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Full text of "The up-to-date cook book of tested recipes"

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LIBRARY OF CONGRESS. 

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UNITED STATES OF AMERICA. 






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THE 



Up-to-Date Cook Book 

OF TESTED RECIPES. 



Compiled and Published by 



Mrs. Spencer Watkins 



AND 



Mrs. Francis F. Field. 



For the Benefit of 



St. John's Church, 

Montgomery Co., Md. Ci« 









WASHINGTON, D.[C. : 

NATIONAL^ PUBLISH IN^G C O . 

1897. 






Copyright 1897. 



IiNDEX. 



Page 
i. SOUPS 5 

2. FISH, CRABS. ETC ["3 

3. OYSTERS [9 

4. MEATS 25 

5. MEAT AXD FISH SAUCES 29 

6. POULTRY AND GAME 3$ 

7. ENTREES 39 

8. EGGS 48 

9. VEGETABLES 51 

0. BREADS 61 

r. sandwiches 69 

2. CUBAN RECIPES 73 

3. SALADS 75 

4. PIES AND PUDDINGS 81 

5. PUDDING SAUCES 93 

6. DESSERTS 98 

7. CAKES 113 

8. PRESERVES. PICKLES AND CATSUPS 129 

9. BEVERAGES 135 

20. CANDIES 141 

2i. MISCELLANEOUS 147 

22. THINGS WORTH KNOWING 150 



SOUPS. 



POTATO SOUP. 

Twelve potatoes pared and grated, one onion sliced, one table- 
spoonful of parsley, one cup unskimmed milk or cream, two table- 
spoonfuls of butter, one tablespoonful of corn starch wet with 
cold milk, one teaspoonful of sugar, two quarts boiling water, 
pinch of soda in milk. Parboil the potatoes ten minutes, throw 
oft" the water, and put them into two quarts of boiling water, cook 
in this one hour, with the onions, replenish from the kettle as it 
boils away, then set through a fine colander. Season with pep- 
per, salt and parsley, reheat and when it bubbles up stir in the 
butter and corn starch, boil up, add milk and serve. 

MRS. N. B. FUGITT. 

TOMATO SOUP. 

To one pound of canned tomatoes or four large ones cut fine 
add one quart of boiling water and let boil till done. Then add 
nearly a teaspoonful of soda, when it foams add one quart of 
sweet milk, pepper, salt and butter, or one cup of sweet cream 
instead of butter, a few cracker crumbs rolled fine, and serve. 

MISS SKILES. 

CREAM OF CELERY. 

One head of celery, one pint water, one pint milk, one table- 
spoonful butter, one tablespoonful of flour, one-half teaspoonful 
salt, one-half saltspoonful white pepper. Wash and scrape celery, 
cut into half-inch slices, put into the pint of boiling water and 
cook until very soft, when done mash it in the water in which it 
is boiled and add salt and pepper. Cook an onion in the milk and 
with it make a white sauce with the butter and flour, add this to 
the celery and strain through soup strainer, mashing with the 
back of a spoon until all but a few tough fibres of the celery are 
squeezed through. Return soup in double boiler to the fire, heat 
till steaming, when it is ready to serve. MISS SKILES. 



6 SOUPS. 

\ EGETABLE SOUP. 

Before breakfast wash a beef shank in several waters, break the 
bone and put in a large pot of cold water, keep it steadily boiling 
until one hour before dinner, when the following vegetables pre- 
viously prepared must be added to the soup, after it has been 
carefully skimmed of all grease and strained: One pint of peeled 
and chopped tomatoes, one pint of lima or butter beans, one pint 
of grated corn, one pint of chopped cabbage, one pint of sliced 
white potatoes, one sliced turnip, one carrot, little minced onion, 
parsley, one tablespoonful of pepper sauce, one heaping table- 
spoonful of flour rubbed into one teacupful of milk, one teacupful 
of brown sugar, one teaspoonful of black pepper. Boil an hour, 
thicken with mixed milk and flour and serve. 

MRS. \V ATKINS. 

CLAM CHOWDER. 

One dozen Little Neck clams, three large potatoes, one-half 
pound butter, two onions, two tablespoonfuls flour, pepper, salt 
and one teaspoonful minced parsley, mince the clams fine and 
boil tender. Put butter and flour in a saucepan, wuen drawn add 
clams and about two quarts of the juice, add potatoes and onion, 
cut fine and cook till done, add parslev, season to taste and serve. 

ST. GERMAINE. 

CREAM OF CORN. 

To each quart of corn cut from the cob for canned corn) add 
three quarts of water, boil till tender and then add two ounces of 
butter that has been well mixed with a tablespoonful of flour, 
boil fifteen minutes more, season to taste and just before serving 
add heaping cupful of whipped cream. 

MRS. SPENCER WATKINS. 

BOUILLON. 

Heat clear soup stock, add pepper, salt, celery salt, cloves, a 
little catsup or Worcestershire sauce, port or sherry to suit the 
taste. Serve in cups for breakfast or luncheon. When used for 
dinner call consomme and serve in soup plates. Egg dice, bread 
dice and force meat balls are put in the tureen and the hot soup 
is poured over them. Of course, onlv one kind is used at a time. 

MISS HOGE. 

DELICIOUS TURTLE SOUP. 

Scald and scrape outer skin off the shell of the turtle, open care- 
fully so as not to break the gall, break both shells to pieces and 



SOUPS 7 

put in the pot, lay the fins, eggs and some of the more delicate 

parts by and put the rest in the pot with a couple of quarts of 
water, add two onions, parsley, thyme, salt and pepper, cloves 
and allspice to suit taste. An hour before dinner take the parts 
laid by, rub them in browned flour, fry them in butter and put 
with the eggs into the soup. About one-half hour before dinner 
thicken the soup with browned Hour and butter rubbed together. 
Serve very hot. MRS. SPENCER WATKINS. 

CREAM OF CHICK EX. 

( hie three-pound chicken, one-quarter pound butter, one 
onion, three tablespoon fills flour, one quart milk, salt, pepper and 
a little nutmeg, yolks of three eggs. Boil fowl till tender, put but- 
ter in pan and work well with flour, then add broth of chicken, 
which will make a very fine cream, when hot add milk and color 
with the volks of eggs. Season to taste and strain through fine 
sieve. ' "THE WINDSOR." 

( )KRA SOUP. 

Cut okra in very thin slices and throw into one and one-half 
quarts of boiling water, when tender add one quart of milk, a 
large tablespoonful of butter, two tablespoonfuls of flour and 
white pepper to taste. This soup must be made in porcelain 
kettle. MRS. SPENCER WATKINS. 

OX TAIL SOUP. 

Take two ox tails, an onion, two carrots, two stalks of celery, 
a little parsley and a small cut of pork. Cut the ox tails at the 
joints, slice the vegetables and mince the pork. Put the pork, 
onion and ox tails into a stewpan and fry them a short time. Now 
put the ox tails and fried onions into soup kettle, with four quarts 
of cold water. Let simmer for about four hours, then add the 
other vegetables, with four cloves, pepper and salt; as soon as the 
vegetables are well cooked the soup is clone. Strain it. 

KENTON COOK BOOK. 

GREEN PEA SOUP. 

Boil one-half peck of peas in one and one-half gallons water 
till perfectly done, take out, mash and strain through colander, 
then pour a little water well boiled over them to separate pulp 
from hull. Return to the water they were boiled in, chop up one 
large or two small onions, fry them in smallest quantity of lard 
not to burn them, add this with chopped thyme, parsley, pepper 
and salt: just before taking from the fire stir in one tablespoonful 
of butter. If the soup is too thin cream a little butter and flour 
to thicken. MRS. WATKINS. 



8 SOUPS. 

CREAM OF TOMATO. 

One dozen ripe tomatoes, one carrot, two onions, six cloves, 
one-half lemon, salt and red pepper to taste, one tablespoonful 
vinegar, one-quarter pound butter, three tablespoonfuls flour; 
cut tomatoes, carrot, onion and lemon in small pieces, put in 
saucepan with one gallon of water, let it boil down to three quarts, 
draw butter and flour in saucepan, then pour over the hot toma- 
toes the broth, which will make a cream. Add vinegar, a table- 
spoonful of sugar and season. Serve with crotons. 

"THE WINDSOR." 

TO MAKE CROTONS. 

Butter a slice of evenly cut bread, divide into cubes one-third 
of an inch thick, place these cubes on a tin plate and place on the 
grate of a moderate oven fifteen minutes; when done they should 
be a light brown, crisp and brittle; sprinkle 'in soup just before 
serving. MISS SKILES. 

RICH BEEF SOUP. 

Crack the bones of a good beef shank and put in a pot that 
holds two gallons, fill the pot with cold water and set on the fire; 
as soon as it begins to boil set it on the back of the stove where 
it will boil slowly, skim well and put in the vegetables, one-half 
pint shelled butter beans, one pint ripe tomatoes peeled, one 
quart tender okra sliced thin, and one-half hour before the soup is 
done one pint corn cut from the cob. Soup should boil slowly 
for six or seven hours. Add salt and pepper to taste where corn 
is added. Before serving carefullv skim off all grease. 

MRS. SPENCER WATKINS. 

OYSTER SOUP WITH MILK. 

Boil one quart of rich milk, season with pepper, salt and a large 
tablespoonful of butter, then add one quart of oysters and just 
le1 it come to the boiling point, and serve. M ISS HOCK 

I >YSTER SOUP. 

One quart oysters, one pint milk, one blade mace, small piece < >f 
celery, one tablespoonful butter, tablespoonful of flour, half tea- 
spoonful salt, and few grains of cayenne. Drain oysters in a col- 
ander and wash them by passing through a cup of cold water 
which drains into the liquor. Lift oysters one at a time and ex- 
amine for pieces of shell. Cook till oysters become plump, but 
do not allow to boil, heat liquor and water that has been drained 



SoUPS. 9 

into it till bubbles rise to the surface and then skim off scum that 
rises. Heat milk, mace and celery in same way, remove mace and 
celery from the milk and add butter and flour that have been 
creamed together with a little milk. Cook till it thickens, add 
oysters and serve at once. MRS. WATKINS. 

GUMBO. 

Fry a large onion in two ounces of lard until it is quite brown, 
but not at all burnt. Remove all the onion from the lard; in the 
same lard fry a chicken which has been cut up and floured, only 
do not cook it quite done; put the fried chicken in a sou]) pot, 
then to the same lard fry one (two quarts better) of okra sliced in 
small pieces, put the okra in the soup pot with the chicken and 
pour over this three pints of water, let it simmer one hour, not 
boil fast, then add one quart of tomatoes chopped fine, season 
with salt and one green pepper chopped fine, parsley, celery tops, 
grated corn, tender lima beans, let this cook ever so slowly, with 
meat, until vegetables and meat -are undistinguishable and the 
whole becomes quite thick; a few minutes before serving add a 
tablespoonful of butter, remove all bones possible, serve with rice. 

For a six o'clock dinner begin your "gumbo" at one p. m. If 
too thick for your taste add a teacupful of hot water from time to 
time. Gumbo cannot be made in one hour, it must cook slowly a 
long time. Gumbo can be made of beef cut in small slices, floured 
and fried in the same way as chicken, and add any bits of cold 
ham, chicken or veal you may have. MISS WAGXER. 



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FISH, CRABS, ETC. 



TURBOT. 

Steam ami pick four pounds of fish. Take one quart of milk. 
one bunch parsley chopped fine, pepper and salt; when milk is 
nearly boiling thicken with flour until it is the consistency of thick 
cream. After taking" from fire add two well beaten eggs and one- 
quarter of a pound of butter. Butter a baking dish, put in a layer 
of hsh, and one of dressing, until the dish is full; sprinkle crackep 
crumbs on top and bake twenty minutes before serving. This can 
be served in individual dishes. MISS SKILES. 

TURBOT DRESSING. 

For four pounds of fish before it is picked use one quart of milk 
and a little parsley, one-quarter pound of butter, pepper, salt and 
two eggs; boil milk with salt, pepper and chopped parsley thick- 
ened with dour, until it is as thick as soft butter. Take from 
stove and put in while hot two well beaten eggs and the butter. 

AIRS. K. W. SKILES. 

FRESH CODFISH AU GRAT1X. 

Boil the cod until tender, cut in pieces and put in baking dish ; 
use same sauce as for cauliflower, cover with bread crumbs and 
send to oven. MRS. G. T. DUNLOP. 

BAKED HALIBUT. 

Take a piece of halibut weigning five or six pounds, and lay in 
salt and water for two hours. Wipe dry and score the outer skin. 
Set in baking pan in tolerably hot oven and bake an hour, basting 
often with butter and water heated together in tin cup or sauce- 
pan. When a fork will penetrate it easily it is done. It should be 
a fine brown. Take the gravy in the dripping pan, add a little 
boiling water. Should there not be enough stir a tablespoonful 
of catsup, the juice of a lemon and thicken with browned flour, 
previouslv wet with cold water. Boil up once and put into sauce 
boat. KENTON COOK BOOK. 

ESCALLOPED SHRIMPS. 

One and one-half pints of shelled shrimps, one pint of boiling 
water, one-half pint of grated bread crumbs, one teaspoonful beef 



14 FISH, CRABS, ETC. 

extract, two tablespoonfuls of flour, three tablespoonfuls of butter, 
one generous teaspoonful of salt, one-eighth teaspoonful of cay- 
enne, one teaspoonful of mustard, one teaspoonful of lemon juice. 
Dissolve the beef extract in the boiling water. Put butter in a 
saucepan and beat to a cream. Add flour and mustard and beat 
until light. Gradually pour the hot liquid on this. Place the 
saucepah on the fire and stir contents until they begin to boil. 
Now add the lemon juice and half the salt and peoper and cook 
six minutes. Season shrimps and stir them into the sauce. Turn 
the mixture in a shallow escallop dish that will hold about a quart, 
cover with grated bread crumbs and dot with half tablespoonful 
of butter broken into little bits. Bake for twentv minutes in a 
rather hot oven. D. 

PICKED CODFISH. 

Soak as much codfish as you desire to cook over night. In the 
morning pick it to pieces and place in a saucepan with cream and 
some potatoes cut into small pieces. Add butter and salt and let 
it cook until thoroughly tender. Serve over toast on a flat dish. 

SPICED MACKEREL. 

Soak half dozen mackerel over night, boil until 'tender, remove 
bones and lay in stone jar. Boil one quart of vinegar with one 
grated nutmeg, three blades of mace and three cloves ; pour over 
fish. Will be readv for use in about two days. 

KENTON COOK BOOK. 

SARDINES ON TOAST. 

Drain the oil from a box of sardines and drain the fishes on 
brown paper. Cut bread into thin slices a little longer and wider 
than the fishes. Toast and arrange the fishes one on each slice. 
Stand in the oven until hot. Scatter lightly with grated Parmesan 
cheese. Garnish dish with lemon and parsley. 

FISH CREAM. 

For twenty-five guests take two pounds of halibut, boil care- 
fully and pick apart, then, with wooden spoon, mash until per- 
fectly fine. Add two unbeaten whites of eggs, mix thoroughly 
and then stir in one pint whipped cream. Add two teaspoonfnls 
salt, dash of pepper, pack into cutlet or other small moulds, 
stand in steamer and steam for twenty minutes, turn out on heated 
dish and pour over them sauce Hollandaise. MRS. RORER. 



FISH. CRABS, ETC. 15 

DEVILED CRABS. 

Take meat, eggs and coral of twelve large crabs, put in sauce- 
pan with half pound butter, warm well. The juice of one lemon, 

red pepper and salt to taste, small pinch of mustard and one 
tablespoonful Hour; stir well and just before taking from the fire 
add yolks of four eggs; mix well and fill shells; sprinkle with 
cracker meal and a little melted butter and brown. ( >ne cup of 
white wine will add to the above. "THE WINDS< >R." 

SOFT CRABS. 

Turn up ends of shells and take out dead man's fingers, take ofT 
flap and cut out sand bag. Lay in cold water till ready to fry. 
Dust with flour, put little salt and fry in hot lard. 

MRS.'SPENCER WATKINS. 

CRAB A LA CREOLE. 

Put into a saucepan a large piece of butter and four young 
onions cut into rings, two green chilies chopped fine, one small 
sliced tomato, salt, black pepper, and a little cayennne; stew 
gently five or six minutes, then dredge in a very little flour and 
add a very little good cream. Pick the meat from two crabs, put 
into the sauce, stew two minutes and serve on toast. 

DEVILED CRABS. 

To twenty-five cents' worth of crab meat add three eggs, a little 
bread crumbs, red pepper, salt, butter, one onion grated fine. 
Mix. Put some butter and lard in frying pan; when hot drop 
these in like potato cakes. MORGAN. 

LOBSTER A LA NEWBURG. 

Split two good sized, freshly boiled lobsters, pick all the meat 
from shells, cut into pieces about an inch square. Place in sauce- 
pan over hot fire with one ounce fresh butter, pinch salt, half 
saltspoonful red pepper, adding two medium sized truffles cut 
into dice. Cook five minutes then add one wine glass of Madeira 
wine, reduce one-half, which will take three minutes. Have three 
egg yolks in a bowl with half pint sweet cream beaten well to- 
gether, add to lobster. Gently shuffle for two minutes longer, or 
until it thickens. Pour into a hot tureen and serve. 

DELMONICO. 



16 * FISH. CRABS, ETC. 

LOBSTER CUTLET. 

( >ne pound lobster meat, half pound best butter, half cup flour, 
pinch mustard, juice of one lemon, salt, pepper and little nutmeg. 
Put butter and flour in saucepan and make a drawn sauce. Then 
add lobster meat and work well. Add mustard, minced parsley, 
salt, pepper, lemon juice and nutmeg. Let cool, then form in 
cutlets, bread in cracker meal and egg, fry a nice brown. Serve 
with cream, tomato or Bernaise sauce. "THE WINDSOR." 

COD A LA.CREME. 

Put into boiling water for ten minutes two pounds of fresh cod- 
fish, lift it carefully from the water and pick into large flakes with 
a silver fork. Put one tablespoonful of butter and one of flour 
into a saucepan, mix, add one pint of milk, stir constantly until 
boiling, then add codfish, teaspoonful of salt and one-fourth tea- 
spoonful of pepper, stand over back part of fire until smoking 
hot. Arrange on the serving dish a neat border of mashed po- 
tatoes, fresh over with white of egg, run in the oven just a mo- 
ment to brown, and then add to the codfish mixture the yolks of 
two eggs; stand over the fire until it just comes to boiling point; 
pour it into the center of border; sprinkle over some thinly chop- 
ped parslev; garnish the dish with gherkins and radishes, and 
serve. MRS. WATKINS. 

SOFT SHELL CRABS. 

Take four pats butter, let it become very hot, then put in four 
medium sized soft shell crabs, first prepared by removing lungs 
and washing thoroughly. Add two teaspoonfuls lemon juice. 
Cook about ten minutes, being careful not to burn. Season with 
little salt and white pepper.' Serve on toast or plain. H. H. 



OYSTERS. 



BROILED ( )YSTERS. 

Lay large oysters on close gridiron. Cook on one side, then 
on the other. Season with pepper, salt and melted butter. Serve 
on squares of toast and garnish with thin sliees of lemon. 

KENTON COOK BOOK. 

PHILADELPHIA FRIED OYSTERS. 

Purchase large oysters, drain in a colander and dry one at a 
time on soft napkin or old linen towel, lifting with the fingers, 
not with a fork. Season them on both sides with salt and pepper. 
Beat up an egg in a saucer, and add tablespoonful of boiling 
water and little salt. Have ready on the baking board plenty of 
powdered bread or cracker crumbs, well seasoned with salt and 
pepper. Dip each oyster in the beaten egg and then in the 
crumbs, being careful that every part is covered with crumbs. 
Meantime heat the fat in which the oysters are to be fried, and 
test by dropping in a crumb of bread, which will brown quickly 
if the fat is hot enough. Lay in six oysters, watch carefully, and 
when they are of a golden brown tint remove with a skimmer, 
drain on soft paper, and serve at once. Cook more as soon as the 
first are served. Oysters should never be fried until it is quite 
time to send them to table. If there are many to fry they may 
all be dipped and made ready as much as half an hour before they 
will be needed. They must then be laid on a clean cloth in a 
cool place until it is time to fry them. D. 

PICKLED OYSTERS. 

For one gallon. Wash oysters and strain liquor through flan- 
nel, then cook. Lay oysters on dish to cool. Take two quarts 
of liquor and one quart vinegar (if too acid add more liquor to 
suit taste). Put on stove with several blades mace, handful cloves 
and few allspice; boil couple of minutes. Take off, add little cay- 
enne and pour over oysters. Let cool before putting in sealed 
jars. MRS. ALPHEUS MIDDLETOX. 

STEAMED OYSTERS. 

Lay some oysters, in the shell,, on a steamer. Set over pot of 



20 OYSTERS. 

boiling water until the shells open. Serve at once with salt, pep- 
per and butter. Lemon can also be used. 

MRS. ROBINSON. 

OYSTER CHARTREUSE. 

One quart oysters, one pint cream, one small slice of onion, 
half cupful milk, whites of four eggs, two tablespoonfuls butter, 
salt, pepper, two tablespoonfuls hour, one cupful of fine, dry 
bread crumbs, six potatoes, one tablespoonful minced parsley. 
Pare and boil potatoes, mash fine and light, add milk, salt, pep- 
per, one tablespoonful of butter, whites of eggs beaten to stiff 
froth and the parsley. Have a two-quart charlotte russe mould 
well buttered and sprinkle the bottom and sides with bread 
crumbs (there must be butter enough to hold the crumbs). Line 
mould with the potato and let stand a few minutes. Put cream 
and onion on to boil, mix flour with little cold cream or milk 
(about one-quarter of a cupful) and stir into the boiling cream. 
Season well with salt and pepper and cook eight minutes. Let 
the oysters come to a boil in their own liquor, skim them and 
drain off all juice. Take the onion from the sauce and add oys- 
ters. Taste to see if seasoned enough, and turn into mould very 
gently, cover with the remainder of potato, being careful not to 
put on too much at once. When covered bake a naif hour in hot 
oven. Take from oven ten minutes before dishing time and let 
it stand on the table. It should be baked half an hour. Place a 
larger platter over the mould and turn both dish and mould at 
the same time. Remove mould very gently. Garnish dish with 
parsley and serve. Every part of the mould must have a thick 
coating of mashed potato, and when the covering of potato is put 
on no opening must be left for sauce to escape. 

KENTON COOK BOOK. 

GRILLED OYSTERS. 

One dozen large oysters, dry them on a towel, take two large 
tablespoonfuls of butter, brown slightly in a stewing pan, and 
when the oysters are thoroughly dry put them in the butter, into 
which add a small quantity of flour. Let them simmer about 
twenty minutes, season with black and red pepper, salt and a 
little Worcestershire sauce. "THE GRAFTON." 

OYSTER LOAF. 

This is particularly nice when something out of the ordinary 
is desired for a luncheon. Cut a long loaf of bread into slices 
about two inches thick. Trim off the crust, make the slices 
sciuare and then dig out the crumb at the center of each, leaving 
sides and bottom to form a sort of box. Brush the hollowed 
squares of bread with melted butter and place them in a quick 



OYSTERS. 21 

oven. \\ lu'ii they have browned nicely fill them with creamed 
oysters and serve. 1 ). 

CREAMED ( >YSTERS. 

Dry one pint of oysters on a napkin, spread on a plate and sea- 
son with salt, pepper and a suspicion of cayenne. Make a sauce 
with one pint of cream, one tablespoonful butter and two of flour. 
When sauce is cooked roll in the oysters, put in individual scallop 
dishes and hake in hot oven ten minutes. Mix oysters and sauce 
while hot and put in oven immediately. "THE WINDS< )R." 

OYSTER PIE. 

( »ne quart of oysters, one pint of milk, one-half pint water, one- 
half cupful of butter. Pmt milk, water and butter on stove and let 
get scalding hot, add one heaping tablespoonful of flour rubbed 
smooth in a little milk, and cook until it thickens. Add three 
eggs well beaten, then two tablespoonfuls of rolled cracker and 
the oysters and let scald, stirring all the time. - Season with pep- 
per and salt. Turn this into baked crust. For crust, make after 
rule for puff paste, line the baking dish and bake. Cut upper 
crust to fit dish and bake on heavy paper if you haven't pan the 
right size. Prick bottom crust with fork to prevent blistering. 

KENTON COOK BOOK. 

PANNED OYSTERS. 

Drain oysters in colander. Have a frying pan very hot. pour in 
the oysters, a lump of butter size of an egg (for a pint of oysters), 
one tablespoonful cracker crumbs, teaspoonful lemon juice, salt 
and cayenne pepper. Let all cook together for a minute or so, 
just until the oysters commence to curl. MRS. INNES. 

MINCED OYSTERS. 

Chop one quart of oysters, mince one onion fine, add about as 
many urown bread crumbs as oysters, season with pepper and 
salt, a little lemon juice with yolks of four raw eggs, one table- 
spoonful of butter. Cook a little, fill shells and bake a light 
brown. MRS. J. X. MITCHELL. 

OYSTER LOAF. 

Cut an oblong slice from the upper side of a Vienna loaf of 
bread, then scoop out the crumbs from the inside of the loaf. 
Spread the casing with butter, fill with raw oysters, about a quart; 
add one tablespoonful of chopped parsley, half a cupful of cream, 
some small bits of butter, pepper, salt and two drops of Tabasco 
sauce. Put on the upper crust, put in a baking dish and pour 
the oyster liquor over it. Cover and bake twenty minutes, bast- 
ing often with the oyster liquor. When done nut on an oblong 
dish, cut in slices and serve hot. MRS. W ATKINS. 



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Optical Goods, Cameras and Photographic Supplies. 



MEATS. 



ROAST PIG. 

The pig should not be under four or six weeks old. Stuff with 
cooked sweet potatoes in which a small slice of bacon has been 
chopped hue. pepper and salt to taste. Scald the pig on the in- 
side, rub with pepper and salt, fill and sew up. Bend the forelegs 
under the body, the hind legs forward under the pig and skewer 
to keep in position. Place in a large baking pan and pour over 
one quart of boiling water. Baste often. When of a fine brown 
cover the edges of a large dish with curled parsley ; first sift over 
the pig powdered crackers, then place it kneeling in a PTeen bed. 
Place in the mouth a red apple. If eaten hot serve with the 
gravy. It is better cold served with little mounds of grated horse- 
radish in the green bed. The mouth must be kept open with a 
corn cob or piece of wood while cooking. 

MRS. CALL AH AX. 

BROILED HAM. 

Cut in slices: if salty, pour boiling water over the meat and let 
it stand five or ten minutes. Wipe dry and boil over a clear fire. 
Pepper before serving. If the ham looks dry, pour a little 
melted butter on it. 

B< >ILED FRESH TONGUE. 

Wash well and put into boiling water to cover, with three table- 
spoonfuls of salt and one tablespoonful of pepper. Cook six 
hours or until very tender; cook down in kettle, being careful that 
it does not burn. Peel off the skin while hot. 

' KENTON COOK BOOK. 

FRICASSEE OF COLD MEAT. 

One and one-half pints of cold meat, one pint of water, three 
tablespoonfuls of butter, one and one-half teasooonfuls of salt, 
one-third teaspoonful of pepper, two tablespoonfuls of Hour, one 
teaspoonful of onion juice. Have the meat cut in generous slices. 
Season it with a teaspoonful of salt and half that much of pepper: 
I'm the butter in a frying nan and set on the fire; wnen it becomes 
hot add the flour and stir until smooth and brown, then draw 



26 MEATS. 

back to a cooler place and gradually add the water, stirring all 
the time. Put the pan back on the hot part of the stove and sea- 
son the sauce with the remaining salt, pepper and the onion juice. 
Simmer for five minutes, then add the cold meat and cook gently 
for three minutes if it be rare beef, mutton or game; but if the 
meat be veal or poultry it may cook longer. D. 

TO FRY TRIPE. 

Cut tripe, if it has been boiled, into strips about four inches 
wide and six inches long; make batter witn eggs, one teacupful 
of flour and a little milk; pepper tripe and roll in batter. Fry in 
pan of hot lard; as soon as one side is done turn on other. 

AIRS. SPENCER W ATKINS. 

STEWED TRIPE. 

Cut one pound of beef tripe into small pieces, stew gently for 
twenty minutes, drain and add one pint of the tomato sauce. 
When boiling, serve. D. 

YEAL SCALLOP. 

Chop some cold roast or stewed veal very fine, put a layer in 
the bottom of a buttered pudding dish and season with pepper 
and salt. Have next a layer of cracker crumbs, sprinkle with bits 
of butter and moisten with a little milk, then more seasoned veal 
and then another layer of cracker crumbs. When the dish is full 
wet with gravy or broth. Have a layer of crackers on top wet 
with milk and two beaten eggs. Bake from half to three-quarters 
of an hour. Do not get too dry. KENTON COOK BOOK. 

FOWL SAUTE WITH GREEN PEAS. 

Remnants cold fowl, one and one-half ounces of butter, one 
dessertspoonful flour, pepper, salt, good pinch of sugar, one and 
one-half pints peas, one-half pint stock. Cut meat from bones in 
neat pieces. Put butter in pan and fry fowl to nice brown, having 
seasoned with pepper and salt, dredge Hour over it, stir ingre- 
dients well, add peas and stock and stew till peas are tender: put 
in pinch of sugar. Serve very hot with peas in center. 

AIRS. SPENCER WATKINS. 

FRIZZLED BEEF. 

Have the dried beef cut in knife blade slices, shaving as thin as 
possible. Place it in a frying pan with enough cold water to 
cover it, set it on the fire in a moderate heat and wiien steaming 



MEATS. 27 

well (but not boiling) pour off this water, return the meat and 
pan to the stove and heat gently, stirring constantly until the beef 
is somewhat dry, add a tablespoonful of butter to every half 
pound of beef, stir and cook until the meat curls and is getting 
slightly crisp, then add sufficient milk for a dressing for the beef, 
about one cupful. .Moisten half a tablespoonful of dour in a little- 
cold milk and when smooth and the milk in the pan is hot add 
this mixture. When about as thick as cream serve on hot platter. 

1). 

CREAMED DRIED BEEF. 

Eor a family of six allow one-half pound of beef, two cupfuls of 
milk, two tablespoonfuls of butter, two teaspoonfuls of flour. 
Place the beef in a frying pan, cover with cold water, set on the 
fire and gradually heat to sejalding. Drain and return to the 
stove, stirring and shaking the beef in the pan to dry off all the 
water. When this is done add the butter to the beef and cook until 
brown, generally four minutes, stirring all the time. Add the 
flour to the fat, stir well, cook one minute, then add the milk. 
It will thicken quickly and should form a creamy dressing for the 
beef when done. Dust lightly with pepper when on the serving 
platter. D. 

BEEFSTEAK FRIED WITH OXIONS. 

Prepare steak as for broiling, pepper and roll in flour and fry 
in lard, remove steak from pan when done, add to gravy one 
chopped onion, pepper, salt, one-half teacupful of water and little 
mustard. Cook few minutes, put steak in gravv and serve. 

MRS. SPEXCER WATKINS. 

BRISKET OF VEAL. 

Get a loin roast of veal, make a dressing of bread crumbs, but- 
ter, salt, pepper and thyme or sage, and a little chopped pickled 
pork. Put this dressing on the under part of the veal and roll. 
Tie with a strip of muslin. Put into a pan with a little hot water 
and bake, basting often. Cook a six-pound roast from one and 
three-fourths to two hours. Make gravv as for roast veal. 

MISS HOGE. 

ROAST MEAT IX TOMATO. 

Make one quart of the sauce as directed. Slice roast beef or 
lamb thin, as for the table, and just before serving place it in the 
boiling sauce. Cook just long enough to heat the meat and serve. 
The secret of making an inviting" dish of alreadv cooked meat is 
not forgetting that it is cooked enough. It should be only heated 
through. D. 



MEAT AND FISH SAUCES. 



CHUTNEY. 



Four pounds of brown sugar, one pound of salt, six ounces of 
powdered ginger, seven ounces of onions, forty large unripe 
apples, two pounds of Sultana raisins, one-half pound powdered 
mustard, seven ounces of garlic, two ounces of cayenne pepper, 
six quarts of vinegar. Peel and chop fine the apples. Boil down. 
Then mix the other ingredients and add them. Stir well. 

* MRS. M. C. D. JOHNS( )N. 

CHILI SAUCE. 

Two dozen large, ripe tomatoes, four tablespoonfuls sugar, 
four onions, two green mango peppers, four cups vinegar, four 
dessertspoonfuls salt, two red mango peppers. Scald and peel 
tomatoes ; put all the ingredients together and boil until the mix- 
ture thickens. Chop onions and peppers verv fine. 

MRS. WATKINS. 

SHIRLEY SAUCE. 

« 

Eight large tomatoes, one green pepper, one tablespoonful salt, 
one quart vinegar, one tablespoonful cinnamon, four large onions, 
four tart apples, two pints brown sugar, one tablespoonful cloves, 
one tablespoonful allspice. Hash all verv fine and boil one and 
a half hours. MISS FIELD. 

TARTAR SAUCE. 

Four yolks of eggs, lemon juice, oil, little vinegar, pickle and 
parsley chopped fine. "THE LOSEKAM." 

MUSHRCX )M SAUCE. 

Roll piece of butter as large as an egg in heaping teaspoonful 
sifted flour, stir in two tablespoonfuls warm water, let simmer, 
pour in one teacupful cream and stir, throw in one pint young 
mushrooms washed, picked and skinned. Add pepper, salt, an- 
other small piece butter, let boil up once shaking pan well and 
serve. 



30 MEAT AND FISH SAUCES. 

NASTURTIUM SAUCE. 

Stir into one teacup drawn butter, three tablespoonfuls pickled 
nasturtiums, adding little salt and pepper. Let simmer and serve. 

OYSTER SAUCE. 

One pint fresh oysters, scalded enough to plump them, add one 
tablespoonful pepper, vinegar, little black pepper and salt, pour 
into sufficient quantity drawn butter and serve. 

MRS. W ATKINS. 

TOMATO SAUCE. 

Take tomato catsup, mustard. Tabasco sauce, red and black 
pepper and juice of lemon, mix thoroughly with a fork; add olive 
oil. When all is thoroughly mixed stir in vinegar. 

MISS SKILES. 

APPLE CHUTNEY. 

Two teacupfuls chopped apples, two teacupfuls chopped 
onions, one-quarter teacupful red or green peppers chopped, one 
pint vinegar and one dessertspoonful salt. Scald and pour over 
the above hot. MRS. HOUSE. 

CREAM SAUCE. 

» 

One pint cream, one tablespoonful flour, salt and pepper to 
taste. Let cream come to a boil, add flour mixed smooth with 
little cold cream. Boil three minutes. 

CAPER SAUCE. 

Make a butter sauce and stir into it one tablespoonful lemon 
juice, two of capers and speck of cayenne. This sauce is for 
stewed or boiled fish or mutton. 

ANCHOVY SAUCE. 

Make butter sauce and stir into it four tablespoonfuls essence 
of anchovv and one of lemon juice. Best for fish. 

KENTON COOK BOOK. 

MINT SAUCE. 

Pour the grease off drippings of roast lamb, add tablespoonful 
tomato catsup and some green mint chopped fine. 

MISS HOGE. 



MEAT AND FISH SAUCES. )[ 

SAUCE H( (LLANDAISE. 

I'ut quarter of a box of gelatine in quarter cup of cold water 
in soak half hour; put one pint milk over lire, beal together yolks 
of three egg's with lour tablespoonfuls sugar, add these to the hot 
milk, cook a minute. Take from fire and add gelatine, teaspoon- 
ful vanilla, and when cold if you use wine, four tablespoonfuls 
sherry. This should be about as thick as good cream. 

MRS. RORER. 

VINAIGRETTE SAUCE. 

( hie teaspoonful white pepper, one-half teaspoonful mustard. 
one teaspoonful salt, one-half cup vinegar, one tablespoonful oil. 
Mix salt, pepper and mustard, then very slowly add the vinegar, 
and after mixing thoroughly add drop by drop the "oil. 

If vou take the meat of a rock fish that has been boiled and al- 
lowed to get cold, mince the meat fine and serve on lettuce with 
this sauce, vou will have a delicious salad. 

MRS. M. C. D. JOHNSON. 

DEVILED SAUCE. 

Two pats butter, two teaspoonfuls chopped parsley, one tea- 
spoonful mixed English mustard, two chopped onions and two 
tablespoonfuls vinegar. After butter is well melted cook two min- 
utes; keep continually stirring. Add one tablespoonful Worces- 
tershire sauce, good pinch salt, some black pepper and little cay- 
enne. Additional mustard and Worcestershire sauce may be 
added if desired to have it more sharp. H. H. 



J. M. BOGLE Y & BRO, 

— FINE— 

..♦©recedes 

1355 32d STREET N. W. 



;F*. ^W. Scheele 

Dealer in 

Choice meats, 
Truits and Vegetables 

Butterine a Specialty 

1424=26 32d Street N. W. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 



^Tarris if 

Qhafer 



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lewekrs 



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1113 Pennsylvania Ave. 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 



The 
Place to 
Get a 
Good 
Luncheon! 



DOWN-TOWN shoppers who 
want a nice, well-cooked 
luncheon or meal at a very 
moderate price can gratify 
their appetite HERE 

Everything that goes on our table 
is the very best the markets afford 
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HSipWe also serve "regular" 
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611 twelfth Street 

Just above F 



POULTRY AND GAME. 



STEWED RABIHT. 

Cut rabbit into eight pieces; after cooking in salt and water put 
in stew pan with slice of pork or bacon and with more than 
enough water to cover it; when nearly done take out the pieces, 
strain water in which they have been boiled and return all to 
stew pan with teacupful of milk, little pepper, salt, chopped onion 
and parsley; after this boils up stir in heaping tablespoonful of 
butter in which a tablespoonful of flour has been rubbed. Let 
boil once more, then serve in covered dish with four hard boiled 
eggs sliced over it and bread crumbs. The same recipe for 
squirrel. MRS. WATKINS. 

BROILED QUAIL. 

Split them at the back, broil, basting them often with butter, 
over a hot fire. As soon as the birds are done add a little more 
butter, pepper and salt. Can be served on buttered toast. 

MRS. INNES. 

ROASTED DUCK. 

If the ducks are young they are served rare and are not 
stuffed. An especially delicious flavor is developed in the cook- 
ing if a cup of chopped celery and a half cupful of onion is placed 
in the body of each bird, removing this flavoring before serving. 
Full grown ducks should be well cooked, an hour and a quarter is 
usually sufficient, unless of extra size. They should be basted 
every ten minutes. D. 

ROAST TURKEY. 

Proceed with turkey as with chicken, allowing fifteen minutes 
to the pound. Roast slowly and baste often. It is well to cover 
the breast with a well greased paper. Stuff the turkey with a 
dressing made of bread crumbs, seasoned with pepper, salt, but- 
ter, onion, thyme or sage. Or mix oysters with the bread crumbs 
or use oysters only. Another way, add raisins and sage to the 
bread crumbs and omit onion. M ISS HOGE. 



36 POULTRY AND GAMK. 

WILD DUCKS. 

Clean the clucks and stuff the body with a dressing of bread 
crumbs seasoned with pepper, salt, melted butter, sage and onions 
or a stuffing of onions alone. Fry the onions brown and season 
with pepper and salt. Place the ducks in a pan and put about a 
half pint of boiling water in the pan and baste often. Keep cov- 
ered. If the ducks are young three-fourths of an hour or one 
hour will cook them long enough. When the ducks are old they 
should be steamed an hour and then roasted thirty minutes. 1} 
the ducks are not fat lav thin slices of bacon over the breast. 

KENTON COOK BOOK. 

TO BROIL PARTRIDGES. 

Place in salt and water an hour or two before broiling. When 
taken out wipe dry and rub all over with fresh butter, pepper and 
salt. First broil under or split side on gridiron over right clear 
coals, turning till upper side is fine, light brown. It must be 
cooked principally from under side. When done rub well again 
with fresh butter, and if not ready to serve immediately put in 
large, shallow tin bucket, which will keep them hot, without mak- 
ing them dry and hard ; when served sift over them powdered 
crackers browned. MRS. WATKINS. 

SMOTHERED CHICKEN. 

Flour, pepper and salt thoroughly spring chickens. Put good 
sized lump butter in pan and let it get hot on top of stove. Put 
in chickens, breast downwards and brown, then put in oven for 
about thirty minutes. Add then a half pint water, cover with pan, 
cook another thirty minutes, basting occasionally. Let cook with 
breast down until water is added. 

CHICKEN PIE. 

Stew chicken until tender, remove it and add to gravy pepper, 
salt, cream and flour, and let come to a boil. Place in baking dish 
first, back of chicken, then wings and any other pieces and some 
small pieces of potato, then pour on some of the gravy. Have 
read\- a rich baking powder biscuit dough, roll out half an inch 
thick and put over the chicken; add rest of chicken and cover 
again with dough; cut slit in middle of dough, pour rest of gravy 
through the slit. Place on top of stove, cover lightly and boil ten 
minutes. Remove cover and bake in oven half an hour. 

KENTON COOK BOOK. 



ENTREES. 



CHICKEN CROQUETTES. 

( )ne chicken boiled and chopped very fine, three pairs of sweet- 
breads, two pairs of calf brains boiled, one tablespoonful butter, 
one tablespoonful chopped parsley, one-half onion put on stove 
and cooked a few minutes, strain and mix with other ingredients. 
Then put one-quarter pound butter, one-half pint cream, two 
tablespoonfuls rlour, yolks of two eggs well beaten; mix all these 
on the stove and when it begins to thicken pour it with the 
chicken, sweetbreads and brains, one-half teaspoonful nutmeg 
or mace (or both), red pepper and salt to taste. Mix thoroughly; 
if too thick then thin with a liquor from the chicken - one gill of 
sherry wine. Set in a cool place two or three hours before mak- 
ing in croquettes. MRS. J. MAURY DOVE. 

SALMON CR( )QUETTES. 

Fry an onion, chopped fine in one oz. butter, a golden brown, 
adding one tablespoonful flour moistened with one-half pint of 
white stock, stirring constantly until it hardens. Season with 
one-half tablespoonful salt, scant teaspoonful white pepper, same 
of cayenne, one tablespoonful English sauce, one-half teaspoon- 
ful mustard, one teaspoonful chopped parsley. Stir well. Add 
two pounds salmon cooked and cut fine, with twelve mushrooms 
also chopped fine. Cook for thirty minutes. Then put back off 
hot fire, add four yolks of eggs, stir again for one minute; then 
let cool. Form into croquettes, roll in bread crumbs and egg and 
fry in very hot lard. DELMONICO. 

RISSOLES. 

Roll the trimmings from pie crust into a sheet about one-sixth 
of an inch thick. Cut this into cakes with the largest patty cutter. 
Have any kind of meat or fish prepared as for croquettes. Put 
heaping spoonful on each cake. Brush edges of the paste with 
beaten egg. then fold and press together. When all are done din 
in beaten egg and fry brown in boiling lard. Thev should cook 
about eight minutes. Serve hot. MISS HOGE. 

CANXELON OF BEEF. 

Two pounds of round of beef that has hung for several days, 



40 ENTREES. 

the rind of half a lemon, four sprigs of parsley, one teaspoonful of 
salt, one-fourth teaspoonful pepper, quarter of a nutmeg, two 
tablespoonfuls melted butter, one raw egg and one teaspoonful 
onion juice. Chop meat, parsley and- lemon rind very fine, add 
other ingredients and mix thoroughly, then add one teaspoonful 
lemon juice. Shape into rolls about three inches in diameter and 
six in length. Roll in buttered paper and bake half hour, basting 
with butter and water. Place on hot plate and serve with tomato 
sauce. MISS SKILES. 

CREAMED TURKEY WITH MUSHROOMS. 

One pint of any kind of cold fowl cut in pieces about the size of 
dice and creamed. Half can mushrooms or same quantity of fresh 
mushrooms; one tablespoonful flour creamed with tablespoon ful 
butter. Serve in patty shells. MRS. WATKINS. 

STUFFED CUCUMBERS. 

Halve cucumbers and remove seeds; boil four tablespoonfuls 
rice for half hour; drain and add to it equal Quantity of chopped 
meat. Peel two tomatoes, halve and press out seeds; cut into 
small pieces and mix with other ingredients; add half teaspoonful 
salt and dash of pepper; place this mixture in cavity from which 
seeds were taken; put halves together: bind cucumbers in shape 
with piece of twine and stand in baking pan. Add half cupful of 
water, bake slowly one hour, basting four or five times. These 
may also be baked by stuffing the mixture into the space from 
which seeds were taken and baking in halves. 

SCALLOPED CUCUMBERS. 

Peel four good sized cucumbers, cut into slices and then into 
blocks. Crumb sufficient bread to make a pint. Cover bottom of 
baking dish with layer of the crumbs, then layer of cucumbers, 
and sprinkle over it a tablespoonful of chopped onion, then an- 
other layer of crumbs, cucumbers, chopped onion, with a dusting 
of salt, pepper and celery and having the last layer crumbs. Dot 
over this a tablespoonful of butter cut into pieces. Bake in a 
moderate oven one hour." . MRS. 1XXES. 

PRESSED CHICKEN. 

To one boiled chicken picked as for salad add one dozen olives. 
Cut up three green peppers, two heads of celery, season with red 
pepper and salt to taste and mix all well. Take one dozen hard 
boiled eggs, slice and place them around the bottom and sides of 
a deep dish, then put the chicken in. Let the liquor in which the 



ENTREES. 41 

chicken was boiled boil down to a pint, then add a quarter of a 
box of gelatine which, when dissolved and cool, pour on the 
chicken in the mould. Let it stand until perfectly firm and turn 
out into a dish. Serve with lettuce and mayonnaise. 

ESCALLOPEL) CHICK EN. 

One can mushrooms, two whole eggs or four yolks, one 
chicken chopped fine with one pair of parboiled sweetbreads. 
Tut on tire, add one pint of cream or rich milk. As it comes to a 
boil stir in one cup of butter creamed with one tablespoonful corn 
starch. Stir in eggs well beaten, salt and penper to taste. Mix 
chicken and mushrooms, put in baking dish with cracker crumbs 
on top and bake brown. AIRS. J. X. MITCHELL. 

DEVILED CHICKEN. 

Chop very fine any pieces of chicken that may be left. To ever) 
pint of the meat allow one-half pint cream, one tablespoonful 
butter, one of chopped parsley, three hard boiled eggs, two table- 
spoonfuls bread crumbs, quarter of nutmeg grated, salt and cay- 
enne to taste. Put butter in a frying pan to melt, add bread 
crumbs, the cream, chicken and seasoning. Stir over the fire un- 
til it boils, then add the hard boiled eggs chopped very hue. Fill 
paper cases or individual dishes with this mixture, sprinkle lightly 
with bread crumbs and brown in quick oven. 

MRS. BILLIXGS. 

SWEETBREAD AXD MUSHROOOM PATES. 

Ten sweetbreads parboiled, skimmed and all fat removed; cut 
in small pieces. Add one even teaspoonful salt, one can French 
mushrooms. Slice thin, add to juice one teaspoonful salt, one 
teaspoonful pepper, one saltspoonful powdered mace, lump of 
butter size of guinea egg. Simmer slowly twenty minutes, add 
sweetbreads dredged with one heaping spoonful corn starch, well 
mixed in sweetbreads. Let boil up once stirring so as to prevent 
sticking. Serve in pate shells. MRS. WATKINS. 

BREADED CHEESE. 

One cupful of coarse bread crumbs, three cupfuls of milk, one 
cupful of grated cheese. Put into pudding dish with crumbs and 
butter on top. Rake thirty minutes. MRS. IX'XES. 

STUFFED GREEX PEPPERS. 

Half loaf of stale bread (not crust) grated. < >ne slightly fried 
onion chopped hue, one slice boiled ham chopped hue. Fry ham 
and onion together. One scalded tomato chopped fine and mixed 



42 ENTREES. 

with the above. Mix in the yolk of one egg and a piece of butter 
size of an egg. Half teaspoonful of powdered thyme. Add bread 
to make thick paste. Stuff pepper and bake. Serve with tomato 
or any other good sauce. "THE LOSEKAM." 

TERRAPIN. 

Six medium sized terrapins, six eggs, half pound butter, one 
quart cream, salt, pepper and vinegar to taste; add cream last. 
Boil the eggs hard; cream yolks, pepper, salt and vinegar to- 
gether. Put terrapin on fire and when boiling add the cream and 
boil. MISS SKILES. 

SPICED BEnF. 

Boil shin of ten pounds beef till meat falls from the bone. Pick 
to pieces, rejecting all gristle. Set liquor away to cool, remove 
fat, boil liquor to a pint and a half, then return meat to the liquor 
and while hot add salt, pepper, half teaspoonful cloves, little nut- 
meg, parsley, cinnamon and a very little sage and savory. Let it 
boil up once and then pour -into a mould or deep dish. Cut in 
slices. MRS. W ATKINS. 

CHICKEN TERRAPIN. 

Boil a chicken, take off skin and cut up as for salad. Add 
quarter of a tumbler of cream or milk, put over fire, then add the 
following dressing: Yolks of three hard boiled eggs mashed fine 
and add a quarter pound of butter, red and white pepper to taste 
and one teaspoonful of salt. Mix all well together, and add one 
wine glass of sherrv. When taken off fire add another wine srlass 
of sherry. MRS. TRAPTER. 

CREAMED SWEETBREADS. 

Parboil pair of sweetbreads; when cold cut up and remove 
tough parts not to be used. Make sauce of one auart milk, pars- 
ley chopped fine, suspicion of onion, teaspoonful of Worcester- 
shire sauce, salt and pepper to taste, three or four tablespoonfuls 
of corn starch, three tablespoonfuls butter. Boil milk, add but- 
ter, pepper, salt and other ingredients and stir in the corn starch 
Mix with sweetbreads and put in pattv dishes, sprinkle top with 
buttered crumbs and bake in hot oven for ten minutes. 

MISS SKILES. 
WELSH RAREBIT. 

Melt one pound creamed cheese in one tablespoonful butter, 
stirring briskly the while. Ueat up two eggs, teaspoonful mustard, 



ENTREES, 43 

pinch red pepper, pinch salt, half bottle ale or beer together and 
mix with cheese. Cook ten minutes on moderate fire. 

"THE GRAFTON." 

( ) RANGE ( >MELETTE. 

The thinly grated rind of one orange and three tablespoonfuls 
of its juice, three eggs and three teaspoonfuls of powdered sugar. 
Beat the yolks, add sugar, rind and juice; fold in the beaten whites 
and cook. Fold, turn out, sprinkle thickly with powdered sugar 
and score in diagonal lines with clean, red hot poker. 

MISS SKILES. 

CHEESE CROQUETTES. 

Two ounces bread crumbs, two ounces grated cheese, one egg, 
pepper, salt, cavenne. Mix cheese and bread crumbs well, season 
rather highly, mix with white of egg, form into balls, dip into 
beaten yolk of an egg, then into bread crumbs and fry to light 
brown. Dry on blotting paper and serve. MRS. W ATKINS. 

TO STUFF GREEX PEPPERS. 

Make a white sauce as follows: One tablespoonfnl of butter, a 
little more than the same of flour, put on fire and let melt rub- 
bing flour slowly in butter, add two cnpfnls milk, stir well: when 
it thickens take it off, chop one small tomato, parsley, celery tops, 
very little onion, stale bread, the lean part of a strip of bacon 
(ham is better), veal, beef or lamb all up together, then add some 
of the white sauce, perhaps three tablespoonfuls to five peppers, 
cut peppers from the top, take out all the seeds, then stnff with the 
above mixture, put on the tops, put in the stove and cook three- 
quarters of an hour; dust the top with cracker crumbs before 
putting on the tops. MTSS WA( rNER. 

BRAISED SWEETBREADS. 

Three pairs of sweetbreads, two tablespoonfuls of butter, one 
level tablespoonfnl of flonr, one-half pint of water, one teaspoon- 
ful of minced carrot, two teaspoonfuls of minced onion, one tea- 
spoonful of salt, one-qnarter teaspoonful of pepper, one-half tea- 
spoonfnl of extract of beef, one bay leaf, one small sprig of pars- 
ley, one small teaspoonful of lemon juice. Clean the sweetbreads 
and let them soak for one hour in two quarts of cold water into 
which two tablespoonfuls of salt have been stirred. On taking 
them from the salt water drop them into a bowl of boiling water 
for two minutes: then arrange them in a <.\eep baking pan. Put 
the butter, herbs and vegetables in a frying pan and set on the 



44 ENTREES. 

stove. Cook slowly for fifteen minutes, then add the flour and stir 
until the mixture becomes frothy. Add the water gradually, stir- 
ring all the time. When this liquid boils stir in the meat extract, 
salt, pepper and lemon juice. Cook for Ave minutes and strain 
over the sweetbreads. Cover the pan and put in a moderately hot 
oven. Cook for one hour, basting every fifteen minutes with the 
gravy in the pan. Arrange the sweetbreads on a warm dish and 
pour brown mushroom sauce around them. 

HEAD-CHEESE. 

Head-cheese (pork) is usually made of the head, ears and 
tongue, but the head alone may be used if preferred. Clean the 
meat with the utmost care and boil both the meat and the bones 
in salted water until the former is very tender. Take out the head, 
place it in a colander to drain and remove all the bones with a 
knife. Cut the ears rather fine and place them with the head 
meat. Season the whole to taste with salt, pepper, sage, sweet 
marjoram and any other herbs that may be available, and also a 
little powdered cloves. Mix the mass well together and pack it 
tightly in a bowl, interspersing layers of the mixture with slices of 
the boiled tongue. Press the whole into a compact shape and 
cover it with a plate on which is placed a sufficiently heavy 
weight. The head-cheese will be ready to use in two or three 
days. It may be cut in thin slices and served with vinegar and 
mustard, if liked; or it may be cut in slices, dipped in egg and 
cracker crumbs and fried. D. 

FROG LEGS FRICASSEE. 

Take three pats butter and let become thoroughly melted, add 
little salt and two teaspoonfuls lemon juice or vinegar, put in 
three dozen medium sized frogs' legs, cover dish and cook for 
thirteen minutes over open fire, being careful not to burn; remove 
juice, add one and a half cups white sauce; if too thick thin with 
some of juice removed. Cook about three minutes, season to 
taste and serve. H. H. 



Ibave JJ)ou Seen... 



The Woodwork in St. Peters Church ? It was all made 
at Capital Park Mills, including the handsome Bard- 
wood Door and Choir front. 



Thos. W. Smith, 

ist and Q Sts. N. E. Proprietor. 



Everything New 



First-class Ladies' and Gents' Restaurant 



morgan Rouse.. 



EUROPEAN 



Pi. W. MORGAN, Proprietor. 



32d St. above M 
West Washington, D. C. 



"Odd things not found elsewhere." 



W. C. Shaw & Co. 



JeV/£T£f-s arjd SrTV£r*$rprth s 



1105 F Street N. W. 
Washington, D. C. 



Cbo$. C. fiume 



Best Coffee 
Pure Spices 



Dealer in 
Fancy Groceries 
Choice Wines 
and Liquors 

Sole Proprietor of Tunlaw Flour 
1204 32d St., Washington. D. C. 



HATTER AND FURRIER 

3139 M Street 



Dealer in 

Gloves, Canes and Umbrellas 

Finest Goods 

at the Lowest Prices 



EGGS. 



OMELETTE. 

Six eggs, one large teacupfulof milk, piece of butter the size of 
an egg, little pepper and salt and dessertspoonful of Hour. Heat 
yolks and whites separately, melt butter in the milk and stir into 
the yolks; put the dour in a little of the milk and stir well; add to 
the yolks lastly the whites beaten to a very stiff froth. Bake in 
pan well greased with lard in quick oven. 

MRS. ALPHEUS MIDDLETON. 

STUFFED EGGS. 

Boil the eggs hard and cut in two, remove the yolks, mash 
hue, adding pepper, salt, melted butter and mustard to taste. Fill 
the cavities and bind the two pieces together. A little chopped 
parsley can be added or omit the mustard and add a little 
chopped chicken, in which case roll in egg and cracker crumbs 
and fry in hot lard. KENTON COOK BOOK. 

EGGS A LA SUISSE. 

Butter a dish, put one and a half ounces of grated cheese, then 
four eggs, not breaking the yolks; two tablespoonfuls of cream, 
pepper and salt; cover with another one and a half ounces of 
cheese and bake ten minutes. This may be served one egg in 
each little saucepan with enough cheese, etc., for itself. 

MRS. BILLINGS. 

STIRRED EGGS. 

Three eggs, one-half pint of milk, one tablespoonful of butter, 
one-quarter saltspoonful of salt. Place butter in the chafing dish, 
beat eggs until light, add to them the milk and salt, and when the 
butter is quite hot stir in this mixture, stirring with a silver fork 
until the eggs are creamv and cooked sufficiently. Serve on toast. 

D. 

BREADED EGGS. 

Boil hard and cut in round, thick slices. Pepper and salt, dip in 
beaten raw egg, then in fine bread crumbs or cracker crumbs and 
fry in hot butter. Serve with cream sauce. 

KENTON COOK BOOK. 



48 EGGS. 

VERMICELLI EGGS. 

Four eggs, one tablespoonful of corn starch, one-half table- 
spoonful of butter, six squares of toast, one-half Dint of milk, salt 
to taste. Boil eggs for twenty minutes and when cold remove 
shells, chop the whites fine and rub the yolks through a coarse 
sieve or a potato strainer. Do not place the yolks with the whites, 
as they are used separately. Toast the bread a light brown, see 
that the squares are uniform and without crust, and lay them on 
the serving platter. Scald the milk and add the corn starch 
thinned with two tablespoonfuls of cold water or milk. Stir until 
of the thickness of cream and then add the seasoning and the 
chopped whites of the eggs. Lightly butter the toast and heap 
the egg sauce upon the slices. Take a small portion of the pow- 
dered yolks and place it on the sauce on each slice of toast, mak- 
ing little nests of it until all is used, and then serve. D. 

EGG BALLS. 

Make a thick syrup of one pound of sugar and teacupful of 
water. Beat the yolks of twelve eggs until very light and almost 
white. Take syrup off stove and stir in the eggs. Put back on 
the stove and let it cook slowly until quite thick. After cool roll 
into balls and dip in caramel as you would fruit glace. When 
carameled place in dish one row above the other in a circle, filling 
in the center with spun caramel. 

PICKLED EGGS. 

Boil eggs twentv minutes, shell them and place in crock, pour 
over them spiced vinegar. Will be fit for use in twenty-four 
hours. If you use vinegar in which beets have been pickled it 
makes the eq-crs a pretty color and gives a good flavor. 

KENTON COOK BOOK. 



VEGETABLES. 



TIME TABLE FOR COOKING \ EGETABLES. 

Potatoes, boiled 30 minutes 

Potatoes, baked 45 minutes 

Sweet potatoes, b< >iled 45 minutes 

Sweet potatoes, baked ■_ , 1 hour 

Squash, boiled ; 25 minutes 

Squash, baked 45 minutes 

( ireen peas, boiled 20 to 40 minutes 

Shell beans, boiled I hour 

String beans, boiled 1 to 2 hours 

Green corn 25 minutes to 1 hour 

Asparagus 13 to 30 minutes 

Spinach 15 minutes 

Tomatoes, fresh 1 hour 

Tomatoes, canned 30 minutes 

Cabbage 4.5 minutes to 2 hours 

Cauliflower 1 to 2 hours 

Beet greens 1 hour 

Onions 1 to 2 hours 

"Beets 1 to 5 hours 

Turnips, white 45 minutes to 1 hour 

Turnips, yellow \\\.o 2 hours 

Parsnips 1 to 2 hours 

Carrots 1 to 2 hours 

KENTON COOK BOOK. 

MACARONI A LTTALIENNE. 

Twelve sticks of macaroni, two tablespoonfuls cream, one table- 
spoonful flour, one-half pint rich milk, two tablespoonfuls butter, 
salt, white pepper and cayenne, and one-quarter pound of cheese. 
Wash and boil the macaroni rapidly for twenty minutes in two 
quarts of water, put the milk on in the double kettle, mix the but- 
ter and flour together and stir into the boiling milk, add the sea- 
soning, cream and grated cheese. Drain and dish the macaroni, 
pour the sauce over and serve immediately. One tablespoonful 
of mustard may be stirred into the sauce if you desire. 

If the sauce and macaroni stand long after being mixed the dish 
will be spoiled, therefore, if they cannot be served immediately, 
keep both hot on separate dishes. As it is awkward to serve the 
macaroni in unbroken sticks some prefer to break the sticks be- 
fore boiling, but the true Italian wav is to serve with unbroken 
sticks. MRS. M. C. D. JOHNSOX. 



52 VEGETABLES. 

TO STUFF EGG-PLANT. 

Parboil one or two egg-plants, cut lengthwise, remove all the 
pulp, beat with two taoiespoontuls of butter until well mashed, 
add two eggs well beaten, yolks and whites separately; slice stale 
bread soaked in teacupful of milk, one onion chopped tine, pepper 
and salt, mix all thoroughly, replace in skins and dust well with 
cracker crumbs, and glaze with white of egg; bake until a rich 
brown. Cucumbers, cooked in the same manner, are delicious. 

MISS WAGNER. 

HASHED BROWN POTATOES. 

Place a tablespoonful of butter in a frying pan and when hot 
add cold, boiled, finely chopped potatoes to uie depth of an inch; 
usually four good sized potatoes will be sufficient. When chop- 
ping them add a teaspoonful of salt and a dash of pepper. Press 
the potatoes down in the pan, packing it firmly with a limber 
knife; cook slowly for six or seven minutes, when the potatoes 
should be brown. Do not stir it. Now begin at one side of the 
pan and foid the potatoes over on the other like an omelette, pack- 
ing it closely together. Turn it upside down on the serving plat- 
ter, when ready to serve. 

STUFFED POTATOES. 

Any cooked meat may be used for this dish. Chop the meat 
very fine and season it with salt, pepper, a bit of butter and a 
tablespoonful of tomato, a sprig of celery, parsley or a grating of 
onion. Cut large sized potatoes into halves, remove the centers, 
leaving a half inch wall, and fill with the seasoned meat, then put 
the two halves together, tie with twine, cut off one end of the 
potatoes, stand them upon their ends in a pan or dish, cover 
tightly and bake for fort}- minutes. 

CREAMED BAKED P< >TAT< >ES. 

Make a cream sauce of one tablespoonful of butter, one table- 
spoonful of flour, one-half pint of milk, one-quarter teaspoonful of 
salt. Rub the butter and flour together until smooth and add it to 
the milk when boiling: when creamy add the salt. Cut cold, 
boiled potatoes into small blocks, place them in a baking dish, add 
salt and pepper and cover with the cream sauce, sprinkle over it 
a thin laver of bread crumbs and bake until brown. 

POTA'D ) ( >MELETTE. 

Four eggs, one ounce of bread crumbs, two ounces of potatoes, 
one-half ounce of butter. Roil the potatoes and mash them with 



VEGETABLES 53 

the butter, adding the bread crumbs and the eggs well beaten, 
leaving out one white; season with salt and pepper, fry the ome- 
lette in the pan with a little butter and serve vcr\ hot. 1 ». 

CREAMED P< >TAT< >ES. 

Bake potatoes in skin til! nearly done, let them get thoroughly 
cold, then cut in small dice; have milk, pepper and butter in sauce- 
pan and when hot pour in potatoes, shaking or stirring - all the 
time, which will be only a minute or two. Salt and serve. 

MRS. COLLINS. 

MINCED POTATOES. 

Boil potatoes with skins on until almost done. When cold peel, 
cut in pieces size of dice, season with cayenne pepper, salt and 
parsley. Have frying pan with some hot butter in it, pour in the 
potatoes, press together, cover tightly and cook ten to fifteen 
minutes, turn nut on hot dish with crust up. MISS H( )GE. 

POTATO PUFF. 

Stir two cupfuls mashed potatoes, two tablespoonfuls melted 
butter and some salt to a fine, creamy condition; then add two 
eggs, well beaten separately, and six tablespoonfuls cream; beat 
all well and lightly together, pile in the dish and grate cheese 
over top; bake in quick oven until delicate brown. 

KEXTOX COOK BOOK. 

CREAMED SWEET POTATOES. 

To make creamed sweet potatoes peel cold notatoes left from 
dinner the night before, cut into blocks and warm in a cream 
sauce made by beating half cupful of milk in a skillet, then put in 
one tablespoonful flour rubbed till smooth with one tablespoon ful 
of butter, season with salt and pepper and stir until cooked: then 
put in the potatoes, allow them to be thoroughly heated and 
serve. D. 

BROILED TOMATOES. 

Cut tomatoes in thin slices, sprinkle each slice with bread 
crumbs, pepper, salt, and broil eight minutes; put into hot dish 
and place in oven a few minutes. Small pieces of butter should 
be put on each slice. Little sugar on each slice may be added. 



54 VEGETABLES. 

BAKED TOMATOES. 

Take eight or ten large, fine, ripe tomatoes, skin and cut out 
core. Place in baking pan and fill centers with butter, sprinkle 
with pepper and sugar, dredge over with flour, pour small cupful 
cold water in pan; bake half hour in moderate oven. 

KENTON COOK BOOK. 

STEWED MUSHROOMS. 

Peel the mushrooms, scrape the stems, cutting off the hard 
ends, then wash in cold water. Place in a saucepan a tablespoon- 
ful of butter, and when melted add one-half tablespoonful of flour; 
add one pint of mushrooms, cover and let simmer in a gentle heat 
for ten minutes, stirring often. Add two tablespoonfuls of cream, 
heat again, salt and pepper and serve. All stirring should be 
done with silver spoon ; if it turns black they are not mushrooms, 
but are poisonous, and must be thrown away. 

BROILED MUSHROOMS. 

Peel the mushrooms and cut off the stalks, heat the broiler, lay 
the mushrooms carefully in and broil with the upper side first ex- 
posed to the fire; then turn and broil the under side. Cook but 
eight or ten minutes, when they should be tender. Remove from 
the fire and baste with melted butter, season with salt and pepper 
and serve on toast. 

CREAMED MUSHROOMS. 

Drain off the liquor from the mushrooms and place it in a bowl 
to be used for the sauce. Place on the fire in a granite pan one 
tablespoonful of butter, heat slowly and add one tablespoonful of 
flour, stir until they are blended but not in sufficient heat to 
brown, and gradually add the liquor from the mushrooms and 
enough cream to make a thin sauce; into this turn the mush- 
rooms, season with salt and when thoroughly hot serve on squares 
of toast. 

( IMELETTE OF CORN. 

This is a satisfactory way to use boiled corn. Cut the grains 
from the cob until a cupful is obtained, beat six eggs, yolks and 
whites together, until light, add six tablespoonfuls of milk and the 
corn, season with salt and pepper, mixing well. Place a teaspoon- 
ful of butter in the frying pan, and when hot add the egg mixture 
and cook as with any omelette. 



VEGETABLES. 55 

CORN OYSTERS. 

To one pint of grated corn add one scant half cupful melted 
butter, three tablespoonfuls of milk, two teaspoonfuls salt and 
one-fourth teaspoonful pepper; beat well five minutes. Have but- 
ter very hot in frying pan, drop batter from spoon and fry until 
brown on both sides. KENTON COOK BOOK. 

CAULIFLOWER A I" GRATIN. 

Boil cauliflower till tender, put in earthenware dish whole. 
Make sauce of half pint of milk, two tablespoonfuls flour and little 
butter, one spoonful pepper and salt, two ounces grated cheese; 
pour over cauliflower and bake until light brown. 

.MRS. GEO. T. DUNLOP. 

TO FRINGE CELERY FOR GARNISHING. 

Cut the stalks into two-inch lengths, stick plenty of coarse 
needles into the top of a cork, draw half of the stalk of each piece 
of celery through the needles; when all the fibrous parts are sep- 
arated lav the celery in a cold place to curl and crisp. 

MRS. M. C. D. JOHNSON. 

STEWED CUCUMBERS. 

Select rather large cucumbers, peel them, cut into halves 
lengthwise and then into quarters. Lay them in a shallow pan, 
cover with boiling salted water and stew gently for twenty min- 
utes. When done lay them carefully on toasted bread and pour 
over them this sauce: Two tablespoonfuls of butter, one-half pint 
of boiling water, one-half lemon, one tablespoonful of flour, one- 
half teaspoonful of salt, a dash of pepper. Place half of the butter 
in a stew pan, and when melted add the flour. Cook, but do not 
brown, and when quite smooth add the boiling water. Simmer 
gently for about ten minutes, stirring all the time, then add the 
rest of the butter and the seasoning and serve at once. 

CUCUMBERS IN MILK. 

Cut the cucumbers in small squares after the paring has been 
removed and place in a saucepan over a slow fire. Add a little 
salt and water and cook until tender, using only just enough 
water to keep the cucumbers from burning. Tut a pint of milk on 
the fire and when it boils add two tablespoonfuls of flour which 
has been made smooth in half a cupful of the milk reserved for 
this purpose from the pint. When it has the consistency of cream 
add the cucumbers, drained from their cooking. Sweeten slight- 
ly and serve. 



56 VEGETABLES. 

CREAM SPINACH. 

Use only the tender parts of the spinach, washing thoroughly; 
this vegetable needs a great deal of cleansing. Place it in a large 
stew pan, cover with boiling water (salted) and cook for twenty 
minutes. Drain well and chop fine, then return to the kettle and 
add one tablespoonful of butter, salt and pepper, stir until 
thoroughly hot and the butter is melted, then add two tablespoon- 
fuls of cream, beating until the whole is light and creamy. 

STEWED OKRA. 

Wash a pint of okra, cut it into pieces crosswise, place in a 
granite stew pan, cover with salted boiling water and simmer 
gentlv for half an hour. Add two tomatoes that have been peeled 
and chopped and stew for ten minutes longer. Add a seasoning 
of butter, pepper and salt, if more salt is needed. 

A preparation of corn, okra, tomato and lima beans affords 
an appetizing dish for luncheon. D. 

HOT SLAW. 

Two eggs, one tablespoonful butter, three of cream, one of 
sugar, half teaspoonful mustard, pinch of red pepper, little onion 
and parsley, two tablespoonfuls vinegar; cook until thick, quarter 
head of cabbage. Pour over cabbage and heat all through before 
serving. For cold slaw leave out onion and parslev. 

MRS. W ATKINS. 

DRESSING FOR SLAW. 

Two eggs, two tablespoonfuls sugar, two tablespoonfuls vine- 
gar, one tablespoonful butter, one teaspoonful mustard, pepper 
and salt to taste, two tablespoonfuls milk; beat all together and 
boil until thick, take off and add teaspoonful olive oil, pour over 
slaw while hot. MARY BROOKS. 

STUFFED ONION'S. 

Parboil and cut out the heart of the onions, fill with any kind of 
meat finely chopped and highly seasoned. When onions are filled 
put little butter on each, cover with bread crumbs and bake one 
hour. Serve with cream sauce. 

BAKED BEANS. 

Wash beans in warm water, put in pot with plenty of hard water 
and let simmer until they are transparent or begin to sink, then 



VEGEl \mi.ks 57 

throw into colander to drain. Put hack in pol and pour on boiling 
water and let come to a boil, place half the beans in bottom of 
gallon crock, and in center a nice piece of uncooked pork, sea 
soned with pepper, cover with rest of beans within three inches of 
the crock and pour boiling water until you can see it between 
the beans, cover with plate and hake six hours in slow oven. 
Whenever the water has cooked down so you cannot see it pour 
on more boiling water; if. when you taste them, they are nol 
soned enough, put a little salt in a cup and pour boiling water on 
it and pour over beans; the last water should not he poured on 
over half an hour before beans are done. Tablespoonful of mo- 
lasses can he added. KENT* ).\ C< M >K B< X >K. 

TO BOIL RICE. 

To prepare it cover a cupful of rice with plenty of boiling water, 
add a teaspoonful of salt and stir often from the bottom so the 
rice will not stick. Cook for about twenty minutes, when the 
grains should be quite done but not enough so that they will 
stick to each other. Drain through a colander, return to the ket- 
tle and set uncovered on the back of the range in a gentle heat, 
shake the kettle often to loosen the rice from the bottom: it will 
dry in ten minutes so that every grain is quite separate from the 
others. If cooked a moment too long rice will be too soft and the 
grains will not dry off. Care should be taken to drain it from the 
water as soon as all hardness is gone from the center of the grain. 

FRIED SQUASH. 

The white "button" squashes about four inches in diameter are 
best when fried. Cut the vegetable into thin slices, dip in beaten 
egg, then in seasoned bread or cracker dust and fry in hot fat, 
place a colander in a granite saucepan, lay a soft yellow paper in 
the colander and as the slices become brown place them on the 
paper; set the saucepan in the oven or in a warm place on the 
range; the paper will absorb all of the oil that may he left in the 
squash. Serve on a platter or other flat dish. Fried squash forms 
an excellent luncheon dish. D. 



HUTTON & HILTON 

o o 

Cor. 22d and L Streets Northwest 

WASHINGTON, D. C 



pharmacists 



H. W. FISHER & SON 

Cor. 32d and N Streets N. W. 

k E A LER in Choice Fruits, Meats anrt Vegetables- 
Fine Provisions 
Game in Season. 



DE A LER in Choice Fruits, Meats anrt Vegetables- 
Fine Provisions. Fresh Fish, Oysters and 
fiamp in Spason 



JOHNSON & LUTTRELL 

Dry and Fancy Goods at popular prices. 713 Market Space 



Be&H & B&Ker 



Telephone 981 

486 Pennsylvania Avenue 

Washington, D. C. 



Dealers in 

Choice Family Groceries 

Fine Wines, Liquors and Cigars 



1323 F Street Northwest 



fOR FIFTEEN YEARS this has been the Delmonico of 
Washington for Ladies and Gentlemen. Prompt ser- 
vice and first-class in every respect. Special attention 
given to parties after the theatre. Ladies shopping will find 
an elegant lunch served in Ladies' Cafe from 12 to 2:30 P. M. 
same as business gentlemen's lunch in Gents' Cafe. Private 
Dining Rooms for three or more persons. 



T. R. MARSHALL, Proprietor 



Telephone 1188. 



BREADS. 



PARKER HOUSE ROLLS. 

Two quarts flour, one large spoonful lard, small teaspoonful 
salt, one pint boiled milk, set aside to be cooled, half cupful sugar, 
half cupful yeast; mix and let rise over night. In the morning- 
knead well and let rise till noon; make into long, harrow rolls, let 
rise till tea time. 

HOT ROLLS. 

Mix following ingredients: Four pints flour, one pint fresh 
milk, two eggs well beaten, one large tablespoonful melted lard, 
one large tablespoonful hop yeast; set to rise at n a. m. for 
early tea; make into rolls at 5 p. m., and bake as soon as risen. In 
cool weather set before fire both before and after making into 
rolls. 

BEAT BISCUIT. 

To one quart flour add one teaspoonful salt, half teacupful lard 
and enough cold water to make very stiff dough; beat three- 
quarters of an hour and bake not too fast. One quart flour will 
make about forty biscuits. MRS. W ATKINS. 

MARYLAND BISCUIT. 

Mix one tablespoonful butter and one teaspoonful salt into a 
quart of flour, work in milk enough to make a stiff dough, beat 
dough with mallet or potato masher five hundred times. 

BAKING POWDER BISCUIT. 

Sift through one quart flour four teaspoonfuls Royal Baking 
Powder and one scant teaspoonful of salt, one small tablespoonful 
lard, add enough milk to make soft dough. 

MUSH BISCUIT. 

Take quart warm mush, have some sifted flour in a pan, put 
mush in center, work in tablespoonful each of lard and white 
sugar, one teaspoonful salt, half teaspoonful soda and half cupful 
of yeast, mix with flour until as stiff as bread dough; let rise, work 
done, cut with biscuit cutter, let rise second time, then bake 
brown. KENTON COOK BOOK. 



62 BREADS. 

TEA BISCUIT. 

Two cupfuls flour, two teaspoonfuls baking powder, salt, but- 
ter size of an egg; stir all lightly. Put in enough milk to roll out 
soft and thin. ' MRS. GEO. T. DUNLOP. 

BEATEN BISCUIT. 

One quart flour, one teaspoonful salt, piece of lard size of an 
egg, same of butter, enough water and milk (half and half) to 
make stiff dough, knead for thirty minutes or till dough blisters, 
make into small biscuit, prick with fork and bake in quick oven. 
To make them crisp add yolk of one egg to dough. 

CREAM BISCUIT. 

Beat two eggs well, add a pint of cream and a large spoonful of 
veast, stir in flour until the dough is stiff enough to bake, make 
into biscuit and set to rise for five hours. They need only a few 
minutes' baking. D. 

LIGHT BREAD. 

Two quarts flour, one teaspoonful sugar, one teaspoonful salt, 
half teacupful yeast, one egg well beaten, one pint water, sift flour 
and divide into three parts, mix one-third in batter, put one-third 
in jar to rise in and the other third over the batter; let it stand two 
hours and then work well, adding small piece of lard before bak- 
ing. 

CORN MUFFINS. 

Three eggs beaten light, one pint buttermilk (if very sour use 
less), one teacupful cream or milk, cne small teaspoonful soda, 
lard or butter size of an egg, meal enough to make batter of the 
consistency of pound cake batter. MRS. W ATKINS. 

GRAHAM MUFFINS. 

One and one-half cupfuls of graham flour, one cupful of sour 
milk, one-half teaspoonful of soda, one egg, one-half teaspoonful 
of salt. Dissolve the soda in a teaspoonful of cold water, add it 
t<> the sour milk, beat the egg light, stir it into the milk and then 
the flour and salt. Bake fifteen minutes in quick oven. D. 

VIRGINIA MUFFINS. 

One quart flour, one teaspoonful salt, one tablespoonful butter 
and lard mixed, one tablespoonful brown sugar, one tablespoonful 



BREADS. 63 

well mashed white potato, half teacupful yeast, three well beaten 
eggs, rub butter and lard into flour, then potatoes, salt and sugar 
should be sifted with flour; ponr into it the eggs and yeast and 
make into soft dough with cold water in summer and warm water 
in winter, knead half hour, make them at the same time you make 
light bread and the second time make into round halls without 
working, Grease tops of muffins, let rise two hours, then bake; 
the enp's should he deep. .MRS. GEX. GETTY. 

QUICK MUFFINS. 

One quart sifted flour, three eggs beaten together, one (mart 
milk, lard size of a walnut; hake in iron gem pans; have pans hot. 

MRS. DOUGHTY. 

MUFFINS. 

( >ne egg" beaten separately and very light, one cupful flour, one 
cupful milk, one teaspoonful baking powder or scant half tea- 
spoonful soda and half cream of tartar. 

GRAHAM GEMS. 

One cupful milk, half teaspoonful salt, half cupful white Hour, 
half cupful graham flour, two tablespoonfuls sugar, one teaspoon- 
ful cream tartar, half teaspoonful soda, one tablespoonful melted 
butter. Sift graham flour, add cream tartar, soda and white flour 
and sift a'gain ; mix sugar, salt and milk and stir into flour, put in 
the butter and drop a spoonful in each division of a gem pan, bake 
in hot oven for twentv-*five minutes and serve hot. 

MISS SKILES. 

WHOLE WHEAT GEMS. 

Two eggs, one-half pint of milk, one teaspoonful of salt, one 
and one-half cupfuls of whole wheat flour, one tablespoonful of 
melted butter, two teaspoonfuls of baking powder. Mix the in- 
gredients together the same as for the flour gems and hake in hot 
pans for thirty minutes. 

FLOUR GEMS. 

< )ne and one-half cupfuls of flour, one and one-half cupfuls of 
milk, one teaspoonful of butter, one egg, one and one-half tea- 
spoonfuls of baking powder. Mix the flour and baking powder 
together, stir in the melted butter and the milk, and then the eee. 
well beaten; beat the whole until light and foamy and with it 
nearly fill the gem pans, which should be hot and well buttered. 
Bake for fifteen minutes in a quick oven. D. 



64 BREADS. 

CORN POXE. 

Two coffeecupfuls of corn meal, one quart of milk, four eggs, 
one tablespoonful of drawn butter, one teaspoonful of salt and one 
teaspoonful of sugar. Beat the eggs thoroughly, add the meal, 
butter, sugar and salt and scald the whole with tne milk which 
has been previously set on to boil. Have ready a buttered "turk's 
head." or, failing that, rather deep nans; pour in at once and hurry 
into the oven; dp not let the thin apnearance of the batter tempt 
you to add more meal, as has happened more than once when this 
recipe was being tried to the serious injury of the pone. The four 
eggs will stiffen it sufficiently, and the richness and delicacy of the 
cake are largely due to the small proportion of meal. The "turk's 
head" is preferable to the ordinary pan because the hole in the 
center which permits the hot air to rise diffuses the heat more 
equally through the mixture. Bake in a quick oven. 

MRS. WATKINS. 

( IWENDAW CORN BREAD. 

Two teacupfuls of hominy grist, and while hot mix with it a 
very large spoonful of butter, beat four eggs very light, yolks and 
whites separately, and stir them in slowly to the hominy; next 
add one pint of milk, gradually stirred in; lastly naif pint of 
Southern corn meal, a little salt. Bake in a rather deep pan so as 
to allow room to rise. If properly mixed when cooked will be 
equal to a batter pudding. MISS W AGXER. 

S( >UTH CAROLINA CORX POXE. 

Scald one pint of corn meal with boiling water, add one tea- 
spoonful of salt, one of sugar, one tablespoonful butter, mould 
with the hands into oblong cakes, lay in well greased pan and 
bake quickly. It should be broken, not cut. and eaten very hot. 

BROWN BREAD. 

One pint graham flour, one pint wheat flour, mix well together 
and add one pint of yeast sponge, half cupful sugar, lard size of an 
egg. one teaspoonful salt and half pint warm water, mix as quickly 
and softly as possible, let rise and when light knead quickly and 
put in pans; when light bake. KENTON COOK BOOK. 

A NEW FLAXXEL CAKE. 

One tablespoonful of butter, one pint of flour, one teaspoonful 
of salt, two eggs, two cupfuls of milk, two teaspoonfuls baking 
powder. Rub the butter into the flour and add the salt, beat the 



BREADS. 65 

yolks of the eggs light, add the milk to them and when well beaten 
stir the milk into the hour until quite smooth, beat the whites 
light, add them and lastly the baking powder and bake on a hot 
griddle. 

C< >RN GRIDDLE CAKES. 

Six ears of uncooked corn, one cupful of milk, one cupful of 
flour, one tablespoonful of baking- ^owder, one teaspoonful of 
melted butter, one-half teaspoonful of salt, two eggs. Grate the 
corn from the cob, it should measure a large pint; add the milk, 
salt, butter and beaten yolks of the eggs, then the flour, and lastly 
the beaten whites. Hake on a hot griddle, turning once and add- 
ing a little more Hour if the batter is too thin. D. 

FLANNEL CAKES. 

One quart flour, one pint meal, one teacupful milk, one teacup- 
ful yeast, three eggs, two teaspoonfuls salt. Beat all together and 
let it rise until usual time in warm place. 

BUCKWHEAT CAKES. 

Two teacupfuls buckwheat flour, one teacupful wheat flour, 
three teaspoonfuls baking powder, one teaspoonful salt. Mix all 
together and add sufficient sweet milk or water to make soft bat- 
ter. Bake on griddle at once. 

WAFFLES. 

One quart flour, one quart sour cream (buttermilk if you have 
no cream), six eggs, one and a half teaspoonfuls soda, half table- 
spoonful melted lard poured in after batter is mixed. This may 
be baked as flannel cakes or muffins. 

SUPERIOR RICE WAFFLES. 

( )ne quart flour, three eggs, one cupful boiled rice beaten into 
the flour, one light teaspoonful soda. Make into batter with but- 
termilk; bake quickly in waffle irons. 

OLD FASHIONED EGG BREAD. 

One pint milk, three e£gs well beaten, one teaspoonful salt, 
one tablespoonful melted butter; add enough sweet milk to make 
a rather thin batter; bake quickly. 



66 BREADS. 

BATTER BREAD. 

One cupful meal, one cupful sweet milk, one cupful buttermilk, 
two eggs, one tablespoonful butter, one tablespoonful flour, half 
teaspoonful salt and same of soda. 

VIRGINIA ASH CAKE. 

Add teaspoonful salt to quart sifted corn meal, make up with 
water and knead well, make into round, flat cakes, sweep a clean 
place on hottest part of the hearth, put cakes on it and cover with 
hot wood ashes, wash and wipe it dry before eating. Sometimes 
a cabbage leaf is placed under it and one over it before baking, in 
which case it must not be washed.. MRS. WATKIXS. 

CORN BREAD. 

One pint corn meal scalded, half pint milk, two eggs, table- 
spoonful baking powder. M RS. McD. R. YEN ABLE. 

GERMAN RUSKS. 

One quart flour, two eggs, two cupfuls sugar, two cupfuls but- 
ter and lard mixed, two cupfuls of potato veast, two cupfuls milk. 
one nutmeg. Put all ingredients in middle of flour, work well 
together and set to rise as loaf bread: wash rolls over with butter 
and sugar. 

SALLY LUNN. 

One quart flour, one teaspoonful salt, one tablespoonful white 
sugar, rub in heaping tablespoonful butter and lard in equal 
parts, then rub in an Irish potato mashed fine, half cupful yeast, 
three eggs well beaten. Make up dough to the consistency of 
ligfht bread dough with warm water in winter and cold in sum- 
mer, knead half hour; when it has risen light handle lightly, put 
into a cake mould and bake without second kneading". 

MRS. \Y ATKINS. 

SALLY LUNN. 

Four cupfuls sifted flour, one and a half cupfuls milk, four 
eggs, one and a half cupfuls sugar, quarter of a pound of butter, 
pinch of salt, three even teaspoonfuls baking powder. 

RUSK. 

One tablespoonful sugar, one and a half teaspoonfuls salt, one 
cupful scalded milk, quarter cup of yeast or sixth of a yeast cake, 



BREADS. 67 

flour to make soft dough. Mix ingredients and let dough rise 
over night, then heat quarter of a cupful of butter, quarter of a 
cupful sugar and one egg together and work into the dough, 
adding a little Hour to make it stiff enough to mould, set to ris< 
a second time, then shape into rolls or tiny loaves, let them rise 
again for an hour in a warm place and bake. 

SIPPETS. 

Sippets are evenly cut oblongs of bread, delicately toasted. 
They may be served as dry toast or with broiled birds or oysters. 

SNOW CAKES. 

Half tablespoonful butter, one tablespoonful sugar, whites of 
two egg's, one and a half cupfuls flour, one saltspoonful salt, one 
and a half teaspoonfuls baking powder, one cupful milk. Sift 
flour, salt and baking powder together four times, cream butter 
and sugar with a little milk, then add the well beaten whites. 
Bake in hot, buttered pans from twenty to thirty minutes. 

MISS SKILES. 



SANDWICHES. 



CHICKEN SANDWICHES. 

Chop the chickeiij mix with mayonnaise dressing, put it be- 
tween thin sliced bread with a lettuce leaf. 

AIRS. J. MAURY IX )\ 'I-:. 

CHEESE SANDWICHES. 

Take rich cheese and mash with silver fork, say one-fourth 
pound of cheese, yolks of two hard boiled eggs mixed with 
cheese, add enough mayonnaise dressing" to season well. Cut 
bread in thin slices and butter, spreading cheese between slices. 
A leaf of lettuce can be placed with cheese between bread. 
These sandwiches are nice served with salad. 

STUFFED ROLLS. 

Cut oft* end of roll and remove the inside, leaving only crust. 
Fill with a mixture of cheese, ham or chicken sandwich, a >ver 
top with small slice cut off. This is nice for picnics or a lunch for 
traveling. KENTON COOK BOOK. 

PATE DE FOIS GRAS SANDWICHES. 

Cut bread in very thin slices, butter, then cut diagonally, mak- 
ing sandwiches three cornered in shape. Spread between slices 
pate de fois gras. with or without lettuce leaf. Caviar can be used 
instead of the pate de fois gras. MRS. F. F. FIELD. 

HAM SANDWICHES. 

Grate one-quarter pound cold ham in bowl with one table- 
spoonful chopped pickle, one teaspoonful mustard, little black 
pepper, six dessertspoonfuls butter. Put in a bowl and stir 
quickly till a cream. Add ham and seasoning; mix all well to- 
gether. Spread mixture on thin slices of light bread. 

MRS. WATKINS. 

SHRIMP PASTE. 

One pint of shrimps well boiled, remove skins, be very careful 
to remove all pieces of shell, pound fine to a perfect paste, a table- 
spoonful of butter, cayenne pepper, salt, a little grated nutmeg. 
Put in small earthenware cups and bake; when cold pour over the 
tops melted butter to exclude the air. The paste will keep for a 
long time, and is fine as a sandwich. MISS \V.\( ! XFR. 



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THREE CUBAN RECIPES. 



CREMA DE LECHE DE COCO. 

Grate one cocoanut, add one cupful of water, press through a 
hue strainer. To the juice add an equal quantity of thick syrup 
(made by boiling- sugar and water in proportion of one cupful of 
water to a pint of sugar) and six eggs beaten well. Cook over a 
slow fire until it thickens like custard; when cool dust with pow- 
dered cinnamon. Serve cold. 

PALANQUITA DE SANTI SPIRITA. 

Roast one pound of shelled peanuts until brown, skin them and 
grind fine like coffee. Put this in a saucepan with one pint of 
sugar syrup and boil until thick; roll into balls size of a large mar- 
ble when cool enough to handle. Drop these balls as fast as made 
into a powder prepared beforehand by grinding another quarter 
of a pound of roasted peanuts. 

FLANDES RESTAURANTE DE CARDEXAS 

Beat for half an hour the yolks of eight eggs, add to them one- 
quarter of a grated nutmeg, eight tablespoonfuls of wine, a pinch 
of powdered cinnamon, six tablespoonfuls of syrup (made from 
boiling one cupful of sugar and a half cupful of water until thick) 
and six tablespoonfuls o'f chicken stock. Put all these ingredients 
into a porcelain lined saucepan, cook for half an hour or until 
quite thick, stirring frequently. Serve cold. 

MRS. M. C. D. TOHNS< >N. 



SALADS 



TOMATO JELLY. 

( )ne can of tomatoes or in season eight tomatoes skinned and 
stewed, quarter of a box of gelatine; pass tomatoes through sieve 
to remove seeds, etc., season with pepper and salt and add gelatine 
which has been previously melted in hot water. Pour into a 
mould and place on ice. When cold turn out, garnish with let- 
tuce leaves and pour mayonnaise dressing over the whole. To 
improve appearance of it place sliced cucumber in bottom of 
mould. 

OYSTER SALAD. 

Half gallon fresh oysters, yolks four hard boiled eggs, one raw 
egg well whipped, two large spoonfuls salad oil or melted 
butter, two teaspoonfuls salt, two teaspoonfuls black pepper, two 
teaspoonfuls made mustard, one teaspoonful good vinegar, two 
good sized pickled cucumbers cut up fine, nearly as much celery 
as oysters cut fine. Drain liquor from oysters and throw into hot 
vinegar on fire, let remain till plump, not cooked, then put at 
once into clear, cold water; this gives them a plump look and they 
will not shrink ; drain water from them and set a" ay in cool place 
and prepare dressing. Mash volks as fine as possible and rub into 
it the salt, pepper and mustard, then rub in oil few drops at a time ; 
when all smooth add beaten egg and then vinegar, spoonful at a 
time. Set aside, mix oysters, celery and pickle, tossing up well 
with silver fork, sprinkle in salt to taste, then pour dressing over 
all. 

TOMATO SALAD. 

Take nice, firm tomatoes, take out center, fill with chopped 
green peppers and a little chopped apple; serve with thick may- 
onnaise. MRS. WATKINS. 

CHICK EX SALAD. 

One large chicken boiled tender, remove all skin, fat and 
gristle and mince into small pieces (or cut in small pieces if you 
prefer), cover with dam]) cloth to keep meat moist, cut into small 
pieces three stalks of celery, mix celery and chicken, add pepper, 
salt and celery salt to taste, make mayonnaise and mix part of it 
with celery and chicken, reserving enough to put on thickly over 
the top. Lay in nest of lettuce leaves and garnish top with olives 
(seed taken out) and hard boiled eggs. 



76 SALADS. 

LOBSTER SALAD. 

Pick lobster to pieces as you do chicken, mix with celery and 
season. Mix with thick mayonnaise and serve on lettuce leaves 
with mayonnaise poured over top. Garnish as for chicken salad. 

SWEETBREAD SALAD. 

This salad is made in the same way. Take pair of sweetbreads, 
parboil and put on ice for couple of hours, remove all parts not 
to be used and cut into small pieces, mix with celery and may- 
onnaise and serve as in above salads. MRS. F. F. FIELD. 

TOMATOES WITH CELERY. 

This may be served at luncheon or as a salad course at dinner. 
Select firm tomatoes of a good size, cut a slice from the top of 
each and scoop out all the seeds and soft pulp, being careful not 
to break the sides. Cut celery into small dice, mix it with a may- 
onnaise dressing, fill shells with the mixture, place a teaspoonful 
of the dressing on top of each tomato and serve individually on a 
bed of lettuce leaves, placing three or four small leaves on each 
plate and the tomato in the center. 

CUCUMBER SALAD. 

Peel the encumbers, which should be of medium size, cut them 
into halves, take out the seeds and lay the sections in cold, un- 
salted water for one hour. Y\ Tien ready to serve peel ten medium 
sized tomatoes and chop them fine; also chop half dozen sprats of 
water cress. Mix the two together and add a teasnoonful of 
onion juice and salt and pepper to taste. Drain the cucumbers 
and wipe them dry on a soft cloth. Lay them on a bed of lettuce 
leaves and cover them with the mixture. Pour the juice of one 
lemon over the whole, add a tablespoonful of salad oil and serve. 

SALADE A LA CARLTOX. 

Cut chicken into neat slices, arrange them down the center of a 
long dish in alternation with slices of cold ham or tongue, mask 
the whole with good mayonnaise and sprinkle with French cap- 
ers. Arrange about this preparation a salad of lettuce mixed with 
beets and encumbers, or a macedoine of cooked vegetables ac- 
cording to season. 

BEAX SALAD. 

To make bean salad string the beans, cut them through the 
center and boil in salted water until tender. When cold throw 



SALADS. 7J 

over them a French dressing made of vinegar, oil, pepper and 
salt, and, if liked, a little chopped parsley. D. 

['( >.\1AT( >ES AND SWEETBREAD SALAD. 

Make sweetbread salad as directed: lake one dozen nice to- 
matoes (medium size), remove skin and cut hole in center, remov- 
ing seeds, etc. Into this cavity put sweetbread salad and cover 

wiin mayonnaise. 

MAY( >NNAISE DRESSING. 

Yolks of six eggs, whites of two, dash cayenne pepper, table- 
spoonful mustard, quart bottle best olive oil, saltspoonful each of 
table and celery salt, juice of four lemons. Rub eggs (un- 
beaten) and mustard well together, put in cayenne and add oil, 
drop by drop, stirring constantly; when all the oil has been ab- 
sorbed and mixture is thick and light add salt, and after, lemon 
juice. Mix part of the dressing with the salad and spread the 
rest over the top just before serving. Keep dressing in cool place 
until read\- for nse. MRS. F. F. FIELD. 

POTATO SALAD. 

Cut six medium sized, cold boiled potatoes in form of dice, 
grate one small onion and pour over one teacupful boiling water; 
then add mayonnaise dressing. Three finely cut stalks of celery 
are an improvement and some add a little parsley. 

CHEESE SALAD. OR MOCK CRAB. 

( hie-half pound pickled shrimps, quarter pound of good old 
cheese, one tablespoonful salad oil, one teaspoonful each of cay- 
enne pepper, salt and white sugar and made mustard, four table- 
spoonfnls celery vinegar. Mince the shrimps and grate the 
cheese, stir the various condiments into the cheese, adding vine- 
gar last; let all stand together ten minutes before adding the 
shrimps. Garnish with lemon. 

FRENCH DRESSING. 

Three tablespoonfnls oil, one of vinegar, one saltspoonful salt, 
half saltspoonful pepper. Tut salt and pepper into cup and add 
one tablespoonful of the oil; when thoroughly mixed add re- 
mainder of oil and the vinegar. This rs dressing sufficient for six 
persons. Manv like grated onion inice in the dressing. 

KEXTOX COOK ROOK. 



78 SALADS. 

WALDORF SALAD. 

Take equal parts of pippin apples and celery cut into small 
pieces and lay on crisp leaves of lettuce, make good mayonnaise 
dressing and in it mix whites of two eggs beaten to a stiff froth 
and pour over all. As you peel and slice apples throw into cold 
water to keep white. MISS SKILES. 

ORANGE SALAD. 

Prepare the fruit by slicing, sprinkle with a half teaspoonful of 
powdered cloves to each dozen of fruit, strew plentifully with 
sugar. Mix in a cup or bowl the strained juice of half a lemon, 
half a glass of sherry and one teaspoonful of orange flower water. 
Mix and pour over the salad and serve. 

MRS. M. D. C. JOHNS< >N. 

FRUIT SALAD. 

Slice oranges and bananas very thin, sprinkle with half cupful 
of sugar, two tablespoonfuls sherry and one tablespoonful mar- 
aschino, and then place in refrigerator for an hour. Wine and 
maraschino may be omitted in favor of lemon juice. 

MAYONNAISE OF CELERY. 

Use only the white part of the celery. Cut it into half inch 
lengths, season with salt and pepper, and when ready to mix allow 
one-half cupful of mayonnaise dressing to each cupful and a half 
of celery. 

SALAD DRESSING WITHOUT OIL. 

Two eggs, one-half teaspoonful of salt, one teaspoonful of corn 
starch, one cupful of vinegar, one teaspoonful of mustard, one tea- 
spoonful of sugar, one tablespoonful of butter, one-eighth salt- 
spoonful of pepper. Place the mustard, salt, pepper, sugar and 
corn starch in a bowl, mix them well together and add the butter 
and the well beaten eggs, using both yolks and whites. Set the 
bowl in a stew pan of hot water and cook until the dressing is 
thick, stirring constantly. When done add the vinegar, which 
should not be too strong. Use when quite cold. 

MAYONNAISE DRESSING. 

One teaspoonful dry mustard, one and a half of salt, pinch cay- 
enne pepper, mix well with one and a half teaspoonfuls vinegar 



SALADS. 79 

to smooth paste, then add one raw egg, white and yolk; beat well; 
half pint oil, gradually heating - all the time; half gill vinegar or 
lemon juice. ' MRS. L. E. BAILEY. 

SHRIMP SALAD. 

Lay shrimps in cold water for couple of hours; when ready to 
serve make nest of lettuce leaves, upon which place shrimps and 
cover with mayonnaise. 

SALMON SALAD. 

One can salmon picked over and all bone. etc.. removed. 
Mash salmon smooth, add two stalks of celery chopped fine and 
cracker crnmhs. add juice three lemons and mayonnaise. Serve 
on lettuce leaves. MISS FIELD. 



E. I. Sacks 



DE \ LER IN 



323 Centre Market. 

54 Western Market. 



Strange, is it JMot ? 

But Cruel 

That Burchell's Spring Leaf 
Tea at fifty cents a pound 
grows on the same plant at the 
same time with tea at twice the 
price ! 

SOLD ONLY IN HALF POUND 
PAPERS. 



N. W. BURCHELL 



1325 F Street 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 

C €. tribby... 

Reliable Jeweler. 
3143-3145 M St. N. W. 



CP-TO D\TE CLOTHIEK 
AMI HATTER • • 



A. M. BAER... 

UP -TO-DM 

AMI II ATI 

Cor. 32d &, M Sts. Georgetown. 

,. Henry White .. 

935 F Street 

Kranicta & Bond and Everett Pianos. 
and Music. 

Low Prices and Easy Terms. 



1 1. 1 F. B. 



Hardware and Harness. 
dealers in Contractors and Ma- 
chinists 1 Supplies 



1206 2vd«J 1212 32<I 5tr<?et, 
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Daw & Marceron... 

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Room Mouldings .. .. 

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Frefy\Pure\) 

Novel ties i r? Faacy Baskets >«$ ""•| 
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STOVES AND RANGES. 



House Furnishing Goods. 



PIES AND PUDDINGS. 



ORANGE PIE. 

< rrate the \ ellow peel i if i »ne large orange and mix with juice i >1 
two, add one cupful of sugar and the beaten yolks of three eggs. 
Beat whites to stiff froth and beat it in one cupful of milk; then 
mix all and bake in a puff paste. 

A RICHER KIND. 

Four eggs, two spoonfuls butter, one cupful sugar, all beaten to 
a cream with the juice and grated rind of two oranges and a half 
pint of whipped cream added last, all beaten together and baked 
in a rich paste for twenty-five minutes in moderate oven. 

TRANSPARENT PIE. 

One and a half pounds butter (creamed), three pounds sugar 
put with the butter and well beaten together, yolks twenty-four 
eggs, well beaten; then mixed with butter and sugar and all well 
beaten together. Bake slowly. Beat whites of eggs and spread 
i »yer tops of pies as you wish. 

POTATO PIE. 

Eight large, white potatoes, half pound butter, five eggs, sugar 
to taste, glass of wine, half a nutmeg, juice and grated peel of 
two lemons. Don't add butter to potatoes until they are nearly 
cold. MRS. SPENCER WATKINS. ' 

CREAM PUFFS. 

One cupful of sifted flour, one cupful of water, one-half cupful 
of butter, one-half teaspoonful of salt, three eggs, two tablespoon- 
fuls of sugar. Put butter, sugar, salt and water on the fire in a 
large saucepan, and when the water begins to boil add the flour 
dry, sifting it in by degrees with the left hand, while constantly 
stirring with the right. Stir vigorously until the mixture is per- 
fectly smooth — about three minutes will generally be long 
enough. Remove the pan from the fire, turn the batter into a 
bowl and set it away to cool. When cool put in the eggs, un- 



$2 PIES AND PUDDINGS. 

beaten, adding but one at a time and beating vigorously after 
each addition. When all the eggs are in beat tlie batter until it is 
smooth and soft, at least fifteen minutes being necessary. Lightly 
butter a baking pan and drop the mixture into it from a table- 
spoon, using a spoonful for each puff and placing the puffs an 
inch apart. Bake for thirty minutes in a quick oven. These 
puffs are to be served cold. After taking them from the oven 
split them open and put in the cream, for which use the following: 
One-half pint of milk, one egg (yolk only), one and one-half 
tablespoonfuls of sugar, one tablespoonful (even) of corn starch, 
one-half teaspoonful of salt, two teaspoonfuls of vanilla, one-half 
teaspoonful of butter. Place the yolk of an egg in a teacup, beat 
it light with a fork, and add two tablespoonfuls of the cold milk. 
Place the corn starch in another cup, add to it the same quantity 
of milk, and when the starch is well dissolved add the egg mix- 
ture. Place the rest of the milk on the fire in a small double 
boiler, and when it boils stir in the mixture of egg and corn 
starch. Let the whole boil for three minutes, add the salt, sugar 
and butter, remove from the fire, and when cool add the flavoring. 
Pour a small spoonful of the cream into the hollow of each puff, 
replace the top and serve. These puffs may be eaten hot without 
the cream, and with a strawberry sauce. 

RHUBARB PIE. 

Skin the stalks, cut in lengths of half an inch, fill crust with the 
fruit, strew thickly with sugar. Cover with top crust and bake in 
slow oven three-quarters of an hour. 

PUMPKIN PIE. 

One quart cream, one pint stewed pumpkin, six eggs, two cup- 
fuls sugar, one cupful molasses, one nutmeg grated, one table- 
spoonful ginger, two tablespoonfuls cinnamon, one small tea- 
spoonful salt, one tablespoonful flour rubbed smooth with little 
milk. Then stir flour in the pumpkin, add sugar, molasses, spices 
and salt, the eggs thoroughly beaten, the cream last. This quan- 
tity will make' three pies. KENTON COOK BOOK. 

WHISKEY PIE. 

One cupful apples stewed and sifted, one cupful sugar, one cup- 
ful cream, quarter cupful butter, one wine glass sherry or whis- 
key, three eggs beaten separately and a little nutmeg. Beat 
sugar, butter and apples together, then add wine, milk, nutmeg 
and yolks in order named. Add whites last; no upper crust. Add 
more whiskey if you wish. MRS. BARBER. 



PIES AND PUDDINGS. 8j 

CH( H'( )LATE PIE. 

One pint milk, quarter pound butter, half pound sugar, eighth 
of a pound of flour, vanilla flavoring, half cupful grated choco- 
late. Boil milk and butter together, putting teaspoonful of sugar 
to prevent milk from sticking to bottom of saucepan; mix sugar, 
flour and chocolate dry; when milk boils dump at one time the 
above mixture in the boiling milk, stirring rapidly until it thick- 
ens. When cold add flavoring; All deep pie plates that have been 
lined with thick paste. 

LEMON PIE. 

Two cupfuls boiling water, with four tablespoonfuls corn 
starch, two cupfuls sugar, half cupful butter creamed, juice and 
rinds of four lemons, three eggs. Put vellow of egg when nearlv 
cold. MISS SKILES. 

APPLE PIE. 

Take half peck tart apples, cut in quarters and cook in small 
quantity of water with skin and seeds left on. Put through sifter; 
when cold sweeten to taste. Butter size of an egg, white of one 
e gg beaten to stiff froth, flavor with nutmeg or lemon, put in rich 
crust that has been baked. MRS. DOUGHTY. 

APPLE CREAM PIE. 

Line pie pan with puff paste, have some apples (three medium 
apples for one pie) stewed or steamed until tender, place in pan, 
sweeten and flavor with nutmeg one pint of rich cream; pour 
over apples. Bake in slow oven. The cream will be thick when 
pie is cold. 

PEACH MERINGUE. 

Line pans with puff paste, fill with canned peaches cut in 
halves, sweeten to taste, bake fifteen minutes. Make a meringue 
of whites of eggs and powdered sugar, put a tablespoonful on 
each half peach, return to oven for a few minutes to brown slight- 
ly. Should be eaten the day it is made. MRS. HOGE. 

* APPLE TART. 

Line a plate with plain paste and fill with pared, cored and 
quartered apples. Add a scanty cupful of sugar, a quarter of a 
cupful of water and a sprinkling of cinnamon. Bake in a mod- 
erate oven for forty minutes. When baking any fruit pie with an 



84 PIES AND PUDDINGS. 

upper crust success depends upon retaining the juices in the 
cooking. To accomplish this press the two crusts together at 
their juncture, wet with cold water an inch wide strip ot old white 
cotton cloth long enough to reach about the circumference of 
the pie, and lay this about the edge, pressing it to the upper crust 
and under the edge of the tin. it will adhere to both as it dries 
in the cooking and will form a secure binding, keeping in the 
juice. Remove it as soon as the pie is taken from the oven. D. 

APPLE MERINGUE. 

Six large apples, quarter pound butter, half pound sugar, six 
eggs, reserving the whites, with which make an icing; brown on 
top. MISS SKILES. 

PUFF PASTE. 

One pound flour, three quarters of a pound butter, yolks twc 
eggs, little salt, teaspooonful sugar, little ice water. Sift and 
weigh flour and put on board or marble slab, sprinkle little salt, 
and very little sugar over it. Beat yolks of eggs; stir into them 
a few spoonfuls of ice water; pour this slowly into center of flour 
with left hand, working it at the same time well into the mass 
with tips of fingers of right hand. Continue to work it, turning 
fingers around on the board until paste is smooth and firm. Work 
butter (which must be very firm), until moisture and salt are 
wiped out, and it is quite supple; care must be taken, however, 
to keep butter from getting too soft, as it would then ruin the 
paste. Divide into three equal parts, spread one part as flatly and 
evenly as possible over half the crust, turn the other over half it, 
folding a second time from right to left; roll this out, spread 
second portion of butter on half of crust, fold and roll out as 
before, repeating same process for third portion of butter. The 
paste has now been given three turns; it should be given six; 
turning and rolling paste after butter is in; after the first three 
turns, the paste should be put on the ice for ten or fifteen min- 
utes between each of the last three turns to prevent butter getting 
soft. Each time before dough is folded, it should be turned half 
round, so as to roll in different direction each time; this makes 
ii- more even. To turn paste, hold end to rolling-pin, then roll 
the pin; the dough will fold loosely around it; sprinkle board with 
flour, then the dough can be unrolled in side direction ; this pre- 
vents handling. When folded the last time, put paste on platter, 
cover and place on ice for half hour; then roll out at once, or as 
long as kept in a half-frozen state, it may be kept a day or two. 
Use only firm, solid butter for puff paste. 

KENTON COOK BOOK. 



PIES AND PUDDINGS 85 

BR( n >KLYN PUDDING. 

One cupful raisins, one cupful suet, one cupful molasses, one 
cupful milk, two teaspoonfuls yeast powder sifted in Hour. Boil 
iu mould three or four hours. Add more raisins if you wish. 
Eat with Cahool or Hard sauce. MRS. A. MIDDLETOX. 

LEMON PUDDING. 

Four eggs, leaving out the whites of two, juice of four lemons, 
grated rind of two, two teacupfuls sugar, two tablespoonfuls 
corn starch, one tablespoonful butter, four cupfuls boiling water. 
J '.eat sugar and eggs together till very light. Add butter, 
corn starch, juice and rind of lemons; then pour on boiling water. 
Put on fire until it thickens, stirring all the time. Pour in pud- 
ding dish and bake in moderate oven half hour. Remove from 
stove and cover with meringue of whites of eggs and two table- 
spoonfuls pulverized sugar. Brown in hot oven, and serve with 
cream. Same recipe is an excellent filling for lemon pie. 

MRS. CALLAHAN. 

COCOANUT PUDDING. 

One pound of butter, half pound sugar, creamed together; 
whites eight eggs, half glass of brandy or wine, half pound grated 
cocoanut; bake in thin crust. 

BOILED FRUIT PUDDING. 

One pint milk, three eggs, one teaspoonful yeast powder, bread 
crumbs to make a tolerablv stiff batter, half pound currants, 
quarter pound raisins. Boil one and a half hours. Serve with 



POTATO PUDDING. 

Two pounds well mashed potatoes, one and a half pounds 
sugar, six eggs, half pound butter, one cup milk, wineglass wine 
and one of branch-; or flavor with vanilla or lemon juice. 

MISS SKILLS. 

PLUM PUDDING. 

One pound grated bread, one of suet, one of raisins, two of 
currants, half pound citron, half pound sugar, one pint boiling 
milk on the bread, one nutmeg, nine eggs, one teaspoonful salt, 
one wineglass of wine, one of brandv. Boil six hours. Serve 
with sauce. MRS. R. T. WATERS. 



86 PIES AND PUDDINGS. 

A NICE PUDDING. 

Quarter of a pound of lady fingers dipped in wine and rolled 
in jelly, put in bottom of pudding dish. Make custard of one 
pint milk and yellow of three eggs, sugar to taste; pour over 
cake. Make meringue of the whites. 

RUM PUDDING. 

Take a twenty-five cent sponge cake, cut in slits and pour in 
four tablespoonfuls rum; cover with icing made of one cupful 
sugar, enough water to melt it; boil till thick enough to string 
from spoon, pour slowly into white of one egg well beaten. 
Decorate with conserved cherries and blanched almonds; serve 
with whipped cream flavored with rum. 

PUDDING FROM SOLDIERS' HOME. 

Boil one quart milk, stir into it three tablespoonfuls corn starch 
and yolks of 'four eggs, six tablespoonfuls sugar. Boil it well 
and pour into a buttered pan; bake, flavor with lemon. Beat 
whites of eggs well with three tablespoonfuls sugar and when 
pudding is cool, put it over top and set in stove to brown. Serve 
with S. H. pudding sauce. 

APPLE BETTY. 

Pare and slice apples and put in pan, first layer of apples, then 
layer of sugar, piece of butter, layer of bread crumbs and some 
powdered cinnamon till pan is filled. 

SLICED APPLE OR PEACH PUDDING. 

Beat six eggs light, add one pint rich milk, pare some apples 
or peaches, slice thin; make eggs and milk into tolerably thick 
batter with flour; add small cup melted butter, bake in deep dish 
and serve with sauce of butter, sugar and nutmeg. 

MRS. SPENCER W ATKINS. 

PLUM PUDDING. 

One teacupfu] molasses, one teacupful chopped suet, one of 
currants, one of raisins, one of butter-milk with a spoonful of 
soda, one tablespoonful ginger, one of ground cinnamon, nut- 
meg to suit taste: flour fruit before putting in batter; steam four 
or five hours. 



PIES AND PUDDINGS. 87 

CHOCOLATE PUDDING. 

One quart milk, boiled with one ounce grated chocolate, sweet- 
en to taste, flavor with vanilla. When chocolate has thoroughly 
dissolved, take off and let cool; when cool enough, stir in yolks of 
six eggs, then put in pudding dish and bake until of the consist- 
ency of baked custard. While baking beat whites of eggs to stiff 
froth, adding six tablespoonfuls of sugar; season with lemon, 
put on pudding and brown nicely. 

MRS. WILLSON OFFUTT. 

FIG PUDDING. 

Half pound dried figs, half pound dry breadcrumbs, half 
pound beef suet, two eggs, and two ounces sugar. Pour hot 
water over figs and soak about ten minutes, until soft. Strain 
water, chop figs very fine, with suet, crumbs and sugar; when 
thoroughly mixed and well chopped, add the two eggs beaten 
till very light. Pour into battered mould, and let boil in a pot 
from four to five hours. Serve with melted wine sauce. 

COTTAGE PUDDING. 

Two eggs, piece butter size of an egg, nutmeg, little vanilla, 
pint milk, enough flour to make batter drop from spoon, two 
teaspoonsfuls baking powder. Serve with wine sauce. 

BLACKBERRY PUDDING. 

A delicious blackberry pudding is made by beating six eggs 
and adding a cup of milk with half a teacupful of melted butter, 
a pint of flour and a teaspoonful of baking powder. Mash a 
quart of ripe blackberries ; sweeten and stir into the batter. 
Turn into a pudding dish; set in the oven to bake and serve with 
lemon sauce. 

APPLE DOWDY. 

To make apple dowdv, butter a baking dish and line the bot- 
tom and sides of it with thin slices of buttered bread. Fill the 
centre of the dish with thinly-sliced apples; grate over a little nut- 
meg. Mix half a cupful of molasses with half a cupful of boiling 
water, and pour over the apples. Sprinkle with brown sugrar, 
and put over more buttered bread. Cover the top of the baking 
dish with a tin pie pan. and set in a moderate oven for two hours. 
When done, loosen the edges with a knife, and turn out on a dish. 
Serve with sugar and cream. 



88 PIES AND PUDDINGS. 

MRS. BRADLEY'S PUDDING. 

One cupful molasses, one cupful milk, half cupful butter, 
enough flour to make thick batter, fruit to taste. Eat with wine 
sauce. .MRS. WATKINS. 

TEXAS PUDDING. 

Three eggs, two cupfuls sugar, one cupful sweet milk, two 
tablespoonfuls flour, one cupful butter, season with fresh lemon 
or essence of lemon and little vinegar. Bake on a crust. 

MISS VENABLE. 

LEMON BUTTER. 

Beat together three eggs, then beat in two teacupfuls sugar, 
juice and grated rind two lemons, one tablespoonful butter and 
half teacupful water; let simmer over fire for fifteen minutes, 
stirring all the time. MRS. DAVIDSON. 

JAM PUDDING. 

Three eggs, one cupful sugar, half cupful butter, one cupful 
jam, half cupful flour, half teaspoonful soda, three teaspoonfuls 
sour milk, one teaspoonful vanilla, cinnamon and nutmeg to 
taste; dissolve soda in milk. 

HUCKLEBERRY PUDDING. 

One cupful' sugar, one cup molasses, three eggs, half cupful 
butter, one nutmeg, one and a half teaspoonfuls cloves and all- 
spice mixed, one teaspoonful soda and one of cream tartar, one 
quart berries; stir in enough flour to make very stiff batter: bake 
one hour in two square tin pans. Serve with hard sauce. 

MISS SKILES. 

PLUM PUDDING. 

Two loaves baker's bread, one and a half pounds each of rai- 
sins and currants, half pound citron, eight eggs, one pound suet, 
chopped fine, one pint milk, enough flour to make it stiff enough 
to allow a large spoon to stand in it; nutmeg, allspice, cloves and 
mace to taste; grated rind of lemon, one small bowl brown sugar, 
little salt. MISS BUCKEY. 



PIES AND PUDDINGS. 89 

LEMON PUDDING. 

One lemon two large white potatoes boiled and mashed, three 
eggs, one cup sugar, one cup milk, butter size of an egg; _bake in 
thin crust. MRb - UULblin ' 

CUSTARD PUDDING. 

Five e°^s three pints milk, one teaspoonful corn starch, small 
pint sugar, teaspoonful vanilla; butter very thin bread and lay 
on top; bake brown and when done, sprinkle with pdvempd 
sugar. MRS - CALLAHAN. 

PEACH PUDDING. 

Twelve peaches pared and sliced, three eggs, half cup sugar, 
two tablespoonfuls corn starch wet in cold milk, one tablespoon- 
ful melted butter one pint milk. Scald milk, stir in corn starch, 
when it thickens remove from fire and add butter; when luke- 
warm add beaten yolks. Put peaches in baking dish, sprinkle 
with sugar, then pour over the creamy compound, bake in 
quick oven ten minutes. Make meringue of whites and little 
sugar, spread over top and brown. Eat cold with cream. 

ORANGE ROLEY-POLEY. 

Make light paste as for apple dumplings, roll in oblong sheet 
and lav oranges (sweet ones) peeled, sliced and seeded thickly 
over it, sprinkle well with white sugar, grate some of the peel 
over it and roll up closely, folding down the ends to secure the 
syrup; boiL in a pudding cloth or put in steamer and steam an 
hour and a half; serve with lemon sauce. Cherries, apple butter 
or currants can be used in the same way as oranges; serve them 
with a sweet sauce. MISS HOGE. 

APPLE DUMPLINGS. 

Pare a dozen good cooking apples and take out the cores. 
Make very light snort biscuit dough, roll out half an inch thick, 
and cut in large rounds; put one apple in the centre of each piece; 
fill the space from which the core was taken with sugar, and 
work the dough over the apple. Arrange on a plate a little 
smaller than the steamer; place it in the steamer and let steam 
for three-quarters of an hour. Serve hot on the plate on which 
they were steamed. Serve with hard sauce. 

APPLE TARTS. 

Apple tarts may be made by taking a pint of stewed apples; 
strain, and mix in the volks of six eggs, the juice and grated rinds 



90 PIES AND PUDDINGS. 

of two lemons, half a cupful of butter with one and a half cups of 
sugar; beat all together, and line small tart tins with very delicate 
puff paste; fill with the mixture, and bake in a very hot oven for 
five minutes. Spread the top of each tart with meringue, and 
set in the oven for one minute. 

APPLE SPONGE. 

This is made by covering a half box of gelatine with cold water 
and allowing it to stand for half an hour; then pour over it half 
a pint of boiling water, and stir until dissolved. Press a pint of 
stewed apples through a sieve and mix with the gelatine; add a 
pound of sugar, and stir until it melts; squeeze in the juice of 
two lemons; turn the mixture into a tin pan; set on ice until it 
begins to thicken. Beat the whites of three eggs; stir into the 
apples; beat all together until thick and cold. Pour into a mould 
and set on ice to harden. Serve with whipped cream. 



SAUCES FOR PUDDINGS. 



SAUCE FOR BOILED FRUIT PUDDING. 

( Quarter i if a pound of butter, one pound sugar; wine, brandy i ir 
vanilla: cream butter and sugar together, grate a little nutmeg 
oV er it. MISS SKILES. 

FOAMING SAUCE. 

Two even tablespoonfuls of butter, one-half cupful of powdered 
sugar, one egg (white), three tablespoonfuls of sherry or one tab- 
lespoonful o"f vanilla. Beat the butter to a cream and gradually 
add the sugar, then the well beaten white of the egg, and finally 
the flavoring. Beat well, and when the mixture is perfectly 
smooth set the bowl containing it in a pan of boiling water and 
serve when hot. ^- 

LEMON SAUCE. 

One cupful sugar, half cupful water, rind and juice of two lem- 
ons, yolks of three eggs; beat together sugar, lemon and water 
for twenty minutes, beat the yolks of the eggs, put basin contain- 
ing the syrup into another of- boiling water, stir the yolks into 
this and beat rapidly three minutes. Take off fire and continue 
beating for five minutes. KENTON COOK BOOK 



K. 



CREAM SAUCE. 

Beat one-quarter of a cupful of butter to a cream, add gradu- 
ally one-half of a cupful of powdered sugar, beating all the while. 
Add two teaspoonfuls of wine, and when well mixed four table- 
spoonfuls of cream. When ready to serve the sauce out over hot 
water. Stir until it is smooth and creamy. Serve at once. 

HARD SAUCE. 

Beat one-fourth cupful of butter to a cream, add gradually one- 
half of a cupful of powdered sugar, stirring constantly, and beat 
until very light. Add the unbeaten whites of two eggs, one at a 



94 SAUCES FOR PUDDINGS. 

time, thoroughly amalgamating one before adding the next, add 
one teaspoonful of vanilla, stir until well mixed, then add liquor if 
used, one tablespoonful of sherry or brandy; mix well, mold, and 
put in the ice box to harden before using. " MRS. WATKINS. 

BERRY SAUCE. 

The small fruits, such as raspberries, blackberries or straw- 
berries, make most satisfactory sauce for puddings. One pint of 
berries, one and one-half cup'fuls of powdered suf?ar, one table- 
spoonful of butter, one egg. Place the berries in a bowl, add a 
tablespoonful of granulated sugar and mash slightly to draw out 
the juices, setting the bowl in a moderate heat; beat the butter to 
a cream, add the powdered sugar and when thoroughly mixed 
add the beaten white of the egg. Add the mashed berries just 
before serving. 

SUNSHINE SAUCE. 

One tablespoonful corn starch, one-half pint boiling water, 
one-half cupful sugar, one egg, one-half tablespoonful butter, one 
teaspoonful vanilla. Moisten the corn starch in a little cold water, 
add the boiling water, cook for one minute and add the sugar. 
Pour this hot over the well beaten egg and add the butter and 
vanilla. 

PLUM PUDDING SAUCE. 

Half pound butter, one and a half pounds sugar, one pint wine; 
cream butter and sugar, boil wine, stir together while boiling. 
Season with nutmeg. MRS. R. T. WATERS. 

S. H. PUDDING SAUCE. 

One small cupful sugar, one egg, piece of butter size of walnut, 
one tablespoonful flour, two tablespoonfuls cold water; beat up 
all together and pour into half pint of boiling milk or water, flavor 
with wine or brandy. MRS. WATKINS. 

WINE SAUCE. 

One cupful butter, two cupfuls powdered sugar, one-half cup- 
ful wine: beat butter to a cream, add sugar gradually, and when 
very light add wine, which has been made hot, a little at a time; 
place bowl in basin of hot water and stir for two minutes. 

MISS HOGE. 



SAUCES FOR PUDDINGS. 95 

BEATEN SAUCE. 

Beat butter to a cream, then work in the sugar, nutmeg, one 
egg, wine and boiling water. MRS. W ATKINS. 

CAHOOL SAUCE. 

One and a half pints brown sugar, one pint water, one table- 
spoonful butter, yolks two eggs, one nutmeg grated. Pour water, 
boiling, over sugar, and boil until it becomes a rich syrup, then 
put in butter and nutmeg, and pour the mixture over the yolks 
of the eggs (well beaten), stirring all the while; then replace it 
over the fire and stir till it thickens. Eat while hot. 

MRS. A. MIDDLETOX. 

JAM PUDDING JUICE. 

One cupful sugar, half cupful butter, one egg, three table- 
spoonfuls of boiling water. MISS SKILES. 

RASPBERRY SAUCE. 

The peel of one lemon, one cupful raspberry juice, one table- 
spoonful sugar, one-third teaspoonful cinnamon, one cupful 
water, two teaspoonfuls corn starch. Boil the lemon peel, sugar, 
spice and water together for five minutes, mix the corn starch 
with two tablespoonfuls of water, add it to the boiling water, boil 
for one minute, remove the lemon peel, add the raspberry juice 
and serve either hot or cold, as preferred. 



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98 



DESSERTS. 



WINE JELLY. 

To one package gelatine add one pint cold water, juice and 
peels, cut thin, of three lemons; let stand one hour, then add one 
quart boiling water, one pint sherry, one and a half pounds sugar; 
when sugar has dissolved strain and set away. 

M R.S. A. MIDDLETON. 

COMPOTE OF PEACHES. 

To make a compote of peaches, cut pared ones in halves, put 
in the saucepan, allow them to become heated through in their 
own juice, with four tablespoonfuls of sugar sprinkled over. 
Moisten one tablespoonful of corn starch with cold water, add 
two tablespoonfuls lemon juice and one egg very lightly whipped. 
Put the peaches on squares of sponge cake, hollow side up. Take 
the syrup of their juice and mix the corn starch, etc.. in it. Place 
on stow and allow them to bubble up together, and when slightly 
cooled pour over the peaches; put in a cold place. The syrup will 
jelly all about the fruit and form a delicious dessert. Serve with 
plain cream. This may be' prepared an hour or two before dinner. 

BAKED PEACHES. 

Peel a dozen large clingstone peaches, fully ripe, but firm. 
Stick three cloves in each, then put them in a deep baking dish 
with a half cupful of water, a full cu\> of sugar and a heaping tea- 
spoonful of the best butter. Cook slowly until done, and serve 
either cold, with cream, or hot. as an accompaniment to roast 
fowl or game. Or you can make a superlative peach tapioca pud- 
ding by adding to them, when half done, two tablespoonfuls of 
tapioca, previously soaked twelve hours in cold water. 

A VERY NICE DESSERT. 

Dissolve one-half box of gelatine in one pint hot water, let 
stand long enough to cool a little, but not congeal; then add 
whites of three eggs, juice two lemons and sugar to taste. Beat 
all to stiff froth and pour into moulds. Serve with a custard made 
with the yolks of the eggs and one pint milk; season with vanilla. 



DESSERTS. 99 

CUSTARD WITH T( >AST. 

Four eggs, three pints milk, one teaspoonful rum starch, small 
pint sugar, teaspoonful vanilla. Butter very thin toast, lay on top 
and bake brown, sprinkle pulverized sugar over and serve with 
cream. 

ICED APPLES. 

Pare and core one dozen fine, firm apples, leaving them whole; 
place in stew pan with enough water to cover and stew till von 
can pierce them with a straw, then remove from fire and set in 
dish to cool, then fill center with currant or some other jelly and 
ice over as von would cake: serve in glass dish and eat with cream 
or c u stard . MRS. WAT K 1 N S . 

FIG PUDDING. 

One-half pound figs, one-half pound bread crumbs, six ounces 
moist sugar (wet sugar before weighing), six ounces beef suet, 
two eggs, little nutmeg, cupful milk: figs and suet to be chopped 
very fine; mix all tog-ether and steam in mould or steamer two 
hours; cat with sauce. 

FLOAT. 

One quart milk, one pint cream, ten eggs., four tabic spoonfuls 
sugar, teaspoonful flavoring; whites of eggs well beaten to stiff 
both, slightly cooked in scalding milk and kept in cool place till 
time for using. Custard of the well beaten yolks, sugar, cream 
and milk allowed to come to a boil; flavor when cold. 

FLOATING ISLAND. 

( hie quart new milk, yolks five eggs, five tablespoonfuls sugar, 
two teaspoon fnls vanilla, or bitter almond extract. Beat yolks well, 
stir in sugar and add hot, not boiling, milk, little at a time. Boil 
till it begins to thicken. When cool flavor and pour in gia.^s dish. 
Before serving add teacupful whipped cream. Yon can make 
meringue of whites of two of the eggs and two tablespoonfuls 
powdered sugar. KENTON COOK BOOK. 

ROSE CUSTARD. 

One pint of milk, three eggs, one-half cupful of sugar, one-half 
pint of raspberry juice, one-eighth teaspoonful of salt. Heat the 
milk to the boiling point and pour it upon the well beaten eggs, 
then add the sugar and the salt. Cool until hike warm, when the 
raspberry juice may be stirred in. If not sufficiently colored, add 



100 DESSERTS. 

;i few drops of carmine. Pour into a buttered fancy mould and 
sot in a saucepan of boiling water. Put into the oven and cook 
until firm. When cold turn <>ut and serve on small plates. This 
makes a must attractive dessert. 

C< )FFEE CUSTARD. 

Excellent coffee custard may be made thus: Mix thoroughly, 
eight egg yolks with eight ounces <>!' sugar, dilute with six cus- 
tard cupfuls of boiling milk and a good cupful of black coffee, 
pass through a line strainer, till the cups and put them in a low 
pan with boiling water to half their height, take off the froth that 
may rise to the surface, cover the pan and let its contents simmer 
gently tor twenty minutes. When the custard is well set. let it 
cool in the water, drain, wipe the cups and serve cold. 

WHITE CUSTARD. 

One teacupful of milk, one egg (white only), two teaspoonfuls 
of sugar, one-eighth saltspoonful of salt. Place the white of the 
egg in a howl, add the sugar and salt, mixing them thoroughly, 
hut not beating the egg. Heat the milk slightly, but not to the 
boiling point, and add it slowly to the egg. Stir until quite 
smooth, straining the mixture if the c^l; is not entirely dissolved 
in the milk. Place the mixture in two small custard cups, set 
them in a dish of boiling water, place in the oven, cover with 
brown paper to prevent the coloring of the custard, and bake in a 
moderate heat. A sil.vcr knife will come from the custards quite 
clean when they are sufficiently baked. 

TAPIOCA CUSTARD. 

< hie tablespoonful of pearl tapioca, one tablespoonful of pre- 
pared cocoanut, one-eighth saltspoonful of salt, one-half pint of 
milk, one egg, one-quarter cupful of sugar. Soak the tapioca 
over night in half a cupful of water. In the morning place it in 
a small granite stew pan, add the milk and set the pan in another 
half full of boiling water. Cook slowly until the tapioca is clear. 
Beat the yolk of the egg", tin' sugar, salt and cocoanut together, 
add a tablespoonful of water, and when well mixed stir this mix- 
ture into the milk. Cook four minutes, stirring all the time, then 
pour into custard cups. Beat the white of the egg, add a tea- 
spoonful of the sugar, spread on top of the custard, add a sprink- 
ling of cocoanut and brown delicately in the oven. This is a 
favorite dish. 



DESSERTS. lol 

\ AXILLA S( IUFFLE 

One-half pint of milk, one tablespoonful of corn starch, two 
tablespoonfuls of flour, two tablespoonfuls of sugar, four eggs, 
one-quarter teaspoonful of salt. I lace the milk on the tire in a 
graniteware pan set in another containing boiling water. Wet 

the corn starch and flour in half a cupful ol water, and add to the 
milk when the latter is scalding hot. Stir until the liquid thickens, 

and then add the yolks of the eggs and the salt and sugar, and re- 
move from the lire at once. Beat the whites of the eggs to a stilY 
froth, stir them into the hot mixture, pour into souffle or custard 
enps, set in a pan of hoi water, hake in the oven for fifteen min 
utes and serve with Sunshine sauce. 

RASPBERRY CREAM. 

( me and one-half pints of raspberries, two tablespoonfuls of 
granulated sugar, two tablespoonfuls of cold milk, one-half pint 

of cream, one tahlcspoonfnl of powdered sugar, one ounce of gel- 
atine, one cupful of hot milk, one-half teaspoonful of vanilla. 
I 'lace a pint < >f the raspberries in a hi >w 1, add the p< »wdered sugar 
and let them stand for an hour, then pass through a fine sieve. 
I 'nt the gelatine into the cold milk and soak For half an hour, then 
add the hot milk and the granulated sugar, stir until the ingre- 
dients are melted, then set aside, and when cold add the gelatine 
to the raspberries. Whip the cream, flavor it with the vanilla, 
whisk all lightly together, and turn into a mould with a hollow 
center. Set in a cold place and when stiff turn it from the mould, 
place in the hollow the remaining half pint of raspberries which 
have meanwhile been sweetened and allowed to stand for an hour. 
All gelatine desserts are besl when made the day before using. 

J I ' X K ET. 

( )ne pint of milk, two tablespoonfuls of sugar, two teaspoonfuk 
of Rennet wine, one teaspoonful of vanilla. Warm the milk until 
tepid, add the sugar and flavoring and when the sugar is dis- 
solved stir in the Rennet wine. Turn into the serving dish, let 
it stand for ten minutes and then place carefully in a cold place. 
Serve very cold, with or without sugar and cream. Rennet cost- 
hut a small sum and makes a delicate dessert. Junket is quite 
solid when read) to serve, which will he in a couple of hours if 
left in a c< )ld place. 

T.AXAXA CREAM. 

Five bananas, five ounces of sugar, one-half pint of cream, one- 
half glassful of brandy, one lemon (juice onlv). one-half ounce 



102 DESSERTS. 

gelatine. Peel the bananas, pound them in a mortar with the 
sugar, beat the cream to a stiff froth, stir in the bananas, brandy 
and lemon juice, mix well, add the gelatine dissolved in a little 
boiling water, gently pour into a mould, and stand in a cool place 
to "set." felly must be eaten with a fork. 

BANANAS BAKED. 

I 'eel one dozen rather green bananas, nil) them over with a 
split lemon, place in a pan with red wine poured over them until 
ii stand three-quarters of an inch dee]). Drop in six cloves and a 
few sticks of cinnamon, three tablespoonfuls of granulated sugar 
and one tablespoonful of butter cut in bits. I kike in a quick oven 
until light brown. This makes a sufficient quantity for six per- 
sons. MRS. M. C. D.JOHNSON. 

AMBR( )S1A. 

Sweet oranges peeled and sliced, seeds removed, sprinkle freeh 
with powdered sugar and grated cocoanut. 

MRS. A. iMIDDLEToN. 

BLANC MANGE. 

( )ne quart milk, one ounce gelatine, three-quarters of a cupful 
sugar. Soak gelatine in one cupful milk one hour before boiling, 
flavor with vanilla, wet mould with cold water. 

NEW T< )RT BLANC MANGE. 

To one quart milk add half box gelatine, soak two hours, add 
small cupful sugar and place over fire. When sugar and gelatine 
are mixed with the milk and it has come to a boil, remove and 
add one wineglassful sherry and teaspoonful vanilla. Stir while 
cooling to prevent cream from coming to the top; when cool 
pour in mould and set on ice. 

I rELATINE JELLY. 

( )ne box gelatine, soak in one pint cold water two hours, then 
add one quart boiling water, one and a half pounds sugar, juice 
three lemons. 

CHARLOTTE DE RUSSE. 

< >ne pint cream, one cupful powdered sugar, one tablespoonful 
vanilla, quarter package gelatine, whites six eggs; when gelatine 



DESSERTS. lOj 

is dissolved in a little milk stir into the whipped cream, then add 
beaten whites of eggs; let gelatine cool before adding to the 
cream. MISS SKiLES. 

WHIPPED CREAM WITH MACARi M >NS. 

Put one quart cream in a howl, set it in a cold place, sweeten it 
properly and whip it with a Dover egg heater until it is thick, 
being careful that it does not break. It it is whipped a moment 
too long it may granulate, but this will not happen if the cream is 
perfectly sweet and not too rich. Ver} often cream that seems 
sweet to the taste lias in reality begun to turn and will granulate 
at the last moment when whipped; it is, therefore, important to 
procure fresh and moderately rich cream. When the froth can be 
heaped in a howl, it is well to cease whipping immediately. To a 
pint of cream, which can usually be properly whipped in from ten 
to fifteen minutes, allow six macaroons that arc about two days 
old; roll them until they are finely crumbled, but not powdered, 
and stir enough of the crumbs into the whipped cream to give it 
a delicate brown color. Serve the cream in glass sauce dishes 
with the cake. 

( (RANGE JELLY. 

To make orange jelly dissolve half a box of gelatine in half a 
cupful of cold water. Cut six oranges in halves, remove the pulp 
carefullv and lay the skins in cold water. Add to the pulp the 
juice of two lemons, one cupful of sugar and one cupful of boiling 
water. Add gelatine, stir all together and strain. 1 >rv the insides 
of the skins, notch the edges, till with jelly and set in a cold place. 
When stiff, serve with cake. 

STRAWBERRY PYRAMID. 

Boil two cupfuls of rice in plenty of water until the grains can 
be easily crushed between the thumb and first finger, twenty 
minutes being usually long enough. Drain and spread a layer of 
rice on a serving dish, add an equal depth of strawberries and 
sprinkle lightly with sugar; then add a smaller layer of rice and 
sweetened strawberries, and so continue, making the layers 
smaller and smaller, until an apex is reached and all the rice and 
fruit is used. Sprinkle with sugar, and serve with whipped cream 
1 ir milk. 

STRAWBERRY GELATINE. 

One-half box of gelatine, one-half pint of cold water, one-half 
pint of boiling; water, one and one-half teacupfuls of sugar, one 



KM 



DESSERTS. 



quart of strawberries, two lemons, one-half pint of cream. Soak 
tne gelatine m the cold water for twenty minutes; then add the 
boiling- water and stir until the gelatine is dissolved. Add the 
sugar and the juice from the lemons; then strain the whole into a 
measuring cup and add sufficient cold water to make one and a 
half pints ol tne whole. Wet a tin mould with cold water, and 
set a small jam jar in the middle to make a hollow center when 
finished, placing a weight inside the jar to keep it in place. Pour 
a fourth of the gelatine mixture into the mould and set on the ice 
to thicken, keeping the remainder in a warm place. As soon as 
the jelly sets, add a deep layer of the stemmed fruit, then pour in 
more ol the mixture, again set on the ice, and when it thickens 
add another layer of the fruit and mixture until all is used. When 
ready to serve, put a little hot water into the jam jar and when the 
jelly is released from the sides remove the jar. set the mould for a 
moment in hot water to free the sides ami turn out upon a Hat 
serving dish. Sweeten the cream, whip it to a froth and heap it 
into the hollow center made by the jar. 

STRAWBERRY S< )UFFLE. 

Place a layer of berries in a glass serving dish, sprinkle on a 
sifting of fine sugar, add another layer of the fruit, then more 
sugar, and so continue until the necessary quantity of berries has 
been used. Let this arrangement stand on ice for four hours, or 
even longer, if convenient. For one quart of berries allow the 
following: One pint of milk, two eggs, two tablespoonfuls of 
sugar, one teaspoonful -of vanilla, one-half saltspoonful of salt. 
Make a soft custard of these ingredients, preparing it according 
to the directions in the preceding recipe, and set it on ice. Just 
before serving time whip to a froth half a pint of cream, add a 
tablespoonful of sugar, pour the custard over the top of the ber- 
ries and place the whipped cream on top of the custard. 

STRAWBERRY FLOAT. 

One pint of strawberries, two cupfuls of pulverized sugar, two 
eggs, one pint of milk, vanilla to flavor. Crush the berries. Sep- 
arate the white's of the eggs from the yolks, heat the former to a 
stiff, dry froth, and add the sugar. Put in the crushed berries 
gradually, beating all the while, until the whole is a stiff pile of 
rosv cream; then place in a glass dish and set on ice. Meat the 
;olks of tin- eggs in half a cupful of the milk, place the remainder 
of thi' milk on the stove in a graniteware pan set in another con 
raining boiling water, and when the milk is hot add the beaten 
yolks, stir until the liquid is like thick cream, add salt, sugar ami 
vanilla to taste, and set on ice to cool. This sauce is to be poured 
in serving about the froth v berries. 



DESSERTS. 105 

STRAWBERRY UlAkU >TTE. 

Eight lady fingers, one quart of strawberries, one-half pint of 
cream, two cupfuls of sugar. Mash a cupful of the berries, split 
the lady fingers in two, moisten them with the juice of the 
crushed berries, and use' them to line a serving dish. Place in the 
bottom of the dish a layer of berries, season with fine sugar, whip 
the cream to a froth, add a layer of it. and then another of fruit 
and sugar, and so continue in alternation until all the cream and 
fruit is used. Place on ice and serve very cold. 

STRAWBERRY SP< >NGE. 

( >ne-half box of gelatine, one-half cupful of cold water, one 
pint of boiling water, one cupful of sugar, one pint of strawberry 

juice, three eggs. Place the gelatine in the cold water, and let it 
stand for an hour; then add the boiling water and sugar, and stir 
until the sugar and gelatine are dissolved. When the mixture is 
cool add the fruit juice, strain, and set on ice; and as soon as it 
begins to thicken, stir well, and add the beaten whites of the eggs. 
Pour thi' preparation into a mould, let it harden, and serve the 
next day with sweetened milk or cream. I). 

N ESSELRODE PUDDING. 

One cupful of French chestnuts, one cupful granulated sugar, 
one cupful of almonds, yolks of three eggs, one-half pint cream, 
one-half pound of candied fruits (mixed), one-half can pineapple 
(drained), one and a half tahlespoonfuls of maraschino wine, two 
tablespoon fuls of sherry, one-half tablespoonful of vanilla sugar 
or one-quarter tablespoonful of extract. Remove shells from 
chestnuts, put them in boiling water for three minutes, then in 
cold water and take off skins, then boil until tender. Take one- 
half of them and press through a sieve. Blanch the almonds, 
chop fine, and then pound them. Cut the candied fruit and 
chestnuts into dice, pour over them the wine and let stand until 
ready for use. Put in a saucepan on the fire a cupful of granu- 
lated sugar and one-quarter cupful of boiling water. Stir until 
sugar is dissolved, then let cool slowly for five minutes to make a 
svrup. Beat the yolks of the eggs until very light, pour on them 
slowly the syrup, put on the fire, stirring constantly, until the 
mixture is like cream. Remove from fire and heat until cold, thru 
add the cream, mashed chestnuts, pounded almonds, and freeze. 
When frozen remove the lid, add fruits, and turn freezer for an- 
other five minutes. Then put in fancy mould and pack. This can 
be served with whipped cream as pudding glace. This makes one 
quart of cream, and will serve ten persons, as it is verv rich. The 
candied fruits can he omitted and stoned raisins used. This rule 



106 DESSERTS. 

can be changed to suit one's fancy. I use a pint of milk with the 
cream, and think it better than to have it very rich. 

MRS. D. S. EVANS. 

LALLA ROOKH. 

One quart cream, one pint milk, five eggs full, three-quarters of 
,i pint sugar, third of a pint rum; boil half the liquid with eggs 
and sugar until it begins to thicken; add balance and rum just be 
fore freezing. MRS. G. T. DUNLOP. 

WINE JELLY FROZEN. 

Let one ounce gelatine stand an hour in a pint of cold water, 
then add three pints boiling water, one and a half pounds loaf 
sugar, one and a half pints wine, juice three lemons, rind of two; 
stir all these ingredients and freeze before it congeals. 

PLUMBIERE. 

Make rich custard and flavor when cool with wine and extract 
of lemon; when half frozen add blanched almonds, chopped cit- 
ron, brandy peaches cut up and any other brandied or crystalized 
fruit; make freezer full of custard and fill with fruit. 

WATERMELON ICE. 

Select ripe and very red melon, scrape some of the pulp and use 
all of the water; a few seeds interspersed will add greatly to the 
appearance; sweeten to taste and freeze as you would any other 
ice. If you wish it very light add whites of three eggs (thorough- 
ly whipped) to one gallon of the ice just as it begins to congeal; 
beat frequently and very hard with large iron spoon. 

LEMON ICE. 

One quart water, one pound sugar, eight lemons, one table- 
spoonful gelatine. Boil sugar and water together and pour on 
gelatine, which has been dissolved in a little water. 

ORANGE ICE. 

One dozen oranges, juice two lemons, one quart water, one 
quart sugar, whites two eggs. 

ICE CREAM. 

( )ne quart cream, half pound white sugar, whites two eggs, 
flavor to taste. 



DESSERTS 107 

BISQUE. 

To one pint custard add half pound of macaroons beaten fine 
with quart bf cream and half pint wine. MRS. W ATKINS. 

LAI. LA U( )( >KH. 

Five eggs, five tablespoonfuls pulverized sugar, one tumble] 
famaica nun poured on eggs and sugar, which must be beaten 
verv light; then add three pints rich milk and freeze. 

MRS. |. MAURY D( >VE. 

TLTT1 FRUTT1 CREAM. 

Oik- gallon cream, two and a half cupfuls sugar, two table- 
spoonfuls gelatine soaked two hours in milk (and then melted in 
double .boiler), one tablcspoonful vanilla. Add two tablespoon- 
fuls of Sicily Madeira wine or maraschino, when partly frozen 
add one pound French candied fruit cut hue; use mixture of 
cherries, plums, apricots, pineapple, pears, strawberries and an- 
gelica root, or use home-made preserves carefully drained from 
syrup and cut into dice. KENT< >.\ ( '< )( )K BOOK. 

\< >UGAT CREAM. 

Six drops of pistachio extract, one-half cupful pistachio nuts, 
one quart of vanilla cream, one-quarter cupful of almonds, one- 
half cupful of English walnut meats. Shell and blanch the pis- 
tachio nuts and almonds, add the walnuts and chop very fine. 
Make the cream as directed in the preceding recipe, and when 
nearly frozen add the nuts and extract. 

NEAPOLITAN OR FRENCH CREAM. 

( )ne quart of cream, two cupfuls of sugar, six eggs (yolks), one 
vanilla bean. Split the bean, remove the seeds and place with the 
cream in a double boiler. Cook as before directed, remove from 
the fire and strain. Beat the egg yolks until light, add the sugar 
and the scalding hot cream. Stir well and return to the boiler to 
cook until the cream begins to thicken. Take from the fire, cool 
and freeze. 

PEACH OR APRICOT CREAM. 

( )ne quart of cream, three cupfuls of sugar, one quart of apri- 
cots or peaches. Make the cream as above directed. Pare and 
mash the fruit and add to the cream when frozen. Turn the 
crank rapidly for five minutes, then pack. 



10S DESSERTS. 

COFFEE CREAM. 

( hie quart of cream, three ounces of Java coffee, two cupfuls of 
pulverized sugar. Grind the coffee coarsely, add it to'the half of 
the cream that is to be cooked and let it come to a scald with the 
cream. Then strain through a cheese cloth, pressing well to ex- 
tract all the strength of the coffee. Add the sugar, stir well and 
when cold add the rest of the cream, and freeze. 

PINEAPPLE CREAM. 

( )ne quart of cream, one lemon, two and one-half cupfuls of 
sugar, one large pineapple. Scald half of the cream and half of 
the sugar as above directed, adding the remainder of the cream 
when cold. Peel the pineapple, dig out the eyes, cut lengthwise 
and remove the core, (irate the fruit, mix with it the remainder 
of the sugar and the juice of a lemon and stir until the sugar is 
dissolved. Freeze the cream, add the fruit and finish in the same 
way as for the peach cream. 

(IK >C< >LATE CREAM. 

( )ne quart of cream, two cupfuls of sugar, two ounces of Bak- 
er's chocolate, one tablespoonful of vanilla, one-quarter teaspoon- 

ful of powdered cinnamon. Place the grated chocolate, half of 
the cream, the sugar and the spice together and scald as directed, 
stirring and beating until smooth. Strain through cheese cloth, 
and when cold add the rest of the cream and the flavoring, then 
freeze. 

STRAWBERRY CREAM. 

( >ne quart of cream, one and one-half quarts of strawberries, 
three cupfuls of sugar, one lemon. Place one cupful of the sugar 
and half of the cream on the fire and scald as before directed. 
Add the rest of the sugar and the juice of the lemon to the straw- 
berries; mash them very line and let them stand for one hour, 
mashing and stirring frequently; then strain them through a 
cheese cloth. Add the other half of the cream to that scalded, and 
freeze. Then add the juice of the fruit, beat five minutes and 
pack. 

WHITE CHERRY (REAM. 

< >ne quart of cream, two cupfuls i >f sugar, one quart of cherries, 
one cupful of water. Put the sugar into the water and when the 
sugar is dissolved add the stoned fruit. Simmer for fifteen min- 
utes, then strain. Scald half the cream as before directed and 



DESSERTS. 109 

when cold add the other half of the cream and freeze. When 

frozen add the strained Fruit, brat five minutes and pack. 

PHILADELPH] V CREAM. 

( >ne quart of cream, two cupfuls of granulated sugar, two 
tablespoonfuls of vanilla extract or one vanilla bean. Place half 

the cream and the sugar together and set the kettle in another 
containing boiling water. A farina kettle may be used for the 
purpose. Stir continually and gradually bring to a scald. It 
should co<,k at least ten minutes while reaching this stage, so 
slowly should it he heated. The cream will then look thin and 
blue. Take it from the tire and when cool add the remainder oi 
the cream and the flavoring, and freeze. If the vanilla bean is 
used, split it in half, scrape out the seeds, add them and the shell 
to the cream when it is first placed upon the lire. When the 
cream is sufficiently cooked strain it through a coarse cheese 
(loth. All Philadelphia creams are made in this way, fruit or 
fruit flavoring being added after it is partly or wholly frozen, 
(hie quart of raw cream will more than double in bulk when 
frozen. 

CLARET CVV. 

Ten lemons, sixteen tablespoonfuls powdered sugar, three pirns 
claret, six ponies red curicoa, three or four pints Apolinaris 01 

soda water, one pint brandy, five pounds ice. 

VICTORIA PUNCH. 

Four oranges, eight lemons, one and a half quarts water, four 
cupfuls sugar, one and three-quarter cups Angelica or other sweet 
wine, half cupful rum, whites four eggs; heat or boil sugar and 
water together, add other ingredients and freeze. When nearly 
frozen beat whites to a stiff froth and add to frozen mixture; will 
be six quarts or more when frozen. 

FROZEN FRUIT PUDDING. 

Juice six oranges, add half tablespoonful sugar, one pint cream, 
well beaten whites three eggs, half dozen candied cherries, half 
cupful lady finger crumbs, one banana chopped fine, one slice cit- 
ron chopped fine; mix orange juice, sugar and cream thoroughly, 
then add well beaten whites three eggs and gradually add fruit ; 
put in freezer and when frozen stiff take out and serve in the 
orange skins in nest of green. 



HO DESSERTS. 

FROZEN FRUITS. 

Strawberries, mash one quart and sprinkle with one cupful 
sugar; then boil one pound sugar in one quart water, when cool 
pour over mashed fruit. When frozen let stand two hours before 
using; if very sweet use less sugar on fruit. Other fruits can be 
used in the same way. 

LEMON PUNCH. 

To one gallon hot water add two' pounds sugar, dissolve well, 
juice of sixteen lemons, strain and freeze. For orange, the juice 
of twelve oranges, rineapple, juice of two lemons, four oranges, 
two pineapples minced very fine, and freeze. For sherbet add to 
either white of one egg. 

LEMON SHERBET WITH GELATINE. 

Soak <>ne tablespoonful gelatine in little cold water for half 
hour, pour over it one pint boiling water, stirring until dissolved: 
add one cupful sugar, third of a cupful lemon juice, one table- 
spoonful brandy, strain and freeze. Use Nelson's or Plvmouth 
Rock gelatine.' MISS SKILES. 

CHAMPAGNE AND LEMON ICE. 

E 7 or two-quart brick lemon ice break over it a quart bottle 
of champagne, and when it is half dissolved serve as frozen lemon- 
ade in punch glasses. 

ROMAN PUNCH. 

To make gallon: One and a half pints lemon juice, rinds two 
lemons grated on sugar, one pint rum, half pint brandy, two 
quarts water, three pounds loaf sugar. Pint bottle champagne is 
a great improvement; mix and freeze. MRS. WATKINS. 



Wood A\&r?tels 



Of neat and artistic design at LOWEST PRICES 
Quartered Oak Doors. 

Panel Wainscot. 

Cherry Counters 16 to 24 inches. 

Plate Glass furnished and set in place. 

At THOS. W. SMITH'S 1 ^f OTlflP ^fc N F 
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1^ e £ <3- Mc(Jubbin (o. 

PLUMBERS, 

STEAM AND GAS FITTERS' 

..SUPPLIES.. 

42:5 Tenth Street Northwest 
Washington, D. C. 



METALLIC ROOFING AND REPAIRING 

ERNEST BETZ.. 

Furnaces, Ranges, Grates and Latrobes 



1212 E Street Northwest, 
Washington, D. C. 



FOR 
BEST 

ICE CREAM 
GO TO 



Budd's 



510 NINTH ST. 



CAKES. 



FRUIT CAKE. 

Eighteen eggs, beat separately and very light; one pound of 
flour, well sifted; one dessertspoonful of soda, sifted with flour; 
one pound of best butter, creamed: two pounds of stoned raisins; 
two pounds of currants, well washed; one and a half pounds of 
citron, cut not too fine; one pound of nuts, well brok- 
en; one small tumbler of brandy, and one of wine; 
juice of two oranges and two lemons, strained; the peels stewed 
in sugar and water till tender, cut up with scissors; one large 
nutmeg, one teaspoonful of mace, one of allspice, one of cinna- 
mon, one of cloves, all finely grated. After putting your cake 
together, eggs, flour, butter and sugar, never beat it — in adding 
fruits — but stir in slowly and carefully till all is well mixed. Have 
ready one or two pans, with thickness of three or four sheet.; of 
paper in the bottom, well buttered; give the cake time to rise, 
then bake slowly for seven or eight hours; it must not be hur- 
ried ,and you must not remove the cake until next day, giving it 
time to cool slowly, and shrink, as it is rich and heavv, and will 
become perfectlv firm by that time, and there will be no danger of 
crumbling or breaking.' .AIRS. COLLINS. 

BLACK FRUIT CAKE. 

One pound butter, one pound flour, one pound sugar, twelve 
eggs, two pounds raisins, two pounds currants, one pound citron, 
one tablespoonful cloves, one tablespoonful ginger, two nut- 
megs, two gills molasses, two gills brandy. - 

MRS. A. MIDDLETOX. 

FRUIT CAKE. 

One pound butter, one pound and three tablespoonfuls granu- 
lated sugar, one pound flour, eleven eggs, one pound citron, four 
pounds raisins, three pounds currants, one and a half tablespoon- 
fuls syrup, two wineglasses brandy, two of sherrv, one heaping 
teaspoonful cinnamon, one of nutmeg, scant half teaspoonful 
cloves and of mace. Bake five hours in moderate oven. 

MISS GARRISOX. 



114 CAKES. 

ALBA'S CAKE. 

( )ne ami a half cupfuls sugar, whites of four eggs, half cupful 
butter, two teaspoonfuls of baking powder, three-quarters of a 
cupful of milk, two cupfuls unsifted flour. 

JUMBLES. 

Four eggs, two cupfuls sugar, one cupful butter, one small 
teaspoonful soda; flour enough to make a dough stiff enough to 
roll out. 

SUNSHINE CAKE. 

Whites of five eggs, yolks of seven eggs, one cupful granulated 
sugar, three-quarters of a cupful of flour, one-third teaspoonful 
cream tartar. 

DEVIL'S CAKE. 

Three-quarters of a cupful grated chocolate, three-quarters of 
a cupful milk, same of granulated sugar, yolk of one egg; boil 
above until it thickens, flavor and let cool. 

Cake part: One cupful sugar, half cupful butter, half cupful 
milk, two cupfuls flour, two eggs, one teaspoonful soda put in the 
flour dry. Stir in the chocolate part. Bake in layers. Ice with 
chocolate or white icing. 

CHOCOLATE WAFERS. 

One cupful brown sugar, one cupful granulated sugar, one 
cupful butter, one cupful grated chocolate, one egg, one tea- 
spoonful vanilla, enough flour to make rather stiff (about one 
and a half cupfuls) ; roll very thin ; bake quickly. MISS HOG E. 

HOT WATER SPONGE CAKE. 

Six eggs, two cupfuls of sugar, two cupfuls of flour, half cup- 
ful of boiling water, teaspoonful of lemon juice and grated rind 
of half lemon. MRS. J. X. MITCHELL. 

SCRIPTURE CAKE. 

One cup Butter Judges, 5-25 

Two cu\)^ Sugar Jeremiah. 6-20 

Three and one-half cups of Flour (prepared) .1 Kings, 4-22 

Two cups Raisins I Samuel, 30-12 

Two cups Figs I Samuel, 30-12 



CAKES. 115 

( >ne cup Almonds < renesis, 43-1 1 

l ine cup Water Genesis, 24-20 

Six Eggs Isaiah, 10-14 

A little Salt Leviticus, 2-3 

( )ne large iron spoon of 1 [oney Exodus, 16-31 

Sweet Spices to Taste 1 Kings, 10-2 

MARSHMALLOW CAKE. 

Eighteen eggs (whites only), two and a quarter cupfuls of pow- 
dered sugar, one a half cupfuls of hour, two teaspoonfuls of cream 
of tartar, one teaspoonful of vanilla. Beat the eggs very lightly, 

and then cut the sugar in with a broad-hladed carving knife. 
Sift the hour three times, sift the cream of tartar into it, and then 
cut it into the eggs and sugar; beat, and add the vanilla. Bake 
in three cakes in deep, ungreased layer pans, putting brown pa- 
per in the bottoms, and using a quick oven. Then spread thickly 
between the layers and on top a filling made as follows: Boil 
two cupfuls of sugar with one cupful of water until it ropes. 
Just before taking it off put in half pound of marshmallow brok- 
en into bits to melt readily. Pour this mixture gradually into the 
well-beaten whites of two eggs, and beat continuously until cold. 

CARAMEL CAKE. 

One cupful of butter, two cupfuls of sugar, one cupful of milk, 
three cupfuls of flour, five eggs (whites), two teaspoonfuls of 
baking powder. Place the ingredients together as for plain layer 
cake., adding the whites of the eggs last. Pake in three well 
buttered tins and when done spread between the layers caramel 
filling made thus: One and a half cupful of brown sugar, one 
cupful of milk, one tablespoonful (scant) of butter, half table- 
spoonful of vanilla. Place the milk, sugar and butter on the fire 
in a saucepan set in another containing boiling water and cook 
until thick. Take from the fire and beat it hard until stiff. Then 
add the vanilla. 

POUND CAKE. 

Two cupfuls of butter, two cupfuls of sugar, four cupfuls of 
flour twelve large eggs, one quarter teaspoonful of mace half 
gill of brandv. Butter the pans and line them. Measure the 
sugar flour, brandv and cinnamon. Separate the eggs, putting 
the whites in a large Lowland the yolks in a small one Beat the 
butter to a cream, and gradually beat the sugar into it When - 
the mixture is light and creamy, add the brandv and mace. Beat 
he yolks till light, and add them to the beaten mixture. Beat 
the whites to a stiff froth, and stir them into the mixture alter- 



116 



CAKES. 



nating with the flour. Tour the butter into the pans, and bake 
in a moderate oven for about fifty minutes. 

For two loaves of raisin cake, use: One large cupful of but- 
ter, one cupful of milk, five eggs, two nutmegs, two cupfuls of 
sugar, four generous cupfuls of Hour, one gill of brandy, half tea- 
spoonful of soda, one quart of boiled raisins. Put the raisins in 
a small stew-pan, and cover them with cold water. Cook them 
slowly for half an hour, then drain and cool them. Beat the but- 
ter to' a cream and beat the sugar into it; add the brandy and nut- 
meg, and beat a little longer. Add the yolks of the eggs, well 
beaten. Dissolve the soda in the milk, and add this to the beaten 
ingredients. Now add the flour. Stir in the well-beaten 
whites of the eggs. Spread the batter in thin layers in two large 
cake pans, and sprinkle raisins upon each layer. Continue this 
until all the materials are used. Bake for two hours in a moder- 
ate oven. This cake keeps well. 

SNOW CAKE. 

One pound of arrow root (ground), half pound of sugar, half 
pound of butter, whites of seven eggs, flavoring of essence of 
lemon. Beat the sugar and butter to a cream; then add the ar- 
row root, which has been sifted; when well mixed, stir in the 
whites of the eggs whisked to a very stiff froth, and essence of 
lemon to suit the taste; again whisk the mixture for nearly half 
an hour; place a piece of buttered paper around the sides of the 
tin, and bake in a moderately heated oven. D. 

JAM CAKE. 

Twelve eggs, four cupfuls of sugar, four cupfuls of flour, four 
cupfuls of jam, three cupfuls of butter, two teaspoonfuls of soda 
dissolved in water, two grated nutmegs, allspice and cinnamon to 
taste. 

CHOCOLATE CAKE. 

Two cupfuls of sugar, one of butter, two and a half of flour 
(sift four times), half cupful sweet milk, yolks four eggs, whites 
of two, ten teaspoonsfuls baking powder, two-thirds cake of 
chocolate dissolved in half cupful boiling water: when cool stir in 
batter. 

ICE CREAM FILLING. 

Dissolve four cupfuls of sugar-in one cupful hot water, boil 
till it will crack when tried in glass of cold water: have whites of 
four eggs beaten rather stiff: pour the boiling preparation over 



CAKES. 117 

the eggs, slowly, beating all the time. When it begins to get 
firm, spread on thickly on the layers of white cake, or alternate 

white cake and chocolate cake. If you want to use marshmal- 
lows, use same dressing between the cake and cut the marshmal- 
Lows in two and place on top of dressing. Conserved cherries 
are used in same way. 

WHITE CAKE. 

Ten eggs (whites) beaten to a stiff froth, three cups of flour, 
one cupful of butter, two cupfuls of sugar, two teaspoonfuls of 
baking powder half cupful of sweet milk, one teaspoonful of 

vanilla. Cream the butter nicely, add the sugar and beat well; 
then add one-half of the half cup of milk, leaving the other for 
the baking powder. Add two cupfuls of flour, one at a time and 
beat well; then add half of your eggs, then your last cup of flour 
and the milk with the two teaspoonfuls of baking powder in it; 
then your remaining eggs. Sift the flour four times. To make 
pink cake, take half of your above batter and mix two table- 
spoonfuls of red sugar or cochineal. 

MRS. WILLSOX OFFUTT. 

BOILED ICING. 

Boil one pound granulated sugar and one small cupful of 
water together till a thick syrup is formed. Test this by dropping 
some in cold water on a plate; when done it will form like jelly 
in the water. Beat whites of two eggs very light and then beat 
in the boiling syrup gradually. Flavor to taste and beat till 
nearly cold. Drop spoonful on the cake and when they cool 
without running, apply the rest quickly. A good basis for icing 
to be put between layer cakes is made by boiling one cupful of 
sugar and half cupful sweet milk together till it is of the con- 
sistency of above icing. Flavor to taste and add chopped nuts. 
citron or stew some raisins with the sugar and milk; grated 
cocoanut may also be boiled with it or chocolate with vanilla. 
This icing should be beaten till stiff. 

RTBBOX CAKE. 

One large cupful sugar, one small cupful sweet milk, one small 
cupful butter, one pint flour with one teaspoonful soda and two 
of cream tartar sifted together, four eggs; cream butter and sugar, 
acid the beaten eggs, then the flour and milk alternately. Flavor 
with lemon or vanilla; put half the batter in two round pans and 
in the remaining batter put one cupful raisins, one cupful cur- 
rants, teaspoonful spices, cloves and cinnamon, mixed, bake 
and put on plain and fruit alternately with jam between. 



U8 CAKES. 

CREAM RUSE CAKE. 

Stir into a cupful of sweet cream a pinch of soda, one cupful 
creamed butter with three cupfuls powdered sugar; whip with 
egg beater five minutes or until like whipped cream; flavor with 
vanilla and add five cupfuls prepared flour and frosted whites of 
ten eggs. Color a fine pink with fruit coloring; bake in layers. 

FILLING. 

One and a half cocoanuts grated, whites of four eggs whipped 
stiff; one and a half cupfuls powdered sugar, two teaspoonfuls 
rose water; heap the cake after filling with this mixture by beat- 
ing in more sugar for the purpose. 

COCOANUT CAKE. 

Two cupfuls pulverized sugar, half cupful butter, beaten to a 
cream. Add half cup sweet milk, two and a half cups flour after 
it has been sifted, whites of eight eggs. Bake in jelly cake tins 
and put together with icing made by boiling half teacupful water, 
three cupfuls pulverized sugar till thick pour slowly over well- 
beaten whites of two eggs and beat all together till cool. Beat 
before putting on each layer. Sprinkle thickly with grated co- 
coanut; sift flour three times. 

SUGAR CAKE. 

Four eggs, two cupfuls sugar; beat together; half cupful milk, 
six cupfuls flour, half nutmeg, two teaspoonfuls cream tartar, one 
of soda. 

GINGER CAKES. 

Three pounds flour, half pound butter, half pound lard, one tea- 
cupful ginger, one paper cloves, one paper allspice, one paper 
cinnamon, one teaspoonful soda; enough molasses to work it up. 

MRS. W ATKINS. 

LEMON CAKE. 

Two cupfuls flour, two of sugar, six eggs, volks and whites; 
beat separately; one cupful butter, half cupful milk, two tea- 
spoonfuls cream tartar, one of soda. 

For the jelly: Three quarters of a pound sugar, quarter pound 
butter, six eggs, rind and juice three lemons. Beat butter, sugar 
and eggs thoroughly together and set in a dish of hot water until 
heated, then add grated lemon rind and juice. Stir till thick 
enough and perfectly smooth. Put layers of jelly between cake 
while warm. 



CAKES. i 1*; 

WHITE CAKE. 

Whites one dozen eggs, five cupfuls flour, one cupful butter, 
one cupful sweet milk, two teaspoonfuls baking powder, three 
cupfuls sugar, flavored with hitter almonds. Make icing of three 
ounces grated chocolate, two and a half cupfuls pulverized sugar, 

tin listened with sufficient cold water to make it the right consist- 
ency and flavor with one tablespoonful vanilla. 

MRS. KENDALL. 

DOUGHNUTS. 

Two cupfuls of sugar, two cupfuls of sour milk, eight table- 
spoorifuls of melted butter, four eggs, one teaspoonful of salt, 
two teaspoonfuls of soda, two teaspoonfuls cream tartar, flour to 
thicken. Add the salt and sugar to the milk, and then the soda 
dissolved in a little cold water. Sift a little flour, stir it into the 
cream of tartar, and add tins to the milk; then stir in the melted 
hutter, and the eggs, well beaten. Add only enough flour to ad- 
mit of rolling out the dough, turn the batter out upon a floured 
breadboard, and let it stand for fifteen minutes before cutting 
out. Roll out half an inch thick, cut out with a doughnut-cutter, 
and drop the cakes into very hot fat. When they are brown on 
one side, turn them with a spoon and brown them on the other 
side, and then take them out with a skimmer. Do not pierce 
the doughnuts with a fork, as that would allow the steam inside 
to escape and render them heavy. Roll the doughnuts in pulver- 
ized sugar when cold. 

FREXCH CRULLERS. 

Three eggs, one teaspoonful of salt, flour to thicken, three 
tablespoonfuls of milk, six tablespoonfuls of melted butter, six 
tablespoonfuls of sugar. Rub the butter, salt and sugar together, 
add the beaten egg and the milk and flour enough to roll out the 
dough. Roll half an inch thick, cut out with a very small cake- 
cutter having a hole in the center, and fry in hot lard. 

HARTFORD ELECTIOX CAKE. 

One and a half cupfuls of butter, two cupfuls of sugar, one and 
a half pint of flour, three eggs, one and a half teaspoonful of bak- 
ing powder, two cupfuls of raisins, stoned, twenty drops of ex- 
tract of vanilla, one cupful of currants, half cuoful of citron, 
chopped, half cupful of lemon peel, chopped; half cupful of al- 
monds, shredded; twenty drops of extract of hitter almonds. 
one cupful of milk. Rub the butter and sugar to a light cream, 
add the egg. and heat for a few minutes longer. Then stir in 
tiie flour and baking powder sifted together: add the raisins, 



120 CAKES. 

citron, currants, lemon peel and almonds, extracts and milk; 
mix to a batter, place paper in a tin, and bake for an hour and a 
half in a moderate oven. 1). 

BROWN STONE FRUIT CAKE. 

Half cupful butter, one and a half cupful s sugar, two-thirds of 
a cupful sweet milk, two cupfuls flour, two eggs, two teaspoonfuls 
baking powder. Divide cake in half; take two squares of choco- 
late, half cupful brown sugar, three tablespoonfuls milk; heat 
milk, sugar and chocolate together till melted and when cold put 
with one half the cake, adding a little more flour; flavor with 
vanilla. These are to be baked in separate tins and put together 
with frosting or jelly. 

LEMON CREAM CAKE. 

Half cupful butter, two cupfuls sugar, one cupful sweet milk, 
three eggs, yolks and whites beaten separately, three cupfuls 
flour, two teaspoonfuls baking powder. 

For filling: One cupful sugar, two tablespoonfuls butter, two 
eggs, grated rind and juice of two lemons; mix all together and 
boil till consistency of jelly; spread between layers and dust 
powdered sugar on top without filling. 

CARAMEL ICING. 

Two cupfuls brown sugar, one cupful milk, butter size of an 
egg, boil until it ropes. 

MRS. PORTER'S CAKE. 

One cupful sugar, one tablespoonful butter, rubbed together; 
break two or three eggs in coffee cup, beat, fill cup with milk, 
pinch of salt, cupful and a half of flour before it is sifted, tea- 
spoonful baking powder. 

Icing: One cupful sugar in saucepan, enough water to meet 
it, boil, do not stir; drop in cold water till it stiffens; stir constant- 
ly till eld, add vanilla. MRS. \V ATKINS. 

FRUIT CAKE. 

( )ne and a half pounds sugar, one and a quarter pounds but- 
ter, fifteen eggs, two pounds raisins, three pounds almonds, 
blanched and sliced, one and a half pounds Hour, one wineglass 
brandy, one and a half nutmegs, one and a half pounds citron. 
Flour fruit before mixing. MRS. DAVIDSON. 



CAKES. 121 

S( )FT MOLASSES CAKE. 

( )ne tablespoonful ground ginger, two and a half cupfuls flour, 
one cupful molasses, two teaspoonfuls baking powder, half cup- 
ful butter, one cupful brown sugar, one cupful cold water. Heat 
all together till very light and bake in long pans. 

SPONGE CAKE. 

Twelve eggs, weight of eggs in sugar, half the weight in flour, 
juice of two lemons and grated rind of one. 

MRS. A. MIDDLETOX. 

AXGEL CAKE. 

Whites nine eggs, one and a quarter cupfuls sifted sugar, one 
cupful sifted flour, half teaspoonful cream tartar, pinch salt. 
After sifting flour four or five times, set aside one cupful, then 
sift and measure one and a quarter cupfuls granulated sugar; 
beat whites of eggs one half, add cream tartar and beat till very 
stiff; stir in sugar, then flour; bake in moderate oven thirty-five 
or forty minutes. 

GOLD CAKE. 

Yolks eight eggs, one cupful granulated sugar, scant half cup- 
ful butter, naif cupful sweet milk, one and a half cupfuls flour, 
two teaspoonfuls baking powder. Beat yolks to stiff froth, put in 
milk, then flour and beat hard. 

ICE CREAM CAKE. 

White eight eggs, one cupful sweet milk, one cupful butter, 
two cupfuls sugar, two of flour, one of corn starch, two tea- 
spoonfuls baking powder, mixed with the flour; cream butter and 
sugar, add milk, flour and corn starch, then the whites, beat very 
light, bake in cakes one inch thick. 

Icing: Whites four eggs beaten very light, four cupfuls sugar; 
pour on sugar half pint boiling water and boil until clear and 
will candy in cold water; pour boiling syrup over beaten eggs, 
beat till nearly cold, then add one teaspoonful citric acid, two of 
vanilla. When cold spread as thick as the cake. 

SCOTCH CAKE. 

One pound flour, one pound sugar, half pound butter, three 
eggs, one teaspoonful cinnamon and little soda. 



122 TAKES. 

CREAM FILLING. 

Make a cream sauce of one cupful milk, one tablespoonful 
flour, one tablespoonful butter; beat one egg with balf cupful 
sugar and stir in tbe sauce slowly; cook for two minutes or until 
egg is done, flavor with vanilla or almond, use this for layer 
cakes or split a thin loaf of sponge cake in two and spread be- 
tween layers. MRS. DOUGHTY. 

SILVER CAKE. 

Whites twelve eggs, six cupfuls flour, three and a half cupfuls 
sugar, one cupful butter, one cupful milk, one teaspoonful cream 
tartar, half teaspoonful soda and two teaspoonfuls bitter almond. 

FRENCH CAKE. 

Half pound butter, ten eggs, one pound sifted flour, one pound 
sugar, two teaspoonfuls cream tartar, one of soda, half cupful 
milk. 

( ) RANGE CAKE. 

Four eggs, beat yolks very light, then add half pound granu- 
lated sugar, one tablespoonful water and juice one lemon; beat 
whites to stiff froth and lay lightly on yolks and sugar; sift a 
large size coffee cup of flour and sift the second time in the pan 
with the sugar and eggs, after adding one teaspoonful baking 
powder. Mix all together and bake in three layers. 

Icing: Whites two eggs, one pound pulverized sugar, half 
lemon, grate all of it; juice and rind of one orange. Put icing 
between and on top of layers. 

CORN STARCH CAKE. 

One cupful butter creamed with two cupfuls sugar, one cupful 
milk, two of flour, one large teaspoonful baking powder, whites 
six eggs; mix well, then add one cupful corn starch, bake in mod- 
erate oven. 

NUT CAKE. 

Whites six eggs, one pound pulverized sugar, beat eggs and 
sugar three quarters of an hour, add one pound almonds; make 
in small drop cakes. 



CAKES. 123 

LEMON FILLING FOR CAKE. 

[uice and grated rind of two large lemons, two eggs beaten a 
little, one and a half cupfuls sugar, butter size of walnut, little 
salt: if preferred use yolk of three eggs and white of one. 

MOLASSES POUND CAKE. 

Six eggs, one cupful sugar, two of molasses, one and a half of 
butter, one teaspoonful soda, ginger to taste, flour to make a bat- 
ter as thick as pound cake. 

CARAMEL FILLING. 

I >ne cupful brown sugar, quarter cupful sweet cream, one tea- 
spoonful butter, boil all together till it threads, stirring slowly, 
as it boils for about eight minutes. Use for either frosting or rill- 
ing. 

MERINGUES. 

Two ounces sugar to white of one egg, beat egg very light 
and fold sugar in; don't beat like frosting; bake on board inch 
thick; wet board and drop egg on with tablespoon; bake half 
hour in moderate oven; they are crisp when cold, take soft part 
out and yon have the shell. Eight eggs make a dozen. 

FIG CAKE. 

Use any good layer cake recipe and bake in three layers, when 
done spread between the layers one pound figs chopped fine, one 
teaenpful boiling water, half cupful sugar, stir all together over 
the fire and cool before putting on the cake. Ice the top: you 
can use one-third raisins and one-third figs. 

MISS SKILES. 

ICE CREAM CAKE. 

One cupful pulverized snear, half cupful butter (scantV half 
cupful sweet milk, one and two-thirds cuofuls flour, half tea- 
spoonful bakins: powder, whites three eggs, beaten stiff and add- 
ed last. Bake in two lavers. 

Icing: Four cuos rranulated su^ar: out in pan over fire and 
Dour over it half oint boiling - water: boil till clear and will candv 
in cold water. Beat whites four e^ps very lig/ht and pour oyer 
them slowlv the boiling svrup: flavor and beat hard until cold 
and stiff, put between and on top as thick as cake lavers. 

MRS. 1ERE TOHXSOW 



124 CAKES. 

CHOCOLATE ICING. 

Half cake Baker's chocolate, one cupful sugar, one and a half 
cupfuls milk, butter size of walnut; cook as you would caramels; 
flavor with vanilla. 

BRANDY SNAPS. 

Half pint molasses, half pound butter, three-quaters pound 
sugar, ten ounces flour, three of ginger, half ounce allspice; mix 
all together, drop with spoon in well-greased pans, well apart. 
Bake in cool oven until they stop boiling; when cool roll on 
sticks. Do not let them cool too much before taking from fire. 

"THE WINDSOR." 

CHOCOLATE CAKE. 

Two cupfuls brown sugar, one of butter, two of flour, one and 
a half of grated chocolate, half cup sweet milk with one teaspoon- 
ful soda dissolved in it, whites and yolks four eggs; bake in jelly 
pans and ice with white icing. 

Icing: On two cupfuls sugar pour half pint boiling water; 
boil (do not stir) until clear and waxy, pour this on beaten whites 
of two eggs; flavor with vanilla, beat until cool. 

CHOCOLATE GEMS. 

Beat two tablespoon fuls butter, adding carefully one cupful 
sugar, stir in half cupful water, one and a half cupfuls flour, beat 
thoroughly, add two teaspoonfuls cocoa, one teaspoonful vanilla 
and two eggs beaten to stiff froth. Before adding eggs, add one 
teaspoonful baking powder; pour them into greased gem pans 
and bake in moderate oven about twenty minutes. 

CINNAMON ROLLS. 

Put two tablespoonfuls butter in pint (lour, beat one egg, add 
to it two-thirds cupful milk, add to flour one teaspoonful baking 
powder, half teaspoonful salt; now stir in egg and milk, mixing 
in lightly and roll into a thin sheet, spread lightly with butter, 
dust over four or five tablespoonfuls sugar, sprinkle with cinna- 
mon; roll and cut into biscuits as you would cinnamon buns. 
Bake in moderately hot oven for thirty minutes. 

DATE CAKE. 

One cupful molasses, one of butter, two of sour milk, two of 
brown sutrar. three teaspoonfuls soda, four eggs, four and a half 



CAKES 125 

cupfuls flour, one tablespoonful of any mixed spices, two pounds 
dates seeded and chopped fine, Hour well before adding to cake; 
save some of the flour for that purpose. Bake in moderate own. 

SPICE CAKE. 

Five eggs, leaving' out the whites of four, two cupfuls brown 
sugar, half cupful melted butter, one cupful sour cream or milk, 
one teaspoonful soda, two teaspoonfuls ginger, two teaspoonfuls 
cloves, two teaspoonfuls cinnamon, two teaspoonfuls allspice, 
one teaspoonful nutmeg, three cupfuls flour. Use white icing. 

MISS SKILES. 

WHITE FRUIT CAKE. 

One pound white sugar, one pound flour, half pound buiur, 
whites twelve eggs, two pounds citron cut in thin, long strips, 
two pounds almonds blanched and cut in strips, one large co- 
coanut grated. Before flour is sifted add one teaspoonful soda, 
two teaspoonfuls cream tartar: cream butter as for pound cake, 
add sugar and beat awhile, then add whites of eggs and flour, 
and after beating batter sufficiently, add about one-third of fruit 
reserving the rest to add in layers as vou put batter in cake mould. 
Bake slowly and carefully. MRS. WATKINS. 

PHILADELPHIA CAKE. 

White part: One and a half cupfuls white sugar, three-fourths 
cupful butter, three-fourths cupful sweet milk, one and a half 
teaspoonfuls Royal baking powder, whites six eggs, three cup- 
fuls flour. 

Dark part: One and a half cupfuls brown sugar, three quar- 
ters cupful molasses, yolks six eggs, three-quarters cupful butter, 
three-quarters cupful sweet milk, two teaspoonfuls baking pow- 
der, and one and a half tablespoonfuls cinnamon, one and a half 
teaspoonfuls cloves, three-quarters of a nutmeg, three and a half 
cupfuls of flour, one and a half cupfuls raisins, one and a half 
cupfuls currants: add some citron and figs chopped fine. This 
quantity makes two cakes, ice one with chocolate, the other with 
white icing. MRS. F. F. FIELD. 



J red. Stoblman 

..Confectionery and Bakery.. 


J.T.CLEMENTS 

-TjWj^- -TjS- ■7\^ "TJWjS- "Tjf "Tj^- -?f*r 


Ice Cream 

Water Ices 

Charlotte -s»#^ 

and 

Fancy Cakes 


1Ilnt)crtafter 

an& 

jEmbalmer 


1254 32 d Street N. W. 
Washington, D. C. 


1241 32d Street 
Tel. 1071. West Washington, D. C. 



mayfield $ Brown 



SPECIALTIES— Truckers' Fertilizers, Washing- 
ton Park Lawn Grass, Lawn Mowers, Dairy 
Supplies, Garden and Field Seeds, Tools, Brown 
Farm Wagons, Harness, Oliver Chilled Plows, 
Road Carts. 



3147 M ST., WASHINGTON, D. C. 



R. D. Weaver & Bros. 



DEALERS IN 



Beef, Lamb, Mutton and Veal 



Cor. 32 d St. and Dumbarton Ave. 
Stalls 61 and 62 Western Market. 



1325 32d Street 


E. T. LYDDANE 


First 


Wholesale and Retail Dealer in 


Co-operative 


Groceries 


Building 


Teas 


Association 


Wines, etc. 


OF GEORGETOWN, D. C. 


1408-10 32d St. 

West Washington, D. C. 



PRESERVES, PICKLES AND 
CATSUP. 



PINEAPPLE PRESERVES. 

Pare carefully, shred with a fork, put three-quarters of a pound 
of sugar to each pound of fruit. Put sugar, with enough water to 
dissolve it, in kettle on lire. When syrup is formed put in fruit 
and let cook until clear. Take out fruit and lay on dish, let syrup 
cook until thick and clear, then put fruit in jars and pour syrup 
over it. 

PINEAPPLE AND COCOANUT PRESERVES. 

i'eel and grate a pineapple, and to each pound of fruit add a 
half pound of cocoanut, according to taste. Measure for one 
pound of fruit, one pound of sugar. Take the sugar, add little 
water and the juice of pineapple if there is any left from peeling. 
Make a syrup of it by letting it come to a boil three times. Pour 
a spoonful or two of cold water into it and let it stand a moment; 
then skim. Rut on fire again and when it has boiled up three 
times skim again. Put on the fruit and let boil, stirring with a 
wooden spoon, until you can see the bottom of the kettle. Pour 
into a dish and when cold, if you wish it, cut up into small squares 
and let them dry. 

PRESERVED STRAWBERRIES. 

Pound of sugar to pound of fruit, and a half cupful of water to 
each pound of sugar; boil sugar and water to rich syrup, drop in 
fruit and boil until fruit is clear and soft, take out fruit and lav on 
dish, boil syrup until very thick and rich, drop in fruit, let heat 
thoroughly, then put in jars and seal. MRS. F. F. FIELD. 

YELLOW TOMATO PRESERVES. 

Reel and prick with large needle. To each pound of tomafc >< - 
take pound of sugar and small cupful of water, put sugar and 
water in kettle and let boil to syrup, put in tomatoes and boil until 
clear, take out and put on dishes for an hour. Put syrup on stove 
at the end of an hour and clarifv with well beaten white of an egg, 
boil and skim well, then add the lemon sliced thin Cone lemon to 



130 PRESERVES, PICKLES AND CATSUPS. 

three pounds of fruit). Let boil until v.ery rich and drop in toma- 
toes, cook a few minutes and can. If the tomatoes are too ripe 
they will break up. KEN VON COOK BOOK. 

SPICED PEACHES. 

Take nine pounds of fruit, peel and halve; put four pounds of 
sugar, one pint good vinegar, cloves, cinnamon and mace in ket- 
tle; when syrup is formed throw in fruit, a few at a time, so that 
they "will remain whole; when clear take out and put in more; 
boil syrup until very rich and then pour over fruit. 

Cherries and pears are done in the same manner. 

MRS. F. F. FIELD. 

CUCUMBER SWEET PICKLES. 

Lay cucumbers in salt and water for a week or ten days; take 
out and cut in slices a quarter of an inch thick, soak out salt and 
boil in alum water one-half hour and then in ginger tea an hour. 
Make syrup of one pint water, one quart vinegar, three pounds 
sugar to every four pounds cucumbers; flavor with cloves, cinna- 
mon, mace. Boil all together until syrup is thick enough. 

MRS. W ATKINS. 

BRANDY PEACHES. 

Take white Heath clingstone peaches, pare and throw into cold 
water. For each pound of fruit take half pound of sugar, and for 
each pound sugar half pint water. Put sugar and water on stove, 
and when clarified and formed into syrup throw in peaches, a few 
at a time; when they can be pierced with a straw take out and put 
others in. When all are done put peaches in jars, and when syrup 
is cold take half brandy and half syrup and fill jars with this. 

MRS". F. F. FIELD. 

TOMATO JELLY. 

Take ripe tomatoes, peel carefully, cutting out all rough places; 
to each pound put half pound of sugar, season with white ginger 
and mace, boil to stiff jell}', add enough vinegar to keep it. 

GRAPE JELLY. 

Pick grapes from stems; wash them. Put over fire with just 
enough water to prevent burning, cook a few minutes, mash 
gently with a silver spoon, strain, and to every pint of juice allow 
one pound of sugar. After juice comes to the boiling point boil 
twenty minutes, pour over heated sugar and stir constantly till 
nil is dissolved; fill jelly glasses. MRS. WATKINS. 



rui.si:u\ l-.S. PICKLES AND CATSUPS. 131 

CRAB APPLE JELLY. 

Remove all signs of decay from the apples and cut into pieces, 
without removing seeds or skin. Allow pound of sugar to each 
pint of juice, unless a very tart jelly is desired, in which case 
three-quarters of a pound will suffice. Proceed as with any other 
jelly. MRS. F. F. FIELD. 

ORANGE MARMALADE. 

Cut one dozen oranges into thin slices, rind and all; have slices 
running towards the core, but do not use either seeds or core. 
Pour over the oranges five quarts of cold water and soak twenty- 
four hours. Put on to boil in same water, cook slowly three 
hours, add seven pounds sugar and cook slowly till tender, about 
four hours. Turn into tumblers, and when cold cover. 

MISS SKILES. 

WATERMELON RIND PICKLE. 

Pare rind and cut in squares, put layer of grape leaves and then 
layer of rind until kettle is full; on each layer of rind sprinkle little 
powdered alum, cover all with water and let simmer on stove until 
rind is clear, then put in dishes to cool. To each pound of rind 
take one pound of sugar, half pint vinegar, cinnamon and cloves 
to taste. Boil and pour hot over rind for six mornings. The last 
time put rind and all on and boil till rich and clear. 

MRS. A. MIDDLETON. 

CURRANT JELLY. 

Pour over one peck currants on the stems one quart boiling 
water, kt scald or boil gently till currants are thoroughly wilted. 
Mash and then strain through coarse muslin bag, let boil about 
five minutes, skim thoroughly. One pound sugar to each pint of 
juice; have sugar well heated and stir in juice, let come to a boil, 
remove scum and pour into glasses. MRS. GEN. CETTY. 

SPANISH PICKLE. 

Two dozen large cucumbers cut in large pieces, chop eight 
heads of cabbage, six dozen onions and two dozen green hill pep- 
pers; sprinkle all with salt and let stand all night. In the morn- 
ing squeeze all out, then place in kettle in layers, alternating with 
the following seasoning : Four ounces white mustard seed, four 
ounces termeric, four ounces celery seed, four ounces black- 
mustard, three-quarters of a pound of Colman mustard and eight 



132 PRESERVES, PICKLES AND CATSUPS. 

pounds of sugar, well mixed with good vinegar. Have all well 
covered with vinegar and boil till vinegar begins to thicken. 

CHOPPED CABBAGE PICKLE. 

Take small head of cabbage, chopped fine, and as much celery 
cut in small pieces, one dozen onions, three large green peppers 
chopped fine, put in salt for one hour. .Squeeze ingredients dry. 
Add three tablespoonfuls white mustard seed, one of ground 
mustard, sugar and pepper to taste. Cover with good vinegar 
and bod until thick. MRS. SPENCER W ATKINS. 

CHOW-CHOW. 

One quart large cucumbers cut in small pieces, one quart of 
coarsely cut celery, one quart of small cucumbers, one quart of 
small onions (white), one quart of beans and cauliflower, six green 
peppers. Put all in weak salt and water for twenty-four hours, 
then scald in same water. Six tablespoonfuls mustard, three 
tablespoonfuls termeric, three quarts cider vinegar, one and a 
half cupfuls of sugar, one cupful of flour, four teaspoonfuls of cel- 
ery seed, two tablespoonfuls white mustard seed. Mix well to- 
gether and cook until thick. Drain pickle well and pour paste 
over while boiling hot. MRS. DAVIDSON. 

MRS. SCHAAF'S TOMATO CATSUP. 

Take ripe tomatoes, cut in two or three pieces and put on to 
boil in porcelain kettle; boil till perfectly tender, then take off to 
cool. When cool rub the pulp through common flour sieve to 
remove seeds and skin. Replace the pulp thus separated in kettle 
and boil down to about the consistency of starch (as prepared for 
laundry work). Next measure pulp, and to each three quarts 
add: One quart best cider (apple) vinegar, four ounces of mustard, 
five ounces white mustard seed, four and one-half ounces celery 
seed, two ounces ground cloves, one-half ounce ground cinna- 
mon, two ounces ground ginger, two and one-half pounds gran- 
ulated sugai, salt and popper to taste. Stir frequentlv to pre- 
vent scorching. MRS. MIDDLETON. 

CUCUMBER CATSUP. 

Grate large cucumbers, squeeze through a cloth until all juice 
is extracted; then add to the dry pulp celery seed, black and white 
mustard seed, sugar, pepper and salt to taste. Cover well with 
strong vinegar and put in glass jars. MISS SKILES. 



BEVERAGES. 



CHOCOLATE. 

Each cake is marked off into eight equal squares, each of which 
is an ounce. Scrape fine one ounce, mix with one ounce sugar, 
and add boiling water in sufficient quantity to dissolve it; then 
add boiling milk until the preparation reaches one pint. The bev- 
erage is now ready for use, although some persons boil it from 
five to ten minutes. If a lighter preparation is preferred use boil- 
ing water instead of milk. MRS. N. B. FUGITT. 

BOUILLON. 

Six pounds bouillion beef, cover with water, ten onions sliced, 
one bunch parsley; boil till soup is rich, then strain; put on ice 
until next day, then add yolk of one egg, boil hard for a while. 
Just before serving add cupful of sherry. MRS. W ATKINS. 

COFFEE. 

The best coffee is made by mixing two-thirds Tava and one- 
third Mocha. Allow a heaping tablespoonful of coffee and cup of 
boiling water for each person, also heaping tablespoonful of coffee 
and cupful of boiling water for the pot; settle with white of an 
egg, tiny pinch of salt and wet with little cold water; beat 
thoroughly, then add boiling water. Boil ten minutes, set back 
where it will keep hot, but not boil, ten minutes more. 

MISS HOGE. 

MILK PUNCH. 

Take sweet, rich milk and sweeten to taste, add one to two 
tablespoonfnls best brandy, add pounded ice and shake. This is 
for one glassful. 

CLARET PUNCH. 

One bottle claret, one-quarter the quantity of ice water, three 
lemons sliced, three-fourths cupful powdered sue;ar; cover the 
sliced lemon with sugar and let stand ten minutes, add water, stir 
hard, pour in wine. Put pounded ice in each class before filling 
with the mixture. KENTON COOK BOOK. 



Ij6 BEVERAGES. 

EGG-NOG. 

Take half dozen eggs to each quart cream, separate eggs, beat 
yolks a little light, add slowly and heat in well large cupful of 
sugar to each half dozen eggs, add large tumbler of liquor slowly 
to each half dozen eggs, add little nutmeg; whip cream and beat 
in slowly; beat whites of eggs to stiff froth and add. Liquor 
should be half whiskey, quarter brandy and quarter rum. 

MRS. F. F. FIELD. 

RASPBERRY CORDIAL. 

Put in each quart bottle one pint raspberries and six table- 
spoonfuls granulated sugar; then in a vessel mix alcohol and 
water, two cups of water to one of alcohol; fill bottles, cork and 
set in sun for two weeks. MRS. JOHN G. AMES. 

BLACKBERRY CORDIAL. 

Put berries on and stew until well cooked up, then put in col- 
ander and let drip; afterwards put in thin muslin bag and let drip 
without squeezing. To each gallon of juice put three pounds 
sugar and put on to boil in brass or bell metal kettle, skim well ; 
when done take off and let it get cold, then put one quart liquor 
(whiskey and rum) to each gallon of juice and bottle; put six 
cloves in each bottle of cordial. Never use anything tin about it. 

MRS. A. MTDDLETON. 

MINT CORDIAL. 

Pick mint early in the morning while dew is on it; do not bruise 
it; pour some water over it and then drain off, put two handfuls 
in pitcher with quart French brandy, cover and let stand till next 
day; take out mint carefullv and put in as much more, which take 
out the next day; add fresh mint a third time, taking it out after 
twenty-four hours; then add three quarts water and one pound 
loaf sugar to brandy, mix well and when clear bottle. 

CHERRY CORDTAL. 

Extract juice from ripe Morella cherries, as von would from 
berries, strain through cloth, sweeten to taste and when perfectly 
clear boil. Put gill of brandy in each bottle, cork and seal tightly. 
Will keep all summer in cool place. Delicious with iced water. 

MRS. W ATKINS. 



i;K\ ERAGES 137 

TEA PUNCH. 

Three quarts sherry, one dozen lemons (peel only), two pints 
sugar or more to taste, three pints green tea (quarter pound of the 
tea). Pour tea hoiling over the lemon peel, which has heen cut 
from lemons, and the sugar, and when cold add sherry, and, it 
you like it. a little rum or brandy. Delicious, and will bottle and 
keep for months. MRS. GEO. T. DUNLOP. 

FISH HOUSE PUNCH. 

Half gallon New England rum, half gallon best California 
brandy, three pints Jamaica rum, three dozen oranges, three 
dozen lemons, six pounds cut sugar, one cupful very strong tea, 
two quarts water. Squeeze lemons and oranges the night before 
and pour juice over the sugar; let stand twelve hours before mix- 
ing with liquors. Then add all other ingredients and strain 
through fine muslin. Grate rind of three oranges, but peel all the 
others before squeezing. MRS. J. MAURY DOVE. 

REGENT PUNCH. 

One pint strong black tea (in which put rind of four lemons 
cut very thin), two pounds sugar, juice six lemons, juice six 
oranges, one pint French brandy, one pint rum, two quarts cham- 
pagne. Serve in bowl with plenty of ice. 

* 
GRAPE WINE. 

Press juice carefully from grapes; to every gallon of juice add 
three pounds brown sugar and one quart water. Fill cask, re- 
taining some to fill up everv day during fermetation; when fer- 
mentation ceases (which will be in about six weeks) stop cask 
tightly and in six months rack it off and bottle. 

BLACKBERRY WINE. 

Fill a larg-e stone iar with the ripe fruit and cover with water, 
cover and let stand three or four davs to ferment, then mash and 
squeeze juice. To each gallon juice add three pounds brown 
sugar, return mixture to jar and cover closely; skim it every 
morninc: for a week till it clears from the fermentation; when 
clear pour carefullv from the sediment into a demijohn, cork and 
set in cool place. When' two months old it will be fit for use. 

MRS. SPENCER WAT KINS. 



138 BEVERAGES. 

RED CURRANT WINE. 

Put five quarts of currants and a pint of raspberries into a gal- 
lon of water, let them soak over night, then squeeze and break 
them thoroughly. Rub them well on a fine wire sieve till all the 
juice is extracted, washing the skins again with some of the water. 
Then to every gallon add four pounds of lump sugar. Bottle im- 
mediately, but do not cork, letting it work by its own fermenta- 
tion. In two or three days add half a pint of brandy to every gal- 
lon of the wine, and cork as soon as the fermentation ceases. 

D. 

DR. McCALLA'S PUNCH. 

One quart whiskey, one quart Jamaica rum, one quart brandy, 
two quarts strong Imperial green tea, one and a half pounds gran- 
ulated sugar, one-half dozen lemons, one-half dozen oranges, one 
pound currant jelly, one quart bottle Apolinaris water when 
ready to serve with ice. Mix all water with the boiling tea after 
it is strained. 

MR. S. M. BRYAN'S PUNCH. 

One quart Jamaica rum, one quart brandy, one quart port wine, 
one quart strong made black tea, juice one dozen lemons, three 
cupfuls white sugar, one-half pint Curacao. Add equal quantity 
Apolinaris water with ice at time of serving. Put in sliced oranges 
or pineapples for flavoring. MRS. A. MTDDLETON. 



TH^ Best Place to &uy 



Shingles 

Paling; 



THOS. W. SMITH... 

CAPITAL PARK MILLS. 

1ST& G STS. IM. E. 





Hush RtfTTy 


R. A. CASILEAK 


v. . House and Fresco 


Real Estate, Loans and Insurance 


Painters' Supplies 


1325 32d Street N.W. 


Window and Plate Glass 




1911 Per.na. Avenue, Washington, D. C. 
3207 M Street, Georgetown, D. C. 
'Phones 1209 and 1725-3. 



M. J. ADLER 



Jameg K Prob 



e H 



B 



ardwarc««« 



3148 M Street 
Georgetown, D. C. 



Carriages 

Wagons 

and 

Harness -^* 

TELEPHONE 226 



1230 3>d St. N. W. 
Washington, D C. 



MANOGUE & JONES 



Wholesale and Retail Dealers in 



Fipe Groceries 



Teas, Wines, Cigars, etc. 

S. E. Cor. M and 32d Sts., Georgetown, D. C. 



CANDIES. 



FRUITS GLACE. 

< >ne cupful granulated sugar, one cupful water, juice one 
lemon. Boil together for half hour. If on trying the thread of 
sugar, it is brittle, it is cooked enough. Divide the oranges and 
dry free from moisture. Pour part of the syrup in small cup, 
which keep in boiling water. Take the pieces of oranges (or 
whatever other fruit you wish to caramel) on the point of a large 
needle or skewer and dip into the syrup in the cup; place on a 
slightly buttered dish. 

CRYSTALLIZED FRUITS. 

Take bunches of grapes, slices of oranges, strawberries or 
cherries. Dip them in white of egg well beaten to a froth, and 
then dip them into a cup of finely powdered sugar. Lay fruit on 
a pan with letter paper between and set in a cool oven until the 
icing becomes firm, then put on a plate in a cool place. 

CHOCOLATE CARAMELS. 

One cake Baker's chocolate, three pounds brown sugar, one 
cupful milk, heaping tablespoonful butter; boil all together and 
when done (to ascertain this drop small quantity in ice water; 
if brittle, it is sufficiently cooked) take from fire, add two tea- 
spoonfuls vanilla and beat mixture until smooth and very thick. 
Pour into buttered dish and when partiallv cool, cut into squares. 

MRS. F. F. FIELD. 

CREAM CHOCOLATES. 

Two cupfuls sugar, one of water, two and a half of corn starch, 
half cake chocolate; flavor with vanilla. M ESS SKILES. 

TURKISH FIG PASTE. 

Weigh out four pounds of sugar, one pound glucose, nine 
ounces corn starch, two scruples of powdered citric acid, and 
have readv oil of lemon, orange or any desired extract. A few 
drops of red coloring fluid may also be used. Place sugar and 



142 CANDIES. 

water upon the fire, and when they come to a boil, add starch 
dissolved in a little cold water, and then the glucose and acid. 
Cook until the syrup will leave the fingers readily when tested in 
cold water; it is then done and should be poured out on a slab 
over which powdered sugar has been sifted. Smooth the top 
neatly and sift sugar lightly upon it. When the candy is cool, 
cut it into blocks and crystallize. D. 

CANDIED PEEL. 

Before cutting oranges for the table dip them into warm water 
to remove any grime on the skins and pat dry with a soft cloth; 
then rub the fruit with lumps of sugar to extract the oil, reserving 
this sugar for the final dipping. Peel the oranges and throw the 
skins into boiling water; cook until tender, changing the water 
twice. Drain well and with a pair of scissors cut into strips and 
weigh, allowing one pound of sugar and half a cupful of water 
to every pound of the peel. Boil the sugar and water together 
a moment then add the orange peel and simmer until transparent, 
which usually requires half an hour. Drain and roll each piece 
in the crushed sugar used to extract the oil. Lay in a warm 
oven or a sunny place to dry. 

TO PRESERVE GINGER. 

To preserve ginger, pare the roots of fresh, green ginger, us- 
ing a very sharp knife, and place each piece in cold water as it 
is peeled. When all is peeled, drain from the water. Weigh 
ginger and place in preserving kettle, covering with cold water. 
When water is quite boiling, skim out ginger and place again in 
cold water. When quite cool, again return it to the kettle, add 
more cold water, and when boiling, skim out and lay in cold 
water as before. Do this three times, when the ginger will be 
tender, leaving it at the last in the cold water. Allow: One 
pound of ginger, one pint of water, one pound of sugar, one egg 
(white only). Place sugar and water together in preserving ket- 
tle and heat slowly, boiling slowly until sugar is dissolved. Beat 
white of egg until it froths, and stir into the syrup. When it boils 
skim until quite clear, then stand aside to cool. This is called 
clarifying syrup. Drain ginger, wipe dry with soft cloth and 
when the syrup is cold place the ginger in it and let it stand for 
thirtv-six hours. Drain off syrup, let come to a boil, take from 
fire, and when again cool place in the ginger and let it remain 
for twenty-four hours. Drain off the syrup again, heat to boiling 
and this time turn over the ginger while hot. In a week again 
drain it off, boil it and turn it on hot. Cover closely and the 
ginger will be ready to use in two weeks. Preserved in this way 
it is a great delicacy. 



CANDIES. 14 1 

CHIPS. 

Mix in ;i kettle five cupfuls of sugar, a cupful and a half of 
water and a Eourth of a teaspoonful of cream of tartar and set 
upon the fire. When the mixture boils add a fourth of a cupful 
pf New Orleans molasses. This candy should be cooked until 
very hard consequently great care must be observed to prevenl 
its burning. After the molasses lias been added, the stove lid 
should be kept continually between the kettle and the fire, and 
when tin.' candy is nearly done, the heat should he lowered, to 
prevent scorching. Test frequently and when a small quantity 
upon being dropped into water immediately becomes very hard, 
the candy is done and should be poured out to cool upon a well- 
buttered slab. When cool enough to handle pull until of a b # right 
glossy yellow. Now place the candy near the fire, where it will 
keep warm, and putting or a pair of old kid gloves, pull it out 
into a flat strip and rub it on both sides until very thin and of a 
satiny appearance. Here the assistance, of a second person is 
required to break the candy into small chips as it is pulled out 
and rubbed by the cook. This part of the work must be accom- 
plished as rapidly as possible, so as to allow a minimum of time 
for the candy to cool. These flakes or chips may be variously 
colored, some with chocolate, others pink and still others pale 
yellow. D. 

BUTTER SCOTCH. 

< hie cupful brown sugar, one half cupful water, one teaspoon- 
ful vinegar, piece butter size of walnut. Boil twenty minutes. 
Flavor if desired. 

MOLASSES CANDY. 

( hie quart of molasses, one half cupful butter, one half cup- 
ful sugar. Boil and when done stir in half a teaspoonful of 

soda just before taking from fire. 

( >RANGE DR< >PS. 

Grate rind of one orange and squeeze juice, taking care to 

reject seeds, add to this pinch of tartaric acid, then stir in con- 
fectioners' sugar until it is stiff enough to form into small balls 
the size of small marbles. Lemon juice can he used instead of 
orange, then leave out tartaric acid. K ENTON < '< M )K B< M )K. 

CREAM CANDY. 

Two pounds sugar, half cupful water, two tablespoonfuls vin- 



144 CANDIES. 

egar, one tablespoonful butler, boil twenty minutes, season with 
lemon or vanilla just as you take it off, put in dish and stir till 
cold. 

SUGAR CANDY. 

Three cupfuls sugar, half cupful vinegar, half cupful water', 
juice one lemon, boil (without stirring) until brittle. Pour on 
buttered dish and pull till light and white. MRS. WATKINS. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



Cook's table of weights and measures: 
i quart sifted Hour equals i lb. 
i quart powdered sugar equals i lb 7 oz. 
1 quart granulated sugar equals 1 It) 9 oz. 

1 pint closely packed butter equals 1 lb. 
Butter size of an egg equals about 2 oz. 
10 eggs equal t it). 

3 cupfuls sugar equal 1 It). 

5 cupfuls sifted flour equal 1 lb. 

[ heaping tablespoonful equals [-6 gill. 

4 gills equal 1 pint. 

2 pints equal 1 quart. 

4 quarts equal 1 gallon. 

SOUTH AMERICAN MARMALADE. 

Take one dozen sour oranges. Cut rind into quarters and peel 
off; scrape all the white from rind, cover with cold water and 
boil till tender. Scrape skin and seeds from inner pulp, when 
rind is tender, cut into thin shreds and mix with juice and pulp. 
Add to each pint of mixture, one pound granulated sugar. Boil 
steadily thirty minutes. 

SALTED ALMONDS. 

Blanche one cupful almonds. When cold put one tablespoon- 
ful of salad oil or melted butter on them and let stand one hour. 
then sprinkle with one tablespoonful salt. Put them into bright 
baking pan in moderate oven and cook them with occasional 
stirring, until they are a delicate brown, about twenty minutes. 
Peanuts can be treated in same way. 

KENT! ).\ CO< >K !'.( >OK. 

CHEESE BISCUITS. 

Two ounces flour, two ounces butter, three ounces grated 
cheese, pinch red pepper and salt, yolk one egg; rub all together, 



146 MISCELLANEOUS. 

then add yolk of egg". Roll out quarter of an inch thick and 
cut with round pastry cutter — small. 

MRS. GEO. T. DUNLOP. 

CHEESE STICKS. 

Pinch red pepper, quarter pound cheese, quarter pound but- 
ter, quarter pound flour, tablespoonful baking powder; work but- 
ter and flour together, then put in cheese. MRS. W ATKINS. 

CHEESE FONDU. 

Thick slice of bread crumb into a cup of boiling milk, when 
well soaked strain off milk, without pressing bread, two table- 
spoonfuls of grated cheese, season with salt, mustard and cay- 
enne, add the yolks of two eggs well beaten, lastly stir in the 
whites of three eggs well beaten, put in baking dish, dust with 
cracker crumb, and bake a light brown. MISS WAGNER. 

CHEESE STRAWS. 

Quarter pound grated cheese, two ounces flour, four ounces 
butter, yolk one egg, dessertspoonful mustard. Make thick paste 
of all the ingredients, roll it out and cut into long, narrow strips. 
Bake a light brown. About ten minutes will be sufficient. 

TO KEEP CUT FLOWERS FRESH. 

Put in vase half teaspoonful soda. To revive them take flowers 
from vase, throw away the cold water and replace with hot water 
in which you can barely hold your finger. Put in the flowers at 
once. The effect will be wonderful. 

VIOLET PERFUME. 

Half an ounce of orris root and two ounces of alcohol. Put 
into a bottle, cork tight and shake well. 

SHRIMP PIE. 

One pint of shrimps cooked and shells removed. Half pint 
of rice boiled very soft, while hot beat in a large spoonful of 
butter, two eggs well beaten, two tomatoes chopped fine, salt and 
pepper, in a baking dish spread a thick layer of the mixture, then 
one of shrimps, until the dish is full; glaze with white of eg;^ and 
bake. MISS WAGNER. 



C. W. Cornwell &. Bro. 



o 



Grocers*^ 



!S89 83d Street N. W. 
Washington, D. C. 



CRAIG & JACKSON 

|DRY GOODS^ 

Carpets, Mattings 
and Notions 

3140 M Street— Washington 



J. H. VIERS... 



Pine (jt 



roeerieg 



3218 M St.— West Washington 



E. L. Morgan 



Fine Wis, Cigars, etc. 

3059 M STREET 

Washington 



J. H. Buscher 

540, 541 and 541Ji Centre Market 
9th Street Wing 



Wholesale and Retail 
Dealer in 

Beef, Mutton, Lamb and Veal 



•f w gi they're Rich's Shoes 
they're proper." 



If 



SEE 

our $2.48 Oxfords and $3.48 Shoes 
They are pretty. 

B. RICH & SONS 



1002 F STREET 



JOHN T. WOOD 

D*"V Qoods 

3144 M St N. W. 
Washington, D. C. 



Tansig' 



Ladieg' 6afe 



dA 



BRIGHT, cosy place, where 
ladies, unattended, may 
come atany time. We cater 
to ladies especially. Have 
every substantial dainty 
and fancy dish in season 
that ladies may wish for 
luncheon. We prepare each 
order Feparately-and serve 
everything in most tempt- 
ing style. 



JAR VIS— 426 9th St. 

Confectioner and Caterer— 'Phone 1000 



THINGS WORTH KNOWING. 



If you put a piece of bread on the top of your knife when 
peeling onions, they will not affect your eyes, or if you peel 

onions under water your eyes will not cry. 

To remove grass stains from white goods, wet with water, rub 
in some soft soap, and as much baking powder as will adhere, 
let stand half an hour, wash out in usual manner and the stain 
will be gone. 

Put camphor gum with silver ware and it will not tarnish while 
the gum is there. 

To remove ink from carpets, absorb as much as possible with 
a cloth, cover the spot thickly with salt, in a day or two the stain 
will disappear. 

A piece of dry bread put into a small bag and placed in the 
middle of your stewpan, in which onions or cabbage are being- 
cooked, will absorb the strong flavor. 

Hartshorn will restore colors taken out by acids. 

To clean straw matting, wash with weak salt water. 

To test an oven for bread, pastry and other cereals not meant 
to rise any more, a bit of paper may be placed on it and if it turns 
a dark brown in five minutes the heat is just right. 

An oven intended to be moderately hot for cakes, delicate pud- 
dings, etc., should burn a bit of white paper yellow in five min- 
utes. 

A six-pound roast in an oven requires one hour's roasting to 
be rare and an hour and a quarter to be well done. 

An oven which needs to be a quick one for searing roasts be- 
fore their juices escapes will in three minutes turn to a dark 
brown a bit <>f white paper placed in it. 

One level teaspoonful of soda is sufficient to sweeten a pint of 
milk. 



ISO THINGS WORTH KNOWING. 

Four tablespoonfuls of liquid are equal to one wineglassful. 

Twelve level tablesponfuls of dry material are equal to eight 
that are heaped. 

To prevent a bruise from discoloring apply immediately hot 
water, or if that is not at hand, moisten some dry starch with 
cold water and cover bruised place. 

To remove blood stains, they can be removed from an article 
yon do not care to wash by applying a thick paste of starch and 
cold water. Place in the sun and rub off in two hours; if the stain 
has not entirely disappeared, repeat the process. 

To clean bottles, put into them fine coals, shake well, either 
with or without water. Charcoal left in a bottle for a little time 
will take awav disagreeable odors. 



Established 1831. 



E. E. WHEATLEY, 

(Successor to \V. H. Wheatley. ) 

PREMIUM.... V 



DYEING AND CLEANING ESTABLISHMENT. 



r 



1068 Jefferson Street— Georgetown, D. C. 



Ladies' Work a Specialty. Work called 
for and delivered anywhere in the city. 



PIERCE & LAWTON, 

Manufacturer and Dealer in 

FINE CARRIAGES, BUGGIES, PHAETONS, 
SURREYS AND SPRING WAGONS 



2710 and 2712 M Street, Washington, D. C. 

Prompt Attention Given to Repairing — Work Guaranteed. 



CROPLEY « BOTELER ► ► • 



▲ A 



Manufacturers of Fertilizers and Dealers in 
Field and Garden Seeds, Agricultural Imple- 
ments, etc. Hardware and Glassware, etc. . 



3213 M Street— Georgetown, D. C. 



^V. PESSA^IVO, 

Dealer in 

jfc ,* jfc FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC FRUITS. 

Stand No. 6, Centre Market— 7th St. Wing. 

-^iO'DONNELL PHARMACIES.^ 

32d and O Streets N. "W. 3d and Penna Ave. S. E. 

32d and M Streets N. W. 

—"Washington, D. C. 



DAVID F. WEAVER, 
FINK BOOTS AND SHOES. 

3123 M Street. Georgetown, D. C. 

BV0. 0ffutt — -^ 

• -Tine 6rocerie$ = g£e^ 

32d A N Streets, 
Georgetown, V. C. 

A. GUDE & BRO. 

* * ?lori$t$. 



1224 F St. N. W.— Washington, D. C. 









v^ 






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