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Full text of "University record"

Sltbrart^B 




Zlniversity ^Archives 

George A. Smathers Libraries 
University of Florida 




The University Record 

of the 

University of Florida 

Schedule of Courses 

Second Semester 

1940-41 

NOTE 

Students are referred to the Bulletins of Information 
for The General College and The Upper Division for 
information concerning prerequisites and curricular 
requirements. This publication shows only the time 
schedule for the courses to be offered this semester. 



Vol. XXXVI, Series 1, No. 1 January 1. 1941 



Published monthly by the University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 

Entered in the post office in Gainesville, Florida, as second-class matter, 

under Act of Congress, August 24, 1912 

Office of Publication, Gainesville, Florida 






troiVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

SCHEDULE OF COURSES 

SECOND SEMESTER, 1940-41 



Section Numbers ; Sections indicated with one digit as 1, 2, 3, 
etc., represent lecture sections; with two digits, as 10, 
11, 12, etc., represent recitation or discussion sections; 
with three digits, represent laboratory sections. 

Progress Tests ; In addition to the meetings of the various 
sections in the basic courses, progress tests will be given 
in C-1, C-2, C-3, C-41, and C-42 on Saturdays, alternating 
at 9 and 10 A.M. Students registering for these courses 
should include these hours in their schedules. 



ABBREVIATIONS 

Under the heading Dept. will be found the department name 
abbreviations adopted for official records. 

The following abbreviations have been used to designate 
buildings : 



AG - Agriculture Building 

AU - University Audi tor iiun 

BN - Benton Hall 

BU - Buckman Hall 

CH - Chemistry Building 

DL - Dairy Laboratory 

EG - Engineering Building 

EX - Experiment Station 

HL - Hydraulic Laboratory 



HT - Horticulture Building 

LA - Language Hall 

LW - Law Building 

PE - Peabody Hall 

PO - Poultry Laboratory 

PH - Photo Laboratory 

RA - Radio Station 

SO - Science Hall 

SE - Seagle Building 

YN - Yonge Building 



Vol. XXXVI, Series 1 

THE UNIVERSITY RECORD 

of the 
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



Contait s 

No. Title 

1* Schedule of Courses, 2nd Semester, 1940-41 

2* A Preliminary Announcement of the University of 

Florida Workshop and Work-Conference 

Summer Sess ion 1941 
2* Extra No. 1 - Financial Report, June, 1940 
3. Bulletin of the University Summer Session, 1941 
4* Bulletin of Information 

for the General College, 1941-42 
5* Bulletin of the School of Trade and 

Industrial Education, 1941 

6. Bulletin of Information 

for the Upper Division, 1941-42 

7. Bulletin of the Graduate School, 1941-42 

8. Schedule of Courses, 1st Semester 1941-42 

9. Financial Report, June, 1941 

10. University Directory, 1941-42 

Part I - Students 

11. University Directory, 1941-42 

Part II - Faculty & Employees 

12. Register of the Regular Session, 1940-41 

Summer Session, 1941 



COMPREHENSIVE COURSES 



C-1 



DEPT COURSE 


SEC. 


CRED 


. DAYS 


HOURS 


BLDG. 


ROOM INSTRUCTOR 


COURSE TITLE 




C 1 


1 




M N 


1 1 


A u 




STAFF 


MAN 


SOCIAL 


WORLD 


C 12 


10 


4 


M W 


1 


L A 


20 1 


A T W 


MAN 


SOCIAL 


WORLD 


C 12 


1 1 


4 


M W 


1 


L A 


303 


MILLER H E 


MAN 


SOCIAL 


WORLD 


C 12 


12 


4 


M H 


2 


L A 


204 


A T W 


MAN 


SOCIAL 


WORLD 


C 12 


13 


4 


M N 


2 


L A 


201 


H A N N A 


MAN 


SOCIAL 


WORLD 


C 12 


1 4 


4 


T T H 


8 


S C 


111 


H A WL E Y 


MAN 


SOCIAL 


WORLD 


C 12 


1 5 


4 


T T H 


1 


L A 


301 


PRICE 


MAN 


SOCIAL 


WORLD 


C 12 


16 


4 


T T H 


9 


P E 


308 


C A H LE TO N 


MAN 


SOCIAL 


WORLD 


C 12 


17 


4 


T T H 


9 


L A 


301 


E U TS L E R 


MAN 


SOCIAL 


WORLD 


C 12 


18 


4 


T T H 


9 


L A 


307 


P A T R 1 CK 


MAN 


SOCIAL 


WORLD 


C 1 


3 




T TH 


10 


C H 


A UO 


STAFF 


MAN 


SOCIAL 


WORLD 


C 12 


30 


4 


T T H 


3 


L A 


314 


MILLER R E 


MAN 


SOCIAL 


WORLD 


C 12 


2 1 


4 


T T H 


3 


S C 


20 3 


P A TR 1 CK 


MAN 


SOCIAL 


WORLD 


C 13 


23 


4 


WF 


10 


BN 


206 


H A WL E Y 


MAN 


SOCIAL 


WORLD 


C 13 


23 


4 


T T H 


2 


PE 


102 


C H A C E 


MAN 


SOCIAL 


WORLD 


C 12 


24 


4 


T T H 


3 


B N 


210 


H A WL E Y 


MAN 


SOCIAL 


WORLD 


C 12 


25 


4 


WF 


a 


L A 


20 1 


MILLER R E 


MAN 


SOCIAL 


WORLD 


C 12 


26 


4 


WF 


8 


S C 


20 2 


P A T R 1 CK 


MAN 


SOCIAL 


WORLD 


C 12 


27 


4 


W F 


3 


PE 


10 


P A T R 1 CK 


MAN 


SOCIAL 


WORLD 


C 12 


28 


4 


T T H 


3 


* PE 


1 


■ A R L E TO N 


MAN 


SOCIAL 


WORLD 


C 1 


3 




TT H 


1 


C H 


AUD 


STAFF 


MAN 


SOCIAL 


WORLD 


C 12 


30 


4 


WF 


3 


S C 


215 


MILLER R E 


MAN 


SOCIAL 


WORLD 


C 13 


31 


4 


WF 


10 


BN 


2 10 


H A N N A 


MAN 


SOCIAL 


WORLD 


C 12 


32 


4 


WF 


2 


S C 


306 


PATRICK 


MAN 


SOCIAL 


WORLD 


C 12 


33 


4 


W F 


2 


L A 


311 


L A 1 R 


MAN 


SOCIAL 


WORLD 


C 12 


34 


4 


M W 


3 


L A 


314 


H A N N A 


MAN 


SOCIAL 


WORLD 


C 12 


35 


4 


T r H 


2 


L A 


301 


L A 1 R 


MAN 


SOCIAL 


WORLD 


C 13 


36 


4 


T T H 


11 


L A 


201 


E U T S L E R 


MAN 


SOCIAL 


WORLD 


C 12 


3 7 


4 


H F 


3 


PE 


101 


H A WL E Y 


MAN 


SOCIAL 


WORLD 


C 13 


38 


4 


»F 


11 


A G 


108 


C H A CE 


MAN 


SOCIAL 


WORLD 


C 1 


4 




W F 


9 


C H 


AUG 


STAFF 


MAN 


SOCIAL 


WORLD 


C 12 


40 


4 


W F 


10 


PE 


10 


P A TR 1 CK 


MAN 


SOCIAL 


WORLD 


C 13 


4 1 


4 


W F 


1 1 


S C 


206 


MILLER R E 


MAN 


SOCIAL 


WORLD 


C 13 


42 


4 


W F 


1 


PE 


101 


AU E R 


MAN 


SOCIAL 


WORLD 


C 13 


4 3 


■4 


W F 


10 


PE 


102 


CARLETON 


MAN 


SOCIAL 


WORLD 


C 12 


44 


4 


W F 


1 


L A 


314 


L A 1 RO 


MAN 


SOCIAL 


WORLD 


C 12 


4 5 


4 


W F 


1 


PE 


10 


H A W L E Y 


MAN 


SOCIAL 


WORLD 


C 13 


46 


4 


W F 


2 


PE 


101 


AU E R 


MAN 


SOCIAL 


WORLD 


C 12 


4 7 


4 


W F 


1 


AG 


108 


C H A CE 


MAN 


SOCIAL 


WORLD 


C 12 


4 8 


4 


W F 


3 


PE 


208 


H A WL E Y 


MAN 


SOCIAL 


WORLD 



* P E 101 



C-2 



)EPT. 


COURSE 


SEC. 


CRE[ 


). DAYS 


HOURS 


BLDG 


ROOM INSTRUCTOR 




COURSE TITLE 


C 


2 


1 




T 


2 


C H 


ADO 


EHRMANN 


MAN 


P H Y8 1 C A L 


WORLD 


C 


2 


2 




T 


3 


C H 


A UO 


EHRMANN 


MAN 


PHYSICAL 


WORLD 


C 


2 


3 




T 


4 


C H 


AUO 


EHRMANN 


MAN 


P H YS 1 C A L 


WORLD 


C 


22 


1 1 




M HF 


8 


BN 


201 


K NO WL E3 


MAN 


PHYSICAL 


WORLD 


C 


22 


12 




M WF 


8 


C H 


110 


WILLIAMS F a 


MAN 


PHYSICAL 


WORLD 


C 


22 


13 




M HF 


9 


BN 


209 


S W A NS ON 


MAN 


PH YS 1 C A L 


WORLD 


c 


22 


14 




M WF 


9 


BN 


210 


EDWARDS R A 


MAN 


PH YS 1 C A L 


WORLD 


c 


22 


15 




M W F 


11 


C H 


112 


MULLIGAN 


MAN 


PHYSICAL 


WORLD 


c 


2 2 


16 




M «F 


11 


C H 


212 


WILLIAMS F 


MAN 


P H YS 1 C A L 


WORLD 


c 


22 


17 




TT HS 


8 


C H 


110 


WILLIAMS F 


MAN 


PHYSICAL 


WORLD 


c 


22 


18 




T T H3 


3 


C H 


212 


MULLIGAN 


MAN 


PHYSICAL 


WORLD 


c 


22 


1 9 




TT H 3 


8 


P E 


4 


GEORGE 


MAN 


P H YS 1 C A L 


WORLD 


c 


22 


20 




M « F 


10 


C H 


212 


G A D U M 


MAN 


PHYSICAL 


WORLD 


c 


2 2 


21 




M W F 


1 


BN 


20 5 


K NO WL ES 


MAN 


PHYSICAL 


WORLD 


c 


2 2 


22 




M HF 


8 


E G 


211 


3 N A NS ON 


MAN 


P H YS 1 C A L 


WORLD 


c 


22 


23 




M UK F 


1 


PE 


2 


GEORGE 


MAN 


PHYSICAL 


WORLD 


c 


22 


24 




MWF 


2 


PE 


209 


GEORGE 


MAN 


P H YS 1 C A L 


WORLD 


c 


2 2 


25 




M W F 


2 


C H 


110 


MULLIGAN 


MAN 


PHYSICAL 


WORLD 


c 


2 2 


26 




MWF 


2 


C H 


S18 


EHRMANN 


MAN 


PHYSICAL 


WORLD 


c 


2 2 


27 




MWF 


3 


C H 


1 10 


MULLIGAN 


MAN 


PHYSICAL 


WORLD 


c 


2 2 


28 




M *F 


10 


C H 


110 


MULLIGAN 


MAN 


PHYSICAL 


WORLD 


c 


2 2 


29 




MWF 


3 


C H 


312 


EHRMANN 


MAN 


PHYSICAL 


WORLD 


c 


22 


30 




MWF 


8 


E G 


209 


E0WAR03 R A 


MAN 


PHYSICAL 


WORLD 


c 


22 


31 




MWF 


1 


BN 


210 


G A DO U M 


MAN 


PHYSICAL 


WORLD 


c 


22 


32 




MWF 


1 


E G 


202 


EDWARDS R A 


MAN 


PHYSICAL 


WORLD 


c 


22 


33 




MWF 


2 


BN 


210 


G A DO UM 


MAN 


P H YS 1 C A L 


WORLD 


c 


22 


34 




MWF 


3 


BN 


210 


G A 00 UM 


MAN 


PHYSICAL 


WORLD 


c 


2 2 


35 




T T H S 


8 


BN 


210 


EDWARDS R A 


MAN 


PHYSICAL 


WORLD 


c 


2 2 


36 




MWF 


2 


E G 


202 


EDWARDS R A 


MAN 


PHYSICAL 


WORLD 



C-3 



SEC. CRED. DAYS 



HOURS 



BLDG. ROOM 



INSTRUCTOR 



COURSE TITLE 



C 3 
C 32 
C 32 
C 32 
C 33 
C 33 
C 3 3 
C 32 
C 32 
C 33 


1 
10 
11 
1 2 
1 3 
14 
15 
1 6 
17 
1 8 




M 

M W 
M W 
M W 
M N 
M H 
T T H 
M W 
TTH 
M W 


9 CH 

10 LA 
10 BU 
3 LA 

10 LA 

11 LA 

I LA 

II LA 
10 LA 
3 LA 


AUD 
314 
20 5 
312 
20 3 
203 
307 
312 
307 
314 


STAFF REAOHG 8PKNG WRTNG 
SPtVEV REAOHC 8PKNG WRTNG 
HOPKINS REAONC SPKNG WRTNG 
WILSON J L READNG SPKNG WRTHG 
MORRIS REAONG SPKNG WRTNG 
WISE REAONG SPKNG WRTNG 
MACLEOD REAONG SPKNG WRTNG 
MOORE REAONG SPKNG WRTNG 
HOPKINS REAONG SPKNG WRTNG 
WILSON J L REAONG SPKNG WRTNG 


C 3 
C 32 
C 32 
C 32 
C 3 2 
C 32 
C 32 
C 32 
C 3 3 
C 32 


2 
30 
21 
22 
23 
34 
25 
26 
37 
28 




M 

M W 

TTH 

TTH 

TTH 

TTH 

TTH 

TTH 

TTH 

TTH 


3 C H 
3 LA 
9 LA 
9 LA 

9 LA 
3 LA 

10 LA 
10 LA 
10 LA 
1 LA 


AUO 
203 
203 
306 
813 
307 
304 
212 
20 3 
210 


STAFF REAONG SPKNG WRTNG 
MORRIS REAONG SPKNG WRTNG 
STROUP REAONG SPKNG WRTNG 
SPIVEY REAONG SPKNG WRTNG 
CONSTANS REAONO SPKNG WRTNG 
TEW REAONG SPKNG WRTNG 
WILSON J L REAONG SPKNG WRTNG 
CONSTANS REAONG SPKNG WRTNG 
CONGLETON REAONG SPKNG WRTNG 
SKAGGS REAONG SPKNG WRTNG 


C 3 
C 33 
C 33 
C 33 
C 32 
C 32 
C 3 2 
C 3 2 
C 33 
C 3 2 


3 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 




T 

TTH 

TTH 

TTH 

TTH 

TTH 

TTH 

Kf F 

W F 

N F 


9 C H 
1 LA 
1 LA 
3 LA 
3 LA 
3 LA 
3 LA 
9 LA 

9 LA 

10 LA 


AUD 
303 
30*; 
,06 
307 
311 
301 
307 
312 
307 


STAFF REAONG SPKNG WRTNG 
MOUNTS REAONO SPKNG WRTNG 
':LARK W a REAONG SPKNG WRTNG 
MACLEOD READNG SPKNG WRTNG 
CLARK W A REAONG WPKNG WRTN6 
MOUNTS REAONG SPKNG WRTNG 
SKAGGS REAONG SPKNG WRTNG 
CONGLETON REAONG SPKNG WRTNG 
MOORE READNG SPKNG WRTN6 
ELIA80N REAONG SPKNG WRTNG 


C 3 
C 32 
C 33 
C 33 
C 33 
C 33 
C 33 
C 33 
C 32 
C 3 2 


4 
40 
41 
42 
4 3 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 




T 

TTH 
« F 
W F 
WF 
«F 
• F 
» F 
WF 
■ F 


11 C H 
2 LA 
11 LA 
11 LA 
1 LA 
8 AG 
1 LA 

1 LA 

2 LA 
2 LA 


AUO 
311 
314 
306 
311 
108 
304 
210 
813 
306 


STAFF REAONG SPKNG WRTNG 
CLARK W A REAONG SPKNG WRTNG 
STROUP READNG SPKNG WRTNG 
MOUNTS REAONG SPKNG WRTNG 
MORRIS REAONC SPKNG WRTNO 
WILSON J L READNG SPKNG WRTNO 
MACLEOD REAONO SPKNG WRTNG 
WISE REAONG SPKNG WRTNG 
CLARK W A READNG SPKNG WRTNG 
TEt REAONG SPKNG WRTNG 



SEE NEXT PAGE FOR SCHEDULE OF WRITING LABORATORIES 



C-3 CONTINUED 



DEPT. COURSE SEC. CRED. DAYS 



33 
32 



c 


32 


104 


c 


32 


105 


c 


32 


106 


c 


32 


107 


c 


32 


108 


c 


32 


109 


c 


32 


110 


c 


32 


111 


c 


32 


112 


c 


32 


113 


c 


32 


114 


c 


32 


115 


c 


32 


116 


c 


33 


117 


c 


32 


118 


c 


32 


119 


c 


32 


120 



101 
102 



T 
T 
T 
T 
N 
« 

* 

TH 
TH 
TH 

TH 

F 
F 

F 

F 



HOURS 

8 TO 10 
10 TO 13 

1 TO 3 

3 TO 5 

8 TO 10 
10 TO 12 

1 TO 3 

3 TO 5 

8 TO 10 
10 TO 12 

1 TO 3 

3 TO 5 

8 TO 1 O 
10 T 12 

1 TO 3 

3 TO 5 

8 TO 10 
10 TO 13 

1 TO 3 

3 TO 5 



BLDG. ROOM 



INSTRUCTOR 



L A 
L A 



L A 

L A 

L A 

L A 

L A 

L A 

L A 

L A 

L A 

L A 

L A 

L A 

L A 

L A 

L A 

L A 

L A 



309 
309 

209 

209 
209 
209 
209 
209 
209 
209 
209 
209 
209 
209 
209 
209 
309 
209 

209 

209 



E L I A 
MACL 

SPIV 
F AR R 

C L A R 

C L A R 

S TR 

CONG 

l» I L S 

S K A G 

MACL 

SPIV 

MOU N 

MORR 

WISE 

MORR 

NILS 

S K A G 

SPIV 
F A RR 

MOU N 
NILS 



SON 
EGO 



E Y 
I S 



U P 

L ET N 

ON J L 

G S 

E 00 

E Y 

TS 

I S 

I S 

N J L 
G 3 

E Y 

1 3 

TS 

N J L 



MACLEOD 



COURSE TITLE 

REAONG SPKNG NRTNG 
REAOMG SPKNG NRTNG 

REAONG SPKNG NRTNG 



REAONG 
REAONG 
R E A D N G 
REAONG 
REAONG 
REAONG 
REAONG 
REAONG 
REAONG 
REAONG 
REAONG 
REAONG 
REAONG 
REAONG 
REAONG 



SPKNG 
SPKNG 
SPKNG 
SPKNG 
SPKNG 
SPKNG 
SPKNG 
SPKNG 
SPKNG 
SPKNG 
SPKNG 
SPKNG 
SPKNG 
SPKNG 
SPKNG 



NRTNG 
NRTNG 
NRTNG 
NRTNG 
W R TN G 
NRTNG 
NRTNG 
NRTNG 
NRTNG 
NRTNG 
NRTNG 
NRTNG 
NRTNG 
NRTNG 
NRTNG 



REAONG SPKNG NRTNG 
REAONG SPKNG NRTNG 



MflF 
1 H R 



TO ARRANGE 



CONGLETON 
S TR OU P 



EFFECTIVE NRITING 



MIF 
1 H R 



TO A RRANGE 



3 C 101 



REAONG FOR LEISURE 



C-41 



41 


1 


4 


41 


2 


4 


41 


3 


4 



U WT HF 
M T T HF 
T»THF 



9 

10 

11 



S C|208 
S ClOl 
3 C208 



N I L SO N N 
HINCKLEY 
LITTLE 



MAN HIS THINKING 
MAN HIS THINKING 
MAN HIS THINKING 



C-42 



)URS 


; SEC. 


:red. 


DAYS 


HOURS 


BLDG. 


ROOK/ 


INSTRUCTOR 




42 


1 


4 


M WT HF 


9 


PF 


101 


KOKOMOOR 


GENE 


4 2 


2 


4 


M T W F 


1 


PE 


1 


A V 1 S 


GENE 


4 3 


3 


4 


T WT HF 


10 


PE 


1 


A V 1 S 


GENE 


4 2 


4 


4 


T » T HF 


1 


PE 


102 


PHILLIPS 


GENE 


4 2 


5 


4 


M T »( F 


11 


PE 


2 


PHILLIPS 


GENE 


4 2 


6 


4 


T WT HF 


e 


PE 


10 2 


OU A E 


GENE 


4 2 


7 


4 


M W T HF 


9 


PE 


10 2 


OU A OE 


GENE 


4 2 


8 


4 


M T W TH 


3 


PE 


1 


MC 1 NN 1 S 


GENE 


4 2 


9 


4 


M T W TH 


11 


C H 


110 


MC 1 N N 1 3 


GENE 


4 2 


10 


4 


T •( T HF 


9 


PE 


1 


P 1 REN 1 A N 


GENE 


4 2 


1 1 


4 


M T H F 


10 


PE 


11 


008 T A L 


GENE 


4 2 


12 


4 


M T W F 


11 


PE 


11 


GEORGE 


GENE 


4 2 


1 3 


4 


M T W F 


8 


PE 


101 


PHI PP S 


GENE 


4 2 


14 


4 


M W T HF 


2 


PE 


2 


K US NE R 


GENE 


4 2 


1 5 


4 


M W T HF 


2 


PE 


2 


K Ui>N E R 


GEME 



COURSE TITLE 

RAL MAThEMATCS 

RAL MATHEMATCS 

RAL MATHEMATCS 

RAL MATHEMATCS 

RAL MATHEMATCS 

RAL MATHEMATCS 

RAL MATHEMATCS 

RAL MATHEMATCS 

RAL MATHEMATCS 

RAL MATHEMATCS 

RAL MATHEMATCS 

RAL MATHEMATCS 

RAL MATHEMATCS 

RAL MATHEMATCS 

RAL MATHEMATCS 



C-5 



c 


5 


« 1 




M W 


9 


AU 




STAFF 


THE 


HUMANITIES 


c 


52 


10 




T T H 


10 


BN 


201 


FOX 


THE 


HUMANITIES 


c 


5 2 


11 




T TH 


10 


BN 


205 


CONNER 


THE 


HUMANITIES 


c 


5 2 


12 




TT H 


10 


A G 


210 


MURPHREE C L 


THE 


HUMANITIES 


c 


52 


13 




TT H 


10 


BN 


210 


G LU N T 


THE 


HUMANITIES 


c 


52 


14 




TTH 


10 


L A 


306 


H t N N A 


THE 


HUMANITIES 


c 


52 


15 




TT H 


1 1 


BN 


210 


r OX 


THE 


HUMANITIES 


c 


5 2 


16 




TTH 


11 


BN 


305 


CONNER 


THE 


HUMANITIES 


c 


52 


17 




TTH 


11 


L A 


212 


MOORE 


THE 


HUMANITIES 





5 2 


1 8 




TTH 


11 


A G 


104 


MURPHREE C L 


THE 


HUMANITIES 


c 


5 2 


19 




TTH 


11 


L A 


20 3 


H A N N A 


THE 


HUMANITIES 


c 


5 


** 2 




TTH 


9 


A U 




STAFF 


THE 


HUMANITIES 


c 


5 2 


20 




W F 


10 


BN 


201 


FOX 


THE 


HUMANITIES 


c 


52 


21 




WF 


10 


L A 


212 


ROBERTSON C 


THE 


HUMANITIES 


c 


52 


22 




W F 


10 


s c 


20 5 


MURPHREE C L 


THE 


HUMANITIES 


c 


52 


23 




« F 


11 


BN 


210 


FOX 


THE 


HUMANITIES 


c 


5 2 


24 




WF 


1 1 


AG 


310 


CONNER 


THE 


HUMANITIES 


c 


5 2 


25 




WF 


11 


A G 


302 


MURPHREE C L 


THE 


HUMANITIES 


c 


52 


26 




W F 


11 


BU 


305 


HA N N A 


THE 


HUMANITIES 


c 


52 


27 




H F 


1 


L A 


306 


FOX 


THE 


HUMANITIES 


c 


52 


28 




»F 


1 


BN 


201 


CONNER 


THE 


HUMANITIES 


c 


52 


29 




WF 


1 


L A 


212 


MOORE 


THE 


HUMANITIES 


c 


5 


«1 




M W 


9 


A U 




STAFF 


THE 


HUMANITIES 


c 


52 


30 




TTH 


1 


L A 


212 


MOORE 


THE 


HUMANITIES 


c 


52 


31 




TTH 


1 


BN 


205 


CONNER 


THE 


HUMANITIES 


c 


52 


32 




TTH 


1 


BN 


309 


ROBERTSON C 


THE 


HUMANITIES 


c 


52 


33 




TTH 


2 


BN 


309 


ROBERTSON C 


THE 


HUMANITIES 


c 


52 


34 




TTH 


3 


L A 


212 


MOORE 


THE 


HUMANITIES 



AUDITION HOUR 
AUDIT!"', HOUR 



9:00 EVERY OTHER FRIDAY, AUDITORIUM 
11:00 EVERY OTHER SATURDAY, AUDITORIUM 



C-6 



EPT. 


COURSE 


SEC. 


CRED. DAYS 


HOURS 


BLDG. 


ROOM INSTRUCTOR 




COURSE TITLE 




C 


6 


1 




MWF 

T 


8 
7PM 


C H 


AUO 


HARKNESS 
HUB B E LL 
HO BB S 


MAN 


B 1 OLOG 1 CL 


WRLO 


C 


6 


2 




MIF 

T 


2 
7PM 


C H 


AUO 


8 VERS 


MAN 


8 1 OLO G 1 CL 


WRLO 


C 


6 


3 




TTHS 

T 


8 
7PM 


C H 


AUO 


CARR SENN 


MAN 


B 1 OLOG 1 CL 


WRLO 


C 


62 


10 




M 


8 


A G 


210 


DICKINSON 


MAN 


B t OLOG 1 CL 


WRLO 


C 


62 


11 




T 


8 


S C 


101 


HARKNESS 


MAN 


B 1 OLOG 1 CL 


WRLO 


C 


62 


12 




N 


8 


SC 


111 


COIN 


MAN 


B 1 OLOG 1 CL 


WRLO 


C 


62 


13 




TH 


8 


SC 


101 


HUBB E LL 


MAN 


B 1 OLOG 1 CL 


WRLO 


C 


62 


14 




U 


9 


SC 


1 11 


WALLACE H K 


MAN 


B 1 OLOG 1 CL 


WRLO 


c 


62 


15 




T 


9 


SC 


111 


HOB B S 


MAN 


B 1 OLOG 1 CL 


WRLO 


c 


62 


16 




« 


9 


SC 


111 


WALLACE H K 


MAN 


B 1 OLOG 1 CL 


WRLO 


c 


62 


17 




TH 


9 


SC 


111 


MARSHALL 


MAN 


B 1 OLO G 1 CL 


WRLO 


c 


6 2 


18 




M 


10 


s c 


205 


WALLACE H K 


MAN 


B 1 OLOG 1 CL 


WRLO 


c 


62 


19 




M 


10 


SC 


201 


MARSHALL 


MAN 


B 1 OLOG 1 CL 


WRLO 


c 


62 


20 






10 


SC 


201 


L AESS LE 


MAN 


B 1 OLOG 1 CL 


WRLO 


c 


62 


21 






10 


SC 


213 


CARR 


MAN 


B 1 OLOG 1 CL 


WRLO 


c 


62 


22 






10 


SC 


205 


BER NE R 


MAN 


6 1 LOG 1 CL 


WRLO 


c 


6 2 


23 






10 


S c 


101 


CARR 


MAN 


B 1 OLOG 1 CL 


WRLO 


c 


62 


24 






10 


SC 


201 


MARSHALL 


MAN 


B 1 OLOG 1 CL 


WRLO 


c 


62 


25 




TH 


10 


3 C 


201 


LA ESS LE 


MAN 


8 1 OLOG 1 CL 


WRLO 


c 


62 


26 




TH 


10 


S C 


205 


CARR 


MAN 


B 1 OLOG 1 CL 


WRLO 


c 


62 


27 




T H 


10 


SC 


213 


B ERNE R 


MAN 


6 1 OLOG 1 CL 


WRLD 


c 


62 


28 






11 


SC 


201 


CARR 


MAN 


B 1 OLOG 1 CL 


WRLO 


c 


62 


29 




M 


11 


SC 


205 


MARSHALL 


MAN 


B 1 OLOG 1 CL 


WRLO 


c 


62 


30 




M 


11 


SC 


206 


YOUNG 


MAN 


B 1 OLOG 1 CL 


WRLO 


c 


62 


31 




T 


11 


SC 


111 


HUBB E LL 


MAN 


B 1 OLO G 1 CL 


WRLO 


c 


62 


32 




T 


11 


SC 


201 


WALLACE H K 


MAN 


B 1 OLOG 1 CL 


WRLD 


c 


62 


33 




T 


11 


8C 


205 


B VERS 


MAN 


B 1 OLO G 1 CL 


WRLO 


c 


62 


34 




« 


11 


SC 


201 


CARR 


MAN 


8 1 OLOG 1 CL 


WRLD 


c 


62 


35 




N 


11 


SC 


205 


YOUNG 


MAN 


B 1 OLOG 1 CL 


WRLD 


c 


62 


36 




TH 


11 


SC 


206 


MARSHALL 


MAN 


B 1 OLOG 1 CL 


WRLO 


c 


62 


37 




TH 


11 


SC 


111 


B YERS 


MAN 


B 1 OLOG 1 CL 


WRLO 


c 


62 


38 




TH 


11 


s c 


201 


DICKINSON 


MAN 


B 1 OLOG 1 CL 


WRLD 


c 


62 


39 




TH 


11 


SC 


20 5 


WALLACE H K 


MAN 


B 1 OL OG 1 CL 


WRLO 



DEPARTMENTAL COURSES 



AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY - ACY 



DEPT. COURSE SEC. CRED. DAYS 



T T H 
M 



T T H 

T F 



HOURS 



11 

3 TO 5 



BLDG. ROOM 



INSTRUCTOR 



C H 
C H 



A U 
A U 



313 
3 30 



112 
10 3 



BLACK 
BLACK 



HAWKINS 
HAWKINS 



BLACK 
BLACK 



COURSE TITLE 
AGRICULTURAL CHEM 
ANALYTIC CHEMISTRY 
AGRICULTRL ANALSIS 



AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS AS 



M W 
T H 



M II F 

M W 

T 

T T HS 

T T H S 

TO 

T T H 
M 

M 



8 

1 TO 3 

8 

3 TO 5 

8 

3 TO 5 

11 

10 

1 TO 3 

1 1 

9 

ARRANGE 

10 

1 TO 3 

3 TO 5 

ARRANGE 

ARRANGE 
ARRANGE 
ARRANGE 



2 15 
2 15 



215 
215 



215 
215 



215 
215 

315 

215 

215 

215 
215 

215 

215 

215 
215 
215 



MOODY 
MOODY 



HAMILTON 

HAMILTON 
MOODY 

HAMILTON 

MOODY 

HAMILTON 

SHEALY AND 
HAMILTON 

NOBLE 

NOBLE AND 
MOODY 

HAMILTON 

HAM I L TO N 

HAMILTON 



FRM FINANCE APPR3L 
FARM MANAGEMENT 

FARM MANAGEMENT 

MARKETING 

MARKTNG FRUITS VEG 
AGRCLTRL STATISTC3 

LAND ECONOMICS 
AGRICULTRAL POLICY 
TERMNL MKTS EXCHGS 
MARKETNG LIVESTOCK 

AG ECNOMCS SEMINAR 
PR08S FARM MNGMENT 

LAND ECONOMICS 
MARKETING AG PRODS 
ADV URKTG AG PRODS 



AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING - AG 



1 


3 


T T H 

M 


3 


3 


T T H 

F 


t 


3 


* F 


2 


3 


W F 
T H 




2 


M 

8 




i^ 


TO 




3 


M N 

LAB 




3 


TO 




# 


TO 



9 

3 TO 

1 1 
1 TO 

8 

TO 

1 TO 



A G 
A G 



8 TO 10 
ARRANGE 



11 

TO ARRANGE 



ARRANGE 
ARRANGE 



A G 
A G 



A G 



210 
210 



210 
2 10 



310 
310 



2 10 



A G 2 10 
A G210 

A G106 

A G 208 

A G 1 06 
A g|i06 



ROGERS 
ROGERS 
ROGERS 
ROGERS 
ROGERS 

ROGERS 

ROGERS 
ALL ISDN 



ROGERS F 
ROGERS F 



FARM MOTORS 

FARM MOTORS 

FARM MACHINERY 

FARM MACHINERY 

FARM CONCRETE 

AG ENGRNG INVSTGTN 
SOIL WATER CNSRVTN 

SEMINAR 
RESEARCH 



» 3 or 4 CREDITS 
»» VARIABLE CREDIT 
# 3 to 6 CREDITS 



AGRONOMY - AY 



DEPT. COURSE SEC. CRED. DAYS 
A y 324 13 



AY 400 

AY 422 

AY 426 

AY 492 

AY 64 2 

AY 64 4 

AY 65 2 



TTH 
S 



TTH 
8 



S 



HOURS 

10 

8 TO 1 

11 

10 TO 12 

8 

8 TO 10 

9 

ARRANGE 

8 

ARRANGE 

ARRANGE 

ARRANGE 



BLDG. ROOM INSTRUCTOR 

S ENN 



302 
30 2 


302 
302 


302 
30 2 


302 


303 


302 


303 


303 


303 



3 EN N 

3 EN N 

S ENN 

3 EN N 

S ENN 

S EN N 

S EN N 

S EN N 



COURSE TITLE 
FORAGE COVER CROPS 

FORAGE COVER CROPS 

AGRIC EXTN METHODS 

PLANT BREEDING 
PROB CROP PRODUCTN 
CROPS SEMINAR 
R3CH PLANT BREEONG 
RSRCH CROP PROOCTN 
CONF SPEC AGRN PRB 



ANIMAL PRODUCTION - AL 



AL 311 

AL 312 

AL 314 

AL 322 

AL 414 

AL 416 

AL 418 

AL 4 20 

AL 422 



M WF 

M«F 

T 
MW 

TTH 

M W 

TTH 

M W 

TTH 
M 



11 

11 

9 

3 TO 

8 

8 

11 

10 

10 
1 TO 



A G 
A G 



to|a RR a NGE 



104 

10 2 

104 
104 

104 

104 

109 

102 

215 

215 



SMITH D J 

BECKER 

KIRK 

WILL0UGH8Y 

WILLOUGHBY 

WILLOUGHBY 

WILLOUGHBY 

SHEALY AND 
HAMILTON 

SHEALY AND 
STAFF 

WILLOUGHBY 



PRN ANIMAL HUSBNOY 
FEEDS AND FEEDING 
LIVESTOCK JUDGING 

ANIMAL BREEDING 
SHEEP PRODUCTION 
WORLD MEATS 
BREED HISTORY 
MARKETNG LIVESTOCK 

SEMINAR 

ANIMAL PRODUCTION 



» VARIABLE CREDIT 



ARCHITECTURE AE 



A E 
AE 
AE 
AE 
AE 
AE 
AE 
AE 
AE 
AE 



AE 
AE 
AE 
AE 
AE 

AE 

AE 



COURSE 
1 1 A 



31 A 
21 B 

32 A 

2 3 A 

3 3 B 
31 A 
31 B 
3 3 A 

3 3B 
41 A 

4 1 B 

4 1 C 

5 1 A 

5 1 A 

5 1 B 

5 1 C 

5 3 A 
61 A 



SEC. CRED. DAYS 

M T W F 
T H 

M N F 

M T W F3 

M T W F3 

15 HR 

15 HR 

15 H R 
T T H 
T T H 

6 H R 3 

6 H R S 

T T H 

4 MRS 

T T H 

4 HR3 

T T H 

4 MRS 

M N F 

3 H R S 

M W T H 
6 H R 3 

M W F 
3 MRS 

M W F 

3 MRS 



M W F 

T H 

3 MRS 

M W F 

T H 

3 H R S 



*1 


6 


»«3 


3 




5 




5 




5 




5 




5 




a 




2 




2 




3 




3 




3 




2 


1 


3 


#2 


3 




3 




3 




3 




4 




4 




1 6 



HOURS 

TO 5 
TO 3 

TO 4 

TO 11 
B Toil 
TO ARRANGE 
TO ARRANGE 
TO ARRANGE 
2 TO 5 

2 TO 5 

TO ARRANGE 

TO ARRANGE 

1 

TO ARRANGE 

1 

TO ARRANGE 

1 

TO ARRANGE 

3 TO 5 

TO ARRANGE 

4 

TO ARRANGE 

3 TO 5 

TO ARRANGE 

3 TO 5 

TO ARRANGE 

TO ARRANGE 

1 TO 3 

TO 11 
TO ARRANGE 

TO 3 
TO 11 
TO ARRANGE 

TO ARRANGE 



BLDG. ROOM 



P E 
P E 
P E 
P E 
PE 
P E 
PE 
P E 
P E 

P E 

P E 

P E 
P E 

PE 

P E 

P E 
P E 

P E 
P E 

P E 
BN 

P E 
P E 



P E 
PE 
P E 

P E 
P E 
PE 



301 
301 


301 


303 


201 


30 2 


30 2 


30 1 


302 


201 


30 3 


201 


30 a 
306 


306 
306 


306 
306 


30 2 
302 


206 
303 


201 
106 


306 
204 


30 3 


302 
30 2 
306 


201 
301 
306 


201 



INSTRUCTOR 

WEAVER ANO 
M C V Y 

WEAVER ANO 
MC V V 

GRAND 

A R N E T T 

GRAND 

GRAND 

A RN E T T 

GRAND 

GRAND 

GRAND 

GRAND 

GRAND 
GRAND 

A RN E T T 
A R NE T T 

A R NE T T 
A RN E T T 

HANNAFORD 
HANNA FORD 

HANNAFORD 
HANNAFORO 

ARNETT AND 
WILSON J W 

WEAVER 
WEAVER 



HANNAFORD 
HANNAFORD 
HANNAFORD 

HANNAFORD 
HANNAFORD 
HANNA FORD 

WEAVER ANI 
STAFF 



COURSE TITLE 
FUND OF ARCHITCTRE 

FDNO OF ARCHITCTRE 



A R C H I 
A R C H I 
A R C H I 
LANDS 
LANDS 
F R HND 
F R HN 
F R HN 
F R HN 
H I S T 



T C TR A L 

TC TR A L 

TC TR A L D 

CAPE DE3 

CAPE DE3 

OR WG NT 

DR W G WT 

DR W G WT 

OR N G WT 

R Y A R C H I 



HISTORY ARCH 



E S I GN 

E S I G N 

E S I G N 

I G N 

I G N 

R C L R 

R CL R 

R C L R 

R C L R 

T C T R E 

TC TRE 

T S 



DECORATIVE AR 

MTLS MTOS CNSTRCTN 

MTLS MTOS CNSTRCTN 

MCHNCL EQUIP BLOGS 

PRFSSNL RLTNS MTOS 

MTLS MTOS CNSTRCTN 
STRCTRL DSGN BLOGS 

STRCTRL DSGN 8LDGS 

THESIS 



PE|3 00 ISTAFF 



PROJECT JUDGEMENTS: 

T |9 TO 1 3 

PROJECT LABORATORY (BOOK ROOM): 

DAILyIb to 12 PE|3 06|STAFF 

OAILYIi to 5 Pe|306 ISTAFF 

CONSULTATION ON BOOKS AND RESEARCH AVAILABLE IN THE BOOK ROOM AS FOLLOWS: 



T H 
WF 
M 

T 

M W F 

T T H 3 



TO 
TO 
TO 
TO 



TO 12 
TO 12 



HANNAFORD 

ARNETT 

GRAND 

HOLBROOK 

M C V Y 

WEBB 



3 1 M 



ASTRONOMY ATY 

PEl lllKUSNER 



MVCTN NAUT ASTRNMY 



* FOR ONE YEAR COMPLETION 
«« FOR TWO YEAR COMPLETION 

# FOR STUDENTS FROM OTHER DEPARTMENTS 



BACTERIOLOGY - BCY 



DEPT. 


COURSE 


SEC. 


CRED. 


DAYS 


HOURS 


BLDG. 


ROOM 


INSTRUCTOR 


BCY 


301 




4 


TTH 


9 

1 TO 3 


3 C 
3 C 


101 
104 


CARROLL 


BCV 


302 




3 


TTH 


9 

1 TO 3 


S C 
30 


101 
104 


CARROLL 


BCY 


304 






M« 


11 

3 TO 5 


S C 
S C 


101 
104 


CARROLL 


BCY 


306 






MW 
TTH 


9 

3 TO 5 


SC 
3 C 


101 
104 


CARROLL 


BCY 


413 






TO 


ARRANGE 






CARROLL 


BCY 


503 






TO 


ARRANGE 






CARROLL 


BCY 


504 






TO 


ARRANGE 






CARROLL 


BCY 


506 






TO 


ARRANGE 






CARROLL 


BCY 


508 






TO 


ARRANGE 






CARROLL 


BCY 


510 






TO 


ARRANGE 






CARROLL 



COURSE TITLE 
GENRL BACTERIOLOGY 

AGRIC BACTERIOLOGY 

PATHGENIC BACTRLGY 

BACTROLOGY OF FOOD 

INDUS BACTERIOLOGY 
PBS SOIL BACTROLGY 
PBS DAIRY BACTRLGY 
PBS PATHGNC BACTLG 
PBS WATER BACTRLGY 
PBS INDUS BACTRLGY 



BIBLE BE 



3 


TTH 


10 


3 


TTH 


8 


3 


MWF 


8 


3 


MKF 


10 



3 C 
S C 
3 C 
3 C 



206 


306 


306 


206 



JOHNSON J E 

JOHNSON J E 

JOHNSON J E 

JOHNSON J E 



BIOLOGY - BLY 



1 


3 


It N 


1 TO 4 


S C 


10 


WALLACE 


3 


3 


TTH 


1 TO 4 


S C 


10 


WALLACE 




3 


F 


11 

1 TO 4 


3 C 
SC 


111 
10 


WALLACE 


1 


4 


TTH 
MW 


10 

1 TO 4 


3 C 
SC 


111 
107 


SHERMAN 


2 


4 


TTH 
TTH 


10 

1 TO 4 


S C 
3 C 


111 
107 


SHERMAN 




4 


TO 


ARRANGE 






B YE RS 




4 


MDF 
TH 


10 

1 TO 4 


3 C 
SC 


111 
106 


B YERS 




3 


TO 


ARRANGE 






STAFF 




4 


TO 


ARRANGE 






HARKNESS 




3 


TTH 


9 


SC 


110 


HUBBE LL 




« 


TO 


ARRANGE 






STAFF 




« 


TO 


ARRANGE 






HARKNESS 




3 


TO 


ARRANGE 






STAFF 




« 


TO 


ARRANGE 






SHERMAN 




« 


TO 


ARRANGE 






HU6BELL OR 
B YE RS 




* 


TO 


ARRANGE 






STAFF 




• 


TO 


ARRANGE 






STAFF 




• 
3 


TO 
TO 


ARRANGE 
ARRANGE 






STAFF 
STAFF 



WORLDS GRT RELIGNS 
HOW UNORSTNO BIBLE 
BIBLCL GEOG HISTRY 
NEW TESTMNT WRITN3 



LAB IN GEN BIOLOGY 
LAB IN GEN BIOLOGY 
GEN ANIMAL BIOLOGY 

VERTBRT EMBRYOLOGY 

VERTBRT EMBRYOLOGY 

ANIML PARASITOLOGY 
INVRTBRATE ZOOLOGY 

INOVL PBS ANML BLY 
NATURAL HISTORY 
BLGCL LIT IN3TUTN8 
TAXONOMIC STUDIES 
ANIMAL ECOLOGY 
FLORIDA WILD LIFE 
VERTBRT MORPHOLOGY 
INVRTBT MORPHOLOGY 

INOVL PBS ANML BLY 
NAT HIS SLCTO ANML 
NAT HIS SLCTO ANML 
PBS TAXNMY NOMNCLT 



« VARIABLE CREDIT 



BOTANY BTY 



DEPT. 


COURSE 


SEC. 


CRED 


BTY 


30 4 


1 


4 


BTY 


30 4 


2 


4 


BTY 


308 




4 


BTY 


40 1 




4 


BTY 


4 32 




4 


BTY 


50 2 




4 


BTY 


50 4 




4 


BTY 


50 6 




4 


BTY 


50 a 




4 


BTY 


556 




1 



HOURS 



M W 

M W 



M W 
T T H 



T T H 
M F 



TTH 
S 



UF 
TTH 



8 

1 TO 



11 
1 TO 



9 TO 12 

10 

3 TO 5 

ARRANGE 

ARRANGE 

ARRANGE 

ARRANGE 

ARRANGE 



BLDG. 

S C 
S C 

S C 
S C 

S C 
S C 

S C 
S C 

s c 
s c 

s c 

s c 

s c 

s c 

s c 



ROOM 


INSTRUCTOR 


101 
2 


C 00 Y 


101 
2 


C 00 Y 


101 

1 


CODY 


1 
1 


CODY 


1 
1 


CODY 


1 


CODY 


1 


CODY 


1 


CODY 


1 


CODY 


1 


STAFF 



COURSE TITLE 
GENERAL BOTANY 

GENERAL BOTANY 

TAXONOMY 

PLANT ECOLOGY 

PLANT ANATOMY 

PRBLMS IN TAXONOMY 
PBS PLT PHYSIOLOGY 
RSCH PLNT HI3T0LGY 
PBS PLANT ANATOMY 
SEMINAR 



BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BS 
SEE ECONOMICS 



BUSINESS EDUCATION BEN 



BEN 

BEN 



8 2 

9 1 



C G 34 6 

C G 36 4 

»C G 4 4 3 

C G 4 4 4 

»C G 4 4 7 

C G 448 

C G 4 5 8 

»C G 4 6 7 

C G 4 68 

C G 5 12 

C G 5 3 1 



TO ARRANGE 
M T W TfIs 



306 IMOORMAN 
234 ImOORMAN 



ELMTRV TYPEWRITING 
ELMENTRY SHORTHAND 



CHEMICAL ENGINEERING - CG 



T T H S 

TTH 

M T 

M T 

TO 

M N F 

H 
W 

T T H S 

T T H 8 

TO 

TO 



9 

10 

1 TO 4 

1 TO 4 
ARRANGE 
9 

1 

2 TO 5 

10 

8 

ARRANGE 

ARRANGE 



B N 


20 8 


BN 


104 


BN 


108 


B N 


108 


BN 


104 


BN 
BN 


208 
207 


BN 


208 


BN 


208 



M OR G E N 

B E I S L E R 

B E 1 S L E R 

B E I 3 L E R 

B E I S L E R 

B E I S L E R 

MOR G E N 

MOR G E N 

M OR G E N 

B E I S L E R 

M OR G E N 



INOSTL STOICHOMTRY 

NONMTALC MTHL CNST 

CHEMICL ENGNRN LAB 

CHEMICL ENGNRN LAB 

PRNPLS CHEMICL ENG 

PRNPLS CHEMICL ENG 

CHEMICL ENG DESIGN 

CHEM THERMODYNAMCS 
CHEM THERMODYNAMCS 

AOV CHEM ENGNEERNG 

Al)V CHEM THRMONAMC 



o WILL BE OFFERED ONLY WHEN REQUIRED BY STUDENTS WORKING ON THE COOPERATIVE PLAN 



CHEMISTRY CY 



DEPT. 


COURSE 


SEC. 


CRED. 


DAYS 


HOURS 


BLDG. 


ROOK/ 


INSTRU 


C Y 


101 




4 


M WF 
W 


9 

2 TO 5 


C H 
C H 


110 
130 


HEATH 


C Y 


102 


1 


4 


M W F 


10 


C H 


A UO 


JACKSON 


C Y 


10 2 


2 


4 


MWF 


1 


C H 


AUD 


HEATH 


C Y 


10 2 


1 1 




M 


3 TO 5 


C H 


130 


HEATH 


C Y 


10 2 


12 




T 


2 TO 5 


C H 


130 


OTT E 


C Y 


10 2 


13 




HI 


2 TO 5 


C H 


1 30 


HEATH 


C Y 


102 


14 




TH 


1 TO 4 


C H 


130 


JACKSON 


C Y 


102 


15 




F 


2 TO 5 


C H 


1 30 


JACKSON 


C Y 


20 1 




4 


TT H 

M W 


9 

1 TO 4 


C H 
C H 


312 
330 


HAWKINS 
HAWKINS 


C Y 


20 2 


1 


4 


TTH 
M W 


9 

1 TO 4 


C H 
C H 


112 
114 


BLACK 


C Y 


20 2 


2 


4 


TTH 
TTH 


9 

1 TO 4 


C H 
CH 


112 
114 


BLACK 


C Y 


204 




3 


TTH 

M 


9 

1 TO 4 


C H 
C H 


212 
230 


HAWKINS 


» C Y 


301 




4 


M«F 

T 


11 

1 TO 4 


C H 
C H 


402 
230 


POLLARD 


C Y 


30 2 


1 


4 


MWF 

T 


9 

1 TO 4 


C H 

C H 


113 
2 30 


LEIGH 


C Y 


30 2 


2 


4 


MWF 
TH 


9 

1 TO 4 


C H 
C H 


112 
230 


LEIGH 


» C Y 


401 




4 


MWF 
TH 


8 
1 TO 4 


C H 
C H 


40 2 
204 


HAWKINS 


C Y 


40 2 




4 


MWF 
W 


8 

1 TO 4 


C H 
C H 


213 
204 


JACKSON 


C Y 


4 6 2 




3 


TO 


ARRANGE 






HEATH 


C Y 


483 




S 


TO 


ARRANGE 






P OL L A R 


C Y 


506 




3 


MWF 


10 


C H 


402 


P OL L A RO 


C Y 


518 




3 


T 

LAB 


9 

TO ARRANGE 


C H 


40 3 


POLLARD 


C Y 


5 2 2 




3 


TTH 


11 TO 1230 


C H 


40 2 


HAWKINS 


C Y 


524 




3 


MWF 


9 


C H 


40 2 


HAWKINS 


C Y 


536 




3 


TH 

L AB 


10 

TO ARRANGE 


C H 


402 


BLACK 



COURSE TITLE 
GENERAL CHEMISTRY 

GENERAL CHEMISTRY 
GENERAL CHEMISTRY 
GNRL CHEMISTRY LAB 
GNRL CHEMISTRY LAB 
GNRL CHEMISTRY LAB 
GNRL CHEMISTRY LAB 
GNRL CHEMISTRY LAB 
ANALYTIC CHEMISTRY 

ANALYTIC CHEMISTRY 

ANALYTIC CHEMISTRY 

ANALYTIC CHEMISTRY 

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 

PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY 

PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY 

PHOTOGRAPHIC CHEM 
CHEMICAL LITRATURE 
SPCL CHPTS ORG CHM 
AOV ORGANIC CHEM 

ADV PHYSICAL CHEM 
SPCL TPCS PHYS CHM 
ADV ANALYTIC CHEM 



WILL BE OFFERED ONLY WHEN REQUIRED BY STUDENTS WORKING ON THE COOPERATIVE PLAN 



CIVIL ENGINEERING -CL 



SEC. CREO. DAYS 

T T H 

T 

T T H 
T H 



N F 
T T H 



1 3 
3 3 

3 
4 

1 3 

2 3 

3 

4 

1 
3 

3 

3 
3 



T 



M W 
T H 



T T H 
M 



HOURS 

9 

1 TO < 

9 

1 T 4 

10 

9 

9 TO 12 

1 1 

1 T 3 

11 

1 TO 3 

ARRANGE 

9 
11 

2 TO 5 
1 TO 4 



ARRANGE 



11 

1 TO 4 



11 

1 TO 4 



ARRANGE 



BLDG. ROOM INSTRUCTOR 

HU30 2 REED 
HL 

H L 
HL 



HL 
HL 
HL 
HL 



30 2 
30 3 


30 3 
30 3 


30 2 


302 
30 3 


302 
101 


302 
101 


302 
30 2 
30 3 
303 


301 


301 
301 


301 
301 


301 
301 



SAWYER 
SAWYER 

MILES 

MILES 

STAFF 
REE 

MILES 
MILES 
MILES 



SAWYER 
SAWYER 
SAWYER 

DAIRYING - DY 



COURSE TITLE 

SURVEYING 

SURVEYING 

HIGHER SURVEYING 
THEORY OF STRCTURS 

HYDRAULICS 

HYDRAULICS 

SOIL MECHANICS 
HIGHWAY ENGINEERNG 

HYDRAULIC ENGNRING 
HYDRAULIC LA9 
WATER AND SEWERAGE 

REINFORCO CONCRETE 

STRUCTURAL ENGNRNG 

STATCLY INDET STRC 



3 


WF 

F 


9 

3 TO 


5 


3 


T T H 
TH 


11 
3 TO 


5 


5 


T T H 

M W 


11 

1 TO 


4 



D L 
D L 



L 
L 



101 
101 



10 3 
10 2 



101 
101 



F OU T S 
ARNOLD 
F OU T S 



ECONOMICS ES 
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



CNOENSD N DRY MILK 
MILK PRODUCTION 
DAIRY TECHNOLOGY 



BS 



1 




M WF 


10 


1 1 


5 


TT H 


8 


12 


5 


T T H 


9 


1 3 


5 


TT H 


10 


1 4 


5 


T TH 


10 


1 5 


5 


T T H 


11 


1 


5 


M T W TF 


8 


2 


5 


MT W TF 


a 


3 


5 


MT W TF 


11 


4 


5 


MT W TF 


1 



s c 

P E 
S C 
S C 
P E 
P E 
S C 
S C 
S C 
3 C 



208 


206 


201 


203 


3 


112 


213 


215 


215 


213 



E LOR I OG E 
T U T T L E 
MC F E R R I N 
MC FE RR I N 
T UTT LE 
T U T T L E 
POWERS 
COLLINS 
POWERS 
C OL L I N3 



ECON FOUN MORN LFE 
ECON FOUN MDRN LFE 
ECON FOUN MORN LFE 
ECON FOUN MORN LFE 
ECON FOUN MDRN LFE 
ECON FOUN MORN LFE 
ELMNTRY ACCOUNTING 
ELMNTRY ACCOUNTING 
ELMNTRY ACCOUNTING 
ELMNTRY ACCOUNTING 



ECONOMICS ES CONTINUED 
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION - BS CONTINUED 



COURSE 


SEC. CRED. 


DAYS 


HOURS 


15 


1 


4 


M WF 


8 


1 5 


1 1 




M 


3 TO 


1 5 


2 


4 


MWF 


10 


15 


12 




T 


3 TO 


15 


3 


4 


MWF 


10 


1 5 


13 




W 


3 TO 


15 


4 


4 


MWF 


11 


1 5 


14 




TH 


3 TO 


1 5 


5 


4 


T T HS 


10 


1 5 


15 




F 


3 TO 


311 


1 


3 


MWF 


8 


311 


2 


3 


MWF 


10 


312 


1 


3 


MWF 


9 


312 


2 


3 


MWF 


12 


313 


1 


3 


T THS 


8 


313 


2 


3 


TTHS 


9 


321 




3 


MWF 


11 


32 2 


1 


3 


MWF 


9 


322 


2 


3 


TTHS 


9 


32 2 


3 


3 


MWF 


10 


322 


4 


3 


MWF 


2 


327 


1 


3 


MWF 


8 


327 


2 


3 


TTHS 


8 


3 35 


1 


3 


MWF 


a 


335 


2 


3 


MWF 


9 


351 


1 


3 


TTHS 


9 


351 


2 


3 


MWF 


2 


351 


3 


3 


MWF 


10 


362 




3 


MWF 


9 


37 2 




3 


TTHS 


11 


38 2 




3 


MWF 


11 


401 




3 


MWF 


11 


40 2 


1 


3 


TTHS 


9 


402 


2 


3 


MWF 


10 


402 


3 


3 


MWF 


3 


4 2 


4 


3 


TTHS 


10 


40 4 


1 


3 


MWF 


8 


4 04 


2 


3 


MWF 


11 


407 




3 


MWF 


9 


408 


1 


3 


TTHS 


9 


408 


2 


3 


TTHS 


10 


408 


3 


3 


MWF 


11 


412 




3 


MWF 


11 


414 


1 


3 


MWF 


9 


414 


2 


3 


MWF 


12 



BLOG. 


ROOM 


INSTRUCTOR 


PE 


4 


GERMONO 


L A 


10 


GER MO NO 


PE 


4 


GERMONO 




10 


GERMONO 




10 


ANDERSON M D 




10 


ANDERSON M 




10 


ANDERSON M 




10 


ANDERSON M D 




10 


ANDERSON M D 




10 


ANDERSON M D 


S C 


20 5 


FLY 


8 C 


202 


FLY 


S C 


20 2 


B E 1 G H TS 


S C 


202 


B E 1 G H TS 


S C 


202 


FLY 


SC 


20 2 


FLY 


PE 


20 5 


DOLBE ARE 


AG 


109 


T UTTLE 


PE 


209 


DOLBE ARE 


PE 


206 


D OL B E AR E 


PE 


11 


DOLBEARE 


L A 


314 


DONOVAN 


L A 


314 


DONOVAN 


A G 


109 


H E S K 1 N 


A G 


108 


HE S K 1 N 


PE 


2 


B 1 GH A M 


L A 


210 


E UT S L ER 


L A 


201 


E UT S L E R 


AG 


104 


CH A CE 


PE 


208 


C H A C E 


L A 


204 


D 1 ETT R 1 C H 


A G 


109 


HURST 


A G 


109 


HURST 


A G 


109 


HURST 


A G 


109 


HURST 


AG 


109 


HURST 


S C 


201 


MCFE RR 1 N 


S C 


213 


MC F E R R 1 N 


L A 


201 


DONOVAN 


PE 


10 


HE S K 1 N 


PE 


205 


E LOR 1 OG E 


PE 


112 


E L OR 1 OG E 


8 C 


20 2 


B E 1 G H TS 


SC 


205 


COLLINS 


S C 


205 


POWERS 



COURSE TITLE 
ELMNTRY STATISTICS 
STATISTICS LAB 
ELMNTRY STATISTICS 
STATISTICS LAB 
ELMNTRY STATISTICS 
STATISTICS LAB 
ELMNTRY STATISTICS 
STATISTICS LAB 
ELMNTRY STATISTICS 
STATISTICS LAB 
ACCOUNTING PRNCPLS 
ACCOUNTING PRNCPLS 
ACCOUNTING PRNCPLS 
ACCOUNTING PRNCPLS 
COST ACCOUNTING 
COST ACCOUNTING 
FNCL ORGNZTN SOCTY 
FNCL ORGNZTN SOCTY 
FNCL ORGNZTN SOCTY 
FNCL ORGNZTN SOCTY 
FNCL ORGNZTN SOCTY 
PUBLIC FINANCE 
PUBLIC FINANCE 
ECNMCS OF MARKETNG 
ECNMCS OF MARKETNG 
TRANSPORTN PRNCPLS 
TRANSPORTN PRNCPLS 
TRANSPORTN PRNCPLS 
PROPERTY INSURANCE 
LABOR ECONOMICS 
UTLZJVTN OF RESORCS 
BUSINESS LAW 
BUSINESS LAW 
BUSINESS LAW 
BUSINESS LAW 
BUSINESS LAW 
GOVT CONT OF BSNSS 
GOVT CONT OF BSNSS 
ECON PRINS N PROBS 
ECON PRINS N PROBS 
ECON PRINS N PROBS 
ECON PRINS N PROBS 
AUDI T I N G 

INCOME TAX PRCEOUR 
INCOME TAX PRCEDUR 



ECONOMICS ES CONTINUED 
BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION - BS CONTINUED 



COURSE SEC 


CRED 


DAYS 


HOURS 


BLDG. 


ROOM INSTRUCTOR 




4 18 




3 


T T HS 


1 1 


3 C 


20 2 


B E 1 G H T3 




4 3 2 




3 


T T HS 


8 


P E 


209 


1 E T Z 




4 2 6 




3 


M W F 





P E 


10 


T UTTLE 




4 28 




3 


M W F 


9 


S C 


201 


MCF E R R 1 N 




4 3 




3 


T T H S 


9 


L A 


314 


DONOVAN 




4 33 




3 


T T H S 


8 


PE 


2 


H E S K 1 N 




4 4 




3 


M W F 


8 


L A 


204 


1 E T T R 1 C H 




4 4 2 




3 


T THS 


9 


L A 


20 4 


D 1 E T T R 1 C H 




44 3 




3 


T T H S 


8 


L A 


204 


1 E T T R 1 C H 




4 4 4 




3 


T T HS 


10 


PE 


206 


B 1 G H A M 




44 6 




3 


M W F 


11 


L A 


201 


MATHERLY 




45 4 




3 


M W F 


8 


PE 


2 


B 1 G H A M 




45 6 




3 


M W F 


9 


PE 


2 


B 1 G H A M 




4 66 




3 


M W F 


2 


P E 


102 


C H A CE 




47 




3 


T T H S 


1 1 


L A 


10 


ANDERSON M 





50 2 




3 


TO 


ARRANGE 






MATHERLY 




50 6 




3 


M W F 


2 


P E 


112 


E L DR 1 DG E 




5 12 




3 


TO 


ARRANGE 






BE 1 G H TS 




5 14 




3 


TO 


ARRANGE 






B E 1 G H TS 




5 28 




3 


TO 


ARRANGE 






OL BE AR E 




55 6 




3 


TO 


ARRANGE 






B 1 G H A M 




57 




3 


TO 


ARRANGE 






^NDERSON M 


D 


57 a 




3 


TO 


ARRANGE 






C H A C E 





EDUCATION EN 



M W F 

M W F 

M W F 

M W F 

T T H 3 

T T H S 

M W F 

M W F 

T T H 

M W F 

TO 

DAILY 

T T H 

T T H 

T 
TO 

T H 



ARRANGE 
11 OR 1 
1 1 
10 

ARRANGE 
ARRANGE 
7 9 3 PM 
7 9 3 PM 

10 



150 
134 

134 
134 
134 
134 
138 
134 

150 
134 
150 
326 
326 
134 
326 



NORMAN 

AND OTHER! 

G A R R I S 

H A Y G D 

H A Y G 00 

C R A G 

C R A G 

SALT 

SALT 

STEVENS B 

3 I M M N 3 

T EN N E V 

T E N N E Y 

G A R R I S 

T E N N E Y 

MEAD 

MEAD 

C R A G 

MEAD AND 
OTHERS 



« STtirsrr.- must reserve 9 or 

# GEE INSTRUCTOR FOR DETAILED 



10 DAILY FOR OBSERVATION IN THB LABORATORY 
SCHEDULE 



COURSE TITLE 
AOVANCO ACCOUNTING 
I NVE3TMENTS 
BANKING SYSTEMS 
PR08S CORPTN FNANC 
PRBLMS IN TAXATION 
PROB SALES MKT ANL 
TDE HRZNS CARIB AM 
TOE HRZNS FAR EAST 
FOREIGN TRADE 
OCEAN TRANSPORTATN 
CONSMPTN OF WEALTH 
PRIN PUB UTIL ECON 
PROB PUB SRVC INOS 
REALTY MANAGEMENT 
BUSINESS FORECASTG 
SMNR ECN PRIN PROB 
DVLPMT ECN THOUGHT 
ACCOUNTING THEORY 
SMNR ACCOUNTG PRIN 
PBS MONEY N BANKNG 
PBS PUB SRVC INDUS 
PBS STAT BS FRCTNG 
PROB LABOR RELATN3 



INTRDN TO EDUCATN 

METHODS VOCATNL AG 
DVLPMT N ORG OF ED 
OHSVTN STUD TEACHG 
ADOLESCENT CHILD 
AnOLESCENT CHILD 
HEALTH EDUCATION 
HEALTH EDUCATION 
TEA HEALTH N PL ED 
SCHOOL AOMIN STRATN 
SUPVO TEA VOCTL AG 
SUPVD TEA VOCNL AG 
SPCL MTHDS VOCL AG 
SPCL MTHDS VOCL AG 
ADV DIRECTED TEACH 
AOV DIRECTED TEACH 
EOUCATNL MEASRMNTS 
SlIPRVISN OF INSTRN 

.GUIONCE N C0UN3LNG 



ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING - EL 



DEPT. COURSE SEC. CRED. 



3 

1 3 

2 3 
3 

1 1 

2 1 
1 1 

3 1 

3 1 

4 1 
3 
1 
3 
3 
3 
2 

2 
3 



DAYS 

M W F 

M WF 

M WF 

TTHS 

W 

* 

T 

T 

F 

F 

TTHS 

T 

M RF 

M VF 

M WF 

M OR 
TH 

« 

TTHS 



HOURS 
11 
8 

10 
8 

1 TO 
3 TO 
1 TO 
3 TO 
1 TO 
3 TO 



BLDG. ROOM 



3 


MWF 


10 


3 


M WF 


11 


3 


MWF 


9 


3 


TTHS 


10 


3 


TTHS 


9 


3 


TTHS 


8 


2 


TTH 


11 


3 


MWF 


12 


3 


MWF 


8 


3 


MWF 


11 


3 


MWF 


10 


2 


TTH 


10 


3 


MWF 


12 


3 


MWF 


2 


3 


MWF 


8 


3 


MWF 


10 


3 


TO 


A RR A 


3 


MWF 


12 


3 


MWF 


2 



10 

1 

8 

11 

10 

1 TO 6 

1 T 4 
9 



BN 


209 


BN 


209 


BN 


209 


BN 


104 


BN 


106 


BN 


106 


BN 


106 


BN 


106 


BN 


106 


BN 


106 


BN 


209 


E G 


202 


BN 


208 


EG 


212 


EG 


213 


BN 


106 


S E 




B N 


209 



INSTRUCTOR 
SMITH E F 
WILSON J W 
WILSON J H 
WILSON J W 
SMITH E F 



SMITH 
SMITH 
SMITH 
SMITH 
SMITH 
WILSON J 
S A S H FF 
S A S H FF 
WILSON J 
S A 3 H FF 
SMITH E F 

S A S H FF 
3 A S H FF 



ENGLISH - EH 



A G|10 4 



L A 

L A 

L A 

L A 

L A 

L A 

L A 

L A 

L A 

L A 

L A 

L A 

L A 

L A 

L A 

L A 

L A 

L A 



210 
20 3 
314 
311 
213 
311 
10 
210 
307 
210 
311 
210 
307 
210 
210 
210 
210 
307 



CONNER 

LYONS 

S TR OU P 

ROBERTSON 

F A R R I S 

ELI A S ON 

F A R R I S 

CLARK 

S P I V E Y 

ROBERTSON 

LYONS 

F A R R I S 

CONGLETON 

FOX 

S P I VE Y 

LYONS 

E L I A 3 N 

CONGLETON 

FOX 



COURSE TITLE 
ELEMENTS ELECT ENG 
ELEMENTS ELECT ENG 
ELEMENTS ELECT ENG 
AC N DC PROBLEMS 
DYNAMO LABORATORY 
DYNAMO LABORATORY 
DYNAMO LABORATORY 
DYNAMO LABORATORY 
DYNAMO LABORATORY 
DYNAMO LABORATORY 
INDUS APLNS EL EQP 
ELECTR ENG SEMINAR 
INOSTRL ELECTRONCS 
A C APPARATUS 
THRY ELCT CIRCUITS 
AOVANCD DYNAMO LAB 

ELECTRONICS LAB 
ADV COMMUNCATN ENG 



LITRY MASTRS AMRCA 

LITRY MSTRS ENGLNO 

MASTERPCS WRLO LIT 

SHAKESPEARE 

MJR POETS VICT PRO 

INTROD ENG LANG 

EXPOSITION 

BUSINESS WRITING 

AMERICAN LITERATUR 

MODERN DRAMA 

CHAUCER 

IMAGINATIV WRITING 

AUGUSTAN AGE 

ENGLISH ROMNTC PRO 

AMERICAN LITERATUR 

CHAUCER 

MIDDLE ENGLISH 

AUGUSTAN AGE 

ENGLISH ROMNTC PRO 



ENTOMOLOGY - EY 



E Y 312 
e Y 3 14 



SEC. 


CRED 


. DAYS 


HOURS 


BLDG. 


ROOK 




1 


F 


9 


AG 


308 




4 


M N 
S 


10 

8 TO 1 2 


AG 
AG 


308 
308 




5 


M W 
M W 


9 

1 TO 3 


A G 
AG 


308 
308 




3 


M W 

T 


8 

3 T 5 


AG 
AG 


308 
308 




3 


T 
TH 


10 

3 TO 5 


A G 
AG 


308 
308 




3 


TH 

T 


10 

1 TO 3 


A G 
AG 


308 
308 




3 


TO 


ARRANGE 


A G 


308 




3 


TO 


ARRANGE 


A G 


308 



1 INSTRUCTOR 

CREIGHTON 
H I X 3 N 

CRE IGHTON 

H I X 30 N 

CREIGHTON 

CRE IGHTON 

CREIGHTON 
T I 3 S T 



COURSE TITLE 
ENTOMOLOGY SEMINAR 
PRINC ECNMC ENTMOL 

INSECT MORPHOLOGY 

MEDCAL VTRNY ENTML 

PLNT ORNTN INSPCTN 

MTHOS R3CH ENTMLQY 

PROBLMS ENTOMOLOGY 
AOV IN3CT TAXONOMY 



FORESTRY FY 



F Y 


20 2 






U « 

3 


8 

8 TO 


1 2 


HT 


40 8 


OE V A L L 


WOOD IDENTIFICATN 


F Y 


206 






T T H 
M 


8 

1 TO 


5 


HT 


409 


OE V A L L 


GRAZNG N WILD LIFE 


F Y 


208 






M W 

T 


9 

1 TO 


5 


HT 


409 


FR A ZE R 


FOREST C0N3TRUCTN 


F Y 


220 




2 


MM 


10 




HT 


410 


W EST VEL D 


INTRON TO FORESTRY 


F Y 


309 




4 


T T H 
S 


8 

8 TO 


1 2 


HT 
HT 


408 
409 


N EN 1 N 3 


WD TCHNLGY TMBR PS 


F Y 


310 




3 


r 


10 
1 TO 


5 


HT 


408 


MILLER J W 


RFRSTN NURSY PRCTC 


F Y 


312 




3 


T 
T F 


9 

10 TO 


12 


HT 


409 


OE V A L L 


GAME MANAGEMENT 


F Y 


313 




3 


T TH 

TH 


10 
1 TO 


3 


HT 


410 


XESTVELO 


FARM FORESTRY 


F Y 


318 




3 


M W F 


9 




HT 


410 


Z 1 EG L E R 


FRST UTLZTN PROCTS 


FY 


320 




3 


TH 
WF 


11 

1 TO 


5 


HT 


4 10 


W ES T VEL 


31 LVECULTURE 


FY 


410 




2 


M W 


10 




HT 


409 


FR A ZE R 


FRST HISTRY POLICY 


F Y 


414 




3 


TT H 

F 


9 

1 TO 


3 


HT 


408 


MILLER J W 


WOOD PR3VTN 3EA3NG 


F Y 


416 




3 


M N 
M 


11 
1 TO 


5 


HT 


410 


Z 1 E GL ER 


FRST MANGMNT PLANS 


F Y 


418 




3 


M NF 


9 




HT 


407 


MILLER J W 


LOGGING LUMBERNG 


F Y 


4 20 




3 


T T H S 


8 




HT 


410 


Z 1 E G L E R 


FORST ECON ADMN3TN 


F Y 


4 21 




3 


T 
TH 


11 
1 TO 


5 


H T 
HT 


4 10 
409 


N E W 1 N 3 


KILN DRYING LUMBER 


F Y 


4 2 2 




2 


F 

1 MR 


8 

TO A R 


RANGE 


H T 


4 10 


STAFF 


ADVANCED MEN3URATN 


FY 


4 31 




2 


TO 


A RR A N 


G E 






STAFF 


FRST PR0B3 SEMINAR 



FRENCH FH 



DEPT. COURSE SEC 

C F H 33 

C F H 3 4 

C F H 3 4 

F H 30 2 

F H 30 2 

F H 306 

F H 308 

F H 4 3 

F H 5 30 



CRED 
3 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



DAYS 
TTH 3 

M W F 
M W F 
M W F 
M W F 
T T H S 
M W F 
TTH 



HOURS 



BLDG. ROOM 



INSTRUCTOR 



10 
ORTO ARRANGE 



TTH |10 

ORTO ARRANGE 



BU 


101 


BU 


30 5 


BU 


101 


BU 


101 


BU 


205 


BU 


101 


BU 


101 


BU 


101 


BU 


101 



B R U N E T 

8 RU N E T 

A T K I N 

A T K I N 

8 R U N E T 

A TK I N 

A TK I N 

A TK 1 N AND 

B R U N E T 

A T K I N AND 

BR U NE T 



GENERAL SCIENCE GL 



GL 320| 121 TTH llO 



GY202 4M»(F ]9 

F |l TO 4 



Pe|2 08| PHIPPS 

GEOLOGY - GY 



s c 
s c 



206l HUBBELL 
106 



GEOGRAPHY - GPY 

GPY 30l| |4TTH Iz TO 4 LA204ATWOOD 



COURSE TITLE 
READING OF FRENCH 
READING OF FRENCH 
READING OF FRENCH 
SECOND YEAR FRENCH 
SECOND YEAR FRENCH 
CONVRSTN N COMPSTN 
MASTERPIECS FR LIT 
INDIVIDUAL WORK 

INDIVIDUAL WORK 



HISTORY OF SCIENCE 



HISTORICAL GEOLOGY 



GEOGRPHY OF AMRCAS 



GERMAN GN 



C GN 


33 




3 


C GN 


34 


1 


3 


C GN 


3 4 


2 


3 


C GN 


3 4 


#3 


3 


C GN 


3 4 


#4 


3 


GN 


20 2 


1 


3 


GN 


302 


2 


3 


GN 


326 




3 


GN 


4 30 




» 


GN 


50 2 








T T HS 

M W F 

M W F 

T T H S 

M W F 

M W F 

M W F 

TO 
TO 
TO 



10 

8 

11 

ARRANGE 

ARRANGE 

ARRANGE 



305 


305 


30 5 


305 


305 


201 


205 


30 2 



JONES 

JONES 

JONES 

JONES 

HAUPTMANN 

HAUPTMANN 

JONES 

HAUPTMANN 

JONES 

JONES 



READING OF GERMAN 

READING OF GERMAN 

READING OF GERMAN 

READING OF GERMAN 

READING OF GERMAN 
SECOND YEAR GERMAN 
SECOND YEAR GERMAN 

SCIENTIFIC GERMAN 

INDIVIDUAL WORK 
READING COURSE 



GREEK - GK 

Bu|2 05] BRUNET 



EGINNERS GREEK 



HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION HPL 



M «f 

M W 

M W F 

M W F 



10 
11 

ARRANGE 
ARRANGE 



138 
138 
138 
138 
14 7 
14 7 



BEARD 

MCALL I3TER 

SALT 

SALT 

SALT 

SALT 



TRACK AND FIELD 

BASEBALL 

TEA PHSCL ED EL SC 

TEA PHSCL ED SE SC 

GUiD PROFSNL DVLPT 

PROBLEMS IN PHY ED 



» VARIABLE CREDIT 

# FOR SCIENCE STUDENTS 



HISTORY HY 



DEPT. 


COURSE 


SEC. 


CRED 


DAYS 


H 


C H Y 


1 3 




4 


M T W F 


8 


H Y 


30 4 




3 


T T HS 


10 


H Y 


310 




3 


M N F 


9 


H Y 


306 




3 


T THS 


11 


H Y 


314 




3 


M l» F 


1 1 


H Y 


318 




3 


M W F 


8 


H Y 


3 32 




3 


T T H S 


9 


H Y 


4 2 




3 


T T HS 


8 


H Y 


510 




3 


M 


3 



HOURS 



BLDG. ROOM 
PE 



INSTRUCTOR 



P E 
PE 
PE 
L A 
L A 
PE 
L A 
P E 



Hi". 
112 
113 
206 
311 
311 
112 
20 3 



LEAKE 
LEAKE 
LEAKE 
PAYNE 
GLU N T 
G LU N T 
PAYNE 
PAYNE 



112ALEAKE 



COURSE TITLE 
HI3TRY MOORN WORLD 
AM HIST 1876 1940 
NAPOLEON 

EH HIST 1485 1688- 
EURP OUR MODL AGES 
LM AM HY 19 00 1940 
SURVEY AMERCN HIST 
ANCIENT CIVILIZTN3 
SEMINAR AMRCN HIST 



HORTICULTURE HE 



3 


T T H 
T 


11 
3 


TO 


5 


3 


WKF 


9 






3 


T T H 
M 


8 
3 


TO 


5 


3 


M WF 


8 






3 


M NF 


10 






3 


M « 

W 


1 1 

3 


TO 


5 


3 


T TH 
M 


11 

1 


TO 


3 


3 
1 


F 
TH 

F 


9 

1 

11 


TO 


5 



209 
209 


309 


209 
209 


309 


209 


309 
309 


NHS 
NHS 


310 
209 


209 



ABBOTT 
ABBOTT 

WOLFE 
WOLFE 
ABBOTT 

W A T K I NS 



WATKINS AND 
WOLFE 



VEGETABLE GARONING 

PRNCPLS FRUIT PRON 
CITRUS CUliuRE 

DECIDUOUS FRUITS 
SUBTKPCL TRPCL FRT 
SYSTMTC OLERCULTUR 

CMMRCL FLORICULTUR 

AOV ORNMENTAL HORT 

HORTCULTUR SEMINAR 



INDUSTRIAL ARTS EDUCATION - IN 



IN 112 

IN 112 

IN 212 

IN 212 

IN 30 5 

IN 4 1 

IN 4 4 

IN 4 4 



1 3 

2 3 

1 3 

2 3 
3 
3 

1 3 

2 3 



M « F 

M W F 

T T H S 

T T H S 

T T H 

M W F 

T T H 

M 

T T H 



8 TO 10 

9 TO 11 

9 TO 11 

10 TO 12 
3 TO 5 30 
3 T 5 

9 



TO 5 



1 1 



TO 3 



Y N 

YN 

YN 

YN 

YN 

YN 

A G 
A G 

A G 
A G 



324 


324 


3 HP 


SHP 


S H P 


324 


3 10 
SIO 


310 
310 



BOHANNON 

BOHANNON 

BOHANNON 

BOHANNON 

BOHANNON 

MARTIN 

ROGERS F 

ROGERS F 



MECHANICAL DRAWING 
MECHANICAL DRAWING 
GENERAL SHOP 
GENERAL SHOP 
DESIGN N CONSTRCTN 
ARCHTECTRL DRAWING 
FARM MOTORS 

FARM MOTORS 



INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING IG 



DEPT. COURSE SEC. CRED. 



1 
3 
3 
1 1 
12 
13 
14 



DAYS 


HOURS 


BLDG. 


ROOM INSTRUCTOR 


T 


11 




E G 


211 


DEL U C A 


M WF S 
M 


9 

3 TO 


5 


E G 
E G 


213 

LAB 


ESHLEMAN 


M WF S 


9 




E G 


211 


Y E A T N 


M WF S 


10 




E G 


211 


OEL U C A 


M WF S 


11 




E G 


211 


YE A T N 


W 


1 TO 


3 


E G 


213 


EL U C A 


T 


1 TO 


3 


E G 


213 


EL U C A 


TH 


1 TO 


3 


E G 


213 


OEL U C A 


F 


1 TO 


3 


E G 


213 


OEL U C A 


T THS 


9 




E G 


209 


WEIL 


TTH 


10 




E G 


212 


ESHLEMAN 


M W 
TH 


11 
1 TO 


4 


E G 
BN 


213 
104 


ESHLEMAN 


TTH 


10 




E G 


211 


YE A T N 


M 


1 TO 


5 


E G 


211 


EL U C A 



JOURNALISM JM 



3 


T T HS 


9 


3 


M WF 


10 


4 


M W 
TTH 


8 

2 TO 5 


3 


TTHS 


10 


3 


TTHS 


8 


2 


TTHS 


11 


2 


M W F 


2 


3 


TTHS 


10 


2 


MWF 


11 


3 


M WF 


9 


3 


TO 


ARRANGE 


3 


TO 


ARRANGE 



BU 


301 


BU 


301 


BU 
BU 


301 
301 


BU 


305 


BU 


301 


BU 


301 


BU 


301 


BU 


301 


BU 


301 


BU 


301 


BU 


301 


BU 


301 



E M I G 
L OW R Y 
L W R Y 

L OHR Y 
L W R Y 
L OW R Y 
E M I G 
EM I G 
EM I G 
E M I G 
L OWR Y 
E M I G 



COURSE TITLE 
INTRO TO ENGINRING 

APPLIED MECHANICS 

APPLIED MECHANICS 
APPLIED MECHANICS 
APPLIED MECHANICS 
LAB FOR EE 
LAB FOR CE 
LAB FOR IE AND ME 
LAB FOR CHE 
ENGINERING PRACTIC 
SPCTNS ENGRN RLTNS 
PLNT SHP LYT OESGN 

HUMAN ENGINEERING 
PRFSNL PHOTOGRAPHY 



INTRO TO JOURNLISM 
PRINCPS OF JRNLISM 
NEWS WRTG N EDITNG 

MGZN WRTG N EOITNG 
NEWSPAPER MANAGEMT 
NWSPR N MGZN ILLSM 
RADIO WRITING 
AOV PUBLIC OPINION 
WORLD JOURNALISM 
CNTMPR JRNSTC THOT 
SPCL STUD NSPR PRO 
SPCL STUD PUB OPIN 



I 3 I MWF llO 



LATIN - LN 

BU|2 0l| BRUNET 



SECOND YEAR LATIN 



^' 



LAW LW 



'T. 


COURSE SEC. 


CRED 


DAYS 


HOURS 




30 2 




5 


M T W TF 


9 




30 4 




3 


M WF 


10 




30 6 




1 


F 


11 




308 




3 


T T H 3 


8 




312 




2 


T TH 


11 




40 3 




2 


T TH 


10 




406 




4 


M T T HF 


9 




408 




2 


T H 
S 


8 

10 T 12 




410 




3 


M W F 


8 




413 




3 


M WF 


10 




417 




2 


T S 


3 




418 




3 


M W F 


- 1 




502 




2 


M F 


10 




506 




3 


M WF 


B 




508 




3 


M WF 


11 




515 




3 


WS 


9 




516 




1 


TO 


A R R A NG E 




5 16 




3 


T T H 


10 




520 




3 


MT T H 


9 




5 32 




3 


T TH 


11 




60 2 




« 


TO 


A R R A NG E 



BLDG. ROOM 
L W 
L W 
L W 
L W 
L W 
L W 
L W 

L W 

L N 

L W 

L W 

L W 

L W 

L W 

L N 

L W 

L W 



L W 
L W 
L W 



201 


202 


201 


201 


201 


204 


20 4 


204 
204 


304 


204 


304 


304 


301 


303 


203 


303 


801 


303 


202 


30 2 



INSTRUCTOR 
T RU S L E R 
TESELLE 
MC R A E 
CRANOALL 
A V 
M C R A E 
S L A G L E 
DOLE 

CRANOALL 

MC R A E 

DAY 

CRANOALL 

T R U S L E R 

A Y 

S L A G L E 

MC R A E 

TESELLE AN 
A V 

TESELLE 

TESELLE 

S L A G L E 

STAFF 



MATHEMATICS MS 





4 


1 


4 


3 


4 


3 


4 


4 


4 


5 


4 


6 


4 


7 


4 


8 


4 


9 


4 


10 


4 


1 1 


4 


13 


4 



MT T HF 


MT W F 


T WTHF 


T WT HF 


T WTHF 


T WT HF 


M W T HF 


MT W F 


M T W F 


M T W F 


M W T HF 


T WT HF 


M WT HF 



8 

11 

10 

9 

10 

10 

8 

3 

3 

11 

8 

9 

8 



L A 
P E 
PE 
PE 
PE 
E G 
PE 
PE 
P E 
PE 
E G 
L A 
PE 



10 


102 


101 


4 


209 


209 


11 


1 


4 


1 


203 


10 


208 



PHILLIPS 
SIMPSON 
C A WT HON 
G ERMONO 
P H I LL IPS 
MC I NN I 3 
P I R EN I A N 
P H I PP S 
A V i 
OU A OE 
OOS T A L 
CHANDLER 
C A W T H ON 



COURSE TITLE 
EQUITY JURISPRO 
CONTRACTS 

MARRIAGE N DIVORCE 
COMMON LAW PLOING 
PROPERTY 11 
AGENCY 

PRIVATE CORP 
LGL ETHC3 N BI8L 

PROPERTY IV 

FLA CIVIL PRACT 

SALES 

TAXATION 

DAMAGES 

N E G I NS TS 

CONFL ICTS 

MORTGAGES 

PRACTICE COURT 

TRIAL PRACTICE II 
CREDIT RTS 
AOMI RALTY 
LEGAL RESEARCH 



BASIC 
BASIC 
BASIC 
BASIC 
BASIC 
BASIC 
BASIC 
BASIC 
BASIC 
BASIC 
BASIC 
BASIC 
BASIC 



M A T HE M A 

M A T HE M A 

M A T HE M A 

M A T HE M A 

M A T HE M A 

M A T HE M A 

M A T HE M A 

M A r HE M A 

M A T HE M A 

M A T HE M A 

M A T HE M A 

M A T HE M A 

M A T HE M A 



TICS 
TICS 
TICS 
TICS 
TICS 
TICS 
TICS 
TICS 
TICS 
TICS 
TICS 
TICS 
TICS 



MATHEMATICS MS CONTINUED 



DEPT. 


COURSE SEC. 


MS 


308 




MS 


310 




MS 


312 




MS 


33 6 




MS 


35 3 




MS 


351 


1 


M S 


35 4 


3 


MS 


354 


'3 


MS 


35 4 


4 


MS 


354 


5 


MS 


421 




MS 


521 




MS 


55 6 




MS 


568 





CRF.D 
3 
3 

3 



DAYS 
M W F 

T 
M W F 
T T H S 
T T H F S 
M W F S 
M W F S 
T T H FS 
M HF S 
M T T HS 
T T HS 
T T H 
M W 
T T HS 



HOURS 
11 

ARRANGE 
11 
8 
9 
10 



9 

10 

11 

7 30 9 AM 

2 TO 3 30 

10 



BLDG. ROOM 
P E 



P E 
P E 
PE 
PE 
PE 
E G 
PE 
PE 
P E 
P E 
E G 
PE 



10 

10 

11 

2 

1 

20 2 

206 

10 2 

10 

1 

212 

10 



INSTRUCTOR 
KOKOMOOR 
G E R M NO 
P I R E N I A N 
KOKOMOOR 
GEORGE 
PHI P P S 
A V I S 
OS T A L 
MC I NN 1 S 
P I R E N I A N 
OS T A L 
G E R M NO 
OU A E 
KOKOMOOR 



COURSE 
BUSINESS 

ST A T I S T C 

A D V COLL 

A V G N R L 

OIF INT 

OIF INT 

D I F INT 

GIF INT 

GIF INT 

OIF INT 

H I G H R MA 

E MPR C L A 

F U NC T N S 
HI STORY 



TITLE 
M A TH M 

A L MET 

EG E A L 

M A TH M 

C A L C U L 

C A L CU L 

C A L CU L 

C A L CU L 

C A L CU L 

C A L CU L 

T H E N G 

NL CR V 

C M P L X 

E L M N T 



A T C S 
HO S 
G E a R 
A TC S 
US 
US 
US 
U 3 
US 
US 
PHY 
F ! T 
V R B L 
MATH 



MECHANICAL ENGINEERING ~ ML 



TH 

5 H R S 



TO ARRANGE 



TO ARRANGE 



T T H 
S 



T T H 

F 



M W F 
T T H S 



T H 
T H 



M W F 
M W F 



T 
N 

T T H 

F 

F 



10 

1 T 4 



10 

9 T 1 2 



2 TO 4 
10 

10 

1 

3 TO S 

1 

2 T 5 

10 T 12 

9 

1 

2 T 5 

ARRANGE 

11 

1 TO 5 

9 

2 TO 5 

1 



E G 
E G 


20 2 
304 


C H 
E G 


AUG 

304 


E G 
E G 


20 2 
300 


E G 
E G 


202 
300 


E G 
E G 


213 
304 


E G 
E G 


211 
103 


E G 


213 


E G 


213 


E G 
EG 


209 
103 


E G 
E G 


209 
103 


BN 


AN X 


E G 


209 


E G 
E G 


209 
103 


E G 


103 


E G 

BN 


209 
AN X 


E G 
E G 


213 

300 


BN 


30 3 



KEITH 
KEITH 



F R A S H 
F R A S H 



F I N E RE N 
F I N E R E N 



F I N E R E N 
F I N E R E N 



F I N E R E N 
F I N E R E N 



ESHLEMAN 
ESHLEMAN 



THOMPSON 
E B AU G H 



THOMPSON 
THOMPSON 



JANES 
JANES 



JANES 
E B A U G H 



E B A UG H 
E B A U G H 



THOMPSON 



JANES 
JANES 



FINEREN ANG 
THOMPSON 



THOMPSON 
AND STAFF 



ENGINEERNG GRADING 

DESCRIPTV GEOMETRY 

MECHNI3M N KNMATCS 

MECHNI3M N KNMATCS 

ELEMENTARY OESIGN 

METALLOGRAPHY 

THERMODYNAMICS 
POWER ENGINEERING 
MECHANICAL LABRTRY 

MECHANICAL LABRTRY 

MCHN SHOP METL «»RK 
RFGRTN AIR CONOTNG 
MECHANICAL LABRTRY 

AERODYNAMIC LABRTY 
MANUFCTRG OPERATNS 

AOV MACHINE OESIGN 

SEMINAR 



MILITARY SCIENCE - MY 



COURSE 


SEC. 


CRED. 


DAYS 


HOURS 


102 


1 


2 


M W 


8 


103 


3 


3 


M W 


9 


103 


3 


2 


M W 


10 


10 2 


4 


3 


TTH 


8 


103 


5 


3 


T T H 


9 


102 


6 


3 


TTH 


10 


10 4 


1 


3 


U 


a 


10 4 


3 


2 


M 


8 


10 4 


3 


3 


M 


9 


10 4 


4 


3 


M 


9 


104 


5 


3 


M 


10 


104 


6 


3 


M 


10 


10 4 


7 


3 


T 


8 


10 4 


8 


2 


T 


8 


104 


9 


2 


T 


9 


104 


10 


2 


T 


9 


104 


1 1 


2 


W 


8 


104 


13 


3 


T 


10 


10 4 


1 3 


3 


TH 


8 


104 


14 


2 


TH 


8 


202 


1 


3 


TTH 


8 


203 


3 


3 


TTH 


9 


20 3 


3 


3 


TTH 


10 


203 


4 


3 


HF 


8 


302 


5 


3 


WF 


9 


20 2 


6 


3 


WF 


10 


20 3 


1 


3 


M 


9 


20 3 


2 


3 


M 


10 


20 3 


3 


3 


W 


8 


30 3 


4 


2 


W 


9 


30 3 


5 


2 


F 


8 


30 4 


1 


3 


T 


8 


304 


3 


3 


T 


9 


30 4 


3 


3 


T 


10 


204 


4 


3 


TH 


9 


20 4 


5 


3 


TH 


10 


30 3 


1 


3 


M MF 


9 


303 


3 


2 


M«F 


10 


'302 


3 


3 


MWF 


1 


304 


1 


3 


M W 


8 


30 4 


2 


3 


M W 


9 


304 


3 


3 


M W 


10 


304 


4 


3 


TTH 


9 



BLDG. ROOM 



L A 


30 3 


L A 


304 


L A 


204 


L A 


210 


L A 


310 


L A 


810 


L A 


313 


L A 


301 


L A 


313 


PE 


4 


L A 


213 


PE 


101 


SC 


208 


L A 


201 


3 C 


308 


PE 


101 


L A 


212 


L A 


201 


8 C 


308 


L A 


301 


L W 


303 


L W 


302 


L W 


303 


L A 


306 


L A 


306 


L A 


306 


L A 


306 


L A 


306 


PE 


309 


PE 


11 


PE 


309 


A G 


108 


A G 


108 


A G 


108 


AG 


108 


AG 


108 


8C 


315 


SC 


315 


SC 


31 5 


L A 


307 


L A 


311 


A G 


303 


AG 


303 



INSTRUCTOR 
HALLORAN 
HALLORAN 
HALLORAN 
HALLORAN 
HALLORAN 
HALLORAN 
L A Z ON 8 Y 
6IL0ER3LEEVE 
L A Z ON B Y 
J YNE R 

GIL0ER3LEEVE 
J YNE R 
L A Z ON B Y 
GIL0ER3LEEVE 
L A Z ON B Y 
J YNE R 

GILDERSLEEVE 
J YNE R 
L A Z ON B Y 
GILDERSLEEVE 
CLARK H 
CLARK rt 
CLARK H 
CLARK H 
CLARK H 
CLARK H 
ROB U C K 
ROB U CK 
ROB U C K 
ROB U CK 
ROB U CK 
REYNOLDS 
REYNOLDS 
REYNOLDS 
REYNOLDS 
REYNOLDS 
RUSH 
RUSH 
RUSH 

ROBERTSON J 
ROBERTSON J 
BANKS 
BANKS 



COURSE TITLE 
13T YEAR INFANTRY 
1ST YEAR INFANTRY 
1ST YEAR INFANTRY 
18T YEAR INFANTRY 
1ST YEAR INFANTRY 
1ST YEAR INFANTRY 
1ST YEAR ARTILLERY 
13T YEAR ARTILLERY 
13T YEAR ARTILLERY 
13T YEAR ARTILLERY 
1ST YEAR ARTILLERY 
1ST YEAR ARTILLERY 
1ST YEAR ARTILLERY 
1ST YEAR ARTILLERY 
1ST YEAR ARTILLERY 
13T YEAR ARTILLERY 
13T YEAR ARTILLERY 
13T YEAR ARTILLERY 
1ST YEAR ARTILLERY 
13T YEAR ARTILLERY 
2N0 YEAR INFANTRY 
2ND YEAR INFANTRY 
2N0 YEAR INFANTRY 
3ND YEAR INFANTRY 
3N0 YEAR INFANTRY 
3ND YEAR INFANTRY 
HORSEORAfN ARTILRY 
H0R3E0RAHN ARTILRY 
H0R3E0RAWN ARTILRY 
HORSEORAWN ARTILRY 
HORSEORAWN ARTILRY 
MOTORIZED ARTILLRY 
MOTORIZED ARTILLRY 
MOTORIZED ARTILLRY 
MOTORIZED ARTILLRY 
MOTORIZED ARTILLRY 
3RD YEAR INFANTRY 
3R0 YEAR INFANTRY 
3RD YEAR INFANTRY 
3R0 YEAR ARTILLERY 
3R0 YEAR ARTILLERY 
3RD YEAR ARTILLERY 
3RD YEAR ARTILLERY 



MILITARY SCIENCE MY 



CONTINUED 



DEPT. COURSE SEC. CRED. DAYS 

MY 40 2 

MY 40 2 

MY 40 2 

MY 40 4 

MY 40 4 

MY 404 



1 


2 


2 


3 


3 


2 


1 


2 


2 


2 


3 


2 



DAYS 


HOURS 


M WF 


9 


M HF 


10 


Mil F 


1 


M«F 


9 


MWF 


10 



BLDG. ROOM 
L W 
L W 
L W 
L W 
L W 



301 


301 


301 


302 


302 


302 



INSTRUCTOR 
RING 
RING 
RING 

DONALDSON 
DONALDSON 
DONALDSON 



COURSE TITLE 

4TH YEAR INFANTRY 

4TH YEAR INFANTRY 

4TH YEAR INFANTRY 

4TH YEAR ARTILLERY 

4TH YEAR ARTILLERY 

4TH YEAR ARTILLERY 



HI ADDITION TO THE THEORY SECTIONS AS LISTED ABOVE EACH STUDENT MUST BE ASSIGNED TO ONE OF 
THE FOLLOWING DRILL SECTIONS: 

INFANTRY 



MY 
MY 

MY 
MY 

MY 
MY 



MY 

MY 

M Y 

MY 

MY 

M Y 
M Y 



140 




141 




150 




151 




1 52 




153 




154 




155 




156 




1 57 




158 




159 




160 




161 




162 




163 





TH 



T 
TH 



T 
TH 



T 
TH 



TH 

W 



TH 
TH 



TH 
TH 



3 TO 5 COMPANIES ABC 

3 TO 5 COMPANIES EFGH 

ARTILLERY 



1 TO 3 

4 

1 TO 3 

4 

3 TO 5 
4 

3 TO 5 

4 

1 TO 3 

4 

1 TO 3 

4 

3 TO 5 

4 

3 TO 5 

4 

1 TO 3 

4 

1 TO 3 

4 

1 TO 3 

4 

1 TO 3 

4 

3 TO 5 
3 TO 5 



BATTERY A 

BATTERY B 

BATTERY C 

BATTERY D 

BATTERY E 

BATTERY F 

BATTERY G 

BATTERY H 

BATTERY I 

BATTERY K 

BATTERY L 

BATTERY M 



JUNIOR BTRY 1) OPEN ONLY TO JUTJIORS IN ARTILLERY 

) WHO WILL REGISTER FOR ONE OF THE 
JUNIOR BTRY 2) JUNIOR BATTERIES IN ADDITION TO 
ONE OF THE REGULAR BATTERIES 



THIRD AND FOURTH YEAR INFANTRY STUDENTS MUST ATTEND AN ADDITIONAL HOUR AT 2 W OR TH 
PARADES WILL BE HELD WHEN CALLED ON THURSDAY FROM 5 TO 6 P.M. 



MUSIC MSC 



M S C 


102 




1 


MSC 


310 




2 


BO 


112 




2 


BD 


212 




2 



MT H 
TT H 



MT 

WT H 



M T 
WT H 



7 P M 

2 

5 



FIELD 
FIELD 



FIELD 
FIELD 



BROWN R I 
MURPHREE 
BROWN R 

BROWN R 



ORCHESTRA MUSIC 
MUSIC APPRECIATION 
1ST YEAR BAND 

2N0 YEAR BAND 



PAINTING PG 



P G 1 1 A 
P G 31 A 



P G 32 A 

P G 33 B 

P G 31 A 

P G 31 B 

P G 32 A 

P G 3 2 B 

P G 41 A 

P G 51 A 

P G SIB 

P G 5 3 A 

P G 5 3 B 



SEC. CRED 
6 



»«2 



M T W F 
T H 
M NF 



M N F 
3 HR3 

DAILY 
3 HR 3 

M WF 

9 HR 3 

18 HR 

M WF 
TTH8 
M WF 

A I L y 

M W F 



HOURS 

TO 5 
TO 4 
TO 5 



BLDG. ROOM 



1 3 
1 2 
M N 



HR 
HR 



M T W TF 
MNF 



MT W TF 
M WF 



TTH 
3 HRS 



8 TO 10 

TO ARRANGE 

8 TO 10 

TO ARRANGE 

8 TO 10 



A RR AN GE 
A RR AN GE 



10 TO 12 
8 TO 10 
10 TO 12 



TO 
TO 



TO 12 
TO 12 

A RR AN G E 

ARRANGE 

A RR AN G E 



TO 5 
TO 5 



TO 
TO 



TO ARRANGE 



3 TO 5 

TO ARRANGE 



TO ARRANGE 



PROJECT JUDGEMENTS; 



P E 
P E 



PE 
P E 



PE 
P E 



109 
109 



300 
300 



300 
300 



109 
109 



300 
300 



300 

300 

306 
306 

300 
300 

300 

300 

300 



INSTRUCTOR 

HOLBROOK 
HOLBROOK 
CRITICISM 

HOLBROOK 

HOLBROOK 
HOLBROOK 

HOLBROOK 
HOLBROOK 
CRITICISM 

HOLBROOK 

HOLBROOK 

HOLBROOK 
HOLBROOK 
CRITICISM 

HOLBROOK 
CRITICISM 

HOLBROOK 

HOLBROOK 

HOLBROOK 
HOLBROOK 

HOLBROOK 
CRITICISM 

HOLBROOK 
CRITICISM 

HOLBROOK 

GRAND 
GRAND 

HOLBROOK 

G R A ;■ . 



|9 TO 



PROJECT LABORATORY ^OOK ROOM) 

2 Pe|3 6 

P E|3 6 



PE|3 00 STAFF 



DA I L Via TO 1 ; 
A I L y|i to 5 



STAFF 
STAFF 



COURSE TITLE 
FN0MTL3 PICTRL ART 

FN0MTL3 PICTRL ART 
PICTORIAL COMPOSTN 

PICTORIAL COMPOSTN 

COMMERCIAL DESIGN 
COMMERCIAL DESIGN 
FREEHAND DRAWING 

FREEHAND DRAWING 

FREEHAND DRAWING 
FREEHAND DRAWING 
HISTORY OF PAINTNG 

OIL PAINTING 

OIL PAINTING 

OIL PAINTING 
WATER COLOR 

THESIS 



CONSULTATION ON BOOKS AND RESEARCH AVAILABLE IN THE BOOK ROOM AS FOLLOWS: 



TH 
WF 
M 

T 

M WF 

TTHS 



TO 5 

TO 5 

TO 5 

TO 5 

TO 13 

TO 12 



HANNAFORO 
A R N E T T 
GRAND 
HOLBROOK 
M C V y 
WEBB 



PHARMACOGNOSY PGY 



TTHS 
TTH 

TO 
TO 



8 TO 1 
10 TO 12 
A R R A NG E 

A R R A NG E 



C H 316 
C H 316 



E0WARD3 L 

EDWARDS L 

JOHNSON C H 

JOHNSON C H 



PRACTCL PHARMCGNSY 
MICROSCPY OF DRUGS 
SPCL PRBMS PHMCGSY 
DRUG PLANT ANALSIS 



FOR ONE YEAR COMPLETION 
«« FOR TWO YEAR COMPLETION 



PHARMACOLOGY PLY 



DEPT. COURSE 


SEC. CRED. 


DAYS 


HOURS 


BLDG. ROOM 


INSTRUCTOR 




PLY 


362 




4 


M R 
F 


8 

1 TO 5 


C H 
C H 


316 
400 


EDWARDS 
EDWARDS 


L 
L 


D 
D 


PLY 


452 




3 


M * F 


10 


C H 


316 


EDWARDS 


L 





PLY 


456 




3 


MW 

F 


9 

8 TO 10 


C H 
C H 


316 
316 


F 00 T E 
F OOT E 






PLY 


512 




3 


TO 


A RR A NG E 






EDWARDS 


L 


D 


PLY 


514 




2 


TO 


A RR A NG E 






EDWARDS 


L 


D 


PLY 


517 




3 


TO 


A RR A NG E 






JOHNSON 






PLY 


552 




4 


TO 


ARRANGE 






EDWARDS 







COURSE TITLE 

PHRMCLGCL STNORZTN 

PNPLS OF BIOLOGCLS 
NEW REMEDIES 

ADV PHARMACOLOGY 
ADV PHARMCOLGY LAB 
CLINICAL METHODS 
SPCL PRBMS PHMCLGY 



PHARMACY PHY 



PHY 


22 4 




3 


PHY 


353 




5 


PHY 


362 




4 


PHY 


37 2 




4 


PHY 


40 2 




2 


PHY 


4 32 




3 


FH Y 


50 2 




3 



PP Y 


302 




3 


PP Y 


404 




3 


P P Y 


407 




3 


PP Y 


410 




3 


PP Y 


412 




2 


PP Y 


503 




3 


P P Y 


504 




3 


P P Y 


508 




3 



TTH 
TH 



M W F 
T • 



TTH 
MT H 



M WF S 
TTH 



T 
T W 



MWF 

T 

M 

W 

TTHS 
TO 
T 
T 
TO 



11 

1 T 4 

11 

1 TO 4 

10 

1 TO 4 

10 

11 

9 

1 TO 4 

ARRANGE 



C H 
C H 



212 
306 



316 
306 



212 
306 



112 
112 



110 
306 



F 00 T E 
JOHNSON 



H U S A 
JOHNSON 



F 00 T E 
F T E 



PHILOSOPHY PPY 



4 T 6 

4 

4 TO 6 

11 

A RR A NG E 

A RR A NG E 

A R R A NG E 

A RR A NG E 



209 
209 



209 
209 



E N W A L L 

E N W A L L 

E N W A L L 

E N W A L L 

E N W A L L 

E N W A L L 

E N W A L L 

E N W A L L 

E N W A L L 



GALENICAL PHARMACY 

ORGNC N ANLYT PHAR 

PRSCRPTNS DISPENSG 

COMMERCIAL PHARMCY 
PHARMACTCL ARTHMTC 
AOV DRUG ANALYSIS 

SLCTD TOPCS PHRMCY 



PHILSPHY OF RELIGN 

PHILSPHY OF NATURE 

PHIL CONC ENG POET 

HIST MOO PHILOSPHY 

PERSNLTS PROB PHIL 
AOVNCO LOGIC SEMNR 

AOV HIST PHILOSPHY 

HUME AND KANT SEMR 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION PL 



PL 102 

PL 102 

PL 10 2 

PL 10 2 

PL 10 2 

PL 202 

PL 20 2 

PL 202 

PL 20 2 



1 2 

2 2 

3 2 

4 2 

5 2 

1 2 

2 3 

3 2 
4J 3 



M 


9 




9 




10 




11 




9 




10 




11 




10 




11 



GYM 


GYM 


GYM 


GYM 


GYM 


GYM 


GYM 


GYM 


GYM 



G E N V A R 
G EN V A R 
G E N V A R 
G E N V A R 
G E N V A R 
GEN V AR 
G E N V A R 
G E N V A R 
G EN V AR 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
2ND YR PHYSICAL ED 
2ND YR PHYSICAL ED 
2N0 YR PHYSICAL ED 
2ND YR PHYSICAL ED 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION PL CONTINUED 



DEPT. COURSE SEC. CRED DAYS 



M 



1 1 




12 




1 3 




14 




15 




16 




17 




1 8 





T H 

T H 



HOURS 
TO 3 



BLDG. ROOM 



INSTRUCTOR 



TO 
TO 
TO 
TO 
TO 
TO 
TO 



G YM 


GYM 


G YM 


GYM 


GYM 


GYM 


GYM 


GYM 



G E N V A R 

G E N V AR 

G E N V A R 

G E N V A R 

G EN V AR 

G EN V A R 

G E N V A R 

G EN V A R 



COURSE TITLE 

PHYSICAL EO LAB 

PHYSICAL EO LAB 

PHYSICAL ED LAB 

PHYSICAL ED LAB 

PHYSICAL EO LAB 

PHYSICAL ED LAB 

PHYSICAL ED LAB 

PHYSICAL EO LAB 



PHYSICS PS 





3 


M WF 


11 


ALL 




T 


11 


1 


3 


M W F 


8 


2 


3 


M WF 


8 


3 


3 


M WF 


9 




2 


F 


1 TO 4 


1 


3 


M 


1 T 4 


3 


3 


T 


1 TO 4 


3 


3 


N 


1 TO 4 


4 


3 


TH 


1 TO 4 


ALL 




TH 


11 


1 


3 


M WF 


10 


2 


3 


M WF 


11 


3 


3 


M W F 


11 


4 


3 


T T H 


8 






S 


9 


1 


1 


M 


2 TO 5 


2 


1 


T 


2 TO 5 


3 


1 


T 


2 TO 5 


4 


1 


W 


2 TO S 


5 


1 


W 


2 TO 5 


6 


1 


TH 


2 TO 5 


7 


1 


T H 


3 T 5 


8 


1 


F 


1 T 4 


9 


1 


F 


1 TO 4 




4 


MT W F 


11 






TH 


11 




3 


T T H 


2 




3 


M WF 


10 




3 


T 


A R R A NG E 




3 


T T H 


8 

n T- ft r- 



2 TO 5 



BN 
B N 

BN 
BN 
BN 
BN 
BN 
BN 
BN 
BN 
BN 

BN 
BN 
BN 
BN 

BN 

BN 

BN 

BN 

BN 

BN 

BN 

BN 

B N 

BN 
BN 

B N 
BN 



308 
20 3 

210 
20 5 
20 5 
306 
306 
306 
306 



306 


203 


205 


203 


205 


205 


307 


307 


307 


307 


307 


307 


307 


307 


307 


201 
303 


20 3 


20 3 


301 
304 



BLESS AND 
K N WL E S 

PERRY 

WILLI AMSON 

BLESS 

BLESS 

STAFF 

STAFF 

STAFF 

STAFF 

PERRY AND 
S W A M . ON 

PERRY 

PERRY 

S » A NS ON 

WILLI AMSON 

PERRY 

STAFF 

STAFF 

STAFF 

STAFF 

STAFF 

STAFF 

STAFF 

STAFF 

WILLIAMSON 
PERRY AND 
S W A N S ON 

WILLIAMSON 

K N WL E S 

PERRY 

S W A N S ON 
S W A N S ON 



ELEMENTARY 
ELEMENTARY 

ELEMENTARY 
ELEMENTARY 
ELEMENTARY 
PHYSICS LAB 
PHYSICS LAB 
PHYSICS LAB 
PHYSICS LAB 
PHYSICS LAB 
ENGI NEERNG 



PHYSICS 
PH Y S I C S 

PH Y S I C 3 
PHYSICS 
PH Y 3 I C 3 
ORATORY 
ORATORY 
OR A TORY 
ORATORY 
ORATORY 
PH Y S I C 3 



ENGINEERING PHY3C3 

ENGINEERING PHY3CS 

ENGINEERING PHYSCS 

ENGINEERING PHYSCS 

ENGRG PHYSICS LAB 

ENGRG PHYSICS LAB 

ENGRG PHYSICS LAB 

ENGRG PHYSICS LAB 

ENGRG PHYSICS LAB 

ENGRG PHYSICS LAB 

ENGRG PHYSICS LAR 

ENGRG PHYSICS LAB 

ENGRG PHYSICS LAB 
ELEMENTARY PHYSICS 

SOUND 

AGRICULTRL PHYSICS 

METEOROLOGY 

SPECTRCHMCL ANALYS 



PHYSICS PS CONTINUED 



DEPT. COURSE SEC. CRED. DAYS HOURS 

PS 380 3 TO ARRANGE 

PS 406 3 TO ARRANGE 

PS 413 4 TO ARRANGE 

PS424 3 MWF 10 

PS503 3 MWF 10 



BLDG. ROOM INSTRUCTOR 

BLESS 
BLESS 
K N HL E S 



104 
307 



COURSE TITLE 
X RAY NEW PHYSICS 
THEORETICAL MCHNCS 
AOVNCO ELECTRICITY 



WILLIAMS F CHEMICAL PHYSICS 



WILLI AM SON 



KINETIC THEORY 



PLANT PATHOLOGY PT 



P T 38 2 

PT 3 34 

PT 4 2 3 

PT 4 34 





3 


TH 
T T H 




3 


M 
T T H 




3 


T 
TTH 




3 


TH 
M W 



10 

1 TO 


3 


10 
8 TO 


10 


11 
3 TO 


5 


11 
3 TO 


5 



H T 
HT 


40 7 
407 


NT 
HT 


407 
407 


HT 
HT 


407 
407 


HT 
H T 


407 
407 



WEBER 
WEBER 



WEBER 
WEBER 



WEBER 
WEBER 



WEBER 
WEBER 



VEGETABLE DISEASES 
FUNGICIDES 
FRUIT DISEASES 
MYCOLOGY 



POLITICAL SCIENCE PCL 





4 


MR 
TTH 




3 


MWF 




3 


M WF 




3 


MWF 




3 


MWF 




3 


TT HS 




3 


TTH 




3 


MWF 




3 


TO 



2 

10 

11 

8 TO 3 3( 

10 

ARRANGE 



PE 
P E 

P E 

P E 

P E 

P E 

P E 

P E 

L A 



20 5 
805 


118 


206 


10 


112 


101 


118 


311 



D A U E R 
D A U E R 

CARLETON 

C A W T H ON 

PAYNE 

LEAKE 

C A W T H N 

A U E R 

LAIRD 

A U E R 



POLTL FOUN MOO LFE 

INTRNATNL RLATIONS 
AM STAT MUNCPL ADM 
AMRCN GVRNMT PLTCS 
AMER CONST LAW 
HSTRY PLTCL THEORY 
COMPARTIVE GVRNMT 
PUBLIC AOMINISTRTN 
SEMINAR 



P Y 312 

P Y 314 

P Y 4 16 

P Y 417 

P Y 4 30 



POULTRY HUSBANDRY - PY 





3 


M W 

T 




3 


TTH 
M 




3 


TTH 

M 




3 


TTH 
W 




» 


T 



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The University Record 

of the 

University of Florida 

A Preliminary Announcement 

of the 

University of Florida 

Workshop and Work-Conference 

Summer Session 

1941 




Vol. XXXVI, Series 1, No. 2 February 1, 1941 



Published monthly by the University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 

Entered in the post office in Gainesville, Florida, as second-class matter, 

under Act of Congress, August 24, 1912 

Office of Publication, Gainesville, Fla, 



THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA WORKSHOP - 1941 

I am interested In the type of group work that I have 
indicated below: 

Cooperating Schools Group 

School Planning Groups 

Preparation of Materials in the Field of Visual Aids 

Preparation of Materials in the Field of Social Studies 



Preparation of Materials in the Field of Classroom 

Reading Materials 

I am a teacher of and would like 

suggestions concerning registration in the following fields: 

English Science 

Mathematics Social Studies 



and: 



I plan to take part in this type of work this summer 

(Please check one or more of these items.) 

Wish more information concerning the type of work 
checked above. 

Have sent my transcript to the Registrar. (If a 
former student of the University of Florida there 
is no need to attend to this item. ) 

Plan to register by mail when the proper time comes. 
(Only undergraduate students may register by mail.) 



Name 



School 



MAIL THIS BULNK TO THE WORKSHOP COMMITTEE 

ROOM 317, P. K. YONGEE BUILDING 

GAINESVILLE 



THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA WORKSHOP 

GENERAL INTRODUCTION 

Ihiring the past several years the University of Florida 
has been attempting to provide a better summer program for 
Florida teachers --a program directed toward the Improvement 
of Florida schools. This year, particularly, the summer 
achool program has been studied intensely by a large com- 
mittee representing a Variety of subject-matter areas, pro- 
fessional interests, and accomplishments. Partly as a result 
of the work of this committee, the 1941 summer session will 
reveal significant changes from previous years. Among these 
changes are revisions of some fundamental courses so as to 
adapt them more closely to teacher-needs, the complete reor- 
ganization of the Workshop groups for Cooperating Schools, 
the creation of new courses representing a coalescence of 
subject-matter and professional interests, and the establish- 
ment of an improved pre-registration advisory service. It 
is the function of this bulletin, addressed primarily to 
prospective Workshop participants, to describe the 1941 Sum- 
mer School plans in such manner as to help all enrollees 
register properly for the best possible program for them. 
It is hoped that everyone who receives a copy will read it 
completely and carefully. 

The University of Florida Workshop is a cooperative 
project of the University of Florida and the State Depart- 
ment of Education. The primary purpose is to work with in- 
service teachers and principals toward the solution of prob- 
lems significant to them and toward the improvement of total 
school programs. In carrying out the main purpose various 
groups of school people have worked on different problems 
during the past two summers. Again, for the summer of 1941, 
facilities and personnel of the University and the State 
Department of Education will be made available to interested 
teachers and principals. 

There i(«ill be available opportunities for total school 
faculties , who are working with the State Department of Edu- 
cation and the University as Cooperating Schools , to consider 
total school and individual teacher problems. Smaller num- 
bers or individuals, in some cases, from other schools, who 
seek to make plans for whole faculty consideration of the 
improvement of the school program, may undertake such plan- 
.ning with the School Planning Group . Members of the facul- 
ties of second and third year Cooperating Schools, as well 
as other Interested teachers and principals, will find 
p ^liable a variety of new courses offered In each of the 
majv" subject fields: English, Mathematics, Science, and 
Social Studies. Teachers of mathematics and science, who 
are interested in more preparation for the use of the nation- 
al defense materials, will be given opportunity to survey 



the technological practices of Industry. Finally, groups 
will be organized for the preparation of materials in the 
field of audio-visual aids, social studies, and classroom 
reading msterialr. 

This summer the Workshop will be organized with the co- 
operation of the College of Education, the College of Arts 
and Sciences, and the College of Engineering. The staff of 
instruction of the Workshop will have representatives of ele- 
mentary, secondary, and administration fields and within the 
secondary field, representatives of each of the major subject 
fields. As in the past, the Florida Curriculum Laboratory of 
the University will be available as a work-center and a 
source of materials. 

All teachers and principals who are interested in any 
of these opportunities for professional improvement are 
asked to send in the form attached. It is necessary that 
some indication of possible interest in these groups be as- 
certained. Your cooperation in completing and sending in 
the blank is urged. 



MEMBERS OF FACULTIES OF COOPERATING SCHOOLS, FIRST YEAR 

Faculty members and principals of Cooperating Schools 
that are participating in the Workshop for the first year 
will find available the following course: 

En. 5 29 w 3 or 6 credits 

or Cooperating Schools 

En.529 -x--x- 6 credits Planning Course, First Year 

In this course participants will be con- 
cerned with total school problems and individ- 
ual teacher problems of instruction. 

It is understood that those participants 
who do not have the necessary foundation work 
may enroll in this course for 3 hours credit, 
selecting an additional course or courses that 
may fit their needs. It is further understood 
that those participants whose past records 
warrant may be permitted to enroll for a total 
of 9 hours credit during the first term. Vari- 
ations from this established 6 hours credit in 
En. 329 must be requested in advance. Such re- 
quests should be made to the University Workshop 
Committee. 



^Limited to members of faculties of first year Cooperating 
Schools who have not received bachelor's degrees. 

-;«-^Limited to members of first year Cooperating Schools who 
have already received bachelor's degrees. 

40 



MEMBERS OF FACULTIES OF SECOND AND THIRD YEAR 

COOPERATING SCHOOLS 

Plans are being made to give faculty members and prin- 
cipals of second and third year Cooperating Schools the op- 
portunity to continue the study of their own Individual and 
school problems, continue to meet as total school groups 
and yet not to Interfere with the plans of any Individual 
for an advanced degree. In all cases, courses should be 
selected with care both as to the possibilities of meeting 
teacher needs and as to the program, graduate or under- 
graduate, of the Individual. Time, staff assistance and 
meeting places will be provided on regular days for total 
school faculty meetings. 

PRINCIPALS, ACCOMPANIED BY A FEW FACULTY MEMBERS, 
WHO WISH TO CONSIDER PLANS FOR IMPROVING 
THEIR SCHOOL PROGRAMS 

En. 551 6 credits School Planning Group 

This coiarse is designed to assist all prin- 
cipals of secondary schools and twelve-grade 
schools accompanied by a small number of teachers 
from their schools who wish to make plans for 
developing an improved instructional program with 
the total faculty group during the school year 
1941-1942. Emphasis will be placed on the devel- 
opment of concepts concerning current principles 
and objectives of education and instmictional 
programs basic to an improved school program. It 
is expected that the group will meet as a whole 
In the beginning and then work In smaller groups 
on special problems. 



THE WORKSHOP PROGRAM FOR TEACHERS OF ENGLISH 

EHiring the year the Department of English is under- 
taking a study of the professional needs of English teachers 
for the two-fold purpose (1) of constructing an Improved 
program of English courses intended primarily for teachers, 
and (2) of establishing an advisory service for those 
teachers, both elementary and secondary, who would like 
counsel concerning the courses which seem to be best adap- 
ted to their needs. Those undergraduates who Intend to 
register by mail before summer school begins and who plan 
to take some work in English are urged to write the Univer- 
sity Workshop Committee before they complete their 

41 



registration. To be most helpful, the letter should contain 
Information about what the Inquirer teaches, the college 
work In English he or she has previously taken (especially 
if at some other university), and. any remarks concerning 
conscious needs and likes which the Inquirer may volunteer. 
Graduates are also urged to write for advice but are remind- 
ed that they can complete registration only in person. 

In each of the fundamental coiirses Intended chiefly 
for teachers of English, consideration will be given to ap- 
propriate materials, problems, and methods of teaching 
English in the secondary school. Moreover, each teacher 
is Invited to confer with the Instructor concerning any 
individual teaching problem appropriate to the materials 
within the scope of the course, and if it seems a general 
teacher-need, to request that class consideration be devoted 
to it. In addition to these basic courses the Department 
will offer a new course this summer, English in the Second - 
ary School , 5 credits. It is designed (1) to help teachers 
of English understand and appreciate more fully the rela- 
tionship of English to human needs and hence understand the 
indispensable contributions which they as English teachers 
may make, and (2) to provide help in ministering to their 
specifically Individual needs and desires as English teach- 
ers. This large objective, of course, enforces a consider- 
ation of materials, methods, and problems relating to all 
phases of English instruction in high schools : oral and 
written communication, vocabulary building, reading, listen- 
ing, literary appreciation, etc. In so far as possible the 
separate individuals will be encouraged to devote much of 
their time to those aspects of the work in which they need 
to make most progress. 



THE WORKSHOP PROGRAM FOR TEACHERS OF MATHEMATICS 

In order to serve the needs of teachers of mathematics 
who wish to work on the Improvement of their teaching pro- 
grams in relation to their own schools, a new course in 
mathematics has been organized. This course, which will be 
conducted on the usual workshop dual basis of extensive 
teacher participation and emphasis upon individual situa- 
tions, is concerned with the fundamental questions involved 
in mathematics as a part of general secondary education. 
This new 3 credit course is Mathematics in the Secondary 
School . It is open only to teachers of secondary mathe- 
matics with adequate mathematical backgrounds (to be deter- 
mined by the instructor). 

This course presents the role of mathematics in modern 
life; its place in general education in light of needs, 
interests, abilities and maturity of pupils; its organiza- 
tion in the secondary school program; methods and proce- 
dures of instruction, with emphasis on pupil participation 
through projects, field work, reports, etc; correlation of 
mathematics with other fields; mathematics in the inte- 
grated program. Opportiinity will be offered for extensive 
study of applications of mathematics. Work will be con- 



42 



ducted with the whole group, with committees, and on an 
individual basis, in order that each teacher may develop 
instructional plans adapted to the situation in his com- 
munity. 

In addition to organizing this new course the Depart- 
ment of Mathematics is placing increased emphasis, in Its 
summer session offerings, upon the needs of teachers of 
mathematics. In all courses in which mathematics teachers- 
in-service are enrolled, the Instructor will he glad to 
render all possible aid to the teacher who wishes to uti- 
lize his ST-immer study program for the improvement of his 
own teaching. 

The Department of Mathematics is anxious to cooperate 
closely in every possible way with teachers of mathematics 
In the schools of Florida. Teachers who wish to make 
Inquiry concerning the summer session offerings of the 
Department of Mathematics for teachers, or who wish assist- 
ance in formulating a suitable study program, are invited 
to communicate with the University Workshop Committee. 



THE WORKSHOP PROGRAM FOR TEACHERS OF SCIENCE 

The Departments of Biology, Chemistry, and Physics 
wish to meet, in so far as is possible, the needs of in- 
service teachers of science. In order to do this effec- 
tively, there will be offered opportunities for teachers 
to work in the summer session on problems of particular 
significance to them. Also, an advisory service to assist 
in registration will be available. Advice concerning 
science programs and courses may be obtained by writing 
the University Workshop Committee. 

Beginning this summer, two new courses will be avail- 
able for teachers of science who wish to be concerned with 
preparing better instructional programs in these fields. 
These courses are designed to help teachers of science meet 
the needs of secondary school boys and girls, find and use 
the principles and materials of the respective fields. 

Teachers of general science, physics and chemistry may 
enroll in: 

Physical Sciences in the Secondary Schools . 3 credits. 

Prerequisite: C-2 or equivalent. 

A survey of the field of the physical sciences, 
an examination of the fundamental principles in- 
volved, their effects on our environment, and how 
they govern the conservation of our natural re- 
sources. The selection of materials illustrating 
these principles in action that are suitable for 
the needs, interests, abilities and the level of 
maturity of the secondary school student, and the 
study of the methods of presentation of such mate- 
rials. 

43 



Teachers of biology and general science teachers Inter- 
ested In biology may enroll in: 

Biology In the Secondary Schools . 3 credits. 

One discussion period and two work periods. 
Prerequisites: C-6 (or Its equivalent) and one 
approved course in biology. 

A study program designed to aid teachers of 
the life sciences in constructing and administer- 
ing a stimulating course of biological studies. 
Treats the building of the course and methods of 
presentation. Recommended for all teachers of 
biology, such as nature study, conservation, gen- 
eral science, etc. in the elementary, junior high, 
and senior high schools . 



THE WORKSHOP PROGRAM FOR TEACHERS OF SOCIAL STUDIES 

For high school teachers of the social studies, the 
University of Florida has developed a course. Social Studies 
in the Secondary Schools , 3 credits, which is especially de- 
signed for their needs. This course will consist of three 
principal parts: (l) consideration of the needs for inte- 
gration in the social sciences, (2) consideration of the 
program of social studies in the Florida schools and the new 
course of study, (3) consideration of preparation of mate- 
rials for teaching programs of the class members. 

This course is designed for teachers with adequate 
preparation in the subject-matter fields. It should be the 
equivalent of a senior course in the student's program. It 
is also open to graduate students . 

As a foundation program, a broad training in the social 
studies Is recommended. Students interested In preparation 
in the social studies are requested to write concerning reg- 
istration to the University Workshop Committee. 



THE WORKSHOP PROGRAM FOR TEACHERS OF THE APPLICATIONS 
OF MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE IN ELEMENTARY TECHNOLOGY 

During the past year the schools of Florida have added 
to their programs, either in connection with mathematics 
courses or In connection with science courses or as separate 
courses, work in the applications of high school science and 
mathematics in elementary technology. Many teachers have 
indicated a desire to study and experience these applications 
and therefore, in cooperation with the College of Engineering, 
it is planned to develop the following new course to fill 
this need: 



44 



Survey of the Technological Practices of Industr y. 
3 credits. 

Open to secondary school teachers of science 
or mathematics. 

An opportunity for teachers of mathematics 
and the physical sciences to develop an acquaint- 
ance with the manner in which their fields are 
applied In industry today. These applications 
are of particular importance in the present 
national defense emergency. Topics discussed 
will include shop mechanics, internal combustion 
engines, aeronautics, radio, and photography. 
Work will include films, demonstrations, shop 
and laboratory work, and field trips to airports, 
radio stations, foundries, machine shops, ship- 
building yards, etc. Aid will be given in build- 
ing lists of references, sources of free and 
Inexpensive materials, methods of correlating 
technology with other fields, and teaching plans. 

Write the University Workshop Committee for further 
nformation concerning this course. 



TEACHERS AND PRINCIPALS WHO ARE INTERESTED IN ASSISTING 

IN THE PREPARATION OF MATERIALS FOR THE USE OF ALL 

FLORIDA SCHOOL PEOPLE MAY MAKE APPLICATION 

FOR ONE OF THE PREPARATION OF MATERIALS 

GROUPS 

En. 555 6 credits Preparation of Materials Groups 

Group A - Audio Visual Instructional Aids 

To begin the preparation of a source hand- 
book for audio-visual aids which has been, recom- 
mended by the State Courses of Study Committee. 

Group B - Source Unius in the Social Studies 

The preparation of source units on selected 
pertinent problems by teachers-in-service. The 
units will be prepared in tentative form for use 
in Florida schools. 

Group C 7 Classroom Reading Materials 

To prepare annotated lists of printed mate- 
rials organized under selected topics that concern 
the areas of experience of both the elementary and 
secondary school curricula. 



45 



THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA WORK-CONFERENCE 

En. 557 6 credits Work-Conference on School 

Administrative Problems 



Plans have been made for another Work-Conference on 
School Administrative Problems to be held at the University 
of Florida during the first summer school term this summer. 
This will be open to graduate and advanced undergraduate 
students who are interested in studying problems in the 
field of school administration and are desirous of helping 
to produce materials which will be used throughout the 
state. Persons interested in this work, which is summma- 
rized below, should submit applications immediately to the' 
Director of the Summer Session of the University as mem- 
bership in each group will necessarily be limited. 

School attendance service , including status 
and trends of school attendance, responsibil- 
ities of principals and teachers, qualifications 
and duties of attendance assistants, responsi- 
bilities of parents and procedures for improving 
attendance . 

School financial management , including problems 
of budgetary procedure, school financial account- 
ing, and other phases of financial management. 

Supply management , including specifications, 
requisitioning procedures, purchasing, storage, 
distribution and use of supplies. 



ADMISSION AND REGISTRATION 

Participants in any of the workshop programs are admit- 
ted to the University and register in the same manner as all 
other students. No person may participate in the workshop 
program unless registered in the University. The regular 
Summer Session Bulletin gives complete information as to the 
procedures to follow. Only information which may help you 
to understand the organization of the University and guide 
you in your choice of the college in which you will register 
is given here. 

Admission Requirements 

Students who give evidence of being able to profit by 
college work will be admitted to the University of Florida 
Summer Session. It should be noted, however, that NO CREDIT 
will be allowed unless our specific requirements are satis- 
fied. These requirements are; 

^or students who ar^ transferring fi?om another insti- 
tution and who expect to receive a degree from the Univer- 
sity ol Florida and all students expecting to register in 
the Graduate School Official transcripts sent directly 

46 



to the Registrar from all Institutions previously attended. 
(Teachers' certificates or transcripts presented hy students 
will not suffice.) 

For undergraduate students who regularly attend another 
college or university and who are attending the University 
of Florida Summer Session only for the purpose of securing 
credits to be transferred to the institution regularly at- 
tended - A statement of Honorable Dismissal from the insti- 
tution last attended. (Blanks for this purpose may be 
secured from the Office of the Registrar, 110 Language Hall.! 



Admission to the Graduate School 

To be admitted to the Graduate School an applicant must 
be a graduate of a standard college or university and have 
a foundation in the major subject sufficient In quantity and 
quality to be satisfactory to the department in which the 
student proposes to major, A complete transcript of all 
undergraduate and graduate work must be transmitted to the 
Office of the Registrar before the date of registration. 

The College in Which You Should Register 

Persons who have had less than two years of college 
work will register in the General College, 

Persons with more than two years of college work but 
who have not yet received the bachelor's degree will 
register in one of the Colleges of the Upper Division, 
probably in most cases in the College of Education, 

Persons who have received the bachelor's degree and 
who wish graduate credit (credit that may apply on the 
master's or doctor's degree either at the University of 
Florida or elsewhere) must register in the Graduate School, 

All persons who have the bachelor's degree need not 
register in the Graduate School, but no graduate credit 
can ever be given for work completed while registered In 
another college of the University, 

How to Register 

Graduate students cannot register by mail. Dates will 
be announced in the Slimmer Session Bulletin on which grad- 
uate students may register prior to opening day if they 
desire, but registration can be done only In person and on 
the campus . 

Undergraduate students may register by mail, BUT must 
file the application blank that will be found in the Summer 
Session Bulletin to initiate the procedure. Full directions 
will be given In the Summei? Session Bulletin, 



47 



The University Record 

of the 

University of Florida 



The University of Floridi 

June^ 1940 




Vol. XXXVI , Series], No. 2, Extra No. I February 15, 1 941 

Published monthly by the University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 

Entered in the post office in Gainesville, Florida, as second-class matter, 

under Act of Congress, Augt4st 24, 1912 

Office of Publication, Gainesville, Florida 



REPORT OP THE BUSINESS MANAGER 



Dr. Jno. J. Tigert, President 
University of Florida 

My Dear Sir: 

I have the honor to submit herewith the 
financial report for the year ending June 30, 1940. 

This report is summarized and includes 
a balance sheet with supporting schedules for the 
University, Experiment Station, Agricultural Exten- 
sion and other subsidiary departments and divisions. 

It is set up, as far as practical, in 
accordance with the general plan for institutional 
accounting as recommended by the National Committee 
on Standard Reports for Institutions of Higher 
Learning. 

Respectfully submitted. 



/ft 



/' 



K. H. GRAHAM, 
Business Manager. 



Schedule 
Reference 



Exhibit "A" 
Exhibit "B" 
Exhibit "C" 
Exhibit "D" 
Exhibit "E-1" 

Exhibit "E-2" 
Schedule "A" 
Schedule "B-l" 
Schedule "B-la" 

Schedule "B-2" 
Schedule "B-2a" 
Schedule "B-2a. 

Schedule "C-1" 
Schedule "C-2" 
Schedule "D-1" 
Schedule "E-l" 

Schedule "E-la" 
Schedule "E-2" 
Schedule "E-2a" 
Schedule "E-2b" 
Schedule "E-2c" 
Schedule "E-2d" 
Exhibit "F" 



Title Pap;e 

Condensed Summary 52 

Balance Sheet 54-55 

SvLramary Statement of Current Funds 56 

Summary of Changes in Loan Fund Balances 56 

Siimmary of Changes in Endowment Funds ... 56 

Summary of Changes in Unexpended Plant 

Funds 56 

Summary of Changes in Investment in Plant 57 

Summary of Operations of University Funds 57-58 

Statement of Current Income (By Sources) . 59 

Statement of Current Expenditures 

(By Sources of Income) • 60 

Statement of Current Expenditures 61-62 

Detail of Current Expenditures 63-67 

■1" Statement of Current Expenditures for 

Agricultural Experiment Station Funds . 67 

Changes of Loan Fund Principal 67 

Operation of Student Loan Funds 68 

Summary of Endowment Funds 68 

Statement of Unexpended Plant Funds 69 

Expenditures for Plant Additions 69 

Statement of Investment in Plant • 70 

Summary of Land 70 

Inventory of Buildings 71-72 

Improvements Other Than Buildings 73 

Summary of Equipment Inventory 73 

Summary Statement of Operations of 

Agency Funds • 74 



52 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



CONDENSED SUMMARY 



INCOME 

The income for Educational and General purposes during 1939 - 40 amounted 
to $2,449,181.03 and was derived from sources Itemized in Schedule B-1. This 
amount represents the principal income of the University, Experiment Station and 
Extension Division. A comparison of income from the same sources during 
1938 - 39 is also included. 

1938-39 



Student Pees 
Federal Appropriations 
State Appropriations 
Endowment Income 
Sales and Service of 
Educational Departments 



188,692.4-3 

390,326.75 

1,443,082.00 

8,967.87 

122,267.03 



a. 76% 

18.13^ 

67.01^ 

.42^ 

5.68^ 



191,851.42 

393,882.57 

1,724,306.58 

12,159.80 



1939-40 

7.83^ 
16.07^ 



70.40^ 
.49^ 



126,980.66 5.18/? 



Income from Auxiliary Enterprises and Activities amounted to 
from Non-Educational Funds $138,290.45, as per Schedule B-1. 



,993.86, 



EXPENDITURES 

Educational and General Expenditures for the year 1939-40 amounted to 
$2,115,702.81 as itemized in Schedule B-2. These expenditures are for the fol- 
lowing general purposes and are compared with similar items for 1938 - 39. 



General Administration 

Instructional and Depart- 
mental Research 

Organized Research 

Extension 

Library and Museum 

Operation of Physical Plant 

Special Seagle Building 
Operating and Maintenance 

Special General Expense 



98,250.58 

839,306.98 
598,376.88 
443,269.39 
49,721.16 
117,928.26 

23,272.48 
19,558.38 



4.49% 

38.33^ 

27.33^ 

20.24^ 

2.21% 

5.38^ 

1.06^ 
.89^ 



95,530.01 4.49% 



836,985.25 
573,813.23 
413,792.23 
51,707.41 
118,359.27 

-0- 
25,515.41 



39.52^ 

27.09^ 

19. 52?? 

2.41^ 

2.57^ 



1.18% 



CURRENT BALANCES 



Unexpended funds on June 30, 1940, were as follows (Exhibit "B" 



Funds in State Treasury 
Board of Control Funds 



394,436.88 
77,647.84 



ENDOWMENT FUNDS 

Permanent Endowments created by land-grants of the Federal Government and by 
private gifts amounted to $290,502.84 on June 30, 1940, and were derived from the 
following sources: 



Land- Grant Funds 

Private Gifts for Departmental Use 

Private Gifts for Scholarships 



224,002.84 
40,000.00 
26,500.00 



A detailed statement appears as Schedule D-1 of these fuhds. 

PLANT FUNDS 

The value of all property held by the University on June 30, 1940, amounted to 
$8,724,820.16, distributed as follows: 



Land 

Buildings and Improvements 

Equipment 

These amounts are itemized in Schedules E-2A to E-2d. 



393,771.40 
5,738,973.13 
2,592,075.63 



I 



FINANCIAL REPORT JUNE 30. 1940 



53 



o 



O 



O 



< 

o 

Q 

DO 
X 




54 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



Exhibit "A" 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 
BALANCE SHEET 
JUNE 30, 1940 



I. CURRENT FUNDS: 



A. EDUCATIONAL AND GENERAL 
Funds in State Treasury 

State Appropriations 

Cash in State Treasury- 
Cash in Banks 
Temporary Investments 
Due from Other State Departments 
Inventory of Supplies 

University 

Experiment Stations 

Total Educational and General Funds 

B. AUXILIARY ENTERPRISES AND ACTIVITIES 
Cash in Banks-Board of Control 
University Petty Cash Fund 
Investments 

Deposit with Board of Control for Operation 
of P. v. A. Dormitories 

Total Auxiliary Enterprises and Activities 

C. NON- EDUCATIONAL FUNDS 

Cash in Banks-Board of Control 

Total Current Funds 

LOAM FUNDS: 

Cash in Banks 

Notes Receivable (Schedule "C-2) 

Total Loan Funds 

ENDOWMENT FUNDS: 

A. FUNDS IN TRUST- STATE TREASXJHY 
Cash on Hand 

Invested in Bonds 

Total Funds in Trust-State Treasury 

B. FUNDS IN TRUST-BOARD OF CONTROL 
Preferred Stocks (Par Value) 
Notes and Mortgages 

Invested in Bonds 

Total Funds in Trust-Board of Control 
Total Endowment Funds (Exhibit "D" ) 
PLANT FUNDS: 

A . UNEXPENDED 

Funds in State Treasury 

State Appropriations 

Cash in State Treasury 
Cash in Banks-Board of Control 
Uncollected Grant 
Cash in Banks-P.W.A. Dormitory. Projects 

Total Unexpended Plant Funds 

B. INVESTED IN PLANT 
Land 

Buildings and Improvements 
Equipment 

Total Invested in Plant (Exhibit "E-2) 
Total Plant Funds 
AGENCY FUNDS: 

Cash in Banks 



333,108.39 
61.527.99 



106,407.56 
58,041.31 



30,263.22 
2,940.38 



394,436.88 

8,955.64 

5,350.00 

12,842.08 



164,448.87 



17,555.41 
35,000.00 
13,100.00 

5,075.12 



6,475.02 
10,116.74 



13,752.84 
250,250.00 



1,400.00 

1,600.00 

23,500.00 



33,203.60 

7,484.47 

250.87 

70,257.16 



393,771.40 
5,738,973.13 
2.592.075.63 



586,033.47 



70,730.53 

26.946.77 
683,710.77 



16,591.76 



264,002.84 



.26,500.00 
290,502.84 



111,196.10 



3,724,820.16 
3,836,016.26 

26,759.48 



TOTAL ASSETS 



Qj:853, 581.11 



FINANCIAL REPORT JUNE 30. 1940 



55 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 
BALANCE SHEET 
JUNE 30, 1940 

LUBILITIES 



CURRENT FUNDS: 

A. EDUCATIONAL AND GENERAL 
Current Balances 

University 

Reserve for Encumbrances 
Unappropriated Reserve 
Other Reserve 
Experiment Stations 
Agricultural Extension Service 
Accounts Payable 

Reserve for Temporary Investments 
Reserve for Supply Inventory 

Total Educational and General Funds 

B. AUXILIARY ENTERPRISES AND ACTIVITIES 
Accounts Payable 

Balances of Accounts (Schedule "A") 
Reserve for Operation of P.W.A. Dormitories 

Total Auxiliary Enterprises and Activities 

C. NON-KDUCATIONAL FUNDS 
Accovints Payable 

Balances of Accounts (Schedule "A") 

Total Non-Educational Funds 
Total Current Funds 



54,066.00 
67,984.00 
51.771.40 



153,821.40 

155.485.75 

97.971.81 



15,266.54 

50,388.37 

5.075.12 



4,762.92 
22,185.85 



407,278.96 
8,955.64 
5,550.00 

164.448.87 

586,033.47 



70,730.53 



26.946.77 

663,710.77 



II. LOAN FUNDS: 



Accounts Payable 

Principal of Funds (Exhibit 



Total Loan Funds 



•c") 



2,348.50 
14.243.26 



16,591.76 



III. ENDOWMENT FUNDS: 



Principal of Funds 

U. S. Land Grant of 1862 
Other Educational Endowments 
Scholarship Endowments 

Total Endowment F\mds (Exhibit "D") 

IV. PLANT FUNDS: 

A . UNEXPENDED 
Accounts Payable 

Fund Balances (Exhibit "E-1") 
-Special Building Fund from Student Fees 
Funds In State. Treasury 
Uncollected Grants 

Reserve for Principal and Interest 
of P.W.A. Revenue Certificates 

Total Unexpended Plant Funds 

B. INVESTED IN PLANT 

P.W.A. Revenue Certificates 
Investments in Plant (Including 
Donated Surplus) 

Total Invested in Plant (Exhibit "E-2") 

Total Plant Funds 

V. AGENCY FUNDS 

Accounts Payable 

Balance of Funds Due Others (Exhibit "F") 

Total Apency Funds 



157,326.05 

106,676.81 

26.500.00 



197.20 



7,287.27 

55,203.60 

250.87 

70,257.16 110.998.90 



457,000.00 
,267,820.16 



1,866.65 
24.892.85 



290,502.84 



111,196.10 



8,724,820.16 
8,836,016.26 



26.759.43 



TOTAL LIABILITIES 



9.853.581.11 



56 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



SUMMARY STATEMENT OF CURRENT FUNDS 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1940 



Balance at Beginning of Year 

Adjustments : 

Add additional amount of Forest Funds 
previously reported as reverted 



205,904.23 



.17 

205,904.40 



Deduct Special Seagle Building 

Funds previously Included 17,763.22 

Less Board of Control Funds for 

A;-;ency, Loan, and Building Funds 

previously included 54,046.69 



154,094.49 



Current Educational and General 

Income (Schedule "B-1") 
Income of Auxiliary Enterprises and 

Activities (Schedule "B-1") 
Income of Non-Educational Funds (Schedule "B-1") 



2,449,181.03 

312,993.86 

158,290.45 2,900,465.34 3,054,559.83 



Deduct : 

Current Educational and General 

Expenditures (Schedule "B-la") 2,115,702.81 

Expenditures of Auxiliary Enterprises 

and Activities (Schedule "B-la") 332,183.71 

Expenditures of Non-Educational Funds (Schedule "B-la" ) 134,588.59 

Balance June 30, 1940 



2,582.475.11 
472,084.72 



Balance Consists of: 

Funds in State Treasury 
State Appropriations 
Cash In State Treasury 

Board of Control Funds 

Axoxiliary Enterprises and Activities 
Non-Educational Funds 



333,108.89 
61,327.99 394,436. 



55,463.99 
22.183.85 



77,647.84 472,084.72 



Exhibit "C" 



SUMMARY OF CHANGE? IN LOAN PUMD BALANCES 



Balance July 1, 1939 

Additions : 

Gifts Received 
Interest Income 



Deductions : 

Expenses, Loans charged off 

Balance June 30, 1940 
Exhibit "D" 



1,274.86 
235.57 



12,747.83 



1,510.43 
14,258.26 



14,243.26 



SUMMARY OF CHANGES IN ENDOWMENT FUMDS 



Balance July 1, 1939 

Additions : 

Earnings and profit on investments 

Balance June 30, 1940 (Schedule "D-1") 

Exhibit "E-1" SUMMARY OF CHANGES IN UNEXPENDED PLANT FUNDS 



288,347.84 

2.155.00 

290,502.84 



Balance July 1, 1939 

Additions : 

Additions for Plant 

For Retirement of Indebtedness 

Deductions : 

For Plant Additions 

For Retirement of Indebtedness 

Balance June 30, 1940 (Schedule "E-1") 



260,101.74 
70.087.75 



245,281.31 
18,558.70 



44,429.42 



530,189.49 



374,618.91 



263,620.01 



110,998.90 



FINANCIAL REPORT JUNE 30. 1940 



57 



Exhibit "E-2" 



SUMMARY OF CHANGES IN INVESTMENT IN PLANT 



Value of Plant July 1, 1939 

Additions during 1939 - 40 

Deductions durihg 1939 - 40 

Value of Plant June 30, 1940 (Schedule "E-2") 



SUMMARY OF INVESTMENT IN PLANT 



Land (Schedule "E-2a") 

Buildings (Schedule "E-2b") 

Improvements other than Buildings (Schedule "E-2c") 

Equipment (Schedule "E-2d") 



8,374,830.00 
, 446,592.63 



393,771.40 
5,230,889.53 

508.083.60 
2,592,075.65 



3,821,222.63 

96,402.47 

3,724,82036 



8,724.820.16 



Schedule "A" 



SUMMARY OF OPERATIONS OP UNIVERSITY FUNfiS 
1939 - 1940 



FUUDS IN STATE TREASURY 
State Appropriations 
University : 

Salaries 

Necessary and Regular Expense 

Chair of Americanism 

Forestry, Chapter 17028 

Forestry, Chapter 18403 

Total University State Appropriations 



Experiment Stations : 
Main Station Fund 
Vegetable Crops Laboratory 
Strawberry Investigations Laboratory 
Citrus Disease Investigations 
Potato Disease Investigations 
Potato Laboratory at Hastings 
Pecan Insect Investigations 
Celery Disease Investigations 
Fumigation Research 
Grape Pest Investigations 
Citrus Experiment Station 
Everglades Experiment Station 
Everglades Continuing Fund 
North Florida Experiment Station 
Sub-Tropical Experiment Station 
Watermelon Investigations Laboratory 
Special Diary Investigations 
Special Poultry & Turkey Investigations 
Weather Forecasting Service 
Bright Leaf Tobacco Investigations 
Cotton and Peanut Investigations 
Remodeling Beef Cattle Bam 
Special Pasture Research & Demonstration-O 
Permanent Equipment for Soil Conserva 

tion Districts 
Research and Demonstration Work on 

Bright or Flue Cured Tobacco 
Range Cattle Station--Hardee County 



Total Experiment Station State 
Appropriations 

Agricultural Extension Service: 
Offset for Federal Funds 
Salaries 

Necessary and Regular Expense 
Special 4-H Club Camps 
Special County Agent's Work 

Total Agricultural Extension State 
Appropriations 

Total State Appropriations 



Balance 


Income 


Disbursements 


Balance 


July 1. 1939 


1939-1940 
745.800.00 


1959-1940 


June 50.1940 


-0- 


704.807.66 


40,992.54 


-0- 


199,200.00 


150,642.24 


68,557.76 


-0- 


2,500.00 


2,455.34 


44.66 


-0- 


7,500.00 


7,499.37 


.63 


624.72 


25,000.00 


22,512.36 


5.112.36 


624.72 


980,000.00 


867,916.97 


112,707.75 


-0- 


182,619.00 


165,466.72 


17,152.28 


-0- 


15,000.00 


13,264.10 


1,755.90 


r -0- 


6,300.00 


5,459.00 


841.00 


-0- 


3,500.00 


3,496.81 


3.19 


-0- 


10,000.00 


7,358.09 


2,661.91 


-0- 


2,000.00 


1,260.00 


740.00 


-0- 


4,150.00 


1,500.36 


2,649.64 


-0- 


15,000.00 


11,179.90 


3,820.10 


-0- 


3,062.00 


2,804.94 


257.06 


-0- 


3,500.00 


3,500.00 


-0- 


-0- 


71,451.00 


56,296.74 


15,154.26 


-0- 


45,559.00 


56,572.63 


8,766.37 


-0- 


5,000.00 


5,000.00 


-0- 


-0- 


25,968,00 


25,695.55 


2,272.45 


-0- 


21,000.00 


19.602.90 


1,597.10 


-0- 


10,000.00 


6.999.90 


5,000.10 


-0- 


15,540.00 


15,884.19 


1,655.81 


ons -0- 


12,500.00 


10,995.21 


1,504.79 


-0- 


18,000.00 


17,214.68 


785.52 


-0- 


5,000.00 


3,803.02 


1,196.98 


-0- 


6,500.00 


3,507.49 


5,192.51 


-0- 


6,000.00 


-0- 


6.000.00 


tion-0- 


20,000.00 


-0- 


20,000.00 


-0- 


10,000.00 


-0- 


10,000.00 


-0- 


10,000.00 


4,834.84 


5,165.16 


-0- 


12.500.00 
539.929.00 


22.60 
417,499.67 


12.477.40 


-0- 


122.429.55 


-0- 


55,800.00 


45,918.32 


9,881.68 


-0- 


44,808.00 


38,121.24 


6,686.76 


-0- 


3,000.00 


1,996.65 


1,005.37 


-0- 


80.400.00 
184,008.00 


-0- 


80,400.00 


-0- 


86,036.19 


97.971.81 


624.72 1 


703,937.00 


1,371.452.83 


333,108.89 



CASH IN STATE TREASURY 
University 

Incidental Funds: 

University 

General Extension Division 

Total University Incidental Funds 

Endowment Funds: 

American Legion Interest 
Agricultural College Interest 
Seminary Interest 

Total Endowment Funds 



30 
1, 


836.66 
468.95 


259,402.68 
45.596.92 


241,776.05 
47.022.77 


28 


,463.29 
43.10 


32 


305.61 


284,999.60 


288,798.82 


28 


,506.39 


1, 


-0- 

814.28 

585.10 


2,200.00 
7,750.00 
2,209.80 


2,200.00 
8,564.28 
4.027.72 




-0- 
-0- 
234.82-* 


2 


597.58 


12,159.00 


14,792.00 




234.82* 



58 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



Federal Funds : 
Morri 1 1- Ne 1 s on 
Morrill-Nelson Interest 
Bankhe ad- Jone 3 

Total Federal Funds 

Radio Station 

Incidental Funds 

Experiment Stations 
Incidental Funds 



Agricultural Extension Service 
Federal Funds: 
Smith-Lever 

Smith-Lever Interest P\ind 
Capper-Ketcham 
Further Development 

Additional Cooperative Interest Fund 10.02 
Bahkhead- Jone s 



Total Agricultural Extension Service 
Federal P\inds 



Total Cash in State Treasury 
TOTAL FUNDS IN STATE TREASURY 





-0- 


25,000.00 


25,000.00 




-0- 






-0- 


.17 


.17 




-0- 






.01 
.01 


18,977.57 
43,977.74 


18,977.58 
43,977.75 




-0- 






-0- 




7 


600.97 


2,621.99 


10,222.96 




-0- 




18 


018.85 


50,549.49 


35,511.92 


33 


056 


42 




-0- 


63,968.10 


63,968.10 




-0- 






1.10 


-0- 


1.10 




-0- 






-0- 


26,555.74 


26,555.74 




-0- 






-0- 


8,462.00 


8,462.00 




-0- 




md 


10.02 


-0- 


10.02 




-0- 






-0- 
11.12 


120,447.93 
219,433.77 


120,447.93 
219,444.89 




-0- 






-0- 




60. 


,333.94 


613,742.39 


612.748.34 


61 


,327 


.99 


60 


958.66 


2,317,679.39 


1,984.201.17 


394 


,436 


.88 



BOARD OF CONTROL FUNDS 

Aiaxiliary Enterprises and Activities 
Cafeteria 
Residence Halls 
Infirmary- 
Bookstore and Soda Fountain 
P. K. Yonge Cafeteria 
Radio Station WRUF 



7,228.56 

47,762.13 

17,782.43 

1,013.84 

866.88 

-0- 

74,653.84 

-0- 



Resldence Halls (P.W.A. Projects) 
Total A\ixlliary Enterprises and Activities 74,6 53.84 



93,054.82 
38,360.45 
29,894.49 

107,381.03 

5,737.80 

18.794.44 

293,223.03 

19.770.83 
312,995.86 



92,243.25 
65.363.08 
29,482.52 

107,099.35 

5,711.63 

17,588.17 

317,488.00 

14.695.71 
552,183.71 



8,040.13 
20,759.50 
18,194.40 

1,29 5.52 
893.05 

1.206.27 
50,388.87 

5.075.12 

55.463.99 



NON-EDUCATIONAL FUNDS 

Student Activity Funds 

R. 0, T. C. Clothing Account 

Drug Research Fund 

Scholarships 

Civil Aeronautics Authority 

Sloan Project — Applied Economics 

Tung Oil Fellowship 

Murphree Memorial Fund 

Y. M. C. A. Fund 

Parsons Museum Fund 

Library Fines and Fees 



1 


162.67 


88,202.67 


87 


,050.39 


12,314.95 


1 


,738.75 


13,818.35 


14 


008.26 


1,548.84 




137.97 


-0- 




10.07 


127.90 




532.34 


32,391.13 


30 


703.13 


2,220.34 




-0- 


1,450.00 


1 


,446.95 


3.05 




-0- 


1,999.67 


1 


,165.87 


833.80 




-0- 


1,000.00 




776.57 


223.43 


2 


,893.47 


-0- 




-0- 


2,893.47 




741.30 


-0- 




-0- 


741.30 


1 


,275.49 


780.56 




779.28 


1,276.77 




-0- 


690.21 




690.21 


-0- 



Total Non-Educational Funds 



18,481.99 



140,532.59 136,630.73 



22.183.85 



FINANCIAL REPORT JUNE 30. 1940 



59 



Schedule "B-1" 



STATEMENT OP CURRENT INCOME 

(BY SOURCES) 

FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1940 



EDUCATIONAL AND GENERAL 



1. STUDENT PEES (net, leas refunds 
of $3,795.65) 

8. PUBLIC APPROPRIATIONS AND TAX EEVIES: 

A. Federal 

Morrill Acts (1862,1890) 

Nelson Act (1907) 

Hatch Act (1887) 

Adams Act (1906) 

Purnell Act (1925) 

Smith- Lever Acts (1914,1925) 

Capper-Ketcham Act (1928) 

Further Development Act (1928) 

Bankhead- Jones Act (1935): 

Teaching 

Research 

Extension 
Smith-Hughes, George Deen 
Acts (1917,1936) 

B. State and County- 

University 

Agricultural Experiment Stations 

Agricultural Extension 

Smith- Hughes 



191,851.42 



12,500.00 
12,500.00 
15,000.00 
15,000.00 
60,000.00 
63,968.10 
26,555.74 
8,462.00 

18,977.57 
30,801.64 
L20,447.93 

9,669.59 



980,000.00 

539,929.00 

184,008.00 

9,669.58 

Alachua County for P.K.Yonge School 10,700.00 

3. ENDOWMENT INCOME 

A. Funds from Private Gifts 

Interest on American Legion Endowment 

B. Funds from Public Sources 

Interest on Seminary Endowment 2,209.80 
U. S. Land Grant of 1862 (Paid by 
General Revenue Fund) 7.750.00 

4. RECEIPTS FROM SALES AND SERVICE OP 

EDUCATIONAL DEPARTMENTS 

Agricultural 3,476.92 

Experiment Stations 50,549.49 

General Extension Division 45,59o,92 

Miscellaneous Departmental Sales 4,713.09 

Hon- Educational Departments 19,466.23 

Refunds 556.02 

Radio Station 2,621.99 

Total Current Educational and General Income (Exhibit "B") 



393,882.57 



1.724,306.58 



2,200.00 



9,959.80 



2,118,189.15 



12,159o80 



126.980.66 
2.449,181.05 



II. AUXILIARY ENTERPRISES AND ACTIVITIES 

Cafeteria 

Residence Halls 

Infirmary 

Bookstore and Soda Fountain 

P. K. Yonge Cafeteria 

Radio Station WRUF 

Residence Halls (P.W.A. Projects) 



93,054.82 
38,360.45 
29,894.49 
107,381.03 
5,737.80 
18,794.44 
19.770.85 



Total Income from Aiixiliary Enterprises and Activities (Exhibit "B") 



312,995.86 



:il. NON- EDUCATIONAL FUNDS 



Student Activity Funds 

R.O.T.C. Student Fund 

Library Flnas and Fees 

Civil Aeronautics Authority 

Sloan Project in Applied Economics 

Tung Oil Fellowship 

Scholarships 

Parson's Museum Fund 

Total Income from Non-Educational Funds (Exhibit "B") 



86,160.53 

13,818.35 

690.21 

1,450.00 

1,999.67 

1,000.00 

32,391.13 

780.56 



138.290.45 



60 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



Schedu' i "B-la" 



STATEMENT OF CURRENT EXPENDITURES 

(FROM SOURCE OF INCOME) 
FOR THE YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1940 



I. EDUCATIONAL AND GENERAL 



1. EXPENDITURES FROM STUDENT FEES 

2. EXPENDITURES FROM PUBLIC APPROPRIATIONS 

AND TAX LEVIES 

A. Federal 

Morrill Acts (1862, 1890) 

Nelson Act (1907) 

Hatch Act (1887) 

Adams Act (1906) 

Purnell Act (1925) 

Smith- Lever Acts (1914, 1926) 

Capper-Ketcham Act (1928) 

Further Development Act (1928) 

Bankhead- Jones Act (1935) : 

Teaching 

Research 

Extensioh 
Smith-Hughes, George Deen Acta 

(1917, 1936) 

B. State and County- 

University 

Agricultural Experiment Stations 

Agricultural Fjctension 

Smith-Hughes 

Alachua County for P. K. Yonge School 

3. EXPENDITURES FROM ENDOWMENT INCOME 

A. Funds from Private Gifts 

Interest on American Legion Interest 

B. Funds from Public Sources 

Interest on Endowment from U. S. Land 

Grant of 1862 (Including 47,750 

paid from General Revenue) 
Interest on Seminary Endowment 

4. EXPENDTTURES FROM SALES AND SERVICE OF 

EDUCATIONAL DEPARTMENTS 
Agricultural 
Experiment Stations 
General Extension Division 
Miscellaneous Departmental Sales 
Non-Educational Departments 
Radio Station 

5. EXPENDITURES PROM OTHER SOURCES 

Morrill-Nelson Interest 
Smith-Lever Interest 
Additional Cooperative Interest 

Total Current Educational and General Expenditures (Exhibit "B") 



II. AUXILIARY ENTERPRISES AND ACTIVITIES 

Cafeteria 

Residence Halls 

Infirmary 

Bookstore ana Soda Fountain 

P. K. Yonge Cafeteria 

Radio Station WRUF 

Residence Halls (P.W.A.Pro jects) 



194,997.22 



12,500.00 
12,500.00 
15,000.00 
15,000.00 
60,000.00 
63,968.10 
26,555.74 
8,462.00 

18,977.58 

30,801.64 

120,447.93 



837,916.97 

417,499.67 

86,036.19 

9,669.58 

10,700.00 



8,564.28 
4,027.72 



393,882.58 



1,391,822.41 



2,200.00 



12.592.00 



3,476.92 
35,511.9.2 
47,022.77 

4,713.09 
19,249.65 



92,243.25 
65,363.08 
29,482.52 
107,099.35 
5,711.63 
17,588.17 
14.695.71 



Total Expenditures from ivuxlliary Enterprises and Activities (Exhibit "B" 



III. NON-EDUCATIONAL FUTTOS 

Student Activity Funds 

R.O.T.C. Student Fund 

Library Fines and Fees 

Civil Aeronautics Authority 

Sloan Project in Applied Economics 

Tung Oil Fellowship 

Scholarships 

Parson's Museum Fund 

Drug Research Fund 

Total Expenditures from Non- Educational Funds (Exhibit "B") 



85,008.25 

14,008.26 

690.21 

1,446.95 

1,165.87 

776.57 

30,703.13 

779.28 

10.07 



1,785,704.99 



14,792.00 



10,222.96 




120,197.31 


.17 






1.10 






10.02 




11.29 




2^ 


^115,702.81 



532.183.71 



134. 688.55 1 



jl 



FINANCIAL REPORT JUNE 30. 1940 



61 



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65 



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FINANCIAL REPORT JUNE 30. 1940 



67 



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Schedule "C-2" 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



OPERATION OF STTJDENT LOAN FTJNDS 





Loans 






Loans 




Out: 


standing 


Loans 


Loans 


Outstanding 




July 1, 1939 


Made 


Paid 


June 30, 1940 


STUDENT LOAN FUNDS 






College Girls 


2 


,484.10 


2,724.75 


2,646.10 


2,562.75 


Colonial Dames 




707.43 


613.83 


498.55 


822.71 


Tolbert Memorial 


2 


,182.07 


6,918.15 


6,909.51 


2,190.71 


E. S. Jackson 




7.50 


75.00 


82.50 


-0- 


Doyle E. Carleton 




-0- 


80.00 


72.50 


7.50 


R. A. Gray 




40.00 


25.00 


40.00 


25.00 


E. W. Waybright 




156.66 


-0- 


-0- 


156.66 


Harold Colee 




-0- 


50.00 


50.00 


-0- 


Southern Railway 


2 


,443.13 


290.00 


339.19 


2,393.94 


Florida State 




224.45 


100.00 


-0- 


324.45 


Florida Association of 












Architects 




596.05 


140.00 


188.58 


547.47 


East Florida Seminary 




225.00 


415.00 


155.00 


485.00 


Henry Hohauser 




120.00 


280.00 


-0- 


.400.00 


Sherrill 




35.00 


-0- 


5.00 


30.00 


Summer School Executive 


Council 


-0- 


347.75 


190.75 


157.00 


Miscellaneous 




13.55 


-0- 


-0- 


13.55 




9 


,234.94 


12,059.48 


11,177.68 


10,116.74 



Schedule "D-1" 



SUMMARY OF ENDOWMENT FUNDS 



EDUCATIONAL ENDOWMENTS 

U. S. Land Grant of 1862 
(Assumed by State of Florida) 
Balance of Funds July 1, 1939 
Addition: 

Earnings and Profit on 
Investments 
Balance June 30, 1940 

Other Educational Endowments: 

Seminary Endowment 

Balance of Fund July 1, 1939 
Addition: 

Earnings and Profit on 
Investments 
Balance June 30, 1940 

University of Florida Share 

American Legion Endowment 

Balance of Fund July 1, 1939 

Total Other Educational Endowments 

Total Educational Endowments 



PRINCIPAL 

155,896403 

1,450.00 
157,326.03 

131,903.63 

1,450.00 
133,553.65 

66,676.81 

40,000.00 
106,676.81 
264,002.84 



CASH ON HAND 



146,000.00 



128,500.90 
64,250.00 

40,000.00 
104,250.00 
250,250.00 



11,326.03 



2,426.81 



2,426.81 
13,752.84 



SCHOLARSHIP ENDOWMENTS 

Balance of Fund July 1, 1939: 

Gilchrist Scholarship 

Vim. Loring Spencer Scholarship 

Hamm Scholarship 

David Yulee Scholarship 

David Yulee Lectureship 

Total Scholarship Endowments 



10,000.00 
3,500.00 
5,000.00 
5,000.00 
5,000.00 

26.500.00 



10,000.00 
3,500.00 
5,000.00 
5,000.00 
3,000.00 

26,500.00 



TOTAL ENDOWMENT FUNDS {Exhibit "D" 



290,502.84 



276.750.00 



15.752.84 



FINANCIAL REPORT JUNE 30. 1940 



69 



Schedule E-1" 



STATEMENT OP IMEXPENDKD PLANT FtTODS 



Balance July 1, 1939 

Additions : 

State Appropriations 
Income for Gensral Purposes 
Student Fees for Plant Additions 
Grant from General Education Board 
W.W.A. Dormitory Loan and Grant 
W.P.A. Funds for Plant Additions 
Proceeds from P.W.A. Loan and Grant 
Earnings on P.W.A. Projects 
Donation of Land 

Total Additions 

Total Available 

Deductions: 

Expended for Plaht Additions: (Schedule 
Land 

New Buildings 

Additions to Existing Buildings 
Improvements other than Buildings 

Total Expended for Plant Additions 

Other Deductions: 

Interest Expense for Retirement of 
Indebtedness 

Total Deductions 

Balance June 30, 1940 (Exhibit "E-1") 



Plant 
Additions 



25,921.31 



20,000.00 
2,645.27 
2,085.00 

14,708.00 
164,547.21 

50,116.26 



6,000.00 
260,101.74 
286,023.05 



"E-la") 



6,000.00 

175,560.56 

38,602.57 

25,118.18 



245.281.31 



40,741.74 



Retirement 
of 

Indebtedness 

18,508.11 



33,887.75 
36,200.00 



70,087.75 
88,595.86 



18.558.70 
18,358.70 
70,257.16 



44,429.42 

20,000.00 

2,645.27 

2,085.00 

14,708.00 

164,547.21 

50,116.26 

33,887.75 

36,200.00 

6,000.00 

330,189.49 
374,618.91 



6,000.00 

175,560.56 

38.502.57 

25,118.18 

245,281.31 



18,358.70 
263,620.01 
110,998.90 



Schedule "E-la" 



EXPENDITURES FOR PLANT ADDITIONS 



NEW 

BUILDING 



ADDITIONS 

TO 
EXISTING 
BUILDINGS 



OTHER 
IMPROVENENTS 



Prom Gifts 

Experiment Station Lands 

Prom State Appropriations 
Dormitory Boiler 

Prom General Building Funds 

Addition to P. K. Yonge School 
Addition to Florida Union 



6,000.00 



467.24 
467.24 



7,500.00 



Prom Board, of Control Funds 
Addition to Florida Union 

From General Education Board Grant 
Addition to P. K. Yonge School 

From P.W.A. Dormitory Funds 
Fletcher Hall 
Murphree Hall 

Prom W.P.A. Funds 
Tennis Courts 

Experiment Station Buildings 
Austin Gary Forest 
Law Library Addition 
P. K. Yonge Laboratory School* 

Main Building 

Shop Building 

Tennis and Handball Courts_ 

Total (Schedule "E-1") 



42,309.61 
122,237.60 



11,013.35 



175.560.56 



1,726.23 
14,457.13 



10,542.87 
10,000.00 



58.602.57 



539.30 
7,391.45 



25.118.18 



'Estimates made for division of #30,230.30 for three projects. 



70 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



Schedule "E-2" 



STATEMENT OF INVESTMENT IN PLANT 
FOR YEAR ENDED JUNE 30, 1940 



Value of Plant July 1, 1939 

Additions during 1939 - 40: 
By Expenditures from- 

Eduoational and General Funds 109,411.46 

Auxiliary Enterprises and Activities 37,082.92 

Non-Eduoational Funds 2,425.14 

Plant Funds 245.281.31 



394,200.83 



8,374,830.00 



Other Additions- 
Federal Government Property 
Musexojn Gifts 

Total Additions 



48,045.09 
4,146.71 



52,191.80 
446,392.63 



Deductions : 

Minor Buildings R^zed 

Adjustment to Previously Reported 

Values for Duplications, etc. 
Net Adjustment due to Revaluations, 

Equipment traded in, or other 

Retirements 

Total Deductions 
Net Additions for Year 
Value of Plant June 30, 1940 (Exhibit "E-2") 



10,490.00 
51,141.57 



96.402.47 



549.990.16 
8.724.820.16 



Schedule "£-28" 



SUMMARY OF LAND 



UNIVERSITY : 

Main Campus 

P. K. Yonge Laboratory School 
Y.M.G.A. Tract at Lake Wauburg 
Biological Laboratory Tract at Lake 

Newnan 
City of Gainesville Tract 

EXPERIMENT STATION 
Main Station 
Nichols Tract 
Goldsmith Tract 
Brumley Tract 
Richbourg Tract 

BRANCH EXPERIMENT STATIONS : 
Citrus Station, Lake Alfred 
Everglades Station, Belle Glade 
North Florida Station, Qulncy 
Sub-Tropical Station, Homestead 
Viatermelon Laboratory, Leesburg 
Potato Laboratory, Hastings 
Tomato Laboratory, Bradenton 
Celery Laboratory, Sanford 
Rano;e Cattle Station, Hardee County 

AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE : 

Florida National Egg-Laying Contest, 
Chipley 

SCHOOL OF FORESTRY : 

Austin Gary Memorial Forest 

Total 'Exhibit "E-2") 



ACREAGE 


VALUE 


TOTAL 


320.00 


126,4P0.00 




12.93 


9,526.40 




40.00 


9,000.00 




9.00 


200.00 




5.00 


600.00 


145,726.40 


682.30 


65,230.00 




472.00 


20,000.00 




5.00 


1,300.00 




12.70 


2,000.00 




40.00 


3,000.00 


91,530.00 


143.50 


50,000.00 




825.42 


26,000.00 




658.25 


20,000.00 




170.00 


17,000.00 




.63 


250.00 




ItOO 


100.00 




105.42 


26,000.00 




6.50 


1,000.00 




1,000.00 


5,000.00 


145,350.00 


15,00 


750.00 


750.00 


2,083.00 


10,415.00 


10,415.00 


6,607.65 




393.771.40 



FINANCIAL REPORT JUNE 30. 1940 



71 



INVENTORY OF BUILDINGS 



1 
2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
22 
23 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
49 
50 
51 
52 
53 
54 
55 
56 
57 
58 
59 
60 
61 
62 
63 
64 
65 
66 
67 
68 
69 
70 
71 
72 
73 
74 
75 
76 
77 
78 
79 
80 
81 
82 
83 
84 



Name of Building 

Administration Building 
Benton Hall 
Engineering Building 
Peabody Hall 
Library- 
Law Building and Library 
Language Hall 
Science Hall 

Chemistry - Pharmacy Building 
Agricultural Building 
Post Office Building 
Hortlcultvire Building 
Experiment Station Building 
Brick Gymnasium 
Buokman Hall 
Sledd Hall 
Thomas Hall 
Infirmary 

Cafeteria and Kitchen 
Basket Ball Gymnasium 
Experiment Station Cottage 
Storage Building 
"F" Club Building 
Central Heating Plant 
Maintenance Building 
Radio Station Building 
Artillery Unit 
Poultry Houses (15) 
Engineering Storage Building 
Farm Foreman's Cottage 
Dairy Barn 
Mule Barn 

Testing Machine Shed 
Nutrition Laboratory 
Poultry Plant Store Room 
Veterinary Hospital 
Irrigation Shed 
Corn Storage and Supply House 
Machinei?y and Implement Shed 
Potato Storage House 
Insectary Shed 
Target Range Shed 
Horticulture Greenhouse 
Insecticide and Storage House 
Agronomy Greenhouse 
Quarantine Shed 
Entomology Greenhouse 
Biology Laboratory at Lake Newnan 
Garage and Storage House (Service Department) 
Dietitian's Cottage 
Wooden Poultry Shed 
Miscellaneous Storage Building 
Animal Husbandry Cottage 
Experiment Station Farm Foreman's House 
Pump House 
Service Shop 
Fertilizer Warehouse 
Tobacco Barn 
Experiment Station Barn 
Tobacco Grading House 
Calf Barn 

Implement Warehouse 
Pharmacy Animal House 
Horticulture Tool Shed 
Formaldehyde Shed 
Greenhouse (State Plant Board) 
Spectographic Laboratory 
Horticulture Offices 
Storage House 
Chemistry Greenhouse 
Garage and Storage Hoi:se 
Mule Barn (Ceylon Farm) 

Garage and Storehouse (State Plant Board) 
Lignt Shea 

Forestry Department Garage 
Rabbit House 
Farm Cottage 

Agricultural Engineering Machinery Hall 
Brick Rifle Shed 
Paint and Storage Shed 
Greenhouses (2) 
Cold Storage House Plant 
Mule Shed 



Value 
June 30, 1940 

214,000.00 

95,329.47 

100,000.00 

96,000.00 

224,500.00 

65,464.77 

110,000.00 

110,000.00 

291,639.65 

90,000.00 

2,500.00 

151,584.99 

70,000.00 

45,000.00 

101,916.03 

283,138.76 

197,000.00 

88,202.06 

92,400.00 

47,309.21 

2,400.00 

1,500.00 

5,000.00 

12,725.77 

3,000.00 

16,000.00 

32,000.00 

3,000.00 

1,000.00 

5,000.00 

30,000.00 

2,000.00 

400.00 

8,500.00 

300.00 

2,000.00 

300.00 

800.00 

4,000.00 

1,000.00 

250.00 

100.00 

10,000.00 

1,000.00 

8,000.00 

1,000.00 

4,000.00 

3,000.00 

3,000.00 

1,200.00 

400.00 

2,000.00 

1,000.00 

5,000.00 

100.00 

3,000.00 

4,500.00 

600.00 

12,000.00 

2,000.00 

1,200.00 

4,000.00 

100.00 

1,400.00 

300.00 

5,000.00 

750.00 

5,000.00 

1,000.00 

2,400.00 

1,000.00 

300.00 

100.00 

1,000.00 

200.00 

1,200.00 

6,500.00 

2,800.00 

2,000.00 

75.00 

10,000.00 

15,000.00 

200.00 



72 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



Buildlrg 
Nxunber 

85 

86 

87 

88 

89 

90 

91 

92 

93 

94 

95 

96 

97 ■ 

98 

99 
100 
101 
102 
103 
104 
105 
106 
107 
108 
109 
110 
111 
112 
113 
114 
115 
116 
117 
118 
119 
120 
121 
122 
123 
125 
126 
127 
128 
129 
130 
131 
132 
133 
134 
135 

136-141 
142 
143 
144 
145 
146 
147 



Name of Bulldlnp; 

Rat House 

Cold Storage Laboratory 
Horticulture Laboratories 
F\imlgation House (State Plant Board) 
Double Greerilfouse (State Plant Board) 
Fumigation Laboratory- 
Ammunition House 
Blacksmith Shop 
Wagon and Storage Shed 
Paint Building 
Sewage Disposal Plant 
Hay D3?yer Building 
East Corn Crib 
West Corn Crib 
Northwest Corn Crib 
Corn Fumigation House 
P K Yonge Building 
P K Yonge Bxiilding 
P K Yonge Shop Building 
Cattle Feeding Barn 
Isolation Building 
Electrical Maintenance Building 
Field Crops Warehouse 
Corn Crib 
Scale Shed 

Gasoline Pump and Storage House 
Florida Union Building and Annex 
John F. Seagle Building 
Hurricane Laboratory No. 1 
Hurricane Laboratory No. 2 
Photographic Laboratory Building 
Experiment Station Farm Shop 
Poultry Plant (Experiment Station) 
Drake Laboratory Building 
Observatory Building 
Dairy Products Laboratory Building 
Medicinal Plant Drying House 
Medicinal Plant Barn 
Experiment Station Farm Cottage 
Pump and Tool House (Plant Intro. Gardens) 
Pump and Tool House 
Stadium Press Both 
Drying Shed (Experiment Station) 
Poultry Houses (5) 
New Barracks 
Hydraulic Laboratory" 
N.Y.A. Workshop 

Caretaker's Cottage - Lake Wauburg 
Duncan U. Fletcher Hall 
Albert A. Murphree Hall 

Buildings at Austin Gary Memorial Forest 
Implement Shed 
Abattoir 

Recreation Building- Lake Wauburg 
Boat House-Lake Wauburg 
Pump House-Lake Wauburg 
Plafit Introduction ^leld Laboratory 

Physical Education Improvements made available 
through University Athletic Association. 
Florida Field Stadium and Graham Field 
Swimming Pool 
Flood Lighting System at Florida Field Stadium 

Total Buildings at Gainesville 



Value 
June 50. 1940 

1,750.00 

1,500.00 

2,100.00 

500.00 

10,000.00 

1,200.00 

1,000.00 

400.00 

600.00 

250.00 

200.00 

1,300.00 

125.00 

200.00 

200.00 

1,000.00 

295,740.79 

34,000.00 

16,000.00 

1,100.00 

850.00 

625.00 

3,500.00 

125.00 

100.00 

100.00 

177,722.88 

400,000.00 

500.00 

500.00 

16,000.00 

1,250.00 

6,000.00 

8,000.00 

110.00 

56,250.00 

400.00 

200.00 

2,000.00 

150.00 

75,00 

5,000.00 

800.00 

1,375.00 

1,373.10 

75,000.00 

1,000.00 

3,200.00 

268,996.94 

455,482.09 

16,647.57 

4,000.00 

1,000.00 

7,500.00 

400.00 

100.00 

500.00 



211,900.64 
32,234.01 
29.707.80 

4,910,426.53 



Buildings at Branch Experiment Stations: 

Citrus Station, Lake Alfred 
Everglades Station, Belle Glade 
North Florida Station, Quincy 
Sub-Tropical Station, Homestead 
Watermelon Laboratory, Leesburg 
Potato Laboratory, Hastings 

Florida National Egg Laying Contest, Chipley 
Strawberry Laboratory, Plant City 
Tomato Laboratory, Bradentoh 
Pecan Laboratory, Monticello 
4-H Club Camps (Camps McQuarrie, Timpoochee, 
Cherry Lake) 

Total Branch Station Buildings 

Total Buildings (Exhibit "E-2") 



52,725.00 

123,360.00 

49,473.00 

13,410.00 

11,150.00 

8,300.00 

20,125.00 

720.00 

8,800.00 

2,000.00 

30.400.00 

320,463.00 

5,230.889.55 



FINANCIAL REPORT JUNE 30. 1940 



73 



Schedule "E-2c" 



IMPROVEMENTS OTHER THAN BUILDINGS 



Value 
June 50, 1940 



Heating Plant and Lines in 

Addition to Building 25 
Roads and Walks 
Whiteway System and Underground 

Wiring 
Campus Walks and Fences 
Railway Spur Track 
Tennis and Handball Courts 
Bleachers around Athletic Fields 
Campus Lawns, Shrubbery, Hedges 
Sprinkler System 
Improvements on Austin Gary Forest 

Total (Exhibit "E-2") 



164,440.05 
132,424.80 

79,147.92 
7,200.00 
16,910.43 
39,728.21 
14,382.75 
30,000.00 
16,457.99 
7,591.45 

508.083.60 



Schedule "E-2d" 



SUMMARY OP EQUIPMENT INVENTORY 
AS OF JUNE 30, 1940 



FURNITURE : 
Bookcases 
Beds 
Benches 
Chairs 
Stools 

Cabinets, Cases, and Cupboards 
Desks 
Dressers 
Files 

Mattresses 
Stands 
Safes 

Shelves and racks 
Tables 
Miscellaneous 

OFFICE EQUIPMENT : 
Adding Machines 
Fans 

Ventilators 
Typewriters 
Miscellaneous 

MACHINERY : 
Printing 
Agricultural 
Electrical and Radio 
Cars and Tractors 
Engines and Motors 
Metal and Wood Working 
Testing 
Power Plant 
Refrigeration 
General 

APPARATUS : 
Engineering 
Dairy 

Educational 
Electrical 
Heating 
Microscopic 
Physics 
Photographic 
Scientific 
Hoods 
Surgical 

Weighing and Timing 
Miscellaneous 

MISCELLANEOUS AND GENERAL EQUIPMECT: 
Musical Instruments 
Livestock 
Books 

Broadcasting Equipment 
Miscellaneous Building Equipment 
General Miscellaneous 
Military Property 
Museum 

EXPERIMENT STATION: 
Equipment 
Books 
Livestock 

TOTAL EQUIPMENT INVENTORY (Scisedule "E-2") 



7,479.96 
15,419.49 

1,364.55 
75,827.51 

2,325.47 
48,096.61 
64,997.52 

5,341.99 
26,647.90 
12,187.24 

1,939.55 

4,903.19 
10,299.73 
39,669.79 
20,930,89 



16,674.78 

6,539.71 

604.55 

25,076.69 

10;275.80 



11,987.73 
13,827.31 
41,660.22 
11,907.23 
34,871.87 
16,850.50 
13,667.81 
8,955.84 
19,645.46 
56,438.51 



10,035.43 

1,681.80 

24,153.24 

71,649.16 

63,460.68 

30,760.99 

10,912.23 

15,854.90 

42,570.56 

15,104.52 

4,643.05 

13,559.30 

4.984.71 



64,367.35 

1,905.00 

287,464.13 

81,652.00 

7,197.87 

37,344.20 

244,685.09 

385.588.84 



399,177.82 
122,815.56 

44.112.00 



337,431.59 



59.171.53 



209,812.28 



309,350.57 



1,110,204.48 

566,105.38 
2,592,075.65 



74 



UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 



Exhibit "F" 



SUMMARY STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS OF 
AGENCY FUNDS 



Balance Income Total Income Disbursements Balance 
july 1, 1959 1959 - 1940 1959 - 1940 1959 - 1940' June 50. 1940 



University Incidentals 
Station Incidentals 
Room Reservations 
Laboratory Breakage 
Cash Deposits 
Swimming Pool and Locker 
P.W.A. Dormitory Projects 



-0- 


291,446.40 


291,446.40 


291,446.40 


-0- 


-0- 


50,549.49 


50,549.4^ 


50,549.49 


-0- 


8,550.00 


12,789.00 


21,519.00 


10,595.50 


10,725.50 


180.71 


3,890.00 


4,070.71 


5,297.10 


775.61 


14,892.59 


179,623.07 


194,515.66 


181,122,94 


13,392.72 


2.00 


3,023.00 


3,025.00 


5,022.00 


3.00 


-0- 


55.929.85 


55,929.83 


55.929.85 


-0- 



25.605.50 



597.250.79 620.856.09 



595,965.26 24,892.83 



< 



The University Record 

of the 

University of Florida 

Bulletin of 



1941 

First Term — June 16 to July 25 
Second Term — ^July 28 to August 29 



IMPORTANT 

It is possible to avoid the tedious waiting in long lines 
on registration day if you carefully read this bulletin and 
follow the directions for registration by mail as given on 
page 145. 



Vol XXXVL Series I No. 3 March 1, 1941 



Published monthly by the University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 

Entered in the post office in Gainesville, Florida, as second-class matter, 
under Act of Congress, August 24, 1912 

Office of Publication, Gainesville, Florida 



The Record comprises: 

The Reports of the President to the Board of Control, the bulletins of 
information, announcements of special courses of instruction, and reports of 
the University Officers. 

These bulletins will be sent gratuitously to all persons who apply for them. The appli- 
cant should specifically state which bulletin or what information is desired. Address 

THE REGISTRAR, University of Florida 

Gainesville, Florida 



Research Publications. — Research publicaiions contain results of research work. Papers 
are published as separate monographs numbered in several series. 

There is no free mailing list of these publications. Exchanges with institutions are 
arranged by the University Library. Correspondence concerning such exchanges should 
be addressed to the University Librarian, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida. The 
issue and sale of all these publications is under the control of the Committee on Publications. 
Requests for individual copies, or for any other copies not included in institutional ex- 
changes, should be addressed to 

The Committee on University Publications 
University of Florida 

Gainesville, Florida 



[78] 



CAMPUS — UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 







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[79] 



TABLE OF CONTENTS page 

Map of the Campus 79 

Summer Session Calendar 82 

OfiEcers of Administration 83 

Faculty 84 

Admission 88 

General Information 90 

Placement Bureau , 91 

Laboratory School ; 91 

Reading Laboratory and Clinic , 94 

Extension of Certificates and Certification 95 

Expenses 97 

Rooming Facilities 98 

General Regulations 101 

Colleges and Schools 102 

Gradate School 102 

College of Agriculture 103 

College of Arts and Sciences 103 

College of Business Administration 105 

College of Education 107 

General College 110 

College of Law Ill 

School of Pharmacy Ill 

Advisory Service 112 

Departments of Instruction 113 

General College Courses 113, 133 

Agricultural Economics 115 

Agricultural Engineering 115 

Agronomy 115 

Animal Industry 115 

Bacteriology 115 

Bible 115 

Biology 116, 134 

Business Education 116, 134 

Chemistry 116, 134 

Civil Engineering 117 

Economics and Business Administration 117, 135 

Education 119, 137 

English ;...... 122, 137 

French 124, 138 

General Science 124, 138 

Geography 124 

Geology _... 138 

Health and Physical Education 125, 139 

History 125, 139 

Industrial Engineering 126 

Journalism 126 

Law ; 127 

Mathematics 128, 140 

Music 129, 140 

Pharmacology 129 

Pharmacy 129 

Philosophy 129 

Physics 129, 140 

Political Science 129, 140 

Poultry Husbandry 130 

Psychology 130, 141 

School Art 131, 141 

Social Studies 131, 141 

Sociology 131, 141 

Spanish 132, 142 

Speech 132, 142 

Questions and Answers 143 

Mail Registration 145 

Residence Application Blanks 147, 149 

Application Blank „... 151 

[80] 



IMPORTANT NOTICE TO SUMMER SESSION STUDENTS 

SAVE TIME — Each student who expects to attend the 1941 
Summer Session must fill out the Application Blank on page 
151. Previous attendance at the University of Florida does 
NOT waive this requirement. Fill out the Blank and send it 
to the Office of the Registrar if there is any possibility of your 
attending the 1941 Summer Session. Sending in the Blank 
involves no obligation on your part, but it will considerably 
reduce the time it takes to register, if you do decide to come. 
If the Blank is received before June 1 the Registrar will mail 
forms which will permit registration by mail, completely elim- 
inating the necessity of standing in long lines on Registration 
Day. 

Upon request, additional blanks will be supplied by the 
Registrar. 

READ QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS ON PAGES 143-144. 



IMPORTANT INFORMATION 

After arriving at the University: 

1. If dormitory room assignment has been made, women students will secure keys from 
Murphree Hall Office, located at the southeast corner of that hall; men students and 
married couples will secure keys from the Office of the Director of Residence, Fletcher 
Hall, Section F, adjoining Fletcher Lounge. If you have not yet made a reservation 
but wish to do so, women students should call at Murphree Hall Office, men students 
and married couples at Fletcher Hall Office. 

2. For off -campus rooming accommodations, see Dean of Students, 105 Language Hall. 

3. Cafeteria meal tickets may be purchased from the Cashier, 102 Language Hall, or al 
the cigar counter, Cafeteria. 

4. For information concerning social activities among women students, or on any matter of 
jntere.st to women, see the Dean of Women, 105 Language Hall, or Murphree Hall Office. 



[81] 



SUMMER SESSION CALENDAR 

1941 FIRST SUMMER TERM 

June 9 — June 14 Registration for First Summer Term. 

June 14, Saturday, 1 p.m Placement Tests, Room 208, Science Hall. 

June 16, Monday. 8 a.m.-3:30 p.m Registration for First Summer Term. Late registration 

fee of $5 for registering after 3:30 p.m. on this date. 

June 17, Tuesday, 7 a.m Classes begin. 

June 18, Wednesday, 4 p.m Last day for registration for the First Summer Term. 

and for adding courses. 

June 23-July 12 Short course for Agricultural Extension Workers. 

June 28, Saturday, noon Last day for making application for a degree that is 

to be awarded at the end of the First Summer Term. 

June 28, Saturday Last day for students to apply to the Dean to be desig- 
nated as Honor Students. 

July 4, Friday Holiday. 

July 7, Monday Last day for graduate students, graduating at the end 

of the term, to submit theses to the Dean. 

July 12, Saturday _ Last day for students expecting to receive degrees at 

end of term to complete correspondence courses. 

July 16, Wednesday Last day for filing application for extension of cer- 
tificate. 
Last day for dropping courses without receiving grade 
of E and being assessed failure fee. 

July 21 — July 24 Registration for Second Summer Term. 

July 23, Wednesday, noon Grades for all students expecting to receive degrees at 

end of term are due in the Office of the Registrar. 

July 24, Thursday Faculty meetings to pass upon candidates for degrees. 

July 25, Friday, noon First Summer Term ends. All grades are due in the 

Office of the Registrar by 4 p.m. 

July 26, Saturday, 10 a.m Conferring of degrees. 

SECOND SUMMER TERM 

July 26, Saturday, 1 p.m Placement Tests, Room 208, Science Hall. 

July 28, Monday, 8 a.m. -12 noon Registration for Second Summer Term. Late registra- 
tion fee of |5 for registering after noon on this date. 

July 29, Tuesday, 7 a.m Classes begin. 

July 30, Wednesday, 4 p.m Last day for registration for the Second Summer Term, 

and for adding courses. 

August 1, Friday, 4 p.m. Last day for applications to take Comprehensive Ex- 
aminations in August. 

August 2, Saturday, noon Last day for making application for a degree that is to 

be awarded at the end of the Second Summer Term. 

August 7, Thursday Last day for students to apply to the Dean to be desig- 
nated as Honor Students. 

-August 9, Saturday Last day for graduate students, graduating at the end 

of the term, to submit theses to the Dean. 

August 14, Thursday Last day for students expecting to receive degrees at 

end of term to complete correspondence courses. 

August 20, Wednesday, 4 p.m Last day for filing application for extension of certifi- 
cate. Last day for dropping courses without receiv- 
ing grade of E and being assessed failure fee. 

August 27, Wednesday, noon Grades for all students expecting to receive degrees at 

end of term are due in the Office of the Registrar. 

August 28, Thursday Faculty meetings to pass upon candidates for degrees. 

August 29, Friday, noon Second Summer Term ends. All grades are due in the 

Office of the Registrar by 4 p.m. 

August 30, Saturday, 10 a.m Commencement Convocation. 

[82] 



OFFiCKRS OF IDMFMSJ H iTI()\ 83 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

John J. Ticert, M.A. (Oxon), LL.D.. Ed.D., D.C.L., D.Litt., L.H.D., President of the 
University 

James Wiliiam Norman, Ph.D.. Director of tin- Suminer .Session; Acting Dean of the Grad- 
uate School, Second Term 

Robert Colder Beaty, M.A., Dean of Students, Second Term 

Harley Willard Chandler, M.S.. Dean of the University 

Roland Byerly Eutsler, Ph.D., Acting Dean of the College of Business Administration, 
Second Term 

Klein Harrison Graham, Business Manager 

H. Harold Hume, D.Sc, Dean of the College of Agriculture 

Elizabeth Skinner Jackson, B.A., Dean of Women, First Term 

Richard Sadi.ek Johnson, B S.P., Registrar 

Winston Woodard Little, M.A., Dean of the General College 

Walter Jeffries Matherly, M.A., Dean of the College of Business Administraiion First 
Term 

Zena Morrell, Dean of Women, Second Term 

Joseph Edwin Price, B.A.E., Acting Dean of Students. First Term 

Glenn Ballard Simmons, Ph.D., Acting Dean of the College of Education 

Thomas Marshall Simpson, Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate School, First Term 

George Clarence Tillman, M.D., F.A.C.S., University Physician 

Harry Raymond Trusler, M.A., LL.D., Dean of the College of Law 

Joseph Weil, M.S., Dean of the College of Engineering 

William Harold Wilson, Ph.D., Acting Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences 

assistants in administration 

Lewis F. Blalock, M.A., Director of Admissions 

John Broward Culpepper, M.A.E., Acting Principal, P. K. Yonge Lai)oratorv School 

J. B. Goodson, Cashier 

Rosa Grimes. R.N., Head Nurse 

John Vredenburg McQuitty, Ph.D., University Examiner 

Donald Ray Matthews, B.A., Director of Florida Union 

Claude Leon Murphree, B.A., F.A.G.O., University Organist 

Burton J. Otte, M.S., Curator, Chemistry Department 

Irene Erskine Perry, B.S., Administrative Assistant, Office of the Summer Session 

Edith Patti Pitts, Administrative Assistant to the President 

Thomas James Price, Auditor 

Harold Clark Riker, M.A., Acting Director of Residence 

Norma Hawes Warren, B.S., Assistant to Dean of Women 

Homer D. Wincate, B.S.B.A., Auditor, Custodian Funds 

UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES 

Nancy Karnes Bird, B.A., B.S. in L.S.. Periodicals and Binding Librarian 

Sudie E. Crews, Order Librarian 

Sarah Grace Dickinson, B.A., B.S. in L.S., Librarian. P. K. Yonge Laboratory School 

Effie Davis Flanagan, B.S.. B.A. in L.S., Assistant in Circulation 

Jessie D. Hendershot, B.A., B.A. in L.S., Assistant in Circulation 

Walter Barnard Hill, B.A. in L.S., M.A., Librarian 



84 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 

Elizabeth Thorne Jernigan, B.A., Head of Catalog Department 

Eunice Elizabeth Keen, B.A., B.A. in L.S., Assistant Cataloger 

Mary Frances Hawkins, B.A., B.A. in L.S., Assistant in Catalog and Reference Department 

D. Gwendolyn Lloyd, B.A., B.S. in L.S., Head of Reference Department 

Charlotte Newton, B.A., M.A. in L.S., Head of Circulation Department 

Ivan E. Odle, B.S., LL.B., Assistant Librarian, College of Law 

Ila Rountree Pridgen, Librarian, College of Law 

FACULTY 1941 SUMMER SESSION 

Mabel F. Altstettek, Ph.D., Social Studies 

Montgomery Drummond Anderson, Ph.D., Economics 

Ernest George Atkin, Ph.D., French 

RoLLiN Salisbury Atwood, Ph.D., Geography: Education 

George Fechtig Baughman, B.S.B.A., LL.B., Economics and Business Administration 

ToMPsiE Baxter, M.A., Education 

David Miers Blights, Ph.D., C.P.A., Business Administration 

George Robert Bentley, M.A., Comprehensive Course C-1, Man and the Social World; 

History 
Truman C. Bigham, Ph.D., Economics 
Jack Bohannon, M.A., School Art 
Margaret White Boutelle, M.A., Education 
Norma Smith Bristow, M.A., Education 
Joseph Brunet, Ph.D., French 

Charles Francis Byers, Ph.D., Education; General Science 

Archie Fairly Carr, Ph.D., Comprehensive Course C-6, Man and the Biological World 
Cleva Josephine Carson, M.S., School Music 
William Richard Carroll, Ph.D., Bacteriology 
Willlam Stanmore Cawthon, M.A., Political Science 
Stella Stewart Center, M.A., Litt.D., Education 

Frederick William Conner, M.A., Comprehensive Course C-5, The Humanities; English 
Henry Philip Constans, M.A., Speech 
Eunice Katherine Crabtree, Ph.D., Education 
Alfred Crago, Ph.D., Education 
John Broward Culpepper, M.A., Education 
Manning Julian Dauer, Ph.D.. Comprehensive Course C-1, Man and the Social World; 

Political Science 
James Westbay Day, M.A., J.D., Law 
Sigismond deRudesheim Diettrich, Ph.D., Economics 

Howard Burrows Dolbeare, B.A., Economics and Business Administration 
Charles Harold Donovan, Ph.D., Economics and Business Administration 
Elsie Margaret Douthett, M.A., Health and Physical Education 
Anita Shemwell Dowell, Ph.D., Education 
Vera Dumas, M.A., Education 
Charlotte Dunn, M.A., Education 
Charles Livingston Durrance, Jr., M.A.E., Education 
Paul Eddy, M.A., Education 

Richard Archer Edwards, Ph.D., Comprehensive Course C-2, Man and the Physical World 
William Thomas Edwards, Ph.D., Education 
Winston Wallace Ehrmann, Ph.D., Sociology 



FACULTY 85 

Norman Ellsworth Eliason, Ph.D., English 

John Grady Eldridgic, M.A., Economics 

Elmer Jacob Emig, M.A., Journalism 

Roland Byerly Eutsler, Ph.D., Economics 

Lester Collins Farris, M.A., English 

Perry Albert Foote, Ph.D., Pharmacy and Pharmacology 

Paul Breck Foreman, Ph.D., Sociology 

George Gillispie Fox, Ph.D., Comprehensive Course C-5, The Humanities; Philosophy 

Leonard William Gaddum, Ph.D., Comprehensive Course C-2, Man and the Social World 

Edward Walter Garris, Ph.D., Education 

Paul Ernest Geisenhof, M.A., Speech 

Hugo Giduz, B.A., Education 

James David Glunt, Ph.D., History 

William Louis Goette, IVLA.E., Education; General Science 

Eleanor Kuhlman Green, B.A.E., Education 

SroNEY Bartlett Hall, Ed.D., Education 

Paul Lamont Hanna, Ph.D., Comprehensive Course C-5, The Humanities; HistojT 

Maurice Halperin, Docteur de L'Universite de Paris, Spanish 

Oliver Howard Hauptmann, Ph.D., Spanish 

JaxMEs Douglas Haygood, Docteur de L'Universite de Paris, Education 

Fred Harvey Heath, Ph.D., Chemistry 

Ray Lorenzo Heffner, Ph.D., English 

Leon Nesbitt Henderson, M.A.E., Education 

Elmer Dumond Hinckley, Ph.D., Psychology 

Charles F. Hoban, Jr., Ph.D., Education 

Horton Holcombe Hobbs, M.S., Comprehensive Course C-6, Man and the Biological World 

Arthur Ariel Hopkins, M.A., Comprehensive Course C-3, Reading, Speaking and Writing; 

Speech 
Lillian Page Hough, M.A., Education 
Theodore Huntington Hubbell, Ph.D., Biology 
Huber Christian Hurst, M.A., LL.B., Business Administration 
Richard Elkins Hyde, Ph.D., Education 
Vestus Twiggs Jackson, Ph.D., Chemistry 
John Evander Johnson, B.D., M.A., Bible 
Kathleen Tenille King, M.A., Education 
Harold Loraine Knowles, Ph.D., Physics 
Franklin Wesley Kokomoor, Ph.D., Mathematics 
Joseph Harrison Kusner, Ph.D., Mathematics; Education 
Angus McKenzie Laird, M.A., Comprehensive Course C-1, Man and the Social World; 

Political Science 
Gladys O'Neal Laird, M.A.E., Education 
George Leighton LaFuze, Ph.D., History 
Lillian Magdalen Lawrence, B.M.E., School Music 
James Miller Leake, Ph.D., History 
Winston Woodard Little, M.A., Comprehensive Course C-41. Man and His Thinking: 

Education 
Clifford Pierson Lyons, Ph.D., English 

Samukl Joseph McAllister, B.A., Health and Physical Education 
John Berry McFerrin, Ph.D., Economics 
Sam W. McInnis, M.A., Mathematics 



86 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 

Ida Ruth McLendon, M.A.E., Social Studies 

William Allen McRae, Jr., B.A., B.Litt., Juris (Oxon.). J.l). 

John Miller Maclachlan, PhD., Sociology; Education 

Walter Jeffries Matherly, M.A.. Economics 

Arthur Raymond Mead, Ph.D., Education 

Helen E. Mellish, Ph.D., Education 

Incorie Vause Mikell, B.M., Education 

Russell Elliott Miller, M.A., Comprehensive Course (l-l. Man and the Social World; 
History 

John Haynes Moorman, M.A., Business Education 

Edgar L. Morphet, Ph.D., Education 

Alton Chester Morris, Ph.D., Comprehensive Course C-3, Reading, Speaking and Writing; 
English 

Charles Isaac Mosier, Ph.D., Psychology 

Charles Eugene Mounts. M.A.. Comprehensive Course C-3. Reading. Speaking and Writ- 
ing; English 

Robert Ray Mulligan, M.S.. Comprehensive Course C-2, Man and the Physical World 

Claude Leon Murphree, B.A., F.A.G.O., Comprehensive Course C-5, The Humanities 

James William Norman, Ph.D., Education 

Hazen Edward Nutter, M.A., Education 

Audrey Packham, M.A., Education 

Mary Palmer, B.S., School Art 

Rembert Wallace Patrick, Ph.D., Histoi7; Education 

Ancil Newton Payne, Ph.D., History 

Ruth Beatrice Peeler, M.A., Education 

William Sanford Perry, M.S., Physics 

Cecil Glenn Phipps, Ph.D., Mathematics 

Eunice Jean Pieper, M.A.E., Education 

Zareh Meguerditch Pirenian, M.S., Mathematics 

Cash Blair Pollard, Ph.D., Chemistry 

Earl Patrick Powers, B.S.B.A., Business Administration 

Edward Schaumberg Quade, Ph.D., Mathematics 

Julian Wayne Reitz, M.S., Agricultural Economics 

Charles Archibald Robertson, M.A., English 

Frazier Rogers, M.S.A., Agricultural Engineering 

James Speed Rogers, Ph.D.. Biology; Geology 

Ellis Benton Salt, Ed.D., Health and Physical Education 

Harley Bakwel Sherman, Ph.D., Comprehensive Course C-6, Man and the Biological 
World; Biology 

James Fletcher Shivler, M.S. in Engr., Civil Engineering 

Glenn Ballard Simmons, Ph.D., Education 

Thomas Marshall Simpson, Ph.D., Mathematics 

Kenneth Gordon Skaggs, M.A., Comprehensive Course C-3, Reading. Speaking and Writ- 
ing; English 

Dean Slagle, M.A., LL.B., Law 

Eulah Mae Snider, B.A., B.S. in L.S., Education 

Herman Everette Spivey, Ph.D., English; Education 

Oswald C. R. Stageberg, B.S. in Arch., Comprehensive Course C-5, The Humanities 

Irene Miller Steele, M.A., Education 

BiLLlE Knapp Stevens, M.A., Health and Physical Education 



FACULTY 87 

Grace Adams Stevens, M.A., Social Studies: Education 

Mode L. Stone, M.A., Education 

Thomas B. Stroui', Ph.D., English 

Daniel Cramer Swanson, Ph.D., General Sciences: Education 

Clarence John TeSelle, A.B., LL.B., Law 

Roy Edwards Tew, B.A.E., Speech 

Cecil Wilford Thomasson, Ph.D., Education 

Harry Raymond Trusler. M.A.. LL.B., Law 

Frank Waldo Tuttle, Ph.D., Economics 

Albert Clarence Van Dusen, M.A., Psychology 

r. George Walker, M.A., Education 

Howard Keeper Wallace, Ph.D., Comprehensive Course C-6, Man and the Biological World 

Francis Dudley Williams, Ph.D., Comprehensive Course C-2, Man and the Physical World 

Osborne Williams, Ph.D., Psychology 

James L.\rrymore Wilson. M.A., English 

William Harold Wilson. Ph.D.. Comprehensive Course C-41, Man and His Thinking; 

Education 
Jacob Hooper Wise, Ph.D., Education 
Dean Amory Worcester, Ph.D., Education 

graduate and student assistants 

Ruby Irene Adams, B.A., Education 

George Thomson Armstrong, B.S., Chemistn 

John Herbert Beach, Jr., B.A., English 

Lewis Berner, M.S., Biology 

Edmond Darrell Cashwell, Mathematics 

Lawrence Cade Davis, Education 

James Rousseau Dickinson, B.A., English 

Joshua Clifton Dickinson, Jr., B.S., Biology 

Grayson Harter Ensign, Education 

Charles Shelby Ford, Education 

George Mills Harper, B.A., English 

Paul Revere Hitchcock, B.A.E., Business Education 

James Aquila Martin, B.F.A., School Art 

William James Miller, B.A., Education 

Walter Elmer Millett, B.S., Physics 

Arthur William Newett, Jr., Education 

Bessie Amanda Norton, M.A.E., School Art 

Harry Benton Pillans, B.A.E., Education 

Owen Orlando Pillans, B.A.E., Education 

George Henry Pournfxle, B.S., Biology 

James Beverly Redd, B.S., Chemistry 

Frances Sawyer Sugh, School Music 

Edward Almond Stephenson, B.A., English 

V iRGiL Earl Strickland, B.A.E,, Education 

Alan Patterson Stuckey, B.S., English 

John Vincent Vilkaitis, Education 

John Durham Wing, Jr., B.A., English 

James Nathaniel Young, Education 



88 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 



ADMISSION 

Students who give evidence of being able to profit by college work will be admitted 
to the University of Florida Summer Session. It should be noted, however, that NO 
CREDIT will be allowed unless our specific admission requirements are satisfied. These 
requirements are: 

1. For students who are entering college for the first time. 

See Admission to the General College. 

2. For students who are transferring from another institution and who expect 
to receive a degree from the University of Florida. 

Official transcripts sent directly to the Registrar from all institutions 
previously attended. (Teachers' certificates or transcripts presented 
by students wiU not suffice.) 

3. For students who regularly attend another college or university and who 
are attending the University of Florida Summer Session only for the purpose 
of securing credits to be transferred to the institution regularly attended. 

A statement of Honorable Dismissal from the institution last at- 
tended. (Blanks for this purpose may be secured from the Office 
of the Registrar, 110 Language Hall.) 

4. For students who wish to enter the College of Law. 

See Admission to the College of Law. 

5. For students who wish to enter the Graduate School. 

See Admission to the Graduate School. 

It is the student's responsibility to supply the proper credentials as outlined in num- 
bers 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5 above. NO TRANSCRIPTS FOR COLLEGE CREDIT WILL BE 
ISSUED FOR ANY PERSON FAILING TO COMPLY WITH THE ABOVE. 

Students who have previously attended the University of Florida may continue in 
the college in which they were registered. Transfer students with at least 64 acceptable 
semester hours credit of advanced standing may be admitted to one of the colleges or 
professional schools of the University. 

All other students register regularly in the General College. 

ADMISSION TO THE GENERAL COLLEGE 

The following items will be considered in the admission of students to the General 
College: 

1. Graduation from high school. Graduation from high school is required, although 
no specific high school units are required. 

2. Consistency of the high school record. 

3. Achievement in high school. 

4. Personal qualities. 



ADMISSION 89 

5. Recommendation of high school principal. 

6. Standing on Placement Tests. 

All applicants should submit the Application Blank at the back of this bulletin, and 
in addition should have an Application for Admission blank sent to the Registrar. The 
latter may be secured from high school principals of the State. Applicants for admission 
from other states may secure an Application for Admission blank by writing the Registrar. 

The Placement Tests will be given at 1 P. M., Saturday, June Ik in 208 Science Hall. 
All applicants for admission to tlip General College are retjuired \<> lake these tests before 
registration. 

ADMISSION TO THE COLLEGE OF LAW 

Applicants for admission to the College of Law must be eighteen years of age and 
must have received a bachelor's degree in a college or university of approved standing, 
or must have fully satisfied the academic requirements for a degree in a comhined course 
in the University of Florida. The College of Arts and Sciences and the College of 
Business Administration offer such a course. Evidence of this work must be presented 
to the Registrar of the University on or before the date on which the applicant wishes 
to register. 

During the summer session, students in good standing in any member school of the 
Association of American Law Schools will be admitted as students but not as candidates 
for degrees unless our entrance requirements are met. 

ADMISSION TO THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

To be admitted to the Graduate School an applicant must be a graduate of a standard 
college or university and have a foundation in the major subject sufficient in quantity and 
quality to be satisfactory to the department in which the student proposes to major. 

A complete transcript of all undergraduate and graduate work must be transmitted to 
the Office of the Registrar before the date of registration. 

THE COLLEGE IN VTHICH YOU SHOULD REGISTER 

1. Persons who have less than two years college work will register in the General 
College. 

2. Persons with more than two years of college work but who have not yet received 
the Bachelor's degree will register in one of the Colleges of the Upper Division. 
See pages 103 to 111. 

3. Persons who have received the Bachelor's degree and who wish graduate credit 
(credit that may apply on the master's or doctor's degree either at the University 
of Florida or elsewhere) must register in the Graduate School. 

All persons who have the Bachelor's degree need not register in the Graduate 
School, but no graduate credit can ever be given for work completed while registered 
in another college of the University. 



90 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

ENTERTAINMENTS AND PLAYS 

Adequate facilities for entertainments and plays are provided in the University Audi 
torium, which has a seating capacity of approximately 1800. In addition to the main 
University Auditorium, the auditoriums in Florida Union and in the P. K. Yonge Laborator> 
School wUl be available. Stress is placed upon performances by the students in plays 
and musical entertainments being produced from time to time by the staffs of the depart- 
ments of Speech and Music. 

RELIGIOUS AND SOCIAL UFE 

The moral and religious atmosphere of the Summer Session is wholesome. The leading 
religious denominations have attractive places of worship, and students are welcomed at 
every service. Transportation to and from church is provided for students who will 
attend. Frequent devotional services are held in the University Auditorium in connection 
with the Student Assembly. 

THE FLORIDA UNION BUILDING 

The Florida Union is operated as an official social center for the campus. Reading, 
recreation, and lounging rooms will supply adequate facilities for social activities and for 
comfortable relaxation. 

THE GENERAL ASSEMBLY 

AH Students and faculty members are expected to attend the General Assembly, which 
will be held in the University Auditorium at hours scheduled below. Important announce- 
ments will be made at the General Assembly, for the observance of which students will 

be held responsible. 

8:30 A.M. Wednesday, June 18 

10:00 A. M. Wednesday, July 2 

8:30 A.M. Wednesday, July 30 

10:00 A.M. Wednesday, August 13 

SVFIMMING POOL 

The facilities of the swimming pool will be available, without charge to students reg- 
istered in the Summer Session. Those interested should see Mr. Genovar, Gymnasium. The 
pool will be open daily, except Monday, from 1:00 to 6:00 P. M. 

SOCIETIES AND CLUBS 

PHI KAPPA PHI 

A chapter of the Honor Society of Phi Kappa Phi was established at the University in 
1912. To be eligible for membership, a student must previously have earned at the Uni- 
versity at least thirty semester hours credit, must have been guilty of no serious breaches of 
discipline, and must stand among the upper tenth of all candidates for degrees. Candidates 
for election to Phi Kappa Phi must have attained an honor point average of at least 3.00 
(B) on all scholastic work. If a student comes within the quota for his college, an average 
of 3.00 assures his eligibility, but if he does not come within the quota, it is necessary that 
he have an average of 3.30 or higher. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 91 



KAPl'A DKLTA HI 

Kappa Delta Pi is an honorary education fraternity, in which only juniors and seniors 
in the College of Education are eligible for membership. 

PHI BETA KAPPA 

Phi Beta Kappa was established on the campus of the University of Florida in 1938. 
It is the oldest national fraternity, being founded in 1776. In conformity with the national 
objectives of the society, the University of Florida chapter restricts election to the College 
of Arts and Sciences. Not more than \0% of the senior class graduating in each semester, 
including both graduating classes of summer session, is eligible for election. 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 

Important announcements will be made on the bulletin boards in Florida Union, Peabody 
Hall and Language Hall. Students should read these daily. Students are responsible for 
all announcements made in the General Assembly, on the official bulletin boards, and in 
the Orange and Blue Bulletin. 

ORANGE AND BLUE BULLETIN 

An official mimeographed bulletin is published every other day during the Summer 
Session. It appears on all bulletin boards and carries notices of changes in schedule, 
meetings, lost and found articles, etc. Students and faculty members are responsible for 
observance of all official notices published in the Bulletin. 

THE PLACEMENT BUREAU 

The Placement Bureau of the College of Education attempts to render a public service. 
This is not mere mechanical routine of finding teaching positions for graduates; the Bureau 
considers the welfare of the school concerned, and tries to get the right person in the right 
teaching position. 

There is no service fee for University graduates. Students who wish the help of the 
Bureau may arrange an interview with the Director and submit complete credentials. On 
request, this information is sent to school officials of the State. 

Many specific requests are received from district trustees and county school boards. 
Every effort is made to furnish these officials with information that will enable them to 
select the teachers most likely to succeed in the schools concerned. 

Communications in regard to teaching positions should be addressed to the Director of 
the Teachers' Placement Bureau, College of Education, University of Florida, Gainesville. 

LABORATORY SCHOOL 

The P. K. Yonge Laboratory School will conduct demonstration classes in the Kinder- 
garten, Elementary and Secondary School Grades during the first term of the Summer 
Session from 8:30 A.M. to 11:20 A.M. Provision will be made for seven groups: Kinder- 
g£irten, combined first and second grades, combined third and fourth grades, combined fifth 



92 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 

and sixth grades, combined seventh and eighth grades, combined ninth and tenth grades, 
combined eleventh and twelfth grades. 

Application for enrollment should be made to the Director of the Laboratory School 
as soon as possible since the number who may be accommodated is limited. 

Pupils will register on Monday, June 16, in Room 120, Yonge Building, from 8:30 to 
11:30 and from 1:30 to 4:00. There are no registration fees for the demonstration school. 
Classes will begin Tuesday, June 17. at 8:30 A.M. 

p. K. YONGE SCHOOL LIBRARY 

The P. K. Yonge Laboratory School Library will be open for use of teachers attending 
the Summer Session. This library contains about 5000 books for boys and girls from the 
kindergarten through the twelfth grade. These books are available for use in the library 
only and may not be checked out. 

The library will be open during the following hours: 8:30 A.M. to 12:00 noon and 
1:30 P.M. to 5:00 P.M.; Saturdays: 9:00 A.M. to 12:00 noon. 

The librarian will post hours when she will be available for conference on individual 
library problems. Teachers and principals are invited to ask for whatever help they 
may need. 

FLORIDA CURRICULUM LABORATORY 

The Florida Curriculum Laboratory is located on the third floor of the P. K. Yonge 
Building. This Laboratory is made possible by the cooperation of the Florida State Depart- 
ment of Education, the College of Education, and the Laboratory School of the University 
of Florida. Books and other curriculum materials used in the Florida Program for the 
Improvement of Instruction are available here. 

DOE MUSEUM 

The Doe Museum connected with the P. K. Yonge Laboratory School, is located on the 
third floor of the P. K. Yonge Building. The Museum will be open from 9:00 A.M. to 
4:00 P.M. daily, except Saturday, and from 9:00 A.M. to 12:00 noon on Saturday, from 
June 10 through July 31. This Museum houses a unique collection prepared by the Curator. 
Charles E. Doe. 

THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES 

Four libraries on the campus make up the University Library system — the Main Library, 
the libraries of the Experiment Station, the Law College, and the P. K. Yonge School. 

The Main Library building houses over 150,000 books. It has two large reading rooms. 
Those books assigned for reading in the General College and for Upper-Division students 
are in the Reading Room on the ground floor. In the Reading Room on the second floor 
are the current magazines, the books of reference, and the card catalog. In the book stack 
there are forty-eight carrels for the use of graduate students in their research work. 

STUDENTS' DEPOSITORY 

For the convenience and protection of students while in residence at the University, funds 
may be deposited with the Cashier. A service charge of twenty-five cents is made on each 
account, per term. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 93 

LOAN FUNDS 

The Summer Session is able to make small loans to a limited number of women students 
through the establishment of certain loan funds — the Florida State Scholarship Fund, the 
College Girls' Club Scholarship Loan Fund, the Elizabeth Skinner Jackson Loan Fund, the 
R. A. Gray Loan Fund, the Doyle E. Carlton Loan Fund, the W. M. Sheats Memorial Loan 
Fund, and the Harold Colee Loan Fund. Loans are governed by the following regulations. 

(1) Applicant must be a teacher in the State of Florida. 

(2) Applicant must have a position for the succeeding term of school. 

(3) Applicant must be in need of aid. 

(4) Applicant must apply for loan at least two weeks before opening of a Summer Term. 

(5) Application must be made directly to the Director of the Summer Session. 

(6) Applicant must be recommended by two school oflScials of the county in which she is 
teaching at the time of application. 

(7) Loans are to be used for attendance at the University of Florida Summer Session. 

(8) Loans are made for a period not to exceed nine m.onth3. 

(9) Loans bear interest at the rate of 6%, which is added to the principal fund. 

Upon application to the Director of the Summer Session, blank forms for application 
for a scholarship loan will be furnished. 

THE FLORIDA PROGRAM FOR THE IMPROVEMENT OF SCHOOLS 

The State Department of Education in cooperation with all the educational agencies of 
the State has initiated and is carrying forward a many-sided program designed to improve 
the learning experiences of Florida boys and girls. In developing this program, the State 
Department has employed two methods: the preparation of materials and intensive work 
with cooperating schools seeking to improve their school situations. 

The Workshop, an educational medium used extensively and successfully by both the 
Progressive Education Association and the Southern Association, as well as other institu- 
tions, is utilized for the preparation of both the materials and the plans for improvement. 
A "Workshop is unique only in that it provides opportunities for individuals or whole school 
faculties to work on particular problems of significance to them. All subject-matter fields 
are called upon, much material is furnished, a special staff is provided and full-time work 
on the problems at hand are some of the outstanding characteristics of this means of in- 
struction. 

THE UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA WORKSHOP 

The University of Florida Workshop is a cooperative project of the University of Florida 
and the State Department of Education. The primary purpose is to work with in-service 
teachers and principals toward the solution of problems significant to them and toward the 
improvement of total school programs. In carrying out the main purpose various groups 



94 BULLETIN OF THE U.Ml ERSITY SUMMER SESSION 

of school people have worked on different problems during the past two summers. Again, 
for the summer of 1941, facilities and personnel of the University and the State Department 
of Education will be made available to interested teachers and principals. 

There will be available opportunities for total school faculties, who are working with 
the State Department of Education and the University as Cooperating Schools, to consider 
total school and individual teacher problems. Smaller numbers or individuals, in some cases, 
from other schools, who seek to make plans for whole faculty consideration of the improve- 
ment of the school program, may undertake such planning with the School Planning Group. 
Members of the faculties of second and third year Cooperating Schools, as well as other 
interested teachers and principals, will find available a variety of new courses offered in 
each of the major subject fields: English, Mathematics, Science, and Social Studies. Teach- 
ers of mathematics and science, who are interested in more preparation for the use of the 
national defense materials, will be given opportunity to survey the technological practice? 
of industry. Finally, groups will be organized for the preparation of materials in the field 
of audio-visual aids, social studies, and classroom reading materials. 

This summer the Workshop will be organized with the cooperation of the College of 
Education, the College of Arts and Sciences, and the College of Engineering. The staff of 
instruction of the Workshop will have representatives of elementary, secondary, and admin- 
istration fields and within the secondary field, representatives of each of the major subject 
fields. As in the past, the Florida Curriculum Laboratory of the University will be available 
as a work-center and a source of materials. 

BOOK FAIR 

During the week of June 27 — July 3 the University Summer Session will sponsor a Book 
Fair designed to present the best in books — those of popular literaiy merit, those of scholar- 
ship, and those prepared primarily for textual use. Books about Florida and books written 
by Floridians will be exhibited. There will be a daily program in connection with the Fair, 
each program centering around some type of book or around the literature of some section 
or region of immediate interest to Floridians. Creative writers — producers of well-known 
literary reputation — and authorities on books and literature will appear on the program, 
''^he Book Fair and the Reading Laboratory and Clinic will supplement one the other. 

READING LABORATORY AND CLINIC 

The University Summer Session will conduct a Reading Laboratory and Clinic during 
the period of June 23 — July 3. The purpose of the Laboratory will be to give instruction 
in methods of teaching silent reading on all school levels, elementary, secondary, and college. 
The subject will be presented by means of lectures, discussions, and laboratory practice. 
The aim is two-fold: to outline a developmental program of reading for normal and superior 
pupils and to present methods of teaching remedial reading. The program will include 
instrumentation and other procedures practiced in outstanding school clinics. Dr. Stella S. 
Center, Director of the New York University Reading Clinic, author of several texts, and 
a nationally recognized authority on reading, will direct the work of the Institute. 

Summer school registrants may enroll for the work of the Laboratory (Education 490) 
as a part of their regular course work. Those who wish to register for this course only. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 95 

will follow the regular registration procedure bul will be permitted a reduced registration 
fee of $10.00. All who satisfactorily complete the work will receive two semester hours 
credit. 

Living accommodations — rooms in one of the University's new dormitories and meals at 
the University Cafeteria — may be secured at reasonable rates. For further information 
about the Laboratory and Clinic or the Book Fair, write J. Hooper Wise, Language Hall, 
University of Florida, Gainesville. 

REGULATIONS GOVERNING EXTENSION OF CERTIFICATES 

The following more important items govern the granting of extension certificates: 

1. The certificate must be valid at the close of the Summer Term attended 
and at the time formal application for extension is made. 

2. The applicant must pass at least six semester hours in which no grade i- 
below a "C". 

3. No student wiU be granted an extension of certificate who does not apply for 
the same. In case the student fails to apply on the Registration Card at 
time of registration, request may be made to the Registrar, Room 110, Lan- 
guage Hall, to have his application for extension properly recorded. A list 
of those who have applied will be posted on the bulletin boards in Language 
Hall and Peabody Hall not later than July 1 for the First Term and August 
10 for the Second Term. In case of error in this list, students should report 
to the Registrar. No student will be recommended for extension, whose 
name does not appear on this list by July 10 for the First Term or August 
14 for the Second Term. Students should indicate exactly the name that 
appears on the certificate which they wish to have extended. 

4. Certificates to be extended must be sent by registered mail to Colin English, 
State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Tallahassee, Florida, within a 
year after the close of the Summer Term. Otherwise extension will not be 
granted. 

CERTIFICATION OF TEACHERS 

Persons desiring information concerning the certification of teachers are advised to write 
I he State Department of Education, Tallahassee, Florida, requesting Bulletin A on Cer- 
tification of Teachers. This booklet gives all requirements for Graduate and Undergraduate 
Certificates in the various fields as well as instructions concerning applications for cer- 
tificates. 

As a matter of information to students (and with emphasis on the point that certificates 
are granted by the State Department of Education, not by the University) some of the 
requirements listed in the Certificate Bulletin A, February, 1941, of the State Department 
of Education are repeated below with the numbers of the courses offered by the University 
which are designed to meet these requirements. 



96 



BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 



Requirements 

For All Certificates: 
Constitution 

General Preparation 
Health Education 
Physical Education 

For Elementary Certificates: 
General Psychology 
Educational Psychology 
Child and Adolescent Psychology 
History and Principles or Introduction 

to Education 
Elementary School Curriculum or 

Methods of Teaching in the 

Elementary School 
Principles and Methods of Teaching 

Reading 
Children's Literature 
Methods of Teaching Science in 

Elementary School 
Methods in Arithmetic 
Methods in Social Studies 
Geography 

Observation and Practice Teaching 
Public School Music 
Public School Art 

Health Education in Elementary Grades 
Physical Education in Elementary 

Grades 
Penmanship 

For Secondary Certificates: 
English 
Mathematics 
Physical Education 
Science: 

Physical Sciences 

Biological Sciences 

Conservation 

Social Studies: 
History 

Political Science 
Economics 
Sociology 
Geography 
Conservation 
General 



* University Courses Meeting the 
Requirements 



Two of the following: Hy. 301, 302, 303. 304, 

331, 332; CPl. 13; Pel. 313, 314 
C-1 and C-3 and C-2 or C-6 
En. 387 (or En. 103) 
HPl. 363, 364, 373 



C-41 or CPs. 43 (or Psy. 201) 

En. 385 (or En. 207) 

En. 386 (or En. 203 or 319) 

CEn. 13 (or En. 101 or 102) 



En. 471 (or En. 308) 

En. 471 (or En. 209 or 221) 
Eh. 391 

Gl. 301 (or En. 209 or 222) 

En. 471 (or En. 124) 

Scl. 301 or 302 

C-2 or Courses in Gpy. 

En. 405 or En. 421-2 (or En. 253) 

Msc. courses 

Pc. courses 

HPl. 373 

HPl. 373 

BEn. 97 (or Hg. 101) 



C-3 and courses in CEh. and Eh. 
C-42 and courses in CMs. and Ms. 
Courses in HPl. 

C-2, Gl, 317, Courses in Ps. and Cy. 
C-6, Gl. 318, Courses in Bly. and Bty. 
C-1 or C-2 or C-6 or Gpy. 385 or Gpy. 387 
or Es. 381 or Es. 382 

Courses in CHy. and Hy. 

Courses in CPl. and Pel. 

Courses in CEs. and Es. 

Courses in CSy. and Sy. 

Courses in Gpy. and Es. 381, 385 

See Science 

C-1 will be counted as 8 of the total hours 

required but will not reduce the specific 

requirements. 



♦Based uDon present offerinKS. 
shown in parentheses. 



Discontinued courses which will meet the requirements are 



EXPENSES 97 

COURSES IN TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL AND DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION 
DAYTON A BEACH, FLORIDA 

Under tlie joint sponsorship of the University of Florida and Florida State Department 
of Education, a group of undergraduate and graduate courses leading to a major in Trade 
and Industrial and Distributive Education will be offered, as an integral part of the Summer 
Session, at the Seabreeze High School, Daytona Beach, Florida. 

These courses will be conducted in three terms of three weeks each: June 11 to July 3, 
July 3 to July 24 and July 24 to August 14. Classes will meet six days a week two hours 
a day. The maximum load a student will be permitted to carry is four semester hours. 

This service is oflFered primarily for Trade and Industrial and Distributive Education 
teachers and only the following classes of students will be admitted: 

1. Those actually engaged in teaching Trade and Industrial and Distributive Educa- 
tion or vocational courses subsidized from Smith-Hughes or George-Deen funds: 

2. Novice or apprentice teachers meeting all requirements of the State Plan for 
Trade and Industrial and Distributive teachers with the exception of the required 
amount of teacher training; 

3. County superintendents or school administrators exercising control over a sub- 
sidized vocational program; 

4. Directors, supervisors, and coordinators of vocational programs subsidized from 
Smith-Hughes and George-Deen funds. 

No courses other than those technical subjects of value to Trade and Industrial and 
Distributive Education teachers will be offered and persons not falling in one of the above 
groups will not be admitted. 

To receive credit for these courses the regular admission requirements of the University 
must be met and the approval of the State Supervisor of Trades and Industrial Education 
secured. 

Persons interested should request the Bulletin of the School of Trade and Industrial 
Education. 

EXPENSES 

GENERAL FEES 

Tuition None 

Registration Fees (Florida Students, load of six credits or less) $18.00 

Registration Fees (Non-Florida Students, load of six credits or less) 28.00 

Registration Fees, College of Law (load of six credits 28.00 

— load of less than five credits $6.00 per credit and $3.00) 

Late Registration Fee 5.00 

Breakage Fee for Biology and Chemistry (unused portion refunded* 5.00 

Extra Hour Fee — for each credit carried above six _ 1.00 

Failure Fee, per credit hour (for General College students see paragraph below) 2.50 

(For any course failed since last time registration fees were paid) 

Diploma Fee _ 5.00 



98 BULLETIN OF THE UNll EKSITY SUMMER SESSION 

FAILURE FEES AND EXAMINATION FEES FOR GENERAL COLLEGE STUDENTS 

In lieu of a reexamination fee, a failure fee is charged for each failing grade a General 
College student has received since he last paid registration fees. This fee is assessed 
according to the following schedule and must be paid before the student is permitted to 
continue in the University: 

Each failing grade in C-1, C-2, C-3, C-41, C-42, C-5, or C-6 $5.00 

Each semester hour failed in all other courses 2.50 

A non-refundable fee of $1, payable on the day of application, is charged for each 
application for a comprehensive examination. Applications are necessary only in case 
the student is not currently registered in the course concerned. 

These fees were assessed for the first time beginning with the 1937 Summer Session 
and will be assessed at all subsequent registrations. 

REFUND OF FEES 

Fees paid in advance for room reservations will be refunded up to and including, but 
not after June 1, for first term reservations, or July 14 for second term reservations. 

If by Wednesday of the first week of each term students for any reason wish to with- 
draw from the University, the fees paid, less a flat fee of $3, will be refunded. No refunds 
will be made after this date. 



ROOMING FACILITIES FOR MEN AND WOMEN 

UNIVERSITY DORMITORIES FOR MEN AND WOMEN 

All correspondence concerning dormitory reservations, as well as all dormitory reserva- 
tion fees, should be sent to the Director of Residence, University of Florida, Gainesville. 

All rooms in those dormitories open for the summer session are modern, of fire-proof 
construction, and especially designed to give maximum comfort and accommodations to the 
student. Each room or suite has a lavatory and built-in chifforobes. A bathroom, with 
hot and cold showers and lavatories, is located on each floor of each section. Room furnish- 
ings consist of single beds and mattresses, individual study tables, chairs, and wastebaskets. 
Students must furnish linen, pillows and other things they may require for their own special 
convenience. Easy chairs may be secured for a rental charge of fifty cents per term, and 
electrical appliances, such as radio, iron, fan, etc., may be used for a fee of twenty-five 
cents each per term. 

The dormitories are under the administration of the Director of Residence and the 
Dean of Women. The University officials, with the assistance of the monitors or pre- 
ceptresses assigned to each section, function to create in the dormitories an environment 
most conducive for each student's obtaining maximum advantage from college life. Ade- 
quate hot water, janitorial service, modern equipment and the superior construction of the 
new dormitories insure exceptional comfort and accommodations for each dormitory student. 

RESERVATIONS 

Rooms may be reserved by application to the Director of Residence. (See page 147 for 
application form.) All applications should be made as early as possible and must be 
accompanied by the room reservation fee of $5.00 per person. This fee is not a payment 



ROOMING FACILITIES 



99 



on room rent and may be refunded at the end of the residence period less any breakage 
or miscellaneous charges. If room assignment has been made, no refund •will be granted 
on cancellations after June 1 for the first term, and after July 14 for the second term. 

Rooms are rented for one or both terms of the Summer Session, and rent is due and 
payable in advance at the beginning of each term. The dormitories will be open from 
Saturday, June 14, to Saturday, August 30. 

Women students will check in at the Murphree Hall Office, located at the southeast 
corner of Murphree Hall. The men students and married couples will check in at the 
Fletcher Hall Office, located in Section F, adjoining Fletcher Lounge. 

Students not assigned a room will be given a refund on request. Students signing con- 
tracts and being assigned rooms will not be granted a refund if they withdraw from the 
dormitories during the period stipulated in the contract. Contracts for the dormitory rooms 
are for the term, unless otherwise arranged. 

Both men and women students will be accommodated in the University dormitories dur- 
ing the Summer Session. Fletcher Hall, one of the two new dormitories, completed in 
September, 1939, will be reserved for men; and Murphree Hall, the other new dormitory, 
will be reserved for women. Sections A, B, and C of Sledd Hall (formerly New Dormitory) 
will be reserved for married couples. Children will not be permitted to room in the dormi- 
tories. No other dormitories will be open, unless the demand for rooms exceeds the capacity 
of the halls listed above. 

RATES 

PER STUDENT PER COUPLE 

Hall Fletcher (Men) Murphree (Women) Sledd (Couples) 

1st Term 2nd Term 1st Term 2nd Term 1st Term 2nd Term 

Type 6 wks. 5 wks. 6 wks. 5 wks. 6 wks. 5 wks. 

.$13.50 $11.25 $13.50 $11.25 $24.00 $20.00 

2 Room Suite for two and and and and and and 

9.00 7.50 9.00 7.50 15.00 12.50 

$12.00 $10.00 $ 9.00 $ 7.50 

Large Room for two and and (4th floor (4th floor None None 

9.00 7.50 only) only) 

$15.00 $12.50 

Single Rooms and and None None None None 

12.00 10.00 

in all cases where two prices are stated for a given type of room, the lower price is 
for rooms on the fourth floor. 

Sections G and H of Murphree Hall will be reserved for women students under twenty- 
one years of age. 

The Office of the Director of Residence is located in Fletcher Hall, Section F, adjoining 
Fletcher Lounge. The Office of the Dean of Women is located in Murphree Hall, Section 
H, adjoining Murphree Lounge. 

REGULATIONS 

In general, dormitory regulations are based on those principles of individual conduct 
necessary to obtain maximum benefit and comfort for all dormitory residents. A copy <it 
specific dormitory regulations is posted in each room. 

Specific attention is called to the following: 

All students with less than one year of college work shall be required to room in the 
dormitories on the University campus so long as rooms are available for allotment to them. 



100 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 

All women students will live in the dormitories, with the exceptions that graduate stu- 
dents and others over 21 years of age who have been self-supporting may be permitted to 
live in approved rooming houses after making proper arrangements with the Dean of 
Students.* (See page 149 for application for permission to live off campus.) 

No student may remove from a room in the dormitory or dormitories to other quarters 
without the consent of the University Committee on Residence. Furthermore, the student 
is responsible for the rent of the dormitory room until the end of the then current term, 
unless he supplies another occupant who is satisfactory to the Committee on Residence. 

OFF CAMPUS ROOMING ACCOMMODATIONS 

1. In order to complete registration, all women students must have a place of residence 
approved by the Dean of Students. 

2. All women students will live in the dormitories, with the exceptions that graduate 
students and others over 21 years of age who have been self-supporting may be permitted 
to live in approved rooming houses after making proper arrangements with the Dean 
of Students. 

3. Request to live off-campus should be made to the Dean of Students, on forms provided 
by that office. See page 149. This form contains the following information: age, record 
of employment for the past year, address of rooming house in which student wishes to 
reside, and the reasons why rooming off-campus will be of advantage to the student. 

4. A list of approved rooming houses will be available at the Office of the Dean of Students. 
In order to avoid inconvenience and possible unpleasantness, students should consult this 
list before making any definite arrangements for a place of residence off-campus. 

5. Approved rooming houses will not be allowed to house both men and women except in 
the case of married couples, and for these a special list of approved places will be made, 

UNIVERSITY CAFETERIA 

The Cafeteria is under the direction of a graduate dietitian, and offers to Summer 
Session students high quality food at reasonable prices. The meals are carefully planned, 
offering a pleasing variety of foods attractively served. 

Many innovations have been made in equipment and methods, resulting in a service 
as complete and modem as that found in any school cafeteria in the south. 

All service is cafeteria style, affording individual selections. The policy is to furnish 
well prepared food at actual cost. Coupon books containing tickets with a monetary value 
will be sold at a discount sufficient to warrant their purchase. 

Meeds may be obtained at the University Cafeteria at the following rates: 

$15.00 monetary value coupon ticket $14.25 

5.00 monetary value coupon ticket 4.75 



*Note: No student whose parents are residents of the City of Gainesville, Florida, or the 
adjacent territory to said University which is within daily walking or driving distance from the 
University shall be subject to the foregoing regulation. 



GENERAL REGULATIONS 101 



GENERAL REGULATIONS 

The student is advised to procure a copy of Student Regulations, Part I, and acquaint 
liimself with all general regulations. Particular attention is invited to the following items: 

CKEDITS 

The term credit as used in this bulletin in reference to courses is equal to one semester 
hour. 

RESIDENCE REQUIREMENTS 

1. The minimum residence requirement for the baccalaureate degree is two regular 
terms, or one regular term and three summer terms, or five summer terms. New students 
oflfering advanced standing must meet this requirement after entrance to the University. 
Students who break their residence at the University by attending another institution for 
credit toward the degree must meet this requirement after re-entering the University. 

2. For the master's degree two regular terms or six summer terms are necessary to 
satisfy the residence requirements. 

3. Students are required to complete the last thirty credit hours (28 in the College of 
Law) applied towards the baccalaureate degree during regular residence in the college from 
which the student is to be graduated. Exception to this regulation may be made only upon 
written petition approved by the faculty of the college concerned, but in no case may the 
amount of extension work permitted exceed more than twelve of the last thirty-six hours 
required for a baccalaureate degree. 

AMOUNT OF EXTENSION WORK PERMITTED 

No person will be allowed to take more than one-fourth of the credits toward a degree 
by correspondence study and extension class work. No person will be dlowed to take 
more than 12 of the last 36 credits necessary for a bachelor's degree by correspondence 
study or extension class work. No person will be allowed to take more than 9 credits by 
correspondence during the summer vacation period. While in residence, a student will 
not be allowed to take work by correspondence without the consent of the dean of the 
college concerned. This will be granted only in exceptional cases. In the College of Arts 
and Sciences no extension work is permitted in the last thirty hours, except by special 
permission. 

MAXIMUM AND MINIMUM LOAD 

A. The maximum load for students attending the University of Florida for the first 
time is six hours, or two courses not to exceed seven hours. 

B. The maximum load for students who have previously attended the University of 
Florida is: 

1. For those students who made an honor point average below 3.00 (B) during 
their last term in residence at the University, a maximum of six hours, or 
two courses not to exceed seven hours. 

2. For those students who made an honor point average of 3.00 (B) or higher 
during their last term in residence at the University, a maximum of eight 
hours, or three courses not to exceed nine hours. 

C. The maximum load for students in tiie Graduate School is 6 hours. 



102 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 

STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY 

Each student must assume full responsibility for registering for the proper courses and 
for fulfilling all requirements for his degree. Students should confer with the dean of their 
college, regarding choice of courses several days before registration; in addition to this, 
juniors and seniors should confer with the head of the department in which they expect 
to earn a major. Seniors must file, in the Office of the Registrar, formal application for a 
degree and must pay the diploma fee very early in the term in which they expect to receive 
the degree; the official calendar shows the latest day on which this can be done. 

Each student is responsible for every course for which he registers. Courses can be 
dropped or changed only with the approval of the dean of the college in which the student 
is registered and by presentation of the cards authorizing the change at the office of the 
Registrar. 

GRADUATION WITH HONORS 

For regulations in the various colleges covering graduation with Honors, see the 
Bulletin of Information for the Upper Division. 

COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

The major coiurses are regularly numbered above 500 and the minors between 300 and 
500, but there is no objection to counting a course above 500 in one department as a minor 
in another. On the other hand, there are courses numbered 300 and 400 which are not 
acceptable as minors. 

A number of courses have already been arranged that may count as majors. Efforts 
will be made to arrange stiU others upon request. If the major work desired is not listed, 
requests for it should be made at an early date. 

Passing grades for students registered in the Graduate School are A and B. All other 
grades are failing. 

For requirements for the Ph.D. degree and other information in regard to graduate work 
see the Bulletin of the Graduate School. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MASTER'S DEGREE 

A candidate for the master's degree must be in residence for at least one scholastic year, 
devoting his entire time during this period to study and research. The Summer Session of 
eleven weeks will count as one-third of a year. One-half of this term will be one-sixth 
of a year. 

Work Required. — The work for the master's degree shall be a unified program with a 
definite objective, consisting of twenty-four semester hours or the equivalent, at least half 
of which shall be in a single field of study and the remainder in related subject matter as 
determined by the student's Supervisory Committee. The principal part of the course 
work for the master's degree shall be designated strictly for graduates. However, in the 
case of related subject matter, courses numbered 300 and above may be offered upon the 
approval of the Supervisory Committee. 

In all departments a general examination, either oral or written or both, covering the 
whole of the field of study of the candidate, or any part of it, is required. This may em- 
brace not only the thesis and the courses taken but also any questions that a student major- 
ing in that department may reasonably be expected to answer. 



COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS 103 

A thesis is required of all candidates. This thesis should be closely allied to the major 
subject. The title of the thesis should be submitted by the end of the first summer. The 
thesis itself should be completed and submitted in time to allow an interval of three 
full weeks between the day of submittal and the graduation day of the summer term. 

The requirement of a reading knowledge of a foreign language is left to the discretion 
of the student's Supervisory Committee. 

The work for the master's degree must be completed within seven years from the time 
of first registering for graduate work. For summer session students this means seven 
summers. 

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

In the College of Agriculture during regular semesters, courses in Agricultural Chemistry, 
Agricultural Economics, Agricultural Education, Agricultural Engineering. Agronomy, Ani- 
mal Industry (divisions of Animal Production. Dairy Husbandry, Dairy Manufactures and 
Poultry Husbandry), Botany (divisions of Botany, Bacteriology and Plant Pathology), 
Entomology. Horticulture and Soils and Forestry (School of Forestry), are given. From 
year to year courses in these Departments are rotated in the Summer School since it is 
not possible to give work in all Departments. For the Summer Sessions 1941, courses in 
Agricultural Economics, Agricultural Engineering, Agronomy, Animal Industry, Bacteriology, 
and courses for County and Home Demonstration Agents are offered. Non-agricultural sub- 
jects required for the degree of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture may he taken in Depart- 
ments of other colleges. 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

Bible, biology, chemistry, English. French, geology, German, Greek, history, journalism, 
Latin, mathematics, pharmacy, philosophy, physics, political science, psychology, sociology, 
Spanish and speech are the subject matter fields of the College of Arts and Sciences. The 
College operates in each term. Most of the departments offer basic courses in the Summer 
Session, and many of them offer advanced courses. In addition to work in the fields named 
above, students enrolled in the College may study courses in bacteriology, botany, eco- 
nomics and education. 

Inasmuch as most of the subjects taught in the public schools are continued on the 
college level by departments in the College of Arts and Sciences, this college is of particular 
service to teachers of the State. Others who profit particidarly by the operation of the 
College of Arts and Sciences in the Summer Session are students of the College who wish 
either to make up deficiencies or to hasten graduation, students of other collegiate institu- 
tions and of other colleges of tho University who wish to complete basic arts and sciences 
requirements or electives, and men and women who spend their vacations in attendance 
at the University for the purpose of securing new points of view and renewed intellectual 
vigor. 

Students who do not intend to earn degrees in this college may enroll subject to the 
University Admission Regulations (p. 88). Every effort will be made to cooperate with 
such students in arranging programs of study which will be of greatest advantage and 
help to them. 

CURRICULA IN ARTS AND SCIENCES 

The College of Arts and Sciences offers curricula leading to the degrees of Bachelor 
of Arts, Bachelor of Science, Bachelor of Arts in Journalism, and Bachelor of Science in 



104 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 

Pharmacy. The curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy 
is administered by the Director of the School of Pharmacy. (See School of Pharmacy 
below.) The other curricula are administered by the Dean of the College of Arts and 
Sciences. Only students who have completed the General College or its equivalent (as 
determined by the Board of Examiners and approved by the Dean of the College) are 
eligible to enter the curricula and become candidates for degrees. 

MAJORS 

The College offers two kinds of majors in the curricula leading to the degrees of 
Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science. All majors include the requirement of a read- 
ing knowledge of a foreign language or 6 semester credit hours in a foreign language in 
courses numbered above 100. 

One of the two kinds of majors is called a Departmental Major. A departmental 
major includes a concentration of not less than 24 and not more than 32 semester credit 
hours in one subject-matter field.* It also includes such subsidiary courses from other 
subject-matter fields as are essential to thoroughness and comprehension. 

The other type of major is called a Group Major. A group major includes, in 
addition to the foreign language, courses from related subject-matter fields with at least 
4 semesters of creditable work in one of the fields and not more than 6 semesters in any 
single field. 

The student's major now includes the essential related subjects, and he is not required 
to earn separate minors. 

THE DEGREES OF BACHELOR OF ARTS AND BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

Every student who wishes to be a candidate for one of these degrees should read 
carefully the description of requirements on pages 340-341 of the Bulletin of Information 
for the Upper Division 1940-41. 

The degree of Bachelor of Arts will be conferred upon those who fulfill the specified 
requirements and whose majors center in one or more of the fields of ancient languages 
bible, English, French, German, history, journalism, philosophy, political science, sociol- 
ogy, Spanish and speech. Similarly, the degree of Bachelor of Science will be conferred 
upon those who fulfill the specified requirements and whose majors center in one or more 
of the fields of biology, botany, chemistry and physics. Some students who major in 
mathematics or in psychology receive the degree of Bachelor of Arts while others receive 
the degree of Bachelor of Science, the degree being determined by the direction of the 
student's interests and accomplishments in his major work. 

THE PRE-LAW COURSE 

In cooperation with the College of Law, the College of Arts and Sciences offers the 
pre-law course. This course leads to the degree of Bachelor of Arts or to the degree 
of Bachelor of Science upon completion of the first full year of the law course (28 semester 
credit hours and 56 honor points) , and to the degree of Bachelor of Laws upon completion 
of the law course. For students who make adequate scholastic progress it is possible to 
earn the academic and law degrees in six years, of which two years are spent in the 
General College, one in the College of Arts and Sciences, and tliree in the College of Law. 



*No courses will be counted toward fulfillment of this requirement in which the grade earned 
is below C. 



COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS 105 

PRE-MEDICAL AND PRE-DENTAL COURSES 

Students who upon graduation from the General College have not completed require- 
ments for admission to the medical and dental schools may continue and complete their 
pre-professional training in the College of Arts and Sciences. The student should select 
courses in accordance with requirements for admission to the particular school he wishes 
to enter, and should correspond with the dean of that school for information and advice. 

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

The College of Business Administration operates during the Summer Session as during 
the regular terms. The courses oflered appeal to students attending the regular terms 
who wish to return during the Summer Session, and to teachers and others who wish to 
take courses to prepare for teaching commercial subjects in high schools or to prepare 
for teaching social sciences. 

MAXIMUM CREDIT LOADS OF STUDENTS 

The maximum credit load of all students registered for the curriculum in Public 
Administration as well as for the curriculum in Business Administration proper during 
each of their first two semesters (first year) shall be 15 academic semester hours (6 in 
summer session) to which advanced military science may be added. However, these stu- 
dents may increase their credit loads to 18 academic semester hours during their first 
semester, to which advanced military science may be added, provided they have graduated 
from the General College with honors; likewise, they may increase their credit loads to 
18 academic semester hours (9 in summer session) during their second semester, to which 
military science may be added, provided they have attained an honor point average of 3 (B) 
or more in the preceding semester. The maximum credit load of all students after their 
first two semesters is limited to 18 academic semester hours to which military science may 
be added. The minimum requirement for graduation from the College of Business Ad- 
ministration is 66 semester hours on which the student must earn 132 honor points. To 
graduate With Honors, a student must have graduated from the General College with honors 
and completed 66 semester hours on which he has earned 198 honor points, or in lieu of 
graduation from the General College with honors, have completed 66 semester hours on 
which he has earned 231 honor points. To graduate IVith High Honors, a student must 
meet the following requirements: 

1. Attain a scholastic average in all academic courses of 3.4 or better. 

2. Secure the recommendation of a Faculty Committee. 

A copy of detailed regulations governing graduation with high honors may be obtained 
fritm the Office of the Dean. 

Of the 66 semester credit hours required for graduation, not more than six semester 
credit hours may be earned by correspondence or extension study. Such credit hours, 
furthermore, must be approved for each individual student in advance by the Committee 
on Curricular Adjustments, 

DECREES AND CURRICULA 

The College of Business Administration offers two degrees: The Bachelor of Science in 
Business Administration and the Bachelor of Science in Public Administration. To secure 
the first degree students must complete either the Curriculum in Business Administration 
Proper or the Curriculum in Combination with Law. To secure the second degree they 
must complete the Curriculum in Public Administration. 



106 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 

ADMISSION TO CURRICULUM IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION PROPER AND TO CURRICULUM IN 

COMBINATION WITH LAW 

To enter the College of Business Administration and to register for the Curriculum iu 
Business Administration Proper, or the Curriculum in Combination with Law, students are 
required to present a certificate of graduation from the General College and to have com 
pleted the following courses: 

CEs. 13. — Economic Foundations of Modern Life 

CBs. 14. — Elementary Accounting 

CEs. 15. — Elementary Statistics 

One additional half-year elective course in the General College. 

These courses may be taken for C-7, C-8, and C-9 electives in the General College during 
the second year. 

CURRICULUM IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION PROPER 

Junior Year 

Courses First Semester Credits Courses Second Semester Credits 

Bs. 311 • — Accounting Principles 3 Es. 322 — Financial Organization of 

Es. 321 ■ — Financial Organization of Society 3 

Society 3 Es. 335 — Economics of Marketing 3 

Es. 327 —Public Finance 3 Es. 351 — Transportation Prin 3 

Bs. 401 ^Business Law 3 Bs. 402 — Business Law _ 3 

♦Electives 3 'Electives _ _ 3 



15 15 

Senior Year 

Es. 407 — Economic Principles and Es. 408 — Economic Principles and 

Problems 3 Problems _ 3 

♦Electives 15 *Electives 15 

18 18 

CURRICULUM IN COMBINATION WITH LAW 

The College of Business Administration combines with the General College and the 
College of Law in offering a six-year program of study to students who desire ultimately 
to enter the College of Law. Students register during the first two years in the General 
College and the third year in the College of Business Administration. When they have 
fully satisfied the academic requirements of the College of Business Administration, they 
are eligible to register in the College of Law and may during their last three years com- 
plete the course in the College of Law. When students have, after entering the College 
of Law, completed one year's work in law (28 semester hours and 56 honor points), they 
may offer this year's work as a substitute for the fourth year in the College of Business 
Administration and receive the degree of Bachelor of Science in Business Administration. 

The maximum credit load for all students registered for the curriculum in combination 
with law is 18 academic semester hours, to which may be added advanced military science. 
To graduate With Honors, a student must have graduated from the General College with 
honors and completed 70 semester hours on which he has earned 210 honor points, or in 
lieu of graduation from the General College with honors, complete 70 semester hours on 
which he has earned 245 honor points. 

The curriculum in business administration in combination with law consists of 30 
semester hours of required courses and 12 hours of elective courses. The requirements 
are as follows: 



*Six sennester hours of electives may be taken in advanced military science or in approved 
free electives. The remaining hours are limited to courses in economics and business administration. 



Courses 


Bs. 


311 


Es. 


321-322 


Es. 


327 


Es. 


335 


Es. 


351 


Es. 


404 


Es. 


407-408 


Es. 


454 



COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS 107 

Credits 

— Accounting Principles 3 

— Financial Organization of Society 6 

— Public Finance 3 

— Economics of Marketing 3 

— Transportation Principles 3 

— Government Control of Business 3 

- — Economic Principles and Problems 6 

■ — Principles of Public Utility Economics 3 

*Electives 12 

42 
ADMISSIO.N TO THE CURRICULUM IN PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

To enter the College of Business Administration and to register for the Curriciihiin in 
Puhlic Administration students are required to present a certificate of graduation from the 
General College and to have completed the following courses: 

CPl. 13. — Political Foundations of iModern Life 
CEs. 13. — Economic Foundations of Modern Life 
CBs. 14. — Elementary Accounting 
CEs. 15. — Elementary Statistics 

These courses may he taken for C-7, C-8, and C-9. electives in the General College during 
the second year. 

THE CURRICULUM IN PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 



Second Semester Credits 

— American Government 

and Politics 3 

— Public Finance 3 

— Economic Principles 

and Problems 3 

— Survey of American History 3 

**Electives 3 









Junior 


Year 




Cour= 


;3s 


First Semester Credits 


Courses 


Pel. 


313 

311 
407 

331 


— American Government 


3 
3 

3 
3 
S 


Pel. 

Es. 
Es 

Hy. 


314 


Rs 




327 


Es. 


■ — Economic Principles 


408 


Hy. 


— Survey of American History 
**Electives 


332 








15 












Senior 


Year 




Pel. 


411 
454 




3 

3 
12 


Pel. 
Es. 


412 


Es. 


— Principles of Public Utility 
Economics 


404 




**Electives 





15 



— Public Administration 3 

— Government Control of 

Business 3 

**Electives 12 

18 18 

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

For admission to the College of Education all students will be required to present a 
certificate of graduation from the General College, or its equivalent, and have the approval 
of the Admissions Committee of the College of Education. 

GRADUATION WITH HONORS 

Students successfully completing the work of the Upper Division will, according to the 
character of their work, receive diplomas of graduation, of graduation With Honors, or of 



•Electives are limited to courses in business administration and six semester hours in advanced 
military science. 

**Six semester hours of electives may be taken in advanced military science or in approved 
free electives. The remaining hours, subject to the approval of the Dean, are limited primarily 
to courses in the following Departments: Economics and Business Administration; History and 
Political Science ; and Sociology. 



108 BULLETIN OF THE VNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 

graduation With High Honors. For detailed regulations concerning graduation with honors, 
the student should consult the Dean of the College. 

DEGREES AND CURRICULA 

Only two degrees are offered in the College of Education — Bachelor of Arts in Education 
and Bachelor of Science in Education. For either degree the student is required to com- 
plete 60 semester hours, with an average of "C" or higher, after graduation from the 
General College. 

CURRICULA IN ELEMENTARY EDUCATION LEADING TO THE DECREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS 
IN EDUCATION OR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 

I. For those beginning college work at the University of Florida or transferring from other 
institutions with less than the equivalent of two years' college credit. 

Graduation from the General College. 

Professionalized Subject Matter: Credits 

Children's Social Studies _ 3 

Children's Science 2 

Children's Literature 3 

Health and Physical Education 2 

Public School Art 4 

Public School Music _... 4 

Handwriting 

Education: 

CEn. 13 — Introduction to Education 

En. 385— Pre-Adolescent Child 

En. 386— Adolescent Child 

En. 387 — Health Education 

En. 405— Student Teaching 

En. 406 — -Elementary School Administration 

En. 471 — Problems of Instruction (Elementary School) 

♦English 15 credits 

Total of at least 60 credits in the Upper Division. 

II. For those transferring from other institutions with the equivalent of two or more years* 
college credit. 

General Background: Credits 

C-1 8 

C-2 or C-6 8 

C-3 8 

C-41 4 

Professionalized Subject Matter: Credits 

Children's Social Studies 3 

Children's Science 2 

Children's Literature 3 

Health and Physical Education 2 

Public School Art 4 

Public School Music 4 

Handwriting 

*By permission of the Dean of the College of Education, these hours may be completed in 
other areas. 



COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS 109 

Kducation : 

CEn. 13 — Introduction to Kducation 

En. 385— Pre-Adolescent Cliild 

En. 386— Adolescent Cliild 

En. 387 — Health Education 

En. 405 — Student Teaching 

En. 406 — Elementary School Administration 

En. 471 — Problems of Instruction (Elementary School! 

*English 15 credits 

*Social Studies 15 credits 

Enough electives to make a total of 132 credits 

CURRICULA IN SECONDARY EDUCATION LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS OK 
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN EDUCATION 

I. For those beginning college work at the University of Florida or transferring from otiier 
institutions with less than the equivalent of two years' college credit. 

Graduation from the General College. 

Health and Physical Education 2 credits 

Education: 

CEn. 13 — Introduction to Education 

En. 385— Pre-Adolescent Child 

En. 386 — Adolescent Child 

En. 387 — Health Education 

En. 401 — School Administration 

En. 405 — Student Teaching 

En. 471— Problems of Instruction (Secondary School) 

Complete certification requirements in two fields. (See page 95.) 

Electives, if needed, to make a total of 60 semester hours completed in the Upper Division. 

II. For those transferring from other institutions with the equivalent of two or more years' 
college credit. 

General Background: Credits 

Gl 8 

C-2 or C-6 8 

C-3 8 

C-41 4 

Speech 3 or 4 

Health and Physical Education 2 

Education: 

CEn. 13 — Introduction to Education 

En. 385 — Pre-Adolescent Child 

En. 386 — Adolescent Child 

En. 387 — Health Education 

En. 401 — School Administration 

En. 405 — Student Teaching 

En. 471 — Problems of Instruction (Secondary School) 

Complete certification requirements in two fields. (See page 95.) 

Electives. if needed, to make a total of 132 credits 



*By permission of the Dean of the College of Education, these houi-s may be i-ompleted in 
other areas. 



110 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 

THE GENERAL COLLEGE 

The General College has been organized to administer the work of the freshman and 
sophomore years in the University of Florida. All beginning students wUl register in 
this College. 

The average student will be able to complete the work of the General College in two 
years, while superior students may finish the curriculum in a shorter time, and others 
may find it necessary to remain in the General College for a longer period. 

A program of general education is worked out for all students. In this program the 
University recognizes that broad basic training is needed by all students. To this founda- 
tion that has meaning and significance to the student, he may add the special training of 
the colleges and professional schools of the Upper Division, or drop out of the University 
with something definite and helpful as he begins his adult life as a citizen. The purposes 
of the General College are as follows: 

1. To offer an opportunity for general education and to provide the guidance 
needed by all students. Thus the choice of professional work is postponed 
until the student is better acquainted with his capacity and disposition to 
undertake work that will be profitable to himself and society. 

2. To broaden the base of education for students who are preparing for 
advanced study in the colleges and professional schools of the Upper Division, 
thereby avoiding the handicap of narrow specialization. 

3. To satisfy the needs of those who have only a limited time to give to 
college training, and consequently should concern themselves with general 
viewpoints and major understandings, instead of with introductions to special 
subject matter which they may never enter. 

4. To provide for the constant adjustments required in higher general 
education incident to the changing conditions of modern life. The subject 
matter of the various courses and the methods of presentation are to be con- 
stantly varied in order to awaken the interest of the student, to stimulate his 
intellectual curiosity, to encourage independent study, and to cultivate the 
attitudes necessary for enlightened citizenship. 

5. Guidance. Every part of the General College program is designed to 
guide students. It was felt that too much of the freshman and sophomore 
work of former years had little meaning and significance to the vast majority. 
The material studied was preparatory and foundational, and became mean- 
ingful only when the student pursued additional courses in the junior and 
senior years. The material of the comprehensive courses is selected and 
tested with guidance as a primary function. WhUe, of necessity, we must 
look forward to distant goals, the General College is trying to present 
materials that are directly related to life experiences and will immediately 
become a part of the student's thinking and guide him in making correct 
"next steps". Thus the whole program — placement tests, progress reports, 
vocational aptitude tests, selected material in the comprehensive courses, 
student conferences, provisions for superior students, adjustment for individual 
differences, election privileges, and comprehensive examinations — are all parts 
of a plan designed to guide students. 

Thus guidance is not attempted at one ofiice by one individual with a 
small staff. The whole drive of the General College program is one of direct- 



COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS 111 

ing the thinking of the student. While the necessary correlation and unifica- 
tion is attempted at the General College Office, throughout the General College 
period students consult upper division deans and department heads to discuss 
future work. During the last month of each school year these informal con- 
ferences are concluded by a scheduled formal conference, at which each 
student fills out a pre-registration card for the coming year. 

COLLEGE OF LAW 

The purpose of the College of Law is to impart a thorough scientific and practical 
knowledge of law and thus to equip students to take advantage of the opportunities in 
this field. Since 1927 the College has operated during the Summer Session. Courses 
offered during the regular terms are rotated. Some courses not given during the regular 
terms are offered in the Summer Session. The variety of courses is sufficient to enable 
students of different types to carry a full load, and appeal to a wide range of students. 

SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

Professional courses are offered occasionally by the School of Pharmacy in the summer 
session. It is intended that these may be so rotated that courses of major interest are 
offered during the course of several summers. 

A few professional courses will be offered during the summer of 1941 and foundation 
courses required for admission to the pharmacy curriculum and related courses such as 
bacteriology, biology and chemistry may be taken during the summer session. 

Graduate students may find courses available in minor fields such as biology, bacteri- 
ology and chemistry. Consult the Director of the School of Pharmacy for further 
information. 



112 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 

ADVISORY SERVICE FOR TEACHERS AND A GUIDE 
TO COURSES LISTED IN THIS CATALOGUE 

During the past several years the University of Florida has been attempting to provide 
a better summer program for Florida teachers — a program directed toward the improvement 
of Florida schools. This year, particularly, the summer school program has been studied 
intensely by a large committee representing a variety of subject-matter areas, professional 
interests, and accomplishments. Partly as a result of the work of this committee, the 1941 
summer session will reveal significant changes from previous years. Among these changes 
are revisions of some fundamental courses so as to adapt them more closely to teacher- 
needs, the creation of new courses representing a coalescence of subject-matter and profes- 
sional interests, and the establishment of an improved pre-registration advisory service. 

Teachers are urged to read carefully the course descriptions for all courses offered in 
the fields in which they are interested and to correspond with instructors or department 
heads for advice as to which of the offerings are best suited to their particular needs. 

Some members of the faculty have been designated to act as advisors for persons teach- 
ing or interested in certain fields. All teachers who so desire are invited to seek advice 
from these staff members: 

For teachers of English — Dr. H. E. Spivey, Language Hall 
For teachers of Mathematics — Dr. J. H. Kusner, Peabody Hall 
For teachers of the Physical Sciences — Dr. D. C. Swanson, Benton Hall 
For teachers of the Biological Sciences — Dr. C. F. Byers, Science Hall 
For teachers of the Social Studies--Dr. M. J. Dauer, Peabody Hall 
Some of the certification requirements listed in the literature of the State Department 
may not be represented by the same titles in this catalogue. To facilitate finding the 
proper course descriptions for such fields, the following guide is provided: 

Elementary Teachers 

General Preparation — the basic comprehensive courses of the General College (C-1, C-2, 

C-3, C-41, C-42, C-5, and C-6) 
Elementary Science — listed under General Science (Gl. 301) 
General Psychology — C-41 listed under General College courses and CPs. 43 listed under 

Psychology 
Child and Adolescent Psychology — listed under Education (En. 385, En. 386) 
Children's Literature — listed under English (Eh. 391) 

Social Studies in Elementary Grades — listed under Social Studies (Scl. 301 and Scl. 302) 
Handwriting — listed under Business Education (BEn. 97) 
Health Education — listed under Education (En. 387) 

Secondary Teachers 

Commercial Subjects — listed under Business Education and under Economics and Busi- 
ness Administration 

English — C-3 and courses listed under English, Speech, and Journalism 

Mathematics — C-42 and courses listed under Mathematics 

Science — C-2, C-6, and courses listed under Chemistry, Biology, Geology, Physics, Gen- 
eral Science, and Industrial Engineering 

Social Studies — C-1 and courses listed under Geography, Geology, History, Political 
Science, Economics, Social Studies, and Sociology 

Conservation requirement may be met with any of the following courses: C-1, C-2, 
C-6 (listed under General College courses), Gpy. 385 or Gpy. 387 (not offered 1941 
summer session), or Es. 382 (listed under Economics). 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION FIRST TERM 113 

DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 

AND SCHEDULE OF COURSES 
First Term 

All classes ordinarily meet for one hour and tiventy minutes. Classes scheduled to 
meet daily meet Monday through Friday. 

Some courses are indicated as being offered by the seminar method. Students taking 
these courses will do independent tvork under the supervision of the instructor, with no 
regular class meetings unless time of meeting is listed in the schedule. 

Students not registered in the Graduate School will not be permitted to register fof 
graduate courses unless they secure written approval from the Dean of the Graduate School 
and the instructor concerned. 

GENERAL COLLEGE COURSES 

Comp-rehensive examinations for General College students in C-1, C-2, C-3, C-5, and 
C-6 will be given and will cover the work of both terms. Students should consult officiid 
announcements of the Board of University Examiners for details. Credits are indicated 
for the benefit of Upper Division students who elect these courses. 

C-11. — Man and the Social World. 4 credits. 
Lecture Section 1: 8:30 M. W. F. Ch-Aud. STAFF. 



Discussion Sections: 10 
11 
12 
13 



30 T. Th. and 1:00 W. Pe-101. Dauer. 

30 T. Th. and 1:00 W. Sc-213. MILLER. 

30 T. Th. and 1:00 W. Sc-205. Bentley. 

30 T. Th. and 4:00 W. La-311. LAIRD. 

Designed to develop and stimulate tiie ability to interpret the interrelated problems of the 
modern social world. The unequal rates of change in economic life, in government, in education, 
in science, and in religion are analyzed and interpreted to show the need for a more effective 
coordination of the factors of our evolving social organization of today. Careful scrutiny is made 
of the changing functions of social organizations as joint interdependent activities so that a 
consciousness of the significant relationships between the individual and social institutions may 
be developed, from which consciousness a greater degree of social adjustment may be achieved. 

C-21. — Man and the Physical World. 4 credits. 
Lecture Section 1: 10:00 M. W. F. Ch-Aud. STAFF. 
Discussion Sections: 10 7:00 M. W. F. Bn-205. WILLIAMS. 

11 1:00 M. W. F. Bn-201. MULLIGAN. 

12 11:30 T. Th. F. Bn-205. MULLIGAN. 

An attempt to survey the phenomena of the physical universe with particular reference to 
man's immediate environment ; to show how these phenomena are investigated ; to explain the 
more important principles and relations which have been found to aid in the understanding of 
them ; and to review the present status of man's dependence upon the ability to utilize physical 
materials, forces, and relations. The concepts are taken mainly from the fields of physics, chemistry, 
astronomy, geology, and geography, and they are so integrated as to demonstrate their essential 
unity. The practical and cultural significance of the physical sciences is emphasized. 



114 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 

C-31. — Reading, Speaking and Writing. 4 credits. 
Lecture Section 1: 11:30 M. W. F. Ch-Aud. STAFF. 
Discussion Sections: 10 10:00 Daily. La-203. MORRIS. 

11 2:30 Daily. La-203. HOPKINS. 

12 7:00 Daily. La-203. HOPKINS. 
Writing Laboratory: 101 7:00 M. W. F. La-209. J. L. WILSON. 

102 10:00 M. W. F. La-209. J. L. WILSON. 

Designed to furnish the training in reading, speaking, and writing necessary for the student's 
work in college and for his life thereafter. This training will be provided through practice and 
counsel in oral reading, in silent reading, in logical thinking, in fundamentals of form and style, 
in extension of vocabulary, and in control of the body and voice in speaking. Students will be 
encouraged to read widely as a means of broadening their interests and increasing their apprecia- 
tion of literature. 

CEh. 33.— Effective Writing. 3 credits. 8:30 daily. La-209. Skaggs. Pre- 
requisite: C-3, or permission of C-3 Course Chairman. Open to Upper Division 
students. 

Designed to aid the student to present his ideas in writing which is not only accurate and 
clear but pleasing and attractive to the reader. Students are encouraged to do creative work. 

C-41.— Man and His Thinking. 3 credits. 8:30 daily. La-201. LITTLE. 

Both in private life and vocational life man is faced with the necessity of making decisions 

and of solving problems. The principal aims are (1) to develop ability to think with greater 

accuracy and thoroughness, and (2) to develop ability to evaluate the thinking of others. The 

material used applies to actual living and working conditions. The case method is used to insure 
practice, and numerous exercises are assigned. 

C-42. — General Mathematics. 3 credits. Pe-102. 10:00 daily. KOKOMOOR. 

Designed to acquaint the student with the general nature of mathematics, the manner in which 
the mathematical mode of thought is used in the world of today, and the role it has occupied in 
the development of the world. A survey of some of the fundamental principles and methods of 
procedure in the main branches of elementary mathematics, with considerable attention being given 
to the utilitarian and cultural importance of the subject and its relations to other branches of 
knowledge. 

C-51. — The Humanities. 4 credits. 
Lecture Section 1: 11:30 M. W. F. Auditorium. STAFF. 
Discussion Sections: 10 1:00 M.W.F. La-212. CONNER. 

11 1:00 T. Th. and 4:00 W. La-212. Fox. 

An attempt is made to help the student lay a broad foundation for cultured living. While 
it is impossible to provide an adequate survey of the broad field, immediate help is given in attain- 
ing desirable understandings, attitudes, and dispositions. Students react every day to all culture ; 
material is therefore presented from this and past civilizations to condition this reaction. Even 
though culture is thought of as timeless, ageless, and not belonging to any particular nation or 
people, the course concerns itself largely with the culture of the Western World. 

C-61. — Man and the Biological World. 4 credits. 
Lecture Sections: 1 7:00 M. T. Th. F. Sc-101. SHERMAN. 

2 10:00 T. W. Th. F. Sc-101. WALLACE, HOBBS. 
Discussion Sections: 10 1:00 M. W. Sc-111. WALLACE. 
11 2:30 T. Th. Sc-101. HOBBS. 

20 7:00 M. W. Sc-205. WALLACE. 

21 11:30 T. Th. Sc-111. HOBBS. 

Designed to give the student a general knowledge and appreciation of the world of living 
things. The biological problems and principles that are associated with the organism's role as : 
(1) a living individual, (2) a member of the race. (3) a product of evolutionary processes, 
and (4) a member of a socially and economically interrelated complex of living organisms, supplies 
the main sequence and material of the course. Especial attention is given to man's place in the 
organic world and to human qualities that have a biological basis. 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION FIRST TERM 115 

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 
As. 409.— Cooperative Marketing. 7:00 daily. Ht-215. 3 credits. KEITZ. 

Cooperative buying and selling organizations, their successes and failures ; methods of organiza- 
tion, financing, and business management. 

As. 413.— Agricultural Policy. 10:00 daily. Ht-215. 3 credits. Reitz. 

A history of farmer attempts and accomplishments through organization and legislation to 
improve the economic and social status of agriculture. Evaluation of present legislative programs 
rind policies affecting the farmer. 

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

Ag, 301.— Drainage and Irrigation. 8:30 M. T. W. Th. Ag-210. Laboratory 
1-4 T. Th. Ag-210. 3 credits. F. ROGERS. 

The drainage and irrigation of lands with treatment of the necessity for such in the produc- 
tion of field, fruit and vegetable crops. The cost, design, operation and upkeep of drainage and 
irrigation systems. Field work in laying out systems. 

AGRONOMY 

Ay. 401.— Organization and Conduct of 4-H Club Work. 8:30 M. T. W . Th. 
and 1-4 W. Ag-208. 2 credits. JOY. (June 23 to July 12.) 

A course to cover the purpose, organization and handling of 4-H Club work. 

ANIMAL INDUSTRY 

GRADUATE COURSE 

AL 509.— Problems in Animal Nutrition. 10:00 M. T. W. Th. and 1-4 T. 

Ag-208. 2 credits. BECKER, ARNOLD and Shealy. (June 23 to July 12.) 

studies in nutritional deficiencies of farm animals, mineral supplements, animal physiology, 
feed utilization. 

BACTERIOLOGY 

Bey. 301.— General Bacteriology. 7:00 M. T. W. Th. Sc-111. Laboratory 1-4 
M. T. Th. F. Sc-104. 4 credits. CARROLL. Prerequisites: C-6, or equivalent; 
Cy. 101-102, or Acy. 125-126. 

Morphology, physiology and cultivation of bacteria and related micro-organisms. Tanner, 
Bacteriologji. 

Bey. 304.— Pathogenic Bacteriology. 10:00 T. W. Th. F. Sc-111. Laboratory 
1-4 M. T. W. F. Sc-104. 4 credits. CARROLL. Prerequisite: Bey. 301. 

Recognition, culture, and special laboratory technique of handling pathogens and viruses ; 
theories and principles of immunity and infection. Stitt, Practical Bacteriology, Parasitology, and 
Blood Work. 

GRADUATE COURSE 

Bey. 507. — Problems in Water Bacteriology. To arrange. 3 or 4 credits. 
Carroll. Prerequisite: Bey. 301 or its equivalent. 

BIBLE 
Be. 406.— Life of Jesus. 8:30 daily. Sc-206. 3 credits. JOHNSON. 

An introduction to the main facts in the life of Jesus and to a general knowledge of the 
Gospel literature. 



116 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 

BIOLOGY 

Bly. 61. — Laboratory in General Biology. 1-5 daily. Sc-10. 2 credits. HUB- 
BELL. 

Elective for students who are taking or have taken C-6 in the General College. Satisfactory 
completion of Bly. 61 together with a final standing in the upper half of C-6 will be accepted as 
a satisfactory prerequisite for second year courses in Biology. 

Bly. 133.— Common Animals and Plants of Florida. 8:30 daily. Sc-101. 3 
credits. HUBBELL. 

Designed to provide a recognition of and an acquaintaince with some of the more common 
animals and plants of Florida. Especially planned to prepare teachers to answer the question, 
"What animal — or what plant — is this ?". Individual work in the field and the making of personal 
reference collections of plants and animals are encouraged. 

Bly. 209.— Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy. 8:30 M. T. W. Th. Sc-111. 
Laboratory 1-5 M. T. W. Th. Sc-107. 4 credits. SHERMAN. Prerequisite: Bly. 
61 or Bly. 101. 

The morphology and classification of chordate animals. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 
Courses in Business Administration are listed under Economics and are marked Bs. 

BUSINESS EDUCATION 

BEn. 81. — Elementary Typewriting. 8:30 daily. Laboratory to be arranged. 
Yn-305. 2 credits. MOORMAN. 

Introduction to touch typewriting ; practice upon personal and business problems. 

BEn. 91. — Elementary Shorthand. 10:00 daily. Yn-306. 2 credits. MOOR- 
MAN. 

Introduction to Gregg shorthand by the functional method. 

BEn. 97. — Handwriting. 1 credit. MOORMAN. 
Section 1. 7:00 A.M. M. T. W. Y'n-306. 
Section 2. 7:00 P.M. M. T. W. Yn-306. 

CHEMISTRY 

Cy. 101.— General Chemistry. 10:00 daily. Ch-212. Laboratory 1-4 M. W. F. 
Ch-130. 4 credits. JACKSON. The first half of the course Cy. 101-102. 

Fundamental laws and theories of chemistry, and preparation and properties of the common 
non-metallic elements and their compounds. 

Cy. 201.— Analytical Chemistry. 8:30 M. T. W. F. Ch-212. Laboratory 1-5 
M. W. F. and 1-4 T. Th. Ch-230. 4 credits. JACKSON. 

Theoretical principles and laboratory technique involved in the qualitative detection of the 
common metals and acid radicals. 

*Cy. 262.— Organic Chemistry. 8:30 daily. Ch-110. Laboratory 1-5 M. W. F. 
and 1-4 T. Th. Ch-230. 5 credits. POLLARD. 

The more important aliphatic and aromatic compounds, chiefly for students in applied biologi- 
cal fields. Suitable for premedical students who desire only five hours of organic chemistry. 

*Cy. 301.— Organic Chemistry. 8:30 daily. Ch-110. Laboratory 1-5 M. W. F. 
Ch-230. 4 credits. Pollard. The first half of the course Cy. 301-302. 

Preparation and properties of the various aliphatic compounds. 



♦That one of these courses will be offered for which there is the greater demand. 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION FIRST TERM 117 

CKADUATK COURSES 

tCy. 505. — Organic Nitrogen Compounds. 10:00 daily. Ch-110. 3 credits. 

Pollard. 

Special lectures and collateral reading relative to the electronic and other theoretical concep- 
tions of organic compounds containing nitrogen. Explosives, pseudo-acids, certain dyes, alkaloids, 
proteins, etc. 

tCy. 506.— Special Chapters in Organic Chemistry. 10:00 daily. Ch-110. 3 
credits. POLLARD. 

Lectures and collateral reading. In general, topics to be studied will be chosen from the 
following list : stereochemistry, tautomerism, acetoacetic ester syntheses, malonic ester synthe.ses. 
the Gi-ignard reaction, benzene theories, diazo compounds, and indicators. 

+Cy. 517.— Advanced Organic Chemistry. 10:00 M. T. W. F. Ch-110. Labora- 
tory 1-4 M. W. F. Ch-230. 3 credits. POLLARD. 

Typical reactions which are utilized in the synthesis and proof of structure of organic com- 
pounds ; quantitative determination of carbon and hydrogen in simple organic compounds and the 
determination of various characteristic groups. 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 

CI. 329.— Higher Surveying. 8-9 M. W. F. Hl-302. Laboratory 9-12 and 1-5 
M. W. F., 8-12 and 1-5 T. Th. Hl-301. 5 credits. Shivler. Prerequisite: 
CI. 226. 

Field astronomy and hydrographic surveying. Field work: the making of a complete topo- 
graphical survey ; tests and adjustments of instruments ; precise leveling ; base line work ; 
determination of time, latitude, and azimuth ; triangulation and traverse ; hydrographic surveying 
and stream gauging. Drawing room work on balancing surveys, reducing field notes, map 
drawing, triangulation, and computation. Students registering for this course may not register 
for any other course. 

ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Note: Courses designated by the letters Es. are Economics courses, those designated by 
the letters Bs. are Business Administration courses. 
*CEs. 131.— Economic Foundations of Modern Life. 10:00 daily. Pe-206. 3 
credits. Eldridge. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. 

Emphasis on the functioning of the economic system. Economic organization and institutions 
as parts of the economic order in their functional capacities. The understanding of eoonomic 
principles and processes, especially those relating to value, price, cost, rent, wages, profits, and 
interest, insofar as such knowledge is necessary in understanding the economic situation of the 
present day. The evaluation of economic forces and processes in terms of their contribution to 
social well being. Prerequisite for advanced standing in Economics and Business Administration. 

*CBs. 141.— Elementary Accounting. 8:30 daily. Sc-202. 3 credits. POWERS. 

Designed to provide the basic training in business practice and in accounting. A study of 
business papers and records ; recording transactions ; preparation of financial statements and re- 
ports. Prerequisite for advanced standing in Economics and Business Administration. 



♦This course is a unit. To complete it both terms of the summer session are re<iuired. Students 
may take the second tei-m without having had the first tei-m only with consent of the instructor. 
When the course is completed in the summer session by students in the Upper Division they may 
secure six semester hours credit. 

tThat one of these courses will be offered for which there is the greater demand. 



118 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 

CEs. 15. — Elementary Statistics. 11:30 daily. La-204. 3 credits. ANDERSON. 

The statistical method as a tool for examining and interpreting data ; acquaintance with 
such fundamental techniques as find application in business, economics, biology, agriculture, 
psychology, sociology, etc. ; basic preparation for more extensive work in the field of statistics. 
Prerequisite for advanced standing in Economics and Business Administration. 

Bs. 311. — Accounting Principles. 11:30 daily. Sc-202, 3 credits. POWERS. 
Prerequisite: CBs. 14. 

A study of the mechanical and statistical aspects of accounting ; books of record ; accounts ; 
fiscal period and adjustments ; working papers ; form and preparation of financial statements ; 
followed by an intensive and critical study of the problems of valuation as they affect the 
preparation of the balance sheet and income statements. 

Es. 321. — Financial Organization of Society. 7:00 daily, Pe-206. 3 credits. 
DOLBEARE. Prerequisite: CEs. 13. 

The field of finance ; the institutions providing monetary, banking and other financial services ; 
interrelationships and interdependence of financial institutions ; central banking ; government 
control of finance ; significance of financial organization to the economic system as a whole. 

Es. 351. — Transportation Principles, 8:30 daily, Pe-208. 3 credits. BiGHAM. 
Prerequisite: CEs. 13. 

The economics of transportation, including railroads, inland waterways, highways, airways, 
and pipe lines, specifically with reference to the development of facilities and service ; contribu- 
tion to social welfare ; economic characteristics ; regulation ; rate principles and structures ; 
valuation and fair return ; discrimination ; service ; coordination. 

Bs. 361. — Property Insurance. Seminar method. 3 credits. BAUGHMAN. 

Fire and Marine Insurance. 

Es. 372. — Labor Economics. 11:30 daily. Ag-109. 3 credits. BAUGHMAN. 
Prerequisite: CEs. 13. 

Labor problems ; insecurity, wages and income, hours, sub-standard workers, industrial con- 
flict ; attempts to solve labor problems by employees ; unionism in its structural and functional 
aspects ; attempts to solve labor problems by employers ; personnel management, employee repre- 
sentation, employers' associations; attempts to solve labor problems by state; protective labor 
legislation, laws relating to settlement of industrial disputes. 

Es. 382. — utilization of Our Resources. 7:00 daily. La-204. 3 credits. DlET- 
TRICH. 

A comprehensive review of the natural and human resources of the United States followed 
by an intensive study of the virise and wasteful practices of exploitation and utilization of these 
resources. A study of the human and economic significance of the principles of conservation 
with special reference to Florida. 

Bs. 401. — Business Law. 10:00 daily. Ag-109. 3 credits. BAUGHMAN, 

Contracts and agency; rights and obligations of the agent, principal, and third party; termina- 
tion of the relationship of agency. 

Es. 407. — Economic Principles and Problems. 8:30 daily. Pe-206. 3 credits. 
ELDRIDGE. 

Advanced economic theory with special emphasis on the causes of economic maladjustments 
arising from the operation of economic forces. 

Bs. 422, — Investments. 11:30 daily. Pe-208. 3 credits. DOLBEARE. Pre- 
requisite: Es. 321-322. 

The nature of investments ; investment policies and types of securities ; analysis of securities ; 
the mechanics and mathematics of security purchases ; factors influencing general movements of 
security prices. 

Bs. 426. — Banking Systems. Seminar method. 3 credits. Dolbeare. Pre- 
requisite: Es. 321-322. 

a study of the development of central banking and its functions; the relationships existing 
between central banks and (1) the government, (2) other banks; and an analysis of the banking 
systems of the United States, England, France, Germany and Canada in the light of central 
banking functions. 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION FIRST TERM 119 

Es. 446.— The Consumption of Wealth. 10:00 daily. La-204. 3 credits. 
Matherly. 

An economic analysis of the problems involved in determining the extent and trends of 
consumer demand and in the adjustments of productive processes to that demand. 

Es. 454.— Principles of Public Utility Economics. 7:00 daily. Pe-208. 3 
credits. BiGHAM. Prerequisite: CEs. 13. 

The nature, place and development of public service corporations ; types of public control, 
valuation and rate making ; regulation of service, accounts, reports, and securities ; combinations ; 
public relations ; public ownership. 

Es. 469.— Business Forecasting. 8:30 daily. La-203. 3 credits. ANDERSON. 
Prerequisite: CEs. 15. 

A survey of the problem of the reduction of business risk by forecasting general business con- 
ditions ; statistical methods used by leading commercial agencies in forecasting. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

Es. 501. — Seminar in Economic Principles and Problems. Seminar Method. 
3 credits. MATHERLY. Prerequisite: Es. 407-408 (Economic Principles and 
Problems), or equivalent. 

Bs. 513. — Seminar in Accounting Principles and Problems. Seminar method. 
3 credits. POWERS. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. 

Designed for those students who desire to continue their advanced work in the following fields : 
auditing ; state and federal taxation ; cost accounting ; and governmental accounting. 

Es. 528. — Problems in Money and Banking. Seminar method. 3 credits. 
DOLBEARE. Prei-equisite: Es. 321-322 (Financial Organization of Society), or 
equivalent. 

Critical analysis of monetary standards and central banking control of credit, especially as 
they are related to price and business fluctuations. 

Es. 556. — Problems in Public Service Industries. Seminar method. 3 credits. 
BiGHAM. Prerequisite: Es. 351 (Transportation Principles), or equivalent. 

An intensive study of the more important problems raised in the introductory courses in 
transportation and public utilities. 

Es. 569. — Problems in Statistics and Business Forecasting. Seminar method. 
3 credits. ANDERSON. Prerequisite: Es. 469-470 (Business Forecasting), or 
equivalent. 

Critical study of special problems in statistics and business forecasting. 

EDUCATION 

CEn. 13. — Introduction to Education. 3 credits. 

Section 1. (Elementary Education) 10:00 M. W. F. Sc-208. NORMAN. 

10:00 T. Th. Sc-213. BAXTER. 
Section 2. (Secondary Education) 10:00 M. W. F. Sc-208. NORMAN. 
10:00 T. Th. Sc-202. HYDE. 

Principles upon which present day education is based. 

En. 329. — Cooperating Schools Planning Course — First Year. 8:30 daily. 
Yn-315. 3 or 6 credits. MEAD and others. 

The Florida Workshop first course for undergraduates. Limited to members of the faculties 
of first year Cooperating Schools who have not received the bachelor's degree. Permission to 
register for three credits must be obtained in advance from the Workshop Committee. Participants 
will be concerned with total school problems and individual teacher problems of instruction. 



120 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 

En. 385. — The Pre- Adolescent Child, 11:30 daily. Ag-104. 3 credits. Baxter. 

The Individual and Education. The physical and mental growth of the child from infancy 
to adolescence. 

En. 386.— The Adolescent Child. 11:30 daily. Sc-208. 3 credits. W. H. 
Wilson. 

The Individual and Education. A study will be made of the physical, emotional, social, and 
mental growth of the adolescent. Achievement will be considered in terms of growth. 

En. 387.— Health Education. Yn-138. 3 credits. 
Section 1. 7:00 daily. SALT. 
Section 2. 1:00 daily. DOUTHETT. 

The role of the classroom teacher in health instruction in elementary schools ; w^ho shall teach 
health in the secondary school ; the relationship of health examination, the follow-up program, and 
the hygiene of school plants to health instruction ; the organization of materials for instructional 
purposes ; criteria for evaluation of health materials and methods ; cooperation of parents and the 
local board of health ; the role of local, state, and national non-official organizations in health 
teaching programs. 

En. 405. — Student Teaching. 6 credits. Yn. Auditorium. Conferences to be 
arranged. 

For Elementary Teachers 

Section 1. 10:00- 1:00 daily. KING and STAFF. 
Section 2. 7:00-10:00 daily. STEELE and STAFF. 

Designed to give the student experience in developing and using the various activities of 
the teaching process. Some time is spent in directed observation and student teaching, supple- 
mented by conferences. 

For Secondary Teachers 

Section 3. 8:30-11:30 daily. GiDUZ and STAFF. 

An opportunity is given to the teachers for developing tentative plans for classroom experi- 
ences. Three high school groups will afford a means for directed observation and student teaching, 
supplemented by conferences. The work will include intensive study of the literature of teaching 
in one field. 

En. 471. — Problems of Instruction. 6 credits. 
For Elementary Teachers 

Lecture: Section 1. 7:00 daily. Yn-209. Mellish. 
Discussion: Section 10. 2:30-4:30 daily. Yn-105. HoUGH. 
Section 11. 2:30-4:30 daily. Yn-209. DUMAS. 

An opportunity will be given the teacher for studying curriculum practices and developing 
tentative plans for classroom experiences in the community of the particular teacher. Evaluation 
in various fields will be studied. Problems in teaching reading and the language arts will be 
stressed. 

En. 490. — Reading Laboratory and Clinic. 2:30 daily. Conferences to be 
arranged. Sc-208. 2 credits. CENTER, (June 23 to July 3.) 

A survey of the field of reading instruction through lectures, discussions, and clinical demon- 
strations. Diagnostic testing, class organization, selection and organization of materials, nmethods 
of teaching silent reading, the use of insti-uments in diagnosis and remedial instruction, the relation 
of the course in reading to the English course of study and the curriculum, and final testing for 
mastery will be discussed. Laboratory practices and clinical procedures will be demonstrated. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

All graduate students majoring in Education must register through the General Direct- 
ing Committee of the College of Education. This Committee will assist such students, 
beginning and advanced, in matters pertaining to their graduate work. Communications 
should be addressed to Dr. J. Douglas Haygood, Chairman of General Directing Committee, 
College of Education, University of Florida. 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION FIRST TERM 121 

Note: The program for all students majoring in Education and beginning their graduate 
work in the summer of 1941 must include the following courses: En. 508 and En. 510, 
plus six hours from one of the following courses, En. 524, En. 525, En. 529, En. 551, 
or six hours of Agricultural Education. 

En. 508.— Democracy and Education. 8:30 daily. Sc-215. 3 credits. NORMAN. 

The nature of experience, the nature of institutions, the social inheritance, the individual, 
society, socialization, social control, dynamic and static societies, education its own end. 

En. 510. — Foundations of Modern Education. 10:00 daily. La-201. 3 credits. 
W. W. Little. 

An attempt to evaluate present day education by tracing its dominant factors — teacher, student, 
curriculum, and educational plant, control and support — back to their beginnings ; and to point 
out present tendencies and possible developments. 

En. 524. — Major Sequence in Secondary Education. 8:30-11:30 and 1:00-4:00 
daily. Yn-134. 6 credits. 

Designed to give a thorough overview of: (1) the needs of adolescents in our present social 
order, (2) changes in the high school program, designed to meet these needs, (3) values on the 
basis of which present high school curricula may be judged. 

En. 525.— Major Sequence in Childhood Education. 8:30-11:30 and 1:00-4:00 
daily. Yn-323. 6 credits. G. A. STEVENS and DOWELL. 

Designed to give a unified and thorough discussion of: (1) the needs of children between 
infancy and adolescence, (2) changes in the elementary school program designed to meet these 
needs, and (3) ways and means whereby efforts at curriculum reconstruction may be evaluated in 
the light of sound social and psychological bases. 

En. 529. — Cooperating Schools Planning Course — First Year. 8:30 daily. Yn- 
315. 6 credits. MEAD and others. 

The Florida Workshop first course for graduates. Limited to members of the faculties of first 
year Cooperating Schools who have received the bachelor's degree. Participants will be concerned 
with total school problems and individual teacher problems of instruction. 

En. 551. — School Planning Group. 8:30 daily. Yn-140. 6 credits. HALL, 

BRISTOW and EDWARDS. 

A course designed to help principals and teachers in the planning of a school improvement 
program. Problems in administration and instruction. 

En. 555. — Preparation of Materials Group. To arrange. Yn — . 6 credits. 
Mead and others. 

Group A. — Audio-Visual Instructional Aids. 
Group B. — Source Units in the Social Studies. 
Group C. — Classroom Reading Materials. 

Group D. — Assisting Schools of the Sloan Project. 8:30 daily. Yn-311. 
Henderson, 

This group is limited to the faculty members and principals of the schools of the Sloan Project. 

En. 557. — Work-Conference on School Administrative Problems. 8:30 daily. 
6 credits. MORPHET and others. 

Committees will study special problems in school organization and administration for Florida. 
Reports will be prepared in the nature of recommended handbooks or manuals. 

Graduate Seminar for Beginners. 4:00 M. W. F. Pe-101. No credit. Hay- 
GOOD and Crabtree. Required of all graduate students majoring in Education. 

Graduate Seminar for Advanced Students. 4:00 M. W. F. Pe-102. No credit. 
GARRIS and Hyde. Required of all graduate students majoring in Education. 



122 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 

ENGLISH 

The courses in English, advanced as well as introductory, have one common purpose: 
to enrich the student's experience by intimate association with those writings in our 
language, past and present, which contribute most to meaningful living. The central aim 
is to help persons of all vocations acquire some appreciation of our literary heritage, 
essential to a cultivated outlook on life, and to help persons of all vocations acquire greater 
facility in the knowledge and use of our language. The aim is thus twofold: education 
for enlightened leisure and for enlightened labor. 

Suggestions to Teachers: The Department recommends as the best possible preparation 
for the teaching of English the following fundamental courses, or their equivalents, and 
urges all who have not had equivalent courses to take them at the earliest opportunity: 
CEh. 37-38 or CEh. 313-314, Eh. 301-302. Eh. 305, Eh. 399 (Section 1, if possible). Eh. 
401-402, and, for those who are certified in English and who have had some teaching 
experience, Eh. 380. In all courses intended primarily for teachers, special consideration 
will be given to appropriate topics and problems relating to the teaching of English in 
public schools. (See the course descriptions below.) 

For elementary school teachers the Department suggests Eh. 391 (offered both terms 
this summer), at least one semester of CEh. 37-38 or CEh. 313-314, Eh. 305, Eh. 399, and 
one semester of Eh. 401-402. 

In addition to these basic courses other Departmental offerings may be selected by both 
secondan' and elementary school teachers according to personal preference. 

CEh. 38. — Literary Masters of England. (Formerly Eh. 202.) 10:00 daily. 
La-212. 3 credits. ROBERTSON. 

The most interesting and significant English writers from Wordsworth to the present are read 
and discussed, primarily for an appreciation of their art and outlook on life. Teachers of English 
will be invited to confer with the instructor concerning any individual teaching problem appro- 
priate to the materials within the scope of the course. In class discussions special consideration 
will be given to those aspects of the teaching of English which seem general needs. 

CEh. 313.— Masterpieces of World Literature. (Formerly Eh. 103.) 11:30 
daily. La-212. 3 credits. ROBERTSON. 

A lecture and reading course designed to acquaint the student with some of the greatest books 
in the world, books which every educated person, layman or teacher, should know. As in CEh. 38 
(see above), special consideration will be given to appropriate topics pertaining to the teaching 
of English. 

Eh. 301. — Shakespeare. 11:30 daily. 3 credits. La-210. Heffner. 

The primary design is to increase the student's enjoyment and appreciation of the plays. 
Devoted chiefly to the romantic comedies and the history plays, including A Midsummer Night's 
Dream,, The Merchant of Venice. Much Ado, As You Like It, Twelfth Night, Richard the Third, 
and Henry the Fourth. As an aid to the reading of Shakespeare, some of the most interesting 
features of the Elizabethan stage and drama are treated briefly. 

Eh. 305. — Introduction to the Study of the English Language. 7 daily. La-212, 
3 credits. ELIASON. 

Designed to meet the needs of three types of students: (a) For the general student it offers 
a means of improving his written and spoken English by showing him what "good English" is. 
(b) For the English teacher in the secondary school it provides an adequate minimum knowledge 
of the English Language. (c) For the English major and beginning graduate student it serves 
as an introduction to further linguistic study. Primary emphasis is placed, not upon grammatical 
rules, but rather upon the most interesting features of our language as written and spoken. 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION FIRST TERM 123 

Eh. 380.— English in the Secondary Schools. 8:30 daily. 3 credits. Yn-228. 
SpiVEY. Prerequisite: Certification in English. 

This course is designed to help teachers of English (1) determine the ordinary human needs 
which they as English teachers may minister to, (2) analyze and partially compensate for their 
own deficiencies of knowledge and insight, (3) decide what materials and methods are most help- 
ful in their teaching, (4) consider a more effective inter-relationship between the various phases 
of English construction and also between their subject and others in the curriculum, aud (5) make 
some progress toward solving individual problems pertaining to the improvement of their high 
school prograra in English and what they do with it. 

Eh. 391.— Children's Literature. 1:00 daily. Sc-208. 3 credits. MORRIS. 

Designed to arouse and satisfy a genuine interest in children's books apart from school 
textbooks, to aid the student to obtain a better working knowledge of this literature, and to make 
him more aware of degrees of excellence in content and form. 

Eh. 399. — Introduction to the Study of Literature. 3 credits. LYONS. 
Section 1. 8:30 daily. La-210. 
Section 2. 10:00 daily. La-210. 

A consideration of the nature of literature, its types, forms, content and values. Designed 
to develop greater skill in reading and to provide the student w^ith a better critical understanding 
of literary art. Lectures, conferences, and discussions. Although neither section is restricted, 
it is suggested, if possible, that teachers of English register for Section 1. 

Eh. 401. — American Literature. 10:00 daily. La-311. 3 credits. CONNER. 

A survey, with the stress on major American writers, literary movements, and literary forms 
from Franklin to Whitman. Special consideration vsrill be given to appropriate topics pertaining 
to the teaching of American literature in the public schools. 

Eh, 407. — Contemporary Literature: Fiction. 7:00 daily. La-201. 3 credits. 
SKAGGS. 

A consideration of the most important English and American writers of prose fiction from 
Thomas Hardy to the present, with major emphasis upon recent novelists. 

Eh. 409.— Chaucer. 8:30 daily. 3 credits. La-314. Eliason. 

Designed to help the student appreciate Chaucer as a story teller, as a wise, humorous, and 
penetrating observer of human life, and as a great poet. 

Eh, 417, — Spenser. 10:00 daily. La-314. 3 credits. Heffner. 

The purpose is to lead the student to a large familiarity with the text of Spenser to deal 
with some of the problems of allusion, structure and style, and to suggest the poet's relationship 
to his predecessors and contemporaries. 

Eh. 443.— The English Romantic Period, 11:30 daily. La-307. 3 credits. 
J. L. Wilson. 

Reading and discussion. Chief emphasis on the work of Burns, Blake, Coleridge and Words- 
worth. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

Eh. 501. — American Literature. 10:00 daily. La-311. 3 credits. CONNER. 

The same as Eh. 401, with special assignments for graduate majors in English. 

Eh. 509.— Chaucer. 8:30 daily. La-314. 3 credits. ELIASON. 

The same as Eh. 409, with special assignments for graduate majors in English. 

Eh, 517.— Spenser. 10:00 daily. La-314. 3 credits. HEFFNER. 

The same as Eh. 417, with special assignments for graduate majors in English. 

Eh. 543.— The English Romantic Movement. 11:30 daily. La-307. 3 credits. 
J. L. Wilson. 

The same as Eh. 443, with special assignments for graduate majors in English. 



124 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 

FRENCH 
CFh. 33.— Reading of French. 7:00 daily. La-307. 3 credits. ATKIN. 

A beginning course, basic for further study. The main objective is reading ability ; grammar 
and pronunciation are subordinated. Reading of easy texts is t)egun at once. 

Fh. 201. — Second-year French. 8:30 daily. La-307. 3 credits. Prerequisite: 
CFh. 33-34, or the equivalent (one year of college French or two years of high 
school French). ATKIN. 

Reading ; oral and written practice. 

Fh. 430. — Individual Work. To arrange. 3 credits. ATKIN. 

An opportunity to study, for credit, certain phases of French literature, language, and civiliza- 
tion for which there are no special course offerings. Through this means a student can complete 
an undergraduate major or graduate minor. FTi. 430 may be elected for additional credit in sub- 
sequent sessions. Students will be helped to plan a definite program, and will meet the instructor 
for frequent conferences. 

Fh. 530. — Individual Work. To arrange. 3 credits. ATKIN. 

The provision for graduate students is similar to that for undergraduates (see Fh. 430) and 
will enable them to fulfill the requirements of a graduate major. 

GENERAL SCIENCE 
Gl. 301.— Children's Science. 7:00 M. T. W. Th. Yn-142. 2 credits. GOETTE. 

The content of elementary science together with its organization for use both in the integrated 
program and in the departmentalized school. 

Gl. 317. — Physical Sciences in the Secondary Schools. 8:30 daily. Bn-203. 
3 credits. SWANSON. Prerequisite: C-2 or equivalent. 

Designed for teachers of General Science, Physics, and Chemistry in the secondary schools. A 
topical survey of the field of the physical sciences, and examination of the fundamental principles 
involved, their effects on our environment, and how they govern the conservation of our natural 
resources. The selection of materials illustrating these principles in action that are suitable for 
the needs, interests, abilities, and level of maturity of secondary school students, and the study of 
methods of presentation of such materials. 

Gl. 318. — Biology in the Secondary Schools. 11:30 daily. Sc-101. 3 credits. 
Byers. Prerequisites: C-6 or its equivalent and one approved course in Biology. 

A study program designed to aid teachers of the life sciences in constructing and administer- 
ing a stimulating course of biological studies. Treats the building of the course and methods of 
presentation. Recommended for all teachers of Biology in the secondary schools and for those 
handling phases of biology, such as nature study, conservation, general science, etc., in the elemen- 
tary school and junior high school. 

GEOGRAPHY 
Gpy. 305. — Geography of Florida, 7:00 daily. La-204. 3 credits. Atwood. 

A study of the geographic conditions and human adjustments in the major regions of Florida. 
The distribution of population, routes of communication, industries, resources, and stategic location 
in the Western Hemisphere will be considered in their geographical and historical aspects. Atten- 
tion is given to the explanation and interpretation of major natural phenomena such as weather 
and climate, geologic structure and land forms, surface and underground drainage, shoreline char- 
acteristics, natural vegetation, soil types and animal life. Optional field trips. 

Note: For other courses in geography see Economics. 

HANDWRITING 

See Business Education. 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION FIRST TERM 125 

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

HPl. 261.— FootbalL 1:00 daily. Bn-209. 3 credits. MCALLISTER. (Open 
only to men.) 

Football from the viewpoint of the interscholastic soccer, presenting fundamentals in blocking, 
tackling, kicking, passing, individual position play, appropriate offensive formations and plays, 
and various defensive fonmations. 

HPL 263.— BasketbalL 2:30 daily. Bn-209. 3 credits. MCALLISTER. (Open 
only to men.) 

Fundamentals of basketball for men ; dealing with the techniques of shooting, passing, dribbling, 
stops, and guarding. A consideration of offensive team play, defensive team play, signals, scouting, 
team strategy, training, practice sessions, selection and placing of players, and other essentials of 
the modem court game. 

HPL 363. — Teaching Physical Education in the Secondary School, 2:30 daily. 
Yn-138. 3 credits. DOUTHETT. 

The program of physical education activities for the secondary school involving team games, 
rhythms, gymnastics activities, individual and dual sports ; together with appropriate procedures 
and methods for conducting such a program. 

HPL 373. — Methods and Materials in Physical Education. 3 credits. B. K. 

Stevens. 

Section 1. For first, second, and third grade teachers. 8:30 daily. 

Yn-150. 
Section 2. For fourth, fifth, and sixth grade teachers. 2:30 daily. 

Yn-150. 

The program of physical education activities for the elementary school including small group 
play, large group play, directed play, team game units ; together with appropriate procedures 
and methods for conducting such a program. 

GRADUATE COURSE 

HPl. 533.— Problems of Physical Education. 8:30 daily. Yn-138. 3 credits. 
SALT. 

Designed to give the student an understanding of the contemporary problems in physical educa- 
tion. It foi-ms the basis for the organization of research projects together with an analysis of 
the techniques used in problem solving. 

HISTORY 

The prerequisites for all Upper Division courses in History, except for Hy. 331-332 
and 335-336, are: 

(1) For students whose Freshman and Sophomore work is taken under the curriculum 
of the General College, satisfactory completion of C-1. — Man and the Social World, 
followed by CHy. IZ.— History of the Modern World. 

(2) For students who have not completed the above, Hy. 313-314. (Formerly Hy. 
101-102.) Europe During the Middle Ages. 

Desirable prerequisite for Hy. 331-332 and Hy. 335-336 is C-l.— Man and the Social 
World. 

Students who have had two or more semesters of Advanced American History, Hy. 301, 
302, 303 or 304 may not receive credit for the survey course. 

CHy. 131.— History of the Modern World. 11:30 daily. Sc-213. 3 credits. 
MILLER. Not open to students who have completed Hy. 201-202 or Hy. 219-220. 

The modern world from 1815 to 1870. 



126 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 

Hy. 301.— American History 1492 to 1776. 8:30 daily. Pe-112. 3 credits. 
Leake. 

A thorough and detailed study of the American Colonies to the Revolution with special em- 
phasis on the South. 

Hy. 313. — Europe During the Middle Ages. (Formerly Hy. 101.) 11:30 daily. 
Sc-205. 3 credits. BentleY. 

A study of Europe from 476 to the First Crusade. 

Hy. 331.— Survey of American History. 8:30 daily. La-212. 3 credits. Glunt. 

The first half of a six-credit survey of the entire period of American History, covering the 
period up to 1850. 

Hy. 335. — History of Western Civilization. 11:30 daily. La-201. 3 credits. 
Patrick. 

The first half of a survey course treating the development of Western Civilization. 

Hy. 361.— English History to 1688. 7:00 daily. Pe-112. 3 credits. Hanna. 

A survey of English History from the Anglo-Saxon settlements to the Glorious Revolution. 

Hy. 363.— Latin American History to 1850. 10:00 daily. La-306. 3 credits. 
Glunt. 

A survey course treating the colonization and development of Hispanic America. 

GRADUATE COURSE 

Hy. 509. — Seminar. To arrange. 3 credits. LEAKE. 

INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 

Ig, 301. — Survey of the Technological Practices of Industry. 1:00 M. W. 
Laboratory 1-5 T. Th. F. Eg-202. 3 credits. 

Open only to secondary school teachers of science or mathematics. An opportunity for teachers 
of mathematics and the physical sciences to develop an acquaintance with the manner in which 
their fields are applied in industry today. These applications are of particular importance in the 
present national defense emergency. Topics discussed will include shop mechanics, internal com- 
bustion engines, aeronautics, radio, and photography. Work will include films, demonstrations, 
shop and laboratory work, and field trips to airports, radio stations, foundries, machine shops, 
ship-building yards, etc. Aid will be given in building lists of references, sources of free and 
inexpensive materials, methods of correlating technology with other fields, and teaching plans. 

JOURNALISM 
*Jm. 213.— Propaganda, 8:30 daily. Ag-108. 3 credits. EMIG. 

A study of newspapers, magazines, the radio, and movies designed to develop a clear under- 
standing of the forces that create and control propaganda and public action. Observance of 
history in the making, the management and moulding of public thought, the attitudinizing of 
people, the strategy of propagandists and symbol-makers and their use of such idea-transmitting 
agencies as the newspaper, m^agazine, radio, movies, homo, school, church, political parties, groups, 
recreation, etc. An inquiry into the influence of propaganda on government, law-making, business, 
education, morality, war, and peace. 

*Jm. 314.— Magazine Article Writing. 8:30 daily. Ag-108. 3 credits. EMIG. 

Analysis of technique in preparing articles for publication. Practice in writing articles follows 
the study of principles and technique. Emphasis on attempt to market articles. 



*That one of these courses will be offered for which there is the gi-eater demand. 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION FIRST TERM 127 

**Jm. 401.— School Publications. 10:00 daily. Ag-108. 3 credits. EMIG. 

Supervision of school publications ; organization of the editorial, advertising, and circulation 
departments of school newspapers, maEazines, and yearbooks. Methods of teaching joui-nalistic 
style and writing. Effective use of newspapers and magazines in classroom instruction. 

*''Jm. 408.— Advanced Public Opinion. 10:00 daily. Ag-108. 3 credits. EMiG. 

The power and influence of public opinion in modern life. The technique and strategy of 
directing public opinion : methods of measuring public opinion ; current trends in public opinion. 

LAW 

The Law Summer Session extends through the first term, six weeks, from June 16 to 
July 25. Each period is one hour and fifteen minutes long. 

Lw. 311.— School Law. 9:05-10:20 M. W. Th. S. Law-204. 2 credits. 
Trusler. 

Authority and responsibility of teachers ; rights and duties of students ; rules and regulations ; 
incidental fees ; contracts of teachers ; pensions ; private schools ; illegal expenditures of school 
money ; illegal uses of school property ; school contracts and torts ; diplomas and degrees ; exemption 
of school property from taxation. Trusler, Essentials of School Law. 

Lw, 320.— Workmen's Compensation. 9:05-10:20 T. F. Law-204. 1 credit. 
TRUSLER. 

Scope, construction, beneficiaries, injuries compensated, defenses, and proceedings for adjust- 
ment of compensation, with special reference to the Florida statute. Workmen's Compensation 
Acts in Ruling Case Law and the Florida Act. 

Lw. 407.— Use of Law Books. 3:00-5:00 M. Th. La\v-204. 1 credit. Odle. 

The classes of law books ; the location and use of decisions and statutes ; the trial brief ; the 
brief on appeal. Brandt, Hoiv to Find the Law, 3rd edition. 

Lw. 408.— Legal Ethics. 10:25-11:40 W. S. Law-204. 1 credit. McRae. 

Organization of the bar ; attorneys and professional conduct. Arant, Cases on Legal Ethics. 

Lw. 430.— Bailments. 1:00-2:15 M. Th. Law-204. 1 credit. Slagle. 

Mandates ; deposits ; pledges ; custody and use ; delivery and redelivery ; rights and duties of 
parties ; termination of relation. Elliott on Bailm.e7its, 2nd edition. 

Lw. 506. — Negotiable Instruments. 7:45-9:00 daily. Law-204. 3 credits. DAY. 

Law merchant ; definitions and general doctrines ; contracts of the maker, acceptor, etc. ; 
proceedings before and after dishonor of negotiable instruments ; absolute defenses ; equities ; pay- 
ments ; conflict of laws. Britton, Cases on Bills and Notes, 2nd edition. 

Lw. 515.— Mortgages. 10:25-11:40 M. T. Th. F. Law-204. 2 credits. McRae. 

Nature; elements; discharge; assignment; redemption; foreclosure; injunction and account; 
extent of the lien ; priority between mortgaKC liens and competing claims ; equity of redemption. 
Campbell, Cases on Mortgages, 1940 edition. 

Lw. 5.30.— Administrative Law. 1:00-2:15 T. W. F. S. Law-204. 2 credits. 
Slagle. 

Creation of administrative tribunals ; legislative functions ; judicial functions ; administrative 
functions ; doctrine of separation of powers ; limits upon discreton ; securing information ; notice 
and hearing ; enforcement of rules and orders ; control of action ; judicial relief. Stason, Cases 
and Materials on Administrative Tribunals. 

Lw. 536.— Federal Rules. 9:05-10:20 T. Th. Law-202. 1 credit. TeSelle. 

Federal Rules of Civil Procedure adopted in 1938. New Federal Rules. 

Lw. 537.— Bankruptcy. 9:05-10:20 M. W. Th. S. Law-202. 2 credits. TeSelle. 

Remedies of the unsecured creditor ; fraudulent conveyances ; Chandler Act ; bankruptcy — 
individual ; corporation ; corporate reorganization ; wage earner extension. Holbrook and Aigler, 
4th edition. "^ 



**That one of these courses will be offered for which there is the greater demand. 



128 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 

MATHEMATICS 

Before registering for any course, the student should ascertain the prerequisites. 
Students desiring courses other than those listed below should write to the Department 
of Mathematics, or make inquiry immediately upon arrival at the University. 

C-42. — General Mathmetics. (See General College Courses.) 

CMs. 23. — Basic Mathematics. 8:30 daily. Pe-102. 3 credits. SIMPSON. 

In place of the traditional college algebra, trigonometry, and analytic geometry in succession, 
this course offers a completely new sequence of topics including the above plus a liberal amount 
of calculus. Teachers of high school mathematics who wish to advance in technical command 
of the subject matter should elect both CMs. 23 and CMs. 24. This is also designed for those 
who plan to major in mathematics or to elect courses above the freshman level. Milne and Davis, 
Introductory College Mathe^natics. 

Ms. 226. — Algebra for Teachers. 8:30 daily. Pe-2. 3 credits. PiRENlAN. 

The materials of first and second year high school algebra. A study of the State adopted text 
with supplementary and illustrative material. Methods of presentation. Functional relationships. 
Construction and interpretation of graphs. 

Ms. 326. — Advanced General Mathematics. 10:00 daily. Pe-1. 3 credits. 
PiRENIAN. 

Designed for high school teachers. Selected topics having a dii-ect and significant bearing upon 
the teaching of mathematics in high school. Consideration of the subject matter itself and its 
relation to adequate reorganization programs, both in the light of general modern objectives and 
experience obtained in the teaching of mathematics in the General College. Ms. 325 is concerned 
with the teaching of general (practical) mathematics and algebra in high schools. Ms. 326 deals 
with the teaching of geometry and trigonometry. Either course may be taken first. 

Ms. 340. — Mathematics in the Secondary School. 7:00 daily. Yn-232. 3 
credits. KUSNER. Prerequisites: Open only to teachers of secondary mathe- 
matics with adequate mathematical backgrounds (to be determined by the in- 
structor). 

The role of m.athematics in modem life ; its place in general education in light of needs, 
interests, abilities and maturity of pupils ; its organization in the secondary school program ; 
methods and procedures of instruction, with emphasis on pupil participation through projects, field 
work, reports, etc. ; correlation of mathematics with other fields ; mathematics in the integrated 
program. Oppoi-tunity will be offered for extensive study of applications of mathematics. Work 
will be conducted with the whole group, with committees, and on an individual basis, in order that 
each teacher may develop instructional plans adapted to the situation in his community. 

Ms. 3.53. — Differential and Integral Calculus. 7:00 daily. Pe-1. 3 credits. 
PHIPPS. 

Beginning calculus course. Differentiation, one of the most important and practical fielde 
of mathematics, is treated in the main, but a beginning is made in integration, the inverse 
operation of differentiation. Smith, Salkover, and Justice, Calculus. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

Ms. 500. — Graduate Seminar. 8:30 daily, Pe-1. 3 credits. Phipps. 

Students who wish training on a graduate level may register for Ms. 500. Topics studied 
will depend upon preparation and needs. 

Ms. 568. — History of Elementary Mathematics. 11:30 daily. Pe-102. 3 credits. 
KOKOMOOR. 

A survey of the development of mathematics through the calculus, with special emphasis on 
the changes of the processes of operations and methods of teaching. No specific text is followed, 
but num.erous works are used as references. 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION FIRST TERM 129 

MUSIC 

Msc. 103. — Materials and Methods for Grades One, Two, and Three. 10:00 
daily. Auditorium. 3 credits. Laboratory to be arranged. CARSON. 

The child voice ; rote songs ; development of rhythm ; si§ht-singing from i-ote to note ; develop- 
ment of skills necessary for teaching primary music. 

Msc. 104. — Materials and Methods for Grades Four, Five, and Six. 2:30 daily. 
Auditorium. Laboratory to be arranged. 3 credits. CARSON. 

Development of sight-singing ; study of problems pertaining to intermediate grades ; part sing- 
ing ; song repei'toire ; appreciation work suitable for intermediate grades. 

PHARMACOLOGY 

*Ply. 455.— New Remedies. 8:30 M. T. W. Th. Ch-316. Quiz and Laboratory 
1-4 M. T. Ch-316. 3 credits. FOOTE. The first half of the course Ply. 455-456. 

Ply. 455-456. A study of the most important nonofficial remedies currently found in modem 
prescription practice and over-the-counter sales. More than twelve hundred remedies are available 
for study. 

*Ply. 456.— New Remedies. 8:30 M. T. W. Th. Ch-316. Quiz and Laboratory 
1-4 M. T. Ch-316. 3 credits. FoOTE. The second half of the course Ply. 455-456. 

PHARMACY 

GRADUATE COURSE 

Phy. 554. — Advanced Pharmacy. To be arranged. 2 credits. FoOTE. 

Lectures and assigned reading on the pharmacy and chemistry of vegetable drugs. 

PHILOSOPHY 
**Ppy. 303.— Introduction to Philosophy. 8:30 daily. Bn-205. 3 credits. FOX. 

An introduction to the fundamental problems of philosophy with special emphasis on ethics 
and aesthetics. 

**Ppy. 410.— History of Modern Philosophy. 8:30 daily. Bn-205. 3 credits. Fox 

Readings from original sources, papers on special topics, group discussions. 

PHYSICS 

Students in the College of Engineering desiring to earn credit in Physics may enroll 
in the courses outlined below. Additional problem work and subject matter will be 
assigned, and substitution will be allowed if a grade of C or higher is made. 

Ps. 101.— Elementary Physics. 10:00 daily. Bn-203. 3 credits. PERRY. 
Prerequisite: C-2 or consent of instructor. 

Ps. 103.— Laboratory for Ps. 101. 1-4 M. W. F. Bn-306. 2 credits. PERRY 
in charge. Corequisite: Ps. 101. 

POLITICAL SQENCE 

The prerequisites for the Upper Division courses in Political Science are: C-1 and 
CPl. 13; or Pel. 313-314. (Formerly Pel. 101-102.) 



*That one of these courses will be offered for which there is the greater demand. 
**That one of these courses will be offered for which there is the greater demand. 



130 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 

CPl. 13.— Political Foundations of Modern Life. 1:00 daily. Pe-112. 3 credits. 
Laird. 

The principles and practices of political institutions ; how government functions in the United 
States ; and what information can be drawn from the practices of other countries. 

Pel. 309.— International Relations. 10:00 daily. Pe-101. 3 credits. Dauer. 

First half of the year course on International Relations. Woi-ld politics and the policies of 
the great powers. Underlying factors in international affairs : economic problems, nationalism, 
imperialism. The causes of the present w^ar. The conduct of international affairs and diplomacy. 
World organization and peace movements. 

Pel. 313. — American Government and Politics. (Formerly Pel. 101.) 7:00 
daily. Pe-209. 3 credits. Cawthon. 

The Federal Government, its philosophy, organization and functions. 

Pel. 405.— History of Political Theory. 8:30 daily. Pe-209. 3 credits. CAW- 
THON. 

History of ancient, medieval, and modern political theories. 

POULTRY HUSBANDRY 

Py. 301.— Poultry Production. 10:00 M. T. W. Th. and 1-4 Th. Ag-209. 2 
credits. Mehrhof. (June 23 to July 12.) 

A study of breeds, principles of production, hatching, brooding management with special 
emphasis on farm flock. 

PSYCHOLOGY 

CPs. 43. — Psychological Foundations of Modern Life. 3 credits. 
Section 1. 8:30 daily. Pe-11. Van Dusen. 
Section 2. 10:00 daily. Pe-11. Hosier. 

The social and personal implications of psychology to every day living. An understanding 
of human motivation and one's own personality. How the individual acquires and organizes 
sensory experiences and how these are used in the guidance of effective thinking and behavior. 

Psy, 301. — Advanced General Psychology. 11:30 daily. Pe-11. 3 credits. 
MOSIER. 

An advanced critical and constructive consideration of the major topics in the field of general 
psychology ; methods, systems, mind-body relationships, consciousness, intelligence, nervous struc- 
ture, nervous behavior, mental processes, affection, emotion, volition, learning, self. 

Psy. 309. — Personality Development. 8:30 daily. Pe-114. 3 credits. HINCKLEY. 

The mechanism of personality formation, with special emphasis upon the varieties of human 
adjustment. Particular attention is given to the personality development of the school child 
and the ways by means of which proper adjustment can be guided by the teacher. 

Psy, 310. — Abnormal Psychology. 10:00 daily. Pe-209. 3 credits. HINCKLEY. 

The abnormal phases of mental life, and the ways by means of which the individual develops 
abnormal habits of thinking and acting. The signs of beginning maladjustment in the school 
child and procedures which the teacher should follow to correct these tendencies. Special sugges- 
tions are given for the prevention and treatment of mental disease. 

GRADUATE COURSE 

Psy. 510. — Social Psychiatry. 10:00 daily. Pe-114. 3 credits. VAN DUSEN. 

Lectures and readings on the various forms of mental disease, with attention to causes, 
diagnosis, symptoms, and treatment. Psychiatric information for social workers and school 
psychologists. 



DEI' IRI\lf':\TS OF IX'STHUCTlOy SECOND TERM 131 

SCHOOL ART 

Pc. 251.— Art for the Primary Grades. 1:00 daily. Yn-Shop Annex. 2 credits. 

BOHANNON. 

Activities for the kindeiKarten, fii-st, second, and third grades that interpret the underlying 
philosophy and the skills in art that are basic as a means of expression in large unit teaching. 

Pc. 252. — Art for the Elementary Grades. 4:00 daily. Yn-Shop Annex. 2 

credits, BOHANNON. 

Activities for the fourth, fifth, and sixth grades that interpret the underlying philosophy and 
the skills in art that are basic as a means of expression in large unit teaching. 

Pc. 253. — Principles of Art. 10:00 daily. Yn-Shop Annex. 2 credits. BO- 
HANNON. 

Opportunity will be given for teachers to evaluate chikh-en's work and to learn the funda- 
mentals of art with opportunity for expression. 

SOCIAL STUDIES 

S'cl. 301.— Children's Social Studies. 8:30 daily. Er-202. 3 credits. Al- 
STETTER and McLENDON. 

An opportunity will be given to study content material in the social studies field with implica- 
tions for the activity program. 

Scl. 302.— Children's Social Studies. 11:30 daily. Eg-202. 3 credits. AL- 
STETTER and McLendon. 

A continuation of Scl. 301. 

Scl. 303.— Social Studies in the Secondary Schools. 10:00 daily. Yn-236. 3 
credits. Atwood, Maclachlan, Patrick. 

A course designed to fit the needs of teachers in the Florida Schools. The work will consist 
of three parts: (1) the need for integration in the social sciences, (2) the program of social 
studies in the Florida junior and senior high schools, (3) work with groups of teachers on the 
particular problems of materials for different grade levels. This course is for advanced under- 
graduates in the social studies and for graduate students. 

SOCIOLOGY 

CSy. 13. — Sociological Foundations of Modern Life. 8:30 daily. Pe-4. 3 
credits, MACLACHLAN. Prerequisite: C-1 or consent of instructor. 

The basic forces in human society. Sociology in creative dependence upon the other sciences. 
Social resources and complexities in modern America. The metropolitan environment and the social 
institutions. The American regions as social environments and as challenges to citizenship. 

Sy. 322.— The Child in American Society. 11:30 daily, Pe-4, 3 credits. 
FOREMAN. 

The challenge of adjustment of children to a changing modern society is reviewed in the light 
of recent sociological studies. Some attention is devoted to abnormal and delinquent children as 
adjustment problems. Special consideration is given to sociological pressures upon the American 
schf)ol, but the course is designed to supplement rather than to duplicate courses such as approach 
the child from the viewpoint of Education. 

Sy. 344. — Marriage and the Family. 7:00 daily. Ag-104. 3 credits. EHR- 
MANN. 

The nature and development of domestic institutions, marriage and the family. Prob'ems of 
adjustment to modern conditions. Changes in marital and domestic relations with particular em- 
phasis on preparation for marriage. The status of women and laws pertaining to marriage in 
Florida. Divorce, family disorganization, child training. 

Sy. 490.— The South Today. 10:00 daily. Pe-4. 3 credits. FOREMAN. 

Regional resources and culture. The social resources and challenges of the modern South. 
Measures of southern culture. The place of the South in the nation. Programs and plans for the 
region reviewed and contrasted. A broad view of the foundations of southern life. 



132 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 

GRADUATE COURSES 

Sy. 522. — The Child in American Society. 11:30 daily. Pe-4. 3 credits. 
Foreman. 

The same as Sy. 322, with extra work for graduate students. 

Sy. 542. — Applied Sociology. To arrange. 3 credits. Maclachlan. 

Special problems in advanced sociology. 

Sy. 544. — Marriage and the Family. 7:00 daily. Ag-104. 3 credits. EHR- 
MANN. 

The same as Sy. 344, with extra work for graduate students. 

Sy. 590.— The South Today. 10:00 daily. Pe-4. 3 credits. FOREMAN. 

The same as Sy. 490, with extra work for graduate students. 

SPANISH 
CSh. 33.— Reading of Spanish. 8:30 daily. La-306. 3 credits. Hauptmann. 

First half of course CSh. 33-34. Open to those students who have had no previous work in 
Spanish. Introduction to materials involved in the reading and speaking of Spanish, with special 
reference to Latin America. 

Sh. 201.— Second-year Spanish. 11:30 daily. La-306. 3 credits. HAUPT- 
MANN. 

The first half of course Sh. 201-202. Prerequisite: CSh. 33-34 or equivalent. Readings in 
representative Spanish and Latin-American prose of moderate difficulty. Practice in conversation. 

GRADUATE COURSE 

Sh. 530. — Individual Work. To arrange. 3 credits. HAUPTMANN. Pre- 
requisite: Permission of instructor. 

Readings and reports in field chosen by individual student. Mainly designed for graduate 
students who wish to gain special information on certain genres, movements or authors. This 
course may be repeated without duplication or credit. 

SPEECH 

All students taking work in the Department of Speech must have completed C-3 or 
Eh. 101. 

CSc. 33. — Effective Speaking. 4 credits. 

Section 1. 7:00 daily. 1:00 T. Th. Pe-205. TEW. 
Section 2. 8:30 daily. 1:00 T. Th. Pe-205. CONSTANS. 

Designed to aid the student through lecture, reading, demonstration, and practice to talk 
effectively to a group. Individual needs of the student given attention. 

Sch. 404.— Dramatic Production. 10:00 daily. Pe-205. 3 credits. GeiSENHOF 
and CONSTANS. Prerequisite or corequisite: CSc. 33. 

Consideration of the choice of the play, casting the characters, working out the action, direct- 
ing the rehearsals. Meeting the problem of stage equipment, costuming, lighting, and make-up. 
Observation and participation in the presentation of plays. 

Sch. 416.— Correction of Speech Defects. 10:00 daily. Pe-208. 3 credits. 
Tew and Constans. Prerequisite: CSc. 33 or teaching experience. 

This is a beginning course in the recognition and correction of common speech defects and 
is especially designed for all teachers in the public schools. The problems of individual language 
difficulties will be presented and the actual corrective procedure demonstrated. Correction of 
lisping, indistinct enunciation, foreign accent, stuttering, and delayed speech will also be con- 
sidered. 

Speech Clinic. 1:00 M. W. F. Pe-211. No credit. STAFF. 

The Speech Clinic offers without charge individual assistance to students desiring aid in 
overcoming their speech defects. Applicants for this service should report as soon as possible 
to Peabody 211 at one o'clock on Monday. Wednesday, or Friday. 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION SECOND TERM 1:^3 

DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 

A Nil SCHEDULE OF COURSES 
Second Term 

All classes ordinarily meet for one hour and twenty minutes. Classes scheduled ta 
meet daily meet Monday through Saturday. Course descriptions are not given if the same 
course was offered the first term. See appropriate section of the first term schedule for 
this information. 

Some courses are indicated as being offered by the seminar method. Students taking 
these courses will do independent work under the supervision of the instructor, wiih no 
regular class meetings unless time of meeting is listed in the schedule. 

Students not registered in the Graduate School will not be permitted to register for 
graduate courses unless they secure written approval from the Dean of the Graduate School 
and the instructor concerned. 

GENERAL COLLEGE COURSES 

Students should consult official announcements by the Board of University Examiners 
for details concerning comprehensive examinations. Credits are indicated for the benefit 
of Upper Division students who elect these courses. 

C-12. — Man and the Social World. 4 credits. 
Lecture Section 1: 8:30 M. W. F. Ch-Aud. STAFF. 



Discussion Sections: 10 
11 
12 



30 T. Th. S. and 1:00 Th. Sc-213. Bentley. 
30 T. Th. S. and 4:00 Th. La-204. LAIRD. 
30 T. Th. S. and 1:00 Th. Sc-205. 



C-22. — Man and the Physical World. 4 credits. 
Lecture Section 1: 10:00 T. Th. S. Ch-Aud. STAFF. 
Discussion Sections: 10 7:00 M. W. F. S. Bn-205, Gaddum. 

11 8:30 T. W. Th. S. Bn-205. EDWARDS. 

12 7:00 M. W. F. S. Bn-201. Edwards. 

C-32. — Reading, Speaking and Writing. 4 credits. 
Lecture Section 1: 11:30 M. W. F. Ch-Aud. STAFF. 
Discussion Sections: 10 10:00 daily. La-203. MORRIS. 
11 2:30 daily. La-203. MOUNTS. 
Wiiting Laboratory 101 7:00 M. W. F. La-209. SkaGGS. 
102 7:00 T. Th. S. La-209. SKAGGS. 

CEh. 34. — Reading for Leisure. 8:30 daily. La-210. 3 credits. SKAGGS. 
Prerequisite: C-3 or permission of C-3 Course Chairman. Open to Upper Division 
students. 

Designed to aid the student in planning for himself a well-rounded leisure-reading; prosn^m. 
which will serve to keep him abreast of the best in contemporary thought and literature. 

€-41.— Man and His Thinking. 8:30 daily. La-203. 3 credits. W. H. WILSON. 



134 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 

C-52. — The Humanities. 4 credits. 
Lecture Section 1: 11:30 M. W. F. Aud. STAFF. 
Discussion Sections: 10 8:30 M. T. W. F. Sc-201. Hanna. 
11 1:00 M. T. W. F. Sc-201. Hanna. 
C-62. — Man and the Biological World. 4 credits. 
Lecture Sections: 1 7:00 M. T. Th. F. S. Sc-101. Byers. 
2 10:00 M. T. W. Th. F. Sc-101. Byers. 
Discussion Sections: 10 1:00 M. W. Sc-111. Carr. 
11 2:30 T. Th. Sc-101. Carr. 

20 8:30 M. W. Sc-111. CARR. 

21 11:30 M. W. Sc-111. Carr. 

BIOLOGY 

Bly. 134.— Life of Inland and Coastal Waters of Florida. 8:30 daily. Sc-101. 

3 credits. J. S. ROGERS. 

A companion course to Bly. 33, devoted to the aquatic Jife of the state. Special attention is 
devoted to the aquatic vertebrates, the more interesting invertebrates, and the m.ore conspicuous 
aquatic plants. The lectures are supplem.ented with demonstrations, and one or more field trips 
may be arranged. 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Courses in Business Administration are listed under Economics and are marked Bs. 

BUSINESS EDUCATION 

BEn. 94.— Stenography. 8:30-11:30 and 2:30-4:00 daily. Yn-305 and Yn-306. 

4 credits. MOORMAN. Prerequisites: BEn. 81 and BEn. 91 or permission of the 
instructor. 

Advanced course in shorthand and typewriting. Designed for those who desire more instruc- 
tion than is given in the elementary or introductory courses in shorthand and typewriting for 
personal use, as well as for those who desire certification in the commercial subjects. 

BEn. 97. — Handwriting. 1 credit. MOORMAN. 
Section 1. 7:00 A.M. M. T. W. Yn-306. 
Section 2. 7:00 P.M. M. T. W. Yn-306. 

CHEMISTRY 

Cy. 102.— General Chemistry. 10:00 daily. Ch-212. Laboratory 1-5 M. W., 
1-4 F. Ch-130. 4 credits. HEATH. The second half of the course Cy. 101-102. 

Metallic elements and their compounds. 

Cy. 202.— Analytical Chemistry. 8:30 M. T. W. Th. F. Ch-110. Laboratory 
1-5 M. T. W. Th. F. Ch-114. 4 credits. JACKSON. 

Theoretical principles and laboratory technique involved in the quantitative determination of 
the common metals and acid radicals. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

*Cy. 515. — Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. 8:30 daily. Ch-212. 3 credits. 
HEATH. 

Discussion of Crystallography, Fire-Assay, the Goniometer, Radioactivity, Atomic Structure, 
Isotopes, and Isobars. The less common compounds of Phosphorus, Sulfur, Nitrogen and Silicon. 

*Cy. 516. — Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. 8:30 daily. Ch-212. 3 credits. 
HEATH. 

A systematic discussion of the Rarer Elements, considered by Periodic Group relations to each 
other and to the common elements. Uses of the Rarer Elements and tJieir compounds. 



*That one of these courses will be offered for which there is the greater demand. 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION SECOND TERM 135 

ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Note: Courses designated by the letters Es. are Economics courses, those designated by 
the letters Bs. are Business Administration courses. 

*CEs. 132.— Economic Foundations of Modern Life. 10:00 daily. Pe-206. 3 
credits. TUTTLE. 

•CBs. 142. — Elementary Accounting. 8:30 daily. Sc-202. 3 credits. HEIGHTS. 
Bs. 312.— Accounting Principles. 7:00 daily. Sc-202. 3 credits. HEIGHTS. 

Consideration is given to the legal aspects of accounting and related problems resulting from 
the legal organization form used by businesses : liabilities ; propi-ietorship ; partnerships ; corpora- 
tions ; capital stock ; surplus ; followed by a study of the financial aspects of accounting as disclosed 
by an analysis and interpretation of financial statements : financial ratios and standards, their 
preparation, meaning and use. 

Es. 322. — Financial Organization of Society. 7:00 daily. Pe-206. 3 credits. 
TUTTLE. Prerequisite: Es. 321. 

An introduction to the field of finance; a study of the institutions providing monetary, 
banking and other financial services ; interrelationships and interdependence of financial institu- 
tions ; central banking ; government control of finance ; significance of financial organization to 
the economic system as a whole. 

Es. 327. — Public Finance. 11:30 daily. La-314. 3 credits. DONOVAN. 

Principles governing expenditures of modern government ; sources of revenue ; public credit ; 
principles and methods of taxation and of financial administration as revealed in the fiscal 
systems of leading countries. 

Es. 335. — Economics of Marketing. 8:30 daily. La-201. 3 credits. EUTSLER. 

The nature of exchange and the economic principles underlying trade, with particular attention 
given to interregional trade. The significance of comparative costs, comparative advantages, and 
comparative disadvantages. The institutions and methods developed by society for carrying on 
trading operations ; retail and wholesale agencies ; elements of marketing efficiency ; the cost of 
marketing ; price maintenance ; unfair competition ; the relation of the government to marketing. 

Es. 381. — Economic Geography of North America. 10:00 daily. La-204. 3 
credits. DiETTRICH. 

A geographical survey of the continent of North America with special reference to the natural 
conditions of the United States ; involving the analysis of the major regions of the United States 
from the standpoint of their relation to their natural environment. 

Es. 385. — Economic Geography of South America. 11:30 daily. La-204. 3 
credits. DiETTRICH. 

A geographical survey of the continent of South America, organized around the growth of 
trade, exports and imports, trade by countries, and general business trends ; the economic condi- 
tions that influence commercial advance or decline ; the major geographic regions ; their importance 
in supplying export products and in consuming import commodities. 

Bs. 402. — Business Law. 10:00 daily. Pe-208. 3 credits. HURST. 

A continuation of Bs. 401. 



*This course is a unit. To complete it both terms of the summer session are required. Students 
may take the second term without having had the first term only with the consent of the Instructor. 
When the course is completed in the summer session by students in the Upper Division they may 
secure six semester hours credit. 



136 BULLETIN OF THE VNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 

Es. 404. — Government Control of Business. 11:30 daily. Pe-208. 3 credits. 
HURST. 

The control between government and business ; history, theory, purposes, extent, policy and 
legality of government control, services and agencies which modern governments undertake to 
provide for business enterprises. 

Es. 408. — Economic Principles and Problems. 7:00 daily. Sc-215. 3 credits. 
McFerrin. 

Advanced economic theory with special emphasis on the causes of economic maladjustments 
arising from the operation of econom.ic forces. 

Bs. 427. — Principles of Business Finance. 8:30 daily. Sc-215. 3 credits. 
McFerrin. 

Lectures, discussions, and problems. A study of the economic and legal forms of business 
enterprise ; the instnaments of business finance ; financial problems as they relate to the ordinary 
operations of the business involving working capital, income, dividend policy, current borrowing, 
credit extension, and the business cycle. Considerable attention will be devoted to the financial 
problems of individuals, and to small and average size businesses. 

Es. 430. — Problems in Taxation. 8:30 daily. La-314. 3 credits. DONOVAN. 
Prerequisite: Es. 327. 

An intensive study of the problems of taxation primarily related to the following taxes: 
general, property, income, business, inheritance, and commodity. 

Bs. 461. — Life Insurance. Seminar method. 3 credits. EUTSLER. 

The functions of life insurance ; the science of life insurance and the computation of premiums : 
types of life companies ; life insurance law ; the selling of life insurance. 

Es. 463. — Problems in Social Security. 10:00 daily. La-201. 3 credits. 
EUTSLER. 

The meaning and nature of social security, especially as relate 1 to economic security ; the 
distinctions between social and private insurance ; the hazards of low income groups ; and 
evaluation of projects and methods for eliminating, reducing or indemnifying these hazards ; the 
problems of social security in the United States, especially concerning experiences with relief 
measures, the development of legislation, the problems of financing and administering security 
programs, and the relationship between economic planning and security. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

Es. 502. — Seminar in Economic Principles and Problems. Seminar method. 3 
credits. Eutsler. Prerequisite: Es. 407-408 (Economic Principles and Prob- 
lems), or equivalent. 

Bs. 514. — Seminar in Accounting Principles and Problems. Seminar method. 
3 credits. Beights. The second half of the course Bs. 513-514. Prerequisite: 
Bs. 513. 

Es. 524. — Corporation Finance and Investments. Seminar method. 3 credits. 
McFerrin. Prerequisite: Es. 321-322 (Financial Organization of Society), or 
equivalent. 

Es. 530. — Problems in Taxation. Seminar method. 3 credits. DONOVAN. 
Prerequisite: Es. 327 (Public Finance), or equivalent. 

An intensive study of the problems of taxation primarily related to the following taxes : 
general property, incomes, business, inheritance, and commodity. 

Es. 565. — Problems in Social Security. Seminar method, 3 credits. EUTSLER. 
Prerequisite: Es. 407-408 (Economic Principles and Problems), or equivalent. 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION SECOND TERM 137 

EDUCATION 

CEn, 13. — Introduction to Education. 8:30 daily. Sc-20G. 3 credits. WOR- 
CESTER. 

En. as.'i.— The Pre-Adolescent Child. 10:00 daily. Sc-206. 8 credits. WOR- 
CESTER. 

En. 386.— The Adolescent Child. 11:30 daily. Sc-208. 3 credits. CRAGO. 

En. 387.— Health Education. 7:00 daily. Yn-134. 3 credits. SALT. 

En. 406. — Elementary School Administration. 11:30 daily. Sc-202. 3 credits. 
DOWELL. 

Relationship of the teachers to the pixiblems in school administration. 

En. 471. — Problems of Instruction. 6 credits. 
(Elementary School) 
Section 1. 7:00 daily and conference to arrange. Yn-20y. MELLISH 

and Hough. 

(Secondary School) 
Section 2. 7:00 daily and conference to arrange. Yn-226. CULPEPPER. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

En. 508. — Democracy and Education. 8:30 daily. Yn-134. 3 credits. Nor- 
man. 

The nature of experience, the nature of institutions, the social inheritance, the individual, 
society, socialization, social control, dynamic and static societies, education its own end. 

En. 536.— Elementary Supervision. 10:00 M. T. W. Th. F. Sc-202. 2 credits. 
DOWELL. 

The objectives, procedures, and means of evaluation of supervision in elementary schools ; the 
preparation of teachers. 

En. 562. — Guidance and Counseling. 8:30 daily. Pe-206. 3 credits. HALL. 

Study of guidance and counseling of high school students. Educational and vocational guidance 
and problems of personality adjustment. Offered only in the summer session. 

En. 605.— Public School Administration. 11:30 daily. Pe-206. 3 credits. 
Hall. 

Graduate Seminar for Beginners. 4:00 M. W. F. Pe-101. No credit. HaY- 
GOOD and Crabtree. Required of all graduate students majoring in Education. 

Graduate Seminar for Advanced Students. 4:00 M. W. F. Pe-102. No credit. 
CRAGO and HYDE. Required of all graduate students majoring in Education. 

ENGLISH 

See notes preceding oflferings for the first term. 

CEh. 37.— Literary Masters of England. 10:00 daily. La-210. 3 credits. 
Mounts. 

The most interesting and significant English writers are read and discussed, primarily for an 
appreciation of their art and outlook on life. Teachers of English will be invited to confer with 
the instructor concerning any individual teaching problem appropriate to the materials within 
the scope of the course. In class discussions special consideration will be given to those aspects 
of the teaching of English which seem general needs. 

Eh. ,302.— Shakespeare. 11:30 daily. La-212. 3 credits. ROBERTSON. 

The great tragedies will be studied, notably Hamlet, Othello, King Le.ar, Macbeth, and Antnnii 
nvd Cleopatra. Eh. 301 and 302 may be taken in reverse order. 



138 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 

Eh. 354.— Browning. 7:00 daily. La-311. 3 credits. Farris. 

Intensive study of the poems of Browning. 

Eh. 391.— Children's Literature. 2:30 daily. Sc-208. 3 credits. MORRIS. 
Eh. 402. — American Literature. 10:00 daily. La-311. 3 credits. Spivey. 

A general survey of American literature (of all types and all regions) from Whitman to the 
present, with the major emphasis upon such writers as Whitman, Howells, James, Twain, Lanier, 
the local colorists, Wharton, Gather, Glasgow^, Lewis, Robinson, Frost and O'Neill. Special con- 
sideration will be given to appropriate topics pertaining to the teaching of American literature 
in the public schools. 

Eh. 404.— The Novel. 8:30 daily. La-311. 3 credits. FARRIS. 

A study of the modern English and American novel from Hardy to the present, stressing the 
art, objectives, and types of the novel during this period, together with its relation to the life 
of today. 

Eh. 405. — Drama of the Restoration and Eighteenth Century. 10:00 daily. 
La-212. 3 credits. ROBERTSON. 

A survey of the English stage from Dryden to Sheridan, with emphasis upon principal plays, 
playwrights, and dramatic tendencies. 

Eh. 418.— The Literature of the South. 8:30 daily. La-212. 3 credits. SPIVEY. 

Restricted to a study of the most Important contemporary fiction dealing with the South — 
novels by Ellen Glasgow, Thomas Wolfe, Erskine Caldwell, William Faulkner, Mrs. Rawlings, etc. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

Eh. 502. — American Literature. 10:00 daily. La-311. 3 credits. SPIVEY. 
Eh. 505. — Drama of the Restoration and Eighteenth Century. 10:00 daily. 
La-212. 3 credits. ROBERTSON. 

FRENCH 
CFh. 34.— Reading of French. 7:00 daily. La-307. 3 credits. Brunet. 

A continuation of CFh. 33, which is prerequisite. 

Fh. 202.— Second-year French. 8:30 daily. La-307. 3 credits. Brunet. 

A continuation of Fh. 201, which is prerequisite. 

Fh. 430. — Individual Work. To arrange. 3 credits. BRUNET. 

Fh. 530. — Individual Work. To arrange. 3 credits. BRUNET. 

GENERAL SCIENCE 

Gl. 301.— Children's Science. Yn-142. 2 credits. GOETTE. 
Section 1. 7:00 M. T. W. Th. F. 
Section 2. 8:30 M. T. W. Th. F. 

GEOLOGY 

Gy. 101.— Land Forms and Climate of Florida. 11:30 daily. Sc-101. 3 credits. 
J. S. ROGERS. 

A comprehensive survey of the physical geography, rocks, fossils, minerals, soils and climate 
of Florida. Designed to provide a background for the cultural appreciation of the scenery and 
geology of the state, for an understanding of certain phases of conservation, and for comprehen- 
sion of the factors governing the distribution of the plants and animals of Florida. The lectures 
are supplemented by demonstrations, and one or more field trips may be arranged. 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION SECOND TERM 1H9 

HANDWRITING 

See Business Education. 

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

HPI. 364. — Teaching Physical Education in the Secondary SchooL 2:30 daily. 
Yn-138. 3 credits. SALT. 

A continuation of HPI. 363. (Satisfies certification requirements in physical education for 
those who expect to teach in the secondary school.) 

HPI, 373. — Methods and Materials in Physical Education. 3 credits. B. K. 
Stevens. 

Section 1. 8:30 daily. Yn-150. 
Section 2. 10:00 daily. Yn-150. 

HPI. 534.— Problems of Physical Education. 8:30 daily. Yn-138. 3 credits. 
Salt. The second half of the course HPI. 533-534. 

HISTORY 

For prerequisites see note preceding offerings during the first term. 

CHy. 132.— History of the Modern World. 11:30 daily. Sc-213. 3 credits. 
Patrick. 

The modern world from 1870 to 1941. 

Hy. 302.— American History, 1776 to 1830. 8:30 daily. Pe-112. 3 credits. 
LaFuze. 

The Revolutionary War and the early constitutional period. 

Hy. 314.— Europe During the Middle Ages. (Formerly Hy. 102.) 11:30 daily. 
Sc-205. 3 credits. BentleY. 

Europe from the First Crusade to the Reformation. 

Hy. 332.— Survey of American History. 8:30 daily. Pe-208. 3 credits. 
Payne. 

The second half of a six-credit survey of American History; this half covers the period from 
1850 to 1941. 

Hy. 336.— History of Western Civilization. 10:00 daily. Sc-213. 3 credits. 
PATRICK. 

The second half of a survey course treating the developments of Western Civilization. 

Hy. 362.— English History, 1688 to Present. 7:00 daily. Pe-112. 3 credits. 
Payne. 

The second half of a survey course of English History. This half covers the period from the 
Glorious Revolution to 1941. 

Hy. 364. — Latin American History 1850 to Present. 10:00 daily. Pe-112. 3 
credits. LaFuze. 

A survey course covering the period from IS.'iO to the present. 

GRADUATE COURSE 

Hy. 510. — Seminar. To arrange. 3 credits. 



140 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 

MATHEMATICS 

CMs. 24. — Basic Mathematics. 8:30 daily. Pe-102. 3 credits. MclNNIS. 
A continuation of CMs. 23. 

Ms. 225. — Arithmetic for Teachers. 11:30 daily. Pe-1. 3 credits. QUADE. 

Meaning and cultural values of arithmetic. Principles, fundamentals, processes, checks and 
short cuts. Study of fractions, approximations, percentages, projects and activity programs ; and 
many other topics so treated as to give the student a connected idea of the subject matter of 
arithmetic. Also, treatment of certain advanced notions of arithmetic to throw light upon begin- 
ning processes, which many teachers never have the opportunities to investigate. Designed not 
only for teachers of arithmetic, but also for teachers of any science in which familiarity with 
number processes is desirable. Glazier, Arithmetic for Teachers. 

Ms. 325. — Advanced General Mathematics. 7:00 daily. Pe-102. 3 credits. 
QUADE. 

Ms. .354. — Differential and Integral Calculus. 7:00 daily. Pe-1. 3 credits. 
MclNNIS. 

Integration, the inverse operation of differentiation, is used in the calculation of areas, 
volumes, moments of inertia, and many other problems. 

GRADUATE COURSE 

Ms. 500. — Graduate Seminar. 8:30 daily. Pe-104. 3 credits, QUADE. 

students who wish training on a graduate level may register for Ms. .500. Topics studied will 
depend upon preparation and needs. 

MUSIC 

Msc. 103. — Materials and Methods for Grades One, Two, and Three. 2:30 daily. 
Auditorium. Laboratory to be arranged. 3 credits. LAWRENCE. 

Msc. 104. — Materials and Methods for Grades Four, Five, and Six. 10:00 daily. 
Auditorium. Laboratory to be arranged. 3 credits. LAWRENCE. Prerequisite: 
Msc. 103. 

PHYSICS 

Ps. 102. — Elementary Physics. 10:00 daily. Bn-203. 3 credits. KNOWLES. 
Prerequisite: Ps. 101-103. 

Ps. 104.— Laboratory for Ps. 102. 1-4 M, W. F. Bn-306. 2 credits. KNOWLES. 
Corequisite: Ps, 102. 

POLITICAL SaENCE 

The prerequisites for the Upper Division courses in Political Science are C-1, and 
CPl. 13; or Pel. 313-314. (Formerly PcL 101-102.) 

CPl. 13.— Political Foundations of Modern Life. 1:00 daily. Pe-101. 3 credits. 
Laird. 

Pel. 310. — International Relations. 10:00 daily. Pe-101. 3 credits. MILLER. 

Second half of the course on the nature of international relations. 

PcL 314. — American Government and Politics. (Formerly Pel. 102.) 7:00 
daily. Pe-101. 3 credits. Cawthon. 

state, local and municipal government in the United States. 

Pel. 406. — History of Political Theory. 8:30 daily. Pe-101. 3 credits. Caw- 
THON. 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION SECO.M) TF.H M 141 

PSYCHOLOGY 

Psy. 301. — Advanced General Psychology. 11:80 daily. Pe-11. 3 credits. 
VAN DUSEN. 

Psy. 305.— Social Psychology. 10:00 daily. Pe-114. 3 credits. WILLIAMS. 

Influence of the social environment upon the behavior of the individual and vice versa. Gen- 
eral orientation, typical and atypical forms of behavior, social stimulations and responses, social 
attitudes, social adjustments, language development, personality development, and social change. 

Psy. 312. — Psychology of Problem Children. 8:30 daily. Pe-114. 3 credits. 

WILLIAMS. 

Individual differences, intelligence, feeble-mindedness, dull and backward children, superior 
and gifted children, speech and motor defects, sensory and neurological disorders, conduct 
problems, social and emotional maladjustments, and other types of exceptional and mentally 
peculiar children. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

Psy. 512. — Psychology of Problem Children. 8:30 daily. Pe-114. .5 cixdits. 

WILLIAMS. 

To be taken with Psy. 312, with extra readings and reports for graduate credit. 

Psy. 515.— Social Psychology. 10:00 daily. Pe-11. 3 credits. Van Dusbn. 

SCHOOL ART 

Pc, 251. — Art for the Primary Grades. 1:00 daily. Yn-Shop Annex. 2 credits. 
Palmer. 

Pc. 252. — Art for the Elementary Grades. 4:00 daily. Yn-Shop Annex. 2 
credits. PALMER, 

Pc. 253.— Principles of Art. 10:00 daily. Yn-Shop Annex. 2 credits. PALMER. 

SOQAL STUDIES 

Scl. 301.— Children's Social Studies. 8:30 daily. Eg-202. 3 credits. Al- 
STETTER and Grace A. Stevens. 

Scl. 302.— Children's Social Studies. 11:30 daily. Eg-202. 3 credits. Al- 
stetter and Grace A. Stevens. 

SOCIOLOGY 
Sy. 337.— Social Anthropology. 7:00 daily. Ch-212. 3 credits. EHRMANN. 

Physical anthropology: physical characteristics of prehistoric and modern man; race distinc- 
tion ; distribution of races ; a critical analysis of racial theories — Aryanism, Nordicism, Nazism. 
Archaeology. Cultural anthropology: the development of culture; a comparative study of repre- 
sentative cultures. The American Indian. The Timucua and Seminole Indians of Florida. 

Sy. 344.— Marriage and the Family. 10:00 daily. Ch-112. 3 credits. EHR- 
MANN. 

While following the general outline of the regular course, special stress will be given to those 
aspects of the family and home life of most value to teachers of the social studies. 

Sy. 426.— The City in American Life. 11:30 daily. Pe-4. 3 credits. FOREMAN. 

A study of the rising cities in their effects upon individuals and social institutions. Cultural 
change in American life is related to the sweep of invention and the dominance of the metro- 
politan region. The cities of 1940 are examined as centers of social change and of challenge to 
education, government, and other group realities. The principles of city and regional planning 
are reviewed via case studies of cities, and criticized in relation to their demands upon citizenship. 



142 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 

Sy. 452.— American Culture Today. 8:30 daily. Pe-4. 3 credits. FOREMAN. 

A survey of the greater cultural challenges facing the American people in 1941, and of the 
chief resources available. Particular attention is paid to the changing resources of and challenges 
to the professions, and to the outlook for the social institutions in the world crisis. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

Sy. 526.— The City in American Life. 11:30 daily. Pe-4. 3 credits. FOREMAN. 

The same as Sy. 426, with extra work for graduate students. 

Sy. 544.— Marriage and the Family. 10:00 daily. Ch-112. 3 credits. EHR- 
MANN. 

The same as Sy. 344, with extra work for graduate students. 

Sy. 552.— American Culture Today. 8:30 daily. Pe-4. 3 credits. FOREMAN. 

The same as Sy. 452, with extra work for graduate students. 

Sy. 560.— Special Topics. To arrange. 3 credits. EHRMANN or FOREMAN. 

Special topics in Sociology by arrangement with the instructor. 

SPANISH 

CSh. 34.— Reading of Spanish. 8:30 daily. La-306. 3 credits. Halperin. 
Prerequisite: CSh. 33. 

Continuation of CSh. 33. 

Sh. 407. — South American Literature. 10:00 daily. La-306. 3 credits. Hal- 
perin. Prerequisite: Sh. 202 or permission of the instructor. 

Study of the leading dramatists and prose writers of Spanish-speaking Latin-America. 

GRADUATE COURSE 

Sh. 530. — Advanced Readings. Conference. 3 credits. HALPERIN. Prere- 
quisite: Permission of instructor. 

Readings and reports in field chosen by individual student. Mainly designed for graduate 
students who wish to gain special information on certain genres, movements or authors. 

SPEECH 

All students taking work in the Department of Speech must have completed Eh. 101 
or C-3. 

CSc. 33. — Effective Speaking. 4 credits. 

Section 1. 7:00 daily and 1 T. Th. Pe-205. HOPKINS. 
Section 2. 8:30 daily and 1 T. Th. Pe-205. TEW. 

Sch. 314.— Types of Public Discussion. 10:00 daily. Pe-209. 3 credits. HOP- 
KINS. Prerequisite or corequisite: CSc. 33. 

Designed particularly to aid the individual who is called upon to direct or participate in 
group discussion. The latest trends in handling various types of group discussion, such as round 
table, panel, symposium, forum, and others. The function of the leader and the participant in 
public meetings, faculty meetings, and PTA meetings. A brief review of the practical essentials 
of parliamentary procedure. 

Sch. 420.— Teaching of Functional Speech. 11:30 daily. Pe-209. 3 credits. 
Tew and Hopkins. Prerequisite: CSc. 33 or teaching experience. 

A course designed primarily for teachers. The place of speech education in the secondary 
school ; organization of materials and activities ; methods of presentation ; analysis of state- 
adopted text-book ; discussion of specific problems that ari.se in the teaching of public speaking, 
debate, auditorium programs, oral reading, and dram.atics. 

Speech Clinic. 1:00 M. W. F. Pe-209. No credit. STAFF. 

The Speech Clinic offers without charge individual assistance to students desiring aid in over- 
coming their speech defects. Applicants for this service should report as soon as possible to 
Peabody 211 at one o'clock on Monday, Wednesday, or Friday. 



QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS 14,S 

QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS 

1. Will there be a late registration fee charged to studenls registering after 
3:30 P. M. June 16 for first term or 12 noon July 28 for second term? 
Anstver: Yes. A late registration fee of $5 will be charged. Note that 

registration closes at .3:30 P.M. on June 16 and noon on July 28. 

2. Wliat is the last day on which a person may register by paying the late 
registration fee? 

Answer: First Term: June 18, 4:00 P.M. 
Second Term: July 30, 4:00 P. M. 

3. What is the maximum load a student may carry? 

Anaiver: This depends on previous record and courses se!e<"led. See page 
101. 

4. How many semester hours of credit may be earned during the summer by 
attendance at both terms? 

Answer: 12 to 18, depending upon the student's honor point average and 
courses selected. 
12 in Graduate School. 

5. May students who expect to receive degrees at the end of either term of the 
Summer Session be given permission to carry more hours than provided for 
in No. 3 above? 

Anstver: No. Exceptions will not be made under any circumstances. 

6. May a student complete a correspondence course while attending the Summer 
Session? 

Anstver: Yes, but the hours carried will count in the regular load. 

7. a. Who will submit the grades for students not registered in the General 

College who take comprehensive courses? 

Anstver: In such cases the grades will be submitted by the instructors 
concerned and not by the Board of Examiners. 

b. In such cases how much credit will a student be allowed for the com- 
prehensive course? 

Answer: The student will be allowed the credit assigned to such a course. 

c. May students registered in the Upper Division apply to take compre- 
hensive examinations in courses for which the student is not currently 
registered ? 

Answer: No. General College students only are permitted to take com- 
prehensive examinations by application. 

8. Is there a graduation at the end of the first term? 
Answer: Yes. 



144 BULLETIN OF THE UNIVERSITY SUMMER SESSION 

9. May one visit the classes in the laboratory school? 

Answer: Yes. Application should be made to the Principal, 120 Yonge 
Building. 

10. To whom should application be made for part-time work? 
Answer: Dean of Students. 

11. To whom should application be made for Summer Session loans? 
Answer: Director of the Summer Session. 

12. To whom should application be made for approved room lists? 
Answer: Dean of Students. 

13. To whom should application be made for a room reservation in the 
dormitories? 

Answer: The Director of Residence. (See page 147 for application blank.) 

14. Must one rooming in the dormitories eat in the cafeteria? 
Answer: No. 

15. May children live in the dormitories when mother is a regularly registered 
student of the Summer Session? 

Answer: No. 

16. WiU there be Saturday classes? 

Answer: First Term: No. (Except in the College of Law.) 
Second Term: Yes. 

17. May one comply with the requirements for extension of certificate during 
either term? 

Answer: Yes. 

18. May one get two extensions on a certificate by attending both terms of the 
Summer Session? 

Answer: No. Only one extension is given. 

19. How can information regarding registration procedure be secured? 
Answer: By consulting the bulletin boards in the various buildings on the 

morning of registration day. Also see page 145. 

20. Will any of the dormitories be open to men? women? married couples? 
Answer: Fletcher Hall will be reserved for men, Murphree Hall for women 

and some sections of Sledd Hall for married couples. 

21. How does one make application fo a room reservation in the dormitory? 
Answer: Send application (page 147) with room reservation fee of $5.00 to 

the Director of Residence, who will give you a room assignment. 

22. Must application for room reservation be accompanied by room reservation 
fee of $5.00? 

Answer: Yes. (See page 98.) 



SPECIAL DIRECTIONS FOR MAIL REGISTRATION 145 



SPECIAL DIRECTIONS FOR MAIL REGISTRATION 

Note: If these directions are carefully followed you will be able to complete most of 
your registration by mail and avoid the inconvenience of standing in long lines on registra- 
tion day. 

1. Fill out the Application Blank found on the last page of this bulletin and mail it 
promptly to the Office of the Registrar. If this form is received before June 1 (July 10, 
if you expect to attend the second term only) registration blanks will be mailed to you. 
These will include your registration permit and fee card. NO REGISTRATION 
BLANKS WILL BE MAILED AFTER JUNE 1. Persons not filing the application 
before that time will have to register in the usual manner. 

2. The registration forms should be carefully and COMPLETELY filled in. All requested 
information is SIGNIFICANT. 

3. Do not register for more than the maximum load as indicated on the top of your 
registration blank. 

4. Be sure to fill out the fee card as directed and send a check or money order for the 
amount of your fees. To determine what your fees are follow this scale:* 

If you are carrying six credits or less your registration fee is $18.00 

If you are carrying seven credits your registration fee is 119.00 

If you are carrying eight credits your registration fee is $20.00 

If you are carrying nine credits your registration fee is .121.00 

To the amount of your registration fee add the failure fee that is indicated on YOUR 
registration permit, and send remittance to cover the total. If you have not actually 
lived in Florida for the entire twelve months preceding June 1, 1941, you must add 
another $10.00. NO REGISTRATION WILL BE ACCEPTED UNLESS ACCOM- 
PANIED BY FULL REMITTANCE FOR ALL FEES DUE. 

5. DO NOT SEND MONEY FOR ROOM RENT OR MEAL TICKETS WITH REGIS- 
TRATION FEES. 

THERE IS NO OBLIGATION TO ATTEND THE SUMMER SESSION AFTER 
THIS PRELIMINARY REGISTRATION HAS BEEN MADE, AND A FULL REFUND 
OF FEES WILL BE MADE IF PRELIMINARY REGISTRATION IS CANCELLED 
BY FRIDAY. JUNE 13. 

*For tees for College of Law see paKe 97. 



APPLICATION FOR ROOM RESERVATION IN UNIVERSITY 

DORMITORIES 

To be filled out by each student who is planning to live in the dormitories for the 1941 
Summer Session — and mailed to the Director of Residence, University of Florida, Gaines- 
ville, with check or money order for the Room Reservation Fee of |5.00 per person. 



Date 



Mr. 

Miss 
Mrs. 



Address 



(last name) 



(first name in full) 



Age 



(street & number) (city) (county) 

(FOR RATES IN THE DORMITORIES SEE PAGES 98 AND 99.) 



(state) 



Please state below (a) what terms you shall attend, (b) your preferences, if any, as to 
iDom-mate, (c) room-exposure desired, and (d, e, & f) your choice of rooms. 



a. I shall attend: 



1st Term 



2nd Term 



Both Terms 



I). I would like to room with 

(Note. Room-mate must file separate application and pay room reservation fee also.) 

c. I would like a room with exposure in 

d. FLETCHER HALL (Reserved for MEN STUDENTS ONLY) 

Type or 
No. of Room Section Floor 

1st Choice 

2nd Choice 

3rd Choice 

e. MJJRPHREE HALL (Reserved for WOMEN STUDENTS ONLY) 

1st Choice -. 

2nd Choice 

3rd Choice 



f. SLEDD HALL (Sections A. B. C— Reserved for MARRIED COUPLES ONLY) 

1st Choice 

2nd Choice 

3rd Choice 

Important: This application cannot be accepted unless accompanied by the Room Reserva- 
tion Fee of $5.00 per person. 

[147] 



REQUEST FOR PERMISSION TO LIVE OFF CAMPUS 



To the OflBce of the Dean of Students: 

I hereby request permission to be allowed to live oflf campus during first term, second 
term, both terms, of the 1941 Summer Session. (Underscore terms desired.) 

In support of this request, the following considerations are offered: 

1. I am years of age or over. 

2. I have already received a degree and am now taking 

graduate work. 

3. I have been self-supporting during the past year through the following employment: 



4. If granted permission to live off campus, I will live in the house appearing on the 
Approved Rooming House List at the address below: 



(address) (householder) 
5. I desire to room off campus for the following reason: 



(Signed) 
Address 



Date 

Approved: 

Disapproved: 

[149] 



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APPLICATION BLANK— 1941 Summer Session— University of Florida 

(Tf you wish to attend the first or both terms of the 1941 Summer Session this form must be filled out 
comoletely and mailed to the Registrar before June 1. Tf you wish to attend the second term only it should 
be mailed before July 10.) r 1^:1 1 



The University Record 

of the 

University of Florida 



e 



for 




Vol. XXXVI, Series 1 



No. 4 



April 1, 1941 



Published monthly by the University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 

Entered in the post office in Gainesville, Florida, as second-class matter, 
under Act of Congress, August 24, 1912 

Office of Publication, Gainesville, Florida 



The Record comprises: 

The Reports of the President to the Board of Control, the bulletins of 
information, announcements of special courses of instruction, and reports of 
the University Officers. 

These bulletins will be sent gratuitously to all persons who apply for them. The appli- 
cant should specifically state which bulletin or what information is desired. Address 

THE REGISTRAR, University of Florida 

Gainesville, Florida 



Research Publications. — Research publications will contain results of research work. 
Papers are published as separate monographs numbered in several series. 

There is no free mailing list of these publications. Exchanges with institutions are 
arranged by the University Library. Correspondence concerning such exchanges should 
be addressed to the University Librarian, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida. The 
issue and sale of all these publications is under the control of the Committee on Publica- 
tions. Requests for individual copies, or for any other copies not included in institutional 
exchanges, should be addressed to 

The Committee on University Publications 
University of Florida 

Gainesville, Florida 



[154] 



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[ 155 ] 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

PACE 

University Calendar 158 

Administrative Officers _ 160 

The General College — Administrative Officers and Administrative Board 161 

Faculty 162 

Organization of the University 165 

Notice to Prospective Students _ 166 

Introductory Statement ^... 167 

Admissions 168 

Advanced Standing Students 169 

Women Students 169 

General Regulations : 170 

Preparation for Upper Division Curricula 172 

Program of Studies . 173 

Description of Courses 175 

Admission to the Upper Division 180 

Requirements, College of Arts and Sciences 180 

Requirements, School of Pharmacy 181 

Requirements, College of Agriculture 181 

Requirements, School of Forestry 182 

Requirements, School of Architecture and Allied Arts 182 

Requirements, College of Business Administration 183 

Requirements, College of Education 183 

Requirements, College of Engineering 183 

Expenses 185 

University Dormitories 187 

Scholarships and Loan Funds 192 

Prizes and Medals 196 

General Extension Division 198 

Summer Session 198 

Division of Athletics and Physical Education 198 

Division of Military Science and Tactics 199 

University of Florida Band 200 

Division of Music 200 

University of Florida Libraries ....'. ". 201 

The Florida State Museum 201 

Health Service ; 202 

Bureau of Vocational Guidance and Mental Hygiene 203 

Florida Union 203 

Student Organizations and Publications 204 

Honor System 206 

[ 157 ] 



158 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION FOR THE GENERAL COLLEGE 



UNIVERSITY CALENDAR • 
REGULAR SESSION, 1941-42 

1941 FIRST SEMESTER 

September 1, Monday Last day for making application for admission for 

first semester. 
September 3-10 _ Preliminary registration for all students who have 

previously attended the University of Florida. 

September 10, Wednesday 1941-42 Session officially opens. 

September 10-13, Wednesday-Saturday.-Registration period. 

September 15, Monday, 8 a.m Classes for 1941-42 Session begin; late registration fee 

of S5 for all students registering on or after this date. 
September 20, Saturday, 12 noon ..Last day for registration for the first semester, for 

adding courses, and for changing sections in all 

courses except year comprehensive courses. 
September 27, Saturday, 12 NOON Last day for submitting resignation and receiving 

any refund of fees. 
October 11, Saturday, 12 NOON Last day for making application for a degree at the 

end of the first semester. Last day for changing 

sections in year comprehensive courses. 
October 14, Tuesday, 5 p.m. Last day for students to apply to the Dean to be 

designated as Honor Students. 
November 8, Saturday Georgia-Florida football game in Jacksonville. 

Classes suspended. 

November 22, Saturday Homecoming. Classes suspended. 

Thanksgiving Holiday To be announced. 

December 2, Tuesday Last day for removing grades of I or X received in 

the preceding semester of attendance. 
December 3, Wednesday, 5 p.m. Last day for dropping courses without receiving 

grade of E and being assessed failure fee. 
December 4, Thursday, 5 p.m Progress Reports for General College students are 

due in the Office of the Registrar. 
December 20, Saturday, 12 NOON Christmas Recess begins. 

1942 

January 5, Monday, 8 a.m Christmas Recess ends. 

January 5, Monday, 5 p.m Last day for graduates students graduating at the end 

of the first semester to submit theses to the Dean. 
January 14, Wednesday Last day for candidates for degrees to complete 

correspondence courses. 

January 17, Saturday, 1:30 p.m Final Examinations begin for Upper Division students. 

January 19, Monday Second semester registration begins for students who 

have previously registered in the University. Late 

registration fee of $5 for not registering according to 

the announcements in the Orange and Blue bulletin. 
January 27, Tuesday, 4 p.m. All grades for candidates for degrees are due in the 

Office of the Registrar. 

January 28, Wednesday Faculty meetings to pass upon candidates for degrees. 

January 28, Wednesday, 4 p.m. Classes for first semester for General College end. 

January 28, Wednesday, noon Final Examinations for Upper Division students end. 

January 28, Wednesday, 4 p.m. First semester ends; all grades are due in the Office 

of the Registrar. 



UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 159 

January 29-30, Thursday-Friday Inter-Semester days. 

January 30, Friday, 10 A.M Conferring of degrees. 

SECOND SEMESTER 

January 31, Saturday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m Registration for second semester for new students 

only. Placement Tests, Room 208, Science Hall. 
Grades with failure fee assessments available for 
students registered first semester. 

January 31, Saturday, 5 p.m Last day for all students to pay registration fees 

for second semester without being assessed $5 late 
registration fee. 

February 2, Monday, 8 a.m. Classes begin. Late registration fee, $5. 

February 7, Saturday, 12 noon Last day for registration for second semester, for 

adding courses, and for changing sections. 

February 9, Monday, 4 p.m. Last day for paying failure fees. 

February 14, Saturday, 12 noon Last day for making application for a degree at end 

of second semester. Last day for submitting resig- 
nation and receiving any refund of fees. 

March 18, Wednesday Last day for students to apply to the Dean to be 

designated as Honor Students. 

March 30, Monday, 5 p.m. Progress Reports for General College students due 

in the Office of the Registrar. 

April 1, Wednesday Last day for removing grades of I or X received in 

preceding semester of attendance. 

April 9, Thursday, 8 a.m. Spring Recess begins. 

April 13, Monday, 8 a.m Spring Recess ends. 

April 22, Wednesday, 5 p.m. Last day for dropping courses without receiving 

grade of E and being assessed failure fee. 
April 29, Wednesday, 5 p.m Last day for graduate students graduating at the end 

of the semester to submit theses to the Dean. 
May 12, Tuesday Last day for candidates for degrees to complete 

correspondence courses. 

May 16, Saturday, 1:30 p.m Final Examinations begin. 

May 27, Wednesday, 4 p.m All grades for candidates for degrees are due in the 

Office of the Registrar. 

May 28, Thursday Faculty meetings to pass upon candidates for degrees. 

May 30-June 1, Saturday-Monday Commencement Exercises. 

May 31, Sunday Baccalaureate Sermon. 

June 1, Monday Commencement Convocation. 

June 1, Monday, 12 noon Second semester ends; all grades are due in the 

Office of the Registrar. 
June 8, Monday Boys' Club Week begins. 

SUMMER SESSION, 1942 

June 15, Monday First Summer Term begins. 

July 24, Friday First Summer Term ends. 

July 27, Monday Second Summer Term begins. 

August 28, Friday Second Summer Term ends. 

FIRST SEMESTER, 1942-43 

September 14, Monday 1942-43 Session begins. (Date provisional) 



160 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION FOR THE GENERAL COLLEGE 

ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

1941-42 

BOARD OF CONTROL 

Henry P. Adair. Attorney-at-Law 

1511 Bamett National Bank Building, Jacksonville, Florida 
Chairman of the Board 

R. H. Gore _ Publisher 

Ft. Lauderdale, Florida 

T. T. Scott Merchant 

Live Oak, Florida 

N. B. Jordan Banker 

Quincy, Florida 

Whitfield M. Palmer ..._ President, Dixie Lime Products Company 

Ocala, Florida 

John T. Diamond Secretary of the Board of Control 

Tallahassee, Florida 

Roy L. Purvis, B.S.B.A., C.P.A. (Florida) Auditor for the Board of Control 

Gainesville, Florida 

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

Spessard L. Holland Governor 

R. A. Gray Secretary of State 

J. Edwin Larson State Treasurer 

J. Tom Watson Attorney General 

Colin English, Secretary State Superintendent of Public Instruction 

THE UNIVERSITY 

John James Tigert, M.A. (Oxon.), LL.D., Ed.D.. D.C.L., D.Litt., L.H.D. 

President of the University 

Townes Randolph Leigh, Ph.D Acting Vice-President of the University 

Robert Colder Beaty, M.A Dean of Students 

Harley Willard Chandler, M.S Dean of the University 

Klein Harrison Graham, LL.D Business Manager 

Walter B. Hill, B.A. in L.S., M.A Librarian 

Richard Sadler Johnson, B.S.P Registrar 

George Clarence Tillman, M.D., F.A.C.S University Physician 

BOARD OF UNIVERSITY EXAMINERS 

Richard Sadler Johnson, B.S.P., Chairman Registrar 

Harley Willard Chandler, M.S. Dean of the University 

Elmer Dumond Hinckley, Ph.D Head, Department of Psychology 

Winston Woodard Little, M.A Dean of the General College 

Thomas Marshall Simpson, Ph.D Dean of the Graduate School 

Joseph Edwin Price, B.A.E Assistant Dean of Students 

John Vredenburgh McQuitty, Ph.D., Secretary University Examiner 






ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS AND BOARD 161 



THE GENERAL COLLEGE 
ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 

John James Tigert, M.A. (Oxon.), LL.D., Ed.D., D.C.L., D.Litt., L.H.D, 

— President of the University 

Winston Woodard Little, M.A., Dean of the General College 

ADMINISTRATIVE BOARD 

Winston "Woodard Little, M.A., Ex Officio Chairman 
Richard Sadler Johnson, B.S.P., Ex Officio Secretary 

William Graves Carleton, M.A.. J.D Chairman of Comprehensive Course C-1 

Robert Colder Beaty, M.A Dean of Students 

Alvin Percy Black, Ph.D Professor of Agricultural Chemistry 

Harley Willard Chandler, M.S Dean of the University 

Leonard William Gaddum, Ph.D Chairman of Comprehensive Course C-2 

James David Glunt, Ph.D Chairman of Comprehensive Course C-5 

Franklin Wesley Kokomoor, Ph.D Chairman of Comprehensive Course C-42 

Walter Jeffries Matherly, M.A., LL.D Dean of the College of Business Administration 

James Speed Rogers, Ph.D Chairman of Comprehensive Course C-6 

William Harold Wilson, Ph.D Chairman of Comprehensive Course C-41 

Jacob Hooper Wise, Ph.D Chairman of Comprehensive Course C-3 



162 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION FOR THE GENERAL COLLEGE 

FACULTY 

C-l. MAN AND THE SOCIAL WORLD 

William Graves Carleton, M.A., J.D. (Associate Professor in the General College), 

Chairman 
RoLLiN Salisbury Atwood, Ph.D. (Professor of Economic Geography in the College of 

Business Administration) 
George Robert Bentley, M.A. (Instructor in the General College) (on leave 1940-41) 
James Edward Chace, M.B.A. (Assistant Professor of Economics in the College of Business 

Administration) (on leave) 
Manning Julian Dauer, Ph.D. (Assistant Professor of History and Political Science in 

the College of Arts and Sciences) 
Roland Byerly Eutsler, Ph.D. (Professor of Economics in the College of Business Ad- 
ministration) 
Paul Lamont Hanna, Ph.D. (Assistant Professor in the General College) 
Claude Edward Hawley, Ph.D. (Assistant Professor in the General College) 
Angus McKenzie Laird, M.A. (Assistant Professor in the General College) 
Russell Elliott Miller, M.A. (Instructor in the General College) 
Rembert Wallace Patrick, Ph.D. (Assistant Professor in the General College) 
Joseph Edwin Price, B.A.E. (Assistant Dean of Students) 

C-2. MAN AND THE PHYSICAL WORLD 

Leonard William Gaddum, Ph.D. (Professor in the General College), Chairman 
Richard Archer Edwards, Ph.D. (Assistant Professor in the General College) 
Winston Wallace Ehrmann, Ph.D. (Assistant Professor in the General College) 
Theodore Samuel George;, M.A. (Instructor in Mathematics in the College of Arts and 

Sciences) 
Harold Lorraine Knowles, Ph.D. (Assistant Professor of Physics in the College of Arts 

and Sciences) 
Robert Ray Mulligan, M.S. (Instructor in the General College) 
Daniel Cramer Swanson, Ph.D. (Assistant Professor of Physics in the College of Arts 

and Sciences) 
Francis Dudley Williams, Ph.D. (Assistant Professor in the General College) 

C-3. READING, SPEAKING AND WRITING 

Jacob Hooper Wise, Ph.D. (Professor of Education in the College of Education), Chairman 
Washington Augustus Clark, Jr., M.A. (Assistant Professor of English in the College 

of Arts and Sciences) 
James Edmund Congleton, Ph.D. (Instructor in the General College) 
Henry Phiup Constans, M.A. (Head Professor of Speech in the College of Arts and 

Sciences) 
Norman E. Eliason, Ph.D. (Professor of English in the College of Arts and Sciences) 



FACULTY 163 

Arthur Ariel Hopkins, M.A. (Associate Professor of Speech in the College of Arts and 

Sciences) 
Charles A. McGlon, M.A.E. (Instructor in the General College) (on leave 1940-41) 
Malcolm McLeod, Ph.D. (Instructor in English in the College of Arts and Sciences) 

William Edgar Moore, M.A. (Assistant Professor of English in the College of Arts and 

Sciences) 
Alton Chester Morris, Ph.D. (Assistant Professor of English in the College of Arts and 

Sciences) 

Charles Eugene Mounts, M.A. (Assistant Professor of English in the College of Arts 
and Sciences) 

Kenneth Gordon Skagcs, M.A. (Instructor in English in the College of Arts and Sciences) 

Herman Everette Spivey, Ph.D. (Assistant Professor of English in the College of Arts and 
Sciences) 

Thomas B. Stroup, Ph.D. (Associate Professor of English in the College of Arts and 
Sciences) 

Roy Edwards Tew, B.A.E. (Instructor in Speech in the College of Arts and Sciences) 

James Larrymore Wilson, M.A. (Instructor in the General College) 

C-41. MAN AND HIS THINKING 

William Harold Wilson, Ph.D. (Professor of Mathematics and Assistant Dean of the 
College of Arts and Sciences), Chairman 

George Robert Bentley, M.A. (Instructor in the General College) (on leave 1940-41) 
Elmer Dumond Hinckley, Ph.D. (Head Professor of Psychology in the College of Arts 
and Sciences) 

Winston Woodard Little, M.A. (Professor of Secondary Education in the College of 
Education and Dean of the General College) 

C-42. GENERAL MATHEMATICS 

Franklin Wesley Kokomoor, Ph.D. (Professor of Mathematics in the College of Arts 
and Sciences), Chairman 

Uri Pearl Davis, M.A. (Instructor in Mathematics in the College of Arts and Sciences) 

Bernard Francis Dostal, M.A. (Assistant Professor of Mathematics in the College of 
Arts and Sciences) 

Theodore Samuel George, M.A. (Instructor in Mathematics in the College of Arts and 
Sciences) 

Joseph Harrison Kusner, Ph.D. (Associate Professor of Mathematics in the College of 
Arts and Sciences) 

Samuel W. McInnis, M.A. (Assistant Professor of Mathematics in the College of Arts 
and Sciences) 

Ernest Clifford Phillips, Jr., M.A. (Instructor in Mathematics in the College of Arts 
and Sciences) 

Cecil Glenn Phipps, Ph.D. (Associate Professor of Mathematics in the College of Arts 
and Sciences) 



164 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION FOR THE GENERAL COLLEGE 

Zareh Meguerditch Pirenian, M.S. (Associate Professor of Mathematics in the College 

of Arts and Sciences) 
Edward Schaumberc Quade, Ph.D. (Instructor in Mathematics in the College of Arts 

and Sciences) 

C-5. THE HUMANITIES 

James David Giunt, PLD. (Professor of History and Political Science in the College of 

Arts and Sciences), Chairman 
Frederick Wiluam Conner, M.A. (Instructor in English in the CoUege of Arts and 

Sciences) 
George Gillespie Fox, Ph.D. (Acting Assistant Professor of English in the College of Arts 

and Sciences) 
Paul Lamont Hanna, Ph.D. (Assistant Professor in the General College) 
William Edgar Moore, M.A. (Assistant Professor of English in the College of Arts and 

Sciences) 
Claude Leon Murphree, B.A.. F.A.G.O. (University Organist and Instructor in the General 

College — part time) 
Charles Archibald Robertson, M.A. (Professor of English in the College of Arts and 

Sciences) 
Oswald C. R. Stageberg, B.S. in Arch. (Instructor in the General College — part time) 

C-6. MAN AND THE BIOLOGICAL WORLD 

James Speed Rogers, Ph.D. (Head Professor of Biology and Geology in the College of 

Arts and Sciences), Chairman (on leave 1940-41) 
Charles Francis Byers, Ph.D. (Assistant Professor of Biology in the CoUege of Arts 

and Sciences) , Acting Chairman 
Archie Fairly Carr, Ph.D. (Assistant Professor in the General College) 
William John Knox Harkness, M.A. (Professor on Exchange from the University of 

Toronto ) 

Horton Holcombe Hobbs, M.S. (Instructor in the General College) 

Theodore Huntington Hubbell, Ph.D. (Professor of Biology and Geology in the Col- 
lege of Arts and Sciences) 

Pettus Holmes Senn, Ph.D. (Associate Professor of Farm Crops and Genetics in the 
College of Agriculture) 

Howard Keeper Wallace, Ph.D. (Instructor in Biology in the College of Arts and Sciences) 



ORGANIZATION OF THE UNIVERSITY 165 

ORGANIZATION OF THE UNIVERSITY 

DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS 

LOWER DIVISION 
THE GENERAL COLLEGE 



UPPER DIVISION 

THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES, including 
THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, including 
THE COLLEGE PROPER 
THE SCHOOL OF FORESTRY 
THE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATIONS 
THE AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE 

THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING, including 

THE ENGINEERING EXPERIMENT STATION 

THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION, including 

THE P. K. YONGE LABORATORY SCHOOL 
THE FLORIDA CURRICULUM LABORATORY 

THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

THE SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE AND ALLIED ARTS 



THE COLLEGE OF LAW 
THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



THE GENERAL EXTENSION DIVISION 

THE SUMMER SESSION 

THE DIVISION OF ATHLETICS AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

THE DIVISION OF MILITARY SQENCE AND TACTICS 

THE DIVISION OF MUSIC 

THE FLORIDA STATE MUSEUM 

THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 

THE STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE 

THE BUREAU OF VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE AND MENTAL HYGIENE 



166 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION FOR THE GENERAL COLLEGE 



NOTICE TO PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS 

1. Applications for admission on regulation University blanks pro- 
vided for this purpose should be submitted to the Registrar immediately 
after the end of the spring term, and in no case later than September 1, 
1941. Applications will not be considered unless received by September 
1, 1941. These blanks may be obtained from the principal of any Florida 
high school or from the Registrar of the University of Florida. The 
prospective student should fill out an application (Form I) and mail it 
to the Registrar, and request the high school principal to fill out Form 
III, which includes the student's high school record. The principal will 
then send Form III directly to the Registrar. 

2. All prospective students must take and pass the Placement Tests, 
besides fulfilling the other requirements, before they will be eligible for 
admission. Prospective students who did not take these tests in the 
Spring Testing Program in the high schools of the State may take them 
at the University during the summer. The tests will be given at 1 P. M. 
on alternate Saturdays, beginning June 14, in Room 208, Science Hall. 
Students are advised to take the tests at the earliest possible testing 
period, so they may be advised as to their eligibility for admission. 
Admission certificates will not be issued until the Placement Tests have 
been passed. 

3. Prospective students are advised to be vaccinated against small- 
pox and to be inoculated against typhoid fever. Unless a certificate is 
presented showing successful vaccination within five years, students will 
be vaccinated against smallpox at the time of registration. 

4. Students entering the University as freshmen are required to 
participate in the activities beginning Wednesday, September 10. 

5. Students are advised to reserve a room in the University Dormi- 
tories as early as possible. All first-year students are required to live 
in the University Dormitories. An application for a room reservation 
should be made to the Director of Residence. 



INTRODUCTORY STATEMENT 167 

INTRODUCTORY STATEMENT 

The General College has been organized to administer the work of the freshman and 
sophomore years in the University of Florida. All beginning students will register in 
this College. 

The average student will be able to complete the work of the General College in two 
years, while superior students may finish the curriculum in a shorter time, and others may 
find it necessary to remain in the General College for a longer period. 

A program of general education is worked out for all students. In this program the 
University recognizes that broad basic training is needed by all students. To this 
foundation that has meaning and significance to the student, he may add the special 
training of the colleges and professional schools of the Upper Division, or drop out of the 
University with something definite and helpful as he begins his adult life as a citizen. The 
purposes of the General College are as follows: 

1. To offer an opportunity for general education and to provide the guidance 
needed by all students. Thus the choice of professional work is postponed 
until the student is better acquainted with his capacity and disposition to 
undertake work that will be profitable to himself and society. 

2. To broaden the base of education for students who are preparing for 
advanced study in the colleges and professional schools of the Upper Division, 
thereby avoiding the handicap of narrow specialization. 

3. To satisfy the needs of those who have only a limited time to give to 
college training, and consequently should concern themselves with general 
viewpoints and major understandings, instead of with introductions to special 
subject matter fields which they may never enter. 

4. To provide for the constant adjustments required in higher general 
education incident to the changing conditions of modern life. The subject 
matter of the various courses and the methods of presentation are to be con- 
stantly varied in order to awaken the interest of the student, to stimulate his 
intellectual curiosity, to encourage independent study, and to cultivate the 
attitudes necessary for enlightened citizenship. 

5. Guidance. Every part of the General College program is designed to 
guide students. It was felt that too much of the freshman and sophomore 
work of former years had little meaning and significance to the vast majority. 
The material studied was preparatory and foundational, and became mean- 
ingful only when the student pursued additional courses in the junior and 
senior years. The material of the comprehensive courses is selected and 
tested with guidance as a primary function. While, of necessity, we must 
look forward to distant goals, the General College is trying to present 
materials that are directly related to life experiences and will immediately 
become a part of the student's thinking and guide him in making correct 
"next steps". Thus the whole program — placement tests, progress reports, 
vocational aptitude tests, selected material in the comprehensive courses, 
student conferences, provisions for superior students, adjustment for individual 
differences, election privileges, and comprehensive examinations — are all parts 
of a plan designed to guide students. 



168 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION FOR THE GENERAL COLLEGE 

Guidance is not attempted at one office by one individual with a small 
staff. The whole drive of the General College program is one of directing 
the thinking of the student. Wliile the necessary correlation and unifica- 
tion is attempted at the General College Office, throughout the General College 
period students consult upper division deans and department heads to discuss 
future work. During the last month of each school year these informal con- 
ferences are concluded by a scheduled formal conference, at which each 
student fills out a pre-registration card for the coming year. 

ADMISSIONS 

FLORroA Students. — The following items are considered in admitting students to the 
General College: 

(1) Graduation from high school.* 

(2) Achievement in high school. 

(3) Personal qualities. 

(4) Recommendation of high school principal. 

(5) Rank on Placement Tests. 

Graduation from high school is required. No specific high school units are required; 
however, all applicants must pass the Placement Tests before being admitted to the General 
College. These tests consist of a general psychological test, and achievement tests in the 
fields of English, mathematics, social studies, and natural sciences. Attainments in these 
fields are possible without specific high school courses and are not guaranteed by the 
acquiring of certain high school units. 

Non-Florida Students. — In addition to the requirements for Florida students, non- 
Florida students are required to file preliminary credentials satisfactory to the Board of 
University Examiners. The Board then will determine the eligibility of such students 
to take the Placement Tests. However, permission to come to Gainesville to take these 
tests does not guarantee admission to the General College. Students come to Gainesville 
at the risk of being refused admission if the results of the Placement Tests are not satis- 
factory. 

Special Students. — Special students may be admitted to the General College or to the 
colleges or professional schools of the Upper Division, except the College of Law, only 
by approval of the Board of University Examiners. Special students are never admitted 
to the College of Law. Applications for admission for special students must include: 

(1) Satisfactory preliminary credentials. 

(2) A statement of the type of studies to be pursued. 

(3) Reason for desiring to take special courses. 

(4) Satisfactory evidence of ability to pursue these studies. 



*The Board of University Examiners may in rare cases, when the principal of the high school 
the student has attended recommends such action, permit an exceptional student, before graduation, 
to take the Placement Tests ; if the student passes these tests satisfactorily, he will be admitted 
to the General College. Mature students, lacking a formal high school education, but possessing 
because of some other training the necessary admission requirements, may petition the Board of 
University Examiners for permission to take the Placement Tests and the College Aptitude Test ; 
upon satisfactorily passing the tests, such students will be admitted to the General College. 



ADMISSIONS 169 

ADVANCED STANDING STUDENTS 

The Board of University Examiners will determine the advanced standing of students 
entering from other colleges. In general, the policies of the Board of University Examiners 
will be as follows: 

1. AU students must present training equivalent to the work of the General 
College, and in some cases will be required to pass the prescribed compre- 
hensive examinations. 

2. Students with poor records from other institutions will not be admitted 
to the University of Florida. Students whose average is below "C" should not 
apply for admission to the University, and students whose average is only "C" 
are not guaranteed admission. 

3. The Board of University Examiners, in the case of transfer students with 
high or superior records, may vary the requirements for admission to the col- 
leges and professional schools of the Upper Division to the best interest of 
the student. 

WOMEN STUDENTS 

The University of Florida is an institution for men only, except during the summer 
session. Under certain circumstances women students may be admitted to the professional 
schools. For information concerning the admission of women students, the Registrar should 
be consulted. 



170 BULLET m OF INFORMATION FOR THE GENERAL COLLEGE 

GENERAL REGULATIONS 

COURSES 

Courses offered for General College students fall in two groups. The first group con- 
sists of courses especially designed and integrated with the General College Program and 
referred to as the Comprehensive Courses. The second group, called Departmental Courses, 
consists of courses offered in the various departments, some of which are integrated with 
the General College Program, and some of which are specialized courses required by one 
or more of the colleges for admission to the Upper Division. 

ACADEMIC CREDITS ABOLISHED 

The General College has dispensed with clock hours, class grades, and semester hours' 
credit as prerequisites to the completion of its curriculum. 

METHOD OF REGISTRATION 

The requirements for admission are found in the first part of this bulletin. Registration 
procedure will be outlined in detail in the program supplied the student at his first meeting. 

No student is properly registered until all fees have been paid. Fees are paid at the 
Business Office, Rooms 102-4, Language Hall. 

To drop a course from his schedule, to add a course, or to change a section, a student 
should report to the Dean of the General College. Final dates for such changes will be 
found in the University Calendar. 

Students should notice carefully the registration dates listed in the University Calendar. 
Late registration fees will be charged all students registering at any time after the regular 
registration period. 

MAXIMUM AND MINIMUM LOADS 

The average load for all students will be four comprehensive courses and Military 
Science or Physical Education. Deviations may be permitted by the Dean of the General 
College. 

ATTENDANCE 

If any student accumulates absences or fails to do class work to the extent that further 
enrollment in the class appears to be of little value to him and detrimental to the best 
interest of the class, it shall be the duty of the instructor to warn such student in writing 
that further absences or failure to do class work will cause him to be dropped from the 
course with a failing grade. Where possible this warning will be delivered personally ; 
otherwise, it will be mailed to the student's last University address by the Registrar. 
Instructors shall immediately report all such warnings to the Course Chairman or Depart- 
ment Head. 

Should any absences or failure to do class work be incurred after this warning, the 
student will be dropped from the course and be given a failing grade. Should he be 
dropped from more than one course his case will be considered by the Committee on 
Student Progress who may rule that he be dropped from the University and his record 
marked "Dropped for Non-Attendance" or "Dropped for Unsatisfactory Work" as the case 
may be. 



GENERAL REGULATIONS 171 

PROGRESS TESTS AND REPORTS 

Progress Reports will he made by the Board of Examiners and instructors each semester 
to indicate the progress the student seems to he making in his work. While the results 
of progress tests given by the Board in all the basic comprehensive courses are diagnostic, 
used for adjustment and guidance, and not added to the results of final comprehensive 
exams to determine a student's standing in any course, actual experience shows that students 
who fail to make satisfactory standing on progress tests also fail to pass the comprehensive 
exams. In fact this agreement is so close that progress tests are often taken to determine 
a student's official standing in the University. 

Tlie total Progress Report for each of the basic comprehensive courses includes test 
results and instructors' judgments and indicates progress as "satisfactory" or "unsatis- 
factory" as judged on tlie basis of (1) class attendance, (2i apparent effort, and C3» test 
results. 

COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATIONS 

The comprehensive course examinations (of which the student must successfully pass 
eight or more to complete the program of the General College) are administered by the 
Board of University Examiners and are given in January, May, and August of each year. 
A student must be familiar with the work of the various courses and be able to think in the 
several fields in a comprehensive way in order to pass these examinations. Six hours time, 
divided into equal periods, will be required for each examination covering a full year course. 
Standings on the comprehensive examinations are issued by the Board of Examiners and are 
not subject to change by any other agency. 

APPLICATIONS FOR COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATIONS 

General CoUege students who are enrolled in a course at the time the examination is 
given need not make application for it. General College students who are not enrolled 
in a course at the time an examination is given and who wish to take the comprehensive 
examination must apply in writing to the Board of Examiners for permission prior to the 
last date set for filing such applications. Applications will not be accepted from students 
registered in the colleges of the Upper Division. Before the application is accepted the 
applicant will be required to furnish the Board of Examiners with proof that this privilege 
has not been used to avoid the payment of usual University fees. Applications will be 
accepted only for those examinations which are administered by the Board of Examiners. 
The Board of Examiners is the only agency authorized to give General College students 
examinations by application. 

Should a student fail a comprehensive course examination, he may qualify to repeat 
the examination by repeating the course or by further independent study. Evidence of 
additional preparation must be submitted to the Board of Examiners with the formal 
application to repeat the examination. 

MILITARY SCIENCE AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

All students will be required to take Military Science, unless exempt because of physical 
disability, age, or for other reasons set forth in the University By-Laws. Exemptions will 
be determined before registration, and only those students so exempt will be required 
to take Physical Education. Either Military Science or Physical Education will be taken 
for two years by all students except those exempt from both courses. 



172 BULLET l?^ OF INFORMATION FOR THE GENERAL COLLEGE 

GRADUATION 

When a student has completed his program in the General College and has passed his 
comprehensive examinations and met the other requirements of the General College cur- 
riculum, he will be granted the Associate of Arts Certificate. Students who pass three- 
fourths of the comprehensive examinations with the standing "Excellent" will, on grad- 
uation from the General College, receive the Certificate of Associate of Arts, with High 
Honors. 

WITHDRAWAL FROM THE UNIVERSITY 

A student wishing to withdraw from the University during any semester or at the end 
of the first semester should report to the Office of the Registrar and secure a blank to be 
executed for this purpose. Failure to comply with this requirement makes a student liable 
for dismissal for non-attendance or for failure in studies, and subject to payment of failure 
fees when and if he re-enrolls in the University. 

FAILURE IN STUDIES 

The Committee on Student Progress will consider the record of each student in the 
General College at the end of each session, and will report to the Administrative Board 
of the General College the names of those students whose further attendance at the Univer- 
sity appears to be of doubtful value. The students concerned will be called before the 
Committee and the facts of each case will be thoroughly considered before final action 
is taken. Failure to attend classes, to take progress tests, or to take the comprehensive 
examination at the end of a course may be interpreted as evidence of unsatisfactory pro- 
gress. If further enrollment at the University appears to be of little value to a student, 
the Committee may advise the parent to withdraw the student. 



PREPARATION FOR UPPER DIVISION CURRICULA 

Students who have definitely made a choice of the occupations or professions they will 
follow and who expect to enter a certain curriculum of the Upper Division upon completion 
of the General College work may profit by following the suggestions given here. 

MEDICINE AND DENTISTRY 

Entering students who have definitely decided to study medicine or dentistry should 
notify the Dean of the General College of this choice in order that a program can be 
worked out that will satisfy both the requirements of general education and those necessary 
to enter the medical or dental schools. It is possible for exceptional students to complete 
the minimum pre-medical requirements in two years. However, less than eight per cent of 
those admitted to medical schools have less than three or four years of college preparation. 
To a large extent, students admitted to a medical school with only two years of preparation 
Lave done their pre-medical work in the university of which the medical school is a psirt, 

OTHER CURRICULA 

Certain curricula of the Upper Division require a working knowledge of a foreign 
language. Students contemplating entering such curricula could with profit begin this 
study in the high school. 



PROGRAM OF STUDIES 173 

Students expecting to study engineering need a thorough training in mathematics. An 
effort should be made by such students to obtain the broadest possible mathematical train- 
ing in the high school. These students should obtain, either in high school, by private 
arrangement, or by correspondence study, knowledge of elementary mechanical drawing 
so as to be able to: (1) letter upper and lower case standard letters neatly and accurately; 
(2) trace drawings neatly with India ink, using both ruling pens and compasses. The 
student should obtain either in high school or in outside practice some knowledge of 
elementary woodworking so that he will: (ll know the names and uses of all woodworking 
tools; (2) be able to drive a nail straight; (3) be able to saw a straight line both with 
the crosscut and ripsaw; (4) be able to square the end of a board. 

Students who expect to study architecture or building construction should obtain a 
thorough foundation in mathematics and the physical sciences. 

For information concerning the prerequisites for admission to the colleges and profes- 
sional schools of the Upper Division, the prospective student should consult the Bulletin of 
Information for the Upper Division. This will enable the student to make the proper pre- 
college preparation for the curriculum of his choice. 

PROGRAM OF STUDIES 

For all students who enter the University of Florida. 

FIRST YEAR SECOND YEAR 

C-1. — Man and the Social World C-5. — The Humanities 

C-2.— Man and the Physical World C-6.— Man and the Biological World 

(or C-6) (or C-2) 

C-3. — Reading, Speaking and Writing C-7. — (Elective)* 

C-41.— Man and His Thinking (one C-8.— (Elective)* 

semester) C-9. — (Elective)* 

C-42. — General Mathematics (one Y. — Military Science or Physical 

semester) Education 
X. — Military Science or Physical 

Education 

Except as indicated below, all students take four comprehensive courses the first year 
and two the second year. For the remainder of his work the student elects additional 
comprehensive courses or courses required by the colleges and professional schools of the 
Upper Division (see pages 180 to 184 1. Comprehensive courses normally meet four times 
a week. 

The major provisions for individual differences of students are as follows: 

C-1 to C-4 inclusive. — After conference with his advisor, a student 
may postpone registration in one of the comprehensive courses 
(but only one) until the following year, in order to take a 
modem language or other subject that is introductory to the 
field he is considering for special study. 



•C-7, C-8, and C-9 must together amount to 8 or more hours a week, throughout the year. 
Three laboratory hours will be counted as one hour. Any course described or listed in this Bulletin 
mav be substituted for C-7, C-8, and C-9 with certain exceptions as are stated in this Bulletin. 



174 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION FOR THE GENERAL COLLEGE 

C-2. — This course is elective for students of the superior group of 
the entering class as determined by the Board of University 
Examiners, if such students begin science programs which 
include at least two physical science subjects. 

C-4. — This course is elective for students of the superior group of 
the entering class. 

C-6. — Students who are particularly interested in Biology, or who 
contemplate further work in this field, are advised to take C-6 
in place of C-2 during the freshman year. Upon satisfactory 
completion of the first half of C-6, based upon progress reports 
and the recommendation of their instructors, such students 
may elect Bly. 101-102 (which begins in the second semester) 
as a foundation for further work in Biology. 



I 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 175 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

SOCIAL SCIE^'CES 

C-1. (11-12). — Man and the Social World. 4 hours per week throughout the 
year. 

Designed to develop and stimulate the ability to interpret the interrelated problems of the 
modern social world. The unequal rates of change in economic life, in government, in education, 
in science, and in religion are analyzed and interpreted to show the need for a more effective co- 
ordination of the factors of our evolving social organization of today. Careful scrutiny is made 
of the changing functions of social organizations as joint interdependent activities so that a 
consciousness of the significant relationships between the individual and social institutions may 
be developed, from which consciousness a greater degree of social adjustment may be achieved. 

CEs. 13. — Economic Foundations of Modern Life. 5 hours per week during 
one semester. Offered each semester. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. 

Emphasis on the functioning of the economic system. Economic organization and institutions 
as parts of the economic order in their functional capacities. The understanding of economic 
principles and processes, especially those relating to value, price, cost, rent, wages, profits, and 
interest, insofar as such knowledge is necessary in understanding the economic situation of the 
present day. The evaluation of economic forces and processes in terms of their contribution to 
social well being. Prerequisite for advanced standing in Economics and Business Administration. 

CBs. 141-142. — Elementary Accounting. 3 hours per week throughout the year. 
Designed to provide the basic training in accounting. Prerequisite for advanced standing in 
Economics and Business Administration. 

CEs. 15. — Elementary Statistics. 3 or more hours per week during one semes- 
ter. Offered each semester. 

The statistical method as a tool for examining and interpreting data ; acquaintance with such 
fundamental techniques as find application in business, economics, biology, agriculture, psychology, 
sociology, etc. ; basic preparation for more extensive work in the field of statistics. Prerequisite 
for advanced standing in Economics and Business Administration. 

CEn. 13. — Introduction to Education. 3 hours per week during second semester. 

An attempt is made to foreshadow the field of Education so that the student may see the whole 
field before he studies its detailed and technical parts. Butterwick and Seegers, An Orientation 
Course in Education. 

CHy. 13. — History of the Modern World. 4 hours per week during one semes- 
ter. Offered each semester. Pi-erequisite: C-1. Designed for General College 
students. Prerequisite to advanced courses in History. 

The historical background of present day civilization is considered insofar as that back- 
ground has been developed in the fabric of the historical movements since 1815. The political, 
economic, social, religious, artistic, and cultural aspects of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries 
are studied. 

CPl. 13. — Political Foundations of Modern Life. 4 hours per week throughout 
one semester. Offered each semester. Prerequisite: C-1. Designed for General 
College students. Prerequisite to advanced courses in Political Science. 

An examination of the principles and practices of our political institutions ; how government 
functions in the United States; what information can be drawn from the practices of other 
countries. 

Recommended for students who intend to take advanced work in political science. 

CSy. 13. — Sociological Foundations of Modem Life. 4 hours per week during 
one semester. Offered each semester. Prerequisite: C-1 or extra reading. 

Meaning and scope of sociology ; relation to other social studies. The individual and various 
social groups and processes. Social disorganization and reorganization. 

Special emphasis on concrete community studies. Visits will be made to various state institu- 
tions and philanthropic agencies. 



176 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION FOR THE GENERAL COLLEGE 

NATURAL SCIENCES 

C-2. (21-22). — Man and the Physical World. 4 or more hours per week 
throughout the year. 

An attempt to survey the phenomena of the physical universe with particular reference to 
man's immediate environment ; to show how these phenomena are investigated ; to explain the 
more important principles and relations which have been found to aid in the understanding of 
them ; and to review the present status of man's dependence upon and ability to utilize physical 
materials, forces, and relations. The concepts are taken mainly from the fields of physics, 
chemistry, astronomy, geology, and geography, and they are so integrated as to demonstrate thsir 
essential unity. The practical and cultural significance of the physical sciences is emphasized. 

C-42. — General Mathematics. 4 or more hours )per week during one semester. 
Offered each semester. 

Designed to acquaint the student with the general nature of mathematics, the manner in 
which the mathematical mode of thought is used in the world of today, and the role it has occupied 
in the development of that world. A survey of some of the fundamental principles and methods 
of procedure in the main branches of elementary mathematics, with considerable attention being 
given to the utilization and cultural importance of the subject and its relation to other branches 
of knowledge. 

C-6. (61-62). — Man and the Biological World. 4 hours or more per week 
throughout the year. 

Designed to give the student a general knowledge and appreciation of the world of living 
things. The biological problems and principles that are associated with the organism.'8 role as : 
(1) a living individual, (2) a member of a race, (3) a product of evolutionary processes, and 
(4) a member of a socially and economically intei>related complex of living organisms, supply 
the main sequence and material of the course. Special attention is given to man's place in 
the organic world and to human qualities that have a biological basis. 

Bly. 101-102. — General Animal Biology. 1 hour, and two 2-hour laboratory 
periods thi'oughout the year. Bly. 101 is open to students who have satisfactorily 
completed the first half of C-6; Bly, 102 is open to those who have completed 
C-6 and Bly. 101. Bly. 101 is offered only during the second semester, Bly. 102 
only during the first semester. 

An introduction to the morphology, physiology, development and classification of vertebrate 
and invertebrate animals. Designed to supplement and extend the work of C-6, to supply the 
necessary foundation for Upper Division work in Biology, and to give training in laboratory 
methods and technique. NOTE : Together with C-6, Bly. 101-102 meets the requirements in General 
Biology for entrance into a medical or dental school. Superior students taking the pre-dental 
program should elect C-6 and Bly. 101 during their freshman year in order to complete their 
program in the usual three-year time. Bly. 101 is a prerequisite for Bly. 209-210 ; Bly. 101-102 is 
required of all those who major in Biology in the Upper Division. 

CAy. 23. — Descriptive Astronomy. 3 hours, and 2 hours laboratory-observing, 
during the first semester. 

A survey of the astronomical universe. The earth as an astronomical body ; the solar system ; 
stars and nebulae ; the galaxy ; the constellations ; astronomical instruments and their uses ; 
amateur telescope making. 

CMs. 23-24. — Basic Mathematics. 4 or more hours per week throughout the 
year. Prerequisite: C-42 except for the superior group in Mathematics. 

In place of the traditional college algebra, trigonometry, and analytic geometry in succession, 
this course offers a completely new sequence of topics including much of the above plus a liberal 
amount of the calculus. Thus the student will obtain early a working knowledge of such mathe- 
matics as is basic to the study of the sciences and other subjects, and needed for the cultivation 
of habits productive of clear thinking, writing, and speaking. Moreover, the choice of material 
is so made as to present mathematics as an integrated whole, and at the same time to show its 
correlation with other subjects in the curriculum. 



DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 177 

Cy. 101-102. — General Chemistry. 3 hours class and 3 hours laboratory per 
week throughout the year. 

F\indamental laws and theories of chemistry. Non-metallic elements and their compounds ; 
metals and their compounds and some of their uses. NOTE: This course is required for all students 
who intend to enter the College of Engineering or the School of Pharmacy and for those who 
major in Chemistry in the Upper Division. 

CPs. 43. — The Psychological Foundations of Modern Life. 3 hours per week. 

The social and personal implications of psychology to every day living. An understanding 
of human motivation and one's own personality. A study of how the individual acquires and 
organizes sensory experiences and how these are used in the guidance of effective thinking and 
behavior. 

THE HUMANITIES 

C-3. (31-32). — Reading, Speaking and Writing. 4 or more hours per week 
throughout the year. 

Designed to furnish the training in reading, speaking and writing necessary for the student's 
work in college and for his life thereafter. This training will be provided through practice and 
counsel in oral reading, in silent reading, in logical thinking, in fundamentals of form and style, 
in extension of vocabulary and in control of the body and voice in speaking. Students will be 
encouraged to read widely as a means of broadening their interests and increasing their apprecia- 
tion of literature. 

C-41. — Man and His Thinking. 4 or more hours per week during one semester. 
Offered each semester. 

Both in private life and vocational life man is faced with the necessity of making decisions 
and of solving problems. The principal aims are (1) to develop ability to think with greater 
accuracy and thoroughness and (2) to develop ability to evaluate the thinking of others. The 
material used applies to actual living and working conditions. The ease method is used to insure 
practice, and numerous exercises are assigned. 

C-5. (51-52). — The Humanities. 4 hours per week (2 lecture and 2 discussion) 
throughout the year. 

A study of man as he has expressed himself in literature, philosophy, the graphic and plastic 
arts, and music. Objectives — that the student shall increase his understanding and enjoyment of 
the arts, learn something of the methods of serious and systematic thinking, gain a more thor- 
ough understanding of the world in which he lives and of the rich and abundant experience it 
has to offer, and evolve for himself a serviceable philosophy of life. The main body of the course 
is devoted to a consideration of the basic ideas which have been most significant in man's cultural 
development (classicism, romanticism, realism, and idealism) as expressed in drama, poetry, fiction, 
music and the graphic and plastic arts. The course is open to all second-year students in the 
General College and to all Upper Division students with the permission of the Dean of the 
General College. 

CEh. 33. — Effective Writing. 4 or more hours per week during one semester. 
Offered each semester. Prerequisite: C-3, or permission of C-3 Course Chair- 
man. Open to Upper Division students. 

Designed to aid the student to present his ideas in writing which is not only accurate and 
clear but pleasing and attractive to the reader. Students are encouraged to do creative work. 

CEh. 34. — Reading for Leisure. 4 or more hours per week during one semes- 
ter. Offered each semester. Prerequisite: C-3, or permission of C-3 Course 
Chairman. Open to Upper Division students. 

Designed to aid the student in planning for himself a well-rounded, leisure-reading program 
which will serve to keep him abreast of the best in contemporary thought and literature. 

CEh. 35-36. — Literary Masters of America. 3 hours per week either semester 
or throughout the year. 

The writers emphasized are selected from the most eminent American authors between Irvine 
and Frost, such writers aa everyone should or would like to know, regardless of his intended 
vocation. 



178 BULLETIN OF L\ FORM AT ION FOR THE GENERAL COLLEGE 

CEh. 37-38. — Literary Masters of England. 3 hours per week either semester 
or throughout the year. 

The most interesting and significant English writers are read and discussed, primarily for 
an appreciation of their art and outlook on life. Prospective English Majors should elect this 
course the sophomore year. 

CEh. 313-314. — Masterpieces of World Literature. 3 hours per week either 
semester or throughout the year. 

A lecture and reading course designed to acquaint the student with some of the greatest 
books in the world, books which every educated man should know. 

CFh. 33-34. — Reading of French. 3 hours per week throughout the year. 
(CFh. 33 is also offered in the second semester, and CFh. 34 in the first semes- 
ter.) Open to those students who have had no previous work in French. This 
course or equivalent prerequisite to other courses in French. 

A beginning course, basic for further study. The main objective is the attainment of the 
maximum reading ability that can be developed in one year. Grammar and pronunciation are 
subordinated. Reading of easy texts is begun at once. 

Gk. 33-34. — Beginners' Greek. 3 hours per week throughout the year. 

A beginning course basic for further study, designed to introduce the student to the study 
of Greek and to develop a moderate reading ability. 

CGn. 33-34. — Reading of German. 3 hours per week throughout the year. 
Open to those students who have had no previous work in German. This course 
or equivalent prerequisite to advanced courses in German. 

This course is designed to give students an opportunity to attain, without stressing formal 
grammar, a moderate proficiency in the reading of German. Hagboldt, Allerlei, Fabeln. 

CSh. 33-34. — Reading of Spanish. 3 hours per week throughout the year. 
Open to those students who have had no previous work in Spanish. This course 
or equivalent prerequisite to advanced courses in Spanish. 

Designed to give students an opportunity to attain, without stressing formal grammar, a 
moderate proficiency in the reading of Spanish. 

CSc. 33. — Eflfective Speaking. 4 hours per week during one semester. Oflfered 
each semester. Prerequisite: C-3. Prerequisite to advanced courses in Speech. 

Designed to aid the student through demonstration and practice to talk effectively to a group. 



ADDITIONAL ELECTIVE COURSES FOR UPPER DIVISION 179 



ADDITIONAL ELECTIVE COURSES OR COURSES SPECIFIED FOR ADMISSION TO 
CERTAIN CURRICULA OF THE UPPER DIVISION 

(Descriptions of departmental courses will be found in the Bulletin of Information for 
the Upper Division.) 

Acy. 125-126. — Agricultural Chemistry 
Ae. 11 A. — Fundamentals of Architecture 
Cy. 101-102.— General Chemistry 
Cy. 111-112.— General Chemistry 
Cy. 201-202.— Analytical Chemistry 
Cy. 211-212.— Analytical Chemistry 
CI. 223, 226, 329.— Surveying, Higher Surveying 
Gpy. 201. — Geography of the Americas 
In. 111-112. — Industrial Arts Mechanical Drawing 
In, 211-212.— Industrial Arts General Shop 
Ig. 261-262. — Introduction to Engineering 
Jm. 213-214. — Propaganda, Introduction to Journalism 
Jm. 215-216. — History of Journalism, Principles of Journalism 
Ms. 353-354. — Differential and Integral Calculus 
Ml. 181-182. — Engineering Drawing, Descriptive Geometry 
Ml. 287-288. — Mechanism and Kinematics, Elementary Design 
Pg. 11 A. — Fundamentals of Pictorial Art 
Pgy. 221-222. — Practical Pharmacognosy 
Fhy. 223-224.— Galenical Pharmacy 

Ps. 101-102, 103-104. — Elementary Physics and Laboratory 
Ps. 205-206, 207-208.— Principles of Mechanics, Heat, Sound, Electricity, and 
Light, and Laboratory 

Ps. 211-212, 207-208.— Elementary Physics and Laboratory 



180 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION FOR THE GENERAL COLLEGE 

ADMISSION TO THE UPPER DIVISION 
GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL STUDENTS 

After the student has completed the work of the General College and received a certifi- 
cate of graduation, he may enter one of the colleges or professional schools of the Upper 
Division by meeting the specific admission requirements of that college or school. A student 
remaining in the General College to complete one or more specific requirements may, with 
the approval of the Dean of the College he expects to enter in the Upper Division, take 
additional work which may count in the Upper Division. 

The Board of University Examiners administers the admission requirements of the 
Upper Division. Besides the certificate of graduation from the General College, the student 
must be certified by the Board that he is qualified to pursue the work of the college or 
school he wishes to enter. 

In addition to the general requirements stated above, the various colleges and schools 
of the Upper Division have specific requirements for entrance. These requirements are 
listed below for the curricula of the several colleges and schools. Students in the General 
College may prepare to meet these requirements by taking as electives the courses indicated 
under the various curricula presented. 

SPECIFIC REQUIREMENTS 
COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

BACHELOR OF ARTS 

There are no specific requirements for admission to the curriculum leading to the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts. However, it will be much easier to earn a major in the College 
of Arts and Sciences if the student elects courses in the contemplated major fields as a 
part of his General College program. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

There are no specific requirements for admission to the curriculum leading to the 
degree of Bachelor of Science. However, it is impossible to earn a major in four semesters 
in some departments of the College of Arts and Sciences, and it is distinctly to the advantage 
of the student to include as much as he can of the contemplated major field in his General 
College program. 

BACHELOR OF ARTS IN JOURNALISM 

It is strongly recommend-jd that Journalism 213, 214, 215, and 216 be taken for electives 
C-7 and C-8 in the General College. However, if they are not so taken it will be possible 
to arrange for them in the program of studies in the College of Arts and Sciences. Any 
elective may be taken for C-9. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHEMISTRY CURRICULUM 

Additiona] requirements for admission to the Bachelor of Science in Chem,istry Cur- 
riculum : 

Cy. 101-102, Cy. 111-112, CMs. 23-24, iMs. 353-354, Cy. 201-202, and Cy. 211-212. The 
student should attempt to finish these courses before entering the Upper Division; if he is 



ADMISSION TO THE UPPER DIVISION 181 

unable to complete all of them before entering the Upper Division it will be necessary to 
take them in the Upper Division. 

This program does not preclude the possibility of a free elective in the sophomore year. 
The student should discuss this matter with his adviser or the Dean of the General College. 

COMBINED ACADEMIC AND LAW CURRICULA 

Additional requirements for admission to the Combined Academic and Law Curricula: 
The College of Arts and Sciences offers three different curricula in combination with 
Law. One of them leads to the degree of Bachelor of Arts, another to the degree of Bachelor 
of Arts in Journalism, and the third to the degree of Bachelor of Science. 

In order to complete one of these curricula in the shortest possible time, it is necessary 
that a student select as electives in the General College courses which will form an integral 
part of his major in the College of Arts and Sciences. For this purpose it is urged that 
before he registers for any elective in the General College he confer with the head of the 
department offering his contemplated major. 

PRE-MEDICAL CURRICULUM 

The requirements are the same as for admission to the Bachelor of Science curriculum. 
Insofar as possible the student should choose as electives in the General College sciences 
and foreign language courses required for admission to the medical college of his choice. 

THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PHARMACY 

Additional requirements for admission to the curriculum leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy: 

Students planning to study pharmacy are advised to offer Cy. 101-102, General Chemistry, 
for C-7; Phy. 223-224, Galenical Pharmacy, for C-8; Pgy. 221-222, Practical Pharmacognosy, 
for C-9. Students of the superior group are advised to offer Cy. 101-102, General Chemistry, 
for C-2; CMs. 23-24, Basic Mathematics, for C-4; and Ps. 101-102, 103-104, General Physics, 
for C-7. 

Women Students 

In accordance with an act of the 1935 Legislature, women who present at least 32 hours 
of acceptable college credits may be permitted to enroll in the University of Florida as 
sophomores to study Pharmacy. To meet this requirement credits in English, botany, 
biology, mathematics, physical sciences, social sciences, and psychology are preferable. 

Required Curriculum for Women Students. Women students are limited in their selec- 
tion of courses to those which are prerequisite for admission to the School of Pharmacy. 

COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 
Additional requirements for admission to the College of Agriculture: 

Students are required to have completed the following courses as electives in the General 
College: Acy. 125-126, Agricultural Chemistry, or Cy. 101-102, General Chemistry, for C-7; 
nine hours of electives in Agriculture courses, to be limited to one course per department, 
for C-8 and C-9. 



182 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION FOR THE GENERAL COLLEGE 

All students working toward the B.S.A. degree in the College of Agriculture are required 
to elect nine hours from the following list: 

1. Sis. 301.— SoUs 

2. Al. 211. — Principles of Animal Husbandry; or 
Al. 309. — Fundamentals in Animal Husbandry; or 
Dy. 311. — Principles of Dairying; or 

Py. 301. — Fundamentals in Poultry Production 

3. As. 201. — Agricultural Economics; or 
As. 306. — Farm Management; or 

As. 308.— Marketing; or 

As. 408. — Marketing Fruits and Vegetables 

4. Ey. 201. — Man and Insects; or 

Ey. 301. — Introduction to Entomology 

5. He. 301. — Principles of Horticulture; or 
He. 315. — Citrus Culture; or 

He. 312. — Vegetable Gardening 

6. Ag. 301. — Drainage and Irrigation; or 
Ag. 303. — Farm Shop; or 

Ag. 306. — Farm Machinery 

7. Ay. 321.— Field Crops; or 

Ay. 324. — Forage and Cover Crops 

8. Fy. 313. — Farm Forestry; or 

Fy. 414. — Wood Preservation and Seasoning 

9. Bty. 303-304.— General Botany 
10. Ps. 226. — Agricultural Physics 

Students intending to major in Agricultural Chemistry are required to take Cy. 101-102 
instead of Acy. 125-126. 

Students planning to major in General Agriculture should take Dy. 311 as an elective 
in their sophomore year. 

Students planning to major in Dairy Manufactures !?hould take Ps. 226 as an elective 
in their sophomore year. 

THE SCHOOL OF FORESTRY 

Additional requirements for admission to the School of Forestry: 

Students should have completed the following courses as electives in the General College: 

Cy. 101-102, General Chemistry, or Acy. 125-126, Agricultural Chemistry, for C-7; Bty. 

303-304, General Botany, for C-8; Fy. 220, Introduction to Forestry, for C-9. 

THE SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE AND ALLIED ARTS 

ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING CONSTRUCTION, AND LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 

Additional requirements for admission to the curricula leading to the degrees of 
Bachelor of Architecture, Bachelor of Science in Building Construction, or Bachelor of 
Science in Landscape Architecture: 

Students are required to have completed the following courses as electives in the Gen- 
eral College: Ae. 11 A, Fundamentals of Architecture, for C-7 and C-8; and CMs. 23-24, 
Basic Mathematics, for C-9. 



J 



ADMISSION ro THE UPPER DIVISION 183 

Students may begin Fundamentals of Architecture at any lime since the work is taught 
by the project method as described in the Bulletin of Information for the Upper Division. 
Those who wish to begin the work the first year in the General College may postpone C-2 
until the second year and substitute half of Ae. IIA, Fundamentals of Architecture, in 
its place. In such cases, students will continue the work of Fundamentals of Architecture 
as C-8 the second year. 

PAINTING AND COMMERCIAL ART 

Additional requirements for admission to the curricula leading to the degrees of 
Bachelor of Fine Arts, or Bachelor of Arts in Commercial Art: 

Students are required to have completed the following courses as electivea in the Gen- 
eral College: Pg. 11 A, Fundamentals of Pictorial Art, for C-7 and C-8; and any elective 
for C-9. 

Students may begin Fundamentals of Pictorial Art at any time since the work is taught 
by the project method as described in the Bulletin of Information for the Upper Division. 
Those who wish to begin the work the first year in the General College may postpone C-2 
until the second year and substitute half of Pg. IIA, Fundamentals of Pictorial Art, in 
its place. In such cases, students will continue the work of Pictorial Art as C-8 the 
second year. 

COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Additional requirements for admission to the curriculum in Business Administration 
proper or the curriculum in combination with Law, leading to the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Business Administration : 

Students must have completed the following courses: CEs. 13, Economic Foundations of 
Modem Life, CBs. 141-142, Elementary Accounting. CEs. 15, Elementary Statistics, for 
C-7, C-8, and C-9. 

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 

Additional requirements for admission to the College of Education: 

All students must be recommended by the Board of University Examiners for admission 
to the Upper Division and have the approval of the Admissions Committee of the College 
of Education. Certain groups must meet additional requirements, as listed below: 

The requirements for students whose field of concentration is to be Health and Physical 
Education are: HPl. 261, Football, for one-half of C-7; HPl. 263, Basketball, for one-half of 
C-8; HPl. 264, Track and Field, and HPl. 266, Baseball, for the second half of C-7; and 
electives for the second half of C-8. 

The requirements for students whose field of concentration is to be Agricultural Edu- 
cation are Acy. 125-126, Agricultural Chemistry', for C-7; and nine approved credits in 
A griculture. 

The requirements for students whose field of concentration is to be Industrial Arts 
Education are: In. 111-112, Industrial Arts Mechanical Drawing, for C-7; In. 211-212, 
Industrial Arts General Shop, for C-8; and elective for C-9. 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

Immediately upon entering the University, a student who expects to later register 
for a curriculum in engineering should confer with the Dean of the College of Engineering. 
Particular care should be used by each student in choosing subjects in the General College 
so that he will have the proper prerequisites for advanced subjects. 



184 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION FOR THE GENERAL COLLEGE 

In the freshman year, by exercising the substitution privilege for C-2 and C-4 properly 
qualified students should take Cy. 101-102, CMs. 23-24, and Ml. 181-182. In the sophomore 
year, they should take Ms. 353-354, Ps. 205-206-207-208 and the lower division departmental 
prerequisite for C-7, C-8, and C-9. 

Lower Division Departmental Prerequisites are as follows: 

Chemical Engineering Cy. 201-202; Cg. 342; Cg. 345 

Civil Engineering (General) CI. 223-226 

(Public Health Option) Cy. 201-202 

Electrical Engineering Ml. 287-288 

Industrial Engineering Ig. 261-262 

Mechanical Engineering Ml. 287-288 

The student should make every effort to complete these courses before entering the 
Upper Division, although he may be enrolled in the Upper Division "on probation" until 
he completes them. 

SUGGESTED SCHEDULES FOR GENERAL COLLEGE STUDENTS CONTEMPLATING ENTRANCE TO 

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

Freshman Year 
(All Curricula) 

C-1 Man and the Social World 

C-3 Reading, Speaking and Writing 

Military Science or Physical Education 

Cy. 101-102 (In lieu of C-2) — (4-4) 

CMs. 23-24 (In lieu of C-4) — (4-4) 

Ml. 181 Mechanical Drawing— (2-0) 

Ml. 182 _.._ Descriptive Geometry— (0-2) 

Sophomore Year 
(All Curricula) 

(]-5 The Humanities 

C-6 Man and the Biological World 

J Military Science or Physical Education 

Ps. 205-206 Physics— (3-3) 

Ps. 207-208 Physics Laboratory— (1-1) 

Ms. 353-354 Differential and Integral Calculus— (4-4) 

One departmeHtal prerequisite (see above). 



EXPENSES 185 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

EXPENSES 

GENERAL FEES REQUIRED BEFORE REGISTRATION 

1st Sem. 2nd Sem. 

General College, Freshmen $33.50 $32.00 

General College, Sophomores 33.50 32.00 

Upper Division Students 32.00 32.00 

Law College Students 42.00 42.00 

Graduate School 21.25 21.25 

All Non-Florida Students Pay Additional 50.00 50.00 

DESCRIPTION OF GENERAL FEES 

General Fees listed in the above table include the following: 

Registration and Contingent Fee: A fee of $15 per semester is charged every student. 

Special Fee: A fee of $2.50 per semester is required of each student for the con- 
struction and rehabilitation of buildings. 

Infirmary Fee: All students are charged an infirmary fee of $3.75 per semester which 
secures for the student in case of illness the privilege of a bed in the infirmary and the 
services of the University Physician and professionally trained nurses, except in cases 
involving a major operation. A student requiring an emergency operation which is not 
covered by the fee assessed may employ the services of any accredited physician whom 
he may select, and utilize the facilities of the infirmary for the operation. To secure this 
medical service the student must report to the physician in charge of the infirmary. 
When the operating room is used a fee of $5 is charged. 

Student Activity Fee: A fee of $20.50 is assessed to maintain and foster athletic sports, 
student publications, and other student activities. $10.25 of this fee is paid each semester. 
Student fees are passed by a vote of the student body and approved by the Board of Control 
before they are adopted. 

Swimming Pool Fee: A fee of 50 cents per semester is charged all students for use of the 
lockers and supplies at the swimming pool. 

Military Fee: A fee of $1.50 is charged all students registered for basic Military Science. 

TUITION 

No tuition, except in the College of Law, is charged Florida students. 
Non-Florida students, including those pursuing graduate work, pay tuition of $50 per 
semester in addition to the fees charged Florida students. 

Classification of Students. — For the purpose of assessing tuition, students are classified 
as Florida and non-Florida students. 

A Florida student, if under twenty-one years of age, is one: (1) whose parents have 
been residents of Florida for at least twelve consecutive months next preceding his registra- 
tion; or (2) whose parents were residents of Florida at the time of tlieir death, and who 



186 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION FOR THE GENERAL COLLEGE 

has not acquired residence in another state; or (3) whose parents were not residents of 
Florida at the time of their death but whose successor natural guardian has been a resident 
of Florida for at least twelve consecutive months next preceding the student's registration. 

A Florida student, if over twenty-one years of age, is one: (1) whose parents are resi- 
dents of Florida (or were at the time of their death) and who has not acquired residence 
in another state; or (2) who, while an adult, has been a resident of Florida for at least 
twelve consecutive months next preceding his registration, provided such residence has 
not been acquired while attending any school or college in Florida; or (3) who is the 
wife of a man who has been a resident of Florida for at least twelve consecutive months 
next preceding her registration; or (4) who is an alien who has taken out his first citizen- 
ship papers and who has been a resident of Florida for at least twelve consecutive months 
next preceding his registration. 

All students not able to qualify as Florida students are classified as non-Florida students. 

The status of the classification of a student is determined at the time of his first regis- 
tration in the University, and may not thereafter be changed by him unless, in the case 
of a minor, his parents move to and become legal residents of this State, by maintaining 
such residence for twelve consecutive months. If the status of a student changes from a 
non-Florida student to a Florida student, his classification may be changed at the next 
registration thereafter. 

A fee of $10 will be charged aU students registering incorrectly. In the case of non- 
Florida students, this fee will be assessed in addition to the tuition. In the case of Florida 
students who give an out of state address at the time of registration or any other time, 
this fee will be charged unless the student files a written explanation acceptable to the 
Registr-ar stating why the out of state address was given and giving proof that his resi- 
dence is Florida. 

SPECIAL FEES 

Fees which apply in special cases only are listed below: 

BREAKAGE FEE 

Any student registering for a course requiring locker and laboratory apparatus in one 
or more of the following departments is required to buy a breakage book: Chemistry, 
Pharmacy, Biology, and Soils. This book costs $5. A refund wUl be allowed on any unused 
portion at the end of the year, when the student has checked in his apparatus to the satis- 
faction of the departments concerned. 

ROOM RESERVATION FEE 

Students wishing to reserve rooms in the dormitories must pay a room reservation fee 
of $10 at the time such reservation is made. 

SPECIAL EXAMINATION FEE 

A fee of $5 is charged for each examination taken at a time other than that regularly 
scheduled. 

LIBRARY FINES 

A fine of 2 cents a day is charged for each book in general circulation which is not 
returned within the limit of two weeks. "Reserve" books may be checked out overnight, 
and if they are not returned on time the fin^ is 25 cents for the first hour and 5 cents 
an hour or fraction of an hour thereafter until they are returned. No student may check 
out a book if he owes the Library more than 50 cents in fines. 



UNIVERSITY DORMITORIES 187 

FAILURE FEES AND EXAMINATION FEES 

In lieu of a reexamination fee, a failure fee is charged for each failing grade a General 
College student has received since he last paid registration fees. This fee is assessed 
according to the following schedule and must be paid before the student is permitted to 
continue in the University: 

Each failing grade in C-1, C-2, C-3, C-41, C42, C-5, or C-6 $5.00 

Each semester hour failed in all other courses 2.50 

A non-refundable fee of $1, payable on the day of application, is charged for each 
application for a comprehensive examination. Applications are necessary only in case 
the student is not currently registered in the course concerned. 

PART-TIME STUDENTS 

Students who carry nine hours or less will be charged the registration and contingent 
fee of $15.00 a semester, the infirmary fee of $3.75 a semester and special fee of $2.50 
a semester. Such students must pay any tuition which their classification specifies. Such 
students are not entitled to any of the privileges attached to any other University fee. 

SUMMARY OF EXPENSES FOR THE YEAR 

Minimum Maximum 

General Fees and Course Expenses $ 64.00* $ 65..50* 

Books and Training Supplies for the Year 30.00 50.00 

Laundry and Cleaning 25.00 35.00 

Room and Board 204.50 300.00 

Estimated Total Expenses $323..50* $450..50* 

*Non-Florida students are charged $100 tuition per year in addition. 

REFUNDS 

Students resigning before the dates specified in the University Calendar are entitled 
to a refund of all fees except $5 of the registration and contingent fee. This $5 is the 
cost of service in registering the student and is never refunded. 

UNIVERSITY DORMITORIES 

DIRECTOR OF RESIDENCE 

All correspondence concerning dormitory reservations, as well as all reservation lees, 
should be sent to the Director of Residence, University of Florida, Gainesville. His office is 
located in Section F of Fletcher Hall, adjoining Fletcher Lounge. 

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA DORMITORY SYSTEM 

Administration. — The dormitories are administered by the Director of Residence, his 
staff, a student monitor for each of the sections into which the halls are divided, a head 
monitor, and an advisory Committee on Residence composed of three members of the 
University faculty. The purpose of the administration is to create in the dormitories an 
environment in which each student may obtain the best results from his college life. 

Student Discipline. — Student conduct is supervised by the student monitor in each sec- 
tion and the head monitor, all of whom are responsililr in tin- Director of Residence. All 



188 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION FOR THE GENERAL COLLEGE 

students are responsible for knowing and observing the principles of conduct as outlined 
in the statement of "Dormitory Policy", which is posted in each room, as well as in "Student 
Regulations, parts I and 11". 

Rooms and Facilities. — In the five halls which compose the dormitory system and accom- 
modate approximately 1100 students, there are 3 types of rooms: "single" — one room 
equipped for one student; "double" — one room equipped for two students; "two-room suite" 
— separate study room and bedroom equipped for two or three students. 

A bathroom with hot and cold showers and lavatories is located on each floor of each 
section. Room furnishings include single beds and mattresses, dressers, individual study 
tables, straiglit chairs, and wastebaskets. In Sledd, Fletcher, and Murphree Halls the 
dressers and closets are built-in units, and each room or suite is equipped with a lavatory. 
Every effort is made to provide adequate hot water, heat, light, and janitorial service and 
to maintain comfortable, useful equipment. 

Students must furnish linens (4 to 6 sheets; 2 to 3 pillowcases), 2 to 3 blankets, 
towels, pillows, toilet articles, 2 laundry bags, study lamps, and what other things they 
may require for their own convenience. 

Buckman Hall. — Constructed in 1906. Section E remodeled and modernized in 1940; 
sections B, C, and D not remodeled. Section E has double rooms equipped with lavatories; 
sections B, C, and D have rooms arranged in suites of study-room and bedroom, accom- 
modating three students per suite. Three floors. 

Thomas Hall. — Constructed in 1905; sections A, C, D, E, and F remodeled and modern- 
ized in recent years; section B the same as Buckman Hall. Remodeled sections have single 
and double rooms, equipped with lavatories (except for double rooms in section D). Three 
floors. 

Sledd Hall. — Constructed in 1929; fireproof brick and tile. Rooms arranged in suites, 
with a few singles. Four floors; sections A, B, C, J, H, and G. 

Fletcher Hall. — PWA dormitory, constructed in 1939; fireproof brick and tile. Rooms 
arranged in suites, with a few singles and some doubles. Lounge room adjoining the 
director's office. Four floors; sections D, E, F, K, L, M, N, O, and P. 

Murphree Hall. — PWA dormitory, constructed in 1939; fireproof brick and tile. Rooms 
arranged in suites, with a few doubles on fourth floor. Lounge room adjoining section H. 
Four floors; sections A. B, C, E, F, G, H, J, K, L, and M. 

FRESHMAN RESIDENCE 

All male students with less than one year of college work shall be required to room in 
the dormitories so long as rooms are available. Male students with more than one year of 
college work may be allotted such rooms as the Committee on Residence shall deem proper. 

No students whose parents are residents of the City of Gainesville or territory adjacent 
to the University, within daily walking or driving distance, shall be subject to the fore- 
going regulation. 



UNIVERSITY DORMITORIES 



189 



DORMITORY ROOM RATES PER STUDENT PER SEMESTER 



HALL 


Fletcher 


Murphree 


Sledd 


Buckman E 
& Thomas 
(A,C,E,F) 


Thomas D 


Buckman 
Thomas B 


TYPE OF ROOM 

2-Room Suites 
for 3 Students 







$36.00 








$24.50 




$41.00 

and 
$40.00 


$41.00 

and 
$40.00 


$40.00 

and 
$34.00 








for 2 Students 










$40.00 

and 
$37.50 


$37.50 




$32.00 


$30.00 




for 2 Students 




Single Rooms 
for 1 Student 


$45.00 

and 
$40.00 





$42.00 

and 

$40.00 


$38.00 


$38.00 






Large Rooms 








$30.00 




$24.50 









(In all cases where two prices are stated for a given type of room, the lower price is 
for rooms on the fourth floor.) 



REGULATIONS GOVERNING STUDENT RESIDENCE 

Room Reservations. — When an application for a dormitory room is made, the student 
must post a room reservation fee of $10.00. This fee is not a payment on room rent. It is 
a deposit which is necessary to obtain room assignment and is retained until the close of 
the regular school year. 

Assignments and Leases. — Applicants accepted for dormitory residence are assigned a 
room and sent a lease which must be signed and returned within two weeks after the assign- 
ment is made. This lease is for the period of the school year. If the applicant is under 
21 years of age, his lease must also be signed by his parent or guardian. 

To complete University entrance requirements, the student must secure a certificate of 
admission from the Office of the Registrar. 

Notice of Arrival. — Students must check in at the office of the Director before occupying 
their rooms, and check out at the same office before vacating. Those who have been assigned 
rooms but who will not arrive until after the official opening day of school should give 
notice of late arrival. All dormitories will be available for occupancy on September 6 and 
will remain open through Commencement Day. 

Withdrawals. — No student may move from a room in the dormitories to other quarters 
off campus without the consent of the Committee on Residence. 

Payment of Rent.— Ml rent is due and should be paid in advance at the beginning of 
each semester at the Office of the Business Manager. University registration may be can- 
celled because of failure to pay rent as required. Check or money order should be made 
payable to the University of Florida. 

Refunds. — If a room reservation is cancelled by or before August 30, the reservation fee 
will be refunded. After that date it is not refundable. Students not assigned a room will 
be granted a refund. 

Students permitted to move to quarters off campus may secure a refund of their reserva- 
tion fee and a proportionate amount of their room rent only on the condition that they 



190 BULLET m OF INFORMATION FOR THE GENERAL COLLEGE 

supply another occupant who is acceptal^le to the Committee on Residence and who is not 
living in the dormitories. 

Miscellaneous Charges. — The room reservation fee is suljject to charges made for break- 
age or other damage to the student's room. 

The following charges are optional and are in addition to the reservation fee and room 
rent: (1) $1.00 to $1.50 per semester for the rental of an easy chair. (2) $.50 per semester 
for each electrical appliance used, such as radio, iron, fan, etc. No charge is made for 
electric razors, electric clocks, or one individual study lamp. (3) S2.00 per semester for 
carrying charges, if the student pays room rent on the installment plan. This is an arrange- 
ment strictly limited and must be taken care of at the beginning of each semester. (4) 
$.35 per semester for the rental of a typewriter table. (5) $.50 for an extra room key 
or loss of key. (6) $.50 per night for guests after the first night. 

A charge may be made to students remaining in the dormitories during the Christmas 
holidays. Special permission must be obtained from the Director. 

Baggage. — All trunks and miscellaneous baggage should be clearly marked with the 
student's name and the hall to which be has been assigned. 

CAFETERIA 

The University operates a cafeteria offering a wide selection of wholesome foods. All 
students living on the campus are encouraged to take their meals there. The Cafeteria 
renders a great service to students who live off the campus, because it has the tendency 
to hold down prices for meals to a minimum in the majority of off-campus boarding houses. 
Meal tickets in denominations of $5 and $15 may be purchased at the Business Manager's 
office or at the Cafeteria Cigar Counter at a 5% discount. 

ROOMING HOUSES 

The administration of the University provides an inspection service and publishes a list 
of approved rooming houses for students. Rental in these houses ranges from $5 to $15 
per month per student. In a number of instances, room and board may be secured in 
the same house at rates from $25 to $40 per month. In case a student plans to live oflf 
the campus, he is urged to secure information from the Office of the Dean of Students 
to avoid embarrassment in dealing with landlords other than those of approved rooming 
houses. 

COOPERATIVE LIVING ORGANIZATION 

The Cooperative Living Organization, organized and operated by students to furnish 
economical living accommodations for its membership, is located at 237 N. Washington Street. 
The qualifications for membership are maximum income $25 per month, scholastic ability, 
and references of good character. In order to secure membership in the CLO students 
should apply to the CLO manager at the above address. 

SELF-HELP 

In view of the fact that there are comparatively few positions on the campus and in the 
City of Gainesville, it is strongly urged that no freshman come to the University with the 
expectation of depending very largely upon his earnings during his first college year. 

The Committee on Self-Help, of which the Dean of Students is chairman, undertakes 
to award positions on the campus to deserving upperclassmen. 



SELF -HE 1. 1' l*^! 

A few students are employed as laboratory assistants, office workers, waiters, and in 
other capacities. Application for employment should be made to the Dean of Students. 

REQUIREMENTS AND QUALIFICATIONS FOR STUDENT EMPLOYMENT 

A." The student must be making an average of C or its equivalent. 

B. The student must give evidence of need for the job, 

C. Possession of a car will be evidence of lack of need unless explained on the basis 
of necessity for the student's livelihood. 

D. Preference will be given to those having experience. 

E. No graduate students will be used except as graduate assistants in positions requiring 
the training which the student has secured in college. 

F. No student on probation of any kind will be given a position. If, while holding 
one, he is placed on probation, he will be required to resign the position. 

G. Due to scarcity of jobs, it is contrary to the policy of the University for students 
to hold two University jobs whose aggregate salaries exceed $200 per year. 

CLASSIFICATION OF WORK AND RATE OF PAY 

A. Laboratory Assistance: 

1. Technical— Requiring skill and training in a particular field 40c-45c per hour 

2. General — Requiring some skill above common labor 30c per hour 

3. Unskilled Labor 25c per hour 

B. Clerical : 

1. Highly skilled in a certain field, expert stenographer and typist.. ..40c-45c per hour 

2. Typing, filing, bookkeeping, and limited amount of stenographic 

work 35c per hour 

3. General office work 30c per hour 

C. Mechanical : 

L Skilled 35c per hour 

2. Unskilled 25cperhour 



192 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION FOR THE GENERAL COLLEGE 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOAN FUNDS 

The University of Florida is unfortunate in the paucity of the scholarships and loans 
which are open to students. Generally, the scholarships and loans which are available are 
administered directly by the donors. However, the Committee on Scholarships, of which the 
Dean of Students is chairman, collects all information relative to vacancies, basis of award, 
value, and other pertinent facts, and supplies this information to interested students. The 
Committee also collects information on applicants and supplies this information to the 
donors. In some instances, the Committee has been given authority to make the awards 
without consulting the donors. 

While scholarship, as evidenced by academic attainment, is an important feature in 
making awards, it is by no means the only consideration. The student's potential capacity 
to profit by college training and to make reasonable returns to society are important con- 
siderations in making all awards. 

Unless otherwise specified, applications for the scholarships and loans listed below should 
be addressed to the Chairman of the Committee on Scholarships and Loan Funds, University 
of Florida. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

County Agricultural Scholarships. — Provision has been made by a legislative act for a 
scholarship from each county — to be ofiFered and provided for at the discretion of the Board 
of County Commissioners of each county. The recipient is to be selected by competitive 
examination. The value of each scholarship is a sum sufficient to pay for board in the dining 
hall and room in the dormitory. Whether such a scholarship has been provided for by any 
county may be learned from the Clerk of the Board of County Commissioners, or the 
County Agent of the county in question. If it is desired, questions for the examination will 
be provided and papers graded by the University. 

Vocational Rehabilitation Scholarships. — The Rehabilitation Section of the State De- 
partment of Public Instruction provides limited assistance to persons who are physically 
handicapped. Requirements for eligibility for this assistance are as follows: the applicant 
must have a permanent major physical disability, he must be sixteen years old, he must have 
a good scholastic record and must take courses that will prepare him for some vocation 
at which he can earn a living. Applications for this assistance should be made prior to 
July 1 for the following school year. Students who wish to apply should write to the State 
Supervisor of Vocational Rehabilitation, Department of Public Instruction, Tallahassee, 
Florida. 

United Daughters of the Confederacy Scholarships. — Scholarships have been established 
by various chapters of the Florida Division, United Daughters of the Confederacy. Appli 
cations should be made to Mrs. David D. Bradford, Chairman of Education, 2109 Watrous 
Ave., Tampa, Florida. 

Loring Memorial Scholarship. — A scholarship maintained by Mrs. William Loring 
Spencer in memory of her distinguished uncle. General Loring. 

Arthur Ellis Ham Memorial Scholarship. — Established in 1919 by Mrs. Elizabeth C. Ham. 
in accordance with the last will and in memory of her husband, Captain Arthur Ellis Ham, 
a former student of the University, who fell in battle at St. Mihiel, France, on September 14. 
1918. Value: income from a fund of $5,000. 

Albert W. Gilchrist Memorial Scholarship. — This scholarship is open to students of the 
junior and senior classes. Scholastic achievement is the principal basis of this award. 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOAN FUNDS 193 

David Levy Yulee Memorial Scholarship. — This scholarship is awarded annually on the 
basis of scholarship, and is open to the members of the junior and senior classes. 

Duval High Memorial Scholarship.— An act creating the Memorial Duval High School 
Scholarship and authorizing and appropriating annually $275 of the Duval County funds as 
financial assistance for one worthy high school graduate is covered by House Bill No. 823, 
and was approved May 20, 1927. 

This scholarship, created to memorialize and assist in preserving the high standards and 
traditions of the Duval High School, where many of Florida's worthy citizens were educated, 
was established by the Board of County Commissioners of Duval County, Florida. Appli- 
cation should be made to the Chairman of the Board of County Commissioners, Jackson- 
ville, Florida, 

Children of Deceased World War Veterans Scholarship.— Any student whose father was a 
veteran of the World War and who died in service between the sixth day of April, 1917, 
and the second day of July, 1921, is eligible to apply for this scholarship. The maximum 
amount to be received by any one student within a period of twelve months cannot exceed 
$300. Applications should be made to C. Howard Rowton, State Adjutant, American Legion, 
Palatka, Florida. 

C.M.T.C. Scholarships.— The University of Florida offers a maximum of four scholar- 
ships of $75 each to students who are residents of Florida, Applicants must be graduates 
of an accredited Florida high school, present a proper admission certificate and certificates 
of good character, and they must be recommended by the Corps Area Commander. These 
scholarships are awarded for a period of four years provided the holder maintains a satis- 
factory scholastic average. 

Florida Bankers Associution Scholarship.— The Florida Bankers Association awards 
three scholarships annually: one for North and West Florida, one for Central Florida, and 
one for South Florida. These scholarships are awarded on an examination given at the 
Annual Boys' Short Course, The examination is given and the award is made by the State 
Boys' Club Agent, Applications for these scholarships should be made to the Dean of the 
College of Agriculture, 

The Colonial Dames of America Scholarships.— The Colonial Dames of America Scholar- 
ship, .$250: The Colonial Dames of America, Philadelphia Chapter Scholarship, $250; The 
Colonial Dames of America, St. Louis Chapter Scholarship, $250; Lindsey Hopkins Scholar- 
ship, $250; and the Mrs. John D. Rockefeller, Jr., Scholarship, $250. Applications for 
these scholarships should be made to Mrs. Walter W. Price, 1 West 72nd Street, New 
York City. 

Lake Worth Woman's Club Scholarship.— The Lake Worth Woman's Club, of Lake 
Worth, Florida, maintains a scholarship of $100 a year. Application should be made to 
the Chairman of the Scholarship Committee, Lake Worth Woman's Club, Lake Worth, 
Florida, 

Fairchild Scholarship National.— Mrs. Samuel W. Fairchild, of New York City, offers 
annually a scholarship amounting to $500. The award is made, by competitive examination, 
to a graduate in pharmacy who will do post-graduate work in the year immediately following 
his graduation. Examinations are held in June at the various colleges of pharmacy which 
are members of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. Further information 
may be obtained from the Director of the School of Pharmacy, 

Jacksonville Kiivanis Club Scholarships. — The Jacksonville Kiwanis Club maintains two 
scholarships for Jacksonville boys. Application should be made by letter to Mr. W. S. 
Faulk, Supervisor, Boys* and Girls' Work Committee, Jacksonville Kiwanis Club, Chamber 
of Commerce Building, Jacksonville, Florida, 



194 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION FOR THE GENERAL COLLEGE 

Duncan U. Fletcher Agricultural Scholarship. — Awarded by the United States Sugar 
Corporation in the memory of the outstanding character of our late Senator, a scholarship 
of $500 annually for a period of four years to students particularly interested in agricul- 
tural activities. Details governing the award of this scholarship together with application 
blank may be obtained from the Office of the Dean of Students. This scholarship will 
be open in 1941-42. 

Sears, Roebuck Scholarships. — Sears, Roebuck and Company has given funds to the 
University of Florida for the establishment of a number of scholarships in the amount 
of $90 annually, payable in nine monthly installments, to students particularly interested 
in agricultural activities. Details governing the award of these scholarships, together with 
application blank, may be obtained from the Office of the Dean of Students. 

At the end of each year the Sears, Roebuck Company awards a scholarship in the 
amount of |200 to the outstanding sophomore in the Sears, Roebuck Scholarship group. 

James D. Westcott, Jr., Agricultural Scholarship. — Awarded by the United States Sugar 
Corporation in memory of the first United States Senator from Florida, a scholarship of 
$500 annually for a period of four years to students particularly interested in agricultural 
activities. Details governing the award of this scholarship, together with application 
blank, may be obtained from the Office of the Dean of Students. This scholarship will 
not be open in 1941-42. 

LOAN FUNDS 

Rotary Loan Fund. — The Rotarians of Florida have set aside a considerable sum of 
money to be used in making loans to worthy boys who would not otherwise be able to attend 
college. The maximum loan is $150 per year. These loans are not available to freshmen. 
Applications for these loans should be made to the President of the Rotary Club of the city 
from which the student registers, or to Mr. K. H. Graham, Secretary-Treasurer, Rotary 
Educational Loan Fund, Inc., Language Hall, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida. 

Knights Templar Scholarship Loans. — The Grand Lodge of Knights Templar in the State 
of Florida has arranged a number of loans, in amount of $200 to each student, for students 
pursuing a course at the University of Florida. These loans are made available through 
application to the Knights Templar Lodge in the various cities in the state, and are handled 
by the Grand Lodge officers. Approximately thirty students receive aid from these scholar- 
ships each year. 

Knights of Pythias Scholarship Loans.— Several scholarship loans have been established 
by the Grand Lodge of the Knights of Pythias. Application for these loans should be 
made to Mr. Frank Kellow, Secretary-Treasurer, Student Aid Department, Grand Lodge 
of Florida Knights of Pythias, Fort Myers, Florida. 

William Wilson Finley Foundation. — As a memorial to the late President Finley, and in 
recognition of his interest in agricultural education, the Southern Railway Company has 
donated to the University of Florida the sum of $1,000, to be used as a loan fund. No loan 
from this fund to an individual is to exceed $150 per year. Recipients are selected by the 
Dean of the College of Agriculture, to whom applications should be sent. 

The American Bankers Association Foundation. — One loan scholarship is made to a 
student at the University of Florida whose major course is in banking, economics, or related 
subjects in classes of junior grade or above — value, $250. Application for loan should be 
made to the Chairman of the Committee on Scholarships and Loan Funds, University of 
Florida. 

Murphree Engineering Loan Fund. — On September 16, 1929, a friend of our late Pres- 
ident, Dr. A. A. Murphree, gave to the Engineering College $500, to be used as a revolving 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOAN FUNDS 19S 

loan fund. This fund was to be used in cases of emergency when, on account of financial 
difficulties, worthy students would be kept from graduating unless they could receive some 
assistance. Only in special cases are these loans made to members of the junior class. 
Applications for loans from this fund should be made to the Dean of the College of Engi- 
neering. 

Florida Association of Architects Loan Fund.— The Florida Association of Architects has 
created a revolving loan fund of $500 for the purpose of aiding needy students in Architecture 
who have proved themselves worthy. Applications should be made to the Director of the 
School of Architecture and Allied Arts. 

The National Society of the Colonial Dames of America in the State of Florida Loan 
Fund.— The National Society of The Colonial Dames of America in the State of Florida 
has established a loan scholarship for deserving students. This scholarship is administered 
by the Directors of the Florida Educational Loan Association. Application should be made 
to the Chairman of the Florida Educational Loan Association, University of Florida. 

The Ladies' Auxiliary Fund. — The Ladies' Auxiliary of the Florida State Pharmaceutical 
Association has established a loan fund for deserving students of pharmacy in need of 
assistance. Further information may be obtained from the Director of the School of 
Pharmacy. 

Tolbert Memorial Student Loan Fund. — Through the efforts of various student organiza- 
tions approximately $4,500 has been accumulated for making short time loans to students 
to meet financial emergencies. These loans are made in amounts not exceeding $50 and 
for a period not exceeding 90 days. The fund is administered by a committee of students 
in cooperation with the Office of the Dean of Students to whose office application for a 
loan should be made. 

Phi Kappa Phi Loan Fund.— The Florida chapter of Phi Kappa Phi, national honorary 
scholastic society, has established a $250 annual loan fund for Phi Kappa Phi members. 
Loans will be made principally to students intending to pursue graduate work. Application 
should be made to Mr. B. J. Otte, Chairman, Phi Kappa Phi Loan Fund, University of 
Florida. 

The Henry Hohauser Loan Fund. — This loan fund is confined to students in the School 
of Architecture and Allied Arts. Applications should be made to Director Rudolph Weaver, 
School of Architecture and Allied Arts, University of Florida. 

The Lions Club Agricultural Loan Fund.— The Lions Clubs of the State of Florida have 
set aside a fund to be used in making loans to worthy Florida students who plan to 
specialize in agriculture. In special cases these loans are made to graduate students, but 
they are not available for freshmen. Applications for loans from this fund should be made 
to the Dean of Students at the University of Florida. Mr. Harry Schad is Chairman of 
the local committee which passes on all loans. 

Senior Law Loan Fund. — A loan fund available to needy seniors in the College of Law 
was established by the Law class of 1938 and has been increased by subsequent gifts. 
Applications should be made to the Dean of the College of Law. 

Benton Engineering Loan Fund.— On May 20, 1938, a friend of the late Dean Benton 
gave to the Engineering College $500, to be used as a revolving loan fund. This fund is 
to be used in cases of emergency when, on account of financial difficulties, worthy students 
would be kept from graduating unless they could receive some assistance. Only in special 
cases are these loans made to members of the junior class. Applications for loans from 
this fund should be made to the Dean of the College of Engineering. 



196 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION FOR THE GENERAL COLLEGE 

The Woman's Auxiliary to the Florida Medical Association Loan Fund. — The Woman's 
Auxiliary to the Florida Medical Association has created a loan fund to assist worthy 
students who are the sons of medical doctors who have been members of the Florida 
Medical Association for at least ten years. Loans are made in amounts not exceeding $150 
for the school year. Application should be made to the OfiBce of the Dean of Students, 
105 Language Hall, University of Florida. 

PRIZES AND MEDALS 

Board of Control Awards. — The Board of Control annually awards the following medals: 

1. The General College Declamation Medals, to the two best declaimers of the General 
College. 

2. Junior Oratorical Contest Medals, to the two best orators of the junior class. 

3. Senior Oratorical Contest Medals, to the two best orators of the senior class. 
Harrison Company Award. — A set of the Florida Reports, Volumes 1-22, Reprint Edition, 

is oflFered by the Harrison Company to the senior law student doing all his work in this 
institution, and making the highest record during his law course. 

Harrison Company First Year Award. — Redfearn on Wills and Administration of Estates 
in Florida is offered by the Harrison Company to the first year law student making the 
highest average in twenty-eight hours of law taken in this institution. 

Redfearn Prize. — For the past six years Hon. D. H. Redfearn of Miami has offered a 
prize of $30 for the best essay by a law student on some topic of legal reform. 

Groover-Stewart Drug Company Cup. — Mr. F. C. Groover, president of the Groover- 
Stewart Drug Company, has given a large silver loving cup which is awarded to the grad- 
uating class in the School of Pharmacy attaining the highest general average in scholarship 
and is held by that class until this average is exceeded by a subsequent graduating class. 

David W. Ramsaur Medal. — Mrs. D. W. Ramsaur of Jacksonville offers a gold medal 
to that graduate of the School of Pharmacy making the highest average in scholarship 
and evincing leadership in student activities. 

Emrich Prize. — William Emrich, Orlando pharmacist, annually gives a year's member- 
ship in the American Pharmaceutical Association to the pharmacy student who obtains the 
highest scholastic average in pharmaceutical subjects during the junior year. 

Haisley Lynch Medal. — The University is grateful to Mrs. L. C. Lynch of Gainesville 
for her gift of the Haisley Lynch Medal for the best essay in American history. This medal 
is awarded annually by her in loving memory of her son, Haisley Lynch, a former student 
of the University, who was killed in action in France during the World War. 

Gargoyle Key. — Gargoyle Society awards a gold key each year to the graduate of the 
General College, who, in the opinion of the members, was outstanding in scholarship, leader- 
ship, initiative, and general ability. To be eligible for the award the student must have 
completed the fundamental course in Architecture or that in Painting. 

The David Levy Yulee Lectureship and Speech Contest. — Under the provisions of the 
will of Nannie Yulee Noble, a sum of money was bequeathed to the University of Florida, 
the income of which was to be used to bring outstanding speakers to the University to 
deliver lectures to the student body and faculty on the general topic "The Ideal of Honor 
and Service in Politics." 

In addition there is held annually a David Levy Yulee Speech Contest, the purpose 
of which is to stimulate student thought and encourage the creation and presentation of 
orations on a general idealistic theme. The contest is open to all students in the Univer- 
sity and the winners of first and second place receive cash awards. 



PRIZES AND MEDALS 197 

The James Miller Leake Medal.— This is a medal awarded annually for an essay in 
American History. The medal is given by the Gainesville Chapter of the Daughters of the 
American Revolution and named for the Head of the Department of History and Political 
Science of the University of Florida. 

Fine Arts Society Award. — The Fine Arts Society annually offers a gold medal and 
citation to the outstanding student receiving the baccalaureate degree in the School of 
Architecture and Allied Arts in recognition of his scholastic standing and leadership. The 
award is offered only when there are five or more students graduating. 

Phi Sigma Society Scholarship Aivard.— The Phi Sigma Society, national honorary 
biological society, awards each year a medal to the undergraduate or graduate student 
who is considered to have done the most outstanding research in one of the fields of the 
biological sciences. 

Sigma Tau Award.— The Upsilon Chapter of Sigma Tau awards annually a medal for 
scholastic ability to the sophomore in the CoUege of Engineering who, during his freshman 
year, made the highest average in his scholastic work. 

Sigma Delta Chi Scholarship Key Award. — Sigma Delta Chi, professional journalistic 
fraternity, awards annually a key to ten percent of the students graduating in journalism who 
have the highest scholastic average for the three years' academic work immediately preceding 
the year in which the nominees are candidates for degrees. 

Dillon Achievement Cup.— Mr. Ralph M. Dillon, Tampa, has given a large silver loving 
cup on which is engraved each year the name of that student graduating in journalism who, 
in the opinion of the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and the faculty of the 
Department of Journalism, possesses the highest qualifications for service to the press of 
Florida. 

Delta Sigma Pi Scholarship ^ey.— Each year the Florida chapter of the international 
fraternity of Delta Sigma Pi, professional business administration fraternity, awards a gold 
key to that male senior in the College of Business Administration who upon graduation ranks 
highest in scholarship for the entire course in Business Administration. 

Beta Gamma Sigma Scroll-- Each year the Florida chapter of Beta Gamma Sigma, na- 
tional honorary business administration fraternity, awards a scroll to the junior in the College 
of Business Administration who, during his preparatory work in the General College, made 
the highest scholastic average of all students wlio entered the College of Business Adminis- 
tration. 

Rho Chi Prize.— Iota Chapter of Rho Chi, honorary pharmaceutical society, annually 
gives a key to the junior pharmacy student who obtains the highest scholastic average 
during the sophomore year. 

The Chapter Scholarship Award.— A Certificate of Merit, signed by the President of 
the American Institute of Chemical Engineers and the Chairman of the Committee on 
Student Chapters, and a student membership badge are given to the junior in Chemical 
EIngineering who is a member of the Student Chapter and who has attained the highest 
scholarship standing during his freshman and sophomore years. 

Alpha Kappa Psi Scholarship Medallion. — Each year Alpha Kappa Psi, international 
professional fraternity in commerce, awards a white gold-bronze medallion to the Senior 
in the College of Business Administration who for his first three years at the University 
of Florida has been most outstanding in scholarship and campus activities and has shown 
the most likely qualifications for a successful business career in the future. 



198 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION FOR THE GENERAL COLLEGE 

GENERAL EXTENSION DIVISION 

The General Extension Division of the University of Florida offers educational oppor- 
tunities and numerous services to persons who are removed from the campus. 

The Division represents the Colleges of Arts and Sciences, Education, Lavf, Business 
Administration, and the School of Pharmacy of the University, and the College of Arts 
and Sciences and the Schools of Education and Music of the State College for Women. 

The work is carried on through departments. Formal courses for college credit and 
some high school work are offered through the Department of Correspondence Study. 
Wherever a sufficient number of students may be enrolled, university classes are offered 
by the Department of Extension Classes. Short courses of informal instruction are also 
offered to professional, business, trade and civic groups and organizations in an effort to 
give them the latest information in their respective fields of interest. 

The Department of Women's Activities offers information and instruction on subjects 
of particular interest to groups of Florida women. The Department of Auditory Instruction 
offers cultural and informational programs through lectures and discussion for the benefit 
of schools and special groups. Training for naturalization, citizenship schools and coopera- 
tion with the War Department in enrolling young men for the Citizens' Military Training 
Camps, because of their educational value, are some phases of the work of the Department 
of Citizenship Training. 

Through the Departments of Visual Instruction and General Information and Service, 
the world of letters and arts and music is carried to thousands in more isolated com- 
munities by means of plays, books, package libraries and art exhibits. A picture of the 
world and its work is circulated in stereopticon slides and films furnished for instruction 
and entertainment. The best in recorded music is provided for work in music apprecia- 
tion and culture. 

These and the various service functions of the Division establish contacts which enable 
the University to aid individuals, organizations and communities, and to contribute to 
adult education. 

SUMMER SESSION 

The University Summer Session is an integral part of the University. During the sum- 
mer, the General College, the College of Education, the College of Arts and Sciences, the 
College of Law, the College of Business Administration, the College of Agriculture, and 
the Graduate School operate, and the College of Engineering conducts certain field work. 

Since women are admitted to the Summer Session, many professional courses for primary 
and elementary school teachers are offered in addition to those usually given in the winter 
session. 



DIVISION OF ATHLETICS AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

In September, 1933, the University of Florida joined twelve other southern institutions 
in forming the Southeastern Conference. This conference represents colleges and univer- 
sities in the states of Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Florida, Tennessee, and 
Kentucky. 

The type of athletic program undertaken by the Department of Physical Education at 
the University of Florida compares with that in leading universities. A two-year course 



DIVISION OF MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS 199 

of required Physical Education is included in the curriculum of the Lower Division. Stu- 
dents who are exempt from Military Science are required to take this work, which is designed 
to present participation, training, and instructional opportunities in sports included in the 
intramural program. This course may also be taken as an elective. 

The second major subdivision of this Department is that in which are included inter- 
collegiate athletics. These sports are divided into two groups, generally known as major 
and as minor sports. In the major group are football, basketball, boxing, baseball, swim- 
ming, and track; and in the minor group, tennis, golf, and cross country. The equipment 
includes two baseball diamonds, four athletic fields, twelve handball courts, two indoor 
basketball courts, twelve tennis courts, a large outdoor swimming pool, a concrete stadium 
with a seating capacity of 23,000, and one quarter-mile running track, providing permanent 
seats for approximately 1,500. 

The function of the Intramural Department is to encourage the entire student body to 
participate in organized athletic sports and wholesome recreation. The Department pro- 
vides facilities for such competition and recreation; organizes and promotes competition 
between students, groups, and individuals; and fosters a spirit of fair play and sportsman- 
ship among participants and spectators. 

The program of intramural activities includes the following sports: golf, swimming, 
horseshoes, touch football, basketball, boxing, wrestling, diamondball, tennis, handball, 
water basketball, track, shuffle board, foul shooting, ping pong, badminton, cross country, 
and Sigma Delta Psi (national athletic fraternity) events. 

The proper utilization of leisure time through recreation and play is splendidly expressed 
in tills program. It is estimated that more than 2,500 students (about seventy per cent of 
the student body) take part in some sport sponsored by the Department. There is a decided 
trend toward the expansion of recreational facilities for a large group of students as opposed 
to intense competition for a few. 

The rules of the Southeastern Conference permit member institutions to award scholar- 
ships to athletes. Awards are made in the form of board, rent, books and similar items, 
instead of cash and may be continued from year to year to those students whose records 
prove satisfactory. As a rule, the awards are made only to those unable financially to 
attend the University without assistance and whose standards of conduct and scholarship 
are worthy of consideration. The awarding of Athletic Scholarships is subject to the 
approval of the University Scholarship Committee. 

Further information may be secured by writing to the Dean of Students, who is Chair- 
man of that Committee. 



DIVISION OF MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS 

The course in Military Science is required of all physically qualified General College 
students except adult and special students and students transferring from other universities 
or colleges. 

Students who complete the basic course and are selected by the Professor of Military 
Science and Tactics and the President of the University may elect the advanced courses. 
Students electing these courses must carry them to completion as a prerequisite to gradua- 
tion. Upon the completion of tliese courses, those students recommended by the Professor 
of Military Science and Tactics and the President of the University will, upon their own 
application, be offered a commission in the Officers' Reserve Corps, United States Army. 
Students electing to do advanced work in Military Science and Tactics must attend a 



200 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION FOR THE GENERAL COLLEGE 

summer camp, normally between their junior and senior years, established for this purpose 
by the United States Government. The War Department pays all expenses for the camp 
including mileage, rations, medical attendance, clothing, and laundry service, and in addi- 
tion the pay of the seventh grade. United States Army. 

The War Department provides a monetary allowance for uniforms and subsistence for 
advanced course students. 

Students who combine Band and Military Science will be allowed the necessary time 
from military drill to participate in Band practice and Band activities. 

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA BAND 

A student may elect to combine Band practice and drill with the study of Military 
Science and Tactics, in which case he will register for proper basic course in Military 
Science and attend theory classes in Military Science, combining Military drill with Band 
drill in accordance with the regulations of the Division of Military Science and Tactics. 
Completion of the Basic course in Military Science in this manner will qualify the student 
for advanced Military Science, as well as satisfy the University requirements for Basic 
Military Science. 

A student who is physically disqualified for Military Science, or is exempt from Military 
Science in accordance with university regulations, may elect to register for BD 111-112 the 
first year and BD 211-212 the second year. 

Students will not be permitted to earn more than eight hours (two years work) in Band, 
nor more than a total of eight hours in Military Science and Band. Positively no credit 
will be allowed for Band unless the student registers in the regular manner even though 
he participates in Band work. 

DIVISION OF MUSIC 

The Division of Music offers opportunity for membership in three musical organizations: 
the University Band, the Glee Club, and the Symphony Orchestra. 

All University of Florida students who qualify are eligible for membership in any of 
these organizations. 

The Band performs at all football games within the State and makes at least one out 
of state trip each season. The Band plays at military parades on the campus, gives a 
number of concerts and broadcasts during the second semester, and performs at such public 
functions as the Gasparilla Celebration, the Governor's Inauguration, etc. 

The University of Florida Glee Qub is composed of men enrolled in the University who 
are interested in choral singing. The Glee Club makes several trips through the State, 
particularly during the second semester. Members of the Glee Club are heard regularly 
each week over the radio in a broadcast period known as the University Hour. 

The University of Florida Symphony Orchestra afiFords an opportunity for the study 
and performance of symphonic and classical music, makes a number of trips through the 
State each season and gives a number of concerts and broadcasts on the campus. 

Private lessons are offered by the members of the faculty of the Division of Music. Thesr 
lessons are arranged as follows: 



THE FLORIDA STATE MUSEUM 201 

1. Orchestra and Band instruments, Mr. Brown. 

2. Voice, including radio broadcasting, Mr. DeBruyn. 

3. Piano, Organ, Harmony and Counterpoint, Mr. Murphree. 

Lesson periods are arranged at the convenience of the instructor and pupil. Instructors 
may be consulted concerning lesson periods and rates. 

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA LIBRARIES 

The libraries of the University are the General Library, the Experiment Station Library, 
the General Extension Division Library, the Law Library, and the P. K. Yonge Laboratory 
School Library. The libraries contain approximately 150,000 books. 

The General Library provides facilities for library work in the various courses offered 
by the University and for research work in the different fields. It has two large reading 
rooms which contain the Reserve Books, the General College Books, and the Reference 
Collection. Its stacks are accessible to graduate students and faculty members. 

The library has files of the principal American and foreign periodicals of general in- 
terest, as well as periodicals of special interest in connection with the work of various 
schools and colleges. About 1,450 periodicals are received. Being a depository of the 
United States documents, it receives all the publications of the Government. 

Among the resources of the library is a specieil collection of cataloged books and 
pamphlets which concern Florida and are written by Florida authors, and a large collection 
of state journals received through the courtesy of Florida newspaper editors. 

The Library is open from 7:45 A.M. to 10:30 P.M. every week day except Saturday, 
when it closes at 1 :30 P. M. During the regular session it is open on Sundays from 2 :00 
P.M. to 6:00 P.M. The Reserve Room is open on Sunday nights from 8:30 to 10:30. 

THE FLORIDA STATE MUSEUM 

The Florida State Museum was created by an act of the legislature in 1917 as a depart- 
ment of the University of Florida. 

The main objective of the Florida State Museum is to collect, preserve and interpret 
data concerning the history of Florida, both natural and civil. In the natural history of 
the state the endeavor is to collect the minerals and exhibit them in connection with their 
manufactured products of economics and commerce; to collect the fossils of vegetable and 
animal life showing the evolution of life through the geologic ages; to collect specimens 
of recent vegetable and animal life illustrating the flora and fauna of the state in connection 
with their economic and commercial enterprises. In the civil history of the state the 
endeavor is to collect material and data of the works of mankind from the early aborigines 
on up through the beginning of civilization to the present time; to maintain exhibits of 
artifacts of early man, and exhibits of articles in the economic, industrial and social life 
showing the advancement of civilization. 

To maintain a department of archives for the preservation of the records of the state; 
to maintain a library of publications pertinent to the general and diversified activities of 
the museum; to maintain a gallery of art for the preservation and exhibit of portraits of 
persons who have been responsible for making Florida a better place to live, and for the 
exploitations of works of art for the edification of and as a social center for our citizens; 
to maintain a department of museum extension among the schools and communities of 
the state; to publish reports, bulletins, and monographs of the progress of the work are 



202 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION FOR THE GENERAL COLLEGE 

some of the activities for which the Florida State Museum strives, and for which the 
law provides. 

In carrying on the general activities as above outlined the Florida State Museum now 
has a total of 359,843 specimens catalogued at an inventoried value of $386,293.94, the 
majority of which has been presented or provided by will. The museum is free to the 
public every day in the year. To April 1, 1941, the museum has had 52,679 visitors since 
its reopening in its new quarters May 1, 1939. 



HEALTH SERVICE 

Through the Student Health Service the University makes available to any student 
physical examinations, health consultations, and medical attention. General service is 
provided free of charge, but special fees are charged for services which are individual in 
character, such as dentistry, X-rays, laundry in the Infirmary, special drugs and serums, 
major surgery, special nurses, etc. No student, however, will be denied service because 
of inability to pay these fees. 

The University Infirmary and the offices of the Health Service are on the campus. The 
Infirmary is open day and night for the admission of patients. The Resident Physicians 
live at the Infirmary and their services are available at all hours in case of emergency. The 
Dispensary in the Infirmary building is open from 7 A. m. to 9 p. m., during which time 
physicians are in attendance and may be consulted. Emergency treatment may be obtained 
at any time by reporting to the Infirmary. 

It is the aim of the Health Service not only to function as a Health Service and render 
preventive measures, but to provide full hospital care in cases of illness. The Infirmary 
is rated as a Fully Approved Hospital by the Examining Board of the American College 
of Surgeons. 

The facilities of the Dispensary are such that any number of students can be given 
attention in a day. The Dispensary is maintained to offer conferences with physicians, ex- 
aminations, diagnosis, and treatment of minor injuries and illnesses which a student may 
suffer. The student is encouraged to use this service freely in order that he may avoid more 
serious illnesses by the lack of treatment or from improper treatment. In the Dispensary, a 
modem, well equipped drug room furnishes drugs to the student without charge. A labora- 
tory in connection with the Infirmary and Dispensary is in cheirge of a trained nurse- 
technician, rendering efficient service in prompt diagnosis. The normal capacity of the 
Infirmary, 45 beds, can be increased in emergencies. Ample provisions are made for the 
isolation of communicable diseases. A completely equipped operating room is maintained 
to provide facilities for major surgical operations. The Infirmary is equipped with a mobile 
unit X-ray, which is used for the examination of fractures, but the equipment does not 
provide sufficient service for an extensive diagnostic X-ray study of the intestinal tract, etc. 
This service is made available to students at actual cost of the materials used. 

Students enrolling in the University for the first time are furnished by the Registrar's 
Office a physical examination form which is to be completed by the family physician and 
attached to Registration papers. It is necessary that this physical examination by the home 
physician be completed in order that parents may be aware of defects which should be 
corrected prior to the student's entrance in the University. The correction of these defects 
is necessay in order that he may be in proper physical condition to begin his college work. 
On admission, the student is given a careful physical examination by the University 
Physician. 



FLORIDA U\I01\ 203 

There are three principal phases of the activities of the University Health Service: 
(1) personal attention, (2) sanitation, and (3) education. 

1. Personal Attention. — This division is concerned with the physical examination of 
students. A complete record of the physical condition of each student is made and filed 
when he is admitted to the University. From this record can be determined, in large 
measure, what procedure is essential to keep the student in the best physical condition 
during his academic life. The following are some of the phases of the work in the personal 
division: 

a. Provision for maintaining the health of normal, physically sound students; cooper- 
ation with the Department of Physical Education regarding physical exercise; edu- 
cation concerning right living; safeguarding of environment. 

b. Protection of the physically sound students from communicable diseases; early 
detection, isolation, and treatment of all cases of communicable diseases — tuber- 
culosis, diphtheria, scarlet fever, measles, typhoid fever, smallpox, mumps, etc. 

c. Treatment and professional care of all students who are ill or in need of medical 
advice or treatment. For extended care by the Health Service it is necessary that 
the student enter the Infirmary. Any student may be admitted to the Infirmary upon 
the recommendation of the University Physician. To all patients in the Infirmary 
the staff will furnish medical and nursing services. 

d. Reconstruction and reclamation: correction of defects, advice, and treatment of all 
abnormalities. 

2. Sanitation. — The student's environment should be made as hygienic as possible. 
Hence, this division concerns itself with the sanitary conditions both on and off the campus. 

3. Education. — Every student in the University is made familiar with the fundamentals 
of both personal and public hygiene. Through personal conferences education in hygiene 
and right living is conducted. 

VACCINATION 

Prospective students are advised to be vaccinated against smallpox and to be inoculated 
against typhoid fever. Unless a certificate is presented showing successful vaccination within 
five years, students will be vaccinated against smallpox at the time of registration. 



BUREAU OF VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE AND MENTAL HYGIENE 

A program of vocational guidance is carried on for the students through a series of 
tests, interviews, and the application of scientific occupational information. The Bureau 
offers a service to those encountering mental difficulties which interfere with their scholastic 
work. Further information concerning these services may be obtained from the office of 
the Director of the Bureau, Room 110, Peabody Hall. 



FLORIDA UNION 

Florida Union serves a three-fold purpose. It is the official center of student activities 
and presents a broad program of recreation and entertainment for the student body; it is 
the campus home of faculty, students, alumni, and friends of the University; it aids in 
establishing a cultural pattern which will distinguish Florida men. The building is open 
daily from 8:00 A.M. until 11:00 p.m. The game room, reading room, lounge rooms, and 



204 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION FOR THE GENERAL COLLEGE 

various meeting rooms are available to the student body. The offices of the Student Body, 
the Y.M.C.A., Alumni Association, and the Publicity Department of the University arc 
located in the Florida Union. A soda-fountain and the bookstore in the annex oflFer attrac- 
tive service at the most economical prices. A cordial welcome always awaits every student 
at the Florida Union. 

In addition to its facilities on the campus, the Union operates the University's Camp 
Wauburg, located on a beautiful lake about nine miles from the campus. Here students 
are offered opportunities for swimming, fishing, and other wholesome outdoor activities. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS AND PUBLICATIONS 

Student Government. — Student government in the University of Florida is a cooperative 
organization based on mutual confidence between the student body and the faculty. Con- 
siderable authority has been granted the Student Body for the regulation and conduct of 
student affairs. The criterion in granting authority to the Student Body has been the 
disposition of the students to accept responsibility commensurate with the authority granted 
them. Generally speaking, the fields of student activity include regulation of extra-curricular 
affairs and the administration of the Honor System. 

Every enrolled student^ having paid his activity fee, is a member of the Student Body 
and has an equal vote in its government. 

The University authorities feel that training in acceptance of responsibility for the 
conduct of student affairs at the University is a valuable part of the educational growth of 
the individual student. The Student Body is practically a body politic, occupying its fran- 
chise under grant from the Board of Control and subject to its continued approval. 

Student government is patterned on the state and national form of government, but 
adapted to the local needs of the Student Body. Powers are distributed into the three 
branches: (1) legislative, which is embodied in the Executive Council; (2) judicial, which 
is embodied in the Honor Court with penal and civil jurisdiction of all judicial matters; 
(3) executive, embodied in the President and shared with the Vice-President and the 
Secretary-Treasurer of the Student Body. Members of all three branches are elected directly 
by the Student Body once a year. 

Student government enacts and enforces suitable laws, and promotes athletics, debating, 
publications of the Student Body, entertainments of a general educational value, and such 
other activities as the Student Body may adopt. The officers of the Student Body are the 
President, Vice-President, Secretary-Treasurer, members of the Honor Court, Athletic 
Council, Executive Council, Lyceum Council, editors and business managers of student 
publications, and student members of the Board of Student Publications. 

Debating. — Practice in debating is open to all students through the programs of the 
varsity and General College debate squads. This work, which is sponsored by the Debate 
Club, is under the direction of the Department of Speech, and culminates in an extensive 
schedule of intercollegiate debates. 

Dramatics. — Any student has an opportunity to participate in several plays which are 
presented each year by the Florida Players, a dramatic group under direction of the Depart- 
ment of Speech. 

Executive Council. — The Executive Council is composed of representatives elected from 
the colleges on the campus and in general acts as administrator of Student Body affairs. 
The Athletic Council and the Lyceum Council have jurisdiction over their respective fields. 



STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS AND PUBLICATIONS 205 

Publications. — ^The Student Body publishes The Seminole, the year book; The Florida 
Alligator, the student newspaper; The "F" Book, the student's guide; and The Florida 
Review, the campus literary magazine. 

Y. M. C. A. — The purpose of the Young Men's Christian Association is to provide a 
medium through which the highest ideals of education and religion may be expressed in 
terms of service. The program of the Association is planned to meet definite needs as they 
become apparent. There is no membership fee. Any student may become a member by 
subscribing to its purpose and contributing to its support. A secretary having extensive 
experience with the problems of students is available for counsel and help. 

Social Fraternities. — Twenty-two national social fraternities have established chapters at 
the University; most of them have already built chapter houses and the others have leased 
homes. The general work of the fraternities is controlled by the Interfratemity Conference, 
composed of two delegates from each of the national fraternities. The national fraternities 
at Florida are Alpha Gamma Rho, Alpha Tau Omega, Beta Theta Pi, Chi Phi, Delta Chi, 
Delta Tau Delta, Delta Sigma Phi, Kappa Alpha, Kappa Sigma, Lambda Chi Alpha, Phi 
Delta Theta, Phi Gamma Delta, Phi Kappa Tau, Pi Kappa Alpha, Pi Kappa Phi, Pi 
Lambda Phi, Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Sigma Chi, Sigma Nu, Sigma Phi Epsilon, Tau Epsilon 
Phi, and Theta Chi. 

Professional and Honorary Fraternities. — Alpha Epsilon Delta, pre-medical; Alpha Kappa 
Psi, business; Alpha Phi Omega, service; Alpha Tau Alpha, agricultural education; Alpha 
Zeta, agricultural; Beta Alpha Psi, accounting; Beta Gamma Sigma, commerce; Delta Sigma 
Pi, commerce; Florida Blue Key, leadership; Gamma Sigma Epsilon, chemical; Gargoyle 
Club, architectural; Kappa Delta Pi, teachers; Kappa Epsilon, women's pharmaceutical; 
Kappa Gamma Delta, aeronautical; Kappa Kappa Psi, band; Kappa Phi Kappa, teachers; 
Los Picaros, Spanish; Phi Alpha Delta, law; Phi Beta Kappa, scholastic; Phi Delta Phi, 
law; Phi Eta Sigma, freshman scholastic; Phi Kappa Phi, scholastic; Phi Sigma, biological; 
Pi Delta Epsilon, journalistic; Pi Gamma Mu, social science; Rho Clii, pharmaceutical; 
Sabres, military; Sigma Delta Chi, journalistic; Sigma Delta Psi, athletic; Sigma Tau, engi- 
neering; Sigma Xi, scientific research; Tau Alpha Nu, forestry; Tau Kappa Alpha, debating; 
Thyrsus, horticultural. 

Clubs and Societies. — Agricultural Club; American Institute of Chemical Engineers, 
Student Branch; American Institute of Electrical Engineers, Student Branch; American 
Pharmaceutical Association, Student Branch; American Society of Civil Engineers, Student 
Branch; American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Student Branch; American Student 
Union, local; Astronomy Club; Bacchus, freshman social; Baptist Student Union; Benton 
Engineering Society; Block and Bridle Club; Cavaliers, social; Colonels, social; Commerce 
Qub; Debate Club; English Club; Episcopal Club, Student Branch; "F" Club, athletic; 
F. F. F. Qub (Y.M.C.A.) ; Fine Arts Club; Florida Fourth Estate Club, journalistic; Florida 
Players; Florida Rifles, rifle and pistol club; Forestry Club; Gator Pep Qub; Glee Qub; 
International Relations Club; John Marshall Debating Society; L'Apache, social; Leigh 
Chemical Society; Mathematics Colloquium; Mortar and Pestle, pharmacy club; Newell 
Entomological Society; Newman Club, Catholic Student Branch; Pirates, social; Propeller 
Qub, merchant marine society; Society for Advancement of Management. Student Branch; 
University Radio Guild; Wesley Foundation, Methodist Student Branch; White Friars, 
social; Y.M.C.A. 



206 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION FOR THE GENERAL COLLEGE 

HONOR SYSTEM 

The Honor System. — One of the finest tributes to the character of the students at the 
University of Florida is the fact that the Student Body is a self-governing group. The 
details of the system by which this result is reached will be explained to all freshmen during 
the first week of their enrollment in the University. However, each parent, as well as each 
prospective student, is urged to read the following discussion of the Honor System, as this 
phase of student government forms the keystone of the entire system. 

In addition to permitting student legislation on questions of interest to the members of 
the Student Body, execution of the laws passed, and the expenditure of student funds, the 
governing system at the University gives to the students the privilege of disciplining them- 
selves tlu^ough the means of the Honor System. Inaugurated by some of our greatest edu- 
cators in higher institutions of the nation and early adopted in some departments of the 
University of Florida, the Honor System was finally established in the entire University in 
1914 as the result of student initiative. This plan, having met with the approval of all 
officials of the University, was given the sanction of the Board of Control, and student repre- 
sentatives were selected by the students to administer the system. 

Among the basic principles of an Honor System are the convictions that self-discipline 
is the greatest builder of character, that responsibility is a prerequisite of self-respect, and 
that these are essential to the highest type of education. Officials of the University and the 
Board of Control feel that students in the University of Florida should be assumed to be 
honest and worthy of trust, and they display this confidence by means of an Honor System. 

The success of the System is dependent upon the honor of each individual member 
of the student body in that: (1) he is duty-bound to abide by the principles of the Honor 
Code, and (2) he is further pledged to report to the Honor Court such violations of the 
Code as he may observe. 

Many men coming to the University for the first time may feel hesitant about assuming 
this responsibility, inasmuch as early school training has created feelings of antipathy 
toward one who "tattle-tales" on a fellow-student. The theory of an Honor System ade- 
quately overcomes this natural reaction, however, when it is realized that this system is 
a student institution itself, and not a faculty measure for student discipline, and that to 
be worthy of the advantages of the Honor System each student must be strong enough 
to do his duty in this regard. In this way the responsibility for each man's conduct is 
placed where it must eventually rest — on himself. 

The Honor Code of the Student Body is striking in its simplicity; yet it embodies the 
fundamentals of sound character. Each man is pledged to refrain from: 

(a) cheating, (b) stealing, (c) obtaining money or credit for worthless checks. 

On the basis of this Code, students are extended all privileges conceived to be the 
basic rights of men of Honor. There are no proctors or spies in the examination rooms, each 
student feeling free to do his work, or to leave the room as occasion arises. Secondly, 
fruits and supplies are placed openly on the campus, with the confidence that each man will 
pay for any he may take. This system makes each man the keeper of his own conscience 
until he has proved to his fellow-students that he no longer deserves the trust placed in him. 

A breach of the System may be flagrant and serious, or it may be extenuated by cir- 
cumstances. It may need only mild corrective measures to help the violator obtain a finer 
conception of right and wrong; it may need strong measures. To enforce the System 
equitably the students have established the Honor Court. The Court is composed of twelve 



HONOR SYSTEM 207 

students and a chancellor all of whom are elected annually from the upper classes of the 
various colleges on the campus. Any student convicted by this Court has the right of 
appeal from its ruling to the Faculty Discipline Committee. A tribute to the efficiency oi 
the Honor Court in its existence on the Florida campus is realized in the fact that, since 
its establishment, a surprisingly insignificant number of the Court's decisions have been 
altered upon appeal. 

The penal purpose of the Honor Court should receive less stress, perhaps, than its 
educational purpose, which is its most important function. The responsibUity of acquaint- 
ing every member of the Student Body with the purpose, advantages, and principles of 
the Honor System is placed upon members of the Court. In line with this work, members 
of the Honor Court participate in the orientation program each year during Freshman Week. 
In addition to a series of explanatory talks at that time, special chapel programs are con- 
ducted by the Honor Court during the school year. Honor System talks are delivered in 
the high schools of the State upon request and at regularly scheduled times each spring, 
and radio programs are broadcast especially for the high schools from Station WRUF in 
Gainesville. In this way the Honor Court has endeavored to fulfill its responsibility to 
the men who undertake the problem of self-government and self-discipline at the University 
of Florida. 

The parent of every prospective student should feel that it is his responsibility to stress 
the paramount importance of honorable conduct on the part of his son while the latter is 
in attendance at the University of Florida. Dishonest action brings sorrow both to parent 
and to student. 

Because University students have proved worthy of the trust and responsibility involved 
in administering an Honor System, this feature of student government has become the 
greatest tradition at the University of Florida. It must be remembered that inasmuch as 
it is primarily a student responsibility, the future of the system rests with each new class 
of students entering the University. The University faculty and authorities pledge their 
support to the Honor System. Each student must support it, or, in failing to support it. 
contribute to the loss of this tradition. 



The University Record 

of the 

University of Florida 

Bulletin of the 



1941 

Sponsored jointly by the University of Florida and the 
State Department of Education 

First Term — June 11 to July 2 

Second Term — July 2 to July 23 

Third Temi — July 23 to August 13 




Vol. XXXVI, Series 1 No. 5 May 1, 1941 



Published monthly by the University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 

Entered in the post office in Gainesville, Florida, as second-class matter, 

under Act of Congress, August 24, 1912 

Office of Publication, Gainesville, Florida 



The Record Comprises: 

The Reports of the President to the Board of Control, the bulletins 
of information, announcements of special courses of instruction, and 
reports of the University Officers. 

These bulletins will be sent gratuitously to all persons who apply for 
them. The applicant should specifically state which bulletin or what in- 
formation is desired. Address 

THE REGISTRAR, 

University of Florida, 
Gainesville, Florida 



Research Publications.— Reseaich publications contain results of research 
work. Papers are published as separate monographs numbered in several 
series. 

There is no free mailing list of these publications. Exchanges with 
institutions are arranged by the University Library. Correspondence con- 
cerning such exchanges should be addressed to the University Librarian, 
University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida. The issue and sale of all these 
publications is under the control of the Committee on Publications. Requests 
for individual copies, or for any other copies not included in institutional 
exchanges, should be addressed to 

The Committee on University Publications, 
University of Florida, 

Gainesville, Florida 



[210] 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

PAGE 

School Calendar 212 

Administrative Officers 214 

Faculty 214 

Advisory Committee 216 

General Information 217 

Fees 220 

Expenses 221 

Library 221 

Recreation 221 

Admission :'. 222 

Residence Requirements .._ 223 

The General College 224 

Comprehensive Examinations 225 

The Bachelor's Degree „ 226 

The Graduate School 227 

Registration _ _ 228 

The Master's Degree 228 

Curricula 230 

Time Schedule and Description of Courses 236 

First Term 236 

Distributive Occupations Education 236 

Trade and Distributive Education 237 

Trade and Industrial Education 238 

Special Courses for Defense Training : 239 

Second Term 240 

Distributive Occupations Education 240 

Trade and Distributive Education 240 

Trade and Industrial Education 242 

Guidance _ _ 243 

Special Courses for Defense Training 243 

Third Term _ 244 

Distributive Occupations Eduction 244 

Trade and Distributive Education 244 

Trade and Industrial Education 245 

Guidance _ _ 246 

Special Courses for Defense Training 246 

Application for Admission 247, 249 



[211] 



212 BULLETIN OF SCHOOL OF TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 



IMPORTANT NOTICE 

1. All prospective students who plan to enroll at the Summer 
School of Trade and Industrial Education should fill out the applica- 
tion blanks found on pages 247 and 249 of this bulletin and mail them 
to the Registrar, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, before 
June 1. Previous attendance does not waive this requirement. 

2. Report upon arrival to the Mainland High School for all in- 
formation relative to registration, rooms, or apartments. 

3. For further information, write to Robert D. Dolley, Director 
of the School of Trade and Industrial Education, Capitol Building, 
Tallahassee, Florida, or to Dean J. W. Norman, University of Florida, 
Gainesville, Florida. 



CALENDAR 

1941 HRST TERM 

June 11, Wednesday, 8 a.m Registration for the First Term. 

June 12, Thursday, 8 a.m Classes begin. Late registration fee $5. 

June 13, Friday Last day for registration for the First Term, for chang- 
ing schedules, or for adding courses. 

June 13, Friday, 8:30 a.m Placement Tests. 

June 20, Friday Last day for dropping courses without receiving grade 

of E and being assessed failure fee. 

June 25, Wednesday Last day to file application for removal of deficiences. 

or for extension of Trade and Industrial Education 
Certificates. 

June 30, Monday Last day for application to take comprehensive exam- 
inations in July and August. 

July 2, Wednesday First Term ends. All grades are due in office of the 

Registrar by 5 p.m. 



CALENDAR 213 



SECOND TERM 

July 2, Wednesday, 8 a.m Registration for the Second Term. 

July 3, Thursday, 8 a.m. Classes begin. Late registration fee $.5. 

July 3, Thursday Last day for registration for the Second Term, for 

changing schedules, or for adding courses. 

July n, Friday Last day for dropping courses without receiving grade 

of E and being assessed failure fee. 

July 16, Wednesday Last day to file application for removal of deficiencies, 

or for extension of Trade and Industrial Education 
Certificates. 

July 23, Wednesday Second Term ends. All grades are due in the office 

of the Registrar by 5 p.m. 



THIRD TERM 

July 23, Wednesday, 8 a.m Registration for the Third Term. 

July 24, Thursday, 8 a.m Classes begin. Late registration fee $5. 

July 24, Thursday Last day for registration for the Third Term, for chang- 
ing schedules, or for adding courses. 

July 26, Saturday, 8:30 a.m. Placement Tests. 

August 1, Friday Last day for dropping courses without receiving grade 

of E and being assessed failure fee. 

August 6. Wednesday Last day to file application for removal of deficiencies, 

or for extension of Trade and Industrial Education 
Certificates. 

Vugusl 13, Wednesday Third Term ends. All grades are due in office of the 

Registrar by 5 p.m. 



214 BULLETIN OF SCHOOL OF TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION 

John J. Tigert, M.A. (Oxon.), LL.D., Ed.D., D.CX., D.Litt^ L.H.D., President of the 

University 
Colin English, M.A., LL.D., Ed.D., State Superintendent of Public Instruction 
James William Norman, Ph.D., Director of the Summer Session 
Robert D. Dolley, M.S., Director of the School of Trade and Industrial Education 
Thomas Marshall Simpson, Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate School 
Harley Willard Chandler, M.S., Dean of the University 
Richard S. Johnson, B.S.P., Registrar 
Klein Harrison Graham, Business Manager 
Mary M. Karl, Principal, Demonstration School 
Winston W. Little, M.A., Dean of the General College, Gainesville 

Assistants in Administration 

Lewis F. Blalock, M.A., Director of Admissions 

H. H. Germond, Ph.D., Supervisor Research 

John V. McQuitty, M.A., Examiner, Gainesville 

Irene Erskine Perry, B.S., Administrative Assistant, Gainesville 

Jean Bradley Hamner, B.S., Administrative Assistant 

Lucille T. Moore, B.S., Librarian 

Herman F. Hinton, B.E., Supervisor Instruction 

Maude Griffith Woods, Supervisor Practice Teaching 

Bruce V. Davis, Supervisor of Student Activities 

Helen Snyder, Supervisor Duplicating Bureau 

FACULTY 

E. W. Alexander, M.E., Assistant Principal, Hadley Technical High School, St. Louis. 

Missouri 
Arda Talbot Allen, M.S., Consultant in Vocational Guidance, San Antonio Public Schools, 

San Antonio, Texas 
A. R. Anderson. Director of Vocational Education, Sarasota, Florida 

P. E. Babcock, M.A., Assistant State Supervisor, Trade and Industrial Education, Georgia 
Fannie A. Bagley, B.A., Instructor, San Mateo Junior College, San Mateo, California 
RoYCE E. Brewster, Specialist, Occupational Information and Guidance Service, U. S. 

Office of Education, Washington, D. C. 
N. B. Brisco, B.A., Superintendent of the Namm Store, Brooldyn, New York 
Walter Bronson, Director of National Defense Training, Miami, Florida 
Ann Burnette, District Coordinator of Distributive Education, Marianna, Florida 
J. F. Cannon, B.S., State Supervisor of Industrial and Distributive Education, Georgia 
G. L. Carter, Instructor, Brewster Vocational School, Tampa, Florida 
James Coxen, B.S., Consultant, Job Service Training, U. S. Office of Education, Wash- 
ington, D. C. 
E. F. Daniels, B.S., State Supervisor of Trade and Industrial Education, Missouri 
Bruce V. Davis, State Coordinator of Hotel Training, Miami, Florida 
Robert D. Dolley, M.S., State Supervisor of Trade and Industrial Education, Florida 
Lillian T. Dukes, B.A., District Coordinator of Distributive Education, West Palm Beach, 
Florida 



FACULTY 215 

Charles M. Edwards, Jr., D.C.S., Professor of Retail Advertising, New York University, 
New York City 

D. G. Erwin, Coordinator, Diversified Cooperative Training, Tampa, Florida 

Amne H. Franz, B.A., Head Coordinator, Diversified Cooperative Training, Jacksonville. 

Florida 
H. H. Germond, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Mathematics, University of Florida. Gaines- 
ville, Florida 
J. B. Graham, Instructor, Technical High School, Miami, Florida 
Clarence 0. Grimm, Instructor, Technical High School, Miami, Florida 
C. R. Hale, Coordinator of Evening Trade Extension Education, Miami, Florida 
Ben E. Harris, M.E., Special Agent, Trade and Industrial Education, U. S. Office of Educa- 
tion, Washington, D. C. 
Herman F. Hinton, B.E., State Coordinator, Trade and Industrial Education, Florida 
W. Briant Hobson, A.B., Head, Secretarial Training Department, Drake School, Inc., New 

York City 
Anna May Johnson, Associate Professor of Retailing, School Store Service, College of 

William and Mary, Richmond, Virginia 
Walter E. Keyes, M.S., Special Agent, Trade and Industrial Education, U. S. Office of 

Education, Washington, D. C. 
C. G. Lind, B.S., Director of Vocational Education, Marianna, Florida 
Jean McKillips, B.A., District Coordinator Distributive Education. Georgia: formerly 

Director of Training, Davison-Paxon Department Store. Atlanta 
ViOLETT O'Reilly, M.S.. Principal, L. E. Rabouin Vocational School, New Orleans, Louisiana 
C. 0. Pinch, M.E., Coordinator, Diversified Cooperative Training, Avon Park and Sebring. 

Florida 
Frank A. Petrie, B.S., Director of Vocational Education. Orlando, Florida 

E. R. Plowden, B.S., State Supervisor of Trade and Industrial Education, Alabama 

John B. Pope, M.B.A., Special Agent, Distributive Education, U. S. Office of Education, 

Washington, D. C. 
C. E. Rakestraw, B.S., Consultant, Employer-Employee Relations, U. S. Office of Educa- 
tion, Washington, D. C. 
R. Robert Rosenberg, C.P.A., Ed.D., Principal Public School 34, Jersey City, New Jersey 
E. 0. ScHALLER, D.C.S., Professor of Retail Accounting, New York University, New York 

City 
C. E. ScHissLER, M.S., Instructor, Technical High School, Miami. Florida 
C. J. ScHOLLENBERGER, B.E., Apprentice Training, Des Moines Public Schools, Iowa 
Betty W. Starbuck, B.S., Coordinator, Diversified Cooperative Training, Jacksonville, 

Florida 
H. F. Thompson, Director of Vocational Education. Waycross, Georgia 
J. MacD. Thompson, B.E., Director of Vocational Education, Tampa, Florida 
Naomi Van Horn, M.S., Training Director, Burdine's, Miami, Florida 
Walter T. White, B.A., Pacific Coast Manager, H. M. Rowe Company, San Francisco, 

California 
Maude G. Woods, State Coordinator, General Continuation School Education, Florida 
Arthur B. Wrigley, M.A., Assistant, Trade and Industrial Education, Trenton, New Jersey 



21 f. BULLETIN OF SCHOOL OF TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

Special Lecturers 

Geokge p. Hambrecht, Ph.D., State Director, Vocational Education, Wisconsin 

E. G. LuDTKE, Southern Regional Agent, United States Office of Education, Washington, 
D. C. 

Lt. Col. Frank McSherry, Director of Training, Council for National Defense; Liaison 
Officer, War Department, and Council for National Defense, Washington, D. C. 

M. D. MoBLEY, Ph.D., State Director, Vocational Education, Georgia 

C. E. Rakestraw, B.S., Consultant, Employer-Employee Relations, U. S. Office of Educa- 
tion, Washington, D. C. 

Advisory Committee 

E. G. LuDTKE, Southern Regional Agent. U. S. Office of Education 

W. J. Breit, State Supervisor of Trade and Industrial Education, Arkansas 

W. D. Gardner, State Supervisor of Trade and Industrial Education, Mississippi 

J. F. Cannon, State Supervisor of Trade and Industrial Education, Georgia 

G. W. CoGGiN, State Supervisor of Trade and Industrial Education, North Carolina 

L. K. Covelle, State Supervisor of Trade and Industrial Education, Oklahoma 

J. R. D. Eddy, State Supervisor of Trade and Industrial Education, Texas 

E. R. Plowden, State Supervisor of Trade and Industrial Education, Alabama 

W. A. Seeley, State Supervisor of Trade and Industrial Education, Tennessee 

B. R. Turner, State Supervisor of Trade and Industrial Education, South Carolina 

B. H. Van Oot, State Supervisor of Trade and Industrial Education, Virginia 



GENERAL INFORMATION 217 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

Nature and Purpose of School 

The University of Florida in cooperation with the State Department of Public Instruc- 
tion will open the fourth annual session of the School of Trade and Indusliial Education 
at Daytona Beach, June 11. 

With the advice and counsel of the State Supervisors, the School is planned to serve 
the entire Southern Region. A comprehensive curriculum especially designed to meet the 
needs of teachers of Trade and Industrial Education and Distributive Occupations leading 
to a bachelor's or master's degree is offered. 

Many vocational teachers with short vacations wiU find convenient the schedule arrange- 
ment of three terms of three weeks each: June 11 to July 2, July 2 to July 23, and July 
2.i to August 13. Students may attend any one or all three terms as they desire. Classes 
are held in the Mainland High School Building and meet two hours a day, six days a week, 
(luring each term. 

Advisory Committee 

The State Supervisors of Trade and Industrial Education in the Southern Region, headed 
by Mr. E. G. Ludtke, Southern Regional Agent of the United States Office of Education, 
serve as an advisory committee for the School of Trade and Industrial Education. The 
University is fortunate in having them as advisors, and their willingness to serve in this 
capacity affords a most direct means of making courses immediately applicable to local 
conditions. 

Instructional Staff 

The faculty is selected from the outstanding leaders in vocational education. Many 
are from the neighboring southern states, and are fully acquainted with southern problems, 
hence find it easy to make their courses fit southern needs. Others come from more distant 
states and possess exceptional knowledge of the specific fields which they teach. Those 
attending the school have the opportunity, not only of receiving instruction from able men 
and women, but also of conferring with them personally about problems of interest. Mem- 
bers of the faculty devote their time while on the campus to the discussion of the problems 
brought before them. It is from such personal contacts that the full benefit of the school 
is realized. 

For Whom the School Is Intended 

Admission is limited to the following classes of students: 

1. Those engaged in teaching Trade and Industrial and Distributive Education or 
courses subsidized from Smith - Hughes or George - Deen funds. 

2. Novice or apprentice teachers meeting all the requirements for certification in 
accordance with the provisions of the Florida State Plan for Trade and Industrial 
and Distributive Education with the exception of the required teacher training 
courses. 

3. Superintendents or school officials exercising control over a subsidized program of 
Trade and Industrial and Distributive Education. 

4. Directors, Supervisors and Coordinators of Trade and Industrial and Distriinitive 
Education or other subsidized vocational services. 



218 BULLETIN OF SCHOOL OF TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

5. Those employed in industrial or distributive occupations who wish to take technical 
courses and who are not particularly interested in college credit or teaching. 

6. Those engaged in teaching or supervising any phase of the National Defense Training 
Program. 

To offer educationeJ opportunity to these groups of students is the sole purpose of 
the School, and the courses have been planned especially to take care of their needs. 
Teachers and students interested in other branches of learning should attend the regular 
Summer Session at the University of Florida in Gainesville. 

Courses 

Realizing that there is a wide difference in the type of work performed by personnel 
engaged in the various branch services of Trade and Industrial and Distributive Education, 
the University is of the conviction that in order to accomplish the objectives of the School 
with the greatest effectiveness, the course content must be based upon the needs and 
requirements of the personnel engaged in the respective branch services. The courses are, 
therefore, organized in groups under the following classifications: Trade and Industries 
— ^For Day Trade School Teachers; For Evening School Teachers; For Coordina- 
tors and Related Teachers of Diversified Cooperative Training; For General Con- 
tinuation Teachers; For Directors, Supervisors and Coordinators, and General 
Subjects, Distributive Education — For Evening School Teachers; For Day Part- 
Time Teachers; For Coordinators and Related Teachers Part-Time Cooperative 
Training; Technical Subjects and General Subjects. 

Students will avoid mistakes and errors in selecting courses by studying carefully the 
course descriptions and noting the group classification under which the courses are listed. 
To derive the greatest immediate benefit from summer school, students should before select- 
ing other courses exhaust the course oflFerings planned for the service in which they are 
employed. 

Specially Designed National Defense Courses 

Specially designed short intensive courses for those engaged in National Defense Train- 
ing will be offered throughout the entire summer session. These courses wiU be particularly 
appropriate for pre-employment and supplementary teachers, Army and Navy instructional 
personnel, and supervisors of defense training programs. 

Demonstration School 

Through a cooperative arrangement the Daytona Beach Vocational School is operated 
in conjunction with the summer session and used by the University for its practice teaching 
courses. 

Societies and Clubs 

T. & I. Club 

The T. & I. Club is a student organization composed of both men and women engaged 
in Trade and Industrial Education. Its purpose is to promote good fellowship among its 
members and the student body. A club house is maintained where meals and lodging 
are provided at cost and where many of the social and recreational activities of the 
organization £ire held. The club sponsors a dance and an outing regularly once a week 
throughout the session along with numerous other social functions. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 219 

State Clubs 

There are a miinher of state clubs the membership of which is composed of students 
from the various states. These clubs are very active during the entire summer session 
in the promotion of activities of all kinds calculated to help students to become better 
acquainted and stimulate a friendly hospitable atmosphere about the school. 

lota Lambda Sigma 

Iota Lambda Sigma is a national honorary professional fraternity for persons serving 
with distinction in Trade and Industrial or Industrial Arts Education. To be eligible 
for membership in the Kappa Chapter of the University of Florida one must be out- 
standing in one of these two vocational fields with a scholastic average of B or better. 

Tau Gamma Sigma 

Tau Gamma Sigma is a professional honorary Industrial Education fraternity for women. 
Both the Grand and Alpha chapters are located at the University of Florida. The purpose 
of this fraternity is to recognize high scholastic ability and professional attainment in the 
field of Industrial Education. 

Eta Mu Pi 

Eta Mu Pi is a National Honorary Retailing Fraternity. It is the only retailing frater- 
nity in existence. Membership to the Gamma Chapter of the University of Florida is 
limited to men and women attaining a high scholastic record in Retailing and Distributive 
Education courses. 

Assemblies 

All students and faculty members are expected to attend the general assemblies which 
are held once a week throughout- the summer session. A schedule of the assemblies 
will be supplied each student upon registering. Important announcements are made at 
the general assemblies for the observance of which students will be held responsible. 

Announcements 

Important announcements wUl be posted on the school bulletin board. Students should 
read the notices on the bulletin board daily. Students are held responsible for all an- 
nouncements made in the General Assembly, posted on the official bulletin board, or 
printed in the school newspaper. 

School News 

The official news of the School of Trade and Industrial Education is published twice 
a week in a si>ecial edition of one of the Daytona Beach daily papers. Special news 
items, notices and announcements reach the students and faculty through this official 
publication. 

Employment 

The School of Trade and Industrial Education does not maintain an employment bureau 
as such. It does, however, interest itself in finding employment for capable qualified indi- 
viduals and in recommending suitable personnel when requested to do so. The School has 
placed nearly one hundred per cent of the students trained. 



220 BULLETIN OF SCHOOL OF TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

Students' Depository 

For the convenience of students while in residence at Daytona Beach, funds may be 
deposited with the cashier. A nominal service charge will be made. 

Duplicating Bureau 

The School maintains a duplicating bureau, well equipped with duplicating and binder* 
equipment and managed by expert operators. Qerical work and duplicating for the school 
and faculty members is done on short notice. Student publications, committee reports, 
class reports and term reports or syllabi are reproduced at cost. 

Credits 

Students who qualify for entrance in the School of Trade and Industrial Education 
in accordance with the provisions limiting classes of students to be served, may take the 
courses offered for college credit or to satisfy certification requirements, or both, or for 
no credit at all. 

Credits earned in the School of Trade and Industrial Education will apply as residence 
credit at the University towards the degree of Bachelor of Science in Education, with a 
major in Trades and Industries or Distributive Education. Students who have attended 
another institution and now wish to work towards this degree at the University of Florida 
should see the requirements for admission to advanced standing. 

The maximum number of credits a student may earn in a single term is four for 
undergraduate students, and three for graduate students. All students including those 
not desiring college credit must comply with the requirements listed on pages 222 and 223 
of this bulletin. 

Certification 

All courses have been approved by the Florida State Board for Vocational Education 
and may be used towards satisfying teacher-training requirements for certification or 
for extension of certificates. 

Florida teachers who have certification deficiencies or who wish to satisfy certification 
extension requirements should study the bulletin or certification requirements for Trade 
and Industrial and Distributive Education before registering. Teachers from other states 
should consult their State Supervisors concerning certification regulations. 

Fees 

A registration fee of $12 a term will be charged each student whether he is from 
Florida or from another state. There is no tuition charge. 

There is a failure fee of $2.50 per semester hour for any course failed* during the 
last period of attendance. Tliis fee must be paid before the student is permitted to 
reregister in the University. A late registration fee of $5 is charged students registering 
late. See Calendar, pages 212, 213. 

Auditors: — Auditor permits may be secured for $5 entitling the holder to attend 18 
regular class periods of any class in the school subject to the approval of the respective 



* i. e. Courses not passed with a mark A, B, C or D for undergraduates, or courses not 
passed v-iith a mark A or B for graduate students. 



R EC RE AT 10 \ 221 

instructors. Auditor permits are valid throughout the session. Individuals will be limited 
to one auditor permit per term. 

Expenses 

Living expenses are moderate in Daytona Beach. Rooms may be had from three 
dollars to six dollars per week and meals from twenty-five cents. The city is amply pro- 
vided with hotels, apartment houses, boarding houses, restaurants, and cafeterias. 

It is suggested that those who wish apartments come a day or two in advance as it 
will be more satisfactory to inspect accommodations of this kind personally. 

Modern, up-to-date tourist and trailer camps are numerous and accommodations in these 
camps may be secured at nominal rates. 

A lounge and lunch room in which light meals and confections are served is maintained 
in the school building for the convenience of students. 

Library 

The library of the School contains over 6000 volumes including reference books, en- 
cyclopedias, dictionaries, year books, periodicals, and government publications. These 
volumes are supplemented with a complete library of reference material on Trade and 
Industrial, Distributive and General Vocational Education. The advantages of the library 
are made readily accessible through a complete card catalog and the assistance of a librarian. 

Hours: — The library will open Monday through Saturday at 8:00 a.m. and close 
at 9:00 p.m. except on Friday when it wUl close at 6:00 p.m., and on Saturday when it 
will close at 12:00 noon. 

Training Schools 

A series of three one-week technical courses for peace officers, firemen, and hotel managers 
is usually conducted by the State Department of Public Instruction through its vocational 
division and in conjunction with the School of Trade and Industrial Education. These 
i-ourses are taught by nationally recognized specialists and are often of interest to summer 
school students. 

Special Lecturers 

A series of special lectures by national authorities in Vocational Education will be 
given at convenient intervals during the nine weeks session. The topics to be discussed 
by these lecturers will follow a planned sequence calculated to integrate their observa- 
tions with the current subject matter under consideration in a number of the courses 
offered. 

RECREATION 

Because the enrollment in the School for Trade and Industrial Education is drawn 
largely from persons employed twelve months in the year, every effort has been made to 
select a place off^ering not only the facilities for study but those for spending an ideal 
vacation. Daytona Beach meets these requirements. 

Recreational possibilities abound at Daytona. There is the beach with its motoring 
length of twenty-three miles and low tide width of five hundred feet for those who enjoy 
surf bathing and beach activities. Fishing is excellent from the pier, or by boat on the 
Halifax, or in the inland lakes a short drive from Daytona. Deep sea fishing boats leave 



222 BULLETIN OF SCHOOL OF TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

the city docks daily. Golf, tennis, handball, lawn bowling, shuffle board, speed boating, 
trap and skeet shooting may be enjoyed by those who prefer these sports. 

A number of points of interest, such as St- Augustine, the oldest city in the United 
States — Silver Springs, the largest spring in the world — Tropical Jungles — Mfirine Studios 
— the old mission ruins — the Florida Cypress Gardens — Bok Tower — and the Fountain of 
Youth, are only a few miles from Daytona Beach and can be reached by car in a very 
short time over some of Florida's most scenic highways. 

In view of the social functions students may be invited to attend, it is suggested that 
women bring one or two cotton evening dresses and one afternoon dress, and that men 
bring one white or other light suit. The average summer temperature at Daytona Beach 
is 79 degrees. 

ADMISSION 

A. Students wishing to receive college credit must meet the entrance requirements of 
the University of Florida. The requirements are: 

1. For students who are entering college for the first time. 

See Admission to the General College. 

2. For students who are transferring from another institution and who expect to 
receive a degree from the University of Florida. 

Official transcripts sent directly to the Registrar from all institutions previously 
attended. (Teachers' certificates or transcripts presented by students will not 
suffice.) 

3. For students who regularly attend another college or university and who are attend- 
ing the University of Florida School of Trade and Industrial Education only for 
the purpose of securing credits to be transferred to the institution regularly attended. 

A statement of Honorable Dismissal from the institution last attended. (Blanks 
for this purpose may be secured from the Office of the Registr£ir.) 

It is the student's responsibility to supply the proper credentials as outlined in numbers 
1, 2, or 3 above. NO TRANSCRIPTS FOR COLLEGE CREDIT WILL BE ISSUED 
FOR ANY PERSON FAILING TO COMPLY WITH THE ABOVE. 

The standing of each student entering the School of Trade and Industrial Education 
with advanced standing will be considered individually, with the best interests of the 
student always in mind. A program for the completion of the work for a degree either 
through the General College, or in the College of Education, will be determined at a 
conference with the Board of University Examiners, and the Director of the School of 
Trade and Industrial Education. 

B. Students not wishing to work toward a degree and who do not desire a transcript 
of work completed must present evidence of their eligibility for admission in accordance 
with one of the provisions limiting the class of students to be served by the School (see 
page 217). 

Admission to the General College 

The following items will be considered in the admission of students to the General 
College : 

1. Graduation from high school. Graduation from high school is required, although 
no specific high school imits are required. 

2. Consistency of the high school record. 



ADMISSION 223 

3. Achievement in high school. 

4. Personal qualities. 

5. Recommendation of high school principal. 

6. Standing on Placement Tests. 

All applicants should submit the Application Blanks at the back of this bulletin, and 
in addition should have an Application for Admission blank sent to the Registrar. The 
latter may be secured from high school principals of the State. Applicants for admission 
from other states may secure an Application for Admission blank by writing the Registrar. 

The Placement Tests will be given at 8:30 a.m. June 14, and July 26, Saturday, in 
the Mainland High School Building. All applicants for admission to the General College 
are required to take these tests. 

Residence Requirements 

1. The minimum residence requirement for the baccalaureate degree is two regular 
semesters, or one regular semester and four three-week summer terms or nine three-week 
summer terms. New students offering advanced standing must meet this requirement 
after entrance to the University. Students who break their residence at the University 
by attending another institution for credit toward the degree must meet this requirement 
after re-entering the University. 

2. For the master's degree a minimum of one academic year, or 33 weeks in summer 
sessions, is necessary to satisfy the residence requirement. 

3. Students are required to complete the last thirty credit hours applied towards 
the baccalaureate degree during regular residence in the college from which the student 
is to be graduated. Exception to this regulation may be made only upon written petition 
approved by the faculty of the college concerned, but in no case may the amount of 
extension work permitted exceed more than twelve of the last thirty-six hours required 
for a baccalaureate degree. 

Amount of Extension Work Permitted 

No person will be allowed to take more than one-fourth of the credits toward a degree 
by correspondence study and extension class work. No person will be allowed to take 
more than 12 of the last 36 credits necessary for a bachelor's degree by correspondence 
study or extension class work. No person will be allowed to take more than 9 credits by 
correspondence during the summer vacation period. 

Student Responsibility 

Each student must assume full responsibility for registering for the proper courses and 
for fulfilling all requirements for his degree. Students should confer with the Director 
of the school several days before registration regarding choice of courses. 

Seniors must file in the Office of the Registrar formal application for a degree and 
must pay the diploma fee very early in the term in which they expect to receive the degree. 

Each student is responsible for every course for which he registers. Courses can be 
dropped or changed only with the approval of the Director of the school and by presenta- 
tion of the cards authorizing the change at the Office of the Registrar. 



224 BULLETIN OF SCHOOL OF TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

THE GENERAL COLLEGE 

The General College has been organized to administer the work of the freshman and 
sophomore years in the University of Florida. All beginning students will register in 
this College. 

The average student will be able to complete the work of the General College in two 
years, while superior students may finish the curriculum in a shorter time, and others 
may find it necessary to remain in the General College for a longer period. 

A program of general education is worked out for all students. In this program the 
University recognizes that broad basic training is needed by all students alike. On this 
foundation that has meaning and significance to the student, he may add the special 
training of the colleges and professional schools of the Upper Division, or drop out of 
the University with something definite and helpful as he begins his adult life as a citizen. 
The purposes of the General College are: 

1. To offer an opportunity for general education and to provide the guidance 
needed by all students. Thus the choice of professional work is postponed 
until the student is better acquainted with his capacity and disposition to 
undertake work that will be profitable to himself and society. 

2. To broaden the base of education for students who are preparing for 
advanced study in the colleges and professional schools of the Upper Division, 
thereby avoiding the handicap of narrow specialization. 

3. To satisfy the needs of those who have only a limited time to give to 
college training, and consequently should concern themselves with general 
viewpoints and major understandings, instead of with introductions to special 
subject matter fields which they may never enter. 

4. To provide for the constant adjustments required in higher general 
education incident to the changing conditions of moden life. The subject 
matter of the various courses and the methods of presentation are to be con- 
stantly varied in order to awaken the interest of the student, to stimulate his 
intellectual curiosity, to encourage independent study, and to cultivate the 
attitudes necessary for enlightened citizenship. 

5. Guidance. Every part of the General College program is designed to 
guide students. It was felt that too much of the freshman and sophomore 
work of former years had little meaning and significance to the vast majority. 
The material studied was preparatory and foundational, and became mean- 
ingful only when the student pursued additional courses in the junior and 
senior years. The material of the comprehensive courses is selected and 
tested with guidance as a primary function. While, of necessity, we must 
look forward to distant goals, the General College is tiying to present 
materials that are directly related to life experiences and will immediately 
become a part of the student's thinking and guide him in making correct 
"next steps'". Thus the whole program — placement tests, progress reports, 
vocational aptitude tests, selected material in the comprehensive courses, 
student conferences, provisions for superior students, adjustment for individual 
differences, election privileges, and comprehensive examinations — are all parts 
of a plan designed to guide students. 



THE GENERAL COLLEGE 225 

Thus guidance is not attempted at one office by one individual with a 
small staff. The whole drive of the General College program is one of direct- 
ing the thinking of the student. 

Comprehensive Examinations 

The student must successfully pass comprehensive course examinations — eight or more — 
to complete the work of the General College. These examinations, administered by the 
Board of University Examiners, will be given in January, May and August of each year. 
General College students who are not enrolled in a course at the time the examination 
is given and who wish to take any comprehensive examination, must apply in writing to 
the Board of University Examiners for permission at least one month before the an- 
nounced date for the examination. Before the application is accepted, the applicant will 
[)e required to furnish the Board of Examiners with proof that this privilege has not 
been used to avoid the payment of the usual University fees. A student must be familiar 
with the work of the various courses and be able to think in the several fields in a com- 
prehensive way in order to pass these examinations. Six hours time, divided into equal 
parts, will be required for each examination covering a full year course. 

Should a student fail a comprehensive course examination, he may qualify to repeat 
the examination by repeating the course, or by further study. Evidence of additional 
preparation must be submitted to the Board of University Examiners with an application 
in writing to repeat the examination. 

Graduation 

When a student has completed his program in the General College and has passed his 
comprehensive examinations and met the other requirements of the General College 
curriculum, he will be granted the Associate of Arts Certifiate. Students who pass 
three-fourths of the comprehensive examinations with the standing "Excellent" will, on 
graduation from the General College, receive the certificate of Associate of Arts. With 
High Honors. 

Notice to All Vocational Teachers 

The comprehensive courses of the General College are of special significance and 
value to the vocational teacher. For the teacher entering college lor the first time, 
the General College affords an excellent means of expediting the conclusions of the first 
two years of college study. 

The vocational teacher will find his progress through the General College greatly 
accelerated due to his background of practical work and teaching experiences. Syllabi 
on all General College Courses are available to students. A complete set may be found 
in the Library of the School of Trade and Industrial Education. 

Students entering the School of Trade and Industrial Education may complete their 
major in Trades and Industries or Distributive Education before registering for General 
College Courses or they may apply for examinations on General College Courses any time 
after registration in the School of Trade and Industrial Education. 

Students interested in the General College should consult the Registrar for further 
information during the first week after registration in the School of Trade and Industnai 
Education at Daytona Beach. 



226 BULLETIN OF SCHOOL OF TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

THE BACHELOR'S DEGREE 

Requirements: 

1. Must be regularly admitted to the University. 

2. Must have completed one year of successful teaching experience in an approved 
program of Trade and Industrial Education. This experience may be acquired aftei 
the student has become a candidate for the degree. 

3. Must have satisfied the residence and other routine requirements of the University. 

4. Must have an average of "C" or higher in all work counted toward the degree. 

5. Must satisfactorily complete the curriculum requirements outlined below. 

PROGRAM OF STUDY LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SQENCE IN EDUCATION 
WITH A MAJOR IN TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

I. For those students graduating from the General College of the University of Florida, 
completion of A and B listed below: 

A. General College Program:* 

C-1 Man and the Social World 

C-2 Man and the Physical World 

C-3 Reading, Speaking and Writing 

C-41 Man and His Thinking 

C-42 General Mathematics 

C-5 The Humanities 

C-6 Man and the Biological World 

C-7 Electives in Education 6 semester hours 

**C-8 Electives 5 semester hours 

**C-9 Electives 5 semester hours 

B. Upper Division Progr£un: 

Education 9 semester hours 

Trade and Industrial Education 22 semester hours 

** Approved Electives 29 semester hours 

Total 60 semester hours in the 

Upper Division. 

II. For those students who do not graduate from the General College of the University 
of Florida (Note: The following program is outlined for the convenience of transfer 
students. The Board of University Examiners may waive certain of the following 
requirements if the record of the student warrants special consideration) : 

Physical and Biological Science 

English Composition 

Literature \ 48 semester hours 

Social Studies 

Psychology or Philosophy 

Mathematics 

Education 15 semester hours 

Trade and Industrial Education 22 semester hours 

**Approved Electives 39 semester hours 

Total 124 semester hours 



♦Deviations from this program may be permitted by the Board of Examiners. 
**A minimum of 22 semester hours is required in Trade and Industrial Education for a major. 
For C-8, C-9 and approved electives in the Upper Division a person may take additional work 
in Trade and Industrial Education, but not to exceed 18 semester hours, since not over 40 semester 
hours of the entire four-year program can be in Trade and Industrial Education. 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 227 

PROGRAM OF STUDY LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SQENCE IN EDUCATION 
WITH A MAJOR IN DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION 

Note: The same provisions relating to the bachelor's degree with a major in Trade and 
Industrial Education -will apply to the degree with a major in Distributive Education 
except that the major study shall be in Distributive Education courses and the 
experience requirements shall be in the Distributive Education field. 

PLANNING PROGRAM OF STUDY 

Procedure: 

1. Become regularly admitted to the University. 

2. Consult the Director of the School about selection of courses. 

3. Secure through the Director a list of courses approved by the Dean leading to 
the degree. 

4. In case advanced standing is wished, the applicant should have transcripts of 
credit evaluated by the Registrar before consulting the Director about list of courses 
to be pursued. 

Note: Transcripts of credit must be sent directly to the Registrar from the Institution in 
which the credit was earned. 

THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 

All graduate study in all of the colleges and schools of the University is administered 
by the Graduate Council. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSSION TO GRADUATE STUDY IN THE SCHOOL OF TRADE AND 

INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

1. A bachelor's degree from a standard college or university. 

2. At least one year's continuous employment in an approved Trade and Industrial 
program for those wishing to major in Trade and Industrial Education, or one year's 
continuous employment in an approved Distributive Education program for those 
wishing to major in Distributive Education. The programs in which the experience 
is secured must meet all the requirements of the State Plan for Trade and Industrial 
or Distributive Education for the state in which the applicant was employed. 

3. Eight semester hours in approved teacher training courses in Trade and Industrifd 
Education of which two semester hours shall be in Supervision, two semester hours 
in survey procedures, and four semester hours in courses covering curriculum con- 
struction in and bearing directly upon the branch of service in which the applicant 
has been employed. 

4. Three or more years of continuous employment in an approved Trade and Industrial 
or Distributive Education program may upon the discretion of the head of the depart- 
ment be accepted in lieu of part of the eight semester hour requirement. 

5. Presentation of satisfactory evidence that graduate study may be pursued with 
advantage to the University and the applicant. 

6. Candidates must have completed three years of successful experience in an approved 
program of Trades and Industries or Distributive Education before a degree can be 
conferred. 



22« HVLLETIN OF SCHOOL OF TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

Registration 

A complete transcript of all undergraduate and graduate work must be transmitted 
directly to the Registrar's office by the Registrar of the institution in which the credits have 
been earned. Transcripts presented by students cannot be accepted. 

The transcript should be in the Registrar's office at least one month before the opening 
of the school. If it appears from the student's record that he is eligible for graduate 
study he will be referred to the Director of the School of Trade and Industrial Education 
who will become the professor of the major subject and will plan the courses the student 
is to take. 

Students are urged to file transcripts ahead of the beginning of the school. Under no 
circumstances will students be permitted to register ivho have not fully complied with this 
request. Transcripts submitted directly by students are not acceptable. Transcripts must 
he transmitted by the registrars of the institutions in which the credits were earned. 

Requirements for the Master's Degree with Major in Trade and 
Industrial Education 

Degree Offered. — Master of Arts in Education. 

Residence Requirements. — See residence requirements page 223 this bulletin. 

Transfer of Credits. — Under certain conditions transfer of a limited number of credits 
to the University will be allowed. Transferred credits may reduce the course requirements 
but not the residence, and work they represent shall be included in the final examination. 

Grades. — Passing grades for students registered in the Graduate School are A and B. 
All other grades are failing. 

W^ork Required. — Twenty-four semester hours are required for the degree at least one 
half of which shall be in Trade and Industrial Education and the remainder in related 
subject matter fields. The major study shall be in courses numbered 500 and designated 
strictly for graduates. However, in case of related subject matter, courses numbered 300 
and above may be taken upon the approval of the Director of the School and the Dean 
of the Graduate School. 

The student shall be guided entirely in the research procedure, preparation, organization 
and form of the thesis by the Supervisor of Research. The student should consult the Super- 
visor of Research immediately after admittance to the Graduate School concerning these 
matters. The thesis problem should be selected as soon as possible and be approved by 
the major professor. A statement of the problem, the reason for its selection and an out- 
line of the procedure to be followed in its solution shall be submitted to the Student's 
Advisory Committee for the committee's consideration and approval. All Graduate students 
are required to register for TDE. 508, Research in Industrial and Distributive Education, 
before or by the time they have completed twelve semester hours of graduate study. This 
course carries no credit and may be carried in addition to the regular schedule of work. 

Admission to Candidacy 

Whether the student has been provisionally admitted or regularly admitted to graduate 
study, the Supervisory Committee shall review his entire academic record at the end of 
the first semester or summer session of residence work and fix definitely the additional 
residence or course requirements. Upon ratification of the action of the Supervisory 
Committee by a formal vote of the faculty, the student will be admitted to candidacy for 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 229 

the degrt-e subject to the approval by the Supervisory Committee of the thesis problem 
selected. 

Supervisory Committee. — The Supervisory Committee shall consist oi liie Director of 
the School of Trade and Industrial Education, the Dean of the Graduate School and the 
Supervisor of Research. 

General Examinations. — It will he the duty of the Supervisory Committee, when all work 
is complete or practically complete, including the regular courses and the thesis, to conduct 
a general examination, either written or oral, or both, to embrace: first, the thesis; second, 
the major subject; third, the minor or minors; fourth, questions of a general nature per- 
taining to the student's field of study. The Committee shall report in writing not later 
than one week before the time for the conferring of the degree if all work has been com- 
pleted in a satisfactory manner and the student is recommended for the degree. 

Work Done in Absentia. — Credit is not given for work done in ahsentia. No courses 
may be taken for credit hy pxtensinn or correspondence. 

(;KADUATK COUKSK.S KKQUIKFJ) FOI? major in trade and industrial KITtlCATlON 

TIE. 512. — Colloquium in Administration and Orpfanization of Trade and In- 
dustrial Education 
TIE. 501. — Industrial and Economic Development in the South 
TDE. 502. — Organization and Administration of Adult Extension Training 
TIE. 503. — Administration of Vocational Education 
TDE. 504. — Philosophy of Vocational Education 
TIE. 505. — Technical Schools — ^Their Organization and Control 
TIE. 506. — Apprenticeship and Labor Relations 
TDE. 507. — Administration of Diversified Cooperative Training 
TDE. 508. — Research in Industrial and Distributive Education 

Recommended Minors 

DI.'^TRIBUTIVK KDUCATION 

DOE. 500. — Colloquium in Administration and Organization of Distributive 

Occupations 
DOE. 508.— Retail Buying and Marketing 
DOE. 509.— Retail Merchandising 
DOE. 510. — Sales and Merchandise Promotion 
DOE. 511. — Store Management and Operation 



GU. 400. — Organization and Administration of Guidance 

GU. 401. — Local Guidance Program in the School and Community 

GU. 402-3. — Research Practices, Tests and Measurements in Guidance 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THK MASTERS DECR1:K WITH \ \l\.|()l( IN IH>TKIBLJriVE lUJIJCAHON 

The same provisions relating to the Master's degiee witli a major in Trade and Industrial 
Education will apply to the degree with a major in Distributive Education, except that 
the major study shall be in Distributive Education courses and the experience requirement 
shall be in the Distributive Education field. 



230 BULLETIN OF SCHOOL OF TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

GRADUATE COURSES REQUIRED FOR A MAJOR IN DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION 

DOE. 500. — Colloquium in Administration and Organization of Distributive 

Occupations 
TDE. 502. — Organization and Administration of Adult Extension Training 
TDE, 504. — Philosophy of Vocational Education 
TDE. 507. — Administration of Diversified Cooperative Training 
DOE. 508.— Retail Buying and Marketing 
DOE. 509. — Retail Merchandising 
DOE. 510. — Sales and Merchandise Promotion 
DOE. 511. — Store Management and Operation 
TDE. 508. — Research in Industrial and Distributive Education 

Recommended Minors 

TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

TIE. 512. — Colloquium in Administration and Organization of Trade and In- 
dustrial Education 
TIE. 501. — Industrial and Economic Development in the South 
TIE. 503. — Administration of Vocational Education 
TIE. 505. — Technical Schools — Their Organization and Control 
TIE. 506. — Apprenticeship and Labor Relations 



GU. 400. — Organization and Administration of Guidance 

GU. 401. — Local Guidance Program in the School and Community 

GU. 402-3. — Research Practices, Tests and Measurements in Guidance 

CURRICULA 

The courses have been designed for the particular needs of teachers in the various 
fields of trade and industrial education. These are listed below, along with the time these 
courses will be available during the summer session. For detailed information concerning 
the course, see the Time Schedule on pages 236 to 246. The Time Schedule for the first 
term wiU be found on pages 236 to 239; for the second term on pages 240 to 243; and 
for the third term on pages 244 to 246. 



CURRICULA 



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HILLETIN OF SCHOOL OF TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 



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23() BULLETIN OF SCHOOL OF TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

TIME SCHEDULE 
FIRST TERM 

DISTRIBUTIVE OCCUPATIONS EDUCATION 

DOE. 201. — Retail Organization and Management. 10 to 12 daily. Room 17. 
2 credits. BriSCO. 

The merchandising organization, retail outlets, buying, wholesale selling and stock control 
plan ; case studies in merchandising ; management problems. 

DOE. 214.— Retail Copy Writing. 1 to 3 daily. Room 17. 2 credits. ED- 
WARDS. 

Repetitive practice in writing retail advertising copy. The following factors will be con- 
sidered : the purposes and characteristics, principles of construction, merchandise facts, selecting 
theme, customers' point of view, suitable copy approach, the writing of promotional, service, 
prestige, price line, bargain, fashion, utility, human interest, and rationalization copy ; head lines. 

DOE. 215. — Interior Decorating. 1 to 3 daily. Room 18. 2 credits. 

The application of principles of color and design as employed by decorators, architects and 
designers. The following subjects will be covered : floors, floor coverings, wall, ceilings, fabrics, 
historical transition of decoration by periods, contemporai-y decoration and special problems. 

DOE. 216.— Applied Art in Window Display. 8 to 10 daily. Room 17. 2 
credits. 

The practical application of artistic treatment in display of all types of merchandise. Repeti- 
tive training in arranging the window display. A full-sized display window in the school will be 
used by students taking this course. 

DOE. 508.— Retail Buying and Marketing. 8 to 10 daily. Room 19. IV2 
credits. SCHALLER. 

The buying aspects of merchandising, as distinct from its mathematical aspects, are stressed 
in this course. The subject matter includes : the field of retailing, types of retail outlets, the 
merchandising organization, market organization, the New York market, the clothing and textile 
markets, the nontextile markets, resident buying, foreign buying, the buying process, group and 
hand-to-mouth buying, private brands, exclusive agency, and price maintenance. 

DOE, 510. — Sales and Merchandise Promotion. 10 to 12 daily. Room 18. 
11/2 credits. EDWARDS. 

This course is designed to give a clear understanding of the scope and activities of sales 
promotion. Attention is directed especially to the methods of determining what to promote ; 
to the procedure of formulating a sales-promotion plan ; to an examination of the uses of numerous 
external and internal sales-promotion media and devices ; and to the means of coordinating sales- 
promotion activities. 

DOE. 511. — Store Management and Operation. 1 to 3 daily. Room 19. IV2 
credits. SCHALLER. 

Modern methods of successful retail-store management. The subject matter includes organiza- 
tion and functions of the store manager's division, analysis of operating expenses, wage plans, 
methods of controlling departmental selling costs, receiving procedures, floor supervision, delivery 
methods, handling adjustments, granting and following up credit and controlling workrooms and 
supplies. Special emphasis is placed on methods of expense control. 



I 



TIME SCHEDULE FIRST TERM 237 

TRADE AND DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION 

TDE. 211. — Evening Schools — Their Organization and Control. 1 to 3 daily. 
Room 11. 2 credits. DANIELS. 

The development of a knowledge and understanding of the value, possibilities, and limitation* 
of evening schools and classes to the end that the evening school teacher will understand clearly 
his place in such a program. A thorough study of methods and procedures in organization, 
selection of students. Federal, State, and local lawrs and regulations governing the conduct of 
evening ecliools and classes. Designed to meet the needs of Extension Teachers. 

TDE. 212. — Organization of Subject Matter for Evening School Classes. 10 

to 12 daily. Room 11. 2 credits. DANIELS. 

The development of a knowledge of trade or job analysis and the ability to use such analysis 
in the arrangement of subject matter so that teaching may be simplified and learning stimulated. 
Methods of analysis to determine trade or job content and means of determining student needs. 
Students will be requested to make a job analysis and organize the content for teaching purposes. 
Designed to meet the needs of Extension Teachers. 

TDE. 221. — Organization for Diversified Occupational Training. 8 to 10 daily. 
Room 11. 2 credits. FRANZ. 

Objectives to be attained, organization to attain these objectives. Federal and State require- 
ments, social security, insurance, compensation and labor laws involved will be studied. 

TDE. 222. — Occupational Surveys. 10 to 12 daily. Room 15. 2 credits. 
CANNON. 

A study of procedure in making community industrial surveys and of individual industrial 
plants or business concerns to determine community training needs and acceptable industrial 
concerns in which to give training. 

TDE. 223. — Student Counseling and Selection. 3 to 5 daily. Room U. 2 
credits. ALLEN. 

The procedure to be followed in securing applicants for training, factors involved in selection 
of students, occupational counseling, training, assignments, compensation, and work contracts. 

TDE. 22,5.— Related Study Material. 1 to 3 daily. Room 12. 2 credits. 

STARBUCK. 

The source of securing diversified general and specific related subject matter. Organization 
of it for teaching purposes, related classroom layout and organization, theory and methods in 
teaching diversified related subjects. 

TDE. 245. — Vocational Psychology. 1 to 3 daily. Room 16. 2 credits. 
O'REILLY. 

A description of fundamental aspects of judgment, such as intelligence, memory, learning, 
motivation, imagination, serious thinking; the relation of this knowledge to its physiological 
basis and an indication of this knowledge in its application to learning processes in vocational 
and technical training. 

TDE. 248. — Principles and Purposes of the Vocational Acts. 8 to 10 daily. 
Room 15. 2 credits. PLOWDEN. 

Congressional and legislative acts providing for vocational education of all kinds ; the principal 
purposes and influences involved in the formulation of these acts ; the extent and scope of voca- 
tional service provided by means of them. 

TDE. 250.— Advanced Vocational Psychology. 10 to 12 daily. Room 16. 2 
credits. O'REILLY. 

Prerequisite required TDE. 24.'). Physical, biological and psychological factors which tend tn 
slow up or inhibit learning with procedures and methods for reduction and elimination i)f these 
inhibiting difficulties. 

TDE. 263. — National Defense Nomenclature. 3 to 5 daily. Room 15. 2 
credits. PLOWDEN. 

Laws and regulations governing National Defense training. Procedure in organizing various 
kinds of class practice in budgeting and making Federal reports. 



238 BULLETIN OF SCHOOL OF TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

TDE. 273. — Supervision of National Defense Training. 3 to 5 daily. Room 
19. iy2 credits, HARRIS, 

Philosophy of National Defense training. Basic purposes and underlying principles upon which 
a program of training should evolve. Supervisory procedure, responsibilities and administrative 
organization. Especially designed for those administering large and diversified programs of defense 
training. 

TDE. 502. — Organization and Administration of Adult Extension Training. 

10 to 12 daily. Room 19, IVa credits, HARRIS, 

The various types of extension training, the objectives, the procedure in organization, the 
financial and administrative controls and the Federal, State and local lavrs governing the conduct 
of each. 

TDE. 507. — Administration of Diversified Cooperative Training. 8 to 10 

daily. Room 18, IV2 credits, DOLLEY, 

F'ederal and State requirements, cost control, records, insurance, compensation, labor laws, 
social security, accrediting agencies, personnel relations and management involved in administra- 
tion of cooperative training. 

TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

TIE. 201. — Organization Specific Subject Content. 3 to 5 daily. Room 10. 
2 credits, SCHISSLER. 

The methods of making occupational studies to determine jobs or operations and functioning 
related information la which instruction should be given and the procedure in organization for 
teaching purposes. Designed to meet the needs of Trade Shop Teachers, Trade Shop Related 
Teachers, and Part-Time Preparatory Teachers. 

TIE. 202. — Teaching Methods and Devices. 8 to 10 daily. Room 10, 2 credits, 
LIND. 

The methods used in preparing] instructional material for teaching purposes and the use of 
such methods and aids as demonstrations, illustrations, lectures, conference, instruction sheets, 
charts, films, slides, and models in demonstration teaching. Designed to meet the needs of Trade 
Shop Teachers, Part-Time Preparatory Teachers, and Trade Shop Related Teachers. 

TIE. 203. — Organization for Individual Instruction and Progression. 1 to 3 

daily. Room 10, 2 credits, PINCH. 

Means of providing and carrying on individual instruction for students at various attainment 
levels and progression records and forms for recording individual progress. Designed to meet the 
needs of Trade Shop Teachers, Trade Shop Related Teachers, and Part-Time Preparatory Teachers. 

TIE. 204. — Trade Shop Planning, Organization and Control. 10 to 12 daily. 
Room 10, 2 credits, SCHOLLENBERGER, 

Items for consideration in planning shops, management and control with respect to floor 
space, light, equipment, supplies, inventories. Federal and State regulations, and record keeping 
devices. Designed to meet the needs of Trade Shop Teachers and Part-Time Preparatory Teachers. 

TIE. 227. — General Continuation School Organization. 3 to 5 daily. Room 
12, 2 credits, BabCOCK. 

The development of a knowledge and understanding of the value, possibilities and limitations 
of continuation schools to the end that the continuation school teacher will understand clearly 
his place in such a program. A thorough study of methods and procedures in organization, 
selection of students. Federal, State, and local laws, regulations governing the conduct of con- 
tinuation schools. 

TIE. 239. — Organization of Instructional Material in Typewriting. 8 to 10 

daily. Room 13. 2 credits, WHITE, 

Methods of organization of material for teaching of typewriting in vocational schools, subject 
matter, substance, relation of teaching material, synchronizing instruction with objectives to be 
attained. 

TIE. 240. — Practice Teaching in Business Arithmetic. 10 to 12 daily. Room 
14. 2 credits. 

Instruction in special methods of teaching and organization of instructional material for 
individual progression, practice, demonstration and observation teaching. 



TIME SCHEDULE FIRST TERM 239 

TIE. 241. — Tests and Measurements in Commercial Education. 1 to 3 daily. 
Room 14. 2 credits. 

A study of the various types of objective measurement tests in commercial education, how to 
administer tests, how to interpret, and how to make effective tests for specific subjects. 

TIE. 243. — Labor Relations. 3 to 5 daily. Room 14. 2 credits, VIA. 

The progression and development of skilled labor from the beginning to the present time. 
Designed for Directors and Supervisors. 

TIE. 246. — Apprenticeship Training. 8 to 10 daily. Room 14. 2 credits. VIA. 

The laws affecting apprenticeship training, organization of training programs in cooperation 
with the Federal Department of Labor's Apprenticeship Committee. Types and kinds of training 
services to be given. Designed for Directors and Supervisors. 

TIE. 247. — Vocational School Organization. 10 to 12 daily. Room 12. 2 
credits. Babcock. 

The characteristics and functions of the vocational school ; the groups to be served and the 
provisions, organization and plan necessary to render this service. 

TIE. 259.— Public Service Training, 1 to 3 daily. Room 15. 2 credits. COXEN. 

The classification of qualified groups in need of training and the consideration of their train- 
ing needs in the light of training limitations. The sources and dissemination of instructional 
material and teachers. Promotional agencies and methods that may be used in organizing training 
for public service occupations. 

TIE. 262.— Shop Practice Laboratory. 8 to 3 daily. Shops. 4 credits. 
Anderson, Grimm, Graham, Carter. 

Especially planned for shop teachers of National Defense courses. Actual practice in organiza- 
tion and conduct of training in occupations essential to National Defense. 

TIE. 274. — Organization of Training for Military Personnel. 8 to 10 daily. 
Room 21. 2 credits. 

Designed for Army and Navy officers responsible for personnel and training. 

TIE. 275. — Organization of Instructional Material for Military Personnel. 

10 to 12 daily. Room 21. 2 credits. 

Designed for Army and Navy officers instructing in vocational training programs for military 
personnel administered through national defense training funds. 

SPECIAL COURSES FOR DEFENSE TRAINING 

TDE. 263, — National Defense Nomenclature. 3 to 5 daily. Room 15. 2 credits. 
Plowden. 

TDE. 273. — Supervision of National Defense Training. 3 to 5 daily. Room 
19. 2 credits. HARRIS. 

TIE. 201.— Organization Specific Subject Content. 3 to 5 daily. Room 10. 
2 credits. SCHISSLER. 

TIE. 202.— Teaching Methods and Devices. 8 to 10 daily. Room 10. 2 credits. 
LiND. 

TIE. 203. — Organization for Individual Instruction and Progression. 1 to 3 
daily. Room 10. 2 credits. PINCH. 

TIE, 204. — Trade Shop Planning, Organization and Control. 10 to 12 daily. 
Room 10. 2 credits. Schollenberger. 

TIE. 262.— Shop Practice Laboratory. 8 to 3 daily. Shops. 4 credits. 
ANDERSON, GRIMM, GRAHAM, CARTER. 

TIE. 274, — Organization of Training for Military Personnel. 8 to 10 daily. 
Room 21. 2 credits. 

TIE. 275. — Organization of Instructional Material for Military Personnel. 
10 to 12 daily. Room 21. 2 credits. 



24() BULLETIN OF SCHOOL OF TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

TIME SCHEDULE 
SECOND TERM 

DISTRIBUTIVE OCCUPATIONS EDUCATION 
DOE. 207. — Fashions. 3 to 5 daily. Room 18. 2 credits. VAN HORN. 

Development of fashion through the ages, its purposes, modification and effect on present day 
fashions ; influence of historical, political, and economic events on fashion ; fashion convention 
in selling ; study of European and American designs. 

DOE. 211.— Store Selling. 1 to 3 daily. Room 18. 2 credits. McKlLLIPS. 

Analysis of typical selling situations, psychological approach to customer guidance in buying ; 
factors in arousing interest, desire and action, and basic appeals such as inborn tendencies and 
emotions are to be studied from the customer's point of view. 

DOE. 217. — Fashions in Men's Apparel. 3 to 5 daily. Room 14. 2 credits. 

DOE. 218. — Problems in Merchandising. 10 to 12 daily. Room 19. 2 credits. 
SCHALLER. 

The merchandise planning, mathematical aspects, expenses, merchandise policies, profit calcula- 
tions, problems of the retail method of inventory and expense. 

DOE. 219.— Non-Textiles. 8 to 10 daily. Room 18. 2 credits. JOHNSON. 

The consideration of the following types of merchandise: leathers, metals, stones, jewelry, 
cosmetics, glass, rubber, paper, ceramics and silver ware. 

DOE. 509. — Retail Merchandising. 8 to 10 daily. Room 17. IVz credits. 
SCHALLER. 

Deals with the tools that buyers and merchandise manas^ers use daily in manipulating their 
purchases to make a profit. The subject matter includes markup, terms and datings, cost method 
of figuring profit, retail method of inventory, markdowns and shortages, invoice and importing 
mathematics, stockturn, and merchandise planning. 

TRADE AND DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION 

TDE. 205.— Graphic Analysis. 1 to 3 daily. Room 20. 2 credits. SCHOLLEN- 
BERGER. 

The formulating of abstract and statistical materials into charts and graphs for rapid assimi- 
lation. The types of material suited to this analysis, the methods of presenting the material and 
the preparation of material for display. (A set of drawing instrum.ents will be of value to the 
student in this work.) 

TDE. 206.— Advanced Graphic Analysis. 1 to 3 daily. Room 20. 2 credits. 
SCHOLLENBERGER. 

Prerequisite requirement TDE. 205. A continuation of TDE. 205. 

TDE. 212. — Organization of Subject Matter for Evening School Classes. 10 

to 12 daily. Room 11. 2 credits. HALE. 

The development of a knowledge of trade or job analysis and the ability to use such analysis 
in the arrangement of subject matter so that teaching may be simplified and learning stimulated. 
Methods of analysis to determine trade or job content and means of determining student needs. 
Students will be requested to make a job analysis and organize the content for teaching purposes. 
Designed to meet the needs of Extension Teachers. 

TDE. 213. — ^Teaching Methods and Devices for Evening School Teachers. 1 to 

3 daily. Room 11. 2 credits. J. M. THOMPSON. 

The procedure to be followed in setting up objectives and organizing class work so as to secure 
the active interest of all students. Teaching aids and devices. The student must plan a series 
of lessons with a view to exemplifying the use of various teaching methods and devices and do 
demonstration teaching. Designed to nieet the needs of Extension Teachers. 



TIME SCHEDULE SECOND TERM 241 

TDE. 222. — Occupational Surveys. 3 to 5 daily. Room 15. 2 credits. CANNON. 
TDE. 224.— Industrial Plant Job Analysis. 10 to 12 daily. Room 12. 2 credits. 
Pinch. 

The student must make a complete schedule of work processes in an individual plant. Also 
based upon these processes he must make a schedule of student training, related study, and 
compensation. 

TDE. 225.— Related Study Material. 1 to 3 daily. Room 12. 2 credits. 
STARBUCK. 

TDE. 226. — Coordination of Diversified Cooperative Training. 8 to 10 daily. 
Room 11. 2 credits. FRANZ. 

Coordination aims, purposes, methods of promotion, community and industrial relationships, 
advisory committee organization and function, research problems, trainee follow-up and placement. 

TDE. 241. — History and Development of Vocational Education in the United 
States. 10 to 12 daily. Room 16. 2 credits. O'REILLY. 

The development of Vocational Education by stages from its beginning to the present time. 

TDE. 244.— Conference Methods. 8 to 10 daily. Room 16. 2 credits. 
Wrigley. 

Methods and devices that can be used successfully in leading and managing foremen con- 
ferences and in the selection of problems affecting vocational courses. Designed for Directors, 
Supervisors, Superintendents and Principals. 

TDE. 249.— Safety Education. 8 to 10 daily. Room 15. 2 credits. Petrie. 

A general overview of various safety programs including industrial, home, school and recrea- 
tional safety ; the need and justification of safety education ; its promotion ; material for insti-uc- 
tion ; organization methods and administration. 

TDE. 251. — Supervision and Coordination. 1 to 3 daily. Room 16. 2 credits. 
BABCOCK. 

Duties of vocational supervisors and the means and methods to be employed in properly dis- 
charging them ; special subjects such as laws, promotional methods, public relation, surveys, train- 
ing the teachers in the service placement and supervisory plan organization. 

TDE. 256.— Applied Vocational Psychology. 10 to 12 daily. Room 17. 2 
credits. SCHOLLENBERGER. 

The application of fundamental principles of psychology in the solution of human relation 
problems of the director, supervisor, or coordinator of vocational education. 

TDE. 263. — National Defense Nomenclature. 3 to 5 daily. Room 16. 2 
credits. Keyes. 

Laws and regulations governing National Defense training. Procedure in organizing various 
kinds of class practice in budgeting and making F'ederal reports. 

TDE. 264. — Advisory Committee Organization and Management. 3 to 5 daily. 
Room 11. 2 credits. RakeSTRAW. 

Methods in organization, management, and control of advisory committees in the promotion 
of National Defense activities and training. 

TDE. 500. — Colloquium in Administration and Organization of Distributive 
Education. 3 to 5 daily. Room 17. IVn credits. O'REILLY, VAN OOT, POPE. 

The provisions and interpretations of the George-Deen Act as they pertain to the administra- 
tion and organization for Distributive Occupations, national, state, county and local programs. 

TDE. 508. — Research in Industrial and Distributive Education. 3 to 5 daily. 
Room 19. 11/2 credits. GermOND. 

To aid students in the proper use of research procedures in the solution of research problems, 
analyzing critically objectives and data in the formulation and writing of reports and theses. 
Required of all students majoring in Trade and Industrial and Distributive Education. 



242 BULLETIN OF SCHOOL OF TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

TIE. 201. — Organization Specific Subject Content. 3 to 5 daily. Room 10. 
2 credits. SCHISSLER. 

The methods of making occupational studies to determine jobs or operations and functioning 
related information in which instruction should be given and the procedure in organization for 
teaching purposes. Designed to meet the needs of Trade Shop Teachers, Trade Shop Related 
Teachers, and Part-Time Preparatory Teachers. 

TIE. 202. — Teaching Methods and Devices. 8 to 10 daily. Room 10. 2 credits. 
LiND. 

The methods used in preparing instructional material for teaching purposes and the use of 
such methods and aids as demonstrations, illustrations, lectures, conference, instruction sheets, 
charts, films, slides, and models in demonstration teaching. Designed to meet the needs of Trade 
Shop Teachers, Part-Time Preparatory Teachers, and Trade Shop Related Teachers. 

TIE. 203. — ^Organization for Individual Instruction and Progression. 1 to 3 

daily. Room 10. 2 credits. PiNCH. 

Means of providing and carrying on individual instruction for students at various attainment 
levels and progression records and forms for recording individual progress. Designed to meet 
the needs of Trade Shop Teachers, Trade Shop Related Teachers, and Part-Time Preparatory 
Teachers. 

TIE. 204. — Trade Shop Planning, Organization and Control. 10 to 12 daily. 
Room 10. 2 credits. LiND. 

Items for consideration in planning shops, management and control with respect to floor 
space, light, equipment, supplies, inventories. Federal and State regulations, and record keeping 
devices. Designed to meet the needs of Trade Shop Teachers, and Part-Time Preparatory Teachers. 

TIE. 231. — Practice Teaching Office Practice and Filing. 10 to 12 daily. Room 
14. 2 credits. ALEXANDER. 

TIE. 238. — Organization of Instructional Material in Shorthand. 3 to 5 daily. 
Room 12. 2 credits. 

Methods of organizing material for effective teaching of shorthand, subject outline and sub- 
stance, what to stress, objective, time schedules, and presentation. 

TIE. 241. — Tests and Measurements in Commercial Education. 1 to 3 daily. 
Room 14. 2 credits. 

A study of the various types of objective measurement tests in commercial education, how 
to administer tests, how to interpret, and how to make effective tests for specific subjects. 

TIE. 242. — Organization of Instructional Material in Bookkeeping. 8 to 10 

daily. Room 12. 2 credits. ROSENBERG. 

How to organize teaching material in pen and machine bookkeeping for modern jobs as dis- 
tinguished from the traditional ; short cuts for achievement of understanding of bookkeeping 
principles. 

TIE. 274. — Organization of Training for Military Personnel. 8 to 10 daily. 
Room 21. 2 credits. 

Designed for Army and Navy officers responsible for personnel and training. 

TIE. 275. — Organization of Instructional Material for Military Personnel. 10 

to 12 daily. Room 21. 2 credits. 

Designed for Army and Navy officers instructing in vocational training programs for military 
personnel administered through national defense training funds. 

TIE. 501. — Industrial and Economic Development in the South. 8 to 10 daily. 
Room 19. 11/2 credits. 

The historical transition of economic and industrial growth in the South. Contemporary 
and industrial development. 



TIME SCHEDULE SECOND TERM 243 

TIE. 503. — Administration of Vocational Education. 1 to 3 daily. Room 19. 
iy2 credits. WRIGLEY. 

National, State and local administrative organization, and controls for vocational education. 
Sources and means of procuring and estimating revenue and laws, regulations, principles and 
plan to be followed in spending, a systematic and detailed study of vocational education ad- 
ministrative personnel duties and responsibilities. 

TIE. 505. — Technical Schools — Their Organization and Control. 3 to 5 daily. 
Room 21. IVz credits, ALEXANDER. 

The purpose and limitations of the various types of technical schools, their curricula, organiza- 
tion, management, control devices, and desirability from the standpoint of scope in satisfying 
typical community training requirements. 

TIE. 512. — Colloquium in Administration and Organization of Trade and In- 
dustrial Education. 8 to 10 daily. Room 14. IVz credits. POPE, O'REILLY. 

The provisions and interpretations of the Smith-Hughes and George-Deen Acts as they pertain 
to the administration and organization for Trade and Industrial Education, national, state, county 
and local programs, 

GUIDANCE 

GU. 400. — Organization and Administration of Guidance. 10 to 12 daily. 
Room 18. 1^2 credits. BREWSTER. 

Histoi-y and philosophy of the guidance movement. Guidance as an ethical part of the school 
functional program. National, state, local and institutional organization for guidance. Practices 
and techniques employed in active guidance programs. Methods of initiating, organizing, and 
administering a program of guidance at various levels. 

SPECIAL COURSES FOR DEFENSE TRAINING 

TDE. 263. — National Defense Nomenclature. 3 to 5 daily. Room 16. 2 
credits. KeyeS. 

TDE. 264. — Advisory Committee Organization and Management. 3 to 5 daily. 
Room 11. 2 credits. Rakestraw. 

TIE. 201. — Organization Specific Subject Content. 3 to 5 daily. Room 10. 
2 credits. SCHISSLER. 

TIE. 202.— Teaching Methods and Devices. 8 to 10 daily. Room 10. 2 credits. 
LIND. 

TIE. 203. — Organization for Individual Instruction and Progression. 1 to 3 
daily. Room 10. 2 credits. PINCH. 

TIE. 204.— Trade Shop Planning, Organization and Control. 10 to 12 daily. 
Room 10. 2 credits. LiND. 

TIE. 274. — Organization of Training for Military Personnel. 8 to 10 daily. 
Room 21. 2 credits. 

TIE. 275. — Organization of Instructional Material for Military Personnel. 10 
to 12 daily. Room 21. 2 credits. 



244 BULLETIN OF SCHOOL OF TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

DESCRIPTION OF COURSES 

TIME SCHEDULE 
THIRD TERM 

DISTRIBUTIVE OCCUPATIONS EDUCATION 

DOE. 200. — Store Employment and Training Methods. 1 to 3 daily. Room 
15. 2 credits. VAN HORN. 

The procedures and methods used by retail organizations in the selection of employees, in 
handling employees' grievances, promotions, supervision and discipline, store training programs 
for novices and up-grading employees. 

DOE. 208. — Textiles. 8 to 10 daily. Room 18. 2 credits. JOHNSON. 

Textile designs ; finishing processes ; suitability, durability and stability of cloth ; analysis and 
identification of textile fabrics ; textile fibers and processes used in grading fabrics. 

DOE. 210.— Color, Line and Design. 10 to 12 daily. Room 21. 2 credits. 
MCKlLLIPS. 

Principles of color and design and their relation to styling ; merchandising, customer decora- 
tion, window and interior display. 

TRADE AND DISTRIBUTIVE EDUCATION 

TDE. 211. — Evening Schools — Their Organization and Control. 1 to 3 daily. 
Room 11. 2 credits. HALE. 

The development of a knowledge and understanding of the value, possibilities, and limitations 
of evening schools and classes to the end that the evening school teacher will understand clearly 
his place in such a program. A thorough study of methods and procedures in organization, selec- 
tion of students. Federal, State, and local laws and regulations governing the conduct of evening 
schools and classes. Designed to meet the needs of Extension Teachers. 

TDE. 213. — Teaching Methods and Devices for Evening School Teachers. 10 

to 12 daily. Room 11. 2 credits. J. M. THOMPSON. 

The procedure to be followed in setting up objectives and organizing class work so as to secure 
the active interest of all students. Teaching aids and devices. The student must plan a series 
of lessons with a view to exemplifying the use of various teaching methods and devices and do 
demonstration teaching. Designed to meet the needs of Extension Teachers. 

TDE. 221. — Organization for Diversified Occupational Training. 10 to 12 daily. 
Room 12. 2 credits. FRANZ. 

Objectives to be attained, organization to attain these objectives. Federal and State require- 
ments, social security, insurance, compensation and labor laws involved will be studied. 

TDE. 223. — Student Counseling and Selection. 8 to 10 daily. Room 11. 2 
credits. CANNON. 

The procedure to be followed in securing applicants for training, factors involved in selection 
of students, occupational counseling, training, assignments, compensation, and work contracts. 

TDE. 224. — Industrial Plant Job Analysis. 1 to 3 daily. Room 14. 2 credits. 
Starbuck, 

The student must make a complete schedule of work processes in an individual plant. Also 
based upon these processes he must make a schedule of student training, related study, and com- 
pensation. 

TDE. 226. — Coordination of Diversified Cooperative Training. 8 to 10 daily. 
Room 14. 2 credits. Erwin. 

Coordination aims, purposes, methods of promotion, community and industrial relationships, 
advisory committee organization and function, research problems, trainee follow-up and placement. 



TIME SCHKDVLh: THIRD TERM ■ 245 

TDE. 263. — National Defense Nomenclature. 10 to 12 daily. Room 17. 2 
credits. DAVIS. 

Laws and regulations troverninK National Defense trainintr. Procedure in organizinK various 
kinds of class practice in budgeting and making Federal reports. 

TDE. 264. — Advisory Committee Organization and Management. 1 to 3 daily. 
Room 19. 2 credits. Bronson. 

Methods in organization, management, and control of advisory committees in the promotion 
of National Defense activities and training. 

TDE. 504. — Philosophy of Vocational Education. 8 to 10 daily. Room 16. 
Wz credits. DOLLEY, 

Basic principles involved in vocational education and the interpretation and application of 
these principles to public education and industrial and economic development in the United States. 

TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

TIE. 202. — Teaching Methods and Devices. 10 to 12 daily. Room 15. 2 
credits. H. F. THOMPSON. 

The methods used in preparing instructional material for teaching purposes and the use of 
such methods and aids as demonstrations, illustrations, lectures, conference, instruction sheets, 
charts. Alms, slides, and models in demonstration teaching. Designed to meet the needs of Trade 
Shop Teachers, Part-Time Preparatory Teachers, and Trade Shop Related Teachers. 

TIE. 203. — Organization for Individual Instruction and Progression. 1 to 8 

daily. Room 17. 2 credits. PINCH. 

Means of providing and carrying on individual instruction for students at various attainment 
levels and progression records and fonns for recording individual progress. Designed to meet the 
needs of Trade Shop Teachers, Trade Shop Related Teachers, and Part-Time Preparatory Teachers. 

TIE. 236. — Practice Teaching Business English. 10 to 12 daily. Room 14. 
2 credits. HOBSON. 

Instruction in special methods of teaching and organization of instructional material for 
individual progression, practice, demonstration and observation teaching. 

TIE, 237. — Practice Teaching Dictation and Transcription. 1 to 3 daily. 
Room 12. 2 credits. 

TIE. 238. — Organization of Instructional Material in Shorthand. 8 to 10 daily. 
Room 12. 2 credits. 

Methods of organizing material for effective teaching of shorthand, subject outline and sulv 
stance, what to stress, objective, time schedules, and presentation. 

TIE. 239. — Organization of Instructional Material in Typewriting. 8 to 10 

daily. Room 13. 2 credits. BAGLEY. 

Methods of organization of material for teaching of typewriting in vocational schools, subject 
matter, substance, relation of teaching material, synchronizing instruction with objectives to be 
attained. 

TIE. 252.— Surveys. 10 to 12 daily. Room 18. 2 credits. BabCOCK. 

The factors involved in determining kinds and extent of vocational training service needed 
in a local community in the light of individual and occupational employment needs ; sources of 
information and methods of determining labor turnover, employment and individual training 
requirements ; the evaluation and recording statistical facts pertinent to the interpretation of 
data and the technique of drawing the conclusions ; formulation of a survey procedure and its 
actual application in a real situation. 

TIE. 253.— Placements. 1 to 3 daily. Room 18. 2 credits. BABCOCK. 

Promotional methods in placement ; factors involved in the selection of employment ; place- 
ment methods, follow-up ; records and reports ; evaluating devices and means of determining 
justification of training on the basis of wages earned and individuals placed. 



246 BULLETIN OF SCHOOL OF TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 

TIE. 254. — ^Tests and Measurements in Vocational Education. 8 to 10 daily. 
Room 15. 2 credits. SCHOLLENBERGER. 

The various measurement tests in vocational education with special emphasis on objectives 
to be attained and methods to be employed in their use. 

TIE. 257.— Day Trade Related Instruction. 8 to 10 daily. Room 17. 2 credits. 
SCHISSLER. 

The fundamental purposes and objectives of related instruction. Sources of material, organiza- 
tion and methods to be employed in teaching related material. 

TIE. 505. — Technical Schools — Their Organization and Control. 10 to 12 daily. 
Room 16. 11/^ credits. ALEXANDER. 

The purpose and limitations of the various types of technical schools, their curricula, organiza- 
tion, management, control devices, and desirability from the standpoint of scope in satisfying 
typical community training requirements. 

TIE. 506. — Apprenticeship and Labor Relations. 1 to 3 daily. Room 16. IV2 
credits. DOLLEY. 

National, State and labor organization laws regulating and governing apprenticeship in the 
skilled crafts. Aspects of apprenticeship developments in industrial production and construction. 
Compulsory public training through craft unions and organization for apprentice training. 

GUIDANCE 

GU. 401. — Local Guidance Program in the School and Community. 10 to 12 

daily. Room 19. iy2 credits. 

The functions and the objectives of a guidance program calculated to serve individual, school 
and community. Special emphasis on such aspects of the guidance procedure as individual func- 
tions, materials, personnel, practices and coordinated school activities. 

GU. 402. — Research Practices, Tests and Measurements in Guidance. 1 to 3 

daily. Room 21. IVz credits. SCHOLLENBERGER. 

Securing, analyzing, and using occupational information. Making industrial, occupational, 
vocational, and educational surveys for guidance purposes. Evaluation and measuring of tests 
and devices in guidance for the individual, school, and community. 

SPECIAL COURSES FOR DEFENSE TRAINING 

TDE. 263.— National Defense Nomenclature. 10 to 12 daily. Room 17. 2 
credits. DAVIS. 

TDE. 264. — Advisory Committee Organization and Management. 1 to 3 daily. 
Room 19. 2 credits. BronsoN. 

TIE. 202.— Teaching Methods and Devices. 10 to 12 daily. Room 15. 2 
credits. H. F. THOMPSON. 

TIE. 203. — Organization for Individual Instruction and Progression. 1 to 3 
daily. Room 17. 2 credits. PiNCH. 

TIE. 257.— Day Trade Related Instruction. 8 to 10 daily. Room 17. 2 credits. 
SCHISSLER. 



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APPLICATION BLANK— 1941 Summer Session— University of Florida 

(If you wish to attend School of Trade and Industrial Education. Daytona Beach, Florida, this form 
should be filled out completely and mailed to the Registrar, University of Florida, Gainesville, before 
June 1. See also paee 247.) 

[249] 



7^^< 



The University Record 

of the 

University of Florida 



for 



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COURSES BI 




Vol. XXXVI, Series 1 No. 6 June 1, 1941 



Published monthly by the University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 

Entered in the post office in Gainesville, Florida, as second-class matter, 

under Act of Congress, August 24, 1912 

Office of Publication, Gainesville, Florida 



The Record comprises: 

The Reports of the President to the Board of Control, the bulletins of 
information, announcements of special courses of instruction, and reports of 
the University Officers. 

These bulletins will be sent gratuitously to all persons who apply for them. The appli- 
cant should specifically state which bulletin or what information is desired. Address 

THE REGISTRAR, University of Florida 

Gainesville, Florida 



Research Publications. — Research publications contain results of research work. Papers 
are published as separate monographs numbered in several series. 

There is no free mailing list of these publications. Exchanges with institutions are 
arranged by the University Library. Correspondence concerning such exchanges should 
be addressed to the University Librarian, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida. The 
issue and sale of all these publications is under the control of the Committee on Publications. 
Requests for individual copies, or for any other copies not included in institutional ex- 
changes, should be addressed to 

The Committee on University Publications 
University of Florida 

Gainesville, Florida 



[254] 



ADMISSIONS 



EXPENSES 



DORMITORIES 



STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



SCHOOL OF FORESTRY 



SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE AND 
ALLIED ARTS 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



COLLEGE OF BUSINESS 
ADMINISTRATION 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 



COLLEGE OF LAW 



RADIO CURRICULA 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 



[255] 



CAMPUS — UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 




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[ 256 ] 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

PACE 

University Calendar 258 

Administrative Officers 260 

Organization of the University 262 

Admission 264 

Expenses 266 

Fees and Tuition 266 

Special Fees 267 

University Dormitories 268 

Self-Help 271 

Scholarships and Loan Funds 273 

General Extension Division 280 

Summer Session 280 

Athletics and Physical Education 280 

Military Science and Tactics 281 

Band 282 

Music 282 

Libraries - 283 

Florida State Museum 283 

Health Service 284 

Bureau of Vocational Guidance and Mental Hygiene 285 

Florida Union 285 

Student Organizations and Publications 286 

Honor System _ — .. 288 

Colleges, Schools, and Curricula 290 

College of Agriculture _ 290 

School of Forestry 299 

School of Architecture and Allied Arts 301 

College of Arts and Sciences 306 

School of Pharmacy 316 

College of Business Administration 319 

College of Education 324 

College of Engineering 329 

Graduate School 340 

College of Law 341 

Radio Broadcasting Training 344 

Departments of Instruction 347 



[257] 



258 BULLETIN OF INFORM AT ION — UPPER DIVISION 



UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 
REGULAR SESSION, 1941-42 

1941 FIRST SEMESTER 

September 1, Monday Last day for making application for admission for 

first semester. 
September 3-10 Preliminary registration for all students who have 

previously attended the University of Florida. 

September 10, Wednesday 1941-42 Session officially opens. 

September 10-13, Wednesday-Saturday.-Registration period. 

September 15, Monday, 8 a.m Classes for 1941-42 Session begin; late registration fee 

of $5 for all students registering on or after this date. 
September 20, Saturday, 12 noon Last day for registration for the first semester, for 

adding courses, and for changing sections in all 

courses except year comprehensive courses. 
September 27, Saturday, 12 noon Last day for submitting resignation and receiving 

any refund of fees. 
October 11, Saturday, 12 noon Last day for making application for a degree at the 

end of the first semester. Last day for changing 

sections in year comprehensive courses. 
October 14, Tuesday, 5 p.m _ Last day for students to apply to the Dean to be 

designated as Honor Students. 
November 8, Saturday Georgia-Florida football game in Jacksonville. 

Classes suspended. 

November 22, Saturday Homecoming. Classes suspended. 

Thanksgiving Holiday To be announced. 

December 2, Tuesday Last day for removing grades of I or X received in 

the preceding semester of attendance. 
December 3, Wednesday, 5 p.m Last day for dropping courses without receiving 

grade of E and being assessed failure fee. 
December 4, Thursday, 5 p.m Progress Reports for General College students are 

due in the Office of the Registrar. 
December 20, Saturday, 12 noon Christmas Recess begins. 

1942 

January 5, Monday, 8 a.m Christmas Recess ends. 

January 5, Monday, 5 p.m Last day for graduate students graduating at the end 

of the first semester to submit theses to the Dean. 
January 14, Wednesday Last day for candidates for degrees to complete 

correspondence courses. 

January 17, Saturday, 1:30 p.m. Final Examinations begin for Upper Division students. 

January 19, Monday Second semester registration begins for students who 

have previously registered in the University. Late 

registration fee of $5 for not registering according to 

the announcements in the Orange and Blue bulletin. 
January 27, Tuesday, 4 p.m All grades for candidates for degrees are due in the 

Office of the Registrar. 

January 28, Wednesday Faculty meetings to pass upon candidates for degrees. 

January 28, Wednesday, 4 p.m Glasses for first semester for General College end. 

January 28, Wednesday, noon Final Examinations for Upper Division students end. 

January 28, Wednesday, 4 p.m First semester ends; all grades are due in the Office 

of the Registrar. 



UNIVERSITY CALENDAR 259 

January 29-30, Thursday-Friday Inter-Semester days. 

January 30, Friday, 10 a.m Conferring of degrees. 

SECOND SEMESTER 

January 31, Saturday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m Registration for second semester for new students 

only. Placement Tests, Room 208, Science Hall. 
Grades with failure fee assessments available for 
students registered first semester. 

January 31, Saturday, 5 p.m Last day for all students to pay registration fees 

for second semester without being assessed $5 late 
registration fee. 

February 2, Monday, 8 a.m Classes begin. Late registration fee, $5. 

February 7, Saturday, 12 noon Last day for registration for second semester, for 

adding courses, and for changing sections. 

February 9, Monday, 4 p.m Last day for paying failure fees. 

February 14, Saturday, 12 noon Last day for making application for a degree at end 

of second semester. Last day for submitting resig- 
nation and receiving any refund of fees. 
March 18, "Wednesday Last day for students to apply to the Dean to be 

designated as Honor Students. 
March 30, Monday, 5 p.m Progress Reports for General College students due 

in the Office of the Registrar. 
April 1, Wednesday Last day for removing grades of I or X received in 

preceding semester of attendance. 

April 9, Thursday, 8 a.m Spring Recess begins. 

April 13, Monday, 8 a.m Spring Recess ends. 

April 22, Wednesday, 5 p.m Last day for dropping courses without receiving 

grade of E and being assessed failure fee. 
April 29, Wednesday, 5 p.m Last day for graduate students graduating at the end 

of the semester to submit theses to the Dean. 
May 12, Tuesday Last day for candidates for degrees to complete 

correspondence courses. 

May 16, Saturday, 1:30 p.m Final Examinations begin. 

May 27, Wednesday, 4 p.m Vll grades for candidates for degrees are due in the 

Office of the Registrar. 

May 28, Thursday Faculty meetings to pass upon candidates for degrees. 

May 30-June 1, Saturday-Monday Commencement Exercises. 

May 31, Sunday Baccalaureate Sermon. 

June 1, Monday Commencement Convocation. 

June 1, Monday, 12 noon Second semester ends; all grades are due in the 

Office of the Registrar. 
June 8, Monday Boys' Club Week begins. 

SUMMER SESSION, 1942 

June 15, Monday First Summer Term begins. 

July 24, Friday First Summer Term ends. 

July 27, Monday .Second Summer Term begins. 

August 28, Friday Second Summer Term ends. 

FIRST SEMESTER, 1942-43 

September 14, Monday 1942-43 Session begins. (Date provisional) 



260 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION — UPPER DIVISION 

ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 
UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA 

1941-42 

BOARD OF CONTROL 

Henry P. Adair _ Attorney-at-Law 

1511 Bamett National Bank Building, Jacksonville, Florida 
Chairman of the Board 

R. H. Gore _ Publisher 

Ft. Lauderdale, Florida 

T. T. Scott _ Merchant 

Live Oak, Florida 

N. B. Jordan _ „..Banker 

Quincy, Florida 

Whitfield M. Palmer..._ ,..„ President, Dixie Lime Products Company 

Ocala, Florida 

John T. Diamond.. ._ Secretary of the Board of Control 

Tallahassee, Florida 

Roy L. Purvis, B.S.B.A., C.P.A. (Florida) Auditor for the Board of Control 

Gainesville, Florida 

STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

Spessard L. Holland Governor 

R. A. Gray Secretary of State 

J. Edwin Larson State Treasurer 

J. Tom Watson Attorney General 

Colin English, Secretary State Superintendent of Public Instruction 

THE UNIVERSITY COUNCIL 

John James Tigert, M.A. (Oxon.), LL.D., Ed.D., D.C.L., D.Litt., L.H.D. 

President of the University 

TowNEs Randolph Leigh, Ph.D., Sc.D. Acting Vice-President of the University; 

Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences 

Robert Colder Beaty, M.A Dean of Students 

Harley Willard Chandler, M.S Dean of the University 

H. Harold Hume, D.Sc Dean of the College of Agriculture 

Richard Sadler Johnson, B.S.P Registrar, Secretary of the Council 

Winston Woodard Little, M.A _ Dean of the General College 

Walter Jeffries Matherly, M.A., LL.D. Dean of the College of Business Administration 

WiLMON Newell, D.Sc Provost for Agriculture 

James Wiluam Norman, Ph.D Dean of the College of Education 

Bert Clair Riley, B.A., B.S.A Dean of the General Extension Division 

Thomas Marshall Simpson, Ph.D. _ _...Dean of the Graduate School 

Harry Raymond Trusler, M.A., LL.B Dean of the College of Law 

Joseph Weil, M.S _ Dean of the College of Engineering 



ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 261 



OTHER ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICERS 



RoixiN Salisbury AtttTOOD, Ph.D Director of the Institute of Inter-American Affairs 

Percy M. Beard, M.S Acting Director of Athletics 

Lewis F. Blalock, M.A Director of Admissions 

Richard DeWitt Brown Director of Music 

Perry Albert Foote, Ph.D Director of the School of Pharmacy 

Walter B. Hill, M.A Librarian 

Klein Harrison Graham, LL.D Business Manager 

Thomas J. Lieb, M.A Head Coach 

John Vredenburch McQuitty, Ph.D University Examiner 

Donald Ray Matthews, B.A Director of the Florida Union 

Harold Mowry, M.S.A Director of Research, Experiment Station 

Harold Stephenson Newins, M.F Director of the School of Forestry 

Garland Powell Director of Radio Station WRUF 

Harold Riker, M.A Acting Director of Residence 

Glenn Ballard Simmons, Ph.D Assistant Dean of the College of Education 

Arthur Percival Spencer, M.S Vice-Director of the Agricultural Extension Service 

George Clarence Tillman, M.D., F.A.C.S University Physician 

Thompson Van Hyning Director of the Florida State Museum 

Rudolph Weaver, B.S., F.A.I.A Director of the School of Architecture and Allied Arta 

William Harold Wilson, Ph.D Assistant Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences 

Frank S. Wright, B.S.J Director of Publicity 

BOARD OF UNIVERSITY EXAMINERS 

Richard Sadler Johnson, B.S.P., Chairman Registrar 

Harley Willard Chandler, M.S Dean of the University 

Elmer Dumond Hinckley, Ph.D Head, Department of Psychology 

Winston Woodard Little, M.A Dean of the General College 

Joseph Edwin Price, B.A.E Assistant Dean of Student* 

Thomas Marshall Simpson, Ph.D Dean of the Graduate School 

John Vredenburgh McQuitty, Ph.D., Secretary University Examiner 



262 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION —UPPER DIVISION 

ORGANIZATION OF THE UNIVERSITY 

DIVISIONS, COLLEGES, SCHOOLS 

LOWER DIVISION 
THE GENERAL COLLEGE 



UPPER DIVISION 

THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES, including 
THE SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 

THE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE, including 
THE COLLEGE PROPER 
THE SCHOOL OF FORESTRY 
THE AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATIONS 
THE AGRICULTURAL EXTENSION SERVICE 

THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING, including 

THE ENGINEERING EXPERIMENT STATION 

THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION, including 

THE P. K. YONGE LABORATORY SCHOOL 
THE FLORIDA CURRICULUM LABORATORY 

THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

THE SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE AND ALLIED ARTS 



THE COLLEGE OF LAW 
THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



THE GENERAL EXTENSION DIVISION 

THE SUMMER SESSION 

THE DIVISION OF ATHLETICS AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

THE DIVISION OF MILITARY SQENCE AND TACTICS 

THE DIVISION OF MUSIC 

THE FLORIDA STATE MUSEUM 

THE UNIVERSITY LIBRARY 

THE STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE 

THE BUREAU OF VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE AND MENTAL HYGIENE 



i 



NOTICE TO TRANSFER STUDENTS 263 



NOTICE TO TRANSFER STUDENTS 

1. Applications for admission on regulation University blanks pro- 
vided for this purpose should be submitted to the Registrar immediately 
after the end of the spring term, and in no case later than September 1, 
1941. Applications will not be considered unless received by September 
1, 1941. These blanks may be obtained from the Registrar. The pro- 
spective student should fill out an application (Form I) and mail it to 
the Registrar, and request the registrar of each institution previously 
attended to send a complete transcript of the applicant's record to the 
Office of the Registrar, University of Florida. Transcripts cannot be 
accepted from students. 

2. Some transfer students must take and pass the Placement Tests, 
besides fulfilling the other requirements, before they will be eligible for 
admission. Applicants who did not take these tests in the Spring Test- 
ing Program in the high schools of the State may take them at the 
University during the summer. The tests will be given at 1 P. M. on 
alternate Saturdays, beginning June 14, in Room 208, Science Hall. 
Students are advised to take the tests at the earliest possible testing 
period, so they may be advised as to their eligibility for admission. 

3. Prospective students are advised to be vaccinated against small- 
pox and to be inoculated against typhoid fever. Unless a certificate is 
presented showing successful vaccination within five years, students will 
be vaccinated against smallpox at the time of registration. 



264 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION —UPPER DIVISION 



ADMISSION 

FROM THE GENERAL COLLEGE 

After the student has completed the work of the General College and received a cer- 
tificate of graduation, he may enter one of the colleges or professional schools of the Upper 
Division by meeting the specific admission requirements of that college or school. 

The Board of University Examiners administers the admission requirements of the Upper 
Division. Besides the certificate of graduation from the General College, the student must 
be certified by the Board as qualified to pursue the work of the college or school he wishes 
to enter. 

In addition to the general requirements stated above, the various colleges and schools 
of the Upper Division have specific requirements for entrance. These requirements are 
listed under the curricula of the several colleges and schools. Students in the General College 
may prepare to meet these requirements by taking as electives the courses indicated under 
the various curricula presented. 

TRANSFER STUDENTS 

All students admitted to the colleges and professional schools of the Upper Division 
will be required to meet the requirements for admission to those colleges. Other students 
will be admitted to the General College, provided they meet the standards for admission. 

The manner in which students transferring from other colleges to the University may 
meet the requirements for admission to the colleges of the Upper Division will be determined 
by the Board of University Examiners on the basis of the training of the student before 
application for admission to the University of Florida. In general, the policy of the Board 
of University Examiners will be as follows: 

1. The Board of University Examiners will always bear in mind the aims of the curric- 
ulum of the General College. All students must present training equivalent to the 
work of the General College and must pass the prescribed comprehensive examina- 
tions. 

2. Students with average records from other institutions will be required to meet in 
toto the requirements for admission to the Upper Division. 

3. The Board of University Examiners, in the case of transfer students with high or 
superior records, may vary the requirements for admission to the colleges and pro- 
fessional schools of the Upper Division, to the best interest of the student. 

Students attending other institutions who contemplate entering the University of Florida 
should communicate with the Registrar for information concerning the method of admis- 
sion. Such students should, at the end of their last term or semester in another institu- 
tion, request the registrar of that institution to send directly to the Registrar of the 
University of Florida a complete official transcript of their work, and should also have such 
transcripts sent from any other institutions previously attended. 

Students who, for any reason, are not allowed to return to the institution they last at' 
tended, or have not made a satisfactory record in the work carried at other institutions, will 
be denied admission to the University of Florida. Students with an average below C need 
not apply for admission. Students with an average of C or higher are not guaranteed 
admission. 



i 



ADMISSIONS 265 

SPECIAL STUDENTS 

Only by the approval of the Board of University Examiners may special students be 
admitted either to the General College or to the various colleges of the University. Special 
students are never admitted to the College of Law. Applications for admission of these 
students must include: 

1. The filing of satisfactory preliminary credentials. 

2. A statement as to the type of studies to be pursued. 

3. Reason for desiring to take special courses. 

4. Satisfactory evidence of ability to pursue these studies. 

WOMEN STUDENTS 

The University of Florida is not a coeducational institution. It is an institution of 
higher learning for men. The State institution of higher learning for women is the Florida 
State College for Women located at Tallahassee. 

Women students are admitted to the University of Florida in the regular session under 
the laws of the State provided they meet either set of the following conditions: 

1. Women students who are at least twenty-one years of age and who have received 
credit from a reputable educational institution in at least sixty semester hours of 
academic college work shall be eligible to enroll as students in the University of 
Florida in such subjects and courses as they are unable to obtain in any other insti- 
tution under the supervision of the Board of Control, provided they are able in every 
way, regardless of sex, to meet the admission and eligibility requirements of said 
University. 

2. Women students who present at least 32 semester hours of acceptable college credits 
may be permitted to enroll in the University of Florida as sophomores to study 
Pharmacy. To meet this requirement credits in English, botany, biology, mathe- 
matics, physical sciences, and psychology are preferable. Such students must be 
able in every way, regardless of sex, to meet the admission and eligibility require- 
ments of the University. 



266 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION —UPPER DIVISION 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

EXPENSES 

GENERAL FEES REQUIRED BEFORE REGISTRATION 

1st Sem. 2nd Sem. 

General College, Freshmen $33.50 $32.00 

General College, Sophomores 33.50 32.00 

Upper Division Students 32.00 32.00 

Law College Students 42 00 42.00 

Graduate School 2L25 2L25 

All Non-Florida Students Pay Additional 50.00 50.00 

DESCRIPTION OF GENERAL FEES 

General Fees listed in the above table include the following: 

Registration and Contingent Fee: A fee of $15 per semester is charged every student. 

Special Fee: A fee of $2.50 per semester is required of each student for the con- 
struction and rehabilitation of buildings. 

Infirmary Fee: All students are charged an infirmary fee of $3.75 per semester which 
secures for the student in case of illness the privilege of a bed in the infirmary and the 
services of the University Physician and professionally trained nurses, except in cases 
involving a major operation. A student requiring an emergency operation which is not 
covered by the fee assessed may employ the services of any accredited physician whom 
he may select, and utilize the facilities of the infirmary for the operation. To secure this 
medical service the student must report to the physician in cliarge of the infirmary. 
When the operating room is used a fee of $5 is charged. 

Student Activity Fee: A fee of $20.50 is assessed to maintain and foster athletic sports, 
student publications, and other student activities. $10.25 of this fee is paid each semester. 
Student fees are passed by a vote of the student body and approved by the Board of Control 
before they are adopted. 

Swimming Pool Fee: A fee of 50 cents per semester is charged all students for use of the 
lockers and supplies at the swimming pool. 

Military Fee: A fee of $1.50 is charged all students registered for basic Military Science. 

TUITION 

No tuition, except in the College of Law, is charged Florida students. 
Non-Florida students, including those pursuing graduate work, pay tuition of $50 per 
semester in addition to the fees charged Florida students. 

Classification of Students. — For the purpose of assessing tuition, students are classified 
as Florida and non-Florida students. 

A Florida student, if under twenty-one years of age, is one: (1) whose parents have 
been residents of Florida for at least twelve consecutive months next preceding his registra- 
tion; or (2) whose parents were residents of Florida at the time of their death, and who 



GENERAL INFORMATION 267 

has not acquired residence in another state; or (3) whose parents were not residents of 
Florida at the time of their death but whose successor natural guardian has been a resident 
of Florida for at least twelve consecutive months next preceding the student's registration. 

A Florida student, if over twenty-one years of age, is one: (1) whose parents are resi- 
dents of Florida (or were at the time of their death) and who has not acquired residence 
in anoth&r state; or (2) who, while an adult, has been a resident of Florida for at least 
twelve consecutive months next preceding his registration, provided such residence has 
not been acquired while attending any school or college in Florida; or (3) who is the 
wife of a man who has been a resident of Florida for at least twelve consecutive months 
next preceding her registration; or (4) who is an alien who has taken out liis first citizen- 
ship papers and who has been a resident of Florida for at least twelve consecutive months 
next preceding his registration. 

All students not able to qualify as Florida students are classified as non-Florida students. 

The status of the classification of a student is determined at the time of his first regis- 
tration in the University, and may not thereafter be changed by him unless, in the case 
of a minor, his parents move to and become legal residents of this State, by maintaining 
such residence for twelve consecutive months. If the status of a student changes from a 
non-Plorida student to a Florida student, his classification may be changed at the next 
registration thereafter. 

A fee of $10 will be charged all students registering incorrectly. In the case of non- 
Florida students, this fee will be assessed in addition to the tuition. In the case of Florida 
students who give an out of state address at the time of registration or any other time, 
this fee will be charged unless the student files a written explanation acceptable to the 
Registrar stating why the out of state address was given and giving proof that his resi- 
dence is Florida. 

SPECIAL FEES 

Fees which apply in special cases only are listed below: 

BREAKAGE FEE 

Any student registering for a course requiring locker and laboratory apparatus in one 
or more of the following departments is required to buy a breakage book: Chemistry, 
Pharmacy, Biology, and Soils. This book costs $5. A refund will be allowed on any unused 
portion at the end of the year, when the student has checked in his apparatus to the satis- 
faction of the departments concerned. 

ROOM RESERVATION FEE 

Students wishing to reserve rooms in the dormitories must pay a room reservation fee 
of $10 at the time such reservation is made. 

SPECIAL EXAMINATION FEE 

A fee of $5 is charged for each examination taken at a time other than that regularly 
scheduled. 

LIBRARY FINES 

A fine of 2 cents a day is charged for each book in general circulation which is not 
returned within the limit of two weeks. "Reserve" books may be checked out overnight, 
and if they are not returned on time the fine is 25 cefits for the first hour and 5 cents 



268 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION — UPPER DIVISION 

an hour or fraction of an hour thereafter until they are returned. No student may check 
out a book if he owes the Library more than 50 cents in fines. 

FAILURE FEES 

A fee of $2.50 a semester hour is charged for courses in which the student does not 
receive a passing grade. Once the student has failed a course, this fee must be paid before 
he will be permitted to register again in the University. For variations in this fee for 
General College students see Bulletin of Information for the General College. 

I PART-TIME STUDENTS 

Students who carry nine hours or less will be charged the registration and contingent 

fee of $15.00 a semester, the infirmary fee of $3.75 a semester and the special fee of $2.50 
a semester. Such students must pay any tuition which their classification specifies. Such 
students are not entitled to any of the privileges attached to any other University fee. 

SUMMARY OF EXPENSES FOR THE YEAR 

Minimum Maximum 

General Fees and Course Expenses $ 64 00* $ 65.50* 

Books and Training Supplies for the Year 30.00 50.00 

Laundry and Cleaning 25.00 35.00 

Room and Board 204.50 300.00 

Estimated Total Expenses $323.50* $450.50* 

*Non-Florida students are charged $100 tuition per year in addition. 

REFUNDS 

Students resigning before the dates specified in the University Calendar are entitled 
to a refund of all fees except $5 of the registration and contingent fee. This $5 is the 
cost of service in registering the student and is never refunded. 

UNIVERSITY DORMITORIES 

DIRECTOR OF RESIDENCE 

All correspondence concerning dormitory reservations, as well as all reservation fees, 
should be sent to the Director of Residence, University of Florida, Gainesville. His office is 
located in Section F of Fletcher Hall, adjoining Fletcher Lounge. 

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA DORMITORY SYSTEM 

Administration. — The dormitories are administered by the Director of Residence, his 
staff, a student monitor for each of the sections into which the halls are divided, a head 
monitor, and an advisory Committee on Residence composed of three members of the 
University faculty. The purpose of the administration is to create in the dormitories an 
environment in which each student may obtain the best results from his college life. 

Student Discipline. — Student conduct is supervised by the student monitor in each sec- 
tion and the head monitor, all of whom are responsible to the Director of Residence. All 



GENERAL INFORMATION 269 

students are responsible for knowing and observing the principles of conduct as outlined 
in the statement of "Dormitory Policy", which is posted in each room, as well as in "Student 
Regulations, parts I and 11". 

Rooms and Facilities. — In the five halls which compose the dormitory system and accom- 
modate approximately 1100 students, there are 3 types of rooms: "single" — one room 
equipped for one student; "double" — one room equipped for two students; "two-room suite" 
— separate study room and bedroom equipped for two or three students. 

A bathroom with hot and cold showers and lavatories is located on each floor of each 
section. Room furnishings include single beds and mattresses, dressers, individual study 
tables, straiglit chairs, and wastebaskets. In Sledd, Fletcher, and Murphree Halls the 
dressers and closets are built-in units, and each room or suite is equipped with a lavatory. 
Every effort is made to provide adequate hot water, heat, light, and janitorial service and 
to maintain comfortable, useful equipment. 

Students must furnish linens (4 to 6 sheets; 2 to 3 pillowcases), 2 to 3 blankets, 
towels, pillows, toilet articles, 2 laundry bags, study lamps, and what other things they 
may require for their own convenience. 

Buckman Hall. — Constructed in 1906. Section E remodeled and modernized in 1940; 
sections B, C, and D not remodeled. Section E has double rooms equipped with lavatories; 
sections B, C, and D have rooms arranged in suites of study-room and bedroom, accom- 
modating three students per suite. Three floors. 

Thomas //aZ/.— Constructed in 1905; sections A, C, D, E, and F remodeled and modern- 
ized in recent years; section B the same as Buckman Hall. Remodeled sections have single 
and double rooms, equipped with lavatories (except for double rooms in section D). Three 
floors. 

Sledd //a//.— Constructed in 1929; fireproof brick and tile. Rooms arranged in suites, 
with a few singles. Four floors; sections A, B, C, J, H, and G. 

Fletcher Hall.— FW A dormitory, constructed in 1939; fireproof brick and tile. Rooms 
arranged in suites, with a few singles and some doubles. Lounge room adjoining the 
director's office. Four floors; sections D, E, F, K, L, M, N, O, and P. 

Murphree Hall. — PWA dormitory, constructed in 1939; fireproof brick and tile. Rooms 
arranged in suites, with a few doubles on fourth floor. Lounge room adjoining section H. 
Four floors; sections A, B, C, E, F, G, H, J, K, L, and M. 

FRESHMAN RESIDENCE 

All male students with less than one year of college work shall be required to room in 
the dormitories so long as rooms are available. Male students with more than one year of 
college work may be allotted such rooms as the Committee on Residence shall deem proper. 

No students whose parents are residents of the City of Gainesville or territory adjacent 
to the University, within daily walking or driving distance, shall be subject to the fore- 
going regulation. 



270 



BULLETIN OF INFORMATION ^UPPER DIVISION 



DORMITORY ROOM RATES PER STUDENT PER SEMESTER 



HALL 


Fletcher 


Murphree 


Sledd 


Buckman E 
& Thomas 
(A,C,E,F) 


Thomas D 


Buckman 
Thomas B 


TYPE OF ROOM 

2-Rooin Suites 
for 3 Students 






$36.00 






$24.50 




2-Room Suites 
for 2 Students 


$4L00 

and 
$40 00 


$4L00 

and 
$40.00 


$40.00 

and 
$34.00 













Double Rooms 
for 2 Students 


$40.00 

and 
$37.S0 


$37.50 




$32.00 


$30.00 








Single Rooms 
for 1 Student 


$45.00 

and 
$40 00 





$42.00 

and 
$40.00 


$38.00 


$38.00 






Large Rooms 
for 3 Students 








$30.00 




$24.50 







(In all cases where two prices are stated for a given type of room, the lower price is 
for rooms on the fourth floor.) 



REGULATIONS GOVERNING STUDENT RESIDENCE 

Room Reservations. — When an application for a dormitory room is made, the student 
must post a room reservation fee of $10.00. This fee is not a payment on room rent. It is 
a deposit which is necessary to obtain room assignment and is retained until the close of 
the regular school year. 

Assignments and Leases. — Applicants accepted for dormitory residence are assigned a 
room and sent a lease which must be signed and returned within two weeks after the assign- 
ment is made. This lease is for the period of the school year. If the applicant is under 
21 years of age, his lease must also be signed by his parent or guardian. 

To complete University entrance requirements, the student must secure a certificate of 
admission from the Office of the Registrar. 

Notice of ArrivaL — Students must check in at the office of the Director before occupying 
their rooms, and check out at the same office before vacating. Those who have been assigned 
rooms but who will not arrive until after the official opening day of school should give 
notice of late arrival. All dormitories will be available for occupancy on September 6 and 
will remain open through Commencement Day. 

Withdrawals. — No student may move from a room in the dormitories to other quarters 
off campus without the consent of the Committee on Residence. 

Payment of Rent. — All rent is due and should be paid in advance at the beginning of 
each semester at the Office of the Business Manager. University registration may be can- 
celled because of failure to pay rent as required. Check or money order should be made 
payable to the University of Florida. 

Refunds. — If a room reservation is cancelled by or before August 30, the reservation fee 
will be refunded. After that date it is not refundable. Students not assigned a room will 
be granted a refund. 

Students withdrawing from the University on request or because of sickness will be re- 
funded a proportionate amount of their room rent. Those permitted to move to quarters off 



GENERAL INFORMATION 271 

campus may secure a refund of their reservation fee and a proportionate amount of their 
room rent only on the condition that they supply another occupant who is acceptahle to the 
Committee on Residence and who is not living in the dormitories. 

Miscellaneous Charges.— The room reservation fee is subject to charges made for break- 
age or other damage to the student's room. 

The following charges are optional and are in addition to the reservation fee and room 
rent: (1) $1.00 to $1.50 per semester for the rental of an easy chair. (2) $.50 per semester 
for each electrical appliance used, such as radio, iron, fan, etc. No charge is made for 
electric razors, electric clocks, or one individual study lamp. (3) $2.00 per semester for 
carrying charges, if the student pays room rent on the installment plan. This is an arrange- 
ment strictly limited and must be taken care of at the beginning of each semester. (4) 
$.35 per semester for the rental of a typewriter table. (5) $.50 for an extra room key 
or loss of key. (6) $.50 per night for guests after the first night. 

A charge may be made to students remaining in the dormitories during the Christmas 
holidays. Special permission must be obtained from the Director. 

Baggage. — All trunks and miscellaneous baggage should be clearly marked with the 
student's name and the hall to which he has been assigned. 

CAFETERIA 

The University operates a cafeteria offering a wide selection of wholesome foods. All 
students living on the campus are encouraged to take their meals there. The Cafeteria 
renders a great service to students who live off the campus, because it has the tendency 
to hold down prices for meals to a minimum in the majority of off-campus boarding houses. 
Meal tickets in denominations of $5 and $15 may be purchased at the Business Manager's 
office or at the Cafeteria Cigar Counter at a 5% discount. 

ROOMING HOUSES 

The administration of the University provides an inspection service and publishes a list 
of approved rooming houses for students. Rental in these houses ranges from $5 to $15 
per month per student. In a number of instances, room and board may be secured in 
the same house at rates from $25 to $40 per month. In case a student plans to live off 
the campus, he is urged to secure information from the Office of the Dean of Students 
to avoid embarrassment in dealing with landlords other than those of approved rooming 
houses. 

COOPERATIVE LIVING ORGANIZATION 

The Cooperative Living Organization, organized and operated by students to furnish 
economical living accommodations for its membership, is located at 237 N. Washington Street. 
The qualifications for membership are maximum income $25 per month, scholastic ability, 
and references of good character. In order to secure membership in the CLO students 
should apply to the CLO manager at the above address. 

SELF-HELP 

In view of the fact that there are comparatively few positions on the campus and in the 
City of Gainesville, it is strongly urged that no freshman come to the University with the 
expectation of depending very largely upon his earnings during liis first college year. 



272 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION —UPPER DIVISION 

The Committee on Self-Help, of which the Dean of Students is chairman, undertakes 
to award positions on the campus to deserving upperclassmen. 

A few students are employed as laboratory assistants, office workers, waiters, and in 
other capacities. Application for employment should be made to the Dean of Students. 

REQUIREMENTS AND QUAUFICATIONS FOR STUDENT EMPLOYMENT 

A. The student must be making an average of C or its equivalent. 

B. The student must give evidence of need for the job. 

C. Possession of a car will be evidence of lack of need unless explained on the basis 
of necessity for the student's livelihood. 

D. Preference will be given to those having experience. 

E. No graduate students will be used except as graduate assistants in positions requiring 
the training which the student has secured in college. 

F. No student on probation of any kind will be given a position. If, while holding 
one, he is placed on probation, he will be required to resign the position. 

G. Due to scarcity of jobs, it is contrary to the policy of the University for students 
to hold two University jobs whose aggregate salaries exceed $200 per year. 

CLASSIFICATION OF WORK AND RATE OF PAY 

A. Laboratory Assistance: 

1. Technical — Requiring skill and training in a particular field 40c-45c per hour 

2. General — Requiring some skill above common labor 30c per hour 

3. Unskilled Labor _ 25c per hour 

B. Clerical: 

1. Highly skilled in a certain field, expert stenographer and typist.. ..40c-45c per hour 

2. Typing, filing, bookkeeping, and limited amount of stenographic 

work 35c per hour 

3. General office work 30c per hour 

C. Mechanical : 

1. Skilled 35c per hour 

2. Unskilled 25c per hour 



SCHOr.iRSHIPS i\D LOAN FUNDS 273 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOAN FUNDS 

The University of Florida is unfortunate in the paucity of the scholarships and loans 
which are open to students. Generally, the scholarships and loans which are available are 
administered directly by the donors. However, the Committee on Scholarships, of which the 
Dean of Students is chairman, collects all information relative to vacancies, basis of award, 
value, and other pertinent facts, and supplies this information to interested students. The 
Committee also collects information on applicants and supplies this information to the 
donors. In some instances, the Committee has been given authority to make the awards 
without consulting the donors. 

While scholarship, as evidenced by academic attainment, is an important feature in 
making awards, it is by no means the only consideration. The student's potential capacity 
to profit by college training and to make reasonable returns to society are important con 
siderations in making all awards. 

Unless otherwise specified, applications for the scholarships and loans listed below should 
be addressed to the Chairman of the Committee on Scholarships and Loan Funds, University 
of Florida. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

County Agricultural Scholarships. — Provision has been made by a legislative act for a 
scholarship from each county — to be offered and provided for at the discretion of the Board 
of County Commissioners of each county. The recipient is to be selected by competitive 
examination. The value of each scholarship is a sum sufficient to pay for board in the dining 
hall and room in the dormitory. Whether such a scholarship has been provided for by any 
county may be learned from the Clerk of the Board of County Commissioners, or the 
County Agent of the county in question. If it is desired, questions for the examination will 
be provided and papers graded by the University. 

Vocational Rehabilitation Scholarships. — The Rehabilitation Section of the State De- 
partment of Public Instruction provides limited assistance to persons who are physically 
handicapped. Requirements for eligibility for this assistance are as follows: the applicant 
must have a permanent major physical disability, he must be sixteen years old, he must have 
a good scholastic record and must take courses that will prepare him for some vocation 
at which he can earn a living. Applications for this assistance should be made prior to 
July 1 for the following school year. Students who wish to apply should write to the State 
Supervisor of Vocational Rehabilitation, Department of Public Instruction, Tallahassee, 
Florida. 

United Daughters of the Confederacy Scholarships. — Scholarships have been established 
by various chapters of the Florida Division, United Daughters of the Confederacy. Appli 
cations should be made to Mrs. David D. Bradford, Chairman of Education, 2109 Watrous 
Ave., Tampa, Florida. 

Loring Memorial Scholarship. — A scholarship maintained by Mrs. William Loring 
Spencer in memory of her distinguished uncle, General Loring. 

Arthur Ellis Ham Memorial Scholarship. — Established in 1919 by Mrs. Elizabeth C. Ham. 
in accordance with the last will and in memory of her husband, Captain Arthur Ellis Ham, 
a former student of the University, who fell in battle at St. Mihiel, France, on September 14. 
1918. Value: income from a fund of 15,000. 

Albert W. Gilchrist Memorial Scholarship. — This scholarship is open to students of the 
junior and senior classes. Scholastic achievement is the principal basis of this award. 



274 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION —UPPER DIVISION 

David Levy Yulee Memorial Scholarship. — This scholarship is awarded annually o-n the 
basis of scholarship, and is open to the members of the junior and senior classes. 

Duval High Memorial Scholarship. — An act creating the Memorial Duval High School 
Scholarship and authorizing and appropriating annually |275 of the Duval County funds as 
financial assistance for one worthy high school graduate is covered by House Bill No. 823, 
and was approved May 20, 1927. 

This scholarship, created to memorialize and assist in preserving the high standards and 
traditions of the Duval High School, where many of Florida's worthy citizens were educated, 
was established by the Board of County Commissioners of Duval County, Florida. Appli- 
cation should be made to the Chairman of the Board of County Commissioners, Jackson- 
ville, Florida. 

Children of Deceased World War Veterans Scholarship.— Any student whose father was a 
veteran of the World War and who died in service between the sixth day of April, 1917, 
and the second day of July, 1921, is eligible to apply for this scholarship. The maximum 
amount to be received by any one student within a period of twelve months cannot exceed 
$300. Applications should be made to C. Howard Rowton, State Adjutant, American Legion, 
Palatka, Florida. 

C.M.T.C. Scholarships. — The University of Florida offers a maximum of four scholar- 
ships of $75 each to students who are residents of Florida. Applicants must be graduates 
of an accredited Florida high school, present a proper admission certificate and certificates 
of good character, and they must be recommended by the Corps Area Commander. These 
scholarships are awarded for a period of four years provided the holder maintains a satis- 
factory scholastic average. 

Florida Bankers Association Scholarship. — The Florida Bankers Association awards 
three scholarships annually: one for North and West Florida, one for Central Florida, and 
one for South Florida. These scholarships are awarded on an examination given at the 
Annual Boys' Short Course. The examination is given and the award is made by the State 
Boys' Club Agent. Applications for these scholarships should be made to the Dean of the 
College of Agriculture. 

The Colonial Dames of America Scholarships. — The Colonial Dames of America Scholar- 
ship, $250: The Colonial Dames of America, Philadelphia Chapter Scholarship, $250; The 
Colonial Dames of America, St. Louis Chapter Scholarship, $250; Lindsey Hopkins Scholar- 
ship, $250; and the Mrs. John D. Rockefeller, Jr.. Scholarship, $250. Applications for 
these scholarships should be made to Mrs. Walter W. Price, 1 West 72nd Street, New 
York City. 

Lake Worth Woman's Club Scholarship. — The Lake Worth Woman's Club, of Lake 
Worth, Florida, maintains a scholarship of $100 a year. Application should be made to 
the Chairman of the Scholarship Committee, Lake Worth Woman's Qub, Lake Worth, 
Florida. 

Fairchild Scholarship National. — Mrs. Samuel W. Fairchild, of New York City, offers 
annually a scholarship amounting to $500. The award is made, by competitive examination, 
to a graduate in pharmacy who will do post-graduate work in the year immediately following 
his graduation. Examinations are held in June at the various colleges of pharmacy which 
are members of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. Further information 
may be obtained from the Director of the School of Pharmacy. 

Jacksonville Kiwanis Club Scholarships. — The Jacksonville Kiwanis Club maintains two 
scholarships for Jacksonville boys. Application should be made by letter to Mr. W. S. 
Paulk, Supervisor, Boys' and Girls' Work Committee, Jacksonville Kiwanis Club, Chamber 
of Commerce Building, Jacksonville, Florida. 



SCHOLARSHIPS AND LOAN FUNDS 275 

Duncan U. Fletcher Agricultural Scholarship. — Awarded by the United States Sugar 
Corporation in the memory of the outstanding character of our late Senator, a scholarship 
of $500 annually for a period of four years to students particularly interested in agricul- 
tural activities. Details governing the award of this scholarship together with application 
blank may be obtained from the Office of the Dean of Students. This scholarship will 
be open in 1941-42. 

Sears, Roebuck Scholarships. — Sears, Roebuck and Company has given funds to the 
University of Florida for the establishment of a number of scholarships in the amount 
of $90 annually, payable in nine monthly installments, to students particularly interested 
in agricultural activities. Details governing the award of these scholarships, together with 
application blank, may be obtained from the Office of the Dean of Students. 

At the end of each year the Sears, Roebuck Company awards a scholarship in the 
amount of $200 to the outstanding sophomore in the Sears, Ro€buck Scholarship group. 

James D. Westcott, Jr., Agricultural Scholarship. — Awarded by the United States Sugar 
Corporation in memory of the first United States Senator from Florida, a scholarship of 
$500 annually for a period of four years to students particularly interested in agricultural 
activities. Details governing the award of this scholarship, together with application 
blank, may be obtained from the Office of the Dean of Students. This scholarship will 
not be open in 1941-42. 

LOAN FUNDS 

Rotary Loan Fund.— The Rotarians of Florida have set aside a considerable sum of 
money to be used in making loans to worthy boys who would not otherwise be able to attend 
college. The maximum loan is $150 per year. These loans are not available to freshmen. 
Applications for these loans should be made to the President of the Rotary Club of the city 
from which the student registers, or to Mr. K. H. Graham, Secretary-Treasurer, Rotary 
Educational Loan Fund, Inc., Language Hall, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida. 

Knights Templar Scholarship Loans.— The Grand Lodge of Knights Templar in the State 
of Florida has arranged a number of loans, in amount of $200 to each student, for students 
pursuing a course at the University of Florida. These loans are made available through 
application to the Knights Templar Lodge in the various cities in the state, and are handled 
by the Grand Lodge officers. Approximately thirty students receive aid from these scholar- 
ships each year. 

Knights of Pythias Scholarship Loans. — Several scholarship loans have been established 
by the Grand Lodge of the Knights of Pythias. Application for these loans should be 
made to Mr. Frank Kellow, Secretar^'-Treasurer, Student Aid Department, Grand Lodge 
of Florida Knights of Pythias, Fort Myers, Florida. 

William Wilson Finley Foundation. — As a memorial to the late President Finley, and in 
recognition of his interest in agricultural education, the Southern Railway Company has 
donated to the University of Florida the sum of $1,000, to be used as a loan fund. No loan 
from this fund to an individual is to exceed $150 per year. Recipients are selected by the 
Dean of the College of Agriculture, to whom applications should be sent. 

The American Bankers Association Foundation.— One loan scholarship is made to a 
student at the University of Florida whose major course is in banking, economics, or related 
subjects in classes of junior grade or above — value, $250. Application for loan should be 
made to the Chairman of the Committee on Scholarships and Loan Funds, University of 
Florida. 

Murphree Engineering Loan Fund. — On September 16, 1929, a friend of our late Pres- 
ident, Dr. A. A. Murphree, gave to the Engineering College $500, to be used as a revolving 



276 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION — UPPER DIVISION 

loan fund. This fund was to be used in cases of emergency when, on account of financial 
difficulties, worthy students would be kept from graduating unless they could receive some 
assistance. Only in special cases are these loans made to members of the junior class. 
Applications for loans from this fund should be made to the Dean of the College of Engi- 
neering. 

Florida Association of Architects Loan Fund. — The Florida Association of Architects has 
created a revolving loan fund of $500 for the purpose of aiding needy students in Architecture 
who have proved themselves worthy. Applications should be made to the Director of the 
School of Architecture and Allied Arts. 

The National Society of the Colonial Dames of America in the State of Florida Loan 
Fund. — The National Society of The Colonial Dames of America in the State of Florida 
has established a loan scholarship for deserving students. This scholarship is administered 
by the Directors of the Florida Educational Loan Association. Application should be made 
to the Chairman of the Florida Educational Loan Association, University of Florida. 

The Ladies' Auxiliary Fund. — The Ladies' Auxiliary of the Florida State Pharmaceutical 
Association has established a loan fund for deserving students of pharmacy in need of 
assistance. Further information may be obtained from the Director of the School of 
Pharmacy. 

Tolbert Memorial Student Loan Fund. — Through the efforts of various student organiza- 
tions approximately $4,500 has been accumulated for making short time loans to students 
to meet financial emergencies. These loans are made in amounts not exceeding $50 and 
for a period not exceeding 90 days. The fund is administered by a committee of students 
in cooperation with the Office of the Dean of Students to whose office application for a 
loan should be made. 

Phi Kappa Phi Loan Fund. — The Florida chapter of Phi Kappa Phi, national honorary 
scholastic society, has established a $250 annual loan fund for Phi Kappa Phi members. 
Loans will be made principally to students intending to pursue graduate work. Application 
should be made to Mr. B. J. Otte, Chairman, Phi Kappa Phi Loan Fund, University of 
Florida. 

The Henry Hohauser Loan Fund. — This loan fund is confined to students in the School 
of Architecture and Allied Arts. Applications should be made to Director Rudolph Weaver, 
School of Architecture and Allied Arts, University of Florida. 

The Lions Club Agricultural Loan Fund. — The Lions Clubs of the State of Florida have 
set aside a fund to be used in making loans to worthy Florida students who plan to 
specialize in agriculture. In special cases these loans are made to graduate students, but 
they are not available for freshmen. Applications for loans from this fund should be made 
to the Dean of Students at the University of Florida. Mr. Harry Schad is Chairman of 
the local committee which passes on all loans. 

Senior Law Loan Fund. — A loan fund available to needy seniors in the College of Law 
was established by the Law class of 1938 and has been increased by subsequent gifts. 
Applications should be made to the Dean of the College of Law. 

Benton Engineering Loan Fund. — On May 20, 1938, a friend of the late Dean Benton 
gave to the Engineering College $500, to be used as a revolving loan fund. This fund is 
to be used in cases of emergency when, on account of financial difficulties, worthy students 
would be kept from graduating unless they could receive some assistance. Only in special 
cases are these loans made to members of the junior class. Applications for loans from 
this fund should be made to the Dean of the College of Engineering. 



PRIZES AM) MEDALS 277 

The Woman's Auxiliary to the Florida Medical Association Loan Fund.— The Woman's 
Auxiliary to the Florida Medical Association has created a loan fund to assist worthy 
students who are the sons of medical doctors who have been members of the Florida 
Medical Association for at least ten years. Loans are made in amounts not exceeding $150 
for the school year. Application should be made to the Office of the Dean of Students, 
105 Language Hall, University of Florida. 

PRIZES AND MEDALS 
Board of Control Aivards. — The Board of Control annually awards the following medals: 
L The General College Declamation Medals, to the two best declaimers of the General 
College. 

2. Junior Oratorical Contest Medals, to the two best orators of the junior class. 

3. Senior Oratorical Contest Medals, to the two best orators of the senior class. 
Harrison Company Award. — A set of the Florida Reports, Volumes 1-22, Reprint Edition. 

is offered by the Harrison Company to the senior law student doing all his work in this 
institution, and making the highest record during his law course. 

Harrison Company First Year Award. — Redfearn on Wills and Administration of Estates 
in Florida is offered by the Harrison Company to the first year law student making the 
highest average in twenty-eight hours of law taken in this institution. 

Redfearn Prize.— For the past six years Hon. D. H. Redfearn of Miami has offered a 
prize of $50 for the best essay by a law student on some topic of legal refoi-m. 

Groover-Stewart Drug Company Cup.— Mr. F. C. Groover, president of the Groover- 
Stewart Drug Company, has given a large silver loving cup which is awarded to the grad- 
uating class in the School of Pharmacy attaining the highest general average in scholarship 
and is held by that class until this average is exceeded by a subsequent graduating class. 

David W. Ramsaur Medal.— Mrs. D. W. Ramsaur of Jacksonville offers a gold medal 
to that graduate of the School of Pharmacy making the highest average in scholarship 
and evincing leadership in student activities. 

Emrich Prize. — William Emrich, Orlando pharmacist, annually gives a year's member- 
ship in the American Pharmaceutical Association to the pharmacy student who obtains the 
highest scholastic average in pharmaceutical subjects during the junior year. 

Haisley Lynch Medal.— The University is grateful to Mrs. L. C. Lynch of Gainesville 
for her gift of the Haisley Lynch Medal for the best essay in American history. This medal 
is awarded annually by her in loving memory of her son, Haisley Lynch, a former student 
of the University, who was killed in action in France during the World War. 

Gargoyle Key. — Gargoyle Society awards a gold key each year to the graduate of the 
General College, who, in the opinion of the members, was outstanding in scholarship, leader- 
ship, initiative, and general ability. To be eligible for the award the student must have 
completed the fundamental course in Architecture or that in Painting. 

The David Levy Yulee Lectureship and Speech Contest. — Under the provisions of the 
will of Nannie Yulee Noble, a sum of money was bequeathed to the University of Florida, 
the income of which was to be used to bring outstanding speakers to the University to 
deliver lectures to the student body and faculty on the general topic "The Ideal of Honor 
and Service in Politics." 

In addition there is held annually a David Levy Yulee Speech Contest, the purpose 
of which is to stimulate student thought and encourage the creation and presentation of 
orations on a general idealistic theme. The contest is open to all students in the Univer- 
sity and the winners of first and second place receive cash awards. 



278 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION —UPPER DIVISION 

The James Miller Leake Medal. — This is a medal awarded annually for an essay in 
American History. The medal is given by the Gainesville Chapter of the Daughters of the 
American Revolution and named for the Head of the Department of History and Political 
Science of the University of Florida. 

Fine Arts Society Award. — The Fine Arts Society annually offers a gold medal and 
citation to the outstanding student receiving the baccalaureate degree in the School of 
Architecture and Allied Arts in recognition of his scholastic standing and leadership. The 
award is offered only when there are five or more students graduating. 

Phi Sigma Society Scholarship Award. — The Phi Sigma Society, national honorary 
biological society, awards each year a medal to the undergraduate or graduate student 
who is considered to have done the most outstanding research in one of the fields of the 
biological sciences. 

Sigma Tau Award. — The Upsilon Chapter of Sigma Tau awards annually a medal for 
scholastic ability to the sophomore in the College of Engineering who, during his freshman 
year, made the highest average in his scholastic work. 

Sigma Delta Chi Scholarship Key Award. — Sigma Delta Chi, professional journalistic 
fraternity, awards annually a key to ten percent of the students graduating in journalism who 
have the highest scholastic average for the three years' academic work immediately preceding 
the year in which the nominees are candidates for degrees. 

Dillon Achievement Cup. — Mr. Ralph M. Dillon, Tampa, has given a large silver loving 
cup on which is engraved each year the name of that student graduating in journalism who, 
in the opinion of the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences and the faculty of the 
Department of Journalism, possesses the highest qualifications for service to the press of 
Florida. 

Delta Sigma Pi Scholarship Key. — Each year the Florida chapter of the international 
fraternity of Delta Sigma Pi, professional business administration fraternity, awards a gold 
key to that male senior in the ColJege of Business Administration who upon graduation ranks 
highest in scholarship for the entire course in Business Administration. 

Beta Gamma Sigma Scroll.— Each year the Florida chapter of Beta Gamma Sigma, na- 
tional honorary business administration fraternity, awards a scroll to the junior in the College 
of Business Administration who, during his preparatory work in the General College, made 
the highest scholastic average of all students who entered the College of Business Adminis- 
tration. 

Rho Chi Prize. — Iota Chapter of Rho Chi, honorary pharmaceutical society, annually 
gives a key to the junior pharmacy student who obtains the highest scholastic average 
during the sophomore year. 

The Chapter Scholarship Award. — A Certificate of Merit, signed by the President of 
the American Institute of Chemical Engineers and the Chairman of the Committee on 
Student Chapters, and a student membership badge are given to the junior in Chemical 
Engineering who is a member of the Student Chapter and who has attained the highest 
scholarship standing during his freshman and sophomore years. 

Alpha Kappa Psi Scholarship Medallion. — Each year Alpha Kappa Psi, international 
professional fraternity in commerce, awards a white gold-bronze medallion to the Senior 
in the College of Business Administration who for his first three years at the University 
of Florida has been most outstanding in scholarship and campus activities and has shown 
the most likely qualifications for a successful business career in the future. 



J 



GEiSERAL REGULATIONS 279 

GENERAL REGULATIONS 

STUDENT REGULATIONS 

For information relative to graduation, failure in studies, conduct, social activities, 

etc., the student should consult the Bulletin of Student Regulations. Each student is held 

responsible for observance of the rules and regulations of the University insofar as they 

affect him. Some regulations and interpretation supplementing the Bulletin of Student 

Regulations are given liere- /-r,i7r.n^c 

CREDITS 

The term credit as used in this bulletin in reference to courses is equal to one semester 

'"'"■• DEGREES 

The Board of Control will confer the degree appropriate to the course pursued under 
tile following conditions: 

1. Curriculum requirements. — Certification by the Registrar and the Dean of the college 
concerned that all requirements of the course of study as outlined in the college announce- 
ment, or its equivalent as determined by the faculty of the college offering the course, 
have been completed. 

2. Recommendation of the faculty. 

3. Residence requirements. — (a) The minimum residence requirement for the bac- 
calaureate degree is two regular semesters, or one regular semester and three summer 
terms, or five summer terms. New students offering advanced standing must meet this 
requirement after entrance to the University. Students who break their residence at the 
University by attending another institution for credit toward the degree must meet this 
requirement after re-entering the University, (b) For the master's degree two regular 
semesters or six summer terms are necessary to satisfy the residence requirements, (c) 
Students are required to complete the last thirty credit hours (twenty-eight in the College 
of Law) applied towards the baccalaureate degree during regular residence in the college 
from which the student is to be graduated. Exception to this regulation may be made 
only upon written petition approved by the faculty of the college concerned. 

4. Attendance at commencement. — All candidates for degrees are required to be present 
at commencement exercises (Baccalaureate Sermon and Commencement Convocation). A 
student who fails to attend shall not have his degree conferred until he makes another 
application and complies with this requirement. 

MAXIMUM AND MINIMUM LOAD 

Some colleges have a maximum load regulation which is stated in the description of 
the college in this bulletin. In the absence of such statement the general University 
regulation is followed. This regulation allows a maximum load of 17 hours for an average 
below C made during preceding term of attendance and 21 hours for an average above C 
during the preceding term of attendance. The minimum load is 12 hours. 

GRADUATION WITH HONORS 

Graduation with Honors is voted by the faculty concerned and is not automatically 
granted upon the achievement of any minimum average. Some colleges state the minimum 
average required for consideration by the faculty. Where no mention is made in the college 
section of this bulletin on the requirements for consideration the student is advised to 
consult the dean of the college for detailed information. 

For graduation with High Honors the above statement applies, except that in most 
colleges some independent work or an examination or both are prerequisite for considera- 
tion by the faculty. The student should consult the dean of the college for further in- 
formation. 



280 BULLET If^ OF INFORMATION —UPPER DIVISION 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

GENERAL EXTENSION DIVISION 

The General Extension Division of the University of Florida offers educational oppor- 
tunities and numerous services to persons who are removed from the campus. 

The Division represents the Colleges of Arts and Sciences, Education, Law, Business 
Administration, and the School of Pharmacy of the University, and the College of Arts 
and Sciences and the Schools of Education and Music of the State College for Women. 

The work is carried on through departments. Formal courses for college credit and 
some high school work are ofifered through the Department of Correspondence Study. 
Wherever a sufficient number of students may be enrolled, university classes are offered 
by the Department of Extension Classes. Short courses of informal instruction are also 
offered to professional, business, trade and civic groups and organizations in an effort to 
give them the latest information in their respective fields of interest. 

The Department of Women's Activities offers information and instruction on subjects 
of particular interest to groups of Florida women. The Department of Auditory Instruction 
offers cultural and informational programs through lectures and discussion for the benefit 
of schools and special groups. Training for naturalization, citizenship schools and coopera- 
tion with the War Department in enrolling young men for the Citizens' Military Training 
Camps, because of their educational value, are some phases of the work of the Department 
of Citizenship Training. 

Through the Departments of Visual Instruction and General Information and Service, 
the world of letters and arts and music is carried to thousands in more isolated com- 
munities by means of plays, books, package libraries and art exhibits. A picture of the 
world and its work is circulated in stereopticon slides and films furnished for instruction 
and entertainment. The best in recorded music is provided for work in music apprecia- 
tion and culture. 

These and the various service functions of the Division establish contacts which enable 
the University to aid individuals, organizations and communities, and to contribute to 
adult education. 

SUMMER SESSION 

The University Summer Session is an integral part of the University. During the sum- 
mer, the General College, the College of Education, the College of Arts and Sciences, the 
College of Law, the College of Business Administration, the College of Agriculture, and 
the Graduate School operate, and the College of Engineering conducts certain field work. 

Since women are admitted to the Summer Session, many professional courses for primary 
and elementary school teachers are offered in addition to those usually given in the winter 
session. 



DIVISION OF ATHLETICS AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

In September, 1933, the University of Florida joined twelve other southern institutions 
in forming the Southeastern Conference. This conference represents colleges and univer- 
sities in the states of Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia, Florida, Tennessee, and 
Kentucky. 



I 



MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS 281 

The type of athletic program undertaken by the Department of Physical Education at 
the University of Florida compares with that in leading universities. A two-year course 
of required Physical Education is included in the curriculum of the Lower Division. Stu- 
dents who are exempt from Military Science are required to take this work, which is designed 
to present participation, training, and instructional opportunities in sports included in the 
intramural program. This course may also be taken as an elective. 

The second major sub-division of this Department is that in which are included inter- 
collegiate athletics. These sports are divided into two groups, generally known as major 
and as minor sports. In the major group are football, basketball, boxing, baseball, swim- 
ming, and track; and in the minor group, tennis, golf, and cross country. The equipment 
includes two baseball diamonds, four athletic fields, twelve handball courts, two indoor 
basketball courts, twelve tennis courts, a large outdoor swimming pool, a concrete stadium 
with a seating capacity of 23,000, and one quarter-mile running track, providing permanent 
seats for approximately 1,500. 

The function of the Intramural Department is to encourage the entire student body to 
participate in organized athletic sports and wholesome recreation. The Department pro- 
vides facilities for such competition and recreation; organizes and promotes competition 
between students, groups, and individuals; and fosters a spirit of fair play and sportsman- 
ship among participants and spectators. 

The program of intramural activities includes the following sports: golf, swimming, 
horseshoes, touch football, basketball, boxing, wrestling, diamondball, tennis, handball, 
water basketball, track, shuffle board, foul shooting, ping pong, badminton, cross countr>', 
and Sigma Delta Psi (national athletic fraternity) events. 

The proper utilization of leisure time through recreation and play is splendidly expressed 
in this program. It is estimated that more than 2,500 students (about seventy per cent of 
the student body) take part in some sport sponsored by the Department. There is a decided 
trend toward the expansion of recreational facilities for a large group of students as opposed 
to intense competition for a few. 

The rules of the Southeastern Conference permit member institutions to award scholar- 
ships to athletes. Awards are made in the form of board, rent, books and similar items, 
instead of cash and may be continued from year to year to those students whose records 
prove satisfactory. As a rule, the awards are made only to those unable financially to 
attend the University without assistance and Avhose standards of conduct and scholarship 
are worthy of consideration. The awarding of Athletic Scholarships is subject to the 
approval of the University Scholarship Committee. 

Further information may be secured by writing to the Dean of Students, who is Chair- 
man of that Committee. 



DIVISION OF MILITARY SCIENCE AND TACTICS 

The course in Military Science is required of all physically qualified General College 
students except adult and special students and students transferring from other universities 
or colleges. 

Students who complete the basic course and are selected by the Professor of Military 
Science and Tactics and the President of the University may elect the advanced courses. 
Students electing these courses must carry them to completion as a prerequisite to gradua- 
tion. Upon the completion of these courses, those students recommended by the Professor 
of Military Science and Tactics and the President of the University will, upon their own 
application, be offered a commission in the Officers' Reserve Corps, United States Army. 
Students electing to do advanced work in Military Science and Tactics must attend a 



282 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION —UPPER DIVISION 

summer camp, normally between their junior and senior years, established for this purpose 
by the United States Government. The War Department pays all expenses for the camp 
including mileage, rations, medical attendance, clothing, and laundry service, and in addi- 
tion the pay of the seventh grade, United States Army. 

The War Department provides a monetary allowance for uniforms and subsistence for 
advanced course students. 

Students who combine Band and Military Science will be allowed the necessary time 
from military drill to participate in Band practice and Band activities. 

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA BAND 

A student may elect to combine Band practice and drill with the study of Militar\' 
Science and Tactics, in which case he will register for proper basic course in Military 
Science and attend theory classes in Military Science, combining Military drill with Band 
drill in accordance with the regulations of the Division of Military Science and Tactics. 
Completion of the Basic course in Military Science in this manner will qualify the student 
for advanced Military Science, as well as satisfy the University requirements for Basic 
Military Science. 

A student who is physically disqualified for Military Science, or is exempt from Military 
Science in accordance with university regulations, may elect to register for BD 111-112 the 
first year and BD 211-212 the second year. 

Students will not be permitted to earn more than eight hours (two years work) in Band, 
nor more than a total of eight hours in Military Science and Band. Positively no credit 
will be allowed for Band unless the student registers in the regular manner even though 
he participates in Band work. 

DIVISION OF MUSIC 

The Division of Music offers opportunity for membership in three musical organizations: 
the University Band, the Glee Club, and the Symphony Orchestra. 

All University of Florida students who qualify are eligible for membership in any of 
these organizations. 

The Band performs at all football games within the State and makes at least one out 
of state trip each season. The Band plays at military parades on the campus, gives a 
number of concerts and broadcasts during the second semester, and performs at such public 
functions as the Gasparilla Celebration, the Governor's Inauguration, etc. 

The University of Florida Glee Qub is composed of men enrolled in the University who 
are interested in choral singing. The Glee Club makes several trips through the State, 
particularly during the second semester. Members of the Glee Club are heard regularly 
each week over the radio in a broadcast period known as the University Hour. 

The University of Florida Symphony Orchestra affords an opportunity for the studv 
and performance of symphonic and classical music, makes a number of trips through the 
State each season and gives a number of concerts and broadcasts on the campus. 

Private lessons are offered by the members of the faculty of the Division of Music. These 
lessons are arranged as follows: 



FLORIDA STATE MUSEUM 283 

1. Orchestra and Band instruments, Mr. Brown. 

2. Voice, including radio broadcasting, Mr. DeBruyn. 

3. Piano, Organ, Harmony and Counterpoint, Mr. Murphree. 

Lesson periods are arranged at the convenience of the instructor and pupil. Instructors 
may be consulted concerning lesson periods and rates. 

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA LIBRARIES 

The libraries of the University are the General Library, the Experiment Station Library, 
the General Extension Division Library, the Law Libiary, and the P. K. Yonge Laboraton 
School Library. The libraries contain approximately 150,000 books. 

The General Library provides facilities for library work in the various courses offered 
by the University and for research work in the diiferent fields. It has two large reading 
rooms which contain the Reserve Books, the General College Books, and the Reference 
Collection. Its stacks are accessible to graduate students and faculty members. 

The library has files of the principal American and foreign periodicals of general in- 
terest, as well as periodicals of special interest in connection vrith the work of various 
schools and colleges. About 1,450 periodicals are received. Being a depository of the 
United States documents, it receives all the publications of the Government. 

Among the resources of the library is a special collection of cataloged books and 
pamphlets which concern Florida and are written by Florida authors, and a large collection 
of state journals received through the courtesy of Florida newspaper editors. 

The Library is open from 7:45 A.M. to 10:30 P.M. every week day except Saturday, 
when it closes at 1:30 P.M. During the regular session it is open on Sundays from 2:00 
P.M. to 6:00 P.M. The Reserve Room is open on Sunday nights from 8:30 to 10:30. 

THE FLORIDA STATE MUSEUM 

The Florida State Museum was created by an act of the legislature in 1917 as a depart- 
ment of the University of Florida. 

The main objective of the Florida State Museum is to collect, preserve and interpret 
data concerning the history of Florida, both natural and civil. In the natural history of 
the state the endeavor is to collect the minerals and exhibit them in connection with their 
manufactured products of economics and commerce; to collect the fossils of vegetable and 
animal life showing the evolution of life through the geologic ages; to collect specimens 
of recent vegetable and animal life illustrating the flora and fauna of the state in connection 
with their economic and commercial enterprises. In the civil history of the state the 
endeavor is to collect material and data of the works of mankind from the early aborigines 
on up through the beginning of civilization to the present time; to maintain exhibits of 
artifacts of early man, and exhibits of articles in the economic, industrial and social life 
showing the advancement of civilization. 

To maintain a department of archives for the preservation of the records of the state; 
to maintain a library of publications pertinent to the general and diversified activities of 
the museum; to maintain a gallery of art for the preservation and exhibit of portraits of 
persons who have been responsible for making Florida a better place to live, and for the 
exploitations of works of art for the edification of and as a social center for our citizens; 
to maintain a department of museum extension among the schools and communities of 
the state; to publish reports, bulletins, and monographs of the progress of the work are 



284 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION — UPPER DIVISION 

some of the activities for which the Florida State Museum strives, and for which the 
law provides. 

In carrying on the general activities as above outlined the Florida State Museum now 
has a total of 359,843 specimens catalogued at an inventoried value of $386,293.94, the 
majority of which have been presented or provided by will. The museum is free to the 
public every day in the year. To April 1, 1941, the museum has had 52,679 visitors since 
its reopening in its new quarters May 1, 1939. 

HEALTH SERVICE 

Through the Student Health Service the University makes available to any student 
physical examinations, health consultations, and medical attention. General service is 
provided free of charge, but special fees are charged for services which are individual in 
character, such as dentistry. X-rays, laundry in the Infirmary, special drugs and serums, 
major surgery, special nurses, etc. No student, however, will be denied service because 
of inability to pay these fees. 

The University Infirmary and the oflBces of the Health Service are on the campus. The 
Infirmary is open day and night for the admission of patients. The Resident Physicians 
live at the Infirmary and their services are available at all hours in case of emergency. The 
Dispensary in the Infirmary building is open from 7 A. m. to 9 p. m., during which time 
physicians are in attendance and may be consulted. Emergency treatment may be obtained 
at any time by reporting to the Infirmary. 

It is the aim of the Health Service not only to function as a Health Service and render 
preventive measures, but to provide full hospital care in cases of illness. The Infirmary 
is rated as a Fully Approved Hospital by the Examining Board of the American College 
of Surgeons. 

The facilities of the Dispensary are such that any number of students can be given 
attention in a day. The Dispensary is maintained to offer conferences with physicians, ex- 
aminations, diagnosis, and treatment of minor injuries and illnesses which a student may 
suffer. The student is encouraged to use this service freely in order that he may avoid more 
serious illnesses by the lack of treatment or from improper treatment. In the Dispensary, a 
modem, well equipped drug room furnishes drugs to the student without charge. A labora- 
tory in connection with the Infirmary and Dispensary is in charge of a trained nurse- 
technician, rendering efficient service in prompt diagnosis. The normal capacity of the 
Infirmary, 45 beds, can be increased in emergencies. Ample provisions are made for the 
isolation of communicable diseases. A completely equipped operating room is maintained 
to provide facilities for major surgical operations. The Infirmary is equipped with a mobile 
unit X-ray, which is used for the examination of fractures, but the equipment does not 
provide sufficient service for an extensive diagnostic X-ray study of the intestinal tract, etc. 
This service is made available to students at actual cost of the materials used. 

Students enrolling in the University for the first time are furnished by the Registrar's 
Office a physical examination form which is to be completed by the family physician and 
attached to Registration papers. It is necessary that this physical examination by the home 
physician be completed in order that parents may be aware of defects which should be 
corrected prior to the student's entrance in the University. The correction of these defects 
is necessay in order that he may be in proper physical condition to begin his college work. 
On admission, the student is given a careful physical examination by the University 
Physician. 



I 



FLORIDA L.V/O.V 285 

There are three principal phases of the activities of tlie University Health Service: 
(1) personal attention, (2) sanitation, and (3) education. 

1. Personal Attention. — This division is concerned with the physical examination of 
students. A complete record of the physical condition of each student is made and filed 
when he is admitted to the University. From this record can be determined, in large 
measure, what procedure is essential to keep the student in the best physical condition 
during his academic life. The following are some of the phases of the work in the personal 
division: 

a. Provision for maintaining the health of normal, physically sound students; cooper- 
ation with the Department of Physical Education regarding physical exercise; edu- 
cation concerning right living; safeguarding of environment. 

b. Protection of the physically sound students from communicable diseases; early 
detection, isolation, and treatment of all cases of communicable diseases — tuber- 
culosis, diphtheria, scarlet fever, measles, typhoid fever, smallpox, mumps, etc. 

c. Treatment and professional care of all students who are ill or in need of medical 
advice or treatment. For extended care by the Health Service it is necessary that 
the student enter the Infirmary. Any student may be admitted to the Infirmary upon 
the recommendation of the University Physician. To all patients in the Infirmary 
the staff will furnish medical and nursing services. 

d. Reconstruction and reclamation: correction of defects, advice, and treatment of all 
abnormalities. 

2. Sanitation. — The student's environment should be made as hygienic as possible. 
Hence, this division concerns itself with the sanitary conditions both on and off the campus. 

3. Education. — Every student in the University is made familiar with the fundamentals 
of both personal and public hygiene. Through personal conferences education in hygiene 
and right living is conducted. 

VACCINATION 

Prospective students are advised to be vaccinated against smallpox and to be inoculated 
against typhoid fever. Unless a certificate is presented showing successful vaccination within 
five years, students will be vaccinated against smallpox at the time of registration. 



BUREAU OF VOCATIONAL GUIDANCE AND MENTAL HYGIENE 

A program of vocational guidance is carried on for the students through a series of 
tests, interviews, and the application of scientific occupational information. The Bureau 
offers a service to those encountering mental difiBculties which interfere with their scholastic 
work. Further information concerning these services may be obtained from the office of 
the Director of the Bureau, Room 110, Peabody Hall. 

FLORIDA UNION 

Florida Union serves a three-fold purpose. It is the official center of student activities 
and presents a broad program of recreation and entertainment for the student body; it is 
the campus home of faculty, students, alumni, and friends of the University; it aids in 
establishing a cultural pattern which will distinguish Florida men. The building is open 
daily from 8:00 .\.M. until 11:00 p.m. The game room, reading room, lounge rooms, and 



286 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION — UPPER DIVISION 

various meeting rooms are available to the student body. The offices of the Student Body, 
the Y.M.C.A., Alumni Association, and the Publicity Department of the University are 
located in the Florida Union. A soda-fountain and the bookstore in the annex oflfer attrac- 
tive service at the most economical prices. A cordial welcome always awaits every student 
at the Florida Union. 

In addition to its facilities on the campus, the Union operates the University's Camp 
Wauburg, located on a beautiful lake about nine miles from the campus. Here students 
are offered opportunities for swimming, fishing, and other wholesome outdoor activities. 

STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS AND PUBLICATIONS 

Student Government. — Student government in the University of Florida is a cooperative 
organization based on mutual confidence between the student body and the faculty. Con- 
siderable authority has been granted the Student Body for the regulation and conduct of 
student aflFairs. The criterion in granting authority to the Student Body has been the 
disposition of the students to accept responsibility commensurate with the authority granted 
them. Generally speaking, the fields of student activity include regulation of extr? curricular 
affairs and the administration of the Honor System. 

Every enrolled student, having paid his activity fee, is a member of the Student Body 
and has an equal vote in its government. 

The University authorities feel that training in acceptance of responsibility for the 
conduct of student affairs at the University is a valuable part of the educational growth of 
the individual student. The Student Body is practically a body politic, occupying its fran- 
chise under grant from the Board of Control and subject to its continued approval. 

Student government is patterned on the state and national form of government, but 
adapted to the local needs of the Student Body. Powers are distributed into the three 
branches: (1) legislative, which is embodied in the Executive Council; (2) judicial, which 
is embodied in the Honor Court with penal and civil jurisdiction of all judicial matters; 
(3) executive, embodied in the President and shared with the Vice-President and the 
Secretary-Treasurer of the Student Body. Members of all three branches are elected directly 
by the Student Body once a year. 

Student government enacts and enforces suitable laws, and promotes athletics, debating, 
publications of the Student Body, entertainments of a general educational value, and such 
other activities as the Student Body may adopt. The officers of the Student Body are the 
President, Vice-President, Secretary-Treasurer, members of the Honor Court, Athletic 
Council, Executive Council, Lyceum Council, editors and business managers of student 
publications, and student members of the Board of Student Publications. 

Debating. — Practice in debating is open to all students through the programs of the 
varsity and General College debate squads. This work, which is sponsored by the Debate 
Qub, is under the direction of the Department of Speech, and culminates in an extensive 
schedule of intercollegiate debates. 

Dramatics. — Any student has an opportunity to participate in several plays which are 
presented each year by the Florida Players, a dramatic group under direction of the Depart- 
ment of Speech. 

Executive Council. — The Executive Council is composed of representatives elected from 
the colleges on the campus and in general acts as administrator of Student Body affairs. 
The Athletic Council and the Lyceum Council have jurisdiction over their respective fields. 



STUDENT ORGANZATIONS AND PUBLICATIONS 287 

Publications. — The Student Body publishes The Seminole, the year book; The Florida 
Alligator, the student newspaper; The "F" Book, the student's guide; and The Florida 
Review, the campus literary magazine. 

Y. M. C. A. — The purpose of the Young Men's Christian Association is to provide a 
medium through which the highest ideals of education and religion may be expressed in 
terms of service. The program of the Association is planned to meet definite needs as they 
become apparent. There is no membership fee. Any student may become a member by 
subscribing to its purpose and contributing to its support. A secretary having extensive 
experience with the problems of students is available for counsel and help. 

Social Fraternities. — Twenty-two national social fraternities have established chapters at 
the University; most of them have already built chapter houses and the others have leased 
homes. The general work of the fraternities is controlled by the Interfratemity Conference, 
composed of two delegates from each of the national fraternities. The national fraternities 
at Florida are Alpha Gamma Rho, Alpha Tau Omega, Beta Theta Pi, Chi Phi, Delta Chi, 
Delta Tau Delta, Delta Sigma Phi, Kappa Alpha, Kappa Sigma, Lambda Chi Alpha, Phi 
Delta Theta, Phi Gamma Delta, Phi Kappa Tau, Pi Kappa Alpha, Pi Kappa Phi, Pi 
Lambda Phi, Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Sigma Chi, Sigma Nu, Sigma Phi Epsilon, Tau Epsilon 
Phi, and Theta Chi. 

Professional and Honorary Fraternities. — Alpha Epsilon Delta, pre-medical; Alpha Kappa 
Psi, business; Alpha Phi Omega, service; Alpha Tau Alpha, agricultural education; Alpha 
Zeta, agricultural; Beta Alpha Psi, accounting; Beta Gamma Sigma, commerce; Delta Sigma 
Pi, commerce; Florida Blue Key, leadership; Gamma Sigma Epsilon, chemical; Gargoyle 
Club, architectural; Kappa Delta Pi, teachers; Kappa Epsilon, women's pharmaceutical; 
Kappa Gamma Delta, aeronautical; Kappa Kappa Psi, band; Kappa Phi Kappa, teachers; 
Los Picaros, Spanish; Phi Alpha Delta, law; Phi Beta Kappa, scholastic; Phi Delta Phi, 
law ; Phi Eta Sigma, freshman scholastic ; Phi Kappa Phi, scholastic ; Phi Sigma, biological ; 
Pi Delta Epsilon, journalistic; Pi Gamma Mu, social science; Rho Chi, pharmaceutical; 
Sabres, military; Sigma Delta Chi, journalistic; Sigma Delta Psi, athletic; Sigma Tau, engi- 
neering; Sigma Xi, scientific research; Tau Alpha Nu, forestry; Tau Kappa Alpha, debating; 
Thyrsus, horticultural. 

Clubs and Societies. — Agricultural Club; American Institute of Chemical Engineers, 
Student Branch; American Institute of Electrical Engineers, Student Branch; American 
Pharmaceutical Association, Student Branch; American Society of Civil Engineers, Student 
Branch; American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Student Branch; American Student 
Union, local; Astronomy Club; Bacchus, freshman social; Baptist Student Union; Benton 
Engineering Society; Block and Bridle Club; Cavaliers, social; Colonels, social; Commerce 
Qub; Debate Club; English Club; Episcopal Club, Student Branch; "F" Club, athletic; 
F. F. F. Ciuh (Y.M.C.A.) ; Fine Arts Club; Florida Fourth Estate Club, journalistic: Florida 
Players; Florida Rifles, rifle and pistol club; Forestry Club; Gator Pep Qub; Glee Club; 
International Relations Club; John Marshall Debating Society; L'Apache, social; Leigh 
Chemical Society; Mathematics Colloquium; Mortar and Pestle, pharmacy club; Newell 
Entomological Society; Newman Club, Catholic Student Branch; Pirates, social; Propeller 
Club, merchant marine society; Society for Advancement of Management, Student Branch; 
University Radio Guild; Wesley Foundation, Methodist Student Branch; White Friars, 
social; Y.M.C.A. 



288 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION —UPPER DIVISION 

HONOR SYSTEM 

The Honor System. — One of the finest tributes to the character of the students at the 
University of Florida is the fact that the Student Body is a self-governing group. The 
details of the system by which this result is reached will be explained to all freshmen during 
the first week of their enrollment in the University. However, each parent, as well as each 
prospective student, is urged to read the following discussion of the Honor System, as this 
phase of student government forms the keystone of the entire system. 

In addition to permitting student legislation on questions of interest to the members of 
the Student Body, execution of the laws passed, and the expenditure of student funds, the 
governing system at the University gives to the students the privilege of disciplining them- 
selves through the means of the Honor System. Inaugurated by some of our greatest edu- 
cators in higher institutions of the nation and early adopted in some departments of the 
University of Florida, the Honor System was finally established in the entire University in 
1914 as the result of student initiative. This plan, having met with the approval of all 
officials of the University, was given the sanction of the Board of Control, and student repre- 
sentatives were selected by the students to administer the system. 

Among the basic principles of an Honor System are the convictions that self-discipline 
is the greatest builder of character, that responsibility is a prerequisite of self-respect, and 
that these are essential to the highest type of education. Officials of the University and the 
Board of Control feel that students in the University of Florida should be assumed to be 
honest and worthy of trust, and they display this confidence by means of an Honor System. 

The success of the System is dependent upon the honor of each individual member 
of the student body in that: (1) he is duty-bound to abide by the principles of the Honor 
Code, and (2) he is further pledged to report to the Honor Court such violations of the 
Code as he may observe. 

Many men coming to the University for the first time may feel hesitant about assuming 
this responsibility, inasmuch as early school training has created feelings of antipathy 
toward one who "tattle-tales" on a fellow-student. The theory of an Honor System ade- 
quately overcomes this natural reaction, however, when it is realized that this system is 
a student institution itself, and not a faculty measure for student discipline, and that to 
be worthy of the advantages of the Honor System each student must be strong enough 
to do his duty in this regard. In this way the responsibility for each men's conduct is 
placed where it must eventually rest — on himself. 

The Honor Code of the Student Body is striking in its simplicity; yet it embodies the 
fundamentals of sound character. Each man is pledged to refrain from: 

(a) cheating, (b) stealing, (c) obtaining money or credit for worthless checks. 

On the basis of this Code, students are extended all privileges conceived to be the 
basic rights of men of Honor. There are no proctors or spies in the examination rooms, each 
student feeling free to do his work, or to leave the room as occasion arises. Secondly, 
fruits and supplies are placed openly on the campus, with the confidence that each man will 
pay for any he may take. This system makes each man the keeper of his own conscience 
until he has proved to his fellow-students that he no longer deserves the trust placed in him. 

A breach of the System may be flagrant and serious, or it may be extenuated by cir- 
cumstances. It may need only mild corrective measures to help the violator obtain a finer 
conception of right and wrong; it may need strong measures. To enforce the System 
equitably the students have established the Honor Court. The Court is composed of twelve 



HONOR COURT 289 

students and a chancellor all of whom are elected annually from the upper classes of the 
various colleges on the campus. Any student convicted by this Court has the right of 
appeal from its ruling to the Faculty Discipline Committee. A tribute to the efficiency of 
the Honor Court in its existence on the Florida campus is realized in the fact that, since 
its establishment, a surprisingly insignificant number of the Court's decisions have been 
altered upon appeal. 

The penal purpose of the Honor Court should receive less stress, perhaps, than its 
educational purpose, which is its most important function. The responsibility of acquaint- 
ing every member of the Student Body with the purpose, advantages, and principles of 
the Honor System is placed upon members of the Court. In line with this work, members 
of the Honor Court participate in the orientation program each year during Freshman Week. 
In addition to a series of explanatory talks at that time, special chapel programs are con- 
ducted by the Honor Court during the school year. Honor System talks are delivered in 
the high schools of the State upon request and at regularly scheduled times each spring, 
and radio programs are broadcast especially for the high schools from Station WRUF in 
Gainesville. In this way the Honor Court has endeavored to fulfill its responsibility to 
the men who undertake the problem of self-government and self-discipline at the University 
of Florida. 

The parent of every prospective student should feel that it is his responsibility to stress 
the paramount importance of honorable conduct on the part of his son while the latter is 
in attendance at the University of Florida. Dishonest action brings sorrow both to parent 
and to student. 

Because University students have proved worthy of the trust and responsibility involved 
in administering an Honor System, this feature of student government has become the 
greatest tradition at the University of Florida. It must be remembered that inasmuch as 
it is primarily a student responsibility, the future of the system rests with each new class 
of students entering the University. The University faculty and authorities pledge their 
support to the Honor System. Each student must support it, or, in failing to support it, 
contribute to the loss of this tradition. 



290 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION —UPPER DIVISION 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 

FACULTY 

WiLMON Newell, D.Sc. (Iowa State College), Provost for Agriculture 

Wilbur Leonidas Floyd, M.S., Assistant Dean and Head Professor of Horticulture, Emeritus 

H. Harold Hume, M.S. A., D.Sc. (Clemson), Dean 

AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY 

Alvin Percy Black, Ph.D. (Iowa), Professor of Agricultural Chemistry 

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 

Clarence Vernon Noble, Ph.D. (Cornell), Head Professor of Agricultural Economics 
Henry Glenn Hamilton, Ph.D. (Cornell), Professor of Marketing 
Julius Wayne Reitz, M.S., Professor of Agricultural Economics 

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

Edward Walter Garris, Ph.D. (Peabody), Professor of Agricultural Education 

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

Frazier Rogers, M.S.A., Head Professor of Agricultural Engineering 

AGRONOMY 

Pettus Holmes Senn, Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Head Professor of Agronomy 

ANIMAL industry 

Arthur Liston Shealy, D.V.M. (McKillip), Head Professor of Animal Husbandry 

Claude Houston Willoughby, M.A., Professor of Animal Husbandry 

Raymond Brown Becker, Ph.D. (Minnesota), Professor of Dairy Husbandry and Animal 

Nutrition 
Norman Ripley Mehrhof, M.S., Professor of Poultry Husbandry 
Nathan Willard Sanborn, M.D. (City of New York), Professor of Poultry Husbandry 

(Special Status) 
Mark Wirth Emmel, D.V.M. (Iowa State College), Professor of Veterinary Science 
Everett Lincoln Fouts, Ph.D. (Iowa State College), Professor of Dairy Manufactures 
William Gordon Kirk, Ph.D. (Iowa State College), Assistant Professor of Animal 

Husbandry 
P. T. Dix Arnold, M.S., Assistant Professor of Dairy Husbandry 
Louis Leon Rusoff, Ph.D. (Minnesota), Assistant Professor of Animal Nutrition 
Douglas Johnston Smith. B.S.A., Assistant Professor of Animal Husbandry 
Oliver Wendell Anderson, M.S., Instructor in Poultry Husbandry 



William B. Tisdale, Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Head Professor of Botany 

Madison Derrell Cody, M.A., Professor of Botany 

Wiluam Richard Carroll, Ph.D. (Minnesota), Associate Professor of Bacteriology 

Geo. F. Weber, Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Professor of Plant Pathology 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 291 

ENTOMOLOGY 

John Thomas Creighton, Ph.D. (Ohio State), Head Professor of Entomology 
Homer Hixson, Ph.D. (Iowa), Instructor in Entomology 

horticulture 

Herbert Snow Wolfe, Ph.D. (Chicago), Head Professor of Horticulture 

Charles Elliott Abbott, M.S.. Professor of Horticulture 

John Vertrees Watkins, M.S.A., Assistant Professor of Horticulture 



Robert Verril Allison, Ph.D. (Rutgers), Head Professor of Soils 
Fredrick Burean Smith, Ph.D. (Iowa State College), Professor of Soils 
J. Russell Henderson, M.S.A., Assistant Professor of Soils 



ORGANIZATION 

The College of Agriculture is composed of three divisions: 

1. Instruction Division (the College proper) 

2. Research Division (Experiment Station) 

3. Agricultural Extension Service 

the college 

The aim of the College is to afford young men the best possible opportunity for gaining 
technical knowledge and training in the art and science of Agriculture, thus enabling grad- 
uates to become effective producing agriculturists, leaders in educational work, research 
workers, etc. 

UBRARIES 

The University Library contains many works on agriculture and horticulture. Each 
department has a small collection of well selected volumes which are always accessible. In 
the Experiment Station Library are bulletins from the United States Department of Agricul- 
ture and from the experiment stations of the world, all fully indexed. 

DEGREES AND CURRICULA 

To enter the College of Agriculture and register for the curriculum leading to the degree 
of Bachelor of Science in Agriculture, students are required to present a certificate of 
graduation from the General College, and to have completed the following courses as 
electives in the General College: 

Acy. 125-126 Agricultural Chemistry 

or 
Cy. 101-102 General Chemistry 

and 
Nine hours electives as outlined in the Bulletin of Information for the General College. 

The minimum load for students in the College of Agriculture will average 17 hours a 
semester. A total of 68 semester hours on which the student must earn 136 honor points 
will be required for graduation, including Military Science, if it is elected. 



292 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION —UPPER DIVISION 

Students entering the College of Agriculture may take a major in the curriculum in 
General Agriculture or in any one of the following departments and divisions: 

Agricultural Chemistry Botany, including the departments of 

Agricultural Economics (a) Bacteriology 

Agricultural Education (b) Botany 

Agricultural Engineering (c) Plant Pathology 

Agronomy Entomology 

Animal Industry, including the Horticulture 

departments of Soils 

(a) Animal Production 

(b) Dairy Husbandry 

(c) Dairy Manufacture 

(d) Poultry Husbandry 

A minimum of 20 semester hours is required for a major in any department. 

The head of the department in which a student majors (or his appointee) will act as 
the student's adviser, assist the student in arranging his course of study, and make necessary 
recommendations to the Dean. The student's courses for each semester are subject to the 
approval of the Dean and the department head. 

If a student anticipates pursuing graduate work, he wiU find it helpful to elect as many 
basic courses as possible, such as chemistry, biology, mathematics, botany, physics, econom- 
ics, and a language. On the other hand, if a student anticipates going into applied agri- 
culture: farming, county agent work, farm superintendency, etc., he will find it profitable 
to elect as much technical agriculture as possible in departments related to his major work. 

CREDIT FOR PRACTICAL WORK 

By previous arrangement with the head of the department and the Dean, students may, 
during their course of study, do practical work under competent supervision in any recog- 
nized agricultural pursuit, and upon returning to the college and rendering a satisfactory 
written report showing faithful service, will be entitled to one credit for each month of 
such work. Such credits may not total more than three. 

Practical work is especially important for students who have no farm experience. 

Even though they cannot procure employment under such conpetent supervision as 
will give college credit, they should secure work along the line in which they are major- 
ing. Faculty members will assist as much as possible in securing such vacation employment. 

GRADUATION WITH HONORS 

To graduate WITH HONORS a student must have an honor point average of 3.20 or above 
for the Upper Division and be recommended by the Head of the Department in which he 
majors and the Dean. The number so graduated shall not exceed 20 per cent of the gradu- 
ating class. 

To graduate WITH HIGH HONORS a student must have an honor point average of 
3.50 or above for the Upper Division, must have done independent work exceptionally well 
and must pass a final comprehensive examination with distinction. He must receive the 
recommendation of the Head of the Department in which he majors and of the Dean. The 
number so graduated shall not exceed .5 per cent of the graduating class. 

Students eligible for graduation WITH HONORS or WITH HIGH HONORS shall be 
recommended by the Heads of the Departments in which they are majoring to the Dean. 
Students may complete their qualifications for these HONORS upon invitation from the 
Dean. 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



293 



CURRICULA 



AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY 



Junior Year 

Courses First Semester Credits Courses 

Cy. 201 — Analjrtical Chemistry 4 Cy. 

Cy. 301 — Organic Chemistry 4 Cy. 

CMs. 23 — Basic Mathematics 4 CMs 

Ps. 101 — Elementary Physics _ 3 Ps. 

Ps. 103 — Laboratory for Physics 101_ 2 Ps. 

17 



Second Semester Credita 

202 — Analytical Chemistry 4 

302 —Organic Chemistry 4 

24 — Basic Mathematics 4 

102 — Elementary Physics — 3 

104 — Laboratory for Physics 102.... 2 

17 



Cv. 


401 


Acy. 


431 


Cy. 


481 


Sis. 


301 


Sis. 


491 


Al. 


811 



Senior Year 

-Physical Chemistry 4 Cy. 

-Agricultural Analysis 4 Acy. 

-Chemical Literature % Cy. 

-SoUs - 3 Bey. 

-Soils Seminar 1 

-Elementary Nutrition _ 4 

16% 



402 — Physical Chemistry 4 

432 — Agricultural Analysis — 4 

482 — Chemical Literature % 

301 — General Bacteriology 4 

Electives 5 



17% 



AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 



Junior Year 

"As. 201 — Agricultural Economics 3 **As. 

•As. 303 —Farm Records _ 3 **As. 

tOptions - 3-6 

tElectives 5-8 

17 



306 — Farm Management _ _ 3 

308 — Marketing 3 

tOptions 3-6 

JElectives — 5-8 

17 



Senior Year 

**As. 405 —Agricultural Prices _ 3 ♦*As. 

♦*As. 409 ■ — Cooperative Marketing 3 

tOptions _ 3-6 

tElectives 5-8 

17 



— Agricultural Statistics 3 

tOptions _ - 3- 6 

JElectives 8-11 



17 



AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 



Junior Year 



Ag. 


303 


Sis. 


301 


Dy. 


311 


He. 


315 


En. 


306 



— Farm Shop _ 8 

—Soils _ 3 

— Principles of Dairying 4 

— Citrus Culture _ 3 

— Vocational Education 3 

Physical Education 2 



18 



As. 306 —Farm Management 3 

Al. 211 — Principles of Animal 

Husbandry _ 3 

Al. 314 — Livestock Judging _ 3 

He. 312 — Vegetable Gardening 3 

En. 303 — Methods in Vocational 

Agriculture 3 

Electives in Agriculture .... 1 

16 



♦Required, if not completed in Sophomore year. 
**Other courses in agricultural economics may be substituted. 

tA minimum of 18 hours of technical agricultural subjects is required from the following 
courses: Ag. 301, Ag. 303 or Ag. 306; Al. 211 or Al. 309; Ay. 321 or Ay. 324; Ey. 301 or Pt. 321; 
He. 201, He. 312 or He. 315 ; Sis. 301. 

JA minimum of 15 hours in other technical agricultural subjects in addition to the options 
will be required. The remaining electives may be chosen in agricultural or non-agricultural 
subjects. The non-agricultural subjects espacially recommended are mathematics, accounting, 
economics, and public speaking. 

Students who may be interested in preparing themselves for U. S. Civil Service Examinations 
are advised that in general a minimum of 24 semester hours in agricultural economics are required 
for eligibility to the examination for Junior Agricultural Economist. 



294 



BULLETIN OF INFORMATION —UPPER DIVISION 



Courses 

Ay. 
He. 

Py. 
Vy. 

En. 

En. 



First Semester 



Senior Year 

Credits Courses 



321 —Field Crops 3 

429 ^Ornamental Horticulture 3 

415 — Poultry Management 3 

401 — Livestock Diseases and 

Farm Sanitation 2 

409 ■ — Supervised Teaching in 

Vocational Agriculture 3 

411 — Special Methods in 

Vocational Agriculture 2 



16 



As. 308 
Sis. 302 
En. 410 



En. 

Ey. 
En. 



412 
314 

387 



Second Semester 



Credits 



- — Marketing 3 

—Soil Fertility 3 

— Supervised Teaching in 

Vocational Agriculture .. 3 
— Special Methods in 

Vocational Agriculture .. 2 
— Principles of Economic 

Entomology _ 4 

— Health Education 3 

18 



AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

Junior Year 

Ag. 301 ^Drainage and Irrigation 3 Ag. 302 

Ag. 303 — F'arm Shop _ 3 Ag. 30G • 

Sis. 301 —Soils „ 3 Al. 211 - 

Approved Electives 5 

Py. 301 — Fundamentals in Poultry 

Production 3 



-Farm Motors _ 3 

-Farm Machinery 3 

-Principles of Animal 

Husbandry 3 

Approved Electives 8 



17 



17 



Senior Year 



Ag. 401 — Farm Buildings _ 2 

Ag. 403 — Agricultural Engineering 

Investigations 2 

Ay. 321 —Field Crops _ 3 

Ey. 301 — Introduction to Entomology.. 4 

He. 315 —Citrus Culture 3 

Approved Electives 3 

17 



As. 306 — Farm Management 3 

Ag. 404 — Agricultural Engineering 

Investigations 2 

Ag. 408 — Soil and Water Conservation 3 

Approved Electives 9 



17 



AGRONOMY 



The curriculum in Agronomy is designed to give a broad training in the fundamentals 
of general agriculture with particular emphasis on field and forage crop production, genetics 
and plant breeding. 

Junior Year 



Courses 

Ay. 
Ay. 
Ay. 
Bty. 
Sis. 
He. 



321 
329 
331 
303 
301 
201 



First Semester 



Credits 



— Field Crops 3 

— Principles of Genetics 3 

— Lab. Probs. in Genetics 2 

— General Botany 4 

— Soils _ 3 

■ — Principles of Horticulture ... 3 

18 



Courses 

Ay. 324 

Al. 211 

Bty. 304 

Sis. 302 



Second Semester 



Credits 



— Forage and Cover Crops 3 

— Prin. of Animal Husbandry 3 

— General Botany _ 4 

—Soil Fertility 3 

Approved Electives 3 



Senior Year 



Bty. 311 —Plant Physiology 4 

Ey. 301 — Introduction to Entomology 4 

Pt. 321 —Plant Pathology _ 4 

Approved Electives 3 

Electives in Agronomy 3 

18 



Ay. 

Ag. 

As. 



422 —Plant Breeding 3 

306 — Farm Machinery 3 

308 —Marketing 3 

Electives in Agronomy _ 3 

Approved Electives 4 

16 



i 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



295 



CENEKAL AGRICULTURE 

The curriculum in general agriculture is designed to give a broad fundamental training 
in agriculture and is especially recommended for students preparing to go into agricultural 
extension and similar work. 

Junior Year 

Courses 



Ak. 


301 


Ay. 


321 


He. 


315 


Py. 


301 



Sis. 



Al. 


311 


Ev. 


301 


Fy. 


313 


Pt. 


321 



As. 


306 


Av. 


324 


He. 


312 


Sis. 


302 


As. 


413 



First Semester Credits 

— Drainage and Irrigation 3 Al. 211 

—Field Crops 3 

— Citrus Culture 3 

— Fundamentals in Poultry 

Production 3 

—Soils 3 

Electives 3 

18 

Senior Year 

— Elementary Nutrition 4 Ag. 306 

— Introduction to Entomology 4 As. 308 

— Farm Forestry 3 Al. 312 

—Plant Pathology 4 Ay. 400 

CSc. 33 

15 



Credits 



Second Semester 

— Principles of Animal 

Husbandry „ 3 

— Farm Management 3 

— Forage and Cover Crops 3 

— Vegetable Gardening 3 

—Soil Fertility 3 

— Agricultural Policy 3 



18 



— Farm Machinery 3 

- — Marketing 3 

— Feeds and Feeding 4 

— Agric. Extension Methods .... 3 

• — Effective Speaking 4 



17 



Al. 

Al. 

Bey. 

Vy. 



309 

311 
301 
301 



Dy. 311 



S1.S. 


301 


Av. 


329 


Al. 


413 


Al. 


415 


Al. 


421 



ANIMAL INDUSTRY 

(a) Major in Animal Production 



-Fundamentals in Animal 

Husbandry 

-Elementary Nutrition 4 

-General Bacteriology 4 

-Veterinary Anatomy and 

Physiology 3 

-Principles of Dairying 4 



Junior 


Year 






As. 


306 


3 


Ay. 


324 


4 


Al. 


312 


4 


Al. 


314 




Al. 


322 



18 

Senior Year 



-Soils 3 

-Principles of Genetics 3 

-Swine Production 3 

-Meat Products _ 8 

-Seminar 1 

Electives 4 

17 



— Farm Management 3 

-Forage and Cover Crops 3 

— Feeds and Feeding 4 

— Livestock Judging 3 

— Animal Breeding 2 

Electives 2 



Al. 420 — Marketing of Livestock 3 

Al. 421 — Seminar 1 

Al. 411 — Beef Production 2 

Electives 10 



16 



Al. 311 

Bey. 301 

Dy. 311 

Vy. 301 



Sis. 
Ay. 
Ay. 


301 
329 
331 


Dy. 


413 


Al. 


421 



(b) Major in Dairy Husbandry 
Junior Year 



-Elementary Nutrition 4 

—General Bacteriology 4 

-Principles of Dairying 4 

-Veterinary Anatomy and 

Physiology 3 

Electives 3 



18 

Senior Year 

-Soils _ 3 Ay. 

-Principles of Genetics 3 Dy. 

-Laboratory Problems in Al. 

Genetics 2 Dy. 

-Market Milk and Milk Plant 

Products 4 

-Seminar _ 1 

Electives 4 



As. 


306 


Al. 


312 


Al. 


314 


Bey. 


402 



324 
412 
421 
318 



— Farm Managenaent 3 

— Feeds and F'eeding 4 

— Livestock Judging 3 

• — Dairy Bacteriology 4 

Electives 3 



17 



— Forage and Cover Crops 3 

— Milk Production 3 

- Seminar 1 

— Grading and Judging 

Dairy Products 2 

Electives 7 



17 



16 



296 



BULLETIN OF INFORMATION —UPPER DIVISION 



(c) Major in Dairy Manufactures 
Junior Year 



First Semester 



Credits 



Courses 

Acy. 203 — Analytical Chemistry _ 3 

Al. 311 — Elementary Nutrition 4 

Dy. 311 • — Principles of Dairying 4 

Bey. 301 — General Bacteriology 4 

Dy. 316 — Condensed and Dry Milk 3 



Dy. 413 —Market Milk and Milk Plant 

Products _ - 4 

Dy. 415 — Ice Cream Manufacture 

Al. 421 — Seminar 

Ag. 406 — Dairy Engineering 3 

Approved Electives 6 

17 



Courses 
Acy. 



Dy. 



204 
311 
318 



18 






Senior 


Year 






Bey. 


402 


4 


Dy. 


414 


3 






1 


Dy. 


416 


3 


Al. 


421 



Second Semester 



Credits 



— Analytical Chemistry 3 

— Accounting Principles 3 

— Grading and Judging 

Dairy Products _ 2 

— Marketing 3 

Approved Electives 5 

16 



—Dairy Bacteriology _ 4 

■ — -Manufacture of Butter and 

Cheese 3 

— Dairy Technology 5 

— Seminar 1 

Approved Electives 4 



17 



As. 
Ay. 
Ay. 

Al. 



201 
329 
331 

311 



Ag. 


401 


Pv. 


415 


Al. 


421 


Py. 


427 



(d) Major in Poultry Husbandry 
Junior Year 



-Agricultural Economics 3 

-Principles of Genetics 3 

-Laboratory Problems in 

Genetics 2 

-Elementary Nutrition — 4 

Electives _ — — 5 

17 



Senior Year 

— Farm Buildings _ 2 Py. 

— Poultry Management _ 3 Py. 

—Seminar _ 1 Al. 

— Advanced Poultry Judging Vy. 

and Poultry Breeding 3 

Electives — . 8 

17 



Ab. 806 — Farm Management 

Py. 312 — Advanced Incubation, 

Brooding and Rearing 

Al. 312 —Feeds and Feeding .._ 

Electives 



.... 3 
.„ 4 

.... 7 



416 
417 
421 
402 



17 



• — Poultry Management 3 

- — Marketing Poultry Products 3 

— Seminar _ _ 1 

— Poultry Diseases _ _ 3 

Electives 7 



17 



Students majoring in Poultry Husbandry must meet the above requirements, 
suggested that Py. 429-430 be taken in addition to the required courses. 



(a) Major in Bacteriology 
Junior Year 



First Semester 



Credits 



Courses 



Acy. 


204 


Bey. 


302 


Bey. 


304 


Bey. 


306 


CGn. 


34 



Courses 

Bey. 301 — General Bacteriology 4 

Bty. 311 — Plant Physiology 4 

Pt. 321 —Plant Pathology _.. 4 

Acy. 203 — Analytical Chemistry 3 

CGn. 33 —Reading of German 3 

18 



Senior Year 

Bey. 411 — Principles and Practices of Bey. 412 

Immunology 4 Bey. 402 

Cy. 215 —Water and Sewage 3 Bty. 308 

He. 317 —Plant Propagation 3 Vy. 402 

Sis. 301 —Soils _ 3 Bty. 555 

Bty. 555 — Seminar 1 

Electives 2 



Second Semester 



Credits 



— Analytical Chemistry 3 

—Agricultural Bacteriology .... 3 

— Pathogenic Bacteriology 4 

— Bacteriology of Foods 4 

— Reading of German 3 

17 



— Industrial Bacteriology 4 

— Dairy Bacteriology 4 

— Taxonomy 4 

— Poultry Diseases 2 

— Seminar 1 

Electives 2 



16 



COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE 



297 



Courses 
Bty. 311 
Bey. 301 
Pt. 321 
Cy. 262 



Bty. 


431 


Ay. 


329 


He. 


317 


Sis. 


301 


Ev. 


301 


Bty. 


r,55 



(b) Major in Botany 



First Semester 



Junior Year 

Credits Courses 



— Plant Physiology 4 

— General Bacteriology 4 

— Plant Pathology 4 

— Organic Chemistry 5 



17 



Bty. 
Bty. 



Senior Year 



^Plant Histology 4 

— Principles of Genetics 3 

— Plant Propagation 3 

—Soils 3 

— Introduction to Entomology 4 

— Seminar _ _ 1 



18 



Bty. 
Ay. 
Pt. 
Bty. 



Second Semester 



308 — Taxonomy 

401 — Ecology 

Electives _ 



Credits 

4 

4 



16 



432 —Plant Anatomy 4 

422 — Plant Breeding 3 

434 — Mycology _ 3 

555 — Seminar 1 

Electives 6 



(c) Major in Plant Pathology 
Junior Year 



Pt. 321 —Plant Pathology 4 

Ay. 329 — Principles of Genetics 3 

Bey. 301 — General Bacteriology 4 

Bty. 431 — Plant Histology 4 

Electives - _.. 3 

18 



Pt. 424 — Field Crop Diseases 

Sis. 301 —Soils 

Cy. 262 — Organic Chemistry ... 

Bty. 311 —Plant Physiology 

Bty. 555 — Seminar 

Electives — 



Pt. 


322 


Bty. 


308 


As. 


408 



Senior 


Year 




3 


Pt. 


423 


3 


Ay. 


422 


5 


Pt. 


434 


4 


Bty. 


555 


1 






2 







— Vegetable Diseases 3 

— Taxonomy 4 

— Marketing of FVuits and 

Vegetables 3 

Electives 6 

16 



— Fruit Diseases 3 

— Plant Breeding 3 

— Mycology _ - 3 

— Seminar 1 

Electives _ 6 



18 



16 



ENTOMOLOGY 

The curriculum for this department is flexible. Students will be permitted to make 
alterations which are deemed of value in their specialized type of training. Students should 
confer with the head of the department. The proper selection of electives will enable a 
student to train for one of the following phases of the profession: 1. Insects aff'ecting man 
and animals, 2. Industrial entomology. 3. Insects affecting fruit, vegetable, and field crops. 
4. Legal phase of entomology or plant quarantine and inspection, S. Forest entomology 
and conservation, 6. Research phase of entomolog>' and graduate work, 7. Commercial 
entomology and pest control. 

Copies of the suggested special curricula for the aforementioned fields of specialization 
may be obtained from the head of the department. Ey. 201 (Man and Insects) or Ey. 
301 (Introduction to Entomology) are prerequisites or corequisites for all other entomology 
courses except Ey. 314. 

Electives in non-agricultural subjects must not exceed 15 semester hours. 

Junior Year 



Courses First Semester Credits Courses 

Ey. 301 — Introduction to Entomology 4 Ey. 304 

Ey. 311 — Seminar _. 1 Ey. 

Ey. 405 -insect Control 3 

He. '201 —Principles of Horticulture .... 3 Ey. 

Electives 6 Ag. 



Second Semester Crediti 

Advanced Entomology 5 

432 — Florida Fruit and Vegetable 

Insects 3 

Seminar 1 

Farm Machinery 3 

Electives 5 



312 
306 



17 



17 



298 



BULLETIN OF INFORMATION — UPPER DIVISION 



Senior Year 

Courses First Semester Credits Courses 

Ey. 420 - — Medical and Veterinary Ey. 

Entomology „ 3 Ey. 

Sis. 301 —Soils _ 3 

Ay. 329 — Principles of Genetias 3 

Electiv«s _ _ 8 

17 



Second Semester Credits 

408 — Insect Morphology 5 

441 — Plant Quarantine, Inspection 

and Control 3 

Electives 9 



17 



HORTICULTURE 

The Horticulture curriculum is a broad one, designed to give the student a basic train- 
ing in the field of horticulture, with ample choice of electives in related fields. Opportunity 
is afiforded in the senior year for specialization in any of the following fields: (1) citrus 
culture, (2) olericulture, (3) floriculture, (4) ornamental horticulture, (5) tropical horti- 
culture. Students should consult with the head of the department concerning their field 
of special interest and recommended electives for strengthening it. 



Courses 

Bty. 311 

He. 317 

Pt. 321 

Sis. 301 



Ag. 
Ey. 



301 
301 



First Semester 

— Plant Physiology 

— Plant Propagation 

— Plant Pathology 

— Soils — 

Approved Electives , 



Janior Year 

Credits Courses 



Second Semester 



Credits 



Marketing Fruits and 

Vegetables 3 

Vegetable Gardening _ 3 

Principles of Fruit 

Production _ _ 3 

Sis. 302 —Soil Fertility 3 

Approved Elective! _ 6 



4 


As. 


408 


8 






4 


He. 


312 


3 


He. 


314 


3 







17 



18 



Senior Year 



— Irrigation and Drainage 3 

^Introduction to Entomology 4 

Approved Courses in 

Horticulture 6 

Approved Electives _... 6 



19 



Ay. 422 —Plant Breeding 3 

Approved Courses in 

Horticulture 6 

Approved Electives 6 



15 



The curriculum in soils is designed to give the student a broad training in the funda- 
mentals of general agriculture with particular emphasis on crop production and soil manage- 
ment. Sufficient elective hours are provided so that in addition to the training in soUs, 
any student may specialize in some closely allied line of work such as agricultural economics, 
farm management, animal industry, economic entomology, agricultural chemistry, horticul- 
ture or agricultural engineering. Carefully selected groups of courses along these various 
lines are outlined for individual students so that elective hours may be utilized to the best 
advantage. Students should consult the head of the department for approval of electives. 



Courses 

Acy. 203 

Ag. 301 

Ay. 321 

Sis. 301 



First Semester 



Junior Year 

Credits Courses 



Bey. 

Sis. 



Sis. 
Sis. 



301 
401 



405 
491 



— Analytical Chemistry .... 

— Drainage and Irrigation 3 

— Field Crops 

—Soils 

Approved Electives 



— General Bacteriology _ 4 

— Soil Morphology and 

Classification 

—Soil Microbiology 

— Soils Seminar 1 

Approved Electives 6 



3 


Acy. 


204 


3 


As. 


306 


3 


Ay. 


324 


3 


Sis. 


302 


5 






17 






Senior 


Year 




4 


Acy. 


432 




Sis. 


402 


3 


Sis. 


408 


3 


Sis. 


491 



Second Semester Credit 

— Analytical Chemistry 3 

— F'arm Management 3 

— Forage and Cover Crops 3 

—Soil Fertility _ _ 3 

Approved Electives 5 



17 



—Agricultural Analysis 3 

— Advanced Soil Fertility 3 

— Soil and Water Conservation 3 

— Soils Seminar 1 

Approved Electives 7 



17 



X7 



SCHOOL OF FORESTRY 299 

SCHOOL OF FORESTRY 



WiLMON Newbxl, D.Sc. (Iowa State College), Provost for Agriculture 

H. Harold Hume, M.S.A., D.Sc. (Clemson), Dean of the College of Agriculture 

Hakoli) Stkphenson Newins, M.F., Director and Head Professor of Forestry 

George F. Weber, Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Professor of Forest Pathology (Part Time) 

RuTHFORD H. Westveld, M.F., Professor of Silviculture 

Edwin Allen Ziecler, Sc.D. (Franklin & Marshall), Professor of Forest Economics and 

Finance 
Percy Warner Frazer, M.F., Assistant Professor of Forestry 
James W. Miller, Jr., B.S.F., Assistant Professor of Forestry 
Wilbur B. DeVall, B.S.F., Teaching Fellow in Forestry 

general statement 

The work leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science in Forestry meets the strictest 
requirements necessary in order that the student may be eligible for the Civil Service 
examination required for employment with the United States Forest Service and other 
agencies. 

The curriculum is designed to provide a broad scientific education in the four fields of 
forestry, namely: Forest Management, Forest Utilization, Silviculture, and Forest Economics 
and Finance, with electives in Landscape Forestry and Game Management. The students 
in their senior year may elect advanced subjects in these particular fields. 

The Austin Gary Memorial Forest, consisting of 2083 acres, located eight miles northeast 
of Gainesville on the Waldo highway, is used as an experimental forest wdiere the student 
gets actual field practice. The School of Forestry has a nursery and a small sawmill with 
necessary equipment located on this forest for use in instruction. Naval stores operations 
and experiments are being carried on continuously. A dry kiln and wood preservation 
laboratory will probably be located on the University Campus in the near future. 

The University of Florida has 2500 acres of diversified forest lands in Putnam County, 
Florida, under long time lease agreement with the United States Department of Agriculture. 
This tract is known as the University of Florida Conservation Reserve. This area is avail- 
able for studies in forest management and practices of different kinds. Part of the required 
summer camp will be held on this unit. 

There are several industries at Gainesville, namely: a creosoting plant, pole and tie 
company, chemical retort company, box and crate factory, excelsior plant, and several small 
sawmills located in the city or just outside the city limits. These afford quite a varied 
field of contact for the student during the time of his studies of these particular courses. 
Three large lumber mills with cutting capacities of approximately 100,000 board feet per 
working day are located within a radius of 100 miles of the University. These mills are 
visited from time to time in connection with the particular courses that have reference to 
lumber-using industries. The production and manufacture of pulp and paper are studied 
on cutting sites and in the mills. Two of the four National Forests of the State are less 
than fifty miles distant. Students visit these forests and do actual field work under the 
supervision of ofiBcers of the U. S. Forest Service. The State Forest and Park Service has 
developed many recreational areas within easy traveling distances from which students 
may observe the laying out and planning of recreational sites. 



300 



BULLETIN OF INFORMATION —UPPER DIVISION 



It is the aim of the School to develop young foresters with a broad outlook and a sound 
basic training in applied forestry, thus equipping them for work in any of the various fields 
that forestry affords. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

Graduation from the General College or its equivalent as determined by the Board of 
Examiners. The student should have completed the following courses: 

Acy. 125-126— Agricultural Chemistry or Cy. 101-102 General 

Chemistry 8 credits 

Bty. 303-304— General Botany _ 8 credits 

Fy. 220 —Introduction to Fy 2 credits 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

The student must complete a total of 70 semester hours as determined by the curriculum 
including Military Science, if it is elected. The student must have an average of C or 
higher on all work required for his degree. .41so, the student must attend and successfully 
complete a ten weeks Junior Summer Camp which will be held at the University Conserva- 
tion Reserve; Austin Gary Memorial Forest; Brunswick, Georgia; and one of the National 
Forests in the mountains of the eastern United States. 



GRADUATION WITH HONORS 

See requirements of the College of Agricuhure, p. 292. 

CURRICULUM LEADING TO THE DEGREE BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN FORESTRY 



Junior Year 



Courses 



Sis. 
Fy. 
Fy. 
Fy. 
Fy. 
Ms. 



301 
301 
302 
306 
311 
215 



First Semester 



-Soils 3 

-Dendrology 4 

-Forest Mensuration 4 

-Forest Protection 2 

-F'oundations of Silviculture.. 3 
-Plane Trigonometry and 

Logarithms 3 



19 



Second Semester 



CI. 
Fy. 



Fy. 



Credits 



228 —Surveying _ 3 

309 — Wood Technology and 
Timber Physics 4 

310 — Reforestation and Nursery 
Practice 3 

Fy. 318 — Forest Utilization and 

Products 3 

Fy. 320 —Silviculture 3 

Approved Electives 3 

19 



Junior Sumnicr Camp. — Ten weeks. To be held on the University Conservation Reserve, 
Austin Gary Memorial Forest, and some National Forest in the Southern Appalachians. 
At least 40 hours a week in the forest doing practical work, scientific observations, survey- 
ing, forest mensuration, identification, protection, improvements, utilization, and advanced 
methods of forest topographic mapping, timber appraisal, silvicultural practice, advance 
mensuration, etc. 

Senior Year 



First Semester 



Credits 



Courses 



Second Semester 



Credits 



Fy. 
Fy. 
Fy. 
Fy. 

Pt. 



409 
412 
413 
419 

325 



-Forest Finance 2 

-Seminar 1 

-Regional Silviculture 3 

-Principles of Forest 

Management 3 

-Forest Pathology 4 

Approved Electives in 

Forestry 3 

16 



— ^Forest History and Policy 2 

— Forest Management 

Working Plans 3 

- — Logging and Lumbering 3 

— Forest Economics and 

Administration 3 

Fy. 430 — Seminar 1 

Approved Electives 4 

16 



Fy. 

Fy. 



Fy. 
Fy. 



410 
416 



418 
420 



SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE AND ALLIED ARTS 301 

SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE AND ALLIED ARTS 



Rudolph Weaver, B.S., F.A.I.A., Director, Head Proieaocr of Architecture 

Frederick T. Hannaford, B.A., A.I.A.. Associate Professor of Architecture 

William T. Arnett, M.A.Arch., A.I.A., Assistant Professor of Architecture (on leave) 

John Louis Rochon Grand, M.A., Assistant Professor of Architecture 

Ralph G. Gulley, M.A., A.I. A., Professor of Architecture 

HoLLis Howard Holbrook, B.F.A., Assistant Professor of Drawing and Painting 

Alfred Browning Parker, B.S.Arch., Instructor in Architecture 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

The work of the School of Architecture and Allied Arts is organized on the basis of 
a Lower Division and an Upper Division. Five professional courses are offered: Architec- 
ture, Building Construction, Landscape Architecture, Painting, and Commercial Art. 

Each curriculum is devised with the intention of giving thorough training in the funda- 
mentals of the profession chosen. The project method of teaching, in which related 
material is co-ordinated, is employed in every course in the School of Architecture and 
Allied Arts, and the projects of the various courses are so integrated that each curriculum, 
instead of being a series of separate subjects, is a unified and correlated whole. 

Individual instruction is given to each student. Because of the individual nature of 
the work, each student passes from one group of problems to the next in varying lengths 
of time according to his accomplishment, and irrespective of University time units and 
the progress of other students. 

architectural registration 

The State of Florida, like most of the other states, has prescribed by law the qualifica- 
tions for architectural practice and requires the passing of examinations given by a state 
board. Properly qualified persons may be admitted to the examinations of the National 
Council of Architectural Registration Boards, and many advantages accrue to those who 
obtain their registration in this way. 

special lectures 

Prominent men from related fields and from the various chapters of the American 
Institute of Architects and the Florida Association of Architects are invited to give lectures 
which are intended to acquaint the student with the best professional thought and with 
the culture of our times. 

The semi-annual business meeting of the Florida Association of Architects, which is held 
in the rooms of the School, is open to the students. An opportunity is thus provided for 
the students to become acquainted with the problems which confront the practicing archi- 
tect, particularly in Florida, and to meet potential employers. 

admission 

Requirements for admission to the School of Architecture and Allied Arts are stated 
under "Admission" in each curriculum. For more detailed information concerning admis- 
sion, see the Bulletin of Information for the General College. 



302 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION —UPPER DIVISION 

ADULT REGISTRATION PRIVILEGE 

Persons twenty-one or more years of age who are not candidates for a degree may, by 
special vote of the faculty and the approval of the Board of University Examiners, be per- 
mitted to register in subjects for which they are adequately prepared. For information con- 
cerning the Admission of Special Students see page 265. 

GRADUATE STUDY 

The degree of Master of Arts in Architecture is offered in the Graduate School. For 
further information, see the Bulletin of the Graduate School. 

GENERAL REGULATIONS 

ADVANCEMENT 

Advancements in the Departments of Architecture and Painting are made by vote of 
the faculty. To be advanced from one course to the succeeding one, a student must have 
completed the projects of the course successfully, and must give evidence of satisfactory 
accomplishment in all the corequisite courses of his curriculum. 

[ ■ ACADEMIC CREDIT 

The School of Architecture and Allied Arts has dispensed with clock hours, class grades, 

and semester hours credit as prerequisites to the completion of its work. Understanding 

and demonstrated proficiency are used as a test for granting a degree, rather than the 
traditional accumulation of credits. 

STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY 

The student must assume full responsibility for registering for the proper courses and 
for fulfilling all requirements for his degree. The faculty will assist and advise, but the 
student must take the initiative and assume responsibility for managing his own affairs. 

ELECTIVE COURSES 

In order that a student may broaden his general or professional education beyond the 
regular prescribed program he may obtain permission to enroll in such additional courses 
as he may select. 

student's work 

AH work submitted by students is the property of the School and may be retained for 
purposes of record, exhibition, or instruction. 

GRADUATION WITH HONORS 

Students successfully completing the work of the School shall, according to the char- 
acter of their work as adjudged by the faculty, receive diplomas of graduation, of gradua- 
tion With Honors, or of graduation tTith High Honors. 



SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE AND ALLIED ARTS 303 

DEGREES AND CURRICULA 

DEPARTMENT OF ARCHITECTURE 

The Department of Architecture offers instruction in Architecture, Building Construc- 
tion, and Landscape Architecture. 

Architecture. — The work in Architecture is for students who desire to become architects 
or to enter some related field in which beauty is combined with utility. It is the aim of this 
course to prepare students to become draftsmen, designers, inspectors and superintendents 
of construction, specification writers, teachers, etc., or ultimately to become practicing 
architects or specialists in their chosen fields. 

The course in Architecture, while not of fixed duration, will nominally require three 
years beyond the General College, and leads to the degree of Bachelor of Architecture. 

Building Constructioju — The work in Building Construction is for students who are 
interested in the construction and erection of buildings rather than in their planning, and 
who wish to prepare themselves to design the structural parts of buildings, the business 
of contracting, the manufacture or sale of building materials, or for other branches of 
building construction. 

The course in Building Construction, while not of fixed duration, will nominally re- 
quire two years beyond the General College, and leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Building Construction. 

Landscape Architecture. — The course in Landscape Architecture is designed to fit students 
for work in the arrangement and preservation of land areas for use and beauty. The aim 
is not only to prepare a graduate for immediate usefulness as an assistant to an established 
practitioner, but also to lay a foundation for his ultimate independent practice of the 
profession. 

The course in Landscape Architecture, while not of fixed duration, will nominally require 
two years beyond the General College, and leads to the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Landscape Architecture. 

CURRICULUM IN ARCHITECTURE 

Admission. — To enter the School of Architecture and Allied Arts and to register for 
the curriculum leading to the degree in Architecture, students are required to present a 
certificate of graduation from the General College, and to have completed the following 
courses as electives in the General College: 

Ae. IIA, Fundamentals of Architecture 
CMs. 23-24, Basic Mathematics 

Requirements for the Degree. — To qualify for the degree of Bachelor of Architecture 
a student must complete the following courses to the satisfaction of the faculty and must 
successfully pass a comprehensive examination in Architecture. 

Nominal Semester in Which Course Occurs 



Ae. 


21A. 


—Architectural Design 


1st 


2nd 










Ap 


21B.- 
31A. 


— Architectural Design 




2nd 


3rd 


4th 


5th 




Ae. 


—Freehand Drawing and Water Color 


1st 




^p 


31B.- 
41A. 






2nd 


3rd 


4th 


5th 




Ae. 


— History of Arckitecture 


1st 




Ae. 


41B.- 


— History of Architecture _ 






3rd 


4th 






Ae. 


41(J.- 


— Decorative Arts _ _ 










5th 




Ae. 


51A. 


— Materials and Methods of Construction 


1st 


2nd 


3rd 


4th 






Ae. 


.^.IK 


—Mechanical E(iuipment of Buildings 








4th 


5th 




Ae. 


510.- 


—Professional Relations and Methods 










5th 




Ae. 


61A. 


— Structural Design of Buildings _ 


1st 


2nd 










Ae. 


filB.- 


—Structural Design of Buildings 






3rd 


4th 


5th 




A*^. 


71A.- 


—Thesis 












6th 



304 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION ~ UPPER DIVISION 

CURRICULUM IN BUILDING CONSTRUCTION 

Admission. — To enter the School of Architecture and Allied Arts and to register for 
the curriculum leading to the degree in Building Construction, students are required to 
present a certificate of graduation from the General College, and to have completed the 
following courses as electives in the General College: 

Ae. IIA, Fundamentals of Architecture 
CMS. 23-24. Basic Mathematies 

Requirements for the Degree. — To qualify for the degree of Bachelor of Science in 

Building Construction a student must complete the following courses to the satisfaction of 

the faculty and must successfully pass a comprehensive examination in Building Con- 
struction. 

Nominal Semester in Which Course Occurs 

Ae. 22A. — Architectural Design _ 1st 2nd 

Ae. 31A. — Freehand Drawing and Water Color 1st 2nd 

Ae. 41A. — History of Architecture _ 1st 2nd 

Ae. 51A. — Materials and Methods of Construction 1st 2nd 3rd 

Ae. 51B. — Mechanical Equipment of Buildings _ 3rd 

Ae. 51C.- — Professional Relations and Methods 4th 

Ae. 61A. — Structural Design of Buildings 1st 2nd 

Ae. 61B. — Structural Design of Buildings _ 3rd 4th 

CEs. 13. — Economic Foundations of Modern Life 3rd 

CBs. 141-142. — Elementary Accounting 3rd 4th 

CURRICULUM IN LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE 

Admission. — To enter the School of Architecture and Allied Arts and to register for 
the curriculum leading to the degree in Landscape Architecture, students are required to 
present a certificate of graduation from the General College, and to have completed the 
following courses as electives in the General College: 

Ae. IIA, Fundamentals of Architecture 
CMs. 23-24. Basic Mathematics 

Requirements for the Degree. — To qualify for the degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Landscape Architecture a student must complete the following courses to the satisfaction 
of the faculty and must successfully pass a comprehensive examination in Landscape 
Architecture. 

Nominal Semester in Which Course Occurs 

Ae. 23A. — Landscape Design _ 1st 2nd 

Ae. 23B. — Landscape Design 

Ae. 33A. — Freehand Drawing and Water Color 1st 

Ae. 33B. — Freehand Drawing and Water Color 

Ae. 41 B. — History of Architecture and Landscape Architecture 1st 

Ae. 53A. — Materials and Methods of Construction 

Sis. 301. —Soils 

Sis. 408. — Soil and Water Conservation 

Bty.303-304. — General Botany ._ „ 1st 

Ey. 405. — Insect Control „ 

Fy. 301. - — Dendrology 

He. 429. — Ornamental Horticulture 1st 

He. 430. — Advanced Ornamental Horticulture 

DEPARTMENT OF PAINTING 
The Department of Painting offers instruction in Painting and in Commercial Art. 

Painting. — The purpose of the work in Painting is to develop the student's technical 
ability in pictorial art. Beginning with the fundamentals of drawing, design, and color, 
the work expands into a higlily specialized study of pictorial art, including mural decora- 
tion, figure, landscape, and portrait painting. 

The course in Painting, while not of fixed duration, will nominally require three years 
beyond the General College, and leads to the degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts. 





3rd 


4th 


2nd 








3rd 


4th 


2nd 






2nd 


3rd 


4th 
4th 


2nd 


3rd 


-- 




3rd 


4th 



SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE AND ALLIED ARTS 305 

Commercial Art.— In all fields of commercial activity the product must possess, to a high 
degree, the quality of beauty; in bringing the products of industry to the attention of the 
public the best artistic talent is demanded. To prepare designers for this field of endeavor, 
the work in Commercial Art is offered. In addition to work in drawing, design, and color, 
a sound foundation is laid in the fundamentals of business practice. 

The course in Commercial Art, while not of fixed duration, will nominally require two 
years beyond the General College, and leads to the degree of Bachelor of Arts in Com- 
mercial Art. 

CURRICUHTM IN PAINTING 

Admission. — To enter the School of Architecture and Allied Arts and to register for 
the curriculum leading to the degree in Painting, students are required to present a 
certificate of graduation from the General College, and to have completed the following 
courses as electives in the General College: 

Pg. 11 A, Fundamentals of Pictorial Art 
An elective 

Requirements for the Degree. — To qualify for the degree of Bachelor of Fine Arts a 
student must complete the following courses to the satisfaction of the faculty and must 
successfully pass a comprehensive examination in Painting. 

Nominal Semester in Which Course Occurs 

Pg. 21A. — Pictorial Composition - 1st 2nd 3rd 

Pg. 21B. — Pictorial Composition 4th 5th 

Pg. 31A. — Freehand Drawing 1st 2nd 3rd 

Pg. 31B.— Freehand Drawing ._ 4th 5th 

Pg. 41A.— History of Painting 1st 2nd 

Ae. 41B.— History of Architecture .._ 3rd 4th 

Ae. 41C. — Decorative Arts _ - 5th 

Pg. 51A.— Oil Painting _ _ 1st 2nd 

Pg. 51B.— Oil Painting 3rd 4th 5th . — 

Pg. 61A.— Thesis - 6th 

CURRICULUM IN COMMERCIAL ART 

Admission. — To enter the School of Architecture and Allied Arts and to register for 
the curriculum leading to the degree in Commercial Art, students are required to present 
a certificate of graduation from the General College, and to have completed the following 
courses as electives in the General College: 

Pg. 11 A, Fundamentals of Pictorial Art 
An elective 

Requirements for the Degree. — To qualify for the degree of Bachelor of Arts in Com- 
mercial Art a student must complete the following courses to the satisfaction of the faculty 
and must successfully pass a comprehensive examination in Commercial Art. 

Nominal Semester in Which Course Occurs 

Pg. 22A. — Commercial Design ..„ _ 1st 2nd 

Pg. 22B. — Commercial Design _ 3rd 4th 

Pg. 32A. — Freehand Drawing __ _ _ 1st 2nd 

Pg. 32B. —Freehand Drawing _ — . .- 3rd 4th 

Pg. 52A. —Oil Painting _ 1st 2nd 

Pg. 52B. —Water Color 3rd 4th 

Bs. 433. — Advertising 3rd 

Es. 446. —The Consumption of Wealth _ ..... 4th 

CEs. 13. — Economic Foundations of Modern Life 1st — 

CBs. 141-142.— Elementary Accounting 1st 2nd 



306 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION —UPPER DIVISION 

COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 

FACULTY 

TowNES Randolph Leigh, Ph.D. (Chicago), D.Sc. (Stetson), Acting Vice-President and Dean 
William Harold Wilson. Ph.D. (Illinois), Assistant Dean 

BIBLE 

John Evander Johnson, B.D., M.A., Head Professor of Bible 

BIOLOGY and geology 

James Speed Rogers, Ph.D. (Michigan), Head Professor of Biology and Geology 

On exchange at the University of Toronto (1940-41) 
Theodore Huntington Hubbell, Ph.D. (Michigan), Professor of Biology and Geology, and 

Acting Head of Department (1940-41) 
Harley Bakwel Sherman, Ph.D. (Michigan), Professor of Biology and Geology 
William John Knox Harkness, M.A., Visiting Professor of Biology (1940-41) 
Charles Francis Byers, Ph.D. (Michigan), Assistant Professor of Biology and Geology 
Howard Keeper Wallace, Ph.D. (Florida), Instructor in Biology and Geology 

chemistry 

TowNES Randolph Leigh. Ph.D. (Chicago), D.Sc. (Stetson), Head Professor of Chemistry 

Alvin Percy Black, Ph.D. (Iowa), Professor of Agricultural Chemistry 

P'red Harvey Heath, Ph.D. (Yale), Professor of Chemistry 

Vestus Twiggs Jackson, Ph.D. (Chicago), Professor of Chemistry 

Cash Blair Pollard, Ph.D. (Purdue), Professor of Chemistry 

Burton J. H. Otte, M.S., Associate Professor and Curator of Chemistry and Drake Memorial 

Laboratory 
John Erskine Hawkins, Ph.D. (Pennsylvania), Associate Professor of Chemistry and 

Associate Director Naval Stores Research 

history and political science 

James Miller Leake, Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins), Head Professor of History and Political 

Science, Professor of Americanism and Southern History 
James David Glunt, Ph.D. (Michigan), Professor of History and Political Science 
Ancil Newton Payne, Ph.D. (Illinois), Assistant Professor of History and Political Science 
Manning Julian Dauer, Ph.D. (Illinois), Assistant Professor of History and Political 

Science 
William Stanmore Cawthon, M.A., Assistant Professor of History and Political Science 

journalism 

Elmer Jacob Emig, M.A., Head Professor of Journalism 

William Leonard Lowry, B.A., Assistant Professor of Journalism 

Frank Sumner Wright, B.S.J., Lecturer in Journalism 

Robert Erwin Hoag, B.A.J., Lecturer in Journalism (On Leave of Absence after Feb. 1, 

1941) 
Malcolm McGi.asson, B.A., Lecturer in Journalism (from Feb. 1, 1941) 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 307 



LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE 



Clifford Pierson Lyons, Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins), Chairman of Division of Language and 

Literature and Professor of English 
James Nesbit Anderson, Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins), Professor Emeritus of Ancient Languages 
Charles Lancley Crow, Ph.D. (Goettingen), Professor Emeritus of Modem Languages 
James Marion Farr, Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins), Professor of English (Special Status) 
Ernest George Atkin, Ph.D. (Harvard), Professor of French, and Member of Executive 

Committee. Division of Language and Literature 
Oliver Howard Hauptmann, Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Associate Professor of Spanish and Ger- 
man, and Member of Executive Committee, Division of Language and Literature 
Charles Archibald Robertson, M.A., Professor of English 
Norman E. Eliason, Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins), Professor of English 
Joseph Brunet, Ph.D. (Stanford), Associate Professor of French 
William Byron Hathaway, M.A., Associate Professor of Spanish and German 
Wilbert Alva Little, M.A., Associate Professor of Ancient Languages (Special Status) 
Lester Collins Farris, M.A., Associate Professor of English 

Herman Everette Spivey, Ph.D. (North Carolina), Associate Professor of English 
Thomas Bradley Stroup, Ph.D. (North Carolina), Associate Professor of English 
Washington Augustus Clark, Jr., M.A., Assistant Professor of English 
Frederick William Conner, M.A., Assistant Professor of English 
George Gillespie Fox, Ph.D. (Princeton), Assistant Professor of English 
William Edgar Moore. M.A., Assistant Professor of English 
Alton Chester Morris, M.A., Assistant Professor of English 
Charles Eugene Mounts, M.A., Assistant Professor of English 
Jon Richard Ashton, M.A., Instructor in Spanish 

Albert Alexander Murphree, B.A. (Oxon.), Instructor in English (On Leave of Absence) 
Kenneth Gordon Skaggs, M.A., Instructor in English 

Oscar Frederick Jones, Ph.D. (Stanford), Instructor in Spanish and German 
Malcolm MacLeod, Ph.D. (Virginia), Instructor in English 

mathematics 

Thomas Marshall Simpson, Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Head Professor of Mathematics 

William Harold Wilson, Ph.D. (Illinois), Professor of Mathematics 

Franklin Wesley Kokomoor, Ph.D. (Michigan), Professor of Mathematics 

Cecil Glenn Phipps, Ph.D. (Minnesota), Associate Professor of Mathematics 

Joseph Harrison Kusner, Ph.D. (Pennsylvania), Associate Professor of Mathematics 

Hallett Hunt Germond, Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Associate Professor of Mathematics 

Zareh Meguerditch Pirenian, M.S., Associate Professor of Mathematics 

Bernard Francis Dostal, M.A., Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

Sam W. McInnis, M.A., Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

Edward Schaumberg Quade, Ph.D. (Brown), Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

Uri Pearl Davis, M.A.. Instructor in Mathematics 

Robert Dickerson Specht, B.A., Instructor in Mathematics (On Leave of Absence) 

Theodore S. George, M.A., Instructor in Mathematics 

Ernest Clifford Phillips, M.A., Instructor in Mathematics 

philosophy 
Hasse Octavius Enwali., Ph.D. (Boston), Head Professor of Philosophy 



308 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION —UPPER DIVISION 



Robert Crozier Williamson, Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Head Professor of Physics 

Arthur Aaron Bless, Ph.D. (Cornell), Professor of Physics 

William Sanford Perry, M.S., Associate Professor of Physics 

Harold Loraine Knowles, Ph.D. (Kansas), Assistant Professor of Physics 

Daniel Cramer Swanson, Ph.D. (Cornell), Assistant Professor of Physics 

Ralph E. Carroll, Curator in Physics 

psychology 

Elmer Dumond Hinckley, Ph.D. (Chicago), Head Professor of Psychology and Director 

of the Bureau of Vocational Guidance and Mental Hygiene 
Osborne Williams, Ph.D. (Chicago), Assistant Professor of Psychology 
Albert Clarence Van Dusen, M.A., Instructor in Psychology 

sociology 

John Miller Maclachlan, Ph.D. (North Carolina), Associate Professor of Sociology and 

Acting Head of Department 
Lucius Moody Bristol, Ph.D. (Harvard), Professor of Sociology (Special Status) 
Winston Wallace Ehrmann, Ph.D. (Yale), Assistant Professor of Sociology 



Henry Philip Constans, M.A., LL.B., Head Professor of Speech 

Arthur Ariel Hopkins, M.A., Associate Professor of Speech 

Lester Leonard Hale, M.A., Instructor in Speech (On Leave of Absence) 

Paul Ernest Geisenhof, M.A., Instructor in Speech 

Roy Edwards Tew, B.A.E., Instructor in Speech 

DIVISION OF GEOGRAPHY AND GEOLOGY 

(an intercollege unit offering a program leading to degrees in the college of 

arts and sciences) 

administrative committee 

H. Harold Hume, M.S.A., D.Sc. (Clemson), Dean of the College of Agriculture 

Winston Woodard Little. M.A., Dean of the General College 

Walter Jeffries Matherly, M.A., LL.D. (William Jewell), Dean of the College of Busi- 
ness Administration 

Joseph Weil, B.S.E.E., M.S., Dean of the College of Engineering 

William Harold Wilson, Ph.D. ^Illinois), Assistant Dean of the College of Arts and 
Sciences 

STAFF 

RoLUN Salisbury Atwood, Ph.D. (Clark), Professor of Geography in College of Business 
Administration, Chairman of the Division and Head of the Geography Section 

Theodore Huntington Hubbell, Ph.D. (Michigan), Professor of Biology and Geology in 
College of Arts and Sciences, Head of the Geology Section 

Frederick Burean Smith, Ph.D. (Iowa State College), Professor of Soils in College of 
Agriculture 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



309 



SiGiSMOND DeR. Dikttkich, Ph.D. (Clark), D.Sc. (Budapest), Assistant Professor of Eco- 
nomic Geography in the College of Business Administration 

Richard Archer Edwards, Ph.D. (North Carolina), Assistant Professor of Physical Sciences 
in the General College 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

The subject-matter fields regularly offered to students in the College of Arts and Sci- 
ences are 



Astronomy 

Bacteriology 

Bible 

Biology - 

Botany 

Chemistry y 

Economics 

Education 

English 



French 

General Science 

Geography 

Geology 

German 

Greek 

History 

Journalism 

Latin 



Mathematics 
Music 
Philosophy 
Physics ' 
Political Science 
Psychology y 
Sociology 
Spanish 
Speech 



Curricula are offered which lead to the degrees of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Sci- 
ence, and Bachelor of Arts in Journalism. The College also offers courses in combination 
with Law, which lead to these same degrees. A curriculum leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Science in Chemistry has been formulated and will be offered if adequate 
facilities can be provided; students interested in such a curriculum should correspond in 
advance with the Dean of the College. The College offers programs of special interest in 
Geography and Geology (page 315). in Inter-American Affairs (page 311), and in Radio 
Broadcasting Training (page 344). 

CHAIR OF AMERICANISM 

Through the generosity of the American Legion, Department of Florida, which has 
provided a fund of $40,000 for this purpose, supplemented by legislative appropriation, 
there is maintained a Professorship in the University known as the "Chair of Americanism". 
The holder of this professorship is head of the Department of History and Political Science, 
offering courses in American History, Government, and Constitutional Law. 



GRADUATION WITH HONORS AND HIGH HONORS 

For graduation fFith Honors a student must earn an honor point average of 3.2 or 
greater in the work of the Upper Division. 

The regulations concerning graduation JVith High Honors are administered by a com- 
mittee of the faculty of the College. This committee invites students of sufficiently meri- 
torious scholastic record to take a high honors examination. Recommendation for gradua- 
tion fFith High Honors is based upon excellence in the higli honors examination, honor 
point average, distribution and quality of subject-matter studied, and evaluation of the 
student by his teachers. 

CORRESPONDENCE STUDY 

No part of the last thirty credits counted toward a degree may be earned by corre- 
spondence or extension study except by special permission. 



310 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION — UPPER DIVISION 

STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY 

Each Student must assume full responsibility for registering for the proper courses and 
for fulfilling all requirements for his degree. 

Seniors must file formal application for a degree in the Office of the Registrar and musi 
pay the diploma fee very early in the semester in which they expect to receive the degree; the 
official calendar shows the latest date on which this can be done. 

Each student is responsible for every course for which he registers. Courses can be 
dropped or changed without penalty only through the office of the Dean of the College. 

The student's program of studies is subject to the approval of the adviser, the curric- 
ulum committee, and the dean or his appointee. 

MAXIMUM LOAD 

No student will be permitted to carry more than 16 semester hours in any seniester 
unless his honor point average for the preceding semester is at least 2.5. 

No student will be permitted to carry more than 19 hours in any one semester except 
by special permission. 

DEGREES AND CURRICULA 

AD^USSION 

To enter the College of Arts and Sciences students are required to present 
a certificate of graduation from the General College and to be certified by the 
Board of University Examiners as qualified to pursue the work of the College. 
Transfer students who ivish to enter the College of Arts and Sciences are 
referred to the Board of University Examiners in accordance with the provisions 
of the section of this bulletin entitled ''Transfer Students", page 264. 

THE DEGREES OF BACHELOR OF ARTS AND BACHELOR OF SaENCE 

The curricula which lead to the degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science 
are alike in all basic requirements. 

The requirements for graduation from these curricula are as follows: 
A total of sixty-four semester hours, with an average of C or better; in this total must 
be included (1) either a Departmental Major or a Group Major as described below, and 
(2) at least twelve semester hours, selected with the approval of the Dean or his ap- 
pointee, in departments other than those which contribute to the major. 

THE DEPARTMENTAL MAJOR 

Many students desire or find it expedient to specialize in some one subject-matter field. 
Such students should undertake to earn a departmental major. 

A departmental major consists of three parts, as follows: 

(1) Concentration consisting of not less than 24 and not more than 32 semester hours 
in one subject-matter field. This field is called the student's major field. The 
head of the department in which the major field is administered, or his appointee, 
will act as the student's registration adviser. Each student expecting to earn a 
departmental major should consult his adviser regarding choice of courses before 
each registration. No courses in the major field in which the grade earned is below 
C will be counted toward fulfillment of this requirement. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS ASD SCIENCES 311 

(2) A reading knowledge of a foreign language or 6 semester hours in a foreign language 
course numbered above 100. 

(3) Such subsidiary courses from subject-matter fields other than the major field as are 
essential to thoroughness of concentration and comprehension. The student should 
also consult his adviser concerning these courses. 

THE GROUP MAJOR 

Many students do not need or desire the intensive concentration required in a depart- 
mental major. For such students group majors are provided. 
A group major consists of two parts, as follows: 

(1) A total of not less than fourteen semester courses selected from a group of three 
related subject-matter fields, with at least four semester courses in each, and an 
average of C or better in each of these fields. 

(2) A reading knowledge of a foreign language or 6 semester hours in a foreign lan- 
guage course numbered above 100. 

BACHF.LOR OF ARTS 

The degree of Bachelor of Arts will be conferred upon those who fulfill the requirements 
for degrees with majors in one or more of the fields of Bible, Economics, English, French, 
German, History, Journalism, Philosophy, Political Science, Sociology, Spanish and Speech. 

The degree of Bachelor of Arts will also be conferred upon those who fulfill the re- 
quirements for degrees with majors in one or more of the fields of Geography, Mathematics 
and Psychology when their remaining courses are selected predominantly from the other 
fields which lead to this degree. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 

The degree of Bachelor of Science will be conferred upon those who fulfill the re- 
quirements for degrees with majors in one or more of the fields of Bacteriology. Biology,>- 
Botany, Chemistry, Geology, and Physics. 

The degree of Bachelor of Science will also be conferred upon those who fulfill the 
requirements for degrees with majors in one or more of the fields of Geography, Mathematics 
and Psychology, provided their remaining courses are selected predominantly from the other 
fields which lead to this degree. 

CROUP MAJOR IN INTER-AMERICAN AFFAIRS 

This program of studies provides the student with a many-sidt-d liberal education for 
present-day citizenship and at the same time trains him for lines of endeavor that require 
specialized knowledge and understanding of the peoples and nations of the Western Hemi- 
sphere. Variations in the number and character of specialized courses included in the stu- 
dent's program make it possible to concentrate in many different aspects of Inter-American 
Affairs, including industrial and commercial, diplomatic and consular, journalistic, etc. Spe- 
cial opportunities are available for advanced study through the facilities of the Institute of 
Inter-American Affairs of the University of Florida. Students majoring in Inter-American 
Affairs are urged to spend at least one semester or two summer sessions in a University 
located in one of the countries of Latin America. 



312 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION —UPPER DIVISION 

Requirements 

(1) A group major from three of the follovring fields: Languages, Geography, History, 
Economics, Political Science, and Sociology. 

(2) Four semester courses approved by the group adviser and the Dean or his appointee, 
in fields other than those chosen under (1) above. 

(3) A student should have a speaking, reading, and writing knowledge of Spanish and 
English, and is urged to have some knowledge of Portuguese or French. Under 
ordinary conditions, as regards Spanish, this will involve the completion of Spanish 
313-314, or the equivalent. In any case at least a reading knowledge of a foreign 
language or 6 semester hours in a foreign language course numbered above 100. 

(4) The following courses, or their equivalent should be included in the student's 
program, either as part of the major or as electivee: 

Gpy. 201 Geography of the Americas _ 3 

Geography : Ste. 385 Economic Geography of South America 3 

Es. 381 Economic Geography of North America .„ _ 3 

CHy. 13 History of the Modern World _ 4 

History: Hy. 317 Latin American History 1850-1900 3 

Hy. 318 Latin American History 1900-1941 3 

Economics: CEs. 13 Economic Found, of Modern Life 5 

Bs. 443 Foreign Trade 3 

Political CPl. 13 Political Found, of Modern Life 4 

Science : Pel. 309 International Relations 3 

Pel. 310 International Relations _ 3 

Sociology: Sy. 364 Latin American Civilization 3 

In addition to foreign language courses, the student is advised to select his general col- 
lege electives from the above. 

THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS IN JOURNALISM 

Instruction in .Journalism is intended to provide training for those interested in: (1) 
journalism as a profession, and who seek the more important positions in the fields of 
printing, radio, and films; (2) newspaper production (weekly, small daily, and metropoli- 
tan), either in editorial or business phases; (3) news preparation and communication, such 
as syndicate, correspondence, interpretation, etc.; (4) magazine journalism; (5) manage- 
ment; (6) pictorial journalism; (7) radio journalism; (8) careers closely related to journal- 
ism in which journalistic training is an essential to success; (9) the training provided by 
the study of journalism as a means of understanding and controlling the evolving processes 
of civilization. 

Students interested in professional training for journalism may pursue the professional 
curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts in Journalism, while students inter- 
ested in the cultural training which the study of journalism affords may select journalism 
as a departmental or group major in the curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 
Requirements for graduation with the degree of Bachelor of Arts in Journalism are as 
follows : 

Sixty-six semester hours with an average of C or better; in this total 
must be included the journalism courses required for either the Editorial Se- 
quence, or the Business Sequence. The remainder of the sixty-six semester 
hours must be earned in approved electives, with not less than six nor 
more than eighteen credits in any one department, and with at least eigh- 
teen credits in courses outside the Department of Journalism. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 313 

The Editorial Sequence (news, feature, or magazine writing) : Jm. *213, *214, *215, 
*216, 301-302. 314, 407. 408. 409, and 412. 

The Business Sequence (management, advertising, circulation I : Jni. *213 *214, *215, 
*216, 301-302. 317. 318, 407. 408, 409, 411, and 412. 

The Head of the Department of Journalism will be the registration adviser for students 
in this curriculum. The student's program of studies will be subject to the approval of the 
head of the Department of Journalism and the Dean or his appointee. 



*Jm. 213. 214, 215 and 216 should be taken as electives in the General College, but may be 
taken with Jm. 301-302 with the consent of the Head of the Department. 

CURRICULUM LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN CHEMISTRY 

This curriculum zcill be offered if and only if adequate facilities can be provided; stu- 
dents interested in such a curriculum should correspond in advance with the Dean of the 
College. 

This curriculum offers an especially strong foundation in chemisti-y for students who 
desire to make chemistry their vocation. 

The following courses must be taken either in the General College or later: Cy. 101-102, 
Cy. 111-112, CMs. 23-24, Cy. 201-202, Cy. 211-212, Ms. 353-354. (See Bulletin of the Gen- 
eral College.) 

This program does not preclude the possibility of a free elective in the sophomore year. 

The student should discuss this matter with his adviser or with the Dean of the General 

College. 

Junior Year 

Courses First Semester Credits Courses Second Semester Credits 

Cy. 301 ^Organic Chemistry _ 4 Cy. 302 —Organic Chemistry 4 

Cy. 311 — Organic Chemistry 1 Cy. 312 —Organic Chemistry 1 

Ps. —Elementary Physics Ps. — Elementary Physics 

with Laboratory 5 with Laboratory 5 

CGn. 33 —German 3 CGn. 34 —German 3 

♦Approved Electives 5 or 6 *Approved Electives 5 or 6 



Cy. 


401 


Cv. 


411 


Cy. 


481 


Gn. 


201 


Eh. 


355 



**18orl9 **18orl9 

Senior Year 

— Physical Chemistry 4 Cy. 402 — Physical Chemistry 4 

— Advanced Chemistry 3 Cy. 412 — Advanced Chemistry 3 

— Chemical Literature 5 Cy. 482 — Chemical Literature 5 

— Second-year German 3 Gn. 202 — Second-year German 3 

— Business Writing 3 *Approved Electives 8 or 9 

'Approved Electives 5 or 6 



♦»18.5or 19.5 **18.5 or 19.5 

•No course in chemistry may be used as an elective in this curriculum. 
**Students must abide by the maximum load regulation, except that they may carry 19.5 hours 
in each term of the fourth year if they have qualified for a 19-hour load. 

THE CURRICULA IN COMBINATION WITH LAW 

The College of Arts and Sciences offers three curricula in combination with Law. In 
these curricula it is often possible for capable, industrious students to complete the require- 
ments for admission to the College of Law by one year of work in the College of Arts and 
Sciences after graduation from the General College or its equivalent. 

The requirements for the degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science in these 
curricula are basically the same, and may be described as follows: 

L Thirty-six semester hours and an average of C, or better, in the College of Arts 
and Sciences, 



314 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION —UPPER DIVISION 

II. twenty-eight semester hours and an average of C, or better, in the College of Law, 

and 
III. a departmental major or a group major leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts 
or Bachelor of Science. (See page 310.) 

The requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Arts in Journalism in the combined 
Journalism-Law curriculum are the same as the requirements for graduation in the cur- 
riculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts in Journalism (see page 312), provided, 
however, that credit must be earned as follows: 

I. Thirty-eight semester hours and an average of C, or better, in the College of Arts 

and Sciences, and 
II. twenty-eight semester hours and an average of C, or better, in the College of Law. 

THE PRE-MEDICAL CURRICULUM 

The College of Arts and Sciences cooperates with students who wish to secure training 
which will fit them to enter upon the study of medicine. All such students are advised to 
consult medical school bulletins carefully and widely. The program in the College of Arts 
and Sciences will be planned in accordance with the needs of the individual student. It 
is strongly urged, however, that pre-medical students follow and complete the curriculum 
leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science. 

Students who are interested in medicine are invited to the Office of the Dean of the 
College of Arts and Sciences for counsel and advice. 

DIVISION OF GEOGRAPHY AND GEOLOGY 

The Division of Geography and Geology is organized to provide for instruction and re- 
search in geography and geology, to meet the needs of students who wish to obtain some 
knowledge of these subjects as a part of their general education; to provide part of the 
training for students preparing for business careers and for the United States Foreign 
Service; to prepare students for positions as teachers of geography and geology; to train 
students for research work: as investigators in governmental service, as experts for com- 
mercial, agricultural and industrial firms and as specialists in resources and land planning. 

Advanced work in geography and geology is becoming increasingly significant and essen- 
tial in the rapid growth of the State of Florida, especially with regard to the discovery and 
utilization of natural resources, in agricultural development and in land planning and land 
use programs. In geography the University of Florida is peculiarly suited to the study of 
sub-tropical geography, the Caribbean region, climatic studies including air drainage and 
frost formation, agricultural geography, mapping and cartography, and year around geo- 
graphic field work. In geology special opportunities exist for the study of recent sedi- 
mentary rocks, shorelines and marine terraces, ground water problems and sub-surface 
erosion, paleontology and petroleum geology, and special resources such as phosphate, lime 
rock, glass sands, fullers earth, kaolin, etc. 

DECREES AND CURRICULA 

Students desiring to concentrate in Geography or Geology will register in the College 
of Arts and Sciences. The curricula lead to the degrees of Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor 
of Science. (See page 311.) Group Majors are available for students desiring to com- 
bine training in Geography or Geology and two or more related fields; i. e., training for 
Latin American Affairs, Land Use and Land Planning, Climatology, Cartography, etc. 



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES 



315 



Geography Sequence 

Students should begin the study of a modern foreign language and complete Gy. 303, 
Es. 304, CEs. 13 in the General College for C-7, G8, and C-9. 

Junior Year 

Courses First Semester Credits Courses Second Semester Credits 

Gy. 401 — Physiography of North Gpy. 312 —Plant and Animal 

America _ _ 3 Geography 3 

Sis. 301 —Soils 3 Es. 382 —Utilization of Our Resources 3 

Gpy. 323 — Elementary Climatography .. 3 Gpy. 330 — Maps, Charts and Graphs... 3 

♦Electives 7 *Electives _ _ 7 

16 16 

Senior Year 

Gy. 307 —Rocks of the Atlantic and Gpy. 430 — Field Mapping and 

Gulf Coastal Plain 3 Advanced Cartography 3 

Es. 381 — Economic Geography of fOptional course in Geography 3 

North America _ 3 *Electives 10 

♦Electives _ _ 10 

16 16 

*A11 electives must be approved by the student's advisory committee. Students are advised to 
take one full year above the elementary course in English. Students w^ishing to concentrate in the 
physical aspects of geography, agricultural geography and land utilization, or the cultural and 
human aspects will be required to take courses in the various fields concerned. 

fThe major in Geography requires the completion of six semester hours in Geographical courses 
numbered above 380. in addition to those specified above. 

Geology Sequence 

Students should begin the study of a modern foreign language and complete either Cy. 
101-102 or CMs. 23-24 or both in the General College. In addition they should take Gy. 
303 and Es. 304 in their sophomore year. 



Gy. 



Gy. 

Sis. 



307 



321 
301 



Junior Year 

—Rocks of the Atlantic Gy. 308 

and Gulf Coastal Plain 3 

— Elementary Paleontology .... 3 Gpy. 312 

—Soils 3 

♦Electives 7 Gpy. 330 



-Elementary Mineralogy 

and Petrology 3 

-Plant and Animal 

Geography _ 3 

-Maps, Charts and Graphs 3 

•Electives 7 

16 



Gy. 401 — Physiography of North 

America 3 

Gpy. 323 — Elementary Climatography .. 3 

tOptional course in Geology.. 3 

*Electives 7 



Senior Year 
Gpy. 



430 — Field Mapping and 

Advanced Cartography 3 

tOptional course in Geology.. 3 
♦Electives 10 



16 



16 



♦Electives must be approved by the student's advisory committee. Students are advised to take 
one full year above the elementary course in English. 

fThe major in Geology requires the completion of six semester hours in Geological courses 
numbered above 400, in addition to those specified above. 



316 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION — UPPER DIVISION 

SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 



TowNES Randolph Leigh, Ph.D. (Chicago). D.Sc. (Stetson), Acting Vice-President; Dean, 

College of Arts and Sciences 
William Harold Wilson, Ph.D. (Illinois), Assistant Dean, College of Arts and Sciences 
Perry Albert Foote, Ph.D. (Wisconsin), Director and Professor of Pharmaceutical 

Chemistry 
William J. Husa, Ph.C, Ph.D. (Iowa), Head Professor of Pharmacy 
Leroy D. Edwards, Ph.D. (Western Reserve i , Head Professor of Pharmacognosy and 

Pharmacology 
Carl H. Johnson, Ph.D. (Washington), Instructor in Pharmacognosy and Pharmacology 



GENERAL STATEMENT 

All work offered in the School of Pharmacy meets the highest requirements of pharma- 
ceutical instruction in this country. The school is accredited by the American Council 
on Pharmaceutical Education and therefore receives recognition for its courses from all 
state boards requiring attendance in an accredited school of pharmacy as a prerequisite 
for examination and registration. 

All students are enrolled by the Florida State Pharmaceutical Association as associate 
members, as per resolution adopted by the Executive Committee in January, 1935. Upon 
graduation and registration as a pharmacist, full membership in the Association is granted 
free for one year. "Students' Hour" is a feature of the annual convention of the State 
Pharmaceutical Association. 

The curriculum is designed to provide a broad scientific education, to train retail phar- 
macists, and to provide an opportunity for specialization either in Commercial Pharmacy, in 
Pharmaceutical Chemistry, or in Pharmacognosy and Pharmacology. Specialization in 
Commercial Pharmacy should qualify a student for a position as manager in a drug store, 
prescription clerk, or as a salesman of drugs and chemicals. The work in Pharmaceutical 
Chemistry is designed to train men for positions in food and drug laboratories, or as 
manufacturing pharmacists. The completion of the work in pharmacognosy or pharma- 
cology should qualify one to act in the capacity of pharmacognocist or inspector of crude 
drugs with a manufacturing concern, or with the Federal Customs Service, or as pharma- 
cologist for manufacturing houses or for hospitals. The foregoing are only a few of the 
many positions open to men who possess training along any of the above lines. The 
demand for graduates of this school exceeds the supply. This curriculum also provides 
opportunity, through selection of approved electives or options, for the completion of 
minimum requirements for entrance into certain medical colleges. However, major em- 
phasis is placed on the training of retail pharmacists. 

A ten-acre tract has been allotted to the School of Pharmacy for use as a medicinal 
plant garden, which is used as a teaching adjunct and as a source of supply of fresh 
material for study, investigation, and classroom illustration. 

The General Edmund Kirby-Smith Memorial Herbarium, consisting of 5,600 specimens, 
with those collected locally, provides a collection of approximately 6,000 plant specimens. 
Some of these were collected as early as 1846. Specimens from nearly every state and many 
foreign countries make up this collection. This herbarium provides actual specimens for 
study of plant classification and for comparison and identification of new species. 



SCHOOL OF PHARMACY 317 

The Chemistry-Pharmacy branch of the main library is housed in the Chemistry-Pharmacy 
building. The library includes text and reference books and several of the American and 
foreign periodicals on chemical and pharmaceutical subjects. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

(a) Graduation from the General College or its equivalent as determined by the Board 
of University Examiners, and (b) recommendation of the Board of University Examiners. 

NOTE: Students planning to study pharmacy are advised to offer General Chemistry 
for C-7; Pharmacy 223-224 for C-8; and Pharmacognosy 221-222 for C-9. Students of 
the Superior Group are advised to offer General Chemistry for C-2; Basic Mathematics 
for C-4; and General Physics for C-7. 

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION 

Students entering from the General College, or having equivalent training as determined 
by the Board of University Examiners, must meet the requirements of the curriculum as 
outlined below. 

GRADUATION WITH HONORS 

To graduate With Honors, a student must earn an honor point average of at least 3.0 
in the work of both the General College and the Upper Division or an honor point average 
of at least 3.2 in the work of the Upper Division. 

To graduate With High Honors, a student must meet the requirements for graduation 
JFith Honors and be recommended for graduation With High Honors by the faculty. 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN PHARMACY 

The Degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy is awarded on completion of the 
curriculum as outlined below. Opportunity for specialization in Pharmacy, Pharmaceutical 
Chemistry, Pharmacognosy, or Pharmacology is provided through choice of electives in 
the senior year. Suggested electives are listed after curriculum. 

MASTER OF SaENCE IN PHARMACY 

Courses are offered leading to the degree of Master of Science in Pharmacy. Candidates 
for that degree must possess the degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy from an insti- 
tution of recognized standing. 

The student must spend at least one entire academic year in residence at the University 
as a graduate student, devoting his full time to the pursuit of his studies. 

For further requirements for the Master's Degree, see the Bulletin of the Graduate School. 

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY 

Courses are offered leading to the degree of Doctor of Philosophy with specialization in 
Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Pharmacy, Pharmacognosy, and Pharmacology. For further 
information consult the Bulletin of the Graduate School. 



318 



BULLETIN OF INFORMATION —UPPER DIVISION 



CURRICULUM 

The curriculum outlined below is effective September, 1941. To be eligible for the 
degree of Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy all requirements of the curricula for phar- 
macy students in both the General College and the School of Pharmacy must be completed. 
For example, if Pharmacy 223-224 or Pharmacognosy 221-222 £ire not completed in the 
General College, these courses must be completed after admission to the School of Phar- 
macy. However, in such cases these courses may be taken in lieu of an equal number 
of hours of options. 

NOTE: An average of C, or higher, is required in the work required for a degree. 

CURRICULUM 



Junior Year 

Courses First Semester Credits Courses 

Bly. 261 — Applied Physiology 2 Bly. 

Cy. 262 —Organic Chemistry _. 5 Ply. 

Ply. 351 —Pharmacology _„ 3 

Phy. 211 — Inorganic Pharmacy 5 Phy. 

Cy. 203 —Analytical Chemistry „.... 3 

Phy. 

Cy. 

18 



Second Semester 



Credita 



262 —Applied Physiology 2 

362 —Pharmacological Standard- 
ization 4 

353 — Organic and Analytical 

Pharmacy 5 

372 • — Commercial Pharmacy 4 

204 — Analytical Chemistry 3 



18 



Senior Year 

Ply. 451 —Principles of Biologicals ._... 3 Ply. 456 

Ply. 455 — New Remedies 3 Phy. 362 

Phy. 354 — Organic and Analytical Phy. 402 

Pharmacy 5 Phy. 432 

Phy. 361 — Prescriptions and Dispensing 4 
Phy. 381 — Pharmaceutical 

Jurisprudence _ 2 



Suggested electives: 



17 



-New Remedies 3 

-Prescriptions and Dispensing 4 

-Pharmaceutical Arithmetic .. 2 

-Advanced Drug Analysis 3 

Approved Electives 6 



18 



Ply. 517— Clinical Methods 

Ply. 452 — Principles of Biologicals .. 

CBs. 141-142 — Elementary Accounting 

Pgy. 242— Drug Plant Histology 

Pgy. 342 — Microscopy of Drugs 



COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 319 

THE COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



Walter Jeffries Matherly, M.A., LL.D. (William Jewell), Dean and Head Professor of 
Economics 

MoNTCOMERY Drummond Anperson, Ph.D. (Robert Brookings), Professor of Business 
Statistics and Economics 

RoLLiN Salisbury Atwood, Ph.D. (Qark), Professor of Economic Geography, Director of 
Institute of Inter-American Affairs 

David Miers Beights, Ph.D. (Illinois), C.P.A. (Florid i. West Virginia), Professor of 
Accounting 

Truman C. Bicham, Ph.D. (Stanford), Professor of Economics 

John Grady Eldridge, M.A., Professor of Economics 

Roland B. Eutsler, Ph.D. (Pennsylvania), Professor of Economics and Insurance and 
Director of the Bureau of Economic and Business Research 

Harwood Burrovts Dolbeare, B.A., Associate Professor of Finance 

Huber Christian Hurst, M.A., LL.B., Associate Professor of Business Law and Economics 

George Fechtig Baughman, B.S.B.A., LL.B., Acting Assistant Professor of Economics 
and Realty Management 

James Edward Chace, Jr., M.B.A., Assistant Professor of Economics and Realty Manage- 
ment (on leave) 

Sicismond deR. Diettrich, Ph.D. (Clark), D.Sc. (Budapest), Assistant Professor of Eco- 
nomic Geography 

Clement Harold Donovan, Ph.D. (North Carolina), Assistant Professor of Public Finance 

Oscar Edward Heskin, Ph.D. (Minnesota), Assistant Professor of Economics and Marketing 

John Berry McFerrin, Ph.D. (North Carolina), Assistant Professor of Economics 

Frank Waldo Tuttle, Ph.D. (lowra). Assistant Professor of Economics 

Robert Lee Collins, M.A., C.P.A. (Florida), Instructor in Accounting 

John Wesley Fly, B.S.B.A., C.P.A. (Florida), Instructor in Accounting 

Earl P. Powers, M.A., Instructor in Accounting 

John Wamser Dietz, M.A., Instructor in Finance, part time 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

The College of Business Administration offers instruction in two different fields: Busi- 
ness Administration and Public Administration. 

Instruction in Business Administration is designed to provide analysis of the basic prin- 
ciples of business. Its purpose is to prepare students (1) to become business executives; 
(2) to assume the increasing responsibilities of business ownership; and (3) to act in the 
capacity of business specialists. 

Business education involves consideration of the following occupational levels: (1) upper 
levels composed of proprietors and executives; (2) intermediate levels composed of depart- 
ment heads and minor executives; and (3) lower levels composed of clerical and routine 
workers. The scope of business education includes preparation for all of these levels. Wliile 
the College of Business Administration has organized its curricula in business administration 
to prepare students primarily to occupy the upper and intermediate levels, it has not entirely 
ignored the lower levels. 

The College of Business Administration does not profess to turn out finished business 
managers, executives, department heads, or minor executives. Its curricula provide instruc- 



320 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION —UPPER DIVISION 

tion that will help to shorten the period of apprenticeship for those who expect to enter 
business occupations. 

Instruction in Public Administration is designed to provide analysis of the basic prin- 
ciples of government. Its purpose is to prepare students for public service occupations. 
Government has become increasingly complex and requires personnel thoroughly trained 
in political science, economics, history, and other related sciences. The program of train- 
ing ofiFered supplies fundamental courses in these various fields. It does not equip students 
with specific skills; it is designed to provide them with broad training in the structure 
and functions of government and to prepare them for readier entry into public life and 
occupations. 

It is hoped that arrangements in the near future may be made to provide students with 
actual experience and initiation into government service through a limited number of intern- 
ships in state and local government. 

RADIO TRAINING 

Students in the College of Business Administration who are interested in the special 
program for Radio Broadcasting Training should see page 344. 

SPECIAL INFORMATION 

LECTURES BY BUSINESS EXECUTIVES AND GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS 

It is the policy of the College to invite from time to time prominent business executives 
and public officials both from within and from without the state to address the students 
in business administration and in public administration. 

BUREAU OF ECONOMIC AND BUSINESS RESEARCH 

The College of Business Administration maintains a Bureau of Economic and Business 
Research which provides faculty members and graduate students with an opportunity to 
engage in specific types of research work. Its activities are coordinated with the research 
activities of the College as a whole. 

MEMBERSHIP IN NATIONAL AND REGIONAL ASSOCIATIONS 

The College of Business Administration is a member of the American Association ol 
Collegiate Schools of Business and of the Southern Economic Association. 

PLACEMENT OF GRADUATES 

While the College of Business Administration does not obligate itself to secure positions 
for its graduates, it operates a placement service and does everything it can to assist 
students in securing employment after graduation. 

BUSINESS WRITING 

Students in the College of Business Administration are permitted to include Eh. 355. — • 
Business Writing among their electives in Business Administration. Those students found 
deficient in English will be reported to the office of the Dean and the Dean may require 
them to take Business Writing during the next semester. 



COLLEGE OF BUSINESS AD Ml MST RAT ION 321 

MAXIMUM CREDIT LOADS OF STUDENTS 

The maximum credit load of all students registered for the curriculum in Public 
Administration as well as for the curriculum in Business Administration proper during 
each of their first two semesters (first year) shall be 15 academic semester hours (6 in 
summer session) to which advanced military science may be added. However, these stu- 
dents may increase their credit loads to 18 academic semester hours during their first 
semester, to which advanced military science may be added, provided they have grad- 
uated from the General College with honors; likewise, they may increase their credit 
loads to 18 academic semester hours (9 in summer session) during their second semester, 
to which military science may be added, provided they have attained an honor point 
average of 3 (B) or more in the preceding semester. The maximum credit load of all 
students after their first two semesters is limited to 18 academic semester hours to 
which military science may be added. The minimum requirement for graduation from 
the College of Business Administration is 66 semester hours on which the student must 
earn 132 honor points. To graduate With Honors, a student must have graduated from 
the General College with honors and completed 66 semester hours on which he has earned 
198 honor points, or in lieu of graduation from the General College with honors, have 
completed 66 semester hours on which he has earned 231 honor points. To graduate With 
High Honors, a student must meet the following requirements: 

1. Attain a scholastic average in all academic courses of 3.4 or better. 

2. Secure the recommendation of a Faculty Committee. 

A copy of detailed regulations governing graduation with high honors may be obtained 
irom the Office of the Dean. 

Of the 66 semester credit hours required for graduation, not more than six semester 
CI edit hours may be earned by correspondence or extension study. Such credit hours, 
furthermore, must be approved for each individual student in advance by the Committee 
on Curricular Adjustments. 

DEGREES AND CURRICULA 

The College of Business Administration offers two degrees: The Bachelor of Science in 
Business Administration and the Bachelor of Science in Public Administration. To secure 
the first degree students must complete either the Curriculum in Business Administration 
Proper or the Curriculum in Combination with Law. To secure the second degree they 
must complete the Curriculum in Public Administration. 

ADMISSION TO CURRICULUM IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION PROPER AND TO CURRICULUM IN 

COMBINATION WITH LAW 

To enter the College of Business Administration and to register for the Curriculum in 
Business Administration Proper, or the Curriculum in Combination with Law, students are 
required to present a certificate of graduation from the General College and to have com- 
pleted the following courses: 

CEs. 13. — Economic Foundations of Modern Life 
CBs. 141-142. — Elemenlar>' Accounting. 
CEs. 15. — Elementary Statistics 

These courses may be taken for C-7, C-8, and C-9 electives in the General College during 
the second vear. 



322 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION — UPPER DIVISION 

CURRICULUM IN BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION PROPER 

Junior Year 

Courses First Semester Credits Courses Second Semester Credits 

Es. 321 — Financial Organization of Es. 322 ■ — Financial Organization of 

Society 3 Society 3 

Es. 327 — Public Finance 3 Es. 335 — Economics of Marketing 3 

Bs. 401 — Business Law 3 Es. 351 -^Elements of Transportation 3 

*Electives 6 Bs. 402 — Business Law 3 

♦Electives _ 3 

15 15 

Senior Year 

Es. 407 — Economic Principles and Es. 408 — Economic Principles and 

Problems 3 Problems 3 

*Electives 15 *Electives . 15 

18 18 



*Nine semester hours may be approved free electives of which six may be taken in advanced 
military science. The remaining hours are limited to courses in economics and business administra- 
tion and Eh. 355. — Business Writins. 

CURRICULUM IN COMBINATION WITH LAW 

The College of Business Administration combines with the General College and the 
College of Law in offering a six-year program of study to students who desire ultimately 
to enter the College of Law. Students register during the first two years in the General 
College and the third year in the College of Business Administration. When they have 
fully satisfied the academic requirements of the College of Business Administration, they 
are eligible to register in the College of Law and may during their last three years com- 
plete the course in the College of Law. When students have, after entering the College 
of Law, completed one year's work in law (28 semester hours and 56 honor points), 
they may offer this year's work as a substitute for the fourth year in the College of Busi- 
ness Administration and receive the degree of Bachelor of Science in Business Adminis- 
tration. 

The maximum credit load for all students registered for the curriculum in combination 
with law is 18 academic semester hours, to which may be added advanced military science. 
To graduate With Honors, a student must have graduated from the General College with 
honors and completed 70 semester hours on which he has earned 210 honor points, or 
ill lieu of graduation from the General College with honors, complete 70 semester hours 
on which he has earned 245 honor points. 

The curriculum in business administration in combination with law consists of 27 
semester hours of required courses and 15 hours of elective courses. The requirements 
are as follows: 

Courses Credits 

Es. 321-322 ■ — Financial Organization of Society 6 

Es. 327 —Public Finance 3 

Es. 335 — Economics of Marketing 3 

Es. 351 — Elements of Transportation 3 

Es. 404 — Government Control of Business 3 

Es. 407-408 — Economic Principles and Problems 6 

Es. 454 — Principles of Public Utility Economics 3 

♦Electives 15 

42 

*Electives are limited to courses in business administration and six semester hours in advanced 
military science. 



COLLEGE OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 



323 



ADMISSION TO THE CURRICULUM IN PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

To enter the College of Business Administration and to register for the Curriculum in 
Public Administration students are required to present a certificate of graduation from the 
General College and to have completed the following courses: 

CPI. 13.— Political Foundations of Modern Life 
CEs. 13. — Economic Foundations of Modern Life 
CBs. 141-142. — Elementary Accounting. 

These courses may be taken for C-7, C-8, and C-9, electives in the General College during 
the second year. 

THE CURRICULUM IN PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 



Courses 



CEs. 
Pel. 



Junior Year 

First Semester Credits Courses 

15 —Elementary Statistics 4 Pel. 314 

313 — American Government 

and Politics - 3 Es. 327 

Es. 407 — Economic Principles Es. 408 

and Problems 3 

Hy. 331 — Survey of American History 3 Hy. 332 

♦Electives .._ ~ 2 

15 



Second Semester Credits 

— American Government 

and Politics ..._ 3 

— Public Finance 3 

— Economic Principles 

and Problems _ 3 

— Survey of American History 3 

*Electives 3 

15 



Senior Year 



Pel. 411 — Public Administration 3 

Es. 454 — Principles of Public Utility 

Economics 3 

♦Electives _ 12 



18 



Pel. 

Es. 



412 — Public Administration 3 

404 ■ — Government Control of 

Business _ 3 

♦Electives _ _ 12 



18 



♦Six semester hours of electives may be taken in advanced military science or in approved 
free electives. The remaining- hours, subject to the approval of the Dean, are limited primarily 
to courses in the follovring Departments : Economics and Business Administration ; History and 
Political Science ; and Sociology. 



324 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION —UPPER DIVISION 

COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 



James William Norman, Ph.D. (Columbia), Dean and Head Professor of Education 
Alfred Crago, Ph.D. (Iowa), Professor of Educational Psychology and Measurements 
Joseph Richard Fulk, Ph.D. (Nebraska), Professor of Public School Administration 

(Special Status) 
Edward Walter Garris, Ph.D. (Peabody), Sc.D. (Clemson), Professor of Agricultural 

Education 
Winston Woodard Little, M.A., Professor of Secondary Education and High School Visitor 
Arthur Raymond Mead, Ph.D. (Columbia), Professor of Supervised Teaching and Director 

of Educational Research 
Ellis Benton Salt, Ed.D. (New York University), Professor of Health and Physical 

Education 
Glenn Ballard Simmons, Ph.D. (Johns Hopkins), Assistant Dean in charge of Laboratory 

School, and Professor of Education 
Jacob Hooper Wise, Ph.D. (Peabody), Professor of Education 
Harry Evins Wood, M.A.E., Professor of Agricultural Education and Itinerant Teacher 

Trainer 
Jack Bohannon, M.A., Assistant Professor of Industrial Arts Education 
James Douglas Haygood, Docteur de I'Universite de Paris, Assistant Professor of Education 
WiLUAM Travis Loften, M.A.E., Associate Professor of Agricultural Education and Itin- 
erant Teacher Trainer 
Adam Webster Tenney, M.A., Professor of Agricultural Education 

teachers in the p. k. yonge laboratory school 

Marion Stearns Barclay, A.B., M.A. 

Margaret White Boutelle, M.A. 

Cleva Josephine Carson. M.S. 

John Brovpard Culpepper. M.A.E. 

Carroll Fleming Cumbee. M.A.E. 

Sarah Grace Dickinson, A.B., B.S. in L.S. 

Elsie Douthett, M. A. 

Charlotte Dunn, M.A. 

Charles Livingston Durrance, Jr.. M.A.E. 

William Lev?is Goette, M.A.E. 

Eleanor Kuhlman Green, B.A.E. 

Lillian Page Hough. M.A. 

Mark Bartley Jordan, M.S. 

Kenneth Paul Kidd, M.A. 

Eugene Kitching, M.A.E. 

Gladys O'Neal Laird. M.A.E. 

Rudolph L. Lokensgard, Ed.D. (Columbia) 

Ida Ruth McLendon, M.A.E. 

Lillian Irma Maguire, M.A. 

James Aquila Martin, B.F.A. 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 325 

Ingorie Vause Mikell, B.M. (part time) 

John H. Moorman, M.A. 

Hazen Edward Nutter, M.A., Director, Florida Curriculum Laboratory 

Clara McDonald Olson, M. A.E. 

Ruth Beatrice Peeler, M.A. 

Eunice Jean Pieper, M.A.E. 

Earl Ramer, M.A. (On Leave) 

Billie Knapp Stevens, M.A. 

Grace Adams Stevens, M.A. 

Marie Wesley Swinford, R N., B.S., School Nurse (On Leave) 

Elizabeth Swords, in charge of Cafeteria 

Glover Emerson Tully, M.A.E. 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

The College of Education has as its main purpose the development and the improvement 
of teaching in all its branches. Through its courses in Education it offers opportunities 
for study and professional improvement ; through its Bureau of Educational Research it 
offers opportunity for research and the investigation of school problems; and through its 
laboratory school it offers opportunities for observation and participation in classroom 
instruction. There are constantly many valuable contacts with public school officials, 
teachers, and administrators which afford ample facilities for professional improvement. 

graduate certificates 

Graduates of the College of Education are granted graduate certificates without further 
examination provided that during their college careers they have complied with the regula- 
tions of the State Board of Education covering the certification of teachers. These reg- 
ulations are fully described in a bulletin on the certification of teachers published by the 
State Department of Education in Tallahassee and it is imperative that students who 
expect to be certificated familiarize themselves with these regulations. In general, they 
require that an applicant for certification shall have taken three-twentieths of his work, 
or eighteen semester hours, in Education; that he shall have specialized in the subjects 
to be entered on the face of the certificate; and that he shall have met certain other 
requirements more fully described in the bulletin on the certification of teachers. 

Applications for the certificate should be made immediately after graduation and should 
be addressed to Colin English, State Superintendent of Public Instruction, Tallahassee, 
Florida. 

extension of certificate 

Students enrolled in the College of Education, upon recommendation of the faculty, 
may receive an extension of one year on any or all valid Florida certificates subject to 
extension. 

correspondence courses 

Not more than one-fourth of the semester hours which are applied toward a degree, 
nor more than 12 of the last 36 semester hours which are earned toward a Bachelor's 
degree, may be taken by correspondence study or extension class. While in residence, 
the student will not be allowed to carry on correspondence work without the consent of 
the Dean; this permission will be granted only in exceptional cases. Not more than 9 
semester hours may be earned by correspondence study during the summer vacation period. 



326 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION —UPPER DIVISION 

REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION 

Students entering the College of Education from the General College will be required 
to (1) present a certificate of graduation from that college, (2) be recommended for 
admission to the Upper Division, and (3) have the approval of the Committee on Admis- 
sions of the College of Education. 

Students entering from other institutions must have the equivalent of graduation from 
the General College and have the approval of the Committee on Admissions of the College 
of Education. 

ADDITIONAL REQUIREMENTS FOR CERTAIN GROUPS 

Certain additional requirements for admission are specified for admission to the curricula 
in Health and Physical Education, Agricultural Education, and Industrial Arts Education. 
For these requirements, see the Bulletin of Information for the General College. 

GRADUATION WITH HONORS 

Students successfully completing the work of the Upper Division will, according to the 
character of their work, receive diplomas of graduation, With Honors, or of graduation With 
High Honors. For detaOed regulations concerning graduation with honors, the student 
should consult the Dean of the College. 

DEGREES AND CURRICULA 



Only two degrees are offered in the College of Education: Bachelor of Arts in Education 
and Bachelor of Science in Education. 

For either degree the student is required to complete 60 semester hours with an average 
of C or higher, at least 18 resident hours of which must be in Education and the remaining 
hours of which will be elected by the student in conference with his advisory committee. 
In every case, the student must complete at least 24 hours in a subject or field of con- 
centration to be eligible for graduation. 

All students except those whose fields of concentration are Health and Physical Education, 
Agricultural Education, or Industrial Arts Education, will be graduated upon completion 
of the following curriculum: 

CURRICULUM LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF ARTS OR BACHELOR OF SCIENCE* 

IN EDUCATION 

(For those who expect to teach in the junior and senior high school) 

Courses Credits 

**CEn. 13 — Introduction to Education 3 

En. 305 — Development and Organization of Education 3 

En. 371 — Observation, Participation and Class Room Practices—. 3 

En. 385 — Pre-Adolescent Child 3 

En. 386 —Adolescent Child 3 

En. 387 —Health Education 3 

En. 401 — School Administration 3 

En. 421 —Student Teaching 3 

Certification requirements in 2 fields. 

Electives to make a total of 60 credits in Upper Division. 

♦For the degree of Bachelor of Science in Education the field of concentration must be in one 
of the natural sciences. 

**Students must have completed this course while registered in the General College or else 
must include it as a part of the work of the Upper Division. 



COLLEGE OF EDUCATION 



327 



FOR THOSE WHOSE FIELD OF CONCENTRATION IS AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 



Courses 

Ag. 
Sis. 
En. 
He. 
Dv. 



First Semester 



Junior Year 

Credits Courses 



303 —Farm Shop 3 

301 —Soils _ 3 

306 — Vocational Education _ 3 

315 — Citrus Culture .._ 3 

311 — Principles of Dairying 4 

— Physical Education 2 



18 



As. 
Al. 



Al. 

En. 



306 
211 



314 

303 



He. 312 



Second Semester Credita 

— Farm Management 3 

— Principles of Animal 

Husbandry 3 

— Livestock Judging 3 

— Methods in Vocational 

Agriculture 3 

— Vegetable Gardening _ 3 

— Electives in Agriculture 1 

16 



Ay. 

En. 


321 
409 


En. 


411 


He. 
Py. 
Vy. 


429 
415 
401 



Senior Year 

• — Field Crops 3 As. 

— Supervised Teaching in Sis. 

Vocational Agriculture 3 En. 

— Special Methods in 

Vocational Agriculture 2 En. 

— Ornamental Horticulture 3 

- — Poultry Management 3 Ey. 

— Livestock Diseases and 

Farm Sanitation 2 En. 



16 



308 —Marketing 3 

302 —Soil Fertility _ _ 3 

410 — Supervised Teaching in 

Vocational Agriculture 3 

412 — Special Methods in 

Vocational Agriculture .._ 2 
314 — Principles of Economic 

Entomology 4 

387 —Health Education 3 

18 



FOR THOSE WHOSE FIELD OF CONCENTRATION IS HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

It is suggested that, if possible, the electives in the General College be selected from 
the following courses. Those not completed as General College electives must be completed 
in the Upper Division. 



CEn. 13 — Introduction to Education 
En. 305 — Development and Organiza- 
tion of Education 
HPl. 261.— Football 



HPl. 263— BasketbaU 

HPl. 264— Track and Field 

HPl. 266— Baseball 



Courses 



Junior Year 



First Semester 



Credits 



En. 385 —The Pre-Adolescent Child .... 3 
En. 393 —Teaching of Health and 

Physical Education 3 

HPl. 361 — Teaching Physical Education 

in the Elementary School.. 3 
HPl. 363 — Teaching Physical Education 

in the Secondary School .... 3 

Electives 3 

15 



Courses 



En. 
En. 



386 
394 



Second Semester Credita 

—The Adolescent Child 3 

— Teaching of Health and 

Physical Education 3 

HPl. 362 — Teaching Physical Education 

in the Elementary School.. 3 
■Teaching Physical Education 

in the Secondary School — 3 
Electives 3 

15 



HPl. 364 



En. 
HPl 


401 
411 


Senior 

— School Administration _ 3 

— Principles and Administra- 
tion of Physical Education 3 
Electives _ 9 


Year 

En. 


387 


— Health Education 


3 

12 









16 



16 



328 



BULLETIN OF INFORMATION — UPPER DIVISION 



FOR THOSE WHOSE FIELD OF CONCENTRATION IS INDUSTRIAL ARTS EDUCATION 

If possible, the electives in the General College should be selected from the following 
courses. Those not completed as General College electives must be completed in the Upper 
Division. 

CEn. 13 ^Introduction to Education 

In, 111-112 — Mechanical Drawing 

In. 211-212— General Shop 



En. 


385 


In. 


301 


In. 


305 


En. 


371 



Junior Year 

Courses First Semester Credits Courses 

En. 305 — Development and Organiza- En. 306 

tion of Education 3 En. 386 

— Pre-Adolescent Child 3 In. 302 

—Sheet Metal 3 

— Design and Construction 3 

• — Observation, Participation, 

and Classroom Practices.... 3 

Electives . 2 

17 

Senior Year 

421 —Student Teaching 3 En. 387 

401 — School Administration 3 In. 404 

429 - — Industrial Education 

Forestry 3 

401 — Architectural Drawing 3 

Electives 3 

15 



En. 
En. 
Fy. 

In. 



Second Semester Credits 

-Vocational Education 3 

-Adolescent Child 3 

-General Shop „ _ 3 

Electives 5 



14 



-Health Education 3 

-Farm Motors 3 

Electives 8 



14 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 329 

THE COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 

FACULTY 

Joseph Weil, B.S.E.E., M.S., Dean and Director, Engineering Experiment Station 

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 

Walter Herman Beisler, D.Sc. (Princeton), Head Professor of Chemical Engineering 
Ralph Alexander Morgen, Ph.D. (California), Professor of Chemical Engineering 
Edward C. Barrett. Ch.E., M.S.Ch.E., Acting Assistant Professor of Chemical Engineering 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 

Percy Lawrence Reed, C.E., M.S., Head Professor of Civil Engineering 

\ViLLiAiM Lincoln Sawyer, B.S., M.S., Associate Professor of Civil Engineering (On Leave 

of Absence) 
Henry James Miles, M.S., Assistant Professor of Civil Engineering 
James S. Shivler, M.S.E., Instructor in Civil Engineering 

electrical engineering 

Joseph Weil, B.S.E.E., M.S., Head Professor of Electrical Engineering 

Stephen Pencheff Sashoff, B.S.E.E., M.S.E.E., Associate Professor of Electrical 

Engineering 
Edward Frank Smith, B.S.E.E., E.E., Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering 
John Wesley Wilson, B.S.E.E., M.S., Assistant Professor in Electrical Engineering 

industrial engineering 

Philip Osborne Yeaton, B.S., S.B., Head Professor of Industrial Engineering 

Silas Kendrick Eshleman, M.A., S.M., M.E., E.E., J.D., Assistant Professor of Industrial 

Engineering 
Edward Donald de Luca, B.S., B.B.A., Assistant Professor of Industrial Engineering 

mechanical engineering 

Newton Cromwell Ebaugh, B.E. in M. and E.E., M.E., M.S., Head Professor of Mechan- 
ical Engineering 
William Warrick Fineren, M.E., Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
Edgar Smith Walker, Colonel, U. S. Army (Retired), B.S., United States Militar>- 

Academy, Professor of Drawing (Special Status) 
Chesterfield Howell Janes, B.S.M.E., M.S., Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
Robert Alden Thompson, B.S.M.E., M.S., Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering 
Edwin S. Frash, B.S. in M.E., M.E., Instructor in Mechanical Engineering 



330 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION —UPPER DIVISION 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

The curricula of the College of Engineering are planned to give instruction in the 
technical aspects of professional engineering, and in the social and economic phases of 
modern industrial life. They are not designed to turn out technical experts but rather to give 
students that education which will later enable them to qualify as Professional Engineers 
after they have had the requisite practical experience. 

After a period of general education, well articulated with subjects basic to Engineering 
in the General College, the student enters the Upper Division work of the Engineering 
College. Here he is given instruction in engineering and is encouraged to utilize the 
time allowed for electives for productive activity in non-technical courses. The individual 
characteristics of the student are given consideration and he is encouraged to develop his 
initiative and imagination, to devote his spare time to special technical problems in the 
laboratory, to study the history and trend of engineering practice as related to social and 
economic developments, and to coordinate his efforts to produce an educated man well 
grounded in the fundamentals of engineering practice and well equipped to enter the 
industrial field and to advance himself in his chosen profession. 

The student may select curricula which will give him some specialization in the fields 
of chemical, civil, electrical, industrial and mechanical engineering, the Bachelor's degree 
being awarded on the basis of such specialization. By choosing elective courses in spe- 
cialized fields of radio, aeronautics, air conditioning, management, design, etc., a still 
further degree of specialization can be secured, if he so desires. For each of the curricula, 
close coordination between departments gives broad engineering training; and systematic 
planning gives the necessary detailed factual iirformation required of engineering graduates. 

CIVIL AERONAUTICS AUTHORITY CIVILIAN PILOT TRAINING PROGRAM 

The Civil Aeronautics Authority in co-operation with the College of Engineering presents 
a Civilian Pilot Training Program for giving flight training and ground school instruction 
in related subjects to a selected group of students. 

Students above the Freshman class are examined by a selection board provided they 
meet the preliminary requirements as to an academic standing of "C" average, physical 
requirements as set up by the CAA medical section, and are engaged in no work outside 
of their regular academic studies. This program gives 35 hours of flight instruction, 72 
hoiirs of ground school instruction and prepares the student for a CAA Private Pilot 
Certificate Examination. 

Students who have completed the primary course may be recommended for instruction in 
a secondary course. This program gives 40 to 50 hours of flight and 126 hours of ground 
school instruction. 

ENTRANCE REQUIREMENTS 

To be admitted to the College of Engineering the student should present a certificate 
of graduation from the General College, and be certified by the entrance committee of 
the College of Engineering as qualified to pursue a curriculum leading to a degree in 
engineering. Any student not in the College may register for any course for which he has 
the proper requisites. However, the four hundred courses are of a professional nature and 
only students registered in the College are eligible for registration in them. 

Students in the General College must choose the proper prerequisite subjects to secure 
an engineering degree in four years. Experience has shown that the average student 
requires five years for graduation. Many students find that they can profitably devote 
five years to an engineering education and plan their program accordingly. Each student 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 331 

must assume full responsibility for registering for the required courses in their proper 
sequence and for fulfilling all requirements for his degree. 

Upon entering the University, each student who contemplates studying engineering 
should confer with the head of the department of the engineering course in which he 
expects to major. The Dean of the College and the various department heads are eager 
to confer with students pertaining to their studies and will assist them in planning their 
schedules. 

BACHELORS' DEGREES 

The College of Engineering awards the following Bachelors' degrees: 

Bachelor of Chemical Engineering 
Bachelor of Civil Engineering 
Bachelor of Electrical Engineering 
Bachelor of Industrial Engineering 
Bachelor of Mechanical Engineering 

BACHELOR DECREE REQUIREMENTS — HONOR POINTS 

Students desiring to earn degrees in the College of Engineering must complete the courses 
outlined in the various curricula and must do work of such quality that the total number 
of honor points which they have earned in all of the courses counted toward their degree 
will equal twice the total number of semester hours required for the degree. For informa- 
tion concerning the honor point system, see the Bulletin of Student Regulations. 

HONOR STUDENT DESIGNATION 

A student who is an applicant for the designation of Honor Student in the College of 
Engineering must have a certificate of graduation from the General College or its equivalent, 
and shall have earned at least a B average in his academic work, which must include: 

Ml. 181-182 
Ps. 205-206-207-208 
Cy. 101-102 
Ms. 353-354 

To be considered for classification as an honor student the applicant must file an 
application in proper form with the Dean of the College before October 15 and March 15 
of each semester. The Dean will then notify the student to appear before a committee 
which shall have the power to examine the applicant and to pass upon this application. 

Honor students, as long as they maintain their high scholastic standing, may be granted 
by the Dean of the College, upon recommendation by the Head of the Department in 
which the student is registered, the following privileges: 

1. Deviation from the prescribed curricula in the Upper Division. 

2. Permission to be absent from scheduled classes, when thf absence is justifiable from 
the professional point of view. 

GRADUATION WITH HONORS 

Upon the recommendation of the faculty a student who has an honor point average of 
3.0 for the entire curriculum or of 3.5 for the courses of the Upper Division may be grad- 
uated With Honors. 



332 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION — UPPER DIVISION 

GRADUATION WITH HIGH HONORS 

Upon the recommendation of the faculty a student may be graduated JVith High Honors 
provided he meets the following requirements: 

1. Is designated as an Honor Student and has secured an honor point average of not 
less than 3.3 in the Upper Division. 

2. Files acceptance of the invitation of the faculty to become an applicant for gradua- 
tion With High Honors. 

3. Prepares an outline of some independent work he contemplates doing and submits 
a copy to each member of his advisory committee before the work is done. 

4. Completes this independent work to the satisfaction of the advisory committee 
appointed by the Dean. 

5. Satisfactorily passes a comprehensive examination given him by his advisory com- 
mittee. 

ENGUSH REQUIREMENT 

The responsibility for the correct and effective use of his spoken and written English 
rests primarily upon the student. Any instructor in the College of Engineering may, at 
any time, with the approval of the head of his department and the Dean of the College of 
Engineering, require a student who shows a deficiency in English to elect additional courses, 
over and above the curriculum requirements, in the Department of English. 



Theses are not required of candidates for the Bachelors' degrees in the College of 
Engineering. However, exceptional students, whom the head of a department believes would 
be benefited thereby, may be granted permission by the Dean of the College, upon recom- 
mendation of the head of the department, to undertake a thesis in lieu of prescribed or 
elective work in the department in which he is enrolled. Not more than four semester 
hours will be allowed for such thesis work. 

FLORIDA industries' COOPERATIVE PLAN 

Several of Florida's industries, under a cooperative arrangement with the College of 
Engineering, will employ Florida men in industry at regular intervals during the students' 
course at the University. Students are eligible for cooperative employment who are candi- 
dates for an engineering degree and who have shown that they are satisfactorily prepared 
scholastically ; such as, standing in the upper 25% of their high school class or having 
satisfactory University grades. 

During the months of November or March any student may file an application with 
the Dean of the College of Engineering for assignment in industry. Placement will depend 
upon the openings available and the industrial experience of the applicant, his scholarship 
and personality. Applications may be accepted from men already in industry who wish 
to complete their college courses and need college credit of one year or more towards a 
degree. 

After assignment to an industry, a student alternates with his partner each college ses- 
sion. The periods are: February 1 to May 31; June 1 to August 31; and September 1 to 
January 31. There are two men on each team so that one man is in the University while 
his partner is in industry. During each period in Industry, each student is paid for his 
work. This pay should cover necessary living expenses. 

Any industry willing to enter or desirous of entering the Florida Industries' Cooperative 
Plan should write to the Dean of the College of Engineering, University of Florida. 



COLLEGE OF Ei^GlI^EERING 333 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ENGINEERING 

The degree of Master of Science in Engineering may be earned through the Graduate 
School. (See Bulletin of the Graduate School.) A student who holds a Bachelor's degree 
and the requisite scholastic standing is eligible to major in any department of the College 
of Engineering. A few graduate assistantships are available from time to time, and 
those interested in graduate research in any particular department should address the head 
of that department relative to obtaining an assistantship. 

Information concerning graduate fellowships in the Graduate School may be obtained 
by application to the Dean of the Graduate School. (See Bulletin of the Graduate School.) 

PROFESSIONAL DEGREES 1 

The professional degrees of Civil Engineer, Chemical Engineer, Electrical Engineer, 
Industrial Engineer, and Mechanical Engineer will be granted only to graduates of the 
College of Engineering of the University of Florida who have: 

(a) Shown evidence of having satisfactorily practiced their profession for a minimum 
of five years following receipt of the Bachelor's degree, during the last two years of which 
they shall have been in responsible charge of important engineering work. A graduate 
who is a registered engineer in the State of Florida will be accepted as satisfying this 
requirement. 

(b) Presented a thesis showing independence and originality and of such a quality 
as to be acceptable for publication by the technical press or a professional society. 

(c) Satisfactorily passed an examination at the University upon the thesis and pro- 
fessional work. 

A candidate for a professional degree must make application to the Dean of the College 
of Engineering prior to March 1 of the year in which he expects to have the degree con- 
ferred. He must also make application to the Registrar in accordance with the dates 
specified in the University Calendar. If the candidate appears to satisfy requirements 
listed in section (a) above, the Dean will form a committee of which the head of the 
department in which the degree is to be earned is chairman. This committee shall satisfy 
itself that the candidate has fulfilled all requirements for the degree and report its recom- 
mendation to the faculty of the College of Engineering, which will have final authority 
to recommend to the President and the Board of Control the conferring of the degree. 

LABORATORY FACILITIES 

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING LABORATORIES 

Since chemical engineering is concerned with the development and application of manu- 
facturing processes in which chemical or certain physical changes of materials are involved, 
the chemical engineering laboratories are designed to demonstrate how this is accomplished. 

The Unit Operations Laboratory is equipped to teach the student the fundamental opera- 
tions which are the corner stones of chemical engineering. Included in the facilities of the 
laboratory is equipment to demonstrate the following unit operations on a semi-plant scale: 
distillation, filtration, centrifuging. heat transfer, gas absorption, evaporation, drying, 
crushing and grinding, and fluid flow. 

The Technical Laboratory contains the usual equipment for carrying out chemical 
experiments on a smaller scale than in the Unit Operations Laboratory. In addition it 
contains certain specialized equipment such as viscosimeters, flash testers, gas analysis 
equipment, calorimeters, control instruments, and calibration apparatus. 



334 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION — UPPER DIVISION 

Students are also required to perform experiments on equipment not located in the 
chemical engineering laboratories. This includes air conditioning, humidity and tempera- 
lure control tests on other equipment which is part of the University plant. 

CIVIL ENGINEERING LABORATORIES 

The Civil Engineering Department has laboratories equipped for work in Surveying, 
Hydraulics, Sanitary Engineering, Materials Testing, and Hydrology. 

The Surveying Instrument Room contains the following equipment: Repeating theodo- 
lite, precise levels, base-line measurement apparatus, plane tables, transits, levels, precision 
pantagraph, current meter, and smaller pieces of equipment necessary for field and drawing 
room work in elementary and higher surveying. 

The Hydraulic Laboratory, one of the largest and most m.odei'n of its type, occupies the 
first and second floors of the new Hydraulic Laboratory building completed in 1939. The 
equipment is of modern design and extensive enough so that the theoretical studies of the 
classroom may be verified in the laboratory. In addition there are facilities for research 
on hydraulic problems and a complete water treatment pilot plant including a rapid sand 
filter. The water is recirculated from several storage tanks located in the building. The 
total capacity of the system is 100,000 gallons and the maximum head available, using 
the constant head overflow tank on the roof, is fifty feet. Among the principal items of 
equipment are a 16 inch vertical propeller pump which delivers 4500 g.p.m. at 12 ft. 
head, a 10 x 12 inch horizontal centrifugal pump which delivers 1760 g.p.m. at 32 ft. head, 
an air lift pump, hydraulic ram, pelton impulse wheel, reaction turbine, and apparatus 
for the study and measurement of flow in pipes and open channels. 

The Materials Testing Laboratory contains one four-hundred-thousand-pound capacity 
high column Riehle testing machine equipped for both tension and compressive tests; one 
fifty-thousand-pound low-column machine and apparatus for the usual physical and chemical 
tests on brick, wood, concrete, steel, cement, asphalt, tars, and oils. 

The Sanitary Engineering Laboratory is located on the third floor of the new Hydraulic 
Laboratory building. It contains necessary apparatus and equipment for making the 
routine tests in connection with the design and operation of water, sewage, and industrial 
waste treatment plants and has facilities for graduate work and research in these fields. 
Research on a semi-plant scale can be conducted at the University trickling filter disposal 
plant which was designed for the dual purpose of laboratory experiments on its operation 
and for the practical treatment of the campus sewage and laboratory wastes. 

The Hydrological Laboratory contains anemometers, rain gauges, recording barometers, 
recording thermometers, recording hygrometer, water level recorders, and other apparatus 
useful in illustrating the fundamentals of hydrology as applied to engineering design and 
construction. 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING LABORATORIES 

The Dynamo Laboratory contains dynamo electrical machinery of various types. Motor- 
generators are used for securing alternating currents of a wide range of voltages and fre- 
quencies and for conversion to direct current. Other equipment includes mercury arc 
rectifier units, miscellaneous battery charging equipment, automotive testing equipment, 
transformers, electro-dynamometers, and a wide variety of other electrical machinery. 

The Precision Laboratory contains special devices and instruments for calibrating and 
standardizing work and is available to the utilities of the State for the solution of special 
problems. In addition to the instruments of the Precision Laboratory, there is a double 
sine wave alternator for special testing purposes. Miscellaneous instruments of various 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 335 

types, including oscillographs and a klydonograph, are available for performing tests on 
miscellaneous electrical equipment. 

The Communications Laboratory, located on the top floor of the Seagle Building is well 
equipped. It provides means for testing telephone, telegraph, radio equipment, and 
electronic devices. In this laboratory will be found a special panel board incorporating 
cable terminals, line fault equipment, transmission measuring equipment, audio and high 
frequency oscillators, repeaters, filters, networks, bridges, and a large number of special 
devices including cathode ray oscilloscopes, field strength measuring equipment, automatic 
signal recorder, miscellaneous receiving equipment, static recorders, radio goniometers, etc. 

Radio Station WRUF, a 5000-watt Western Electric transmitter, operating at 850 kilo- 
cycles, cooperates with the laboratory in courses on radio station operation. These courses 
are open to students who have attained sufficient knowledge to benefit by this work. Station 
W4XAD, a special experimental radio-telephone station, is licensed at 600 watts for 
frequencies of 2398, 4756, 6425, 8655, 12,862.5, and 17,310 kilocycles, and is used for 
experimental work in the field of short wave radio communications. In addition to this 
station, short wave radio station W4DFU is licensed for operation in the amateur bands. 

Students who in general show that they may benefit by additional laboratory work, and 
who have the necessary educational experience, may be given special permission to carry 
on individual experimentation and research in these laboratories. 

PHOTOGRAPHIC LABORATORY 

The Photographic Laboratory contains the following rooms: chemical storage, dark 
room, film washing, film storage, printing, paper washing and drying, enlarging, paper 
storage, camera repair, studio, office, and finished film fireproof vault. The laboratory is 
to be used for experimental research in photography, as a service duplicating and photo- 
graphic shop for the University, and for class instruction in photography. 

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING LABORATORIES 

The laboratories of the Mechanical Engineering Department include facilities for draw- 
ing, design, and production of machinery and equipment; and for the study of the per- 
formance of machinery and allied apparatus. 

Modern drafting rooms are provided, which are capable of taking care of approximately 
100 students. 

Laboratory facilities for studying the production of machinery include equipment for 
casting, forging, welding, and machining of metals, and various types of woodworking 
machines. 

Extensive equipment is available for the study of the strength and behavior of wood, 
cement, concrete, metals, and other materials used in engineering structures and machines. 
Coupled with this is the Metallography Laboratory, which is arranged for the study of 
internal crystal structure of these materials. 

Facilities are provided for studying the performance and other characteristics of steam 
engines, turbines, boilers, automobile engines, airplane engines, Diesel engines, refrigeration 
equipment, air conditioning apparatus, airplanes, and auxiliary equipment used with these 
machines. 

The aerodynamic laboratory is equipped with three wind tunnels for studying air flow, 
airfoil characteristics, and the performance of aircraft models. Supplementing the model 
tests, are tests of full size airplanes under various conditions of actual flight. 

Basic engineering instruments are available for use in connection with special studies and 
research in any of the foregoing fields. 



336 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION —UPPER DIVISION 

CURRICULA REQUIREMENTS 

The student should present a certificate of graduation from the General College which 
will include C-1, C-3, C-5, C-6, and Military Science or Physical Education. 
The following courses must be taken either in the General College or later: 
Cy. 101-102, CMs. 23-24, Ms. 353-354, Ml. 181-182, Ps. 205-206-207-208 and a special 
departmental prerequisite as follows: 

Chemical Engineering Cy. 201-202; Cg. 345 

Civil Engineering (General) CI. 223-226 

(Public Health Option) Cy. 201-202 

Electrical Engineering El. 241-242 

Industrial Engineering Ig. 261-262 

Mechanical Engineering Ml. 287-288 

The student should endeavor to complete these courses before entering the Upper Divi- 
sion, although he may be enrolled in the Upper Division "with conditions" until he com- 
pletes them. 

UPPER DIVISION REQUIREMENTS 

Students who wish to secure a degree in four years should select, with considerable 
care, their courses in the General College. Only by proper selection of courses is it pos- 
sible to have the necessary prerequisites so that the Upper Division requirements can be 
met in two years. 

FOR THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF CHEMICAL ENGINEEUUNG 

*Cy. 301-302 — Organic Chemistry 4-4 

*Cy. 401-402 —Physical Chemistry 4-4 

*Cy. 481-482 —Chemical Literature _ %-% 

*Cg. 346 —Industrial Stoichiometry 3 

*Cg. 443 — Chemical Engineering Laboratory 2 

*Cg. 447 — Principles of Chemical Engineering 3 

Cg. 444 — Chemical Engineering Laboratory 2 

Cg. 448 — Principles of Chemical Engineering — 3 

Cg. 457-458 — Chemical Engineering Design 2-2 

Cg. 467-468 — Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics 3-3 

Cg. 449 — Unit Processes 3 

*Ig. 365-366 —Statics and Dynamics 3-3 

Ig. 367 —Strength of Materials 3-0 

El. 341-342 —Elements of Electrical Engineering 3-3 

El. 349-350 —Dynamo Laboratory 1-1 

Ml. 386 — Power Engineering 0-3 

*German or French 3-3 

**Electives 7 

A Plant Inspection Trip is also required. 

FOR THE DEGREE BACHELOR OF CIVIL ENGINEERING 

CI. 329 — Higher Surveying (Summer Camp) 5-0 

*Bcy. 308 — Sanitary Laboratory Practice 3-0 

*Cy. 215 —Water and Sewage 3-0 

*CL 331 —Railway Engineering 3-0 

*C1. 332 —Highway Engineering 0-4 

*C1. 326 —Theory of Structures 0-4 

*C1. 327 —Hydraulics 4-0 

CI. 420 — Hydraulic Engineering 0-2 

CL 423 —Materials Laboratory 2-0 

CI. 425-426 —Water and Sewerage 3-3 

CL 433-434 — Theory and Design of Reinforced Concrete .... 2-3 

CL 435-436 — Structural Engineering 3-3 

*Ig. 363-364 —Applied Mechanics 5-5 

Ig. 463 — Specifications and Engineering Relations 2-0 

18 hours of approved electives of which 8 hours m.ust be in Engi- 
neering subjects other than in Civil Engineering. 

*To be taken in the Junior year. 
♦♦Students contemplating becoming candidates for the Bachelor of Chemical Engineering degree 
should take at least one course during the summer session. 



*Cv. 


21.5 


Cy. 


262 


Cy. 


403 


*C1. 


223-226 


•CI. 


326 


01. 


327 


CI. 


420 


CI. 


425-426 


CI. 


429-430 


CI. 


433 


CI. 


437 


*Bcy. 


301 


*Bcy. 


304 


*lK. 


363-364 


Ig. 


463 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 337 

FOR THi: DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF CIVIL ENGINEERIM, 

(Public Health Option) 

■ — Water and Sewage 3-0 

- — Organic Chemistry 5-0 

— Water Analysis 3-0 

— Surveying 3-3 

— Theory of Structures 0-4 

— Hydraulics 4-0 

■ — Hydraulic Engineering 0-2 

• — Water and Sewerage 3-3 

— Public Health Engineering 5-.5 

— Theory of Reinforced Concrete 2-0 

— Estimating Quantities and Costs 0-2 

• — General Bacteriology 4-0 

— Pathogenic Bacteriology 0-4 

— Applied Mechanics S-.S 

— Specifications and Engineering Relations 2-0 

**Approved Electives 4 

Courses Suggested as Electives: 

— Elements of Electrical Engineering 

— Dynamo Laboratory 

— Manu acturing Operations 

— Thermodynamics 

— Power Engineering 

• — Hydrology 

— Estimating Quantities and Costs 

■ — Hydraulic Laboratory 

- — General Geology 

- — Effective Speaking 

— Materials and Methods of Construction 

— Elementary Accounting 

— Statically Indetenninate Structures 



FOR THE DECREE BACHELOR OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 
(Discontinued after 1942-43) 

*E1. 341-342 —Elements of Electrical Engineering 3-3 

*E1. 344 —Problems in D and A Currents 0-3 

El. 447-448 — Alternating Current Apparatus 3-3 

*E1. 349-350 —Dynamo Laboratory 1-1 

El. 451-452 - — Advanced Dynamo Laboratory 2-2 

El. 441-442 — Electrical Engineering Seminar 1-1 

El. 446 — Electrical Power Transmission 0-3 

El. 449 —Theory of Electric Circuits 3-0 

*Ig. 363-364 — Applied Mechanics 5-5 

*M1. 385 —Thermodynamics 3-0 

♦Ml. 386 —Power Engineering 0-3 

*M1. 387-388 —Mechanical Laboratory 1-1 

Ml. 489 — Manufacturing Operations 3-0 

Ig. 460 — Engineering Practice 0-3 

**20 hours of approved electives of which not less than 9 shall be 
from one of the following groups : 

Communications Transmission Power Plant and Industry 

El. 346 EI. 346 El. 345 

El. 443-444 El. 440 EL 440 

El. 453-454 El. 443-444 EL 443-444 

El. 457-458 El. 445 EL 445 

El. 551 



El. 


341-342 


EI. 


349-350 


Ml. 


489 


Ml. 


385 


Ml. 


386 


CI. 


431 


CI. 


437 


CI. 


422 


Gy. 


303 


CSc. 


33 


Ae. 


51A 


CBs. 


141-142 


CI. 


438 



*To be taken in the Junior year. 
**The student should confer with the Department Head of his major subject on the selection of 
electives. 



538 



BULLETIN OF INFORMATION —UPPER DIVISION 



FOR THE DEGREE BACHELOR OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 
(For students entering the College of Engineering after September 1, 1942) 



*M1. 
*M1. 
*M1. 
*ML 

Ml. 
*Ig. 
*Ig. 

Ig. 

Ig. 
*E1. 
*E1. 
*E1. 

El. 

El. 

El. 

El. 

El. 

pi. 

[ei. 



El. 
El. 



El. 
El. 



El. 
El. 
El. 

El. 



287 — Mechanism and Kinematics 0-3 

385 — Thermodynamics 3-0 

386 — Power Engineering 0-3 

387-388 — Mechanical Laboratory 1-1 

489 — Manufacturing Operations 3-0 

365 — Engineering Mechanics — Statics _ 3-0 

366 — Engineering Mechanics — Dynamics 0-3 

367 —Strength of Materials 3-0 

460 — Engineering Practice 0-3 

346 — Electrical Communications 0-4 

351-352 • — Dynamo Laboratory 1-1 

353-354 — Electrical Engineering 5-3 

441-442 — Electrical Engineering Seminar 1-1 

446 — Electrical Transmission Lines 0-3 

449 ^Theory of Electric Circuits 3-0 

455-456 — Radio Engineering 3-3 

and 

457-458 — Electronics Laboratory 2-2 

OR 

447-448 — Alternating Current Apparatus 3-3 

and 

451-452 — Dynamo Laboratory 2-2 

• — Electives (either Group A or Group B) 6 

**Approved Electives 8 

Group A Electives (General Option) 

345 -^Electrical Illumination 4 

440 — Industrial Applications of Electrical 

Equipment 3 

445 — Electrical Instruments, Meters and Relays .... 3 
493-494 —Electrical Design and Experimental 

Procedure Var. 

551 — Symmetrical Components 3 

Group B Electives (Communications Option) 

443-444 — Industrial Electronics 3-3 

453-454 — Radio Station Operation 1-1 

493-494 — Electrical Design and Experimental 

Procedure Var. 

551 — Symmetrical Components 3 



FOR THE DEGREE BACHELOR OF INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 



*CEs. 


13 


*CBs. 


141-142 


Es. 


321-322 


Bs. 


401-402 


*Bs. 




*E1. 


341-342 


*E1. 


349-350 


Ml. 


385 


*lg. 


363-364 


iK. 


463 


Ig. 


469-470 


Ig. 


460 


iK. 


472 


Ig. 


477 


Is. 


478 



— Economic Foundations of Modem Life 5-0 

— Elementary Accounting 3-3 

— Financial Organization of Society 3-3 

• — Business Law 3-3 

— Electives from Group A 6 

— Elements of Electrical Engineering 3-3 

— Dynamo Laboratory 1-1 

^Thermodynamics 3-0 

— Applied Mechanics 5-5 

• — Specifications and Engineering Relations .... 2-0 

— Plant Shop Layout and Design 3-3 

—Engineering Practice _ 0-3 

— Human Engineering 0-2 

— Motion Study 2-0 

—Time Study 0-2 

**Approved Electives 10 



CEs. 


15 


Bs. 


313 


Es. 


335 


Bs. 


440 


Es. 


351 


Es. 


372 


Bs. 


422 


Bs. 


465 


Bs. 


466 



Group A Electives: 

— Elementary Statistics 

— Cost Accounting 

— Economics of Marketing 

— Trade Horizons in Caribbean America 

— Elements of Transportation 

— Labor Economics 

— Investments 

— Realty Principles 

— Realty Management 



*To be taken in the Junior year. 
**The'student should confer with the Department Head of his major subject on the selection of 
electives. 



*lK. 


363-364 


Ik. 


463 


Ik. 


472 


*E1. 


341-342 


♦El. 


349-350 


♦Ml. 


383 


*M1. 


384 


•Ml. 


385 


*M1. 


386 


*M1. 


387-388 


Ml. 


473-474 


Ml. 


481 


Ml. 


483 


Ml. 


489-490 


Ml. 


491 



COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING 339 

FOR THE DEGREE BACHELOR OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING 

— Applied Mechanics 5-5 

— Specifications and Engineering Relations 2-0 

— Human EngineerinK 0-2 

— Elements of Electrical Engineering 3-3 

— Dynamo Laboratory „ _ 1-1 

— Materials of Engineering 2-0 

— Metallography 0-2 

— Thermodynamics 3-0 

— Power Engineering 0-3 

— Mechanical Laboratory 1-1 

— Seminar _ 1-1 

— Internal Combustion Engines 0-3 

— Mechanical Laboratory 0-1 

— Manufacturing Operations 3-3 

— Machine Design 4-0 

Electives (either Group A or Group B) 16 

♦♦Approved Electives 6 

tCroup A Electives (Aeronautical Engineering Option) 

An. 481-482 — Aerodynamics, Advanced Aerodynamics 3-3 

An. 483 — Aerodynamic Laboratory 1-0 

An. 484 — Aircraft Instruments 0-1 

An. 485-486 — Airplane Design 4-4 

Group B Electives (General Option) 

*C1. 327 —Hydraulics _ - 4-0 

Ml. 482 — Refrigeration and Air Conditioning 0-3 

Ml. 484 — Mechanical Laboratory 0-1 

♦♦Approved Electives _ 8 

Recommended Approved Electives 

— Surveying 

— Electrical Illumination 

— Industrial Applications Electrical Equipment 

— Industrial Reports 

— Industrial Safety 

— Engineering Practice 

— Marine Engineering 

— Advanced Machine Design 

*To be taken in the Junior year. 
**The student should confer with the Department Head of the major subject on the selection of 
electives. 

tStudents expecting to take this option should elect An. 381 — Aeronautics in the second semester 
of the Junior year. 



CI. 


223 


El. 


345 


El. 


440 


Ig. 


261 


Ig. 


262 


Ig. 


460 


Ml. 


480 


Ml. 


492 



340 BULLETIN OF INFORM AT ION ~- UPPER Oil ISION 



THE GRADUATE SCHOOL 



THE GRADUATE COUNCIL 

Thomas Marshall Simpson, Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate School 

Truman C. Bigham, Ph.D., Professor of Economics 

Harley Willard Chandler, M.S., Dean of the University 

H. Harold Hume, D.Sc, Dean of the College of Agriculture 

TowNES Randolph Leigh, Ph.D., Head Professor of Chemistry and Dean of the College 

of Arts and Sciences 
Winston Woodard Little, M.A., Professor of Secondary Education and High School 

Visitor, Dean of the General College 
Clifford Pierson Lyons, Ph.D., Head Professor of English 

James William Norman, Ph.D., Head Professor of Education and Dean of the College of 
Education 

Robert Crozier Williamson, Ph.D., Head Professor of Physics 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

The affairs of the Graduate School are administered by the Graduate Council, which 
consists of the Dean as ex-officio chairman, and certain members of the faculty, who are 
appointed annually by the President. 

For general information, including the teaching faculty, all departments offering graduate 
work leading to an advanced degree and all strictly graduate courses, as well as conditions 
of admission and requirements for the advanced degrees, see the Bulletin of the Graduate 
School. 

THE master's decree 

Degrees Offered. — Master of Arts; Master of Arts in Architecture; Master of Arts in 
Education; Master of Science; Master of Science in Agriculture; Master of Science in 
Engineering; and Master of Science in Pharmacy. 



the degree of doctor of PHILOSOPHY 

Departments. — The Doctor's degree is offered in the following departments: Animal 
Husbandry (Animal Nutrition), Biology (Zoology), Chemistry, Pharmacy, and Pharma- 
cognosy and Pharmacology, 



COLLEGE OF LAW 341 

COLLEGE OF LAW 

FACULTY 

Harry Raymonp Trusler, M.A., LL.B. (Michigan). Dean and Head Professor of Law 

Robert Spratt Cockrkll, M.A., B.L. (Virginia I, Professor of Law, Emeritus 

Clifford Waldorf Crandall, B.S., LL.B., LL.D. (Adrian), Professor of Law 

Dean Slagle, M.A., LL.B. (Yale), Professor of Law 

Clarence John TeSelle, A.B., LL.B. (Wisconsin), Professor of Law 

James Westbay Day, M.A., J.D. (Florida), Professor of Law 

William Allen McRae, Jr., B. Litt. (Oxon.), J.D. (Florida), Professor of Law 



Ila Rountree Pridgen, Executive Secretary and Librarian 
Ivan E. Odle, B.S., LL.B. (Florida), Assistant Librarian 

GENERAL INFORMATION 
admission 

Applicants for admission to the College of Law must be eighteen years of age, and must 
have received a degree in arts or science in a college or university of approved standing, or 
must be eligible for a degree in a combined course in the University of Florida, upon the 
completion of one year of work in the College of Law. 

In addition to other requirements, all applicants for admission to the College of Law, 
whose pre-law training has not been received at this institution, must satisfactorily pass 
scholastic and legal aptitude tests given by the Board of University Examiners, unless 
from the nature of their previous record they are excused by the law faculty. 

Women Students. — Women students who are twenty-one years of age and who fully meet 
the entrance requirements of the College may enter as candidates for degrees. 

Special Students. — Special students are not admitted to the College of Law. 

Advanced Standing. — No work in law done in other institutions will be accepted towards 
a degree unless the applicant passes satisfactorily the examination held in the subjects in 
question in this College, or unless credit is given without examination. Credit of an average 
of C from schools which are members of the Association of American Law Schools, of which 
this College is a member, will be accepted without examination. In no case will credit be 
given for work not done in residence at an approved law school. 



The aim of the College, which is a member of the Association of American Law Schools, 
registered by the New York Board of Regents, and an approved school of the American Bar 
Association, is to impart a thorough, scientific, and practical knowledge of the law. It 
aims to develop keen, efficient lawyers, conversant with the ideals and traditions of the 
profession. Its policy is characterized by the emphasis of practice as well as theory; 
pleading as well as historical perspective; skill in brief making, as well as in giving legal 
information. 

LIBRARY 

The Law Library contains over 14,200 volumes. In it are included the piiblislied reports 
of the courts of last resort in every state in the Union and of the Federal Courts, the 
English Reports, Full Reprint, the English Law Reports, Law Journal Reports, Dominion 
Law Reports, the Canadian Reports, and the Philippine Reports, together with a collection 



342 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION —UPPER DIVISION 

of digests, encyclopedias, series of selected cases, English and American treatises and text- 
books, and the statutes of a majority of American jurisdictions including the Federal 
statutes. 

ADMISSION TO THE BAR 

Upon presenting their diplomas and satisfactory evidence that they are twenty-one years 
of age and of good moral character, the graduates of the College are licensed, without 
examination, to practice in the courts of Florida. 

PLEADING AND PRACTICE 

An intensive knowledge of pleading and practice should be secured by the student, since 
legal rights cannot be well understood without a mastery of the rules of pleading whereby 
they are enforced. The College offers thorough courses in criminal pleading and procedure, 
common law pleading, equity pleading, Florida civil practice, trial practice, and Federal 
procedure. Thus, the student on graduation is enabled to enter understandingly upon the 
practice of law. The College endeavors to serve those who intend to practice elsewhere as 
efficiently as those who expect to locate in this State. 

Believing the students obtain in the Practice Court a better practical knowledge of 
pleading and practice than can be acquired in any other way, aside from the trial of actual 
cases, the faculty places special emphasis upon this work. Sessions of the Practice Court 
are held throughout the year. Each student is required to participate in the trial of at least 
one common law, one equity, and one criminal case, and is instructed in appellate procedure. 

LEGAL RESEARCH 

To enable students to specialize in legal problems of particular interest to them, to 
acquire a grasp of the technique of legal investigation, and to do more creative work than 
ordinary courses in law permit, a course in legal research (Lw. 601) is offered. Each 
student taking the course is required to make an original study of the subject he selects 
under the guidance of the member of the faculty in whose field it falls. Suitable studies 
will be submitted by the College to law journals for publication. 

Applications for the course should be filed with the Secretary of the College at least 
one week prior to the first day of registration. Students who register for two or three 
hours will not be permitted to drop the course for the number of hours for which they have 
registered and continue it for a lesser number of hours, unless they do so within the first 
two weeks of the term. No more than three credits may be earned by a student in this 
course in one term^ but the faculty may admit a student to the course (Lw. 602) for a 
second term. 

STANDARDS OF THE AMERICAN BAR ASSOCIATION 

The Council on Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar of the American Bar 
Association requests that attention be called to the Standards of the American Bar Asso- 
ciation adopted in 1921 and by it recommended for enactment by all states. These Standards 
provide in effect that every candidate for admission to the bar, in addition to taking a 
public examination, shall give evidence of graduation from a law school which shall require 
at least two years of study in a college as a condition of admission, and three years of law 
study (or longer if not a full-time course), which shall have an adequate library and a 
sufficient number of teachers giving their entire time to the school to ensure actual personal 
acquaintance and influence with the whole student body, and which shall not be operated 
as a commercial enterprise. 



COLLEGE OF LAW 343 

DEGREES AND CURRICULA 

BACHELOR OF LAWS 

The degree of Bachelor of Laws (LL.B.) is conferred upon those students who satisfac- 
torily complete eighty-five semester hours of law, which must include all of the first-year 
subjects. Students who have an honor point average of 3.0 for all the law work offered for 
graduation will be eligible for the degree of LL.B. With Honors. Those who have an honor 
point average of 3.5 for all the law work offered for graduation, which work must include 
Legal Research, will be eligible for the degree of LL.B. With High Honors. 

Students admitted to advanced standing may receive the degree after one year's residence, 
but in no case will the degree be granted unless the candidate is in actual residence during 
all of the third year and passes in this College at least 28 semester hours of law. 

All students are required to complete the last 28 credit hours applied towards the degre« 
during regular residence. This may be varied only upon written petition approved by the 
faculty of the College of Law. 

An average of C, or higher, is required in all work counted toward a degree. 

COMBINED ACADEMIC AND LAVF COURSE 

By pursuing an approved course of collegiate and law studies a student may earn both 
the academic and the legal degree in six years. Both the College of Arts and Sciences 
and the College of Business Administration offer such a combined course. For further 
particulars, see pages 313 and 322 of this Bulletin. 

CURRICULUM LEADING TO THE DEGREE OF BACHELOR OF LAWS 

Students completing the first year as outlined below and a total of 85 semester hours of 
law credit with an average of C, or better, will be awarded the degree of Bachelor of Laws. 

First Year 

Courses First Semester Credits Courses Second Semester Credits 

Lw. 301 —Torts 5 Lw. 302 — Equity Jurisprudence 5 

Lw. 303 — Contracts 3 Lw. 304 — Contracts _ 3 

Lw. 305 — Criminal Law and Procedure 4 Lw. 306 — Marriage and Divorce 1 

Lw. 309 — Property 2 Lw. 308 — Common Law Pleading _ 3 

Lw. 312 —Property _ 2 

Second Year 

-U. S. Constitutional Law 4 Lw. 403 — Agency 2 

-Evidence _ _ 4 Lw. 406 — Private Corporations 4 

-Equity Pleading 2 Lw. 408 — Legal Ethics and Bibliography 2 

-Quasi Contracts 2 Lw. 410 — Property 3 

-Property _ 3 Lw. 413 —Florida Civil Practice 3 

-Florida Constitutional Law.... 2 Lw. 415* — Abstracts 2 

-Insurance 2 Lw. 417* — Partnership 2 

-Legislation _ 2 Lw. 418 — Taxation 3 

Third Year 

Lw. 503 —Public Utilities „ 2 Lw. 502 —Damages 2 

-Municipal Corporations 2 Lw. 506 — Negotiable Instruments 3 

-F'ederal Jurisdiction 2 Lw. 508 — Conflict of Laws 3 

-Sales 2 Lw. 515 — Mortgages 2 

-Property 3 Lw. 516 — Practice Court 1 

-Practice Court _... 1 Lw. 518 —Trial Practice II _ 2 

-Trial Practice I 2 Lw. 520 —Creditors' Rights 3 

-Trusts 2 Lw. 530 — Administrative Law 2 

-Equitable Remedies 2 Lw. 602 — Legal Research 1 to 3 

-Legal Research 1 to 3 

*Offered in alternate years ; Lw. 415 offered in 1941-42. 



Lw. 


401 


Lw. 


402 


Lw. 


405 


Lw. 


404 


Lw. 


409 


Lw. 


411 


Lw. 


416 


Lw. 


421 



Lw. 


504 


Lw. 


505 


Lw. 


509 


Lw. 


513 


Lw. 


517 


Lw. 


519 


Lw. 


521 


Lw. 


531 


Lw. 


601 



344 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION — UPPER DIVISION 

CURRICULA IN RADIO BROADCASTING TRAINING 

THE COMMITTEE ON TRAINING FOR RADIO 

Harley W. Chandler, Chairman, Dean of the University 
Henry P. Constans, Head Professor of Speech 
William L. Lowry, Assistant Professor of Journalism 
Garland W. Powell, Director Radio Station WRUF 
Thomas B. Stroup, Associate Professor of English 

JOSEPH Weil, Dean of the College of Engineering and Head Professor of Electrical 
Engineering 

GENERAL INFORMATION 

The curricula in Radio Broadcasting Training are designed to give each student a broad 
cultural background and to train for specialization in radio according to individual in- 
terests and aptitudes. It involves training in the fields relevant to that end with the student 
securing his basic education from the program of the General College and his specialized 
training in the College of Arts and Sciences, the College of Business Administration, and 
the College of Engineering. The three general categories of activity involved in radio 
broadcasting are: 

1) technical operation 

2) commercial activities 

3) programming activities 

Since the demand for persons thoroughly trained in radio broadcasting has been steadily 
increasing, the curricula are organized to acquaint the student with all the aspects of 
program preparation and production, and with the organization and management of a 
radio station. Each student is allowed to gain experience in actual radio procedure in 
Radio Station WRUF, which is used as a laboratory for the course. 

A Committee on Training for Radio administers the curricula of Radio Broadcasting. 
By means of tests, conferences, and other devices, this Committee advises and assists 
students who are interested in the field. 

METHOD OF REGISTRATION 

The student who wishes to register for one of the programs of Training for Radio is 
to report to the Chairman of the Committee on Training for Radio who will designate 
one of the members of the Committee as adviser to the student. This adviser will assist 
the student in outlining his program and will recommend the courses for which the student 
is to register each semester. 

technical curriculum in RADIO BROADCASTING 

For work in the technical field of radio broadcasting, there is available the curriculum 
in Communications in the College of Engineering. This is open to students after they 
have completed the work of the General College, which constitutes the first two years of 



RADIO BROADCASTING TRAINING 345 

their program. For further information on this curriculum see page 337, Electrical Engi- 
neering. The electives of this curriculum should be utilized in taking some of the 
Professional Courses in Radio Broadcasting. 

COMMERCIAL CURRICULUM IN RADIO BROADCASTING 

A. Completion of the General College program including: 

C-1 Man and the Social World 

C-2 Man and the Physical World 

C-3 Reading, Speaking and Writing 

C-41 Man and His Thinking 

C-42 General Mathematics 

C-5 The Humanities 

C-6 Man and the Biological World 

CEs. 13 Economic Foundations of JModern Life 

CEs. 15 Elementary Statistics 

CBs. 141-142 Elementary Accounting 

CEh. 33 Effective Writing 

Ps. 224 Sound and Its Application 

B. Registration in the College of Business Administration, following the regular curric- 

ulum with emphasis upon courses in advertising and marketing, or the curriculum 
in Public Administration. 

PROGRAMMING CURRICULUM IN RADIO BROADCASTING 

A. Completion of the General College program including: 

C-1 Man and the Social World 

C-2 Man and the Physical World 

C-3 Reading, Speaking and Writing 

C-41 Man and His Thinking 

C-42 General Mathematics 

C-5 The Humanities 

C-6 Man and the Biological World 
Ps. 224 Sound and Its Application 

and, with the advice of the Committee on Training for Radio, enough electives to 
complete the program of general education. Some of these electives will be chosen 
from the professional courses in Radio Broadcasting. 

B. Registration in the College of Arts and Sciences, taking a group major in The Human- 

ities or the Social Sciences, including as many of the professional courses in Radio 
Broadcasting as fit into the group major. The other Upper Division requirements 
should be met in part by selecting as many courses as fit in with radio broadcasting 
training, both from the professional courses listed below, and from other courses 
that are available. The selection of courses shall in all cases be made with the 
approval of the Committee on Training for Radio. 



346 



BULLETIN OF INFORMATION —UPPER DIVISION 



PROFESSIONAL COURSES IN RADIO BROADCASTING 



Courses Credits 

1. SOUND 

Ps. 224 — Sound and Its Application 2 

2. WRITING 

CEh. 33— Effective Writing 4 

Jm. 301 — News Writing and Editing 4 

Jm. 302 — News Writing and Editing 4 

Jm. 406— Radio Writing 2 

3. SPEAKING 

CSc. 33— Effective Speaking 4 

Sch. 311 — Speech Training for the 

Radio 3 



Courses Credits 

4. READING 

Sch. 307 — Interpretation of Literature 3 

Sch. 403— One-Act Play 3 

5. ADVERTISING 

Bs. 433 — Advertising _ 3 

Jm. 403 — Newspaper Advertising 3 

6. SPECIAL COURSES 

Jm. 409 — Law of the Press _ 3 

Psy. 306 — Applied Psychology 3 

Msc. 310 — Music Appreciation _ 2 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 347 

DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 

Courses with odd numbers are regularly offered in the first semester; courses with even 
numbers are regularly offered in the second semester. However, if this is not the case, a 
statement of this fact is made immediately following the course title. In many cases 
courses are offered both semesters and this is indicated by a statement following the course 
title. Not all of the courses listed are offered in any one year. To determine which 
courses are offered the reader should consult the Schedule of Courses. 

The number of hours listed is the number of hours a week which the class meets. 

The number of credits is the number of semester hours assigned a student who receives 
a passing grade (A, B, C, or D for undergraduate students; A or B for graduate students) 
when the course is completed. 

Some courses are year courses, and are continued throughout the first and second 
semesters. Unless otherwise noted, the student must take both semesters of such a course 
in order to receive credit. 

The abbreviations used are, wherever possible, the first and last letter of the first word 
of the name of the department. Occasionally, a third letter is inserted to distinguish 
between departments. 

Several General College courses are listed under the departments in the same general 
field. 

AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERING 

An. 381. — Aeronautics. 3 hours. 3 credits. THOMPSON. Prerequisites: Ps. 
205-206. 

The fundamentals of aircraft with introductory aerodynamics ; structural arrangement of air- 
craft ; engine and propeller types ; aircraft accessories. Chatfield, Taylor and Ober, The Airplane 
and its Engine. 

An, 481. — Aerodynamics. 3 hours. 3 credits. THOMPSON. Prerequisites: 
Ig. 363-364, Ml. 385. The first half of the course An. 481-482. 

An. 481-482 : Properties of air ; airfoil characteristics ; drag calculations ; engine-propeller char- 
acteristics ; performance calculation ; stability calculations ; aerodynamic problems. Wood, Tech- 
nical Aerodynamics ; N. A. C. A. Reports. 

An. 482. — Advanced Aerodynamics. 3 houi's. 3 credits, THOMPSON. Pre- 
requisite: Ml. 385. The second half of the course An. 481-482. 

An. 483. — Aerodynamic Laboratory. 4 hours, laboratory, 1 credit. THOMPSON. 
Corequisite: An. 481. 

Aerodynamic experimentation on models and in flight. Verification of aerodynamic theory. 
Methods and equipment used in aerodynamic research. Pavian, Experimental Aerodynamics and 
N. A. C. A. Reports. 

An. 484. — Aircraft Instruments. 1 hour, and 3 hours laboratory. 1 credit. 
THOMPSON. Prerequisite: An. 381. 

The theory of aircraft instruments and their testing in the laboratory. Notes and manufac- 
turers reports. 

An. 485. — Airplane Design. 3 hours, and 3 hours laboratory. 4 credits. 
Thompson, Prerequisite: An. 381. Corequisite: An. 481. The first half of 
the course An, 485-486. 

An. 485-586 : Introductory airplane design ; layout principles ; weight and balance analysis : 
principles of stress analysis ; the preliminary design of a selected airplane. C. A. A. bulletins, 
N. A. C. A. Reports ; Wood, Airplane Design. 



34S BULLETIN OF INFORMATION — UPPER DIVISION 

An. 486. — Airplane Design. 3 hours, and 3 hours laboratory. 4 ciedits. Co- 
requisite: An. 482. The second half of the course An. 485-486. 

AGRICULTURAL CHEMISTRY 

Acy. 125. — Agricultural Chemistry. 3 hours, and 2 hours demonstration. 4 
credits. BLACK. The first half of the course Acy. 125-126. 

Acy. 125-126: A basic course embodying selected fundamentals of both inorganic and organic 
chemistry and designed primarily for agricultural students. Suitable also for the general student 
who wishes a non-laboratory course in science. 

Acy, 126. — Agricultural Chemistry. 3 hours, and 2 hours demonstration. 4 
credits. BLACK. The second half of the course Acy. 125-126. 

Acy. 203. — Analytical Chemistry. 1 hour, and 6 hours laboratory. 3 credits. 
BLACK. Prerequisite: Acy. 125-126 or Cy. 101-102. 

A brief course in quantitative analysis. The laboratory work is designed to fit the special 
needs of agricultural students. 

Acy. 204. — Analytical Chemistry. 2 hours, and 3 hours laboratory. 3 credits. 
Heath. Prerequisite: Acy. 125-126 or Cy. 101-102. 

A brief course in qualitative analysis designed especially for agricultural students. 

Acy. 431. — Agricultural Analysis. 2 hours, and 3 or 6 hours laboratory. 3 or 
4 credits. BLACK. The first half of Acy. 431-432. Prerequisite: Acy. 204 or 
Cy. 202. 

Acy. 431-432 : The quantitative analysis of agricultural products. 

Acy. 432. — Agricultural Analysis. 2 hours, and 3 or 6 hours laboratory. 3 or 
4 credits. BLACK. The second half of Acy. 431-432. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

Acy. 561. — Animal Bio-Chemistry 

Acy. 563. — Plant Bio-Chemistry 

Acy. 570. — Research in Agricultural Chemistry. 

AGRICULTURAL ECONOMICS 
As. 201. — Agricultural Economics. 3 hours. 3 credits. Reitz. 

An introduction to the field of agricultural economics ; principles of economics as applied 
to agriculture ; economic problems of the agricultural industry and the individual farmer. 

As. 302. — Agricultural Resources. Offered only in the first semester. 2 hours, 
and 1 hour discussion. 3 credits. HAMILTON. 

Potentialities and limitations of agricultural production in the various regions of the United 
States and the world. Development of surplus and deficient agricultural areas. 

As. 303. — Farm Records. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits. Reitz. 

Methods and practice of making farm inventories, keeping financial records, and feed and 
crop records. 

As. 304. — Farm Finance and Appraisal. 2 hours. 2 credits. REITZ. 

Problems peculiar to financing farmers and farmers' associations. Special attention is given 
to the Farm Credit Administration. 

As. 306. — Farm Management. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits. 
Reitz. 

The factors of production ; systems of fanning, their distribution and adaptation ; problems of 
labor, machinery, layout of farms, and rotation systems. 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 349 

As. 308. — Marketing. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits. Hamilton. 

Principles of marketing agricultural commodities ; commodity exchanges and future trading ; 
auction companies; market finance; market news; marketing of important agricultural com- 
modities. One or two field trips at an estimated cost of $4 each to be paid by the student at 
the time trips are made. 

As. 311. — Rural Law. 2 hours. 2 credits. Hamilton. 

Classification of farm property ; study of farm boundaries, fences, stock laws, rents, contracts, 
deeds, abstracts, mortgages, taxes, and laws governing shipping of farm products. 

As. 403. — Advanced Farm Management. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 
3 credits. Prerequisite: As. 306. REITZ. 

Research and extension methods in farm managem.ent ; practice in taking farm surveys ; study 
of successful farms in specialized type of farming areas in Florida. Field trips, at an estimated 
cost of $10, paid at time trips are made. 

As. 405. — Agricultural Prices. 3 hours. 3 credits. Hamilton. 

Prices of farm products and the factors affecting them. 

As. 408. — Marketing Fruits and Vegetables. 2 hours, and 1 hour discussion. 
3 credits. HAMILTON. 

Marketing of citrus, tomatoes, beans, potatoes, and other Florida products. Two-day field 
trip, at an estimated cost of $10, paid at time trip is made. 

As. 409. — Cooperative Marketing. 2 hours, and 1 hour discussion. 3 credits. 
Hamilton. 

Cooperative buying and selling organizations, their successes and failures ; methods of organiza- 
tion, financing, and business management. Two-day field trip, at an estimated cost of $10, paid 
at time trip is made. 

As. 410. — Agricultural Statistics. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits. 
Reitz. 

The principles involved in the collection, tabulation, and interpretation of agricultural statistics. 

As. 412. — Land Economics. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits. 
HAMILTON. 

History of public land policies : land utilization ; land reclamation ; marginal and submarginal 
lands ; and land credit. Particular attention is given to the Land Section of the National Re- 
sources Board. 

As, 413. — Agricultural Policy. Oflfered only in the second semester. 3 hours. 
3 credits. Reitz. 

A history of farmer attempts and accomplishments through organization and legislation to 
improve the economic and social status of agriculture. Evaluation of present legislative programs 
and policies affecting the farmer. 

As. 414. — Terminal Markets and Commodity Exchanges. 3 hours discussion 
week preceding and week following field trip, respectively. 1 ci'edit. HAMIL- 
TON. Prerequisite or corequisite: As. 308 or consent of instructor. Offered in 
alternate years. Offered in 1942-43. 

A study of marketing agricultural products in terminal markets and agricultural commodity 
exchanges by visitation and inspection. The week of Spring Recess will be used for visiting the 
markets. Estimated cost of trip $40 to $50, to be paid at time trip is made. 

As. 420. — Marketing of Livestock. Identical with Al. 420. 2 hours, and 2 
hours laboratory. 3 credits. Shealy, HAMILTON. 

Market classes and grades of livestock ; study of firms handling livestock and distribution 
problems ; factors affecting the price of livestock. Given jointly with the Department of Animal 
Husbandry. One or two field trips at an estimated cost of $2 each to be paid at time trip 
is made. 



350 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION —UPPER DIVISION 

GRADUATE COURSES 

As. 501. — Agricultural Economics Seminar 

As. 502. — Agricultural Economics Seminar 

As. 505. — Research Problems. — Farm Management 

As. 506. — Research Problems. — Farm Management 

As. 508. — Land Economics 

As. 511. — Research Problems — Marketing Agricultural Products 

As. 512. — Research Problems — Marketing Agricultural Products 

As. 514. — Advanced Marketing of Agricultural Products 

AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION 

(See Education) 

AGRICULTURAL ENGINEERING 

Ag. 301. — Drainage and Irrigation. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits. 
Rogers. 

The drainage and irrigation of lands with treatment of the necessity for such in the produc- 
tion of field, fruit and vegetable crops. The cost, design, operation and upkeep of drainage and 
irrigation systems. Field work in laying out systems. 

Ag. 302. — Farm Motors. Identical with In. 404. 2 hours, and 2 hours labora- 
tory. 3 credits. ROGERS. 

The general principles of operation of the various sources of farm power. The care, operation 
and repair of electric motors, internal combustion engines, (including automobile, stationary 
gasoline engines, truck and tractor) and windmills. Laboratory work includes actual operation 
and repair. 

Ag, 303. — Farm Shop. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits. Rogers. 

The farm shop jobs that are common to the farms of Florida. Carpentry, concrete con- 
struction, light forging, soldering, tool care and repair are some of the jobs given special 
emphasis. Laboratory work includes actual shop practice. 

Ag. 306. — Farm Machinery. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits. 
Rogers. 

Machines that are used in the production of field, fruit and truck crops. Care, construction, 
operation and repair, selection of harvesting, picking, seeding, spraying and tillage machinery. 
Machines provided for laboratory observation and study. 

Ag. 401. — Farm Buildings. 1 hour, and 2 hours laboratory. 2 credits. 
Rogers. 

The arrangement, cost, construction, depreciation, design, location and ventilation of farm 
buildings. 

Ag. 402. — Farm Concrete. 1 hour, and 2 hours laboratory. 2 credits. Rogers. 

The coloring, curing, m.Lxing, placing, proportioning, reinforcing and waterproofing of con- 
crete for fann use. Consideration of materials suitable for farm concrete work. 

Ag. 403. — Agricultural Engineering Investigations. 2 hours. 2 credits. 
Rogers. The first half of the course Ag. 403-404. 

Ag. 403-404 : Assigned reading and reports of recent developments in the field of agricul- 
tural engineering. 

Ag. 404. — Agricultural Engineering Investigations. 2 hours. 2 credits. 
ROGERS. The second half of the course Ag. 403-404. 

Ag. 406. — Dairy Engineering. Offered only in the first semester. 2 hours, 
and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits. ROGERS. Offered in alternate years. 

The machinery and power used in the manufacture and storage of dairy products. Shop 
operations necessary to operation of dairy plant considered. 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 351 

Ag. 408. — Soil and Water Conservation. Identical with Sis. 408. 2 hours, 
and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits. ROGERS, SMITH. Prerequisites: Sis. 301, 
Ag. 301. Prerequisite or corequisite: Sis. 302. 

For description see Sis. 408. 

CflADUATE COURSES 



Ag. 501. — Seminar 
Ag. 570. — Research 



AGRONOMY 



Ay. 321. — Field Crops. 2 hours, and 2 hours demonstration-laboratory. 3 
credits. Senn. 

An intensive study of field crops. Crops of southeastern United States — cotton, tobacco, the 
grains, sweet potatoes, peanuts, sugar cane — soil conservation crops and crop rotation systems are 
given special emphasis. Hutcheson, Wolfe and Kipp, Production of Field Crops. 

Ay. 324. — Forage and Cover Crops. 2 hours, and 2 hours demonstration- 
laboratory. 3 credits. SENN. 

Plants that produce feed for livestock and methods of establishing pastures. Consideration 
of plants suited for cover crops and rotation systems of the South. Survey v7ork, topic develop- 
ment and field trips are embodied in the demonstration-laboratory. 

Ay. 325. — Exhibiting and Judging Farm Crops. 2 hours. 2 credits. SENN. 

Designed to fit one to prepare exhibits and to judge competitive farm crop displays. Arrange- 
ment of exhibits, assimilation of materials and preparation of premium lists for fairs are con- 
sidered. Especially adapted to students preparing for teaching agriculture in high schools, and 
county agent work. 

Ay. 329. — Principles of Genetics. 3 hours. 3 credits. SENN. 

A basic course dealing with fundamental principles of heredity, variation and selection, and 
the application of genetic principles to plant and animal improvement. Sinnott & Dunn, Principles 
of Genetics. 

Ay. 331. — Laboratory Problems in Genetics. 2 or 4 hours laboratory. 1 or 
2 credits. SENN. 

Laboratory methods in applying genetic principles, with breeding experiments illustrating 
the laws of inheritance. Designed to be taken in conjunction with Ay. 329. 

Ay. 400. — Agricultural Extension Methods. 3 hours. 3 credits. SENN. 

Designed to acquaint students with the activities of the Agricultural Extension Service, in- 
cluding specific duties of the county agent, agricultural specialists and county, state and federal 
agencies contributing toward the general betterment of agricultural conditions. 

Ay, 422. — Plant Breeding, 3 hours. 3 credits. SENN. 

The fundamental principles of plant improvement. Field practice in artificial pollination, 
hybridization, and field plot technique, acquaint the student with modern methods employed in 
plant breeding. 

Ay. 426. — Problems in Crop Production. Offered either semester. 2 to 6 
hours reference or laboratory w^ork. 1 to 3 credits. SENN. 

Individual study of selected problems in crop production. 

Ay. 492. — Crops Seminar. 1 hour. 1 credit. SENN. 

Assigned readings, reports and discussions of current developments in the field of plant 
science. 

GRADUATE COURSES 



Ay, 551. — Conference on Special Agronomic Problems 
Ay, 570. — Research in Plant Breeding 
Ay, 571, — Research in Crop Production 



352 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION —UPPER DIVISION 

ANIMAL PRODUCTION 

Al. 211. — Principles of Animal Husbandry. 3 hours. 3 credits. SMITH. For 
students majoring in departments other than Animal Husbandry. Offered only 
in second semester. 

The place of livestock in agriculture ; principles of livestock improvement ; characteristics of 
feeds ; and feeding principles. 

Al. 309. — Fundamentals in Animal Husbandry. 2 hours, and 2 hours labora- 
tory. 3 credits. WiLLOUGHBY. 

Types and breeds of farm animals ; principles of breeding, selection and management. 

Al. 311. — Elementary Nutrition. 3 hours, and 3 hours laboratory. 4 credits. 
RUSOFF. 

Elements and compounds, metabolic processes in animal nutrition, biological assays. 

Al. 312. — Feeds and Feeding. 3 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 4 credits. 
Becker and Anderson. Prerequisites: Al. 311, except by consent of instructor. 

Composition of plants and animals ; feeding standards and rations for farm animals and poultry. 

Al. 314. — Livestock Judging, 1 hour, and 4 hours laboratory. 3 credits. 
Kirk. Prerequisite: Al. 309, or Al. 211. 

Special training in livestock judging ; show ring methods ; contests at fairs. 

Al. 322. — Animal Breeding. 2 hours. 2 credits. WiLLOUGHBY. Prerequisite: 
Al. 309. 

Principles of breeding applied to animals ; pedigree and record work ; foundation and manage- 
ment of a breeding enterprise. 

Al. 411. — Beef Production. 2 hours. 2 credits. KiRK, WiLLOUGHBY. Second 

semester only. 

Selection, feeding and management of beef cattle ; finishing and marketing. 

Al. 413. — Swine Production. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits. 
Smith. 

Selection, feeding and management of hogs ; forage crops and grazing ; disease and parasite 
control ; slaughtering of hogs on the farm. 

AL 414. — Sheep Production. 2 hours. 2 credits. WiLLOUGHBY. 

Production methods with sheep and goats ; breeds ; management in Florida ; marketing of wool. 

Al. 415. — Meat Products. 1 hour, and 4 hours laboratory. 3 credits. KiRK, 
Smith. 

Farm slaughtering and packing house methods ; curing and processing of meats. 

AL 416. — World Meats. 2 hours. 2 credits. WiLLOUGHBY. Prerequisites: 
AL 309, 411, 413. 

Meat production in other countries of the world compared with the United States. 

AL 417. — Breed History. 2 hours. 2 credits. WiLLOUGHBY. Prerequisite: 
AL 309. 

History of breeds of beef, dairy, and dual purpose cattle ; pedigree studies and registration 
methods. 

Al. 418. — Breed History. 2 hours. 2 credits. WiLLOUGHBY. Prerequisite: 
Al. 309. 

History of breeds of horses, sheep, and swine ; pedigree studies and registration methods. 

Al. 419. — Horse Husbandry. 2 hours. 2 credits. WiLLOUGHBY. 

Raising horses and mules in the southeast ; their use as farm power, multiple hitches : housing 
and equipment. 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 353 

Al. 420. — Marketing of Livestock. Identical with As. 420. 2 hours, and 2 
hours laboratory. 3 credits. Shealy, HAMILTON. 

Market classes and grades of livestock ; study of firms handling livestock and distribution 
problems ; factors affecting the price of livestock. Given jointly with the Department of Agri- 
cultural Economics. One or two field trips at an estimate cost of $2.00 each to be paid by the 
student at the time trips are made. 

Al. 421, — Seminar. 1 hour. 1 credit. Staff Seminar will be conducted jointly 
with Dairy Husbandry, Dairy Manufacturing and Poultry Husbandry groups. 
This course is designated for seniors. 

Al. 424. — Animal Production, 3 hours. 3 credits. WiLLOUGHBY. 

Origin and development of the livestock and meat industries from colonial times to the present ; 
modern management trends and prospects for the future. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

Al. 501. — Advanced Animal Production 
Al. 503. — Animal Nutrition 
Al. 505. — Livestock Records 
Al. 508. — Methods in Animal Research 
Al. 509. — Problems in Animal Nutrition 
Al. 511. — Problems in Swine Production 
Al. 513. — Problems in Beef Production 
Al. 551. — Advanced Animal Nutrition 
Al. 554. — Vitamins 

ARCHITECTURE 

Courses in the Department of Architecture are carried on by means of the prob- 
lem or project method, and accomplishment is the sole criterion for advancement. 
Consequently, the courses are of indeterminate duration, and the tim,e listed for each 
course represents merely the nominal titne which the average student will need to 
complete the work. 

Students in the Department of Architecture must complete the various courses 
in the sequence listed in their respective curricula. Students from other depart- 
ments may, with the consent of the instructor and the approval of the Director, 
enroll in courses for which they have sufficient preparation. 

Lower Division 
Ae. IIA. — Fundamentals of Architecture. Weaver, Parker. 

A creative introductory course leading the student, through a study of human actions, to 
devise buildings in which all the arrangements, details, and materials are intended to make human 
activity both efficient and pleasant. The creation of buildings to meet the requirements of use 
is emphasized. Drawing of all kinds is taught, not in a formal manner, but as an incidental accom- 
paniment to design. A study of principles of composition and of nraterials and methods .of con- 
struction is an integral part of the work from the beginning. Nine projects. Nominal time, 9 
hours a week for 4 semesters, or 18 hours a week for 2 semesters. (Equivalent to 12 credit^s.) 

Upper Division 
DESIGN 

This work consists of the design of buildings of the type encountered in con- 
temporary practice. In general, the problems are non-covipetitive in character and 
the time for the completion of the solutions is not fixed. Criticisms are given in- 
dividually, and solutions are in the form of plans, sections, plastic models, and 
elevations. Other problems which are competitive in character are assigned regularly 
every four weeks. Such problems are solved without criticism and without references 
and the solutions are generally limited to nine hours. 



354 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION ~ UPPER DIVISION 

Ae. 21 A. — Architectural Design, GRAND. 

A continuation of Ae. IIA for students in Architecture. The design of simple residential, 
commercial, and public buildings in wood, brick, and stone with emphasis on the analysis of 
human requirements, the consideration of the conditions of environment, and the selection of 
materials for color, texture, and appropriateness. Preliminary studies, design models, and work- 
ing drawings. Eight projects correlated with Projects in Architecture 1 to 8, inclusive. Nominal 
time, 15 hours a week for 2 semesters. 

Ae. 21 B. — Architectural Design, GULLEY, 

A continuation of Ae. 21A for students in Architecture. The design of more complex buildings 
including a hospital, an airport, a two story house, a bank, a city hall, a theater, a high school 
and a hotel. Conferences on the theory of composition. Eight projects correlated with Projects 
in Architecture 9 to 16, inclusive. Nominal time, 15 hours a week for 3 semesters. 

Ae. 22A. — Architectural Design. GRAND, 

A continuation of Ae. IIA for students in Building Construction. The preparation of working 

dravidngs. Estimating of building costs. The preparation of quantity surveys. Eight projects 

correlated with projects in Building Construction 1 to 8 inclusive. Nominal time, 15 hours a 
week for 2 semesters. 

Ae, 23A, — Landscape Design. GRAND. 

A continuation of Ae. IIA for students in Landscape Architecture. The design of small 
properties with emphasis on the principles of landscape composition. Eight projects correlated 
with Projects in Landscape Architecture 1 to 8, inclusive. Nominal time, 15 hours a week for 
2 semesters. 

Ae. 23B. — Landscape Design. GULLEY. 

A continuation of Ae. 23A for students in Landscape Architecture. The design of public 
and private properties including a park, a country club, a high school grounds, a residential 
development, and two other projects. Six projects correlated with Projects in Landscape Archi- 
tecture 9 to 14, inclusive. Nominal time, 15 hours a week for 2 semesters. 

DELINEATION 

Ae. 31A. — Freehand Drawing and Water Color. GRAND. 

A continuation of Ae. IIA for students in Architecture and Building Construction. The 
delineation of form in architecture with charcoal, pencil, colored pencil, water color, and pen 
and ink. Color theory, and a continuation of the study of perspective. Eight projects correlated 
with Projects in Architecture 1 to 8, inclusive. Nominal time, 6 hours a week for 2 semesters. 

Ae. 31B. — Freehand Drawing and Water Color. GRAND. 

A continuation of Ae. 31A for students in Architecture. Outdoor sketching in pencil and 
water color. Eight projects correlated with Projects in Architecture 9 to 16, inclusive. Nominal 
time, 6 hours a week for 1 semester and 3 hours a week for 2 semesters. 

Ae. 33A. — Freehand Drawing and Water Color, GRAND. 

A continuation of Ae. IIA for students in Landscape Architecture. Drawing in charcoal, 
pencil, and water color. Eight projects correlated with Projects in Landscape Architecture 1 
to 8, inclusive. Nominal time, 6 hours a vreek for 2 semesters. 

Ae. 33B. — Freehand Drawing and Water Color. GRAND. 

A continuation of Ae. 33A for students in Landscape Architecture. Outdoor sketching in 
various media. Six projects correlated with Projects in Landscape Architecture 9 to 14, inclusive. 
Nominal time, 6 hours a week for 2 semesters. 

HISTORY 

Ae. 41A. — History of Architecture. GRAND. 

For students in Architecture and Building Construction. An analytical study of the develop- 
ment of the art of building with emphasis on historical and other influences, materials and 
methods of construction, and principles of composition and planning. A study of the component 
parts of buildings including such structural elements as walls, roofs, openings, columns, and piers, 
and the decorative elements such as mouldings and ornament. Individual research, conferences, 
and illustrated reports. Eight projects. Nominal time, 6 hours a week for 2 semesters. 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 355 

Ae. 41 B. — History of Architecture. GULLEY. 

For students in Architecture, Landscape Architecture, and Painting. A chronological study 
of the development of the art of building from ancient to modem times with emphasis on environ- 
mental influences, architectural development, and significant buildings. Individual research, con- 
ferences, and illustrated reports. Six projects. Nominal time, 6 hours a week for 2 semesters. 

Ae. 41C.— Decorative Arts. GULLEY. 

For students in Architecture and Painting. A study of the decorative use of various materials, 
especially those used in building, such as stone, ceramic products, textiles, glass, plaster, wood, 
and metals. Two projects. Nominal time, 6 hours a week for 1 semester. 

CONSTRUCTION AND EQUIPMENT 

Ae. 51A. — Materials and Methods of Construction. Hannaford. 

A continuation of Ae. IIA for students in Architecture and Building Construction. A study 
of the materials used in the construction of buildings and of the principles governing the selection 
and use of such materials. Methods of building construction, the developm.ent of construction 
details, and working drawings, and elementary surveying as applied to building. Eleven projects 
correlated with Projects in Architecture 1 to 12 inclusive. Nominal time, 9 hours a week for 3 
semesters and 12 hours a week for % of a semester. 

Ae. 53A. — Materials and Methods of Construction. GULLEY. 

A continuation of Ae. IIA for students in Landscape Architecture. Methods of constructing 
walks, steps, terraces, fences, gates, walls, driveways, water supply systems, and the like. Prepara- 
tion of working drawings, contour maps, and grading plans. Seven projects correlated with Projects 
in Landscape Architecture 5 to 8, and 12 to 14, inclusive. Nominal time, 9 hours a week for 2 
semesters. 

Ae. 51B. — Mechanical Equipment of Buildings. GULLEY, WILSON. 

For students in Architecture and Building Construction. A study of plumbing, heating, 
ventilation, and electrical installations in buildings. The design of simple plumbing systems, 
selection of types of heating systems, calculation of heat losses and raliator sizes, and the design 
of interior wiring systems. Four projects correlated with Projects in Architecture 13 to 16 inclu- 
sive. Nominal time, 12 hours a week for % of a semester and 3 hours a week for 1 semester. 

PROFESSIONAL RELATIONS 

Ae. 51C. — Professional Relations and Methods. WEAVER. 

For students in Architecture and Building Construction. Conferences on professional relations 
and on methods of modern practice. Ethics, law, specifications, and estimates. Two projects 
correlated with Projects in Architecture 15 and 16. Nominal time, 9 hours a week for 1 semester. 

STRUCTURES 

The courses in structures presuppose a vatisfactory knowledge of trigonometry, 
algebra, analytic geometry, elementary calculus, and elem,entary physics. The work 
consists of a series of projects designed to give the student proficiency in solving the 
structural problems of buildings. 

Ae. 61A. — Structural Design of Buildings. HANNAFORD. 

For students in Architecture and Building Construction. The structural design of the com- 
ponent parts of buildings in wood and steel. The weights of building materials, live loads, and 
the investigation of the stresses produced in the component parts. Eight projects correlated with 
Projects in Architecture 1 to 8, inclusive. Nominal time, 12 hours a week for 2 semesters. 

Ae. 61B. — Structural Design of Buildings. HANNAFORD. 

A continuation of Ae. 61A for students in Architecture and Building Construction. The 
structural design of the component parts of buildings in wood, masonry, cast iron, steel, and 
reinforced concrete. Eight projects correlated with Projects in Architecture 9 to 16, inclusive. 
Nominal time for students in Architecture, 12 hours a week for 3 semesters; for students in 
Building Construction, 15 hours a week for 1 semester and 21 hours a week for 1 semester. 



356 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION — UPPER DIVISION 

THESIS IN ARCHITECTURE 

Ae. 71 A. — Thesis. WEAVER and STAFF. Prerequisite: Completion of all' 
other requirements for the degree. 

A comprehensive final project in architecture based on a program submitted by the student 
and approved by the faculty. The program must be approved in time to permit not less than 
14 weeks for the study of the problem. The presentation will include the architectural, structural, 
and mechanical equipment drawings, and portions of the specifications. Models and written 
descriptions may accompany the solution. One project. Nominal time, 48 hours a week for 1 
semester. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

Ae. 501-502. — Architectural Design 

Ae. 521-522. — Advanced Freehand Drawing 

Ae. 525-526.— Advanced Water Color 

Ae. 531-532. — Historical Research 

Ae. 551-552. — Building Construction 

Ae. 553-554. — Structural Design of Buildings 

ASTRONOMY 

CAy. 23. — Descriptive Astronomy. 3 hours, and 2 hours laboratory-observing. 
4 credits. KlISNER. 

A survey of the astronomical universe. The earth as an astronomical body ; the solar system ; 
stars and nebulae ; the galaxy ; the constellations ; astronomical instruments and their uses ; 
amateur telescope making. 

Aty. 302. — Navigation and Nautical Astronomy. 3 hours. 3 credits. KUSNER. 
Prerequisite: Plane Trigonometry or equivalent. 

The geographical and astronomical principles and practices involved in determination of 
position at sea and in the air and in the guidance of marine- and air-craft. Instruments of 
navigation and their use. 

BACTERIOLOGY 

Bey. 301. — General Bacteriology. 2 hours, and 4 hours laboratory. 4 credits. 
Carroll, Prerequisites: C-6, or equivalent; Cy. 101-102, or Acy. 125-126. 

Morphology, physiology and cultivation of bacteria and related micro-organisms. Tanner, 
Bacteriology. 

Bey. 302. — Agricultural Bacteriology. 1 hour, and 4 hours laboratory. 3 
credits. CARROLL. Prerequiste: Bey. 301. 

Bacteria and associated micro-organisms in relation to water, milk, silage and farm problems. 

Bey. 304. — Pathogenic Bacteriology. 2 hours, and 4 hours laboratory. 4 
credits. Carroll. Prerequisite: Bey. 301. 

Recognition, culture, and special laboratory technique of handling pathogens and viruses ; 
theories and principles of immunity and infection. Stitt, Practical Bacteriology, Parasitology, and 
Blood Work. 

Bey. 306. — Bacteriology of Foods. 2 hours, and 4 hours laboratory. 4 credits. 
Carroll. Prerequisite: Bey. 301. 

Relation of bacteria, yeast, molds and other micro-organisms to preservation and spoilage of 
foods. Tanner, Microbiology of Foods. 

Bey. 308. — Sanitary Laboratory Practice. Offered only in the first semester. 
1 hour, and 4 hours laboratory. 3 credits. CARROLL. Corequisite: Cy. 215. 

Problems in sewage and public sanitation, designed primarily for sanitary engineers. American 
Public Health Association and American Water Works Association, Standard Methods for Examina- 
tion of Water and Seivage. 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 357 

Bey. 402. — Dairy Bacteriology. 2 hours and 4 hours laboratory. 4 credits. 
Carroll. Prerequisite: Bey. 301. 

Consideration of bacteria and related micro-organisms encountered in milk and dairy products : 
milk spoilage, milk fermentation ; bacteriology of butter, ice cream, cheese ; standard methods of 
milk analysis and dairy inspection. Hammer, Dairy Bacteriology. 

Bey. 411. — Principles and Practices of Immunology. 2 hours, and 4 hours 
laboratory. 4 credits. Carroll. Prerequisite: Bey. 301. 

Consideration of preparations and therapeutic uses of biologicals from a bacteriological stand- 
point ; diagnostic tests. Zinsser, Resistance to Infectious Diseases. 

Bey. 412. — Industrial Bacteriology. 2 hours, and 4 hours laboratoi-y. 4 credits. 
Carroll. Prerequisite: Bey. 301. 

Consideration of principles and problems in industrial bacteriology ; isolation, cultivation and 
classifications of organisms concerned. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

Bey. 501. — Problems in Soil Bacteriology 
Bey. 503. — Problems in Dairy Bacteriology. 
Bey. 505. — Problems in Pathogenic Bacteriology 
Bey. 507. — Problems in Water Bacteriology 
Bey. 509. — Problems in Industrial Bacteriology 

BAND 

(See Music) 

BIBLE 
Be. 303. — World's Great Religions. 2 hours. 2 credits. JOHNSON. 

A study of some African, Chinese, Japanese and Indian religions showing their development 
and contribution. 

Be, 304.— World's Great Religions. 2 hours. 2 credits. JOHNSON. 

A study of Buddhism, Zoroastrianism, Judaism. Christianity, Islam, showing some similarities 
and dissimilarities and contribution of each religion. 

Be. 305. — How to Understand the Bible. 2 hours. 2 credits. JOHNSON. 

A brief survey of how we got the Bible. A study of the evolution of three fundamental ideas 
in the Hebrew-Christian literature : Gk)d, Man, Right and Wrong. 

Be. 306.— How to Understand the Bible. 2 hours. 2 credits. JOHNSON. 

Acquiring a familiarity with Biblical literature by tracing the development of such funda- 
mental ideas as Suffering, Fellowship, Immortality. 

Be. 309.— Biblical Geography and History. 3 hours. 3 credits. JOHNSON. 

An introduction to a more intensive study of Biblical literature. Emphasis on the geography 
of Palestine and its relations to Assyria, Babylonia and Bgypt. Growth of Old Testament literature 
as affected by these civilizations. 

Be. 310. — Biblical Geography and History. 3 hours. 3 credits. JOHNSON. 

The influence of Persian, Greek, and Roman cultures on Jewish religion and the rise of 
Christianity. A brief survey of the Apocalyptic movement and its literature. 

Be. 403. — Old Testament Literature. 3 hours. 3 credits. JOHNSON. 

A survey of Old Testament writings dealing with histories, laws, and legends of Israel, 
authorship and composition of books, the united and divided kingdoms and the dominating leaders, 
showing historical sequence and spiritual affiliation. 

Be. 404. — Prophets of Israel. Offered only in the first semester. 3 hours. 
3 credits. JOHNSON. 

A study of the background and message of the creative personalities in Hebrew and Jewish 
religious life. The relation of prophetic thought to present day problems ; the study of a great 
religious movement and how it affected ethics, morality and religion. 



358 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION —UPPER DIVISION 

Be. 405. — New Testament Writings. 3 hours. 3 credits. JOHNSON. 

A study of the New Testament writings dealing with their background, authorship, occasion, 
content, and purpose. 

Be. 406. — Life of Jesus. Offered only in the first semester. 3 hours. 3 credits. 
Johnson. 

An introduction to the main facts in the life of Jesus and to a general knowledge of the 
Gospel literature. 

Be. 412. — Early Christianity, 3 hours. 3 credits. JOHNSON. 

A general concept of the rise of the Christian movement and the organization of the Christian 
Church. 

BIOLOGY 

Students planning to major in Biology should, if possible, arrange to take C-6 during 
the freshman year and C-2 during the sophomore year. All majors in Biology will include 
Bly. 101-102, 209, 210, 325 and 332. Ely. 133. 134 and 261-262 may not be used as a part of 
the major. Any exceptions to the above regulations will require the approval of the head 
of the department. Students who expect to pursue graduate work in Biology should also 
take Bly. 425-426. 

Biology courses that are to be offered as a part of a group major must be selected 
from Bly. 101-102, 209, 210, 325, 332, 416 and 425426. 

Bly. 101 is a prerequisite for Bly. 209, 210 and 310; Bly. 101-102 is a prerequishe for 
all other courses in Biology except Bly. 261-262. 

Bly, 101. — General Animal Biology. Offered only in the second semester. 1 
hour and 4 hours laboratory. 3 credits. WALLACE. The first half of the course 
Bly. 101-102. Open to students who have satisfactorily completed the first half 
of C-6. 

Bly. 101-102 : An introduction to the morphology, physiology, development and classification 
of animals. Designed to supplement and extend the work of C-6, to give the necessary foundation 
for Upper Division work in Biology, and to furnish training in laboratory methods and technique. 
Bly. 101 is devoted primarily to the vertebrates. Bly. 102 is devoted primarily to, invertebrates. 

Bly, 102. — General Animal Biology. — Offered only during the first semester. 1 
hour and 4 hours laboratory. 3 credits. Byers. The second half of the course 
Bly. 101-102. 

Bly. 209. — Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy, 2 hours, and 6 hours laboratory. 
4 credits. SHERMAN. Prerequisite: Bly. 101, or C-6 and Bly. 61. 

The morphology and classification of chordate animals. 

Bly. 210, — Vertebrate Embryology, 2 hours, and 6 hours laboratory. 4 credits, 
SHERMAN. Prerequisite: Bly. 209. 

Bly, 261. — Applied Physiology. 4 hours laboratory demonstration or discus- 
sion. 2 credits. EDWARDS. The first half of the course Bly. 261-262. 

Bly. 261-262 : A study of the anatomical structures and physiological processes having a direct 
relationship to pharmacology. 

Bly, 262, — Applied Physiology. 4 hours laboratory demonstration or discus- 
sion. 2 credits. EDWARDS. The second half of the course Bly. 261-262. 

Bly, 310, — Mammalian Anatomy and Physiology. Offered only in the first 
semester. 2 hours, and 6 hours laboratory. 4 credits. SHERMAN. Prerequisite: 
Bly. 209 or consent of instructor. 

Lectures on the physiology and anatomy of the mammalian body supplemented by individual 
dissections of the cat. 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 359 

Bly, 325. — Genetics and Evolution. 3 hours. 3 credits. ROGERS. Prere- 
quisite: Bly. 101-102. 

An introduction, to the data and methods of genetics with special reference to their bearing 
on the problems of organic evolution. 

Bly. 332. — Invertebrate Zoology. 3 hours, and 4 hours laboratory. 4 credits. 
BYERS. Prerequisite: Bly. 61 or Bly. 101-102. 

An advanced survey of the morphology, developmental stages and classification of the inverte- 
brate phyla. 

Bly. 411. — Individual Problems in Animal Biology. 2, 3, or 4 credits. STAFF. 
The first half of the course Bly. 411-412. Prerequisite: At least 16 credits in ap- 
proved major courses in Biology and permission of the Head of the Depai'tment. 

Bly. 411-412 : Qualified students and the instructor concerned may choose a particular topic 
or problem for study in one of the following fields: Animal Ecology, Limnology (Rogers); Ento- 
mology, Zoogeography (Hubbell) ; Embryology, Mammalian Morphology (Sherman) ; Advanced 
Invertebrates, Parasitology (Byers) ; Laboratory Technique, Arachnida (Wallace) ; Herpetology, 
Ichthyology (Carr) ; Crustacea (Hobbs). 

Bly. 412. — Individual Problems in Animal Biology. 3 credits. STAFF. The 
second half of the course Bly. 411-412. 

Bly. 416. — Animal Parasitology. 3 hours and 3 hours laboratory. 4 credits. 
Byers. Prerequisite: Bly. 209 or Bly. 332. 

The animal organisms, ecpecially the Protozoa and worms, that cause disease in man and the 
higher vertebrates. 

Bly. 425. — Field Biology. 2 hours, and all of Saturday for field or laboratory 
work. 4 credits. ROGERS and HUBBELL. The first half of the course Bly. 425- 
426. Prerequisite: Bly. 332 or the equivalent. 

Bly. 42.'>-426 : Animal life of northern Florida, with particular reference to the Arthropods. 
An introduction to bio-ecology and field methods. The acquirement of a recognition knowledge of 
the more common terrestrial and aquatic animals is accompanied by field and laboratory work in 
animal ecology and field biology. 

Bly. 426. — Field Biology. 2 hours, and all of Saturday for field or laboratory 
work. 4 credits. ROGERS and HUBBELL. The second half of the course Bly. 
425-426. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

Bly. 505. — History of Biology 

Bly. 506. — Biological Literature and Institutions 

Bly. 507-508. — Taxonomic Studies 

Bly. 509. — Zoogeography 

Bly. 510. — Animal Ecology 

Bly. 511-512.— Florida Wild Life 

Bly. 513-514. — Vertebrate Morphology 

Bly. 515-516. — Invertebrate Morphology 

Bly. 519-520. — Individual Problems in Animal Biology 

Bly. 521-522.— Natural History of Selected Animals 

Bly. 523-524.— Natural History of Selected Animals 

Bly. 533-534. — Problems and Concepts of Taxonomy and Nomenclature 



360 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION — VPPER DIVISION 

BOTANY 

Bty. 303. — General Botany. 2 hours, and 4 hours laboratory. 4 credits. 
Cody. The first half of course Bty. 303-304. 

Bty. 303-304: A study of the form, structure, growth, reproduction, physiology and functions 
of plants and their various organs ; relation of plants to their environment and to each other ; 
principles underlying inheritance, variation and organic e\'olution. Required of students majoring 
in Botany, Bacteriology and Plant Pathology. 

Bty. 304. — General Botany. 2 hours, and 4 hours laboratory. 4 credits. 
Cody. The second half of course Bty. 303-304. 

Bty. 308. — Taxonomy. 2 hours, and 4 hours laboratory. 4 credits. CODY. 
Prerequisites: Bty. 303-304. Desirable prerequisites: Sis. 301, Bty. 311. 

Identification of common seed plants and ferns of the Gainesville region. Frequent field trips 
will be made for study of vegetation. Grays, New Manual of Botany, 7th Edition. 

Bty. 311. — Plant Physiology, 2 hours, and 4 hours laboratory. 4 credits. 
Cody. Prerequisites: One semester of General Botany; Acy. 125-126, or equiv- 
alent. Desirable prerequisites: Sis. 301, Ps. 211, Pt. 321. 

Absorption, assimilation, transpiration, metabolism, respiration, and growth of plants. 

Bty. 401. — ^^Plant Ecology. 1 hour, and 6 hours laboratory. 4 credits. CODY. 
Prerequisites: Bty. 308, Bty. 311, Sis. 301 or Sis. 302. 

Relation of plants to environment ; plant associations and their successions. 

Bty. 403. — Advanced Plant Physiology. 1 hour, and 6 hours laboratory. 4 
credits. Cody. Prerequisites: Bty. 311, Cy. 262. Corequisite: Bey. 301. 

Special consideration of processes of absorption and relation of plant cell to water and the 
soil ; transpiration and photosynthesis. Special problems. 

Bty, 404. — Advanced Plant Physiology. 1 hour, and 6 hours laboratory. 4 
credits. CODY. Prerequisites: Bty. 403, or prerequisites of Bty. 403. 

Principles of syntheses by plants ; digestion, respiration and growth. A continuation of 
Bty. 403. 

Bty. 431. — Plant Histology. 2 hours, and 4 hours laboratory. 4 credits. 
Cody. Prerequisite: Bty. 303-304 or equivalent. 

Methods and practice in killing, fixing, sectioning, and staining of plant tissues and organs. 
Assignment of special plant materials. 

Bty, 432 — ^Plant Anatomy. 2 hours, and 4 hours laboratory. 4 credits. CODY. 
Prerequisite: Bty. 303-304 or equivalent. Desirable prerequisite: Bty. 431. 

Origin, structure and function of principal tissues and organs of plants. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

Bty. 501. — Problems in Advanced Taxonomy 

Bty. 503. — Problems in Plant Physiology 

Bty. 505. — Advanced Plant Histology 

Bty, 507. — Advanced Plant Anatomy 

Bty. 555. — Botany Seminar 

Bty. 570. — Research in Plant Histology 

Bty. 571. — Research in Plant Anatomy 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

(See Economics and Business Administration) 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 361 

BUSINESS EDUCATION 
Note: These courses do not count as credit in Education. 
BEn. 81. — Elementary Typewriting. 3 hours laboratory. 2 credits. MOORMAN. 

Introduction to toucii typewriting : practice upon personal and business problems. 

BEn. 91. — Elementary Shorthand. 5 hours. 2 credits. MOORMAN. The first 
half of the course BEn. 91-92. Corequisite: BEn. 81. 

BEn. 91-92 : Introduction to Gregg Shorthand by the functional method. 

BEn. 92. — Elementary Shorthand. 5 hours. 2 credits. MOORMAN. The second 
half of the course BEn. 91-92. 

*BEn. 94. — Stenography. 6 hours laboratory. 3 credits. MOORMAN. 

Advanced course in shorthand and typewriting. Designed for those who desire more instruc- 
tion than is given in the elementary or introductory courses in shorthand and typewriting for 
personal use, as well as for those who desire certification in the commercial subjects. 

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING 
Cg. 342. — Fuels. 7 hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: Cy. 102 and CMs. 24. 

A study, with laboratoi-y tests following A.S.T.M. methods, of the three major fuels, coal, oil 
and gas. 

Cg. 345. — Industrial Stoichiometry. 3 hours. 3 credits. MORGEN. Prerequi- 
sites or corequisites: Cy. 202, Ms. 354, Ps. 206. 

Cg. 345-346: Industrial processes and calculations. Hougpn and Watson, Industrial CheTnical 
Calculations. 

Cg. 346. — Industrial Stoichiometry. 3 hours. 3 credits. MORGEN. The sec- 
ond half of the course Cg. 345-346. 

Cg. 363.— Metallic Materials of Construction. 2 hours. 2 credits. BARRETT. 
Prerequisites: Cy. 101-102 and College Physics. 

Production, properties and uses of the ferrous and non-ferrous metals and alloys. 

Cg. 364. — Non-metallic Materials of Construction. 2 hours. 2 credits. BAR- 
RETT. Prerequisites: Cy. 101-102 and College Physics. 

Production, properties and uses of such materials of construction as cement, brick, plastics, etc. 

Cg. 443. — Chemical Engineering Laboratory. 6 hours. 2 credits. BEISLER. 
The first half of the course Cg. 443-444. Corequisite: Cg. 447. 

Cg. 443-444 : Experiments in chemical engineering operations. 

Cg. 444. — Chemical Engineering Laboratory. 6 hours. 2 credits. BEISLER. 
The second half of the course Cg. 443-444. Corequisite: Cg. 448. 

Cg. 447. — Principles of Chemical Engineering. 3 hours. 3 credits. BEISLER. 
The first half of the course Cg. 447-448. Prerequisite: Cg. 346. 

Cg. 447-448 : Fundamental chemical engineering operations. Badger and McCabe, Elements 
of Chemical Engineering. 

Cg. 448. — Principles of Chemical Engineering. 3 hours. 3 credits. BEISLER. 
The second half of the coux'se Cg. 447-448. 

Cg. 449. — Unit Processes. 3 hours. 3 credits. Prerequisites: Cg. 448 and Cy. 
302. 

An introduction to the unit processes. Groggins, Unit Proceaaea. 



*Offered only >n the Summer Session. 



362 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION —UPPER DIVISION 

Cg. 457. — Chemical Engineering Design. 1 hour, and 3 hours laboratory or 
its equivalent. 2 credits. MORGEN. The first half of the course Cg. 457-458. 
Corequisite: Cg. 447. 

Cg. 457-458: The design of chemical plants and equipment. Vilbrandt, Chemical Engineering 
Plant Design; Tyler, Chemical Engineering Economics. 

Cg. 458. — Chemical Engineering Design. 1 hour, and 3 hours laboratory or 
its equivalent. 2 credits. MORGEN. The second half of the course Cg. 457-458. 
Corequisite: Cg. 448. 

Cg. 467. — Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics. 3 hours. 3 credits. MOR- 
GEN. The first half of the course Cg. 467-468. Prerequisites: Cy. 402, calculus. 

Cg. 467-468: Fundamental applications of thermodynamics to chemistry and chemical engi- 
neering. 

Cg. 468. — Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics. 3 hours. 3 credits. MOR- 
GEN. The second half of the course Cg. 467-468. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

Cg. 511-512. — Advanced Chemical Engineering 

Cg. 521-522. — Special Topics in Chemical Engineering 

Cg. 531. — Advanced Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics 

Cg. 541. — Advanced Unit Operations 

CHEMISTRY 

Cy. 101. — General Chemistry. Offered each semester. 3 hours, and 3 hours 
laboratory. 4 credits. JACKSON, Otte. The first half of the course Cy. 101-102. 

Cy. 101-102 : Fundamental laws and theories of chemistry. Non-metallic elements and their 
compounds; metals and their compounds and some of their uses. NOTE: This course is required 
for all students who intend to enter the College of Engineering or the School of Pharmacy and 
for those who major in Chenaistry in the Upper Division. 

Cy. 102. — General Chemistry. Offered each semester. 3 hours, and 3 hours 
laboratory. 4 credits. JACKSON, Otte. The second half of the course Cy. 
101-102. 

Cy. 111. — General Chemistry. 1 hour or its equivalent. 1 credit. JACKSON. 
The first half of course Cy. 111-112. Corequisite: Cy. 101. 

Cy. 111-112: Assigned readings for orientation and guidance in chemistry and laboratory experi- 
ments. 

Cy. 112. — General Chemistry. 3 hours laboratory. 1 credit. JACKSON. The 
second half of course Cy. 111-112. Corequisite: Cy. 102. 

Cy. 201. — Analytical Chemistry. Offered each semester. 3 hours, and 3 hours 
laboratory. 4 credits. HEATH, HAWKINS. The first half of the course Cy. 
201-202. Prerequisite: Cy. 102 or a grade of at least B in Acy. 126. 

Cy. 201-202 : Theoretical principles and laboratory technique involved in the qualitative detec- 
tion and quantitative determination of the common metals and acid radicals. 

Cy. 202. — Analytical Chemistry, Offered each semester. 2 hours, and 6 hours 
laboratory. 4 credits. BLACK, HEATH. The second half of the course Cy. 201-202. 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 363 

Cy. 203. — Analytical Chemistry. 1 hour, and 6 hours laboratory. 3 credits. 
Heath. The first half of course Cy. 203-204. Prerequisite: Cy. 102 or Acy. 126. 

Cy. 203-204 : A course in quantitative and qualitative analysis offered primarily for students 
of pharmacy. 

Cy. 204. — Analytical Chemistry. 2 hours, and 3 hours laboratory. 3 credits. 
Heath. The second half of the course Cy. 203-204. 

Cy. 211. — Analytical Chemistry. 3 hours laboraory. 1 credit. Heath. The 
first half of course Cy. 211-212. Corequisite: Cy. 201. 

Cy. 211-212: Laboratory procedures in analytical chemistry. 

Cy. 212. — Analytical Chemistry. 6 hours laboratory. 2 ci'edits. BLACK. The 
second half of course Cy. 211-212. Corequisite: Cy. 202. 

Cy. 215. — Water and Sewage. 2 hours, and 3 hours laboratory. 3 credits. 
Black. Prerequisite: Cy. 101-102. 

A theoretical and practical study of the examination and treatment of water and sewage. 

Cy. 262. — Organic Chemistry. Offered only in the first semester. 3 hours, 
and 6 hours laboratory. 5 credits. POLLARD. Prerequisite: Cy. 101-102. 

A brief elementary course embracing the more important aliphatic and aromatic compounds. 

Cy. 301. — Organic Chemistry. 3 hours, and 3 hours laboratory. 4 credits. 
Leigh, Pollard. The first half of the course Cy. 301-302. Prerequisite: Cy. 
102, 202. 

Cy. 301-302 : Preparation and properties of the various aliphatic and aromatic compounds. 
Conant, The Chemistry of Organic Co7npounds; Fieser, Experiments in Organic Chemistry. 

Cy. 302. — Organic Chemistry. 3 hours, and 3 hours laboratory. 4 credits. 
Leigh, Pollard. The second half of the course Cy. 301-302. 

Cy. 311. — Organic Chemistry. 3 hours laboratory. 1 credit. LEIGH, POLLARD. 

The first half of course Cy. 311-312. Corequisite: Cy. 301. 

Cy. 311-312: Elementary Organic Syntheses and Organic Qualitative Analysis. 

Cy. 312. — Organic Chemistry. 3 hours laboratory. 1 credit. LEIGH, POLLARD. 
The second half of course Cy. 311-312. Corequisite: Cy. 302. 

Cy. 401. — Physical Chemistry. 3 hours, and 3 hours laboratory. 4 credits. 
Hawkins. The first half of the course Cy. 401-402. Prerequisites: One year 
of College Physics, calculus, and Cy. 302. Corequisite: Cy. 301 for engineering 
students. 

Cy. 401-402 : Matter in the three states, elementary thermodynamics, solutions, colloids, elec- 
tricity as applied to chemistry, homogeneous and heterogeneous equilibria, chemical kinetics, 
photochemistry, introduction to quantum theory. 

Cy. 402. — Physical Chemistry. 3 hours, and 3 hours laboratory. 4 credits. 
Hawkins. The second half of the course Cy. 401-402. Corequisite: Cy. 302 for 
engineering students. 

Cy. 403. — Water Analysis. 1 hour, and 6 hours laboratory. 3 credits. Black. 
Prerequisite: Cy. 202. 

Analysis of waters to determine their potability and fitness for steam raising and other purposes. 
Standard Methods of Water Analysis of the A. P. H. A. 

Cy. 411. — Advanced Chemistry. 2 hours and 3 hours laboratory. 3 credits. 
Black, Pollard, Hawkins. The first half of course Cy. 411-412. Corequisite: 
Cy. 401. 

Cy. 411-412 : Studies in Stoichiometrical and Theoretical Chemistry. 

Cy. 412. — Advanced Chemistry. 2 hours and 3 hours laboratory. 3 credits. 
Black, Pollard, Hawkins. The second half of course Cy. 411-412. Corequi- 
site: Cy. 402. 



364 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION — UPPER DIVISION 

Cy. 462. — Photographic Chemistry. 3 hours. 3 credits. HEATH. Prere- 
quisites: Cy. 262, or 302; college physics, or suitable photographic experience; 
Cy. 202. 

Theory and practice of photographic processes and materials, and their uses. 

Cy. 481. — Chemical Literature. One-half hour or its equivalent. V2 credit. 
Pollard. The first half of the course Cy. 481-482. Prerequisite: 3 years of 
chemistry. A reading knowledge of French and German is desirable. 

Cy. 481-482 : A general study of the present sources of published chemical information. 

Cy. 482. — Chemical Literature. One-half hour or its equivalent. V2 credit. 
Pollard. The second half of the course Cy. 481-482. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

Cy. 501. — Organic Preparations 

Cy. 504. — Inorganic Preparations 

Cy. 505. — Organic Nitrogen Compounds 

Cy. 506. — Special Chapters in Organic Chemistry 

Cy. 515-516. — Advanced Inorganic Chemistry 

Cy. 517-518. — Advanced Organic Chemistry 

Cy. 521-522. — Advanced Physical Chemistry 

Cy. 523-524. — Special Topics in Physical Chemistry 

Cy. 525-526.— Chemistry of the Terpenes 

Cy. 533. — Advanced Analytical Chemistry 

Cy. 534. — Advanced Sanitary Chemistry 

Cy. 536. — Advanced Analytical Chemistry 

Cy. 538. — Quantitative Organic Chemistry 

Cy. 570. — Research in Inorganic Chemistry 

Cy. 571. — Research in Analytical Chemistry 

Cy. 572. — Research in Organic Chemistry 

Cy. 573. — Research in Physical Chemistry 

Cy. 574. — Research in Naval Stores 

Cy. 575. — Research in Sanitary Chemistry. 

CIVIL ENGINEERING 

CI. 223. — Surveying. Offered each semester. 2 hours, and 3 hours laboratory. 
3 credits. REED. Prerequisite: Trigonometry, Basic Mathematics. 

The use of chain, level, and transit ; balancing of surveys, calculating of areas, contour work, 
simple curves ; elementary practical problems generally included in a short course for students 
who do not take advanced surveying work. 

CI. 226. — Higher Surveying. 3 hours. 3 credits. STAFF. Prerequisite: CI. 223. 

Traverse, triangulation, precise leveling, topographic mapping ; city, land, hydrographic, and 
aerial surveying ; practical astronomy, and map projections. 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 365 

CI. 326. — Theory of Structures. 2 hours, and 6 hours laboratory. 4 credits. 
Staff. Prerequisite: Ig. 363. Corequisite: Ig. 364. 

The resolution of forces, computation of reactions and stresses in statically determinato 
structures and the design of simple structures. Shedd and Vawter, Theory of Simple Structures. 

CI. 327. — Hydraulics. 3 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 4 credits. MILES. 
Corequisite: Ig. 363. 

The principles underlying the behavior of fluids at rest and in motion. The transportation 
and measurement of fluids. 

CI. 329. — Higher Surveying. Summer Term. 3 hours, and 40 hours labora- 
tory. 6 weeks. 5 credits. STAFF. Prerequisite: CI. 226. 

Field and office practice in traverse, topographic mapping, base line measurement, triangula- 
tion, practical astronomy, stream gauging and hydrographic surveying, precise leveling and adjust- 
ments of instruments. Breed and Hosmer, The Principles and Practice of Surveying, Volume II. 

CI. 331. — Railway Engineering. 2 hours, and 3 hours laboratory. 3 credits. 
REED. Prerequisite: CI. 223. 

Simple, compound, reversed, vertical, and spiral curves ; earthwork ; recitation, field and 
drawing-room work in the principles of railway engineering. Data is obtained in the field for 
the design work in both CI. 331 and CI. 332. Pickles and Wiley, Route Surveying. 

CI. 332. — Highway Engineering. 2 hours, and 6 hours laboratory. 4 credits. 
Reed. Prerequisite: CI. 331. 

Recitations, field and drawing-room work covering the location, design, and construction of 
highways. Bruce, Highway Design and Construction. 

CI. 420. — Hydraulic Engineering. Offered only in the second semester. 2 
hours. 2 credits. MILES. Prerequisite: CI. 327. 

Lectures and recitations on the design and testing of hydraulic machinery. Turbine and pump 
characteristics, the homologous series. Water hammer, backwater and drawdown cui^es. 

CI. 422. — Hydraulic Laboratory. 2 hours laboratory. 1 credit. MiLES. Co- 
requisite: CI. 420. 

Parallel study in the laboratory of the subject matter presented in CI. 420. Syllabus and trade 
literature. 

CI. 423. — Materials Laboratory. 1 hour, and 2 hours laboratory. 2 credits. 
STAFF. Prerequisite: Ig. 363. Corequisite: Ig. 364. 

Laboratory work in, the testing of stone, brick, asphalt, and other road materials ; cement, 
sand, concrete, timber, steel and other materials used in construction. Tucker, Laboratory Manual 
in the Testing of Materials. 

CI. 424. — Soil Mechanics. 2 hours, and 3 hours laboratory. 3 credits. STAFF. 
Prerequisite: CI. 325, 

Theory of soil mechanics, standard tests, current research, classification of soils, properties, 
bearing values, settlement, foundations. 

CI. 42.5. — Water and Sewerage. 2 hours, and 3 hours laboratory. 3 credits. 
Prerequisites: CI. 327, Cy. 215, Bey. 308. 

The principles underlying the collection, treatment and disposal of sewage. The design of 
collection system and treatment plants. Steel, Water Supply and Sewerage. 

CI. 426. — Water and Sewerage. 2 hours, and 3 hours laboratory. 3 credits. 
Prerequisite: CI. 425. 

Lectures and recitations on water supply systems. Sources of supply, methods of treatment, 
the design of a water supply system, including collection, treatment, and distribution. Steel, 
V-'ater Supply and Sewerage. 

CI. 429. — Public Health Engineering. 3 hours, and 4 hours laboratory. 5 
credits. MILES and Staff. The first half of course CI. 429-430. 

Cl. 429-430 : A comprehensive course in various phases of public health engineering including 
limnology, communicable disease control, food inspection and handling, waste disposal, industrial 
sanitation, and public health administration. 



366 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION —UPPER DIVISION 

CI. 430. — Public Health Engineering. 3 hours and 4 hours laboratory. 5 cred- 
its. Miles and special lecturers. The second half of the course CI. 429-430. 
CI. 431. — Hydrology. 2 hours, 2 credits. Prerequisite: Senior rating. 

The principles of hydrology, their relations and applications to engineering design. Meyer, 
Elements of Hydrology. 

CI. 433. — Theory of Reinforced Concrete. 2 hours. 2 credits. STAFF. Pre- 
requisite: CI. 326. 

Theory and design of slabs, beams, girders, columns. Resistance to flexure shear, diagonal 
tension, bond, compression. 

CI. 434. — Reinforced Concrete Design. 1 hour, and 6 hours laboratory. 3 
credits. STAFF. Prerequisite: CI. 433. 

Stress analysis and design of rectangular frame, buildings, footings, retaining walls, highway 
bridges. 

CI. 435. — Structural Engineering. 1 hour, and 6 hours laboratory. 3 credits. 
Staff. Prerequisite: CI. 326. 

Recitations, lectures, and drawing-room work in the analysis of stresses due to moving loads, 
design of miU buildings in wood and steel. Shedd and Vawter, Theory of Simple Structures; 
Shedd, Design of Structures in Steel. 

CI. 436. — Structural Engineering. 1 hour, and 6 hours laboratory. 3 credits. 
Staff. Prerequisite: CI. 435. 

Recitations, lectures and drawing-room work in the design of foundations, and bridges. Shedd 
and Vawter, Theory of Simple Structures; Shedd, Design of Structures in Steel. 

CI. 437. — Estimating Quantities and Costs. 2 hours. 2 credits. STAFF. 
Prerequisite: CI. 326. 

Estimating material quantities and costs ; valuation, cost keeping, time schedules, and progress 
charts for engineering w^ork. 

CI. 438. — Statically Indeterminate Structures. 3 hours. 3 credits. STAFF. 
Prerequisite: CI. 435. 

Classical and modern methods of analysis of continuous beams, long span bridges, rectangular 
frames, space structures. 

CRADUATE COURSES 

CI. 521-522. — Advanced Steel Structures 

CI. 523-524. — Advanced Concrete Structures 

CI. 527-528. — Advanced Sanitary Engineering 

CI. 529. — Advanced Sanitary Engineering Design 

CI. 530. — Sanitary Laboratory Methods 

CI. 533. — Advanced Hydraulic Engineering 

CI. 534. — Hydraulic Measurements 

DAIRYING 

Ps. 226 is required of students majoring in Dairy Manufactures. 

Dy. 311. — Principles of Dairying. 3 hours and 2 hours laboratory. 4 credits. 
FOUTS and ARNOLD. 

Composition and properties of mijk ; sanitary milk production ; common methods of analyzing 
milk ; common dairy processes ; farm methods of handing milk ; dairy breeds, selection, breeding 
and raising of dairy cattle. 

Dy. 316. — Condensed Milk and Dry Milk. Offered only in the first semester. 
2 hours, and 3 hours laboratory. 3 credits. FoUTS. Prerequisites: Acy. 203, 
Dy. 311. 

Principles and operations involved in the manufacture of condensed milk and dry milk. 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 367 

Dy, 318. — Grading and Judging Dairy Troducts. 4 hours laboratory. 2 credits. 
FOUTS. Prerequisite: Dy. 311. 

Market grades and classes of dairy products ; the use of score cards in grading and judging 
dairy products. 

Dy. 412. — Milk Production. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits. 
Arnold. Prerequisites: Al. 311, Dy. 311. 

Feeding and management of dairy cattle for milk production. 

Dy. 413. — Market Milk and Milk Plant Products. 3 hours, and 3 hours labora- 
tory. 4 credits, FoUTS. Prerequisite: Dy. 311. 

Sanitary supervision of the milk supply ; methods of handling and processing milk and milk 
plant products in the commercial dairy ; technical operation of milk plants. 

Dy. 414. — Manufacture of Butter and Cheese. 2 hours, and 3 hours laboratory. 
3 credits. FoUTS. Prerequisite: Dy. 311. 

Principles and practices of butter and cheese manufacture. 

Dy. 415. — Ice Cream Manufacture. 2 hours, and 3 hours laboratory. 3 credits. 
FoUTS. Prerequisite: Dy. 311. 

The ice cream mix ; flavoring and freeaing ice cream ; ice cream plant operation. 

Dy. 416. — Dairy Technology. 2 hours, and 6 hours laboratory. 5 credits. 
FOUTS. Prerequisites: Dy. 311, Bey. 301, Acy. 125-126. 

Advanced laboratory methods and their application in chemical and bacteriological control 
of milk and milk products. 

Dy. 418. — Approved Dairy Practice. 1 to 3 credits. FoUTS. 

Practical experience in approved dairy plants during the summer preceding, or following, the 
junior year. Satisfactory work and a written report are the basis of credit allowed. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

Dy. 520. — Advanced Dairy Technology 

Dy. 521. — Problems in Milk and Milk Products 

Dy. 523. — Problems in Dairy Production 

ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

Courses preceded by Es. are courses in Economics and courses preceded by Bs. are 
courses in Business Administration. 

(The following courses are designed for students in the General College. May be 
taken for credit by Upper Division students registered in colleges other than Business Ad- 
istration.) 

CEs. 13. — Economic Foundations of Modem Life. Offered each semester. 5 
hours. 5 credits. Eldridge, Dietz, DONOVAN, McFerrin, TUTTLE. Prerequi- 
site: Sophomore standing. 

Emphasis on the functioning of the economic system. Economic organization and institutions 
as parts of the economic order in their functional capacities. The understanding of economic 
principles and processes, especially those relating to value, price, cost, rent, wages, profits, and 
interest, insofar as such knowledge is necessary in understanding the economic situation of the 
present Jay. The evaluation of economic forces and processes in terms of their contribution to 
social well being. Prerequisite for advanced standing in Economics and Business Administration. 

CBs. 141. — Elementary Accounting. Offered each semester. 3 hours. 3 credits. 
Collins, Fly, Powers. The first half of the course CBs. 141-142. 

CBs. 141-142 : Designed to provide the basic training in business practice and in accounting. 
A study of business papers and records : recording transactions ; preparation of financial state- 
ments and reports. Prere;iuisite for advanced standing in Economics and Business Administration. 



368 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION —UPPER DIVISION 

CBs. 142. — Elementary Accounting. Offered each semester. 3 hours. 3 credits. 
Collins, Fly, Powers. Second half of the course CBs. 141-142. 

CEs, 15. — Elementary Statistics. Offered each semester. 3 hours, and 2 hours 
laboratory. 4 credits. ANDERSON, Germond. 

The statistical method as a tool for examining and interpreting data ; acquaintance with BUch 
fundamental techniques as find application in business, economics, biology, agriculture, psychology, 
sociology, etc. ; basic preparation for more extensive work in the field of statistics. Prerequisite 
for advanced standing in Economics and Business Administration. 

(The following courses are designed for Upper Division, students, primarily those in 
the College of Business Administration.) 

Es. 304. — Regional World Geography. 3 hours, and 3 Saturday field trips. 
3 credits. Atwood, Diettrich, Hubbell. 

An analysis of world distribution of the features of the natural environment, such as climate, 
surface features, native vegetation and animal life, soils and mineral resources, and a regional 
survey of the occupations and adjustments of man which form the basis for the interdependence 
and commerce of the peoples and nations of the world. 

Bs. 311. — Accounting Principles. Offered each semester. 3 hours. 3 credits. 
Beights, Collins, Powers. Prerequisite: CBs. 141-142 or its equivalent. 

A study of the mechanical and statistical aspects of accounting ; books of record ; accounts : 
fiscal period and adjustnnents ; working papers ; form and preparation of financial statements ; 
followed by an intensive and critical study of the problems of valuation as they affect the 
preparation of the balance sheet and income statements. 

Bs. 312. — Accounting Principles. Offered each semester. 3 hours. 3 credits. 
Beights. Prerequisite: Bs. 311. 

Consideration is given to the legal aspects of accounting and related problemis resulting 
from the legal organization form used by businesses : liabilities ; proprietorship ; partnerships ; 
corporations ; capital stock ; surplus ; followed by a study of the financial aspects of accounting 
as disclosed by an analysis and interpretation of financial statements : financial ratios and 
standards, their preparation, meaning, and use. 

Bs. 313. — Cost Accounting. Offered each semester. 3 hours. 3 credits. FLY. 
Pi-erequisite: Bs. 311. 

A study of the methods of collection, classification, and interpretation of cost data ; special 
problems, standard costs, cost systems, uses of cost data in business control. Lectures and problems. 

Es. 321, — Financial Organization of Society. Offered each semester. 3 hours. 
3 credits. DOLBEARE, TUTTLE. The first half of the course Es. 321-322. 
Prerequisite: CEs. 13. 

Es. 321-322: An introduction to the field of finance: a study of the institutions providing 
monetary, banking and other financial services ; interrelationships and interdependence of financial 
institutions; central banking; government control of finance; significance of financial organization 
to the economic system as a whole. 

Es. 322. — Financial Organization of Society. Offered each semester. 3 hours. 
3 credits. DOLBEARE, TUTTLE. The second half of the course Es. 321-322. 

Es. 327. — Public Finance. Offered each semester. 3 hours. 3 credits. DONO- 
VAN. Prerequisite: CEs. 13. 

Principles governing expenditures of modern government; sources of revenue; public credit; 
principles and methods of taxation and of financial administration as revealed in the fiscal 
systems of leading countries. 

Es, 335. — Economics of Marketing. Offered each semester. 3 hours. 3 
credits. Heskin. Prerequisite: CEs. 13. 

The nature of exchange and the economic principles underlying trade, with particular atten- 
tion given to interregional trade. The significance of comparative costs, comparative advantages, 
and comparative disadvantages. The institutions and methods developed by society for carrying 
on trading operations ; retail and wholesale agencies ; elements of marketing efficiency ; the cost 
of marketing ; price maintenance ; unfair competition ; the relation of the government to marketing. 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 369 

Es. 351. — Elements of Transportation. Offered each semester. 3 hours. 3 cred- 
its. BIGHAM, EUTSLER. Prerequisite: CEs. 13. 

Significance, history, facilities, geoKraphy, economic characteristics, elementary rate making, 
and development of regulation of all important forms of intercity transportation. 

Es. 352. — Principles and Problems of Transportation. 3 hours. 3 credits. BlG- 
HAM. Prerequisite: Es. 351. 

A continuation of Es. 351 with special reference to problems such as valuation, fair return, 
rate structures, discrimination, control of service, finance, consolidation, labor relations, public 
ownership, and coordination. 

Bs. 361. — Property Insurance. 3 hours. 3 credits. BauGHMAN. 
Fire and Marine insurance. 

Bs, 362. — Property Insurance. 3 hours. 3 credits. BAUGHMAN. 
Bond, title, and casualty insurance. 

Es. 372. — Labor Economics. 3 hours. 3 credits. BAUGHMAN. Prerequisite: 

CEs. 13. 

Labor problems : insecurity, wages and income, hours, sub-standard ^vorkers, industrial conflict ; 
attempts to solve labor problems by employees ; unionism in its structural and functional aspects : 
attempts to solve labor problems by employers: personnel management, employee representation, 
employers' associations; attempts to solve labor problems by state: protective labor legislation, 
laws relating to .settlement of industrial disputes. 

Es. 381. — Economic Geography of North America. 3 hours. 3 credits. 
DIETTRICH. 

A geographical survey of the continent of Nortli America with special reference to the natural 
conditions of the United States ; involving the analysis of the major regions of the United States 
from the standpoint of their relation to their natural environment. 

Es. 382. — Utilization of Our Resources. 3 hours. 3 credits. DIETTRICH. 

A comprehensive review of the natural and human resources of the United States followed 
by an intensive study of the wise and wasteful practices of exploitation and utilization of these 
resources. A study of the human and economic significance of the principles of conservation with 
special reference to Florida. 

Es. 385. — Economic Geography of South America. 3 hours. 3 credits. DIET- 
TRICH. 

A geographical survey of the continent of South America, organized around the growth of trade, 
exports and imports, trade by countries, and general business trends ; the economic conditions that 
influence commercial advance or decline ; the major geographic regions ; their importance in supply- 
ing export products and in consuming import commodities. 

Bs. 401. — Business Law. Offered each semester. 3 hours. 3 credits. HURST. 
The first half of the course Bs. 401-402. 

Bs. 401-402: Contracts and agency; rights and obligations of the agent, principal, and third 
party ; termination of the relationship of agency. Conveyances and mortgages of real property ; 
sales and mortgages of personal property ; the law of negotiable instruments. 

Bs. 402. — Business Law. Offered each semester. 3 hours. 3 credits. HURST, 
BAUGHMAN. The second half of the course Bs. 401-402. 

Bs. 403. — Law in Relation to the Form of the Business Unit. 3 hours. 3 cred- 
its. HURST. 

Partnership: nature, internal and external relationship, property rights of partner, dissolu- 
tion and winding up. Corporations: Corporate charter and structure, stock and stockholders, 
directors and officers and power of corporation. 

Es. 404. — Government Control of Business. Offered each semester. 3 hours. 
3 credits. McFERRIN. Prerequisite: CEs. 13. 

A study of the evolution of economic control ; an examination of the effectiveness of laisaez 
faire control in the American economy; legality of and chief methods of effectuating govern- 
mental control ; the development of the relationship between government and non-public utility 
monopolies ; Federal Trade Commission control of competitive practices : a critical appraisal of 
recent developments in the field of government control. 



370 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION —UPPER DIVISION 

Es. 407. — Economic Principles and Problems. Offered each semester. 3 hours. 
3 credits. ELDRIDGE, EUTSLER, Heskin. The first half of the course Es. 407- 
408. Prerequisite: CEs. 13. 

Es. 407-408 : An advanced course in economic theory with special emphasis on the causes of 
economic maladjustments arising from the operation of economic forces. 

Es. 408. — Economic Principles and Problems. Offered each semester. 3 hours. 
3 credits. ELDRIDGE, EUTSLER, HESKIN. The second half of the course Es. 
407-408. 

Bs. 411. — Advanced Accounting. Problems. 3 hours. 3 credits. BEIGHTS. 
Prerequisite: Bs. 312. 

A study of specialized accounting problems ; mathematics of accounting.; statement of affairs ; 
consignments ; installments ; ventures ; insurance ; and other related subjects. 

Bs, 412, — Auditing. 3 hours. 3 credits. BEIGHTS. Prerequisite: Bs. 312, 

A study of auditing theory and current auditing practice ; principal kinds of audits and services 
of the public accountant ; professional and ethical aspects of auditing. Lectures, discussions, 
and problems. 

Bs, 413. — Advanced Accounting, Systems. 3 hours. 3 credits. BEIGHTS, 
Prerequisite: Bs. 312. 

Consideration is given to the principles underlying the structure of accounting systems. A 
detailed analytical study of six or more systems is made. Reports on systems in operation for 
various industries are made. 

Bs. 414, — Income Tax Procedure. Offered each semester. 3 hours. 3 credits. 
Collins, Powers. Prerequisite: Bs. 311. 

A study of the Federal Income Tax Law and Regulations, and related accounting problems : 
preparation of tax returns for individuals, corporations and fiduciaries. 

Bs. 417. — Governmental Accounting. 3 hours. 3 credits. FLY, Prerequisite: 
Bs. 312. 

A study of the basic principles underlying fund accounting. Detailed consideration is given 
to the preparation and use of the budget, system of accounts, special vouchers, records, statements. 

Bs. 418. — Advanced Accounting. C.P.A. Problems. 3 hours. 3 credits. 
BEIGHTS. Prerequisite: Bs. 312. 

A continuation of the study of specialized accounting problems ; receiverships ; foreign ex- 
change : stock brokerage; estates and trusts; budgets; business taxes; consolidations and mergers; 
and other problems usually covered in C.P.A. examinations. 

Bs, 422. — Investments. Offered each semester. 3 hours. 3 credits. DiETZ. 
Prerequisite: Es. 321-322. 

The nature of investments ; investment policies and types of securities ; analysis of securities ; 
the mechanics and mathematics of security purchases ; factors influencing general movements of 
security prices. 

Bs. 423. — Commercial Banking. 3 hours. 3 credits. DOLBEARE. Prere- 
quisite: Es. 321-322. 

Banking policies, practices, and problems ; the relations of the individual bank with other 
banks, the money market, and other classes of financial institutions. 

Bs, 424. — Investment Analysis. 3 hours. 3 credits. DiETZ. Prerequisite: Bs. 
422. 

A study of the standards employed in the analysis of public utility, railroad, and general 
corporate securities ; the supervision of individual, bank, and insurance company security invest- 
ments ; present day factors influencing security values. 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 371 

Bs. 426. — Banking Systems. 3 hours. 3 credits. TUTTLE. Prerequisite: 
Es. 321-322. 

A study of the development of central banking and its functions ; the relationships existing 
bttween central banks and (1) the government, (2) other banks; and an analysis of the banking 
systems of the United States, England, France, Germany, and Canada in the light of central 
banking functions. 

Bs. 427. — Principles and Problems of Corporation Finance. Offered each semes- 
ter. 3 hours. 3 credits. McFerrIN. 

Lectures, discussions, and problems. A study of the economic and legal forms of business 
enterprise ; the instruments of business finance ; financial problems as they relate to the ordinary 
operations of the business involving working capital, income, dividend policy, current borrowing, 
credit extension, and the business cycle. 

Bs. 428. — Principles and Problems of Corporation Finance. 3 hours. 3 credits. 
McFerrin. Prerequisite: Bs. 427. A continuation of Bs. 427. 

The sale of corporation securities ; problems incident to growth and expansion ; business failures 
and financial reconstruction ; social aspects of corporate financial policy, regulation and control 
of corporate fiscal policy and taxation of corporations. 

Bs. 433. — Advertising. 3 hours. 3 credits. Heskin. 

The relation of the principles of advertising to economic theory ; psychology of advertising 
a study of agencies, media and methods. 

Bs. 438. — Problems in Sales and Market Analysis. 3 hours. 3 credits. HES- 
KIN. Prerequisite: Es. 335. 

Methods used in analyzing the selling, advertising, and merchandising problems of manu- 
facturers, wholesalers, and retailers ; the use of market research ; the objective of market investiga- 
tions ; planning market investigations ; sales survey methods ; preparation of reports ; quantitative 
analysis ; measurement of market conditions and their effects on sales ; market trends. 

Bs. 440. — Trade Horizons in Caribbean America. 3 hours. 3 credits. 
DiETTRICH. 

A regional trade course covering the West Indies, Mexico, Central America, Colombia, and 
Venezuela. The commercial importance of each republic and island as a market for American 
goods and as a source of raw materials and foodstuffs ; Florida's commercial position in such 
trade as a result of its geographical proximity to this area. 

Bs. 443. — Foreign Trade. 3 hours. 3 credits. DIETTRICH. 

Problems in foreign trade: promotion of overseas trade; foreign trade surveys; products 
of international commerce ; trade barriers, tariffs, customs ; foreign commercial policies ; exporting 
systems and methods ; financing of foreign trade ; problems of shipment ; legal aspects of foreign 
trade ; importing problems ; foreign trade of Florida. 

Bs. 444. — Ocean Transportation. 3 hours. 3 credits. EUTSLER. 

Problems in ocean transportation : types of ocean carriers ; ocean routes ; ocean ports ; services 
of ocean freight carriers ; ship brokerage and freight brokerage ; passenger carriers ; steamship 
combinations and conferences ; ocean freight rate-making ; vessel and cargo documents ; regulation 
of shipping ; government aid to ship-building and operation ; shipping of Florida ports. 

Es. 446. — The Consumption of Wealth. Offered each semester. 3 hours. 3 
credits. Matherly. 

An economic analysis of the problems involved in determining the extent and trends of con- 
sumer demand and in the adjustments of productive processes to that demand. 

Es. 454. — Principles of Public Utility Economics. Offered each semester. 3 
hours. 3 credits. BiGHAM. Prerequisite: CEs. 13. 

The nature, place and development of public service corporations ; types of public control . 
valuation and rate making ; regulation of service, accounts, reports, and securities ; combinations ; 
public relations ; public ownership. 

Es. 456. — Problems in Public Service Industries. 3 hours. 3 credits. BiGHAM. 

An intensive study of the more important problems raised in the introductory courses in trans- 
portation and public utilities. 



372 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION — UPPER DIVISION 

Bs. 461. — Life Insurance. 3 hours. 3 credits. Eutsler. 

The functions and nature of life insurance ; the economic characteristics of life insurance ; 
the fundamentals of the science of life insurance ; practices and policies of insurance companies ; 
types of insurance companies. 

Es. 463. — Problems in Social Security. 3 hours. 3 credits. EUTSLER. 

An analysis of the meaning and nature of social security, especially as related to economic 
security ; the distinctions between social and private insurance ; the hazards of low income groups ; 
an evaluation of projects and methods for eliminating, reducing, or indemnifying these hazards : 
the problems of social security in the United States, especially concerning experiences with relief 
measures, the development of legislation, the problems of financing and administering security 
programs, and the relationship between economic planning and security. 

Bs, 465. — Realty Principles. 3 hours. 3 credits. BaUGHMAN. 

Fundamentals of realty economies. 

Bs. 466. — Realty Management. 3 hours. 3 credits. BAUGHMAN. 

The organization of realty enterprises ; managem.ent of real property ; handling of rentals ; 
administration of real estate development. 

Es. 467. — Economic History. 3 hours. 3 credits. DIETTRIGH. 

A study of the development of the present economic order and its institutions. Variant forms 
of economic life are surveyed with emphasis placed on capitalism and its culture. Some of the 
problems that have arisen as a result of capitalistic economy are analyzed. 

Es. 468. — Economic History in the Making, 3 hours. 3 credits. DIETTRICH. 

The era of industrialism ; contemporary economic organization ; types of economic reform ; 
srecial consideration of current social and economic problems in England, France, Germany, 
Soviet Russia, and the United States. 

Es. 469. — Business Forecasting. 3 hours. 3 credits. ANDERSON. Prere- 
quisite: CEs, 15. 

A survey of the problem of the reduction of business risk by forecasting general business 
conditions ; statistical methods used by leading commercial agencies in forecasting. 

Es. 470. — Business Forecasting. 3 hours. 3 credits. ANDERSON. Prere- 
quisite: CEs. 15. 

The application of statistical technique and economic principles to specific problems of busi- 
ness forecasting. Seasonal variation, trend lines, and multiple correlation analysis. Methods of 
forecasting the stock market and the price of important commodities. 

Es. 477. — Problems in Federal Finance. 3 hours. 3 credits. DONOVAN. Pre- 
requisite: Es. 327. 

Economic effects of public expenditure ; war finance ; personal income and estate taxes ; cor- 
porate income and profits taxes ; excise taxes ; debt problems. 

Es. 478. — Problems in State and Local Finance. 3 hours. 3 credits. DONOVAN. 
Prerequisite: Es. 327. 

Allocation of functional responsibility ; property taxation ; sales taxes ; highway finance, busi- 
ness taxation ; supervision of local finance. Emphasis on Florida problems. 

Es. 485. — International Economic Relations. 3 hours. 3 credits. DiETTRICH. 

A study of the development of international economic policies : geographic, economic, social, 
and political factors underlying contemporary international problems ; economic and political 
methods employed by the leading commercial nations to expand their economic interests. 

Es. 486. — Economic Geography of Asia. 3 hours. 3 credits, DiETTRIGH. 

A study of human relationships to natural environment as presented in the economic adjust- 
ments in Asia, Australia and New Zealand and their relations with the Western World ; the 
major geographic regions in the area, their economic significance in production of various raw 
materials, foodstuffs, and manufactured goods. Not offered in 1941-42. 

Es, 487. — Economic Geography of Europe. 3 hours. 3 credits. DiETTRICH. 

A study of human relationships to natural environment as presented in the economic adjust- 
ments in Europe and in its commercial connections with the other continents, especially with 
North America. 



Es. 501 

Es. 505 

Es. 509 

Bs. 511 

Bs. 513 

Es. 524 

Es. 528 

Es. 530 

Es. 531 

Es. 556 

Es. 565 

Es. 569 

Es. 572 

Es. 585 

Es. 589 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 373 

GRADUATE COURSES 

502. — Seminar in Economic Principles and Problems 
506. — The Development of Economic Thought 

— The Development of Economic Institutions 
512. — Accounting Theory 
514. — Seminar in Accounting Principles and Problems 

— Corporation Finance and Investments 

— Problems in Money and Banking 

— Problems in Taxation 

— Economic Functions of Middlemen 

— Problems in Public Service Industries 

— Problems in Social Security 
570. — Problems in Statistics and Business Forecasting 

— Problems in Labor Relations 

— International Economic Relations 

— Problems in Economic Geography 

EDUCATION 



CEin. 13. — Introduction to Education. Offered each semester. 3 hours. 3 
credits. NORMAN. 

An attempt is made to foreshadow the fieJd of Education so that the student may see the whole 
field before he studies its detailed and technical parts. 

En. 303. — Methods in Vocational Agriculture. Offered only in the second 
semester, 3 credits. Garris. 

General methods of teaching high school subjects applied to vocational agriculture. Garris, 
Special Methods in Teaching Vocational Agriculture. 

En. 305. — Development and Organization of Education. 3 hours. 3 credits. 
HAYGOOD, 

An attempt to interpret and evaluate the role of the public school in our rapidly changing 
society. 

En. 306. — Vocational Education. Offered only in the first semester. 3 hours. 
3 credits, GARRIS. 

Development, function, and scope of vocational, agricultural, home economics, trade and in- 
dustrial, and commercial education as provided for by the National Vocational Education Act of 
Congress. 

En, 371. — Observation, Participation, and Classroom Practices. 3 hours. 3 
credits. Staff. Prerequisite: Permission of the staff committee. 

A critical survey of the materials and methods used in each of the various fields of secondary 
education, examined in relation to the most valid aims, values, principles and practices. The major 
problems involved in teaching in each field will be intensively studied in the li'.rht of recent experi- 
mentation. After a period of observation in the student's chosen field he will participate in actual 
classroom teaching. 

En. 385.— The Pre-Adolescent Child. 3 hours. 3 credits. Crago. The first 
half of the course En. 385-386. 

En. 385-386: Designed to acquaint the student with the prowth and development of children 
into mature personalities. The findings of recent research will be studied through outside reading, 
class discussion and observation. Methods of evaluation of child growth will be included. 



374 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION —UPPER DIVISION 

En. 386. — ^The Adolescent Child. 3 hours. 3 credits. Crago. The second 
half of the course En. 385-386. 

En. 387. — Health Education. Offered only in the second semester. 3 hours. 
3 credits. SALT. 

A consideration of the principles underlying health education, together with the organization 
and administration of such a program ; the role of the teacher in health instruction, who shall 
teach health, the organization of materials for instructional purposes, criteria for the evaluation 
of health materials and methods, the role of local, state and national non-offlcial organizations 
in health teaching programs. 

En. 393. — Teaching of Health and Physical Education. 6 or more hours of 
obsesrvation, participation, and discussion. 3 credits, SALT. The first half of 
the course En. 393-394. 

En. 393-394: Directed observation, participation, and teaching in the health and physical 
education program of the Yonge Laboratory School. (Note: Must be taken concurrently with 
HPl. 361-362 and HPl. 363-364.) 

En. 394. — Teaching of Health and Physical Education. 6 or more hours of 
observation, pai'ticipation, and discussion. 3 credits. SALT. The second half of 
the course En. 393-394. 

En. 401. — School Administration. 3 hours. 3 credits. SIMMONS. 

Problems peculiar to schools in Florida ; the supervising principal, qualifications, relation to 
superintendent, boards, teachers, pupils, patrons, and community ; adapting the school to the 
child's needs ; business practices. 

En. 402. — Administration Practice. 3 hours. 3 credits. SIMMONS. Prere- 
quisite: En. 401. 

The supervision of instruction ; visits to schools for the study of administrative and supervis- 
ing practice ; a survey of one school system. 

En. 406. — Elementary School Administration. 3 hours. 3 credits. SIMMONS. 
Prerequisites: En. 305 and the required junior courses. 

The problems that usually confront the elementary school principal will be stressed in this 
course. Reavis, Pierce and Stulken, The Elementary School. 

En. 408. — High School Administration. 3 hours, 3 credits. SIMMONS. 

Practical management and administration of the modem high school. 

En. 409. — Supervised Teaching in Vocational Agriculture. Offered each semes- 
ter. 9 hours laboratory. 3 credits. TenneY. 

For part-time and evening classes in vocational agricultuie. Under supervision, students will 
assist in organizing and teaching part-time and evening students in the Gainesville area. 

En. 410. — Supervised Teaching in Vocational Agriculture. Offered each semes- 
ter. 9 hours laboratory. 3 credits. Tenney. 

For all-day classes in vocational agriculture. Under supervision, students will observe and 
teach all-day classes in vocational agriculture in the P. K. Yonge Laboratory School or in other 
schools located in the Gainesville area. 

En. 411. — Special Methods in Vocational Agriculture. Offered each semester. 
2 hours. 2 credits. G ARRIS. 

Teaching part-time and evening classes in vocational agriculture. Organization, course con- 
tent, and methods of teaching applied to adult classes for vocational agriculture. Garris, Special 
Methods in Teaching Vocational Agriculture. 

En. 412. — Special Methods in Vocational Agriculture. Offered each semester. 
2 hours. 2 credits. TENNEY, 

Teaching all-day classes in vocational agriculture. Organization of a long-time teaching 
program, methods in Future Farmer work, and class management for high school classes in voca- 
tional agriculture. Garris, Special Methods in Teaching Vocational Agriculture. 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 375 

En. 421. — Student Teaching. 6 or more hours of teaching. 3 credits. MEAD 
and Staff. The first half of the course En. 421-422. Prerequisite: En. 371. 

En. 421-422 : The student is given practice in the art of teaching by actually taking over 
responsibility for the teaching-learning situation and putting into operation under direction and 
supervision the theories, methods, materials, and teaching techniques acquired during his junior 
year through observation and participation. 

En. 422. — Advanced Student Teaching. 6 or more hours of teaching. 3 credits. 
Mead and Staff. The second half of the course En. 421-422. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

En. 503. — Educational Measurements 

En. 507. — Educational Psychology 

En. 508, — Democracy and Education 

En. 510. — Foundations of Modern Education 

En. 511-512. — Teaching Vocational Agriculture 

En. 516. — Character and Personality Development 

En. 517. — Educational Statistics 

En. 518. — High School Administration 

En. 524. — Major Sequence in Secondary Education 

En. 525. — Major Sequence in Childhood Education 

En. 528. — Supervision of Instruction 

En. 529. — Florida Workshop. Cooperating Schools Division 

En. 539. — Exceptional Children 

En. 551. — Florida Workshop. Principals Division 

En. 555-556. — Florida Workshop. Bulletin Series Division 

En. 557. — Work-Conference on School Administrative Problems 

En. 565-566. — Problems in Agricultural Education 

En. 567-568. — Problems in Agricultural Education 

En. 591-592. — Public School Administration 

En. 597. — Elementary School Administration 

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 

Radio courses in the Department of Electrical Engineering are given in cooperation 
with Radio Station WRUF. Qualified students can secure practical experience in station 
operation. 

El. 241. — Introduction to Electrical Engineering. 2 hours. 2 credits. Sashoff. 
The first half of the course El. 241-242. Prerequisite: CMs. 23-24. 

El. 241-242 : The nature of electricity and magnetism ; electric charges ; magnetic poles ; 
electromotive force; electric current; Ohm's and Kirchofif's Laws; sinosoidal alternating currents 
and voltages ; Vector representation of alternating currents and voltages ; complex notation ; the 
dielectric circuit and capacitance ; the magnetic circuit and inductance ; the generation of electro- 
motive force; properties of conductors and insulators; non-linear circuits; electrochemistry; 
electric and magnetic fields; radiation. Mueler, Introduction to Electrical Engineering; Gilbert, 
Electricity and Magnetism. 

El. 242. — Introduction to Electric Engineering. 2 hours. 2 credits. SASHOFF. 
The second half of the course El. 241-242. Prerequisite: Ps. 205, Ps. 207. 

El. 341.— Elements of Electrical Engineering. 3 hours. 3 credits. SMITH. The 
first half of course El. 341-342. Prerequisite: One year of college physics, includ- 
ing electricity and magnetism; differential and integral calculus. 

El. 341-342 : Electric and magnetic circuits ; electrostatics ; electro-magnetics ; representation 
of alternating currents by vectors and complex quantities ; measurement of power in single phase 
and polyphase circuits; generation, transmission, and utilization of electrical energy; character- 
istics of apparatus ; selection, testing, and installation of electrical equipment. 



376 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION —VPPER DIVISION 

El. 342. — Elements of Electrical Engineering. 3 hours. 3 credits. Smith. The 
second half of the course El. 341-342. 

El. 344. — Problems in Direct and Alternating Currents. 3 hours. 3 credits. 
Wilson. Corequisite: El. 342. 

Problems on Kirchoflf's Laws for Electric and Magnetic Circuits; electrostatics; energy and 
power ; wave form ; power in single and polyphase circuit ; transients ; unbalanced circuits ; 
harmonics. 

El. 345. — Electrical Illumination. 2 hours, and 5 hours laboratory. 4 credits. 
Wilson. Corequisite: El. 341. 

Illumination ; modern light sources ; reflection, transmission, and absorption ; diffusion ; re- 
fraction ; glare ; color ; application of lighting units to various types of buildings ; circuits for 
lighting ; control equipment for lighting ; wiring methods ; flood-lighting. 

El. 346. — Electrical Communications. 3 hours, and 3 hours laboratory. 4 
credits. Sashoff. Corequisite: El. 342. 

Speech and hearing ; receivers and loud speakers ; principles of various systems of wire and 
radio telegraphy and telephony ; elementary tube theory ; amplifiers, radio receivers, and trans- 
mitters. 

El. 349. — Dynamo Laboratory. 3 hours laboratory. 1 credit. SMITH. The first 
half of the course El. 349-350. Corequisite: El. 341. 

El. 349-350 : Experimental studies and tests on direct current and alternating current 
apparatus. 

El. 350. — Dynamo Laboratory. 3 hours laboratory. 1 credit. SMITH. The 
second half of the course El. 349-350. Corequisite: El. 342. 

El. 351. — Dynamo Laboratory. 3 hours. 1 credit. SMITH. The first half of 
the course El. 351-352. Corequisite: El. 353. 

El. 351-352 : A course in elementary dynamo laboratory for electrical engineering juniors. 
First semester covers work in alternating currents, including experiments in alternating current 
circuits ; determination of characteristics of a.c. machinery and transformers, etc. ; second semester 
work covei's d.c. measurements, characteristics of d.c. machinery, etc. Work of the course includes 
the performance of experiments in the laboratory and the preparation of reports thereon. Pre- 
pared sheets on the experiments are furnished by the laboratory. Hehre and Balmford, Electric 
Circuits and Machine Experiments. 

El. 352. — Dynamo Laboratory. 3 hours. 1 credit. SMITH. The second half of 
the course El. 351-352. Corequisite: El. 354. 

El. 358. — Electrical Engineering. 5 hours. 5 credits. WILSON. The first half 
of the course El. 353-354. Prerequisite: El. 241-242. 

El. 353-354 : Alternating current circuits ; complex notation ; vector algebra : single and poly- 
phase circuits ; alternating current measurements ; transformers ; a.c. machinery ; primary and 
secondary batteries ; d.c. instruments ; d.c. machinery construction and operation. Kerchner and 
Corcoran, Alternating Current Circuits; Dawes, Electrical Engineering, Volumes I and II. 

El. 354. — Electrical Engineering. 3 hours. 3 credits. WILSON. The second 
half of the course El. 353-354. 

El. 440. — Industrial Applications of Electrical Equipment. 3 hours. 3 credits. 
Smith. Corequisite: El. 447-448. 

Application of motors to industry and transportation ; electric heating ; electric w^eiding ; 
starting and speed control ; protective equipment signal systems ; wiring design for light and power. 

El. 441. — Electrical Engineering Seminar, 1 hour. 1 credit. SASHOFF. The 

first half of the course El. 441-442. Prerequisites: Not less than 14 credits in 
courses in Electrical Engineering. 

El. 441-442 : Discussions on topics from current engineering periodicals, on research projects 
in progress in the laboratories, and on new developments in industry. 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 377 

El. 442. — Electrical Engineering Seminar. 1 hour. 1 credit. Sashoff. The 
second half of the course El. 441-442. 

El. 443. — Industrial Electronics. 3 hours. 3 credits. Sashoff. The first 
half of the course El. 443-444. Prerequisites: El. 341-342, El. 344, or El. 353-354. 

El. 443-444 : Electron tubes and their application to radio, television, and indvistry. 

El. 444. — Industrial Electronics. 3 hours. 3 credits. SASHOFF. The second 
half of the course El. 443-444. 

El. 44.5. — Electrical Instruments, Meters, and Relays. 2 hours and 3 hours 
laboratory. 3 credits. WILSON. Prerequisites: El. 341-342, El. 344, or El. 353-354. 

Design, construction, testing, and application of electrical instruments, meters, and relays. 
Knowlton, Electric Power Metering. 

El. 446. — Electric Power Transmission. 3 hours. 3 credits. WILSON. Prerequi- 
site: El. 449. 

Electric and magnetic field distribution ; inductive interference ; corona ; calculation ; per- 
formance, electrical and mechanical design of short and long lines. 

El. 447. — Alternating Current Apparatus. 3 hours. 3 credits. WILSON. The 
first half of the course El. 447-448. Prerequisites: El. 341-342, El. 344, or El. 
353-354. 

El. 447-448: Design, characteristics, and operation of alternating current apparatus particu- 
larly transformers, generators, naotors, and rotary converters. 

El. 448. — Alternating Current Apparatus. 3 hours. 3 credits. WILSON. The 
second half of the course El. 447-448. 

El. 449. — Theory of Electric Circuits. 3 hours. 3 credits. SASHOFF. Prere- 
quisites: El. 341-342. El. 344, or El. 353-354. 

Networks : resonance phenomena ; the infinite line ; reflection ; filters ; inductive interference, 
coupled circuits ; impedance matching. 

El. 451. — Advanced Dynamo Laboratory. 5 hours laboratory. 2 credits. 
SMITH. The first half of the course El. 451-452. Prerequisite: El. 349-350, or 
El. 351-352. 

El. 451-452: Experimental tests on alternating current apparatus, particularly transformers, 
synchronous machinery, and induction motors. 

El. 452. — Advanced Dynamo Laboratory. 5 hours laboratory. 2 credits. 
Smith. The second half of the course El. 451-452. 

El. 453. — Radio Station Operation. 3 hours laboratory. 1 credit. SASHOFF, 
The first half of the course El. 453-454. Prerequisite: El. 346. 

El. 453-454 : Operation, maintenance, and testing of a broadcasting station, under actual 
operating conditions and under the direction of licensed operators. 

El. 454. — Radio Station Operation. 3 hours laboratory. 1 credit. SASHOFF, 
The second half of the course El. 453-454. 

El. 455. — Radio Engineering. 3 hours. 3 credits. SASHOFF. The first half of 
the course El. 455-456. Prerequisite: El. 346. 

El. 455-456. The function of hiijh freiiuency networks : network theorems, resonance ; the infinite 
line; reflection; filters; coupled circuits; impedance transfoiination ; inductive interference; vacuum 
tubes; modulation and demodulation; vacuum tube detectors: audio video and radio frequency 
amplifiers ; osciUators ; antennas and radiation. Terman, Radio Engineering. 

El. 456. — Radio Engineering. 3 hours. 3 credits. SASHOFF. The second half 
of the course El. 455-456. 

EI, 457. — Electronics Laboratory. 5 hours. 2 credits. SASHOFF. The first 
half of the course El. 457-458. Prerequisites: El. 341-342, El. 344, or El. 353-354. 

El. 458. — Electronics Laboratory. 5 hours. 2 credits. SASHOFF. The second 
half of the course El. 457-458. 



378 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION — UPPER DIVISION 

El. 493. — Electrical Design and Experimental Procedure. Variable credit. 
Staff. The first half of the course El. 493-494. 

El. 493-494 : Special projects are studied and reports prepared thereon. 

El. 494. — Electrical Design and Experimental Procedure. Variable credit. 
Staff. The second half of the course El. 493-494. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

El. 541-542. — Advanced Experimental Electrical Engineering 

El. 543. — Advanced Electrical Circuit Theory 

El. 545-546. — Advanced Course in Communication Engineering 

El. 547-548. — Advanced Communications Laboratory 

El. 549-550. — Electrical Engineering Research 

El. 551. — Symmetrical Components 

El. 552. — Theory of Vacuum Tubes 

ENGLISH 

The courses in English, advanced as well as introductory, have one common purpose: 
to enrich the student's experience by intimate association with those writings in our 
language, past and present, which contribute most to meaningful living. The central aim 
is to help men of all vocations acquire some appreciation of our literary heritage, essential 
to a cultivated outlook on life, and to help men of all vocations acquire greater facility 
in the knowledge and use of our language. The aim is thus twofold: education for en- 
lightened leisure and for enlightened labor. Bacon's words are pertinent: "Studies serve 
for delight, for ornament, and for ability. . . . Some books are to be tasted, others to 
be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested." 

Majors. — The following courses are required for English majors in the College of Arts 
and Sciences: CEh. 37-38, Eh. 301-302, Eh. 305, Eh. 339. CEh. 37-38 should, if possible, 
be elected in the sophomore year. English majors should elect a foreign language in the 
sophomore year. 

Prerequisites. — There are no rigid prerequisites for non-majors. 

Important. — All of the courses in English are so organized that they may be taken 
lor credit either semester. 

C-3 (31-32).— Reading, Speaking, and Writing. 

( See Bulletin of Information for the General College. ) 

CEh. 33. — Effective Writing. Offered only in the second semester. 4 hours. 
4 credits. CONGLETON. Prerequisite: C-3, or permission of C-3 Course Chairman. 

Designed to aid the student to present his ideas in writing which is not only accurate and 
clear but pleasing and attractive to the reader. Students are encouraged to do creative work. 

CEh. 34. — Reading for Leisure. Offered each semester. 4 hours. 4 credits. 
Skaggs. Prerequisite: C-3, or permission of C-3 Course Chairman. 

Designed to aid the student in planning for himself a well-rounded, leisure-readinsj program, 
which will serve to keep him abreast of the best in contemporary thought and literature. 

CEh. 35. — Literary Masters of America. 3 hours. 3 credits. CONNER. The 
first half of the course CEh. 35-36. May be taken for credit without CEh. 36. 

CEh. 35-36 : The writers emphasized are selected from the most eminent American authors 
between Irving and Frost, such writers as everyone should or would like to know, regardless of 
his intended vocation. 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 379 

CEh. 36. — Literary Masters of America. 3 hours. 3 credits. CONNER. The 
feecond half of the course CEh. 35-36. May be taken for credit without CEh. 35. 

CEh. 37. — Literary Masters of England. 3 hours. 3 credits. LYONS. The 
first half of the course CEh. 37-38. May be taken for credit without CEh. 38. 

CEh. 37-38: The most interesting and significant English writers are read and discussed, 
primarily for an appreciation of their art and outlook on life. 

CEh. 38. — Literary Masters of England. 3 hours. 3 credits. LYONS. The 
second half of the course CEh. 37-38. May be taken for credit without CEh, 37. 

CEh. 313. — Masterpieces of World Literature. 3 hours. 3 credits. STROUP. 
The first half of the course CEh. 313-314. May be taken for credit without CEh. 
314. 

CEh. 313-314: A lecture and reading course designed to acquaint the student with some of 
the greatest books in the world, books which every educated man should know. 

CEh. 314. — Masterpieces of World Literature. 3 hours. 3 credits. Stroup. 
The second half of the course CEh. 313-314. May be taken for credit without 
CEh. 313. 

Eh. 221. — ^Types of Humorous Literature. 3 hours. 3 credits. MoORE. 

An approach to the masterpieces of humorous literature, with some attention to the nature 
and function of humor and to its various types. 

Eh. 301. — Shakespeare. 3 hours. 3 credits. ROBERTSON. 

The primary design is to increase the student's enjoyment and appreciation of the plays. 
Devoted chiefly to the romantic comedies and the history plays, including A Midsummer Night'e 
Dream, The Merchant of Venice, Much Ado, As You Like It, Twelfth Night, Richard the Third, 
and Henry the Fourth. As an aid to the reading of Shakespeare, some of the most interesting 
features of the Elizabethan stage and drama are treated briefly. 

Eh. 302. — Shakespeare. 3 hours. 3 credits. ROBERTSON. 

The great tragedies will be studied, notably Hamlet, Othello, King Lear, Macbeth, and Antony 
and Cleopatra. Required of majors. 

Eh. 303. — Major Poets of the Victorian Period. 3 hours. 3 credits. Farris. 

Reading and discussion of such major writers as Browning, Tennyson, Arnold, the Rossettis, 
Morris, Swinburne, and Kipling. 

Eh. 304. — Major Prose Writers of the Victorian Period. 3 hours. 3 credits. 
Farris. 

Reading and discussion of such eminent Victorians as Carlyle, Dickens, Macaulay, Arnold, 
Ruskin, Thackeray, Huxley, and Hardy. 

Eh. 305. — Introduction to the Study of the English Language. (Off'ered each 
semester.) 3 hours. 3 credits. Eliason. 

Designed to meet the needs of three types of students: (a) For the general student it offers 
a means of improving his written and spoken English by showing him what "good English" is. 
(b) For the English teacher in the secondary school it provides an adequate minimum knowledge 
of the English Language. (c) For the English Major and beginning graduate student it serves 
as an introduction to further linguistic study. Primary emphasis is placed, not upon grammatical 
rules, but rather upon the most interesting features of our language as written and spoken. 

Eh. 307. — English and Scottish Popular Ballads. 3 hours. 3 credits. MORRIS. 

A study of the English and Scottish popular ballads, their origin in folklore and their develop- 
ment and spread to America. 

Eh. 308. — American Folksongs. 3 hours. 3 credits. MORRIS. 

A study of the American folksong, with consideration of the English and Scottish sui-vivals. 
The introduction to the course will consider the general subject of folklore and the folksong as a 
part of folklore. 

Eh. 309.— Short Story. 2 hours. 2 credits. FARRIS. 

Studies in the history, criticism, and appreciation of the short story as a literary type. 
Lectures, extensive readings. 



380 BULLET W OF INFORMATION — UPPER DIVISION 

Eh. 312. — Exposition. 2 hours. 2 credits. Farris. 

Advanced studies m composition especially designed to meet the needs of those intending to 
pursue graduate study, those preparing to enter the professions, engage in research, etc. 

Eh. 327. — Imaginative Writing. 2 hours. 2 credits. Farris. The first half 
of the course Eh. 327-328. May be taken for credit without Eh. 328. 

Eh. 327-328 : Designed to help the student who desires guidance in developing his capacity 
for original vyork. Group discussion, individual conferences, many papers. 

Eh. 328. — Imaginative Writing. 2 hours. 2 credits. FARRIS. The second half 
of the course Bh. 327-328. May be taken for credit without Eh. 327. 

Eh. 354. — Browning. 3 hours. 3 credits. FARRIS. 

Wide reading and discussion of the writings of Browning and a few of his immediate con- 
temporaries. 

Eh. 355. — Business Writing. 3 hours. 3 credits. CLARK. 

A general course in business letter and report writing. The more common types of business 
letters are written, such as letters of application, letters of credit, and sales letters. Reports are 
written upon projects of the students' special interest. 

This covirse is especially designed to meet the needs of students in Business Administration 
and allied fields. Prerequisite : C-3. 

Eh. 361.— The Novel. 3 hours. 3 credits. FARRIS. The first half of the 
course Eh. 361-362. May be taken for credit without Eh. 362. 

Eh. 361-362 : The development of the novel from earlier fiction ; the great novels of the 
eighteenth, nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Major emphasis upon the modem novel. 

Eh. 362.— The Novel. 3 hours. 3 credits. FARRIS. The second half of the 
course Eh. 361-362. May be taken for credit without Eh. 361. 

Eh. 363. — Modern Drama. 3 hours. 3 credits. ROBERTSON. 

A study of recent and contemporary drama, with emphasis upon such major English and 
American playwrights as Shaw and Eugene O'Neill. The work of Ibsen and other Continental 
writers will be treated briefly. 

Eh. 365. — Contemporary Literature: Fiction. 3 hours. 3 credits. MOUNTS. 

A consideration of the most important English and American writers of prose fiction from 
Thomas Hardy to the present, with major emphasis upon recent novelists. 

Eh. 366. — Contemporary Literature: Poetry: 3 hours. 3 credits. LYONS. 

Reading, critical interpretation, and discussion of modern British and American poetry, with 
chief emphasis upon recent poetry. 

Eh. 399. — Introduction to the Study of Literature. 3 hours, 3 credits. LYONS. 

A consideration of the nature of literature, its types, forms, content, and values. Designed 
to provide the student with a better critical understanding of literary art. Lectures, wide reading, 
and discussion. 

Eh. 401. — American Literature. 3 hours. 3 credits. Spivey. 

A study of American literature from the beginnings to 1850. 

Eh. 402. — American Literature. 3 hours. 3 credits. Spivey. 

A general survey of American literature (all types and all regions) from Whitman to the 
present, with the major emphasis upon such writers as Whitman, Howells, James, Twain, Lanier, 
the local colorists, Wharton, Gather, Glasgow, Lewis, Robinson, Frost and O'Neill. 

Eh. 405. — Drama of the Restoration and Eighteenth Century. 3 hours. 3 
credits. ROBERTSON. 

A survey of the English stage from Dryden to Sheridan, with emphasis upon principal plays, 
playwrights, and dramatic tendencies. 

Eh. 409. — Chaucer. Offered only in the second semester, 3 hours. 3 credits. 

Eliason. 

Designed to help the student appreciate Chaucer as a story teller, as a wise, humorous, and 
penetrating observer of human life, and as a great poet. 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 381 

Eh. 413. — The Renaissance in England. 3 hours. 3 credits. Stroup. 

The origin of the movement in Italy and its spread in England ; special emphasis on the 
development of English drama. The work of the Renaissance humanists, such as Colet, Erasmus, 
and More and the work of the Elizabethan and Jacobean dramatists, such as Marlowe, Kyd, 
Greene, Jonson, Beaumont and Fletcher will be studied. 

Eh. 414. — The Renaissance in England. 3 hours. 3 credits. STROUP. 

The lyric and epic poetry of the period and with the various prose works to 1660. Selections 
from such poets as Spenser, Drayton, Donne, Milton and from such prose masters as Ascham, 
Sidney. Lyly. Bacon, and Fuller will be studied. 

Eh. 415. — Milton. 3 hours. 3 credits. STROUP. 

Though the emphasis will fall upon Paradise Lost, all of Milton's poetry will be read and 
much of his prose. Attention will be given to Milton's social, religious, educational, and philo- 
sophical views, and his work will be related to his age. Wide reading in the literature of the 
period will be expected. 

Eh. 417. — Spenser. 3 hours. 3 credits. MOUNTS. 

The purpose is to lead the student to a large familiarity with the text of Spenser to deal 
with some of the problems of allusion, structure and style, and to suggest the poet's relationship 
to his predecessors and contemporaries. 

Eh. 418. — The Literature of the South. Offered only in the first semestei*. 
3 hours. 3 credits. Spivey. 

A study of the poetiT and prose written by Southerners or reflecting the life in the region, 
and a consideration of various literary centers and local color movements. Chief emphasis on 
19th and 20th century literary productions. 

Eh. 419. — Elizabethan Drama. 3 hours. 3 credits. ROBERTSON. 

A course in the origins and development of the Elizabethan drama, exclusive of Shakesi)eare. 
with emphasis upon such major writers as Marlowe, Kyd, Chapman, Marston, Webster, and Jonson. 

Eh. 433. — English Literature of the Late 17th and Early 18th Centuries. 3 
hours. 3 credits. CONGLETON. 

A study of English prose and poetry from Dryden through Pope, with chief emphasis upon 
Dryden, Defoe, Addison and Steele, Pope and Swift. 

Eh. 434.— English Literature of the Eighteenth Century, 1744-1800. 3 hours. 
3 credits. Spivey. 

All the works of Johnson, the best of Boswell, and the most interesting of Goldsmith, Garrick, 
Reynolds, Burke, and other members of the famous Literary Club will be studied. 

Eh. 443. — The English Romantic Period. 3 hours. 3 credits. FOX. 

Reading and discussion. Chief emphasis on the work of Burns, Blake, Coleridge and Words- 
worth. 

Eh. 444. — The English Romantic Period. 3 hours. 3 credits. Fox. 

Reading and discussion. Chief emphasis on the work of Byron, Keats, and Shelley. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

Eh. 501-502. — American Literature 

Eh. 505. — Drama of the Restoration and 18th Century 

Eh. 509-510.— Chaucer 

Eh. 511. —Old English 

Eh. 512. —Middle English 

Eh. 513-514. — The Renaissance in England 

Eh. 515. —Milton 

Eh. 517. — Spenser 

Eh. 518. — Studies in American Literature 

Eh. 519. —Elizabethan Drama 

Eh. 529. —Graduate Seminar 



382 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION — UPPER DIVISION 

Eh. 530. —Individual Work 

Eh. 533. — English Classicism 

Eh. 534. —English Literature of the 18th Century 

Eh. 541. —Beowulf 

Eh. 543-544. — The English Romantic Movement 

ENTOMOLOGY 

Ey. 201. — Man and Insects. 3 hours. 3 credits. Creighton and HIXSON. 
This course or Ey. 301 are prerequisites or corequisites of all courses in Ento- 
mology except Ey. 314. Only students in freshmen and sophomore classes 
permitted to register for this course. 

The influence of insects upon man's agricultural and social world. The course treats of the 
contrast between the history of man and insects ; the influence of insects upon domestic life, 
agriculture, commerce, industry, w^ars, human diseases, and medical practices, machine develop- 
ment, engineering, legal practices, scientific investigations, and upon other insects. It is designed 
to broaden the knowledge of all students concerning the influence of man's greatest limiting factor 
ir. the continuance of the human race. 

Ey. 301. — Introduction to Entomology. 2 hours, and 4 hours laboratory. 4 
credits. Creighton and HlXSON. This course or Ey. 201 are prerequisites or 
corequisites for all other courses in Entomology except Ey. 314. 

An introduction to entomology which is based upon a study of the structure, classification, 
life histories, and control of major insect enemies of American agricultural crops. Particular 
stress is placed upon Southern and Florida economic insects. This course is designed for all 
students in the College of Agriculture either as a pre or corequisite for other entomology courses. 

Ey. 304. — Advanced Entomology. 2 hours, and 6 hours laboratory. 5 credits. 

Creighton. 

A survey of the major phases of entom,ology including biological and natural control, insect 
histology, insect taxonomy, insect ecology, economic entomology, insect behavior, and the experi- 
mental method. This course is designed primarily for students majoring in the field of entomology. 

Ey. 311. — Entomology Seminar. 1 hour. 1 credit. CREIGHTON and HlXSON. 
The first half of the course Ey. 311-312. 

Ey. 311-312 : This is attended by all graduates and undergraduates in the department of ento- 
mology. Students are required to prepare papers dealing with some phase of agriculture and 
submit them for correction by members of the staff. At regular intervals students appear before 
the seminar group at which time they give talks dealing with the subjects selected. 

Ey. 312. — Entomology Seminar. 1 hour. 1 credit. CREIGHTON and HlXSON. 
The second half of the course Ey. 311-312. 

Ey. 314. — Principles of Economic Entomology. 2 hours, and 4 hours labora- 
tory. 4 credits. CREIGHTON and HlXSON. For agricultural teachers only. 

The fundamental principles of entomology, stressing the economic aspects. This course 
includes a study of national insect problems with a detailed discussion of the insects of importance 
en all cultivated plants and domestic animals in the Florida area. 

Ey. 405. — Insect Control. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits. CREIGH- 
TON and HlXSON. 

A study of the methods of control including insecticides, repellants, cultural, biological, legal, 
and natural. Consideration is given the toxicological principles of inseeticides. This course is 
designed for all students in agriculture and provides them with ideal training to meet the every 
day problems of insect attacks upon man, domestic animals, and cultivated plants. 

Ey. 408. — Insect Morphology and Physiology. 3 hours, and 4 hours laboratory. 
5 credits. CREIGHTON. 

The external and internal anatomy of insects together with the functioning of the parts of 
the body and the systems of organs. A course designed for students majoring in the department 
of entomology. 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 383 

Ey. 411. — Apiculture. An Introduction to Bee Culture. 2 hours. 2 credits. 
Creighton. 

A study of the organization of a bee colony, life processes, races of bees, manipulation, value 
of colonies, nectar and pollen sources, pollination value, diseases, selection of apiary site, economic 
importance of industry, apparatus, and marketing of products. 

Ey. 420. — Medical and Veterinary Entomology. 3 hours. 3 credits. HlXSON. 

A study of the Arthropods that are parasitic upon man and animals, including insects and 
their near relatives. This course includes a study of insects and their close relatives that affect 
the health of man and animals, and their relationship to diseases. This course is designed for 
students in agriculture, particularly in entomology and animal industry ; also for students in 
ether educational work in which the health of man and animals are important considerations. 

Ey. 430. — Insect Histology. 1 hour, and 2 hours laboratory. 2 credits. 
Creighton. 

The histological structure of insects. A study of the laboratory technique involved in the 
preparation of insect tissues for microscopical study. A course designed for students majoring 
in entomology and other students who are interested in technique methods. 

Ey. 432. — Florida Fruit and Vegetable Insects. 2 hours, and 2 hours labora- 
tory. 3 credits. CREIGHTON. 

A detailed study of the identification, life histories, and control of the major insect pests of 
Florida's fmit and vegetable crops. A course designed for all students in the College of Agri- 
culture, especially those interested in economic plant life. 

Ey. 441. — Plant Quarantine, Inspection, and Control. 2 hours, and 2 hours 
laboratory. 3 credits. CREIGHTON, BROWN, GOODWIN. 

A study of the legal, operational, and administrative principles of plant quarantine inspection 
and control together -vnth a study of plant quarantine organization methods and control and eradi- 
cation efforts of the past and present. A course designed for all students intei'ested in the future 
of Florida's agricultural industry. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

Ey. 501. — Methods of Research in Entomology 
Ey. 503. — Problems in Entomology 
Ey. 506. — Advanced Insect Histology 
Ey. 507. — Advanced Insect Taxonomy 
Ey. 509. — Advanced Insect Embryology 
Ey. 513. — Advanced Insect Morphology 
Ey. 515 — Biological and Natural Control 
Ey. 516. — Insect Ecology 

FORESTRY 

Fy. 220. — Introduction to Forestry, Offered each semester. 2 hours. 2 credits. 
Westveld and Zeigler. 

A basic course designed to acquaint the student with the various phases and fundamental 
underlying principles of the field of Forestry. 

Fy, 301. — Dendrology. 2 hours, and 4 hours laboratory. 4 credits. DeValL. 

The botany of trees of the United States, siivical characterization including general range 
and local occurrence, field identification. 

Fy. 302. — Forest Mensuration. Offered only in the first semester-. 2 hours, 
and 4 hours laboratoi-y. 4 credits. Frazer. 

Principles and practice of measuiing forests and forest products with special attention to 
Florida conditions. 

Fy. 306. — Forest Protection. OfTered only in the first semester. 2 hours. 2 
credits. Frazer. 

Technique of forest fire protection, as developed and practiced in the United States with 
special emphasis on the Southern states. 



384 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION —UPPER DIVISION 

Fy. 309. — Wood Technology and Timber Physics. Offered only in the second 
semester. 2 hours, and 4 hours in field. 4 credits. DeVall. Prerequisite: Fy. 301. 

Identification of commercial woods of the United States, especially those of Florida, by 
appearance, structure, use of microscope, hand lens ; preparation of wood slides ; testing for 
mechanical properties of woods ; effect of density on strengrth, etc. 

Fy. 310. — Reforestation and Nursery Practice. 2 hours, and 4 hours labora- 
tory. 3 credits. MILLER. 

Cleaning, grading, germination tests, plantings in School nursery, cultivation and care of 
seedlings. 

Fy, 311. — Foundations of Silviculture. 2 hours, and 4 hours field and labora- 
tory. 3 credits. Westveld. 

Classification of forest vegetation : climatic, edaphic, physiographic, and biotic factors of 
the site ; forest succession. 

Fy. 312. — Game Management. Offered each semester. 1 hour, and 4 hours 
laboratory. 3 credits. DeVall. 

The properties of game populations, including fish, birds and mammals ; improvement of 
game range ; methods of census ; measurem.ent and diagnosis of productivity ; predator control ; 
food cover types ; and field studies in classification and identification. 

Fy. 313. — Farm Forestry. Offered each semester. 2 hours, and 2 hours field 
and laboratory. 3 credits. WESTVELD. 

Farm forests in the farm management plan ; economic and other values of farm forests ; 
methods of growing and pi-otecting farm forests ; measuring and marketing farm forest products ; 
wood preservation. Florida conditions. 

Fy, 318. — Forest Utilization and Products. 3 hours. 3 credits. ZlEGLER. 

Rough forest products, poles, piling, logs, cross-ties, posts, pulp-wood, mine timbers, boxes 
and crates, cooperage, furniture and flooring, veneers and plywood, naval stores industry — field 
operations, turpentine still and products. 

Fy. 320, — Silviculture. 1 hour, and 8 hours field and laboratory. 3 credits. 
Westveld. Pi-erequisite : Fy. 311. 

Factors influencing natural regeneration : methods of cutting to secure natural regeneration : 
methods of cutting for stand improvement ; slash disposal ; preparation of silvicultural plans. 

Fy, 351. — Forest Conservation. 3 hours. 3 credits. Frazer. 

Brief history of the forest conservation movement in the United States with particular em- 
phasis on the southern states and Florida, including the work of several states, various agencies 
of the federal government, private associations and individuals. 

Fy. 407, — Forest Recreation and Landscape Forestry, 1 hour, and 4 hours 
laboratory, 3 credits. MILLER. 

Practical experience in designing of recreational areas. Construction, use, care, etc., of 
such areas. 

Fy. 409. — Forest Finance. 2 houi-s. 2 credits. MILLER. 

Forests as investments, interest rates, carrying charges, maturity, relation of intermediate 
to final and net incomes, and forest insurance. 

Fy. 410. — Forest History and Policy. 2 hours. 2 credits. FRAZER. 

History of forest land use in the United States. Development of conservation agencies and 
study of federal and state laws affecting forests. 

Fy. 412. — Seminar. Offered only in the first semester. 1 hour. 1 credit. 
Staff. 

Round-table discussion of the trends, developm^ents, problems, etc., that are found in forestry 
from time to time. 

Fy, 413. — Regional Silviculture, 3 hours. 3 credits. WESTVELD. Prere- 
quisites: Fy. 311, Fy. 320. 

The ecological and economic factors that influence silvicultural practice, and the application 
of silvicultural methods to the forests of the United States and Alaska. 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 385 

Fy. 414. — Wood Preservation and Seasoning. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 
3 credits. MILLER. 

Decay, preservatives, treating plants and apparatus, methods and costs, objects treated and 
results, fire proofinK, painting and finishing woods, conditioning of wood-storage, stacking, air 
Eeasoning, kiln drying and schedules. 

Fy. 416. — Forest Management Working Plans. 1 hour, and 5 hours in field. 
3 credits. ZlEGLER. 

Application of principles of Forest Management in making working plans for specific forest 
areas, beginning with the school forest working plans ; measures for sustained yield, increase 
or reduction of growing stock. 

Fy. 418. — Logging and Lumbering. 3 hours. 3 credits. MILLER. 

Utilization of major forest products ; logging engineering, transportation, equipment, costs, 
lumbering manufacture, plant, milling practice, and merchandising products. 

Fy. 419. — Principles of Forest Management. 3 hours. 3 credits. ZlEGLER. 

Principles of forest management, forest organization, management plans, subdivisions of 
forest area, forest regulations, cutting cycle, normal forest, etc. 

Fy. 420. — Forest Economics and Administration. 3 hours. 3 credits. ZlEGLER. 

A world survey of forest resources ; land economics as applied to forestry ; supply, demand, 
price trends and forest net income, forest taxation, public and private forest administration. 

Fy. 421. — Kiln Drying of Lumber. Offered each semester. 1 hour, and 4 hours 
laboratory. 3 credits. Newins. 

Principles and practices of the kiln drying of lumber, temperatures, moisture, etc. 

Fy. 422. — Advanced Mensuration. 2 hours. 2 credits. Frazer. 

Advanced problems in forest mensuration, involving sampling of forest stands and study 
of grovirth. 

Fy. 429. — Industrial Education Forestry. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 
3 credits. NeWINS. For Industrial Education students only. 

Identification of woods, cell structure, seasoning, sap stains, etc. 

Fy. 430. — Seminar. 1 hour. 1 credit. STAFF. 

A continuation of Fy. 412. Required of all Seniors in Forestry. 

Fy. 431. — Forest Problems Seminar. Offered each semester. Lecture, field 
and laboratory work arranged. 2 credits. STAFF. 

Discussion of and investigation in some particular field of Forestry. The student will be 
assigned to the member of the staff in whose field his interest lies. 

Fy. 432. — Forest Improvements. Offered only in the second semester. 1 hour, 
and 4 hours field work. 3 credits. Frazer. 

The character, installation and maintenance of the forest property necessary for administration 
and fire control. 

FRENCH 

IMPORTANT: With the exception of CFh. 33-34 and Fh. 201-202, all the courses in French 
may be taken either semester for credit. In special instances Fh. 202 may be taken — with per- 
mission of the instructor— even though the student has not had FTi. 201. In all other courses 
the first semester is not a prerequisite for the second semester. 

CFh. 33.— Reading of French. 3 hours. 3 credits. Atkin, BRUNET. The 
first half of the course CFh. 33-34. Open to those students who have had no 
previous work in French. 

CFh. 33-34 : A beginning course basic for further study. The main objective is the attain- 
ment of the maximum reading ability that can be developed within the year; gramnnar and 
pronunciation are subordinated. Reading of easy texts is begun at once. 

CFh. 34. — Reading of French. 3 hours. 3 credits. ATKIN, Brunet. The 
second half of the course CFh. 33-34. 



386 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION —UPPER DIVISION 

Fh. 201. — Second-Year French. 3 hours. 3 credits. Atkin, Brunet. The 
first half of the course Fh. 201-202. Prerequisite: One year of college French, 
or two years of high school French. 

Fh. 201-202 : Reading of stories, essays, and plays ; Eeneral review and translation of simple 
English into French. 

Fh. 202. — Second-Year French. 3 hours. 3 credits. ATKIN, BRUNET. The 
second half of the course Fh. 201-202. 

Fh. 305. — Conversation and Composition. 3 hours. 3 credits. ATKIN. Pre- 
requisite: Fh. 201-202 or permission of the instructor. 

Training and practice in oral and written expression. 

Fh. 306. — Conversation and Composition. 3 hours. 3 credits. ATKIN. Pre- 
requisite: Fh. 201-202 or permission of the instructor. 

Practice in precise and fluent speaking and in correct and effective composition. 

Fh. 307. — Masterpieces of French Literature. 3 hours. 3 credits. ATKIN. 
Prerequisite: Fh. 201-202 or permission of the instructor. 

Reading and discussion of such eminent writers as Rabelais, Montaigne, Moliere, Racine, 
Voltaire, and Rousseau. 

Fh. 308. — Masterpieces of French Literature. 3 hours. 3 credits. ATKIN. 
Prerequisite: Fh. 201-202 or permission of the instructor. 

Reading and discussion of such eminent writers as Victor Hugo, Balzac, Stendhal, Flaubert, 
FVance. 

Fh. 403. — French Literature, 1800-1850. 3 hours. 3 credits. ATKIN. Pre- 
requisite: Fh, 307-308 or permission of the instructor. 

Study of the chief literary figures of the first half of the nineteenth century. 

Fh. 404.— French Literature, 1850-1900. 3 hours. 3 credits. ATKIN. Pre- 
requisite: Fh. 307-308 or permission of the instructor. 

Study of the writers of the second half of the nineteenth century. 

Fh. 417. — French Pronunciation. 2 hours. 2 credits. ATKIN. Prerequisite: 
Fh. 201-202. 

Description of French speech sounds ; practice in pronunciation. 

Fh. 418. — Selections from Contemporary French. 2 hours. 2 credits. ATKIN, 
Prerequisite: Fh. 201-202. 

The selections read, and discussed in English, consisting mostly of brief extracts from recent 
books and periodicals, are good specimens of French expository prose, and are informative of 
French ideas and opinions. Considerable attention is given to points of vocabulary and idiomatic 
phrasing. 

Fh. 420. — Contemporary French Civilization. 2 hours. 2 credits. ATKIN. 
Prerequisite: Fh. 201-202. 

Land, people, institutions and culture of present-day France. The course is conducted in 
English with reading in French and English. 

Fh. 421. — Contemporary French Civilization. 2 hours. 2 credits. ATKIN. 
Prerequisite: Fh. 201-202. 

The culture of present-day FVance, with emphasis upon art and letters. 

Fh. 427. — French-English Word Study. 2 hours. 2 credits. ATKIN. Pre- 
requisite: Fh. 201-202. 

Differentiation of meaning in French and English words of sim.ilar spelling. Comparison of 
the meanings of such words should be useful to students and teachers of either language. Previ- 
ous knowledge of Latin is not necessary though desirable. 

Fh. 428. — French-English Word Study. 2 hours. 2 credits. ATKIN. Pre- 
requisite: Fh. 201-202. 

Further comparison of related words in French and English. 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 387 

Fh. 430.— Individual Work. Variable credit. Atkin. 

An opportunity to study, for credit, certain phases of French literature, language, and civiliza- 
tion for which there are no special course offerings. Through this means a student can complete 
an undergraduate major or graduate minor. Fh. 430 may be elected for additional credit in sub- 
sequent sessions. Students will be helped to plan a definite program, and will meet the instructor 
for frequent conferences. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

Fh. 505-506. — French Novel 
Fh. 517-518.— Old French 
Fh. 530. —Individual Work 

GENERAL SCIENCE 
GI. 320.— The History of Science. 2 hours. 2 credits. PHIPPS. 

A history of the development of science restricted primarily to the physical and biological 
sciences. The treatment is non-technical and the social significance of the important discoveries 
and inventions will be studied. Designed for science majors and minors as well as those who 
teach science in the secondary schools. Open to students in their last semester of the General 
College with the approval of the Dean. 

GEOGRAPHY 

Gy. 303 and Es. 304 may be elected by students in the General College who have com- 
pleted C-1 and C-2, or the equivalent. These courses are required of all students intending 
to major in either Geography or Geology and should, if possible, be elected in the sopho- 
more year. 

All departmental majors in Geography will include, in addition to the above. Es. .381, 
Es. 382, Gpy. 312, Gpy. 323, Gpy. 330, and Gpy. 430 together with three additional credits 
in Geograpiiy courses numbered above 380. 

The following courses in Economic Geography are offered in the Department of Eco- 
nomics and Business Administration and form a part of the Geography program: Es. .304, 
Es. 381, Es. 382. Es. 385, Bs. 440. Es. 387, Es. 389. For descriptions of these courses see 
Economics and Business Administration. 

Gpy. 201. — Geography of the Americas. 3 hours. 3 credits. Atwood. 

A regional survey of the lands and peoples of Anglo and Latin America ; location, surface 
features, climate, ancient civilizations, European settlement, natural resources and economic devel- 
opment; an analysis of the growth of present-day nations and their economic, political and social 
interdependence. Introductory to study of geography, history, languages and Inter-American affairs. 

Gpy. 305. — Geography of Florida. 3 hours. 3 credits. ATWOOD. 

A study of the geographic conditions and human adjustments in the major regions of Florida. 
The distribution of population, routes of communication, industries, resources, and strategic 
location in their geographical and historical aspects ; explanation and interpretation of major 
phenomena such as weather and climate, geologic structure and land forms, surface and under- 
ground drainage, shoreline characteristics, natural vegetation, .soil types, and animal life. Optional 
field trips. 

Gpy. 312. — Plant and Animal Geography. 3 hours. 3 credits. HUBBELL. 

The world distribution of the major types of plant and animal associations in relation to 
climate, topography and other factors, and its bearing upon geology, geography, and human affairs. 

Gpy. 323. — Elementary Climatography, 3 hours. 3 credits. ATWOOD. 

The elements of climate, weather types and stonns ; classifications and distribution of climatic 
types : descriptive and explanatory analysis of the climatic characteristics of Florida with special 
attention to the influence of surface features and water bodies. 



388 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION —UPPER DIVISION 

Gpy. 330. — Maps, Charts and Graphs. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. S 
credits. Atwood. 

Elementary cartography and map interpretation ; map projections ; geographic and geologic 
symbols ; methods of graphic presentation used in the different sciences, including block diagrams, 
structural diagrams, statistical maps, cartograms, slope, soil, erosion and land utilization maps ; 
field mapping and field techniques essential to the preparation and use of geographic and geologic 
maps. 

Gpy. 405. — Advanced Regional Geography. 3 hours. 3 credits. ATWOOD. 

An intensive study of geographic problems in selected regions. Designed for advanced stu- 
dents in geography and related subjects. 

Gpy. 424. — Advanced Regional Climatography. 3 hours. 3 credits. ATWOOD. 

Intensive study of climatic conditions in selected regions. 

Gpy. 430. — Field Mapping and Advanced Cartography. 3 hours. 3 credits. 
Atwood. 

Special training in map interpretation and preparation, including observation, measurement, 
and recording of geographic and geologic data. 

GEOLOGY 

Gy. 303 and Es. 304 may be elected by students in the General College who have com- 
pleted C-1 and C-2 or the equivalent. These courses are required of all students intending 
to major in either Geology or Geography and should, if possible, be elected in the sopho- 
more year. 

All departmental majors in Geology will include in addition to the above, Gy. 307, Gy. 
308, Gy. 321, Gy. 401, and Gpy. 430, together with six additional credits in Geology courses 
numbered above 400. 

Gy. 303. — General Geology. 3 hours, and 3 Saturday field trips. 3 credits. 
HuBBELL, Atwood, Edwards. 

An introduction to earth science, with special application to Florida. A study of rocks and 
their formations, erosion, climate in relation to geology and soils, land forms and their interpre- 
tation, the history of Florida in relation to that of the North American continent, and the bearing 
of geology upon engineering and agricultural problems. To be accompanied by demonstration 
laboratory periods. 

Gy. 307. — Rocks of the Atlantic and Gulf Coastal Plain. 2 hours, and 2 
hours laboratory. 3 credits. HUBBELL. 

An introductory study of the origin, distrribution, characteristics and properties of the sedi- 
mentary rocks of the Coastal Plain, of their economic uses and their relation to human problems. 

Gy. 308. — Elementary Mineralogy and Petrology. 2 hours, and 2 hours lab- 
oratory. 3 credits. EDWARDS. 

A study of the characteristics and identification of important minerals and rocks, by methods 
not involving the use of the microscope. 

Gy. 321. — Elementary Paleontology. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits. 
EDWARDS. Prerequisite or corequisite: C-6 or the equivalent. 

The characteristics and identification of important groups of invertebrate fossils and the use 
of fossils in the identification of rocks, with special reference to the stratigraphy of the Coastal 
Plain. 

Gy. 401. — ^Physiography of North America. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 
3 credits. ATWOOD. 

An analysis and interpretation of the evolution of present-day surface features and the prin- 
ciples for regional classification of the land areas of the earth. A detailed study of the physio- 
graphic regions of North America and their significance in the study of geology and geography. 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 389 

Gy. 402. — The Geology and Mineral Resources of Florida. 2 hours, and 2 
hours laboratory. 3 credits. STAFF. 

A detailed study of the geolojjical history, stratigraphy and mineral resources of the state. 

Gy. 409. — Shoreline and Marine Physiography. 2 hours, and 2 hours lab- 
oratory; Saturday field trips to be arranged. 3 credits. Atwood and HUBBELL. 

An advanced treatment of shore processes and shoreline development, including beach forma- 
tion and erosion, the submarine topography and currents of the continental shelf, and the bearing 
of these and related factors on human activities. 

Gy. 410. — The Surface and Underground Waters of Florida. 2 hours, and 2 
hours laboratory; Saturday field trips to be arranged. 3 credits. STAFF. 

A study of precipitation, run-off, surface and sub-surface erosion and the effects upon the 
composition of v^ater, in a region of low relief and prevailing soluble rocks. Of importance to 
students in the fields of geology, geography, engineering, soils and public health. 

Gy. 415. — Advanced Physical Geology. 3 hours. 3 credits. HUBBELL. 

Advanced study of the physical nature of the earth and processes affecting the earth's surface. 

Gy. 416. — Advanced Historical Geology. 3 hours. 3 credits. HUBBELL. 

Advanced study of the origin and history of the earth and the development of plant and animal 
life during the geologic past. 

Gy. 420. — Advanced Invertebrate Paleontology. 3 hours. 3 credits. EDWARDS. 

Laboratory and lectures on important problems in Atlantic and Gulf Coast paleontology to- 
gether with individual problems. 

GERMAN 

IMPORTANT: With the exception of CGn. 33-34 and Gn. 201-202, all the courses in German 
may be taken either semester for credit. In special instances Gn. 202 may, with permission of 
the instructor, be taken even though the student has not had Gn. 201. In all other courses the 
first semester is not a prerequisite for the second semester. 

CGn. 33. — Reading of German. 3 hours. 3 credits. JONES, Hauptmann. 
The first half of the course CGn, 33-34, Open to those students who have had 
no previous work in German. Prerequisite to all other courses in German. 

CGn. 33-34 : This course is designed to give students an opportunity to attain, without stressing 
formal grammar, a moderate proficiency in the reading of German. 

CGn. 34. — Reading of German. 3 hours. 3 credits. JONES, HAUPTMANN. 
The second half of the course CGn. 33-34. 

Gn. 201. — Second-Year German, 3 hours. 3 credits. JONES, HAUPTMANN. 
The first half of the course Gn. 201-202. Prerequisites: CGn. 33-34 or equivalent. 

Gn. 201-202 : Reading of modern stories, essays, and dramas ; practice in conversation. 

Gn, 202. — Second-Year German. 3 hours. 3 credits. JONES, HAUPTMANN. 
The second half of the course Gn. 201-202. 

Gn. 303. — Masterpieces of German Literature. 3 hours. 3 credits. JONES. 
Prerequisite: Gn. 201-202 or permission of instructor. 

A survey of German literature from, the ninth century to the end of the eighteenth. Works 
by Lessing and Schiller will be read in the original ; the Nibelungenlied and Grimmelshauson's 
SimpUcissiynus will be read in translation. 

Gn. 304. — Masterpieces of German Literature. 3 hours. 3 credits. JONES. 
Prerequisite: Gn. 201-202 or permission of instructor. 

A survey of German literature from the last decade of the ei:jrhteenth century to the end of 
the nineteenth century. Works by Kleist, Hebbel, Wagner, Keller and Hauptmann will be read 
in translation. 

Gn. 325. — Scientific German. 3 hours. 3 credits. HAUPTMANN. Prerequisite: 
Gn. 201-202 or permission of instructor. 

The reading of representative selections in Chemistry, Biology, Physics and other fields. De- 
signed to provide the student with an adequate tool for research involving German publications. 



390 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION —UPPER DIVISION 

Gn. 326. — Scientific German. 3 hours. 3 credits. Hauptmann. Prerequisite: 
Gn. 201-202 or permission of instructor. 

Advanced readings in student's chosen science. Designed to provide orientation in important 
German publications concerning student's own field. 

Gn. 401. — German Writers in Translation. 3 hours. 3 credits. JONES. No 
knowledge of the German language is required; no language credit is allowed 
for the course. 

A study of the German Classical period, writh emphasis upon the writings of Leasing, Goethe, 
and Schiller (in translation). 

Gn. 402. — German Writers in Translation. 3 hours. 3 credits. JONES. No 
knowledge of the German language is required; no language credit is allowed 
for the course. 

Intensive study of Lessing, Goethe, and Schiller. 

Gn. 403. — The German Classical Period. 3 hours. 3 credits. JONES. Pre- 
requisite: Gn. 303-304 or permission of the instructor. 

Designed to afford an opportunity for a detailed study of the w^orks of the Classical authors 
(in the original), together with the cultural background of the period. 

Gn. 404. — The German Classical Period. 3 hours. 3 credits. JONES. Pre- 
requisite: Gn, 303-304 or permission of the instructor. 

Study (in the original) of Lessing, Goethe, and Schiller. 

Gn. 430. — Individual Work. Variable credit. Hauptmann. 

Gn. 430 makes it possible for a student to fetudy, for credit, certain phases of German litera- 
ture, language, and civiHzation for which there are no special course offerings. Through this 
means a student can complete an undergraduate major or graduate minor. Gn. 430 may be elected 
for additional credit in subsequent sessions. Students will be helped to plan a definite program, 
and will meet the instructor for frequent conferences. 

Reading Course. 4 hours. credits. HAUPTMANN. Open to graduate stu- 
dents, faculty members and seniors who are planning to do graduate work. 

A special course for beginners who are primarily interested in meeting the reading require- 
ments for advanced degrees. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

Gn. 505. —The German Novel 

Gn. 506. — German Prose Fiction in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries 

Gn. 509-510.— Middle High German 

Gn. 517-518. — Introduction to Germanic Philology 

GREEK 

Gk. 33. — Beginners' Greek. 3 hours. 3 credits. Brunet. The first half of 
the course Gk. 33-34. 

Gk. 33-34 : A beginning course basic for further study, designed to introduce the student to 
the study of Greek and to develop a moderate reading ability. 

Gk. 34. — Beginners' Greek. 3 hours. 3 credits. Brunet. The second half 
of the course Gk. 33-34. 

Gk. 201. — Second Year Greek. 3 hours. 3 credits. BRUNET. 

Continuation of Xenophon's Anabasis. Grammar study. 

Gk. 202. — Second Year Greek. 3 hours. 3 credits. BRUNET. 

Translation of Plato's Apology and Crito. 



DEPARTMENTS OF I.\STRUCTIOl\ 391 

HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
HPl. 261. — Football. 3 hours. 3 credits. MCALLISTER. 

A consideration of football from the viewpoint of the interscholastic coach, presenting 
fundamentals in blocking, tackling, kicking, passing, individual position play, appropriate offensive 
formations and plays, and various defensive formations. 

HPL 263. — Basketball. 3 hours. 3 credits. McAllister. 

Fundamentals of basketball for men ; dealing with the techniques of shooting, passing, 
dribbling, stops, and guarding. A consideration of offensive team play, defensive team play, 
signals, scouting, team strategy, training, practice sessions, selection and placing of players, 
and other essentials of the modern court game. 

HPL 264.— Track and Field. 2 hours. 2 credits. Beard. 

Discussion of procedures and techniques involved in coaching the standard track and field 
events. 

HPL 266. — Baseball. 2 hours. 2 credits. McAllister. 

Discussion covering the fundamentals of fielding, batting, base running, play of the various 
positions, offensive and defensive team play, and the rules of the game. 

HPL 361. — Teaching Physical Education in the Elementary SchooL 3 hours. 
3 credits. SALT. The first half of the course HPl. 361-362. 

HPl. 361-362 : Methods and Materials. The program of physical education activities for the 
elementary school involving directed play, small group play, large group play, rhythms, sport 
units; together with appropriate procedures and methods for conducting such a program. (Note: 
Must be taken concurrently with En. 393-394.) 

HPL 362. — Teaching Physical Education in the Elementary School. 3 hours. 
3 credits. Salt. The second half of the course HPl. 361-362. 

HPl. 363. — Teaching Physical Education in the Secondary SchooL 3 hours. 
3 credits. SALT. The first half of the course HPl. 363-364. 

HPl. 363-364: Methods and Materials. The program of physical education activities for the 
secondary school involving team games, rhythms, gymnastics activities, individual and dual sports ; 
together with appropriate procedures and methods for conducting such a program. (Note: Must 
be taken concurrently with En. 393-394.) 

HPL 364. — Teaching Physical Education in the Secondary School. 3 hours. 
3 credits. SALT. The second half of the course HPl. 363-364. 

HPL 411. — Principles and Administration of Physical Education. 3 hours. 
3 credits. SALT. 

Fundamental principles upon which the present day program of physical education is based, 
together with a study of the history, aims, objectives, and contemporary trends in this field. 
The organization and administration of the program pertaining to the playground, gymnasium, 
swimming pool, service unit, intramural and interscholastic athletics. 

HPl. 462. — Community Recreation. Ofl"ered each semester. 6 hours labora- 
tory. 3 credits. SALT. 

A laboratory course in which the student is assigned weekly duties on a community play- 
ground under supervision. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

HPl. 531-532. — Guided Professional Development in Health and Physical Ed- 
ucation 

HPl. 533-534.— Problems in Physical Education 



392 



BULLETIN OF INFORMATION —UPPER DIVISION 



3 hours. 3 credits. LEAKE. The 



3 hours. 3 credits. Leake. The 



HISTORY 

In all the courses offered in this department political, economic, social, religiotis 
and cultural aspects are given consideration. Prerequisites: C-1 or Hy. 313-314 
{formerly Hy. 101-102) or equivalent. 

CHy. 13. — History of the Modern World. Offered each semester. 4 hours. 
4 credits. Leake. Prerequisite: C-1. Designed for General College students. 
Prerequisite to advanced courses in History for students entering from the 
General College. 

The historical background of present day civilization is considered insofar as that back- 
ground has been developed in the fabric of the historical movements since 1815. The political, 
economic, social, religious, Artistic, and cultural aspects of the nineteenth and twentieth centurieu 
are studied. 

Hy. 301.— American History, 1492-1776, 3 hours. 3 credits. LEAKE. The 
first half of the course Hy. 301-302. 

The Colonial Period up to 1776. 

Hy. 302.— American History, 1776-1830. 

second half of the course Hy. 301-302. 

The early Constitutional Period. 

Hy. 303.— American History, 1830-1876. 

first half of the course Hy. 303-304. 

The Civil War and Reconstruction. 

Hy. 304. — American History, 1876-1941. 3 hours. 3 credits. LEAKE. The 
second half of the course Hy. 303-304. 

From Reconstruction to the present. 

Hy. 305. — English History to 1485. 3 hours. 3 credits. PAYNE. The first 
half of the course Hy. 305-306. 

From early times to the end of the War of the Roses, 1485. 

Hy. 306.— English History, 1485 to 1688. 3 hours. 3 credits. PAYNE. The 
second half of the course Hy. 305-306. 

From 1485 to the "Glorious Revolution", 1688. 

Hy. 307. — The Renaissance and Reformation. 3 hours. 3 credits. LEAKE. 
The first half of the course Hy. 307-308. 

The Renaissance. 

Hy. 308. — ^The Renaissance and Reformation. 

The second half of the course Hy. 307-308. 

The Protestant Revolution and the Catholic Reformation. 

Hy. 309. — The French Revolution and the Napoleonic Era. 

Leake. The first half of the course Hy. 309-310. 

The causes and course of the French Revolution. 

Hy. 310. — The French Revolution and the Napoleonic Era. 

Leake. The second half of the course Hy. 309-310. 

The Napoleonic Era. 

Hy, 311.— English History, 1688 to 1815. 3 hours. 3 credits. PAYNE. The 
first half of the course Hy. 311-312. 

FVom the Revolution of 1688 to the close of the Napoleonic Period. 

Hy. 312. — English History, 1815-1941, 3 hours. 3 credits. Payne. The 
second half of the course Hy. 311-312. 

From the Congress of Vienna to the present. 



3 hours. 3 credits. LEAKE. 



3 hours. 3 credits. 



hours. 3 credits. 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 393 

Hy. 313. — Europe During the Middle Ages. 3 hours. 3 credits. Glunt. The 
first half of the course Hy. 313-314. 

Hy. 313-314 : The history of Western Europe from. 476 A.D. to the Renaissance and Reforma- 
tion. This course is a prerequisite for other history courses for students who do not enter the 
Upper Division from the General College. 

Hy. 314. — Europe During the Middle Ages. 3 hours. 3 credits. GLUNT. The 
second half of the course Hy. 313-314. 

Hy. 315.— Latin American History to 1850. 3 hours. 3 credits. GLUNT. The 
first half of the course Hy. 315-316. 

Hy. 315-316: First semester work covers the discovery, settlement, and early development 
of South and Central America. Second semester work covers the discovery, settlement, and early 
development of Latin America to 1850. 

Hy. 316.— Latin American History to 1850. 3 hours. 3 credits. GLUNT. The 
second half of the course Hy. 315-316. 

Hy. 317. — Latin American History, 1850-1900, 3 hours. 3 credits. GLUNT. 
The first half of the course Hy. 317-318. 

Hy, 318.— Latin American History, 1900 to 1941. 3 hours. 3 credits. GLUNT. 
The second half of the course Hy. 317-318. 

Hy. 331. — Survey of American History. 3 hours. 3 credits. LEAKE. The 
first half of the course Hy. 331-332. 

Hy. 331-332: A general survey course on the development of the United States, designed for 
students in Public Administration. Not open to other students unless they have completed C-1 
and CHy. 13 or Hy. 313-314. 

Hy. 332. — Survey of American History. 3 hours. 3 credits. LEAKE. The 
second half of the course Hy. 331-332, 

Hy. 401. — Ancient Civilizations. 3 hours. 3 credits. PAYNE. The first 
half of the course Hy. 401-402. 

Hy. 401-402: Egyptian, Assyrian, Babylonian, Persian, Semitic, Hellenic, and Roman peoples. 

Hy. 402. — Ancient Civilizations. 3 hours. 3 credits. PAYNE. The second 
half of the course Hy. 401-402. 

Hy. 403.— History of Europe, 1648 to 1714. 3 hours. 3 credits. PAYNE. The 
first half of the course Hy. 403-404. 

Hy. 103-404: The histoi-y of Europe from the Treaty of Westphalia to the French Revolution. 

Hy. 404,— History of Europe, 1714-1789. 3 hours. 3 credits. PAYNE. The 
second half of the course Hy. 403-404. 

GUADUATE COURSES 

Hy. 501-502.— American History, 1492 to 1830 

Hy. 503-504.— American History, 1830 to 1941 

Hy. 505-506,— English History to 1688 

Hy. 507-508. — The Renaissance and the Reformation 

Hy. 509-510, — Seminar in American History 

Hy. 511-512,— English History, 1688 to 1941 

Hy, 515-516. — Latin American History to 1850 

Hy. 517-518.— Latin American History, 1850 to 1941 

Hy. 521-522. — Ancient Civilizations 

Hy, 523-524,— History of Europe. 1648 to 1789 



394 BULLET IIS OF INFORMATION — UPPER DIVISION 

HORTICULTURE 

He. 201. — Principles of Horticulture. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3 
credits. WOLFE, Watkins. 

The principles underlying home and commercial production of fruits, vegetables and flowers. 
A course designed especially for students not expecting to major in horticulture and not counting 
for a major. 

He. 310. — Plant Pruning. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits. 
Watkins. 

Principles and practices in the pruning of trees and shrubs and in the treatment of wounds 
and cavities. 

He. 312. — Vegetable Gardening. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits. 
Abbott, 

Principles and practice of vegetable growing, with special attention to the home garden. A 
brief general course or an introduction to further work in olericulture. 

He. 314. — Principles of Fruit Production. 3 hours. 3 credits. ABBOTT. 

The principles underlying fruit production, with special reference to such factors as water 
relations, nutrition, temperature, fruit setting, and geographic influences. 

He. 315. — Citrus Culture. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits. ABBOTT. 
The first half of the course He. 315-316. May be taken for credit without He. 316. 

He. 315-316 : A thorough study of all phases of the growing of citrus fruits, including 
propagation, selection of site, planting, grove operations, harvesting and varieties. A three-day 
trip is required each semester. 

He. 316. — Citrus Culture. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits. ABBOTT. 
The second half of the course He. 315-316. 

He. 317. — Plant Propagation. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits. 
Abbott. 

Principles and practices in the propagation of orchard and garden crops, and the physiological 
and economic factors related to them. 

He. 412. — Deciduous Fruits. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits. 
Wolfe. 

A study of the culture of peaches, pears, persimmons, grapes and other deciduous fruits 
including the strawberry as grown in Florida. 

He. 423. — Major Subtropical Fruits, 3 hours. 3 credits. WOLFE. 

A study of the propagation, culture and commercial production of the avocado and mango. A 
three-day field trip will be made. 

He. 424. — Minor Subtropical and Tropical Fruits. 3 hours. 3 credits. WOLFE. 

studies of the culture and relationships of such fruits as the guavas, carissa, sapodilla, star- 
apple, papaya, lychee, tamarind, etc. A three-day field trip will be made. 

He, 425. — Commercial Truck Crops. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3 
credits. ABBOTT. Prerequisite: He. 312. 

The principles and practices in the commercial production of the important truck crops of 
Florida, including beans, celery, cabbage, potato, tomato and watermelon. A three-day trip will 
be required. 

He. 426. — Systematic Olericulture. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits, 
Abbott. 

The origin, history, types, classification, nomenclature and adaptations of vegetables. 

He. 427. — Elementary Floriculture, 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits. 
Watkins. 

The principles of flower culture, with special emphasis on the growing of annuals and peren- 
nials for the home garden. 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRUCTION 395 

He. 428. — Commercial Floriculture. 2 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 3 credits. 
Watkins. 

The propaKEtion and handling of commercial florists crops and the management of greenhouses. 

He. 429. — Ornamental Horticulture. 1 hour, and 4 hours laboratory. 3 credits. 
Wolfe, Watkins. 

Plant materials suitable for use in ornamental horticulture with special application to the 
beautification of homes and schools in Florida. 

He. 430. — Advanced Ornamental Horticulture. 1 hour, and 4 hours laboratory. 
3 credits. WATKINS, Wolfe. 

Plant materials for use in landscape work, with more emphasis given to use in commercial 
landscaping and to tropical materials. 

GRADUATE COURSES 

He. 503. — Horticulture Seminar 

He. 514- — Advanced Citriculture 

He. 515. — Advanced Olericulture 

He. 518. — Advanced Floriculture 

He. 570. — Research in Horticulture 

INDUSTRIAL ARTS EDUCATION 

In. 111. — Mechanical Drawing. 6 hours lecture-laboratory. 3 credits. BO- 
HANNON. 

Designed for industrial arts students. Freehand sketching, lettering, orthographic projection, 
geometric construction, working drawing and blue printing, care and use of instruments. 

In. 112. — Mechanical Drawing. 6 hours lecture-laboratory. 3 credits. Bo- 
HANNON. Prerequisite: In. 111. 

Designed for industrial arts students. Perspective rendering, tracings and blue prints for 
a small building ; different types of letters, machine sketching, and conventions. Suggestions and 
plans as to the most effective way of teaching a course of this type. 

In. 211. — General Shop. 6 hours lecture-laboratory. 3 credits. BOHANNON. 

Designed for industrial arts students. Practice in use of hand tools commonly found in 
school shops ; types of construction, design, woodfinishing ; block-printing. Analysis of logical 
teaching units in projects and problems in the various phases of industrial arts. 

In. 212. — General Shop. 6 hours lecture-laboratory. 3 credits. BOHANNON. 
Prerequisite: In. 211. 

Designed for industrial arts students. Use of hand tools and power machines, with special 
emphasis on the speed lathe; use, parts and care of machines; shop equipment and construction. 
In addition to the development of manipulative skills, special emphasis is given to selecting 
projects, and writing the various types of instruction sheets. 

In. 301.— Sheet Metal. 6 hours lecture-laboratory. 3 credits. BOHANNON. 
Prerequisites: In. 111-112. 

Design and construction in sheet metal for industrial arts students. Scope of sheet metal, 
various methods of drafting and construction, shop arrangements and equipment, methods of 
motivation for secondary school students in this phase of work. 

In, 302. — General Shop. 6 hours lecture-laboratory. 3 credits. BOHANNON. 
Prerequisites: In. Ill, 211, 301. 

Units given in machine drawing ; bench woodwork, advanced cabinet work, concrete work, 
sheet metal ; in addition, several craft activities presented. 



3% BULLETIN OF INFORMATION — UPPER DIVISION 

In. 305. — Design and Construction. 6 hours lecture-laboi'atory. 3 credits. 
BOHANNON. 

Designed for industrial arts students. Advanced problems in design and construction taken 
from some area of work in the general shop in selected advanced areas in which the student 
desires major emphasis. 

In. 401. — Architectural Drawing. 6 hours lecture-laboratory. 3 credits. Pre- 
requisite: In. 111-112. 

Designed for industrial arts teachers. Study made of building materials, sources and prices ; 
landscaping as to orientation ; plans, elevations, sections, details, conventions ; types and styles 
of domestic architecture, and a review of the history of architecture. 

In. 404. — Farm Motors. Identical with Ag. 302. 4 hours lecture-laboratory. 
3 credits. ROGERS. 

A general understanding of the various types of gasoline motors. Lecture-laboratory work on 
the theories and practical phases of engines ; fuel systems, carburation, ignition ; starting and 
generating systems. 

INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING 

Ig. 260. — Summer Shop Course in which 12 weeks' summer work may be 
oflfered for three hours electives. 3 credits. 

Ig. 261. — Industrial Reports. 1 hour. 1 credit. DE LUCA. Prerequisite: C-3. 

A study of the principles and methods used by engineers in the preparation of typical reports 

for proposed industrial projects. Accepted abbreviations, style, arrangement of contents, use of 

illustrations, charts and other graphic material are considered. Representative professional reports 
are studied and discussed. Walter Rautenstrauch, Industrial Surveys and Reports. 

Ig. 262. — Industrial Safety Etigineering. 1 hour. 1 credit. DE LUCA. Pre- 
requisite: C-3. 

The purpose, origin, growth, agencies, and organization of safety work in industry. Accident 
causes and responsibility, safety codes and standards, mechanical safeguards, fire prevention, and 
workmen's compensation. Pamphlets, posters, magazine "Safety Engineering" . 

Ig. 363. — Applied Mechanics. 4 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 5 credits. 
YEATON, ESHLEMAN, DE LuCA. Prerequisites: Ms. 353-354, Ps. 205-206. The 
first half of the course Ig. 363-364. 

Ig. 363-364: (a) Statics, eQuilibrium, centers of gravity, moments of inertia and friction, (b) 
Mechanics of materials. (c) Kinematics. Poorman, Applied Mechanics; Poorman, Strength of 
Materials. 

Ig. 364. — Applied Mechanics. 4 hours, and 2 hours laboratory. 5 credits. 
YEATON, ESHLEMAN, DE LuCA. The second half of the course Ig. 363-364. 

Ig. 365. — Engineering Mechanics — Statics. 3 hours. 3 credits. YEATON, 
ESHLEMAN, DE LUCA. Prerequisite: Ps. 205 and Ms. 353. 

Principles of statics ; resolution and equilibrium of concurrent forces ; numerical and graphical 
solution of trusses and hinged frames ; couples ; centers of gravity ; forces in space ; and moments 
of inertia. Timoshenko and MacCulIough, Engineering Mechanics. 

Ig. 366. — Engineering Mechanics — Dynamics. 3 hours. 3 credits. YEATON, 
ESHLEMAN, DE LuCA. Prerequisite: Ps. 206 and Ms. 354. 

Principles of dynamics ; rectilinear, curvilinear, and harmonic motions ; momentum and im- 
pulse ; work and energy ; force, mass, and acceleration ; projectiles ; simple, torsional, and com- 
pound pendulums ; balancing of rigid bodies ; and relative motion. Timonshenko and MacCulIough, 
Engineering Mechanics. 

Ig. 367. — Strength of Materials. 3 hours. 3 credits. YEATON, ESHLEMAN, 
DE LUCA. Prerequisite: Ig. 365. 

Tension, compression, shear, stress and strain ; combined stresses ; riveted joints for pressure 
vessels and structural work ; torsion ; bending moments ; stresses and deflection of simple, canti- 
lever, and continuous beams ; concrete beams ; curved beams and hooks : eccentric loading ; col- 
umns ; and elastic strain energy. Timoshenko and MacCulIough, Elements of Strength of Materials. 



DEPARTMENTS OF INSTRVCTION 397 

Ig. 377. — Elements of Photography. 1 hour, and 3 hours laboratory. 2 credits. 
DE Luc A. Prerequisite: Cy. 101-102, or C-2. 

Types of cameras; films, paper; exposures, developing and printing; pictorial report; lighting; 
copying, lantern slides; dark-room procedure. Text: Mack and Martin, The Photographic Process. 

Ig. 378. — Principles of Photography. 1 hour, and 3 hours laboratory. 2 
credits. DE LUCA. Prerequisite: Ig. 377. 

Lenses, lense mounts, exposures ; films ; filters ; composition, trimming, mounting, enlarging ; 
developers, reducers, intensifiers, the reversing process ; stock room and storage. Text : Mack 
and Martin, The Photographic Process. 

Ig. 460. — Engineering Practice. 3 hours. 3 credits. WEIL and YEATON. 

Prerequisite: Senior rating in engineering. 

Projects selected from the general fields of engineering are solved by the student. His solu- 
tions are comipared with those actually obtained by the practicing professional engineer. The 
course involves the principles of design, selection and use of engineering apparatus, plants and 
systems ; engineering finance as applied to public utilities ; legal factors as applied to engineering 
practice ; the relations of engineering and the public ; engineering ethics. Lister, Applied 
Economics for Engineers. 

Ig. 463. — Specifications and Engineering Relations. 2 hours. 2 credits. 
ESHLEMAN. Prerequisite: Ig. 364. 

Specifications for materials and construction of engineering prejects ; advertising and letting 
contracts ; agreements and contractual relations. Mead, Contracts, Specifications, and Engineering 
Relations. 

Ig. 469. — Plant, Shop, Layout and Design. 2 hours, and 3 hours laboratory. 
3 credits. ESHLEMAN. The first half of the course Ig. 469-470. Prerequisites: 
CEs. 13, El. 342, Ig. 364. 

Ig. 469-470: An intensive study of some industry; its layout, design, machinery, operations, 
and product. Alford, Principles of Industrial Management for Engineers. 

Ig. 470. — Plant, Shop, Layout and Design. 2 hours, and 3 hours laboratory. 
3 credits. ESHLEMAN. The second half of the course Ig. 469-470. 

Ig. 472. — Human Engineering. Offered each semester. 2 hours. 2 credits. 
YEATON. Prerequisite: Ig. 463. 

Problems of production engineering and management. The human factors in industry. Tead, 
Human Nature and Management. 

Ig. 477. — Motion Study. 1 hour, and 3 hours laboratory. 2 credits. DE LUCA. 
Required of Industrial Engineering students and open to all senior students. 

Methods of simplifying work in industrial plants and business offices are studied and analyzed 
by the use of process charts, operation charts, motion picture films, and micro-motion analysis. 
In the laboratory, projects from industry are taken, analyzed and improved. Motion pictures are 
made of these projects. Barnes, Motion and Time Study. 

Ig. 478. — Time Study. 1 hour, and 3 hours laboratory. 2 credits. DE LUCA. 
Prerequisite: Ig. 477. Requii-ed of Industrial Engineering students. 

Analysis of methods of taking time studies, rating operators, determining fatigue, personal 
and miscellaneous allowances, and the computing of elemental time units are studied. The build- 
ing of time standards from these elemental time units with the aid of charts, curves, and com- 
bination tables is demonstrated. Time studies are made on a great variety of projects performed 
in the laboratories. Barnes, Motion and Time Study. 

CR.ADUATE COURSES 

Ig. 561-562. — Advanced Shop Layout and Design 
Ig. 563-564. — Management Training 



398 BULLETIN OF INFORMATION —UPPER DIVISION 

JOURNALISM 
Jm. 213. — Propaganda. 3 hours. 3 credits. EMIG. 

A study of newspapers, magazines, the radio, and movies designed to develop a clear under- 
standing of the forces that create and control propaganda and public action. Observance of 
history in the making, the management and moulding of public thought, the attitudinizing of 
people, the strategy of propagandists and symbol-makers and their use of such idea-transmitting 
agencies as the newspaper, magazine, radio, movies, home, school, church, political parties, 
groups, recreation, etc. An inquiry into the influence of propaganda on government. Jaw-making, 
business, education, morality, war, and peace. 

Jm. 2