(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Unveiling of monument erected in Capitol Square, Raleigh, to Charles Brantley Aycock : born November 1, 1859, Governor of North Carolina 1901-5, died April 12, 1912 : addresses of presentation in City Auditorium, unveiling and acceptance on Capitol Square : Thursday, March 13, 1924"

UNIVERSITY OF N.C. AT CHAPEL HILL 




Library of the 
University of !North Carolina 

Endowed b}' the Dialectic and Philan- 



thropic Societies 



(lp6- fl^^^o 



Q>H^' Z 



00033926459 



m 



^^mx:^-> 



■mi;m 



Mm 






This BOOK may be kept out TWO 
WEEKS ONLY, and is subject to a fine 
of FIVE CENTS a day thereafter. It was 
taken out on the day indicated below: 






UNVEILING OF MONUMENT 

Erected in Capitol Square, Raleigh 

TO 

CHARLES BRANTLEY AYCOCK 

Born November 1, 1859 

Governor of North Carolina 1901-5 

Died April 12, 1912 




Addresses of Presentation in City Auditorium 
Unveiling and Acceptance on Capitol Square 

THURSDAY, MARCH 13, 1924 



Ayeock Memorial Committee 

George C. Royall, Chairman B. R. Lacy, Treasurer 
Nathan O'Berry, Chairman Finance Committee 

J. Y. Joyner, Chairman Unveiling Committee 

Wm. R. Allen* R. D. W. Connor P. M. Pearsall* 

Albert Anderson D. Y. Cooper* F. D. Winston 

T. AV. Bickett* Joseplius Daniels 

E. C. Brooks E. C. Duncan* * Deceased. 



Quotations from Aycock Appearing on Monument 

I. 

//( Semicircular Portion Back of Monument : — • 

CHARLES BRANTLEY AYCOCK 
1859-1912 

II. 

Ead Inscription, Front of Monument, Under Tablet Represent- 
ing Education: — 

"The equal right of every child born on earth to have the 
opljortunity to burgeon out all there is within him.'" 

III. 

West Inscription, Front of Monument, Under Tablet Represent- 
ing North Car'olina: — 

"I would have all our people believe in their power to accom- 
plish as much as can be done anywhere on earth by any people.'' 

IV. 

West Inscription Back of Monument: — 

AN IDEAL FOR NORTH CAROLINA 

"I would have all our people to believe in the possibilities of 
North Carolina : in the strength of her men, the purity of her 
women, and their power to accomplish as much as can be done 
anywhere on earth by any people. 

"I would have them to become dissatisfied with small things : 
to be anxious for higher and better things ; to yearn after real 
greatness : to seek after knowledge ; to do the right thing in order 
that they may be what they ought. 

"I would have the strong to bear the burdens of the weak and 
to lift up the weak and make them strong, teaching men every- 
where that real strength consists not in serving ourselves, but in 
doing for others." 

V. 

East Inscription Back of Monument: — 

IDEALS OF PUBLIC SERVICE 

"Equal ! That is the word ! On that word I plant myself and 
my party — the equal right of every child born on earth to have 
the opportunity to burgeon out all there is within him." . . . 

"No man is so high that the law shall not be enforced against 
him. and no man is so low that it shall not reach down to him to 
lift him up if may be and set him on his feet again and bid him 
godspeed to better things." 

"There is but one way to serve the people well, and that is to 
do the right thing, trusting them as they may ever be trusted, to 
approve the things which count for the betterment of the State." 



PROGRAM OF EXERCISES 

Dr. Edwi^'^ a. Alderman, Presidixg 






12 M. — -City Auditorium: 

Prayer — Reverend Richard Tilman Vann, D.D., Ra- 
leigli. 

An Appreciation of Cliaries Aycock — Dr. Edwin Ander- 
son Alderman. 
Historical Address — The Honorable Josephus Daniels. 



1 r. M. — xludience follow State College Band to Capitol Square, 
where unveiling will occur immediately. 



1 :10 p. M. — Unveiling of Monument, under Direction of Pre- 
siding Officer, Presenting it to the People of the 
State — Unveiling by Master Charles Brantley Aycock, 
Goldsboro, jST. C., and Master Charles Aycock Poe, 
Raleigh. 



1:15 P.M. — Acceptance of Statue on Behalf of State— His Ex- 
cellency, Cameron Morrison, Governor of iSTorth Caro- 
lina. 



1 ;30 p. M. — Benediction — Elder Frederick "W. Keene, Raleigh. 



HISTORY OF THE AYCOCK MEMORIAL 



Dr. J. Y. JOYNEE 



THE suggestion tliat a suitable 
monument should be erected 
to the memory of Charles Brant- 
ley Aycock was made very soon 
after his sudden death in Bir- 
mingham, Ala., April 4, 1912, but 
the World War and its aftermath 
jirevented the effective further- 
ing of the idea until three or four 
years ago. 

From the first, the Aycock 
Memorial Committee had three 
ideas in mind. 

I. One was that the monument 
should be a free-will offering by 
the people he loved and served, 
and of the boys and girls for 
whom he gave the gladdest serv- 
ice of his heroic life, and that 
no contribution should be re- 
ceived from the public treasury. 
About a third of the total amount 
came in pennies and dimes from 
countless boys and girls all over 
North Carolina for whom Aycock 
had widened the door of educa- 
tional opportunity, while the re- 
mainder expresses the love of 
men and women, sons and daugh- 
ters of North Carolina, who fol- 
lowed him in his great campaigns 
and wished to express their ap- 
preciation of his life and service. 

II. The second purpose of the 
Committee was that the memo- 
rial should not be the mere 
statue of a man, a mere repre- 
sentation of Aycoek's form and 
features, but that in some beau- 
tiful and enduring way it should 



symbolize the ideals and aspira- 
tions for which Aycock stood, and 
for which North Carolina stood 
under his leadership ; that 
through this memorial Aycock 
should still live and speak his 
high message to all succeeding 
generations of North Carolinians. 
Through the genius of the artist 
as expressed in two remarkable 
historical panels, reinforced by 
some of Aycoek's own eloquent 
words, this hope has been real- 
ized. 

III. The third hope of the 
Committee was that the memo- 
rial should be a genuine and 
notable contribution to the art 
treasures of North Carolina and 
the South. To this end, the Com- 
mittee secured the services of 
Gutzon Borglum, undoubtedly 
one of the world's greatest sculp- 
tors. Already distinguished for 
having wrought out some of 
America's greatest statues, it is 
felt that his supreme achieve- 
ment — the Stone Mountain Con- 
federate Memorial — will rank 
Avith the Pyramids for majesty 
and sublimity. Avoiding a tra- 
ditional smoothness and over- 
emphasis of detail, Borglum 
works in the style of his great 
master, Rodin, achieving effects 
by bold, rugged, and vigorous 
outlines, giving his statues an 
expression of life, force, and 
virility rather than mere passive 
elegance. 






#