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Full text of "U. S. Communist Party assistance to foreign Communist governments ; (Medical Aid to Cuba Committee and Friends of British Guiana) : hearings before the Committee on Un-American Activities, House of Representatives, Eighty-seventh Congress, second session, November 14 [-15] 1962"

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U.S. COMMUNIST PARTY ASSISTANCE TO 
FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 

(Medical Aid to Cuba Committee and Friends of 
British Guiana) 

PART 1 



u 

HEARINGS 

BEFORE THE 

COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 

EIGHTY-SEVENTH CONGRESS 

SECOND SESSION 



NOVEMBER 14, 1962 
INDEX IN PART 2 



Printed for the use of the Committee on Un-American Activities 




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Superintendent ot Documents 



DEPOSITOf 

U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE 
91669 WASHINGTON : 1963 A "& 



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COMMITTEE ON UN-AMERICAN ACTIVITIES 

United States House of Representatives 

FRANCIS E. WALTER, Pennsylvania, Chairman 

MORGAN M. MOULDER, Missouri GORDON H. SCHERER, Ohio 

CLYDE DOYLE, California AUGUST E. JOHANSEN, Michigan 

EDWIN E. WILLIS, Louisiana DONALD C. BRUCE, Indiana 

WILLIAM M. TUCK, Virginia HENRY C. SCHADEBERG, Wisconsin 

Francis J. McNamaka, Director 

Frank S. Tavenner, Jr., General Counsel 

Alfred M. Nittle, Counsel 




\ 



CONTENTS 



Part 1 

Page 

Synopsis 1837 

November 14, 1962 : Testimony of — 

Melitta del Villar 1851 

AFTERNOON SESSION 

Melitta del Villar (resumed) 1902 



Part 2 
(Afternoon session continued) 

November 14, 1962 : Testimony of — 

Sidney J. Gluck 1951 

Albert S. Baker 1974 

November 15, 1962 : Testimony of — 

Emilio V. Soto 1987 

Jose G. Tremols 1992 

Dr. X 1997 

Leo Huberman 2003 

AFTERNOON SESSION 

Leo Huberman (resumed) 2010 

Marcia G. Rabinowitz . 2027 

Michael Crenovich 2032 

Index i 

m 



Public Law 601, 79th Congress 

The legislation under which the House Committee on Un-American 
Activities operates is Public Law 601, 79th Congress [1946] ; 60 Stat. 
812, which provides : 

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United 
States of America in Congress assembled, * * * 

PART 2— RULES OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES 

Rule X 

SEC. 121. STANDING COMMITTEES 
******* 

17. Committee on Un-American Activities, to consist of nine Members. 

Rule XI 

POWERS AND DUTIES OF COMMITTEES 



(q) (1) Committee on Un-American Activities. 

(A) Un-American activities. 

(2) The Committee on Un-American Activities, as a whole or by subcommit- 
tee, is authorized to make from time to time investigations of (i) the extent, 
character, and objects of un-American propaganda activities in the United States, 
(ii) the diffusion within the United States of subversive and un-American propa- 
ganda that is instigated from foreign countries or of a domestic origin and attacks 
the principle of the form of government as guaranteed by our Constitution, and 
(iii) all other questions in relation thereto that would aid Congress in any neces- 
sary remedial legislation. 

The Committee on Un-American Activities shall report to the House (or to the 
Clerk of the House if the House is not in session) the results of any such investi- 
gation, together with such recommendations as it deems advisable. 

For the purpose of any such investigation, the Committee on Un-American 
Activities, or any subcommittee thereof, is authorized to sit and act at such 
times and places within the United States, whether or not the House is sitting, 
has recessed, or has adjourned, to hold such hearings, to require the attendance 
of such witnesses and the production of such books, papers, and documents, and 
to take such testimony, as it deems necessary. Subpenas may be issued under 
the signature of the chairman of the committee or any subcommittee, or by any 
member designated by any such chairman, and may be served by any person 
designated by any such chairman or member. 

******* 

Rule XII 

LEGISLATIVE OVERSIGHT BY STANDING COMMITTEES 

Sec. 136. To assist the Congress in appraising the administration of the laws 
and in developing such amendments or related legislation as it may deem neces- 
sary, each standing committee of the Senate and the House of Representatives 
shall exercise continuous watchfulness of the execution by the administrative 
agencies concerned of any laws, the subject matter of which is within the juris- 
diction of such committee ; and, for that purpose, shall study all pertinent reports 
and data submitted to the Congress by the agencies in the executive branch of 
the Government. 



RULES ADOPTED BY THE 87TH CONGRESS 
House Resolution 8, January 3, 1961 

******* 

Rule X 

STANDING COMMITTEES 

1. There shall be elected by the House, at the commencement of each Congress, 
******* 

(r) Committee on Un-American Activities, to consist of nine Members. 

******* 

Rule XI 

POWERS AND DUTIES OF COMMITTEES 

******* 

18. Committee on Un-American Activities. 

(a) Un-American activities. 

(b) The Committee on Un-American Activities, as a whole or by subcommit- 
tee, is authorized to make from time to time investigations of (1) the extent, 
character, and objects of un-American propaganda activities in the United States, 
(2) the diffusion within the United States of subversive and un-American prop- 
aganda that is instigated from foreign countries or of a domestic origin and 
attacks the principle of the form of government as guaranteed by our Constitu- 
tion, and (3) all other questions in relation thereto that would aid Congress in 
any necessary remedial legislation. 

The Committee on Un-American Activities shall report to the House (or to the 
Clerk of the House if the House is not in session) the results of any such in- 
vestigation, together with such recommendations as it deems advisable. 

For the purpose of any such investigation, the Committee on Un-American 
Activities, or any subcommittee thereof, is authorized to sit and act at such times 
and places within the United States, whether or not the House is sitting, has 
recessed, or has adjourned, to hold such hearings, to require the attendance 
of such witnesses and the production of such books, papers, and documents, and 
to take such testimony, as it deems necessary. Subpenas may be issued under 
the signature of the chairman of the committee or any subcommittee, or by any 
member designated by any such chairman, and may be served by any person 
designated by any such chairman or member. 

******* 

27. To assist the House in appraising the administration of the laws and in 
developing such amendments or related legislation as it may deem necessary, 
each standing committee of the House shall exercise continuous watchfulness 
of the execution by the administrative agencies concerned of any laws, the subject 
matter of which is within the jurisdiction of such committee : and, for that pur- 
pose, shall study all pertinent reports and data submitted to the House by the 
agencies in the executive branch of the Government. 



SYNOPSIS 

Activities of two domestic organizations soliciting funds within 
this country to send certain supplies to Communist-oriented govern- 
ments in Latin America were the subjects of committee investigations 
and public hearings held in Washington, D.C., on November 14 and 
15, 1962. 

Officials of the Medical Aid to Cuba Committee and the Friends of 
British Guiana were interrogated by the committee at these hearings 
after preliminary investigations revealed that individuals with rec- 
ords of activity in the Communist Party, USA, were active in both 
organizations. The committee sought to determine whether the orga- 
nizations were engaging in propaganda and other activities in order 
to assist the establishment of Communist-controlled governments in 
the Western Hemisphere, or to aid and strengthen those already in 
existence. 

The committee announced that the legislative purpose of this inquiry 
was to determine whether the Foreign Agents Registration Act of 
1938 required further amendment to carry out the full intent of the act 
as originally set forth by the Congress. 

Subcommittee Chairman Morgan M. Moulder explained at the out- 
set of the committee's public hearings that the aim of the registration 
statute is "public disclosure by persons engaging in propaganda ac- 
tivities and other activities for or on behalf of foreign governments, 
foreign political parties, and other foreign principals so that the Gov- 
ernment and the people of the United States may be informed of the 
identity of such persons and may appraise their statements and actions 
in the light of their associations and activities." 1 Agents of foreign 
principals are defined in the act as including anyone who "within the 
United States solicits, disburses, dispenses, or collects compensation, 
contributions, loans, money, or anything of value, directly or indi- 
rectly, for a foreign principal * * *." Solicitation of funds used 
solely for medical assistance is presently exempt from provisions of the 
act, however. 

"Confusion concerning the application of the act to certain organiza- 
tions has resulted from court decisions," the subcommittee chairman 
declared, and the committee is considering the necessity for "clarifica- 
tion of the act" as well as amendments to "substantive provisions" and 
a possible increase in penalties for violation of the act. 

Medical Aid to Cuba Committee 

The chairman and two other individuals who have served as treas- 
urer of the Medical Aid to Cuba Committee appeared before the Com- 
mittee on Un-American Activities on November 14, 1962. The orga- 
nization, with headquarters at 147 West 33d Street in New York City, 
was created in October 1961. By May of 1962, it had collected between 
$20,000 and $30,000 for the purpose of sending medical supplies to 
Cuba, Chairman Melitta del Villar informed the committee. 

1837 



1838 ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 

Mrs. del Villa r identified herself as a Cuban-born U.S. citizen, whose 
real name is Emma Lopez-Nussa Carrion Amster (Mrs. Louis J. 
Amster) . She said that Melitta del Villar is a professional name she 
employs in her career as a singer and entertainer in New York City. 
According to her testimony, the Medical Aid to Cuba Committee was 
formed after she had heard about an "emergency" need for medicines 
in Cuba and invited two or three acquaintances to get together to ex- 
plore the possibilities of helping to supply medical items to that 
country. 

Mrs. del Villar insisted in her testimony before the committee that, 
as chairman, she had exercised close personal supervision over the 
operating expenses of the organization which has continuously func- 
tioned as a charitable, nonpolitical endeavor and has not engaged in 
propaganda activities. As a purely "humanitarian" organization, she 
said, the Medical Aid to Cuba Committee had been advised by its 
attorney that it is exempt from the provisions of the Foreign Agents 
Registration Act. 

Preliminary committee investigations showed that the only other 
individuals currently holding official positions in the Medical Aid 
to Cuba Committee are Dr. Louis I. Miller, its "medical director," 
and Sidney J. Gluck, treasurer. 

Mr. Gluck was interrogated by this committee on November 14, 
1962, but repeated efforts to serve a subpena upon Dr. Miller at his 
home and office in New York were unsuccessful. 

Dr. Miller is credited with purchasing medical supplies which 
have been shipped to Cuba by the MACC. Mrs. del Villar testified 
that she had invited him to join the MACC for that purpose, al- 
though she was not acquainted with him personally at the time and 
did not know anything about his background other than that he had 
once been active in medical aid to Spain. She also said she could 
not recall who had recommended Dr. Miller to her. 

Committee counsel thereupon read from public records which 
showed that Dr. Miller was not only chairman of the Medical Bureau 
of the cited Communist front, the American Friends of Spanish 
Democracy, in the 1930's but was also one of the "principal New 
York contacts," during the lOlO's, for Soviet espionage agent Arthur 
Alexandrovich Adams. Counsel further stated that Louis F. Budenz, 
a former member of the Communist Party's National Committee, 
had testified before the committee in executive session in 1951 that 
he had met Dr. Miller during the 1940's at enlarged meetings of the 
National Committee of the Communist Party. 

Sidney Gluck, treasurer of the Medical Aid to Cuba Committee 
since April 1962, was brought into the organization by Dr. Louis 
Miller. In his appearance before the committee on November 14, 
1962, Mr. Gluck invoked the fifth amendment in response to com- 
mittee questions concerning past and present membership in the Com- 
munist Party. Mrs. Mildred Blauvelt, an undercover informant 
within the Communist Party for the New York City Police Depart- 
ment, had testified publicly before the committee on May 3, 1955, that 
Mr. Gluck was a member of the Flatbush Club of the Communist 
Party. In November of 1944, she said, he was credited with having 
recruited 54 new members into the party. 

Mr. Gluck refused to answer questions concerning literature issued 
by the Communist Party's Jefferson School of Social Science in New 



ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 1839 

York, identifying him as a teacher at the school in 1947 and 1950. 
A 1947 advertisement of the school named Mr. Gluck as instructor 
of a class on "Principles of Marxism, I." 

The witness acknowledged that in 1961 he had engaged in activi- 
ties sponsored by the Emergency Civil Liberties Committee and the 
National Assembly for Democratic Rights, which have been character- 
ized as Communist fronts in official reports of this committee. He 
resorted to the fifth amendment again, however, when confronted 
with evidence that he publicly solicited the participation of young 
Americans in the Communist-dominated Eighth World Youth Festi- 
val held in Helsinki, Finland, in the summer of 1962. 

When questioned concerning the selection of Mr. Gluck as treas- 
urer of the Medical Aid to Cuba Committee, Chairman del Villar 
disclaimed any knowledge of his relationship with the Communist 
Party. "I do not screen people," she said. "I do not question any- 
body who wants to help Medical Aid." 

Mrs. del Villar acknowledged that she had been in correspondence 
with local Medical Aid to Cuba Committees established in Los Angeles, 
Detroit, and Chicago. Although they had sent in financial contribu- 
tions, she said, they were not "branches" of her organization, because 
the New York committee exercised no control over them. She dis- 
claimed any personal acquaintanceship with officers of the Los Angeles 
Medical Aid to Cuba Committee, as well as any knowledge that several 
of them had appeared as witnesses in previous hearings of the Com- 
mittee on Un-American Activities. 

Committee counsel observed for the record that Helen Travis, sec- 
retary of the Los Angeles Medical Aid to Cuba Committee, had in- 
voked the fifth amendment when questioned by this committee on 
August 30, 1950. The committee had interrogated Mrs. Travis, a 
former Daily Worker employee, regarding evidence that she had 
transferred $3,700 to a "money drop" in Mexico City in an effort to 
finance the release of a Stalinist agent imprisoned for murdering Leon 
Trotsky. 

Simon M. Lazarus, treasurer of the Los Angeles committee, had re- 
fused to answer committee questions on March 26, 1953, regarding his 
role as financier of a motion picture produced by the Communist- 
infiltrated International Union of Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers. 

Chairman del Villar was questioned about a MACC press state- 
ment which attributed the need for its activities to (1) "an unofficial 
boycott" by U.S. drug manufacturers, even though certain foods and 
medicines were exempted from the U.S. embargo on trade with Cuba, 
and (2) an expansion in medical care through public health services 
in Cuba since the Castro-led revolution. Mrs. del Villar testified that 
her information regarding an alleged boycott was obtained from a 
British "peace" magazine and other journalistic sources. She con- 
ceded, however, that her organization had experienced no difficulty in 
purchasing medical supplies for shipment to Cuba. She stated she 
personally knew of an improvement in social conditions in Cuba under 
Castro. 

Mrs. del Villar informed the committee she would not discuss her 
own attitude toward the Communist dictatorship Castro has estab- 
lished in Cuba because her "political beliefs" were not a "question for 
debate" in an inquiry into a "humanitarian" organization. When con- 
fronted with committee evidence that she had been active in an ex- 



1840 ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 

tremely "political" and notoriously pro-Castro propaganda organiza- 
tion, the Fair Play for Cuba Committee, Mrs. del Villar admitted 
membership in, and speaking engagements in behalf of, the FPCC. 
She insisted, however, that she severed her relations with the organi- 
zation several months before conceiving the idea of a medical relief 
agency. Her appearances for FPCC, she stated, were not "as a prop- 
agandist for the Communist regime in Cuba, but simply to say what I 
know to be true — that I knew Cuba and that I knew many things that 
happen in Cuba now which were beneficial to the Cuban people from 
my direct knowledge, whether it is called communism or Buddhist or 
Zendist * * *." (During almost 30 years' residence in the United 
States, Mrs. del Vilar said, she had made two trips to Cuba — one in 
1950 and the other in the summer of 1960.) 

Contradictory testimony was received from Mrs. del Villar and a 
former MACC officer regarding the purpose of a telegram, bearing 
the signature "Pat O'Morte," which had been sent from MACC head- 
quarters on February 23, 1962, to a private New York residence. A 
Western Union record of the telegram listed the names of Mrs. Amster 
(Mrs. del Villar) and Albert S. Baker as "subscriber." 

Mrs. del Villar testified the telegram was a "fun message" which 
she had sent to a birthday celebration for Mr. Baker (treasurer of the 
MACC until his resignation in February 1962 for reasons of ill 
health). Mrs. del Villar said "Pat 'O'Morte" was herself and was a 
name which meant "nothing" — "just a play of words" because "some- 
times they say that I am somber." She admitted, when questioned, 
that the word "morte" means "death" in Latin. 

When the committee interrogated Mr. Baker on November 14, 1962, 
he insisted that he had neither received nor sent such a telegram, that 
his birthday was in October not February, and that his name may 
have appeared on the telegram as subscriber because he paid tele- 
graphic bills for MACC. This committee has also taken note of the 
striking similarity between Mrs. del Villar's allegedly meaningless 
alias, "Pat O'Morte," and the slogan popular in revolutionary Cuba: 
"Patria o muerte (Country or death) ." 

DISTRIBUTION OF MEDICAL AID TO CUBA 

Members of the committee pointed out to Chairman del Villar that 
Communist governments in East Europe have made political use 
of food and medical relief by distributing them so as to reward Com- 
munist collaborators and punish those not considered loyal to the 
Communist regime. They asked whether or not there was any fol- 
lowup by the MACC on the distribution of its supplies in Cuba. 
Mrs. del' Villar answered that there was no followup and that she 
was ignorant of past Communist misuse of relief supplies. She never- 
theless expressed "complete confidence" that the supplies were being 
distributed in Cuba on the basis of need. She said medical supplies 
which have been purchased with contributions to MACC (after an 
approximate 14-percent deduction for operating expenses) are sent to 
the National Hospital in Havana. She said the hospital director, 
Dr. Martha Frayde, communicated with MACC on Cuban medical 
needs. 

After interrogating officers of the Medical Aid to Cuba Committee, 
this committee received testimony on November 15, 1962, from three 



ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 1841 

Cuban doctors who have taken asylum in the United States since 
Castro's assumption of power : Dr. X, a surgeon who left Cuba several 
months prior to his appearance before the committee and whose 
identity was withheld to prevent possible reprisals against relatives 
still in Cuba, and Drs. Emilio V. Soto and Jose G. Tremols, Cuban 
pediatricians, who arrived in this country in 1960. 

All of the doctors testified to a shortage of medical supplies in 
Cuba. Dr. Soto offered the opinion that the shortage as of August 
1960, when he left Cuba, had been created by Castro, who wanted 
to make it appear the United States was to blame. He explained 
that American drug manufacturing firms were still operating in 
Cuba and supplying medicines to the Cuban medical profession at 
that time. 

Dr. X stated that, prior to his departure from Cuba in 1962, 
he saw very few American medical supplies and. he believed the 
shortage was caused by the Cuban Government's inability to buy suf- 
ficient quantities and Soviet failure to provide the quality medical 
supplies to which Cubans are accustomed. Dr. X noted that no private 
hospitals remained in Communist Cuba and that the Cuban Govern- 
ment controlled all medical supplies, which would include the distribu- 
tion of relief shipments from the United States. This physician said 
that, on one occasion, he had observed that medical tablets bearing the 
name of an American laboratory \yere packaged in cases labeled to 
indicate that they came from an East European Communist nation. 

Dr. Tremols recounted occasions in 1960 when a Cuban hospital, 
still being operated privately, had to rely on one of its interns with 
"good relations with the goA r emment" to obtain needed medical sup- 
plies. Each of the three doctors testified that Dr. Martha Frayde, 
director of the National Hospital in Havana, has the reputation in 
Cuba of being a Communist. 

Friends or British Guiana 

An organization known as Friends of British Guiana made its 
appearance in New York City early in 1962. It had the avowed pur- 
pose of raising "a few thousand dollars" to buy printing equipment 
for Cheddi Jagan's governing party in British Guiana. 

Advertisements placed in some publications by the Friends of 
British Guiana in April and May 1962 and introduced as exhibits 
during the committee hearings on the organization on November 15, 
1962, frankly explained that "Dr. Jagan's elected government relies 
upon one crudely printed, totally inadequate weekly paper to explain 
its position to the people." The advertisements declared : "A political 
movement or government without the means to convey its program 
to the broadest masses of the people operates under a severe handicap. 
Friends of British Guiana in this country have accordingly determined 
to provide Dr. Jagan's movement, the People's Progressive Party, 
with a linotype machine, photoengraving equipment, and other essen- 
tial printing machinery" so that it can issue a daily newspaper and 
"meet its important political obligations." 

British Guiana is a former colonial possession of Great Britain 
which has almost complete autonomy in internal affairs, and its gov- 
ernment recently has been engaged in negotiations for complete in- 
dependence. The local ruling party is the aforementioned People's 



1842 ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 

Progressive Party, whose leader, Cheddi Jagan, holds the post of 
Premier of the Government of British Guiana. A general strike and 
rioting erupted in British Guiana in February 1962 and was settled 
only after British troops arrived on the scene at the request of the 
Jagan government. In its April appeals for funds to help Dr. Jagaivs 
movement establish a daily newspaper, the newly formed Friends of 
British Guiana stated : 

In a recent Guardian 1 interview Janet Jagan, wife of the Prime Minister of 
British Guiana, declared that one of the chief reasons for the February riots in 
Georgetown was the government's lack of a daily paper to explain its new budget 
to the people. 

Publicity issued by the Friends of British Guiana referred to 
Jagan's political followers as "embattled friends of democracy" and 
his opponents in British Guiana as "reactionaries." In contrast, an 
official British Commission of Inquiry into the February disturbances 
in British Guiana found that some of the opposition to Dr. Jagan and 
his local government was motivated by the belief that his policies were 
"leading the country towards Communism." The Eoyal Commis- 
sion observed that Dr. Jagan had evaded answering its questions as 
to whether he was a Communist. The Commission concluded : "There 
is very little doubt that many of his speeches and some of his deeds 
gave rise to the apprehension that despite his evasions and profession 
to the contrary, he was acting as a communist." The Eoyal Commis- 
sion quoted statements made by Dr. Jagan (subsequently made part 
of this committee's hearing record) showing that the British Guiana 
Premier was an admitted Marxist who had publicly declared that 
"Communism is winning throughout the world — it will win every- 
where." 

Preliminary committee investigations revealed that the leaders of 
Friends of British Guiana were: Leo Huberman, provisional chair- 
man; Michael Crenovich, vice president; and Marcia G. Eabinowitz, 
treasurer. The committee also ascertained that the organization had 
not registered with the U.S. Attorney General as a foreign agent. 

The three officials of Friends of British Guiana were interrogated 
by this committee on November 15, 1962, but uniformly refused 
to answer questions concerning their activities in the organization on 
the grounds of possible self-incrimination. 

Provisional Chairman Huberman, who is also co-editor of the "inde- 
pendent socialist magazine" Monthly Review, readily discussed his 
own views as a "Marxist," however. He informed the committee that 
he was an "independent Marxist- Socialist," who has never been a mem- 
ber of the Communist Party but who believes in "working together 
with others, including Communists, to the extent that their aims and 
methods coincide with mine." Mr. Huberman admitted having per- 
sonally talked with Premier Cheddi Jagan within the past year, but 
refused to state whether the conversations involved the Friends of 
British Guiana organization. 

Michael Crenovich, a New York printing pressman, has never been 
identified in Friends of British Guiana publicity as an officer of the 
organization, although he applied for a post office box for the organi- 
zation on March 22, 1962, in the capacity of vice president. Mr. 



1 This is a reference to the National Guardian, a weekly newspaper cited in the committee's 
Guide to Subversive Organizations and Publications as "a virtual official propaganda arm 
of Soviet Russia." 



ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 1843 

Crenovich's membership on the National Committee of the Com- 
munist Party in 1961 had been made public by the committee in the 
course of hearings which it held in November 1961 on the Structure 
and Organization of the Communist Party of the United States. In 
his appearance before the committee on November 15, 1962, Mr. 
Crenovich invoked the fifth amendment in response to all questions 
regarding his membership in the Communist Party. He also refused 
to confirm the accuracy of literature issued in 1959 by the Communist 
Party training school, the Faculty of Social Science, which listed him 
as an instructor of its courses dealing with Latin America. 

Marcia Rabinowitz, publicized as treasurer of Friends of British 
Guiana, has been a member of the Coney Island Club of the Com- 
munist Party in the Second Assembly District, Kings County, New 
York, according to information received by the committee. On 
grounds of possible self-incrimination, Mrs. Rabinowitz refused to 
answer committee questions concerning her past or present member- 
ship in the Communist Party. 



U.S. COMMUNIST PARTY ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN 
COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 

(Medical Aid to Cuba Committee and Friends of British Guiana) 

Part 1 



WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 1962 

United States House of Representatives, 

Subcommittee of the 
Committee on Un-American Activities, 

Washington, D.C. 

PUBLIC HEARINGS 

A subcommittee of the Committee on Un-American Activities met, 
pursuant to call, at 10 a.m., in the Caucus Room, Cannon House Office 
Building, Washington, D.C., Hon. Morgan M. Moulder (chairman of 
the subcommittee) presiding. 

Subcommittee members present : Representatives Morgan M. Moul- 
der, of Missouri; Edwin E. Willis, of Louisiana; and Gordon H. 
Scherer, of Ohio. 

Also present : Representative Donald C. Bruce, of Indiana. 

Staff members present : Francis J. McNamara, director ; Frank S. 
Tavenner, Jr., general counsel; Alfred M. Nittle, counsel; Louis J. 
Russell and Neil E. Wetterman, investigators. 

Mr. Moulder. The committee will come to order. 

In their legislative efforts which have as their ultimate objective the 
preservation and defense of our free way of life, this committee and 
its predecessor committees have directed considerable attention to the 
subject of persons within the United States who act as agents for 
foreign governments. 

The Foreign Agents Registration Act of 1938 was adopted by the 
Congress expressly to carry out a recommendation made in 1935 by 
the McCormack committee, which was a special committee to investi- 
gate un-American activities. Since the passage of this act, the present 
Committee on Un-American Activities has made certain legislative 
recommendations for its amendment, some of which have been adopted 
by the Congress. 

Recently, on March 21, 1961, Mr. Walter, the chairman of this com- 
mittee, introduced H.R. 5751, a foreign Communist propaganda con- 
trol bill, which would amend certain provisions of the Foreign Agents 
Registration Act. The bill was referred to this committee for 
consideration. 

1845 



1846 ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 

The Foreign Agents Registration Act provides, in brief, for the 
registration of persons and organizations which act as agents of for- 
eign principals, including agents of friendly foreign powers, as well 
as of Soviet bloc countries. The policy and purposes of the Foreign 
Agents Registration Act of 1938 are set forth in the act as follows : 

It is hereby declared to be the policy and purpose of this act to protect the 
national defense, internal security, and foreign relations of the United States 
by requiring public disclosure by persons engaging in propaganda activities and 
other activities for or on behalf of foreign governments, foreign political parties, 
and other foreign principals so that the Government and the people of the United 
States may be informed of the identity of such persons and may appraise their 
statements and actions in the light of their associations and activities. 

It is thus clear that, in dealing with the activities which the act 
covers, it is not the purpose of the committee to obstruct the inter- 
change of ideas or information, but rather to preserve the integrity of 
free speech and communication. The U.S. Supreme Court had oc- 
casion to consider the act in Vierech v. United States, 318 U.S. 236. 
As Justice Black then pointed out : 

What emerged from extended Congressional investigations, hearings and 
deliberations was this Act, intended to provide an appropriate method to obtain 
information essential for the proper evaluation of political propaganda emanat- 
ing from hired agents of foreign countries. As the House and Senate Com- 
mittees considering the Bill said, it "does not in any way impair the right of 
freedom of speech, or of a free press, or other constitutional rights." Resting 
on the fundamental constitutional principle that our people, adequately informed, 
may be trusted to distinguish between the true and the false, the bill is intended 
to label information of foreign origin so that hearers and readers may not be 
deceived by the belief that the information comes from a disinterested source. 
Such legislation implements rather than detracts from the prized freedoms 
guaranteed by the First Amendment. No strained interpretation should 
frustrate its essential purpose, (p. 250f ) 

In the present hearings by this subcommittee, the committee will 
inquire into the Medical Aid to Cuba Committee and another organi- 
zation known as the Friends of British Guiana, for the legislative 
purpose of determining whether the Foreign Agents Registration Act 
requires further amendment for its effective operation in carrying out 
the intent of Congress as set forth in the act. 

Preliminary investigation indicates that the two previously named 
organizations are involved in propaganda and other activities in be- 
half of persons, institutions, publishing undertakings, and political 
parties which are not only foreign principals but also Communist 
instruments. 

In considering the activities of such organizations, this committee 
will consider not only the advisability of recommending amendments 
to the substantive provisions of the act but also the advisability of 
recommending additional penalties for its violation. 



ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 1847 

Section 611(b) of the Foreign Agents Registration Act states that 
a foreign principal includes not only the government of foreign coun- 
tries but foreign political parties and persons, and also partnerships, 
associations, corporations, organizations, or other combinations of in- 
dividuals organized under the laws of, or having its principal place of 
business in, a foreign country. 

Section 611(c) of the act defines "agent of a foreign principal" as, 
among others — 

any person * * * who within the United States solicits, disburses, dispenses, 
or collects compensation, contributions, loans, money, or anything of value, 
directly or indirectly, for a foreign principal * * * . 

Confusion concerning the application of the act to certain organi- 
zations has resulted from court decisions. This and other hearings of 
the committee may determine the necessity for clarification of the act 
in this regard. 

The committee would be derelict in its duty if it did not devote its 
attention particularly to persons and organizations which, under the 
guise of humanitarianism, engage in deception or fraud with a view 
toward influencing the public and Government of the United States 
in their policies and relations, or that seek to promote within the 
United States racial, religious, or social dissension or other conflict, 
or have as an ultimate objective the overthrow of the Government 
of the United States. The never-ending tensions and disturbances, 
inimical to the welfare and safety of our country, frequently 
created by such persons and organizations, demand the attention of 
the Congress which has a constitutional duty to provide for the safety 
and welfare of these United States. 

At this time I would like to call upon Congressman Willis, of Loui- 
siana, for his comment on the question of medical aid to Cuba or 
other countries. 

Mr. Willis. I think the statute referred to, the Foreign Agents 
Registration Act, contains an exemption with reference to people en- 
gaged in humanitarian causes, such as dissemination and distribution 
of medicines, impartially and without regard to political philosophy, 
and so on. 

The point is that it has been repeatedly demonstrated that the Com- 
munist regimes have frequently in the past made political use of aid 
or assistance, medical or otherwise. This happened in various eastern 
European countries following World War II when the Communists 
in power there used food, clothing, and medical and other supplies sent 
to them for relief purposes, so-called, really to reward collaborators. 

On the other hand, it was demonstrated during that experience also 
that anti-Communists in these areas were denied such medical as- 
sistance, and so it seems to me that it is very proper that we should 



91669 O— 63— pt. 1- 



1848 ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 

inquire into this subject, the background of it, whether this outfit or 
this organizaton 

Mr. Moulder. Medical Aid to Cuba Committee. 

Mr. Willis. — is really organized for humanitarian purposes as 
we understand those terms, or whether this is one more effort to use 
very fine, appealing language to disseminate Communist propaganda, 
and so on, so I congratulate the chairman of the committee for calling 
these hearings today. 

Mr. Moulder. The Chair recognizes Congressman Scherer, of Ohio. 

Mr. Scherer. Mr. Chairman, I have before me a rather lengthy 
telegram addressed to the House Committee on Un-American Activi- 
ties 

Mr. Willis. Are they coming in already ? 

Mr. Scherer. Yes; I understand this telegram has been given 
wide circulation — protesting the hearings. It has been signed by 
quite a few people and, so that the American people may better evalu- 
ate the content of this telegram and the charges made against the 
House Committee on Un-American Activities, I think we should 
include at this point in the record the text of the telegram and the 
names of the signers. I recognize many of the signatures as persons 
who have Communist connections, members of the Communist Party, 
and others who have long Communist-front records. 

Mr. Moulder. The telegram will be included in the record as sug- 
gested by Congressman Scherer. 

(The telegram, Committee Exhibit No. 1, referred to appears on 
pp. 1849, 1850.) 

Mr. Moulder. The legislative purposes of the hearings are set forth 
in the resolution authorizing them, which I now read : 

BE IT RESOLVED, that hearings by the Committee on Un-American Activities 
or a subcommittee thereof, be held in Washington, D.C., or at such other place 
or places as the Chairman may determine, on such date or dates as the Chair- 
man may designate, relating to propaganda activities of members and affiliates 
of the Communist Party of the United States, for the following legislative 
purposes : 

1. Consideration of the advisability of amending Title 22 USC, 611(c), by 
extending the definition of the term "Agent of a Foreign Principal" so as to 
remove any doubt as to what should be the true test of agency within the 
meaning of this Act. 

2. The execution, by the administrative agencies concerned, of the Foreign 
Agents Registration Act and all other laws, the subject matter of which is 
within the jurisdiction of this Committee, the legislative purpose being to exer- 
cise continuous watchfulness of the execution of these laws, to assist the 
Congress in appraising the administration of such laws, and in developing such 
amendments or related legislation as it may deem necessary. 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED, that the hearings may include any other 
matter within the jurisdiction of the Committee which it, or any subcommittee 
thereof, appointed to conduct these hearings may designate. 

The above resolution bears the date August 2, 1962. 



ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 



Committee Exhibit No. 1 



1849 






.,.„N.l 

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WESTERN UNION 

TELEGRAM - - 



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LLC509 SYA262 

SY SIA5U2 NL PO SI NEW YORK NY 1} 

STAFF DIRECTOR 

HOUSE COMMITTEE ON UNAMERICAN ACTIVITIES HOUSE OFC BLDG WASHDC 
WE HAVE LEARNEfi) THAT OFFICERS OF THE MEDICAL AID TO CUBA COMMITTEE 
HAVE BEEN SUBPOENAED TO APPEAR BEFORE THE HOUSE UN-AMERICAN 
ACTIVITIES COMMITTEE AT A HEARING IN WASHINGTON, DC THIS WEDNESDAY 
MORNING, NOVEMBER lUTH. AS A GROUP OF PRIVATE CITIZENS, WE 
PROTEST THE ACTION OF THE HOUSE COMMITTEE. 

THE MEDICAL AID TO CUBA COMMITTEE IS AN ORGANIZATION 
PERFORMING A HUMANITARIAN, NON-POLITICAL SERVICE BY SENOING 
LIFE-SAVING MEDICINES TO SICK MEN, WOMEN AND CHILOREN IN CUBA. 
ITS PROGRAM ACCOROS WITH THE STATEO POLICIES OF BOTH THE PREVIOUS 
REPUBLICAN ADMINISTRATION AND THE PRESENT DEMOCRAT 10 ADMINISTRATION. 
IN HIS TELEVISED ADORESS OF OCTOBER 22ND, PHESIOjEWT KEMK€OY 
OECLAftEO THAT THIS GOVERNMENT "WOULD NOT, AT THIS TIME, WITHHOLD 

?JS1 SIA3*2 

THE NECESSITIES OF LIFE FROM THE CUBAN PEOPLE" DESPITE DIFFERENCES 
BETWEEN THE TWO GOVERNMENTS. 

IN FEBRUARY, WHEN INSTITUTING ECONOMIC SANCTIONS AGAINST 
CUBA, PRESIDENT KENNEDY STATED THAT MEDICINES AND FOOO WERE 
EXEMPT FROM THE PROVISIONS OF THE EMBARGO "ON HUMANITARIAN 
GROUNDS." 

WE BELIEVE THAT THE ACTION OF THE HOUSE COMMITTEE HARASSES 
CITIZENS WHO ARE PERFORMING A CONSTRUCTIVE FUNCTION, WHICH 
MIGHT CONTRIBUTE TO IMPROVED RELATIONS BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES 
AND CUBA. THESE SUBPOENAS ARE NOT ONLY ILL-ADVISEO) THEY ALSO 
ENCROACH ON THE RIGHTS OF THE INDIVIDUALS CONCERNED. 

WE CALL UPON THE HOUSE COMMITTEE TO DESIST. WE HOPE THAT 
ALL MEN OF CONSCIENCE WILL SUPPORT US IN TMIS PROTEST. 

REV WILLIAM T BAIRD CHICAGO ILL REV FREDERIC E BALL CHICAGO 



1850 ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 



Class of Service 

! ■... u a la»< mMiV 
unlesa Hi deferred char- 
■crer Is Indicated by the 
proper symbol. 



WESTERN UNION 

TELEGRAM •*•»»- 

le of receipt 1 1 Tcfe «V Im E Lipo. n f3T< 



NL«Nifhi Lener 



: telegrams is LOCAL TIME a i point ofc 



U£„.£3 



3/SY SIA342 

ILL HARRY BARNARD CHICAGO ILL NELSON 3ENGST0N NYC DANIEL M 
BERMAN WASHDC MISS JESSIE BINF0RO CHICAGO ILL PROF DERK BODDE 
PHILADELPHIA PA DWIGHT L BOLINGER BOULDER COLO REV THEOOORE 
R BOWEN WASHINGTON OC DR THEOOORE BRAMELD BOSTON MASS RABBI 
STANLEY R BRAV CINCINNATI OHIO DR DOROTHY BREWSTER NYC REV 
E T BUEHRER CHICAGO ILL RABBI ELIAS CHARRY PHILADELPHIA PA 
GRENVILLE CLARK NYC NOAM CHOMSKY CAMBRIDGE MASS DR HENRY HITT 
CRANE DETROIT MICH PROF EPHRAIM CROSS NYC HORACE B DAVIS RALEIGH 
NC DOROTHY DAY NYC ERNEST DE MAIO CHICAGO ILL PROF WALLACE 
W DOUGLAS EVANSTON ILL REV JOHN E EVANS COLUMBUS OHIO MARION 
FRENYEAR SIDNEY NY LEONARD M FRIEOMAN CHICAGO ILL CARLTON B 
GOODLETT MD SAN FRANCISCO CALIF DR A EUSTACE HAYDON CHICAGO 
ILL REV CHARLES A HILL DETROIT MICH DR WILLIAM E HOCKING CAMBRIDGE 
MASS PROF HERBERT JEHLE WASHINGTON DC FREDA KIRCHWEY NYC DR 
4/8Y SIA342 

HELEN B LAMB NYC KENNETH MAY NORTHFIELO MINN ARTHUR MACEWAN 
CHICAGO ILL LAFAYETTE MARSH CHICAGO ILL DR CLYDE R MILLER NYC 
JAY MILLER CHICAGO ILL A J MUSTE NYC WALTER MITCHELL RANCHO 
SANTA FE CALIF REV CLARENCE T R NELSON DETROIT MICHIGAN DALE 
PONTIUS CHICAGO ILL W_ CAR SON RYAN CHAPE L, HILL NC PROF PAUL 
A SCHILPP EVANSTON ILL PROF MALCOLM SHARP CHICAGO ILL GUY E 
SHIPLER ARCADIA CALIF PROF WILLIAM T STARR EVANSTON ILL ANNE 
THROP CAMBRIDGE MASS REV ALVA TOMPKINS CHICAGO ILL REV ROSS 
A WESTON EVANSTON ILL AUBREY WILLIAMS MONTGOMERY ALA REV DAVID 
RHYS WILLIAMS ROCHESTER NY DR H H WILSON PRINCETON NJ PROF 
ERNEST J WRAGE EVANSTON ILL. 



ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 1851 

The order for appointment of this subcommittee is also being in- 
cluded in this record as follows : 

November 9, 1962. 
To: Francis J. McNamara, 

Director, Committee on Un-American Activities 
Pursuant to the provisions of the law and the rules of this Committee, I 
hereby appoint a subcommittee of the Committee on Un-American Activities, 
consisting of Honorable Morgan M. Moulder as Chairman, and Honorable Ed- 
win E. Willis and Honorable Gordon H. Scherer, as associate members, to con- 
duct a hearing in Washington, D.C., Wednesday, November 14, 1962, at 10 :00 
a.m., on subjects under investigation by the Committee and take such testimony 
on said day or succeeding days, as it may deem necessary. 
Please make this action a matter of Committee record. 
If any Member indicates his inability to serve, please notify me. 
Given under my hand this 9th day of November, 1962. 

(s) Francis E. Walter, 
Francis E. Walter, 
Chairman, Committee on Un-American Activities. 

Are you ready to proceed with the first witness? 

Mr. Nettle. Yes, sir. Will Melitta del Villar please come forward? 

Mr. Moulder. Will you be sworn, please ? 

Do you solemnly swear that the testimony which you are about to 
give before this subcommittee will be the truth, the whole truth, and 
nothing but the truth, so help you God ? 

Mrs. DEL VlLLAR. I do. 

TESTIMONY OF MELITTA DEL VILLAR, ACCOMPANIED BY 
COUNSEL, BASIL R. POLIITT 

Mr. Nittle. Would you state your full name and residence for the 
record, please ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes, sir. My name is Emma Lopez-Nussa Car- 
rion Amster. This is my legal name. My professional name is Melitta 
del Villar, so I am known, since del Villar is also my family name. 

Mr. Scherer. Will you push the microphone a little closer? 

Mrs. del Villar. Surely. Should I say it again ? 

Mr. Nittle. In repeating your name, will you please spell it for the 
benefit of the reporter? 

Mrs. del Villar. E-m-m-a, Emma, Lopez, L-o-p-e-z — usually I 
don't use the other part, which is hyphenated, because it is long and 
cumbersome — Nussa, N-u-s-s-a, Carrion, my mother's name, Amster, 
my husband, and in Anglo-Saxon, Melitta, M-e-1-i-t-t-a, small d-e-1, 
capital V-i-1-l-a-r, Villar, which is my professional name and is also 
my grandfather's title. 

Mr. Nittle. Mrs. del Villar, I believe you are represented by coun- 
sel? 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Nittle. Would counsel please identify himself for the record ? 

Mr. Pollitt. Yes. 

Mr. Nittle. Stating his name and office address. 

Mr. Pollitt. Basil R. Pollitt, P-o-l-l-i-t-t, 52 Sidney Place, Brook- 
lyn, N.Y. 

Mr. Nittle. Will you state the date and place of your birth, Mrs. 
del Villar? 



1852 ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 

Mrs. del Villar. I was born in Havana, Cuba, April 10, 1918, the 
real birth. My papers read 1913. This was very common in Cuba 
in the old days, to change around to suit your convenience of school 
and things like that. 

Mr. Nittle. Are both your parents now alive ? 

Mrs. del Villar. No, sir. My father is dead. My mother is alive. 

Mr. Nittle. Where does your mother now reside ? 

Mrs. del Villar. In Havana, Cuba. 

Mr. Nittle. You have also used the name Melitta Sheyne, 
S-h-e-y-n-e, have you not ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes, sir, because that was my former marriage. 

Mr. Nittle. Would you relate the extent of your education, please ? 

Mrs. del Villar. I was born in Havana, as I told you, and studied 
in Cuba, elementary and primary school, which we have slightly dif- 
ferent names for the training; in other words, high school, part 'of 
high school, and then in Puerto Rico, where I continued my educa- 
tion, and then went back to Havana where I continued the high school 
and normal school training, and then came to this country where I have 
taken numerous studies, but usually not for credit, mostly for my own 
interest of education, in Columbia University, and other places where 
I have attended, as I say, but not for credit, so therefore it is not a, you 
know, a formal way, and also in France I have taken courses at the 
Sorbonne as a guest, you know, as auditor. 

Mr. Nittle. Did you receive any degrees from universities which 
you attended ? 

Mrs. del Villar. No, I have no degrees. I have studied music, 
also. 

Mr. Nittle. Where have you studied music ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Private teachers. 

Mr. Nittle. You are also trained as an entertainer? You sing and 
dance? 

Mrs. del Villar. No, I do not dance. I sing and recite. 

Mr. Nittle. Have you performed under the professional name of 
Melitta? 

Mrs. del Villar. Melitta and Melitta del Villar, both. 

Mr. Nittle. Did you state your present residence? 

Mrs. del Villar. No; 215 East 15th Street in Manhattan. 

Mr. Nittle. What was your residence prior to that on East 15th 
Street? 

Mrs. del Villar. Well, it was 400 Central Park, West. In between 
we spent a short period out of the city, but I don't call that residence, 
so we had not intended to stay. 

Mr. Nittle. What was the period of your residence at 400 Central 
Park, West? 

Mrs. del Villar. Oh, about a year, a little less than a year. 

Mr. Nittle. Commencing when and ending when? 

Mrs. del Villar. Oh. It started August 1961, 1 guess; and we left, 
I would say, July, I think, 1962, but I'm not exact as to all the dates. 
I am not absolutely sure. 

Mr. Scherer. Do you consider yourself now a permanent resident 
of the United States? 



ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 1853 

Mrs. del Villar. I always have been. 

Mr. Scherer. You always have been ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes, since I was a young woman. 

Mr. Scherer. Are you a citizen of the United States ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Scherer. And you have been here 

Mrs. del Villar. Since 1933. 

Mr. Scherer. And you came to the United States from Cuba? 

Mrs. del Villar. That's right. 

Mr. Scherer. You have been back, I suppose, a number of times? 

Mrs. del Villar. No, not much because my mother always used to 
come to visit me, but I was once or twice. 

Mr. Nittle. What is your present occupation ? 

Mrs. del Villar. My present occupation, actually still performing 
and singing, but I have been not doing much of it because of the fact 
that, I don't know — call it conscience, call it ethical upbringing, or 
sense of responsibility — when I became aware that there was a need, 
that people were sick and dying because they didn't have medicines, 
I decided to do something about it, and it has represented considerable 
personal loss and sacrifice, material, but, as you know, there are some 
things that are more important than bread. 

Mr. Nittle. I suppose you are referring to the Medical Aid to Cuba 
Committee ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Nittle. You are the chairman of that committee, is that 
correct ? 

Mrs. del Villar. I am. 

Mr. Nittle. I now direct your attention to an article marked for 
identification as del Villar Exhibit No. 1, entitled "U.S. committee 
formed to send drugs and medicines to Cuba," which appears in the 
issue of the National Guardian for February 19, 1962, at page 5. I 
hand you a copy of that article. 

You will note the article states that : 

A NEW COMMITTEE, Medical Aid to Cuba, has been formed in New York to 
send needed drugs and medicines to Cuba * * *. 

The article further states that the committee, headed by Melitta del 
Villar, has already forwarded more than $5,000 in medical supplies. 

Although the article appeared in the February 19, 1962, issue of 
the National Guardian, it is our information that the Medical Aid to 
Cuba Committee was formed at least 5 months prior to the appearance 
of this article. Would you tell us when the Medical Aid to Cuba 
Committee was formed ? 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mrs. del Villar. Sometime in the fall the committee, so-called — it 
was not really committee then, it was just myself and a couple of 
friends — recognized this emergency situation and this need and we 
got together informally to see and explore whether it was possible to 
send medicines and to comfort with this help. Excuse me, because I 
forget what the rest of the question is. 

(Document marked "del Villar Exhibit No. 1" appears on pp. 1854, 
1855.) 



1854 



ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 



DEL VlLLAR EXHIBIT No. 1 

[National Guardian, Feb. 19, 1962] 



CAMPAIGN ANSWERS 'UNOFFICI AL BOYCOTT 

- ■ -- - - ■■ 

U. S. committee formed to send 
drugs and medicines to Cuba 



ANEW COMMITTEE, Medical Aid to 
;_Cj»Da, hu been formed In New York 
to send needed drugs and medicines to 
Cuba, now under virtually a total trade 
boycott by the TJ.S. Though medicines 
and food were exempted from the trade 
ban, an "unofficial boycott" by drug man- 
ufacturers Is In effect, the committee 
charged. This 'unofficial agreement" has 
affected UJ3. subsidiary drug companies 
In Europe and Canada, the committee 
said. In addition, Cuba's need for medi- 
cines Is greater now, since medical care 
through public health services has great- 
ly expanded since the revolution and Is 
now available to more people. 

The committee pointed out that of 
Cuba's 8,500 doctors, only 1,121 were in 
public health in 1968. In 1961, the num- 
ber had risen to 3. 633. The number of 
physicians In rural sections of Oriente 
province has risen from 16 in 1958 to 700 
and the number of hospital beds in the 
area, from 10 in 1958 to 925 In June, 1961. 

On Feb. 11 the Ministry of Health In 
Havana announced a system of controls 
on drugs and medicines to pres er ve ex- 
isting supplies, according to the N.T. 
Times, Feb. 12. The Times said: "It (the 
Cuban government) said the controls 
were made necessary by the 'brutal Im- 
perialist blockade* imposed by the Unit- ' 
ed States." 

Complicating the shortage of medi- 
etnes In Cuba are language differences 
in labeling and descriptive literature on 
drugs from countries other Ann the UJB. 
Medicine is being received In Cubs, from 
the socialist countries, but the distance 
causes delays and the shortage of ads* 
Quate storage facilities In Cuba cannot 



Insure a large supply on hand. Formerly 
overnight orders could be placed with 
U.8. firms. 

The committee, headed* by Mrt^fra A*} 
Villa r, has already forwarded more than 
$5,000 in medical supplies. One needed 
drug Is vital to post-operative treatment 
of cardiac cases. It costs over $600 for 
1,000 ampules at the hospital price. 
From 5 to 20 ampules are used per oper- 
ation. Since the cost of drugs is high, 
the committee is in need of funds. Dona- 



Lamont charges Washington ■ 
with a frame-up ef Cuba 

DR. CORLISS LAMONT. author and 
philosopher, has called the Kennedy 
Administration campaign against Cuba 
"the height of hypocrisy." Speaking at 
a meeting of the West Side Committe e 
for Fri endly Relattogg -J-rith' pgi re5! 9 
in New York, Dr.' Lamont said there can 
be frame-ups of nations as well as Indi- 
viduals. He proposed that Washington 
"cease the dishonest anti-Cuban propa- 
ganda, restore normal diplomatic and 
trade relations, and re-establish the 
right of Americans to travel to Cuba." 

ttons may be mailed to: Medical Aid to 
Cuba Committee, Suite 409, 147 W. 33 
fit.. New Tort 1. 

A rally to encourage Americans to 
help "as an expression of the good will 
and friendship which many United States 
eltirene feel for the people of Cdba" wlB 
be held March 14. W illiam Wort hy, 
and Mel 



jnJttjejwunmJttee's in- 
formation director, win be chairman. 



ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 1855 



A non-political 

humanitarian 

effort, 

unaffiliated 

with 



"On humanitarian grounds the President will 
allow some foods and medicines to be shipped 
to Cuba— New York TIMES, 2/4/62. 



MBHCAL AID TO CUBA 



Yet . . . 



"Even medicines are being held up on one 
technicality after another . . ." — Sidney Lens, 
Nov. 1, 1961 issue of FELLOWSHIP (Maga- 
zine of the Fellowship of Reconciliation). 



any 

other 

organization 

We invite the in- 
terest and support 
of all Americans 
of good will 

THE MEDICAL AID TO CUBA Committee is a voluntary 
organization of men and women who, in the spirit of bro- 
therhood and humanity, have assumed the task of inform- 
ing their fellow-Americans about the present emergency in 
Cuba. It is the function of the committee to raise funds to 
purchase some of the urgently needed medicines which are 
sent to hospitals and medical facilities in Cuba . . . 

WE HOPE YOU BELIEVE WITH US THAT THJS PROJECT DE- 
SERVES THE SUPPORT OF EVERY AMERICAN OF CONSCIENCE. 
THE SICK AND SUFFERING CANNOT WAIT. 

Please send your contribution today to: 

Medical Aid to Cuba Committee 

Suite 409 

147 West 33 rd St. 

New York I, N.Y. 

Make checks payable to Albert S. Baker, Treasurer 

,■■",■' r: „i , 

NEW YORKERS SAVE THIS DATE—WED., MARCH 14, at 8 P.Af. 

MEDICAL AID TO CUBA COMMITTEE PUBLIC MEETING 
Palm Gardens, 306 W. 52nd St. (Just West of 8th Av.) 

William Worthy Bayard Rustin Melirta del Villar 

and others ; Chum. : JESSE GORDON Entertainment 

Contribution 99c 



1856 ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 

Mr. Nittle. I asked you the date when this committee was formed. 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes. Well, the committee was not formed until — 
I don't have a special, specific date because I didn't know what was 
the nature of this inquiry and what specifically I should try to remem- 
ber, and I don't always have a very good memory for these details, but 
sometime in the fall, let us say around October or late October or 
middle October, around there, but it was not formed in an organized 
manner the way we were later when we already had operating facili- 
ties, you know, like an office and things like that. 

Mr. Willis. That was about October of what year ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Last year, 1961. 

Mr. Nittle. Would you relate the circumstances under which you 
were selected as chairman of the Medical Aid to Cuba Committee? 

Mrs. del Villar. Actually, I wish I could say there was a throng 
of people who elected me unanimously, but it was really more the sense 
that we were two or three people, and because I had invited them 
for this purpose I guess they decided, well, you better carry on with 
the leadership, you know, with the responsibility. That was all. 

Mr. Willis. Who were those two or three people ? 

Mrs. del Villar. The people who are members of the committee? 

Mr. Willis. What are their names ? 

Mrs. del Villar. You want to say something ? 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mrs. del Villar. The thing is that I am very happy to answer 
all the questions that concern, absolutely relevant to this immediate 
work, to the work of the committee, and all the work, in fact, that 
we have done and all the people involved in this work is a matter of 
public record. Their names have appeared, you know, in leaflets, 
or whatever it is we use for appeal. 

Mr. Scherer. I don't know who these people are. I have never 
heard of them, and Mr. Willis asked you to tell us who they are. 

Mr. Willis. You said two or three. That is not difficult to name. 

Mrs. del Villar. No, no, it isn't and I have no hesitation because 
in their case it is a matter of public record; the chairman, myself; 
treasurer, Mr. Baker; and secretary, Miss Apolloni for a very short 
time and also clerical worker. That is all. That was the original 
group. 

Mr. Nittle. I don't think I was able to hear the persons you named. 
Yourself as chairman ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes ; Mr. Baker, treasurer — provisional treasurer. 

Mr. Nittle. Will you state the full name of Mr. Baker ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Mr. Albert Baker. 

Mr. Nittle. Yes. 

Mrs. del Villar. And Miss, I think her name is — isn't it Rose? 
Rose Apolloni, A-p-o-l-l-o-n-i, I think. 

Mr. Nittle. Why do you have any difficulty in recollecting the 
name of Rose Apolloni if, as you have stated, the original persons 
who formed this group were your friends ? 

Mrs. del Villar. No, because I don't know them intimately. I 
know them only in this context, you see, and, besides, I am notorious 
for names. 

Mr. Nittle. Since you knew them only in the context of the Medical 
Aid to Cuba Committee, it would not be correct, or apt, to describe 
them as your friends at the time the committee was formed. 



ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 1857 

Mrs. del Villar. Well, friends — acquaintances, not friends. 
Friends I consider something very intimate, somebody you know for 
many years. 

Mr. Nettle. As a matter of fact, were these persons suggested to 
you by other persons ? 

Mrs. del Villar. No, not at all. 

Mr. Moulder. How did they happen to attend the meeting ? 

Mrs. del Villar. I invited them. 

Mr. Nittle. How long have you known Albert Baker whom you 
named as the treasurer of the committee ? 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mrs. del Villar. About 7 months, I suppose, some months, I guess. 

Mr. Nittle. Are you referring to 7 months from today ? 

Mrs. del Villar. I don't understand. 

Mr. Nittle. How long have you known Albert Baker 

Mrs. del Villar. You mean before ? 

Mr. Nittle. — whom you have named as treasurer of this 
committee ? 

Mrs. del Villar. You mean before when we first got together? 

Mr. NiTTLE7Will you state the date when you first made his ac- 
quaintance? 

Mrs. del Villar. I don't know. This I can't remember absolutely. 

Mr. Nittle. Had you made his acquaintance prior to October 1961 
when you stated the committee was formed ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Sure. I wouldn't have invited him if I hadn't 
known. 

Mr. Nittle. How long before October 1961 did you know Albert 
Baker? 

Mrs. del Villar. Probably several months, probably 6 months be- 
fore, or 4 months. I don't know exactly. I don't keep tally of 
when I meet people because I didn't anticipate this kind of thing in 
connection with the work I do. 

Mr. Nittle. This was a very important event, a matter of con- 
science, as you said. 

Mrs. del Villar. Absolutely. 

Mr. Nittle. And you do not recall the time when you met Albert 
Baker prior to the formation of this committee ? 

Mrs. del Villar. No, I do not, not exactly. 

Mr. Nittle. How long did you know Rose Apolloni prior to Oc- 
tober 1961? 

Mrs. del Villar. The same applies to her. 

Mr. Scherer. About 6 months, you said ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Probably, probably around that, perhaps 6 
months, 8 months, 5 months. I don't know. 

Mr. Scherer. How did you happen to meet Miss Apolloni ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Socially. 

Mr. Scherer. Socially ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes. 

Mr. Scherer. You had been in her company often in this 6-month 
period? 

Mrs. del Villar. No. You know, you go out and visit and you 
meet people, and if you are a model you are interested in modeling and 
if you are a musician you talk about music. If you are interested in 
medical aid, you talk about medical aid, and invariably you find some 
kind of response or support, you know. I don't understand too much, 



1858 ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 

in fact nothing at all about legal ups and downs and gimmicks and 
tricks and I am not here 

Mr. Nittle. We are not asking about tricks or legal gimmicks. We 
are going back to what you said, conscience, which you said was im- 
portant in your life, important enough to lead you to make a career 
sacrifice, I believe you stated. 

Mrs. del Villar. Correct, correct. 

Mr. Nittle. I again direct your attention to Exhibit 1, the article 
appearing in the National Guardian of February 19, 1962. The ar- 
ticle reports that although medicines and food were exempted from 
the U.S. trade ban, your committee stated that drug manufacturers 
in the United States 

Mr. Willis. I couldn't hear you, sir. I couldn't understand you. 
You started to say, "although something," and I missed it. 

Mr. Nittle. The article, Exhibit 1, reports that although medicines 
and food were exempted from the U.S. trade ban, your committee 
stated that drug manufacturers in the United States were maintain- 
ing, and I quote, "an unofficial boycott" of Cuba. It is stated that the 
Ministry of Health in Havana announced a system of controls on drugs 
to preserve existing supplies and then quotes a Nero York Times report 
of February 12 which stated : 

"It (the Cuban government) said the controls were made necessary by the 
'brutal imperialist blockade' imposed by the United States." 

Mrs. del Villar. Where do you see that ? I don't see that. Where 
do you see that, sir ? 

Mr. Nittle. I point it out to you as being contained in the first three 
paragraphs of that article. 

Mrs. del Villar. Oh, I see. 

Mr. Willis. You haven't finished your question. 

Mr. Nittle. No, sir. The question, Mrs. del Villar, is: From what 
source did the National Guardian obtain its information for its report 
that your committee stated that drug manufacturers in the United 
States were maintaining an unofficial boycott of Cuba? 

Mrs. del Villar. There was an article in the Peace magazine in 
London. I think it is called Peace. It also appeared, I think, in the 
Baltimore American. This is, of course, what I remember. I hope 
I am correct. I am not absolutely sure, but I know in two peri- 
odicals at least, and maybe in another one still, a periodical stating 
these facts, and a reporter who at the time was in Cuba made these 
statements, as you see, that it is in quotes. This is not something we 
said or invented, or something we gather was the situation. 

Mr. Nittle. Do you mean to state that you provided this informa- 
tion to the representative of the National Guardian^ 

Mrs. del Villar. I am not sure. I think they probably saw it in the 
newspapers, because they had seen it in the newspapers. They had 
seen it in the various — you know, the newspaper people read all the 
papers and they picked it up. 

Mr. Scherer. You said that you had seen it in the Peace magazine 
from London. 

Mrs. del Villar. A newspaper, a little newspaper called Peace, 
I think it is, published in London. I am not sure of the name. 



ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 1859 

Mr. Scherer. Is that a Communist publication ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Oh, I haven't the faintest idea. I don't think so 
from what I gather, from what I saw, but I have no idea, because I 
am not at all informed about this. 

Mr. Scherer. It occupies a somewhat similar position in England 
as does the National Guardian, in this country, does it not? 

Mrs. del Villar. I don't know. It's the first time I ever saw that 
periodical. I never saw it before or since. 

Mr. Nittle. The National Guardian article states that your com- 
mittee reported this to the National Guardian. Is it your statement 
that you, basing your own information upon articles you read in other 
magazines or newspapers, communicated these facts to the National 
Guardian? 

Mrs. del Villar. No. The thing is that here it says "The Times 
said." It doesn't say I said or we said. It says "The Times said." 

Mr. Nittle. I think if you will read the item, I will point out to 
you the specific words. 

Mrs. del Villar. According to the New York Times, February 12. 
"The Times said." 

Mr. Nittle. I am not referring to that portion of the item which 
you have pointed out in paragraph three, but to that portion of the 
article which appears in paragraph one of the item. The exact lan- 
guage is: "Though medicines and food were exempted from the 
trade ban, an 'unofficial boycott' by drug manufacturers is in effect, 
the committee charged." — referring to the Medical Aid to Cuba 
Committee. 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes. 

Mr. Nittle. I am simply trying to determine whether you, as 
chairman of that committee, provided the National Guardian with 
that information. 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes. 

Mr. Nittle. As the article indicates. 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Willis. Let us try to clarify it in an accurate and fair way. 

Do I understand the situation to be that you provided this informa- 
tion and that you made this charge, but you based your charge upon 
what you had read in the magazine from London? Is that the 
situation ? 

Mrs. del Villar. That is part of it, and also 

Mr. Scherer. What is the other part ? 

Mr. Willis. What is the other part ? 

Mrs. del Villar. I am coming to that. Also I don't remember 
exactly, in all fairness to the man, to the committee, exactly what we 
said. This I don't remember but approximately this is correct what 
you indicated very well, now. The other part of it is that, for in- 
stance, in exploring about finding out how one can get medicine, 
because I have never been on any committee and I have never formed 
any committee and I don't know these mechanics — I have been learn- 
ing — I inquired from various drug manufacturers and in some in- 
stances they said they wouldn't touch Cuba with a 10-foot pole. This 
is literally, but it was off the record. Now, of course, I said, "Well, 
look. We will buy whatever it is," you know, " and pay whatever is 
necessary. I hope, because it is charity and nonprofit, that you will 
give us a reasonable discount." 



1860 ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 

Mr. Willis. That is the very purpose of these hearings, whether it 
is really charity, really nonprofit, and really humanitarian. 

Mrs. del Villar. This is easy to discover. That is easy to find 
out. When you say not really, may I ask, sir, with all respect, you 
sort of make me upset a little bit because you are putting in question 
my honesty or my sincerity. I mean do you think I am using this as 
a coverup to do something vicious? 

Mr. Willis. I have made no charge. We will soon find out. I will 
direct a few questions right now and find out in a few moments ? 

Mrs. del Villar. You are making this matter and it is very upset- 
ting. 

Mr. Willis. I am making no charge. 

Mrs. del Villar. All right. Okay. 

Mr. Willis. I hope when the questions are asked it will come out 
as you say it is. It is fine with me. 

Mr. Moulder. But you are just as anxious to determine or to ascer- 
tain whether you are being used for such purposes ? 

Mrs. del Villar. No. I tell you why ; because I know I am not. I 
mean I am not a dope. I am not a child. I am not being mesmerized, 
and I don't have a Svengali over me. This is honest work. I sacri- 
fice lots of time and effort. I wish more people were less guided by 
their own interests and more guided by the interest of others and do a 
little bit of this. I think this is one of the unique charitable problems 
in the country, where the operational expenses are minimal compared 
to what we try to do. 

Mr. Scherer. Nobody could disagree with that statement of yours. 
I am sure nobody. 

Mrs. del Villar. I understand about it because it is something I am 
doing. 

Mr. Willis. Proceed, Counsel. 

Mr. Nettle. I now hand you a copy of a large advertisement which 
appeared yesterday, November 13, 1962, on page 29 of the New York 
Times. 

Mr. Willis. What is the date of that ? 

Mr. Nittle. November 13, 1962, Mr. Willis. 

The item is marked for identification as del Villar Exhibit No. 2. 
By that advertisement it appears that your organization is soliciting 
funds and requesting that checks be made payable to Elizabeth Suther- 
land, MACC, Suite 409A, 147 West 33rd St., New York 1, N.Y. What 
position does Elizabeth Sutherland hold in your organization ? 

Mrs. del Villar. If you will kindly note the bottom of the para- 
graph where the text ends, you will see her name as one of the sponsors 
of the committee. 

(Document marked "del Villar Exhibit No. 2" follows :) 



ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 1861 



DEL VlLLAR EXHIBIT No. 2 

[The New York Times, Tuesday, Nov. 13, 1962] 



Juanita 
is dying! 



In a small white cot in a ward in a Cuban hospital, 
Juanita, 11 years old and all unknowing is waging a 
fight for her life. Her father, a physician on the hos- 
pital staff stands at his child's bedside. All his skill, 
all his love are insufficient to stave off encroaching 
death. Lacking the one drug that can save his beloved 
child, Dr. G. feels helpless and despairing. 

Trained like his medical colleagues in the use of 
phamaceutical products made in the United States, 
Dr. G. knows that the specific, life-saving drug can 
be obtained only in our country. He knows that rnedR 
cines are exempt "on humanitarian grounds" from 
the U. S. embargo on trade with Cuba. But since 
there is no trade with the United States, Cuba has no 
way to get U. S. dollars. And without U. S. dollars, 
Dr. G.-i-and other physicians like him — cannot buy 
U. S. drugs. Thus, he faces the grim prospect that his 
child may die. 

Knowing these facts would you let Juanita die? 

You can save her-life, and the lives of many like 
her, by providing the dollars which the Medical Aid 
to Cuba Committee uses exclusively to supply vital 
medical needs to treat the sick. 

But the dire lack of drugs is not the sole problem 
with which the Medical Aid to Cuba Committee has 
reckoned since it was organized one year ago. Cuban 
doctors, nurses, hospitals and research centers were 
supplied in the past with products of U. S. manufac- 
ture. Much of this urgently needed equipment is 
presently out of use in Cuba due to lack of replace- 
ment parts, available only in this country. In the 
twelve months of its existence, the Medical Aid to 
Cuba Committee has been carrying on a major effort 
to raise funds with which to purchase as much of this 
indispensable equipment as possible. 

What is the Medical Aid to Cuba Committee? It is 
a non-profit organization formed by a group of U. S. 
citizens for the purpose of carrying out a humani- 
tarian, non-political program of sending essential 
drugs and medical supplies for free distribution 
to sick men, women and children of Cuba. 
This program is in accord with the stated policies of 
both the previous Republican Administration and the 
present Democratic Administration. Only recently, in 
his televised address to the American people on Octo- 
ber 22nd, announcing the blockade of Cuba, President 



Kennedy declared that the U. S. government "would 
not, at this time, withhold the necessities of life from 
the Cuban people" despite the differences between 
the two countries. Indeed, when instituting economic 
sanctions against Cuba last February, Mr. Kennedy 
stated that medicines and food were exempt from the 
embargo. 

The Medical Aid to Cuba Committee has been mak- 
ing regular shipments of medicines and medical sup- 
plies to Cuba via commercial carriers under the terms 
of the regulations set down by the U. S. Department 
of Commerce and the U. S. Post Office Department. 

We hope that these gifts of medicines and medical 
supplies have served as an expression of the abiding 
spirit of brotherhood which many people in our coun- 
try feel for the people in other parts of the world. We 
hope that you will believe with us that the Medical 
Aid to Cuba Committee deserves the support of every 
American of conscience. Chairman: Melitta del 
Villar. Sponsors: David Dellinger, Waldo Frank, 
Ruth Gage-Colby, Douglas Gorsline, Freda Kirchwey, 
Warren Miller, James O'Connor, Bayard Rustin, 
Elizabeth Sutherland, William Worthy. 



MEDICAL AID TO CUBA 



Please mail your contribution today. Make checks payable to Elizabeth Sutherland, MACC, Suite 409A, 
147 West 33rd St., New York 1, N. Y. For further information Telephone LA 4-0729. 



1862 ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 

Mr. Nittle. Miss Sutherland is more than a sponsor, is she not ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Well, no. She is a sponsor, but has been willing 
to act for this particular campaign, have her name, checks made to her. 

Mr. Nittle. Is she an officer of your organization ? 

Mrs. del Villar. No, sir. 

Mr. Nittle. Is she a member ? 

Mrs. del Villar. No, sir, just a sponsor, as this public record shows. 

Mr. Scherer. Could we see that ? We haven't seen that. 

Mrs. del Villar. It is a beautiful ad. Glad to have you see it. 

Mr. Nittle. How long has she served your organization as sponsor? 

Mrs. del Villar. I don't have exact memory. You must bear with 
me in memories, because it is very bad and all my family has always 
known this. Miss Sutherland became a sponsor probably some months 
ago, since the summer, before the summer. I don't know exactly, but 
I have, you know, always 

Mr. Nittle. You say she became a sponsor then, approximately 
this past summer ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes, I would think so, roughly. I would have to 
check. 

Mr. Nittle. A matter that you must know. 

Mrs. del Villar. I would have to check. 

Mr. Scherer. Let us get this straight. She is not a member of the 
organization. She is not an officer of the organization. She is a 
sponsor of the organization. 

Yet, the ad at the bottom says, "Make checks payable to Elizabeth 
Sutherland, MACC, Suite 409A, 147 West 33rd St., New York 1, N.Y." 
Is she in charge of that office there ? 
t Mrs. del Villar. No, sir. I am. 
, Mr. Scherer. You are in charge of the office ? 
" Mrs. del Villar. That is right. 

Mr. Scherer. Does she work at the office ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Not at all. She is a sponsor and it is just like, 
for instance, I would have liked to have a sponsor, say Mrs. Roose- 
velt, may she rest in peace. This is the role. 

Mr. Scherer. The natural question that would come to your mind 
as it does mine — if she is not a member, not an officer, and not at the 
office or not in charge of the office — why are checks made payable 
to this woman ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Well, because my name is always appearing in 
everything and I thought it sounds awfully one-man setup, you know. 
It is better to have someone else. 

Mr. Scherer. Who is the secretary or treasurer of this committee \ 

Mrs. del Villar. The treasurer is — it is also in the record— official 
is Mr. Sidney Gluck. 

Mr. Scherer. And the secretary ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Well, we don't have a secretary at present. It 
used to be Miss Apolloni for a short time, but we don't have one. We 
have a clerical worker, but that is not a secretary of the committee. 

Mr. Moulder. Who keeps the record of the receipts and contribu- 
tions made and the expenditures ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Well, that is done between Mr. Gluck and the med- 
ical director, myself, and the other people who constitute the mem- 
bership. 

Mr. Willis. And who is the medical director ? 



ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 1863 

Mrs. del Villar. Dr. Louis Miller. That is also a matter of public 
record. 

Mr. Moulder. For example, do you now know how much money 
has been collected ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes, roughly, I think I would have. I would have 
to again go and check and add up to the last minute, but I would say 
roughly — would you like me to tell you ? 

Mr. Moulder. Your estimate of it. 

Mrs. del Villar. I beg pardon ? 

Mr. Moulder. The way you describe how your records were kept, 
that is, you had no secretary, that everybody kept records, I just won- 
dered how you could accurately ascertain how much money? 

Mrs. del Villar. Oh, no, the books are kept very meticulously. 
Everything is kept very carefully because that is part of my feeling 
about it. 

Mr. Scherer. Since the checks are made payable to Elizabeth Suth- 
erland, does she have an account or is this money kept in an account in 
the name of the committee ? 

("Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mrs. del Villar. The truth and nothing but the truth, so help me 
God, it comes into the office and it goes into the treasury of the com- 
mittee. 

Mr. Scherer. She has to endorse the checks ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Of course, and she sees it, and always by me, by 
the treasurer, and by Miss Sutherland. 

Mr. Scherer. Can you explain to us why you have the checks made 
payable to Elizabeth 

Mrs. del Villar. Sutherland. It is a beautiful name. 

Mr. Scherer. Sutherland. Why are the checks made payable to 
her when she is not a member of the committee, not an officer of the 
committee ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Nothing, because I don't know. It occurred to 
me that it was better to have still another person to be participating 
in the activity and give it there for a little more body, more en- 
dorsement. 

Mr. Scherer. Why did the ad not call for the checks being made 
payable to the committee or to the treasurer ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Well, I will also be very honest and candid with 
you, and it is as follows : 

The reason for it, I would prefer it to be made to Medical Aid to 
Cuba, but it is very strange apparently, because even this event, that 
is so perfectly courteous and everything, is something that people are 
terrified about and I am amazed to see, with great distress, because my 
family is partly North American. 

My uncle in fact is from Georgetown. His father was dean of 
the Georgetown Medical School, so you see I have very close ties 
and was brought up with the idea of the freedom of our country 
and so on. 

And it astonishes me to see, to go to a meeting like we held, a 
public meeting to raise funds, people send anonymous, anonymous, 
anonymous. 

I said, well, Mr. Anonymous is fabulous. Why don't people say 
John Smith, Mary Doe, and Peter Brown? Why don't they say 
it? 

91669 O— 63— pt. 1 3 



1864 ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 

Mr. Scherer. Was there any reason why the checks were not or- 
dered or requested to be made payable to the treasurer ? 

Mrs. del Villar. No reason at all because in the past we have had 
checks made to the treasurer. It was just, as I said, the idea I would 
have liked to have had, with all respect to Elizabeth, say, some very, 
very prominent person like Mrs. Roosevelt or somebody like that, 
may she rest in peace, whom I invited to be a sponsor, as a matter 
of fact, and this is what I would have liked, but people are some- 
how timid, afraid. Can you explain that? I don't understand it. 

Mr. Scherer. Is this Miss Sutherland's right name ? 

Mrs. del Villar. As far as to my knowledge and belief. 

Mr. Scherer. Does she have any other name ? 

Mrs. del Villar. I don't know. 

Mr. Scherer. How long have you known Miss Sutherland ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Oh, I have known her probably, let us see — 
I am trying to remember when I met her, but I would say about 7 
months or something like that. 

Mr. Scherer. Seven months from this date, or 7 months prior to 
the date of formation ? 

Mrs. del Villar. No, no; 7 months to this date, not to the hour 
and the minute because I do not wish to say an untruth, but this 
is approximately how long I have known her. 

Mr. Scherer. When approximately was this committee formed? 

Mrs. del Villar. I told you, about the middle of October. 

Mr. Scherer. You became acquainted with Miss Sutherland sub- 
sequent to the formation and organization of this committee? 

Mrs. del Villar. That is correct. ^ 

Mr. Scherer. Did you also meet her socially ? 

Mrs. del Villar. That is correct, and, you see, what happens is 
you start a work like this — and we have done very little publicity 
because we don't want to spend what little money we have, com- 
paratively speaking, for advertising, so it gets by word of mouth. 

People hear about it just as you have, and everybody hears about 
it and they come forth and try to be helpful, those who are not so 
afraid. This is what puzzles me, the fear, because we talk about the 
freedom, and yet there is this dreadful panic. 

Mr. Scherer. You heard the statement of Mr. Willis at the be- 
ginning of this session in which he pointed out how, in the past, the 
Communist movement throughout the world has used medical supplies 
and food, not for the humanitarian purposes, which you stated it 
is the purpose of your committee, but to promote the Communist cause 
by depriving people in those countries of these medicines and foods 
because they did not support the current regime. 

That is one of the purposes of this investigation. 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes. Well, I haven't any political background 
or knowledge. 

Mr. Scherer. I understand. We are trying to find out 

Mr. Willis. May I ask a question, Mr. Chairman ? 

Mr. Moulder. Yes. 

Mr. Willis. You said you are horrified at the attitude on the part 
of some people, whom you haven't named, at their fashion of opera- 
tion, anonymously and so on, and that you were in favor of these 
checks being made payable to your committee. 



ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 1865 

Now, who overruled you and who hides behind this cloak of ano- 
nymity that you say you are shocked about ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Now, nobody overruled me. It is myself, you see. 
Mr. Willis. All right. ' You said you were in favor of these checks 
being made payable, as usually they are, in an open fashion that you 
talked about to the committee, or to you or to an officer or to the 
president or the treasurer or somebody, that that was your pref- 
erence, your attitude. And you are shocked at the attitude in Amer- 
ica — apparently you are saying with a pretty scattered shot — of 
operating imder a cloak of anonymity. 

Mr. Pollitt. That is a misstatement of this lady's testimony. 
Mr. Willis. Answer my question please. Why in this instance 
were you overruled, if you were overruled, and I am not quarreling 
with you. I am trying to read your mind, because you say something 
and I want to know what this is all about. 
(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Pollitt. Mr. Willis, I am aware of the rules of the committee. 
Mr. Moulder. You may confer with the witness. 
Mr. Willis. You can advise her. 
(Witness conferred with counsel.) 
Mr. Moulder. Go ahead. 

Mr. Willis. I am not making any charge. I am asking a question 
from what you have said. That is all. 
Mrs. del Villar. I understand you and may I please respectfully 

submit that you have 

Mr. Willis. You are making a broad statement. You are not 
answering the question. 
Mrs. del Villar. I understand. I am coming to answer. 
Mr. Willis. Do you understand the question? 
Mrs. del Villar. Yes, sir. 
Mr. Willis. Will you answer it ? 

Mrs. del Villar. I will, but first before I answer the question 

Mr. Willis. There you go. That is what has been going on for 
the last half hour. 

Mrs. del Villar. It is my privilege to express myself in my stupid 
way. 

Mr. Willis. Of course it is, but it is our privilege to develop a 
record. 

Mrs. del Villar. I am going to tell you that first of all what you 
have imputed me to say for some reason, because of semantics or 
something, was not correct. 

Mr. Willis. If I put words in your mouth, I take them all back. 

Did you not say that you were shocked at i habit of some people 

Mrs. del Villar. No, this is not so. 
Mr. Willis. — of operating under anonymous names ? 
Mrs. del Villar. No. 

Mr. Willis. If they are John Brown, why don't they say they are 
John Brown or Joe Bloke ? 
Mrs. del Villar. No. 

Mr. Willis. Why do they make these checks anonymous and all 
that? 

Mrs. del Villar. Not exactly, no. I will restate what I said. 
Mr. Willis. All right. And I will bet I can straighten it out. 



1866 ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 

Mrs. del Villar. Theoretically, I said it was ideal that people 
should be able to make checks to whether it is Medical Aid to Cuba, or 
all they want to make a check to. Ideally, this is what I would like. 
Also it isn't contradictory to that, or in any conflict, to choose some 
member who is responsible, who is a nice person, because it gives a 
personification. 

Mr. Willis. Prestige? 

Mrs. del Villar. It no longer makes abstraction. You are not 
making it to an entity, but rather to a person and who has a rather 
prestige value, as you say. 

That is one thing. The other thing I said is that one of the things 
that has depressed me considerably and preoccupied me, since I have 
no experience politically, is to see that in general when people have 
such a meeting, contribute, maybe they do it because they are modest 
or shy, but somehow it struck a funny chord with me to see so many 
people wanted to give anonymous contribution. 

Mr. Willis. Exactly. 

Mrs. del Villar. So there is no cloak, and no cloak and dagger op- 
eration. It is just an observation. That is all. 

Mr. Willis. My next question is this, and I understand your feel- 
ing, the way you feel, that people who want to contribute to a cause 
should have the courage, as you put it, to make checks payable to that 
cause. 

Mrs. del Villar. Sure. 

Mr. Willis. Right. 

That being so, why, having that philosophy of operation, did you 
put the committee in the background, let it be anonymous, and choose 
a person to make a check to ? That is what I am asking. 

Mrs. del Villar. I beg to disagree, sir. The committee is not 
in the background and is far from anonymous. 

Mr. Willis. So far as the payment of checks are concerned ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Well, no, but it has a huge identification symbol. 
It has an address and no one is told that you may not write to the 
Medical Aid to Cuba, but it simply facilitates and gives its prestige, 
identity, and personification, rather than being an abstraction. 

Mr. Willis. I have clarified the record. That is all I wanted to 
know. 

Mr. Scherer. Will the gentleman yield at this point ? 

Mr. Willis. Yes. 

Mr. Scherer. Let us quit playing games. 

Isn't it a fact that the checks were not requested to be made payable 
to the treasurer because he is a member of the Communist apparatus? 
Isn't that the real reason ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Oh, I have no such idea. 

Mr. Scherer. You don't know ? 

Mrs. del Villar. I don't even know what you are talking about. 

Mr. Scherer. You don't know that the treasurer of your organiza- 
tion is a member of the Communist apparatus ? 

Mrs. del Villar. No, sir, absolutely not. 

Mr. Scherer. All right. 

Mr. Moulder. I didn't understand you to say that you had a 
treasurer. 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes, we have a treasurer. 



ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 1867 

Mr. Moulder. What is his name ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Mr. Sidney J. Gluck. 

Mr. Moulder. Oh, yes. I am sorry. 

(At this point Mr. Bruce entered the hearing room.) 

Mr. Moulder. Proceed. 

Mrs. del Villar. You see, sir, may I say that when I am engaged 
in a good work of which I know what I am doing and I am nobody's 
mesmerized fool 

Mr. Moulder. Let us get to the next question. 

Mrs. del Villar. I do not screen people. 

Just like somebody is sick and they want the medicine, I don't ask, 
"What is your opinion" or if the house is on fire, "Before you put 
water in the fire, let me find out your opinion." 

This is not my feeling. I am not an investigating committee and I 
would like this very clear. 

Mr. Scherer. I understand, but you just said that you did not know 
that Mr. Gluck, the treasurer of this organization, was a member of 
the Communist apparatus. 

Mrs. del Villar. I don't know anything of anybody's private life, 
including your own, sir. With all respect, I don't. 

Mr. Scherer. Then you were fooled ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Why would I be fooled ? Look, I am called here. 
Would say then I am fooled because you were questioning and making 
me feel like a convict when I haven't done anything wrong. 

Mr. Scherer. No, you are evidently duped. 

Mrs. del Villar. I don't understand this. I don't really understand 
it. I do not understand what you mean. 

Mr. Scherer. This comes as a surprise and a shock to you, does it 
not, that the treasurer of this organization is a member of the Com- 
munist Party ? You said you didn't know that. 

Mrs. del Villar. I do not question anybody who wants to help 
Medical Aid. 

Mr. Scherer. I understand. 

The question is you said that you did not know that he is a mem- 
ber of the Communist apparatus. 

Mrs. del Villar. I don't know anything about his private life. 

Mr. Scherer. I asked you if 

Mr. Moulder. She didn't answer that. You say you do not know 
anything about his private life ? 

Mrs. del Villar. No. 

Mr. Moulder. Do you know he is a member of the Communist 
Party? 

Mrs. del Villar. I do not know. I said I do not know. 

Mr. Scherer. The fact that he is a member of the Communist 
Party, isn't that the reason that you had checks made to this woman 
who is not a member of the organization, who is not an officer of the 
organization ? 

Mrs. del Villar. You are attributing to me a Machiavellian scheme 
and it never entered my head in this fashion. I explained it to Mr. 
Willis very simply. 

Mr. Moulder. Just answer the question. 

Mrs. del Villar. The question is ? 

Mr. Moulder. He asked you if that was the reason why you had 
checks made payable to Miss Sutherland instead of the treasurer. 



1868 ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 
Mrs. DEL VlLLAR. No. 

Mr. Scherer. Who made the decision? Was it somebody else in 
this group that made the decision ? 

Mrs. del Villas. No, I made the decision. 

Mr. Scherer. You made the decision ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes. 

Mr. Scherer. Did you discuss it with anyone before you made the 
decision ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Well, generally with the committee members. I 
discussed these things of course, but in this matter I didn't feel that 
it was a matter for a big issue. Miss Sutherland was willing. It 
seemed very attractive and very nice and I used it. I could have used 
anyone else, Elizabeth or anyone else who inspires this integrity. 

Mr. Scherer. You say she inspires integrity. What is her position 
in the community ? 

Mrs. del Villar. As far as integrity I would say, of my own say so, 
I like her as a person, she is a nice woman, and that is all. I feel that 
she is somebody who is nice. 

Mr. Scherer. What field is she in ? 

Mrs. del Villar. In publishing. She is an editor. 

Mr. Scherer. For what publication ? 

Mrs. del Villar. For Simon and Schuster. This again is public 
record. 

Mr. Scherer. She is an editor ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes, that is right. 

Mr. Scherer. Of a publication ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Of a publishing house. 

Mr. Moulder. All right. Let us get to the next question. 

Mr. Nittle. By whom were you introduced to Elizabeth Suther- 
land? 

Mrs. del Villar. By herself. She came forth. She said she 
wanted to meet me. She had heard my name and she liked to meet me. 
It happens to me with a lot of people. 

Mr. Nittle. You. had mentioned Albert Baker as being the treas- 
urer of your organization. When did Sidney J. Gluck succeed him 
as treasurer? 

Mrs. del Villar. Oh, now you have me. I don't remember dates. 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mrs. del Villar. I have to beg I don't remember. 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mrs. del Villar. Sometime before this summer, I think, in mid- 
winter, I suppose, if it is close enough. 

Mr. Nittle. Now, I want to return for a moment to the New York 
Times advertisement, marked del Villar Exhibit No. 2. You will 
note the advertisement states in part : 

The Medical Aid to Cuba Committee has been making regular shipments of 
medicines and medical supplies to Cuba via commercial carriers under the terms 
of the regulations set down by the U.S. Department of Commerce and the U.S. 
Post Office Department. 

Apparently your group experienced no difficulty in purchasing 
supplies ? 

Mrs. del Villar. That's right, 

Mr. Nittle. If there was an unofficial boycott, as you have stated 
to the National Guardian in February 1962, when did this boycott end ? 



ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 1869 

Mrs. del Villar. I don't know if the boycott has ended. I know 
nothing about that aspect of it because that is on a different level 
where I have nothing- to do with it. 

In our own experience. I will say we have been able to buy as a 
committee and so this has been no problem to us and the whole opera- 
tion has always been carried out in full compliance of all the regula- 
tions necessary. 

Mr. Nittle. For a moment, I would now like to return to del Villar 
Exhibit No. 1, the National Guardian article of February 19, 1962. 
You will note in the last paragraph an announcement is made, and I 
quote. "A rally to encourage Americans to help 'as an expression of 
the good will and friendship which many United States citizens feel 
for the people of Cuba' will be held March 14," at which you and 
other persons, including one William Worthy, who I believe is listed 
as a sponsor, will speak. Did you and William Worthy later speak 
at the rally to which reference is made ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes, sir. I didn't speak really. I sang. Mr. 
Worthy spoke and I sang love songs. 

Mr. Nittle. I hand you a copy of the May 22, 1961, issue of the 
National Guardian, page 11, which is marked for identification as del 
Villar Exhibit No. 3. 

Mrs. del Villar. I feel like an awful convict. 

Mr. Nittle. I call your attention to an advertisement appearing 
in the left-hand column titled, "Will There be Another Invasion?" 

The note indicates that a meeting on Thursday, May 25, will be held 
at Hunts Point Palace, Bronx, and the speakers on that subject, 
namely, "Will There be Another Invasion?" include, among others, 
yourself and William Worthy, at this affair being held under the 
auspices of the Bronx Fair Play for Cuba Committee. 

Did you also have an occasion to appear on the same platform with 
William Worthy, one of your committee sponsors, in that instance? 

Mrs. del Villar. Well, it is listed here. 

Mr. Moulder. Just answer. 

Did you ? 

Mrs. del Villar. I did appear, yes, of course. 

Would you like this, sir ? 

(Document marked "del Villar Exhibit No. 3" follows:) 



del Villar Exhibit No. 3 
[National Guardian, May 22, 1961] 

WILL THERE BE ANOTHER INVASION? 

Speakers: WlDUm Worthy, Julio Medina, 

MeJitt* del Villar. John T. McMonus 

THURSDAY, MAY 25— S P.M. 

HUNTS POINT PALACE 163 St. <fe 

SOUTHER;* BLVD., BRONX. 

Admission Free 

Ausjv Bronx Fa'r Play Tor Cuba Cental. 



1870 ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 

Mr. Scherer. Do you happen to be a member of the Fair Play for 
Cuba Committee? 

Mrs. DEL VlLLAR. No. 

Mr. Pollitt. May I have a brief consultation ? 

Mr. Moulder. Yes, certainly. 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Moulder. Now, the next question. 

What is the object of asking that question about Wjlliam Worthy ? 
What is the point there ? 

Mr. Nettle. Mr. Worthy is one of the sponsors of the organization, 
Medical Aid to Cuba Committee, and there will be some further ques- 
tions concerning William Worthy as a sponsor of the organization, 
with respect to the registration requirements generally laid out in the 
Foreign Agents Registration Act of 1938. 

I now hand you, Mrs. del Villar, a copy of an editorial marked for 
identification as del Villar Exhibit No. 4, appearing as the continua- 
tion of the inside front cover of the March 1962 issue of the Monthly 
Review, a magazine described on its cover as "An Independent Social- 
ist Magazine." 

The editors of Monthly Review are listed as Leo Huberman and 
Paul M. Sweezy. 

The following is an excerpt of the editorial appearing in that issue 
of the Monthly Revieiv : 

Speaking of Cuba reminds us that the Medical Aid Committee for Cuba, for- 
mation of which we announced in the January issue, will hold its public meeting 
on Wednesday, March 14th, at 8 p.m. at Palm Gardens, 310 West 52nd Street. 
Jesse Gordon will be in the chair and the speakers (on the subject of the short- 
age of medicines in Cuba) will be William Worthy, Bayard Rustin, and Melitta 
Del Villar. Contribution 99tf. Meanwhile, the Committee asks us to relay 
thanks to all MR readers who have made contributions. 

Mr. Moulder. Now, what is the question ? 

Mr. NiTTLE. Did you solicit the Monthly Review to call attention 
to these facts? 

Mrs. del Villar. We sent releases about these meetings to all the 
periodicals, everywhere, the city dailies and to these too. Everywhere 
we sent releases. When we send release out it goes to every newspaper 
I can think of. Some print it. Some don't. And very often, I say 

Mr. Willis. It is the usual thing ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Of course, you know. So the Monthly Review was 
very generous to quote it and mention it, which is a great help to our 
work wherever it is printed. 

(Document marked "del Villar Exhibit No. 4" appears on pp. 1871, 
1872. 



ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 1871 



DEL VlLLAR EXHIBIT No. 4 

[Monthly Review, Mar. 1962] 



AN INDEPENDENT SOCIALIST MAGAZINE 



VOL 13 



ALGERIA, VIETNAM, 
and PUNTA DEL ESTE 1 1 

THE EDITORS 

THE COMING LATIN 
AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



A TRAVELING OBSERVER 



A LETTER FROM CUBA 



1872 ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 



Century"; and Tawncy's Introduction to Wilson's "Discourse on Usury." 
How I enjoyed them all! Later I attended his lectures on the 19th century 
- — the course he did with Durbin, Power, and Postan. I still have vivid 
memories of this giant! He influenced my thinking, as no doubt he did 
that of many others." As a tribute to Tawncy's memory, we plan to 
publish in an early issue a coHection of characteristic quotations from his 
two best known works. 

Through an oversight, we neglected to annoui e in our last issue that 
MR Press would publish on February 28th an American edition of E. P. 
Thompson's monumental 908-page study of William Morris and his in- 
fluence in Victorian England. The book is entitled William Morris: 
Romantic to Revolutionary. Its list price is $8.50 and prepublication price 
$5.00. Since most of you have not had a chance to take advantage of the 
prepublication offer, however, we are extending it for another month to 
the end of March. Since we have only a small stock of this title, those of 
you who want to add it to your libraries would do well to act promptly. 

PLEASE. When you move and fail to notify us in advance of your 
change of address, the postoffice sends us a slip saying that the magazine 
is undeliverable at your old address. That notice costs us 10^. Multiply 
that 10^ by 10 or 15 or whatever the average number of slips received 
each day, and you get a substantial sum of money wasted in the course of 
a year. So please: move if you must, but let us know. 

We arc happy to be able to announce that Ralph Miliband, now 
teaching at Roosevelt University on leave from the London School of 
Economics, will be the speaker at a Monthly Revirw Associates meeting 
in New York on Monday, April 16th. Dr. Miliband's articles in MR have 
always evoked an enthusiastic reader response, and we are sure that many 
of you will welcome this opportunity to hear him in person. His subject 
will be "World Socialism and War" Details of time and place will be 
published in the April issue: meanwhile, be sure to reserve the evening. 

You know how we complain about the wav MR Press books don't get 
reviewed. Well, every once in a while we like to note when they do 
get reviewed, especially if the review is a fair and reasonable one. This 
certainly holds for the review of Cuba: Anatomy of a Revolution by 
Professor Mervyn L. Cadvjcaliadcf of San Jose State College, which ap- 
peared *Tn the January, 1962, issue of the American Journal of Sociology. 
He describes the book as "the first and only approximation to a scholarly 
analysis of this fast-moving social transformation just south of Florida" 
and expresses the opinion that it is "the best book on Cuba so far." 
^L^Speaking of Cuba reminds us that the Medical Aid Committee/ox. 
Caba^ formation of which we announced in the January issue, will hold 
Its first public meetinc: on Wednesdav. March 14th, at 8 p.m. at Palm 
Gardens, 310 West 52nd Street. Jesse Gordon will be in the chair and 
the speakers (on the subject of the shortage of medicines in Cuba) will 
be Williarn. Worthy. Bayard Ru$tin, and Melitta D el Villar . Contribution 
90<*. Meanwhile, the Committe^asks us to relay thanks to all MR readers 
who have made contribv.tions^J 

Scott Nearing anr.o .rues four lectures in early April under the general 
title "The Socialist Century" — (\) The Cradle of Socialism, April 3; 
(2) Socialism in Eastern Europe, April 5; (3) Socialism in the Western 
Hemisphere, April 10; and (4) Fifty Years of Socialism, April 12. All 
lectures will be at Academy Hall, 853 Broadway (at 14th Street), at 
8:30 o'clock. Admission $1 per lecture. 



ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 1873 

Mr. Nittle. Are you personally acquainted with Leo Huberman? 

Mrs. del Villar. Do I answer this ? 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mrs. del Villar. You see, I turned to my attorney, not because of 
any desire to fool or deceive you, or anything, but because one thing 
I have sort of very superficially, and I don't know it very well yet, 
but one thing I have seen and that is that very often a perfectly in- 
nocent thing can be turned around to mean something tremendously 
complicated. Now you are an expert. I am not. You asked me if 
I know Leo Huberman. 

Mr. Nittle. You can answer that question very simply. 

Are you personally acquainted with Leo Huberman ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes. 

You see, it is very simple on the face of it, but I don't know what 
you are aiming at and I have no aims or designs. I know Mr. Leo 
Huberman, period. 

Mr. Moulder. I think you protest too much about that. Do you say 
you know him ? 

Mrs. del Villar. About anyone you would ask me I would feel 
this because this already transgresses into my private acquaintances 
and this is something I am entitled to having. I don't have to declare 
it, but I do say I know Mr. Huberman. 

Mr. Nittle. How long have you known Leo Huberman ? 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes, I agree with this. 

The thing is, you see, I do object. I really object. I have indicated 
it already to this line of questioning that is not relevant to the work 
I am doing, that is not absolutely immediate, because this is already 
personal. You might ask if I went to church. 

Mr. Nittle. Let me relate the question more directly to the issue. 

Did you know Leo Huberman prior to the formation of your com- 
mittee in October of 1961 ? 

Mrs. del Villar. I think I met him, yes, before. 

Mr. Nittle. You think you met him ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes, I think so. 

Mr. Nittle. Were you personally acquainted with him? 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes, socially I met him. 

Mr. Nittle. How long prior to October 1961 ? 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mrs. del Villar. But the gentleman says this has to do with the 
cc.nmittee. I think this is personal. So far it has no relevance. Mr. 
Huberman is not a member. He is not connected with the committee. 

Mr. Moulder. How long had you known him prior to the organiza- 
tion of the committee? 

Mrs. del Villar. Well, it is not a part of the necessary information. 

Mr. Moulder. Mr. Nittle, what is your point in asking about this 
man? 

Mr. Nittle. Mr. Huberman has been subpenaed to appear as a 
witness in the course of these hearings. It seems that Leo Huberman 
has undertaken activities in support of the Medical Aid to Cuba 
Committee. 

Mrs. del Villar. No. 

Mr. Nittle. And it is this subject that I am probing. 

Mr. Moulder. Well, ask her then. 



1874 ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 

Mrs. del, Villar. Mr. Huberman lias never undertaken activity in 
support of Medical Aid to Cuba Committee except the releasing of a 
release, as the New York Times did. 

Mr. Willis. Has he been subpenaed ? 

Mr. Nittle. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Willis. Is he here? 

Mr. Nittle. He is expected to be questioned tomorrow. 

Mr. Moulder. Has he attended any meetings of the committee? 

Mrs. del Villar. No. 

Mr. Moulder. Has he ever conferred with you about the work of 
this committee? 

Mrs. del Villar. Never, nothing to do at all with the committee. 

The only connection was the release in the paper, no more connec- 
tion than Mr. Sulzberger or somebody in the Times. 

Mr. Moulder. No other connection whatsoever? 

Mrs. del Villar. None at all. 

Mr. Moulder. I want to ask one question. 

Where do you ship the medical supplies to Cuba? Where do you 
send them? 

Mrs. del Villar. We send them to Hospital Nacional, the National 
Hospital in Havana. 

Mr. Moulder. Directed to a hospital ? 

Mrs. del Villar. That's right, because we feel that this is a secure 
place for them to go, the best organized for distribution and all that, 
facilities. 

Mr. Moulder. Go ahead. 

Mr. Nittle. I want to refer you again to the May 22, 1961, issue of 
National Guardian. 

I direct your attention to another notice, del Villar Exhibit 4— A, 
appearing in the lower left-hand portion on page 11 where your name 
appears as guest artist under the heading, "Monthly Review Associates 
invites you to hear the truth about cuba, An Eyewitness Report by 
leo huberman," to be held at the Hotel New Yorker on May 22. 

Mr. Scherer. I am sorry. An eyewitness what, did you say ? 

Mr. Nittle. An eyewitness report by Leo Huberman. 

Mr. Scherer. That is the man you asked the witness a few min- 
utes ago whether she knew ? 

Mr. Nittle. Yes, sir. 

This affair appears to have been sponsored by the Monthly Review 
Associates, who are the publishers of the Monthly Revieio magazine, 
of which Leo Huberman is the editor. Did you entertain the 
audience which was there assembled to hear Leo Huberman ? 

Mrs. del Villar. You see, sir, I don't know your name. I am sorry. 
What is your name ? 

Mr. Nittle. Mr. Nittle, N-i-t-t-1-e. 

Mrs. del Villar. Thank you. 

Mr. Nittle, I have no objection about telling anything that I do 
because I don't know anything criminal or dirty or embarrassing, 
and duped and et cetera, all the things, but I do feel this is a trans- 
gression of my private activities. This has nothing to do with Medi- 
cal Aid. 



ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 1875 

You know that it is May 22, 1961 ; May, June, .July, August, Sep- 
tember, October, fully 6 months before. 

(Document marked "del Villar Exhibit No. 4-A" follows :) 

del Villar Exhibit No. 4-A 
[National Guardian, May 22, 1961, p. 11] 

Monthly Review Associates 

invites you to hear 

THE TRUTH ABOUT CUBA 

An Eyewitness Report 

by 

LEO HUBERMAN 

who was an the scene when the 

inva.svm occurred 

• Guest Artioi; Melitia del Villar 

• Chairman Carey McWllHams 
Mob4a*. May 23 8:30 p.m. 

Grand Bailroom — Hotel New Yorker 

34th St. & 8th Art. 

$1 in advance $1.50 at the door 

Send f:r tickets to 

MONTHLY REVIEW AS8OCIATE8 

333 Sixth Ave., I'YC 14 CH 2-8J03 



Mr. Kittle. Mrs. del Villar, the committee resolution clearly sets 
forth that the hearings relate to propaganda activities of members and 
affiliates of the Communist Party of the United States. It is now 
exploring such propaganda activities. 

Mrs. del Villar. But, you see, and I am concerned 

Mr. Willis. You were asked a very simple question. Did you put 
the question, Counsel? 

Mr. Nittle. Yes. I am asking whether she entertained the audi- 
ence assembled to hear Leo Huberman. 

Mrs. del Villar. I beg your pardon, because Mr. Willis was talk- 
ing. What was the question ? 

Mr. Nittle. Did you entertain the audience at the Hotel New 
Yorker assembled to hear Leo Huberman as noted in the advertise- 
ment on May 22, 1961 ? 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mrs. del Villar. Now, yes, I have no 

Mr. Nittle. You can answer that, yes or no. 

Mrs. del Villar. But it isn't a matter of yes or no. I am concerned 
with 

Mr. Willis. It is a matter of yes or no. 

Mr. Chairman, let us not pussyfoot. 

Mr. Moulder. Yes, you answer the question and then you may 
explain. 

Mr. Willis. That involves you personally. 



1876 ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 

Mrs. del Villar. It involves me that I am connected with Medical 
Aid, but that time I was not. 

Mr. Willis. The resolution relates to your committee and any other 
activities that are appropriate or proper. 

Mrs. del Villar. The committee does not engage in propaganda 
at all. 

Mr. Willis. Do you refuse to answer the question ? 

Mrs. del Villar. No, I do not refuse. 

Mr. Willis. Then answer, please. 

Mrs. del Villar. I have to make honorable objection because it is 
dishonorable to be asked 

Mr. Moulder. Answer the question and then explain as you want 
to. 

Mrs. del Villar. I did sing at the meeting, but I have nothing to 
hide. It is just that it is completely out of the question we are dis- 
cussing and it has nothing to do with Medical Aid because at that 
time I didn't even know there was a shortage of medicine, so this is 
kind of making an intricate weaving that I do not understand. 

Mr. Moulder. In other words, this entertaining was prior to your 
forming of this organization of Medical Aid ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Absolutely, that's right, because we have no 
propaganda and no political activity at all. We do not engage in 
political activity. 

* * * * * * *i 

Mr. Moulder. Who invited you there? 

Mrs. del Villar. Mr. Huberman. 

Mr. Moulder. How did he invite you? When did this occur? 

Mrs. del Villar. Well, he had heard me sing and, as it happens 
to a few people, they liked it and they asked me would I sing, so I 
said "Sure." 

******* 

Mr. Nettle. Did you know the purpose for which you were to per- 
form on that occasion at the Hotel New Yorker ? 

Mrs. del Villar. My role as a performer is to entertain and to 
make people, I hope, a little more gentle, kinder, because my theme 
is always the theme of love in a very nice sense, personal sense. 

Mr. Moulder. Were you paid for your performance there? 

Mrs. del Villar. I was given a contribution, yes, a payment. 

Mr. Moulder. All right. 

Mr. Pollitt. Mr. Nittle, if you are going into another line of 
inquiry, the witness has been on the stand for an hour. 

Mr. Nittle. Would you address that request to the chairman, 
please ? 

Mr. Pollitt. I am sorry. 

Mr. Chairman, the witness has been on the stand for an hour. 

Mr. Moulder. Do you want a recess ? 

Mr. Pollitt. It might be in order. 

Mr. Moulder. The committee will recess for 5 minutes. 

Mrs. del Villar. Thank you very much. 



1 Asterisks here and on pp. 1960 and 1974 indicate deletions of remarks ordered by the 
subcommittee. 



ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 1877 

(Committee members present at time of recess: Representatives 
Moulder, Willis, Scherer, and Brace.) 

(Present when subcommittee reconvened : Representatives Edwin E. 
Willis, presiding, and Gordon H. Scherer.) 

Mr. Willis. The subcommittee will please come to order. 

Proceed Counsel. 

Mr. Nittle. Mrs. del Villar, I now direct your attention to a letter 
marked for identification as del Villar Exhibit No. 5, dated March 16, 
1962, on the letterhead of the Medical Aid to Cuba Committee, ad- 
dressed to the Passport Division, U.S. Department of State, under 
your signature, Melitta del Villar, chairman. 

The letter bears the printed matter as follows : "Sponsors in Forma- 
tion: Freda Kirchwey, Editor; Warren Miller, Author; James 
O'Connor, Economist ; William Worthy, Journalist." 

Although we have been familiar with the use of letterhead sponsors 
in correspondence and in communications of various organizations, 
I do not believe that we have before heard, at least not recently, of a 
group designated specially as "sponsors in formation." 

It would seem pertinent therefore to inquire of you what those 
persons did in forming the organization, Medical Aid to Cuba Com- 
mittee. Would you tell us about that ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Well, "in formation" is my perhaps own unortho- 
dox manner of indicating that we are hoping to have more sponsors 
and that this is a list in the process of forming itself. That is what it 
means, because I am not, you know, I don't have previous 

Mr. Willis. I think that explains it. 

Mrs. del Villar. Thank you. 

Mr. Nittle. Did anyone make any suggestion to you of the use 
of this type of letterhead indicating names of sponsors ? 

Mrs. del Villar. No, no. That is a simple matter. 

Mr. Nittle. The Foreign Agents Registration Act of 1938, 
although it expressly exempts certain persons from the requirements 
of registration, would generally require that no person shall act as an 
agent of a foreign principal unless he has filed with the Attorney 
General a registration statement, which would include, among other 
matters, the status of the registrant and, if a combination of indi- 
viduals, the name, residence, and nationality of each director and of- 
ficer and of each person performing the functions of a director or 
officer, together with a statement of the registrant's ownership and 
control. 

Have these "sponsors in formation" exercised any control over the 
organization, Medical Aid to Cuba Committee, as to its powers or 
purpose, or with respect to its future activities ? 

Mrs. del Villar. None whatsoever. 

Mr. Nittle. To establish the fact for the record, I understand that 
the Medical Aid to Cuba Committee, you, and its officers have not been 
registered under the Foreign Agents Registration Act of 1938. Am 
I correct? 

Mrs. del Villar. You are absolutely correct. May I add a little 
bit? That inasmuch as we have tried, as you will know, to comply 
with every legal requirement, we asked our counsel if this was re- 
quired and our counsel advised us that no, it was not required for our 
particular work. 

(Document marked "del Villar Exhibit No. 5" follows:) 



1878 ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 



Spomort in Formal 

Freda Kirchwey 
Editor . 



DEL VlLLAR EXHIBIT No. 5 

MEDICAL AID TO CUBA 

COMMITTEE 

147 WEST 33RD STREET (PENN ARCADE) NEW YORK 1, NEW YORK 

(Room #409) 

Telephone. LAckatanna 4-0729 



Warren Miller 
Author 

James OConnor 

Economist 

William Worthy 
Journalist 



March 16, 1962 



Passport Division 

U. S. Departraent of Stcte 

Hew York, N.Y. 

Gentlemen: 

In the live months of operations of our Committee rendering 
..ledical assistance to various hospitals in Cuba, particularly 
Hospital ilacional in Havana, we have encountered certain 
technical problems involving coordination, procurement of 
supplies, forwarding, etc. Inasmuch as the Committee is pres- 
ently vastly expanding its program of assistance it beoomea 
necessary for the Medical Director of our Committee, Dr. Louis 
lailer, to make an on-the-spot survey interviewing people in 
various institutions with whom we have only been able to oom- 
municate through mail correspondence. 

Dr. LUller will plan to spend from ten to fifteen days in Cuba 
and make his residence at the Hotel Blviera in Havana. He 
will naturally not concern himself with any matters outside 
the scope of our medical aid program. 

Very truly yours, 



iEDICAl AID TO CUBA OOLUITTSE 



Uelitta del Villar 
Chairman 



MlV/ra 



ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 1879 

Mr. Nittle. We are, of course, aware that under existing law, per- 
sons, although agents of foreign principals, engaging, or agreeing to 
engage in, the solicitation or collection of funds and contributions 
within the United States to be used only for medical aid and assistance 
are exempted from the registration requirements of the act. 

Have you corresponded with the Department of Justice on this 
subject? 

Mrs. del Villar. It was left to the discretion of our counsel. Since 
we went by his advice, I didn't have to question beyond his advice. 

May I say also that since we were not organized — I did not plan 
this — it has not been and it is now not and it does not intend to be in 
the future an agency of propaganda of any sort. Also on this basis 
we asked our counsel, especially of the medicine. 

Mr. Nittle. Would you tell us how many branches of the Medical 
Aid to Cuba Committee have been organized within the United States 
to date? 

Mrs. del Villar. Well, we don't really have branches because it 
would imply a very complicated set of organizations for which we are 
not equipped and for which I have no experience. 

What has happened actually, something very commendable that 
should make you all proud, and this is what Spallanzani called a spon- 
taneous generation. It has been by spontaneous role, that people else- 
where — we don't have a monopoly on humanitarianism, so other peo- 
ple have felt the same urge to do something decent and good and they 
have formed to help Medical Aid to Cuba Committee. 

Mr. Nittle. It has been the experience of this committee, based 
upon testimony received in many hearings, that Communist organi- 
zations particularly seem to have a "spontaneous" generation. 

Mrs. del Villar. That may be. 

Mr. Nittle. What was your answer ? 

Mrs. del Villar. That may be, but that has nothing to do with me 
or with our organization. 

Mr. Nittle. You are aware, are you not, that one Harriett Buhai, 
attorney in Los Angeles, Calif., participated in the organization of 
a Los Angeles chapter of the Medical Aid to Cuba Committee? 

Mrs. del Villar. That is correct, but I have never met Mrs. Buhai 
or Miss Buhai. I have never met her. I don't know her at all except 
from knowing there is this activity collecting medicines. 

Mr. Nittle. I direct your attention to an article, marked for iden- 
tification as del Villar Exhibit No. 6, appearing in the Daily People's 
World of October 26, 1957, the Communist Party's west coast publica- 
tion. At page 14 is an account of Miss Buhai's application for ad- 
mittance to the California bar. 

The article is titled, "Ex-Communist to be lawyer? She's 1 vote 
shy." 

The article states that Miss Buhai had informed the State Bar 
Examiners during a hearing in 1955 

Mrs. del Villar. She had what ? 

Mr. Nittle. Informed the State Bar Examiners during a hearing 
in 1955 that she had 11 years before been a member of the Communist 
Party, but had resigned. 

Now, I state for the record, Mrs. del Villar. that the committee has 
no information at this time that Miss Buhai has been a member of 

91669 O— 63— pt. 1 4 



1880 ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 



the Communist Party since the time indicated by her that she resigned 
from the party. 

Do you have any information on that subject ? 

Mrs. del Villar. All I can say is truth and nothing but the truth 
I have never seen this paper before. I never knew it existed. I never 
met Miss Buhai. I never knew she existed until I recently learned 
that she was connected with this helping organization, and I think it 
speaks well for Miss Buhai that she is willing to help with medicines. 
What her activities are is no business of mine. 

(Document marked "del Villar Exhibit No. 6" follows :) 

del Villar Exhibit No. 6 
[Daily People's World, Oct. 26, 1957] 

Ex-Communist to be lawyer? 
She's 1 vote shy 



LOS ANGELES — Civil 
rights supporters footed at- 
tention this week on a unique 
situation in the State Supreme 
Court, which was hung up — 
3 to 3 — on whether Harriet Bu- 
haL Los Angeles law ^fstOffSTe, 
^'SHwuM be immediately admit- 
ted to the California Bar. 

Former student at South- 
western University, Miss Bu- 
hai stated before the State 
Bar Examiners during a hear- 
ing in 1955 that she had — 11 
years before — been a member 
of the Communist party, but 
had resigned. 

The Bar Examiners then 
recommended against her ad- 
mittance to the practice of law 
in California, but recently, in 
light of the U. S. Supreme 
Court decision in the Koenigs- 
berg case, reversed themselves. 

WOULDN'T ANSWER 

Raphael Koenigsberg of Los 
AffgeleS^ad fceerf Burred by 
the Examiners on grounds he 
had refused to answer ques- 
tions aboi)t asserted Commu- 



nist party "affiliations. The Su- 
preme Court said his failure 
to answer did not show "poor 
moral character," as the Bar 
Examiners contended. 

When the new recommenda- 
tion to admit Miss Buhai came 
before the State Supreme 
Court last weekend, three jus- 
tices voted for her admission. 

Three others did not vote 
against admission, but asked 
to hold up proceedings until 
the full record of her case 
could be obtained for study 
and review. 

JUDGE ABSENT 

One justice, Homer Spence, 
was absent. The court decided 
to hold its decision in abey- 
ance until Spence could cast 
his vote. 

Even if Spence voted "No," 
it was pointed out, it would 
not necessarily mean Miss Bu- 
hai would be denied admit- 
tance — it would mean that a 
final vote would be taken when 
her full record was before the 
court. 



ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 1881 

Mr. Nittle. It is our information, that Helen Travis is the secre- 
tary of the Los Angeles branch which was organized by Miss Buhai. 
Are you personally acquainted with Helen Travis ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Never met the lady. 

Mr. Nittle. Do you know the secretary of the Los Angeles branch ? 

Mrs. del Villar. No, sir. Personally I have never met any of the 
people in that group. 

Mr. Nittle. Mr. Chairman, to refresh the recollection of the com- 
mittee, Helen Travis has been identified as a member of the Com- 
munist Party in hearings before this committee. Mrs. Travis ap- 
peared before this committee on August 30, 1950. 

Mrs. del Villar. Really? 

Mr. Nittle. She had formerly been employed by the Daily Worker 
writing under the name of Maxine Levi. A committee report, of 
1950 dealing with the assassination on August 20, 1940, of Leon 
Trotsky, the political rival of Joseph Stalin, who was murdered in 
his home in Mexico City, disclosed that Helen Travis, under the 
name of Helen Levi Simon, transferred $3,700 to one D. Enrique de 
Los Rios, a "money drop" in Mexico City to finance the release of the 
Trotsky murderer, identified as Jacques Mornard Vandendreschd, who 
had used the fictitious name of Frank Jacson. 

Do you have any information relating to Mrs. Travis' Communist 
Party membership ? 

(At this point Mr. Moulder entered the hearing room.) 

Mrs. del Villar. I told you never met the lady. I don't know 
anything about it. 

Mr. Scherer. Pardon me just a minute. She said she didn't meet 
the lady. Did you know that she was the secretary of the Los An- 
geles chapter of the Medical Aid to Cuba Committee ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes, because when she writes into the committee 
she signs secretary, so from this I know. 

Mr. Scherer. That is the extent ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes. 

Mr. Nittle. Were you informed by any other person with respect 
to Mrs. Travis' Communist Party membership? 

Mrs. del Villar. Absolutely not. 

Mr. Nittle. Now, Simon M. Lazarus is the treasurer of the Los 
Angeles branch of the Medical Aid to Cuba Committee, is he not ? 

Mrs. del Villar. They said that he was the treasurer. I don't 
know if he still is because I remember one order or announcement or 
something in which they say he is no longer treasurer, but I really 
don't know. 

Mr. Nittle. Do you know S. M. Lazarus ? 

Mrs. del Villar. I said before and I say again I have never met 
any of the members composing this group. I never heard of them 
before. 

Mr. Nittle. You never heard the name of Simon Lazarus before 
the time I stated it to you here ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes, I heard his name in connection with the Los 
Angeles Medical Aid to Cuba Committee. 



1882 ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 

Mr. Nittle. Mrs. del Villar, I hand you a copy of a telegram 
marked for identification as del Villar Exhibit No. 7, dated June 5, 
1962, addressed to S. M. Lazarus, 316 Conway, Los Angeles, under 
your signature as chairman of the Medical Aid to Cuba Committee, in 
which you express to Mr. Lazarus your salutations, and appreciation 
for "the great work you are carrying forward in the cause of peace." 

Do you recall sending this message to S. M. Lazarus? 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes, indeed I do. They were having a public 
meeting and I was 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

(Document marked "del Villar Exhibit No. 7" follows :) 

del Villar Exhibit No. 7 



T'.. LEG RAM RKCEivcD ;< 



S M LAZARUS 



316 CONWAY 



^ 

> 



> 



THE BIRTH AND CONTINUING GROWTH OF THE LOS ANGELES 

NOURISHES 
COMMITTEE FOR METICAL AIDE TO CUBA WCMM«VTHE HOPES 

OF ALL AMERICANS OF GOOD WILL THAT BROTHERHOOD WILL 

PREVAIL - THAT LOVE WILL BECOME THE COMMON VEHICLE 

OF COMMUNICATIONS AMOUNG ALL PEOPLES WE SALUTE YOU AND 

CLASP YOUR HAND IN FRIENDSHIP AND IN APPRECIATION OF 

THE GREAT WORK YOU ARE CARRYING FORWARD IN THE CAUSE • 

OF WEB PEACE 



"49 JUNE 5 
LAC4 0729 


732P EDT 
i EXTRA 


LOSA 





M DEL VILLAR 
CHA(RMAN 
MEDICAL AIDE TO CUBA 
COMMITTEE, NEW YORK 



BQOK-E. D 




L:~±ITJ% Hi U1M 




'*■*■ 






M DEL VILLAR 


If K 





' MEDICAL AIDE TO CUBA 
: COMMITTEE 

■ r*~~ 1 l i iKi 



Mr. Nittle. Mr. Chairman, Simon M. Lazarus is the financier of a 
motion picture produced by the International Union of Mine, Mill and 
Smelter Workers, a union which has recently been found by the Sub- 
versive Activities Control Board to be Communist infiltrated. 

The movie was titled "Salt of the Earth." Mr. Lazarus appeared 
before this committee on March 26, 1953, and invoked the fifth amend- 
ment with regard to his participation in the making of this movie and 
with respect to his membership in the Communist Party. 

Have you received any knowledge respecting these activities of Mr. 
Lazarus ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Before I say that, I think it is relevant and very 
much to the point that I read the full text of my message, because I 
don't want anything misconstrued in a very skillful manner. 



ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 1883 

Mr. Moulder. Just read it. 

Mrs. del Villar. I say the following : 

The birth and continuing growth of the Los Angeles Committee for Medical 
Aide [sic] to Cuba nourishes the hopes of all Americans of good will that brother- 
hood will prevail — that love will become the common vehicle of good communica- 
tions amuong [sic] all peoples. We salute you and clasp your hand in friendship 
and in appreciation of the great work you are carrying forward in the cause of 
peace. 

Mr. Scherer. That was the telegram 

Mrs. del Villar. I sent, and I subscribe to this. 

Mr. Scherer. To Mr. Lazarus ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes. 

Mr. Scherer. The outstanding question — do you know about these 
matters ? 

Mrs. del Villar. No, sir. 

Mr. Scherer. Do you know about Mr. Lazarus ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Not at all. I heard his name and I heard he was 
a rich millionaire. This was my only kind of impression. 

Mr. Scherer. You had no knowledge that the Mine, Mill and Smel- 
ter Workers Union was found by the Subversive Activities Control 
Board to be a Communist-infiltrated union ? 

Mrs. del Villar. No. I have an abysmally ignorant political back- 
ground. I am sorry. 

Mr. Scherer. Let me ask — I have the floor I presume, Mr. Chair- 
man — the headquarters, I believe, of your committee is Suite 409, 147 
West 33d St. ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Correct. 

Mr. Scherer. And the telephone number is Lackawanna 4-0728 ? 

Mrs. del Villar. 0729 and 0728. 

Mr. Scherer. I have before me del Villar Exhibit No. 8, which is 
a press release dated November 14, a.m., "Charge House body seeks 
to undermine humane work of Medical Aid to Cuba Committee." The 
release is from L. J. Amster, Suite 409, 147 West 33d St., New York 
1, N. Y., Phone : Lackawanna 4-0728. Is that Amster related to you ? 

Mrs. del Villar. He is my husband. 

Mr. Scherer. Your husband ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes. 

Mr. Scherer. Is he the same L. J. Amster who has written articles 
for the Daily Worker and New Masses? Is that the same man? 

Mrs. del Villar. In reference to my husband I absolutely claim my 
privilege. 

Mr. Scherer. We are not asking anything 

Mrs. del Villar. Under the constitutional privilege of not testify- 
ing against my family, that or that means myself. 

Mr. Scherer. Since he issued this release let me ask, is he connected 
with your committee ? 

Mrs. del Villar. No, sir; he is not connected with the committee. 
He has knowledge in this technical business of handling the mechanics 
of it, and since I had to come here he came forth and helped me to do it. 
Otherwise, I would be doing it. So it is really your doing, not 
mine. 

(Document marked "del Villar Exhibit No. 8," appears on pp. 1884- 
1886.) 




1884 ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 



DEL VlLLAR EXHIBIT No. 8 

From: L. J. Amster 
Suite 409 
147 West 33rd St. 
New York 1, N. Y. 

Phone: LAckawanna 4-0728 

FOR RELEASE WED. NOV. 14TE,"A.M. , PLEASE 
/ ' 

CHARGE HOUSE BODY SEEKS TO UNDERMINE 

HUMANE WORK OF MEDICAL AID TO CUBA COMMITTEE 

A group of leading figures in civic, religious and educational affairs 
charged the House Committee on UnAmerican Activities, in issuing subpoenas to 
officers of the Medical Aid to Cuba Committee, is harassing people who are doing 
"a humanitarian service by sending life-saving medicines to the sick men, women 
and children of Cuba. 1, 

Speaking as private citizens, the signers of the statement declared that 
the action of the House Committee is aimed at halting ,{ a constructive function 
which might contribute to improved relations between the United States and Cuba." 

Among those who signed the protest against the House Committee action 
against the medical aid group are: Rev. William T. Baird, Chicago, 111.; Nelson 
Bengston, investment banker; Prof. Derk Bodde, University of Pennsylvania; 
Rabbi Stanley R. Brav, Cincinnati, 0.; Dr. Dorothy Brewster, Professor Emeritus, 
Columbia University; Grenville Clark, Attorney; Dr. Henry Hitt Crane, Methodist 
minister, Detroit; Dorothy Day, Editor, The Catholic Worker; Carlton B. Goodlett, 
M.D., Editor San Francisco Sun-Reporter; Dr. William E. Hocking, Emeritus Pro- 
fessor of Philosophy, Harvard University; Freda Kirchwey, former publisher of 
The Nation; Dr. Helen B. Lamb, New York; Rev. A. J. Muste, Chairman, Committee 
for Non-Violent Action; Guy E. Shipler, Editor, The Churchman; and Dr. H. H. 
Wilson, Princeton University. 



ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 1885 



The statement follows: 

We have learned that officers of the Medical Aid to Cuba Committee have been 
subpoenaed to appear before the House UnAmerican Activities Committee at a hearing 
in Washington, D. C, this Wednesday morning, November 14th. As a group of 
private citizens, we protest the action of the House Committee. 

The Medical Aid to Cuba Committee is an organization performing a humanitarian, 
non-political service by sending life-saving medicines to sick men, women and 
children in Cuba. Its program accords with the stated policies of both the 
previous Republican Administration and the present Democratic Administration. 
In his televised address of October 22nd, President Kennedy declared that this 
government "would not, at this time, withhold the necessities of life from the 
Cuban people" despite differences between the two governments. 

In February, when instituting economic sanctions against Cuba, President 
Kennedy stated that medicines and food were exempt from the provisions of the 
embargo "on humanitarian grounds." 

We believe that the action of the House Committee harasses citizens who are 
performing a constructive function, which might contribute to improved relations 
between the United States and Cuba. These subpoenas are not only ill-advised; 
they also encroach on the rights of the individuals concerned. 

We call upon the House Committee to desist. We hope that all men of 
conscience will support us in this protest. 



1886 ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 



Additional endorsements received up to 1:30 p.m. November 13, 19fe2 

Anne Thorp, Cambridge, Lass. 

David Rhys Williams, Minister Emeritus, Unitarian Church of Rochester 

Rev. Charles A. Hill, Hartford Avenue Baptist Church, Detroit 

Prof. Theodore Brameld, Professor of Sociology, Boston School of Education, 
Boston U. 

Rev. Theodore R. Bowen, Washington, D. C. 

Noam Chomsky, M.I.T. 

Horace B. Davis, Raleigh, N. C. 

Daniel M. Berman, Washington, D. C. 

Marion Frenyear, Sidney, N. Y. 

Dr. Clyde R. Miller 

Rabbi Elias Charry, Philadelphia 

Dwight L. Bolinger, Boulder, Colorado 



ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 1887 

Mr. Scherer. Did any person in the Fair Play for Cuba Commit- 
tee ever speak to you about the need for medical aid in Cuba prior 
to the formation of this committee by you ? 

Mrs. del Villar. No, sir. 

Mr. Scherer. Did you know, at the time you had this acl placed in 
the New York Times, which appeared in yesterday's issue, that Eliza- 
beth Sutherland was a prime mover in the Fair Play for Cuba Com- 
mittee ? Did you know that ? 

Mrs. del Villar. No, sir. 

Mr. Scherer. You didn't know that ? 

Mrs. del Villar. No. 

Mr. Scherer. Did you know that she attended the Cuban Writers 
and Artists Congress in Havana, Cuba just less than a year ago? 
Did you know that ? 

Mrs. del Villar. I am not sure if I knew it. I may have heard it. 
Somebod}' may have mentioned it to me, but I never discussed it with 
her. I am not positive, no. 

Mr. Scherer. That is all I have. 

Mr. Moulder. Proceed, Mr. Nittle. 

Mr. Nittle. It is not entirely clear from that telegram to S. M. 
Lazarus — so it seems to me — but is the cause of "peace" to which you 
referred in the telegram one of the purposes and objectives for which 
the Medical Aid to Cuba Committee and its Los Angeles branch were 
formed ? 

Mrs. del Villar. I would like to make a correction. There is no 
Los Angeles branch. We have no connection with its organization 
or with Los Angeles. They are a separate unit and they want to 
help. That's all. That is number one. 

Number two, because peace is not the immediate objective of our 
work; but it stands to reason and obvious that if you do something 
kind it is going to improve the attitudes of people. It is going to 
make it more peaceful, because I am nicer if you treat me nicely than 
if you slap me. That's only logical. 

Mr. Nittle. You mean to say you are advancing the thought that 
the American people should be friendly to the Government of Cuba ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Never to the government, nothing to do with 
government, because I would be political. We have no concern with 
intergovernmental relationships. All we say is that sick John is here, 
and sick Juanita is here, and it is my duty as a citizen to see that John 
doesn't die, or Juanita, or Jack. 

Mr. Nittle. Well, the government is composed of people and don't 
you speak of brotherhood of the people of Cuba in the advertisement 
in the New York Times? 

Mrs. del Villar. I am talking about 6y 2 million people, 7 million 
people, whatever the number is. 

Mr. Nittle. Let me proceed to another question. 

Are you aware of the branch of Medical Aid to Cuba Committee 
which has been established in Detroit, Mich. ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Would you be kind enough, sir, to not to use the 
word, "branch," because that is incorrect in terms of our organization. 

It is not a branch. It is a separate setup. There is no group in 
Detroit, no. 

Mr. Moulder. May I ask, do they contribute to your organization ? 



1888 ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 

Mrs. del Villar. They send sometimes contribution that they raise 
of their own free will and in their own way. 

Mr. Moulder. I understand. 

Mrs. del Villar. We do not interfere with their ways. 

Mr. Nittle. Do you know whether the people who are active in 
your organization have also been active in organizing these groups to 
which I have referred in Los Angeles and Detroit? 

Mrs. del Villar. Not to my knowledge and belief, I don't know 
this. 

Mr. Nittle. You do not know ? 

Mrs. del Villar. No, sir. 

Mr. Scherer. They use the same name, though, in those cities, do 
they not, Medical Aid to Cuba Committee ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Sure. That's all right. We have no objection 
to that. 

Mr. Scherer. You have had correspondence with the Los Angeles 
branch ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes, indeed. 

I congratulated them and I said, "Please go ahead, by all means. 
I think it is wonderful. If there is something we can help," that 
sort of thing. 

Mr. Scherer. Do you want us to call it a group in Los Angeles that 
uses the same name as you do and is associated in the same type of 
work? 

Mrs. del Villar. Simultaneous, that's right, a parallel group, 
friendly group, but not a branch. 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Nittle. You have no control over the collection or disbursal 
of funds by these other groups ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Absolutely none. 

That is why I don't want it to be a branch. 

Mr. Nittle. And if the funds collected were applied for purposes, 
other than the ostensible and declared purpose of the organization, 
you would have no knowledge of that nor would you be able to control 
it, would you ? 

Mrs. del Villar. No. That's why we didn't want to make national 
organization, because then we would have to be responsible. 

Mr. Nittle. So that this Committee of Congress may judge the 
extent of the collections by this organization and contributions for 
these purposes, would you tell us roughly how much money your 
organization has collected since its inception in October 1961 to date ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Well, I could tell you up to about May it was 
about $20,000 — $20,000, and since May, June, July, August, Septem- 
ber, October, 5 months, it's very difficult for me to say because again 
I didn't check on these figures. 

Mr. Nittle. I understand you keep the books ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes, I take care of it, but I don't remember all the 
things. I work 16 hours a day. 

Mr. Nittle. I have only asked you for the approximate figure. 

Mrs. del Villar. I wanted to be very clear that I am not saying 
absolutely specifically because I don't want that you should say I 
was lying. Is that very clear ? Because I am not lying. 

It was $20,000 odd by May and possibly $25,000, $30,000. I am not 
positive. 



ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 1889 

Mr. Nittle. Why do you say possibly and why can you not be more 
exact since May ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Because I didn't check the record and I have a 
million other things in my head. 

Mr. Nittle. Is it because the records are under the control of 
Sidney J. Gluck? 

Mrs. del Villar. What do you mean ? He gives the cloak and he 
hides it in overcoat? No. I have the records and I could tell you 
if I had remembered to look it up. I just didn't think of it. 

Mr. Scherer. Have the contributions increased since May ? 

Mrs. del Villar. I would say that they were about the same. They 
have continued to be regular and in my opinion piddling, because 
$20,000, $30,000, $50,000 is pathetic. 

Mr. Scherer. This is a little over a quarter of a page ad in the 
New* York Times. How much does that cost ? 

Mrs. del Villar. $2,500. 

Mr. Scherer. This ad costs $2,500 ? 

Mrs. del Villar. That is correct, very expensive, but that's the only 
way, in advertising and promotion, that you can raise funds, you 
know. I mean that's one of the best ways. ' 

Mr. Scherer. Did your group or your committee in New York ever 
receive any money from the groups in Los Angeles, Detroit, or some 
other city ? Did you ever receive any money ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes, we have. They have sent contributions. 

Mr. Scherer. They have sent contributions ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Surely. 

Mr. Willis. Could you estimate — we are not going to hold you to a 
particular accuracy — how many such groups there are ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes. I can tell you accurately as far as I know, 
to my knowledge. It is the Los Angeles group, and the group formed 
in Chicago, which hasn't really gotten off the ground very much, sort 
of beginning, you know. That's about all. 

Mr. Scherer. Who are the officers of the group in Chicago ? 

Mrs. del Villar. I don't remember their names. 

Mr. Scherer. Would your records in your office in New York City 
show who the 

Mrs. del Villar. I have a couple of letters. I have a few letters. 

Mr. Scherer. And that would show ? 

Mrs. del Villar. That would show, yes. 

Mr. Scherer. Who the people are. 

Mrs. del Villar. I am trying to remember. There is a doctor. It 
is public record with them. They have made an announcement, but I 
don't remember the name ; no, in all truth. I'm not sure. 

Mr. Scherer. You could furnish the committee with the names of 
the individuals who are heading up the Medical Aid to Cuba Commit- 
tee in Chicago? 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes, sir. You could correspond directly with 
them, which would be even better, because why should I be interme- 
diary ? That is not directly with our organization. You see? 

Mr. Scherer. We have a right to ask you that question, and since 
you say that you don't have the information here, but you do have it 
in the office. Rather than ask you to come back, I was suggesting 
that you furnish the staff with the names of the individuals who are 
heading this committee in Chicago. 



1890 ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 

Now, if our staff has those names, of course, we would not bother you. 
It may not have. I do not know. 

Mrs. del Villar. Very well. 

Mr. Scherer. We want to know who these people are and their 
backgrounds. 

Mrs. del Villar. Right. 

Mr. Scherer. We may have a "Gluck" in one of those committees. 

Mrs. del Villar. I object to that, sir, because I think it has a kind 
of tone that I don't think is nice or dignified. 

Mr. Scherer. I meant it. 

Mrs. del Villar. With all respect. 

Mr. Scherer. I meant it not to have a very nice or dignified tone. 

Mrs. del Villar. In my state or knowledge of Mr. Gluck he has been 
nothing but very kind and gentle, and he has never subverted me, never 
indoctrinated me. He has never mesmerized me. 

He has never done anything that I would consider objectionable. 
He has been nothing but decent, kind, and helpful. And I have a sense 
of loyalty as I would have towards you if you were nice to me. 

Mr. Scherer. I understand. 

Mrs- del Villar. Please. 

Mr. Moulder. Proceed Counsel. 

Mr. Nittle. Of course, Dr. Louis Miller is known to you as the 
medical director of your committee, is he not ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes indeed. 

Mr. Nittle. How long have you known Dr. Louis Miller ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Oh, I knew him shortly before the committee 
was organized. 

Mr. Nittle. How shortly before the committee was organized in 
October 1961 did you know Dr. Louis Miller? 

Mrs. del Villar. Perhaps a week, or a few days, or something, not 
very long, no. 

Mr. Nittle. Was it Dr. Louis Miller who suggested to you your 
participation in an organization to be known as the Medical Aid to 
Cuba Committee ? 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mrs. del Villar. The thing is Dr. Miller — did you say that he 
instructed me to form this committee? Not at all. I invited him. 
He didn't even know my idea inside my head. 

Mr. Nittle. By whom were you introduced to him a week before 
your committee was formed ? 

Mrs. del Villar. By hearsay because it is important — I mean my 
whole attitude about the committee, let me say, has been serious. 

Mr. Nittle. Will you please answer the question, Mrs. del Villar? 
We will be fair with you but we must 

Mrs. del Villar. I meant to say 

Mr. Nittle. Keep to the point. 

Mrs. del Villar. Why did I want medical director? Because we 
are dealing with medicines. I am not a doctor. 

Mr. Nittle. I did not ask you that. 

Mrs. del Villar. I know, but that's why I looked around to see 
where I could find a doctor who could help us, not in the technical 
part. 

Mr. Moulder. He asked you who introduced you to him. 



ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 1891 

Mrs. del Villar. I am trying to remember. I don't think anyone 
introduced him. I heard about him. 

Mr. Nittle. From whom ? 

Mrs. del Villar. No one in particular that I can think of. I am 
trying to think very hard. Let me see now. No, I don't have anyone 
in particular who introduced me. 

Mr. Scherer. At the time that you asked — 

Mrs. del Villar. Called him up. I heard about him. I called him 
up and said, "I am so and so. You don't know me from Adam. Could 
I see you V and he said okay. 

Mr. Scherer. At the time you called him up and asked him to be 
medical director, did you know anything about Dr. Miller's back- 
ground and activities? 

Mrs. del Villar. No. But I can tell you this. 

Mr. Scherer. Have you learned anything since about Dr. Miller ? 

Mrs. del Villar. No. I can tell you what I know. 

Mr. Scherer. Just answer my question. At the time you asked 
him did you know anything about his background and activities? 

Mrs. del Villar. No. What I had understood was that he was a 
very kind person and very good doctor and very nice man. 

Mr. Scherer. That is all you knew about him ? 

Mrs. del Villar. That is all. I went to see him and then he turned 
out to be interested and willing, not to be medical director, but to 
help me. 

Mr. Scherer. And who suggested that you get Dr. Miller? 

Mr. Moulder. She said she didn't remember. 

Mrs. del Villar. I don't remember because in this area 

Mr. Scherer. You do not remember ? 

Mrs. del Villar. No. I heard 

Mr. Scherer. Someone had to suggest him. 

Mrs. del Villar. I heard the name, but I don't remember whether 
it was one person, I heard it in a group, or how it came about. I don't 
remember. 

Mr. Scherer. Since Dr. Miller has been associated with you in this 
work as medical director have you had occasion to learn anything 
about Dr. Miller's background and activity over the years? 

Mrs. del Villar. Only to the extent that he was also helping in the 
medical aid to Spain. 

Mr. Scherer. Is that all you know about him ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes. He has been in a couple of relief organiza- 
tions, but I don't know the details or the dates. 

Mr. Scherer. You learned that but nothing else ? 

Mrs. del Villar. That he is a Communist conspirator, I never 
heard. 

Mr. Scherer. I didn't say that. What made you say that ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Indication every time. 

Mr. Scherer. Well, he has had some 

Mrs. del Villar. This I never heard, no. No, I never heard this. 



1892 ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 

Mr. Sctierer. — unusual activity ? 

Mrs. del Villar. All I have seen is that he works like a dog in 
his practice. He is elderly man and he is still willing to come and 
help us in a very tiresome work and tedious work and strenuous work. 
That's all I know about Dr. Miller. 

Mr. Moulder. You say medical aid to Spain. In what year was 
that ? 

Mrs. del Villar. I don't know. I came to confess now that at that 
time, I will tell you, I was unaware of what was going on. I paid no 
attention. 

Mr. Moulder. All right. Let us go ahead, Mr. Nittle. 

Mrs. del Villar. Are you still not persuaded of the cleanliness and 
dignity of our work? I mean do you still think that I am a coverup 
for some sinister operation ? 

Mr. Moulder. We make no accusations whatsoever. 

Do you have any other questions, Mr. Nittle ? 

Mr. Nittle. Yes; I was going to ask a question with respect to Dr. 
Louis Miller's activities on behalf of the Spanish Communists. 

Mrs. del Villar. Spanish Communists? 

Mr. Nittle. I offer for the record, Mr. Chairman, a copy of the 
Communist Daily Worker, Monday, January 11, 1937, and direct your 
attention to page 3 thereof. 

Mr. Scherer. Mr. Chairman, this witness has said that she knows 
nothing of his activities other than she related. Somebody whom she 
can't remember told her to get in touch with Miller. She got in touch 
with Miller and he became the medical director of the Medical Aid 
to Cuba Committee, but she has not learned anything about his past 
activities other than that to which she has testified. 

I realize that we are unable to find Miller to subpena him, but I think 
we should continue to try to locate Dr. Miller and then question him 
concerning his activities in connection with the Communist Party. 

Mr. Willis. Eight. 

Mr. Scherer. This witness has already said that she didn't know 
anything about him. 

Mrs. del Villar. May I say this, sir, that in connection with Dr. 
Miller and our present work, if you worried about what he might be 
doing by way of perverting us, I can tell you on the oath that Dr. 
Miller has never, in my presence or in the presence of our activity, 
said anything that in any way, or done anything in any way, that 
would undermine the principles we stand for or the safety of our coun- 
try or anything that you could find fault with. But this is what con- 
cerns me, what Dr. Miller is as I know him of today. In other words, 
he is not a serpent trying to poison us. He is doing decent work that 
does you honor. 

Mr. Scherer. But don't you think we have a right to know who Dr. 
Miller is? 

Mrs. del Villar. That is up to you. That is something else. 

Mr. Scherer. That is all we are trying to do. 



ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 1893 

Mr. Moulder. You referred to a document a moment ago, Counsel ? 

Mr. Nittle. Yes. 

An item that appears at page 3 of the Communist Daily Worker 
of Monday, January 11, 1937, which describes Dr. Louis Miller as the 
executive committee chairman of the Medical Bureau of the Com- 
munist-front organization, American Friends of Spanish Democracy. 

Mr. Scherer. That is just what I said, Mr. Chairman. If you 
want to put this in the record I think we have a right to put it in the 
record at this point, but on the basis of this woman's testimony we 
must assume at least that she is telling the truth, that she knew 
nothing about this man's background, she knew nothing about Gluck 
or nothing about the background of these people in California. We 
must assume that she is telling the truth. 

Mr. Moulder. All right. Now, the document referred to by coun- 
sel will be admitted into the record as well as other documents referred 
to by counsel at the appropriate place as the staff may deem proper. 

Mr. Nittle. Mr. Chairman, may that order you have just made 
relate not only to the exhibits introduced in the interrogation of this 
witness but in the entire course of the hearings ? 

Mr. Moulder. Yes, that will be the general order. 

(Document marked "del Villar Exhibit No. 9" follows:) 



1894 ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 



DEL VlLLAR EXHIBIT No. 9 

[Daily Worker, New York, Monday, Jan. 11, 1937, p. 3] 

Medical Unit Ready 
To Sail for Spain 

To Give Farewell Party to 15 Nurses, Doctors 

and Ambulance Drivers at Manhattan Opera 

House Thursday — Plan Second Expedition 

American believers in democracy, outraged by the 
latest "big push" engineered against Madrid by General 
Franco and his foreign fascist allies, are answering the 
challenge by sending to Madrid this country's first medical 
relief expedition. Announcement of the assemblage of 



equipment, supplies and personnel 
for America s first surgical unit and 
ambulance corps In Spain has been 
made by the Medical Bureau, Amer- 
ican Friends of Spanish Democracy, 

Responding to the Medical Bu- 
reau's appeal to America to "stem 
the blood of Spanish democracy* 
more than (20,000 in cash has been 
sent during the last week to the 
Medical Bureau's offices at 20 Vesey 
Street. In addition, about $10,000 
worth of supplies and equipment 
have poured into the bureau's ware- 
house, which it maintains with tht 
North American Committee to Aid 
Spanish Democracy at 227 West 
17th Street. 

SHIPPED ON PARIS 

The Individual contribution* 
range in sums from 20 cts. sent 
in by a seven-year-old girl who 
saved her weekly movie money, to 
$1,500 given by a prominent manu- 
facturer. Chapters of the Medical 
Bureau . all over the country have 
sent in substantial sums, and other 
chapters and Individuals have 
promised to send funds. 

All funds and supplies received 
by Thursday will be used for the 
first expedition, which will be 
shipped aboard the French Liner 
"Paris," which sails Saturday noon. 
A farewell party to a complement 
of* fifteen surgeons, physicians, 
nurses, technicians and ambulance 
drivers, who will be part of Amer- 
ica's medical relief expedition to 
8pain, will be held Thursday even- 
ing at the Manhattan Opera Ball- 
room, 331 West 34th Street. 

Colonel Frank T. Woodbury, 
United States Army Medical Corps, 
retired, will be chairman at Thurs- 
day's bon voyage affair. Speakers 
will Include Congressman John T. 
Bernard cf Minnesota, who cast the 
sqle' negative ballot against 404 
votes in the House of Representa- 
tives last week when the Adminis- 
tration's embargo resolution against 
Spain was voted; and Dr. Henry E. 
Sigerlst, director. Institute of Medi- 
cal History, Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity. Associate Chairmen of the 
farewell function include Professor 
Walter B. Cannon, famous physio- 
logist, of Harvard University, % 
number of nationally known leaders 



in medicine and the allied profes- 
sions; trade union leaders, and 
other noted friends of Spanish de- 
mocracy. 

START SECOND DRIVE 

"At the farewell meeting, we shall 
not only wish Godspeed to our per- 
sonnel," said Dr. Louis Miller, chair- 
man of the Medical Bureau's ex- 
ecutive committee, "but we shall 
also start our campaign for a 
second and much larger medical re- 
lief expedition to be sent in the 
near future." 

According to Saul Carson, ex- 
ecutive director of the Medical 
Bureau, the first shipment, aboard 
the "Paris" on Saturday, will In- 
clude complete equipment, from 
beds and bedding to surgical, medi- 
cal and wardroom supplies, for a 
fifty-bed surgical hospital which 
will be set up In Madrid in accord- 
ance with arrangements between 
the Medical Bureau and the 
Spanish Government Red Cross. 

The consignment will Include sev- 
eral tons of crates containing 
operating room equipment, surgical, 
medical and diagnostic apparatus; 
medicines, antiseptics and anesthe- 
tics; 10,00 tubes of antl -toxins and 
vaccines against gangrene, tetanus 
and diphtheria; seventy-five beds 
with sufficient bedding for twenty- 
five hospital personnel and fifty 
patients; and complete hospital 
ward equipment. The equipment 
will be accompanied, also aboard 
the "Paris." by four ambulances 
which have already been officially 
accepted on behalf of his govern- 
ment by Dr. Fernando de los Rios, 
Spanish Ambassador to the United 
States. 

"The personnel has been chosen 
carefully from among more than 
150 applicants," said Dr. Miller. 
"An astounding number of the ap- 
plicants for medical service In 
Spain were professionally and tem- 
peramentally fitted to go. But we 
had to choose, due to limitation of 
funds, between sending more peo- 
ple or more medical and surgical 
supplies. We chose to meet the 
emergency by shipping only s> 
skeleton personnel now, and in- 
creasing our shipment of suppliei 
and equipment. 



ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 1895 

Mr. Nittle. Mr. Chairman, in order to refresh the committee's 
recollection with respect to Dr. Louis Miller, I should like to note 
for the record that in 1948 the committee received testimony relating 
to the Arthur Adams Soviet espionage ring which operated out of a 
jewelry shop in New York City managed by one Victoria Stone. In 
1938, under the name of Arthur Alexandrovich Adams, a Soviet 
espionage agent, born either in Sweden or Russia, entered the United 
States from Canada with a fraudulent Canadian birth certificate. 
Arthur Adams participated in the Eussian revolution of 1905 and had 
made several previous sojourns in the United States commencing 
in the year 1920 or 1921. 

During the period of World War II, Adams was discovered to be 
actively engaged in espionage activities for the Soviet Government, 
particularly with respect to developments made in the United States 
relating to nuclear fission. He was in contact with Clarence F. 
Hiskey, atomic scientist assigned to the Manhattan Project, and also 
with John Hitchcock Chapin, a chemical engineer employed in the 
Metallurgical Laboratories in Cleveland, engaged in a project which 
was even secret within the Manhattan Engineering District Project 
itself. 

The committee, on September 28, 1948, filed with Congress its 
report, entitled Report on Soviet Espionage Activities in Connection 
with the Atomic Bomb. The report stated that Arthur Adams' 
principal New York contacts during the 1940's were Victoria Stone, 
Julius Heiman, Eric Bernay, Samuel Novick, and Dr. Louis Miller. 

In 1951 Louis Francis Budenz testified in executive session before' 
this committee that Dr. Louis Miller 'had been a physician in Metro- 
politan New York, and that he met Dr. Miller during the 1940's on 
occasions at enlarged meetings of the National Committee of the 
Communist Party of the United States. He testified that Dr. Miller 
had been very active in organizing Communist physicians. 

We have endeavored to supena Dr. Louis Miller to obtain his testi- 
mony at this hearing today with respect to his activities as medical 
director of the Medical Aid to Cuba Committee. Service was re- 
peatedly attempted, without success, at his office and residence, 201 
Beach 27, Far Eockaway, Long Island, N.Y., and at his apartment, 
340 West 28th St., New York City ; 

Mr. Moulder. Any other questions ? 

Mr. Willis. Mr. Chairman, I request that that subpena be carried 
as outstanding. 

Mr. Moulder. Yes, it is so ordered. 

Congressman Bruce has a question he would like to ask. 

Mrs. del Villar. Very good. 

Mr. Bruce. I understood you to testify a few moments ago that 
the medical supplies that you purchased through your organization 
are sent directly to a hospital in Cuba ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Eight. 

Mr. Bruce. Do you have any means of following up on the use of 
the medical supplies that you send to this hospi r 



91669 O— 63— pt. 1- 



1896 ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 

Mrs. del Villar. Now, we have the means of certifying this from 
the answer of the doctors who are in charge of receiving the medi- 
cation. 

Mr. Bruce. Are not the doctors in charge of that hospital at the 
whim of the Cuban Government ? 

Mrs. del Villar. I don't know because I don't know exactly how 
it operates. The Nacional Hospital is like Bellevue Hospital and 
Bellevue is not at the whim of Mayor Wagner. 

Mr. Bruce. I think when you you compare a Cuban hospital under 
the existing dictatorship in Cuba with any hospital in the United 
States you are stretching credulity a little far. It is a fact that all 
institutions in Cuba are under the control of the Cuban Government 
directly. Is that not so ? 

Mrs. del Villar. I suppose. I don't know. I don't know that 
exactly. 

Mr. Bruce. Do you have any means, through your committee, of 
checking and following through on the use of the medical supplies that 
you send outside of the secondhand reports the Cuban Government 
sends to you ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Well, again I have to say that there are a group 
of doctors, some of them independent, and some of them associated 
with the staff of the hospital, who are in charge of seeing that the medi- 
cines arrive and are nationally distributed, and we get their receipt 
from them 

Mr. Bruce. But you get the receipt from the Cuban doctors ; is that 
correct ? 

Mrs. del Villar. From the Cuban doctors. 

Mr. Bruce. The Cuban doctors are part of a hospital controlled by 
the Castro government? 

Mrs. del Villar. Some of them are part of the hospital, some of 
them a part of the medical school of the university. 

Mr. Bruce. It is a state institution, however? 

Mrs. del Villar. Some of them are private doctors, from what I 
understand. 

Mr. Bruce. And it is a state institution, is it not ? 

Mrs. del Villar. I suppose. 

Mr. Bruce. And as a state institution, it is under the control of the 
Castro government, is that not correct ? 

Mrs. del Villar. I suppose so. 

Mr. Bruce. Do you have any faith in the Castro government ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Noav you are coming to politics. 

Mr. Bruce. No, I am not. 

Mrs. del Villar. We are not concerned with politics. 

Mr. Bruce. I am coming to the distribution of supplies for which 
you are raising funds in the United States. I am simply trying to 
determine whether you have any adequate means, outside of the Com- 
munist government of Cuba and their representatives, selected and 
controlled by them, of following up on the use of the medical supplies 
that you send there. Do you ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Well, it is very difficult to answer the question the 
way you put it because it sounds so ominous. 

Mr. Bruce. It is ominous. 

Mrs. del Villar. I don't see it as ominous. I see it as a group of 
doctors who I know about as people, from friends and relatives of 



ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 1897 

mine, who know that these are decent, honorable people. They are 
not like that with a machinegun going over their head. 

Mr. Bruce. They are not in Cuba today. 

Mrs. del Villar. I am. Cuban and I know what Cuba has always 
been. 

Mr. Bruce. Well, do you know what it is now ? 

Mrs. del Villar. I don't know what it is now in your terms. 

Mr. Bruce. Not in my terms, in your terms. Do you know what it 
is now? 

Mrs. del Villar. This is political. I will be glad to discuss it with 
you after the hearing, but it doesn't belong in here. 

Mr. Bruce. We are discussing it now while you are on the stand. 

Mrs. del Villar. No. No. 

Mr. Bruce. As to the distribution of the medical supplies that you 
provide to the Cuban Government. 

Mrs. del Villar. To my knowledge and belief it is distributed 
legitimately by a number of doctors who have become responsible 
and who were reputable before the revolution. They are known 
as good doctors. 

Mr. Bruce. I think you would find that there are thousands of 
Cuban children, also who were of reputable families in what you call 
before the revolution, many of whom have now been transported to 
the Soviet Union. 

Mrs. del Villar. This I haven't followed political. I do not wish 
to discuss anything because this is not the area. 

Mr. Bruce. But you are dealing with a political institution. 

Mr. del Villar. No, I am sending supplies of medicine for people 
to be cured. 

Mr. Bruce. What is Juanita? (See del Villar Exhibit No. 2, 
p. 1861.) 

Mrs. del Villar. Juanita is a prototype child. 

Mr. Bruce. She is not a real child as far as you are concerned ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Is this all right for me to say, or is this a direct 
question ? 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mrs. del Villar. I have seen this. I took the notion from ads 
that I have seen from other charitable organizations where they say, 
you know, Johnny is barefoot and this and that. Juanita is a name 
in Spanish. 

Mr. Bruce. You make a specific statement in this ad. You say : 

In a small white cot in a ward in a Cuban hospital, Juanita, 11 years old 
and all unknowing is waging a fight for her life. 

This is a statement of fact. 

Her father, a physician on the hospital staff stands at his child's bedside. 

Who is Juanita ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Juanita is a poetic license. 

Mr. Bruce. It is a figment of your imagination ? 

Mrs. del Villar. That's right. 

Mr. Bruce. The fact that you state in your ad that her father is 
a physician is, too, part of the figment ? 

Mrs. del Villar. It is a perfectly possible situation. It is nothing 
underworld or contrived. 

Mr. Bruce. It isn't contrived ? 



1898 ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 

Mrs. del Villar. No, because you know there are millions of little 
Johnnies sick in the hospitals in our country or in any country in 
the world. 

Mr. Bruce. But in your ad you describe her father as a physician 
on the staff at the child's beside. You talk about his love insufficient 
to stave off death, and how he feels helpless and despairing, "trained 
like his medical colleagues" in the use of pharmaceutical products. 
You build quite a case in this figment of the imagination. 

Mrs. del Villar. I am a good copy writer, I guess. 

Mr. Bruce. This is just an ad ? 

Mrs. del Villar. It is an ad, but it isn't, you see 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mrs. del Villar. My counsel is correct. Actually, the way you put 
it, it gives a derogatory quality which it doesn't have, because you 
know when you take a classical case in any study on medicine you 
don't give the names and addresses of people, and you make a com- 
posite presentation of a perfectly authentic fact. 

Mr. Bruce. You go into pretty good details here, however, about 
Juanita and her father being on the staff of the hospital. 

Mrs. del Villar. But, sir, may I ask you with all respect, what are 
we going to prove with this ? 

Mr. Bruce. I am trying to find out directly what followup 
you have — I am going back to that. You are describing a physician 
and his daughter in an ad. We have certain regulations on adver- 
tising, generally in force in the United States. You built up a case 
here which now you say is strictly an advertising gimmick, in other 
words. 

Mrs. del Villar. Not a gimmick. It is a composite of a very real 
situation. 

Mr. Bruce. How do you know it is real ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Because I know of sick children in hospitals in 
Cuba as well as here. 

Mr. Bruce. But you do not know whether or not these children are 
being treated by the medical supplies you send in? You have no 
direct control over it ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Oh, no, I don't have any personal supervision. 

Mr. Bruce. Does your committee have any control over the drugs ? 

Mrs. del Villar. We made a request from the State Department 
to allow Dr. Miller or any one of us to go to Cuba so that we could 
see this for ourselves and set it up the way we would like it. 

Mr. Bruce. But you have no 

Mrs. del Villar. But it was denied. 

Mr. Bruce. You have no direct control over the medical supplies 
you send there ? 

Mrs. del Villar. I could hardly do that until you granted me per- 
mission to go. 

Mr. Bruce. You have no means, then, of following through to 
know whether or not they are being used for the Juanita that you 
describe theoretically. 

Mrs. del Villar. Not at the present, I have no direct connection, 
no, but I would like to. I wish you would send me. 

Mr. Bruce. Is it not possible, then, that this could be diverted for 
treatment of the Cuban Army ? 



ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 1899 

Mrs. del Villar. I don't think. 

Mr. Bruce. These are medical supplies. Why don't you think so? 

Mrs. del Villar. Because I have faith in the doctors with whom I 
have been dealing. They are doctors of reputation in Cuba and out- 
standing. They are decent people and I know that medicines have 
gone to the Cuban hospital and to many other hospitals of the island. 

Mr. Bruce. This is a state hospital down there, is it not ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes, I guess so. It's government owned, I 
suppose. 

Mr. Bruce. And it is a matter of record that in Communist dictator- 
ships hospitals and all other institutions become vehicles of the gov- 
ernment for their end, is that not true ? 

Mrs. del Villar. You know, sir, I don't know how familiar you 
were with Cuba before, this particular quotation that you are refer- 
ring to, but it was always like this. In Cuba the hospitals, the 
newspapers, everything was controlled by one or another member of 
government who owned everything and who was a completely, as 
you know, immoral and corrupt figure. This is the record of 
everybody. 

Mr. Bruce. I am not quarreling with that at all. I am simply 
trying to find out whether you have any control over the distribution 
of medical supplies which you send them. 

Mrs. del Villar. Personally, no. 

Mr. Bruce. Does your committee ? 

Mrs. del Villar. No, because we have no one there. 

Mr. Bruce. Do you know for a fact that drugs and medical sup- 
plies that you are sending to the Castro-controlled hospital are being 
used for the purpose for which you allegedly send them ? 

Mrs. del Villar. I am perfectly willing to say that it is so. 

Mr. Bruce. Do you know this is so ? 

Mrs. del Villar. I haven't been there to see it. But then I could 
ask you anything like this about your own home at this minute. Do 
you know such a thing is happening. You have to believe that your 
wife is doing such and such ? 

Mr. Bruce. That is a nice diversion, but it is not at the point of 
the question. 

Mrs. del Villar. No, it is the same thing. I believe that these 
doctors are decent and they are not using it for tricks. 

Mr. Bruce. What we have established here is that you are raising 
funds to buy medical supplies. You send them to a Communist 
government-controlled hospital. 

Mrs. del Villar. You label and make 

Mr. Bruce. I do not label. 

Mrs. del Villar. That is diversionary. 

Mr. Bruce. You think it is diversionary when we are talking about 
quarantine and possible blockade and men dying because 

Mrs. del Villar. This I understand. 

Mr. Bruce. — of Communist-controlled Cuba? 

Mrs. del Villar. We are sending it for people to be cured whether 
they are pro, or in favor, or in between. This is no concern of ours. 
We want it to be sent so that everybody gets it. 

Mr. Bruce. But you don't know this for a fact ? 

Mrs. del Villar. As a witness personally and alive, no. 



1900 ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 

Mr. Bruce. You have no means of actual control over the distribu- 
tion of the goods ? 

Mrs. del Villar. No, we do not. 

Mr. Bruce. And the only way you have is the reports that are 
coming from the doctors there ? 

Mrs. del Villar. That's correct. 

Mr. Bruce. And these doctors are under the control of the gov- 
ernment, are they not ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Well, the thing is I would like to add that this is 
not a kind of secret midnight operation and that only these doctors 
know about it with a mask and a hood and that they distribute these 
things mysteriously. This is public notice. The shipments come into 
the airport and everybody in Cuba knows that they are arriving, and 
the doctors 

Mr. Bruce. How do you know this ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Because I have heard it commented. I have 
heard it. 

Mr. Bruce. From whom did you hear it ? 

Mrs. del Villar. The letters we get. 

Mr. Bruce. From whom ? 

Mrs. del Villar. From my mother. My mother says, "I hear that 
a shipment came, was mentioned in the paper. I hear that medicines 
were distributed," or something like that in a very innocuous manner, 
but the way it sounds it is so nerve-wracking. 

Mr. Bruce. It is very nerve- wracking. 

Mrs. del Villar. But that is not how the medicines operate. 

Mr. Bruce. But you don't know this for a fact ? 

Mrs. del Villar. I am not there. I don't know for a fact anything 
that I am not in here for. 

Mr. Bruce. Do the representatives of your committee have access to 
the personal followup on the distribution of these supplies? 

Mrs. del Villar. Not unless you grant us permission to go there, 
which is what we would like to do. 

Mr. Bruce. In other words, you send them in and the distribution 
then is up to the Castro government, in effect ? 

Mrs. del Villar. The distribution there is up to the doctors who are 
in charge of the distributing, and this is what I know. 

Mr. Bruce. O.K. 

Mr. Scherer. Actually you don't know whether these medicines are 
used for people who are in favor of the present regime, do you, and 
those who are not 

Mrs. del Villar. I am in complete confidence. I have felt confi- 
dent all along. It never entered my head to doubt it that the doctors 
are distributing the medicine wherever it is needed in the hospitals 
throughout the island. That is all I know. 

Mr. Moulder. That is your opinion and it is not based upon any 
actual information ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Well, you see, you put me in a very awkward sit- 
uation, because if you said "Look, we gave you permission to go and 
now you are not telling us" 

Mr. Moulder. You say you are not there and you don't know. 

Do you want to ask her any more questions ? 

Mr. Willis. May I ask one question just to follow through for the 
record. 



ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 1901 

Mr. Moulder. Yes. 

Mr. Willis. You say you made application with the Department of 
State or the Department of Commerce to send a representative there. 
You made that application personally ? 

Mrs. del Villar. I signed it, but it was with the accord of the com- 
mittee. 

Mr. Willis. And were the names of the other committee members 
on that? 

Mrs. del Villar. It is here. It is Exhibit No. 1 — I don't know. 

Mr. Willis. That is the letter from which counsel read a while ago 
and put in the record ? 

Mrs. del Villar. That's right, sir. 

Mr. Willis. And that request was denied ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Was denied. 

Mr. Willis. Did they tell you why? Did they write a letter? 

Mrs. del Villar. I don't remember. I don't think the denial was, 
as I remember — I don't have any special feeling about it. I mean it 
was nothing unpleasant or anything. They just said they couldn't 
at this time grant us permission or something like this. That is what 
I remember, but I don't exactly. 

Mr. Scherer. You are engaged in this type of work and have been 
so engaged for quite a few months now. Did you ever know, before 
you heard Mr. Willis this morning, that the Communists over the years 
have used food and medical supplies to give to those whom the Com- 
munists consider loyal to the Communist causes in the country and 
deprive food and medicine to others whom they did not consider loyal 
to the Communist cause, and as a method of punishment? 

Mrs. del Villar. You ask me if I knew this ? 

Mr. Scherer. Yes, did you ever hear that before ? 

Mrs. del Villar. No. 

Mr. Scherer. In all your work ? 

Mrs. del Villar. No. 

Mr. Scherer. You do not know that ? 

Mrs. del Villar. No, because as I told you before I have never 
been politically minded so I didn't pay much attention. 

Mr. Scherer. Do you know now from a Member of Congress, that 
our investigations have shown, that that has happened over the years 
in countries that have been under Communist discipline ? \ v 

Mrs. del Villar. I suppose. 

You may have found that, but, as the Honorable Congressman 
there says, I don't know. I didn't see it. I don't know it for a fact. 

Mr. Scherer. You don't know, then, whether such a policy is being 
followed today in Cuba? 

Mrs. del Villar. I don't know that and I tell you the only thing 
I can say is that my mother, who is a lady of the old guard and not at 
all a rabble rouser, has not been oppressed or persecuted in any way 
whatsoever and that she is just a quiet little lady, elderly, who lives 
quietly. 

Mr. Moulder. We have covered this point 

Mrs. del Villar. She has not been denied anything. 

Mr. Moulder. — several times. Is there any need for this witness 
following the recess ? 

Mr. Nittle. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Moulder. Then we will stand in recess until 2 p.m. 



1902 ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 

You will return. 

Mrs. del Villar. Do you want me again ? 

Mr. Moulder. Yes, 2 o'clock. 

(Committee members present at the time of recess: Representatives 
Moulder, Willis, Scherer, and Bruce.) 

(Whereupon, at 12:35 p.m., Wednesday, November 14, 1962, the 
hearings were recessed to reconvene at 2 p.m. of the same day.) 

AFTERNOON SESSION— WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14, 1962 

(The subcommittee reconvened at 2 p.m., Representative Morgan M. 
Moulder presiding.) 

Present : Representatives Moulder and Willis. 

Mr. Moulder. The committee will come to order. You will resume 
the witness stand, please. 

TESTIMONY OF MELITTA DEL VILLAR— Resumed 

Mr. Moulder. Proceed, Mr. Nittle. 

Mr. Pollitt. Mr. Nittle, this seems to be an original, and I would 
rather you held it than I. 

Mr. Nittle. Yes. We can pick these up a little later. 

I call your attention again to Exhibit 2, the New York Times ad, 
dated yesterday. I would like to ask you: When was the decision 
made by your group to place this ad in the New York Times? 

Mrs. del Villar. I would say about 2 weeks ago, at least. We have 
been contemplating having such an ad for a long time. 

Mr. Nittle. Did you prepare this advertisement personally ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes, me and the other — you know, Mr. Gluck and 
the other people. 

Mr. Nittle. Who besides Mr. Gluck participated in the preparation 
of this advertisement ? 

Mrs. del Villar. He didn't participate, actually. I am afraid if 
it is a bad literary production, it is my doing. But I told Mm I was 
doing it, and he knew, because I don't do these things except by ap- 
proval of the commitee, you see. 

Mr. Nittle. Where is Dr. Miller now ? 

Mrs. del Villar. I don't know. 

Mr. Nittle. Is he still the medical director of your committee ? 

Mrs. del Villar. I hope so. 

Mr. Nittle. I believe you have indicated that names of the officers 
of the Medical Aid to Cuba Committee have been published to the 
world, so to speak. Have they been ? 

Mrs. del Villar. I think so. The officers, yes. 

Mr. Nittle. We have been unable to find any public reference to 
the names of Dr. Louis Miller as medical director or to the name of 
Sidney J. Gluck as treasurer. How do you account for that? 

Mrs. del Villar. Well, we have it on our stationery, which I didn't 
bring any copy of, and we also have it in the brochure that we have 
about the work of the committee. 

Mr. Nittle. Their names have not appeared in the National Guard- 
ian or Monthly Review? 



ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 1903 

Mrs. del Villar. No, because we haven't placed ads in the Monthly 
Review, and the National Guardian had a small ad, I think, prior to 
Mr. Gluck's, you know, being a member of the committee — I think. 
I am not sure of the dates, but I think so. 

Mr. Nittle. Did Dr. Louis Miller engage in travel to Cuba as 
medical director at any time after the formation of the group in 
October 1961 ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Not to my belief and knowledge, because there is 
a travel ban, and that is why we asked for permission. We would 
have liked him or someone else from the committee to go. 

Mr. Nittle. Did he travel outside of the United States on the busi- 
ness of the Medical Aid to Cuba Committee ? 

Mrs. del Villar. No. Not in an official capacity, no, because we 
don't send emissaries, you know. 

Mr. Willis. Let me ask you this question. I may anticipate your 
answer. 

When were you served with a subpena ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Tuesday night I received it. This gentleman 
here brought it. 

Mr. Willis. What date was that ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Tuesday a week ago. Yes. I don't remember the 
date. I can tell you right away. I have a little calendar here, and 
that is how I can tell you the date. 

Today is what ? 

Mr. Nittle. I believe November 6 was the date of service. 

Mrs. del Villar. Today is "the 14th? I got it the evening of the 
5th. I think that is when I came. 

Mr. Willis. What date is that ? 

Mrs. del Villar. The 5th of November. I know I came home, and 
this gentleman was waiting [pointing to Mr. Louis J. Russell, in-, 
vestigator] . 

Mr. Willis. And what is the date of the ad ? 

Mr. Nittle. November 13, Mr. Willis. 

Mr. Willis. Was the preparation of the ad planned since the service 
of that subpena ? 

Mrs. del Villar. No. We had decided, the committee had decided, 
a long time ago, that we should have an ad in the Times. There was 
something we wanted to do. The summer, you know, is a bad time, 
and we thought it wouldn't have been practical. 

Mr. Willis. I am being very practical, too, right now. You realize 
that. 

Mrs. del Villar. In what way ? 

Mr. Willis. Just to find out in my own mind, so that I can judge 
your answer, whether the decision to place the ad was after you and 
others had been subpenaed. That is obvious. 

Mrs. del Villar. We had the plan of the ad for, a long time. 

Mr. Willis. I say that because of the protesting telegram and your 
husband's press release. 

Anyway, you have answered the question. And I anticipated your 
answer. 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes. I understand. 

Mr. Nittle. When did you deliver this item for publication to the 
New York Times? (See del Villar Exhibit No. 2, p. 1861.) 



1904 ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 

Mrs. del Villar. I think it was either Saturday last, Friday or 
Saturday or Monday. I am not sure. 

Mr. Nittle. Do you have knowledge of any travel made by Dr. 
Louis Miller outside the United States since the formation of your 
committee ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Dr. Miller's travels and affairs and his trips on 
vacation and otherwise are no concern of mine. 

Mr. Nittle. I did not ask you that. I asked you whether you had 
knowledge of his travels outside the United States since October 1961. 

Mrs. del Villar. May I consult with counsel ? Because I don't wish 
to do anything beyond the work of the committee. 

(Witness conferred with counsel. ) 

Mrs. del Villar. My counsel considers it all right for me to say 
the truth, which is that I believe he went on his vacation to Mexico. 

Mr. Nittle. Now, on March 16, 1962, Dr. Louis Miller made ap- 
plication to the Passport. Division of the Department of State, as you 
are well aware. 

Mrs. del Villar. Right. 

Mr. Willis. Well, is she? 

Did you know that ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Beg your pardon? 

Mr. Willis. Did you know he had'made application ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Well, I signed the request. 

Mr. Nittle. As a matter of fact, in support of his validation of a 
passport 

Mr. Willis. To travel where ? 

Mr. Nittle. He stated in his validation request to the Passport Di- 
vision, Mr. Willis, that he desired to travel to Cuba for 10 or 15 days. 
This letter is del Villar Exhibit No. 10. 

Mr. Willis. When was that? 

Mr. Nittle. March 20. 

Mr. Willis. March 20, 1962 ? 

Mr. NrrTLE. Yes. 

Mr. Willis. He applied for a passport ? 

Mr. Nittle. He applied on March 16, 1962, for validation of a pass- 
port that had been previously issued to him in 1961, in which he stated 
that he desired to travel to Cuba for a period of 10 or 15 days, com- 
mencing March 20, 1962. 

He further stated that he would travel via Pan American Airways 
on behalf of the Medical Aid to Cuba Committee. 

(Document marked "del Villar Exhibit No. 10" follows:) 



ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 1905 



DEL VlLLAR EXHIBIT No. 10 



f ' S\ 



mm. 



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l*"**-*%tyvj A? 



1906 ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 

Mr. Willis. I am interested in that. We are getting down to sub- 
stantial evidence. 

May I ask two or three questions ? 

May I see that letter. 

I had not read this letter. Now I have some questions. 

I asked you before we adjourned whether you — by "you," I mean 
the committee — had made application, as you said you were very 
anxious to do, to send an on-the-spot representative to Cuba, so 
that you could know, as you so dramatically said, with your own 
eyes, what was going on with your medical aid. You said you had, 
and that it had been denied. I am correct thus far, am I not ? 

Mrs. del Villar. That is right. 

Mr. Willis. And I asked you about the date of it, and you 
referred to this letter of March 16, 1962, a copy of which has now been 
handed to me, and for the first time I have read it. 

And I asked you to verify what you had previously said, that that 
opportunity to have representatives of your committee go to Cuba 
and see what was happening to your medical aid was denied, and you 
said it had been denied by the Department of State. 

And I asked you this morning, before we recessed, for a copy of 
the letter of denial, whether they had assigned any reason for it. 
You said, with telling effect, "Yes, but there was nothing unusual, 
unpleasant, about the denial." 

Mrs. del ViLLAR. That is what I remember. 

Mr. Willis. That is according to what you remember. Do you 
have a copy of the letter of denial ? 

Mrs. del Villar. No. I must have in the office, I suppose. 

Mr. Nittle. The committee has a copy of the letter of refusal dated 
March 28, 1962, addressed by the State Department to Dr. Miller, 
which is del Villar Exhibit No. 11. 

(Document marked "del Villar Exhibit No. 11" follows:) 



ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 1907 

DEL VlLLAR EXHIBIT No. 1 1 

MAR 2 8 1962 



la raalr rttm to 

H/D-lJOtUllar, Laala ■«« 26* 1962 



Dr. MUlari 

Carafal — 1 ii«r«» Inn baa boon glvan to two- ra aj ai a t for 
valldatlaa af jaar p— a part for tranwl to Cwba an bahalf of to* 

OoBBlttoa far Mtdlcal LU to Ctfca, Kscaptlona to tha | 1 

raatrlattaaa an traval to Oate ara aada in oaly a far taa to a oaa . 
It la art a— Id—a 1 that jvmr raajaaato ear wlthla aar af tha 
aatobllahad arltorla and tharafara, It la with raarat that I 
advlaa yaa feat jrwar paaaport milt ba valldatod for aaoh traval. 
Wtanaraly, 

Edward/ J. H l oka y 
Oapatgr Ddbraotor, Paaaparl Offlaa 



■c. 16 152A 



Dr. Laala Millar, 

2*5 Caatral Part ¥., 
Inr Vart OWy. 
PT/D«JA>iangtprg 
3-28-62 



1908 ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 

Mr. Willis. Well, you answered — and you voluntarily said it — 
that there was nothing unusual about the reply, nothing accusatory 
about it, but it had been denied. 

Now, I see from your letter, signed by you, dated March 16, 1962, 
that the person, apparently, you had in mind to send to Cuba to over- 
see or overlook your operations, was this Dr. Louis Miller, a fact I 
did not know until now. 

Now, I regard you as an unusually intelligent person. 

Mrs. del Villar. Thank you, sir. 

Mr. Willis. And I ask you this simple question. Do you think 
that the denial which you complained about, on the part of the Gov- 
ernment of the United States, to permit your committee to oversee 
what was being done with your medical supplies — that that denial 
was based upon the fact that the person you wished to send there was 
Dr. Miller, whose record was read into the record of today ? Do you 
think that has any connection ? 

Mrs. del Villar. With this record you have shown me, perhaps it 
has. But I had no way of knowing, as I remember, from the letter, 
you see. 1 didn't connect anything. 

Mr. Willis. Well, you seemed, as I recall, to be slightly reproach- 
ful of the Government of the United States not to permit a committee 
that unquestionably you have deep faith in having representatives in 
Cuba to oversee your work. 

Now, as an American citizen, I ask you this : Do you blame the Gov- 
ernment of the United States for not having approved your sending Dr. 
Miller to do your charitable work in Cuba ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Excuse me, please. 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Willis. And I ask you to be very careful in answering, because 
I might have some other questions after you do answer. 

Mr. Moulder.. The question is: Do you now criticize the Govern- 
ment? 

Mr. Willis. Do you now, in view of these revelations, blame the 
Government for not permitting your committee — that, let's assume 
you have deep faith in 

Mrs. del Villar. I do. 6 

Mr. Willis (continuing). To send as your representative to Cuba, 
with what is going on, the person named Dr. Louis Miller ? Do you 
blame our Government ? 

(Witness conferred with counsel. ) 

Mrs. del Villar. I would like, sir, for you 

Mr. Willis. I will caution you : Do not make a speech to me, be- 
cause I am going to cross-examine you. 

Please answer the question. 

Mrs. del Villar. No. 

The thing is that no question, sir, is black or white. It is not a yes 
or no question, because Dr. Miller — I know him within the context 
of the committee, and he has never done anything that anyone could 
consider in any way harmful to the country. He, as a medical man, 
seemed to be the adequate person to see a medical situation, see to, 
and on that basis, let us consider the following : If a person, a convict, 
from a criminal case, say a murderer 

Mr. Willis. What? 



ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 1909 

Mrs. del Villar. If a murderer does a thing and is punished and 
comes out, you don't forever keep penalizing him for something that 
he has already been punished for. 

Now, the record that you tell me would substantiate the State 
Department's refusal. I understand what you mean. 

Isn't that what you say ? 

Mr. Willis. I ask you : Now that you know the facts, are you still 
reproachful of the Government of the United States not issuing a pass- 
port to Dr. Miller to represent your committee in Cuba ? 

That is my question. 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes, but that is a political 

Mr. Willis. If you want it that way, madam, you and I will have it, 
and I am not quarreling, because I have a lot of questions. I have 
asked you a question. Do you want to answer it ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Well, yes. I would like to say that the thing is 
that the Government of the United States I hope has understand- 
ing that Dr. Miller is not doing anything wrong with the commit- 
tee. And on the basis 

Mr. Willis. What committee ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Our committee. 

And on the basis of his work with the committee, he wouldn't do 
any harm. 

Now, if they have their reservations because they think they 
shouldn't do it, that is their privilege. I am not questioning it. 

Mr. Willis. So you are not answering the question. Therefore, I 
will ask you a few others. 

Mr. Moulder. As I understand, she says she does not criticize the 
Government for making the decision. 

Mr. Willis. You do, or do not ? 

Mrs. del Villar. I can't argue, because that opens a completely 
different line of argument, which I am not qualified to and can't un- 
dertake. 

(At this point Mr. Scherer entered the hearing room.) 

Mr. Willis. Yes, I think you can defend yourself, because I have 
questioned you, and because you appear to me as being a person of 
deep faith. 

Mrs. del Villar. I am. 

Mr. Willis. And I think probably you believe in all this being 
done. But yet, to be frank about it, this telegram we received this 
morning, signed by quite a few people, taken up by your husband, 
in a press release, addressed, as you say, to all the newspapers on 
earth, or in America, that wished to carry it, carries, if you will per- 
mit me, a certain sting at this committee, as though we are accus- 
ing you personally, or anyone else. 

Mrs. del Villar. But, sir, the very fact that I come here carries 
a terrible sting for the work I am doing, because the minute any- 
one will say, "Look, Melitta, you were called by the committee." 
And that already makes me an un-American. And this makes it very 
bad for my work. It is besmirching my work. 

Mr. Willis. I have not said that. Now, I will ask you a few more 
questions. 

Mrs. del Villar. Please. 

Mr. Willis. With regard to the questions that my colleague was 
asking you, right before we adjourned, about whether you knew for 



1910 ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 

what purpose these medical supplies were being used, and you said 
you did not know. 

Mrs. del Villar. I assume, and I have absolute confidence 

Mr. Willis. Really, it is the policy of the Government of the 
United States, as I understand it, through our President, not to deny 
medical aid to Cuba. 

Mrs. del Villar. That is correct. 

Mr. Willis. So there is no quarrel there. 

Mrs. del Villar. That is why I work under this exemption. 

Mr. Willis. Now let me ask you this. Do you not agree that it is 
not so much to whom the aid will be extended at the other end, by 
people of noble humanitarian motives, as for the Government of the 
United States through its legislative branch to inquire into the motives 
of those behind the movement? Let us say we will exclude yourself 
for the moment. 

Mrs. del Villar. Do I agree that you should not enter into inquiry 
into the motives of our doing ? 

Mr. Willis. I say exclude yourself for the moment. Exclude your- 
self as a person, and even exclude your committee, which is the subject 
of inquiry right now. 

And admitting that it is noble and humanitarian for people of good, 
fine, clean, American, charitable, humanitarian motives, to come to 
the aid of people in distress 

Mrs. del Villar. Right. 

Mr. Willis. Particularly the sick and the maimed and the afflicted 
and victims. Assume all that. We are all for that. 

Can you not see a line of distinction between those in this country 
who might be doing it for an evil political motive that you do not 
want to talk about, as compared to those who might not be doing it 
contrary to the best interests of this Government ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes, I suppose. People of all kinds get into all 
things. This is true in any situation. When a person joins anything, 
say even the most wonderful work, they could do it for the wrong rea- 
sons. A man who could be a surgeon because he is a butcher. I don't 
know. 

Mr. Willis. All right. You being philosophical about it, I will 
take you up on that. 

Do you not think it is possible for people of evil motives to use an 
organization as a vehicle to do evil ? 

Mrs. del Villar. That is right. There is a possibility in everything. 

Mr. Willis. Do not misunderstand me. I am not pointing the 
finger at you. 

Mrs. del Villar. I understand. 

Mr. Willis. Do you not think that perhaps that with this telegram, 
which is certainly unkind to this committee, and your husband's pub- 
lication of it, dated for release while we are having these hearings, 
implying that we, as Members of Congress, representing the people of 
the United States — do you not think it is as unkind, as you have been 
implying here, in your dramatic, theatrical way, "Please leave this 
alone," and all that kind of stuff ? 

You see what I mean ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes, but 

Mr. Willis. Do you not think that we are justified in raising our 
eyebrows, when we know through our investigations, that people like 



ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 1911 

Dr. Miller, if the record is true — I do not know him. Or what is the 
other man ? The treasurer, and perhaps others who have been named. 
And they are subpenaed. You have been asking us to try to see your 
side. Have you thought enough to see our side as Members of 
Congress ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Well, look, sir 

Mr. Willis. If you ask me a question, I will answer it. Why do 
you not ask me, and we can keep it up for 3 days, if you want to. 

Mrs. del Villar. No, I am no match to you, because you are su- 
premely intelligent. 

Mr. Willis. "Methinks" sometimes we protest too much. 

Mrs. del Villar. That is Shakespeare. Do you think that logic 
would apply to any situation or group? By the same token, your 
committee, with all respect — there could be members, and I do not 
mean you or the gentlemen present, because I do not know your work 
or anything at all about it, except just now. And it could also be 
possible that the fact that there is a person in office does not — the cloak 
does not make the priest. So it is not necessarily that this man has 
the best intentions. You see? 

Mr. Willis. All right. Let us take it that way. You are the 
chairman. According to you, this is your conception of a noble, 
humanitarian effort, to do good, to preach love. 

Mrs. del Villar. What is wrong with that ? 

(At this point Mr. Bruce entered the hearing room.) 

Mr. Willis. So be it. What is wrong with that ? But yet, when 
we talk to you about your associates and all the others, you say, 
in effect, "Please dissociate me from politics.'' 

Mrs. del Villar. That's right. 

Mr. Willis. That is right ? Well, you see, we have to view it dif- 
ferently. We have to take it organization by organization, and sep- 
arate the wheat from the chaff. And if, in the barrel, there are a few 
rotten apples — that does not include you, let us say — we are obligated 
to see the motives behind the organization and to count all the apples. 

And when I now discover that you made application to have a rep- 
resentative go to Cuba to verify that your noble intentions were 
carried out — and I now see that your representative was to be Dr. 
Miller, and that the Department of State turns it down, and you seem 
to have been reproachful of that — I have some question about it. 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes, but I think I answered that already. I think 
Mr. Moulder can agree that I have answered it. 

Mr. Moulder. Well, let us proceed, so that we can finish this 
hearing. 

Do you have any other questions ? 

Mr. Nittle. Yes, sir. 

Dr. Miller's passport and application of March 16, 1962, as has 
been pointed out, was rejected by the Department of State, in a letter 
dated March 28, 1962. 

Despite the rejection of Dr. Miller's passport application, did he 
nonetheless, to your knowledge, depart for Cuba via Mexico on or 
about April 4, 1962 ? 

Mrs. del Villar. To my knowledge and belief, absolutely not. 



91669 O— 63— pt. 1- 



1912 ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 

Mr. Nittle. Did he depart for Mexico on April 4, 1962, after the 
rejection of his passport application ? 

Mrs. del Villar. I understand that he did want to go to Mexico on 
his vacation. 

Mr. Nittle. Well, now, you more than "understand" that he went 
there. You sent him a telegram, did you not ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes. 

Mr. Nittle. I hand you a copy of a telegram marked for identi- 
fication as del Villar Exhibit No. 12, dated April 4, 1962, addressed 
to Dr. Louis Miller, care of Ticket Counter, Air France, Idlewild 
Airport. The telegram indicates thereon that the addressee, Dr. Louis 
Miller, was departing on flight 707 for Mexico. 

Mrs. del Villar. I didn't remember any of that. 

(Document marked "del Villar Exhibit No. 12" follows :) 



del Villar Exhibit No. 12 
telegram received by telephone ' * s £ 



CARE TICKET COUNTER 
DR LOUIS MILLER AIR FRANCE 

van 4 w^jffj ?o7 RpoRi 



DEPARTING *30PM 
FDR MEXICO 



UACC SEND BESTFST N»HCS FOR HAPPY TRIP 

LOVE 



BOOKtLv 

SKIltTOtf IN PHI 



DATE. 



"LLT.K 



sent by yisr--mn«r 



*tj mo ()•••; 



21? AW ♦ g*jgg 



8 S»D 



t*C * Vfrl 

"ikffllD *tfN»WI 1 



wt 



£ 



■ELW7A 



KDICAL AID 

1*7 »est 33 iT 

JUC 



Mr. Nittle. And the message contained in your telegram is : 

"MACC send bestest wishes for happy trip. Love." It is signed 
"Melitta." 

The telegram is subscribed for by the Medical Aid, 147 West 33d 
Street, New York City. 

I ask you : Did Dr. Miller, to your knowledge, depart for Mexico 
on business of the Medical Aid to Cuba Committee \ 

Mrs. del Villar. No. We do not send official delegates any place. 



ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 1913 

I 

Mr. Nittle. Did you use the funds of the Medical Aid to Cuba 
Committee to make payment for that telegram, which emanated from 
your business headquarters ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Oh, yes. This is of course. 

Mr. Nittle. You did use the money of the Medical Aid to Cuba 
Committee ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Sure. Any member who would go on a trip or 
have an operation will get our telegram. 

Mr. Nittle.. I hand you a copy of the ticket obtained by Dr. 
Miller from Air France," dated April 2, 1962, which has been marked 
del Villar Exhibit No. 13. 

Mr. Moulder. Let me see the telegram. 

Mr. Nittle. The purchase price of the ticket is $362.61. Did the 
Medical Aid to Cuba Committee finance the purchase of this ticket 
for Dr. Louis Miller? 

Mrs. del Villar. Not to my knowledge, sir. That would be too 
expensive. 

Mr. Scherer. You would not say it did not ? 

Mrs. del Villar. No, I didn't. That I know of, no. I don't 
know. 

Mr. Scherer. Did you know at the time you sent in this telegram on 
his departure for Mexico that he had been denied a passport by the 
State Department? 

Mrs. del Villar. Sure. That is why he didn't go to Cuba. Of 
course. 

Mr. Scherer. Let me tell you if the State Department had given 
this man a passport, as I know his record, this member of the commit- 
tee would have somebody from the State Department here and want 
to know why they did give it to him. 

Mrs. del Villar. This I didn't know, you see. This I don't know. 

Mr. Scherer. Under the circumstances. 

Mrs. del Villar. I can only speak for what I know. 

Mr. Scherer. Well, in the light of some of the things you have 
learned today about some of your associates — and there is some more 
you might learn later on — do you think that the release made by 
your husband, as referred to by Congressman Willis, is justified? 

Mrs. del Villar. I don't remember what the release says, but I 
can only say that when my husband, who knows what I do — he other- 
wise has nothing to do with the committee; he is volunteering for 
this — knows how hard I work, how much I sacrifice, and I don't say 
it virtuously, I say it as a statement of fact, and everything like that, 
and suddenly I get this invitation, which has very sad and negative 
implications, as you know, and can destroy the work and destroy my 
reputation, he feels that this is not quite fair. 

Mr. Scherer. But you would not want the money that you are 
raising with the aid of these other people, many of whom, to say the 
least, are suspect, to be used for political purposes, would you? 

Mrs. del Villar. No. 

Mr. Scherer. You would not want it ? 

Mrs. del Villar. I do not. We never have. 

(Document marked "del Villar Exhibit No. 13" follows :) 



1914 ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 



DEL VlLLAR EXHIBIT No. 13 




*M«>«J WO' O TON «H *« 



ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 1915 

Mr. Scherer. And you would think it would be the duty of this 
committee to determine whether or not they are being used for political 
purposes. You want them used for Cubans, irrespective of their 
political beliefs? 

Mrs. del Villar. Correct. 

Mr. Scherer. And you would object if they were being used to aid 
those who were loyal to a certain regime, and being refused others, 
to punish them ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Right. They should be given indiscriminate of 
opinion. 

Mr. Scherer. That is what this committee by these hearings is try- 
ing to determine. As I have said before, and as Mr. Willis has said, 
the Communists in the past have used food and medicines as weapons 
to promote the Communist program of subversion. In most instances 
they have not used food and medical supplies for humanitarian pur- 
poses which you contend to be the objective of your committee. 
Persons supporting the Communist regimes have been given needed 
medical attention and supplies while those who differ politically with 
their Communist masters have been callously deprived of vitally 
needed food, medicines, and medical care. 

Mrs. del Villar. I understand, but you see 

Mr. Scherer. We have good and sufficient reason to believe that this 
is happening in Cuba today. 

Mrs. del Villar. But you see, sir 

Mr. Scherer. The purpose of these hearings, therefore, is to let 
people who are contributing money to your committee know two 
things: first, whether your committee is Communist infiltrated and 
controlled, and, second, whether their money is being used for 
humanitarian purposes, as you say, or as a weapon in the cold war, 
as I believe. 

Mrs. del Villar. That may be, sir. But the question is that in un- 
dertaking this kind of work, if I begin to think of all the things you 
have said, I am so horrified and so intimidated that then I say, "Well, 
nobody should do any medical aid, nobody should rescue the ship, no- 
body should rescue the dying, because maybe there is a Communist 
there who is doing it for the wrong reasons." 

This I cannot — You see ? 

Mr. Scherer. Well, would you not like to know, through an inves- 
tigation such as we are conducting, whether or not the funds you are 
raising are being used for the humanitarian purposes to which you sub- 
scribe, or whether they are being used by the people who surround you 
and whose conduct and records are suspect, for the purpose of aiding a 
regime that is an enemy of the United States ? 

Mrs. del Villar. I have said already that I have absolute confidence 
and faith that the medicine goes to people all over. 

Mr. Scherer. I understand, but you avoid answering my question. 
I do not see how you can say anything else, in view of your testimony, 
but "yes" to the question I have just asked. 

Mrs. del Villar. What is the question again ? Because I get con- 
fused ; there is so much barrage, you know. 

I mean : Is the idea to destroy the committee ? Is this what you 
would like that I should do no more medical aid ? 

Mr. Willis. Of course not. 



1916 ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 

Mrs. del Villar. I do not understand. 

Mr. Nittle. I believe that you indicated that the ticket acquired by 
Dr. Louis Miller for travel to Mexico in April of 1962^ at a cost of 
$362.61, was not known by you to have been purchased with the funds 
of the Medical Aid to Cuba Committee. 

Mr. Willis. She has said she did not. 

Mr. Nittle. But is it not a fact that you do not have the control, or 
absolute control, over the funds of the Medical Aid to Cuba Com- 
mittee ? 

Mrs. del Villar. From New York? Oh, yes. I know what the 
funds I spent. Surely. 

Mr. Nittle. I said you do not have the absolute control over the 
funds of the Medical Aid to Cuba Committee ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Well, not absolute. 

Mr. Nittle. Am I correct, or am I incorrect ? 

Mrs. del Villar. By that I mean that I cannot locate when I want 
something to be done on my own taste ? 

Mr. Nittle. I mean to say if funds are to be withdrawn from the 
account of the Medical Aid to Cuba Committee, they can be with- 
drawn without your consent or signature ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Not at all. Not at all. Not in terms of the funds 
of our operational expense. 

Mr. Nittle. I show you a bank authorization form filed by the 
Medical Aid to Cuba Committee with the Amalgamated Bank of New 
York, in which the bank is notified that the funds on deposit there of 
the Medical Aid to Cuba Committee may be withdrawn upon the 
signature of any two of three named persons. 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes. 

Mr. Nittle. The three named persons whose signatures appear upon 
this card are "chairman, Melitta del Villar; vice chairman, Albert S. 
Baker ; and treasurer, Sidney J. Gluck." 

Mrs. del Villar. Well, when you put it this way, I understand what 
you are leading to. 

Mr. Nittle. Is that your signature upon that card, authorizing the 
Amalgamated Bank to issue funds from the account of your organi- 
zation under the signatures of Albert S. Baker and Sidney J. Gluck? 

Mrs. del Villar. Excuse me for a second. 

It is perfectly honest. Don't worry. 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Nittle. I will number that del Villar Exhibit No. 14. 

Mr. Nittle. Now, will you answer the question, please ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Excuse me for a second, please. 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mrs. del Villar. Now, the absolute truth is that there are the three 
names, as Mr. Nittle says, and I have signed. That is correct. 

But as it happens, I am the person who is all the time at the office. 
And the reason we have the two alternative signatures was in case I 
would get sick or not be able to be there. But it is not likely for 
reasons of their own activities, they don't have the same amount of 
time I can give, that the two of them would sign, since I keep a very 
close touch with everything that happens, you see. 



ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 1917 



So usually, and as far as I can remember, I don't think any check 
has been done — I maybe forget in some instance — I don't think any 
check has gone out that I haven't seen. 

Mr. Nittle. Why does Albert. Baker appear there as vice chairman 
of the Medical Aid to Cuba Committee? 

Mrs. del Villar. No, that is a mistake. For a while he was a sort 
of an, how you say, ad hoc vice chairman. 

Mr. Nittle. Or was he a cochairman with you ? 

Mrs. del Villar. No. No. 

(Document marked "del Villar Exhibit No. 14" follows:) 

del Villar Exhibit No. 14 

Tha Mudariitnad karooy aeknewlodtoi Miat ha K»« rwd and undoMtandi all o< tfco condition* 
iMIlrfru •« two rovorao »»•• at H»n card and fcarooy aaaonti to oach and ovary ana »t thow. 
THI AMALGAMATED IANK O* NfW YORK 
HP lllll— II |] UNINCdHPORATCD ASSOCIATION 

Chair** a 

Chairman 



•KCHCTAMY 




IAUTHOKIIKD •iONATUKf 



WMU. /V7 *<*$£ J3l-dSt Af/C TELEPHONE 



■uoiKroa 

INCK* 

IINCfl 



OPENED «Y (A VI DATE /— f ~ C2.** 



MEDICAL AID TO CUBA COMMITTEE 



Mr. Moulder. At that point may I ask a question ? 

You stated at the beginning that you could give us the approximate 
amount of the total funds collected by your committee since its 
organization ? 

Mr. Willis. That was covered while you were gone. 

Mr. Nittle. As a matter of fact, when the initial deposit was made 
to the account of the Medical Aid to Cuba Committee, it was made, 
was it not, from the personal account of Albert S. Baker, who 
initially had personal possession of the finances of your organization? 

Mrs. del Villar. Well, there again, there is a very simple explana- 
tion to what seems a very sinister thing. And that is, that we started 
together informally. I didn't know whether it would develop into a 
committee, whether I would be able to know. I didn't know how the 
mechanics are. We had no office and we had no funds to establish an 



1918 ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 

office. So as an accommodation, Mr. Baker, who at the point was 
sort of informally elected treasurer for that purpose, said, all right, 
he would assume this nuisance and responsibility and bother. 

He is an elderly gentleman and very 

Again, to my knowledge, I have to testify with pride to his record 
of behavior with us — kind and cooperative and helpful. In fact, 
many times I felt embarrassed to impose on a gentleman, who could 
be my father, and have him run errands to the bank. 

Mr. Willis. Well, please, as I understand it — and certainly I will 
not express my view about it — I do not know anything about Mr. 
Baker. We are not pointing the finger of scorn at all of your asso- 
ciates. And that may or may not include him. 

The point is — you have used the word "sinister" — whether there 
are those in your organization who might feel differently than those 
who look at this thing as a humanitarian venture. I just want to make 
that statement. 

Mrs. del Villar. I would like you to bear in mind, sir, that what 
I say is according to what I know. And my knowledge of all the 
gentlemen in my association is nothing but the most honorable and the 
most straightforward and square. Absolutely nothing devious I have 
seen. 

Mr. Willis. I am willing to accept the sincerity of that statement. 

Mrs. del Villar. It is true. 

Mr. Willis. But that does not answer the question we are after at 
all. 

Mrs. del Villar. Well, no, but I think it is relevant to the com- 
mittee to know whether these people are in fact doing anything bad 
using the committee, which they are not, you see. 

Mr. Willis. Well, my dear lady, it just "ain't" done that way. 

Mrs. del Villar. What isn't? You mean I wouldn't see it? I 
don't understand. 

Mr. Scherer. Well, you just told me a few minutes ago that you 
were aware of the fact that the State Department denied Dr. Miller 
a passport to go to Cuba on behalf of the committee. 

Mrs. del Villar. But lots of people are denied, as far as I have 
heard. 

Mr. Scherer. Yet you were willing to participate in a venture 
which would circumvent the action of your Government in denying 
him a passport. That is obvious. His going to Cuba. 

Mrs. del Villar. In what way ? I never sponsored anything that 
he should go illegally. 

Mr. Scherer. Oh, you said it was a vacation to Mexico. 

Mrs. del Villar. He went on vacation to Mexico. This is what I 
know. I did not circumvent, did not plot, did not intrigue, did not 
aid and abet. All I know, he said he was going to Mexico. I said 
happy landings. That is all. But don't impute me with intrigues 
I have no knowledge of. It makes me sad. 



ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 1919 

Mr. Nittle. Referring back again to the ticket purchased by Dr. 
Miller from Air France: his itinerary was indicated as to Mexico 
City, and by Air France, at his choice as to time, to travel from Mexico 
City to Los Angeles, Calif., and thence to Idlewild. 

Can you tell us whether Dr. Miller, after his visit to Mexico, at a 
subsequent time in the course of that excursion beyond the limits of 
the United States, did in fact visit the Los Angeles leadership of 
Medical Aid to Cuba Committee? 

Mrs. del Villar. May I say this. I don't know if it will meet with 
my counsel's approval. But inasmuch as you are going to interview 
Dr. Miller, and he can answer these questions directly — why should I 
be responsible for his actions ? 

Mr. Nittle. Will you tell us where Dr. Miller is? Do you know 
where Dr. Miller is? 

Mrs. del Villar. At this moment, no, sir. 

Mr. Nittle. We have tried to subpena him. He has disappeared. 

Mr. Moulder. Counsel just asked you whether he did make contact 
with the Los Angeles committee. 

Mrs. del Villar. I think he went to Los Angeles. I think so. I 
don't have exact recori of things in my mind. 

Mr. Nittle. Was he on the business of the Medical Aid to Cuba 
Committee ? 

Mrs. del Villar. No, not as an official delegate or representative. 
If he knew that this group was being formed, and he might have seen 
these people, that is possible. But I don't know the details. 

Mr. Bruce. Did he or did he not, to your knowledge ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Meet with the people there? I think he might 
have. 

Mr. Bruce. Do you know that he did ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Well, I wasn't there. 

Mr. Bruce. Did he tell you that he did ? 

Mrs. del Villar. I give you my word of honor that I am not abso- 
lutely sure. I can look up in my memory or my records and tell you 
then. I think he might have told me he did. I never thought of it as 
anything suspicious. So I didn't make a special — you know, didn't 
make a special mental note. 

He probably did. I didn't see anything wrong in it. 

Mr. Scherer. Did he tell you that while he was in Mexico City and 
before he went to Los Angeles with his open-end ticket that he had 
taken a trip over to Havana ? 

Mrs. del Villar. No. 

Mr. Scherer. He did not tell you that ? 

Mrs. del Villar. No such thing. 

Mr. Scherer. Did he tell you he went to Los Angeles ? 

Mrs. del Villar. He told me, I think, he went to Los Angeles. 

Mr. Scherer. Can you tell us where Dr. Miller is, why he is evad- 
ing the subpena? 

Mrs. del Villar. As far as I know, he isn't evading anything. 
He was at the office last Thursday, I think it was. He might have 
gone away for the weekend or something. From what I know of Dr. 
Miller, he wouldn't have evaded anything. 

Mr. Moulder. What is the question you are pursuing about the 
visit in Los Angeles ? 



I? 



1920 ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 

Mr. Nittle. Whether the witness was aware of that. 

Mr. Moulder. She has answered. Are you going on further? 

Mr. Nittle. Now, I hand you a copy of a letter marked for identi- 
fication as del Villar Exhibit No. 14-A, dated March 21, 1932, ad- 
dressed to "Dear Mellita [sic] and Dr. Miller :" signed by Dr. Martha 
Frayde. And I ask you whether you have received that letter, the 
original of that letter ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes, sir. I recognize this letter. 

(Document marked "del Villar Exhibit No. 14-A" follows:) 

del Villar Exhibit No. 14-A 

Rough translation *rom Letter from Dr. n. Frayde to 

the Spanish M. del Villar and Dr. Louis Miller 



March 21, 1962 






w/\ 



Dear Mellita (alo) and Dr. Miller: 

1 hereby acknowledge your latter of Maroh 8 of this year, and wish 
to thank you in behalf of the Hospital Haolonal as well as in my own 
behalf for the shipment of medications received, corresponding to 
the list numbered by you as 62-2, dated January 30, 1962. I attach 
our own reoelpt In which we have nade an exaot listing of the medi- 
cations received, whioh correspond to our requests, confirmed by 
the signature of the Chief of Pharmacy of the Hoapltal Haolonal and 
Including the date it waa received. 

Concerning List lo. 62-3, I would like to mention that, Inasmuch as 
I was absent from the Hospital for a period of ji2_daya (during the 
months of Deoember and January), I am not informed as to that list, 
nor have I been able to find out who sent it — all I know is that 
we have no record of it in our files. List So. 62-1*, however, does 
correspond to our request of the urgent needs of this Hospital. For 
this lstter list we acknowledge full responsibility. 

A posteriori, a telegram dated Maroh 16, 1962, was reeelved. In this 
telegram you indicated the possibility of sending us replacement parts 
for the hospital. Ve are enclosing a list of such items as would be 
needed by the Central Sterilisation Department, General Laboratory 
Equipment, and X-Rays — these items, as the American manufacturers 
themselves suggest are the least, the minimum required replacement 
psrts that should be at band to insure uninterrupted functioning in 
oaae of breakage. Breakage of parts would paralyse function and 
this should not be allowed to happen. 

We should like to state that wa acknowledge full responsibility for 
the requests sent to you for the needs of this Hospital, although 
in the ease of eertaln pediatric medloaments, we have forwarded them 
to "William Solar children's Hospital," whose Director, Dr. Daniel 
Alonso, sends you their deep gratitude. The same applies to the 
Item POLTBREHB whioh wa forwarded to "Hospital Comandante pajardo," 
where they perform oardlovasoular surgery. 

Having read about your reoent events inthe Cuban press, I wish to 
send you my heartiest congratulations for the tremendous program 
your Committee is carrying out. 

Regarding subscription to "American Heart Association of Cardio- 
vascular Disease," we shall let you know the moment It begins to 
arrive. 

For the benefit of all ooneerned, may I wish you the greatest success 
in reaoblng the goal you have set for yourselves for 1962. 



ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 1921 
I send my affectionate greetings. 

(signed) Dra. Martha Frayde, 
Director, 
Hospital Naclonal, Havana 

F* S. I have Just received Dr. Miller's letter dated 16 March, In wbleh 
be tells me about bis efforts to acquire permission from the 
State Department of tbe United States to visit Cuba In order to 
advance and coordinate tbe medical aid which tbe Committee Is 
carrying out as a humanitarian deed in behalf of the people of 
Cuba. If Dr. Miller succeeds in getting suob permission, we 
shall be very bappy to have him here aa our guest and collab- 
orate with him in every way. 

Once more, please let me congratulate tbe Committee for the 

for the beautiful affair which took place at Palm Gardens. 

Cordially, 

(signed) 

Dr. Martha Frayde 



Mr. Moulder. You did receive the original of that letter? 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes. I have copies of it for public use, you 
know. We made mimeographed copies of this. So everybody has 
seen it. 

Mr. Nittle. Yes. Now, may I have that back for a moment? 

In this letter, reference is made to list numbered 62-3. Dr. Frayde 
writes : 

Concerning List No. 62-3, I would like to mention that, inasmuch as I was 
absent from the Hospital for a period of 42 days (during the months of Decem- 
ber and January), I am not informed as to that list, nor have I been able to 
find out who sent it — all I know is that we have no record of it in our files. 

What was contained in List No. 62-3 ? 

Mrs. del Villar. I don't know. 

Do you know what the numberings mean ? 

Mr. Nettle. I take it, Mrs. del Villar, that you are neither con- 
sulted nor do you participate in the preparation of the items of equip- 
ment that are acquired by Dr. Louis Miller with the funds of the 
Medical Aid to Cuba Committee for transmittal to Cuba. Is that 
right? 

Mrs. del Villar. I don't understand. I am getting tired, you 
know. 

Mr. Moulder. To whom was it addressed? 

Mr. Nittle. It is an organization that operates under the Ministry 
of Public Health, Republic of Cuba. It was addressed to "Dear Mel- 
lita and Dr. Miller." 

Mr. Moulder. To both of them ? 

Mr. Nittle. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Moulder. Does she know what that has reference to ? 

Mr. Willis. She was asked to explain what the 62-something means. 

Mrs. del Villar. When we started, we didn't know exactly what to 
send. We would send things in general. But we wanted specific 



1922 ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 

knowledge of the more needed medicines. So we wrote in to the Na- 
tional Hospital, as an authoritative place that would be aware of these 
needs, and said, "We are forming for this purpose; and would you 
let us know the most urgent medicines you need ?" 

Then as the list of medicines would arrive, for purposes of clarifica- 
tion, we would write the year "62" and List No. 1, the year "62," List 
No. 2, which would make it easy for cross reference, you see. 

Now, occasionally, independent doctors, hearing of our work, would 
write in and send us their own list or their own private need of medi- 
cines, and we tried to keep these in the hospital separate. 

But it is possible that through some clerical mistake a separate list 
not of the hospital would go in, with card 62-3 or 62-4. But generally 
they are all concerned with the hospital needs. 

That is the list. Now, I don't remember the specific list, but it is 
possible, if Dr. Frayde didn't see it, it might have been that we re- 
ferred to this list, although it didn't come from the hospital. It might 
have come from a doctor. 

Mr. Moulder. What is that number ? 

Mr. Nittle. 62-3. 

Mrs. del Villar. It might have been from some dental list. I don't 
remember. 

Mr. Nittle. Why would Dr. Frayde, in this communication to you 
and Dr. Miller, be so concerned as to be specific about the number of 
days of her absence ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Well, because 

Mr. Nittle. She said she had been absent from the hospital for a 
period of 42 days. 

Mrs. del Villar. That was her own volunteering information. We 
didn't request this. 

What happens is that we have tried, we have made an effort, to work 
it out efficiently, and we demand quick answers. Well, you know, I 
don't want to disparage my Latin temperament — we are not always 
as fast as we are accustomed, here. And it is possible we might have 
pressured her, I don't remember, and she might have apologized, and, 
"Look, these people are giving us these things; the least I can do is 
explain." 

Mr. Nittle. I am inquiring whether it was not sufficient for Dr. 
Frayde simply to say, "I have been absent from the hospital in De- 
cember and January." Why the number "42" ? 

Mrs. del Villar. I don't know. I can't dictate to her. I didn't 
dictate the letter. I only received it. 

Mr. Nittle. Now, let me also ask you this question. Have you made 
application for a special export license relating to certain equipment 
to be sent to Cuba, not classified as medicines ? 

Mrs. del Villar. We inquired. We inquired about some parts for 
X-ray equipment and things like that. 

Mr. Nittle. Yes. You made application on March 5, 1962, to the 
Department of Commerce, Washington, D.C., requesting the privilege 
of sending electronic equipment to Cuba. This is del Villar Exhibit 
No. 15. 

Mrs. del Villar. Well, it must be equipment. You see, that is 
technical. I don't know the specifications. 

Mr. Nittle. Did you make that application? 

Mrs. del Villar. Well, we inquired. 

(Document marked "del Villar Exhibit No. 15" follows:) 



ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 1923 



DEL VlLLAR EXHIBIT No. 15 



MEDICAL AID TO CUBA 

COMMITTEE 



nzyo, 



^ 



147 WEST 33u> STREET (PENN ARCADE) NEW YORK 1. NEW YORK 
(Room »409) 

Tiliphoni: LAolawamna 4-0779 

^^^ lo * 

. „ rjarch 5, 1962 / 

Spo* sort rt P a tmmm: 3 J 

PUDA KmcwwiY 
Editor 

Wauix IIolb Departaur. t of Cooaarue 

Aud>0 ' Foreign Trade Division 

Jamu o'CoMwoa V.'aahlngton, D. C. | 

Bcoooaiift 
William Worthy Jeuf SirSi 



JOUIlllllt 



Our Co:x±ittee, a Iiumanitarian, non-political organisation, 13 engaged 
In sending uedical aid .'or t;:a relief oi' tiie Cuban people, channeled through 
t'.ie Hospital Hacioual in Havana, Cuba. 

Jo reoently recelvad a request frora the Director of this Hospital, 
Dr. -artha Frayde, including » lis* o* renli.oer.iant* parts for various types of 
hospital equipaent, all of vThlch is of Atarioan manufacture and for '.nhich parts 
can be obtained only la toe United States. In attempting to laaka purchase of 
aooo of these ;arts, v/e find that some firms are questioning the scope of our 
government' j declared policy in emitting shiprsent3 of neoessary medical aid, 
such as t:»e Cuban people .lay require. 

So'ae of the items in short supply at Hospital Saclonal, and presum- 
ably other similar institutions, consist of; 

Coolidge tubes and otKer essential parts for x-ray machines for 
diagnostic use j ^,f)f V 

^ce^ont pa/ts for electrocardiograph and enoephalograph laaohlnes ,etc. 

j:d other parts for lighting ap.-aratus^ such as Otoscopes, 
3yiijt>lol3?Mj_r , ruL;lusuO; ea - , eto^ 
r, v Siboratory a.-> t &ratuT) for diagnostic purposes and parts for same 

" T\3 27r wjuld OoTresiond .vitli your Depart-aor.t 's Commodity iio .91966 

Our 0: Tjr.it tee naturally assumes that such Iters as the above are 
fully within the 3cope of the . k u ministration's statement of exemptions to the 
general existia^ -aabar^o 0:1 trade ..'ith Cuba. Ye would like a clarification on 
tliis r.v.tt >r in oru^r to guid": us In our efforts in supplying shortages of these 
critically needed lta.-rs for .wdi'^1 aid. 

Our C . ■•.•jit tee i3 fa.ilir.r with tie regulations governing exports and 
are ooaplyiag v/tth tiieir rea-.irj-.eut3 . 

Co.iSideri i_- tLo ur t -,ajy 3. t ho situation, v/e would appreciate a prompt 
reply, ^ith .«j-iy tl an;^3 for ;, Tur : ;o;erat ion, I am 

V-jry sincere!, 




v-jry 3 1 nc are ly y >4' ^ , 



[.j:3.]'~\. del Villar 
V/33 5hrlr:ian 



1924 ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 

Mr. Nittle. Who suggested to you that electronic equipment was 
required in Cuba ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Well, we received requests from the hospital, and 
there are some parts of diagnostic equipment that have this category, 
you see. 

Mr. Willis. In other words, as far as you know. 

Mrs. del Villar. Absolutely. 

Mr. Willis. Everything you requested in the shape of an export 
license had to do with medical treatment? That is your position? 

Mrs. del Villar. Absolutely. Diagnostic equipment. But, you see, 
we never proceeded with it, because, one, it was very complicated, 
the mechanics of it, and also, we just didn't have enough money. So 
it all went into medicines, and the medicines were pressing, you see. 

Mr. Nittle. In a letter of March 12, 1962, from the Office of Export 
Control of the Department of Commerce, you were refused an export 
license to deliver to Cuba electron tubes, were you not ? 

Mrs. del Villar. I think you have the evidence. That must be so, 
yes. So that means we didn't send it. We didn't do any more. 

(Document marked "del Villar Exhibit No. 15- A" follows:) 



ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 1925 

DEL VlLLAR EXHIBIT No. 15-A 

OTsaev warns ookbol 

MAR 121962 T3to-1» 



Mrs. X. del WIUt, 
Medical Aid to Cuke Canal ttee 
1»T beet 33rd ttreet 
■ew York 1, lee York 

Dwr Kre. del TiUar: 

Then* you for your letter of Hereto 5, fivlBa; «» the opfrlwftr of 
olarifying our licensing policy to Cube insofar ea the — II — J 
iiutnavti sad eejulpeant you listed are eoooeraed. 



This will ooafim that general lieensc 800 any bo need for tho first 

tvo items you listed, I.e. 

Coolidge tubes and other essential port* for X-ray 

■nehlaao for alagnootle una 
Isrplacenent parts for electrocardiogrepa and 

«oc«pheuograjpfc aaehlaes, Ote. 

Those tvo lteme arc covered by the entry wader Inhoawls • eg— oilty 
classification noaber 91 5T» on tbe QCU list. Bovever, g o n s r el 
license QCU nay not be used for any eleetroa t ub es that oay bo 

Included Is suoh eqnBpwent. 

Th« other ofulpnont you listed; bulbs and other part* for lighting 
apparatus, and laboratory apparatus for diagnostic parpoeee, are Dot 
exportable to Cube under general llceass. Although o$r licensing 
policy with reepeot to exparte to Cube is one of a general eebarge, 
nevert beieas you aay wish to submit ae application far aa export 
license to cover the aon-dCU oouipaent, ragssntlag that eoaeldoratlen 
be given la tbe light of the humanitarian aepect involved. Tbe 
applications should specify the equipment by name, Include aernif acturers ' 
catalogs or other descriptive literature, and a list of representative 
users of the eoulpnent. 

Se7*ral seta of the required export license applleatioa fonts are 
enclosed for your conveniens*. The PeyaxfeiTt. of Cessna rill field 
office In See York City (olet floor lispire State Building, Phone LO. > 
33TT) vill be glad to assist you la assuring that it Is properly 
filled out. 

Sincerely yours, 



/ Jeraldlne S. DsPuy, Director 

. I Operations Pi vie ion 

abcl/Mures 



1926 ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 

Mr. Kittle. Can you tell us whether, to your knowledge, any sup- 
plies have been acquired by the Medical Aid to Cuba Committee, 
other than medical supplies, for transmission to Cuba ? 

Mrs. del Villar. No. To my knowledge, only medical supplies 
and some dental equipment, or things like plastic polyethylene tubing 
or things that have to do with cardiac surgery. That sort of thing. 
That is to my knowledge. 

Mr. Nittle. How much money was expended by the Medical Aid 
to Cuba Committee for medical supplies since October 1961 ? 

Mrs. del Villar. I should know this, shouldn't I ? 

I can only deduce, because I really don't remember the figures, 1 
would have to look them up. But I would say the majority. 

I could only put it this way. When we made the last reckoning 
of our expenses, and so forth, we figured we spent 14 cents for opera- 
tion and the rest for medical supplies, out of a dollar. So if you are 
a good mathematician, you can figure the proportion, you know. But 
a large majority is for medicines. 

Mr. Nittle. Who made the purchases on behalf of the Medical Aid 
to Cuba Committee within the United States? 

Mrs. del Villar. Dr. Miller. 

Mr. Nittle. Do you know the persons from whom he acquired 
supplies of any kind? 

Mrs. del Villar. No, I don't have that direct contact with this. 

Mr. Nittle. You do not have direct contact with what ? 

Mrs. del Villar. With the shopping, with the purchasing. 

Mr. Nittle. You do not have any contact with that at all ? 

Mrs. del Villar. With the purchasing, no. 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mrs. del Villar. But everything, I must say — we have the bills, 
and everything is bona fide, nothing casual. 

Mr. Nittle. We are inquiring into that and trying to determine 
whether that is so. It is evident that it is your belief that this is bona 
fide. 

Mrs. del Villar. Absolutely. 

Mr. Nittle. But you are speaking for yourself ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Well, I am speaking for myself and the com- 
mittee. 

Mr. Nittle. You cannot speak for Dr. Louis Miller ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Well, I can speak for Dr. Louis Miller to the 
degree that I have seen the medicines. I have seen the boxes. I have 
seen the shipments. And I have seen the bills. 

Mr. Scherer. Did they ship the medicines to your office? Do they 
not ship those directly to the supply house ? 

Mrs. del Villar. We wish they would. It would save us a lot of 
headaches. 

Mr. Scherer. They bring them all to your office ? 

Mrs. del Villar. No. It varies. Mostly at our office. Dr. Miller 
orders them and they come to our office for the most part. Other 
times, they are stored at his office, and then we bring them to our 
office. It is all very cumbersome and hard work. 

Mr. Scherer. Some are stored at his office ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes, which I have seen and checked with the bills. 

Mr. Scherer. You do not know always what is in the boxes, 
though, do you ? 



ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 1927 

Mrs. del Villar. Oh, yes. And the customs inspectors take care 
of that. So it is all with declarations, you know, declaration forms 
and shippers' declarations and a thousand and one details, you know. 

I think I should go back to sing-in a-. 

Mr. Nittle. Did vou say some of the supplies were stored in the 
office of Dr. Miller? 

Mrs. del Villar. They have been at some time or other, and I have 
seen the things. 

Mr. Nittle. Where is his office located ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Was. Used to be. Not any more. 

Mr. Nittle. What do you mean, "used to be" ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Well, I think he closed their office. 

Mr. Nittle. Where was the office that you believe he closed ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Do you remember ? 400, isn't it ? 

Mr. Willis. Can we move on to other things in less detail ? We have 
other witnesses. 

Mr. Nittle. We would like to inquire with respect to other persons 
who are believed to be active in your organization. 

Referring again to the National Guardian, issue of February 19, 
1962, del Villar Exhibit No. 1 (see pp. 1854, 1855), which related the 
formation of the Medical Aid to Cuba Committee, Jesse Gordon is 
named as the committee's information director. Does he hold that 
office in your committee ? 

Mrs. del Villar. No, he does not. He doesn't any more, no. 

Mr. Nittle. When did he cease holding that office ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Oh, I don't know. By kind of inertia he has 
been busy and couldn't come around and so on, and so we did it 
ourselves. 

Mr. Nittle. What is his occupation ? 

Mrs. del Villar. A journalist, I think. 

Mr. Nittle. By whom is he employed ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Oh, gee, I don't know. 

Mr. Nittle. You do not know by whom he is employed? 

Mrs. del Villar. Wait a moment. I think he works at The Nation. 
I think. 

Mr. Nittle. The Nation magazine? 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes, I think so. 

Mr. Nittle. How long did he serve in the position of information 
director for the Medical Aid to Cuba Committee ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Well, you see, our tenure in this case doesn't 
apply, because he just came a few times, did just a few releases, and 
that is all. 

Mr. Nittle. He volunteered his services to you ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Everything is volunteer, absolutely. 

Mr. Nittle. Do you know who sent him there, if anyone? 

Mrs. del Villar. No. Nobody. 

Mr. Nittle. How long did you know Jesse Gordon ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Not long. 

Mr. Nittle. Did you know him prior to October 1961 ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes. Probably some months before. 

Mr. Nittle. Probably? 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes. 

Mr. Nittle. Are you certain? 

91669 O— 63— pt. 1—7 



1928 ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 

Mrs. del Villar. I guess so. I mean this thing is something I 
can't 

Mr. Nittle. By whom was Jesse Gordon introduced to you? 

Mrs. del Villar. By nobody. I think I met him again in one of 
these 

Mr. Nittle. It is the committee's information that George Evans 
of 97 Brooklyn Ave., Brooklyn, N.Y., a member of the editorial staff 
of the National Guardian in charge of promotion, has been active in 
the organization of the Medical Aid to Cuba Committee. Would you 
tell us what is the extent of the activities of George Evans in the 
committee's affairs? 

Mrs. del Villar. Nil. 

Mr. Nittle. Do you know George Evans ? 

Mrs. del Villar. I have met him, sure. 

Mr. Nittle. Has he performed any services for the Medical Aid to 
Cuba Committee? 

Mrs. del Villar. No. He came once or twice and helped me with 
some mechanics at the office, you know, filing and stuff. 

Mr. Nettle. Did he assist in the organization of your office? 

Mrs. del Villar. Not really. He worked very hard, and he had 
no time. 

Mr. Nittle. Did you ask him to do this, or did he volunteer ? 

Mrs. del Villar. No, I asked him. 

Mr. Nittle. The National Guardian has been cited in the publica- 
tion of this committee, the Guide to Subversive Organisations and 
Publications, and described as the "virtual official propaganda arm of 
Soviet Russia." Do you have any knowledge of the National Guard- 
ian as a propaganda arm of Soviet Russia ? 

Mrs. del Villar. No. I don't have any such knowledge. 

Mr. Nittle. In addition to the announced purpose of your organiza- 
tion, Medical Aid to Cuba Committee, to provide medical assistance 
to Cuba, was your organization formed for any other purpose as well ? 

Mrs. del Villar. For instance? 

Mr. Nittle. I am asking you. 

Mrs. del Villar. Well, I just can't imagine what other purpose. 

Mr. Nittle. Well, then, I will give you an example. 

Was it one of your purposes to assist Castro in solidifying Commu- 
nist domination of the island of Cuba ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Oh, my gracious. No, that is already political. 
Our purpose, I stated over and over again, not propaganda 

Mr. Nittle. This committee is interested in the propaganda activi- 
ties of certain political organizations. 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes, but we don't do propaganda and we are non- 
political. And all we have said, over and over again 

Mr. Nittle. I am asking you whether one of your purposes was to 
assist Castro in solidifying Communist domination of that island. 
Now, you can answer that "Yes" or "No." 

Mrs. del Villar. I can't, I have to say that our purpose is exclu- 
sively sending medicines for the sick, period. 

Mr. Scherer. Mr. Chairman, I ask that you direct the witness to 
answer. 

Mr. Willis. She did. She said "exclusively." 



ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 1929 

Mr. Nittle. You have been instrumental, at least, in the published 
expression of the purposes of your group to limit it to the alleged 
humanitarian purpose of furnishing medical supplies to Cuba. 

I show you a letter from Dr. Martha Frayde on the letterhead of the 
Republic of Cuba, Ministry of Public Health, National Hospital, 
Havana, dated December 1, 1961, addressed to "Dear Friend.'' 

Did you receive the original of that ? 

Mrs. del A t illar. Yes. Not only that. I mimeographed it for pub- 
lic distribution. This is not hidden, you know. 

(Document marked "del Villar Exhibit No. 16" follows :) 

del Villar Exhibit No. 16 

Republic of Cuba 
Ministry of Publlo Health 



NATIONAL HOSPITAL 
Habana 



La Habana , December 1, 1961 
"TEAR OF EDUCATION" 



Daar Friend: 



In the nana of tha people of Cuba a a wall as in ay own name aa 
Director of the National Hospital, I wiah to let you and the members 
of the Medical Relief for Cuba Committee know that we have received 
the laboratory reagents and the medicines which in such aplandid 
and generous manner you have been kind enough to send to thia 
Institution. 

All the items received are of extreme usefulness in bringing 
humanitarian succour to our sick ones. Please accept onoe more 
our profound gratitude, which we send you full of emotion. 

Not long after our telephone conversation, we received the last 
shipment, which lead* me to believe that we can continue to receive 
such small packages without difficulty. In any case, I enclose 
herewith a list of the medicinea moat urgently needed here inasmuch 
as. we lack them co mpletely . I do not stipulate quantities because 
in all truth whatever little you can send will be of extreme 
usefulneaa— thua I leave to your own possibilities the quantities 
to be supplied. 

We are organising here a Committee that should have all the 
characteristics you indicate are preferable, so that we can have 
a non-political and exclusively humanitarian exchange. 

I wiah to add that, though I leave for Europe tomorrow on an official 
mission in connection with this institution, and that I shall be 
abaca t for approximately one month, you can oontlnue to correspond 
in the same manner. Inasmuch aa the Hospital will be in charge of 
responsible colleagues who have followed with keen interest the aid 
which the Committee has offered us. 



With grateful greetings from your friend. 



(signed) 
Dr. Martha Frayde 



1930 ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 

Mr. Moulder. She says she received that letter. What is the ques- 
tion concerning the letter ? 

Mr. Nittle. Dr. Frayde, in the letter, states : 

We are organizing here a Committee that should have all the characteristics 
you indicate are preferable, so that we can have a non-political and exclusively 
humanitarian exchange. 

What committee was Dr. Frayde organizing in Cuba? 

Mrs. del Villar. This letter, I would like to put on the record, 
was made public. We mimeographed it. So you see it holds no 
secret ? 

Now, for better efficiency, we hoped that our work would expand 
and we would do better and we have been suggesting to Dr. Frayde, 
who was then director of the hospital, to please — could she organize 
a group of doctors who would be in charge of this distribution, not 
only for the hospital alone, but maybe some little rural hospital in 
the hinterland, that might be needing a certain medicine very badly. 
It would be impossible for us to correspond with whatever number 
of hospitals. So we suggested, "Could you have a group of doctors 
be in charge of this, be informed of the needs, and take care of dis- 
tribution?" And she said that they were trying to do so. 

I am very willing to answer, but 

Mr. Nittle. The advertisement which appeared in the New York 
Times of November 13, 1962 (previously marked del Villar Exhibit 
No. 2), subscribed by your organization, indicates that you are mak- 
ing an appeal, really, for American dollars with which to acquire 
supplies here on behalf of Cuba and that the dollar supply is short 
there. 

That is what you say, is it not? You say in the advertisement, 
"But since there is no trade with the United States, Cuba has no way 
to get U.S. dollars." 

Mrs. del Villar. Sure. 

Mr. Nittle. Are you transmitting to Cuba, in addition to medical 
supplies, any cash ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Oh, gracious, no. 

Mr. Nittle. Have you not been occupied in the past as a propa- 
gandist for the purpose of establishing or maintaining a Communist 
regime in Cuba ? 

Mr. Moulder. Repeat the question so that she can understand it. 

Mr. Nittle. Have you not acted as a propagandist in the United 
States for the purpose of maintaining a Communist regime in Cuba ? 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mr. Moulder. In view of your previous testimony, I would think 
we could expect a very quick answer to that question. 

Mrs. del Villar. Well, sir, I have no hesitation. But you see what 
happens: I have openly and sincerely answered these things, and it 
drags on and on. 

Mr. Willis. That is a simple question and it is a brand new topic 
and it is so easy. I should think it is fair to you, to give you an op- 
portunity to answer that. I would expect your answer would have 
come very easy. 

Mrs. del Villar. You see, this is a political question. I am not 
engaged in political activities. 

Mr. Willis. Well, will you answer the question? You should be 
very grateful that it has been asked of you. 



ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 1931 

Mrs. del Villar. I am not grateful, because I am very tired, you 
know. 

Mr. Moulder. You are very what ? 

Mrs. del Villar. I am very tired. It has been a long session. 

Mr. Willis. I request that a direct answer be given. 

Mr. Moulder. It is giving you a direct opportunity to cooperate 
on anything you have been trying to impress us with. 

Mrs. del Villar. What is the question ? 

Mr. Kittle. Have you not been occupied as a propagandist in the 
United States for the purpose of maintaining a Communist regime in 
Cuba? 

Mrs. del Villar. If you are inquiring as to any activities prior to 
Medical Aid, I will say I have appeared and have spoken, not as a 
propagandist for the Communist regime in Cuba, but simply to say 
what I know to be true — that I knew Cuba and that I knew many things 
that happen in Cuba now which were beneficial to the Cuban people 
from my direct knowledge, whether it is called communism or Bud- 
dhist or Zendist or something else. This is not what my angle was, 
or my direction. 

My direction had the same spiritual direction, the same inspiration, 
the same truth, and the same passion that I have about Medical Aid. 

Now, if this is bad, I don't know. 

Mr. Willis. Let's avoid the word "propaganda," and let's talk about 
thepast first, and then the present. 

Counsel, if I could split the question into two — and it implies noth- 
ing, so far as you are concerned — One, did you, in the past, advocate 
a pro-Castro regime? And if your answer is "yes," you might have 
conscientiously felt that way. But we owe it to you and to us to ask 
the question. I will say "in the past." 

Mrs. del Villar. I am saying I, in the past, advocated the things 
that were happening in Cuba beneficial to the people of Cuba, whether 
it happened to be under Castro or somebody else. 

Mr. Willis. We might imply more than you intend to disclose. 

Mrs. del Villar. This, of course, I know. 

Mr. Willis. Proceed. 

Mr. Nittle. I hand you a copy of the issue of the June 5, 1961, 
National Gwardian, marked for identification as del Villar Exhibit No. 
17, and direct your attention to a notice of a meeting, appearing in the 
lower left-hand portion of page 10, entitled "NO INTERVENTION 
IN CUBA— MEETING," to be held at the Carlton Terrace in New 
York on June 8, 1961, at which Melitta del Villar, of the Fair Play 
for Cuba Committee, is listed as one of the speakers. 

Did you speak at that meeting? 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Nittle. Are you a member or officer of the Fair Play for Cuba 
Committee? 

Mrs. del Villar. No, sir. 

Mr. Scherer. Well, were you a member ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Scherer. You were a member ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes, sir. 



1932 ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 

Mr. Scherer. You see ? We almost lost that one. 
Mrs. del Villar. But I wouldn't deny it. I am answering you the 
truth. I am not playing any tricks. 

(Document marked del Villar Exhibit No. 17" follows:) 

del Villar Exhibit No. 17 
[National Guardian, June 5, 1961, p. 10] 



NO INTERVENTION 
IN CUBA— MEETING 

CARLTON TERRACE 
100th St. & Broadway 

Thar*. Jane 8th — t P.M. 

Speakers: 

JABfgg O'CONNO* 
"■""TPaeulty, Barnard College 
DR. DATED DUBNAC 

"Columbia TJntreraity 

MgLLXtA BEL THJLAB 

F air, P lay for Cuba Oomoa. 
JVJJD MEDINA 





m, k>r NoanoK«i Action 
on Preaant-day tiifta.' Ad* He 
Wn% ate* OcmmL left Frtfcrfiy 
Rolaifast wHh Cafe* ~~^ 

V , , , 



Mr. Moulder. Mr. Bruce. 

Mr. Bruce. I have sat here this morning and this afternoon and I 
have listened to you, in reply to many questions, say that you were not 
the least bit interested in what you term the political. 

Were you not directly dealing with the political affairs of Cuba in 
an appearance such as this ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Before Medical Aid was founded, yes. 

Mr. Bruce. But you expressed complete lack of concern for political 
affairs. 

Mrs. del Villar. In the past of my life, yes. But at this time, on 
this date of June 8, 1961, 1 was interested to say what I knew to be true. 

Mr. Bruce. But you testified here, in effect, that you knew nothing 
about what you term political affairs. And yet the record indicates 
that you actively participated in political affairs. 



ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 1933 

Mrs. del Villar. The record should show that I have said that I did 
not, I do not, since Medical Aid to Cuba Committee, participate in 
political activities and do not use Medical Aid as a political agency, 
and we use no propaganda. This is absolutely the truth, what I have 
said. 

Prior to the formation of Medical Aid, I did appear in a meeting 
connected with Fair Play. But that was long before Medical Aid 
came into existence. 

Mr. Bruce. Then you would answer this question, would you not? 
You would not, on the basis of your past activity in political affairs, 
claim for yourself the position of being naive then, would you, on the 
political implications involved between the existing Cuban Govern- 
ment and the United States ? 

Mrs. del, Villar. Up to 1960, 1 would say yes, I knew nothing. 

Mr. Scherer. What was the date of this meeting ? 1961 ? 

Mrs. del Villar. 1961. 

Mr. Scherer. It was after the Bay of Pigs? 

Mrs. del Villar. I guess so$ yes. 

Mr. Nittle. June 8, 1961. 

Mr. Scherer. When did you resign from the Fair Play for Cuba 
Committee ? 

Mrs. del Villar. SomethVie at the end of June or beginning of July. 

Mr. Scherer. 1961 ? V 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes. 

Mr. Scherer. Kight after this appearance ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Shortly after, I guess. 

Mr. Scherer. Is that just about the time you were considering start- 
ing this Medical Aid to Cuba Committee? 

Mrs. del Villar. No, immediately at that time I didn't know there 
was the shortage. It was sometime after that, that I learned about it. 

Mr. Scherer. You mean that you did not know that there was a 
shortage of medicine in Cuba when you made that speech in June 
of 1961? 

Mrs. del Villar. I am quite sure I didn't. Now, if you have a 
recording of it, I would like to hear it. Maybe I have forgotten. 
But I don't have recollection of it, no. 

Mr. Scherer. Anybody that was as interested as you were — you 
read the papers, do you not? 

Mrs. del Villar. Not too much. 

Mr. Moulder. What did advise you and inform you of this des- 
perate need for medical supplies in Cuba ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Two things. From my mother I heard that there 
was shortage, and from other friends and relatives, and also from the 
dispatch that I told you about, that I had read, of Mr. Worthy's. 
These two things informed me of this. 

Mr. Moulder. Well, go ahead, Mr. Nittle. 

Mr. Nittle. I now hand you a copy of the Communist publication, 
The Worker, marked for identification as del Villar Exhibit No. 18, 
dated Sunday, June 25, 1961, and direct your attention to an item 
entitled "What's On,'' which appears in the upper right-hand corner 
of page 11. 



1934 ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 

A July 26th dance is advertised, sponsored by the Brooklyn Fair 
Play for Cuba Committee. Melitta del Villar, among others, is listed 
as a guest of honor. 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes, I remember that. And I also remember that 
I did not attend. 

(Document marked "del Villar Exhibit No. 18" follows:) 

del Villar Exhibit No. 18 
[The Worker, Sunday, June 25, 1961, p. 11] 

What's On 



FAIR FLAY FOR CCBA FIK&TA. 

tertainm»»nt — I>n»*rhijc — Rr fn S eh - 
merit*. Central nut*, 40 K. 1th 8t* 
S:S0 P.M. Jttly 1st. A<lmi*«ton 9M**|f 

JIXY 26 DANCE. Ciiutit* of mmort 
Shirle y flra lmin . e'liter, rreedooHl^rti 
IM&tttKFi duMy >^l nu, organisational 
H*«reta-ry, fcfltlTtif^&rJ^Iovemea*; Mfc» 
Bit* d*l YH tyi-. Kair Flay f«r ^m 
Committee: fti?U> r d _jli]> s<»ii. r>e*lngr «•* 
tioual elmirin>clfT**f i'Cl : yl ^ f 1flL l fagMffr 
t^cretHr>, J 1H V. 1 tate rt* i iiiiV#nE--^EJBIa 
America* baud. At the LepnajHio 4m 
Vinci Hull. :i60 rhilliUNh Ave." Kit. tap- 
pe>*it« Faraaiount tht'»ter). BM1^-Il6 
Kalb Ave. Hit- Neviti* At* tfetwfcfcy. 
July T% t f* p*m. Tioket* in rtrfvance oatjrf 
For rc*ervatlo«H *cttil cltcck or 
order to Fatr Fie> for Cuba O 
7W itauulaar. New York 3, N. ¥• 
Tickets $2. Auspice*: Brooklyn IWff 
Fifty tor Cuba Committee* 






ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 1935 

Mr. Nittle. Did you dance on that occasion ? 

Mrs. del Villar. I did not attend. 

Mr. Nittle. You did not attend that affair at that time? 

Mrs. DEL VlLLAR. No. 

Mr. Nittle. I hand you a copy of the August 20, 1961, issue of 
The Worker, marked for identification as del Villar Exhibit No. 19, 
and I direct your attention to an item appearing on page 7, upper 
right-hand portion, entitled "What's On," giving notice of a 
"FORUM FOR PEACE WITH CUBA," to be held August 23rd, 
at which Melitta del Villar is to appear, among others, as speaker, 
under the auspices of the "Garment Committee for a Good Neighbor 
Policy ( Provisional ) . " 

Did you speak on that occasion ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Let me see, and see if I can remember. Yes. 
Yes, sir, I did. 

(Document marked "del Villar Exhibit No. 19" follows:) 

del Villar Exhibit No. 19 
[The Worker, Sunday, Aug. 20, 1961, p. 7] 



What's Oo 



FORUM I*OR PKACK WITH CFBA, 

WtMi,, Augrujtt 2:ird. 6:00 p.m. Speaker* 
MniUw IM Villi**. John T. MtHmum 
Hotel CornUb Ann*, 31] W. 2&r<ft 84. 
C'oiUt. 40*. <iaraifnt C»m ml t »t » for m 
OiHMi Neighbor Poller (IVortalamil). 

IINUA1 8KPT. 17. THK WOBAOfc»8 
Pk-nto »t Cwomp Midrale. 

8ATT KDAY, OCT. »— Th# Wor**ft 



1936 ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 

Mr. Nittle. Did you utilize your position, as chairman of the 
Medical Aid to Cuba Committee, to conduct propaganda activities on 
behalf of Communist revolutionary efforts in the Caribbean and Latin 
America ? 

Mrs. del Villar. No, sir. This is before the foundation of the 
committee. 

Mr. Nittle. I hand you a copy of a program agenda marked for 
identification as del Villar Exhibit No. 20, for the period June 18 to 
September 3, 1962, which is a period sometime after the formation 
of the Medical Aid to Cuba Committee. 

This is issued by the World Fellowship, Conway, New Hampshire, 
an organization under the directorship of Dr. Willard Uphaus, which 
has been under investigation by the Attorney General of New 
Hampshire. 

The program, you will note, for July 23-27, 1962, is as follows : 

July 23-27 — Cuba and Latin America. A study of the revolutions to the 
south of us, including British Guiana. Among the resource persons — Felix 
Cummings, representative of British Guiana's Premier Cheddi Jagan ; Melitte 
del Villar, Chairman, Medical Aid to Cuba Committee ; Richard Gibson, Acting 
Executive Secretary, Fair Play for Cuba Committee ; Dr. Dirk J. Struik, 
Professor of Mathematics, Emeritus, M.I.T., and this year on the faculty of 
the University of Puerto Rico. 

It is the committee's information, however, that you did not par- 
ticipate in the seminar during the week of July 23-27, as scehduled, 
nor did Felix Cummings, the personal representative of the Com- 
munist Cheddi Jagan, Premier of British Guiana. 

It is our information that you, in fact, appeared in a week prior 
to that scheduled and that you spent 2 days at the camp, during the 
course of which you lectured and danced and sang in support of that 
program. 

(Document marked "del Villar Exhibit No. 20," follows :) 



ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 1937 

DEL VlLLAR EXHIBIT No. 20 

If VOU CAIWOT G0_ ABROAP THIS SUMMER LET US BRING THE tfORIP TO VOU 

at 
Make M*^ 

ReieAuatton World Fellowship Center, Conway, New Hampshire RtAeAvaCuin 
iojdb) June 18 - September 3, 1962 Easily 

PROGRAM - IN PROCESS OF FORMATION - ASK FOR NEXT REPORT 

June 18-29 - Students for Peace . A ten-day seminar for students, including 
guests from other lands. Recreation, work in camp; lectures and discussions; survey 
of present scene on the American campus and plans for action. Speakers and resource 
persons: Eugene Bronstein, Conrad Cohen, David McReynolds , Truman Nelson, Michael 
Rice, Jessie and Harvey O'Connor, and Willard Uphaus. Special rates. Write for 
special bulletin. 

July 2-6 - Peace and Universal Human Rights . Our texts: The Bill of Rights and 
the UN's Universal Declaration of Human Rights . The threat of restrictive legislation 
such as the McCarran Act, and the danger of all thought control measures. A great 
week with Irving Dilliard, famed editorial writer and author; Frank J. Donner, well- 
known constitutional lawyer, author of "The Un-Americans"; ancfother leaders. 

July 9-L3 - Faith and Man's Destiny . Making faith relevant to the world's un- 
solved problems. World Fellowship will be host during this week to the Annual Con- 
ference of the)(Methodist Federation for Social Action. A stimulating program with - 
,g ev. Le eJU Ball, Federation Executive Secretary; Professor Joseph F. Fletcher, Epis- 
copal Theological Seminary, Cambridge, Mass.; Carleton Beals, speaker and writer on 
Cuba and Latin America; Daniel Watts, Chairman, Liberation Committee for Africa; 
Da vid Wesle y, York, Pa., Gazette; Rev. Loyd F. Worley, former Federation President. 
All WorTdFellowship guests Invited to take part in conference sessions . 

July 16-20 - What Our Neighbors Think of Us . Guests and speakers from Canada, 
and other neighboring countries. Special announcement to come . 

July 23-27 - Cuba and Latin America . A study of the revolutions to the south of 
us, including British Guiana. Among the resource persons - Felix CumralnSB. repre- 
sentative of British Guiana's Premier Cheddi Jagan; Melitte delVillar, Chairman, 
Medical Aid to Cuba Committee; 'Richard Gibson, Acting Executive Secretary, Fair Plav 
for Cuba Committee; Dr. Dirk J.'Strulk, Professor ol Mathematics, Emeritus, M. !.r., 
and this year on the faculty of the University jf Pu<:io Kico. 

July 30-Au£. 3 - The United Nations , the New Nations and the Shift jLn Social 
Power in the World . Attention to crisis areas, such as Berlin and Southeast Asia. 
American foreign policy. Write for special bulletin . 

Aug . 6-10 - The Socialist World . What is happening in industrial production, 
agriculture, education, health, culture, and the religious movements? Resource per- 
sons from East and West to be present. Let us know if you are Interested In the 
details . 

Aug . 13-17 - Integration - both North and South Social, economic, political, 
legal, religious factors. A study of action and how to take part. Among the 
speakers: Rev. Howard Melish, Re\. Maurice McCrackin, Carl Braden^ and a representa- 
tive of thelstudent Nonviolent Luordinating^ Committee. 

Aug . 20-24 - Towards Peace . A The entire summer will have been dedicated to the 
peace effort, but this week" will be given to a more exacting study of peace philosophy 
and action in the United States, and to a unification of forces. Detailed program later . 

Aug . H-3J. - The American Ultra Right ,V The religious, social and economic 
factors; the threat to civil liberty~anapeace; foreign policy and the fall political 
campaign. 

Sept . 1-3 - Labor and the Problem of Peace . Decline and stagnation in the labor 
movement. Is there a change coming; if so, what will be the causes and consequences? 



WEEKLY EVENTS 

Theatre night - there are two summer theatres within a few miles 

Fun night - delightful programs with guest talent, including children 

Picnic trips to the mountains - day-long trips, sightseeing, swimming, 

picnic lunch 
Sunday Evening Fellowship - Faith and Man's Destiny. What Do We Believe and Whyf 

WRITE TO WORT.n FELLOWSHIP . CONWAY, N.H. , for MORE INFORMATION - 
TELL US WHEN YOU ARE COmiC. 



1938 ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 

Mrs. del Villar. I do not dance. 

Mr. Nittle. Did you sing? 

Mrs. del Villar. I sang. 

Mr. Nittle. And did you lecture on the subject of Cuba and Latin 
America ? 

Mrs. del Villar. But mostly about medical aid. I was trying to 
raise funds for Medical Aid. 

Mr. Nittle. Mostly about Medical Aid to Cuba ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Right. 

Mr. Nittle. And the rest of the time ? 

Mrs. del Villar. About the background of Medical Aid and what 
we had done. 

Mr. Nittle. Well, that is still on Medical Aid to Cuba. 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes. And I might have talked about my own 
experiences in Cuba, my knowledge of Cuba, my background, and 
things like that. 

Mr. Willis. Well, now, what would that be ? Will you not tell us ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Well, I can, certainly — What I know of Cuba. 
When I was a youth, a country that I was always very much ashamed 
of. And I never wanted to admit that I was Cuban. I would say 
I was Spanish as a device to avoid being questioned on Cuba, because 
Cuba to me represented the height of corruption and immorality, 
where the girls who had any teeth at the age of 14 would have to 
become prostitutes and where the only thing that was successful and 
recognized was theft and pillage, bribery, and corruption. 

There are exceptions. I am making a general view- 
Mr. Scherer. You are making a pretty serious charge against the 
Cuban people. 

Mrs. del Villar. Not against the Cuban people. The Cuban peo- 
ple for the most part, three out of five, could not read and write. Three 
out of five had no floors in their houses. A large majority, 90 percent 
of the peasant population, had no electric light and even the most 
elementary sanitary facilities. 

This is what I knew about Cuba. This is what I told the people. 

Mr. Scherer. I may be wrong 

Mr. Willis. Let her proceed, please. I asked the question, and 
she is entitled to answer it. 

Mrs. del Villar. This is what I told them and this is what I knew 
about Cuba. 

Mr. Willis. And did you tell them, did you feel, that these things 
having occurred under Batista, for a while, at least — I am giving you 
a chance to apparently carry out your humanitarian motives — you 
thought they might have been better under Castro ? Would you talk 
about that ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes. 

Mr. Willis. This is why I asked, a while ago, to give you an op- 
portunity. 

Mrs. del Villar. But that is a different way of the question, you 
see. 

Mr. Willis. I asked you : Were you for a time in the past pro- 
Castro ? 

Mrs. del Villar. That is not it. That is not the question. 



ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 1939 

Please, I beg you in all humanity, not to use devices to trip me, be- 
cause I am not equipped to handle it. I am telling you the truth as 
I know it. 

Mr. Willis. I would not do that. I thought it was being kind to you 
to ask you the question. But apparently, and as I say, I am afraid you 
implied more than what was on your mind. 

Mrs. del Villar. Well, you know, there is so much of hostility and 
negative and suspicion and all that sort of thing, that it is so terrible ; 
and, actually, all I am saying is that what I saw and what I knew 
as a youth was something that made me always ashamed, even though 
I was not downtrodden and even though I was not the underdog — I 
always felt a sense of shame and disgust at this kind of affair. 

And I also know that much of this had disappeared and that people 
had houses and people had toilets and people had some electric light 
and people were beginning to have some means of education and 
things that I considered important. 

Mr. Moulder. I would say, from what I have been informed, the 
conditions you described in Cuba certainly did exist. Certainly I do 
not think any member of the committee would dispute that. 

But when did you have an opportunity to go back to Cuba to observe 
any changes from the conditions that were deplorable that you de- 
scribe ? 

Mrs. del Villar. I went to Cuba to visit my mother in August or 
September of 1960, a good many months before the travel ban, when 
it was still permitted to go to Cuba. And I went to visit my mother. 
And then I had, as a part of being there — I saw what had been done. 

Mr. Scherer. Will you yield ? 

Mr. Willis. No. I asked a while ago to be able to split the ques- 
tion into two parts. That is the first part of my question. 

Now, the second part is — and ~I am not trying to probe your 
philosophy or your politics, but you did portray a picture from per- 
sonal experience. And let's assume that all you say comes from the 
heart. I am willing to accept that until and if there is evidence to 
the contrary. 

This was in 1960 that you saw a change. Apparently, you became 
attached to, enamoured of, or had a kind of feeling toward, the 
regime. Now, has that feeling persisted ? 

I do not want to say : Are you pro-Castro ? Let's use something 
else: Has anything happened since that time to make you believe 
otherwise ? 

And I am not going to press it if you do not want to answer it 
frankly ; but I think you owe it to yourself, in view of all you have 
said, and because that comes down to the committee you are now as- 
sociated with. 

Mrs. del Villar. It does not. I will tell you why. 

I have told you repeatedly, and the record can prove it, that I have 
not engaged in any propaganda using the committee as a vehicle. 

Mr. Willis. May I interrupt you, there ? 

You have used that expression time and time again, that you "have 
not used the committee for propaganda purposes." So it seems to me 
you appear before us, unless you explain it, in a dual capacity. You 



91669 O — 63— pt. 1- 



1940 ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 

have your own sympathetic feeling about the political end of it, which 
apparently is sympathetic to, let us face it, the present Castro regime. 
Yet, having that feeling, in another capacity, as a humanitarian, you 
do not reflect it in your work. 

That is the impression I get. Whether a person is capable of doing 
that, I do not know. 

Mrs. del Villar. The thing is, you see, that I don't think that my 
political beliefs are a question for debate, because I assume the com- 
mittee has respect for beliefs, whether they are political or religious, 
especially if a person is not doing sabotage or doing anything harm- 
ful or destructive. 

So what I believe in the privacy of my heart I think everybody is 
entitled to have, and as a Congressman I think you will uphold this 
more than anyone else. 

Mr. Willis. I said I w T ill not press it. But I think it is an awful 
burden on one's self. Apparently you do believe in the regime going 
on, and then as a humanitarian send aid, and not to feel in your heart 
that you are really aiding the regime. 

Mr. Scherer. This morning I asked you when you came to the 
United States and I do not recall your answer, but sometime in 1933. 
That is almost 30 years ago. 

Mrs. del Villar. That is right. 

Mr. Scherer. That was the time of your marriage, was it not ? 

Mrs. del Villar. That is right. 

Mr. Scherer. And I asked you how many times you had been back 
to Cuba, and you said once. 

Mrs. del Villar. Or twice. I said both. 

Mr. Scherer. I thought you said once. 

I remember your mother came here to visit you, you said, rather 
than you going there. 

Mrs. del Villar. Right. 

Mr. Scherer. Batista was not in power in 1930, was he? 

Mrs. del Villar. No. It was Machado, another peach, exactly 
like Batista. 

Mr. Scherer. So you have been back once or twice. You cannot 
remember whether it was once or twice ? 

Mrs. del Villar. No, no. Twice. I was once in 1950 and once 
in 1960. 

Mr. Scherer. Well, my recollection of your testimony was that you 
were back once to see your mother and that other times she came 
here to see you. 

Mrs. del Villar. No, no. I said once or twice, and the rest is 
correct. 

Mr. Scherer. How long were you there in 1960 ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Which time ? 

Mr. Scherer. In 1960. 

Mrs. del Villar. I came there sometime in July and I returned 
back here sometime in September, early September. 

Mr. Scherer. Now, all of us abhor the Batista regime as much 
as you do. 

Mrs. del Villar. I am glad. 



ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 1941 

Mr. Scherer. But under the Batista regime, I happened to have 
been in Cuba. I happened to be a member of the Public Works Com- 
mittee. I went to a highway conference in Cuba. And at that time, 
I saw some of these things under the Batista regime taking place. I 
saw the new highways, the new buildings, the new public housing, 
long before Castro came. 

Mrs. del Villar. Well, there were a few more built since then. 

Mr. Scherer. Oh, I am saying we all abhor Batista, but I was there 
when Batista was still in power, when Castro was still out in the hills. 
So these things that you say you saw in 1960 — and I was there be- 
fore 1960 — were taking place in Cuba long before Dr. Castro came 
out of the hills, because I saw them with my own eyes. I was there 
for that purpose. 

Mrs. del Villar. Sure. 

Mr. Moulder. Mr. Bruce? 

Mr. Bruce. Your distress on the humanitarian feelings that you 
have exhibited here is noteworthy. 

One of the common cries in Cuba over the past year or so has been, 
"To the wall." How does this practice of the Castro regime of the 
shooting of hundreds of people, with what are obviously typical 
Communist mock trials — how does this square with this feeling of 
humanitarianism and improvement of the lot of the people? 

Mrs. del Villar. You know, sir, I would like very much to discuss 
that and many other things with you, but in all fairness to me, and in 
all fairness to you, this is something outside of our discussion. This 
already becomes my opinions on the subject of their behavior. And 
I don't think this is fair. 

Mr. Bruce. Well, the opinions that you expressed justifying your 
opinions earlier fall in the same category, and you had no reluctance 
whatsoever to describing that. 

Mrs. del Villar. But, sir, there are lots of injustices being per- 
petrated right in our country. And that doesn't mean I don't uphold 
the good things we do. 

Mr. Bruce. That is again a diversion away from the question I 
asked you. 

Mrs. del Villar. If we want to discuss my opinions on the subject 
of Cuba, I will be glad to do so, but not as part of this inquiry. 

Mr. Bruce. Only as part of what you have already testified, that 
you felt this was an improvement, that the present regime has a more 
humanitarian approach to the people. And I am trying to find out 
how you square that with the practice of "To the wall with those that 
disagree." 

Mrs. del Villar. Well, I don't know about that, you see. 

Mr. Bruce. You do not know about that ? 

Mrs. del Villar. No. 

Mr. Bruce. You have not heard about that ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Oh, yes, I have heard about it. But I don't know 
about it. 

Mr. Moulder. All right. It is almost quarter to four. I wonder 
if we can proceed. 

Are you about through ? 

Let us continue then, and finish. 



1942 ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 

Mr. Nittle. I believe that a moment ago you indicated there Avas a 
great deal of criticism and hostility in the world, which you seemed to 
deplore. Is that right ? 

Mrs. del Villar. That is right. 

Mr. Nittle. Did you yourself engage in agitational activities di- 
rected toward Latin American residents of the United States? 

Mrs. del Villar. No, because I am not an agitational speaker. 

Mr. Nittle. Now let me hand you a copy of an excerpt from the 
National Guardian, dated October 22, 1962. I direct your attention to 
an advertisement which appears at the lower left-hand corner of 
page 21. 

The advertisement indicates that a protest meeting will be held 
Sunday, October 21, 1962, at the Hotel New Yorker, under the auspices 
of the Emergency Civil Liberties Committee, a Communist-front or- 
ganization, at which a Melitta del Villar, among others, is to be heard 
on the subject, "Mounting terrorism and violence directed toward 
Latin-Americans in the United States." 

Are you the Melitta del Villar therein referred to ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes, sir. 

(Document marked "del Villar Exhibit No. 21" follows :) 

del Villar Exhibit No. 21 
[National Guardian, Oct. 22, 1962, p. 21] 



STOP MGILANTISM 

in NEW YORK 
PIOTEST MEETING 

mgminnt mtontlnf terrorism smd violence directed toward 
L*ttn- Americans i* the Unitmd States. Lenrn yonr civ A 
rights omd how you cm* protect yoursel). 
HEAR: 

• HON HUBERT T. OELANEY • HON MARK LANE 

• SUA MELITTA DEL VILLAR • MR. CYRIL PHILIP 
SII: 

Actual pfrf i e« titmstrtim§ pkmUrstm t« Nev York 
Shoeing begins promptly at 2 3D 

SUN.. OCT 21 2:30 P.M. 

HOTEL MEW YORKER, 34th St at 8th Av«nu« 

Contribution 99c 

AUSMCB; In i n» if CMI UMh Ce— m m t m 

42)Sm«HiAf«M M Nt.Y»4l,Hr. 



ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 1943 

Mr. Nittle. Did you address the group at the Hotel New Yorker 
on the subject of "Mounting terrorism and violence directed toward 
Latin-Americans in the United States" ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes. It was composed of largely North Ameri- 
cans, not Latin Americans, actually. 

Mr. Nittle. It is the committee's information that a Celia Saper- 
stein has received from you certain funds of the Medical Aid to Cuba 
Committee. Investigations by the Senate Internal Security Subcom- 
mittee held in 1953, relating to activities of United States citizens em- 
ployed by the United Nations, indicate that Celia Saperstein was one 
of several United Nations employees discharged by the Secretary 
General after his investigation of persons engaged in activities re- 
garded as disloyal by the host country. 

Did you pass funds of the Medical Aid to Cuba Committee to Celia 
Saperstein ? 

Mrs. del Villar. I don't have any recollection of doing that, no. 

Mr. Nittle. I show you a copy of a check of the Medical Aid to 
Cuba Committee, which was stamped paid by the bank upon which 
drawn, the Chemical Bank New York Trust Company, and drawn 
by Melitta del Villar and Sidney J. Gluck, with the notation appear- 
ing, "Advance to Camp Midvall 1 party Aug. 11," endorsed by Celia 
Saperstein. 

Does that refresh your recollection ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes. Now I know what you mean. 

(Document marked "del Villar Exhibit No. 22" follows:) 



1 This Is a reference to Camp Midvale In New Jersey. 



1944 



ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 



DEL VlLLAR EXHIBIT No. 22 



(M!0 


X 




?5 | 


M 




,!.\S 


J- ' 


»■ v 1 





^o- V 



! i" 



wMl 




en 






ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 1945 

Mr. Nittle. Do you know Celia Saperstein ? 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mrs. del Villar. No. I remember, now. Celia Saperstein tried 
to arrange some kind of a private gathering in that area. I have 
never been there. I don't know the camp. I never had heard about 
it until recently. 

And she needed funds to buy paper cups and buy other things to 
plan the party to raise funds for Medical Aid. And we participated 
in this for her, and it was later refunded for us, because she couldn't 
take it out of her pocket. She is not a wealthy woman. 

We advanced the funds and then we got them back. 

Mr. Nittle. "We" advanced the funds ? Who advanced the funds 
to Celia Saperstein ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Mr. Gluck and me. And they were returned. 

Mr. Nittle. The committee's investigation discloses that you have 
established a contact with a W. Davidson, of London, England. We 
are interested in knowing : Who is W. Davidson ? 

Mrs. del Villar. I don't know. 

Mr. Moulder. What was your question ? 

Mr. Nittle. Who is W. Davidson ? 

Mr. Willis. But you said we had information. She is entitled to 
know. 

Mr. Nittle. We have a record of a telephone contact between the 
Medical Aid to Cuba headquarters and W. Davidson, of London, 
England. Do you have any knowledge of that call ? 

Mrs. del Villar. No. 

Mr. Nittle. And you do not know who W. Davidson is ? 

Mrs. del Villar. We have never made a London call, to my knowl- 
edge. 

Mr. Nittle. That is, to your knowledge ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes. It could be a mistake of the telephone 
company, because we were once charged for a call from Minneapolis 
that we hadn't made, you know. 

Mr. Scherer. It might have been the good doctor that made the 
call, or somebody else. 

Mrs. del Villar. I have been there most of the time in the office, 
and generally the doctor does not do things like that without asking, 
you know, because I am very strict and stingy about the funds. 

Mr. Willis. She does not know. Proceed. 

Mr. Scherer. Wait a minute. Why did you pay the bill, then? 

Mrs. del Villar. We haven't paid such a bill. I haven't seen such 
a thing. 

Mr. Nittle. The committee's investigation also discloses that a 
message emanated from the headquarters of the Medical Aid to Cuba 
Committee, signed by an individual described as Pat O'Morte. 

Who is Pat O'Morte? 

Mrs. del Villar. This is some kind of amusing or something. I 
don't think it is anything special. 

Mr. Nittle. It is hardly amusing, because it is a telegram, a copy 
of which the committee has, and which I will exhibit to you. It bears 
the name, "Mrs. Amster" ; signature, "Pat O'Morte" ; subscriber, "Al- 
bert S. Baker." 



1946 ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 

Mrs. del Villar. That is all right. It is something — I think it was 
some kind of a celebration, a birthday party or something, of Mr. 
Baker, and we sent him this telegram for fun, or something like 
that. 

(Document marked "del Villar Exhibit No. 23" follows :) 

del Villar Exhibit No. 23 

telegram received by telephone $ s e i 



MRS BERTHS FRIEDMAN 

DtR IUMY 



-^ 



4i.l tNtc> 221 FtB 2J 6 3y 3 ' 



100 LASALLE ST 



'ljS^ 0729 

A. * ' 



NYC 

I 



xxx0xgxxi;0xiNKxxBNX(tKsy 

*LL 
OUR TOAST TO REBECCA /THE CHICK 5 ( THERSFWTIENT ! ^^^ 

HUSBANDS AND SILENT PARTNER LOVE j P*T 0„M0RTE 



7 eP- 



BOO . 


*m* 


SKLilTO 1 . 


\ fUjj 


DATE 




n r < 





ALBERT S BAKER 



MRS * A**TER 

wu B»o (1-S2) 



Mr. Nittle. This is not addressed to Mr. Baker. 

Mrs. del Villar. But I think it was for Mr. Baker's celebration. 
It was something like that. 

Mr. Nittle. Can you tell us who Pat O'Morte is ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Myself. 

Mr. Nittle. Yourself? 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes. That was a fun message. 1 

Mr. Scherer. Did you not just tell us you did not know who she 
was? Just a few minutes ago, did you not say you never heard of 
that person ? 

Mr. Willis. She did say it was for fun. 

Mrs. del Villar. I know what it was. They were having a stag 
dinner or a women's dinner, and I think it was some birthday party. 
And I thought since he had worked so hard with us and helped us 
so much — I sent him that message. I didn't know everything I did 
was going to be considered bad. 

"Our toast to Rebecca, all the chicks there," something, "patient 
husbands and silent partner. Love, Pat O'Morte." 

1 Patria o Muerte (Homeland or Death) together with Venceremoa (We Shall Conquer) 
are two of Castro Cuba's most common slogans. Such phrases frequently appear, for 
example, in correspondence and other communications. 



ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 1947 

Mr. Moulder. A toast to all the chickens ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes, some foolish thing, because they were all 
elderly. So I called them "chicks," for fun. Gee whiz ! 

Mr. Nittle. Investigation of the committee further discloses that 
a telephone call was made from your unlisted telephone number to 
a Charles S. Flato, of Truro, Massachusetts. 

Do you know Charles S. Flato ? 

Mr. Moulder. Can you give her any more information on it? 

Mrs. del Villar. Will you tell me what context ? 

Mr. Nittle. I am simply asking whether you know Charles S. Flato. 

Mrs. del Villar. This name has nothing to do with the committee, 
not even remotely, not even remotely. 

Mr. Nittle. Do you know Charles S. Flato ? 

(Witness conferred with counsel.) 

Mrs. del Villar. I have met the gentleman. 

Mr. Moulder. Then you do know him ? 

Mrs. del Villar. I have met him. I don't know him. 

Mr. Moulder. Well, that is what he means by that. 

Mr. Nittle. It is the committee's information that Charles S. 
Flato was an employee of the U.S. Government during the period 
1934 to 1945. He was last employed as a senior information specialist 
for the Foreign Economic Administration, then later transferred 
to the Office of War Mobilization and Reconversion. He was finally 
rated ineligible by the Civil Service Commission on loyalty grounds, 
and instructions were issued for his removal on April 23, 1945. 

Charles S. Flato appeared in hearings before the Senate Internal 
Security Subcommittee, during the course of which he invoked the 
fifth amendment as a basis for refusal to answer questions, particularly 
relating to his Communist Party membership. 

Mr. Moulder. Do you want to make any explanation as to how you 
happened to meet him, or make any explanation whatsoever other than 
that you met him ? 

Mrs. del Villar. No. I met him. It might have been at one of the 
places I spoke. Or I don't remember, really. I really don't know him 
at all. I just know that he is a little — he is is crippled, you know. And 
he seemed like a nice man. 

Mr. Nittle. One final question. 

You issued a check to yourself on August 20, 1962, or August 23, 
1962, on the funds of the Medical Aid to Cuba Committee, in the sum 
of $200, to attend the Pan American Medical Congress. 

Mrs. del Villar. That is correct. 

Mr. Nittle. When and where was that held ? 

Mrs. del Villar. In Minneapolis, Minnesota. 

Mr. Nittle. Did you attend that ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes, sir. 

Mr. Moulder. Do you want to tell us what your functions and pur- 
poses were in attending that ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes, Mr. Moulder. The Pan American Health 
Organization, which is a branch of the new World Health Organiza- 
tion, meets every so many years to congregate doctors from all over 
Pan America and this hemisphere, Canada, I think, too; and they 
meet to discuss medical matters among all the other countries. 

So we thought at the committee that it would be a good idea, since 
we had not been able to go to Cuba to get direct information there, 



1948 ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 

to meet the Cuban delegation that was going to be there and get from 
the horse's mouth, so to speak, some information about specifications 
and catalog numbers of medicines and position in ordering, what our 
requirements here were, so that they can understand how they hap- 
pened to send us the receipts, so that we have the thing correctly, and 
so on, technical matters. 

Mr. Moulder. Whom did you meet from Cuba there ? 

Mrs. del Villar. The various doctors who came in the delegation. 
There were, I think, three or four. 

Mr. Moulder. Are there any questions? Mr. Scherer, any addi- 
tional questions ? 

Mr. Scherer. Who is Bertha Friedman ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Not a member of the committee. 

Mr. Scherer. Who is she? 

Mrs. del Villar. I don't know. She is not a member of the com- 
mittee. 

Mr. Scherer. Well, she is the woman, may I point out to you, to 
whom you sent this so-called funny telegram. 

Mrs. del Villar. It was an acquaintance of mine, and she had the 
party for Mr. Baker. 

Mr. Scherer. Mr. Reporter, will you read back the witness' answer 
to my first question, "Who is Bertha Friedman?" Read that answer. 

(The answer referred to was read by the reporter.) 

Mrs. del Villar. I don't know her well. 

Mr. Scherer. You wanted to leave the impression when I asked you 
about her, by, the answers to the first two questions, that you did not 
know this woman. 

Now wait a minute. 

Mrs. del Villar. As a member of the committee. 

Mr. Scherer. All right. We heard the answer. 

And when I said, "Well, she is the woman to whom you sent this 
telegram," you replied, "It was an acquaintance of mine." 

Mrs. del Villar. Yes, I recollected the two. I don't know her that 
well. 

Mr. Scherer. You do not know her that well, but you sent her this 
funny telegram, "Our toast to Rebecca, all the chicks there, patient 
husbands and silent partner. Love, Pat O'Morte." 

And you said that Pat O'Morte was you. What does that mean, 
Pat O'Morte? 

Mrs. del Villar. Nothing. 

Mr. Scherer. Well, morte in Latin means what ? 

Mrs. del Villar. Death. Well, that is just fooling, because some- 
times they say that I am somber, and it was just a play of words. 

Mr. Scherer. All right. 

Mr. Moulder. Mr. Bruce, any questions ? 

Mr. Bruce. No, sir. 

Mr. Moulder. That will be all. 

Will you recall her at any time ? Do you wish her to return ? 

Mr. Nittle. I do not think so, Mr. Chairman. 



ASSISTANCE TO FOREIGN COMMUNIST GOVERNMENTS 1949 

Mr. Moulder. Then you may see the clerk about your witness fees. 

Mrs. del Villar. Good afternoon. 

(At this point the witness was excused.) 

(The testimony of Sidney J. Gluck and Albert S. Baker, two wit- 
nesses also heard on November 14, is printed in pt. 2 of these hearings, 
with the November 15 testimony.) 

o