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Full text of "The uplift [serial]"

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THE 





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VOL. XIII 



CONCORD, N. C, NOVEMBER 22, 1924 



No. 1 



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24 



THANKSGIVING REFLECTIONS. 

When I am weary, I am so thankful that I have 
a bed; 

When I am hungry, I am so thankful that I have 
that which will nourish the body; 

When I am lonely, I am so thankful that I have 
friends ; 

When I am homesick, I am so thankful for my 
mother and father; 

When I am weary in body, spiritually hungry and 
mentally forlorn, I am so thankful that I have a 
merciful God. 



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♦j.iJhj.aaaaa.j 



>. A A A A A A A A A A A A A A . 



-PUBLISHED BY- 



THE PRINTING CLASS OF THE STONEWALL JACKSON MANUAL 
TRAINING AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL 



(v 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

J. P. Cook, Chairman Concord Mrs. G. T. Roth, Elkin 
Miss Easdale Shaw, Vice-Chairman Herman Cone, Greensboro 

Rockingham Mrs. Cameron Morrison, Raleigh 

Jno. J. Blair, Sec, Raleigh Mrs. A. L. Coble, Statesville 

D. B. Coltrane, Treas., Concord Mrs. T. W. Bickett, Raleigh 

J. S. Efird, Albemarle Mrs. W. N. Reynolds, Winston-Salem 

Mr. Chas. A. Cannon, Concord Mrs. I. W. Faison, Charlotte 

Rev. Tom P. Jimison, Spencer Mr. Paul Whitlock, Charlotte 

Mrs. W. H. S. Burgwyn, Honorary Member 
Chas. E. Boger, Supt. 



CONTENTS. 



EDITORIAL COMMENT 3-8 

THE JACKSON TRAINING SCHOOL 

Greensboro Christian Advocate 9 

ANGUS WILTON McLEAN— Governor-elect 11 

WASN'T SHE LITTLE M. A. H. 12 

NEXT GOVERNOR OF STATE J. L. Hampton 15 

McLEAN AIMS Ben Dixon MacNeill 20 

A GLORIOUS DAY WITNESSING GLORIOUS WORK ' 

PERFORMED Old Hurrygraph 24 

AND THEY SERVE TOO 26 
"AT LEAST EDUCATION STIIL SCRATCHES 

HEAD" 27 

NSTITUTION NOTES J. J. Jones, Jr. 29 



The Uplift 



A WEEKLY JOURNAL 

PUBLISHED BY 

The Authority of the Stonewall Jackson Manual Twining and Industrie 
School. Type-setting by the Boys Printing Class. Sabscription 
Two Dollars the Year in Advance 

JAMES P. COOK, Editor, J. C. FISHER, Director Printing Department 



Entered as second-class matter Dec. 4, 1920 at the Post Office at Concord, 
N. C. under act of March 3, 1879. Acceptance for mailing at special rat« 



of 4, 1923. 



A SONG OF GRATITUDE. 

All the blesings of the fields, 
All the stores that the garden yields, 
Flocks that whiten all the plain, 
Yellow sheaves of ripened grain: 
Lord, for these our souls shall raise. 
Grateful vows and solemn praise. 

Clouds that drop their fattening dews,- 
Suns that genial warmth diffuse; 
All the plenty summer pours, 
Autumn's rich, o'erflowing stores: 
Lord, for these our souls shall raise 
Grateful vows and solemn praise. 

Peace, prosperity, and health, 
Private bliss and public wealth, 
Knowledge, with its gladdening streams, 
Pure religion with its holier beams: 
Lord, for these our souls shall raise 
Grateful vows and solemn praise. 
^ — Adelaide Proctor. 






4 THE UPLIFT 

THE GOVERNOR-ELECT. 

The Uplift carries in tins number the picture and stories of the gentle- 
man, whom North Carolina has elected by a most complimentary majority to 
be her governor, beginning in January next. 

Our readers will get a very intimate line on just what kind of man is Hon. 
Angus Wilton McLean by following the contributions in this number by 
Ben Dixon MacNeill and L. J. Hampton on the next governor of the 
state. This is no pre-nomination nor pre-election estimate of the distin- 
guished gentleman — it is a deliberate and studied effort to speak by note the 
entire truth, with no purpose to catch sympathy or support. 

Mr. McLean is of the highest personal character and of the strictest integ- 
rity ; he is no wall flower — he is a man of action ; he is not effervescent — he 
is a sound and safe business man ; he is remarkably democratic — the lowliest 
citizen of the state will receive polite and patient treatment at his hand; he 
is frank and open — every question that concerns the state and her citizens, if 
it 's in his province, will be met with an eye single to the glory and welfare 
of North Carolina. 

The Uplift is proud to be able to carry to its readers this estimate of 
the splendid gentleman, whom North Carolina has selected for her chief magis- 
trate for the next four years. The Old North State is truly fortunate. 

"SEEING CONCORD." 

It must be a source of no little pleasure and entertainment to all to be in- 
troduced to conditions of the past. It is a fine way to get a concrete know- 
ledge of the marvelous growth, or the stand-still-ness of a community. For the 
young to know the obstacles which their parents encountered as youths, the 
lack of conveniences, the lack of modern tools, or the many handicaps because 
invention had not reached the zenith of its accomplishments, and to be con- 
scious of the success that their parents achieved under the circumstances, 
must be regarded by every normal child a challenge to do something with his 
life, with the wealth of literature, enlarged school facilities, unlimited op- 
portunities, and the applause of an awakened interest in childhood by church, 
state and society — all freely given him without price. 

There are hundreds of welcomed new-comers in every town of the state, 
who have stepped into opportunities that were made possible for them by 
the deeds, service and activities of those who have finished their work and 
gone on. These, too, must be interested in the beginning and the development 



THE UPLIFT 5 

of their adopted homes. 

It is with peculiar pleasure that The Uplift is favored with, an insight in 
the conditions of Concord many years ago as revealed bj' the interesting con- 
tribution of ' ' M. A. H. " Very few people now living in the town ever knew 
the county's first court-house stood about where Capt. Smith's office and 
the Concord library are ; and that the building was burned to the ground. 
Very few people knew that the jail, with all the ancient means of punishment 
then in vogue, occupied the site the Pearl Drug Store now does. Very few 
people know that when Squire George M. Lore first took up his residence in 
Concord a cow-barn, with a caved-in roof, stood where the Correll Jewelry 
store now stands. Hundreds of people daily walk over the abandoned well at 
the corner of North Union and West Corbin streets — a well that practically 
furnished water for the entire population at one period. 

They carried lanterns not many years ago, which were abandoned for an 
electric light system that a few enterprising citizens made possible — but the 
individual lights then were just a little superior to lightening-bugs — see the 
Whiteway we now have. 

Not many years ago there was not a single bath tub in this modern city. 
A patriot in the person of the late P. B. Fetzer risked his all to give the town 
a water system — he was a benefactor, and people rapidly learned how to take 
a bath — in a bath tub. Jim Dayvault, chairman of board of Co. Commissioners, 
taught the people the necessity of ice, and the best people of town carried a 
little chunk of ice suspended from a string to their homes, just as proud as 
proud could be — now A. B. Pounds manufactures the ice for the town and de- 
livers it — everybody uses ice now. What was once regarded a luxury is now 
a necessity. There is no end to the list of conveniences vouchsafed to us 
all by the far-sighted men who wrought before us. 

And just thing! The old town is soon to have a $500,000 hotel, modern and 
the last word in hotel construction — and this is a contribution by the men 
and women of today who are full of vision and faith. You fellow, that is 
satisfied with your surroundings and what you enjoy, are indebted to those 
who visualized in the past and those who are pressing forward today. A town 
is what its people make it; and it is a pleaasure to take stock and note the 
changes and the growth. 



"WILL YOU CO-OPERATE WITH ME?" 

There used to be many schools, teachers and parents that observed systems 



6 THE UPLIFT 

and practices that prevail at Prof. Webbs' Bellbuckle School in Tennessee. 
There are several of this kind of schools still in North Carolina. 

Here is an incident coming out from one of the schools (it is in North 
Carolina and the man in charge of it insists on his own methods) that carries 
with it a perfectly apparent moral. The event is something like this: a sixteen 
year old boy was withdrawn from a public, graded school, one of the best in 
the state; the father was skeptical about the efficiency of the methods and 
the teachers, because his boy's monthly grades did not go over 25. Enough to 
arouse the anxiety of an honest-to-the-goodness father. He entered the boy 
in one of these Bellbuckle-kind of schools a few months ago. 

Last week the head man of this school called on this particular father to 
consult with him about the deportment and application of his son. The boy 
was in the office at that moment. The father was politely informed that his 
son was not applying himself, was indifferent and was making no progress. 
These shortcomings, the teacher assured the father, can be overcome "if you 
will co-operate with me. ' ' That word ' ' co-operate " is a flexible term and very 
meaningful — as interpreted in all Bellbuckle schools — and the father, throw- 
ing himself back simply replied: "My son will not be at your school any 
more. 

And yet there are people who think that there are some bad and indifferent 
and sorry boys. Take the case. 

******** 

GREAT REJOICING. 

Having outgrown her hotel accomodations and the public having come to 
demand better and more conveniences in hotels, Concord finally awoke to the 
fact that something must be done. The Kiwanis, the Rotary and the Cham- 
ber of Commerce, aided and abetted by every one who recognized the great 
need, endorsed a movement for a modern hotel. 

Some time ago a spurt in the direction of realizing the wished-for thing 
spent itself. Then certain people took counsel with each other and expert 
hotel campaigners were employed to put on a systmatic drive. It began ; it 
prospered from the start : and no town or city ever saw so many of its real 
live wires hustling with more energy and enthusiasm over a proposition than 
manifested by these representative citizens. They started out to sell $375,000 
worth of stock. 

Monday evening the drive came to a successful conclusion. The campaign 
resulted in selling for the proposition $382,200 worth of stock. Coupled with 



Tin-: itl:i t ? 

the contribution to the proposition by t'.e National Bank, this assures, for 
Concord a half million dollar hotel. 

Who did the thing- ? That is being' discussed in the old town today. Hosts 
of people, joining their energies, enthusiasm and services, under the leader- 
ship of a number of promoters, put the thing across. The honor belongs to 
no individual. There is glory enough to go round several times. Let re- 
joicing be unconfined. 

But, say friend citizen, when you come to single out folks for valiant service 
and abiding hope and a bull-dog determination, don 't forget a song continu- 
ally sung by a little wiry new-comer in our midst — they simply call him 
Blanks, his full name and title are fi. W. Blanks, secretary of the Chamber of 
Commerce and chief of some other things. 

HOLES IN THE BREAD. 

We can fly — a thing that everybody except the late Joseph P. Caldwell de- 
clared about twenty-five years ago could never be done ; we can ride along the 
road without horses; we can do hundreds of stunts that we regarded in the not 
distant past as impossible or not even thought of; but generations after gen- 
erations have sat themselves down at the dining table three times a day and 
are today unable to tell exactly why there are holes in the light bread they 
eat. 

Such a simple thing — so common and of every day view — has never excited 
the curiosity of man long enough for him to attempt a reason why dough 
will bake and then show numerous holes about in it. You may think you 
are smart, well-informed, popular and of some consequence, but the law of 
nature thrusts a little matter right at your eyes day after day, year after year 
that baffles your intelligence. Poor man — mighty nature. 

Now comes I. K. Russell, member of the American Chemical Society, writ- 
ing a book on the high sounding title of "The Romances of the Holes in the 
Bread." Does it solve the puzzle? 

******** 

DREAMS COME TRUE. 
In a highly complimentary article, which pleases all North Carolina, French 
Strother, painting a picture for the November number of World's Work, puts 
into the record this : 

North Carolina is one of the oldest states in the Union. Twenty years 
ago it was on of the poorest. Today, with practically no immigration 



8 THE UPLIFT 

from other states, with only the increase in population that comes from 
its excess of births over deaths, it finds itself one of the richest states, 
progressing- rapidly in every desirable nstrument of civilized life — a 
community of contented, industrious citizens, with beautiful and modern 
homes, thriving farms and factories, hotels in every small city that can 
not be excelled anywhere, highways that make travel and commerce com- 
fortable and expenditious, schools that are good and daily growing better, 
a public health department that has brought its death rate to the lowest 
in the country and best of all, a people of one mind upon the great issues 
of life, inspired by a common ideal, informed with a common purpose, 
heartened by their success in the pursuit of a great vision, and confident- 
ly pressing forward to further achievements. 

About twenty-five years ago there was a man named Aycoek . 

******** 

POST-ELECTION DIAGNOSIS. 

The public, in private and through newspapers, have tried to make out the 
reason for the failure of the Port measure at the late election, when the 
leading proponents actually believed that the measure would carry by a hun- 
dred thousand majority. It didn't, and now everybody is trying to ascertain 
what happened. 

The people just couldn't see wherein it could accomplish what was claim- 
ed for it, and were unwilling to invest eight and half million dollars in an 
experiment. The simple reason, therefore, is that there were more people not 
in favor of the proposition than the number favoring it. Such economic 
questions, we take it, are no settled by North Carolinians on the ground of 
personal dislike or favortism. The thing lacked friends — that's all. 




THE UPLIFT 



THE JACKSON TRAINING SCHOOL. 



Greensboro Christian Advocate. 



It was our privilege and pleasure, 
too, last Sunday morning to speak 
to the boys of the Jackson Training 
School. These boys to the number 
of 400 and a score or more of men 
and women to whom have been com- 
mitted the care and training of these 
young Americans constitute an im- 
pressive assemblage as they gather 
in the big auditorium, which has been 
provided for church services and all 
public meetings of the Training 
School. 

Those boys look and act the part 
of young sodiers and join with in- 
terest and good will in the services. 
Their quickness of perception and 
manifest interest in the speaker in- 
spires him to do his best. 

Superintendent Chas. E. Boger. is 
leading in a great work and he is 
meeting in admirable fashion every 
demand of his important task as su- 
perintendent. And no man in North 



portant work than he in training 
these boys for citizenship and Chris- 
tian manhood. 

The boys of the Jackson Training 
School each week bring from their 
presses "The Uplift," an interesting 
and valuable periodical that is ably 
edited by Col. J. P. Cook, of Concord, 
who has been from the first the valu- 
ed an enthusiastic friend of the Jack- 
son Training School, and this weekly 
paper is but a suggestion of the high 
clas of work the school in doing in 
all lines of its varied activities. 

When you are passing on the state 
highway from Concord to Charlotte, 
or from Charlotte to Concord, as the 
case may be, do not fail to stop and 
see what is being accomplished by 
one of North Carolina's most valu- 
able institutions — The Jackson Train- 
ing School. 



HOW ABOUT LIVING? 

"You frequently hear it said that the world owes every man a living. 
Nothing could be further from the truth." We don't believe we ever 
heard anybody say that the world owes every man a living, or "the 
world owes me a living." But we have heard it said that we have heard 
it said, from something like 10 per cent of the speakers we have heard, 
all told. — Greensboro News. 



10 



THE UPLIFT 




ANGUS WILTON McLEAN— Governor-elect. 



The distinguised citizen of Robeson county, whom the state elected her 
chief magistrate by a majority exceeding- a hundred thousand, breaking all 
election records of North Carolina. 



THF UPLIFT 



11 



ANGUS WILTON McLEAN— Governor-elect. 



Hon. Angus Wilton McLean, whom 
the people of North Carolina electa 
ed on the 4th of November, by a 
majority exceeding one hundred 
thousand, was born in Robeson coun- 
ty April 20t,b, 1870. Through his 
veins runs the inherited blood of 
some of the most prominent fami- 
lies, who made up the Scotch immi- 
grants of the early history of this 
great section. In his lineage are 
representatives of men and women, 
who occupied places of great honor 
and esteem in their day. 

Governor-elect McLean grew up in 
the country near Maxion, attended 
the public schools and later became 
a pupil in the school at Laurinburg 
of the late Prof. W. G. Quackenbush, 
a noted teacher of his day. Later 
Mr. McLean studied law at the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina and upon 
his admission to the bar he located 
in Lumberton, having partnership 
association, from time to time, with 
the leading attorneys of that section 
of Norh Carolina. 

The thing that makes this distin- 
guished gentleman so outstanding 
among men, aside from the compli- 
ment and confidence in his selection 
as governor by a record-breaking 
majority, is his varied abilities and 
capacity along numerous lines : an 
able lawyer, successful banker, rail- 
road president, a promoter of various 
industrial enterprises, cotton manu- 
facturer, community builder and a 
splended farmer. In all of these 
activities, he is smooth, cautious, 
calculating, earnest and trustworthy. 
What greater record could man wish 
than to have his neighbors, among 
whom he has labored and wrought 



for years, say these things behind 
his back. 

Politically, Mr. McLean has been 
an outstanding leader in democratic 
councils, having been National Com- 
mitteeman ; and in governmental af- 
fairs his wisdom and great judgment 
have been invoked, President Wilson 
having named him .as one of the four 
directors of the War Finance Cor- 
poration. This corporation was the 
largest financial organization in the 
world, having capital resources of 
$3,500,003,000. His experiences 

at the bar, his record as a business 
man and banker peculiarly fitted him 
for the duties of this high and im- 
portant position. The fact that this 
position came to him unsought car- 
ries with it a distinctive honor, which 
the state at large begs to share with 
him — it was a compliment to the man 
and to the state, which he loves and 
serves. 

Notwithstanding the honors confer- 
red upon him, his prominence, his 
influence, his wealth and his success 
in so many directions, Angus Wilton 
McLean is folksy and approachable — 
in this he shows an inborn greatness 
that is not vouchsafed to some whom 
fortune attends. When he takes 
over the reins of the government of 
North Carolina as her governor, the 
humblest citizen of the state, regard- 
less of party or religion, will have no 
trouble or embarrassment in reach- 
ing a necessary audience with him. 
Judging this distinguished gentleman, 
by his deeds and his faithfulness to 
every trust in the past, there is every 
assurance that North Carolina will 
be proud of the record which Mr. 
McLean will write as her chief magis- 



12 . THE UPLIFT 

trate. old time, Southern hospitality will, 

About the middle of January, 1925, as in the past, prevail. Gracious 

Mr. McLean will be inaugurated, and hospitality abides where royalty has 

he and his wife, formerly Miss Mar- no part — this be the proud glory of 

garet French, and children, will oc- the state, 
cupy the stately mansion, in which 



' ' Every heart that is truly great and generous is also tender and 
compassionate toward others." 



WASN'T SHE LITTLE? 

By M. A. H. 

When Dr. Herring and Judge Morrison Caldivell gave us two interesting 
pictures of Concord as they first knew her, The Uplift's appetite for more 
of this "Seeing of Concord" as she used to be was considerably whetted. Ac- 
cordingly several long-time residents were invited to make contributions on 
the subject. 

In the response by "M. A. H.," which follows below, we are given a pic- 
ture with a setting of many years ago. It is full of living beings of that 
period, some of whom in name have entirely vanished from the roll of citizen- 
ship; and this choice friend of ours for many years and herself a charming 
example of the integrity, sentiment and chivalry of that period has given 
?is a fine picture of the old town sixty-three years ago; and as the sunset 
Of life is approached, as men and women come to count time, the thoughts of 
Sir Thomas Moore, as quoted, truly reveal the thoughtful and refined spirit 
of the correspondent and which is entirely natural with and indicative of 
those cradled in the environment of way back yonder. 

The contributor declines for the name to be attached, so our readers may 
entertain the?nselves in figuring it out — but the story is historically correct 
as remembered by one who lived in that period. In an accompanying note, 
the fact is stated that "there must have been a meat market," but the keeper's 
name has passed out of memory. 

The seasons come and go, the panorama charmingly spread over a 

years roll by, and changes are wide extent of slopes and hills, 
wrought by the ever-flowing stream The citizens, then as now, were 

of time. kind and neighborly, intelligent and 

Sixty-three years ago Concord was law-abiding. Union street was then 

a village. Now the traveller, stand- Main Street for on it were all the 

ing on the heights of Sunderland, public buildings and homes of many 

sees a city of handsome homes, prominent families. The public 

churches, public buildings and busi- square on which the courthouse stood, 

ness houses, embowered in trees, a with public well near by, was the 



THE UPLIFT 



13 



corner where Corbin now runs into 
Union street. The county jail, a large 
brick structure, was on the corner 
where the Pearl drug store stands, 
and had a garden which ran back to 
the limits of the First Presbyterian 
church, and included a big barn. The 
schoolhouse, where Rev. Elijah Mor- 
rison taught the boys and girls of 
the village, and later Misses HeleD 
and Lily Long, was on the grounds 
of the Y. M. C. A. McDonald's 
factory, during the War Between the 
States, supplied all this section of the 
state with yarn and cloth. 

Where are now Central school, 
Baptist church and homes on Grove 
street was a thickly wooded grove. 
Scotia was a grassy field. Phifer & 
York, Robert Foard, Washington Al- 
lison, a merchant on Hudgins cor- 
ner, and the firm of Aaron Bost & 
Baldy Moss carried stores of general 
merchandise. Joel Reed's drug store 
was the only one in town. Across 
from this store was Harris' hotel 
where no Confederate soldier was 
permitted to pay for his entertain- 
ment. A flourishing cabinet shop 
was carried on by Castor & Deatou. 
There were no street lights and lan- 
terns were carried on dark nights. 
The homes on Main Street were 
those of Caleb Phifer, Washington 
Allison, Dr. Edmund Gibson, Rufus 
Barringer, Victor Barringer, Nelson 
Price, (later Joel Reed's home) Dr. 
Lucius . Bingham, David Bostain, 
Rhinehold Suther, Dan Coleman, Rosa 
Kluttz, (on the present court house 
square,) Billy Cook, Robert Foard, 
Hattie Winecoff and Margaret Brown, 
whose house, still standing, was the 
end of the town. The homes on 
West Depot street were those of 
Matthew Goodson, John Swink, Col- 



umbus White, Elam Castor, Milas 
Leslie, Dr. John Fink, John Alex- 
ander and Calvin Burkhead. 

There were Lutheran, Methodist 
and Presbyterian congregations, with 
faithful pastors in the pulpits. Dr. 
Bessent and a new comer from Vir- 
ginia were the dentists; the lawyers 
were : Rufus and Victor Barringer, 
John Long and Dan Coleman. The 
doctors were Edmund Gibson, Lucius 
Bingham, "Red" Henderson and 
later the Confederate recruiting of- 
ficer, Dr. Scott. In the house, where 
Dr. Houston lives, Victor Barringer 
entertained President Jefferson Davis, 
as he was on his way south from 
Richmond. Mr. Barringer on learn- 
ing that the President and his escort 
were camped in the pine woods on 
the Godfrey Winecoff place sent out a 
carriage and brought in the Presi- 
dent and his staff to spend the night 
with him. Mrs. Barringer, delighted 
with the honor, immediately had her 
cook, old Ellen, to get busy and pre- 
pare for them the best supper to 
which they had sat down in many a 
day. 

Every family in town had a flower 
garden where were grown flowers 
and vegetables. On the lawns were 
shrubs and evergreen and in the gar- 
dens a wealth of flowers charmed 
the eye and were the delight and 
pride of the town. In Miss Jane 
Mahan's garden the walks were bor- 
dered with box wood and in the 
shelter of these grew the earliest 
vegetables. 

Such was Concord in 1861. Her 
people were quietly going the round 
of daily business undisturbed by 
rumors of war. They were startled 
from this security by the secession of 
the state and the call of Gov. Ellis 



14 



THE UPLIFT 



for the state troops to join the Con- 
federate army. The Cabarrus Guards 
and the Black Boys, the two military 
companies of the county, responded 
to his call and left their homes on 
the 21th of April, to join the State 
troops at Raleigh. From there they 
were sent to camp at Smithville, now 
Southport, where they fretted and 
fumed, because they were not in the 
fight, until they were transferred to 
the battle fields of Virginia. There 
were no more dinner parties, ban- 
quets or social gatherings in Con- 
cord. A heavy hearted people wait- 
ed, morning by morning, for John 
Swink to hand out from the post- 
office in Allison's store the Richmond 
Dispatch, that they might scan first. 
of all the list — "killed — wounded, 
missing. ' ' 

At last the Conquered Banner was 
furled. The soldiers came home — 
some of them. Then followed the 
social and political turmoil of the 
reconstruction period. A time of per- 



plexity and uncertainty for the 
housekeeper — a time when the car- 
riage driver could vote but the mas- 
ter who rode inside could not. Nev- 
ertheless through the mercy of a 
watchful Providence and the indom- 
itable spirit of her people Con- 
cord came triumphantly through the 
succeeding years to peace and pros- 
perity. 

We rejoice in this prosperity, yet 
when we recall the days of long ago 
and see again in memory the friends 
who walked the streets and mingled 
with us in daily business, church and 
social life our hearts are stirred with 
emotion, so admirably expressed in 
the beautiful lines of Sir Thomes 
Moore, 

' ' When I remember all 

The friends so linked together 

I 've seen around me fall 

Like leaves in wintry weather 

I feel like on who treads alone 

Some banquet hall deserted." 



THANKSGIVING. 



I thank Thee Lord for eyes to see 

The need in every heart; 
For hands and feet that I may meet 

That need, and do my part; 
For this Thanksgiving Day and friends, 

For good I hear and see; 
For all the year and its good cheer 

My thanks I give to Thee. 



— H. O. Spelman. 



THE UPLIFT 



15 



NEXT GOVERNOR OF STATE. 



(By L. J. Hampton.) 



Angus Wilton McLean, next Gov- 
ernor of the State, comes from a 
long- line of Scotch forbears who 
tilled the soil, went to church every 
Sunday, and helped in any forward 
movement that promised the better- 
ment of the community. 

Some of his friends were discus- 
sing the other day his qualifications 
for the position showing how his 
steady rise from a modest country 
boy to a national figure was due not 
to any preconceived and herculean ef- 
fort on his part but was a succes- 
sion of events that came about 
through hard work and serious inten- 
tion. What claim he has to the con- 
sideration of the voters is not of his 
own choosing. He never held an im- 
portant elective office in his life nor 
has he sought one. His work for the 
Democratic party has consisted in 
organizing the forces, drafting the 
platforms, and helping finance the 
campaigns. Other than that he has 
remained modestly in the background 
and has let the other fellow do the 
shouting. 

This trait of his character, his 
friends say, comes from a natural 
aversion to "showing off" and an 
uncommon aptitude "for organizing 
a business and making it a commer- 
cial success. His home town always 
was planning some new project — 
either new waterworks, electric 
light improvement, red cross drive 
or some other cause just as worthy; 
and it had no difficulty in finding 
plenty of citizens who were willing 
to help but very few who were will- 
ing to shoulder much responsibility. 



It was in the latter field, so say Lum- 
bertonians, that McLean 's aid always 
had to be sought. They felt that no pro- 
ject, no matter how necessary and 
promising it might appear to be, was 
a sound one unless it received first 
the whole-hearted endorsement of 
their fellow townsman who has now 
become a state and national figure. 
If he said it was all right and should 
be done and he would help put it 
through, there was nothing else to 
worry about. The thing was accom- » 
plished. 

As to his ' ' showy ' ' qualities, his 
boyhood friends say he hasn't any. 
His first teacher says his hair was 
always brushed, his shoes tied, and 
his appearance more like the model 
schoolboy than any pupil she had. 
He was not a model schoolboy, how- 
ever, if one is to believe what his old 
schoolmates say. There was many a 
scrap and lively fistfight at recess 
with the other boys and not always 
well-prepared lessons because he had 
extra work to do at home. He was, 
so they say, a typical boy who liked 
fun, had to work hard in school and 
out, and who impressed the others 
not by his showy and exceptionally 
brilliant work but by his manliness 
and industry. "There was nothing 
colorful about the early life of Angus- 
Wilton McLean, ' ' one of his play- 
mates wrote to another when he heard 
that Angus Wilton might be a can- 
didate for governor. "His work on 
the farm and his circumstances at 
this time were too severe to let him 
cut up many capers. He plowed all 
the week, went swimming and fishing 



16 



THE UPLIFT 



on Saturday afternoons, and al- 
ways — always — to church on Sun- 
days. On Monday morning' the 
same old routine started all over 
again. But this was the way he 
learned bow success comes only from 
hard work and continual pegging 
away. He would never be where he 
is now if he hadn't been taught for- 
titude when he was a strapping young- 
boy. ' ' 

So he comes from good family al- 
though he was born poor. His fath- 
er taught him how to farm just as 
he had learned from his father and 
grandfather. Today Mr. McLean is 
one of the largest farmers in Robeson 
County, but he does not let his 
large holdings be attended to by 
somebody else. He superintends his 
fields because he likes to do it and 
because he knows more about crops 
and land than the average tenant 
and so-called farm manager. He 
learned all this, not in school, but 
between the plowhandles. And he 
is proud of his knowledge and ■ his 
experience. 

As A Good Business Man 
Mr. McLean organized and di- 
rected one of the first banks in Robe- 
son County. He was only a young- 
fellow at this itme, but evidence of 
what the town of Lumberton thought 
of his business ability and trust- 
worthiness, the bank in a very short 
' time became one of the leading in- 
•stitutions of the county. It has con- 
tinued to grow until today, the Na- 
tional Bank of Lumberton, is one 
of the safest and soundest banking- 
houses in the State. His interests 
were so varied, however, that he in- 
vaded other fields. Soon after to 
see that better railroad facilities 



were needed by the section. Imme- 
diately he set to work to form a com- 
pany that would build a short line 
railroad through the richest part of 
the section^ tap the main lines, and 
develop the commercial and farming 
possibilities of a hitherto backward 
part of the country. The Virginia 
and Carolina Railroad, 27 miles long, 
running from Lumberton to Hope 
Mills, is the material evidence of his 
youthful plans. The fine farming- 
country along the railroad, the little 
towns scattered aloh'g tnet rack, and 
the heavy traffic in freight and pas- 
sengers show most conclusively how 
much needed was the project. St. 
Pauls, one of the towns on the short 
line, was hardly a wide place in a 
bad road before the railway was 
buitl. Now it is a thriving town of 
2,000 with four cotton mills, fine hous- 
e's, and everything that makes for 
substantial progress and comfort. 
This is merely one instance of what 
Mr. McLean's uncommon business 
vision and enterprises have done to 
help along a good county and town. 
There are others, to be sure, his 
development of the cotton mill in- 
dustry in his home town, his invest- 
ment in home ventures, and his open- 
hearted patronage of civic improve- 
ments have all contributed heavily to 
making Lumberton grow into a fine 
town. 

As A Good Democrat 
While Mr. McLean has never held 
important public office other than 
appointive, he has never aspired to 
such honors. His work as a consist- 
ent Democrat has been continuous. 
When he had just passed his major- 
ity, he was made chairman of the 
local Democratic organization and 



THE UPLIFT 



17 



from that time on he was closely 
identified with the Democratic party. 
He was a strong supporter of Wood- 
row Wilson in the preconvention cam- 
paign of 1912, and was delegate at 
large from North Caolina to the con- 
vention that nominated Wilson in 
Baltimore for the first time. At this 
convention he rendered signal services 
to the Wilsonite sand to the cause of 
liberalism in general when he vir- 
tually secured the election of Edward 

E. Britton of North Carolina as per- 
manent secretary of the conventon. 
The fight was hard and bitter, for the 
ultra-conservative forces of Charles 

F. Murphy and others for Champ 
Clark's nominee nearly succeeded the 
latter. But many progressive lead- 
ers came to the support of Mr. Mc- 
Lean's candidate, however, and he 
was elected. The newspapers of Bal- 
timore and other cities in recount- 
ing the happenings at the convention 
called this move one of the most "ef- 
fective and unexpected successes" 
of the progressives in the early days 
of the convention. He had done a 
very bold thing and had gotten away 
with it. Such matters as this 
identified Mr. McLean with the pro- 
gressive wing of the party and mads 
his views and judgment much 
sought in public matters. From this 
time on he was no longer a Demo- 
cratic committeeman from North 
Carrolina. He was one of the new, 
energetic forces in the party that 
were doing everything to rejuvenate 
the party and bring it again to public 
confidence and service. 

When the Democrats met at St. 
Louis in 1918 to renominate Wilson 
and to decide how the campaign for 
re-election should be waged, Mr. 



McLean was one of the busiest and 
most necessary men there. Every mat- 
ter of the party interested seemed to 
claim his attention. In the midst 
of all this confusion and hard work, 
a little incident, insignificant per- 
haps in itself but possessing vast 
possibilities of help or injury came 
to hand. It was the matter of select- 
ing an appropriate legend for the 
campaign button. Somebody had 
selected the motto, "Safety First," 
and had in fact struck off several 
thousand buttons when Mr. McLean 
found it out. Immediately he caught 
the train for Washington intent up- 
on convincing the secretary to the 
committee that such a motto was not 
only inappropriate at that time but 
might have disastrous results if used 
as a campaign slogan. He laid be- 
fore the secretary in the most im- 
pressive way he could just his ob- 
jection to the button; that such a 
motto as "Safety First," was most 
un-American; that it did not meet 
the temper of the American people 
when so many outrages were being 
committed; that it wouid leave in 
the popular mind that all we wanted 
to do, and all that the Democratic 
party wanted to do, was to remain 
hleutral always and save our own 
skins; and finally that any such sen- 
timent was selfish and cowardly and 
would not be welcomed by the de- 
cent element of our population. It 
was hard word convincing the com- 
mittee, so they that attended say, 
but Mr. McLean went at the job 
with so much enthusiasm and confi- 
dence that in time he won them over. 
He suggested that the slogan "Ameri- 
ca First," be used instead; and it 
was. With what success the campaign 



18 



THE UPLIFT 



of 1916 shows. 

These are only one or two inci- 
dents of his service to the party, 
however. As has been said, hie has 
never asked for public support and 
has not, in fact, been anxious to ob- 
tain it. He has been quite content 
to use his unusual business and or- 
ganizing abilities to forward the 
cause of Democracy leaving the 
matter of standard bearer to be tak- 
en charge of by popular choice. 
There, is no campaign, county, state, 
congressional, or national that has 
not had free use of his services and 
that has not profited by his keen 
business ability and .judgment. 
As a Friend of Education 

In the first speech Mr. McLean 
ever made for the cause of popular 
education he took a most extraordi- 
nary position. He stared that he 
hoped there would never come a 
time when there would be inequali- 
ty of sexes in the matter of public 
education. He felt, as we all feel, 
that all the young folks should ob- 
tain the best education that a good 
state can give. But, he went on to 
say, if it ever happens that there 
must be a discrimination, female ed- 
ucation is the most important and 
should be given first consideration. 
The Scotch have always bean re- 
spected for their deep interest in 
education, but not particularly noted 
for giving precedence to female edu- 
cation; the older heads used to think 
that some kind of domestic training 
was necessary for Scotch maidens, 
but the higher education was not so 
important as in the case of males. 
But Mr. McLean has never held any 
such views. He has always insisted 
in practically every speech that fe- 
male education is much neglected and 



that it should receive more thorough 
and extensive consideration from our 
educators and public men. And his 
reason for this is clear: the woman 
is the maker of the home, and she 
ought to have ever social and cul- 
tural advantage for this reason. 
And so his feeling that if anything 
is to be neglected in our education- 
al system it certainly should not be 
the homemakers is really the most 
sensible position to taka, after all. 

He has been not only a liberal contri- 
butor, to worthy education causes, but 
has served acceptably on several ed- 
ucational boards. He has been a 
trustee of the State University since 
1912 and a vigorous supporter of its 
enlargment program. For more than 
fifteen years he has been chairman 
of the board of trustees of Flora 
Macdonald College spending a great 
deal of his time and money in mak- 
ing this Scotch miemoral an active, 
valuable educational institution. As 
a good Presbyterian he has also 
served in church affairs. For a long 
time he has been a member of the- 
board of trustees of Union Theologi- 
cal Seminary, Richmond, acting oft- 
en as 'the institution's financial ad- 
viser. His own church, too, at Lum- 
berton, has enjoyey his exceptional 
business services in addition to his 
earnest efforts as a ruling elder. 

As a good farmer — Perhaps if 
you were to ask Mr. McLean what 
the one thing he would rather do 
best in the world he would tell you 
point-blank : be a good farmer. He 
has been trying, so he says, to grow 
big crops and enrich the soil ever 
since he used to plow from sun-up 
to sun-down on his father's small 
farm on the Buck Pong in upper 
Robeson. How well he has succeed- 



THE UPLIFT 



19 



ed can be readily seen by the ship- 
shape condition of his farming lands 
outside the corporate limits of Lum- 
berton. His farms are large, well 
drained, stumped, and bearing good 
yeilds. He has been careful, . too, 
look after the. comfort of his tenants 
both white and colored. Every farm 
has comfortable dwelling houses, 
warm and well situated. Health of 
his tenants and their contentment, 
he says, are as important as big 
crops. 

Ha has overseers for his farming 
properties, but prefers to make the 
rounds himself. And he usually does 
for no matter how busy he may be 
and you want to find him the chanc- 
es are that he will bia out on some 
farm somewhere talking with one 
of his tenants, about the crops, or 
something. He says ne does not 
need golf to keep in trim; he needs 
only a brisk walk or horseback ride 
over a farm to put him in happy 
frame. He is never quite in his 
sphere unless he is on a farm study- 
ing its needs and trying to see what 
will make crops grow larger. His 
early earnings in the law were in- 
vested in farm lands and are just 
now begining to show some return 
on the money. But ha is not worri- 
ed. He would, enjoy farming if lie 
lost money at it every year. 

This prediction for the soil comes, 
of course, from a long line of Scotch 
forbears who were all farmers. He 
learned how to plow in the field, not 
at school; and he saw how certain 
crops reacted to certain fertilizers 
and intensive cultivation, not by 
reading about such matters in a book, 
but by hard 'experience on a stingy 
little farm. Yet no man has a 
greater faith in scientific principles 



of farming as taught in our schools 
today than Mr. McLean. He has 
no prejudices against "book" farm- 
ing; one of his petty hobbies is to 
insist always that the farmer should 
have more farmer education and 
then a little bit more. Besides he 
should know not only how to grow 
crops but how to market them to 
advantage; in short, the farm boy 
should learn all he can about the soil 
and its productivity and then he 
should turn business man by keen- 
ing strict account, selling his pro- 
duct advantageously, then piling up 
a surplus against a rainy day later 
on. Peculiarly enough, Mr. Mc- 
Lean's own farming activities il- 
lustrate what he. preaches. As a 
"dirt" fanner he learned a great 
deal about dirt farming. Now as 
a business man he is trying to ap- 
ply modern methods to his farming 
operations. And his public service 
has been devoted to carrying a 
speech advocating a system of agri- 
cultural credits, including such fea- 
tures as land banks, short time credits, 
and such, that was practically un- 
heard of and little understood at 
•the time. It is an interesting coin- 
cidence, too, that the establishment 
of Federal Farm Land Banks ex- 
emplified the general principals that 
Mr. McLean had argued for in all 
his public ut'^eranccj supporting 
farm relief. It is simply another 
example of one man insisting upon 
a pressing need years before the 
organized forces of government took 
advantage of it. His public ad- 
dresses show that he urged the 
establishment of a rural credit fa- 
cilities long before 1913. 

Therefore, Mr. McLean's activities 
have been much more varied and re- 



20 



THE UPLIFT 



sponsible than that which falls to the 
lot of the average .good, substantial 
citizens of a community. What he 
has done, though, is his. It has been 
achieved solely by hard work and 
earnest effort. He says he is a farm- 



er first and next a business man. By 
inheritance and aptitude he is a good 
farmer and business man. That is 
what he would liked to be called, and 
his friends say that no cognomen 
him'better. 



Wisdom evades the young person who has never learned to conserve 
the golden moments. — Selected. 



MCLEAN AIMS. 

By Ben Dixon MacNeill. 



' ' While I have never been con- 
vinced that the port bill, defeated 
last Tuesday, was economically sound, 
or that it would remedy the evils 
at which it was aimed, I am profound- 
ly convinced that we have too long 
neglected this phase of our natural 
resources. These inland waterways 
should be made to serve the State, 
and full advantages should be taken 
of the ports that we have. 

' ' Inequalities in freight rates un- 
doubtedly exist. Nobody seems to be 
in agTeement as to the nature and the 
extent of the inequality. It will be 
the business of the administration 
after I am inaugurated to find out 
from authoritative sources, and ap- 
ply remedies that are • economically 
sound and that will operate effec- 
tively. Where there is discrimina- 
tion, it will be r-emoved, at whatever 

' ' If the development of wateraways 
cost. 

and terminals can be made to serve 
the people of the State, either di- 
rectly or as a factor in the adjust- 
ment of freight rates, I expect to ask 
the General Assembly for reasonable 
financial assistance. It cannot be 
done instantly. It should be done 



carefully, with the minimun of risk 
to public funds. We should be able 
to see our way before we go ahead. 
Question of Ships 

I doubt if the State of North 
Carolina or any other commonwealth 
can ever operate ships effectively. 
The Nation has failed at it, and we 
could not hope for greater success 
with very limited capital. The de- 
velopment of our ports and water- 
ways has not been defeated or stop- 
ped in the defeat of the port bill. 
We should go ahead with it, but we 
must know where we are headed be- 
fore we start. ' ' 

That is the opinion of Angus Wil- 
ton McLean, Governor-elect of North 
Carolina, on the port terminal meas- 
ure defeated at the polls last Tues- 
day. It is the opinion he held before 
the primary in June, before the elec- 
tion in November, and the opinion 
with whieh he will be inaugurated 
next January. The port issue is not 
dead, nor is the determination for 
an equitable adjustment of freight 
rates in abeyance. 

Contributory to the doubt in the 
mind of the Robeson county man 
about the advisability of passing the 



THE UPLIFT 



21 



measure last Tuesday is the prevail- 
ing uncertainty about the condition 
of the State treasury, and the abil- 
ity of the treasury to carry further 
burdens without the neglect of ob- 
ligations that have already been as- 
sumed, and which cannot now be 
displaced for measure of undeter- 
mined value. In other words, North 
Carolina is in the position of a man 
who has a family to support on a 
given income that cannot be stretch- 
ed to cover speculations. 

Where We Stand 

' ' The first thing we must do is to 
find out where we stand. North 
Carolina is not going backward. That 
much you can be sure of. It is not 
going to stand still. That much 
you . can be sure of. If we find we 
can afford it, there are .many things 
that ought to be done. Among them 
the development of our waterways 
and terminals. If we have the money, 
or can get the money without crip- 
pling anybody, progress will move into 
new fields. ' ' 

Finding out definitely whether 
North Carolina has a deficit of seiven 
or eight milion dollars on running 
expenses is going to be the first of 
the McLean activities after he moves 
. to Raleigh in January. He has lis- 
tened to those who see figures in red 
on the wrong side of the State's 
ledger. He has listened to those who 
see black figures on the other side of 
the ledger. He has an open mind, 
and he is bringing it to Raleigh with 
him. 

Must Be Eniterly Frank 

"There will be' no use in not be- 
ing entirely frank with the people," 
he says. "If we have a deficit, we 
have a deficit, and we will have to 



find the money to take care of it. 
If we have a deficit, we are not going 
to add to it. Somewhei'e, we are 
going to find the money to do the 
tilings that North Carolina expects us 
to do. It will not have less roads, 
it will not have a less efficient health 
service; it will not have a less effec- 
tive educational system; it will not 
give less care to its wards. 

' ' These things are going forward. 
Our educational system must be 
strengthened. The State must take 
a fuller interest in the public schools. 
To that end we must make our equal- 
izing fund more effective, giving aid 
to those who need it most. The small- 
er and less prosperous counties must 
have schools that are the equal of 
those in the richest . It will require 
additional revenues and probably a 
recasting of the machinery for dis- 
tribution. ' ' 

' ' The State must live within its in- 
come. Economies must be effected 
wherever it is posible. None of the 
institutions of the State should be 
pinched in their facilities for per- 
forming their appointed service. You 
hear a lot about ' ' putting things on 
a business basis. ' ' Too often it is 
an empty pharse. We ought to make 
it mean something in North Caro- 
lina. I am directing no criticism. 
I am sensible of the service that 
has been rendered by the Morrison 
administration and it predecessors. 
Safeguard the Future 

The great task of the McLean ad- 
ministration will be to safeguard 
the future of the things that have 
been undertaken in preceeding ad- 
ministrations. Almost everywhere 
there is a feeling of fear that prog- 
ress has been too rapid to be safe, 



THE UPLIFT 



that retrenchment will be necessary 
until financial resources overtake the 
chariot of progress. The feeling that 
there is a wide gap between income 
and expenditures is almost univer- 
sal. 

Under McLean there will be no 
looking backward. Where the slo- 
gan of the past four years has been 
' ' Progress, ' ' the platform for the next 
will be "All the Progress We Can 
Pay For. ' ' North Carolina will build 
all the new roads it can afford to 
build ; it will build all the new 
school houses it can afford to build ; 
it will sustain its hospitals, its insti- 
tutions, it health work, its depart- 
ment of argriculture and do whatever 
else it has the money to do. 

Even though it has been done at 
the expense of a deficit in the State 
treasury, North Carolina has done 
nothing that its duty to its citizens 
did not require. Some of the things 
it waited overlong to do. Too wide 
a gap lay between duty and per- 
formance. North Carolina was too 
far behind the procession. Roads, 
schools, f hospitals, universities had 
to be built immediately to bring the 
State abreast of the procession. 
North Carolina, even if it is behind 
in its running expenses, needs no 
justification. 

Time For Balancing Affairs 

But the time has come for a bal- 
ancing of the States affairs. The 
State has done no more than a prop- 
er regard for its duty required. It 
will not now do less. It will add to 
its program when sound judgment 
recommends it. This will be the 
attitude of the Governor to be inau- 
gurated next January. Income will 
be made to balance with the require- 



ments of the State's obligations to 
its citizens. 

Development of the State 's re- 
sources on sound economic principles 
rather than the great expansion of 
the State's primary govermental ac- 
tivity appeals strongly to McLean. 
This is the only basis upon which to 
build a greater state. A paved road 
through a profitless field, or by any 
idle factory adds no great value to 
the life of the State. 

An educated citizenship that must 
go elsewhere to find an outlet for its 
energy and training is of no great 
benefit to North Carolina. Here at 
home agriculture and industry must 
be made to keep step with the phe- 
nomenal progress that has been made 
in primary governmental activities 
during the past four years. Life and 
opportunity and prosperity in the 
State must be made uniform. 

The attitude of McLean is com- 
parable to the "consolidating" pro- 
cess that used to be mentioned in 
the war news.- After the first rush 
of the infantry over a territory, the 
taking of enemy positions, other 
troops were brought along to turn 
enemy positions to the uses of the 
captors, to extend the lines, to bring 
up supplies, and supporting artillery,, 
to make the territory a part of the 
terrain already held by the invading 
troops. 

With a mighty rush, the State has 
advanced its lines during the past 
four years. McLean comes along to 
consolidate the advance thai was at- 
tained under the Bickett and Morri- 
son administrations. He will bring- 
up the material and cultural re- 
sources of the State, and prepare the 
Commonwealth for new advances. 



THE UPLIFT 



23 



If the times are propitious for a new 
"push," it will be made. 

This is the state of mind with 
which McLean will come to Raleigh 
next January. It is not a detailed 
statement of definite items that 
make up the program that he in- 
tends to work with when he becomes 
Governor. He has many definite 
things he expects to be done with 
the territory that has been regained 
for the State along- so many lines, 
but the big thing is that he is com- 
ing to Raleigh with an open mind on 
many determined to study every 
question thoroughly. 

The new Governor is profoundly 
interested in bringing North Caro- 
lina to the attention of the rest of 
the world. He has had in mind for 
many monhs the suggestion of a 
department that will foster the 
bringing of new streams of energy 
into the State, new people with new 
ideas, and after they are brought 
here infuse them into the sound na- 
ive soil. 

He believes that hei-e in North 
Carolina is the greatest natural op- 
portunity to be found in the world. 
He would let the world know about 
it, and encourage responsible people 
who appreciate opportunity to come 
here and share it with North Caro- 
linians. He believes that they would 
naturally bring with them many ideas 
of value to the people of the State. 

Nothing in the recent history of 
the State has so profouundly disgust- 
ed the next Governor as the pillage 
that was perpetrated on 'the farmers 
of the State in the past few years by 
rapacious stock salesmen. Every- 
where in his campaign he has seen 
the effeccts of it, and he will come 
to Raleigh with a determination that 



it will not happen again during his 
administration. If there is insuffi- 
cient law to prevent it, he will ask 
for more. If there is sufficient law, 
lie will see that it is enforced. 
Wants Pardon Attorney 

Among the things he will ask of 
the General Assembly will be au- 
thority to employ a pardon attorney. 
He will not necessarily be a law- 
yer, but a man with capacity to in- 
vestigate every application for par- 
don that is made. Instead of the 
long and heart-rending hearings 
that are made to the Executive for 
clemency, all applications will go 
automatically to the pardon attor- 
ney. 

This official will investigate them. 
He will get the record in the case. 
He will see both sides of it. He will 
look into every phase of an applica- 
tion, not confinning himself to listen- 
ing to special pleadings that are 
made to him. This done, he will 
present the unbiased record of the 
case to the governor for action, to- 
gether with recommendations. This 
one official will save the Governor 
half the time in his office, and nine- 
tenths of the strain of it, and at the 
same time give him authoritative 
basis for action. 

It will unlikely develop into a 
spectacular administrantion. It will 
be conducted much like a business. 
McLean is a lawyer, but primarily 
he is a business man who has made 
a success of his own business. He 
has a reputation among his neigh- 
bors for fair dealing with them. 

Primarily his interest will be to 
see that the State government per- 
forms its duty. As he sees the 
State 's duty it means as much prog- 
ress as the State is able to pay for, 



24 



THE UPLIFT 



and a healthy prosperity in all en- to pay for anything that it needs, 
terprises that will enable the State 



The work an unkown good man has done is like a vein of water flowing 
hidden underground secretly making the ground green. — Carlyle. 



A GLORIOUS DAY WITNESSING 
GLORIOUS WORK PERFORMED. 

(Old Hurry grahp.) 

A Party of Durhamites Visit the Stonewall Jackson Training School, at 
Concord, and the Guilford Tuberculosis Sanatorium, near Greensboro. 



Wednedsay morning, at 5 o 'clock, 
with a Big Ben alarm clock, beating 
its tintinnabulations with all the 
vigor of a jazz band, the writer 
burst open the doors of slumber aud 
immediately harkened to the call of 
the clock. It was the preliminaries 
to a visit to the Stonewall Jack- 
son Training School, one hundred 
and forty miles away. It was an 
inspiring call. Jocund day had 
scarcely reached the horizon, to stand 
tip-toe and peep over the earth, but 
anticipation increased in brightness 
as the morning shades were raised. 

At 6:30 o'clock two black automo- 
biles trailed each other across the 
country, like two mellow-bugs chasing 
each other upon the placid waters 
of a lake. While day lingered along 
the eastern highway in golden char- 
iot, in the west a full-orbed moon 
was bathing the earth in a silvery 
sheen and flooded a charm of love- 
liness upon forest and fields, hills 
and dales, like a bright silver signate 
leading us on, as we sped — not be- 
yond the limit — along the winding 
way. As this silvery light melted 
into the day dawn, the sun arosa 



in golden splendor and changed the 
scene to one of supernal beauty, as 
all nature, as if in touch with his 
beauty, appeared as if clad in a gos- 
samer of gold. Thei* was no trouble 
in traveling. We had the major 
lights of the world, one in our rear 
and one in front of us, mingling in 
a flood of gold and silver. 

Hearts were happy for the oc- 
cupants of the ears were on a mission 
of witnessing human interest work — 
Uplift work, with all the word signi- 
fies. The two cars contained Dur- 
ham county officials, and friends of 
the school, who had great faith and 
interest in the Stonewall Jackson 
Training School, at Concord, for the 
reclaiming of wayward boys, and 
giving' them a chance in life. The 
occupants iwe W. E. Stanley, M. 
G. Markham, H. L. Carver, D. W. 
Newsom. C. M. Crutchfield, T. 0. 
Sorrell, W. G. Fraiser, T. L. Pender- 
ifrass, C. A. Crabtree, Kev. T. M. 
Green, J. D. Pridgen, T. H. Lawson 
and J. A. Robinson. 

The party was greeted most cor- 
dially at the institution by Mrs. Cook, 
Mrs. Boger, and James P. Cook, chair- 



THE UPLIFT 



25 



man of the board, and the man with 
this vision which has been realized 
after hard work with his good wife . 
and C. E. Boger, the superintendent 
of the institution. There are 397 
boys in this school. It is an inspiring' 
sight to see them at their work and 
in their marches and other activities. 
Durham county has one of the four- 
teen cottages of the plant, erected 
by the generosity of her citizens and 
for the promulgation of this noble 
work. Cottage life is the rule of the 
school. These cottages accommodate 
30 boys. Durham county has 29 boys 
in her cottage, one being from Orange 
county. Three boys in each cottage, 
taking it turn-about are assigned to • 
the matron of each cottage to assist 
her in the carte of the cottage, the 
preparation and serving of meals, and 
other details that may arise. They 
have a program for each cottage in 
the week, and Sunday nights singing 
and readings. Each cottaga has a 
phonograph and quite a few games. 
All cottages are built along the same 
lines, and face the avenue. Each 
one is kept in perfect order, and is 
a little home, with all necessary com- 
forts, for each cottage colony. 

The 397 boys, in line, marched to 
the beautiful auditorium and render- 
ed an impromptu program for the 
visitors, after each visitor had been 
personally introduced to the boys, 
and made the youngsters a number of 
cheering and helpful talks. The au- 
ditorium full of bright-eyed, smiling- 
faded boys was a thrilling sight. 
Their eagerness to take in all that 
was said and done, and their appre- 
ciation of the visitors was an unus- 
ual inspiration. It was a good time 
all round. The boys sing well and 



with a vim and vigor that makes the 
welkin ring with haimony when they 
lustily enter into the proceedings. 
The delightful concert was lead by 
a band of their number, little fellws, 
which have been in practice only GO 
days. It was wonderful the way they 
used their instruments and the eon- 
cord of their music. It would put 
some of the older bands to shame. 
After the concert, the Durham county 
boys formed a line of march and con- 
ducted the visitors to the Durham 
cottage which was thoroughly in- 
spected and found to be ideal in every 
particular. The visitors and the boys 
had a jolly social mingling for quite 
a while and the joy was equally dis 
tributed among all. The glorious, 
amid such glorious work, was fraught 
with benedictions from the visitors 
upon the institution. 

There are geniuses in that bunch of 
boys. Only waiting their opportunity 
to develop it, and be lead along lines 
that will reveal this development. 
One of the boys, digging Irish pota- 
toes, saw in a ordinary 'spud" the 
image of a human being. On his 
own volition, with some little pearl 
buttons, and hooks-and eyes, and a 
little narrow ribbon, he fashioned a 
good likeness of a woman. Who 
knows what images his young vision 
sees in the big boulders about the 
place. A newspaper article is too cir- 
cumscribed to give an adequate ac- 
count of the school — its beautiful and 
healthful location, environments; its 
splendid equipments for the work; lis 
various buildings so admirably adapt- 
ed to its purposes; its splendid and 
humane management; the success of 
its activities; the wholesomeness of 
its atmosphere; its farm, dairy and 



26 



THE UPLIFT 



mechanical operations, it is all so 
splendidly done it reveals a wonder- 
ful oft'ort and situation. It must be 
seen to be appreciated. It is a re- 
vealization of James P. Cook's dream 
of years. What little I have endea- 
vored L'?re to portray to you of this 
great and wonderful work, may be 
likened to what the Queen of Sheba 
said to Solomon, when she beheld 
his glory, "the half has not been 
old." 

Guilford County Tuberculoeis 
Sanitarium. 
Durham county is interested in the 
building- of a tuberculosis sanitarium. 
The question is now being- agitated. 
To get concrete information on an 
institution of this kind, the Durham 
county board of health, visited Guil- 
ford county, which county has taken a 
decided lead in this State in this 
particular, to inspect the sanitarium 
of that county, between Greensboro 
and High Point, on the public high- 
way, and which was put in operation 
last January. A party of Durham- 
ites, with board of health, composed 
of Dr. J. H. Apperson, Dr. B. U. 



Brooks, Miss Frazier, Dr. A. S. 
Campbell, E. K. Powe, Holl andHol- 
ton and Dr. S. D. Mcpherson, went 
up Wednesday at 1 'oclock, and were 
met at the sanitarium Dy the party 
that had been to the Sonewall Jack- 
son Training School, and every 
courtesy was shown them by Dr. 
Spruill, the head of the Guilford 
institution. The building was gone 
over thoroughly and pronounced one 
of the most perfect institutions of 
the kind in the land. Every modern 
convenience and equipment has been 
installed. The arrangements of the 
buildings is ace in sanitarium con- 
struction. The Durhamites are high- 
ly delighted with their visit and ihe 
information they obtained. The 
Guilford institution can, at present 
accommodate 60 white patients, and 
12 colored. The original building 
was erected at a cost of $114,000. 
Other buildings are being added. 
It has an equipment of $75,000. 
There are now 55 patients , under 
treatment. Marked improvement 
has been noted in many cases and 
some have left restored to health. 



AND THEY SERVE, TOO. 



Editor of The Uplift:— 

I note what you have thoughtfully 
said in your most interesting little 
magazine about what our big sisters 
of The King's Daughters have ac- 
complished, I wonder if you will not 
be interested enough to view what 
their little sisters I. H. N. are doing 
in the Junior Circle of Concord. I 
know you are, and so we are send- 
ing you these few observations : 

It has been said by Senior workers 
in the King's Daughter's order that 



it is difficult to keep in tact a junior 
circle for the fact that in the trans- 
formation period from high school 
girl to college the circle loses mem- 
bers. 

We feel that the Stonewall Junior 
Circle of Concord has a proud record, 
if not worthy of the banner among 
the junior circles of the state. Our 
circle was organized in 1915, at the 
home of Mrs. M. L. Marsh, on South 
Union street by ten high school girls 
under the direction of the Senior Cir- 



THE UPLIFT 



27 



cle of Concord. 

During the nine years, the work of 
the Stonewall Junior Circle may 
prove interesting- to your readers to 
know that from the original mem- 
bership of this junior circle there are 
ten excellent graded school teachers, 
one trained nurse who is now holding 
an important position in a Philadel- 
phia hospital ; and seven of them are 
presiding over their own homes. 

The officers of the present junior 
circle are : 

President — Mary Cannon, 
Vice-President — Mary Grady Parks, 
Rec. See. — Frances Boger, 
Treasurer — Louise Webb. 

The Circle 's first contribution to 
the state work was a beautiful oval 
art glass window, showing the King's 
Daughter's colors, the Maltese cross 
and lettering I. H. N., that was placed 
in the chapel built by the North 
Carolina Branch of King's Daughters 
& Sons at the Stonewall Jackson 
Training School ; it aided in paying 
the expenses of a tubercular patient 
at the Sanitorium ; it continues at 
its principal aim, that of giving 
school books to indigent children in 
the county; it gives every Christmas 
a subscription to the Popular Mechan- 
ics Magazine to each cottage of the 
Training School, thereby remember- 
ing every one of the four hundred 



boys at the Training School; and 
the little band of fine little girls re- 
joice in having every year a part in 
the state work of the order. 

In September, 1923, the member- 
ship of this circle reached thirty-six 
girls whose ages ranged from 8 years 
to 16. There was too great a dif- 
ference in ages to adjust the work 
and at the same time arrange suit- 
able entertainment, so the circle di- 
vided in two. The High School girls 
continue to maintain the name of the 
Stonewall Junior Circle, and christen- 
ed the band of little girls as the Sil- 
ver Cross Circle. These High School 
girls act as big sisters to the little 
girls, and share equally in work and 
funds. 

The Silver Cross Circle, composed 
of these precious little eight and 
nine year old girls, has reached a 
membership of twenty-eight and they 
are as busy as bees in swelling their 
ranks and take a keen and intelligent 
interest in their work. 

The oliicers of the Silver Cross 
are: 

President — Douglass Archibald, 
Vice-President — Frances Fisher, 
Rec. Sec. — Claudia Moore, 
Treasurer — Orchard Lafferty. 

These little folks hold and con-' 
duct their meetings like grown-ups, 
their big sisters in the cause. 



u 



AT LEAST EDUCATION STILL 
SCRATCHES HEAD." 



Dr. Thomas Alexander of Teachers 
College, Columbia university, who ad- 
dressed the district meeting of the 
public schools teachers of the state 
here last night, points out some of 



the defects in education in the south. 
Our schools, he says, ana text book 
schools, our teachers are poorly e- 
quipped and rural supervision oi 
teaching has failed. Dr. Alexander 



28 



THE UPLIFT 



used Tennessee as a horrible example 
but that might have been because 
he was in North Carolina. Had he 
been in Tenness.e.i, he doubtless 
could have made an object lesson of 
North Carolina. 

There is hope for popular educa- 
tion so long as educators realize 
thfore is something left to learn and 
to teach. Conceding southern ed- 
ucation to lie as bad as the worst 
picture Dr. Alexander could paint cf 
it, there is still progress being made. 
Anyhow, thenn is vastly more of it 
now than formerly and if only a 
smattering is being given the children 
they are all forced to take broken 
doses of learning. 

No doubt the public schools in 
this section do rely to much on text- 
books, but while the sort of training 
imparted by those who can rise a- 
bove the text is of higher quality, 
there are not so many teachers who 
can make this grade. Nor have they 
the time. Some of the children, too, 
if given a book will get something 
out of it in spite of poor instruction. 
The first weakness Dr. Alexander 
points out is not v without its compen 
sations. 

The second weakness, that of poor 
equipment, can be brought against 
the members of every profession. 



The best equipment that may be ob- 
tained is all too little for the big aud 
complicated business of living now- 
a-days. Teachers should be better 
equipped; but those who lack the cap- 
acity to assimilate more than they 
now have are, perhaps, better off, 
with a msision finish. It is there the 
primary trouble with the public 
schools is a lack of precision and 
thoroughness. Better a teachc" who 
has covered eight grades and knows 
the ground traveled over than one 
whose brain has been atrophied by 
overfeeding. 

And who may say that rural super- 
vision is a total loss because it has 
failed to do what was hoped for it? 
Supervision in -all lines is a doubt- 
ful efficiency. The United States 
congress has undertaken to super- 
vise a number of things, including 
freight rates child labor and industri- 
al disputes. All of its attempts can 
be termed failures. 

Of course, educators should adopt 
and cling to higher standards of 
success thari congress; but there is 
one wing of popular education which 
continues to insist on federalizing 
the , public schools. 

We wonder if Dr. Alexander fa- 
vors the creation of secretary of edu- 
cation ? — Raleigh Times. 



WELL REPRESENTED. 

There are 1,118,000 insects in the British museum. Somebody must have 
left the. screen door open. — Deroit News. 



THE UPLIFT 



29 



INSTITUTION NOTES. 



Mr. John Russell has returned to 
the institution after spending a 
pleasant vacation. 



Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Loven and 
s:>ns, of Charlotte were recent visi- 
tors of Miss Hattie Fuller. 



By J. J. Jones, Jr. 

Concord, conducted the services at 
the school last Sunday afternoon. 
If Mr. Higgins liked the school as 
much as the boys liked him and his 
sermons, he will be a regular visitor 
as Ions' as he remains at Forest 
Hill. 



Professor Harding and a group 
of teachers from Charlotte visited 
the institution last Wednesday. 



Several jobs have been, printed 
during the past two weeks, one a 
thirty two page book for the Cas- 
well Training School at Kinston. 



Mr. and Mrs. Joe Goodman of 
Mooresville, and Mr. W. T. Goodman 
of No. 6 township, this county, paid 
a brief visit to the school last Fri- 
day morning. 



Mr. Guy Alexander, the basket 
ball coach, picked his team last Sat- 
urday, the members of" the team are 
as follows: Luke Patterson, James 
Suther, Earnest Brown, John Seigle, 
and Bill Sherrill. 



Mr. and Mrs. G. T. Roth of Elkins 
were recent visitors at the institu- 
tion. They made a thorough inspec- 
tion of the school, and were thorough- 
ly delighted with the school and its 
work. 



Rev. Mr. Higgins, the new pastor 
of Forest Hill Methodist churck, 



The Training School takes a par- 
donable pride in its Sunday School. 
The interest and enthusiasm of the 
boys will attract the attention of 
the average visitor. And sometimes 
a visitor goes away and says some 
mighty nice things about us, just as 
Rev. A. W. Plyler did last week in 
his paper — The Christian Advocate. 
To have made a favorable impression 
upon Rev. Plyler means a whole lot 
in the estimation of all who heard 
him at the school. His sermon was 
one of the most uplifting and help- 
ful that has been heard by the boys, 
and good preaching is not unusual at 
the school. Just as evidence that he 
had the attention of the boys — a 
teacher whose class is composed of 
some the smallest boys at the school 
asked one of them last Sunday morn- 
ing if he remembered anything Rev. 
Plyler had said. "Yes Ma'am," 
answered the youngster, and before 
he could be halted, he had launched 
into a regular discourse. Of course, 
he's only a small boy, but we just 
wondered if even a big preacher like 
Mr. Plyler wouldn't feel a little bit 
complimented ! 



Ambitious Plans. 

Barring an epidemic of measles or 



30 



THE UPLIFT 



a "spell" of bad weather, there 
won't be a dull moment at the school 
this Thanksgiving. 

In keeping with the proper observ- 
ance of the day, there will be church 
services. These will be conducted at 
1 o'clock by Rev. L. A. Thomas of 
Concord, and will be so arranged 
that all of the boys will have a share 
in the rendition of thanks and praise. 

There seems to be an idea preva- 
lent that it would not be fair to let 
the day go by without a hunt. Su- 
perintendent Boger has promised 
that there will be a rabbit hunt first 
thing after breakfast. Anybody who 
hasn't gone with the boys when they 
hunt rabbits with sticks instead of 
guns doesn't know all there is about 
the ethics of hunting, and has missed 
a good time besides. 

Certainly there will be dinner! 
This year there will be a barbecue 
instead of the time-and-custom hon- 
ored turkey. And since nobody is 
expected to be able to indulge in 
much exercise after a barbecue din- 
ner the basket ball team has a game 
scheduled during the afternoon so 
wlq can all sit in the grandstand and 
rest for an hour or so. 

At seven o'clock in the evening 
there will be a program at the audi- 
torium. The musical numbers will 
include everything from a rousing 



march by the band to a vocal solo by 
a dainty Scotch Lassie, and if a good 
time is not "enjoyed by all present" 
it just can't be helped, that's all. 
To sum it up, the Training School 
is preparing to celebrate Thanks- 
giving. And all of the folks who 
have been asked to contribute to 
this celebration have been so nice 
about saying "yes" that we feel all 
thankful-like already. There's Hugh 
Sloop and his quartette, known as 
the singingest folks anywhere, and 
they are, right on the program. And 
Miss Margaret Taylor, a niece of the 
jolly Scotchman, Jimmie Donald, 
is going to sing for us, too. Miss Ca- 
therine Deaton is coming to play some 
piano solos that sound mighty classi- 
cal as to title, and we are prepared 
to listen with appreciation. Miss 
Catherine's father, Mr. Harry Deaton, 
is a Cabarrus county product, even if 
he does edit the Mooresville Enter- 
prise now. Then, our band director 
is connected with the Melody Makers 
orchestra. If there's any better way 
to make the boys smile than to get 
the Melody Makers on the program we 
didn't know about it until it was 
too late. 

As we stated in the beginning. 
Providence permitting, we are going 
to have a good time Thanksgiving. 




VIRGINIA-CAROLINA FOOTBALL GAME 

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA. 

THANKSGIVING DAY, NOVEMBER 27TH, 1924. 

Don 't miss this great game which is an annual classic. 
Special Trains. Special pullman sleeping cars and day coaches via SOUTH- 
ERN RAILWAY, November 26th and 27th, 1924, for this occasion. 

Very low reduced round trip fares from all Southern Railway stations in 
North Carolina and Virginia to Charlottesville for this game. 

Special dining cars will be placed at Charlottesville serving breakfast and 
special Thanksgiving turkey dinner, Thanksgiving- Day, November 27th. 

Baggage may be left on pullman sleeping- cars during stay at Charlottes- 
ville, and the cars may be used during the day. 

Special trains will be operated as sections of train 32 November 26th. 
Returning- special trains will leave Charlottesville 1 :00 A. M., as sections of 
train 33 November 28th. 

Make your sleeping car reservations now. 

For further information call on any Southern Railway Agent or address: 

R. H. Graham, 
Division Passenger Agent 
Charlotte, N. C 



THE 





Carolina Collection, 
IT. N. C. Library 



r 1 1 



VOL.. XIII 



CONCORD, N. C, NOVEMBER 29, 1924 



No. 2 



$^$&&$$$$$$$$<&»&^$4 , $$^$$$$$$$'$ ,< $ > $*$ M $"$ H 3' , 3 ,< 3 ,, 3 , $'$ , $ , $' 






PAYING TOO MUCH. 



♦ 



If I knew a miser, who gave up every kind of .♦. 

% comfortable living, all the pleasure of doing good *{* 

% to others, all the esteem of his fellow, citizens, and * 

♦ the joys of benevolent friendship, for the sake ♦ 

♦ of accumulating wealth, poor man, said I, you ♦;♦ 

% pay too much for your whistle. — Benj. Franklin. £ 

♦ * 



-PUBLISHED BY- 



THE PRINTING: CLASS OF THE STONEWALL JACKSON MANUAL 
TRAINING AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL • 



EOARD OF TRUSTEES 



J. P. Cook, Chairman Concord 

Miss Easdale Shaw, Vice-Chairman 

Rockingham 
Jno. J. Blair, Sec, Raleigh 
D. B. Coltrane, Treas., Concord 
J. S. Efird, Albemarle 
Mr. Chas. A. Cannon, Concord 
Rev. Tom P. Jimison, Spencer 

Mrs. W. H. S. Burgwyn, Honorary Member 



Mrs. G. T. Roth, Elkin 

Herman Cone, Greensboro 

Mrs. Cameron Morrison, Raleigh 

Mrs. A. L. Coble, Statesville 

Mrs. T. W. Bickett, Raleigh 

Mrs. W. N. Reynolds, Winston-Salem 

Mrs. I. W. Faison, Charlotte 

Mr. Paul Whitlock, Charlotte 



Chas. E. Boger, Supt. 



CONTENTS. 



EDITORIAL COMMENT 

JUDGE HENRY GROVES CONNOR 



'AN ENGINE OF POWER ' 



FOR GOOD OR BAD? 

C. W. Hunt 



Mary M. Kizis 
Charlotte Observer 
Mrs. Clyde Hewitt 

Dr. N. R. Melhorn 



STORY OF JOHN AND ANNA 

SOCIETY OF MAYFLOWER 

THE COUNTY MARKET 

SEEING HIS GOAL 

YOUTH IN THE FOREGROUND 

CAPTURE AND BURNING OF CAPITOL 

FACE THE FACTS Asheville Citizen 

EVERY-DAY TREASURES Emma Gary Wallace 

EMBLEM FLOWER OF THE COUNTRIES Lena C. Ahlers 

MAN'S DOMINION W. S. Rankin, M. D. 

INSTITUTION NOTES J. J. Jones, Jr. 



3-8 
9 

10 
12 
13 
15 
17 
18 
20 
22 
24 
2.5 
27 
30 



The Uplift 



A WEEKLY JOURNAL 



PUBLISHED BY 



The Authority of the Stonewall Jackson Manual Training and Industrial 

School. Type-setting by the Boys Printing Class. Subscription 

Two Dollars the Year in Advance. 

JAMES P. COOK, Editor, J. C. FISHER, Director Printing Department 



Entered as second-class matter Dec. 4, 1920 at the Post Office at Concord, 
N. C. under act of March 3, 1379. Acceptance for mailing at special rate 
of 4, 1923. 



THE CONVINCING PROOF. 

' 'Here, is a dollar," said a banker to his young son one one occasion. ' 'I 
am giving it to you to do with as you may please. Do you understand, son? 
I want to see how wisely you can use. it." 

A few days afterwards the banker, who prided himself upon his 
business acumen, called the boy to him and asked "Have you found a 
way to use your dollar yet ? ' ' 

The lad stood abashed for a moment, and then replied: "Yes, sir, 
I remembered what you had said, so when an appeal was made at 
Sunday school for an orphanage for boys, I gave my dollar. ' ' 

"You gave, it to an orphanage!" exclaimed the father in amazement. 
"You'll never make a business man." Then, after a moment's thought, 
he added: "I will try you once more. Here are two dollars. Let me see 
what you can do with them." 

To his surprise, the by clapped his hands and cried: "I knew it! I 
knew it! My teacher told me that giving to the poor was lending to the 
Lord, and that He would return us double." 

The father found himself with considerable food for thought. — Ex- 
change. 



THE GREAT MIDDLE GROUND. 

French Strother came down, took an inventory of things he saw in the old 
state in comparison with no distant past, returned to his desk and wrote his 



4 THE UPLIFT 

fine piece about what North Carolina has done, ending all by saying '•about 
twenty-live years ago there was a man by the name of Ayeock." 

Then the New York Times got a letter from a Miss Hunter, who claims to 
be a North Carolinian, and with one ruthless and careless smear of her pen 
tried to spoil the picture. One cannot, be a very intense North Carolinian to 
rush in and spoil as pretty a picture as Strother drew without some real hidden 
purpose. 

Sometimes, to gain profit, alms or sympathy, there have been folks going 
North, crawling on -their knees, begging for aid to redeem "low-down,, be- 
nighted spots" in the state. This course leaves the impression that the pic- 
ture that is drawn is a general condition, thus doing injury to a state. In 
some part of any city North you may find conditions the equal in poverty, 
ignorance and filth to anything that may be found in this state, but that 
does not mean that the whole city is like unto it. 

Without calling names R. R. Clark, in one of his letters to the Greensboro 
News, takes occasion to talk as follows : 

The trouble as between our boosters and knockers is the same old 
trouble, and it is universal. The enthusiastic boosters magnify our ad- 
vantage and our progress. They assume it a virtue to exaggerate in 
what they regard as a good cause. The lightest criticism, any suggestion 
that we have a good piece to go; that while we have done well, have 
really made splendid progress in some directions but have fallen far short 
in others, is treated as rank disloyalty. The suggestion is derided 
and he who makes it is denounced as a kicker and a grouch. Any intima- 
tion that we are a little short of perfection is viewed with suspicion. 
Of a kind is the grouch who magnifies our short-comings; who assumes 
it a virtue to exaggerate and over-draw our ugly places and make them 
appear as typical of the whole. The extreme grouch refuses to give cred- 
it for any progress or to see any good. The whole emphasis is so placed 
on the dark side as to obscure all the brightness, the deliberate purpose 
being to create the impression that all is darkness and ignorance and 
vice; just as it is the deliberate purpose of the ultra-booster to make 
it appear that everything is all right; that there is neither spot nor 
blemish. 

From both the forgoing, we should pray deliverance. But as it is 
impossible to exclude the ultra-booster, so it is necessary to have the 
ultra-knockers to make a balance. Roth do harm. The truth is of course 
in the middle ground. We have made, are making, really great progress 
in North Carolina. It is cause for pride. It is well to recite the story, 
if we keep within bounds, as an encouragement 'to further progress. But 
it is foolish not to recognize the fact that we have yet a long way to go 



THE UPLIFT . 5 

before we reach the ideal state. We have yet progress and poverty, edu- 
cation and ignorance, vice and virtue. There is a great work yet to be 
done. It is absurd to pretend that there are no spots on the picture ; 
and it is equally absurd as well as mean to try to darken the whole pic- 
ture — to so over-emphasize our uncomely places that the beauty in others 
is obscured, and we are denied that which is our greatest assest — the fact 
that we are progressing, that we are making really great strides toward 
higher ground. 

THE, STATE'S OFFICIAL VOTE. 

The State Board of Elections, having canvassed the returns of the late elec- 
tion, according to law, makes among other announcements of interest that Hon. 
Angus Wilton McLean received 294,441 votes, while his competitor, Hon. f. 
M. Meekins, polled 185,627 votes, making a majority for McLean of 108,814. 
The total vote cast in the gubernatorial race was 480,068. The vote given 
Hon. W. N. Everett was 295,564, which was the largest vote given to any of 
the democratic candidates. 

The amendment providing for an increased pay for legislators was de- 
feated by a majority of 15,358 ; that limiting the state debt carried by a ma- 
jority of 84,911; securing the inviolability of the sinking fund received a 
majority of 58,863; the exemption of taxation on homes and homestead notes 
not exceeding $8,000 was carried by a majority of 102,864; and the World 
War veterans' loan measure received a majority of 80,754. 

The port terminals and water transportation bill presented for a referen- 
dum was defeated by a vote of 193,913 against, and 126,820 for, or an adverse 
majority of 67,193. Just 320,733 voters gave expression on this measure, or 
159,335 less than the number who exercised their choice for governor. Those 
who are elated over this expression affect to believe that all of the one hun- 
dred, fifty-nine thousand, three hundred and thirty-five who did not vote on 
the measure at all were against it — a far-fetched belief — and, therefore it was 
defeated by a majority of practically more thn 200,000. 

It is resonable to believe, however, that a vast majority of the 159,335, who 
failed to register their will in this matter, did not vote because they had not 
been convinced of the efficacy of the measure and certainly did not want to 
condemn a measure about which they were in doubt. It is also true that a 
few did not vote for or against, thinking that it was to be decided by a vote 
against the registration, as sometimes prevails in a bond election. 

It must be a source of great gratification to U. S. Senator F. M. Simmons 
that his record has been such as a representative of the state in the United 



6 THE UPLIFT 

States Senate for these number of years that the people gave him the largest 
majority of all the candidates in the recent election; and to Secretary of 
State Everett that he polled the highest vote recorded. 



DIGGING DEEPER INTO THE PAST. 

"The Society of the Mayflower" is a new organization, at least for the 
state of North Carolina. Its purpose is to enroll the descendants of those 
who came across in the Mayflower; and considering the unique prestige of 
those who are qualified for membership in this organization gives it a dis- 
tinct position among the historical organizations, many of which have taken 
on no little social ambition and a select attitude. 

Elsewhere in this number is an account of the initial meeeting of the North 
Carolina branch of the Society of the Mayflower, same being held in Ashe- 
ville and where a complete organization was effected. Unlike the Daughters 
of the American Revolution, men are eligible to membership, and it remains 
to. be seen how big a part they will play when it comes to the political side 
of the society's activities. 

This is getting back mighty far into American history. The family tree 
must have been well preserved to enable one to trace his or her beginning on 
this soil to the Mayflower's arrival at our coast. It would be quite easy for 
the Indian to establish his firstness in this country, or even for the one who 
is proud to claim a little Indian blood running through his veins. 

Sometime ago, we are reminded, a swell function was being held in Boston, 
at which a considerable number of snobs were in attendance, one of whom in 
a condescending manner addressed a distinguished Indian who was present 
and assured him of his rightful claim of having been descended from one 
of the passengers of the Mayflour — swelling with great pride in making this 
statement. The Indian simply replied he too could trace his ancestors pretty 
far back, citing the fact that his forbears were on the reception committee 
that welcomed the Mavflower to the American coast. 



"CORNCOBS." 

Dr. Frank Crane, the versatile and erudite syndicate writer, declares that 
"some twenty million tons of corncobs, in the United States, are going to 
waste. ' ' If the doctor means this is an annual waste, his statement is quite 
faulty. Twenty million tons means, as nearly every school boy can easily 



THE UPLIFT ? 

figure, forty billion pounds of corncobs annually which would mean the by- 
product of the production of nearly three billion bushels of corn, a thing' 
this country it not guilty of. 

"Corncobs going to waste!" Perish the idea. Thousands and thousands 
of bushels of them are used in making quick, hot fires; for smoking meat; 
for the manufacture of fancy breakfast foods ( ?) ; and for many other pur- 
poses to say nothing of the manufacture of the popular corncob pipe. Why, 
Judge Heriot Clarkson, of the North Carolina Supreme Court, remaining 
true to form and habits, folksy and of the peple, makes a heavy draft an- 
nually upon the supply of corncobs in providing for his favorite pipe. 

Mighty few corncobs are wasted, and it appears that the scholarly Dr. 
Crane puts himself in the alarmist class. 



A DISTINGUISHED N. C. JURIST PASSES. 
North Carolina is called upon to mourn the passing of Hon. Henry Groves 
Connor, of Wilson, N. C, whose death occurred at his home Sunday after- 
noon. At the time of his passing he held the position of Federal Judge for 
the Eastern North Carolina district, to which position he was elevated by 
Presidednt Taft from a position on the Supreme Bench of the state. 

The state never knew a more highly respected official, and no judge enjoyed 
a higher position in the confidences and esteem of all classes. He was a 
model citizen — gentle as a woman but with a courage that was never question- 
ed. Born in Wilmington July 3, 1852, but grew to manhood in Wilson, where 
ever after he maintained his residence and reared a large and honored family 
of children, among them Judge George W. Connor, of the Supreme court 
of the state; Prof. R. D. W. Connor, a member of the University faculty 
and an outstanding scholar of the state ; and Henry Groves Connor, Jr., a 
prominent member of the Wilson bar, and who as legislator has made an 
enviable reputation as a wise and safe leader. 

In early manhood Judge Connor made a distinctive record in the N. C. 
Legislature; he was appointed to the superior Court bench in 3885 by Gov. 
Scales, which position lie held for eight years ; from this he was elevated to 
the Supreme Court, which position he held for six years, going from there 
to a federal judgship which he had filled for fifteen years, and his record 
shows that no position or ruling of his during that whole time was ever 
reversed by the Supreme court of the United States. 

Judge Connor lived the life of a Christian gentleman; he renderd to his 



8 THE UPLIFT 

state a faithful and esteemed service; and he died, mourned by t lie whole 
state, which was enriched by his nobility and his spotless record for a third 
of a century. > 

THE COUNTY MARKET. 

Elswhere in this number is a story of the Mecklenburg County Market, the 
same being taken from the Mecklenburg Times. It makes interesting read- 
ing, because of its vital touch to a class that must husband all their resources 
to make ends meet. 

It is of no little interest to observe that such a market is being advocated 
for all the county site towns. One was opened in Concord on the 22nd, and 
it started off in tine shape with a promise of success. There was a little quiet 
objection to its establishment, but no one needs fear that it will work a hard- 
ship on any business concern, for there is enough business to keep happy all 
enterprising and hustling concerns: and who there be that would withhold 
from the industrious and enterprising country woman any opportunity to 
better her bank account or the simple means of a livelihood .' 

A glad sight: the little crippled boy, apparently made most happy when- 
ever he made a sale to the passer-by of an almanac that boldly declared an- 
other year — 1925. Just a few years ago we wrote it 1900 — today a quarter 
of a centurv is measured off in time since that date. 




1852 JUDGE HENRY GROVES CONNOR 192J 



■ 10 



THE UPLIFT 



AN ENGINE OF POWER," FOR GOOD 

OR BAD? 



By C. W. Hunt. 



Reverting to -what Gerald Johnson, 
who was perhaps born in editorial 
harness, said : The power of the 
press is not diminishing but rapidly 
increasing, where it seems to dimin- 
ish the appearance is clue to the in- 
ability of newspaper men to handle 
and direct the immense engine in 
their hands." And your comment 
on the work that is done or should 
be done by those who essay to lead 
thought in .a progressive or a tardy 
state, there comes to me these 
thoughts, which I hope are not out of 
place on these pages that have to deal 
with civics so largely. 

This writer has often said, per- 
haps on these pages, once, that 
' ' great editors are born, not made. ' ' 
And I feel confident that no amount 
of training can make a newspaper 
man out of a man who has no talent, 
for the work ; nor make a wise and 
enlightened editor out of a crook, a 
money maker, a time server, at any 
cost. An honest man trying to serv e 
his day and generation, can, with a 
limited talent for newspaper work be 
of real service : on the other hand a 
talented hireling, bought and purchas- 
ed to edit a paper according to the 
interests of corporate power or poli- 
tical crooks, is a curse to its clientel- 
le. 

The attributes of an editor of a 
secular paper need to be many, if 
he is to be followed with any degree 
of safety. 

(1) He needs to be educated and 
broad enough to know the Golden 



Rule. 

(2) He needs a knowledge of ge- 
ography, argriculture, science, politi- 
cal economy, psychology ; a sympa- 
thizer with common liumanity; all 
largely taken on by absorption. 

(3) He needs to be honest in pur- 
pose, thoroughly grounded in the 
moral law, at least, and religion will 
not hurt him. 

(4) He needs to be an independent 
thinke.r, and broad enough to be 
' ' four square. ' ' 

(5) He needs to be above price, 
unbuyable for money or favor. 

(6) He needs to be, first, a MAN; 
with a purpose, an honest purpose 
to know and to serve his generation 
in a way that is above ordinary sus- 
picion. 

(7) He needs, above all, good com- 
mon sense. 

That is putting it high, but when 
an independent thinker reads the pa- 
pers of today, and notes how far 
short of the above standards so many 
of them fall, who would be leaders 
of thought, he is appalled, at times, 
at the bald attempts to mislead 
thought, and pervert what should be 
honest leadership to sell interest or 
favortism to some corporation, man, 
or some measure. 

I go a step further to assert that 
any man, small or great, who can be 
hired to conduct the editorial columns 
of a paper of general circulation, 
supposing to tell the truth? as some 
one else wants it done, is unsafe to 
follow anywhere. And if schools of 



THE UPLIFT 



11 



journalism will drill that fact into 
wouldbe newspaper editors, in the 
embryo stage, it or they will have 
done the country a real service. In 
late years schools of journalism have 
sprung up in the universities of the 
land, at which a man of talent for that 
line can no doubt get help to broad- 
en his perspective and fit him better 
for real helpful newspaper work. On 
the other hand if the student in your- 
alism has not the standard qualifica- 
tions, like some of the above, as a 
ground work, the school is likely, to 
turn out a crook all the better quali- 
fied for cropk-ed-ness. 

The writer was amazed not long 
ago, at reading a leading editorial 
in a paper of large circulation in 
this State, dening the assertion that 
it' had tried or was then trying to 
mould public opinion, but that it was 
trying to reflect public opinion. 
This was no doubt a shock to thousands 
of others who had been reading it 
for years and thought they were 
following a leader(?) This editor 
had all these years never realized 
his duty, or did not know what he 
had been doing or was a crook, pass- 
ing as a saint. A man can pervert 
honesty of purpose in any Iftie of 
newspaper work, .religious not ex- 
cepted, if his zeal for one side of a 
thing possesses him, and misleads 
his readers as to real conditions; but 



what has been said above refers in 
particular to the paper that is the 
only perveyor a certain man reads ; and 
is supposed to keep the busy worker, 
at other work, abreast of the times. 
If the reader takes and pays for it 
to get one side and biased stuff, then 
he is a contributor, that far, to sorry 
newspaper work. Of course this 
writer does not expect the fool poli- 
tician to understand what he is driv- 
ing at. Perversion is his stock in 
trade and few hope to reform Kim. 

It has been less than a month since 
the oldest, in point of service, editor 
in he State, over his own signature, 
said: "there is no state west of the 
Mississippi river the majority party 
can call its own. ' ' That was as far 
from .the truth, as independent and 
liberal men saw it, and as it proved 
to be, as it possibly could have gone. 
The fact is there was not a semblance 
of truth in it; yet there were thou- 
snds of North Carolina citizens who 
read no other paper thought they 
were reading truth. Reckless aban- 
don is the proper name for such. 
In teaching journalism in the Uni- 
versity of North Carolina, it is to be 
hoped for the State's sake, and for 
its citizens' sake the matter of truth 
will be the very first and the last 
lesson given. To put other than 
truth in a newspaper, wilfully, is to 
make it a perveyor of lies. 



The Eliizabeth City Independent, or The Advance tells of the philoso- 
phy of a mulatto who was a foundling and reared as a whote boy till 
fourteen. He tried to be white, but came to the conclusion that it is 
useless to try to be "what you ain't," and contendtedly lived as a 
negro till his death a few days ago. There would be much more happi- 
ness in the world if everybody would quit trying to be "what he ain't 
and never can be. 



12 



THE UPLIFT 



STORY OF JOHN AND ANNA. 



By Mar-; 

John and Anna were sweethearts 
in Lithuana years ago, before John 
left his native vilage and began life 
as a miner in Pennsylvania. Anna 
waited for him to return, but John 
grew more fond of his new home a* 
the years passed and urged Anna to 
join him here. Anna hesitated to 
make the long journey overseas; time 
slipped by; the romance dimmed and 
all correspondence between the two 
ceased. At length John married a 
girl in Pennsylvania. When ten 
years had passed and he was the fa- 
ther of four children his wife died. 

How is a miner to care for his 
children? All John's days were spent 
deep underground. He had not become 
an American citizen yet. Neighbors 
did what thy could to hold the lit- 
tle family together, and one day an 
old countryman suggested to John 
that it might be a good thing if he 
would try to get in touch again will) 
Anna the girl he left behind in Lithu- 
ania. Perhaps the great war and 
things that followed it made Anna 
willing to come to America. The pair 
succeeded very quickly, and after a 



M. Kizis. 

little enco.uagen.ent Anna bade fare- 
well to Lithuania and set out to join 
her sweetheart of years before. 

There followed a fortnight of joy- 
ous anticipation — aboard the steamer 
bound for New York and in the 
Pennsylvania mining town where 
John and his friends awaited the day 
of reunion. When Anna reached 
Ellis Island it was found that she 
could not pass the literacy test. 
She must go back to Lithuania. 
John's American neighbors, fellow 
countrymen and various organizations 
made vain attempts to find a way 
that would make her admissable. 
They all failed. In deep dismay, 
Anna was shipped back across the 
ocean to her native village. 

But the romance of John and 
Anna is not ended yet. If he were a 
naturalized citizen and Anna were his 
wife she could enter in spite of the 
literacy test, so John has taken steps 
lo hasten his citizenship. When that 
is completed Anna plans to be ready 
and waiting for him in Canada, where 
they can be married and return to- 
gether to Pennsylvania. 



COLLEGE EDUCATION VALUED AT $72,000. 
A college education is worth 372,000 to its possessor, according to a 
report made public by Dean Everett W. Lord of the Boston University. 
The estimate is based on a study of college graduates. The cash value of 
a high school education is placed at p33,000. — N. C. Argriculture and In- 
dustry. 



THE UPLIFT 



13 



SOCIETY OF MAYFLOWER. 



(Charlotte Observer.) 



Mrs. James Eugene Reilly, Mrs. 
J. Gr. Baird, Mr. Lee A. Folger and 
Mr. M. R. Dunnagan returned to the 
city yesterday from Asheville where 
they went to attend the organization 
meeting of the Society of Mayflower 
descendents in the state on North 
Carolina. 

The following from yesterday's is- 
sue of The Asheville Citizen will he 
read with interest in this section of 
of the state : 

The Society of Mayflower descen- 
dants in the state of North Carolina 
was formerly organized last night at 
the home of Burnham Standish Col- 
burn, in Baltimore Forest and Mr. 
Colburn was elected governor. 

Of the 21 original signers ask- 
ing for the charter for this state, the 
first south of the District of Colum- 
bia and nineteenth in the United 
States, 14 being present for the or- 
ganization meeting. 
• Officers elected were: Mr. Colburn, 
governor; Leonard Tufts, Pinehurst, 
deputy governor; Chester Pierce 
Munroe, Asheville secretary-treasur- 
er; Macon Rush Dminagan, Char- 
lotte, historian, and James G. K. Me- 
Clure, Asheville, elder. 

The board of assistance will be 
composed of the officers and the 
following: Mrs. James Grier Baird, 
Charlotte; Lee A. Folger, Charlotte; 
Luria Lyons Lee, Asheville; Mrs. T. 
D. Rhodes, Asheville, and Edward K. 
Towe, Durham. 

Chester P. Munroe is a son of the 
governor general, head of all of the 
organizations in the United States; 
Mr. McClure's father is governor of 



the Illinois society and Mr. Colburn 
was formerly head of the Michigan 
society. 

The session last night was fea- 
tured by a talk on thePilgrirus by 
Mr. McClure and the reading of a 
poem by Mrs. Baird. Those present 
at the meeting were guests of the 
newly elected president for dinner. 

The organization meeting was 
staged on the 304th anniversary of 
the signing of the compact in the 
cabin of the Mayflower. 

About 30 applications for men> 
bership in the North Carolina so- 
ciety are in hand and will be acted 
upon in the near future. 

Indications are that there are 
several .hundred people in the state 
who are eligible to membership in 
the Society of Mayflower descen- 
dants. Many of these are expected 
to join now that the organization 
is completed. Those signing the pe- 
tition for a North Carolina charter 
are as follows: 

Bunrham Standish Colburn, Wil- 
liam Cul'len Colburn, TBiltmore; 
Chester Pierce Munroe, James G. X. 
McClure, Jr., Luria Lee Lyons, Mrs. 
T. D. Rhodes, Asheville; Mrs. John 
Grier Baird, Mrs. James Eugene 
Reilly, Lee A. Folger, Macon Rush 
Dunnagan, Charlotte: Leonard Tufts, 
Pinehurst ; Mrs. Edward Cyrus Wins- 
low, Tarboro; Benjamin Franklin 
Folger, Dobson; Mrs. Fredrick Bel- 
ton John, Fayetteville ; Mrs. Frank 
P. Hall, Belmont; Miss Mary Wilson 
Puett, Lenoir; Horace Waldo Por- 
ter, Greensboro; Claude Romulus 
Dunnagan, Winston-Salem; Mrs. 



14 THE UPLIFT 

Franklin L. Townsend, Durham; Eu- West Durham: Mrs. Maud D. Shae- 
ward K. Powe, Edward K. Powe Jr.. kleford, Tarboro. 



THE OLD-FASHIONED WOMAN. 

I suppose I'm an old-fashioned woman, 

At least my neighbors think so ; 
They say I'm clinging to customs 

That went out of date years ago. 

I simply can't learn the slang phrases, 

In style I'm worse than a wreck, 
For my skirts reach clear down to my ankles, 

And my waist comes clear up to my neck. 

I'm still saying grace at the table, 

Tho' the bread may be barley or oats; 
I don't hanker to join the "new women." 

And I've never b^'en crazy to vote. 

I still love my husband and children; 

I suppose that's an old-fashioned view; 
And I still ready my Bible each morning 

My faith in God's care to renew. 

And so when they say I'm old-fashioned, 

It's truth L don't want to deny; 
For I love the old creed and the customs 

That were born in the ages gone by. 

And if the great morning of judgment, 

Finds my soul without blemish or sin: 
How much do you think it would matter, 

How queer and old-fashioned I've been? 

— Selected. 



THE UPLIFT 



15 



THE COUNTY MARKET. 

By Mrs. Clyde Hewitt in Mecklenburg Times. 



For a long time Mecklenburg 
county women have wished for a way 
to sell their garden and pantry pro- 
duce. Much had been said and writ- 
ten in an endeavor to obtain a mar- 
ket place but all attempts had ended 
in failure. Finally the women de- 
cided to settle this poblem in their 
own way and under the leadership 
of Miss Bertha Proffltt, home dem- 
onstration agent, the 19th of Janu- 
ary, 1924, was set for the opening 
day. 

The only place they could obtain 
was the home demonstration agent's 
small kitchen in the basement of the 
courthouse, but not being undaunted 
they fixed up this place with shelves 
and tables and hopefully launched a 
county market. Nineteen women 
sent in cakes and chickens and a 
variety of vegetables and realized 
forty dollars from their sales. This 
first day's patronage assured the wo- 
men there was a real need for a 
county market and they went to 
work in earnest to study the needs 
of their customers and to get other 
women to send in produce. 

They soon picked up many market 
pointers, for instance the dressing of 
hens. A hen with head and feet re- 
moved, singed and carefully dressed 
made a ready sale. Clean eggs of 
uniform size, vegetables washed ana 
attractive arranged, butter firm and 
fresh, jellies covered with parafin fco 
prevenet mold, preserves, pickles and 
canned goods in attractive contain- 
ers, all this combined witli an effort 
to put out quality was repaid by 



the keen appreciation of those who 
bought. They also discerned quality 
in, cooking and the cakes, citron tarts, 
cookies, beaten biscuits, bread and 
candies are enjoying wide popularity. 

Previously so much at home went 
to waste, many of the women had no 
way or time to peddle their produce 
and those that could go to town 
would often times find the market 
flooded and after weary hours ped- 
dling would sell or carry it back 
home. With the county mrket this 
is different, those unable to get their 
produce in can send it by a neigh- 
bor contributor or community club 
leader. Some of the regular con- 
tributors have never been to the mar- 
ket. A ten per cent commission is 
taken out and. a check mailed back. 
This commission is to pay for paper 
bags, oiled paper, ice and other 
thing's. Perishables not sold are re- 
turned if convenient, or sold to the 
city markets at wholesale prices. 
Other products are left on the shelv- 
es. 

Assured sales have stimulated the 
interest of the women and poultry 
clubs are being ' organized thruout 
the county to meet the great demand 
for chickens and eggs. They are 
becoming experts in many lines and 
realizing financial gains that will 
add much to the comfort of the home 
and family. For example, in the 
kitchen contest put on last spring by 
Miss Proffltt forty-eight kitchens 
were- improved and much of the mon- 
ey was earned by the women them- 
selves in the market. 



16 



THE UPLIFT 



become so very small that the county 
commissioners generously fixed up a 
larger room connected with the kitch- 
en by a large hall which is used as 
an office and storage room. Over 
two hundred women were now con- 
tributing farm and culinary products 
and the management had become 
very difficult, so with the opening of 
the new room it was decided to put 
on community booths. The Derita 
club demonstrated this idea so suc- 
cessfully that Central Steel Creek, 
Dixie, and Hopewell followed their 
example, thus making four communi- 
ty and one general booth. 

The booths have attracted much 
interest and enthusiasm for it is a 
greater incentive to the women to 
send in their produce when they sell 
it themselves. Every week sees new 
members and scores are willing to 
work, but the relay of two women 
at each booth on market day, Wed- 
nesday and Saturday, has been found 
most practical. Last Saturday, No- 
vember loth, 125 dozen eggs, a whole 
pork, ten dozen tarts and a great 
variety of cakes, fruits, vegetables 
and flowers were sold. Over two 



hundred dollars were taken in, show- 
ing a phenomenal growth when com- 
pared with the first day sales. 

Not being convenient for the Ra- 
man club to put on a booth they 
conceived the idea of serving light 
lunches. With a few dozen sand- 
wiches, pies and coffee, this idea was 
launched Saturday. November 8th. 
The following Saturday a chicken 
dinner was served. For lack of serv- 
ing space many were turned away, 
and there were dozens of shoppers, 
business men and women who came 
after the regular dinner had given 
out. These were served sandwiches 
and coffee. 

We are just beginning to glimpse 
what we could do if we had adequate 
space. The women are making the 
market a game of life and playing 
it for wonderful results, not only for 
financial returns but social and edu- 
cational benefits as well. The suc- 
cess of the market has been due to 
the untiring service of the county 
women, the splendid suggestions and 
inspiration of Miss Proffit and the 
hearty co-operation of the county 
commissioners. 



PAGE THE SAGE! 

Miss Lizzie Kelly whom it would be superflous to introduce to North 
Carolina readers was recently visiting the State Hospital at Raleigh. A 
patient came up to her and said, admiringly: 

"Well, now, ain't you a fine-looking woman! . .Who 're you anyway? 
I reckon you're Queen of Sheba, ain't you?" 

' ' I am that ! ' ' said Miss Kelly. 

"Then what're you doin' heare?" the patient asked. 

"I'm looking for King Solomon," Miss Liz replied. 

— Nell Battle Lewis. 



THE UPLIFT 



17 



SEEING HIS GOAL. 



Under date of November 18, the following interesting story of a marked 
determination comes out from Jefferson, Ashe County, N. C.\ 

The Jefferson school, the prepara- 
tory institution here controlled by 
the Methodist church, has a student 
who is exciting much interest and 
admiration in this section. He is 
W. H. Scott of Riverside, in this 
county. At the age of 32, he has 
entered the seventh grade and an- 
nounced his intention to finish high 
school and college. 

Seventeen years ago, Waddy Scott 
a boy in knee trousers, went to the 
Appalachian Training school, at 
Boone, and entered school. He was 
in the sixth grade. He was getting 
on well in school and looking for- 
ward to the completion of his course. 
But while he was home on vacation, 
he fell under the influence of some 
of the boys of his community, some 
of them his kinsmen. They told 
gloing stories of the money to be 
mde in West Virginia. With a long- 
ing for adventure that was as great 
as his desire for money, he left school 
and went to the coal fields. After 
a few years of wandering and itin- 
erant employment, Waddy returned 
to Ashe county, married a neighbor- 
hood girl, and settled down on a small 
poor farm on Mill creek. 

But the boy was still restless and 
unsatisfied. He could not forget the 
erstwhile thirst Tor knowledge. But 
he had no money ; he was past the 
school age; and, one child after an- 
other came to the little home until 
there were five. All hope for an edu- 
cation seemed to have departed. 

Then, a wonderful thing happened 
to Waddy Scott. He sot religion. 



learning there was a strange indefi- 
nite urge to a higher life. He won- 
dered if be was called to preach the 
gospel. The few friends in whom he 
confided, even his reltives, laughed 
at him and discouraged him. He was 
a member of the Methodist church, 
which requires a rather high stand- 
ard of scholarship for its ministers. 
But, as he expressed it, "there was 
no peace ' ' for him. He prayed over 
the matter and came to the conclu- 
sion that if God wanted him for His 
man, He would help him find a way 
to prepare. 

Waddy Scott made a trip to Ram- 
seur where his first cousin, Rev. W. 
L. Scott is pastor. W. L. Scott grew 
up in the same neighborhood, finished 
high school and college, was for nine 
years the president of the Jefferson 
school, and is now a preacher in the 
Western North Carolina Conference. 
He was the boy from the home set- 
tlement to whom the natives point- 
ed with pride. His example was the 
inspiration that caused many to 
break away from the poor fields of 
Mill creek and obtain an education. 
But even he could not find encour- 
agement for Waddy Scott. Waddy 
was 32 years old, with a wife and 
five children dependent on him. He 
had no money. Wadddy came home 
almost ready to give up his vision. 
But it seemed that there was a voice 
speaking to him which would not 
desist. 

And then, there came into Ashe 
county a man whose faith in God and 



18 



THE UPLIFT 



his fellowman knows no limitations. 
Rev. J. L. Reynolds, pastor of this 
circuit, some way learned the secret 
of Waddy Seott. It was a secret ; for 
his friends laughed at his suggestion 
that lie was going back to school. 
But Reynolds said nothing was im- 
possible for him who has faith. 

When the fall term of the Jeffer- 
son school opened, Waddy Scott en- 
rolled. He secured a little cottage 
and moved his family to Jefferson. 
Thrive of his children enrolled in 
school with him. One, he says, is a 



''better scholar" than his father. But 
Waddy Scott says that the way is 
becoming easier. He is janitor at 
the school and the church. He does 
any job that anyone is willing to 
pay him for. He feels no shame in 
going lip 1 witli the children and 
marching into the school room. He 
wants knowledge. He wants to pre- 
pare to answer the gTeat call that 
he feels has come to him. His face 
shines as it has not for 17 years. He 
is marching to his goal. 



YOUTH IN THE FOREGROUND. 



By Dr. N. R. Melhorn. 



A correspondent from Chicago 
sends us a clipping from one of that 
city's dailies, which reports the criti- 
cisms of the Church of England by 
a group of students at Oxford Uni- 
versity. The occasion was a "Church 
Congress" that was held, and after 
reasonable allowance has been made 
for high spots in reporting, one can 
infer that the Anglican Church is 
not satisfying many of the young 
intellectuals of Great Britain. One 
might say much the same thing about 
American youth. The ' ' Student Vol- 
unteer Movement" was more or less 
radicial at its 1924 meeting. The 
Methodist General Conference gave 
careful heed to a communication 
from young people's organization. 
Recently a group of Presbyterian 
collegians were given a rather tart 
response to criticism they offered to 
the Presbyterian Church through res- 
olutions published in their journals. 

Those of us who are fifty years of 
age or more may not always ap- 



praise our youth correctly. Probably 
they know more at the' age of 
twenty-one than their parents did at 
that period. The schools teach more 
extensively, the press is cheaper, and 
more effective in reporting, and i he 
vogue of travel has increased beyond 
measure during the past twenty-fivri 
years. We meet ten times as many 
people observe ten times as much 
variety of life now as they did when 
you and I were young. We are all 
ready to admit the superiority of the 
rising generation whe n it comes to 
knowing things. 

Whether they think more ac- 
curately than did their fathers in op- 
en to considerable debate. For ex- 
ample, the Oxford conference to which 
we referred at the beginning of-this 
paprag.raph is reported as describ- 
ing the Church as "a middle-age 
institution run by the middle-aged 
for the middle-aged. ' ' That saunds 
well and is a type of phrase that a 
reporter likes to hear. It puts into 



THE UPLIFT 



19 



three apt phrases what is a general 
ipinion among young people. Suppose 
one analyzes it. 

Is the Church, a middle-age Institu- 
tion? 

The middle ages are commonly 
dated between Charlemagne (800 
A. D. ) and the Reformation (1517i. 
Neither the Anglican Church nor any 
other Protestant group was then in 
existence. The creeds, which occa- 
sion so much impatience, were, with 
the exception of the Apostles', Nic'ene 
iiiid Athanasian, not yet formulated. 
The big problem was the relationship 
of Church and State, but the factors 
were popes and kings, bishops and 
princes. The "common people" who 
eqrtainly figjuxe largely at present 
could eat. breed children, fight battles, 
pay taxes and die-, but they were not 
prominent as now. The present forms 
of Church activity are as different 
from the Middle Ages as a Pullnum 
train is from the famous covered 
wagon. 

Yet in one way the Church con- 
tains the Middle Ages. The admin- 
istration of the Christian religion is 
through a continuous organism that 
began at Pentecost and has continued 
ever since. You can find many in- 
fluences or features that originated 
between 800 and 1517. One might 
use these for a label, but it would 
lack accuracy. 

Those Middle-aged Folk 

Young people often complain that 
the Church caters to the middle-aged 
people. Well, we hope it does. It 
could not justly neglect those past 
thirty for several reasons. One is, 
that the majority of the earth's in- 
habitants are not young people. In 
America not more than fifteen per 
cent are between twelve and twenty- 



five years of age. Youth would cer- 
tainly lack most of its privileges and 
nine-tenths of its pleasures if these 
" middle-agesrs " did not keep the 
home fires supplied with fuel. You'h 
is long on promise and short on pro- 
tior;,. We need their promise, but 
duetion. We neeed their promise, but 

The middle-aged need the Church 
that caters to middle-age. The 
chance to sing the hymns one learned 
in youth is a privilege one values, not 
because it is so old-fashioned, nor 
because he is obstinately wedded to 
the past, but because it is something 
that has lasted longer, than he has. 
It was a favorite "when. he was a 
boy. ' ' When you come to think 
about it, there are mighty few things 
that endure from generation to gene- 
ration. Doctrines and customs which 
youth cannot adequately interpret 
and whose simplest meaning is en- 
meshed in experience and circum- 
stances, are like old hymns. They 
stir up feeling and involve values 
to the folk of fifty that the youh of 
twenty cannot even imagine; of 
course, he cannot understand. One 
reason why the average teacher in a 
school, even in a university, cannot 
appreciate how socking his academic 
criticisms are to the generation that 
parented the group he is teaching, 
lies likewise the pedagog's inability 
to value wear and tear in every-day 
life, where the wheels are always 
turning, and one never knows what 
may happen next. It is middle-age 
that loves God because He is the 
same yesterday, today and forever 
Every other thing he meets is sure 
to change. Religion alone furnishes 
him with a group oi invariables 
Give the Grown-ups a Share 

We have no complaints to make 



20 



THE UPLIFT 



about youth. We were once young 
ourselves, and we are proud if it. 
But youth should treat middle-age 
fairly, permit them to enjoy a certain 
fixedness, even in worship. The 
present generation of college and 
military youth have a lot of advan- 
ages their fathers and mothers never 
had, and they are thus superior. 
But the middle-aged have one advan- 
tage youth gets only when it lias 
ceased to be young. The man of 
fifty has lived twice as long as his 
son of twenty-five. You can leani 
a lot from books and reading, and 
today's opportunities arc wonderful. 
But nothing is real until you have 
lived it. It is experience that clari- 
fies, classifies and values knowledge. 
The eager, cock-sure venturesome- 



ness of youth is a fine quality, bill 
it is only attribute of humans. Young 
folk think a lot of themselves, and 
they should. But the middle-agers 
love these youngsters more than 
they love themselves. Most people 
between forty and sixty have gladly 
given up the things that were the 
chief sources of their earlier happi- 
ness. Quite a few were more or less 
play, but others have been given to 
their sons and daughters. Few* chil- 
dren realize how eager a parent is 
to do well by the sons and daughters. 
If his religion did not stand by him, 
they would be the first sufferers. All 
of which means to us that a middle 
age Church for middle-age people is 
something for which the restless youth 
should devoutly be thankful. 



CAPTURE AND BURNING OF CAPITOL. 



What is regarded as a valuable 
historical document, a letter des- 
cribing the capture and burning of 
Washington, D. C. 110 years ago, is 
in the possession of the New York 
Historical Society. It was sent >y 
Mrs. Mary Hunter to her sister, Mrs. 
Susan Cuthbert, a few days after the 
events described. 

The sisters were daughters of 
Richard and Annie Stockton. Their 
father, their uncle, Elias Boudinot, 
and their brother-in-law, Dr. Benja- 
min Rush, were all signers of the 
Declaration of Independence and 
distinguished supported of the 
American Revolution. The writer's 
husband, the Rev. Dr. Andrew Hun- 
ter, served as chaplain in the Revo- 
lutionary army and during the War 
of 1812 was a chaplain in the United 



States navy, stationed at the Navy 
Yard in Washington. Morven, the 
Princeton, N. J., estate of the fam- 
ily was destroyed by the Hessians 
in 1776. The letter follows: 

"My dear Sister — You will doubt- 
less wish to hear how we have pass j d 
through the perils to which we have 
been lately exposed by an invading 
foe, whether our lives have been 
spared or our habitations have es- 
caped the devouring flames. Wi'!i 
respect to both these events we have 
been highly favored. We are all in 
good health and our house unmo- 
lested. But our fears and trouble 
for some time past have been' almost 
beyond description. The Bhitish 
army commanded by General Ross 
and the seamen by Admiral Cock- 
burn have been advancing upon us 



THE UPLIFT 



21 



for more than two weeks, and, as 
we supposed, were not likely to he 
stopped or prevented from ravaging' 
our city and destroying our property 
to the extent of their wishes. To 
crown this scene of affliction, on 
Wednesday last, the 24th of the 
month, we heard in the morning that 
the enemy were on their march near 
Bladensburgh and that our militia 
were on their way to meet them. 
My husband and myself concluded 
that if would be prudent to take 
our children and servants out of 
the way and place them a few miles 
off till the storm should be ended. 
Redcoats In Washington 

"I myself concluded to stay in 
our house with our housekeeper and 
one black servant, and my husband 
took away the children and the other 
servants. About the middle of the 
day we heard a severe cannonading 
in the direction of Bladenburgh 
and some hours after we saw our 
men running- in great numbers in a 
disorderly manner. And in the eve- 
ning, perhaps at sunsetting, I will 
leave you to conjecture what our 
feelings must have been when we 
saw the British flag flying on Capi- 
tol Hill, and the rockets brandished 
for the destruction of our Capitol 
and for what other property >ve 
knew not. 

' ' In a. few minutes a grum looking 
officer rode up to our door and asked 
me where my husband was. I in- 
formed him he was not at home. 
He asked me when he went abroad. 
I told him this morning. What in- 
duced him, he said, to go abroad 
just at this time. I then looked him 
fully in the face and very deliber- 
ately told him that my husband was 
gone to take a family of young chil- 



dren from witnessing such a horrid 
scene. He asked when my husband 
was expected home. This put a st 'p 
to all further interrogatories. I .then 
asked him to go to the sideboard 
and help himself to any refresh- 
ments that were agreeable to him. 
And while he' was regaling himself 

I asked in my turn what they were 
going to do; whether to burn the 
city generally, or confine themselves 
to the public buildings? He said 
that would depend on cireumstanei •.-. 
Where no resistance was made priv- 
ate property would be safe; espe- 
cially to those who remained in their 
houses. But that every house where 
resistance was made or in which 
arms should be found would be fired. 

II then told us that General Boss's 
horse had been shot under him fro i 
Galat in's house and that it was 
burnt. After graciously assuring us 
that we need be under no apprehen- 
sions — that their troops were undev 
the strictest discipline — that none 
dared to come info our houses with- 
out permission. 

"Soon after I went across the 
street to a neighbor's house from 
whence I could have a better view 
of the Capital. At this house i 
number of the officers we-re taking 
some refreshments, and seeing us 
alarmed they said evrything that 
could be said to quiet us. I told 
them I had seen many B. officers 
who were gentlemen, and that I could 
not bring myself to be afraid. I 
mentioned that a quantity of powder 
had been deposited in the Capitol 
and that I was apprehensive when 
the fire reached it, it might injure 
the inhabitants — they said it would be 
immediately removed, and that the 
Capital would no be blown up. They 



22 



THE UPLIFT 



talked of burning the Washington 
Bank, but were informed that it was 
pprivate property and that it must 
destroy a great deal of individual 
property if it should be burnt — under 
these considerations they spared it. 
They mentioned that it was a pain- 
ful service to them — that they were 
disposed to do all in their power to 
mitigate the distress of the citizens 
against whom they had no enmity. 
That their war was with the govern- 
ment and not with the people. All 
this relieved our fears concerning 
the city and ourselves. 

' ' But a most awful scene was to 
follow. Our important navy yard 
was to lie destroyed by our own hands 
— the most suicidal act ever com- 
mitted. No pen can describe ithe 
appalling' sound that our ears heard 
and the sight that our eyes saw. We 
could see' everything from the upper 
part of our house as plainly as if 
we had been in the yard. All the 
vessels of war on Are — the immense 
quantity of dry timber, together with 
the houses and stores in flames pro- 
duced and almost meridian bright- 
ness. You never saw a drawing 
room so brilliantly lighted as the 
whole city was that night. Few 



thought of going to bed — they spent 
the night in gazing on the fires and 
lamenting the disgrace of the ci;y. 
The British never went near the Navy 
Yard till next morning. 

"On the morning of the 25th we 
were introduced to Admiral Cock- 
burn, who said he admired the Ameri- 
can ladies — they made excellent wives 
and good mothers; but they were 
very much prejudiced against him — ■ 
that his friend Joseph Gales had 
told so many lies about him that he 
was afraid he should never be a 
favorite. But he said he had paid 
him by scattering his types — that 
he had left a line to desire him to 
publish it in his next paper. He in- 
quired of me and all the ladies in a 
very particular manner if they had 
sustained any injurj — if any of the 
soldiers had come into our houses 
or taken anything from us. He in- 
treated us if anything of that nature 
had occured that we would immediate- 
ly compplain and they should be pun- 
ished. I began to think ourselves 
happy, when an alarming storm of 
wind and rain came on which blew 
down and unroofed many houses. 
The storm we believe hurried the 
army off. ' ' 



FACE THE FACTS. 



(Asheville Citizen.) 



Does the general opinion of the 
country wish a continuation or 
abolishment of capital punishment ? 
The country does not say. It does 
not meet the issue but seems inclined 
to shirk it — to procrastinate, to post- 
pone decision and talk of something 
pleasanter. However, it gives signs 



that it is uneasy over what it tries 
to put out of mind. 

Consider now the case of two men, 
King and Harrell, convicted' in South 
Carolina for the murder there in 
July of Major S. H. McCleary and 
sentenced to death. At the time the 
crime outraged the country's sense 



THE UPLIFT 



23 



of right and there was a general de- 
mand that the convicted men should 
meet the extreme penalty. A gallant 
soldier of the world war had hospit- 
ably given the two men a ride and by 
way of reward they planned to rob 
him and in pursuance of this he was 
killed by King. 

And yet in a few months there 
stirs an appreciable clamor that the 
Governor communte the death sen- 
tence to life imprisonment — with the 
inevitable prospect that in a few 
years they will be pardoned. The 
reasons for leniency may be utterly 
inadequate, but they are sufficient to 
induce people to sign the petitions 
lor leniency — including eleven of the 
jurymen wdio in effect voted the 
death sentence. 

It is maintained that Harrel tired 
no shot, and it is seriously argued 
that the word of the two miscreants 
should be taken that they did not in- 
tend to kill Major McLeary but only 
rob him and because the Major made 
a move as if to draw a pistol in self- 
defense King was somewhat justified 
in slaying him. The law does not 
recognize and such self-defense right 
in a robber, but the petitioners do. 

And stress is laid on the claim that 
Harrell had not made it clear to the 
jury that he had served in the war, 
whether a volunteer or dragged in by 
the scruff of the neck not stated, as 
if this were anything of atonement, 
that Harrell cannot read or write, 
and then further that the two men 



lacked the education and training in 
the ways of advanced society. 

Contrast the latter plea with one 
precisely t lie opposite made for 
Leopold and Loeb and not how the 
issue of capital punishment faces the 
country. The Chicago youths should 
have clemency, it was urged, because 
they were over-educated so that they 
passed the bounds of humanity as 
supermen; King and Harrell should 
have clemency because they were un- 
der-tutored. 

A passing comment might be made 
that the pioneers of this country were 
in large proportion uneducated 
and though they might kill in 
fair fight or heat or passion they 
did not need to learn from books to 
hate the character who would abuse 
a benefactor's hospitality to do him 
harm. Such a one they held lower 
than the lowest — and so do most of 
their desendants this day. 

The issue is, however, whether the 
country wishes to have capital pun- 
ishment enforced or abolished — and 
it cannot long be evaded if there are 
more Frank and McLeary cases. If 
the extreme penalty is justified, is 
it not called for in these cases'? Yet 
we note that the very jurymen who 
convicted King and Harrell ask that 
the death penlty be set aside in their 
cases. It this or not sign that 
at heart these jurors did not be- 
lieve in capital punishment, however 
much they may tell themselves they 
do favor it. 



American women are buying 17,000,000 boxes of rouge annually, but 
to judge, from the thickness with which some of 'em are laying it on 
there must be millions and millions of women who are not getting their. 
— Louisville Times. 



24 



THE UPLIFT 



EVERY-DAY TREASURES. 



By Emma Gary Wallace. 

We do not need to go to the far- 
away fields of the frozen North, to 
rugged mountain fastness, to stand 
knee-deep on the pebbly beds of rac- 
ing rivers searching for gold, or to 
dig for precious gems in the pipes 
of extinct volcanoes. 

We have far greater wealth right 
within our reach and grasp. 

After all, the most precious treas- 
ures possible to win are those which 
are aetulaly priceless — and the best 
of it all is that most of these every- 
dy treasures are ours for the taking. 

Sunshine, fresh air, and pure water 
are nature's gifts, and yet it has tak- 
en centuries of education to teach 
people to appreciate these things. 

Every-day life has many daily sat- 
isfactions, which for preciousness are 
not comparable with taxable treas- 
ures — the joys of friendship, the 
sweetness of family ties, the splendid 
senses of seeing, and smelling, and 
touching, and tasting, the ability to 
surmount difficulties, and the know- 
ledge that even if our best 
efforts seem to fail, that in the final 
pattern of life, every thread will be 
picked up and woven into lines of 
enduring strength and beauty. 

One of the richest women I have 
ever known did not possess a large 
share of this world 's goods, but her 
interest in the people about her, her 
fine spirit of encouraging and helpful 
service, her never-failing apprecia- 
tion of the beauties of nature, her 
cheerfulness and great faith, made 
her rich bevond all estimate. 



She had deliberately turned her 
back upon large wealth to do the 
things she loved to do. She heard the 
call and answered it. It was years 
and years ago that a timid school 
techer about to fare forth for the 
first time sought her counsel. 

''Well, how does thee feel?" she 
asked. 

••Rather frightened," confessed the 
writer, who was that girl of yester- 
year. 

"But why " 

"Oh, I am so eager to do my best," 
was the reply. "But the road is 
steep and long, and it would be seri- 
ous to make a mistake. ' ' 

The lady smiled again. "Thee has 
no need to fear, ' ' she returned quiet- 
ly, ' " for thee has thy sword and 
buckler to fasten on, and the path 
up the mountain side leads to the 
top. Then thee has seen the vision. 
Thee is very rich!" 

One of the things that is making 
our American life so feverish and 
increasing the strain of making both 
ends meet in the mistake of putting 
the emphasis in the wrong place. 

Simpler living, a deeper joy in the 
worth-while things of life, and the 
courage to say and to do what is 
best for us individually, regardless 
of the pace set by neighbors and 
friends — all make for contentment, 
self-respect, the strengthening of 
family ties, and high thinking. "As 
a man thinketh in his heart, so is 
he." — The Christian Herald. 



THE UPLIFT 



25 



EMBLEM FLOWERS OF THE COUN- 
TRIES. 



By Lena C. Ahlers. 



It is interesting' to know just why 
the different countries selected the 
various flowers that they chose to 
be their emblems. It was not for 
its beauty that Wales choice center- 
ed on leeks nor Ireland's on the 
shamrock, which is the best known 
of the country's emblems. These em- 
blem Mowers have been chosen with 
as much care and sentimentality as 
that exercised by most parents in 
finding a suitable name for their 
children. Religious ceremonies, cus- 
toms, important events and other 
historical happenings have played an 
important part in the choosing of 
the flower emblems of the countries 
that now have them. 

It is usually well known why Ire- 
land adopted the shamrock as its em- 
blem, and many beautiful poems 
have been written in its honor, of 
which probably Moore 's "0, the 
.Shamrock ' ' is best known : 
' ' 0, the Shamrock, the green immortal 
Shamrock ! 

Chosen leaf 

Of barb and Chief. 
Old Erin's native shamrock." 

The shamrock is a beautiful bluish- 
green color, and being the sign of 
three in one was chosen by Saint 
Patrick as symbolic of the Trinity. 

It is also popularly known why 
Scotland chose the thistle and its em- 
blem. It is said that in the reign 
of Malcom the second the Danish in- 
vaded Scotland, and would have 
crept upon and captured the sleep- 
ing army had not one of the Danes 



stepped upon a thistle, growing in a 
moat, and screamed. This awoke 
the sleeping Scots and the fortress 
was saved, and in gratitude the 
Scottish people honored the lowly 
thistle by choosing it as their flower 
representatives. The early recon- 
struetionists and James the second 
had thistles engraved on their jewlry. 

The rose has been chosen as the 
emblem of England, and the flag of 
Great Britain has a rose, thistle and 
shamrock entwined as representative 
of its three greatest powers, Eng- 
land, Scotland and Ireland. Dur- 
ing the War of the Roses the sol- 
diers of the house of stewart wore 
white roses and those of the house 
of Lancaster wild ones, so the rose 
was adopted as the emblem flower 
in the fifteenth century. 

The little country of Wales tells 
an interesting story of why they 
chose the unattractive leek as their 
emblem flower. While the brave 
Welshmen were fighting in A. D. 
G40, it is said, that the soldiers pick- 
ed the leaves from the wild leeks 
found grrowing everywhere and 
placed them in their caps to dis- 
guise themselves. This camouflage 
was so successful that they were vic- 
torious, and ever since the Welsh 
wear leeks on Saint David's day, 
the first of March. Sometimes, some 
of the peasants plant leeks on their 
cottage roofs, believing that it is a 
protection against lightning. The 
plant grows from ten to twelve 
inches high and has greenish-white 



20 



THE UPLIFT 



or purple flowers that do not appear 
till alter tht leaves have died down. 
Landscape gardeners sometimes plant 
them in neat patterns, which from 
a distance resemble a painting. 

■ I ust why the Mexicans chose no- 
pal cactus or prickly as their em- 
blem flower is not known. The plant 
is also known as Indian fig, and the 
stem is composed of many joints, 
covered with small awl-shaped leaves 
that are usually deciduous, and in 
the axils of which are found clus- 
tered barbed bristles and sometimes 
prickly spines. The Sowers are yel- 
low and only open in the sunshine. 

The sugar maple has been chosen 
by Canada as its emblem. It is a 
beautiful tree, whose sap is made in- 
to the appetizing' syrup that tastes 
so good. Canada's national song al- 
so immortalizes this handsome tree, 
the chorus of the song being: 
"The Maple Leaf, our emblem dear, 

The Maple Leaf forever ! 
God save our King, and heaven bless 

The Maple Leaf forever!" 

Just why 'beautiful Switzerland 
chose the edelwiss is not known. 
Persia has also chosen the rose as its 
emblem, and every year holds a great 
feast of roses, in which eveything pos- 
sible is decked with roses. Because 
Japan is the real home of the chrys- 
anthemums, and is known as the 
"Land of the Chrysanthemum," this 
queen of the autumn garden has been 
chosen as the national emblem. Vio- 
lets are of great importance in Greece, 
so this modest little flower has been 
their choice of an emblem. Italy be- 
ing the true home of the most mag- 
nificent water lilies has made its 
choice of this blossom for an emblem, 
and Spain has chosen the pomegra- 



nate. 

The fleur-de-lis is the flower em- 
blem of France, and many legends 
are related as to the origin of the 
emblem. It was King Charles the 
fifth who definitely fixed it on the 
French coat of arms as three golden 
fleur-de-lis on a blue field. As a com- 
pliment to the king his subjects 
adopted the habit of marking north 
on a mariner's compass card, with a 
i! e.ir-de-lis, and the practice stdl exists_ 
This flower stands for real achieve- 
ment in peace as in war and is sup- 
posed to have been first adopted as 
a national emblem by the Bourbons, 
after the reign of Napoleon. The 
plant has sword-shaped rush-like 
leaves and is extensively cultivated. 
The flower have the brilliancy and 
beauty of an orchid and have many 
shades and colors ranging from white 
and yellow to mauve, blue, purple and 
pink. "The rainbow flower" is has 
often been called, and is a fitting 
representative of the artistic nature 
of the French people. 

Because the lotus is always asso- 
ciated with the gods that they wor- 
ship, and is supposed to be a repre- 
sentative of wisdom, the Egyptians 
chose the lotus as their emblem. The 
flower fairly throbs with the mystery 
and orientalism that makes Egypt 
such a strange, fascinating place. As 
Winter said in his beautiful poem 
"A Lotus Flower:" 

"And every secret Nature told, 
Of golden wisdom 's power ; 

Is nestled still in every fold 
Within the lotus flower!" 

Pagan India believeing that the 
lotus is sacred because Brahma, the 
Supreme. Being that they worship, 
was born in its bosom, has also chos- 



THE UPLIFT 



27 



en it as their emblem. Lotus are 
found in great beds along the Nile 
and neighboring streams, and often 
the white, purple or rose colored 
flowers grows a foot in diamenter. 
They grow on weak stalks four to 
eight feet long, but the giant flowers 
are only raised a few inches from the 
surface of the water. The beautiful 
drak green leaves are wide and 
spreading, looking like a fairy boats 
floating on the warm sluggish streams. 
A pretty story is told how the 
kaiserblume know in America as 
corn-flower or bachelor's buttons, was 
chosen as the flower emblem of Ger- 
many. When the army of Napoleon 
held Berlin, Louise, the queen mother 



of the Emporor William the first, tak- 
ing refuge outside of the city, com- 
forted and cheered the children by 
weaving garlands of kaiserblumen, 
which they enjoyed picking for her. 
When the garlands were finished the 
children and queen wore them. 

The United 8tates has chosen the 
regal golden rod as its emblem, over 
eighty spices of this family being found 
growing in this country. As Andrew 
Downing has written so appropriate- 
ly: 
"The goldenrod, a Grecian torch, 

Will light the splendid scene, 
When autumn comes in all the pomp 

And glory of a queen " 



MAN'S DOMINION. 

By W. S. Rankin, M. D. 



Man's Conquest of Nature 
It is written, "And God said, Let 
us make man in our imagte, after our 
likeness, and let them have domin- 
ion over the fish of the sea, and over 
the foul of the air, and over the cat- 
tle, and over all the earth, and over 
every creeping thing that ereepeth 
upon the earth. ' ' This is the first com- 
mission given to man, a divine com- 
mission given man even before his 
creation. Moreover, it is a commis- 
sion that partakes of that "likeness" 
in which man was created. The cre- 
ator, in giving the creature the com- 
mission to live over and not under 
nature lifted, as the Psalmist has said 
the worm of the dust to a place but 
a little lower than the angles. 

It was not willed that man should 
assume instantly complete mastery 
over natural forces. The divine 
idea was that man should extend his 



dominion gradually but continuously 
over nature toward an ever increas- 
ing, more compl/ete and perfect ex- 
ercise of power. 

In the Beginning and Now 
To fully appreciate the extent to 
which this great primary commis- 
sion has been compiled with, we need 
to realize as fully as possible, to the 
stretching point of our imagina- 
tions, what man had to start with 
as compared with what he now has. 
Many of the simple things that we 
are likely to take as a matter of 
fact, to feel instinctly that they 
have always existed, have signalized 
great achievements in the advance- 
ment of man's dominion over nature. 
Take so simple a thing as fire and 
what fire means in its domestic uses, 
in the preparation and the steriliza- 
tion of food, in bodily comfort and 
cleanliness; what fire means in the 



THE UPLIFT 



commercial world in manufacturing 
and transportation. The discovery 
of fire and the elaboration of that 
discovery into its many and compli- 
cated uses represents a tremendous 
extension of the dominion of man. 
Again, take so matter of fact a thing 
as a wheel, which has been said to be 
the greatest single invention. When 
one reflects upon the part it plays in 
transportation and manufacture and 
the relation of these two to civiliza- 
tion, to the freeingof man from physi- 
cal slavery and the giving of time to 
him for thinking and developing the 
nervous and spiritual elements of his 
life, one can well agree that the in- 
vention of the wheel is one of the 
greatest of all discoveries. The chim 
ney, which we instinctively feel al- 
ways existed, represented a very def- 
inite step in the advancement of 
man's dominion over, nature. The 
smoky, dirty, malodorous cave and hut 
became much more habitable when 
the chimney came and carried away 
the smoke, the order, and the devital- 
izing air. The discovery and use of 
window glass to keep out the cold 
and to let the rays of the sun into 
an otherwise dajrk hovel meant a 
great stride in man's conquest of 
his surroundings. Perhaps greater 
than all of these was the develop- 
ment of a language and an alphabet 
by which knowledge was made cumu- 
lative, Without written language, 
knowledge died with each generation 
except for that small fraction 
which was transmitted by tradition; 
without an alphabet, knowledge re- 
mained circumscribed in location 
moving with leaden feet from one 
small community to another instead 
of generalizing itself throughout tho 



world with the speed of the light- 
ning. 

Rate of Advancement 

In man's enlarging dominion 
progress has increased its rate with 
each new conquest. It has been said on 
high authority that the race travelled 
farther in the last hundred years 
than in the twenty thousand years 
between the stone age and the age of 
cultivation, and that the race trav- 
elled farther in the last hundred 
years than it did in the three thou- 
sand years between ancient Egypt 
and the Revolutionary war. We rea- 
lize something of the rate of progress 
during the last hundred years when 
we recall that the first steam-driv- 
en machinery came in 1785, about 
one hundred and forty years ago; 
that the first locomotive came in 
1804 and the first railroad in 
1825, a little less than one hun- 
dred years ago; that the first steam 
boat was built in 1802; that the Cler- 
mont steamed upon the Hudson "in 
1807; that the first ocean-going steam- 
er steamed out of Savannah, Georgia, 
in 1819; that the telegraph came in 
1835; the ocean cable in 1851; that 
the Bessemer process for steel mak- 
ing came in 1856; that electric light, 
electric transmission, that is, the 
sending of power, came almost with- 
in our own g-eneration, within the 
eighties and nineties of the last cen- 
tury; that the gasoline engine, which 
has made possible the automobile 
and the flying machine, came in the 
eighties, and the airplane practically 
in the last fiften years. So we move 
and have our beings more and ever- 
more in the creative likeness of the 
Creator Himself. 

Man's dominion over the forces of 



THE UPLIFT 



29 



disease and death has been gained 
largely in the last fifty years; more 
strictly speaking, in the last thirty or 
thirty-fivif, j^ears. While the eon- 
quest of disease and, through disease, 
the conquest of death itself is strik- 
ingly evident in the history of the 
last quarter of a century, it is easy 
to see, looking back through the his- 
tory of the last three or four cen- 
turies, that the beginnings, in accord- 
ance with which later events shaped 
themselves, were in the past, several 
centuries back, and that the conquest 
of disease is associated with and close- 
ly related to the conquest of nature 
in general. 

The oldest authentic records that 
we have as to the average duration 
of life show that about four hun- 
dred years ago the average age at 
death was twenty-three years, [n 
1F00, that is in about three hun- 
dred years, seven years had been 
added to the twenty-three, and the 
average age at death was thirty years. 
In 1900, the average age at death 
was forty-two years. Now, in 1924, 
the average child born has an expect- 
ancy of fifty-four years of life. 

In 1887, the French lost nearly one 
hundred lives for every thousand en- 
gaged in the work of digging the 
Panama Canal. When General Gor- 
gas took charge, the death rate, was 
sixty-five lives per year per thousand 
population. When General Gorgas 
finished, the death rate (that is, the 
number of deaths for each thousand 
of the poplation) for the Canal Zone 
was about eighteen, and for the labor- 
ers, over whom he had complete con- 
■rtol, the death rate was about nine. 
It may be remarked incidentally for 
the benefit of those who frequently 



compare the work of state and county 
health authorities with the standard 
achieved by General Gorgas that the 
work in Panama was carried on un- 
der military law which, of course, 
was a far more rigid control of con- 
ditions than is permitted under civic 
law. furthermore, the expenditure 
for health work in Panama was one 
cent per capita per day, 365 cents per 
capita per year, wheas the average 
county in the United States spends 
about 3 or 4 cents per capita per year 
on its public health. The 260 full-time 
county health departments spend 
about 25 or 30 cents per capita per 
year. The best financed city health 
department in the United Stages 
spends 97.4 cents per capita per 
year. It is true that public health, 
human life and health, is purchas- 
able; but if it is purchased it costs 
money. So much > in the nature of 
a pane.nth.etic remark. We were 
speaking about the evidence of man's 
conquest over disease. We recur to 
our theme. 

In 1890, when what we know as 
the era of preventive medicine really 
got out of the crawling stage find 
learned to stand and to walk alone, 
the death rate from tuberculosis in 
the United Sates was 245 deaths per 
1D0,000 population. Last year it 
was 100 .per 100,00 population. The 
typhoid death rate in 1890 was 46.5 
per 100,000 population. Last year 
it was around 12, in many cities un- 
der two. In 1890 the diphtheria 
death rate was 81 per 100,000. It 
is now 15. Measles, whooping cough, 
and scarlet fever have been cut down 
25 per cent since 1895. Infant mor- 
tality that is, deaths within the first 
year of life per thousand births, has 



30 



THE UPLIFT 



dropped from something like 150 lo 
89, Typhus fever and yellow fever, 
now largely diseases of history, prac- 
tically no longer exist. Smallpox 
that once caused one-tenth of all 
deaths now causes less than one-two- 



hundredths of all deaths. And so 
we see how, in obediance to his iirst 
great commission, man has oxceuded 
iiis dominion over nature, over dis- 
ease and death lis.df, toward an ever 
n^oi e abundant l.fe. 



INSTITUTION NOTES. 



By J. J. Jones, Jr. 



Rev. Mr. Gibson, Pastor of the 
Reformed Presbyterian church, of 
Concord, conducted the services last 
Sunday afternoon. 



Four of the new instruments which 
were ordered a few weeks ago have 
arrived at the school. The instru- 
ments are: two saxiphon.es and two 
cornets. 



The boys who were made happy 
by their relatives last Wednesday : 
Mack Wentz, Robert McDaniel, David 
Driver, Fleming Clinton, Herbert 
Flovd, Jack Stewart and Mark Jollv. 



The golden text of the Sunday 
school lesson last Sunday was, ''This 
is my beloved Son hear Him." A 
strong impression of the great, char- 
acter, Peter who gave up his. all and 
followed Jesus, was fixed firmly in 
the minds of the bovs. 



Two Prominent Official Visitors. 

The Training School had two dis- 
tinguished visitors Tuesday. Every- 
thing was quiet, and the boys were 
busy at work and in school when 
word was ''passed down the line'' 
that Representative Walter Murphy 



and State Senator Giles were in our/ 
midst. In as few minutes as it could 
be accomplished, the Training School 
band playing a welcome in the audi- 
torium, and the morning school sec- 
tion was being assembled by Prof. 
Johnson to render an impromptu 
program just to show these friends 
of the school that we were really 
and truly glad to see them. Of 
course, the main idea was to permit 
the boys to see and hear them, and 
they were given a rousing cheer 
coming and going when they were 
introduced by Superintendent Boger. 
They treated the boys to a sample 
of what real oratory can be when 
it is mingled with practical common 
sense, and gave the youngsters a 
most enjoyable and profitable half 
hour. They remained at the school 
for dinner and made a general in- 
spection of the place. They seemed 
to especially enjoy a military drill 
given by the boys after dinner, 
and were introduced to the boys from 
their respective counties. 



The band gave a concert in the 
Pavilion last Sunday afternoon. 
They did fine and the music was 
greatly enjoyed by everyone who 
heard it. 



RAILROAD SCHEDULE 
Northbound. 



No. 


136 


To 


Washington 


5:00 A. 


M. 


No. 


36 


To 


Washington 


10:25 A. 


M. 


No. 


46 


To 


Danville 


3:15 P. 


M. 


No. 


12 


To 


Richmond 


7:25' P. 


M. 


No. 


32 


To 


Washington 


8:28 P. 


M. 


No. 


38 


To 


Washington 


9:30 P. 


M. 


No. 


30 


To 


Washington 
Southbound. 


1:40 A. 


M. 


No. 


45 


To 


Charlotte 


4:14 P. 


M. 


No 


35 


To 


Atjanta 


10:06 P. 


M. 


No. 


29 


To 


Atlanta 


2:45 A. 


M. 


No. 


31 


To 


Augusta 


6:07 A. 


M. 


No. 


33 


To 


New Orleans 


8:27 A. 


M. 


No. 


11 


To 


Charlotte 


9:05 A. 


M. 


No. 


135 


To 


Atlanta 


9:15 P. 


M 



THE SOUTHERN SERVES THE SOUTH 




*~~ 



THE IfcfJSZ' 




VOL. XIII CONCORD, N. C, DECEMBER 6, 1924 



A A ♦£*>♦« »JnJ« >♦* >** >Jt ♦■*« **■« *J» «j» «$• >*•• *J»*J* ♦*+ *J* **•* «$**Jt *Jnj» *J» *Jt *J» *J+ *J« *J* *Jt ♦}• *Jt t$t*J« »J* »J»»}»'$>*Jt*J*»J* 

BUILDS NO TEMPLES. I 

I $ 

* A rocking-chair and a newspaper on a Sunday * 
♦:* morning in a cozy room before a cheerful fire may % 

5 make the head of the family comfortable, but it *£ 
%. never yet helped to build a church. The radio may * 
% bring to your house a rich musical treat, and you ♦ 

* may feel more like flinging yourself on a couch and .> 

* enjoying it than walking half a dozen blocks to t> 

6 church, but the easy way will never dot the land * 
% with temples. * 

* % 



-PUBLISHED BY- 



THE PRINTING CLASS OF THE STONEWALL JACKSON MANUAL 
TRAINING AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL 



EOARD OF TRUSTEES 

J. P. Cook, Chairman Concord Mrs. G. T. Roth, Elkin 
Miss Easdale Shaw, Vice-Chairman Herman Cone, Greensboro 

Rockingham Mrs. Cameron Morrison, Raleigh 

Jno. J. Blair, Sec, Raleigh Mrs. A. L. Coble, Statesville 

D. B. Coltrane, Treas., Concord Mrs. T. W. Bickett, Raleigh 

J. S. Efird, Albemarle Mrs. W. N. Reynolds, Winston- Salem 

Mr. Chas. A. Cannon, Concord Mrs. I. W. Faison, Charlotte 

Rev. Tom P. Jimison, Spencer Mr. Paul Whitlock, Charlotte 

Mrs. W. H. S. Burgwyn, Honorary Member 
Chas. E. Boger, Supt. 



CONTENTS. 



EDITORIAL COMMENT 3-10 
THE OUTSTANDING INSTITUTION IN THE GALAXY 

OF NORTH CAROLINA'S AID TO HUMANITY 

Old Hurrygraph 11 

SAMMY James Hay, Jr. 15 

THE LIFE OF HIGHWAYS Ben Dixon MaeNeill 18 

THE BANKER OUTSIDE OF THE BANK 

J. M. Broughton 22 

WITH US ON THANKSGIVING 26 

INSTITUTION NOTES J. J. Jones, Jr. 27 

HONOR ROLL "28 



Kf*» T 



THE USfe/'T 



VOL. XIII CONCORD, N. C, JANUARY 3, 1925 No. 6 



! WE HAVE THE CHOICE. ! 

♦ * 

i* t 

j£ As we travel the way of life, we have the choice, * 

* according to our working, of turning all the voices *> 
.♦. of Nature into one song of rejoicing, and all her ♦> 

* lifeless creatures into a glad company, whereof the % 

* meanest shall be beautiful in our eyes, by its kind * 

* message, or of withering and quenching her sympathy ♦> 
£ into a fearful, withdrawn silence of condemnation, »;♦ 

* or into a crying out of her stones, and a shaking of *;* 
her dust against us. — John Ruskin. ♦> 



♦ 



V *J* *♦+ *t? *$* *$» »♦* *♦* *■+■* *♦* *♦* *♦* *J* *♦■• *♦* »♦* *** *** ""t 4 *** *♦■* *♦■• *** *** *♦* *♦■* *♦* *♦* *♦■* **■* *•♦* **■* "♦* *♦* *+* *** *5* *$• *♦* *♦* *♦* *$*■' 



-PUBLISHED BY- 



THE PRINTING CLASS OF THE STONEWALL JACKSON MANUAL 
TRAINING AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



J. P. Cook, Chairman, Concord 

Miss Easdale Shaw, Vice-Chairman 

Rockingham 
Jno. J. Blair, Sec, Raleigh 
D. B. Coltrane, Treas., Concord 
J. S. Efird, Albemarle 
Mr. Chas. A. Cannon, Concord 
Rev. Tom P. Jimison, Spencer 



Mrs. G T. Roth, Elkin 

Herman Cone, Greensboro 

Mrs. Cameron Morrison, Raleigh 

Mrs. A. L. Coble, Statesville 

Mrs. T. W. Bickett, Raleigh 

Mrs. W. N. Reynolds, Winston-Salem 

Mrs. I. W. Faison, Charlotte 

Mr. Paul Whitlock, Charlotte 



Mrs. W. H. S. Burgwyn, Honorary Member 
Chas. E. Boger, Supt. 



CONTENTS. 



EDITORIAL COMMENT 3-8 

A CHRISTMAS BIRTH; A CHRISTMAS DEATH 

James A. Robinson ,9 

THE SPIRIT THAT COUNTS A. L. Whitson 10 

RESOLUTIONS James Hay, Jr. 17 

SANTFOR MARTIN AND HIS LITTLE PARTNERS 

Winston-Salem Journal 19 

WHEN PEOPLE FORGET THEIR BANK ACCOUNTS 

Harry Van Demark 21 

HERE'S OUR RECORD 23 

EIGHTY-TWO YEARS YOUNG 26 

THE HINDU WIDOW SPEAK Alpha Fisher Thomas 27 

INSTITUTION NOTES J. J. Jones, Jr. 30 



The Uplift 



A WEEKLY JOURNAL 



PUBLISHED BY 



The Authority of the Stonewall Jackson Manual Training and Industrial 

School. Tyue-setting by the Boys Printing Class. Subscription 

Two Dollars the Year in Advance 

JAMES P. COOK, Editor, J. C. FISHER, Director Printing Department 



Entered as second-class matter Dec. 4, 1920 at the Post Office at Concord, 
N. C. under act of March 3, 1879. Acceptance for mailing at special rate 
of 4, 1923. 



NEW YEAR'S GREETING TO ONE AND ALL: 

As you climb the hill of prosperity during 1925, as you deserve, so to do, 
may you never meet a friend. 

* * fc * * « * * # * * * 

GOBBLED 'EM UP. 

One most pleasing fact, among others, was made clear in the local neighbor- 
hood during the past Christmas season. Heretofore the subjects for the 
exercise of the Christmas spirit by way of "Opportunities" passed the hun- 
dred mark in number, and the aggregate number of needy ones in these op- 
portunities reached into the hundreds. 

This past season the "opportunities" did not pass the half hundred mark 
and the total number of the needy ones did not exceed two hundred. This 
shows a gratifying material condition of the community, whicli surpasses that 
of a year ago ; or the system of making a thorough investigation of the 
worthiness of the cases by the County Welfare Officer, under the direction of 
the local circle of the King's Daughters, caused only the real needy cases 
to offer for assistance. In either event, the situation is improved and is, 
therefore, most gratifying. The Uplift had occasion, also, to note the most 
patient and efficient aid of Miss Lucy Richmond Lentz, who helped to 
make the handling of the "Opportunities" go off so smoothly. 

But we started out to tell how two men gobbled 'em up. At a meeting of 



4 THE UPLIFT 

the Kiwanis Club, just before the Yuletide, certain of the opportunities 
not taken were called to the attention of the Club by Kiwanian Tracy Spencer. 
Something like a dozen were in this list. And as they were called out Caleb 
Swink and Charlie Smart (they are never mistered in the Club without a fine 
is exacted) gobbled every one before others could put in a bid. But the 
large membership in attendance were made most happy to see two of its mem- 
bers so radiantly happy in putting into action their safety valves for relief 
of their overcharge of the Christmas spirit that was in their bones. 
What an influence the story of the Christ Child has on normal man! 

A MEAN HANDICAPPING SIN. 

This is the time that many men and women feel called upon to make some 
resolutions. There is possibly not a living soul that did not on New Tear's 
Day secretly, perhaps taking a friend into confidence, make some kind of a 
resolution to mend certain defects among the many that are so afflicted. And 
this is the third day of January 1925 and we dare say that many of the very 
positive resolutions made just three days ago have already been broken. 

This is to be regretted ; but after all good has resulted, for the act of 
making the resolution was the result of a self-examination and a secret if 
not a public acknowledgement that the fault was personally possessed and 
recognized. By and by the resolution will again be registered, perhaps at 
Easter, on a birth day, or July 4th, or at Thanksgiving — if not at either of 
these times, perhaps before the final dissolution, when strength may have 
been gained to enable the builder of the resolution to stand victor. 

Speaking of New Year's resolutions brings one to think of the most pre- 
valent faults of men and women. Jealousy, envy and back-biting are the 
meanest, most cowardly of them all. Any old thing, discredited by acquaint- 
ances and even his own family, can make things miserable by the exercise 
of his jealous and envious spirit and engage in a back-biting and black- 
guarding that is even repulsive to those that occasionally enjoy gossipping. 

Jealousy and envy accomplish nothing — get you nowhere — and finally is 
the agency that leads up to the unhappy state of snarling, snapping cynicism. 
Among the New Year's resolutions let jealousy and envy and back-biting be 
aiven a deserved rebuke. 



* * * * « 



"THE SPIRIT THAT COUNTS." 

The very foundation of civilization and the success of human families and 



THE UPLIFT 5 

the glory of a people are to be found in examples such as exhibited in the 
story of "The spirit that counts," which appears elsewhere in this issue. 
One cannot read this engaging story of a manly young fellow taking the 
place of his father and playing so successfully the part of the head of a 
family of orphaned children, without feeling that there is lots of goodness 
in action everywhere. 

The bad among us, the frivolous, the idle, the careless and the wicked, re- 
ceive so much prominence in newspaper space and in the gossip feasts that 
carry on where serious things do not interest, one is sometimes inclined to 
believe that the world has lost its compass and is going at a rapid rate devil- 
ward. What if the papers would tell more stories wherein ' ' The spirit that 
counts" is exemplified; and if the kind and helpful deeds of men towards 
less fortunate ones would become the theme among the loungers on the 
streets and at public places — would we not come to believe that the old world 
is growing better and progressing along safe and sane lines? 

There are (we are certain from a close and intimate knowledge of the 
diamonds in the rought we have met in a ten year sojourn in the rural dis- 
tricts) lots of Thadoas Kingsleys today, as in the past, doing men's part out 
in the valleys, in the mountain coves, in the sticks and backway spots — 
many of them in the past have found their way to the towns and cities, 
filling a majority of the positions in industrial, commercial and religious ac- 
tivities. Stop and note the number of Thadoas Kingsleys who are making- 
things happen and go in your neighborhood. 

************ 

THE OCCASION MET. 

The papers, daily and weekly, have for the past several days given us 

splendid accounts of how their people met Christmas and its opportunities. 

How they approached the matter in a majority of instances of seeing that 

the poor and unfortunate were provided with Christmas cheer, was itself a 

1 cheer to him that fully realizes the significance of the glorious season. 

Down at Raleigh they have a working Rotary Club — it is made up of fine- 
spirited, red-blooded men. As their opportunity they adopted the two large 
convict camps of Wake county. Forty of these fine men met at the Confed- 
erate Monument on Christmas morn, divided the bunch int» two squads, one 
headed by Col. Olds and the other by editor John Parks. Loaded with those 
things that play a part in the regular Christmas gifts they proceeded to the 
camps. There they met the unfortunate population of the camps as human, 



6 THE UPLIFT 

fellow being's, and began the glorious work of trying to carry some cLeei 1 ' 
into their miserable souls, by gifts, cordial fellowship and songs and Christ- 
mas stories. 

Somebody at a certain period in the history of the world made this obsei - 
vation, ' ' I was in jail, and you visited me not. ' ' This suggests a command : 
and those who sought to be obedient to an implied injunction were clearly 
on their rights with no suggestion of butting in. Men, however, differ — they' 
have different visions and impulses; some seem to have none. 

Throughout the state this Christmas seems to have been one of gT f t 
cheer; and many there were, we make bold to believe, saw for the 'fiist 
time the true significance of the event. 

* * * * t i t i 

TRANSFERRED TO ANOTHER ROUTE. 

Smiling and alert in the face of every kind of weaker, he rode rural route No. 
6 daily, excepting Sunday, for over twenty years. He was always cheerful 
accommodating and efficient. Everybody at the Training School esteemed 
liim and counted him a choice friend, who brought letters, papers, boxes and 
all kinds of mail matter just as regular as the clock marked the hour. 

We all mourn the passing of Mr. William H. Heglar, the rural route car- 
rier that had ridden the route, that passes this institution, ever since we 
have been in existence. The genial and enthusiastic soul has been transferred 
by a High Power to another route, and we entertain no doubts that the fine 
fellow is now enjoying the rewards of an earnest and faithful life in a 
territory not afflicted with the trials, and skids, the weather and a jungle 
of poorly addressed mail. Up to his dying hour he had us in mind — we shall 
not forget him. 

Mr. Heglar died on the morning of the 30th at the Concord Hospital, where 
he had been under treatment for a stubborn and what proved an incurable 
disease, which doubtless his exposure and trials brought on. And yet there 
are people that begrudge a living and decent remuneration to these faithful- 
agents of the government. 

• i i ' $ # 3t # 4* # $ * - 

PUBLIC GRATITUDE. 

"Archibald Henderson Boyden High School" sounds mighty good — good, 
because it is so seldom that a community rises to the point of doing full jus- 
tice to ^he actpr in a .faithful and. sacrificing service to his community. Salis- 
bury does herself proud and honors herself in having the new handsome 



THE UPLIFT 7 

' igj,; school building named for Col. Boyden, who for years had given a loyal and 
wise s.-rvice to the public schools of his city. Of course, the people of today 
and those who follow will come to call the school "Baldy Boyden School," 
for that is the affectionate appellation that the hosts of friends and admirers 
of this choice spirit among us always speak of him. 

The completion of this splendid building and its proper naming is an 
event in educational affairs of the state. 

A NEW PRESIDENT. 

JLis.-> Edith Vanderbilt, who has successfully directed the affairs of the 
£ at'; Fair during the past two years, declined a re-election to this responsible 
position. The whole state, just as one person, turned its eyes to one man 
in Cleveland county as the fitting and proper successor to Mrs. Vanderbilt. 
That man is Hon. 0. Max Gardner. 

He was unanimously elected to the presidency and has accepted. A fine 
and successful business man, an outstanding lawyer and a powerfully suc- 
cessful farmer is this most popular North Carolinian. He will fill the bill to 
the satisfaction of all. 

* * * * * * * * * * * * 

The election of Dr. E. W. Sykes, one of North Carolina's many proud prod- 
ucts, to the presidency of Clemson College of South Carolina, reminds us of 
a terrible plight that would be the condition of South Carolina and Virginia 
if it were not for North Carolina. What would they do without he Old 
Norh State? Alderman at the head of the great University of Virginia; Pell 
at Converse; White at Anderson Seminary; and a score of others having gone 
to the rescue of these two neighbors in various great endeavors, express the 
prowess of the dearly beloved state that, quoting the late beloved Ayeock, is 
coming down the road ' ' with her head over the moon, her tail over the dash- 
board, a-hitting of the ground only at high places." 

******** 

THE BOYS' CHRISTMAS FUND. 

Mr. A. W. Klemme, Hight Point $ 5.00 

Mr. Herman Cone, Greensboro 25.00 

Stonewall Jackson Junior Circle of King's Daughters, Concord, 5.00 

Standard Buick Company, Concord 5.00 

Silver Cross Circle, King's Daughters, Concord 5.00 

Stonewall Jackson Circle, King's Daughters Senior, Concord 10.00 



THE UPLIFT 



F. M. Young-blood & Co., Concord 




10.00 


Dr. A. F. Mahoney, Monroe 




25.00 


E. B. Grady, Concord 




25.00 


Ritchie Hardware Co., Concord 




10.00 


W. B. Ward & Co., Concord 




25.00 


Lady whose name begins with "E" 




5.00 


Mrs. J. M. Odell 


crate of oranges 




Parks Manufacturing Co. 




5.00 


Wilse W. Martin 




15.00 


Hoover's, Concord 




5.00 


R. S. Huntington 




5.00 


H. I. TVoodhouse 




5.00 


Hardaway-Hecht 


Raisins and Candy 




Mrs. C. E. Boger 




10.00 


D. B. Coltrane 




25.00 


W. J. Swink 




10.00 


Silver Cross Circle King's Daughters, 


Rockingham 


10.00 


Rev. T. W. Smith 




2.00 


Mrs. J. W. Cannon 




25.00 


A. H. Boyden 




5.00 


10-13-8 




50.00 


Kiwanis Club 




37.65 


J. A. B. Goodman 




5.00 


Ed Mellon Co. 




10.00 



S^-.*^ 



THE UPLIFT 

A CHRISTMAS BIRTH; A CHRISTMAS DEATH. 

(By James A. Robinson.) 

Broadcasted from the Studio of Santa Clans, Station DEC. 25. 

"Stand by"— "listen in," little dears, 
And barken to tbe story I'm bringing; 

It bas come down two thousand years, 

And that is wby Christmas bells are ringing. 

Angels touched their harps of gold, 

At night, while bending o'er the peaceful earth, 

And to the watchful shepherd's told 

The most joyous news of a Messiah's birth. 

'Twas to a manger, lowly made ; 

Brightest of stars guided them on their way — 
They found to human view display 'd 

The Holy babe who is the Lord today. 

A Christmas Death. 

'Twas a week before Christmas day, dearie, 

With sweet joy beaming o'er his face, 
A little child scribbled letters cheerie, 

And mailed them in the fire place. 

Kris Kringle was a merry, good old soul — 

He read those letters with a gleam; 
He brought to that dear little child four-fold 

Of toys, like in a fairy dream. 

The little one babbled with joy on things 

Old Santa would place on his bed — 
But on Christmas morn, when an angel sings, 

That little heart was still — was dead. 

So, on this Happy Christmas morn, 

Little dears, this is my memory story — 

While to us the Christ-Child was born, 
Another dear babe went back to glory. 



10 



THE UPLIFT 



THE SPIRIT THAT COUNTS. 

By A. L. Whitson in Young Folks. 



The last rays of a dull December 
sun fell softly over the world as 
Thadoas Kingsley, in a self-made 
skeeter, went skimming along the 
country road that led from the thriv- 
ing little city of Chattanooga, to his 
home in the foothills of the Cumber- 
lands. 

Thadoas, commonly known as Thad, 
was an employee of Fulton's Auto 
Repair Company, whose reputation 
for long hours exceeded any other 
shop in the whole city. But regard- 
less of that fact, Thad preferred liv- 
ing in the country. Not that he had 
anything especially attractive to live 
in when he got there, but he loved 
the hills; loved to live among them, 
and he loved the little hillside farm 
which his father had left him to look 
after, when he died some five years 
ago. The little hillside farm, how- 
ever, wasn't all that Thad's father 
left for him to look after, for be- 
sides the farm he left a frail little 
mother and three small brothers, for 
the eldest son to take care of. And 
Thad, an honorable son, of an honor- 
able father, accepted the obligation 
to the best of his ability; and today, 
as he raced along the winding coun- 
try road, his brain was awhirl with 
plans for the future. 

Tom and Ben, the eldest of the 
three brothers, would finish high 
school with the coming spring. Then 
it was planned that Tom would take 
over the little farm; Ben would be- 
come a chemist in a laboratory in the 
city, and Ray, the youngest, should 
have a college education and become 
a lawyer. Thad had always wanted 



his family name to stand out for 
something more than a mere farmer, 
and through Ray, he expected his 
ambitions to be fulfilled. 

Suddenly he rounded a curve in 
the road and for a moment he al- 
lowed the little racer to slow down. 

"God must have been in a wonder- 
fully beautiful creative mood when 
he made you," he murmured aloud, 
as his eyes rested on the great tow- 
ering crage of Lookout Mountain. To 
the imaginative mind of the youth, 
the mountain smiled back an affirma- 
tive answer. Then stepping on the 
gas with a generous pressure the lit- 
tle car moved forward again. Not 
until he reached the gate of his own 
little mountain home did he stop. 

But long before he reached the 
house, however, he knew something 
was wrong. The unusual sight of his 
mother walking up and clown the long 
gallery that ran the full length of 
the old-fashioned house, on such a 
blustery day, was quite enough to 
tell him so. As he neared the house, 
he saw her making her way down the 
narrow walk that led to the entrance. 

' ' What 's the matter, mumsy, 
dear?" he exclaimed anxiously, as he 
sprang from the little ear to her 
side. z 

"Oh, Thad, Thad," she murmured 
hoarsely, "somehing dreadful has 
happened ! Your Uncle Tom Kings- 
ley, of Oklahoma, is dead, and his 
last wish on earth was that we would 
take his three orphan children to live 
with us." 

"Three children to live with us, 
mumsy ! ' ' Thad exclaimed in amaze- 



THE UPLIFT 



11 



merit. "Why the idea is absurd. 
Surely he didn't know that it is tak- 
ing every penny I can rake and scrape 
to take care of my immediate 
family. ' ' 

"That's what puzzles me, Thad," 
the mother answered, as she drew her 
son's arm about her waist and moved 
slowly toward the house. "You 
know, he was here last summer and 
saw with his own eyes the responsi- 
bility on your young shoulders, and 
yet, his dying request is that we take 
his three motherless children into our 
home." 

"Let me think, mother, let me 
think," the boy murmured huskily, 
as he dropped into an old-fasLioned 
chair that stood beside the low, wide 
window on the left of the open fire- 
place. 

Mother Kingsley made no reply, but 
passing into the small kitchen that 
adjoined the living room of the old 
farmhouse, began the preparations of 
a substantial supper. Thad always 
insisted that the family have a good 
six o'clock meal, and some way, some- 
how, there were always the necessities 
to provide such a meal in the Kings- 
ley pantry. 

Presently the door swung open to 
admit Ray. One glance at the bow- 
ed head of his brother brought the 
youngster scurrying across the floor. 

"What's the matter, Thad?" he 
asked anxiously, as he dropped to 
his knees beside the youth who stood 
as a father to him. 

Thad dropped his hand on his 
young brother's head and looking 
down at him smiled wanly. "I guess 
your brother is something of a cad, 
Ray," he said presently, "to feel 
inclined to shirk a responsibility, but 



he feels like that nevertheless." 

"My brother isn't anything of the 
sort," responded Ray, admiringly. 
"My brother, Thad, never shirked a 
responsibility in his whole life and I 
know he never will, so there. ' ' And 
striking him a friendly blow on the 
shoulders, Ray arose and marched 
away in the direction his mother had 
gone. From her he learned the see- 
ret of Thad's worried expression. 

"I call him a nervy scoundrel," 
Ray exclaimed, when he understood 
the meaning of his uncle's request 
fully, ' ' that 's what I call him ! ' ' 

' ' It would be a great added expense 
to Thad," mother Kingsley said 
thoughtfully. ' ' A great expense. I 
can 't see how he 's going to do it. ' ' 

' • What 's the trouble, mumsy V a 
fresh voice interrupted, and turning, 
Mrs. Kingsley beheld both Tom and 
Ben standing on the threshold. 

' ' We came by our traps, ' ' Ben 
explained pleasantly, "therefore re- 
turned home through the back gate. 
And mumsy," Ben whispered, soft- 
ly, ' ' we 've captured a peach of a 
turkey for Christmas. He just walk- 
ed into the trap we had laid for him 
and without harm or injury of any 
sort, and we 're going to surprise 
Thad. Now, don't you tell him. 
You just tell him to leave the meat 
for our Christmas dinner for you to 
decide on, and we'll give him the 
surprise of his life. ' ' 

"All right," Mother Kingsley ans- 
wered sweetly, "though I am afraid 
it would take more than a turkey 
to revive Thad 's spirits just now. ' ' 

Carefully, minutely, Mother Kings- 
ley related what had taken place, and 
that Thad was trying to make up his 
mind what to do about the matter. 



12 



THE UPLIFT 



' ' Let 's don 't interfere, Tom, ' ' Ben 
said slowly. "He is the head of the 
house and whatever he says, goes 
with me. 

' ' I don 't feel that way about it, 
Ben, ' ' Tom replied quickly. ' ' I think 
it 's a downright shame and thought- 
lessness on Uncle Tom's part to put 
such a responsibility on Thad. He 
knew how things stood here at home. 
Now, if it were next year, instead of 
this, I could see some chance of grant- 
ing his request, for both Ben and I 
will be at work by then and could 
help Thad with the proposition. As 
it is, he has our schooling expenses 
piling up on him with all the rest of 
his troubles. It's just out of the 
question; we can't do it!" 

' ' Here Tom, ' ' Mother Kingsley in- 
terrupted, "take this pail and run 
along to the barn. Old Snow won't 
understand why she isn't being milk- 
ed. And you, Ben, better run along 
and feed the other livestock. Be 
sure," she cautioned, as the boys 
moved through the kitchen door, ' ' to 
put a little extra hay in the pig' 
shelter for the baby pigs." 

"I'll fix the table mother," Ray 
said as soon as the door closed be- 
hind his brothers, "and then I'll run 
out and put Thad's little car away. 
He seems to have forgotten every- 
thing tonight." 

' ' Don 't disturb him, son, ' ' the 
mother answered sweetly. "He is 
trying to solve this unexpected prob- 
lem that has fallen upon him. Your 
father was like that, Ray, only he al- 
ways took his troubles to the moun- 
tains to fight them out alone." 

Finally the outsidfc chores were 
over and dinner was served, the 
dishes put away, and still no word 



from Thad concerning the decision 
his hour of meditation had brought 
him. But at last, when the little 
family had assembled about the big 
living room, he looked up from the 
pages of the evening paper and smiled 
at his mother. 

"I know, son," she said, without 
wailing for him to speak, "what 
your decision is. ' ' 

"Yes, mother," he responded 
huskily, "we must take them." 

' ' Thadoas Kingsley, ' ' exclaimed 
Tom, excitedly, you are perfectly 
foolish to take on such an added 
responsibillity ! The State of Okla- 
homa, no doubt, provides homes for 
its destitute inhabitants. Why should 
you bring Uncle Tom's children here 
to take up the extra space in our 
home, and right now, of all times, 
to spoil our Christmas?" 

Thad looked at his brother for a 
moment in silence. "Come, Tom," 
he said, in a tender tone of voice, 
"you didn't mean that. That ex- 
pression really didn't come from the 
heart of a real mountaineer. You 
were thinking of me altogether. Now 
f ess up. ' ' 

Tom hung his head, then moved 
across the floor to Thad's side. "You 
are right, Thad," he said weakly. "I 
was thinking of you, but you've been 
the spirit of generosity and unsel- 
fishness to us, and somehow I just 
can't stand to see you burdened down 
again with care, just at a time when 
we are on the verge of relieving you 
of some of it, at least." 

" It 's the spirit in which we do a 
thing, Tom, that counts," said the 
elder brother, ' ' and while I know 
it is going to mean a sacrifice on the 
part of us all, there's no way getting 



THE UPLIFT 



13 



around one 's duty, so the family must 
take on its increase in number. Any- 
way, won't it be nice to have a girl 
around the place? Just think of hav- 
ing a sister to love and take care 
of." 

"Well, since you've mentioned it, 
it doesn 't sound bad, ' ' Ben interrupt- 
ed, "but one thing sure, I'm going to 
sell that silver fox fur before she 
comes, or else it will be good-bye 
fur. The girls on this side of the 
city have wanted it, but I shall turn 
it into a nifty suit before Cousin 
Margie arrives. ' ' 

"Wait till you see her, Ben," Ray 
interrupted. "She might be worth 
doing without a suit for, and just 
think what a lovely Christmas gift 
that fur would make for a pretty 
girl. ' ' 

' ' Like as not, she 's as ugly as sin, ' ' 
Ben declared solemnly, "but either 
way, she doesn 't get the silver fox. ' ' 

' ' It will be finished in a few days, 
son," Mother Kingsley chimed in. 
' ' I have the lining almost complet- 
ed." 

"I'll take it to the city just as soon 
as it is finished, mother," answered 
Ben, "thought I think I'd make more 
money to wait till just a few days 
before Christmas, don't you?" 

' ' No doubt you would, ' ' the woman 
responded, "for beautiful things al- 
ways appeal to us most around Christ- 
mas time. 'Tis then we all want to 
be millionaires." 

"And instead of that, you only 
have this to play on," said Thad, lay- 
ing a ten-dollar bill on his mother's 
lap as he spoke. "That's all you 
can have to spend on the entire 
family this year, mumsy, dear," the 
boy continued, "ALL." 



' ' That 's enough, ' ' Mother Kingsley 
replied, as she patted the son's hand 
gently, "quite enough. We'll make 
up in spirit what we lack in gifts, 
won't we?" 

"That's the idea!" shouted Ray. 
"We'll have a happy Christmas in 
spite of things. Maybe after all they 
won't be a bad lot, and big families 
are alright after they grow up. 

' ' Yes, ' ' interrupted Ben, ' ' all 
right if they don't starve before they 
get grown. 

"How's the cellar, mother," in- 
quired Thad pleasantly, "enough of 
what 's down there, with a bit to 
spare ? ' ' 

' ' Plenty of potatoes, canned fruit 
and red apples," Mother Kingsley 
answered, "a barrel or so of nuts, a 
keg of kraut, a stand or two of lard 
and a half-dozen hams. ' ' 

' ' Not so bad, boys, ' ' Thad laughed. 
"Guess we'll manage some way. 
When do they want to come, moth- 
er?" 

' ' As soon as we will receive them. ' ' 

Thad studied the big figured calen- 
dar on the wall for a* moment, then 
turned his face back to the eager 
group about him. 

"I'll telegraph them in the morn- 
ing to come right on," he said 
thoughtfully, ' ' and by so doing they 
will reach here in plenty of time to 
celebrate Christmas with us. ' ' 

' ' I 've a feeling there won 't be 
much but spirit with such a gang as 
that piling in," laughed Ray, "but 
we'll give 'em a dose of good-fellow- 
ship and perhaps they won't notice 
the lack of gifts." 

"That will go a long ways," Thad 
answered, "but let's don't look upon 
them as something coming to destroy 



14 



THE UPLIFT 



our pleasure ; let 's think of them as 
something going to add to it. And 
let's plan for a tree just as we've 
always planned, but instead of buy- 
ing the thing's we had planned to buy, 
we will have to change our minds 
and make our money go further by 
purchasing inexpensive gifts. ' ' 

Eay went over to the mantle and 
took down his little china-pig bank, 
then, the only bank he had ever been 
known to trust his savings in. Care- 
fully he extracted the contents and 
counted it out. 

"Nine dollars and fifteen cents," 
he exclaimed joyfully. "Didn't know 
I bad that much." 

From a fruit jar in the cupboard, 
Ben produced his savings which 
amounted to eleven dollars and sixty 
cents. Tom being financial boss of 
the farm, brought out a little bank 
book and proudly displayed the mag- 
nificent sum of thirty-seven dollars 
and ninety-eight cents. 

"Everybody has money but me," 
Thad laughed, as Tom replaced the 
bank book, "but I have the promise 
of a good raise soon." 

' ' Of course, you haven 't any 
money, Thad," Tom answered, "the 
head of the family rarely has, but 
just you wait till I get through 
school and you shall have a bank 
account." 

"I'll add my share to Thad's ac- 
count, too," chimed in Ben. 

"And me, too," added Ray. "He 
deserves a big one and he shall have 
it. But what lie's going to get in 
the future doesn't help now, so here's 
where I start the ball rolling. Let's 
divide up, and share our Christmas 
fund with Thad." 

With a grateful heart at the genr- 



osity displayed by his brothers, Thad 
accepted the contribution with the 
promise that he would make it stand 
for his Christmas shopping, just as 
they would do, except the food, that 
he always stood for alone. One by 
one the details of the housing and 
caring for the newcomers were dis- 
cussed and taken care of. Margie 
would have the little room adjoin- 
ing Mother Kingsley's room. Wil- 
liam, being the age of Ray, would 
share Ray's room. The baby, a wee 
little lady of three summers, would 
occupy any available space that could 
be found for her. 

On the twenty-second of December, 
the three Oklahoma Kingsleys arriv- 
ed at the country home of the Ten- 
nessee Kingleys. Just how Thad ever 
got the bunch, with their queer bag- 
gage, wedged in the little red racer 
was beyond the comprehension of 
his mother. Nevertheless, about five 
o'clock in the afternoon, she looked 
out the window and saw them alight- 
ing. Presently she was among them, 
kissing them and caressing them with 
motherly tenderness to which they 
so readily responded. 

' ' Welcome home, ' ' Thad said pleas- 
antly as he threw back the door and 
invited them in. 

All the way out from the station 
Margie had been strangely silent, but 
when the doors of her new abode were 
thrown open to her the pent-up feel- 
ing that had held her captive all the 
way, seemed suddenly to turn loose 
and throwing her arms about Mother 
Kingsley, she began to cry. 

' ' I was so afraid we would not be 
welcome, Auntie, she said hoarsely, 
"and knowing the conditions of 



THE UPLIFT 



15 



things here, I scarcely hoped to be 
received as pleasantly as I was. I 
only hope that I may in time make 
myself so worth-while for you and the 
boys that you may excuse us for in- 
truding." 

"I said welcome home," Thad re- 
peated, ' ' and I meant every word of 
it. ' ' And, gathering the baby in his 
arms, he went dancing about the 
room. ' ' A little sunbeam like this 
will make the place more Attrac- 
tive, won't it?" 

Margie was a born housekeeper, 
and from the moment of her arrival 
her presence was felt. In less than 
two days, .the boys, one and all, 
agreed she was wonderful — just the 
sort of a sister they would have chos- 
en had they had a choice in the mat- 
ter. William, too, made himself 
handy. The long poles in the wood- 
shed became firewood ere his second 
clay's sojourn had ended. He loved 
livestock and farmwork, and until 
he would start to school, he insisted 
that he assume responsibility for the 
feeding and outside work. 

Christmas Eve dawned clear and 
cold but long before noon a gray 
mistiness had enveloped the world, 
and specks of snow were occasionally 
hiting the kitchen window where 
Mother Kingsley and Margie were re- 
veiling in the mystery of spice-cake 
making. On the kitchen table, all 
dressed and ready, was a wonderful 
fowl, and in the living room stood a 
Christmas tree with its topmost 
branches kissing the ceiling. On it 
were numerolus packages, small, 
that's true, and all day new pack- 
ages were added. Mother Kingsley, 
along in the afternoon, slipped up to 
the garret, and, opening a little hair 



trunk, took therefrom a beautiful 
china doll old-fashioned, of course, 
but nevertheless beautiful — the One 
sweet link with a long lost baby 
daughter. Twice she put it back, 
then taking it firmly in her grasp, she 
hastily made her way downstairs, 
and, after labeling it for baby Cath- 
erine, she tied it on the tree and 
went back to her work in the kit- 
chen. 

It was twilight when Margie enter- 
ed the room with her tiny packages. 
But the Christmas spirit was in the 
Kingsley home, and though her gifts 
were no more than ten-cent handker- 
chiefs that she had purchased at the 
Kress store in the city, she tied them 
on with joyousness. "And this," 
she said aloud, taking from the folds 
of her gingham gown a slender en- 
velope bearing the name of her cousin, 
Thadoas Kingsley, "is the gift of 
my father to the boy, provided he 
opened the door of his home to us. 
I wonder what is in it. Anyway, 
Dad," she said sweetly, "I have fol- 
lowed your instructions. ' ' 

A little later, Thad gazing upon 
the tree, looked also with wondering 
eyes at the envelope bearing his 
name. "What could such a slender 
thing contain?" he mused to him- 
self. Perhaps he would have thought 
more about it had not a large bundle 
of extraordinary size, "To Margie 
from Counsin Ben," caught bis at- 
tention. One little pressure of his 
hand on the package made him stand 
back and chuckle with laughter, for 
well he knew that the package con- 
tained none other than the silver 
fox fur that Ben had intended to 
swap for a suit of Christmas clothes. 

Christmas morning brought the 



16 



THE UPLIFT 



Kingsley tribe from their beds with 
shouts of joyousness on their lips, and 
rushing to the window, they beheld 
a snow-clad world. 

"Just the sort of weather to make 
us eat up everything in the house, 
nmmsy" Ben declared, as he grab- 
bed his mother for a Christmas caress, 
' ' so come along and let 's have break- 
fast — then for the tree." 

' ' Let auntie rest, Ben, ' ' interrupt- 
ed Margie, "I will help with the 
breakfast. ' ' 

It didn't take long to prepare a 
breakfast of crisp waffles and syrup; 
and shortly afterwards the family 
assembled for the distribution of the 
Christmas gifts. 

Shouts of joy went up from the 
lips of the receivers as one by one, 
the various packages were unwrap- 
ped; but the joy of Catherine over 
the old-fashioned doll, seemed to ex- 
ceed the pleasure of everyone else. 

Suddenly a little gasp of surprise 
caused every eye in the room to turn 
to Thad. 

' ' What is it, dear ? ' ' mother Kings- 
ley asked, as she saw her son's white 
face. In his hand she beheld a single 
sheet of white paper. 

"It's wonderful, mother! Simply 
wonderful!" he answered, as he held 
out the paper to her. ' ' Here; read it 
yourself. ' ' 

For a moment, after reading the 
message, the letter contained, mother 
Kingsley, like her son, seemed stun- 
ned. Then she turned a smiling 
face upon the excited group about 
her. ' ' This letter, ' ' she said, ' ' con- 
tains wonderful news for us all. It 
is a letter from Margie's father to 
Thad, but I want you all to hear it : 
" 'Dear Nephew: 

When you open the doors of your 



house to my children, you are willing- 
ly assuming a responsibility for them. 
Something tells me you will do this; 
do it in the spirit that rightly be- 
longs to a thoroughbred Kingsley. 
But, for once, you are going to be 
remunerated for your bigness of 
heart. When you get this you will 
kindly take it to Mr. Rose Wilson 
in your city, and he will in turn ad- 
vise you what to do. 

I have amassed a great fortune in 
oil lands in Oklahoma, but realizing 
I have only a short time to live, de- 
cided not to reveal my secret. Know- 
ing you as I do, I feel that my chil- 
dren will find in you a fatherly pro- 
tection. So unto you, I leave the 
bulk of my estate, to be equally di- 
vided among the Kingsley tribe con- 
stituted by your father's children and 
mine. I have no special request to 
make aside from a college education 
for yourself, because I believe you 
possess the spirit of doing things on 
the square and I trust you implicitly. 
Devotedly your Uncle, 

Tom Kingsley.' " 

When at last the state of confu- 
sion and excitement had dwindled 
down to silence. Thad slipped over 
to his mother's chair, and dropping 
on his knees, bowed his head in her 
lap. 

' ' I guess it was all for the best, 
mother," he said, slowly, "that I 
assumed this added responsibility. 
I am so glad I did. ' ' 

Mother Kingsley laid a caressing 
hand on his shoulder. 

"It's not so much the thing you 
did, son," she said, sweetly, "that 
counts; but it was the spirit in which 
you did it that deserves this re- 
ward." 



THE UPLIFT 



17 



RESOLUTIONS. 

By James Hay Jr., in Asheville Citizen. 



The day approaches when a large 
percentage of the apparently intelli- 
gent population of the land steps for- 
ward to announce, assert, depose, pro- 
fess, swear or vow that, exercising 
its invincible will and irresistible re- 
solution, it will never a.gain do this, 
that or the other thing. 

Aplomb will stalk the streets, 
Manliness will be writ upon the 
knitted brow. Moral courage will 
fill the air like an incantation. Af- 
firmation, affidavit and asseveration 
will echo in baritone, soprano and 
eiight different octaves from the se- 
rene sides of the everlasting hills. 

The fetters of customs? Pouf! 
Gross stuff, to be burned into nothing- 
ness by the order of one's unfalter- 
ing purpose! The grip of habit' 
Again pouf! Cobwebs, to be brushed 
incontinently from the walls of life 
by the magic broom of a man's God- 
given free will ! 

And another day approaches, fast 
and furious, that said, short stretch of 
sunlight when contemptuous Destiny 
strides up to him who so bravely 
swore on January 1, and says: "In- 
firm of purpose, give me the dagger ! ' ' 
And in the twinkling of a pessimistic 
eye, the dagger of indecision works 
its havoc, cuts through the fortifica- 
tions of determination and lays Re- 
form, a bleeding and piteous victim, 
upon the shelf. 

New Year's resolutions? Short- 
lived, punny and pallescent things ! 
They are the lilies of egotism, certain 
to wilt in the first warm blast of de- 



And that depression and destruc- 
tive statement holds good because the 
average man, in swearing to cease 
pursuits of false and ancient gods, 
neglects to take the oath which, it 
anything can do it, will hold him true 
to the high resolve that decorates his 
conscience on New Year's morn. 

He omits the little detail of pledg- 
ing himself to associate only with 
those men and women whose influence 
will tend to keep him in the thorny 
path he has chosen. He forgets to 
cut loose from the acquaintances and 
friends who, unencumbered by pur- 
poses of reform, will go blithely oh 
their way, offering him a cigarette, 
drink, golf game, lunchon, loafing 
or other self-indulgence to which he 
in unregenerate days would rush with 
the speed and gait of a terrified 
antelope. 

He overlooks the fact that, being 
an average man, he is, above all things 
suggestible. Circumstances beat upon 
him as if he were white-hot metal un- 
der the hammer. What others think or 
say lashes him to this turning of the 
other. Let him see Sam plunge in- 
to the forbidden vice, r and he is im- 
mediately harassed by the thought of 
how pleasant similar plunges on his 
part used to be. 

Let him enter a room where for- 
merly the gang passed around this 
beverage or played that game of 
cards for a little on the side. Let 
the familiar atmosphere of the aparr- 
ment get into his nostrils. Let him 
contrast the picture of that good- 
fellowship, its friendly laughter, its 
cozy and delightful intimacy, with 



18 



THE UPLIFT 



the thought of another hour alone in 
the office. Let him, poor and hes- 
tant creature, stand a minute in the 
current of those thoughts and mental 
representations, and nine times out 
of ten Desiny whispers in his tortured 
ear: "Infirm of purpose — " 



It is all very well to talk about a 
man's will power. It has an inde- 
pendent sound. It is the essence of 
flattery to the one who mentions it 
and the one who hears it. No doubt 
it was a wonderful and powerful 
piece of work some years ago. But 
along about thirty years of age it be- 
gins to assume a battered and shop- 
worn look. It has had its knocks. 

It has surrendered again and again 
to the voices epediency instead of up- 
holding the banners of idealism. It 
has been knocked about by ' ' What 
will people say ? " It bent the suppli- 
ant knee to the need of a raise in 
salary. It has been kidded into sub- 
mission. And, worst of all, it has 
been imprisoned by the walls of hab- 
it. Its owner has done certain things 
so often for so long that what he likes 
to do is the jailer of his resolution. 

"Ha,!" says the voice of the scorn- 
ful. "Is a man to desert his old 
friends just because he wants to live 
differently?" 

The answer to that is: "Of what 
value is their friendship to him if 
they pull him down into low places 
or become a drag on his better eon- 



duct?" 

A man has a right to choose as 
his friends and associates those from 
whom he will get something worth 
while, whether it be wit, or laughter, 
or sympathy, or inspiration. The 
interchange of helpful and enter- 
taining thoughts and influences is the 
very structure of true friendship. 
He is the despoiler of his own char- 
acter and the destroyer of his own 
strength if he consorts habitually 
with those who give him as their part 
of the trade harmful influences and 
nothing unlifting or improving. 

"But," inquires the superior per- 
son, ''can't a man stick to his good 
resolutions? Does he have to have 
help always?" The fate of the vast 
majority of New Year's resolutions 
answers that with a compelling thougii 
gloomy finality. The average men 
can keep their good resolutions with- 
out help, but few of them do. Why, 
then, make the thing harder by living 
among people who instead of helping 
on the good work directly and in- 
cessantly assail it ? 

If, of course, you are superior to 
the average man, you can do anything 
you want to. That has been proved a 
hundred thousand times. The hu- 
man will, when really summoned to 
victorious battle, is unbeatable. And 
who is to sa,y that you are n'ot a su- 
l sxe uoS. yex\% aAaipg jireni jouad 
and you are. The will is just that 
mighty and imperial. 



It is natural to desire and seek prominence in the world, yet it is a 
serious thing to be placed in the full light of public observation, our 
faults and weaknessess heightened by its glare, and doing— even the 
smallest of them — so much harm. — Exchange. 



THE UPLIFT 



19 



SANTFORD MARTIN AND HIS LITTLE 

PARTNERS. 



(Winston-Salem Journal.) 



Yesterday the Editor had the pleas- 
ure of meeting in a body and look- 
ing into the faces of The Journal's 
carrier boys, his most faithful part- 
ners in the business of providing the 
city of Winston-Salem with a morn- 
ing newspaper. He experienced the 
joy of saying a word to them in 
commendation of their loyal service 
during the year 1924 and of wishing 
for them the sort of Christmas they 
deserve — the best that Santa C'laus 
can give to anybody in the whole 
wide world. 

Today he desires thus publicly to 
acknowledge his indebtedness to and 
grateful appreciation of the service 
rendered during the year by the little 
army of carrier boys — the "paper 
boys ' ' — who deliver The Journal to 
the homes of its readers in Winston- 
Salem every morning in the year, ex- 
cept the morning after Christmas, 
when publication is suspended for 
one day in honor of the little boy 
who was born in Bethlehem two 
thousand years ago. He, too, was a 
working boy. 

The Editor could not help but 
think as he looked into the upturned 
faces who greeted him yesterday 
that Jesus was once a little boy who 
toiled early and worked late in the 
town of Nazareth. To His mother, 
Jesus was just like these little boys 
in the city of Winston-Salem. To her 
he was always a boy — her boy — for 
Mary, the mother of Jesus, was not 
different from all other true Chris- 
tion mothers of little boys who have 



ever lived in the world. 

Dr. W. T. Ellis, in his Christmas 
Sunday School lesson, imagines that 
Mary sat one evening at twilight 
talking with the disciple, John, to 
whose care Jesus had committed her. 
It was some time after Jesus had 
been put to death and has ascended 
into heaven. And Mary said to 
John : 

"In these days of memory, I live 
over those first months at Nazareth, 
and the journey tcr Bethlehem, and 
the wonder-night at the khan. * * * 

' ' As we went south to our family 
home for the high-handed Roman cen- 
sus, the spirit of Joseph was shaken 
because the public khan at Bethle- 
hem was crowded; for he always 
treated me as though the best were 
my right; and he had set his heart 
on a large upper room. How tender 
and comforting he was on those try- 
ing last five miles between Jerusalem 
and Bethlehem. As for me, I was 
well content when the golden-hearted 
horse-grooms made place for me by 
a manger, on the fresh, sweet straw, 
with the friendly warmth of the 
beasts about me. Somehow I felt as 
if it were fitting that my Son should 
be born amid these strong men and 
simple surroundings. I thought of it 
many times later when He called 
Himself the 'Son of man' * * * 

' ' Then at His first Passover, when 
we found Him the center of the 
learned rabbis, who thought Him and 
His questions wonderful, the refrain 
that sang itself in my heart was, 



20 



THE UPLIFT 



'This is my Son.' True, I rebuked 
the Boy, as was fitting, (Joseph never 
laid word of admonition on Him, 
leaving that to me) but even as I 
spoke and He answered, I glorified, 
that He who so early was about the 
things of the Father, was my son. 

• ' When the crowds followed Him 
through Gallilee, and when He enter- 
ed Jerusalem, my spirit kept saying 
within me, 'To them He is some Great 
One, but to me He is my Son.' * * * 

' ' The whole world is talking of the 
deeds of mercy and helpfulness that 
He did throughout those three busy 
years when He walked publicly amidst 
the multitudes; yet I can match every 
one of these marvelous ministeries 
with an instance of sweet and beau- 
tiful service in our home circle. Nev- 
er was there such a son or brother. 
How blessed was I above women ! 

' ' That gentle heart which loved the 
whole world, loved me most of all. 
He thought of me in that last hour, 
when He gave me into your keeping; 
that was because He had bee,n 
thoughtful of me ever since, as a lit- 
tle toddler about my feet in Nazareth, 
He had done the first considerate of- 
fices of love. A wondrous gentleman 
was my Son. 

' ' Now I must tell you a thing that 
I have never said before, but you will 
understand. In that awful hour on 
the Cross, when His broken heart 
cried aloud with a cry that seemed 
to break my heart, too ; when the 
sympathetic darkness wrapped us in; 
and when the very rocks themselves 
on which we stood swayed in agony, 
I seemed to hear Him crying as my 
Babe cried, long, long ago. Even 
in that hour of anguish — I hope it 
is not impious — He who hung there 



before us in bitter shame, all for a 
world 's pardon, was to me a Babe 
once more in my arms ; and my heart 
ached to comfort Him with tender, 
soothing crooning words. 

' ' While I was bowed in tears be- 
side the Cross, there pasesd before 
my mind all His beautiful babyhood. 
I looked upon those bleeding hands 
nailed to the wood, but what I saw 
was His baby hands, so small, so soft, 
so graceful ; and the face as delicate 
as a flower's petal, with golden curls 
where now the cruel thorns flowered 
red. A thousand incidents of His 
childhood came back to me; and 
while the others heard Him cry in 
anguish, 'Faher!' I seemed to hear 
Him call ' Mother ! ' as he used to do 
in all His little joys and sorrows." 

Mary was the first Christian moth- 
er of a little boy. Before Jesus 
came women did not feel toward 
their children as she felt toward her 
little boy. Even to this day there are 
lands where heathen dwell, where 
there is no Christmas, where the 
spirit of Jesus, who was the first man 
to love all little children, does not 
reign in the lives of men and women. 
In those lands little boys are treated 
as slaves, not loved as children, even 
by their parents. 

But wherever true Christians dwell 
everybody loves the boy. And that 
is why we know that this morning 
thousands of readers of The Journal 
in Winston-Salem will gladly join the 
Editor in wishing all the joy that 
Christmas can bring to our brave 
little partners in service who race 
through sleet and rain and snow and 
bitter cold to beat the sun to the 
waiting world. May God bless our 
"paper boys'' and sustain them and 



THE UPLIFT 



21 



help them as they fight their way up sort of manhood that rules the world, 
to big, strong, manly manhood — the 



' ' The most forgiving animal in the zoo is the giraffee. ' ' 

"What makes you think that?" 

"Why, my dear, he overlooks everything." — Tit-Bits. 



WHEN PEOPLE FORGET THEIR BANK 

ACCOUNTS. 

By Harry Van Demark. 



On the faue of if, it hardly .-collie- 
possible that any man would forget 
where he put his money; yet this 
happens with sufficient frequency to 
keep the banks busy looking for the 
owners of some accounts. In abnost 
every instance these owners or heirs 
are found, usually after a long lapse 
of years, and often with the greatest 
difficulty. 

Almost invariably these occurrences 
happen in the savings departments. 
While there seems to be no universal 
rule, in some States savings banks do 
not consider an account dormant un- 
til it has gone from five to ten years 
without a transaction. Then the in- 
terest is stopped and a search begun 
for the owner, and Sherlock Holmes 
and Nick Carter themselves might 
have taken a few pointers from the 
officials who do this work. 

The Central Savings Bank of New 
York City had a typical ease involv- 
ing a man who had opened an account 
in trust for another during the Civil 
War. He dropped completely out of 
sight, and in time, following its 
nolicy in such cases, the bank began 
to look for him. 

Investigation brought to light the 



tact that he had enlisted, and the rec- 
ords of the adjutant-general record- 
ed him as having deserted. Further 
investigation showed that the de- 
positor had changed his foreign name 
to an American name, duly author- 
ized by a court of law, had entered 
business and become wealthy. 

When approached by the bank's 
representative, he emphatically de- 
nied that he was the party who had 
opened the account. When shown a 
tracing of his signature from the 
books of the adjutant-general 's office, 
and told where it had been obtained, 
he admitted that it resembled his, 
but positively asserted that it was 
not. 

He denied that he had ever desert- 
• ed from the army, insisted that he 
had been and was still a friend of 
the most prominent men of the nation, 
a loyal American who had rendered 
valuable service during the war, and 
that he had no knowledge of or re- 
lation with the bank in question. 

When, shortly thereafter, a report 
was presented to him, reciting the 
conversation of a representative of 
the bank with a prominent business 
man who had known the depositor 



22 



THE UPLIFT 



from his youth, and by his former 
name, he went to the bank and ad- 
mitted his identity, signed a draft 
authorizing the payment of the ac- 
count to the widow of the man who 
was the beneficiary of the trust ac- 
count, and of whose estate she had 
been appointed administratrix. 

The same bank had a depositor 
named John Nugent, who described 
himself as a teacher and gave Tip- 

perary, Ireland, as his birthplace. 
"When Nugent 's account became dor- 
mant, the bank officials found that 
a man of the same name, and who 
had lived in this country the same 
length of time, had died in the year 
of Nugent. 's last deposit. This ex- 
plained Nugent 's non-appearance 
thereafter to the bank's satisfaction, 
but when that institution got in 
touch with he man's relatives, it was 
found that the John Nugent who had 
died was a totally different persci 
from John Nugent the depositor. 

With this complication settled, the 
bank advertised in Ireland, and wrote 
to everyone by the na,me of Nugent, 
known to live in or near Tipperary. 
They searched the New York Board 

of Education 's records, but could find 
no record of any teacher named 

Nugent. A search of private school 
records was also unsuccessful. All 
Nugents in New York and Brooklyn 
were asked about the missing de- 
positor without result. 

Finally the marriage records of 

Ireland were examined; the parish 
priests of Tipperary were enlisted in 
the hunt. The marriage record at 
last was found and one of the witnes- 
ses reached by that clue. He said 
that John Nugent had died in Ire- 
land after returning from America, 
and led the searchers to Nugent 's 



widow, more than eighty years old, 
who was living in a work-house. The 
bank presented her with $3,000 prin- 
cipal and interest of her husband's 
lleposits, begun over a quarter of a 
century before. 

The Bowery Savings Bank of New 
York also had an interesting case in 
the account of Frederick Sollmau. 
the acount was transferred to Eliza 
Sollmon two years after it had been 
opened, and three years later to Eliza 
Sullivan. Note the slight change in 
name. The acount was finally enter- 
ed on the dormant ledger and all ef- 
forts to trace its owner proved futile. 

In answer to one of the many ad- 
vertisements a William Sullivan wrote 
the ba.nk, stating that the similarity 
to his mother's name had made him 
wonder if there could be any con- 
nection. In an interview with the 
bank officials he explained that his 
father, Frederick Sullivan, had died 
suddenly, and the shock had caused 
his mother to have recurring attacks 
of insanity. At last she was put in 
an asylum and her three boys in city 
charitable institutions. 

Up to this point the story w T as 
clear. But Sullivan could not re- 
member where he had lived as a child 
except that it was on the East Side 
opposite a graveyard. One of the 
several addresses given by Mrs. Sul- 
livan proved to tally with that de- 
scription. To most minds this would 
have established Sullivan's ideality, 
but it was not legal proof. 

So a search for papers began'. Fin- 
ally Sullivan found an old wallet with 
his father's name written on the flap, 
and his mother's workbox with her 
name on the cover. Both signatures 
matched bank records as well as could 
be determined from such time-worn 



THE UPLIFT 



23 



writing. The bank officials told Sul- 
livan that there was $1,100 to his 
mother's credit and advised him 
how to get administration papers. 
It then developed that there had 
been a fourth brother, ar.d as this 
brother could not be found, Sullivan 
became weary of the matter and 
gave it up. 

But the bank became all the mor<? 
determined to find the Sullivan heirs. 
One of the officials recalled that in- 
sane persons often had a cunning way 
of concealing things and making 
mysteries out of very simple matters. 
He suggested that there might be 
other savings accounts, and found one 
in the Metropolitan Savings Bank to 
the credit of Eliza Sullivan for 
$2,000. It also was dormant a,nd un- 
claimed. 

This bank's record made mention 
of a child named Mary, whom Sul- 
livan wholly had forgotten, but whom 
he recalled when her name was men- 
tioned. He said that the children 
had been sent to Randall's Island 
when they were all very young, al- 
though examination of the records 
there failed to reveal any such entry. 
Sullivan persisted in this assertion, 
however, and a long search finally 



brought the record to light. The 
mother had fallen into the hands of 
the police in an insane condition, 
Sullivan said, and the children never 
saw her after that. 

But nothing could be found of an 
Eliza Sullivan in any institution for 
the insane near New York. Further 
exhautive searching by the bank of- 
ficials uncovered the police record, 
showing the arrest of one Elizabeth 
Solhnan, committed as insane, who 
had died in the Ward's Island Hos- 
pital. This undoubtedly was Eliza 
Sullivan, and on the strength of the 
evidence the surrogate issued letters 
of administration to the son. 

It still remained necessary to find 
the sister and the other brother. The 
woman was traced to Connecticut, 
living- as the daughter of parents she 
suppopsed to be her own, unaware 
that she had any brothers. Sullivan 
immediately recognized her from the 
resemblance to his mother. The 
last boy was located after an equally 
troublesome search, the estate settle 1, 
the family united, and memories of 
thirty years before renewed, all be- 
cause the savings bank would not 
give up the effort to render a las: 
service to a depositor. 



HERE'S OUR RECORD. 



Looking back upon it all, we can't 
help but feel a bit uneasy. We 
just wonder if folks outside had any 
Christmas at all. For it seems that 
all the Christmas there was must 
have been at the Training School. 
Right after Thanksgiving somebody 
had said, "We're going to have the 
best Christmas of anybody!" In 
a week it had become a slogan. And 



day by day the preparations went 
forward. In the school rooms the 
first step toward the program is the 
memorizing of the first sixteen ver- 
ses of the second chapter of St. 
Luke. It is a Training School cus- 
tom, and the smallest boy is taught 
the verses perfectly. Then there 
were recitations to be learned, and 
carols, and all the things necessary 



24 



THE UPLIFT 



to provide a program worthy of the 
occasion. 

In the cottages and all the depart- 
ments of the school folks were work- 
ing busily with one idea in view — 
"the best Christmas of anybody.'' 
The boys practicing the Christmas 
program had keen competition from 
the boys who were getting ont the 
programs and the menus in the 
print shop, and baking the cakes in 
the bakery, and getting the materi- 
als ready for the dinner in the store 
room, and getting the cottages all 
decorated and ready for the great 
event. But it all went on amid an 
atmosphere of cedar, holly, mistle- 
toe, red bells and tinsel, with hearty 
good will and cheer pervading the 
whole. 

And at last it was Christmas Eve. 
Outside, rain and murky darkness. 
But nobody noticed. For everybody 
was going to the Christmas Tree. 
Xorth Carolina soil never produced 
a finer tree than the one that oc- 
cupied the center of the stage in the 
auditorium. It had been carefully 
selected, beautifully decorated, and 
it was a joy to behold. There was 
nothing of a tired, and stale, and 
worn-out feeling about that Tree. 
It was fresh and green, and pungent 
with the odor of live cedar, and it 
represented the ideal of happy 
hearts and willing hands who wanted 
us to have "the best Christmas of 
anybody." Two smaller trees had 
been placed in the background, and 
the entire stage decorated with gar- 
lands of Christmas greens. Wreaths 
and bells in every window finished 
the decorative scheme, and the whole 
was perfect — if you ask us ! 

Line after line of boys marching in 



while the band played a hymn, march- 
ing eagerly, expectantly, but quietly. 
Then, if you did not believe in Christ- 
mas, it was time for you to leave. 
For who could keep a grouch when 
four hundred boys were on their feet 
singing ' ' Hark ! the Herald Angels 
Sing ! " ? And just at the close of the 
song a boy was coming forward at 
the front of the stage. He was only 
a boy — perhaps fourteen years of age. 
But with perfect composure he faced 
his audience and led the school in 
one of the most beautiful parts of 
the program, the recitation of the 
Scripture. In perfect rhythm, with- 
out a single falter, the chorus of 
voices rose and fell upon the verses 
they had learned days before, end- 
ing as they "found Mary, and Joseph, 
and the babe lying in the manger." 
A hush, and every head was bowed 
while the leader prayed as only one 
could pray who was a boy and who 
believed with all his heart in Christ- 
mas, and had been trained to prop- 
erly conduct and express himself. 

The program always includes a 
minister. This year Dr. Jesse C. 
Rowan of the First Presbyterian 
church of Concord was with us, and 
his talk to the boys was unusual and 
enjoyable. In fact, the school is 
justly proud of the entire program. 
A rendition of the hymn, ' ' Silent 
Night, ' ' played softly by the band 
while all lights were off except the 
ones on the tree, and echoed by in- 
struments from outside was especial- 
ly effective. Another number by the 
band, ' ' Cantique de Noel, ' ' was equal- 
ly fine in interpretation. And nobody 
ever sang carols as the boys sing them 
on Christmas Eve. Nor, we think, 
could any youngsters recite better, 



THE UPLIFT 



25 



or do any of the things that went on 
in the auditorium. 

Of course it wouldn't be a real 
Tree without Christmas bags. And 
they were there, a great big one for 
every boy, filled with good things, 
and distributed by men who were as 
excited and enthusiastic as any of the 
boys, and who were having as much 
fun out of the proceedings as any 
ten year old in the crowd. 

It was altogether appropriate that 
such an event should be closd with 
a prayer, and once again quiet pre- 
vailed as Dr. Rowan led the closing 
petition. Satisfied, happy, and look- 
ing forward to To-morrow, the boys 
went back to the cottages, each one 
lugging his bag of goodies. 

And Christmas Day"? Well, it's 
just born in North Carolinians to be- 
lieve in vittles. Each cottage had 
individual ideas about decorations, 
and each one seemed more Christmasy- 
like than the last one you entered. 
But they all smelled like dinner! 
And well thev might. A hundred 



chickens had bled and died for the 
glory of that dinner, not to mention 
the boiled ham, and the candied po- 
tatoes, and the rice and gravy, and 
the cake and all the rest of it. That 
was a dinner, and not a single boy 
would deny it. 

And so Christmas went on. Not 
a lot of noise and wild excitement, 
but groups of boys, happily employed 
with games, gifts and boxes from 
home, and all that contributes toward 
a sane observance of the biggest 
event of the year. Who would have 
it otherwise? If Christmas means 
not joy, and hope, and new enthu- 
siams, and generous giving and gra- 
cious receiving, and kindly speaking, 
and friendly doing, then Christmas 
. may well be celebrated at any time 
of the year. Christmas to us means 
all of those things, and we wish you 
a ' ' Happy New Year, ' ' happy in the 
knowledge that the Christmas-time 
we have celebrated was better than 
anybody 's. 



TWICE A CHILD. 

The greater part of Christmas activity was directed towards making 
the child happy. It is said that a person is twice a child; and it was 
most appropriate that The Sheltering Arm Circle of King's Daughters 
were busily employed in devising means for the happiness of the old 
women in the "Old Woman's Home," in Durham, which his their 
special object of interest and love. They had a tree, and a special 
program arranged for the entertainment of the old women; and a play, 
the product of the brains and genius of Mrs. Z. A. Rochelle, treasurer 
of the state organization, was the joy of the occasion. Nothing can be 
more beautiful than the spirit of love and service for the aged, who 
have reached that point in life that they cannot well care for themselves 
or their wants and needs. Strikes us that this is practical religion in 
action. 



26 



THE UPLIFT 



EIGHTY-TWO YEARS YOUNG. 




Daniel Branson Coltrane. 

A few people have the distinguishing honor of celebrating their birthday 
on Christmas Day. One of them is Mr. Daniel Branson Coltrane, President 
of the Concord National Bank and the treasurer of the Jackson Training 
School since its ealy history. On that day he reached the completion of his 
eighty-second year in an active and useful life. There is no reason why his 
objective should not be an even hundred or more. 



THE UPLIFT 



27 



THE HINDU WIDOW SPEAKS. 

By Alpha Fisher Thomas in Woman's Work. — A Monologue. 



TOMORROW, yes tomorrow it musi 
be; I cannot longer escape. It js 
my fate — and who am I that I should 
attempt to thwart the will of the 
gods ? 

Tomorrow, I must become a widow 
indeed — and oh, Hindu sisters of like 
fate, you alone can know all that 
means. Oh, why was I ever born'/ 
Why could I not have entered this 
life as a man-child, as a son, then 
my mother need not have suffered 
those untold cruelties? Had she 
been the mother of five sons, what 
a glory would have been hers; but 
not even to have one, and to bring 
forth five daughters — what a erasl 
fate! 

On the day that I was born (she 
tells me) my father cursed as he had 
cursed at the advent of my four sis- 
ters, only his rage increased at each 
succeeding disappointment in having 
no son. But father is not to blame. 
Do not our sacred books tell us that 
every father must have a son? Else 
who could perform the religious cere- 
monies for the family after the fath- 
er's death — and how could father's 
soul ever go safely through the count- 
less millions of rebirths and finally 
be re-absorbed into Brahma who 
gave it, if thefe ■were no son to per- 
form the funeral rites and the annual 
ceremony for the dead father? Surely, 
father was justified in taking' a second 
wife into his house. Did not the 
S'ods reward him by giving him a son 
by this second woman? 

But oh, how my heart bled for my 



hapless mother, even when I was a 
tiny girl. Who was she? Only a fe- 
male, the mother of other females. 
The new wife was not so fair as my 
mother, but she was the mother of a 
son, and hence found favor in father's 
sight. 

Oh, Rama, Rama and oh, all ye 333 
millions of Hindu gods, what did my 
mother do to anger you, — why did 
you give her only female offspring, 
and not even one son? Is there no 
mercy, no pity ? Do you not care that 
a mother of daughters should endure 
daily curses and frequent beatings? 
That she should never have a kind 
word — that many times she should 
lie down at night hungry and weep- 
ing? 

No wonder that she wanted to go 
back to visit her parents a few days 
each year — but even those visits were 
not satisfactory. Her brothers and 
their families were living in the same 
house with her parents, and some of 
the sisters-in-law were always quar- 
reling. There were jealousies and 
rivalries so that we were always glad 
to get away again. But when we got 
home, father complained about the 
money he had spent and the new 
clothes we had bought. Then every 
year or two, there was the question 
of p-ett.inp one of us, married, and that 
meant a heavv debt for father. 
Mother wanted. us each to marry a 
man not more than twenty years 
older than our-elves, but father 
thought money and jewels ought to 
have first consideration. 



28 



THE UPLIFT 



For several years our house was 
scarcely free of suitors, for must we 
not all be married before we were 
ten, according to our sacred books? 
Sita, my third sister, was very win- 
some. Two of my uncles asked f oi- 
lier, but she could not be promised 
until Kotamma and Tirupatamma 
were sure of husbands. Finally a 
relative of mother's, a widower with 
foitr sons, a man old enough to be 
Kotamma 's grandfather, asked for 
her. He offered a nice dowry, so father 
called the priest and an astrologer 
and all was satisfactorily arranged. 
The wedding took place when Kotam- 
ma was nine. She was not a bit 
happy because she knew this old man 
could not live long and she would 
soon be a widow. A year later Tir- 
upatamma was disposed of to a 
bachelor of thirty-five. My two un- 
cles quarreled when the decision was 
made concerning Sita, the prettiest 
of us all. She liked the uncle who 
brought her the most toys, but this 
did not count with father and he gave 
her to the elder, the one who owned 
the most oxen. The astrologer said 
neither the names nor star of the 
younger uncle matched with Sita's, 
so there was nothing more to do about 
it. 

Then Subbamma was arranged for. 
She was given to the uncle Sita 
liked. Mother says she felt much re- 
lieved when a suitable husband had 
been found for me, the ast of her 
daughters. I can just barely re- 
member my wedding day. I was 
only five. I wore a pretty silk dress 
and many jewels and had a garland 
of jasmine flowers. As I sat in one 
end of the palanquin, I stole shy 
glances at the man of thirty who was 



being caried with me through the 
streets in this fine way. He did not 
seem to notice me, but I enjoyed the 
band that led the procession, and the 
noise and the people. The men of 
our families followed us while the 
women stayed in the house and cook- 
a. fine meal. 

(I often wished that mother eoulcl 
go out on the street like father,, but 
she says no self-respecting Broman 
girl over twelve or any woman would 
thing of doing such a thing. She 
must not even let her face be seen 
by any man outside the family). 

In a few days the bridegroom and 
his relatives went to his distant house. 
I did not see him again for a long 
time. When I was twelve, he came 
with his relatives and carried dig 
away to his mother's house. I ivas 
proud that I was now old enough to 
go with him and yet I wept bitterly, 
because I had to leave my sad mother 
behind. When we reached my mother- 
in-law's house, I was very weary. 
All were eager to see my pretty 
clothes and my jewels. I was too 
shy to lift my eyes. His mother and 
brothers and their wives admired me. 
It did not take me many days to 
learn that the youngest sister-in-law 
was jealous of me, for I now became 
the pet of all the others. I was 
flattered and pleased especially be- 
cause my brothers-in-law considered 
me attractive. It does not take a. 
Hindu girl long to lose her beauty 
and I knew that I would lose mine 
all too soon, so I determined to enjoy 
it while it lasted. 

My husband, (but of course I can 
only speak of him in my own medi- 
tations) — I wonder "\yjhy a woman 
is considered so low that it is disre- 



THE UPLIFT 



29 



spectful for her to call her husband 
by name. I never say "Brahmayya" 
except secretly to myself. I would 
not so dishonor a man who has honor- 
ed me by making me his wife, and he 
never call me Sundaramma. I wond- 
er if no man in the world, not even 
a white man, honors his wife by 
speaking 1 her name, and I wonder if 
a white woman always speaks of her 
husband as "the father of my chil- 
dren." I wonder if she too, she who 
is so bold that she goes out on the 
street just as men do, and walks and 
talks to her husband pubiicy, and even 
eats with him (I am told) and sits 
while he stands — I wonder if she 
ever calls him by his name? The 
white people have such queer customs; 
a woman does not marry until she 
wants to, and if she does not want 
a man she tells him so. Some do not 
marry at all. Very few marry be- 
fore they are twenty years old, and 
here I am at twenty with the best 
of life past and gone. 0, how dif- 
ferent my estate ! 

At fourteen my first baby came. 
I was too sick to know or care if it 
was a boy or girl, if it lived or died. 
When a few days later I was able 
to undersand, I was not very sorry 
that it had died, for it was only a 
girl. I did not see its father for 
many days, but I was sure he was 
glad it died, and its death made him 
less angry with me. When I was 
fifteen and a half, the gods were 
good, oh, very good to me. They 
gave me a son. Oh, how happy I 
was! The father of my boy came 
in to see him the first day and every 
day. He did not say much to me 
but I knew he was happy. After 
that I bore a girl and then another 
son. In the midst of our joy Cholera 



visited our village and took away 
' ' the father of my children ' ' and our 
babies. I was so grief-stricken' that 
I did not think much of the evil days 
to come. 

Cholera killed my babies and their 
father, I know it did, and yet our 
sacred books teach us that a woman 
becomes a widow only as a punish- 
ment for sin. Our gods know I al- 
ways tried to serve "the father of 
my children'' faithfully and well. f. 
cooked his food the" best I knew how, 
and placed it all before him without 
keeping back any. I did not eat un- 
til he was satisfied, and sometimes 
there was not much left for me. I 
never spoke back when he was angry. 
I was ever obedient. My one thought 
was to please him. 

I wonder what terrible crime I 
committed in my former birth that 
could bring this horrible woe upon 
me now. It is my fate to be a widow. 
Yes, the gods will it. It is six months 
tomorrow since my babies were 
buried and their father's body burn- 
ed. Sadness and loneliness have been 
my part; but oh, the past six months 
have been joy in comparison with 
tomorrow and the existanee I must 
then begin. 

Tomorrow I must become a widow 
indeed. I wear this gay dress todav 
for the last time. Tomorrow for a 
little time I shall be dressed as a 
bride, only to have that silken gar- 
ment replaced by a cearse one, my 
jewels all taken away from me, my 
bracelets broken, my long black hair 
will be cut, my head will be shaved 
and my hair not allowed to grow 
again. I shall be made to look like 
all India 's millions of miserable wid- 
ows clad in their coarse, colorless 
homespun — with no ornaments, eat- 



30 



THE UPLIFT 



ing only one meal a day, a slave in 
the house where I was once favoi'ed 
by all, a disgrace to my family and 
his, and ill omen to all who meet me, 
I must go out on the street with my 
face exposed like an outcaste woman. 
Oh, Rama, Rama, help me to endure 
the shame and the indignities my wid- 



owhood brings upon me, and I will 
ever pray for the safety of the soul 
of ' ' the father of my children. ' ' 

I am only a woman. I sinned in 
a former birth and called forth the 
anger of the gods. This widow's lot 
is my fate. The gods will it; it must 
be so! 



INSTITUTION NOTES. 



By J. J. Jones, Jr 



Miss Vernie Goodman was visited 
by her parents Mr. and Mrs.J. A. B. 
Goodman of Mooresville, on Christmas 
day. 



John Forester, Theodore Wallace, 
Lambeth Cavenaugh, and Hurley Way 
attended the Kiwanis Club meeting fat 
Concord. They rendered a progrim 
under the direction of Miss Vernie 
Goodman. 



Herbert Poteat, Joe Wilkes, Zeb 
Trexlor, James Davis, Walter Cullers, 
J. J. Jones Jr., Earnest Brown, John 
Tomasin, Harvey Cook, Walter 
Hildreth, Fleming Clenton and Her- 
bert Floyd, Judge Brooks, Sylvester 
Honeyeutt, Lery Carlton, and Mike 
Mahon.ey composed the "Happy" 
squad on Christmas Eve. 



The boys enjoyed a fine religious 
service Sunday afternooi}. Team 
Number Four of the Christian Men's 
Club of Charlotte, led by Mr. Ed E. 
Jones came over and rendered a pro- 
gram that w.as one of the best we 
have had from any organization. 
Besides several helpful and inspir- 



ing talks to the boys, there were 
musical numbers by a male quartette, 
and two solos by Mrs. Tom Glass- 
glow. And besides all these things, 
we had with us a,t this service our 
loyal and esteemed friend, Rev. T. 
W. Smith. 



Dr. A. F. Mahoney of Monroe is 
not only a skilled surgeon, but he 
is entirely successful in another role 
— that of the Training School Santa 
Claus. He ha,s played this part at 
other times than Christmas, and his 
coming to the school is the signal for 
a general rush on the part of the 
boys. This Christmas he, of course, 
contributed generously toward the 
Boys' Chrismas Fund. But he didn't 
stop there. He came along the day 
before Christmas with a smile, and 
gifts for folks in general, and among 
other things he left a good trap drum 
outfit for the school orchestra. We've 
stopped trying to say "thank you" 
to Dr. Ma.honey, but we honestiy 
hink he ought to have a mighty good 
time if there's anything in the idea 
that the right way to be happy is to 
make other folks happy. 



RAILROAD SCHEDULE 









Northbound 






No. 


136 


To 


Washington 


5:00 A. 


M. 


No. 


36 


To 


Washington 


10:25 A. 


M. 


No. 


46 


To 


Danville 


3:15 P. 


M. 


No. 


12 


To 


Richmond 


7:25 P. 


M. 


No. 


32 


To 


Washington 


8:28 P. 


M. 


No. 


38 


To 


Washington 


9:30 P. 


M. 


No. 


30 


To 


Washington 
Southbound 


1:40 A. 


M. 


No. 


45 


To 


Charlotte 


4:14 P. 


M. 


No. 


35 


To 


Atlanta 


10 :06 P. 


M. 


No. 


29 


To 


Atlanta 


2:45 A. 


M. 


No. 


31 


To 


Augusta 


6:07 A. 


M. 


No. 


33 


To 


New Orleans 


8:27 A. 


M. 


No. 


11 


To 


Charlotte 


9:05 A. 


M. 


No. 


135 


To 


Atlanta 


9:15 P. 


M. 



THE SOUTHERN SERVES THE SOUTH 



THE 




VOL. XIII CONCORD, N. C, JANUARY 10, 1925 No. 7 



* 



1 WHAT THEY DO. I 

* * 

*£ Let us thank God for books. When I consider * 

what some books have done for the world, and what * 

they are doing; how they keep up our hope, awaken ,j. 

& new courage and faith, soothe pain, give an ideal *t* 

% life to those whose homes are hard and cold, bind * 

* together distant ages and foreign lands, create new ♦:* 

* worlds of beauty, bring down truths from heaven, % 
% — I give eternal blessings for the gift, and pray % 

% that we may use it aright, and abuse it not. — James * 

* a 

* Freeman Clarke. * 

* * 

A A a a a a a a a A A A i& a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a a A A A." 
'V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V V 



—PUBLISHED BY- 



TEE PRINTING CLASS OF TEE STONEWALL JACKSON MANUAL 
TRAINING- AND INDUSTRIAL SCEOOL 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

J. P. Cook, Chairman, Concord Mrs. G T. Roth, Elkin 
Miss Easdale Shaw, Vice-Chairman Herman Cone, Greensboro 

Rockingham Mrs. Cameron Morrison, Raleigh 

Jno. J. Blair, Sec, Raleigh Mrs. A. L. Coble, Statesville 

D. B. Coltrane, Treas., Concord Mrs. T. W. Bickett, Raleigh 

J. S. Efird, Albemarle Mrs. W. N. Reynolds, Winston-Salem 

Mr. Chas. A. Camion, Concord Mrs. I. W. Faison, Charlotte 

Rev. Tom P. Jimison, Spencer Mr. Paul Whitlock, Charlotte 

Mrs. W. H. S. Burgwyn, Honorary Member 
Chas. E. Boger, Supt. 



CONTENTS. 



EDITORIAL COMMENT 3-7 

DEPENDABLE MAN 8 

OVER-RELIGIOUS vs BAD MANNERS C. W. Hunt 9 

GOOODFELLOWS CLUB 10 

MR. DUKE AND COUNTRY CHURCH 

North Carolina Christian Advocate 12 

THE CHALLENGE TO MANHOOD Stanly News-Herald 15 

MR. WADE RECOMMENDS R. R. Clark 17 

MARY'S QUEST Emily H. Glover 18 

A PILGRIM IN BELGUIM Mrs. Charles P. Wiles 21 

MARK TWAIN'S AUTOBIOGRAPHY 27 

INSTITUTION NOTES J. J. Jones, Jr. 28 

HONOR ROLL 29 



The Uplift 



A WEEKLY JOURNAL 



PUBLISHED BY 



The Authority of the Stonewall Jackson Manual Training and Industrial 

School. TyDe-setting by the Boys Printing Class. Subscription 

Two Dollars the Year in Advance 

JAMES P. COOK, Editor, J. C. FISHER, Director Printing Department 



Entered as second-class matter Dec. 4, 1920 at the Post Office at Concord, 
N. C. under act of March 3, 1879. Acceptance for mailing at special rate 
of 4, 1923. 



JUST A LITTLE "MORE." 

A little more kindness and a little less creed ; 
A little more giving and a little less greed ; 
A little more smile and a little less frown ; 
A little less kicking a man when he's down; 
A little more "we" and a little less "I." 
A little more laugh and a little less cry, 
A few more flowers on the pathway of life; 
And fewer on graves at the end of the strife. 

—Mrs. B. F. Fuller. 



RECALLING SOME HISTORY. 

Noticing a general discussion in the papers as to what new items might 
be added to the taxables, in order to raise additional revenue, and the alleged 
statement of (Jov. Morrison that he could write a section to the Revenue 
Bill that would bring in twelve million dollars, we are reminded of a little 
piece of hist.ry th^t was made in the General Assembly of 1913. 

Realizing ciiat tnare existed an outrageous inequality in the assessment of 
properties, some sscaping entirely and other items sneaking through with 
but little respect to justice, the Joint Finane? Committee undertook to place 



4 THE UPLIFT 

on the books a tax measure that would "make the tax-books tell the truth," 
which afterwards became the slogan of Gov. Biekett. This measure in the 
legislature of 1913 failed, because of a number of combinations; but it is 
interesting- to recall that the able minds that had most to do with the defeat of 
that measure in 1913 became the leaders in a later legislature in writing prac- 
tically the very identical measure into law. 

A condition existed at that time, as in all periods, that called for a larger 
revenue and everybody, who took an interest in the matter, was trying to 
find a way out of the dilemma. Many suggestions of how to master the 
situation came from various sources. Among them was one from Attorney- 
General Biekett, who wrote a section to the revenue bill and submitted it 
to the Finance Committee. It was unique and far-reaching, and would have 
touched nearly a third of the population at that time, men, women, children 
and even babies. Mr. Biekett had written a measure that would levy a 1-cent 
tax on each glass of coca cola sold in the state. He confidently claimed that 
the revenue arising from the proposed tax would pay the entire running 
expenses of the state, and urged the Committee to incorporate it in the 
Revenue Bill. However, it was not accepted. 

How many millions of dollars would a one-cent tax today on each glass of 
coca cola sold in North Carolina during one year bring into the treasury of 
the state? Figure it out. 

******** 

IT'S A CONDITION. 

R. R. Clark, in one of his editorial contributions to the Greensboro News, 
takes notice of the number who went through a jail confinement during the 
past year, at Greensboro. These numbered 8C9 whites, and 704 colored, or 
a total of 1,573. It is noted that the colored people had the minimum num- 
ber; but taking the relative per centage of population the colored people's 
patronage of the county jail is the larger. 

But superior advantages and opportunities being the lot of the whites, 
one might easily expect the white race to be in the minoroity. But we are 
confronted by a real disturbing condition. Comparing statistics of today 
with that of ten 3-ears ago, one is disturbed by the terrible increase of the 
whites who find themselves incarcerated. Years ago, it was rare to find more 
than 5 per cent of the prisoners in jail to be of the white race. It is not so 
today. This is a condition; and there must be a reason or reasons. 

Mr. Clark further points out: "one finds support for the contention of some 



THE UPLIFT 5 

of our Superior court judges, who have called attention to the fact tha't the 
number of whites — especially white youths — is increasing on the criminal 
dockets of our courts. ' ' This seems quite evident. But why is it the con- 
dition ? The answer is clear : parents are neglecting the real welfare of their 
children, the neglect of keeping the homefires burning; delegating the moral 
training almost entirely to the schools and other agencies; giving liberties 
that children do not know how to properly use, permitting them to loaf on the 
streets and other substitute-for-home places when their proper places are at 
their real home in company with their parents. The world has gone made in 
an effort to make the young lives of the children one grand play-house, when 
some simple duty that leads to making useful manhood and womanhood 
should be assigned them. We have absolute evidence — testimony that cannot 
be gainsaid — right before us that the absence of intelligent parenthood, 
idleness and liberty from home unattended breeds 95 per cent of youthful 
deliquency. 

The fault is all but entirely with the parents — the youths become the suf- 
fering victims. 

***** * * * ■*■ * * * 

STILL TALKING A DEFICIT. 

On the eve of the assembling of the General Assembly of North Carolina 
there has been a revival of the discussion of the relative size of an alleged 
deficit in the state's finances. Though a number of audits have been made 
and horse-back opinions galore been advanced, no two seem to agree on the 
size of the alleged deficit. 

It appears to a layman that a simple set of books, showing receipts and 
expenditures — including what is due the state and showing every sign of be- 
ing solvent and capable of collection and the authorized obligations of the 
state — would call for just a matter of the use of mathematical addition. 
With properly-kept books, and a strict obedience to the mandates of the Gen- 
eral Assembly, it seems that the use of a Burroughs Adding Machine in the 
hands of a competent operator could decide the matter of a deficit or a sur- 
plus in a day or so. 

Whatever the true condition maybe, it is certain that no money has been 
embezzeled; and we have hundreds of miles of the finest roads in the world 
and in spots some of the finest institutions and schools in America; and a 
public school system in a majority of the counties constantly improving and 
more efficiently meeting the demands of the time; and a people, brave and 



6 THE UPLIFT 

industrious, that have theii' eyes set on the rising sun. Lots of comfort and 
hope in these. 

******** 

THE VERY BIGGEST THEME. 

The press is still busy, and for a good reason, in discussing the very biggest 
thing that ever occurred in the South — the establishment of a forty million 
dollar trust fund, by Mr. J. B. Duke, for the benefit of Duke University at 
Trinity College, for the aid of other institutions and for assistance of reli- 
gious and chaiitable endeavor in the two Carolinas. 

The press of the North seems to have taken as much delight in this most 
wonderful act, a demonstration of regard for his native soil and the vision 
Mr. Duke entertains for the future of it. We entertain no doubt that this 
great captain of development is just as happy over his most generous gift 
and the hope of its achieving in the future what his vision has pictured. 
It was not an impulse of the moment — it was the act of a cold, deliberate 
calculation of a master builder, who loves to make money not for the glory 
of it, but for the substantial purpose of doing big things, in the benefits of 
which all may in a measure participate — even unto unborn generations. 

ANOTHER CONFEDERATE PASSES. 

Cant. E. F. Lovill, one of the sturdy sons of the mountains, after a period 
of feeble health passed away on the 3rd at his home in Boone, Watauga 
county. Capt. Lovill had reached the fine old age of 83, though at no time 
did he seem to. carry such an age, for he had lived a clean, honorable and up- 
right life. 

He was a lawyer, a legislator, a friend of man, a great believer in educa- 
tion, and a brave Confederate soldier. The most conspicuous labor of his 
whole life lies in ,the' loyal devotion to the establishment of and success of the 
Appalachian Training School at Boone. From its foundation up to the day 
of his death he wis the chapman of its Boaw 1 of Trustees. Did we have the 
opportunity in t ; e for this issue, we would like to incorporate into this 
short notice of this manly man the estimate held of him by Prof. Dougherty, 
the head of that ropular and successful institution, in whose interest for years 
these two men worked most faithfully side by side. 

* * '!> * * * # * 

THE NEWS' HOUS^-WARMING. 

The Greensboro News, having moved into its handsome new home, invited 



THE UPLIFT 7 

the public to make it a visit. It concluded its program of pardonable pride 
in its good fortune and great success by having a number of the craft as 
guests at a banquet. Those who found attendance possible are loud in their 
estimate of the wonderful achievement. 

The Greensboro News has had a marvelous growth and it reflects credit and 
honor on its home city. The truth of the matter is, The News would do credit 
to a community five times the size of Greensboro. 

DOWN TO BUSINESS. 

The General Assembly for 1925 was formally organized on Wednesday, by 
the election of Hon. Edgar W. Pharr, of Mecklenburg, Speaker of the House ; 
and Hon. W. H. S. Burgwyn, of Northampton, President Protem of the Sen- 
ate. 

The tentative arrangement provides for the inauguration of Governor-elect 
McLean on Wednesday, the 14th. The press carries the statement that Gov. 
Morrison has no further communication for the legislature, leaving all sug- 
gestions and recommendations to his successor. 

Gov. Morrison plans leaving Raleigh Wednesday afternoon for Durham, 
where he and Mrs. Morrison will spend the night, proceding the next day en- 
route to their future home in Charlotte. 

General R. F. Hoke used to enjoy telling of the remark Mrs. T. J. Jarvis 
made to her distinguished husband when he relinquished the reins of govern- 
ment to Gov. Scales : ' ' Governor, it is all over. ' ' 

But it wasn't. 



THE UPLIFT 



DEPENDABLE MAN. 

Giving his life to the service of his state without stint, Hon. 0. Max Gardner 
never refuses to answer a call whenever it is at all possible. They had him 
in Charlotte to address a meeting, ivhich was held at the Chadivick Hoskins 
Cotton Mills. The audience composed of mill folks and a large crowd from 
the city overflowed the hall. 

What Mr. Gardner said is so fine and sensible that we reproduce a part of 
what the distinguished citizen had to say on that occasion, his theme being 
"The Dependable Man." 



' ' The finest thing that can be said 
of any man is that he is depend- 
able. It is the best thing an em- 
ployer can say of an employe, and 
the highest tribute an employe can 
pay his employer. This word com- 
prehends and implies the basis of 
all trust and the foundation of every 

' ' There is nothing so fatal to any 
honorable relation in life, 
man's success in any business occu- 
pation, profession or work, as a 
reputation for being slippery, un- 
certain, unreliable and unstable. I 
would a thousand times prefer to be 
called a fool, an ignoramus, a hog, 
or even an ass, than to deserve to 
be called an undependible man. The 
trouble with many of us is, we get 
the reputation of being untrustworthy 
without knowing it, without intending 
it, and sometimes without fully de- 
serving it. There is little hope for 
the deliberate crook. The sooner he 
is loc':ed up the Better for society. 
I am not talking about him. The 
man we must help, and the man 
whoTi we shr»'_;Id try to influence is 
the xellow who drifts and flounders 
unci iseious of his uncertainty. 

" feel mighty sorry for this man. 
We find bin not i.'oue in the cot- 
ton mill, bu( on the farm and every 
where. He is primari y hones;, and 
wor'-s hard — when he works — payj 



his debts if he can, goes to church, 
is law-abiding and peace-loving, a 
good fellow. But somehow he gets 
nowhere, and gradually and slowly 
loses out. You look for him and he 
ain 't there. You expect him and he 
doesn't come. There are thousands 
of such men in North Carolina. Their 
greatest trouble is, they lack 
the supreme ingredient of dependa- 
bility. 

1 ' And bear in mind that this qual- 
ity is not acquired in schools, col- 
leger and unervisities. It is not the 
product of refinement or culture. 
It is the raw material of manhood — 
dependability. The great trouble 
with so many of us is that we are 
not possessed of a consecrated spirit 
of hang-to-itiveness. We are dis- 
satisfied with what we have and long 
for that which we have not. We are 
restless and roving. We are bound 
10 mov<-.. We think there is a bet- 
ter job over the r\ver or a finer pros- 
per; 'down there.' We flinch in the 
face of devout purpose, and pull by 
jerks and spurts. We are always in 
motion, but we travel like a merry- 
go-round. One of the great prob- 
lems of the present-day civilization 
is to stabilize acid strengthen the will- 
power of this class of our citizen- 
ship. 

"I do not believe that there is a 



THE UPLIFT 



9 



higher resolution any of us can make 
in the New Year than a firm resolve 
to so live and serve as to be worthy 



of the unsupassed title of a truly de- 
pendable man." 



"Some folks," said Uncle Eben, "is so busy botherin' 'bout de debts 
of Europe dat dey clean fohgits what dey owes at the corner grocery." 



OVER-RELIGIOUS VS BAD MANNERS. 



By C. W 

There is nothing that goes as far 
in the making of a gentleman or a 
lady or a boy and a girl as decent 
manners. Even the poorest can be 
mannerly: and it is certain no parent 
can give a child a greater legacy in 
life than the training in good man- 
ners. I know people who can shine 
in conversation and entertaining 
ability, who will spoil the meal of 
all the other guests at a dinner party 
by taking a handkerchief and blow- 
ing their noses at the table as though 
they were in the barnyard. But the 
foregoing is just thrown in here; 
for the suggestion of this line of 
thought came by what a lady said 
not long since about two new boys in 
the neighborhood, the coming of 
whose parents had occupied some 
black headlines in the local paper, 
and were supposed to be up in "G-" 
when things polite were at stake. 
"Said this lady: "Yes, the boys 
have been to my house, and they went 
into every thing in the house except 
the hot furnace. ' ' She could not 
hove spoken more loudly or to the 
point. Somebody may have been busy 
telling others how to act, to the neg- 
lect of the home household. Re- 
minds me of the old saying, "Shoe- 
makers go barefooted." 

And the foregoing recalls an in- 
cident, which I w T as a party to, in a 



. Hunt. 

town west of Charlotte about 20 years 
ago. I was on the road in the inter- 
est of two papers, and approached a 
preacher's house on a business call. 
I noticed the gentleman was busy 
talking over the telephone, and natu- 
rally delayed announcing my pres- 
ence until he had finished the con- 
versation ; but his two boys five and 
sis years old took advantage of my 
civilty and the father's being busy, 
and by the time he had finished his 
talk, they knew who I was and had 
searched all my pockets and had my 
pen and pencils in possession. I 
could have excused all that in the 
boys, but a few minutes afterwards 
in the parlor, when I offered to give 
a colored comic supplement to the 
boys, the father objected to their 
having this sheet for fear of con- 
tamination of their young lives. 

The world is full of just such as 
these — top heavy — too busy training 
other people's children to train their 
own, or pampering in fear of world- 
ly contamination, and by that deny- 
ing the child the duty every parent 
owes, home training, and allowing the 
child to get that knowledge gained 
by association, and which no school 
teaches. We all love religious men 
and women, when they lead consis- 
tent lives, and inconsistency includes 
the failure to tell children and sink 



10 



THE UPLIFT 



it deep into their minds that they to others you meet, but teach your 
have no business nosing into other children that there is nothing so 
people's things. beautiful as politeness and if they do 

You can make no more helpful re- not know what politeness is, from 
solution for the New Year than to your neglect, keep them home until 
resolve not only to practice politeness you have done your duty by them. 



"Walk with your head up, you have a perfect right to, the world 
doesn't belong to any one individual." 



GOODFELLOWS CLUB. 

Under a Charlotte date line we find this inspiring story in the Greensboro 
News, which tells of a most wonderful organization that operates in The 
Queen City: 



"Your heart must be in the right 
place. ' ' 

In the above eight words are sum- 
med up the motto, slogan and guid- 
ing thought of the Charlotte Good- 
fellows club, an organization that is 
fast becoming known throughout 
the length and breadth of the land. 

Formed five years ago by Rev. Dr. 
A. A. McGeachy, pastor of the sec- 
ond Presbyterian church, as the 
Meri.'s Benevolent association, the 
the organization has grown to im- 
posing proportions both in membership 
and accomplishment. 

However, ever after the organiza- 
tion' of the Men's Benevolent asso- 
ciation there was a lack of pep in 
the organization, caused, it was said, 
by the heaviness of the name. Dr. 
McGeachy called a conference of the 
leading members of the club and in 
an executive conference on the grass 
covered lawn of the manse the Good- 
fellows club was born and the old 
association passed away. 

Unobstrusive charity is the main 
object of the club. Charity that 
reaches out and extends the helping 



hand to those who have been denied 
or ignored by other agencies of 
mercy. 

The club was born of the idea 
that there are hundreds of men in 
every city who have charitable ten- 
dencies but who have no connection 
with a church or charitable organi- 
zation and who dislike mja king a 
parade of their charitable impuls- 
es. 

No appeal ever has been made for 
charity except that three members 
of the club are allowed at each 
monthly meeting to describe in three 
minute talks one deserving ease of 
charity that has come under their 
observation. No obligation is placed 
upon any of the more than 600 mem- 
bers to donate for any cause except 
of his own free will and accord. This 
policy, it is said, is responsible for 
the popularity and success of the 
club. Men who have attended prac- 
tically every meeting admit that no 
member has yet failed to respond 
when given an opportunity. 

One of the most inspiring of its 
many meetings was that held on 



THE UPLIFT 



11 



Christmas eve when the more than 
600 men in attendence contributed 
(almost $2,000 to carry Christmas 
cheer to several needy families in 
tho city. This was done without 
ostentation, publicity being sihunned 
by the club. 

The club has no minutes, permits 
no long addresses to its members, 
has the passing of resolutions on all 
matters, important or otherwise, and 
has no records except a card index 
system of its paid-up members, who 
are never dunned for fees and are 
automatically dropped from the roll 
when their membership fees are not 
paid in advance. 

The club maintains an office and 
a full time secretary, Miss Gertrude 
Gower, of Gainsville, Ga., who also 
is a soprano singer of note, who 
keeps the membership roll and re- 
ceives all dues and contributions. 
Three professional nurses are main- 
tained in the city by the club and two 
orphans are kept in school. The 
nurses are paid by the club and work 
under the direction of the city health 
department. These nurses and sev- 
eral singers are honorary members 
of the club, being the only women 
whose names are on the roll. 

The organization is composed of 
men from all walks of life from 
ma.ny sections of the United States 
and representing practically every 
religious creed and political organi- 
zation in the country. Organized by 
a Presbyterian minister, its second 
president was a Catholic and its 
present president is a Jew. Playing 
the good fellow and acting the good 
Samaritan in a quiet way is the only 
function of the club. 

Meetings of the club are marked 



by a spirit of fun and good fellow- 
ship. Long winded addresses are ta- 
boo, although a number of celebri- 
ties have delivered three minute 
talks. Among the notables who have 
spoken are Major General John A. 
LeJeune, commandant of the United 
States marine corps; Billy Sunday, 
tb. evangelist; Houdini, the magic- 
ian; Rev. Dr. George Stuart, evange- 
list, Strickland Gillian, noted humor- 
ist, "Cyclone" McLendon, evangelist, 
United States senators, govenors of 
several states, and a, number of noted 
musicians have appeared at club 
meetings. 

Music takes about 75 per cent 
of the time of each program. "It is 
a mistake to believe," says David 
Ouens, for the past several years 
president of the club, "that a hard- 
headed business man cannot be ap- 
pealed to through his emotions. All 
decent men are charitable, only a lot 
of them are ashamed to admit it. It 
is impossible to bring 600 men to- 
gether every month unless you have 
something better to offer them than 
a long speech describing the beauty 
of Christian charity. The banker 
and the industrial leader like to 
laugh and tre creation of an informal 
atmosphere of good fellowship is the 
best advice for loosening tight purse 
strings. 

' ' Lots of men brag that they do not 
care for as trival a thing as music 
but they are lying when they say so, 
and 75 per cent of the success of the 
Goodfellows club is due to the fact 
that each program is made up largely 
of music. That, coupled with the fact 
that men are innately good and 
charitable and that they find an es-. 
cape from organized uplift and regu- 



12 



THE UPLIFT 



lation by by-laws and constitutions, 
spells the success of the Goodfcl- 
lows club." 

The organization is now closing its 
fifth year of activity and is without 
a counterpart either in purpose or 
organization, so far as members have 
been able to find out, though several 
clubs have been organized in the 
south in emulation of it. 



As stated above Dr. A. A. Mc- 
Geachy, pastor of the Second Presby- 
terian church, was the moving spirit 
of the organization of the club, al- 
though he modestly disclaims this 
honor. T. T. Allison was the first 
president of the club and John M. 
Robinson the second. David Ovens 
is the third president. 



MR. DUKE AND COUNTRY CHURCH 



North Carolina Christian Advocate. 



Mr. James B. Duke in his founda- 
tion of $40,000,000 for education, 
charity and religion has set apart ten 
per cent of that magnificent gift to 
the building and maintenance of coun- 
try churches in North Carolina. 
Nothing like this has occurred, hith- 
erto, with all the multiplied millions 
that rich men have contributed to 
the welfare of humanity. And we be 
lieve that Mr. Duke in his gift to the 
country churches of his native state 
has placed this money where he can 
expect the very largest returns in 
character and high service. 

In fact this new venture in minis- 
tering to the spiritual needs of rural 
North Carolina has already been tried 
out by Mr. Duke in his annual gift 
of $25000, which with gratifying re- 
sult he has for the last ten years con- 
tributed to the country churches of 
North Carolina. With the aid of 
"The Duke Fund," as it has come 
to be known, quite a large number of 
churches have been erected which 
could not h^ve been built without 
such aid, and ministers were kept up- 
on scores of fields that would have 
been deprived of their services but 



for the timely aid of James B. Duke. 

These $25,000 each year for the last 
ten years have proved a great blessing 
to many of the rural sections of this 
state, but that is only a foretaste of 
what is to come when the Old North 
State receives a minimum of $200,000 
a year for religious work in the open 
country. In consequence of these 
generous funds there is a new and 
greater day just ahead for the coun- 
try church in North Carolina. 

But this new opportunity will 
bring with it added responsibilites. 
This gift does not imply a release 
from hard work, but it does imply 
an even greater devotion to the larg- 
er tasks in North Carolina Method- 
ism. These unparalleled opportunities 
for development of the rural church- 
es is going to require bishops who 
look not backward but forward and 
who are men of vision knowing how 
to plan wisely for the future. There 
will be needed also as presiding elders 
men of the same type. The presiding 
elder who just "goes around" will 
be more out of place than ever before. 
A living salary will be provided for 
the rural pastor, but at the same 



THE UPLIFT 



13 



time there will be a call for men, 
and men only, who can bring things 
to pass. There is no place for men 
who 'mark time." 

There will be, also, an urgent de- 
mand for additional ministers. We 
should at this very time have at least 
one hundred consecrated, religious 
young men in training for the great 
days ahead. Not men who have their 
eyes on big salaries and prominent 
places and whose desire is to be min" 
istered unto, but, rather, young men 
with the spirit of the Master who 
would become great by rendering 
a great service. 

A familiar portion of the Word of 
God comes to us just at this time with 
peculiar force. Here it is : " There- 
fore said he unto them, the harvest 
truly is great, but the laborers ai^ 
few : pray ye therefore the lord of the 
harvest, that he would send forth 
laborers into the harvest." 

The church should pray for labor- 
ers and then be careful to guide a- 
right those whom God calls. Even 
the call of God has sometimes to be 
interpreted to youth by an older per- 
son. It was so even in the case of 
Samuel, who came eventually to 
stand at the head of God's greatest 
line of prophets. Furthermore, young 
men should be guided in their train- 
ing. A n intense passion for holy and 
high service hurries one to his task. 
He needs to be told by those who 
have been in the fight to equip him- 
self in the best possible manner for 
what is to come. It is nothing short 
of a crime to allow young man to 
enter the Methodist itineracy half 
prepared for his life's work on the 
flimsy excuse that he does not have 
the money to go to college. It is 



the church's duty to loan him the 
money that he may need to complete 
his education. And the church or 
me n in it who have the due qualifi- 
cations of the Christian ministry up- 
on their hearts wilil see that such 
young men get the money. If any- 
body doubts this, try it out and be 
convinced. 

In view of the foregoing consider- 
ations., the interests of the country 
church are to occupy a prominent 
place this year in the columns of 
the North Carolina Christian Advo- 
cate. We expect among other things 
to carry a series of articles upon this 
subject from church leaders who 
are not impractical theorists, but are 
men who know the whole subject and 
its attendant problems from actual 
experience. And we expect the se- 
ries of articles to be one of the val- 
uable features of the paper in this 
year of grace, 1925. 

The attention of the whole church 
in our state should be riveted upon 
the country churches of North Caro- 
lina. Mr. James B. Duke is a prod- 
uct of the country church as was his 
honored father, Mr. Washington 
Duke. At least ninety-five per cent 
of the Methodist preachers of the two 
conferences in this state came out of 
country churches and a very large 
per cent of the membership in the 
town churches, owing to the influx 
of country people to town, were con- 
verted and joined some country church 
and later brought their church let- 
ters to town. 

Mr. Duke though engrossed with 
big business was wise enough to see 
all this add in consequence to right- 
ly estimate the value of these rural 
churches and of the ministers who 



14 THE UPLIFT 

labor in these fruitful fields. And membership of our Methodism, both 
he not only saw clearly the value of ministers and laymen, in Northt Ca- 
the country church, but he has also rolina should be electrical. One and 
given largely of his money to carry all should be aroused to fresh 
forward this all important work. sense of their opportunities and re- 
The response of the church to this sponsibilities in this new golden day 
sublime challenge of J. B. Duke must which has come to our Methodism 
be met by immediate and whole- and to the people of our common- 
hearted enthusiasm. The effect of wealth, 
the gift of Mr. Duke upon thee coun- 



THE OLD WAGON WHEEL. 



It is a worn out wheel, fit only for the junk pile. But it is mounted 
on a chestnut post, and revolves upon an axle that an amateur carpenter 
cut. The spokes project horizontally from the top of the post. 

Upon the top of the spokes are fastened rural mail boxes. The carrier 
stops by it, turns it to a certain box and deposits mail; turns it again 
and takes mail out of a certain box. It receives messages, as the spokes 
indicate, from every point of the compass. It sends out messages to 
every point of the compass. 

What are the lessons? Your life may be frail, or old and worn — ready 
for the junk pile as the world thinks. But it is capable of bearing a world 
message if it finds its place — if it is adjusted. Has your life found its 
place? Has it been adjusted? It can be, however frail or worn, what- 
ever the world may think. 

Another found its place and put it there; your Lord must find your 
place. You must submit. What about it? 

Another old wheel (perhaps its mate) hangs in an apple tree hard by. 
I could hear it say: "I have seen my day; there is nothing I can do; 
nobody loves me; times are not like they used to be." Which wheel are 
you? They both had the same chance. 

Hanging beside the last wheel was the "eye" of an old-fashioned hoe; 
it too was harking back to the "good old days" before "goose-necked" 
hoes came into vogue and knocked it out. 

But it could be sold to the ' 'junk" man, shipped to the foundry and con- 
verted into a thing of use. Maybe some of us need to be sent to the 
foundry. I wonder which ones? — J. J. Gray. 



THE UPLIFT 



15 



THE CHALLENGE TO MANHOOD. 



Stanly News-Herald 



The young or middle aged man who 
reads the daily newspapers these days 
and sees the evident dawning- glory 
of old North Carolina and does not 
feel a challenge to his own manhood, 
might as well be taken out and shot, 
as far as his future usefulness to 
himself, his family, his town, counly 
or state is concerned, for there is no 
spark there to ignite the fire of use- 
fulness and service within' his soui. 
But to the real men of this state 
there never was more to thrill, en- 
thuse and incite to action than at 
this very time. Hardly does a day 
pass without something new develop- 
ing that should call out th e best 
that is in us all. New inventions, 
new developments in industrial and 
commercial lines, improved farming, 
better highways, finer educational ad- 
vantages — all these stimulate the 
real man to greater personal endea- 
vors and challenge his ambition to 
keep pace With the tremendous 
march of progress on every hand. 



As we approach the beginning of 
new New Year let us, therefore, look 
to the future with hope and faith. 
Let us resolve that during this year 
we will play a real man's part. May 
we determine to better develop oi;r 
minds, our bodies and our various 
business. Let the North Carolina 
high school and college pupil go 
back to his work with renewed de- 
termination to utilize his time in (he 
preparation of himself for his life 's 
work, to build a greater character 
and become a man among men. Let 
the business and professional man 



realize that if he would keep up with 
the trend of the times, and take his 
place along with the leaders in his 
line of work, he must grow in charac- 
ter and soul, must keep his body 
clean and strong and his mind bright 
and alert. Let the farmer open his eyes 
to the fact that this is 1925, and that 
if he would do his best to serve him- 
self and his country and help clothe 
and feed a great people, he must be- 
come a student and a business man 
as well as a farmer, that he must 
think and Work, keep up with the 
latest and best methods and use the 
latest and best farm machinery. But 
these things mean WORK. 



Speaking of work, reminds us of 
the statement which Mr. James B. 
Duke made at Durham the other day. 
It was a regular 1925 sermon that 
ought to be hammered into the life 
of every man, woman and child in this 
state. Mr. Duke was speaking of 
the great University which he has 
made possible for this state and of 
the great things in store for old North 
Carolina in the near future. He said 
' ' North Carolina should, within a 
few years, become the leading state 
en the United States. No state has 
greater natural advantages, if the 
peopl will only work and develop 
them. That's a point that should be 
hammered always. Work, work, 
work. People here just don't work 
enough. They are beginning to in 
the western part of the state, if 
they will only continue and increase 
their efforts, this will be a wondei- 
ful state in a few years." 



16 



THE UPLIFT 



And he preached another big ser- 
mon on the importance of activity 
when he said: "That Germans were 
able to become a world of power be- 
cause they were active working and 
trading, turning money over. They 
will become a great power again in 
25 years if they are allowed to con- 
tinue. They work. The French are 
given to hoarding, holding what they 
ha.ve, turning nothing over. A sec- 
tion, state or nation can never get 
wealthy by trading with itself. If 
must go outside make things that 
others need, in return for whic 
money is brought in. Then wealth 
will result." 



Dreams and visions are great 
things if we work them out, but it 
takes work. A young fellow who 
spired to become a great painter look- 
ed upon the masterpiece of a great 
artist and exclaimed, ''Oh, if I could 
thus put a dream on canvas ! ' ' Dream 
on canvas," roard the great master, 
"it is the ten thousand touches with 
the brush you must learn to put on 
the canvas that make your dream. ' ' 
Just a polite way of saying that 
sweat has done more to produce the 
great things than genius. 

If there is an authority on what 
work will do, it is Mr. Duke. He 
started at the bottom and got his 
great fortune largely through hard 
work — work both o^ mind and muscle. 
He is known as the one rich man who 
works and works and works — works 
all the time. Possibly no one in his- 
tory has appiled himself more ar- 
dently and regularly to his work than 
has this great power and tobacco 
kir-g. It is said /of him that he 
takes very little time for rest and 
recreation, but works constantly 



and has done so all his life. We 
would not recommend the practice 
of ' ' all work and no play for every 
one , but we do believe that most 
of us fail absolutely to work as we 
should. We in this section have never 
known what it is to really work like 
Mr. Duke recommends. We are jusc 
beginning to learn what real industry 
means. Some of us work hard en- 
ough with our muscles, but fail to 
work with our brain. That prevents 
us from getting anywhere. We should 
think first and then work towards 
something definite. In other words 
we should have a vision and then 
work towards it. 

But getting back to the thought of 
our great state's glorious future 
and to Mr. Duke's statement, that 
gentleman, and he is a practical 
hard working man and not merely a 
dreamer or a visionary, sa.id : "I have 
set out two and a half million trees 
from all over this country and Eu- 
rope on my New Jersey place trying 
to make it look nice. I have done 
practically nothing with the one 
here, but the New Jersey place will 
not compare with this one in beau- 
ty. If I had done as much as I 
have done up there, this would be 
wonderful. ' ' 



If there is a man in the world 
who should be authority 01* our 
state's natural resources and ad- 
vantages, that man is J. B. Duke. 
The above statement, therefore, 
means far more than a mere spon- 
taneous outburst of enthusiasm. He 
believes our state will soon be the 
greatest among the American Union 
and he tells why he believes it and 
his reasons are good, for he knows 
this state as few others do, and he 



THE UPLIFT 



17 



knows other sections of the world 
as well. He spoke after comparing 
our state with others. 

Now as we start out the New Year 
let us do so with hope and faith. 
Hope in the future of our state, and 
faith in ourselves to measure up to 
the great service demanded of us in 
the future as makers of and citizens 
of such a glorious commonwealth. 
But let us remember here and now 
(and we would especially like to im- 



press this upon the young men) 
the fellow who measures up as a 
real leader and stands out a man a- 
mong the mighty men of our state 
during the next half century must 
work. He must be stronger in both 
body and mind than his father was 
because he will have to measure his 
strength with real men, for the fu- 
ture North Carolinian is going to be 
a real man in every sense of the 
word. 



MR. WADE RECOMMENDS. 

R. R. Clark in Greensboro News. 



Insurance Commissioner Wade rec- 
ommends a change in the law licens- 
ing stock sales, which he thinks will 
curtail the sale of phony stocks and 
"relieve the state of the unreason- 
able responsibility of acting as guardi- 
an for the public in the appraise- 
ment of speculative investments." 
Certainly if there is no method by 
which the value of the stock may be 
determined with a fair degree of ac- 
curacy before the sale is licensed, 
which may not be practical, then the 
state should refuse to be a party to 
the business. Licensing a stock sale 
without knowledge of the value of 
the stock, or whether honestly pro- 
moted or promoted to defraud, makes 
the state aid and abet fraud. The 
state authority to sell gives the fake 
promoter the best argument he could 
possibly have. Mr. Wade says: 

It would more practically safeguard 
the public to license the securities 
now exempted because of their 
soundness and instead of licensing 
the speculative security require all 
such to file complete data with the 
department regarding the organiza- 



tion, personnel, plan of sale, promo- 
tion, granting no license for the sale 
of such securities, but providing a 
penalty for offering them to the pub- 
lie until such data is on file with 
the department, and a further pen- 
alty for representing to the public 
that they have been licensed by the 
state. 

Authority should be lodged in the 
supervising official to suppress alto- 
gether the sale of any securities in 
which the element of fraud is appar- 
ent. Under such a system the public 
would be entirely safe in purchasing 
any security licensed by the depart- 
ment, and would be put on notice that 
those concerns not licensed were 
highly speculative, and that their se- 
curities would be bought at the pur- 
chaser 's risk. 

This would take away from the 
promoter the greatest selling argu- 
ment he now has. It would relieve 
the state of the unreasonable res- 
ponsibility of acting as guardian for 
the public in the appraisement of 
speculative investments. ' ' 

Mr. Wade "points with pride'' to 



18 



THE UPLIFT 



the fact that, notwithstanding he 
had no appropriation for the admin- 
istration of the blue sky law, of 53 
concerns licensed to sell stock dur- 
ing his administration, and which 
did sell stock, only three reported 
failures that resulted in any loss to 
stockholders. This is an estimated 
ratio of about 6 per cent, which Mr. 
Wade thinks is sufficient "answer 
to the charge of laxity in the en- 
forcement of this law. ' ' On the per- 
centage basis, on the face of the 
proposition, the critics are silenced. 
But while it may not be Mr. Wade's 
fault so much as it is the fault of 
the law, when one considers what 
the three did to large numbers of 
our folks financially we hate to 
think what might have happened if 
six of the concerns had gone bad in- 
stead of three. At the same ratio of 
loss, if 25 per cent of the concerns 
licensed Had gone bad, as they might 
have done so far as any special care 
on the part of the state was concern- 



ed, a large section of the state would 
have been wiped out financially. It 
is poor consolation to one who lost 
his all by investing in a concern 
licensed by the state, which the state 
in effect said was sound and worthy 
of confidence — it is little comfort to 
say to a man who has been finan- 
cially ruined and maybe never can 
come back, that only three of the 53 
companies went to the bad. So far 
as the loser is concerned, it would 
be the same to him if all of 'em had 
gone to the bad. 

The storm that followed the heavy 
losses sustained has made a big dif- 
ference. A lot of people have been 
ruined and the knowledge that the 
state in effect helped in the ruin 
doe's not decrease the bitterness. 
Either the state will make a real ef- 
fort to safeguard or will go out of 
the business of licensing frauds. The 
sacrifice has not been in vain, even 
if that is small comfort to the suf- 
ferers. 



MARY'S QUEST. 

By Emily H. Glover. 



That was certainly the most event- 
ful week that Mary had known for 
a long time. 

Since her father's death her life 
had been hard and lonely. She spent 
the nights in the house of her nearest 
neighbor, but the days were passed 
in her own little cottage, striving in 
every way to make an ' ' honest 
penny" here and there. She sold her 
violets and other flowers, took in 
sewing, made cake, helped the neigh- 
bors to can their vegetables — anything 
to make a little money. For Mary 



Granville dreaded the idea of selling 
the little cottage and going to some 
large city to work. Her idea of bliss 
was to have plenty of time and money, 
so that she might study and read and 
travel, but always she wanted 'to 
keep the old home ready for her re- 
turn. 

Her only brother, who was much 
older than herself, lived on their 
father's plantation in the Mississippi 
Valley, and often sent long letters 
begging Mary to go and live with 
him; but Mary knew he could scarce- 



THE UPLIFT 



19 



ly "make ends meet" and was gen- 
erally in debt when the year ended. 
So she stayed on in the old home, 
though she longed to go out west 
for a visit, and see all of her nephews 
and nieces. 

But to go back to that wonderful 
week — the first event was a long, de- 
lightful drive with some friends. The 
fifty-mile trip and the delicious lunch 
at a farmhouse rested Mary greatly. 
But they had driven only three miles 
on the way home when something 
seemed to go wrong with the steer- 
ing-gear, and for one sickening mo- 
ment Mary realized that the car was 
turning over; then followed agonizing 
pain, and she knew no more. 

When she opened her eyes she was 
lying on a little white bed in a little 
white room, and the friend who had 
taken her to drive was standing near 
her, while the doctor was holding her 
wrist. There was a sweet-faced lady 
at the foot of the bed, but Mary hard- 
ly noticed her at -first, as one arm 
ached a good deal. 

"You are all right now, Miss Gran- 
ville," Sjairl the doctor cheerfully. 
' ' You were lucky to get off with noth- 
ing worse than a broken arm, after 
such a fall. If you'll keep perfectly 
quiet and mind my orders you '11 soon 
be all right again." 

"Anyone else hurt?" asked Mary 
faintly. 

"No, strange to say, you were the 
only victim, so you have nothing 
but your own arm to worry about, 
and the less you worry about that 
the sooner it will get well. It was 
very fortunate that the accident hap- 
pened right in front of the Orphan- 
age, for Mrs. Merton has given you 
the guest room, and there are lots 



of nice little girls to wait on you. ' ' 

"Yes," said the lady at the foot 
of the bed, "it will be a real kind- 
ness if you'll let Marjorie nurse you 
when your friend goes home — the 
child is a newcomer, and very lone- 
ly." Mrs. Merton smiled, and Mary 
loved her at once. 

Even after the arm was set and 
doing well Mary felt so stiff and 
bruised that the doctor advised her 
to stay at the Orphanage for some 
days longer. And Mary was not un- 
willing, for she and the little Mar- 
jorie had become great friends. Mar- 
jory told her about the happy home 
she had lived in once, and how one 
misfortune after another had come 
to them, until an epidemic had de- 
prived her of both father and mother. 
She and her brother, Tom, two years 
younger than herself, were left with- 
out home or money, and only a few 
distant cousins, who were almost as 
poor as themselves. Mary grew much 
interested in the two attractive chil- 
dren, and promised to write often to 
the lonely Marjorie. 

But the news which reached her 

n the veryday of her return home 
made her forget her promise for some 
days. The mail brought a letter from 
her brother — ' ' a wonderfully short let- 
ter for Jim, ' ' was Mary 's mental com- 
ment as she opened the pages. Then 
her eyes grew wide with wonder and 
astonishment as she read : 

' ' Dearest Mary, ' ' it began. ' ' Good 
news ! Good news ! You 're a rich 
woman ! We 're both rich, I mean — 
oil on the old place, and money in- 
it after all ! I am enclosing a check 
for $200.00, so that you can come 
right out and see us at once. Then 

1 can tell you all about it. I feel 



20 



THE UPLIFT 



as if I can hardly wait to see you. 
No time for more at present, as I'm 
desperately busy. > Jim. ' ' 

That was all, but Mary read it 
over and over and stared at the check 
for a long time before she could be- 
lieve it. Then she was suddenly 
conscious-stricken 'with the feeling 
that she was wasting time when she 
ought to be working. 

Another quick thought almost made 
her jump — why, there was no need to 
work any more ! What a wonder- 
ful thought ! She began to dream 
and plan. She seemed to see all sort 
of beautiful things in a kind of gold- 
en haze — first the visit to Jim and 
Eleanor, and the pleasure of know- 
ing all of those dear children. Oh, 
and the trips to Europe and Pales- 
tine and Egypt and all the places she 
had longed to see. She would take 
two dear friends with her — poor art- 
ists who longed to travel. And what 
lots of money she would have to give 
away — money to missions, money to 
her own home church, money to the 
poor — yes, and a good deal of money 
to the orphanage where she had late- 
ly spent so many quiet days and had 
been so kindly treated. The orphan- 
age should certainly have every com- 
fort that money could buy. 

At last she shook off the tempta- 
tion to go on dreaming, and began at 
once to make preparations for the 
long journey to see her brother. 

A happy year for Mary followed. 
She carried out every one of the beau- 
tiful plans she made that first day. 
Who can tell how much happiness her 
money gave, and to how many? The 
two artist friends enjoyed the eight 
months of travel abroad almost as 
much as Mary did. But "it is more 

blessed to give than to receive," and 



in watching their happiness Mary 
had a double portion for herself. 

But when they finally turned their 
faces homeward she could hardly 
wait to see the little cottage with its 
old-time flower garden and lawn and 
big orchard. She wondered if the 
flowers would be blooming and birds' 
nests all about the place, just as they 
were last year. 

When at last she walked into her 
house again home seemed sweeter tha"n 
ever to Mary, yet a sudden sense of 
loneliness possessed her. She sat 
very still on the wide porch and 
thought and thought. Finally she 
said softly to herself: "It does seem 
a shame that this dear little home 
should be of so little use now. And 
I can ' leave it ! And Jim and Elean- 
or don't need me, but it's so lonely 
here—" 

Suddenly a thought struck her and 
her troubled face grew radiant. 

" I '11 do it tommorrow ! ' ' she cried. 
"They're the dearest little lady and 
gentleman in the world." 

The next morning a handsome tour- 
ing car stopped at the orphanage 
and Mary sprang out. After a con- 
sultation in the reception room Mrs. 
Merton told Mary she would send 
Marjorie and Tom to talk to her. 
Presently the two children came in 
with smiling faces. They thought the 
sweet visitor of last year wished to 
speak to them before she drove home. 
But when Mary explained that she 
had come to ask them to share this 
home — to be her own Marjorie and 
Tom — their joy and astonishment 
knew no bounds. 

To have a little home of their own, 
with a garden and birds and chickens, 
and dear Miss Mary always with 
them. 



THE UPLIFT 



21 



No, they must call her "Aunt 
Mary," she said, and love her as 
much as she loved them. 

Ah, that would be easy ! ' ' Why, 
we couldn't help loving you, Aunt 
Mary ! ' ' cried Marjorie, giving her a 
loving kiss, while Tom held one of 
her hands tight in both of his small 
ones. 

A month later Mary sent this let- 
ter to her brother: 
Dear Old Jim: 

I do hope you'll find time for that 
promised visit. You can't think how 
I long to see you and to show you 
my Marjorie and Tom. They are 
darling children, and I've realized 
today for the first time that in try- 
ing to make them happy I've grown 
radiantly happy myself. In fact, I 



have not had time to think of my- 
self at all, because I've been so busy 
taking care of their present comfort 
and planning for their future wel- 
fare. Sometimes I lie awake at 
night thinking about Marjorie 's 
graduation day, and wondering just 
what line of work Tom will take up 
when he is a man. 

I wonder — but, no, I feel sure you 
won't laugh at your little sister's 
plans, Jim, for this kind of happiness 
is yours also. Today I read these 
lines, and they are so marvelously 
true I must copy them for you : 
"It is in loving, not in being loved 

The heart is blessed; 
It is in giving, not in seeking gifts, 

We find our quest. ' ' 



A PILGRIM IN BELGIUM. 

By. Mrs. Charles P. Wiles in Young Folks. 



' ' Low and loud and sweetly blended, 
Low at times and loud at times, 
And changing like a poet's rhymes 
Rang the beautiful wild chimes 
From the Belfry in the market 
Of the ancient town of Bruges. 

When the wrangling bells had ended 
Slowly struck the clock eleven, 
And from out the silent heaven 
Silence on the town descended. 
Silenca, silence everywhere 
On the earth and in the air. 

Save that footsteps here and there 
Of some burgher home returning 
By the street-lamps faintly burning 
For a moment woke the echoes 
Of the ancient town of Burges." 
Longfellow, The Carillon. 



Burges, sometimes called ' ' The 
Venice of the North" contains many 
things that are of interest to the 
traveler. Because of this our heavy 
baggage was placed at the last mo- 
ment in the parcels room at the sta- 
tion in Brussels, and we departed 
to spend a week-end in the quaint- 
est of quaint cities. But we had not 
taken into consideration the fact 
that Monday was a national holiday, 
Belgium's national "fete-day." The 
crowded condition of trains north 
caused us to realize something un- 
usual was in the air. We learned 
that many employed people were 
using the opportunity for a few days 
at one of the coast resorts, Ostende, 
Zeebrugge, or at Middleburgh. Hol- 
land. The trains, in Europe, are 



22 



THE UPLIFT 



made up of ears that are numbered, 
I, II, III class. Few people travel 
first cl,ass many use the second 
class, while the third-class cars are 
over-crowded. Few Americans travel 
by the third class. We have travel- 
ed in all for the experience. 

The cars are divided into com- 
partment, holding from six to eight 
people, and usually have a passage 
at one side. Doors open at either 
side, so that the passenger may con- 
veniently alight on a platform. The 
conductor comes and punches your 
ticket, sometimes before the train 
starts. With that, his responsibility 
for you seems at an end, If you 
do not alight at your own particular 
station, that is your misfortunte.. At 
some places, the name of the station 
eppears on a street light near the 
station, at others, on a station bench, 
while at others you look in vain for 
a name. Conductors, owing to the 
construction of the cars, never call 
out the stations. Nor is "all 
aboard" or its equivalent shouted 
out. Instead, a bell, like a farmer's 
dinner bell, is rung a minute or two 
before the time for departure. 

As, by the time we were ready to 
leave, ten persons had come to our 
compartment, the men took turns 
sanding. All of them were of the 
better class Belgians and spoke Flem- 
ish. A young woman by my side 
spoke to me in English, having ac- 
quired a fluency in the language from 
an English governess. It was she 
who gave the reason for the crowded 
condition of trains. 

We traveled through a level coun- 
try, well-cultivated and having a soil 
of rich black loam. It was the time 
of wheat harvest and on all sides, al- 



though it was near the third week in 
July, the reapers could be seen. 

No fences or hedges divide the 
fields or farms. Not even the land- 
marks of Palestine or the cairns of 
Sccotland. It is impossible to imag- 
ine how farmers keep to their own 
bounds. The grass was green. Not 
a withered looking green, or a 
brownish burned-out looking green, 
but a green like a deep plush of 
emerald. The fields, brown-golden 
of the wheat, silvery green of the 
oats, emerald green of the grass 
fields, covered here and there with 
the scarlet of the poppies, of the 
blue and yellow of many other flow- 
ers, gave the appearance of a succes- 
sion of patch-work quilts. 

And there were orchards in abund- 
ance, with well-loaded apple and 
pear trees, and trees on which the 
cherries ripe and cherries red tempt- 
ed the passerby. Gardens looked 
well-kept and prolific. The summer 
skies were bright. The villages, 
made up of quaint, comfortable- 
looking red tiled or thatched roof 
cottages surrounded with an abund- 
ance of marvelous flowers such as 
we never know, each village having 
its ivy-covered church tower piercing 
the sky, offered a variety that made 
every mile interesting and attrac- 
tive. 

People in foreign lands proudly 
memorialise those, by they poets, art- 
ists, or statesmen, who have added 
glory to their city. Our hotel was 
the Memling Palace, named in honor 
of the fiftenth century artist, Hans 
Memling, whose very choicest work 
of art kept within their own pre- 
cincts. 

A beautiful statue to his memory 



THE UPLIFT 



23 



stands in the Place Memling, a public 
square, while in another square the 
Place Van Eyck, stands a statue of 
Jean Van Eyck, another old master, 
the most famous painter of the early 
Flemish school, who died here in 14- 
40. 

One ofthe greatest glories of Bru- 
ges is the Belfry, immortalized by 
Longfellow. It stands in the market 
square, or Grand Place, a beautiful 
piece of Gothic architecture built in 
1248. But the chi,ef glory is not in 
the age of the tower nor in the style 
or architecture, but in the marvelous 
chimes in the top. 

The "Bell of Triump" weighing 
19,000 ounds, requires eeigth men to 
put it in motion, while in the story 
above is placed the celebrated chime, 
or Carillon, composed of forty-nine 
bells, and weighing 56,166 pounds. 
These, cast in 1741, were the work 
of George Dumery of Amsterdam 
and made his name famous. Every 
year, from all over the world, many 
travelers come to hear these chimes. 
"But our eity is not what it once 
was, ' ' said a native Brugeois to me. 
"It has never been the same since 
the Americans discovered it." I 
almost felt a sense of guilt as I sat 
in our hotel balcony listening to the 
wonderous music of the chimes but 
the huge clock face in the belfry 
seemed to look down at me with an 
air of genial interest and bid me wel- 
come. 

The "Bell Triump" in reality a 
huge brass barrel, or drum having 
30,500 square holes to change the 
tunes, starts the chimes every quar- 
ter of an hour by striking with each 
of its points the hammers, 184 in 
number, which are attached to the 



bells by means of iron or brass wires. 

Besides this enormous brass drum 
that makes the bells play mechanically, 
there is a keyboard on which the 
chimer plays the finest and most 
varying melodies. 

A famous bell-player, Mr. A. Nau- 
webaerts, for more than a decade has 
given his talent for the pleasure of 
the people of Bruges. During the 
summer months concerts are held 
regularly three times a week, usually 
from nine to ten in the evenings, 
when the man, who is an interna- 
tional competition carried off the 
first prize, makes the bells speak to 
one's heart while he sends their 
sweet tones echoing over the town. 

During the winter months the con- 
certs are given in the mornings. 

On one's approach to the eity, 
three great towers pierce the sky, 
the belfry, the tower of the Cathed- 
ral of St. John and that of the Notre 
Dame. On the site of the Cathed- 
ral a chapel was first erected in 646 
A. D., the Cathedral, in its various 
parts covering the dates from 961 
A. D. to 1871. One of the famous 
sections of this place of worship 
is the pulpit of carved wood which 
required eight years to make and cost 
42,000 frances. In the choir hang 
eight splendid Gobelin tapestries. 
Across the street, in the Hospital 
St. Jean, is the museum containing 
the very finest of Memling's master- 
pieces. 

An outstanding work of art in the 
Notre Dame is the state of the Vir- 
gin and child out in white marble 
by Michael Angelo in 1504. A 
similar statue by the same ,artist, 
is seen in St. Peter's at Rome. Of 
the chief glory of the first-named 



24 



THE UPLIFT 



tower, mention has already been 
made. 

Bruges is a city of canals and 
cobbled 'canal bridges), so many 
bridges that, "no one has ever taken 
the trouble to count how many there 
are," we were told. 

Surrounding the city are two canals, 
within the inner canal being the ele- 
vated tree-bordered walk called the 
"Kamparts. " The people go to and 
from the city by one of four gates, 
one of the most interesting being 
south gate. Or Porte du Marechale, 
on the facade of which is fixed an 
iron head, to recall to the people 
of Bruges the fate of a man of Ghent, 
a traitor, who, in 1668, when the 
French army besieged the city, was 
ready to betray the city by opening 
the gate. His plan was discovered 
and he was beheaded. 

Many of the houses of this city 
of 58,000 people are charmingly 
simple, being yperfect examples of 
sixteenth century architecture, with 
the Flemish "step" gables so be- 
loved by the Van Ecyks. The roofs 
present a hunch back jumbled appear- 
ance, red-gold in the setting sun. 

Having taken a general view of 
the city, the pilgrim takes a seat on 
one of the numerous motorboats 
down by Quai de Rosalie for a tour 
through the numerous canals of the 
city: and here is picturesque beauty, 
the houses, with their over-hanging 
balconies and window boxes filled 
with flowers of brilliant hue, border- 
ing the canals on every side. Here 
and there trees grow along the banks, 
reaching far out over the water, and 
forming a verdant arcade under 
which to pass. Bridges were many, 
"and bend very low" was the fre- 



quent admonition of our English 
speaking guide. Some of the older 
bridges have beautiful arches, while 
the more modern ones make "stoop- 
ing low" necessary. Hearing that 
Monday was to be a day of festivity 
over all Belgium, we decided to lin- 
ger longer than had been planned at 
first, in order to witness the Carnival 
on the canals at night. Having some 
time to spare, we boarded a canal 
steamer and sailed by canal into Hol- 
land where we trailed around the 
streets of a town equally as quaint 
as Burges and where we seemed to 
offer as much amusement to the peo- 
ple as they did to us. 

While the walks along the canals 
are not easy, much of the paving be- 
ing of the cobblestone variety, they 
are very worth while. On many of 
them are quaint fourteenth century 
houses, each having its exquisitely 
beautiful embroidered linen half- 
shades with designs oi mediaeval 
knights and ladies carried out in 
broderie Anglaise or in Flemish. In 
the smallest of shops were these same 
elegant shades, even in the small cigar 
shops. At every window, no matter 
how Immble the cottage, were to be 
seen window curtains bordered in 
wide edges of real lace. We feel 
rich if we possess a nine inch piece 
for the front of a frock. Here, real 
lace abounds in profusion. But this 
is the city of real lace, the lace 
makers laying claim to supplying 
many of the shops of Brussels with 
their products. 

Wandering down some of the nar- 
row streets we came to the homes uf 
the lace-makers. One sweet faced old 
lady looked from her doorway with 
the most cordial of smiles as though 



THE UPLIFT 



25 



inviting me to tarry awhile. At 
another place, women sat with bonnets 
like our grandmothers used to wear. 
Inquiring as to the reason why they 
wear these bonnets in their houses 
while at work, "It is the custom of 
our country," was the answer I re- 
ceived. 

Travelers frequently inquire of 
other travelers in hotels as to what 
they have seen, so that nothing that 
is worth seeing is omitted Learning 
that in the old Grunthuse, the palace 
of a noble family in the middle ages, 
in which many of the rooms are left 
as in the early days of its history, 
was to be seen one of the most val- 
uable collections of lace in the world 
I went around. "Surely," I thought 
"no where in the world can lace 
makers be more adept. ' ' For here 
was one piece as fine as cobweb, a 
piece requiring fifteen hundred bob- 
bins to make. The threads being so 
fine the work had to be done in a 
damp room to lessen the danger of 
breaking. This is said to be the 
finest piece of lace in the world, the 
maker having given her sight as a 
result of the strain. 

In another ease was a famous 
piece three yards long; forty- five year 
and three generations being necessary 
to its completion, while on the other 
side were the original Van Dyke col- 
lar and cuffs. Four hundred different 
pieces go to complete the display. 

The art has to be acquired in child- 
hood or it is not acquired at ail. 
Passing by the lace-makers as they 
sit at their tasks by their doorsteps, 
one is reminded of the skilled pianist 
playing an intricate piece of music, 
with such ease do the fingers, fly. 
Going down the business streets, one. 



wonders how they ever dispose of 
all their products, for on all sides 
are lace shops filled with most ex- 
quisite pieces. Nothing I saw in 
this line, however, in Brussels or Bru- 
ges was more beautiful than a lace 
gown on exhibit at Wembley, London, 
and in front of which stood an elder- 
ly man of ministerial appearance 
with a lady, presumbly the Mrs. Cu- 
rate. The gown was made over a pat- 
tern designed especially for Queen Vic- 
toria. As the white-haired, plain- 
looking old gentleman stood gazing, 
he remarked, in his prounoneedly 
English accent, "Now, there is a 
frock I like." "I wonder who 
wouldn't," said his wife, gently and 
meekly, with an accent equally Eng- 
lish, realizing doubtless, as the old 
gentleman did not, the priceless value 
of the pattern. 

Our Hotel Memling, as well as 
many other hotels, the belfry, the 
government building, and the post- 
office, a few cafes dating from the 
seventeenth century are some of the 
buildings surrounding the Market 
Square or Grand Place. 

Here, on certain mornings, are 
groups of marketing folk, some buy- 
ing some selling. Here, from our bal- 
cony we looked down upon a scen^ of 
uncommon interest, upon the street 
traffic, small carts drawn by oogy, 
singly, or in pairs or in threes, dogs 
that are trained f this particular 
work, nevertheless ae to type It 
was with somethin;; uKin to nity that 
we looked at a fim dog drawing a 
cart, while a jaost inferior looking 
yellow street dog wij:ed by, carefree. 
The cart dog, seen ing to resent the 
superior air of the care- free cur, felt 
within him a desir to fight, but how 



2G 



THE UPLIFT 



could he attached as he was to his 
encumbrance? All the fine dog could 
do was to look backwards as he drew 
the cart, barking vociferously at 
the yellow dog the while. 

Here we see queer two-wheeled 
vehicles and queered quaint tilt-top 
wagons, market women in real lace 
head-dresses and wooden clogs,priesls 
in black cassocks and flat roll- 
brimmed hats, and nuns with enor- 
mous wimples, all making a picture 
that looks more like the sixteenth 
century etching than market square 
in the modern world. 

Monday morning saw the city in 
gala array, the red, yellow and black 
of the Belgian flag flying to the 
breeze on all sides, while here and 
there the Lion of Flanders, red on 
a yellow ground, rampant and claw- 
ing, was in evidence, people gath- 
ered early and soon the market 
square was filled. In the center a 
band-stand had been erected and 
here, at intervals during the day, 
one band or another played in their 
very best fashion the old classics. 
But now and again, we heard the 
clump, clump, clump of a boy in 
clogs going along the streets whistl- 
ing, as he walked, as if to the 
accompaniment of the clogs, the seem- 
ingly world-known tune," Yes, We 
Have No Bananas." 

The people of Belgium are quiet 
and orderly. In spite of the fact 
that the day was a gala day, there 
was no disorder. On the wide pave- 
ments in front of the hotels and 
cafes, under awnings, hundreds of 
people sat, sipping various beverages. 

All the townspeople had come out 
and the country folk came in, for 
the holiday. It was a holiday with- 



out noise and commotion. No loud 
voices were heard, and no street 
brawls seen. The only sounds car- 
ried on the air were those of the 
carillon in the belfry each quarter 
hour, and the music band in the 
Market Square. 

The people seemed to feel kindly 
toward us. As I wandered through 
the most ancient part of the city I 
lost my way. Thinking perhaps a 
group of schoolboys might be able 
to direct me, I inquired in the very 
few Flemish words I could remem- 
ber, how to reach my destination. 
One of the boys, a lad of about 
twelve, could not ..restrain himself at 
my efforts, but laughed heartily in 
my face.. The other two looked em- 
barrassed at his bad manners. A 
little farther along as I walked on 
the Ramparts by the ancient body 
of water known as the Minnewater, 
where is an old tower from the year 
1398, a last vestige of the old forti- 
fications defending tho city, three 
little girls smiled sweetly at me and 
greeted me in French. I tried to 
answer in the very best accent I 
could summon, and, while it was 
very bad French, I know, they un- 
derstood men and waved their hands 
in a kindly farewell. 

The carnival on the canals after 
darkness had fallen was the crowning 
epoch of a perfect day. Artistic fin- 
gers had fashioned the decorations 
on the boats, while musicians of abil- 
ity played or sang as the boats glid- 
ed noiselessly along. 

During the fourteenth and fifteenth 
centuries, Burges was a city of 200,- 
000 inhabitants and was then the 
center of commerce for Northern 
Europe. All the shipping towns of 



THE UPLIFT 



27 



north Germany had their storehouses 
in Burges where the ships of all na- 
tions discharge their rich cargoes. 
In one day as many as 150 vessels 
sailed into the large harbor. Seven- 
teen kingdoms had their official trade 
centers and twenty ministers rep- 
resented far-off lands. In the early 
part of the sixteenth century the two 
rivers Swyn and Roy a which formed 
a large estuary and fine spacious na- 
tural harbor, became silted up and 
choked with mud, to which is attri- 



buted the decay of Bruges. 

In 1907, the Brugeois inaugurated 
their new seaport Zee-brugge, which 
port obtained an historical reputation 
during the great war. It was here, 
on April 23, 1918, that the British 
navy sanak at the entrance to the 
harbor, three large warships which 
effectually bottled up the mouth of 
the Bruges canal and put an end to 
the activity of the German sub- 
marines. 



MARK TWAIN'S AUTOBIOGRAPHY. 



So much had been written about 
the humorous side of the late Mark 
Twain (Samuel M. Clemens) that only 
in these two volumes have we had the 
the opportunity of knowing his in- 
nermost thoughts and emotions. But 
it is not biograhpy; rather it is an 
intimate record of the author's pri- 
vate life. He stipulated that it 
should not be published until after 
his death. "I am writing from the 
grave," he says in a foreword. "On 
these terms only can a man be ap- 
proximately frank." And he is 
frank ! He bares a human side little 
suspected. He was an ordinary 
mortal after all. Words and things 
hurt him — and deeply. He had his 
likes and dislikes. He was a man 
of many moods. Some of his percep- 
tions are good ; others absurd. Be- 
reavements left wounds that never 
healed and caused him to regard the 
world through mirthless glasses. Mark 
Twain's life was, bitter-sweet, though 
his writings do not show it. He had 
a 'queer „ philosophy. Listen to the 
man. who, wrote ' ' Tom ..Sawyer, " ' ' A 
Connecticut Yankee at King Athur 's 



Court" and other sterling works: 

' ' What a wee little part of a per- 
son 's life are his acts and words ! 
His real life is led in his head and 
is known to none but himself. All 
day long and every day, the mill of 
his brain is grinding and his thoughts 
are his history. His acts and his 
words are merely the visible thin 
crust of his world, with its scattered 
snowy summits and its vacant wastes 
of water — and they are so trifling a 
part of his bulk ! a mere skin envelop- 
ing it. The mass of him is hidden 
— it and its volcanic fires that toss 
and boil, and never rest, night nor 
day. These are his life and they 
are not written and cannot be writ- 
ten." 

But for real bitterness the follow- 
ing is hard to match : 

' ' A myriad of men are bo^n : thf;y 
labor and sweat and struggle for 
bread; they squabble and scclc and 
tight; they scramble for little mei i 
advantages over each otuer. Age 
creeps upon them; iufirmilies fo'- 
low ; shames and humiliations bring 
down their prides and their vanities. 



2a 



THE UPLIFT 



Those they love are taken from them, 
and the joy of life is turned to ach- 
ing; grief. The burden of pain, care, 
misery, grows heavier year by year. 
At length ambition is dead ; pride is 
dead; vanity is dead; longing for re- 
lease is in their place. It comes at 
last — the only unpoisoned gift earth 
ever had for them — and they vanish 
from a world where they were of no 
consequence; where they achieved 
nothing; where they have left no sign 
that they have existed — a world which 
will lament them for a day and for- 



get them forever. Then another my- 
riad takes their place, and copies 
all they did and goes along the same 
profitless road, and vanishes as they 
vanished — to make room for another 
and another and a million more my- 
riads to follow the same arid path 
through the same desert and accom- 
plish what the first myriad, and all 
the myriads that came after it, ac- 
complished — nothing ! ' ' 

And they called Mark Twain 
''America's greatest humorist!" 



INSTITUTION NOTES. 



By J. J. Jones, Jr 



The boys could not do much work 
last week because of wet weather. 



Nine hogs were killed during the 
past week. 



New quarterlies, for the first quart- 
er, were distributed to the cottages 
last week. 



Letter writing day came around 
last week, and every boy had the 
pleasure of rending a letter home. 



The Goodman Literary Society 
held its regular meeting on last Mon- 
dav evening, and held a fine debate. 



The bakery has been closed for 
about six days while the old oven is 
being removed. A new oven will be 
installed soon. 



The boys have been cutting- wood 



most of the time for the past week, 
as they had to have something to 
keep them warm. 



The boys had a big time at the ball 
ground, last Saturday afternoon, the 
basket ball players had a long prac- 
tice. 



Mrs. 0. K. Duckett has just re- 
turned to the institution after spend- 
ing Christmas holidays in South Car- 
olina. 



The boys enjoyed a show on last 
Thursday evening. The show exhib- 
ited was : ' ' Milky Way ' ' and ' ' Dumb 
Waiters. ' ' 



The following boys received pa- 
roles last week : Bill Sherill, Garland 
McCall, Edwin Baker, and James 
Martin. These boys have made good 
records at the school. McCall was 



THE UPLIFT 



29 



one of our best baseball players and 
Sherill was a member of the basket 
ball team. 



Readers of this issue of THE 
UPLIFT will notice a large honor 
roll for the last month, showing' that 
the boys are still keeping up the good 
work in the school rooms. 



day's lesson, Blessed be the King 
that cometh in the name of the Lord'' 
and the subject, "Christ's Trium- 
phal Entry" were read with en- 
thusiasm by the boys. 



Rev. Mr. Higgins, of Concord, con- 
ducted the services in the auditorium 
last Sunday afternoon. Rev. Higgins 
preached a fine sermon, which was 
enjoyed by everyone. 



Mr. A. A. Sims, Jr., and Mr. Ralph 
Lank Ford, representing the Lions 
Club of Gastonia, visited the school 
Tuesday afternoon. They brought 
with them, as a gift from their Club, 
a handsome cabinet Victrola and fif- 
ty records. The Gaston county cot- 
tage is very proud of such a nice ad- 
dition to its furnishings, and the 
boys will get much pleasure from the 
machine. 



The golden text of the last Sun- 



HONOR ROLL. 



Room No. 1 

"A" 
David Brown, Ernest Brown, Lam- 
bert Cavenaugh, Charles Grossman, 
James Davis, Claud Evans, Elwyii 
Green, Everett Goodrich Albert Hinl, 
Robert Lea, Ervin Moore, Roby Mill- 
lies, Freed Ma honey, Washington 
Pickett, Watson O'quinn, Thomas 
Sessoms, Vaughn Smith, Mack Wectz, 
Vestal Yarborough, Haskell Ayers, 
Charles Beech, Walter Cumins, Oler 
Griffin, John Keenan, Valtoii/ Lee, 
Vernon Lauder, Earl Little, Lee Mc- 
Bride, Argo Page, Whitlock Pridgen, 
Alwyn Shinn, Odell Wrenn. 

"B" 
Robert Ferguson, Doy Hagwood, 
Carl Henry, Geo. Howard, Geo. Fat- 
ferty, William Miller, Lexie New- 
nam, Carl Osborn, Sam Osborn, Au- 
brey Weaver, Clyde Pierce, Clint 
Wright, Archie Waddell, James Alex- 
ander, Percy Briley, Harry Dalton, 



Olive Davis, James Gillespie, Her- 
man Goodman, Theodore Wallace, 
Smiley Morrow, Louie Pate, Donald 
Pate, James Watts. 

Room No. 2 
"A" 

William Creasman, Mack Duncan, 
Fleming Floyd, Albert Jarman, Hugh 
Moore, Robert McDaniel, Harry 
Stevens, Clyde Holingsworth, Hy- 
ra::i Greer, Jeo Carrol, Leon Allen, 
Sam Carrow, Ray Franklin, Pleas 
Garfield Mercer, William Nichlos, 
Walter Page, Frank Stone, Lester 
Stalev, Jim Suther, Robert Ward, 
Hurley Way. 

"B" 

Clarence Anderson, David Driver, 
Mark Jolly, Howard Keller, Homer 
Montgomery, Dick Pettipher, Brantly 
Pridgen, Joe Stevens, Jack Stewart, 
Worth Stout, Ed Ellis, Zeb Trexler, 
Frank Emmett, Irwin Cooper, Broach- 



30 



THE UPLIFT 



ie Flowers, Jess Forester, Sylvester 
Honeycutt, Charles Jackson', Garfield 
Mercer, Sallie Matthews, Ralph Mart- 
in, Lee Smith, Herbert Tolley, Gra- 
ham York. 

Boom No. 3 

"A" 
Lester Bowen, Albert Buck, Clif- 
ton Hedrick, Roy Johnson, Solomon 
Thompson, Carlton Hegar, Elmjo 
Oldham, Sam Poplin, Edwin Cren- 
shaw, William Barbee, Abraham 
Goodman, George Holland, Arnold 
Teague, Luke Patterson, Walter 
Williams. 

"B" 
Adam Beik, Lester Morris, J. B. 
Hairgrove, Rhodes Lewis, James 
Ci^viness, Sam ^tevenis, James 
Philips, Herbert Orr, Connie Loinan, 
Douglas Williams, 

Room No. 4 

"A" 
Jesse Harrell, Allen Byers, Ned 
Morris Jesse Hurley, Ed Moses, Jeff 
La.tterman, Harold Thompson, Jas. 
Fisher, Clyde Lovett, Hunter Cline, 
Raymond Richards, Charles Carter, 
Cebern MeConnell, Brevard McLen- 
don, Broadie Riley, Harvey Cook, Rex 
Weathersby. Furman Wishon, Jeff 
Blizzard, Jay Lambert, Cedric Bass, 
John Creech, Clarence Maynard, Her- 
man Hemric, John W. Forester, Wint- 
er Matthews, Regjie Brown, Bruce 
Bennett, James Pe: .er, Calvin Forbusli 

"B" 
Paul Oldham, Alfred Stamey, Carl 
Richards, Luther Mason, W ; llumi 
Harmon, Harold Crary, James Bed- 
ingfield, Glenn Walter, Britt Gatlin, 
Hil) Ellington, Delmas Stanley, Her- 
bert Floyd, Leonard Atkins, Ray- 



mond Kennedy, John Kivett, David 
Queen, Harrell King, Sam Smith, 
Vernon Hall, Bill Rising, Paul Ed- 
wards, Ralph Leatherwood, Junius 
Matthews, Bill Penny, Emis Harper, 
Carl Richards. 

Boom No. 5 

"A" 
Lattie McClamb, Andrew Parker, 
Claud Wilson, Charlie Beaver, El- 
mer Mooney, Thomas Tedder, Kell'o 
Tedder, Earl Torrenee, Earl Ed- 
wards, Robert Sprinkle, Ray Brown, 
Theodore Coleman, George Lewis, Al 
Pettigrew, Lester Matthews, Grey 
Haddock, Lee King Lester Franklin, 
Wannie Frink, Clarence Weathers, 
Tessie Massy, Norman Beck, Albert 
Stansbury, Van Dowd, Eugene Kel- 
ler, Robert Sisk, Walter Culler, Mas- 
ton Britt, Samuel DeVon, John To- 
misian, Larry Griffith, Woodrow 
Kivit, Ralph Glover, David Whis- 
ker, Linzie Lambeth, Elmer Proctor. 
Cecil Trull, William Wafford, John 
Gray, Lemuel Lane, Earl Green, 
Floyd Stanley, Dewy Blackburn, Will 
Hodge, Andrefw Bivins, Leonard 
Burleson, Eugene Glass, Kenneth 
Lewis, Claude Dunn, John Watts 
Burton Emory, Elias Warren, Ly- 
onel McMahan, Preddy Turner, Geo. 
Cox, Claude Stanley. 

"B" 
Cecil Arnold,' Coaley ' Aumontf, 
Parks Earnheart, J. David Sprinkle, 
James Long, Lestetr Love, Regige 
Payne, Ben Cameron, James Robin- 
son, Ben Cook, Frank Ledford, Wil- 
bert Rockley, Charlie Carter, Ben- 
jamin Moore, Otis Floyd, Toddie 
Albarty, John Hill, Bertie Murry, 
Garland Ryls, Roy Hauser. 



RAILROAD SCHEDULE 

Northbound 



No. 


136 


To 


Washington 


5:00 A. 


M. 


No. 


36 


To 


Washington 


10:25 A. 


M. 


No. 


46 


To 


Danville 


3:15 P. 


M. 


No. 


12 


To 


Richmond 


7:25 P. 


M. 


No. 


32 


To 


Washington 


8:28 P. 


M. 


No. 


38 


To 


Washington 


9:30 P. 


M. 


No. 


30 


To 


Washington 
Southbound 


1:40 A. 


M. 


No. 


45 


To 


Charlotte 


4:14 P. 


M. 


No. 


35 


To 


Atlanta 


10:06 P. 


M. 


No. 


29 


To 


Atlanta 


2:45 A. 


M. 


No. 


31 


To 


Augusta 


6:07 A. 


M. 


No. 


33 


To 


New Orleans 


8:27 A. 


M. 


No. 


11 


To 


Charlotte 


9:05 A. 


M. 


No. 


135 


To 


Atlanta 


9:15 P. 


M. 



THE SOUTHERN SERVES THE SOUTH 



fc*5 &«* 



THE 




VOL. XII 



CONCORD, N. C, JANUARY 17, 1925 



No. 8 






♦ 



♦ 
* 
* 



THE GUIDE. 



"Be ye not as the horse or as the mule which 
have no understanding, whose mouths must be held 
in with bit and bridle." 

You are not be without the reins, indeed ; but they 
are to be of another kind; "I will guide thee with 
Mine Eyes." So the bridle of man is to be the 
Eye of God; and if he rejects that guidance, then 
the next best for him is the horse's and the mule's, 
which have no understanding. — John Ruskin. 



* 



* 






$$<^$$$$$$$3h^$$$<^$$$<^$$$$<^<$$$$»J>$<^<$$$$.- 



-PUBLISHED BY- 



THE PRINTING CLASS OF THE STONEWALL JACKSON MANUAL 
TRAINING AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



■7. P. Cook, Chairman, Concord 
Miss Easdale ,Shaw, Vice-Chairman 

Rockingham 
Jno. J. Blair, Sec, Raleigh 
D. B. Coltrane, Treas., Concord 
J. S. Efird, Albemarle 
Mr. Chas. A. Cannon, Concord 
Rev. Tom P. Jimison, Spencer 



Mrs. G T. Roth, Elkin 

Herman Cone, Greensboro 

Mrs. Cameron Morrison, Raleigh 

Mrs. A. L. Coble, Statesville 

Mrs. T. W. Bickett, Raleigh 

Mrs. W. N. Reynolds, Winston-Salem 

Mrs. I. W. Faison, Charlotte 

Mr. Paul Whitlock, Charlotte 



Mis. W. H. S. Burgwyn, Honorary Member 
Chas. E. Boger, Supt. 



CONTENTS. 



EDITORIAL COMMENT 3-6 

ANGUS WILTON MeLEAN 7 

ROBERT EDWARD LEE 8 

BENJAMIN FRANKLIN 12 

THOMAS JONATHAN JACKSON 16 

THE THREE MAJOR QUESTIONS 18 

A SPECIAL MESSAGE FOR BOYS AND GIRLS 

Dr. Holland 19 

UNCLE RASTUS' CRISTMAS MEDITATIONS 

Old Hurrygraph 21 

RAMBLING AROUND Old Hurrygraph 21 

COLUMBUS AND THE ECLIPSE 24 

GEMS OF TH E SKY Josephine E. Toal 25 

TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO AND NOW Smithfield Herald 28 

INSTITUTION NOTES J. J. Jones, Jr. 29 



The Uplift 



A WEEKLY JOURNAL 

PUBLISHED BY 

The Authority of the Stonewall Jackson Manual Training and Industrial 

School. Type-setting by the Boys Printing Class. Subscription 

Two Dollars the Year in Advance 

JAMES P. COOK, Editor, J. C. FISHER, Director Printing Department 



Entered as second-class matter Dec. 4, 1920 at the Post Office at Concord, 
N. C. under act of March 3, 1879. Acceptance for mailing at special rate 
of 4, 1923. 



FRIENDSHIP. 

Gold cannot buy it, 

Poverty try it; 

Thrift may not cheapen it, 

Sorrow must deepen it; 

Joy cannot lose it, 

Malice abuse it; 

Wit cannot choke it; 

Folly provoke it; 

Age can but strengthen it, 

Time only lengthen it, 

Frienship forever. 

Death cannot sever 

Heaven the true place of it, 

God is the Grace of it. 

— Abbie Farwell Brown, in Youth's Companion. 



THREE ANNIVERSARIES. 

Lest we forget, The Uplift spends a little time in this issue in dealing out 
some thoughts relative to the lives and careers of three most outstanding 
characters in American history, — Franklin, Lc i and Jackson. Benjamin 
Franklin's birthday is on today, the 17th; Robert E. Lee's, on the 19th; and 
Stonewall Jackson's, on the 21st. 

There come days in the lives of men, of nations, of races, and in the life 



•4 THE UPLIFT 

of civilization itself which are of such conspicuous importance that they are 
set apart from the ordinary run of days and the events they stand for are 
duly remembered each recurring year on the proper date. Birthdays, reli- 
gious feast days, days of battle — many are the occasions commemorated. 
The value to us of such special days is in their observance — that we dedicate 
ourselves to the spirit they perpetuate. 

Much of what The Uplift carries about Gen. Lee is suggested by the 
statements and sidelights used by Muzzy in his School History, which has 
been justly criticised and very properly discarded by a large number of 
schools. The author, it may be noted in pasing, is brilliant, scholarly and 
a master of the language, but in his pen there is vitriol. 

Of the most wonderful man, Franklin, many stories have been attached 
to his name, as were jokes to the name of the late beloved Zeb Vance, that 
are merely the creation of brilliant and careless imaginations. Somebody 
recently claims to have exposed the act of discovery accredited to Franklin 
with regard to his kite and lightning. Regardless of whether this be true 
or not, this remarkable man wrought splendidly and served his country most 
admirably in a number of great and important events. The idea of observing 
Thrift Week, predicated on the sayings and acts of Franklin, is a wholesome 
one, fraught with much hope for good and no evil. 

But the suggestion of a " Dollar-day, ' ' when preparing for Thrift Week, 
to stimulate business and seduce people to buy things they do not need be- 
cause of their apparent cheapness, seems the height of absurdity. Just got 
the wires crossed by giving away to enthusiasm. 

"SEVEN MILLIONS THROWN AWAY." 

This is a statement made in the Chapel Hill News Letter. It has reference 
to the deplorable school attendance that the records reveal. The News Letter 
argues for its statement as follows : 

The compulsory school attendance law of North Carolina does not seem 
to be very effective. Out of every 100 children enrolled in school during 
the last school year, an average of only 71 were in daily attendance. In 
73 counties more than one-fourth of the enrolled children were absent 
daily. A school is organized to care for the total enrollment. When 
three out of every ten children enrolled in the state are absent daily it 
meaus that 30 per cent of the taxpayers' money is being wasted. Which 
means that about seven million dollars of school tax money was wasted 
last year because of poor attendance. This is enough money to carry the 
entire State bonded debt, and equals the total income from automobile li- 



THE UPLIFT 5 

cense and the gasoline tax. 

Four out of every ten dollars the taxpayers of Scotland county pay for 

school purposes are wasted. It 's the taxpayers ' fault, for poor attendance 

is largely the fault of the parents. It is up to the parents to keep their 

children in school and get the benefit of the money paid for school 

support. 

The appeal is especially directed at tenant farmers, whose children in 

turn will be tenant farmers if they are not allowed to get an education 

that will enable them to compete with others on equal terms. 

If the same condition prevails among the tenant farmers elsewhere, as 
we happen to know it in a certain community, then the low average daily 
attendance in the public schools is largely due to the indifference of the 
tenant farmer. One example of stubborn indifference comes to mind. Un- 
able to read himself, one of these indiffierent men deprived his little girl 
in the second grade of two whole months' schooling. He side-stepped the 
compulsory school law, by sending her one day in each ten. 

Just what excuse this miserable and ignorant father would have given, had 
the authorities approached him on the subject, is hard to tell ; but the real 
reason is that he did not want his child vaccinated. He boldly declared, "I 
will rot in jail before I will permit it.'' 

The statistics, as published for the several counties, seem to indicate the 
ineffectiveness of the compulsory school law. It does appear that it is based 
on a wrong idea. If the law compelled each normal child to complete a cer- 
tain number of grades — say the seventh — it naturally follows that there would 
be an incentive to the careless and indifferenant parents to avail themselves 
more liberally of the advantages and opportunities offered them. 

PICKING ON THE QUEEN CITY. 

It appears that the modernists, or what not in the kingdom of those who 
would sow the seeds of doubt in the authenticity of the Bible, have an eye 
set on Charlotte. 

In the latter part of last year there was entertained in a select circle in 
that city an emissary from the clique that has prepared a "Shorter Bible'' 
and some of the preachers were taken to task for not lending their presence 
to the designing woman that had come with her new wares. Just the other 
day an imported teacher, now employed in a North Carolina School, represent- 
ing a so-called extension service, practically repudiated the Bible. In the 
first instance Dr. Bridges sounded the alarm and clearly explained why the 
preachers did not support the presence of the advocate of the "Shorter 



6 THE UPLIFT 

Bible." 

And a teacher in the Observer, on Sunday morning, gave no uncertain. 
sound in opposition to such trash being handed out to the intelligence of 
her city. Just because Charlotte is the scene of the first Declaration of 
Independence, these minions of devilment and conceit need not think that 
the Queen City can be converted to the theories of evil, such as must please 
Satan. 

* * * « * * * * * * * * 

DOESN'T SOUND LIKE HIM. 

There is something in the article on Jackson, elsewhere in this issue, which 
does not square with our understanding of the character and temperament of 
the great general, though it is taken from a high-class publication that is not 
given to extravagance. 

There is nothing in Jackson's life as a boy and young man, nor after he 
became conspicuous in the military world that is at all compatible with a 
temperament that would give utterance to a statement like this: "President 
Davis rode on the field, and Jackson pushing aside the surgeons (they were 
dressing his wounded hand) tossed his cadet cap in the air and exclaimed, 
' ' Hurrah for the President ; give me ten thousand men and I will be in Wash- 
ington tonight." 

We just can 't believe Stonewall Jackson pulled off such a stunt. 
************ 

OCCUPIES A UNIQUE POSITION. 

A great majority of the states of the Union have several ex-governors. 
North Carolina today has but one — ex-Governor Cameron Morrison. They 
work them too hard in the Old North State, for them to survive the strain 
for many years. 

It is gratifying, however, to note that Gov. Morrison, while heading a 
strenuous administration in which he was never idle, retires to private 
life physically fit for long years of service. 



THE UPLIFT 
GOVERNOR ANGUS WILTON McLEAN. 




Inaugurated on Wednesday in the presence of an immense throng, who 
reflected the great satisfaction and joy of all North Carolina, and with an 
abiding confidence that North Carolina is to have in him a wise and great 
business governor. 



THE UPLIFT 

ROBERT EDWARD LEE. 



Robert Edward Lee, son of "Light- 
Horse Harry" Lee of the Revolution, 
was born in Virginia, January 19th, 
1807. He graduated at West Point 
in 1829, second in his class. He dis- 
tinguished himself in the Mexican 



In March, 1862, he was made com- 
mander in chief of the Confederate 
forces. To his surpassing ability 
was due the stubbornness of the strug- 
gle carried on by the Confederates 
between Richmond and Washington. 




vhu 



War as Scott's chief engineer. For 
three years he was in command of 
the Military Academy at West Point. 
When his state, Virginia seceded 
from the Union, he though himself 
obliged to go with it. He resigned 
his commission in the army of the 
United S+ates, and was made com- 
mander of the Virginia State forces 
and later a Confederate general. 



When The War Between the Slates 
was over General Lee took the re- 
sult manfully and devoted himself 
to the building up of Washington Col- 
lege (now the Washington and Lee 
University, at Lexington, Virginia) 
of whiea he was made president. He 
died en the 12th of October, 1870. ' 
Comments By Muzzey. 

"John C. Calhoun probably has 



THE UPLIFT 



9 



even today but one rival in the hearts 
of Southern patriots, — the gallant, 
warrior-gentleman, Robert E. Lee.'' 

Referring to the John Brown Raid 
about Harpers Ferry : ' ' where with 
only eighteen men he seized the 
United States arsenal and, raiding 
the houses of a few of the neigbor- 
ing planters, forcibly freed about 
thirty of their slaves. They were 
huddled together with his men in the 
arsenal, rather bewildered, and more 
like captives than newly |baptized 
freemen, when a detachment of Unit- 
ed States marines (under the com- 
mand of Robert E. Lee) arrived on 
the scene, battered down the doors 
of the arsenal, and easily made cap- 
tives of Brown's band (October 18, 
1859.) Brown, severely wounded, was 
tried for treason by the laws of Vir- 
ginia. He pleaded only his divine 
commission in his defense and was 
speedily condemned and hanged. ' ' 

Of the effect of this occurrence, his- 
torian Muzzey says in a foot-note : 
"The tense feeling in the North led 
many men of note to endorse John 
Brown 's deed in words of extravagant 
praise. Theodore Parker declared 
that his chances for earthly immor- 
tality were double those of any oth- 
er man of the country, and Ralph 
Waldo Emerson even compared the 
hanging of John Brown with the cru- 
cifixion of Jesus Christ. The funds 
and firearms for Brown's expedition 
of course came from the North, but 
the men who contributed them (with 
perhaps one or two exceptions) 
thought they were to be used in 
Kansas and not for a raid in the 
state of Virginia. ' ' 

"The secession of Virginia," says 
Muzzey, ' ' two days after Lincoln 's 



call for troops was an event of prime 
importance. It gave the South her 
greatest general, Robert E. Lee. Gen- 
eral Lee was the son of a distin- 
guished Revolutionary general, be- 
longing to one of the first families 
of Virginia, and was himself of 
spotless purity of character, — noble, 
generous, sincere, brave, and gifted. 
He had already been selected by 
President Lincoln to command the 
Union Army, but he felt that he could 
not draw his sword against his na- 
tive state. ** e *He became commander 
of the Virginia troops and, in May, 
1862, general of the Confederate 
army in Virginia, which he led with 
wonderful skill and devotion through 
the remainder of the Civil War, ' ' (an 
inaccurate and derisive name for the 
War Between the States.) 

This author, in a foot-note, says 
this: "It was not till near the close 
of the war, (1805) that President 
Davis, who never very cordially rec- 
ognized Lee's greatness, was forced 
by public opinion to make him general 
in chief of the Confederate forces 
in the field." Other authorities fix 
the date in 1862, but Muzzey declares 
that this did not occur until near 
the close of the war. 

When forty counties of Virginia 
broke away from the state and formed 
a ' ' Loyal ' ' government, which was rec- 
ognized by President Lincoln and lat- 
er received into the Union (1863) as 
the state of West Virginia, Muzzey 
declares that Lee "called the people 
of West Virginia 'traitors' for leav- 
ing their state to adhere to the 
Union. ' ' 

The Greatness of Lee. 

The world has come to recognize 
the hero of the South as one of the 



10 



THE UPLIFT 



greatest of all ages. The upright 
man, who did his t best, which taxed 
the world 's military genius and its 
storehouse to force a surrender upon 
the armies of the South in that great, 
terrible struggle in behalf of what 
they regarded a righteous cause, re- 
turned to the high office of a private 
citizen, living an example of modesty, 
correctness and usefulness to his fel- 
low man that gave dignity and cour- 
age to the thousands that had fol- 
lowed him throughout the war and 
had returined to the task at home of 
making a living. 

Another Story About Lee. 

By Genevieve D. O'Niel, who, writ- 
ing in The Way, gives an account 
of the great Lee in language that ap- 
peals to the young. This is the 
story : 

He was a big-hearted boy and most 
loyal to his invalid mother. As a boy 
he was ambitious, and cared far less 
for popularity than for the fulfillment 
of duty. His father was a soldier 
and that is why young Lee spent 
a part of his youth at West Point, 
graduating from there as an engineer. 

So well did he use the opportuni- 
ties offered him at the academy that 
it was not long before his country 
recognized bis great ability and set 
him at many difficult engineering 
tasks, among them the construction 
and repairing of the forts at the en- 
trance of New York harbor. It was 
largely through his engineering skill 
that Vera Cruz was taken when the 
United States was at war with Mexico. 
But Robert E. Lee was modest. To 
him duty was worth more than 
wealth or flattery. While he was in 
the City of Mexico his health was 



proposed by his jubilant friends who 
found him at work drawing a map. 

•'Oli, make some one else do that 
<"r;-d:er, and come with me!" an 
o-Xtcer e::cla'med. 

"I am but doing my duty," he re- 
] lied and went on with his work. 

Fobert E. Lse became superinten- 
dent of West Point Academy and was 
leader of the party sent to take John 
Brown at Harper's Ferry. Then the 
War Between the States broke out 
and Virginia withdrew from the 
Union. 

Robert, who by this time had risen 
to the rank of Colonel did not be- 
lieve in slavery. Indeed, had he not 
treed all his slaves in 1862? But 
he did believe strongly in States' 
Rights and he loved his State above 
all else; therefore, though he knew 
his choice might mean ultimate ruin 
for himself, he allied himself with 
her and was appointed commander 
of the Virginia troops. 

By now the United States had two 
presidents : Abraham Lincoln in the 
North and Jefferson Davis in the 
South, and to President Davis Robert 
became military adviser. 

Although a great strategist, when 
mistakes occurred among his officers, 
Robert E. Lee was big enough to 
shoulder the blame himself. Even at 
the last, when a petty officer stupidly 
disobeyed him and forcved him to 
divide his forces and to make half 
disobeyed him and forced him to 
keep his army frm starving, he 
showed marvelous self control and 
magnanimity, never publicly blaming 
the unhappy man, although to him 
r.nd his forces it brought defeat. 

Once Stonewall Jackson sent to him 
for instructions about directing the 



THE UPLIFT 



11 



troops. "Go, tell General Jackson," 
he said to the messenger, "that he 
knows what to do as well as I. " 
And after this, when Stonewall Jack- 
son was wounded, he showed his fair- 
ness again hy saying, "He has lost his 
left arm, but I have lost my right." 
It was this nobility in times of stress 
that has endeared him to the entire 
nation. 

Think of asking to have your rank 
taken from you when you are in com- 
mand of an army. Well, that is 
what Robert E. Lee did. He suggest- 
ed to President Davis that a more 
fitting man be put in his place ; but 
this Davis refused to do, and so we 
see him, loyal to his cause, fighting 
against fate. Gradually starvation 
seized his troops; their clothes be- 
came ragged, their animals perished 
for want of food and many of the 
troopers, becoming too weak to carry 
muskets, were forced to east them 
aside. Yet they remained true to 
their commander, one and all. They 



had grown to look upon the Southern 
cause as Lee's cause and it was even 
suggested that he still keep up the 
fight, using guerrilla warfare. 

But he loved his men, also ! "It 
must be remembered we are Christian 
people," he replied, "We have been 
defeated and for us as a Christian 
people, there is but one course to 
pursue. These men must go home 
and plant a crop, and we must pro- 
ceed to build up our country on a 
new basis. ' ' 

So it was he surrendered and with- 
drew to a little farm where he tried 
to live in obscurity. As he had help- 
ed to support his State, so now he 
did all he could to support the Union. 
He will be remembered for his tender- 
ness towards the wounded Northern 
soldiers more than for anything else. 
Even when they taunted him, he show- 
ed them consideration. It is said of 
him, too, that he once exposed him- 
self to great danger to save from 
death a fledgling sparrow. 



THE DIFFERENCE. 

There was a man, there was a man, 

Who hated meddling so, 
He saw his neighbor's house burn down 
And closer drew his dressing-gown 

And let the building go. 

There was a man, there was a man, 

Who always lent a hand, 
Whate'er his neighbors did, he'd try 
To have a finger in the pie, 

They drove him from the land. 

And old Diogenes remarked 

The difference to hit: 
'"Twixt meddling when you do no good 
And bravely helping when you should 

Requires a pretty wit." 



12 



THE UPLIFT 



BENJAMIN FRANKLIN. 



Benjamin Franklin, the son of a 
tallow candle-maker, was born in 
Boston in 1706. He learned the 
printer's trade in his brother's of- 
fice. He went to Philadelphia at 
seventeen. After many vicissitudes 
he rose to the ownership of a print- 
ing office, with an equipment such as 
was possible in that period. He 
published "Poor Richard's Alman- 
ac," which became famous for its 
proverbs. 

He edited and printed the best 
newspaper published in the American 
colonies. He proved, in 1752, as the 
story comes down to us, that lighten- 
ing and electricity are the same by 
means of a famous experiment with 
a kite. This discovery and the inven- 
tion of the lightening rod made him 
widely celebrated. (It is a far cry 
from Ben Franklin to J. B. Duke, 
but one generation profits by the dis- 
coveries of a preceding one ; and it 
is still a further cry from the ex- 
periment with the kite to the devel- 
opment of an electric plant that made 
possible the establishment of a gigan- 
tic plant that contributes the pro- 
ceeds of forty million dollars to edu- 
cation, religion and charity. But it's 
a fact, just the same.) 

Franklin founded libraries, a hos- 
pital, and a university. He went to 
London more than once as agent for 
his own and other colonies, and he 
promoted the repeal of the Stamp 
Act. He was one of the committee of 
Congress appointed to draft the Dec- 
laration of Independence, and was a 
signer of the document. Soon after 
he went to France as embassador. 
It was his skillful hand that negoti- 




ated the treaty of alliance with that 
country, without which the Revolu- 
tion could hardly have succeeded. 
He assisted in making the treaty with 
England in 1782, and took part in 
framing the Constitution of the 
United States in 1787. Benjamin 
Franklin was the very best thing that 
ever come out of Boston. He died 
in Philadelphia in 1790. 

It is fitting at this time, as we 
approach the observance of Thrift 
Week, to read one of Franklin's pro- 
ductions that appeared in ' ' Poor 
Richard's Almanac." The title of it 
is "The Way To Wealth," which 
demonstrates his practical turn of 
mind, and suggests thrift of the first 
order. It reads as follows: 

Courteous reader, I have heard that 
nothing gives an author so great 
pleasure as to find his works respect- 
fully quoted by others. Judge, then, 
how much I must been gratified by 
an incident I am going to relate to 
you. I stopped my horse lately where 



THE UPLIFT 



13 



a great number of people were col- 
lected at an auction of merchant's 
goods. The hour of the sale not be- 
ing come, they were conversing on 
the badness of the times; and one of 
the company called to a plain, clean 
old man, with white locks ; — Pray, 
Father Abraham, what think you of 
the times? Will not these heavy tax- 
es quite ruin the country ? How shall 
we ever be able to pay them? What 
would you advise us to?" Father 
Abraham stood up and replied, ' ' If 
you would have" my advice, I will give 
it you in short; for A Word to the 
wise is enough, as poor Richard 
says. ' ' They joined in desiring him 
to speak his mind, and, gathering 
round him, he proceeded as follows : 

"Friends,"' said he, "the 'taxes 
are indeed very heavy, and, if those 
laid on by the government were the 
only ones we had to pay, we might 
more easily discharge them, but we 
have many others, and much more 
grievous to some of us. We are 
taxed twice as much by our idleness, 
three times as much by our pride, and 
four itmes as much by our folly; and 
from these taxes the commissioners 
cannot ease or deliver us, by allowing 
an abatement. However, let us heark- 
en to good advice, and something may 
be done for us ; God helps them that 
help themselves, as Poor Richard says. 

"It would be thought a hard gov- 
ernment that should tax its people 
one-tenth part of their time, to be 
employed in its service ; but idleness 
taxes many of us much more; sloth, 
by bringing on diseases, absolutely 
shortens life. Sloth, like rust, con- 
sumes faster than labor wears; while 
the used key is always bright, 
as Poor Richard says. But dost 



thou love life? Then do not squand- 
er time, for that is the stuff life is 
made of, as Poor Richard says. How 
much more than is necessary do we 
spend in sleep, forgetting that The 
sleeping fox catches no poultry, and 
that There ivill be sleeping enough in 
the grave, as Poor Richard says. 

"If time be of all things the most 
precious, wasting time must be, as 
Poor Richard says, the greatest pro- 
digality; since as he elsewhere tells 
us, Lost time is never found again; 
and what we call time enough always 
proves little enough. Let us then be 
up and doing, and doing to a purpose ; 
so by diligence shall we do more with 
less perplexity. 

' ' But with our industry we must 
likewise be steady, settled and care- 
ful, and oversee our own affairs, with 
our own eyes, and not trust too much 
to others; for, Three removes are as 
bad as a fire, and again, Keep thy 
shop, and thy shop will keep thee; and 
again, //' you would have your busi- 
ness done, go; if not, send. 

' ' So much for industry, my friends, 
and attention to one 's own business ; 
but to these we must add frugality, 
if we would make our industry more 
certainly successful. A man may 
if he knows not how to save as he 
gets, keep his nose all his life to the 
grindstone, and die not worth a gToat 
at last. A fat kitchen makes a lean 
will. 

"Away, then, with your expensive 
follies, and you will not then have so 
much cause to complain of hard times, 
heavy taxes, and chargeable families. 

"And further, What maintains one 
vice would bring up two children. 
You may think, perhaps, that a little 
tea or a little punch now and then, 



14 



THE UPLIFT 



diet a little more costly, clothes a lit- 
tle finer, and a little entertainment 
now and then, can be no great mat- 
ter; but remember, Many a little 
makes a mickle. Beware of little ex- 
penses: A small leak will sink a 
great ship, as Poor Richard says; and 
again, Who dainties love, shall beg- 
gars prove; and moreover, Fools 
make feasts, and wise men eat them. 

' " Hero you are all got together 
at this sale of fineries and knick- 
knacks. You call them goods; but, 
if you do not take care, they will 
prove evils to some of you. You ex- 
pect they will be sold cheap, and 
perhaps they may be for less than 
they cost ; but, if you have no occasion 
for them, they must be dear to you. 
Remember what Poor Richard says: 
Buy what thou hast no need of, and 
ere long thou shall sell thy neces- 
saries. And again, At a great penny- 
worth pause awhile. He means, that 
perhaps the cheapness is apparently, 
and not real, or the bargain, by 
straitening thee in thy business, may 
do thee more harm than good. For 
in another place he says, Many have 
been ruined by buying good penny- 
worths. Again, It is foolish to lay 
out money in a purchase of resent- 
ence; and yet this folly is practised 
every day at auctions, for want of 
minding the Almanac. Many a one, 
for the sake of finery on the back, 
have gone with a hungry belly and 
half-starved their families. Silks 
and satins, scarlet and velvets, put 
out the kitchen fire, as Poor Richard 
says. 

But what madness must it be to 
run in debt for these superfluities! 
We are offered, by the terms of this 
sale, six months' credit; and that, 



perhaps, has induced some of us to 
attend it, because we cannot spare 
the ready money, and hope now to be 
fine without it. But ah! think what 
you do when you run in debt; you 
give to another power over your 
liberty. II you cannot pay at the 
time, you will be ashamed to see 
your creditor; you will be in fear 
when you speak to him; you will 
make poor, pitiful, sneaking ex- 
cuses : and, by degrees, come to lose 
your veracity, and sink into base, 
downright lying; for The second vice 
is lying, the first is running in debt, 
as Poor Richard says, and again, to 
the same purpose, Lying rides upon 
Debt's back; whereas a free born 
Englishman ought not to be ashamed 
nor afraid to see or speak to any man 
living. But poverty often deprives 
a man of all spirit and virtue. 
It is hard for an empty bag to stand 
upright. 

' • What would you think of that 
prince, or of that government, who 
would issue an edict forbidding you to 
dress like a gentleman or a gentlewom- 
an, on pain of imprisonment or servi- 
tude ? Would you not say that you were 
free, have a right to dress as you 
please, and that such an edict would 
be a breach of your privileges, and 
such a government tyrannical? And 
yet you are about to put yourself 
under such tyranny, when you run in 
debt for such dress ! Your creditor 
has authority, at his pleasure, to de- 
prive you of your liberty, by con- 
fining you in jail till you shall be 
able to pay him. (This was the 
remedy for collecting a debt in 
Franklin's time.) When you have 
got your bargain, you may perhaps 
think little of payment; but, as Poor 



THE UPLIFT 



15 



Richard says, Creditors have better 
memories than debtors; creditors are 
a superstitious sect, great observers 
of set days and times. The day comes 
round before you are aware, and the 
demand is made before you are pre- 
pared to satisfy it ; or, if you bear 
your debts in mind, the term, which 
at first seemed so long, will, as it 
lessens, appear extremely short. Time 
will seem to have added wing's to 
his- heels as well as his shoulders. 
Those have a short Lent, who owe 
money to be paid at Easter. At pres- 
ent, perhaps, you may think your- 
selves in thriving circumstances, and 
that you can bear a little extravagance 
without injury ; but, 
For age and want sat>e ivhile you 

may; 
No morning sun last a whole day. 
Gain may be temporary and uncer- 
tain, but ever, while you live ex- 
pense is constant and certain ; and 
It is easier to build two chimneys, 



than, to keep one in fuel, as Poor 
Richard says; so, Rather go to bed 
supperless, than rise in debt. 

This doctrine, my friends, is rea- 
son and wisdom; but, after all, do 
not depend too much upon your own 
industry and frugality, and prudence, 
though excellent things; for they may 
all be blasted, without the blessing 
of Heaven ; and, therefore, ask that 
blessing humbly, and be not unchari- 
table to those that at present seem to 
want it, but comfort and help them. 
Remember, Job suffered, and was 
afterwards prosperous. ' ' 

Thus the old gentleman ended his 
harange. I resolved to be the better 
for it ; and though I had at first de- 
termined to buy stuff for a new coat, 
I went away resolved to wear my 
old one a little longer. Reader, if 
thou wilt do the same, thy profit will 
be as great as mine. I am, as ever, 
thine to serve thee. 

Richard Saunders. 



IN TEN YEARS. 

It was Sydney Smith who did this figuring: "If you make one person 
happy every day, in ten years you will make 3,650 persons happy; or 
brighten a small town by your contributions to the fund of general 
joy." 

Take any worthy act, and figure on it for ten years. Suppose that you 
speak to some one every day for ten years about the value of Sunday 
school class-work. Thirty-six hundred and fifty people will have had 
their attention called to this important factor in the development of mod- 
ern life. 

Or suppose you add one word to your vocabulary every day; in ten 
years how fluent that vocabulary will be! 

Thoughtfully read just one verse from the Bible every day, what a mass 
of good impressions you will have received in ten years. 

Many little things do not seem worth doing. Perhaps they are not, if 
done only once, but think what the result will be if continued for ten 
years. — The Boys' World. 



16 



THE UPLIFT 



THOMAS JONATHAN JACKSON. 



Thomas Jonathan Jackson, immor- 
tal under the name of "Stonewall" 
Jackson, was born in Clarksburg, 
Virginia (now West Virginia), Jan- 
uary 21st, 1824. He was descended 
from Scotch-Irish stock, and, left a 
penniless orphan when three yearn 
old, he soon showed ' ' the stuff ' ' of 
which heroes are made in his manly, 
self-reliant efforts to support him- 
self. The world has never known a 
more dashing soldier; a more beloved 
general ; a purer man ; or more loy- 
al patriot. 

' ' The South in the Building of 
Nation ' ' carries the following sketch 
of the life and career of General 
Jackson, which makes fine reading 
on the anniversary of his birth by all 
those who enjoy the story of the life 
and acts of a manly man of sterling 
qualities. 

' ' Hearing of a vacancy at West 
Point he (Jackson) determined to 
apply for it, and making the journey 
to Washington, partly on foot, he 
appeared before the member of 
Congress from his district in his 
home-spun suit and with his saddle 
bags over his shoulders. The con- 
gressman took him to the secretary 
of war, who was so much pleased 
with his manly independence that he 
gave him the appointment. He was 
very poorly prepared and barely 
squeezed through the entrance exam- 
ination, but he made rapid progress 
and graduated No. 17 in a brilliant 
class of which McClellan, Foster, 
Reno, Stoneman, Couch, Gibbon, A. 
P. Hill, Pickett, Maury, D. R. Jones, 
Wilcox and others were members, 
and one who knew him intimately 




expressed the opinion that "if the 
course had been longer 'old Jack' 
would have graduated at the head of 
his class." 

He at once reported for duty in 
Mexico, and serving in the artillery 
won distinction on every field, being 
made first lieutenant at Vera Cruz 
and breveted captain at Vera Cruz 
and Chembuso, and major at Chapul- 
tapec, rising to this rank in seven 
months and promoted more rapidiy 
than any other officer in the Ameri- 
can army. 

In 1851 he was elected professor 
of natural science and instructor of 
military tactics at the Virginia Mili- 
tary Institute. While in the city of 
Mexico after the capture, he had, un- 
der the influence of Colonel Taylor, 
made a public profession of faith in 
Christ, and he now became one of 
the most active member of the Lex- 
ington, Vs., Presbyterian church. 
He was accustomed to teach the 



THE UPLIFT 



17 



scriptures every Sunday afternoon to 
the negroes of his household, and 
out of this grew his negro Sunday 
school, to which he devoted much 
time and thought, and which exerted 
so wide an influence over the negroes. 
Then were very much devoted to him, 
and the first contribution to his mon- 
ument in Lexington was from the 
negro Baptist church, whose pastor 
had been one of his Sunday school 
scholars. In the negro Presbyterian 
church of Roanoke there is a beauti- 
ful memorial window to Stonewall 
Jpekson. 

Jackson, like Lee and most of the 
Virginia people, was a ' ' Union man, ' ' 
and opposed secession as a remedy 
for Southern wrongs, but when news 
was received at Lexington that Lin- 
coln had called for 75,000 troops to 
coerce the sovereign states of the 
south which had seceded, and had 
called on Virginia for her quota of 
these troops, and that in response 
the Virginia convention had passed 
an ordinance of secession, Jackson 
made a speech to a mass meeting in 
which he said "I have longed to 
preserve the Union and would have 
been willing to sacrifice much to that 
end. But now that the North has 
chosen to inaugurate war against 
us, I am in favor of meeting her b\' 
drawing the sword and throwing 
away the scabbard." 

His friend and neighbor, Gov. John 
Letcher, made him colonel and sent 
him to Harpers Ferry where the skill 
he showed in reducing the high- 
spirited rabble who rushed to the 
front at the first call of the bugle 
into the respectable "Army of the 
Shenandoah," which he turned over 
to Gen. J. B. Johnson, marked him 
a real soldier. He was placed in com- 



mand of the Virginia Brigade, which 
afterwards bore his name and became 
famous. 

He met the advance of Gen. Pat- 
terson at Falling "Waters, July 2, 
checked it and captured a number of 
prisoners. Soon after he ".received 
his commission of brigadier-general. 

But it was on the field First Manas- 
sas that he won his flew name and 
fame, when gallant Bee exclaimed; 
"There stands Jackson like a stone 
wall," and where he cheeked the on- 
ward movement of the enemy and 
did so much to turn the threatened 
disaster into the glorious Confederate 
victory. He was wounded in the 
hand but refused to leave the field, 
and while the surgeons were dressing 
his wound President Davis rode on the 
field, and Jackson pushing aside the 
surgeons tossed his cadet cap in the 
air and exclaimed : ' ' Hurrah for the 
and exclaimed : ' ' Hurrah for the 
President; give me ten thousand men 
and I will be in Washington to- 
night. ' ' 

In September he was made major- 
general and sent soon after to com- 
mand the Valley District. 

In early spring of 1862 he began 
his famous "Valley campaign" which 
has been studied in the military 
schools of Europe as an example of 
rapid marching, able strategy and 
brilliant fighting. That campaign 
may be summarized as follows : In 
thirty-two days, Jackson and his 
"foot cavalry" marched nearly 400 
miles, skirmishing almost daily, 
fought five battles, ' defeated three 
armies, two of which were completely 
routed, captured twenty pieces of 
artillery, 4,000 prisoners and immense 
quanities of stores of all kinds, and 
had done all this with a loss of 



18 



THE UPLIFT 



fewer than 1,000 men killed, wound- 
ed and missing, and with, a force of 
only 15,000 men, while there were at 
least 60,000 men opposed tq him. 

He had spread consternation 
throughout the North and neutral- 
ized McDowell 's men at Fredericks- 
burg, who were about to march to 
aid McClellan in investinig Rich- 
mond. 

He bore a most conspicuous- part 
in Seven Days around Richmond, the 
Second Manassas, and First Mary- 
land, and Fredericksburg. 

He captured Harpers Ferry with 
11,000 prisoners, 13,000 stand of small 
arms, 73 pieces of artillery and largs 
quantities of provisions and stores of 
every description, and hastened to 
Sharpsburg (Antietam) in time to 
defeat McClellan in his attack on the 
greatly inferior force of Confederates. 

He devoted a great deal of time to 
supplying his regiments with chap- 
lains and missionaries; had preach- 
ing and prayer-meetings at his quart- 
ers regularly and did everything in 
his power to promote the religious 
influence of his command. 

His military career closed wich 
the great Confederate victory at 
Chancellorsville, General Hooker with 
140,000 men crossed the Rappaha- 
nock and Lee with his bare 50,00'), 



instead of retreating on Richmond, 
advanced to meet him and sent Jack- 
son on a flank movement to Hooker's 
flank and .rear, which resulted in 
the defeat and utter confusion of 
that part of his army. Jackson then 
went on one of those bold recon- 
naissances which he was accustomed 
to make, and on his return his 
party was mistaken for a cavalry 
charge of the enemy and fired into 
by his own men, with the fatal result 
that several were killed or wounded, 
and Jackson himself severely wound- 
ed. The surgeons thought that he 
would recover from his wounds, but 
a severe case of pneumonia ensued 
from which he died. 

Calm, peaceful, trustful, in his 
last hour's, he talked cheerfully of 
his approaching end-said that it 
' ' would be infinite gain to be trans- 
lated and be with Jesus," and that 
"it was all right," and that he would 
' ' have his cherished wish of dyinj; 
on Sunday ' ' — then his mind wander- 
ed to the battlefield and he exclaimed : 
"Tell A. P. Hill to prepare for 
action! Pass the infantry rapidly to 
the front! Tell Major Hawks" and 
then with a sweet smile, he said : 
' ' Let us cross over the river and 
rest under the shade of the trees." 



THE THREE MAJOR QUESTIONS. 



There are three questions that I try 
to make myself answer every year. 
The first is, "What am I going to 
do?" 

Life gets stale as swill unless it is 
stirred often. Gunners have to con- 
stantly test their aim. Guns are like 



men, they are useless without aim. 
Aim keeps the planet in its orbit and 
a man or woman at his or her best. 

Drifters are never anything but 
driftwood. A definite try puts pow- 
er into our purposes. In youth you 
set out to own a farm, and educate 



THE UPLIFT 



19 



the children. Now that middle life 
has come, there are great things to 
be thought about and done. 

"What are you trying to do" with 
the remaining years ? I am convinced 
that fewer people than we think have 
a definite goal. What kind of a, 
man or woman am I ? Men who build 
houses for us to live in use a blue- 
print of plans and drawings. Charac- 
ters are about the only things that 
are allowed to "just grow" as Topsy 
said in Uncle Tom's Cabin. The Mas- 
ter of men said, "I must be about 
my father's business." 

The second question almost drives 
me to distraction at times. It is 
"Am I getting it done?" 

I have often semi-wished that the 
Almighty had made heroism of a lit- 
tle less extracting stuff. 

The greatest thinker of the past 
100 years said, ' ' The greatest enemy 
of human goodness and greatness is 
not sin or ignorance, terrible as they 
are, but inertia." That is the scien- 
tific name for laziness. 

The Columbus who ' ' sail on, ' ' in 
spite of winds and floods and dark- 
ness are rare. Most of us say, "pull 
for the shore. ' ' 

A farm boy who was sent out to 
hoe corn was asked at noon how many 
rows he hoed. He replied, "When 
I get these two I am on, and eleven 



more I will have thirteen. ' ' 

The future rubs right up against 
the present and takes its color from 
today. Break with worth today, and 
tomorrow is in danger. There is 
no other way than to keep eternally 
at it. 

The third question we shall not be 
able to answere till the close of life : 
"Will it be worth while?" 

"Ty" Cobb, the world's greatest 
ball player and manager, was asked 
what he would do if he had his life 
to live over. He said, "If I had my 
life to live over again, I would prob- 
ably be a surgeon instead of a ball 
player. I have only one regret: I 
shall not have done any real good to 
humanity when I retire." 

Of course, no man living can com- 
pletely enter into the thoughts of 
Christ, but I have often tried to ima- 
gine how He felt when He said, "I 
have finished the work thou gavest 
me to do. ' ' 

In some deep sense each one of us 
has our work born with us, and if 
we set our souls to do some decent 
unselfish thing each day, and keep 
the white plume of the mind unstain- 
ed, I believe that the things we have 
done will at least gleam like gold in 
the fading sunshine of life. — Select- 
ed. 



A SPECIAL MESSAGE FOR BOYS AND 

GIRLS. 

By Dr. Holland in Progressive Farmer. 

This is for boys and girls .Not When I was a plow boy an educated 

because boys and girls need preach- man came to our house, and ate at 
ing to, but because I love them, I our table. I listened to what he 
write this. said. I have never forgotten on'e sen- 



20 



THE UPLIFT 



tenee he spoke: "Our greatest pleas- 
ures come from our work." 

I did not hare any more sense 
than to believe it, and I have sense 
enough now to know that it is true. 

Nature made our wonderful bodies 
for activity. We can't be well with- 
out moving our bodies. Play and 
work are the two ways God has of 
building healthy bodies for boys and 
girls. 

Nature keeps alive our decent be- 
lief in ourselves by work. I cannot 
forget the .500 boys and girls I saw 
at the Junior Live Stock Show in No- 
vember. Every one of them seemed 
to have something worth while doing 
in the world. They respected them- 
selves because of their work. 

Yesterday I spent t ; wo hours in a 
municipal court. Boys and girls, I 
wish I could paint for you the faces 
of a hundred different people I saw 
there : — thieves bootleggers, hold-up 
men and women, bandits, and thugs 
that had been caught in the net of 
the law. 

Most of them were lazy, good-for- 
nothing men and women, mainly for 
the reason that they despise honor- 
able labor. There was one woman 
brought up for stealing in a store. 
I could see written iin her face the 
story of lost self-respect because she 
did not work hard at some good 
thing. 

Nature keeps honest those who 
work. On our old copy books we 



used to copy this maxim, "An idle 
brain is the devil's workshop." 
Now, I know that is true also. 

We can't keep from doing some- 
thing. We are made tiiat way. Un- 
less we direct our energies into some 
useful work, we will soon find our- 
selves doing things we are ashamed 
of. 

The boy who has important things 
to work at will not have time to get 
off with the gang in a barn or box 
car on Sunday afternoons and smoke 
cigarettes and learn to gamble. 

I have never yet seen a thoroughly 
lazy man or woman converted. It 
seems as if God himself can't do much 
with the lazy or non-workers. Every 
boy or girl who does not fall in love 
with useful work is a possible crook. 

Nature makes us religious by our 
work. I remember the sunrises that 
I used to see when I went out to 
work. How beautiful tiiey were! It 
always made my heart light to sec 
the wonderful colors which God put 
in the morning skies. I know that 
I would have missed many an uplift 
in my heart for good if I had not 
been a working boy. 

It does little good to preach salva- 
tion to idlers. 

Because I believe in the characters 
and the future goodness of our farm 
boys and girls, I want to begin 1925 by 
waving my hand to them, and saying 
a prayer in my heart for them. 
" HAPPY NEW YEAR ! 



I pity no man because he has to work. If he is worth his salt he will 
work. I envy the man who has a work worth doing and does i well. 

Theodore Roosevelt. 



THE UPLIFT 21 

UNCLE RASTUS' CHRISTMAS MEDITATIONS. 

(By Old Hurry graph. ) 

I shore am gettin' pestered 'bout nex' Chris 'mus comin' on; 
'Taint lack ole times tor Moster Santa Claus, shore as yu ' is born ; 
Mon 'strous changes in dese new times, an ' hit 'pears ev 'ry day, 
Things is jis' gettin' euriser in mos' ev'ry which a' way. 

Niggers ain't satisfied de way de Lord made dere kinky ha'r 
Deys strait 'in hit out, lack white f olkses, wid sum 'fin ' frum a jar ; 
De men is gettin' autaymobeels, an' actin' lack dey is sports; 
Spendin' haf ' dey time huntin* bootleggers — 'tother haf ' in courts. 

Dar ain't no mo' reigndeers, bells and sleighs to jingle and skeet — 
Your neber sees Moster Santa Claus walkin' 'round on he feet; 
He jis ' hops inter an airyplane, and flies 'round same as a bird, 
Dey contraption makin' de buzz'est noise dot mortal ever heard. 

Den dars dem radyo things, dat takes words and music frum de a'r — 
You talks in er trumpet, dey hears frum Durham to Zanzibar; 
Ef yu' think 'bout hit keerfully, an' look at hit fus an' las' 
Yu' can put hit down fer sartin, we'se a'livin' mighty fas'. 

"But ah's tryin' not to worry, 'kase I ain't got long to stay, 
Ole Moster gwine to take me frum dese here low grounds sum fine day ; 
When ah climbs up to de corn'ouse in de neighborhood on high, 
Ah hopes ah won 't be a nubbin ' at de shuckin ' in de sky. ' ' 

' ' Jes ' turn de back log ober dar, an ' pull your stool up nigher, 
An' watch dat 'possum a' cookin' in de skillet by de fire; 
In dese here Chris 'mus days, dey has changed so much de fashions, 
Yu' needn't look to mirakuls to furnish yu' wid your rations." 



RAMBLING AROUND. 

By Old Hurrygraph. 

This cross word puzzle business and the front door was opened to 

is getting a whole lot of people admit of cool air. A lady, deeply 

puzzled, in such a way that their ideus absorbed in a cross word puzzle in a 

come horizontally one minute and newspaper — the Herald, I think — 

vertical another. In one of the Dur- had her little girl by her side, who 

ham cafe's, no longer than yesterday, was sitting with her back to the door, 

the atmosphere became a little sudor- Pretty soon she remarked, "Hone.y, 

ifous from too much heat in the room, you go there and close those screen 



22 



THE UPLIFT 



doors to keep the cool air off your 
back." That's one of the effects of 
the cross word craze. 



He was a Durham citizen of an- 
other nationality, and small of stature. 
A man had requested him to sign a 
note in order that he might get some 
money from a bank. "Veil," saul 
the man of small stature, "ets not 
necessary to go to de bank for 
money; you get de bank to sign de 
note, and I let's you have de money." 
Clever proposition that. Can you 
beat it ? 



A certain county official is a Dem- 
ocrat of the Democrats and his poli- 
tics fits him like a sweater. He was 
asked on Wednesday, by a Republi- 
can whose party affiliations are as 
equally pronounced, if he thought 
there were any good Republicans. 
"There might be," the Democrat re- 
plied, "but they are all dead." 



I met a man recently who was des- 
pondent. He was out of work, and 
had not been able to land a job. It 
was a hard matter to revive his 
drooping spirits. It is pretty gener- 
ally always the case. A man hunt- 
ing for a job soon gets acquainted 
with how the world is. There's 
something in the perversity of nature 
that doesn't want to consider a fel- 
low that's out of a job. It will glad- 
ly take him from another job — but 
afraid of him if he hasn't one. When 
a fellow is busy, there is a whole lot 
of difference. When the job goes 
out hunting for the man the situation 
is entirely different. Instead of cold 
shoulders you get warm hands. You 
are wanted in various places. The 



whole world seems one series of op- 
portunities plated over with gold. It's 
funny; but it's so — and a strange 
characteristic of human nature. And 
human nature is the one thing that 
is the same everywhere. 



The law has its humorous side as 
well as all other professions and acti- 
vities in this life. A man whose 
mind was in doubt about a certain 
question, approached a Durham law- 
yer and asked the practitioner what 
could be done with a man guilty of 
arson. The lawyer very promptly 
told him he did not see what possibly 
could be done except make him marry 
the girl. That was a burning ques- 
tion easily disposed of apparently to 
the satisfaction of the lay mind. 



Some people talk a great deal and 
say very little that you can remem- 
ber. I heard a man talking a day 
or two ago that was the most sensible 
reasoning I have heard this year. Dis- 
cussing things in general, at home 
and abroad, among other matters he 
said that "At home we have some- 
thing to do before we may resolve 
ourselves into complete contentment. 
Crime continues on an increasing 
scale. Criminals find it too easy to 
avoid arrest and escape punishment. 
They are helped on by a distressing 
laxity in public sentiment and, worse 
than all, in certain places by a strange 
indifference to official responsibility. 
This won't do. Our material pros- 
perity means very little without great- 
er respect for the majesty of the law, 
the thing we must get before we can 
hope fully to correct these conditions. 
Material prosperity never can out- 
weigh spiritual values. Let us re- 



THE UPLIFT 



23 



member that. The year 1925 will 
fall far short of any worthy ideals 
unless it marks a decided resolration 
in law and order. If we are still 
worthy of the priceless heritage of 
Americanism we can snow it in no 
better way than in bringing this 
about. ' ' That is what I call good, 
straight, sensible talking with solid 
food for thought." 



When I published one of the Dur- 
ham daily papers, years ago, I em- 
ployed a young reporter, fresh from 
a college of journalism, and sent him 
out to report a fashionable dance, as 
I wanted the affair done up in the 
very best style. After a great deal 
of laborious writing he turned in 
the following copy his account of the 
dance : 

Miss Flapperwit's gown was a lovely 
fit, 

It was beautiful, there was no 
doubt ; 
But when she was fully inside of it, 

Behold, she was over half way out. 
This reporter was all out after that. 



Tree planting should be considered 
an investment; not an expense. Few 
of us can own a forest, or even a 
wood lot, except by proxy of the gov- 
ernment. But forests are composed 
of tree units, and trees of our own 
to love and care for. Plant trees 
for friendship, for comraderie, for 
beauty. Since time began trees have 
been man's unfailing friend. They 
have graced the world with beauty 
and given freely of their fruits and 
shelter. They cool and freshen the 
air we breathe, since they consume 
the carbon dioxide given out by the 
lungs of animals and release a portion 



of the oxygen so necessary to the life 
of man. 

There are trees in Durham named 
after people. I recall right now that 
some twenty-five or thirty years ago, 
there were two trees set out and 
both named "Jim Robinson." One 
planted by Capt. L. L. Pamplin, in 
the yard of the old original Watts 
hospital site, West Main street, and 
for a long time carried the tag on it 
bearing the name until it outgrew the 
tag. The other was set out by Mrs. 
M. B. Wyatt, in front of her resi- 
dence, on Cleveland street. Both are 
water oaks, and both are fine, large 
and healthy shade trees today. Capt 
Pamplin was here at that time on the 
construction of the Durham & Lynch- 
burg railroad, now the Norfolk & 
Western. He was a warm friend of 
the writer. So is Mrs. Wyatt, and 
their trees attest their friendship, and 
at the same time give pleasure to 
others who "rest under the shade." 



A short while back the subject of 
"auto-suggestions" was the rage 
qver the country. That discussion 
referred principally to a state of 
mind, and its operations. The 
auto suggestions most needed just 
now more appropriately appertains to 
those who drive cars. Automobile 
drivers who believe they have heard 
every safety admonition regarding 
automobiles are liable to change their 
minds if they will glance over some 
of the suggestions I bumped into a 
few days ago, which are as follows : 

Before an auto turns turtle all the 
passengers should get out. 

The number of a car should be 6699 
and should be worn upside down. 

For the benefit of the man behind 



24 THE UPLIFT 

the thoughtful autoist will mix per- Autos should always stop abruptly for 

fume with his gasoline. washouts or burned fuses. It is not 

It is considered very bad form for proper for an auto to turn the corner 

a man driving an auto to try to drive on two wheels. 

between the headlights of another One honk of tre horn means "cross 

auto. This is liable to seriously street;" two honks means "stand 

damage the crank handle. still, I'll get you coming back;" 

Two automobiles should pass on Ihree honks, "get your ol' ice wagon 

either side of each other, rather than out. of the way ; " a dozen honks, 

on a direct line through each other. "help, I'm out of gasoline." 



THE OTHERS. 

What do we mean by others? We hear much about serving and help- 
ing others. That one word has been made the motto of classes and organi- 
zations connected with the Church. Poems have been written and stories 
gathered to show what is the proper relation to others. Are these 
others a selected group made up of individuals who are poor, or suffer- 
ing, or handicapped or unfortunat in one way or another? Might Others 
be the people around us who are free from physical want and bodily 
pain? Maybe the others we need to be deeply concerned about are just 
the people we associate with day after day. It may be the companions in 
the home with whom we are in daily contact who are our others for 
whose welfare, comfort and good cheer we are accountable. Who will 
deny that we are in danger of not being all we might be to those imme- 
diately in touch with us, even when we are racing wlidly hither and 
thither to do something for the others of whom we have heard, but pos- 
sibly have never met. Certainly that wide range of unselfish service 
should be cared for, but lest we forget the others right at hand, it might 
be well to take a close-up view of home, office, school, neighbors and 
local church, so as to observe how many others are nearby to who we can 
minister — Selected. 



COLUMBUS AND THE ECLIPSE. 

Now that we are approaching a great eclipse of the sun, January 24th, a 
story by James Johonnot telling how Columbus restored to the means of pre- 
serving his own life by taking advantage of the superstitious of the Indians 
will prove interesting reading. A subject for debate, therefore, is suggested: 
"Was Columbus justified in deceiving the Indians?" 

When Columbus first landed upon change, 

the shores of the New World, and for Now Columbus knew that in a few 

a long time after, the natives thought days there was to be an eclipse of 

that he had come down from heaven, the sun ; so he called the chiefs 



THE UPLIFT 



25 



and they were ready to do anything 
for this new friend. But at one 
place, where he stayed for some 
months, the chiefs became jealous 
of him and tried to drive him away. 
It had been their custom to bring 
food for him and his companions 
every morning, but now the amount 
they brought was very small, and 
Columbus saw that he would soon be 
starved unless he could make a 
around him and told them that the 
Great Spirit was angry with them 
for doing as they agreed in bringing 
him provisions, and that to show his 
anger, on such a day, he would cause 
the sun to be darkened. The Indians 
listened, but they did not beliieve 
Columbus and there was a still great- 
er falling off in the amount of the 
food sent in. 

On the morning of the day set, the 
sun rose clear and bright, and the 
Indians shook their heads as they 
thought how Columbus had tried to 
deceive them. Hour after hour pass- 
ed and still the sun was bright, and 
the Spanish began to fear that the 
Indians would attack them soon, as 
they seemed fully convinced that 
Columbus had deceived them. But 
at lengh a black shadow began to 
steal over the face of the sun. Lit- 
tle by little the light faded and dark- 



ness spread over the land. 

The Indians saw that Columbus had 
told them the truth. They saw that 
they had offended the Great Spirit 
and that he had sent a dreadful 
monster to swallow the sun. They 
could see the jaws of this terrible 
monster slowly closing to shut off 
their light forever. Frantic with 
fear, they filled the air with cries and 
shrieks. Some fell prostrate before 
Columbus and entreated his helpf 
some rushed off and soon returned 
laden with every kind of provisions 
they could lay their hands on. Colum- 
bus then retired to his tent and prom- 
ised to same them if possible. About 
the time for the eclipse to pass away, 
he came out and told them that the 
Great Spirit had pardoned them this 
time and he would soon drive away 
the monster from the sun; but they 
must never offend in that way again. 

The Indians promised, and waited. 
As the sun began to come out from 
under the shadow their fears subsided, 
and when shone clear once more, their 
joys knew no bounds. They leaped, 
they danced, and they sang. They 
thought Columbus a god, and while 
he remained on the island the Span- 
iards had all the provisions tfieyl 
needed. 



GEMS OF THE SKY. 

By Josephine E. Toal. 

How many stars can you name and of heaven? Which star is red' 



point out definitely in the glittering 
sky? Do you know when beautiful 
Vega shines at her best? At what 
time of the year Aacturus is over- 
head ? Can you tell the name of the 
brightest star in the twinkling lights 



orange? or yellow? or diamond 
white? Have you found your favorite 
star? 

Astronomy is a subject so great 
that few can pursue it in an exhaus- 
tive way — in fact, it never has been, 



26 



THE UPLIFT 



or can be, all learned — but everyone 
should be able to make at least a few 
acquaintances among the friendly 
lights of the silent night. 

There are but twenty names in the 
list of brightest stars as given by 
accepted authorities, and only fifteen 
of these are visible in the United 
States, the remaining five belonging 
to south equatorial regions. It is 
true, however, that some of these 
latter are occasionally glimpsed from 
extreme southern latitudes in this 
country. 

Not all of these fifteen royal onus 
are visible at the same time, for while 
a few can be seen at some hour be- 
tween sunset and sunrise the year 
round, others, coming and going in 
their order, remain in sight for limit- 
ed periods. 

The star-lover hails the appearance 
of each in its season with the same 
delight he has in discovering the first 
violet of spring, the earliest golden- 
rod blossom of the declining summer, 
or in hearing the first robin song of 
the season. 

On a clear January evening, when 
the thickly frozen ponds echo to the 
steel-shod font of the merry skater, 
high overhead shines a V-shaped 
cluster of stars, particularly promi- 
nent, beca.use of the brilliance of the 
star which marks the eastern side of 
the V — a rosy red light, Aldebaran. 
This red star is one in the great con- 
stellation known as Taurus, the Bull. 
The V-shaped cluster outlines the 
bull's face, wherein blazing Aldebaran 
makes an angry looking eye. 

One cannot well notice this star 
without having his attention attract- 
ed to a striking group a bit to the 
southeast — great Orion with the two 



flashing gems, orange-red Betelgeuse 
in the right shoulder of the warrior, 
and white Rigel in the left foot, stars 
that rival Aldebaran in brightness. 
Having once noticed Orio n with his 
three-star belt from which hangs sirs 
spended his gleaming sword, his ma- 
jestic and commanding figure cannot 
again escape the sight so long as he 
holds sway. All through February 
he is a magnificently beautiful spec- 
tacle as he sails grandly through 
the southern sky, gradually retreat- 
ing to the southwest until finally in 
May he disappears into the region 
beyond the setting sun, not to re- 
turn again until the next October, 
when he slips in through the eastern 
doorway. 

When out on a sleighing party some 
fine starlit February night, you will 
en;joy meeting the "Heavenly 
Twins, ' ' Castor and Pollux. They 
are then about half-way across the 
sky from east to west. These two 
star., arc always so near together 
that you see both at once. Castor 
is white, while his brighter brother 
is a pale yellow. The twins may be 
recgnized from the fact that two 
parallel lines of fainter stars extend 
from Castor and Pollux in a south- 
westerly direction, into the Milky 
Way, that broad scarf of hazy white 
spanning the hea.vens. The Twins 
lie farther north than Orion. Costor 
is not counted among the fifteen 
brightest stars. To his brother is 
accorded that distinction, but being 
a twin companion, the name Castor 
is always linked with that of Pul- 
lux. The two brothers will be your 
nightly companions all through the. 
spring months. 

When the mild April evenings be- 



THE UPLIFT 



27 



gin to tempt one to linger out of doors 
after sunset, look for Regulus, that 
bright white star at the end of the 
sickle's handle. About nine o'clock 
at night in the middie of April, the 
curved line of stars representing the 
old-fashioned tool used to harvest 
grain may be seen half-way across 
the sky from east to west and more 
than half-way to the zenith. Regulus 
shines with a clear scintillating ray. 

As Maytirne somes with all its 
orchard fragrance, and bird chorus- 
es, and the out-door world calls 
with special urge, star-studying is 
more than ever a delight. Then 
one's attention is attracted by a 
beautiful white diamond sparkling 
in the east in mid-evening. Its name, 
Spica, means "an ear of wheat." 
It is one of a large group of stars 
known as the Virgin, who is supposed 
to be holding in her hand a head of 
wheat. Spica 's path across the 
heavens lies to the south of the ze- 
nith. 

In the long June days, starlight 
time comes late, but everbody is then 
out of doors, sleeping porches are 
full-tenanted and the stars seem 
more than ever companions. Every- 
one, of course, knows the Big Dip- 
per, but n'ot everyone, is familiar 
with that star of poetical fame, 
Arcturus, which shines, in June, 
nearly overhead and in range with a 
line drawn southeast from the bottom 
of the Big Dipper. It is distant from 
the Dipper about twice the length 
of the handle. The especially bright 
golden radiance of Arcturus makes 
it easily distinguishable from its 
star mates. 

If in camping days, you will push 
your boat out upon the sleepingwat- 
ers of the lake some warm July 



evening and look off to the south, 
low down in the sky, you cannot 
fail to notice a naming red star in 
the midst of an' irregular cluster 
rudely resembling the object for which 
it is named, the Seorpin. The red 
star is Antares. Because of its low 
position in the sky and consequent 
short path to travel, its stay above 
the horizon is comparatively brief, 
but its rare color makes it an espe- 
cial favorite with star students. 

In the clear, dry atmosphere of 
the sultry August night, a trio of 
beautiful lights form a striking dia- 
mond-shaped figure overhead. Look 
first for a brilliant, white star, the 
center one in a row of three stars 
set close together like gems in a bar 
pin. You will find it about midway 
from east to west. This bright star 
is Altair, known, with its compan- 
ions, as the Eagle. It triangles witli 
charming Vega — a star farther to 
the north and so brilliant that you 
cannot mistake it, for with the ex- 
ception of one other it is the bright- 
est star in the whole visible sky — and 
with Deneb in the head of the North- 
ern Cross, a large figure in the Milky 
Way. 

Strolling across the campus on a 
soft September evening, your atten- 
tion may be attracted to a solitary 
star very low down in the south, it 
so far outshines any other near it 
that it seems to be alone. Fomal- 
haut's path lies even closer to the 
horizon than does that of Antares 
and it makes an even shorter stay 
in our latitude. 

October will have a delightful sur- 
prise for you if sometime, about an 
hour after sundown, you look care- 
fully in the north-eastern sky. Soon 
you will discover a rarely beautiful 



2U 



THE UPLIFT 



gem flashing its shining way along 
its upward course. Capella is ono 
of the finest ornaments of the whole 
starry curtain. It flashes with ;i 
peculiar golden brightness compell- 
ing attention. You will recognize it 
by its place in a five-sided figure 
known as Auriga. All through No- 
vember Capella is truly wonderful in 
the northern sky, and remains a 
cheery companion through the long 
winter. 

In the keen air of frosty December 
nights the stars shine with more than 
their usual 'brilliance. Then it is 
that Sirius, the Great Dog Star, the 
brightest star of all the bending 
dome, reigns supreme in the east 
in earl evening. It flares with the 
dazzling splendor of a huge diamond, 
following on after Orion toward the 
west, and coming into view a little 
earlier each night until in February 
it has made half its run across the 
sky. 
Its companion, Procyon, known as 



the Little Dog Star, is less striking 
but easily recognized by its greater 
brilliance than the other twinklers 
in its immediate field, and by its' 
yellowish tinge in contrast to the 
white light of its regal brother. 
Procyon rises a few minutes earlier 
than Sirius and a little more to the 
north, but because the swing of its 
orbit gives it a longer path across, 
it sets much later than does the 
Great Dog Star. 

Polaris, the North Star, which is 
always to be found in line with the 
two stars which form the front of 
the Big Dipper's bowl, and a con- 
siderable distance away, though not 
one of the fifteen brightest stars, yet 
so far outshines its neighbors as to 
make it prominent in its field. 

The fifteen brightest stars, named 
in the order of their brilliance are : 
Sirius, Vega, Capella, Arcturus, Rigel, 
Procyon, Altair, Betelgeus, Aldebaran 
Spica, Polluz, Antares, Fomalhaut, 
Deneb, Regulus. 



TWENTY-FIVE YEARS AGO AND NOW. 



(Smithfield Herald.) 



One more day and we will be 
writing it "1925." We are about 
to enter the last lap of the first 
quarter of the twentieth century. 
Twenty-five years have seen many 
changes. In 1900 cotton was selling 
at seven cents per pound. Eggs sold 
for twelve and a half or fifteen cents 
per dozen ; chickens from twelve and 
a half to twenty-five cents apiece ; 
hams, about fourteen cents a pound ; 
butter twenty to twenty-five cents 
per pound; flour $2.50 a sack. The 
hired girl received two'dollars a week 
and did the washing. Laborers work- 



ed ten hours a day and never went 
on stike. Women did not powder 
and paint (in public,) smoke or vote. 
A kerosene hanging lamp and a stereo- 
scope in the parlor were luxuries and 
no one bothered about an electric 
light bill or even thought of a mov- 
ing picture. Appendicitis had not 
become fashionable and microbes were 
still to be discovered. 

Today! 1925 — Everybody rides in 
automobilies or flies; we play the 
piano with our feet; go to the movies 
every night, and never go to bed the 
same day we get up. We blame the 



THE UPLIFT 



29 



high cost of living on our neighbors 
and wonder how in the world we can 
manage to ' ' keep up with Lizzie. ' ' 
These are days of suffragetting, pro- 
fiteering, and excess taxes. 

And yet as we mark the changes in 
the past quarter of a century none 
of us want to go back to the "cheap" 
clays of 1900. We know we have gone 
forward in things that count. Our 
schools are better housed and we have 
better teachers as a whole. We have 
better homes to live in, and better 
working conditions. Our churches are 
serving humanity as they have never 
served before. The spirit of the Mas- 
ter is spreading unto the uttermost 
parts of the earth. At the beginning 



of this new year of 1925, we find it 
a pretty good old world after all and 
even thought we eat five dollar flour, 
fifty cent bacon, and grape fruit for 
breakfast these days, and get tax no- 
tices for Christmas presents, we still 
prefer the present to those ' ' good old 
days of long ago" that some folks 
are always talking about. As we 
look back over the past years and 
more particularly the past year, we 
see much that might have been dif- 
ferent. We see mistakes for which 
we are sorry. We see opportunities 
that were wasted. But one of the 
joys of the new year is the new start 
that we all can make. 



INSTITUTION NOTES. 



J. J. Jones, Jr. 



Lattie McClam has been appointed 
afternoon ear boy. 



The new oven for the bakery has 
not yet arrived, but is expected soon. 



Wet weather prevented the boy : 
from going to the ball ground last 
Saturday. 



James Suther, a member of the 
ninth cottage, has received permission 
to join the U. S. Navy. 



Many mothers, relatives, and 
friends will be made happy this 
month since it is parole month. 



James Gillespie, Will Hodge, Broad- 
dy Riley and Wayland Barbee have 
left us with honorable paroles. 



The barn boys have been hauling 
dirt during the past week. This dirt 
was hauled to the cottage yards. 



The boys that were given the new 
instruments a few weeks ago are 
progressing repidly. 



The carpenter shop has been closed 
down on account of the absence of 
Mr. J. M. Day, who is spending a 
few weeks in Ashville. 



Haskell Ayers, Homer Barnes, and 
Thamer Pope have left the institution. 
They were paroled by Superintendent 
Boger last week. 



ilr. John J. Earnhardt and Dr. 
Lewis, of Concord, conducted the serv- 
ice at the institution last Sundav aft- 



30 



THE UPLIFT 



ernoon, Mr. Barnhardt has been se- 
lected to get any particular man that 
the boys want to hear on the 
second and fifth Sundays of each 
month so last Sunday he brought 
with him Dr. Lewis, of Concord, who 
made a very interesting talk. 



recently. 



Paul Camp and Herbert Apple 
have been placed in the shoe shop 
under the direction of Mr. A. C. 
Groover. 



The boys had their weekly 6how 
last Thursday evening. The show 
exhibited was: "Cabarrus County" 
and a two reel comedy. 



Preparations are being made for 
chicken raising at the school this 
year. One incubator, holding four 
hundred eggs and another holding 
two hundred fifty, have been filled 



Instead of having our regular Sun- 
day School lesson last Sunday, we 
again had the pleasure of listening to 
Rev. A. W. Plyler, editor of the 
Christian Advocate, Greensboro. He 
took his test from II Peter 3 :8 
He opened his sermon by saying that 
figures were an important thing with 
man, but that God had no use for 
them. He said that one day is w r hh 
the Lord as a thousand years and a 
thousand years is as one day, that 
when the little babe was born way 
down in Bethlehem, Judea, there was 
no given time or date, just said that 
he was born. He said that arithme- 
tic wasn't the only study that was 
important, there are grammar history 
and geography. Rev. Plyler said 
that there were no dates recorded in 
the Bible. He preached a fine sermon 
and it was enjoyed by everyone. 



DEEPER THAN CLOTHES. 

Isn't he a fine-looking fellow?" you have heard folks remark about a 
boy who has passed by. A statement like, this is a fair estimate of 
character. A boy who does not respect others enough to keep clean 
and neat does not have much respect for himself. There are times, of 
course, when a fellow canot look like a fashion plate. But he need not 
worry. True worth goes deeper than clothes. — Selected. 



EAILROAD SCHEDULE 









Northbound 








No. 


136 


To 


Washington 


5:00 


A. 


M. 


No. 


36 


To 


Washington 


10:25 


A. 


M. 


No. 


46 


To 


Danville 


3:15 


P. 


M. 


No. 


12 


To 


Richmond 


7:25 


P. 


M. 


No. 


32 


To 


Washington 


8:28 


P. 


M. 


No. 


38 


To 


Washington 


9:30 


P. 


M. 


No. 


30 


To 


Washington 
Southbound 


1:40 


A. 


M. 


No. 


45 


To 


Charlotte 


4:14 


P. 


M. 


No. 


35 


To 


Atlanta 


10:06 


P. 


M. 


No. 


29 


To 


Atlanta 


2:45 


A. 


M. 


No. 


31 


To 


Augusta 


6:07 


A. 


M. 


No. 


33 


To 


New Orleans 


8:27 


A. 


M. 


No. 


11 


To 


Charlotte 


9:05 


A. 


M. 


No. 


135 


To 


Atlanta 


9:15 


P. 


M. 



THE SOUTHERN SERVES THE SOUTH 



VOL. XIII CONCORD, N. C, JANUARY 24, 1923 No. 9 



■**4 »Ji «J» *J» *.J» A A *■*« «J* »J* >J» >J* *J» >J» >*« A A **•» tj» >J* ♦$*♦£•**•}» A *■*« >** >*■» A A A ■*% *J* *J» •$» A A *J* #J* >J» A A *J* 



$ OUTSTANDING NEEDS. I 

* ♦:♦ 

* "I favor progress in public education, because ♦ 

* it is the foundation stone of our civilization. The £ 
X classic utterance of great North Carolinian, 'A dem- *j* 
% ocracy canot be built on the backs of ignorant men' * 

* sounded an everlasting truth. * * * * * * ♦ 
♦> ' ' The fundamental factor in our system of educa- %> 
% tion is the public school system, because every *j* 
% process of educational development must begin at the * 

* bottom. Therefore, we need to stress more and ♦ 
4- more the work of our elementary and high X 
% schools. * ***** * 
% "If I should be. asked to say what I found to * 

* the outstanding needs in North Carolina, as I * 

* visualized them during my travels covering some * 
forty thousand miles in ninety-eight counties in the £ 

♦ 



past twelve months, I would unhesitatingly reply: 
Agricultural improvement and rural betterment. If 



* I should then be asked to suggest what I considered <$> 
<£> the prime remedy for supplying this need, I would ,£ 



say: MORE EDUCATION, both academic and vo- 
cational." — Gov. McLean in his inaugural address. 






■>t«».t.>t« >:<■>♦♦»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»»♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦»»♦♦♦»»♦*' 



-PUBLISHED BY- 



TEE PRINTING CLASS OF THE STONEWALL JACKSON MANUAL 
TRAINING AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

J. P. Cook, Chairman, Concord Mrs. G. T. Roth, Elkin 
Miss Easdale Shaw, Vice-Chairman Herman Cone, Greensboro 

Rockingham Mrs. Cameron Morrison, Charlotte 

Jno. J. Blair, Sec, Raleigh Mrs. A. L. Coble, Stateville 

D. B. Coltrane, Treas., Concord Mrs. T. W. Bickett, Raleigh 

J. S. Effird, Albemarle Mrs. W. N. Reynolds, Winston-Salem 

Mrs. Chas. -4. Cannon, Concord Mrs. I. W. Faison, Charlotte 

Rev. Tom P. Jimison, Spencer Mr. Paul C. Whitlock, Charlotte 

Mrs. W. H. S. Burgwyn, Honorary Member 
Chas. E. Boger, Supt. 



CONTENTS. 



EDITORIAL COMMENT 3-7 

CHARACTER 8 

THE WIZARD OF "STRASBURG" Gladys Blake 9 

A NORTH CAROLINA WILL 193 YEARS 

OLD— MADE IN 1731 (The Wachovia) 15 

BIRTHDAY OF ANOTHER OUSTANDING 

FLORIDA'S SHELL MOUNDS Merritt L. Allen 17 

RAMBLING AROUND (Old Hurrygrahp 19 

HEALTH— THE STATE'S GREATEST ASSEST 

Angus Wilton McLean 23 

WHEN A PREACHER IS A SINNER News & Observer 21 

BAYARD TAYLOR May C. Kingwalt 22 

IS TUBERCULOSIS A SUFFICIENT REASON 
FOR COMMITTING SUICIDE? 

N. C. Tuberculosis Association 26 

'BUTCHERING TIME 28 

CRITICISM Beatrice Cobb 29 

INSTITUTION NOTES J. J. Jones, Jr. 29 



The Uplift 



A WEEKLY JOURNAL 

PUBLISHED BY 

The Authority of the Stonewall Jackson Manual Training and Industrial 
School. Tyne-setting by the Boys Printing Class. Subscription 

Two Dollars the Year in Advance 

JAMES P. COOK, Editor, J. C. FISHER, Director Printing Department 



Entered as second-class matter Dec. 4, 1920 at the Post Office at Concord, 
N. C. under act of March 3, 1879. Acceptance for mailing at special rate 
of 4, 1923. 



Never forget to have a penny when all thy expenses are enumerated and 
paid; then shalt thou reach the point of happiness — Benjamin Franklin. 



PAYING A HIGH PRICE. 

Some days ago "Teacher" in the Charlotte Observer called attention to the 
infidelic utterances of an imported teacher, drilling a class of teachers 
in Charlotte. He dismissed the Bible as myth, and his arrogant manner sug- 
gests that he depends entirely on his own strength and wisdom, leaving 
God out of the equation. 

It is strange that orthodox North Carolinians will spend North Carolina 
tax money for such influences among the youth of the state. But it seems 
that it is being done with impunity. 

Following this communication by "Teacher" in the Observer another cor- 
respondent of The Observer has this to say : 

"Last Sunday there appeared in the Open Forum an article about the 
teachings of a professor of the North Carolina College for Women, Greens- 
boro. We wish to say that the article was a good one but it was not half 
of the story. This professor, who comes to Charlotte and meets his class 



4 THE UPLIFT 

of teachers every Monday afternoon, has not only infidel ideas about 
the Bible, but the racial problem likewise. Time nor space permits us 
to print this man's attitude on the "home," "Bible," and race question. 
However, we shall say this much: He is an advocate of amalgamation. 
An investigation will be worth while any one's time in this serious mat- 
ter. 

It is not a question of what Mr. Keister is doing to uproot the faith 
of the group of Charlotte teachers who have paid for the course, but 
what is he teaching the girls at the college. 
Why not investigate this man's teachings'? 

A LISTENER-IN. 
Charlotte, January 17. 

In the same paper Editor Wade H. Harris, taking note of some legisla- 
tion along the line, has this to say editorially: 

"Representative Broug-hton makes known the fact that he "will support, 
heartily the measure to prohibit the teaching of evolution in our public 
or State-owned schools," specifically denying "the right of any teacher 
to draw a salary from the State of North Carolina or any of its subdivi- 
sions, for teaching evolution to any of our young people. ' ' The citizen- 
ship was only last week waked to the fact that the State is doing that 
very thing. Young teachers who pay a wage to a State professor to 
"coach" them to procurement of higher classifications, are forced to lis- 
ten to ridicule of the Bible as the kindergarten to evolution. If Repre- 
sentative Broughton wants evidence to bring "before the General As- 
sembly," he has only to subpoena a delegation from the professor's au- 
dience. ' ' 

* * * * -X- * s * * $ * -* 

KEEPING HISTORY STRAIGHT. 

The Uplift has many good and helpful friends, who watch us closely and 
keep us in the straight and narrow path. We are proud of them. This eard 
from Mrs. Bettie P. Gibson, of Concord, will explain itself : 

"Again I am taking the liberty of commenting on an article in The 
Uplift, which I consider one of the best publications in the State. It 
is in reference to the statement made in regard to President Davis' visit 
to the field of Manassas after the battle. 

I cannot, of course, vouch for the exact truth of the statement made that 
General Jackson said to the President, "Give me ten thousand men and 
I could take Washington before night;" but I do know that it was pub- 
lished at the time and received without question all through the country. 
When you get tired of my efforts to 'keep history straight, ' please do not 
hesitate to let me know." 

One of the sincerest purposes of this little paper is to be accurate and 
frank. And we receive with gratitude any correction that friends may wish 



THE UPLIFT 5 

to make to any article that The Uplift carries; and this particularly choice 
spirit that offers this information will be our historical guardian as long as 
life last, before we suffer any tired feeling. 

It was, however, the picturing of General Jackson 'tossing his military 
cap into the air' as an introduction to his statement to President Davise re- 
garding what he could do if he had ten thousand men that challenged our 
belief. We just could not think of the modest, serious-minded Jackson 
'throwing up his military head-gear in the air,' but we doubt not that the 
great general could have accomplished just what he is made to have said to 
the President. 

MAKING A BRAVE FIGHT. 

State Treasurer Lacy, who has served in the state so well and faithfully for 
years, is now suffering one of his frequently recurring and frightful attacks 
of asthma. Before he had completed signing his name fifteen thousand times 
to as many bonds being sold in New York City, he was strickened. Distress- 
ing news came from his sick room; but in a few days the brave and courageous 
little official took the train and came home, where he is yet confined. 

In the meantime some .propaganda started to legislate him out of 
office, via the pension route. Those, who know the fine North Carolinian, 
were slow to believe that he would accept what seemed setting a bad example 
in the state, though conceived in the best and most laudable spirit. 

His hosts of friends throughout the state are hoping and praying for 
his speedy recovery, and they expect at no distant day to greet him in his 
office and have him call us by our Kiwanian name and, in turn, address him by 
the friendly and companionable name, Ben. 

* * * X- •* * * # # * *- * 

JUST BEGINNING THIS FLYING BUSINESS. 

The Chairtown News, of Thomasville, has been interviewing some advanced 
thinkers. A visiting genius, not satisfied with what has been accomplished 
with aerial craft, has communicated some ambitious ideas to editor Sturkey, 
and who knows but that in a few years his dream may be realized in ac- 
cordance with the following: 

It seems that I have been given to talking to people with wild ideas 
this week, as another fellow told me of an airship that he was working 
on that would make it possible to circle the earth within twenty-four 
hours. His machine is to be a cigar shaped, equipped with five motors 



THE UPLIFT 

and has large compressed air compartments. It will be able to ascend 
straight up in the air to a height of one hundred miles, which will eli- 
mate the earth's gravity. Of course there will be no air that distance 
from the earth, nothing but pure ether, so he will start up his compressed 
air pump and supply air breath. While perched one hundred miles 
above the earth, the earth will be rotating at the rate of 1030 miles 
an hour. If he wanted to go to China he would go up, stay about ten 
hour and then come down in China and so on. Yes I admit it sounds 
foolish, but who can tell what the future will bring us. 



THE GOVERNOR'S INAUGURAL. 

The concensus of opinion with regard to Gov. McLean's inaugural address 
is that it is indisputable evidence that he is a safe business man and 
a statesman. That will g'o a long way in giving the public assurance that 
the Old North State is to profit by the leadership of a wise and safe man. 

This gives coloring to the famous telegram that General Cox, years ago, sent 
to the powerful county: "Hold Robeson and save the state." That fine 
old county has answered the appeal. 

************ 

The General Assembly is enjoying the services of two very able presiding 
officer — one by the grace of the state in the election of Lieut-Governor Long, 
presiding in the Senate ; and Hon. Edgar W. Pharr, unanimously elected 
Speaker of the House. If no considerable legislation has yet occurred, it is 
not their fault. These gentlemen announced their committees within a small 
number of hours after their induction into office. They did what they said 
they would do. 

********■***# 

It is now Judge Isaac M. Meekins. PresidentCoolidge gave him the appoint- 
ment ; the judiciary committee unanimously recommend his confirmation, which 
was quickly done by the U. S. Senate. Chief Justice Taft administered the 

oath of office, last Monday. While identified with the republican party, 
Juge Meekins enjoys the friendship of prominent democrats, who see in him 
very fine qualities of mind and heart. He succeeds the late H. G. Connor, 
who presided so ably over the Federal courts of the Eastern North Carolina 
district. 

************ : 

Great is a child. Little Hector McLean, the Governor's youngest, cared 



THE UPLIFT 7 

nothing for what that vast throng was going to do to his daddy in Raleigh — 
he wanted to ride on the street car. And they failed to get the youngster to 
return home until he had satisfied his longing desire, and he was shocked 
that Raleigh folks run their "Street cars in the woods." 

************ 

George Ross Pou, the superintendent of the State Prison, has had his hands 
full. To be between two fires is no pleasant situation, one would imagine. 
One extreme would have it a money-making institution ; another would have 
it made a picnic with frills and ruffles. It will require a man of great 
wisdom to satisfy both of these ideas. 

************ 

"The Wizard of Strasburg, " appearing in this number, is a comprehen- 
sive picture of how we have gotten away from spooks and withchcraft, and re- 
cites the story of the invention of the very agency that had most to do with 
bringing about the new condition. The story itself is a little exciting — spooky 
— but the end justifies it all. 



THE UPLIFT 



BIRTHDAY OF ANOTHER OUTSTANDING 

CHARACTER. 

One's plans are sometimes tricked into failure. In preparing for the 
observation of the anniversary of disinguished men, whose birthdays fall 
in January, The Uplift had material for the inclusion of a fourth, 
but by some unaccountable oversight the copy did not get in the hands 
of the youngsters of the print shop. 

No less renown and contributing no less to the distinction of this 
country was that superb scholar and scientist, Mathew F. Maury. This 
oversight is detected by an article just seen in the Rocky Mount Telegram, 
which follows. Maury, while a world character, never forgot that he 
was a child of Virginia. His dying words were, "Carry my body through 
Goshen Pass when the laurels are in bloom." 



Although comparatively few may 
be famaliar with the fact, today is 
the birthday of 'Matthew Fontaine 
Maury, one of the greatest naval 
figures of Confederate history. Con- 
sequently on today, his birthday, a 
brief resume of his work and a tri- 
bute to the man may be considered 
most timely. At the same time it 
may serve of worthy educational val- 
ue. 

Matthew Fontaine Maury, illu- 
strious scientist, pathfinder of the 
seas and brave Confederate officer, 
was born January 14, 1806 near 
Fredericksburg, Va. 

When he was quite young his 
family moved to Tennessee, and there 
he lived until at the age of nineteen 
he entered th navy as midshipman. 
From then on until his death in 1873 
Ms life is full of interesting events, 
always abounding in works that have 
benefited the world. It was he who 
found the paths of the sea, who 
made the wind and current charts, a 
lasting favor to the mariners of the 
world. He organized and designed 
the system of weather reports and 
forecast of weather probabilities for 



the farmers. One of his most popular 
works is "Physical Geography of the 
Sea" which has been translated into 
six foreign languages. 

He was sent to Brussels in 1853 as 
the American representative to the 
Maritime Congress. Such was the im- 
press of his greatness that he re- 
turned with five orders of knight- 
hood conferred upon him. No other 
American was so honored by foreign 
potentates. 

The possibility of the Panama 
canal and the laying of the Atlantic 
cable were conceptions of his brain. 
Cyrus Field said when the cable was 
completed: "Maury furnished the 
brains, England gave the money and 
I did the work. ' ' 

With Maury religion and science 
never conflicted as he learned their 
harmony. To him the Bible was 
true and science was true. In this 
faith he passed away, and his body 
rests in beautiful Hollywood ceme- 
tery at Richmond. Although loved 
and raised by residents of the south 
especially for his Confederate record, 
he was truly a world figure in 
thought, deed and action. 



THE UPLIFT 



THE WIZARD OF STRASBURG. 



By Gladys Blake. 



By the light of one candle in a 
quaint little room behind dianiond- 
paned windows which overlooked a 
narrow, unpaved ' street, two girls 
were going to bed. 

"I wish I had not come here," 
said the younger of the two with a 
sigh, as she tied on her nightcap. 
"Everything is so strange and queer. 
I can see that Aunt Emmeline doesn't 
want me in the house. She wishes 
me back home. And as for Uncl-5 
John — he frightens me ! He is not 
the same man he used to be. In- 
stead of the lively, cheery person I 
knew when I was a child, he has be- 
come a dark-browed, brooding indi- 
vidual with hardly a word for any- 
body. What can have changed hint 
so? What is the matter with him ." ' 

The other girl went softly to the 
door and looked out in the hall. As- 
sured that no one was there, she 
closed the door again and bolted it. 
When she turned back into the room 
her face plainly showed that she had 
something to tell. But just as she 
was about to answer her companion 's 
questions she hesitated and broke 
off a sentence in the middle. "Per- 
haps I had better keep quiet, ' ' she 
said doubtfully. "You would not 
want to hear gossip of your uncle 
from the lips of one who is but a 
sort of servant in his house.'' 

"Do not call yourself a servant, 
Elsa, protested the younger girl with 
real indignation. "Would I sleep 
in the room with a servant? Aunt 
Emmeline herself told me that you 
are a daughter of a friend of hers 
and just came in to help her with 



the housework while her health is so 
bad. She regards you as a guest. ' ' 

"Be that as it may," said Elsa, 
"I learned what I have learned 
while serving in this house, and it 
might be more honorable if I held 
nry tongue about it. Still, it is not 
right that you should be left in ig- 
norance of the things people are 
saying about your uncle and — and — 
some things I have found out my- 
self. You may not want to visit in 
this house when you know. Your 
uncle is under a dreadful suspicion, 
fraulem!" 

"Call me Griselda," directed the 
other, and added : ' ' Tell me at once 
what you are talking about, Elsa. 
What are people saying about ray 
uncle?" 

"They say," and the girl's voice 
dropped to a mere breath of sound, 
"that he has sold his soul to Satan 
and is become a sorcerer! He prac- 
tices black magic in his jewelry shop 
at nigiit when every one else sleeps. 
And by the help of his black art he 
can do in a day what it takes others 
many months to accomplish. That 
is what people are saying of your 
uncle, Griselda, and I have reason to 
believe it true." 

Elsa spoke earnestly, and she who' 
heard felt no desire to laugh. The 
date was in the middle of the fif- 
teenth century, and in that medieval 
era witches and wizards were not 
mere Halloween jokes as they are 
todaj', but were firmly established as 
real beings in the minds of every 
man, woman, and child. The world 
lived in a sort of nightmare in which 



10 



THE UPLIFT 



witches in high-peaked hats rode 
on broomsticks to. horrible appoint- 
ments with demons and devils 
(where they received instructions cs 
to how to contribute to the misery of 
mankind!) and magicians and sor- 
cerers and wizards practiced black 
arts with the aid of Satan himself 
and sold their souls for the power it 
gave them. 

So Griselda Ganfleisch, who had 
come a long journey on muleback in 
a merchant 's slow caravan to visit 
her uncle and aunt in the free Ger- 
man city of Strasburg, felt the strong- 
est consternation when this dread- 
ful suspicion of her uncle was told 
her with bated breath by the girl 
who had been living for weeks in the 
house. A sorcerer! Her Uncle John 
a sorcerer? A confederate of Satan's 
and a worker of evil miracles? If 
it were so, she could not stay in his 
home, for sooner or later the burgo- 
masters and the priests of the Church 
would have him up for trial and 
terrible punishment. But to leave 
suddenly and take refuge in a con- 
vent until there was some way to get 
back to her parents would seem to 
prove the truth of all these rumors 
against her uncle and might bring 
his immediate arrest. She must not 
be the cause of that until she was 
sure the awful suspicion was true. 

"Elsa, what did you mean when 
you said you had found out some 
things yourself while serving in this 
house?" Griselda asked after a 
long silence. "On what do you 
base your suspicions that my uncle 
is a wizard?" 

Elsa shivered and went again to 
the door to make sure no one was 
listening outside. "Please do not 



say that I suspect him," she begged 
when she had turned back to her 
companion's side. "I do not want 
him casting a spell on me that would 
lame or kill me. His cnanged char- 
acter, his lack of hospitality (he will 
hardly let an outsider within his 
doors), and the way he neglects his 
honest trade of a, lapidarv had started 
people to whispering about him Ions; 
before I came here. And then, as I 
told you before, he can do in a day 
what it takes others a long while 
to complete. But I know more than 
this. I know that he meets Satan 
every night in the jewelry shop just 
beneath this room where we are to 
sleep and that in the mornings when 
1 go in there to clean up I find the 
place in a dreadful fix. Blood on the 
floor, on the walls, and bloody finger 
prints on the towels where they have 
wiped their hands! I say nothing 
as I wash them away, but I think a 
great deal." 

"Blood?" repeated Giselda, and 
the dreadful word made her blench. 

' ' Yes, blood ! Brown, sticky blood ! 
At first I thought it was wine, but 
wine is not sticky. And you know 
magicians have to use blood in work- 
ing charms! Every magic philtes 
must have its drop of blood." 

"Muman blood?"' shuddered Gris- 
elda; 

"I don't say that. It may be 
only the blood of chickens or animals. 
But blood is blood and proves that 
unholy deed are done down there in 
the dark of night. ' ' 

The flame of the candle on the 
shelf flickered eerily, and the wind 
outside wailed up and down the nar- 
row lane which passed as a street. 
Bain had begun to fall, and the patter 



THE UPLIFT 



11 



of it on the gabled roof of the house 
had a melancholy sound. The au- 
tumn night was cold, and there was 
no heat in the room. Both girls 
shivered with a sense of chill which 
penetrated their very souls. 

"I shall not sleep tonight," stated 
Griselda, not in complaint but in de- 
termination. "I believe everything 
you have told me, Elsa, but I will 
not believe my uncle is a sorcerer 
until I have seen with my own eyes 
that Satan visits him and that they 
practice black arts together. Tonight 
you and I will keep watch. ' ' 

Elsa agreed eagerly. She desired 
nothing more than to show Griselda 
those strange things she had witness- 
ed so often. 

The candle was blown out and the 
room left in heavy darkness. Curfew 
had sounded, and the walled city was 
very quiet except for the rain and 
the wind. The two girls lay in bed 
and waited and listened. They did 
not speak for fear they would lose 
some faint sound below which wouid 
tell them if anything was happening 
in the shop. 

Lying there, Griselda 's thoughts 
wa.ndered to a scene she had wit- 
nessed in the market place of a large 
city not months before. She saw a 
great square filled with people and 
in the center of the crowd a stake. 
Tied to that stake 'was an old wrinkled 
woman who was pleading that she 
was innocent of having cast spells 
on anybody, that she had never rid- 
den a broomstick in her life, that 
she had never hrewed a love philter 
and never talked with a demon. But 
her words changed into shrieks as 
some one set fire to the wood piled 
up aroud her and flames ran up her 



body. Griselda shuddered at the re- 
membrance, but not at the cruelty 
to the poor old woman. She shud- 
dered at the thought of there being 
such horrible things as witches and 
wizards in the world. Anw now her 
own uncle was under suspicion of 
being a sorcerer in league with Sa 
tan! 

What was that! 

Both girls sat up quickly in the 
big bed and strained their ears. Some 
sound in the street had attracted 
their attention at the same instant. 
Elsa got up and ran to the window, 
and at her. soft call Griselda followed 
her. And looking out, they saw — 
the arrival of a visitor! 

He was a tall man wrapped in a 
black cloak and he looked all around 
him as if he were terribly afraid of 
some one's seeing him enter the jew- 
elry shop. Griselda saw her uncle 
come out with a lantern and heard 
him assure the man that there was 
no danger, that all were asleep. Then 
the tall man bent his head and van- 
ished quickly through the low door, 
followed by his host. Immediately 
afterwards a gleam of light through 
the chinks of the floor informed the 
girls that the man were now below 
in the shop. And a queer creaking 
sound and a droning voice that seem- 
ed to be repeating an incanation as- 
sured them that they were busy in 
some manner. What mysterious 
work they were engaged in? 

"You saw the man who arrived?" 
whispered Elsa to her friend. "He 
comes every night in that same 
furtive manner. And did you notice 
how tall he was and how black his 
clothes? He looks exactly as Satan 
is said to look." 



12 



THE UPLIFT 



pies , , 'Apsop oaoin raiq aas ;snui j , , 
Griselda, though her heart was beat- 
ing furiously and there was no doubt 
in her own mind that her uncle's 
nocturnal visitor was he whom Elsa 
believed him to be. 

"We will steal dpwnstairs and see 
if they have left a crack in the door, ' ' 
agreed Elsa. "Though if they have 
it will be the first time," she added, 
thus betraying former experiences of 
her own. 

The ladderlike stairs creaked sorely 
as they descended, but the strange 
noise in the shop and the pouring 
rain covered the sound. Both girls 
were trembling, but it was natural 
that Griselda should be the more ner- 
vous of the two. Elsa was getting 
used to the idea of being under the 
same roof with the devil, but to Gris- 
elda it was an entirely novel ex- 
perience. Under her nervous excite- 
ment did she feel just a little curiosity 
as to what this infamously gentle- 
man looked like on close view? 

Unfortunately the door of the 
shop was closed and bolted as Elsa 
had always found it before. They 
could find no crack through which 
to peer inside the room. But press- 
ing their ears against the panels, they 
could distinguish a few words that 
passed between the two — were they 
both men? — whom they knew to be 
inside. 

"Ha, Master John!" cried a 
strange voice exultantly, evidentlv 
the voice of the visitor. "See all 
that we have done tonight ! See, 
see! Does it not awe you to possess 
the power to do in one night what 
other men labor for months to pro- 
duce ? 

The jeweler's reply could not be 



heard, nor did the girls listen for it. 
For just then, something else at- 
tracted their horrified attention. A 
little sluggish stream of reddish 
brown liquid had trickled out from 
under the door, and on touching it 
Griselda found it faintly sticky. Yes, 
Elsa was right; it could be nothing 
but blood! 

"And look here!" whispered Elsa, 
picking up something that had evi- 
dently been thrown outside the door. 
"What is this, Griselda?" 

' ' It seem to be a sort of pillow, ' ' 
said Griselda, examining the object. 
"And it is simply soaked in blood." 
she added with a shudder. "O, 
what if a human head once lay here, 
Elsa, and was severed in its sleep? 
Not one other night will I spend in 
this horrible house. When morning 
breaks I shall tell my uncle that 1 
know him for a sorcerer and a con- 
federate of the evil one, and I shall 
ask protection at the nearest convent. 
You must leave with me, Elsa. You can- 
not stay here longer." 

' ' And your Aunt Emmeline 1 ' ' 
asked Elsa, as they slipped unstairs 
again. 

' ' We will try to persuade her away 
also, but if she won't leave her hus- 
band she must take the consequences. 
It cannot be helped. ' ' 

Griselda was not a girl to hesitate 
when she had made up her mind. 
Having determined to confront her 
uncle with the evidence she possessed 
of his being a sorcerer, she did so 
at the earliest opportunity. Before 
breakfast the next morning she fouud 
him polishing mirrors in his shop; 
and standing up before him, she in- 
formed him that she knew now that 
his lawful trade was not his only 



THE UPLIFT 



13 



business, but that he did dark deeds 
with Satan's aid every night when 
the city and household slept. How 
did she know? She had seen his 
black-clad visitor arrive by stealth 
his awful trade was not his only 
them talking' of being able to do 
more in one night than other men 
could perform in weeks. Further- 
more, she had seen blood trickling 
from under the door where they 
worked, and she had found a bloody 
pillow where some poor victim of 
theirs must have once laid his hea;i. 
So she was going away from the 
house where such things oceured. 

Her uncle listened to her words in 
silence and sat quietly a long while 
after she had finished speaking. But 
when she was turning to leave him, 
he stopped her. "No, no, Griselda, 
you shall not go away thinking such 
things of me," he declared, starting 
to his feet. "Come and I will show 
you something that is a great secret. 
The man you saw last night was only 
a cowardly human being and not a 
devil. He lends me money to carry on 
this new work of mine, but is so 
afraid that he will fall under the 
suspicion of being a magician, as I 
have done, that he comes here only 
at night with great secrecy. Open 
that, cuppboard door yonder — here is 
the key — and see what you see inside. 
Draw it forth; look at it! What 
would you say that machine is?" 

Geriselda, who had obeyed all his 
instructions, stared uncertainly at 
the odd object she had drawn into the 
lighted shop. Then her face cleared 
a little. "It is a sort of wine press, 
is it not?" she aked. 

"A wine press from which shall 
flow the most learned drink ever 



quailed by mortal men, ' ' declared 
her uncle solemnly. "It is a fount 
of knowledge, Griselda; it is a print- 
ing press ! ' ' 

"And what is that?" asked his 
niece. 

"See, cried her uncle, growing ex- 
cited in explaining his dear secret. 
"See! I dab this type I have so 
laboriously cut with this ink I have 
so varefully compounded — which is 
not blood, but only a nut stain mixed 
with a little glue to make it stick — 
and the pillow yon found last night 
is but my dauber.Now see, I place 
the paper so, I work the machine 
thus, and behold we have page after 
page of neatly written words which 
it would have taken a monk in his 
monastery a long, long while to have 
penned. In this way books shall be- 
come numerous and knowledge widely 
diffused. People call me magician, 
but I tell you, Griselda, that this in- 
vention of mine will abolish magicians' 
sorcerers, witches, demons, warlocks, 
and goblins! All, all will vanish 
when people have drunk deep of the 
wine* from this press ! Witchcraft 
will become the joke of children in- 
stead of the terror of adults. It is 
ignorance that makes the world be- 
lieve in witches and hobgoblins, and 
I have here the magic which will 
banish that ignorance." 

But Griselda, looking at those pages 
so swiftly written and at the odd 
machine on which they had been 
created, drew away from her uncle 
and stared into his gleaming eyes 
with her fear by no menas dispelled 
by what he had shown her. She still 
felt that the inventor of this infernal 
writing machine must-be a confederate 
of the demons he derided. And 



14 THE UPLIFT 

edging farther from him, she soon standing there yet — John Gutenberg, 

fled and left him standing there by the wizard whose wizardry has ab- 

his press. olished witchcraft! 
And on a marble pedestal he's 



IF YOU WERE. 

If you were busy being kind, 
Before you knew it you would find 
You'd soon forget to think 'twas true 
That some one was unkind to you. 

If you were busy being glad, 
And cheering people who are sad, 
Although your heart might ache a bit, 
You'd soon forget to notice it. 

If you were busy being good, 
And doing just the best you could, 
You'd not have -time to blame some man 
Who's doing just the best he can. 

If you were busy being true, 
To what you know you ought to do, 
You'd be so busy you'd forget 
The blunders of the folk you've met. 

If you were busy being right, 
You'd find yourself too busy, quite, 
To criticize your neighbor long 
Because he's busy being wrong. 

— Rebecca B. Foresman. 



THE UPLIFT 



15 



A NORTH CAROLINA WILL 193 YEARS 
OLD-MADE IN 1731. 



(The Wachovia.) 



In the name of God Amen. 

I, John Baptista Ashe, of Bath 
County, in the Province of North 
Carolina, Gent., being- through the 
mercy of God Almighty of sound mind 
and memory, do make, appoint, de- 
clare and ordain this and this only to 
be my last Will and Testament, re- 
voking and making void all former 
wills by me heretofore made. The 
Lord have mercy on my soul for 
Christ's sake: 

Imprimis : I will that all my just 
and lawful debts be dully paid by my 
Executors herneinafter named, par- 
ticularly. 

First Item. I give, bequeath and 
devise (after payment of debts) to 
my three children, John, Samuel, and 
Mary all my (personal) estate to be 
equally divided amongst them. 

Second Item. I give, devise and 
bequeath unto my son, Samuel and 
to my daughter, Mary, up the North 
(Branch) of Cape Fear River called 
Ashwood which are situated lying 
and being on the south side of said 
River between the lands of John Por- 
ter, of Virginia, merchant, and the 
plantation where Daniel Renoho, late- 
ly deceased, dwelt, together with my 
other lands on the north side of said 
River directly opposite to those afore- 
mentioned to be equally divided be- 
twixt them, the said Samuel and 
Mary, to them, their heirs, and as- 
signs forever. 

Third Item. I give, devise and be- 
queath unto my son, Samuel, a tract 
of land containing six hundred and 



forty acres lying on Stumpy Sound, 
called Turkey Point, also one other 
tract containing one thousand acres 
called Henry's Island, on New River 
bank, to him, his heirs and assigns 
forever. 

Fourth Item. I give, devise and 
bequeth unto my son Samuel four 
hundred acres of land lying above 
William Lowrie's plantation on the 
main branch of Old Town Creek. 

Fifth Item. It is my Will that my 
sons have their estates delivered unto 
them as they severally arrive to the 
age of twenty and one years, and that 
my daughter have her estate at the 
clay of her marriage or age of twenty 
and one years, which shall first hap- 
pen. 

I will that my slaves be kept to 
work on my land, that my estate be 
managed to the best advantage, so 
as my sons may have as liberal an 
education as the profits thereof will 
afford and in their education I pray 
by Executors to observe this method. 
Let them be taught to read and 
write and be introduced into the prac- 
tical part of Arithmetiek, not too 
hastily hurrying them to Latin or 
Grammar, but after they are pretty 
well versed in these let them be taught 
Latin and Greek, I propose this ma> 
be done in Virginia. After which 
let them learn French, perhaps some 
Frenchman at Santee will undertake 
this, when they are arrived at age 
I recommend the pursuit and study 
of some profession or business. (I 
would wish one to ye Law the other 



16 



THE UPLIFT 



to Merchandise) in which let them 
follow their own inclinations. 

Sixth Item. I will that my daugh- 
ter be taught to write and read and 
some feminine accomplishments which 
may render her agreeable and that 
she be nut kept ignorant as to what 
appertains to a good housewife in 
the management of household affairs. 
Seventh Item. I give to each my 
Executors a gold ring, the respects 
which in ray life I bore them. 

Eighth Item. I will that Brick 
vault may be built at Gravely and 
my Dear Wife's body be taken up out 
of the earth and brought and laid 
therein: and if it should be my for- 
tune to die in Carolina as my corpse 
may be conveyed thither, I desire that 
one large coffin be made and both 
our bodies laid together therein 
lodged in the said vault. 

Ninth Item. I give and bequeath 
unto my honored friend, Edward 
Mosely, Esquire, the one-half or 
moiety of my land lying near Rock 
Fish Creek on the North West branch 
of the Cape Fear River, being twenty- 
five hundred and sixty acres, to be 
equally divided between him and my 
heirs, to him and his heirs and as- 
signs forever. 

Tenth Item. I give, devise and be- 



queath unto my loving brother John 
Swan six hundred and forty acres 
of land lying on North East Branch 
of Cape Fear River which he bought 
of me of which I have not yet made 
him any conveyance, being land ad- 
joining below that where on my broth- 
er, Samuel Swann dwells, to him the 
said John Swann and heirs and as- 
signs forever. 

Lastly : I nominate and appoint 
my honored friends, Edward Mosley 
and Nathaniel Rheid, Esquires, my 
good friend Moore, my loving brother-:, 
Samuel Swann and John Swann, my 
good friends, Messrs. William Down- 
ing and Edward Executors of this 
my last will and Testament desiring 
and praving them to see the same 
duly. 

In witness whereof I have hereunto 
set my hand this second day of Nov- 
ember Anno Domini 1731. 

Jno. Baptista Ashe 
Signed, sealed and published in the 
presence of us 

John Hawkins 
Cornelius Dargan 
Mitch R utter 
her 
Mehittabe X Rutter 
mark 



' ' The more important the thing we feel we must do, the more careful, 
extended and complete should be our preparation for doing it." 



THE UPLIFT 



1? 



FLORIDA'S SHELL MOUNDS. 



By Merritt L. Allen. 



Digging into the past has brought 
startling discoveries in all parts of 
the world. The excavators of the 
shell mounds of Florida have exhumed 
skeletons and articles which throw 
considerable light upon the aboriginal 
tribes that inhabited North America. 
The entire peninsula is dotted with 
these mounds, and the things which 
are found in them are the evidence 
upon which the American ethnologists 
are building the history of the early 
settlers and the Indians who were 
their direct descendants. 

The mounds are of all shapes, sizes 
and formation, but for the most part 
they are round pr conical. Those 
found inland are usually not very 
high, but those hear the water's edge 
reach a height of from twelve to 
eighteen feet. Most of the sheil 
mounds consist of irregular layers of 
sand and shell. As fast as the shells 
were washed ashore they were tossed 
tipon the mounds, so that they rep- 
resent an accumulation of ages. 

The exact purpose of these mounds 
is a question which has caused much 
interesting discussion, but there are 
^several uses which are .very evident. 
Their first thoughts were undoubtedly 
for a home well above the low 
level they planted their gardens and 
built their huts. The elevation gave 
sweep to the strong winds which 
afforded the best of protection against 
mosquitoes and flies. It also pro- 
tected the inhabitants during the. high 
waters of hurricanes, when the water 
has been known to rise twelve feet 
in less than twenty-four hours. And 
they did not pick their locations for 



building until they were sure that 
they were in a country abounding 
with game, and a good fishing ground 
along the coast. The steep sides and 
the loose shells made them excellent 
means for defense, but where the 
tribe was small in number it was 
their custom to build their mound 
where it would be most difficult to 
find in a locality surrounded by trees 
and scrub growth. Perhaps on one 
side they would be protected by an 
impassable morass and the other 
side would touch the head of a bayou 
where it would be hidden in a. laby- 
rinth of small islands. 

They buried their dead in these 
mounds in order that their last sleep 
would be undisturbed by the high 
waters and the skulking wild beasts. 
The prevailing way to inter the bodies 
was in a squatting position. The 
feet were placed on a level with the 
knees . with the legs against the thighs 
and these drawn up against the body. 
The heads were bent, over and forced 
between the thighs. The accom- 
panying photograph shows the skulls 
and a large bowl in an excavation 
now being made by the Smithsonian 
Institute at Weedon's Island on 
Tampa Bay. Common among die 
things found are pdbble hammers, 
smoothing stones, sharks' teeth, flint 
spearheads, beads and shell drinking 
cups. A large number of hammers 
made from stone are found which 
were evidently used to open shell 
fish for food. Exhibitions show 
beautiful but crudely carved jars and 
bowls. Their pottery was made of 
black, blue, and red clay with a mix- 



18 



THE UPLIFT 



tiire of white materia] resembling 
pounded shell. Cement is encounter- 
ed now and then. This was made by 
burning the ever abundant supply of 
shells and obtainin lime. 

The other accompanying phono- 
graph shows what is left of a shell 
mound in the heart of the city of 
St. Petersburg, Florida. It is a 
great curiosity to the tourists, for 
the story connected with it goes that 



here the tribes for miles around used 
to gather for their festivals. Clams, 
oysters and other shell food were 
gathered in grea,t quantities. As the 
clatter of their stone hammers broke 
the shells, and which were tossed 
upon the ever increasing mound, they 
told mighty tales of encounters with 
snakes, panthers, and hazardous 
trips through miles of saw-grass in 
the Everglades. 



SAND BLAST FOR CARVING WOOD. 

The sand blast — a stream of sand driven with considerable force by 
compressed air or steam through a tube which terminates in a nozzle of 
reduced bore — has long been used for cutting and engraving glass, stone 
and other hard substances. Lately it has been adapted to carving wood. 
The wood is first covered with a protective stencil of rubber, wax or other 
material that the sand will not act on. The sand cuts away the portions 
of the wood left exposed, the portions covered standing out in relief in 
the finished work. Flowers, leaves, conventional designs, etc., are easily 
and quickly carved. The effects prduced are quite beautiful, far superior 
to those obtained by any other mechanical process. The cost, of course, 
is much less than that of hand carving. 

California redwood lends itself particularly well to sand-blast carv- 
ing, because of its soft and relatively uniform texture. Carved wood 
is being much used for paneling and other decorative features in liv- 
ing and dining rooms, dens, etc., of Caliifornia houses. The wood is 
often finished in its natural reddish-brown color. Sometimes it is stain- 
ed or painted in a manner to bring out grain and carving with striking 
effect. Redwood, carved or uncarved, has an unusually beautiful grain, 
and gives pleasing results when used for inside trimming for houses, 
for picture-frames, etc. It is in many instances, being used for making 
door and window frames, siding and trimming of various kinds. — Ex. 



THE UPLIFT 



19 



RAMBLING AROUND. 

By Old Hurrygraph. 



A darky walked into a prominent 
young lawyer's office the other day 
and said he was looking for some 
free legal advice. "Have a seat," 
said the attorney, " I '11 give you some 
and it will be worth just what you 
pay for it 



A group of Durhamites were dis- 
cussing the growth of radio fans and 
the interest people were taking in 
this new development in our every-da.' 
life; how satisfying it was at times. 
and how much static there was at 
other times, when up speaks a fellow, 
noted for his much talking and knowl- 
*edge on all subjects, who had recently 
put in radio set, and said, "He had 
noticed that the 'statistics' in his 
were so voluminous that he could 
hear nothing else, and he was not 
much on 'statistics,' didn't cafe 
anything for them. 



A motor concern sends me some 
literature on "the secret of motor 
efficiency; that saves its price e\ery 
few days." Also is added, "Don't 
confuse this really great invention 
with anything you have ever seen 
or heard of. Don't use snap judg- 
ment. Let me send you one at my 
own risk to try on your own car. ' ' 
I hail anything that will save its own 
price. If the gentlemen will send me 
a car to try it on, I certainly will not 
confuse it with anything I "have 
ever seen or heard of" — sure will. 



He holed his putt for a birdie 
three after Bishop, who trapped his 
second, got out nicely and left him- 



self a short putt for a four. Hill 
tried to pitch and run through a shal- 
low trap but his ball trickled into 
the sand. Both punched their second 
shots in the barrance, while the local 
amateurs played short and pitched 
on in three. Bishop shanked his iron 
second when he hit it in the "grunk- 
el. ' ' You wonder what in the world 
I am talking about. Oh, just a 
game golf on the Hillandale course. 
Of course you understand how it was 
done. 



"I know I ain't no glass of 
fashion, nor a mould of form, nor 
nothing like it," said one of Durham's 
fastidious Adonises, "and maybe 
there's lots of little things about 
Being genteel and on the up and up 
that I don't anything about, but 
they ain't nobody can say they ever 
seen me wearing sleeve garters with 
red or blue bows on 'em." 



The only trouble I see with these 
Christmas saving clubs is, they are 
started right before or just after 
Christmas, when most in general a 
gent is broke, or about to be broke. 
And then to add to the gaity of his 
financial feelings, right on the heels 
of his depleted exchequer come the 
gathering in of the income tax. 
Others may say what they please, 
but I rejoice over the fact that I have 
an income to pay on and I gladly 
give Uncle Sam some .of my outgo 
to help him along. Some fellow has 
written a poem on the "Incoming 
and out going of the day," being so 
beautiful. It is. So is your income 



20 



THE UPLIFT 



and your taxes. 

A Negro had been sentenced to 
the roads in the Recorder's court, and 
took an appeal to the superior court. 
Failing to give bond he was incarcer- 
ated in the county jail, waiting for 
the term of the court, and had been 
in jail for several weeks. His at- 
torney visited him just before the 
court convened and told him he had 
better withdraw his appeal and go 
on and take his sentence. "Law, 
man," said the negro,, "I thought 
I was employing a lawyer, not an 
agent for the chain gang." 



The cafeteria policy is to wait on 
yourself. The cafeteria affords a 
fine opportunity for experimenting 
with one's self. It has its uses ys 
well as its object of feeding the 
public. The grouch or growler, who 
is continually complaining or growling 
with waiters about this, that and the 
other, and taking him as an object, 
or an outlet for all his grouehiness, 
can visit a cafeteria; be his own 
waiter, and there take out his spite, 
spleen, and grouch on himself, and 
argue and abuse himself while he is 
waiting on himself, and it does not 
involve no one but himself. If he 
will do this it is a fine place for him 
to hear himself as others hear him. 



rity, and the reporter said he had. 
"What did he say?" inquired the 
editor. "Nothing at all," replied 
the reporter. "I know that," said 
the editor, "but how many columns 
of it ," -That's about the way 1 
feel quite often when I start to tell 
folks what I've seen and heard in 
"Rambling Around." It's kind of 
hard work to write a whole column 
of nothing, but I have to do it to keep 
the editor of this paper in a good 
humor, and earn my salary. Of 
course it wouldn't be so hard if I 
didn 't care what I said ; but I do. 
I'm like a certain person I heard of 
once who always told everyone every- 
thing unpleasant she ever heard 
about her best friend, just to be able 
to say that she didn't believe a word 
of it. • 



Once an editor asked a reporter 
if he had interviewed a certain celeb- 



The funny age is coming on us; 
in fact it is already here. Men are 
wepjring bal'joon 'trousers, and the 
women are getting skirts that look 
like cross-word puzzles, and every- 
body thinks it is funny. But it is uoc 
half so funny as the costumes our 
ancestors wore — Knee britches, and 
skin tight pants, collars like side- 
boards on a wheel-barrow that choked 
the ears, and buckles and bows on 
their shoes; and the women hoop- 
skirts that made goodsize tents of 
their dresses. They did. And it 
was the fashion. 



A grocer says that some people who buy on time don't s&sm to know 
when times leaves off and eternity begins. — The Progressive Grocer. 



[TIE UPLIFT 



21 



WHEN A PREACHER IS A SINNER. 



News & Observer. 



Preachers are not usually classed 
among sinners. As a rule, their walk 
and conversation are exemplary. 
Other men might with profit follow 
in their footsteps. The truth is that 
their correct life, aye, their unselfish 
life, is as compelling as the gospel 
they preach. If they were not more 
consistent than most men, their ap- 
peals would fall on deaf ears. It is 
because they illustrate the virtues 
they hold up for emulation that 
they find access to men's hearts. 

Now and then a preacher goes 
wrong or falls from grace. The flip- 
pant assert it is proof that "min- 
isters are no better than other men." 
They are wrong, and the evidence of 
their harsh and unfair judgment is 
that the lapse of a preacher is sen- 
sational news. It is because it is ex- 
ceptional for a preacher to go wrong 
that the fall of one constitutes news. 
But, taking the word of a Metho- 
dist bishop, there are preacher's who 
are sinners. In an address to Chicago 
Methodist preachers last week, Bishop 
Hughes made this declaration : 

"Any minister today who fails 
,to toil in his study, who fails to 
buy new books and keep himself 
at the best, is a sinner." 
If the bishop is right there are a 
few ministers who can be called sin- 
ners, but fewer than in "the good old 
days ' ' when a Bible and a hymn-book 
and a volume of homiletics in sad- 
dle-bags constituted a preacher's li- 



brary. But, if "sinners" in the de- 
finition of the bishop, they were the 
apostolic sort who by abundant labors 
planted the seed of the real Ameri- 
cans and Christianity in the New 
World. 

There are new definitions of viola- 
tors in every decade. With new in- 
ventions come new crimes. It was no 
crime to speed before we had flivvers, 
no crime to make brandy when it was 
not forbidden, no crime for parents 
to let their children roam the streets 
or fields when there were no compul- 
sory school laws, and so on, includ- 
ing crimes against monopolizing the 
air and the like. It is because col- 
leges abound and congregations are 
well read that a preacher is a "sin- 
ner" who does not bring to his hear- 
ers a sermon out of the fullness of 
the ready mind informed by much 
reading and study. 

' ' Beware of the unprepared preach- 
er who comes to a congregation and 
says, ' Brethren, I will speak to you 
out of my heart today,' " said a 
distinguished divine. "Usually he 
means he will preach out of an empty 
mind and is seeking an excuse for his 
lack of preparation. ' ' 

What happens to "sinners" in the 
pew when the mandate of the Christ, 
"Feed my sheep," is not obeyed by 
the preacher in the pulpit? Does he 
not sin against hearts yearning to 
be fed with the bread of life? 



They are never alone that are accompanied with noble thoughts.- 
ney. 



-Sid- 



22 THE UPLIFT 

HEALTH- 
THE STATE'S GREATEST ASSET 

By Angus Wilton McLean. 

One of the most significant aspects of modern conservation is a high re- 
gard for the health of the community. In the strenuous life of the twentieth 
century the demand is for a maximum amount of mental vigar in a sound 
body. 

Community health, State health and national health is a composite of in- 
dividual health. The better the individual health, the better the general 
average of community health. The more healthy, producing individuals any 
community has and the longer such individuals live to produce, just that much 
greater will be the progress of that community. 

Good health is both an individual and a national asset. It is just as es- 
sential and fundamental to the integrity and permanence of a democratic 
nation as scientific progress, political achievement, industrial development 
or economic accomplishment. Indeed it is the basis upon which all these 
things are built. 

The marvelously increasing longevity, with its resultant increased produc- 
tion and general progress, can be ascribed not to any change in climate or 
natural conditions, but to health education. People have learned how to 
conserve their health and abolish those conditions which were conducive to 
plague and pestilence. People have learned how to protect themselves against 
many of the diseases which were once so greatly dreaded. 

An important agent for the advancement of health education and the rea- 
lization of this individual and national asset is the public school, which is 
the natural and most effective training centre for this branch of public wel- 
fare work. Our schools must teach the elements of personal hygiene as well 
as community sanitation. The teaching of these things is an important part 
of the education of a community. Our schools must so train the individual 
as to prolong the period of individual productiveness, and prevent interrup- 
tions caused by illness, thus adding to social efficiency and individual happi- 
ness. Our State can no longer afford the retardation of efficiency which comes 
from ill health brough on by neglect, by environment, or by failure to com- 
bat preventable disease. 

Some of the principal attributes of education in a democracy are moral 
character, civic efficiency and industrial competency. All of these can be 
attained in our American schools under well-trained teachers. To their 
achievement and full development there is this basic requisite — good health. 
Health education produces good health. Good health makes possible educa- 
tion. Education means progress. 



THE UPLIFT 



23 



BAYARD TAYLOR. 



By May C. 

One hundred years ago this 11th of 
January was born Bayard Taylor, — 
poet, novelist, newspaper correspon- 
dent, lecturer, and United States am- 
bassador to a foreign court. 

Bayard Taylor's birthplace was 
Kenneth Scpiare, Chester Co., Penn- 
sylvania, but as shortly after the Tay- 
lors left town to live on a farm, he 
grew up in the country. 

All country children delight in the 
outdoor world, but the color of the 
sky, the form of a passing cloud, 
and the rhythm of rain upon the roof 
meant more to the poet-to-be than to 
the average country boy. And was it 
merely a boy's adventuresome nature, 
or an intimation of the future globe 
trotter that made young Bayard love 
above all things to climb to the house- 
top, — or some other equally hazard- 
ous high place, — and look out upon 
the far country unfolded before him? 

Very early he showed a great apti- 
tude for committing poetry to mem- 
ory and although as a growing boy 
he read everything, always he cared 
most for poetry and books of travel. 

At seventeen, having finished his 
schooling at the Unionville Academy, 
young Bayard apprenticed himself to 
a West Chester printer and publisher 
of the Village Record. 

But he soon grew restless. More 
and more ardent became his desire to 
travel and study in Europe. And 
when he heard that his eohsin, Frank 
Taylor, and a friend were going 
abroad, his mind was made up. He 
would go with them. 

The fact that he had not a cent 
toward expenses did not faze him; it 



Kingwalt. 

merely sharpened his initiative. 

At once he went to Philadelphia to 
try to arrange with certain editors 
for letter to be written during his 
stay in Europe. 

He was so eminently unsuccessful 
that two weeks before the day set for 
his sailing, he had accomplished noth- 
ing. 

But the mark that distinguishes the 
man of achievement from one who re- 
mains a mere plodder is that he nev- 
er accepts failure as final. Bayard 
Taylor kept at it. As a result, he 
went home in triumph, — with the 
munificent sum of $140 in his pocket ; 
$50 that the editor of the Saturday 
Evening Post had paid in advance 
for twelve letter; a like sum from the 
editor of the United States Gazette; 
and $40 for some poems that he had 
written, while later he arranged to 
contribute letter to the New York 
Tribune as well. 

"A slim, upright youth, with rich 
dark-brown flowing hair, lustrous 
dark-brown eyes, and an expression 
which was half of eagerness, half of 
melancholy," is the vivid picture we 
have of Bayard Taylor at nineteen 
when July 1st he set sail for Liver- 
pool. 

Such a wonderful two years abroad ! 

First, he went on a walking tour 
through the north of England and 
Scotland. Then he traveled through 
Belgium and up the Rhine to Heidel- 
berg. He spent the winter at Frank- 
fort-on-the-Main, where he learned 
to speak German fluently. The fol- 
lowing summer, another walking tour 
took him over the Alps and through 



24 



THE UPLIFT 



northern Italy to Florence, where he 
spent four months perfecting himself 
in Italian. After visiting Borne, he 
turned his face north, and from Mar- 
seilles tramped through cold winter 
rains to Paris. Three months shared 
between Paris and London, and 
Bayard Taylor was homward bound. 

And every penny for his $500 ex- 
penses during the two years abroad 
he earned himself. Think of the 
sturdy ambition and self-reliance and 
self-denial necessary to accomplish 
it ! And never did so small an in- 
vestment of capital pay such big 
dividends. For Bayard Taylor had 
not merely "seen Europe'' in super- 
ficial tourist style. His thirsty soul 
had drunk deep of its culture; the 
new associations and contacts of trav- 
el had both stimulated his mind and 
broadened his outlook on life. And 
his letters, particularly those to The 
Tribune, had been so widely read, 
that on his return to America, if not 
actual fame, at least an enviable rep- 
utation for a young man of only 
twenty-one awaited him. 

But as so often happens when one 
feels most confident of success, now 
came a dash of cold water in the 
face of his next endeavor. 

Not only did young Taylor waste 
a year in a futile attempt to make 
a go of a weekly paper that he and 
a friend had bought out in his home 
county, but saddled himself with a 
debt that took him three years to pay 
after he had shaken off the dust of 
failure and begun all over again in 
New York City. 

"But the mere determination to 
face difficulties diminishes their num- 
ber, ' ' valiantly declared Bayard Tay- 
lor, ' ' and in the good-will with which 



we undertake a work is the work 
half done." 

Yet time was so precious. For not 
only was there the urge of ambition. 
A dear dream of a home of his own 
was also an impelling power. 

Even before he left for Europe, 
Bayard Taylor was already in love 
with Mary Agnew of his home town, 
a young woman of the most beauti- 
ful Christian character, and no poem 
that he ever wrote had the poetic ex- 
quisiteness of the love-story of these 
two. 

It was a love-story with a sad end- 
ing. For after heroic years of wait- 
ing; the heartbreak of many separa- 
tions while young Taylor was making 
a place in the world and an income 
sufficient to support a wife, the two 
were married only a couple of months 
when the sweet, saintly Mary, whose 
incomparable love letters had been the 
inspiration of Bayard Taylor's high- 
est endeavors, died from old-fashion- 
el lingering consumption. 

But always had Bayard Taylor been 
of deeply religious nature; one of his 
strongest convictions through life, 
his belief in immortality, and at his 
young wife's death, while bowed in 
grief, his spirit was not broken. 

The following year he went abroad, 
visiting Egypt, China, Japan. 

On his return after a two years' 
absence, Bayard Taylor began giving 
the popular lectures on his travels 
that were received with such wide- 
spread enthusiam. 

But the lectures were always dis- 
tasteful to him, and he only under- 
took the arduous task to make money 
enough to give him independence of 
time that he might be free to write. 

For besides his newspaper and 



THE UPLIFT 



25 



magazine articles; the Cyclopedia of 
Travel and other books on travel 
produced by this indefatigable work- 
er, Bayard Taylor also was a novelist 
of no mean ability, and, dearest to 
his own heart, a poet. 

' ' Nothing kindled his pride and his 
pleasure like the praise of his poet- 
ry. ' ' 

No less a critic than Longfellow 
called Bayard Taylor's "The Picture 
of St. John" a great poem, — "noble, 
sustained, beautiful from beginning 
to end. ' ' 

Bayard Taylor himself considered 
"The Masque of the Gods," in which 
he portrayed "the evolution of the 
human conception of Deity," his 
best work, written at white heat in 
four days. 

Albert H. Smyth, one of his bio- 
graphers, quotes the following noble 
lines from his ' ' Prince Denkalin ' ' as 
representing Bayard Taylor's own 
philosophy of life. 

The words are spoken by a Chris- 
tian in answer to Buddha's gospel of 
renunciation : 

' ' But I accept, — even all this con- 
scious life 
Gives in its fullest measure, — gladness, 

health, 
Clean appetite, and wholeness of my 

claim 
To knowledge, beauty, aspiration, 

power ! 
Joy follows action, here; and action 

bliss, 
Hereafter! While God-luliecL, thy 

children sleep, 
Mine, Cod-aroused, shall wake to wan- 
der on 
Through spheres thy slumbrous es- 
sence never dreamed. 
Thy highest is my lowest." 



In the meantime had begun the hap- 
piest days of Bayard Taylor 's life ; 
the sunlit fruition of years of inces- 
sant hard work. 

While abroad in 1857 he had mar- 
ried Marie Hansen, daughter of a dis- 
tinguished astronomer. 

Back in America with his bride, he 
began the building of Cedarcroft, 
their beautiful country home with its 
unsurpassed gardens, and fruit trees, 
and hospitality ; the house-warming at 
its opening in 1860, "such as never 
was known in Pennsylvania. ' ' 

Their winters the Bayard Taylors 
spent in New York where the author 
and poet had all the joy and stimulus 
of mingling in literary circles. 

In 1878 a new honor and responsi- 
bility were added to his already abun- 
dant life. 

Bayard Taylor was sent as ambas- 
sador to Germany. 

The appointment gave great satis- 
faction to Berlin and the new minis- 
ter with his wife and child took up 
his residence with equal pleasure. 

But Bayard Taylor had been in 
German only a short time when he was 
taken seriously ill and he died Decem- 
ber 19th of that same year. 

The following March his remains 
were brought home to Cedarcroft and 
four thousand of those who knew and 
loved him followed in the funeral 
procession to Longwood Cemetery, 
three miles away, where later his last 
resting place was marked by a noble 
monument. 

Not quite fifty-three when he died, 
yet how much of accomplishment ; how 
fully he had lived ! 

' ' On all sides he touched the life 
of his time." 

Bayard Taylor's last poem was 



2G 



THE UPLIFT 



"Epicedium," written in honor of 
William Cullen Bryant, and ' ' the clos- 
ing lines, ' ' comments Mr. Smyth, 
"are as true of their author as of 
Bryant. ' ' 

' ' His last work, as his first, was Lib- 
erty ! 
His last word, as his first, for Truth 
Struck to the heart of age and youth : 

He sought her everywhere, 
In the loud city, forest, sea, and air: 
He bowed to wisdom other than his 



own, 
To wisdom and to law, 
Concealed or dimly shown 
In all he knew not, all he knew and 

saw, 
Trusting the Present, tolerant of the 
Past, 
Firm-faithed in what shall come 
When the vain noises of these days 

are dumb; 
And his first word was noble and 'his 
last!' " 



Young men think old men fools ; and old men know young men to be so. 
—Dr. Metcalf. 



IS TUBERCULOSIS A SUFFICIENT REA- 
SON FOR COMMITTING SUICIDE? 



By th6 N. C. Tuberculosis Association. 



The daily press of January 14th, 
1925, reports that a bank official in 
a prominent town in this State com- 
mitted suicide that day, and gives 
as the cause the fact that he had tu- 
berculosis and was afraid of trans- 
mitting the disease to his wife and 
children. This report brings force- 
fully to the attention of our people 
the question at the head of this 
article. 

In some instances I believe the 
question could be answered in the 
affirmative ; for example : An intelli- 
gent man has a wife and four chil- 
dren. He and his wife have been 
looking forward to the time when 
their children would be large enough 
to enter college, and have planned to 
give each one of them a college edu- 
cation. Against that day, they began 
early to be economical, and out of 
every month's salary, except when 
there was sickness in the family, they 



laid by a small part for this parti- 
cular purpose. Likely, too, some of 
the savings were being placed in 
Building and Loan, and perhaps some 
in life insurance, to help provide for 
the family in case of accident, and to 
help toward the education of the chil- 
dren. Possibly they had a little home 
with a mortgage still plastered on it 
for perhaps the last one or two pay- 
ments. And now before he had got- 
ten well started on his plan, he finds 
that he has tuberculosis. 

He knows that in all likelihood he 
must stop work for a year, maybe 
two or three years, at the best. He 
sees his income stopped, his life in- 
surance forfeited, his savings used 
up, debts accumulated, his home sold 
under mortgage. While, if he had 
died quickly, (and the truth that 
tuberculosis does not kill quickly like 
diphtheria, typhoid fever, and pneu- 
monia makes it the most expensive 



THE UPLIFT 27 

disease there is ; in fact more ex- to this tragedy, and only one, to 

pensive than all other preventable wit : With the small amount of money 

diseases put together) the insurance being spent in the fight against tu- 

would become available, probably en- berculosis in North Carolina, only 

abling the wife to pay off the mort- one-half as many tragedies of this 

gage on the home, and with the sav- character are occurring today as oc- 

ings pull herself together, go to work, curred eleven years ago when the 

and raise her family. State began feebly to do active work 

Is there any greater tragedy than in the fight against tuberculosis, 

this? The fact that the bank cashier Surely tragedies of this kind ought 

committed suicide makes this particu- to be sufficient to cause the people 

lar tragedy "news" as the news- of our State, through the legislature 

papers say, but the greater tragedy now sitting, to multiply many times 

still is that it is happening every day the amount of money being so well 

in our State, and sometimes several used in the fight against tuberculosis, 
times a day. There is one bright side 



ONE APPLE. 

In an orchard from which twelve thousand barrels of apples are ship- 
ped every year one individual apples does not seem worth thinking about. 
Yet in just such an orchard not long ago the foreman of the packing force 
made a determined search for one apple. 

"We've got to find it!" he declared. "Come on now." 

The men soon learned that the apple was in one of two barrels that 
had just been headed up. Into the first went a packer ; he took out the first 
layer and the second and third and so on down through half the 
barrel before the desired apple appeared. 

"See!" cried the foreman, turning the fruit bottom up. "Note that 
speck of rot? That's why I was so insistent." 

One of the pickers had found the apple on the ground. It was a singularly 
large and well-shaped winesap and it weighed half an ounce more than 
the biggest apple ever found in that orchard, but it was a windfall and was 
bruised. 

"These barrels go into cold storage," explained the foreman. "They 
are for late winter and early spring trade and will bring high prices. 
That speck of rot would have spread on that apple and then would have 
infected others nearby. The whole barrel of apples might have been 
ruined before the retailer could dispose of them. ' ' 

So should we cope with bad habits. Run down that evil trait; its in- 
fection will spread, Summary treatment is the cure. That is the teach- 
ing not only of religion but of psychology. Go to the bottom of the 
barrel if necessary. — Youth's Companion. 



28 



THE UPLIFT 



<.(. 



BUTCHERING TIME. 



11 



To the fellow who was reared on 
the farm there always clings the mem- 
ory of that greatest-of-all annual 
events — butchering time. 

Though it has been a great many 
years, when we turn back and re- 
view that page in our life's history, 
the whole scene passes in panoramic 
view before us, from the setting of 
the alarm clock the night before 
clear on through every detail of 
the events of that long-looked-for- 
ward-to day. A strange tingling 
numbness occurs in our fingers how, 
when we think of the frosty fagots 
that we gathered in the early hours 
of that crisp November morning to 
keep alive the fires burning under the 
big black kettle suspended on a tri- 
pod in which the water was heated 
to scald the hogs. "Well do we re- 
member the old scalding barrel, and 
the old wagon box turned upside 
down to serve as a table on which 
to "scrape" the pigs; the old single- 
tree which was used as a gambol 
stick. I know just the spot where 
we left it; we can still hear the sick- 
ening thud of the axe, as dad struck 
the hogs in the head knocking them 
down; we are startled as we feel the 
warm blood trickling over our fingers, 
from the cold steel blade of the long 
knife that he used to "stick" the 



pigs with. As the day came to a 
close, we remember the crimson sun- 
set and the reddened glow of the sky, 
and wonderful if it was stained with 
the blood of those poor pigs. Then 
as the night shades gathered there 
was the long row of ghostly appear- 
ing forms of the dressed hogs sil- 
houetted against the moon-lit sky that 
caused a ' ' spooky ' ' feeling to play 
up and down our spinal high-line. 
Then followed the feasting period. 
Oh ! how could anyone forget that in- 
termingled aroma of frying liver, ten- 
derloin, sage, mace, head cheese and 
garlic that permeated that home. 
Talk about white rose, lillac helitrope, 
or carnation, for fragrance they are 
as nothing as compared with frying 
liver. Then there was the making of 
the sausage. We never crank a Ford, 
but we are reminded of the days 
when we turned a sausage grinder. 
Doughnuts ! Why man, the dough- 
nuts that mother made after "but- 
chering time ' ' equaled in size the ba- 
loon tires sold by Ford Agencies to- 
day. 

If we could only live over again the 
' ' butchering time ' ' of our boyhood 
days we would be willing to step 
aside and let the rest of the world 
go by. — Ex. 



Dumb — "I hear they have established a home, for telephone operators." 
Bell — ' 'And what did they name it?" 
Dumb — "Listen Inn." 



THE UPLIFT 



29 



CRITICISM. 

By Beatrice Cobb. 



All of us are too prone to criti- 
cize. It seems to be an inborn incli- 
nation to find fault with the other 
fellow — the way he handles his job, 
when possibly in his place we 
wouldn't do it any better; his way of 
living, when our own lives are not 
exemplary; his opinions, when he has 
just as much right to think as lie 
does as we have to think our way. 
We need to investigate, oftentimes 
more thoroughly than we do, before 
Ave pass along with critical comment 
reports of an adverse nature that 
come to us. 

Isn't it a strange commentary on 
life that to criticize is one of the 



easiest things to do, to praise seem- 
ingly one of the hardest? We look 
at our neighbors' falts through the 
magnifying end of the lens, at his 
virtues through the minifying glass. 
We save until after he is dead and 
buried all the nice things we have to 
say and think about him, when they 
mean nothing to him. How much 
better to show a little more charity 
and kindness while he is alive? 

Many a critic can have the brakes 
put on his tongue by being asked 
"Do you know this for a fact ." Of- 
ten an investigation puts an entirely 
different light on a matter. 



INSTITUTION NOTES. 



J. J. Jones, Jr. 



The boys have been cutting wood 
for the past week. 



The boys could not do much work 
last week on account of wet weather. 



For four Saturdays the boys have 
not gone to the ball ground because 
of bad weathter. 



Master Adam Beck, a member of 
the fifth cottage, has been placed in 
the shoe repair shop. 



Mrs. Schwarberg, of Pinehurst, 
spent one afternoon last week at the 
training school. She is employed by 
the State Insurance Commissioner 



and is visiting the schools in this 
community, making a number of 
talks on "Safety." 



The new oven for the bakery has 
arrived at the school and will be in- 
stalled at once. 



Harry Dalton and Lee Smith, mem- 
bers of the tenth and first cottages, 
were paroled last week. 



On account of rainy weather dur- 
the past week the work section has 
been shelling peanuts in the cottage 
basements. 



Preston McNeill, a member of the 



30 



THE UPLIFT 



twelfth cottage, was honorably pa- 
roled a few days '-ago by Superin- 
tendent Boger. He has made a very 
good record. 



The Goodman Literary Society and 
the Boger Literary Society held 
meetings last Monday evening and 
had fine debates. These are the first 
meetings held since before Christmas. 



The old chapel is now being 
used for a band room. The band is 
growing since our new director, Mr. 



Paul Owensby, has taken charge. Jt 
now consists of thirty-one members. 



Prof. Hugh Moore, of the Concord 
High School faculty, and Mr. Lee 
Johnson, the boys work secretary 
of the Concord Y. M. C. A. conduct- 
ed services at the school last Sunday. 
He took his text from Luke, 2 :52, 
"And Jesus increased in stature and 
wisdom and in favor with God and 
man." He made a very interesting 
talk which was enjoyed by everyone. 



DOES A DOG KNOW. 

Maybe Foxy did not know what she was doing. Maybe it was merely 
a chance? Maybe the accident had nothing to do with her actions. 
But, it was all so remarkable and her actions meant so much that, though 
but an ordinary long-haired, black dog, she merits at least passing 
notice. Foxy is twelve. From her puppy days she has lived as a con- 
stant companion with two people who are now past seventy. She seems 
to understand them thoroughly. This is what happened. In July her 
master was painting a roof and by a strange kind of accident fell 
sixteen feet to the ground and was for the time helpless. The house 
was quite a distance away. Her mistress was in the house, upstairs in 
the sewing room. As soon as her master fell, Foxy ran to the house, 
found a screen door she could open, rushed through the house and found 
her mistress upstairs. Her wild excited barking, her strange actions, 
and her eagerness to get downstairs, indicated that she had a story to 
tell. She was followed and because of Foxy's unspoken import of the 
accident the hurt man was soon receiving much needed attention. Call 
it what you please, what that dog did was as effectual in givin? the 
alarm as if she had possessed human intelligence and speech. Foxy 
had always been the recipient of the marks of kindness that makes a 
dog a faithful friend, and it is needless to say that her right to a first- 
class place in that household will remain unquestioned as long as she 
lives. — Exchange. 



RAILROAD SCHEDULE 

Northbound 



No. 


136 


To 


Washington 


5:00 A. 


M. 


No. 


36 


To 


Washington 


10:25 A. 


M. 


No. 


46 


To 


Danville 


3:15 P. 


M. 


No. 


12 


To 


Richmond 


7:25 P. 


M. 


No. 


32 


To 


Washington 


8:28 P. 


M. 


No. 


38 


To 


Washington 


9:30 P. 


M. 


No. 


30 


To 


Washington 
Southbound 


1:40 A. 


M. 


No. 


45 


To 


Charlotte 


4:14 P. 


M. 


No. 


35 


To 


Atlanta 


10:06 P. 


M. 


No. 


29 


To 


Atlanta 


2:45 A. 


M. 


No. 


31 


To 


Augusta 


6:07 A. 


M. 


No. 


33 


To 


New Orleans 


8:27 A. 


M. 


No. 


11 


To 


Charlotte 


9:05 A. 


M. 


No. 


135 


To 


Atlanta 


9:15 P. 


M. 



THE SOUTHERN SERVES THE SOUTH 



u 



I rifcj \^J Carolina Collect* 

'U. N. C. Library 




VOL. XIII CONCORD, N. C, JANUARY 31, 1925 No. 10 



•J* *** i%t *J» »J* *J* «J+ ♦£•» *£♦ *J+ *J* **+ *Jt *Jt »J» *J» **•* *J* *£* *Jt *^+ *J» *J+ *J» +Jt «J* tj» »J* *J» *J» *J» *J* >J» *J» *J» *J» *Jt *J» *J» +J+ *J* ♦£•*■ 

$ THE DIFFERENCE. ! 

♦ * 

* Dissatisfaction with present attainments is a prim- ♦ 
♦> al characteristic of man. The. robbin, the wren and. % 
^ all God's feathered creatures are content with the *|* 

* nests and the songs of a thousand generations. * 

* The centuries come and go, but the squirrel is still ♦ 

* satisfied with his storehouse of nuts. But the his- <♦ 
% tory of the human race is altogether a different * 
£ story. One generation is but a stepping stone to * 

* something higher. The tug is out of the unattained ♦ 

* and the unknown. Neither has any bird or animal *> 
„£ shown an interest in the worship of God. The beav- *j* 
% er builds dams, but builds no temples. Man, on the ¥ 

* contrary, demands as a necessary part of his life a *> 
*> place to worship his deity. — Greensboro Christian ♦> 
% Advocate. !£ 



-PUBLISHED BY- 



THE PRINTING CLASS OF THE STONEWALL JACKSON MANUAL 
TRAINING AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



J. P. Cook, Chairman, Concord 
Miss Easdale Shaw, Vice-Chairman 

Rockingham 
Jno. J. Blair, Sec, Raleigh 
D. B. Coltrane, Treas., Concord 
J. S. Effird, Albemarle 
Mrs. Chas. A. Cannon, Concord 
Rev. Tom P. Jimison, Spencer 



Mrs. G. T. Roth, Elkin 

Herman Cone, Greensboro 

Mrs. Cameron Morrison, Charlotte 

Mrs. A. L. Coble, Stateville 

Mrs. T. W. Bickett, Raleigh 

Mrs. W. N. Reynolds, Winston-Salem 

Mrs. I. W. Faison, Charlotte 

Mr. Paul C. Whitlock, Charlotte 



Mrs. W. H. S. Burgwyn, Honorary Member 
Chas. E. Boger, Supt. 



CONTENTS. 



EDITORIAL COMMENT 

RAMBLING AROUND Old Hurrygraph 

WHAT ARE WE GOING TO DO ABOUT IT? 

Presbyterian Standard 

MY WHITE FOLKS 

THE CASH WORTH OF A WIFE 

THE GAMBLERS 

BAYARD TAYLOR 

MRS. COIT NORTH CAROLINA 

THAT SPECK IN THE SKY 

BURR TAKES A CHANCE 

INSTITUTION NOTES 



J. L. Seawell 

Selected 

James Hay, Jr. 

May C. Kingwalt 

E. B. Novell 

Emma Maritz Larson 

Margaret Beibel 

J. J. Jones, Jr. 



3-7 



11 
12 
19 
21 
22 
23 
24 
27 
29 



The Uplift 



A WEEKLY JOURNAL 

PUBLISHED BY 

The Authority of the Stonewall Jackson Manual Training and Industrial 
School. TyDe-setting by the Boys Printing Class. Subscription 

Two Dollars the Year in Advance 

JAMES P. COOK, Editor, J. C. FISHER, Director Printing Department 

Entered as second-class matter Dec. 4, 1920 at the Post Office at Concord, 
N. C. under act of March 3, 1879. Acceptance for mailing at special rate 
of 4, 1923. 



A FATAL SOURCE. 

I believe the quiet admission which we are all of us so ready to make, 
that, because' things have long been wrong, it is impossible they should ever 
be right, is one of the most fatal sources of misery and crime from which 
this world .suffers. — John Ruskin. 



WRIGHT G. CAMPBELL. 



A fascinating and inspiring spirit which had its dwelling place in the 
body of Rev. Wright G. Campbell, for the space of time allotted to man, took 
its flight Thursday of last week. 

There was a day in the history of Concord, along about in the 80 's of 
the past century, when this man and his wife, then residents of the city, 
were numbered among the most popular folks — people, regardless of denom- 
ination, or class or station in life, counted it a privilege and an honor to 
know them. He was a genius and brilliant; his wife possessed all those 
engaging charms that have made Southern womanhood outstanding among 
women. 

A physical infirmity overtook him and he retired from the ministry. He 



4 THE UPLIFT 

adopted the hand-maiden of preaching — he took to the school room. When 
the call could not be longer resisted and his health gave a warning, he returned 
from Pennsylvania to Concord, where open arms awaited him. Just about this 
time the Jackson Training School was taking form. To occupy his time and 
give him the benefit of the open air, he tendered his services in looking after 
and checking up the material as it was beginning to arrive for the very first 
building at this institution. 

He helped in launching The Uplift; he taught school; he bridged chasms 
in our experience; he drew to him by his personality and charm every boy; and 
then when the companion of his bosom was stricken and her spirit returned 
to its God, he could no longer remain with us. 

In all the thousands whom it has been the privilege of this writer to know 
most intimately, none possessed to a higher degree the attributes of the true 
gentleman. Selfishness — and he was a ripe scholar and a man of wide 
reading — was one word in the English language he did not understand. 

Giving no thought for the tomorrow, he literally spent his life, his talents 
and his all for the pleasure and benefit of others. Years never blotted out 
his memory of former friends and associates. The character of the two 
men were revealed on one occasion — this man Campbell and the late George 
W. Watts ; we saw these two men meet years after the time they had been 
playmates, had climbed the same trees and roamed the fields together, when 
responsibilities and activity had carried them fax-apart in different endeavors 
and communications had long since ceased between them. This is how it hap- 
pened : Mr. Watts throwing his arm around Mr. Campbell said, "well, well, 
this is Wright; and Wright yielding to the embrace warmly said, "and this 
is George. 

We have reasons for an abiding belief that these two choice spirits are 
now together, never again to part after their good endeavors, each of his 
own choosing. 

******** * 

WHAT BECOMES OF ALL THE FURNITURE? 

' ' The whole town was crowded to the roof with furniture men, from every- 
where; and the show continues next week," spoke a man that entered the 
local train at High Point on the 23rd. This gentleman was returning to his 
kome in Greenville, S. C, after spending a day or so, taking in the great 
furniture show at High Point. 

The number of men, who go to that great furniture manufacturing city, 



THE UPLIFT 5 

from every section of the United States, and the greater number of furniture 
manufacturing plants in many places in this state and in others, leads one 
to wonder where in the world does all this furniture that is annually made 
get to. The number of bed-room suits made annually and the number of 
chairs manufactured annually outnumber all the births, we are certain, in a 
ratio of 5 to 1. 

We were further entertained by a salesman — they always follow such meet- 
ings — who seems to have had poor business in his particular line. He de- 
plored the fact that retail dealers, who emphasize the installment plan 
of selling furniture, had such a burden to carry on long-drawn out contracts. 
He stoutly recommended a clearing house, or a financial pool to carry all these 
contracts for a small consideration etc. If such financial organization were 
brought into existence, ''I could," he claimed, '"sell hundreds of car-loads 
of furniture where I only sell one. ' ' A little further down the line, an- 
other salesman informed the very same dealer that he had his factory run- 
ning over-time in making a certain article of furniture. He was running over 
with enthusiasm. 

But wht becomes of all the furniture that is made in this state? 



TELLS A TRUE STORY. 

In Sunday's Greensboro News, Mr. J. L. Seawell had a most engaging story 
of Henry Crichton, a typical ante-bellum negro. We are assured that the 
entire article is historically correct. It being such, it affords the newer 
and later generations the opportunity to understand the fine relations that exist- 
ed between the two races, and, in many instances, the great love that prevailed. 

We are reproducing the entire story, without the pictorial part, which 
consisted of the picture of Lawyer Lee and old Henry holding affectionately in 
his arms an attractive white child. That's true to life, too. Who of us, 
who are old enough to sport silver locks, do not recall the mutual affection 
between the negro and the child? 

The conversation between lawyer Lee and Henry Crichton, when approach- 
ing the question of his defense, illustrates the confiding trust of the average 
ante-bellum negro and most assuredly the determined purpose of his white 
master to astutely and adroitly get Henry off just as light as possible. 
Lee is a great lawyer; and the attorneys, who see this, will appreciate the 
far-sighted smartness of Henry's attorney. The average lawyer makes for 



6 THE UPLIFT 

himself his greatest reputation when he can spring such surprises or quote 
freely -whole verses of scripture. 

****** ** 

MANY NEW INDUSTRIES ESTABLISHED IN THE SOUTH. 

Continued industrial development in the territory served by the Southern 
Railway System is shown by the annual report of the Southern's Develop- 
ment Service covering the year 1924. 

The report lists a total of 132 new industries placed in operation during 
the year, 28 new industries under construction on December 31st, 84 enlarge- 
ments of existing industries placed in operation during the year, and 8 en- 
largements under construction at the end of the year, a total of 253 new 
industries and enlargements. 

As in former years, the greatest activity was in the building and enlarging 
of textile plants. New installations of textile machinery in new mills and in 
enlargements at points served by the Southern included 172,473 spindles, 
4,307 looms, and 1,380 knitting machines. 

**»»*• •* 

PASSED US BY. 

There was no little hope that the President would recognize the rights 
of the South in the selection of a successor to Mr. Potter, who resigned from 
the Interstate Commerce Commission; and to this end practically everybody 
had decided that Mr. A. J. Maxwell, of the North Carolina Corporation Com- 
mission, was the logical man to succeed Potter. 

Maxwell has no equal when it comes to understnding the intricate points 
in the adjustment of freights, and when it comes to making a financial 
statement he stands very high with most men. President Coolidge persuaded 
himself that he did not need a man of Maxwell's type and he hiked off to 
New York, for a successor to Potter. 

****** •• 

REFUSES TO BE STAMPEDED. 

The public has learned early in his administration that Gov. McLean has 
a habit of studying a situation before he commits himself. They have found, 
too, that he has a distaste for the spectacular, and thus it is impossible to 
stampede him. 

Gov. McLean, like the famous Georgian, wants to know where "he is at" 
— to know the facts — before he proceeds. He is right, of course. He evi- 



THE UPLIFT 7 

clently, from what the paper boys gather in conversation with him, does 
not value very highly ' ' accruals ' ' in the conduct of a serious and statewide 
business. 

****** ** 

The Uplift joins his other friends in the sincere regret over the illness of 
Mr. W. A. Foil, the State Senator from this county, who for the past ten 
days or more has been confined to his home. He had looked forward to an 
active and conspicuous part in the deliberations and actions of the General 
Assembly, and his constituency deplores the unfortunate condition of his 
health which deprives them of his valuable services. 

****** * * 

That was a most distressing fire that swept one-fourth of the business 
section of Troy, N. C. In it Mrs. J. R. Blair, widow of the late beloved 
Reece Blair, was the greatest loser, having lost buildings valued at $100,000, 
with just two thousand dollars insurance. Another loser was Editor Honey- 
cutt, whose newspaper plant (The Montgomerian) was destroyed. But it 
takes more than a fire of that kind to block the genial, earnest Honeycutt. 



4&MR& 



THE UPLIFT 



RAMBLING AROUND. 



(Old Hurrygraph) 



The most patient man the world 
has ever known said "Man was born 
to ; trouble as the sparks to fly up- 
ward.", tit's tfee truth. And man is 
prone to mistakes as the rain drops 
are to fall. In the last, rambles 1 
wrote that I was "not" like a certain 
party; but I was madeito say", "lam 
like." The little word not was left 
out. So it is well to watch your 
words as well your steps. Howsornever 
I don't think I'll make any more 
comparisons. I am like myself, and 
let it go at that. 



It looks as though, if things keep 
on, the cities will be made up of 
automobiles, filling stations and hos- 
pitals. Every day ! brings more au- 
tomobiles; filling stations are taking 
possession of all the street corners : 
and auto accidents are making - more 
hospitals necessary. Not until the 
violators of traffic laws are made 
to feel the discomforts of an electric 
chair, to which every reckless speed- 
ster and bright-lighter, after an ac- 
cident, should be sent, will the dan- 
ger be : corrected. That 's the only 
way to eliminate the violators. 



I passed by a business, place the 
other day and tLs boss was evident. y 
in a bad humor, from the way ' he 
was addressing his employes, using 
harsh language. He had on a terrible 
ease of .grouch. There is no place 
in achievement for fault-finding'. It 
takes up time and energy. Worst of 
all it makes others grouchy. No- 
body can do <his best under such con- 
ditions. As a fello / helps others he 



adds to his own fitness. It's just 
as natural as sunshine and quite as 
sure of beneficial results. Learning 
to be 100. , rpei\ cent fit and to do 
everything , .welL- makes a fellow still 
more fit. , It's this yielding to serv- 
ice that adds to efficiency and results 
in worth. 



Man, of all creatures, is said to 
be the only being endowed with the 
faculty for thinking and reasoning. 
I am not so sure about that. There 
are some animals which appear to 
exercise these qualities, or at least 
some sense very much akin to them, 
far more clearly and rations fly 
than many men, judging by the ul- 
timate and final results as compared 
between some men and some animals. 



Young Eugene Reade has developed 
a passionate fondness for raising 
chickens. He had on his yard a 
rooster that was moping about. And 
looking as if he was about to pass 
out from something like bronchitis. 
It was suggested to Young Reade 
that sometimes a little whisky ad- 
ministered in eases of this kind, 
would do good. He got the whisky 
and gave Mr. Rooster a spoonful 
Not long thereafter this chanticleer 
was seen leaning against a post, 
looking as if he couldn't see clear, 
and then he tangoed in a real reel- 
ing way about the yard, and cut up 
all kind of monkey shines foreign 
to respectable roosterhood. He was 
on a well-developed spree. Since 
that time he has been in apparently- 
good health and the liveliest rooster 



THE UPLIFT 



9 



in the poultry colony. Usually 
whisky makes a rooster of a man. 
but this whisky made a man of that 
rooster. 



Many an amusing incident is laid 
on Newlyweds. Some are fiction and 
some are true. A Durham Newly wed, 
talking to her dairyman, said : "I 
hope you keep your cows in a pas- 
ture. " "Yes, ma'am,'' replied the 
milkman, "Of course we keep our 
cows ni a pasture." "0, I'm so 
glad," gushed Mrs. Newlywed, I am 
told that pasturized milk is so much 
the best." 



I so frequently hear people say, 
"I fear this, that or the others is 
going to happen. ' ' The greatest en- 
emy of humanity is fear. And fear 
exists only within ourselves. If ye.': 
admit there is no future for you, then 
there certainly can be none. You 
have said it cannot be, and in say- 
ing you have made it so. If you es- 
tablish a. certain line beyond which 
you say you cannot travel, then you 
most certainly ■ set a line beyond 
which you can never go. You have 
determined your own limitations; 
you have admitted your own weak- 
ness, or rather you have set up the 
weakness within you as superior to 
strength and courage. 



Some time ago I was at the Pat- 
terson School, in the Happy Valley 
— the school for mountain boys, which 
is so much/in need of funds to rebuild 
the original Patterson colonial home 
burned last Easter — and little Eliza- 
beth Dobbin, the four-year-old 
sprightly daughter of Mr. 4 and Mrs. 
Ed Dobbin, heard her mother a-:d 



some friends talking about having 
a twilight picnic. She stood around 
andslistened, with her large blue eyes 
full of expected wonder, and when 
the opportune time came when she 
though she would be heard she said : 
"Mamma, I wants to go on that 
' toothpick. ' ' That was a clever and 
an entirely original expression. 



I heard a lady, walking along the 
highway, talking to a companion, 
say, "Well, leap year passed and it 
didn't bring me a thing." Just 
about that time an automobile honked 
behind her and she and her companion 
jumped for the curbing on the side 
of the road and she added, "It 
seems that every,year is leap year for 
the walking public." 



I was in a store the other day when 
a tourist came in for a purchase and 
during the transaction, remarked to 
the affable clerk, "You haven't mu<'-h 
parking space in your city." "No, 
we haven't," replied the clerk; "we 
live so close together that we haven 'i 
room for that ; but look at our million- 
and-half dollar new hotel goin up, 
and the other big things about Dur- 
ham. ' ' That 's the spirit we want 
in Durham. If we haven't one thiiig, 
we've plenty of something else. 



There was a discussion recently, 
among a coterie of young folks on 
Christmas presents they received. 
One said she got a beautiful book, 
and when one of the party asked 
her the name of it, she said she 
thought it was "The Red Boat." 
Then she changed her mind, and de- 
clared it was "The Scarlet Launch." 
Her friend still looked puzzled, 



10 THE UPLIFT 

and after a little thought, the girl however, that more people got chew- 
exclaimed, "Oh' I remember now; ing gum Christmas than .books. I 
it was the 'Ruby Yacht,' by a inian suppose because it is so much easier 
named Omar.'' Statistics shov , to exercise the chin than tne mind. 



MANNER OF WALKING. 

To be recognized, by our walk is quite common. All of us have person- 
al pecularities of many kinds, and none of them is more tell-tale than 
the way we walk. There is something in the swing of the feet that 
discriminates us one from the others. We can easily determine the 
identity of individuals frequently as far as we can see them if they are 
walking. . . The Bible has some things to say about how we are to walk 
to meet the approval of God. And, of course, when we are approved 
by Him we ought to be given a good reputation by all who see us and 
know us. We are asked to walk honestly. That suggests that all our 
movement among people should be irreproachable. Honesty may be our 
possession because we have been taught the worth, or the need, or being 
honest. The honest walk before God means that we are never found 
where He does not want us to be or traveling towards any place that He 
does not endorse. Walking honestly is walking worthily and the Bible 
suggests this as a worth while manner of walking. To be honest 
and to be worthy as God views us is about enough to justify any claim 
we want to make before the people about us. But, there is one thing 
more to be said about this manner of walking. Walking honestly and 
worthily brings a happiness to the individual that produces what we 
might term walking rejoicingly. How can we walk as though happy and 
rejoicing, unless we are honest before God and the people and are worthy 
of the claims we make? Watch your step, is a common warning. It 
might be amplified into a series of steps and be a walk. That is to be 
watched. This involves more than the swing of the legs and the put- 
ting down of the feet. It has to do with the whole manner of living, 
whoever takes himself seriously enough to believe that he is res- - 
ponsible for where he goes, what he does, and how he is judged, will 
be glad to have a walk that is honest, worthy and rejoicing. — Selected. 



THE UPLIFT 



11 



WHAT ARE WE GOING TO DO ABOUT 

IT? 



(Presbyterian Standard.) 



Recently a professor,, formerly of 
Chicago, but now a teacher in the 
North Carloina College for Women, 
came to Charlotte to give an exten- 
sion course on sociology before a 
class of public school teachers. 

He is reported to have said that 
Genesis is only a bit of Israelitish 
mothology, handed down by word of 
mouth from one generation to an- 
other. He said that this was proven 
by the fact that all other primitive 
people had similar myths and legends. 

He ridiculed the account of God's 
writing the Ten Commandments on 
two tables of stone, as unbelieveable. 

The mircales were simply represen- 
tatives of great truths. The feeding 
of the five thousand was only an illus- 
tration of the fact that Jesus taught 
enough truth to satisfy that many 
people. When questioned as to the 
12 basketfull remaining, he thought 
that meant that there ,were more 
wonderful truths given than the peo- 
ple could understand. It seems 
though that he did not try to answer 
the question why Jesus took these 
truths from the little boy's basket. 
As a fitting climax to this perfor- 



mance he said that he did not know 
that there was any one that believed 
in the whole Bible. 

When one reads these remarkable 
views, he wonders how the people of 
this God-fearing State will receive 
them, whether they are willing to sit 
at the feet of this disciple of Modern- 
ism in its rankest form, who judges 
our faith by that of Chicago. We 
also wonder if these people whose 
fathers planted in early days the 
schools and churches of our State, 
are willing to allow the money of the 
State to be used to employ such men 
to instill their subtle poison into the 
minds of our young women, and thus 
touch the coming mothers of the fu- 
ture. 

The State College for Women has 
done a great work for women in the 
past, and now we hope that the lead- 
ers will guard these young women at 
the most impressionable period of 
their life. 

The authorities are asking for a 
larger appropriation from the Legis- 
lature. That such teachings are to- 
lerated will scarcely appeal to those 
who hold the purse-strings. 



There are but two ways of paying debt: increase of industry in raising 
income, increases of thrift in laying out. — Carlyle. 

"I have been on this train seven years," said the conductor of a slow- 
ly moving Southern train, proudly. 

"Is that so?" said a passenger. "Where did you get on?" — The 
American Boy. 



12 



THE UPLIFT 



MY WHITE FOLKS. 

By J. L. Seawell, in Greensboro News. 



It is a rare feat to smuggle ir- 
revelent and incompetent evidence 
to the jury and make it impregnable 
in defense of the prisoner's liberty 
or life. This was brilliantly ac- 
complished in the trial of Henry 
Griehton. An anarchist bomb-tosser 
would not have been less selective of 
bis victim than was apparently Henry 
Crichton, the venerable negro wait- 
er. 

About 11 o'clock on the morning 
of July 16, 1897, Henry, clad in his 
culinary garb and armed with a 
double barrel shotgun, shuffled hur- 
riedly from a side entrance of the 
hotel, walked 25 yards up Main 
street, a crowded ^thoroughfare of 
Lynchburg, Virginia, suddenly paus- 
ed, raised the gun to firing posture 
and discharged both barrels in rapid 
succession. 

The detonations were terrifying and 
terrific. Country teams broke from 
hitching posts and dashed madly down 
the street. There was stampeded in- 
gress and egress into and out of 
stores and a stream of people poured 
from the Lynchburg National bank, 
where an immense plate glass window 
bad been shattered by Henry's wild 
markmanship, for a merciful provi- 
dence had directed his aim above the 
heads of pedestrains. Henry did not 
move from his tracks and was imme- 
diately seized by bystanders, some of 
whom were rugged countrymen. 

"Why, damn the nigger; what ails 
him ? What was he shooting at ? 
Hang him ! No, pitch him down the 
high steps and bust his head open ! ' ' 

But the erstwhile polite and peace- 



able old negro was rescued by the 
police, taken to jail and infuriated 
citizens were quieted, though some 
were vehement in demanding sum- 
mary punishment. 

' ' Well, what have you to say for 
yourself, you crazy old fool?" de- 
manded the young lawyer, who was 
daily served by Henry and who had 
been summoned as his counsel. 
' " What have you got against this 
town, Do you know that people out 
there are ready to lynch you?" 

' ' Lawdy, lawdy, Mister Johnny, I 
want trying ter hurt nobody but dat 
nasty, yaller, crap-shootin John Wil- 
son. He's 'suited my gal Susy three 
times, atter I tole 'im ter lit Susy 
'lone. He's pledged rat gal most ter 
death, en Susy's er good gal, Mister 
Johnny; Susy's egicated, Susy is, en 
she haves herself gist like er white 
lady. En I tole dat John Wilson 
three times ter lit Susy 'lone. But 
las' night at de festivul — well what 
dat low life, yaller, twinge-minded 
nigger sed ter my Susy, rite out 
loud — en he drunk, en cum staggerin 
en cussin rite up ter her. Well whut 
lie sed wud er made eny white man 
kill 'im ef he'd er sed it ter er white 
lady en nuthin wud er bin dun 'bout 
it. When Jim Tolliver tole me 'bout 
it I got my old muzzle loader en 
went scoutin fer dat nigger, en when 
I seed 'im I fergot whar I was en dat 
dere wus eny body in de wurld but 
me en dat nigger. Mr. Johnny, dat 
yaller nigger ain't nuthin but er bad 
white man en er mean nigger all 
mixed togedder. " 

"Henry, do you mean to say that 



THE UPLIFT 



13 



you risked the life of every person 
in front of your gun — every inno- 
cent woman and child, white or back 
— just to resent what a drunken, irres- 
ponsible negro said to your girl 
Susy?" 

' ' Mister Johnny, I want shootin at 
nobody but John Wilson, en — " 

' ' Well, you 're in a devil of a mess. 
You'll be indicted for a felonious as- 
sault — an assuault with intent to kill 
— and your offense is aggravated by 
a general disregard for human life. 
You seemed to have a grudge against 
humanity at large. Why didn't you 
just beat the nigger without risk- 
ing the lives of other people? The 
entire town is down on you. Every 
one thinks you were crazy drunk. 
The only thing you can do is to sub- 
mit and take your medicine. It's a 
bad dose. It's several years in the 
penitentiary. ' ' 

"Oh, Gawd! But Mister Johnny, 
you ken plead fur me ! ' ' 

' ' Plead for you ; yes, but what good 
will it do?" 

Mister Johnny dair aint NO law- 
yer ken plead like you ken. ' ' 

"But I can't plead for anything 
but mercy and you'll never get mercy 
from a jury in this county. Never. 
We'll submit and plead to the gov- 
ernor. ' ' 

' ' Mister Johnny cant yed tell em 
'twus all 'bout Susy en won't dey 
sorter sense de ole nigger? Ain't 
er nigger got er right ter perfect his 
ehillun same es er white man? Er 
nigger's ehillun is jes es good ter er 
nigger ez er white man's ehillun is 
ter er white man. ' ' 

"Yes, Henry, a negro has a right to 
protect his children, but the law 
claims the paramount right to pro- 



tect; it authorizes no one to person- 
ally avenge a wrong; certainly not 
when in doing so lie risks the lives 
of innocent persons. The law as- 
sumes to protect, not to avenge or 
'pay back' and it punishes only that 
it may protect and that it may pre- 
serve its majesty. Sometimes, in sud- 
den anger, we attempt to personally 
avenge or to 'pay back' and those 
who administer the law sympathize 
with us and don't punish us as severly 
as the law says we deserve to be pun- 
ished. But Henry, a white man seeks 
personal vengeance in a sensible way; 
he singles out his man, goes after 
him and usually gets him. You went 
after everybody and got only your- 
self. ' ' 

' ' But Mister Johnny wont dey sort- 
er scuse me kase I'se jest er nigger?" 

"Henry, I'm afraid that's the 
principal reason they won't excuse 
you — because you're just a negro." 

' ' But Mister Johnny won 't yer tell 
'em twus all 'bout Susy, en — " 

Susy, the devil ! Do you expect me 
to make a fool of myself on account 
of Susy and be laughed out of court? 
Why they'd take it as a joke. But 
I'll do the best I can for you. We 
must submit and then see the gover- 
nor. ' ' 

"Mister Johnny what '11 it cost 
me?" 

"Well, there'll be the cost of the 
trial ; aside from that it will cost 
you nothing in money; but it will 
cost you considerable in penal servi- 
tude. It'll cost you a term in the 
penitentiary. You will be indicted 
for a felonious assault with intent 
tn kill, not for a common assault, 
which is only a misdemeanor. If it 
were for a common assault vou might 



14 



THE UPLIFT 



be merely fined ; but it 's for a feloni- 
ous assault and that draws a term 
in the penitentiary." 

"Mister Johnny, I means whut you 
en de guvner gwinter charge me?" 

"Not a cent, you old fool." 

* * * 

The Letter. 

Within a fortnight the lawyer re- 
ceived a surprising letter. It caused 
more or less jubilant profanity 
coupled with an inquiry why, in the 
name of all that is god and holy, the 
dejected Henry had not during their 
long acquaintance, disclosed to the 
lawyer momentous facts respecting 
Henry's past life. But Henry's em- 
passive mind was enshrouded in 
gloom: "Dat want nuthin, Mister 
Johnny, dem wus my white folks. 
Dat letter won't git me nowhar. " 
And the black prisoner looked pathe- 
tically and appealingly at his counsel. 

The lawyer concealed his emotion 
by banter and bluster: "That letter 
will keep you from going some- 
where, you old numbskull, if I can 
get it to the jury. It'll keep you 
from going to the penitentiary, you 
old rowdy — trying to assassinate this 
town with heavy artillery, instead of 
mauling that nigger with a hickory 
stick. Why you couldn't hit a flock 
of barns. Where 'd you get that tiger 
blood anyway? I thought you were 
a peaceable nigger. You're never 
been in a scrape before in your life. 
What do you think the judge and 
the jury will care for a nigger quar- 
rel? I believe you were drunk any- 
way. Why you'd have killed the 
president of the bank if he hadn't 
moved his seat a moment before you 
fired. How do you expect me to get 
you out of a scrape like this? Yes, 



I could arrange your bail, but you'd 
best stay in jail and serve some of the 
time they'll give you. You might be 
the honor guest at a necktie party 
anyway. ' ' 

' ' But Mister Johnny you sed dat 
letter you gist red wud claire me ef 
you eoul git de letter de jury. I doan 
know how dat is kase I ain no lawyer 
en I doan see nuthin in dat letter 
to mirate ovur. Ez I sed, dem wus 
my white folks; but Mister Johnny, 
fer de Lawd 's sake you git dat letter 
ter de jury. Gist read de letter when 
you's pleadin fer me." 

"Well I see myself reading it now. 
Why the commonwealth's attorney 
would object before I had fairly be- 
gun and the judge would immedi- 
ately stop me. ' ' 

' ' How cum he 'd stop yer ? ' ' 

"Oh that's hard to explain to you. 
The judge would not permit me to 
even refer to the letter unless it had 
been admitted in evidence, and it 
cannot be admitted in evidence be- 
cause the letter is what you call in- 
competent and irrelevant evidence. 
That is, evidence which has nothing 
to do with the case, or because what 
I claim to be evidence, the law says 
is no evidence at all, so far as your 
case is concerned. And that is true 
because the letter certainly has noth- 
ing to do with your case." 

"Well dat's curious ter me. You 
gist sed ef de jury knowed 'bout de 
letter dey wouldn't sen me ter de 
penitensury en now you turns rite 
'round en says de letter aint got 
nnthin ter do wid de case." 

' ' No, the letter has absolutely noth- 
ing to do with the case. There will 
be an indictment against you for 
felonious assault with intent to com- 



THE UPLIFT 



15 



mit murder in the first degree. Now 
tell me if that letter 'which relates 
only to something- that occurred near- 
ly 30 years ago, has anything to do 
with your firing a gun down Main 
street in an attempt to kill John Wil- 
son?" 

"Dat's rite; I sees, taint got 
unthin ter do wid de scrape I'se in. 
But yit you says de letter wud git 
me outer de scrape ef de jury know- 
ed erbout it; en it do look lack de 
law wud lit er nigger whats in er 
scrape tell evvy thing he could en 
show evvy thing he could ter git his 
sef outer de scrape. It looks lack 
de law is studdin more erbout keepin 
er nigger in er scrape dan gittin him 
out." 

"Oh, the law doesn't apply to the 
negro race alone. The law applies 
impartially to every one, white or 
black. The law even presumes that 
every prisoner is innocent until he 
has been proven guilty by a fair 
and impartial trial." 

"Well dont dey hire er lawyer ter 
plead ginst er nigger, en — " 

"There you go again. You seem 
to think that the administration of 
the criminal law is directly solely 
against the negro race." 

' ' Naw, taint dat, Mister Johnny, 
but most prisners is niggers, en when 
you say ' prisner. ' I natherly thinks 
uv er nigger. Well you says de law 
presumes er prisner 's innercent till 
dey pruves he's guilty; what good do 
it do de prisner ter persume he aint 
guilty en den hire er lawyer ter 
pruve he IS guilty? En it do seem 
ter me de law studies more 'bout 
ketchin er nigger dan ketchin 'er 
white man; en it do seem hader 
fer er nigger ter git loose den fer 



er white man ter git loose. When 
de law ketches er nigger he goes 
rite ter jail 'till he's tried en atter 
he's tried, ef he's guilty (which he 
most generaly is) de stripes goes rite 
on de nigger en de nigger goes rite 
on de roads. When dey ketches er 
white man he niver sees de inside uv 
er jail en dey's slow es de rath er 
Gawd 'bout even tryin 'im en — " 

"Oh, well, even if that's true it 
doesn't help us. I must think of 
some way to get that letter to the 
jury and your wild talk has given 

me an idea." 

* * * 

The Indictment. 
The records of the corporation 
court of Lynchburg, Virginia, attest : 
' ' The jurors of the commonwealth of 
Virginia in and for the city of Lynch- 
burg . . upon their oaths present : 
That H. W. Crichton on the 16 day of 
July in the year 1897, within the 
said city, unlawfully and feloniously 
did attempt to commit the crime of 
murder in the first degree, in this, 
to-wit, that he, the said H. W. Crich- 
ton on the day and year aforesaid, in 
and upon the body of one John Wil- 
son, feloniously, wilfully and of his 
malice and aforethought did make an 
assault, and that the said H. W. Crich- 
ton, with a certain gun, which he the 
said H. W. Crichton in his hands then 
and there loaded with gunpowder and 
leaden shot, then and there felonious- 
ly, willfully and of his malice afore- 
thought, did discharge and shoot at 
and in the direction of the body of 
the said John Wilson ; and in his 
said attempt did point and aim said 
gun, charged with gunpowder and 
laden shot as aforesaid and then and 
there discharge the same at and in 



16 



THE UPLIFT 



the direction of the said John Wil- 
spn, then and there being 'within 
shooting range and distance of him 
the said John Wilson, with intent 
him the said John Wilson, then and 
there feloniously, wilfully and of his 
malice aforethought to kill and mur- 
der, against the peace and dignity 
of the commonwealth of Virginia . 
. . Indictment for attempt to 
combat murder in the first degree. A 

true bill. ' ' 

* * * 

Lee Superb in Boldness. 

Henry's escapade was harmless but 
the public had been outraged. It 
was aggrieved, resentful and bitter. 
He remained in jail till the day of 
the trial and his appearance as pri- 
soner at the bar personified appre- 
hension and fear; he was ashy and 
haggard. "Mister Johnny" arose, 
with an air of cool assurance, and 
to the astonishment of the specta- 
tors and the court, entered a plea of 
"not guilty." He artfully concealed 
his gratification that six of the jury- 
men were Confederate veterans by 
asking only those jurymen the per- 
functory questions and with feigned 
relnctance announced, "the prisoner 
is content. ' ' Having established 
Henry's exemplary character and 
corroborated his testimony that his 
daughter had been three times gross- 
ly insulted by the prosecutor the de- 
fense rested. 

The prisoner's counsel was superb 
in boldness and dash — eloquent in 
fervent appeals to reason and pas- 
sion. Because oratory and eloquence 
are ' ' the sweet elusive fragrance — 
the thyme and mignonette — of things 
that were;" because time makes mem- 
ory dull, it may be only perhaps this 



is what he said: 

"Mister Johnny's" Address. 

The only substantial thing worth 
living for in this sad world — the 
greatest prize of civilizations — is a 
happy home. We get nothing more 
in this life or in the life to come. 
The noblest attributes of the hu- 
man heart are engendered by love of 
home. When merging into society 
from his primeval state, man sur- 
rendered his personal liberty to the 
law, the moving consideration of the 
pact was the law 's guarantee of a 
reward to man's endeavor for a 
peaceful home. Hence, by the law of 
the land, a man's home is his strong 
fortress — his haven of refuge; his 
sure protection against "the terror 
by night," "the pestilence that 
walketh in darkness," "the arrow 
that flieth by day," the felon's 
stealth and the marauder's force. 
But the surest deterrent of a happy 
home is not restrained. Of the in- 
sidious, prowling, lustful wolf of in- 
famy and disgrace, the keeper of the 
home and he alone can beware. The 
keeper of the home is charged with 
gigilance and care, for the wolf hav- 
ing entered, his ruin is irreparable. 
It is vain to suppose that the law 
affords a remedy for every wrong. 
There can be no remedy for a wrong 
which takes that which cannot be re- 
turned or which destroys that which 
cannot be restored. Vengeance is 
born of consciousness of a wrong the 
law cannot requite. A man's home 
is part and parcel of his soul. ' ' What 
shall it profit a man if he gain the 
whole world and lose his soul 1 ? Or 
what shall a man give in exchange 
for his soul?" And yea, what shall 
this brief span of years profit a man 



THE UPLIFT 



17 



though he gain the whole world and 
lose his home? Or what shall a man 
give and what can the law give, in 
exchange for a home? 

When in a sudden rage caused by 
even an imaginary wrong, one takes 
the life of his fellow man, the law 
mistigates the punishment of death 
and inflicts a milder penalty. When 
an anguished and distracted victim 
of the greatest wrong that can be 
perpetrated by crime — a wrong for 
which the law cannot fully penalize 
and for which it can give no rem- 
edy — or when one who is even threat- 
ened with such a wrong — seeks per- 
gonal vengeance, what then? For the 
white man there is the plea of "the 
unwritten law," for the black man 
the plea of mercy. "The unwritten 
law" presupposes defense against the 
invasion of a home. Has the pris- 
oner a home? The prisoner is a negro 
and he was a faithful slave. 

From the relation of master and 
slave, as a natural sequence of its 
maintenance by the gentry of the old 
south, there grew the relation of 
guardian and ward. Master and slave 
are now no more. Guardian and ward 
must linger for aye. Faithful guard- 
ian and loving ward ! It has been 
exquisitely said "The sun of their 
day has indeed long since set, but 
like twin clouds lifted high and mo- 
tionless into some far quarter of the 
gray twilight skies, they are still radi- 
ant with the glow of the invisible 
orb. ' ' The issues of the war are 
dead . O'er countless graves where 
heroes sleep, nature itself, in floral 
beauty or waving fields of golden 
grain, extols forgetfulness of battle 
fought. But remnants of forests ef- 
faced from the landscape's memory 



by carnage of battle ramain deep 
rooted in the soil to combat the ero- 
sion of time or to spring again in 
newness of life. And know we well, 
they who once saw room and rea- 
son for two American sovereignties 
instead of one — just as did New Eng- 
land 50 years before ; they who charg- 
ed like demons at Gettysburg and 
fought like tigers at bay at Sharps- 
burg and Malvern Hill, would eon- 
tend as valiantly against foreign foes ! 
And know we well, deep rooted in the 
soil of our social life are remnants 
of an institution forever effaced (and 
thank God it is so) — yet remnants 
which thwart and combat political 
hatred and strife, which engender 
gratitude and love that could never 
be born of cruelty and wrong. Mem- 
ory gives as confluences of an aeolian 
harp, the croonings of my own black 
mammy, as she held me in her arms 
and lulled me to sleep. In the words 
of Georgia's matchless orator, utter- 
ed on the brink of his grace, ' ' May 
God forget me and my people when I 
forget her and hers. ' ' The loyalty of 
the southern slave is unsurpassed ! 
He toiled faithfully at home to sus- 
tain armies contending against his 
freedom and he served his master in 
the ranks. When freedom came his 
faithfulness was not deterred. 

This have I read or heard. Par- 
taker of the horrors of Gettysburg- 
was Tom, a slave — serving his mas- 
ter, a colonel. In the memorable 
' ' third day 's charge ' ' — American val- 
or 's superlative test — the master was 
mortally wounded. Tom stayed at 
his master's side in that carnage of 
hell and saw him breathe his last. 
The master was solicitous of his son, 
a captain in the same regiment, and 



18 



THE UPLIFT 



Tom was besought and he promised 
to care for his young master and to 
remember his old mistress and her 
invalid daughter at home. Having at 
greatest risk carried his senior mas- 
ter's body from the field and giv- 
en it descent burial, Tom sought his 
young master and was faithful in 
his minstrations. Later the young 
master also was killed and Tom car- 
ried his body to the old home and 
himself buried it in the family plot. 
With freedom to Tom came dire 
transition to mistress and child. 
Widowed and orphaned, they became 
destitute and poor. A few short years 
and they changed their abode from a 
palatial to an humble home. For 
their daily bread the mistress toil- 
ed— 

"With fingers weary and sore 
And eye-lids heavy and red." 
Actually on their way to the alms 
house, mother and daughter were 
met by Tom. Steady industry and 
thrift in a neighboring city had pro- 
vided Tom with a home. This home 
he surrendered to his mistress and 
her suffering child. Tom's wife and 
two children were moved into a one- 
room house on his lot and Tom fed 
and clothed those who once owned 
him, housed, fed, clothed and nursed 
them till they died and then buried 
the min the graveyard at their for- 
mer home. There they sleep till this 
day. 

For, THIS IS NO IMAGINARY 
TALE! THIS IS NO FABRICA- 
TION! (Then stooping and encir- 
cling the black prisoner with one 
arm, raising high above his head the 



other arm and flouting an open 
letter) HERE'S TOM; TOM IS 
HENRY CRICHTON, THE PRIS- 
ONER AT THE BAR! Every word 
of my story is verified by this let- 
ter from a grand woman whose word 
cannot be doubted ; a woman known 
throughout this commonwealth for 
her noble deeds ! When I read to him 
this letter in his gloomy cell, the 
prisoner, in mild surprise, simply 
said, "Dat want nuthin, them wus 
my white folks. ' ' Yes, they were his 
white folks and he and his kind 
are our black folks — ours forever ; ours 
to encourage, ours to guide and pro- 
tect! 

But he is guilty! He is guilty of 
attempting to murder a wretch who 
would debauch his child! Alas, jury- 
men, you are helpless. You have 
sworn to do your duty, under our 
penal code, for felonious assault with 
intent to kill, to imprison him, for a 
term of years; the law is so writ- 
ten ! You must consign him to slav- 
ery again! Take him! Imprison him. 
But as for me, than do such as that 
to such an one as he 
"Great God I'd rather be a Pagan 
Suckled in a creed outworn" 

Or 
' ' All of holy rites to pagan honor 

pay." 

* * * 

The minutes of the Lynchburg cor- 
poration court for October 6, 1897, 
further attest : ' ' We find the prisoner, 
H. W. Crichton, guilty of a COMMON 
ASSAULTand asses his fine at fifty 
dollars." 

Raleigh, Jan. 24, 1925. 



A sound mind in a sound body is a short but full description of a 
happy state in this world. — Locke. 



THE UPLIFT 



19 



THE CASH WORTH OF A WIFE, 



(Selected.) 



How much is a wife worth as a cold 
cash proposition? The question is 
put by The American Agriculturist 
(New York,) which compares a few 
estimates on the value of a wife's 
services as a business asset. Some 
of the answers would seem to indi- 
cate that the woman is getting the 
worst of the bargain, tho the implied 
appeal that the farmer's wife should 
receive a stated salary is met with 
the statement that husband and wife 
should share as business partners. 
Both men and women answer the 
question, the answers ranging from 
one which quotes the story of a poor 
young farmer who justified his ap- 
proaching marriage on the ground 
that he could almost take care of him- 
self and that "it's a poor wife that 
can't help some," to the woman who 
submits the following formidable list 
of statistics: 

' ' In the thirty years of my married 
life I have served 235,425 meals, 
made 33,190 loaves of bread, 5,930 
cakes and 7,960 pies. I have canned 
1,550 quarts of fruit, raised 7,660 
chicks, churned 5,450 pounds of but- 
ter, put in 36,461 hours sweeping, 
washing and scrubbing. I estimate 
the worth of my labor conservatively 
at $115,485.50, none of which I have 
ever collected. But I still love my 
husband and children and wouldn't 
mind starting all over again for 
them." 

In sharp contrast a man sets down 
this feeling comment on housekeeping 
on the farm. 

"It is a well established fact that 
many thousands of good, conscienti- 



ous women have slaved themselves 
to the grave on the farm. They sank 
into untimely graves to make way 
for new household drudges. The 
farmer's second wife would wear out 
in a few years and fold her toil-worn 
hands for the long rest. The minis- 
ter would comment anew, vaguely 
but feelingly, upon the 'inscrutable 
providences' of God. Often before 
the clods were well dried on the 
grave of the departed, 'our bereaved 
brother,' the victim of these 'inscru- 
table providences,' would cast a cal- 
culating eye over the visible supply 
of marriageable maidens, looking for 
another husky female willing to 
work eighteen hours a day and 
'mother' ten stepchildren for her 
board and keep. 

"But the housewife whose endless 
rounds of drudgery has made her the 
butt of a lot of ill-timed jokes, per- 
petrated chiefly by soured and satur- 
nine bachelors, has at last been rec- 
ognized as occupying a place of dig- 
nity and importance in the economic 
world. 

"Miss Margaret Feddes, of the 
University of Nebraska, has figured 
exactly what the wages of the aver- 
age farm wife should be, |and it 
comes to the scientifically accurate 
amount of $4,004.04. It includes 
separate items for cooking and serv- 
ing meals, washing and ironing 
cleaning, care of children and sick, 
helping with milk and care of poul- 
try, sewing and mending and mis- 
cellaneous services. 

"What will the bewildered agricul- 
turist think of the above claim when 



20 



THE UPLIFT 



presented by his smiling 'partner' at 
the end of the year"? We opine that 
his views will have to undergo a rad- 
ical change before he will be ready to 
pay his wife $333.67 per month for 
just 'piddlin' about the house' six- 
teen or eighteen hours a day, seven 
days out of the week. 

' ' He has always recognized her as 
a partner of a few of his joys and all 
of his sorrows, but this is a horse of 
another color." 

A woman contributor scorns the 
time-honored precident of ' ' giving ' ' 
the farm wife any particular share 
of the receipts, such as ' ' the butter 
and egg money. " " Under what au- 
thority does the husband 'give' his 
with necessities?" It is difficult, she 



asks. "Why should not she just as 
reasonably present him with a runt 
pig or stunted calf, with which he is 
to provide himself and his children 
with necesities?" It is difficult, she 
says, to comprehend the condition by 
which the wife keeps up the house 
with butter and egg money, and she 
asks sarcastically, "What keeps up 
the farm, the watercress money?" 
The general opinion, as exprest in 
the answers, seems to be that the wo- 
man who cuts up the kindling and 
serves at the stove is worth all her 
husband can pay her, but that her 
share of the income should be in 
terms of joint partnership and not as 
' ' wages ' ' grudgingly paid. 



CLEVER TRICK OF FOX THAT FOOLED HOUNDS. 

A reader sends us this account of a bit of strategy on the part of a fox 
that he saw when he was a boy in Fayette County, Pennsylvania: "One 
summer day father and mother and I hitched up the horses and took a ride 
down to a neighbor's. After dinner I walked to the sugar camp, and, 
as the day was bright and warm, I lay down under a tree on the hillside. 
I was very quiet; the ground squirrels were playing round; then I saw 
partridges and their young. 

"While I was watching, I herd hounds barking. Soon afterward a 
large red fox came into sight. He would stop and look back and then run 
on a piece and stop and look back again. About fifty feet below me was 
a large rock. . . The fox stopped and looked at it ; then he looked back, and 
taking a run, lit upon the rock. There he sat and watched the hounds, 
but when they came to where he had left the ground they lost the trail 
nd began to hunt around for it. When they were on the back trail the 
fox gave another leap and landed away from the rock. The hounds 
heard him alight, and they came back, but the fox was sitting on the 
hill, watching them. They did not find his trail, and it seemed as if he 
were laughing and saying to himself: 'I fooled them that time!' " — 
Youth's Companion. 



THE UPLIFT 



21 



THE GAMBLERS. 

By James Hay, Jr. in Asheville Citizen. 



Life, a pleasing comedy if you 
don't weaken, in chock full of men 
who, racing nimbly to the sun-kissed 
heights of optimism, join their power- 
ful hand above their unthinking 
heads and, emitting a reekless whoop, 
plunge straight into the middle of 
things without the shadow of an idea 
as to where they are going, what they 
will do Or how to play the game. 

They are the gentlemen whom 
Walter S. Gifford describes as "the 
blind frogs of life." They jump 
without looking. 

This Mr. Gifford on Tuesday last, 
at the age of forty years, became 
president of the American Telephone 
and Telegraph Company, a two-bii- 
lion-dollar corporation. When he 
was thirty-four years old, he was Di- 
rector of the Council of National De- 
fense with headquarters in Washing- 
ton; in touch with every effort of 
whatever sort made by the Execu- 
tive Departments of Government and 
civic organizations of the country to 
win the war. In those days he made 
statistics give forth eloquent and con- 
vincing language. He was then, and 
is today, the greatest statistician i'i 
the United States. 

"The regulation idea of a statisti- 
cian," he told me one day, "is a long- 
haired, seedy-looking individual who 
keeps his nose buried in figures and 
turns out dry-as-dust charts which 
apparently do nobody any good The 
idea 's all wrong. The scientific, 
statistician of modern business must 
be an up-to-date man. who is young 
enough to be full of nap and ginger 
and who is able to exercise his imagi- 



nation. He must have the ability to 
read the wonderful stories that figures 
tell and to communicate these narra- 
tives to others. ' ' 



He proceeded to express his opinion 
of the hit-or-miss men who dru-v 
cards in the game of life without the 
faintest idea even of what the limit 
is. 

".Every man," he declared, "if he 
is honest with himself, can sit down 
and figure out whether he is head- 
ed for failure or success. He can 
tell just where he stands in the battle 
for success, just as a business £ri»< 
can do the same thing by the use of 
statistics. 

"I'll illustrate. If two men form 
a partnership to run a grocery store 
at the next corner, I am perfectly 
certain that, with the aid of scientific 
statistics, they can come mighty 
close to finding out before they start 
whether they will make or lose money 
in the venture. 

' ' I don 't care what sort of business 
you mention, you should have a train- 
ed statistician who can lay on the 
table before you the cold figures 
which will make it possible to analyze 
the chances of success or failure in 
what you are planning to do. 

' ' The little fellow, or the man who 
is in business alone for himself, can 
be his own statistician, provided that 
the scope of his business is small 
enough, but all the same he must 
have the benefit of statistics bearirg 
on every phase, even the smallest, of 
his undertaking. 

"Even the man who is thinking 



22 



THE UPLIFT 



of starting a little fruit store on the 
corner should work a lot with facts 
which aer really statistical. He 
should know how much territory he 
can draw from, how near to him his 
next competitor is located, the gene- 
ral average incomes of the famiiks 
in his district, the directions people 
walk and the streets they use in going 
to street cars and coming from them, 
or in going to churches or motion pic- 
ture houses and all other kinds of 
stores than his. He should certainly 
know how many, if any, men have 
failed in that particular line of busi- 
ness in that particular location be- 
fore him, and why they failed. 



"And, just as a business concern 
can do this, the young man who is 
ambitious and wants to face honestly 
the obstacles ahead of him, can do 
it. In fact he is to succeed, he must 
do it. You can map out our own 
career just as you can map out what 
must be done to insure prosperity for 
a business undertaking. 

"The real value of statistics, kept 
up to date from day to day, is that 
they give an unfailing and accurate 
past, and thus cable you to esti- 
picture of accomplishment in the 
mate the future and plan for it. 

"For all business concerns, and for 
all individuals, the day of the lucky 
hunch, the snap judgment, the hit- 
or-miss proposition, is past. That 
is, ajiy concern can find out any day 
through honest statistics where it is 



losing or gaining business, and why. 
It seems superfluous to point out the 
tremendous advantage to any busi- 
ness or professional man of knowing 
just where all his assets and liabilities 
are every day. In this way, he has 
time by the forelock. 

"He can forestall ruin instead of 
waiting in ignorance or in cloudy un- 
certainty for the catastrophe to hit 
him. He can find out how competi- 
tion is making inroads on him and 
what he must do to withstand these 
inroads and overcome them. Also, 
he can see the bright glow of oppor- 
tunity ahead of him" 

The trouble with the average in 
dividual, however, is that he delights 
in the deadly pastime of fooling him- 
self. He likes to remain blind to 
the fact that he is slipping. He 
thinks with his wishes instead of his 
reason. Doing this, he surely and 
swiftly slides down to mediocrity and 
failure when once he has started on 
the wrong course. 

This young Gifford, who at the age 
of thirty-four had one of the biggest 
jobs under the Government in time of 
war, outlined in a, few words why so 
many men fail. They bet on them- 
selves with the cards stacked against 
them. They refuse to judge and meas- 
ure their own abilities or to take 
them as a guide to what sort of, 
work they should undertake. They 
are weak corporations badly man- 
aged. 



"True eloquence consists in saying all that is necessary, and nothing, 
hut what is necessary." 



THE UPLIFT 



23 



MRS. COIT NORTH CAROLINA. 



By E. B. Norvell. 



To the Editor: I note with pleas- 
ure that Mrs. Coit contemplates do- 
nating her land on the Nantahala 
Mountains, Way ah Bald, for a park. 
I am writing to correct this state- 
ment, "Will of Trench woman said 
to provide park. ' ' Mrs. Coit is an 
American, born in Murphy, Cherokee 
County, North Carolina, the daugh- 
ter of Charles M. and Martha Hitch- 
cock, and grand daughter of Col. 
A. R. S. Hunter. Colonel Hunter was 
a pioneer settler of Cherokee Coun- 
ty, and lived on West side of Hiawas- 
see River, just below the mouth of 
Valley River that flows into Hiawas- 
see on East side, and just to North 
West of center of Murphy. 

Col. Hunter erected the first bridge 
that was ever built across the Hiam- 
assee River just below where the Val- 
ley River flows into the Hiawassee. 
His home was on a beautiful knoll 
overlooking the Hia,wassee and Val- 
ley Rivers. He was there when the 
treaty of New Echota was entered in- 
to between the United States and the 
Cherokee Indians, concluded Dee. 
29th and ratified May 23, 1835, 1836. 
Wherein the Indians agreed to move 
west of the Mississippi. When tbe 
time came for the Indians to go west 
some 2,500 refused to go which neces- 
sitated the government authorities 
sending General Wool with a number 
of United States troops to Cherokee 
County for the purpose of compelling 
the Indians to move. 

Huntersville, the home of Colonel 
Hunter, was the headquarters, for a 



time, of General Wool. Among those 
who came with General Wool was 
Charles M. Hitchcock, a young army 
surgeon. It was whilst stationed at 
Port Butler, now a part of the town 
of Murphy, that the young army sur- 
geon met Martha Hunter, the daugh- 
ter of Col. A. R. S. Hunter, which af- 
terwards resulted in the marriage of 
the two. Mrs. Coit, nee, Elizabeth 
Wyche Hitchcock, and I think, the 
only child of Surgeon and Martha 
Hitchcock, spent her childhood days 
in Murphy. Some years after the re- 
moval of the Cherokee Indians, Dr. 
Hitchcock, with his wife and child 
moved, first, I think io some point 
in Texas, and afterwards to Califor- 
nia, finally settling in San Francisco. 
In after years their daughter mar- 
ried a Mr. Coit, who died a number of 
years ago.. 

Doctor Hitchcock amassed a large 
fortune. His daughter has spent a 
great part of her time in San Fran- 
cisco and a great part in Paris. 

The land on Wayah Bald was in- 
herited from her mother. It lays on 
top of Nantahala Mountains on North 
West side of the public road leading 
from Murphy, in Cherokee County 
to Franklin, in Macon County. There 
is not a grander or more beautiful 
range of mountains in Western North 
Carolina, than this part of the Nan- 
tahala. I sincerel hope Mrs. Coit 
will donate her holdings on Wayah 
for a park which may be the nu- 
cleus for great park in the Smokies. 



24 



THE UPLIFT 



THAT SPECK IN THE SKY. 

By Emma Mauritz Larson in Young Folks. 



Most of us have little sympathy or 
admiration for that speck in the 
sky that makes the inhabitants of the 
poultry yard hurry frantically for 
shelter, and yet the hawk and its 
cousins, the falcons, the eagles and 
the owls, all birds of prey, have a 
real and useful task in the world of 
out-of-doors. They keep in check 
the small rodents, field mice, rats and 
many other small gnawing beasties 
that devour untold quantities of grain 
and other human food materials. They 
sometimes actually help to save our 
farms for us, though they may look 
like unpleasant and expensive work- 
ers when we see them swoop down 
and almost catch in their clutch old 
Biddy Leghorn and her brood of six- 
teen downy chicks. 

Naturalists have made careful stu- 
dies of all these birds of prey, spend- 
ing long weeks hunting for their 
nests and making sure just what 
varieties of falcons, ,buzzards, hawks 
and owls live in each part of the 
globe. There are in the world five 
great owl families, and of these three 
live in North America, Horned Owls, 
Bird Owls and Day Owls. But these 
families have several species in each 
so that there are in our country at 
least ten distinct sorts of owls. Per- 
haps that is enough to get along with 
in our national outdoor housekeep- 
ing, so that we need not mourn that 
there are about one hundred and forty 
other sorts of owls in the world who 
do not come to our temperate zone 
of America to live. 

One of the puzzling and confusing 
things in naturalists' study of both 



owls and falcons is the fact that often 
the young have a very different 
feathering from their elders, and they 
are apparently even larger than the 
parent birds. Several times when a 
bird with different plumage was first 
discovered the cry went out: "There 
is a new species of owl on this side 
of the Atlantic, ' ' but later it was dis- 
covered that the bird sighted was only 
a sturdy fine youngster of some well- 
known family sporting his first year 
feathers and that by the time he was 
two years old he would shed these 
feathers and assume the plumage by 
which his family have long been 
known and that he will wear all the 
rest of his owl days. A red owl was 
discovered in such a manner and 
christened Kirland befort it was dis- 
covered that he was only a young owl 
of the Acadian Owl family, the fami- 
ly known among farmers as the Saw- 
whet Owl. 

The Snowy Owl seems indeed to be- 
long to the northern part of our 
continent with its beautiful plumage 
matching the winter landscape. The 
Cree Indians called it the Wopohoo, 
but when it summers in the far north 
the Esquimaux hail it as the Oopee- 
guak. Most of the Snowy owls are 
barred or banded with gray some- 
what, but some of them are clear 
glistening white without a stain of 
color, and it is interesting to hear 
the naturalists say that these pure 
white birds are very old owls, grown 
hoary and silver like old grandmoth- 
ers and grandfathers. 

Hunters find so few male birds 
among the Snowy Owls in this coun- 



THE UPLIFT 



25 



try and Canada, perhaps one to ten or 
fifteen females, that they suppose that 
the males are, too lazy to leave the 
articles for the migrating months, but 
await there the' return of the tour- 
ing female birds. Heavy storms to 
the north have somtimes driven down 
to Ontario and Quebec numbers of 
Snowy Owls, and yet it seems strange 
that they should be driven south by 
any degree of cold so wonderfully are 
their coats of feathers adapted to 
shut out the cold, with thick, matted, 
elastic feathers almost woven to- 
gether. And under the matting of 
outer feathers, almost impossible for 
the hunter to break through, is a soft 
and very thick white down to addi- 
tionally protect the, owl from cold. 
And even under his slun, the Snowy 
Owl wears winter protetction of a 
thick layer of yellow fat. In fact, as 
the bird sits like a lump of snow only 
his staring yellow eyes, the tip of his 
beak and the very ends of his hook 
claws are bare, and surely those parts 
can not suffer from cold. 

Perhaps after all it is not the 
storm directly that drives the Snowy 
Owls south, but the fact that the 
severe cold drives the small beasts and 
birds south and the hungry owl fol- 
lows his fleeing pantry. When he 
deigns to stop at a farm he isn't easy 
prey to the hunter, even though wily 
hunters have sometimes disguised 
themselves in white garments, or if 
he is caught he is a terrible fighter 
with both bill and claws. 

The Snowy Owl hunts its food both 
in daylight and twilight, indeed, it 
would have a sorry time if it could 
be active only in darkness, since the 
artic mid-summers days are very long. 
The Hawk Owl or Day Owl, is .an- 



other owl that can see in bright light 
and the strongest sunlight can not 
put him at the mercy of the hunter. 
They like to dine on mice or squir- 
rels or small birds, but if they stop 
near a farm they are quiet willing 
to try chickens or pigeons, and they 
are bold fellows not easily scared 
away. 

In the fur countries hunters have 
reported that Hawk Owls followed 
them and snatched before they them- 
selves could reach them any ducks 
their guns might try to bring in for 
the campfire supper. These Day Owls 
sleep at night like proper human be- 
ings, but in homes in hollow trees or 
rough nests constructed of sticks and 
dry grass. In these nests are laid 
from three to six very round eggs 
of clear white. 

The great Horned Owl or Cat Owl 
was sometimes also called the Eagle 
Owl by the early settlers, though it 
has no right to steal that personal 
name from its owner in Europe, the 
true Eagle Owl. This is the Owl we 
are most apt to see stuffed, for it has 
been common all through the west- 
ern hemisphere. So slyly does it 
choose its nest that not many eggs 
have been discovered by naturalists! 
It is a nocturnal bird, dozing all day 
in the shade, and flying noiselessly 
after nightfall to find its food and 
explore the land. They welcome a 
dark rainy day, which is as good as 
night to them, and with doleful cries 
they fly through the woods. 

When there are a number of them 
together they seem to scold and jibe 
at one another. One hunter, kept 
awake all night by their uproar, said 
it sounded like one of the noisy crea- 
tures cracked a joke, laughed at it 



2C 



THE UPLIFT 



himself and got all the other owls to 
laughing at it and then 'suddenly 
getting in bad humor demanded 
' ' what in the world they were laugh- 
ing at anyhow." 

The parent birds of the Horned 
Owl sometimes neglect their babies 
and stay away from the nest a long 
time, but woe to the boy who thinks 
he can safely climb to the nest if the 
old owls are in sight. The mother 
bird will fight fiercely. 

The Horned Owl likes his meals 
to be of rats, mice, partridges, rab- 
bits, pigeons, or poultry, and if these 
are scarce and he is hungry he may 
turn cannibal and attack and eat his 
own cousins the Short-eared and Long- 
eared Owls. Always, in his wild free- 
dom or in captivity, he seems cruel 
and treacherous, and gives all owl 
families a bad name. 

A funny little owl is that one call- 
ed the Screech Owl or Red or Mot- 
tled Owl. It is almost blind in the 
daytime, and hides away safely dur- 
ing those helpless haurs, so that it 
isn't as easily or as often captured as 
one might suppose. The early natur- 
alists had a confused time studying 
them, for sometimes they seemed 
gray and sometimes red and the ques- 
tion was, "Are the red ones Screech 
Owls or are the gray ones Screech 
Owls?" At last it was learned that 
it was the youngsters of the family 
who were red and that all Screech 
Owls over two years old were gray. 

The Long-eared Owl has a taste for 
insects, and loves to live in the lone- 
liest spot he can find, where men are 
not apt to come. It winters in the 



coast states of the Eastern United 
States, and goes north for the sum- 
mer. It has small eyes and long ear 
tufts. It probably raises two broods 
a year, in April and July, and may 
use the same nest for several seasons 
instead of taking the trouble to build 
a new one. 

The Short-eared Owl is really hand- 
some and it can be proud of being 
scattered over all of America, Asia, 
Europe and Greenland. And every- 
where they agree on the same family 
habits. Their food of insects and 
field mice, seldom of birds, makes 
them regarded more kindly by bird- 
lovers. They nest on the ground and 
may not even take the trouble to 
gather sticks and grass, but lay in 
natural hollows or depressions in the 
ground. The four or five eggs aren't 
nearly so spherical as those of the 
other owls and they are of grayish 
white. 

The Short-eared Owls sometimes 
gather in flocks, perhaps for com- 
pany in their migrations, and they are 
a fine sight, buff barred with dark 
brown and some parts nearly white. 

The hawks and buzzards and eagles 
and falcons come for part of the 
year too and have been studied by na- 
turalists and many mounted speci- 
mens placed in museums, so that we 
may know even the rarer ones by 
name and plumage. And if that hov- 
ering speck in the sky ever swoops 
down close enough to be really seen 
we may recognize the Sparrow Hawk 
or the Pigeon Hawk even as we learn 
to know our friends the Owls. 



"Do motor cars make us lazy?" asks the Digest, 
we're pedestrians. — Eoanoke World-News. 



Well, not if 



THE UPLIFT 



27 



BURR TAKES A CHANCE. 

By Margaret Beibel in Young People. 



Burr Henderson appeared preoccu- 
pied paying little attention either to 
his guest or the dinner. 

"What's on your mind, Burr?" 
Gardner asked at length. "You 
haven't said ten words since we sat 
down. I'll begin to think you're sor- 
ry you invited me!" 

In view of the fact that they had 
been chums for years, this was a safe 
remark. Burr scarcely heard it. 

' ' I was just thinking about my 
job in the laboratory. I'm afraid 
there' isn't much future in it." 

"Why, I thought you liked it!" 
Gardner was curious as well as sur- 
prised. 

"I did," Burr emphasized mean- 
ingly, "but it looks now as if Tay- 
lor, the new man, is intended for as- 
sistant to the chief chemist, and na- 
turally the rest of us feel it rather 
keenly. I've been there two years. 
Today Graig overheard the chief say 
something to Taylor about an assis- 
tant for our department. Why 
should lie speak of it to the new man 
unless he intends to give him the 
place?" 

But Gardner was a confirmed op- 
timist. "Hang around a while, Burr. 
Maybe he'll fall down on the job — 
if he gets it." 

Mr; Henderson smiled.. „ Better 
nake friends with him, Burr, while 
there's some doubt," he said joking- 

ly- ■ . . . :m. ' ' . 

"Give him the benefit of the doubt, 
Son," his mother suggested. "May- 
be he is pretty well qualified for the 
place, by previous training. ' ' 

"Well — there might be something 



in that, though he seems to know 
very little about the work. Someone 
said he has been connected with a 
branch of the firm — but that doesn't 
help the rest of us. ' ' 

"Father says to consider always 
the firm's attitude in putting men in 
charge of departments, Gardner put 
in. "A firm is in business to make 
money, and is not likely to show 
much favoritism without hearing ob- 
jections if a department doesn't make 
good. ' ' 

"There is a good deal in that," 
Mr. Henderson agreed readily. 

" I '11 compromise then, ' ' Burr de- 
cided aloud. "I'll help this fellow 
all I can — if he's worth it. He needs 
the information all right, and no one 
is over-anxious to help him. If the 
decision has been made, it isn't like- 
ly anything I can do will alter it 
now. If I see that I can't get ahead, 
I shal leave, for I'm merely . mark- 
ing time." 

The boys finished .their meal and 
left for a game, where Burr forgot 
the matter. 

Morning found him resolved to ac- 
cept whatever situation arose, since 
he was powerless to change it. 

' ' Good morning ! " he greeted cor- 
dially as Harmon Taylor entered the 
laboratory. 

Obviously Harmon Taylor was sur- 
prised as he responded to this , ngw 
cordiality. Burr, having determined 
to be through, watched for the new 
man ' difficulties, discussed past, ©ri- 
ders, and explained conditions about 
" the. - plant. . ; Taylor, was grateful be- 
•■ yond- words and, when he found that 



28 



THE UPLIFT 



Burr was a willing source of infor- 
mation, plied him with questions. 
" I 'd like to learn all I can about this 
department in a, short a space of 
time as possible," he confided. 
"When a fellow is vague on one 
point, it seems to make others more 
difficult to understand." 

They soon became friends, for Burr 
found Taylor more congenial than 
any of his fellow-workers — more alive, 
more ambitious, a bigger man. 

' ' You know, Gardner, a fellow who 
isn't getting ahead, gets to be a bore 
— talks the same line all the time," 
he remarked one evening when they 
were discussing Burr's problem. 

' ' I know, ' ' Gardner nodded. ' ' With 
nothing new to discuss, it's natural 
to talk in circles. 

"Taylor's thirst for knowledge 
isn't doing me any harm," Burr in- 
formed his friend. ' ' We 're working 
together digging up data. He isn't 
satisfied if I don 't know — I have to 
find out. ' ' 

Oddly enough, Burr had no thought 
of how his change of front would 
affect the others in his department. 
His one idea had been to accept the 
inevitable; to help Taylor and then 
leave, if there was nothing promis- 
ing in sight for himself. It startled 
Burr to hear Craig advise mocking- 
ly one evening: 

' ' Be sure to help Taylor along so 
no one else will have any chance ! ' ' 

Burr flushed, but did not reply. 
It disturbed him more than he cared 
to admit. If Craig thought that, he 
probably would say it to the rest. 
Perhaps all the fellows in the labora- 
tory looked at it in the same way. 
' ' What a nice position I 've put my- 
self into unwittingly ! " he mused. 



Finding it impossible to think of 
anything else, he fell to analyzing his 
position, "Do I imagine it, or have 
they all acted a little distant since 
I've become chummy with Taylor?" 
He worried over it at night, unable 
to sleep. Evidently Craig looked 
upon him as a traitor to the rest. 

This was an angle of the situation 
that had not presented itself to Burr. 
Having decided definitely that the 
firm must have some adequate reason 
giving Taylor the coveted position, he 
had considered the question settled. 
If, however, the other fellows felt 
differently about it, Burr was not so 
sure. 

Another week among his fellow- 
workers convinced him that there was 
a little difference in their attitude 
towards him. Then, just when it had 
become almost unbearable, a change 
came. Taylor was put in another de- 
partment — likewise a minor positon! 
The chemical laboratory became nor- 
mal ; small differences were forgotten. 
The affair blew over and the fellows 
resumed their former friendliness. 

Three weeks passed, with no new 
development, except that Taylor was 
being shifted about constantly, al- 
ways in unimportant positions. 

Then, one evening, Gardner Clark 
inquired casually, "Anything new. 
Burr?" 

Burr grinned. ' ' Quite new. I 
found out today that Taylor is go- 
ing in as assistant sales manager! 
He was on the road for the com- 
pany — one of their crack salesmen. 
The firm offered him a good place 
in the office, if he brushed up on the 
technical end of the business. That 
is why he didn't mention his reason 
for being there. He 's never gone 



THE UPLIFT 



29 



into the technical end much, and 
wasn't sure of qualifying. He is 
thorough, and wanted all the infor- 
mation he could get. The logical 
place to begin is the laboratory — the 
analysis of the product. ' ' 

"All that fuss about nothing!" 
Gardner commented, referring to the 
position as assistant to the chief 
chemist. 

"No — not for nothing!'' Burr 
tried to keep the elation out of his 
voice. "Taylor recommended me for 
assistant. The story the fellows had 
pieced together drifted back to him, 



and he told the chief. ' ' Burr paused. 
"I don't see yet how that helped 
me." 

Gardner Clark saw a chance to reg- 
ister superiority. He patted Burr on 
the back in a way that implied a vast 
difference in their age — with the dif- 
ferences in favor of himself. 

' ' Sometimes I will explain fully the 
attitude of the world in general, and 
of bosses in particular, toward the 
man who plays well a losing game," 
he promised airily. "As a matter of 
fact, Son, I 'm going to be a great help 
to you in your new position!" 



INSTITUTION NOTES. 



J. J. Jones, Jr. 



Hair cutting came around last week 
and every boy was glad to get his 
hair cut. 



Richard Petterpher, a member of 
the fifth cotage, has been placed in 
the shoe shop. 



The band gave a concert Jast Suii- 
.day afternoon. It was enjoyed by 
evervone who heard it. 



The boys who were visited by rela- 
tives last Wednesday : James Davis, 
Howard Riggs, and Zeb Trexler. 



Mrs. Fraley, a member of the staff 
at the Barium Springs Orphanage, re- 
cently visited Mrs. Maude Harris. 



The barn boys have been .hauliiv 
dirt during the past week, improving 
the streets on the school grounds. 



Herbert Tolley, Mack Duncan and 
Carl Osborne were paroled last week. 
These boys have made fine records 
at the school. 



The boys went to the ball ground 
last Saturday. The basket ball play- 
ers did not have a game, but had 
a long practice. 



Charles Blackmail, Charles Haynes, 
Thomas Oglesby, and Travis frown- 
ing, formerly boys at the school, 
were visitors here last Sundav. 



i'ne bmitn uiCerary Society, and 
the Goodman Literary Society held 
their meeting last Monday evening 
and had fine debates. 



One of the biggest activities en- 
gaging the field work at the insti- 
tution is poultry raising. There are 



30 



THE UPLIFT 



in the several pens four hundred hens, 
and the egg production averages over 
three hundred per day. 

Mr. Shelton, the boy's work secre- 
tary of the Y. M. C. A., at Charlotte, 
accompanied by Mr. A. C. Bridges, a 



lawyer, and a quartet, was here last 
Sunday afternoon. Mr. Shelton had 
charge of the services. Mr. Bridges 
made a very interesting talk on good 
habits. 



IN THE WINTER WOODS. 

Bank after Rank the patient trees 

Rise up against the sky, 
Strange voices whisper in the breeze 

That sways their heads on high. 

Beneath lies silence, robed in ■white 
Broad billows like the sea, 

Her garments all with gems alight, 
That gleam mysteriously — 



The world of men, and all it holds 

Of care, is far away; 
Here's naught but peace, the night enfolds 

To hide the scars of day. 



— Outing. 



RAILROAD SCHEDULE 
Northbound 



No. 


136 


To 


Washington 


5:00 A. 


M. 


No. 


36 


To 


Washington 


10:25 A. 


M. 


No. 


46 


To 


Danville 


3:15 P. 


M. 


No. 


12 


To 


Richmond 


7:25 P. 


M. 


No. 


32 


To 


Washington 


8:28 P. 


M. 


No. 


38 


To 


Washington 


9:30 P. 


M. 


No. 


30 


To 


Washington 
Southbound 


1:40 A. 


M. 


No. 


45 


To 


Charlotte 


4:14 P. 


M. 


No. 


35 


To 


Atlanta 


10:06 P. 


M. 


No. 


29 


To 


Atlanta 


2:45 A. 


M. 


No. 


31 


To 


Augusta 


6:07 A. 


M. 


No. 


33 


To 


New Orleans 


8:27 A. 


M. 


No. 


11 


To 


Charlotte 


9:05 A. 


M. 


No. 


135 


To 


Atlanta 


9:15 P. 


M. 



THE SOUTHERN SERVES THE SOUTH 



Carolina Collection, 
U. N. C. Library 

the UPLIFT 

VOL. XIII CONCORD, N. C, FEBRUARY 7, 1925 No. 11 






♦ 



* 



LESSONS FROM NATURE. 



In nature's laboratories Silence reigns even as it •> 

♦J, rules amid the movement of the spheres. The Mas- £ 

1* ter artist utters not his voice as he saturates the * 

* rose with fragrance or puts the delicate tints in the ♦> 

* pansy. The oak, the pine and the redwood become * 
% strong and tall without any herald having proclaim- £ 
X ed that they were to be the monarchs of the % 

* forests. The trees grow in silence. "First the * 

♦J* V 

* blade, the stalk, the full corn in the ear," but with- •:• 
4 out noise the garners of Egypt and of America .•, 
^ have been filled with corn. The peach blushes in |* 

* silence and orchards, vineyards and fields are obe- * 

* dient to the universal law of growth, Only the ♦ 
% forces that destroy are accompanied by sound. % 

* Harsh and sometimes terrible are the voices cf the *£ 

* storm, the earthquake and the thunderbolt in its * 

* work of destruction. These evident facts serve * 



* 



to remind us that the man who makes the most 
noise is not necessarily doing the greatest and best 



1* work. — N. C. Christian Advocate. * 



>.A.:4.j.}K«*>H4i<**K<*{4i4*}*<'W''>»' , ;"^K , >' , WA':<.»:": 



-PUBLISHED BY- 



THE PRINTING CLASS OF THE STONEWALL JACKSON MANUAL 
TRAINING AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

J. P. Cook, Chairman, Concord Mrs. G. T. Roth, Elkin 
Miss Easdale Shaiv, Vice-Chairman Herman Cone, Greensboro 

Rockingham Mrs. Cameron Morrison, Charlotte 

Jno. J. Blair, Sec, Raleigh Mrs. A. L. Coble, Stateville 

D. B. Coltrane, Treas., Concord Mrs. T. W. Bickett, Raleigh 

J. S. Effird, Albemarle Mrs. W. N. Reynolds, Winston-Salem 

Mrs. Chas. >. Cannon, Concord Mrs. I. W. Faison, Charlotte 

Rev. Tom P. Jimison, Spencer Mr. Paid C. Whitlock, Charlotte 

Mrs. W. H. S. Burgivyn, Honorary Member 
Chas. E. Boger, Supt. 



CONTENTS. 



EDITORIAL COMMENT 3-7 

RAMBLING AROUND Old Hurrygraph 8 

WHY I AM A CHRISTIAN J. W. Holland 11 

ST. VALENTINE \S NEW BOY Union Herald 12 

WHY MARCH 4 IS INAUGURAL DAY 16 

PUBLIC HEALTH WORK AND PROLONGATION 

OP LIFE Journal of Public Health 18 

REMARKABLE STUNTS IN DREAMS Selected 20 ' 

MEAL TIME TWO CENTURIES AGO Earle 22 

MODERN SHYLOCKS News & Observer 26 

A BOY'S ALARM CLOCK Adelbert F. Caldwell 27 

INSTITUTION NOTES J. J. Jones, Jr. 28 

HONOR ROLL 29 



The Uplift 



A WEEKLY JOURNAL 

PUBLISHED BY 

The Authority of the Stonewall Jackson Manual Training and Industrial 
School. Type-setting by the Boys Printing Class. Subscription 

Two Dollars the Year in Advance 

JAMES P. COOK, Editor, J. C. FISHER, Director Printing Department 

Entered as second-class matter Dec. 4, 1920 at the Post Office at Concord, 
N. C. under act of March 3, 1879. Acceptance for mailing at special rate 
of 4, 1923. 



PULLING AGAINST THE BIT. 

Our people have gotten a taste of first-class, modern highways, and up to 
this time the cost of securing' them has not fallen on the public, and thereby 
the state is full of enthusiasts who are pulling for a large continuation of the 
good-roads-program. 

Responding to this sentiment that everywhere prevails in the state, Repre- 
sentative Bowie and Senator Heath have introduced in the General Assembly 
a measure providing for the issue of $35,000,000 to continue this road con- 
struction. Gov. McLean, having familiarized himself with the financial status 
of the state at this time, and having large experience in financial matters and 
being a conservative and safe business man, recommends an issue of twenty 
million for the next two years. The governor has taken the public into his 
confidence — and they appreciate his candor — and assures it that he is 
heartily in favor of the modern highway construction in the state, but that 
conditions require great caution. From the reports from Raleigh it seems 
that Gov. McLean's views will prevail. 

It is estimated that to complete the original program of building good 
roads in the state will cost at least $250,000,000, and safety would suggest 
that it might be well to await the time when improvements would produce 
returns commensurate with the outlay. 

Mighty big showing may be had by the expenditures of twenty millions 



4 THE UPLIFT 

during the next two years in the construction of highways. Gov. McLean 
certainly has his eyes turned toward a safe progress. 

THE FACT CONFRONTS US. 

By way of the Christian Advocate of New York we come upon an ex- 
hibit that we have seen verified time after time in our own observation. 
It is very rare that trouble comes out of a home where parental training is 
emphasized; and it is very seldom that a regular attendant among the young 
upon Sunday Schools ever gets into serious trouble or does not attain man- 
hood substantially equipped to withstand besetting temptations. 

The little organizations that undertake to perform the functions of parental 
training and the Sunday Schools — substitutes that emphasize play and games, 
whether they bear a Christian name or not — are not the dependable means 
to equip the young for substantial manhood. 

Listen here to the experience of Supreme Court Justice Lewis L Fawcett, 
as reported in the New York (Methodist) Christian Advocate: 

"The latest plea for the Sunday school comes from Supreme Court 
Justice Lewis L. Fawcett, of Brooklyn, who has had eighteen years' ex- 
perience in the County and Supreme Courts. For the past seven years 
he has been trying cases in the Supreme Court, New York State. 

" 'In the eighteen years of my experience on the bench,' Judge Fawcett 
says, 'more than 4,000 boys less than twenty-one years old have been 
arraigned before me charged with various degrees of crime. Of this 
4,000, only three were members of a Sunday school at the time of 
the commission of their crimes. 

" 'Even these three exceptional cases were technical in character and de- 
void of heinousness, so that they are scarcely wirth mentioning. 

" 'In 1,092 suspended criminal sentences, only sixty-two of 'the 
young men were brought back for violation of the conditions of their 
paroles. In each suspended sentence case I insisted upon the return of 
the youth, if he was a Protestant, to a Sunday school, if a Roman 
Catholic, to attendance at mass, and if a Jew, to attendance at a synagogue 
or a temple. In each instance I had the earnest co-operation of the 
minister, the priest or the rabbi, and in each case I saw to it that the 
young man had a job to go to as soon as he was freed on parole. In 
virtually all of the suspended sentence cases the reform was quick and, 
I believe, permanent. 

" 'If we could keep the youth of America in Sunday school during the 
period of character formation, or at regular attendance upon religious 
worship, we could close the criminal courts and the jails. There would 
be no "raw material'' to work on. And what is good for the vouth would 



THE UPLIFT 

be equally salutary with adults. The sustained, wholesome, moral at- 
mosphere imparted through habitual attendance upon Sunday school and 
church will expel criminal impulses. 

" 'Any man not contributing to the support of some church or organiz- 
ed religious work is living on charity — riding on some other man 's trans- 
portation. If he really desires abatement of crime he should ally 
himself with those agencies which prevent or abate crime.' 

"The plea of Judge Fawcett's, coming as it does out of the daily ex- 
perience of eighteen years, well emphasizes one of the major tasks of 
the Church and a major task of our civilization as well. 



"ECONOMY TO THE BONE." 

A very grave and stubborn proposition confronts the General Assembly, 
now in session. It is a very able body of men, who are bent on legislating 
for the good of the state. They are taking stock of expenses and revenues. 
There is a sentiment among some to invoke the "sales tax," as suggested in 
part by Attorney-General Bickett in 1913, who advocated the levying of a 
one-cent tax on each glass of coca cola. There is very strong opposition 
to any sales tax. 

Touching on the problem that confronts this legislature, Editor Daniels 
says editorially under the caption, "Economy to the bone," in the News 
& Observer of Tuesday: 

"This Legislature, in order to pay the deficit of $9,515,786.63 and pro- 
vide necessary expenses, must levy additional taxes. Where this is 
shown to be absolutely necessary, the taxes should be levied. But not a 
dollar of tax ought to be levied on any man or industry until the Legis- 
lature lias made a survey to see where expenses can be reduced with- 
out injury to the public service. 

Senator Humphrey, of Wayne, has introduced a resolution calling for 
a detailed statement of salaries paid in all departments. That informa- 
tion should have been contained in the reports presented when the General 
Assembly met. It should be had without delay. It will be found that 
in some departments the salaries and expenses have doubled and trebled 
and even quadrupled in the past few years. There should be enough 
employees in every department to carry on the public business and they 
should be given just and adequate compensation. But any number not 
needed and every extravagant salary should be cut off. The people at 
home must practice economy. The State departments and institutions 
should do likewise. 

It is the duty of the Committee on Salaries and Fees and the Appropri- 
ation Committee to see where money can be wisely saved. With large 



THE UPLIFT 

sums of money paid for auditing, nobody until the Budget Commission's 
report knew how . big was the deficiency or whether there was any de- 
ficiency. The legislators should go to the bottom. It would be well 
to begin with the State Auditor's Department. In the report of the 
year ending June 30, 1924, are these items of expense: 

Administrative $26,047.45 

Special auditing and accounting — State account 28,018.65 

Special Auditing and accounting — County accounts 57,687.83 

Total $111,743^93 

Whether this includes the big fee to the New York accountants is not 
stated. The Legislature ought to know. It ought to see how much it 
cost to audit aeounts in 1920, 1921 and 1923 and compare the expenditures 
with those ending June 30, 1924. Like information ought to be had of 
expenses, with names of all employees, experts, etc., together with the 
salary and per diem pay, from all other departments. 

Economy to the bone should be the policy, but no so-called economy 
that stops necessary progress and no niggardly salaries." 



THEY SAY IT IS "INCONTESTIBLE." 

In the face of different opinions entertained in some quarters, the Budget 
Commission, composed of splendid gentlemen, faced a delicate and trouble- 
some job in arriving at an absolute knowledge that there is a deficit in the 
operating account of the state and more difficult job in ascertaining the 
exact amount of that deficit. 

That body of men, all of whom can read, are familiar with the rules of 
addition and subtraction, are upright and honorable men and have the good 
of the state at heart, have declared that there is a deficit and that it amounts 
to $9,515,786.63. This finding is pretty generally accepted as accurate. 
Neither the Budget Commission nor Gov. McLean, wise, substantial and 
business-like, did not, in the discharge of an importan't and delicate duty, 
undertake to fix the responsibility for the existence of this deficit. 

* * * * * * * $ 
THE CIGARETTE. 

The cigarette and defective wiring cause the majority of fires. Greens- 
boro and Raleigh have suffered greater fire loss during January than they 
did during the entire past year. 

The Charlotte Sanatorium had a fire scare on Monday. Some careless per- 
son, just like eirgarette smokers become, Uirew a lighted stub down a waste 



THE UPLIFT 7 

chute. The trash caught fire, and considerable alarm was felt for awhile un- 
til the Are was located and extinguished. 

The fascination of a workman sitting on the top of an uncompleted build- 
ing, lighting a cigarette and enjoy himself on somebody else's time and 
watching another worker straining to get a piece of timber in place without 
assistance, and then after a few puffs throw the burning stub down among 
trash, is a puzzle to a normal man, who values life and property and faith- 
ful service. 

****** * * 

"Old Hurrygraph " in his letter, this week, makes note of the richness 
of February in containing the anniversaries of many notable events. In 
this month we find the anniversaries of the birth of Washigton and Lincoln; 
added in interest are Valentine Day, Shrove Tuesday and Ash Wednesday — 
and, then, the little violets are sticking out their noses, coaxing and courting 
Spring to appear. 

******* * * * * * 

Senator Overman's bill providing for the establishment of a third Federal 
judicial district in the bounds of North Carolina, has passed the U. S. Senate. 
Just see what bootleggers, use of the mails for fraudulent purposes and the 
violation of the Mann act have done to congest the federal courts. 

************ 

Those, who set their faith on the reliability of the Ground Hoa's forecasting 
of the weather, are in the class of those who place confidence in Jo Jo. 



THE UPLIFT 



RAMBLING AROUND. 



(Old Hurrygraph) 



You know it is just naturally hard 
i ii -Mine people to comprehend, take 
in, absorb, words or ideas when they 
are first given them. They seem dull 
to catch the meaning'. 1 passed two 
men on the street the other day, 
and one was doing his best to ex- 
plain a matter to the other who ap- 
peared to be lost in the explanation. 
It reminded me of the two Irishmen 
in business. Pat bought an office 
desk, and when it was installed, he 
gave an extra key to Mike, remark- 
ing that both could use the desk 
jointly. Mike began a careful search 
of the desk when Pat asked him 
what he was looking for. "I'm 
looking for my key hole,'' ' replied 
Mike.' 



I hear that Lieutenant-Governor J. 
Elmer Long is giving the automobile 
salesmen a lively and merry chase. 
His Lincoln automobile was destroyed 
in the recent garage fire in Raleigh. 
The Lieutenant-Governor was long on 
insurance, and he will get a new ear 
and pay cash for it. Now a cash 
in is the very cream of prospects; 
in is the very scream of prospects; 
hence the agents are sticking to the 
Lieutenant-Governor like fly paper. 
He is hearing more discussions, pro 
and con, mostly prQ, than he hears 
sitting as president of tne senate, he 
is just "Listening in." The only 
expression from him i.-, "When I 
buy a car you can set it down that 
I got a bargain." So, Long; hope ue 
will. 



Wednesday morning, on a pavement 
as slick a* a sea of bald-headed on- 
ions, with their jackets off, with in- 
pedal extremities jazzing with quiveis 
as if tbey were treading on egg she'!, 
when a man in a closed car drove up 
to the curving and opening the door, 
waved me in. That was benevolence 
in its most beautiful form. If I 
owned a car I would do this often, 
it made me feel so good. 



I was walking along the street 



I see it "stated in the papers" 
that Henry L. Doherty, president 
of the Cities Service Co., in a letter 
to stockholders, just made public, 
says "There never has been a time 
for the past 20 years when condi- 
tions in this country were more- 
promising for a long period of gene- 
ral business activity and prosperity, 
and the return of the rental value 
of capital reasonable rates is a strong 
factor in the situation." He out- 
lined his company's plan's for the 
year, which includes the redemption 
of the common stock script dividends 
and the resumption of regular month- 
ly cash dividends on the common. 
This is fine. If this optimistic view, 
and realization of facts <_ mid be ex- 
tended to all other concerns which 
are not paying dividends, and haven 't 
for some l ne. it v ./'lid put a whole 
lot of joy in this ol ! world, and raise 
many bowed heads to the sunshine, 
and lighten the hei vy hsarts of great 
numbers. I do hope Mr. Doherty is 
a prophet. Xot oit-y in his own busi- 
ness, but as to other lines of industry 
' ' I cannot si i a angle cloud in the 
business sky that can be regarded as 



THE UPLIFT 



9 



a menace, ' ' he assures Lis stock- 
holders. Would that all industries 
could say the same thing. 



February is ushered in today. It 
is the shortest month of the year, 
yet it has more superstition, love, 
religion, veneration and patriotism 
crowded into its 28 day than any 
month of the year. The 2d is ground- 
hog day, when some hold that the 
groundhog comes out on that day, 
and seeing his shadow he goes back 
and there will be 20 more days of bad 
weather. If he doesn't see his shad- 
ow, good weather begins. You can 
believe this if you want to; there 
are other things in the world just as 
believea.bie. If the groundhog has 
anything to do with the weather he 
is a smart chap. The 12th is Lin- 
coln's birthday. The 14th is St. 
Valentine's day, when the lovers 
come out and make the atmosphere 
and the mails resonate with tender 
sentiments. The 15th is expiation 
day, on which the great expiation 
and purification feast was held. The 
22d is Washington's birthday. And 
the 24th is Shrove Tuesday, the day 
before Ash Wednesday, the beginning 
of the Lenten season, the 40 days be- 
fore Easter. So you see February 
is pretty well crowded with import- 
ant events. 



The appeal to the emotions is the 
essential of -all hu,rn'an endeavors,. 
In these days they do so many things 
mechanically and electrically. Logic 
and reason are the skeletons to carry 
the real appeal to the heart. It i.^ 
very easy to see that logic and reason 
can be so weak that the strongest 
emotional appeal could not carry it. 
On the other hand, logic and reason 



might be so strong and still have a 
small emotional appeal coupled to it 
that none other than t'nose. who take 
delight in the highest intellectual 
emotion would feel its influence. 
When we attempt to eliminate the 
feeling from human affairs and every- 
day life, when dealing with our fel- 
low men, we leave only dry bones — 
the skeleton. The flesh, the heart 
beats, the bright and sparkling eye 
are gone. You have left only the 
dry matter of fact, reason and logic, 
and, therefore, in order to put the 
proper life, sprit and power into your 
appeal, that is done only through the 
emotions. It is the emotions that 
cause men to act. As Faust says in 
the words of Goethe: "But that 
which issues from the heart alone will 
turn the hearts of otiiers to your 
own. ' ' 



There is a good deal of talk about 
the cotton market. A whole lot of 
people are interested in cotton. Some 
are more interested in cotton futures 
than they are about the future of 
themselves. I was just thinking that 
an interesting analysis might be made 
of the market along the lingerie 
line. Figure the change in the habit 
of the gentler sex, estimate the num • 
her of yards of cotton whieh do no. 
go into the petticoat trade; balance 
this against one million Ku Klux 
members with average of fou, r yards 
per item of regalia and possibly two 
suits per year; debit item the in- 
creasing use of near silk ; credit item 
increasing number of shirts totally 
ruined under flivvers. With the boll 
weevil annual dinner bill charged 
against production, the balance ought 
to strike pretty well. 

Writing for a newspaper surely 



10 



THE UPLIFT 



does get you in bad every once in a 
while, do the best you can. Just 
leaving out a letter in somebody 's 
name, or calling Mrs. Smythe Mrs. 
Smith, or getting an initial wrong, 
is enough to make someone your 
enemy for life. If you inadvertenly 
forget one in a list of forty or fifty 
people who went somewhere to some- 
thing or other, good night. They'i! 
never forgive you, and say you did 
it on purpose. The average person, 
I mean. There are exceptions, .>L' 
course. I know a society editor, on 
one occasion, among a long list of 
names furnished, at the last minute, 
badly written, hard to discipher, left 
out the name of a prominent couple 
and didn't get called down at all. Tf 
everybody would only be sensible 
like that, and ralize that editors and 
reporters are only human, and just 
as likely to make mistakes, and for- 
get once in a while, as anybody else, 
life would be lots easier for the news- 
paper writers. Why, even when they 
ta,kc extra pains to write something 
complimentary, they're likely to get 
jumped on just the same. I remem- 
ber one society editor (not in this 
town) who wanted to please a certain 
lady especially, and wrote this about 
her: "Miss Molly Jenkins, a beauti- 
ful and charming voung lady from 



Newtown, is visiting her twin brother, 
John Jenkins, arriving just in time 
to attend the surprise party given 
him by his neighbors in celebration 
of his 55th birthday." And he never 
could understand why she passed him 
on the street without speaking. 1 
guess editors are in just about the 
same boat as preachers. Whatever 
they do, folks don't like it. A Texas 
paper once put it this way about 
ministers: "The preacher has a great 
time. If his hai r is gray, he is old. 
If he is a young man he hans't had 
experience. If he has ten children, 
he has too many; if he has none, he 
isn't setting a good example. If his 
wife sings in the choir, she is pre- 
suming; if she doesn't, she isn't 
interested in ; her husband's work. 
If a preacher reads from notes, he is 
a bore; if he speaks extemporan- 
eously, he isn't deep enough. If he 
stays at home in his study, he doesn't 
mix enough with the people; if he 
is seen around the streets, he ought 
to be at home getting up a good ser- 
mon. If he calls on some poor family 
he is playing to the grandstand; if 
he calls at the home of the wealthy, 
he is an aristocrat. Whatever he 
does some one could have told him 
to do better." 



First Stenog. (reading.) — Think of those Spaniards going three thou- 
sand miles on a galleon! 

Second Stenog. — Aw, forget it. Yuh can't believe all yuh hear about 
them foreign cars. — The American Boy. 



THE UPLIFT 



11 



HY I AM A CHRISTIAN. 



By Dr. J. W. Holland in Progresive Farmer. 



It is difficult to set down the rea- 
sons for one's beliefs. 

No one can perfectly describe the 
inner proofs that he may feel so 
surely. 

First of all, I suppose I am a 
Christian because my parents 'were. 
Do not turn up a nose at that rea- 
son. It is a good one. Family pray- 
ers were a little dry, and I had to go 
to church a little more than I wanted 
to, but the consistent lives of my 
father and mother proved to me that 
Christianity made good people. A 
hundred little doubts have come to 
my mind since I have grown up, but 
the joyful and sacrificing lives of 
my parents were too real to be de- 
nied. 

Parents, you and I are rightly anx- 
ious to give our children a good 
' ' setting out ' ' in life. I feel sure 
that the best gift we can give them 
is the example of consistent lives, and 
the memory of our devotion to re- 
member when we are gone. 

If our children believe in us, they 
will believe in our God. 

A man once said this to me, ' ' You 
are a Christian because your parents 
were, I am not a Christian because 
my parents professed to be and were 
not." 

I am a Christian because of the 
inspiring ideals that Christianity 
brings to young people. Burn down 
all the churches, tear up all the New 



Testaments, and in three generations 
virtue will be a rare jewel. 

I think we fail to see this : that 
the ideals of personal purity, clean 
and high thjinking about life, devo- 
tion to the heroic, all come, in the 
fullest measure from Christianity. 

Christianity appeals to me because 
it condemns meanness and lowness in 
thought and action. Not that Chris- 
tians are perfect. I have met a few 
that said they were, but their hus- 
bands and wives know better. ' ' There 
is about as much human nature in 
one person as another, if not a leetle 
more," said wise old David Harum. 
We are not put here to grow wings, 
but to grow up. Christianity con- 
demns in a man the things that are 
low and imperfect. 

I am a Christian because I have the 
experience of getting strength in 
times of trouble. 1 have never had 
any need for dying Grace, and so 
know nothing about it. I have such 
a time trying to get Grace to live by, 
that I do not think of dying Grace. 

Christianity is the inspiring power 
that is trying to build a better world. 
War, sin, and disease will be ban- 
ished if God gets His way with the 
world. 

The Christian life is the happiest, 
purest, most unselfish, and most 
neigborly way of living I know about, 
so I think I shall try to stick to it. 



' ' Smiles should rightly be called human sunbeams, and a generous sup- 
ply of them can chase dull care away any time." 



12 



THE UPLIFT 



ST. VALENTINE'S NEW BOY. 



(Union Herald.) 



I'M going to send a valentine to 
old Miss Rugg!" 

Elfrida Lee turned her head with 
rn indignant frown towards the tail, 
prosperous-looking boy, lounging 
against one of the pillars at the High 
School door. Comic valentines seem- 
ed to have emerged from a short 
period of oblivion in Byfield, with 
a new lease of vulgarity and silliness. 

' ' You ought to be ashamed of your-, 
self!'' That candid expression of 
opinion was on the very tip of El- 
frida 's tongue, and it was rather a 
wonder that it did not come out ; 
for Elfrida had a jack-in-the-box 
sort of tongue. 

But it was the Axling boy — Theo- 
dore Axling — who had expressed the 
objectionable intention; that fact 
helped her to self-restraint. She 
didn't care to have anything to say- 
to those people. She never had done 
so when they lived just around the 
corner, on Bay Street. Mr. Azling 
was the new mill owner, and people 
had not wanted mills in Byfield, any- 
way; that is the "old" people had 
not. And the Axling dog had made 
her cat's life miserable — they ha 1 
seemed to reform the dog, as he grew 
out of rampageous puppyhood, but 
then you may lie a person who par- 
ticularly dislikes to have dogs chase 
eats! 

Then Mr. Axling, who was rather 
a rough man', and, it wes said, had 
been a. mill boy, himself, had run 
for a town office and beaten her fath- 
er — and they didn't go to her church 
— and so — and so — although there 
was a daughter just her age, Elfrida 



had avoidtd them. She had persuaded 
Arnt Leonora, who had been at the 
head of their household since the 
mother died not to call upon them— 
although Aunt Leonora would have 
liked to do so. 

Elfrida remembered having heard 
that Lucy Axling, the daughter, was 
delicate. She went to Miss Mark- 
ham's private school, where the girls 
were mostly younger than she, and 
where she could not have a very 
good time, decided Elfrida. 

But she had thought very little 
about the Axlings, since they had 
moved from Bay Street, until she. 
heard what that horrid boy said about 
a valentine to old Miss Rugg. It 
was a simply brutal thing, she said 
to herself, to send comic valentines 
to poor and old and lonely people, 
like Miss Penelope Ruggi 

Miss Rugg lived alone, the last of 
a large family, in her dilapidated 
old house on the crest of Crow Hill. 
The wolf had always prowled ground 
the old house; it was she who had 
fought him off — for the sake of the 
others. She said, now, that there 
wasn 't much heart in doing it, just 
for herself, and that people didn't 
care so much for home-made rugs 
as they did once, and the factories 
did all the knitting of stockings. 

There wasn't much left for her to 
do except keep hens and pick berries 
— and it was no wonder if the wolf 
had his nose fairly inside the door. 

No wonder, either, if she was some- 
time cross, as people said, to the boys 
who picked berries in the weeds 
around her house. It was on that 



THE UPLIFT 



13 



aceout that the boys had fallen into 
the habit of teasing her; and hence 
the comic valentine! — thought El- 
frida.. 

"I know just what the valentine 
will be ! " she said to herself, as she 
walked on; "a cross-patch, an old 
maid, a scarecrow" (Miss Penelope 
was tall and gaunt) "hideous color- 
ing', vulgar verses! One may soy 
such things don't maiter, but I 
know Miss Rugg, and I know they'll 
hurt ! It would have done no good vo 
say anything to that dreadful boy, 
but I'll see if I can't intercept the 
valentine before it reaches Penelope 
Rugg! I wish the Axiings had never 
come to Byfield ! " Elfrida was a per- 
son, of strong opinion's, feelings — 
and prejudices! 

She happened to meet Elsie Crock- 
er just as she made that resolve and 
Elsie had an idea in her mind. The 
boys and girls' branch of the Village 
Improvement Society was to meet next 
at Elsie's house, and she proposed 
to make a valentine party of the 
occasion and "have some fun out of 
it, ' ' she said. 

The fun-loving giri was uppermost 
in Elfrida, as Elsie talked of ap- 
propriate decorations, of ice cream 
hearts and jelly turtle doves, and of 
the clever verses that some of the 
boys and girls might be expected to 
write. "We want some really bright 
things — the old saint's name has been 
such a synonym for silliness!" said 
Elsie. 

That seemed delightful and sensible 
to Elfirda and she feii so much en- 
thusiasm that she immediately began 
to compose some verses for the oc- 
casion, and quite forgot Miss Penelope 
Rugg and the threatened valentine, 
until the very morning of St. Valen- 



tine's day! If she had seen the Ax 
ling boy she might have remembered, 
but he was in a lower form, and the 
sight of him very seldom oiien'ede I 
Elfrida 's fastidious eyes. 

She hurritd to the post office, be- 
fore school, on St. Valentine's morn- 
ing, and demanded of the clerk that 
anything that looked like a valentine 
addressed to Mis Rugg, should be de- 
tained and destroyed. "Give it to 
me and I will destroy it I" she said 
fiercely. 

••Can't do that, you know," an- 
swered the astonished clerk. "State's 
prison offence to tamper with the 
mails!' ' 

Elfrida caught her breath. She 
had not regarded the matter in just 
that light! "But people can be ar- 
rested for abusing the mails, can't 
they"? she asktd, irately. 

"I don't know whether comic val- 
entines would be regarded as abuse. 
They're not very serious," said the 
clerk with a grin. 

"They are when they hurt people's 
feelings ! ' ' Elfrida declard forcibly. 
"There's a boy whom I should like 
to have arrested ! ' ' 

That Axling boy was so athletic, 
and easy and prosperous! so cruel to 
animals she was sure, for it was 
more than likely that he had set his 
dog after her cat — and he was so 
heartless, as he showed by the delight- 
ed tone in which he had said that 
he was going to send a valentine to 
old Miss Rugg! 

* * I "11 go up there, this very after- 
noon," she said to herself, "and T '11 
carry her some 'goodies' that I've 
got ready for the valentine party. 
And oh, don't I wish I could get the 
valentine out of her little mail-box 
at the cross roads ! ' ' For there was 



14 



THE UPLIFT 



a t-arrier who made his route on a 
bicycle, around the' outlying distrleis 
of Byfleld, and deposited mail in boxes 
by the wayside. 

Up to Crow Hill she went, in a 
hurry, after school, with a baskel 
full of delectable dainties that had 
been, prepared for the Village im- 
provement Society's party. 

R!'e felt conscience-stricken thai 
she had never before thought of carry. 
i~:~ anything to Miss Rugg — or even 
of going to see her, except once or 
twice when she had been on a sum- 
mer picnic in her vicinity. She did 
not quite know what she meant to do 
now — only to keep Miss Eugg's worn, 
old heart from even a small hurt, if 
she could. 

"Honk! Honk! - ' she heard, as she 
stood shaking Miss Eugg's dilapidated 
little mail-box, a if she might pos- 
sibly shake it open, regardless of the 
terrors of the law. It was an auto- 
mobile, in the distance, coming along 
that very untraveled road too ! 

As it came in sight sue recognized 
:: motor baggage ear, considerably 
the worse for wear, that she knew 
belonged to the mills. "That Axling 
boy" was driving it. and his sister 
was with him, tucked away among 
a lot of barrels and boxes. 

He slowed up the machine at sight 
of Elfrida. The color flamed into 
her cheeks. He stopped deliberately. 
If he dared to speak to her it might 
be an opportunity to give him a 
lesson ! ' ' If — if you are going to 
Miss Rugg' shan't I give you — or 
your basket, anyway — a lift ? he ask- 
ed. "The basket looks heavy." 

"I — I wish I could protect Miss 
fiugg from the insults of heartless 
people!" flamed Elfrida. "You may 



think it a small thing, but I happen 
to know that she's very sensitive- — 
and — oh, won't you try to get it out 
of the box?" 

",0, you mean valentines! Don't 
you be a bit afraid! I told the ras- 
cals I'd punch their heads if they 
sent any ! Not one of them will ! 
Muscle is a good thing sometimes! ' ' 
He flung out an arm evidently made 
for strength, and in good practice. 

An expostulating dog whine came 
to Elfrida. 's bewildered ears, from bt- 
hind the box upon which Lucy Axlir.g 
sat. There was the sleek, brown head 
of the dog that had chased her cat ! 
Elfrida 's suspicions of the Axling 
boy returned in full force at the 
sight. It was easy to pretend to be . 
her ally, now, but she could not be- 
lieve in him ! 

"We made Grif lie down in the 
car because he was bad," explained 
the sister, with a shy smile. "He 
found a wounded bird in the woods; 
you wouldn't think the boys would 
shoot a redpool linnet, would you? — 
and after all Theadore's trying to 
teach them better? Grif didn't want 
to drop it; he isn't a bird dog, you 
know, and he didn't understand. 
"We 've only just cured him entirely 
of cats ! ' ' She looked at Elfrida in a 
deprecating, apologetic way that was 
very disarming — to any one who had 
a heart ! 

' ' I have the bird here in a boy, " ' 
the girl went on, with better cour- 
age, after she had met Elfrida 's look; 
' ' we hope to cure it. Theodore is 
very skillful about such things." 

Elfrida drew near and gazed piti- 
fully at the little red-poll that tried 
to flutter and could not. 



THE UPLIFT 



15 



' ' Won 't you let us take your heavy 
basket, if you won't ride with us?" 
asked Lucy Axling. 

The boy swung the basket up on 
the car and Elfrida, bewildered, 
mounted beside Lucy. As ready and 
fluent as Elfrida was, ordinarily, it 
was now Lucy Axling who talked — 
as became the hostess of the occa- 
sion. 

"I stop here, please," said Elfrida, 
as Miss Rugg's old house came in 
sight. 

"Of course," said the boy with a 
glance at Elfrida 's basket. ' ' So do 
we. ' ' 

Elfrida began to have a glimmer- 
ing sense of what Theodore Axling 's 
valentine might mean. But Miss 
Rugg, who stood in her doorway, 
shading her eyes with her hand, was 
evidently taken by surprise, although 
her seamy old face broadened into 
a welcoming smile at sight of. her 
visitors. "It isn't Thanksgiving and 
it isn't Christmas!" she exclaimed. 

' ' And — and you, too, Miss Lee ! , I 
always hoped it would come about 
that you young people would be 
friends — you 'r so much alike ! ' ' 

"It's St. Valentine's Day," said 
Theodore Axling, somewhat hurried- 
ly; "and I'm the old saint's new 
boy ! He has hired me to help him 
change things round a little, for the 
better ! ' ' 

"I guess he has got hold of the 
right boy ! ' ' said Miss Rugg, heartily. 

Her face darkened a little at the 
mention of Valentine 's Day. ' ' I sup- 
pose the children enjoy their fun, ' ' 
she said, ' ' but I never can bear to 
go near my box on this day, and when 
I have to take them out I tear them 



up and throw them away without 
looking at them? Solitary folks 
get too sensitive, I suppose. ' ' 

"See here! I don't know whether 
you care about this wood ! ' ' Theo- 
dore was lifting a barrel from the 
car. "It's only kindling from the 
mill. I'm coming up to chop you 
some more logs, next week ! ' ' 

' ' He — he is the best boy ! ' ' f ater- 
ed Miss Rugg, to Elfrida. 

The same tact and thoughtfulness 
had been shown in the filling of the 
boxes and baskets; the suggestion of 
St. Valentine 's day had been used 
everywhere to soften the hard guise 
of charity. Elfrida was glad that 
she had brought one of the heart- 
shaped, frosted cakes that had been 
made for the Village Improvement 
party. The young Axlings had 
brought "goodies," also, and they 
had a merry tea, at which Penelope 
Rugg presided, with the memory of 
many small bitternesses of the day 
quite smoothed out of her face. 

" I 'm glad I thought of it, ' ' said 
Theodore, when Miss Rugg and his 
sister had left the room for a min- 
ute. "Shouldn't have if those little 
beggars hadn't been threatening to 
send her comic valentines. So I owe 
them one ! ' ' 

' ' I — I ' owe you one ' ! " said El- 
frida, impetuously. "I shouldn't 
have thought of her if I hadn 't heard 
you say htat you were going to send 
her a valentine ! I — misjudged you ! 
— about your dog and all! I didn't 
wait to find out what sort of a boy 
you really were ! ' ' 

"Go off at half-cock, do you? I'm 
a little that way, myself ! ' ' said Theo- 
dore, lightly. But something' in his 



16 



THE UPLIFT 



voice showed that he had not liked 
to be misunderstood. 

' ' I might never have known you 
or your sister — since you live on the 
other side of tht town'' ' — stammered 
Elfrida, in a tone that recognized the 
loss it would have been to miss their 
acquaintance. 

''Father wanted to live among his 
workmen, so tiiat he could look out 
for them. He has those ideas, you 
know/ 'explained the boy. Ideas of 
looking after his men ! — and Elfrida 
had understood that he only desired 
town ot'lice ! 

Miss Rugg and Lucy returned. 
They had gone only ^o get cotton t" 
put in the bird's box and to give a 
bone to Grif on the porch, who bark- 
ed every time he heard the linnet 
chirp. 

' ' I wish you would join the Boys 
and Girls' Village Improvement So- 
ciety," said Elfrida cordially to 
Lucy. 

"I think you could improve us! — 
you're so — so in earnest!" added El- 
frida impulsively. ' ' There 's to be a 
Tillage Improvement party — a valen- 
tien party, tonight — 1 wish you would 
come as my guest! You would be 



voted into the society — unanimously! 
— when they know — " The girl 
flushed and the brother and sister 
looked at each other doubtfully. It 
was evident that old, aristocratic By- 
field had offered some social slights 
to the family of the new mill own- 
er. 

"I'd love to go to the party!" said 
Lucy, wistfully, with her eyes on her 
brother's face. 

1 • 0, we '11 go — sure ! ' ' said the boy 
heartily. "But perhaps you'd better 
not put up our names for member- 
ship until we get a little acquainted," 
he added, with a touch of dignity 
that diet not sit badly upon his very 
youthful shoulders. "Now, if you 
don't mind the baggage motor, shall 
we take you home 1 ' ' And he led 
the, way to that vehicle. 

Miss Rugg stood in her porch and 
watched them as they w-ent merrily 
off, the great dog capering behind. 
Her house was overflowing with com- 
forts, and her heart with the good 
cheer of friendliness and thoughful 
sympathy. 

"Blessed St. Valentine!" she 
murmured. 



"What became of that portable garage of yours?" 

"I tied the dog to it the other day and a cat came by. — Phoenix. 



WHY MARCH 4 IS INAUGURAL DAY. 



How did it happen that March 4 
was the date selected for the inau- 
guration of the President; of !t.he 
United States? 

It came about that it was in the 
City of New York that the old "Con- 
gress of the Confederacy" held its 



final session. It had led a peripatetic 
life, holding sessions in no less than 
eight different cities and towns, Phila- 
delphia, Baltimore, Lancaster, Pa; 
York, Pa. ; Princeton, N. J. ; Anna- 
polis, Md. ; Trenton, N. J.; and then 
New York, where sessions began in 



THE UPLIFT 



17 



1785. 

During its last session, in July, 
1788, it received official notice that 

the new Constitution, framed by a 
Constitution Convention held at Phi- 
ladelphia, in 1787, had been ratified 
by the necessary number of States, 
and it immediately adopted a reso- 
lution providing that the selection of 
Presidential Electors by the various 
States as provided in the new Con- 
stitution should occur on the "first 
"Wednesday in January, 1789 ; ' ' that 
the electors should cast their votes 
for President on the "first Wed- 
nesday in February," and that the 
President thus elected should be in- 
augurated on the "first Wednesday 
in March." 

And as it happened that the "first 
Wednesday in March, ' ' of that year 
occurred on the fourth day of the 
month, the date for the beginning of 
the Presidential term was thus fixed 
for the historic date, the "Fourth of 
March." And while it happened that 
in the absence of railway, telegraphs, 
long-distance telephones, wireless tele- 
graphy and the radio, George Wilm- 
ington, seated at his comfortable 
home at Mount Vernon, Va., did not 
receive official notice of his elec- 
tion in itme to reach New York by 

* March 4, and was in fact, inaugu- 
rated on April 30, the date fixed for 
the inauguration by the act of the ex- 
piring Congress of the Confederacy, 
March 4, has always been observed as 



the beginning of the Presidential term. 
"Curiously," says the Trade Rec- 
ord of the National City Bank, which 
recalls these incidents, "while the 
new Government with its Congress 
and Chief Executive were thus estab- 
lished in the City of New York, the 
acutal seat of the Government only 
remained here for a comparatively 
short time. All the sections of the 
country, New England, the Middle 
States and South, were respectively 
clamoring for the establishment of 
a permanent capital, and the matter 
was finally settled in favor of the 
South by a compromise by which cer- 
tain Southern members withdrew their 
objections to a bill providing that the 
Government of the United States 
should assume the 26,000,000 of debts 
which the various States had incurred 
during the Revolutionary War, and a 
measure establishing the permanent 
seat of Government ' on the Potomac 
River' was adopted the necessary 
buildings for its occupancy to 
be ready by the year 1800, and the 
sessions of Congress meantime to be 
held in the City of Philadelphia. 

"This establishment in the wild- 
erness of a new seat of Government 
at a point distant from any great 
business centre marked a new era in 
capital making, and is now being fol- 
lowed in Australia where the new 
City of Canberra is being establish- 
ed as the future capital of the com- 
monwealth of Australia." 



Careful Listeners. — "When the eyes are shut the hearing becomes 
more acute," says a medical authority. We have noticed people trying 
this experiment in Church. — London .Opinion. 



18 



THE UPLIFT 



PUBLIC HEALTH WORK AND PRO- 
LONGATION OF LIFE. 



Journal of Public Health. 



In 1911 The City That Was, writ 
ten by Dr. Stephen Smith, the hou- 
ored founder of the American Pub- 
lic Health Association, made the fol- 
lowing statement: 

" " It has been estimated by careful 
writers on vital statistics that 17 in 
1,000 living persons annually die from 
inevitable causes. ' ' In other words, 
a death rate of 17 per 1,000 was con- 
sidered normal, so much so that th'i 
Registrar-General of England in his 
Twelth Annual Report said: "Any 
deaths in a people exceeding 17 in 
1,000 annually are unnatural deaths." 
In 1923 the death rate for the Regis- 
tration Area of tht United States 
was 12.3 per 1,000, while the estimated 
rate of 1924 is only 11.6 per 1,000. 

How rapidly our ideas have chang- 
ed! How quickly have the standards 
of a decade ago been proved to be 
too low! How clear the demonstra- 
tion that life can be saved beyond 
what seemed possible only a few 
years ago ! 

Fiction and romance contain noth- 
ing more marvelous than our accom- 
plishments in saving and prolonging 
life. The figures have often been 
given,but will bear repetition. The 
average length of life in this coun- 
tr has been increased from forty 
years to fifty-eight years in two gene- 
rations, and the rate of increase has 
been more rapid in recent years. Four 
years were added between 1910 and 
1920. The only disappointing, fea- 
ture about this increase in life ex- . 
pectancy is the fact that most of it 



has come through saving infants and 
children under five years of age. Up 
to 1910, and probably up to 1917, 
there was no gain in expectancy of 
life at 50, and for the 60-70 year 
period it was not so good as in an- 
cient times. Reports during the 
past two or three years indicate that 
we are at least beginning to prolong 
life in the middle and later ages, 
whereas formerly the middle life 
death rate was increasing somewhat. 

Infant welfare work, including pre- 
natal as well as post-natal care is 
still the most hopeful as well as the 
most practical and actually success- 
ful line of endeavor looking to the 
increase in longevity. 

Among the other fields in which 
prevention has been markedly success- 
ful tuberculosis must take a high 
place. The death rate has been re- 
duced one-half in twenty-five years, 
and the rate is steadily decreasing. 
Not only has the rate decreased, but 
the age at death of fatal eases has 
advanced six years, a factor of enor- 
mous economic significance. It seems 
likely that by 1930 the death rate 
from tuberculosis will have been re- 
duced to a point below 50 per 100,000. 
Typhi iid fever, which was for many 
years a scourge of our great cities, 
is now a vanishing: disease, a reduc- 
tion of approximately 75 per cent 
having taken place during the past 
twenty-five years. 

The insect-borne diseases are a 
striking example of successful public 
health work. Yellow fever, the 



THE UPLIFT 19 

scourge of tropical America, and a. participated more or less actively, 
frequent visitor of the temperate We are not giving ancient history, 
zones, is another vanishing disease, rather are we recounting facts known 
practically unknown in districts in to all of us, and some of which are 
which it was endemic for many years. so recent that we have scarcely real- 
Malaria gives ground always before ized them. 

the advance of agriculture and drain- While epoch making discoveries 

age. Bubonic plague will never again have pointed the path to successful, 

become pandemic, and outbearks practical accomplishment, education, 

will be limited, as they have been in must be credited with a major share 

New Orleans, San Francisco, and oth- in the results. The public is becoin- 

er American ports, to a few cases. ing educated as to scientific facts, 

This is in no sense a survey of the and is demanding educated physicians 

situation, merely a pointing out of a and health officers. Many newspapers 

few of the most striking results publish regularly reliable scientific 

achieved in the field of prevention information and are seeking more 

during the last few years, in which and more authentic sources for their 

every reader of this Journal has articles. 



"HE DIED FOR ME." 



Sometime after the War Between the States, Henry Ward Beecher 
visited the Soldiers' Cemetery at Nashville. "Here," he says, "I ob- 
served a man planting a flower over a grave. I approached him and 
asked if his son were buried there. 'No.' 'A relative?' 'No.' 'Whose 
memory then do you cherish?' I ventured to ask. After delaying a mo- 
ment, and putting down a small board which he had in his hand, he 
replied, 'Well, I will tell you. When the war broke out I lived in 
Illinois. I wanted to enlist, but I was poor, and a large family of chil- 
dren depended on me for their daily bread. Finally, as the war con- 
tinued, I was drafted. No draft money was given me; I was unable 
to procure a substitute, and made up my mind to go. After I had got 
everything in readiness and was just going to report for duty at the con- 
scription camp, a young man whom I had known came up to me and said, 
'You have a large family which your wife cannot support while you are gone. 
I will go for you.' In the battle of Chickamauga the poor fellow was 
dangerously wounded, and he along with others, was taken back to a 
hospital at Nashville. After a lingering illness he died there.. Ever 
since hearing of his death I have been desirous of coming to Nashville 
and seeing that his body had been properly buried. Having saved suffi- 
cient funds 1 came on yesterday, and here today found the poor fellow's 
grave.' On completing his story the man took up the small board and 
inserted it at the foot of the grave. Turning to look at it, I saw this 
simple inscription, and nothing more: 'He died for me.' " 



20 



THE UPLIFT 



REMARKABLE STUNTS IN DREAMS. 



(Selected) 



While asleep Mrs. Frank M. hi- 
man, of 1060 Peachtree, street balanc- 
ed a bank book that wouldn't come 
right in he r waking hours. 

That experience is the most nn- 
nsual related by prominent Atlanta 
men and women interviewed on the 
subject of dreams. Others are al- 
most as odd. 

Ex-Governor John H. Slaton says 
that he frequently dreams of talking 
with his former law partner, the late 
Luther Z. Rosser, and that they dis- 
cuss whatever comes to mind. 

C. J. Haden, in a dream, was lec- 
tured by a pioneer of 1814 on the com- 
forts enjoyed by the people of todav. 

W. R. C. Smith, dreaming of a feat 
of maz-kmanship, found that he had 
sent a bullet — one of lead and not of 
dreams — into the wall. 

When the question of dreams was 
broached, Mrs. Irunan was genuinely 
surprised. 

"Who told you about my dream?" 
she exclaimed. "This is almost spoo- 
ky as though you had read my mind. 
I've just been downstairs telling a 
friend about this dream that turned 
very much to my advantage." 

In managing household affairs, Mrs. 
Inmau had paid everything by check 
and filed her receipts. All had gone 
beautifully and she was thinking wh&fc 
a good manager she was until the time 
came to balance her bank book. 
"Balanced, While Asleep" 

"I tried for days to do so," she 
said, "but the pesky thing woiild.i't 
balance. My husband refused to 
help me, and there it lay in my draw - 
er, they fly in the ointment. One 



night I went to bed and slept. Around 
5 o 'clock in the morning, while asleep 
I had revealed to me in careful de- 
tail just exactly what to do to balance 
my book. It was as plain as if 1 
were reading it from a page. When I 
awakened shortly afterwards, I got 
up, followed my dream thoughts and 
the result was a. perfectly balanced 
book. Mr. Inman has never stopped 
teasing me about my dream teacher. ' ' 

Ex-Governor John M. Slaton says 
he day dreams almost as much as he 
does at night, ' ' and I like them i - ose- 
coiored, " said he. "A dream, how- 
ever, that comes to me frequently, is 
one in which I am talking to Mr. Lu- 
ther Z. Rosser, my former partner 
who died last year. We seem to take 
up our conversation where it left oil' 
last, and we discuss everything that, 
comes to mind. ' ' 

That dreams do inspire people to 
do great things, according to Gov- 
ernor Slaton, is proven Dy Coleridge's 
famous poem beginning: 
"In Xanadu did Kubla Hhan 

A stately pleasure dome decree, 
Where Alf, the sacred river ran, 
Down into caverns measureless to 
man, 

Down to a sunless sea." 

"Coleridge dreamed his journey to 
these realms of fancy," said he, "and 
on awaking he found he had written 
a masterpiece in his sleep." 

Some dreams are porphetic, par- 
ticularly if you believe in dreams, as 
most of us do who have old-fashioned 
mothers, or mammies. "We used to 
(ell our dreams at breakfast table, 
but after breakfast," said Mrs. B. M. 



THE UPLIFT 



21 



Boykin, ' ' because it was bad luck to 
tell them before. We all dream in 
my family, but 1 have two kinds of 
dreams that spell trouble. One is 
when I dream of a tooth coming 
through, and the other, when a snake 
bites me." 

Brake in a 'Garden 

She then told a vivid dream shy 
had in Chicago last year, while she 
was there promoting and staging a 
play to help the Tallulah Falls school. 
"I retired early," she said, "after a 
busy day, and found myself walking 
in a beautiful garden. At my feet 
I saw a very long, ha.ndsome snake. 
I am not afraid of them, so I picked 
it up, but it coiled around my hand 
and bit me. I flung it oil and began 
sucking the poisonous blood out, Af- 
ter I returned home, 1 learned from a 
very reliable source that a so-called 
friend of mine had written to Chicago 
to the people interested with me in 
putting on the play and had said she 
could not understand why I had been 
sent on this mission, s'-nce I did not 
have the confidence of the people 
here." . 

"I try not to dream, I can't afford 
to," said W. R. C. Smith, president of 
the W. R. C. Smith Publishing com- 
pany, whose experience in dreamland, 
told by him at a recent luncheon of 
the Chamber of Commerce, inspired 
this tale. 

"My dreams are too realistic, and 
take in too much territory," he con- 
tinued. "It's a year's experience 
with me. The dream that I told at 
the luncheon was this. Several years 



ago there was a hold-up of a street 
car at the end of the Ponce de Leon- 
Druid Hills line. I was living at that 
time in a new house in Druid Hills, 
near Moreland avenue. The area had 
not been built up, and we were some- 
what isolated, so the night after the 
hold-up, when I went to bed about 
ten or eleven, I thrust a iosded pistol 
under my pillow. I went to sleep. 
Suddenly, my thoughts turned to 
Montana and my life in the west. I 
remembered how the cowboys used to 
twirl a gun on each forefinger, bring 
it to position and shoot in the twinkle 
of an eye. I had tried to do it many 
times, but never successfully. 

"That night, however, I twirled an a 
twirled, and evidently said aloud ' I've 
got it,' meaning I had mastered the 
feat. The screams of my wife from 
the adjoining room awakened me, and 
she called, "What are you shooting 
at?" 

I then discovered that I had reached 
under the pillow, grabbed the pistol 
and fired it off. The bullet went 
through the mattress, hit the wall, 
and rebounded, coming to a rest un- 
der the bed. Attached to it was a 
bit of cotton batting from the mat- 
tress, and the cotton was afire. This 
dream taught me two things : One, 
that many an innocent man, sleeping 
with a gun under his pillow, has bee n 
wrongly adjudged a. suicide. The 
other, that it is safer to encounter a 
burglar, if you are subject to dreams, 
than to have a loaded revolver too 
handy. ' ' 



Worse. — "Did the speaker electrify his audience?" 
'"Worse buddy, he gassed it." 



THE UPLIFT 



MEAL TIME TWO CENTURIES AGO. 



("Home Life in Colonial Days," Earle,) 



Perhaps no greater difference ex- 
ists between any mode of the olden 
times and that of today than can be 
seen in the manner of serving the 
meals of the family. In the first 
place, the very dining table of the 
colonists was not like our present 
ones; it was a long and narrow board, 
sometimes but three feet wide, with 
no legs attached to it. It was laid 
on supports or trestles, shaped some- 
thing like a saw-horse. Thus it was 
literally a board, and was called a 
table-board, and the linen cover used 
at meals was not called a tablecloth, 
but a boardeloth or boardclothes. 

As smoothly sawed and finished 
boards were not so plentiful at first 
in the colonies as might naturally be 
though when we remember the vast 
encircling forests, all such boards 
were carefully treasured, and used 
many times to avoid sawing others 
by the tedious and wearying process 
of pit-sawing. Hence portions of 
packing boxes, or chests which had 
carried stores from England to the 
colonies, were made into table-boards. 

The old-time boardeloth was in no 
way inferior in quality or whiteness 
to our present table linen, for we 
know how proud colonial wives and 
daughters were of the linen of their 
own spinning, weaving and bleach- 
ing. 

The colonists had plenty of nap- 
kins. They had need of them, for 
when America was first settled, forks 
were almost unkoun to English peo- 
ple — being used for eating in luxuri- 
ous Italy alone, where travelers, hav- 



ing seen and found them useful and 
cleanly, afterwards introduced them 
into England. So hands had to be 
constantly employed for holding food 
instead of the forks we now use, and 
napkins were, therefore, as constant- 
ly necessary. The first fork brought 
to America was for Governor John 
Winthrop, in Boston, in 1633, and it 
was in a leather case with a knife 
and a bodkin. If the governor ate 
with a fork at the table, he was doubt- 
less the only person in the colony who 
did so. Thirty or forty years later a 
few two-tined iron and silver forks 
were brought across the water and 
used in New York and Virginia, as 
well as Massachusetts, and by the 
end of the century they had come into 
scant use at the tables of persons of 
wealth and fashion. The first men- 
tion of a fork in Virginia is in an 
inventory dated 1677; this was of a 
single fork. 

The saltcellar was the centerpiece 
of the table; it was often large and 
high, of curious device in silver. 
Guests of honor were seated "above 
the salt" that is, near the end of 
the table where sat the host and host- 
ess side by side, while children and 
persons who were not of much dig- 
nity or account as guests were placed 
'"below the salt," th^t is, below 
the middle of the table. 

One of the most important articles 
for setting the table was the trench- 
er. These were made of wood, about 
twelve inches square and three or four 
inches deep, hollowed down into a 
sort of bowl in the middle. In this 



THE UPLIFT 



23 



the food was placed — porridge, meat, 
vegetables, etc. Each person did 
not have even one of these simple 
dishes ; usually two children, or a man 
and his wife, ate out of one trench- 
er. This was a custom in England 
for many years, and some very great 
people, a duke and his wife, not 
more than a century and a half ago, 
sat side by side at the table and ate 
out of one plate to show their unity 
and affection. For many years col- 
lege boys at Harvard at out of wood- 
en trenchers at the college mess table. 

Poplar-wood is an even, white and 
shining wood. Until the midle of 
this (nineteenth) century, poplar- 
wood trenchers and plates were used 
on the table in Vermont, and were 
really attractive dishes. From earli- 
est days they made and sold many 
bowls and trenchers of maple-wood 
knots. Bottles were also made of 
wood, and drinking cups and ' ' nog- 
gins, ' ' which were a sort of mug with 
a handle. Wood furnished many 
article for the table to the colonist 
just as it did in later days on our 
Western frontiers, where trenchers 
of wood and plates of birch bark 
were seen in every log cabin. 

The word tankard was originally 
applied to a heavy and large vessel 
of wood banded with metal in which 
to carry water. They were made in 
various sizes and used throughout 
Europe and occasionally were brought 
over by the colonists. The chargers, 
or large round platters found on every 
dining table, were of pewter (tin and 
lead.) Some were so big and heavy 
that the weighed five or six pounds 
apiece. Pewter is not seen any more 
in domestic use, but in colonial times 
a "garnish of pewter," that is, a full 



set of pewter platters, plates and 
dishes, was the pride of every good 
dishes could be recast into new pew- 
ding gift. It was kept as bright and 
shining as silver. One of the duties 
of children was to gather a kind of 
horse-tail rush which grew in the 
marshes, and because it was used 
to scour pewter, was called scour- 
ing-rush. 

Porringers of pewter, and occasion- 
ally of silver, were much used at the 
(able, chiefly for children to eat from. 
Some had a "fish-tail'' handle; these 
are said to be Dutch. 

"Spoons, if not as old as the world, 
are as old as soup. ' ' All the colonists 
had spoons, and certainly all needed 
them, for at that time much of their 
food was in the form of soup and 
"spoon-meat' 'such as had to be 
eaten with spoons where there were 
no forks. Meat was usually made 
into hashes , thick stews and soups 
with chopped vegetables and meats 
were common, as were hotch-pots. 
The cereal foods were more frequent- 
ly boiled in porridge than baked in 
loaves. Many of the spoons were of 
pewter. Worn-out pewter plates and 
dishes could be recost into new pew- 
ter spoons. The molds were of wood 
or iron. Wooden spoons were always 
seen. In Pennsylvania and New York 
laurel was called spoon wood, be- 
cause the Indians made pretty white 
spoons from that wood to sell to the 
colonists. Horn was an appropriate 
and available material for spoons. 

Every family of any considerable 
possessions or owning good household 
furnishings had a few silver spoons; 
nearly every person owned at least 
one. Families of consequence usually 
had a few pieces of silver besides 



24 



THE UPLIFT 



their spoons and saltcellar. Virgi- 
nians and Marylanders in the seven- 
teenth century had much more silver 
than New Englanders. Some Dutch 
merchants had ample amounts. It 
was deemed a good and safe invest- 
ment for spare money. 

There was a great desire for glass, 
a rare novelty to many persons at 
the date of colonization. The English 
were less familiar with its use than 
settlers who came from Continental 
Europe. The establishment of glass 
factories was attempted in early days 
in several places, chiefly to manufac- 
ture sheet glass, but with slight suc- 
cess. The earliest glass for table 
use was greenish in color, like coarse 
bottle glass, and poor in quality. 
Blissfully ignorant of the existence 
or presence of microbes, germs and 
bacteria, our sturdy and unsqueamish 
forebears drank contentedly in suc- 
cession from a single vessel, which 
was passed from hand to hand, and 
lip to lip, around the board. At col- 
lege tables, and even at tavern boards, 
where table neighbors might be 
.strangers, the flowing bowl and foam- 
ing tankard was passed serenely from 
one to another, and replenished to 
pass again. 

Leather was perhaps the most curi- 
ous material used. Pitchers, bottles 
and drinking cups were made of it. 
Great jugs of heavy black leather, 
waxed and bound, and tipped with 
silver, were used to hold ale and beer ; 
they were commonly called black- 
jacks. Drinking cups were sometimes 
made of horn. Gourds were plenti- 
ful on the farm and gathered with 
care, that the hard-shelled fruit might 
be shaped into simple drinking cups. 
The ships that brought lemons and 



raisins from the tropics to the col- 
onies also brought cocoanuts. The 
shell of the cocoanut was a favorite 
drinking cup among the settlers! 

Popular drinking mugs of the Eng- 
lish, from which they drank their 
mead and ale, were the stoneware 
jugs which were made in Germany 
and England in great numbers. There 
was no china in common use on the 
table either in England or in Amer- 
ica. The Dutch settlers had ' ' purslin 
cups" and earthern dishes in con- 
siderable quantities toward the end of 
the seventeenth century. 

The earthen was possibly Delft 
ware, and the "Purslin" East India 
china, which, by that time was large- 
ly imported to Holland. It was not 
until Revolutionary times that china 
was a common table furnishing; then 
it began to crowd out pewter. The 
sudden and enormous growth of East 
India commerce, and the vast cargoes 
of Chinese pottery and porcelain to 
every housewife. In the Southern 
colonies beautiful pieces of porcelain 
were found in the homes of opulent 
planters, but there, as in the North, 
the first chine for general table use 
were the handleless tea cups, which 
crept with the fragrant herb into 
every woman's heart — both welcome 
Oriential waifs. 

It may well be imagined that this 
long narrow table — with a high salt- 
cellar in the middle, with clumsy 
wooden trenchers for plates, with 
round pewter platters heaped high 
with the stew of meat and vegetables, 
with a can of pewter, or a silver 
tankard to drink from, with leather 
jacks to hold beer or milk, with many 
wooden or pewter or some silver 
spoons, but no forks, no glass, no 



THE UPLIFT 



25 



china, no covered dishes, no saucers — 
did not look much like our dinner 
tables today. 

Even the seats were different ; there 
were seldom chairs or stools for each 
person. A long narrow bench with- 
out a back, called a foim, was placed 
on each side of the table. Children 
in many households were not allowed 
to sit even on these uncomfortable 
forms while eating. In some families 
children stood behind their parents 
and other grown persons, and food 
was handed back to them from the 
table. In other houses they stood at 
a side table, and, trencher in hand, 
ran over to the great table to be 
helped to more food when their sup- 
ply was eaten. They were to eat in 
silence, as fast as possible (regard- 
less of indigestion,) and leave the 
table as speedily as might be. 

When the table-board was set with 
snowy linen cloth and napkins, and 
ample fare, it had some compensa- 
tions for what modern luxuries it 
lacked. There was nothing perish- 
ablye in its entire furnishings ; no 
frail and costly china or glass whose 
injury and destruction by clumsy or 
heedless servants would make the 
heeart of the housewife ache; there 
was a little of intrinsic value to watch 
and guard and worry about. There 
was little to make extra and difficult 
work — no glass to wash with anxious 
care, no elaborate silver to clean — 
only a few pieces of pewter to polish 
occasionally. It was all so easy and 
so simple when compared with the 



complex serving of meals today that 
it was like Arcadian simplicity. 

There were few State dinners serv- 
ed in the American colonies, even in 
the larger cities ; there were few din- 
ners, even, of many courses; not al- 
ways were there many dishes. There 
were seen in many houses more pri- 
mitive forms of serving and eating 
meals than were indicated by the 
lack of individual drinking cups, the 
mutual use of a trencher, or even the 
utilization of the table top as a 
plate. In some homes an abundant 
dish, such as a vast bowl of mush 
and milk, a pumpkin stewed whole 
in its shell, or a savory and mam- 
moth hotchpot was set, often smoking 
hot, on the table-board, and from 
this well-filled receptacle each hun- 
gry soul, armed with a long-handled 
pewter or wooden spoon, helped him- 
self, sometimes ladling his great 
spoonfulls into a trencher or bowl, for 
more moderate and reserved after- 
consumption — just as frequently eat- 
ing directly from the bountful dish 
with a spoon that come and went from 
dish to mouth without reproach or 
thought of ill manners. The reports 
of old settlers often recall the general 
' ' Dutch ' ' dish, and some very dis- 
tinguished persons joined in the cir- 
cle around it and were glad to get it. 
Variety was of little account com- 
pared to quantity and quality. A 
cheerful hospitality and grateful 
hea s filled the hollow place of for- 
mality and elegance. 



It is better to have a schedule and be la! now and then, than to have 
no schedule and never get anywhere. — Forw -d. 



so 



THE UPLIFT 



MODERN SHYLOCKS. 



(News & Observer.) 



About the most depicable man alive 
is the one who takes advantage of 
the necessitous to fleece them when 
making loans. The Bible has fey 
anathemas so severe as those against 
usurers. Money lenders who extort 
exorbitant demands should read their 
Bible and desist before securing the 
condemnation promised. In the 
Goklsboro News John Herndon tells 
this story of the meanest man in 
Wayne county. 

Douglas Sasser, a good-natured, 
hard-working colored man of family, 
is happy. He has just been released 
from the clutches of a modern Shy- 
lock, who was charging him interest 
at the rate of 500 per cent per annum 
on a loan of +20. 

It's the usual story. The furni- 
ture dealer was pushing him for a 
long overdue payment on his house- 
hold goods. Foreclosure was threat- 
ened, and after making a vain effort 
to find someone whose endorsement 
would secure him a loan from the 
bank, he went to a money lender 
as a last resort. "Yes," said the 
money lender after the application 
had been duly made, "I will let you 
have $20 so long as you pay me $2 
a week interest. ' ' Douglas needed 
that money too badly to haggle. He 



readily agreed to signing a mortgage 
on the furniture, already sufficiently 
plastered — a fact that he did not re- 
veal to the money lender, nor was 
that gentleman particularly inquisi- 
tive on this point — and signed up an 
agreement to pay .$101 a year for 
the loan, or until such time he found 
it possible to raise $20 at one time — 
a rather impossible feat to a man who 
earns but $12 per week and has a 
family to support. 

A Goklsboro lawyer, "righteously 
indignant ' ' when he learned of the 
usurious rate, signed the note for 
the colored man and enabled him to 
borow the money at the legal rate of 
interest. He was a good Samaritan. 
Are there not good Samaritans else- 
where who will relieve the victims 
of such extortion? Better still, are 
there not officers of the law who will 
punish men guilty of this indefensible 
crime against those in distress? The 
law is plain that 6 per cent is the 
legal rate. Every man who charges 
more is a lawbreaker. The practice 
should be broken up. 

Wanted : Portions on the bench who 
will give the modern Shylocks the 
medicine that the original Portia gave 
to the original Shylock. 



Captain. — If anything moves, shoot! 

Sentry. — Yessah; an' if anything shoots, Ah move. — The American 
Boy. 



THE UPLIFT 27 

A BOY'S ALARM CLOCK. 

It's something that isn't wound up with a key, 

As many larm clocks are; 
It is not to be seen en a table or shelf, 

And its ring is not sounded afar. 
And only one hears it and that is the boy, 

Who owns this alarm clock true — 
It cannot be bought and it cannot be sold, 

And it cannot be given to you. 
It's a delicate piece of machinery, too, 

Which never should suffer abuse; 
If it should (in time, and it wouldn't take long,) 

'Twould gradually get out of use. 
And what's the alarm clock of which I now tell, 

That isn't wound up with a key? 
It's that which says, "Don't!" when one starts to do wrong, — 

Why, it's a boy's conscience, you see! 

— Adelbert F. Caldwell. 



CAUSE AND EFFECT. 



Dr. Moffat, a missionary to Africa, relates the following incident, 
which happened to himself and companions near a native village on one 
of their journeys: "We had traveled far and were hungry and thirsty 
and fatigued. We asked for water, but they would not supply it. I 
offered three or four buttons that still remained on my jacket for a 
little milk. This also was refused. We had the prospect of another 
hungry and thirsty night. When twilight drew nigh, a woman approached 
from the height beyond which the village lay. She bore on her head 
a bundle of wood and had a vessel of milk in her hand. She laid them 
down and returned to the village. A second time she approached 
with other and larger supplies. We asked her again and again who she 
was. She remained silent till affectionately entreated to give us a rea- 
son for such unlooked-for kindness to strangers. The solitary tear stole 
down her sable chesk when she replied: "I love Him whose servants ye 
are, and surely it is my duty to give you a cup of cold water in His 
name. My heart is full; therefore I cannot speai the joy I feel to see 
you in this out-of-the-world place.' I asked her how she kept the life 
of God in her soul in the absence of all communion with saints. Sae 
drew from her bosom a copy of the Dutch New Testament she had 
received in school some years before. 'This' she said, 'is the fountain 
where I drink; this is the oil which makes my lamp burn.' " 



28 



THE UPLIFT 



INSTITUTION NOTES. 



J. J. Jones, Jr. 



Peanuts were distributed amor.,; 
the hoys at the ball ground last Sat- 
urdpv. 



Ned Morris, a member of the 
ninth cottage, was paroled last week. 



The barn boys have been busy 
during the past week, hauling wood 
and coal. 



The boys all took a pleasure in 
writing a letter home to their par- 
ents last week. 



Doy Hagwood, Herbert Poteat, 
and Reggie Payne have been placed 
in the laundry. 



The morning school sections had a 
fine time at the ball ground last Fri- 
day sliding on the ice. 



Mr. Corzine, the night watchman' 
on the upper eiid, has resumed his 
duties ».t the school, after a long 
sickness. 



We now have twelve cottages in 
use, two awaiting opening. Tin.; 
makes a total of fourteen cottages 
with more to come. 



Readers of this issue of THE UP- 
LIFT will notice again a large Honor 
Roll, which shows that the boys hiv 
keeping up the good work in tb«! 
school room. 



The J. T. S. Basket ball team 
met their defeat last Saturday, when 
the Rocky River five defeated them 
easily. 



Mr. J. T. Bostick, one of the night 
watchmen, has left the institution to 
work in Sanford. Mr. Tom Carricker 
has been given the job. 



Mr. and Mrs. Paul Cloer have re- 
signed their duties at the institution. 
Mr. and Mrs. Carricker have taken 
their places as officer and matron in 
the fifth cottage. 



Mr. J. M. Day, one of the third 
cottage officers, has returned to the 
institution after spending a few 
weeks with his wife in Asheville. 



The sermon in the auditorium last 
Sunday by Rev. W. C. Lyerly, of 
the Reform church, Concord, was 
enjoyed by everyone. 



Last Tuesday morning when the 
boys asssembled at the tree ProL 
W. W. Johnson read out the boys 
to be promoted to higher grades. 
This promotion has been- delayed for 
a long time and the boys are glad lo 
be promoted. 



This is wlipt you might call a 
' ' Ford ' school, for at the present 
time no less than ten Fords are 
possessd by various officers and 
employees. And this gives many 



THE UPLIFT 



29 



of the boys who are mechanically in- 
clined a chance to show their abili- 
ties, for more than frequently, end 



as is usual, these Fords get out of fix. 
The best workers so far are Garnie 
Hawks and James Torrenee. 



HONOR ROLL. 



Room No. 1 
"A" 

Percy Briley, John Keenan, Smiley 
Morrow, Louie Pate, Fleming Floyd, 
James Slither, Herbert Apple, James 
Davis, Elwin Greene, Roby MulUes, 
George Howard, Lexie Newnam, Au- 
brey Weaver, Jessie Walls. 
"B" 

Haskel Ayers, Walter Cumins, 
Olive Davis, ( )ler Griffin, Valton Lee, 
Argo Page, Whitlock Pridgen, Willie 
Smith, Theodore Wallact, Hurley- 
Way, William Case. Everett Good- 
rich, William Miller, James 'Quinn, 
Washington Pickett, Vaughin Smith, 
Clint Wright, Vestal Yarborough. 
Room No. 3 
"A" 

Carlton Hegar, Rhodes Lewis, W: 1- 
ter Evers, Walter Hildrelh, Adam 
Beck, Calvin Forbish, John B. Har- 
grove, Solomon Thompson, Russeli 
Capps, Albert Buck Biil Rising, Sam 
Poplin, Alton Ethridge, Walter Wil- 
liams, Doughlos Williams, Cliften 
Hedrick, Edwin Crenshaw, Wirrou 
Terry, Leary Carlton. 

"B" 

Connie Loman, William Beard, 
Alton Piner, John Haggari, Buford 
Carter, Lester Morris, James Poplin. 
Garland Rice. 

Room No. 2 
"A" 
Garnie Hawks. Albert Jarm-.;i), 



Howard Keller, Dick Pettipher, 
Brantley Pridgen, Karry Stevens, 
Herbert Poteet, Carl Teagueagi'e, 
Luke Patterson, Abraham Goodman, 
Albert Johnson, Albert Martin, Roy 
Rector, Dalmas Roberson, Herbert 
Pottat, Carl league. 

"B'" 
Zeb Trexlar, ' Graham York, Frame 
Stone, Bill Odom, William Nichols, 
Halite Mathews, John Kemp, Chas. 
Jackson, William Kerndon, Broachie 
Flowers, Judge Brooks, Claren.o 
Anderson. William Creasman, Roy 
Johnson, Homer- Montgomery, Robt. 
McDaniel, James Caviness, James 
Ford. 

Rccm No. 5 

"A" 

Lattie McClamb, Andrew Parker, 
Claude Wilson, Charlie Beaver, Earl 
Edwards, Robert Sprinkle, Theodor 
Coleman, Al Pettigrew, Lester Frank- 
iin, Wilbert Racklty, Tessit Massy, 
Albert Stanburg, Howard Riddle, El- 
don Ha.irt, Earl Maylield, Doffus Wil- 
liams, Douglass William, Cliften 
Glinn Taylor, Van Dowd, Eugene 
Keller, Robert Sisk, Walter Culler, 
Otis Floyd, John Tomisian, Larry 
Griffith Woodrow Kivitl, Broncho 
Owens, Elmer Proctor, William Woffi- 
ord Claud Stanley, Andrew Bivhis 
Eugene Glass Lee Wright, John Hill, 
John AYatts, Berti Murry, Garland 
Ryals, George Lewis, Elias Warren 
Turner Preddy, George Cox, Ciarnre 



30 



THE UPLIFT 



Weathers, Frank Ledford, Bowling 
Bvrd, Lester Love, Raph Gover, Col- 
umbus McGee, Jesse Hprry, Claude 
Dunn. 

"B" 
Samuel DeVon, James Cook, David 
Whitaker, John Gray, Earl Green 
Dewey Blackburn, Burton 'Emerr, 
Lyonel Mac-Mahan, Claud Stanley, 
Roy Hansen James Robertson Earl 
Torrenee James Long Robert Munday 
Elmer Mooney Tom Tedder Kellie 
Tedder Ben Cameron, Willie Shaw, 
Lee King, Wannie Frankj Myron 
Tomision. 

Room No. i 
"A" 
Glem Walter, Russell Caudill, Jes ;e 
Hannell, Lemuel Lant, Charles Car- 
ter, Clvde Lovett. Hill Ellington, 



Clyde Smith, McCoy Smith, Simon 
Wade, Pearson Hunsucktr, Charles 
Sherrill, Ceburn MeConnell, Brevard 
MeLendon, Junious Matthews, Ned 
Morris. John Kivttt, Forman Wishon, 
Harold Thompson, Jay Lambert, Ced- 
ric Bass, Vernon Hall, Vance Cook, 
Clinto H Floyd, James Bedingfield. 
"B" 
Fred Gray, Luthtr Mason, James 
McCoy, Ed Moses, Lonnie Lewis, 
Hunttr Cline, Delmas Stanley, Thnr- 
man Baker, Rudalph Watts, Car] 
Richards, Jess Hurley, Emis Harper, 
David Queen, Clydde Brown, Jeff 
Blizzard, Sam Smith, John Creech, 
Byron Ford, Troy Norris, Britt Gat- 
lin, Paul Edwards, Harold Crary, 
James Ivev. 



The automobile has been termed "the implement of the devil" and, 
also, "the chariot of Jehovah. ".. It may he either, or both, or neither. 
That depends altogether upon its owner and driver. There is no such 
thing as a "tainted" auto, just as there is no such thing as "tainted 
money." The automobile is onl. an instrument that men use in the 
service, of God and humanity or in the service of the devil. The 
Mettcdist circuit rider has become a Methodist Ford driver, hut the 
change has only increased his speed and efficiency. The little one-room 
school house with one little overworked teacher, has been exchanged for 
a finely equipped graded school with a teaching force in keeping with 
its material equipment, while high powered auto husses carry the chil- 
dren to school in the morning and home again :n the evening. The auto 
is responsible for the new country school thrt we have and the new 
country church that we are gohij; to have. The big ideas is to make 
it, whether a Ford or a Pie-rc^ Arrow, a "chari.ot of Jehovah." — Greens- 
boro Advocate. 



RAILROAD SCHEDULE 
Northbound 



No. 


136 


To 


Washington 


5:00 A. 


M. 


No. 


36 


To 


Washington 


10:25 A. 


M. 


No. 


46 


To 


Danville 


3:15 P. 


M. 


No. 


12 


To 


Richmond 


7:25 P. 


M. 


No. 


32 


To 


Washington 


8:28 P. 


M. 


No. 


38 


To 


Washington 


9:30 P. 


M. 


No. 


30 


To 


Washington 
Southbound 


1:40 A. 


M. 


No. 


45 


To 


Charlotte 


4:14 P. 


M. 


No. 


35 


To 


Atlanta 


10:06 P. 


M. 


No. 


29 


To 


Atlanta 


2:45 A. 


M. 


No. 


31 


To 


Augusta 


6:07 A. 


M. 


No. 


33 


To 


New Orleans 


8:27 A. 


M. 


No. 


11 


To 


Charlotte 


9:05 A. 


M. 


No. 


135 


To 


Atlanta 


9:15 P. 


M. 



THE SOUTHERN SERVES THE SOUTH 




Carolina Collection 



THE U r^CT. 



FT 



VOL. XIII CONCORD, N. C, FEBRUARY li, 1925 No. 12 



■♦J************* ****** *♦**+* ^^4* *♦**♦* *♦* *+* *** *******+**** *♦* *♦* *♦* *♦* *♦* *** *♦* ****** *♦* *♦* ****** **-» ♦$• *J» *J» *J* *J+ >*♦>!♦ 

*> *t* 

I THE NOBILITY OF LABOR. | 

*+* *** 

♦ * 

♦ I make the grain grow in the fields. I burrow into £* 

♦ the earth and bring forth its buried treasures, cen- * 
**« *j» 
♦> turies old. I turn the wheels of mills and factor- ♦> 

% ies. I speed the thundering trains, the ships on the !> 

|* seven seas, and the airplanes in the sky. All this ^ 

♦ I do that man may live in comfort. For I am * 
*** *i* 

♦ the god of Progress: * 

% I am WORK. $ 

'****♦* ****** *♦■• *+*****♦**♦**♦* *$» *** ********* *$* *$*■ *J* ■•$•■ ♦$*■*$»*$♦■■•$* ■*$* ■•$* *J* *$* *$* *$* ^* "*5* •J* *$•■ *$* *$* *$*■*$* *5* ^* *$* ■*$*'•$*' 



-PUBLISHED BY- 



THE PRINTING CLASS OF THE STONEWALL JACKSON MANUAL 
TRAINING AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



J. P. Cook, Chairman, Concord 
Miss Easdale Shaw, Vice-Chairman 

Rockingham 
Jno. J. Blair, Sec, Raleigh 
D. B. Coltrane, Treds., Concord 
J. S. Effird, Albemarle 
Mr. Chas. A. Cannon, Concord 
Rev. Tom P. Jimison, Spencer 



Mrs. G. T. Roth, Elkin 

Herman Cone, Greensboro 

Mrs. Cameron Morrison, Charlotte 

Mrs. A. L. Coble, Stateville 

Mrs. T. W. Bickett, Raleigh 

Mrs. W. N. Reynolds, Winston-Salem 

Mrs. I. W. Faison, Charlotte 

Mr. Paul C. Whitlock, Charlotte 



Mrs. W. H. S. Burgwyn, Honorary Member 
Chas. E. Soger, Supt. 



CONTENTS. 



EDITORIAL COMMENT 3-8 

RAMBLING AROUND Old Hurrygraph 9 

DARE COUNTY— SCENE OF MODERN MIRACLES 

Ben Dixon MacNeill 12 

THE TWO NOBLES Remi Drum 16 

HOW THINGS LOOK R. F. Beasley 21 

WE READ THE BIBLE 23 

ST. AUGUSTINE, THE ANCIENT CITY Antonio J. Stemple 26 

EDUCATED CRIMINALS The Lutheran 28 

INSTITUTION NOTES J. J. Jones, Jr. 30 



The Uplift 



A WEEKLY JOURNAL 

PUBLISHED BY 

The Authority of the Stonewall Jackson Manual Training and Industrial 
School. Type-setting by the Boys Printing Class. Subscription 

Two Dollars the Year in Advance 

JAMES P. COOK, Editor, J. C. FISHER, Director Printing Department 

Entered as second-class matter Dec. 4, 1920 at the Post Office at Concord, 
N. C. under act of March 3, 1879. Acceptance for mailing at special rate 
of 4, 1923. 



WHAT A TRIBUTE! 

My first debt to my father is the one I owe for having been brought into 
the world bearing an old and an honorable name 

When I say an "honorable"' name, in the case of my father, I mean 
a name that never was touched by any faintest breath of scandal of any 
kind. I mean the name of a man who was outstanding- in his day and state. 
I mean a name which stood * ;:• love in his family, for recognition of and 
fidelity to manifest duty, for kindly consideration of his neighbors, for in- 
telligent participation in affairs tending toward the betterment of the 
neighborhood, of the state, and of the nation. — Gene Stratton-Porter. 

RECORDS OF INSPIRATION. 

Mr. Drum, of the Cleveland Star, has picked out two of Shelby's conspicuous 
citizens, and about them he has written an engaging story of achievement. 
We are passing along Drum's story, for the subjects of it are among the 
state's finest products and their lives and records are an inspiration to the 
young who face life and a pride to us who love to look upon choice spirits. 

So far as we know we have no case in their courts, never have bad, and 
by the eternals we hope never to encounter such a situation, so we cannot 
refrain from a little comment. Judge Jas. L. Webb, who graces the North 



4 THE UPLIFT 

Carolina Superior Court bench, is physically the larger — in fact his brother 
Judge E. Yates Webb, of the U. S. Court, while physically a large man, 
by the side of his brother looks the part of a boy. Drum 's story would have 
been much more effective and pleasant to the thousands of admirers of these 
splendid citizens if he had accompanied it with the pictures of the two 
judges standing side by side. 

Intellectually, they are both very pronounced ; there is a charm about 
their personality; their lives are objects of cleanliness and high purpose; 
and with all their records of achievements, popularity, and honors they 
have all these years remained very folksy — that tells a great story. 

Any community that claims such outstanding, tine fellows among its 
citizenship has reasons for feeling proud — and they are not all : Max Gard- 
ner, Clyde Hoey, B. T. Falls and scores of others attest the high-moral health 
and prominence of Shelby, which at this itme, having outgrown its boundaries, 
is a-courting of the surroundings to come in and be happy along with 

her. 

* * * * » * * * 

UP FROM A SLAVE HUT. 

Margaret R. Seebach, a scholarly woman of Ohio, lias written a book dedi- 
cated to missions and an aid to missionary workers, home and abroad. 
This book, entitled "Land of All Nations," tells the story of Moses 
Carver, a thorough-bred negro — not a mixture of different bloods as in the 
case of Booker Washington and other negroes who made their marks in the 
world. 

We started out to adapt this story to meet the space we have to give to it, 
because it is the account of what we regard a marvelous achievement and 
points the way to a better understanding of the possibilities in a less favor- 
ed race. At this juncture of our endeavor, we ran across an editorial in the 
Greensboro Christian Advocate, which we appropriate. 

Editor Plyler will pardon us for taking the liberty of making one change 
in his clever notice of this remarkable negro — we have taken the liberty 
of eliminating the words, "Civil War" and given to that terrible struggle 
its historically correct name. The good brother, we are sure, will not 
object. For the sake of brevity many fine scholars and great, good men 
drop into the habit of calling "The War Between the States" by the 
title of the "Civil War." 

Here is what The Advocate had to say editorially about Moses Carver : 
Prof. George Washington Carver, famous negro chemist of Tuskegee 



THE UPLIFT i 

Institute, Tuskegee, Ala., has been lecturing recently in North Carolina. 
Among other places, he filled engagements at the University of North 
Carolina and at the North Carolina College for Women. We heard him 
at North Carolina College, where he spoke and exhibited 118 different . 
products which he had made from the sweet potato. Approximately 
700 young women of the college gathered to hear him, notwithstanding 
it was in the midst of the winter examinations. 

Prof. Carver showed to the young women of the college a great number 
of things made from the potato. In tin containers he had samples of 
stock food, several kinds of paint, coffee, several kinds of flour, break- 
fast foods, meal, mock cocoanut concoction for making pies, instant 
tapioca, chocolate bonbons, corn starch, substitute, after dinner mints, 
flavoring, chocolate compound, yeast, orange drops, molasses, caramel, 
ginger, vinegar, rubber compound and many other things just as interest- 
ing and useful. 

This wizard in the field of productive chemistry, has a life history 
equal to the wildest dreams of romance. He was born of slave parents 
on a farm near Diamond Grove, Mo., about 1864. In infancy he lost his 
father and several years later he and his mother were stolen and carried 
into Arkansas. The little boy had such a severe case of whooping cough 
that the thieves left him on the way not expecting him to live, but 
the mother was carried on and never heard of again. When the former 
owner of the parents heard of what had happened to the mother and 
boy, he sent messengers to recover them and bring them back. The 
boy was found and recovered in exchange for a race horse valued at $300. 
He returned to his former home in Missouri, where he remained till 
a good sized boy when he began the struggles for an education by working 
his way through high school in Minneapolis, Kans., and later through 
college in the Iowa State College of Agriculture and Mechanical Arts. 
After his graduation in 1894, he was elected professor of his alma 
mater and placed in charge of the greenhouse, devoting special attention 
to bacterial laboratory work in systematic botany. In 1890' Booker 
Washington secured him as a teacher in Tuskeege Institute, where he has 
been these 29 years. He now devotes his entire time to the department 
of research, except he teaches on Bible class. 

This plain, unpretentious genius who appears to be as unmindful of him- 
self and of the world about him as a hard working negro ' ' field hand ' ' 
who makes his living hoeing and digging sweet potatoes, and withal as 
religious, is a member of the Royal Society of Arts, London, and his 
work is the admiration and wonder of the scientific world. 
The head of the department of science in North Carolina College began 
his brief speech of introduction by saying: "We are highly honored this 
evening in having with us one of the world's most renowned chemists." 
It is a long way from the pinnacle of fame in the scientific world to a 



! THE UPLIFT 

slave hut in the last days of the War Between the States. But one life 
of 60 years, and that of a negro, extends from the one extreme to the 
other in human experience. 

CAVE CITY AND FLOYD COLLINS. 

Cave City, Ky., and its now most conspicuous citizen, Floyd Collins, are 
coming in for unusual notoriety. The story that pictures this young fellow 
having failed to crawl out of the opening in a cave, through which he is 
alleged to have entered, is most thrilling. They say that a stone or a 
slide has caught him by one foot and holds him fast. In this condition he has 
been imprisoned for days. 

There have been some conflicting accounts, to such an extent that a rumor 
has gained circulation that the whole affair is a fake. The military authori- 
ties of Kentucky, jealous of the state's good reputation, threatens to 
make an official investigation into the verity of the case. If Floyd Collins 
does exist in the flesh and is caught in the terrible condition alleged, we 
pray he may survive the time the faithful rescuers can reach him. 

There is, nevertheless, a great moral attending this story: one may get 
into a trouble with more ease than he can extricate himself, either morally 
or physically. 

************ 

VIRGINIA AND NORTH CAROLINA ROADS. 

Gov. Trinkle, of Virginia, in making his statement to the effect that Vir- 
ginia had a greater mileage of hard-surface roads than North Carolina; 
and that his state owed just $7,500,000 while North Carolina owed .$65,000,000, 
no doubt tickled some of his constituency. But this superiority cannot be 
charged to any progxessiveness on the part of Gov. Trinkle, who, if no 
presides over such a mileage of good roads, must have inherited them. 

The News & Observer quotes Chairman Frank Page, of the North Carolina 
Highway commission, as follows: 

'"I wrote my friend Shirley that if he had all those roads why didn't 

he put them out on the ground where folks could use them," said Frank 

Page, state highway commissioner, yesterday referring to a statement 

made by Governor E. Lee Trinkle that Virginia has 1,753 miles of hard 

surface roads to North Carolina 's 1,692. 

Governor Trinkle based his statement on figures prepared by the 

North Carolina Highway Commission and H. G. Shirley, chairman of the 



THE UPLIFT 

Virginia Highway Commission. 

"I haven 't anything to say about Virginia roads," Mr. Page said, "I 
try to know everything I can about North Carolina roads, but I don't 
know about the roads in Virginia. ' ' 

' ' I imagine that we 've torn up better roads in North Carolina than 
some of these Virginia roads, ' ' he declared. 

Governor Trinkle in his statement said that in fairness to the people 
of both States it should be remembered that North Carolina owes $05,- 
000,000 for its roads, while Virginia owes approximately $7,500;000, but 
that_ practically all of the North Carolina mileage was of modern con- 
struction whereas a good per centage of Virginia's is of ancient type. 
Some of the Virginia roads were built before the War Between the 
States. 

Actually Governor Trinkle 's figures on North Carolina is too high. The 
State's total is 1,660 miles including every finished mile, some on projects 
which have not yet been completely opened to traffic. The State's total 
including' only finished projects is only 1,338 miles, which includes 1,012 
miles paid for by the State, 54 built by Federal aid and 172 miles 
built by the counties and taken over upon the establishment of the 
State Highway Commission. 



DEFEAT LOOKS PROMISING. 

The amendment that proposes to put the control of work by youths under 
eighteen years of age in the direction of Congress seems happily riding to 
defeat. It is the sorriest piece of legislation offered to the country in a 
century. 

Pamper a boy, and keep him ignorant of the blessings of work, and 
deprive him of a development that reasonable occupation always affords, you 
are preventing him from reaehing manhood prepared for the serious duties 
of life. There are ten youths ruined by idleness where one suffered by having 
to do service. The proposition is not even an old-granny thing — it is a down- 
right absurdity and a design against capable young men of tomorrow. 

Teach the boys to work and not so much play is a fine prescription to pro- 
duce useful and capable men. 

****** ** 

DIVORCE. 

Instead of making divorces easier, it would be wiser to make it impossible 
except on biblical grounds. The state press is cognizant of the forceful 
remarks of Representative Julia Alexander, of Mecklenburg county, speaking 



8 THE UPLIFT 

against a bill that made two years' separation a reason for divorce. 

State Senator Johnson, of Robeson, has offered a bill providing that no 
divorcee may marry inside of one year after securing a divorce. This is leg- 
islation headed in a wise direction. Nothing reflects so much on our ideals 
of home-life than to have it possible for a party to secure a divorce and 
proceed from the court-room to the register's office and take out license to 
marry another. It is scandalous, besides trifling with sacred matters. 

Let us hope that Senator Johnson's measure may appeal to the favor and 
judgment of the General Assembly. 

THE WORK IS PART OF THE BIRTH. 

Nothing worthwhile, ennobling or beneficial has ever resulted from idle- 
ness and a state of do-nothing. Every success in life carries with it the 
badge of the dignity of labor. Work is part of the birth of everyone, who 
gets a proper view of life. 
Lowell well says: 

No man is born into the world whose work 
Is not born 'with him ; there- is always work 
And tools to work withall, for those who will; 
And blessed are the horny hands of toil ! 

Ben Dixon MacNeill has been down to Dare county. In an informative 
story he recounts the number of great things that first saw the light in the 
county by the sea — and he has the people, a-hoping and praying for the 
success of the experiments being tried out in that section. Nobody ever 
heard a Dare county citizen, upon seeing an experime-nt come to naught, to 
say : " I told you so. ' ' 

****** ** 

State Treasurer Lacy, whom certain parties desired to legislate out of 
office on the pension route, after one of his severe attacks of asthma, spent 
two hours on Monday with the Council of State. Everybody rejoices over 
his comeback. Loyal, clean, able and faithful is this man Lacy; not a particle 
of selfishness in his make-up — he serves the state, not himself. 

************ 



^swKtoa* 



THE UPLIFT 



RAMBLING AROUND. 



You have been 1 in 
seen cream puffs that were pII puffed 
up in the latest fashion? Yes; I 
know you have. I stepped into a 
bakery not long since, and asked the 
price of a. cream puff ihat hud a 
chocolate-tinted cream de chene dress 
on that looked very tempting and 
appetizing. I was informed that ten 
cents of Uucle Sam's coin of the realm 
would put me in possessio.i of that 
particular kind of puff. I set my 
thinking machinery to work, which 
ran off several yards of ruminations. 
Ten cents for a cream puff.atid five 
cents for a newspaper. Gee, Whizz ! 
what a. contrast the size of the Morn- 
ing Herald represents an investment 
of thousands of dollars; requires a 
force of more than 30 people to pro- 
duce it; has leased wires that bring 
news from all parts of the world ; us- 
ing a car load of paper ever week; 
printed on a press costing $25,001'; 
carried by mail and automobiles to 
towns; and carriers to homes, at a 
fraction over two cents a day. Oh, 
shaw ! Whar\s the use of arguing 
against a cream puff. I'll not do it. 
I'll eat the thing and be thankful 
that I had the sense (ten cents) 
enough to get it. I know now how it 
got it name. Anybody would be puf- 
fed up under the circumstances. 



(Old Hurrygraph.) 

bakeries and of sand paper, which reminds me of 



They were standing before an art- 
shop just those two, conversing on 
what would be nice and proper gifts 
for people. She said a handsome 
shaving mirror would be nice for a. 
young man no doubt thinking a smo- 
oth face is nicer than one like a pie. e 



a try-to-befunny fellow who remark- 
ed that the\ difference between a 
woman and a looking glass was that. 
th glass reflected without speaking, 
while a woman spoke without reflect- 
ing. The girl didn't have to reflect 
before replying, "and the difference 
between you and the glass is that 
the glass is polished." 



Man is very much like an auto- 
mobile. It takes a lot of gas to run 
him ; and sometimes it takes a wo- 
man to steer him. When he is 
courting he goes in high gear at a 
60 mile gait; and has to be careful of 
his clutch. When age comes on sci- 
ence has provided the way for or- 
dering the ]3arts needd to vamp the 
physical machinery. You may order 
limbs, if you need them, hair for the 
bald pate; teeth and eyes when they 
are needed. It reminds me of Dr. S. 
Rapport, who is en report in Dur- 
ham. On one occasion he had to or- 
der a glass eye for an aged colored 
woman. When the artificial eyes came 
and was shown the ebony patron, 
she inquired: "Doctur, does yu' 
think I 'H see out 'er dat eye as well 
as out 'er de one in ma.h he 'd "1 ' ' The 
Dr. told her it was for ornament and 
not service, and it would be a "sight"' 



to see her see through it. 

In rambling around I have noticed 
that when you have "gotten up in 
the world," as saying goes; that is, 
accumulated a moderate fortune, as 
it were, people say that are smart, 
and begin to take notice of you, and 



10 



THE UPLIFT 



show yon attentions not before be- 
stowed upon you. You will have 
plenty of frien'ds who will say yoii 
are the luckiest fellow in the world. - ' 
Your enemies will, say you did not 
get your money honestly, or stole it. 
After you have passed out, and left 
behind what worldly goods you had 
accumulated, it will probably be 
spent by somebody who doesn't care 
a cuss how you got it; or even thank 
your memory for leaving it behind. 
It's the way of this old flivvering, 
radioing', flappering world. 



The whimsicalities of life are seen 
on all sides. It pereolates through 
business, as well as our everday af- 
fairs. It gets mixed up with humor 
and the twain are often the season- 
ing that gives variety and spice to 
the sober side of humanity. They 
had in Durham some time ago a big 
sale that required scores of clerks to 
handle the goods and the crowd. The 
clerks were secured on quick time, 
and there was not the fashionable 
formality of introductions to each 
other before their work began. The 
bonhomie, as we French scholars say, 
of the simplicity of the proceedings, 
was named humorous by the fact 
that when the rush came on there 
was so many clerks employed, that 
did not know each other, that they 
were often trying to sell one another 
goods, thinking they were prospective 
customers along with the others. 
But it kept every body smiling and 
that is a good thing in buiness. 



As the world wings around in its 
orbit, and dashes off to us so many 
new things and contrivances, like the 
sparks from an anvil when a red 



hot iron is being hammered into cer- 
tain shapes it is hard to keep up with 
the whirl of events. Customs change 
too. And there is change among 
individuals, even if they have no ch- 
ange in their pockets. The fellow 
who some time ago would mow your 
yalrd, and trim your hedges, now 
styles himself a mowing engineer. 
Why, the old-fashion shoe-shine is al- 
most insulted to call him that now. 
He 's a " shoe surface engineer. ' ' 
The man who has been in the habit 
of taking off your tin cans and 
trash, weekly — and sometimes pretty 
weakly — now styles himself "a gar- 
bage engineer. " So it goes. Peo- 
ple are all the time, in this age, en- 
gineering something- 
It is natural to suppose that a 
person g'oing to heaven from Durham 
would not want to leave heaven and 
come back to Durham. But some 
Durham enthusiasts are telling some 
stories as tall as the mountains of 
western North Carolina. One in 
particular. It is to the effect that a 
Durhamite died and when he got to 
heaven, St. Peter welcomed him and 
gave him the keys of the city. ' ' Go 
anywhere you wish, Just wander 
around and enjoy yourself, ' ' St. Peter 
told him. He wandered. After a 
while, he came to a beautiful grove, 
and every tree in it had some one 
chained or tied to it. He asked St. 
Peter what it meant. St. Peter said, 
"Oh you mean that Durham bunch! 
Well, yu see, it's like this: The Dur- 
ham slogan is ' They always come 
back. ' Every one of those people 
have been in that town, so of course 
heaven isn't good enough for them, 
and they'er bound to go back. So 



THE UPLIFT 



11 



of course we just naturally have to 
keep them tied up, to keep them 
here." What do you think of that? 

This thing of thinking has puzzled 
me more than the daily cross-word 
puzzles, since a man told me that 
about five per cent of civilized human 
beings think; twenty per cent think 
they think; and seventy-five per cent 
do not think at all. I have been 
wondering if I came under the head 
of the 25-per cent, because I am 
under the hallucination of thinking 
that I am thinking. But I may lie 
mistaken. Nobody is infallible. Tt 
may be set down this way : The live 
per cent of independent thinkers 
are the saving force of humaity; with- 
out them we should be in a sorry 
plight. The twenty per cent mostly 
think what their favorite newspaper 
tells them to think ; while the seventy- 
five per cent, so far as any intelligent 
effort towards the betterment of 
their own class or world conditions 
are concerned, merely drift; the 
best that ca,n be said about them is 
that, like sheep, they will follow the 
first bell wether that happens to head 
the flock. 

To think clearly and sanely, to ar- 
rive at honest, just, and profitable 
conclusions, we must first empty our 
minds of all narrow, extraneous ideas 
born of prejudice or intolerance, for 
if persisted in until they crystallize 



into a habit of mind, they distort its 
vision, weaken our solidarity units in 
progressive movements for the benefit 
of humanity as a whole. 

No. R. Our thoughts cannot help 
but be influenced by what we hear 
and what we read, and here is where 
the powerful influence of what, in 
these days, is called propaganda, 
slips in to mold and solidify our at- 
titude of min'd toward political and 
social questions of class and public 
interest. 

It was getting on to the "we small 
ours" of Thursday night when the 
telephone rang vigorously, just like 
a fellow was excited and wanted to 
get something of his mind right away, 
when the call was answered, a rather 
harsh male voice filled the wire to its 
capacity with, "Tell me what is the 
vertical word of seventeen letters in 
Thurday's cross-word puzzle. If 1 
don't find out before * go to sleep 
I '11 have to go asylum. ' ' He was 
given the word, and when asked who 
it was speaking, replied, "John Dne. "' 
I do not find the name of John Doe 
in the city directory or the telephone 
directory, so I verily believe he must 
be trying to fool somebody, and is 
not as near going to an asylum as he 
thought he was. This is one instance 
when the accommodating Herald re- 
porter got the "Doe" for serving 
the public. 



A Baltimore man has erected a monument to Adam. Perhaps be- 
lieves he deserves the honor for belonging to one of the first families. — 
Louisville Courier-Journal. 



12 



CHE UPLIFT 



DARE COUNTY -SCENE OF MODERN 

MIRACLES. 



By Ben Dixon McNeill. 



"They like to come here," A. W. 
Drinkwater, operator of the gov- 
ernment telegraph office at Manteo, 
explained to Van Ness Harwood, 
then a staff correspondent of the 
New York World and now a grower 
of figs at Manteo, ''because we let 
them alone. We don't bother them. 
They don't favor .publicity much. 
They are nice people, but they don't 
favor publicity, and we let them 
alone. 

It was a long speech for Mr. 
Drinkwater, but he could hardly 
have summed up the philosophy of 
Dare comity with fewer words. Nor 
could a book full of words have con- 
veyed a more comprehensive de- 
lineation of the people of the 
county. They find good in people ; 
they are helpful to them; and they 
never bother them with busy and 
helpfully-intended proffers of sug- 
gestion. 

Which probably explains why so 
many notable things have happened 
for the first time in Dare county, 
and among all the counties in the 
State there is none that can begin 
to compare with it. From the be- 
ginning of things in North America, 
on down to those present times, when- 
ever any notable event was about 
to take place, somehow Dare county 
got itself determined upon as the 
scene of its happening. 

It was the scene of the first at- 
tempt at colonization by the Eng- 
lish in North America. 

It was the scene of the birth of 



the first white child in North Amer- 
ica. 

It was the scene of the first sue- 
tained flight of an airplane in the 
world. 

It was the scene of the first suc- 
cessful experiments with the radio 
broadcasting. 

Perhaps there are others and equal- 
ly important, first things that hap- 
pened in Dare county, but these are 
enough for purposes of demonstra- 
tion of the fact that Dare county 
is peculiarly adapted to the uses of 
experimenters. Dare county lets 
them alone, leaves them to their de- 
vices, helping when help is asked, 
but otherwise effacing itself while 
history is being made. 

Nor does it content itself entirely 
with imported first things. Now and 
then it determines upon doing some- 
thing first itself. As for instance 
when it determined to make Miss 
Mabel Evans the first woman county 
superintendent of public schools in 
the State. This was six years ago, 
and although other counties have since 
followed Dare's example, they have 
been less steadfact. Miss Evans is 
still superintendent and has brought 
about some first things of her own. 
But that is a story in itself. 
Even Indians Friendly 

It is an attitude of life that ap- 
pears to be indigenous to the island 
and the banks that stand guard be- 
tween the sounds and the pounding 
winds of the Atlantic. Even in so 
remote a time as the 1580 's, when 



THE UPLIFT 



13 



the first of the English slipped 
through some long closed inlet, the 
Indians they found there were the 
same sort of folks as the Dare 
county folks now are. They didn't 
bother the colonists. They were 
friendly and helpful — so long as 
they were able to be in the face of 
the barbarities of the English. 

And centuries later, when the 
Wrights came down from Ohio to 
experiment with something they 
hoped would fly, the Dare county 
folks were friendly and unobstrusive. 
When Fessenden and others came 
down with the intent to send tele- 
phone messages without wires, Dare 
did not call them idiots, as must 
have happened had they come to 
Wake county, or almost any other 
county in the State. Now when Miss 
Evans became county superintend- 
ent did anybody who got himself 
into the record cry out what it was 
a vain and foolish thing. 

Old timers among the newspaper 
men who came down to observe these 
first things happen — there were none 
at the founding of the colony, nor 
was the advent of Virginia Dare 
chronicled in the society columns of 
that remote day — looking- back over 
a quarter of a century are still puz- 
zled, and not a little bewildered at 
Dare county, and the equanimity with 
which it observes the unfolding of 
experiments that have reshaped the 
lives of people in all lands and on 
all seas. 

Battalions of them who came down 
with their noses into the wind in 
1903, moved by unbelievable rumors 
that some men by the name of 
Wright had brought down a con- 
trivance that was expected to fly 



under its own power, still ponder 
the friendly reticence of Drink- 
water when he told them that the 
Wrights were nice people and not 
favored to publicity. Dare county 
didn't bother itself particularly 
about whether the Wrights were go- 
ing to fly, but it did respect their 
desire for solitude for their experi- 
ment. 

A Self Possessed County 

And when the flimsy craft did lift 
itself of Kill Devil Hill and flut- 
ter across the orange sands of the 
beach, there was no surprise among 
the men of Dare who were permit- 
ted to watch it, and who had lent 
friendly hands when hands were 
needed. Dare county is self pos- 
sessed. For three hundred years it 
banks and sounds. It is listed to 
seeing the unbelievable happen and 
has watched the world from its 
it is never astonished thereby. Van 
Ness Harwood was marveling about 
it a few nights ago. The speel of 
Manteo had got him and he was back 
among them to stay. 

Roanoke Island is by way of be- 
ing the hub of this vast county, and 
from it life radiates. Beyond the 
shallow waters of the sound are the 
banks. To the north is Kill Devil 
Hill, and a little to the southward 
is Nags Head. And then the Inlet 
and Chieomieomica and Hatteras, 
with every mile of it thickly 
peopled with legend from Theodosia 
Burr to the killing of the devil on 
a stormy night behind the 300-foot 
hill whose name commemorates the 
event. 

The Island itself is 10 miles long 
ard three miles wide. Manteo is set 
upon a little harbor that thrusts in 



14 



THE UPLIFT 



through the marsh grass at the 
northeast. Across six miles of 
sound is Xags Head, for a century 
the summer playground of north- 
eastern North Carolina and for a 
quarter of a century the mecca of a 
discriminating clas s of people from 
other sections of the State, where 
shoes are forbidden in summer. 

Cutting the island in half is a ten- 
mile section of State highway, 
reaching from the site of old Fort 
Raleigh, wrom which the Lost Colony 
disappeared, southward through 
Manteo and to Wancdiese on the 
southern tip of the Island. It is 
the only piece of State road on the 
island, and 25 miles of water sep- 
arate it from any other road. There 
are two or three dozen automobiles 
on the Island, with ten miles of road 
and the streets of Manteo among 
them. 

Up there at the old fort and just 
beyond it, where the hopes of Sir 
Walter Raleigh withered and were 
gone, where the mystery of Ameri- 
can history had its tragic begin- 
nings, is the site of the solution of 
a scientific mystery that is begin- 
ning to revolutionize life. Within 
sight of the old fort are the tumb- 
ling buildings w : here the first radio 
message was received from the sta- 
tion at Hatteras when the govern- 
ment was experimenting with the in- 
vention that was later acquired by 
Marconi. 

Where Mountains Move 

Across the sounds and within 
plain view from the fort is Kill 
Devil Hill, from which the Wrights 
flew 21 years ago. The road runs 
down the length of the Island 
through scrubby lands, menaced by 



dunes that come nearer and nearer 
the threat of the marching sand 
down from te Atlantic across Kill 
Devil and the open sound. 

There is something to inspire awe 
in the implacable solidity of these 
moving mountains that stand stark 
and yellow above the pine forests. 
Behind them are the bones of thou- 
sands of trees engulfed in years 
past, and before them virgin for- 
ests that will presently be swal- 
lowed up. There are pitiful trees 
witli their heads torn and distorted, 
with only their tips struggling above 
the tide of sand a hundred feet 
high. By now they must have gone 
down to drowning in the sand. 

Down there these sand dunes, east 
against the low background of the 
island and the waters, seem im- 
mensley high, and relentlessly pow- 
erful, like mountains marching 
slowly across the plain, unhindered 
by the dread that runs before themj 
They tower above the tall pine 
trees, with the sun glisting on their 
crests, and march and march and 
march toward the inland sea that 
lies beyond the island. Behind them 
there is desolation, 

But Manteo is remote from this 
threat, peaceful and content beside 
its little harbor, where the fisher- 
men mend their nets and the mail 
boats come and go. It is the metro- 
polis of the sound country, the capi- 
tal, the clearing house for all its 
activities, and the point of concen- 
tration of the strange things ihat 
come and go up and down the waters. 
It is the most unique county seat in 
Xorth Carolina, with a people whose 
faces are turned always upward to- 
ward the sun. 



THE UPLIFT 



15 



Remote and inaccessible, perhaps, 
but withal having a cosmopolitan 
air. Sleek yachts coming and go- 
ing from New York to Florida put 
in there always. Great air cruisers 
sweeping up and down the coast, 
circle the harbor and drop down to 
smooth anchor. Hard by are : the 
ancient fishing shacks, little sailing- 
vessels, and every sort of craft that 
plies the water. Parked on the 
wharf in sight of these ships of the 
air, these yachts, these fishing ves- 
sels there may be a fine sedan and 
hard by it an ox cart. Only a grunt- 
ing locomotive seems to be lacking 
from the scene to make it wholly 
representative of the ways men have 
devised for their own movements. 

Sometimes a foolish traveler will 
approach a citizen with patronizing 
manner. He isn't rebuffed. He isn't 
patronized or laughed at in turn. It 
isn't the way of Dare county. They 
are a courteous people, 'and they 
have traveled widely. There are 
perhaps more college graduates there, 
more men who have traveled around 
the world and come back unspoiled 
than in any town in the State. You 
can't show off before them, because 
you have nothing to show off. Man- 
teo is at the door of the Atlantic, 
and her sons have the blood of ad- 
ventureres in them. 

And the most delightful thing to 
be discovered about the people is that 
they have not lost the art of con- 



versation. They are not gossips in 
the unworthy sense, ;but by-word- 
of-mouth is still the means of com- 
munication and the transmission of 
intelligence among them. They 
talk. They have brought down their 
traditions with them from genera- 
tion to generation, and each suc- 
ceeding age has added to the store 
of tales that men tell among them. 
Aaron Burr's Daughter 

Romance is not dead there. You 
can still get a vivid account of the 
sad end of Aaron Burr's daughter, 
or the tale of where Nags Head got 
its name, or the killing of the Devil 
on a dark night and the name of 
the hill for him, and of countless 
adventures when the Atlantic had 
tossed its toll upon the beach along 
the banks, or of countless other le- 
gends and traditions that have 
come down through the centuries. 

And strangers are not tolerated 
among them. They do not ambush 
and shoot them as is reported in 
certain remote places in the moun- 
tains. They adopt him immediately 
into the fraternity of Dare county, 
if he is at all the sort of people 
they like to have among them. And 
usually the stranger comes back. 
They can tell you funny little stories 
of the times Edison has been there 
among them, and of hordes of other 
people that you might think when 
wholly unknown among them. 



It seems that a resort hotel was robbed and the guests, instead of 
expressing sympathy, only laughed. — Greensboro News. 



16 



THE UPLIFT 



THE TWO WEBBS. 



By Renn Drum. 



Down on South Washington street 
in Shelby, one of the most beautiful 
and historic streets in Western Caro- 
lina, are two homes side by side. By 
the window of one on week-ends a 
passer-by may see the towering' and 
stately form of Western North Caro- 
lina's veteran jurist, the erect 
shoulders not yet showing the weight 
of 71 winters and summers .Perhaps 
the gaze of the twinkling eyes out 
of the window is recalling, or looking 
back over 32 years spent in the 
courts of North Carolina. For jus 1 ', 
exactly 32 years has Judge James 
L. Webb been solicitor and judge in 
the Superior court of North Carolina 
and throughout the 32 years he has 
never known Democratic opposition. 

The window looks out upon the 
adjoining house, where there lives 
the "kid brother," and on week-ends 
the two chum together. The "kid- 
brother, ' ' now slightly beyond the 
half century mark, has been United 
States District Judge for five years 
in Western Carolina. Prior to that 
time he was known to America — and 
because of the times to the world — 
as the closest friend in the "War Con- 
gress to Woodrow Wilson; 17 years 
on the floor of Congress, eight of 
which w r ere devoted to leading the 
fights for the Wilson measures. Tiie 
eight years saw him the most fre- 
quent guest of all the members of 
Congress at the White House, and 
the prime factor in hte bitter yet 
successful fight for the Ship Bill. 
Judge E. Yates Webb was one of the 
few who were always admitted to 
the closest parleys of tiie Wilson ad- 



ministration. 

Remembers Struggles. 
Brothers and next door neigbors 
and distinguished over state na- 
tion, yet old Shelby remembers them 
as two struggling young lawyers, 
partners. The many stories of their 
rise the elder residents tell are 
unique, interesting, yet none so in- 
teresting as the men themselves. 

"A ship sails east, a ship sails west; 

By the self same wind that blows — 
For it's not the gale, it's the set of 
the sail 

That determines the way she goes ! '' 

Up in the mountains of Rutherford 
county in the fifties there lived a 
pioneer Baptist minister, Rev. George 
Milton Webb. That in their youth 
he had dreams of both sous becoming 
ministers is a part of the interesting 
story of thei r life; that he was very 
desirous of having the younger son 
become a preacher is a known fact. 
However, from early boyhood and 
through the struggles that were part 
of life for a pioneer preacher's 
family there arose a longing 1 to be 
a lawyer, a craving fo r the qourt- 
room. One owing to his prominence 
in athletics while in college almost 
became a professional athlete, but 
otherwise it was the set of the sail 
that brought two boys from the same 
home to prominence on the bench. 

The official lives of the two broth- 
ers — Judge James L. and Judge 
Yates to Shelby people — cover many 
State and National offices. One has 
been mayor of Shelby, State senator, 



THE UPLIFT 



1? 



postoffice inspector, solicitor and Su- 
perior court judge. The other's offi- 
cial life runs from chairman of the 
county executive committee to state 
senator, keynote speaker at the 
nomination of the immortal Aycock, 
Congress and the Federal bench. 
Hung Around Court Rooms 

In his boyhood Judge Jim fre- 
quently left the others at play and 
passed many hours, lounging about 
the court room, listening to the dis- 
position of eases and what interest- 
ed him most of all, the speeches of 
the lawyers. So his life was moulded 
and at the completion of his educa- 
tion he returned to his hill country 
and his first law office was a corner 
in the study of Shelby's Baptist pas- 
tor. As the years passed the prac- 
tice grew and a private office was 
secured. 

During the time however the 
' ' kid brother ' ' was building for a 
goal educating himself for a law- 
yer. Earlier perhaps in life than 
the older brother he also decided 
to be a lawyer and early Cleveland 
county court scenes are not com- 
plete without the youngsters up near 
the front drinking in every spoken 
word. The set of the sail was the 
same and after a big athletic career 
at Wake Forest Judge Yates Webb 
came home and was taken in the law 
office of the big brother — and the 
original law office, Webb & Webb 
is also a rare bit of Shelby history. 
There for a year or so the junior 
partner became an expert on the 
town's first typewriter, while the big 
brother was the talker in court. In 
1893 the senior partner was appoint- 
ed solicitor by Governor Carr, suc- 
ceeding Frank Osborne, and at that 



date the "kid brother" stepped out. 

In the present day of such legal 
lights as Hoey and Gardner, debates 
wax wami in the county court house, 
hut the old times tell of hotter 
times and real tooth-to-nail argu- 
ments that took place in the old 
Cleveland court building, when the 
young solicitor and iiis younger 
brother faced each other on a case. 
With the desire to show no partiality 
Solicitor Webb fought Attorney 
Webb harder than any other mem- 
&,• of the profession. The young- 
attorney knew it and the case trans- 
formed itself into a battle between 
two brothers rather than the presen- 
tation of the merits in the ease. 

Asked if he had his elder brother 
ever mixed with their fists when 
boys, Judge Yates Webb remarked : 

"Not as I recall, perhaps it's too 
far back, but when he was solicitor 
and I was practicing we sure had 
some hot times in the old court 
house. And a naged resident lis- 
tening in over in the corner chimed 
in: "I so, u-h- ! " 

It is just another coincidence in 
the lives of the two brothers that 
Aycock, who was nominated for gov- 
ernor by the younger brother in a 
keynote speech that is recalled over 
the State yet, appointed the elder 
brother to the Superior Court bench. 
And in his twenty years of service 
dealing with the trials and flaws 
of mankind Judge James L. We'll) 
has a record known to few jurists. 
In western sections of the State 
Judge Jim means as much to "court 
week" as do the court houses them- 
selves. Twenty years in dealing out 
punishment, advice, and to thousands 
' ' another chance ' ' has brought against 



18 



THE UPLIFT 



hini a Democratic oppnent, as for 
twelve years he was solicitor with- 
out opposition. 

Knows Many Counties 

More than three decades of. pass- 
ing from court to .court over the sec- 
tion covered by Cabarrus, Mecklen- 
burg, Rutherford, Cleveland, Gaston, 
Polk, Stanly, Lincoln and Catawba 
counties has made of the section to 
him an office. A historian seeking 
data and an' outline of progress that 
has been made in the section repre- 
sented by the counties could find no 
better source of 'information. Char- 
lotte, when Judge James L. Webb 
first appeared in court there boasted 
of near ten thousand inhabitants, 
the big' textile center at Gastiona 
had never beim visioned arid the 
county seat of Gaston was a Dallas. 
The long' journeys from court to 
court were made horseback or in a 
buggy and many of the journeys cov . 
ered days. Now the veteran jurist 
can make any of his courts in a few 
hours by train or automobile and is 
enabled to spend most of his week- 
ends at home. 

Queried" as to the most remarkable 
bit of progress that he has noted 
during' the three decades Judge Webb 
mused through the airplane, auto- 
mobile and many things, common to 
the present day but unknown in his 
a twinkle that is familiar to tbou- 
early life. Finally his eyes twinkled 
sands in the court rooms of North 
Carolina, and replied : 

' ' The typewriter ! Yes, the old 
Munson. ' ' 

The reminiscence brought forth 
some history. The copying, indexing 
and opinoins in days of old were 
tediously written in long hand and 



the first typewriter that Shelby and 
the entire section knew was in the 
law office of Webb & Webb. Doing 
the junior partner Judge Yates Webb 
was the manipulator of the old ma- 
chine and the early training is evi- 
dent as yet when the Federal jurist 
.strikes a rush, and he has been in 
one for months, and 'decides to do a 
little bit of the typing himself. But 
it is Judge Jim that recalls the ma- 
chine with the most pleasure — "And 
the typewriter is typical of the prog- 
ress the state has made. Perhaps 
you of the younger day might under- 
stand that I mean the state lias 
made wonderful progress if you just 
had been a lawyer prior to the com- 
ing of the typewriter, " he says. 
Wilson, Aycock and Walter Johnson. 
Perhaps if Judge Yaics Webb, the 
dread of G. 0. P. Congressmen for 
17 years, should name three of his 
most outstanding friends they would 
be Woodrow Wilson, his best; 
Charles B. Aycock and Walter John- 
son, the hero of baseball. Char- 
acteristics of the three taken to- 
g-ether might make the ideal of the 
Baptist preacher's son who rose to 
national and international promi- 
nence. Two North Carolinians were 
close to the great Wilson during his 
two administrations — Josephus Dan- 
iels and Yates Webb. Daniels has 
written his "Life of Wilson" and 
where there are parts missing, if 
there be any, they best could be 
filled in by the Congressmen Wilson 
personally appointed Federal Judge. 
For it may be said that as chairman 
of the judiciary committee for five 
years and as Wilson's leader in Con- 
gress none knew the official War 
President better than the brilliant 



THE UPLIFT 



19 



Tar Heel. And years of comradship 
like the trying years of the Wilson 
administration make of men' friends 
in the holiest sense of the world. 
Saw "Old Master's Triumph 

Perhaps because at one time a 
brilliant athletic career faced him 
Judge Yates Webb during his 17 
years in Washington became one of 
Writer Johnson's closest friends. 
Through the Federal jurist baseball's 
greatest hero met his wife, the 
daughter of a Congressman. After 
being advised by his Congressman 
friend the "Old Master" asked for, 
and received, his first raise. When 
the trains from the South packed 
with fans of the national pastime 
last fall roiled into Washington for 
the World Series, Judge Webb was 
a passenger. 

When the "Old Master" tunic. 1 
loose his all in the opening games, 
pitched his heart out and lost 
grieving with him up in the stands 
was his friend of 17 years. In that 
final game one of the most thrilling 
and outstanding bits of diamond his- 
tory, when "Barney, the Pride of 
the Capitol," came back none re- 
joiced more than his Carolina friend 
doing an undignified dance for a 
judge as Washington picked up 
Walter and roared. 

The fact that Walter Johnson was 
a pitcher perhaps started the great 
friendship between the two. At 
Wake Forest yet the records of Yates 
Webb, young 'varsity moundsman, 
are recalled. For three years he was 
a member of the 'varsity football 
and baseball teams of the Baptist in- 
stitution, playing left tackle on the 
gridion and pitching in baseball. 
During one summer vacation he 



made a trip to Gainesville, Ga,. and 
there pitched the Gainesville club 
to a victory, over Atlanta in one of 
Georgia's historic old diamond en- 
counters. Offers were received then, 
but. the young student stuck to law 
and held the set of his sail. 
How Much Corn? 

Shortly out of school the present 
jurist tried farming on a small scale 
and he recounts as one of the proud- 
est moments in his life the time 
when a big neighboring farmer asked 
him "how much corn will you make'?" 

During the six years as partner of 
his elder brother the young lawyer, 
just a boy, ran for mayor of Shelby 
■v*as defeated by a small margin, his 
only defeat, in official life. While 
State Senator he became famous 
through his keynote speech when 
Aycock was nominated, and during 
the administration of Roosevelt he 
was elected to Congress. His terms 
covered four years under Roosevelt, 
four under Taft and eight under 
Wilson. When an appointment to 
the Federal bench became necessary 
in North Carolina during the end of 
the Wilson administration, there 
were no delegations to Washington, 
letters written, reccommendations 
made and ' ' wires pulled. ' ' The great 
War President knew the man of the 
job and named him — a personal ap- 
pointment in the fullest sense of the 
term a tribute to the man who had 
fought his cause in Congress through 
eight hard years. That no bette)' ap- 
pointment could have been made is 
the testimony of those who have come 
in contact with the United States 
courts i n Western North Carolina. 
Today in Western North Carolina 
Judge Yates Webb handles more cases 



20 THE UPLIFT 

than are disposed of in any one sons of the minister who establish- 
Southern State Ranking as one of ed the First Baptist church in Shel- 
North Carolina's brilliant men and by are two of the state's leading cl- 
one of the outstanding Carolinians tizens and are today, and have been 
of his day there are few in the State for 15 years living side by side ai- 
better known or 'admired more, and though prominent in official life is 
the admiration and love of his home just as rare. But the "set of the 
town people is greater still. sail" and the way it was held is 
Out of One Home the foundation of the story — of all 
Thatout of the home of a moira- the proud stories Shelby people tell 
tain preacher there came two such of the two jurists who live side by 
men is remarkable. That the grand- side on South Washington Street. 



LAW ENFORCEMENT. 
(Monroe Journal.) 

We hear a good deal about law enforcement. It is well. There will 
always be a considerable number of people who must be disciplined by 
the law. But in the final outcome in this country the only law enforce- 
ment that will maintain socieyt will be the selp discipline of men and 
women and the teaching of the children that self-restraint, and not out- 
ward restraint, is the developing force, of character and real lawful- 
ness. 

There is an old citizen of Union county who has reared a large number 
of sons. All through the years of their boyhood and youth he fre- 
quently said to them, "Boys, there has never been, so far as I can 
learn, a person of our name who was ever served with a warrant of any 
kind. We must keep up that good name." And the boys have done so 
and are doubtless teaching their children the same thing. 

There used to be some parents who said to their children on starting 
them to school: ' 'You are to obey the rules and mind the teacher. If you 
don't do it and the teacher has to whip you, you may count on getting 
another one when you get home." That might be considered rather rig- 
orous, and perhaps was, but it taught a good lesson. Such children were 
more likely to grow into law abiding citizens than the children of the 
family who always planted the seed of insubordination and lawlessness 
in the minds of their children by encouraging them to nag the teacher 
and upheld them in evedy little difficulty, right or wrong, important or 
trivial. 

People, law enforcement works from within. 



THE UPLIFT 



21 



HOW THINGS LOOK. 



By R. F. Beasley. 



I have been coming down a good 
many years along with lots of other 
people who just have a liking for 
such things, to take a peep at the 
legislature and help save the State 
a little. As usual I am unable to 
report any progress. Hanged if I 
can save the State and I have been 
working at it a good long time. I 
have seen so many fellows who want- 
thought they could do it if they 
ed to save the State and honestly 
could just come to the legislature, 
or go to congress, or be elected as 
county commissioner, or city alder- 
man. Of course there are lots of 
folks who will say frankly that they 
just want it "for the honor," and 
sometimes some are so indiscreet as 
to say they want it for the salary. 
These are rare. The rule is that of- 
fice is sought in order to put the 
candidate in a position to save the 
State. And so many honestly think 
that they can, and will, do wonders. 
But they all get caught in the whirl 
and bang of the machine. They have 
their day and go out and still the 
State is not saved. 

A King of France once said con- 
temptuously, "The state, bah, I am 
the State." But he found that he 
was mistaken. When the deluge 
struck him he was nothing but a 
memory. Over in England about the 
same time their leaders and writers 
were defending the state as the peo- 
ple — not the king, not parliament, not 
the land or the city or the rivers and 
the hills — but the living mass of 
people. And so it has turned out 



under the working of free govern- 
ment.. More than ever today the 
state is the people. We talk about 
reforming this and reforming that 
and saving the State. The organi- 
zation of government is composed of 
men which form a pretty good cross 
section out of the population. These 
men act and react about as you 
would expect them to act in accord- 
ance with their atmosphere. So the 
State cannot be saved unless the 
people who are the State are saved. 

So, like many others, I come down 
and look about and have my say, 
and meet old friends — and pay my 
own expenses — belonging to that class 
which somebody called "visiting- 
Statesmen." 

' What Is Taking Place. 

When I first began helping to save 
the State I thought it was a nice 
easy job that any patriotic and fairly 
intelligent man could do easily. I 
have found out my mistake. Some 
people never find it out and these 
are they who constantly think that 
if they could only get this law or 
that law passed the thing would be 
done. You can't save the State un- 
til the State gets interested in sav- 
ing itself, and acquires enough in- 
telligence /and unselfishness to act 
together for the best interest of all 
instead of every one for himself 
and the devil take the hindmost. 
Will the State ever get that way? 
I doubt it, hence I am prepared to 
see the State go unsaved for the 
balance of my lifetime, and a long- 
time afterward. But am I hopeless ? 



22 



THE UPLIFT 



Not a bit of it. In truth I think the 
State is better than it ever has been 
and is getting better. But here is 
what is happening. The organization 
and the machine which we call gov- 
ernment — local, State, national — is 
getting so big, so ramified and div- 
ersified, with so many arms and legs 
and noses and eyes and ears reach- 
ing out in every direction, that it is 
becoming a huge barrier apart, aside, 
above and over, the balance of the 
State — the mass of the people. The 
machine is becoming to have interests 
and aspiration and purposes of its 
own. The average man in daily los- 
ing his power to influence it. Mere 
mass of government is smothering the 
individual and he is losing his liberty 
unconsciously, and sacrificing it to 
a Moloch which is itself unconsious 
and purposeless. Mr. Shelby invent- 
ed a character who undertook to 
make a life, breathing, man, to create 



life. He got the huge thing ready, 
breathed life into it, and then found 
that it was a frightful monster that 
he could neither control or kill. It 
was his master. That is what is hap- 
pening with our government. Will 
have built them for good and use- 
ful purposes merely as our servants. 
They have become so vast that they 
are becoming our masters and we can 
no longer control them. Not that the 
men who are a part of them con- 
spire to this purpose, but that the 
machine has gotten so big that we 
can't help it. What is the end to 
be'? Every man who wants a new 
law, a new office, or a new thing 
done, is adding his part to the huge 
machine. Yet how can we help it? 
There is the question for philosop- 
hers. Statesmen cannot , handle it, 
because statesmen are concerned in 
running the machine, not in studying 
it. 



WORK. 

Let me but do my work from day to day, 

In field or forest, at desk or loom, 
In roaring market place or tranquil room; 

Let me but find it in my heart to say, 
When vagrant wishes beckon me astray, 

' ' This is my work ; my blessing, not my doom ; 
Of all who live, I am the one by whom 

This work can best be done in the right way." 



Then shall I see it not too great, nor small, 

To suit my spirit and to prove my powers; 
Then shall I cheerful greet the laboring hours, 

And cheerful turn, when the. long shadows fall 
At eventide, to play and love and rest, 

Because I know for me my work is best. 

— Henry van Dyke. 



THE UPLIFT 



23 



WHY READ THE BIBLE. 



We reprint here a chapter on the 
Bible from a recent book entitled, 
"A Layman's Confession of Faith," 
by Mr. P. Whitwell Wilson, publish- 
ed by the Revell Co. 

About the Bible, there is this ad- 
vantage that whether we go to church 
.or not, we can carry it with us every- 
where and make it our constant com- 
panion. If, then, we neglect the 
Bible, the responsibility for so doing 
is entirely our own. That the Bible 
is so neglected cannot be denied. 
Most of us are too busy with other 
matters to find time to read the Bible, 
and we are content, therefore,, with 
the verses which the minister still 
includes in "the preliminaries,'' as 
they are called, of public worship. 
What has elienated us. from the Bible 
is not an intellectual difficulty over 
its contents, but the paramount claim 
of the automobile, the country club, 
and the making of money to pay 
for these things. 

We are content, therefore, with an 
easier literature, and are much re- 
lieved in our minds when learned or 
pretentious persons tell us that the 
Bible has ceased to be trustworthy, 
is full of errors, and may now be 
discarded. That comforting theory 
sets us free for golf on Sunday; and 
as we tramp around the links, we 
thoroughly approve of the latest 
scholarship. We need not learn the 
Bible any longer for ourselves, and 
we need not teach the Bible any 
longer to others. It is a most happy 
release from reverence to God and 
service to man. And the sequel for 
society — for the nation — for man- 
kind '.' One wonders ! 



It is possible that, in this mood, we 
underestimate the Bible. Far be it 
from- me to deal hastily with anyone 
who is troubled with doubts; but life 
is really too short for time to be 
wasted on what the Psalmist calls 
"the fool" who cannot or will not 
admit that the Bible is unique. That 
the Bible stands alone among books, 
is common ground with everybody 
who is anybody; and it is merely in 
passing, therefore, that one mentions 
one or two illustrative facts. 

A hundred and fifty years ago, 
there was the French Revolution and 
an outburst of Rationalism. Imme- 
diately there arose, for the first time, 
the Bible Societies, which translated 
this obsolete volume into every lan- 
guage, whether written or unwritten, 
on the fact of the earth ; and momen- 
tous have been the results. In India 
and the East, the Bible is more read 
than any other book ever has been 
or ever will be; China alone has ab- 
sorbed ninety million copies Gandhi, 
the mystic, and Sun-Yat-sen, the 
statesman, are both of them readers 
of the Bible. In earlier days, there 
may have been a time when, in Eng- 
lish-speaking countries, a ruler could 
afford to be ignorant of the Bible ; 
but with the progress of enlighten- 
ment, the Bible has become an essen- 
tial, at any rate, in the English- 
speaking world. All recent Prime 
Ministers in Britain — Gladstone, 
Rosebery, Salisbury, Bailfour, As- 
quith, Lloyd George, Bonar Law, and 
Baldwin — have been men of the 
Bible; and every recent American 
President — McKinley, Taft, Roose- 
velt, Wilson, Harding, and Coolidge — 



24 



THE UPLIFT 



has taken good care to be acquaint- 
ed with the volume on which he 
swears his loyalty to the United 
States. When H. Or. Wells proposes 
to complie a new Bible, a popular 
mag'azine manages to market the idea 
for precisely one month; but, dur- 
ing that very month, the circulation 
of the old Bible exceeds that of the 
popular magazine. Then we have 
Conan Doyle suggesting a Bible 
without the Old Testament — which 
idea also lasts for one month, only to 
be followed by De Mille's great film, 
"The Ten Commandments.'' 

And when some one organizes a de- 
bate on the inspiration of the Bible, 
the newspapers report it and the 
radio broadcasts it as fully as the 
most sensational of international 
prize fights. 

In every generation there are simil- 
ar evidences to the ineradicable fas- 
cination of the Bible. Scholars slay 
the Book, but it rises from the dead. 
And from all this it follows that the 
question to be answered on the Bible 
is essentially the same question that 
we must answer on Christ. Beyond 
dispute, he was the best Man, and 
beyond dispute, this is the best Book. 
Then, was the best Man, and is the 
best Book merely human or also div- 
ine? Is the Bible and is the Christ 
to be accepted as the Word of God? 
Was the Man God incarnate? Was 
the Book divinely inspired? That, 
in plain terms, is the issue. 

To this question on the Bible, three 
answers have been given ; First, there 
are those who value the Bible as a 
supreme literature, inspired by genius 
as other great literature is inspired; 
and that is so far, so good. See- 
ondlv, there are those who find the 



Bible to be more than other litera- 
ture, however noble it be, and de- 
clare that the Bibjle . contains Itjie 
Word of God. And that goes fur- 
ther and is better. Thirdly, and my 
own belief is, that the Bible, consist- 
ing of sixty-six books written during 
fifteen centuries or more, and mould- 
ed and selected by the inspired piety 
of fifty generations of worshipful peo-. 
pie, is now to be trusted, for life here 
and hereafter, as wholly and in all 
its parts, the revelation of God to 
man, of man to himself, and of the 
universe to us who dwell within it. 
It was in that belief that they to 
whom I owe my being lived and died, 
leaving an example of faith and duty 
which I find to be indeed rare; and 
I have proved that belief myself by 
seeking in vain for any passage in 
the Bible which fails to yield an 
abundant harvest in mental stimulus, 
moral encouragement or spiritual sat- 
isfaction, for whatever time and 
thought I may have devoted to it. 

The difficulties in the Bible, as they 
are called, fall under three heads: 
First : the miracles ; secondly : the 
mistakes; thirdly: the lapses in 
ethics. For the man who regards the 
Bible merely as literature, none of 
these offer any perplexity, because 
he takes the Bible no more serious- 
ly than he takes his Homer or his 
Shakespeare. For the man who says 
that the Bible contains the Word of 
God, the difficulties are, again, sim- 
plified, because whenever he encount- 
ers one, he can say that the passage 
in question is not. part of God 's Word 
to him. If, then, you wish to skim 
the surface of life instead of soaring 
to its heights and peering into its 
depths, you can adopt a theory of the 



THE UPLIFT 



25 



Bible which will ennoble much of the 
Scripture without troubling about the 
rest. Indeed, it is an abundant ban- 
quet that this Book provides; and no 
one, living or dead, has yet exhaust- 
ed that illimitable and varied "bread 
of life. ' ' Even for him who wishes 
to run as he reads, there is offered 
a choice of food. The fact that some- 
body announces a mistake in ethics 
in Exodus does not affect the Twenty- 
third Psalm. And the fate of the 
Gadarene swine need not cancel the 
Sermon on the Mount. The Bible is 
like a tree which grew with the cen- 
turies, reaching forth its branches to 
greet God 's sun. Pick the fruit, then, 
which is nearest to hand. And, for 
the moment, do not worry about that 
which seems to be beyond your reach. 
When you have made that part of 
the Bible which you can understand 
and enjoy your own, then it will be 
time enough to consider the rest. 

If, however, I am not myself con- 
tent with selected passages from the 
Bible, the reason is, first and fore- 
most, that in this maltter I must 
give due weight to the example of 
Jesus, who accepted his Bible as a 
whole. Our Lord lived in an era 
when the best in Greek and Roman 
literature was available. And yet his 
perfect character was nourished en- 
tirely on the Old Testament, which 
was his only library. In the prophe- 
cies of Isaiah, he heard the call to 
his public career. In the law of 
Moses, he found his defense against 
the Tempter. In the Book of Jonah, 
and indeed in Jonah's whale itself, 
he discovered the . sign of his resur- 
rection. And in the Sermon on the 
Mount, there is not an idea which 
you may not trace to those ancient 



Hebrew Scriptures. When our Lord 
talked with his friends, he did not 
enter into bitter argument over the 
inspiration and infallibility of the 
Bible. What He said was ' ' Search 
the Scriptures." "Have ye never 
read," He would ask, "what David 
did?" Did they not remember that 
in the beginning God created them 
male and female? If only they had 
known what was read to them on 
the Sabbath day, they would have 
understood the Christ. It was not 
their opinions of the Bible that He 
condemned, but their ignorance of 
its pages. And this is the ignorance 
that confronts us today. 

At the Univesity of Cambridge, 
When I was an undergraduate, a 
number of us met every week to read 
the Bible itself. All forms of faith 
and of doubt and of denial, then 
current, were to be found in this lit- 
tle company; but whether we accept- 
ed or criticized or rejected the Gos- 
pel of St. John, we did at least know 
what it contained. We concealed 
neither our dagmas nor our heresies. 
And an open Bible, openly discussed, 
was thus a part of what has been 
called a liberal education. At Toyn- 
bee Hall, in East London, I have 
spent many an evening around the 
fireside, talking over the problems of 
life with men drawn from Eastern 
Europe and elsewhere, whose know- 
ledge of English was imperfect and, 
in every such discussion, it made all 
the difference that I was able to 
quote the Bible. For twenty years 
in England, my Sundays were devoted 
to teaching or addressing audiences 
of working men — for the most part, 
actual trade-unionists — and, again, 
what I gave them was simply the 



2C 



THE UPLIFT 



Bible. Anyone who masters any part 
of the Bible for himself has some- 



thing of value to share with others. 



ST. AUGUSTINE, THE ANCIENT CITY. 



By Antonia. J. Steonnle 



The early history of our great a ad 
wonderful country has many interest- 
ing phases and many different people? 
had a hand in its making. The ad- 
venturous Ponca ds Leon was a ro- 
matic figure of whom we know some- 
what, but who seems, at times, more 
like a legendary character than a real 
personage. But the doughty de Leon, 
who wanted to remain forever young, 
assumes a real individuality, and his 
fellow Spaniards and those who fol- 
lowed him, seem like real flesh and 
blood personages after one has once 
walked the streets of ancient, lovely, 
historic St. Augustine, Florida, which 
Ponce de Leon discovered 400 year* 
ago. 

St. Augustine is the oidest town or 
city in the United States, and the old- 
est European settlement on the main- 
land of North America. It is alto- 
gether different from any other place 
in the country, and the trail of the 
Spaniard is over it all. Ponce de 
L^on, while searching for the fabled 
Fountain of Youth, discovered Flori- 
da in 1513, and landed on the site of 
what is now St. Augustine. He dis- 
covered, too, what he supposed was 
the miraculous fountain, and it is 
still shown- to this day. The new 
settlement did not flourish at first, 
and it was not till August 28, 1565, 
that St. Augustine was permanently 
settled by Pedro Menendez, who land- 
ed on St, Augustine's day, hence the 
name of the place. 



St. Augustine retains numerous 
traces of tire Spaniards, who kept 
possession of Florida until 1763, 
when it was ceded to the English by 
Spain. Later it was given back to 
Spain, and not till July 12, 1821, 
did it pass into the possession of the 
United States. So Florida and St. 
Augustine have the distinction of hav- 
ing been under three flags: that of 
Spain, the flag of the discoverer and 
conquerors: of England, and then 
came the Stars and Stripes, which 
have been waving there since 1S21, 
and will so continue to wave. 

The streets of St. Augustine bear 
Spanish names, such as Valencia, 
Cordova, San Sebastian, Hiployta, 
anil the like. The city was enclosed 
by a strong wall, as a defense against 
invasion, and parts of this wall and 
of the old city gates are still stand- 
ing, and are a distinctive feature of 
the ancient, city. These walls, and 
the older houses in the place, are 
built of coquina, and have great in- 
terest. 

Conquhia is a kind of natural ce- 
ment formed of sand and innumerable 
tiny sea shells, and occasionally a 
few larger ones, which in the process of 
tim e has become a sort of stone and 
i^ dug out of the ground, at some 
points in Florida. When first un- 
earthed, it is quite soft and may he 
readily cut and carved. But it hard- 
ens by exposure to the air, and is 
verv durable. It looks something 



THE UPLIFT 



27 



like a r ough cement. The little shells 
of which it is composed, are readily 
discernible. 

The streets of the old town are ex- 
ceedingly narrow and lined with 
quaint old houses, many of them 
built of eoquina, and with overhang- 
ing balconies. St. George's street is 
especially narrow, and is the oldest 
business thoroughfare in America, 
dating back to early in the seven- 
teenth, extending in a straight line 
from the Plaza to the old city wall. 
In going through it, one seems to be 
carried back through the years, 
despite the many modern shops which 
neighbor with the ancient buildings. 
Charlotte Street is also of much in- 
terest and fascination. Here are 
numerous old houses, including what 
are supposed to be some of the oldest 
wooden houses in the United States. 
The oldest house in the country is 
preserved as a historical museum. 
This is a very interesting old struc- 
ture, and has a beautiful garden with 
statuary, a large variety of shrubs 
and trees, and the remains of an old 
Spanish oven and chimney. It's a 
garden to dream and linger in. Near- 
by are the remains of an old Spanish 
convent, now used as a barracks for 
soldiers. There is no end to the in- 
teresting and historical sites in St. 
Augustine, and the old town, with 
walls about many of the picturesque 
houses, and tantalyzing glimpses of 
the gardens, filled wit every variety 
of semi-troppipcal flowers and trees, 
add to the charm. 

But the old Plaza, the heart and 
soul of St, Augustine, is probably 
the most interesting place in the city. 
The Plaza, or Place of the Constitu- 
tion, was in the days of the Spanish 
occupancy, the scene of all the public 



.gathering's held and where the gover- 
nor's proclamations were promul- 
gated. In the days of the British it 
was used as a drill and parade ground. 
Now it is a very beautiful garden-like 
litle park. In its stands an old, 
severely plain monument, with an 
elaborate and flowery inscription in 
Spanish, giving a history of the 
Plaza. There is also a Confederate 
monument, as well as several others, 
and the so called public or slave mark- 
et, a covered, many-pillard building 
once used as a market, but popularly' 
supposed to have been the place where 
slaves were sold. Near here is the 
oldest post office in the country, an 
imposing stone building, once the 
mansion of the Spanish governor. It 
is a queer post office, none too well 
adapted for the extensive postal busi- 
ness of the present day, but it is a 
historic, architecturally noble and in- 
teresting structure, fitting to be locat- 
ed in the oldest section of the oldest 
city in the United States. 

On one side of the Plaza is the 
old cathedral, of Moorish style of 
architecture, with several old bells in 
the tower, and a large sun-dial oves 
one entrance. King Streets flanks the 
other side of the Pla.za, and here are 
located the finest shops in the city, 
and some of the many fine and pala- 
tial hotels. The Plaza and the ad- 
jacent streets have a charm of which 
one never tires, and the more one 
sees of them the more is one capti- 
vated. 

Old Fort Marion is a splendidly 
preserved survival of the Spanish 
regime. It is a very good example 
of a mediaeval fortress, a.nd every foot 
enclosed within its massive grey walls 
is full of interest. Built of eoquina 
by the Spaniards, away back in the 



28 



THE UPLIFT 



early ds.ys, it was many years in 
building, and has many underground 
dungeons, winding passages, and vari- 
ous historic chambers, also a wide 
moat. One dungeon with a tiny bav- 
red window about 16 feet from the 
stone floor, is pointed out as the one 
from which a certain famous prisoner 
managed to make his escape in a 
dramatic manner. The massive iron- 
barred cell doors, the courtyard, the 
portcullis with the Spanish coat of 
arms and inscription over the main 
entrance, and the hot shot oven, — 
all these things are of vast interest, 
to every visitor. An entrancing 
view over the water and into the 
town may be obtained from the port 
holes of each of the four watch 
towers, and nobody has seen St. 
Augustine who has not made at 
least one visit to wonderful and his- 
toric and ancient Fort Marion. 

The ancient city in its modern sec- 
tion is exceedingly beautiful. It has 
lovely residences, and homes, anil 
wide avenues and streets bordered 
with immense trees draped with 
Spanish moss. The grounds of all 
the public and private Buildings are 



lovely in the extreme, and flowers, 
palms, and other tropical trees and 
shurbs are everywhere. The hotels 
are in themselves worth going south 
to see. They are beautiful architeot- 
urall, and of a type to harmonize 
with the traditions, the origin, and 
the ancient atmosphere and buildings 
of the city. 

St. Augustine has a individuality. 
It has all the charm and attractions 
of the finest city of the southland 
plus its unique history, and relics of 
a romatic age and of another race, 
no longer dominant in this hemis- 
phere. If one could only see one 
city in Florida, St. Augustine should 
be that one. 

St. Augustine has many beautiful 
churches. The old cathedral has the 
greatest interest, and the Flagler 
Memorial Church, built by Henry M. 
Flagler, the railroad magnate, who 
built up the east coast of Florida, is 
a gem. It was rarely beautiful, and 
built of many colored marblets. Thus 
do the old and the new make for its 
rart individuality, alluring atmos- 
phere and charm. 



EDUCATED CRIMINALS. 



(The Lutheran) 



In the prison of Sacramento, Cali- 
fornia, there are criminals who are 
graduates of more than a dozen uni- 
versities, from Notre Dame and Stan- 
ford of that State eastward (includ- 
ing Neveda, Nebraska, Northwestern, 
Wisconsin and Harvard) across the 
seas (including London, Glasgow, 
Melbourne (Australia,) Amsterdam, 
Moscow, Canton (China,) TVaseda 



Japan.) Evidently the value of an 
education depends very much upon 
the character of the man who gets it. 
The newly elected warden of the 
prison is nothing if not progressive. 
He is contemplating the organization 
of a prison high school with some 
of these highly educated criminals 
as teachers ! No doubt such a 
scheme, if carried out, might make 



THE UPLIFT 



29 



prison life less monotonous and more 
bearable. It would undoubtedly tend 
to get minds that are idle, and 
thoughts and acts that are evil, to 
be more healthfully employed. Oth- 
ers are advocating giving the con- 
victs cells that have windows to let 
the sunlight stream in, and motion 
pictures to entertain them, and thus 
make prison life more congenial. 

The new method of dealing with 
criminals is in striking contrast with 
the old. The old was often brutal 
in the extreme and proceeded on the 
principle that a criminal must be 
made to reap what he sows. It had 
more respect for the law of retribu- 
tion than the more modern merciful 
and reformatory method of adminis- 
tering justice. Parole, the indeter- 
minate sentence, and efforts to res- 
cue from a life of crime those guilty 
of a first offense (committed perhaps 
under extenuating circumstances, or 
under varying degrees of irresponsi- 
bility,) are begining to figure quite 
largely in the treatment of criminals. 
Crime is of the nature of a disease 
and there is need in many cases of 
therapeutical treatment such as the 
new method contemplates. No sen- 
tence after a court trial ever gets at 
the real root of the disease, and it 
needs to be followed up with a kind 
of study and treatment that may 
lead to the reformation of many a 
criminal. A more rational method 
of treating criminals is needed. 

But care must be taken not to do 
violence to the law of retribution, 
and thus rob justice of the respect 
and honor that are her due. No 
criminal is a fit subject for reforma- 
tion (not to speak of redemption 
which is still more vital) who does 



not recognize the justice of his pun- 
ishment and stand repentant before 
the law. Prison life must not be 
made so congenial that persons who 
commit crimes because they despise 
honest toil and mean to escape it, 
may, like two convicts who recently 
escaped from an eastern prison, pre- 
fer to return rather than work for 
a living. And this suggests one de- 
fect in the treatment of criminals. 
Many, if not most of them, are in 
prison because they hate honest toil 
or have proved themselves incom- 
petent and untrustworthy. They 
want a living without paying the 
price for it, and so they prefer be- 
ing parasites and do not hesitate to 
commit crimes in order to escape 
earning a living. Thievery and rob- 
bery have become a finished art, as 
the existence of well-organized bands 
of criminals attest. What such 
criminals need is to be put to real 
hard work and made to earn what it 
costs to apprehend and maintain 
them and their families, if they have 
dependents. Whatever may be faulty 
in the system of convict labor for 
the benefit of the State, it is a move 
in the right direction. When one 
sees gangs of workmen digging and re- 
pairing sewers, excavating for sub- 
ways, building railways and tunnels, 
etc., thus doing the drudgery which 
Americans as a rule despise and shun, 
one cannot escape the query, ' ' Why 
should criminals in our prisons have 
an easier life than this army of 
toilers who do our dirty and yet 
necessary work that iwe may live 
in comfort?" Let us not forget that 
the best way to reform the criminals 
is to teach him to work. 



30 



THE UPLIFT 



INSTITUTION NOTES. 



J. J. Jones, Jr. 



A mimber of boys have been pick- 
ed out for the afternoon band. 



The band gave a concert last 
Sunday afternoon. It was enjoyed 
by everyone who heard it. 



Five hogs were killed last Wed- 
nesday, and the boys got sausage 
last Sunday morning. 



Clint Wright has returned to the 
institution after spending a short 
time with his people in Statesville. 



Harry Stephens, J. J. Jones, Jr., 
and Samuel McPherson, members of 
the first, seventh and eighth cottages, 
were paroled last Tuesday morning. 
These boys have made very good 
records. 



It was warm last Saturday after- 
noon so the base ball team practiced 
and it looks like the school is going 
to have a real base ball team this 
vear. 



Mr. and Mrs. H. W. Johnson and 
family, of Charlotte, and Miss Mar- 
tha Davis, of Harrisburg, spent the 
week end with Mr. and Mrs. W. W. 
Johnson. 



Two incubators which were set 
throe weeks previous, have turned out 
their hatches of 196 out of 200 eggs 
This is considered very good compared 
with last year's hatching. 



The Boger Literary Society held 
its weekly meeting last Monday eve- 
ning. The debate for the evening 
w;is : "Resolved that the printiug of- 
fice is of more use to the school than 
the farm force. ' ' The debators were : 
J. J. Jones, James Davis and Charles 
Grossman on the affirmative side. 
Donald Pate, Lesie Newnam and 
Lambert Cavenaugh on the negative 
side. 



Rev. Lawrence Little, of Concord, 
conducted the services at the school 
last Sunday. He based his talk up- 
on people that count. He told a few 
stories about his subject. He told 
one special story the boys liked very 
much, he said that one time a great 
base ball player had a father who was 
blind. His father would go to the 
games and hear people talk about 
his son and how he knocked the tail 
over the fence. After a while his 
father died. Two da T ~s after his 
father's death there was to be a 
game and his manager did not ex- 
pect him to play. But when the 
day came for • the game the boy 
came out on the grounds in his base 
ball togs ready to play. He played 
harder that day than he ever had. 
He knocked a few balls over the 
fence. After the game the mana- 
ger come up to him and said: "We 
all thought you were not going to 
play, on account of goosing your 
father so recently." Then he asked 
him why he played so hard, he an- 
swered him saying: "It was the fir^t 
time my father was able to see me 
play." ' 






SPECIAL EXCURSION FARES 

VIA 

SOUTHERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 

TO 

Mobile, Pensacola and New Orleans. 

Account MARDI GRAS CELEBRATION 

FEBRUARY 19th-24th, 1925 

Very low reduced round trip fares from all stations on Southern Railway 
Lines. 

Tickets on sale to New Orleans, Feb. 17th to 23rd. To Mobile Feb. 18th 
to 23rd, and to Pensacola Feb. 20th to 23rd. 

Final limit all tickets March 3, 1925. Tickets may be extended upon 
payment of fee $1.00 per ticket. 

Stop-overs will be permitted going and returning. 

Excellent through schedules with sleeping and dining car service. 

For further information and reservation call on any Southern Railway 
Agent, or address: 

M. E. Woody, 
Ticket Agent, 
Concord, N. C. 
R. H. Graham, 
Charlotte, N. C. 
Division Passenger Agent, 



tf 



3 b 



i 




THE U JefS.'SSj 



«—. «r 



it'von, I ' 

vry 



VOL. XIII CONCORD, N. C, FEBRUARY 21, 1925 No. 13 



■**•* A A *J»*J» ♦J* A *J» *J* A A A A »J» *** A *■♦+ *J**J , *5 t **• *J* *♦* *♦**♦* *♦* A A A*J**J« *$* *J» **+ *++ A «J+ *$»*$* *J» A A- 

I "THE FATHER OF HIS | 
I COUNTRY." f 

A *J* 

t A 

% He lives, ever lives in the hearts of the free, <$> 

A *I+ 

a The wings of his fame spread across the broad * 

^ seas \ >*+ 

* 



* 



He lives where the banner of freedom's unfurl- 
ed, 



* 



The pride of his country, the we?!th of the * 
world. —Alfred Tennyson. * 



* 
'< i' | i' t i> I « ^ «» t '' to> ^ o t<> t «»|<» * <>t o {«i t «^i^Htiii«. > » t «> x «it«il<il«^<» t <i t «^'4''i t 4 H $ t ^4'4'^ l > t '' t ''t''t' 1 



—PUBLISHED BTf- 



THE PRINTING CLASS OF THE STONEWALL JACHSON MANUAL 
TRAINING AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



J. P. Cook, Chairman, Concord 
Miss Easdale Shaw, Vice-Chairman 

Rockingham, 
Jno. J. Blair, Sec, Raleigh 
D. B. Coltrane, Treas., Concord 
J. S. Effird, Albemarle 
Mr. Chas. A. Cannon, Concord 
Rev. Tom P. Jimison, Spencer 



Mrs. G. T. Roth, Elkin 

Herman Cone, Greensboro 
Mrs. Cameron Morrison, Charlotte 
Mrs. A. L. Coble, Stateville 
Mrs. T. W. Bickett, Raleigh 
Mrs. W. N. Reynolds, Winston-Salem 
Mrs. I. W. Faison, Charlotte 
Mr. Paul C. Whitlock, Charlotte 



Mrs. W. H. S. Burgwyn, Honorary Member 
Chas. E. Boger, Supt. 



CONTENTS. 



CHARACTERISTICS OF WASHINGTON 

GEORGE WASHINGTON 

THE MOTHER OF WASHINGTON A. M. Barnes 

HAUNTS OF WASHINGTON IN NEW YORK 

Julia W. Wolfe 



CITY 

RAMBLING AROUND 
FOREVER OUR FIRST 
RUTS 

A MEDAL FOR BRAVERY 
ALL ABOUT PAPER 
THE TAMING OF THE JUNGLES 
INSTITUTION NOTES 



Old Hurrygraph 

Robert Lee Madison 

James Hay, Jr. 

Ruth Sifferd 

Edwin Tarrissee 

Merritt L. Allen 

James Davis 



3 
4 
5 

10 
13 
16 
17 
19 
23 
27 
29 



The Uplift 

A WEEKLY JOURNAL 

PUBLISHED BY 

The Authority of the Stonewall Jackson Manual Training and Industrial 
School. Type-setting by the Boys Printing Class. Subscription 

Two Dollars the Year in Advance 

JAMES P. COOK, Editor, J. C. FISHER, Director Printing Department 



Entered as second-class matter Dec. 4, 1920 at the Post Office at Concord, 
N, C. under act of March 3, 1879. Acceptance for mailing at special rate 
of 4, 1923. 



CHARACTERISTICS OF WASHINGTON. 

Punctuality was one of Washington's strong points. When company 
was invited to dinner he made an allowance of only five minutes for 
variation in watches. If the guests came late he would say: "We are 
too punctual for you. I have a cook wlio dees not ask if the company 
has come, but if the hour has come." 

In a letter to a friend he wroDi,- "I begin my diurnal course with the 
sun; if my hirelings are not in their places by that time, I send them 
messages of sorrow for thji- indisposition." 

Stuart, the portrait painter, on>'e said to General Les that Washington 
h. d a tremendous temper, but that he had it under wonderful control. 
While dining with the Waohingtons, General L;e repeated the first part 
of Stuart's remark. Mrs. Washington flushed, and said that Mr. Stuart 
took a great deal up an himself. Then General Lee said that Mr. 
Stuart had added that the President had his temper under wonderful 
control. Washington seemed to bj thinking for a moment, then he smilea 
ana sai'J, "Mr. Stuart is right." 



THE UPLIFT 



WIBMIB 
I III IB, 



WiiiW mm 



Wk 



■ 




Feb. 22, 1732 



GEORGE WASHINGTON 



Dec. 14, 1799 



THE UPLIFT 



THE MOTHER OF WASHINGTON. 



By A. M. Barnes. 



In the year of his inaugural as 
first President of the new American 
Republic, a great sorrow came to 
Washington in the death of Ms 
mother. 

No finer tribute has ever been paid 
to motherhood than the one credited 
to a Jewish rabbi: "God could not 
be everywhere, and so he made moth- 
ers. ' ' A mother in its highest, truest 
sense was Mary Ball Washington, 
the mother of the man who achieved 
the greatness of being "first in the 
hearts of his countrymen." Wash- 
ington was only one of the numerous 
company of the great men of the 
world who owed much of what they 
became to a mother's force of char- 
acter, her steadfast devotion to life 's 
highest ideals. 

Like the Washington of Sulgrave 
Manor, Mary Ball could trace her 
ancestry back to ' ' high-born English- 
men. ' Her forefathers came to 
America about the same time as did 
John and Lawrence Washington, the 
former destined to become the great- 
grandfather of the future President. 
Like the Washingtons, too, the Balls 
soon become people of prominence in 
the colony. Her father, Joseph Ball, 
was a prosperous planter of Lanees- 
ter County, Virginia. 

Historians describe Mary Ball as 
"a beauty and a belle,'' not only 
of the neighborhood, but of the 
colony. Although extremely popular, 
however, she was not a belle in the 
sense that she was a slave to the 
mandates of fashion nor a devotee 
at the shrine of frivolity. Even in 



these days of early womanhood, when 
the cup of pleasure could have been 
drained to its depths, she showed 
plainly that to her life was "real 
and earnest," that no portion of it 
was to be wasted in selfish living. 
No young woman ever had a higher 
sense of life's obligations than Mary 
Ball, nor sought more faithfully to 
live up to them. 

If was while visiting relatives in 
England that she met Augustine 
Washington, grandson of John Wash- 
ington, who, in 1657, had come to 
America in company with his broth- 
er, Lawrence. 

At the time Augustine Washington 
and Mary Ball met in England he 
was there attending to some matters 
of business. He was a widower, and 
the father of Lawrence Washington, 
through whom in the course of time 
beautiful Mount Vernon came into 
the possession of his half-brother, 
George. 

Mary Ball and Augustine Wash- 
ington were married in England and 
returned to America to live in the 
Washington home at Bridges Creek, 
in Westmoreland County, Virginia. 
This home, as one -who knew it des- 
cribes it, was "no palatial residence, 
but a simple home, with sloping roof 
and dormer windows, such as was the 
familiar style of architecture of that 
period. ' ' The plantation, however, 
was of considerable size, consisting 
of a thousand acres, which "sloped 
gently toward t' e Potomac. ' ' It was 
in this home that the future Presi- 
dent, the first child of this marriage, 



THE UPLIFT 



was born February 22 (new style,) 
1732. 

Unfortunately, this birthplace of 
our First President was burned. Mrs. 
Washington herself was. the innocent 
cause of it. In her zeal for neatness 
and order in her surroundings, she 
cleaned the yard herself, lacking a 
servant at the time. Raking: the 



belonging to the parish church, the 
sexton of the clmrch acting as teach- 
er. Many things George could not 
learn at school his mother taught 
him. It is stated that the "One 
Hundred Rules for Behavior in 
Company, ' ' that he copied with pains, 
and "in such a neat hand,'' in one 
of his blank books, were those his 




JUMEL MANSION 



lea'\ es into a pile, she set them on 
fire. A high wind came up, and be- 
fore the danger was realized, the 
burning leaves had been carried to 
the shingled roof of the house. 

After the burning of this home, 
and when George was just a li+tle 
m re than tiiree years old, his parents 
removed to an estate on the Rap- 
pahannock River, in the vicinity of 



Fredericksburg. It was he i 



that 



Washington's first schooldays were 
.spent. It was a plan, old-fashioned 
school, taught in a small building- 



mother had written out for him. 

When George was nearing his 
t ivelfth year his father died, leaving 
his wife with five small children for 
whom to care. Accounts agree ill 
stating that, while Mary Ball Wash- 
ington was a strict disci nlinarian in 
the bringing up of her children, she 
was also a loving, devoted mother, 
with a heart of tenderness and sym- 
pathy. While seeking to rear them 
"in the fear and admonition of the 
Lord,'' she at the same time never 
denied them any harmless pleasure 



THE UPLIFT 



it was in her power to give them. 

In the days of Washington's boy- 
hood very much the same customs 
prevailed in America as in England. 
Among these customs was that of 
leaving the landed estate to the eldest 
son. As George's half-brother, Law- 
rence, some years older than himself, 
was to be the head of the family at 
his father's death, he was sent to 
England to be educated and to learn 
all the fine manners appropriate for 
the landed gentleman he was to be- 
come. Thus he grew deeply attached 
to England. On his return to Amer- 
ica he received the appointment of 
captain in the English army, and 
his company was one sent with a 
regiment to wage war against the 
Spaniards in the West Indies. The 
young George, inspired by his broth- 
er's soldierly spirit, also longed to 
enter the service of England, though 
his preference was for the sea. He 
was just a little past his fourteenth 
year when his brother Lawrence se- 
cured for him a commission in the 
British navy. Overjoyed, George 
hastened to tell his mother; but his 
heart sank when he noticed her ex- 
pression. 

"For one thing, my son," she said 
to him, "you are too young to leave 
home. For another, I do not wish 
you to enter the navy. It is a rough 
life. Your companions will be god- 
less men. ' ' 

George was too obedient a son not 
to yield to his mother's wishes; and 
one cannot help but wonder what 
different trend would have been given 
to certain chapters of American his- 
tory had Mary Washington yielded 
her consent to her son's entrance as 
a midshipman in the British navy. 



While the mother of Washington 
must have had all of a mother's 
pride and joy in the splendid achieve- 
ments of her great son, yet it is re- 
lated of her that she never once open- 
ly exulted over his rise to renown, 
or ever allowed words of congratula- 
tion to him personally to pass her 
lips. Once, when some other distin- 
guished man — some writers state that 
it was Lafayette — was speaking to her 
in the highest praise of her son's 
glorious record in the cause of Ameri- 
can independence, she replied, "He 
has only done his duty." 

Even when he had been exalted to 
the highest position within the gift 
of his countrymen, and all America 
was ringing with his name, she still 
refused to join in the general lauda- 
tion. This story is related by more 
than one historian: 

Shortly after he had become Presi- 
dent, Washington visited his mother 
at Fredericksburg. As befitted his 
high position, he traveled in consider- 
able state. A messenger was sent 
ahead to announce to his mother his 
coming. 

Greeting Mrs. Washington, the mes- 
senger said to her, ' ' Madam, I am 
sent to state to you that His Excel- 
lency will shortly be here." 

With a little indignant toss of the 
head, and with a slight frown, the 
mother of the first President of the 
United States replied, 

"His Excellency, is it? Well, you 
can tell my son George that his moth- 
er is waiting to see him. ' ; 

He might be everybody else's Presi- 
dent, ' ' His Excellency, ' ' but to her 
he was still ' ' my son George. ' ' 

It is truly unaccountable that, con- 
sidering the patriotic spirit of Ameri- 



THE UPLIFT 




WASHINGTON DANCING A MINUET 



cans, their reverence for the name of 
Washington, the grave of the mother 
of the first President of the United 
States should have remained so long 
neglected. For some years there was 
but a plain stone marking the gTave, 
and this stone had been shamefully 
defaced by the vandalism of sight- 
seers, from time to time, who had 
chipped away pieces of it to be car- 
ried away as souvenirs. 

Finally, the people of Virginia, feel- 
ing that a suitable monument ought 
to be erected, w 'de effort to secure 
one. The attention of Congre :<•- was 
called to ;ne matter. At two or ibxee 
different tir;o bills were introduced 
set xin" to sec ire an appropriation; 
but erch timo failed of pas age. F.o- 
a long period the grave remained un- 



marked ; then suddenly something 
very startling happened that brought 
matters to a head. Not only the peo- 
ple of Fredericksburg, but of the 
whole State of Virginia, received a 
shock when they read in their news- 
papers the statement that the plot 
of ground containing the grave of 
Mary Washington was about to be 
sold at public auction. 

This was a clarion call to the peo- 
ple of Virginia, especially to + he wom- 
en of the State They rose to the oc- 
casion by forming tie Mary Washing- 
ton Memorial Association, an-j set 
to work a; :>nc? to secure the money 
not only for the purchase of the land 
containing the grave, but also for 
th. erection of a monument. 

The monument was completed dur- 



THE UPLIFT 



9 



ing the presidency of Grover Cleve- 
land, and he went to Fredericksburg 
to have prominent part in its dedi- 
cation. It was an occasion on which 
were gathered not only many of the 
most distinguished men of Virginia, 
but of the nation. 

Senator Daniels' oration contained 
this glowing tribute "At her knee 
she trained to the love and fear of 
God the lion of that tribe that gave 



to America her independence. ' ' 

It will no doubt be a source of 
wonder to the reader ,as to Iwhy 
Washington himself did not erect an 
appropriate monument to his mother. 
He expressed his intention of doing 
so, on more than one Occasion, but 
was importuned to leave that honor 
for the people of Virginia. He died 
at the height of the movement for the 
erection of the monument. 




WASHINGTON AT HOME 



10 



THE UPLIFT 



HAUNTS OF WASHINGTON IN NEW 
YORK CITY. 



By Julia W. Wolfe. 



To every American, and the 
majority of foreigners, for that mat- 
ter, the name of Washington sounds 
a note of such deep interest, that 
the wayfarer in New York might, 
with pleasure and profit, give him- 
self a Washington day in observ- 
ing whatever is associated with the 
first president in the metropolitan 
city. To carry out this object, one 
cannot do better, in' theory at any 
rate, than land at the Battery as 
did Washington when summoned fc. 
receive the greatest honor bestowed 
upon him by his country. To be 
sure the Battery of today in most 
of its features little resembles the 
spot in the latter half of the eigh- 
teen century; but still it is de- 
finite Washington territory, and it 
is likely the wide, far-reaching view 
of the bay impressed Washington 
much as it does the twentieth cen- 
tury visitor. But its setting is now 
vastly different, for in place of the 
gigantic office buildings facing har- 
borward, stood the residences of 
New York's fashionable society. 
Much as one would like to suggest 
a particular house as entertaining 
AYashington, it is certain that, iu 
this quarter, not a brick of his era 
remains in place. Neither can bet- 
ter fortune in this respect be hoped 
until Fraunces' Tavern is reached. 
Considering the ravages of fi.r.3 
and real estate speculators it would 
seem that almost by a miracle has 
this old hostelry been preserved to 
us, as the ever memorable scene of 



Washhyrton' 's farewell Ho his of- 
fices on Evacuation Day, 1783, when 
the last British soldier had departed 
from New York territory. At that pe- 
riod Fraunces' Tavern was in the 
New York territory. At that peri- 
od Fraunces' Tavern was in the 
heart of the city, which seemed to 
cling more to the East River than 
the Hudson. Passing on to Wall 
Street, a century ago pleasantly 
lined with shade trees, on the site 
how occupied by the sub-treasury 
stood Federal Hall. In front a sta- 
tue of Washington, in the role o£ 
statesman, marks th e spot where he 
took the oath of office as the firs^ 
president of the United States, and 
on the pedestal is the stone on which 
he stood, then forming part of the 
floor of a balcony. Doubtless with 
significant intention, wp are told, 
on that occasion he wore a suit of 
brown cloth with white silk stock- 
ings, all of American manufacture. 
Those not overweighted with the 
present financial atmosphere of the 
place, may with the aid of old 
prints, form a mental picture of 
the scene and with Washington, at- 
tended by both houses of Congress, 
proceed to St. Paul's, on Broadway. 
There a solemn Te Deum of grat- 
itude was sung for the happy con- 
summation of the long struggle for 
freedom. 

Like Fraunces' Tavern St. Paul's 
has remained to our day much as 
it stood in pre-revolutionery times, 
being the second of the three 



THE UPLIFT 



11 



building-s so left in New York 
City. As thereafter Washington 
was a regular attendant at St. Paul's 
his pew may be seen in the north 
aisle in the side wall, since closed. 
But previously, it would appear 
Washington frequently worshiped at 
St. George's, near Trinity, on a site 
now occupied by a business block. 
This calls to mind some pre-revolu- 
tionary relies of curious interest 
which New York has let slip from 
her grasp. Briefly, while King 
George yet held sway over the col- 
onies a ship trading out of New York 
was dismantled in the Gulf of Mexico 
and compeled to put into a port of Cen- 
tral America to refit with mahogsny 
tral America to refit with mahogany 
the spars were found too heavy for 
the size o fthe vessel, so they were 
presented to St. George's and fashion- 
ed into a pulpit, reading desk and 
altor rails. Doubtless, therefore, 
Washington heard more than one 
sermon delivered from this pulpit. 
But when St. George's was dismantled 
these relics found their way to Christ 
Church, Manhasset, Long Island, 
where, it is to be hoped, they still 
remain. 

From St. Paul 's a visit may be 
made to City Hall, where Washing- 
ton's desk, table, and other person- 
al relics are preserved ; and thence 
to Franklin Square, on one corner 
of which stood the firrst executive 
mansion. A tablet on one of the 
piers of the Brooklyn Bridge gives 
this as 1 Cherry Street, so where to- 
day the elevated and bridge traffic 
crash overhead, President and Lady 
Washington held their reception in 
courtly fashion. But not even the 
present surroundings, perhaps, mark 



so great a change between our day 
and his as the termination of such 
official gatherings punctually at nine 
o 'clock. On this spot one longing- 
ly asks if no wall stands to echo 
the sound of Washington's voice. 
The best answer to be given is, that 
while no pre-revolutionary building 
remains, it may be that parts of such 
structures of uncertain date, as 26 
Cherry Street, existed at Washing- 
ton's death. 

Leaving the region of Franklin 
Square and passing uptown, one loses, 
as it were, a direct touch with Wash- 
ington to note the manner in which 
the greater city has honored his 
memory. As part of the celebration 
of the one hundreth anniversary of 
Washington's inauguration, a tem- 
porary arch was erected spanning 
Fifth Avenue on the north side of 
Waverly Place. This' attracted sjo 
much attention that the decision was 
reached to perpetuate it in white 
marble, by public subscription on the 
present site in Washington Square 
directly facing Fifth Avenue. The 
arch rises sevently-seven feet, and the 
group of figures designed on it, is 
a noble witness of the worth of Amer- 
ica's first president. On the north 
panel is the following inscription from 
Washington's address: 

"Let us raise a standard to which 
the wise and honest can repair. The 
Event is in the Hands of God." 

Proceeding to Union Square you 
will find a equestrain statue of Wash- 
ington erectefl by the city, which 
admirably represents him as one of 
the greatest military commanders of 
all time. Another statue of Wash- 
ington, subscribed for by the chil- 
dren of the public schools, stands in 



12 THE UPLIFT 

Riverside Drive near ; Eighty-eighth tablet and bas-relief set in the halls 

Street, and ' is a reduced replica of of Columbia University by the Sons 

the Hudson statue at Richmond, Va. of the Revolution. To complete the 

A fourth statue of Washington greet- Washington tour there remains the 

ing- Lafayette, is to be seen at the Jumel Mansion, the third and last 

junction of Manhattan and Morning- pre-revolutionary building standing 

side Avenues bearing the signature in the city, and concerning which 

of Bartholdi as sculptor. In the posi- many pages of ' ' historical fiction ' ' 

tion of this statue there is much ap- li£>v e been written. This house for 

propriateness, for near by Wash- a brief period was Washington's head- 

ington won the victory of Harlem quarters. It is now a museum, aud 

Heights over the royal troops on is the property of the Daughters of 

September 16, 1776. This event is the American Revolution, 
further commemorated by a bronze 



AN OUTRAGE. 



When Washington was young and slim. 
And went to school and worked with vim, 
It must have been extraordinary 
To study straight through February. 
I feel quite sorry, now, for him. 

Perhaps there was a birthday cake 
With lighted candles, for his sake, 
But still, according to the rule, 
He and the rest were sent to school. 
I think it was a big mistake. 

Oh, well! you see, they couldn't know, 
(And maybe it was better so) 
That such a little fellow 'd be 
The father of his country free, 
Or what a great man he would grow. 

So, when the twenty-second came 
The children studied just the same, 
With pen and book, the very way 
They studied any common day — 
You know this was a perfect shame! 

— Nancy Byrd Turner. 



THE UPLIFT 



13 



RAMBLING AROUND. 



(Old Hurry graph.) 



I do not know how it is in other 
places but in Durham automobile so- 
ciety is fast foaming itself into caste, 
from the talk I hear now and then. 
Pretty soon the "big bug" cars will 
be turning up their noses at tile 
cheaper cars, and passing them en 
the street without speaking, or I 
might say, honking. "I don't think 
I will ever be able to ride in a Ford 
again, atte- I have ridden in a 
Buiek or Cadilae," I heard a lady 
remark the other day. The caste is 
forming as the common class; the 
middle class; the upper class, or the 
"four hundred," just like some folks 
classify humanity. Is it coming to 
this? I have no compunctions oC 
conscience on riding i n any kind of 
a car. I am willing to associate 
with them from the least to the great- 
est, and count all makes my friends, 
just so they do not run over me — 
while 1 am not looking. 



There is one thing about men's 
underwear I never could understand, 
and it has never been satisfactorily 
explained to me. For instance: Take 
the ordinary, o r commonly used, 
men's undershirt. After a fellow 
has worn one for a little while one 
sleeve will begin to stretch, or crawl, 
and every time you put it on that 
sleeve has grown longer, the wrist 
end seeming like it was going out 
into the neighborhood to look for 
somebody, and your arm looks and 
feels like it was encased in one leg c f 
a union suit that was walking away; 
while the other sleev e will draw up, 
and climb up your arm like mercury 



going down a weather indicator, and 
trying' its best to keep you from hav- 
ing elbow room : in fact, trying to 
part company with you by going over 
your shoulder and head. You can 
roll them up and pull t'aem out, b'lZ 
they continue their several journeys 
in opposite directions, and make a 
fellow feel one-sided, and no sided. 
Why don't the makers cut. sleeves 
from the same cloth, with tha 
stretching 1 going the same way, or 
vice versa, as lawyers say? 



In primitive days the Indians used 
bonfires, and with blankets, covering 
the smoke, communicated with each 
other by signals. Then came the 
telegraph. This was followed by the 
telephone and the long distance. 
Now it is the ra.dio. It is stated 
that it takes about one-tenth of a sec- 
ond for a wave to get from a radio 
station in Chicago round to the An- 
tipodes; therefore the most distant 
individual in the whole world from 
us is one-tenth of a second away. 
That is certainly bringing the woird 
close together. Air full of voices. 
songs and speech. This more and 
more impresses me that with that 
scripture, from Heb. 12-1: "Where- 
fore, seeing we also are compassed 
abort with so great a cloud of wit- 
nesses, let us lay aside every weight, 
and sin, which doth so easily beset 
vs, and let us run with patience the 
race that is set before us." Verily 
the air is filled with witnesses. 



Speaking of radio, which is our 
newest infant protege of modern 



14 



THE UPLIFT 



science, it is worth noting that al- 
ready in this country three million 
homes are equipped with radio sets; 
and that about four hundred million 
dollars is now being spent annually 
for radio sets and accessories. Dur- 
ham has a good supply. I know a 
Durham man so fascinated with ra- 
dio that he spends his evenings at 
home working with it. He says it is 
the only thing he has discovered by 
which you can stop a man or woman 
from talking in a polite way withor.t 
offending them. That's why he 
likes it. He 'gets' way off places 
some nights that you'd never dream 
you could hear in North Carolina. 
He gets so tired some nights that 
his wife works the dial for him. 1 
think slie must have gotten Chile one 
night, for she had a terrible cold the 
last time I saw her. 



I don't know why mention' of a 
wife should remind me that yester- 
day was Valentine's Day, but it did. 
I think I heard of a husband sending 
better half a Valentine once, ami 
that must have made a lasting im- 
pression in my sub-conscious mind — 
as the unusual often does. A more 
common experience, I am sorry to 
say, is that of a certain married man 
in this town who received a Valen- 
tine last year from a lady who was 
not his better half, and nearly a year 
later his wife found it carefully per- 
served in his breast pocket. I never 
did hear just what she said, but I 
woultn't wonder if her husband could 
tell vou. 



was a victim of old fashion chivalry. 
He always gives up his seat to a lady 
and every time he sits down in the 
barber chair, he sees a lady waiting 
for the same seat, and promptly hops 
up and gives it to her. He 's thinking 
of kidnapping the barber and his 
implements and taking him off to the 
hills somewhere for a private session. 
I 'm not sure that that would save hiim 
though, for even the hills are full 
of ladies nowadays— although so dis- 
guised sometimes it's hard to be sure. 
I heard there was a string of them 
climbing a hillock near here the other 
day, some iin masculine garments and 
some in feminine, and some in hy- 
brid affairs that were neither ex- 
actly one or the other. 



Jerry Markham, 76 years old, the 
colored retired "man of all work," 
who lives in a row of sheds, having 
three cows, a horse, and chickens, 
and who says he is drinking milk 
now in large quantities since the Vol- 
stead act acts like it does with other 
liquids, was in a heated discussoin 
with one of his white friends of the 
city, a few days ago, and the white 
friend told him there was no mention 
of colored folks in the bible. Jerry 
scratched his head, studied a few mo- 
ments, and then came back at his 
white friend with, "Well, boss, how 



Have any of you noticed a man with 
an outgrowing beard around here late- 
ly? I have, and some one told me he 



I was in the hospital a few days 
ago—not sent there for any ailment 
or dissection — just visiting to give 
to give a little cheer to a patient, and 
see how the sick were getting on. 
One of the patients, wo seemed to 
be getting on fine, said he had been 



THE UPLIFT 



15 



censored. "Censored?" I asked in 
surprise, thinking how mean it was to 
scold a poor sick man. "Yes," he 
went on with a grin. "I had several 
important parts cut out." But I was 
ready for him. "That's nothing," 
"said I. I had two columns cut 
out once. And its nothing to have 
a paragraph or two cut every day. 



Another patient told me that a 
doctor (before he came to the hos- 
pital) had offered to exaimne his for 
$15. and he told him to go ahead, and 
if he found it, to split fifty-fifty. 
This one had just had the barber to 
cut his hair, it was growing so fast 
while he was in bed. He told the bar- 
ber to be careful not to cut it too 
short or people would mistake him 
for his wife. 



I was talking the other day with 
some of the high school pupils on their 
progress and one little fellow, who 
seemed to have the germs of an edi- 
tor in him said they had a wonderful 
art teacher in that school. He said 
that Miss Mary Pegrani, the teacher, 
drew a picture of a piece of beef 
fiteak the other day that was so 
natural a stray dog that had wander- 
ed in grabbed it up and ate it. "Aw 
come oft'," said another little fellow, 
from another school. "That's noth- 
ing. Our art teacher at the Fuller 
School, once drew a hen and threw 
.it into the wastebasket, and their 
it laid. ' ' 



A grouch sooner or later meets his 
match. I hear of a husband who was 
always criticising his wife 's pudding 
found fault with her cake; didn't 
make flapjacks or mend his socks 
like his mother used to do. The wife 
with patience was doing her best. 
She bore his nagging about what 
mother used to do, until one day the 
backbone of patience snapped. When 
her hubby started up his same old song 
in a fit of unbearable desperation 
she up and boxed his ears as his moth- 
er used to do. That settled it. He 
did as good husbands usually do ; turn- 
ed his fault finding to praise, and 
they were happy ever after that. 



I met Miss Marggaret Herr, of the 
high school faculty, bright as a new 
silver dollar and asked her if she 
could give me any news, or tell me a 
story. Right of the reel she says, 
"Did you ever hear of the Johnstown 
man who died and went to heaven?" 
I told her I had not. "Well, it was 
this way. The fellow from Johnstown 
died and went to heaven and after 
he had gotten in the gate, St. Peter 
told him he must tell some of the trib- 
ulations he had gone through. He 
told the story of the Johnstown flood. 
While he was telling it he saw an 
old gray headed fellow get up and 
walk away in disgust. After he had 
finished he asked St. Peter who 
that old fellow was. ' ' Oh that was 
Noah,' repliied the Saint." 



"Into the jaws of death rode the Six Hundred." Shucks, pedestrains 
do that every day and think nothing of it. — Itoanoke Times. 



16 



THE UPLIFT 



FOREVER OUR FIRST. 

Robert Lee Madison. 

FIRST IN WAR— 

He breaks the tyrant's chain, 
Bears undaunted peril, want, and pain, 
Trusts in God till freed&m's cause is won, 
Noble Christian warrior, Washington. 

FIRST IN PEACE— 

He guides the Ship of State, 
Safe where sirens sing and whirlpools wait; 
Cautious, calm, discreet — oh, there was none 
Fitted for his task as Washington! 

FIRST IN FREEMEN'S HEARTS— 
Till end of time; 
Hero, sage, and patriot sublime; 
Idol and ideal of our land, 
Truthful, honest, loyl, modest, grand. 



"First in War," a knight with stainless steel; 
"First in Peace," a chief who sought our iveal; 
Freedom, Fame, and Love enthroned him then 
"First in the hearts of his countrymen." 



THE UPLIFT 



17 



RUTS. 

By James Hay, Jr. 



All the successful workers have dis- 
covered that there is one thing no 
man may do and retain his financial 
life. It is a self-indulgence which 
Edison was never brave enough to 
sSnona usi[ooj p.10^ ion 'asipe-id 
to contemplate, nor Rockerfeller rich 
enough to risk. 

It destroys credit and repels the 
public. It devitalizes energy and vi- 
tiates intelligence. Tt robs even 
genius of its glory. Without it, any 
man may accomplish better things 
and rise to greater heights. Under 
its terrific handicap no man can grasp 
an alluring opportunity or create a 
brilliant future. Inevitibly as the 
hours come and pass, it breaks the 
arm of ambition and blinds the eyes 
of enterprise. 

It frequency and its depraving pow- 
er are responsible for the popular 
and absurd delusion that men past 
fifty can never go into a new line 
of work and succeed. 

All of which means this : getting 
into a rut is the supreme sin in 
modern business. It is suicide. It 
rushes its victims to loss of money 
and destruction of reputation, and 
the rushing is always at top speed. 
That is to say procrastination is the 
thief of trade; and those who dwell 
in ruts are punctual once only: their 
appointments with ruin are always 
kept. 

When you are in a rut, you are 
convinced that the business methods 
of yesterday will meet and beat the 
competetition of today. When you 



are in a rut, you forget that business 
has its fashions no less than woman, 
that the business man who fails to 
learn and use "the latest thing out" 
accompanies last year's hats and 
shoes to the rubbish pile. 

' ' Watchful waiting ' ' has no charms 
for success. The new thing is the 
open seasame of the people's purse. 

The man who is "in a rut" has 
slipped a mental cog. He has per- 
suaded himself that there is no new 
path to profits. Act the Christopher 
Columbus to the world of new meth- 
ods, new advertising, new selling 
talk? Not he! Not in a thousand 
years ! 

He made good, he reflects, when 
he was twenty-five, when he was 
thirty-five, when he was forty. Why 
change at forty-two? Why look for 
"new stuff" in the conduct of his 
business? 1 Useless! — and that set- 
tles it — he has found his rut and 
lain down in it. Being in it, he not 
only works less efficiently, but he 
soon reaches the point where the 
light of imagination is lost. He 
thinks of nothing new, striking or 
original. 

The tragedy of the tiling is that, 
while a man can plainly see others 
sinking into ruts, he can seldom de- 
tect the beginnings of his own des- 
cent. 

Does the constant ringing of the 
cash register across the street drive 
you to haled of tha.t competitor 
instead of spurring you on to new 
ideas to attract trade? Instead of 
reading advertisements ottering to 



18 



THE UPLIFT 



teach you better methods, do you im- 
patiently toss them into the trash 
basket? Are you a professional man, 
losing your old clients, and not at- 
tracting new ones"? Is your income 
as large as it once was? 

These an'd similar queries, if an- 
swered fairly in your own mind, will 
show you soon enough which way you 
are headed. 

And yet, no matter how deeply a 
man has sunk into the unproductive 
groove, be can get (out. Not tflia 
gelling ov.t is easy! If it were, there 
would be fewer ruts and fewer peo- 
ple in the ruts. But getting out is 
the thing that is being done every 
day. It is the one attractive thing- 
connected with ruts. 



There was the case of the travel- 
ing man who, up to his thirty-fifth 
year, was a whirling wonder. He 
was a world-beater as a salesman. 
He could sell anything. His friends 
said of him : ' ' He could sell ivory 
toothpicks to an elephant for tusks!" 
Merchants, when they saw him com- 
ing, sighed resignedly and reached 
for their checkbooks. 

Suddenly he lost his grip. His 
commissions shrank and dwindled to 
nothing. Buyers stopped reaching for 
checkbooks. He became a rank fail- 
ure. What was worse, he confessed 
the fact. 

After three years of this, he met 
a woman who took the trouble to 
tell him what she thought of him and 



what ailed him. "She made me ad- 
mit to her and to myself what I 
hadn't admitted before," he sail 
afterwards. ' ' She made me see that 
my failure had come from loss of 
interest in my work, from a conceit- 
ed idea that I could sell without ex- 
erting myself and from contempt for 
the abilities and enterprises of my 
competitors. 

' ' As soon as I realized this, I knew 
I'd been in a rut. But I also knew 
that the stuff of success was still 
in me if I choose to draw on it. I 
did choose to draw on it. I hit the 
road with my old enthusiasm, energy 
and courage. And I gqt back to 
where I had been. Another way of 
saying that I got out of the rut that 
was killing me. ' ' 

Life's business can not be operated 
like a railroad. It must be devoid 
of sidetracks and terminal facilities. 
To win is to keep going. The high- 
jump medals don't go to those who 
stand flat-footed on the grass rail 
their lives. Success comes only to 
those who rush forth to meet it. 

But for the man who has been 
overcome for the moment by the 
fierceness of the conflict, there is 
this consoling knowledge : he who re- 
fuses to drink the poison of yester- 
day's defeats finds the everlasting- 
fires of hope in the crimson glory 
of today's rising sun. And with that 
torch he can burn away all the bar- 
ricades of idleness, all the bonds of 
sloth. He can achieve! 



The fame of Washington stands apart from every other in history, 
shining with a true luster and more benignant glory. — Washington Irving. 



The Uplift 



A WEEKLY JOURNAL 



PUBLISHED BY 



The Authority of the Stonewall Jackson Manual Training and Industrial 

School. Type-setting by the Boys Printing Class. Subscription 

Two Dollars the Year in Advance 

JAMES P. COOK, Editor, J. C. FISHER, Director Printing Department 



Entered as second-class matter Dec. 4, 1920 at the Post Office at Concord, 
N. C. under act of March 3, 1379. Acceptance for mailing at special rate 
of 4, 1923. 



It is said that a child in broken health asked, ' 'Father, how much would 
my education cost?" Why do you ask that, my daughter?" inquired 
the father, greatly interested. "Because, father, I want you to spend 
that much money in educating some other child when I am gone." "I 
will do it for your sake, ' ' replied the father. And he did. The result 
was that Alexander H. Stephens of Georgia invested and reinvested that 
money in ninety young lives and only one of them proved unworthy. 
That little girl must somewhere in God's universe be crowned with many 
crowns. — Greensboro Advocate. 



LET US NOT FORGET THEM. 

We have in the neighborhood of 420 boys at the Jackson Training School, 
who have their eyes set on Christinas and Christmas spirit. With boys this 
means, besides the celebration of the great anniversary, those things that 
normal children in normal homes enjoy. 

You business man, you fine spirited man, . you kindly woman, there must 
appear to you at once that to hand to all these boys a proper Christmas treat 
means a considerable outlay. Do you wish to help? Of course, you do— 
you did this thing last Christmas and you did it before; and you remember 
what pleasure it gave you. It is true that it is more pleasant to give than to 
receive. 

Voluntarily and unsolicited, there came to The Uplift' from Mr. A. W. 
Klemme, of High Point, a starter of this annual Christmas Fund, a check 



6 THE UPLIFT 

Trustee of the Kiwanis, upon invitation, made a rousing exhibit of the use- 
fulness of the Kiwanis, analyzed what it stood for and applauded whtit the 
several clubs in the state had thus far accomplished and bade them to press for- 
ward. 

He was followed in a pleasing address by Supt. Joe Johnston, of the 
Barium Spring's Orphanage, who discussed from his storehouse of experiences 
and observations as the head of an orphanage "The Underpriviledged Child. " 
Then Mr. C. A. Owens, of Lexington, entertained the Kiwanians with a 
scholarly and timely address, which bore directly and forcibly upon the 
spirit of true Kiwaninism. 

The music was extraordinary; the spirit was folksy; happiness and joy 
reigned ; and that pleasant evening shall be duplicated on home ground when 
our half million dollar hotel is transferred from the blue prints to the select- 
ed site — it won 't be long, until representative bodies may be entertained in 
our midst. Glorious prophecy, backed by the hand-writing on the wall. 

AN HOUR WITH A CHURCH PAPER. 

In the reading that engages The Uplift none gives more pleasure and pront 
than the reading of the several church papers that come to our desk. It is 
our pleasure to have access to the church publications of all the. leading and 
outstanding denominations represented in the South, except that of the 
Catholic church. 

An Hour With the Presbytetrian Standard 

Engages us at this moment. This is a great church paper and edited by a 
scholarly gentleman, who though physically small has a courage to speak most 
plainly his thoughts about all matters that affect religious matters and es- 
pecially those that directly affect his denomination, that of the Presbyterian 
church. Dr. Bridges is a representative of the fine scholarship that has ob- 
tained in this denomination; he has had wide evperiences in nearly every field 
of church activity. He hits hard when he faces a proposition — not a physical 
or puglistie hit, but one of fine reasoning and strongly backed up by a know- 
ledge that has been tested out in actual life. 

In the Issue of November 26th 

The Standard reviews the reasons why the ministers disapproved of the lady 
in charge of a course of Bible readings, recently given in Charlotte under 
the auspices of the Young Women's Christian Association. It so happens 
that the lady in question was one of the collaborators of the "Shorter Bible." 



THE UPLIFT 7 

The average man has never seen this Shorter Bible and knows less about it, 
to his own good — it is a mutilated production of The Bible; and is the work 
of two Divinity Professors of Yale University, ' ' the hot-bed of Modernism, ' ' 
and the secretaries of the Young Men's Christian Association and the Sec- 
retary of the Young Women's Christian Association, the latter being Miss 
EShel Cutler and who was the one in charge of the Charlotte Bible readings 
that did not meet the approval of the ministers. 

These Presumtious Dignitaries 

Have given out a mongrel Bible, having eliminated several whole books in 
the Old Testament, and mutilated every book in the New Testament except 
one. It seems, as Dr. Bridges points out, a hidden motive that shows that 
the "Shorter Bible" is one of the many methods of propagating the teach- 
ings of Modernism. 

This mongrel Bible has been condemned by the General Assembly of the 
Presbyterian Church, and the doctor would have proven an unworthy steward 
had he ignored the request of "one of the elect ladies, "who inquired why 
the ministers held aloof from Miss Cutler's readings. In passing, it might 
avail something to note that it is not entiely safe to leave all the religious 
training and the methods employed to the Y. M. C. A's. and the Y. W. C. A's. 
— enthusiasm, excitement, novelty and the spectacular may lead, sometimes, 
somewhere and somehow, to regrettable pitfalls. 

"Another Disturber." 

Editorially Dr. Bridges notes that "another Baptist Disturber" has gotten 
into the Presbytery of New York. In introducing what he says, Dr. Bridges 
is pleased to say: "That Northern Baptists are not as sound in the faith 
as those of the South, who, as far as we know, are sound to the man." Just 
why a preacher of one denomination will seek or accept a pastoral position 
in another denomination without renouncing his former views and then accept 
the pastorate of the denomination in whose field be desires to work, is hard 
to explain except that he is a seeker after notoriety, or lacks Christian piety 
or is dishonest with himself. 

Dr. Bridges deplores the admission of this preacher that has taken work 
in the New York Presbytery, and reviewing the answers that the applicant 
gave to the leading questions propounded to him on vital matters that con- 
cern all Protestant churches, there is a surprise that he was admitted by a 
vote of 69 to 23. The replies given to vital questions were such that re. 



8 THE UPLIFT 

would not be received into a single church connection in the South — he is too 
unsound to be trusted as a Christian teacher. He would fit better in the 
councils of modernism or an enemy of real Christian effort. 
How They Have Organized 
In one hour's reading of The Standard we ran across a communication by 
Mr. J. Archie Cannon, who wrote entertainingly of the organization that has 
charge of the affairs of the Men's Bible Class, of the First Presbyterian 
church of Concord. The Uplift reproduces Mr. Cannon's article, for no oth- 
er purpose than to show that the employment of business methods and the 
creation of a working organization appears necessary in the work of the 
Lord, if the work of the church is to prosper. Mr. Cannon wrote The Stand- 
ard as follows: 

We have a very fine onrganization in the way of a Men's Bible Class 
with officers consisting of a president, vice-president, treasurer, and four 
teachers. We also have a missionary committee both for Home and 
Foreign Missions and we are supporting two missionaries — one in the 
home and one in the foreign field. Our membership committee consists 
of a chairman and eight associates. The class is divided into teams and 
the captains of the teams have the duty of seeing that the members come 
to Sunday School. As an inducement to these teams and to the team 
captain we have a loving cup and the team making the highest percentage 
of attendance during the year will have their names inscribed on the cup. 
Our devotional committee, made up of 20 men, agrees to lead in prayer 
at any time or anywhere. We also have teams of four men whose duty 
it is to conduct the mid-week prayer service whenever they are called 
upon, each member of these teams taking a part in the service. We have 
about 83 enrollments in what we call our shut-ins, under the head of 
our home department. These are people that either cannot be persuaded 
to come to Sunday School or they are physically unable. We have a 
committee to look after these 83 members by carrying them literature 
and taking up their contributions. We have a teachers' committee of 
young men who have agreed to substitute in Sunday School in the ab- 
sence of a regular teacher. In this way we keep our Sunday School well 
supplied with teachers. 

Prayer 

Is the theme of a lecture by a member of the South Carolina Supreme Court. 
It is so novel to find a lawyer, who has reached such high position in life, ' ' to 
find the time" to contribute to the work of the church, and the lecture is 
so fine and deals with a matter that deserves more attention in these pecu- 
liar times, that The Uplift is reproducing it in our issue of next week. It is 



THE UPLIFT 9 

long, but we dare say not a one of our readers will fail to read the entire 
article when once he begins it. We all need to know more of the efficacy of 
prayer — by theory at least, if we are not humble enough and dependent 
enough to daily practice prayer. 

Judge Fraser is an alumnus of Davidson College, graduating in 1881 ; is 
a leading citizen of South Carolina; a Supreme Court Justice of that state; 
and finds time to teach a Bible Class in Sumter, his home town. 

HE DID HIS PART. 

Another outstanding citizen of the state has passed away in the person of 
Hon. J. Frank Ray, of Macon county, N. C. Mr. Ray served in a number of 
the General Assemblies and there he did his part as he saw it for the 
public weal, especially for the county which he represented. 

He had the foresight and the courage to father a measure, twenty-five years 
ago, looking to the compulsory attendance upon the public schools — for his 
county. And he later passed a dog-law that had teeth in it. These two 
measures are calculated to make a heavy drain on the popularity of any states- 
man, but J. Frank Ray survived it and among his people he was regarded with 
affection. 

This reminds us that we have a compulsory school law for the entire state, 
but it lacks a whole lot of being observed as faithfully as even the Volstead 
act. We have reached this view of the matter from "School Facts" coming- 
out from the office of the state superintendent of education. The enroll- 
ment, according to a recent publication by the state department, in some 
counties reaches only 60 per cent; while in our own county it reaches just 75 
per cent. 

If the school officials and the welfare officers had the courage to stand up, 
as did Frank Ray, the report for the present enrollment in the public schools 
would make a different record. 



"REUBIN RINK." 
Mr. J. Gilmer Korner, who enjoyed a deserved reputation as a real artist, 
is no more in the flesh. He died last Thursday at his home in Kernersville. 
Mr. Korner 's reputation as an artist and a painter is not confined to the 
state. He it was, at the suggestion and as the agent of the late General J. 
S. Carr, covered much of the earth, and at prominent places painted the 



10 THE UPLIFT 

Durham Bull sign that made smoking tobacco a household word through- 
out the world. 

Retiring from that work, he entered the field of a Decorator; and of this 
he was regarded a master. Some of the most elegant homes of the state bear 
the imprint of his taste, his genius and his ability. All in all, while somewhat 
eccentric, like all geniuses, he was a pleasing companion, and was all but 
daffy about things beautiful. Reubin Rink did his part to make North 
Carolina homes beautiful, as he knew the beautiful ; and hundreds of admir- 
ing friends of his, both personal and for his artistic genius, mourn his pass- 
ing. 



<^S^,«^!> 



THE UPLIFT 



11 



THE OUTSTANDING INSTITUTION IN 

THE GALAXY OF NORTH CAROLINA'S 

AID TO HUMANITY. 

By Old Hurrygraph. 

The Casivell Training School a Revelation of the Care Given by the State 
to Her Mental Defectives — Impressive Examples of Bodies without Minds. 



Jesus said : ' ' Inasmuch as ye have 
done it unto one of the least of 
these, my brethren, ye have done it 
unto me." (Matt. 25:40.) Minister- 
ing. Service to others. Even to so 
small a thing as "a cup of cold 
water. ' ' 

North Carolina, with all of her pa- 
triotic generosity and spirit of broth- 
erly love, and christian precepts, has 
one institution, if more than another, 
that stands out as a leadidng charac- 
ter in her humane effort to aid suf- 
fering and unfortunate humanity, 
and that is the Caswell Training School 
for the State 's mental defectives, 
situated in Lenoir county, some three 
miles this side of Kinston. The lo- 
cation is ideal, with buildings prac- 
tically new and all kept in the neat- 
est and most sanitary condition. Sev- 
eral new buildings without equip- 
ment, which if provided, could ac- 
commodate possibly one hundred 
more. The plant is up-to-date in its 
fixtures for "carrying on." There 
are 360 inmates there at the present 
time, with applications for scores of 
more admissions from all parts of 
the State. The farm of 1,000 acres 
is well cultivated ; with a herd of 77 
Holstein cows, 40 of which are milk- 
ed, and from which they get 130 gal- 
lons of milk daily. The best stock 
of hogs are kept, and the several lit- 
ters of pigs are the finest and pret- 



tiest to be found in the State. The 
institution is well set and surround- 
ed with all the comforts of a fine, 
productive farm. 

Durham Officials Visit the Institution 
Durham county commissioners and 
county welfare officials, in keeping 
with an idea they have to visit the 
institutions in the State in which this 
county has patients, and personally 
inspect their management and learn 
more of their work, for their own 
satisfaction, on Tuesday, in a body, 
with interested friends, visited the 
Caswell (named in honor of the first 
governor of North Carolina ) Train- 
ing School, near Kinston. Three 
automobiles, containing nineteen per- 
sons, on one of Carolina's fine hard- 
surfaced roads, except from Smith- 
field to Goldsboro, which was sand clay, 
passed through Nelson, Moorisonvillr, 
Cary, Method, Raleigh, Garner, Clay- 
ton, Smithfield, Princeton, Goldsboro, 
LaGrange, and arrived at the School 
about 11 o'clock, making the distance 
of 96 miles in about three and a half 
hours. The visiting party was com- 
posed of H. L. Carver, chairman of 
the board, and commissioners W. G. 
Frasier, C. A. Crabtree, T. O. Sorrell, 
C. M. Crutchfield, D. W. Newsom; 
W. E. Stanley, Superintendent of 
welfare work ; W. H. Young, clerk of 
the superior court ; P. C. Graham, 
judge of the recorder's court; M. G. 



VI 



THE UPLIFT 



Markham, register of deeds; Dr. A. 
S. Campbell, of the health depart- 
ment; W. M. Upchurch, of the city 
schools; Capt. L. H. Barbour, super- 
intendent of the county schools; J. 
R. Patton, Jr., representative in the 
legislature ; T. L. Pendergrass, super- 
intendent of the county roads; Eev. 
Trela D. Collins, of Temple Baptist 
church; T. H. Lawson, George Clark, 
and James A. Robinson. 

The day was one of gleaming val 
uable information on the mental de- 
fective, and a revelation on human- 
ity in its defective state. The party 
was most graciously received and 
entertained by Dr. C. Banks Mo- 
Nairy, the superintendent, and his 
capable corps of assistants. Every 
department of the institution was 
shown the visitors, Dr. McNairy was 
particularly gracious in explaining- 
UK' condition of the inmates; 
temperments, characistics, and how 
they were treated. A sumptuous, 
old-fashioned dinner, fit for a king, 
will be one of the lasting memories 
of the visit; the waiters being three 
of the more intelligent girls in the 
institution, who were presented with 
a purse of money by the visitors, at 
the conclusion of the meal. They 
served beautifully. 

Seme 6i the Scenes Witnessed. 

A body without a mind is a fear- 
fully horrible thing to witness. It 
overwhelms one with unscrutible 
ways of God in dealing with human- 
ity. It calls from the very depths 
of the soul prayers of thankfulness 
from those who have health and 
their mental faculties, and nothing 
else is more convincing, of how "won- 
derfully and fearfully we are made. ' ' 
Durham has Ave inmates in this insti- 



tution. There is no respecter of pei- 
sons among the 360 unfortunates in 
this school — they are from all walks 
and conditions of life throughout 
the State. A class of the better 
girls, under the supervision of their 
teachers, regaled the visitors with 
admirable concert;, of sinking and 
recitations, in which some of the 
boys took part. They would have 
done credit to many of our high 
schools. The entire body of children 
sing with a gusto and volume of 
voices that was inspiring. They sing 
the old familiar hyms. 

In going through the wards there 
were witnessed scenes that are al- 
most unbelieveable unless you se. ? 
them with your own - eyes. Every 
one is handled with the gentlest care 
and there appeared to be a spirit of 
love on the part of the children to- 
wards the ' superintendent and the 
assistants, which was mutual, and 
beautiful to behold. 

There are tiny tots there from 
eighteen months old to gray-haired 
women with the mentality of young 
children. One instance was a woman 
who was dumb, had been on a bed 
for forty years, and had not the men- 
tality to eat. Her head had to be 
raised, and the food forced down her 
throat. She just laid there and looked 
around. One of the saddest cases, in 
another ward, were two little blind 
boys, brothers, who looked to be about 
five and ten years of age. They sat 
together, in little chairs, beside the 
wall ; playing with their hands, and 
only seemed interested when they 
heard a noise in any portion of the 
room. They were from a family of 
five children, four of whom were 
blind. Dr. McNairy said it was one 



THE UPLIFT 



13 



of the saddest homes he had ever 
visited, and yet, he said, the mother 
was bearing her burden with tie 
most, wonderful cheerfulness; and thy 
children were always neatly dressed 
and the house was one of the neatest 
he had ever seen. He wanted to know 
how she did it. She said "by the 
grace of God." But the children 
know little or nothing-. 

Another scene that was horrifying 
to the sensibilities of those who have 
never given the mental defectives 
much thought, was a young girl, ap- 
parently seventeen or eighteen, who 
had to be confined in a cage. Her 
mentality was gone and Dr McNairy 
said • she was as wild as the- wildest 
animal that ever came out of the wild- 
est jungles. She had to be confined to 
prevent her from doing harm to others 
and protect her from herself. She 
was in a docile mood when the visitors 
beheld her. One of the new brick 
buildings is fire-proof; with the doors 
and window casing of steel. Ye-t Dr. 
McNairy showed the visitors steel 
doors, whose pannels had been broken 
out and they were mended with little 
bars of brass screwed on with bolts. 
It was done by girls in their seasons 
of aberrations. In the boys wards 
there are equally as pitiful and heart- 
rending scenes, and equal care and 
attention is given in every instance. 
Attendants have to care for them day 
and night. Wonderful patience is 
exhibited in this institution. Every 
precaution is taken to protect the 
inmates, and every device is arranged 
to instruct them in every way pos- 
sible, and by every means that will 
teach them something. There is one 
class whose mentality is so low that 
the teacher is teaching them one word 
at the time, and is doing it through 



their senses. A little bit of salt is 
dipped up on a little wooden paddle 
— a paddle for each child — and placed 
on its tongue', and it is asked to tell 
how it tastes. This is followed by 
sugar and other things. Then per- 
fume is given them to smell and they 
are asked to tell the odor. This is 
their daily lessons, with objects point- 
ed out for them to run to and tell 
what the object is. So the work goes 
on day after day with the precision 
of clock work, along all lines and 
endeavors to bring the. young minds 
out of their chaotic condition. 
Mental Deficiency a Vital Question. 

The visit of the Durham party was 
the means of getting a great deal of 
valuable information on the subject 
of mental defectiveness, causes, types, 
and other things pertaining thereto. 
Dr. McNairy was very kind in ex- 
plaining many things.After showing 
the visitors over the plant, its work- 
ings and its present equipment, he 
said: "The social problem to which 
I wish to call special attention is : 
what can we best do to preserve 
humanity and protect the unfortu- 
nates? 'Tis true we are awakened 
as never before, but this awakening 
brings to our view much more forcibly 
than heretofore the enormity of the 
situation and our inability, as individ- 
uals, States and nations to cope, with 
the ever increasing problem. We of 
the South, are only as yet awakening. 
In our own belove-d North Carolina 
there are thousands, and we have only 
been able to provide for a few hun- 
dred while they increase rapidly. 

"We separate the feeble minded 
into three general classes: idiots, 
imbeciles and morons. For conveni- 
ence in grading and classifying, we 
usually subdivide each of these into 



14 



THE UPLIFT 



two divisions — high and low. An idiot 
intelligently sees nothing', does 
nothing, knows nothing; he simply 
lives alone — the solitary one. This 
is the lowest class of human beings . 
mere organism, masses of flesh and 
bone and human form. An imbecile 
is able to see and to understand to 
a greater e,r less degree, is wanting in 
strength of min'd — feeble, weak, ex- 
pressive of a certain degree of intel- 
ligence, but unstable, incapable, ir- 
responsible; one who cannot take care 
of himself at all, (may do fairly well 
under the direction of another,) the 
simpleton who thinks he. is a man, who 
hangs on the skirts of society, the 
victim of some and the butt of others. 
The moron is one who is capable of 
earning a living under fayo-rable cir- 
cumstances, but incapable, from 
rental defects existing from birth or 
early age, of competing on equal 
terms with his fellows, or of manag- 
ing himself and his affairs with or- 
dinary prudence. The high grade 
moron may be one of those known as 
odd, peculiar and erratic. They are 
incompetent of functioning properly 
in our highly organized society. They 
are society's greatest problem. From 
this class come the truant, the ne'er- 
do-well, the pauper, the prostitute, the 
criminal, and other cases demanding 
the attention of the juvenile court. 
The neglected moron is the defective 
that makes trouble, in later life. 
Therefore, he should receive the prop- 
er care and training during the form- 
ative period. 

"Some of the outstanding char- 
acteristics of this group are lack of 
will power and foresight, inability to 
withstand temptation and the lack of 
fear of physical consequences. It is 



hereditary feeble-mindedness that 
accounts for these conditions most 
often. The proposition of education 
and training more forcibly emphasizes 
itself here than in the other types. 
This type is the hardest to control, 
most dangerous to society, and propa- 
gates most rapidly, therefore they go 
in a way of greatest temptations and 
least resistance, handing down their 
mental defects to embarrass and bur- 
den future prosperity. 

How shall It Be in North Carolina? 

' ' I trust we have been able to 
create some public sentiment and 
interest in the study of heredity 
and eugenics, and that the time i,< not 
far distant when our children shall 
be taught scientific facts about hu- 
man beings and their mating to that 
extent that they may not be gov- 
erned by sentiment alone, but apply 
the same common sense and reaso.'i 
to raising human beings that Ave do 
to stock or fowls. There is no rec- 
ord that two mental defective hu- 
man beings have ever produced a 
normal one. Education and training 
have no effect whatever towards 
changing this result. 

"The truest thankfulness and the 
highest service of gratitude that can 
be shown to the Great Creator for 
the life given us is to reproduce 
and pass it on in a higher mental, 
moral and physical form, and see to 
it that our children and grandchil- 
dren shall not be hampered or handi- 
capped by the sins of their fathers. 
Shall we wait for them to come 
back and take up the problem that 
we should have long since settled 
and pushed forward along lines that 
will provide means and laws looking 



THE UPLIFT 



15 



to the segregation and sterilization 
of all the Stae 's feebleminded. Take, 
care of what Ave already have and 
prevent reproduction in the future. 
"Registration of families should 
be required, placing a ban upon mar 
riage and compelling them to pre- 
sent a clean health certificate, be- 
fore marriage license is issued. Tnat 
pupils in the public schools be in- 
structed according to their several 
mentalities and ages, in personal 



hygiene and not be permitted to get 
the wrong ide-a and look upon the 
subject of sex as unholy, base and 
polluted; that the God-given object 
and purpose of sex shall be taught 
and impressed upon children in a 
sane and sensible way; that it is 
pure and holy as the God who cre- 
ated it and only sinful, lascivious and 
lustful to the loathsome, impure and 
mentally weak. 



Touring Up To Date. — "Tell me of your tour to the homes of famous 
English poets. The home of Shelley?" 

"They stung us forty cents a gallon for gasoline. 

"At the home of Byron?" 

"There we had a bad puncture." — Louisville Courier- Journal. 



SAMMY. 



By James Hay, Jr., in Asheville Citizen. 



We spent last winter in the same 
house with Sammy. He was eight 
years old then, and the very mold 
and fashion of everything' excellent 
in a gentleman. 

His maners were exquisite. When 
a lady rose to leave the room, he was 
up like a shot to open the door and 
bow her out. When he misunder- 
stood what was said, his ' ' I beg your 
pardon ' ' was perfection. When oth- 
ers entered the room, he was always 
first on his feet, pushing forward 
comfortable chairs for the newcomers. 
' ' Mr. Brown, ' ' he would say, with a 
fine air of concern, "don't you think 
you would find this chair more com- 
fortable?" or Aunt Loula, isn't the 
light better at this window ? ' ' 

Sammy was a prime entertainer. 
Standing before the fireplace, with 
his big brown eyes shining, his fists 



i-tuffed into the pockets of his knick- 
ers, and his eager words tumbling 
over each other, he often delighted 
us all with stories of his experiences. 

His mind worked fast as quicksil- 
ver. A lovely lady who had been 
visiting in the house reoppned her 
own home, and one afternoon short- 
ly thereafter Sammy disappeared. He 
showed up late for dinner, coming in 
like Beau Brummell in kid gloves 
and velvet collared overcoat and car- 
rying his little walking stick. He 
had been to call on the lovely lady, 
he volunteered, and had prolonged 
his visit from three until half-past 
six. 

His mother expressed the horri- 
fied opinion that he had stayed much 
too long. "Oh, 1 don"t think so," 
protested Sammy. ' ' She said she 
was enjoying herself, and I know I 



16 



THE UPLIFT 



was. Ami two people don 't do tbat 
every day, you know ! ' ' 

When desirous of conversation and 
not sure of his welcome in another 
apartment, Sammy would appear 
with the inquiry, "Have you ever 
heard about the time I rolled down 
the mountain and got full of stick- 
ers?" Reassured on that point, he 
would further fortify himself thus: 
" I '11 tell you about it if you will 
promise to say when you are the 
very slightest bit bored," and sever- 
al times during his exciting narra- 
tive, he would stop to inquire, ' ' Sure 
you 're not bored 1 ' ' 

But Sammy was too polite to even 
attempt to occupy the foreground all 
the time. His greatest pleasure was 
to introduce his father. In a pause 
of the talk, he would suggest: "Dad- 
dy, why don't you tell that one about 
the hoot owl landing on the colored 
man's shoulder in the graveyard?" 
When his father showed a disincli- 
nation to oblige, Sammy would per- 
sist : ' " Daddy, > ou know a funnier 
one even than that! Tell the one 
about the old man getting a hoop 
around his ankle," and then the 
laughter would be started, Sammy's 
heartiest of all. 

But Sammy's life was not all 
laughter and sunshine. He came 
home from school one day with a 
black eye, which, it was finally learn- 
ed, had been inflicted by a bigger 
boy with the aid of two lieutenants. 
Sammy's father referred a good 
many times to the fact that he had 
been "beaten up." Finally Sammy 
objected. "Daddy," he said, "I 
don't see what you want to talk 
about that so much for! Let's talk 
about something more pleasant. ' ' 



That, however, was only the be- 
ginning of the episode. Sammy was 
suddenly subject to strange disap- 
pearances, and it was rumored about 
that he was taking boxing lessons, 
so as to be sure of conquering the 
big boy who had blacked his eye. 
Ten day after that dismal occur- 
rence, Sammy encountered the bully 
on the street, and later described the 
incident succintly: "You know, it 
would have been more comfortable to 
run, and I thought about it. I hadn't 
anywhere near finished my boxing 
lessons. But I talked as big as I 
p.ould, and I hollered out to him : 
"' ' Stand still until I get over there ! 
I 'in going to give you the beating 
of your life!" And I did." 

Soon after Christmas Sammy was 
given a dog, a collie pup whom he 
named Dixie, and life was straight- 
way merry as a dream until the morn- 
ing when Dixie was run over in the 
street by an automobile. At the dog 
hospital it was discovered that one 
of the collie's hind legs had been 
broken, and that many weeks would 
be required for his recovery. "That's 
tough!" Sammy lamented. "He's 
such a good pup ! ' ' 

Soon after Dixie came back, they 
all went out to Busbee, and we saw 
Sammy only rarely. When we did, 
he told us great stories of his gar- 
dening and building. "You can see 
my stuff pop right up out of the 
ground ! " he said. 

Then last Wednesday we heard of 
Sammy again. He and Dixie were 
being driven to the country store 
when Dixie, for some reason known 
only to the dog psychology, leaped 
out of the car directly in the path 
of another automobile coming from 



THE UPLIFT 



17 



the opposite direction. Straight af- 
ter him without a moment's hesita- 
tion, Sammy dived over the side door 
and out of the ear. He remember- 
ed the long weeks following Dixie's 
stay in the hospital, and here was 
another ear about to run him down ! 
Obviously, Dixie must be saved. 

Sammy landed in the roadway with 
force enough to knock Dixie to one 
side and safety, but the wheels which 
would have struck Dixie got Sammmy. 
All of a sudden he was down in a 
smother of asphalt and gasoline and 
dust, looking up at the bottom of a 
big car, whose tires, apparently as 



big as tree trunks, were passing over 
him. 

When they picked him up to take 
him to the hospital, they found his arm 
broken, and bruises and cuts all over 
him. 

' ' Where 's Dixie ? ' ' he wanted to 
know. 

Sammy is still in an Asheville hos- 
pital, and Dixie comes in every day 
to see him. 

His full name? 

As they say out West, where Sam- 
my once spent a year, "Shake hands 
with Mr. Samuel H. Northeross, Jr., 
a real square shooter." 



IN A SHOP WINDOW. 



He was such a litte puppy in the window of a shop, 

And his wistful eyes looked at me, and they begged me pleaso to stop 

And buy him — for a window's awful lonely, and folks pass, 

And they make strange, ugly faces and rap sharply on the glass. 

He was such a cunning beggar, and his paws were soft and wide, 
And he had a way of standing, with his head held on one side, 
And his mouth just slightly open, and he almost seemed to cry: 
"Take me from this horrid window, 'cause I'm ready most to die!" 

He got tangled in my heart strings, made me want to break away 
From the lease I signed so gladly — was it only yesterday? 

Said that dogs were not admitted He was not a dog, not yet ; 

Only just a tiny puppy — and his nose was black and wet. 



Did you ever speak unkindly of the friend you hold most dear? 
Did you ever call out crossly, so that by-standers could hear? 
Did you ever pull a curtain to shut out the smiling day? 
That's how I felt — but more so — as I turned and walked away. 

— Margaret E. Sangster. 



18 



THE UPLIFT 



THE LIFE OF HIGHWAYS. 

By J. M. Broughton, Attorney, in The Wachovia. 



' ' That truck is hitting' the road a 
140,000-pound lick every time it 
turns a wheel, ' ' said Frank Page one 
day when he had thrust his car past 
a lumbering vehicle bearing hun- 
dreds of gallons of gasoline to re- 
mote filling stations along the Cen- 
tral Highway. 

"How long is the road going to 
last if he keeps pounding away like 
that"?" 

"I don't know. * s No, don't 
get alarmed about it right now. 
You'll probably be riding over this 
same piece of pavement when you 
are seventy years old, provided they 
are still riding on roads when you 
double your age. But we've got to 
put pneumatic tires on that truck." 

"But why don't, you know how 
long this road is going to last and 
why are you going to put pneumatic 
tires on that truck? What harm is 
he doing to the road with solid tires 
and if you don't know what, how 
do you know what I'll be riding on 
at the age of seventy?" 

Ask Charlie Upham 

"Ask Charlie Upham — he can tell 
you about it. All that 1 know is 
that I have never seen one of them 
worn out yet, and that we are build- 
ing them to stay here as long as 
they will stay. They may last a thou- 
sand years. They may go to pieces 
in ten years, maybe twenty, maybe 
forty. But I don't think they 
will. ' ' 

Upham is the technician of the 
road building organization in North 
Carolina. He has been working with 
cement and other ingredients of pav- 



ing since he was a boy, and is re- 
garded by the engineerirng .high- 
brows as the last authority on the 
eomponding of elements that go into 
roads. Frank Page sees that Up- 
ham 's experienece is properly built 
into the road. Upham is the man 
who knows and Page the man who 
does, but it is not to be inferred 
that either is lacking in the quali- 
ties of the other. So the questiion 
was laid before Upham. 

"How long are these roads going 
to last?" 

"I don't know," said the techni- 
cian. 

Nobody knows how long they are 
going to last. They have theories 
about them, and elaborate tests have 
been made, by the State, by the 
United States, by private engineer- 
ing oi'ganizations and by manufac- 
turers of materirals that go into 
roads. Nobody has yet been found 
who can fix any definiite time when 
these $65,000,000 worth of roads will 
be worn out, or when they will have 
to be replaced by other roads. 
None Worn Out Yet 

They have watched their roads 
under all sorts of traffic conditions. 
They have appliied all sorts of tests 
to them, measured them with instru- 
ments so delicate that they are as- 
tounding, and with great bludgeons 
of testing machinery. They have 
studied the effect of all sorts of 
traffic on them. They have meas- 
ured the stresses under every type 
of vehicle and in every variation 
of traffic and weather. And they 
don't know when they are going to 



THE UPLIFT 



19 



wear them out. 

The only answer yet found is that 
no road has yet worn out. Theoreti- 
cal answers are of little value be- 
cause the thing that wears out a 
road is traffic, and nobody can pic- 
ture what the traffic on these roads 
is going to be ten or twenty years 
from now. Twenty years ago any 
prophecy that 2,350 vehicles would 
pass over a given spot on a given 
road in one day of normal traffic 
would have been hooted at. Nobody 
knows whot it is going to be twenty 
years from now, and nobody knows 
what the conditions of the road will 
be when it is subjected to conditions 
that are not yet definite enough to 
speculate about. 

Solid Tire Menace 

"Under present traffic conditions, 
with the elimination of the solid 
truck tire and the regulation of its 
speed, a properly paved road will 
last forever said the technician. 
"We know the strength of concrete 
properly laid, and so long as it is 
not loaded to the breaking capacity, 
so long as it is not 'bent,' there is 
no disintegration of the road. If 
the impact load is increased beyond 
the strength of the road, they are 
going to pieces. ' ' 

"Left to a choice between another 
bond issue of $35,000,000 and a law 
prohibiting absolutely the use of 
solid tires on any vehicle on the 
road, I would choose the latter. It 
would be of greater value to the peo- 
ple of the State. " 

' ' A truck weighing five tons and 
loaded to its capacity, making a to- 
tal weight of 20,000 pounds, on solid 
tires, hits the road a blow of 70 tons 
everv time it turns a wheel. When 



it hits a bump three quarters of an 
inch high, the impact is greatly in- 
creased. That is what is going to 
ruin the roads we are building. Con- 
crete has not yet and probably never 
will be developed to the point where 
it can withstand that sort of usage. 
We have got to get solid tires off 
the roads if we want to use them." 
Speed Doesn't Hurt 

That impact is attained at a speed 
of fourteen miles an hour. Strange- 
ly enough speed above fourteen 
miles an hour does not sharply in- 
crease the impact. Laymen may be 
astonished also that one of these 
great busses plying between Raleigh 
and Greensboro, weighing 15,000 
pounds and moving at speeds rang- 
ing from 30 to 70 miles an hour — 
and this latter speed is not theoreti- 
cal, but actual and provable — does 
not endanger the road a tenth as 
much as a ton-and-a-half truck with 
solid tires moving at 15 miles an 
hour. 

Concrete has a strength that may 
be placed at 7,000 pounds to the 
square inch. Engineers may con- 
tend otherwise, but Upham used it 
for illustration. Beyond that is the 
danger point of breaking up. Under 
that there is no appreciable wear or 
strain on the paved highway. These 
heavy busses, at all speeds, when 
equipped with pneumatic tires, fall 
away under that figure while the 
truck with solid tires doubles the 
strain. 

Surface wear is negligible. Three 
years on roads that have been test- 
ed, does not indicate an abrasion of 
the surface, even under the heaviest 
traffic, that can be measured with 
the most delicate instruments. 



20 



THE UPLIFT 



Breaking under strain is the danger 
that lies ahead of the roads. If 
they are pounded to pieces under 
unscientific handling and regulation 
of traffic, the State will have to set 
about replacing the roads. And no- 
body has yet learned to build better 
roads than are being built. 

It is reduced to a question of 
whether on-tenth of one per cent of 
the traffic is going to be allowed to 
pound the roads to pieces while the 
other 99.9 per cent use them reason- 
ably and with no measurable damage 
to them. Constant use of any piece 
of paving by heavy vehicles on solid 
tires, will break up any road yet 
built before many years, according 
to Upham 's study of impacts made 
during the past six months. 
Build For Traffic 

' ' Of course all road builders 
realize they are building roads to 
carry traffic. That is all roads are 
built for. The question is whether 
traffic owes any consideration to the 
road after we have built them. We 
are satisfied that the pneumatic tire 
on vehicles under seven and a half 
tons, in weight, or a total of 15 tons 
with load, on pneumatic tires, does 
not damage a road appreciably. Any 
truck with a solid tire will pound a 
road to pieces. That is as far as 
we know now. Under reasonable 
conditions, roads tested over a period 
of 15 years show no signs of wear or 
disintegration. ' ' 

That is the whole story, insofar 
as paved roads go. Gravel and oth- 
er types of roads are another mat- 
ter. Any sort of a tire will pick 
up the gravel and a dry dirt road 
and distribute it everywhere. A 
heavy car does more damage than 
a light ear, and a truck, pounding 



along with a 70-ton impact will beat 
holes into a road in a week. That 
is the cause of these "washboard" 
effects you get on many sand-clay 
roads after heavy use by trucks. 

Comparatively the process is not 
costly. A good dirt road can be 
built and rebuilt many times at 
small cost. A paved road once it be- 
gins to break up, is in ruins. Cali- 
fornia is a sad spectacle of this sort 
of experience. It built many hun- 
dreds of miles of road only to see 
them begin to break up after a few 
years ' use. It spent its money be- 
fore it knew how, and now it has 
to do it all over again. Its experi- 
ences have been of tremendous value 
to North Carolina. We have learned 
some things not to do. 

Road building in the modern sense 
is less than 75 years old. The first 
of the paved type was built in 
Scotland in 1865. It is still in use. 
The first paved road, other than 
cobble-stones, was built in Bellfon- 
taine, Ohio, in 1892, and still carries 
traffic. The first stretch of concrete 
paving was built in the United States 
in Wayne county, Michigan, in 1909, 
seven miles in length. It is still in 
use. 

New Business of Roads 

It is a new busines. Five years 
ago men were still experimenting 
with concrete. The cement indus- 
try was a mere infant. Men knew 
next to nothing about its use, or of 
methods that would bring out its 
strength. There are as many grades 
of it as there are of tobacco, and the 
exact proportions in which it is mix- 
ed with sand and stone are of tre- 
mendous importance. It is no less 
important that it be mixed and ex- 
act number of seconds. 



THE UPLIFT 



21 



Properly mixed concrete will take 
on the strength of granite. A gran- 
ite rock used as a part of the mix 
will break through when the mass 
is broken. Improperly mixed the 
concrete will shell off from around 
it. That is only one test of the pav- 
ing to which Page subjects all roads. 
Roads are mixed with all the care a 
competent pharmacist gives to the 
compounding of a prescription. That 
is why this paving ought to last. 

No considerable mileage of paved 
roads was built in this country un- 
til ten years ago. Mistakes were 
made, to be sure, and probably are 
still being made. North Carolina 
has made some, and will probably 
learn later on that it has made more. 
Out in the laboratory here they 
have made thousands of experiments. 
All of them are too technical to be 
discussed here, but many of them 
have been made the basis of radical 
improvements in road building, not 
only here but throughout the coun- 
try. 

Will the Central Highway be here 
2,23ii years from now, a monument 
to Frank Page and Charles M. Up- 
ham, as is the Appian Way, to Ap- 
pius Claudius Caescus? Will future 
generations marvel at the ingenu- 
ity of these men as do moderns at 



the engineering skill of the builder 
of the "Regina Yiarurn?'' Appius 
Claudius didn 't know how long 
the Queen of Roads was going to 
last. He built as a roadway to em- 
pire and it still stands, in the dim 
twilight of the glories that were 
Rome. 

Conditions Favorable 

Climatic conditions here are fa- 
vorable to the indefinite life of pav- 
ed roads. To date North Carolina 
has built or is building 1,473 miles 
of paved roads and 1,785 miles of 
other types that will eventuate into 
paved roads when the traffic demands 
it. It has cost 65 million dollars. 
What it has been worth is incalcul- 
able. What they will be worth by 
the time they are worn out, nobody 
knows. 

When they will wear out nobody 
knows. The men who are building 
them believe they will last forever, 
provided care is taken of them. 
Whether they are being built wide 
enough is a matter that only time 
and the capacity of the State to buy 
automobiles can tell. Thus far 
none of them has given way under 
uo paseq seuoeq} puB 'uie;s 9i[^ 
every test tha ttheir ingenuity can 
suggest has not yet developed a fatal 
defect. 



The world gets out of the way for a man who knows where he is going, 
so they say. At a lecture the speaker stated fervently: "He drove 
straight to his goal. He looked neither to the right nor to the left, but 
pressed forward, moved by a definite purpose. Neither friend nor foe 
could delay him nor turn him from his course. All who crossed his path 
did so at their own peril. What would you call such a man?" 

"A truck driver!" shouted a voice from the audience. 



22 



THE UPLIFT 



THE BANKER OUTSIDE OF THE BANK. 

By J. M. Broughton, Attorney in The Wachovia. 



Banking' as a profession calls for a 
high degree of training coupled with 
long- and varied experience. Techni- 
cal skill is considered indispensable 
as a qualification for the successful 
banker: and uppermost in the mind 
of the average young- bank clerk is 
the ambition to master the details 
of finance, the art of banking. No 
business of profession is attracting 
more alert young men and "women 
than banking; and in no field of en- 
deavor rare higher prizes available 
to those who become masters of the 
profession. 

Technical skill is indispensable, 
but also insufficient. A young man 
may learn all there is to know" in- 
side the bank and yet fall short of 
success unless he learns certain things 
outside the bank. It is with the 
banker outside the bank that we shall 
deal in this discussiion. The real 
foundations of success are laid out- 
side the bank. A banker is an in- 
dividual, not a machine. With him, 
as with every other individual, there 
are certain essentials to success. 
Among these are the following: 
The Banker As An Individual 

Good health is essential to success. 
It sounds quite elementary to say this, 
but nevertheless to much emphasis 
cannot be placed upon this proposi- 
tion. It is almost tragic to observe 
the numerous cases of men and wo- 
men in the banking profession, as 
well as in other lines of business, 
who are handicapped and absolutely 
prevented from achieving anything 
like success on account of their 
health. What does it matter if a 



young man or young woman has mas- 
tered all of the technical details of 
banking, and is mentally equipped 
for a career of achievement and dis- 
tinction, if there is lacking that vi- 
tality and vigor that come only from 
bouyant good health. There is no 
recipe for good health, but there are 
certain simple requirements that 
need only to be stated. These are 
the following: 

(a) Proper food and regularity 
in eating: The employee who cuts or 
delays lunch, or permits the condi- 
tion of his work to involve irregu- 
larity in his meals is not only under- 
mining his health, but is rendering a 
disservice to the institution by which 
he is employed ; and the institution 
which encourages or even permits 
habits of work which involve irre- 
gularity in meals on the part of em- 
ployees is short-sighted indeed. 

(b) Reasonable and regular ex- 
ercise : "It is a notorious fact that 
the average banker takes no exercise 
w hatever. These sense of responsi- 
bility and the constant urge to keep 
up his pressing work results in al- 
most a permanent postponement of 
any form of exercise. Futhermore, 
the average employee feels that be- 
cause he may not be able to afford 
golf or polo he is unable to engage 
in any sort of exercise. The answer 
to this attitude that walking is not 
only the cheapest but the best form 
of exercise. The individual who 
takes reasonable daily exercise will 
get more work done in seven hours of 
a day than one who grinds nine to 
ten hours without exercise. 



THE UPLIFT 



23 



(c) Joy in work: The greatest 
single contributing factor to good 
health is pleasant work. The man 
who isn't happy in his work isn't 
healthy in his work. The man or 
woman who does not enjoy every min- 
ute of the day's work should begin 
to look for some other employment. 
No individual ever became a great 
banker who did not believe from the 
bottom of his heart that banking is 
the greatest and most enjoyable pro- 
fession in all the world. 

Another essential for success is 
good appearance. This, also, is of 
an elementary nature, and yet many 
a young man or young woman fails 
of success just at this point. By 
good appearance I do not mean gaudi- 
ness which is offensive to the eye, but 
rather neatness. There is very little 
chance for the employee who isn't 
neat in appearance; aid it is need- 
less for the employee to argue that 
his income is not sufficient to enable 
him to maintain a neat appearance. 
A great lawyer told me on one occa- 
sion that when he began practicing 
. law, one of the rules that he fixed 
and followed was, as he stated it 
' " to shave every day and charge a lit- 
tle more for his work." Slovenli- 
ness is one of the chief foes to suc- 
cess in any profession ; and parti- 
cularly in that of banking. This ap- 
plies not only to dress, but also to 
speech and habits. 

Punctuality and fidelity in engage- 
ments are also characteristics of the 
successful man. Failure to keep an 
engagement is rude; and being late 
is discourteous. In almost any sort 
of group meeting, it can be noted 
that the men of success and achieve- 
ment are invariably prompt in at- 
tendance. 



Mental Growth 

There is no hope or future for a 
young banker who is not gTowing 
mentally every day. .It was said of 
the great historian Green that the 
epitaph which he requested to mark 
his final resting place was this: "He 
died learning. ' ' Travelers relate 
that in one section of the Alps there 
is a monument to one of the great- 
est Alpine climbers, and on the monu- 
ment appears this inscription. "He 
died climbing." These are senti- 
ments which may well be pondered 
by the young man or woman who as- 
pires to success in the field of bank- 
ing, as well as in any other profes- 
sion. 

Among those things that are essen- 
tial for mental growth there is no 
substitute for daily reading of the 
right sort. Many men of limited 
school education have found it possi- 
ble by daily reailing to obtain a 
very general education. Such read- 
ing should be of a character of lit- 
erature that elevates the ideals and 
improves speech. It has been said 
that there has never been a master 
of men who was not a master of lan- 
guage. It is related of Abraham 
Lincoln that in order to learn what 
the word "demonstrate" meant, he 
bought and mastered a book on geo- 
metry. It was by such habits of 
study that he not only learned the 
meaning of words, but was enabled 
to write some of the classics of Eng- 
lish literature. 

In this day of public libraries there 
is every opportunity afforded to the 
young men and young women to read 
very best of literature. Unfortunate- 
ly so much time is spent in cheap 
and idle reading that the best of lit- 
erature passes unnoticed. There is 



24 



THE UPLIFT 



no compulsion upon a young man and 
young woman with reference to read- 
ing good literature. Let it be said, 
however, that few men or women who 
have attained worthy distinction who 
did not familiarize themselves with 
the best of literature. 

Obviously, the banker's reading 
will include the best of publications 
concerning the technical side of bank- 
ing and relating to general matters 
of financing. Also, advantage will 
be taken of every opportunity to at- 
tend conventions and other banker's 
meetings where discussions and ex- 
change of ideas help to increase 
the usefulness of this individual bank- 
er. 

Moral Foundation For Success 

The banker asks of a borrower: 
"What kind of a moral risk is he?" 
The customer has the same right to 
ask the same question about the 
banker. The history of bankfailures 
in this country leads unerringly to 
the conclusion that the moral col- 
lapse of some individual banker 
nearly always preceds the failure of 
the institution. By moral collapse 
is not necessarily meant actual em- 
bezzlement, but reference is made 
rather to compromise of ideals, wil- 
lingness to take short cuts, deviation 
from tired and true standards of 
honorable banking. There is a geo- 
metry of morality that should be in 
the curriculum of every student of 
banking, and in it are included those 
symbols of morality — the straight 
line, the square and the level. 

It is demanded of the successful 
banker that he be a man of clean 
thoughts, clean speech and clean 
habits. While there . are exceptions, 
it is certainly true that the outstand- 



ing bankers of this country are men 
whose lives are marked by these 
characteristics. A man, who himself 
is a grea tbanker, recently told me, 
in discusing one of the prominent 
figures in the banking world, that the 
latter 's excessive use of profanity 
had undoubtedly hampered his growth 
in the leadership of his profession. 
It is related by one who attended the 
recent bankers convention in Chicago 
that at one of the dinners that was 
tendered to certain officials of the 
organization, at which about one hun- 
dred leading bankers of America were 
present, there was in evidence an 
abundance of intoxicants, but that 
less than a dozen of the men pres- 
ent participated in any way in the 
use of these intoxicants. This is a 
significant commentary on the high 
standard of conduct that is being 
maintained by the great bankers of 
America. 

Right ideals are the largest contri- 
buting factors to moral conduct. It 
is quite impossible to build a suc- 
cessful career without a moral foun- 
dation ; and such a foundation is . 
not laid apart from the right ideals. 
It is not sufficient that the young 
banker have a success ideal, an in- 
spiration toward the summit of ma- 
terial prosperity and success. There 
must be that fine and higher ideal 
for service. This is the elevating- 
quality in banking as in every profes- 
sion. As the great surgeon thinks 
in terms of humanity, as well as sur- 
gery, and the great statesman thinks 
in terms of national betterment as 
well as political preferment, so the 
great banker has as his ideal not 
simply financial success and achieve- 
ment, but the development and the 



THE UPLIFT 



25 



betterment of the community in which 
lie lives and serves. 

The Banker As A Citizen 

Bankers are essential to the pub- 
lic; and it is equally a truth that 
the public is essential to the banks. 
There is probably no other profes- 
sion in which right relationship with 
the public counts for so much as in 
banking'. It is not simply a matter 
of being acquainted with the public. 
Acquaintance is important, but not 
enough. In this eonection, one is 
reminded of the humorist who said 
that banks are utterly inconsistent ; 
that he went to one bank and ap- 
plied for a loan, and was turned down 
because the banker did not know 
him; and he thereupon went to an- 
other banker, and was turned down 
because the banker did not know 
him. 

There is in no community any 
movement of importance which does 
not in some manner and at some point 
relate itself to questions of finance. 
It is the business of the banker to 
be in touch with every agency and 
movement that concerns itself with 
community development, expansion 
and betterment. How can a bank- 
er serve a community unless he is 
acquainted with the processes, the 
agencies and the ins^rumeintali/ties 
by which the city is being develop- 
ed? 

Moreover, the banker as a citizen 
ought to serve as an example. Es- 
pecially is this true in respect to 
habits of thrift. A banker who is 
himself not thrifty speaks in vain 
when he urges thrift upon the com- 
munity. In addition to thrift, there 
should come from the banker an ex- 
ample of prudence in investments. 



The average layman is shocked if 
he finds on the subscription list of a 
doubtful enterprise the name of his 
banker; and it is a humiliating- spec- 
tacle to find a banker involved in 
the manipulation of questionable 
business ventures. 

The courts of North Carolina have, 
for the last several years, been en- 
gaged in large part with clearing up 
the wrecks of institutions and indivi- 
duals that, in many instances, might 
have been averted by the prudent 
counsel and example of the bankers 
in the sections involved. Reference 
is made to the staggering amounts 
lost by citizens of the State in specu- 
lating in blue sky stock. So far from 
discouraging such unwise and fool- 
hardy ventures the banks and bank- 
ers in many sections by discounting 
paper, by furnishing names of pros- 
pects and in many other was actu- 
ally, though not intentionally, gave 
aid and assistance to the crew of 
spoilers and bandits who, in 1919 
and 1920, almost, devastated certain 
areas of the State. Had all the 
banks and bankers maintained that 
fine and helpful and conservative at- 
titude displayed by the great majority, 
the citizens of the State, would have 
been saved probably the loss of ten 
million dollars, and there would prob- 
ably have been averted the tragedy 
of numerous suicides and hundreds of 
wrecked homes and fortunes. 

The banker as a citizen must also 
set an example in his own personal 
credit standing. The bank cashier, , 
teller or other official or employee, 
who permits his personal credit to be- 
come involved, is undermining Ike 
foundations for his future s u< es~. 
A sick doctor may be able to te'ievo 



'Id 



THE UPLIFT 



physical distress, but a finauiiinlly 
involved banker io <i broken reed in 
the industrial and financial life of 
the community. 

Community building is hoc a side 
line of banking; it is one of its chief 



objectives. The banker w ho, with a 
vision of service, throws his life into 
community building', not only serves 
the community, but in the best pos- 
sible way serves the institution which 
he prepresents. 



WITH US ON THANKSGIVING. 



Sometimes there's so much differ- 
ence between what people expect to 
do and what really happens that you 
can't really tell there's any connec- 
tion at all. But it wasn't like that 
with Thanksgiving at the Training 
School. We started out to have a 
real Thanksgiving, and with the 
hearty cooperation of all the folks 
at the school, and the enthusiasm of 
the boys to keep things bubbling, we 
had the best Thanksgiving of any- 
body — just as we intended to do. 

The rabbit hunt started off the day. 
To have a small army of hilarious 
boys, armed with sticks, start out 
in groups to hunt rabbits, and to 
have them return in two hours with 
twenty-one rabbits and no eausual- 
ties speaks well for the school, aside 
from the fact that the boys had a 
jolly good time. 

Everybody knows that a boy gets 
wiggly when he is hungry, and to 
preach to four hundred starving boys 
would have been more of an ordeal 
than we wanted our friend, Rev. 
Thomas, to undergo. So, ' ' Sand- 
wiches and milk before church" was 
on the program for the day, and 
when the bell rang for church every- 
body was ready and comfortable. 
While this article is not intended as 
an advertisement for the school, we 
can't help but feel proud of the way 
the boys conducted themselves at the 



reli.'ious services of the day. Com- 
ing in from two hours of fun and 
frolic, thejy entered immediately into 
the spirit of the services. No one 
could have seen and heard the boys 
sing ' ' Praise God from Whom all 
Blessings Flow," read in unison the 
One Hundreth Psalm, listen atten- 
tively to the Proclamation issued by 
President Lincoln, followed by the 
one for the current year by Presi- 
dent Coolidge, read by Albert Hill 
and Everett Goodrich respectively, 
without being impressed. The ser- 
mon was preceded by a solo by Car- 
Pie Hardy, and at the conclusion 
Lambert Cavenaugh Protheroe's 
"Hymn of Praise." The sermon 
was one fitting the day and the audi- 
ence, and so incorporated the spirit 
of religion with that of patriotism 
that the listeners felt that to be a 
"thankful American" was a real 
privilege. The services were con- 
cluded with a hymn and the benedic- 
tion. 

The barbecue was ready at one 
o'clock, and with plates and other 
necessary equipment in hand, the 
boys lined up to march by a long, long 
table, set up on the athletic field. No 
machine could have worked with more 
precision than that table. You just 
walked along held out your plate, 
and got some slaw to start with. A 
few steps farther, you got some of the 



THE UPLIFT 



27 



nicest, jueiest, barbecued pig' you ever 
tasted — (or smelled.) Then you got 
bread and hot dressing for the meat. 
You went off and sat down while you 
ate that, and then you marched 
'round again — and again — and may- 
be again ! And the last time you 
went by the table you got a big piece 
of chocolate cake along with the oth- 
er things — the king of cakes that has 
a lot of creamy-tasting filling in it. 

About three o'clock, or a little 
earlier, it was generally conceded 
by all present that dinner was over. 
A basket ball game between our team 
and Rocky River was called as soon 
as the boys could be seated in the 
grandstand. It left us badly beaten, 
but who cares for a licking right af- 
ter a barbecue ? Other athletic games 
were in progress on the field until 
it was time to go to the cottages and 
prepare for the evening program. 

The Musieale at the auditorium 
began at seven o'clock. Besides the 
boys and all the folks connected with 
the school, we had the pleasure of 
having a large number of our friends 
with us from Concord, Mooresville, 
Rocky River, Kannapolis, and the 
general community. The stage in our 



big auditorium had been attractively 
decorated, and made a fine setting 
for the band, and for the other per- 
formers. We want to say right now 
that every single person we asked 
to take part in the program not only 
came, but were so nice about it, and 
contributed so willingly of their time 
and their talent that we didn't know 
a single thing to do but just applaud 
as hard as we could and call for 
more. To Miss Margaret Taylor, who 
sang real Scotch songs for us; to 
the Mooresville quartette, which is 
a real quartette, musically speaking, 
and a bunch of mighty good fellows 
besides, and who not only sang at 
the appointed place on the program 
but ' " filled in ' ' with some extra 
numbers; to the Melody Makers, the 
aggregation of jazz producers that 
set the boys wild and had even the 
preachers keeping time with their 
feet ; to Miss Catherine Deaton, who 
played two piano numbers for us as 
only an artist can play, and to every- 
body else who helped to make our 
Thanksgiving an Event instead of 
just the 27th of November, we want 
to say, with all our hearts, ' ' We 
thank you. ' ' 



INSTITUTION NOTES. 

By J. J. Jones, Jr. 

Along with the joy of Thanksgiv- siuned her duties as seventh cottage 

ing, each boy wrote a letter to his matron, after a long absence on ae- 

parents. count of sickness. 



The carpenter shop boys have been 
busy during the past week making 
music stands for the band. 



Mrs. Mattie Fitzergerald has re- 



Several new boys have been placed 
in the band : Doy Hagwood, and Paul 
Camp have been given cornets. J«?ff 
Blizard has been transferred from 
alto to a cornet, Carlvle Hardy has 



28 



THE UPLIFT 



been placed on the bass drum. These 
boys will be progressing rapidly as 
the other bovs have done. 



team for the school. 



Miss Elizebeth Young, who is at- 
tending school Mt. Amoena Seminary 
at Mt. Pleasant visited her mother 
Mrs. Pearl Young. 



Mrs. J. M. Day and Miss Flossie 
Pay wens visitors of Mr. J. M. Day. 
Mrs. Day is now a helper of the 
public welfare office of Buncombe 
countv. 



The Training School basket-ball 
team was defeated last Trursday by 
the Rocky River team, by a score 
of 40—10.' 



Mrs. Joseph M. Stokes and chil- 
dren, of Fountain Inn, South Caro- 
lina, were visitors oli Mrs. Olivia 
Duckett. 



A new Foot-ball and a Soccer- 
ball have been bought, the first game 
of Soccer was played Thursday, and 
the boys like to play it. 



Mr. T. L. Grier and several boys 
have built a soccer ball court. The 
boys like the game very much. 
Mr. Grier is going to organize a 



Rev. C. C. Myers, pastor of the 
Presbyterian church, of Concord, 
conducted the services at the school 
last Sunday. He announced that he 
\; ould preach no more in Concord, or 
at the school, because he has been 
transferred to Wilmington. For 
nearly two years Mr. Myers has been 
coming to the school regularly one* 
each month, and the boys are sorry 
to see him go for he has preached 
some good sermons. 



Thursday past bid fair to be Hie 
most eventful Thanksgiving ever 
spent at the institution. After a 
very successful rabbit hunt, the boys 
prepared for our annual Thanks- 
giving service, being conducted by 
Rev. L. A. Thomas, of the St. James 
Lutheran church, of Concord, Im- 
mediately after the service the boys 
assembled on our athletic field for 
"the crowning event of the day." 
The Barbecue, with accessories, was 
a tempting collation, and we can 
safely say it was thoroughly enjoy- 
ed by everyone. 

The event of the evening was a 
musical program delightfully render- 
ed by a number of our boys with 
tba assistance of several imported 
artists. 



HONOR ROLL. 



Room No. 1 
"A" 
Walter Cummins, Oscar Johnson, 
Valton Lee, Parks Newton, Whit- 
lock Pridgen, Herbert Apple, Jas. 
Davis, Doy Hagwood, Albert Hill, 



George Howard, Roby Mullies, Irvin 
Moore, Clyde Pierce, Mack Went/,, 
Aubrey Weaver. 

"B" 
Charles Beech, Herman Goodman, 
Thos. Howard, Jno. Keenan, Earle 



THE UPLIFT 



29 



Little, Yermon Lauder, Lee McBride, 
Smiley Morrow, Donald Pate, Alwyn 
Shiri, Theodore Wallace, Robert Fer- 
guson, Everett Goodrich, Carl Henry, 
Watson O'Quinn, Washington Pick- 
ett, Vaughin Smith, Archie Waddell, 
Vestal Yarborough. 

Rccm No 2 
"A" 

Isaac Anderson, Basel Johnson, 
Floyd MeArthur, Harry Stevens, 
Clyde Holingsworth, James Cumbie, 
Jcb Trexle., Irvin Cooper, Sam 
('arrow, Sam Deal, Plas Johnson, 
Garfield Mercer, Walter Page, Avery 
Rothrock, Jim Slither, 
"B" 

Clarence Anderson, Homer Barn.-:, 
Walter C'reasman, David Driver, 
Mack Duncan, Fleming Floyd, Al- 
bert Garrison, Mark Jolly, Albert 
Ja.rman, Homer Montgomery, Rich- 
ard McDaniel, Richard Pettipher, 
Julian Raines, Joseph Stevens, Worth 
Stout, Gordon Ellis, Buster Gamble, 
Edward Ellis, Amaziah Corbet, Roy 
Franklin, William Herndon, Sylves- 
ter Honeycutt, Charles Jackson, 
John Kemp, Hallie Matthews, Ralph 
Martin., William Nichols, Billie 
Odom, Thamer Pope, Roy Rectar, 
Dalmas Robertson, Frank Stone, 
Julius Strickland, Lee Smith Herbert 
Tolley, Robert Ward, Hurley Way, 
Graham York. 

Room No. 3 
"A" 

Allen Byers, Alford Stanley, Jesse 
Hurley, Ed Moses, Jeff Latterman, 
Harold Thompson, Lonnie Lewis, 
Hunter Cline, Pearson Hunsucker, 
Bruce Bennett, Rudolph Watts, Hill 
Ellington, Cebern McConnell, Bre- 
vard McLendon, William Hurley, 
Broadie Riley, Raymond Kennedy, 



Calvin Forbush, Rex Weathersby, 
Ferman Wishon, John Kivett, David 
Queen, Harold King, Jeff Blizzard, 
Jay Lambert, Clarence Maynard, 
Herman Homric, John W. Forester, 
Winton Matthews, Reggie Brown, 
Kill Penny. 

"B" 
Clay Bates, Paul Oldham, Jesse 
Harrell, Ned Morris, Luther Mason, 
Clyde Lonett, Clyde Smith, Thurman 
Baker, Delmas Stanley, Daniel Ncth- 
crcutt, James Ivey, Harold Crary, 
Carl Richards, Herbert Floyd, Clint- 
ton Floyd, Ermis Harper, Harvey 
Cook, Clyde Trollinger, Olen Wil- 
liams, Samuel Smith, Cedric Bass, 
John Creech, Vornon Hall, Lyman 
Love, Clyde Brown, Robert Hart- 
line. 

Room No. i 

"A" 
Garland Rice, Clifton Hedrick, 
William Beard, Russell Capps, Al- 
vin Ethridge, David Fountain, Carl- 
ton Hegar, Elmer Oldham, Solomon 
Thompson, Fonso Wiles, Sam Pop- 
lin, Rose Lewis, Ed Crenshaw, Jas. 
Ford, George Holland;, Connie Lo- 
man, Herbert Orr, Luke Patterson, 
James Philips, Sam Stevens, Walter 
Willious, Douglos Willious. 

"B" 

Adam Beck, John Faggot, Roy 

Lafon, Lester Morris, James Long, 

Lester Bowers, Roy Johnson, Earl 

Houser, Jessie Martin, Abe Goodman. 

Room No. 5 

"A" 
Van Dowd, Eugene Keller, Robert 
Sisk, Walter Culler Samiel Defon, 
John Ton.ision, Larry Griffith, Wood- 
row Kivitt, Bronco Owens, David 
Whitaker.Ceeil Trull, William Waf- 
ford, Limuel Lane, Earl Green, Dewy 



30 



THE UPLIFT 



Blackburn, Will Hodges, Andrew 
Bivins, Leonard Burleson, Eugene 
Glass, Toddie Alberty, Kenneth Lew- 
is, Lee Right, Claude Dunn, Bertie 
Murry, Carl Ballard, Lawrence Scales, 
Lyonel MeMaJh.au, Turner Preddy, 
George Cox, Roy Houser, Willie Rec- 
tor, Cecil Arnold, Lattie MeClam, 
Conly Aumond, Claude Wilson, Chas. 
Beaver, Thomas Tedder, Earl Ed- 
wards, James Long, Lester Love, 
Al Pet'tigrew, Lester Matthews, Les- 



ter Franklin, Wilbert Rackley. 
"B" 
Andrew Parker, Amos Ramsey El- 
mer Mooney, Earl Torrence, Robert 
Cooper, Theodore Colman, Ben Camer- 
on, Guy Haddock, Wannie Frink, 
Earnest Carlton, Wilbert Rackley, 
Maston Britt, Ralph Glover, James 
Cook, Elmer Proctor', John Gray, 
Floyd Stanley, John Hill, John Watts. 
Burton Emory, Garland, Ryals, Elias 
Warren, Claud Stanley. 



MRS. FRANCES HODGSON BURNETT. 



Mrs. Burnett, when I came to Washington, was the most honored lit- 
erary person in the District of Columbia. She was the author of more 
than forty books, of which "Little Lord Fauntleroy" is a classic in chil- 
dren's choice literature. Born of humble parents in Manchester, England, 
Mrs. Burnett wrote her first story at the age of thiteen. It was pub- 
lished a few years later, after her family had emigrated to America, 
ettling in Knoxville, Tenn., in 1865. She was married to Dr. Swan M. Bur- 
nett, a scion of an old Southern family, whom she first met when as a 
barefoot girl she called at his home to sell berries. Mrs. Burnett obtain- 
ed a divorce in 1898 and in 1900 was married to Stephen Townsend, also 
an author, who died fourteen years later. Her books are all very inter- 
esting. She was always spoken of as Mrs. Burnett. Dr. Burnett died, 
an eminent physician, a number of years ago — Mrs. Monroe in The 
Lutheran. 



RAILROAD SCHEDULE 

Northbound. 



No. 


136 


To 


Washington 


5:00 A. 


M. 


No. 


36 


To 


Washington 


10:25 A 


. M 


No. 


46 


To 


Danville 


3:15 P. 


M. 


No. 


12 


To 


Richmond 


7:25 P. 


M. 


No. 


32 


To 


Washington 


8:28 P. 


M. 


No. 


38 


To 


Washington 


9:30 P. 


M. 


No. 


30 


To 


Washington 
Southbound. 


1:40 A. 


M. 


No. 


45 


To 


Charlotte 


4:14 P. 


M. 


No 


35 


To 


Atlanta 


10:06 P. 


M. 


No. 


29 


To 


Atlanta 


2:45 A. 


M. 


No. 


31 


To 


Augusta 


6:07 A. 


M. 


No. 


33 


To 


New Orleans 


8:27 A. 


M. 


No. 


11 


To 


Charlotte 


9:05 A. 


M. 


No. 


135 


To 


Atlanta 


9:15 P. 


M 



THE SOUTHERN SERVES THE SOUTH 



*s& -' ■ '- 



i/ 



Mrs. H. it Wagitaff 

4-28-23' 



™ UPLiFr 



VOL. XIII CONCORD, N. C, DECEMBER 13. 1921 No. 4 



* A 

? "SHE'S MY FRIEND." ! 

t I 

X That's a sweet and instructive story we are car- ♦ 

* rying under the title of "She's my friend." .♦. 

* Throughout the country where wise and heroic ef- X 
I> fort has been made, by the employment of every * 
X possible agency and the services of a capable nurse, ♦ 

* whose heart is in her work, there are thousands <|> 
**♦ ♦ 

* of cases where the blessed can and do truthfully ' X 

% exclaim "she's my friend." *;* 



A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A t 



-PUBLISHED BY- 



THE PRINTING CLASS OF THE STONEWALL JACKSON MANUAL 
TRAINING AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



J. P. Cook, Chairman Concord 
Miss Easdale Shaw, Vice-Chairman 

Rockingham 
Jno. J. Blair, Sec, Raleigh 
D. B. Coltrane, Treas., Concord 
J. S. Efird, Albemarle 
Mr. Chas. A. Cannon, Concord 
Rev. Tom P. Jimison, Spencer 



Mrs. G. T. Roth, Elkin 

Herman Cone, Greensboro 

Mrs. Cameron Morrison, Raleigh 

Mrs. A. L. Coble, Statesville 

Mrs. T. W. Bickett, Raleigh 

Mrs. W. N. Reynolds, Winston-Salem 

Mrs. I. W. Faison, Charlotte 

Mr. Paul Whitlock, Charlotte 



Mrs. W. H. S. Burgwyn, Honorary Member 
Chas. E. Boger, Supt. 



CONTENTS. 



EDITORIAL COMMENT 

"SHE'S MY FRIEND" 

ASK THOSE WHO USE IT 

"STATE'S CHIEF NEED IS GOOD COA I I'.M' • 

TOM TELLS IT 

JOHN C. CALHOUN HENPECKED 

PRAYER 

UNDESERVED CREDIT 

THE AMERCAN AND HIS MONEY 

A SURE PASSWORD 

INSTITUTION NOTES 





3-8 


Elizabeth Cole 


9 




11 


PAINT" 




Harvey H. Smith 


12 


Monroe Journal 


16 




18 


T. M. Fraser 


20 


Asheville Citizen 


26 


Or. J. W. Holland 


28 


Selected 


29 


J. J. Jones, Jr. 


29 



The Uplift 



A WEEKLY JOURNAL 



PUBLISHED BY 



The Authority of the Stonewall Jackson Manual Training and Industrial 

School. Type-setting by the Boys Printing Class. Subscription 

Two Dollars the Year in Advance 

JAMES P. COOK, Editor, J. C. FISHER, Director Printing Department 



Entered as second-class matter Dec. 4, 1920 at the Post Office at Concord, 
N. C. under act of March 3, 1379. Acceptance for mailing at special rate 
of 4, 1923. 



Self-distrust is the cause of most of our failures. In the. assurance of 
strength there is strength, and they are weakest, however strong, who 
have no faith in themselves or their Dowers. — Boree. 



ARE YOU SURE YOU ARE SAFE? 



It is unworthy of any people, having intelligence and without selfishness 
when it conies to meet a public duty, to deliberately shut their eyes to a 
condition that demands heroic efforts, and thereby fool themselves into a 
sense of security. We have in this county, as well as in other counties of the 
state, a duty that belongs to all. 

Having made an effort to ascertain the number of tubercular cases in 
Cabarrus county, The Uplift has at last found an answer to its inquiry in a 
roundabout way. So far as we know the local Health Department has not 
issued any official statement covering this phase of the condition of the 
health of the county. In the December number of the N. C. State Health 
Bulletin, issued by the State Board of Health, the number of deaths from pul- 
monary tuberculosis in the state is given by counties. Cabarrus is accredit- 
ed with twenty-eight (28) deaths during the year 1923 — from unofficial 
sources, it is believed that the year 1924 will show a considerable increase. 

From Mrs. G. B. Lewis, treasurer, of the Anti-Tuberculosis Association 
of Cabarrus county, The Uplift gets these figures touching on the tubercular 



4 THE UPLIFT 

situation in the county. These figures have been gotten from the N. C. 
Sanatorium : 

"In Concord, with street address named, 90 cases; 

In Kannapolis, Concord, K. F. D., Mt. Pleasant and the county 165 



A total of 255 cases.'' 

Experts in the observation and treatment of such cases have estimated that 
every person dying with tuberculosis infects nine others. According to this 
estimate there is a possibility, if not a probability, of nine times 255, or 
2,295 innocent and unsuspecting citizens becoming infected with this terrible 
disease. "What are you, Mr. Citizen, who love your home, your family, your 
fellow man, and in a measure regard yourself a keeper of your brother, going 
to do about it? 

Were not the 28 of our citizens, who died last year of this terrible disease, 
worth something to the community? Are not the innocent, and perhaps ig- 
norant, who came into contact with these fatal cases of last year and ex- 
posed to the 255, who are today suffering from the disease not worth your 
most thoughtful and serious consideration? 

Until we get a county sanatorium, or in connection with another county a 
joint sanatorium, the next best thing, and indeed a necessary and wise step, 
is the putting on in the county of an expert tubercular nurse, who may locate 
these homes that are infected and teach the family how to best care for the 
cases, so as to reduce the possible infection to the smallest number. This 
is vital, if we are to make a reasonable show at fighting this enemy of hu- 
manity. The Uplift understands that the local Anti-Tubercular Association 
is planning to maintain such a nurse in the county. We congratulate the 
society on its wisdom and applaud their efforts in this direction. 

Now that the sale of Christmas seals are on, let every one do his utmost, in 
keeping with the spirit of the season, to supply himself with these pretty little 
stamps, and thereby get the satisfaction of rendering a substantial encour- 
agement to these earnest people, who mean to wisely spend the money for the 
common good. This is a business that calls aloud for the aid of every one — it 
is your enemy as well as those already wasting away with the cruel disease. 
That enemy may be just around the corner, ready to attack your home. 

If the local association is fortunate in securing a Red Cross nurse, who is 
well and efficiently trained in her work, such as the county was blessed with 
several years ago, the record of the cases and the number of infections are 
bound to be reduced, or there is no dependence and faith to be put into the 



THE UPLIFT 5 

the records made elsewhere under faithful and watchful care of a trained 
nurse. 

Let us sustain the local organization in this advanced and worthy move. If 
brotherly love is not strong- enough to prompt our support ; then what about 
a selfish motive — self-defense? 



THE BIGGEST THING IN THE STATE. 

The state on Tuesday was a"ll agog over the announcement that Mr. J. B. 
Duke had established a forty million dollar trust fund, to aid Trinity College, 
certain hospitals, certain charitable institutions and to aid in the work of 
the North Carolina Methodist Conferences. The beneficiaries of this magni- 
ficent gift are in North and South Carolina. 

The statement that accompanied this announcement clearly shows that Mr. 
Duke, while an immensely rich man and has accumulated no little of this 
by meeting, accepting and directing certain opportunities that were going to 
waste in the two Carolinas, has a heart for his fellows. He is not stingy 
with his wealth, and while accumulating it he has thrown opportunities around 
hundreds of men, who have become conspicuous in social, business and indus- 
trial activities in many states. 

When this man has finished his earthly career, the product of his genius, 
brains, vision and masterful leadership will remain to bless mankind forever. 
Mr. J. B. Duke has executed the biggest thing ever done in the state. 

# * * * * ■*■ * * 

LESPEDEZA GREEN. 

The Uplift is honored by a goodly number of the leading farmers and 
agriculturists of the state that weekly read this little journal ; and we regard 
it fitting that some attention should be paid to the greatest sensation (from 
the standpoint of Union county) of recent years. It is a soil-improver, which 
Zeb Green, late of Marshville and now editor of the Mecklenburg Times, dis- 
covered, if he did not actually develop to meet a serious condition that con- 
fronted the farmer. Green always honors this newly-discovered clover by 
spelling it with a capital letter, and it is said that everytime an ignorant 
proof reader permits the name of the plant to get by with a lower case "1," 
Editor Green growls like unto a lion, or words to that effect. 

There must be some remarkable virtue in Lespedeza, or else a whole county 
would not go wild about it, lead by a serious-minded and honest fellow like 
Green. At a meeting of editors a year or more ago, when editor Honeycutt 



6 THE UPLIFT 

had proven that there was such a thing as Morrow Mountain, Green to save his 
reputation as a truthful man voluntarily promised to send a sample of a 
bushel of Lespedeza seed to the members of the craft for the simple pur- 
pose of getting into the class with Honeycutt, who went off with flying colors 
in the establishment of the fact that such a thing as Morrow Mountain did 
reside in Stanly county. But Green has not yet made good — not a single 
editor in that party at Albemarle has ever heard another word from Green. 

If Lespedeza will accomplish all that is claimed for it, it behooves every- 
one of us to get behind it and Green, and Beasley (a late convert) and spread 
the story of its value to the uttermost parts of the state and elsewhere. 

ROUTING SISTER HUNTER. 

Miss Susan Hunter, disregarding the wisdom of caution, and discretion and 
showing a lack of patriotism, by her unworthy example of fly-blowing her 
own state, since she has taken up her residence in New York, has been choked 
unmercifully by a series of facts thrust down her throat, by disinterested in- 
vestigators, by the Health Department, by Miss Kelly, by Bill Richardson, 
the governor's private secretary, and a score of others. 

We invite a reading of an article in this number, the same being the candid 
opinion of a real New Yorker, who was seeking after truth and was willing 
to go on record. An embossed copy of this pleasing exhibition of facts 
should be sent to sister Hunter for her information. That kind of a story, 
however, will not aid a self-constituted missionary in raising funds for 
' ■ ignorant mountain folk, ' ' or the ' ' hungry and ignorant ones in the east. ' '• 
After all, there may not be any Susan Hunter — maybe some jealous faker 
sprung the miserably false article on the New York Times. 

PATERNAL INTEREST. 

One of the choicest joys that come to him who may unselfishly appreciate 

the attitude of an aged father, who is living in the lives of his children, was 

witnessed the other day, which is described by an exchange in these words. 

"I sat in a hotel a little while ago with an old friend. I had not seen 

him for several years. Our paths have parted, and not often do they 

cross. Death has invaded his home so that his family is not so large 

as it used to be. But he has two children, a son and a daughter. The 

daughter was with him on the occasion of our short visit together. I 

asked about the son, who, I was told, is married and lives in 

New York City. I saw by the expression on the fathers face he was 



THE UPLIFT 7 

proud of his son. It does not take long to see whether or not a son is 
the joy of his father and mother. My inquiry about the boy was all the 
father needed to start him out on a long and interesting story. That 
story need not be long here. The son and wife live in a small flat in 
our nation's metropolis. They are adding to their furniture a piece now 
and then as they are a'^le. Then the father told me what interested him 
most of all. It was to the effect that the son writes him every week. 
The week previous the son, being very busy, did not get to write until late 
and fearing the father would not receive the letter by Saturday sent it 
special delivery. The father's chest swelled with pride and joy as he told 
me of the devotion of his son; and he was not half as much concerned 
that that son should live in more spacious quarters or enjoy more abund- 
ant furniture as that he should not forget him whose love is next to the 
love of a mother. Dutiful sons make glad fathers." 

* * * * <t * * * 

TOOK HIM FOR A PREACHER. 

Some days ago Hon. Walter Murphy, of Salisbury, and Hon. D. F. Giles, of 
Marion, as representatives of the State Budget Commission, paid an official 
visit to the Jackson Training School. They went over the entire plant, and 
concluding their visit they made practical talks to the boys who had as- 
sembled in the auditorium for the pleasure of hearing these distinguished 
gentlemen. It was an enjoyable affair. 

Leaving the auditorium, so impressed with the orthodoxy and soundness 
of Mr. Murphy's remarks, which forcibly dwelled upon the possibilities of 
overcoming obstacles, one of our youngsters approached Mr. Murphy and as- 
sured him that "we would be glad to have you as our regular preacher." 
That came from the boy's heart; and up to this day that youngster does not 

know that Mr. Murphy is not a licensed preacher. 

* **■** * * * 

THEY SEE THE PROBLEM. 

The treasurer of the local Anti-Tubereulosis Society writes that during the 
past year it was their privilege of ministering to 19 adults and 12 children 
(the latter either in the house with tuberculosis or having recently been with 
parents who died with the disease.) They sent four patients to the State 
Sanatorium for treatment, others not being willing, or too ill to go. 

The same authority further says: "We are convinced that tuberculosis is 
increasing in Cabarrus county, and feel what we are doing is very ineffective 
to check its spread, and that a nurse, well equipped to do educational work, 
will be of inestimable value. ' ' 

The Soeiety is right. Get a well trained nurse — a Red Cross Nurse, if 



8 THE UPLIFT 

possible. The best is not too good to tackle this important job. 

******** 

GOOD FOR MECKLENBURG. 

The old cradle of the First Declaration of American Independence — Meck- 
lenburg — did herself proud on the 9th. By a handsome majority at a specially- 
called election the people authorized the authorities to issue $100,000 in bonds 
for the erection of a Tuberculosis Sanatorium in the county and the levy of a 
5-cent tax for its support. 

The county never did a finer or a more humane act. The people are 
aroused over the vital matter of making our citizens safe from this sneak- 
ing disease. No man, woman or child is safe until this enemy of humanity 
is conquered — it is posible, if we go about it in determination and relent- 
lessly. 

* * * * * * * * 

Reader: if yon desire a real lucid presentation of the efficacy of prayer, 
don't fail to read the article, entitled "Prayer," by Judge T. M. Fraser, 
an associate justice of the South Carolina Supreme Court, who is not too busy 
to go to his home in Sumter to teach his Bible class. 

******** 

THE BOYS' CHRISTMAS FUND. 

Mr. A. W. Klemme, Hight Point $ 5.00 

Mr. Herman Cone, Greensboro 25.00 

Stonewall Jackson Junior Circle of King's Daughters, Concord, 5.00 

Standard Buiek Company, Concord 5.00 

Silver Cross Circle, King's Daughters, Concord 5.00 

Stonewall Jackson Circle, King's Daughters Senior, Concord 10.00 

Mr. Herman Cone, of Greensboro, a fine friend of the cause that engages 

this institution, in enclosing his check is pleasd to say: "I hope that the 

enclosed cheek will be useful in helping to provide a Merry Christmas for the 

bovs." 



<&&"^& 



THE UPLIFT 



SHE'S MY FRIEND!' 



By Elizabeth Cole. 



Billy came running' up the walk and 
breathlessly jumped into his mother's 
arms for a hug and a kiss. 

' ' Who was that walking home with 
you ? ' ' asked his mother. She looked 
down the street at a disappearing 
slender figure. 

"Oh," exclaimed Billy, "she's my 
friend ! ' ' His eyes sparkled and he 
grinned all over as the figure at the 
corner turned around and blew a kiss 
at him. 

"Well, so she's your friend, is 
she?" asked Billy's mother "Who 
is she, ducky?" 

' ' Why, don 't you know her, moth- 
er? She conies to our school and 
tells us stories and all about brush- 
ing our teeth n ' everything. — and 
didn't you see her going into Mrs. 
Brown 's last week when the baby 
was sick? And don't you remember 
last year when they gave that play 
in school and Polly was the health 
fairy and they got her some money 
to buy an automobile with ? Why, 
you know her, mother." Billy was 
all out of breath in his eagerness to 
make his explanation understood. 

"You're just about as clear as a 
muddy pool, son, ' ' said his mother, 
"but I gather she is the public 
health nurse. Is she?" 

"Yes," replied Billy, a bit doubt- 
fully, "sort of, but they have an- 
other name for her — it's a long word 
— it begins with ' t. ' You know what 
they have that santorium for at 
Laurel Hill. ' ' 

"Oh, you mean tuberculosis?" 
questioned his mother, "a tubercu- 
losis nurse?" 



"Yes" replied Billy, not wholly 
sure whether or not he liked the 
word. ' ' Tuberculosis, ' ' he said it 
over once or twice, deciding it was, 
after all, an intriguing addition to 
his vocabulary. "Yes, that's it — 
tuberculosis nurse, they call her. But 
anyway she's my friend." 

That is a true story and it is told 
to introduce to the reader no only 
Billy's friend, but everybody's friend 
the tuberculosis public health nurse. 

The whole public health nursing 
movement grew out of a desire to be 
friendly, and a wish to do everything 
possible for anyone who was sick. 
Neighborliness and friendly care have 
always been known, but organized 
and scientific home-nursing care, de- 
signed to prevent disease, has only 
been developed within the past two 
decades. 

The "public health nurse" (that 
is another name for her) is now such 
a recognized necessity in the com- 
munity that we could not well live 
without her. Her work is not only 
to care for the sick, but has come to 
be a health teacher as well, one who 
helps; toward preventing sickness. 
Her work is also coordinated with 
other community health work and 
she sometimes serves as a connecting 
link for various health organizations. 
There are neatly 20,000 of these 
trained public health nurses in the 
field today. Many are specialized 
tuberculosis nurses, while most of 
them care for tuberculosis patients 
in their homes. 

It is almost impossible to realize 
what an important factor the tuber- 



10 



THE UPLIFT 



culosis nurse has been in the or- 
ganized educational campaign to pre- 
vent and stamp out tuberculosis. 
Twenty-five years ago, under the late 
Sir William Osier's direction, two 
women medical students in Balti- 
more went to the homes of several 
patients who had been coming to the 
John Hopkins Hospital dispensary. 
There they instructed them regard- 
ing diet, fresh air, disposal of sput- 
um and generally inspected the home 
conditions. Tuberculosis was then 
regarded as a hopeless and inherited 
disease. The patients remained at 
home for the most part within close 
stuffy rooms and no care was taken 
to protect other members of the fam- 
ily from infection. This was the be- 
ginning of the idea of having nurses 
specialize in tuberculosis care and 
prevention. 

With the advent of the tubercu- 
losis nurse to visit the home and 
give education in healthy living, 
naturally the children in many fami- 
lies wherein tuberculosis had been 
constantly spreading could be sav- 
ed. Children with infectious dis- 
eases were sent home from school, 
but formerly no one checked up to 
see whether or not proper treatment 
was given and precautions taken to 
keep the infected child from placing 
with others. The tuberculosis nurses 



did this and, in cases of malnutrition 
in children so conducive to tuberculo- 
sis, they began to give the mothers 
instruction on diet, fresh air and 
other health habits. Health educa- 
tion in the home has become of in- 
creasing help in preventing tubercul- 
osis for this so often can follow such 
seemingly simple sicknesses as measles 
colds, pneumonia. 

The organized tuberculosis camp- 
aign carried on for the passed twenty 
years by the National Tuberculosis 
Association and affiliated state and 
local organizations depends more and 
more on the cooperation of the public 
health nurse. They work together in 
teaching health to prevent sickness. 
Christmas seals, the funds of which 
support tuberculosis work, have help- 
ed to make it possible to have these 
specialized nurses irl various com- 
munities. The should be in every com 
munity to bring health to mothers 
and children and to help decrease tub- 
erculosis in this country. They should 
be in isolated districts as well as in 
crowded cities, so that every mother 
may be taught health and be able to 
say, as little Billy did, "She's my fri- 
end ! ' ' 

Buy Chrismas seals in December 
and help make it possible to have 
more tuberculosis nurses, everybody's 
friends. 



Kentucky has an anti-gossiping act, a new law, and under it a farm- 
er's wife in Daviess county has been fined $10. If malicious gossiping 
can be stopped, or even decreased, by the mere enactment of a statute, 
it is a wonder the method has not long since been tried. North Caro- 
line, will soon have a legislature in session, with not a great many press- 
ing tasks on hand, and maybe the solons would do well to consider this 
Kentusky Law. — Greensboro News. 



THE UPLIF' 



11 



ASK THOSE WHO USE IT. 

The Chatom Record, making note of the large amounts invested in adver- 
tising by various concerns, asks whether it pays and then advises you to ask 
those who use it. We are reminded that hundreds of car-loads of Cannon- 
made towels would go out month after month to the trade who are cognizant 
of the quality, but who there be that doubts that that magnificent sign — per- 
haps no more attracive or significant can be found in the whole wide world — ■ 
at Kannapolis telling of the great towel industry does not whet up trade and 
interest? But says the Record, in is compilation of moneys spent: 



Wrigley spends $3,500,000 a year 
to tell the public theirs is the gum to 
chew. 

For spends .$6,000,000 to tell the 
Ford story. 

The Electric Light Power industry 
spends more than $4,000,000 flashing 
the kilowatt hourly message. 

Campbells are coming across with 
$1,500,000 to say they sell succulent 
soup. 

Electric railway companies ring 
up about $2,2000,0*00 for advertising 
trolley rides. 

Colgates assert, to the tune of 
some $1,185,000, that their shaving- 
soap, etc., produces the smile that 
won't erase. 

Proctor and Gamble are still con- 



vincing the ablutionsly inclined that 
Ivory soap floats — and are spending 
$1,170,000 to make that conviction 
stick. 

(las companies talk more than $2,- 
000,000 worth through advertising 
channels. 

One of Victor's most telling talking 
machine is its advertising which 
costs $1,142,000. 

Telephone companies have busy 
advertising lines with an estimated 
toll of $1,500,000. Along each line 
sounds the voice with the smile. 

Does advertising pay? 

The answer is to be found in Amer- 
ica 's business, commercial and indus- 
trial trend. 



ECHOES FROM A NURSERY. 

"Let me tell you, Miss Daisy," said a clever little six year old boy, 
"one night I peeped out of the window and I saw the biggest, blackest 
cloud, and seven little stars twinkling right under it. Then it commenced 
to rain, and the stars were about to get wet and they all slipped back 
home." 

"Let me tell you something, too, Miss Daisy," quickly followed the 
child's sister, "One night, standing right here I was getting ready to 
go to bed and the curtain was up ; a little bird out there on that tree 
saw me, and when I laid down that little bird tried to do as I did — it 
lay flat down on the limb and went to sleep." 



12 



THE UPLIFT 



"STATE'S CHIEF NEED IS GOOD COAT 

PAINT." 

By Harvey H. Smith. 



I have been in North Carolina al- 
most a month. In that time I have 
traveled over two thousand miles by 
automobile and in that distance I 
encountered considerably less than 
one-half of one per cent poor roads. 
Starting at Raleigh I descended to 
the level of the sea at Beaufort and 
rose to the dizzying heights of Chim- 
ney Rock, continuing west to Bryson 
City and detouring at interesting 
way stations in between. I came to 
North Carolina, not to scoff exactly, 
but somewhat skeptical, and I re- 
main to praise. My peregrinations 
have been a succession of pleasant 
surprises. 

Previous to my visit my knowledge 
of the State was fragmentary, to say 
the least. Early iu my scholastic 
career I learned that North Carolina 
was bounded on the north by Vir- 
ginia, on the west by Tennessee, on 
the south (fittingly enough) by 
South Carolina and on the east by 
the Atlantic ocean. Raleigh was its 
eapitol and its principal crops were 
cotton and tobacco. From time to 
time this meager information was 
augmented. Since I started smoking 
"Winston-Salem has loomed large on 
my mental horizon and of late years 
I have had the annual urge to golf 
at Pinehurst and Asheville. 

But of the real North Carolina, 
its people, its scenic beauty, its tra- 
ditions, progress, pride and problems 
I knew as little as the average man 
knows of his wife before marriage. 



I do not claim to know North Caro- 
lina now. I doubt if even her oldest 
inhabitants are thoroughly convers- 
ant with her manifold attractions. 
No, picture of travel is ever quite 
finished. There are always fresh 
strokes to be added. The world is 
too full of unseen things. Had I 
traversed every county — had I stop- 
ped in every town there would still 
be a host of voices raised to shout, 
' ' You aint seen nothin ' yet. ' ' 

I don't know just what I ex- 
pected when I got off the train at 
Raleigh. A chorus of "you-alls" 
probably, from a welcoming delega- 
tion of honorary colonels in broad- 
brimmed black felt hats; picturesque 
negroes, doubtless, working in still 
more picturesque cotton fields ; a 
duel or two to avenge slighted honor, 
perhaps with two minute intermis- 
sion for Coca-Cola. At any rate, 
I clidn 't expect to be whisked away 
in a yellow taxi with the meter 
clicking as disturbingly as ever it 
clicked in New York or to be set 
down in front of a modern ten-story 
hotel equipped with running ice water 
ter and less rapid bell boys. 

There is no reason why I shouldn't 
have anticipated these latter ear- 
marks of twentieth century progress 
were it not for the fact that mine 
was the journey of an innocent 
abroad, my first trip below Virginia. 
And furthermore I am a New Yorker, 
than whom, I am told, there is noth- 
ing more provincial. Let it be stated 



THE UPLIFT 



13 



here that ray preconceptions were 
all wrong. I haven't seen a single 
duel or even heard of one. Not more 
than a dozen "yon-alls'" have reahed 
my ears, which is averaging pretty 
low per gallon. I haven't seen 
enough broad-brimmed black felt 
hats to start even a small town hat 
store. Only on cotton fields and 
Coca-Cola did I approximate reality. 
The cotton fields have been fully as 
picturesque as I imagined and the 
pickers even more so, and I have 
seen enough Coca-Cola consumed to 
make me believe that nine out of 
ten North Carolinians must be stock- 
holders in the Coca-Cola company. 

I came down here neither as a 
toivriest nor on business, on the ordi- 
nary sense of the word. Together 
with a cameraman I came to photo- 
graph the scenic beauties of North 
Carolina for a one-reel educational 
motion picture. I have seen enough 
beauty and interesting things to 
make several dozen reels and have 
"shot'' enough to make at least 
five. 

Yet were anyone to ask me to 
name the most beautiful part of the 
State or the most unsightly I could 
not do so. I thought the little lake 
outside of Trenton, its old moss-hung 
cypresses back lighted by the late 
afternoon sun, quite the most beau- 
tiful thing I had ever seen until 1 
reached the pinnacle of Linville 
Mountain and a panorama of unbe- 
lievable grandeur un'folded beneath 
my eyes. 

So struck were my cameraman and 
myself at this scene that we decided 
to spend several days photographing- 
it and other matchless views to be 
had from the mountain which it is 



hoped will soon be a part of the 
Southern Appalachian Park. We 
started with Linville Falls and work- 
ed out the mountain. At every turn 
a new picture, more beautiful than 
the one that preceded it, confronted 
us, culminating like the climax of an 
engrossing novel in the view from 
the Pinnacle. 

From the Pinnacle we descended 
some two thousand feet into Linville 
Gorge and climbed out again, over 
a thousand feet straight up the face 
of the mountain, clinging to roots 
and gaining footholds in rock crev- 
ices. It was like climbing the face 
of the Woolworth building. Instead 
of spending two days we spent seven 
and would have been turning the 
crank yet had Ave enough film left. 

Those were delightful days in the 
mountains. The air was fortunately 
clear for our purposes and although 
the mercury was low there was al- 
ways time for a fire and a can of 
steaming hot coffee. I liked the peo- 
ple we met. Our host had spent 
some time in the revenue service 
and regaled us with bloodcurdling 
tales while an old-timer who travel- 
ed witli us taxed our credulity with 
a wealth of bear stories. 

My outstanding impression of this 
section of the State, however, has 
nothing to do with scenery or with 
old-timers. It is one of a clean-cut 
young man in his twenties whom we 
came upon taking part in a square 
dance at the Crossnore School. I 
think he is the most remarkable man 
I have ever met. He refused an offer 
of $1,000 a week from the largest 
vaudeville circuit in the country to 
imitate the songs and cries of birds 
and beasts so that he might devote 



14 



THE UPLIFT 



himself to his work among his own 
people. 

I marveled at the hand of Nature 
in rearing- Chimney Rock. A young 
man interested in the development 
of the surrounding country told us 
that its summit was the warmest 
place in North Carolina. I cred- 
ited his statement to over-exuber- 
ance until I mounted the several 
hundred steps to get there. Then I 
knew he was right. 

I cannot chronicle my entire trip. 
My mind is a kaleidoscope of im- 
pressions. A giant negTo astride an 

undersized mule Fort 

Fisher with the waves washing over 
the silhouetted ribs of a wrecked 
clipper ship . . sunrise on Lake 
James .... a Sunday evening 
meal at Linville Falls . . . my 
first taste of barbecued pig . . . 
the graveyard at Beaufort . . . 
the incomparable architecture of 
New Bern; its perfect old church 
after plans by Sir Christoper Wrenn ; 
the houses with railed lookouts on 
their roofs where anxious wives 
watched for the returning ships of 
their husbands . . . the serpen- 
tine concrete road winding its way 
over the mountains between Old 
Fort and Asheville . . . moun- 
taineers driving into town with shot- 
guns over their knees. 

I am at a loss to understand how 
a State which can construct such an 
imparalleld system of roads and 
erect modern urban schools in rural 
districts can allow such a cherished 
possession as Fort Macon, or such 
pai't of it as vandals have not car- 
ried away, sink into soon irretriev- 
able ruin. May I recommend to 
those North Carolinians who have 



not visited it, a trip to this relic 
of the past as a most delightful Sun- 
day excursion. 

To one accustomed to motoring 
over flat Long Island roads, riding 
over mountains that are mountains 
has been something of a thrill, much 
like riding on a scenic railway for 
the first time with no guard rails 
to lend security. I found it rather 
trying to admire the scenery when 
my mind was more concerned with 
the probabilities of negotiating the 
next hairpin curve. However, hence- 
forth when anyone recounts a tale of 
a horrowing automobile ride I will 
silence him with a dozen better, each 
beginning, ''When I was in North 
Carolina — ' ' 

I have memories of my first ex- 
perience putting on sand greens 
. . an oyster roast with a bushel 
of oysters for three . . the sur- 
prising number of buildings under 
construction . . . thousands of 
rhododendrons . . . growing wild 
on the mountain side . Abe Mitchell 
driving 370 yards over the course of 
the Asheville Country Club . . . 
cornbread and buttermilk .... 
Pigeon River valley ... A galax 
picker's home built under an over- 
hanging rock on the side of Grand- 
father Mountain .... ginning 
cotton . . . three bountiful meals 
a day . . . the hospitality of the 
members of the Marion Lake Club 
. . . six chopped onion and may- 
onnaise sandwiches consumed en 
route to Linville Mountain . . . 
a C. C. & 0. freight train climbing 
the mountains . . . the Cherokee 
Indian reservation . . . the Capi- 
tol at Raleigh . . . fried apples 
for breakfast .... a modest- 



THE UPLIFT 



15 



mannered young mountaineer threat- 
ening to shoot anyone who harmed 
any of his dogs . . . two tame 
coons ... a 15-mile stretch of 
concrete road without a turn near 

Wilmington Crossnore 

School . . . the excitement caused 
in Morganton on Saturday after- 
noon by Ben Dixon MacNeill and 
myself in knickers . . . the Cus- 
toms House at Wilmington . . . 
the feat of removing a hill and fill- 
ing in a swamp in the heart of Ashe- 
ville . . . the amazing number 
of native-born Americans .... 
charging five cents for newspapers 
. . . the interest in politics . . 
Biltmore Forest Country Club . 
the talc mine near Carthage 
a veneer mill in New Bern . . . 
a charming lady of 83 in Charlotte 
. . . a porter parading through 
the hall of a hotel in Bryson City 
clanging a dinner bell at 7 a. m. 
. . . an ugly shack surrounded by 
varied colored chrysanthemums . . 
the hospitality of the members of 
the Marion Lake Club. 

I have these and a thousand and 
one other impressions of North Caro- 
lina to treasure and revive from time 
to time. No longer will North Caro- 
lina be to me just a part of the 
South, bounded on the north by Vir- 
ginia, on the west by Tennesse, on 
the south by South Carolina and on 
the east by the Atlantic. It is some- 
thing alive to me now. I have come, 
seen and been conquered. During 
my sojourn I have met only one sec- 
retary of a chamber of commerce 
and not once during our conversa- 
tion did he mention the fact that his 
city would in 1928 lead the world 
in the manufacture of non-refillable 



fountain pens or that even now it 
led in the matter of mean rainfall 
per annum. Furthermore, he abso- 
lutely abstained from statistics 
which is an accomplishment for any 
chamber of commerce secretary. 

My escutcheon thus cleared I be- 
lieve that I write of North Carolina 
without bias. I have seen it through 
the lens of a camera. I came in 
quest of beauty and found it. Nor 
did I find much of squalor. I read 
French Strother's article on North 
Carolina and Susan Hunter's article 
in rebuttal and from my observation 
I think the former paints the bet- 
ter picture. He is not an idealist 
as charged but a stark realist. 

It is useless to deny that there is 
poverty among the mountaineers or 
in the lowlands, but it is a healthy 
poverty not to be compared with that 
on the East Side of my own city. 
And although the poor mountaineer 
may be lacking in worldly goods he 
lives close to nature and has a 
knowledge of the beauties of this 
world which many an educated and 
wealthy man would give much to 
possess. 

I have been most struck by the 
niggardly use of paint on almost all 
houses outside of cities and towns. 
Someone told me that what North 
Carolina needed most was a good 
press agent. I disagree with him. 
What North Carolina needs most is 
a coat of paint. But North Caro- 
lina is a State with a purpose. Its 
roads, its schools, its welfare serv- 
ices prove that and the paint can 
come latter. Any way paint is super- 
ficial and North Carolina seems to 
get along every well without super- 
ficiality. 



16 



THE UPLIFT 



TOM TELLS IT. 



(Monroe 

Tom Broom came along: this morn- 
ing with a big roll of manuscript un- 
der his arm and a "question revealed 
the fact that it was the several re- 
ports he has to make on his year's 
work to the various official agencies 
under which he works. An examina- 
tion showed that he had done as 
pretty a piece of typewriting as any 
expert stenographer would have done 
and done it with the same old rough 
hands that Sheriff Griffith used to 
say slung the plow and harrow so 
much. Hanged if this man Tom 
Broom ain't a wonder anyway. He 
can do more things and do them 
well, and know more about more 
things than any other man you will 
meet in many day's journey. 

But this report, as might have been 
expected, has a lot to say aboat 
lespedeza. and so The Journal asked 
Mr. Broom a very "pinted 1 question. 
TVe have been hearing a lot about 
lespedeza and what it is doing for the 
soil in this country, as well as how glad 
the farmers are that they have at 
last found something that fills the 
bill. "Now," Mr. Broom was asked, 
"how much of this is just talk and 
how much is actuality? Are the 
farmers generally taking on to it. or 
are there just a few who are trying 
it?" 

"I figure," said Mr. Broom, "that 
there are already 2,500 individual 
farmers in the country who have be- 
gun to use lespedeza. ' ' 

That sounded good, and Mr. Broom 
was asked why this was true, and 
why he had not sueceded in getting 
great attention paid to crimson clover 



Journal) 

and other soil improvers that he had 
been talking about in years gone by. 
And take it or leave it, this wonder- 
ful man had all that figured out. 
"Here is that point right here in 
my report, ' ' he said, and we read : . 
"It (lespedeza) has inspired the 
farmer with hope and courage. His 
confidence in his ability to improve 
his acres has been restored. He had 
well nigh lost hope and courage. His 
confidence had been shattered by his 
strenuous but futile efforts to improve 
his acres with crimson clover and cow- 
peas. These so often refused to 
catch, or refused to grow. He now 
knows that in lespedeza he has leg- 
ume that will give good account of 
itself anywhere, if he will only sow 
the seed. In times past he has de- 
nied himself many comforts and con- 
veniences in order to get a supply of 
crimson clover seed, or the seed of 
some other legume, to grow, and more 
often than otherwise had failure for 
his pains. But now he goes out and 
in an afternoon saves enough seed 
for his own requirements, and in an- 
other afternoon harvests $50 worth of 
seed for some one else. It has liber- 
ated him from the slavish method of 
pulling fodder. He is no longer hur- 
ried by the thought that his peavine 
or sorghum ha may be caused to rot 
in the stack by continuous rains. He 
now knows that if he can get two 
fair days together he can get his 
winter forage into the barn in fine 
condition, for lesepedeza can be cut 
in one day, baled and put in the barn 
the next. It is a common saying among 
farmers, 'lespedeza improves the 



THE UPLIFT 17 

soil, feeds the cows, fills the barn?, And that is the story told with as 

and puts money in the pocket.' The fine command of English as a profes- 

above statements may read like truth sional writer could employ. The ease 

stated in the abstract, yet every with which this legume may be grown 

statement is based on concrete facta. and the certainty of the crop, as well 

If any one doubts it, let him come as its value, then, explains why peo- 

and see." pie are "catching onto" it. 



GRANDMOTHER MAKING CORNBREAD. 

(Laura S .Stacy, Glen Alpine) 

If you find her in the kitchen 

After you have been away 
Making cornbread like she. used to 

Just be careful what you say. 

For the joy she finds in sifting, 
Mixing, smelling, while it browns, 
Ought to bring some smiling dimples 
To your face, instead of frowns. 

She'll not feel that she is useless 
If once more her hands may do, 

Little things that gave her pleasure 
When she worked for me and you. 

If you have a cook or daughter 

Let her do another turn 
While grandmother makes the cornbread 

Listening to the woodfire burn. 

She'll be happy when its finished 
And the smile upon her face 

Will reward you for your patience 
When she bows her head in grace. 



18 



THE UPLIFT 



JOHN C. CALHOUN HENPECKED. 



In the home of a grandaughter of 
John C. Calhoun, the great Southern 
statesman, who lives in Atlanta, are 
many relies of the statesman. "Yes," 
said the great grandaughter in 
speaking of her relies, 'It is John C. 
Calhoun whose spirit burns strong- 
est here. There in the right hand 
corner next to the window, is the 
great portrait of him by De Bloch, 
the Belgian, which has been copied 
again and again for all the history 
books. On the opposite side of the 
window is the companion portrait 
of Mrs. John C. Calhoun. 

And there, on a mahogany pier 
table at the left, are tha old silver 
candle-sticks, and a curious silver 
vase, once the ear-trumpet of John 
C. Calhoun's daughter, Cornelia 

"Which piece do you prize most of 
all ? " I asked of Mrs. A. P. Calhoun : 
"That big Gothic secretary?" 

"No," she answered, "I do prize 
that and I think it is one of the fin- 
est I ever saw. That was presented 
to my great-grandfather, John C. 
Calhoun, by the state of South Caro- 
lina when he became vice president 
of the United States. It was carved 
of Swiss oak by an old Swiss who 
was called 'a sculptor in wood.' 
The state of South Carolina paid 
$5, 000 for the five pieces which were 
in this same gift : that secretary, this 
screen, a stool I have upstairs, an 
arm-chair which is at Clemson col- 
lege, and an ottoman. 

"But there is the antique I prize 
most — or perhaps I should call it just 
an heirloom, for it 's only about a hun- 
dred years old," pointing to the carv- 
ed scren. ' ' That petit point was 



by Grandmother Clemson without a 
pattern. It is just a free hand pic- 
ture of an alabaster vase, which be- 
longed to the family, filled with flow- 
ers from their garden — roses, 'red- 
hot pokers, ' Canterbury bells, and 
other old-fashioned things." 

' ' But I '11 tell you a curious thing, ' ' 
she went on. "You see thoes carv- 
ed fauns' heads on the sides? Well, 
although no two pieces of the five 
were made to match, it happens that 
the arm eair at Clemson is decorated 
with similar fauns' heads. But there 
the custodian tells the story that the 
chair was presented to Grandfather 
Clemson by his friend Leopold of 
Belgium; and that Leopold, wishing 
Grandfather to have some personal 
reminder of him, had his own por- 
trait carved on the chair. But what 
would Leopold think," she added with 
a twinkle, "of having his portrait 
carved with horns ! ' ' 

Mania for Work 

Mrs. Calhoun has a host of anec- 
dotes to tell of her great-grandfather 
and his dainty, but fierce, little wife. 
Floride, whom he always called 
"Miss Flurried" (which is some- 
what nearer the old French pronun- 
ciation of the name, Fleuride). 
"Great-grandmother had a maina for 
making people work," she said. "If 
ladies came to call, she would have 
various sorts of needlework handy, 
steer the conversation around that 
way, and say, 'What kind of fancy- 
work do you like best ? ' and on get- 
ing some kind of answer would add, 
'Well, while we are talking, let us 
be working. It is a sin not to use 
our hands.' If a slave in the com- 



THE UPLIFT 



19 



munity was disobedient or obstreper- 
ous, bis owner would b'-mg bim to 
order witb the threat, "If you don't 
behave, I'll sell you to Mrs. John C. 
Calhoun}" 

But one of the most interesting 
stories is that of the incident which 
led to the building of his "library" 
next to the old home at Clemson. One 
day while trying to work, and pester- 
ed by some request of his wife, he re- 
torted mildly, in the grammar reserv- 
ed for family use, "Miss Flurrid, I 
can't do no work with you bothern, 
me now. Won't you leave me alone V 

"This is my house," came the an- 
swer, "and I'll go in it where I 
please! " 

' ' Well, I' ve got five hundred dollars, 



Miss Flurrid, and if I build me a 
little house out in the yard, will you 
let me stay in it without botherin' 
me?" 

"Yes, if you'll promise never to 
set foot in my house again unless I 
invite you." 

So he built the little library at 
"Fort Hill," and lined it with pine 
shelvies of his ooks, put in a plain 
table with a few chairs, and upstairs 
in a little loft, a very narrow spool 
bed with a corn-shuck mattress. And 
there he read, and wrote, and slept, 
and occasionally had his meals served 
him, till he died, in 1850, mourned 
by a whole state and most of a na- 
tion as one of her clearest thinkers 
and greatest sons. 



TRUE BEAUTY. 

There is a treatise on true beauty in Prov. 31:10-31 that is better 
than any of the beauty-books on sale, and has a better prescription than 
any of the beauty doctors can give. This famous chapter is worth an- 
alyzing. 

What make a beautiful woman, according to this old philosopher? 

1. She is absolutely trustworthy. 

2. She seeks to do good. 

3. She is diligent. 

4. She has her household in her heart. 

5. She has courage and strength. 

6. She is generous to the poor. 

7. She sees that all her household are neatly and prettily clothed. 

8. She makes her house beautiful. 

9. She is anxious and ambitious for her husband. 

10. She is honored because of her sterling characte-r. 

11. All her words are wise, helpful and kind. 

12. She makes herself beloved of all her children. 

13. She fears the Lord. 

Notice how right at the end the writer says that all these beautiful 
traits are but manifestations of an inward beauty — it ss fear of the 
Lord — His spirit in her heart. — Exchange. 



20 



THE UPLIFT 



PRAYER. 

By T. M. Fraser. 



The subject of this lesson is 
"Jesus Heals the- Son of a Noble- 
man, at the request of the Father;" 
or it may be stated, Jesus heals a 
young' man in answer to the prayer 
of his father. 

This is not an isolated incident. 
There are others. It is entirely clear 
that the Bible teaches that while 
Jesus was on earth He did hear and 
answer prayer for the healing of the 
sick. 

I am fully convinced that the world 
is now ripe for a great religious re- 
vival and it will come, if the Chris- 
tian people will do their part. The 
Christian world is at Kadesh Barnea 
and God is offering to them and 
commanding them to go up and 
posses the land. If the command is 
not obeyed and we allow the time 
to pass, we too may be led out into 
the wilderness — it may be for many 
years. It is not to be expected that 
the Devil is idle. He will use all the 
forces of darkness and as many of 
God 's people as he can deceive to 
prevent the coming of the great re- 
vival. The Devil will strike at stra- 
tegic points. If a general can break 
the connection between the army of 
his enemy and his base of supplies, 
he has conquered his enemy and it is 
only a short time before his victory 
is complete. 

The Christian soldiers are weak 
and helpless in themselves, and they 
can win only when they keep in 
touch with their source of supply of 
power. Their source of supply is 
God. They keep in touch with God 
by prayer. Some people speak of 



the power of prayer. This is mis- 
leading. There is no lighting power 
in the wire that connects our light- 
ing plant with our lamps. Cut the 
wire and you break the connection 
and the lamp gives no light. The 
purpose of prayer is to keep us in 
touch with God. If the , Devil can 
discredit prayer, then men will cease 
to pray. When men cease to pray 
the connection is broken and the bat- 
tle is lost. 

We are finding, in the magazines, 
articles attacking prayer. In an 
article entitled "Pray," by Kensopp 
Lane, in the Atlantic Monthly for 
August, 1924, Mr. Lane speaks of 
two supposed effects of prayer, to- 
wit : Subjective effect, and objective 
effect. 

The subjective effect is the influ- 
ence prayer has on the man who 
prays. 

The objective effect is the influ- 
ence prayer has on others, or on 
inanimate nature. 

I. He says that the subjective ef- 
fect is efficient and admitted. That 
is, if I pray that my pastor shall 
preach a good sermon, my own mind 
is placed in harmony with the preach- 
er and I readily take in the truth 
that he speaks. This does not in- 
clude the work of God's spirit upon 
me. He might have gone a step 
further and said that I might enjoy a 
sermon, though there might be no 
merit in it whatever. A mother hears 
her son preach and thinks there nev- 
er was such a preacher. Others 
whose mental attitude to the preach- 
er is not influenced by mother love 



THE UPLIFT 



21 



may agree with her, that there never 
was such a preacher, but for a- very 
different reason. The judgment as 
to the merits of a discourse may de- 
pend entirely on the mental attitude 
of the hearer to the speaker. The 
effect of the prayer in fixing the 
attitude of the hearer who has pray- 
ed, to the speaker and the discourse, 
and its effect on him who has pray- 
ed, is called the subjective effect of 
prayer. 

II. Now, if I pray for an outpour- 
ing of the Spirit on my pastor, and 
in answer to that prayer God does 
pour out His Spirit upon him, and 
my pastor does preach a better and 
more spiritual sermon than he would 
have preached without it, then the 
effect of my prayer on the preacher 
and his other hearers is called the 
objective effect of prayer. The ob- 
jective effect of prayer is sought in 
prayer for rain and the recovery of 
the sick, and the conversion of oth- 
er men. Mr. Lane denies the objec- 
tive effect of prayer. He says that 
the Roman Catholic world still be- 
lieves in the objective effect of pray- 
er, but intimatse that the more in- 
telligent Protestant world is fast 
throwing off the delusion. Mr. Lane, 
who, it seems, was or is a minister 
of the Gospel, is strangely ignorant 
of the fact that, with the exception 
of prayers for the dead (in which 
Protestants do not believe,) the 
Protestant world is just as loyal to 
the old doctrine of the objective ef- 
fects of prayer as the Roman Catho- 
lics are. He says: "In my boyhood, 
it was customary to pray for fine 
weather or in the rarer occasion when 
English climate demands it, for rain. 
The custom is now, I fancy, almost 
dead. It has not been killed by at- 



rophy of religion, but by increased 
knowledge in meteorology. If you 
teach the public in the newspapers 
every week day that the weather is 
fixed through complicated laws, that 
if the barometer is rising, fair weath- 
er is probable, while rain may be 
expected if it is falling, you can- 
not expect them to believe on Sun- 
day that humidity of the atmosphere 
will be affected by prayer. ' ' ( Italics 
are mine.) 

A great scientist has recently made 
a great discovery, to-wit : there is no 
law of gravitation. When he comes 
to convince the world he must pro- 
duce proofs and not mere probabili- 
ties. 

Mr .Lane surrenders his whole case 
when he admits that the sequence of 
a rising barometer and fair weather, 
and a falling barometer and rain, is 
only probable. He leaves the door 
wide open for a Supreme Ruler when 
he admits that there are unexplain- 
ed variations from the rule. Is it 
entirely stupid to admit that these 
inexplicable departures from the rule 
may be caused by the providence of 
God .' Then why not the God of our 
fathers'? 

The story is told of an old preach- 
er who was asked to pray for rain, 
lie was the local weather prophet. 
He said, ' ' I can pray for rain, but 
I can tell you now that it will not 
rain until the wind changes." Even 
if we admit that it will not rain 
until the wind changes, still if there 
be a Supreme Ruler who is omnipo- 
tent and omnicient, surely He can 
He can make the initial change, which 
will result in rain and do no violence 
to any law. If there be such a ruler 
and He be also my loving Father, 
why may He not know today with 



22 



THE UPLIFT 



absolute certainty that I will come 
to Him tomorrow with a prayer for 
rain and anticipate my coming and, 
anticipating my coming, set in mo- 
tion that forces that will produces the 
blessing when I come. I know of a 
case in which a young lady was go- 
ing to an out-of-the-way place. Her 
mother said to her, you will need 
things you cannot get in this out-of- 
the-way place, and wehnever you da 
need anything, write me and ask for 
what you want. It happened time 
and again that letters to the mother, 
asking for things, passed on the way 
parcel post packages containing the 
very things asked for in the letter. 

The Bible tells us, "Your Father 
knoweth that you have need of these 
things before ye ask Him." Not 
only the Christian world, but even 
the heathen world believe that there 
is an unseen power that affects our 
lives. The heathen believe that this 
unseen power is a malignant power 
and must be appeased by sacrifice 
to ward off his wrath. The Chris- 
tian believes that this unseen power 
is God, all-wise, all-powerful, all-lov- 
ing, our God and Father. 

We are told that we have learned 
so much that our very intelligent 
people will turn away from a God 
who directs the affairs of men to a 
god who has bound himself so help- 
lessly in the bonds of his own immu- 
table law that he cannot hear our 
cry or will not. The belief in the 
unseen power is stamped on the hu- 
man heart, and those who do not be- 
lieve it are more or less than human. 

Let us say that there is a road 
leading down a steep hill to a river. 
Just before it reaches the river it 
turns and runs paralell to the riv- 



er. Now start an automobile at the 
top of the hill. By one law it goes 
down the road at an ever increas- 
ing rate of speed, accelerating as it 
goes. Apply no other force and ii; 
will go into the river and to its des- 
truction. The owner of the car ap- 
plies his brakes and the machine de- 
scends the hill at a moderate rate of 
speed and when it reaches the bend 
in the road, a turn of a wheel drives 
the car around the bend and wherev- 
er the intelligent driver determines 
that it shall go. There has been no 
violation of natural law and yet the 
automobilist may stop the car on the 
way down and turn around and go 
back up the hill. 

The modification of the effect of 
one law by involving another is com- 
mon. Take, for instance, the oper- 
ation of centrifugal force and cen- 
tripetal force: If centrifugal force 
alone operated, we would be thrown 
into space. If centripetal force alone 
operated, no man would be able to 
stand on his feet, or lift his hand 
from the ground. Both are operat- 
ing and we have an equilibrium that 
enables us to stay on the earth and 
move about with ease. 

So in prayer for the sick. The 
Holy Ghost may influence the mind 
of the sick man. The mind may re- 
act upon the body and enable the sick 
man to pass the crisis. The Holy 
Ghost may reveal to the physician 
the true nature of the disease and 
the proper remedy. Besides this, it 
frequently happens that learned phy- 
sicians tell us that our sick have 
passed the crisis and will recover, 
and they die in a few hours, or that 
our friend will die in a few hours, 
and he recovers. Surelv such cases 



THE UPLIFT 



23 



will allow even euuvucu nnd intelli- 
gent men to believe that there is a 
God,' who, sometimes, at least, di- 
rects the affairs of men. 

What does experience show as to 
the objective effect of prayer? In 
this test I know that the unbelievers 
in the objective effect of prayer are 
at a disadvantage. The prayer that 
is heard and answered is made in 
faith and they admit they have none. 
Go to the business men's prayer 
meeting, held in this city, and hear • 
the daily report of evangelistic meet- 
ings held the night before. 

' 1. It is reported that young peo- 
ple come to a meeting and sit in 
their cars and laugh and talk so loud 
that they disturb the meeting. Do 
the workers summon the police ? 
No ! They pray to God to take away 
the disturbing element. They are 
not disturbed again. That is the ob- 
jective effect of prayer, and it is 
effective. (I have seen it more than 
once.) 

2. At one of these meetings a 
man is approached and asked to con- 
fess Christ. His reply is, I have 
lived what you call a life of sin all 
my life and intend to continue to the 
end. The club prays for him and 
the next night he voluntarily makes 
a confession of Christ. 

3. In one community there is a 
man of upright life who will have 
nothing to do with religion. This 
is the hardest man to reach. He is 
regarded as the ' ' key man. ' ' His in- 
fluence is against religion and he has 
many followers. The club prays for 
him. The man is converted and goes 
to work for Jesus. 

4. One of the religious papers tells 
of a missionary in China who was 



sent to hold a meeting in a certain 
town in China. He did not want to 
go. There were some converts there 
but they were lukewarm Christians. 
There were enemies there and they 
were active, desperate and danger- 
ous. When he got there he found 
the Christians had warmed up and 
were zealous and active. The ene- 
mies did not appear and there was a 
splendid meeting. When he got back 
home he read in a missionary paper 
that that week was devoted to pray- 
er by the home people, for his work. 
These proofs might be indefinitely 
extended. 

Unless we believe in the objective 
effect of prayer, we must believe that 
many thousands of upright Christian 
people are unmitigated liars or fana- 
tics. 

The only reason I can give for the 
scores of men and women who are 
being converted in the laymen's meet- 
ings and the few who are converted 
by other agencies is, that the lay- 
men's clubs are composed of pray- 
ing men who pray over every action 
taken. There is an objective effect 
of prayer and God is manifesting it 
every day. The church has every ad- 
vantage. She is the bride of Christ, 
and the bride-room is only waiting 
for the petitions and prayers of His 
bride. When the church wakes up 
to prayer as she should do, the 
blessing will come and the blessing 
will be ponred out until there shall not 
be room to receive it. 

The Bible teaches the objective ef- 
fect of prayer. 

Matt. 7:7: ''Ask an it shall be 
given you. ' ' 

Mark 11:24: "Therefore I say 
unto you, what things soever ye de- 



24 



THE UPLIFT 



sire, when ye pray, believe that ye 
receive them and ye shall have 
them. ' ' 

Luke 11:9: "And I say unto you, 
ask and it shall be given you; seek 
ye shall find, knock and it shall be 
opened. ' ' 

John 14 :13 : " And whatsoever ye 
shall ask in my name, that will I 
do, that the Father may be glorified 
in the Son. ' ' 

John 15:7: "If ye abide in me 
an dmy words abide in you, ye shall 
ask what ye will and it shall be 
done unto you." 

John 16:23: "Verily, verily I 
say unto you, whatsoever ye shall 
ask the Father in my name, He will 
give it you. ' ' 

Luke 10:2: "Pray ye then the 
Lord of the harvest that He would 
send forth laborers into his har- 
vest. ' ' 

James 5:17: "Elias was a man 
subject to like passions as we are, 
and he prayed earnestly that it might 
not rain, and it rained not on the 
earth by the space of three years 
and six months. 

18: "And he prayed again and 
the heavens gave rain and the earth 
brought forth her fruit." 

These, quotations are sufficient to 
show that the objective effect of 
prayer is taught in the Bible. 

I do not construe the promises as 
unconditional. The only uncondition- 
al promises are the promises of the 
Holy Ghost, and to give good things. 
These isolated sentences should not 
be distorted. He has not promised 
always to give the specific thing for 
which we ask. 

Paul prayed God to take away his 
thorn in the flesh. God answered 



that prayer by giving him grace to 
bear it. 

David prayed for he life of his 
child and it died. 

Jesus prayed that if it be possible 
this cup might be taken away. The 
cup was not taken away, but He 
was strengthened to drink it to its 
last bitter dregs. 

I heard a distinguished preacher 
say, "If I thought that God had 
pledged Himself to give me the 
specific thing for which I asked, I 
would be afraid to pray. I might 
ask for something that would do 
great harm. ' ' 

When dangers threaten we pray 
to be delivered from them. God 
either takes them away or blesses 
them to our spiritual good. Then 
these light afflictions which are but 
for the moment, work out for us the 
far more exceeding and eternal weight 
of glory. 

An English prisoner who escaped 
from a German prison, says that on 
his way to the prison he had to 
walk for many miles. He was wound- 
ed and suffered from thirst. He had 
not had water for many hours. He 
begged for water. They came to a 
German village and the officer in 
charge of the prisoners told him that 
he had suffered long enough and he 
would get him some water. The offi- 
cer went into a house and came out 
with a glass of water and gave it 
to the prisoner. The prisoner said 
that when he took the water into his 
mouth, he found it to be saturated 
solution of salt. The contents of 
the glass did not slake his thirst, 
but greatly increased it. So it is, we 
mortals, in our ignorance, seek the 
things that would destroy us, and a 



THE UPLIFT 



25 



lovingly heavenly Father withholds 
the specific things for which we ask, 
and substitutes the thing's we need. 

I saw a fancy sketch once that will 
illustrate : 

The scene was laid in an humble 
cottage. A young mother was hold- 
ing i nher lap her little child. The 
child was very ill and the mother was 
praying for the life of her child. 
An angel appeared and told her that 
it was God's will that the child 
should die. The mother told the 
angel that her husband left her aloen 
with her sick child while he was 
drunk at a wine shop; that she want- 
ed her child to love her, and in her 
loneliness and weakness she needed a 
strong arm on which to lean. The 
angel told her that if she insisted on 
it, her child might live, but she must 
first see a vision of the child 's fu- 
ture, if it lived. The mother was 
then granted a vision. She saw a 
dark and stormy night. Still, in the 
darkness she saw a miserable hovel. 
From this hovel came screams of a 
woman. The door suddenly opened 
and a young woman covered with 
blood and with a little baby in her 
arms, ran out into the storm. A 
man came to the door with a knife 
in his hand. The light fell on his 
face. It was a drunken, brutal face 
and in that face she could see the 
features of her child. The mother 
looked at her child and it was dead. 
The mother then thanked an all-wise 
and loving Father that He had saved 
her and her innocent child from such 
a future. The mother wanted some- 
one to love her and, infinite wisdom 
and love filled her heart with abund- 
ant love of God., She wanted a 
strong arm to lean upon and' He sub- 



stituted His own arm of infinite 
power for the weak, polluted arm of 
a thankless child. 

Mr. Lane says that petitions must 
and will be eliminated from prayer. 
If so, what is left for prayer? It 
is inexplicable to me that any man 
who claims to believe in the Bible 
and God, as therein revealed, shall 
undertake to ; destroy the faith of 
other men in God, as the hearer and 
answerer of prayer. The old belief 
is that there is a God who is my 
Father, all-wise, all-powerful, all-lov- 
ing. That so minute is His know- 
ledge of me that the hairs of my 
head are numbered. That His provi- 
dence extends to the lower animals 
and no sparrow falls to the ground 
without His consent. That in His 
sight I am of more value than many 
sparrows. That no gain or loss, pain 
or pleasure, comes to me unless it 
is sent to me by Him. That my so- 
called misfortunes are blessings in 
disguise. The infinite and inerrant 
love and care follow me every mo- 
ment of my life and fit me for the 
full enjoyment of God to all eter- 
nity. 

Now, look on the other picture: 
The subjective effect of prayer 
takes no account of God. The subjec- 
tive effect of prayer is the effect of 
prayer on myself. If God hears my 
prayer and in answer to that prayer 
pours out His Holy Spirit upon me, 
then I have a result that is not sub- 
jective. They say God may be rec- 
ognized as my Creator, but not my 
Redeemer, Preserver or bountiful 
Benefactor. The Creator in this view 
has fixed His laws and retired from 
- control. I am the abondoned or- 
phan of blind chance ; the victim of 



2G 



THE UPLIFT 



inexorable and immutable law, In 
other words, I am without God and 
without hope in the world. We are 
told that God will give me no com- 
fort in time of trouble. My only 
hope is auto-intoxication. That there 
is no balm in Gilead ; that there is 
no physician there. Is there no God 
in Israel ? 

I cannot understand why men 
should want to destroy the belief of 
others in the presence and protection 
of a personal God. So many people 
in great affliction are sustained and 
soothed by what they believe to be 
the touch of their Father's hand, that 
it is cruel to destroy their faith. 
What have they to give in its place"? 



Nothing. 

Mr. Lane says : ' ' Probably few edu- 
cated men believe in its efficiency." 
That is the objective effect of prayer 
I deny that this statement is true, 
but if it is true, tnen so much worse 
for the trend of modern education. 
Jesus taught His disciples to pray, 
' ' Give us this day our daily bread, ' ' ' 
or as in Luke, "Give us day by day 
our daily bread. ' ' This teaching of 
the objective effect of prayer can 
not be doubted. 

Choose ye this day with whom ye 
will stand. Shall we stand with the 
' ' educated ' ' men of today, or shall 
we stand with Jesus'? 



Let poets sing their lilting song, 

And gayly smits the lyre, 
Give me the man who whistles while 

He's putting on a tire. 

Mount Union Dynamo. 



UNDESERVED CREDIT. 



(Asheville Citizen) 



A lot of people all over the count ry 
are getting credit by false pretences 
and something should be done about 
it, but what? This is no hurry-up 
call for a Merchant's Association or 
Credit Men's Bureau, for they can- 
not help nor can the police. These 
agencies deal with matrial things ob- 
tained by fraudulent misrepresenta 
tion, such as goods and money, while 
we are refering to something not >A 
all material. 

Credit in the sense of public praise 
— this it is which va.rious persons am 
getting from people generally by 
false claims of merits they do not 



possess or of service to others which 
they have not rendered. In their 
ranks are included fake philanthro- 
pists, heroes, martyrs, wise men, 
public benefactors and public-spir- 
ited citizens. 

Some of these are actuated solely 
by vanity — the love of praise and 
prominence — while others wish to use 
their ill-acquired credit to get some- 
thing further from the public such 
as a good office which will give them 
power or profit. Thus the peanut 
politician intrigues for credit in order 
to get a larger measure of control. 
Vanitv solelv seems to move the 



THE UPLIFT 



27 



women who trick the public. 

It is an old game, this acquiring 
of undeserved credit, but the pub- 
lic is as easily deceived now as when 
this bunco game first made its ap- 
pearance with the early "medicine 
men" who claimed they could effect 
rain or fair weather as they chose. 
Since everyone in general is defraud- 
ed by the faker no one in particular 
seeks to expose him, or her. 

There is no law adequate for the 
situation and the newspapers can- 
not be expected more than any one 
else to wrest credit from those not 
entitled to it. As a matter of fact 
newspapers are often the unwitting 
accomplices of the "criminal" and 
his accessories. These, either in per- 
son or through good people they have 
deceived, give the papers specious 
proofs of the merits claimed and the 
papers pass these on to the people. 

The newspaper cannot refuse to 
publish the resolution of some club 
that Mr. Bunk is an eminent citizen 
and should have a place in the cabi- 
net. It may not properly decliae 
publicity for the eulogy which as- 
signs all manner of good qualities to 
one departed even though it knows 
he possessed none of these. It would 
be denounced if it told the truth and 
stated that some woman was getting 
the credit for work done by oher 



women. 

False pretense increase the quani- 
ty of credit and so, by lowering its 
quality, defraud those on whom it is 
worthily bestowed. Medals of honor 
cease to be distinctive if distributed 
wholesale. Meritorious people are 
generally modest and so they are 
served Ipst. The Citizen is pleased 
that it recently proclaimed the phi- 
lanthropy of a proinent Asheviile 
merchant who was hiding his good 
works, even though he was thus much 
embarrassed. 

We have in mind an Asheviile 
nurse who uses her spare time in 
ministering to prisoners and helping 
poor families and who gets no word 
of credit because she is not a poseur. 
She wears no spotless gown — it would 
not be appropriate to washing dishes 
left by one immaculately dressed. 
Florence Nightingale ■ received no 
credit for a long time and then by 
a curious turn of circumstance was 
pictured as a soft-voiced angelic fe- 
male, whereas it is now claimed she 
spoke harshly to strikers and was 
aggressive in demanding relief for the 
wounded. She sought to render real 
help — not to merely pose as an angel. 

The public is quick to detect fak- 
ers among "statesmen" and can do 
a good work by turning its critical 
eye on glory-seekers in other lines. 



A little library growing larger every year is an honorable part of a man's 
history. It is a mans auiy to have books. A library is not a luxury, 
but one of the necessaries of life. Books are the windows through which 
the soul looks out. A home withut books is like a room without windows. 
No man has a right to bring up his children without surrounding them 
with books, if he has the means to pay for them. — Beecher. 



28 



THE UPLIFT 



THE AMERICAN AND HIS MONEY. 

Dr. J. W. Holland. 

A wise man wrote down this, "A its punishment. They spent more for 

fool and his money are soon part- the causes of religion, that is, a high- 

ed. * ' er per cent of their earnings. 

Most of us have had experiences Really as you look at this list of 

that have made us feel that this figures, one has to admit that we 

sentence was written to describe our show too little sense in the spending 

personal actions. What one of us of our cents. You and I are spend- 

has not sometime exchanged gold for ing three times as much for luxuries 

glitter, and come home poorer in as we are for goverment, schools, and 

pocket, but richer in experience? church. How long will the moral 

The spending of money is an index life of America be preserved, sweet, 

of character. What we spend for, clean, and wholesome, if that propor- 

shows our deepest likes and dislikes. tion of things .continues? 

The woman whose checkbook stub We are spending 2% per cent more 

was being examined by her husband for crime than we are for govern- 

had written clown the letters "G. 0. ment, schools, and church. 

K. ' ' after many of her figures. He If that is true, then we must begin 

said, "What does that mean?" She to teach ourselves, and teach to our 

replied, ' ' God Only Knows. ' ' children the sacredness of obedience 

The American Educational Digest to good laws, 

gives the following table to show how The next 2.5 years of American 

we Americans as a whole are dis- history will determine the trend of 

posing of our earnings : — the next 500 years. 

Of each $1 which we spend, the Science is bringing to our hands 
following items are the average pro- and homes convenience after con- 
portion : venience. Luxuries that were only 

Cents tasted by our richer people of a 

Living costs 24y 2 generation ago now crowd the lives 

Luxuries 22 of the children of the poor. The lab- 
Waste 14 orer of America eats better food 

Miscellaneous 13V2 with knife and fork of silver than 

Investments 11 Queen Elizabeth, in her palace, ate 

Crime, court costs, etc 8*4 with her fingers. 

Government 4y 2 I plead for a sanity that will save 

Schools iy 2 us from folly. I plead for purposes 

Church 3^ that will reverse the proportions of 

That list does not describe every America's spending list, and lift those 

one of us, but the average of all of figures now at the bottom of the list 

us. nearer to the top, where they right- 

Our fathers spent more of their fully belong, 

income for living, and little for lux- Unless we put more money into 

uries. They spent less for crime and these things that preserve and save 



THE UPLIFT 



29 



us, we shall soon begin to write the I believe that we shall change these 

lurid tragedy of another people who figures, and personally, I am going 
forgot God and perished. to begin with myself. 



A SURE PASSWORD. 



(Selected) 



Giving thanks is not natural; it is 
a result of culture. Saying "Thank 
you," comes from training, as every 
child and every parent knows. We 
regard it as a matter of manners, 
and deplore the rudeness that expres- 
ses no thanks. Somehow we welcome 
being thanked for what we do for 
others, and are glad to have them 
tarry in our presence if they manifest 
the thankfulness we admina and ap- 
preciate. Often our ' ' thank you ' ' 
is the word that passes us into favor 
with others. 

In the one hundreth psalm there 
is announced a password that assures 
entrance into God's presence. If we 
think of God as being within the 
gates that we must find some test- 
ing word to assert our worthiness to 
come through the gates to him, then 
that sure password is made public 
in the oft used verse, "Enter into his 
gates with thanksgiving and into his 
courts with praise. " It is wise to 
cultivate the habit of thankfulness 
to God if we would be welcomed in 



his presence. We secure the right to 
use that word, and find that it can 
be honestly and sincerely usednly as 
we think f thee ountless god things 
God has permited us to posess and 
enjoy. To think these over impels 
us to thank Him for them. 

Our wilingnes to acknowledge 
God as thei source of our blesings, 
particularly the material ones, has 
given a national Thanksgiving Day 
a right to claim our attention an- 
nualy. We asemble to praise and 
thank God for His goodness to ns 
through they ear; wo lament our 
shortcomings and heed appeals for 
help for the suffering; we take sin 
cere delight in expressing our 
thanksgiving t God; we use. our 
sure password. 
"Sweet is the work my God, my 

King- 
To praise Thy name, giv ethanks and 

sing, 
To show Thy love by morning light 
And talk of all Thy trut hat night." 
sure password. 



INSTITUTION NOTES. 



By J. J. 

A barn is being constructed beside 
the dairy barn for the housing of 
calves. 



Jones, Jr. 

for the Christmas 
which is not far off 



entertainment 



The boys have started practicing 



Christinas carols are being printed 
so that the boys will be able to mem- 



30 



THE UPLIFT 



orize them before Christmas. 



Mr. Sam B. Kennett, formally an 
officer at the school now working as a 
railway mail clerk, visited the school 
last Tuesday. 



Six hogs were killed during last 
week's slaughter, that means that the 
boys are going to get good meat and 
sausage for awhile. 



The boys in the print shop have 
been busy during the past week fold- 
ing a job that was printed for the 
Woman's Club of Kannapolis. 



The boys who were visited by rel- 
atives last Wednesday were Doy Hay- 
wood, Herbert Poteat, Brochy Flowers 
Edwin Baker and Buster Gamble. 



Christmas seals were sold to the 
boys last Monday, by some ladies 
from Concord, so as to get a nurse 
to take care of people that have 
tuberculosis in Cabarrus Countv. 



Rev. W. A. Jenkins, pastor of the 
Central Methodist Church of Concord, 
conducted the services at the school 
last Sunday afternoon, Mr. Jenk- 
ins made a vers' intersting talk upon 
the life of Jesus. 



The boys saw their weekly picture 
show last Thursday evening, the show 
exhibited was a two reel story of a 
whale hunt and a comedy and a six 
reel show the name of the show was 
"Bing Bang Boom." 



The Training School basket-ball 
team won its first game of the season 
when it defeated White Hall in a hard 
fought battle last Saturday afternoon. 
Each team scoring four points in the 
first quarter, at the end of the first 
half the score was eight to ten in 
White Hall 's favor, the Training Sch- 
ool came back in the last half stronger 
than the first half and defeated 
Wh te Hall by a score of 18 to 20. 
The stars of the game were Patterson 
and Slither. 



LET 'EM MOVE TO TOWN— IF THEY SO DESIEE. 



One city editor is frank enough to admit that he has, along with oth- 
ers, assisted in adding to the tons of gratuitous and harmless advice hand- 
ed to farmers, but he remarked that he has never been guilty of advising 
farm raised boys to stay on the farm. A resident farmer who under- 
stands the law of supply and demand, which is always operative, has 
reasons to rejoice every time a man moves from the farm to town or city 
for every time it happens there is one less producer on the farm and one 
more consumer in town or city, and this has a doubly favorable effect 
toward relieving congested market conditions, followed by more profitable 
prices for farm products. If they want to move to town, and can find 
a way to make a living, encourage them to go, if you really want to 
help those who remain on the farm. — Mecklenburg Times. 



RAILROAD SCHEDULE 









Northbound. 






No. 


136 


To 


Washington 


5:00 A. 


M. 


No. 


36 


To 


Washington 


10:25 A. 


. M. 


No. 


46 


To 


Danville 


3:15 P. 


M. 


No. 


12 


To 


Richmond 


7:25 P. 


M. 


No. 


32 


To 


Washington 


8:28 P. 


M. 


No. 


38 


To 


Washington 


9:30 P. 


M. 


No. 


30 


To 


Washington 
Southbound. 


1:40 A. 


M. 


No. 


45 


To 


Charlotte 


4:14 P. 


M. 


No 


35 


To 


Atlanta 


10:06 P. 


M. 


No. 


29 


To 


Atlanta 


2:45 A. 


M. 


No. 


31 


To 


Augusta 


6:07 A. 


M. 


No. 


33 


To 


New Orleans 


8:27 A. 


M. 


No. 


11 


To 


Charlotte 


9:05 A. 


M. 


No. 


135 


To 


Atlanta 


9:15 P. 


M 




THE SOUTHERN SERVES THE 


SOUTH 





V 



(Carolina Collection, 

jt N. C. Library 



THE \JfL,urV 



VOL. XIII CONCORD, N. C., DECEMBER 20, 1924 No. 5 





Christmas 



Has many solemn and splendid meanings. It 
stands for the greatest fact in history. — the birth 
of Jesus. It stands for the mightiest doctrine in 
theology-— the incarnation. It stands for the 
strongest force in human society— sympathy and 
brotherhood between man and man. 



-PUBLISHED BY- 



THE PRINTING CLASS OF THE STONEWALL JACKSON MANUAL 
TRAINING AND INNDUSTRIAL SCHOOL 






**— - m. 



Again the joyous Yule-tide 

We welcome happily, 
With gladness celebrating 

The Christ-child's natal day. 

To eager lad and lassie 
This season is most dear, 

It brings them annual pleasure, 
Love's giving and good cheer. 

The old folks share the gladness 
That's scattered far and near, 

And help to swell the reasons 
Why Christmas is so. dear. 

Nor are the poor forgotten, 
To them the kind old saint 

Comes laden with rich blessings 
To hearts with sorrow faint. 

Widespread are all these blessings 
Of Christmas love and cheer, 

To crown with joy and gladness 
The coming of the year. 



In all our rare enjoymeovts 
Forget ill-will and hate; 

Follow the holy Christ-child 
Whose birth we celebrate. 



Ok m 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 



J. P. Cook, Chairman, Concord 
Miss Easdale Show, Vice-Chairman, 

Rockingham 
Jno. J. Blair, Sec, Raleigh 
D. B. Coltrane, Treas., Concord 
J. S. Efird, Albemarle 
Mr. Chas. A. Cannon, Concord 
Rev. Tom P. Jimison, Spencer 



Mrs. G T. Roth, Elkin 

Herman Cone, Greensboro 

Mrs. Cameron Morrison, Raleigh 

Mrs. A. L. Coble, Statesville 

Mrs. T. W. Bickett, Raleigh 

Mrs. W. N. Reynolds, Winston-Salem 

Mrs. I. W. Faison, Charlotte 

Mr. Paid Whitlock, Charlotte 



Mrs. W. H. S. Burgwyn, Honorary Member 
Chas. E. Boger, Supt. 



CONTENTS. 



EDITORIAL COMMENT 3-7 

BOYS' CHRISTMAS TREE OF 1924 8 

CHRISTMAS THOUGHTS Lisette Bernheim Hood 9 

THE WORLD'S GREATEST SONG Mrs. Allen Phillips Prior 10 

CHRISTMAS FACTS AND FANCIES 11 

CHRISTMAS IN THE OLD WORLD Marie Widmer 15 

A SYMPATHETIC SANTA CLAUS Alice Whitson 19 

DO YOU LIKE ORANGES? Antonia J. Stmeple 24 
PRACTICAL PROBLEMS OF THE BANKER 



INSTITUTION NOTES 

THE KIND OF A WILL NOT TO MAKE 



V. R. Patterson 
J. J. Jones, Jr-.' 



26 
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THE MADONNA 









The Uplift 



A WEEKLY JOURNAL 



PUBLISHED BY 



The Authority of the Stonewall Jackson Manual Training and Industrial 

School. Type-setting by the Boys Printing Class. Subscription 

Two Dollars the Year in Advance 

JAMES P. COOK, Editor, J. C. FISHER, Director- Printing Department 



Entered as second-class matter Dec. 4, 1920 at the Post Office at Concord, 
N. C. under act of March 3, 1879. Acceptance for mailing at special rate 



of 4, 1923. 



THIS ISSUE 

Our readers will find this number of The Uplift manifesting a deep interest 
in the great anniversary, which enjoys a world-wide observance of a kLnd, 
increasing with the years. In this number will be found many entertaining 
and instructive articles bearing on some phase of Christmas. The story of 
of Christmas, though two thousand years old, has lost nothing of its interest 
and joy to the world. 

No myth could survive all these years — the angelic host, announcing the 
birth of the Christ child, saying "Peace on earth, good will toward men rt 
touched the heart of the world with the power and force of a reality. It 
lives; and in all the countries where it is accepted in the largest measure there 
you find the finest citizenship, the highest type of life and the greatest 
achievements. 

MEREY CHRISTMAS AND A HAPPY NEW YEAR. 

The Uplift has it in its heart to wish everybody, everywhere, a Merry 
Christmas and a Happy New Year. It is necessary to put our sentiments on 
record for the second event even before we have embraced the first. This is due 
to the fact that The Uplift, not in keeping with any fixed purpose or a slave 
to habit, will not appear on December 27th. 

We are skipping an issue. None of our many fine friends, who read this 
little magazine every week, will begruage the little fellows that run the 



4 THE UPLIFT 

linotype machines, the job presses, and do all manner of duties in a printing 
office, a week's let-up in order to observe the great Christmas event just 
like other children. And the officers, who daily make themselves useful 
in this shop will welcome, also, a let-up. 

The editor, whether he deserves it or not, hopes to so use this let-up, too, 
in an orderly way, chiefly enjoying seeing the happiness that radiates from 
the childish hearts in his countryside neighborhood and a peep-in on the 400 
youngsters at the school. He wishes it possible that not a single child will 
be forced to carry a heavy heart at Christmas 1924, because of neglect or 
selfishness. 

The Uplift will again appear on January 3, 1925 — in the new year, which 
we hope may prove the very best of all for every one. 



"SEND ME." 

I saw a picture the other day of five young women, who had been commis- 
sioned Missionaries to far-off countries to carry the gospel to the benighted. 
In their faces were the evidences of a consecrated purpose to render a serv- 
ice to their unknown fellows beyond the seas. No fad, no measure to drown 
a disappointment, not even the gratification of a curiosity, but just simply a 
desire to aid in the extension of the kingdom of their Lord_and Master, and, 
in appealing to the authorities, they cried out: "Send me." 

' ' Send me ' ' is everywhere the expressive representation of a spirit of 
service that yields returns. 

************ 

LOWER THE SIGHT. 

A letter came through the Concord postoffiee simply addressed "To the 
Charity Association, Concord, N. C. " It fell into the hands of County Wel- 
fare Officer Brown. It 's a recitation of a real condition that exists in a 
worthy home in our midst. Investigation has revealed the genuineness of 
the condition that brought forth this appeal from a little girl. Are there 
not others? 

Sometimes we get dazzled and stampeded to do our bit in a distant way, 
when right at o,ur doors may be found objects of care and mission. We need 
to lower our sights and reach the calls that surround us. 

Are there not other little Margarets and sisters and brothers, whose lean 
conditions (not their fault) have not been discovered by a Santa Claus in 



THE UPLIFT 5 

our midst ? Here is the little girl 's letter : 
' ' Dear Friend : 

I am a little girl nine years old I have a little brother seven years old. 
I have another little brother six years old. I have a little sister four 
years old. I have a little brother two years old. My mother is in the 
hospidle Pa Pa said he would not have no money to get us any Christmas. 
Will you good People remember us Christmas. 

Yours Kindley, 

Little Margaret " 

Oh, what joy there would be in the old world at this Christmas time, did 
each person, that has been blessed, silently and unselfishly pick out for him- 
self or herself a ' ' little Margaret ' ' or some deserving person to approach 
with assistance in a Santa Claus manner? 

* ¥ * * * * * * # # 4 % 

JAMES BUCHANAN DUKE. 

Just like thunder out of a clear sky did a recent announcement strike not 
only the people of the whole South but throughout the whole country. It 
stunned them. But when the public mind composed itself and took in the 
whole situation it understood it all. 

The gift of James Buchanan Duke of forty million dollars to the cause of 
education, charity and church purposes is a perfectly logical and natural 
thing for a genius and master builder like Mr. Duke to have done. Has he 
not felt for all these years the sting of what was denied him in youth ? Has he 
not, hid away in what the unknowing public thought a metal heart exercised his 
generosity to the oppressed, the suffering and the needy — and the world was 
not paraded with it? Has he not seen how scores of men, devoting their lives 
in the service of the Great King, came up to the close of the year failing to 
make tongue and buckle to meet, and unostentatiously he handed out a fund 
to enable these men to look the world square in the face? 

Has this builder of gigantic enterprises, that made possible and set in 
motion hundreds of industries, not manifested a most wonderful faith in his 
native state and his fellows when he risked millions of dollars in the develop- 
ment of unharnessed forces in his native South, thus increasing the produc- 
tive power of the people? 

Mr. Duke, from the time he began to play the part of man, daily at an 
early hour emerging from his log-cabin home back in the sticks, had one 
consuming passion — building, creating, achieving. And why should men won- 
der, at this princely gift of forty million dollars to the trinity — education, 



6 THE UPLIFT 

charity and church extension? All these things he has been doing for years; 
and now that he is approaching the sunset of life, it was entirely natural 
and most meritorious and commendable for him to desire, when he has cross- 
ed the great divide, that this constructive work should go on unhampered and 
"without a jar. 

The editor of The Uplift only knows this great benefactor by sight, but 
Ms achievements which have resulted in the advancement of so many thou- 
sands and made so many industries possible and removed the curtain that 
shut out the sight of so many. possibilities of the future, is happy to join the 
thousands in rejoicing over this, the outstanding deed of the South in all 
the years. 

This exciting Christmas deed, which Mr. Duke has furnished the people, 
does another thing that must not be overlooked. It establishes the fact that 
a purpose faithfully and intensively followed eventually leads to success. 
To be struggling for a living, domiciled in a country cabin, just sixty years 
ago, and today handing out to worthy causes the princely sum of forty million 
dollars and still be a very rich man is an example of achievement that in- 
spires. 

The Uplift's best Christmas gift wish is — Would that we had more Buck 
Dukes in the land! 

************ 

IN KEEPING WITH THE SEASON. 

Dr. C. Banks MeXairy, one of the state's most faithful and capable serv- 
ants, out of Ms appreciative heart for The Uplift and its little family in 
throwMg a good sized bouquet at us, ties it up with a poem that is in keeping 
with the season. Dr. McXairy invokes the poet in these words : 

'•For greater gifts I would not pray, 
Nor ask the gods to send my waj, 

If I could have four friends a dav. 

v 

A friend of better days than this, 
Of brighter sun and golden bliss 
Before the times had gone amiss. 

A friend of worse days dark and drear, 
Who shared the hours of storm and fear 



THE UPLIFT 

Before the skies began to clear. 

A friend new made who shall afford 

Adventure of the unexplored 

A friend with happy future stored. 

An old friend who has stood the test, 
Has known the worst and known the best, 
Alike in oth forever blessed." 

* * ********** * 

THE BOYS' CHRISTMAS FUND. 

Mr. A. W. Klemme, Hight Point $ 5.00 

Mr. Herman Cone, Greensboro 25.00 
Stonewall Jackson Junior Circle of King's Daughters, Concord, 5.00 

Standard Buiek Company, Concord 5.00 

Silver Cross Circle, King's Daughters, Concord 5.00 
Stonewall Jackson Circle, King's Daughters Senior, Concord 10.00 

|F. M. Youngblood & Co., Concord 10.00 

Dr. A. F. Mahoney, Monroe 25.00 

E. B. Grady, Concord 25.00 

Ritchie Hardware Co., Concord 10.00 

W. B. Ward & Co., Concord 25.00 
Alike in both forever blessed. ' ' 




THE UPLIFT 




BOYS' CHRISTMAS TREE OF 1924. 



THE UPLIFT 



CHRISTMAS THOUGHTS. 

By Lisetto Bernheim Hood. 



Of all the seasons of the year, of 
all anniversaries and festival days, 
with almost every soul in Christen- 
dom, the Christmas season brings the 
most unalloyed pleasure. With some 
few heart-stricken ones Christmas 
days are sources of sad reminiscences 
when they think of an empty chair 
at the "lowing fireside, or of the ab- 
sence of a bright, beloved face at 
the festive board. But with most of 
us — oh, how inexpressibly sweet it 
is to go back and search in the hid- 
den recesses of heart-memories and 
bring forth each tender recollection 
of past joys that each Christmas 
brought to hearts and homes, in all 
the happy years that have turned 
their backs on us forever ! To sit 
idly and dream of how this and that 
festive season was spent ; what hap- 
pened to us on a certain Christmas ; 
who sat with us in the old family 
pew at that time, and what dear ones' 
hands fashioned the pretty gifts that 
greeted our eyes, as we awoke on 
some particular bright Christmas 
morning. Sweet indeed are the hal- 
l&wed recollections of the past, be 
they full of joy or pain. As some 
clear-souled Frenchman has said : 
"It is to live twice when we can en- 
joy the recollection of our former 
life." 

Shall any of us, if we are at all 
able, forget any dear one, any rela- 
tive, friend or less fortunate one, 
when this glad season makes its tri- 
umphal entry among us, each pass- 
ing year? No matter how short are 
the purse-strings — how many weeks 
and perhaps months of careful sav- 



ing it may take — no matter how tri- 
fling the little gift — love will sanctify 
it, in the eyes of the recipient, more 
than a showy present, given only for 
display. Do not allow those to whom 
we give to forget that the love in our 
hearts prompted our hands to the 
giving. 

How do you intend to pass your 
Christmas? How many hearts do 
you intend to gladden, and how much 
good do you expect to do? Think 
of other joyless lives, young and old 
pleasure-seekers, while you are lav- 
ishing upon your more fortunate dear 
ones and friends, the choicest and 
costliest gifts in the well-stocked 
stores! Think of the orphans and 
the homeless, to whom Christmas will 
not come unless you bring it to them. 
Take this one grain of truth home 
with you, think it over often and seri- 
ously, and may this little seedsown 
now in kindness and affection, grow, 
flourish and bear abundant fruit 
against the happy Christmas time. 

What a gay holiday it will be for 
the most of us! How the dear fath- 
ers ' and mothers ' faces will glow 
and beam, with an added touch of 
time-gained happines illuminating the 
often wrinkled and care-worn but al- 
ways sweet and precious faces! How 
a ray of that same Christmas sun- 
shine will also rest on the happy, 
bright faces ' of tihe sunny-hearted 
young sisters, or the eager, manly 
countenances of the typical "big 
brothers!" How the lips of husband 
and wife will meet in yet another 
kiss of renewed love and fidelity as 
their married eyes rest upon the 



10 



THE UPLIFT 



warmth and comfort around them, faithful lips frame the words of 
upon the glowing faces of their glad David 's thangsgiving : ' ' Bless the 
young children; and they lift their Lord, my soul! and forget not all 
hearts anew to the generous Giver His benefits." 
of all earthly blesings, while their 



i 



THE WORLD'S GREATEST SONG. 

By Mrs. Alice Phillips Prior in Silver Cross. 



Singing is used figuratively in the 
Bible as a sign of joy. The first 
song spoken of is that of Moses when 
he and the Israelites expressed their 
triumph over the Egyptians at the 
Red Sea. The last song mentioned 
is the song of Moses and the Lamb 
which those who have conquered Sa- 
tan are to sing. History was handed 
down from one age to another by 
means of songs and the bards and 
minstrels were not only entertainers 
but historians. Song has ceased to 
be a spontaneous expression of joy. 
It has been commercialized and over- 
done until its value to history is 
nearly lost. Only a few outstanding 
martial songs, typical racial songs 
or religious thoughts set to music 
remain from generation to generation. 
To most of us the choice of songs 
and singers has narrowed down to 
two classes — the songs of those we 
love and the songs of those that thrill 
us. 

Every mother is a musical artist 
to her children whether her voice be 
strong or feeble, whether her tones 
are true or faltering. The simple 
hymn, ' ' Hush, my dear lie still and 
slumber," brings tears to many eyes, 
not because the poem is great or the 
tune difficult, but because of the pic- 
ture it brings. Not all the madonna 
pictures have been put on canvas, 



nor all the lullabies printed for the 
world 's inspection. The companion 
to this picture shows the parents 
who have pride in the efforts of their 
children. The story is told of a 
young woman who had unusual mu- 
sical talents and who went abroad to 
study. The Christmas season bade 
fair to be a gloomy one for the par 1 
ents who were left alone on the lit- 
tle farm. The day before the holi- 
day at large box was delivered at the 
farmhouse. Opening the box, the 
parents found a phonograph with a 
special record and when they placed 
the record on the machine they heard 
their daughter's voice, singing. 
' ' Mid pleasure and palaces though 

we may roam, 
Be it ever so humble, there's no 

place like home." 
It would be hard to convince those 
parents that there could be a great- 
er singer or a more wonderful song. 
Modern invention has made it pos- 
sible to preserve the great voices of 
the world. Wonderful artists have 
lived, have sung their way to triumph 
and have become only memories. 
Happily the day has come when the 
voice can outlive the singer and when 
distance is no barrier to the thrill 
of music. Not only does the Metro- 
politan Opera House ring to the 
voices of great artists, but the little 



THE UPLIF' 



11 



cabin in the mountains may be filled 
with the same echoes. 

The world has grown so very so- 
phisticated that it is difficult to pro- 
duce a thrill. The names of artists 
and singers fall trippingly from our 
lips and we make a study of the 
music in which they excel. But there 
is a song and there are singers whose 
power to thrill us has never ceased. 
It is the solo and chorus rendered at 
Bethlehem in Judea one starry night 
centuries ago. There had been cen- 
turies of silence and then came a 
burst of triumphant song. 

That chorus needs no amplifier as 
it comes down through the ages. It 
celebrates the world's greatest tri- 
umph of that day of every cen- 
tury since. They sang not to their 



own glory, but to that of a little 
child. They asked no stipend for 
their song, but they inspired the 
shepherd listeners to go to Bethle- 
hem's manger to worship. The sing- 
ers went back into Heaven and, after 
a few years, the Prince of Peace re- 
turned to His home, but the song may 
still be heard by listening ears and 
"where meek souls will receive Him 
still, the dear Christ enters in." 

"0 holy Child of Bethlehem, 

Descend to us, we pray; 

Cast out our sin and enter in 

Be born in us today. 

We hear the Christmas angels 

The great glad tidings tell; 

come to us, abide with us, 

Our Lord Emanuel. ' ' 



CHRISTMAS FACTS AND FANCIES. 



Three wise men, as everyone knows, 
paid homage to Jesus at his birth. 
Their story is told in part thus in 
the Gospel according to St. Matthew : 

Now when Jesus was born in Beth- 
lehem of Judea in the days of Herod 
the King, behold, there came wise 
men from the East to Jerusalem. 
■ Saying, where is he that is born 
King of the Jews 1 For we have seen 
his star in the East, and are to wor- 
ship him. 

And when he had gathered all the 
chief priests and scribs of the peo- 
ple together, he demanded of them 
where Christ should be born. 

And they said unto him, In Beth- 
lehem of Judea, for thus it is writ- 
ten by the prophet. 

And thou, Bethlehem, in the land 
of Judea, are not the least among 
the princes of Judea; for out of thee 



shall come a Governor, that shall 
rule my people Israel. 

Then Herod, when he had privily 
called the wise men, inquired of them 
diligently what time the star appear- 
ed. 

And he sent them to Bethlehem, 
and said, go and search diligently for 
the young child; and when ye have 
found him, bring me word again, that 
I may come and worship him also. 

When they had heard the king, they 
departed, and, lo, the star, which 
they saw in the East, went before 
them, till it came and stood over 
where the young child was. 

When they saw the star, they re- 
joiced with exceeding great joy. 

And when they were come into the 
house they saw the young child with 
Mary his mother, and fell down, and 
woshiped him: and when they had 



12 



THE UPLIFT 



opened their treasure, they presented 
unto him gifts; gold, and frankin- 
cense and myrrth. 

And being warned of God in a 
dream that they should not return 
to Herod, they departed into their 
own country another way. 

These Three wise Men were named 
Melchior, Kaspar and Balthazar. 
They are sometimes called the "Three 
Kings of Cologne." Their bones 
are said to rest in the cathedral of 
Cologne. This is the finest specimen 
of Gothic architecture in Europe and 
its building took more than 600 years 
—1218 to 1880. Anyway, skulls pur- 
porting to be theirs, were exhibited 
as late as the Eighteen century. To 
touch them was to be healed. An old 
prayer charm reads : 

Ye three holy kings, 

Kasper, Melchoir and Balthazar, 

Pray for us now 

And in the hour of death. 

Early tradition supplemented this 
account by adding a fourth wise man. 
And the story of this fourth wise 
man is one for us to keep in mind at 
Cbristmas time. 

This fourth wise man started with 
the other three to make the journey 
to Jerusalem and pay homage to the 
new-born King. But he never 
reached the manger where lay the 
child. Instead he sacrificed his life 
to render service. Nevertheless, be- 
fore he died he was granted a vision 
of the Christ. Henry Van Dyke's 
"The Story of the Other Wise Man" 
tells the tradition most excellently 
well : 

Detained by his efforts to save a 
dying stranger, Artaban becomes sep- 
arated from his companions. He, 
therefore, seeks the Christ alone, 



traveling from place to place, feed- 
ing the hungry as he goes, clothing 
the naked, nursing the sick, comfort- 
ing the oppressed. 

One after another he spends for 
others the precious gifts which he 
had hoped to offer to the Christ. At 
last he surrenders his one remaining 
pearl in order to ransom a tormented 
slave girl. 

Struck on the temple by a falling 
tile, he lies bleeding and breathless. 
But he hears a Voice commending 
him. 

Unable to believe the testimony of 
his own ears, the Other Wise Man 
murmurs : 

Not so, my Lord ! For when saw 
I Thee an hungered and fed Thee? 
Or thirsty, and gave Thee drink? 
When saw I Thee a stranger, and 
took Thee in? 

Or naked, and clothed Thee? When 
saw I Thee sick and in prison and 
came unto Thee? Three-and-thirty 
years have I looked after Thee ; but 
I have never seen Thy face, nor min- 
istered to Thee my King. ' ' 

But the Voice replies : 

"Inasmuch as thou hast done it 
unto one of the least of these, my 
brethren, thou hast done it unto me." 

Is it hard to imagine the Fourth 
Wise Man reappearing on earth at 
Christmas time with a message to 
all mankind? Certainly he has a 
message well worth delivering. And 
certainly it is a message well worth 
listening to, For from his experience 
he could say to us : 

' ' You have served God only as you 
have served men. ' ' 

The Christian citizen should serve 
God in relation to his home, to his 
communitv and his nation. There 



THE UPLIFT 



13 



are those who are serving God by 
trying to improve the conditions un- 
der which their less privileged fel- 
lows live and work, by trying to 
bring more of justice, beauty, peace 
and love into the life of the world. 
It is feared that most of us fall for 
short here. But he is a poor Chris- 
tian and a poor citizen indeed who, 
having, can pass Christmas without 
doing something in keeping with the 
day for those who have not. 

Everywhere in our modern Twen- 
tieth century life we meet the very 
people whom Jesus painted in liv- 
ing words 2,000 years ago — the elder 
brother, who "was angry and would 
not go in ; " the priest and the Le- 
vite, who "passed by on the other 
side ; ' ' the good Samaritan, who ' ' was 
moved with compassion ; ' ' the Phari- 
see, who thanked God that he was 
' ' not as other men are ; ' ' the pub- 
lican, who cried "God be merciful 
unto me a sinner ! ' ' 

At Christmas time, if at no other, 
it is well for us to be the publican 

and the good Samaritan. 

****** ****** 

Without Christmas tree, holly and 
mistletoe Christmas would seem 
strange indeed to most Americans. 
The balsam fir is most used for 
Christmas trees, but doubtless almost 
any kind of evergreen can be used 
in an emergency. And some of the 
municipal and community centers 
Christmas trees nowadays are of great 
size, especially when they are set 
up outdoors. 

A photograph of a certain Christ- 
mas tree is well worth studying as 
something quite out of the ordinary 
in several respects. In the first place 
in the original photograph three sepa- 



rate exposures of the plate were 
made — the first for the building and 
its light; the second for the Christ- 
mas tree and its lights ; and the third 
for the moon. Each exposure varied 
in length to suit the different degrees 
of brilliance. 

And where do you suppose this un- 
usual photograph was taken? Why, 
at the valley, Yosemite National 
park, California. Most people think 
that all the national parks are clos- 
ed in the winter time. Well, they 
are not. Rock Mountain National 
park in Colorado has a carnival of 
winter sports in February. Mount 
Rainier National park in Washing- 
ton has winter sports and a ski tour- 
nament as late as July. And Yose- 
mite is open the year 'round. And 
Yosemite 's Christmas celebration in- 
cludes a fat, jolly, fur-clad Santa 
Claus who drives up in the old-fash- 
ioned way in his sleigh and distri- 
butes his gifts to the village chil- 
dren. 

But that isn't all about this un- 
usual picture. What kind of a tree 
do you suppose the Christmas gift 
depended upon your guess. That 's be- 
cause it is the only one of its kind 
in the whole world. 

This Christmas tree is nothing less 
than a living Sequoia tree. The Se- 
quoia (Sequoia gigniea) is the old- 
est and biggest living thing in the 
world. Some of the biggest and old- 
est of them are 35 feet in dia- 
meter and at least 5,000 years old. 
So you see many of these Big Trees 
in Sequoia and Yosemite national 
parks were not even middle-aged 
when Christ was born in Bethle- 
hem. 

This particular Sequioa Christmas 



14 



THE UPLIFT 



tree was planted in 1890. From a 
seeding it has grown to a height of 
more than 60 feet. A thousand 
years from now it will probably be 
nearly 300 feet tall and have a dia- 
meter of 15 or 20 feet. 

One wonders if there will be a 
similar Christmas celebration in Yose- 
mite valley then — a thousand years 
from now. Why not? Christmas 
will still be celebrated then — if the 
world endures. And our nineteen na- 
tional parks have been set apart by 
congress as public playgrounds for 
the people forever. So, if the United 
States of America endures, why not 
a Christmas celebration in Yosemite 
A. D. 2924? All that seems to be 
necessary is the planting of a Se- 
quoia seedling every thirty years or 



Christmas and mince pie ! Nobody 
ought to have to tell anybody that 
Christmas is the time for mince pie. 
Why, the two go together — just like 
Thanksgiving and pumpkin pie and 
the Fourth of July and spring lamb 
and green peas. The first mince pie 
of the winter should grace the Chirst- 
mas board ; any housewife who gives 
her family even a taste of one be- 
fore Christmas day should go with- 
out new Easter hat — that's the pun- 
ishment to fit the crime. And any 
man who eats mince pie at a rest- 
aurant or at his club before Christ- 
mas day should go without mince pie 
all winter. 

However, if he should this pun- 
ishment would likely fit the crime. 
For nowadays the making of mince 
pies is largely a lost art. The ordi- 
nary restuarant mince pie is noth- 



ing but minced fruits. 

There ies a saying that every really 
good woman cook must have a temper. 
Maybe. Certainly she should be nice 
and plumb — as if she ate her own 
mince pies and thrived on them. And 
it's easy to tell by watching a woman 
make mince pies whether or not 
they're going to be a success. If she 
goes at it, you know, as if it were 
sort of a religious rite — as if the fate 
of the nation hung on her work — 
why, all is well. 

' ' Pies like mother used to make ! ' ' 
Tenderloin of beef and Northern Spy 
apples and seal cider and everything 
else to correspond ! Maybe mother 
used to bake her pies a dozen at a 
time and set them away in a cold 
store room to freeze. Maybe mother 
got her mince meat ready and set 
it aside in a big stone jar to ripen. 
It doesn't make any difference. They 
were real mince pies when they got 
to the Christmas dinner. The looks 
of them! The smell of them! The 
taste of them! Yum, yum,! There's 
a memory a fellow can carry with 
him to his grave. 

Do you remember Izaak Walton's 
friend Dr. Bottleler and his famous 
appreciation of the strawberry? Well 
it's quite evident the good doctor 
never sat down to iust hte right kind 
of a Christmas dinner or he would 
have ignored the strawberry as un- 
worthy of his cleverness and would 
have said instead that doubtless God 
could have inspired some beaven- 
born cook to make a more appro- 
priate dessert for December 25 than 
mince pie but that doubtless od nev- 
er did. 



THE UPLIFT 



CHRISTMAS IN THE OLD WORLD. 



By Marie Widmer 

Christmas! The mere thought of 
this most important day on the 
Christian calendar suffices to conjure 
up visions of jolly old Santa Clans 
or the angelic Christkindli among 
thousands and the "ids of children 
in European lands, -hile grown-ups 
love to linger with cherished memo- 
ries of Yule days gone by. The frag- 
rant pine tree, the gently flickering- 
candles, the decorative holly and mis- 
tletoe and in the northlands yet — the 
Yule log — each and every one of 
these poetic and now-a-days indis- 
pensable characteristics of a real old- 
fashioned Christmas, including even 
the joyous carols, and th e special 
Christmas dishes, actually date their 
origin back to pagan festivities. 

In Scandinavia, in northern Ger- 
many, in ancient Egypt, in Greece 
and Italy, glad festivals were held at 
the time of the winter solstice; then, 
gradually, with the dawn of the 
Christian era these celebrations on 
the occasion of the turning of the 
sun, took on a deeper meaning of 
ethical and religious import. 

The Origin of Christians Carols. 

Our Christmas carols are on out- 
growth of the carefree, hymns sung 
bj ancient Romans at; the .Saturnalia, 
a harvest feast held on lh<> !7th uf 
December in honor of the God Saturn. 
To give expresion to their feelings of 
joy and gratitude on ! lie birthday of 
t hrist, the bishops in some of the 
1irst Christian churejif.-i chanted songs 
of praise. In the early history of 
the church there wurs consemieiitly 
no Christmas carols, as are sung now, 
and even carols dating back to the 



in "Heme Folks." 



ii toe'nt | century posses character- 
i-t'Ys of folk songs and preserve curi- 
o is legends. Carol singing flourish- 
ed, however, during the sixteenth and 
Seventeenth cent.iries, and Milton, one 
of tie greatest of English writers, 
prod iced some beautiful specimens. 
In the eighteenth century Charles 
Wesley wrote "Hark, the Herald 
Angels Sing." The earliest printed 
collection of carols was issued in 
1(>21, and contained the famous 
"Boar's Head" carol, which is still 
sung every year at Oxford. 

Candles, Holly and Mistletoe. 

The custom of burning candles at 
Christmas tide dates back to the 
Roman Saturnalia, when candles were 
not only used for illumination pur- 
poses, but they were also exchanged 
as gifts in token of cheerfulness and 
good will. The Jews, too, were ac- 
customed to burn candles at that 
time, which happened to be their 
Feast of Dedication, and it is thus 
not improbable that thousands of 
candles were burning throughout 
Palestine when Christ was born. To- 
day yet the Greek Catholics describe 
Christmas as "The Feast of Lights." 

Since time immemorial the north- 
ern and northwestern countries in the 
Old World have been accustomed to 
using holly and mistletoe as indoor 
Christmas decorations and one of 
the most attractive legends in Norse 
mythology relates how this came 
about — Freya, or Frigga, Queen of 
Heaven and wife of Odin, or Thor, 
the all-powerful, dreamed a dream 
in which she felt that shadow of some 
disaster that would befall her cher- 



16 



THE UPLIFT 



ished son Balder, the Sun God. She 
then wandered all over the world 
asking' everything, animal, vegetable 
and mineral, not to harm him, but 
she overlooked to ask the little clump 
of mistletoe which grew on the huge 
oak tree that stood at the gate of 
Asgard. Loki, the ever watchful 
spirit of fire and evil, became a war of 
this lapse and cunningly wrought a 
deadly arrow for his bow out of the 
green plant. 

Balder, who had been partly shel- 
tered by a holly bush, became a vic- 
tim of this arrow, and the sun shone 
no more. The world mourned with 
the darkness of winter. And then, 
ever afterwards, the holly which had 
sheltered the Sun God was kept sa- 
cred for festivals, and because Nana, 
his wife, wept over the mistletoe, her 
tears becoming pearl-berries, this 
bush was also forgiven and dedicat- 
ed to lovers. Never was it allowed, 
however, to be taken into any sa- 
cred building. 

Burning the Yule-log. 

Devout Scandinavians, in paying 
honor to their God Thor, built great 
fires called ' ' Yule ' ' fires. The word 
' ' yule ' ' is of ancient Gothic and Sax- 
on origin and refers to the festival 
of the winter solstice. With shout- 
ing and song the huge log was drag- 
ged into the festive hall and soon the 
merry crackling of the burning wood 
was greeter with the following song: 
' ' Welcome be Thou, Heavenly King, 

Welcome born on this morning; 
Welcome for Whom we shall sing, 

Welcome Yule. ' ' 
Traditional Christmas Dishes. 

From the earliest days, when the 
Druids offered their sacrifices around 
the great oak tree, beef was always 



a popular meat with the northern 
peoples at Christmas tide and the 
loin of beef was actually knighted by 
Charlet II at a Christmas feast, be- 
cause on returning from the hunt the 
dish was so gratifying to his palate. 

The origin of roast pork, another 
favorite Christmas dish of the north- 
lands, also dates back to mythlogi- 
cal times when the Scandinavian God 
of Peace and Plenty, used to ride a 
boar. His festival was also held at 
Yuletide and at that time the people 
sacrificed a boar to him. 

The plum pudding which plays so 
important role in an English Christ- 
mas diner is believed to symbolize 
in its contents, same as the ingre- 
dients used for mince pie, the rich 
offerings made by the Wise Men to 
the Infant Jesus, and dates back to 
the earliest celebrations of Christ- 
mas. 
The History of the Christmas Tree. 

A pretty legend indicates that the 
origin of the Christmas tree dates 
back to the ninth century, when a 
certain Saint Winfried went to 
preach Christianity to the people 
in Scandinavia and northern Ger- 
many. One Christmas Eve these peo- 
ple were gathered round a huge oak 
to offer a human sacrifice, according 
to the Druid rites, but St. Winfried 
hewed down the great tree and as it 
fell there appeared in its place a tall 
young fir. When St. Winfried saw 
it he said to the people : 

"Here is a new tree, unstained by 
blood. See how it points to the sky ! 
Call it the tree of the Christ Child. 
Take it up and carry it to the castle 
of your chief. Henceforth you shall 
not go into the shadows of the forest 
to hold your feasts with secret rites 



THE UPLIFT 



17 



of shame. You shall hold them with- 
in the walls of your own home with 
ceremonies that speak the message of 
peace and good-will to all. A day is 
coming when there shall not be a 
home in the north wherein on the 
birthday of Christ the whole family 
will not gather arond the fir tree in 
memory of this day and to the glory 
of God." 

A thousand years have since rolled 
by and the Christmas tree, in the 
shape of a fir or pine, has become 
the most beloved of all symbols char- 
acteristic of the season. 

Other Christmas Features. 

While the majority of the before 
cited symbols of Christmas in the 
Old World, the Christmas tree with 
its candles, the holly and mistletoe 
and the singing of carols are a prac- 
tically uniform feature of modern 
days, Scandinavion countries only 
burn the Yule log, which, according 
to a superstitious belief, chases away 
all evil spirits. In memory of the 
humbly born Christ Child the Swedish 
people on Christmas eve place recep- 
tacles filled with corn and seeds for 
the hungry birds around their homes, 
while they themselves celebrate the 
evening of Dec. 24th with a bounti- 
ful repast of fish, bacon, sausages, 
cakes and punch. 

Same as in Britain, Christmas in 
Ireland is kept with every evidence 
of joy, but the peasantry of the 
Emerald Isle observes one beautiful 
custom, which has more or less been 
given up in England, and that is the 
lighting and exhibiting of the Christ- 
mas candle on Christmas eve. When 
the shadows of night descend upon 
land and sea, the Christmas candle 
is brought forth and lighted, for there 



must be no darkness on the Holy 
Night, when the "Light of the 
World" came to take possession of 
His own. 

In France, Christmas is mostly ob- 
served in the churches, and New 
Year's day is set aside for public 
rejoicing and celebrating. However, 
almost everybody attends midnight 
Mass on Christmas eve and on the 
night before Christmas the children 
place their shoes on the hearth and 
find them filled with little gifts in 
the morning. 

Italy is probably the only Euro- 
pean country where the children hang- 
up their stockings on Christmas eve, 
and this custom which brings so many 
trills to American kiddies, is said to 
have had its origin in that South- 
land. Folklore has it that St. 
Nicholas, an Italian bishop, used to 
throw long knitted purses, tied at 
both ends, into the open windows of 
the very poor people, but especially 
was he generous to portoinless maid- 
ends . who aspired to matrimony but 
had not the supposedly necessary 
dowerv. These purses were of yarn 
and not unlike a stocking. Finally 
it became the custom of the people 
to hang these long empty receptacles 
out of their windows on Christmas 
eve, so that St. Nicholas could put 
a gift into them as he passed by. 
By and by when coins became scarce, 
the generous bishop put toys instead 
of money into the stockings for the 
children, and useful gifts for the 
adults. 

While the children in Germany 
look forward to the visit of an ever 
bountiful " Weihnachtsmann " a per- 
sonage greatly resembling the Amer- 
ican Santa Claus,) the children in 



18 THE UPLIFT 

re' ' '-i. 1 i -i. ' i.1 rii ■ ii • bi- : ■'! ' ' ■ ■ ' ■ h li- i 

Switzerland await the Ckristkindh, its masses ot sparkling snow and 
a lovely angel, who for several de- great expanses of marvelously polish- 
cades has heen distributing the gifts ed ice, is a fairyland in itself, where 
in place of St. Nicholas. Christkind- young and old, from far and near, 
li rides in a beautiful sleigh, drawn set out to enjoy themselves with 
by six reindeer, and on this magic skates, skis, toboggans and bobsleighs, 
vehicle are Christmas trees of every Christkindli often brings a variety 
'size, decorated with the many glit- of sport implements on her sleigh, 
tering objects which are so fascinat- and the happy recipients are of course 
ing to young hearts. all those children who were obedient 

Since Switzerland in winter, with throughout the year. 

or ,091) 

i 

■ 

" ALLELUIA J ' t ' c,; '' B9 

By Florence White Barbour (written at 11 years.) 

. 
The heavens glow with flooding light 
Dazzling the eyes of the startled night; 
The star-flowers fade and the moon burns dim, 
Listening awed to the angels hymn. 
Alleluia!" 

Lo! while above the angels sing 
In strains ecstatic to their King, 
From Earth returns the accordant cry, 
"All glory be to God most High!" 
Alleluia!" 

The ocean lifts its throbbing voice, 
The mighty winds aloud rejoice, 
The forests raise their bare boughs high 
To swell the anthem of the sky, 
Alleluia ! ' ' 

Sing thou, my soul! Not yet forbear 
The homage of all worlds to share. 
Sing thy Redeemer's wondrous birth, 
"Goodwill toward men, and peace on earth!" 
Alleluia!" 



THE UPLIFT 



19 



A SYMPATHETIC SANTA CLAUS. 

By Alice. Whitson Norton in Young Folks. 



In spite of a biting wind coming 
down from the north, snow threaten- 
ing clouds hanging low in the west, 
and the big town clock registering 
only 9 :30 A. M., the spirit of Christ- 
mas was in evidence. 

The streets of Winton, early as it 
was, were filled with eager-faced in- 
dividuals crowding and pushing their 
way in and various shop windows in 
the town and crowding and pushing 
their way in and out of the festively 
decorated stores, but the most crowd- 
ed quarters, and the hardest place 
to get what you wanted wrapped up 
after you bought it was at Larkin's 
big department store. Here as no- 
where else in the ciity congregated 
the Christmas shoppers. 

Here the boiler-maker rubbed 
shoulders with the millionaire, for 
Larkin's had the reputation of cater- 
ing to the poor as well as the rich, 
and their selection of Christmas gifts 
was in keeping with the purse of the 
spender regardless of its full or mea- 
ger condition. Consequently, the 
sales force of the big department 
store was doubly increased during 
the holiday season, and among the 
new force came Celia Reefers. 

The ways of a big department 
store were not new to Celia, for fill- 
ing in during big occasions among the 
various shops was Celia 's specialty. 
Keeping a steady job with Celia 
Reefers was out of the question, for 
Celia happened to be the eldest in a 
family of five motherless children, 
and being the girl that she happened 
to be, she decided it was wiser for 
her to remain at home and take care 



of the little folks than to earn a pal- 
try sum outside ; to this her father 
agreed also, for surely no children 
had even been more loved and pet- 
ted and looked after than the little 
Reefer mother had loved and looked 
after hers. So with her passing, the 
task of mothering the four younger 
than herself fell on Celia and she 
met the task nobly. But once in a 
great while her young heart hunger- 
ing for the things that only a girl- 
ish heart can hunger for, and the 
father's salary not being sufficient 
to supply this lacking element, Celia 
would persuade Aunt Cleo, and old 
and trusted servant in the Reefers 
family, to come in and look after 
the children a few days and let her go 
out and earn. 

With the extra funds her earnings 
produced, the thing she coveted most 
was usually forgotten, and some little 
luxury added to the home, and in 
this instance the spirit of Christmas 
prompted the move. 

"Things at our house, Dimple, - ' 
Celia confided to the friend who 
helped her secure the place as extra 
saleswoman at Larkin's, as they ar- 
ranged their counters fort he big 
holiday rush ahead, "were beginning 
to look mighty slim for the children 
when I landed this little job." 

"So that's why you wanted the 
work, was it?" asked Dimple in sur- 
prise. 

"Sure," responded Celia. "What 
else did you think I wanted it for?" 

Dimple gave Celi,a's rusty serge 
dress a significant glance, then smiled. 

"You might find it an advantage, 



20 



THE UPLIFT 



Celia, ' ' she answered slowly, ' ' to think 
of self occasionally. ' ' 

"Of course," answered Celia," 
this old dress is a bit rusty, but 
honestly, Dimple, I — I — couldn't be 
the least bit happy in a new gown 
with the children's Christmas wishes 
unsatisfied. You know mother al- 
ways — ' ' 

"Yes, I know — " interrupted Dimp- 
le, "your mother was wrapped up in 
her children, and while she made them 
happy, it has been rather hard on 
you to it keep up ' ' 

"For two reosons, " answered Celia 
quickly: "First, I'm not the sweet, 
sunny creature she was, and then — 
then — father's failure in health and 
losing his job naturally made it hard; 
still we're doing all we can, and by 
my helping out occasionally we man- 
age to keep the little tots at home 
fairly happy. ' ' 

The nine o'clock gong sounded 
through the big building, the doors 
swung open and immediately the 
store was swamped with buyers, and 
Celia at the ribbon counter, was 
presently absorbed with the femi- 
nine task of matching ribbons to va- 
rious materials. 

So busy was she in the work of 
her hands she failed to see the man- 
ager of the toy department while in 
conversation with the manager of the 
first floor, observin her from the 
corner of his eye ; maybe she wouldn 't 
have known it that day at all if it 
hadn't be-en for Dimple who, at the 
first idle moment sauntered to Celia 's 
counter. 

"I saw the managers of the toy 
department and the first floor eyeing 
you, Celia," she whispered softly," 
"better watch your steps." 



' ' Surely, ' ' murmured Celia in dis- 
tressed tones, "I haven't done a 
wrong thing around here." 

' ' No criticisms to make, Celia 
laughed Dimple, "except you're a 
little over-work brittle; the majority 
of girls in this store are more in- 
terested in their own problems than 
they they are in the problems of the 
store." 

' ' I don 't understand, ' ' murmured 
Celia, "just what do you mean?" 

"I mean just this — " chuckled 
Dimple — "we who have been here 
for some time don't find any ad- 
vantage whatever in straining our- 
selves to render service, so don't 
show too much enthusiasm — get 
me?" 

"I guess I do," replied Celia as 
the meaning of Dimple's remark 
flashed through her brain, ' 'but un- 
derstanding, my dear, doesn't change 
my idea of things in the least; yon 
see, I figure if I sell mjy time away 
from the kiddies to the manager of 
this store it is but right that I count 
the time his, — for my own peace of 
mind I want to give satisfaction — 1 
might want to some back some time. ' ' 

"You might," laughed Dimple, 
"but you won't — the efforts you 
make in this store are wasted — 
WASTED— understand— V ' 

With that as a parting reminder, 
Dimple moved back to her own count- 
er and just as indifferently as she 
had crossed the space that separated 
the two, she began to wait upon a 
customer. 

Celia watched her movements for 
a moment in astonishment, then turn- 
ing back, she faced a pleasant little 
woman with a piece of ribbon in her 
hand. Dimple's way didn't fit Ce- 



THE UPLIFT 



21 



lia; she had grown up with the 
thought deeply implanted in her 
mind that anything worth doing at 
all was worth doing well, and even 
matching ribbon was an art if well 
mastered. 

Like all days when business was 
at full tide, the hours in the store 
went racing by, and five o 'clock was 
at hand before Celia had given a 
thought to it — but the closing gong 
found her with a littered counter, 
so instead of rushing off she lingered 
behind to straighten things up. 

The manager, passing, saw what 
she was doing, and paused to speak 
to her. 

"Aren't you a little late, Miss- 
Miss — " 

"Reefers — " supplied Celia. 

I had forgotten your name," ad- 
mitted the manager, "but I must 
say I like your style of leaving your 
counter. ' ' 

"Maybe it's carelessness on my 
part," laughed Celia, "b,ut I — I — was 
really so interested in matching a bit 
of ribbon for that last customer I just 
didn't hear the first bell, that's all." 

"The excuse is acceptable, Miss 
Reefers, ' ' answered the man smilingly 
as he moved off, "you'll probably 
be on guard tomorrow. ' ' 

To this Celia made no response 
but all the way home she continued 
to remeber the kind expression on 
the manager's face and mentioned 
the matter to her father. 

' ' Work well done, daughter, ' ' re- 
plied the man, "never goes with- 
out its reward. That little act of 
thoughtfulness will make a mark in 
the mind of the manager if an emer- 
gency should arise in which he need- 
ed a competent helper. ' ' 

That it would come as soon as it 



did the farther had no idea, but the 
very next morning when Celia reached 
the store she found the manager at 
her counter. After a pleasant good 
morning, he went right to the point. 

"We are in great trouble, Miss 
Reefers," he said slowly. "The 
man serving as our San'ta Claus is 
sick this morning and we've adver- 
tised this as a special day in the toy 
department — I — I was just wondering 
if we couldn't depend on you to help 
us out a little. ' ' 

' ' Me help in the toy department ! ' ' 
exclaimed Celia eagerly. "Why I'd 
love it ! When can I begin ? ' ' 

' ' Immediately, ' ' answered the 
man; calling Dimple from across the 
aisle to come and take her place, he 
bade Celia follow him. 

One glimpse at the toy department 
sent little thrills of joy hrough the 
heart of Celia Reefers, and she enter- 
ed the duties with a gladness that 
pleased the man who had suggested 
bringing her to the department — but 
the day was a disappointment to the 
girl. Children came to the depart- 
ment by the score but the absence 
of a Santa Claus to cheer their child- 
ish hearts ca,used them to go away 
without choosing lavishly. 

The next day was even worse than 
the first, and the morning of the 
third day when Celia reached the 
store and still found he Santa Claus 
missing, she suddenly became des- 
perat over the situation. Finally she 
screwed up her courage to the speak- 
ing point, and went to the office door 
marked private on the balcony floor, 
and timidly knocked. 

Once inside she faced the manager 
and owner of the store, and a moment 
later she was laying her plans before 
them. 



22 



THE UPLIFT 



"The absence of a Santa Clans," 
admitted Mr. Larkins, "no doubt ef- 
fects the sales, but we have adver- 
tised repeatedly for a man, to no ef- 
fect. I see no help for the present 
condition Miss Reefers; I suppose 
we shall have to count our toy de- 
partment a total loss this year." 

' ' We have ten days yet, ' ' answered 
Celia. ' 'Much could be accomplished 
in that time." Then suddenly a 
great idea entered her head, and her 
eyes began to twinkle. 

"If you'll furnish the costume, 
Mr. Larkins," said Celia softly, "I'll 
— I'll become a Santa Claus mjyself. 
Of course I may not be as successful 
as a real man Santa, but I am sym- 
pathetic with children, and I — I — I 
believe I could put the idea over." 

For a minute the manage-r of the 
big department store sat looking at 
the little figure opposite him, then 
presently he began to smile, and 
asked her to sit down. 

Three hours later the most adorable 
little figure in a red velvet dress with 
a toboggan of white and high white 
boots made her appearance in the toy 
department, and straightway busi- 
ness began to pick up. 

Parents read with considerable in- 
terest the big toy advertisement from 
Larkins' department store, the an- 
nouncement that a sympathetic Santa 
Claus would be on hand, caused the 
crowd to double itself from the pre- 
vious day, and just as Celia had 
surmised, in playing the part of a 
sympathetic Santa Claus for both 
the little folks and the tired mothers 
the toy business began to soar, and 
in less than three days after the jolly- 
little Santa had taken over the job, 
a force of three extra salespeople 



was added to the toy department. 

Given free reign to do what she saw 
fit Celia 's ideas became as numer- 
ous as candleflies over in a meadow 
in summer time, and Christmas eve 
found the toy department almost bare 
of its treasures, but not until the gong 
sounded at nine P. M; for the closing 
of the big store doors, did the tired lit- 
tle Santa stop her merry-making; 
once, however, the necessity for joy- 
making was over, Celia sank weari- 
ly down in one corner of the toy 
department and began to weep, and 
here the manager found her some 
thirty minutes later. 
"What can be troubling you , Miss 
Reefers," when you have so beaut- 
ifully succeeded in this undertaking 
of your own suggestion? There are 
scarcely any toys left." 

■' ' Quite true, Mr. Larkins, ' ' mur- 
mured Celia softly, "and I am very 
happy in that fact; but the thought 
has just dawned upon me that in my 
eagerness to make this a great success 
I have neglected the tots at home — 
there is nothing at home to make 
Christmas with — no tree, no candies 
no toys ! Oh, what would my mother 
say?" 

Then before Celia knew just how 
it happened she found herself telling 
the owner of Larkins ' big department 
store about the little brothers and sis- 
ters left in her care at home, then 
suddenly she dried her eyes and 
springing to her feet, began removing 
the white toboggan — 

"I'll have to work fast, Mr. Lark- 
ins," she cried eagerly, "but I'll fix 
it some way." 

"Don't worry Celia," said the man 
tenderly. "This store has a reputa- 
tion of rewarding its workers accord- 



THE UPLIFT 



23 



ing to their title, worth, and when w< 
find a worker who gives us her time 
unselfishly we make a point to leal'n 
something about her, so I sent one 
of my men out to get what informa- 
tion he could about our little Santa 
Caus, and just to show you that we 
appreaeiate good service — well — well 
— ■ " the man finished softly "I be- 
lieve you will find everything you 
need for a full Christmas awaiting 
you when you get home — and — and 
— I would suggest that you carry the 
suit along also," the man called 
back from the door leading into the 
office marked Private. 

Cielia tried to speak, but words 
failed her — maybe later, she reasoned 
with herself, she would be able to 
tell him just how much she appre- 
ciated his thoughtfulness, and when 
she got hoina and examined the huge 
package as well as the little Christ- 
mas tree that had already been set 
up by har father 1 , her cup of hap- 
piness overflowed. 

"Honest 'effort, father," she said 
soberly when at last the little tree 
with its generous supply of gifts stood 
ready for the sleeping children, "cer- 
tainly does carry a just reward. ' ' 

And so believed Dimple the next 
morning when coming over to wish 
Celia a Merry Christmas, she dis- 
covered the truth of the tree with 
the toys with which the Reefer chil- 
dren were playing. 

"I guess you'll be taken on as a 
regular at the store, Celiai, " said 
Dimple!, ' '.since you 've put this Santa 



idea, over with the boss." 

<VH;i sin. ok her head. ".Air. Lar- 
king calle'd by this morning," said 
the girl presently, ' ' and we talked 
things over, butl can 't leave the chiU 
dren yet — so for the time being I am 
going to help out only on special 
sales occasions." 

"But anybody," exclaimed Dimple, 
"can take care of the children — a:id 
you've got big ideas — big ideas." 

' ' True enough, answered Celia, ' ' I 
have got ideas, but the biggest of all 
is to keep the home together." 

' ' But thing of the money you 'd 
earn," Dimple reasoned. "You 
coud hire somebody to look after the 
home and children. ' ' 

"Money is a great necessity, 
Dimple, I admit," answered Celia, 
"but Mr. Larkins is going to give 
father a place in the office so it won't 
be necessary for me to earn more 
than spending money. This I can do, ' ' 
continued the girl happily, "by fill- 
ing in on big sales occasions and giv- 
ing the rest of my time to the home. ' ' 

' ' Some people, ' ' murmured Dimple 
as she wandered idly homeward, 
"don't know a big chance when they 
see it—" 

But to the girl who had played the 
sympathetic Santa Claus in Larkins' 
epartment store, the big chance for 
her lay in the fact that her father 
would do the earning and she would 
keep the home together, which, after 
all according to Celia 's idea, was the 
greatest thing in a girl could do. 



Teacher — "If the President and Vice President both die who would 
get the job?" 

Silent Pupil — ' ' The undertaker. ' ' 



24 



THE UPLIFT 



DO YOU LIKE ORANGES? 



Ey Antonia J. Stemple. 



There are few persons who do not 
like oranges and grape fruit. These 
popular fruits are not only delicious 
to the taste and pleasing to the eye, 
but they are among the most healthful 
fruits in our dietary. Vast quantities 
of citrus fruits are shipped from 
Florida and California where they 
grow to best advantage in this country 
and nearly every Northerner hopes 
to see oranges growing, some day, 
if he has not already had that pleas- 
ure. 

And indeed the orange and grape 
groves of the Southland are beauti- 
ful to behold, and individuals who 
have never seen the fruit excpt as 
it is dsplayed in the fruit stores, in- 
varibly go into raptures at their first 
sight of a orange grave. 

The trees are very low ,and rather 
squatty, so that it is easy to pick the 
fruit without extension ladders. The 
leaves of the orange and grape fruit 
trees are dark green and very glossy, 
and in a properly cared for orchard, 
the trees are literally loaded with fruit. 
It is nothing unusual to see six or 
nine large oranges or huge grape 
fruit growing in a single cluster, and 
one wonders how the small low trees 
manage to stand up under their lu- 
cious burdens. The branches usual- 
ly have to be well propped while the 
fruit is in the later stages of growth. 

Oranges and grape fruit grow in 
very light sandy soil in Florida. It is 
a constant wonder to the uninitiated 
that any thing can grow in what looks 
like good for nothing, very powdry, 
ordinary bright colored sand. Yet 
this sand is what oranges grow in best. 



Some orange and grape fruit groves 
contain thousands of trees, all plant- 
ed a few feet apart in endless rows 
which stretch for miles. But beside 
these mammouth groves, orange and 
grape fruit trees are planted in back 
yards and front lawns of private home 
so that nearly every family in the or- 
ange growing section raises enough 
for their own use. 

Oranges and ^grape fruit picked 
from the trees when they are ripe are 
infinitely more sweet, juicy and delici- 
ous than they are when we get them 
in the north, good as they are then. 
The best oranges and grape fruit grow 
in the Indian River region of Florida, 
though all the first class fruit does 
not come from there by any means. 

The orange and grape fruit trees 
look very much alike, there being a 
slight, difference in the size of the 
leaves and the size of the blossoms. 
The orange blossoms especially, are 
exceedinly beautiful and their per- 
fume is enchanting. In orangeblos- 
soms time the air is laden with the 
exquisite scent of the multitudes of 
blossoms in bloom, and every breeze 
wafts it to the nostrils. Although the 
perfume is so sweet, it is never cloy- 
ing, and most people never get enough 
of it. Fortunate are those mortals, 
who, when the north is shivering 
amid snow and ice, may revel amid 
the orange groves of the sunny south. 

The orange blossoms are pearly 
white, star shaped, with bright yellow 
centers, and they grow in clusters 
and very profusely. Lorge quantities 
are shipped north by tourists. Strange 
as it may seem, in the spring, ripe 



THE UPLIFT 



25 



fruit and blossoms may be seen on 
the same trees. 

An,. orange packing' plant is an 
interesting place to linger in, and ''c 
is always pleasantly redolent of the 
luscious fruit which is being handled. 
The operation of preparing oranges 
for shipment is very simple. The 
fruit is brought from the groves in 
great trucks. A large quantity is 
dumped at one time into the orange 
grading machine, a very simple, but 
lfingthly contrivance, where it is first 
put through a bath, where the fruit 
is washed and leaves and stems are 
eliminated. The orangs come out on 
an endless belt and go through a dry- 
process. As the oranges emerge from 
the dryer, with their faces all nicely 
washed and dried, the sorter sorts 
out the bright . and dark skinned 
fruit, each passing into a different 
channel. The oranges are then auto- 
matically graded by machine, for size, 
by means of a series of springs set 
along the top of the grader above the 
belt along which the fruit travels. 

As the oranges of all sizes comer- 
tumbling along the endless belt, just 
as though they were in a hury to get 
somewhere, they pass under the set 
springs. There are about a half 
dozen of these springs adjusted for 
different sizes. The biggest oranges 
hit the first spring, and as they do 
so, they are shot into a bin and their 
journey is ended. Those oranges too 
small to hit the first spring, travel 
along till they get nipped by the 
right spring, and they come to rest in 
another bin, so that all fruit of one 
size falls into the proper bin. The 
smallest fruit travels the farthest, 
but that too, meets its Waterloo in 
the last bin. All the while the oranges 
are going through the grader and being 



automatically sorted, as described, 
the man in charge of the machine 
keeps out a sharp watch for damaged 
or defective fruit, and throws it out 
as it goes by him. That's absolutely 
all there is to the process. 

The packers take the fruit from the 
bins, one at a time, wrapping each 
orange or grape fruit in a square of 
tissue paper, with a dextrous twist 
of the hand and arm. The packers 
work fast as they are paid ' ' by the 
piece," so much for every box pack- 
ed. When the box is filled tightly 
the cover is adjusted, the steel bands 
are naild over the ends, the label is 
offixecl, and the box is all ready to 
start on its long journey to the north 
and way stations. 

The terms 96 's, 136 's, 212 's, and the 
like, simply means the number of 
oranges required to fill a full box of 
standard siz. The smaller the fruit 
the more oranges to the box. There 
are also standard half and quarter 
size boxes. 

Grape fruit is handled like the 
oranges and so are lemons. 

There are almost as many varities 
of grape fruit and oranges as there are 
of apples. The fruit is very cheap 
where it is grown, and nobody ever 
thinks of picking up the large quanti- 
ties which strew the ground. Be- 
sides oranges, grape fruit and lemons, 
which are grown in the south and 
in California, there are kumquats, or 
' ' Chinese oranges, ' ' tangerines, and 
pamelos, a new fruit which is a cross 
of other citrus fruits. 

Grape fruit is now being canned 
in some southern factories, and 
chrystallized grape fruit and orange 
peel as well as marmalade is largely 
utilized for the surplus product. 

The citrus fruits are a great money- 



26 



THE UPLIFT 



making crop, and the amount of fruit 
shipped out of he states where it is 
grow} is almost unbelievable. In- 
deed, orange eating is a great nation- 



al pastime in season, and a stay in the 
land where the fruit grows gives 
aided zest to the eating. 



PRACTICAL PROBLEMS OF THE 
BANKER. 



By V. R. Patterson, 

In days gone by the public thought 
of the banker as one who worked 
from nine until two. Some, this day 
and time, accuse us of keeping these 
hours. Of course, this is a mistaken 
idea for the banker works more 
l'iours on an average per day than al- 
most any person engaged in business. 
This would tend to prove that bank- 
ers have problems to solve and work 
to do just the same as others in busi- 
ness, and it requires more hours than 
contained in the space of time from 
nine until two. 

Some Of Our Functions 

The receiving of deposits and mak- 
ing loans. Deposits are three in 
kind — cheeking, savings and time. 
Some customers seem to confuse the 
three, because thej want to have 
their checking account c"raw interest, 
and their savings account subjest to 
check, even without leaving their book 
at the bank. Too, we very often 
have to refuse payment on a check, 
the party not having an account sub- 
ject to cheek, only to find a record 
of a time certificate issued, and, no 
doubt, filed away in an old trunk 
for safe-keeping. Are these condi- 
tions in our business problems to 
solve ? Bankers think so. 

In the usual course of business, 
cheeking deposits are made up of 
cash, checks on our bank, checks on 



in The Wachovia. 

other banks in the city, and cheeks 
on foreign points, which for the pur- 
pose of a correct understanding we 
will say the smaller towns in our im- 
mediate section, and checks on the 
larger cities. The problem of collect- 
ing cheeks handled for our custom- 
ers has grown to be one of large pro- 
portions on account of the exchange 
involved and time necessary to make 
collection. Practically all of the 
smaller banks charge on an average 
of $1.50 per thousand for making re- 
mittances covering cheeks drawn on 
them which the collecting bank has 
to absorb, expecting the customer's 
account in the way of a blame to 
be such that this expense can be in- 
curred. 

Accounts Are Analyzed 
In order that we may know the 
total checks handled that cost ex- 
change, as well as time involved, our 
active accounts are analyzed and 
every check payable outside our 
city is noted as to exchange and num- 
ber of days necessary before the pro- 
ceeds are actually in our hands. For 
example, John Doe deposits (the fig- 
ures are arrived at by adding total 
for each day) during the month a 
total of $3,000.00 on points that do 
not cost ,any exchange to collect, 
but require an average of three days 
time before we receive returns. He 



THE UPLIFT 



27 



also deposits $5,000.00 on miscellane- 
ous towns which cost $1.50 per thou- 
sand or total cost of $7.50 and re- 
quire three days to collect. This 
makes a total of $8,000.00 out of 
town items handled requiring three 
days time to collect, giving a total 
volume of $24,000,000 which, divided 
by 30 days in the month, makes an 
average of $800.00 daily outstanding 
in uncollected funds which has to be 
taken into consideration and deduct- 
ed from the customer's average book 
balance which we find was $1,400.00. 
From this is deducted the $800.00 
leaving net balance of $600.00 which 
is the balance that is worth something 
to the bank in the way of an income 
at the legal rate of 6 per cent or $3.00 
for the 30 day period. 

From this analysis you will see the 
bank has sustained a loss of $4.50, 
as the exchange charge of $7.50 had 
to be absorbed and the only revenue 
received was the $3.00 interest. This 
does not take into consideration any 
charge for clerk hire, stationery and 
other expense necessary for the prop- 
er handling of the account. 
Overdrafts 

The question of overdrafts is, with- 
out a doubt, one of the hardest prob- 
lems we have to solve in the entire 
operation of our bank. Some cus- 
tomers would like to carry a good 
balance in the savings departmeint 
at 4 per cent interest, and carry a 
small checking account expecting the 
bank to pay overdrafts on account 
of the value of the account in the 
savings department. 

Section 60 of the Banking Law of 
our State says : 

"Any officers (other than a direc- 
tor) or employee of a bank who shall 



permit any customer or other per- 
son to overdraw his account, or who 
shall pay any check or draft, the 
paying of which shall overdraw any 
account, unless the same shall be 
authorized by the board of directors 
or by a committee of such board au- 
thorized to act, shall be personally 
liable to such bank for the amount 
of such overdraft." 

I have known numbers of custom- 
ers to feel that the banker had some 
grudge against them personally, when 
payment on a cheek was refused, in 
endeavoring to carry out the in- 
tent of the section I have just quot- 
ed. 

Bankers are called upon to contri- 
bute liberally to every cause. We 
have to maintain suitable and ex- 
pensive quarters; we have to pay 
taxes of every description. If we 
do not have a sufficient number of 
profit-paying accounts — which means 
balances rather than overdrafts — we 
simply are not in a position to handle 
satisfactory the business of the pub- 
lic. Our customers should maintain 
satisfactory balances in order that 
we may successfully perform the 
duties incumbent upon us. We be- 
lieve that it is not altogether a sel- 
fish service rendered by the banker 
of today. 

The Making Of Loans 

Concerning this all-important fea- 
ture of banking, let me say that 
quite a few customers think that 
banks are always — at least should be 
— anxious to lend money. There are 
probably certain seasons in the year 
when banks as a rule do seek loans. 
The reverse is just as true, because 
there are other seasons of the year 
when banks refrain from making new 



THE UPLIFT 



loans and, on the contrary, endeav- 
or to reduce the loans they are then 
carrying. 

The banker's ability to make loans 
is regulated by two conditions : 
amount of his deposits and his abi- 
lity to rediscount the notes of his 
bank. Suppose, for instance, at cer- 
tain seasons in the year when the 
bank has borrowed as much money 
as it is entitled to borrow from its 
corresponding- banks in the larger 
cities (the bank is limited as to this 
the same as individuals in borrowing 
from their bank,) and deposits be- 
gin to decrease at an alarming rate, 
due to seasonal demands, the banker 
is not in a position to take care of 
all the loans that are offered him and 
some have to be declined. The cus- 
tomer who is owing the bank as much 
as he should does not receive addi- 
tional accomodations, but, in fact, 
is asked ot reduce his indebtedness. 
The customer who is entitled to bor- 
row and does not owe the bank is 
the one who gets the loan even though 
the bank's credit has to be strained 
in order to meet the demand. 

It is at this time when the custom- 
er who has already borrowed more 
than he is entitled to is asked to re- 
duce his loaus in order that the money 
received from him can be lent to 
other customers who need accommo- 
dation. Therefore if you hear of a 
banker asking certain of his cus- 
tomers to reduce their indebtedness, 
or if you experience such, do not 
necessarily become alarmed over the 
bank 's condition and think it must 
have money to keep from closing its 
doors', it is simply trying success- 
fully to function as a clearing house 
for financial matters and is endeav- 



oring properly to place all its loans 
in order that a greater number of 
borrowers may be taken care of ade- 
quately. 

Bankers should never lose sight of 
the fact that they are trustees of 
other people 's fund 's and that when 
they make a loan they should be rea- 
sonably satisfied, in the first place, 
that it is absolutely good and, also, 
that it is being used for legitimate 
purposes and can be returned to the 
bank at a specified time. 
Other Problems 

You will be surprised probably to 
know that we are called upon to 
find out for a customer whether or 
not some one else has a balance in 
our bank. This may not seem a 
problem but it is, because in numer- 
ous cases, if we do not tell the cus- 
tomer, he becomes angry and feels 
that, because he carries a good bal- 
ance, his request should be granted. 
It is absolutely against our rules to 
divulge any information concerning 
the business of our customers. We 
adhere to this rule religiously re- 
gardless of who makes the request. 

From my experience and observa- 
tion it seems that almost every kind 
of business manned by human beings 
is supposed to make mistakes, ex- 
cept the bank. We make mistakes 
the same as any one else, and yet 
we have a number of customers who 
seem to feel that this should not be 
the case with banks, and that our 
errors are absolutely inexcusable. 

We could not conduct our busi- 
ness unless we had a sufficient num- 
ber of customers who were willing for 
us to make a profit in handling 
their account. I am glad to state 
that when the question is proper- 



THE UPLIFT 



29 



ly placed before a majority of our 
customers, they see the matter in 
the right way and realize that suc- 
cessful banks are necessary for the 
proper and orderly running of the 
wheels of commerce. 

In solving the problems that arise 



in the conduct of our business we en- 
deavor at all times to see the cus- 
tomer's view-point. As bankers we 
are willing to go just as far as hu- 
manly possible in an effort to meet 
the wishes and demands of those who 
carry accounts with us. 



INSTITUTION NOTES. 



By J. J. Jones, Jr 



Master Plas Johnson is visiting 
his relatives in Granite Falls. 



The boys were surprised last Thurs- 
day in not seeing a moving picture 
show. 



During the past week the Pro- 
gram and Menu for Christmas have 
been printed. 



The new Susaphone Bass which 
was ordered a number of days ago 
has arrived at the institution. 



The boys that were placed in the 
band a few weeks ago are progress- 
ing rapidly. 



Trees are being planted on the 
upper and lower end of the campus, 
by a number of the boys and various 
officers. 



A new addition to the platform 
in the Auditorium is being erected 
for the purpose of the boys that have 
recitations for Christmas. 



Master Earnest Whitehurst, 
member of the seventh cottage, was 
paroled last Wednesday by Super- 



intendent Boger. 



The boys who were made happy 
by their relatives last Wednesday- 
were: Thamer Pope, Edwin Baker, 
and Fleming Clinton, and Herbert 
Floyd. 



The golden text of the last Sun- 
days lesson was, "I am the res- 
urrection and the life." The subject 
"The Raising of Lazarus," it touch- 
ed the boys very deeply when they 
read about Jesus weeping over the 
Death of Lazaras. This is the only 
place recorded in the Bible where 
Jesus wept. 



Miss Helen Misenheimer and Miss 
Mabel Rudisill of the music faculty 
of Mont Amoena Seminary, Miss 
Mary Margaret Barrier of Mt. Pleas- 
ant, and Mr. Kay Patterson of Con- 
cord rendered a delightful musical 
program on Sunday afternoon. Three 
special numbers rendered at the 
church service were greatly enjoyed 
by the boys. These consisted of a 
solo by Miss Rudisill, a flute solo 
by Mr. Patterson with piano ac- 
companinent by Miss Misenheimer. 
and two trios by Miss Misenheimer, 
Barrier and Rudisill. 



30 THE UPLIFT 

THE KIND OF WILL NOT TO MAKE. 

The Will of a Cynic. 

The following- is an excerpt from the "To my valet, I leave the clothes 

will of a Wall Street man, which is that he has been stealing from me 

said to have been recently probated regularly for the past ten years, 

in the New York courts : Also my fur coat that he wore last 

"To my wife, I leave her lover winter when I was in Palm Beach, 
and the knowledge that I wasn 't the "To my chauffer, I leave my cars, 

fool she thought I was. He almost ruined them and I want 

' ' To my son, I leave the pleasure him to have the satisfaction of fin- 

of earning a living. For thirty-five ishing the job. 

years he has • thought that the pleas- ' ' To my partner, I leave the sug- 

ure was all mine. He was mistaken, gestion that he take some other clev- 

' ' To my daughter, I leave $100,000. er man in with him at once if he ex- 
She will need it. The only good pects to do any business." — The 
piece of business her husband ever Wachovia, 
did was to marry her. 



THAT SAFE VOICE. 

The mariner's compass in a small but very important instrument. It 
has revolutionized the life of the sailor and made travel by water safe. 
But it stands to reason that very few of us would care to entrust our 
lives to a vessel for any great distance that did not list among its ap- 
pliances a compass. The old method if depending on the reliative posi- 
tion of the stars was shot through with great peril. For stars have a 
way of hiding behind clouds and fog, and sometimes when their light 
is most sought after. But the reliability of the compass is not dependent 
on the climate. Its ne6dle points to the north through day and night, 
cloud and sunshine, calm and storm. It is worth its weight in gold and 
much more. 

It is little wonder that men have fallen into the habit of seeing a 
similarity between the compass and the conscience. The conscience be- 
comes our guide across the sea of life. It points toward right and 
duty and God. A man may throw away his compass, and he may kill 
his conscience, but he thereby cuts off every hope of reaching the harbor 
safely. He is utterly foolish who refuses to keep his conscience in 
good repair and to live up to it. It is the voice of God in the soul, the 
guarantee of safety to the land beyond. — Selected. 

:'. i) llolfiq 



RAILROAD SCHEDULE 









Northbound. 






No. 


136 


To 


Washington 


5:00 A. 


M. 


No. 


36 


To 


Washington 


10:25 A, 


M. 


No. 


46 


To 


Danville 


3:15 P. 


M. 


No. 


12 


To 


Richmond 


7:25 P. 


M. 


No. 


32 


To 


Washington 


8:28 P. 


M. 


No. 


38 


To 


Washington 


9:30 P. 


M. 


No. 


30 


To 


Washington 
Southbound. 


1:40 A. 


M. 


No. 


45 


To 


Charlotte 


4:14 P. 


M. 


No 


35 


To 


Atlanta 


10:06 P. 


M. 


No. 


29 


To 


Atlanta 


2:45 A. 


M. 


No. 


31 


To 


Augusta 


6:07 A. 


M. 


No. 


33 


To 


New Orleans 


8:27 A. 


M. 


No. 


11 


To 


Charlotte 


9:05 A. 


M. 


No. 


135 


To 


Atlanta 


9:15 P. 


M 



C\vTvs\mas CaroV 



"PVvWips "BvooVs 



The earth has grown old with its burden of care, 

But at Christmas it always is young; 
The heart of the jewel burns lustrous and fair, 
And its soul, full of music, breaks forth on the air 

When the song of the angels is sung. 

It is coming, Old Earth, it is coming to-night! 

On the snowflakes that cover thy sod 
The feet of the Christ-child fall gentle and white, 
And the voice of the Christ-child tells out with delight 

That mankind are the children of God. 

On the sad and the lonely, the wretched and poor, 

That voice of the Christ-child shall fall, 
And to every blind wanderer opens the door 
Of a hope that he dared not to dream of before, 
With a sunshine of welcome for all. 

The feet of the humblest may walk in the field 

Where the feet of the Holiest have trod. 
This, this is the marvels to mortals revealed 
When the silvery trumpets of Christmas have pealed : 
That mankind are the children of God 




Here's Our Old Friend 



THE UPLIFT 



19 



A MEDAL FOR BRAVERY. 

By Ruth Sifferd in "Bays and Girls." 



Long, long ago during the War Be- 
tween the States the Northern forces 
had a suply station and headquarters 
on the south side of the Ohio River, 
directly across from the little town 
of Willowville. Willowville was 
built at the foot of a hill which over- 
looked the river. On this hill stood 
a large, white, stone house which be- 
longed to the Talbots. 

One dark night during the most ex- 
citing part of the war when the South- 
ern forces were nearing the Ohio 
River, a horseman rode up the hill 
and stumbled onto the Talbot's porch. 
His horse was exhausted and he him- 
self was nearly dead for lack of food 
and water. He had come all the way 
from Philadelphia, without stopping, 
for he carried a message which must 
be put into the hands of the general 
before morning. 

The horseman could go no farther 
and he begged Mr. Talbot to send 
some one across with the message. 
David Talbot, who was fourteen and 
in search of adventure, offered to go. 

In a few moments, with the warn- 
ing of his parents and of the horse- 
man ringing in his ears, David slipped 
away from the shore on his sturdy, 
home-made raft. After what seem- 
ed hours of quiet rowing in the dark- 
ness a voice called, "Who goes 
there?" 

Something warned David that this 
was one of the Confederate spies 
whose business it was to guard the 
shore against messengers from Phila- 
delphia. They boy remained quiet 
for a long time and then began care- 
fully to approach the shore. He 



knew that the spy could not use a 
lantern any more than he himself 
could, for they were both in danger 
of being seen by a sentinel. So David 
hoped to be able to reach the shore 
without touching the spy's raft. He 
did reach shore safely and then, mak- 
ing his raft as secure as possible, he 
began his lonely walk through the 
dense woods. 

Owls hooted, crickets sang, and the 
far away call of the whip-poor-will 
could be heard frequently, but David 
was not afraid. He must get to the 
general and get back home before 
morning began to dawn. Presently 
he saw lights ahead of him. As he 
came nearer he saw that they were 
the many campfires of the Northern 
soldiers. He spoke the password to 
three guards and finally was shown 
the way to the general's hut. When 
he had told his story he sank down 
on the ground in exhaustion. A sol- 
dier brought him water, while the 
general took his name and village and 
praised him for his bravery. As soon 
as he was rested, he started back. 
Strangely enough, the journey back 
did not seem as long as before and 
he pushed off in his raft without in- 
terruption. A very tired boy, but 
very proud, climbed the hill that 
morning just as streaks of gray were 
beginning to show through the dark- 
ness that dawn was coming. 



* # * * 



When the war was over, the gener- 
al visited Willowville, the little 
town on the Ohio River. He had with 
him a medal for bravery for David 
Talbot. 



20 



THE UPLIFT 



David's twin sister, Dorothea, was 
chosen to pin the medal on David 
after the speech by the general. 

On the eventful day, the square 
was crowded with people. The gen- 
eral made a long speech, while David 
and Dorothea stood behind the plat- 
form and waited impatiently. After 
what seemed at . least four hours to 
the waiting twins, but was really only 
two, the general called them and they 
came up on the platform. 

They made a beautiful picture — the 
girl in the pink ruffled gown, and 
quaint buckled slippers, holding the 
bright silver medal; the boy, stand- 
tall and straight, with his eyes fixed 
on the American flag above him ; and 
the general, smiling down at them 
both, his white head bared and shin- 
ing in the sunlight. Then the people 
stood and sang "The Star Spangled 
Banner'' to show their happiness be- 
cause they had a real hero in their 
own little village. 

At sunset, David and Dorothea 
walked up the winding path which 
led to their home on the hill. David 
looked down at the medal shining 
on his coat and said, "Don't ever 
forget this day, Dorothea." 

And Dorothea answered, "I won't 

David. ' ' 

• * # * # 

It was two weeks before Decoration 
Day, fifty years later, when Kenneth 
and May Allison called on their he- 
loved school teacher in the same lit- 
tle town of Willowvilie. 

Kenneth, the oldest, began to ex- 
plain why they had come, ' ' Miss Wil- 
liams, in that pageant we 're going 
to have on Decoration Day, who's go- 
ing to be the old soldier that gets 
the bouquet of roses? We want to 



know: ' ' 

' ' Why, I don 't know. Do you have 
anyone to suggest, Kenneth?" asked 
Miss Williams pleasantly, passing a 
plate of sugar cookies to the chil- 
dren. 

"Well, I think our Great-uncle 
David would be the best one, don 't 
you?" asked Kenneth looking a lit- 
tle bit worried. What if Miss Wil- 
liams don't agree with him? 

"He's so nice and soldierly look- 
ing," chimed in May between bites 
of sugar eoogies. 

Miss Williams laughed at that and 
then asked, "But why are yoii chil- 
dren so interested in that part of the 
pageant ? ' ' 

" I '11 tell you all about it, Miss 
Williams, ' ' said Kenneth, beginning 
again. ' ' You see, Granny and Great- 
uncle David are twins, but they had 
a quarrel when they were twenty-two 
years old and they've never spoken 
to each other since. And we thought 
that if you could get them to speak 
to each other in the pageant, they 
might made up and — and — " 

' ' 'Cause Grany 's always crying 
lately," continued May, "and she's 
all alone with just us." The chil- 
dren were orphans and lived with 
their grandmother. 

"Granny worries an awful lot, be- 
cause Great-uncle David has all the 
money and the estate and Granny 
hasn 't anything, ' ' explained Kenneth. 
"It isn't fair because uncle David 
hasn't anybody, he just lives in the 
big house on the hill and saves his 
money. ' ' 

Miss Williams nodded her head. "I 
begin to understand, children, and I 
think it is fine of you to think of fix- 
ing it that way. I'll help you all I 



THE UPLIFT 



21 



'Oh, I'm so glad," cried May. "I 
know you can do it and then Granny 
will be happy and we will, too." 

Miss Williams promised to think 
it over and to keep the plan secret, 
and t|he children walked home to 
Granny's cottage on Main Street very 
much happier. 

"Whenever Miss Williams says 
she '11 help, it 's always all right, ' de- 
clared Kenneth. 

"Yes," responded May. "There's 
Granny on the porch making lace 
for the store. Won't it be nice when 
she can sit on Great-uncle David's 
front porch and make lace for her- 
self?" May skipped ahead a little for 
joy. 

"She won't even have to make lace 
at all," said Kenneth catching up 
with his sister. "She can do what- 
ever she wants to do. ' ' 

The next day Kenneth, with his 
arms full of groceries, met Miss Wil- 
liams and May a few blocks from 
the cottage. "0, Ken," exclaimed 
May, "Granny will do it." 

Kenneth and Miss Williams laugh- 
ed. "Do what?" asked Kenneth. 

Then Miss Williams explained, 
"I'm having the oldest soldier re- 
ceive the bouquet of roses at the 
end of the pageant, and your Grand- 
mother is going to present it. But 
there is no soldier of the War Be- 
tween the States living anymore, so 
I am asking your, Great-uncle David, 
Mr. Talbot, to receive the bouquet 
because he has a medal for bravery, 
won during that War. They A\ill 
neither one know the other one is 
until the time of the presentation, 
and then they cannot refuse. SeeJ 
How do you like my plan ? ' ' 



"It is fine, ' ' cried Kenneth. 
"Thanks so much for helping us 
and Granny will thank you, too, when 
its all over. ' ' 

"I shall have thanks enough," res- 
ponded Miss Williams, "when I see 
your Granny and Great-uncle David 
happy together. ' ' 

"I can hardly wait," said May, 
jumping up and down for joy. 
' ' Good-bye, Miss Williams. ' ' 
" Decoration Day dawned clear and 
warm. Everywhere flowers bloomed 
and flags waved. The platform at 
the square was in readiness for the 
pageant which was to take place at 
ten o'clock. The parade and mem 
orial service were to be held in the 
afternoon. 

"Got your speech ready, Granny?" 
queried May as they sat down to 
breakfast. 

Granny did not answer, but fumbled 
for her handkerchief and then the 
children noticed rtihe tears in her 
dear, gray eyes. Kenneth was 
frightened. He wondered if Granny 
had found out about the oldest sol- 
dier. 

' ' It 's nothing, ' ' said granny, smiling 
through her tears at the wide-eyed 
children. ' ' I wish — but there ; chil- 
dren, eat your breakfast. You must 
be at the square at nine o 'clock. ' ' 

"Do you think she knows?" ask- 
ed May as they waited for Miss Wil- 
liams at her gate. 

Kenneth shook his head gravely. 
' ' Anyway if she does know, she 's go- 
ing to do it, anway. Granny's a 
good sport. ' ' 

When Miss Williams came out, the 
children told her all about it. She 
smiled cheerily, ' ' Don 't you worry, ' ' 
she said stroking May's silky curls. 



22 



THE UPLIFT 



"Now here we are at the square. 
Forget about it." 

The pageant was beautiful. Every- 
one clapped heartily when it was 
over. May and Kenneth, behind the 
platform, waited with fast beating 
hearts for the first sound of Granny's 
voice. And Granny was a "good 
sport" as Kenneth had said. She 
caught her breath when she saw 
David, her twin brother, come for- 
ward and salute the flag. But she 
said her presentation speech and 
held out the roses to David. Then 
suddenly a mist came before her 
eyes. She saw only a boy, tall and 
straight, his eyes on the American 
flag above him. She herself was only 
a bit of a girl in a pink ruffled 
gown, and quaint buckled slippers, 
and she held in her hand a bright 
silver medal. The people were sing- 
ing the "Star Spangled Banner." 
"And the rocks and red glare, 
The bombs bursting in air." 
David Talbot looked dowii at the 
medal shining on his coat. ' ' Did 
you forget that day, Dorothea?" he 
asked in a low voice. 

"I couldn't, David," answered 
Dorothea who had forgotten that 
she was a grandmother. 

"Gave proof through the night 
That our flag was still there." 
' ' Can you forgive me ? ' ' asked 
David, again looking up at the flag. 
"There is nothing to forgive," said 
Dorothea and smiled. 

"Oh say does that star-spangled 
banner vet wave 



'er the land of the free, and the 
home of the brave ! ' ' 

Miss Williams walked home be- 
tween May and Kenneth. "It will 
he all right, my dears; just you wait 
and see," she promised. "They will 
remember about you in a very lew 
minutes. They are trying to make 
up many years of happiness which 
they lost through a foolish quarrel." 

"Here they come now," cried 
Kenneth, looking bavk down Main 
Street. 

"In Great-uncle David's car," 
breathed May in delight. 

8he automobile, decorated with red, 
white, and blue bunting stopped at 
the curbing. "Well, well," Great- 
uncle David exclaimed, "I'll bet you 
didn't even know you had a great- 
uncle, did you?" 

"Oh, yes, we did," responded May. 
"We knew all the time, didn t we 
Granny?" 

Granny smiled happily and, lean- 
ing back against the cushions, said, 
"We're going up the hill to home, 
now. Get in, children." 

Kenneth got in with Great-uncle 
David and May cuddled up beside 
Granny in the back seat. Miss Wil- 
liams had disappeared. 
"Look, May and Kenneth," said 
Granny, pointing up to the great, 
white, stone house on the hill, "that 
is home." 

"And isn't it funny, Ken," laugh- 
ed May, "that we have never been 
home before and we're almost grown 
up." 



Sometimes we may learn more frqm a man's errors than from his 
virtues. — Longfellow. 



THE UPLIFT 



23 



ALL ABOUT PAPER. 

By Edwin Tarrissee. 



Althpugh a greater quatity of news 
print paper is made than of any 
other kind, in value it is .exceeded by 
the production of book paper, accord- 
ing to the testimony of those quali- 
fied ,to speak on the subject. The 
author of the much-quoted phrase that 
' ' Of the making of books there is 
no end," would have found material 
for >a stronger statemen had he been 
able to contemplate a yearly output 
worth millions and millions of dollars. 

"Fine papers, include writing 
papers ranging from the best bank- 
note and stock certificate to such in- 
ferior grades that a pen scarcely will 
travel over them without blotting-: 
ledger papers, for bookkeeping, and 
other fine writing purposes; and lin- 
en papers, usually with rough surface 
and; laid water-mark. To these must 
be added wrapping paper, compris- 
ing rope manila, manila, imitation 
manila, etc.; tissue such as blotting 
paper, cover papers„/etc, and boards 
of all sorts straw-board box-board, 
news-board, bristle-board, etc. 

like a good many other modern 
industries that of paper-makirg 
had its origin with the Chi- 
nese. The papyrus of the Greeks 
and Romans, not to speak of that 
of the Egyptians, was not paper at 
all but simply the piths of the stem 
of a plant cut into,/ strips, placed side 
by side and across eaeh other ami 
pressed into a sheet, lo which the 
natural cgum of the plant gave a 
homogeneous character. But the Chi- 
nese in every early times made as 
genuine vpaper, in its general charac- 
teristics, as that produced by the 



perfected methods and machinery of 
today. 

A sheet of paper is an artificially 
felted web of vegetable fiber, puri- 
fied by means of vertain processes, 
of perishable materials ; that is, 
fibers of more or less pure cellulose, 
cellulose being the enduring -jjortion 
of vegetable growth and forming the 
structural base of all plants. In its 
broad outline the pro. cess, of paper- 
making may be described as collecting 
the raw material (pulp, whether mado 
from wood, rags or other substances) 
diluting with water, forming a sheet 
on a porous surface, so that the water 
may drain oflv and drying the sheet 
of paper thus formed. Different 
materials are used for the pulp to 
make different grades of paper, won.;! 
pulp now being used in the manufac- 
ture of nearly all the news paper, 
rags for writing and other fine 
papers, straw and manila in ^making 
wrapping papers, etc. But a large 
amount of paper is given its distinc- 
tive character.- after it leaves the 
paper mill by surface coatinfs with 
various substances. 

The processes of making pulp may 
be passed over, as they haye been 
much written about, and only the 
methods of making the paper from 
the pulp be taken up here. No more 
striking comparison can be made of 
the old and the new in the paper in- 
dustry than to note that whereas half 
a century ago most of the paper mills 
of the United States employed little 
labor outside of the individual pro- 
prietor and his family, some of the 
largest of their present-day sue- 



24 



THE UPLIFT 



cessors, with their houses for em- 
ployees, machine shops, and other de- 
pendent features, from veritable 
cities in themselves. At a single pap- 
er-making plant in Maine a thousand 
tons of finished paper are turned out 
every twenty-four hours, and at an- 
other mill in the same State a single 
machine is producing some eighty 
tons of wrapping manila in the same 
time. 

From the primitive hand processes 
of early paper-making to the huge 
machines of the present-day mills 
is a remarkable progress in methods 
of production, yet the principles are 
the same whether the pulp be taken 
from the vat in small hand-sieves and 
turned out a single sheet at a time, 
as was once the method, or whether, 
as is now done, it is made to flow on 
to an endless wire cloth, from which 
it is conveyed on blankets, or felts, 
in a continuous web through heavy 
press rolls and over steam-heated dry- 
ing cylinders. But machinery had 
made possible a more •uniform quali- 
ty of product as well as multiplied 
many times the rapidity of manu- 
faclure and diminished the labor 
cost. 

To a limited extent paper is still 
made by hand in the United States, 
but since the invention of what is 
known as the Foudrinier machine, in 
1708, machinery has gradually sup- 
planted the manual process. Until 
about 1860 paper was made chiefly 
from rag fiber, but the comparative 
cheapness of wood fiber has since that 
time revolutionized the pulp indus- 
try. 

Rags are prepared for making into 
paper by the successive operations of 
cleaning, boiling, washing, bleaching 



and beating or reduced to pulp. AH 
this is accomplished by machinery. 
In the washing engine the rags, after 
having been cleaned and boiled, are 
slowly macerated, losing their char- 
acteristics of textiles and being finally 
resolved into single fibers of varying 
lengths. In the beating engines the 
knives are arranged to macerate the 
pulp still more rapidly, and if vari- 
ous fibers are used, such as rag, wood 
fiber or esparto grass, the mixing is 
done here while the stuff is being re- 
duced to the very fine condition re- 
quired for making into paper. 

The bleached pulp has a yellowish 
cast, and to obtain a pure white a 
little blue is added, and papers that 
are colored in the pulp are prerjare.il 
at this point., 

Although the pulp may be beaten 
fine enough in the beating engine the 
practice in this country is to pump 
it afterwards through a so-called 
"Jordan" or refining engine, which 
consists of a stationary hollow cone 
mounted with knives on the inside 
which fits over a solid, rapidly re- 
volving cone mounted with similar 
knives on the outside. As the pulp 
passes between these cones the knives 
can be brought close together or sepa- 
rated, so that the degrees of fineness 
of the pulp can be accurately gauged. 

After passing through the Jordan 
engine the fluid pulp — whether made 
from rags, wood, or other material — 
is pumped into the Foudrinier ma- 
chine, where its transformation to 
finished paper becomes an automatic 
operation. The pulp is first screened 
from the vat over an apron to a mov- 
ing endless wire cloth supported by 
a series of small metal rolls set close 
together but not touching each other. 



THE UPLIFT 



25 



By these rolls an even surface of 
the wire eloth is maintained, and by 
keeping up a steady flow of the pulp 
and a constant forward motion of 
the wire screen a uniform thickness 
of the layer of pulp deposited is ob- 
tained. At the same time a violent 
lateral motion of the supporting rolls 
causes all the fibers to interlace, 
giving greater transverse strength to 
the texture. 

While this is going on much of 
tiie water in the pulp drains through 
leaving the fiber on the meshes. 

When sufficient water has drained 
from the pulp the moist web is car- 
ried between "couch" rolls, which 
are covered with woolen felt, and 
which press the water out still more 
and consolidate the fiber, giving it 
strength to cross alone the gap be- 
tween the wire cloth and the felt of 
the first press roll. This felt is an 
endless woolen blanket which sup- 
ports the tender web of paper through 
a pair of highly polished brass rolls 
under considerable pressure, giving 
the upper side of the sheet a smooth 
surface and leaving the impress of 
the felt on the under side. From the 
first press the sheet runs under thj 
second pair of rolls and back through 
them in the reverse direction, thus 
smoothing the other side of th sheet. 

The paper is "ow formed and the 
remaining operation is to dry it. 
This is accomplished by passing it 
through driers, which consist of Isrge 
metal cylinders heated by steam, 
placed one after another or in tiers, 
the number varying in different, 
machines. The paper while beng 
carried about by the cylinders is held 
to the hot surfaces by an endless 
blanket usually of cotton. Thin pa 



per can be run through the driers 
with great rapidity; thick paper slow- 

ly. 

The drying process being completed, 
the paper is given a smooth surface 
by mahine called calenders, which 
are smooth-faced heavy metal rollers 
arranged vertically in a stack, giving 
great pressure by their cumulative 
weigh! and by the application of 
screws. The paper thus treated is 
ea ed "machine finished" paper as 
contrasted with "superealendercd'' 
paper, the latter being paper that 
has been passed between alternate' 
iron and compressed paper rolls un- 
der great pressure. The finished pa- 
per is finally reeled oft' in rolls or 
cut into sheeis of the desired size. 

By the Foundrinier machine as 
now perfected on endless web of pa- 
per is made from 60 to 160 inches 
wide at a speed of from 10 to 401) 
feet a minute. 

Another type of paper machine, in 
use in a number of mills, is known as 
the cylinder machine, and differs from 
the Foudrinier chiefly in that the 
pulp, instead of being made to flow 
on to an endless wire eloth, is taken 
up by a cylinder under the face of 
which is formec 1 from close-meshei 
wire cloth revolving partly submerged 
in a vat of pulp-stock. From the 
cylinder the net is removed by a couch 
roll carrying a felt and then drW 
and fi lished es: mti&Ily as in the 
Foudrinier machine. There is less 
waste of pulp in this machine, out 
the paper made by it lies mostly in 
the line of travel of the web, there 
being no s!,."ke to give ther-. lateral 
mocion A large class of htavj pa- 
pers, cardboard, strawboard, news- 
board, binders' board, and the like, 



26 



THE UPLIFT 



as well as most tissue papers, is mfde 
on the cylinder machine. 

he mthod of coating paper in or- 
der to give it a certain smoothness 
of finish is, in outline, as follows: 
The paper to he coated is fed in a 
continuous roll, hy means of machin- 
ery, to a rotary brush, which applies 
the coating to one side at a time. 
The coating material is spread even- 
ly over the paper by other brushes, 
and the paper is then hung in festoons 
from sticks resting on moving racks, 
in a room heated by steam. When 
the paper is dry it is re-wound and 
calendered (that is, smoothed by being 
placed through smooth chilled iron 
rolls), glazed or embossed. The 
heavy coated book paper used where 
illustrations of the better sort are to 
be reproduced, is coated with clays 
and glue or casein, and the necessary 
smoothness is obtained by super- 
calendering. This consists in pars- 
ing it between alternate iron and 
compressed cotton rolls under groat 
pressure. 

Glazed papers, which are used prin- 
cipally for covering paper boxes, are 
coated on one side only and given 
a very high, glossy surface by a 
machine called the friction calender. 
This consists of a top roll of polished 
iron, heated by steam, and a lower 



roll of compresed cotton, the top 
roll revolving at a much higher speed 
than the lower one. As the paper 
passed between these rolls, it is 
smoothed in the same way as if a .hot 
iron had been passed over it. Colors 
may be added to the coating mix- 
ture, and a high polish given by us- 

Mills where writing paper is the 
chief product are located with re- 
gard to available water power rather 
than, as in the case of the wood-pulp 
mills, source of supply. Mills using 
rags as their principal material, there- 
fore, are found chiefly in Massachu- 
setts, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin; 
Massachusetts alone producing more 
than 60 per cent of the writing paper 
of the country. 

Several other States have other 
peculiarities. Connecticut produces a 
very large proportion of the cover 
and heavy wrapping papers, binders, 
trunk boards, news boards, and simi- 
lar grades. Indiana produces a large 
part of the wood-pulp boards and 
other boards; New Jersey about half 
of the news boards, Pennsylvania 
nearly one-half of all the binding and 
roofing paper. The farming States 
of the Middle West are the chief pro- 
ducers of the straw wrapping and 
strawboard. 



Miss Alexander of Mecklenburg led the fight against the bill to make 
divorces easier in North Carolina and her masculine associates agreed 
with her in the conviction that it is now easy enough. If parents would 
devote more time to the fostering of common sense and high ideals 
about matrimony, there would be fewer unwise marriages and fewer 
divorces. — Asheville Citizen. 



THE UPLIFT 



27 



THE TAMING OF THE JUNGLES. 



By Merritt L. Allen. 



Ray Bruce sat on the edge of the 
long pier which ran well out into the 
deep water of the Gulf of Mexico. 
He gave the fish line in his hands an 
impatient jerk, pulled it out of the 
water, and then wound it upon a flat 
wooden spool. As soon as school was 
out at two o 'clock his brother, Jim, 
had started out in his flat bottom 
boat, which was propelled by a port- 
able engine, to gather Spanish moss 
in the jungles of a bayou which crept 
into the mainland bordering the Gulf. 
This moss he sold to the fruit pack- 
ers for a fair price, but much as 
he wanted a share in the proceeds, 
Ray could never be induced to enter 
that forbidding tangle commonly 
known as The Jungles. It was loath- 
some enough looking from the out- 
side and very few people ever pene- 
trated into its depths. 

On this particular afternoon, hard- 
ly a blemish had marred the sky when 
Jim started out, and Ray had drop- 
ped his line in the water to fish for 
sheephead until his brother would 
return wi h a boat laden with moss 
and he co^ld help him carry it to the 
village o" oafety Harbor two or three 
miles from the pier. But an hour 
after Jhr had started out dark clouds 
threateneu the bright sunlight and a 
coolness crept huj the air. Many 
times Ray looked toward the jungles 
with a little pucker jetween his eyes. 
F'vshing was out o the question, for 
a strong breeze was whipping the 
Gulf into whit:' caps. 

Big Tom owned the pier a^d the 
boats v, hich were tied along the sides. 
These he rented to the tourists who 



wanted to go out into the Gulf and 
fish. He was a retired seafaring 
man, and he had shaken his bead 
dubiously when Jim had started out, 
for his experienced eye had seen the 
white hazy clouds on the horizon, 
and they told him that there was a 
storm brewing. Now he sauntered 
down to where Ray was leaning 
against a piling, while his eyes search- 
ed the shore line of the jungles. 

' ' Hey, Sonny, see anything of your 
brother?" 

' ' Not a sign of him. I 'm scared 
of those jungles. ' ' 

Big Tom looked across the expanse 
of disturbed water with squinted 
eyes. 

' ' Guess he ain 't got his load yet. ' ' 

' ' I wish he wouldn 't go in there. 
You couldn't get me in those jungles 
if there was a Captain Kidd's trea- 
sure hidden there. No sir, it makes 
me shiver. ' ' 

" Ho ! " Big Tom said with a laugh, 
but his anxious eyes again searched 
the shore line. ''I wish that boy 
would hurry up and get back." 

"So do I. It's dark in there. He 
can't tell that there's a storm com- 
ing up." 

While the two had been talking the 
wind had been increasing. Iwo boat 
loads of fishermen' came up to the 
pier and Big Tom tied up the boats 
seeui ely and pocketed his, f ,re. When 
he he. I finished he looked at tho shy 
and its signs for several miuutes. 

"T.:ok here. Sonny, guess you'd 
better take that old launch and go 
after your brr^her. Y. e're due for a 
big blow and that flat bottom bvat 



28 



THE UPLIFT 



your brother has will capsize sure as 
anything. ' ' 

Ray looked startled. 

' ' Me go in there ! No, no ! You go. ' ' 

"I've got to tie up my boats and 
put things to rights or they'll be 
smashed to smitherins. We might 
get a regular hurricane this time of 
the year. ' ' 

"But I can't go in' there!" with 
a dismayed look. 

' ' Why not ? Your brother is in 
real danger. Jump in! I'll put in 
this long pole so you can shut off 
the engine when you leave the open 
water. ' ' 

"But I'm afraid!" Ray replied, 
shuddering from the thought. "I've 
never been in The Jungles." 

Nevertheless he clambered down in- 
to the boat indicated by Big Tom, who 
threw in a long pole and started the 
engine. As the boat drew away from 
the pier R av ' s blood seemed to freeze 
in his veins. 

"Good luck, Sonny," Big Tom 
called to him cheerfully. 

The boat chug-chugged into the 
channel of the bayou. A dignified 
old pelican sat on a piling and watch- 
ed him with his feet bent over the 
edge, ready for instant flight. A 
dozen sea gulls followed him for a 
time uttering their weird cries. Ray 
never looked back, but as he neared 
the edse of the jungles, his heart be- 
gan to pound and his mouth became 
dry. When the end of the bayou 
was reached, he shut off the engine. 
For perhaps five minutes he hesi- 
tated and then with clinched teeth he 
picked up the pole and forced the 
boat into the tangled mass of dead 
growth. As he zig-zagged farther 
and farther into the depths, his breat' 1 
came in short gasps, and only the 



thought of his brother gave him 
courage to continue his course. The 
border of sea grass and stunted 
palmettos were soon left behind, and 
he entered the dimness of the jungles 
caused by curtains of vines and Span- 
ish moss. 

A half mile inland there was a 
small fresh water lake which was 
infested with alligators. 

Ray had heard many tales about 
them; that when they grew to a 
great size they left the lake and lived 
in the jungles near the gulf. A 
partially submerged log startled him 
until he had jabbed it viciously with 
the pole and discovered that is was 
not alive. The farther he poled the 
boat the more regular became his 
brathing. Every water soaked stick 
which looked like a reptile of the 
jungles, he jabbed with his pole and 
once or twice he chuckled at his 
daring. 

It was always gloomy in the jungles 
for the sun had little chance to peek 
into its secrets. As Ray's eyes be- 
came accustomed to the obscure 
forms about him, his fea r gave way 
to curiosity. His brother had often 
told him of the interesting things to 
be seen here, and now he began to 
wonder if there was really anything 
to fear as long ;is he was in a sound 
boat. It was very quiet. He knew 
that the wind was howling outside, 
but in this almost sound proof mass 
only a low moa n - could be heard or 
the ripple of the brackish water 
against the sides of the launch. Ray 
knew that if they did not get back 
to the pier in time and the blow con- 
tinued that his In-other and himself 
would have to remain in the jungles 
all night and perhaps for a long 
time, for their boats would be cap- 



THE UPLIFT 



29 



sized by the high waves. The jungles 
were anything but safe, for as the 
wind continued it would force the 
water in there. 

He began to call to his brother 
and after a time he received a faint 
hello in reply. Jim was surprised 
when he saw him, but when he heard 
what was going on outside, he was 
ready for quick action'. 

"What in the world ever induced 
you to come in here, Ray?" 

"Big Tom sent me. There's a 
big blow coming. Hurry up!!" 

Jim did hurry, but he wondered 
about his younger brother. 

"I brought you were too much 
afraid of the jungles to ever venture 
in them?" 

"Sure, but I had to get you out. 
You couldn't tell about the storm in 
here; the sun was shining bright 
when you came in." 

Jim smiled from pleasure as he de- 
tached his portable machine and put 
it into the launch. 

"I'll tie the old boat to this tree 
and. we'll both go back in the 
launch." 

And so began the journey back. 
Jim look lhe pole and Ray squatted 
at the bow to clear the way and 
watch for submerged logs. This 
made it easier and the distance to 



the opening was soon accomplished. 
The storm had increased in fury, but 
Jim was an expert in handling a 
boat in rough weather. Ray used an 
old tin can to bail out the wate r they 
shipped. 

Old Tom appeared glad when they 
ran up beside the pier after much 
difficulty. When they had tied the 
launch securely like the other boats 
along the pier, he hurried them into 
his secure old shack. 

"Well, Sonny, was you scared?" 
Big Tom asked of Ray after they had 
listened to the howling of the wind 
for a time. 

' ' Nop — er — yes I was at first, but 
when I found out that nothing hurt 
me, it was klnda like having fun. ' ' 

' ' Hugh ! We 're feared of lots of 
things until we jump into the middle 
of them, and then we get along fine 
and we're not seared at all." 

Ray nodded his head emphatically. 

"That's right, Big Tom. And alter 
this Jim's got to split with me on 
what 's made from the sale of the 
moss because I 'm going in the jungles 
with him, as soon as this blow clears 
up, and pull moss myself." 

Big Tom chuckled again, and Ray 
knew from Jim's smile that he would 
welcome him as a partner. 



INSTITUTION NOTES. 

James Davis. 



The work sections have been cut- 
ting wood for the past three weeks. 

The radio fans have been enjoying 
concerts over the five-tube Freshman 
outfit. Mr. Smith, local dealer, left 
it at second cottage for several nights 



and Mr. Spaugh has purchased one 
and had it installed in twelfth cot- 
tage. 



About two weeks previous "Prac- 
tical writing books ' ' arrived at the 
school. Through practice with these 



30 



THE UPLIFT 



books the boys have improved in writ- 
ing very much. New song books also 
arrived and were put into use last 
Sunday. 



the services in the auditorium last 
Sunday afternoon. 



G. Lee Simpson, one of our teach- 
ers, has purchased a new Ford coupe. 



The platform in the chapel is be- 
ing enlarged for the use of the band. 

George Lafferty a member of the 
eleventh cottage, was paroled last 
week. 



Owing to the warm weather the 
boys have started playing base-ball 
again. A practice game was played 
last Saturday afternoon. 

Master J. J. Jones, Jr., who has 
been our reporter for about six months, 
has been paroled and has gone to live 
with his parents at Columbia, S. C. 



Mr. Carriker has taken charge of 
the wood shop, succeeding Mr. J. M. 
Day. 



J. M. Day, who lias been carpenter 
shop instructor for some time, has 
resigned. He left the institution last 
Saturday, to take a position in Ashe- 
ville. 



Walter Cummins was paroled 
last week. H e made a very good 
record while at the school. 



Rev. W. A. Jenkins, of the Central 
M. E. Church, of Concord, conducted 



Through the courtesy of the Con- 
cord Post of the American Legion, 
we were enabled to enjoy ''Powder 
River," the great world war pictre, 
last Thursday morning. 




WASHINGTON'S HOME, MT. VERNON 



SPECIAL EXCURSION FARES 

VIA 

SOUTHERN RAILWAY SYSTEM 

TO 

Mobile, Pensacola and New Orleans. 

Account MARDI GRAS CELEBRATION 

FEBRUARY 19th-24th, 1925 

Very low reduced round trip fares from all stations on Southern Railway 
Lines. 

Tickets on sale to New Orleans, Feb. 17th to 23rd. To Mobile Feb. 18th 
to 23rd, and to Pensacola Feb. 20th to 23rd. 

Final limit all tickets March 3, 1925. Tickets may be extended upon 
payment of fee $1.00 per ticket. 

Stop-overs will be permitted going and returning. 

Excellent through schedules with sleeping and dining car service. 

For further information and reservation call on any Southern Railway 
Agent, or address: 

. M. E. Woody, 
Ticket Agent, 
Concord, N. C. 
R. H. Graham, 
Charlotte, N. C. 
Division Passenger Agent, 






VOL. XIII CONCORD, N. C, FEBRUARY 28, 1925 No. 14 



**■*-•$* > j**$ t •$* *♦* *t 4 *j t *$* *+ 4 *j* *+**$* *$**+'* *♦* *** *j* *+*' , i**i**+* < $* *♦* *+ 4 *♦* *i* *$* *ji**3* *i* *j* > * 4 ^>^ ^n $t »$» *j* *j* *+■**+*' 

! CRITICS. I 



* 



* The jealous eye and the caustic tongue are abroad 
X in the land. There is in each community a self- 

* constituted board of censors who gratuitously evalu- 

* ate your labors. They think that everything that % 

* is not expended on self or does not yield a material £ 
»> return is wasted. There is no place in their make- * 
% up for the generous overflow of love. * 
J| When Carey went out as a missionary, people * 
f said, "What a waste!" To many of like mimd the % 

* time spent in the church is wasted, the energy put || 

* into Bible study is wasted, the money given to * 
% charity and missions is wasted. ♦ 
% But we know it is such waste that is making the <j 

* world a paradise. It is the hospitable spirit and *| 

* the gifts love prompts that are part and parcel of || 
<£> the abundant life. * 

* 1 

-»J* »J»»J+*J* **+ *+■**♦**$* <$H$H$H$nJ+*Jn$» *J 4 *J 4 *J 4 ** 4 *******t 4 •J**? 4 ** 4 *J 4 *+" 4 ♦J 4 ** 4 ♦J 4 *! 4 *+* *+ 4 *t 4 *J 4 ♦t 4 ******** 4 ** 4 *J 4 *fa 



-PUBLISHED BY- 



THE PRINTING CLASS OF THE STONEWALL JACKSON MANUAL 
TRAINING AND INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

J. P. Cook, Chairman, Concord Mrs. G. T. Roth, Elkin 
Miss Easdale Shaw, Vice-Chairman Herman Cone, Greensboro 

Rockingham Mrs. Cameron Morrison, Charlotte 

Jno. J. Blair, Sec, Raleigh Mrs. A. L. Coble, Stateville 

D. B. Coltrane, Treas., Concord Mrs. T. W. Bickett, Raleigh 

J. S. Effird, Albemarle Mrs. W. N. Reynolds, Winston-Salem 

Mr. Chas. A. Cannon, Concord Mrs. I. W. Faison, Charlotte 

Rev. Tom P. Jimison, Spencer Mr. Paul C. Whitlock, Charlotte 

Mrs. W. H. S. Burgwyn, Honorary Member 
Chas. E. Soger, Supt. 



CONTENTS. 



EDITORIAL COMMENT 3-5 

RAMBLING AROUND Old Hurrygraph 6 

1 ' AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF OPERATIC ART " 10 

BIBLE AND SCIENCE FRIENDS 14 

STATE S. S. CONVENTION 16 

THINGS TO REMEMBER AND THINGS TO FORGET 

Dr. Holland 18 

TH ELEE HALF-DOLLAR Asheville Citizen 19 

VENEZUELA, THE PICTURESQUE Julia W. Wolfe 20 

GREAT BRIDGES OF THE WORLD Ella B. Bucher 22 

GROVER, PIGEON AND CO., GROCERS William H. Leach 27 

INSTITUTION NOTES James Davis 29 



The Uplift 



A WEEKLY JOURNAL 

PUBLISHED BY 

The Authority of the Stonewall Jackson Manual Training and Industrial 
School. Tyne-setting by the Boys Printing Class. Subscription 

Two Dollars the Year in Advance 

JAMES P. COOK, Editor, J. C. FISHER, Director Printing Department 



Entered as second-class matter Dec. 4, 1920 at the Post Office at Concord, 
N. C. under act of March 3, 1879. Acceptance for mailing at special rate 
of i, 1923. 



"We rise by the things that are under our feet, 
But what we have mastered of good and gain. 
By the pride deposed and the passion slain, 
And the vanquished ills that we hourly meet." 



NEVER TOO OLD. 

The evening papers of the state carry a service, in which outstanding and 
conspicuous characters, men and women, are daily presented. It is quite edu- 
cative- and is enjoyed. 

The Concord Tribune of the 24th carried the picture of the "prettiest wom- 
an" of the whole season. If you don't believe it, send to John Sherrill for 
a copy of that issue and see the face of a real pretty woman, a heroine, who 
just draws one to her. It is Miss Emily Morgan, who rendered a service in 
Alaska which makes of her a wonderful heroine. Now, what Miss Morgan 
did was enough to make even a homely person look fine ; but coupled with 
real, genuine goodness and sacrifice, the natural beauty of face and make-up 
of the hair in this picture entitles, according to the taste of this lover of the 
good and true, Miss Morgan to first place in American Beauties. 

How old must one become before he ceases to admire a beautiful woman, 



4 THE UPLIFT 

with attractive graces and a heart overflowing with service to fellow 
being's ? 

V 

# # * » # .# # # # * -:s * 

FLU. 

This cowardly ; assassin of foreign origin — the dirty sneak which the medi- 
cal profession have designated as influenza — invaded the editorial sanctum 
of The Uplift last week and came near putting the little journal out of com- 
mission for that week. 

But the arrival of the cur seemed to have some compassion in timing 
his visit. Having come at the season when the public mind reverts to the 
life and career of the "Father of his country'' enabled The Uplift, though 
badly crippled, to present a rather attractive Washington edition by falling 
back on an accumulation of most readible selections touching upon the great 
American. 

But, pray, when does Flu find out when it has taken a sufficent toll of 
energy, fine spirit and health to turn loose and to take to his heels? 

"STANDARDS OF HONOR." 

Dr. Clarence Poe in his Progressive Farmer, taking two conspicuous Ameri- 
can characters, who are resting under a shadow of wrong-doing, reads a 
moral that should receive the serious thought of the country. He goes far 
off to pick his subject — and may we hope and believe that he could not find 
suitable characters nearer home on which to base his observations — by which 
he argues for the emphasizing of the proper ideals and the erection in our 
hearts and minds proper standards of honor. 

Dr. Poe fears that we are obsessed with a worship of the "almighty dollar" 
and he urges a home training, which, while he did not just say so, involves 
the use and teachings of the Ten Commandments, which some of the sociolo- 
gists have no patience with. Hear Dr. Poe : 

In the last Democratic National Convention, Governor Jonathan Davis 
of Kansas was frequently voted on as a candidate for President of the 
United States. Now he is seriously charged with having accepted bribes 
from persons seeking pardons for convicts, and considerable evidence has 
been brought out tending to prove his guilt. 

The shame of Governor Davis was reported just about the time the 
United States Senate was publicly censuring ex-Secretary Fall for ac- 
cepting bribes from Doheny; and the two incidents coming together raise 
a serious question as to what are the prevailing ideals of Americans today. 



THE UPLIFT 

Here are two men who were given great honors by their fellow-men, and 
who seemingly should have desired nothing else so much as to hand down 
to their children and children's children an untarnished reputation. One 
wonders whether in the homes of America today enough is being done to 
enthrone the highest standards of honor, or whether the worship of the 
"almighty dollar" is really undermining public morals. The need for 
right training in the home is more imperative in America because here 
the state does not look after the moral or spiritual training of the young, 
as is the case in nations where there is an established church. In America, 
if children, do not get moral training in the home, they do not get it at 
all. 



TODAY. 

By Nixon Waterman. 

We shall do so much in years to come, 

But what have we done today? 
We shall give our gold in a princely sum, 

But what did we give today? 
We shall lift the heart and dry the tear, 

We shall plant a hope in the place of fear, 
We shall speak with words of love and cheer, 

But what have we done today? 
We shall he so kind in the after while, 

But what have we been today? 
We shall bring to each lonely life a smile, 

But whom have we fed today? 
We shall give to truth a grander birth, 

And to steadfast faith a deeper worth, 
We shall feed the hungering souls of earth, 

But whom have we fed today? 



THE UPLIFT 



RAMBLING AROUND. 

By Old Hurrygraph. 



An automobile came rushing along 
the street. Just ahead was a puddle 
of muddy water, near the curbing. 
Right through that puddle went the 
auto, splitting the water, and splash- 
ing about half of it on a pedestrain. 
I looked to see the atmosphere in that 
neighborhood turn to a bluuish yel- 
low, firey red. Xot so. The man 
whose clothes had been splashed, re- 
marked: "Bless you my man; may 
you miss the next fellow. " I do not 
know what you would call that, but 
I would term it the quintessence of 
Christianity. The spirit of doing 
good to those "who dispitefully use 
you, ' ' in its fullest sense. 



Speaking of this Christian spirit, I 
heard a man say recently, that he 
' ' would join the church, but there 
were too many hypocrites in the 
churches. ' " Well, I know it. The 
church is not for perfect people. The 
church is for people who want to be 
better. There are hypocrites on the 
street, but you don't leave the street. 
There are hypocrites in your business, 
but you don't get out of the busi- 
ness. There are hypocrites in your 
lodges, but that is no argument 
against your lodges. Neither is it any 
argument against the churches, for 
just as long as Uncle Sam makes a 
silver dollar worth a hundred cents 
somebody will try to imitate it ; and 
just so long as there is an opportu- 
nity for a man to be healthy, and 
strong, and manly, made so by the 
power of Jesus Christ, just so long 
there will be imitators who are will- 
ing to pay the full price. 



Who knows but what the time 
may come, and possibly sooner than 
most of us expect, when the basement 
will be rendezvous of society, when 
guests will be invited into the cellar 
to hear the new radio play bridge; 
the heating plant will be costumed in 
dress shirt, with stiff collar and white 
spats, and upon its immaculate bosom 
will be the coat of aims of its own- 
er: and the artistic boiler will be 
painted to match the library furni- 
ture: or having nursery rhyme to 
please the kiddies; and finally boil- 
ers in cross-word patterns, so that 
the entire family, in coal-shoveling 
intermissions, may flock about it with 
dictionaries and boxes of chalk to 
work out the hefty problems that 
are now rendering the minds of our 
times bow-legged. 



She was a dainty, delicate, dreamy- 
eyed little thing, chewing gum at 
intervals as if her life depended upon 
getting in so many workings of the 
jaws to the minute, intently reading 
in the public library, and when she 
closed the book, remarked, looking 
around at the other readers : ' ' Mercy ! 
What a terrible creature that Mino- 
taur was ! It says that he used to 
devour a young maiden at a meal, 
and then fall into a deep sleep." 
A newspaper reporter heard her and 
remarked, loud enough for her bene- 
fit, ' ' Overcome by the lass-he-chewed, 
possibly." 



As a nation we may be slow start- 
ers, but when we do go in for any- 
thing, whether it be war, radio or 



THE UPLIFT 



some new ism, we go the limit. I 
see it stated that in Los Angeles 
alone during the past month a single 
radio manufacturing concern sold a 
million and a half dollars of its sets. 
The next step will be sending pictures 
by radio so that farmers and persons 
located far distant from the great 
cities can enjoy not alone the music 
and words of the best operas, etc., 
but also actually see them played in 
their own homes. Radio sets as small 
as a cigarette are being made, to be 
carried in the vest pocket. With an 
equipment for also seeing what is 
going on at a distance, we will as a 
people have about as much privacy 
as gold fish. Setting up an alibi 
when coming home at two o'clock in 
the morning will in days to come be 
a difficult proposition, unless hubby 
can carry a special interference set 
tuned in privately to static the one 
at home. The man who perfects a 
small radio set that will enable wifey 
to tune it in and see what hubby is 
doing all the time will be about as 
welcome as a wet dog in a boat. 



ter will be the work I do tomorrow." 
This observation should aid each one 
of us in our estimate of the relative 
values ow today and tomorrow. 



• Some one has said that "today is 
the tomorrow you worried over yester- 
day. ' ' There is no such thing as to- 
morrow today. It is always coming. 
Some day it will never come to each 
one of us. Todays are realities. Tomor- 
rows are imaginations. Today is ati 
asset; tomorrow a liability. Assets 
must over-balance liabilities if we 
would b e solvent. Solvency is the 
foundation of all success, in life and 
in business. Making good today re- 
duces the liability of tomorrow and 
may wipe it out. Thomas Edison 
once said: "The more and better 
work I do today; still more and bet- 



1 have seen many intelligent dogs, 
in life and in the movies. They have 
acted with the intelligence of the 
most rational beings. I have not yet 
esen Balto pictured and his deeds re- 
corded on the silver screen. Balto 
is a dog. Nome, Alaska, is a city in 
the grip of a diphtheria epidemic. The 
physicians there were calling for an- 
titoxin. By radio the call reached 
Seattle. The toxin was dispatched 
by Leonard Sappla who dared the 
waters of Norton Sound, barely escap- 
ing death. The toxin was given by 
him to Gunnar Kasson, who started 
on the 650-mile trip to Nome, with 
his train of dogs. Sappala had no 
story to tell the newspapers; neither 
had Kasson. All Kasson did was to 
point to Balto. Balto is only a dog, 
but he did it. He led the dog trait'. 
When Kasson was blinded by the icy 
blasts and hurricane-driven snows, 
Balto scented the trail and kept the 
dogs i n it. When the dogs, from 
fatigue, threatened to lie down, Bal- 
to 's barking stirred them to further 
endeavor, until the serum was at 
last delivered to the waiting physi- 
cians in Nome. Sappala a hero? Yes. 
Kasson a hero? Yes. Both are as 
modest as Balto, only a dog, whose 
story, too, may never be told. 



Life is getting mighty cheap now 
in the days of speeding automobiles. 
In contrast with the reckless drivers 
c f cars is the case of two citizens I 
heard of who came to town the 
other night; stayed pretty late, and 



8 



THE UPLIFT 



got into their car and started home. 
At least they started to start, but 
their self-starter was peevish at being 
kept up so late, and refused to work. 
They eoudn't start the car any other 
way, so the gentlemen got out and be 
gan pushing the machine along the 
road, hoping the engine would sudden- 
ly take a notion to get busy. Ent 
it didn't, and they were just think- 
ing sadly of the two long miles they'd 
have to walk home, when up came 
a car driven 1 by a prominent citizen 
of Durham and stopped right behind 
them. When the driver discovered 
their trouble he had the gentlemen 
get back into their automobile and 
he pushed that balky car along the 
road and landed them safely right in 
their ouw garage, and then turned 
around and drove back over the same 
road to his home in the city. That \s 
the Durham spirit, and in all our 
development work here, let's keep 
right on developing that, whatever 
else we may fall down on. 



A man said to me the other day, 
anent the discussion in the state as- 
sembly on the bill to prevent teach- 
ing evolution in the public schools 
of North Carolina: "I don't know 
whether man sprang from the monkey 
or not; but it looks to me like a 
monkey would spring from that legis- 
lature. The bill was introduced by 
a man named Poole. It ought to be 
called th e Fool bill." There are so 
many other things the legislature is 
trying to do, and some things they 
are not doing that it reminds me of 
a little verse I came across some- 
where about statesmen. It runs thus : 
"The statesman throws his shoulders 
back and straightens out his tie, 



And says: 'My friend, unless it rains 
the weather will be dry.' 

And when this thought into our brains 
has percolated through 

We common people nod our heads 
and loudly cry: 'Kow true.' " 



Some fool congressman, with more 
time to work his imagination than he 
has to give to the practical serving 
of the people's interest, has- intro- 
duced a bill in Congress to the effect 
that the government assume control 
of organized baseball. That's by a 
joker who should be back at the 
cross roads telling them from the 
top of a box or barrel instead of being 
in a national law-making. body. Speak- 
ing of the matter a baseball fan told 
line that should such a bill become a 
law, "it will be easy for a manager, 
when he needs a good left-handed 
pitcher, to have his congressman, in 
his district, ask for an appropriation 
for a southpaw twirler instead of a 
new ppstoffice building, but just 
think of the delay possible when a 
thrilling contest gets mixed up with 
governmental red tape. When a 
game is about is to be won, by one. 
run, what is simpler than to have the 
manager of the prospective losing 
team petition the court for an in- 
junction compelling the runner to 
halt at the second base while congress 
invetigates. By the time the supreme 
court had decided th e issue, and con- 
gress had completed its ponderous 
probe, the runner would have whis- 
kers touching the ground, and his 
grandchildren woud b e skating up 
and down the sidewalks on roller 
skates. If those busvbodics in con- 
gress must have something to do, let 
them try regulating the uyniverse, 



THE UPLIFT 

but let baseball alone." And half versation said, "That's the stuff.' 
a dozen more fans hearing the eon- 



POEMS OF COUNTRY LIFE: "LUCTNDA MATLOCK" 

One of the most talked of poets of recent years is Edgar Lee Masters, 
author of "The Spoon River Anthology." In this book the dead in 
the old Spoon River hurying-ground are supposed to tell their life stories 
frankly, bluntly, candidly — each in a few short lines. In the following 
characteristic "Spoon River" poem, Lucinda Matlock, a typical pioneer 
woman, gives the world her vibrant message of strength and courage: — 

I went to dances at Chandlersville, 

And played snap-out at Winchester. 

One time we changed partners, 

Driving home in the moonlight of middle June, 

And then I found Davis. 

We were married and lived together for seventy years, 

Enjoying, working, raising the twelve children, 

Eight of whom we lost 

Ere I had reached the age of sixty. 

I spun, I wove, I kept the house, I nursed the sick, 

I made the garden, and for holiday 

Rambled over the fields where sang the larks, 

And by Spoon River gathered many a shell, 

And many a flower and medicinal weed — 

Shouting to the wooded hills, singing to lite green valleys. 

At ninety-six I had lived enough, that is all, 

And passed to a sweet repose. 

What is this I hear of sorrow and weariness, 

Anger, discontent, and drooping hopes? 

Degenerate sons and daughters, 

Life is too strong for you — 

It takes life to love Life. 

— Edgar Lee Masters. 



10 



THE UPLIFT 



"AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF OPERATIC 

ART." 

This is a story of the institution being established up on the Hudson, which 
was compiled and read by a member of the Music Department of the Concord 
Woman's Club, on the 24th, held at the home of Mrs. C. F. Ritchie. 

The Uplift has no other purpose in reproducing this story of an interesting 
and novel effort to make a worthwhile contribution to musical accomplishments 
in America, other than give emphasis to the fact that there is much music 
talent in America going to ivaste because of a lack of proper direction and 
encouragement. Men bent on business achievements are not mindful of the 

potver of music and the importance of its encouragement Several years ago 

when the women of Concord, moving to have music introduced into the public 
schools, secured the presence of the music leader of the Winston-Salem schools, 
a revelation took place; a prominent gentleman, of business and character, 
not heretofore caring for or even tolerating music, was completely overcome and 
is now one of the music enthusiasts of the community. Like all fine things 
of life, one needs to get acquainted with the power and joy of music. 

This institute of Operatic Art