SIMONDS, A.B.. Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins) 
Lectwrer on Roman Law 



PRISCILLA McCALL KENNEDY 
Librarian and Secretary 

ILA ROUNTREE PRIDGEN 
Assistant Librarian 



University of Florida 



HISTORY 



Largely thru the influence of Hon. Nathan P. Bryan, 
ihen a member of the Board of Control, the College of Law 
was established in 1909. From this time until 1917 the course 
comprised the work of two years. With the session of 1917-18 
the present three-year course was inaugurated. 

At first the College was quartered in Thomas Hall, one of 
the dormitories. At the opening of the session of 1913-14 
more spacious rooms were provided in Language Hall. During 
the following summer and fall the present structure was 
erected and on Thanksgiving Day, 1914, the College, with 
fitting ceremonies, took possession of its own home, one of the 
finest law school buildings in the South. 

PURPOSE 

It is the purpose of the College to impart a thoro, scientific, 
and practical knowledge of the law, and thus to equip its 
students to take advantage of the splendid opportunities the 
present readjustments in business and social life are creating. 
It aims to develop keen, efficient lawyers, conversant with the 
ideals and traditions of the profession. Its policy is character- 
ized by the emphasis of practice as well as theory; pleading 
as well as historical perspective ; skill in brief making as well 
as legal information. 

EQUIPMENT 

Building. — This splendid structure is one hundred seventy- 
two feet long, seventy feet wide, and two and one-half stories 
high. It contains a large, well-lighted library, furnished with 
bookstacks, library tables, librarian's office, and consultation 
rooms for students and faculty. It has three commodious 
lecture-rooms, together with the offices of administration, and 
the offices of the several resident professors. It contains, 
also, a handsomely paneled courtroom and auditorium. The 
courtroom has all the usual accessories, jury box, witness 
stand, judge's office, and jury room, and is connected with 
the library below by a circular stairway. Every interest of 
the College has been provided for, including attractive quar- 
ters for the Marshall Debating Society. The building is steam- 
heated, lighted by electricity, and equipped thruout with a 
superior grade of furniture. It is devoted exclusively to the 



College of Law 7 

uses of the College of Law and furnishes accommodations aa 
comfortable and as convenient as can be found in the country. 

Library. — The Law Library contains all the published 
reports of the courts of last resort of every State in the Union 
and of the Federal Courts, the full English Reprints, the Eng- 
lish Law Reports, Law Journal Reports, Dominion Law Re- 
ports, the reports of the Interstate Commerce Commission 
and the Land Decisions of the Department of the Interior be- 
sides an excellent collection of digests, encyclopedias, series 
of selected cases, treatises and text books, both English and 
American. The Library also contains the Statutes of several 
of the States besides those of the Federal Government, and 
is a subscriber to the leading legal periodicals. A course of 
instruction is given in legal bibliography and the use of law 
books. Every facility also is offered law students to make use 
of the General Library, in which are included works of inter- 
est and information to the lawyer. Both libraries are open 
during the academic year on every secular day between the 
hours of 8:00 A. M. and 10:00 P. M. and are in charge of 
trained librarians, who will render such aid as the students 
may need in their use of the books. 

Henderson Memorial Library. — The College gratefully 
acknowledges the gift of the library of the late John W. Hen- 
derson of Tallahassee. This splendid collection of law books, 
containing volumes of rare value and historical importance, 
will be maintained intact in memory of its donor. 

Gymnasium. — A brick and stone structure of two storiea 
and basement, one hundred and six feet long and fifty-three 
wide. It is steam-heated, supplied with hot water, and well- 
lighted and ventilated. A gallery around the main floor pro- 
vides space for spectators at gymnastic exhibitions. The base- 
ment contains lockers, shower baths and toilets. Adjacent ia 
a swimming-pool, thirty-six feet long and twenty-four feet 
wide, and from four and one half to seven feet deep. Organized 
classes are conducted by the Professor of Physical Culture. 

Fleming Field. — A large and well-kept athletic field 
equipped for the various outdoor games and sports which in 
this climate are carried on the year round. 



University of Florida 



ADMISSION 



Requirements for Admission. — Those entering as candi- 
dates for degrees must be eighteen years of age and must 
present, in addition to sixteen high school units, two years of 
college work of not less than sixty-eight semester hours ac- 
ceptable for a bachelor's degree. Evidence of this work must 
be presented to the Registrar of the University on or before 
the date on which the candidate wishes to register. 

The College reserves the right to reject students whose 
admission credits do not average C. 

A high school unit represents a course of study pursued 
thruout the school year with five recitation periods of at least 
forty-five minutes per week, four courses being taken during 
each of the four years. 

Seven of the high school units are prescribed, viz: Eng- 
lish 3; Mathematics 2; History 1; Science 1. The remaining 
units may be chosen from among the subjects regularly taught 
in a standard high school, although not more than four will be 
accepted in vocational subjects — agriculture, mechanic arts, 
stenography, typewriting, etc. 

The University will accept certificates of graduation from 
accredited Florida high schools. Certificates of graduation 
will also be accepted from Florida high schools that are mem- 
bers of the Southern Association of Secondary Schools, and 
from any secondary school elsewhere which is accredited by 
its State university. 

The certificate must be officially signed by the principal 
of the school attended, and must be presented to the Registrar 
on or before the date on which the candidate wishes to reg- 
ister. It must state in detail the work of preparation and, in 
the case of Florida high schools, that the course thru the 
twelfth grade has been satisfactorily completed. Students not 
presenting a statement of graduation from high school will 
be required to take entrance examinations in all subjects pre- 
sented for entrance. 

Blank certificates, conveniently arranged for the desired 
data, will be sent to all high-school principals and, upon 
application, to prospective students. 



College of Law 9 

No specific course of studies is prescribed for the college 
work required for admission; but, in general, students are 
advised to pursue the course offered by the College of Arts 
and Sciences or by the College of Commerce. Thereby it will 
be easier for them to complete the combined academic and 
law course should they so desire. 

Women Students. — By an Act of the Legislature of 1925, 
women who are twenty-one years of age and who fully meet 
the entrance requirements of the College may enter as candi- 
dates for degrees. 

Special Students. — The practice of admitting special stu- 
dents (i. e., those not meeting the requirements for admis- 
sion) has been discontinued. 

Advanced Standing. — No work in law done in other in- 
stitutions will be accepted towards a degree, unless the appli- 
cant passes satisfactorily the examinations held in the sub- 
jects in question in this College, or unless credit is given with- 
out examination. Credit of an average of C from schools 
which are members of the Association of American Law 
Schools, of which this College is a member, will be accepted 
without examination. In no case will credit be given for work 
not done in residence at an approved law school. 

EXPENSES 

The yearly expenses of a law student who is a permanent 
legal resident, exclusive of incidentals, may be summarized 
as follows: 

Tuition $40.00 

Registration Fee and Contingent Fee 7.50 

Student Activity Fee 23.60 

Infirmary Fee 9.00 

Locker Service Fee 1.50 

Board and Lodging (in advance) 200.00 

Books (about) 65.00 

346.60 

An additional fee of five dollars ($5.00) is required of 
students who do not complete their registration on the dates 
set by the Council. 



10 University of Florida 

Registration is not complete until all University bills are 
paid. Those who fail to meet this obligation are not regarded 
as members of the University. 

Students who are assigned to student service will be re- 
quired to pay their fees at the beginning of the semester m 
cash; and at the end of the semester, or at such time as the' 
service to which they are assigned is completed, the University 
will pay them in cash for the work done. 

No refund of any fees except unused portions of labora- 
tory fees, will be made after the student has attended class 
for three days. 

Tuition is payable in advance, $20,00 each semester. 
Students taking less than eleven hours of w^ork are charged 
a proportionate part of the full tuition. 

Non-resident students will pay an additional tuition fee of 
$100.00 for the year, $50.00 per semester in advance. The 
burden of proof as to residence is with the student. Any stu- 
dent who registers improperly under the above rule will be 
required to pay the non-resident tuition and also a penalty 
of $10.00. 

A diploma fee of five dollars ($5.00), is charged all candi- 
dates for degrees. 

Students are urged to provide themselves with the Statutes 
of their state and a law dictionary. These books will form a 
nucleus for a future library, and by the purchase of second- 
hand books the cost may be materially reduced. 

The charge for board and lodging and janitor service is 
one hundred dollars ($100.00) per semester in the old dormi- 
tories and one hundred-sixteen ($116.00) in the new, payable 
at the beginning of each semester. 

For more detailed statements reference is made to the 
University catalog, pp. 43-45. 

Board and lodging in private homes may be secured at the 
rate of thirty-five to forty-five dollars ($35.-$45.00) per 
month. For copy of lists and advance information, address 
the General Secretary, Y.M.C.A., University of Florida. 

The dormitories are inadequate. Freshmen are given pref- 
erence in reservations. Students wishing to stay in them are 
urged to reserve their rooms at the earliest possible date. Ap- 
plication should be made to Mr. K. H. Graham, Business 
Manager. 



College of Law 11 

A room reservation fee of $10.00 is charged for dormitory 
space, and is payable in advance. This fee is retained as a de- 
posit until the student gives up his room, when refund, less 
any charges for damages incurred during his residence there, 
is made. 

UNIVERSITY PRIVILEGES 

Electives in Other Colleges. — The advantages of the 
other colleges of the University are open to such students in 
the College of Law as desire and are able to accept them. 
Courses in History, Economics, Sociology, Psychology, Logic, 
English, and Speech are particularly recommended. No extra 
charge is made for such courses, but they can be taken only 
with the consent of the Dean. 

Military Science and Tactics. — The University has an 
Infantry Unit, Senior Division of the Reserve OflEicers' Train- 
ing Corps, to membership in which law students are eligible. 
They are not required, however, to join this organization or 
to take any other military drill. 

Marshall Debating Society. — Early in the first year of 
the College the students organized a society that would secure 
to its members practice in debating and public speaking and 
experience in arguing legal questions, as well as drill in parlia- 
mentary law. The society was fittingly named "The Marshall 
Debating Society", in honor of the distinguished Southern 
jurist, John Marshall. 

PRIZES 

Thru the generosity of The American Law Book Com- 
pany a Corpus Juris-Cyc prize is offered, under certain con- 
ditions, for the best work in legal research. Excellency in this 
work also will be considered in computing the grade of students 
taking Brief Making. 

The Harrison Company of Atlanta kindly offers a set of the 
Photographic Reprint of the Florida Supreme Court Reports, 
vols. 1-22, to the senior doing all his work in this institution 
and making the highest record during his law course. 

DEGREES 

Bachelor of Laws. — The degree of Bachelor of Laws 
(LL.B.) is conferred upon those students who satisfactorily 



12 University of Florida 

complete eighty-five semester hours of law which must include 
all of the first year subjects. Students admitted to advanced 
standing may receive the degree after one year's residence, 
but in no case will the degree be granted unless the candidate 
is in actual residence during all of the third year and passes 
in this College at least twenty-eight semester hours of law. 

Juris Doctor. — Students who have complied with all the 
requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Laws (LL.B.), 
who have maintained an average standing in their law studies 
of 10% above the passing mark, and who have obtained the 
degree of A.B., or an equivalent degree, from an approved 
college or university, or who secure such degree the same year 
they complete their law course, will be awarded the degree of 
Juris Doctor (J.D.). After 1929-30 the average standing 
must be B. 

Combined Academic and Law Course. — By pursuing an 
approved course of collegiate and law studies a student may 
earn both the academic and the legal degree in six years. 
Candidates for either the A.B. or the B.S. degree may elect 
twelve year-hours of work from the first year of the course 
of the College of Law and count the same as credits toward 
the aforesaid degrees. Such degrees will not be conferred, 
however, until after the completion of the second year of the 
law work. See University Catalog, pp. 63, 122. 

ADMISSION TO THE BAR 

Upon presenting their diplomas, duly issued by the proper 
authorities, and upon furnishing satisfactory evidence that 
they are twenty-one years of age and of good moral character, 
the graduates of the College are licensed, without examina- 
tion, to practice in the courts of Florida. They also are ad- 
mitted without examination to the United States District 
Court for the Northern District of Florida. 

GRADES 

Grades are recorded by use of the letters A (95-100), B 
(86-94), C (77-85), D (70-76), E (below 60). D is the low- 
est passing grade. E is failure. 



College of Law 13 

Other special grades are I (Incomplete) ; X (missed ex- 
amination with excuse by instructor). 

The grade of I must be removed within two months or it 
will be recorded E. 

In addition to passing the required courses, students must 
average C in all courses used for meeting the requirements of 
a degree. In computing an average, each semester hour with 
A gives three points, each hour of B, two points, each hour 
of C, one point. Other grades give no points. 

EXAMINATIONS 

Searching examinations are held at the end of each semes- 
ter. 

No fee is charged those taking an examination at the reg- 
ular semester examination period. To take an examination at 
any other regularly scheduled time, the student must secure a 
card from the Registrar and pay a fee of $2.00 for each sub- 
ject, the maximum charge of any period for such examina- 
tions being fixed at $5.00. 

A fee of $5.00 is charged for each examination given at a 
time other than the regularly scheduled examination. 

Re-examinations have been abolished. 

FAILURE IN STUDIES 

A final grade, based upon the examination and the monthly 
grades, is assigned for each semester's work. If this grade 
falls below D, the student is considered to have failed and 
may proceed only with the permission of his Dean. 

A student who fails fifty per cent or more of his work for 
the mid-semester or for the semester, or for the Summer 
School, luill be dropped from the University hy the Registrar 
and will he re-instated at the discretion of his Dean, if he 
makes application for such reinstatement not later than forty- 
eight hours (exclusive of Saturday afternoons, Sundays, and 
holidays) after the notice has beeyi mailed to his University 
address by the Registrar. 

A student who fails fifty per cent or more of his work 
twice is automatically dropped from the University. These 
tiuo failures need not be consecutive. 



14 University of Florida 

A student dropped for failure in studies at the mid-semes- 
ter may re-register for the following semester, or for the 
Summer School; a student dropped at the close of the first 
semester may re-register for the Summer School or for the 
following fall semester. 

A student who has been dropped twice for failure in stud- 
ies may never again register in any college at the University 
of Florida, except by permission of the University Council. 
Every portion of this rule is applicable to special students, to 
students registered in nfiore than one college at one time, and 
to students who transfer from one college to another. 

STUDENT RULES AND REGULATIONS 

No attempt is made in this announcement to give a synop- 
sis of the student rules and regulations of the University. 
These recently have been compiled and revised, many im- 
portant changes being made. It is expected that they will be 
printed and ready for distribution by the beginning of the 
session of 1929-30, and students are urged to familiarize 
themselves therewith. 

PLEADING AND PRACTICE 

Courses. — Differing from some other law schools, this 
College is convinced that an intensive knowledge of pleading 
and practice should be secured by the student, since legal 
rights cannot be well understood without a mastery of the 
rules of pleading whereby they are enforced. As Lord Coke 
declared: "Good pleading is the touchstone of the true sense 
and knowledge of the common law." The development of 
right has depended upon the development of actions ; the rule 
of law was the rule of writs and in large measure remains so 
today. Consequently the College offers thoro courses in Crimi- 
nal Pleading and Procedure, Common Law Pleading, Equity 
Pleading, Florida Civil Practice, General Practice, and Fed- 
eral Procedure. Thus the student on graduation is enabled to 
enter understandingly upon the practice of law; and to this 
fact the College attributes much of the rapid advancement of 
its Alumni. 

As young men from all parts of the country in increasing 
numbers are attending the University, combining the ad- 



College of Law 15 

vantages of travel, new associations, and salubrious climate 
with those of the superior educational facilities here afforded, 
the College endeavors to serve those who intend to practice 
elsewhere as efficiently as those who expect to locate in this 
State. 

The Practice Court. — Believing the students obtain in 
the Practice Court a better practical knowledge of pleading 
and practice than can be acquired in any other way, aside from 
the trial of actual cases, the Faculty lay special emphasis upon 
this work. Sessions of the Practice Court are held thruout 
the year in an admirably equipped courtroom. A clerk and a 
sheriff are appointed from the Junior class, and regular rec- 
ords of the court are kept. Each student is required to par- 
ticipate in the trial of at least one common law, one equity, 
and one criminal case, and is instructed in appellate procedure. 

The Practice Court is conducted by Professor Te Selle, 
assisted by Professors Cockrell and Day. 

SUMMER SESSIONS 

Starting in 1927, instruction has been offered during the 
summer. The sessions are eight weeks in length, the require- 
ments and standards of the regular session are maintained, 
and credit towards a degree is given for the work offered. 

The courses are varied from year to year and have at- 
tracted many students. Particulars for next summer may be 
obtained a month or so before the close of the regular session. 



16 University of Florida 

CURRICULUM 
FIRST YEAR 

FIRST SEMESTER 

301. Torts. — History and definitions ; elements of torts ; 
conflicting rights; mental anguish; parties to tort actions; 
remedies; damages; conflict of laws; methods of discharge; 
comprehensive study of particular torts; false imprisonment, 
malicious prosecution, abuse of process, conspiracy, slander 
and libel, trespass, conversion, deceit, nuisance, negligence, 
and others. Textbooks: Burdick on Torts and Burdick's 
Cases on Torts, fourth edition. (5 hours. Professor Trus- 
ler; Assistant, Professor Day.) 

303. Contracts. — Formation of contract; offer and ac- 
ceptance; form and consideration; reality of consent; legality 
of object; operation of contract; limits of the contract obliga- 
tion ; assignment of contract. Textbooks : Clark on Con- 
tracts, third edition ; Throckmorton's Cases on Contract, 
fourth edition. (Two sections. 3 hours. Professor Thomp- 
son.) 

305. Criminal Law. — Sources of criminal law ; nature and 
elements of crime; criminal intent; insanity; intoxication; 
duress; mistake of fact or law; justification; parties in crime; 
offenses against the person, habitation, property, public health 
and morals, public justice and authority, government, and 
the law of nations. Textbook : Clark on Criminal Law, third 
edition ; selected cases. (Two sections. 2 hours. Professor 
Cockrell.) 

307. Criminal Procedure. — Jurisdiction ; arrest ; prelim- 
inary examination and bail; grand jury, indictment and infor- 
mation and their sufficiency in form and substance ; arraign- 
ment, pleas, and motions ; nolle prosequi and motions to quash ; 
jeopardy; presence of defendant at the trial; verdict; new 
trial; arrest of judgment; judgment, sentence, and execution. 
Textbook: Clark's Criminal Procedure, second edition; selec- 
ted cases. (Two sections. 2 hours. Professor Cockrell.) 

309. Property. — Personal property ; possession and rights 
based thereon ; acquisition of title ; liens and pledges ; conver- 



College of Law 17 

sion. Textbook: Warren's Cases on Property. (Two sections. 
2 hours. Professor Crandall.) 

SECOND SEMESTER 

302. Equity Jurisprudence. — History and definition; 
jurisdiction; maxims; accident, mistake, fraud; penalties and 
forfeitures ; priorities and notice ; bona fide purchasers, estop- 
pel ; election ; satisfaction and performance ; conversion ; equit- 
able estates, interest, primary rights ; trusts ; powers, duties, 
and liabilities of trustees ; mortgages ; equitable liens ; assign- 
ments; specific performance; injunction; reformation; can- 
cellation; cloud on titles; ancillary remedies. Textbook: 
Eaton on Equity, second edition; selected cases. (5 hours. 
Professor Ti'usler; Assistant, Professor Day.) 

304. Contracts. — Joint obligations; interpretation of 
contracts; rules relating to evidence and construction; dis- 
charge of contract. Textbook: Throckmorton's Cases on Con- 
tract, fourth edition. (Two sections. 3 hours. Professor 
Thompson.) 

306. Marriage and Divorce. — Marriage in general; na- 
ture of the relation ; capacity of parties ; annulment ; divorce ; 
suit, jurisdiction, grounds; defenses; alimony; effect on prop- 
erty rights; custody and support of children; agreements of 
separation. Textbook: Vernier's Cases on Marriage and Di- 
vorce. (Two sections. 1 hour. Professor Cockrell.) 

308. Common Law Pleading. — History and development 
of the personal actions at common law ; theory of pleading and 
its peculiar features as developed by the jury trial; demur- 
rers, general and special; pleas in discharge, in exc.use, and 
by way of traverse; replication de injuria; duplicity; depart- 
ure ; new assignment ; motions based on pleadings ; general 
rules of pleadings. Textbook: Keigwin's Cases on Common 
Law Pleading. (Ttvo sections. 3 hours. Professor Crandall) 

312. Property. — Introduction to the law of conveyanc- 
ing; rights incident to the ownership of land, and estates 
therein, including the land itself, air, water, fixtures, emble- 
ments, waste; profits; easements; licenses; covenants run- 
ning with the land. Textbook: Warren's Cases on Property. 
(Two sections. 2 houi^s. Professor Crandall.) 



18 University of Florida 

SECOND YEAR 

FIRST SEMESTER 

401. United States Constitutional Law. — General 
principles; distribution of governmental powers; congress; 
the chief executive; the judiciary; police powers; eminent do- 
main; checks and balances; guarantee of republican govern- 
ment; civil rights; political privileges; guarantee in criminal 
cases; impairment of contractual obligations. Textbook: 
Hall's Cases on Constitutional Law. (^ hours. Professor 
Slagle.) 

403. Agency. — ^Nature of the relation; purposes and 
manner of creation ; who may be principal or agent ; ratifica- 
tion; delegation of authority; general and special agents; 
rights and duties of agents ; termination, nature, extent, con- 
struction, and execution of authority of agents ; rights, duties, 
and liabilities of agents ; principal and third persons inter se; 
particular classes of agents. Textbook: Mechem's Cases on 
Agency, second edition. (2 hours. Professor Thompson.) 

405. Equity Pleading. — Nature and object of pleading 
in equity; parties to a suit in equity; proceedings in a suit in 
equity; bills in equity, disclaimer; demurrers and pleas; 
answer and replication ; preparation of bills, demurrers, pleas, 
answers. Textbooks: Keigwin's Cases in Equity Pleading; 
Rules of the Circuit Court in Chancery in Florida; Rules of 
the Federal Court; Statutes of Florida. (3 hours. Professor 
Te Selle.) 

407. Brief Making and the Use of Law Books. — ^Where 
to find the law; how to use statutes and decisions; how to 
find the law ; the trial brief ; the brief on appeal and its prepa- 
ration. Textbook: Cooley's Brief Making and the Use of 
Law Books. (Two sections. 1 hour. Professor Day.) 

409. Property. — Titles and conveyancing, including ac- 
quisition of titles by possession, modes of conveyance at 
common law, under the statute of uses, and by statutory 
grant; the execution of deeds; estates created; covenants for 
titles; estoppel by deed; priorities among titles. Textbook: 
Warren's Cases on Conveyances. (3 hours. Professor Day.) 



College of Law 19 

411. Florida Constitutional Law. — Declaration of 
rights; departments of government; suffrage and eligibility; 
census and apportionment; counties and cities; taxation and 
finance; homestead and exemption; married women's prop- 
erty ; education ; public institutions ; miscellaneous provisions. 
Textbooks: Constitution, statutes, and judicial decisions of 
Florida. (2 hours. Professor Trusler.) 

413. Florida Civil Practice. — Organization of courts; 
parties; joinder and consolidation of actions; issuance, ser- 
vice, and return of process; appearance; trial; verdict; pro- 
ceedings after verdict; appellate proceedings; peculiar char- 
acteristics of the common law actions; special proceedings 
including certiorari, mandamus, prohibition, quo warranto, 
habeas corpus, attachment, garnishment, statutory liens, for- 
cible entry and detainer, landlord and tenant. Textbook: 
Crandall's Florida Civil Practice. (Section A. 3 hours. Pro- 
fessor Crandall.) 

417. Sales. — Sale and contract to sell ; statute of frauds ; 
illegality ; conditions and warranties ; delivery ; acceptance 
and receipt; vendor's lien; stoppage in transitu; bills of lad- 
ing; remedies of seller and buyer. Textbook: Tiifany on 
Sales, second edition. (1 hour. Professor Day.) 

SECOND SEMESTER 

402. Evidence. — Judicial notice; kinds of evidence; bur- 
den of proof; presumptions of law and fact; judge and jury; 
best evidence rule ; hearsay rule and its exceptions ; admis- 
sions ; confessions ; exclusions based on public policy and priv- 
ilege; corroboration; parol evidence rule; witnesses; attend- 
ance in court ; examination, cross examination, privilege ; pub- 
lic documents; records and judicial writings; private writ- 
ings. Textbook: Greenleaf on Evidence, sixteenth edition, 
Volume 1; selected cases. (4 hours. Professor Cockrell.) 

404. Quasi Contracts. — Origin and nature of quasi 
contract; benefits conferred in misreliance on rights or duty, 
from mistake of law, and on invalid, unenforceable, illegal, 
or impossible contract; benefits conferred through dutiful in- 
tervention in another's affairs; benefits conferred under con- 
straint; action for restitution as alternative remedy for 



20 University of Florida 

breach of contract and for tort. Textbook: Woodruff's 
Cases on Quasi Contracts. (2 hours. Professor Day.) 

406. Private Corporations. — Nature; creation and citi- 
zenship ; defective organization ; promotors ; powers and lia- 
bilities ; corporations and the State ; dissolution ; membership ; 
management ; creditors ; foreign corporations ; practice in 
forming corporations, preparing by-laws, electing officers, 
and in conducting corporate business. Textbooks: Clark on 
Private Corporations, and Wormser's Cases on Corporations. 
(4- hours. Professor Slagle.) 

408. Legal Ethics. — Admission of attorneys to practice ; 
taxation; privileges and exemptions; authority; liability to 
clients and to third parties; compensation; liens; suspension 
and disbarment; duties to clients, courts, professional breth- 
ren, and to society. Textbooks : Attorneys at Law in Ruling 
Case Law and the Code of Ethics adopted by the American 
Bar Association. (1 hour. Professor Day.) 

410. Property. — History of the law of wills and testa- 
ments; testamentary capacity and intent; kind of wills and 
testaments; execution, revocation, republication, revival of 
wills; descent; probate of wills and the administration of es- 
tates. Textbook: Mechem and Atkinson's Cases on Wills and 
Administration. (3 hours. Professor Thompson.) 

412. Florida Civil Practice. — Organization of courts; 
parties; joinder and consolidation of actions; issuance, ser- 
vice, and return of process ; appearance ; trial ; verdict ; pro- 
ceedings after verdict; appellate proceedings; peculiar char- 
acteristics of the common law actions ; special proceedings 
including certiorari, mandamus, prohibition, quo warranto, 
habeas corpus, attachment, garnishment, statutory liens, for- 
cible entry and detainer, landlord and tenant. Textbook: 
Crandall's Florida Civil Practice. (Section B. 3 hours. 
Professor Cockrell.) 

416. Insurance. — Theory, history, significance; insur- 
able interest; concealment, representations, warranties; sub- 
rogation; waiver and estoppel; assignees, beneficiaries; cred- 
itors; fire, life, marine, accident, guarantee, liability insur- 
ance. Textbooks: Humble's Law of Insurance and Humble's 
Cases on Insurance. (1 hour. Professor Te Selle.) 



College of Law 21 

THIRD YEAR 

FIRST SEMESTER 

503. Public Service Corporations. — Nature of public 
utilities; railroads and other common carriers of goods and 
passengers; telegraphs and telephones; light and water com- 
panies; inns; warehouses; elevators; stockyards; methods of 
incorporation; public control; rights and obligations at com- 
mon law and under federal and state statutes. Textbook : Wy 
man's Cases on Public Service Companies, third edition. (2 
hours. Professor Slagle.) 

505. Federal Procedure. — System of courts created 
under the authority of the United States, jurisdiction of the 
several courts and procedure therein; removal of cases from 
state courts; substantive law applied by federal courts; ap- 
pellate jurisdiction. Textbook: Rose on Federal Jurisdic- 
tion and Procedure, third students' edition. (2 hours. Pro- 
fessor Slagle.) 

509. Partnership. — Creation, nature, characteristics of 
d, partnership; nature of a partner's interest; nature, extent, 
duration of the partnership liability; powers of partners; 
rights, duties, remedies of partners inter se; rights and reme- 
dies of creditors; termination of partnership. Textbook: 
Gilmore's Cases on Partnership. (2 hours. Professor 
Thompson.) 

513. Property. — Conditional estates; licenses and waiv- 
ers; reversions and remainders; rule in Shelley's Case; fu- 
ture uses; future interests; executory devises and bequests; 
vesting of legacies; cross limitations; gifts; failure of issue; 
determination of classes; powers; rule against perpetuities; 
restraints on alienation. Textbook: Kale's Cases on Future 
Interests. (3 hours. Professor Crandall.) 

515. Mortgages. — Nature; elements; incidents of the re- 
lation; discharge; assignment; redemption; foreclosure; in- 
junction and account; extent of the lien; priority between 
mortgage liens and competing claims; equity of redemption. 
Textbook: Durfee's Cases on Mortgages. (2 hours. Profes- 
sor Cockrell.) 



22 University of Florida 

517. Roman Law. — The fundamental legal conceptions 
which are found in Roman Law. Readings in the Institutes 
of Gaius and Justinian (Robinson's Selections), with con- 
stant reference to Sohm — Institutes of Roman Law — trans- 
lated by Ledley. Topics assigned for reports. Lectures with 
chief stress on Private Law. (3 hours. Professor Simonds.) 

519. Trial Practice and Practice Court.* — Jurisdic- 
tion; process; the jury; instructions. Preparation of plead- 
ings and trial of cases. Textbook: McBaine's Cases on Trial 
Practice. (3 hours. Pi^ofessor Te Selle.) 

521. Trusts. — The Anglo-American system of uses and 
trusts; creation, transfer, extinguishment of trust interests; 
priorities between competing equities; construction of trust 
dispositions; charitable trusts. Textbook: Bogert on Trusts; 
selected cases. (2 hours. Professor Day.) 

SECOND SEMESTER 

502. Damages. — General principles; nominal; compensa- 
tory; exemplary; liquidated; direct and consequential; proxi- 
mate and remote; general and special; measure in contract 
and tort actions ; entire damages in one action ; mental suffer- 
ing; avoidable consequences; value; interest; lateral support; 
counsel fees and expenses of litigation; injuries to real prop- 
erty and limited interests; death by wrongful act; breaches 
of warranty. Textbook : Rogers' Law of Damages ; selected 
cases. (2 hours. Professor Trusler.) 

504. Municipal Corporations. — Creation of cities and 
towns; powers of a municipality, including public powers, 
power of taxation, power over streets and alleys, etc. ; obliga- 
tions and liabilities of municipal corporations; powers and 
liabilities of officers. Textbook: Elliott on Municipal Corpo- 
rations, second edition. (1 hour. Professor CrandalL) 

506. Negotiable Instruments. — Law merchant; defini- 
tions and general doctrines; contract of the maker, acceptor, 
certifier, drawer, indorser, vendor, accommodater, assurer; 



*In special cases permission may be given to take either Trial Prac- 
tice or Practice Court. 



College of Law 23 

proceedings before and after dishonor of negotiable instru- 
ments; absolute defenses; equities; payments; conflict of 
laws. Textbook: Britton's Cases on Bills and Notes. (3 
hours. Professor Day.) 

508. Conflict of Laws. — Jurisdiction; sources of law 
and comity; territorial jurisdiction; jurisdiction in rem and 
in personam; remedies, rights of action, procedure ; creation of 
rights; property rights; personal rights; inheritance; obliga- 
tions ex delicto and ex contractu; recognition and enforcement 
of rights; personal relations; property; inheritance; admin- 
istration of estates; judgments and obligations. Textbook: 
Lorenzen's Cases on Conflict of Laws, second edition. (3 
hours. Professor Slagle.) 

510. Abstracts. — Practical problems covering the inter- 
pretation of maps and the plotting of lots described by metes 
and bounds; the formal requisites of the different convey- 
ances in use in Florida; deeds executed by public and judi- 
cial officers; liens and contracts for the sale of lands. Text- 
books : Thompson's Examination of Titles ; Florida Statutes 
and selected Florida cases. (1 hour. Professor Thompson.) 

516. Roman Law.* — Readings, references, and reports. 
Subjects treated: Roman Public Law; Roman International 
Law ; Stoic Philosophy and the Jus Gentium ; Christianity and 
the Roman Law; Roman Law in Mediaeval Europe; The Re- 
vival of Roman Law; The Roman Element in Modern Juris- 
prudence. (3 hours. Professor Simonds.) 

518. Trial Practice and Practice Court. — Trials; ver- 
dicts; judgments; new trials; bills of exceptions. Preparation 
of pleadings and trial of cases. Textbook: McBaine's Cases 
on Trial Practice. (3 hours. Professor Te Selle.) 

520. Bankruptcy. — Federal and state bankruptcy legis- 
lation; who may become bankrupt; prerequisites to adjudica- 
tion; receivers; trustees; provable claims; exemptions; com- 
position; discharge; appeals. Textbook: Brittons' Cases on 
Bankruptcy. (2 hours. Professor Te Selle.) 



*Only three semester hours of Eoman Law will be counted toward a 
degree. * 



24 University of Florida 

522. Admiralty. — Jurisdiction; contracts, torts, crimes; 
maritime liens, ex contractu, ex delicto, priorities, discharge; 
bottomry and respondentia obligations; salvage; general av- 
erage. Textbook: Hughes on Admiralty. (2 hours. Profes- 
sor Slagle.) 



Those who desire further information concerning the 
College of Law may address letters of inquiry to Harry R. 
Trusler, Dean of the College of Law, Gainesville, Florida. 



College of Law 25 

REGISTER 



DEGREES CONFERRED 

May 28, 1929 



Juris Doctor 

Brown, Algernon Dana St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Denison, Edward O Fort Pierce, Fla. 

Harris, William Curry Key West, Fla. 

Jnman, Rudolph Joe Lake City, Fla. 

Kendall, Michael M Winter Haven, Fla. 

Roberts, Nathan J Daytona Beach, Fla. 

Stanly, Richard Lee Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. 

Thacker, Omer Stephen Kissimmee, Fla. 

Bachelor of Laws 

Aikin, Horace Dean St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Airth, George Edward Live Oak, Fla. 

Anderson, Jr., Charles B Tampa, Fla. 

Atwater, Jr., James M Burlington, N. C. 

Bancroft, Winthrop Jacksonville, Fla. 

Baynard, Henry Swinton St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Bennett, Stanley LeRoy Prospect Plains, N. J. 

Bishop, Howard Wayne Gainesville, Fla. 

Black, Arthur Keith Lakeland, Fla. 

Bouvier, Jr., John Andre Gainesville, Fla. 

Bradford, A. Lee Miami, Fla. 

Bryan, Allan Jacksonville, Fla. 

Buie, Jr., George Archibald Lake City, Fla. 

Burr, Raymond Orlando Tallahassee, Fla. 

Casebier, Herbert Nicholas Kathleen, Fla. 

Cannon, Frank Thomson Falmouth, Fla. 

Cleveland, Jr., Wilburn A Jacksonville, Fla. 

Davis, William Mahon St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Edelstein, Marcus Gainesville, Fla. 

English, Bernard Henry Lake City, Fla. 

Enwall, Hayford Octavius Gainesville, Fla. 

Fisher, Augustus Alston Pensacola, Fla. 

Frank, David Miami, Fla. 

Frazier, Jr., Joseph Wheeler Tampa, Fla. 

Garner, Jr., James Franklin Fort Myers, Fla. 

Gillis, Alva Knox Ponce de Leon, Fla. 

Graham, George Boyington Tampa, Fla. 

Graham, John Louis DeLand, Fla. 

Gramling, William Sanders Miami, Fla. 

Granger, Stanley Miami, Fla. 

Hendry, Jr., H. Asbury Tampa, Fla. 

Hill, William Logan Washington, D. C, 

Holsberry, John Edwin Pensacola, Fla. 

Hughes, Robert Lawrence Bartow, Fla. 

Judge, William William Daytona Beach, Fla. 

Kustoff, Michael Lake Wales, Fla. 

Lanier, David Madison, Fla. 

Lewis, Jr., Edward Clay Marianna, Fla. 

Linebaugh, Charles David Tampa, Fla. 

Long, Latimer Ashlay Polk City, Fla. 

McClain, Will Kelly Lebanon, Tenn. 

Messer, Jr., James Tallahassee, Fla. 



26 University of Florida 

Rifkin, Lewis Burney Miami, Fla. 

Ripley, Wayne Eugene South Jacksonville, Fla. 

Schwartz, Joseph Miami, Fla. 

Sears, Jr., William Joseph Jacksonville, Fla. 

Silverman, Sam Miami Beach, Fla. 

Smith, Allen Lowd New Smyrna, Fla. 

Swink, William Marion Woodruff, S. C. 

Thrower, Frank Briggs Quincy, Fla. 

Traxler, Leon William Alachua, Fla. 

Turner, Jr., Glover Manuel South Jacksonville, Fla. 

Vanderipe, Jr., John Fisk Bradenton, Fla. 

Williams, Nat Lawrence Miami, Fla. 

THIRD YEAR CLASS 

Abernathy, Jr., James Greenwood Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. 

Aikin, Horace Dean St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Airth, George Edward Live Oak, Fla. 

Anderson, Jr., Charles B Tampa, Fla. 

Atwater, Jr., James M Burrington, N. C. 

Bancroft, Winthrop Jacksonville, Fla. 

Bajmard, Henry Swinton St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Bennett, Stanley LeRoy Prospect Plains, N. J. 

Bishop, Howard Wayne Gainesville, Fla. 

Black, Arthur Keith Lakeland, Fla. 

Boozer, Elwin Claud West Palm Beach, Fla. 

Bouvier, Jr., John Andre Gainesville, Fla. 

Bradford, A. Lee Miami, Fla. 

Brown, Algernon Dana St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Bryan, Allan Jacksonville, Fla. 

Buie, Jr., George Archibald Lake City, Fla. 

Burr, Raymond Orlando Tallahassee, Fla. 

Casebier, Herbert Nicholas Kathleen, Fla. 

Cannon, Frank Thomson Falmouth, Fla. 

Chambliss, James Walter Tampa, Fla. 

Cleare, Jr., Allan Bruce Key West, Fla. 

Cleveland, Jr., Wilburn A Jacksonville, Fla. 

Davis, William Mahlon St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Dehoff, Philip Donald Jacksonville, Fla. 

Denison, Edward Fort Pierce, Fla. 

Edelstein, Marcus Gainesville, Fla. 

English, Bernard Henry Lake City, Fla. 

Enwall, Hayford Octavius Gainesville, Fla. 

Fisher, Augustus Alston Pensacola, Fla. 

Frank, David Miami, Fla. 

Frazier, Jr., Joseph Wheeler Tampa, Fla. 

Garner, Jr., James Franklin Fort Myers, Fla. 

Gillis, Alva Knox Ponce de Leon, Fla. 

Graham, George Boyington Tampa, Fla. 

Graham, John Louis DeLand, Fla. 

Gramling, William Sanders Miami, Fla. 

Granger, Stanley Miami, Fla. 

Guyton, Charles Moses Marianna, Fla. 

Hall, Malcolm Jackson Tampa, Fla. 

Harris, William Curry Key West, Fla. 

Hawley, Jr., Clifford Daniel Lakeland, Fla. 

Hendry, Jr., H. Asbury Tampa, Fla. 

Hill, William Logan Washington, D. C. 

Holsberry, John Edwin Pensacola, Fla. 

Hughes, Robert Lawrence Bartow, Fla. 

Inman, Rudolph Joe Lake City, Fla. 

Jordan, William Douglas New Smyrna, Fla. 



College of Law 27 

Judge, William William Daytona Beach, Fla. 

Kendall, Michael M Winter Haven, Fla. 

Kolbe, Henry Harold Waukegan, 111. 

Lanier, David Madison, Fla. 

Lewis, Jr., Edward Clay Marianna, Fla. 

Lewis, Jr., Henry Hays Marianna, Fla. 

Linebaugh, Charles David Tampa, Fla. 

Long, Latimer Ashlay Polk City, Fla. 

McClain, Will Kelly Lebanon, Tenn. 

Messer, Jr., James Tallahassee, Fla. 

Model, Jacob Gainesville, Fla. 

Pepper, Jr., William Mullen Gainesville, Fla. 

Pogue, Cyril E Orlando, Fla. 

Ramsey, Allan Collier Tampa, Fla. 

Reese, John Lewis Pensacola, Fla. 

Richards, Benjamin Pierpont Gainesville, Fla. 

Richards, John Lawler Tampa, Fla. 

Rifkin, Louis Burney Miami, Fla. 

Ripley, Wayne Eugene South Jacksonville, Fla. 

Rivers, Thomas Judson Green Cove Springs, Fla, 

Roberts, Nathan J - Daytona Beach, Fla. 

Sarra, Ernest LaMar Gainesville, Fla. 

Schwartz, Joseph Miami, Fla. 

Sears, Jr., William Joseph Jacksonville, Fla. 

Silverman, Sam Miami Beach, Fla. 

Smith, Allen Lowd New Smyrna, Fla. 

Smith, David Clair Wabasso, Fla. 

Stanly, George Booth Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. 

Stanly, Richard Lee Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. 

Stewart, Arthur Edward Coconut Grove, Fla. 

Swink, William Marion Woodruff, S. C. 

Thrower, Frank Briggs Quincy, Fla. 

Traxler, Leon William Alachua, Fla. 

Turner, Edward Eugene Stuart, Fla. 

Turner, Jr., Glover Manuel South Jacksonville, Fla. 

Vanderipe, Jr., John Fisk Bradenton, Fla. 

Vega, Jr., Celestino Camilo Tampa, Fla. 

Wallace, Samuel Delmar Gainesville, Fla. 

West, Jr., Thomas Franklin Gainesville, Fla. 

Williams, Nat Lawrence Miami, Fla. 

Wilson, Horace S Gainesville, Fla. 

Wise, Jacob Hooper Gainesville, Fla. 

SECOND YEAR CLASS 

Airth, Alfred Thomas Live Oak, Fla. 

Akridge, William Greenberry Cocoa, Fla. 

Ausley, Charles Saxon Tallahassee, Fla. 

Bailey, Wilfred George Port Richey, Fla. 

Bonsteel, Louis Spencer Lake City, Fla. 

Brandt, Edward Frederick Gainesville, Fla. 

Brooks, Roy Ray Tampa, Fla. 

Buck, Kenneth Victor Miami, Fla. 

Burch, Ernest William Ocala, Fla. 

Calvert, Donald Ellwood Newton Hamilton, Pa. 

Camp, Henry Nurney Ocala, Fla. 

Campbell, Byron Fred Hilliard, Fla. 

Carlton, Mabry A Jacksonville, Fla. 

Carlton, Thad Hudson Fort Pierce, Fla. 

Childs, Lawrence David St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Coleman, Burnis Theo Panama City, Fla. 

Connor, Warren William Pensacola, Fla. 



28 University of Florida 

Coogler, Monroe Alvin Brooksville, Fla. 

Cun-y, Edgar Hayden Nokomis, Fla. 

D'Alemberte, Daniel Willoughby Pensacola, Fla. 

Davis, Harold Gilbart St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Denham, George Leitner Bartow, Fla. 

Dubler, Sheldon Miami, Fla. 

Edwards, Carlos Leroy Miami, Fla. 

Evans, Lewis Alexander Gainesville, Fla. 

Farnsworth, Harold Charles Tampa, Fla. 

Featherstone, Leland Blane Miami, Fla. 

Felson, Edgar Martin Jacksonville, Fla. 

Ferguson, Chester Howell Wauchula, Fla. 

Fishier, H. W Fernandina, Fla. 

French, John Compton Tampa, Fla. 

Fuller, Herbert Francis New Smyrna, Fla. 

Getzen, Jr., James Culbert Webster, Fla. 

Gravely, Jr., Louis Overton Labelle, Fla. 

Green, Carl Roger St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Green, George Marvin Tampa, Fla. 

Crenelle, Edwin William Palm Harbor, Fla. 

Griggs, Hulbert Eugene Rockledge, Fla, 

Hardee, James Edward Madison, Fla. 

Helvenston, George Rudolph Jacksonville, Fla. 

Herlong, Jr., Albert Sydney Leesburg, Fla. 

Houk, Dean Charles St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Johnson, Arrie Lee Jay, Fla. 

Johnson, Dewey Macon Quincy, Fla. 

Kaplan, Harry Maurice Miami, Fla. 

Love, Francis Edmond Lake Worth, Fla. 

Love, Jr., Herbert A DeFuniak Springs, Fla. 

Luther, Charles William Daytona Beach, Fla. 

MacKenzie, Edward S Leesburg, Fla. 

McNatt, John Mathews Uvalda, Ga. 

Marks, Paul Harold Miami, Fla. 

Mathis, Jr., Charles Carvel Hastings, Fla. 

Meeth, Jr., Louis Henry New Port Richey, Fla. 

Miller, Edwin Lee Orlando, Fla. 

Moyer, Martin Hartwell Fort White, Fla. 

Owenby, Jr., Carl Lester Lakeland, Fla. 

Phillips, William Sigmon Tampa, Fla. 

Piatt, William Zachary Arcadia, Fla. 

Rawls, Vernon Charles Gainesville, Fla. 

Ray, William Newton Pensacola, Fla. 

Rothstein, Abe Jacksonville, Fla. 

Saloman, Morris Seymour Orlando, Fla. 

Schoize, Robert Ellis Miami, Fla. 

Simpson, Arthur Allen Jacksonville, Fla. 

Stone, Wilbur Charles St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Tedder, Warren Louis Live Oak, Fla. 

Thomas, Walter Lowrance Palm Harbor, Fla. 

Thornal, Jr., Benjamin Campbell Orlando, Fla. 

Towles, Alton Myers Crawford\alle, Fla. 

Troxler, Walter Ganett Ocala, Fla. 

Untreiner, Royal J Pensacola, Fla. 

Willes, Errol Shippen Jensen, Fla. 

FIRST YEAR CLASS 

Alexander, Thomas Tampa, Fla. 

Anderson, Arthur Lochridge Tampa, Fla. 

Anderson, William Faris Orlando, Fla. 



College of Law 29 

Arnow, Carlton Columbus Hawthorne, Fla. 

Atkins, George Wesley Blountstown, Fla. 

Axtell, Reginald Randall Jacksonville, Fla. 

Bass, Clayton Claude Live Oak, Fla. 

Berryhill, Tom Oscar Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. 

Black, Kermit Kellogg Tampa, Fla. 

Bond, William Bours Jacksonville, Fla. 

Brannon, William Brantley Lake City, Fla. 

Brogdon, Wright Martin Miami, Fla. 

Brown, Clyde Ree Graceville, Fla. 

Brown, Jr., William Franklin Miami, Fla. 

Bruton, Jr., James De Witt Plant City, Fla. 

Bull, John Francis Burt Gainesville, Fla. 

Butler, Byron Neel Chipley, Fla. 

Carmichael, Parks Mason Gainesville, Fla. 

Carraher, John Joseph St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Cason, Roy Sloan Delray Beach, Fla. 

Chace, Thomas Stephen Tampa, Fla. 

Clark, Charles L. Blountstown, Fla. 

Cobb, Jr., William Alfred West Palm Beach, Fla. 

Connor, Henry Inverness, Fla. 

Cooperman, Leonard William St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Corbett, Jr., Deloren Dempsey St. Augustine, Fla. 

Carrie, F. A West Palm Beacn, Fla. 

Dial, William Henry Gainesville, Fla. 

Dinning, William Layton Tampa, Fla. 

Dishong, William Word Arcadia, Fla. 

Donahoo, John William Jacksonville, Fla. 

Dongo, Joseph Harry Key West, Fla. 

Duckwall, William David Bradenton, Fla. 

Dugan, Auldon Berge Gainesville, Fla. 

Evers, Joel Mulberry, Fla. 

Feuer, Gus Miami, Fla. 

Fisher, Jr., William Pensacola, Fla. 

Ford, Raymond Edmund Fort Pierce, Fla. 

Frecker, William Hubert Tampa, Fla. 

Fuchs, Richard William Homestead, Fla. 

Furman, Abraham Gordon Jacksonville, Fla. 

Gill, Jo Dozier Sarasota, Fla. 

Goldstein, Kessler M La Grange, Ga. 

Green, Harry St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Haines, Webber Bly Altamonte Springs, Fla. 

Hall, Jr., Charles Reade Mobile, Ala. 

Harrell, Maurice Ticer Noblesville, Ind. 

Harrison, Louis Stanley Tampa, Fla. 

Hawkins, Durward E Tampa, Fla. 

Hiers, Jr., Bryant Dickinson Gainesville, Fla. 

Hirsch, Bennett Marcus Jacksonville, Fla. 

Horrell, Robert Paul Gainesville, Fla. 

Howze, Jr.j Thomas Alston Palmetto, Fla. 

Ifuddleston, George Adam Sanford, Fla. 

Keezel, James Edward Winter Park, Fla. 

Kelly, Jr., Daniel Anthony Fernandina, Fla. 

Larson, John Edwin Keystone Heights, Fla. 

Lawrence, Richard Abbott Melbourse, Fla. 

Livingston, Howard Gordon Orlando, Fla. 

Loewenkopf, Jack Jacksonville, Fla. 

Lorraine, Charles Cabell Jacksonville, Fla. 

McLanahan, Clarence Rhodes Bunnell, Fla. 

Maddox, John Clyde - Wauchula, Fla. 

Mahorner, Bernard Teague Inverness, Fla. 

Martineau, James Anthony Marinette, Wis. 



30 University of Florida 

Massey, Hollis Gainesville, Fla. 

Mathis, Jr., Charles Robert Panama City, Fla. 

Messer, William Herbert Sanford, Fla. 

Miller, J. B. Hamner Tampa, Fla. 

Montgomery, Stephen Miles Gainesville, Fla. 

Munger, Forest Harrold Rivera, Fla. 

Neuwirth, Phillip Alvin Tampa, Fla. 

O'Berry, Karlyle Tampa, Fla. 

O'Connell, Phillip Dillon Gainesville, Fla. 

O'Mahoney, Jeremiah Patrick Gainesville, Fla. 

Parker, James Perkins Jacksonville, Fla. 

Pegg, John William Hernando, Fla. 

Phillips, Cecil Robert Gainesville, Fla. 

Phillips, Jr., Enoch Bothwell Bartow, Fla. 

Rainey, Morton Henry Jacksonville, Fla. 

Richardson, Hugh Bracey Sarasota, Fla. 

Rosenberg, Morris St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Safer, Moe Ben Jacksonville, Fla. 

Scadron, Ivis Josef Tampa, Fla. 

Schirard, John Rogero Sanford, Fla. 

Schwartz, Dan Richard Jacksonville, Fla. 

Shuler, Jay Alfred Hosford, Fla. 

Starnes, Finis Ewing Fort Myers, Fla. 

Stenstrom, Eric Corr Wauchula, Fla. 

Stokes, John Patrick Miami, Fla. 

Suit, William Marion Lakeland, Fla. 

Sum.mers, Adolphus Eugene High Springs, Fla. 

Tomlinson, Laurence Wells Lake Wales, Fla. 

Vaccaro, Joseph Anthony Tampa, Fla. 

Walker, Jr., Shade Wilson Tampa, Fla. 

Watrous, Thomas M Tampa, Fla. 

Watson, Jr., William Bedford Jacksonville, Fla. 

Williams, Jack Davis Tampa, Fla. 

Wilson, Alfred Edgar Bradenton, Fla. 

Winderweedle, William Elbert Mayo, Fla. 

Wolfe, Joseph Emmet Miami, Fla. 

Woodberry, Robert McTyer Orlando, Fla. 

Woods, James Pasco Perry, Fla. 

Woodward, William Edward Quincy, Fla. 

Yancey, Hervey Hall Tampa, Fla. 

Y'arbrough, Lucien Bell Nashville, Tenn. 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Allen, John Edward Tampa, Fla. 

Bryan, Johnson Hamlin Jacksonville, Fla. 

STUDENTS FROM OTHER COLLEGES TAKING ONE OR TWO 

SUBJECTS 

Carleton, William Graves Evansville, Ind. 

DeHoff, William Joseph Jacksonville, Fla. 

Eshleman, Silas Kendrick ...Gainesville, Fla. 

Hudson, J. H Key West, Fla. 

Josey, Metzger Elroy Gainesville, Fla. 

Roberts, W. H Homestead, Fla. 



/,