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Full text of "ANNUAL DEPARTMENTAL REPORTS OF THE DOMINION OF CANADA, 1928, v.4"

ANNUAL DEPARTMENTAL 
REPORTS 



VOLUME I 

Auditor General, for the fiscal j-ear ended March 31, 1928. 

VOLUME II 

Public Accounts, for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1928. 

National Revenue, Department of, (Customs and Excise), containing accounts of Revenue 
with statements relative to the Imports, Exports, and Excise of the Dominion of Canada, 
for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1928. 

National Revenue, Department of, (Shipping Report, Customs), containing the Statements 
of Navigation and Shipping for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1928. 

Trade and Commerce, Department of, for the fiscal year ended INIarch 31, 1928. 

Weights and Measures Inspection Service (Trade and Commerce), for the fiscal year 
ended March 31, 1928. 

Electricity and Gas Inspection Services (Trade and Commerce), for the fiscal year ended 
March 31, 1928. 

Board of Grain Commissioners for Canada (Trade and Commerce), for the crop year 
ended August 31, 1928. 

Interior, Department of the, for the fiscal j^ear ended March 31, 192S. 

Immigration and Colonization, Department of, for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1928. 

Indian Affairs, Department of, for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1928. 

Mines, Department of, for the fiscal year ended ]\larch 31, 1928. 

Agriculture, Department of, for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1928. 

National Defence, Department of, (Militia and Air Service), for the fiscal year ended 
March 31, 1928. 

National Defence, Department of, (Naval Service), for the fiscal year ended March 31, 192S. 



Pensions and National Health, Department of, for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1928 
Health, Department of, for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1928. 

VOLUME III 

Superintendent of Penitentiaries, for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1928. 

Royal Canadian Mounted Police, for the year ended September 30, 1928. 

Secretary of State, Department of the, for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1928. » 

Commissioner of Patents, for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1928. 

Archives, for the year 1928. 

Civil Service Commission, for the calendar year ended December 31, 1928. 

External Affairs, Department of the Secretary of ^tate for, for the fiscal year ended March 
31, 1928. 

Labour, Department of, for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1928. 

VOLUME IV 

Public Printing and Stationery, Department of, for the fis: al year ended March 31, 1928. 
Marine and Fisheries (Marine), Department of, for the fis al year ended March 31, 1928. 
Marine and Fisheries (Fisheries), Department of, for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1928. 
Post Office, Department of the, for the fiscal year ended March 31, 192S. 
Public Works, Department of, for the fiscal j'ear ended March 31, 192"^. 
Railways and Canals, Department of, for tho fiscal yctir ended Marcli 31, 1928. 
Board of Railway Commissioners for Canada, for the calendar year ended December 31, 1928 . 
Chief i;icctoraI Officer By-elections for tbe year 1928). 

VOLUME V 

Trade of (J^inada Imports for Consumption and I'lxports), for th; fiscal year ended 
Marcli 31, r.J2S. 



DOMINION OF CANADA 



DEPARTMENT 



OF 



PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 



ANNUAL REPORT 



FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED MARCH 31 



1928 




OTTAWA 

F. A. ACLAND 

PRINTER TO THE KING'S MOST EXCELLENT MAJESTY 

1923 



To His Excellency the Right Honourable Viscount Williiigdon, G.C.S.I., G.C.M.G.^ 
G.C.I.E., G.B.E., Governor General and Commander-in-Chief of the 
Dominiori of Canada. 

May it Please Your Excellency: 

The undersigned has the honour to present to Your Excellency the Annual 
Report of the Department of Public Printing and Stationery for the year ended 
March 31, 1928. 

I have the honour to be, 

Your Excellency's most obedient servant, 

FERNAND RINFRET, 

Secretary of State and Minister charged with administration of 
Department of Public Printing and Stationery. 

Ottawa, October, 1928. 



69595— li 



INTRODUCTORY STATEMENT 

Otta-WA, September, 1928. 

No doubt the most marked feature of the year, outside the customary 
activities of the department, was the printing, binding and distribution of the 
Revised Statutes of Canada, 1927. Important incidents affecting the depart- 
ment were the amendment of the Pubhc Printing and Stationery Act with respect 
to the King's Printer's advance account and the enactment of an important 
reguhition governing the distribution of official documents. 

The personnel of the establishment on December 31, 1927, was 692, a very 
slight increase over the figures at the same date for any quite recent years. The 
figures representing the number of employees of all classes stood as follows on 
December 31 for each of the years named: — 

1891 341. 1920 703 

1901 oil 1921 730 

1911 S61 1922 665 

1915 1.160 1923 688 

1916 1.240 1924 670 

1917 1,300 1925 671 

1918 1,169 1926 685 

1919 1,134 1927 692 

It should be noted that with respect to the establishment a new list of 691 
positions was, with the co-operation of the Civil Service Commission, made 
effective as from August 1, 1927. The old list of December, 1920, covering 705 
positions, had become in the changes of eight years somewhat confused and 
complicated; the new list of course is free from these objections. The numbers 
printed above, as for December 31 in each case, include all positions, those 
temporarily vacant and temporary appointments; for December 31, 1927, the 
vacancies numbered eleven and the temporaries twelve, one in excess of the new 
establishment. 

"Within these figures for the total establishment there are of course many 
groups, and several of these groups have undergone expansion or contraction 
during recent years; in several cases also new groups have come into existence, 
which had helped to confuse the old establishment list. Despite the maintenance 
of the personnel at practically a standard figure there has been a "substantial 
increase in production and in the activities generally of the department; the 
gross cash, turnover of the fiscal year, $7,292,473.87, shows an increase over the 
preceding year- of $820,422.73. The various branches of activities, including the 
publication of periodicals, have had their share of expansion, an important addi- 
tion to the number of regular publications being " The National Revenue 
Review," a handsomely printed journal of approximately thirty-two pages, pub- 
lished in both English and French. 

Periodical Publications 

A word generally as to the printing and publication of official periodicals 
will not be out of place. These publications are many and various in character 
and in frequency of issue, ranging from the Hansard and other parliamentary 
documents published daily in English and French when Parliament is in session, 
to weekly and monthly periodicals, and to the annual reports of the different 
departments, these last being, however, somewhat outside of the " periodicals " 
class proper. 

5 



6 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTIXG AND STATIONERY 

Of the various publications the Canada Gazette, the official gazette of the 
Dominion Government, is alone edited within the department itself, under the 
authority of the King's Printer; it is issued on Saturday of each week,, with 
special issues as occasion may require. This publication contains numerous 
advertisements as to matters which by law are required to appear in its pages. 
A special page of this present report gives information as to its revenue and 
expenditure annually from 1874, the statement showing that for several years 
past there has been an excess of revenue ranging between S35,000 and $50,000; 
tliis year the excess reaches $50,536.28. The Canada Gazette is bilingual. 

Other weekly publications are: Commercial Intelligence Journal, printed 
for the Department of Trade and Commerce; Patent Record, printed for the 
Patent and Copyright Office; the Egg and Poultry Review, printed for the 
Department of Agriculture; Weekly News Letter, printed for the Department 
of Immigration and Colonization. 

The publication '' Judgments, Orders," etc., of the Board of Railway Com- 
missioners, is issued fortnightly. 

Of monthly periodicals there is a considerable list, the more important pub- 
lications being as follows: (1) Agricultural Statistics, (2) Labour Gazette, (3) 
Bank Statement, (4) Monthly Review of BiTsiness Statistics, (5) Coal Statistics 
for Canada, (6) Canada Law Reports, for ten months only, (7) Health Bulletin, 
(8) National Revenue Review. (9) Canadian Tuberculosis Bulletin, (10) Natural 
Resources Intelligence Journal, (11) the Trade of Canada report, long published 
as a monthly journal, was during the year converted to a quarterly. 

]\Iany of these publications are issued in both English and French, and the 
copies printed number well over a million. In some cases, as with the Canada 
Law Reports, Railway Judgments, Postal Guide Supplements, Bank Statement, 
Commercial Intelligence Journal, and the Monthly Review of Business Statis- 
tics, the circulation is almost wholly on paid subscription. In the case of t|ie 
Canada Gazette certain classes of officials receive copies free by statute, and 
complimentary copies go to members of Parliament who so request; the circula- 
tion is othens'ise on paid subscription. With respect to several publications the 
distribution is free, or occasionally, as in the case of the Labour Gazette, there 
is a nominal subscription. As stated, the Canada Gazette alone of these publi- 
cations is compiled and edited in the department, but in many cases this depart- 
ment undertakes the collection of subscriptions, the maint<}nance of the sub- 
scription lists and the work of addressing and mailing, and our Distribution 
Branch having been equipped with the latest modern devices for addressing and 
mailing, there is a growing tendency on the part of otlier departments to realize 
that this work can be performed here at a minimum of cost and to request this 
department accordingly to act as distribution agent for them. 

A statement printed in this report relating to the work of the Distribution 
Branch shows that the total of publications received for distribution in English 
and French, including parliamentary documents, annual departmental reports 
and miscellaneous publications, is between four and five millions. These figures 
(io not of course include copies distributed direct from the departments con- 
cerned, and a considerable amount of distribution is still done in this way. 

Distribution of Official Publications to Libraries 

During the year an important departure was made with respect to the mat- 
ter of distribution of pul)lic documents to libraries. In the past practically no 
arrangement existed under which all important libraries might expect to receive 
as a matter of course a copy of r>very official document of public interest. In some 
cases the department issuing a publication distributed copies to a limited list of 
libraries, and in otlier cases the dejiartment made no provision for libraries; nor, 
under the practice, would lii)rarians have the opportunity of becoming aware, 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1927-28 7 

save by accident, of the publication of official documents which might be of par- 
ticular importance to them, or, sometimes, from what department a particular 
publication known to them by name might be obtained. Hence librarians would 
frequently write to the King's Printer requesting copies of publications which 
had become known to them, and as a rule would state their expectation of receiv- 
ing a copy free of cost. Librarians, it may be remarked, have shared in the 
illusion that the King's Printer holds large quantities of publications of all sorts 
for distribution without charge to all applicants, or at least to all important 
libraries. Properly speaking, there has never been any King's Printer's free list, 
but lists received from the House of Commons and from the different depart- 
ments, and mailed under the King's Printer's frank, have sometimes been inform- 
ally designated as such. All such lists are actually controlled by the depart- 
ment for which the King's Printer performs the distribution, but frequently the 
King's Printer, on receiving these requests, has been able to arrange with the 
department concerned to secure for an important library or other institution a 
copy of the publication desired. 

Librarians were much interested also in the volumes of sessional papers in 
bound form formerly ordered by the House of Commons, and of which compli- 
mentary sets were supplied to certain libraries and other institutions as well as 
to some official personages. These volumes of sessional papers included the 
annual reports of the various departments and other annual publications such 
as the Estimates, Trade of Canada Report, etc. With the issue of these reports 
for the fiscal year 1924-25 the authorities of Parliament ceased to order their 
printing as sessional papers. Large libraries in Canada and a good many libraries 
abroad, which had been on what had been regarded as an exchange basis with 
the Parliamentary Library of Canada, had been for many years receiving these 
volumes of bound sessional papers and were somewhat disturbed to learn that 
the annual reports, etc., would no longer be printed in this form. Many com- 
munications reached the King's Printer from leading librarians speaking of the 
particular value in permanently bound form of the reports which had been 
included in these volumes of sessional papers, and urging the desirability of such 
reports being still if possible supplied in permanent binding to the libraries which 
had received the earlier volumes. 

After consideration it was found practicable to meet the needs of the libraries 
by printing extra copies of annual departmental reports at the same time as the 
original order was being executed and binding these copies, five or six to a volume 
if the bulk permitted, as had been done with these reports when printed as ses- 
sional papers, and in a style similar to that employed in the case of the earlier 
volumes, thus permitting the series to be continued unbroken in contents and 
general appearance. The total number of the reports concerned, English and 
French and bilingual, was sixty-seven for the first year of printing, namely, 
1925-26. Under P.C. 322, February 26, 1927, it was decided that it would be 
to the advantage of Canada that public documents of the nature of these under 
discussion should be, without charge and on application, supplied to the libraries 
of legislatures and universities and to official persons or institutions of recognized 
standing; of the annual reports for 1925-26 printed and bound in this form about 
one hundred sets were supplied to such institutions, and a few copies remain in 
reserve. 

Consideration was given also to the request of many librarians that more 
effective procedure might be if possible devised for the systematic distribution 
free of charge to larger libraries in general of all important public documents, 
and librarians themselves thus relieved of the necessity of making separate 
application in each case to the King's Printer or to the department concerned 
for a copy of a particular publication. The annual conference of the American 



8 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 

Library Association, a body composed of tlie librarians of tlie United States 
and Canada, was held in Toronto in July, 1927, and, shortly prior to the con- 
ference, communications were received from officers of the Canadian com- 
mittees of this body, referring to the difficulties outlined as above and asking 
if the King's Printer or representative would attend a gathering of Canadian 
delegates to the conference, at which the whole subject of the distribution of 
official documents to the libraries of Canada might be discussed and a plan 
devised for improving the situation. The King's Printer, by your instructions, 
attended the conference and conferred with the librarians in attendance from 
various parts of Canada. A special committee, selected from the Canadian 
delegates, was appointed to take the matter up for discussion with the King's 
Printer, and at the meeting of the committee a representative of the Library 
of Congress at Washington, D.C., was present and indicated the policy pursued 
by the United States Government with respect to the distribution of official 
documents to public libraries. The outcome of the conference was reported 
to yourself as minister, and as a result regulations were, on your recommenda- 
tion, made by Council (P.C. 1471, August 4, 1927) which are believed to i)ro- 
vide a remedy for the defects under which librarians had laboured with respect 
to these matters. 

The occasion afforded convenient opportunity for the improvement gener- 
ally of procedure respecting the free distribution of official documents; the 
scope of the regulation was accordingly extended beyond the range of library 
necessities and it was planned to meet so far as possible requirements of all 
official institutions and personages having special need of the official publica- 
tions of Canada and to decide in what cases it would seem to be in the public 
interest to have such official documents readily available. 

The essential provisions of the regulation enacted are as follows: — 

(1) A. That the King's Printer be instructed to send without charge to the Library of 
Parliament of Canada six copies of each official publication of the Dominion of Canada (not 
being of a confidential character) and one copy of each such publication to the following, 
viz.: (a) the Under-Secretary of State for External Affairs; (6) the High Commissioner 
for Canada in London; (c) the Canadian Minister at Washington, D.C.; (d) the Dominion 
Archivist; (e) the libraiy of each provincial legislature; (/) the library of each university; 
ig) Public Libraries of Canada, Grade 1 list; (/i) the Congressional Librarj-, Washington, 
D.C.; (?) the Minister of the United States at Ottawa. Where, having regard to the fore- 
going institutions and persons, the minister becomes aware that one copj"^ of particular 
document is not adequate to the reasonable requirements of the institution or person con- 
cerned, additional copies may be furnished so far as the stock of copies printed under this 
regulation may permit. 

B. One copy of any publication (not of a confidential character) may be sent on 
application and without charge to institutions and persons as follows: (a) Public Libraries 
of Canada. Grade II list; (6) Consuls-General in Canada; (c) Members of Provincial Gov- 
ernments in Canada; (r/) Members of the Government of a division of the British Empire; 
(e) a library of anj' legislature in any portion of the British Empire; (/) any library 
outside of (I!anada which is known to have exchunge relations with the Library of the 
Parliament of Canada; (y) any institution or person not included in any of the foregoing 
classes and regarded by the minister as meriting such consideration, the number of names 
in this group not to exceed ten with respect to any publication. It is believed that demands 
from the various groups in this section will cover a wide range without bearing heavily 
on any particular publication or class of publications, and will not materially increase the 
number of documents printcil for free distribtilion; should the applications received from 
such classes be in excess of the supply of cojiies jirinted for free distribution under thiel 
regulation, the King's Printer .shall refer such ajiplications for the consideration of the 
departments re.sjxctively concerned. 

Under this regulation extra coi)ies of publications not of a confidential 
character arc printed, and, save for a small number iicld in reserve, distributed 
to the institutions and persons as indicated in the regulation. The regulation 
became offectivc as from September 6, 1927, and from that date to the close of 
the fiscal year there liad been printed 218 separate official publications of which 
copies had been forwardcfl to institutions and personages named on the official 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1927-28 9 

lists. A complete statement of the distribution thus effected will be found in a 
section of this report. 

Special representations were received from the librarians also with respect 
to the matter of catalogues or price-lists of the official publications of Canada, 
and this subject also was considered at the Toronto conference. For some years 
this department had issued a price-list with names and titles of such publica- 
tions as are held for sale in its Distribution Branch, but the list did not include 
the titles of publications not held here for sale. Certain other departments have 
printed independent catalogues or lists of publications issued by them, and the 
librarians, who may or may not receive these catalogues and the publications 
named in them, represented that the general situation with respect to official 
catalogues was somewhat confusing. It was decided therefore that the price- 
lists wliich had been issued in the past by the King's Printer, naming simply the 
publications held here for sale, should be enlarged to include the titles of official 
publications of all kinds, whether or not copies were procurable from the King's 
Printer. Some branches of the Government service, it should be observed, issue 
publications which are much in the nature of propaganda, having usually an 
intimate bearing on their work, as in the case of the Departments of Agriculture, 
Immigration, Health, Mines, Labour, Dominion Bureau of Statistics, etc., and 
the free distribution of such documents is controlled by the publishing depart- 
ment, which is naturally in a position to exercise proper discrimination as to; 
institutions or persons requiring them ; in some cases, as before stated, the King's 
Printer acts as distributing agent. It was not regarded as practicable at the 
present time to undertake in this 'department the preparation of a catalogue 
which would comprehend the titles of all official publications now in print, 
though this task may be at some time undertaken; in the meantime a catalogue 
was prepared to include the titles of all official publications issued subsequent to 
September 6, 1927, the date from which P.C. 1471 was made effective, and copies 
of which would under that regulation be distributed to libraries, etc. Looking 
slightly beyond the close of the fiscal year, it may be said that the catalogue 
was issued in April, 1928, with the announced intention that monthly supple- 
ments would follow. 

RE\asED Statutes of Canada, 1927 

The largest single undertaking of the year in the printing branch was, as 
stated, that pertaining to the printing and binding of the Revised Statutes of 
Canada. 1927. The statutes had not been revised since 1906. The work of 
revision had been in progress for some years on the tmderstanding, as this depart- 
ment was advised, that the revision would close with the statutes of the session 
of 1926; in 1926 it was found desirable further to extend the revision so that it 
would include the statutes of 1927. The work of composition on the Revised 
Statutes was well advanced early in the fiscal year 1927-28, and it appeared 
probable, as the year advanced, that the revised volumes would be available for 
distribution by about the beginning of the session of Parliament, 1928. When 
it became evident that this hope would be realized the revising body caused the 
issue under date of December 22, 1927, of a proclamation declaring the Revised 
Statutes of Canada, 1927, effective as law " on, from and after the first dav of 
February, 1928." 

The revised Statutes proper, without the index volume, comprised four 
volumes, and distribution in English and French to members of Parliament, 
judges, police magistrates, federal and provincial officials and public or other 
bodies receiving the same by practice and under the governing regulations, pro- 
ceeded during the months of February and March, large sales being made also 
to the public. A final volume comprised appendices and index, but the prepara- 
tion of the index is a work requiring considerable time and the publication of 



10 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 

this volume was necessarily deferred, the oflficials engaged in the work of index- 
ing suggesting August or September, 1928, as the probable date of publication. 
The four volumes comprising the Revised Statutes of Canada, 1927, contain 
4,302 pages in 217 chapters, as compared with three volumes containing 2,959 
pages in 155 chapters for the Revised Statutes of Canada, 1906. The index 
volume, Revised Statutes of Canada, 1906, contained an additional 678 pages, 
and with the proportionate increase for the larger index required for the Revised 
Statute? of Canada, 1927, the total number of pages of the five volumes. Revised 
Statutes of Canada, 1927, English, will be no doubt when completed in the 
vicinity of 5,000, and the French edition somewhat in excess of that figure. 

After careful inquiry as to the number of copies estimated to be necessary 
to meet the requirements of all entitled to receive the statutes free and of mem- 
bers of the bar and others who might be expected to purchase copies, it was 
decided to print 6,000 sets in English and 1,500 sets in French. The distribu- 
tion without charge required about 2,200 sets, and the sale during the first few 
months was estimated to need approximately a somewhat larger number, leaving 
aboui 1,500 sets for general stock. Demands on the quantity stocked will no 
doubt be severe during the first few months but may be expected to decline 
thereafter, rendering the stock in hand adequate to meet demands for some 
time; the extent of the demand must, however, remain an uncertain quantity, 
and the contingency of reprinting a supply of these volumes for stock is a matter 
which must b(; kept in mind and will arise for action within a period of two, 
three or four years. Pressure of work in both press-room and bindery at the 
time the Revised Statutes were being printed practically prohibited consider- 
ation of increasing beyond the figures indicated the number printed in English 
and French respectively. 

The regulation governing distribution provided also that the official selling 
price of the five volumes representing the Revised Statutes of Canada, 1927, 
and index should be $10, which would not be subject to discount in the case of 
booksellers or otherwise. It may be noted that a trade discount of 25 per cent 
on oflficial publictions is usually allowed to booksellers, and a quantity dis- 
count of the same percentage is allowed to any purchaser of 100 copies or over. 
In the case of a publication such as the Revised Statutes, where a large pro- 
portion of the members of the legal profession will find it necessary to purchase 
a set, it was felt that the price should be kept at the lowest practicable figure. 
The selling price decided on was estimated as sufficient to more than equal the 
costs of presswork, paper and binding; all printing charges were of course paid 
from the appropriation voted for the printing and binding of the Revised 
Statutes. 

A word may be said with respect to the binding of these volumes. Under 
"The Publication of Statutes Act" it is decreed that "the statutes . . . 
shall be bound, if practicable and convenient, in one volume in full buckram 
and lettered in black, with the exception of a certain number to be specified 
by the Governor in Council, which shall be bound in half-calf and gilt-lettered." 
Whilst the Publication of Statutes Act applies expressly to the printing and 
binding of the Annual Statutes and only indirectly if at all to the Revised 
Statutes of Canada, 1927, it is clearly desirable if not necessary that the bind- 
ing of the Revised Statutes should be in harmony with that of the Annual 
Statutes. The Act formerly recjuired the Annual Statutes to be bound in half 
sheepskin and this practice continued until about 1918, when buckrarn was 
substitutefj for general binding, about fifty copies only being bound in half calf. 
Buckram binding has proved strong, dural)le and effective and the cost is of 
course greatly less than binding in half-calf. The selling price would have- been 
at least doul)le with half-cjilf binding, and the experience of the department 
has been that expensively bound copies of statutes are practically unsaleable. 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1927-28 11 

It should be noted that P.C. 1471, the new regulation governing distribu- 
tion matters generally, was made inapplicable to the Statutes of Canada, it 
being deemed desirable to deal specially with this point in any order which 
might be made with respect to the printing of the Revised Statutes of Canada, 
1927, and accordingly in P.C. 2319, December 9, 1927, provision was made for 
the distribution of the Revised Statutes, as well as for other procedure. 

After correspondence with the officers of Parliament, the departments of 
the Dominion Government and the several provinces and with various other 
authorities concerned in the matter, lists were compiled which are believed to 
contain the names of all institutions and persons entitled, by reason of the func- 
tions performed or services rendered, to receive free of charge copies of the 
Statutes of Canada, and these lists, having been examined by yourself, were, 
on your recommendation, approved by Council. To members of Parliament 
the King's Printer was instructed to supply one complete set in the language 
indicated, and the regulation further provided that •" each such member shall 
be supplied by the King's Printer, on request, wdth a second set of such statutes 
in the language other than that of the first supplied." This action was taken, 
as the regulation itself sets forth, '' failing action on this point by joint recom- 
mendation or otherwise of the House of Parliament ", and has apparently 
proved fairly satisfactory to members of Parliament. The administrative and 
official distribution lists were substantially as in the past, and in the case of 
libraries in Canada and abroad, the same general principle of distribution was 
adopted as in the case of other official publication and as laid down in P.C. 
1471 as above. 

Closely linked with the printing of the Revised Statutes of Canada, 1927, 
is the publication of the volume officially entitled '' Criminal Code and Asso- 
ciated Statutes ■', issued by the King's Printer for the convenience of justices 
of the peace, members of the Bar, etc. Officers of the Law Branch of the House 
of Commons kindly, at my request, arranged the contents of the volume. With 
regard to the Criminal Code volume based on the Revised Statutes of Canada. 
1906, the practice had been to forward copies without charge to newly appointed 
justices of the peace, to whom also would be forwarded from year to year any 
amendments to the Criminal Code. The distribution lists had become very 
heavy and the total number of justices receiving copies of amending statutes 
numbered in 1927 about 15,000. Inquiry seemed to indicate that the lists con- 
tained many names of persons who though holding the rank of justice of the 
peace did not exercise any magisterial functions, the title being of a nominal or 
honorary character. By arrangement of the officers of the respective provinces 
the distribution was confined as far as could be ascertained to the active jus- 
tices, and the number of copies of the new volume sent out free of charge was 
thus reduced by several thousand. The num.ber of copies printed was 10,000 
English and 3,000 French. The distribution to justices of the peace was made 
shprtly after the close of the fiscal 3''ear; also, continuing a former practice, 
authority was also given the King's Printer to supply one copy of the Criminal 
Code without charge and on request to a member of Parliament. There is a 
considerable demand from the public for these volumes, copies of which, bound 
in buckram, are held for sale at $2. 

Increase in Salaries and Wages 

An incident of the year whietl demands particular mention in these remarks 
is the general increase in salaries and wages, effective as from the beginning of 
the fiscal year. So far as respects the Ci\il Service section of the department, 
including some 250 officers and clerk:-, the increase was common to the Civil 
Service at large and was the outcome of representations made to the Govern- 
ment by organizations representative of the Civil Service and which had been 



12 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 

for some time the subject of investigation by the Civil Service Commission 
Action taken as a result of this inquiry caused a flat increase throughout the 
service of $120 per annum to all classes receiving salaries up to and including 
$5,100, exceptions being those officers only who might be, under former regula- 
tions, in receipt of salaries already exceeding by $120 or more the compensa- 
tion assigned to the class involved; where the excess in such cases was less 
than $120 the salary was increased by the amount of the difference. 

The employees'^ in the mechanical branches of this department, working 
under prevailing rates system, were not of course affected officially or formally 
by the action taken with respect to civil servants, but prior to such action repre- 
sentations had already been received from representatives of the prevailing 
rates employees urging that wage rates in the printing trades in Montreal and 
Toronto had reached a higher level than that obtaining in this department, 
which remained at the figure as set in 1920, following the reorganization then 
completed. The governing statute iChap. 162, R.S.C. 1927, sec. 16, par. 3) 
provides with respect to wage rates that " no increase of any such rate of wages 
shall be made so as to raise the rate above that which is at the time of such 
increase paid for similar work in the cities of Montreal and Toronto ". By 
your direction nn inquiry was made as to the wage rates in the printing trades 
in the cities of Montreal and Toronto, the Deputy Minister of the Department 
of Labour kindly placing at my disposal for this purpose very full information 
especially procured by his officers. Close analysis of the situation showed 
wage rates in the printing trades in Montreal and Toronto for the highest grades 
of workers to be somewhat above these obtaining in the Printing Bureau, and 
since the nature of the work executed in the Bureau requires that, so far as can 
be secured, workers in the various branches shall be of the highest grade, my 
report to you on the subject recommended advances in weekly wage rates whicii 
affected the divisions generally as follows: for workers in (1) Composition 
Branch and Press-rooms, an increase of $2; (2) Bindery, an increase of $3; 
(3) Stereotype Branch, an increase of $4; members of the small group of workers 
in the mechanical branches exempt from the operations of the Civil Service Act 
received proportionate increases. These various increases, being approved by 
voursclf. became effective as from April 1, 1927, by virtue of P.C. 112-1232 and 
P.C. 86-1583. 

It will be of interest to include in this statement a table showing weekly 
wage rates in the printing trades as paid at various periods in the Department 
of Public Printing and Stationery as from 1887 to the present time; the table 
follows: — 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1927- 



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14 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 

Re King's Printer's Advance Account 

It became necessary during the year to secure an amendment to the statute 
governing the department, namely, the Public Printing and Stationery Act, 
chapter 162, R.S.C., 1927, the object of this legislation being to make more 
effective the section of the statute under which the King's Printer is provided 
with working capital necessary to enable him to perform the responsibilities 
imposed upon him. These responsibilities briefly stated are as follows: (1) To 
execute the printing of all kinds required by the Houses of Parliament and by 
every branch of the service of the Government of Canada; (2) to provide all 
stationery and ofiBice appliances required by the Houses of Parliament and the 
various branches of the Government service; (3) to edit and publish the Canada 
Gazette; (4) to be the distributing agent of the various departments for their 
respective publications; (5) to be the exclusive sales agent of all official pub- 
lications; (6) to audit all advertising undertaken on behalf of the departments 
of the Government. 

Under the terms of the statute the Minister of Finance authorizes advances 
to the King's Printer, and the King's Printer remits to the Receiver General 
all moneys received for service rendered. Before the King's Printer can execute 
orders for printing or stationery he must have working capital for the payment 
of wages and the purchase of paper and other printing material and of stationery, 
and when he has purchased his stocks and filled his orders he must proceed with 
other purchases and with the filling of other orders before payment can be 
received from the Houses of Parliament and the Government departments for 
printing done and goods supplied. Something of the extent of the business of 
the department and of the necessities of a working capital are indicated by the 
inventory which, on the 1st of April, 1927, amounted to $370,128.52 for printing 
and $137,792.78 for stationery, a total of $507,921.30. Included in the printing 
inventory was material in stores as follows: printing paper, $103,304.57; print- 
ing material, $68,974.26; also on account of work in process: printing labour, 
$111,842.56, and printing material, $86,187.13. During the year the amounts 
of work and material in process and of material in stock vary according to the 
demands of Parliament and the several departments. The turnover for the 
year was, as alreadv stated, $3,883,036.89 in printing and $2,208,568.95 in 
stationery, a total of $6,091,605.84. 

Section 38 of the statute before amendment had provided that the Minister 
of Finance may authorize "the advance to the King's Printer, out of the Con- 
solidated Revenue Fund of Canada, of such sums of money, not exceeding at 
any time two hundred thousand dollars, as the King's Printer requires," etc. 
This clause was placed in the statute in 1900 and was no doubt at that time 
adequate for the object in view. Two causes have combined to render this 
sum insufficient properly to meet the King's Printer's necessities at the present 
time: (1) a very large increase in all branches of the activities of the depart- 
ment; (2) the change in money values; the wages per capita having, for instance, 
Increased by much over 100 per cent as compared with 1900. 

For several years the interpretation placed on the clause was such as seemed 
to render an amendment unnecessary, no objection having been raised to 
advancing the King's Printer the moneys needed to carry on the work of the 
department, but during the last year or two the Auditor General has pressed 
strongly for an amendment which would remove all doubt or ambiguity. After 
careful consideration the sum of $700,000 was estimated as the amount which 
may be with reasonable safety substituted for that of $200,000 as set in the 
existing statute. 

The situation was briefly outlined by yourself as minister in the House 
of Commons and the amending measure duly became law. 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1927-28 15 

Pre-Cancellatiox of Stamps 

A branch of work which is of comparatively recent origin is that known 
as " pre-cancellation of stamps ", an arrangement wherebj^ the Post Office 
Department provides for the sale to particular commercial concerns of postage 
stamps in considerable quantities which are over-printed with the name of the 
city at which the mail carrying such stamps is posted, this pre-cancellation 
saving labour at the post office and expediting geoerally the mail service. Under 
the procedure adopted sheets of 100 stamps of varying value are delivered by 
the Post Office Department to the officers of this Department. Special pre- 
cautions are taken in this Department to guard the stamps until the work of 
over-printing has been completed and the officials of the Post Office Department 
have received the pre-cancelled stamps safely back in their hands. The follow- 
ing table shows the quantities and values of pre-cancelled stamps handled 
during each of the last four years: — 

Year Quantity Value 

1927-8 49,579,700 $ 956.940 00 

1926-7 64,066,400 1,529,180 00 

1925-6 85,187,450 3,040,957 50 

1924-5 87,423,200 3,259,263 00 

Total 306,256,750 $8,786,340 50 

It is a matter of deep satisfaction to the Department that throughout the 
different phases of this important work absolutely no losses have been incurred 
a situation reflecting the highest credit on the various officers concerned. 

New Plant 

New plant to the value of $34,051.50 was purchased and installed as fol- 
lows during the fiscal year, viz: — 

General Plant. — Installation of new transformer, etc., for increased power 
for stereotype and other equipment, $629.23. 

Chiej Mechanic's Division. — One gasolene pump and meter, $579. 

Hand Contposing Division. — Two lead and rule cutters, $111. 

Linotype Division. — Two linotype machines No. 8, $7,561.20. 

Monotype Division. — One keyboard machine, $1,343.79; 1 giant casting 
machine, $3,624.32; 886 matrices, $888.04; 2 Margach metal feeders, $140; total, 
$5,996.15. 

Stereotype Division. — One moulding and drying press, $6,213.25; 1 set 
heaters, $450; total, $6,663.25. 

Press Division. — One platen press, $875; 12 steel chases, $120; total, $995. 

Bindery Division. — One stamping press, $2,900; 1 perforator, $6,262.70; 
1 bundler, $1,550; 1 temperature controller, $235.83; 1 tying machine with motor, 
$568.14; total, $11,516.67. 

Of the above list the name of the article purchased as a rule indicates the 
object, and the purchases were mainly to replace worn plant with more modern 
equipment. The largest individual purchases were a perforating machine in the 
bindery and a moulding and drying press in the stereotype division, the last 
representing a distinct advance on old methods, direct pressure being substituted 
for hand process. 

The two linotypes were replacements but the new machines were fitted for 
Made matrices and will relieve somewhat the pressure on the monotype division 
arising from the increasing statistical and wide-measure work. 



I 



F. A. ACLAND, 

King's Printer and Controller of Stationery. 



F. A. AcLAND, Esq., 

King's Printer and Controller of Stationery. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit a report of the work executed for Par- 
liament and the various departments in the Government Printing Bureau and 
in commercial lithographing, engraving and printing establishments during the 
fiscal year ending March 31, 1928, contained in the following tabulated state- 
ments : — 

1. Annual reports. 

2. Supplementary reports. 

3. Routine Parliamentary work. 

4. House of Commons and Senate Debates. 

5. Statutes. 

6. Canada Gazette. 

7. Voters' lists. 

8. Pamphlets and miscellaneous book-work. 

9. Statement of other letterpress departmental work. 

10. Statement of books bound. 

11. Pads made. 

12. Making and stamping of prepaid Post Office envelopes. 

13. Die stamping of letter and note headings and envelopes. 

14. Loo3e-leaf work. 

15. Lithographed maps, plans, cheques and forms. 

16. Half-tones, line cuts, electros and dies made. 

17. Lithographing and Engraving Division — Record of Work for Fiscal 

Year 1927-28. 

18. Comparative statement of presswork. 

Respectfully submitted, 

P. M. DRAPER, 
Director and Superintendent of Printing. 

Ottawa, August 7, 1928. 



17 

69595—2 



18 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 



Table No. 1 — Annual Reports to Parliament completed during the Fiscal Year 

1927-28 



Title of Document 



English 

Agriculture, 1926-27 

Civil Service Commission, 1926 

Commissioner of Patents, 1926-27 

Dominion Statistician, 1926-27 

Health, 1926-27 

Immigration and Colonization, 1926-27 

Indian Affairs, 1926-27 

Interior, 1926-27 

Labour, 1926-27 

Marine and Fisheries (Fisheries Branch), 1926^27 

Marine and Fisheries (Marine), 1926-27 

Mines, 1926-27 

National Defence (Militia and Air Services), 1926^27. 

National Defence (Naval Service), 1926-2? 

National Revenue (Customs and Excise Divisions), 

192&-27 

Penitentiaries, 1926-27 

Postmaster General, 1926-27 

Public Accounts, 1926-27 

Public Printing and Stationery, 1926-27 

Public Works, 1926-27 

Railway Commission, 1926 

Railways and Canals, 1926-27 

Royal Canadian Mounted Police, 1926-27 

Secretary of State, 1926-27 

Secretary of State for External Affairs, 1926-27. . . . 

Soldiers' Civil Re-Establishment, 1926-27 

Trade and Commerce, 1926-27 

Weights and Measures, Electricity and Gas Inspection 

Services, 1926-27 



Number 

of 
Copies 



Bilingual 
Auditor General— Auditeur general, 1926-27, (Vol. I) 
Auditor-General— Auditeur general, 1926-27, (Vol. II) 
National Revenue — Shipping Report (.Customs Div- 
ision) — Revenu National — Navigation (Service 
des Douanes) 



French 

Affaires Indiennes, 1925-26 

Commerce, 1925-26 

Commerce, 1926-27 

Commissaire des brevets, 1926-27 '.'. 

Commission des chemins de fer du Canada, 1926... 

Commission du Service Civil, 1925 

Commission du Service Civil, 1926 

Comptes publics, 1926-27 

Defense Naticnale (Service Naval), 1926^27 

Immigration et Colonisation, 1925-26 

Impressions et Papeterie publiques, 1926-27 

Intel leur, 192.5-26 

Marine et Pecheiies (Marine), 1926^27 

Marine et Pficheries (direction des PScheries), 1926-27 

Mines, 192,5-26 

Mines, 1926-27 

Pcnitenciers, 1925-26 

Poids et mesjies, de r61ectricit6 et du gaz, 1925-26 
Poids et mesures, de relectricit6 et du gaz, 1926-27 

Postes, 1926-27 

R6tablissement des soldats dans la vie civile, 1925-26 

Santd, 1925-26 

Scfx^.tiiirc d'ntat, 192.5-26 

Sccr^-taire d;i':tat aux Affaires cxt^rieures, 1926-27. . 

Statisticjen du Dominion, 1926-27 

Travaux publics, 1926-27 



Totals 

Totals (March .31, 1927). 



5,395 
M2 
706 
965 

1,816 

1,556 
880 
873 

2,561 
914 
722 

3,374 
648 
552 

1,093 

1,898 

1,051 

1,476 

451 

711 

543 

1,012 

1,351 

590 

663 

1,950 

911 

983 



1,788 
1,688 



Number 

of 

Pages 



724 



136 
156 
172 
156 
175 
266 
81 
231 
169 
361 
1.36 
164 
212 
219 
1,262 
1,333 
182 
161 
271 
206 
131 
354 
103 
205 
246 
155 



47,730 
44,887 



136 

86 

16 

24 

72 

84 

72 

130 

164 

124 

164 

66 

96 

28 

120 

44 

114 

152 

72 

160 

232 

122 

108 

664 

24 

84 

44 

74 



342 
1,352 



128 



74 

60 

48 

16 

304 

112 

92 

152 

32 

68 

72 

154 

176 

136 

90 

72 

48 

68 

74 

114 

56 

80 

602 

24 

24 

166 



,012 
,060 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 



733,720 

55,212 

11,296 

23,160 

130,752 

130,704 

63,360 

113,490 

420, 004 

113,336 

118,408 

222,684 

62,208 

15,456 

131,160 

83,512 
119,814 
224,352 

32,472 
113,760 
125,976 
123,464 
145,908 
391,760 

15,912 
163,800 

40,084 

72,742 



611,496\ 
2,282,176/ 



92,672 



10,064 

9,360 

8,256 

2,496 

53,200 

29,792 

7,452 

35,112 

5,408 

24,548 

9,792 

25, 256 

37,312 

29, 784 

113,580 

95,9/6 

8,736 

10,948 

20, 054 

23,484 

7,3.36 

28,320 

62,006 

4,920 

5, 904 

25,730 



7,679,676 
8.219,618 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1927 -i 



19 



Table No. 2- 



-Supplementary Reports to Parliament completed during the 
Fiscal Year, 1927-28 



Title of Document 



Number 

of 
Copies 



Number 

of 

Pages 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 



Cost 



English 

Board of Pension Commissioners, 1926-27 

Public Archives, 1926 

BiLINOTTAl 

Report ot the Chief Electoral Officer, By-Elections 
held during the Year 1924 — Rapport du Directeur 
general des elections, Elections partielles tenues 
pendant I'annee 1924 

French 

Archives publiques, 1926 

Commission des pensions, 1925-26 

Totals 

Totals (March 31. 1927) 



385 
1,360 



632 



645 
91 



3,113 
4.309 



106 
1.742 



7,700 
.35,360 



5,056 



18,060 
2,184 



68,360 
1.850.484 



$ cts 
98 13 
11? 33 



41 09 



102 48 

103 39 



462 42 
9,845 20 



Table No. 3 — Statement showing the Routine Parliamentary Work, Year 

1927-28 

* In this table and in other tables which contain a column giving the total numljer of printed pages, 
the figures in the total column coincide, as a rule, with those obtained by multiplying the number of 
copies by the number of pages. In some cases, however, a printing job includes different sections or 
series which vary as to the number of copies and number of pages; the two first columns do not therefore 
multiply into the figures shown in the column representing the total number of pages printed. Cases of 
this class aie denoted by an asterisk (*). 



Title of Document 


Number 

of 
Copies 


Number 

of 

Pages 


Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 




t2,594 
t374 

11,403 
t367 

tl,295 
1275 

1 1,828 
t425 

tl,144 
t272 

tl,163 

t338 

t806 

1221 

8,425 

2,292 
72,675 
45,233 
412 
140 
405 
137 


684 
664 
1,212 
1,256 
540 
5.32 
412 
680 
900 
931 
604 
700 
752 
756 
256 

504 

3,. 324 
2,992 
696 
672 
808 
816 


1,774,296 




248,336 


Orders of the Day 


1,700,4.36 




460,952 




699,300 




146, 300 


Public Bills 


753,136 




289,000 


Private Bills 


1,029 600 




253,232 


Third Reading Bills (Commons) 


702,452 




236,600 


Third Reading Bills (Senate) ,. . 


606.112 
167,076 


Returns (for distribution or Sessional Papers, either or both) .... 
Reponsps (pour distribution ou pour insertion aux documents parle- 


*a52.800 
*315,588 


Divorce cases 


*1, 412, 700 




*1, 931, 8.32 


House of ('ommons Journals, 1926-27 


286, 752 




94,080 


Senate Journals, 1926-27 


32y,240 


Journaux du Senat 1926-27 


111,792 






Totals 


142,224 
227,792 


20,691 
33,296 


13,799,612 


Totals (March 31, 1927) 


21,737,172 







t Average number of copies printed. 
69595— 2i 



20 



depaktment of public printing and stationery 



Table No. 4 — Statement o^ the Work on the House of Commons and Senate 

Debates, Year 1927-28 

* In this table and in other tables which contain a column giving the total number of printed pages, 
the figures in the total column coincide, as a rule, with those obtained by multiplying the number of copies 
by the number of pages. In some cases, however, a printing job includes different sections or series which 
vary as to the number of copies and number of pages; the two first columns do not therefore multiply 
into the figures shown in the column representing the total number of pages printed. Cases of this class 
are denoted by an asterisk (*). 



Title of Document 


Number 

of 
Copies 


Number 

of 

Pages 


Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 


Cost 


House of Commons Debates — 

Unrevised Edition ' English) 

Unrevised Edition (French) 

Revised Edition, 1926-27. 5 Vols, and Index (En- 
glish) 

Senate Debates — 

Unrevised Edition (English) 


tl4.400 

t971 

524 

t2.322 
374 


2,944 
2,420 

2,782 

478 
456 


*44,551,144 
*2, 353, 520 

1,457.768 

*979.700 
170.544 


$ cts. 

15,750 19 
8,313 16 

6,639 82 

1,583 92 


Revised Edition, 1926-27 (English) 


877 38 






Totals 


18,571 
11,575 


9,080 
23,652 


49,512,676 
52,095,929 


33.164 47 


Totals (March 31. 1927) 


69,158 34 


Speeches: Extra copies ordered by Members and 
Senators 


243,400 
515,300 


854 
2,008 


*2, 339, 800 
*6, 236, ICO 


1,733 73 


Speeches: (March 31, 1927) 


5,106 93 







tAverage number of copies printed. 

Table No. 5 — Statement of the work on the Statutes, Year 1927-28 





Number 

of 
Copies 


Number 

of 

Pages 


Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 


Cost 


The Statutes 

English 
Parts I-II. 1926-27 

Fretich 
Parties I-II. 1926-27 


4.550 
515 


756 
762 


3,439,800 
392,430 


S cts. 
6,129 73 

2,808 94 






Totals 

Totals (March 31, 1927) 


5.065 
5.276 


1,518 
4,370 


3,832.230 
2.202.634 


8,938 67 
6,891 70 



Table No. 6 — Statement of the work on the Canada Gazette for the Fiscal Year 

1927-28 





Aggregate 

Annual 

Issue 


Number of 
Pages in 
Volume 


Canada Gazette 


106,600 
12.710 
31.125 


4.350 




186 


Extras 


62 






Totals 


150.435 
138.945 


4.598 


Totals (March 31. 1927) 


4.392 







Table No. 7— Voters' Lists. (None printed in 1927-28) 



ANNUAL REPORT, 19^ -i 



21 



Table No. 8 — Statement of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, 1927-28 

* In this table and in other tables which contain a column giving the total number of printed pages, 
the figures in the total column coincide, as a rule, with those obtained by multiplying the number of 
copies by the number of pages. In some cases, however, a printing job includes difTerent sections or series 
which vary as to the number of copies and number of pages; the two first columns do not therefore multiply 
into the figures shown in the column representing the total number of pages printed. Cases of this class 
are denoted by an asterisk (*). 



Description 



Number 

of 
Copies 



Number 
of 

Pages 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 



Agriculture- 



English 



Assistance to Sheep Breeding by the Federal and Provincial 

Departments of Agriculture (Pamphlet No. 76) 

The Canadian Record of Performance for Pure-Bred Poultry, 

Record Year 1925-26 — Regulations, Standards and Records of 

Fowls Qualified for Certificates (Report No. 7) 

Weeds and Weed Seeds — Illustrated and Described (Bulletin No. 

4 — New Series) 

The Cabbage Flea-Beetle and Its Control in British Columbia 

(Pamphlet No. 80— New Series) 

The Red-Backed Cutworm and Its Control in the Prairie Provinces 

(Pamphlet No. 69 — New Series) 

The "Egg Case Plan" (Pamphlet No. 8 — Poultry Division) 

Insects affecting the Strawberry 

Register of Fully Accredited Herds arranged by Breed as recorded 

to March 31, 1927 

World's Poultry Congress, Canada, 1927 — Final Announcement and 

Congress Programme 

Annual Statistics of Fruit and Floriculture, 1926 

The Dairy Produce Act, as amended in 1925, and Regulations — 

Acts, Orders and Regulations (No. 21") 

The Cooling of Milk for Cheesemaking (Pamphlet No. 28 — New 

Series) 

Programme of Lamb Fair and Sale 

Fruit and Vegetable Crop and Market Summary, 1926-27 

Regulations made under the provisions of the Live Stock and Live 

Stock Products Act, respecting the Grading and Marking of 

Eggs 

The Conversion of Dry Roughage into a Succulent Feed — An Ex- 
amination of the Sugar Jack Process (Bulletin No. 96 — New 

Series) 

Canadian Seed Growers' Association — Classification of Canadian 

Spring Wheat Varieties 

The Testing of Milk, Cream and Dairy By-Products by Means of 

the Babcock Test (Bulletin No. 14— New Series) 

The Agricultural Pests' Control Act, 1927, with Regulations — 

Acts, Orders and Regulations (No. 22) 

Swine Husbandry in Canada 

The Hessian-Fly in the Prairie Provinces (Pamphlet No. 30^— New 

Series) 

World's Poultry Congress, Ottawa, Canada, July 27 to August 4, 

1927 — Canadian Exhibit, Descriptive Booklet 

How to Reduce the Meat Bill — Recipes for Utilizing the Cheaper 

Cuts of Beef (Pamphlet No. 4.3 — New Series) 

Report of the Veterinary Director General; 1926-27 

The Origin and Quality of Commercial Live Stock marketed in 

Canada in 1926 (Report No. 7) 

Eggs — Their Value as a Food and their Place in the Canadian Diet 

(Pamphlet No. 59) ' 

The Agricultural Pests' Control Act, 1927, with Regulations — Acts, 

Orders and Regulations (No. 22) 

The United States Federal Import Milk Act — Some of Its Pro- 
visions — Acts, Orders and Regulations (No. 23) 

Register of Fully Accredited Herds — Arranged by Breeds as 

recorded to September .30, 1927 

Hog Marking (Pamphlet No. 88 — New Series) 

Dehydration of Fruits and Vegetables in Canada (Bulletin No. 

90 — New Series) 

The Canadian Record of Performance for Pure-Bred Dairy Cattle 

— Regulations, Standards and Records of Cows Qualified for 

Registration (Report No. 19) 

Carried forward 



15,006 

10,006 

30,006 

1,500 

5,006 

15,006 

500 

156 

3,000 
1,000 

2,006 

15,006 
1,000 
6,556 

20,000 

5,000 

8,000 

5,000 

3,000 
20,205 

5,006 

25,000 

20,000 
7,011 

2,011 
75,000 

2,500 

11,000 

211 
10,000 

8,011 
7,611 



16 



32 



130 



240,096 



22 


1,220,732 


64 


1,920,. 384 


12 


18,000 


16 
16 

8 


80,096 

240,096 

4,000 


24 


3,744 


64 
20 


192,000 
20,000 


16 


32,096 


8 

8 

48 


120,048 

8,000 

314,688 



160,000 



40 


200,000 


32 


256,000 


48 


240,000 


22 

72 


66,000 
1,454,760 


8 


40,048 


24 


600,000 


12 
64 


240,000 

448,704 


64 


128,704 


8 


600,000 


20 


50,000 


24 


*132,000 


28 
8 


5,908 
80,000 



256,352 



989,430 



340,320 



1,086 



10,361.886 



22 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 

Table No. 8 — Statement of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, 

1927 -28— Continued 



Description 



Brought forward . 



Agriculture — Continued 



English — Concluded 



Number 

of 
Copies 



Astragalus Campestris and Other Stock Poisoning Plants of British 
Columbia (Bulletin No. 88) 

Fertilizer Analyses, 1926-27 ■ ■ • • ■.• -.■ 

The Seeds Act, 1923, with the Regulations made by the Minister 
of Agriculture ■ 

Report of Committee on Dressed Poultry Standards 

Experimental Station, Lethbridge, Alta.— Report of the Super- 
intendent, 1926 w • • X • ••■ ■ ; 

Screenings as a Feed for Live Stock (Pamphlet No. 87— New Series) 

The Cabbage Flea-Beetle and Its Control in British Columbia 
(Pamphlet No. 80— New Series) ■ • ■ • • 

The History and Present Status of Wheat Production in Canada 
(Pamphlet No. 8&— New Series) \- ■<■;■■ ^o" 

Why and How to Use Milk— Revised Edition (Pamphlet No. 36— 
New Series) ^; • • -^^ • •.• \- 

List of Publications, 1928 (Pamphlet No. 90— New Series) 

Extract from the Canada Gazette, February 11, 1928 

Seed, Feed and Fertilizer Markets 

Bulletin of the Canadian Tuberculosis Association 



340,320 



5,506 
3,000 

15,200 
10,000 

5,000 
8,000 

1,500 

10,000 

25,000 

35,011 

2,500 

189,450 

140,000 



French 

Comment se prot6ger contre les moustiques, les mouches noires et les 
fleaux semblables dans la foret (feuillet n° 55— nouyelle serie) 

La bete a patates au Canada (bulletin n° 52— nouyelle serie).. 

Congres mondial d'aviculture, Canada, 1927— Avis final et pro- 
gramme du congres .• • • ■ • ■ ■ • • ■ 

Rapport du Directeur general veterinaire, 1925-26 ........ 

Petits refrigerateurs et laiteries (bulletin n 16— nouvelle sferie) . . . 

Les oeufs «Le dejeuner national ))—Leur valeur nutritive et leur 

place dans le regime alimentaire au Canada (feuillet n i>yh . . . 

La loi des fruits et rfeglements— Lois— arretes et r^glements (n 7) . 

Programme de I'exposition et vente d'agneaux •••••••.•■•;■ v o 

La preparation et la coupe de la viande d agi.eau (feuillet n 8— nou- 

vgHg s^riG^ * 

Le contrrle de la ponte au Canada pour les volailles de race pure 

1925-26 (rapport n° 7) •,■•,•■.••, V- 

Supplement aux rfeglements etablis sous la loi des semences— L,ois, 

arretes et rfeglements (n° 11) - ■■ :kky- 

La loi des produits laitiers avec amendements apportes en iMza— 

Lois, arrfetes et rfeglements (n° 21) ..... . . • • • ■ ■ • • •■ ■ 

Le refroidissement du lait pour la fabrication du fromage (feuillet 

n° 28— nouvelle s6rie) • ;,• • ' • j • A J" ' ^. 

Insectes nuisil)les aux arbres d'ombrage dans 1 est du Canada et 

moyens de les combattre (bulletin n° 63— nouvelle s6rie) .... ■ 

La loi des viandos et des conserves alimentaires— Lois, arretes et 

rfeglements (n° 15) ,;■■/'•;, 

Le marquage des pores (feuillet n° 88— nouvelle scrie ............. 

La loi des semences, 1923, et r6glements etablis par le ministre de 
r Agriculture— Lois, arrSt^s et rdglements (n 11), octobre 1927. 
La gale des chevaux, des boeufs et des moutons (bulletin n 31— nou- 
velle 86rie) ■ • ; • ■ ; 

La composition du fromage Cheddar canadien et du fromage 

refait (bulletin n° 79— nouvelle s6rie) .........;....•■•• 

Le ver pris ii dos rouge et les moyens de le ddtruire dans les pro- 
vinces des Prairies (feuillet n" 69— nouvelle s6rie) • 

La loi des plantes-racines potagdres. 1922— Lois, arr6t6s et rfegle- 

ments (n° 3 ) .- .......... 

Un plaidoyer dans la cuisine— Com6die en un acte pour les enlants 

(feuillet n° 67— nouvelle s^rie) • • ■ ; • • •••.■••■■• 

Moyens d'6conomiser sur la viande— Recettes pour 1 utilisation dc.~ 
coupes de boeuf meillcur march6 (feuillet n° 43— nouvelle s^rie) 



Carried forward . 



Number 

of 

Pages 



3,000 
506 

3,258 
3,006 
2,006 

506 
8,006 
5,000 

5,000 

2,506 

2,006 

2,006 

5,006 

2,006 

2,006 
10,000 

5,011 

2,006 

4,006 

506 
3,006 

506 
5,006 



866,364 



1,086 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 



40 

48 
16 

64 
16 

12 

16 

32 
16 
16 
216 
32 



48 

8 

32 
128 

8 
16 

8 

64 

52 
8 

52 

16 

20 

16 

16 

20 

12 



10,361,886 



264,288 
120,000 

729,600 
160,000 

320,000 
125,000 

18,000 

160,000 

800,000 

560,176 

40,000 

*1, 515, 600 

»1, 120,000 



36,072 
16,192 

208,512 

126,252 

40, 120 

4,048 

384,288 

40,000 

160,000 

320,768 

16,048 

32,096 

40,048 

128,384 

104,312 
80,000 



2,360 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1927- 



23 



Tablo No. 8 — Statement of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, 

1927-28— Continued 



Description 



Number 

of 
Copies 



Number 

of 

Pages 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 



Brought forward . 



Agriculture — Concluded 



French — Concluded 



Assistance k I'elevage du mouton (feuillet n° 76) 

La loi federale des Etats-Unis concernant le lait inspecte — Quelques- 

unes de ses dispositions — Lois, arrfetes et r^glements (n° 23). . . . 

Rapport du Directeur general veterinaire, 1926-27 

La loi federale des Etats-Unis concernant le laitimporte — Quelques- 

unes de ses dispositions — Lois, arretes et r^glements (n° 23) .... 

Desserts geles faits a la maison (feuillet n° 49 — nouvelle serie) 

Les criblures pour 1' alimentation du betail (feuillet n° 87 — nouvelle 

serie) 

Liste des publications, 1928 (feuillet n° 90 — nouvelle s6rie) 

Loi modifiant et codifiant les Lois concernant les animaux de ferme. 

Consommons du lait (feuillet n° 36 — nouvelle serie) 

Consommons du fromage (feuillet n° 7 — nouvelle serie) 

Recolte et commerce de fruits et de legumes — Rapport sommaire, 

1926-27 

La revue des marches des semences, des produits alimentaires pour 

les animaux et des engrais chimiques 

Bulletin de 1' Association Canadienne Antituberculeuse 



Archives — 



English 



The Canadian Historical Association — Report of the Annual 
Meeting held in the City of Toronto, May 27-28, 1927 



Auditor General — 



Bilingual 



Auditor General's Report — Rapport de I'Auditeur general, 1926-2^ 
(Published in separate parts) 



Canada Gazette- 



English 



Index to the Canada Gazette, 1926-27. 



Civil Service Commission — 



English 



Information respecting Examinations for the Postal Service 

Information respecting Examinations for the Customs Service 

Examinations for Clerks, Stenographers and Typists 

Civil Service Regulations, Canada ." 

Occupational Opportunities in the Civil Service 

French 

Renseignements sur les examens du service des douanes 

Renseignements generaux sur les examens du service civil 

Examens pour commis, stenographes et dactylographes 

Renseignements sur les examens du service postal 

Diamond Jubilee — 

English 

Diamond Jubilee of Confederation — General Suggestions for the 
guidance of committees in charge of local celebrations 

Diamond Jubilee of Confederation 

The Story of Canada 

Diamond Jubilee of Confederation — Programme of National 
Celebration at Ottawa, July 1, 1927 

Canada — Confederation, 1867-1927 

Carried forward 



866,364 



10,000 

2,000 
3,000 

5.011 
15,000 

3,000 

8.011 

1,000 

15,000 

15,000 

1,206 

160,. 350 
18,022 



800 



40 



2,050 



5,000 
5,000 
5,000 
510 
5,000 



3,000 
5,000 
3,000 
5,000 



10,100 

20,080 

1,200 

10,000 
11,100 



2,360 



16 



16 
16 
16 
40 
24 

48 

192 
40 



120 



1,604 



82 



12 



12 



16 
128 
28 

32 



18,533,862 



80,000 

24,000 
192,000 

80, 176 
120,000 

48,000 
128,176 

16.000 
600,000 
360,000 

57,888 

*1, 282, 800 
*144,176 



96,000 



64,160 



168,100 



60,000 
40.000 
40 000 
16.320 
60,000 



24,000 
40,000 
24,000 
60,000 



161,600 

"1,285,120 

33,600 

*160,000 
88,800 



1,214,844 



24,088,778 



24 



DEPAIITMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 



Table No. 8 — Statement of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work. 

1927 -28— Continued 



Description 



Number 

of 
Copies 



Number 

of 

Pages 



Brought forward. 
Diamond Jubilee — Concluded 



French 



Soixantenaire de la Confederation — Suggestions g^nerales a I'usage 

des comites charges des f&tes locales 

Soixantenaire de la Confederation 

Canada— Confederation, 1867-1927 



1,214,844 



2,500 

23,500 

4,100 



Experimental Farms- 



English 



Experimental Station, Swift-Current, Sask. — Report of the Super 
intendent, 1926 

Experimental Station, Scott, Sask. — Report of the Superintendent, 
1926 

Experimental Station, Sidney, B.C. — Report of the Superintendent, 
1926 

Experimental Station, Charlottetown, P.E.I.— Report of the 
Superintendent, 1926 

Experimental Station, Morden, Man. — Report of the Superintend- 
ent, 1926 

Experimental Station, Fredericton, N.B. — Report of the Super- 
intendent, 1926 

Experimental Station, Invermere, B.C. — Report of the Super- 
intendent, 1926 

Experimental Station, Lennoxville, Que. — Report of the Super- 
intendent, 1926 

Experimental Station, Kapuskasing, Ont. — Report of the Super- 
intendent, 1926 

Experimental Station, Rosthern, Sask. — Report of the Super- 
intendent, 1926 

Experimental Station, Lacombe, Alta. — Report of the Super- 
intendent, 1926 

Experimental Station, Cap Rouge, Que. — Report of the Super- 
intendent, 1926 ■ 

Experimental Station, Harrow, Ont. — Report of the Superintend- 
ent, 1926 

Experimental Station, Summerland, B.C. — Report of the Super- 
intendent, 1926 

Experimental Station, Ste. Anne de la Pocatifere, Que. — Report of 
the Superintendent, 1926 

Experimental Station, Kentville, N.S.— Report of the Superintend- 
ent, 1926 

Experimental Station, Farnham, Que. — Report of the Superintend- 
ent, 1926 

Experimental Substations: Fort Vermilion, Alta., Salmon Arm, 
B.C., Betsiamites,Que., Fort Smith, N.W.T., Fort Resolution, 
N.W.T. — Report of the Experimentalists in Charge, 192G 

Experimental Farm, Brandon, Man. — Report of the Superintendent, 
1926 

Experimental Farm, Indian Head, Sask. — Report of the Super 
intendent. 1926 

Experimental Farm, Agassiz, B.C.— Report of the Superintendent, 
1926 

Experimental Farm, Nappan, N.S.— Report of the Superintendent, 
1926 

Report of the Dominion Animal Husbandman, 1925-26 

Report of the Dominion Apiarist, 1926 

Rei)ort of the Dominion Chemist, 1926 

Report of the Dominion Poultry Ilusbandiiian, 1926 

Report f>f the Dominion Agricultural Hactoriologist, 1926 

Report of the Division of Forage Plants, 1926 

Report of the Dominion Corealist, 1926 

Report of the Dominion Field Husbandman, 1926 

Report of the Dominion Botanist, 1926 



Carried forward 1 1 461 , 642 



5,011 

7,131 

12,606 

6,706 

4,206 

13,186 

8,506 

6,2.56 

21,106 

5,206 

5,500 

8,. 500 

10,000 

5,400 



5,606 


48 


4,806 


64 


4,800 


68 


12,756 


64 


4,206 


64 


8,206 


80 


5,506 


32 


5,706 


72 


5,506 


64 


5,211 


64 


7,211 


72 


3,211 


48 


6,200 


32 


6,206 


80 


3,200 


72 


6,035 


98 


3,000 


24 



36 

56 

48 

48 

64 
68 
20 

104 
64 
16 
40 
32 
40 

152 



6,930 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1927 -i 



25 



Table No. S — Statement of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, 

1^21-2^— Continued 



Description 



Number 

of 
Copies 



Number 

of 

Pages 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 



Brought forward. 



-New 



Experim ental Farms — Continued 

English — Continued 

Report of the Dominion Horticulturist, 1926 

Apple Scab — Studies in Fruit Diseases (Pamphlet No. 82 

Series) 

Legume Inoculation (Pamphlet No. 81 — New Series) 

The Strawberry and Its Cultivation in Canada (Bulletin No. 80 — 

New Series) 

Preserving Fruits and Vegetables in the Home (Bulletin No. 77 — 

New Series) 

Pamphlets in Ukrainian language (2) 

The Prairie Farmer's Vegetable Garden (Bulletin No. 43 — New 

Series) 

Medicinal Plants and their Cultivation in Canada (Bulletin No. 36 

— New Series) 

Alkali Soils — Their Nature and Reclamation (Bulletin No. 21 — 

New Series) 

The Combined Reaper — Thresher in Western Canada (Pamphlet 

No. 83— New Series) 

The French-Canadian Horse (Bulletin No. 87 — New Series) 

Canadian National Egg-Laying Contest, 1927-28 — Registration. . . 
Smut Diseases of Cultivated Plants — Their Cause and Control 

(Bulletin No. 81 — New Series) 

Rabbits (Bulletin No. 28— New Series) 

Standard Descriptions of Vegetables: Beets and Carrots — A Guide 

to Seed-Growers (Bulletin No. 82 — New Series), . . . 
Garnet Wheat — New Promising Variety of Early Maturing Spring 

Wheat (Bulletin No. 83— New Series) 

A Survey of Canadian Plants in Relation to their Environment 

(Bulletin No. 58 — New Series) 

The Illustration Stations in British Columbia, Alberta, Saskat- 
chewan and Manitoba — Report of the Chief Supervisor, 1926. . 

Tomato Diseases (Bulletin No. 51— New Series) 

The Illustration Stations in Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick, 

Nova Scotia, and PrinceEdward Island — Report of the Chief 

Supervisor, 1926 

Dominion Experimental Farms — Report of the Director, 1926-27. . 

Tobacco Division — Report of the Officer in Charge, 1926 

Root-Rots and Foot-Rots of Wheat in Manitoba (I3ulletin No. 85 — 

New Series) 

Studies in Cereal Diseases "Take AH" — A Destructive Disease of 

Wheat (Pamphlet No. 85 — New Series) 

Ornamental Trees, Shrubs and Woody Climbers (Bulletin No. 89 — 

New Series) 

Division of Botany — White Pine Blister Rust (Circular No. 48). . 
Canadian Certified Seed Potatoes — Rules and Regulations Gov- 
erning Their Production (Pamphlet No. 84 — New Series) 

The French-Canadian Horse (Bulletin No. 87 — New Series) 

Division of Economic Fibre Production — Report of the Chief 

Officer, 1926 

Banner Oats — The Best Variety for Quebec (Bulletin No. 91 — New 

Series) 

Turkeys — Their Care and Management (Bulletin No. 46 — New 

Series) 

Hardy Roses — Their Culture in Canada (Bulletin No. 17 — New 

Series) 

Swine Husbandry in Central Alberta — Results from Thirteen Years 

of Experiment at the Dominion Experimental Station, La- 
combe, Alta. (Bulletin No. 73 — New Series) 

Field Roots in Canada — Classification, Improvement and Seed 

Production (Bulletin No. 84 — New Series) 

Manures and Fertilizers^Their Nature, Functions and Application 

(Bulletin No. 92 — New Series) 

Growing and Feeding Field Roots (Bulletin No. 94 — New Series). 
Seasonable Hints 



1,461,642 



11,000 

10,006 
15,000 

20,006 

30, 106 
10,000 

10,006 

5,056 

5,000 

15,006 
3,006 
2,000 

10,006 
15,206 

10,006 

3,506 

5,006 

8,006 
5,006 

5,006 

10,092 

5,411 

7,006 

8,011 

35,340 
12,000 

20,011 
6,000 

5,200 

15,000 

15,011 

25,006 

15,106 
5,006 



6,930 



25,205 

20,011 

,058,222 



80 
106 
32 

32 



52 

8 

16 

24 

20 

8 

10 

40 

32 

52 

64 
36 
96 



37,246,044 



880,000 

80,048 
240,000 

1,120,336 

1,445,088 
480, 000 

360,216 

161,792 

60,000 

240,096 
72, 144 
16,000 

800,480 
486, 592 

360,216 

266,456 

320,384 

640,480 
100, 120 

400,480 

1,069,752 

173,152 

224, 192 

64,088 

1,837,680 
96,000 

320,176 
144,000 

104,000 

120,000 

240, 176 

1,000,240 

483,392 

260,312 

1,613,120 

720,396 

"16,931,552 



Carried forward 2, 947, 220 



8,424 



71,179,200 



26 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 

Table No. 8— Statement of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, 

1927-28 — Continued 



Description 



Number 

of 
Copies 



Brought forward 

Experimental Farms — Continued 



2,947,220 



French 



-Rapport 



Station experimentale, Ste-Anne de la Pocatifere, Que. 

du regisseur, 1925 • • • • • • i " ■■/ '• moc 

Station experimentale, Kentville, N.-E.— Rapport du regisseur, 1925 
Station experimentale, Charlottetown, I.P.-E.— Rapport du regis- 

sGiir 1926 ••• 

Station experiiAentale'de Lennoxville, Qu6.— Rapport du regisseur 

1996 .• 

Station experimentale, Kapuskasing. Ont.— Rapport du regisseur 

1926 ; 

Station experimentale, Fredericton. N.-B.— Rapport du regisseur, 

1996 

Station experimentale, Cap Rouge, Que.— Rapport du regisseur, 

Sous-Stations exp6rimentales": Fort Vermilion, Alta, Salmon Arm, 
C -B , Betsiamites, Que., Fort Smith; T.N.-O., iort Resolu- 
tion, T.N.-O., Fort Providence, T.N.-O.— Rapport des expe- 

rimentateurs, 1926 • • ■ • • • ■■:■ •; •.■ ■ 

Sous-Station experimentale. Beaverlodge, Alta— Rapport du regiS' 

seur, 1925 • ,■•••■••■••"■ iAo-oc' 

Fermes experimentales federales— Rapport du directeur, 192o-Zb. 
Stations federales de demonstration— Ontario, Quebec, Nouveau 
Brunswick, Nouvelle-Ecosse et He du Pnnce-Edouard— 

Rapport du surveillant en chef, 1926 •■■•,■. inAA 

Ferme experimentale de Brandon, Man.— Rapport du regisseur, 1920 
Ferme experimentale, Nappan, N.-E.— Rapport du regisseur, 192b 
Fermes experimentales federales— Service des tabacs— Rapport du 

prepose, 1926 ; ■"■,:■' '/ inoc'07' ' 

Fermes experimentales federales— Rapport du directeur, 192b-2/. . 

L'elevaf-e des pigeons (bulletin n° 15— nouvelle serie) ■ ■ ■ 

La culture du pommier au Canada ayec liste et description des 

varietes (bulletin n° 55 — nouvelle serie 

Rapport de I'apiculteur du Dominion, 1925 • • ■ ■ ■ • ■ • • •. ■ • 

Son, petit son, grus et remoulages— Recherches en vue de 1 etablis- 
sement de nouveaux types modeles (bulletin n 2— nouvelle 

Service de la grande culture— Rapport de I'agriculteur du Domi 



nion, 192.J .- ,, 

Recherches sur les maladies du framboisier (feuiUet n 72— nouvelle 



sGri© ) 

I.e fromage Meilleur (feuillet n° 27— nouvelle s6rie) ••••••:•■;•■•• 

Plantes a foin et h. pacage pour le nord-ouest de la Saskatchewan 

(bulletin n° 4(>^nouvelle serie) -^^ ; • ■ 

La chaux en agriculture (bulletin n° 86— nouvelle sene) 

La tavelure du pommier (feuillet n° 82— nouvelle s6rie) 

Rapport de I'aviculteur du Dominion, 1925. . . ... ■ •• ■ • • • .„ ■ • • j ' " 

Recherches sur le ble k la ferme experimentale federale de Brandon, 

Man.— R63um6, 1889-192.3 (bulletin n° 42— nouvelle scrie) 

L'elevage du dindon (bulletin n° 46— nouvelle s6ric). . . •••,■■.•; 

L'inoculation des legumineuses (feuillet n° 81— nouvelle sene) 

La production de lait propre (feuillet n° 79— nouvelle sene). . ... . 

Culture du tabac dans le sud-ouest de 1 Ontario (bulletin n 7b— 

nouvelle .serie) •,■•;.■••.•■■;■„■/ iV ' ' a •' \ 

L'hivernage des abeilles au Canada (bulletin n° 74— nouvelle s6nc) 
L'ensilage et la construction des silos dans les Provinces Mantimes 

(feuillet n° 35— nouvelle s6rie) 

Le lapin (bulletin n° 28— nouvelle s6rie) •.••••;••,•,• ■: ' • o -,; 

Conserves de fruits et de legumes faites k la maison (bulletin n 7/ 

nouvelle s/^rie) •■ •• • • • • • • ■ ■ • . 

Service de I'exploitation animale— Rajjport de 1 feleveur du Domi- 
nion, 192.5-26 ■ • ••■•.•• 

Les maladies des tomates (bulletin n° 51— nouvelle s6rie) 



Number 

of 

Pages 



Carried forward. 



2,006 
1,206 

1,206 

3,606 

3,106 

3,506 

18,211 

1,511 

756 
5,006 



2,006 
1,206 
1,106 

4,211 
5,006 
3,006 

15,132 
3,506 



1,006 

3,006 

2,006 
2,000 

3,006 
8,006 
3,506 
6,006 

3,006 
10,006 

3,000 
15,006 

2,506 
10.006 

4,006 
5,006 

10,006 

3,506 
2,506 



3,119,621 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 



8,424 



72 
88 

64 

80 

72 
84 
48 

40 
72 



84 
64 
68 

36 

120 

24 

56 
20 



24 
40 

16 

8 

16 

20 

8 

68 

56 
16 
16 
20 

32 
32 

28 
32 

52 

72 
20 



71,179,200 



144,432 
106, 128 

77,184 

288,480 

223,632 

294,504 

874,128 

60,440 

54,432 
490, 588 



168,504 
77,184 
75,208 

151,596 

600,720 

72,144 

847,392 
70,120 



24.144 

120,240 

32,096 
16,000 

48,096 
160,120 

28,048 
408,408 

168,336 

160,096 

48,000 

300, 120 

80,192 
320, 192 

112,168 
160,192 

520,312 

252.432 
50.120 



10,190 



78,865,328 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1927-28 



27 



Table No, 8 — Statement of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, 

1^21-1^— Continued 



Description 



Number 

of 
Copies 



Number 

of 

Pages 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 



Brought forward 

Experimental Farms — Concluded 

French — Concluded 

Le ble Garnet — Nouvelle variete d'avenir de ble de printemps 
hatif (bulletin n° 83 — nouvelle serie) 

Rapport du service des plantes fourrag^res, 1924-25 

Rapport de I'horticulteur du Dominion, 1925 

Rosiers rustiques — Leur culture au Canada (bulletin n° 17 — nouvelle 
serie) 

Rapport de I'apiculteur du Dominion, 1926 

Service de la botanique — La rouille vesiculeuse du pin blanc (cir- 
culaire n° 48) 

Etudes des maladies des cereales — «Le pietin » — Une maladie des- 
tructive du ble (feuillet n° 85 — nouvelle serie) 

Rapport de I'agriculteur du Dominion, 1926 

Comment chaponner (feuillet n° 12 — nouvelle serie) 

Le jardin potager des prairies (bulletin n° 43) — nouvelle serie) 

Les plantes medicales et leur culture au Canada (bulletin n° 36 — 
nouvelle serie) 

Rapport du cerealiste du Dominion, 1925 

Service des tabacs — Rapport du chef du service, 1925 

Guide des recherches entreprises sur les fermes experimentales 
federales 

Descriptions typiques de legumes — Betteraves et carottes (bulletin 
n° 82 — nouvelle serie) 

Le cheval canadien (bulletin n° 87 — nouvelle serie) 

La moissonneuse-batteuse (Combine) dans I'ouest du Canada (feuil- 
let n° 38 — nouvelle serie) 

Rapport du chimiste du Dominion, 1924-25 

Rapport de I'aviculteur du Dominion, 1926 

L'avoine Bannifere (bulletin n° 91 — nouvelle serie) 

Semence canadienne certifiee de pommes de terre — Rfeglements 
gouvernant leur production 

Conseil pour la saison 

External Affairs — 

English 

International Sanitary Convention, Paris, June 21, 1926 

League of Nations — Slavery Convention, Geneva, September 25, 

1926 

Passport, Canada 

Treaties and Agreements afTecting Canada in force between His 

Majesty and the United States of America with Subsidiary 

Documents, 1914-15 

Address by the Prime Minister, on the occasion of the unveiling of 

the Statue of Sir Wilfrid Laurier by His Royal Highness the 

Prince of Wales, Parliament Hill, August 3, 1927 

League of Nations — Second Opium Conference, Geneva, February 

19, 1925 

Report of the Canadian Delegates to the Eighth Assembly of the 

League of Nations, September 5 to 27, 1927 , 

Confidential documents 



French 

Convention sanitaire Internationale, Paris, 21 juin 1926 

Societe des Nations — Convention relative k I'esclavage, Geneve, 

25 septembre 1926 _. ^ 

Rapport des delegues canadiens k la huitifeme as.semblee de la 

Societe des Nations, 5 au 27 septembre 1927 

Conference imperiale, 192(5 — Appendices au sommaire des delibdra- 

tions 

Societe des Nations — Deuxiftme conference de I'opium, Geneve, 

19 f^vrier 1925 



3,119,621 



524 
2,506 
5,006 

5,006 
3,506 

5,300 

2,011 
3,006 
5,006 
3,006 

4,006 
3,006 
3,006 

1,006 

3,006 
9,006 

4,006 

3,006 

8,006 

30,000 

6,011 
314,228 



500 

500 
27, 0000 



600 

1,350 

500 

200 
75 

250 
250 
100 
50 
250 



10,190 



78,865,328 



80 
44 
56 


41,920 
110,264 
280,336 


48 
20 


240,288 
70, 120 


8 


42,400 


8 
40 

8 
40 


16,088 
120,240 

40,048 
120,240 


32 
36 

48 


128, 192 
108,216 
144,288 


76 


76,456 


36 
48 


108,216 
*216,144 


16 

80 

64 

8 


64,096 
240,480 
512,384 
240,000 


16 
96 


96,176 
t5, 027, 648 



40 

8 
32 

586 

16 

20 

16 
70 

40 

8 

16 

372 

20 



20,000 

4,000 
864,000 



351,600 

*10,800 

10,000 

3,200 
*1,750 

10,000 
2,000 
1,600 

18,600 
5,000 



Carried forward 3,574,416 



12,342 



88,212,180 



28 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 



Table No. 8 — Statement of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book- work, 

1927-28— Continued 



Description 



Number 

of 
Copies 



Number 
of 



Brought forward . 



Finance — 



English 



Offices of the Assistant Receivers General — Rules and Regulations 
April 1 , 1927 

Estimates of Canada, 1928 

Estimates of Canada, Supplementary, 1927-28 

List of Lost, Stolen and Destroyed Dominion of Canada Bonds 
including Bonds issued at New York also Interim Scrip Cer- 
tificates and Canadian National Railway Bonds 

Report to the Hon. Minister of Finance, Ottawa, re Inquiry and 
Investigation into certain Branches and Accounts of the Depart- 
ment of Finance, as at March 31, 1927 

Budget Speech, February 16, 1928 



Bilingual 

Important Information regarding Civil Service Insurance — Rensei- 
gnements importants concernant I'assurance du Service Civil 



Health— 



English 



Information for Young Women about Sex Hygiene (Publication 

No. 25) 

Information for Parents — Teaching of Sex Hygiene to Children 

(Publication No. 26) 

Memorandum of the Proprietary of Patent Medicine Act 

Regulations under the Food and Drugs Act 

Memorandum of Food and Drugs Act, 1920, with Amendments, 

1927 ; .••■•.••-•; 

What you should know about Tuberculosis (Publication No. 31) 
Venereal Diseases — Diagnosis and Treatment (Publication No. 23). 
An Act to Prohibit the Improper Use of Opium and Other Drugs 
Proceedings of the Canadian Association of Child Protection 

Officers, held in Ottawa, Ont., October 28, 1926, and in Van- 
couver, B.C., May 23-25, 1927 

Regulations under the Food and Drugs Act 

The Second Conference on the Medical Services in Canada, held 

at Ottawa, March 28, 29, 30, 1927 

An Act respecting Food and Drugs 

Report of the Second Conference on the Medical Services in Canada, 

held at Ottawa, March 28, 29, 30, 1927 

Regulations concerning Water for Drinking and Culinary Purposes 

on Vessels Navigating on the Great Lakes and Inland Waters . 
Regulations made by Order in Council under the Opium and 

Narcotic Drug Act, March 31, 1924 

The Little Blue Books (Home Series) — 

Beginning a Home in Canada — Publication No. 7 

How to Build the Canadian House — Publication No. 8 

How to Make our Canadian Home — Publication No. 9 

How to Make Outpost Homes in Canada — Publication No. 10. 

How to Avoid Accidents and Give First Aid — Publication 

No. 11 

The Little Blue Books (Household Series) — 

Canadians Need Milk — Publication No. 12 

How we Cook in Canada — Publication No. 13 

How to Manage Housework in Canada — Publication No. 14 . . . 

How to Take Care of Household Waste — Publication No. 15. . 

Household Cost Accounting in Canada — Publication No. 16. . . 
The Little Blue Books (National Series No. 1) — 

Maternal Mortality in Canada — Publication No. 37 

Mother — A Little Book for Women — Publication No. 38 

Mother — A Little Book for Men — Publication No. 39 

Carried forward 



3,574,416 



352 
700 
300 



15,106 



500 
5,000 



6,000 



5,000 

5,000 
1,000 
1,000 

5,011 
50,000 
10,000 
20,000 



311 
1,000 

1,511 
5,000 

4,011 

2,000 

2,000 

5,000 
7,500 
7,500 
5,006 

5,000 

7,500 
4,000 
4,000 
5,000 
4,050 

20,220 
10,000 
10,000 



12,342 



48 

112 

18 



96 



32 



176 



3,809,994 



13,620 



95,382,426 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1927-23 



29 



Table No. 8 — Statement of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, 

1^21 -2%— Continued 



Description 



Number 

of 
Copies 



Number 

of 

Pages 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 



Brought forward 

Health — Concluded 

English — Concluded 

The Little Blue Books (Mother's Series) — 

The Canadian Mother's Book — Publication No. 2 

How to Take Care of the Baby — Publication No. 3 

The Canadian Mother's Book — Publication No. 3 (Confeder- 
ation Diamond Jubilee Edition) 

How to Take Care of the Mother — Publication No. 4 

How to Take Care of the Children — Publication No. 5 

How to Take Care of the Father and the Family — Publication 
No. 6 : 



Bilingual 

Abstracts of Current Public Health Literature — Extraits de publi 
cations courantes sur la sante publique — 

Abstract (March, 1927) 

Abstract (April, 1927) 

Abstract (May, 1927) 

Abstract (June, 1927) 

Abstract (July, 1927) 

Abstract (August, 1927) 

Abstract (September, 1927) 

Abstract (October, 1927) 

Abstract (November, 1927) 

Abstract (December, 1927) 

Abstract (January, 1928) 

Abstract (P'ebruarv, 1928) 

Abstract (ALarch, 1928) 



French 

Renfieignements pour les hommes — Syphilis et blennoragie (publi 

cation n° 24) 

Renseignements pour les jeunes filles sur I'hygi&ne sexuelle (publi- 
cation n° 25) 

Renseignements pour les parents — L'enseignement de I'hygi^ne 

sexuelle aux enfants (publication n" 26) 

Vaccination par piqure. — Mcthode recommand^e par le ministfere 

de la Sante 

Loi concernant les aliments et les drogues 

Loi concernant les specialites pharmaceutiques ou medicaments 

brevetes 

Les petits livres bleus (collection domestique) — 

Les foyers-vedettes au Canada — Publication n" 10 

Canadiens, buvez du lait! — Publication n° 12 

La cuisine canadienne — Publication n° 13 

Comment tenir maison au Canada — Publication n" 14 

Les ordures menag^res — Publication n° 1.5 

Comptabilite domestique au Canada — Publication n° 16 

Les petits livres bleus (collection du foyer) — 

La premiere etape au Canada — Publication n° 7 

Comment construire un maison canadienne — Publication n" 8 . 

Comment fonder un foyer canadien — Publication n° 9 

Accidents et premiers necours — Publication n° 11 

Les petits livres bleus (collection matornelle) — 

( "omment prendre soin du bebe — ^Publication n" .'j 

Comment prendre soin de maman — Publication n" 4 

Comment elever les enfants — Publication n" 5 

Comment prendre soin de papa et de la lamillo — Publication 
no 6 



3,809,994 



10,000 
15,000 

50,006 
7,500 
7,500 



7,500 



500 
5,200 
5,206 
5,206 
5,207 
5,211 
5,511 
6,100 
6,200 
6,500 
6,011 
9,011 
9,011 



5,000 

10,500 

15,000 

2,000 
5.000 

500 

3,000 
7,500 
5,000 
3,000 
5,000 
40,006 

9,017 
5,000 
5,000 
6,000 

4,000 
7,000 
7,500 

6,000 



13,620 



136 

48 

164 
24 
40 

32 



95,382,426 



1,360,000 
*360,000 

8,200,984 
180,000 
300,000 

240,000 



24 


12,000 


24 


124,800 


24 


124,944 


32 


166,592 


24 


124,968 


32 


166,752 


48 


*132,264 


40 


*122,000 


24 


148,800 


32 


208,000 


32 


192.352 


24 


216,264 


32 


288,352 



40,000 

■^84,000 

*120.000 

16,000 
80,000 

6,000 

72,000 
120,000 
360,000 
204,000 

60,000 
800, 120 

*216,408 
100,000 
280,000 
192,000 

128,000 
224,000 
420,000 

240,000 



Carried forward 4, 133, 397 



15,060 



111,814,026 



30 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 



Table No. 8 — Statement of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, 

1927-28— Continued 



Description 



Brought forward . 
House of Commons — 



English 



List of Acts, Session 1926-27 • • • • ; 

Index — House of Commons Debates (Unrevised Edition), Session 

of 1926-27 

Efatimates of Canada, Supplementary, 1927-28 

Appendix to the Sixty-Fourth Volume of the Journals of the House 

of Commons, December-April Session, 1926-27 

Report of the Superintendent of Insurance of the Dominion of 

Canada, 1926 (Vol. I) •.•: 

Report of the Superintendent of Insurance of the Dominion of 

Canada, 1926 (Vol. II) 

List of Reports and Returns to be made to the House of Commons 

by Public Officers and Private Corporations, Session of 1928. . 

Estimates of Canada, 1928 

Royal Commission on Customs and Excise— Interim Reports (Nos 

1 to 10) 

Precis of Discussions — Dominion-Provincial Conference, November 

3 to 10, 1927 

Report of the Canadian Delegates to the Eighth Assembly of the 

League of Nations, September 5 to 27, 1927 



Number 

of 
Copies 



BlLINGU-\L 

List of Shipping, 1926 — Liste des navires, 1926 

Abstract of Statements of Insurance Companies in Canada, 1926 — 
Releve des etats des compagnies d'assurance au Canada, 1926. 

Standing Orders of the House of Commons, 1927— Rfeglement de la 
Chambre des Communes, 1927 

Statistics of Steam Railways of Canada, 1G26— Statistique des 
chemins de fer du Canada, 1926 • • 

List of Members of the House of Commons with their Constitu- 
encies and Post Office Addresses— Liste des membres de la 
Chambre des Communes avec les districts electoraux et 
adresses postales (Corrected to January 11, 1928) 

Annual Report of Statistics of Criminal and Other Offences, 
September 30, 1926— Rapport annuel sur la statistique de la 
criminalite, 30 septembre 1926 

List of Members of the House of Commons with their Constitu- 
encies and Post Office Addresses— Liste des membres de la 
Chambre des Communes avec les districts electoraux et 
adresses postales (Corrected to January 25, 1928) 



French 
Commission federale du combustible — Memoire contenant des 

donnees sur I'approvisionnement en combustible provenant 

enti^rement du ( 'anada ou des pays britanniques 

Budget du Canada, supplementaire, 1927-28 

Budget, du Canada, 1928-29 

Loi a I'effet dc prohiber I'usage illicite de I'opium et autres drogues 
Rapport des dok'-guos canadiens k la huiti^me assembl6e de la 

Societe des Nations, 5 au 27 septembre 1927 .•••■■•. 

Conference fodorale-provinciale — Sommaiie des discussions, du 3 

au 10 novembre 1927 



4,133.397 



50 

3,707 
1,000 

402 

250 

250 

401 
1,073 

1,200 

1,500 

300 



Immigration and Colonization- 



English 



Land Settlement, Canada— Where to go for Advice 

Canada and Immigration— A Brief Review of Policy, Organization 

and Practice 

Farm Opportunities in Canada 

Minutes of a Conference of the Canadian Council of Immigration of 

Woman, held at (Jttawa, February 27, 28, 29, 1928 

On the Doorstep of Prosperity in Western Canada 



Carrind forward. 



Number 
of 



500 



400 

150 

163 

5,000 

65 

600 



20,006 

3,000 
211,050 

500 
104,000 



4,491,637 



15,060 



72 
18 

72 

1,284 

1,078 

8 
112 

120 

40 

16 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 



113 


280 


194 


374 


,766 


196 


230 


184 


300 


64 


70 


356 



04 



24 

20 

112 

12 

16 

36 



24 



111,814,026 



19,858 



1,040 
21,600 



480, 144 

192,000 
*6, 753, 600 

24,000 
3,328,000 



124,510,970 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1927-28 



3t 



Table No. 8 — Statement of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, 

1^21 -2?f— Continued 



Description 



Number 

of 
Copies 



Number 

of 

Pages 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 



Brought forward. 



Indian Affairs- 



English 



Regulations lor the Disposal of Petroleum and Natural Gas Rights 

Regulations for the Disposal of Coal on Indian Reserves 

Regulations for the Disposal of Timber on Indian Reserves (except 
in British Columbia) 



Insurance- 



English 



List of Insurance Companies Licensed to do Business in Canada 
under The Insurance Act, 1917, and Amendments 

Report of the Committee on Combustibility of Roofing Materifls 
— Dominion Fire Prevention Association, March 31, 1927 

List of Insurance Companies Licensed to do Business in Canada 
under The Insurance Act, 1917, and Amendments. . , 

Abstract of Statements of Loan and Tiust Companies in Canada 
1926 

Report of the Superintendent of Insurance of the Dominion of 
Canada, 1926 (Vol. I) 

Report of the Superintendent of Insurance of the Dominion of 
Canada, 1926 (Vol. II) 

Schedule of Classification of Fire Insurance Risks, December 31, 
1926, and Aggregate Experience for the Years 1922 to 1926, 
inclusive 

Annual Statement required from British and Foreign Companies 
Licensed to Transact Business i f Insurance, other than Life 
Insurance, in the Dominion of Canada, in Compliance with the 
Insurance Act, 1917 

Annual Statement required from Canadian Companies Licensed 
to Transact Business of Insurance, other than Life Insurance, 
in the Dominion of Canada, in Compliance with the Insurance 
Act, 1917 

Report of the Superintendent of Insurance of the Dominion of 
Canadp, 1926 — Loan and Trust Companies 

List of Securities held by Insurance, Loan and Trust Companies 
in Canada, as at December 31, 1927 

List of Insurance Companies Licensed to do Business in Canada 
under The Insurance Act, 1917, and Amendments (Extracts 
from the Canada Gazette, January 7, 1928) 

Bilingual 

Abstract of Statements of Insurance Companies of Canada, 1926 — 
Relev6 des 6tats des compagnies d'assurance au Canada, 1926 



Interior 



English 



Report of the Director of Forestry, March 31, 1926 

Report of the Commissioner of Canadian National Parks, March 

31, 1926 

Betty in Dreamland 

Lessons on Bird Protection 

Winter in Canada 

Petroleum and Natural Gas Leases 

The Peace River Country, Canada 

Pacific Drainage — British Columbia and Yukon Territory, 1924-25 

(Water Resources Paper No. 51 ) 

Annual Report of the Topographical Survey, 1925-26 

Tree Planting for Ornamental Purposes (Forestry Topic No. 5). 
List of School Lands to be offered for Sale by Public Auction at 

Biggar, Sask., Monday, .July 25, 1927 

List of School Lands to be offered for Sale by Public Auction at 

Swift Current, Sask., Monday, July 4, 1927 



4,491,637 



.506 
500 



500 



706 
300 
706 
511 
3,800 
4,800 

2,011 

1,208 

450 
300 
8C0 

711 
7,500 

2,006 

2,506 

2.50,000 

100,000 

7,500 

5,000 

35,250 

1,801 

706 

10,000 

2,000 

4,500 



19,858 

16 

8 

12 



16 
96 
20 
24 

1,284 
1,078 

12 

32 

48 
176 
312 

20 
374 

32 

40 
8 
16 
16 
20 
96 

304 
32 
10 

8 

20 



124,510,970 



8,096 
4,000 



6.000 



11,296 
28,800 
14, 120 
12,264 
4,879,200 
5,174,400 

24, 132 

38,656 

21,600 

52,800 

249,600 

14,220 
2,805,000 

64, 192 

100,240 

2,000,000 

1,600,000 

120,000 

100,000 

3,384,000 

547,504 
22,592 
100,000 

16,000 

90, 000 



Carried forward 4,938, 215 



23,938 



145,999,682 



32 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 

Table No. 8 — statement of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, 

1927-28 — Continued 



Description 



Brought forward . 



Interior — Continued 



English — Continued 



List of School Lands to be offered for Sale by Public Auction at 
Carlyle, Sask.. July 11, 1927 

The Geodetic Survey of Canada (Operations, April, 1924, to Decem- 
ber, 1926) ; -. 

Prince Edward Island — Its Resources and Opportunities 

The Kicking Horse Trail • 

Annual Report of the Dominion Water Power and Reclamation 
Service, 1925-26 : • • •• 

Arctic and Western Hudson Bay Drainage (and Mississipi Drainage 
in Canada) in Alberta, Saskatchewan, Manitoba and Western 
Ontario, Climatic Year 1924-25 (Water Resources Paper No. 



Number 

of 
Copies 



4,938,215 



2,000 

1,506 
10,000 
25,006 

2,406 



50). 



List of School Lands to be offered for Sale by Public Auction at 

Rosetown, Sask., on Thursady, July 21, 1927 • • ■ 

Dominion Lands— Hand-Book— For the Information of the Public, 

Edition of April 5, 1927 • ■ ■. 

A Summary of Regulations and Departmental Rulings relating to 
Dominion Lands for the Guidance of Agents, Sub-Agents and 

Other Officials, Edition of April 25, 1927 (No. 19) 

Fishing in Canada • ■ • • 

Publications of the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory, Vic- 
toria, B.C.— Index to Vol. Ill 

List of Subscribers of Banff Telephone Exchange, July 2, 1927 

List of School Lands to be offered for Sale by Public Auction at 

Saskatoon, Sask., on Monday, July 18, 1927 

List of School Lands to be offered for Sale by Public Auction at 

Yorkton, Sask., on Thursday, July 14, 1927 

The Preparation of Pets for the Market 

Waterton Lakes Park l^- • ■ . 

Regulations governing the Granting of Yearly Licenses and Permits 
to Cut Timber on Dominion Lands in Manitoba, Saskatche- 
wan , Alberta , etc • ■ 

The Migratory Birds Convention Act and Federal Regulations for 
the Protection of Migratory Birds, Edition of September 1, 

1927 ;•,■••• 

Some Commercial Softwoods of British Columbia— Their Mechan- 
ical and Physical Properties (Forest Service— Bulletin No. 78). 
List of School Lands to be offered for Sale by Public Auction at 

Moose Jaw, Sask., on Wednesday, June 29, 1927 

Tests of Green-Cut Western Cedar Poles (Forest Service— Circular 

No. 21) ■■■■: 

List of School Lands to be offered for Sale by Public Auction at 

Lloydminster, Alta., on Tuesday, November 8, 1927 

List of School Lands to be offered for Sale by Public Auction at 

Vegreville, Alta., on Monday, November 14, 1927. 

Regulations for Dominion Forest Reserves (Consolidated for 

Office use) 

List of School Lands to be offered for Sale by Public Auction at 

Vermilion, Alta., on Thursday, November 10, 1927 

Atlantic Drainage (South of St. Lawrence River), New Brunswick, 
Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, Climatic Years 1924-25 

and 1925-26 (Water Resources Paper No. 52) 

List of School Lands to be offered for Sale by Public Auction at 

Wetaskiwin, Alta., on Thursday, November 24, 1927 

Annual Report of the Director of the Geodetic Survey of Canada, 

192.5-26 

List of School Lands to be offered for Sale by Public Auction at 

St. Paul de M6tis, Alta., on Thursday, November 17. 1927 
List of School Lands to be offered for Sale by Public Auction at 

Wainwright, Alta., on Monday, November 28, 1927 

Water Powers of Canada, November, 1927 (Water Resources Paper 
No. 60) 



Carried forward. 



Number 

of 

Pages 



1,806 

2,500 

30,006 



1,006 
25,331 

600 
300 

2,500 

2,500 
10,000 
25,131 



5,011 

17,510 
13,000 
2,000 
1,511 
1,500 
2,000 
4,011 
2,000 

1,806 
2,000 
1,206 
2,000 
2,000 
2,500 



23,988 



5,140,808 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 



232 



48 



145,999,682 



16,000 

42,168 

640,000 

1,200,288 

211,728 



418,992 

20,000 

1,440,288 



96 
20 



12 



25,184 



96,576 
506,620 

4,800 
3,600 

20,000 

20,000 

120,000 

1,206,288 



160,352 

630,360 
728,000 
16,000 
12,088 
12,000 
16,000 
128,352 
16,000 

173,376 
16,000 
48,240 
32.000 
16,000 

240,000 



154,211,798 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1927-28 



33 



Table No. 8 — Statement of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, 

\^21 -2^— Continued 



Description 



Number 

of 
Copies 



Number 

of 

Pages 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 



Brought forward 

Interior — Concluded 

English — Concluded 

List of School Lands to be offered for Sale by Public Auction at 
Edmonton, Alta., on Thursday, December 1, 1927 

List of School Lands to be offered for Sale by Public Auction at 
Camrose, Alta., on Tuesday, November 22, 1927 

Index of Gazetted Orders in Council for 1921-1922-1923 (Vol. 43) ... . 

Second British Empire Forestry Conference, held in Canada, Julj' 
25 to September 7, 1923 — Proceedings and Resolutions with 
Brief Descriptions of Tours •_ 

Mining Lands Branch Regulations governing Placer Mining in 
Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and the Northwest 
Territories of Canada 

Vacations in Canada 

List of Subscribers of Banff Telephone Service, January 2, 1928. . . 

Taper as a Factor in the Management of Standing Timber (Forest 
Service — Bulletin No. 79) 

Publications of the Dominion Observatory, Ottawa (Vol. VIII, 
No. 8) ._ 

An Act respecting Quartz Mining in the Yukon Territory 

Western Yellow Pine (Tree Pamphlet No. 13). 

Regulations governing Grazing Lands in the Provinces of Manitoba, 
Saskatchewan, Alberta and the Peace River Tract in the 
Province of British Columbia 

Regulations for the Disposal of Quartz, Mining Claims on Domi- 
nion Lands in Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and the 
Northwest Territories ■ 

An Act respecting Placer Mining in the Yukon Territory 

Geodesy (Publication No. 11) 

A Graphical Method of Plotting Oblique Aerial Photographs 

Western Yellow Pine (Tree Pamphlet No. 13) 

Geographic Board of Canada — Decisions 

Natural Resources, Canada 

Publications of the Dominion Observatory 

Publications of the Dominion Astrophysical Observatory 

French 

La situation foresti^re 

La production de I'edredon 

Programme scolaire 

Loi de la convention concernant les oiseaux migrateurs et rfegle- 

ments federaux pour la protection des oiseaux migrateurs. ..... 

Les oiseaux — Richesse nationale — Vues des ministres provinciaux 

de I'Angleterre sur la valeur des oiseaux 

Service administratif des terres federales — Renseignements pour 

le public (Edition du 5 avril 1927) 

Maisons d 'oiseaux et leurs occupants 

LeQons concernant la protection des oiseaux 

L'art d'attirer les oiseaux en leur ofirant le manger et le boire 

La fee des bois _ 

La situation foresti^re ' 

Ressources naturelles, Canada 

Justice — 

English 

Special Report by the Commissioners appointed to Revise the 
Public General .Statutes of Canada 

In the Supreme Court of Canada — In the Matter of a Reference to 
the meaning of the word "Persons" in Section 24 of the British 
North America Act, 1867 

Factum 

Appeal Cases '. 

Confidential documents 

Carried forward 

6959&— 3 



5,140,868 



2,500 

2,000 
35 



1,200 



2,000 

12,500 

424 

1,011 

706 
1.000 
1,000 



5,000 



4,000 
1,000 
1,206 

200 

9,011 

1,1.50 

435,970 

700 
2,400 



2,400 

500 

9,606 

2,510 

5,000 

3,011 
30,011 
30,011 
30,011 
40,000 

2,500 
126,600 



100 



100 

400 

200 

1,500 



25,184 



16 



40 



416 



20 
96 
12 

1.32 

106 

48 



160 



1.32 

196 

120 

24 



154,211,798 



40,000 

16,000 
1,400 



499,200 



40,000 

1,200,000 

5,088 

133,452 

74,8.36 

48,000 

8,000 



40,000 



30 


144,000 


32 


32,000 


04 


125,424 


24 


4,800 


8 


72,088 


32 


*9,200 


48 


*1, 743, 880 


12 


8,400 


72 


*43,272 


16 


38,400 


16 


8,000 


16 


153,696 



90,360 
100,000 



60 


180,660 


16 


480,176 


16 


480, 176 


16 


480, 176 


16 


640,000 


32 


80,000 


52 


*548,000 



16,000 



13,200 
*13,500 

*7,300 
*18,000 



5,910,341 



27,406 



161.848,482 



34 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 

T\BLE No. 8— Statement of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, 

1927-28 — Continued 



Description 



Brought forward. 



Labour — 



English 



Number 

of 
Copies 



5,910,341 



Twentieth Report of the Registrar of Boards of Conciliation arid 
Investigation of Proceedings under The Industrial Disputes 



Act, 1907, March 31, 1926-27 ■ x- a * 

Fourth Report of the Registrar of The Combine Investigation Act 
of Proceedings under The Combines Investigation Act, 192^, 

First Report of the Administration of Old Age Pensions in Canada, 

March 31, 1926-27 „ ' ' • ' ' -d' " ' v, ' t' +i,' ' 't^'^',^^'.* 

Ninth Report of the Employment Service Branch of the Depart 
ment of Labour, Canada, on the Operations under the Employ 

ment Offices Coordination Act, 1918, March 31, 1926-27 

Strikes and Lockouts in Canada and Other C<)untries, 1927 -^^ 
Labour Organization in Canada— Sixteenth Annual Report, 192b. 

An Act respecting Old Age Pensions^_ r^ ' V ' • " ' , -r; j,,;.,' 

Proceedings of the Second National Conference on Technical Educa- 
tion, Ottawa, February 9-11, 1927 (Bulletin No. 20) -^ 

Sixth Report on Organization in Industry, Commerce and the 

Professions in Canada, 1927 

Everv where, they say too old!. . . . 

Labour Legislation in Canada, 1926. . t-„„+v. 

League of Nations International Labour Organization— lenth 

Session of the International Labour Conference. ..... ^ 

The Old Age Pensions Regulations (Office Consolidation) ...... 

Investigation into the Proprietary Articles Trade Association- 
Report of Commissioner, October 24, 1927. . ._.... . . ■_• • -^ • ■ -^ 

Canadian Railway Board of Adjustment No. 1-Third Report of 
Proceedings of Board, October 1. 1923, to September 30, 1927 
ex to.the Labour Ga../ie, Vol XXVII 1927 .^^^ . 



Pri^sTn'clnadr'and" Other' CourtriesT'l927 (Supplement to the 
Labour Gazette, January, 1928) - ■ ;••••/£;• ■ ■ ; 

Wages and Hours of Labour in Canada, 1920 to 1927 (Supplement 
to the Labour Gazette, January, 1928) . . . ... ■ ■ •, 

An Act to aid in the Prevention and Settlement of Strikes and 
Lockouts in Mines and Industries connected with Public 

Eight ReioVt' of ' the' Technical Education Branch of the Depart 
^ ment of Labour, Canada, on the Operations of the Technical 

Education Act, assented to July 7, 1919, 19ib-// 

Vocational Education ■■ -■-■ ---^^ ; ■ ^.t ' ; • ".• .'^ W 

The Labour Gazette, Nos. 4 to 12, Vol. XX\II, and Nos. 1 to 3, 

Vol. XXVIII 



French 

Sixi^me rapport sur les associations d'industriels, de cominercants 
et de membres des professions liberales du L anada, 192/ 

Index— Gaze^c du Travail, Volurne XXVI, 1926 

Loi concernant les pensions de vieillesse 

Partout la mcme reponse trop vieux! • i-tnoR 

L'organisiition ouvri&re au Canada-Sclzl^me rapport annuel, 1926^ 

Canadian Railway Board of Adjustment No. l-Froisi^e rapport 
des decisions du Board, ler octobre 1923 au 30 scptombre 1927 

Enquote sur les activit6s de la Proprietary Articles 1 rade Associa- 
tion—Rapport du commissairc, 24 octobre 1927 . . :••••/• 

Prix au Canada et a lY-tranger. 1927 (Suppl6ment k la Gazette du 

Salaii':ui:I%^?S!ailau(anada.del920^1927(Suppi6ment 

h la Gazette du Travail, Janvier 1928) 

L'en.seignement profcssioncl ^ . . • •••■:•••• 1 '^t 1„„'^' o 

La Gazette du Travail, Nos. 3 to 12, Vol. XXVII, and Nos. 1 and 2, 
Vol. XXVIII 



Carried forward 6.226.609 



Number 

of 

Pages 



250 

100 
250 



250 

500 

5,006 

1,700 

4,806 

3,206 

20,200 

1,206 

300 
1,000 

7,000 

14,161 
10,900 

18,900 

18,175 



1,000 



4,700 
29, 190 

128,021 



300 

2,000 

280 

10,000 

906 

2,536 

500 

2,900 

2,900 
200 

22 , 925 



27,406 



20 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 



161,848,482 



16 
20 

282 



52 



180 
16 



24 
24 

32 

40 
40 

64 

200 

20 



52 
252 



176 
32 

8 
16 

284 

48 

32 

64 

200 
36 

1,490 



5,000 

1,200 
4,000 



4,000 

10,000 

1,411,692 

13,600 

249,912 

577,080 

323,200 

96,480 

7,200 
*8,000 

224,000 

*283,220 
436,000 

*604,800 

*1, 817, 500 



20,000 



244,400 
*986,60.8 



1,402 *14,953,896 



32,644 



52,800 

64,000 

2,240 

160,000 

257,304 

*60,864 

16,000 

*92,800 

*290,000 
7,200 

*2, 846, 450 



187,979,928 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1927-28 



35 



Table No. 8 — Statement of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, 

1^21 -2S— Continued 



Description 


Number 

of 
Copies 


Number 

of 

Pages 


Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 




6,226,609 

550 

19,006 

656 

27,006 

206 

3.56 

12,006 

506 
1,000 
1,000 

3,000 

2,000 

600 

3,000 

2,. 500 
1,500 
•3,000 
3,000 
1,0.50 
2,056 

4,500 

1.50 

1,000 

2,006 

500 

3.50 

500 

2,000 

500 

511 

1,000 

500 

500 

5,000 

500 


32,644 

200 

64 

112 
68 
12 
16 

96 

24 
68 
80 

32 
32 
32 
20 

32 
32 
40 
40 
10 
54 

32 
16 
64 

104 

52 

16 
24 
68 
16 

16 

16 

8 

20 
OS 
20 


187,979,928 


Library oj Parliament — 

Bilingual 

Annual Supplement to the Catalogue of the Library of Parliament, 
1926 — Supplement annuel au catalogue de la biblioth^que du 
parlement 1926 


110,000 


Marine and Fisheries — 

English 

Abridged Edition of Tide Tables for St. John, N.B., with Tidal 
Differences for the Bay of Fundy, and Time of High Water at 
Windsor N.S. 1928 


*608,192 


Tide Tables and Information connected with the Ship Channel 


73,472 


Tide Tables for the Pacific Coast of Canada, 1928 


1,8.36,408 


Report on Investigation of Lobster Canning, Session of 1925 

Annual Announcement of the Biological Board of Canada, 1927 

Abridged Edition of Tide Tables for Vancouver and Sand Heads, 
B.C., and Slack Water for First Narrows and Active Pass, 
etc., 1928 


2,472 
5,696 

*576,288 


The Oyster Fishery on the Canadian Atlantic Coast — Second 
Edition 


12,144 


Tide Tables for the Pacific Coast of Canada, 1928 


68,000 


Tide Tables for the Eastern Coasts of Canada, 1928 


80,000 


Special Fishery Regulations for the Province of Prince Edward 


96,000 




64,000 




19,200 




60,000 


Special Fishery Regulations for the Provinces of Saskatchewan 


80,000 




48,000 


Special Fisherj^ Regulations for the Province of British Columbia. 
Special Fishery Regulations for the Province of New Brunswick.. . 
The Processing of Dried Fish (Bulletin No. IX) 


120,000 

120,000 

16,800 


The Preparation of Lobster Paste (Bulletin No. X) 


*55,344 


Biological Board of Canada — Methods of Handling Fish (Bulletin 
No. IX) 


*72,000 


Index to Notice to Mariners 1926 (Nos. 1 to 86 inclusive) 


2,400 


Official List — Radio Stations of Canada 


64,000 


The Radiotelegraph Act and Regulations issued thereunder, 
June 1, 1927 . 


208,624 


Memorandum for Royal Commission to Investigate Fishery 
Conditions and Requirements of the Maritime Provinces 
including the Mao'dalen Islands 


26,000 


Judgment of the Lords of the Judicial Committee of the Privy 
Council, December 2, 1913 


5,600 
12,000 


Tide Tables for the Pacific Coast of Canada, 1928 


136,000 


Regulations relating to the Issue of Motor Engineer Certificates. . . 

Statistics of the Catch of Cod of? the East Coast of North America 

to 1926 


8,000 
8,176 


Radio Stations of Canada — Supplement No. 1 to Official List, 
November 30, 1927 


16,000 


Report of Mr. J. J. Cowie and Mr. G. R. Earl on their work in 
connection with the Imperial Economic Committee's Inquu-y 
into the marketing of Fish Products of the Empire (1927) 

Report to the Minister of Marine and Fisheries by the Canadian 
Delegation to the International Radiotelegraph Conference, 
Washington, October and November, 1927 


4,000 
10,000 


Tide Tables for the Pacific Coast of Canada, 1928 


.340,000 


Annual Report of the Radio Branch, 1920-27 


10,000 








6,330,124 


34,2.54 


192,9.54,744 



69595-3i 



36 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 

Table No. 8— Statement of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book work, 

1927-28 — Continued 



Description 



Brought forward . 



Marine and Fisheries— Condnded 

English — Concluded 



Number 

of 
Copies 



The Fish Inspection Act ^ , v, ,. , ^, , . i. 

Standard of Size and Quality for Dry and Salted C od and such 

Like Fish -■ ■: ,.^' •-■ ; ,' 'A' \' " L'-' ' 

Special Fishery Regulations for the Province of British C olumbia. 
Act respecting Shipping in Canada (Part I) 



Act respecting Shipping in Canada (Part II) 

Act respecting Shipping in Canada (Part III) 

Act respecting Shipping in Canada (Part IV) 

Act respecting Shipping in Canada (Part VI) 

Act respecting Shipping in Canada (Part V 11) 

Act respecting Shipping in Canada (Part X) 

Act respecting Shipping m Canada (Part XIV ) 

The Meat and Canned Foods Act and Regulations made thereunder 
governing the Inspection of Canned Fish and Shell-Fish and 
the Operations of Canneries. • _ • • ■ • ■ ,_„_ • 

Report of the Hudson Strait Expedition, to December 31, 19^7. . 

Quarterly Bulletin of Sea Fishery Statistics 

Monthly Record of Meteorological Observations 



6,330,124 



2,011 

8,000 
3,000 
200 
500 
500 
500 
100 
500 
200 
100 



Bilingual 



List of Shipping, 192(>-Liste des navires 1926. ..... ^. . . . . .^. ■ 

By-Laws of the Pilotage District of Montreal, C anada— Regle- 

ments pour le district de pilotage de Montreal, Canada. ••••,■• 
Supplement to List of Vessels, 1926— Supplement a la liste des 

navires, 1926 



French 



Precedes rclatifs au sechage des poissons (bulletin No. IX) 

De la fabrication du pate de horaard (bulletin No. X) 

Codification administrative de la loi des pecheries. 

Rfeglements canadiens concernant I'examen des capitaines et aes 

seconds de la marine marchande . . ^ • • ■ 

R^glements pour prevenir les abordages sur les Crands l^acs . . 
Reglernents de peche particuliers h la province du Nouveau-Bruns- 



LLste ofhcieile des stations de radio du Canada (Supplement No. 1), 
30 novembre 1927 , . • ; ■ ; ■, : ' i •■ ' 

Normalisation de la taille et de la qualite de la morue et des pois- 
sons de cette categoric — Seches et sales 



Mines — 



English 



Annual Report of the Explosives Division of the Department of 

Mines, 1926 • • • • •• • • • ■ • ■ • • ■.: -A-* '•' V 

Placer and Vein Gold Deposits of Barkerville, Cariboo District, 

British Columbia (M einoir 149) 

Whitehorse District, Yukon (Memoir 150) ■.•■•■•• 

Minto Coal Basin, New Brun.swick (Memoir 151) ............... 

Experimental Ore Testing and Research Laboratories, Booth 

Street, Ottawa ■ • • ■ 

St. Urbain AreJi, Charlevoix District, Quebec ... ■ • -. • • 

Abrasives: Products of Canada (Technology and Application)— 

Part II, Corundum and Diamond 

Milling Plants in Clanada • •. ; d "J" 

Canadian Shale Oil. and Bitumen from Bituminous Sands, as 

Sources of Clasolinc by Pressure Cracking. 

Department of Mines— Some of the Services it Performs 

Natural Gas and Petroleum Wells ( List No. 5) 

Sand and Gravel Deposits in Canada (List No. 8-5) 



Carried forward 6, 404, 517 



Number 

of 

Pages 



2,000 

1,000 

3,006 

16,909 



800 

300 

2,589 



2,. 500 
500 
250 

300 
311 

311 

1,000 

2,500 



2,006 

2,478 
1,986 
2,506 

3,006 
2,006 

4,006 
1,500 

506 
2,006 
1,600 
1,000 



Total 

Number 

of 

Printed 

Pages 



34,254 



24 



20 

80 

64 

1,238 



280 

48 

72 



192,954,744 



48,264 

64,000 
156,000 

3,200 

8,000 
34,000 
10,000 

3,600 
16,000 

4,800 
800 



40,000 

80,000 

*48,096 

*1, 495, 148 



22.x, 000 

14,400 

186,408 



50,000 

14,000 

8,000 

24,000 
7,464 

14,928 

16,000 

20,000 



24 

256 
74 
48 

16 
76 

60 



48,144 

634,368 
146,964 
120,288 

48,096 
152,456 

240,360 
12,000 

4,048 
40,120 
24,000 

8,000 



37,230 I 197,024,696 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1927 -'4 



37 



Table No. 8 — Statement of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Rook-work, 

1927-28— Continued 



Description 



Number 

of 
Copies 



Number 

of 

Pages 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 



Brought forward 

Mines — Concluded 

E NGLisH — Cone luded 

Stone Quarry Operators in Canada (List No. 6-6) 

The Storage of Fxplosives ._ 

Canada — Geology, Mines and Metallurgical Industries — Second 
(Triennal) Empire Mining and Metalluro-ical Congress. 1927. . . 

Tests of various P'uels made in a Domestic Hot-water Boiler at 
the Fuel Testing Station in co-operation with the Dominion 
Fuel Board 

Abrasives — Products of Canada (Part III). Garnet 

Why You Should Insulate Your Home 

Lo« -Temperature Carbonization oi Bituminous C oals 

Gold Mines in Canada 

Examination of Typical Cokes sold in Canada as Household Fuels 

Birds of Western Canada (Museum Bulletin No. 41) 

Analyses of Solid Fuels 

Instructions for Burning Coal, Coke and Peat 

Use of Alberta Bituminous Sands for Surfacing of Highways 

Destor Area, Abitibi County, Quebec 

Contributions to Canadian Mineralogy and Petrography (Bulletin 
No. 40) 

BanfT Area, Alberta (Memoir 153) 

Helium in Canada 

Preliminary Report on the Limestones of Quebec and Ontario 
(Publication No. 682) 

Regulations under the Domestic Fuel Act. 1927 

Investigations of Fuels and Fuel Testing, 1825. 

Arsenic-bearing Deposits in Canada (Economic Geology Series, 
No. 4) 

Abrasives — Products of Canada 

Report on a Collection of Marine Algse made in Hudson Bay 

A Study of Buteo Borealis, the Red-Tailed Hawk, and its Varieties 
in Canada (Museum Bulletin No. 48) 

An Act to regulate the Manufacture, Testing, Storage and Import- 
ation of Explosives 

Why you Should Insulate Your Home 

Summ.ary Report 1925 (Part C) 

Summary Report, 1926 (Part A) 

Summary Report, 1926 (Part B) 

Summary Report, 1926 (Part C) 

French 

Rapport annuel dc la division des explosifs du ministrfee des Mines, 
1923 

Rapport sommaire, 1924 (partie C) 

La region cartogranhiee du Mont Albert, Quebec (memoire 144). . . 

Avantages de I'isolation thermique de votre maison 

Instruction pour le chauffage au charbon, au coke et a la tourbe. 
aofit 1927 

Loi concemant la fabrication, I'epreuve, I'emmagasinage et I'im- 
portation des explosifs 

Reeherches touchant les ressources minferales et I'industrie mini^re, 

1924 ; 

Rapport sommaire, 1925 (partie C) 

National Defence — 

English 

List of Officers — Militia Service and Air Service, April, 1927 — 

Part I (( 'orrected to April 14, 1927) 

The Cana<iian Navy List for .June 1927 (Corrected to May, 1927). . 

Index to General Orders, 1926 

Index to Militia Orders, 1926 

Carried forward 



6.404,517 



l.COO 
5,006 

2,.5C6 



l.OOC 

4,C06 

25,146 

.500 

1 500 

1 . 500 

14.817 

500 

100,000 

4,026 

316 

1,506 
1,820 
4.054 

4,035 

250 

4,006 

2,506 

3,974 

261 

1,006 

5,000 
25,790 
3,. 506 
3,006 
3,006 
3,006 



1,006 
1,006 
1,006 
5,011 

29,250 

1,000 

1,2C6 
1,011 



1,206 

156 

2,400 

2,406 



37,2.30 



224 



36 
90 
24 
40 
8 
30 
556 
36 
16 
48 
30 

52 
96 

72 

82 
8 

208 

192 

120 

16 

28 



24 

182 

.64 

72 

146 



24 
50 
74 
24 

16 

12 

82 
126 



296 
40 
20 
20 



197,024,696 



12,000 
12G, 144 

561 344 



.36,000 

360,540 

60:i,.504 

20,000 

12,000 

45,000 

8,2.38,252 

1?.,000 

1,600,000 

193,248 

9,480 

78,312 
174,720 
291,888 

330,870 

2,000 

833,248 

481,152 

476,880 

4,176 

28,168 

40,000 
018,960 
6.38,092 
192,384 
216,432 
4.38.876 



24 144 
50,300 

74,444 
120,264 

468,000 

12,000 

98,892 
127,386 



356,976 

6,240 

48,000 

48,120 



6,679,736 



40,5.58 



215,135,132 



38 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 

Table No. 8 — Statement of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, 

1927 -2S— Continued 



Description 



Brought forward. 



National Defence — Concluded 

E NGLiSH — Conch ded 

Report on Civil Aviation and Civil Operations by the Royal Air 
Force, 1926 

Confidential document ', • • • Vt- 

Visit to Canada of His Royal Highness, the Prince of Wales, His 
Royal Highness, Prince George, the Right Honourable the 
Prime Minister of Great Britain, 1927 

Physical Standards and Instructions for the Medical Examination 

' of Recruits for the Royal Canadian Navy, the Permanent and 

Non-Permanent Active Militia and the Royal Canadian Air 

Force, 1927 

Regulations and Instructions for the Clothing of the Royal Can- 
adian Air Force, 1927— Parts I and II (Canadian Air Publica 
tion No. 9) 

Instructions for the Canadian Officers' Training Corps, 1924— 
Amendments 

Notes for the (ruidance of Officers and N.C.O.'s in Charge of 
Mechanical Transport, etc 

Battle Honours— The Great War, 1914-19— General Orders Nos. 
6 and 7, February 1st, 1928 

Proceedings at the Dedication of the Altar in the Memorial 
Chamber, Peace Tower, Houses of Parliament, by His Royal 
Highness the Prince of Wales, August 3, 1927 

Scales of Issue of Barrack Equipment, 1927 ^ 

Royal Canadian Air Force — Information relating to Pay, Allow- 
ances, Qualifications, General Conditions of Service, Future 
Prospects, etc., of Airmen 

List of Officers— Militia Service and Air Service, December, 1927 
—Part II (Corrected to December 1, 1927) 

Militia Orders, 1927-28 

Militia General Orders, 1927-28 



Number 

of 
Copies 



6,679,736 



French 



Ordres de la milice, 1927-28 

Ordres g^neraux de la milice, 1927-28 

National Galleiy — 

English 

Annual Report of the Board of Trustees, 1926-27 

National Research Council — 

English 

The Life History of Exerites Roborator Fab., a Parasite of the 
European Corn Borer (Report No. 21) 



National Revcnuc- 



E NGLISH 



The Customs Act with Index and the Department of National 
Revenue Act (Office Consolidation) 

The Special War Revenue Act, 1915, and Amendments to date, 
July, 1927 (Office Consolidation) ■ • • ■ 

Denatured Alcohol and Specially Denatured Alcohol— Consolid- 
ated Departmental Regulations and Instructions, September 
10. 1927 (Circular No. 488c— Revi.sed) 

Tourists' Automobiles and Travellers' Vehicles— Memorandum 
No. 2 Revised 

An Act to Supplement the Revenue required to meet War Expcnd- 
iture.s 



Carried forward. 



2,5C6 
1,600 



1,925 

1,506 

150 

2,500 

500 

100 



66,040 
3,019 



2,000 

1,211 

257,400 

31,200 



11,050 
1,200 



1,500 



2,011 



2,500 
25,000 

4,000 
6, COO 
1,000 



Number 

of 

Pages 



7.105.654 



40,558 



28 

32 

192 
40 
12 

28 

8 
48 

16 

368 
630 
148 



600 
132 



16 



72 



104 
36 

16 
16 
36 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 



43,258 



215,135,132 



225, 540 
51,200 



53,900 

48,192 

*14,400 

100,000 

6,000 

2,800 



528,320 
144,912 



32,000 

445,648 

•■1,500,800 

*355,200 



*63,800 
*13,200 



24,000 



144,792 



260, 000 
900,000 

64,000 
96,000 
36,000 



220,245,836 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1927-28 



39 



Table No. 8 — Statement of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, 

1927-28— Continued 



Description 


Number 

of 
Copies 


Number 

of 

Pages 


Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 


Brought forward 


7,105,654 

1.000 
2,000 
2,000 
1,106 
3,000 
4,000 
3,000 
5,000 

35,000 
6,000 
8,000 

10,030 
3,500 
5,000 

38,025 

3,200 

250 
500 
300 
4,000 
1,000 
6,000 
1,500 
2,000 
2,000 
7,600 

1,006 
2,021 

1,011 

5,000 

2,012 
52,461 

506 
100 

2,534 
1,706 


43,258 

32 

96 

120 

72 

8 

8 

8 

16 

24 

16 

16 

8 

8 

8 

156 

36 

32 
128 

96 
8 

16 
8 
8 

16 

32 
156 

32 

32 

178 

36 

72 
3,714 

20 

8 

72 
280 


220,245,836 


National Revenue — Concluded 

English — Concluded 
An Act to authorize the Levying of a War Tax upon Certain 


32,000 




192,000 




240,000 


Official List of Licensed Manufacturers, 1927-28 


79,632 


An Act to amend The Income War Tax Act, 1917 


24,000 




32,000 




24,000 




80,000 




*280, 000 




96,000 


Memorandum No. 87 


128,000 


Circular No 220C 


80,240 




28,000 


Circular No. 636C 


40,000 


The National Revenue Review, October, 1927, to March, 1928 

French 

Loi speciale des revenue de guerre, 1915, avec modifications jusqu'a 

ce jour, juillet 1927 (codification a I'usage des bureaux) 

Loi portant autorisation de lever un impot de guerre sur certains 


*987, 100 

115,200 
8,000 




64,000 


Loi concernant les douanes .* 


28,800 




32,000 


Memoire n° 75 


16,000 


Memoire n" 76 


48,000 


Memoire n" 78 


12.000 


Memoire n° 87 .. . . 


32.000 


Circulaire N° 2C8C . . . 


64, 000 


La Revue du Revenu National, October, 1927, to March, 1928 

Patent and Copyright Office — 

English 

An Act to amend and consolidate the Law relating to Copyright. . 
The Copyright Act, 1921 — Rules and Forms 


*19e,800 

32, 192 
*33,336 


The Canadian Patent Office Record, 1927 — Annual Index (Volume 

LV) 


179,958 


Patent Office of Canada — Rules and Regulations and Forms— Sep- 
tember 1 1923 


180,000 


Circular of the Patent and Copyright Office containing The Trade 

Mark and Design Act" and "The Timfjer Marking Act", 1925 

The Canadian Patent Office Record 

French 


*72,432 
*3, 747, 029 

10,120 


Ordre de procedure h suivre dans la poursuite de recjuctes de mar- 

Post Office— 

English 
Rural Post Offices and Rural Routes in the Western Provinces — 


800 
182.448 


Schedule of Mail Trains and Water Services — East of Port Arthur, 
June, 1927 


477,680 




7,329.022 


48,834 


228,121,603 







40 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 

Table No. 8— Statement of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, 

1927-'?8 — Coniinued 



Description 



Brought 



forward 7,329.022 



Number 

of 

Copies 



Post Ofice— Concluded 



English — Concluded 



Number 

of 

Pages 



Schedule of Mail Trains and Water Services— West of Port Arthur, 

June, 1927 

Postal Information, 1927 • . .• • • ■ • • _•.■ • y -- 

Post Office Department, Ottawa-Third Annual Field Da>_^ ... 
Instructions for Postmasters m Charge of Accounting Post Othces 

1927 ^ 

Quebec Distribution List, 1927 

Instructions to Letter Carriers, 1927 ■ • ■ ■•■•••• \-..^- 

Schedule of Mail Trains and Water Services— East of Port Arthui 

(Eastern Districts), October, 1927. \A-:-,^- V a ;.;i;;,. 

Schedule of Mail Trains and Water Services— East of Port Arthur 

(Central Districts), October, 1927. .^ ;^-:\ iu ' ' 

Schedule of Mail Trains and Water Services— W est of Port Arthur 
(Western Districts), October, 1927 ..... . .^. . . . ■■•-.• • • ; • ■ • : - 

Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island Distribution 

List, 1927 

Rural Mail Delivery in Canada 

Instructions to Postal Chauffeurs, 1927 

Postal Service in Pictures .. •■ • ■ • • •. 

List of Money Order Offices in the Dominion of Canada, in opera 

tion on January 1 , 1928 

Canada Official Postal Guide, 1928 ^ 

Canada Official Postal Guide, 1928— Part L 

Canada Official Postal Guide, 1928— Part II 

Monthly Distribution List, 1927-28 .-... . ._..... ■^. v.- •, -^'^A' 
Monthlv Supplement to Canadian Official Postal Guide, 19^7-26 
Monthly Supplement to Canadian Official Postal Guide and Mom 
Order Information, 1927-28 



loney 



BlLINGU.\L 



Montreal City Preliminary Distribution List, April, 1927- 
distribution preliminaire de la viUe de Montreal, Qi 



-Liste de 
ic., avril 



1927. 



French 



Guide officiel du .service postal canadien, 1927 ■ • 

Guide officiel du service postal canadien, 1927 (premiere partie). . 

Renseigneinents postaux, 1927 ■ • • • • ■ 

Instructions aux maitres de poste en charge des bureaux comptables, 

1927 

Reglements relatifs aux bons_de poste 

In.structions aux facteurs, 1927 >, ' ' j 

Distribution rurale des correspondances au C anada 

Guide officiel du service postal canadien, 1928. ■■■■ ■ 

Guide officiel du service postal canadien, 1928 (premiere partie). . 
Supplement mensuel au guide officiel du service postal canadien 

1927-28 • ; ■ • •, i-' ■ • ■ . 

Supplement mensuel au guide offi(;iel du service postal canadien et 

renseignernents sur les mandats de poste, 1927-28 

\Puhlic Printing and Stationery — 

English 

Canadian Seed Growers] Association— Classification of Canadian 

Spring Wheat Varieties . • •,• ■•■••■ • • • • • 

Preliminary Report on tlie Mineral Production of C anada, iJ^i 

Q 



uarterly Report of the Trade of Canada (Imports for ( (msuinp- 
tion and Exports), months of October. November and Oc(|m.i- 
ber. 1927. and Nine Months ending December. 1926 and l.t-( ... 



1,200 

300,000 

1,000 

7,062 
2,015 
1,023 

1,011 

1,314 

1,211 

2.008 

250.500 

250 

300,500 

G.Oll 

13,701 

3,750 

25 

58,590 

133,500 

68.640 



603 



3,014 

1,100 

79,300 

2,500 

2G1 

500 

75.011 

3.111 

1,100 

30.075 

18,305 



125 
125 



150 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 



48.834 



136 
24 

8 

192 

128 

56 

144 

144 

144 

196 
32 
64 
16 

116 
598 
212 
382 
100 
196 

256 



250 



Carried forw 



.ard l8.697.673 



228.121,603 



163.200 

7.200.000 

8,000 

1,355,904 

257,920 

57.288 

145.584 

189,216 

174,384 

393,568 

8.016.000 

16.000 

4.808,000 

697,276 

8.229,078 

795.000 

9.550 

*450. 696 

*2, 181. 600 

*1, 464.480 



150,750 



598 

216 

24 

202 

20 

56 

32 

596 

220 

196 

252 



32 



344 
55,064 



1.802.372 

237,600 

1,903.200 

505.000 

5,220 

28.000 

2,400.352 

1,854,156 

242,000 

*49 1,800 

*384,920 



4,000 
0.000 



51.600 
274.801.317 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1927-28 



41 



Table No. 8 — Statement of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, 

1927-28— Continued 



Description 



Number 

of 
Copies 



Number 

of 

Pages 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 
'Pages 



Brought forward. 



\Puhlic Printing and Stationery — Continued 

English — Continued 

Reparations — Index of Names and Addresses of Claimants which 
appear in Vols. I and II of the Reparations Report 

Royal Commission on Customs and Excise — Interim Reports 
(Nos. 1 to 10) 

Precis of Discussions — Dominion-Provincial Conference, Novem- 
ber 3 to 10, 1927 _ 

Experimental Station, Farnham, Que. — Report of the Superinten- 
dent, 1925 

Annual Report of the Radio Branch, 1926-27 

Senators of Canada, according to Seniority, January, 1928 

The Classification of the Civil Service of Canada, September 1 
1927 

League of Nations — Second Opium Conference, Geneva, February 
19, 1925 

List of Lost, Stolen and Destroyed Dominion of Canada Bonds 
including Bonds issued at New York also Interim Scrip Cer- 
tificates and Canadian National Railway Bonds 

A Graphical Method of Plotting Oblique Aerial Photographs.. . 

Annual Report of the Board of Trustees of the National Gallery of 
.Canada, 1926-27 

The Conversion of Dry Roughage into a Succulent Feed — An Exa- 
mination of the Sugar Jack Process (Bulletin No. 96 — New 
Series) 

Report of the Superintendent of Insurance of the Dominion ol 
Canada, 1926 (Vol. I) 

Report of the Superintendent of Insurance of the Dominion ot 
Canada, 1926 (Vol. II) 

List of Senators and List of Members of the House of Commons, 
1928 

Sixth Report of the Soldier Settlement Board of Canada, December 
31, 1927— Land Settlement 

The Testing of Milk, Cream and Dairy By-Products by Means of 
the Babcock Test (Bulletin No. 14 — New Series) 

Budget Speech, February 16, 1928 ... 

Minutes of a Conference of the C'anadian Council of Immigration 
of Women, held at Ottawa, February 27, 28, 29, 1928 

Royal Commission on Customs and Excise — Final Report 

Regulations under the Opium and Narcotic Drug Act 

Comparative Rates of Customs Duties on Articles enumerated in 
the Customs Tariff Re.solutions, February 16, 1928 

Report of G. W. Scott on Investigation of Department of Soldiers' 
Civil Re-E.stablishment, October 29, 1927 

Reparations (Volume II) 

Sweden as a Market for Canadian Products 

Report of the Hudson Strait Expedition, to December 31, 1927. . . . 

The Agricultural Pests' Control Act, 1927, with Regulations — Acts, 
Orders and Regulations (No. 22) 

Experimental Station, Ste. Anne de la Pocatifere, Que. — Report of 
the Superintendent, 1926 

Western Yellow Pine (Tree Pamphlet No. 13) 

Experimental Station, Lethbridge Station, Alta. — Report of the 
Superintendent, 1926 

Venereal Diseases — Diagnosis and Treatment (Publication No. 23) 

Annual Report of the C'ommissioner of Highways, April 1, 1926, to 
March 31, 1927 (Bulletin No. 10) 

Report of the Superintendent of In.surance, 1926 — Loan and Trust 
Companies 

Manures and Fertilizers — Their Nature, Functions and Application 
(Bulletin No. 92 — New Series) 

Radio Stations in Canada— Supplement No. 1 to Official List, 

November 30, 1927 

. Reparatrions 



Carried forward 8,707,419 



8,697,673 



150 

2,125 

375 

125 
125 
100 

246 

125 

1.50 
150 

150 

125 

50 

50 

200 

1.50 

125 
125 

1.50 

1,000 

300 

1,200 

700 

50 

1.50 

150 

125 

125 
125 

125 
125 

250 

125 

125 

125 
150 



53,064 



274,801,317 



24 


3,600 


20 


255,000 


40 


15,000 


24 
20 
12 


3,000 
2,. 500 
1,200 


16 


28,536 


20 


2,500 


32 
24 


4,800 
3.600 



16 

40 

1,284 

1,078 

48 



22 

72 
8 

64 
32 

32 

176 

64 

16 
64 



58,946 



2,400 

5,000 

64,200 

53,900 

9,600 

4,800 

6,000 
4,000 

7,200 

24,000 

2,400 

*19,200 

11,200 
3,100 
7,800 

12,000 

2,750 

9,000 
1,000 

8,000 
4,000 

8,000 

22,000 

8,000 

2,000 
9,600 



275,432,203 



42 



' DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 

Table No. 8— Statement of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, 

1927-28 — Continued 



Description 



Number 

of 
Copies 



Brought forward . 
^Public Printing and Stationery— Continued 

English — Continued 
Screenings as a Feed for Live Stock (Pamphlet No. 87— New 

^pj-j^gg J \ ' 

The Cabbage Flea-Beetle and Its Control in British Columbia 

(Pamphlet No. 80— New Series) ....... .^. .... • 

The History and Present Status of Wheat Production in Canada 

(Pamphlet No. 89— New Series) 

Report of the Dominion Botany, 1926. 

Report of Mr. J. J. Cowie and Mr. G. R. Earl on their work in con 
nection with the Imperial Economic Committee's Inquiry intc 

the marketing of Fish Products of the Empire, 1927 

Estimates of Canada, 1928 

Illegal Warfare Claims 

The Little Blue Books (National Series No. 1)— 

Maternal Mortality in Canada— Publication No. 37 

Mother— A Little Book for Mein— Publication No. 39. .. ...... 

Report to the Minister of Marine and Fisheries by the Canadian 
Delegation to the International Radiotelegraph Conference, 
Washington, October and November, 1927 

Revised Statutes of Canada, 1927— List of Chapters 

List of Securities held by Insurance, Loan and Trust Companies in 
Canada, as at December 31, 1927 •■•■.;•• 

Regulation for the Disposal of Quartz Mining Claims on Dominion 
Lands in Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and the North- 
West Territories ~- ■ ■ ■ ,' ' , ' ' ' o •' ' 

Experimental Station, Kentville, N.S.— Report of the Superin- 
tendent, 1926 

Report of the Dominion Horticulturist, 1926 

Regulations under the Food and Drugs Act . . r,' ' ' r Ju 

Report of the Canadian Delegates to the Eighth Assembly of the 
League of Nations, September 5 to 27, 1927 

Printing of various Committee Sittings 

Confidential document ■ ■ ;;■ ■ ; ■ inno' ' 

The National Revenue Review, October, 1927, to March, 1928. . 

Preparation of Copy for the Printer 

Canada Official Postal Guide, 1928 

Criminal Code and Selected Statutes, 1927 

List of Acts, Session of 1926-27 ■■■:,■■■.■ ■■■■■■■■:■■ 

Index— House of Commons Debates (Unrevised Edition), Session 

British North America Act and Amendments, 1867-1916 

An Act respecting the Department of Soldiers' Civil Re-Establish- 

ment 

An Act to amend The Insurance Act, 1917 

The Companies Act and amending Acts, 1924 (Office Consolidation) 

An Act to amend and consolidate the Law relating to Copyright 

An Act respecting certain issues of Dominion Notes 

An Act respecting the Currency ■ ■ . ; ■, '. ^ V c 

An Act to conserve the Commercial and financial interests ol 

Canada. 



8,707,419 



An Act respecting certain Savings Banks in the Province of Quebec 

Guide to Relative Precedence at Ottawa 

Estimates of Canada, Supplementary, 1927-28. .■ 

Treaties and Agreements affecting Canada in force between 11 is 

Majesty and the United States of America with Subsidiary 

Documents, 1914-192.5 • ■■■■■:■- ■ • •„„„ 

The Bankruptcy Act, 1919, with Amendments of 1920, 1921, 19<J2, 

1923 and 192.'j, etc. (Office ( "onsolidation) 

The Excise Act. 1906 (Office Con.solidation) ......... 

The Customs Act with Index and the Department of National 

Revenue Act • ■ • ••.•■■ ; ' ' ' ' 1 

Alphabetical List of Employees, July 1, 1927 (Revised to August 

1, 1927) 



Carried forward 8,734,215 



Number 

of 

Pages 



125 
125 



125 
125 



2.50 
550 
300 

125 
125 



150 
500 



150 



125 

125 
125 
125 

175 

150 

50 

1,350 

1,000 

1,900 

10,011 

25 

2,600 
500 

200 
1,000 
1,000 
200 
200 
200 

100 

100 

10 

300 



600 



1,200 
400 



300 
75 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 



58,946 



16 
152 



16 
112 
124 

72 
48 



312 



36 

98 
80 
64 

32 
104 

12 
156 

40 
598 
694 



72 
112 

12 
20 
88 
32 
8 
20 

10 

42 

154 

18 



586 



200 
128 



104 
40 



275,432,203 



2,000 

1,500 

2,000 
19,000 



*2,000 
61,600 
*18,600 

9,000 
6,000 



63,422 



3,000 
4,000 

46,800 



4,500 

12,250 

10,000 

8,000 

*2,800 

*5,200 

600 

*35,100 

40,000 

1,136,200 

6,947,634 

200 

187,200 
56,000 

2,400 
20,000 
88,000 
6,400 
1,600 
4,000 

1,000 
4,200 
1,540 
5,400 



351,600 

240,000 
51,200 

31,200 

3,000 



284,864,927 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1927-28 



43 



Table No. 8 — Statement of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, 

1^21 -2^— Continued 



Description 



Number 

of 
Copies 



Number 

of 

Pages 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 



Brought forward 

jPublic Printing and Stationery — Continued 

English — Concluded 

Appendix to the Skty-Fourth Volume of the Journals of the House 
of Commons, December-April Session, 1926-27 

The Special War Revenue Act, 1915, and Amendments to date, 
July, 1927 (Office Consolidation) 

The Copyright Act, 1921— Rules and Forms 

Commercial Intelligence Journal 

The Board of Railway Commissioners of Canada re General 
Freight Rates Investigation — Judgments, September, 1927. 

The Board of Railway Commissioners of Canada — Judgments, 
Orders, Regulations and Rulings 

List of Lost, Stolen and Destroyed Dominion of Canada Bonds 
including Bonds issued at New York also Interim Scrip Certi- 
ficates and Canadian National Railway Bonds 

The Agricultural Pests' Control Act, 1927, with Regulations- 
Acts, Orders and Regulations (No. 22) 

Second British Empire Forestry Conference, held in Canada, July 
25 to September 7, 1923 — Proceedings and Resolutions with 
Brief Descriptions of Tours 

Regulations relating to the Issue of Motor Engineer Certificates 

Mining Lands Branch Regulations governing Placer Mining in 
Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and the Northwest Terri- 
tories of Canada 

Quarterly Report of the Trade of Canada (Imports for Consump- 
tion and Exports), months of July, August, September, 1927 
and Six Months ending September 1926 and 1927 

Fertilizer Analyses, 1926-27 (Pamphlet No. 86— New Series) 

The Canadian Historical Association — Report of the Annual 
Meeting held in the City of Toronto, May 27-28, 1927 

The United States Federal Import Milk Act — Some of Its Prov- 
isions — Acts, Orders and Regulations (No. 23) 

Memorandum of the Proprietary or Patent Medicine Act 

The Classification of the Civil Service of Canada, revised to 
September 1 , 1927 

Annual Report on Fish Culture, 1926 

Czechoslovakia as a Market for Canadian Products 

Regulations under the Food and Drugs Act 

Regulations under the Domestic Fuel Act, 1927 

Investigation into the Proprietary Articles Trade Association 
Report of Commissioner, October 24, 1927 

Water Powers of Canada, November, 1927 -. 

The French-Canadian Horse (Bulletin No. 87 — New Series) 

Report of the Division of Forage Plants, 1926 

Experimental Station, Harrow, Ont. — Report of the Superintend- 
ent, 1926 . 

Division of Economic Fibre Production — Report of the Chief 
Officer, 1926 

Supplement to the Canada Gazette 

An Act respecting Proprietary or Patent Medicines 

The Excise Act, 1906, with Index and amending Acts of 1925, 1926, 
1927 

Office Consolidation of the Fisheries Act 

Banner Oats — The best variety for Quebec (Bulletin No. 91 — New 
Series) 

Report of the Dominion Cerealist, 1926 

Vocational Education 

Senate Debates of various dates 

Commons Debates of various dates 

Various Acts reprinted for stock 

Canada Gazette, extra 

Camilla Guzettr supplement 

Ciiniida Gazetti of various dates 

Monthlj- Supplement to Canadian Official Postal Guide, 1927-28 



Carried forward 8,953,671 



8,734,215 



50 

500 
500 
125 

125 

150 

150 
125 



450 
125 



125 



150 
175 

1.50 

125 

125 

389 
125 
125 
300 
125 

125 
150 
125 
125 

125 

125 

2,150 

100 

400 
200 

125 
125 

125 

300 

3,300 

188,992 

125 

125 

1,000 

17,400 



63,422 



72 

36 
16 
40 

286 

32 

32 
20 



416 
16 



20 



344 
40 

120 

12 
16 

232 
32 

48 
64 



32 
96 
24 
40 

32 

20 
42 
20 

128 
24 



32 

36 

72 

512 

5,941 

4 

26 

736 

196 



73,345 



284,864,927 



3.600 

18,000 
8,000 
5,00C 

35,75C 

4,800 

4,800 
2,500 



187,200 
2,000 



2,500 



51,600 
7,000 

18,000 

1,500 
2,000 

*45,124 

4,000 

6,000 

19,200 

1,000 

4,000 

14,400 

3,000 

5,000 

4,000 

2,500 

90,300 

2,000 

51,200 
4,800 

1,000 

4,000 

4,500 

*7,200 

*198,400 

*3, 261, 852 

500 

3,2.50 

*93,500 

*284,200 



289,334,103 



44 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 

Table No. 8 — Statement of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, 

1927-28 — Continued 



Description 



Numbar 

of 
Copies 



Brought forward 

^Public Printing and Stationery— Continned 

Bilingual 

Annual Report of Statistics of Criminal and Other Offence; 
September 30, 1926— Rapport annuel sur la statistique de la 

criminalite, 30 septembre 1926 ■ • • 

Census of Saskatchewan, 1926, Population and Agriculture^ 
Recensement de la Saskatchewan, 1926, population et agri- 
culture • • • • ■ ■ 

Census of Industry, 1926, The Pulp and Paper Industry— Recense 

ment industriel, 1926, Industrie dela pulpe et du papier . 

Statistics of Dairy. Factories, 1926— Statistique de I'lndustrie 

laitiere, 1926 

List of Shipping, 1926— Liste des navires, 1926 ' ' • ' j' ' ' ^nor ' ' 

Abstract of Statements of Insurance Companies in ( anada, 1^26— 

Releve des etats des compagnies d'assurance au Canada, 1926. 

Fisheries Statistics of Canada, 1926— Statistique des pecheries di; 

Canada, 1925 ;,•••:••. .• ' 

Statistics of Electric Railways of Canada, 1926— Statistique des 

tramways clectrinues du Canada, 1926 • ■ ■ 

Abstracts of Current Public Health Literature— Extraits de publi- 
cations courantes sur la sante publique ■ ■ - 

Standing Orders of the House of Commons, 1927— Reglement dela 

Chambre des Communes, 1027 ■ ■ 

Statistics of Steam Railways of Canada, 1926— Statistique des 

chemins de fer du Canada, 1926 ■ ■ 

Census of Manitoba, 1926, Population and Agriculture— Recense 
ment du Manitoba, 1926, population et agriculture. ............ 

List of Members of the House of Commons with their Constitu 

encies with Post Office Addresses— Liste des membres de la 

Chambre des Communes avec les districts electoraux et 

adresses postales (Corrected to January U, 1928)...^. ■-■•;. 

Auditor General's Report— Rapport del'auditeur general, 1926-2<— 

Part A — Agriculture Department 

C — Civil Service Commission 

D— Customs and Excise Department 

E — External Affairs Department 

H — Immigration and Colonization Department 

I — Indian Affairs Department 

K — Interior Department 

L — Justice Department 

M — Labour Department 

O— Marine and Fisheries Department 

P — Mines Department 

Q — National Defence Department 

S — Post Office Department 

T— PuV)lic Printing and Stationery Department. . . 

V — Public Works I )ci)artiuent 

W — Railways and ( 'anals 1 )opartinent 

X — Royal Canadian Mounted Police 

-Health Department 

-Soldiers' Civil Re-Establishment Department 



8,953,671 



Part 

Part 

Part 

Part 

Part 

Part 

Part 

Part 

Part 

Part 

Part 

Part 

Part 

Part 

Part 

Part 

Part GG- 

Part YY- 



Part ZZ— Trade and Commerce Department. 



Fhench 

Societc des Nations— Deuxi6me conference de I'opium, Geneve 
19 fevrier 1925 \<-y:< 

Le marquage des pores (feuillet No. 88— Nouvelle sferie) . . ^^^^ . . 

Rapport prcliminaire sur la production mini^l•e du Canada, 1J2/^ 

Conference ftHler.ile-provinciale— Sonimaire des discussions, du 
3 au 10 nuvembre 1927 

La f ^-e des hois 

La situation foresti^re 

Guide officiel du service postal canadien, 1928 



Number 

of 

Pages 



r3,345 



Carried forward. 



225 

1.50 

L50 

150 
50 

25 

175 

175 

500 

200 

305 

125 

100 

35 
25 

100 
25 
25 

340 
40 
15 
15 
60 
20 
50 
75 
25 
60 
35 
10 
30 
10 
20 



50 
50 
50 

100 
50 
50 

150 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 



8,957,576 



356 

302 

100 

06 
280 

374 

202 

56 

88 
196 
184 
208 

64 

56 
6 

130 

8 

36 

1.58 
80 
24 
10 
70 
16 
68 

168 
14 

126 
80 
26 
14 
40 
38 



20 

8 

48 

36 

16 

32 

596 



289,334,103 



80,100 

45,300 

15,000 

14,400 
14,000 

9,3.50 
35,350 

0,800 

*11,000 

30,200 

67,160 

26,000 

6,400 

1,960 

1.50 

13,000 

200 

900 

53,720 

3,200 
360 
1.50 

4,200 
320 

3,400 

12,600 

350 

7,. 560 

2,800 
260 
420 
400 
760 



1,000 

400 

2,400 

3,600 

800 

1 , 600 

89,400 



77.775 1 280,913,073 



ANNVAL REPORT, 1927-28 



45 



Table No. 8 — Statement of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, 

1927-28~C ontinued 



Description 



Number 

of 
Copies 



Number 
of 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 



Brought forward. 



jPublic Printing and Stationery — Concluded 

French — Concluded 

Code criminel et autres lois, 1927 

Commission federale du combustible — Meinoire contenant des 
donnes sur I'approvisionnement en combustible provenant 
entierexnent du Canada ou des pays britanniques 

Guide officiel du service postal canadien, 1927 

Budget du Canada, supplementaire, 1927-28 

Liste de prix des publications du gouvernenient, mai 1927 

Loi concernant les assurances 

Rapport du Directeur general veterinaire, 1926-27 

Code criminel et certaines lois — Modifications, 1907-1927 

La loi federale des Etats-Unis concernant le lait importe — Quelques- 
unes de ses dispositions — Lois, arretes et r^glements (No. 23 

Sixi^me rapport sur les associations d'industriels, de commergants et 
de membres des professions liberales du Canada, 1927 

Rapport des delegues canadiens k la huiti^me assemblee de la 
Socicte des Nations, 5 au 27 septembre 1927 

Le cheval canadien (bulletin n° 87 — nouvelle serie) 

Rdglements canadiens concernant I'examen des capitaines et des 
seconds de la marine marchande 

Enquete generale sur les tarifs de marchandises — Jugements (Vol 
XVII, n° 13 et 13a), septembre 1927 

Statuts revises du Canada, 1927 — Liste des chapitres 

Codification administrative de la loi des pecheries 

L'avoine Banni^re (bulletin n° 91 — nouvelle serie) 

Budget du Canada, 1928-29. 

Les criblures pour I'alimentation du betail (feuillet n° 87 — nouvelle 
serie) 

Enquete sur les activites de la Proprietary Articles Trade Asso- 
ciation — Rapport du commissaire, 24 octobre 1927 

L'Enseignement Professionel 

Supplement mensuel au guide officiel du service postal, 1927-28. 

La Revue du Revenu National, Octobre, 1927, to March, 1928. . 



Public Works — 



English 



Dominion Government Telegraph and Telephone Service — List of 
Telephone Subscribers on Exchanges at Brisco, Golden and 
Invermere, etc., April 1, 1927 

Dominion Government Telegraph and Telephone Service — List of 
Telephone Subscribers at Ganges, B.C., Sooke, B.C., and 
Connecting Lines, July 1, 1927 

Programs of Carillon Recitals, August, 1927 

Champlain and Lome Dry Docks at Lauzon, P.Q., in the Harbour 
of Quebec 

Dominion Government Telegraph and Telephone Service — List of 
Telephone Subscribers on Exchanges at Brisco, Golden, Inver- 
mere, etc., January 1, 1928 

Bassins de radoub Champlain et Lome k Lauzon, Que., dans le 
port de Quebec 



Railways and Canals- 



English 



The Highway, the Motor Vehicle and the Tourist in Canada 
(Circular No. 8) 

Annual Report of the Commissioner of Highways, April 1, 1926 
to March 31, 1927 (Bulletin No. 10) 

St. Lawrence Waterway Project — Report of Joint Board of Engin- 
eers with Appendices 

Carried forward 



8,957,576 



2,992 



50 
175 

25 
206 
200 

50 
210 

50 

50 

75 
50 

50 

50 
200 
50 
50 
50 

50 

25 

50 

1,200 

300 



287 

500 
10,000 

1,000 

281 
1,000 



5,000 
2,000 
1,511 



77,775 



728 



24 
598 

20 

32 
168 

64 



12 

176 

32 
24 

80 

310 

8 

32 

8 

112 

16 

32 

36 

184 

156 



40 

32 

460 



289,913,073 



2,178,176 



1,200 

104,650 

500 

6,592 

33,600 

3,200 

182,280 

600 

8,800 

*1,200 
1,200 

4,000 

15,500 

1,600 

1,600 

400 

5,600 

800 

800 

1,800 

*18,400 

*7,8O0 



4,592 



4,000 
160,000 

20,000 



4,496 
20,000 



200,240 

64,000 

695,060 



8,985,369 



82,123 



293,665,759 



46 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 

Table No. 8— Statement of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, 

1927-28 — Coniinued 



Description 



Brought forward . 



Railway Commission — 



English 



Number 

of 
Copies 



Index to Vol. XVI— Judgments, Orders, et^. . .^. ^ ■ ■ 

The Board of Railway Commissioners for C anada re |^eneral 
Freight Rates Investigation— Judgments, September, ^^^\ 

In the Matter of Order in Council, P-C. iNo. 886, of June 5 1925, 
etc.— Judgment of the Chief Commissioner, August 4, 1927^. ■ 

In the Matter of Order in Council, P.C. No. 886, of June 5, 1925, 
and P C No. 24 of January 7, 1926, etc— Conclusions of Com- 
missioner Oliver and reasons for dissent from sections 1, 2 and 
4 of the Judgment of the majority of the Board, August 30, 
1927 

Judgments, Orders, etc 



8,985,369 



606 



French 



Jugements, arrets, reglements et decisions. ■ ■ ■ ■ 

Enquete generale sur les tarifs de marchandises— Jugements (.Vol 

XVII, n° 13 et 13a), septembre 1927 - ■ ■ \ i " V ' • 

Commission des chemins de fer du Canada— Enquete sur la ten 
fication generale des marchandises, instituee en vertu des 
arretes en conseil C.P. 886, du 5 juin 1925, et CP. 24, du 7 jan- 



arretes en conse 
vier 1926— Jugement. 



Royal Canadian Mounted Police — 

English 
Memorandum on the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, April, 1927 



Secretary of State — 



English 



\n Act respecting British Nationality, Naturalization and Aliens 

Reparations— Index of Names and Addresses of ( laimants which 
appear in Vols. 1 and II of the Repa,rations Report, etc 

Illegal Warfare Claims 

Factum ■ 

Guide to Relative Precedence at Ottawa. . -•,■,,• t^^:^:/^:; 

In the Supreme Court of Ontario— In the Matter of the Convey- 
ancing and Law of Property Act, etc.— Argument of C ouncil or 
Behalf of the Custodian on the Motion for Re- Argument 

Royal Commission on Customs and Excise— I'^^nal Report^. . . ._. . . 

Interim Reports of the Royal Commission on Customs and Excise 

Reparations 

Confidential documents 



French 



Loi (wncernant la nationality britannique, la naturalisation et les 
Commission royaie des Douanes et de I'Accise— Rapport final. . . 



Senate of Canada — 

English 

Senators of Canada, according to Seniority, March, 1927. . 
Senators of Canada, according to Seniority, January, 19J8 

Railway Transportation to Senators of ( 'ana( a, 1927 

Railway Transportation to Senators of ( 'anada, 1928 

Carried forward 



Number 

of 

Pages 



300 
100 



300 

19,874 



400 
300 



100 



1,506 



1,000 

500 
1,000 

77 
25 



25 

50 

50 

500 

1,260 



500 
50 



200 

100 

50 

175 



9,014,417 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 



82,123 



12 

286 

40 



64 
1,240 



28 
310 



28 



16 

24 
124 

24 
154 



48 
26 

120 
64 

306 



293,665,759 



7,272 

85,800 

4,000 



19,200 
*737,256 



11,200 
93,000 

2,800 
12,048 

16,000 

12,000 

*62,000 

1,848 

3,850 



1,200 

1,300 

6,000 

32,000 

*53,640 



85,141 



8,000 
1,200 



4,000 

1,200 

600 

2,100 



294,845,273 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1927 -S8 



47 



Table No. 8 — Statement of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, 

1^21 -2d,— Continued 



Description 



Number 

of 
Copies 



Number 

of 

Pages 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 

Pages 



Brought forward. 
Soldier Settlement Board — 



English 



Fifth Report of the Soldier Settlement Board of Canada, Decem- 
ber 31, 1926— Land Settlement 

Sixth Report of the Soldier Settlement Board of Canada, Decem- 
ber 31, 1927— Land Settlement 



Soldiers' Civil Re-Estahlishment — 

English 

Vetcraft Shops— Canada's Largest Juvenile Furniture Manufac- 
turers 

Vetcraft Shops — Canada's Largest Juvenile Furniture Manufac- 
turers 



Supreme Court- 



English 



Canada Law Reports — The Supreme and Exchequer Courts of 
Canada — 

Part III— March 31, 1927 

Part IV— April 30, 1927 

Part V— May 31, 1927 

Part VI— June 30, 1927 

Part VII— September 30, 1927 

Part VIII— October 31 , 1927 

Part IX— November 30, 1927 

Part X— December 31, 1927 

Part I— January 31, 1928 

Part II— February 29, 1928 

Trade and Commerce — 

English 

The Manufacturing Industries of Canada, 1924 (Reprinted from 
the Canada Year Book, 1926) 

Forestry in Canada (Reprinted from the Canada Year Book, 1926) 

Chemicals and Allied Products in Canada, 1926 

Instructions for the Guidance of Officers of the Commercial Intel- 
ligence Service of Canada 

Annual Report of the Board of Grain Commissioners for Canada, 
for the Crop Year ended August 31, 1926 

Preliminary Report on the Mineral Production of Canada (during 
the Calendar Year 1926), March 14, 1927 

Annual Statistics of Fruit and Floriculture, 1926 

The Copyright Act, 1921 — Rules and Forms 

An Act to amend and consolidate the Law relating to Copyright... 

Condensed Preliminary Report on the Trade of Canada, 1927 

Report on the Grain Trade of Canada, for the Crop Year ended 
July 31 and to the Close of Navigation, 1926 

The Patent Act 

Index to the Cjommercial Intelligence Journal — Six Months ending 
June 25, 1927 (Nos. 1196 to 1221) 

Prices and Price Indexes, 1913-1926 

Perliminary Report of the Mineral Production of Canada — Six 
Months ending .Tune 30, 1927 

Diamond .Jubilee of the Confederation of Canada — Sixty years of 
Canadian Progress, 1867-1927 

Canadian Trade in Farm Products, 1926-27 

Quarterly Report of the Trade of Canada, months of April, May 
and June and three months ending June, 1927 

Carripd forward 



9,014,417 



512 
500 



2,006 
2,000 



6,317 
6,256 
6,. 325 
6,256 
6,304 
6,256 
6,530 
6,511 
6,816 
6,761 



1,000 

800 

1,006 

50 

891 

1,987 
1,006 
2,000 
1,000 
2,506 

1,624 
5,075 

2,300 
1,006 

2,011 

151,500 
200 

1,256 



85,141 



64 

32 

128 

52 

40 

52 
20 
32 
32 
108 

202 

24 

20 
170 

80 

176 
16 

344 



294,845,273 



12,288 
16,000 



64,192 
32,000 



144 


909,648 


112 


700,672 


96 


607,200 


126 


788,256 


104 


655,616 


96 


600,576 


160 


1,044,800 


112 


729,232 


120 


817,920 


84 


567,924 



64,000 
25,600 

128,768 

2,600 
35,640 

103,324 
20, 120 

*32,000 
32,000 

270,648 

328,048 
121,800 

46,000 
171,020 

160,880 

26,664,000 
3,200 

432,064 



9,260,985 



87,991 



331,033,309 



48 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 

T\BLE No. 8— Statement of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, 

1927-28 — Continued 



Description 



Brought forward. 



Trade and Commerce— Continued 

English — Concluded 



Iron and Steel and their Products in Canada, 1925 

Coal Statistics for Canada, 1926 • ■ ■ . • ■ • • • • • • • ■ 

List of Publications (Including Reports, Bulletins, Press Releases, 



Number 

of 
Copies 



9,260,985 



1,606 
1,356 



etc . ) . 



Manufacturers of the Non-Ferrous Metals in Canada, 1925 

Invoice Requirements of Brazil ; ' V.' ' J 

Czechoslovakia as a Market for Canadain Products. ............. 

Handbook for Use of Crop Correspondents with Selection of Annual 
Agricultural Statistics, 1908-26 

Canada Year Book, 1926 ,■••.■• , /,■ • • , • ■ • no'- 

Annual Report on the Mineral Production of Canada, 19Jo. 

Quarterly Report of the Trade of Canada (Imports for Consump- 
tion and Exports), Months of July, August, September, 1927, 
and Six months ending September, 1926 and 1927. ........... 

The Maritime Provinces since Confederation— A btatistical fM,udy 
of their Social and Economic Condition during the Past Sixty 
Years 

Gasoline Measuring Devices • •, ' /o- ' 'nV " 'Ji; j • " ' 

Index to the Commercial Intelligence Journal (Six Months ending 
December 31, 1927 (Nos. 1222 to 1249) . . . . . ...... ..... - • • ■ 

Manufactures of the Non-Metallic Minerals in Canada, 1925 . 

Preliminary Report on the Mineral Production of C anada, l\)Z7 . . . . 

Quarterly Repoi t of the Trade of Canada (Imports for Consump- 
tion and Exports), Months of October, November and Decem- 
ber, 1927, and Nine Months ending December, 1926 and 1927. . 

Sweden' as a Market for Canadian Produce 

Tariff Preferences of the British Empire 

Inspection— Tank Wagons ; V-' ' ' ' 1' -; ' moV " ' ' 

Trade of Canada (Imports for Consumption and Exports), 192/. .. . 

Monthlv Bulletin of Agricultural Statistics, 1927-28. . ...... . . _^^_ 

Monthly Report of tne Coal and Coke Statistics for Canada, 1927. 

Supplement to the Commercial Intelligence Journal 

Monthly Trade Report, 1927 

Commercial Intelligence Journal 



BlUNGr.\L 

Financial Statistics of Provincial Governments in Canada, 192; 
Statistique financifere des gouvernements provinciaux du 

Canada, 1925 .■••.•••- ,qo« 

Canal Statistics, 1926— Statistique des canaux, 1926. , 

Report of the Fur Farms of Canada, 1925— Elevage des animaux a 

fourrure, 1925 • • • ■ :■ 'A" :•'""•' "r^" ' 'j" 

Census of Industry, 1925, Central Electric Stations in Canada— 

Recensement industriel, 1925, usines 61ectnques centrales du 

Census of Industi-y. 1925, The Lumber Industry— Recensement 
industriel, 1925, indu.strie en bois /,••.••. •/■,■■■ 

Vital Statistics, 1926, Preliminary Report— Statistiqucs vitales, 
1926, rapport pr61iminaLie .^^ • • ■••■•• • •. : • 

Live Stock and Animal Products Statistics, 1926— Statistique du 
betaii et des produits animaux, 1926. ;; " " j' " i ' 

Monthly Review of Business Statistics— Revue mensuelle de la 
situation 6conomique A" ' ■ : ' '. _, k'i" '■" "imp 

Fisheries Statistics of ( 'anada, 1926— Statistique des pficheries, 1926 

Statistics of i;iectric Railways of Canada, 1926— Statistique des 
tramwavs ^lectriques du Canada, 1926. . ..... . . . . ... . ._ ■ ■ . 

Statistics of Steam Railways of Canada. 1926— Statistique des 
chemins de fer du Canada, 1926 - 

Census of Manitoba, 1926, Population and Agriculture— Recense- 
ment du Manitoba, 1926, population et agriculture 



Carried forward 9.573,371 



Number 

of 

Pages 



1.000 
997 
511 
600 

3,011 
7,006 
2,016 



1,250 



2,006 
200 

2,300 
1,206 
2,000 



1,250 

500 

300 

500 

1,425 

89, 179 

13,011 

9,629 

2,812 

121,969 



1,306 
1,016 

1,800 



2,006 

1,212 

1,411 

2,006 

29,589 
2,000 

600 

800 

1,000 



87,991 



188 
106 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 



82 



32 

1,092 

228 



344 



146 



24 

128 

48 



344 

52 

16 

8 

343 

470 

228 

72 

968 

1,856 



331,033,309 



301,928 
143,7.36 

8,000 
81,754 

4,088 
28,800 

96,3.52 

7,650.552 

459,648 



4.30,000 



292,876 
1,600 

55,200 

1.54,368 

96,000 



430,000 

26,000 

4,800 

4,000 

488,775 

*3, 769, 578 

*226, 136 

*115,496 

*1, 361, 008 

*4, 271, 296 



84 
52 

84 

64 

82 

16 

106 

352 
202 

56 

184 

208 



96,328 



109,704 
52,832 

151,200 



128,384 
99,384 
22,576 

212,636 

*946,848 
404,000 

33,600 

147,200 

208,000 



354,051,664 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1927- 



49 



Table No. 8 — Statement of Pamphlet and Miscellaneous Book-work, 

1927 -2S— Concluded 



Description 



Number 

of_ 
Copies 



Number 

of 
Pages 



Total 
Number 

of 
Printed 



Brought forward 

Trade and Cornmerce — Concluded 

Bilingual — Concluded 

Annual Report of Statistics of Criminal and Other Offences, Sep- 
tember 30, 1926 — Rapport annuel sur la statistique de la crimi- 
nalito, 30 septembre 1926 

Vital Statistics, 1925, Fifth Annual Report — Statistiques vitales 
1925, cinqui^me raoport annuel 

Census of Saskatchewan, 1926, Population and Agriculture — 
Recensement de la Saskatchewan, 1926, population et agriculture 

Census of Industry, 1926, The Pulp and Paper Industry — Recense- 
ment industriel, 1926, Industrie de la pulpe et du papier 

Statistics of Dairy Factories, 1926 — Statistique de I'industrie 
laiti^re, 1926 

French 

Aper^u annuel sur I'instruction publique au Canada, 1925 

Table des matieres du Bulletin des renseignements commerciaux — 
Pour les six mois termines avec juin, 1927 (Numeros 1196 k 1921) 

Analphabetisme et freqiientation scolaire au Canada 

Annuaire du Canada , 1926 

Guide des correspondaats agricoles — Avec une selection de statis- 
tiques agricoles annuelles, 1908-1926 

Table des matieres du Bulletin des renseignements commerciaux- — 
Pour les six mois termines avec decembre 1927 (Numeros 1222 
a 1248) _. 

Rapport preliminaire sur la production minifere du Canada, 1927... . 

Bulletin de renseignements commerciaux 

Bulletin mensuel de la statistique agricole, 1927-28 

Totals 

Totals (March 31, 1927) 



9,573,371 



900 
1,406 
1,000 
1,100 
2,600 

307 

450 

511 

2,113 

1,011 



400 

1,000 

24,306 

8,273 



96,328 



9,618,748 
7,243,273 



2.58 

16 

152 

1,106 

32 



16 

48 

816 

432 



354,051.664 



356 


320,400 


638 


897,028 


302 


.302,000 


100 


110,00C 


96 


249, 60C 



79,206 

7,200 

77,672 

2,336,978 

32,352 



6,400 

48,000 

*390, 696 

*290,468 



100,696 
96,791 



359,199,664 
307,570,661 



NOT EXECUTED IN PRINTING BUREAU 



Experimental Farms — 

Counter Sales Book 

Immigration and Coloni?ation- 



English 



English 



Canada "The New Home Land" 

Canada West (United States Edition). 



National Revenue — 



English 



Counter Sales Book 

Catalogue of Unclaimed Goods. 
Sales Catalogues 



Bilingual 
Freight Unclaimed Goods — Marchandises non rcclamees (fret). . . 

Totals 

Totals (March 31, 1927) 



500 



199,496 
304, 000 



1,000 
500 
500 



1,000 



507,002 
114,027 



50 



38 



226 

188 



25,300 



6,383,872 
12,160,000 



42,000 
6,000 
6,000 



.38,000 



18,661,172 
3,430,864 



* For sale purposes. 
69595—4 



50 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 



Table No. 9 — Statement of other Letterpress Departmental Work for the Fiscal 

Year 1927-28 



Department 


Executed 

in 

Printing Bureau 


Not Executed 

in 
Printing Bureau 


Envelopes 


Copies 
other 
work 

393,100 

11,306,388 

6,650 

64,315 

552, 120 

1,039,383 

8,813,780 

229,860 

22,725 

1,259,207 

418,404 

1,797,500 

12,000 

49,078 

757,520 

125,756 

3,908,459 

584,969 

757, 149 

6,755,308 

127,999 

1,184.715 

17,000 

5,233,551 

507,438 

7,649,278 

6,505 

37,215 

35,648,332 

160,850 

75,410 

83,865,182 

- 18,909 

8,571,888 

2,755,266 

793,565 

77,645 

144,102 

250 

670,868 

43,285 

642, 136 

196,300 

28, 109 

6,665,281 


Envelopes 


Copies 
other 
work 


Advisory Board on Tariff and Taxation 










4,068,098 

9,530 

50,000 

626,613 

166,100 

974,575 

50,905 

500 

653,769 

49,980 

983,040 

50,900 
2,000 
204, 175 
528,335 
471,205 
198,600 




2,430,900 








Auditor General. . . 






Chief Electoral Officer 






Civil Service Commission 






Customs and Excise 






Diamond Jubilee Committee 






Exchequer Court 






Experimental Farms 


21,000 


400,000 


External Affairs 




Finance 






Government Contracts Supervision Commit- 
tee . . .... 






Governor General's Secretary 






Health . . ... 




1,000 


House of Commons 






Immigration and Colonization 


10,000 


5,000 


Indian Affairs. 


1,506 


Insurance 


7,000 
1,000 


600 


Interior 


1,622,762 

75,010 

166,500 

5,000 

968,570 

197,760 

1,994,629 


472.918 






Labour. ... 




18,000 


Library of Parliament . . 






Marine and Fisheries 


5,000 


11,250 


Mines 


19,938 






42,980 


National Gallery of Canada 






National Research Council of Canada. . . 


6,000 

1,665,403 

61,600 

10, 000 

10,120,040 

1,760 

1,491,129 

331,480 

182,100 

63.802 

50,000 

1,000 

149,000 

61,510 

460,867 






National Revenue. 




633.031 


Patent and Copyright Office. . 






Penitentiaries 






Post Office 


60,450 


21,285.365 


Privy Council 




Public Printing and Stationery 






Public Works ... 


50,425 




Railways and Canals 


10.000 


Railway Commission 






Royal Canadian Mounted Police 






Royal Mint 






Secretary of State. 






Senate of Canada 






Soldiers' Civil Re-Establishment 


1,000 


44.000 


Soldier Settlement Board 






16,025 
1,067,079 






Trade and Commerce 


10,725 


375.900 






Totals 


29,857.349 
28,839,499 


193,974,750 
205,196,110 


166,600 
192,060 


25,752.388 


Totals (March 31, 1927) 


6,717,016 







ANNUAL REPORT, 1927-28 51 

Table No. 10 — Statement of Books Bound during the Fiscal Year 1927-28 



Department 


Executed in 
Printing Bureau 


Not Executed in 
Printing Bureau 


Full 
Leather 


Half 
Leather 


Quarter 
Leather 


Cloth 


Full 
Leather 


Half 
Leather 


Quarter 
Leather 


Cloth 


Advisory Board on Tariff and 
Taxation 








1 

20,485 

13 

35 

20 

4 

6,288 

600 

105 

1,186 

346 

317 

19 

345 

3,7.53 

963 

1,944 

3,197 

13,9,30 

19 

264 

62 

51,678 

12,455 

6,575 














66 
3 

72 
15 

■"949 


124 

2 

r 

400 






2 


205 












Auditor General 












Chief Electoral Officer 












Civil Service Commission 


1 
1 










Customs and Kxcise. . . 










Diamond Jubilee Committee. . . . 










Exchequer Court 


I 

62 


31 
12 
19 
21 
2 


48' 










Experimental Farms 

External Affairs 






























Governor General's Secretary . . . 












Health 






40 




31 


House of Commons 


5 


29 

95 
136 
31? 

95 
158 
168 
956 

48 
199 

81 


1 
34 

63 

2 

663 

1 
9 
8C 
38 
14 
14 














Indian Affairs 


3 






















5 

10 

2 

9 

3 

30 

78 

1 






























Library of Parliament 














4 


3 


14 
















National Gallerv of Canada. 










National Research Council of 






285 

6,401 

8 

50 
35,667 










National Revenue ... 




531 

81 

100 

1,169 

1 

224 

l.?9 

64 

25 


1,3,58 

1 

1,781 




16 






Patent and Copyright Office 

Penitentiaries 


27 














Post Office 


1 
2 




1 






Pri\T Council 






Public Printing and Stationery. . 


36 

36 

38 

3 

1 


41,964 

1,499 

3,5.37 

267 

1,180 








13,003 


Public Works 


8 
18 

7 










Railways and Canals 






























Royal Mint. 




2 
90 
38 












17 

7 


20' 


42 
19 

1,767 

2,700 

23 

23,907 




















Soldiers' Civil Re-Establish- 
ment . . 










Soldier Settlement Board. .. . 


















1 
26 


57 
130 


18' 










Trade and Commerce 


50 






500 










Totals 

Totals (March 31, 1927).... 


325 
307 


6,069 
3,729 


4,786 
7,840 


243,920 
228,630 


50 

1 


61 

58 


5 


13,753 
2,116 



69695-3 J 



52 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 

Tabie No. 11 — Number of Pads made during the Fiscal Year 1927-28 



Department 


Executed 

in Printing 

Bureau 


Not Executed 

in Printing 

Bureau 




Quantity 


Quantity 


Advisory Board on Tariff and Taxation 


5,078 

20,485 

50 

460 

11,072 

286 

880 

4,534 

480 

620 

2,098 

12,522 

885 

20 

8,382 

1.220 

3,516 

17,379 

500 

58,046 

200 

52,479 

170 

ISO 

205,874 

113,092 

23,088 

3,037 

215 

32 

696 

1,325 

3,333 

702 

306 

29,796 




Agriculture 


7,500 


Auditor General 




Civil Service Commission 




Customs and Excise 




Experimental Farms 




External Affairs 




Finance 




Governor General's Secretary 




Health 




House of Commons 


6,334 


Immigration and Colonization 




Indian Affairs 




Insurance 




Interior 




Justice 




Labour. . . 




Marine and Fisheries 








National Defence 




National Research Council of Canada 




National Revenue 


4,202 






Penitentiaries 




Post Office 


143,524 


Public Printing and Stationery 








Railways and Canals 








Royal Canadian Mounted Police 




Secretary of State . . . 




Senate of Canada 




Soldiers' Civil Re-E.-itablishment 




Soldier Settlement Board. .. . 








Trade and Commerce . . 


1,038 






Totals 


oS3,008 
617,399 


162, 598 


Totals (March 31, 1927) 


233.075 







Table No. 12 — Statement of Prepaid Post Office envelopes made and stamped 

during the Fiscal Year 1927-28 



One-cent envelopes 

Two-cent envelopes 

Three-cent envelopes 

Totals 

Totals (March 31. 1927) 



Executed 

in Printing 

Bureau 



Quantity 
made and 
stamped 



2,828,475 

10,974.875 

102,000 



13.905,350 
28,058,346 



Not Executed 

in Printing 

Bureau 



Quantity 
made and 
stamped 



4,675,000 

725,473 

50,000 

5,450,473 
2,319,800 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1927-28 



53 



Table No. 13 — Statement of the Die Stamping; of Letter and Note Headings 
and Envelopes during the Fiscal Year 1927-28 





Executed in Printing Bureau 


Not Executed 

in Printing 

Bureau 


Department 


Foolscap. 

Half Cap, 

Letter 

and 

Half Letter 


Note 

and 

Half Note 


Envelopes 


Number 

of 

Impressions 


Note 

and 

Half Note 


Advisoi'y Board on Tariff and Taxation 


13,. 500 

43.500 

5,000 

7,000 




13,000 
24,150 


26,500 
74,664 

5,000 
15,000 

2,2.50 

4,400 
14,945 

9,. 100 

100, 135 

10,200 

115,8.32 

10,000 

573,572 

40,000 

16,000 

78,. 560 

85,650 

22,500 

26,850 

6,. 500 
59.900 

5,000 
55,570 

5,000 
76,000 
28,825 
11,868 
54,800 
41,575 
12,060 

1,000 
15.100 
37.310 
1.52,317 
31,974 
14.000 
32,800 




Agriculture 


7,014 




Archives 




Chief Electoral Officer 


2,000 

250 

1,000 

14,295 


6,000 
2,000 
3,400 
650 
8,000 
48,500 




Civil Service Commission 




Customs and Excise 






Diamond .Jubilee Committee 






Exchequer Court 


1,500 
40,650 
10,000 
18,500 

8,000 
46,5C0» 
25,000 
13,500 
41,000 
38,000 
12,000 
12,500 

6,500 
28,500 




External Affairs 


10,985 

200 

53,907 

2,000 

38,372 




Finance 




Governor General's Secretary 


43,425 




Health 




House of Commons 


488,700 
15,000 
2,000 
.37,350 
42,875 
10,000 
13,3.50 




Immigration and Colonization 




Indian Affairs 


500 
210 

4,775 
500 

1,000 




Interior 




Justice 




Labour 




Marine and Fisheries 




Mines 




National Defence 


8,900 


22,500 
5,000 

30,520 
5,000 

25,000 
7,075 
4,618 

20, 100 
7,000 
4.000 
1,000 
5,100 

12,800 

66,3.50 
3.262 
7,000 
3,000 




National Gallery of Canada 




National Revenue 


23,000 


2,050 




Patent and Copyright Office 




Post Office 


51,000 

8,500 

7,000 

.32,600 

.30,000 

7,000 






Privy Council 


13,2.50 

250 

2,100 

4,575 

1,060 




Public Printing and Stationery 




Public Works 




Railways and Canals 




Railway Commission 




Royal Canadian Mounted Police 




Royal Mint 


10,000 
22,000 
10, 500 
26,000 
4,000 
25,000 






Secretary of State 


2,510 
75,367 
2,712 
3,000 
4,800 


600 


Senate of Canada 




Soldiers' Civil Re-Establishment 

Supreme Court 


300 


Trade and Commerce 








Totals 

Totals (March 31, 1927).. . 


627,750 
614,625 


257,582 
394,427 


987, 725 
1,228,534 


1,873,057 
2,237,586 


900 







54 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 



Table No. 14 — Statement of the Loose-Leaf Work performed during the Fiscal 

Year 1927-28 





Executed in Printing Bureau 


Not Executed in Printing Bureau 




Binders 


- Loose 
Leaves 


Index 
Leaves 


Index 
Cards 


Binders 


Loose 
Leaves 


Index 
Leaves 


Index 
Cards 


Advisory Board on Tariff 
and Taxation 




1,000 

280,818 

30,896 

82,125 
115,850 
3,300 
40, 750 
68,015 
43,200 

1,750 
7,100 
1,700 

1,007,873 

30,400 

800 

274,485 

27,500 

221,300 

371,436 

15,200 

1,857,951 

751,896 

500 
16, 100 
97,605 

536 

1,975,745 

68,315 

258,280 

24,300 

126,000 
700 
800 

67,944 

43,250 

1,800 

1,150,606 


800 

1,950 

460 




5 




337 






115 
18 


2,000 




Auditor General 










Civil Service Commis- 












Custonis and Excise 


310 














Exchequer Court 


58 












Experimental Farms 


26 

8 

98 

5 

7 

1 

28 

23 

13 

1,004 

7 

18 

120 

22 

394 

709 

? 

33 












External Affairs 


44 
1,244 












Finance 












Governor General's Sec- 












Health 


87 
29 

609 

'217 

348 

3,145 

190 

149 

947 

215 

3,711 

l,a57 












House of Commons 












Immigration and Colon- 
ization 












Indian Affairs 
























Interior 


1,000 




2,500 












Labour 
























Mines 












National Defence 






200 
1,000 


"8,879' 


163 






1 




Patent and Copyright 
Office 








.58 
670 












Post Office 


1,000 




2,800 






Privy Council 






Public Printing and Sta- 


80 

73 

142 

6 

26 
9 


821 
385 
193 
209 

51 
89 
29 

191 


240,400 
1,000 














5,035 






Railways and Canals 
















Royal Canadian Mount- 
























Senate of Canada 












Soldiers' Civil Re-Estab- 


20 

46 

1 

410 












Soldier Settlement 
Board 














29 
1,412 












Trade and Commerce 


325 




















Totals 


3,775 
4,084 


9,067,736 
7,865,401 


19,397 
20,531 


245,725 
560, 100 


6 
2 


11,525 
1,500 


9,216 


163 


Totals (March 31, 
1927) 











ANNUAL REPORT, 19^ -i 



55 



Table No. 15— Statement giving the Number of Maps, Plans, Cheques and 
Forms Lithographed during the Fiscal Year 1927-28 



Department 



Not Executed 

in 

Printing Bureau 



Maps 
and 
Plans 



Cheques 

and 

Forms 



Advisory Board on Tariff and Taxation. 

Agriculture 

Archives 

Auditor General 

Chief Electoral Officer 

Civil Service Commission 

Customs and Excise 

Diamond Jubilee Committee 

Exchequer Court 

Experimental Farms 

External Affairs 

Finance 

Governor General's Secretary 

Health 

House of Commons 

Immigration and Colonization 

Indian Affairs '. . . 

Interior 

Justice 

Labour 

Library of Parliament 

Marine and Fisheries 

Minos 

National Defence 

National Revenue 

Patent and Copyright Office 

Penitentiaries 

Post Office.. 

Privy Council 

Public Printing and Stationery 

Public Works 

Railways and Canals 

Railway Commission 

Royal Canadian Mounted Police 

Secretary of State 

Senate of Canada 

Soldiers' Civil Re-Establishment 

Soldier Settlement Board 

Supreme Court 

Trade and Commerce 



411,382 



203,810 
35,061 



150,939 



9,326 



Totals 

Totals (March 31, 1927). 



810,926 
978,634 



1,000 

1,744,015 

1,450 

1,125 

1,000 

3,518 

50, 000 

11,430 

1,400 

1,337,710 

4,300 

780, 500 

18,025 

4,065 

459, 107 

297,050 

74,710 

2,860,098 

7,850 

20, 760 

560 

213,814 

25,850 

221,060 

268,806 

7,200 

15,000 

7,871,905 

3,785 

5,000 

121.800 

66, 780 

1,150 

51,400 

9,947 

10,206 

1,628,623 

18,000 

400 

1,359,898 



19,580,297 
31,123,229 



56 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 



Table No. 16 — Statement of the Number of Half-tones. Line Cuts, Electros 
and Dies made during the Fiscal Year 1927-28 



Department 



Not Executed in Printing Bureau 



Half-tones Line Cuts Electros 



Dies 



Advisory Board on Tariff and Taxation. 

Agriculture 

Archives 

Chief Electoral Officer. 

Civil Service Commission 

Customs and Excise 

Diamond Jubilee Committee 

Experimental Farms 

External Affairs 

Finance 

Governor General's Secretary 

Health 

House of Commons ■.■••; 

Immigration and Colonization 

Indian Affairs 

Insurance 

Interior 

Labour 

Marine and Fisheries 

Mines 

National Defence 

National Research Coimeil of Canada. . . 

National Revenue 

Patent and Copyright Office 

Post Office.. 

Privy Council 

Public Printing and Stationery 

Public Works 

Railways and Canals 

Railway Commission 

Royal Canadian Mounted Police 

Secretary of State 

Senate of Canada 

Soldiers' Civil Re-Establishment 

Supreme Court 

Trade and Commerce 



Totals 

Totals (March 31. 1927). 



1 

100 

18 



342 



44 
4 

32 
332 

13 

27 
155 



1,235 
1.255 



275 

42 

16 

419 

5 

10 

19 

,697 

46 



3 
145 



9,857 
9,912 



16 



4 

65 

48 

140 

4 



14 



100 
16 



145 

8 

37 

48 

12 

2 

166 



502 



117 
"3 



39 



1.486 
783 



3 
2 
1 

U 
1 
1 



43 
52 



Table No. 17 — Lithographing and Engraving Division — Record of Work for 

Fiscal Year 1927-28 

Number 

Sketches for steel dies 24 

Engraved steel dies 63 

Sketches for card plates 37 

Engraved card plates 106 

Sketches for Invitation — Christmas cards, etc 50 

Engraved Invitation — Christmas cards, etc 72 

Sketches for Cheques — Forms, C'ertificates. etc 12 

Engraved Cheques — Forms. Certificates, etc 11 

Engraved patches for cheques 125 

Making drawings for diagrams 7 

Preparing zinc plates 2 

Proofs from zinc plates 4 

Proofs from copper plates 916 

Transfers from map plates ' ^7 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1927-28 



57 



Table No. 18 — Comparative Statement of the Number of Letterpress 
Impressions for the last Eight Years 



Years 


Impressions 

executed in 

Printing 

Bureau 


1920-21 


94,563,860 
94 482 190 


1921-22 


1922-23 


98 7SQ 23Q 


1923-24 


109,417,386 
96,879,527 
97 Oil 711 


1924-25 


1825-26 


1926-27 


113 973 666 


1927-28 


111 908 Oil 







ACCOUNTANT'S BRANCH 

Ottawa, August 1, 1928. 

F. A. AcLAND, Esq., 

King's Printer and Controller of Stationery. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit the following report of the transactions 
of this branch of the department for the fiscal year ending March 31, 1928, 
Complete details of the financial operations of the department will be found 
imder the following heads: — - 

1. General Financial Statement. 

2. Letter of Credit Account. 

3. King's Printer's Advance Account. 

4. Printing Branch Account and comparative statements. 

5. Stationery Branch i\.ccount and comparative statements. 

6. Appropriations, detail of expenditure. 

7. Canada Gazette, comparative statement of Revenue and Expenditure. 

8. Casual Revenue Account. 

Respectfully submitted, 

F. G. BRONSKILL, 

Chief Accountant. 



59 



60 



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64 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 

2. LETTER OF CREDIT ACCOUNT 

Amount received by letters of credit for the fiscal year ending March 31, 1928 $ 3,588,676 28 

Amount received by bills of exchange 

Amount received by cheques on New York 

Amount received by cheques on France 

Amount received by cheques on Italy 

Amount received by cheques on Belgium 

Amount received by cheques on Germany 

Amount received by cheques on India 

Amount received by cheques on Switzerland 

Amount received by cheques on Austria 

Amount received by cheques on Spain 

Amount received bj'^ cheques on Manilla, P.I 

Total $ 3,637,277 86 

Detail by accounts of net expenditure drawn on above credit account — 

Printing Branch Account $2, 176,000 27 

Stationery Branch Account 1 , 163, 638 64 

Printing, binding and distributing the Annual Statutes 8, 938 67 

Canada Gazette 30, 706 34 

Plant — Renairs and Renewals 29, 260 48 

Plant— New 34,051 50 

Distribution of Parliamentary Documents 48, 473 52 

Printing and binding Government Publications for sale and distribution to deoartments 

and the public 33,713 95 

Gratuities 1,041 34 

Printing, binding and distributing the Revised Statutes of Canada, 1927. English and 

_ French editions .•••;•• ■; •. •. 96,265 32 

Printing, binding and distributing the Revised Edition of the Criminal Code, 1927, 

English and French editions 14,905 88 



15,369 90 


32,631 11 


14 21 


5 54 


7 92 


478 76 


31 12 


37 66 


16 40 


3 65 


5 31 



S 3,036,995 91 
Refunds deposited to respective accounts — 

Printing Branch Account $ 29 02 

Stationery Branch Account 202 93 

Plant — Rejjairs and Renewals 50 00 

2S1 95 



$ 3,637,277 



3. KING'S PRINTER'S ADVANCE ACCOUNT 

Debit balance brought forward from the fiscal year 1926-27 — Stationery Branch Account. .$ 17,185 22 
Advances to King's Printer during fiscal year 1927-28 — 

For Printing Branch $ 2.176.029 29 

For Stationery Branch 1, 163,841 57 

3,339.870 86 

Amount received for printing, etc., in excess of expenditure on same 36,065 32 

Amount received for stationery in excess of expenditure on same 18, 553 82 

54,619 14 

$ 3,411,675 22 

Deposits to credit of Receiver General made by the King's Printer to cover advances made 
during the fiscal year 1927-28— 

Amount received from departments and Parliament for printing, etc ? 2,197.615 81 

Amount from sale of empty spools 30 90 

Amount from sale of electros : 5 40 

Amount from sale of sanitary towels 2 10 

Crating charges 57 55 

$ 2,197,711 76 

Amount of refund.s — Printing Branch 29 02 

$2,197,740 78 

Amount received from departments and Parliament for stationery, etc $ 1,197,573 10 

Amount from sale of discarded typewriters < 2,834 93 

1,200,408 03 

Amount of refunds — Stationery Branch 202 93 

$ 1,200,010 96 

% 3,398,351 74 
Amount by which the stock of the Printing Branch was increased during the fiscal year 

1927-28 14,3.53 83 

$ 3,412,705 57 
Amount by which the stock of the .Stationery Branch was decreased during the fiscal year 

1927-28 1 .030 35 

$ 3,411,675 22 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1927-28 65 

4. PRINTING BRANCH ACCOUNT 

Inventory on April 1 . 1927 $ 370, 128 52 

Expenditure for the fiscal year 1927-28 — 

Wages $ 1,039,790 44 

Printing material $ 77,056 94 

Customs duties (rechargeablel 1 , 504 74 

78,561 68 

Paper stock 665,597 69 

Outside work 356, 901 73 



Office printing $ 16, 145 01 

Office stationery 1 , 679 53 

Freight 718 74 

Brokerage 49 50 

Motor supplies, repairs, gasoline, etc., 50 p.c. of cosi 2, 208 39 



20,801 17 



Char service and cleaning material 14,317 56 



2,176,000 27 



Profit for the fiscal year 1927-28 transferred to Casual Revenue Account 36, 065 32 

$ 2,582,194 11 



Revenue for the fiscal year 1927-28 — 

Sale of inside work, printing, etc., to departments and Parliament $ 1,844,665 92 

Sale of outside work to departments and Parliament 352, 949 89 

$ 2,197,615 81 

Sale of empty spools ' $ 30 90 

Sale of electros 5 40 

Sale of sanitary towels 2 10 

Crating charges 57 55 

95 95 



$ 2,197,711 76 
Inventory on March 31, 1928 384,482 35 



$ 2,582,194 11 



Detail of Inventory of Printing Branch as on March 31, 1928 

Work in process — Labour and Burden — 

Hand composition. $ 46,272 98 

Monotype composition 33, 161 21 

Linotype composition 15,926 66 

$ 95,360 85 

Stereotyping 1 , 858 , 70 

Press work 18. 103 44 

Binding 17, 752 55 

Die-stamping 334 40 

Engraving 569 00 

$ 133,978 94 

Work in process — Material — 

Press division — Ink $ 369 14 

Bindery division 7, 244 48 

Engraving division 2 12 

Paper 62, 559 00 

$ 70,174 74 

Materials etc., on hand, in different divisions — 

Paper stores division $ 89,097 93 

Printing stores division 60, 793 85 

Mechanical division 1 , 488 65 

Hand composing division 28 75 

Monotype composing division 18 17 

Linotype composing division 9 25 

Stereotyping division 131 95 

Press division 1 , 183 31 

Bindery division 2,647 41 

Engraving division 494 02 

S 155,893 29 

Amount for lithographing, printing, binding, etc.. paid to outside firms and not charged to 

departments and Parliament on March 31, 1928 24,435 38 

S 384,482 35 
69595—5 



66 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 



Statement, b}- Departments, of accounts paid for Printing, Binding, Litho- 
graphing, etc., done outside the Department, during the fiscal year ending 
March 31, 1928. 



Department 



Express and 

Freight 

paid to 

transportation 

companies 



Printing, 
Binding and 
Litho- 
graphing 



Total 



Advisory Board on Tariff and Taxation. 

Agriculture 

Archives 

Auditor General 

Chief Electoral Officer 

Civil Service Commission 

Exchequer Court 

External Affairs 

Finance 

Governor General's Secretary 

Health 

House of Commons 

Immigration and Colonization 

Indian Affairs 

Insurance 

Interior 

Justice 

Labour 

Library of Parliament 

Marine and Fisheries 

Mines 

National Defence 

National Research Council 

National Revenue 

Post Office 

Privy Council 

Public Printing and Stationerj' 

Public Works 

Railways and Canals 

Railway Commission 

Royal Canadian Mounted Police 

Secretary of State 

Senate of Canada 

Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment 

Soldier Settlement Board 

Supreme Court 

Trade and Commerce 



if CtS, 

"158 03 



5 76 
39 50 

3 45 
73 52 



S3 93 
6 76 
5 15 
65 

99 24 
1,970 61 



4 18 
2 66 



0-55 



Total. 



1,399 53 
3,853 52 



cts 

11 44 
26,343 97 

29 36 

19 32 

31 98 

38 74 

19 50 

2,408 .51 

4,054 46 

©80 01 

505 58 

1,229 72 

53,460 86 

288 89 

426 58 

44,869 13 

611 45 

598 IS 

19 24 

14,976 62 

12,234 63 

7,257 60 

82 45 

15,251 66 

121,947 11 

383 22 

6,537 41 

929 62 

13,423 73 

165 78 

543 56 

9,201 51 

264 40 

3,847 55 

53 92 

12 48 
10,288 04 

353,048 21 



$ cts. 

11 44 
26,502 00 

29 36 

19 32 

31 98 

38 74 

19 50 

2,408 51 

4,0.j4 46 

680 01 

503 58 

1,229 72 

53,466 62 

328 39 

430 03 

44,942 65 

611 45 

598 18 

19 24 

15,060 55 

12,241 39 

7,262 75 

83 10 

15,350 90 

123,917 72 

383 22 

6,537 41 

933 80 

13,426 39 

165 78 

543 56 

9,201 51 

264 40 

3,848 10 

53 92 

12 48 
11,687 57 

356,901 73 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1927- 



67 



Statement of Printing, Lithographing, etc., and Paper supphecl to Department? 
and Parliament, for the fiscal year ending March 31, 1928. 



Department 



Outside 
Work 



Inside 

Printing, 

Binding 

etc. 



Paper 



Total 



Advisory Board on Tariff and Taxation. . 

Agriculture 

Archives — Public 

Auditor General's Office 

Chief Electoral Officer 

Civil Service Commission 

Diamond Jubilee Committee 

Exchequer Court 

External Affairs 

Finance 

Govt. C'ontracts Supervision Committee. 

Governor General's Secretary 

Health 

House of Commons 

Immigration and Colonization 

Indian Affairs 

Insurance 

Interior 

Justice 

Labour 

Library of Parliament 

Marine and Fisheries 

Mines 

National Defence 

National Gallery of Canada 

National Research Council 

National Revenue 

Penitentiaries 

Post Office 

Privy Council 

Public Printing and Stationery 

PuVjHc Works 

Railways and Canals 

Railway Commission 

Royal Canadian Mounted Police 

Royal Mint 

Secretary of State 

Senate of Canada 

Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment 

vSoldier Settlement Board 

Supreme Court 

Trade and Commerce 



S cts. 

11 44 

27,648*42 

253 81 

19 32 

31 98 

44 77 

2,233 77 

19 50 

181 39 

4,880 03 



680 01 

599 68 

1,506 40 

53,468 55 

328 39 

431 63 

44,319 43 

520 16 

598 00 

19 24 

15,145 72 

9,130 28 

2,285 32 



Total. 



83 10 

15,231 83 

32 24 

126,774 33 

383 22 

6,434 24 

888 41 

13,426 39 

165 78 

551 40 



7,956 35 



4,066 41 

53 92 

36 62 

12,508 41 



352,949 89 



§ cts. 

377 52 

95,689 88 

3,560 07 

11,681 02 

3,009 95 

4,926 93 

5,239 15 

292 45 

15,919 38 

7,835 52 

55 61 

2,402 30 

14,142 19 

80,961 38 

18.066 58 
4,752 82 

21,993 11 

63,4.56 14 

3,706 46 

32,838 34 

6,292 89 

62,263 23 

43,817 52 

43,648 88 

146 23 

1,663 84 

71,422 17 

1,862 00 

121,321 60 

975 71 

175,623 03 

11,146 02 

10.067 12 
7,931 43 
2,822 76 

60 81 

24,4.56 99 

2,162 71 

4.976 72 

1.977 94 
6,401 86 

138,049 33 



1,129,997 59 



$ cts. 

532 05 

69,006 .58 

190 42 

1,348 67 

5,654 41 

3,999 22 

3,909 82 

135 92 

3,490 34 

9,982 33 

131 73 

1,220 24 

9,737 36 

14,888 43 

42,757 91 

2,970 51 

4,9.54 70 

56,216 .31 

1,361 56 

12,624 92 

100 84 

22,. 580 15 

13,106 74 

28,2.52 84 

123 08 

309 93 

130,254 60 

1,041 56 

112,238 67 

395 66 

66,681 87 

8,170 00 

7,913 02 

1,060 48 

1,391 23 

89 54 

8,595 65 

134 49 

7,100 78 

2,0.52 24 

3,618 34 

54,343 19 



714,668 33 



S cts. 

921 01 

192,344 88 

4,004 30 

13,049 01 

8,696 34 

8,970 92 

11,382 74 

447 87 

19,. 591 11 

22,697 88 

187 34 

4,. 302 55 

24,479 23 

97,3.56 21 

114,293 04 

8,0.51 72 

27,379 44 

163,991 88 

5,. 588 18 

46,061 26 

6,412 97 

99,989 10 

66,054 54 

74, 187 04 

269 31 

2,056 87 

216,908 60 

2,935 80 

360,3.34 60 

1,7.54 59 

248,7.39 14 

20,204 43 

31,406 53 

9,1.57 69 

4,765 39 

150 35 

41,008 99 

2,297 20 

16,143 91 

4,084 10 

10,056 82 

204,900 93 



2,197,615 81 



69595—55 



68 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 



Comparative Statement of Printing, Binding, Lithographing, etc., and Paper 
suppHed to Departments and ParHament, for the last five fiscal years, 
1923-24, 1924-25, 1925-26, 1926-27 and 1927-28. 



Department 



1923-24 



1924-25 



1925-26 



1926-27 



1927-28 



Advisory Board on Tariff and Taxation 

Agriculture 

Air Board 

Archives 

Auditor General 

Canadian National Railways 

Chief Electoral Officer 

Civil Service Commission 

Diamond Jubilee Committee 

Editorial Committee 

Exchequer Court 

External Affairs 

Finance 

Government Contracts Supervision Comjnittee 

Governor General's Secretary 

Health 

House of Commons 

Immigration and Colonization 

Indian Affairs 

Insurance 

Interior 

Justice 

Labour 

Library of Parliament 

Marine 

Mines 

National Defence 

National Gallery of Canada 

National Research Council 

National Revenue 

Northwest Territories 

Patent and Coypright OflSce 

Penitentiaries 

Post Office 

Privy Council 

Public Printing and Stationery 

Public Works 

Purchasing Committee 

Railways and Canals 

Railway Commission 

Royal Canadian Mounted Police 

Royal Mint 

Secretary of State 

Senate of Canada 

Soldiers' Ci^dl Re-establishment 

Soldier Settlement Board 

Supreme Court 

Trade and Comjnerce 



174,620 70 
21 20 
12,604 82 
19,316 92 
2,460 96 
3,861 10 
8,981 23 



180,905 07 



153,160 51 



«79 65 
160,705 29 



4,423 64 

15,810 73 

223 69 

7,712 77 

6,217 34 



1,398 83 
16,471 20 



18,593 11 
15,756 12 



59,854 84 
7,217 68 



36,609 23 
6,807 83 



3 15 

299 88 

^2,912 67 

117,840 68 

190 32 

2,576 59 

39,216 05 

138,354 05 

146,373 32 

8,498 09 

34,822 68 

125,611 76 

6,252 10 

49,138 77 

8,397 66 

109,843 55 

70,294 99 

59,407 66 

209 28 

1,088 73 

107,956 54 

1,880 12 

41,305 84 

3,093 79 

310,095 45 

1,006 12 

136,730 80 

21,143 78 

211 28 

15,616 80 

5,324 37 

7,379 47 

267 28 

13,576 12 

11.765 46 

18,182 54 

7,199 21 

11,071 79 

174,215 42 



217 58 

11,360 75 

38,024 67 

96 05 

1,800 38 

19,705 13 

177,574 10 

143,775 51 

8,852 68 

30,298 81 

155,836 30 

25,944 33 

41,004 15 

8,056 40 

91,313 40 

74,747 59 

63,186 35 

1,262 14 

995 74 

137,174 79 

706 72 

38,296 99 

2,743 96 

364,098 14 

646 28 

140,612 94 

22,989 34 



447 95 

19,913 20 

21,416 43 

542 69 

2,201 70 

14,280 50 

151,772 22 

100,695 87 

5,579 34 

26,422 15 

135,266 56 

6,345 58 

37,186 78 

5,239 22 

82,753 26 

98,909 24 

61,096 29 

396 48 

2,017 92 

174,370 38 



224 99 

16,194 29 

23,180 91 

114 77 

5,021 37 

19,873 19 

165,109 39 

30,626 33 

8,140 51 

28,688 30 

154,334 71 

5,618 83 

46,333 63 

5,021 02 

89.262 81 

85.302 70 

59,156 31 

356 62 

2,710 51 

159,616 21 



43,125 53 

3,019 10 

287,342 21 

608 33 

127,966 70 

18,529 03 



36,594 61 

2,541 90 

349,987 95 

1,014 30 

137,269 84 

20,970 09 



14,724 32 
3,738 83 
9,104 87 
77 01 
9,450 84 
9,143 09 
13,383 30 
5,581 99 
8,215 41 
137,200 49 



12,939 56 

5,013 80 

5,432 34 

37 10 

10,941 24 
7,013 62 

12,872 53 

4,5.30 12 

9,575 70 

165,470 18 



13,530 74 
4,004 33 
9,834 05 
141 67 
8,977 72 
4,574 45 

14,551 57 

3,903 26 

9,127 96 

175,367 24 



921 01 
192,344 88 



4,004 30 
13,049 01 



8,696 34 
8,970 92 
11,382 74 



447 87 

19,591 11 

22,697 88 

187 34 

4,302 55 

24,479 23 

97,356 21 

114,293 04 

8,051 72 

27,379 44 

163,991 88 

5,588 18 

46,061 26 

6,412 97 

99,989 10 

66,054 54 

74,187 04 

269 31 

2,056 87 

216.908 60 



2,935 80 

360,334 60 

1.754 59 

248,739 14 

20,204 43 



31,406 53 

9,157 69 

4,765 39 

150 35 

41,008 99 
2,297 20 

16,143 91 
4,084 10 

10,056 82 
204,900 93 



Total. 



2,041,221 09 



2,027,234 61 



1,899,373 91 



1,936,730 31 



2,197.615 81 



ANNUAL REPORT, im-i 



69 



5. STATIONERY BRANCH ACCOUNT 

Debit balance brought forward from fiscal year 1926-27 $ 17, 185 22 

Inventory, April 1, 1927 137,792 78 

Amount of goods purchased during fiscal year 1927-28 — 

Canadian $ 986,209 86 

United Kingdom 14,827 87 

United States 26, 241 29 

Other countries 600 57 

Customs (rechargeable) $ 5,100 97 

Postage (rechargeable) 3, 600 00 

Freight (rechargeable) 16,362 66 

25,063 63 



Amount of other expenditure during fiscal year 1927-28 — 

Wages (direct) 99, 251 37 

Wages (indirect), mechanical repair and upkeep 2,008 12 



1,052,943 22 



Office printing. . . 
Office stationery. 



1,700 37 
2,254 67 



101,259 49 



Brokerage 

Freight, etc 

Char service and cleaning material 

Motor supplies, repairs, renewals, gasoline, oil, etc., 30 p.c. of cost. 



3,955 
96 
1,625 
2,433 
1,325 



Profit for the fiscal year 1927-28 transferred to Casual Revenue Account. 



110,695 42 
18,553 82 

$1,337,170 46 



Amount of goods issued to departments and Parliament during fiscal year 

1927-28 % 1,197,573 10 

Amount of sale of discarded typewriters 2, 834 93 



Inventory, March 31, 1928. 



-$ 1,200,408 03 
136,762 43 

$ 1,337,170 46 



The stock of goods has been decreased $1,030.35 during the fiscal year. 



Statement of Goods purchased and Goods issued to Departments and Parlia- 
ment in each month for the fiscal year ending March 31, 1928 



Month 



Canadian 



United 
Kingdom 



United 
States 



Other 
Countries 



Total 



Goods 
Issued 



1927 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

1928 

January 

February 

March 

Refunds on goods purchased 

Total of goods purchased 
and goods issued 



$ cts. 

76,082 94 
70,092 35 
93,930 00 
71,748 43 
69,997 05 
98,291 40 
84,009 80 
98,667 67 
101,712 18 



79,485 04 
59,868 80 
107,534 87 



$ cts. 



cts. 



1,011,420 53 
147 04 



1,011,273 49 



467 55 

891 91 

2,212 05 



2,385 05 
3,468 74 



1,007 54 



2,065 13 

500 67 

1,829 23 



2,733 67 
3,061 60 
1,917 95 
3,010 12 
373 84 
1,113 61 
3,108 58 
4,480 11 



2,592 37 
2,010 90 
1,854 29 



41 97 



400 56 

7 40 

29 73 



4 08 

18 82 



64 26 

27 20 

6 55 



$ cts. 

76,082 94 

73,335 54 

97,883 51 

76,278 99 

73,014 57 

101,080 02 

88,592 15 

101,780 33 

107,218 65 



84,206 80 

62,407 57 

111,224 94 



14,827 87 



26,257 04 
15 75 



600 57 



1,053,106 01 
162 79 



$ cts. 

85,101 27 
78,644 91 
95,343 02 

104,955 82 
83,724 49 

108,603 89 
90,574 53 

113,750 47 

108,125 85 



86,652 37 
108,560 14 
133,536 34 



14,827 87 



26,241 29 



600 57 



1,052,943 22 



1,197,573 10 



70 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 



Comparative Statement of amount of Goods issued to Departments and 
Parliament for the last five fiscal years, 1923-24, 1924-25, 1925-26, 1926-27 
and 1927-28. 



Department 



Advisory Board on Tariff and Taxation 

Agriculture 

Archives 

Auditor General 

Canadian National Railways 

Chief Electoral Officer 

Civil Service Commission 

Editorial Committee 

Exchequer Court 

External Affairs 

Finance 

Government Contracts Supervision Committee 

Governor General's Secretary 

Health 

House of Commons 

Immigration and Colonization 

Indian Affairs 

Insurance 

Interior 

International Joint Commission 

Justice 

Labour 

Library of Parliament 

Marine 

Mines 

National Defence 

National Gallery of Canada 

National Research Council 

National Revenue 

Northwest Territories 

Patent and Copyright Office 

Penitentiaries 

Post Office 

Privy Council 

Public Printing and Stationery 

Public Works 

Purchasing Commission 

Railways and Canals 

Railway Commission 

Royal Canadian Mounted Police 

Royal Mint 

Secretary of State 

Senate of Canada 

Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment 

Soldier Settlement Board 

Supreme Court 

Trade and Commerce 



Total. 



1923-24 



S cts 



63,253 38 

2,670 88 

4,939 64 

11,356 17 

207 31 

8,937 33 

69 29 

582 69 

5,256 41 

42,220 24 

395 15 

3,290 62 

9,434 98 

8,707 52 

27,447 35 

33,735 53 

2,961 15 

79,340 25 

14 

7.506 19 
3,835 93 

837 00 

46,192 68 

20,320 68 

64,440 43 

37 58 

1,484 07 

73,520 75 

3,417 62 

3,770 33 

7,682 06 

179,869 20 

1,707 69 

70,034 99 

34,652 49 

136 93 

21,605 51 

6.507 51 
17,373 92 

204 07 

9,216 57 

6,339 30 

50,211 19 

20,891 60 

1,104 13 

33,553 34 



991,259 79 



1924-25 



61,530 69 
2,870 80 
3,253 64 
2,621 49 
1,022 95 
5,747 14 



319 34 

4,661 95 

19,488 46 

261 68 

1,925 90 

7,924 24 

12,388 41 

28,623 70 

33,251 04 

2,375 44 

77,971 07 

20 97 

6,038 70 

3,385 17 

894 73 

34,280 95 

19,423 09 

72,718 15 

70 81 

1,330 90 

77,638 16 

1,797 68 

8,062 54 

7,731 48 

115,996 55 

1,129 60 

56,790 20 

32,648 13 



24,796 70 
5,201 39 

12,315 16 

181 94 

8,796 02 

6,306 99 

35,948 09 

14,959 82 
714 84 

30,332 34 



845,749 04 



1925-26 



67,985 35 
4,904 61 
4,861 17 
1,517 21 

10,419 34 
5,243 56 



375 21 

4,271 70 

10,355 94 

951 15 

2,910 89 

10,219 50 

10,682 25 

26,820 00 

35,588 15 

3,700 20 

84,138 39 

41 44 

6,956 91 

4,884 44 

638 55 

36,177 29 

18,121 82 

76,057 69 

146 77 

, 2,287 61 

108,440 16 



9,255 02 

9,555 26 

181,487 63 

1,213 57 

59,740 43 

35,518 94 



35,685 33 
7,306 12 

20,032 77 

280 63 

8,392 68 

5,108 47 

36,570 01 

17,462 01 
1,257 12 

34,034 26 



1,001,597 55 



1926-27 



S cts 

2,856 57 
72,294 02 
5 J 18 37 
4,687 55 
724 61 
7,551 95 
7,616 69 



558 30 

4,534 99 

10,301 73 

1,108 57 

2,842 19 

9,842 88 

21,256 18 

25,643 58 

35,557 62 

2,423 97 

96,551 68 

21 77 

8,935 05 

6,562 16 

835 43 

49,123 19 

17,158 49 

87,399 80 

225 88 

853 75 

110,518 53 



9,568 57 

8,574 39 

219,409 87 

1,564 09 

69,672 29 

31,651 31 



28,167 88 
7,161 32 

23,700 13 

351 66 

8,337 93 

5,859 57 

40,456 82 

20,306 21 
1,207 31 

45,127 67 



1,114,922 52 



1927-28 



$ cts. 

4,233 55 
75,777 93 
4,759 69 
4,497 82 
182 52 
3,283 70 
7,896 66 



. 665 99 

7,880 85 

13,399 32 

584 07 

2,218 45 

10,371 32 

18,944 00 

24,755 19 

45,648 07 

3,252 09 

96,907 13 

1 58 

8,336 03 

7,957 26 

1,045 90 

58,481 19 

19,682 93 

102,971 71 

186 79 

1,144 34 

118,350 30 



8,838 60 

231, .393 14 

1,561 34 

66,362 82 

35,096 75 



38,056 02 
8,555 67 

18,197 92 
342 90 

12,068 81 
6,580 93 

41,401 53 

26,876 78 
1,901 16 

56,922 35 



1,197,573 10 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1927-28 71 

6. DETAIL OF EXPENDITURE OF APPROPRIATIONS 

Appropriation — Ciml Government Salaries § 77,565 00 

Detail of expenditure — 

Salaries paid during the year S 77, 562 33 

Unexpended balance 2 67 

77,565 00 

Appropriation — Civil Government Contingencief S 13,500 00 

Detail of expenditure- 
Window cleaning $ 681 00 

Washing office towels and welfare linen 238 00 

Office printing 4,322 14 

Office stationery 5,096 61 

Travelling expenses 2,028 04 

Telephone and telegraph 641 90 

Cab hire and street car fare 119 50 

Postage 110 00 

Newspapers and periodicals 233 1 1 

Sundries 26 65 

$ 13,496 95 

Unexpended balance 3 05 

S 13,500 00 

Appropriation — Printing, binding, and distributing the Annual Statutes ■. $ 10, 000 00 

Detail of expenditure — • 

Printing and binding $ 8,938 67 

Unexpended balance 1 , 061 33 

$ 10,000 00 

Appropriation— Canada Ga.,ette $ 35, 000 00 

Detail of expenditure — 

Printing and binding $ 22,451 58 

Paper used for above 3, 665 24 

Editing and translating 4, 589 52 

S 30,706 34 

Unexpended balance 4, 293 66 

$ 35,000 00 

Approjiriation — Plant — Repairs and Renewals S 30, 000 00 

Detail of expenditure — 

Bindery division S 3, 525 07 

Die-stamping division 62 74 

Divisions generally 2, 771 24 

Envelope division 42 92 

Hand composing division 760 59 

Linotype division 8, 55.5 Sf 

Mechanical division 1,283 80 

Monotype division 4, 197 01 

Engraving division 90 

Offices 170 32 

Paper stores division 85 96 

Press division 4,594 78 

Ruling division 767 22 

Printing and Sundry Stores division 577 22 

Stereotyping division 1 , 323 70 

Customs duties 343 48 

Brokerage 60 50 

Freight, etc 137 53 

$ 29,260 48 

Unexpended balance 739 52 

$ 30,000 00 

Appropriation — Plant — New $ 34,550 00 

Detail of expenditure- 
Linotype division $ 7,093 70 

Stereotype division 6, 551 10 

Press division 995 00 

Monotype division 5,610 99 

Hand Composing division Ill 00 



72 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 

Bindery division 11 , 312 70 

Mechanical division 1 , 208 23 

Customs duties 1,036 13 

Brokerage 20 00 

Freight, etc 112 65 

$ 34,051 50 

Unexpended balance 498 50 

$ 34,550 00 

Appropriation — Distribution of Parliamentary Documents % 50, 000 00 

Detail of expenditure — 

Office printing % 1 , 763 03 

Office stationery 3,762 26 

Office stationery, "addressograph" equipment 6,864 47 

Postage 2,781 00 

Express and freight. 807 77 

Char service and cleaning material 980 56 

Motor supplies, repairs, renewals, gasoline, oil — 20 p.c of cost 883 36 

Sundries 4 50 

Salaries (dii-ect) _ 28,991 76 

Salaries (indirect), mechanical repairs and upkeep 1,634 81 

$ 48,473 52 

Unexpended balance 1 , 526 48 

• $ 50,000 00 

Appropriation — Printing and binding Government Publications for sa^e and 

distribution to departments and the public $ 40,000 00 

Detail of expenditure — 

Public Printing and Stationery — 

Acts, public and private $ 1 1 , 788 24 

Postal Guide and Supplements, 1927 2,821 12 

Annual reports 7, 882 19 

Debates 7, 056 23 

Votes and Proceedings, etc 1 , 700 91 

Members' speeches 2,411 40 

Senators' speeches 53 86 

Unexpended balance $ 33,713 95 

6,286 05 
$ 40,000 00 

Gratuities paid under Civil Service Act, 1918 $ 1 ,041 34 

Detail of expenditure, death gratuities paid to widows or legal representatives of: — 

J. Adelard Boyle, stereotyper, died April 27, 1927 $ 312 00 

George J. Jackman, labourer, died June 17, 1927 242 67 

Joseph H. Labelle. clerk, grade 2, died September 29. 1927 246 67 

George L. Fink, clerk, grade 2, died March 27, 1928 240 00 

1,041 34 

Approvriation — Printing, binding and distributing the Revised Statutes of Canada, 

1927, English and French editions % 125,000 00 

Detail of expenditure — 

Printing and binding— progress charge to March 31, 1928 $ 96,265 32 

Unexpended balance 28.734 68 

$ 125,000 00 

Appropriation — Printing, binding and distributing the Revised Edition of the Criminal 

Code, 1927, English and French editions $ 30,000 00 

Detail of expenditure — 

Printing and binding $ 14,905 88 

Unexpended balance 15,094 12 

$ 30,000 00 

Appropriation — Vole No. 635, Flat increase to Civil Service, both inside and outside S 2.340 00 

Detail of expenditure — 

Flat increase paid during the year S 2,340 00 

1 2.340 00 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1927-28 
7. "CANADA GAZETTE" 



73 



Comparative Statement of Revenue and Expenditure on account of Canada 
Gazette from the year 1874 to the fiscal year ending March 31, 1928. 



Expenditure 



Revenue 



Copies 
Gratis 



Sub- 
scribers 



Paper 



Printing I Editing 
and and Trans- 
Distributing iating 



Subscrip- 
tions 



Advertising 



Loss 



Gain 



1,045 
1,077 
1,049 
1,084 
1,108 
1,115 
1,170 
1,251 
1,238 
1,250 
1,290 
1,321 
1,318 
1,366 
1,369 
1,367 
1,429 
1,436 
1,429 
1,426 
1,418 
1,425 
1.428 
1,492 
1,438 
1,486 
1,529 
1,528 
1,553 
1,545 
1,559 
1,573 
1,559 
1,616 
1,625 
1,665 
1,692 
1,725 
1,742 
1 , 7.54 
1,791 
1,907 
1,901 
991 
1,000 
1,303 
1,278 
1,259 
1,0.37 
1,086 
1,122 
1,006 
1,102 
1,248 
1.364 



77 

85 

88 

81 

79 

85 

70 

68 

92 

109 

85 

69 

77 

84 

81 

83 

71 

84 

86 

84 

82 

75 

72 

83 

87 

89 

96 

97 

97 

105 

116 

177 

191 

184 

200 

185 

208 

250 

258 

271 

284 

293 

424 

484 

600 

797 

722 

1,321 

1,088 

1,0.39 

1 , 003 

969 

698 

752 

686 



$ cts. 

1,142 17 
1,177 17 
1,195 98 
1,292 25 
1,016 65 
1,195 21 
1,208 48 
1,197 38 
1,346 42 
1,414 24 
1,411 33 

250 00 
2,302 00 
1,797 21 
2,164 85 
1.883 83 
1,758 50 
1,492 62 
1,480 19 
1,485 71 
1,183 66 
1,153 87 
1,129 .52 
1,129 07 
1,450 21 

940 43 
1,092 72 
1,349 79 
1.430 89 
1,315 56 
1,427 48 
1,684 85 
1,629 58 
1,322 63 
1,805 72 
2,053 45 
2,158 56 
2,548 44 
2,943 28 
4,385 03 

2.720 83 
4,102 28 
3,018 22 
4,088 93 
6,966 17 
5,249 59 
4,693 32 

11,716 .53 

8.721 43 
5,600 45 
4,410 90 
3,, 5.37 35 
3,0.52 08 
3,. 527 95 
3,664 24 



$ cts. 

2,416 40 
2,414 00 
2,301 51 
2,323 45 
2,139 48 
2,293 81 
2,. 357 72 
2,1.32 20 
2,449 58 
2,181 48 
2,231 23 
2,291 74 
2,288 57 
2,537 79 
2,933 57 
2,859 19 
3,128 36 
2,060 45 
2,069 36 
2,826 07 
2,485 08 
2,704 36 
3,007 00 
3,003 51 
3,803 11 
3,273 01 
3,640 17 
4,267 81 
3,858 22 
3,999 78 
4,368 81 
5,9.50 35 
6,909 57 
4,248 17 
7,484 48 
7,319 99 
7,983 10 
9,532 19 
9,600 27 
19,349 44 
15,477 24 
22,579 68 
14,978 79 
14,248 76 
28,214 72 
28,743 33 
42,850 34 
29,295 91 
31,463 74 
29,019 07 
26,175 61 
21,137 13 
21,481 34 
21,688 15 
22,451 58 



$ cts. 

119 45 
135 53 
184 80 
141 80 
125 80 
123 90 
106 30 
137 40 
199 00 
215 30 
148 24 
150 05 
62 20 
389 10 
349 80 
103 60 
204 00 
211 85 
188 98 
240 54 
265 10 
232 50 
259 75 
245 40 
337 10 

255 30 
289 50 

256 60 
284 00 
253 60 
309 80 
364 80 
460 85 
329 20 
709 80 
587 60 
815 80 
918 55 
438 60 

3,261 07 
3,842 06 
4,202 56 
2,905 34 
2,658 00 
3,764 71 
3,007 00 
3,268 00 
2,. 508 62 
3,160 00 
3,900 00 
4,140 00 
3,290 00 
4,210 00 
4,340 00 
4,589 52 



$ cts. 

242 20 

242 80 
241 80 
224 75 
268 40 
246 50 

243 90 
353 65 
378 44 
367 25 
414 67 
289 85 
299 70 
321 40 

307 35 

308 60 
487 95 
139 38 
313 47 
306 50 
298 73 
281 65 
276 65 
298 55 
312 70 
329 95 
350 00 
329 65 
361 80 
371 85 
430 40 
604 12 
750 00 
524 27 
762 15 
721 20 
775 25 
949 85 
979 15 

1,034 20 
1,090 05 
1,121 45 
1,505 58 
1,677 20 
2,335 35 
3,071 10 
2,746 00 
5,251 00 
4,331 35 
4,092 69 
3,973 35 
4,522 69 
3,442 45 
3,767 48 
3,407 02 



$ cts. 

931 43 

843 74 

578 41 

681 62 

683 47 

739 82 

865 38 

1,028 04 

2,706 28 

2,181 53 

1,921 82 

1,264 65 

2,007 82 

2,831 04 

2,909 72 

4,637 49 

2,777 03 

3,293 84 

3,436 32 

4,612 37 

3,545 87 

4,015 64 

4.678 69 
4,992 94 
5,574 45 
3,948 65 

4.679 98 
4,370 82 
4,451 39 
5,667 65 
4,523 25 
6,997 50 
7,644 35 
6,821 20 
8,472 51 
8,684 40 

14,219 41 
15,844 95 
21,077 11 
30,804 59 
23,062 88 
18,322 04 
28,357 80 
35,885 58 
29,671 57 
26,342 60 
47,. 579 26 
56,230 57 
73,498 94 
78,7.54 52 
68,194 09 
72,900 87 
63,442 70 
64,544 49 
77,835 60 



$ cts. 

2,504 39 
2,640 16 
2,862 08 
2,851 13 
2,330 06 
2,626 60 
2,563 22 
2,085 29 
910 28 
1,262 24 
1,454 31 
1,137 29 
2,345 25 
1,571 66 
2,231 15 



1,825 88 
331 70 



89 24 



190 14 



1,173 73 
759 92 



1,152 44 
398 38 
605 65 



765 34 
555 44 



$ cts. 



11,441 03 



6,938 68 

7,586 22 

486 40 



99 47 



11 26 
366 55 

206 56 
559 07 
913 51 
296 73 

7 59 



470 56 



1,445 47 



4,037 20 
3,795 62 
9,074 11 
4,843 25 
2,112 80 

8,961 03 
16,567 09 



17,960 51 
34,485 12 
44,327 69 
37,440 93 
49,459 08 
38,141 73 
38,755 87 
50,537 28 



Translating and editing from 1913. 



74 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 

8. CASUAL REVENUE ACCOUNT 

Detail of proceeds of Casual Revenue sales made during the fiscal year ending 

March 31, 1928 

Sales of parliamentary and other publications to departments and Parliament. . . S 20, 351 67 

Sales to the public 46, 282 35 

$ 66,634 02 

Sales of Canada Gazette and advertising 77, 835 60 

Sales of subscriptions 3, 407 02 

81,242 62 

Sales of waste paper $ 13,899 96 

Sales of packing cases 452 60 

Sales of discarded office equipment 1,018 24 

Sales of waste twine 45 10 

Sales of discarded printing equipment 384 40 

15,800 30 

Sales of printing to departments and Parliament — 

Amount received in excess of expenditure during the fiscal year 1927-28 36,065 32 

Sales of stationeiy to departments and Parliament — 

Amount received in excess of expenditure during the fiscal year 1927-28 18, 553 82 

Total $ 218 , 296 08 



STATIONERY BRANCH 

Ottawa, August 14, 1928. 

F. A. AcLAND, Esq., 

King's Printer and Controller of Stationery, 
Ottawa, Ont. 

Dear Sir, — I have the honour to submit for your information the general 
statement of the accounts of this office from April 1, 1927, to March 31, 1928: — ■ 

Inventory, April 1, 1927 $ 137, 792 78 

Expenditure — Net — 

Wages $ 101,259 49 

Expense 9,435 93 

Stationery stock 1 ,052, 943 22 

1,163,638 64 

$ 1,301,431 42 

Sales — 

Departments and Parliament 1, 197,573 10 

Sundries 2,834 93 

1,200,408 03 

Inventory— March 31, 1928 136,762 43 

1,337,170 46 

Profit for the fiscal year 1927-28 35,739 04 

Debit balance from 1926-27 17,185 22 

Net gain $ 18,553 82 



In presenting the above report I take this opportunity of advising you 
that the financial statement from the Auditor General's office has come to 
hand, showing a net difference of S349.57. 

When you take into consideration that the goods supplied amounted to 
over $1,000,000, I think this is a very small percentage, and is bound to occur 
in any business. 

Since the last report I have made further changes in our stock ledgers 
by the addition of one clerk, which enables a double check to be made on all 
entries. To date the balancing shows an improvement, and I feel that at the 
end of this year a marked improvement will be shown in our records. 

A number of errors have been found and rectified through the double 
checking. 

During the year: — ■ 

24,153 requisitions were received from departments, 
3,173 letters were received, 
15,312 letters were mailed. 

Yours respectfully, 

EDMUND RYDER, 

Superintendent of Stationery. 



76 



DIVISION OF DOCUMENTS 

F. A. AcLAND, Esq., 
King's Printer, 
Ottawa. 

Dear Sir, — I have the honour to submit for your information the repori 
of this division from April 1, 1927 to March 31, 1928. Owing to the new system 
of records of publications received, distributed and sold, the statement of activi- 
ties is more complete than in the past. 

The total sales during the fiscal year were as follows: — ■ 

To the Houses of Parliament and departments $ 22,015 12 

To the public 49, 106 49 

A total of i 71,121 61 

showing an increase over the preceding fiscal year as follows: — • 

To the Houses of Parliament and departments $ 7, 533 39 

To the public 9,492 94 

A total of $ 17,026 33 

The number of orders issued for the mailing of publications during the 
fiscal year 1927-28 was 17,694. 

The departmental sub post office worked efficiently during the year, its 
activities being as follows: — 

Number of registered letters 2, 556 

" insured parcels 6, 105 

letters 107,719 

Mail bags sent to railway station 19,634 

" " post office for final sortation 4,463 

Total number of bags 23,870 

The very large increase in sales was due mainly to the fact that the volumes 
of Revised Statutes of Canada, 1927, became available for distribution in 
February, and by March 31, 1928, 1,571 sets in English and 98 sets in French 
had been sold at the rate of $10 per set. 

The duties of the branch were increased by the enactment of special regu- 
lations under P.C. 1471 authorizing the distribution to important libraries 
of all official publications not of a confidential character, and a report on this 
distribution is included in this statement. Tables showing distribution and 
sales of various publications or classes of publications are submitted. 

A. L. NORMANDIN, 

Chief, Division of Documents. 



76 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1927-28 
Revised Statutes of Canada, 1927 



77 



The following tables show the distribution, without charge, of the Revised 
Statutes of Canada, 1927, bound in cloth; also the number of sales. 



To whom sent 


English 


French 


Parliament 
Cabinet Ministers 


17 

89 

237 


5 


Senators 


24 


Members of the House of Commons 


176 








343 


205 


Alberta 
The Lieutenant-Governor 


1 

7 

24 

77 




Members of Government 




Officials of Provincial Government 




Police Magistrates 










109 




British Columbia 
The Lieutenant-Governor 


1 
10 
37 
29 
59 
6 
1 




Members of Government 




Officials of Provincial Government 








Stipendiary Magistrates 








Judges Chambers 










143 




Manitoba 
The Lieutenant-Governor 


1 

4 

88 

27 

6 




Members of Government 




Officials of Provincial Government 




Police Magistrates 




Sheriffs 










126 




New Brunswick 
The Lieutenant-Governor 


1 

6 

22 

40 

8 




Members of Government 




Officials of Provincial Government 








Sheriffs 










77 




Nova Scotia 
The Lieutenant-Governor 


1 

4 

7 

55 

18 




Members of Government 




Officials of Provincial Government 




Stipendiary Magistrates 




Sheriffs 










85 




Ontario 
The Lieutenant-Governor ... 


1 
8 

31 

2 

203 

48 








Officials of Provincial Government 








Police Magistrates 














293 





78 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 



To whom sent 



English 



French 



Prinxe Edward Island 

The IJeutenant-Govemor 

Members of Government 

Officials of Provincial Government 

Police Magistrates 

Stipendiary Magistrates 

Chief Magistrate 

Sheriffs 



Quebec 



The Lieutenant-Governor 

Members of Provincial Government. 
Officials of Provincial Government. . 

Magistrates 

SherifTs 

Recorders 



Saskatchewan 

The Lieutenant-Governor 

Members of Government 

Officials of Provincial Government 

Police Magistrates 

Sheriffs and Local Registrar 



Yukon 

Members of Government 

Officials of Provincial Government 

Police Magistrate 



Judges, Libraries, Consuls General, I'iepartmental Lists, Etc 

Judees 

Libraries 

Consuls General 

Departmental Lists 

Outside of Canada 



19 



34 


118 


2 


13 


7 


27 


8 


37 


52 


200 


1 




5 




12 




11 




28 




57 




1 




3 




1 




^ 









240 


44 


205 


51 


22 


2 


183 


33 


108 


4 


758 


134 



RECAPITULATION 



Parliament of Canada 

Province of Alberta 

" British Columbia 

" Manitoba 

" New Brunswick 

" Nova Scotia 

" Ontario 

" Prince Edward 

" Quebec 

" Saskatcliewan 

" Yukon Territory . . . 

Judges, Libraries, Consuls General, Departmental Lists. 
Outside of Canada 



General distribution. 

Sales 

Balance on hand 



Total number received. 



6.000 



343 


205 


109 




143 




126 




77 




85 




293 




19 




52 


200 


57 




5 




6.50 


130 


108 


4 


2,067 


539 


1,571 


98 


2.362 


863 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1927-2S 
Statutes of Canada, 1927 



79 



The following tables show the distribution, without charge, of Statutes 
of Canada, being 17 George V, First Session, Sixteenth Parliament, 1926-27, 
bound in cloth; also the number of sales. 



To whom sent 



English 



French 



Parliament of Canada 

Cabinet Ministers 

Speakers of the Senate and House of Commons 

Senators 

Members of the House of Commons 

Officers of the Senate 

Officers of the House of Commons 



Judicial and Depahtmental List Dominion Government 

Judges, Supreme Court 

Judges, Exchequer Court 

Library, Supreme Court 

Library of Parliament 

Library of Parliament (for exchange) 

Deputy Ministers and Departments 

Department of Justice 



Province of Alberta 

Provincial Government , 

Judges , 

Clerks, Supreme Court 

Librairies 

Newspapers 

Stipendiary Magistrates 

Police Magistrates 



Province of British Columbia 

Provincial Government 

Judges 

Clerks, County Courts 

Registrar 

Registrar, County Court 

Stipendiary Magistrates 

SherifTs 

Libraries 

Newspapers 

Police Magistrates 



Province of Manitoba 

Provincial Government 

Judges 

Clerks, County Courts 

Police Magistrates 

Sheriffs 

Prothonotaries 

Stipendiary Magistrates 

Libraries 

Newspapers 

Commissioners of Police 



17 


5 


2 


2 


74 


19 


179 


56 


9 




13 


5 


294 


87 


5 


2 


2 


1 


6 


3 


20 


10 


49 




100 


10 


75 




257 


26 


14 




23 




7 




13 




6 




27 




7 




97 




16 




24 




9 




2 




1 




61 




7 




20 




10 




3 




153 




11 




21 




55 




2 




7 




1 




65 




13 




4 




2 




181 





80 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 

Distribution of Statutes of Canada — •Continued 



To whom sent 



English 



Provincial Government. 
Judges. 



Province of New Brunswick 



Clerks, County Courts... 
Clerks, Circuit Courts. . . 
Clerks, Supreme Court. . . 
Deputy Clerk in Equity. 

Sheriffs 

Stipendiary Magistrates. , 

Newspapers 

Clerk of the Crown 

Libraries 

Police Magistrates 



Province of Nova Scotia 

Provincial Government 

Judges 

Barristers, Society of Nova Scotia 

Sheriffs 

Clerks, County Courts 

Stipendiary Magistrates 

Newspapers 

Library 

Clerks, Admiralty Court 



Provincial Government.. 

Judges 

Officials at Osgoode Hall. 

Police Magistrates 

Sheriffs 

Clerks of the Peace 

Clerks, County Court 

County Crown Attorneys. 

Law Associations 

Commissioner of Police. . . 

Newspapers 

Libraries 



PR0\aNCE OF Ontario 



Province of Prince Edward Isl.\nd 

Provincial Government 

Judges. 



Stipendiary Magistrates. 

Prothonotaries 

Sheriffs 

Police Magistrates 

Clerks of the Crown 

Law Sooiet V 

Newspapers. . . 



Provincial Government. 

Judges 

Clerk, Admiralty Court 

Judges' Chambers 

Advocate Libraries 

Clerks, Sessions of the Peace. 

Recorders 

Sheriffs 

Prothonotaries 

Clerks of the Peace 

Clerks of Circuit Court 

Clerks of District Court 

Clerks of the C'rown 

District Magistrates 

Newspapers 

Police Maizistrates 

Libraries 

Bar Associations 



Province of Quebec 



11 

14 

14 

9 

1 

1 

14 
27 
6 
1 
1 
9 



108 



10 

14 

1 

18 

26 

30 

8 

1 

1 



109 



21 
92 

8 
204 
41 
45 
44 
.51 
41 

1 
38 

7 



593 



32 



13 

20 

1 

9 

9 

2 

5 

4 

10 

5 

16 

11 

3 



6 
1 
4 
9 

128 



ANNUAL REPORT, 19^-28 
Distribution of Statutes of Canada — Continued 



81 



To whom sent 


English 


French 


Province of Saskatchewan 
Provim-ial Government 


11 
31 
5 
4 
16 
5 
8 
1 
1 




Judges 




Clerks, Supreme Court 




Sheriffs 




Libraries 




Newspapers 




Stipendiary Magistrates 




Clerks, District Court 




Mjaster in Chambers 










82 




Yukon TEBRrroRY 
The Commissioner 


2 
7 
1 

3 
1 

1 




Officials 




Police Magistrate 




Libraries 




Judge 




Newspaper 










15 




High Commissioner for Canada, London, England 


2 




Commissioner General for Canada, Paris, France 


1 


United Kimhdom— Officials and Libraries 


20 

67 

4 




British Overseas Dominions 




United States Officials 




Ministere de I'Agriculture et Commerce, Paris 


3 


Ministere des AfTaires Etrangeres, Paris 


1 
1 


1 


International Institute of Agriculture, Italy 








Total 


95 


5 






MiSCELtANECUS 

Consuls General in Canada 


5 

1,815 


2 


Sales 


47 








1,820 


49 


RECAPITULATION 

Cabinet Ministers 


17 

2 

275 

256 

97 

153 

181 

108 

109 

593 

32 

128 

82 

15 

95 

5 

1,815 

534 


5 


Speakers of the Senate and House of Commons 


2 


Parliament of Canada 


80 


Departmental List 


26 


Province of Alberta 




" British Columbia 




" Manitoba 




" New Brunswick 




" Nova Scotia 




" Ontario 


4 


" Prince Edward Island 




" Quebec 


256 


" Saskatchewan 




Yukon Territory 




Outside of Canada 


5 


Consuls General in Canada 


2 


Sales 


47 


Balance on hand including 400 unbound 


73 






Number of copies printed 


4,500 


510 







69595—6 



82 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 
Distribution of Statutes of Canada — Concluded 



The following table shows the distribution of Statutes of Canada, being 
17 George V, First Session, Sixteenth Parliament, 1926, bound in ^ Calf, also 
the sales: — 



To whom sent 


English 


French 




17 

7 
26 


5 


Sales 


2 




8 








50 


15 







Revised Statutes Canada, 1927 (English) Separate Chapters 



Chapter 



3 

33 

4 

12 

11 

16 

18 

10 

19 

20 

59 

86 

196 

66 

21 

172 

95 

22 

24 

23 

25 

26 

27 

110 

178 

31 

32 

51 

39 

40 

43 

44 

42 

74 

46 

71 

96 

103 

106 

125 

136 

171 

187 

189 

200 

52 

50 

53 

78 



Aeronautics Act 

Admiralty Act 

Agriculture Act, Department of 

Bank Act 

Bankruptcy Act 

Bills of Lading Act 

Biological Board Act 

Board of Audit Act 

Board of Trade Act 

Bridges Act 

Canada Evidence Act 

Canada Grain Act 

Canada Temperance Act 

Canada Farm Loan Act 

Canadian Nationals Act 

Canadian National Railways Ant 

Chinese Immigration Act 

Civil Service Act 

Civil Service Superannuation Act 

Civil Service Insurance Act 

Cold Storage Act 

Combines Investigating Act 

Companies Act 

Conciliation and Labour Act 

Consolidated Revenue and Audit Act 

Contingencies Act 

Copyright Act 

Corrupt Practices Inquiries Act 

Cullers Act 

Currency Act 

Customs and Fisheries Protection Act 

Customs Tariff Act 

Customs Act 

Deep Sea Fisheries Act 

Demise of the Crown Act 

Department of Finance and Treasury Board Act 

Department of Immieration and Colonization Act. .. 

Department of Interior Act 

Department of Justice Act 

Department of Marine and Fisheries Act 

Department of National Defence Act 

Department of Railways and Canals Act 

Department of Soldiers Civil Re-establishment Act. 

Department of State Act 

Department of Trade and Commerce Act 

I)i.sfranchi.-;c Act 

Dom inion ( ontroverted Elections Act 

Dominion Elections Act 

Dominion Forest Reserves and Parks Act 



Number 
of copies 
received 



100 
200 
200 
3,000 
3.000 
300 
100 
500 
500 
200 
300 
300 
500 
2,000 
500 
200 
200 
4,000 
2,000 
500 
300 
3,000 
3,000 
300 
500 
100 
300 
500 
100 
100 
200 
200 
3,000 
200 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
200 
100 
200 
200 
200 
500 
1,000 
500 
200 



ANNUAL REPORT, 19^-28 83 

Revised Statutes Canada, 1927 (English) Separate Chapters — Continued 



Number 




of copies 
received 


Sales 


700 


112 


200 


52 


200 


3 


200 


20 


200 


1 


200 


1 


600 


3 


200 


6 


200 


31 


1,000 


38 


200 


5 


200 


11 


200 


14 


200 


3 


300 


1 


200 


22 


500 


124 


1,000 


2 


500 


17 


200 


1 


100 


4 


300 


6 


500 


33 


800 


110 


300 


13 


300 


20 


200 


26 


200 


6 


100 


3 


300 


4 


500 


85 


200 


1 


2,000 


251 


300 


31 


500 


4 


200 


10 


300 


2 


300 


41 


200 


8 


200 


9 


200 


39 


200 


2 


200 


6 


200 


1 


500 


47 


300 


5 


200 




300 


8 


500 


76 


300 


68 


200 


31 


200 


24 


400 


21 


200 


10 


300 


39 


700 


500 


700 


500 


500 


1 


1,200 


123 


200 


6 


200 


26 


200 


17 


500 


10 


200 




200 


74 


100 


26 


100 


10 


200 


9 


200 


2 


300 


101 


200 


1 


1,500 


501 



Dominion Lands Act 

Dominion Notes Act 

Dominion Water Power Act 

Dry Dock Subsidies Act 

Electricity and T"luid Exportation Act 

Electrical Units Act 

Employment Offices Co-Ordination Act 

Escheats Act 

Exchequer Court Act 

Excise Act 

Explosives Act 

Export Act 

Expropriation Act 

Extradition Act 

Feeding Stuffs Act 

Ferries Act 

Finance Act 

Fisherie,s Act 

Food and Drugs Act 

Fugitives Offenders Act 

Geology and Mines Act 

Gold and Silver Marking Act 

Government Annuities Act 

Government Employees Compensation Act. 

Government Harbours and Piers Act 

Government Railways Act 

Government Vessels Discipline Act 

Government Work Tolls Act 

Governor Generals Act 

High Commissioners Act 

Immigration Act ._ 

Immigration Aid Societies Act 

Income War Tax Act 

Indian Act 

Industrial Disputes Investigation Act 

Inquiries Act 

Inspection and Sales Act 

Interest Act 

Interpretation Act 

Judges Act 

Juvenile Delinquents Act 

Labour Department Act 

Land Titles Act 

Live Stock Shipping Act 

Loan Companies Act 

Lord's Day Act 

Manitoba Supplementary Provisions Act 

Maritime Conventions Act 

Maritime Freight Rates Act 

Militia Act 

Militia Pensions Act 

Money Lenders Act 

Naturalization Act 

Naval Service Act 

Navigable Waters Protection Act 

Northwest Game Act 

Northwest Territories Act 

Oaths of Allegiance Act 

Old Age Pensions Act 

Ordnance and Admiralty Lands Act 

Ottawa Mjnt Act 

Passenger Tickets Act 

Patent Act 

Pawnbrokers Act 

Penitentiary Act 

Penny Bank Act 

Pensions Fund Societies Act 

Petition of Right Act 

Petroleum and Naptha Inspection Act 

Post Office Act 

Prisons and Reformatories Act 

Proprietary or Patent Medicine Act 



84 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 

Hevised Statutes Canada, 1927 (English) Separate Chapters — Continued 



Chapter 


• 


Number 
of copies 
received 


Sales 


192 


Provincial Subsidies Act 


700 
100 
100 
200 
200 
200 
100 
100 
300 
SOO 
100 
300 

1,000 
200 
200 
100 
200 
100 
200 
200 
100 
200 
200 
200 
700 
100 

1,000 
400 
200 
300 
200 
400 
500 
200 
200 
600 
200 
500 

50 
50 
1,000 
1,000 
1,000 
100 
100 
500 
500 
100 
500 
100 
100 
100 
100 
50 
100 
300 
100 
100 
200 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
200 
1.000 
100 
100 
100 


50 


9 




3 


48 




9 


114 


Public I>ands Grant Act 


9 


164 


Public Officers Act 


6 


162 


Public Printing and Stationery Act 


23 


165 


Public Service Re- Arrangement and Transfc of Duties Act 


26 


166 


Public Works Act 


33 


91 


Public Works Health Act 


3 


168 


Quarantine Act 




14 


Quebec Savings Bank Act 


26 


195 




3 


170 


Railwav Act 


74 


175 






176 






177 


Researcli Council Act. . .... ... . 


6 


181 


Root Vegetables Act 


3 


131 


Royal Miliwary College Act 


10 


182 


Sa'aries Act 


22 


184 


Satisfied Securities Act 


3 


15 




25 


183 


Savings Deposit Returns Act 


10 


«7 


Seed Grain Act 


4 


88 


Seed Grain Securities Act 


3 


188 




3 


107 


Solicitor General's Act 


] 


179 


Special War Revenue Act 


111 


190 




o 


35 


Supremo Court Act 


9 


194 




3 


197 




3 


201 


Trade Mark and Design Act ' 


8 


29 




50 


205 


Wages Liability Act 


1 


206 


War Measures Act 


16 


207 


Water Carriage of Goods Act 


2 


212 


Weights and Measures Act 


2 


213 


Winding Up Act 


67 




RE\^SED Statutes, 1927, Frenxh 
Aeronautics Act 












Bank Act . 


5 






10 






1 




Biological Board Act . . 






Canadian Medical Act 






Canadian Farm Loans Act 


11 




C'ivil Service Act . 


12 




Copyright Act 


1 




Customs Act . . 


1 










Dominion Forest Reserves and Parks Act 






Dominion I^ands Act . . 






Dominion Lands Survbys Act 












Escheats Act 






Excise Act 


1 




Explosive^! Act.' 












Fi.sheries Act 


IOC 










Fugitives OfTenders Act 


















Government Vessels Discipline Act 






Government Work Tolls Act 














i 
















I-and Titles Act 





ANNUAL REPORT, 1927-28 85 

Revised Statutes Canada, 1927 (English) Separate Chapters — Concluded 



Chapter 



Marriagre and Divorce Act 

Militia Pension Act 

Money I^enders Act 

Kaval Service Act 

North West Territories Act 

Naturalization Act 

Ordnance and AdmiraJty Lands Act 

Passenger Ticket Act 

Pawnbrokers Act 

Penitentiaries Act. 

Pension Fund Societies Act 

Petition of Right Act 

Prisons and Reformatories Act 

Proprietary or Patent Medicines Act 

Provincial Subsidies Act 

PubHcation of Acts 

Public Lands Grants Act 

Quebec Harbours and Rivers Police Act 

Railway Belt Act '. 

Reclamation Act 

Saskatchewan and Alberta Roads Act. . 

Satisfied Securities Act 

Savings Deposits Returns Act 

Seed Grain Act 

Seed Grain Securities Act 

Timber Marking Act 

Trust C'ompanies Act 

United States Wreckers Act 

Victoria Day Act 

Wages Liability Act 

Water Carriage of Goods Act 

Water Meters Inspection Act 

Yukon Placer Mining Act 



Number 
of copies 
i-eceived 



100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
250 
150 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
200 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
200 



Sales 



Statutes of Canada 1926-27 (Enghsh) Separate Chapters 



Chapter 


• 


Number 
of copies 
received 


Sales 


1 


Appropriation Act. No. 1 


500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 

1,800 
400 
400 
800 
100 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 

2,. 500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 


102 


2 


No. 2 


102 


3 


" No. 3 


102 


4 


No. 4 


102 


5 


No. 5 


102 


6 


Diamond Jubilee of Confederation Act 


19 


7 


Grand Trunk Pacific Securities Act 


63 


8 


Montreal Harbour Commissioners Loan Act 


12 


9 


Royal Agricultural Winter Fair Act, Toronto . . 


11 


10 


Special War Revenue Act, 1915 


416 


11 


( 'anada Evidence Act 


27 


12 
13 
14 
1.5 


Canada National Railways Branch Lines — St. F61icien-Misstassini. . . . 

Grande Mfere-East Burrells 

" " " Pilkington-Niagara Jet 

" " " Wevburn-Radville 


68 
77 
66 
66 


16 
17 


" " " Willowbrook Northwesterly 
" " " SturiTes-Peesane 


66 
66 


18 


" " " Peesana Northerly 


66 


19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 


Shell brook Westerly 

Turtelford-HafYord 

" " " Kindersley-Glidden 

" " " Spruce Lake Westerly 

" " " Hudson Bay .Jet. Southerly. 
" " " Elk Point F-asterlv 


66 
66 
66 
66 
66 
66 


25 
26 

27 


" " " Ashmont-Bonnyville 

" " " Bretona-CIover Bar 

Canadian National Railways (Refunding) 


66 
67 
64 


28 


" " (Maintenance) 


68 



69595— 7§ 



86 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 

Statutes of Canada 1926-27 (English) Separate Chapters — Continued 



Chapter 



Number 
of copies 
received 



29 
30 
31 
32 
33 
34 
35 
36 
37 
38 
39 
40 
41 
42 
43 
44 
45 
46 
47 
48 
49 
50 
51 
52 
53 
54 
55 
56 
57 
58 
59 
60 
61 
62 
63 
64 
65 
66 
67 
68 
69 
70 
71 
72 
73 
74 
75 
76 
77 
78 
79 
80 
81 
82 
83 
84 
85 
86 
87 
88 
89 
90 
91 
92 
93 
94 
95 
96 
97 
98 
90 
100 
101 



Canadian National Steamships, West Indies Service 

Exchequer Court Act 

Income War Tax Act 

Indian Act 

Judges Act 

National Revenue, Department of. Act 

Old Age Pensions Act 

Special War Revenue Act, 1915 

St. Regis Indian Reservation Act 

Supreme Court Act 

War Charities Act 

Agricultural Poisons Act 

Canada Grain Act 

Canada Shipning Act 

Canadian Farm Loan Act 

Canadian National Maritime Freight Rates Act 

Canadian National (Rosedale) 

Chicoutimi Harbour (Loan; Act 

Chicoutimi Harbour Act. 

Civil Service Superannuation Act 

Compensation Act 

Customs Act 

Debts due the Crown 

Domestic Fuel 

Dominion Election Act 

Excise Act 

Federal District Act 

Food and Drugs Act 

Fruit Act 

Halifax Harbour Act 

Insurance Act 

Live Stock Act 

Loan Companies Act 

Marine and Fisheries Act 

National Revenue Act 

North West Territories Act 

Pensions Act 

Post Office Act 

Saint John Harbour Act 

Soldier Settlement Act 

Special War Revenue Act, 1915 

Three Rivers Harbour Act 

Trade Mark & Design Act 

Trust Companies Act 

Vancouver Harbour Act 

Widows' Annuities Act 

Winding Up Act 

Appropriation Act No. 6 

Alberta Railway and Irrigation Go's Act 

Algoma Central and Hudson Bay Ry. Go's Act 

Brandon, Saskatchewan and Hudson Bay Go's Act 

Canadian Pacific Railway Go's Act 

Canadian Transit Go's Act 

(-'hem in de fer de Colonization du Nord, La Gie du 

Detroit and Windsor Sunway Co.'s Act 

E.ssex Terminal Railway Co.'s Act 

Joliette and Northern Railway Co.'s Act 

Manitoba abd North Western Railway Go. of Canada Act 

Midland Railway Co. of Manitoba Act 

Quebec, Montreal and Southern Railway Co.'s Act 

Columbia Life Assurance Co 's Act 

f^ommerce Mutual Life Insurance Go's Act 

Commercial Travellers' Mutual Insurance Societies Act... 

Guardian Trust Corp. of Montreal Act 

Premier Guarantee and Accident Insurance Co. Act 

Sterling Trusts C'orporation Act 

Briggs, Enos, Henry Act 

Coleman, .Tames McCutcheon, Act 

Frigon, Albert P., Art 

Grav, Chester T'"ar] and Jensen, Aage, Act 

R. T. Vanderbilt Co.'s Act 

Spabright Co. Inc. Ar-t 

Haptist Convention of Ontario and Quebec Act 



500 
300 
800 

1,100 
100 
500 

2,800 
800 
600 
300 
500 
500 

1,700 
500 
550 
500 
300 
300 
300 
800 
300 
800 
300 
500 
300 
600 
600 

6,000 
500 
900 
200 
500 
600 
300 
300 
700 

1,815 
300 
300 

1,100 
800 
300 
700 
500 
200 
600 
500 
600 
200 
200 
300 
300 
300 
300 
200 
300 
300 
300 
300 
200 
200 
300 
300 
300 
300 
300 
300 
300 
300 
300 
300 
200 
300 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1927-28 87 

Statutes of Canada 1926-27 (English) Separate Chapters — Concluded 



Chapter 



Number 
of copies 
received 



Sales 



102 
10.3 
104 
105 
106 

107 
108 
109 
110 
111 
112 
113 to 
308 



Bronson Co 's Act 

Congregration de Saint Dominique du Tiers Orders Act 

Dominion Electric Protection Co.'s Act 

Fior d'ltalia Independent Order of, Act 

Foresters in the Dominion of Canada, Subsidiary High Court of the 

Ancient Order of, Act 

Free Methodist Church in Canada, Act 

Gatineau Transmission Co.'s Act 

North American Relations Foundation Act 

Ottawa Electric Co. Act 

Ottawa Gas Co. Act 

President of Lethbridge Stake Aci, 

Divorce Acts — 12 each. 



300 
300 
300 
300 

200 
307 
200 
200 
200 
200 
200 



12 
2 
2 

38 

2 
209 
5 
4 
3 
3 
2 



Statutes of Canada 1926-27 (French) Separate Chapters 



Chapter 




Number 
of copies 
received 


Sales 


1 


Appropriation Act, No. 1 


200 
200 
200 
200 
200 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 

100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 

ino 

700 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 


154 


2 


Appropriation Act, No. 2 


154 


3 


Appropriation Act, No. 3 


154 


4 


Appropriation Act No. 4 


154 


5 


Appropriation Act, No. 5 


154 


6 


Diamond Jubilee of Confederation Act 


80 


7 


Grand Trunk Pacific Securities Act 


84 


8 


Montreal Harbour Commissioners Loan Act 


1 


9 


Royal Agriculture Winter Fair Act, Toronto 


3 


10 


Special War Revenue Act ... 


78 


11 


Canada Evidence Act 


2 


12 


Canadian National Railways Branch Lines— 

St. Felicien — Mistassini 


28 


13 


Grand-Mere — East Burrils 




14 


Pilkington — Niagara Jet 




15 


Weyburn — Radville 




16 


Willowbrook — Northwesterly 




17 


Sturgis — Peosane 




18 


Peesane Northerly 




19 


Shellbrook Westerlv 




20 


Turtleford— Hatford 




21 


Kindersley — Glidden 




22 


Spruce Lake Westerly 


1 


23 


Hudson Bay Jet., Southerly 




24 


Elk Point Easterly 




25 


Ashmont — Bonneville 




26 


Bretona — Clover Bar .... 




27 


r'anadian National Railways (Refunding) 




28 


Canadian National Railways (Maintenance) 


20 


29 


( 'anadian National Steamships (West Indies Service) 




30 


Exchequer Court Act 




31 


Income War Tax Act 


57 


33 


Judges A ct 




34 


N^ational Revenue, Department of , Act 


22 


35 


Old Age Pensions Act 


676 


36 


Special War Revenue Act, 1915 


75 


37 


St. Regis Indian Reservation Act 


2 


38 


Supreme Court Act 


2 


39 


War Charities Act 




40 


Agricultural Poisons Act 


41 


41 


f 'anada Grain Act 


60 


42 


Canada Shipping Act 


38 


43 


Canadian Farm Loans Act 


47 


44 


C anadian National (Maritime Freight Rates), Act 




45 


Canadian National (Ro.sedale) 




46 


( hicoutimi Harbour (Loan) Act 




47 


Chicoutimi Harbour Act 





88 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 

Statutes of Canada 1926-27 (French) Separate Chapters — Concluded 



Chapter 



Number 
of copies 
received 



48 
49 
50 
51 
52 
53 
54 
55 
56 
57 
58 
59 
60 
61 
62 
63 
64 
65 
66 
67 
68 
69 
70 
71 
72 
73 
74 
75 
76 
77 
78 
79 
80 
81 
82 
83 
84 
85 
86 
87 
88 
89 
90 
91 
92 
93 
94 
95 
96 
97 
98 
99 
100 
101 
102 
103 
104 
105 
106 

107 
108 
109 
110 
111 
112 
113 to 



308 



Civil Service Superannuation Act 

Compensation Act 

Customs Act 

Debt due t!ie Crown 

Domestic Fuel 

Dominion Elections Act 

Excise Act 

Federal District Act 

Food and Drugs Act 

Fruit Act "^, 

Halifax Harbour Act 

Insurance Act 

Live Stock Act 

Loan Compaies Act 

Marine & Fisheries Act 

National Revenue Act 

North West Territories Act 

Pensions Act 

Post Office Act 

aint John Harbour Act 

Soldier Settlement Act 

Special War Revenue Act 

Three Rivers Harbour Act 

Trade Mark & Design Act 

Trust Companies Act 

Vancouver Harbour Act 

Widows Annuities Act 

Winding-Up Act 

Appropriation Act No. G 

\lberta Railway & Irrigation Go's Act 

Algoma Central & Hudson Bay Co's Act 

Brandon, Saskatchewan & Hudson Bay Co's Act 

Canadian Pacific Ry. Co's Act 

Canadian Transit Co's Act 

Chemin de Fer de Colonisation du Nord, La Cie du 

Detroit and Windsor Subway Co's Act 

Essex Terminal Ry. Co's Act 

Joliette & Northern Ry. Co's Act 

Manitoba & North Western Ry. Co. of Canada Act 

Midland Ry. Co. of Manitoba Act 

Quebec, Montreal & Southern Ry. Co's Act 

Columbia Life Assurance Co's Act 

Commercial Mutual Life Ins. Co 

Commercial Travellers Mutual Ins. Soc. Act 

Guardian Trust Corporation of Montreal Act 

Premier Guarantee & Accident Ins. Co., Ltd 

Sterling Trusts. Corporation Act 

Briggs, Enos Henry, Act 

Coleman. James McCutcheon, Act 

Frigon, Albert P 

Gray, Chester Earl & Jensen, Aage, Act 

R. t. Vanderbilt Co's Act 

Sealbright Co. Inc. Act 

Baptist Convention of Ontario & Quebec, Act 

Bronson Co's Act 

Congregation de Saint Donriinique des Tiers Ordres Act 

Dominion Electric Protection Co's Act 

Fior d'ltalia Independent, Order of. Act 

Foresters in the Dominion of Canada, Subsidiary High Court of the 

Ancient Order of, Act 

Free Methodist Church in Canada, Act 

Gatineau Transmission Co. Act 

North A merican Relations Foundation Act 

Ottawa Electric Co. Act 

Ottawa Gas Co. Act 

President of Lethbridge Stake Act 

Divorces, Acts, 12 each 



100 
100 
500 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
200 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
1,000 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
200 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 

100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 
100 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1927-28 



89 



Annual Reports 1927, English 

The table printed herewith shows the number of copies received of each 
publication and the general disposition of the same. Many copies of each 
document, sometimes practically all, are delivered direct to the ordering Depart- 
ment; in some cases copies are requisitioned by the Clerk of the House of Com- 
mons for distribution to Members of Parliament. Often considerable numbers 
are mailed direct to addresses supplied by the Clerk of the House and by the 
Department interested. Copies of all publications not confidential in character 
are mailed to important libraries, etc., under P.C. 1471, a regulation enacted 
on August 4, 1927, and operative since September 4, 1927. The system indi- 
cated applies not only in the case of annual reports but to practically all 
publications other than the Statutes of Canada. 





Number 
of copies 
received 


Distribution 






Delivered 


Mailing List 


P.C. 
1471 


Sales 




Parlia- 
ment 


Depart- 
ments 


Parlia- 
ment 


Depart 
ments 


Annual Reports, 1927 — English 
Agriculture 


5,276 
1,622 
1,517 

35 

100 

25 

30 

25 

40 

340 

15 

15 

60 

20 

50 

25 

75 

60 

35 

10 

10 

20 

478 

963 

471 

538 

2,322 

1,823 

1 , 339 

1,691 

1,431 

772 

906 

1,029 

727 

375 

2,447 

600 

781 

3,278 

633 

420 

979 

324 

487 

889 

1,222 

462 

1,825 

385 


206 
456 
456 


5,000 
262 
162 


50 
394 
394 






<5 


Auditor General, Vol. I 




113 
113 


140 


Auditor General, Vol. II 


132 


Auditor General — Separates: — 

Agriculture . 


30 














69 


External Affairs 














Health 












24 


Immigration and Colonization . . 














Interior 












30 


Indian Affairs 












300 














6 


Labour 












6 


Marine and Fisheries. 












46 














14 


National Defence 












38 


Public Printing and Stationery 

Post Office 












1 












43 


Public Works 












43 


Railways and Canals 












20 


Royal Canadian Mounted Police. . . 












Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment. . 














Trade and Commerce 












15 


Chief Electoral Officer 


100 

300 

25 

200 

1,000 

1,000 

511 

1,500 

200 

110 

256 

256 

161 

1.50 

211 

206 

206 


200 
332 
222 
200 
700 
300 
500 

■i;oi2' 

339 
267 
200 
203 

"2,200' 
300 
500 


2 
41 
49 
53 

47 

76 

56 
59 
80 

""4io 

62 
48 
11 
72 
3 






3 


National Revenue 


68 

78 




15 


Shipping Report 




External Affairs 


3 


Estimates, Main 






436 


Estimates, Supplementary 


73 






Public Accounts 


45 


Health 






3 


Immioration and Colonization. . 






7 


Indian Affairs 


218 
333 




5 




14 


Insurance, Vol. II. .... 


15 


Interior 

Superintendent of Penitentiaries . . . 


265 




7 
6 


LaVjour 






8 








11 


Fisheries 

M ines 


87 




10 

7 


Militia and Air Service 


200 
211 
306 
25 
200 
200 
150 
206 
1.50 
200 


200 
122 
500 

" "]93 

473 

656 

112 

1,.500 


78 
28 
85 
77 
11 
10 
51 
78 
35 
50 


22' 


86 


7 


Naval Service 


8 


Postmaster General 


20 


Public Printing and Stationery 






6 


Public Works 


57 
27 
94 


86' 


8 


Royal ( 'anadian Mounted Police 

Secretary of State .... 


8 

52 

6 


Soldier (Jivil Re-establi.shment 






6 


Pensions Commissioners 






3 



90 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 



Number 
of copies 
received 



Distribution 



Delivered 



Parlia- Depart- 
ment ments 



MaOing List 



Parlia- Depart- 
ment ments 



P.C. 
1471 



Sales 



Annual Reports 1927 — English-codc. 

Trade and Commerce 

Trade of Canada, Calendar Year 

Dominion Statistician 

Weoghts and Measures 

Commissioner of Patents 



Annual Repohts, 1927 — French 

External Affairs 

Estimates, 1928-29, Main 

Public Accounts 

Marine and Fisheries — Marine 

Fisheries 

Militia and Air Service 

Naval Service 

Mines 

Post Office 

Public Printing and Stationery 

Public Works 

Trade and Cornmerce 

Dominion Statistician 

Weights and Measures 

Commissioner of Patents 



Miscellaneous Publications — 
English 



Abrasives, Part I. No. 673 

Abrasives, Part II, No. 675 

Abrasives, Part III, No. 677 

Agricultural Pests Control Act, 1927. 

Banner Oats for Quebec 

Budget Resulations, No. 87, 1928 

Budget Speech 

British Empire Forestry Convention, 
Second, Report of the 

Cabbage Flea Beetle and its Control 
in British Columbia 

Canadian Council of Immigration for 
Women, Report of the 

Canadian Delegates to League of Na- 
tions, 8th Assembly, Report of the 

Canadian Historical Association, Re- 
port of the 

Canadian Seed Growers' Association, 
Report of the 

Census of Manitoba, 1926 

Census of Population, Vol. Ill, paper. . . 
Vol. Ill, bound... 

Census of Saskatchewan 

Cereal Division, Report of the 

Central Electric Stations, 1925 

Chemical and Allied Products. 1927-28. 

Civil Aviation, 1926, Report of 

Classification of Civil Service 

Commissioner of Highways, 1927, Re- 
port of the 

Conversion of Dry Roughage into a 
Succulent Fuel 

Criminal Code 

Criminal Statistics, 1926 

Division of Horticulture, Report of the. 

Divi.sif)n of P>otany, Report of the 

Division of ICconiinic Fibre Production, 
Report of the 

Division of Forage Plant.s, Report of the 

Electric Railway Report, 1926 



786 
1,132 
835 
858 
581 



170 
213 
191 
174 
191 
154 
147 
1,293 
174 
69 
125 
137 
184 
229 
116 



1,850 
1,839 
1^850 
125 
125 
100 
125 

450 

125 

150 

475 

150 

125 

125 

1,987 

1,500 

150 

125 

2.006 

800 

400 

100 

250 

125 
10.021 
175 
125 
125 

125 
125 
175 



206 

11 

100 

156 

6 



50 
150 
50 
56 
61 
50 
61 
26 
56 
10 
56 
56 
50 
10 
6 



300 



262 



30 



500 
500 
500 



50 



238 
1,032 



83 



33 



50 
100 
100 

25 

50 
773 

75 

"so 

50 
100 
1.50 
100 



477 



100 
359 



1 , 950 
600 



1,680 
1,680 



1,428 
1,096 



350 



5,631 



33 
33 



86 



113 
86 

113 
86 

113 

86 
86 



113 
86 



113 
86 



313 



113 
86 
86 



86 
113 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1927-28 



91 





Number 
of copies 
received 


Distribution 






Delivered 1 


Mailing List 1 


P.C. 
1471 


Sales 




Parlia- 
ment 


Depart- 
ments 


Parlia- 
ment 


Depart- 
ments 


Miscellaneous Publications — 
English — Continued 

Experimental Stations — 
Farnham, Que., Report of the Supt.. 


125 
125 
125 
125 
125 

1,875 
175 
175 
125 
125 
125 
125 

873 
150 

150 
125 

1,726 
125 

153 
150 

150 
125 
125 

1,310 
125 
125 
125 

25 

1,200 

125 
200 
150 

125 

150 
150 
125 
125 

125 

125 
125 

1,000 

3,211 

3,325 

2,125 
125 
125 
150 

150 
125 

492 










86 
86 
86 
86 
86 




Harrow, Ont. " " 












Kentville, Ont. " " 












Lethbridge, Alta. " " 












Ste Anne de la Pocatiere, Que. " 












Federal and Provincial Conference, Re- 
port on the 


1,500 










Fertilizers Analysis 








113 
113 

86 
86 
86 
86 

86 
37 

119 
92 

86" 

114 
113 

113 

86 
86 

86 
86 
86 
86 




Fisheries Statistics, 1926 












Fish Culture, 192G, Annual Report 












Food and Drugs Act 












French Canadian Horse 












Hog Marking 












House of Commons Committee re 
Allied Indian Tribes 


706 










Hudson Bav Expedition, Report of the 










Imperial Economic Commission on 
Fish Production, Report of the 












Investigation re Proprietary Articles . . . 












Limestones, Quebec and Ontario, Pre- 
liminary Report on 


6 






1,635 




List of Licensed Insurance Companies. 








List of Securities held by Insuarnce 
Companies 












List of Stolen and Destroyed Bonds 












List of Stloen and Destroyed Bonds, 
revised to February 10, 1928 












Loan and Trust Companies 












Manures and Fertilizers 












Mineral Production of Canada, Report 
on the 








1,263 




Mother — A little Book for Men 










Mother — A little Book for Women 
























Organization in Industry, Commerce, 
and the Professions, Report on 











1 


Organization re Department of Soldiers' 
Civil Re-establishment 


1,000 








86 

86 
113 
119 

86 

113 
113 

86 
86 

86 

86 
86 


50 


Placer Mining in Manitoba and Saskat- 
chewan 










Plotting Oblique Aerial Photographs.. . 












Privv Council Appeal, No. 41 of 1913. . . 












Proprietary or Patent Medicine Act. . . . 












Pulp and Paper Industry, 1926, Report 
on 
























Radio Branch, 1926-27, Report of the.. 












Radio Stations, List of 












Regulations under the Food and Drugs 
Act 












Regulations re Motor Engineer Certifi- 












Regulations re Quartz Mining Claims. 












Reorganization of Department of Na- 


400 
1,200 
1,200 
1,000 








283 


Royal Commission Customs Enquiry 
— Final Report of the 








824 


Royal Commission Customs Enquiry 










397 


Royal Commission re Department of 
Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment 








113 
86 
86 

113 

114 
86 


95 


Screenings as a food 










Some Flowering Bulbs 












Statistics of Dairy Factories, 1926 .. . . 












Sweden as a Market for Canadian Pro- 
ducts 












Testing of Milk, etc., by Babcock Test 












Treaties and Agreements affecting 
Canada, etc 


6 











92 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 





Number 
of copies 
received 


Distribution 






Delivered 


Mailing List 


P.C. 
1471 


Sales 




Parlia- 
ment 


Depart- 
ments 


Parlia- 
ment 


Depart 
ments 


Miscellaneous Publications — 
English — Concluded 

United States Federal Import Milk Act 


125 

1,870 
125 

150 
150 
125 
125 

1,125 
4,000 

975 
975 
975 
975 
975 
975 
975 

800 

800 
800 
800 
800 
800 
800 
800 
800 
800 
800 
800 
800 
800 
800 
800 
800 
800 
800 
800 
' 800 
800 
800 

750 
750 
750 
750 
750 

925 
925 
925 
925 
925 

750 
750 
750 
750 

750 
750 
750 
750 
7.'-)0 
750 










86 

86' 

113 

113 

86 

86 

88 

113 
113 
113 
113 
113 
113 
113 

113 
113 
113 
113 
113 
113 
113 
113 
113 
113 
113 
113 
113 
113 
113 
113 
113 
113 
113 
113 
113 
113 
113 

113 
113 
113 
113 
113 

86 
86 
86 
86 
86 

113 
113 
113 
113 

113 
113 
113 
113 
113 
113 




Use of Alberta Bituminous Sands for 









1,686 




Vocational Education, Bulletin No. 24.. 








Washington International Conference, 
1927, Report of the 












Water Powers of Canada 












Western Yellow Pine. 












Wheat Production 












World Economic Conference, 1927, Re- 
port of the Delegates to the 


500 
24 

750 
750 
750 
750 
750 
750 
750 

500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 

500 
500 
500 
500 
500 

750 
750 
750 
750 
750 

500 
500 
500 
500 

500 
500 
500 
500 
500 
500 








128 


Year Book. 1926 






1.832 


111 


Industrial and International Relations- 
No. 1 






32 


2 








32 


3 








32 


4 








32 


5 








32 


6 








32 


7 








32 


Pensions — 
No. 1 








62 


2 








62 


3 








63 


4 








63 


5 








63 


6 








63 


7 








63 


8 








63 


9 . ., 








62 


10 








62 


11 








62 


12 








62 


13 








62 


14 








62 


15 








62 


16 








62 


17 








62 


18 








62 


19 








62 


20 








62 


21 








62 


22 








62 


23 








62 


Immigration — 
No. 1 








8 


2 








14 


3 








14 










8 


5 








11 


No. 1 








54 










60 


3 








54 


4 








54 


5 








54 


I'«-h. 29-Mar. 15 








4 


March 22 








4 


March 23 








4 


March 26 








4 


Railways and Shipping — 








10 


9 








10 


3 








10 


4 








10 










10 


6 








10 













ANNUAL REPORT, 1927-28 
Periodicals 



93 





Number of 

copies 

received 

during year 


Distribution Weekly or Monthly 


Sales of 

separate 

copies 




To Dept. 


To subs. 


Free 


P.C. 1471 


Abstract of Public Health, 
Monthly 


74,323 

85,785 

8,023 

3,4.50 

18,417 

130,465 

70,644 

117,369 
134,785 

42,375 

134,718 
1,925 
6,498 

135,021 






6,100 

959 

2,012 






Agriculture Statistics, 
Monthly 




36 




75 


Apple Supplement, Quart- 
erly 








Bank Statements, Monthly. 




124 

1,181 

700 

144 

908 




149 


Business Statistics, Monthlv 








50 


Canada Gazette, Weekly. . . 




1,147 

5,885 

1,416 
11,231 

4,822 

11,216 


113 


1.800 
200 


Canada Law Reports, 
Monthlv 


150 


Commercial Intelligence 
Journal, Weeklv 




1 150 


Labour Gazette, Monthly . . 








National Revenue Review, 
Monthlv 


700 


115 


113 


100 


Natural Resources, Month- 
ly 




Postal Guide, Yearly 




1,554 
326 




875 


Trade of Canada, Quarterly 




680 
11,251 





65 


Tuberculosis Bulletin, Mon- 
thlv 



















Number 
of copies 
received 


Distribution 






Delivered 


Mailing List 


P.C. 

1471 


Sales 




Parlt. 


Depts. 


Parlt. 


Depts. 




Miscellaneous Publications- (French 
Banner Oats 


50 

140 
2,992 

50 
700 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 
50 

50 
50 
50 

50 
50 

50 

50 

50 
50 
50 
50 

450 










33 
33 




Canadian Delegates to League of 
Nations 


65 










Criminal Code 




1,278 




54 


Examinations re Captains, Mates, Mer- 
chant Marine 








33 
33 
33 
33 
33 
33 
33 
33 
33 

33 
33 
33 

33 
33 

33 

33 

33 
33 
33 
33 

33 




Federal and Provincial Conference, 1927 


600 










Fisheries Act 










Forest Facts 












French Canadian Horse 












Hog Marking 












Judgments re Tariff 












Mineral Production of Canada, 1927. . . . 












Pamphlet re Old Age 












Organization in Industry, Commerce 
and the Profession 












Opium Conference 












Division of Forage Plants 












Royal Commission on Customs En- 
quirv 












Screenings as a Feed- for Livestock. . . . 












Special Committee re Allied Indian 
Tribes 












Special Committee on Banking and 
Commerce No. 1 












United States Federal Import Milk 
Act 












Veterinary Director General, 1927 












Vocational Education, Bull. No. 19 












Woodland Fairy 












World Economic Conference, 1927, 
Report of the Delegates 


300 





















94 DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 

Parliamentary Papers 

The following statement shows the parliamentarj' papers received for the 
Session 1926-27, April 1, 1927 to April 14, 1927, and for the Session 1928, from 
January 26 to March 31, 1928. 



Part 
Session 
1926-27 



Part 

Session 
1927-28 



Total 
received 



English 

Senate Debates 

House of Commons Debates 

Minutes of Proceedings — Senate 

Votes and Proceedings — House of Commona 

Orders of the Day — H. of C 

Bills— Senate 

Bills— H. of C 

French 

Senate Debates 

House of Commons Debates 

Minutes of Proceedings — Senate 

Votes and Proceedings — H. of C 

Orders of the Day— H. of C 

Bills — Senate 

Bills— H. of C 



17,875 
75,192 
15,070 
13,092 
17,040 
1,225,900 
581,604 



None 

11,640 

3,234 

5,304 

3,900 

306,885 

141,882 



29,250 
294,502 
24,160 
86,527 
68,160 
Xone 
69,624 



None 
45,590 
5,292 

20,774 
15,600 
None 
16,692 



47,125 

369,694 

39,230 

99.619 

85,200 

1,225,900 

651,228 



None 

57, 230 

8,526 

26,078 

19,500 

306,885 

158,574 



Number of subscribers to Parliamentary Papers on lists March 31, 1928 





To Departments 


To the Public 




English 


French 


English 


French 


Senate- 
Debates of 


368 
325 

686 
428 
382 
226 




103 
63 

1,438 

112 

69 

97 




Minutes of Proceedings 


23 

60 
27 
25 
16 




House of Commons — 

Debates of 


148 


Votes and Proceedings 


2 


Orders of the Day 




Bills of both Houses 


3 







REPORT OF THE CONTROLLER OF PURCHASES 



Fiscal Year, 1927-28 

f. a. acland, 

King's Printer, 
Ottawa, Ont. 

Dear Sir, — I have the honour to submit report of the Purchasing Branch 
for the fiscal year 1927-28. The total amount of money paid for purchases 
made by the four divisions of this branch is $2,124,666.53, subdivided as follows: 



— 


Canadian 


United 
Kingdom 


United 

States 


Other 
Coun- 
tries 


Total 

Material 

Purchased 


Customs 
Duty and 
Brokerage 


Freight 

and 
Express 


Grand 
Total 


Stationery and 

Paper Stores 

Printing Stores 


$ cts. 

1,557,178 13 
130,251 09 

352,372 37 


$ cts. 
14,827 87 


$ cts. 

26,241 29 
6,324 07 


1 cts. 
600 57 


$ cts. 

1,598,847 86 
136,575 16 

352,914 40 


$ cts. 

5,197 47 
3,014 35 

134 81 
4 50 


$ cts. 

22,472 34 
845 35 

3,852 52 
807 77 


$ cts. 

1,626,517 67 
140,434 86 


Lithographing 
Printing , 
Binding, En- 
graving, etc. 


542 03 


356,901 73 


Distribution . . 






812 27 
















Totals. . . . 


2,039,801 59 


15,369 90 


32,565 36 


600 57 


2,088,337 42 


8,351 13 


27,977 98 


2,124,666 53 



For the above mentioned purchases 1,257 personal accounts were opened 
for stationery and paper purchases; 209 for printing stores purchases and 97 
for lithographing and engraving purchases; 29,442 invoices were received, 
audited and certified ready for payment; 26,892 individual orders were issued, 
and 967 special specifications for tenders were prepared. Sale of discarded 
equipment, machines, etc., amounted to $2,037.50. Metal dross exchanged 
for virgin metal, 26,542 pounds to the value of $1,712.34. Customs entries 
for import and export, 338; number of express and freight slips audited and 
cleared for payment 2,807. 

Work performed or supervised by the Lithographing and Engraving Division 
is as follows: Cheques lithographed, 3,507,947; maps lithographed, 898,076; 
forms, posters, etc., 9,080,927; lithographed money orders, 19,063,640; booklets, 
1,150,950; printed cards and tags, 8,796,434; line engravings and halftones, 
10,581; electros and dies, 1,610; helyotype prints, 270,538; cartons and envelopes, 
5,611,115; binding (books), 21,711. 

Government Newspaper Advertising 

The total amount of the invoices audited and passed for payment by this 
department for Government advertising during the fiscal year ending March 
31, 1928, is $110,551.20, the details of which are set forth in statement on the 
next page. These accounts were paid by the several departments for which 
the advertising is done and the amount is therefore not included in the statement 
of expenditure of this department. 

The number of advertising accounts audited is 6,017, orders issued, 4,626, 
of which 2,995 were for transient advertising and 1,631 for space contract 
advertising. 



95 



96 



DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC PRINTING AND STATIONERY 



00 
05 



© 

O 

o 

CO 



b£ 



> 



> 

o 

o 

o 

I— I 

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OS 



» B rf 
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03 g 



g c3 C 



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03." 



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00 000 CO 



10 CO o >o 

TtH (M (M O 
<0 C^ C<1 >o 

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C> .-H T)< 10 

(M ^ O —1 

O O tC CO 
■^ tj- 10 ^H 

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1— I 05 O 
05 "JIM OJ 



lO -^ C5 »-H 
C^ IC 05 10 

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O »0 CO 05 
<-l CO O <M 






:.5 o =-■ £2 



C 03 

c rt t- t,.i; o. 



COOC10-^C03C«0 

ocooiocoiooeo 

C-lt^OOiO-^COO 
Ot^O-^OOOCO-^ 
Or-<M<— •CO'S'OOCO 



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O r^ >- 



4tf 

15E 



O r^ >- 
C 2 O 

Sl^ « c c 
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50c 



05 






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-5 — 
03. £ 



^ O 

.si 

en en 

13 IS 



ANNUAL REPORT, 1927- 



97 



Below is a statement of the total amount of advertising accounts audited 
by this department from the j^ear 1876 to the fiscal year ending March 31, 1928, 
inclusive. 



Calendar Year 

1876 $12,529 27 

1877 12,751 56 

1878 20,583 77 

1879 39, 676 60 

1880 63,092 50 

1881 30,015 44 

1882 50, 604 71 

1883 30, 149 31 

1884 39,401 48 

1885 33,782 53 

1886 25,102 83 

1887 48,596 03 

1888 44,520 30 

1889 35,939 47 

1890 26, 102 48 

1891 27,519 59 

1892 24,819 54 

1893 26,704 27 

1894 26.423 72 

1895 27,424 68 

1896 30, 760 76 

1897 35,138 54 

1898 (6 mos. to June 30, 1898) '. . . . 16, 312 58 



Fiscal Year 

1898-1899 S 27,699 72 

1899-1900 46,317 74 

1900-1901 50, 790 40 

1901-1902 53,850 75 

1902-1903 41,078 02 

1903-1904 57,898 72 

1904-1905 102,848 11 

1905-1906 107.812 56 

1906-1907 89,329 77 



(March 31) 

1907-1908 141,200 45 

1908-1909 156,673 50 

1909-1910 102,841 15 

1910-1911 144,081 66 

1911-1912 166,224 26 

1912-1913 204,762 87 

1913 -1914 247,477 61 

1914-1915 200,441 19 

1915-1916 210,818 48 

1916-1917 295,694 98 

*1917-1918 496,645 77 

1918-1919 622,197 21 

1919-1920 235,663 93 

1920-1921 183, 656 65 

1921-1922 98,663 02 

1922-1923 224,885 07 

1923-1924 129, 611 43 

1924-1925 77,434 09 

1925-1926 105.021 81 

1926-1927 72.961 95 

1927-1928 110,551 20 



*Includes advertising of Victory Loan, 1918, amount $184,064.59, contracted for with Canadian Press 
Association. 

J. 0. PATENAUDE, 

Controller of Purchases. 



1 



DOMINION OF CANADA 
SIXTY-FIRST ANNUAL REPORT 

OF THE 

DEPARTMENT OF MARINE 
AND FISHERIES 

FOR THE 

FISCAL YEAR 1927-28 



MARINE 




OTTAWA 

F. A. ACLAND 

PRINTER TO THE KING'S MOST EXCELLENT M.UESTY 

1928 



To His Excellency the Right Honourable Viscount Willingdon, G.C.S.I., 
G.C.M.G., G.C.I.E., G.B.E., Governor General and Commander in Chief 
of the Dominion of Canada. 

May it Please Your Excellency: 

I have the honour to submit herewith, for the information of Your Excel- 
lency and the ParHament of Canada, the Sixty-first Annual Report of the 
Department of Marine and Fisheries, Marine Branch. 

I have the honour to be. 

Your Excellency's most obedient servant, 

P. J. ARTHUR CARDIN, 

Minister of Marine and Fisheries. 

Department of Marine, 
Ottawa. 



65702— A 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 

REPORT OF DEPUTY MINISTER. Subjects paged in summary below. 

A 

Page 

Agencies' reports 67-87 

Halifax, N.S., agency 67-69 

Sydney, N.S., sub-agency 70 

Pictou, N.S., sub-agency 70 

St. John, N.B., agency 70-74 

Victoria, B.C., agency 74-77 

Prince Rupert, B.C., agency 77, 78 

Charlottetown, P.E.I., agency 79-82 

Fort William, Ont.. sub-agency 82, 83 

Parry Sound, Ont., agency 83-85 

Kenora, Ont., sub-agency 85 

Montreal, P.Q., agency 85, 86 

Quebec, P.Q., agency 86. 87 

Appropriation and expenditure 166 

B 

Belleville Harbour Commission report 135 

Board of Steamboat Inspection, report of chairman 135-138 

Staff 135, 136 

Board meetings 136 

Engineer examinations 136 

Inspectors acting in dual capacity 136 

Inspectors of boilers and machinery 136 

Inspectors of hulls and equipment 137 

Inspectors of ships' tackle 137 

Table showing number of inspections made, fees collected, etc., during year 

ending March 31, 1928 138 

British Dominions, mercantile shii)building 7 

Burrard Dry Dock Co., Ltd., operations of 13 

C 

Canadian Government Merchant Marine 9-11 

Comparison of operations, 1926 and 1927 9 

Tonnage handled by Canadian Government Merchant Marine fleet 10 

Disposition of fleet as at December 31, 1927 10 

Voyages completed during the year 10 

Regular sailings during the year 10,11 

Canadian shipbuilding plants, operations of 11-13 

Canadian Vickers, Ltd., operations of 12 

Charlottetown agency report 79-82 

Chief Engineer's report 20-23 

New aids to navigation 20 

Changes and improvements 21 

Dominion Lighthouse Depot, Prescott 21, 22 

Dominion steamers 22 

Publications 22 

V 



vi MARINE AND FISHERIES 

C 

Paoe 

Chief Engineer's Report — Concluded 

Ice-breaking • 23 

Removal of obstructions 23 

Maintenance and repairs to wharves 23 

Commissioner of Lights' report 23, 24 

Statement, by districts, showing the number of lights of the several orders, 

lightships, lightkeepers, fog signals, buoys, submarine bells, etc 24 

Comparison (by countries) of tonnage in hand at close of 1926, with 1926 output.. 1 

Comparison between British Empire and foreign shipping at June 30, 1927 8,9 

Comparison of world merchant fleets in June, 1914, and in June, 1927 9 

Correspondence 1"" 

Countries for which the merchant vessels launched in Great Britain and Ireland 

during 1927 have been built 4 

D 

Davie Shipbuilding and Repairing Co., Ltd., operations of 11 

Denmark, mercantile shipbuilding 7 

E 

Expenditure and revenue 46, 47 

F 

Fort William, sub-agency report 82, 83 

France, mercantile shipbuilding 7 

G 

General statistics 8 

Germany, mercantile shipbuilding 6 

H 

Halifax agency report 67-69 

Halifax Shipyard, Ltd., operations of 13 

Harbour Commissioners' reports 111-135 

Quebec 111-115 

Montreal 115-122 

Three Rivers 122-124 

New Westminster 124-128 

Vancouver 128-132 

Chicoutimi 133-135 

Belleville 135 

Holland, mercantile shipbuilding 6 

Hydrographic Survey — report of Chief Hydrographor 93-100 

Atlantic coast and Great Lakes division 93 

Pacific coast divi.«ion "3 

Headquarters 93 

Gulf of St. Lawrence Cnorth slioro) 9:i,M 

Bay of Fundy 94 

Lake St. Clair -. 95 

Pacific coast 95 

Automatic gauges 96 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER vii 

H 

Page 

Hydrographic Survey — Concluded 

Chart construction room 97 

Chart distribution room 97 

Monthly mean water surface elevations of the " Great Lakes " by automatic 

gauge division 98 

, Monthly water surface elevations of the " St. Lawrence River " by automatic 

gauge division 99 

I 

Inspection, Board of Steamboat, report of chairman 135-138 

Italy, mercantile shipbuilding 6, 7 

J 

Japan, mercantile shipbuilding 7 

K 

Kenora, sub-agency report 85 



L 

Legislation, new 166 

Live stock shipments, 1927 92, 93 

Lloyd's returns — Motor shipbuilding at June 30, 1927 2 

" " Tankers under construction at June 30, 1927 2, 3 

" " Motor shipbuilding, at Sept. 30, 1927 3 

" " Mercantile shipbuilding in 1927 3-8 

" " Number and tonnage of merchant vessels launched in Great 

Britain and Ireland during the two years 1926 and 1927 3 

" " Size of merchant vessels launched in Great Britain and Ireland 

during 1927 4 

" " Countries for which the merchant vessels launched in Great 

Britain and Ireland during 1927 have been built 4 

" " Size and type of vessels 5 

" " Vessels fitted with tm'bines 5 

" " Vessels fitted with internal combustion engines 5 

" " Output of leading shipbuilding centres 5 

" " Germany 6 

" " United States 6 

" " Holland 6 

Italy 6,7 

Denmark 7 

Sweden 7 

France 7 

Russia 7 

Japan 7 

" " British Dominions 7 

" " Summary 7 

" " General statistics 8 

" " Comparison (by countries) of tonnage in hand at close of 1927, 

with 1927 output 8 



Vlii MARINE AND FISHERIES 

L 

Page 

Lloyd's returns — Concluded 

" " Comparison between British Empire and foreign shipping at June 

30, 1927 8, 9 

" " World-motor ships under Lloyd's register in periods from 1914 to 

1927 9 

" " Tanker tonnage under Lloyd's register in periods from 1914 to 

1927 9 

" " Comparison of world merchant fleets in June, 1914, and in June, 

1927 9 



M 

Marine Department correspondence 166 

Masters and Seamen Branch — report of Superintendent 62 

Mercantile shipbuilding in 1927 3-9 

Merchant marine, Canadian &-11 

Meteorological Service, report of Director 47-56 

Forecast division 47, 48 

Division of climatology 48 

Atmospheric physics 48-51 

Terrestrial magnetism 51 

Summary of results of magnetic obser\'ations at Agincourt for the fiscal year 

1927-28 52, 53 

Summary of results of magnetic observations at Meanook for the fiscal year 

1927-28 52 

Astronomy 53 

Seismology 53, 54 

Library report, fiscal year ending March 31, 1928 54 

Quebec Observatjory — report of director 54, 55 

St. John Observatory — report of director 55 

Victoria Observatory — report of director 56 

Midland Shipbuilding Co., Ltd., operations of 11, 12 

Montreal agency report 85, 86 

Montreal harbour commission report 115-122 

Motor shipbuilding at June 30. 1927 2 

Motor shipbuilding at September 30, 1927 3 

N 

New legislation 166 

New Westminster harbour commission report 124^128 

Number and tonnage of merchant vessels launched in Great Britain and Ireland 

during the two years 1926 and 1927 3 



O 

Operations of chief Canadian shipbuilding plants 11-13 

Output of leading shipbuilding centres 5 

P 

Pacific Salvage Co., report 89 

Parry Sound agency report 83-85 

Pictou sub-agency report 70 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER ix 

P 

Page 

Pilotage — report of director 62-64 

District of Montreal 62 

District of Quebec 62, 63 

General Montreal and Quebec 63 

District of Saint John 63, 64 

District of Sydney 64 

District of Halifax 64 

General 64 

Port Arthur Shipbuilding Co., Ltd., operations of 12 

Port Wardens' reports 103, 104 

Prince Rupert agency report 77, 78 

Prince Rupert Dry Dock and Shipyard, operations of 13 



Q 

Quebec agency report 86, 87 

Quebec harbour commission report 111-115 

Quebec Salvage & Wrecking Co., report 88, 89 



R 

Radio Branch — report of Director 139-166 

Number of Radio stations in the Dominion 139 

Licenses 139 

License fees 139 

Government coast stations 139, 140 

Radiotelegraph aids to navigation broadcasts 140 

Radiotelephone aids to navigation broadcasts 140 

Time signals 141 

Spring Patrol, Cabot straits, gulf of St. Lawrence 141 

Radio direction finding 141 

Bearings given 1927-28 142 

Radio beacon service 142 

Commercial ship service 142 

Radiotelephone service to small craft on the Pacific coast 142 

Ship's emergency apparatus 143 

Number of ships exercised 1926-27 143 

Traffic section 143 

Messages handled by the coast station services 143 

Revenue 143 

Inspections 144 

Examinations for certificate of proficiency in radiotelegraphy 144,145 

Fees for examination 145 

Radio broadcasting 145 

Broadcasting wavelength arrangements with the United States 145 

Broadcast of the celebration of the diamond jubilee of Confederation 146 

Amendments to the radiotelegraph act 146 

Commercial activities 146 

Transatlantic 147 

Transpacific 147 

Communication with isolated points 147 

Other departments of Canadian government 147 

The International radiotelegraph conference 147-149 

6570;— B 



X MARINE AND FISHERIES 

R 

Page 

Radio Branch — Concluded 

Convention 149 

General regulations, Part 1 149-156 

Regulations, Part II (Inductive interference) 157-160 

New construction, additions and alterations 160-162 

West coast 160,161 

Great lakes 161 

East coast 161, 162 

Hudson ba}' and strait 162 

Special assistance rendered to ships during the year by government radio stations. 162-166 

West coast 162,163 

Pachena point direction finding 163 

Vancouver 163, 164 

Great lakes 164 

East coast 164, 165 

Quebec 165 

Belle Isle d/F 165 

East coast visual signal service 165, 166 

Returns of Shipping Masters 90-92 

Quebec 90 

New Brunswick 90 

Nova Scotia 90,91 

Prince Edward Island 92 

British Columbia 92 

Recapitulation 92 

Revenue and expenditure 46, 47 

Russia, mercantile shipbuilding 7 



Sable island — report of Superintendent 66, 67 

Shipments, live stock 92, 93 

Shipping masters, returns of 90-92 

Signal Station, Halifax — record of .^hipping 65 

Size and type of vessels 5 

Size of merchant vessels launched in Great Britain and Ireland during 1927 4 

Sorel Shipyard — report of Superintendent 104, 105 

Statistics of Canadian Shipping 14-19 

Statement of vessels built in Canada and registered during the year 1927 14 

Statement showing nmnber of vessels and number of tons on registry books of the 

Dominion of Canada on December 31, 1927 15, 16 

Statement showing number of vessels removed from the registry books of the 

Dominion of Canada during year ended December 31, 1927 17 

Statement, comparative, showing number of vessels and number of net tons on 
registry books of the Dominion of Canada, on December 31, in each .year from 

1918 to 1927, both inclusive 18 

Statement, comparative, of vessels built and registered in the Dominion of Canada 
and their net tonnage during the year ended December 31, in each year from 

1918 to 1927, both inclusive 19 

Steamboat Inspection — Board of — report of Chairman 135-138 

St. John agency report 70-74 

St. John Dry Dock and Shipbuilding Co., Ltd., operations of 13 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER xi 

S 

Page 

St. Lawrence Ship Channel — report of Superintending Engineer 25-45 

Physical features 25 

History of the river St. Lawrence ship channel 25, 26 

Thirty-foot channel 26, 27 

Thirty-five foot channel 27 

The ship channel below Quebec 28 

South channel (30 ft. at E.L.W.) 28 

North channel (35 ft. at E.L.W.) 28, 29 

Dredging operations, season 1927 29-31 

Projiress of dredging operations at the end of season 1927 31 

Tidal semaphores 32, 33 

Accidents in the river St. Lawrence, season of navigation 1927 33, 34 

Marine Signal service 34, 35 

Brief summary of work performed 35, 36 

Icebreaking, 1927-28 36, 37 

Average depth for each month in the 27^ foot channel 37 

Average depth for each month in the 30 foot channel 37 

Cost of ship channel to date 38 

Progress of dredging operations at the close of the season 1927 (30 foot project) 39,40 

Progress of dredging operations at the close of the season 1927 (35 foot project) 40, 41 

Abstract of work of dredging fleet during fiscal year ending March 31, 1928. ... 42, 43 

Classification of disbursements for fiscal year ended March 31, 1928 44 

Details of dredging, locality and cost per cubic yard 45 

Summary, mercantile shipbuilding, 1927, by countries 7 

Supervisor of Harbour Commissioners' report — including reports of Harbour Com- 
missioners 105-135 

Sweden, mercantile shipbuilding 7 

Sydney sub-agency report 70 

T 

Tankers under construction at June 30. 1927 2,3 

Tanker tonnage under Lloyd's register in periods from 1914 to 1927 9 

Three Rivers harbour commission report 122-124 

Tidal Survey, report of Chief Hydrographer 100-103 

Seasonal tidal stations (Atlantic coast) 101 

Seasonal tidal stations (Pacific coast) 101 

Investigations of currents (Atlantic coast) 101 

Investigations of currents (Pacific coast) 102 

Tide tables 102 

Staff 102, 103 

U 

United States, mercantile shipbuilding 6 

V 

Vancouver harbour commi.ssion report 128-132 

Vessels fitted with turbines 5 

Vessels fitted with internal combustion engines 5 

Victoria agency report 74-77 



xii MARINE AND FISHERIES 

W 

Page 

World-motor ships under Lloyd's Register in periods from 1914 to 1927 9 

Wreck Commissioner's report 57-61 

Investigations and inquiries 57-61 

Wrecking Companies reports 88, 89 

Y 

Yarrows, Ltd., operations of 13 



REPORT 



OF THE 



DEPUTY MINISTER OF MARINE 



To the Hon. P. J. Arthur Cardin, 
Minister of Marine and Fisheries. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit herewith mj' report for the fiscal year 
ended March 31, 1928. 

At the beginning of 1927 there was, apart from Japan and the Scandinavian 
countries, an increase in the shipbuilding activity of every other maritime 
country, the tonnage in hand being in excess of the 1926 output, the figures 
being: — 



Countrj' 



Tonnage in hand 

Jan. 1, 1927 

(Lloyds statement) 



Tonnage output 

1926 

(Lloyds statement) 



Great Britain and Ireland 

Italy 

Germany 

United States 

Holland 

France 

Scandinavian countries (Denmark, Sweden, Norway) 

Russia 

Spain 

Japan 



gross tons 

760,084 

239,776 

211,062 

151,635 

145,005 

143,068 

84,728 

54,420 

46,848 

43,060 



gross tons 

639,568 

220,021 

180,548 

1.50,613 

93,671 

121,342 

134,863 

not given 

not given 

52,405 



Since' 1922, when her output amounted to 227,425 gross tons of merchant 
shipping (Lloyd's statement), there has been a steady and marked decline in 
Japanese shipbuilding until, as shown in the above table, her building program, 
at the beginning of 1927 was the lowest among the maritime countries of the 
world. , 

Russia at the close of 1926, as stated in last year's report, entered the shipr 
building field for the first time since the close of the war. At the beginning of 
1927 her tonnage under construction exceeded that of Spain and of Japan. 

Lloyd's returns for the March, 1927, quarter show an increase of world 
tonnage under construction over that of the previous quarter of 637,000 tons,; 
viz., 2,569,864 tons as against 1,932,864 tons. 

Great Britain and Ireland show an increase of 456,848 tons; 1,216,932 tons 
as against 760,084 tons. Germany shows an increase of 139,871 tons; 350,933 
tons as against 211,062 tons. Italy a decrease of 30,982 tons; 208,794 tons as 
against 239,776 tons. United States an increase of 27,690 tons; 179,325 tons as 
against 151,635 tons. France an increase of 11,370 tons; 154,438 tons' as against 
143,068 tons. Holland a decrease of 11,360 tons; 133,645 tons as against 145,005 
tons. 

Lloyd's register shipbuilding returns for the quarter ended June 30, 1927, 
as compared with those of the previous quarter show an increase in the ship- 
builing activity of the world at large, and also an increase in the activities of 
the majority of the maritime countries. 

World tonnage under construction amounted to 2,840,545 tons, an increase 
of 271,000 tons over the previous quarter. British and Irish tonnage in hand, 

65702—1 



2 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

1.390,388 tons, showed an increase of 173,456 tons over the previous quarter, 
and exceeded by 549,000 tons the tonnage building a year ago. Work was sus- 
pended on only 8,745 tons at the end of June, 1926. 

Germany had in hand at the end of June, 1927, 407,620 tons of merchant 
shipping, as against 350,933 tons for the previous quarter, an increase of 56,687 
tons; Italy, 226,774 tons, as against 208,794 tons, an increase of 17,980 tons; 
Holland, 171,825 tons, as against 133,645 tons, an increase of 38,180 tons; 
United States, 146,846 tons, as against 179,325 tons, a decrease of 32,479 tons; 
France, 136,474 tons, as against 154,438 tons, a decrease of 17,964 tons. 

Motor Ship Building at June 30, 1927 
(Lloyd's statement) 

For the first time in the history of shipbuilding motor tonnage building in 
the world exceeded steam tonnage. 

The tonnage of vessels building in the world on June 30, 1927, to be fitted 
with internal combustion engines, amounted to 1,459,595 tons; the steam ton- 
nage to 1,366,809 tons; showing the continued and rapid development of the 
former system of propulsion. 

In Great Britain and Ireland motor tonnage under construction amounted 
to 627,700 tons, about 82 8 per cent of the steam tonnage under way. 

In the Continental countries of Europe, however, motor tonnage' in hand 
at June 30, 1927, far exceeded the steam tonnage. 

In Danzig, Denmark, Holland, France, Italy, and Sweden, 561,135 tons of 
motor tonnage were being built as against 152,055 tons of steam tonnage. 

At the close of June, 1927, there were being built in the world eighty- 
four motor ships of between 6,000 and 10,000 tons; seventeen of between 10,000 
and 15,000 tons; nine of between 15,000 and 24,000 tons; and one of about 
33,000 tons. 

Tankers Under Construction at June 30, 1927 
(Lloyd's Statement) 

The following table shows the number and gross tonnage of steamers and 
motorships, each of 1,000 tons and above, intended to carry oil in bulk, under 
construction in the World at the end of June, 1927: — 



Countries of build 



No. 


Gross 




tonnage 


65 


400,992 


1 


1,100 


6 


38,400 


8 


59,440 


10 


79,170 


2 


22,870 



Countries of build 



No. 



Gross 
tonnage 



Great Britain and Ireland 

China 

Danzig 

Denmark 

France 

Germany 



Holland 

Italy 

Russia 

Sweden 

United States 

Total... 



112 



39,000 
16,804 
7,000 
36,500 
24,150 



725,426 



The above table shows the present marked lead of Britain in the building of 
ships for the carriage of fuel oil in bulk, her tanker tonnage building at the end 
of June 1927, being consideralbly more than that of all the other maritime 
countries combined. 

Lloyd's register shipbuilding returns for the quarter ended September 30. 
1927, show world tonnage under construction to amount to 3,074,057 tons, au 
increase of about 234,000 tons over tonnage in hand at the close of the previous 
quarter, due to increased building activity in Great Britain and Ireland, and 
in Germany. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 



The total for Great Britain and Ireland is 1,536,416 tons, as against 1,390,- 
388 tons for the previous quarter, an increase of 146,028 tons; for Germany 
516,245 tons, as against 407,620 tons for the previous quarter, an increase of 
108,625 tons. 

Totals for some other continental countries are Italy 208,420 tons; Holland, 
163,824 tons; France, 130,914 tons. 

As tonnages in hand for these countries at the close of the previous quarter 
were respectively 226,774 tons; 171,825 tons; and 136,474 tons, it will be seen 
that in Italy, Holland, and France there has 'been a slight falling off in the 
September quarter building as compared with that of the June quarter. 

Lloyd's September returns show that British and Irish tonnage then in 
hand, was only 1,200 tons less than that under construction in the rest of the 
world 

McnoR Shipbuilding, at September 30, 1927 

At the close of the September quarter world merchant shipping, to be fitted 
with internal combustion engines, amounted to 1,589,510 tons; steam tonnage 
building at the same time amounted to 1,468.842 tons, a difference of 120,668 tons 
in favour of motor tonnage. 

The excess of world motor tonnage in hand over steam tonnage at the close 
of the June quarter amounted to 92,786 tons. It will thus 'be seen that the 
movement in favour of the former mode of propulsion continues to increase. 

Of British and Irish tonnage in hand at the close of the September quarter, 
motor ship tonnage comprised 653,342 tons, about 74 per cent of the steam 
tonnage. 

In Danzig, Denmark, France, Holland, Italy, and Sweden, motor tonnage 
under construction totalled 581,544 tons, as against 137,964 tons of steam 
tonnage. 

Mercantile Shipbuilding in 1927 

These returns are from Lloyds Register Annual Summary, are in gross tons 
and comprise only merchant ships of 100 gross tons or upwards. 

Table Showing the Number and Tonnage of Merchant Vessels launched in Great 
Britain and Ireland during the two years 1926 and 1927 





1927 




T^^+o1 


District 


Steamers 


Motor Ships 


Sail and 
Barges 


Total 


1926 




No. 


Gross 
tonnage 


No. 


Gross 
tonnage 


No. 


Gross 
tonnage 


No. 


Gross 
tonnage 


No. 


Tons 


Aberdeen 


9 

2 
12 

1 


5,896 

22,300 

51 , 087 

156 






2 


1,824 


11 

2 

21 

3 

1 
8 
87 
44 
13 
23 
11 
13 

18 
61 
11 
37 

7 


7,720 

22,300 

107,181 

425 

1,080 

23,567 

263,455 

160,268 

65,588 

14,852 

16,707 

36,636 

64,783 
274,056 

3,206 
162,770 

1,279 


9 

3 
9 
2 
2 

7 
48 
28 

3 
11 

6 

7 

21 

25 

3 

8 

5 


3,723 
12 516 


Barrow, Maryport and 
Workington 






Belfast 


8 


55,964 


1 
2 


130 
269 


92,919 
520 


Bristol 


Dublin 


1 
3 

25 

7 


1,080 

16,983 

109,322 

24,111 


732 


Dundee 


5 
56 
37 
13 
22 

9 
10 

15 
47 

3 
31 

4 


6,584 
152,508 
136,157 
65,588 
14,602 
16,443 
29,773 

38,033 
197,091 

702 
127,632 

920 






10,761 


Clyde fGlasgow 


6 


1,625 


146,234 


\Greenoek 


121,411 


Hartlepools 






14,814 


Hull 






2 


250 
264 


8 271 


Leith 






7 124 


Liverpool 


3 

3 
14 
7 
6 
3 


6,863 

26,750 

76,965 

2,244 

35, 138 

359 


34,619 
22,369 


Middlesbro', Stockton and 
Whitby 






Newcastle 






126 609 


Southampton 


1 


260 


1 503 


Sunderland 


35,187 


Other districts. . 






956 












Total 


276 


865,472 


80 


355,779 


15 


4,622 


371 


1,225,873 


197 


639,568 





65702—1 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



Table Showing size of Merchant Vessels launched in Great Britain and Ireland 

during 1927 



Tonnage 



100 and under 

500 

000 

000 

000 

000 

000 

000 

000 

OOC 

000 

000 



000 tons and above. 



500 tons. 

1,000 " 

2,000 " 

3,000 " 

4,000 " 

5,000 " 

6,000 " 

8,000 " 

10.000 " 

12,000 " 

15,000 " 

20,000 " 



Total. 



Steam 



54 
27 
37 
35 
19 
49 
32 
13 
6 



276 



Motor 



80 



Sail and 
Barges 



15 



Table Showing the Countries for which the Merchant Vessels launched in Great 
Britain and Ireland during 1927 have been built 



C'ountfies'for which intended 



Great Britain and Ireland 

British Dominions 

Argentine 

Brazil 

Chili 

Ecuador 

France 

Greece 

Holland 

Honduras 

Italy 

Jugo-Slavia 

Norway - . . 

Portugal. 

Spain 

United States 

Venezuela 

Country not stated 

Total.... 



Gross 
tonnage 



958,154 

113,254 

2,840 

15,378 

3,100 

259 

12.991 

4.164 

17,311 

12,750 

180 

23,049 

23,247 

350 

1,220 

18.740 

18.543 

343 

1,225.873 



It was pointed out in last year's report, that in Great Britain's and Ireland's 
building for foreign account, the British Dominions were their best customers 
as to number of ships — 24 to Norway's 8, and the second Ibest as to tonnage 
17,408 gross tons to Nonvay's 41,543 gross tons. In 1927, however, the British 
Dominions as shown by the above table accounted for 45 vessels, 113,254 gross 
tons of British and Irish building on foreign account, all the other foreign 
countries combined accounting for 54 vessels, 154,465 gross tons. 

In 1927 the British Dominions absorbed not far off one-half of Britain's 
entire output on foreign account both as to number of ships and total tonnage. 

The British and Irish tonnage built, on foreign account during 1927, viz.: 
267,719 tons it 21.8 per cent of the total tonnage launched during the year; the 
percentage in 1926 was 14 per cent, about 16 per cent in 1925, and about 15 per 
cent in 1924. 

In 1923 British and Irish building on foreign account was less than 3 per 
cent and during the pre-war years 1909-1913 inclusive the average was a little 
above 22 per cent. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 5 

It will thus be seen that the British and Irish percentage of shipping built 
on foreign account during 1927 very nearly equals the average of the years 
1909-1913, and as already stated nearly half of this goes to the British 
Dominions. 

SIZE AND TYPE OF VESSEI.S 

The returns for 1927 sh.ow that 86 vessels of between 5,000 and 10,000 tons 
each and 7 vessels of 10,000 tons and upwards were launched. The largest are 
the turbine steamers Duchess of Atholl (21,500 tons) and Orford (20,000 tons) ; 
the Laiirentic (18,724 tons) fitted with a combination of turbines and recipro- 
cating engines, and the raotorship Bermuda (16,000 tons). 

Excluding vessels of less than 1,000 tons, 62 vessels of 305,781 tons, for the 
carriage of oil in bulk were launched during 1927. Of these, 45 vessels of about 
258,000 tons, and two other vessels of 7,830 tons, were built on the Isherwood 
system of longitudinal framing. 

The tonnage of steamers fitted for burning oil fuel, launched dm"ing the 
year, amounts to nearly 300,000 tons. 

The tanker tonnage represents nearly 25 per cent of the total tonnage 
launched during 1927. 

The returns include a number of vessels designed for channel, coasting, 
fishing, towing, harbour service, and other special purposes. 

The average tonnage of steamers and motorships launched during the year 
is 3,430 tons. If the vessels of less than 500 t-ons are excluded, the average is 
increased to 4,193 tons, as compared with 4,486 in 1926, 4,439 in 192)5, 3,777 
in 1924, 3,805 in 1923, and 5,186 in 1922. 



VESSELS FITTED WITH TURBINES 

Further progress was recorded in the use of steam turbines during 1927, 
when 13 vessels with a total tonnage of 137,628 tons were launched which will 
be fitted with this method of propulsion. These figures include a vessel of 
18,724 tons, which has a combination of steam turbines and reciprocating 
enginesx It will be seen that the average tonnage of these vessels reaches the 
high figure of 10,587 tons. 

VESSELS FITTED \\TTH INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES 

The tonnage of vessels fitted with internal combustion engines is steadily 
increasing in comparison with the total output. The tonnage of such vessels 
launched during 1919 was 32,936 tons, while during 1925 it amounted to 267,217 
tons, and to 201,913 tons during 192G. During the year 1927, 80 motorsihips 
of 355,779 tons were launched, this tonnage equalling 41 .1 per cent of the steam 
tonnage launched. The largest motorship launched during the year is the 
Bermuda, of about 16,000 tons, and it may be stated that of the 52 vessels of 
6,000 tons and upwards, launched during the year, 29 are to be fitted with oil 
engines. 

OUTPUT OF LEADING SHIPBUILDING CENTRES 

The Clyde district ocfupies first place amongst the shipbuilding centres, 
showing an output of 423,723 tons. Then follow the Tvne (274,056 tons), the 
Wear (162,770 tons), the Tees (130,371 tons), Belfast (107,181 tons), and the 
Mersey (36,636 tons). The largest increase, as compared with 1926, has taken 
place on the Clyde, the figures for which are 156,078 tons higher than the 
previous vear. The increase on the Tvne amounts to 147,447 tons, on the Wear 
to 127,583 tons, and on the Tecs to 93,188 tons. 



6 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

Germany 

During the year under review 105 vessels of 289,622 tons were launched. 
As compared with the output for 1926, the present figures show the large 
increase of 109,074 tons and represent 27^ per cent of the total output abroad 
during 1927, as compared with only 17^ per cent in 1926. 

These figures include 12 vessels of 78,676 tons to be fitted with steam 
turbines, including the largest vessel launched in the world during 1927, viz., 
the Cap Arcona, of 27,561 tons; the totals for turbine vessels comprise eight 
vessels of 35,115 tons which will have a combination of steam turbines and 
reciprocating engines. The total figures comprise, also, 33 vessels of 115,882 
tons to be fitted with oil engines, the largest being the motor tanker C. 0. 
Stillman, of about 16,000 tons. Four tankers, of 35,097 tons — all motorships 
were launched. 

The totals include 14 vessels of between 6,000 and 8,000 tons, 4 of between 
8,000 and 10,000 tons, and 3 vessels of above 10,000 tons each. 

United States 

The output for the year 1927, namely 179,218 tons is 28,605 tons higher 
than during 1926. 

Of the tonnage launched, 17 steamers and motorships of 82,754 tons and 30 
barges of 24,800 tons were built on the Atlantic coast, eight steamers of 54,948 
tons on the Great Lakes, and 11 vessels of 16.716 tons on the Pacific coast. 

The largest vessels launched during 1927 wTre the turbo-electric vessel 
California, of about 22,000 tons, built at Newport News, and the motorship 
Gulfpride, of 12,510 tons, built at Kearny, N.J.; four other vessels of between 
6,000 and 10,000 tons were launched on the Atlantic coast; and one of 10,180 
tons and four between 8,000 and 10,000 tons were launched on the Great Lakes. 

Six turbine steamers of 54,916 tons were launched in this country during 
1927, including two vessels, the above-mentioned California and one other vessel 
of 8,816 tons, both fitted with turbines in conjunction with electric motors. The 
motor tonnage launched amounts to 39,282 tons; of oil tankers of 1,000 tons 
and upwards, five of 37,318 tons w^ere launched. 

The totals also include five vessels of 39,261 tons built on the Isherwood 
system of longitudinal framing. 

Holland 

The total tonnage launched during 1927 — 119,790 tons — is 26,119 tons 
higher than the 1926 figures. As usual, the figures for this country do not 
include vessels exclusively intended for river navigation, the total tonnage of 
which vessels reaches a high figure. 

Seven vessels were launched of over 6,000 tons each. 

The totals for the year include forty-nine vessels of 86,194 tons to be fitted 
with internal combustion engines. Eight motorships arc of 6,000 tons and 
upwards, the largest being the Christiaan Hxnjgen^ of 15,636 tons and the 
Sibajak of 12.040 tons. 

Four motorships of 25,227 tons are intended for the carriage of oil in bulk. 

Italy 

The' total figures for this country — 101,076 tons — are 118,945 tons lower 
than those for 1926, which were the highest ever reached in this country. 
Eighteen vessels of 73,955 tons were launched in the Trieste district, as com- 
Dared with an output of 94,136 tons during the previous year. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 7 

The totals comprise three vessels of 10,000 tons and upwards, the largest 
being the turbine steamers Conte Grande of about 22,800 tons, launched at 
Trieste, and Ausonia of 13,500 tons, launched at Genoa. Thirteen motorships of 
49,698 tons were launched, the largest being the Virgilio of 11,920 tons, built at 
Baia, near Naples. 

Denmark 

The total tonnage launched during 1927- — 72,038 tons — is practically the 

same as last year, and is composed mostly of motorship tonnage (63,690 tons). 

Seven motorships of between 5,000 and 9,150 tons were launched; six of these, 

.with a total tonnage of 44,501 tons, are intended for the carriage of oil in bulk. 

Sweden 

The output for 1927—67,361 tons— is 13,843 tons more than that for 1926, 
and is the highest ever recorded in this country. Over 92;^ per cent of the total 
is composed of motorships, of which eight are of between 5,000 and 7,000 tons 
each. The tankers launched — all motorships — amount to seven, of 42,566 tons. 

France 

The output for the year — 44,335 tons — is 77,027 tons lower than that for 
1926, and is the lowest recorded since 1919. 

The total figures include one steamer of 9,950 tons, five motorships of 
17,076 tons, and six trawlers of over 1,000 tons each. 

Russia 

The shipbuilding activity in this country, which has been developing for 
the last two years, has resulted in the launching, during 1927, of eighteen vessels, 
of 43,917 tons. These figures include ten motorships, of 25,414 tons, one of which 
— an oil tanker — is of about 7,000 tons, and two are of 4,957 tons each. 

Japan 

The output for this country — 42,359 tons — is 10,046 tons less than that in 

1926, and is the lowest recorded since 1910. 

The 1927 totals comprise two motorships, of 5,612 tons each, and two tur- 
bine steamers, of about 4,250 tons each. 

British Dominions 

The' total tonnage launched in all the British Dominions overseas during 

1927, namely, 30,250 tons, is slightly less than in 1926. 

Of the total output, 23,773 tons were launched in Canada, including 10,131 
tons on the Great Lakes. 

The totals include two steamers, of between 6,000 and 7,000 tons each, 
launched at Levis, Quebec. 

SUMMARY 

C'ljuntry Gross tons 

Great Britain and Ireland 1, 225,873 

Germany 289,622 

United States 179, 218 

Holland 1 19, 790 

Italy 101 , 076 

Denmark 72,038 

Sweden 67, 361 

France 44.335 

Russia 43, 917 

Japan 42.3.59 

British Dominions 30, 250 



8 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

General Statistics 

World output of merchant shipping in 1927 amounted to 2,285,679 tons; to 
this Great Britain and Ireland contributed 1,225,873 tons, other countries 
1,059,806 tons. Great Britain and Ireland were responsible for more than half 
the merchant ship tonnage launched during the year — about 54 per cent of it. 

As compared with the 1926 world output, the 1927 one is 610,702 tons 

greater. 

During 1927, 863,694 tons were launched, fitted with internal combustion 
engines. Similar tonnage launched in 1926 amounted to 704,006 tons. 

Tonnage of motor ships building in the world at the beginning of 1928 is 
115,000 tons more than the steam tonnage under construction, showing the con- 
tinued progress of the former mode of propulsion. 

Of the total steam tonnage — 1,375,828 tons — launched in the world during 
1927, 470,000 tons is for steamers fitted for burning oil fuel under the boilers, 
so that the tonnage depending exclusively upon coal for propulsion amounts to 
only 39-6 of the world total for 1927. 

The tankers launched during 1927 amounted to ninety-nine vessels of 
542,437 tons, as against 246,000 tons in 1926. 
CoMP.\RisoN (by countries) of tonnage in hand at close of 1927, with 1927 output 



I 



Country 



Great Britain and Ireland. 

Germany 

Italy 

Holland 

France 

Sweden 

Denmark 

United States 



Tonnage in hand at 

Dec. 31, 1927 
(Lloyds statement) 



gross 
1 



tons 

.579,713 
472.29.5 
183.216 
174,887 
11.5,029 
100.700 
97,710 
97,370 



Tonnage output 

1927 

(Lloyds statement) 



gross tons 

1,22.5,873 

289,622 

101,076 

119,790 

44,335 

67,361 

72.038 

179,218 



The above table shows a marked revival in world shipbuilding at the end 

of 1927. . . ^, . , 

The tonnage in hand of every maritime country given in the table (with 
the exception of the United States) showing an increase over its 1927 output. 
France in particular has between two and three times more tonnage in hand 
at the end of 1927 than was built by her during the year. Germany also shows 
a substantial gain. 

Comparison between British Empire and Foreign Shipping at June 30, 1927 

The subjoined table shows the total of Empire and foreign merchant 
shipping afloat under the classification of Lloyd's register, at the end of June, 
1927:— 





Ships 


Gross 
tonnage 




4,900 
521 


13,742,6.39 




1.314.238 






Total 


5,421 
4,123 


15,056.877 


C)ther countries 


14,471,752 




1,298 


585. 125 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER ,9 

Empire merchant shipping; afloat at the end of June, 1927, exceeded that 
of the rest of the world by 1,298 ships and 585,125 gross tons. These figures 
clearly indicate the present maritime pre-eminence of the British Empire. 

World-Motor Ships under Lloyd's Register in Periods from 1914 to 1927 






Motor 
ships 


ToniKige 


1914 


297 

912 

2,145 

2,552 


2.34 287 


1919 


7.52,606 
2 714 073 


1925 


1927 


4,270,824 





It will ibe seen that in little less than a decade from 1919 to 1927, motor 
ship tonnage under Lloyd's register, has become nearly six times as great. 

Tanker Tonnage under Lloyd's Register in Periods from 1914 to 1927 

Clross tons 

1914 1.478,988 

1919 2,929. 113 

1925 ^ 5, .384, 290 

1927 5,915,677 

Tlic enormous increase in the tonnage of vessels for the carriage of fuel 
oil in bulk during the 1919-1927 period is shown by this table. 

Comparison of World Merchant Fleets in June, 1914, and in June. 1927 

Apart from sailing vessels and wood steamers, the gross tonnage of sea- 
going steel and iron steamers and motor ships in June 1914 was 42,514,000 tons 
(Lloyd's statement), in June 1927, 59,688,000 tons an increase of over 17 
million tons. 

The changes in the types of ^■essels during this period have been remark- 
able. 

Tankers wliich in 1914 totalled 1,479.000 tons, now amount to 5,916,000 
tons. 

Motor ships which in 1914 only totalled 234,000 tons now amount to 
4,271,000 tons (including auxiliaries). 

A great change has taken place in the relative use of coal, and fuel oil for 
boilers. In 1914 the tonnage of steamers fitted for oil fuel was 1,310,000 tons; 
in 1927 the figures approximated 18^ million tons. 

Canadian Government Merchant Marine 

f 'oMP.4Tii.soN OF Operations, 1926 and 1927 



— 


Year 1927 


Year 1926 


Total revenue 


$10,233,964 43 
10,954,699 83 




$10,989,437 42 


Total operating expenses 


11 079 597 33 






Operating 1"S.- for year 


$ 720,735 40 


S 


90,159 91 







It will be seen that both the gross revenue and the operating ex^penses 
were lower in 1927 than in 1926; gross revenue being $755,472.99 or 6.87 per 
cent less than in 1926, and the operating expenses $124,897.50 or 1.12 per cent 
less than in 1926. 



10 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

The operating loss was $720,735.40 in 1927 as compared with operating 
loss of $90,159.91 in 1926. 

The less favourable showing in 1927 was largely attributable to conditions 
under which certain of the services ihad to be operated, there being a shortage 
of cargo tonnage, also additional competition which resulted in reduced freight 
rates. However, prospects for the future are brighter owing to decreased 
competition and the stabilization of freight rates. 

Tonnage handled by Canadian Government Merchant Marine Fleet during 

the Year 

Tons Value 

Export traffic 707,305 S 77,2.32,705 20 

Import traffic 401,025 65,564,848 53 

Tntercoastal traffic 119.385 15,108,814 48 



1,227,715 S 157,906,368 21 

Disposition or Fleet as at December 31, 1927 

Vessels 

United Kingdom and Continent 9 

Australia 7 

New Zealand « 4 

West Ind ics 10 

Vancouver-coastal 4 

Interco<istal 3 

Newfoundland 1 

Chartered 3 

Laid-up— Halifr-.x 5 

46 

Voy.\ges Completed during the Year 

Atlantic 

Voyages 

United Kins;dom and Continent 60 

West Indies — Passenger and Freight (Eastern Group) 14 

West Indies — Freight (Eastern Group) 28 

West Ind ies — Passenger (Western Group) 17 

Newfoundland 10 

A rstralia 16 

New Zealand 12 

Tntercoastal .■. 16 

Charters 5 

178 



P.^cinc 

^"oyages 

United Kintrdom and Continent 10 

Coastal to California 52 



62 
REGULAR SAILINGS DURING THE YEAR 

From the Atlantic 
United Kingdom — 

Fortnightly service to Cardiff and Swansea. 

Ten-day service to London and Antwerp' — January to October. 

Fortnightly service to London and Antwerp — November to December. 

West Indies — 

From Montreal (summer) , Halifax (winter) . 

Three-weekly passenger and freight service to Bermuda, Nassau, Kingston 
and Belize. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 



11 



West Indies — ^Conduded 

From Halifax and Samt John. 

Fortnightly freight service to Bermuda, St. Kitts, Antigua, Montserrat, 

Dominica, St. Lucia, Barbados, St. Vincent, Grenada, Trinidad and 

Demerara. 
From Halifax and Saint John — May to December. 
Monthly passenger service to Bermuda, St. Kitts, Antigua, Montserrat, 

Dominica, St. Lucia, Bai'bados, St. Vincent, Grenada, Trinidad and 

Demerara. 
From Montreal — May to November. 
From Halifax — December. 

Fortnightly freight service to St. Kitts, Antigua, Barbados, Trinidad and 
Demerara. 

Australia — 

Three-weekly service to various Australian ports. 

New Zealand — 

Monthly service to various New Zealand ports. 

Newfoundland — 

Three-weekly service from Montreal in summer to St. John's, Newfound- 
land, via Oharlottetown, P.E.I. 

Intercoastal — 

Monthly service to Vancouver. 

From the Pacific 
Pacific Coast — 

Weekly service to San Pedro and San Francisco. 

Intercoastal — 

Monthly service to St. Lawrence ports, via Jamaica. 

Note. — From Vancouver were despatched early in the year three steamers 
to west coast United Kingdom ports and one steamer to London and Antwerp, 
after which both services were cancelled. 



Operations of Chief Canadian Shipbuilding Plants 

DAVIE shipbuilding AND REPAIRING COMPANY, LIMITED, LAUZON, LEVIS, P.Q. 

New Construction, April 1, 1927, to April 1, 1928 



Name of Vessel 



St. Lawrence 

Tadoussac 

Quebec 

George M. McKee. 
Foundation H.l. . . . 
Foundation H.2. . . , 



Type 



T.R. passenger steamer. 
T.S. passenger steamer. 
T.S. passenger steamer. 

Oil cngined tug 

Sand flump scow 

Sand dump scow 




MIDLAND SHIPBUILDING COMPANY, LIMITED, MIDLAND, ONT. 

New Construction 

Steel supply boat North Shore Supply, 52 feet by 13 feet 6 inches by 5-78 
feet; gross tonnage, 33 12. 

Steel package freighter City of Hamilton, 238 feet by 38 feet by 23 feet; 
gross tonnage, 1,665-43. 



12 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

Steel package freighter City of Montreal, 238 feet bj- 38 feet by 23 feet; 
gross tonnage, 1,665-43. 

Steel package freighter Saskatoon, 258 feet 8 inches by 42 feet 9 inches by 
26 feet 6 inches; gross tonnage, 2,411.94. 

Steel package freighter Weybvrn, 258 feet by 42 feet 9 inches by 26 feet 
6 inches; gross tonnage, 2,407-60. 

Repair Work 

Repair of shell damages, etc., of varying dimensions to the several steamers 
of the Canada Steamship Lines, Limited. 

PORT ARTHLTR SHIPBUILDING COMPANY, LIMITED, PORT ARTHLTl, ONT. 

Repair Work 

Total number of boats entering plant for repairs 156 

Number of hull repair jobs involved 75 

Number of engine repair jobs involved 58 

Number of boiler repair jobs involved 37 

Number of miscellaneous repair jobs involved 38 

208 

Dry Dock Report 

Numb(>r of boats docked — tonnage basis: 29 ^gross tonnage 140.718. 
Number of tugs and barges docked 11 

40 
CANADIAN VICKERS, LIMITED, MONTREAL, P.Q. 

Shipbuilding, 1927-28 



Yard 








No. 


Vessel 


Built For 


Dimensions 


99 


Paddle wheel towboat 


-Abitibi Pulp and Paper Co 


65' X 16' X 5' 6" Built at our yard. 




{ Alligator type). 




Knocked down and erected at 
site, Low Bush, Ont. Completed 
August, 1927. 


100 


Tug 


Canadian Pacific Railway Co 


02' X 24' X 10' 6" Built at our yard, 
knocked down and re-erected 
and launcVied at Kootenay lake, 
B.C., Febv. 192S. 


101 


Salvage vessel 


Foundation Co. of (^anada, Ltd. . . 


134' X 35' X li' 6" Almost completed. 
To be launched Mav, 1928. 


102 


Scow 


Canada Cem( nt Co., Ltd 


rO' X 23' X 4' 3" Built at our yard, 
knocked down, re-erected and 
launched at Antigonish, N.B., 
March. 1928. 


103 


S (u. vd. Dipper Dredge 








for Hudsons Bay 


Dcpt. of Railways and Canals 


!35' X 44' X 12' ^^ell under construc- 
tion; for mid-summer delivery. 


106 


8 cu. vd. Dipper Dredge 








for Hudsons Bay 


Dept. of Railways and Canals 


135' X 44' X 12' Under construction 
for delivery August, 1928. 


104 


T.S. Pulpwood carrier. . 


Donnacona Paper Companv 


!37' X 30' X 10' Construction well 




(oil engines) 




advanced; to be delivered May, 

1928. 


lor) 


T.S. Pulpwood carrier. . 


Donnacona Paper Companv 


137' X 30' X 10' Con.st ruction well 




(oil engines) 




advanced; to be delivered May, 
1928. 



Ship Repair Work. — A total of sixty-six vessels were dry docked, including 
ocean liners, lake vessels, and small craft. Repairs covered from minor jobs 
to extensive bottom damage. In addition, quite a number of vessels were 
repaired afloat, either at our basin or in Montreal harbour. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 13 

HALIFAX SHIPYARDS, LIMITED, HALIFAX, N.S. 

No new shipbuilding was done during the fiscal year 1927-28. Repair work 
to the value of $1,091,680.95 was carried out. 

PRINCE RUPERT DRY DOCK AND SHIPYARD, PRINCE RUPERT, B.C. 

New Construction 

Seventy-five-foot sei"\'ice boat Granbv built for Granby Cons. M. S. and 
P. Co. 

Fifty-eight-foot fishing boat Signal built for J. Iverson. 

Sixty-four-foot fishing boat Bertha G. built for Gammon & Watts. 

Sixty-one-foot fishing boat Zapora built for Lars Voge. 

Fifty-four-foot fishing boat Emblem No. 1 built for P. Bruno. 

Fifty-eight-foot fishing boat Belville built for J. Iverson. 

Fifty-eight-foot fishing boat Covenant built for H. Underdahl. 

One pile-driver scow, 60 feet by 20 feet, built for Pacific Stev. and Contg. 
Co. 

Repairs 

Repairs were made to 26 steamers, 625 fishing boats, and 14 scows. 

ST. JOHN DRY DOCK AND SHIPBUILDING COMPANY, LIMITED, ST. JOHN, N.B. 

From April 1, 1927, to April 1, 1928 

Ships repaired in dry dock 27 

Ships repaired on marine slipway 26 

Ships repaired afloat 104 

Total 157 

BURRARD DRY DOCK COMPANY, LIMITED, NORTH VANCOUVER, B.C. 

Record of Shipbuilding and Ship Repairing, April 1, 1927, to April 1, 1928 

New construction. — Schooner Saint Roch for Royal Canadian Mounted 
Police. 

Reconditioning. — SS. Prince Rupert, extensive hull and engine repairs; ss. 
Catala, extensive hull and engine repairs. 

Repairs, general, were made to 195 steamers and 21 tugs. 

Vessels prepared for grain. — Forty-two vessels were prepared for grain 
carrying. 

YARROWS, LIMITED, VICTORIA, B.C. 

April, 1927. — Nine vessels repaired; gross tonnage, 19,779 tons. 
May, 1927. — Fourteen vessels repaired; gross tonnage, 38,972 tons. 
June, 1927. — Eight vessels repaired; gross tonnage, 12,761 tons. 
July, 1927. — Ten vessels repaired; gross tonnage, 23,053 tons. 
August, 1927. — Seven vessels repaired; gross tonnage, 16,283 tons. 
September, 1927. — Ten vessels repaired; gross tonnage, 17,404 tons. 
October, 1927. — Six vessels repaired; gross tonnage, 21,460 tons. 
November, 1927.— Eight vessels repaired; gross tonnage, 19,347 tons. 
December, 1927. — Seven vessels repaired; gross tonnage, 17,239 tons. 
January, 1928. — Five vessels repaired; gross tonnage, 14,584 tons. 
February, 1928.— Seven vessels repaired; gross tonnage, 5,723 tons. 
March, 1928. — Five vessels repaired; gross tonnage, 13,420 tons. 



14 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



I— I 

K 
m 

<: 
I— ( 

Q 
< 

< 

o 

o 
o 



CO 

I— I 

Eh 
02 



05 



c3 



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c 

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03 
03 
03 

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Eh 






1 

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1,228 

384 

69 

12,186 

1,089 

635 


CO 
CD 




CO 


IB 




1,673 

454 

85 

19,654 

1,530 

654 


00 

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1 


























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c 


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REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 



15 



Statement showing the Number of Vessels and Number of Tons on the Registry 
Books of the Dominion of Canada on December 31, 1927 



Ports 


S 


liling vesse 


Is 


Steam vessels 


No. 


Gross 
tons 


Net 
tons 


No. 


Gross 
tons 


Net 
tons 


New Brunswick — 

Campbellton 








5 

162 

2 


148 
5,2.32 

8 


76 


Chatham 


288 

2 

2 

20 

1 

IQ- 

86 


8,203 

277 

28 

363 

12 

1 , 690 

10,3C6 


7,916 

262 

26 

353 

12 

1,678 

9,977 


3,179 


Dorchester 


6 


Mont'ton 




Richibucto 


23 

1 

43 

89 


424 

16 

839 

13,143 


314 


Sackville 


11 


St. Andrews 

St. John 


599 
8,668 








504 


20,879 


20,224 


325 


19,810 


12,853 


Nova Scotia — 

Amherst 


2 
10 
52 
24 
31 
48 

1 

107 

26 

17 

148 

4 
42 

9 
19 

4 
24 
6i 


97 

2,44.5 

1 , 257 

553 

910 

1,422 

10b 

6,852 

6,278 

1,902 

18,843 

569 

12,446 

1 , 92o 

299 

226 

1,22 

3,976 


80 

2,166 

1,210 

523 

857 

1,401 

97 

6,411 

4,871 

1,686 

14,241 

514 

11,289 

1,763 

299 

226 

1,207 

3,797 


2 
9 

2;; 

41 
11 
30 


5S 
662 
4 4 
848 
226 
1,159 


50 


Annapolis Royal 


417 


Arichat 


'81 


Harrington Passage 


751 


Canso 


206 


Digby 


821 


Guy sboro 






165 



23 
184 

1 
20 
12 

7 

2 
26 
63 

1 

16 
18 
56 


63,38; 

94.^ 

1,188 

5,819 

88 

1,66! 

2,212 

18C 

26 

1 , 39.^ 

4,14i 

18 

1,386 

4,148 

8,186 


38,864 


La Have 

Lunenburg 


619 

730 

4,382 

59 


Parrsboro 


1,149 


Pictou 

Port Hawkesbury 

Shelburne 

Sydney 

Truro 


1,457 

155 

25 

1,067 

2,225 

7 




13 
22 
38 


4,157 

11,90" 

1,179 


3,627 

11,008 

1,10.' 


985 


Windsor 

Yarmouth 


2,. 590 
4,164 








702 


78,563 


68,378 


710 


98,151 


61,104 


Ontario — 

Amherstburg 

Belleville 


4 

2 
1 

1 
7 


602 
72 
146 
81f 
900 


602 
72 
146 
751 
890 


9 
10 


1,040 
232 


569 
138 


Bowmanville 




Broekville 


14 

7 


530 
33o 


339 


Chatham 


224 


CoUingwood 


2 


460 


460 


48 
5 
3 


15,. 551 
26C 

3: 


10,451 


Cornwall 


133 


Deseronto 


1 
1 
4 
3 

7 


40.3 
8^ 
413 
67.^ 
807 
572 


370 
57 
413 
675 
780 
572 


22 


Dunnville 




Fort William 


2?. 
28 
19 
93 
1 
106 
12 
64 


69,84.^ 

1 , 657 

7,9.5c 

3,846 

If 

10,008 

39; 

89,7ir 


46,691 


Godcrich 


1,079 


Ham ilton 


4,874 


Kenora 


2,438 


Kincardine 


13 


Lindsay 


48 


8,90: 


8,011 


5,807 
271 


Midland 


12 

1 

1 

108 

6 

22 

66 


9,.5.5r 

12 

2G 

16,704 

2,70?- 

1,744 

2,066 

23,936 


8,531 

121 

26 

15,707 

2,436 

1,744 

1,886 

23,568 


57,665 


Napanee 




Oakville 








Ottawa 


213 
33 
48 

8 
79 

8 
10 


36,99r 

4,364 

1 , 02;-i 

2,596 

23,798 

28.^ 

306 


18,694 


Owen Sound 


2,728 


Peterborough 


700 




1,769 


Port Arthur 


14,161 


Port Burwoll 


146 


Port Dover 








181 




1 


213 


190 




Prot Stanley 


23 
13 
47 


934 
2,68! 
1,997 


558 


Prescott 


8 
20 


i,,323 
5,660 


1,195 
4,983 


1,809 


St. Catharines 


1,284 



16 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



Statement showing the Number of Vessels and Number of Tons on the Registry 
Books of the Dominion of Canada on December 31, 1927 — Concluded 



Ports 


Sailing vessels 


Steam vessels 


No. 


Gross 
tons 


Net 
tons 


No. 


Gross 
tons 


Net 
tons 


Ontario — Concluded. 

Sarnia ^ 


8 

41 

2 


1,988 

8,111 

36 


1,780 

7,910 

36 


35 
41 

1 

8 

222 

7 


29,767 

10,921 

20 

282 

143,207 

224 


18,551 


Sault Ste. Marie 


6,418 
8 


Simcoe 


I'^outhampton 


191 


Toronto 


65 
3 


17,374 
795 


15,448 
760 


91 413 


Wallaceburg 


78 


Whitbv 




Windsor 


14 


3,362 


3,166 


17 


9,243 


3,299 








469 


110,583 


103,28.^ 


1,255 


470,436 


294,702 


Quebec — 

Gaspe 


9 
8 

281 
8 

306 
26 


338 
409 

91,912 
140 

29,501 
9,718 


308 

400 

88,603 

130 

28,882 
8,568 


6 

3 

453 

29 

195 

44 


974 

989 

502,942 

526 

31,583 

10,770 


500 


Magdalen Islands 


556 


Montreal 


304,661 


Paspebiac 


415 


Quebec 


18,124 


Sorel 


4,954 








638 


132,018 


126,891 


730 


547.757 


329,201 


BriUsh Columbia — 
Nanaimo . 


6 

148 

13 

615 

138 


545 

23,705 

1,503 

117,186 

30,476 


545 

23,676 

1,503 

115,681 

29,443 


4 

296 

158 

1,188 

306 


563 

11,190 

23,772 

165,475 

72,002 


201 


New Westminster 


6,227 


Prince Rupert 


13,349 


Vancouver 


97,212 


Victoria 


40,147 








920 


173,415 


170,848 


1,952 


273,002 


157,136 


Prince Edward Island — 

Charlottetown 


91 


5,471 


5,092 


42 


7,322 


3,489 






Saskatchewan — 

Prince Albert 


1 


145 


145 


5 


588 


341 






Manitoba — 

Winnipeg 


26 


5,549 


5,549 


70 


8,041 


5,112 






Yukon Territory — 

Dawson 


7 


1,621 


1,621 


7 


2,917 


2 029 







REC.\PrrULAT10N 



Province 


Sailing vessc 


Is 


Steam vessels 


No. 


Gross 
tons 


Net 
tons 


No. 


Gross 
tons 


Net 
tons 


New Brunswick 


504 

702 

638 

469 

91 

920 

26 

? 

1 


20,87f 

78,563 

132,018 

110,583 

5,471 

173,415 

5,549 

1.621 

145 


20,224 

68,378 

126,891 

103,285 

5,092 

170,848 

5,. 549 

1,621 

145 


325 

710 

730 

1,255 

42 

1,952 

70 

7 

5 


19,810 

98,151 

547,757 

470,436 

7,322 

273,002 

8,041 

2,917 

588 


12,853 


Nova Scotia 


61,104 


Quebec 


329,201 


Ontario 


294,702 


P. E. Island 


3.489 


British Columbia 


157,136 


Manitol)a 


5.112 


Yukon TiTritory 


2.029 


Saskatchewan 


341 








3,358 


528,244 


502,033 


5,096 


1,428,024 


865,967 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER TT^ 

Statt^ment showing Number of Vessels Removed from the Registry Books of tiie 
Dominion of Canada during the Year ended December 31, 1927 

Sold to foreigners 27 

Wrecked 20 

Stranded 9 

Lost '. 3 

Broken up 72 

Foundered 7 

Burnt 27 

Transferred to St. John's, Newfoundland 19 

Transferred to Great Britain 3 

Transferred to Nassau B.W.I 1 

Supposed to be out of existence 10 

Seized by U.S.A 4 

Collision 2 

Abandoned at sea 4 

Missing 5 

Total 213 

It is estimated that 42,410 men and boys, etc., inclusive of masters, were 
employed on the ships registered in Canada during the year 1927. 



65702—2 



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Comf)arative Curves Showing the Number of Vessels on the Registry Books of the Dominion 
of Canada, on December 51, in each Year from \ijH to IJE^, both inclusive. 



r~-t~~I^r~-l-~r^»^trOto^oww■«o^o«3Wa^o^ON(>c^vc^^c^-c^-o^a^oooooooooo■-^ — — _^^.-_.-c^^^J^^4wpJ^JN 

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Comparative Curves Showing the Number of Vessels on the Registry Books of the Dominion 
of Canada, on December ^1, m each Year from 1674 to 1927? ^°^^ inclusive. 



tO'WiO «•© iototo«VJioiflwjxOTOV)-m-raM-wionov)"eOTW-<oo~-<x~a~-cr^(TNcr-o^c^o^o^<T--o^o^cr^o^a^a^cr^c^ 
















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qTCqA^ S<yr\^ 



Com|>arative Curves Showing hhe Number of Net Tons on the Registry Books of the Dominion- 
of Canada, on December 31, in «ach Year from I674 to I927, both inclusive. 





























































































































600,000 






















































































































580,000 






















































































































560,000 






















































































































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460,000 
440, 000 
420,000 
400,000 
380,000 
360,000 
340,000 
320,000 
300,000 
280,000 
260,000 
240,000 
220,000 
200,000 
180,000 






























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60,000 
40,000 

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-- 





Combapativ« Curves Showing the Number of Net Tons on the Registry Boo^s of the Dominion 
of Canada, on December 31, in each Year from IS/A to \9Zy , bpth inclusive. 





P^^-!^~.^^t^^--Wl»TOK>«5T0W<0t0VDcr~0--0^0^q^0^0Nq>Cy^2-^OOOOOOOOOO — -■;- — ^^'^^ — ^CMCMCvjC^J 

to t0%0*0 *D 8D*0 «DlO*0<0 lOtOtOWlO W «3tO60lOV0*0lO«D W O^O^Cr>ONO\O^C>O^CjNONONOSC7SO~.(JNC3NONONO~>ONO^OsO^OsONOsOsaNONONO^ 




























































































































600,000 
























































































































580,000 
























































































































360,000 
























































































































540,000 
























































































































520,000 
























































































































500,000 
























































































































460,000 






















































































































/ 


460,000 


































































































1 


















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440 , 000 
420,000 
400, 000 
380,000 
360,000 
340,000 
520,000 
300,000 
250,000 
260,000 
240,000 
220,000 
200, 000 
































































































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20 MARINE AND FISHERIES 



REPORT OF L. E. COTE, B.A.Sc, M.E.I.C., CHIEF ENGINEER 

The duties of the general staff of the branch consist in the construction, 
repair and improvement of lighthouses, fog alarms, 'beacons, and other aids to 
navigation, the supply of new or improved illuminating apparatus, repairs to 
wharves, removal of obstructions in navigable waters, ice breaking, the publi- 
cation of lists of lights and notices to mariners, reporting on water lots, harbour 
improvements, dealing with lighthouse sites, and experimentation in light and 
sound signals. 

Details of the work done in this connection during the past year are as 
follows: — 

New Aids to Navigation 

In Nova Scotia 

Lockeport. — Range lights placed on local buildings to lead to the wharf. 

St. Mary River. — A new light to lead into the entrance to the river when 
in line with the Budget light. 

In New Brunswick 

Lighted beacons at Courtenay bay and Ships Stern 
Day beacons at Dingees creek. 

In Prince Edward Island 

Cap Rouge. — New light leading past shoals when in line with the former 
light now used as front one. 

Port Hood island. — Small light on mast. 

In the Province of Quebec 

Range lights have been installed at the following stations: Anse a la Barbe, 
Chandler, Ellis bay, Grande greve, Hamilton cove, Manikuagan harbour, 
Mingan harbour, two ranges; St. Michel and St. Joachim. 

Small lights on masts have been placed at Crane island, Port aux Saumons, 
Sault au Cochon, Sheldrake, and St. Francois Dauphin. 

A large station including fog alarm and lighthouse with dwelling attached 
has been built at Goose cape. 

In Ontario . 

Angus island. — ^Large station with lighthouse, fog alarm, and suitable 
dwelling for keeper and engineer. 

Port Colborne. — Concrete tower with fourth order apparatus. 

De Wattville. — Range lights with powerful back light showing from a steel 
tower erected on Hillcrest cliff to take the place of the Cole Shoal range when 
used in connection with Union Park. 

Union Park. — New range. 

Smaller range lights at Icelandic river and Refuge harbour. 

Small lights on poles at Drummond island (two), Jeannette narrows. Pine 
Tree point, Robertson point, Stubling point, and Walpole island. 

Three lighted beacons to mark the North Channel below Prescott. 

In British Columbia 

Amphitritc point. — Station equipped with diaphone. 

Lighted beacons at Cape Scott, Deep bay, Sugar Loaf point, Bonilla island, 
and Serpent point. 

Day beacons at Port Neville and Ucluelet. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 21 

Changes and Improvements 

Among changes and improvements to existing stations the following which 
are the most important may be mentioned: — 

In Nova Scotia 

Betty island. — Intensity of light considerably increased and flashing 
characteristic adopted. 

New dwellings with lighthouses, attached at Country island, Green island, 
Guion island, Medway bay, Three Top island, and Wedge island. 

In Neiv Brunswick 

Cape Spencer. — New fog alarm to replace that destroyed by fire. 

In Prince Edward Island 

Panmure island — Intensity of light considerably increased and light made 
flashing. 

Entry island. — Dwelling with lighthouse attached. 

Shippigan gully front light and South Tracadie light have been moved to 
new locations. 

In Quebec 

New apparatus more powerful and of improved characteristics have been 
installed at Cap au Corbeau and Sandy beach. 

The lights at Bonaventure and Cape Brule have been moved to new 
locations. 

A new dw^elling has been built at Fame Point and the towers at Marcelle 
point and Pointe Traverse have been rebuilt. 

Important repairs have been carried out at the following stations: Cape Dog, 
Pointe des Monts, West Point Anticosti, Contrecceur, Vercheres, La Perade and 
Langlois Point. 

In Ontario 

Apparatus have been improved at the following stations: Aylmer island, 
Battle island, Cecebe island. Fort Maiden, Killarney, Lyal island. Nigger island, 
Owen Sound, Point Clarke, Port Weller, Presquile, Slate island and Toronto 
East gap. 

Cape Crooker fog alarai — the steam plant has been replaced by an oil 
plant. 

Important repairs have been carried out at the following stations: Lime- 
kiln crossing, Pelee island. Port Stanley, and South East bend. 

In British Columbia 

Brockton point — automatic bell replaced by diaphone. 
Beacons at Shoal point and Tozier rock have been improved. 
The wharf at Prince Rupert has been repaired. 

DOMINION LIGHTHOUSE DEPOT, PRESCOTT, ONT. 

Lighthouse apparatus, fog alarm accessories and other materials required 
for the various agencies of the department and for Dominion lightstations have 
been manufactured. Necessary repairs have been made to the hulls, engines, 
etc., of Prescott division steamers and to the depot plant. 

The work of the manufacturing departments, which included repairs to 
dominion steamers, represented this year an amount of $84,037.56 divided as 
follows: — 

Material $ 37,064 82 

Labour. 33,681 04 

Overhead 13,291 70 



22 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

The latter item included expenses in connection with the engineering staff, 
a proper portion of the cost of general administration and other incidentals to 
manufacturing. 

The principal works of the manufacturing departments have been as 
follows — The making of buoy superstructures, buoy lanterns, buoy whistles, 
steel towers, large and small headlights complete with hoisting gears, reflectors, 
mercury float revolving apparatus, vapor burners and accessories, diaphones, 
pistons and other fog alarm parts, also repair and spare parts for the different 
agencies. 

Articles have been manufactured for the Z^Ieteorological Service to the 
amount of $267. 

Stores. — The cost of the administration of stores has been $6,420 and new 
stock to the amount of $127,648 has been added. The total amount of stores 
distributed to the maintenance and construction branches as well as to the 
various agencies has been $111,488.18. 

Experimental W ork.—'D\iYmg the year the regular testing of oil samples, 
received from various firms and from our own agencies, has been carried out. 
Also mantles, burners, fog alarm parts have been tested. 

Various improvements in lighthouse electric lamps have been experimented 
with. A new weight clock has been designed to take the place of the spring 
clock when used in connection with small mercury float revolving apparatus 
and also as a standby wdth this latter type of apparatus when electrically 
driven. 

DOMINION STEAMERS 

C.G.S. Cono-etia. — The C.G.S. Concretia, after being fitted out at Prescott, 
went into commission on April 12, 1927. Her work consisted in charging and 
placing the buoys between Prescott and the head of lake Ontario, inspecting 
buoys and beacons at regular intervals and delivering supplies to the various 
lightstations. 

The Concretia assisted with the erection of new lights at De Wattville 
island, Union park, Bayfield island. Nigger island and Port Weller. At the 
close of the season the Concretia lifted the buoys and placed markers. She 
was laid up at Prescott on December 15, 1927. 

C.G.S. Scout, after being fitted out at Prescott, went into commission on 
April 12, 1927 to maintain the lights between Prescott and Coteau. Her work 
was of the same nature as that of the Concretia. 

The Scout assisted with the erecting of new lights at the North channel, 
Robertson point and Pine Tree point. At the close of the season the Scout 
lifted the buoys and placed markers. She was laid up at Prescott on 
December 17, 

Publications 

Ninety-nine notices to mariners comprising 277 subjects have been 
published during the year. 

Among the subjects covered have been tables of currents, sailing directions, 
and other hydrographic informations prepared by the Chief Hydrographer's 
Branch, data regarding the ice patrol in the gulf of St. Lawrence, and 
descriptions of dredging done by the Department of Public Works. 

The annual edition of the Lists of Lights and Fog Alarms has been 
published. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 
Ice-Breaking 



23 



The contract with the Dominion Salvage and Towing Company, Limited, to 
keep the harbours at the head of lake Superior open for navigation until 
December 17 in each year and to open them in the spring as soon as the canal 
at Sault St. Marie is open for navigation is still in force. 

Removal of Obstel'Ctions 

As usual the branch has attended to the removal of obstructions in 
navigable waters. In four cases the obstacle was removed by the owners of the 
wreck; in the other cases (five) the work was done under contract. 



Maintenance and Repairs to Wharves 



Whraves were repaired at the following places: 



N^ova Scotia — 
Bel'liveau cove 
East Ferry 
Joggins Mines 
Twirton 
Wolfville 



Quebec- 



Jean 



Anse a St. 
Cap Chat 
Fox river 
Grindstone island 
Magog 
Matane 
Mechins 
Montmagny 
New Carlisle 
Riv^iere du Loup 
St. Irenee 
Grand river 



New Brunswick — 
Lameck 



British Columbia- 
Alice arm 
Nanaimo 
Port Alberni 
Royston. 



Prince Edward Island- 
China, point 
Georgetown 
Hickey wharf 
McPherson cove 
North Cardigan 
Pownal 
Victoria 



COMMISSIONER OF LIGHTS' BRANCH 
Report of J. G. Macphail, B.A., B.Sc, M.E.I.C., Commissioner of Lights 

The Principal work performed during the fiscal year ending March 31, 
1928, has been an extension O'f the buoy and beacon services, together with the 
maintenance of lights and other aids to navigation throughout the Dominion, 
and the maintenance and inspection of public wharves. These operations are set 
forth in tabular form in statement attached. 



24 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



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REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 25 

RIVER ST. LAWRENCE SHIP CHANNEL 
Report of F. W. Forneret, B.A., Sc, M.E.I.C., Chief Engineer 

PHYSICAL FEATURES 

It is probable that there is no river in the world better adapted for 
improvement than the St. Lawrence. The Great Lakes act as storage reservoirs 
and settling basins. Except for floods during ice accumulations, the fluctua- 
tions in level are gradual and not excessive. 

The position of the St. Lawrence is the reverse of most rivers. The usual 
condition of a river comes from the source — steep slopes erode the banks and 
transport coarse material, which, as the slope becomes more gradual, decreases 
until at the moutli of the river it carries in suspension a fine sediment which 
deposits, to the great detriment of navigation. 

In the St. Lawrence the material from most of the sources of supplj is all 
deposited in the settling basins. From the lakes to the ocean the bottom of 
the river is usually hard, so that we have not only clear water, but a permanent 
bed. 

The nature of the material composing the bottom of the river, though in 
many places difficult to dredge, is for the same reason of such a character that 
a dredged cut once made is substantially permanent. 

In the Ship Channel the material to be excavated varies from soft blue 
clay to hard pan, as hard as a macadamized road, to shale rock and large 
boulders. In one or two localities we find coarse sand, to which points dredging 
has to some extent to be repeated. 

The currents of the St. Lawrence are, for a river of such a size, not only 
reasonable and regular, but altogether free from the usual dangers to navigation 
resulting from freshets. 

The winter season, with its ice and snow, is the one drawback to the St. 
Lawrence. This route, however, with its seven months' season of navigation, 
is one of the greatest factors in the success of the Canadian transportation 
system. The successful work accomplished by the ice-breaking steamers during 
the last few years proves that the season of navigation can be lengthened 
materially. 

HISTORY of THE RIVER ST. LAWRENCE SHIP CHANNEL 

The St. Lawrence, owing to its situation, is the natural route from the 
Atlantic to the northern and northwestern half of the North American con- 
tinent. The possibility of converting Montreal into a deep water seaport was 
first suggested in the year 1825, when the Lachine canal was completed and 
connected Montreal with the Great Lakes, establishing the route commercially. 

Light-draught sailing vessels could then reach Montreal without trouble 
except during a few weeks in the autumn, when they resorted to lightering. 
Surveys were made with the object of increasing the depth of water in the 
waterway. After these were completed, the question of which channel to adopt 
through lake St. Peter was hotly discussed, some favouring the " natural " or 
old Ship Channel and others the " straight channel " through St. Francis bank. 
Finally it was decided to proceed with the work of deepening the " straight 
channel ", the aim being to obtain a channel 150 feet in width and to a depth 
of 14 feet at the lowest water, instead of 10 feet 6 inches at lowest water, as 
existed in the old Ship Channel which covered the available depth for naviga- 
tion between Quebec and Montreal. The " Board of Works " of Canada was 
entrusted witli the task and began operations in the spring of 1844 and con- 



26 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

tinued till the month of June, 1846, when the work was suspended; the manage- 
ment was changed, and the execution of the work was transferred from the 
Board of Works to the control of the Commissioners of Public Works. 

The dredging was again resumed in the month of September of the same 
year. Owing to continued opposition, the work of cutting the "straight channel" 
was finally suspended on the 16tli of September, 1847, and subsequently aban- 
doned. It is now considered that the " straight channel " as commenced would 
have been preferable. Nothing was done on lake St. Peter by the Commis- 
sioners of Public Works for three years. The Harbour Commissioners of Mont- 
real then came forward and offered to complete the project expeditiously and 
economically. The proposal was accepted find^an Act was passed in August, 
1850, transferring the work of improving tlie Ship Channel from the Commis- ^ 
sioners of Public Works to the Harbour Commissioners of Montreal, who were 
empowered to charge a tonnage duty sufficiently to pay 8 per cent intere.~t upon 
the outlay, with a 2 per cent contribution to the sinking fundi 

This plan was adopted in August, 1850, and the commissioners were author- 
ized to proceed in such a manner as they should deem best, the government 
plant being transferred to them. 

The Harbour Commissioners, after examination and the best advice obtain- 
able, adopted the location of the deepest natural channel in lake St. Peter. 
This results in the present channel with five tangents instead of two straight 
courses as at first commenced. 

The original depth through lake St. Peter was 10 feet 6 inches at ordinary' 
low water, the plan adopted by the Montreal Harbour Commissioners. (The 
present extreme low water datum adopted for the 35- foot channel is the actual ,^ 
obser\^ed lowest water during the season of 1897 which corresponds to a depth 
of nine feet 4 inches on lake St. Peter flats^ This level of 1897 was the lowest 
ever observed, except the extraordinary low water of 1895, which at lake St. 
Peter went 6 inches lower7 

^The channel through lake St. Peter is practically completed to 35 feet at 
E.L.W. of 1897, there remaining only a short distance at He au Raisin yet to 
be deepened from 30 to 35 feet E.L.W^ 

t^rom 1850 the channel was deepened from stage to stage until in 1888, 
when the debt amounted to somewhat over three million dollars, the Govern- 
ment decided to complete the channel as a national work, and to assume the 
debt, and from that day the Ship Channel has been open, free to the commerce 
of the world?) 

The Harbour Commissioners carried on operations for the Department of 
Public Works till the end of the season of 1888, when the official connection of 
the commissioners with the Ship Channel ceased, after having continued for 
oven thirty-eight years. 

[in Januan.', 1889, the control and management of the work was assumed by 
the Department of Pu])lic Works^ During the winter, extensive repairs were 
made to the dredging plant, which, on the opening of navigation was set to 
work at Cap a la Roche, Pouiller Payer and Cap Charles in deepening the 
channel to 27| feet at low water, spring tides. 

From this date to 1898, the Department of Public Works continued opera- 
tions and completed the difficult rock work at Cap a la Roche and Cap Charles 
to 27-| feet at low water. In addition, many portions of the channel were 
cleaned up, straightened and several curves and narrow places widened. 

THIRTY-FOOT CHANNEL 

The unusually low water of 1895 and 1897 and the increased size of vessels 
urgently called for a wider and deeper channel, and larger and more powerful 
dredges and plant were refjuired. In 1899 the dredging plant was in a condition 
to warrant a more extensive plan of operation. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 27 

The low water of 1897, the lowest on record, except the short period of 
unusually low water of 1895, was adopted as the new datum for the 30-foot 
channel. It is nearly H to 2 feet lower than the ordinary low water plane of 
the 272-foot channel. The object, therefore, was to realize in the shortest time, 
a channel 450 feet wide on the tangents, and from 500 to 750 feet on the curves. 
An anchorage 800 feet in width was to be provided at Wliite Buoy Curve in 
lake St. Peter. The work also included much straightening of the channel. 

The Ship Channel continued under the control of the Department of Public) 
Works until 1904, when an Order in Council was passed on March 11, trans- 
ferring the management and control of the river St. Lawrence Ship Channel, 
together with the dredging and shipbuilding plant to the Department of Marine 
and Fisheries so as to place the supervision of the improvements to navigation 
on the St. Lawrence route under the department directly responsible for the 
pilotage and aids to navigation. Under this department the work was vigour- 
ously continued so that the season of 1907 saw the completion of the channel, 
Montreal to Bastican, to 30 feet depth at E.L.W. of 1897, a distance of 101 
miles. The dredging operations were carried on with renewed energy. The Cap 
a la Roche channel is now widened from 300 to 450 and 550 feet, and the Cap 
Charles channel widened from 300 to 450 feet in the straight part and to 600 
feet width at the curve. 

At the end of the season 1927, the Cap a la Roche channel was completed 
to 30 feet depth at extreme low water, but there is a considerable amount of 
cleaning up before this depth is obtained for navigation. This depth at Cap a 
la Roche is 4^ feet greater than in the 27|-foot channel, as the low water plane 
adopted for the 30-foot project is here 2 feet lower than that used for the 
27i-foot deepening. The widening is nearly completed and will probably be 
finished next season. 

The only place that requires dredging to obtain 30 feet between Cap a la 
Roche and Quebec, is at St. Augustin bar, 14 miles above the latter place. 
Advantage must still be taken of the tide, by deep draught vessels, to pass this 
place, the range of tide being 16^ feet at springs and 11 feet at neaps, the avail- 
able depth at present being 22 feet at extreme low tide. It is proposed to com- 
mence this work as soon as we have a dredge available to do it. 

THIRTY-FIVE FOOT CH.\NNEL 

In 1910 the question of further deepening was considered because the rapid 
increase in the size of vessels was likely to find the 30-foot channel too shallow. 
The Government therefore, resolved to proceed immediately with the deepening 
of the Ship Channel to 35 feet at extreme low water of 1897 (this being the 
datum to which the 35-foot deepening was to be done), and in 1910 the work 
was started in lake St. Peter. The work of deepening the 35-foot channel has 
been carried on at different points ever since. During season of 1917, owing 
to existing conditions, and for sake of economy, the dredging operations were 
considerably cut down. This state continued until season of 1925, when the 
department decided to carry on the dredging operations on the river St. Law- 
rence on a more extensive scale in order to expedite the work of deepening the 
channel. More dredges were put into commission and the whole dredging fleet 
was again operated day and night. 

At the end of season 1927, the 35-foot channel was completed from Sorel 
to the upper end of Longue Point curve, a distance of 38 miles. 

It is also nearly completed to 35 feet between Sorel and Three Rivers. It 
is hoped that this section will be completed next season. 

This season has seen considerable progress in deepening the Ship Channel 
to 35 feet E.L.W. below Three Rivers, where, despite the hard material encount- 
ered, satisfactory progress has been made at Becancour lower traverse, and at 
Champlain and Cap Charles channels. 



28 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

THE SHIP CHANNEL BELOW QUEBEC 

In the spring of 1901 the shipping interests of Montreal brought to the 
attention of the Honourable the Minister of Public Works, the fact that deep 
draught vessels had to wait for the tide to pass St. Thomas and Crane island 
shoals (Beaujeu bank), which caused these vessels to lose a great deal of valu- 
able time. The officers of the Marine and Fisheries Department at Quebec, 
who had an intimate knowledge of this part of the river, strongly recommended 
improving the North channel by way of cap Tourmtntine and Goose cape, as 
being much better, more easily navigated and having less ice in winter than in 
the South channel. Orders were given to the Ship Channel staff to make a 
survey and examination of the North channel with a view to reporting on the 
practicability and cost of improving that route and adopting it for navigation. 

In 1902 a similar survey was made of the South channel to ascertain what 
improvements would be required to make a 30-foot channel on the line of the 
existing route. 

A comprehensive report was made in 1903 by Mr. F. W. Cowie, who was 
then superintending engineer, but the report did not recommend the adoption of 
either route but advised that the choice should meet with the approval of the 
underwriters, the shipping interests and the pilots. 

The Transportation Commission visited the locality, going over each 
channel and took evidence on the subject. It was finally decided to improve the 
South channel by dredging it to 30 feet at extreme low tide and to a width of 
1,000 feet. 

SOUTH CHANNEL (30 FEET AT E.L.W.) 

The Government having decided to first improve the South channel, pre- 
parations were made to start the work. The project had in view a channel 30 
feet in depth at extreme low tide at Beaujeu bank and St. Thomas flats, with a 
width of 1,000 feet. 

The changes and improvements to the dredge Galveston (sea-going suction) 
(No. 9), which had been purchased for work below Quebec were completed and 
the Galveston left Sorel for Beaujeu bank, off Crane island, on August 11, 1906. 
The material consisted of coarse sand and gravel with some layers of soft blue 
clay. 

The new hopper hydraulic dredge Beaujeu (No. 8) was launched at the 
Government Shipyard at Sorel on December 2, 1906, and completed on November 
1, 1907. 

With these two powerful dredges, good progress was made with the work. 
The Beaujeu Bank channel was completed in 1909 to 30 feet at extreme low 
tide and the widening finished in 1910. The channel was then opened to naviga- 
tion. 

The St. Thomas channel was completed to a depth of 30 feet at extreme 
low tide and to a width of 1,000 feet during the season of 1912. The channel 
was then marked out with gas buoys and opened to navigation. This was con- 
sidered a great improvement, as deep-draught vessels were not obliged to anchor 
to wait for the tide to pass '' Beaujeu " bank or St. Thomas flats, much valuable 
time being thus saved. 

NORTH CHANNEL (35 FEET AT E.L.W.) 

The South channel being now completed, the powerful hydraulic dredge 
Beaujeu (No. 8) was enabled to be placed to work on the North channel where 
dredge Galveston (No. 9) had already been operating for a season, as the 
Government had decided to dredge the North channel between St. Jean (Island 
of Orleans) and Goose cape to a depth of 35 feet at extreme low tide and to a 
width of 1,000 feet. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 29 

Good progress was made, but the Government, in order to hasten the work 
as much as possible, gave a contract on October 27, to the Canadian Vickers 
Limited, Montreal, to build one of the largest sea-going elevator dredges in the 
world. Owing to the Great War the completion of the dredge was delayed very 
much. It was launched on November 18, 1916, and finally completed in 1922 
and placed to work on the North channel, deepening to 35 feet at E.L.T. Good 
progress was made. 

During the season of 1919 the dredging operations were cut down owing to 
financial conditions. Dredge Beaujeu (No. 8) was the only dredge working 
below Quebec, and was operated only during the daytime. Dredge Galveston — 
No. 9 — having been sold. No. 8 continued to work there during daytime only, 
seasons 1920 and 1921. 

As the elevator type of dredge was better suited for cleaning up to grade 
and also for economical reasons the new dredge built at Canadian Vickers 
(No. 16) was the only one operated below Quebec during season of 1922, No. 
8 being laid up at Sorel. 

No. 16 was operated only during the daytime until the season of 1925, 
when the department decided to operate all the dredges, day and night. There- 
fore in the spring of 1925, dredge No. 16 was organized to work twenty-four 
hours, the same as those above Quebec and has done so ever since. The depart- 
ment having decided to convert dredge Beaujeu (No. 8) into an elevator type 
in order to expedite the work, plans were drawn and work carried on to do so 
at the Sorel Shipyard. No. 8 is now completed and will be ready to commence 
operations below Quebec next spring. 

The total number of cubic yards removed in the North channel up to the 
end of season 1927 amounted to 16,889,053 and cubic yards yet to be removed 
6,602,876. 

The River St. Lawrence Ship Channel commences at Lock No. 1 (Lachine 
canal) and extends to Father Point, a distance of 340 statute miles. 

The Ship channel proper is divided into five sections as follows: — 

Statute miles 

Division I — Montreal to Sorel 45 

Division II — -Sorel to Batiscan (not including lake St. Peter) 36 

Division III— Lake St. Peter 20 

Division IV — Batiscan to Quebec 59 

Div ision V — Quebec to Goose cape 70 

230 



The comple'^cd channel between Montreal to Quebec has a minimum width 
of 450 feet on tangents and 500 to 800 feet on curves. 

, Below Quebec the completed channel has a minimum width of 1,000 feet. 

Dredging Opeeations, Season 1927 

The department decided that in order to expedite the work the dredges were 
to be operated day and night. 

The dredging fleet consisted of nine dredges and attending plant, one rock 
breaker, one stone lifter, one sweeping steamer, and one sweeping scow. 

Notwithstanding many breakages and consequent delays for repairs, good 
progress was made. Though most of the fleet was operated below Three Rivers, 
considerable work was also done at Longue Pointe and Poulier a Gagnon 
(Longue Pointo course). The material, generally, was very hard, causing great 
wear and tear on the plant; yet the progress was good. 

Cap a la Roche. — One powerful elevator dredge worked most of tlu' season 
at Cap a la Roche and completed this channel to 30 feet E.L.W., save for some 
cleaning up and widening, on which also progress was made this season. An 
additional depth of 1-5 foot was given for Cap a la Roche channel at the latter 



30 MARIXE AXD FISHERIES 

part of the season. Further additional depth will be given as the cleaning up 
progresses. The rock breaker was also employed during the season on Cap a la 
Roche curve and one stone lifter also was used as required, cleaning up stones 
and boulders. The total number of cubic yards dredged during the season 
of 1927 amounted to 38,320 at a cost of $86,761.78, or $2.26*yioo cents per cubic 
yard. 

Cap Charles Channel. — One powerful elevator dredge was employed in 
deepening Cap Charles channel to 35 feet E.L.W. for a period of three months. 
Considering the nature of material, solid unbroken shale, the progress was good. 

The total number of cubic yards dredged amounted to 33,875, at a cost of 
$81,092.98, or $2.39=5%oo cents per cubic yard. 

Chamylain Channel. — The work of deepening Champlain channel to 35 
feet E.L.W. commenced last season and was carried on this year. One powerful 
elevator dredge worked here for a large part of the season, making excellent 
progress. In addition to deepening the old channel, the dredge widened the 
channel 300 feet at the lower end, north side, in the vicinity of red gas buoy 
2-C, just above Pointe Citrouille. The material dredged was sand, clay, and 
boulders. This will be a great improvement at this point of the channel. 

The total number of cubic vards dredged amounted to 304,990 at a cost 
of $91,386.07, or 0-29»%oo cents'per cubic yard. 

Becancour Lower Traverse. — Two powerful elevator dredges worked here 
for the greater part of the season, deepening this channel to 35 feet E.L.W. 
The material consisted of embedded boulders, stones, hard pan and some soft 
shale, but despite breakdowns bj- this hard material, good progress was made. 

The total number of cubic vards dredged amounted to 636,550 at a cost of 
$241,894.55, or 0-38<>%oo cents per cubic yard. 

Three Rivers. — A powerful elevator dredge worked at Three Rivers, for a 
few days opposite black gas buoy 59-C, deepening the channel to 35 feet E.L.W. 
The material consisted of clay, stones, and boulders. 

The total number of cubic yards amounted to 4,900 at a cost of $11,029.35, 
or $2.250%oo cents per cubic yard. 

Port St. Francis. — A powerful elevator dredge worked for two and one half 
months at Port St. Francis, deepening the channel to 35 feet E.L.W. The 
material consisted of clav, stones and boulders. The total number of cubic vards 
dredged amounted to 157,300 at a cost of $59,321.27, or 0.37^%oo cents per 
cubic yard. 

Nicolet Traverse (Lake St. Pet^r) . — One dredge worked for half the season 
at Nicolet traverse, deepening the channel to 35 feet E.L.W. and widening the 
channel from 350 feet to 450 feet. The material consisted of clay, stones and 
boulders and good progress was made, the widening on the south side being com- 
pleted and that on the north side commenced. 

The total number of cubic vards dredged amounted to 167,250 at a cost of 
$73,131.22, or 43'^%oo cents per cubic yard. 

He au Rahin. — Two powerful elevator dredges worked at lie au Raisin for 
brief periods completing this channel to 35 feet E.L.AV. The material was clay. 

The total number of cubic yards removed amounted to 41,520 at a cost of 
$30,993.86 or 0-74fi"yioo cents per cubic yard. 

Stone Island. — Two elevator dredges worked here for one month each, 
completing this channel to 35 feet E.L.W. The material dredged consisted of 
clay with some small stones. 

The total number of cubic yards dredged amounted to 170,120 at a total 
cost of $61,062.59, or 358%o(. cents per cubic yard. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 31 

Sorel to He de Grace. — Two powerful elevator dredges worked for short 
periods, deepening this channel to 35 feet E.L.W. The material dredged con- 
sisted of clay and sand. 

The total number of cubic yards dredged amounted to 91,490 at a cost of 
,940.59, or 0-753%oo cents per cubic yard. 



Longue Pointe Curve. — One powerful elevator dredge worked at Longue 
Pointe curve for over three months, widening the cuiwe on the south from 500 
feet to 650 feet and deepening to 35 feet E.L.W. The material dredged was 
clay, stones, gravel and sand and good progress was made. This section of the 
channel was almost completed. 

The total number of cubic yards removed amounted to 221,250 at a cost 
of $80,814.48, or 0-365%oo cents per cubic yard. 

Longue Pointe Traverse. — One powerful elevator dredge worked at Longue 
Pointe traverse for half the season and completed this section of the channel 
to a depth of 35 feet E.L.W. The material dredged was clay and gravel. 

The total number of cubic yards removed amounted to 202,250 at a total 
cost of 170,422.66, or 0-34S2/ioo cents per cubic yard. 

Maisonneuve — Longue Pointe Course. — One elevator dredge worked at 
Poulier-a-Gagnon during the entire season, deepening the channel to 35 feet 
E.L.W. The material proved to be hard pan, clay and shale and while very 
hard, satisfactory progress was made. 

The total number of cubic yards dredged amounted to 88,055 at a cost of 
$124,828.14, or $1.41 ■^^00 cents per cubic yard. 

North Channel Below Quebec. — The powerful sea-going elevator dredge 
No. 16 was operated all season in the North channel, dredging to 35 feet, 
extreme low tide and 500 feet wide, following out the department's policy of 
completing the channel to this width as soon as possible, opening it for naviga- 
tion and then eventually widening it to 1,000 feet. One and one-quarter mile 
of 500-foot channel was completed this season and the material dredged con- 
sisted of sand, clay and boulders. 

This channel, w^ith a minimum width of 500 feet and a minimum depth of 
25 feet was opened to navigation this season. 

The large, powerful sea-going hydraulic dredge No. 8 (Beaujeu) has now 
been converted into an elevator dredge and will b€ ready for the opening of the 
next dredging season, when it is hoped to employ her also in deepening the 
North channel. With this additional dredge, progress will be considerably 
greater. 

The total number of cubic yards dredged during the season of 1927 amounted 
to 1,099,950 at a cost of $287,396.00, or 0-26i3/joo cents per cubic yard. 

The total number of cubic yards dredged by the whole fleet of dredges 
above and below Quebec during the season of 1927 amounted to 3,258,320 at a 
cost of $1,369,075.54, or 0-4207/100 cents per cubic yard. 

PROGRESS OF DREDGING OPER.\TIONS AT THE END OF PE.\S0N OF 1927 

.30-FOOT PROJECT 

Total length of dredging done (statute miles) 6^^-85 

Total length of dredging yet to be done (statute miles) 1-20 

Total number of eubic yards dredged .5.3, 781 , S32 

Total number of cubic yards yet to be dredged 1,519,500 

35-FOOT PROJECT 

Total length of dredging done ( tatute miles) 56-95 

Total length of dredging yet to be done (statute miles) .34-94 

Total number of cubic yards dredged 50, 667, 416 

Total number of cubic yards yet to be dredged 23,822,715 



32 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

The total cost from 1851 to the end of the fiscal year ending March 31, 1928, 
of the St. Lawrence Ship Channel from Montreal to Father Point, including 
plant, shops, surveys, etc., is as follows: — 

Dredging 821,040, 358 60 

Plant, shops, surveys, etc 11, 761, 278 89 

Grand total §32,801,637 49 

The total number of cubic yards dredged in the River St. Lawrence Ship 
Channel from 1851 to the end of the season of 1927, amounted to 131,976,168; 
the material varying from very hard slate rock to soft blue clay. 

Tidal Semaphores 

Cap a La Roche. — The tidal semaphore at Cap a la Roche (Deschaillons, 
P.Q.) situated on the south shore of the St. Lawrence river and which indicates 
the available depth of water in the dredged channel was put in operation on 
April 19, 1927. 

Pointe Citrouille. — The tidal semaphore at Pointe Citrouille situated on the 
north shore of the St. Lawrence, 10^ miles above Cap a la Roche, was put into 
operation the same day. This semaphore is connected with Cap a la Roche 
semaphore by special telephone line to enable the operator at Cap a la Roche 
to telephone the operator at Pointe Citrouille every three inches of rise or fall 
of the tide, as the case may be. The Pointe Citrouille semaphore shows th(; depth 
in feet by large figures and inches by small semaphore. This semaphore enables 
the pilot of a deep draught vessel outward bound to judge if there is sufficient 
depth of water in the dredged channel at Cap a la Roche to pass in safety. 
If not, it gives him time to get ready to anchor below Pointe Citrouille where 
there is a good anchorage ground, and where he can wait for the tide to rise 
sufficiently to enable him to pass at Cap a la Roche. 

St. Nicholas. — The tidal semaphore at St. Nicholas point, on the south side of 
the St. Lawrence river, a distance of 15 miles above Quebec, shows the depth 
of water available in the undredged channel over St. Augustin bar, commenced 
operations on April 20, 1927. 

Crane Island. — On recommendation made to this department by the Ship- 
ping Federation of Canada, it was decided to establish a tidal semaphore on 
Crane Island wharf to show the depth of water available in the dredged 
channel in Beaujeu channel and St. Thomas channel. The lighthouse at the 
end of the wharf at Crane island was fitted out with arms to show similar signals 
as shown at Cap a la Roche and St. Nicholas. This semaphore was operated 
for the first time on July 28, 1925, and gave satisfaction. It commenced opera- 
tions for season of 1927 on April, 24. 

Sweeping Operations. — The annual sweeping of the Ship Channel was done 
by the sweeping steamer Detector and no obstructions of a serious nature were 
found. The tug James Hoivden, with a sweeping scow, proved some of the 35 
feet dredging and it is expected that, next season, further proving of dredging 
will be done. The Detector was also occupied proving dredging above and below 
Quebec, and in sweeping part of the new North channel opened this year to 
navigation for 25 feet depth at extreme low water. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 



33 



Height of Water. — The following table gives the monthly averages of the 
height of water in the Ship Channel at Sorel, P.Q., by which it will be seen that 
the monthly averages for 1927 compare very well with those since 1920: — 



Year 


May 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


Oct. 


Nov. 


Highest 


Lowest 




ft. in. 


ft. in. 


fr. in. 


ft. in. 


ft. in. 


ft. in. 


ft. in. 


ft. in. 


ft. in. 


1920... 


35 9 


33 


32 4 


31 8 


31 5 


31 4 


31 6 


37 5 


30 1 


1921... 


35 6 


32 9 


31 10 


31 4 


30 10 


31 4 


31 6 


37 8 


30 1 


1922... 


37 1 


34 9 


33 4 


32 3 


31 7 


31 4 


30 11 


40 5 


30 1 


1923... 


38 2 


34 3 


32 1 


31 2 


31 1 


30 8 


30 9 


39 8 


29 9 


1924... 


38 8 


34 10 


32 6 


31 10 


31 11 


32 4 


31 3 


40 


30 1 


1925... 


35 3 


33 9 


32 5 


31 9 


31 


31 3 


31 11 


43 4 


30 2 


1926... 


37 4 


34 6 


32 10 


31 8 


31 1 


31 3 


33 3 


41 5 


30 6 


1927... 


34 3 


33 10 


33 2 


32 5 


31 3 


31 4 


34 9 


39 8 


30 5 



The lowest reading of last season was 30 feet 5 inches, this occurring in 
October for just one day. 

During the most important months of navigation, the level of water was 
higher than last j^ear which was another good year. 

Accidents in the River St. L.wvrexce, Season of Navigation 1927 
between montreal and qlt^bec 

May 11. — SS. Ikcda, inward bound, was in collision with ss. James McGee, 
Jr., outward bound, near St. Antoine traverse, through the fault of the Ikala, 
with considerable damage to both vessels. 

June 19. — SS. Lingan, inward bound, was in collision with ss. Doric, which 
was leaving wharf at Quebec, with only slight damage incurred. 

September 7. — SS. Darnholme and ss. Keyport, both light, were in collision 
off Three Rivers, with some damage incurred by both vessels. 

September 11. — SS. Bueland, inward bound, sheered and touched the north 
bank of the Ship Channel three miles above St. Antoine, sustaining no damage. 

November 22. — SS. Songa, inward bound during a heavy snov;storm, 
stranded on the south bank near St. Pierre les Becquets, sustaining only veiy 
slight damage. 

November 27.- — SS. City of Windsor stranded between Port St. Francis 
and Three Rivers in heavy fog, on the north, outside the channel, sustaining no 
damage. 

BETWEEN QUEBEC AND FATHER POINT 

June 24. — SS. Gaspesia, inward bound, stranded at night north of Ship 
Channel, above St. Jean, I.O., wharf, with heavy damage. 

July 20. — SS. Lake Larga, while being towed at the west end of Orleans 
island, sheered in a tide rip and collided with schooner St. Leon, incurring no 
damage. 

August 6. — SS. Knockficrna, inward bound, stranded at night on Brule 
bank, due to Long Pointe ledge gas buoy being extinguished, and was refloated 
with but slight damage. 

August 14. — SS. Keyivest, inward bound, stranded at Madame reef, outside 
of Ship channel, with some damage incurred, and was refloated with rising tide. 

August 17. — SS. Courtright, inward bound, stranded at St. Roch shoal out- 
side of the channel, sustaining but small damage. 

65702—3 



34 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



November 4. — SS. Vallehice, outward bound, stranded one mile below 
Berthier-en-bas, south of the Ship channel, and was refloated on the rising tide, 
sustaining considerable damage. 

November 20.— SS. Copthorne, outward bound, stranded one mile south- 
west of Lark reef, sustaining considerable damage. 

December 5. — SS. Philip T. Dodge, outward bound, grounded on Ste. Mar- 
guerite's tail, with apparently no damage. 

Marixe Signai, Service 
March 31, 1928 

Signal stations have been established for the purpose of maintaining com- 
munication between ship and shore by means of flag signals. 

This system of stations extends from St. John. N.B., Cape Race, Nfld., and 
Belle Isle up the gulf and river St. Lawrence and through the Great Lakes to 
Port Arthur and Fort William, Ontario. 

Following is a complete list of stations: — 

EAST OF QUEBEC 



Name of Station 


Location 


Nautical 

miles from 

Quebec 


Means of Communication 


(R)— Quebec 


Custom House 



14 
32 
40 
81 
103 
157 
175 
200 
219 
2.34 
260 
294 
325 
349 
377 
400 
332 
360 
415 
438 
462 
540 
537 
575 
553 
826 
673 
734 


Telephone. 


(R)_St. Jean d'Orleans 


Shore end of wharf 

Lighthouse 

100 yards east of Church. . . . 

Lighthouse 

Mouth of Saguenay river . . . 

Shore end of wharf 

Lighthouse 


Crane Island 

L'IsJet 

Cape Salmon 


Telegraph. 

Telephone and telegraph. 

Telegraph . 


Pointe Xoir 


Father Point 


Little Metis 

Matane 


" 


Pointe des Monts 


" 


« 


Gap Chat 


'< 


" 


Riviere a la Martre 


" 


« 


Cap Magdalen 


« 


u 


Fame Point 




" 


Cap des Rosiers 


" 


« 


Cap d'Espoir 


" 


" 




" 


" 


West Point, Anticosti 


<< 


" 


South ^^ est Point, Anticosti 


" 


" 


South Point, Anticosti 


" 


« 


Heath Point, Anticosti 


" 


" 


Point Escuminac, N.B 


" 


Telephone. 

Wireless and telephone. 


St. Paul's Island, C.B 




Money Point, C.B., N.S 


Lighthouse 


Flat Pointe. N.S 




Telegraph. 


Cape Ray, Nfld 


<< 


Cape Race, Nfid 


" 


" 


Point Amour, Labrador 


" 


Wireless and telegraph. 


Belle Isle 


" 




Chebucto Head 


" 




Halifax, N.S 


The Citadel 






Point Lcprcau, N.B 


Lighthouse. 




(< 


Partridfje Island, N.B.. 






« 


Saint John, N.B 


Custom House 




" 


Point Tuppcr, C.B 






Telegraph. 


Scatari Island, C.B 

















REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 

WEST OF QUEBEC 



35 



Name of Station 


Location 


Nautical 

miles from 

Quebec 


Means of Communication 


Bridge Station 


Half mile above Quebec 


6 
12 
31 
41 
45 
55 
68 

100 

110 

125 
134 
139 


Telephone. 


St Nicholas 






Portneuf 


In front lighthouse 

In old windmill tower 

At tidal semaphore 

In lighthouse 

Upper end of Bureau wharf. . 
Lower end of Government 

wharf 

Above 500 feet east Contre- 

coeur course new light 

Abreast east end He des 

Lauriers 


" 


St. Jean Deschaillons 

Pointe Citrouille ... 


" 


Three Rivers 

Sorel 

Bellmouth 

Cap St. Michel 


" 


Longue Pointe 


Point between wharves 

(La Sauvegarde building).. . 


" 


(R) Montreal 


" 







WEST OF MONTREAL 



Name of Station 


Location 


Nautical 
miles from 
Montreal 


Means of Communication 


(R) Lachine canal 

(R) Lachine canal 

(R) Soulange canal 

(R) Soulange canal 


Lock No. 2 




8 

21 

33 

62 

99 

298 

321 

820 


Telephone. 


Cascades Point 

Coteau Landing 


" 


(R) Cornwall canal 


Cornwall 


u 


(R) Galops canal 

(R) Welland canal 


Lift Lock 

Port Dalhousie 

Port Colborne 

Sault Ste. Marie 


Telegraph. 


(R) Weiland canal 


'< 


(R) Soo canal 


" 







Stations marked (R) are reporting stations only and are not equipped for signalling purposes. 



BRIEF SUMMARY OF WORK PERFORMED 

1. Stations report movements of vessels to Montreal, Quebec, Sydney, 
Halifax or St. John. 

2. Stations report weather conditions daily to Montreal, Quebec, Sydney, 
Halifax or St. John. 

3. Montreal, Quebec, and St. John publish daily bulletins giving weather 
and ice conditions and movements of vessels. 

4. Montreal and Quebec publish daily bulletins showing depths of water 
at various points in the river St. Lawrence Ship Channel. 

5. The Signal Service offices at Montreal, Quebec, and Saint John are open 
day and night for the puipose of furnishing the public with information of 
shipping matters. 

6. The telegraph system of the Department of Public Works on the north 
shore of the gulf of St. Lawrence report the movements of vessels engaged in the 
coasting trade to the Signal Service at Quebec. 

7. The Government Grain Elevator at Port Colborne reports to Montreal 
the arrival and departure of vessels engaged in the Upper Lakes grain trade. 

8. The collectors of customs at Fort William and Port Arthur report to 
Montreal the arrival and departure of vessels engaged in the Canadian grain 
trade. 

65702— 3J 



36 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

9. The collector of customs at all the seaports in the river and gulf of St. 
Lawrence, on the Atlantic coast, and in the bay of Fundy report the arrival and 
departure of vessels engaged in the overseas trade. 

10. Lloyd's agent at Quebec is furnished daily with full information of the 
movements of vessels engaged in the overseas trade to and from ports in the 
province of Quebec. 

11. Lloyd's agent at Saint John, N.B., is furnished daily with full informa- 
tion of the movements of vessels engaged in the overseas trade to and from ports 
in the Maritime Provinces. 

12. All the signal stations and masts were maintained in good order. 

ICEBREAKIXG, 1927-28 

iu::poet of alphokse lafleche, exgixeer. river st. law^rexce ship channei., 
on the work of the icebre.\kixg steamers "' l.\dy grey " and '' mikula " 
during the winter of 1927-28. 

The Lady Grey was placed on her usual icebreaking station at Three Rivers 
on December 1. The season was comparatively open, and there were but very 
few ships to leave for the sea in the latter part of the navigation season. There 
was very little icebreaking required at Three Rivers and, navigation havving 
closed, this icebreaker left for Quebec on December 14. 

The Mikula was stationed at Quebec as usual during the closing days of 
navigation to cope with any emergency that might occur. She was called upon 
to escort the hopper barge Foremost inward bound. She left Quebec on Decem- 
ber 12 and arrived back the next day. 

Due to the unusual height of the water the ice bridge at Port St. Francis 
formed only on January 10 and the river below this point remained open prac- 
tically all season. 

During the winter only two light jams occurred at Quebec bridge which 
were easily broken by the Mikula and Lady Grey. By making occasional trips 
to Portneuf and slicing the ice battures the Lady Grey managed to keep the river 
open at this point all winter. 

The Mikula made her usual trip to the north shore points below Quebec, 
and Anticosti, leaving Quebec on February 16 and rettu-ning on February 29. 

Before the spring breakup commenced the Lady Grey was sent on April 3 
to open Port St. Francis and the lower part of lake St. Peter. 

Due to a sudden thaw the various tributaries of the St. Lawrence reached 
their flood stage suddenly and at the same time, while the ice in the river was 
still unusually firm. A severe jam developed in the vicinity of Varennes, flood- 
ing the lower part of Montreal island and the south shore opposite, causing 
considerable damage to private property and blocking traffic. 

The Mikula was sent on April 12 to help the Lady Grey, clearing out lake 
St. Peter ice and, if possible, it was intended to send this vessel up river towards 
Montreal. The channel was easily cut by the Mikula through lake St. Peter 
but, as several piers of piled ice had formed during a shove previous to that 
date, the ice on either side of the lake St. Peter channel did not move out in its 
usual fashion. This created a situation that made it dangerous to send either 
icebreaker farther up the river while this ice remained. Both ships therefore 
worked on the lake St. Peter ice outside tiie channel with the Mikula making 
occasional short trips to Sorel islands and Sorcl as the work proceeded and 
opportunities occurred. 

Meanwhile the jam at Varennes had broken, the floods had receded, and 
the river was open from Montreal to Vercheres. On April 20 the Mikula broke 
the last jam at Hay island though there was still about one-third of the lake 
St. Peter ice holding. The last of this lake ice did not pass out of the lake till 
buoy laying had actually commenced. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 



37 



The Mikida returned to Quebec April 26 and prepared for her usual ice 
patrol in the gulf. She left Quebec April 28 to relieve the Montcalm at Cabot 
straits. 

The Lady Grey arrived at Montreal iVpril 27 to proceed to the foot of the 
Soulan,s;es canal to clear the accumulation of frazil ice as usual. This work was 
completed by May 2 although an unusual amount of frazil was encountered for 
a length of 2\ miles. 

Average Depth for Each Month in the 27-1- Foot Channel. (27+ Feet at Ordinary 
Low Water.) From Sorel Gauge each year May to November 



Year 


M 


ay 


June 


July 


Aug. 


Sept. 


O 


rt. 


Nov. 


Highest 


Lowest 




ft 


in. 


ft. 


in. 


ft. in. 


ft. in. 


ft. in. 


ft. 


in. 


ft. 


in. 


ft. in. 


ft. in. 


1897.. 


3.i 


6 


32 


6 


30 3 


29 3 


2S 


27 





27 


6 


37 


26 4 


1898... 


31 


6 


30 


9 


29 8 


28 2 


28 2 


28 


3 


28 


6 


32 1 


26 9 


1899.. 


36 


2 


31 


9 


30 3 


28 6 


27 6 


28 





27 


9 


37 9 


26 9 


1900... 


33 


6 


30 


9 


30 6 


29 6 


28 1 


28 


9 


29 


2 


3.5 9 


27 4 


1901... 


34 


3 


31 


10 


29 2 


28 3 


27 7 


27 


4 


27 


3 


36 3 


26 6 


1902.... 


32 


2 


32 


2 


32 2 


29 4 


28 1 


28 


1 


29 





34 1 


27 6 


1903.. 


33 





30 


11 


30 5 


29 5 


28 4 


29 





27 


11 


32 8 


26 11 


1904.. 


36 


3 


34 


5 


30 i 


29 .5 


29 5 


30 


4 


29 


3 


37 4 


28 1 


1905. . 


31 


10 


30 


8 


29 7 


29 


28 


28 


h 


28 


1 


33 6 


27 1 


1906.. 


32 


4 


31 


5 


29 3 


27 11 


27 3 


27 


4 


27 


6 


33 3 


26 9 



AvER.\GE Depth for Each IMonth in the 30-Foot Channel. 

Low Water of 1897) 



(30 Feet at Extreme 



1907.. 


37 


1 


35 


9 


31 


3 


32 


10 


32 


4 


32 


9 


33 


7 


38 


3 


31 


10 


1908.. 


41 


5 


37 


10 


33 


10 


32 


10 


32 





31 





30 


6 


42 




30 





1909.. 


40 


6 


37 


6 


33 


10 


33 


2 


32 


7 


32 


4 


31 


6 


42 




30 


11 


1910.. 


35 


7 


34 


5 


32 


3 


31 


7 


31 


6 


31 


6 


31 


7 


37 




30 


11 


1911.. 


36 


6 


34 


6 


32 


1 


31 


3 


30 


9 


30 


2 


39 


3 


38 




29 


4 


1912.. 


37 


9 


37 


6 


33 


6 


32 


8 


32 





32 


6 


31 


9 


40 


11 


31 


3 


1913.. 


37 





34 


4 


32 


8 


31 


10 


31 


6 


32 


1 


32 


7 


38 


6 


31 


1 


1914.. 


35 


2 


33 





32 


4 


31 


4 


31 


3 


30 


11 


31 





36 


10 


30 


3 


191.5... 


34 


7 


32 


6 


31 


6 


31 


4 


31 


1 


30 


11 


30 


8 


37 


4 


30 


1 


1916.. 


38 


9 


37 


2 


34 





32 


5 


31 


7 


31 


9 


31 


U) 


40 





30 


9 


1917... 


36 


8 


36 


6 


34 


10 


33 


6 


32 


3 


32 


6 


33 





38 


2 


31 


3 


1918... 


36 


1 


34 


1 


33 


10 


32 





32 


3 


33 


7 


34 


11 


38 


i 


31 


3 


1919... 


39 


7 


36 


7 


33 


5 


32 


4 


32 


3 


32 


8 


33 


5 


41 


1 


31 


o 


1920... 


35 


9 


33 





32 


4 


31 


8 


31 


5 


31 


4 


31 


6 


37 


5 


30 


1 


1921... 


35 


6 


32 


9 


31 


10 


31 


4 


30 


10 


31 


4 


31 


6 


37 


8 


30 


1 


1922.. 


37 


1 


31 


9 


33 


4 


32 


3 


31 


7 


31 


4 


30 


11 


40 


5 


30 


1 


1923... 


38 


2 


31 


3 


32 


1 


31 





31 


1 


30 


8 


30 


9 


39 


S 


29 


9 


1921... 


38 


8 


34 


10 


32 


6 


31 


10 


31 


11 


32 


4 


31 


3 


40 





30 


1 


1925... 


35 


3 


33 


9 


32 


5 


31 


9 


31 





31 


3 


31 


11 


43 


4 


30 


2 


1926... 


37 


4 


31 


6 


32 


10 


31 


8 


31 


1 


31 


3 


33 


3 


41 


5 


30 


6 


1927... 


34 


3 


33 


10 


33 


2 


32 


5 


31 


c> 


31 


4 


34 


9 


39 


8 


30 


5 



38 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 
Cost of Ship Channel to Date 



Table showing the Total Cost of the Dredging and Plant and the Quantities 

Dredged to March 31, 1928 



Cost of 
dredging 



Expenditure 
for plant, 

shops. 

surveys, 

etc. 



Quantities 
dredged 



Montreal Harbour Commissioners, 1851 to 1888 

Dredging Montreal to Cap a la Roche to 27§ ft. at O.L.W. 
and from Cap a la Eoche to Quebec to 271 ft. at half tide 

Department of Public Works 

Dredging consisting of widening and cleaning up of channel, 
deepening Cap a la Roche to Cap Charles to 27| ft. at 
O.L.W. and dredging at Grondines, Lotbiniere and Ste. 
Croix 1889 to June 30, 1899 



Project of 1899 

Dredging channel between Montreal and Quebec to 30 ft. at 
lowest water of 1897, also widening to a minimum width 
of 450 ft. and straightening — 

Fiscal vear, 1899-1900 

1900-1901 

1901-1902 

" 1902-J903 

" 1903-1904 

Department of Marine and FisHERiEs 



This includes the work below Quebec. 

Fiscal year, 1904-1905 

1905-1906 

1906-1907 (Julv 1, 1906 to Mar. 31, 1907). 

1907-1908 

1908-1909 

1909-1910 

1910-1911 

1911-1912 

1912-1913 

1913-1914 



1914-1915. 
1915-1916. 
1916-1917. 
1917-1918. 
1918-1919. 
1919-1920. 
1920-1921 . 
1921-1922. 
1922-1923. 
1923-1924. 
1924-1925. 
192.5-1926. 
1926-1927. 
1927-1928. 



S cts. 



3.402,494 35 



839.583 08 



100,191 91 
136,680 83 
185,429 80 
255,776 55 
276,958 59 



311, 
431, 
302, 
478, 
497. 
572, 
576, 
588, 
663, 
895, 

,036, 
976. 

,030. 
618, 
.3.50, 
422, 
446! 
46-1, 
465, 
550, 
557 , 
996, 

,240, 

,369, 



087 93 
768 30 
677 37 
209 66 
686 03 
950 71 
838 02 
697 60 
229 74 

235 59 
846 65 
622 03 
550 60 
399 69 
152 92 
107 05 
1.34 85 
660 74 

236 80 
612 71 
863 56 
554 42 
044 98 
075 54 



534,809 65 



486,971 79 



265,270 78 
287,040 04 
479,731 47 
277,703 50 
308,765 44 



277,225 69 
317,. 327 37 
275,003 61 
417,390 22 
.340,861 86 
,321,375 
488,248 88 
499,799 58 
702,071 ,86 
740,664 26 
.549,. 369 91 
809,443 95 
.3.53,1.52 12 
156,112 .57 
82,480 60 
132,747 20 
151,422 99 
102,710 14 
446,933 08 
130,481 9 
333,345 19 
600, 199 42 
343,901 27 
548,716 68 



cu. yds. 
19.865,693 

3,558,733 



1,107,894 
2,479,385 
3,098,3.50 
6,544,605 
4,619,260 



2.716,220 
4,047.5.30 
3,001,010 
4,831,875 
5,896,737 
6,354,285 
5,600,050 
4,509,904 
6,929,344 
6,140,867 
6.225,143 
8,462,957 
7,800,555 
2,517,376 
628,060 
517,305 
715,895 
1,167,100 
793,350 
1,314,050 
1,373,420 
2,754,770 
3,146,125 
3,258,320 



Total to March 31, 1928. 



21,040,358 60 



11,761.278 



131,976,168 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 39 

Progress of Dredging Operations at Date of Writing, the Close of the Season 1927 

30-FOOT PROJECT 



Locality 


Distance 

English 

miles 


Total 

length 

requiring 

dredging 


Length 
dredged 
in 1927 


Total 
length of 

30-foot 
channel 
dredged 


Length 
yet to be 
dredged 


Division No. 1 — 


miles 
45 

36 

20 

59 

60 


miles 
22-90 

12-45 

18 00 

10 05 

4-65 


miles 


miles 
22-90 

12-45 

* 0-28 
tl7-72 

8-85 
4-65 


miles 
All com- 


Division No. 2 — 




pleted 


Division No. 3 — 
Lake St. Peter 






Division No. ^ — 
Batiscan to Quebec 


001 


1-20 


Division No. 5 — 
Quebec to the Traverse 










Totals 


220 


68-05 


0-01 


66-85 


1-20 







*Not widened. fWidened. 

Progress of the Dredging Operations at the Date of Writing, the Close of 

the Season of 1927 

30-FOOT PROJECT 



Locality 


Length of Dredging 


Cubic yards 
yet re- 
quired to 
be done 


Required 


Done 


Division No. 1 — 

Longueuil Shoal 


miles 


miles 

MO 
5-05 
0-40 
3-00 
4 -.50 
MO 
1-70 
6-05 




Longue Pte. to Pte. aux Trembles (en haute) 






He Ste. Therese 






Varennes to Cap St. Michel 






Cap St. Michel to Vercheres 






Vercheres Traverse 






Verclieres-Contrecoeur 






Contrecoeur Channel 












Total 




22-90 










Division No. 2 — 

Sorel to He de Grace 




4-40 
MO 
0-25 




Stone Island .- 






He au Raisin Traverse 






Lake St. Peter (See Div. 3) 






Port St. Francis 




0-50 
0-.50 
1-55 
2-25 
1-30 
0-60 




Three Rivers 






Cap Magdeleine to Becancour 






Pecancour to Champlain 






Champlain to Pte. Citrouille 






Batture Perron 












Total 




12-45 










Division No. 9 — 

Lake St. Peter 




* 0-28 
tl7-72 








169,500 


Total 




18-00 


169,500 









40 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 
30-FOOT PROJECT— Concluded 



Locality 


Length of Dredging 


Cubic yards 
yet re- 
quired to 
be done 


Required 


Done 


Division No. 4 — 

Batiscan to Cap Levrard 


miles 


miles 

300 
2-05 
1-20 
0-90 
0-80 
0-40 
0-20 
0-30 




Cap a la Roche Channel 






Poulier Raver 












Grondines 












Cap Sante 






Ste. Croix . 


0-60 
0-60 


300 000 


St. Augustin 


500.000 






Total 


1-20 


8-85 


800,000 






Division N'o. 5 — 




4-65 


550.000 








Total 




4-65 


550.000 








Totals 


1-20 


66-85 


1,519,500 







*Xot widened. 



tWidened 



Progress of Dredging Operations at Date of Writing, tlie Close of the Season 1927 

35-FOOT PROJECT 



Locality 


Distance 

English 

miles 


Total 

length 

requiring 

dredging 


Length 
dredged 
in 1927 


Total 
length of 

35-foot 
channel 
dredged 


Length 
yet to be 
dredged 


Division A'o. / — 
Montreal to Sorel 


miles 
45 
36 
20 
59 
70 


miles 
26-80 
20-44 
18-32 
15-54 
10-79 


miles 
0-63 
2-30 
0-10 
05 
1-25 


miles 

24-22 

11-49 

17-62 

005 

3-57 


miles 
2-58 


Division No. 2 — 

Sorel to Batiscan 


8 95 


Division No. S — 
Lake St. Feter. 


0-70 


Division No. 4 — 

Batiscan to Quebec 

Ditision .Vo. a— 

Quebec to Goose Cape (North channel) 


15-49 
7-22 


Totals 


230 


91-89 


4-33 


56-95 


34-94 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 



41 



Progress of the Dredging Operations at the Date of Writing, the Close of 

the Season of 1927 

35-FOOT PROJECT 



Locality 



Division No. 1 — 

Longueuil Shoal 

Longue Pte. Traverse 

Longue Pte. Curve 

Pte. aux Trembles Channel. . 

He Ste. Therese Channel 

Varennes Curve 

Cap St. Miohel Curve 

Cap St. Michel to Vercheres. 

Vereheres Traverse 

Vercheres to Contrecoeur. . . . 

Contrecoeur Channel 

Lanoraie to Sorel 



Totals — Division No. 1. 



Division No. 2 — 

Sorel to He de Grace 

Stone I.sland 

He au Raisin 

Port St. Francis 

Three Rivers 

Cap Madeleine to Pecancour. 

Pecancour to Champlain 

Champlain to Pte. Citrouille. 
Eatture Perron 



Totals— Division No. 2. 



Division N^o. 8 — 
Lake St. Peter. 



Totals — Divi.?ion No. 3. 



Division N'o. 4 — 

Patiscan to Cap Levrard. 

Cap Levrard 

Cap a la Roche Curve. . . 

Cap Charles Channel 

Grondines 

Lotbiniere 

Cap Sante 

St. Croix 

St. Augustin 



Totals — Division No. 4. 



"Division No. 5 — 
Quebec to Goose Cape (North channel )- 

Madame Reef Shoal 

West Sand and East Narrows Shoal . . 



Totals- 
Totals. 



■Division No. 5. 



Length of dredging 
in miles 



Yet to be 
done 



miles 

1-73 

' 0-24 



0-61 



2-58 



0-81 



0-48 
0-61 
2-40 
0-87 
2-55 
1-23 



8-95 



0-70 



0-70 



■48 
■27 
06 
■99 
•83 
•47 
■.'Jl 
■47 
■41 



Done 



miles 

015 
0-47 
1-08 
307 
112 
2-14 
056 
4^72 
072 
191 
8-28 



24-22 



4-17 
2-11 
209 
0^62 
Oil 

1.35 
104 



Cul)ic yards 
yet to be 
dredged 



429,904 
489,206 



159.215 



1,078,325 



630,346 



15^ 19 



4 -.54 
2^68 



7-22 



34 94 



11-49 



17 02 



17 62 



05 



0-05 



3-57 



3-57 



490,000 

500,532 
1,348,578 

684,000 
1,9.57,556 

684,600 



6,295,612 



Cubic yards 
dredged 



291,. 5.50 
394,. 300 
744,675 

1,239,975 
358,9.50 

2,666,560 
176,. 500 

2,048,8.50 
306,. 595 

1,1.57,700 

5,159,028 



14,-544,683 



3,079,714 

983,660 

974,094 

691,085 

32,660 



949,210 
674,800 



682,570 



682,570 



2 -3^6, 168 
781,666 
l,.>36,S.i9 
1.043,. 541 
513.3.32 
.331,480 
6.55.. 561 
79S,518 
826.207 



9,163,332 



3,743,806 
2,859,070 



56-95 



6,602,876 



23,822,715 



7,385,223 



11.814,582 



11,814,582 



.33,875 



33,875 



.38,600 
16,8.50.453 



16,889,053 



50,667,416 



*This channel is being dredged .500 feet wide, is at present opened at thi)= width for 25 feet dcnth, 
will bo opened, at same width, for thirty-five feet depth when completed, and will be eventually widened 
to 1,000 feet. 

Mileage is shown on a basis of 500 feet wide. 



42 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 






M 









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^i 



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ee — 



P, S « fe 






bC C 



>>>. o 

CO 



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o o o o 



O t^ CO <M 



£ OS 

3 Sec 



^ C^ CO M 
<M C) -*< <M 

^ >-H CO 



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t^ CD IC 

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3«^ 

cbHO 



g to 
o o 

■Q 03 



£ ft 

c "^ 



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blj o 

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REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 



43 



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46 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

EXPENDITURE AND REVENUE 

STATEMENT OF EXPENDITURE, MARINE DEPARTMENT, 1927-28 



Service 



Ocean and River Service — 

Dominion steamers 

Distressed seamen 

Masters and mates 

Investigation into wrecks. . 

Schools of navigation 

Registry of shipping 

Removal of obstructions. . . 

Cattle inspection 

Subsidy to wrecking plants 

Unforeseen expenses 

Life saving service 

Radio service 

Hydro and tidal survey. . . . 

Hudson bay patrol 

Radio receotion 

Radio conference 



Public Works (Capital) — 

Ship channel 

Sorel shipyard 

Sorel wharf No. 4. . . 



Lighthouse and Coast — 

Agency rents and contingencies 

Salaries of lightkeepers 

Maintenance of lights 

Construction of lights 

Administration of pilotage 

Repairs to wharves 

Pensions to pilots : . . . 

Icebreaking 

Signal service 

Harbourmaster, Amherstburg. 

Salary, W. R.Wallace 

Allowance, J. David.son 

Steamer to replace "Brant". . . 



Civil Government — 

Salaries 

Contingencies. 



Appropriation 



1,650, 

5. 

20, 

6, 

9. 

3, 

5, 

4. 

45, 

5, 

80, 

499, 

340, 

1,050, 

169, 

10. 



> cts 

000 00 
000 00 
000 00 
000 00 
000 00 
000 00 
000 00 
500 00 
000 00 
500 00 
000 00 
865 00 
000 00 
000 00 
475 00 
000 00 



3,902,340 00 



1,922,000 00 

154,000 00 

45, 780 00 



2,121,780 00 



Scientific Institutions — 

Meteorological Service 

Steambont Inspection — 

Steamboat inspection.. 

Miscellaneous — 

Gratuities 

Salary, .]. C. Patterson 
Flat increa.se of $120. . . 

Vot«338 

Vote 339 



Investments — 

Quebec Harbour Commission. 
Montreal " " 

Vancouver " " 



236,000 00 

700,000 00 

900.000 00 

783,000 00 

250,000 00 

10,000 00 

11,100 00 

30,000 00 

103,000 00 

600 00 

1,920 00 

500 00 

95,000 00 



Expenditure 



s 



cts 



1,625,. "^01 41 

400 14 

19,303 41 

5,748 62 

7,288 09 

2,572 76 

1,770 96 

3,709 42 

45,000 00 

5.500 00 

62.918 72 

475,204 16 

310,699 01 

1,021,512 65 

154,543 19 

7,432 58 



3,749.105 12 



1,921,902 .56 
95,561 83 



2,017,464 39 



3,121,120 00 



401,760 00 
60,000 00 



461,760 00 



272,500 00 



134,610 00 



6,487 23 

2,400 00 

102,6.58 77 

255 60 

2,500 00 



114,301 60 



210,047 90 

676,079 80 

893,182 43 

.597,6.3.3 11 

121,744 10 

6,572 24 

10.. 575 00 

.30.000 00 

102,9.3S 37 

600 00 

1,920 00 

500 00 

94,967 59 



2,746,760 54 



382,292 83 
.53.426 45 



4.35,719 28 



270,276 31 



131,065 31 



6,487 23 

2,400 00 

102,6.58 77 

255 60 

2,500 00 



114,301 60 



2,160.000 00 
2.180,000 00 
1.. 564, 000 00 



5,904,000 00 



Balance 



S cts. 

24,498 59 
4,. 599 86 

696 59 

251 38 
1,711 91 

427 24 
3,229 04 

790 58 



17,081 28 
24.660 84 
29,. 300 99 
28,487 35 
14,931 81 
2,567 42 



153,234 88 



97 44 

58,4.38 17 
45,780 00 



104,315 61 



25,9.52 10 

23,920 20 

6,817 .57 

185.366 89 

128,255 90 

3,427 76 

525 00 



61 63 



32 41 



374,359 46 



19,467 17 
6,573 55 



26,040 72 



2,223 69 



3,544 69 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 
RECAPITULATION OF SERVICES 



47 



Appropriation 



Expenditure 



Balance 



$ 



cts. 



Ocean and River 

Public Works (Capital). 
Lighthouse and Coast. . 
Steamboat Inspection. . 
Scientific Institutions. . 

Civil Government 

Miscellaneous 



3,902,340 00 
2,121,780 00 
3,121,120 00 
134,610 00 
272,500 00 
461,760 00 
114,301 60 



S cts. 

3,749,105 12 
2,-017,464 39 
2,746,760 54 
131,065 31 
270,276 31 
435,719 28 
114,301 60 



Investments. 



10,128,411 60 



9,464,692 55 
5,904,000 00 



15,368,692 55 



$ cts. 

153,234 88 

104,315 61 

374,359 46 

3,544 69 

2,223 69 

26,040 72 



663,719 05 



STATEMENT OF REVENUE FOR FISCAL YEAR 1927-28 





Gross 
Revenue 


Refunds 


Net 
Revenue 


Radio 


S cts. 

64,218 60 

2,164 71 

56,089 53 

5,909 04 

5,002 00 

128,656 95 

90 00 

98,659 13 

4,225 25 

1,110 00 

46 75 

262,550 30 

485 50 


$ cts. 


$ cts. 
64 218 60 


Harbour dues 

Piers and wharves 

Dominion steamers 


1 00 
450 61 


2,163 71 

55,6.38 92 

5,909 04 

5 00'> 00 


Examination of masters and mates 


80500 


Steamboat inspection 


127 851 95 


Pilots license fees 


90 00 


Casual revenue 




98 659 13 


Fines and forfeitures 




4 225 25 


Signal station dues 




1 110 00 


Marine register fees 




46 75 


W/A license fees 


12,862 00 
5 00 


249,693 30 
480 50 


W/0 examination fees. . . 








629,212 76 


14,123 61 


615,089 15 



METEOROLOGICAL SERVICE 

Report of Sir Frederic Stupart, Director 

After striking from the lists stations from which no reports have been 
received for some time, we find that we now have a total of 855 observing 
stations, reporting to the Central Office, Toronto. 

At 352 of these stations the observer is paid a small salary, ranging from 
$12 per annum to as much as $2,400, at a chief station. 

There are 116 storm signal display stations, at which the agent is either 
paid $75 or $100 per annum according to the length of the season of navigation. 

At 503 of the observing stations the work is performed gratuitously by 
voluntary observers who furnish climatic data which is utilized for the benefit 
of the country at no other cost but that of instruments and occasional replace- 
ments, and postage. 

FORECAST DIVISION 

The weather map has been prepared twice daily, Sundays and holidays 
included, throughout the year and forecasts were issued for the various parts 
of the Dominion, Newfoundland and adjacent waters. Stoma warnings were 
also issued as occasion warranted. 

The percentage of verification of forecasts was 87 per cent and of storm 
warnings 91-3 per cent. 



48 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

Special forecasts were issued daily during the fire weather season to the 
Forestry officials in Ontario, Quebec and Alberta. Instruments were installed 
at 11 new stations in Quebec in connection with the fire weather work. 

Special forecasts were issued daily during the spring and summer to the 
fruit-growers of the Niagara peninsula. 

During the winter, numerous forecasts were issued as in past years, to 
transportation companies and shippers of perishable goods. 

The forestry stations in Ontario and Quebec and the chief stations in 
Newfoundland were inspected by members of the forecast staff. 

The system of forest fire weather forecasting continues to expand and most 
of the provincial forestr^^ departments are in active co-operation with the 
Meteorological Service; the service has equipped numerous stations with 
hydrographs and other meteorological instruments, and has undertaken the 
inspection of these stations. 

Immediately following the despatch of the regular daily forecasts, special 
forecasts bearing especially on the requirements of foresters have been, and will 
again this coming year, be despatched to forestry centres, and no effort will be 
spared in making the system an ever growing success. 

DIVISION OF CLIMATOLOGY 

During the year the publication of the Monthly Record of jMeteorological 
Observations in Canada, Newfoundland and Bermuda, has been continued. 
This consists of 87 pages monthly, giving daily figures of temperature and pre- 
cipitation for several hundred stations as well as monthly means and extremes 
and differences from normal. Daily figures of pressure, wind, sunshine and 
humidity, with means, are given for stations of the first class, and hourly figures 
for chief stations. Data from fifty-four additional new stations appear this 
year. 

The monthly Weather Map has been issued at the end of the first week 
of each month, giving a preliminary summary of the abnormalities of the 
weather of the preceding month, as well as notes on the progress of crops when 
available. During tbs year advantage has been taken of radio communication 
from the north, to extend this summary to cover the weather of the far north- 
west, Hudson strait and Greenland. 

Each week during the season of growth a special report showing the differ- 
ence from normal of the weather of the preceding week is made and telegraphed 
to Washington for inclusion in Weather, Crops and Market, each Wednesday. 

Special reports on weather or climate have been furnished upon request for 
legal, engineering, agricultural, medical, research or other purposes to a large 
number of enquirers, necessitating a large amount of copying. 

Progress in preparing a manuscript report on the climate and weather of 
the last forty years in Eastern and Northern Canada has continued. 

Data for future compilation on comparative weather and crop growth 
continues to be accumulated. 

ATMOSPHERIC PHYSICS 

The International Commission for the Exploration of the Upper Air 
designated October, 1927, and March, 1928, as the international months for 
sending up balloons carrying recording instruments from which the temperature 
and pressure of the upper air at all levels reached by the balloons can be 
obtained. During these two months 47 ascents were made from Calgary, Alta., 
45 from Goderich, Ont., and 33 from Woodstock, Ont. To date the recoveries 
have been 29, 39, and 18, respectively, or slightly over 61 per cent of those sent 
up. The recoveries from Goderich have been better than from Woodstock. An 
instrument sent up from Woodstock on March 28 was found at Gay Head, 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 49 

Mass., having travelled about 500 miles; it reached a height of 6-5 miles and 
the lowest temperature recorded was 60 degrees below zero, while the tempera- 
ture at the surface was 26 degrees. The highest ascent was made from Calgary 
on March 26, when the balloon reached a height of 10-5 miles and recorded a 
temperature of 85 degrees below zero; the average height of the ascents was 
8-5 miles. 

The results of the ascents made in May, 1926, were prepared for the meet- 
ing of the International Commission for the Exploration of the Upper Air at 
Leipzic in August, 1927. 

During the year the investigation of the aneroid used in the balloon 
meteorograph was continued and has resulted in developing a method whereby 
the disks out of which the aneroids are made can be spun from the best quality 
of phosphor bronze without annealing. The aneroids are partially exhausted 
of air and dried very carefully; they have proved to be superior to all the previous 
ones. 

The frame of the meteorograph has also been simplified and lightened and 
at the same time after some years of experimenting a satisfactory and simple 
arrangement for raising the pen from the writing surface just before it reaches 
the ground has been obtained. 

Pilot balloons. — Pilot balloon observations to obtain the direction and 
velocity of the wind in the upper levels of the atmosphere were continued 
throughout the year at Toronto and Camp Borden. At the former place balloons 
were sent up on 255 days. The highest flight occurred on August 26, when a 
height of nearly 9 miles was reached; at this level the wind was 30 miles an 
hour from the south west. 

To provide upper air data for use of the aviators, for air mail services and 
the airship route from Britain to Canada, equipment has been assembled during 
the year sufficient to begin at least twelve new pilot balloon stations during the 
summer of 1928. The existing methods of carrying out the work have been 
revised and modified as experience has indicated so that the equipment now 
provided will enable the work to be done expeditiously. The instructions for 
pilot balloon work have been rewritten to conform with the methods to be 
adopted. Meteorological equipment has also been assembled for the pilot 
balloon stations that are not at present taking meteorological observations. 

Sea Water Temperatures. — The thermographs on the three boats of the 
Canadian Pacific ocean services plying between Vancouver and Hong Kong 
have been in operation throughout the year. The ss. Aorajigi of the Canadian 
Australasian Line and the ss. Canadian Fisher and Canadian Forester of the 
Canadian Government Merchant Marine between Montreal or Halifax and 
Bermuda and the West Indies have been equipped during the year. On the 
route to Australia it is found that the water is colder at the Equator than on 
either side of it. The route from Canada to Bermuda crosses the Gulf Stream 
almost at right angles and thus affords an excellent opportunity to study the 
position of the Gulf Stream; to do this most accurately the thermographs are 
provided with daily charts. On the first occasion as the boat was returning 
from Bermuda to Montreal the boundary of the Gulf Stream did not appear to 
be more than five miles wide as the temperature dropped 13 degrees in this 
distance. 

The thermograph temperatures obtained during the past four years in the 
North Pacific have all been collected in 5-degree quadrangles by weeks instead 
of months and the normals obtained. A preliminary study has been made to 
see if there is any connection between the temperature of the sea water and 
the character of the winters in Canada but the results are still too meagre to 
draw any conclusions. This, however, may be stated that there has been a 

65702—4 



50 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



progressive increase of temperature from 1922 to 1926 in the water of the North 
Pacific. The investigation has also revealed that, especially during the summer 
months, the water is colder along the shores and begins to get warmer about 
300 miles out. From the experience gained on the three routes it appears that 
the best range for the thermographs is from 30 degrees to 90 degrees instead 
of 35 degrees to 85 degrees and it has been decided to adopt this range for all 
ocean temperature measurements; this still enables the temperatures to be read 
to 0-2 degrees F. 

An account of the methods used in obtaining sea water temperatures and 
the preliminary results of the investigation were presented to a joint meeting 
of the section on Oceanography and Meteorology of the American Geophysical 
Union, Washington, on April 26, 1928. 

Earth Temveratures. — Daily readings to OOl'^F. of platinum thermometers 
at eight depths: Surface, 4 inches, 10 inches, 20 inches, 40 inches, 66 inches, 
9 feet, and 15 feet were taken throughout the year. The minimum and maxi- 
mum temperatures with the dates on which they occurred and the range at each 
of the depths are given in the table. 





Highest 


Date 


Lowest 


Date 


Range 


Surface 


81 
70 
70 
70 
64 
57 
55 
49 


June 30 
July 29 
July 29 
Aug. 2 
Aug. 3 
Aug. 23 
Oct. 10 
Nov. 8 


22 
25 
31 
37 
38 
37 
42 
43 


Jan. 11 
Mar. 4 
Mar. 4 
Mar. 10 
Mar. 29 
Mar. 31 
April 11 
May 23 


59 


4" • 


45 


10° . 


39 


20" 


33 


40' 

66" 

9' 

15 


26 

20 

13 

6 



Evaporation. — The amount of water evaporated from a surface 6 feet square 
was measured daily from April to October, inclusive. The amount by months 
was: April, 211 inches; May, 2-27 inches; June, 3-38 inches; July, 3-80 
inches; August, 3-22 inches; September, 2-22 inches; October, 1-42 inches; or 
a total of 18-42 inches for the season. Omitting April the amount was 16-31 
inches, as against 15-74 inches for the same period last year. 

Solar Radiation. — The amount of heat received from the sun was measured 
by an Angstrom pyrheliometer. The observations were taken between 11 a.m. 
and 1 p.m. on all days when there were no clouds or thick haze crossing the face 
of the sun during the observations. There were only sixty occasions during the 
year when observations were possible under these conditions. The greatest 
amount of heat received on a square centimetre (016 square inch) was 1-437 
gramme calories per minute as against 1-453 the previous year. 

Atmospheric Pollution and Visibility. — Observations of the amount of dust 
in the atmosphere in Toronto and near Aurora, Ont., have been commenced 
during the year in an investigation into the relationship between visibility and 
the dust content of the atmosphere. A new method of measuring visibility is 
also being worked out whereby it will simply be necessary to observe on an 
object a short distance away and read the visibility on a scale. The instrument 
consists of a piece of glass gradually becoming more and more opaque until no 
light gets through and is called a neutral wedge; a position is found where the 
object is just visible and no more; it is found that this ])o?ition is dependent 
on the visibility and consecjuently the wedge can be calibrated in terms of the 
visibility. 

Wind Equipment. — Working drawings of the new anemograph as finally 
designed last year were prepared and fifty instruments arc now nearly com- 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 



51 



pleted at a cost of about $100 each, or about 60 per cent of the cost of the older 
type. The anemometer tower has been redesigned, simplified and standardized. 
Dines pressure tube anemometers and direction recorders have been ordered for 
some of the Air Force stations in order to study the actual structure of the wind. 

TERRESTRIAL MAGNETISM 

The Agincourt Magnetic Observatory has been maintained in operation 
throughout the year. Continuous photographic records of the movements of the 
magnetic needle and the variation in the force acting upon it were secured. 

At Meanook new photographic equipment for the declination and horizontal 
force was installed during July, and we are now securing continuous record of 
H as well as of the D. Since this installation was made the time elapsed has 
not been sufficient to give final base line results for reduction and the values 
given in the tables are only approximate. 

Large magnetic disturbances were of frequent occurrence during the year. 
The most important ones were recorded on April 13, 14, May 5, July 21, 22, 
August 20, 21, and October 12, 22, and 23. At Agincourt the range of disturb- 
ance was from 2° to 3° in declination, from 600 to 800 gammas in horizontal 
force and from 250 to 700 gammas in vertical force. At Meanook the declina- 
tion range was considerably in excess of 3"" and during the August and October 
disturbances the horizontal force variations were about double the magnitude 
of those at Agincourt. 

The regular programs of absolute observations were made at both observa- 
tories with the exception of the months of December and January at Meanook, 
when the observer through illness was forced to omit a number of observations. 

The results of observations for the year 1923 have been completed and are 
now in the printer's hands. Work on the 1924 results is proceeding. 

Magnetic cliaracter tables were as usual prepared and forwarded to the 
International Commission on Terrestrial Magnetism. 

At the request of the Surveyor-General, index corrections for compasses 
attached to thirty-nine (39) surveyors' theodolites were determined and the 
results forwarded to him. 

Assistance was given to members of the staff of the Dominion Observatory 
and the Topographical Surveys Branch in standardizing their instruments for 
use in field work. 

The accompanying tables summarize the results at Agincourt and Meanook 
for the fiscal year 1927-28:— 

Summary of Results of Magnetic Observations at Agincourt for the fiscal year 

1927-28 



1927 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

1928 

January 

February 

March 

65702— 4i 



D. West 



16- 1 
15-8 
1.5 2 

15 5 

16 5 
171 
17-9 
17-8 
18-3 



18 -.3 
18-5 
18-9 



Mean Monthly Values 



H 



7 

1.5,069 
671 
6S2 
670 
660 
6.54 
640 
652 
648 



648 
847 
644 



Z 



.57, 4.39 
418 
404 
406 
404 
.393 
381 
36S 
353 



.343 
345 
338 



74 



44-2 
44-3 
44-3 



52 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 
AGINCOURT DAILY AND MONTHLY RANGES 





D 


H 




Z 






Mean Daily 




Mean 


Daily 




Mean Daily 






Range 


Abso- 


Range 


Abso- 


Range 


Abso- 


Month 




lute 
Month- 






lute 
Month- 






lute 
Month- 


From 


From 


From 


From 


From 


From 




Hour 


Max. 


ly 


Hour 


Max. 


ly 


Hour 


Max. 


ly 




Read- 


and 


Range 


Read- 


and 


Range 


Read- 


and 


Range 




ings 


Min. 




ings 


Min. 




ings 


Min. 






' 


' 


o , 


7 


T 


7 


7 


7 


7 


1927 




















April 


10-5 


21-9 


1 36-5 


52 


94 


625 


16 


40 


246 


May 


12-8 


22-3 


1 57-9 


47 


106 


678 


18 


42 


283 


June 


141 


17-6 


30 


46 


74 


207 


12 


27 


130 


July 


13-3 


23-7 


2 01 


54 


102 


787 


23 


57 


584 


August 


15-2 


300 


2 18-7 


61 


112 


830 


33 


64 


667 




12-8 
9-4 


21-7 
29-4 


56-8 
3 000 


50 
42 


90 

134 


339 
749 


21 
22 


43 
58 


215 


October 


524 


November 


8-8 


12-4 


30-5 


37 


50 


114 


4 


9 


52 


December 


6-4 


13-5 


44-7 


31 


56 


143 


6 


12 


80 


1928 




















January 


10 6 


14-6 


560 


* 43 


57 


109 


3 


/ 


43 


February 


10-8 


15 


28-8 


44 


57 


90 


3 


7 


18 


March 


120 


16-9 


48-4 


42 


60 


131 


4 


9 


65 







Summary of Results of Magnetic Observations at Meanook for the fiscal year 

1927-28 



Month 



]\Iean Monthly Values 



D. East 



H 



1927 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 

September 

October 

November 

December 

1928 

January 

February 

March 



26 
27 
26 
26 
26 
26 
26 
26 
26 

26 
26 



59-2 
54-6 
54 1 
54-2 
.53-6 
570 
56-9 
53-2 
54-9 

55-1 
46-6 



7 
12,815 
12,819 
12,822 



12,810 
12,819 
12,801 
12,809 
12,802 

12,792 
12,788 



59,709 
702 
733 



694 
761 



825 



77 



53-2 
52-9 
53- 1 
52-9 
53-3 
53-6 
54-9 
54-9 



MFANOOK DAILY AND MONTHLY RANGES 





D 


H 




Diurnal Range 




Diurna 


Range 










Absolute 
Monthly 






Absolute 
Monthly 




From 


From 


From 


From 




Hour 


Max. and 


Range 


Hour 


Max. and 


Range 




Readings 


Min. 




Readings 


Min. 




1927 


' 


' 


o 


7 


7 


7 


April 


13-8 
170 
16-4 
15-8 
15-6 


400 
42-4 
27-2 
37-3 
51-3 


3 10-4 
3 14-6 

1 21-3 

2 450 

3 47-5 








M!ay ' 








June 








July 


115 






August 


270 


1,746 


September 


12-5 


45-2 


3 7-2 


00 


266 


1,238 


October 


10-5 


48-7 


3 50 


108 


344 


1 , 630 


November. . 


7 


16-6 


1 01-2 


33 


85 


602 


December 


7-3 


12-4 


31-3 


25 


63 


147 


1928 














January 


81 


20 -S 


2 14-6 


34 


104 


986 


February 


9-5 


22 


1 01-3 


36 


123 


539 


March 

























REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 53 

ASTRONOMY 

Observations were made on eighty-four days, for the purpose of obtaining 
correct time by meridian transits of stars with the 3-inch Troughton and Simms 
transit telescope. Positions of stars used were taken from the British Nautical 
Almanac or the American Ephemeris. 

Instrumental, constants were redetermined about once a month. 

The number of enquirers for correct time continues to increase. Each 
M-eek day at 11.55 a.m. exactly a time signal is transmitted over the fire alarm 
system for the city of Toronto. Once a w^eek time signals are telegraphed 
to Agincourt Observatory, for the purpose of controlling errors and rates of their 
clocks and chronometers. 

Time exchanges were made about once a month with Quebec, St. John, 
N.B., and Montreal. The results of these exchanges show an average difference 
of about half a sjcond. 

Observations of Sunspots with the 6-inch equatorial were made on 118 
days and on no occasion was the sun free of spots. The mean relative numbers 
for the months of the civil year 1927, as deduced from these observations were 
as follows: January, 103-1; February, 92-7; March, 69-3; April, 100-9; May, 
81-7; June, 87-7; July, 46-5; August, 36-0; September, 82-1; October, 78-0; 
November, 72-4; December, 31-8, Yearly mean 73-5, an increase of 1-8 over the 
year 1926. 

A large number of visitors were privileged to view the heavens through 
the equatorial telescope. 

SEISMOLOGY 

The Milne-Shaw seismographs which superseded the old Milne instrument 
some 5'ears ago, have been maintained in operation throughout the year and 
have recorded many important earthquakes. The constants were duly checked 
and the loss of trace throughout from photographic failure was small. On some 
occasions the control clock failed, but was soon set right. Both driving-clocks 
were overhauled and cleaned in September and the bearings were found badly 
worn. It may be necessary in the near future to supersede these spring clocks 
with a better movement. 

During the year, 282 earthquakes were recorded; 44 less than last year. 
The greater number of these were slight records of distant earthquakes. August 
showed the greatest monthly number, namely, 39; and October and December 
the least with 14. The dates of the most important, given in G.M.T. were: 

April 10. — Felt 1,000 miles along the Chilean coast. 

April 16. — Kamchatka. 

Mav 22. — Destructive Kan-Su Chinese earthquake, Lat. 36° N., Long. 
102° E. 

June 3. — S.E. of the island of Ceram. 

June 18.— 

June 21.— Lat. 4°, Long. 82° W. 

September 3. — Alaska. 

September 11. — Asia Minor. 

October 24. — (Very large record). S.E. Alaska. 

November 4. — Off the const of Los Angeles. 

November 14. — Northern Siberia. 

November 14. — Southern Chili. 

November 21. — Southern part of Argentine, not far from the Chilian 
boundary. 

December 28. — Kamchatka. 

January 1. — S.E. Mexico. 

January 6. — 



54 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

February 21.— N.W. Alaska. 

February 26.— N.W. Alaska. 

March 9. — S.E. of the Philippines. 

]\'Iarch 16. — South of the Fiji Islands. 

March 22.— Lat. 14°, Long 95° W. (coast of Mexico). 

March 31. — Smyrna earthquake. 

The monthly bulletins giving the times of the most important phases of 
the record, together with the Victoria, B.C., tabulations are forwarded to a num- 
ber of seismological centres and stations throughout the world. There has been 
a marked increase in the requests for our bulletins from foreign countries. 
These bulletins in conjunction with various stations throughout the world afford 
material for the study of the speed of the various wave phases of earthquakes 
passing through and tend to disclose the material comprising the central portion 
of our earth. Bromide copies of the records are often called for and in some 
cases the original curves are loaned to seismological bureaus for seismic study. 
We continue to supply information to the public and press regarding the dist^ 
ance and epicentre of large quakes, such information generally being available 
as soon as the records are developed. Tabulation of the records are up to Decem- 
ber, 1927. 

Library Report 
fiscal year ending march 31, 1928 

For the library 210 new books were received and 184 periodicals, besides 
numerous pamphlets. Of the magnetic year-book 108 copies and of the Toronto 
year-books for 1925 and 1926, 224 and 231 copies were sent out. 

Each day 465 copies of the Daily Weather Map were sent out, each month 
552 copies of the Monthly Weather Map and 902 copies of the Monthly 
Record of Meterological Observations were sent out. 

The Toronto Year-book for 1927 is in progress and will soon be published. 

Appendix "A" 

The Director of the Quebec Observatory reports as follows: 

During the j'-ear under review the usual meteorological observations have 
been taken regularly and foi-warded to your office, and all the instruments under 
my care have been kept in good order. 

The weather bulletins issued by the Central Bureau have been published 
daily in the local newspapers, and posted in the different public buildings in 
the city. 

Tlie number of inquiries for information regarding local weather conditions 
has steadily increased during the past year. These requests were principally 
from farmers, tourist agencies, engineers and contractors, etc. I had also on 
frequent occasions to give infonnation to transportation companies carrying 
perishable goods, and also to insurance companies with respect to accidents in 
and outside the city. 

Statistics covering long periods were prepared and furnished to several 
people and corporations as well as reports to be used in the different courts. 

I have also given general information concerning the weather conditions, 
and the exact time to aviators connected with the Mail Service and also to 
Commander De Pinedo, and Commander Byrd who personally called at my 
office. 

I have tested and adjusted several barometers, thermometers and chrono- 
meters. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 55 

Standard stars were observed regularly and the correct time given by 
means of the noon gun, the time-ball, and by telephone to watchmakers and 
the general public. 

May I be permitted to draw again your attention to the present state of 
the Observatory buildings. 

These wooden buildings, owing to long exposure, are in such dilapidated 
condition, that I consider them unsafe, and unfit to be repaired, and 1 would 
ask you to please give your kind and favourable consideration to my present 
request to be supplied with safer quarters. 

x\pPENDIX " B " 

The Director of the St. John, N.B., Observatory reports as follows: — 

METEOROLOGICAL SERVICE 

The meteorological work has been carried on in the usual manner; readings 
are taken at 9 a.m., 3 p.m. and 9 p.m., Atlantic standard time. The 9 a.m. and 
9 p.m. readings are coded and telegraphed to the Central Office. 

Weather bulletins have been issued daily and mailed to the different parties 
requiring the same. 

Information requested by railways and engineers, regarding weather con- 
ditions, past and present, have been cheerfully furnished. 

Storm warnings have been displayed on the signal mast of the Customs 
House at Point Lepreaux on receipt of telegram from Central Office. Acknow- 
ledgment of notice to hoist or take down signals have been rigidly adhered to. 

Broadcasting of the daily weather reports have been recently inaugurated 
by station C.F.B.O. Saint John, 336-9 metres. Steamships and fishermen along 
the coasts of New Brunswick and Nova Scotia and in the Bay of Fundy, within 
a radius of two hundred miles from Saint John, have been obtaining these 
reports on their radio sets with complete satisfaction and have shown their appre- 
ciation by telegrams and letters to those in charge of the local station. 

TIME SERVICE 

Observations of stars have been made as frequently as possible on avail- 
able clear nights for the establishment of clock rates. Daily comparisons 
have been made between the mean time and Riefler clocks and necessary 
corrections made. 

Time signals are automatically sent from our mean time transmitting clock 
every week day over the Western Union wires to all their offices in the Mari- 
time Provinces, as well as to the Canadian National, Dominion Atlantic and 
Canadian Pacific Railway companies. Automatic signals for broadcasting are 
sent over the Canadian Pacific Railway land lines to Chebucto Head. 

On Tuesdays and Fridays at 10 p.m. and every week day at 3 p.m. the 
regular time signal is transmitted from our mean time clock by land line to 
station C.N.R.O. of the Canadian National Railway, Moncton, N.B., and broad- 
casted to all places within the zone of their station. 

The daily time signals in Saint John and Halifax have been given to 
shipping and others by the dropping of the time ball on the Customs House 
and Citadel respectively. 

In saint John the system of hourly synchronizing ofiice, street and tower 
clocks continues to give most satisfactory and useful results. 

In December, the service sustained a serious loss in death of D. L. Hutchin- 
son, who had been a trusted and valued official officer for a long period. To 
Mr. Hutchinson's endeavours have largely been due the very efficient time service 
of the Maritime Provinces, and he will be a difficult man to replace. 



56 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

Appendix " C " 

The Director of the Gonzales Heights Observatory, Victoria, B.C., reports 
as follows: — 

During the past year the regular meteorological and seismological obsen^a- 
tions have been taken here, and daily weather forecasts issued for the following 
districts, South Vancouver Island, Lower Mainland, Okanagan, and Kootenay. 

During the summer months special fire weather warnings were issued to the 
Dominion and provincial Forestry Departments, and daily radio broadcasting of 
these conditions were carried out both at Victoria and Vancouver for the benefit 
of the general public and the logging interests. Wind and weather forecasts are 
also issued daily by the Dom Radio Station here in the morning for small craft 
on the Straits of Fuca and Georgia, and at night a general forecast is sent out 
for the Coast from Alaska to the Columbia river. 

TIME SERVICE ! 

The clocks and chronometers have given perfect satisfaction as to rates,; 
errors and the electric contacts for the recording instruments. The Time Ball 
which is installed on a high city building has been dropped regularly from here 
at 1 p.m., and the noon and 9.30 p.m. time guns have been regularly fired from 
here by signal. 

SEISMOLOGY 

The Milne-Shaw seisanograpbs have been in continuous operation and an 
average of nearly one quake per day has been recorded on these instruments, 
and acting upon your instructions, details of the larger quakes are promptly 
weired to Washington, where they assist in locating the positions of these great 
disturbances shortly after they 'have occurred. 

The daily slow movements of the other N-S and E-W horizontal pendulums 
have been observed, and from the long series of observations now obtained 
(nearly 30 years), they indicate several interesting phenomena including a 
probable S.E. tilt of this coastal region. 

INSPECTIONS 

During last June I inspected our stations in Kootenay, Okanagan and the 
Kamloops districts, including the forestry centres at Kamloops, Cranbrook and 
Penticton. 

In December a special meeting of the Britisli Columbia and Alberta 
Dominion Foresters and Provincial Foresters was held here when we fully 
discussed improved methods for co-operation in connection with the warning of 
forest fire weather. 

In February I attended the W^estern Forestry Conservation Association 
at Tacoma, where I represented our service and spoke on co-operation with the 
United States Weather Bureau. 

VISITORS 

I am pleased to state this institution is becoming very well and favourably 
known and during the past year over 3,500 visitors were shown through here, 
and since the observatory was opened in April, 1914, nearly 27,000 visitors 
have been through here. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 



57 



REPORT 01' L. A. DEMERS, DOMINION WRECK COMMISSIONER 

Statement of Formal Investigations and Preliminary Inquiries held during the 

Fiscal Year 1927-28 



Name of Ship 

and 

Official Number 



Port 

of 

Registry 



Remarks 



Ariano, 142293 

and 
Lurcher Lightship, 
116993. 



Alhertolitc, 150462 

and 
Rose Castle, 137438 



A. M. German, 
152649, 

and 
Turret Cape, 104283 

and 
A'o. 6. 



Agawa, 62277. 



London. 
Ottawa. 



Halifax.. . 
Montreal. 



Midland, Ont 

Montreal. 

Sault Ste. Marie. 



Altadoc, 116577. 



Fort William. 



Baie St. Paul 

and 
Canadian Trapper, 
141585. 



Brignogan, 150359 

and 
James Stewart, 
148901. 



Britlanic, 100188 

and 
Key port, 125459 

and 
Sherbrooke, 150823. 



Coban, 86071. 



Not registered. 
Montreal. 



Montreal. 
Glasgow. 



Collingwood, Ont. 

Newcastle. 

Montreal. 

Montreal 



On April 27, 1927, collided in the Ba.v of Fundy. Formal in- 
vestigation was held at Montreal on May 4, before Capt. 
L. A. Demers, Dominion Wreck Commissioner, assisted by 
Capt. N. Martorell and Capt. W. G. McConechy, acting as 
nautical assessors. Finding: Accident inscrutable. Master 
and mate exonerated. 

On July 25, 1927, collided 4 or 5 miles abeam of Matane, in the 
gulf of St. Lawrence. Formal investigation held at Mont- 
real, Aug. 4, before Capt. Demers, assisted by Capt. E. C. 
Sears and Capt. B. W. Lyons, acting as nautical assessors. 
Finding: Casualty was inevitable happening. Both Masters 
Luke Holmes of the .ffo.se Castle, and A. G. Cameron of the 
Albertolite, absolved from blame. 

On Nov. 7, 1927, collided in Welland canal, Turret Cape ground- 
ed. Formal investigation held at Toronto, Dec. 12, before 
Capt. L. A. Demers, assisted by Capt. J. B. Foote and 
Capt. J. Williams, acting as nautical assessors. Finding: 
Tug A. M. German involuntarily placed her scow in slight 
de\-iation, causing damage to herself and scow N'o. 6. 
There was on either side a failure to judge distances and 
consequence of movements of engines for which each is 
pardonable. Certificates returned and advice for greater 
caution given. 

On Dec. 7, 1927, stranded near Michael's bay, Manitoulin 
island, lake Huron. Formal investigation held at Toronto, 
befor-e Capt. Demers, assisted by Capt. J. Williams and 
Capt. J. Ewart, acting as nautical assessors, on Jan. 25, 1928. 
Finding: The master found in default, and severely repri- 
manded for what court considers culpable error in judgment 
Second mate is exonerated from blame. 

On Dec. 8, 1927, stranded and lo.st near Keweenaw point, lake 
Superior. Formal investigation held at Toronto on Feb. 
3, 1928, before Capt. Demers, assisted by Capt. J. B. Foote 
arid Capt. John Williams, acting as nautical assessors. 
Finding: Master, in default for error in judgment, whicli is 
not considered a culpable action by court, and is cautioned. 

On June 24, 1927, collided 3 miles from Red Island, River St. 
Lawrence. Formal investigation was held at Montreal, 
June 30, before Capt. Demers, assisted by Capt. C. Lapierre 
and Capt. A. Lefebvre, acting as nautical assessors. Find- 
ing: Collision due to indifferent lookout on part of Pilot and 
Third Officer of Canadian Trapper. Pilot, Rodiique La- 
Chance, is fined $400. Certificate of Third Officer, J. S. 
Duffield, is suspended for one month. 

On May 22, 1927, collided off Goose Neck, in Upper St. Law- 
rence River. Formal investigation was held at Toronto, 
Dec. 7, befoi-e Capt. Demers, assisted by Capt. J. B. Foote 
and C'apt. John Williams. Finding: This case is one of in- 
evitability insofar as direct action of navigating officers of 
either ship ar-e concerned. For damage done by the swerv- 
ing or sheering, the SS. James Steicart is held to blame. 

On Oct. 22, 1927, collided in Cornwall Canal. Formal investi- 
gation held at Montr-eal, On Dec. 20, 1927, before C;apt. L. 
A. Demers, assisted by Capt. C. Lapier-re and Capt. J. 
Duguay. Finding: The Keyport found alone to blame, 
through failure of Master C. .J. Kenney to observe Rule 25 
due to misapprehension of what the Sfierbrooke was to do at 
the bridge. He stands reprinranded, cautioned and warned. 
Master of Sherbroolce exonerated. 

On Juno 19, 1927, stranded, east side of Partridge Island, at 
entrance of St. .John Harbour, N.B. I'ormal investigation 
held at Saint John, N.li., June 25, 1927, before Capt. L. A. 
Demers, assisted by Capt. A. J. Mulcahy and Capt. W. J. 
Davis, acting as nautical assessors. Finding: Master, 
Benjamin Pope, is in default for stranding, showing indiffer- 
ence, induced by over confidence. His certificate is sus- 
pended for six months. 



58 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



Statement of Formal Investigations and Preliminary Inquiries held during the 
Fiscal Year 1927 -2S— Continued 



Name of Ship 

and 

Official Number 



Port 

of 

Registry 



Remarks 



Chapleau, 145461. 



Montreal. 



Canadian Volunteer, 
141424. 



Montreal . 



Courtright, 145466. . 



Canadian Runner, 
141834 
and 
Newton Pine, U9i03 



Montreal . 



Montreal 

Newcast le-on-T y n e 



Catala, 152822. 



Vancouver. 



Copthome, 147472. 



[^ondon. 



On June 5, 1927, struck bottom 17 miles above Port-neuf-en-bas, 
River St. Lawrence. Formal investigation was held at 
Montreal, on July 15, before C'apt. Demers, assisted by 
Capt. C. Laoierre and Capt. A. Lefebvre acting as nautical 
assessors. Finding: Master, A. M. Sparling, in default for 
lack of observation, disregard of responsibilities. Owing to 
extenuating circumstances Court ccercisa? leniency, and he 
is fined .S75 towards cost of investigation. Pilot. Paul Emile, 
LaChance, is in default for lack of vigilance. This being his 
first offence, minimum fine of S50 is imposed. 

On Aug. 8, 1927, stranded near Gull Ledge, West Musquash, 
Bay of Fundy. Formal investigation held at Saint John, 
N.B., before Capt. L. A. Demers, assisted by Capt. A. J. 
Mulcahy, and Capt. R. T. Deans, acting as nautical assessors 
on Aug. 13. Finding: Master, E. E. Manning, is in default, 
in maintaining an unwarrantable speed in fog, in failing to 
take frequent soundings, in ignoring the Direction Finding 
Stations, until the last stage, and in attempting to place 
part of blame on wireless operator. His cei tificate sus- 
pended for six months. Mate's certificate is recommended 
in the interim. 

On Aug. 17, 1927, grounded near St. Roch Shoal, River St. 
Lawrence. Formal investigation held at Montreal, Sept. 22, 
before Capt. Demers, assisted by Capt. C. Lapierre and 
Capt. A. Lefebvre, acting as nautical assessors. Finding: 
Pilot Joseph Lachance found in default for seeming indiffer- 
ent navigation and fined four hundred dollars. Master and 
Mate exoneiated. 

On Oct. 19, 1927, collided off Cock Point, River St. Lawrence. 
Formal investigation held at Quebec, Oct. 24, before Capt. 
Demers, assisted by Capt. N. Martorell and Capt. A. Lan- 
dry, acting as nautical assessors. Finding: Donald Mc- 
Nicoli, Master of Newton Pine, erred grievously in judg- 
ment in permitting Third Officer to assume responsibility 
whilst Master on Bridge, and after acquiescing in order 
given by Third Officer for taking action to neutralize such 
order, and also for maintaining immoderate speed. He is 
held to blame and severely reprimanded. Third Officer, 
James Stevenson, advised to exercise wisdom in future when 
Master is on Bridge. A. E. Seaman, INIaster of Canadian 
Runner, credited with displajdng excellent seamanship in 
beaching his vessel. Court adds lider suggesting establish- 
ment of lanes for inward and outward bound ships, and 
reverting to Bic as pilotage station. 

On Nov. 8, 1927, stranded on reef extending off Mist island. In 
Cunningham Pa.ssage, B.C. Formal investigation held at 
Vancouver, Dec. 21, before Capt. J. A. Macpherson, Deputy 
to Dominion Wreck Commissioner, assisted by Capt. J. B. 
Stewart and Capt. Wellington, acting as nautical assessors. 
Finding: Master, E. A. l>ickson, and First Mate, Harold 
Brown, 0(iually responsible for casualty, and censured for 
not employing more se;iiiuinlike and correct method of 
verifying ship's position tlian a more or less casual glance at 
floating buoy. Coui C is of opinion southern part of Cunning- 
ham passage should be discontinued, and Northern Passage 
used, as much safer and better alternative. 

On Nov. 20, 1927, stranded on or near Lark Reef, River St. 
Lawrence. Formal investigation held at Quebec on Nqv. 
29, befoie Capt. Demers, assisted by Capt. A. Landry and 
( 'apt. O. Sherrer, acting as nautical assessors. I'inding: 
Master, W. j.;. Hall, exonerated. Pilot, Alphonse Paquet, in 
default for falling asleep when on duty, and oitlered to defray 
expenses of investigation, ciedit given being for unblemished 
record of 40 years service, ('liief (Jfficei , .lames Hutchinson 
McNiel, h. of T. certificate No. 020290, severely repri- 
manded for lack of attention, judgment, inactivity and 
indifference in face of apparent danger, which he must have 
realized. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 



59 



Statement of Formal Investigations and Preliminary Inquiries held during the 
Fiscal Year 1927-28— Continued 



Name of Ship 

and 

Official Number 



Port 

of 

Registry 



Remarks 



Doric, 147215 

and 
Lingan, 1.32810. 



Darnholme, 131836 

and 
Key port, 125459. 



Liverpool, Eng. 
Montreal. 



London, Eng. 
Newcastle. 



Dewstone, 147687.. 



London. 



Gaspesia, 144625. 



Quebec. 



Huronic, 107168.. 



Ikala, 11.3479 

and 
James McGee, 
U.S.A. 



Imacos, Norwegian, 

and 
Keyhar, 147763. 



C'ollingwood. 



Liverpool 

Bayonne, N.J. 



Tvedstrnd 

Middlcsborough. 



On June 19, 1927, collided in Quebec Harbour. Formal investi- 
gation held at Montreal, on June 22, before Capt. Demeis, 
assisted by Capt. C. Lapierre and Capt. N. Maitorell, act- 
ing as nautical assessors. Finding: Both ships to blame. 
Master, Samuel Bolton, and Pilot, Alberic Angers, oi Doric, 
erred in judgment, and are cautioned. Master, Christopher 
Lewis, of Lingan, is in default for giving a wrong signal, and 
is ordered to pay .§110 towards cost of investigation. 

On Sept. 7, 1927, collided off Three Rivers. Formal investiga- 
tion held at Montreal, Sept. 14, before Capt. Demers, 
assisted by Capt. C. Lapierre and Capt. A. Lefebvre, acting 
as nautical as.>essors. Master of Larnholme, J. T. Evans, 
Certificate No. 041320, in default for execution of wrong 
signal, as well as wrong helm order and movement. Ordered 
to pay $250 towards cost of investigation. Pilot, Arthur 
Belisle, of Darnholme, found grievously in default for order- 
ing wrong signal and helm movement. Suspended until he 
attains 65 years of age, with understanding that temporary 
license will not be issued thereafter. Second Officer of 
Darnholme exonerated. Pilot, Alexis Perrault, of Kcyport 
in default for giving uncalled for signal, and fined $400. 
Mate, William Blackwell, in default for absenting himself 
from post for lengthy period, and certificate suspended for 
one month. Master, C. J. Kenney, exonerated. 

On Sept. 27, 1927, stranded near Traverse Shoal, south of Prince 
Edward point. Lake Ontario. Formal investigation held at 
Montreal, Oct. 19, before Capt. Demers, assisted by Capt. 
C. Lapierre and Capt. C. W. McConechy, acting as nautical 
assessors. Finding: Master, John McPhee, Certificate No. 
007699, exonerated. First Mate, Cyiil Edward Brown, 
Certificate No. 0015298, held solely in default for lack of 
attention and improper lookout. His certificate suspended 
for one month. 

On June 24, 1927, stranded off shore of Orleans island, vicinity 
of River Maheun, in River St. Lawrence. Formal investi- 
gation held at Quebec on July 7, before Capt. Demers, 
assisted by Capt. C. Lapierre and Capt. Arthur Lefebvre, 
acting as nautical assessors. Finding: The Court finds the 
Master, G. P. Caron, forgot responsibilities in leaving 
Bridge without giving definite instructions. Due to excel- 
lent record, certificate is not dealt with, but he is ordered 
to pay $215 towards cost of investigation. Second Officer 
is in default for sleeping on duty, and his certificate is sus- 
pended for balance of season, and whole of next, that is, 
until Dec. 31, 1928. 

On Aug. 23, 1927, .stranded in Mud Lake, head of Lake Huron. 
Formal investigation held at Sarnia, on Sept. 1, before 
Capt. Demers, assisted by Capt. A. E. MacGregor and 
Capt. J. A. Glass, acting as nautical assessors. Finding: 
due to an excusable error in judgment on part of Master. 

On May 12, 1927, collided between buoys 24Q and 23Q in the St. 
Lawrence river. Formal investigation held at Montreal, 
on May 23, before Capt. Demers, assisted by Capt. N. Mar- 
torell, and Capt. A. Thomas, acting as nautical assessors. 
Finding: SS. Ikala to blame for casualty. Pilot, Arthur 
Belisle, found in default, and fined .5400. Master of Ikala 
also in default for not making obligatory inquiries after the 
impact, and is severely reprimanded. 

On June 19, 1927, collided in Lake Ontario. Formal invest iga- 
lion held at Montreal, on Sept. 26 before Capt. Demers, 
assistc(l by Capt. C. Lapierre and Capt. A. Lefebvre, acting 
as nautical assessors. Finding: Imacos not being navigated 
with prudence, violating Rules 19, 37 and 38, of Great Lakes, 
thereby inviting collision. Matter referred to Norwegian 
Government, this Court having no jurisdiction over cer- 
tificates of Master and Second Officer of Imacos. Keybar 
failed to carry out provisions of Rule 24. Court criticizes 
Cross Signal, Rule 23, Master of Keyhar in default to lesser 
degree than Imacos. Relatively, Imacos two-thirds, and 
Keyhar one-third. 



60 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



Statement of Formal Investigations and Preliminary Inquiries held during the 
Fiscal Year 1927 -2S— Continued 



Name of Ship 

and 

Official Number 



Port 

of 

Registry 



Remarks 



Jolly Inez, 106605. 



Kingdoc, 149429 

and 
Oxford, 145515 



Knockfierna, 138911 



Montreal. 



Newcastle-on-Tyne 
Montreal. 

Limerick 



Kurdistan, 1407( 



Lambton, 150234. 



Newcastle. 



Port Arthur. 



Mont Louis, 147791. 



Montreal. 



Martian, 3396. 



Port Arthur. 



Monarch, dredge, 
77591. 



Marila, 144920. 



Liverpool. 



Gaspe, Que. 



On Nov. 16, 1927, stranded on or near Saddle Bag island. Lake 
Huron. Formal investigation held at Toronto on Dec. 15, 
before Capt. Demers, assisted by Capt. .J. B. Foote and 
Capt. John Williams, acting as nautical assessors. Finding: 
Master, Harry Finn, Certificate No. 11526, found in default 
for bad judgment which may be termed of culpable nature, 
and certificate suspended for the j^ear 1928. Court recom- 
mended issuance of Mate's certificate in interim. 

On June 5, 1927, collided at the head of Lachine Canal. Formal 
investigation held at Montreal on July 11, before Capt. 
Demers, assisted by Capt. C. Lapierre and Capt. A. Lefeb- 
vre, acting as nautical assessors. Finding: Master of King- 
doc erred in judgment, and is cautioned. Master and Mate 
of Oxford are exonerated. 

On Aug. 6, 1927, stranded Brule Bank, North Channel, River 
St. Lawrence, whilst en route to Montreal. Formal investi- 
gation held at Montreal on Aug. 16, before Capt. Demers, 
assisted by Capt. E. C. Sears and Capt. B. W. Lyons, act- 
ing as nautical assessors. Finding: Master, Robert Bow- 
den, failed to exercise resourcefulness which might be 
expected. There being mitigating circumstances the Court 
does not deal with his certificate, but severely reprimands 
and cautions him. 

On Sept. 20, 1927, stranded, east end Anticosti island. Formal 
investigation held at Quebec on Sept. 30 before Capt. De- 
mers. Finding: Court found casualty the result of an act 
of God, and exonerated Master, John MacFarlane, and 
Second Officer. 

On Dec. 8, 1927, stranded and lost on or near Parisienne island. 
Lake Superior. Formal investigation held at Toronto, 
Jan. 17, before Capt. Demers, assisted by Capt. J. Williams 
and Capt. J. Ewart, acting as nautical assessors. Finding: 
Court exonerates Master and Officers from blame with 
respect to loss of ship and disappearance of two members of 
crew. Mate, C. E. Forbes, severely reprimanded for lack 
of disciplinary knowledge. 

On Aug. 5, 1927, grounded. Cap Bon Desir, east of Saguenay 
river, in River .St. Lawrence. Formal investigation held at 
Montreal, on Aug. 24, before Capt. Demers, assisted by Capt 
R. G. Sprague and Capt. P. S. Robertson, acting as nautical 
assessors. Finding: Pilot, First and Second Officers, in 
default. Certificate of First Officer is suspended for one 
month. Second Officer is severely reprimanded and warn- 
ed. Pilot Jo.seph Delisle, is fined S400, the maximum fine 
in lieu of suspension. 

On Dec. 9, stranded near Hare island. Thunder bay, Lake 
Superior. Formal investigation was held at Toronto, on 
Feb. 2, 1928, before Capt. Demers, assisted by Capt. J. 
Williams and Capt. J. P^vart, acting as nautical assessors. 
Finding: The Master, Robert Mclntyre, erred in judgment 
but not in culpable manner. He is severely reprimanded 
and cautioned, and his certificate is returned to him. 

On Aug. 24, 1927, foundered 2* miles of? Port Dalhouise, Lake 
Ontario. Preliminary investigation held at Welland, Dec. 
16, before Capt. Dcnier.s. Pending: Sinking of Dredge was 
due partially to lack of good judgment, as well as lack of 
seamanship. 

On Nov. 17, 1927, stranded on or about north side of Ile-aux- 
Coudres, River St. Lawrence. Formal investigation held 
at Quebec, on Nov. 16, before Capt. Demers, assisted by 
Capt. A. Landry and Capt. O. Sherrer, acting as nautical 
assessors. Finding: Master, J. J. Deslauriers, Certificate 
No. 9897, held cliiofiy to blame, and in default for entrusting 
valuable properly in hands antl care of one who for lack of 
experience should never have been permitted to leave the 
main deck. He was ordered to pay S135 toward costs of 
investigation. 'J'he casualty was found to be due to gross 
stupiditv, and ignorance of an untiualified, inexperienced 
man, boatswain .Auguste .Murray, left in charge by Master. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 



61 



Statement of Formal Investigations and Preliminary Inquiries held during the 
, Fiscal Year 1927-28— Condwded 



Name of Ship 

and 

Official Number 



Port 

of 

Registry 



Kidarholm. 



Oslo, Norway. 



Princess Charlotte, 
126263. 



Prince Rupert, 
129743. 



Sarnolite, 134515 

and 
Spriicp Bay, 150845. 



ScUasia, 113495. 



Union, 

and 
Vnlcano, 666. 



Victoria. 



Prince Rupert, B.( 



^arnia. . . . 
Montreal. 



Remarks 



Leith. 



Valleluce, 866. 



William H. DanicU 
147764. 



Dunkirk, France. 
Genoa, Italj"^. 



Genoa, Italy 



Middlesboro. 



On May 27, 1927, stranded, east point P.E.I. Preliminary in- 
vestigation held at Lauzon, on June 9, before Capt. Demers. 
The casualty was due to thoughtless navigation on part of 
Master. I'he Court has no jurisdiction over the certificate, 
the vessel being Norwegian, and the matter was referred to 
the Home Government. 
On Aug. 30, 1927, stranded on Vichnefski Rock, Sumner Straits, 
Alaska. Formal investigation held at Victoria, B.C., on 
Hept. 19, before Capt. John Macpherson, assisted by Capt. 
Reuben Balcolm and Capt. M. F. Cutler, acting as nautical 
as.scssors. Finding: Stranding due to slight error in judg- 
ment of Master, Claud Clifford Sainty, Certificate No. 
032219, in his estimate of ship's position, while in near 
vicinity of Vichnefski Rock, and he was mildly censured. 
No blame attached to other otiicers of vessel. 
On Aug. 22, 1927, striking Ripple Rock, in Discovery Passage, 
B.C. Formal investigation held at Vancouver on Dec. 19, 
before C apt. John McPherson, assisted by Capt. J. B. 
Stewart, and Cap.t- W. Bell, acting as nautical assessors. 
Finding: Accident occurred in dense fog, in narrow intricate 
tidal channel, and was not caused by any wrongful act or 
default of Master and Officers. 
On April 28, 1927, Sprucebay struck south bank of Cornwall 
canal in avoiding Sarnolite. Formal investigation held at 
Montreal, on July 5, before Capt. Demers, assisted Ijy Capt . 
C. Lapierre and Capt. A. Lefebvre, acting as nautical asses- 
sors. Finding: Damage sustained by Spruce Bay due to an 
error of judgment. Master, John Robert Montgomery, is 
advised to exercise coolness and calculation in issuance of 
orders when meeting ships. Master of Sarnolite is exoner- 
ated. 
On July .30, 1927, grounded. Belle Isle, whilst en route to Port 
Alfred, P.Q. Formal investigation held at Quebec on Aug. 
17, before Capt. Demers, assisted by Capt. f'rnest Fair and 
Capt. A. Landry. Finding: Master, David Smith, is in 
default for indifference. His certificate is not dealt with, 
but he is severely reprimanded. 
On Oct. 18, 1927, collided off Cock Point, St. Lawrence river, 
Vulcano sank, sub.sequently. Formal investigation held at 
Montreal on Oct. 26, before Capt. Demers, assisted by R. 
A. Williard, Capt. N. Martorell, and Capt. J. H. Reid, 
acting as nautical assessors. I-'inding: Master of I'nion, 
Auguste Mai, found to blame for collision through maintain- 
ing excessive speed. Master of Vulcano, Achille iVIoscatellie, 
exonerated insofar as collission is concerned, but found in 
default for lack of judgment and display of ordinary seaman- 
ship in the sinking and total loss of his vessel. Matter re- 
ferred to French and Italian Governments respectively, 
owing to the vessels being of French and Italian register, 
'hi Nov. 4, 1927, stranded near Point Berthier, River St. Law- 
rence. Formal investigation held at Quebec, on Nov. 17, 
before Capt. Demers, assisted by Capt. A. Landry and 
Capt. O. Sherrer, acting as nautical assessors. The Court 
finds that by permitting the pilot to perform such incompre- 
hensible evolutions, the Master is to blame for not asserting 
his authority. The T'ourt has referred matter to his home 
governir.ent. The pilot's certificate is returned. 
On (Jet. 27, stranded on Twelve Foot Spot off Crossover light, 
upper part of St. Lawrence. Formal investigation held at 
Montreal, Nov. 24, before Capt. Demers, assisted V)y Capt. 
C. Lapierre and Capt. J. A. Ouellctte, acting as nautical 
assessors. Finding: The Pilot, George P. Fleming (an 
American citizen), found alone to blame for failure to adopt 
measures of prudence, such as decrea.^ing speed, and making 
careful STUtiny and search for slake when range light on 
which he depended primarily was not seen. Matter referred 
to American authorities. Master, C. M. Chadwick, certifi- 
cate No. 10648, and Second Mate, L. Bishop, exonerated. 



62 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

MASTERS AND SEAMEN BRANCH 
Report of B. F. Buenett, Superintendent 

Navigation schools were in operation at St. John, N.B., at Halifax and 
North Sydney, N.S., at Quebec, P.Q., and at Kingston, Ont., and marine lectures 
were delivered at Collingwood, Ont., and at Vancouver, B.C. 

Examinations for masters' and mates' certificates were held at Halifax, 
Yarmouth and North Sydney, N.S., at Borden, P.E.I. , at St. John, N.B., at 
Quebec and Montreal, P.Q., at Ottawa, Kingston, Midland, Toronto, Colling- 
wood, Port Arthur and Kenora, Ont., at Selkirk, Man., at Prince Rupert, Van- 
couver and Victoria, B.C. 

Issued during the year 16 masters', 35 mates' and 31 second mates' sea- 
going certificates of competency; 82 masters' and 117 mates' coasting certifi- 
cates of competency; 35 masters' and 56 mates' inland waters certificates of 
competency; 44 masters' and 15 mates' minor inland waters certificates of com- 
petency, and 40 masters' temporary certificates. 

Twenty-eight thousand one hund.red and thirty-seven seamen were shipped 
and twenty-five thousand eight hundred and sixty-three seamen were discharged 
at sea-ports. 

PILOTAGE REPORT 

Captain G. E. L. Robertson, Director Pilotage 

The Honourable the Minister of Marine and Fisheries is the Pilotage 
Authority for the Pilotage Districts of Montreal, Quebec, Saint John, Halifax 
and Sydney, and all matters relating to pilotage in these districts are dealt with 
through the local superintendents at the above-mentioned places. 

district of MONTREAL 

At the opening of the 1927 season there were 51 pilots and 20 apprentices in 
this district. During the season 5 apprentices were examined and satisfactorily 
passed as pilots making a total of 56 pilots, and, as further apprentices were 
also added, making 24 apprentices on March 31, 1928. 

The first arrivals at Montreal at the commencement of the season were a 
co:tsting vessel on April 12, an ocean going vessel on April 17, and an inland 
water vessel on April 24. 

The gross earnings of the pilots were $293,316.47 for the season as com- 
pared with $257,325.37 for the 1926 season: an increase of $35,991.10 over 1926. 

The total number of vessels piloted inward was 2,240; outward, 2,147; 
w^hich makes a combined total of 4,387 vessels with a net tonnage of 11,866,275, 
as compared with 3,827 vessels with a net tonnage of 9,948,278 in 1926. This 
is an increase of 560 vessels with a net tonnage of 1,917,997. 

The last departures from the port of Montreal at the end of the season 
were: an inland vessel December 2, coasting and ocean going December 6. 

In this district 5 per cent of the gross earnings of the pilots is deducted for 
the Montreal Pilot's Pension Fund, which fund is administered bv the Depart- 
ment of Finance. The fund amounted to $106,280.33 on March 31, 1928. 

New by-laws were made and authorized by the Governor General in Coun- 
cil, Septemi^er 16, 1927 (1824), published in the Canada Gazette on September 
24. 1927, and printed for distribution. 

DISTRICT OF QUEBEC 

At the opening of the 1927 season, there were 47 pilots and 21 apprentices 
in tliis district, one apprentice was passed and given his pilot's license during 
the season, but no further apprentices were appointed. This made a total of 
48 pilots and 20 apprr ntices on March 31, 1928. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 63 

Father Point Pilotage Station opened on April 5, with the first vessel out- 
bound on April 5, and the first inward vessel on April 16, 1927. 

The gross earnings of the pilots were $1296,238.46 for the season, as copi- 
pared with $247,393.30 for the 1926 season, an increase of $48,845.16. 

The total number of vessels piloted inward was 2,156; outward, 1,931; 
which makes a combined total of 4,087 vessels with a net tonnage of 12,112,519, 
as compared with 3,455 vessels of 10,496,171 tons in 1926. This is an increase 
of 632 vessels and an increased net tonnage of 1,616,348 over the 1926 season. 

The Pilotage Station at Father Point was closed December 12, 1927, after 
the last vessel passed out. The pilot tender Jalobert was brought to Father 
Point and drydocked for the season. SS Jalobert and two launches were on the 
station. 

In this district 7 per cent of the gross earnings of the pilots is deducted for 
the Pension Fund. This fund is administered by the Quebec Pilot's Corpora- 
tion, and amounted to $106,788.38 on December 31, 1927. In addition to the 
pension received from the corporation, certain retired pilots (35 in number) 
receive an annual allowance from the Government of $300 each. 

GENERAL — MONTREAL AND QUEBEC 

Mr. R. A. Wiallard, Montreal, is the acting superintendent for these dis- 
tricts, and Mr. F. J. Boulay, Quebec, is the assistant superintendent. 

All expenses for the Pilotage service at Montreal and Quebec are paid 
out of public funds. These amounted to $13,408.78 for the District of Montreal, 
and $69,662.77 for the District of Quebec, the latter including the cost of the 
maintenance of the pilot tender Jalobert and pilotage launches. 

The pilot Tender Jalobert and launches in addition to the pilotage work 
attend also to the Quarantine Station, doctors being attached to the Jalobert 
allowing of practique being given to ships provided there is no contagious 
disease on board. This does awav with delavs to ships having to stop at Grosse 
Isle. 

The Jalobert lands the mails for all eastern points, and also handles mail 
betv\'een ship and aeroplane and vice versa for the aerial mail service which 
was started during the season. This included 5.629 bags and 1,822 baskets, and 
a considerable quantity of loose mail, also 172 bags of letters on out-going ships 
during the 1927 season. The Customs officers are also put on board and taken 
off ships. Five services are, therefore, centralized at Father Point, which means 
a considerable economy to the federal Government and satisfaction to shipping. 

DISTRICT OF SAINT JOHN 

At the beginning of the 1927-28 fiscal year, there were 13 pilots and 2 appren- 
tices in the district, during the year, two pilots were retired having reached 
the retirement age, and accepted their pensions. 

The gross revenue of the district for 1927-28 was $51,500.50 and the expenses 
including the upkeep of the pilot vessel and motor launch, the repayment of 
loans, and the amount paid into the pension fund amounted to $15,273.29, leav- 
ing a balance to be divided among the pilots of $36,227.21. 

The number of vessels inward was 473 and outward 462, a total of 935 
vessels with a total net tonnage of 2,436,787, as compared with 1,124 vessels of 
2,921,213 net tons in the previous j^ear paying pilotage dues a decrease of 189 
vessels of 384,426 net tons. 

In this district 12 per cent of the gross revenue is deducted for the Super- 
annuation Fund. This fund is administered without charge for the Saint John 
pilots bv the Department of Finance. The fund amounted to $39,964.10 on 
March 31, 1928. 

The auxilliary vessel Monarchy with a motor launch are the pilot tenders 
on the station. 



64 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

Mr. J. C. Chesley, Saint John, is the Acting Superintendent of Pilots. 
The expenses incurred by the department for the upkeep of the ofl&ce and 
staff were $1,450.27. 

DISTRICT OF SYDNEY, N..S. 

There were 21 pilots and no apprentices in this district at the beginning 
of the season of navigation. During the season, one pilot died and two were 
dismissed, leaving 18 active pilots who worked through the whole season. 

The season commenced on April 23, 1927, and closed on January 22, 1928. 

The gross revenue of the district amounted to $55,930.66 and the total 
expenses including the amount paid into the Superannuation Fund, general 
maintenance and upkeep of the pilot vessel and the repayment of part of the 
money loaned for the building of the pilot vessel amounted to $4,820.84, leaving 
a balance of $51,109.82 to be divided among the pilots. 

The total number of vessels piloted inward was 1,109 and outward 1,109, 
making a total of 2,218 vessels with a net tonnage of 2,076,248, as compared 
with a total of 2,567 vessels with a total net tonnage of 2,626,808, for the previ- 
ous year, a decrease of 349 vessels of 550,560 net tons. 

In this district 15 per cent of the gross revenue is deducted for the Pilots' 
Superannuation Fund which is administered by the Department of Finance. 
On March 31, 1928, the fund amounted to $34,474.83. 

The auxilliaiy vessel H.M. Whitney is the pilot tender on the station. 

Captain J. D. Mackenzie s the superintendent of pilots for this district. 

The expenses incurred by the department and paid out of public funds 
amounted to $5,773.45. 

DISTRICT OF H.\LirAX 

There were 20 pilots and 4 apprentices in this district at the commencement 
of the 1927-28 season. One pliot was retired and was placed on the Pension 
Fund. One apprentice pilot was given a temporary license on probation. No 
further apprentices were taken on the register during the fiscal year. This left 
20 pilots and 3 apprentices on the active list. 

The gross revenue for 1927-28 amounted to $99,128.85. The total expenses 
including repa\Tnent of loans, general maintenance of the two pilot tenders and 
the amount paid into the Superannuation Fund amounted to $26,828.85, leaving 
a balance to be divided among the pilots of $72,300. 

The total number of vessels piloted inward 1,572 and outward 1,533, making 
a total of 3,105 vessels of a total net tonnage 7,902.319, as compared with 3,174 
vessels of a total net tonnage 7,431,502, a decrease of 69 vessels, though the ton- 
nage was increased by 470,817 tons over 1926-27. 

The auxilliary vessels Nauphila and Columba were the pilot tenders during 
the season. 

The Columba was sold out of the service and a new vessel is being built 
for the service, so that by tlic beginning of the 1928-29 season, the port of 
Halifax will have two very able vessels that are a credit to the Pilotage service. 

In this district 5 per cent of the gross revenue is deducted for the Superan- 
nuation Fund. This fund is administered without charge for the Halifax Pilots 
by the Department of Finance and on March 31, 1928, amounted to $75,330.27. 

Captain P. C. Johnson is the superintendent of pilots at Halifax. 

The expenses incurred by the department for the upkeep of the office and 
staff were $6,350. 

GENERAL 

Of the thiHy-six pilotage authorities constituted under the authority of 
the Governor Coneral in Council in pursuance of the provisions of the Canada 
Shipping Act, ihirteen have forwarded returns for 1927. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 



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66 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

ANNUAL REPORT ON SABLE ISLAND 

H. F. Henry, Superintendent 

An unknown trawler reported he was ashore on the Northeast bar and 
later he reported he was clear; was unable to get his name. Considerable 
wreckage came ashore last August, such as ship's timbers, oars and parts of 
dories; during gale of August five schooners were lost near island. Damage 
was done to No. 3 barn; the roof blew off and the tide rose to such a height 
that it destroj^ed considerable of the island crop. 

The C.G.S. Arras arrived at island with five Lunenburg schooner masters 
to try and identify wreckage strewn about beach. 

Various repairs carried out at all stations as usual, such as repairing fences, 
barns, doors, and shingling. In addition. No. 3 Station had to shingle barn, 
having been damaged by gale. At Main Station considerable repairs were 
made; shingled north side warehouse, repaired doors of dairy, horse barn, cow 
barn, life-boat shed, and men's house. Hauled many tons of sand away from 
life-boat shed to repair sills which were badly decayed; placed a sill 51 feet 
long under east .-ide and one 28 feet long under north side; boarded in side and 
end and then shingled it. The West Light was scraped and painted under the 
direction of E. R. Morrison, of the Halifax Agency of the Marine and Fisheries. 
F. Fultz, G. Goddard, and two assistants visited East Light to make temporary 
repairs to floor under lantern. 

Inside of all dwellings cleaned and painted where necessary. Those that 
had previously been whitewashed outside were again whitewashed. Inside of 
all bams, sheds and outhouses were whitewashed; painted life-boats, surf 
boats and dories. 

Life-boats, surf boats and beach apparatus in excellent condition. 

Vegetable fi?lds were prepared for planting before arrival of spring steamer; 
when seed was received fields were planted; hauled over 120 loads manure 
to hay and vegetable fields. The crop was damaged by August gale, and the 
combined crop of island does not include vegetables used from August to harvest. 
Combined crop was 120 bushels potatoes, 7 barrels cabbage, 6 barrels turnips, 
and a fair crop from other seed. 

Shipped 8 barrels cranberries to agent. Marine and Fisheries. The bogs 
filled up with water, making it near impossible to get any cranberries. Main 
Station cut and stowed 60 loads of hay in barns; 18 loads were fine hay. All 
other stations filled barns with hay. 

No. 4 Station was closed by authority of the department. The staff was 
reduced to fifteen men, and the department raised the staff's pay accordingly. 

Coxswain R. Naugle resigned from service and left island by spring steamer. 

Keeper A. Lapierre, of No. 2 Station, resigned from service and left island 
by spring steamer. 

Keeper J. Gregoire, of East Light, was transferred to No. 2 Station at his 
request. 

Keeper W. Cleary, of West Light, took sick and was taken off island and 
placed in the V. G. hospital at Halifax, where he died after an operation. 

E. Stoddard was appointed to West Light as keeper. 

D. Mackenzie was appointed to East Light, and resigned, W. 0. Mason 
being appointed in his place. 

Stock killed during year — 1 bull; weight, 700 pounds. 

Stock on hand — 30 head horned cattle, 32 trained horses, about 125 wild 
ponies, 1 sow, 1 boar, and 4 small pigs. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 67 

The population is now 41, comprising the following: — 

Main Station — 

Supt. Henry, wife and family 6 

Cook, E. Kerwin; Coxswain, T. Keating; Staffman, C. Pye; StafTinan, N. 

Mosher; StafTnian, M. Dooks; Staffman, J. Home; Staffman, G. Anderson. . 7 

No. 2 Station — 

Keeper J. Gregoire, wife and family 8 

A'o. 3 Station — 

Keeper \V. Mackenzie, wife, and Assistant E. Gill 3 

West Light — 

Keeper E. Stoddard, wife, child, and Assistant H. Stoddard 4 

East Light — 

Keeper W. Mason, wife, child, and Assistant D. Home 4 

Wireless Station — 

Chief Operator, H. Masson, wife, family, and Mrs. Day 7 

Assistants, G. Raine and G. Day 2 



41 



Island patrolled fifty-nine times on account of fog, snow and heavy rain. 
Carried out life-boat drill twelve times and rocket apparatus drill eight 
times. 

Visited all stations nine times during year. 

REPORTS OF AGENCIES 

Halifax, N.S., Agency 

During the fiscal year ended March 31, 1928, this agency maintained 
164 lighthouses, 165 lights, 71 wharves, 25 storm signals, 19 pole lights, 6 life 
boats, 6 electric lights, 2 lightships, 1 explosive fog alarm, 19 diaphones, 1 steam 
whistle, 48 hand horns, 2 mechanical bells, 20 combined gas and whistling 
buoys, 18 combined gas and bell buoys, 7 gas buoys, 23 automatic whistling 
buoys, 52 automatic bell buoys, 192 can and conical buoys, 1,204 spar buoys, 2 
day beacons, 1 humane station Sable island, 3 Government steamers, Aranmore, 
Lady Laurier, and J. L. Nelson. 

CHANGES IN AIDS TO NAVIGATION 

Cape Negro island. — Character of light changed. 
Flying point shoal. — Bell changed to whistling buoy. 
Fort point.— Character of light changed. 
Betty island. — Character of light changed. 
Barrington East bay. — Can changed to bell buoy, 

NEW AIDS ESTABLISHED 

Port DujEferin. — Pole light. 

St. Mary's river. — Pole light back range. 

Little harbour. — Bell buoy. 

Sonora. — Bell buoy. 

Smith rock. — Bell buoy. 

Little Liscomb entrance. — Five spar buoys. 

Ecum Secum. — Eleven spar buoys. 

Larry's river. — One spar buoy. 

CONSTRUCTION AND REPAIR WORK 

St. Mary's River Back Range Light.— A new pole light with shelter shed was 
built at this place to form a range with the Budget light. 

Three Top Island.— A new standard combined lighthouse and dwelling 
was built at this station to replace the old building. The latter is now being used 
as a storehouse. 

65702— 5i 



68 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

Guion Island. — A new standard combined lighthouse and dwelling was 
built at this station to replace the old building, which was condemned. A new 
boathouse, with slipway, was also built at this station. 

Battery Point. — The back electric range light at this station was moved 
about 150 feet close to the front light. Two new 40 foot poles, wire, etc., were 
required, and the work was done by contract with the Cape Breton Electric 
Company. 

Canso D. F. Station. — Repairs were made to roadway leading from the town 
limits to station. All ruts were filled in and a good covering of gravel 
put on practically the entire road. 

Betty Island. — A new lighting apparatus authorized for this station was 
installed, and is giving good satisfaction. 

Chebucto Head Signal Service Lookout Station. — A new lookout building 
was built from plans prepared in my office. 

Country Island. — A new standard combined lighthouse and dwelling was 
built to replace the old building, which was beyond repair. 

Green Island. — A new standard combined lighthouses and dwelling was 
erected at this station to replace the old building, which was in a dilapidated 
condition. 

Feltzen South. — A pressed lens lantern complete with burner was forwarded 
to this station. 

Dog Island. — A new pressed lens lantern complete with burner was received 
and shipped to Dog Island. 

Little Hope Island. — Repairs were made to the stone wall breakwater and 
slipway, and some sheathing was put on face of cribwork. 

Sable Island West End Light. — Forty-six new angle irons were put in the 
steel frame of tower, and the latter was thoroughly scraped and painted. 
The slatwork under lantern was removed as instructed. The erector reports 
a good job done. 

Halifax Lightship ''No. 21^\. — The diaphone was rebored and three oversize 
pistons were supplied. 

Wedge Island. — A new standard combined lighthouse and dwelling was 
built at this station to replace the old one. 

Cape Negro Island. — The new 4th order clockwork mechanism was received 
from Prescott, forwarded to station, and installed as instructed. 

Medway Head. — A new combined lighthouse and dwelling was built to 
replace the old building. A new boathouse and slipway were also built. 

Chebucto Head D. F. Station. — An addition was built to the operating 
house, and other alterations were carried out as directed, and in accordance 
with plans and specifications received. 

Lockport Range Lights. — A new electric range was established at Locke- 
port, and the erection and installation of lighting apparatus was carried out 
under my directions. 

Beaver Island, St. Peter's Inlet. — Materials for new standard pole light and 
shed have been cut and framed at depot, and are to be shipped to station for 
erection at first opportunity. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 69 

Petit de Grat Storm Signal Station. — A new mast has been made ready at the 
depot here, and material for repairs to shed have been ordered and will be 
shipped to station at an early date. 

West Dover new Storm Signal Station. — A new storm signal mast and shed 
were erected at this place. 

Sable Island East End. — Materials are being ordered for repairs to deck of 
tower, and work will be put in hand early this summer. 

Whitehead Deming Island. — A new storm signal mast and shed are to be 
established at this place, and the building materials have been ordered- same 
will be started when definite instructions are received re site. 

Cape Freels. — The new diaphone, type "F", and three pistons for this station, 
have not yet arrived from Prescott. When received, same will be shipped on 
the annual supply trip and installed as directed. 

Black Rock Point. — A new hand fog horn was received from Prescott and 
shipped to this station as directed. 

DOMINION STEAMERS 

C.G.S. J. L. Nelson. — April 1 to June 8, on harbour duties, transporting 
supplies; at Chebucto head; to Mauger's beach. June 9 to 27, on eastern buoy 
program. June 28 to August 4, on western buoy program and western inspec- 
tion trip. August 5 to September 26, on eastern supply trip and eastern buoy 
program. September 27 to March 5, 1928, 'blown down for annual repairs. 
March 6 to 31, harbour duties; transporting supplies. 

C.G.S. Aranmore. — April 1 to May 2, under contract repairs. May 3 to 19, 
on harbour work; loading buoys; transporting supplies. May 20 to August 15, 
on eastern buoy program. August 16, returned to agency. August 17 to 24. 
supplies to Sable island and Eastern station. August 25 to September 16, 
coaling at North Sydney for cape Race; supplying cape Race and endeavouring 
salve buoy at Miquelon. September 17 to December 18, at Prince Edward 
Island agency. December 19 to 27, at North Sydney, proceeding to St. Paul's 
island. December 28 to February 4, 1928, on western buoy program. February 6 
to 27, on eastern buoy program. February 27 to March 31, Annual overhaul. 

C.G.S. Lady Laurier.^Apnl 1 to 4, on eastern buoy program. April 5 to 6, 
at agency, storm. April 7 to 16, on eastern buoy program. April 18 to 26, on 
western buoy program. April 28 to 30, loaded but detained at agency account of 
storm. May 2 to 7, on eastern buoy program; placing Halifax buoy. May 9 to 
15, on western program. May 16 to June 28, blown down for annual overhaul. 
June 29 to July 8, on buoy and supplies program. July 9 to 31, on western 
buoy program. August 1 to 25, on eastern supply trip. August 26 to Septem- 
ber 4, on western supply trip. September 6 to 8, on eastern programme and 
salving buoys. September 9 to 15, on western program. September 16 to October 
25, on eastern supply trip. September 26 to 31, on western buoy program. 
November 1 to 16, supplies to eastern lights and Sable island. November 18 to 
December 12, on eastern buoy program relieving lightship A^o. 21^. December 13 
to 27, on western buoy program. December 28 to January 7, 1928, blown down 
for cleaning boilers. January 9 to 17, with supplies to Sable island. January 
18 to 31, on eastern buoy trip. February 1 to 20, on western buoy trip. Febru- 
ary 21 to 27, on eastern buoy program. February 28 to March 28, on western 
buoy program. March 29, placed inner Automatic, Halifax. March 30, load- 
ing buoy for East. 



70 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



Sydney, N.S., Subagency 

All aids to navigation in this harbour and nearby coast line have been well 
maintained during the past year, and for this reason no groundings or collisions 
have taken place; this together with the very efficient pilotage service now 
maintained may be accepted as the reason why shipowTiers or shipmastei? have 
filed no complaints. 

Canadian Government steamers Lady Laurier and Arranmore have lifted 
and placed the buoys, carried supplies to lighthouses, and at the same time gave 
attention to all matters assigned by the department. Ice breaker C.G.S. Mont- 
calm was again assigned to winter duty relieving shipping in this port as well as 
at the -^-inter port, Louisburg and at other ports or places when required. Owing 
to favourable winds, Cabot strait did not require very special attention this 
spring, the C.G.S. Montcalm doing practically all the convoying required. 

Sydney harbour is well provided with ship-repair shops, but with the 
exception of ceriain repairs to machinery and boilers, vessels required but veiy 
little attention, and this is quite noticeable because of the very heavy traffic in 
which is engaged ships carrying cargoes many running as high as 12,000 tons, 
and arriving and clearing almost hourly day and night, the conclusion is, the 
harbour service given by the department, together with the shipmasters them- 
selves, may be tlie reason for this safe navigation. Matters in which the Quebec 
and Charlottetown agencies were interested received attention here. 

SHIPPING RETURNS FOR THE PORTS OF SYDNEY, NORTH SYDNEY, AND 

LOUISBURG 

Number 

Port of Sydney — of ships Tons 

Foreign inwards 25.5 535, 545 

" outwards 330 743, 522 

Coastwise inwards 1, 127 1,413,584 

outwards 1,066 1,211,598 

Port of North Sydney — 

Foreign inwards 868 352, 869 

" outwards 892 395,340 

Coastwise inwards 858 308, 936 

" outwards 844 271,049 

Port of Louisburg — 

Foreign inwards 145 43, 458 

" outwards 138 56, 686 

Coastwise inwards 123 90, 973 

outwards 136 86,375 



PicTou, N.S., Subagency 

The deep-water channel from Abercrombie point to New Glasgow was 
marked and marks kept in position by contractor during season. Operation of 
East river range lights was supervised during season. 

Harbour and roadstead buoys were placed in position by ss. Brant May 19 
and lifted early in December. 

Steamers Margaret, Bayfield, Greb, and Brant were in port during season 
on lighthouse and patrol service. 

Lighthouse keepers were notified regarding lighting and extinguishing lights. 

During early part of spring daily reports of ice conditions in the harbour 
and vicinity were made to superintendent of Signal Service, Quebec. 

Oil furnished lighthouse keepers when required. 

St. John, N.B., Agency 

During the past year all aids to navigation in this division have been 
inspected by the district engineer. The usual annual repairs, cleaning and paint- 
ing have been carried out at the various stations. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 71 

We have under the supervision of this agency one hundred and seventy 
light, fog-alarm and fog-bell stations, classified as follows: — 

4 unwatched lights — using "Aga" acetylene. 
3 fog-alarm stations only. 

1 fog bomb-station. 

2 fog-bell stations operated by machinery. 

7 electric light-stations, one of which is a combined light and fog-bell 

station. 
1 station using a Banner burner. 

6 stations having Piper lanterns. 

28 vapour lightstations, sixteen of which are light and fog-alarm stations 
combined. 
116 stations using duplex lamps — six being combined light and fog-alarm 
stations. 

At Peases island a Mammoth No. 3 lamp is maintained in addition to the 
55 m/m diamond vapour light. 

At Mitchener point, where we have a duplex lamp, a second light is main- 
tained of the Mammoth No. 3 type. 

Also, the Lurcher lightship, a red, steel steamer with two masts, each show- 
ing a white light, equipped with diaphone, submarine fog-bell, and radio- 
telegraph apparatus, and manned by a crew of fifteen, is located on the Lurcher 
shoal^ seventeen miles from Yarmouth, N.S. 

CHANGES IN LIGHTHOUSE AND FOG-ALARM SERVICE 

Courtenay Bay Breakwater Light, N.B. — An unwatched, white light was 
established on the outer end of Courtenay bay breakwater. 

Cheverie Light, N.S. — The pole light, formerly located on the inner end of 
Cheverie wharf, N.S., was moved to the outer end of this wharf. 

Cape Spencer Fog-Alarm, N.B. — Cape Spencer fog-alarm destroyed by fire 
on November 28, was rebuilt. 

MAINTENANCE OF BUOYS AND BEACONS 

All the buoys and beacons under the supervision of this agency, including 
those under contract as well as attended by departmental steamers, have been 
well maintained during the past year. 

The following is a list of those maintained under contract: — 

3 barrels, 6 cans, 

3 dropping buoys, 15 bushed stakes, 

7 casks, 7 miles bushing, 

3 spindles, 517 bushes and stakes, 

8 corneals, 334 spars. 

Our departmental steamers have attended to the following: — 

4 gas, 55 cans, 

33 bell, 57 conicals, 

7 whistle, 104 spars, 

5 gas and bell, 25 spindles, 
15 gas and whistle, 18 stakes. 

At Reeds point, St. John city, an electric beacon, showing a red and white 
light, is exhibited from a three branched lamp post. 



72 MARINE AXD FISHERIES 

CHANGES AND ADDITIONS TO BUOY SERVICE 

Abbot Harbour Bell Buoy, N.S. — A steel, cylindrical, bell buoy, painted 
black and white vertical stripes, was established 1| miles 222 degrees from 
Abbot harbour lighthouse. 

Cape Fourchu Gas and Whistling Buoy, N.S. — The cape Fourchu gas and 
whistling buoy, located in 22 fathoms of water, 5 miles 286 degrees from cape 
Fourchu lighthouse, was moved to a new position in 11 fathoms of water, 2 miles 
286 degrees from cape Fourchu lighthouse. 

Cat Rock Gas and Bell Buoy, N,.S. — The Cat rock bell buoy was replaced 
by a black, steel, cylindrical gas and bell buoy, showing an occulting white 
light. 

Comwallis River Buoys, N.S. — Six black stakes and five red stakes, about 
10 feet high, were placed on the edge of the marsh on the banks of the Corn- 
wallis river between Wolfville and port Williams. 

Dingees Creek Buoys, N.B. — Two poles, with white, wooden, diamond 
shaped daymarks on them, were erected about one mile above Gagetown. 
Beacons in line mark the centre line of the St. John river. 

Sandjord Bell Buoy, N.S. — A red, steel, bell buoy was established 1\ miles 
from Sandford, N.S., in 9 fathoms of water. 

Tusket Islands Gas and Whistling Buoy, N.S. — A steel, cylindrical buoy, 
painted in black and white vertical stripes showing an occulting white light, was 
established 2 miles 250 degrees from Soldiers ledge, Tusket islands, N.S. 

Yarmouth Sound Buoys, N.S. — Three red, wooden spar buoys were estab- 
lished in Yarmouth sound, between Hen and Chickens and Cornish rock, on 
the east side of the channel recently dredged. 

METEOROLOGICAL SERVICE 

There are under the supervision of the New Brunswick agency eight signal 
stations, viz.: Digby, N.S. ; Lepreau, N.B.; Parrsboro, N.S.; Port Maitland, 
N.S.; Saint Andrews, N.B.; Saint John, N.B.; Westport, N.S.; Yarmouth, N.S. 

These stations have been inspected by officials connected with the agency. 
Various repairs have been carried out, where found necessary. 

LIFE-SAVING SERVICE 

The three life-saving stations under the direction of this agency; viz.: Bay 
View, N.S., Clarks harbour, N.S., and Little Wood island, N.B., were visited 
during the year by our District Engineer. 

CONSTRUCTION AND REPAIRS 

Four bell buoys, four winter can buoys and four winter conical buoys were 
supplied for use in the buoy service. 

Cape Spencer Light and Alarm, N.B. — A 1,500 gallon oil storage tank was 
erected at cape Spencer for the storage of fuel oil. 

Courtenay Bay Light, N.B. — An unwatched light was established on the 
end of Courtenay bay breakwater to show the entrance to Courtenay bay. 

Ellenwood Island Spindle, N.S. — The spindle at EUenwood island carried 
away by ice last winter, was replaced. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 73 

Gannet Rock Light and Alarm, N.B. — A 1,600 gallon and a 1,300 gallon oil 
storage tanks were erected. 

Head Harbour Light and Alarm, N.B. — Repairs to foundation of the light- 
house tower and the bell of the L of the dwelling, and a 1,500 gallon oil storage 
tank installed. 

Lepreau Light and Alarm, N.B. — Oil unit installed, also a new type "F" 
diaphone with three pistons. 

Lights and Alarms, GeneraL — Forty-two oil storage tanks were supplied 
for use at various stations. 

Long Eddy Alarm, N.B. — New diaphone installed. 

Parrsboro Alarm, N.S. — New type "A" diaphone installed. 

Samt John River Buoys, N.B. — Two day beacons erected at Dingee's creek 
on Saint John river, to show the centre of the channel there. 

Swallow Tail Light, N.B. — Repairs to top of tower. 

]Volfville Wharf, N.S.- — Fenders placed. 

Yarmouth D. F. Station, N.S. — Repairs to dwelling house. 

Big Duck Island Alarin, N.B. — Repairs to cylinders of engines. 

Brier Island Light and Alarm, N.S. — Repairs to keeper's dwelling. 

Bunker Island S. W. Light, N.S. — General repairs. 

Cape Fourchu Light and Alarm, N.S. — General repairs. 

Drews Head Light, N.B. — General repairs. 

Grand Passage Light and Bell, N.S. — Repairs to fog-bell engine. 

Horton Bluff Light, N.S. — Repairs to kitchen and new floor. 

He Haute Light, N.S. — General repairs. 

Lepreau Light and Alarm, N,.B. — General repairs. 

Letite Light and Alarm, N.B. — General repairs. 

Long Eddy Point Alarm, N.B. — Repairs to diaphone. 

Partridge Island Light and Alarm, N.B. — Repairs to telephone cable. 

Pecks Point Liglit and Alarm, N.B. — General repairs. 

Pubnico Light, N.S. — Repairs to seawall and breakwater. 

Quaco Light and Alarm, N.B. — Repairs to engines. 

Tucket River Light, N.S. — General repairs. 

MAINTENANCE OF WHARVES 

There are under the supervision of this agency one hundred and thirty-two 
public wharves, Port Williams, N.S., having been added during the year just 
ended. 

All of these wharves have been inspected by the district engineer, and 
repairs made where found necessary. 



74 MARLY E AXD FISHERIES 

PARTRIDGE ISLAND SIGNAL STATION 

STATEMENT OF VESSELS SIGNALLED, GIVING TOTAL TONNAGE OF SAME, FROM 
APRIL 1, 1927, TO MARCH 31, 1928 

Tonnage 

137 steamers 517, 397 

12 three-masted schooners 4, 444 

6 four-masted schooners 3, 693 

8,137 

Total tonnage 525,534 

2 men of war. 

157 vessels reported from Partridge island. 

DOMINION STEAMERS 

C.G.S. Dollard. — This steamer was constantly employed dm-ing the fiscal 
year 1927-28 in buoy and lighthouse service, landing coal and supplies at the 
various stations under the jurisdiction of this agency. 

During the year the steamer was laid off duty at the following times for 
repairs as specified: April 22 until May 4, 1927, cleaning boilers. September 10 
to September 22, 1927, cleaning boilers. January 19 until February 2, 1928, 
at the St. John Dry Dock and Shipbuilding Co. for annual overhaul. 

G.G.S. Laurentian. — Was employed continuously in lighthouse and buoy 
service under the New Brunswick agency during the fiscal year 1927-28. During 
the following periods this steamer was laid ofi for repairs, as stated: May 19 
until July 12, 1927, at the St. John Dry Dock and Shipbuilding Co., for annual 
overhaul. November 9 until November 19, 1927, at Saint John Dry Dock and 
Shipbuilding Co., cleaning boilers and repairing tanks. March 27 to April 7, 
1928, cleaning boilers. 

Victoria, B.C., Agency 

LIST OF LIGHTHOUSES, FOG ALARMS, FOG BELLS, ETC., IN THE VICTORIA AGENCY 

3 light stations of the first order. 

3 light stations of the third order. 

9 light stations using catoptric reflectors. 

8 light stations of the fourth order. 

8 light stations of the fifth order. 

1 light station of the sixth order. 

12 light stations of the seventh order. 

Fog Alarms — 

23 fog alarms of the diaphone type. 
1 fog alarm of the Strombos compressed air type. 

4 fog alarms of the reed type. 
10 bdls. 

1 siren. 

Lighted Buoys — 

1 type 11 gas and whistling buoy. 

5 type 9> gas and whi.'tling buoys. 
1 type 9j gas and boll buoy. 

3 type Si gas and bell buoys. 

8 type 8j gas and lighted buoys. 

1 only wooden platform buoy with Agra gas light. 

3 only wooden platform buoys with oil lanterns. 

Unligihted Buoys — 

3 automatic whi.stling buoys. 
5 surface bell buoys. 
23 steel conical buoys. 
34 steel can buoys. 
3 small steel mine buoys. 
112 wooden spar buoys. 
16 wooden platfonn buoys. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 75 

Lighted Beacons — 

21 automatic acetylene gas beacons. 

8 Aga acetylene gas range beacons using 200 m/m flashers. 

6 Aga acetylene gas range beacons using 200 m/m lanterns. 

2 light stations using 200 m/m Aga flashers. 
39 Aga acetylene gas beacons using 150 m/m lanterns. 
20 electric lighted beacons. 
13 oil lighted beacons. 

Unlighted Day Beacons, Range MarkS; Dolphins, etc., 68. 

MAINTENANCE AND CONSTRUCTION WORK 

Amphitritc Point. — A diaphone fog alarm type "B" was established. 

Banfield Life-Saving S'ation. — Extensive alterations and repairs authorized. 

Burnaby Slioal. — Beacon rebuilt. 

Clayoquot Life-Saving Station. — Extensive alterations and repairs author- 
ized. 

Carmanah Point. — Repairs made to station. 

Deep Bay. — An unwatched light authorized. 

Port Alberni. — Repairs to government wharf. 

Port Neville. — Range beacons authorized. 

Sugar Loaf Point.- — An unwatched light authorized. 

Skoal Point. — A new beacon was rebuilt to replace the old one. 

Sidney. — Repairs made to government wharf. 

Sisters Light Station. — Repairs made. 

Tozier Rock. — Concrete beacon built. 

Ucluelet Arm. — Three day beacons constructed. 

Banfield Lifeboat. — Was overhauled. 

Scarlett Point. — Repairs to wooden tramway. 

Helen Point. — Fog bell structure rebuilt. 

Sandheads Lightship. — Was repaired and machinery overhauled. 

Race Rocks — Repairs to fog alarm machinery. 

Clayoquot Lifeboat. — New engine installed. 

Brockton Point. — New fog alarm was installed. 

Cape Scott. — An unwatched light installed. 

Pachena Point. — Fog alarm engine rebored and fitted with new piston. 

Yellow Island. — New dwelling authorized. 

Victoria Depot. — Repairs to wharf authorized. 

Nanaimo. — Repairs to government wharf. 

Eraser River. — Five gas buoys installed and extensive changes made to 
improve the navigation of the river. 

Lennard Island. — New dwelling authorized. 

Cape Beale-Banfield trail built. 



76 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

LIFE-SAVING AND SALVAGE OPERATIONS FOR YEAR ENDING MARCH 31, 1928 

The life-boats at Banfield and Clayoquot were in commission the whole 
year, except for the short period in which they were being overhauled. 

Patrol steam vessels were stationed at Banfield during the winter months 
and three patrolmen were kept on the west coast trail from November 1 to 
April 1. 

The following is a list of shipping casualties: — 

.Sea TFo//.— American fishing vessel, 32 feet long,, wrecked off cape Beale, 
August 31. 1927. Boat total loss. No lives lost. 

SS. Nohile. — Canadian motor schooner, wrecked on Escalante reef on 
January 5, 1928. Total wreck. Lives lost, 4. Two lives saved. 

Mail Launch. — Gasolene boat, 28 feet long, wrecked on Pine island Decem- 
ber 11, 1927. Ship total loss. No lives lost. 

U.S.S. Northuwstern. — Mail and passenger steamer, owned by the Alaska 
Steamship Company, went ashore on cape Mudge on December 11, 1927. One 
hundred passengers were taken off by a halibut boat and thirty-three members 
of the crew taken off by C.G.S. Estevan. No loss of life. Steamer eventually 
salvaged. 

DOMINION STEAMERS 

C.G.S. Estevan. — April 1 to 7 — employed recharging gas buoys in the strait 
of Georgia. April 7 to May 10 — employed overhauling and recharging gas 
buoys on w-est and north waters of Vancouver island. May 10 to 14 — replaced 
Sand Heads lightship; coaled and then loaded cargo of oil for west coast light- 
houses. May 19 to June 11 — landed supplies at west coast stations. June 11 
to July 2 — overhauled Clo-oose bell buoy, landed supplies at Banfield for Public 
Works department and fog alarm machinery at Amphitrite point. July 2 to 9 
— boiler blown down, crew loading supplies for Pine island, Scarlett point and 
Pulteney point stations. July 9 to August 13 — landing supplies at lightstations 
and overhauling gas buoys in northern British Columbia. August 13 to Sep- 
tember 16 — landing construction material and building beacons on west coast 
of Vancouver island. September 16 to October 8 — overhauling buoys on west 
coast and landing construction material for new dwelling at Lennard island. 
October 8 to October 20 — loaded lumber at Victoria for new dwelling at Yellow 
rock station and landed same at Yellow rock. October 20 to November 5 — 
establishing new light at cape Scott. November 5 to November 12 — laying new 
gas buoys on Fraser river. November 12 to December 16 — landing Christmas 
and Government supplies at west coast stations Took off 33 of crew from 
wrecked vessel Northwestern. December 16 to December 24 — overhauling 
buoys in strait of Georgia. December 24 to January 14, 1928 — recharging buoys 
in the Fraser river. January 14 to February 10— laid up for repair estimate 
and inspection. February 10 to March 1 — circled Vancouver island, landing 
stores at lightstations and life-saving stations, and replaced buoys en rout-e. 
March 1 to 31 — undergoing annual overhaul. 

C.G.M. Berens. — April 1 to 19 — undergoing annual overhaul. April 20 to 
June 1 — recharging acetylene beacons, Victoria to Queen Charlotte sound. 
June 1 to June 26 — landing annual supply of oil at stations in tlie strait of 
Georgia. June 26 to 30 — rebuilt Tozier rock beacon. June 30 to July 12 — 
landing annual supplies at lightstations in Haro straits. July 12 to 17 — 
rebuilding Patey rock concrete beacon. July 17 to 31 — inspected Government 
wharves and lightstations with Superintendent of Lights on board. August 1 
to 30 — overhauling small buoys in strait of Georgia. August 31 to September 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 77 

30 — ovehauling buoys in Haro straits. October 1 to 25 — establishing new 
lights and beacons on the Fraser river. October 25 to November 6 — establish- 
ing new buoys in northern inside channels. November 6 to 20 — recharging acety- 
lene lights on the Fraser river. November 20 t,o December 18 — landing stores 
at lightstations in the strait of Georgia. December 18 to 24 — with fog alarm 
inspector making repairs at Sisters Station. December 25 to January 20, 1928 
— with construction foreman making repairs to Entrance Island Station. 
January 20 to 24 — with Superintendent of Lights inspecting aids to navigation. 
January 27 to February 9— annual holidays. February 9 to 20 — landing Gov- 
ernment and private stores at strait of Georgia stations. February 20 to Feb- 
ruary 26 — rebuilding Helen point fog bell and replacing drifting buoys. Feb- 
ruary 26 to March 7 — recharging lights on Fraser river. March 7 to 31 — 
recharging acetylene beacons in Johnstone straits. 

Prince Rupert, B.C., Agency 

GENERAL 

The general work of the agency during the year comprised purchase and 
delivery of supplies to lighthouses, maintenance of aids to navigation, super- 
vising of construction and repairs to lighthouses and wharves and reporting on 
wharves and foreshores. 

CONSTRUCTION AND MAINTENANCE 

A new cable was placed on the derrick of the wharf at Alice arm, B.C. 

At Addenbrooke lightstation, the derrick was overhauled. 

At Egg island lightstation, repairs were carried out to the walks and 
verandah. 

Small repairs were carried out to the boathouse at Pointer island light- 
station. 

The walks and tramway were overhauled at cape St. James lightstation. 

The oil house was reshingled at Massett range lights, B.C. 

Small repairs were carried out at Lawyer island lightstation. 

At Ivory island lightstation, repairs were made to the walks and bridge. 

Repairs were carried out to the walks at Lucy island lightstation. Green 
island lightstation, also at Langara island lightstation. 

A new Aga beacon light was placed on Serpent point, B.C. 

A lighted Aga beacon established on Bonilla island, B.C. 

Two 8,000-pound concrete anchors were constructed for use with the buoys 
in this agency. 

A day beacon established at the entrance to Porpoise harbour. 

Repairs were carried out to the agency wharf and new gutters supplied on 
the buildings. 

New lighting apparatus is being supplied for Ivory island lightstation. 

A new derrick is being established at Lucy island lightstation. 

LIGHTS, FOG ALARMS, ETC. 

All lights and fog alarms, all lighted and unlightcd aids to navigation were 
maintained in proper order throughout the year. 

DOMINION STEAMERS 

The C.G.S. Estevan, captain H. R. Bilton, arrived at this agency on July 
18, to attend to the overhaul of large buoys in this district. After loading the 
necessary buoys, anchors, chain, and paint, etc., she overhauled Rose spit buoy, 
and then the buoys at the entrance to Skidegate inlet. After completing these 
she attended to White rocks buoy, then Hodgson reef, Alford reef, Spire ledge, 



78 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

Georgia rock, and Casey point buoys, after which she left to overhaul Van- 
couver rock and Dall patch buoys, completing her work at this agency, and 
left to attend her work at the Victoria agency. 

The C.G.S. Newington, captain H. A. Ormiston, has been engaged through- 
out the year attending to the outside work of the service, including: landing 
supplies at lightstations, recharging the lighted beacons, overhauling uniighied 
aids and other incidental work. 

The C.G.M. Birnie, captain J. Peterson, was engaged throughout the year 
in recharging beacons, landing mail and supplies at the inside Hghtstations, over- 
hauling the smaller buoys and on inspection work, etc. 

Launch Rhona, under captain H. Calderwood, has been continuously 
engaged throughout the year, exclusive of the time for overhauling, in the ser- 
vice between Prince Rupert and the agency, transferring mail, passengers, pro- 
visions and supplies for the agency and wireless station, making from two to 
three regular trips every day, and extra trips as required, including a regular 
service for the employees of the wireless station, Digby island. 

GOVERNMENT WHARVES 

Five Government wharves in this district are under the jurisdiction of this 
agency, located at the following points: Alice arm, B.C.; Queen Charlotte city 
and Massett, Queen Charlotte islands; Refuge bay on Porcher island, and 
Stewart, B.C. 

Each wharf has been regularly inspected and the condition reported on. 

PUBLIC W^H.\RF, STEWART, B.C. 

The above-mentioned wharf has been operated throughout the year under 
the supervision of a wharfinger, Mr. H. C. Bennett, the traffic consisting mainly 
of passenger and freight vessels of the Canadian National Steamship Company 
and the Union Steamship Company, and the ore carriers of the Coastwise Steam- 
ship and Barge Company, Limited. 

Freight shipments inward were approximately the same as last year. Out- 
ward shipments of ore, including concentrates, amounted to approximately 
127,000 tons, which is a little in excess of the previous year. 

Tolls, leviable in accordance with the regulations and tariff, have been 
duly collected, and, less the wharfinger's remuneration of 25 per cent, been 
forwarded to the department monthly, accompanied by the regular statements. 

Collections for the fiscal year 1927-28 amounted to $3,774.44 gross, which 
is considerably less than the amount of collections for the previous year, due 
to concentrates naving been shipped in builk instead of in parcel shipments as 
previously. 

To keep the wharf open to traffic has necessitated the expenditure of 
S340.20 for labour for the removal of snow during the winter season. This 
amount is $137.40 in excess of the amount spent during the preceding year for 
the same purpose. 

The mining district adjacent to this wharf is being developed gradually, 
and sliipments of freight, machinery, and ore portend a considerable increase in 
the near future. 

MASSETT WHARF, B.C. 

This wharf was operated since October last, under the direction of Mr. 
E. H. Simpson as wharfinger, who was appointed at that time. 

The shipping is comprised of a passenger and freight vessel of the Canadian 
National Steamship Company, which maintains a regular schedule, also an 
occasional freighter and a number of smaller gas boats. 

Tolls, levied in accordance with the regulations and tariff, amounting to 
$187.70 were duly collected, and forwarded to the department monthly. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 79 

Charlottetown, P.E.I. Agency 



GENERAL 

During the fiscal year, this agency maintained 15 combined light and fog 
alarm stations, 44 lights over 4th OTder, 104 small lights other than pole lights, 
82 pole lights, 3 Aga lights, 6 electric lights, 10 hand horns, 6 life-saving sta- 
tions, 2 rocket brigades and 2 Government steamers. 

BUOY SERVICE 

All the buoys under the supervision of this agency under contract, as well 
as those maintained by Dominion steamers, were well maintained during the 
year. 

The following buoys were maintained under contract: 276 cans, conicals 
and casks, 576 spars, 795 stakes, 855 bushes, 5 beacons, 27 winter spars, 2 gas 
buoys, 2 bells, and 1 gas and bell buoy. 

The following buoys were maintained by Dominion steamers: 10 bells, 3 
combined gas and bells, 4 whistlers, 4 combined gas and whistle, 1 gas, 21 
conicals, 19 cans, 2 casks, 8 spars, and 4 beacons. 

CHANGES IN AND ADDITIONS TO BUOY SERVICE 

Miramichi Bay. — One red wooden spar and two stakes placed to mark 
boat channel from Huckleberry gully to bale Ste. Anne. 

Georgetown Harbour. — ^Winter spar buoys replaced steel can and conical 
buoys at McDonald's point, Wheeler's bar, Noel shoal, Thrum cap and Bear's 
point during winter of 1927-28. 

NEW AIDS TO NAGIGATION 

Cap Rouge. — Fixed white pole light established as back range. 

Entry CliJJ. — ^A combined light and dwelling built and catoptric apparatus 
installed. 

Port Hood Wharf. — New pole light established. 

Fort Hood Island Breakwater. — New pole light established. 

Souris. — Hand fog horn established. 

LIGHTHOUSE SERVICE 

Annual supplies were distributed to all light and fog alarm stations; a 
large number of buildings at lightstations were painted, and during the year 
the mechanism of lights and fog alarms were inspected and repairs effected when 
necessary. 

REPAIRS, ETC. 

Alberton. — Front and back ranges relocated. 

Bay du Vin. — Dwelling repaired. 

Belle Isle N.E. — Fog alarm dwelling and stores shed repaired. 

Bird Rocks. — Tower reshingled, porch and steps renewed, walk repaired. 

Blockhouse. — Fence repaired. 

Cape Bear. — Interior of dwelling repaired. Road and fence repaired. 

Cape George. — Well rebuilt. 



80 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

Cape Ray. — Roof and verandah repaired. Large oil storage tank installed. 

Cardigan River. — White catoptric light replaced by white dioptric light. 

Caveau Point. — Repairs to towers of ranges. 

Coldspring Head. — New door and frame installed. 

East Point. — New fence erected. 

Entry Island. — New combined lighthouse and fog alarm built and light 
apparatus installed. 

Ferolle Point. — Repairs to eaves, gutters and windows of dwelling. 

Fish Isla7id. — Substructures of lighthouse renewed. 

Flat Island. — Roof of dwelling reshingled. 

Fort Monckton. — Cribwork repaired. 

Grandoon Flats. — Plank walk rebuilt. 

Jourimain. — Building and fence repaired. 

Middle Island. — Dwelling floor repaired. 

Murray Harbour front. — Repairs to breakwater effected. 

Panmure Island. — Old diamond apparatus dismantled and new revolving 
apparatus installed. 

Pictou Island West End. — General repairs to interior of dwelling effected. 
Well bored and piping and pump installed. 

Point Prim. — Road leading to lighthouse repaired. 

Portage Island. — Foundation of lighthouse building and plank walk 
repaired. 

Preston Beach. — Repairs to protection work effected. 

Richibucto Bar. — Ranges relocated and extension built to shelter shed. 

St. Louis Gully. — Repairs to huts and poles effected. 

St. Mary Island. — Slipway rebuilt. 

Sea Cow Head. — Roof of lighthouse reshingled. 

Shediac Wharf Light. — Foundation repaired. 

Sheldrake Island. — Service rowboat repaired. 

Shippigan (Big). — Protection to foundation of dwelling repaired. 

Shippigan Gully. — New huts erected. 

Shipwreck Point. — ^Well-house repaired. 

Souris. — Lighthouse altered for use of new hand fog horn supplied. 

Tracadie South. — Moved to new location and lantern deck repaired. 

Wallace Harbour. — Gallery decks renewed. 

West Point Wharf. — Light moved and replaced. 

Wood Island, Main. — Repairs to porch and oilhouse effected. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER S\ 

METEOROLOGICAL SERVICE 

All the stormsignal stations were inspected. A new signal shed was erected 
at Escuminac, N.B. 

LIFE-SAVING SERVICE 

The equipment at all the life-saving stations in the district was inspected. 
The following stations were discontinued during the year: Cascumpec, Priest 
pond, and Souris life-saving stations and Alberton rocket brigade. 

DOMINION PIERS 

Repairs were effected to the following wharves: — China point, McPher- 
son's cove, Hickey's, North Cardigan, Victoria, Pownal, Chapel point, George- 
town R.R., and Annadale. 

DOMINION STEAMERS 

The C.G.S. Aranmore arrived at this agency on June 20. At Marine wharf 
loading lighthouse supplies for the Belle Isle trip until July 4 when she pro- 
ceeded to deliver those supplies. Returned to Charlottetown on July 31. At 
Marine wharf coaling, cleaning ship, etc., until August 8 when she proceeded 
to deliver construction material at Entry island light, after which she came 
under the Halifax agency. 

The Aranmore again arrived at Charlottetown on September 20. Clean- 
ing ship and loading lighthouse supplies for the Belle Isle trip from September 
21 to October 5 when she proceeded to deliver those supplies. Returned to 
Charlottetown on October 27. At Marine wharf coaling, cleaning ship, blowing 
down boilers, etc., until November 21 when she commenced lifting the large 
buoys of this agency. Her work at this agency was completed on December 
18 and she then proceeded to St. Paul island under orders from Halifax. 

The C.G.S. Montcalm arrived at Charlottetown on May 31 to place the 
large buoys of this agency. She completed this work on June 16, and pro- 
ceeded to Quebec on June 17, as per orders from Ottawa. 

The C.G.S. Brant went into commission on May 10, and from that date 
till the 30th she was engaged in placing buoys. June 4 to 30 supplied the 
northern New Brunswick lights, as well as some of the Nova Scotia lights from 
Coldspring head to Pictou. From July 4 to the 30th August, on lighthouse 
supply trip to New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island and from September 
1 to October 6, delivered supplies to lighthouses in Hillsborough bay, assisted 
steamer Baroff which was ashore at Shippigan, N.B., and towed the Public 
Works' dredge from Naufrage to Charlottetown, etc. October 5 to November 
2, visited Pictou with agent on board to examine applicants for the position of 
lightkeeper at Pictou island east end, inspected several buoy services, public 
wharves, etc., and from November 2 to 15, lifted East river buoys and replaced 
them with stakes. On the last mentioned date, the Captain, Mate, 2nd Engineer 
and crew of the Brant, together with oiler and fireman from Aranmore, pro- 
ceeded to Sorel, P.Q., to take the new Brant to Charlottetown, the Chief Engi- 
neer of the Brant having preceded them there. From the 15th to the 21, the 
old Brant, with temporary crew selected from the Aranmore on board, lifted 
the Murray harbour, Annadale and Georgetown buoys, after which she returned 
to Charlottetown. From December 24-28, laying up Brant. 

On the 29th November the new Brant took up the work of the old Brant 
when she delivered construction material at Sea Cow head and lifted several 
buoys. From the 3rd December to 29th, had condenser repaired and endea- 
voured to have compasses adjusted. Went to Pictou for that purpose but 
attempt proved unsuccessful. Attempted to assist Grace Darling in the har- 

65702—6 



82 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

bour at Georgetown but was unsuccessful; lifted Shemogue buoys, Jourimain 
can, etc. December 29 to January 27, laying her up and men were paid off 
on the last mentioned date. . 

The C.G.S. Bayfield was taken over by the Customs Preventive service 
in the spring of 1927 and placed in commission by them, leaving her berth at 
the Marine wharf, Charlottetown. 

The C.G.S. Ostrea was not in commission during the past season, but was 
lying hauled out on the approach to the Marine wharf at Charlottetown and 
under the general supervision of the Marine agency. 

Fort William, Ont., Subagency 

On February- 29, had new walk constructed over Riprap breakwater at Port- 
Arthur, north entrance. 

On March 23, some new machinery parts were installed at the Port Arthur 
bell tower. 

On April 4, gave Kaministiquia entrance lighthouse and mast, two coats of 
white paint. 

On April 6, tugs Whalen and Strathmore started breaking a channel to open 
water, making open water in two days near Thunder cape. 

On April 8, Mission range masts were moved 20 feet south of their original 
position. 

On April 14, sent lightkeepers to their stations, ten in number. 
On April 15, all shore lights were put in commission. 

On April 15, ss Westyywiint was first Canadian vessel to leave for eastern 
ports. 

On April 16, ss. F. D. Block was first vessel to arrive from eastern ports. 
On April 18, all lightkeepers were at their stations. 
On April 20, all ice left Thunder bay with a strong northwest wind. 
On April 22, all spar buoys were placed at Fort William and Port Arthur 
harbours. 

On April 24, placed all gas and gas and bell buoys at Fort. William and 
Port Arthur harbours. 

On April 25, placed Hare island reef gas and bell buoy, also Welcome shoal 
gas buoy. 

On April 29, three spar buoys were placed at Victoria island, Iroquois shoal 
and Grassy shoal by chartered tug. 

On September 1, rebuilt department's boathouse at Port Arthur, which was 
damaged by two vessels colliding. 

On September 8, had Mission pier lighthouse painted, two coats. 
On September 16, placed temporary lightkeeper at Victoria island. 
On September 25, Murray Stewart arrived and left for Angus island and 
Bateau rock, after surveying Bateau rock left for eastern ports, Sunday, 
October 2. 

On November 9, Murray Stewart arrived with machinery for Angus island 
fog alarm and lighthouse. 

On November 12, last vessel cleared. 
On November 16, tug Whalen started ice breaking. 

On November 20, contractor Justin completed all the buildings on Angus 
island. 

On November 26, the new light and fog alarm at Angus island went into 
commission. 

On November 29, Hare island gas and bell Imoy was lifted and on December 
1, Welcome island gas buoy was lifted. 

On December 8, shipped five gas buoy lanterns to Parry Sound to be over- 
hauled. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 83 

On December 19, tug Whalen left for lightkeepers and returned December 
22, with lightkeepers from nine stations. 

On December 26, all shore lights were discontinued. 

There are eleven manned lighthouses, six Aga gas lights, one electric light, 
one set of electric ranges, one set of oil ranges, three gas and bell buoys, three 
gas buoys and fifty-five spar buoys maintained in this locality. 

Parry Sound, Ont., Agency 

The agency maintained all Parry Sound unwatched lights, and the spar 
buoy service in the inner channel between Parry Sound, Waubaushene, Fesser- 
ton, Cold water, and the channel north of Parry Sound as far as Shawanaga 
bay. 

During the winter of 1928, twenty-three Aga and fifty-nine Pintsch buoy 
lanterns were overhauled and tested in the agency, after which they were 
reshipped to their localities for service. 

BUOYS AND BEACONS 

During the year there Vv'ere maintained in the district: 2 bell buoys, 1 
conical buoy, 20 gas buoys, 281 spar buoys, and 54 day beacons. 

CONSTRUCTION AND REPAIRS 

Walton Rock. — Installed new Aga light. 

Stribling Point. — Established mast light and shed. 

Beauty Island and Turning Islands. — Repaired beacons. 

Angus Island. — Installed machinery in new light and fog alarm station. 

Cecebe Lake. — Installed unwatched light. 

Killarney East. — Installed ney type small mercury float apparatus. 

Cabot Head. — Repaired foundation and floor of fog alarm plant. 

Jeanettes Narroivs. — Established new mast light. 

Sulphur Island. — Changed to unwatched Aga light. 

Erected new icehouse at agency. 

DOMINION STEAMERS 

C.G.S. Grenville. — April 16 to May 20 — Landed all outlying keepers, 
restored buoy service in the Georgian bay and upper end of Lake Huron, also 
relighted all unwatched beacons. Made survey of reported uncharted shoal in 
Parry Sound approach between Seguin bank and Red rock. 

May 12 to June 14 — Delivered supplies to lightstations, installed new 
illuminating apparatus at Griffith island, removed old machinery from Cape 
Croker, corrected gas buoys reported defective, painted and scrubbed ship pre- 
paratory to the annual supply trip. 

ANNUAL SUPPLY TRIP COMMENCED JUNE 15 

Lake Huron and Georgian Bay 

June 15 to July 2L — Supplied and inspected all light and fog alarm sta- 
tions in the above mentioned section including south side of Manitoulin island, 
and on to Sault Ste. Marie. 

Lake Superior 

July 22 to August 5. — Supplied and inspected Gros Cap lightship and all 
stations along this section, and back to Sault Ste. Marie. 

65702—65 



84 ' MARINE AND FISHERIES 

North Channel and Upper part Georgian Bay 

August 6 to 18. — Supplied and inspected all stations along above section, 
prepared ship and loaded for lower division. 

St. Clair River and Lake, Detroit River, and Lake Erie 

August 19 to September 16. — Supplied and inspected all stations and light- 
ships along this territory, and back to Parry Sound with annual trip completed. 

From September 19 on to the close of navigation the vessel was employed 
to the best possible advantage attending to the buoy and lighthouse service of 
the immediate division, namely Georgian bay and part of lake Huron. 

She swept part of the Byng inlet channel for a reported obstruction in 
September. 

The vessel was in dry dock early in October for underwater parts inspec- 
tion, and her bottom plates were painted. 

During October and November, considerable inside painting was done by 
the crew. 

She commenced withdrawing buoys in the division around November 17 
and completed this work, including the removal of all outlying keepers, on 
December 21. 

The vessel laid up at Midland for the winter with her captain retained 
as watchman. 

C.G.S. Murray Stewart. — April 13 to 25. — Landed all keepers at outlying 
stations in the east end of lake Superior, restored Pancake shoal gas buoy and 
spar buoys of locality. Repaired steering equipment and crew did considerable 
painting on board. 

April 28. — Arrived at Parry Sound. April 29 to May 12. — Continued 
repairs on steerings gear. Placed spar buoys and lighted unwatched lights in 
inner channels of immediate division. Transported supply of new spar buoys 
from Owen Sound to Parry Sound. 

May 13 to May 28. — Coaled Hope island and cape Croker fog alarm sta- 
tions, also attended to Griffith island unwatched light. 

May 29 to June 14. — Painted and scrubbed ship. Lighted unwatched 
beacons in inner channels Georgian bay, landed illuminating apparatus at Lyal 
island, and on to Amherstburg. 

June 15 to July 18. — Engaged in construction work with scow Parry Sound 
in connection with Southeast shoal and Colchester reef light and fog alarm sta- 
tions. Coaled Southeast shoal lightship, and returned to Parry Sound on July 20. 

July 31 to August 9. — Attended to Georgian bay buoy service and delivered 
supplies to stations. Examined into shoal struck by vessel at Byng inlet and 
established new spar buoy. Crew painted hull and decks, whitewashed Griffith 
island tower and effected odd repairs there. Transported additional new supply 
of spar buoys from Owen Sound to Parry Sound. 

August 10 to September 11. — Painted all gas beacons and lightstations in 
Parry Sound approach. Installed new illuminating apparatus in Killarncy east 
end. Examined O'Brien Patch gas buoy stranded on Black Bills, but could not 
recover. Painted Turning rock tower near Waubaushcne. 

September 12 to 18. — Crew did painting on board ship, also repaired work 
boat. 

September 19 to October 8. — Loaded machinery and proceed to Angus 
island, lake Superior, arrived there September 27. Unloaded machinery, made 
survey of Bateau rock with District Engineer, and returned to Parry Sound, 
inspecting cape Smith beacon en route. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 85 

October 10 to October 24. — Repaired pumps at Midland and coaled. 
Patrolled north shore for Kennedy bank buoy reported adrift, located it at 
mouth of Bad river, could not recover owing to shoal water. Landed Inspector 
of Fog Alarms at Hope island and Western island stations. 

October 25 to November 2. — Engaged in construction work and repairs at 
cape Croker and Cabot head light and fog alarm stations. Delivered supplies 
at Flowerpot, Tobermory and Cove island stations. 

November 3 to November 27. — Engaged in construction work at Angus 
island, lake Superior, under direction of Jas. McDonald. Cleared Fort William 
for Sault Ste. Marie November 24. Visited Slate island, Jackfish, Otter head, 
Quebec harbour, and arrived at Soo 27. 

December 1 to 3. — Landed supplies at Gros cap lightship, and withdrew 
Pancake shoal gas buoy for the winter. 

December 10 to December 18. — Removed all lightkeepers in east end of 
Superior including Gros cap lightship. 

The vessel completed her season's work and laid up at Sault Ste. Marie 
for the winter, with the captain and chief engineer of the Gros cap lightship 
left in charge of both vessels as watchmen. 

Kenora, Ont., Subagency 

Rainy Lake. — June 13 to 15^ — steamer Laura A was employed in painting 
and replacing buoys in Rainy lake. Fifty-two buoys were painted and four 
were replaced. 

Shoal Lake and Lake of the Woods. — From May 29 to June 15 steamer- 
Red Wing was employed on the lake of the Woods and Shoal lake painting and; 
replacing buoys. Three hundred and twenty-six buoys were painted, and thirty- 
eight were replaced, and twenty-three new buoys established. 

Wabigoon Lake. — August 3 and 4 — the steamer Bonnie Mac was employed 
painting and replacing buoys. Twenty-six were painted and two buoys were 
replaced. 

Montreal, P.Q., Agency 

Total expenditure for the fiscal year amounted to $450,579.11, an increase 
of $92,008.27 over the 1926-27 expenditure. 

REPAIRS 

Beloeil Bridge. — Reconstruction of storehouse and pole light. 

Lacolle Range. — Repairing door sills. 

Laperle Traverse. — Renewing floor. 

Points a Cadieux light. — General repairs to station. 

Portneuf Range. — Installation of electric light in lightkeeper's dwelling. 

Pointe aux Anglais. — Renewing of floor. 

xMAINTENANCE AND REPAIRS TO WHARVES 

L'Orignal iv harf .—Renewing planks on wharf, also electric lighting. 
St. Denis wharf. — Renewing flooring. 

DOMINION STEAMERS 

C.G.S. ArgenteuiL— Employed in buoy service, lighthouse construction and 
repair work on Lake St. Louis, Ottawa and Richelieu rivers, also used for minor 
repairs to wharves. 



86 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

C.G.S. Berthier. — Employed in spring and fall in buoy laying and buoy 
raising purposes. 

C.G.S. Einilia. — Used in connection with buoy service, lighthouse repairs, 
and general construction work. 

C.G.S. Shamrock. — Was busy throughout season in lower end of district in 
.general buoy service work and delivery of lighthouse supplies. 

C.G.S. Vercheres. — Employed throughout season in work of maintaining 
-and painting bank beacons and lighthouses, night and day patrol and inspection 
~work; recharging all shore gas stations; towing of scows with construction and 
maintenance material, and buoy service work in conjunction with scow 
Acetylene. 

Tugs Becancour, James Howden, Lavaltrie, Lac St. Pierre, Laviolette, and 
Varennes and coal barge No. 5 were employed in spring and fall in buoy laying 
and buoy raising operations. 

Scow Acetylene was also used for lighthouse and buoy service work. 

Quebec, P.Q., Agency 

AIDS TO NAVIGATION 

New establishments — 

Pointe Dauphine back light of St. Francois wharf light. 

Bale St. Nicholas, 4 sets range lights. 

Grande Greve range lights. 

Mingan harbour, east and west entrance, 2 sets range lights. 

Manicouagan range lights. 

Chandler wharf range lights. 

Sault au Cochon light. 

Crane island, north side, wharf light. 

Anse a la Barbe wharf light. 

Port au Saumon wharf light. 

Cawee island gas light. 

Sheldrake range lights. 

St. Joachim (Tourelle) range lights. 

N.E. Channel Hamilton cove range lights. 

Goose cape, fog alarm. 

Lightship, He aux Coudres. 

One can buoy, wreck " Lodilus." 

One can buoy Shippigan shoal. 

Two can buoys New North channel. 

Two ^par buoys, Indian cove. 

Four conical buoys, New North channel. 

Thirteen gas buoys, New North channel. 

One bell on gas buoy No. 102 B and horizontal slat work. 
Changes — 

Cap au Corbeau front light apparatus. 

Sandy beach apparatus. 

St. Francois wharf apparatus. 
Discontinued — 

Gas buoy No. 103 11 

St. Francois range lights, 

REPAIRS 

Bat}iur:d, N.B. — Repairs made to foundation of back light pier. 
Cap Chat Wharf. — Renewing about 1,000 feet b.m. decking. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 87 

Cap Dogs. — Repairs to landing. 

Fame Pt. — New keeper's dwelling built. 

Fox River. — Cleaning freight shed and repairing floor. 

Goose Cape. — New lighthouse and dwelling combined, also new fog alarm 

built. 
Cxrand River. — Repairs to wharf. 
Lamec, N.B. — Repairs to freight shed. 
Marcelle Pt. — New pier under existing lighthouse built. 
Matane Wharf. — Repairs to wharf. 
Machins Wharf. — Repairs to wharf. 
Montmagny West. — Repairs to deck of wharf. 
Montmagny Wharf. — Repairs to flooring of inner basin wharf. 
A'ew Carlisle Wharf. — Parts of decking of wharf renewed. 
Pointe des Monts. — Repairs to bridge which connects island to mainland. 
River du Loup. — Repairs to wharf. 
West Pt. Ant. — Extensive repairs to tower, also minor repairs to keeper's 

dwelling and protection work around station. 

AVHARVES 

Eighty-three wharves are under the control of the Quebec agency of the 
Department of Marine and Fisheries, four new wharves having been transferred 
to this agency, viz: Bale St. Paul, Grande bale, Grosse Roche, and Shippigan. 

DOMINION STEAMERS 

C.G.S. Mikula. — Occupied in opening the St. Lawrence river channel 
between Quebec and Montreal until April 11. April 13, entered dock for repairs. 
Then left on ice patrol duty in the Cabot straits. Returned to Quebec on June 1. 
Early in July was brought to old Allen's wharf. From November 29, employed 
in ice-breaking operations, until the middle of February when she made a trip 
to the north shore with passengers and freight. After this continued ice-break- 
ing operations around Quebec, until the close of fiscal year. 

C.G.S. Mo7itcaZm.— Employed in ice-breaking operations at North Sydney 
and Louisburg, N.S., also on ice patrol duty in Cabot straits. At buoy work 
under the direction of Charlottetown agency, supplying and inspecting light- 
houses and lights. Lifting and transporting to Quebec gas and other buoys in 
the fall and attending to other aids to navigation, as well as construction work 
of all kinds. 

C.G.S. Druid. — Engaged throughout the season in buoy service work, keep- 
ing buoys of all kinds in their positions, examining and looking after the 
numerous gas and other buoys in this district as well as maintaining quite a 
number of beacons and day marks. Also employed in towing lightships to their 
respective stations in the spring and towing them back to Quebec in the fall. 
Delivering lighthouse supplies. 

C.G.S. Loos. — Principally employed in lighthouse and buoy service, also on 
general construction work. 

Relief Lightship No. 25. — Employed in assisting lighthouse and buoy tender 
Druid — delivering lighthouse and light supplies, repairing and painting buoy 
beacons, placing and attending to gas and other buoy services, coaling lightships, 
transporting construction materials, and attending to other aids to navigation. 



88 MARINE AND FISHERIES 



SALVAGE SERVICES RENDERED BY THE QUEBEC SALVAGE AND 
WRECKING COMPANY, LIMITED, FROM APRIL 1, 1927, TO 

MARCH 31, 1928 
1927 

May 10. — British steamer Manchester Commerce. Our diver examined 
propeller and rudder and cleared away length of rope which was twisted around 
her propeller. 

June 24-25. — Canadian steamer Gaspesia. This steamer ran ashore on the 
island of Orleans; we rendered the necessary salvage work and refloated her 
following day. 

June 30. — Canadian steamer Saguenay. Our diver examined her propeller 
for satisfaction of captain and owners. 

July 9. — Canadian steamer Keyvive. This steamer with a very heavy 
deckload of pulpwood arrived at Quebec, where she took a list, had to be beached, 
sustained damage to bottom, refloated again and brought into Inner basin, 
Quebec, where she was again beached, and we with our diver and wieckers 
adjusted the necessary work to enable her to proceed to her destination. 

July 13-22. — Canadian Government steamer Margaret. This steamer 
struck submerged rock off Magdalen islands and by the assistance of another 
boat she reached nearest place, Amherst harbour. We went to her assistance, 
our diver tightened up the bottom, after which we, by using motor pumps, 
pumped out engine and boiler room and convoyed her to Pictou, N.S. 

August 9-10. — British steamer Knockfierna. This steamer with a load of 
coal grounded in north channel off cap Brule; we rendered necessary assistance 
with wreckers and ss. Lord Strathcona and refloated her and convoyed her to 
Quebec. 

August 12. — American steamer Iroquois. Our diver cleared propeller and 
rudder from ropes which were entangled to same. 

August 12-14. — SS. Lord Strathcona towed dredging outfit from Riviere-du- 
Loup to Quebec. 

August 17-18. — SS. Lord Strathcona towed dredging outfit, Quebec to Three 
Rivers. 

August 1 to 24. — During this period rented for various times, one 12-inch 
gasolene pump, one 12-inch steam pump, and one 10-inch steam pump to Davie 
Shipbuilding and Repairing Company Limited, which firm refloated whatever 
was left of Canadian steamer Montreal sunken in front of their plant. 

September 10. — Canadian Pacific Steamships steamer Montrose. Our diver 
examined both propellers to satisfaction of captain and owners. 

September 20-23. — British steamer Kurdistan. This steamer went ashore 
East point Anticosti; we went to her assistance, but she refloated herself before 
our arrival; we met her and convoyed her to Quebec. 

October 18-19. — Italian steamer Operosita. This steamer collided off Father 
point; we went to her assistance and met her, but she was in position to proceed 
up herself. 

October 19-20. — Italian steamer Vulcano. This steamer collided off Father 
point; we were at the disposal of the underwriters to assist, but she sank. 

October 20-23. — Canadian Government Merchant Marine steamer Cana- 
dian Runner. This steamer collided off Father point and was beaclied off 
Rimouski; we went to her assistance, rendered the necessary work, pumped her 
out, refloated her and brought her to Quebec. 

November 4-5. — Italian steamer Vallcluce. This steamer went ashore off 
Berthier wharf; went to her assistance, performed necessary work, and by help 
of anchor and ss. Lord Strathcona we succeeded in refloating her and brought 
her to Quebec. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 89 

November 6-7. — British steamer Odile. This steamer sustained disabled 
steering gear; with our ss. Lord Strathcona we towed her to Three Rivers. 

November 7-9. — Canadian steamer Marita. This steamer with a consider- 
able quantity of dynamite as cargo went ashore at the West point of Isle aux 
Coudres, north channel; we went to her assistance, found her landed in a very 
intricate position among boulders, but we successfuly refloated her and brought 
her to Quebec. 

November 12-13. — British steamer Baluchistan. This steamer got her pro- 
peller tangled up in the mooring of buoy 30 Q, about 27 miles above Quebec; 
by assistance of our diver, she cleared and proceeded. 

November 14. — Canadian Pacific Steamships steamer Montnairn. In order 
to enable the ship's engineers to repack gland for rudder-head inside ship, our 
diver did necessary work to prevent inflow of water. 

November 21-22. — Norwegian steamer Reinunga. This steamer sustained 
damage to her rudder while departing from Three Rivers, to such an extent 
that she could not be steered; our ss. Lord Strathcona towed her to Quebec. 

The ss. Lord Strathcona, schooner G.T.D., properly manned, with all salvage 
gear in good order, have been kept in constant commission during the season of 
navigation to proceed to any accidents or mishaps to ships at very short notice. 



REPORT OF SALVAGE SERVICES RENDERED BY THE PACIFIC 
SALVAGE COMPANY, LIMITED, DURING THE FISCAL 

YEAR 1927-28 

June 3 to June 5, 1927. — ^SS. Arkansas and ss. Suremico reported in collision 
off cape Flattery and calling for assistance, ss. Salvage King was dispatched to 
the scene of the accident finding ss. Arkansas badly damaged and towing vessel 
to Seattle. 

June 23 to June 30, 1927. — ^SS. Challamba reported ashore on Whitecliff 
island, B.C. SS. Salvage King was dispatched to her assistance; floated vessel 
and towed her to Esquimalt, B.C. 

July 30 to August 6, 1927. — SS. Salvage King left port 5.30 a.m. to go to 
the assistance of ss. Admiral Watson ashore on Ivory island. Succeeded in 
floating vessel and towing her to Seattle. 

August 17, 1927. — SS. Salvage King left to assist Prince Charles reported 
ashore on Rose spit near Queen Charlotte. Later recalled as the Prince Charles 
floated herself. 

August 31 to September 8, 1927. — SS. Princess Charlotte ashore at Wrangell 
island, Alaska. Salvage King left for her assistance and brought vessel to port. 

September 16, 1927. — SS. Horace X. Baxter ashore on Norris rock near 
Deep cove. Salvage King left for her assistance, floated vessel and took her to 
Sidney, B.C. for survey. SS. Charmer ashore in Vancouver Narrows. Success- 
fully floated by ss. Salvage King. 

November 8 to December 18, 1927. — SS. Salvage King left port 9.30 p.m. 
November 8 to proceed to the assistance of the ss. Catala ashore on Mist island, 
near Prince !Rupert, B.C. After extensive salvage operations succeeded in 
floating vessel and towed her to Vancouver, B.C. 

November 24, 1927. — SS. Salvage Queen left port 3 p.m. to proceed to the 
assistance of the ss. Tenpaisan Maru ashore at Aberdeen, Wash. When only six 
miles oE wreck Salvage Queen recalled as Tenpaisan Maru breaking up. 

December 11 to January 30, 1928. — SS. Northivestern ashore at cape Mudge, 
B.C. Salvage operations carried out by Salvage King and Salvage Queen and 
vessel finally floated and towed to Vancouver, B.C. 



90 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



RETURNS OF SHIPPING MA^STERS FOR THE YEAR ENDING 

DECEMBER 31, 1927 

Note. — The Collector of Customs acts as shipping master where no shipping master is appointed 

QUEBEC 



Name of Ports 


Name of County 


Name of 
Shipping Master 


Seamen 
shipped 


Seamen 

dis- 
charged 


Amount 




Gaspe 








$ cts. 




Saguenay 












Gaspe 

Gaspe 


F.G.Eden 


21 


34 


20 70 






Montreal 

I^lagdalen Islands 


Hochelaga 

Gaspe 


I.e. Grey 


9,432 


8,805 


7,357 50 


Bonaventure 

Gaspe 

Quebec 


E. W. LeGallais 

Phil. LaBoutelliei 

T. Beland 


Nil 

Nil 
840 


Nil 
Nil 
664 


Nil 


Perce 


Nil 




828 50 




Rimouski 






St. Johns 










Three Rivers 


St. Maurice 


J. P. Gaiiepy 


146 


143 


115 90 




10,439 


9,646 


8,322 60 



NEW BRUNSWICK 



Albert .... 


Albert 


H. W. Crocker 


6 


5 


4 50 




Albert . 








Westmoreland 












Gloucester 


J. E. White . . . 


8 
16 
Nil 


25 
8 
Nil 


11 50 


Chatham 


Northumberland . . . 

Restigouche 

Westmoreland 


R.J. Walls 

John B. Delaney 


10 40 


Dalhousie 


Nil 








York. 










Grand Harbour 


Charlotte 












Albert 










Hillsborough 

Lepreau 


Albert 










Charlotte 




















New Brandon 


Gloucester 












Northumberland . . . 
Albert 


John Russell 


Nil 


Nil 


Nil 


Riverside 








Westmoreland 










Sackville 


Westmoreland 












Charlotte 










St. George 


Charlotte 

St. John 

St. John 

Charlotte 


J. A. Spinner 

W.H.Purdy 

W. B.Bentley 


Nil 
1,797 
13 


Nil 
1,340 

4 


Nil 


St. John 

St. Martins 


1,300 50 

7 70 




Westmoreland 










Shippigan 
























1,840 


1,382 


1,334 60 



NOVA SCOTIA 



Advocate Harbour. 

Amherst 

Annapoli.s Royal. . . 

Antigonish 

Apple River 

Arichat 

Baddeck 

Barrington 

Barton 

Bayfield 

Belli voau Cove. . . . 

Bear River 

Bridge water 

Canning 

Canso 



Cumberland.. 
Cumberland.. 

Annapolis 

Antigonish 

Cumberland.. 

Richmond 

Victoria 

Shelburne 

OiKby 

.\ntigonish 

Di^by 

Digby 

Lunenburg 

King.s 

Guy.s borough. 



W. W. Gray. 



J. L. Warren.. . 
C. N. Corkum. 



E. M. Hurst. 



20 



Nil 



21 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 
NOVA SCOTIA— Concluded 



91 



Name of Ports 


Name of County 


Name of 
Shipping Master 


Seamen 
.seipped 


Seamen 

dis. 
charged 


Amount 




Digby 








$ cts. 


Clark Harbour 


Shelburne 










Clementsport 


Annapolis 










C'heverie . .... 


Hants 


B. H. McLaughlin 

P. Poirier 


Nil 
Nil 

9 
Nil 


Nil 
Nil 

26 
Nil 


Nil 




Richmond 


Nil 


Digbv 


Digby 


W. J. McMahon 


12 30 


Five Islands . . 


Colchester 

Cape Breton 


J. S. Henderson 


Nil 








Great Village 


Colchester 












Guysborough 










Hawkesbury 


Inverness 










Halifax 


Halifax 


H. S. Drake 


5,370 
5 


5,175 
3 


4,237 50 


Hantsport 


Hants 


W. D. Comstock 


3 40 


Havre Bouche 


Antigonish 




Isaac Harbour 


Guvsborough 










Jordan Bay 


Shelburne 










*Lahave 


Lunenburg 


Wm. Maschke 


98 
Nil 

106 

Nil 

109 

358 

18 


123 
Nil 

59 

Nil 

103 

224 

19 


122 90 


Lisconib 


Guysborough 

Queens .... 


R. Hemlow 

W. A. Smith 


Nil 


Liverpool. 


70 70 


Lockeport 


Shelburne 


J. R. Ruggles 


Nil 


Louisburg 


Cape Breton 

Lunenbuig 


W.W.Lewis 


85 40 


fLunenburg 


B. C. Knock 


408 20 


tMahone Baj' 


Lunenburg 

Cape Breton 


T. F. Mader 


19 70 


Mainadieu. 






Maitland 


Hants 










Margarestville 


Annapolis 










Margaree 


Inverness 










Merigomish. . . 


Pictou 










Meteghan 


Digby 


L. T. Melanson 


34 


29 


25 70 


New Campbellton 


Victoria 






North Ea.st Harbour . 


Shelburne. 










North Sydney 


Cape Breton 

Cumberland 

Pictou 


M. J. Ross 


431 

145 

168 

56 


222 

103 

155 

32 


282 10 


Parrsboro 


J. G. Henderson 

W. E. Jones 


103 40 


Pictou 


130 50 


Port Oreville 


Cumberland 

Inverness 


B. L. Hatfield 


37 60 


Port Hawkesbury 

Port Ha.stings 






Inverness 


Geo. L. McLean 


Nil 


Nil 


Nil 


Port Hood 


Inverness 






Shelburne 










Port Lome 


Inverness 










Port Med way. 


Queens 










Poit Morien 


Cape Breton 












Guysborough 










Port Wade 


Annapolis 










Port Williams 


Kings 










Pubnico , 


Yarmouth .... 










Pugwash 


Cumberland 












Cumberland. . . . 










Riverport 


Lunenburg 

Victoi ia 


J. L. Himmelman 

D. M. MacAskill 


19 

Nil 


25 

Nil 


17 00 


St. Anns 


Nil 


St. Peters . 


Richmond 




Salmon River 


Digby 

Shelburne 


F. P. Deveau 

A. S. Goodick 


Nil 
5 


Nil 
16 


Nil 


Sandy Point 


7 30 


Sheet Harbour 


Halifax . . . 




Shelburne . . 


Shelburne 

Guj'sborough 


A. C. Bruce 


17 


7 


10 60 


Sherbrooke. . 






Spencers Island 


Cumberland 

Cape Breton 

Annapolis 


Geo. D. Spicer 


20 
385 


9 
348 


12 70 


Sydney . . 


J. D. McMillan 


296 90 


Thorne Cove . 






Truio 


Colchester 






















Wallace 


Cumberland 

Hants 


A. D. Macfarlane 


Nil 


Nil 


Nil 


Walton 




W'est Arichat 


Richmond 










Weymouth. . . . 


Digby. . . . 










\\ ind.sor 


Hants 




9 


3 


4 50 


Wolfville 


Kings 






Yarmouth 


Yarmouth 


Geo. L. Wetmore 


393 


428 


352 90 








7,863 


7,184 


6,345 50 



fShipping 2 fishing crews — $5.00. *Fees from fishermen — S27.00. t54 fishing vessels at $3.00. 



92 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 
PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND 



Name ot Ports 


Name of County 


Name of 
Shipping Master 


Seamen 
shipped 


Seamen 

dis- 
charged 


Amount 












•S cts 


Charlottetown 

Crapaud (Outport of 


Queens 

Queens 


L. W. Goodwin (Act.).. 
Neil Waddell 


Nil 
Nil 


9 

Nil 


2 70 

Nil 


Georgetown 


Kings 
















Murray Harboui 


Kings . . . 




















Pinette 


Queens 










Poit Hill . . . 


Prince 










St Peters 


Kings 












Kings 












Prince 

Prince 


M. L. Bradshaw 


4 


5 


3 50 




















4 


14 


6 20 



BRITISH COLUMBIA 





V'ancouver 
























Comox-Atlin 










Kyoquot 


Comox-Atlin 










Comox-Atlin .... 










New Westminster 

Prince Rupert 

Tofino 


New- Westminster. . . 
Atlin 


Perry P. Peele 

J. R. Elfert 


8 
317 


9 

347 


6 70 
262 60 


Como.x-Atlin 
















Vancouver 


New Westminster.. . 
Victoria 


J. B. Campbell 

Geo. Kirkendale 


6,082 
1,586 


5,815 
1,466 


4,667 50 




1,234 80 










7,993 


7,637 


6,171 60 



RECAPITULATION 



Province 



Seamen 
shipped 



Seamen 

dis- 
charged 



Amount 



Quebec 

New Brunswick 

Nova Scotia 

Prince Edward Island 
British Columbia 



10,439 

1,840 

7,863 

2 

7,993 



9,646 
1,382 
7,184 
14 
7,637 



28,137 



25,863 



$ cts. 

8,322 60 
1,334 60 
6,345 50 
6 20 
6,171 60 



22, 180 50 



LIVE STOCK SHIPMENTS 

List of Live Stock shipped to ports in Great Britain and Russia during the 

Year 1927 

HALIFAX 



Months 


Sheep 


Cattle 


Horses 


Swine 


January 




1,079 
1,129 
1,428 






February 








Marrti 
























3,636 

















REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 
QUEBEC 




93 


August 




1 


1,018 

1 , 057 

735 


2 


September 






November 






















1 


2,810 


2 








MONTREAL 


October . 






3 












ST. JOHN 






855 
1,007 
1,560 

102 






February 








March 






April 












1 


















3,524 


1 











HYD'ROGRAPHIC SURVEY 
Report of Captain F. Anderson, M.E.I.'C, Chief Hydrographer 

At the request of the Department of National Revenue they were loaned the 
C.G.'S. Bayfield which they eommissioned and operated in the Preventive 
Service. 

The following gives the general disposition: — 

ATLANTIC COAST AND GREAT LAKES DIVISION 

Gulf of St. Lawrence. — C.G.S. Acadia, under the command of Mr. J. U. 
Beauchemin. 

Bay of Fundy. — 'C.G.S. Cartier, under the command of Mr. Georges A. 
Bachand. 

Lake St. Clair. — Launch Boulton, under Mr. Edouard Ghysene. 

PACIFIC COAST DIVISION 

C.G.S. Lillooet, under the command of Mr. H. D. Pariseau and the Somass 
in charge of Commander J. H. Knight, R.N. 

HEADQUARTERS 

Automatic Gauge Division, from Quebec to Port Arthur, in charge of Mr. 
Charles A. Price. 

Chart Preparation, Engraving and Printing, in charge of Mr. Gordon L. 
Crichton. 

Chart Distribution, in charge of Mr. Charles McGreevy. 

GULF OF SAINT LAWRENCE (nORTH SHORE) 

Operations off this coast were carried out from the C.G.S. Acadia, a vessel 
of some thousand tons displacement, built especially to meet hydrographic 
surveying requirements, and which was fitted out at Halifax and placed in 
commission about the end of May. This party was under the command of Mr. 
J. U. Beauchemin, assisted by Messrs. H. L. Leadman, M. A. MacKinnon and 
F. C. G. Smith. 



94 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

The first week of June was spent at the Mingan ishands checking up clear- 
ing marks, range lights, and examining shoals. 

The main work of the season, from June 9 to September 22, was occupied 
in carrying on operations from Sheldrake river to Seven islands. 

Triangulation. — Four Canadian Geodetic stations located in this district 
were used to good advantage; besides the above four main stations were built 
and fixed by ship station triangulation. The secondaiy stations used for 
marking the shore-line and boat-sounding were located by 40-foot pole traverse 
which proved to be very accurate and expedient. 

Sounding. — Owing to the unevenness of the bottom, boat sounding lines 
about one cable apart were carried out to an average depth of 12 fathoms, the 
ship-sounding extending off-shore about 15 miles to a depth of 100 fathoms. 
All shoals were carefully examined and off-shore banks sounded closely from 
the ship. 

On September 22 the ship proceeded to Mutton bay where a week was 
spent triangulating and sounding the har'bour and approaches thereto. The 
above area was closely sounded and a range of day beacons erected marking the 
channel leading from Dykes island into the harbour which will prove of great 
assistance to vessels calling at this place. 

During the season the ship called at Ellis bay, Anticosti island, locating 
lights and other improvements in the harbour that the chart might be posted 
to date. 

Weather. — During the season twenty-seven per cent of the time was entirely 
lost througli weather unsuitable for surveying purposes, in addition to which, 
the time lost for coaling, left about sixty days on which it was possible to carry 
out surveying operations. 

On October 1 the ship arrived at Pictou, N.S., the survey staff returned 
to Ottawa and the Acadia was handed over to the Dominion Fisheriies Com- 
mission for a special cruise in connection with the Maritime Fisheries inquiry, 
which terminated November 15, when the ship was laid up at Halifax foT the 
winter. 

Season's Work. — During the season the following work was carried out: 
Ship-sounding, 1,145 miles; boat-sounding, 647 miles; coast-lining, 180 miles; 
area sounded, over 570 square miles. 

BAY OF FUNDY 

Operations in this locality were carried out with the C.G.S. Cartier, a vessel 
of some 900 tons displacement built especially for this service. The ship was 
fitted out at Halifax and commissioned on May 20. 

This survey was under the command of Mr. Georges A. Bachand, assisted 
by Messrs. Norman Wilson and Reginald W. Bent, the latter, however, owing 
to illness was unable to join the ship. 

The season was chiefly occupied in surveying operations off the approach 
to Saint John harbour, covering an area of 500 square miles. 

As a result of the season's operations a much needed chart of the 
approaches to Saint John on a scale of one inch to one nautical mile will be> 
issued. 

This chart extends seven miles eastward of Saint John to cape Spencer 
and twenty-three miles to the westward to pointe Lcpreau. The last survey 
of this locality was carried out many years ago; the chart is of small scale 
and quite useless for the present needs of navigation. 

The Cartier was laid uj) at Halifax early in October, the survey party 
returning to Ottawa. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 95 

LAKE ST. CLAIR 

The survey of this lake was under the direction of Mr. Edouard Ghysene, 
assisted by Mr. John L. Foreman, using the Boulton, a 45-foot sea-going 
gasolene launch. 

Early in May Mr. Ghysene proceeded to Outarde bay, St. Lawrence river, 
for the purpose of relocating three sets of beacons and placing six can buoyte 
marking the channel, also at Manicougan bay a little to the eastward of the 
above, two sets of temporary ranges were erected and buoys placed to mark 
the best water leading into the wharf of the Ontario Paper Company. 

The main season's work consisted in a resurvey of the Canadian shores 
of lake St. Clair, Ontario, which was started about the middle of June. It was 
found unnecessary to carry out a new triangulation. the old United States 
Lake Survey triangulation points being used whenever they could be definitely 
located. The south and east coasts of the lake were resurveyed and sounded 
from one mile west of the Puce river, joining up with the United States Lake 
Survey of 1919 and carried well past the mouth of the Thames river. A 
survey on a large scale of the approaches to Belle river was carried out. 

The survey was closed for the season on October 1st; the launch was 
hauled out and placed in winter quarters. 

Season's Work. — A summary of the season's work shows that the follow- 
ing was accomplished: — Boat-sounding 118 miles; Launch-sounding 450 miles; 
Area sounded 85 square miles; Highways traversed 18 miles; Coast-line tra- 
versed 36 miles. 

PACIFIC COAST 

Operations on this coast were carried out with the C.G.S. Lillooet, a vessel 
of some 800 tons displacement and built especially for this service. 

This division of the Hydrographic Service is under the direction of Mr. 
H. D. Pariseau, assisted by Commander J. H. Knight, R.N., and Messrs. L. R. 
Davies, W. K. Willis and R. H. Ettershank, the latter of which having received 
a temporary appointment to the staff last spring. The Lillooet was fitted out 
at Victoria and placed in commission about the end of May. 

The early part of the season was occupied in surveying False creek, 
Burrard inlet, also several small surveys and sweepings in Vancouver harbour. 
In the latter part of June the ship proceeded to Quatsino sound where several 
old triangulation marks were reestablished that the provincial Government may 
connect them up with Canadian Geodetic positions in the Queen Charlotte 
strait. 

While in this locality a rock in Verney bay, Rupert island was located, 
also a small survey in the vicinity of a cannery in Koprino harbour was carried 
out. 

On July 1 the houseboat Somass was commissioned under Commander 
J. H. Knight, R.N., assisted by Mr. R. H. Ettershank, for service in Laredo 
inlet, which work was completed early in October. The main work of the sea- 
son until September 20 consisted in surveying off the west coast of Aristazabal 
island and the western portion of the Gander islands group. 

The latter part of the month was occupied in completing a survey of the 
entrance to False creek, Burrard inlet, and connecting up the outside triagu- 
lation with that of Vancouver harbour. 

The Lillooet returned to Victoria on October 28 and proceeded to lay up 
for the winter. 

As a result of the season's operations new charts of Prince Rupert harbour 
and Laredo sound and approaches will be issued. 



96 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

AUTOMATIC GAUGES 

This division of the Hydrographic Survey is under Mr. Charles A. Price, 
who has as his assistants Messrs. W. J. Miller, A. S. Matthewman, and H. P. 
Williams. During the past season forty-three automatic water gauges were 
operated on the Great lakes and St. Lawerence river between Quebec and Port 
Arthur, including two new gauges installed at Point Edward and Port Lambton 
in the St. Clair river and the reinstallation of a gauge at Couteau du lac in the 
St. Lawrence river which had not been in operation since 1925. 

With the exception of two gauges on the Great Lakes at Gros Cap and 
Port Dalhousie, and four in the St. Lawrence river where the spring high water 
makes it impossible to operate them, records were obtained during the twelve 
months of the year, affording very satisfactory and valuable results, the import- 
ance of which increases each year for scientific and surveying purposes. 

The standardization of gauge clocks, which was commenced in 1925, has 
been carried forward as planned, and there are now only two gauges with clocks 
which are not interchangeable, both of which will be completed in 1928. 

Precise Water Transfers. — Special water-surface transfers for the purpose 
of checking and strengthening the net of precise levels by the Geodetic Survey 
of Canada in the vicinity of the Great lakes have given rather astonishing 
results of accuracy in the closure of various circuits which further justify the 
conclusion that differences in elevation can be determined by water-surface 
transfers to a higher degree of precision than by precise land levels. Another 
season of observations will be required to complete the computations, then a 
continuous yearly check will be available for the major points of reference. 

Special graphs of outstanding storm effects and barometric seiches were 
prepared upon request, this data in many cases solving discrepancies in hydrau- 
lic problems and the reason for boats temporarily grounding in harbours where 
suflEicient draught is available during normal conditions. 

Monthly Bulletin. — During the year the publication of the Monthly Bul- 
letin of the water surface elevations of the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence river, 
inaugurated in 1925, was continued, there being an increasingly great demand 
therefor from engineers and scientific institutions all over Canada, and each 
issue has been republished by marine and engineering magazines and daily 
newspapers, due credit for the information obtained being given this Depart- 
ment in each instance. 

This bulletin, issued just previous to the 10th of each month, gives the 
mean stage of water level for the preceding month as computed from hourly 
readings, and a comparison with past stages of importance for the same month 
in the preceding years as far back as records are available. 

The demand for special data, computations, etc., in this connection is 
increasing rapidly. During the past year 22,064 sheets of prepared information 
were furnished to the public as compared with 122 sheets in 1918. 

Attached are tables giving: — 

L Monthly mean water surface elevations of the Great Lakes during 
1927. 

IL Monthlv mean water surface elevations of the St. Lawrence river 
during 1927. 

in. List of automatic gauges, and their locations, maintained in operation 
during the past year. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 97 

CHART CONSTRUCTION DIVISION 

This division is under the direction of Mr. Gordon L. Crichton with Major 
F. Delaute as assistant in charge, and the following staff: Paul E. Parent, 
Alexander J. Pinet, Henri Melancon, and W. L. Andrew. 

The work of this division is varied, comprising the compilation and engrav- 
ing of new charts, computations in connection thereto, and the revision of exist- 
ing charts. Following is a summary of the work accomplished during the 
year: — 

New charts issued (engraved) 10 

New editions of existing charts 17 

Number of chart editions corrected 53 

Number of copies corrected 14,380 

Number of corrections made 87, 700 

Number of coirections to copper-plates (small and large) 420 

Grain Statistical chart edition 1 

Automatic Gauge Record chart edition 1 

CHART DISTRIBUTION DIVISION 

This division is in charge of Mr. Charles McGreevy and has been con- 
ducted with efficiency. 

During the year 11,427 charts and 261 sailing directions were issued to 
the public. 



65702—7 



98 



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100 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



During 1927 automatic gauges were maintained at forty-three locations on 
the Great lakes and the St. Lawrence river, as follows: — 



A — 



Port Arthur 

•Miehipicoten harbour 

•Gros Cap 

•Soo f above lock) 

Soo (below lock) . . . . 

■Thessalon 

■Collingwood 

•Goderich 

■Point Edward 

Port Lambton . 

■Tecumseh 

La Salle 

Port Stanley 

Port Colborne No. 2 

Port Colborne No. 1 

Port Dalhousie 

■Toronto (by Harbour Coiuiiiission) . . . 

Kipgston 

Prescott ' 

■Upper lock 27 

■Lower lock 25 • 

Upper lock 24 

Lower lock 23 . 

L'pper lock 21 

Cornwall 

Summertown 

Coteau landing 

Coteau du lac 

Cedars (P.P.P.) 

Cascades point 

Ste. Anne.s (above lock) 

Pointe Claire 

■L'pper Lock 5 

■Montreal (lower lock 1) 

(Harbour Commission registering 
gauge balance of the year.) 

Longue Pointe 

■Varennes 

(Staff gauge readings 9 a.m. and 3 
p.m., balance of the j'ear.) 
Lanorie 

(Staff gauge readings 9 a.m. and 3 
p.m., balance of the year.) 

■Sorel 

Pange Light No. 2 

•Three Rivers 

Batiscan 

Cap k la Roche 

•Neuville 



Lake Superior 

St. IVIaiy's river 

Georgian bay 

Lake Huron 

St. Clair river 

Detroit river 

Lake Erie 

Lake C)ntario 

St. Lawrence river. 



Lake St. Francis.. 
St. Lawrence liver. 



Lake of Two Mountains. 
Lake St. Louis 



St. Lawrence river. 



Lake St. Peter 

St. Lawrence river. 



Jan. 



May 
Jan. 



June 
July 
Jan. 



.\pril 
Jan. 



24 



May 
Jan. 



Api il 



Jan. 
April 



-Dec. 31 

- " 31 
-Oct. 31 
-Dee. 31 

- " 31 

- " 31 

- " 31 

- " 31 
31 
31 
31 
31 
31 
31 
31 
17 
31 
31 
31 
31 
31 
31 
31 
31 
31 
31 
31 
31 
31 
31 
31 
31 
31 

27-'Nov. 18 



1-Dec. 1 
25-Nov. 16 



13 



I 



April 20-Nov. 15 



Jan. 
.\pril 
Jan. 
April 

May 



1-Dec. 31 
22-Nov. 4 

1-Dec. 31 
21-Nov. 16 
22-Sept. 29 

2-Nov. 15 



Note. — 

"A'" Denotes a Haskell self-registering graphic gauge; hourlj' readings, daib' means, and monthly 
means compiled. 

"B" Denotes a Giirley printing register; half-hourly readings, daily means, and monthly means 
compiled . 

"C" Denotes a Haskell self-iegistering graphic gauge; half-hourly readings, daily means, monthly 
tueaim, time and elevation of high and low waters compiled. 



TIDAL AKD CURRENT SURVEY 

Report of C/.\fiain F. Axder.son, ]\LE.I.C., Chief H\'drogr.a.pher 

In general term.s, Die work of the Tidal and Current Survey comprises the 
maintenance of principal tidal stations in Eastern Canada and on the Pacific 
const; further investigation of tides and currents during the summer months; the 
reduction of observations to make the results of practical use; and the publica- 
tion of tide tables, cunent tables and reports containing other tidal information. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 101 

Eleven principal tidal stations were kept in cnntinr.oiis operation during 
the past fiscal year — six on th(^ Atlantic coast and five on. the Pacific coast, as 
follows: — 

Atlantic Coast — Pacific Coast — . 

Quebec, P.Q. Vancouver, B.C. 

Father Point, Rimouski, P.Q. Caulfields, B.C. 

Point Peter, Gaspe, P.Q. Prince Rupert, B.C. 

Charlottetown, P.E.I. Victoria, V.I., B.C. 

St. John, N.B. Clayoquot, V.I., B.C. 
Halifax, N.S. 

The records obtained fi'om these stations were carefully checked and pre- 
pared for tabulation and comparison made with the secondary stations where 
found necessary. 

During the summer all were uispected, the zeros of the gauges checked with 
permanent bench mark? and the necessary repairs carried nut. 

SEASONAL TIDAL STATIONS 

Atlantu: Coast 

As a necessary preliminary to the hydrographic survey of the Saint John 
river or any part of it as far as Fredericton, but also to obtain data previous to 
the power development near the head waters now under way, a series of fide 
gauges were operated during the summer of 1927, namely at Indiantown, Rothe- 
say, Brown's Flats, Hampstead, Gagetown, Oromocto and Fredericton. By 
building the gauge at Rothesay in such a way that it could be kept in continuous 
operation throughout the winter, the department v;ill be able to accede to the 
request urgently made by the " Shore Line Investigation Committee of the 
United States Coast and Geodetic Survey and Columbia University " for a 
year's tidal observations at this place. 

A line of Geodetic levels had been run along the railroad near the river by 
the Geodetic Su.rvey and in every case the zero on the tide scale was connected 
with the local Geodetic bench mark. In this way all records can be reduced to 
one datum plane and the slope of the river determined. 

The tide gauge installecl at Welshpool, Passamaquoddy bay, in 1926, has 
been kept in operation through co-operation with the Dexter P. Cooper Com- 
pany. The records are received by this office and copies are made and for- 
warded to Mr. Cooper in return for his services attending the gauge. An extended 
period of observations is desu'ed [wn) because of the prospective tidal power 
development. 

Pacific Coast 

Two gauges were operated on the west coast of Vancouver island, one in 
lilsperanza inlet and the other in Nootka sound to obtain informaition for the 
tide tables and to determine the datiun planes for the hydrographic survey to 
be made. 

At Squamish the gauge was aga.in set up for a further season of records for 
the Geodetic Survey. 

INVESTIGATION OF CURRENTS 

Atlantic Coast 

Sufficient observations foi prediction of tlie turii of the tidal streams in the 
strait of Canso have been obtained, and tables are now published as a result. 
No new current work was undertaken in 1927, but it is proposed to carry out a 
similar investigation for the publication of current tables for the entrance to 
the Bras d'Or lakes, Nova Scotia,, beginning this summer. 



102 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

Pacific Coast 

The time of the turn of the tidal streams in Percival Narrows at the entrance 
to Matheson channel was taken by an observer placed in camp, and the results 
of the investigation will be indicated on the charts and included in the tide tables. 

TIDE TABLES 

The annual tide tables were calculated and printed as usual. The 1928 dis- 
tribution, the bulk of which was sent out previously to the beginning of the year, 
numbers 85,000 copies of the different editions combined. An innovation has 
been made in the preparation of the 1929 edition which will include tide tables 
for Boston and New York in the eastern publication, and those for Seattle and 
Port Townsend with the Pacific tables. These additions, it is thought, will add 
greatly to the usefulness of the tables to the larger shipping. The current tables 
of the strait of Canso, N.S., and for Turn Point, B.C., calculated by the harmonic 
method of prediction were also incorporated in the main edition for 1929, likewise 
such other information as was deduced from the work of the past year. 

Additional abridged editions for distinct localities to fill the needs where 
the complete tables are unnecessary are also under preparation for the year 
1929. These are entitled "Tide Tables for Charlottetown, P.E.I. , Pictou, NjS., 
and Strait of Canso Slack Water Tables", on the Eastern coast; on the Pacific 
coast, "Tide Tables for Prince Rupert, B.C., with Tidal Differences for Northern 
British Columbia." The abridged pocket editions besides being more con- 
venient for local use, are an economy in that they lessen the distribution of the 
larger complete tables. Below is the list of the tide table books as issued for 
1928: — 

Eastern Coast of Canada, unabridged 14, 000 

St. John, N.B., and Bav of Fundy 5, 000 

Quebec and Father Point 19, 000 

Port Nelson. Hudson Bay (a limited number of mimeograph copies is prepared 
each year). 

Pacific Coast of Canada, unabridged 35, 000 

Vancouver and Sand Heads 10, 000 

85,000 

[n formation on tidal matters has been furnished in answer to frequent 
ret]uests from engineers in the Government Service and in private practice as 
well as other interested. 

STAFF 

The staff of this Division of the Hydrographic Service comprises five, 
exclusive of the outside tidal observers, who number six on the eastern and five 
on the west coast. In addition to the above, temporary observers are employed 
(luring the summer according to the requirements of the work undertaken. 

Mr. H. W. Jones, B.Sc, M.E.I.C., Senior Tidal and Current Surveyor, 
supervises the work on the eastern coast, inspecting the tidal stations and 
arranging for necessary repairs, superintending current surveys and the erection 
of secondary stations, also the preparation and issue of the tide tables and the 
general office routine at headquarters. 

Mr. S. C. Hayden, Senior Tidal and Cm-rent Surveyor, supervises the work 
on the Pacific coast, with headquarters at Vancouver. He inspects the tidal 
stations on that coast, arranges for the secondary stations, etc. 

Mr. R. B. Lee, Junior Tidal and Current Surveyor, assists in the office work 
at lic:ul(|uarters as well as looking after the installation of special gauges when 
rc(]U!)cd 

Mis> L. R. Brown, Clerk-Stenographer, attends to {\\c correspondence and 
a.ssi.sts in the reduction of computations. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 103 

Miss E. Campbell was added tempo'rarily to the staff late in the year to 
assist in the tabulation of records and to do other work as directed. 

During the winter months the tidal records are checked and reductions 
made for analysis; seven sets of tide tables are calculated, including both 
coasts, and the manuscript prepared for printing. The observations olbtained 
during the summer months are dealt with and special data worked out. 

At the close of the fiscal year I have to express my appreciation of the 
efficient service rendered by the members of this staff. 



PORT WARDEN'S REPORTS FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 

31, 1927 

Reports were received from fourteen port wardens, eight from Nova Scotia 
port wardens, two from Quebec port wardens, and four from British Columbia 
port wardens. 

The total amount of fees collected at the port of Montreal for the year 
ended December 31, 1927, amounted to $18,793.76; at the port of Vancouver to 
$16,798.50; at the port of Halifax to $3,838; at the port of Quebec to $2,077; 
at the port of Sydney, C.B., to $1,141.50; and at the port of Victoria to $1,288. 

PORT OF MONTREAL 

April 10. — Government steamer Lady Grey arrived in port, reported channel 
clear between Quebec and Montreal this being twenty-two days earlier than 
last year and same date as the year 1925. 

April 12. — SS. Lakefield was the first departure, sailed coastwise, having 
wintered in this port. 

April 12. — ^SS. Gaspesia first arrival from Quebec. 

April 16. — Steamers Kielhaven, Ootmarsum, Hans Gude and Blackheath 
sailed for overseas with full grain cargoes having wintered in this port with 
cargo on board. 

April 17. — SS. Laval County was the first arrival from overseas. Fifteen 
days earlier than 1926. 

April 21. — SS. Alchiba first certificate issued to load full grain cargo, 
nineteen days earlier than 1926. 

April 23. — T.S.S. Montrose first passenger overseas vessel arrived ten days 
earlier than 1926. 

April 24. — SS. Alchiba loaded and sailed for overseas with first grain cargo. 
Twenty-one days earlier than 1926. 

April 28. — T.S.S. Mclita was the first passenger sailing for this season. Nine 
days earlier than 1926. 

November 26. — T.S.S. Letitia for Glasgow sailed; the last of the passenger 
sailings for this season. One day earlier than last year. 

December 1. — ^SS. Rosalia sailed for Italian ports, the last grain vessel to 
leave Montreal for overseas. Four days earlier than last season. 

December 3. — 'SS. Svartfond arrived with full cargo of sugar, the last vessel 
to report inward at this office. 

December 6. — SS. Svartfond sailed for British West Indies via, Halifax 
and the ss. Lakefield cleared for St. John, Nfld. via Halifax the last sailings for 
this season and one day later than last year. 

OVERSEAS VESSELS REPORTED 

Vessels, 1,161; aggregate tonnage, 4,211,746 tons; an increase of 278 
vessels and 818,228 tons as compared with the 1926 figures. 



104 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

LOWER PORT VESSELS REPORTED 

Vessels, 340; aggregate tonnage, 665,689 tons; an increase of 20 vessels and 
78,213 tons, as compared with the 1926 figures. 

Four hundred and eighty-seven (487) vessels cleared with full cargoes of 
grain for overseas, this in comparison with last year shows an increase of two 
hundred and eighteen and an increase of 156 over the record year of 1925. 

Five hundred and ten liner vessels cleared with general cargo for overseas, 
an increase of thirty-seven over last year. 

Overseas vessels with coal cargoes show a decided increase. One hundred 
and eighty-two as against ninety-four the record year of 1925. Last year 
owing to the U. K. coal strike there were only forty-two vessels with coal cargoes, 
an increase this year of 142. 

Special reference may be made to the arrivals of 22 vessels with full cargoes 
of maize from Argentine ports. 

EXPORTS OF GRAIN 

Exports of grain for 1927 amounted to 185,067,087 bushels, an increase of 
59,414,601 bushels, as compared with the 1926 export. 

CASUALTIES BETWEEN MONTREAL AND QUEBEC 

May 12. — ^^SS. Ikala and ss. Jas. McGee collided in St. Antoine channel. 

September 7. — iSS. Keyport and ss. Darnholma collided near Three Rivers. 

November 16. — SS. Kamouraska touched bottom near Buoy 152 M; slight 
damage. 

November 21. — SS. Songa grounded near Batiscan and refloated November 
24. No apparent damage. 

SHIP CHANNEL 

The water in ship channel was considerably higher from July to close of 
navigation than in the past five years. Still a number of hea\^ draft vessels 
called at Quebec to complete loading or take on fuel. 



SOREL SHIPYARD 
Report of Fred Bridges, Superintendent 

During the fiscal year ended March 31, 1928, the operations of the ship- 
yard consisted chiefly in maintaining the fleet of the St. Lawrence Ship Channel 
Branch in good order, carrying out the necessary repairs and the building of 
new constructions. 

Work was also done for dominion steamers, Maintenance of Lights Depart- 
ment, Signal Service, and Maintenance of Buoys Department. 

New Construction. — Dredge No. 8 (Beaujeu) was converted to elevator 
dredge; work not completed. 

Constructions Nos. 91 and 92. — Construction of two steel dumping sand 
scows; work not completed. 

Construction No. 87. — Steel tug to replace tug James Howden; work com- 
pleted. ^ 

Construction No. 95. — Steel tug to replace tug Frontcnac; work not com- 
pleted. 

Construction No. 96. — New wooden scow; not completed. 

Construction No. 97. — New wooden scow; work not completed. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 105 

Constructions Nos. 98 and 99. — New elevator dredges; preliminary office 
work started. 

Constructions Nos. 100 and 101. — Two Scotch Marine boilers; not com- 
pleted. 

Repairs to Dominion steamers, etc. — ^\^arious repairs were made to the 
Government steamers Acetylene, Argenteuil, Berthier, Emilia, Shamrock, and 
Vercheres; also to tugs Becancour, Carmelia, Contrecoeur, Deschaillons, 
Detector, James Howden, Hercule, Lavaltrie, Laviolette, and Varennes; also 
to dredges, dumping scows, etc. 

Buildings and Wharves. — Shipyard buildings and wharves were kept in 
good condition, and necessary repairs made. 

Shecrlegs and Hauling Ways. — Necessary repairs were made to the 140- 
ton sheerlegs and hauling ways. 

General. — The force employed during the fiscal year varied fro ma mini- 
mum of 675 at January 23, 1928, to a maximum of 682 at October 10, 1927, an 
average of 679. 

The total amount expended for shipvard operations during the fiscal year 
1927-28 was $1,284,220.49. 



REPORT OF A. R. TIBBITS, SUPERVISOR OF HARBOUR COMMIS- 
SIONS, PUBLIC HARBOURS, AND HARBOUR MASTERS 

The heading of my report embraces the two forms of harbour administra- 
tion by which all the public harbours of Canada, except those on the canal 
system, are controlled. 

The larger harbours are all under the commission form of administration, 
the commission for each harbour being created by a special Act of Parliament, 
which provides for the appointment of Commissionei-s and defines their func- 
tions and powers. The same form of administration, also, has been adopted for 
some of the smaller, but active and ambitious harbours. With the exception 
before noted, the balance of the public harbours, so far as navigation, the 
movements of vessels, their mooring or anchoring and the manner of taking 
on or discharging cargo or ballast is concerned, are supervised in each harbour 
by an officer known as the harbour master, appointed by the Governor in 
Council under the provisions of the Canada Shipping Act (Part XII), whose 
activities are under the direction of the department at headquarters here, and 
whose duty it is to enforce the regulations provided for the government and 
control of all public harbours. The department's work in connection with these 
two forms of harbour administration is executed in my branch. 

Harbour Commissions 

During the year with which this report will deal, the work of the branch 
has been considerably increased by the creation of new harbour commissions, 
entailing a large amount of additional work in the supervision of the organiza- 
tion of the commissions for secretarial and accounting work, as all the powers 
of the commissions must be exercised by means of bylaws, which must be 
confirmed by the Governor in Council after approval in the department: and 
all their receipts and expenditures, both on capital and revenue accounts, must 
be reported monthly to the department on standard forms of the department's 
design, where they are checked and filed for reference. The work of instructing 



106 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

the new staffs in properly recording and preparing the information for these 
reports, and the examination and criticism of bylaws submitted for confirma- 
tion to assure that they finally reach a form that conforms to the fixed policy 
of the Government and to the powers conferred on the commissions by the 
terms of their respective Acts of incorporation, entails a large amount of cor- 
respondence, and considerable travel, for inspection purposes, to the offices of 
the different harbour commissions, which now number six of major importance, 
viz. — Halifax, Saint John, Quebec, Montreal, Toronto and Vancouver; while 
active and increasingly important commissions are in existence at the ports of 
Chicoutimi and Three Rivers, Quebec, Hamilton, Ontario; and New West- 
minster and North Fraser in British Columbia. Other commissions whose influ- 
ence does not extend much outside their local communities exist at Belleville 
and Trenton, Ontario, and Winnipeg (Red River), Manitoba. 

Summarized details of the reports submitted by the larger of these har- 
bour commissions — which reports it should be noted cover the calendar year 
1927 and not the Government fiscal year of 1927-28, as the other details of this 
report do — will as usual be found under their own headings in another section 
of this publication. 

There have been no changes in the personnel of the established commis- 
sions since my last report was made; but the personnel was appointed for the 
harbour commission created in 1926 to administer the harbour of Chicoutimi, 
P.Q., which my last report referred to but at which time there had been no 
appointments made. This commission is now established, as follows: — 

Chicoutimi, P.Q., Harbour Commissioners. — President, Vincent Dubuc. 
Commissioners, Adjutor Bouliane, Adelard Tremblay. (Appointed by Order 
in Council of the 24th June, 1927.) 

In addition, effect was given to the Saint John Harbour Commissioners' 
Act, chapter 57 of the statutes of 1927; and to the Halifax Harbour Commis- 
sioners' Act, chapter 58 of the statutes of 1927; by the appointment of the 
personnel to constitute the commissions provided for by these Acts, as follows: — 

Saint John Harbour Commission. — President: Hon. Walter E. Foster. 
Commissioners: William E. Scully, Lt.-Col. Alexander McMillan. (Appointed 
by Order in Council of June 30, 1927.) 

Halifax Harbour Commission. — President: Peter R. Jack. Commissioners: 
John Murphy, Charles W. Ackhurst. (Appointed by Order in Council of January 
11, 1928.) 

GENERAL 

In analyzing the returns received from the larger harbour commissions, 
which indicate the volume of business being done by these harbours, there is 
noted a general tendency to an increase over the previous year, as shown by 
the larger number of vessels, with an increased total tonnage, which entered 
the harbours during the year, and by the consequent increase in the revenue 
receipts of the harbour. There was a small decrease in the revenue of the Van- 
couver Harbour Commissioners, due probably to the commissioners having 
discontinued the operation of their grain elevators themselves, • and leasing 
them to certain of the large grain interests, at an annual rental. Although the 
revenue from this source was not as large as when the commissioners operated 
the elevators themselves, there is a consequent reduction in the operation costs 
of the harbour; so that, although the revenue was not equal in volume to that 
of the previous year, the net result was more than satisfactory, as the saving 
in operation expenses was some $14,000 more than the reduction in revenue. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 



107 



The net result of the operations for the year, as shown by the balance 
sheets of each of the three commissions, at December 31, 1927, is as follows: — 



Total revenue receipts 

Administration and operation costs, including interest paid on 
funded indebtedness 

Surplus 



Montreal 



5,453,951 
5,335,452 



$ 118,499 



Quebec 



702,310 
631,539 



70,771 



Vancouver 



$ 2,003,889 
1,718,606 



$ 285,283 



There was an increased activity in the building program of harbour develop- 
ments, in each of the harbours receiving aid from the Government in the way 
of loans for the purpose; and a consequent increase in the amount of their 
debenture indebtedness to the Government and of the interest charges on same, 
which was satisfactorily met from the revenues of all the commissions with the 
exception of that of Quebec, where the harbour revenues were not sufficient to 
meet the payments due on the indebtedness of this commission to the Govern- 
ment. 

The Chicoutimi Harbour Commission during this year adopted a scheme 
of development to provide increased facilities to accommodate the growing 
business of their harbour, and Parliament provided assistance for carrying on 
the work, by authorizing loans to the commissioners from the public treasury, 
not to exceed $500,000, in a statute assented to April 14, 1927 (17 George V, 
chapter 46). 

Legislation was passed also, reducing the limits of Chicoutimi harbour, 
by eliminating the area of Ha Ha bay, which included the harbour adjacent 
to Port Alfred (17 George V, chapter 47). 

Also the limits of the harbour of Three Rivers were amended to eliminate 
that part of the harbour adjacent to cap Magdalene, from the jurisdiction of 
the Three Rivers Harbour Commissioners by statute (17 George V, chapter 70). 

The port of Three Rivers, under the Three Rivers Harbour Commissioners, 
is making steady and satisfactory progress and the commissioners are undertaking 
an addition to the existing coal wharf which will largely increase the capacity 
of the port, for coal handling. They propose to finance this project independ- 
ently by obtaining authority from the Governor in Council to issue their own 
d ebenture s to be sold to the public. 

The port of New "Westminster in British Columbia, under the New West- 
minster Harbour Commissioners, also obtained authority from the Governor 
in Council to issue debentures to the public for the sum of $700,000, the issue 
being guaranteed both as to principal and interest by the Government, and the 
proceeds are to be used for the construction of a grain elevator in the harbour 
with an initial capacity of 750,000 bushels; and the elevator was expected to 
be able to take grain during the crop year 1927-28. 

The North Fraser Harbour Commission, having jurisdiction over the North 
branch of the Fraser river from its mouth to the westerly boundary of New 
Westminster harbour, have shown increased activity, particularly in regulating 
the movements of steamers with tows of logs in the harbour, and have provided 
facilities for the mooring of rafts and booms of logs when adverse tidal con- 
ditions make this necessary. They have also enacted a new tariff of rates on 
cargo handled within the harbour. 

Tlie activities of the Chicoutimi Harbour Commission with regard to har- 
bour development have been mentioned earlier in this report. The unusual 
industrial development in the territory adjacent to this port has made an 



108 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



increased demand for shipping accommodations, and the new facilities to be 
provided by the commissioners, from present indications, will be used to 
capacity, and the energy and foresight of the Chicoutimi Harbour Commission 
in thus providing for anticipated business is to be commended. 

The grain shipments for the year from Montreal, Quebec, and Vancouver, 
the three larger ports, also show the tendency to increased business, thatat 
Montreal being particularly noticeable, where an increase of over sixty million 
bushels over the previous year's grain shipments was made, the larger part of 
the increase being due to greater shipments of American grain coming by the 
lake route through Montreal. This large increase in the volume of grain handled, 
of course led to a consequent increase in operation costs, but the total increase 
in the commissioners' revenue exceeded this by some two and a quarter times. 

Following in tabular form will be found the usual comparative statistics 
showing the results of the various activities of the larger harbour commissions, 
with the exception of that administering Toronto harbour, in regard to revenue 
and capital receipts and expenditures, operation costs, interest on capital 
loaned by the Government and on similar loans made from the public, together 
with tables showing the number and tonnage of ocean vessels, tramps and 
liners, that made use of the different larger ports, and cargo returns with regard 
to grain shipments. It is to be noted again that these statistics cover the 
calendar year for the years given, the fiscal year of each of the harbour com- 
missions closing December 31, as before stated. 

The net financial results of the operations for the year, as shown by the 
balance sheets of the three older harbour commis^s'ions at December 31, 1927. 
are as follows: — 

Comparative table showing, respectively, Revenue and Capital Receipts and 
Expenditures; Total Funded Indebtedness; Interest Charges on same for 
the year; with the total of Grain Shipments in bushels; for the three 
major Harbour Commissions during the year 1927. 





Harbour 

Commissioners 

of Montreal 


Quebec Harbour 
Commissioners 


Vancouver Harbour 
Commissioners 


Gross Revenue for year: — 

1926 

1927 


$4,632,599 
5,453,951 


$678,882 
702,310 


$2,193,670 
2,003,889 


Increase 
Expended for operation costs, salaries of 
administration, etc.: — 

1926 

1927 


821,352 

$2,601,929 
2,950,182 


Increase 23,428 

$549,272 
585,539 


Decrease 189,781 

$1,193,007 
988,196 


Increase 
Capital Expenditure for harbour improve- 
ments: — 
Loans received 1926 


348,253 

$1,325,000 
1,835,000 

$1,842,531 
nil 

$1,916,004 44 
nil 

nil 

$47,710,000 
nil 


Increase 36,267 

$919,000 
1,138,000 

nil 
40,000 

nil 
46,000 

$389,235 56 

$10,515,800 
1,150,000 


Decrease 204,811 
$ $491,000 


Loans received 1927 


1,542,000 


Interost paid on debentures — 

1926— To f Jovernment 


$681,245 


To Public 


97.500 


1927— To Government 


$711,686 


To Public 


97,500 


Interest due Government for 1927 and not 
paid 


nil 


Total debenture indebtedness: — 

To Government 


$15,3.52,900 


To Public 


1,950,000 







REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 



109 



Table showing comparative grain shipments for the years 1926 and 1927 from 
the three major harbours, Montreal, Quebec and Vancouver. 





Harbour Commission- 
ers of Montreal 


Quebec Harbour 
Commissioners 


Vancouver Harbour 
Commissioners 


Grain Shipments: — • 

1926 

1927 


134,591,240 Bus. 
195,247,914 " 


8,461,678 Bus. 
9,773,370 " 


43,207,244 Bus. 
42,006,874 " 




Increase 60,566,674 " 


Increase 1,311,692 " 


Decrease 1,200,370 " 



There also follows, in tabular form, comparative statistics for the years 
1926 and 1927, of the vessels which entered the three major ports referred to, 
as well as for the ports of Halifax and Saint John, which are now brought under 
the commission form of administration. The results of these tables show a 
similar condition to that with regard to the gross revenue receipts. 

Table showing total number of ocean vessels, with their total registered tonnage 
using the five larger coastal harbours of Canada during the year 1927. 





Number of V 


ossels 


Tonnage 


Montreal, P.Q.— 

1926 


Increase 

Decrease 

Increase 


1,042 
1,231 


Increase 


3,551,489 


1927 


4,252,325 






Quebec, P.Q.— 

1926 


189 

467 
449 


700,836 
3,204,041 


1927.... 


3,445,338 






Vancouver, B.C.— 

1926 


18 

1,071 
1,123 


241,297 
3,698,066 


1927 


3,779,015 






Halifax, N.S 


52 

1,584 

427 


80,949 
3,610,113 


Saint John, N.B 




1,222,813 









It will be noted that, at the three harbours for which the statistics are 
comparative, there is an increase of tonnage over last year, although at Quebec 
there were eighteen less vessels entered but the average capacity was greater. 

Public Harbours and Harbour Masters 

In this branch of harbour administration, there have been the usual changes 
during the year. Vacancies in the position have occurred through the resigna- 
tion of the harbour master, and in a very few cases the incumbent has been 
removed by death. In addition to the 173 harbours previously proclaimed 
public harbours, one new harbour has been proclaimed — that of Squamish, B.C., 
where Mr. John Wilkinson was appointed harbour master. 

The vacancies referred to were filled as follows: — 

BRITISH COLUMBIA 

Chemainus. — James Goldsmith appointed harbour master. 

Port Alberni. — F. H. Vradenburgh appointed harbour master. 

Prince Rupert. — Capt. Elfert appointed harbour master. 

Squamish. — Proclaimed public harbour, John Wilkinson appointed harbour 
master. 



110 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



NEW BRUNSWICK 

Beaver Harbour. — Services of Elias Cross dispensed with. (Position tem- 
porarily vacant.) 

Port Elgin. — J. A. Johnstone appointed harbour master. 
St. Martins. — W. B. Bentley appointed harbour master. 

NOVA SCOTIA 

Canso. — Denis McNeary appointed harbour master. 
Cape Negro. — ^Capt. Jas. E. Perry appointed harbour master. 
Chester. — George Freda appointed harbour master March 10, 1927; resigned 
July 8, 1927. 

Clement sport. — C. I. Stronach, resigned. (Position temporarily vacant.) 

Country Harbour. — Marshall Dixon appointed harbour master. 

L'Ardoise. — D. H. Sampson appointed harbour master. 

Little Narrows. — M. Matheson, resigned. (Position temporarily vacant.) 

Liverpool. — John Seldon appointed harbour master. 

Parrsboro. — J. S. Henderson appointed acting harbour master. 

Port Haiokesbury. — John Lamey died. (Position temporarily vacant.) 

Queensport. — Allan Johnston, resigned. (Position temporarily vacant.) 

Sheet Harbour. — Counsellor Henry Hall appointed harbour master. 

Yarmouth.— C&\)t. G. L. Wetmore. 

ONTARIO 

Little Current. — F. B. Gray appointed harbour master. 
Southampton.— W . H. Johnston died. (Position temporarily vacant.) 

QUEBEC 

Bonaventure. — Napoleon Bourdages appointed harbour master. 

Chandler. — Napoleon Lefebvre appointed harbour master. 

Malbaie. — Maurice Tapp appointed harbour master. 

Matane. — Thomas McKinnon appointed harbour master. 

St. Johns. — Francois Goyette appointed harbour master. 

The following is a summary, by provinces, of the collection of harbour 
dues for the year 1927, with the amount of remuneration retained by harbour 
masters: — 

Summary of Harbour Dues for Year 1927 



Province 


Amount 
collected 


Remuner- 
ation 


Amount 
remitted 

to 
Depart- 
ment 




$ 1,645 00 

1.614 00 

6.615 00 
565 50 
272 50 

4,457 75 


$ 1,415 00 

1,4.39 00 

5,818 50 

565 50 

272 50 

3,517 04 


$ 230 00 




175 00 




*797 50 










Briti.sh Columbia 


940 71 






Total 


$ 15,169 75 


$ 13,027 54 


$ 2, 143 21 







*Halifa.x, N.S., over paid $1.00 refunded to Harbour Master. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 111 

Quebec Harbour Commissioners' Report ♦ 

increased trade of port 

As stated in last year's report during 1926 imports showed an increase of 
27 per cent and exports one of 42 per cent over the previous year. 

During 1927 there has been a 10 per cent increase over 1926 both in imports 
and exports. 

REVENUE 

Revenue in 1927 $ 702, 310 01 

Revenue in 1926 678,882 06 

Increase in 1927 $ 23,427 95 

OPERATING EXPENDITURES 

Expenditure in 1927 $ 631, .5.39 73 

E.xpenditure in 1926 595, 272 89 

Increase in 1927 $ 36, 266 84 

The surplus of revenue over expenditure in 1927 was $70,770.28. 

HARBOUR MASTER'S REPORT 

March 24. — The ss. Gaspesia of the Clarke Steamship Company left port 
for the north shore. First departure of the season, for lower gulf ports. 

March 30. — The ss. Gaspesia of the Clarke Steamship Company arrived 
from lower gulf ports, and north shore. First arrival of the season. 

April 11. — The ss. Gaspesia of the Clarke Steamship Co. left at noon for 
Montreal, being the first departure for that port this season. 

April 12. — The main ship channel, Montreal-Quebec practically clear of 
ice. Government boats placing the buoys. The lower St. Lawrence light- 
vessels left to take their respective positions for the coming season. 

April 15. — The ss. Gaspesia of the Clarke Steamship Company arrived 
from Montreal, being the first arrival from that port this season. 

April 22.- — The ss. Montrose of the Canadian Pacific Ocean Service, arrived 
in port, from Liverpool, being the first Atlantic liner of the season. 

November 26. — The ss. Regina of the White Star line, left at midnight for 
Liverpool. Being the last passenger liner to depart from this port this season. 

December 1. — The ice begins to make in the river, and small ice floes have 
been noticed running down stream. 

December 5. — The ss. Bell left port after bunkering for Halifax, being the 
last ocean steamer to depart from this port this season. 

December 14. — The coasting fleet of steamers anchored and moored in the 
inner and outer Louise's basin for the winter months. 

December 18.- — The Sable I. of the Bras d'Or Bay Navigation Company, 
arrived from Ellis bay, Anticosti, being the last coasting arrival of the season. 

The Canadian Pacific Ocean Service Company, in addition to their palatial 
fleet of trans-atlantic passenger carrying steamers, had this year on the Que- 
bec-Southampton route the magnificent ss. Empress of Australia, with terminal 
at this port, with the other empresses, owned and navigated by the said com- 
pany. 

The White Star Dominion Line, also in addition to their fleet of palatial 
trans-atlantic liners had this year on the Liverpool-St. Lawrence route, the ss. 
Calgaric and the ss. Albertic calling at Quebec weekly, inward and outward 
from Montreal. 

During the year 1927, two palatial passenger river boats, the ss. Tadoussac, 
and the ss. St. Laivrence have been built by the Davie Shipbuilding Co. at 
Lauzon, Que. Both vessels are equipped with all modern accommodations for 
carrying passengers on the river. The Tadoussac has a gross tonnage of 6,500 
tons, and the St. Lawrence 6,327, thus making the total gross tonnage built 
this 12,728 tons. 



112 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

• CHIEF engineer's REFORT 

Princess Louise Docks 

Dredging. — Carrying out the policy of the commissioners to maintain a 
minimum ch'aught of 35 feet at low water in the turning basin of the estuary of 
the St. Charles river, the commissioners' dredge No. 2 was placed in operation 
on May 19 and worked until September 3. 

The quantity of material moved was 238,710 cubic yards or a daily average 
of 2,682 cubic yards. 

For dredging the Customs House pond and Atkinsons wharf, a small 10- 
inch suction dredge was employed with very satisfactory results. 

Shed No. 18. — On March 25 a fire destroyed shed No. 18 which was a 
wooden shed. The cause of the fire has not been discovered and the shed has 
not so far been reconstructed. Our independent fire system proved its value on 
that- occasion, in the protection of surrounding wooden sheds. 

Shed No. 29. — The work started in the fall of 1925 at the west section of 
this shed, consisting of replacing the pedestals, supporting the front row of 
columns, with a continuous reinforced concrete slab for a distance of 200 feet 
proved so satisfactory that two more sections of 200 feet were commenced in 
January, 1927, and completed in April. 

Our experience so far has proven that these slabs improve the stability of 
the shed and overhead grain conveyors. A similar concrete slab will be con- 
structed this winter in the remaining two sections of the shed^ 

Improved Railway Facilities. — The work done during the year consisted 
in changing the rail from 60- to 80-pound rails on the water side of sheds 25 
and 26, pier No. 1, facing the river St. Lawrence; and also at the west end of 
our property from the Canadian National Railway diamond along the main 
line to connect with previously laid 80-pound rail. 

Cold Storage. — Certain improvements were made at the cold storage plant 
to facilitate the handling of goods, the principal items being an overhead meat 
track in rooms Nos. 12 and 8a, and the addition of one beam scale and two 
automatic dial scales in the fish house. 

General Improvements. — ^Works of minor importance carried out during the 
past year were as follows: — 

The construction and placing in commission of three 40-foot freight gang- 
ways and one passenger gangway. 

The addition of a public toilet room in the concourse of shed No. 28. 

Raising and renewing foundation sills on the south side of shed No. 20. 

A general painting of sheds Nos. 5, 6, 19, 20, 25, 26 and 27. 

Renewing foundation sills for gantry rails. 

The commissioners floating equipment was overhauled and the plant gen- 
erally has been maintained in good working order. 

The Cross-wall bridge was operated for the first time during the past season 
on April 2 and for the last time on December 11. 

The water was retained in the Wet dock for the first time during 1927 on 
April 20 and for the last time on December 6. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 113 

Wolfe's Cove Terminals 

Dredging. — The suction dredge General Wolfe started operation on May 
24 and worked until August 21 preparing the ground for the cribs. The number 
of cubic yards of material dredged during that period amounted to 410,953 
cubic yards which was deposited in the fill between the Canadian National 
Railways line and Champlain street and back of our rip-rap embankment. 

Cribs. — The cribs have been built and sunk into position for a distance of 
2,666 feet. The timber built into the cribs this year amounted to 11,362,252 
feet b.m. of British Columbia fir. We still have on hand a quantity of 2,013,137 
feet b.m. for work early next spring. 

A quantity of 134,000 cubic yards of stone from Victoria cove and Chateau 
Richer quarries was put into the cribs during the season leaving a balance of 
about 36,000 cubic yards required to complete the filling of the cribs. 

Steel anchor rods, 3 inches diameter, have been placed in main cribs Nos. 
5, 6, 10, 14 and 18 which will be extended next spring to an anchorage back of 
the railway embankment. 

Rip-Rap Embankment. — Last winter the rip-rap embankment for the 
approach to the quav wall was extended for a length of 300 feet from station 
62-00 to station 65-00. 

In order to provide dumping room for the dredge next summer we are 
building this winter a temporary cut-off with stone taken from Ottawa cove. 
This cut-off will extend from the railway embankment to anchor crib No. 12 at 
right angle to the line of the quay wall. 

Generally speaking better progress was made this year as compared with 
previous years; however, it does not seem possible for the contractors to com- 
plete their work for the time stipulated in their contract. 

wharfinger's report 

The traffic at the St. Charles river docks and wharves was: — 

LOWER PORT STEAMERS 

Inwards 8, 082 tons general cargo 

" 2, 492 tons wet pulp 

Outwards 15, 592 tons general cargo 

1,246,078 f.b.m. lumber and timber 

11,250 ties 

" 72, 700 bricks 

QUEBEC-MONTREAL 

Inwards 24, 601 tons general cargo 

Outwards 2,322 tons general cargo 

The Canadian Import Company have 31,600 tons of coal stored on the 
space rented to them. 

The Dominion Coal Company have 48,270 tons of coal stored on the space 
rented to them. 

There are winter-stored on Louise docks lumber, laths, coal, etc. 

There are stored in the different sheds spoolwood, salt, lumber, fertilizers, 
etc. 

The docks are occupied during the winter months by vessels of various 
tonnage, where they find safe quarters until the opening of navigation. 

65702—8 



114 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

ELEVATOR SUPERINTENDENT'S REPORT 

Grain Elevator No. 2 

GRAIN RECEIVED 

Bushels Bushels 

In store at end of year 1926 1,664,339 

Wheat 6,876, 611 

Corn 910, 039 

Oats •. 1,376,436 

Barlev 99,372 

Rye 177, 994 

Other grain 1 . 246 

Total 1 1 , 106 , 037 

GRAIN DELIVERED 

Bushels Bushels 

By conveyers 7, 557, 653 

By cars 171, 886 

By teams 158, 750 

By bags 1,885,087 

9,773,376 

In store December 31, 1927 1,332, 661 

From the total of grain delivered 2,215,723 bushels were local deliveries. 

TRAFFIC MANAGER'S REPORT 

Loaded cars received 5, 775 

Loaded dars forwarded 12, 379 

18,154 

Empty cars received 11 , 457 

Empty cars forwarded 4, 824 

16,281 

Total number of cars handled 34,435 

Loaded passenger, mail and baggage cars handled 3, 129 

Total number of cars coal handled 7, 454 

COMMODITIES STORED IN COMMISSIONERS' COLD STORAGE WAREHOUSE DURING 

1927 

Apples barrels and boxes 16,007 

Other fruits boxes 6, 009 

Vegetables lbs. 1,415,252 

Frozen and salted fish lbs. 1,222,783 

Meats lbs. 1,312,654 

Eggs doz. 2G4,.300 

Frozen eggs lbs. 88, 900 

Butter lbs. 631 , 232 

Groceries lbs. 815, 116 

Small frtuits (strawberries, etc.) lbs. 59, 189 

Oats bus. 49, 233 

PORT OF QUEBEC— SUMMARY OF GROSS TONNAGE AND NUMBER OF VESSELS 

ARRIVED DURING 1927 

Vessels Tonnage 

Coasting vessels inward from sea 320 431 , 131 

Coasting vessels from Montreal and Great Lakes 327 404,091 

Ocean steamers inward from sea 449 3, 445, 338 

Ocean steamers outward for sea via Montreal and Quebec 441 3,375,037 

Totals 1 , 537 7, 655, 597 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 11.5 

PORT OF QUEBEC (LEVIS)-SUMMARY OF XET TONNAGE AND NUMBER OF VESSELS 

ARRR'EID DURING 1927 
Vessels Tonnage 

67 157, 332 

COMPARISON OF IMPORTS AND EXPORTS 1926 AND 1927 

Imports 1926 1927 

tons tons 

Grain received 261,585 283,250 

Coal 352,859 405,037 

Fuel oil 125,433 110,048 

Other cargo 125,734 148,841 

865,611 947,176 
Increase in 1927: 81,565 tons. 

1926 1927 

f.b.m. f.b.ni. 

Lumber and timber 18,879,599 13,331,680 

Exports 1926 1927 

tons tons 

Grain delivered 253,850 293,201 

Other cargo 102,389 106,286 

356,239 399,487 
Increase in 1927: 43,248 tons. 

1926 1927 

Lumber and timber 9,313,782 8,449,088 

f.b.m. f.b.m. 

Cattle 933 head 

Hor.ses none 2,810 head 

IMMIGRANTS 
Landed in 1926: 63,785 Landed in 1927- 64,3S1 

GENEEAL 

July 30, the ss. Empress of Australia of the Canadian Pacific Ocean Sei-vice, 
arrived in port from Southampton, with their Royal Highnesses, the Prince of 
Wales, and Prince George. The official landing took place at the King's wharf, 
which was magnificently decorated for the occasion. Right Honourable Stanley 
Baldwin, Prime Minister of Great Britain, and IMrs. Baldwin were included in 
the Royal party of visitors to this country. 

September 7. — The Canadian Pacific liner ss. Emipress of Scotland left port 
for Southampton, with their Royal Highnesses, the Prince of Wales, and Prince 
George, on their retm^n to England, after visiting the most important cities of 
the Dominion. 

VISITS OF WARSHIPS 

July 20. — The French cruiser Ville d'Ys of the French navy arrived in 
port from Montreal on her Annual visit to the St. Lav.Tence waters. Com- 
mander Antoine in command. 

August 21.— The H.M.S. Calcutta flag ship of the West Indies, and North 
American waters Squadron, arrived in port. Admiral Sir Walter Cov/ans. 
Baronet, K.C.B., D.S.O., M.V.R. in command. 

MoNTREAi. Harbour Commissionees' Report 

PERSONNEL 

The personnel of the Montreal harbour commission suffered a grave loss 
in the death of Mr. Emilien Daoust, February 23, 1928. Mr. Daoust was a 
harbour commissioner, 1922-1928. 

port ACTIVITIES, 1927 

The total business of the port in 1927 exceeded by a wide margin all 
previous records. 

In 1926, the imports, exports, and domestic tonnage passing over the 
wharves amounted to 9.210,699 tons, a record total. In 1927, the total tonnage 
amounted to 11,921,173 tons. 

65702— 8i 



116 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



Comparisons of the two years follow :- 



Imports. . . 
Exports. .. 
Domestic. 



1926 1927 

tons tons 

2,028,162 2,693,5.35 

4,549,835 6,175,485 

2,632,702 3,052,153 



Total 9,210,699 11,921,173 

The bulk of the increase in imports was due to coal imports and in exports 
to grain exports, but apart from these there was a steady increase in a number 
of other commodities. 

SHIPPING IXCiffiASES 

Ocean going ships numbered 1,610, net registered tonnage, 4,992,486 tons 
as compared with 1,421 .^hip?, net registered tonnage 4,221,730 tons in 1926. 

GRMN EXPORTS 



TOTAL CrRAIN EXPORTS. 192.'5 TO 1927 



1923. 
1924. 
1925. 
1926. 
1927. 



120, 107, 990 bushels 
165, 1.39,. 399 " 
166, 212,. 3.35 
135,897,882 " 
195,247,914 " 



CANADIAN AND AMERICAN WHEAT EXPORTS, 1923 TO 1927 



■ — 


Canadian 
wheat 


American 
wheat 


Total 
wheat 


1923 

1924 


bush. 

64,131,724 
71,114,269 
64,770,611 
67,328,382 
72,978,666 


bush. 

25, 4.34, .3.39 
46,817,002 
19.130,201 
24,443.3.12 
46,134,760 


bush. 

89,566,063 
117,931,271 


1925 


83,900,812 


1926 


91,771,734 


1927 


119,113,426 



COAX, IMPORTS 



In this business the luiibour set up three new records viz.: largest tonnage 
of British anthracite coal ever imported, largest tonnage of Nova Scotia coals 
ever brought up to Montreal, and largest total tonnage of all imports of coal. 

Herewith are given statements of imports of British anthracite coal, and 
of total imports of coal for tlie years 1921 to 1927 (inclusive). 



BRITISH ANTHRACITE 



1921. 
1922. 
1923. 
1924. 
1925. 



5,163 tons 
177,630 " 
111,2.34 " 
219,. 327 " 
438,841 



1926 (British coal strike) 

1927 683, 090 tons 



Total imports oe co.vl 



1921. 
1922. 
^23. 
1924. 
1925. 
1926. 
1927. 



1,042,716 tons 

2.009,917 

1,660.009 

1,8.33,695 

1,697,143 

1.887,988 

2,448,477 



{;U.\.1X ELEV.VTOR SYSTEM 



The total deliveries lioni Montreal elevator.s in 1927 (as already sho\\Ti) 
amounted to 195,247,914 l)ushels, a world record for grain-shipment from a 
single port for any one >(ar, in achieving this, new marks were set up as 
follows: — 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTBH 



It? 



Largest total grain handlings ever achieved in u single year. 

Largest exports of wheat in any year. 

Greatest exports of American grain in any year,, 

Greatest volume of water-borne grain unloaded at the elevators. 

Busiest grain shipping months in the history of the port. 

Greatest daily total receipts. 

Greatest daily total deliveries. 

Largest margin of supremacy over all competing jjort^. 

NEW Ea:.EVATOR CONSTRUCTIOM 

Forming part of the program of new work covered by the new loan of 
$12,000,000 authorization for which was granted by the government early in 
1927, is the extension of 3,000,000 bushels capacity to Grain Elevator No. 3. 
Construction of this important addition to the grain handling facilities of tbe 
port was begun in the early summer of 1927, and was carried on throughout 
the year. It is expected that this new storage annex will be ready to receive 
grain during 1928, and will materially add to the worldng capacity of the 
port. The completion of this new house will increase the capacity of Elevator 
No. 3 to 5,000,000 bushels, and of the entire port to 15,162,000 bushels. 

RECORD OF RECEIPTS AND DELIVERIES OF THE MONTREATi HARBOUR, COMMISSIOITERS' 
GRAIN ELEVATOR SYSTEM FOR 1927 



Receipts 



ELEVATOR No. 1 



Deliveeies 



Water 43. 3cS3,227 bush. 

Rail 4,879,119 " 



Convej'ev 

Cars 

Teams 



45,111,381 bush. 
1,263,495 " 
555,364 " 
110 " 



48,262,340 



46,930,350 



First vessel unloaded April 26, 1927. 
Last vessel unloaded December 0, 1927. 

572 steamers 1591 vessels.. . 43,383,227 bush. 

19 barges / 

1,777 C.N.R. cars \2,586 eras. . . . 4,879, 119 " 
809 C.P.R. cars..../ 



48,262,346 



Receipts 



Can. Grain. ?,-[, 320, 128 bush 

Amer. Grain 16,936,218 " 

Arg. Grain 



DELrVEEIES 

Can. G];'i;i 30,081,616 bush. 

Amer. Grain.. 16,835,663 " ' 

Arg. Grail). 13,071 " 



48,262,316 " 

ELEVATOR No. 



46,930,350 



Receipts 



Deliveries 



Water 45, 908, S50 bush. 

Rail 12,828,409 " 



Conveyer 56,222,352 bush. 

Cars ; 2,495,179 " 

Teams 773,568 " 

Bags 1,346,966 " 



58,797,259 " 
First vessel unloaded April 26, 1927. 
Last vessel unloaded December 16, 1927. 
647 steamers. ...:.. 1662 vessels.. . 45,968,850 bush, 

15 barges J 

2,295 C.N.R. cars 16,794 cars. . . . 12,828,409 " 
4,499 C.P.R. cars / 



60,838,065 



Receipts 



58,797,259 



Can. grain 27,942,470 bush. 

Aner. gi-ain 30, 381, 257 " 

Arg. grain 473, 532 " 



Deliveries 

Can. grain 29,094,571 bush, 

Amer. gi-ain 31,280,306 " 

Arg. gi-ain 463,188 " 



58,797,259 



60,838,065 



118 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



Receipts 

Water 83.069, 

RaU 7,247, 



ELEVATOR No, 3 

130 bush. Convever. 
640 " Cars 

Teairife. . 

Bags 



Deliveries 



38,085,257 bush. 
1,600,908 " 
55,971 " 



40,316,770 



39,742,136 



First vessel unloaded April 26, 1927. 
Last vessel unloaded November 28, 1927. 
433 steamers 1 449 vessels. . . 33 , 069 

16 barges p 

964 C.N.R. cars 13,688 cars. . . . 7,247 
2,724 C.P.R. cars / 



Receipts 



130 bush. 
640 " 

40,316,770 " 



Deliveries 



Can. grain :I5,8S6, 174 bush. 

Amer.grain 19,989,464 " 

Arg. grain • 4,441,132 " 



Can. grain. . 
Amer. grain. 
Arg. grain . . 



15,937,656 bush. 
20,441,730 " 
3,362,750 " 



Receipts 



40,316,770 '■ 

ELEVATOR "B" 



39,742,136 



Deliveries 



Water 3o, 649, 

Rail 10,261, 



829 bush. ConA'eyer. 
106 " Cars 

Teams. 

Bags 



46,567, 180 bush, 

747,727 " 
422,456 " 



46,910 
First vessel unloaded April 26, 1927. 
Last vessel unloaded December 6, 1927. 

516 steamers \544 vessels. .. 36,049 

28 barges / 

5,657 C.N.R. cars 5,657 cars... . ]0,26L 



935 



47,737,363 



Receipts 



829 bush. 
106 " 
46,910,935 " 



Deliveries 



Can. grain 23, 142, 301 hush. 

Amer. grain 23, 768, 034 '* 

Arg. grain 

46,910,935 '•■ 



Can. grain. . . 
Amer. grain. 
Arg. grain. . . 



23,483,599 bush. 
24,123,764 " 
130,000 " 



47,737,363 



SUMMARY OF GRAIN HANDLING— ELEVATORS 1, 2, 3, AND "B" 



Receipts 

Water 159,071,036 bush. 

Rail 35,216,274 " 



194,287,310 '■ 
First vessel unloaded April 26, 1927. 
Last vessel unloaded December 16, 1927. 

2,168 steamers 12,246 vessels. 159,071,030 bush. 

78 barges / 

10,693 C.N.R. cars \18,725 cars... 35,216,274 " 
8,032 C.P.R. cars./ 



194,287,310 



Receipts 



Can, grain 98,297,073 bush. 

Amer. grain M , 075, 573 '" 

Arg. grain 4,914,664 " 



Deliveries 



Convej'er. 

Cars 

Teams. . . . 
Bags 



Can. grain 
Amer. grain 
Arg. grain 



194,287,310 " 
Stock in elevators (at December 31, 1927) 7,378,949 bush. 



185,986 
6,107 
1,807 
1,347 



170 bush . 
309 " 
359 " 
076 " 



195,247,914 



Deliveries 



98,597 

92,681 

3,969 



442 bush . 
463 " 
009 " 



195,247,914 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 

GRAIN EXPORTS 

Countries of Destination 



119 



Country 


Wheat 


Barley 


Rye 


Can. 
oats 


Amer. 
oats 


Buck- 
wheat 


Corn 


Algeria 


254,279 

13,719,848 

750,848 














Belgium ... 


1,586,4.38 
289,904 


1,223,8.54 

1,621,176 

144,000 

88,426 

19,281,6.39 

325,488 


703,303 


946, 123 






Denmark ... ... 


137,143 


Finland 










France 


3,445,265 
13,980,904 
35,285,317 

3,365,816 

18,443,830 

8.37,005 

19,621,054 




209,982 

406,8.34 

1,498,370 


265,922 

1,741,883 

10,000 






Germany 


13,057,541 
1,686,617 


26,4.57 




Great Britain 




Greece 






Holland 


5,105,624 
241,676 


8,172,708 


614,187 


1,226,709 
12,500 






Ireland .... 






Italy 










Jugo Rlavia 


338,875 






49,000 






Malta, 


112,000 

926,922 

1,414,208 










Norway 


390,404 


3,047,047 


58,704 








Portugal 








Sweden 


1,405,714 
100,000 
356,274 

4,208,416 




696, 585 










Tunis 












Union South Africa 














Unknown 


50, 000 


481,004 




















Total (bushels) 


118,227,726 


22,747,079 


.35,081,927 


3,491,380 


4,252,137 


26,457 


137, 143 



NEW MONTREAL SOUTH SHORE BRIDGE 



The program of completion of the various stages of this important work 
is being well adhered to, and it is confidently anticipated by the Commissioners 
that this new artery of traffic will be opened to the public within the time limit 
set for its completion. 

ENGINBERING DEPARTMENT 

The main items of construction and repair work carried out during the 
season of 1927 are the following: — 

Wharves. — ^Continuation of shore wharf at sections 32-33. Continuation 
of Bickerdike pier construction. Back-filling of shore wharf at section 38. 
Construction of wharf and mole at section 100. 

Buildings. — Annex to elevator No. 3. 

Sewers. — ^Very short lengths on Bickerdike pier and at section 30. 

Dredging. — Continuation of dredging operations in Bickerdike basin and 
its entrance channel. Dredging of chanel at sections 58-60. Maintenance 
dredging. Dredging in connection with new wharves: at Bickerdike pier, at 
sections 32-33, at section 99. 

Electrical Work. — Additional power equipment for elevator No. 3. Trans- 
mission and service lines extension. 

Paving. — Sections 20-21, high level roadway. Victor street ramp. Shed 
No. 16 ramp. 

Railway Construction. — Construction and rearrangement of railway yard in 
vicinity of new bridge site. Track service at sections 31-32. Track service at 
sections 38-39. Extension of tracks at Victoria bridge; end of Alexandra pier, 
and at harbour yard. 



120 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

COLD STORAGE WAREHOUSE 

In 1927 important increases were recorded in many commodities, the most 
notewortliy being in the storage of nuts, of which more than 3,00-0,000 pounds 
was stored. Again, in the warm summer months, the warehouse stored large 
quantities of valuable furs. Decreases were experienced in the storage of 
cheese and butter, due to the shrinkage in the export of these commodities from 
Canada, a result of a dull European market. 

At the end of the year the commissioners made an important concession in 
switching charges to customers of their warehous'e. All switching charges on rail 
traffic from points outside the harbour to the commissioner's cold storage ware- 
house, and from the warehouse to points outside the harbour commissioners' 
territory, have been cancelled: — 

The following are the ciuantities of the more important products stored 
during the year: — 

Apples, barrels 17, 720 

Apples, boxes 30, 797 

Apples, evaporated, pounds 111,650 

Butter, pounds 8, 109, 248 

Cheese, pounds 36,268,370 

Celery, crates 20,434 ' 

Canned goods, cases 4,399 

Eggs, doz 1 , 468, 020 

Fish, pounds 1, 238,498 

Meat, pounds 3,993,866 

Poultry, pounds 1, 768, 110 

Onions, bags 7, 454 

Onions, crates 5, 674 

Hops, bales 5, 047 

Binder twine, pounds 307, 350 

Furs, pounds 97, 775 

Nuts, pounds 3, 168,258 

HARBOUR RAILWAY TERMINALS 

The figures for car handlings at the sheds during the season of navigation 
evidence the increase in import, and the decrease in export rail traffic, the 
number of cars loaded having been 14,348 as compared with 12,317 in 1926; 
and the number of cars unloaded having been 24,141 as against 29,073 in the 
previous year. 

With the completion of the extension to the locomotive shop, suitable accom- 
modation was furnished for the housing of the nine electric locomotives. These 
locomotives were operated during the year with very S'atisfactory results, and, 
as in the case of the steam locomotives, the number in daily operation varied 
with the volume of traffic. The running record of the electric locomotives 
during 1927 shows that they were in operation during 10,788 hours, and covered 
during that time 33,249 miles in switching service. 

An important, though temporary, rearrangement of tracks at sections 26-28, 
necessitated by the construction work of the Montreal south shore bridge, was 
carried out prior to the opening of navigation. In addition, new tracks were 
built to wharves at sections 31-32, and alongside new wharf at sections 38-39. 

The total mileage of harbour railway tracks in 1927 was 67-44 miles or 
356,092 lineal feet, the corresponding figure for 1926 was 65 19 miles, or 344,238 
lineal feet. 

The total number of cars handled by the commissioners during 1927 was 
195,853; in 1926 the number was 205,481. 

HARROUR POLICE DEPARTMENT 

During the season of navigation the harbour police force, consisting of 
chief, three captains, and sixty-five constables, maintained order within the 
harbour, protected life and property, and regulated the traffic on the wiiarves. 

For the winter season the force consisted of four officers and twenty-six 
constables. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 121 

An automobile and two motor-cycles are attached to this department, and 
were in constant use during the year, 43,026 miles having been covered by these 
vehicles during 1927. A continuous patrol is maintained by means of this 
equipment from Windmill point to the Imperial Oil plant at Montreal east. 

The police department rendered first aid in 30 cases of accidents on the 
waterfront. 

During the year 76 arrests were made for various offences within the har- 
bour, and, in addition, seven arrests were made for contravention of customs 
laws. 

Eight thousand and eighty-one carters, loading at various places along the 
harbour, were checked by the traffic constables. 

Five thousand two hundred and forty-eight taxicabs were checked and 
their numbers taken. 

FINANCIAL 

The income on revenue account for 1927 was $5,453,951.56, as against 
$4,632,599.92 for 1926, an increase of $821,351.64. 

The cost of operation, maintenance, interest, sinking funds, etc., in 1927 
was $5,335,452.69, as against $4,892,953.88 for 1926; an increase of $442,498.81; 
leaving a surplus on revenue account for the year 1927 of $118,498.87. 

NEW^ H.\RBOUR BY-L.\WS 

A harbour work of considerable importance which had been under way for 
some time was brought to fruition in 1927 with the issuance of a completely 
rewritten and revised set of harbour by-laws and tariffs, bearing the approval, 
as required by law, of the Governor in Council. By-laws of antiquated form, 
some of which dated from the era of sailing ships, were rewritten, and in their 
new form the by-law^s which govern procedure and conduct within the precincts 
of the harbour of Montreal are easy to understand, and are thoroughly codified, 
notated, and indexed. The harbour tariffs which are also by-laws, and bear a 
number in the complete code, are included in the compact volume which is 
available for issuance to the public, but in addition, each tariff by-law, in 
pamphlet form, has been printed separately. 

Increases have been made in the rates for switching cars on the harbour 
tracks. Before this step was taken, the commissioners gave serious study to 
every phase of this situation, and had conferences with the representatives of 
the Canadian National Railways and the Canadian Pacific Railway. The old 
switching rates, which were exceptionally moderate, and were everywhere 
recognized as the lowest in North America, were based on a " per car " basis, 
and were first established at a time when railway cars were very much smaller 
than the type of equipment in use to-day, when wages and operating costs 
were much lower than at the present time, and when the equipment of the har- 
bour railway did not include standard 100 pound section, ballasted tracks, and 
an electrified system operated by electric locomotives, the provision of which 
has resulted in more efficient service to the railway companies, and a saving in 
wear and tear on rolling stock. 

ST.\FF CHANGES 

Important changes were made by the commissioners during 1927 in the 
executive structure, and the allocation of duties of the staff. For some years the 
executive duties were divided between the general manager and the secretary, 
but upon the retirement from active duty of the secretary, througli failing 
health, the duties of general manager and secretary were combined. An 
assistant general manager and an assistant secretary were appointed, and the 
position of purchasing agent, made vacant through the promotion of the latter 
officer, was filled from the ranks of the staff. The commissioners feel that the 
present arrangement is an entirely satisfactory one. 



122 MARIXE AND FISHERIES 

SHIPPING, PORT OF MONTREAL, 1927 

The season under review was very satisfactory. More ocean sliips with a 
larger aggregate net registered tonnage than in any previous year, used the 
port. 

Navigation opened earlier in the season than usual and closed later, very 
considerably later. 

Practically all of the larger steamship companies trading to ^Montreal 
either launched new tonnage for the St. Lawrence service, or made arrange- 
ments for the construction of new vessels. As the years elapse, the gross tonnage 
of passenger vessels which sail from Montreal is growing, and in 1927 vessels 
of 19,000 gross tons came regularly to Montreal. 

An important shipping transaction which took place during the season was 
the purchase of the White Star Line by the Royal Mail Steamships, Ltd., thus 
bringing this old established shipping company back under British control. 

STATEMENT SHOWING THE NUMBER, N'ATIONALITIES. AND TONNAGE OF 

SEA-GOING VESSELS THAT ARRIVED IN PORT DURING 

THE SEASON OF 1927 

Net Regd. 

Ships Tonnage 

British 1,052 3, 610,899 

Norwegian 1-57 305, 912 

Italian Ill 384, 230 

American 110 243, 192 

Dutch 72 182, 277 

Danish 39 64, 748 

Greek 19 52,851 

French 16 41,617 

Spanish 9 .30,826 

Jugo Slav 6 21,343 

German 5 13, 746 

Swedish 5 7, 287 

Japanese 4 18,1.39 

Mexican 2 6, 473 

Belgian 1 3, 071 

Portuguese 1 2, 986 

Finnish 1 2,889 

1,610 4,992,486 



Three Rivers Harbour Commissioners' Report 

personnel, 1927, commission 

The personnel of the 1927 commission is the same as that of 1926, viz.: 
President and Chairman, Robert F. Grant; Commissioners, Joseph L. Fortin 
and Norman Labelle; Harbour Master, U. P. Bureau; and Secretary-Treasurer, 
Joseph J. Ryan. 

PORT OF THREE RIVERS 

Situated near lake St. Peter on north shore of St. Lawrence river at the 
junction of the St. Maurice and St. Lawrence rivers. Head of natural deep- 
water navigation of St. Lawrence river, and commands St. Maurice river terri- 
tory, which has a superficial area of 17,000 square miles. 

Population at last census in 1921, 35,000. 

Principal industries, lumber, pulp, paper, cotton, machinery, footwear, 
gloves, caskets, biscuits, wearing apparel, etc. 

Commercial centre of large agricultural district of 1,470,000 acres. 

DEVELOPMENT OF PORT 

The pulp and paper trade has undergone a remarkable expansion in recent 
years. Several large new mills have been constructed, and the ones already 
existing extended. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 123 

The district now manufactures 2,100 tons of newsprint and kraft paper a 
day, and is one of the great centres of the world's pulp and paper trade. 

The electro-chemical industry at Shawinigan Falls of the Shawinigan 
Water and Power Company has been largely extended, and the Wabasso Cotton 
Company has developed into the largest cotton mill operating under one roof 
in the Dominion, while the Canadian Iron Foundries, Casket and Boot factories 
have appreciably increased their trade. 

As a result the tonnage handled by the port has year by year shown a, 
steady and rapid increase, in order to cope with increased outputs of raw 
materials, and finished products. 

In view of these developments steps have been taken to enlarge the present 
harbour facilities, and plans have been drawn up and submitted to the authori- 
ties, providing for the additional accommodation of deep draught vessels in the 
harbour, and it is important that these extensions and improvements to the 
port should be completed as soon as possible, in order not to retard the expan- 
sion of the port and the district. 

STATEMENT OF KtTMBEE AND TONNAGE OF STEAMERS AND OTHER VESSELS 

REPORTED "INWARD' AND "OUTWARD" AT THE PORT OF THREE 

RIVERS, QUE.. FOR THE YEAR 1927 

Ocean Traffic: Vessels "Inward" Ocean Traffic: Vessels "Outward" 

Nationality No. Reg. Ton. Cleared for No. Reg. Ton. 

English 61 165,225 Inland ports 41 114,728 

Canadian 32 93, 622 Sea ports 76 211, 930 

Norwegian 8 16,829 

Italian 7 27,660 

Danish 4 11,282 

Dutch 3 7,646 

German 1 2,960 

American 1 1,434 

117 326,658 117 326,658 



United St.\tes Traffic Inland Traffic 

No. Reg. Ton. No. Reg. Ton. 

Canal boats and M/S 154 68,677 Steamboats, tugs and barges 2,135 1,265,671 

RECAPITULATION 

Ocean traffic 117 326,6.58 

United States traffic 154 68, 677 

Inland traffic 2, 135 1,265,671 



Grand total 2,406 1,661,006 

MERCHANDISE 

Ocean Traffic 

"Inward" "Outward" 

Lumber 9,807,974 ft.b.m. Lumber 430,128ft.b.m. 

Pulpwood 56, 928 cords Newspnnt paper '." 31, 793 tons 

Coals— General cargo 794 " 

(Bituminous) 348,512 tons 

(Coke) 15,873 " 

(Anthracite) 3, 267 " 

Sulphur 16,625 " 

Saltcakes 14,517 " 

Pig iron 5,614 " 

Sugar 1,6.50 " 

Soapstone 280 " 

Salt 227 " 

Rails 207 " 

Salmon 24 " 

Machinery 11 " 

Rice 10 " 

Angle bars 6 " 

Spikes 3 " 

Wire boxes 3 " 



124 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



"Inward" 



MERCHANDISE— CowcZwded 
UxiTED States Traffic 



"Outward" 



Coals — 

(Bituminous) . 

(Anthracite) . . 
Moulding sand.. 



53,626 tons 

10,061 " 

1,656 " 



Lumber 

Newsprint paper. 

Pulp 

Sugar 



3,554 ft.b.m. 
42,408 tons 
11,256 " 

1,650 " 



IxLAND Traffic 



Lumber 

Bricks 

Fuel oU 

Laths 

Pulpwood 

Apples 

Potatoes 

Cedar posts 

Cord wood 

General cargo 

Coal (Anthracite). 

Pig iron 

Hay 

Fish 



5,806,906 

'2,126,500 

1,009,449 

585,500 

105,444 

2,500 

2,400 

2,070 

798 

24,255 

4,514 

4,405 

240 

2 



ft.b.m. 

bricks 

I. galls. 

laths 

cords 

bushels 

posts 
cords 
tons 



Receipts 



January 1, 1927: cash on hand 88,759 53 

Accounts receivable 9i 960 21 

Harbour dues $42,980 23 

Tonnage dues 11,562 33 

Moorage dues 2, 037 75 

Wharves rentals 4, 850 00 

Sheds rentals 5,456 00 

Water lots rentals 1 , 025 05 

Sundries 512 20 

— 68,423 56 



Lumber 1,868,084 ft.b.m. 



Laths. 

General cargo 

Coal (Bituminous). 

Hay 

Cast iron pipes 

River sand 



5,000 laths 

11,364 tons 

5,521 " 

98 " 

2 " 

56,700 " 



Disbursements 

Interest on debentures $12, 375 00 

Maintenance and gen. rep 5,878 50 

Salaries 9, 000 00 

Office expenses 1,637 76 

Travelling expenses 442 92 

§29,334 18 

Cash from "Current Account" to 

"Surplus for Maintenance" 40,000 00 

Accounts receivable 5, 671 96 

Cash on hand, Dec. 31, 1927 12, 137 16 



S87,143 30 



S87, 143 30 



New Westminster, B.C., Harboiti Commissioners' Report 

PERSONNEL OF 1927 COMMISSION 

The personnel of the 1927 commission is the same as that of the 1926 one, 
viz.: Chairman, F. J. Coulthard; Commissioners, Geo. BLakeley and C. A. 
Welsh. 

The Consulting Engineer is W. G. Swan, C.E., M.E.I. C, and the Secretary 
and Harbour Master, W. B. English. 

BUSINESS OF PORT IN 1927 

Exports of lumber in 1927 totalled 212,000,000 feet b.m. valued at $4,306,000, 
a slight increase of about 1.000,000 feet over last year's total. 

This is approximately 29 per cent of the total quantity of lumber (exclusive 
of logs and bolts) exported by water from all British Columbia ports. 

Exports of bar metal and ore concentrates amounted to 18,581 tons, value 
$2,125,000; as against 41,327 tons, value $5,132,000 exported in 1926. 

The total value of deep sea exports in 1927 was $6,447,000. In 1926 it was 
$9,200,000. 

Imports, 10,444 tons, approximate value $300,000, show a slight falling off 
from 1926 when the imports totalled 12,221 tons, approximate value $400,000. 

SHIP CHANNEIL 

Reference was made in last year's report to certain improvement works, 
of a permanent nature, that the Government had arranged to carry out on 
the river in 1927. These works were all duly completed in a satisfactory manner 
and have resulted in an improved channel at the stretches where they were 
carried out. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 125 

In continuance of the Government's policy of steadily and consistently 
improving the channel of the river, provision has been made for further 
improvement works to be carried out during the current year, as follows: — 

(1) Sapperton Bar — Construction of Dyke No. 1. The proposed work con- 
sists of constructing a " V "-shaped dyke, each leg 600 feet long, of which 500 
feet is close piling and 100 feet at the outer end open piling, spaced 3' 6" 
centres, in two rows, zig-zagged. 

(2) Steveston — Repairs and Extension of Woodward's Training Wall. 
Repairs will consist of raising the rock mound to its original level by dumping 
rock on same till the required elevation is reached. 

(3) Steveston — Extension of North Jetty. It is proposed to extend this 
jettv approximatelv 5,000 feet, making the total length of this jetty about 
26,000 feet. 

Depth of Water. — As has been stated before, the natural depth of the 
Eraser river is approximately 30 feet at low water, but at certain stretches, 
not exceeding two or three miles altogether, there are shoaler places, and it is 
to these stretches that the Government is directing its attention at the present 
time, as above indicated, with the object of establishing a uniform depth through- 
out. At the pres'ent time the controlling depth from the entrance to the river 
to New Westminster, at the ordinary high tide (12-foot tide at Sandheads), 
remains at 28 feet, or at low water, 18 feet. 

PORT DEVELOPMENT 

Towards the end of the year under review and after lengthy negotiations, 
arrangements were finally completed in connection with financing of the 
commissioners' grain elevator, the Dominion Government having agreed to 
guarantee the authorized bond issue of $700,000, both as to interest and prin- 
cipal. By this arrangement a considerable annual saving will be effected inas- 
much as the rate of interes't which the bonds will bear has been consequently 
reduced. 

At time of writing, construction of the elevator is well under way, and as 
the project will mark a very important forward step in the port's development, 
being looked upon as only the beginning of similar undertakings by private 
interests on the Eraser river, the following description of the plant will be of 
general interest: — 

(1) Site. — The site of the elevator is on the south bank of the Eraser river, 
two miles below the New Westminster bridge. The waterfrontage occupied is 
approximately 1,800 feet in length and the reclaimed area of 12 acres, plus an 
additional 60 acres on shore, gives this property great possibilities for future 
use and development. It is directly accessible by Canadian National and Great 
Northern Railways and within the switching zone of the Canadian Pacific 
Railway. 

A timber bulkhead wall retains filling material for the foreshore reclama- 
tion. This material is made available from the dredging operations being car- 
ried on by the Dominion Government in the river immediately in front of the 
wharf wall, where a depth of 30 feet of water at low tide is being provided. 

A wharf approximately 1,100 feet in length is being constructed parallel 
to the river bank, and dredging operations are being carried out by the 
Dominion Government, which will provide excellent approach for shipping and 
a 30-foot depth of berth at low tide. This will permit the berthing of two 
ships at one time. A local water service from springs in the hill is now being 
established by the commissioners to serve the S'hips occupying these berths 
and also for domestic supply to the elevator. 



126 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

(2) Buildings and Equipment. — (o) Workhouse. — The workhouse, although 
originally designed for timber construction, is now being constructed in concrete. 
It has a bin capacity of approximately 110,€(K) bushels. The track shed con- 
tains four unloading pits and these are connected to one shipping leg and one 
shipping receiving leg. Unloading bins are provided both in the workhouse 
and in the storage, five dock spouts being provided in all. An additional ship- 
ping leg forms part of the equipment. 

Other equipment consists of three scale garners, three cleaning garners, six 
screening and one double carter-disk separator, four No. 11 receiving separators, 
one automatic scale in sacking room. The house has a receiving capacity of 
100 cars per day of two shifts of 8 hours each and a shipping capacity of 
30,000 bushels per hour. 

(6) Storage. — The storage is approximately 50' x 220', built of reinforced 
concrete fireproof construction throughout. It will contain 16 circular bins 24' 
diameter each, 14 inter-space bins and 15 outer-space bins. The circular and 
inter-space bins are full hoppered and provided with a separate draw-off valve 
in each case. The bin capacity is approximately 700,000 bushels. 

(c) Sacked Grain Warehouse. — A sacked grain warehouse of timber con- 
struction, metal clad, having a dimension of 60' x 65', is being constructed west 
of the workhouse. This is designed to carry a live load at 300 pounds per 
square foot. The warehouse will have a roof of four-ply tar and gravel. 

{d) Dryer and Boiler House. — Dryer house will contain a 500- bushel dryer 
of standard type. This building is located between the workhouse and storage 
and is of reinforced concrete fireproof construction. 

The boiler house, immediately adjoining, is similarly of fireproof concrete 
construction. 

A major project that will be of great importance to the port, serving the 
interior of British Columbia and the provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan, 
are the shipping terminals, including old storage facilities of Pacific Coast Ter- 
minals, Limited, for the establishment of which all financial arrangements have 
been completed, construction to be commenced at an early date. The amount 
of capital involved in this project will be approximately $2,250,000, and it will 
provide the port with modern and adequate facilities for handling all classes 
of export and import cargo. 

The site to be occupied, comprising about 18 acres, is located in the west 
end of the city of New W^estminster, and is most advantageously situated, 
both from the standpoint of water and rail shipments. Adequate Terminal 
Railway yards will be provided, connecting up with three transcontinental 
railways— Canadian National, Canadian Pacific and Great iSTorthem — as well 
as with the British Columbia Electric Railway. 

The first unit of this large undertaking provides for: — 

(1) Cold storage building of concrete and steel construction, with walls 
and roof insulated with cork, of 140 feet by 300 feet dimensions, four stories 
in height. Three different degrees of storage will be provided — cold, cool and 
dry, thus providing for all classes of commodities. 

(2) A wharf approximately 1,020 feet in length, paralleling the river 
bank, with depth of water 35 feet at low tide, which, with present structures 
to be acquired, will provide a total berthing space of over 3.000 feet. 

(3) Modern mechanical handling facilities for bulk and general cargo. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 
COMPARATIVE RECORD OF DEEP SEA SHIPPING 1926 AND 1927 



127 



('Including Vessels trading to Off-Shore Ports and that Portion of Foreign Coastwise 

passing Outside Cape Flattery) 





Number 

of 

Ships 


Net 

regd. 

tonnage 


Gross 
tonnage 


1926 


175 
153 


579, 167 
486,603 


926,046 


1927 


776,229 







NATIONALITY OF DEEP SEA VESSELS, 1927 

British 52 

United States 45 

Japan 22 

Norwegian 17 

Danish 8 

Swedish 4 

Italian 4 

German 1 

Total 153 

COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF LUMBER PRODUCED AND SHIPPED BY MANUFAC- 
TURERS ON THE LOWER ERASER RIVER, 1923-1927 



Year 


Production 
board feet 


Approximate 
value 


Shipments: 


Local 
(B.F.) 


Water 

(B.F.) 


Rail 
(B.F.) 


1923 


290,000,000 
322,080,000 
417,9.52,785 
4.59,806,9.57 
491,163,000 


S 7,2.50,000 
8,052,000 
7,941,000 
8,7.36,000 
9,419,000 


78,600,000 
119,469,000 
171,4.59.665 
211,2.30,9.50 
212,045,613 


168,000,000 
1.53,736 000 
176.877,793 
178,779,482 
196,451,199 


43,200,000 


1924 

1925 


40,527,000 
62,. 386,. 5.50 


1926 

1927 


56,7.50,612 
55,620,559 



Below is given the destination of lumber exported from the Fraser riA^er 
in 1927, with the percentage for each country, viz: — 

L'nited States Atlantic coast 43% 

Orient 16% 

Canadian Atlantic coast 10% 

Australia 10% 

West Indies 7% 

L'nited Kingdom 5% 

South Africa 3% 

Other Countries 6% 



DEEP SEA EXPORTS, 1926 AND 1927 



Commodity 


Quantity 


Approximate Value 


1926 


1927 


1926 


1927 


Lumber and lumber products, board feet 

Ore concentrates, tons 


211,231,000 

10,822 

.30,-505 

235 


212,046,000 
1,163 1 

17,418/ 
186 


$ 4,013,000 
5,132,000 

60,000 


S 4,-306,115 
2 125,000 


Bar metals (lead and zinc), tons 

General merchandise, tons 


16,000 




9,205,000 


6,447,115 



128 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 
DEEP SEA IMPORTS, 1926 AND 1927 



Commodity 


Quantity 


Approximate Value 


1926 


1927 


1926 


1927 




3,507 tons 
1,500 " 
4.980 " 
2,234 " 


6,841 tons 
1,765 " 

1,838 " 


$ 400,000 






















12,221 " 


10,444 " 


S 300,000 



RECEIPTS AND EXPENDITURES, 1927 

The receipts in 1927 amounted to $5,759.91; the expenditures to $4,942.60; 
leaving an unexpended balance of $817.31. 

Vancgitv'er Harboub Commissioners' Report 
personnel, 1927 

President, F. R. Med. Russell, K.C.; Commissioners, A. M. Pound and 
B. Geo. Hansuld. 

tonnage 

The number of deep-sea vessels entering the port was 1,123, as compared 
with 1,071 in the previous year, showing an increase of 52 vessels, with an 
increase iq gross tonnage of 188,779 tons. 

Of the deep-sea vessels entering, 445 were of British register, 327 United 
States, 155 Japanese, and the balance distributed among other countries such 
as France, Nonvay, Denmark, Holland, Italy, Germany, etc., all in practically 
the same proportions as last year — a feature which emphasizes the regular 
character of the business enjoyed by the port of Vancouver. 

The total number of vessels of all classes entering the port was 20,363, 
being 596 more than in 1926, representing an increase in tonnage of 610,689 
tons. 

IMPORTS AND EXPORTS 

Deep-sea imports were a little in excess of last year's figure, while deep- 
sea exports were slightly less. 

LUMBER 

The foreign export of lumber and logs in 1927 was 496.208.258 f.b.m. 
This is somewhat below the previous year's total; but it must be remembered 
that the 1926 foreign export was 82,000,000 feet in advance of the previous 
high record — namely. 432,652,770 feet in 1924— so that the 1927 figure very 
creditably occupies the second highest place in the history of this trade. 

Well over three-fourths of the total foreign lumber export went to Japan 
and the United States of America, the next highest purchasers being the United 
Kingdom, with nineteen million feet; Australia, with about the same amount; 
New Zcahind. twelve million feet; South Africa, ten million feet; China, eight 
and a half million feet. 

FISH 

Next in order among the natural sources of British Columbia's wealth 
is the fishing industry, and it is gratifying to report that the export of canned 
fish during 1927 shows an increase of 354,547 cases over 1926, while the export 
of salt and dried fish is practically the same as last year. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 129 

Canned fish went in greatest quantities to the following countries, in the 
order mentioned: United Kingdom, Germany, France, Australia, Italy, the 
number of cases consigned to these countries ranging from one hundred and 
eighty-five thousand to two hundred and eighty-four thousand cases. The total 
export amounted to 1,657,838 cases. The great bulk of the salt and dried fish 
went, as usual, to China and Japan, about 32,000 tons to the former and 16,500 
tons to the latter. 

GRA.IN SHIPMENTS AND ELEVATORS, PAST AND PRESENT 

The year 1921 saw the birth of Vancouver as a grain shipping port when 
one and a half million bushels passed through the port for Japan and United 
Kingdom ports. 

The first elevator was built at the port at Salisbury drive, adjoining the 
present Lapointe pier and had a capacity of 1,250,000 bushels. 

During 1922 the total export of grain reached fourteen and a half million 
bushels, the orient taking three and a half million bushels, and the United 
Kingdom the balance; the capacitv of the existing elevator was accordingly 
increased from 1,250,000 bushels to 2,050,000 bushels. In 1923 the amount of 
grain exported reached 25,000,000 bushels, and in order to cope with the 
increased flow of grain. No. 2 elevator, capacity 1,650,000 bushels, with con- 
veyor system, receiving and shipping houses, etc., was built by the commis- 
sioners at the south end of Ballantyne pier. 

A smaller elevator, originally intended to be operated by a private com- 
pany, was taken over by the commissioners and completed with a storage 
capacity of 650,000 bushels as No. 3 elevator. 

The Vancouver Terminal Grain Co., Ltd., constructed an elevator, capacity 
2,250,000 bushels, on a site leased from the commission adjoining No. 1 elevator; 
and the Columbia Elevator Co. a small one, with 100,000 bushels capacity. 

The elevator capacity of the port in the course of about 18 months had 
been increased from 1,250,000 bushels to 6,700,000 bushels. 

During 1925 extensive additions and improvements were earried out, the 
capacity of No. 3 elevator being increased to 1,650,000 bushels. 

The Alberta Pool Elevator Co. have chosen a site just west of the Second 
Narrows bridge on the south shore of the harbour, and an elevator with storage 
capacity of 2,500,000 bushels and all modem facilities is in course of erec- 
tion and will be ready for the 1928 crop. 

The Messrs. Randall, Gee & Mitchell Ltd., have decided to lease a site 
on the area on the north shore recently reclaimed by the Commissioners, where 
an elevator with all modem appliances with an initial storage capacity of 500,- 
000 bushels (capable of being extended to 1,500,000 bushels) will be built. 

It will thus be seen that for the handling of the 1928 grain crop, the port 
of Vancouver will have an elevator storage capacity of approximately 10,700,- 
000 bushels. 

The amount of grain shipped through the port during the calendar year 
1927 was 43,552,210 bushels— somewhat less than was anticipated. 

MINOR EXPORTS 

"Flour" shipments showed a material improvement over the previous year, 
the total for 1927 amounting to 126,053 tons, which indicates an increase of 
23,000 tons. 

The bulk of this commodity went to China and Japan; and it is interesting 
to note that while the former got about the same quantity as last year, Japan 
—where milling is understood to be developing— increased her import by about 
30,000 tons. ^ 

65702—9 



130 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

"Lead" was exported to the amount of 101,583 tons, this being 25,000 tons 
more than in the previous year. Of this product, 41,354 tons went to the 
United Kingdom and 33,000 tons to Japan. 

"Zinc" shipments amounted to 51,548 tons, representing an increase of 
14,000 tons. Twelve thousand tons went to the United Kingdom, 11,000 tons 
to Germany, and 9,000 tons to Japan. 

NORTH SHORE DEVELOPMENT 

The grading of the Terminal Railway, North Shore section, was completed 
in December, 1927, up to St. George's avenue. This involved a cut along the 
face of a high bluff through district lot 274 and Moodyville. and the material 
thus obtained was deposited on the tideflats and enclosed within a timber bulk- 
head, making a level reclamation of approximately fifteen acres, suitable for 
industrial and commercial development. By means of the terminal railway 
this property is provided with access over the Second Narrows bridge to the 
transcontinental railways in Vancouver, and is also served by a concrete paved 
road which parallels the terminal railway on the north or land side. Light and 
power will be supplied by the British Columbia Electric Railway Co., Ltd., 
and water by the city of North Vancouver. During the progress of this wprk 
many inquiries were received regarding manufacturing and commercial sites 
and, as a result of negotiations that followed, several concerns decided to take 
leases — one for a grain elevator (referred to in another section of this report), 
another for a lumber export and general shipping business involving the con- 
struction of a 500-foot lumber assembly wharf and sheds, another for a manu- 
facturing plant, and the indications are that the balance of the property will 
be taken up at a very early date. 

As mentioned above, the present terminus of the terminal railway is in 
the vicinity of St. George's avenue, and it was the original intention of the 
commissioners to extend this section westerly to connect with the Pacific Great 
Eastern Railway by means of a level crossing over Lonsdale avenue, having 
in mind the substitution of an overhead crossing in place of the level crossing 
when the volume of traffic increased to necessitate this. 

On further consideration, however, it was decided that it would be every 
way more desirable and ultimately more economical to make the crossing at 
Lonsdale avenue by means of a subway, and plans were accordingly prepared 
for a reinforced concrete subway, beginning at the present terminus, running 
along Esplanade street, under Lonsdale avenue and connecting with the Pacific 
Great Eastern tracks on the west side of Lonsdale avenue — this being now under 
construction. 

When this link is completed, railway service will be provided for the entire 
North shore from the entrance to the harbour to the Second Narrows bridge. 

MARINE GASOLINE STATIONS 

In the past such stations have been operated at a number of points on both 
sides of the harbour and, on account of the constantly increasing demand for 
gasoline supply, the commissioners decided to establish a gasoline area off 
Deadman's island which will provide accommodation for a sufficient number of 
new fioating stations to meet requirements for a considerable time to come. 
The location chosen is convenient for the class of craft requiring this service 
as it is close to the entrance to Coal harbour, which is much frequented by 
small craft, both for pleasure and business, and is practically in the course of 
fishing boats and small craft entering and leaving the harbour. Six stations 
have been laid out and lessees will provide their own scows and equipment, 
which will have to conform strictly to the Commissioners' regulations and to 
the requirements of the fire authorities. Vessels will not be allowed to berth 
or anchor at or near these stations, but will simply take their supplies and clear. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 131 

A few service stations that were carrying on business prior to this new 
arrangement will not be disturbed so long as their operation in their present 
locations is satisfactory to the commissioners and the fire authorities, but no 
other stations will be allowed within the harbour outside of the prescribed area, 
which will be known as " Gasolene Area No. 1 ". 

TRAFFIC DEPARTMENT 

In consequence of the constantly increasing number of inquiries received 
for information in regard to the port, the Commissioners decided that it would 
be in the interests of business to institute a department whose business it will 
be to give careful and complete replies to all such inquiries and to compile and 
disseminate throughout the shipping and manufacturing centres information 
regarding natural products, manufactures', facilities, transportation, rates, regu- 
lations, etc., with a view to stimulating interest in the opportunities and advan- 
tages offered by the port of Vancouver as the Pacific doorway to the Dominion 
of Canada and a strategically situated shipping point on the highway to and 
from the markets of the world. 

Among the means to be employed in carrying out the purposes of this 
department will be the preparation and world-wide circulation of periodic trade 
reports giving commodities with origin, destination and other advantageous 
particulars; booklets of general information, regularly revised, and circular 
letters of current features of interest, together with sustained press advertising 
and personal attention to interested visitors. The creation of this new depart- 
ment, which, it is hoped, will bring good results, is simply a matter of reorganiza- 
tion and will not involve any increase in expenditure in the way of employment. 

BY-LAWS 

The following new by-laws were passed by the commissioners and approved 
by Order in Council during the year: — 

1. By-law 121, approved February 26, 1927, being "Regulations governing 
the handling of explosives in the harbour," superseding previous regulations in 
this regard, and prepared for the purpose of insuring a maximum of safety in 
handling this traffic. 

2. By-law 127, approved August 31, 1927, being " Regulations governing 
the conduct, management and operation of the Second Narrows bridge," Burrard 
inlet, B.C., and " Regulations governing the conduct, management and opera- 
tion of vessels passing thereunder." 

By virtue of the terms of their act of incorporation, the commissioners are 
charged with the responsibility of regulating and controlling navigation within 
the harbour and by agreement with the Burrard Inlet Tunnel and Bridge 
Company, they have sole control of railway traffic over the Second Narrows 
bridge, and it was therefore deemed to be in order that the regulations embodied 
in this by-law, both in respect to the operation of the bridge and navigation 
of vessels passing thereunder, should be exercised by the commissioners. 

GENERAL 

_ A large number of ocean-going vessels were drydocked and the following 
major repair jobs were carried out during the year within the harbour: — 

SS. Kaikyu Maru, 8,134 tons, repaired at cost of $385,000. 

SS. Prince Rupert, 3,379 tons, repaired at cost of $75,000, 

SS. Catala, 1,159 tons, repaired at cost of $150,000. 

One-third of the total number of ocean-going vessels entering the harbour 
berthed at Ballantyne pier, 

65702— 9i 



132 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



Seventeen silk cargoes, representing 61,640 bales, or 188 cars, were handled 
at the Commissioners' piers during the year. 

Pier " B-C ", the magnificent new freight and passenger pier of the Canadian 
Pacific Railway Company, was officially opened on July 4, 1927. 

The Pacific Coast Association of Port Authorities held itsr fourteenth annual 
convention at Vancouver, B.C., on July 21, 22 and 23, 1927. 

Visitors to the port of Vancouver, B.C., included Lord Willingdon, Governor- 
General of Canada, and Lady Willingdon; Sir Esme Howard, British Ambassador 
at Washington, D.C.; F. A. Pauline, Agent-General in London, Eng., for the 
province of British Columbia; E. W. Beatty, president of Canadian Pacific 
Railway Company; Sir Henry Thornton, President of Canadian National Rail- 
ways; the following cabinet ministers of the Dominion of Canada: Hon. P. 
Veniot, Postmaster-General; Hon. J. A. Elliott, Alinister of Public Works; Hon. 
Dr. J. H. King, Minister of Health and Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment; Hon. 
Peter Heenan, Minister of Labour; Hon. Lucien Cannon, Solicitor-General, and 
representatives of banking houses, steamship lines, engineering institutions, 
grain growers from the Canadian prairies and the press. 

Comparative Recced or Shipping, 1926 and 1927 

LOCAL COASTWISE 
(This includes all vessels trading in British Columbia waters only) 





Number of Ships 


Gross tons 


Net tons 


1926 


17,148 
17,770 


6,892,579 
7,267,444 


4,268,620 


1927 


4,627,880 








Lacrease 622 


Increase 374,865 


Increase 359,260 



FOREIGN COASTWISE 
(This includes all vessels trading to Puget Sound and Alaska) 



1926 


1,548 
1,470 


3,710,654 
3,757,699 




1,900,942 


1927 


1,897,362 








Decrease 


78 


Increase. . 


47,045 


Decrease. . 


3,580 



DEEP SEA 

(This includes all vessels passing outside Cape Flattery) 



1926 


1,071 
1,123 


5,877,725 
6,066,504 




3.698,066 


1927 


3,779,015 








Increase 


52 


Increase . . 


....188,779 


Increase. . 


80,949 



TOTAL SHIPPING 



1926 


19,767 
20.363 


16,480,958 
17,091,647 




9.867 


1927 


10.304.257 








Increase 


596 


Increase. . 


610,689 


Increase . . 


4.36,629 



COMPARISON PASSENGER TRAFFIC 1926 AND 1927 



1926. 
1927. 



. Paasengers landed 508.661 

.PasaengerB landed 478,024 



Passengers shipped 513. 908 

Passengers shipped 499, 14S 



Decrease. 



30,637 



Decrease. 



14,760 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 133 

Chicoutimi Haebour Commissioners' Report 
personnel 1927 

Commission — President, Vincent Diibuc. Commissioners, Adelard Trem- 
blay, and Adjutor Boulianne. 

Chief Corporation Officials— Secretary-Treasurer, Armand Viau. Engineer 
— Edouard Lavoie. Harbour-Master — Frangois Boulianne. 

harbour of chicoutimi 

Is a tidal harbour with a variation between extreme high and extreme low 
water of 18-25 feet, situated about 75 miles inland from the St. Lawrence river. 

It is 2,594 miles distant from Liverpool; Quebec being 2,635 miles distant 
from Liverpool, and Montreal 2,775 miles. 

The ice conditions at Chicoutimi are at present practically similar to those 
at Montreal. There is at Chicoutimi and in the dredged channel of the river a 
depth of 16 feet at low water; the tidal range giving a depth of 34 feet at extreme 
high water. 

Arrangements are being made to increase the depth of the ship channel 
up to Chicoutimi to 17 feet at low water, and 35 feet at high water. The har- 
bour comprises the tidal waters of the Saguenay river above an imaginary line 
drawn from West cape to East cape. 

The upstream limit of jurisdiction is approximately about eight miles above 
the present government wharf, giving a harbour front of about twenty miles 
on both sides of the river. 

Chicoutimi is the present terminal of the central region of the Canadian 
National Railways; and also the terminal of sea-borne traffic, passenger and 
freight, on the Saguenay river, as there is not at present sufficient depth of 
water beyond the town for vessels of any size. 

Near to it are magnificent water-powers, pulp and paper, mining and agri- 
cultural industries, and with the growth of these the future of the port is 
assured, providing proper facilities and equipment for handling cargoes are 
supplied at an early date. 

INDUSTRIES 

The principal industries at present in the vicinity of Chicoutimi are: — 

Kenogami Paper Mills, owned by Messrs. Price Bros. & Co., Limited, 
capacity 500 tons newsprint per day. 

Quebec Paper Mills, Chicoutimi, capacity 650 shipping tons groundwood 
pulp per dav. 

Chute-A-Galets Power Plant, Price Bros & Co., Ltd., capacity 16,000 
horse-power. 

Murdock Falls Power Plant, Price Bros. & Co., Ltd., capacity 10,000 
horse-power. 

Chute-A-Caron Power Development, 800,000 horse-power. (Development 
in progress). 

Price Bros. & Co., Ltd., 32,000 horse-power. 

Jonquiere Municipal Power Plant, 2,600 horse-power. 

Riverbend, Price Bros. & Co., Ltd., 200 tons, newsprint per day. 

Isle Maligne Power Plant, Duke Price Power Company, capacity 540,000 
horse-power. 

Metabetchouan Sulphite and Power Co., Ltd., capacity 40 tons sulphite 
per day. 

Quebec Pulp & Paper Mills, Ltd., Ouiatchouan, 200 shipping tons ground- 
wood Mill Hydraulic Plant, 7,800 horse-power. 



134 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

Jonquiere Paper Mills, Price Bros. & Co., Ltd., capacity 30 tons newsprint 
per day and 25 tons cardboard per day. 

Jonquiere Pulp Co., Hydraulic Plant, Price & Co., Ltd., capacity 3,600 
horse-power. 

Aluminum Company of Canada, Ltd., Arvida Aluminum Works. 

Chute Garneau Power Plant, capacity 3,500 horse-power. 

Pont Arnaud Power Plant, capacity 7,500 horse-power. 

Quebec Pulp & Paper Mills Ltd., Power Plant, 26,000 horse-power. 

Price Bros. & Co., Ltd., Power Plant, 9,000 horse-power. 

Lake St. John Power & Paper Company Ltd., capacity 220 tons newsprint 
per day. In addition to the foregoing there are: 

Port Alfred Pulp & Paper Corporation Power Plants, 1,500 K.V.A. 

Port Alfred Pulp & Paper Corporation, capacity 450 tons newsprint per day. 

Port Alfred Pulp & Paper Corporation, capacity 160 tons sulphite per day. 

These latter, however, already have their own wharfage and harbour facili- 
ties at Port Alfred, Ha! Ha! Bay. 

POPULATION 

The population of the town of Chicoutimi at present is 15,070 as com- 
pared with 7,400 ten years ago, and there is altogether a population of 48,000 
within a radius of 20 miles. 

PRESENT FACILITIES 

The present accommodation consists of a small wharf 500 feet in length 
by about 200 feet in width, with a small shed where general merchandise is 
discharged or loaded. A considerable quantity of coal is discharged at the 
lower end of the wharf but tliere is only 14 feet depth of water at low tide along 
side the wharf and the structure itself is not in very good condition, neverthe- 
less, during the year 1925, 111,936 tons of miscellaneous goods and a large 
quantity of dressed lumber were handled at the port. 

HARBOUR master's REPORT 

During the year, 685 vessels entered the port including 20 vessels with 
a tonnage varying between 800 and 3,000 tons and carrying 44,205 tons of coal, 
5,850 tons of sulphur and 150,000 bricks. 

The Canada Steamship Lines' vessels docked eighty-seven times at the 
main wharf for freight and tourist traffic. Freight carried by said vessels was 
estimated at 6,300 tons. 

Coasting vessels carried 7,077 tons of merchandise, 2,435 cords of wood and 
4,473,285 feet of sawn lumber. 

Traffic was handled under satisfactory conditions notwithstanding the fact 
that in some instances, freight and docking operations were considerably delayed 
due to lack of space. 

engineer's REPORT 

In the spring of 1927, important repairs were carried out on the Chicoutimi 
wharf. In response to a request from Messrs. Price Bros, and Company, your 
commission had piles placed along the outer side of the wharf to protect the 
woodwork which, in certain places, had fallen away and left gaps through which 
tlie inner filling was slipping away. This work entailed quite an expense but 
on the other hand, we believe that no further repairs will be needed there for 
some years. 

During the month of June, 1927, a channel was dredged to permit vessels to 
proceed to the wharf at St. Fulgcnce at low tide. The channel was dug by the 
National Dock and Dredging Corporation and is now 1,300 feet in length by 
60 feet in width. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 135 

A new wooden pavement on part of the St. Anne wharf was laid in October. 
Repairs and maintenance work on the pontoons of the wharves at Ste. Anne 
and Chicoutimi basin were carried on during the months of November and 
December, 1927. 

To facilitate the preparing of plans for the construction of the wharves 
proposed by your commission, soundings and borings were undertaken in the 
harbour, in front of the town of Chicoutimi, in the summer of 1927. This work 
was supervised by the engineer of the commission who followed the instruc- 
tions of Mr. A. D. Swan, consulting engineer from Montreal. 

It was also necessary, in view of the proposed works, to make a topo- 
graphical survey of both the north and south shores of the Saguenay for a con- 
siderable distance. 

In order to enable your commission to call for tenders, detailed plans and 
specifications were prepared by the commission's consulting engineer, Mr. A. D. 
Swan. Tenders were asked for for September 28, 1927, and the contract was 
awarded to Messrs. Quinlan Robertson & Janin Limited of Montreal. A survey 
was made during November and December with a view to making certain 
soundings in 1928 in order to determine the condition of the bed of the river 
and a dredging program if needed. 

OPERATING ACCOUNT DECEMBER 31, 1927 

Receipts $ 12, 201 46 

Expenditures 6,802 49 

Surplus $ 5,398 97 

Report of Belleville Haebour Commissioners 

Balance in bank from 1926 $ 1 , ,565 15 

Harbour dues collected, 1927 1,575 97 

Interest on savings accounts 29 67 

Receipts 3, 170 79 

Total disbursements 1 , 281 67 

Surplus for 1927 and balance on hand in bank $ 1,889 12 

During the season 131 craft of all sorts, including motor boats entered 
the harbour. 



BOARD OF STEAMBOAT INSPECTION 
Report of Chairman, Frank McDonnell, M.E.I.C. 

STAFF 

By Order in Council B.C. 130/795, dated May 20, 1926, three new positions 
were created: that of Steamship Inspector (General) at the ports of Halifax 
and Toronto, and that of Steamship Inspector (Hulls and Equipment) at the 
port of Vancouver. By the same Order in Council, the position of Steamship 
Inspector (General) at the port of Victoria, formerly occupied by the late Mr. 
W. J. Cullum, was transferred to the port of Vancouver. To fill these positions, 
the following appointments were made: — 

By Order in Council, dated August 12, 1927, Mr. S. J. Hill was appointed 
Steamship Inspector (General) at the port of Halifax. 

By Order in Council, dated May 5, 1927, Mr. W. P. Craig was appointed 
Steamship Inspector (General) at the port of Toronto. 

By Order in Council, dated May 5, 1927, Mr. James Brydon was appointed' 
Steamship Inspector (General) at the port of Vancouver. 

By Order in Council, dated November 28, 1927, Mr. E. M. Sleigh was 
appointed St-eamship Inspector (Hulls and Equipment) at the port of Vancouver. 



136 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



I regret to report the death, on June 4, 1927, of Mr. J. E. Lunan, Steamship 
Inspector (General) at the port of Montreal. 

To fill the vacancy resulting, Mr. Stanley Gruzelier was appointed Steam- 
ship Inspector (General) by Order in Council dated March 19, 1928. 



BOARD MEETINGS 



Board meetings for the purpose of dealing with questions arising out of 
the administration of the regulations governing steamboat inspection, for con- 
sidering the qualifications of candidates for the position of steamboat inspector, 
and for the approval of plans of hulls, machinery, boilers and equipment for 
use in ships coming under inspection were held during the year. 

ENGINEER EXAMINATIONS 

During the fiscal year 315 candidates for certificates of competency were 
granted certificates as marine engineers. In addition, 93 temporary engineer 
certificates were issued, also 20 certificates to motor engineers. 

Appended will be found a list of the Steamboat Inspection staff during the 
fiscal year, also table showing the number of inspections made, fees collected, etc. 

Steamboat Inspection Staff for the Dominion of Canada during the Fiscal Year 

ended March 31, 1928 

SENIOR STEAMSHIP INSPECTORS 



Name of Inspector 


Headquarters 


Division 


N. A. Currie 


Halifax, N.S 


Nova Scotia. 


P. W. Lvon 


Toronto, Ont 


Western Ontario, Toronto, Collingwood 


H. G. Robinson 


Vancouver, B.C 


and Midland. 
British Columbia. 









INSPECTORS ACTING IN DUAL CAPACITY 



A. I. Ross 

<S.J. HUl 

C.E. Dalton 

J. A. Samson 

F. X. Hamelin... 

ij. E. Lunan 

J. H. Fontaine 

F. Bridges 

*S. Gruzelier 

B. Mantrop 

J.J. Moflfatt 

A. K. Venables... 

*W. P. Craig 

W. L. MacKenzie 

R. C.Blyth 

W. J. Vigars 

A. Farrow 

T.M. Stephen..., 
J. T. Mathews... 

»J. Brvdon 

J. T.Edmond... 



Halifa.K, N.S.. 
Halifax, N.S. . 
St. John, N.B. 



Quebec, P.Q 

Sorel, P.Q 

Montreal, P.Q 

Montreal, P.Q 

Montreal, P.Q 

Montreal, P.Q 

Kingston, Ont 

Toronto, Ont 

Toronto, Ont 

Toronto, Ont 

Midland, Ont 

Collingwood, Ont. 
Port Arthur, Ont. 
Vancouver, B.C.. 
Vancouver, B.C... 
Vancouver, B.C... 
Vancouver, B.C. . . 
Victoria, B.C 



Nova Scotia. 
Nova Scotia. 
New Brunswick and Prince Edward 

Island. 
Quebec. 
Sorel. 
Montreal. 
Montreal. 
Montreal. 
Montreal. 
Kingston. 
Toronto. 
Toront-o. 
Toronto. 
Midland. 
Collingwood. 
Port .Arthur. 
British Columbia. 
British Columbia. 
British Columbia. 
British Columbia. 
British Columbia. 



INSPECTORS OF BOILERS AND MACHINERY 



D. J. Stevens. . . 
J. T. Gardham. 



Halifax, N.S.. 
Montreal, P.Q. 



Nova Scotia. 
Montreal. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 
INSPECTORS OF HULLS AND EQUIPMENT 



137 



Name of Inspector 


Headquarters 


Division 


D. K. O'Brien 


Halifax, N.S 


Nova Scotia. 


Capt. W. R. Bennett 


St. John, N.B 




J. C . Beaudoin 


Quebec, P.Q 


Island. 
Quebec. 


M. R. Davis 


Kingston, Ont 


Kingston. 


A . A . Young 


Toronto, Ont 


Toronto. 


«E.M. Sleigh 


Vancouver, B.C 


British Columbia. 









INSPECTORS OF SHIPS' TACKLE 



D. K. O'Brien. 
J. M. Martin... 
A. Duval 



Halifax, N.S... 
St. John, N.B. 
Montreal, P.Q. 



iMr. Lunan died on June 4, 1927. 
*Vice Mr. J. E. Lunan, deceased. 
'Vice Mr. W. J. Cullum, deceased. 
<New position. 



138 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



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REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 139 

RADIO BRANCH 
Report of C. P. Edwards, O.B.E., F.I.R.E., A.M.E.I.C., Director 

NUMBER OF RADIO STATIONS IN THE DOMINION 

The total number of licensed stations in operation in the Dominion and on 
ships registered therein was, on March 31, 1928, as follows: — 

Coast Stations 33 

Direction Finding Stations 8 

Beacon Stations 8 

Radiophone Stations 4 

Government Ship Stations 33 

Commercial Ship Stations 279 

Limited Coast Stations 3 

Public Commercial Stations 7 

Private Commercial Stations 77 

Private Commercial Broadcasting Stations 84 

Amateur Broadcasting Stations 15 

Radiotelegraph Training Schools 9 

Experimental Stations 42 

Amateur Experimental Stations 532 

Private Receiving Stations (includes 365 licenses issued free to the blind) 268,420 

Total 269, 554 



LICENSES 

Under the provisions of section 3 of the Radiotelegraph Act, chapter 43, 
Statutes 1913, every radio transmitting and receiving set must be licensed by 
the Minister of Marine and Fisheries. The licenses are issued through the 
medium of the Radio Branch in accordance with the Radiotelegraph Regula- 
tions, copies of which may be obtained from the department, price ten cents 
(10c.) . 

LICENSE FEES 

The annual fees charged in respect of radio licenses issued by the Minister 
of Marine and Fisheries, are as follows: — 

1. Limited Coast Stations S 50 00 

2. Public Commercial Stations 50 00 

3. Private Commercial Stations 10 00 

4. Experimental Stations 5 00 

5. Amateur Experimental Stations 2 50 

6. Broadcasting Stations, Private Commercial 50 00 

7. Broadcasting Stations, Amateur 10 00 

8. Private Receiving Stations 1 00 

9. Technical or Training School Stations 5 00 

10. Ship Stations 10 00 

GO\^ERNMENT COAST STATIONS 

"Coast Station" is the term used to designate a radio station established 
on shore to communicate with ships at sea. Canada's extensive coast line 
demands a large number of stations to cover all its coasts and approaches 
thereto. The complete system consists of fifty-three stations located as fol- 
lows: — 

East Coast (includes sLx radio beacons) 24 

Great Lakes (includes one radio beacon) 9 

Pacific Coast (includes one radio beacon) 15 

Hudson Bay and Straits 5 

53 



The coast station system consists of two chains, one extending from Van- 
couver to Frince Rupert on the Pacific, and the other from Port Arthur to the 



140 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

Atlantic ocean in the east, and, for the purposes of administration, is divided 
into three divisions, Pacific Coast, Great Lakes, and East Coast. The stations 
of the Great Lakes division communicate with those of the East Coast division, 
but there is no direct radio connection between the Great Lakes and the 
Pacific coast. 

During the year five temporary stations in the Hudson bay and strait 
were established and placed in commission. Two of these were operated on 
behalf of the Department of Railways and Canals, and three in connection 
with the Hudson strait expedition. 

Of the above stations, nineteen on the East coast and Great Lakes are 
operated by the Canadian Marconi Company, under contract with the depart- 
ment, and the balance of thirty-four on the East and West coasts and Hudson 
bay and strait are operated directly by the department. 

The primarv^ aim of the coast station organization is to provide radio 
facilities whereby any ship within 500 miles of the Canadian coast can establish 
instant touch with the shore. Constant watch, 24 hours a day, 365 days a 
vear, is maintained at practically all of the stations, which during the vear 
handled a total of 7,695,757 words. 

RADIOTELEGRAPH AIDS TO NAVIGATION BRO.\DCASTS 

Twice daily, at advertised hours, eight stations on the East coast, seven 
on the Great Lakes and one on the West coast broadcast information to 
navigators covering weather forecasts, position and nature of dangers to navi- 
gation, etc. In addition, urgent information, such as hurricane warnings, etc., 
is broadcast immediately upon receipt. 

Details of the times of transmissions, call signals, wavelengths, etc., are 
given in the current Notices to Mariners in this reference. 

The East coast arm of this service has been extended this year with the 
inclusion of the high-power long-range station at Louisburg, which broadcasts 
a daily weather report at 0418 G.M.T. on 2.800 metres. 

RADIOTELEPHONE AIDS TO NAVIGATION BROADCASTS 

Numerous fishermen haxing intimated their intenjtion of fitting theiir 
vessels with radio receiving sets, the department has decided to inaugurate a 
radiotelephone service to fishermen on the East coast early in the coming fiscal 
year. 

Three stations will be used for this purpose — louisburg (VAS), Halifax 
Lightship (VCX), and St. John, N.B. fCFBO). Louisburg, using a 4,000 watt 
radiotelephone transmitter, will broadcast on 434-5 metres at 3 a.m. and 12 
noon, E.S.T., daily, a message to fishermen which will include weather fore- 
casts, storm warnings and a synopsis of information in regard to the market 
prices of fish, the amount of bait on hand at various points, and any other 
outstanding items of interest to fishermen generally. 

The power used by this station will enable fishermen well out into the 
Atlantic, to the eastward of the Grand Banks, to receive these messages. 

The Halifax Lightship Station will broadcast on 322-4 metres at 7 a.m. 
and 12.30 p.m., E.S.T., daily, a message to fishermen the same as that of Louis- 
burg and will have a range of approximately 150 miles. 

Station CFBO, St. John, will broadcast weather forecasts and storm warn- 
ings to fishermen in the Bay of Fundy on 336-9 metres at 7 a.m. and 11 a.m., 
E.S.T., daily. 

It is anticipated that these stations will provide reception at any point 
along the Atlantic seaboard as well as covering the banks fished by Canadian 
vessels. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 141 

TIME SIGNALS 

East Coast 

Chebucto Head. — Daily, except Sunday, at 2 p.m., G.M.T., on 600 metres. 

This service will be augmented in 1928, by the inclusion of the long- 
distance Radiotelegraph Station at Louisburg, which will transmit time signals 
on a long wavelength. 

West Coast 

Gonzales Hill. — Twice daily at 10 a.m., and 7 p.m., P.S.T., on 900 metres. 

Estevan. — Twice daily at 10 a.m., and 7 p.m., P.S.T., on 600 metres. 

SPRING PATROL, CABOT STRAITS, GULF OF ST. LAWRENCE 

The patrol service maintained in the Cabot straits at the opening of navi- 
gation was undertaken this year by the ice-breakers Mikiila and Montcalm 
and commenced on April 12. 

Profiting by exp.erience in previous years, some minor changes were made 
in the radio organization, more particularly in the way of eliminating redundant 
transmissions. 

The patrol ships cruise in the vicinity of Cabot straits observing the ice 
conditions and the senior ship, everj^ few hours, obtains from all incoming and 
outgoing ships, and from all radio and signal stations, a detailed report on the 
ice conditions in the different areas. These, in conjunction with her own 
observations, are compiled and analyzed, and based thereon, a broadcast mes- 
sage, containing a synopsis of location and drift of the ice, together with recom- 
mendations as to the best route for ships to follow, is broadcast four times 
daily from the patrol ship, using the general call sign VCQ. A summary of 
this message is also included by Cape Race (VCE) in his daily routine broad- 
casts. For details of transmissions, see Notice to Mariners No. 19 of 1928. 

During the ice season, the long-distance station at Louisburg also broad- 
casts daily a notification to all ships on 2,800 meters inmaediately following 
the press message at 04- 18 G.M.T. advising that the ice patrol is on her station 
thus giving advance information in this respect. 

In addition to the above, every vessel spoken is advised of the location 
and nature of the ice she may expect to encounter on her particular course, 
and the best route to follow. 

The total number of words handled by the patrol this year was: — 

Mikula 17,855 

Montcalm 18,481 

36,336 

The patrol was discontinued on May 21, 1928. 

RADIO DIRECTION FINDING 

Eight Direction Finding Stations, seven on the East coast and one on the 
West coast, were operated throughout the year. These stations maintain " con- 
stant watch " and give bearings to any ships, fitted with radio, free of charge. 

The Canadian Direction Finding Stations continue to enjoy a good repu- 
tation for efficiency and accuracy, many comments on the same having been 
received from navigators. 

The number of bearings given by the station varies from* month to month, 
being dependent on weather conditions. The average number continues to 
increase, and has risen from 2,300 per month last year to 2,800 per month this 
year. 



142 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

BEARINGS GIVEN 1927-28 
Station — 

Chebucto Head, N.S 7,293 

Canso, N.S 4,221 

Yarmouth, N.S 3, 138 

St. Paul Island, N.S 4,679 

Cape Race, Nfld 8, 250 

St. John, N.B 1 ,342 

Pachena Point, B.C 3, 100 

BeUe Isle, Nfld 1 , 497 

Total 33 , 520 

RADIO BEACON SERVICE 

There are now approximately 276 ships fitted with radio direction finding 
apparatus plying to and from Canadian ports, and our previous forecast, that 
in the course of the next few years, direction finding apparatus would form 
a part of the permanent radio equipment of every large ship, is rapidly being 
fulfilled. 

The Radio Beacon system of the department now comprises eight stations, 
located as follows: — 

Cape Bauld, Nfld. Seal Island, N.S. ■ 

Heath Point Lightship. Lurcher Lightship. 

Cape Ray, Nfld. South East Shoal, Lake Erie (new) . 

Halifax Lightship. Race Rocks, Vancouver Island )new). 

It is anticipated that further stations will be established next year and 
with this in view a standard outfit is being designed to meet the requirements 
of a permanent service. 

In addition to the above facilities, ships can take bearings from any of the 
coast stations of our Coast Station system. One thousand seven hundred and 
thirty requests for signals for D/F purposes were dealt with by our coast 
stations during the past year. 

COMMERCIAL SHIP SERVICE 

Each of the regular thirty-three coast stations handles commercial trafiic 
to and from ships and in addition four of the Direction Finding Stations — Belle 
Isle, Yarmouth, Chebucto Head, and St. John — combine commercial service 
with their direction finding work. 

Long-distance service to ships on the Atlantic is provided by the licensed 
station at Louisburg, N.S., owned and operated by the Canadian Marconi 
Company, and on the Pacific by the departmental station at Estevan, Van- 
couver island. The traffic returns from these stations indicate that the route 
of commercial traffic continues to shift from the low power short wave coast 
stations to the high power long wave stations, the latter being better equipped 
and located to handle this traffic in an expeditious manner. 

RADIOTELEPHONE SERVICE TO SMALL CRAFT ON THE PACIFIC COAST 

The radiotelephone system has completed another year's work with satis- 
factory results and is being used to a gratifying extent. The shore telephone 
stations arc located at Vancouver (Merchants' Exchange), Merry Island, 
Alert Baj', and Cape Lazo. 

In addition the four life-saving radio telephone stations on the west coast 
of Vancouver island at Banfield, Cape Beale, Pachena Point and Carmanah 
are available for" this service. Approximately forty-one tugs and other small 
craft are now equipped with radiophone apparatus. The sets in these boats are 
operated by the captain or engineer and most of them are installed by an 
operating company on a rental basis which includes service. The number of 
paid radio telephone calls handled numbered 11,508. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 143 

ship's emergency apparatus 

The department has in effect an arrangement whereby its coast stations 
call upon Canadian and certain British ships to operate their emergency appar- 
atus whilst at sea, in order to check their efficiency. 

NUMBER OF SHIPS EXERCISED 1926-27 

Total 424 

Failures Nil. 

Average time taken to change over 12-7 sees. 

Time allowed 30 sees. 

TRAFFIC SECTION 

This section of the Radio Branch handles the preparation, rendering and 
collection of accounts for commercial ship to shore and inter-station messages 
handled by the departmental ships and stations, and the auditing, rendering and 
collection of international accounts to various operating companies and foreign 
administrations for radiotelegrams exchanged by foreign ships through Cana- 
dian coast stations and by Canadian ships through foreign coast stations. 

The number of accounts handled by the branch was 137,000, representing 
$165,000 in tolls. 

MESSAGES HANDLED BY THE COAST STATION SERVICES 

The total number of messages and words handled during the year ending 
March 31, 1928 (including retransmissions), was as follows:— 





Messages 


Words 


East Coast 


156,110 

32,846 

205,766 

9,422 


2,775,743 


Great Lakes 


478,582 


West Coast 


4,064,762 


Hudson Bay and Strait 


376,670 








404,144 


7,695,757 



The business handled by the East Coast System (operated partly by the 
Canadian Marconi Company under contract and partly by the department) 
shows an increase of 5,493 messages with an increase of 150,793 words. 

The Great Lakes System (operated directly by the Canadian Marconi 
Company under contract) shows a decrease of 6,721 messages with a decrease 
of 97,915 words. 

The West Coast System (operated by the department) shows a decrease 
of 6,073 messages with a decrease of 81,585 words. 

REVENUE 

The net radio revenue accruing to the Radio Branch from all sources during 
the year amounted to $316,582.74, against $276,233.70 in 1926-27, an increase 
of $40,349.04. This revenue is apportioned as follows: — 

Traffic Revenue — 

East Coast $ 6, 499 44 

Great Lakes 782 14 

West Coast 59, 129 16 

$ 06,410 74 

Other Revenue — 

License fees $ 249,687 00 

Examination fees 485 00 

1250,172 00 

$ 316,582 74 

The East Coast trafific shows an increase of $881.63, the Great Lakes a 
decrease of $233.84, and the West Coast a decrease of $3,779.75. Net traffic 
revenue decrease $3,131.96. 



144 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

INSPECTIONS 

The administration of the Radiotelegraph Act has been carried on as usual 
and no evasions or attempted evasions of section 4 of the Act, calling for com- 
pulsory equipment of radiotelegraph apparatus on board passenger steamers, 
have been reported. 

Five new inspectors were added to the permanent staff during the year, 
and permanent inspection establishments are now maintained at Victoria, Van- 
couver, Winnipeg, Calgary, Regina, Toronto, Hamilton, London, Kitchener, 
Ottawa, Halifax, Montreal, Quebec, and St. John. 

Inspectors, in addition to inspecting all ships and licensed stations in their 
district, also undertake the examination of operators for Certificates of Pro- 
ficiency. All land stations are inspected at least once a year, and all ships when 
they visit Canadian ports. Supervision of broadcasting comes under their 
jurisdiction and now comprises a considerable part of their duties. 

The policy of utilizing the services of qualified radio operators as " part 
time " inspectors to look after small localities or areas and to assist permanent 
inspectors in the larger centres continues to prove satisfactory. These '"' part 
time " inspectors are paid a nominal salary of $15 to $30 per month, and are 
located at the following points: — 

Nova Scotia. — Halifax (Dartmouth), Glace Bay, and Sydney, N.S., and 
district. 

Prince 'Edward Island. — Charlottetown and Summerside. 

New Brunswick. — St. John, Moncton (vacant), and Fredericton, N.B. 

Quebec. — Montreal, St. Lambert, Quebec (vacant), Sherbrooke' (vacant), 
and Three Rivers. 

Ontario. — Brantford, Fort William (vacant). Port Arthur (vacant), 
Hamilton, Kingston, Peterborough, Sarnia, Toronto (2), Windsor, Chatham, 
North Bay (vacant), Sault Ste. Marie, and Kenora-Keewatin. 

Manitoba. — Brandon and Winnipeg. 

Saskatcheivan. — Moose Jaw, Regina, Saskatoon, and Prince Albert. 

Alberta. — Calgaiy, Edmonton, and Lethbridge. 

British Columbia. — Vancouver and Kamloops (vacant). 

Yukon. — Dawson. 

The number of inspections carried out during the fiscal year was: — 

Coast and land stations 96 

Ship stations 2, 181 

Amateur experimental and private receiving stations 14,452 

Total 16 , 729 

EXAMINATIONS FOR CERTIFICATE OF PROFICIENCY IN RADIOTELEGIL\PHY 

Protection for the safety of life at sea demands the employment of com- 
petent operators on ship and at shore stations, while interference problems 
necessitate a similar recjuirement in the case of amateur and land stations. To 
secure this the radio regulations provide that all operators must satisfy the 
minister as to their ability to operate the class of station on which they are 
working. In the more important classes of service the operators must be the 
holders of first, second or other prescribed class of certificate, while in the case 
of stations of lesser importance, not likely to become a som-ce of interference, 
the operators must satisfy a radio inspector that they are capable of handling 
their equipment in an efficient manner. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 



145 



One hundred and seventy-three operators were examined for Commercial 
Certificate of Proficiency in Radio during the year, including seventy-two re- 
examinations; ninety-five candidates were successful and seventy-eight failed. 
Thirty-three holders of certificates were examined on additional types of equip- 
ment; twenty-six were successful and seven failed. 

Ninety-six candidates for Amateur Radio Certificates were also examined, 
of whom ninety-five were successful and one failed. 

Two thousand one hundred and four Certificates of Proficiency in Radio 
have been issued by the department up to the end of March, 1928. 

FEES FOR EXAMINATIONS 



1. Extra First Class Certificate 

2. First Class Certificate 

3. Second Class Certificate 

4. Third Class Certificate 

5. Experimental Certificate 

6. Amateur Certificate 

7. Emergency CBrtificate, any class. 

8. Radiotelephone Certificate 



5 00 
2 50 
1 00 

1 00 

2 50 
50 
5 00 
2 50 



R.\DIO BROADCASTING 



As anticipated, radio broadcast reception on the whole showed a per- 
ceptible improvement over the signal level which prevailed during the year 
1926-27, especially during the winter months, and it is not improbable that 
a further betterment of conditions will be observed during the winter of 1928-29. 

Ninety-nine broadcasting stations were licensed during the year, an increase 
of three over 1926-27. 

Active stations 74 

Phantom stations 19 

Inactive stations 6 

99 
(A phantom license is one which authorizes the licensee to use the apparatus of an existing station 
under a special call sign.) 

The total number of licenses issued for receiving sets was 268,420, an 
increase of 52,770, and the net revenue from broadcasting license fees, after 
deducting commissions to radio dealers, and to the Post Office Department for 
the sale of licenses, and the subsidy of $9,644.50 for station CKY, Winnipeg 
(50 cents in respect of each license issued in Manitoba) , amounted to $243,979.50. 

BROADCASTING WAVELENGTH ARRANGEMENTS WITH THE UNITED STATES 

The negotiations entered into with the United States Government in 
February, 1927, with a view to obtaining the release for the use of Canada 
of additional channels which were occupied by United States broadcasting 
stations having failed, there has been no change in the wavelengths used by 
Canadian stations, which are as follows: — 

Shared with United States — 
K/C 



247 


8M — 


1210 


*249 


9M — 


1200 


267 


7 M — 


1120 


296 


9M — 


1010 


322 


4M — 


930 


336 


9M — 


890 


340 


7M — 


880 


384 


4M — 


780 


475 


9M — 


630 


499 


7M — 


600 


516 


9M — 


580 


* (Amateur) 




65702—10 







Exclusive — 




2911 M — 


1030 K/C 


312 3 M — 


960 '' 


329 5M — 


910 " 


356 9 M — 


840 " 


410-7 M — 


730 •" 


434 5 M — 


690 '' 



146 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

BROADCAST OF THE CELEBRATION OF THE DIAMOND JUBILEE OF CONFEDERATION 

On the 1st July, 1927, citizens of the Dominion from coast to coast were 
enabled by radio to hear the official program of the Celebration of the Diamond 
Jubilee of Confederation at Ottawa. 

The arrangements for this elaborate undertaking were made by a Broad- 
casting Committee of which the Hon. Thomas Ahearn, P.C., was chairman. 

Through the co-operation of the various railway, telegraph, telephone and 
radio organizations throughout the Dominion, who placed their facilities at the 
disposal of the committee, free of charge, the effort proved to be abundantly 
successful, and the program which was broadcast through twent}'' Canadian 
and one United States station, was heard in practically every comer of Canada, 
as well as in other parts of the world, including New Zealand, Panama, Peru, 
Great Britain, Holland, Brazil, South Africa, etc. 

An idea of the magnitude of the enterprise may be had from the fact that 
over 400 persons and some 19,000 miles of telephone and telegraph circuits 
were employed. This was the first occasion on which the broadcasting stations 
of the Dominion were linked together from coast to coast. 

AMENDMENTS TO THE RADIOTELEGRAPH ACT 

Concession to the Blind 

A large number of persons afflicted with blindness derive much comfort 
and pleasure from the reception of radio broadcasting and as many of them 
are in poor circumstances, it was decided to forego the license fee of one dollar 
($1) in such cases. Regulation No. 1 issued in accordance with Section 10 
of the Radiotelegraph Act, chapter 43, Statutes 1913 (now chapter 195, Revised 
Statutes of Canada, 1927) has, therefore, been amended by the addition of 
the following: — 

" 1. (a) no change 

(b) Provided that the Minister may at his discretion issue free of charge to any- 
blind person a license for a private receiving station upon being satisfied that 
such person is blind." 

During the fiscal year 1927-28 the number of free licenses issued under 
the above regulation was 365. 

COMMERCIAL ACTIVITIES 

Imperial Communication 

On February'- 23, 1928, an Imperial Committee consisting of representa- 
tives of Great Britain, the Dominions and India, met in London, with the 
following terms of reference: — 

" To examine the situation which has arisen as a result of the competition of the Beam 
Wireless with the Cable Services, to report thereon and to make recommendations with a 
view to a common policy being adopted by the various Governments concerned." 

Canada was represented on this committee by Sir Campbell Stuart, K.B.E., 
our representative on the Pacific Cable Board. He was assisted by L. J. 
Gaboury, Deputy Postmaster General, representing the Post Office Depart- 
ment, and C. P. Edwards, Director of Radio, representing the Department of 
Marine. Tlie committee will examine in detail the financial and operating 
arrangements of the British-owned cable and radio systems undertaking over- 
seas communication services. 

It is not anticipated that the final report of the committee will be avail- 
able for several months. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 147 

Transatlantic 

The Marconi Beam Service between Dnimmondville, P.Q., and Bodmin, 
England, which was inaugurated on October 25, 1926, continues in permanent 
operation. The rates in effect via this circuit are as follows: — 

Canada Eastern Zone to Great Britain and Ireland 

Fully paid messages 18c. per word. 

Deferred messages 8c. per word. 

Nightletter messages $1.10 for 20 words or less and 6c. for each extra 

word. 
Weet-end letter messages SI .00 for 20 words^or less and 5c. for each extra 

word. 
Post letter messages 60c. for 20 M'ords or less and 3c. for each extra 

word. 

Transpacific 

The Canadian Marconi Company are licensed to install a beam transmitter 
at Drummondville to communicate direct with Australia. Work on this trans- 
mitter is in progress and it is anticipated that the Australian service will be 
placed in commission during the summer of 1928. 

Communication With Isolated Points 

The utility of radio as a means of communication with isolated points not 
reached by telegraph or telephone lines is becoming more and more appreciated 
by private enterprise, and during the year twenty-one licenses were issued to 
companies and private individuals for stations of this class. Thirty-two 
licenses were also issued to public utilities and power companies for the estab- 
lishment of radio stations at their power plants and distribution centres for 
the purpose of emergency communication in case of breakdown or other emer- 
gency. 

Other Departments of Canadian Government 

Department of National Defence. — Eight commercial stations along the 
McKenzie river and in the Yukon territory are operated by the Royal Cana- 
dian Corps of Signals of the above department, with enlisted personnel. 

Civil Aviation Stations.— The Directorate of Civil Government Air Opera- 
tions of the Department of National Defence maintains eleven stations in 
connection with its forestry and other air activities. These stations are 
operated on behalf of the Directorate by the Royal Canadian Corps of Signals, 
with an enlisted personnel. 

Department of the Interior. — The patrol steamer Beothic, chartered by 
the Department of the Interior for their far northern patrol, is fitted with a 
short wave radio equipment, and maintains communication with civilization 
during the whole of her annual cruise. 

THE INTERNATIONAL RADIOTELEGRAPH CONFERENCE 

The International Radiotelegraph Conference of Washington opened on 
October 4, 1927, and closed on November 25, 1927. 

This conference met for the purpose of revising the Radiotelegraph Con- 
vention signed at London in 1912. Participating in the task of revision were the 
properly accredited representatives of seventy-nine contracting administrations, 
together with the representatives of international organizations and operating 
companies aggregating three hundred and seventy-eight individuals. 

65702— lOi 



148 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

The Government of the Dominion of Canada's delegation, appointed under 
Order in Council of August 11, 1927 (P.C. 1548), was as follows:— 

Head of Delegation. — Mr. A. Johnston, Deputy Minister, Department of 
Marine, Ottawa. 

Delegates. — Mr. C. P. Edwards, O.B.E., Director of Radio, Department 
of Marine, Ottawa. Major W. A. Steel, M.C., Royal Canadian Corps of Signals, 
Department of National Defence, Ottawa. Mr. Laurent Beaudry, First Sec- 
retary, Legation of the Dominion of Canada, Washington. 

Technical Advisors. — Mr. Donald Manson, Chief Inspector, Radio Branch, 
Department of Marine, Ottawa. Mr. J. W. Bain, Radio Engineer, Department 
of Marine, Ottawa. 

The Conference was formally opened by the President of the United 
States, who outlined in his opening address the main objects sought to be 
obtained as the result of the Conference. 

At the first plenary session, committees with their assignment of chair- 
manships and vice-chairmanships were named as follows: — 

Coynmittee Chairman Vice-Chairman 

No. 1. Convention United States Canada. 

No. 2. General regulations Great Britain Spain. 

No. .3. Mobile and special service regulations Germany Brazil. 

No. 4. Point-to-point regulations and regulations forUruguay Great Britain. 

other services. 
No. 5. Special section to consider the report of theltaly Checoslovakia. 

Committee on the study of Code language. 

No. 6. Tariffs, word count and accounting Italy Australia. 

No. 7. Technical France Denmark. 

No. 8. Drafting Belgium Sweden. 

No. 9. International Code of Signals Japan Holland. 

No. 10. Committee on the work of the InternationalChina Mexico. 

Bureau. 

While the Chairmanship of the Convention Committee was assigned to 
the United States, all the sessions of that committee were presided over by the 
head of the Canadian delegation. 

On the committees formed, the Canadian delegation was represented as 
follows: — 

Committee No. 1 — Mr. Laurent Beaudrv. 

2— Commander C. P. Edwards. 
" 3 — Commander C. P. Edwards and D. Manson. 

4— Major W. A. Steel and D. IManson. 
" 6 — Commander C. P. Edwards and D. Manson. 

7— Major W. A. Steel and J. W. Bain. 
" 9 — British delegate on that Committee represented 

Canada. 

Aside from technical problems, the question which offered the most diffi- 
culty was that of voting. Under the terms of the London Convention of 1912, 
the principle of multiple voting based on colonial possessions was followed. 
Complicating factors had since then arisen. Germany had lost her colonies. 
The Irish Free State had been created. Besides, the Dominions took the view 
that each of them was entitled to a vote quite independently of any vote or num- 
ber of votes which might be allocated to Great Britain and her non self-gcvern- 
ing colonies. 

It was finally agreed that the representatives of any Government properly 
accredited and in attendance at the conference should be permitted to sign the 
new convention, the signatures to be in alphabetical order, in French, and that 
any provision relating to voting would be omitted from the convention. With 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 149 

this decision, an explanatory note was made to the effect that before the time 
for holding the next conference arrives, the United States Government will, 
through the regular diplomatic channels, take up with the Governments inter- 
ested the question of the voting plan to be adopted for that occasion. 

The convention* which will be known as the International Radiotelegraph 
Convention of Washington, 1927, is completed by two sets of regulations, i.e. (1) 
General Regulations and (2) Supplementary Regulations. A review of the 
same follows: — 

Convention 

The convention itself sets out the main principles which are to govern 
the establishment and operation of the different classes of radio services, the 
basic idea being the minimization of international interference. 

Apparatus and Licenses 

The subscribing nations agree to maintain the apparatus of their stations in 
accordance with the best scientific and technical progress, and to compel every 
private station under their jurisdiction to take out a license under which such 
stations will comply with the rules of the convention, as set down for the class 
of service they perform. 

Intercommunication 

Communication between ships and between ship and shore stations is obli- 
gatory, but in the case of fixed stations, that is, stations working between one 
country and another, each country reserves the right to determine the countries 
with which its stations shall work. This has its parallel in the cable situation. 

Secrecy 

With a receiving equipment of suitable type, it is possible for any station 
to intercept the messages transmitted by other stations. In order to protect the 
interests of the public, each country agrees to take steps to prevent the unauth- 
orized reception of messages and the divulging of the contents. 

Prionty of Distress Calls 

The principle that distress calls and distress messages from ships at sea 
take priority over all other radio communication is set down. 

Arbitration 

In the case of disagreement between two countries, compulsory arbitration 
is provided for, the same to take place on the demand of one of the govern- 
ments concerned. 

Military Stations 

Military and naval stations are not included in the scope of the convention^ 
except insofar as they may handle commercial traffic. 

General Regulations, Part I 

The general regulations which form a part of the convention, and which 
have the same force and effect as the convention prescribe the detailed working 
rules for the establishment and operation of the different radio service. 
Classification of Transmitters 

As has already been stated, the main object of the convention is the reduc- 
tion of interference, and it having long been demonstrated that certain types 
of radio transmitters cause much more interference than others, the regulations 

*Copios of a publication containing the full text of the Convention and Regulations- 
annexed thereto may be obtained from the Department. Price, twenty-five cents (25c.). 



150 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

first of all classify radio emissions into four general classes and prescribe the 
conditions under which each type may be used. The four classes are as 
follows: — 

1. Pure continuous waves; 

2. Continuous waves modulated at a periodic audible frequency (tonic 

train) ; 

3. Continuous waves modulated by voice (radiotelephone) ; 

4. Damped waves. 

Restriction of Use of Damped Waves 

The worst offender from the interference standpoint is the old type spark 
transmitter, and whilst in Canada and the United States, this problem has 
already been dealt with and steps taken to eliminate it at points where it is a 
source of trouble, it still affects these two countries internationally through the 
medium of foreign ships when in the proximity of the coast line. There is also 
the isolated case of the French Station " HYS ", at St. Pierre, Miquelon, adjacent 
to the Maritime Provinces. 

The question of the abolition of spark equipment was the subject of pro- 
longed discussion based on the Canadian proposal that " on and after the 
coming into effect of the convention no further new spark installations should 
be permitted on ship or shore." The proposal was actively opposed by Great 
Britain and other European countries and supported by the countries in North 
and South America. After several days' discussion, Canada finally added an 
amendment, that the proposal would not apply to small spark equipments of 
limited range (300 watts power), the utility of which, in connection with dis- 
tress calls, was not denied. The proposal thus amended carried. 

Under the regulations, as finally drafted, no new installations of spark 
transmitters may be made in stations on land after December 31, 1928, nor in 
ships (except those of low power above mentioned) after December 31, 1929. 
The use of all spark sets in stations on land is forbidden after December 31, 
1934, and in ships (except those of low power already referred to) after Decem- 
ber 31, 1939. 

Allocation of Waves 

The next major question was that of the allocation of radio waves or chan- 
nels among the different classes of service, viz: — 

1. Mobile service, which includes " ship to shore" and aircraft to ground; 

2. Fixed services, i.e., for communication between fixed points on land and 

including both national and international services; 

3. Broadcasting services; 

4. Special services, which includes meteorological, time signals, notices to 

mariners, radio beacons, radio direction finding stations and private 
experimental stations. 

The spectrum of frequencies in actual radio use runs from 10 to 60,000 K/C 
(or from 30,000 to 5 metres) and the final allocation was made as follows: — 

The band 90 K/C wide between 10 K/C and 100 K/C (30,000 to 3,000 
metres) is reserved primarily for high power, long distance trans-ocean com- 
munications. 

The band 400 K/C wide, between 100 K/C and 500 K/C (3,000 to 600 
metres) is primarily, though not exclusively reserved for ship to shore and air- 
craft services, certain European long wave broadcasting stations being allowed 
to use the portion of this band between 160 K/C and 224 K/C (1,875-1,340 
metres) . 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 151 

The general calling waves for ship to shore and aircraft, for distress and 
commercial work, and also for direction finding beacons are in this band. 

The distress and calling wave for ships of 500 K/C (600 metres) , the Direc- 
tion Finding wave of 375 K/C (800 metres), and the aircraft calling wave of 
333 K/C (900 metres) remain unchanged. 

The band 125 to 150 K/C (2,400 to 2,000 metres) is reserved exclusively 
for " ship to shore " and aircraft working and it is on this band that most of 
the long distance ship commercial traffic will continue to be handled. The call- 
ing wave for this band is 143 K/C (2,100 metres). 

The band 950 K/C wide, between 550 and 1,500 K/C (540 to 200 metres) is 
reserved for broadcasting, but the European nations may use the lower end of the 
same, viz., 1,300 to 1,500 K/C (230 to 200 metres) for certain special ship ser- 
vice on small ships such as tug boats. 

This mobile service also receives the next band 215 K/C wide, between 
1,500 to 1,715 K/C (200 to 175 metres). Above 1,715 K/C (175 metres) the 
channels are divided between the different services in proportion to their 
importance. 

These high frequencies above 1,715 K/C (175 metres) or the wavelengths 
below 175 metres are still, more or less, in the development stage, and it is 
intended that each class should be given an opportunity to experiment to 
ascertain the utility of these waves for its own particular class of service. 

It was a difficult matter to reconcile all the conflicting points of view in 
regard to the allocation of waves and many and prolonged were the discussions 
which took place. 

Canadian interests demanded the long distance Trans-Atlantic and Trans- 
Pacific services of this country be adequately protected, that there be adequate 
provision for the future development of aircraft communication, and that broad- 
casting services be protected from foreign enterprises. 

On this last question it was somewhat surprising to find that some of the 
most important European nations did not hold the opinion that the band 550 to 
1,500 K/C (545 to 200 metres) should be devoted exclusively to broadcasting; 
they desired to retain ship waves in the same, including those from the inter- 
fering spark apparatus. This problem of interference from ships is serious 
enough on the Atlantic and Pacific coasts of Canada, but, after all, it does not 
affect the big percentage of the inland radio listeners; on the other hand, in 
Europe, by reason of the proximity of the majority of the listeners to the different 
coast lines, it was believed that this question of interference would have been a 
vital one. 

For years foreign fishing vessels, operating along the Canadian Atlantic 
coast, have been using spark equipment on 1,000 K/C (300 metres) and 665 K/C 
(450 metres) which are within the broadcast band, for traffic and direction finding 
purposes. Up to date Canada has lacked the necessary authority to regulate 
such traffic, but Article 18 of the Regulations will completely remove this source 
of annoyance for all broadcast listeners in the Maritime Provinces. After 
numerous conferences on the matter, between the interested delegations, it was 
decided to forbid the use of 665 K/C (450 metres) from the date on which the 
new Convention becomes effective (January 1, 1929), in regions where it might 
interfere with broadcasting; 1,000 K/C (300 metres) may not be used for 
traffic between the hours of 6 p.m. and midnight, and is to be entirely dispensed 
with, insofar as spark equipment is concerned, after January 1, 1930. It may 
still be used by fishing vessels for direction finding purposes, but such use 
must not interfere with broadcasting. 

Aircraft Communication 

The use of radio for communication purposes by aircraft is becoming 
increasingly more important in Canada as civil aviation and forest protective 



152 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

work is developed. Canada's representatives brouglit out quite forcibly the 
importance of this service to this country, and succeeded in having established 
definite wavebands for the use of such services. In the past there has beejn 
considerable interference from high powered broadcasting stations and others, 
on aircraft waves, but by mutual arrangement among the nations this has been 
greatly decreased, and in some cases eliminated. With the increased facilities 
now available it will be possible to provide for the forest protective services in 
all provinces, the Government aerial surveying activities and for all forms of 
commercial aviation. 

Operators 

Another important point was that of the qualifications of operators. 

This is an international question, since a ship or aircraft station improperly 
operated could completely upset international working and might readily 
become a menace to life through interfering with the prompt handling of distress 
calls. 

A ship operator must not only be able to operate at a reasonable speed, but 
should have, in addition, sufficient technical qualifications to repair and remedy 
faults which may develop in the radio apparatus, as once a ship is clear of the 
dock, the operator is entirely on his own resources. 

Under the 1912 convention two classes of certificate were established, calling 
for operating speeds of 12 and 20 words per minute, respectively, knowledge of 
the international regulations, and certain theoretical and practical technical 
knowledge. 

The second class certificate which prescribed a speed of 12 words per 
minute has been a source of considerable trouble to Canada, particularly in the 
congested radio area of the North Atlantic. It is not difficult for a person to 
acquire this minimum speed, and in certain countries advantage has been taken 
of this fact to have one of the deck officers qualify for a certificate and thus 
avoid carrying a regular operator. 

Transmission of traffic at 12 words per minute is annoying enough on a busy 
circuit, but even this speed is not maintained. The class of operator having only 
these qualifications does not handle very much business, and in a matter of 
months it is found that his operating speed rapidly falls from 12 words per 
minute to, as the humourist of the Convention described it, '' 12 words per 
month ", with disastrous effects to the radio organization. 

The whole question was thoroughly discussed and it was finally agreed that 
20 words per minute should be the minimum operating speed of any operator, 
which adequately takes care of the situation before mentioned. 

The final arrangement establishes three classes of operators: — 

1. The first class, which demands a minimum speed of 25 words per minute, 

with good theoretical and technical qualifications of both radiotelegraph 
and radiotelephone apparatus; 

2. The second class, which demands a speed of 20 words per minute, and 

a lower standard of theoretical and practical knowledge of operating 
radiotelegraph apparatus only; and 

3. The special class, which demands a minimum speed of 20 words per 

minute, and such technical qualifications as each administration may 
prescribe. 

A first class operator is qualified to take charge of a ship station of any- 
class; a second class operator may act as junior operator on a big ship or take 
charge of the apparatus of a smaller vessel. The special class is intended to 
cover the special cases such as fishing boats and those which are not, by legis- 
lation, compelled to carry radio apparatus in connection with " safety of life 
at sea." 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 153 

There was much discussion over the question of experience. The majority 
desired three years' experience at sea in the case of a first class man, and one 
year in the case of a second class man, and whilst agreeing with the general 
principle that experience is not only desirable but essential, a provision such 
as this would prevent fully qualified operators from Canadian shore stations 
acting as operators on board a ship. After prolonged debate, it was finally 
agreed that the experience for a first class operator should be fixed at one year, 
a second class six months, and to meet the specific case of Canada, where there 
are so many coast stations, it was agreed that one year's service on either a 
coast station or a ship would render a first class operator eligible to take charge 
of a first class ship station. 

The radiotelephone certificate is for operators on small ships carrying low 
power (not exceeding 300 watts) radiotelephone equipments, and precaution 
was taken to see that it was so worded as to cover such equipments as are 
installed in tugs plying on the Pacific coast of Canada. 

In the case of aircraft operators, the number of hours of flying service will 
be prescribed by each Administration. 

Experimental and Amateur Stations 

The development of short waves has lifted the amateur from a national to 
an international plane, and the conference deemed it necessary to draft regula- 
tions to regulate the international activities of this class of station. 

The views of North America and some of the British Dominions were 
materially different from those of the majority of European nations. Canada 
and the United States were disposed to be as liberal with the amateur inter- 
nationally as nationally, while the European nations were combined to limit his 
activities to an absolute minimum. Some of them even proposed to suppress 
him altogether. 

It was difficult for the nations who were opposed to the amateur to appre- 
ciate the North American point of view; for instance, all European countries 
operate their telegraphs as a government monopoly, and they drew rather lurid 
pictures of their telegraphic revenue suffering from the enormous international 
traffic the amateur may handle, a contingency which this country, in turn, found 
difiicult to appreciate. However, the spirit of compromise prevailed, and the 
impression gained was that in future the European amateurs will enjoy bands 
of waves and privileges far beyond their expectations, while Canadian and 
American amateurs will find themselves under more restrictions in so far as 
their international activities are concerned. 

The new regulations prescribe that amateurs must not exchange communi- 
cations with stations in countries which give notice that they are opposed to 
such exchange. The international messages they transmit must be in plain 
language and limited to the subject of the experiments, and to remarks of a 
private nature. The operators must be capable of handling the apparatus 
efl5ciently and must be able to operate at a reasonable speed. 

The bands out of which the amateur may be allotted channels for inter- 
national use are: — 

The band 285 K/C, between 1,715 K/C and 2,000 K/C (175-150 metres) . 
The band 500 K/C, between 3,500 K/C and 4,000 K/C (85-75 metres). 
The band 300 K/C, between 7,000 K/C and 7,300 K/C (42-8-41 metres). 
The band 400 K/C, between 14,000 K/C and 14,400 K/C (21 -4-20 -8 

metres). 
The band 2,000 K/C, between 28,000 K/C and 30,000 K/C (10-7-10 

metres) . 
The band 4,000 K/C, between 56,000 K/O and 60,000 K/C (5-35^5 

metres). 



154 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

Working the Nearest Coast Station 

The London Convention provides that ship stations should, as a matter of 
principle, communicate with the coast station which is nearest to them. The 
purpose is to avoid unnecessary^ interference which is liable to occur when a 
ship endeavours to exchange traffic with another coast station a long distance 
away with correspondingly weak signals and repetitions. 

This rule, since 1919, has been '' more honoured in the breach than in the 
observance " and has been a source of much trouble to Canadian statiom-. 

Since 1920, new long wave, long distance transmitters have been developed, 
and ships fitted with this type of apparatus work with coast stations specially 
equipped to handle traffic, so provided; as a result, there are now two distinct 
services, the first, mainly " aid to navigation and safety of life " conducted on 
the shorter waves of the order of 600 metres, and the second, commercial traflfic 
handled on waves of the order of 2,000 metres. 

Prior to the advent of this long range equipment, the 600 metre wave Cana- 
dian station at Cape Race handled traffic yielding as much as $70,000 per year 
(90 per cent being to United States points) ; to-day that station is handling 
traffic providing less than one-tenth that amount. 

To meet long wave competition from stations in the United States, the 
Canadian Marconi Company were, in 1922, licensed to install a long wave station 
at Glace Bay, N.S. This station is handling a satisfactory volume of business, 
which about offsets the reduction suffered by Cape Race. 

To return to the matter of the convention, it was not only desirable that 
no regulation should be accepted which would tend to prejudice this traffic, 
but, if possible, it was desired to secure some regulation which would tend to 
route the traffic through Canadian stations, even if such action might bring 
criticism of impeding progress. 

The one advantage Canadian stations enjoy is that their geographical posi- 
tion relative to the North Atlantic steamship routes make them the " nearest 
coast station " for a considerable portion of the route, and it was hoped that 
privileges might, by regulation, be accorded such stations. 

The stations in Great Britain occupy a similar position, in regard to the 
eastern end of these routes. 

Canada pressed the matter strongly through the various committees some- 
times with the support of one or two countries, sometimes entirely alone. How- 
ever, it is felt that the final result has justified the efforts made and that ways 
and means are provided whereby the Canadian commercial companies can carry 
on with every hope of success, provided they continue to provide a first class 
service. 

The regulations reiterate the general principle of working the nearest coast 
station, set out in the London Convention of 1912, for spark transmitters^ and 
extend it to include telephone and tonic train emission. Canada's desire was to 
have a similar regulation in a modified form apply to the stations operating on 
continuous waves on the long wave band, to the general effect that any ship 
communicating with other than the nearest coast station must cease work if she 
interfered with the nearest station. 

Great Britain had already submitted a similar proposal, but abandoned it, 
so that there was no support from that quarter. 

The final regulation, as agreed upon in regard to the long wave band deals 
with the problem from a somewhat different viewpoint. It contemplates the 
allocation of a specific wave or waves to each of the different stations in each 
area, each station to enjoy priority on the wave or waves which are allotted to 
it, and its working on such waves must not be interfered with. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 155 

The conference itself did not allocate any waves. This, in the case of the 
North Atlantic, was done by private agreement among the managements and 
the representatives of the administrations concerned in the operation of long 
wave ship to shore services. 

There are 13 waves available, in the band 125 K/C to 150 K/C (2,400 to 
2,000 metres), one of which, 2,100 metres, is the calling wave, and the agreement 
proposes to divide the remaining 12 on the basis of 6 to Europe and 6 to North 
America. Six European nations are given one wave each, the United States 4, 
and Canada 2. With this arrangement, Canada will be able to adequately look 
after not only all traffic to and from Canadian bound ships but a considerable 
volume to and from American points, it being observed, in passing, that some 
90 per cent O'f the North Atlantic traffic is destined to and from the United 
States. 

Control of Radio on Board Ship 

The radio service on board a ship or aircraft is placed under the supreme 
control of the master of the ship or aircraft and the secrecy of messages is 
properly protected. 

Procedure 

Several long articles deal with the general procedure to be observed in the 
transmission and reception of radiotelegrams ; these follow the general procedure 
set out in the London Convention, greatly amplified to meet developments since 
that date. 

New procedure to cover transmission and reception on the long wave band, 
and for the operation of direction finding stations is also included. 

These changes and additions are demanded by virtue of the fact that in 
the past the mobile service was carried on on single waves; hereafter it will 
be carried on on bands of waves, stations being now authorized to use any of 
the waves in an allotted band. 

The basic principle of the operating organization is that there are two 
standby waves, viz: 600 metres (which is also the distress wave) and 2,100 
metres, and all ships and stations not engaged in correspondence will revert to 
these waves and standby for calls. Provision is made whereby ships using the 
long w^ave band will either revert to 600 metres at specified intervals or main- 
tain a separate watch on this wave in order to take care of distress calls. 

Distress: Procedure 

The whole of the "distress procedure" was carefully gone over and the 
London procedure changed and amplified in the light of the past fifteen years' 
experience. 

In addition to the distress call SOS which has not been changed, an urgency 
signal has been established to take care of cases in which a ship is in diSiculty, 
but where danger to life is not involved. Many occasions have arisen in the 
past where a ship has sent out a distress call, and another ship, at considerable 
waste of time and expense, has gone out of its way to render assistance, when 
the trouble was only some mechanical defect not involving danger to life. 

The new urgency signal XXX provides for such cases. 

Provision is also made for a signal to operate an automatic alarm device, 
such signal consisting of 12 dashes, each four seconds long, with one second 
inter\'al between them. This is intended to call the attention of ships carrying 
one operator when that operator is off watch. 

The automatic receiving apparatus will be left in operation, and will only 
respond to the above mentioned signal. On receipt of such a signal a bell will 
ring in the chart room, indicating that some ship is in distress; the operator will 
then be called and put on watch. This arrangement is still in the development 
stage and the regulation is intended to protect its further development. 



156 MAPdNE AND FISHERIES 

In the case of ships sending out distress calls by radiotelephone, they will, 
in addition to the regular SOS, send out the spoken expression MAYDAY, 
corresponding to the French pronunciation "m'aider" (Help me). 

The question of allocation of call signs raised considerable discussion and 
Canada was finally given all the call signs commencing with CF, CG, CH, CI, 
CJ, CK, VA, VB, VC, VD, VE, VF, VG. It will be appreciated that these are 
more than adequate to meet Canada's requirements for many years to come. 

It was proposed, at first, that broadcasting stations should be treated as 
fixed stations, and given a three letter group out of calls allotted to their 
respective countries. Incidentally the "C" calls now enjoyed by Canada were 
allotted to other countries, leaving Canada only the V's, it being pointed out 
that the V's alone gave a total of over 8,000 call signs, ample for the needs of 
this country. Such a proposal would have meant changing the call sign of 
every" broadcasting station in the Dominion, and Canada's refusal supported 
ably by the United States to even discuss, much less accept, such an idea resulted 
in the arrangement above stated, viz., not only the "Y" and "C" call signs 
already enjoyed, but an additional allotment of C's. 

Under the new arrangement, fixed and land stations will have three 
letter call signs; ship stations will have four letter call signs; aircraft stations 
five letter call signs; amateur stations four or five letter call signs with a figure 
inserted. Broadcasting stations are specifically omitted, leaving each country 
free to allot any sort of call sign it wishes, out of the series it has assigned to it. 

Accounting 

A considerable number of the regulations deal with form of messages and 
accounting for the same. This is a somewhat complicated subject on which a 
good deal of time was spent. A radiotelegram, for instance destined to Europe, 
sent to a Canadian station by a foreign ship, is handed to the Canadian land- 
lines for delivery to the cable, which in turn hand it to the European landlines 
for delivery. Each one of these services or administrations, as well as the coast 
station, makes a charge for the services rendered, while the operator on the 
ship, which probably will never come near Canada, has the tolls in cash. On the 
other hand, Canadian ships have accounts with foreign coast stations which 
have handled their trafiic. The rendering of accounts and the settlement of the 
balances between the different administrations is, therefore, a somewhat com- 
plex matter. Canada endeavoured to have the principle established that the 
charges follow the message, which is, it is believed, a simple and effective way of 
dealing with the question. However, the European opposition to this procedure 
was too strong and a system along the general lines of that established by the 
London Convention, amplified to meet present conditions, was adopted. The 
gold franc continues to be the basis of settlement. 

Abbreviations 

The abbreviations to be used in handling radio traffic were considerably 
amplified in the light of experience and unifonn hours of service for ships, not 
maintaining 24-hour watch, were established, so that every ship can, by refer- 
ence to the international publications, ascertain exactly when any other ship 
will be on watch. 

Briefly, the world is divided into six divisions, — 

Eastern Atlantic Ocean, 
Indian Ocean, 
Western Pacific Ocean, 
Central Pacific Ocean, 
Eastern Pacific Ocean, 
Western Atlantic Ocean, 

and the hours during which watch must be kept in each division arc specified. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 157 

REGULATIONS, PART II 

Several points covering the charges on messages and the application of the 
international telegraph regulations to radiotelegrams were placed in the Regu- 
lations, Part II, to which Canada, the United States and the Republic of 
Honduras, did not subscribe. The points contained therein are of secondary 
importance and do not affect the general structure of international radio working. 

INDUCTIVE INTERFERENCE 

This section has been operated along the same general lines as in the past, 
with increased staff and equipment. 

Fifteen interference cars are equipped and in operation investigating inter- 
ference from the following headquarters: Vancouver, Calgary, Regina, Winnipeg, 
London, Hamilton, Toronto, Ottawa, Montreal, Quebec, St. John, N.B., and 
Halifax. 

In addition to the regular tours of the interference cars, special trips are 
made by the investigators, either with the interference cars', or by train, in 
cases where the interference aft'ects many broadcast listeners and the town 
would not be visited, on tour, for a considerable time. 

" Part time " inspectors are provided with limited equipment for the 
investigation of radio interference and carry out preliminary investigations in 
all cases of interference in their districts, and arrange for the elimination of 
same, if at all possible, with the facilities at their command. In cases where 
they require assistance from headquarters, an investigator is sent from the 
nearest divisional headquarters. 

The equipment of the interference cars has been considerably improved 
during the year and improved means have been devised for the location of many 
sources of interference and for their elimination. The most important apparatus 
carried on the interference cars consists of a radio receiver with a direction 
finding loop, by means of which the investigator is able to associate the inter- 
ference with certain particular lines which are radiating same. The automobiles 
carry, also, small portable receivers, fitted with exploring coils for investigations 
ir^ power houses. In case the interference which has been reported is not heard 
when the investigator visits the town, he endeavours to produce, artificially, such 
conditions as will cause the interference to start. With the permission of the 
public utilities, he strikes the poles carrying transformers and other electrical 
apparatus, and shakes the guy wires, causing the power lines to swing and 
vibrate as they would in windy weather or when heavy traffic causes the poles 
to shake. 

If the interference is apparently caused by the distribution system or 
apparatus belonging to the public utilities, the investigator obtains the assist- 
ance of a lineman to help in locating the exact source and when the source of 
interference is located, the public utilities invariably take steps to repair the 
fault which is found to be the cause. In case the interference is found to 
originate on some privately owned electrical apparatus the owner of the apparatus 
is requested to take the necessary steps to eliminate this interference, and the 
investigator may assist him in testing liis apparatus to determine where the 
fault is. In cases where the interference is caused by the normal operation of 
electrical apparatus, the investigator tries the effect of surge traps and preventive 
devices which are carried in the car. Where it is possible to prevent the inter- 
ference by such means tlie owner of the electrical apparatus may purchase the 
necessary equipment either from the Department or from other sources. 

Local radio clubs are instructed how to deal with simple sources of inter- 
ference and they are provided with circulars describing tests to assist them in 
locating and eliminating the same. 



158 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

We are pleased to report that our investigators have received the greatest 
co-operation in their work, in practically every point visited, particularly from 
the public utilities, and many of the latter have provided themselves with port- 
able radio receivers for the investigation of interference caused by their lines. 
It is gratifying to note the increased interest in the prevention of radio inter- 
ference on the part of most of the public utilities throughout the country, who 
realize the importance of eliminating any sources of interference which may be 
caused by their systems, both for the sake of the listening public and to ensure 
that their lines and apparatus are in first class condition. Radio interference 
frequentl^^ indicates defects which may cause serious damage, through fire, elec- 
tric shock or damage to plant if not rectified in the early stages. The British 
Columbia Electric Company appears to have gone furthest along this line by 
employing a full time electrician for investigation work on their lines. This, 
electrician is, at present, working in co-operation with our inves'tigators in 
Vancouver. The Toronto Hydro-Electric System do considerable investigating, 
as do many of the smaller public utilities. The Radio Branch investigators 
instruct the superintendents and linemen of the public utilities in means of 
dealing with the interference and supply circulars prepared by headquarters, 
describing means of locating and eliminating interference radiating from these 
sources. 

In the case of privately owned electrical apparatus, such as violet ray 
machines, farm lighting plants, electrical signs, and many other sources of inter- 
ference, it is found that rarely does any person desire to be a nuisance to his 
neighbour and in nearly all cases they either agree to cease using the apparatus 
during the broadcast hours, or, if the interference is preventable, to install 
suppression devices which the department provides at cost. In some cases the 
local listeners affected have subscribed the cost of the device. These usually 
cost only a few dollars and are easily installed by an electrician. 

The number of sources of radio interference investigated personally by the 
staff of this department may be summarized as follows: — 

Sources investigated — 

Domestic electrical appliances causing interference 291 5-3% 

Electrical distribution systems and power lines 4,383 80-7% 

Commercial electrical apparatus 610 11 -2% 

Radio apparatus (amateur and commercial) 152 2-8% . 

Total sources investigated 5,436 100% 

Action taken — 

Number of sources definitely reported cured 4,880 89-8% 

Number of sources not yet reported cured 465 8 • 5% 

Number of sources having no economic cure 91 1 • 7% 

Total 5,436 100% 



In addition to the sources listed above, a great number of cases have been 
successfully dealt with by correspondence and 'he interference eliminated by 
the owners of the apparatus on receipt of detailed instructions from the Radio 
Branch headquarters or local inspectors. Many special surge traps have been 
designed and special and standard surge traps sold to suppress interference from 
domestic and commercial electrical apparatus. 

Many of the 465, or 8-^ per cent of the sources which are listed as not yet 
reported cured, have undoubtedly been successfully dealt with by the owners 
of the apparatus causing the interference. In all cases of preventable inter- 
ference the investigator specifics in detail the most economic means of sup- 
pressing the interference, conducting tests when necessary. 

The sources recorded as having no economic cure include some cases of 
power line and street car interference where the radio receivers are close to the 
power lines. They also include electro-medical and other types of apparatus 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 159 

where all known means have failed to eliminate the interference. Research is 
being conducted in an endeavour to find a means of suppressing such inter- 
ference. 

As an illustration of the widespread interference from one single source, the 
following is an extract from the report of one of our investigators: — 

" On March 28, 1928, in Victoria, B.C., a loose transformer cutout was located by the 
radio inspector, after a difficult investigation extending over several days. This interfer- 
ence was first reported on March 20, and was very intermittent, causing no interference 
from the 24th to the 26th, but starting again and becoming more continuous on the 27th. 

" The investigator commenced by patrolling the entire city and it was found that the 
interference was extremely loud near any of the street car lines. It was, therefore, neces- 
sary to compare the loudness of the interference on streets away from the car line. By 
this method the investigator Hmited the area under investigation and finally located the 
exact pole by the sledge hammer test. The fault was found to be a loose cutout, which 
was sparking, in the primary lead to the transformer. The sparking and the interference 
stopped for an instant when the pole was tapped with the sledge hammer. This investi- 
gation required eighteen hours of the inspector's time, as well as valuable assistance given 
by several broadcast listeners. When the fault was repaired, many broadcast listeners, 
several miles from the source, reported reception free from this interference. The 2,200 
volt power line to which the defective cutout was connected, ran parallel to and within a few 
feet from the street railway feeder cable, and the surge from the power line was induced 
to the railway feeder and carried by it many miles, causing intereference to all radio 
receivers along the car line." 

Research work has been carried out both at Ottawa and on many trans- 
mission lines and industrial plants throughout Canada, and by several of the 
radio inspectors at their own headquarters. Types of apparatus and methods 
of investigating interference have been developed and a number of surge traps, 
both for experimental purposes and for permanent installation, have been 
designed. Probably the most far reaching in its effect of these new devices 
will be the surge trap for the elimination of interference from telegraph appar- 
atus. Satisfactory negotiations have been completed with the various tele- 
graph companies operating in Canada, whereby they co-operate with the Radio 
Branch in investigating and arranging for the elimination of much interference 
caused by their apparatus, along the lines recommended by the Radio Branch. 
There are at present over one hundred towns in which preliminary investiga- 
tions have been carried out and the telegraph companies have undertaken to 
endeavour to eliminate the interference from their lines. 

Several manufacturers of electrical apparatus have been approached regard- 
ing certain features of their products which cause radio interference, and by 
co-operation with the Radio Branch, the designs have been revised to eliminate 
the objectionable features. Some dealers guarantee their products not to cause 
radio interference, and such articles as electric warming pads have been 
replaced by dealers free of charge on that account. 

In addition to the interference work, the investigators do any other work 
required by the Radio Branch in the towns they visit. Such work includes the 
sale of licenses, inspection of amateur stations and the examination of can- 
didates for operators' certificates, etc. 

The reports of the year indicate a great advance in the results obtained 
the previous year, above the normal increase which is to be expected with the 
increased staff and equipment. 

1926-27 1927-28 

Sources investigated 2,793 5,436 

Per cent of sources reported cured 87% 89-8% 

From correspondence received, it is believed that there is also a great 
increase in the number of sources of interference eliminated by the public utili- 
ties and owners of electrical apparatus. 

It is also believed that the general noise level of interference throughout 
the Dominion, and the length of time which faults cause interference before 



160 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

they are repaired have been considerably reduced during the year. These 
improvements are more than keeping pace with the increased sensitivity of 
the sets now used by the broadcast listeners. There still remains, however, 
much work to be done, particularly in cities where much electricity is used, 
to reduce the level of the continuous noise, in addition to the work of investi- 
gating new sources of interference. 

NEW CONSTRUCTION, ADDITIONS AND ALTERATIONS 

During the year in addition to the regular maintenance work which was 
carried out, including painting of buildings and masts where necessary, and 
overhauling rigging and other related equipment, the department, in accord- 
ance with its policy of improving reception conditions for the broadcast list- 
ener, installed two additional continuous wave and interrupted continuous wave 
transmitters on the Great Lakes and three of similar type on the East coasl^ 
and gulf of St. Lawrence. Also, in conformity with the same policy and that 
of improving aids to navigation, valve type radio beacon transmitters emitting 
interrupted continuous waves were installed; one on the Great Lakes and one 
on the West coast. These beacons are becoming increasingly useful as more 
and more ships are being fitted with radio direction finding equipment. 

In order to ensure continuous communication between the different bases 
established by the Hudson Strait Expedition, radio stations were erected at each, 
equipped with medium power valve type transmitters. Electric power for driv- 
ing the transmitters and for lighting the buildings was provided by gasolene 
engine driven generators. Regular communication was maintained between the 
expedition and Ottawa by means of a short wave transmitter installed, in addi- 
tion to the regular station equipment, at the central base at Wakeham Bay. 

The following is a synopsis of the new construction, additions or alterations 
carried out at each station concerned during the fiscal year 1927-28: — 

West Coast 

Ale7't Bay. — A small mast, new aerial and counterpoise were erected for the 
radiophone transmitter. 

Bull Harbour. — A new gasolene engine driven generating unit together with 
a 13-plate starting battery and a remotely controlled switchboard were installed, 
the latter being so arranged as to allow the operator on watch to start and stop 
the generating plant without leaving his working position at the receiver. 
Advantage was taken of the presence of the starting battery to use it for supply- 
ing current to electric lights installed in the operating house, which resulted in 
improved working conditions for the staff. 

Cape Lazo. — A second single piece, 120-foot mast, complete with concrete 
deadmen and all rigging and fittings, also a counterpoise for the radiophone 
transmitter, was erected. The operating and dwelling houses were overhauled 
and placed in good order. 

Digby Island. — A closed circuit inductance unit was installed and the C.W. 
transmitter converted into the five-unit type. A tone wheel was fitted for I.C.W. 
transmission and a new aerial change-over switch and transmitting relay 
installed. The rigging was overhauled, and a new aerial erected. To enable 
watch to bo maintained simultaneously on two wavelengths a 600-metre standby 
receiver was installed. A plank sidewalk was built from the station to the 
wharf. The power line was overhauled and repaired. 

Dead Tree Point. — A new trestle was erected to support the 1,000-gallon 
fresh water supply tank, and all connecting pipes were boxed in as a protection 
from frost. 



REPORT Oh THE DEPUTY MINISTER 161 

Estevan Point — A new aerial was erected. Considerable work was done 
on the Estevan-Hesquiat road, corduroy and binish being put down and road 
ditched and graded. 

Point Grey.- — A radiophone transmitter ex Vancouver City Station was 
installed. In order to improve the appearance of the grounds and buildings the 
roadway was gravelled and concrete curbs constructed at each side, concrete 
walks were laid and the buildings painted. A large part of the site adjoining 
the buildings was levelled and seeded. 

Race Rocks. — A type 400 W radio beacon transmitter was installed in the 
fog alarm building. The aerial was supported between the lighthouse tower 
and a 70-foot single piece wooden mast erected for the purpose. A suitable 
ground system was also put down and a larger engine capable of driving both 
the fog alarm and the radio beacon transmitter was installed. 

Lije-Saving Service. — The four radiotelephone equipments installed for the 
Life-Saving Sennce at Bamfield, Cape Beale, Pachena, and Carmanah were 
given their annual overhaul and all necessary replacements and repairs effected. 

Great Lakes 

Southeast Shoal, Lake Erie, Radio Beacon. — A type 400 watt valve equipped 
radio beacon transmitter was installed in the new combined Fog Alarm and 
Lighthouse recently constructed on this shoal. Due to the restricted natiu'c 
of the structure it was necessary to erect the aerial above the lantern in the 
form of a horizontal rectangular wire grid fastened to four self-supporting 
tubular masts built into the concrete walls at the comers of the building. 

Midland, Ont. — A 1,600 watt C.W. and I.C.W. valve transmitter was 
installed with very satisfactory results. 

Kingston, Ont. — A 1,600 watt C.W. and I.C.W. valve transmitter was 
installed. The operating house and dwelling at the station which were wired 
for electric lighting when built were connected to a power line constructed for 
the department by the Kingston Public Utilities Commission. 

Tobermory, Ont. — A Type M.S. valve receiver was installed. 

East Coast 

Chebucto Head, N.S., Direction Finding.- — The station building was 
extended to accommodate a new 1,600 watt C.W. and I.C.W. transmitter and 
new generating set and same were installed. The latter is arranged to be 
remotely started and stopped by the operator without moving from his work- 
ing position. A new 500-gallon gasolene tank was installed and connected 
to a Bowser pump. A new D.F. aerial was erected. This new equipment went 
into operation on the 23rd of January. 

Canso, N'.S., Direction Finding. — The ^ K.W. Canadian Marconi spark 
transmitter was replaced by a used 2 K.W. set of the same type. A type G-3' 
D.F, receiver, together with a new operating table to accommodate same and 
a remotely controlled send-receive switch, were installed. Necessary repairs 
were made to the road between the station and the main highway. 

Cape Race, Nfld., Direction Finding. — An M.S.A. and M.S.T. receiver and 
amplifier were installed. 

St. Paul Island, N.S., Direction Finding. — The type 12 A. D.F. receiver 
was replaced by a type G-3 type receiver, which considerably improved the 
efficiency of the station. 

6.1702—11 



162 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

Father Point, P..Q.—k new 1,600 watt C.W. and I.C.W. valve transmitter 
was installed and tested, the results being very satisfactory. A 7i K.V.A. 
transformer and oil switch were supplied for connection to the power company's 
line. A type M.S. valve receiver was installed. 

Clarke City, P.Q. — A type M.S. valve receiver was installed. 

Grindstone Island, P.Q. — A type M.S. valve receiver was installed. 

North Sijdney, N.S. — A standard 100 watt C.W. and I.C.W. transmitter 
and type M.S. valve receiver were installed. 

Hudson Bay and Strait 

Port Nelson, Man. — The station was reopened on behalf of the Depart- 
ment of Railways and Canals and a type M.S. valve receiver installed. 

Fort Churchill, Man. — A temporary station was erected on behalf of the 
Department of Railways and Canals. The equipment was housed in a tem- 
porary building and consists of a standard 100 watt valve transmitter with 
type M.S., valve receiver, the prime mover being a 3 K.W. 100 volt non- 
battery lighting plant. A 120-foot angle iron steel mast was erected. 

Port Burivell, Hudson Sti-ait.—A temporary station was erected and equipped 
with tw^o 150-foot steel masts and standard 1,600 watt C.W. and I.C.W. valve 
transmitter and type M.S. valve receiver. 

Wakeham Bay, Hudson Strait. — A temporary station was erected and 
equipped with 500 watt C.W. and I.C.W., and 500 watt short wave transmitters 
and types M.S. and S.W. 3 valve receivers. Two 150-foot steel masts were 
erected. 

Nottingham Island, Hudson Strait. — A temporary station was erected and 
equipped with a 500 watt C.W. and I.C.W. transmitter, and type M.S. valve 
receiver. Two 150-foot steel masts were erected. 

SPECL^L ASSISTANCE RENDERED TO SHIPS DLRIXG THE YEAR BY GOVERNMENT R.\DIO 

STATIONS 

West Coast 
Digby Island 

SS. "Princess Charlotte".— At 21.23 on August 30, 1927, the Digby Island 
station received a distress message from the ss. Princess Charlotte advising 
ashore Vichnefski rock near Wrangell. Signals from the Charlotte were very 
weak, and she was unable to hear Digby's reply. At 21.33 Digby Island informed 
the Ketchikan Station of the casualty and requested that if possible a cutter be 
sent to assistance. At 21.35 Ketchikan was in communication with the 
Charlotte, who requested removal of passengers. At 21.40 Ketchikan in touch 
with the ss. Explorer in vicinity of Wrangell, who proceeded to assistance, 
.-arriving about 5 a.m., after encountering heavy fog. The Charlotte had floated 
■ ofif, but unmanageable, and drifting, water in fuel tanks. The Explorer removed 
passengers and conveyed them to Wrangell, the Charlotte proceeding under tow. 
JEstevan Point 

SS. "Arkansas" and ss. "Suremico".— At 10.05 on June 3, 1927, the Esteyan 
Station received a distress message from the ss. Arkansas reporting collision 
with the ss. Suremico five miles north cape Flattery, in fog; Surcniico not in 
danger and standing by Arkansas. The Pachena Point Direction Finding Station 
advised the Banfield Life-Saving Station and C.G.S. Malaspina. The Mala- 
spina took the Arkansas in tow until relieved by the ss. Salvage King, who 
towed vessel to Victoria, B.C. The Suremico proceeded under own steam. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER TSS 

M.S. "Noble".— At 18.00 on January 5, 1928, Mr. Smith of Escalante, B.C., 
telephoned the Estevan Station requesting information regarding a wreck in 
vicinity Escalante, as wreckage had been seen on the beach, and that he was 
proceeding to investigate. The officer in charge informed Mr. Smith that no 
wreck had been reported. At 21.20 Mr. Smith reported men on wreck or reef 
about four miles south of him and that this information had been telephoned 
direct to the Tofino Live-Saving Station, who advised lifeboat leaving imme- 
diately, but on account of heavy sea doubtful if they could get past Riley's 
cove. The officer in charge at Estevan communicated the above information, 
together with local weather conditions, to Captain Henderson, C.G.S. Givenchy. 
Both the Givenchy and lifeboat were off the approximate position of wreck at 
daylight on January 6, but were unable to locate same owing to heavy sea and 
mist. With the assistance of Mr. Smith, directions were given the Givenchy^ 
and with the aid of a fire on beach the lifeboat was able to run in channel and 
rescue two of the crew, four being drowned. Mr. Smith and Government line- 
man were asked to keep a lookout for bodies. The vessel was a total loss. 

SS. "Griffco".— At 22.40 and 23.20 on January 11, 1928. the ss. Grijjco 
broadcast ''Help SOS"; this was repeated several times, but no other par- 
ticulars or information were given. The Estevan Station answered the call 
immediately, but receiving no response, broadcast the SOS. The Pachena 
Direction Finding Station announced approximate position of vessel 218-5 
degrees from that station. This inf omiation was also broadcast by Estevan. 
The ss. Planter tried to raise' the Griffco and reported signals very loud. At 
8.20 a.m. on January 12, the ss. Aorangi reported running out bearing given by 
Pachena Direction Finding Station. At 6.10 a.m. on the 13th the Griffco broad- 
east the following: " Unable receive on wireless. Report us Inter Island vSteam 
Navigation Co., Honolulu. All well. Signed Martin." Vessel apparently pro- 
ceeded on course. Ko reason given for sending SOS. 

Pachena Point Direction Fiiiding 

At 10.12 a.m., on November 19, 1927, the lightkeeper at Carmanah reported 
to the Pachena Direction Finding station by radiophone, "one gasboat reported 
ashore and two in distress off Cloose." At 10.20 a.m. Pachena notified the 
Banfield Lifeboat which put out, also gave details to U.S.S. Snohomish who 
proceeded to Cloose. The ss. Vinemoor, abeam Carmanah about 10 a.m'.,, 
reports no gasboats sighted. Pachena called Norwegian vessel abeam Car- 
manah, but received no reply, also broadcast general call to any ship near 
Carmanah Light. Details were given to U.S.S. Swallow for information coast- 
guard lifeboat at Neah bay. The report was evidently a false one as no 
substantiation of same was received and no wreckage found by beach patroh 

Vancouver 

SS. "Northwestern''. — At 5.05 a.m. on December 11, 1927, the Vancouver 
Station received a distress message from the ss. Northwestern, advising ran 
ashore, cape Mudge. Vancouver informed the tup Capescott to be prepared 
to leave if required to assist. Several messages were sent to the vessel's 
agents and at 8 a.m. the passengers w^ere put ashore. At 10.06 a.m. the C.G.S. 
Estevan proceeded to assistance. The Northwestern was taken in hand by 
the Pacific Salvage Company. 

SS. "Lakina".— At 5.20 a.m. on December 24, 1927, the Vancouver Station 
received a distress message from the ss. Lakina advising ashore in Porlier pass, 
also a message to Ladysmith, asking assistance. At 5.40 a.m. the Lakina sent 
out a distress call for the Salvage Company and at 6.40 a.m. advised the B.C. ■ 
Salvage Company, Victoria, that she was afloat and no assistance required. 
The Lakina afterwards proceeded to Nanaimo, B.C. 



164 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

The West Coast radio stations were also of assistance to the ss. Admiral 
Watson, Prince Rupert Challamba, Catala, Donaldson, and Atsuta Mara 

No. 6. 

Great Lakes 
Port Arthur 

SS. ''Altadoc'\— At 4.20 p.m. on December 8, 1927, the Port Arthur Station 
received a distresis message from the ss. Altadoc, advising on rocks off 
Keweenaw point, in northwest gale, heavy sea, snow storm and winter fog. 
The Altadoc which had lost her steering gear in early morning, had been 
adrift in lake Superior up to time of grounding. Vessel was abandoned, total 
wreck. 

The Great Lakes radio stations were also of assistance to the ss. Joseph 
G. Butler, Jr., Athabasca, Maplecourt, Bricoldoc, Frater Taylor, Harvester. 
Huronic, Agawa, Martian, and Alpena,. 

East Coast 
Sable Island 

SS. "Rene Godet".— At 4.45 p.m., E.S.T., on April 9, 1927, the ss. Rene 
Godet informed the Sable Island Station that she was in dangerous position 
on northeast bar of Sable island. At 5 p.m., E.S.T. Sable island assisted in 
obtaining bearings from the Chebucto Head, Canso and St. Paul's Island D/F 
stations. At 6.30 p.m., E.S.T., the Rene Godet advised had cleared bar and 
in safe position. 

Schooner "Maurice R. Thurlow" .—At 3.20 p.m.. on October 25, 1927, the 
Sable Island Station received a report from the sis. Sliedricht advising passed 
schooner Maurice R. Thurlow of Boston at 18.40 G.M.T., October 23rd, Lat. 
38-5 N., Long. 66-57 W. in waterlogged condition, sails torn, boats washed 
away, no signs of crew. Lloyds, London, Pickford, and Black, Halifax; and 
Marine Agent, Dartmouth, N,S.. were advised. 

Schooner "General Bynf.— At 3.14 p.m., E.S.T., on March 20, 1928, the 
Sable Island Station was advised by the m.s. Korshohn that she had saved crew 
of six men of schooner General Byng, from St. John's, Nfld., when vessel in 
sinking condition, position Lat. 4208, Long. 61 17 W. The schooner was set 
on fire and abandoned. 
North Sydney, N.S. 

French Trawler " Adriatique " .—At 10.20 p.m., E.S.T., on July 24, 
1927, the North Sydncv Station received a distresis message from the trawler 
Adi-iatique advising ashore Scatari rock. This information was broadcast 
immediately and answer requested from any ship in vicinity; no response. 
At 10.30 p.m.. North Sydney repeated broadcast and from 10.35 to 11 p.m. 
called Adriatique without response. At 11.12 p.m., ss. Talaralite replied giving 
position five miles, 110 degrees, from Scatari Rock, standing by. No further 
information received from Adnatique. Talaralite stood by all night. Reported 
trawler total loss; crew landed. 

Fame Point, P.Q. 

SS. "Kurdistan".— At 2.50 a.m. on September 20, 1927, the ss. Kurdistan 
sent a message to the Fame Point station, reading: "Kurdistan ashore east end 
Anticosti island wants assistance ", and advised ship in no danger, sea smooth. 
At 2.55 Fame Point broadcast information and requested assistance; no 
response. At 3.27 a.m. message containing particulars forwarded to Marine 
Agent, Quebec. 4 a.m. unable raise any vessel in vicinity. 5.35 a.m. general 
broadcast repeated. 7.05 to 7.20 ss. Turkestan in communication with Kur- 
distan and proceeding to assistance, arriving at 4 p.m. At 1.45 a.m. on September 
21, Kurdistan refloated without assistance, proceeding to Quebec escorted by 
the Turkestan. 



REPORT OF THE DEPUTY MINISTER 165 

Quebec 

SS. 'Thilip T. Dodge'\— At 7.27 p.m., E.S.T., on December 5, 1927, the ss. 
Philip T. Dodge advised the Marine Agent, Quebec, that she had grounded at 
Cliff island at 7 p.m., and required immediate assistance. Vessel refloated at 
high water 1.30 a.m., December 6, apparently undamaged, and proceeding to 
Father Point for survey. 

Belle Isle D/F 

SS. " Bay Rupert".— At 12.12 G.M.T., on July 22, 1927, the Belle' Isle D/F 
Station intercepted a report being broadcast by the ss. Empress of Scotland 
advising ss. Bay Rupert ashore on uncharted rock, 55-59 N., 59-59 W. ; Belle 
Isle rebroadcast this information. The Bay Rupert being out of range, no direct 
communication was possible and no bearings were given. At 12.37 p.m., E.S.T., 
the following report was received: " Standing by in boats, deck level with water, 
weather good, sea smooth, crew and passengers safe". 

The East coast radio stations were also of assistance to the ss. Nidarholm, 
Stiltonhall, Rosecastle, Albertolite, Canadian Runner, Newton Pine, Valleluce, 
San Guiseppe, and Canadian Volunteer. 

EAST COAST VISUAL SIGNAL SERVICE 

During the present year the signal stations on the East coast were placed 
under the administration of the Radiotelegraph Branch and under the direct jur- 
isdiction of the Division Superintendent of Radio at Halifax. All radio stations 
report all ships communicated with and this is supplemented by reports of ships 
sighted by the follo^^^ng visual signal stations which are organized to tie in with 
the East coast radio service: — 

Magdalen Islands. — Including Grindstone, Amherst Island, Pleasant Bay, 
Groose Isle, and Etang-du-Nord. Wireless to Sydney. 

St. Paul Island.— Signal agent part-time. Wireless to Sydney. 

Aspy Bay. — Signal agent part-time. Landline to Sydney. 

Scatari Island. — Signal agent part-time. Landline and telephone to Sydney. 

Flat Point. — Signal agent part-time. Telephone to Sydney. 

Point Tupper. — Signal agent part time. Landline to Sydney; ice reports 
to Canso. 

Sydney, C.B. — This office has been reorganized and the duties of signal 
agent are undertaken by Captain MacKenzie, Superintendent of Pilots, who, 
upon receipt of reports, analyses same and forwards to central offices at Halifax 
and Quebec as requisite. 

Halifax, N'.S. — This station is located at the Citadel and maintains a con- 
tinuous watch day and night and is in direct communication with Chebucto 
Head Radio and Signal Station by telephone. The present telephone line is not 
satisfactory and arrangements have been made to secure a good line between 
these two points. A summary of ships reported by the Citadel Station appears 
on page 65 of the Department's Annual Report. 

Chebucto Head. — This station is situated at the entrance to Halifax Har- 
bour and reports the passing of all vessels to the Signal Station at the' Citadel. 
One full-time signal agent and one part-time agent for night duty is main- 
tained here for visual signalling. The D/F Station situated at the same point 



166 MARIXU AND FISHERIES 

reports all vessels communicated with by wireless, giving position and probable 
time of arrival. A new lookout building was erected and is connected by tele- 
phone to the D/F Station and to the Citadel. All flags and signal books have 
been brought up to date and the station organized for lamp signalling at night 
to vessels not fitted with wireless. 

Sambro Head Light Vessel. — ^This lightship keeps a lookout and reports all 
passing vessels not fitted with wireless to Chebucto Head. 

St. John, N.B. — The Signal Station at St. John is situated in the Customs 
building and is connected by telephone to the Red Head D/F Station. Two 
full-time signal clerks are employed. 

Lurcher Lightship. — Reports all ships spoken or sighted by wireless to Red 
Head, St. John. 

Seal Island. — A signal clerk part-time reports by wireless to Red Head, St. 
John, all ships spoken or sighted. 



APPROPRIATION AND EXPENDITURE 

The parliamentary appropriation for the Marine Departm-ent for the fiscal 
year 1927-28 was $10,128,411.60; the expenditure. $9,464,692.55; leaving an 
unexpended balance for the department of $663,719.05. 



CORRESPONDENCE 

The number of letters received during the fiscal year 1927-28 was 81,485. 

The number of letters sent out during the fiscal year 1927-28 was 31,200; 
this does not include 8,000 circular letters despatched. 

The above does not include letters received and sent out by the branches 
transferred from Naval Service or those received and sent out by the Fisheries 
Branch. 

NEW LEGISLATION 

During the parliamentary session of 1928, new legislation affecting the 
department was enacted as follows: — 

18-19 George V, Chapter 46. — An Act to provide for a loan to the Saint 
John Harbour Commissioners; assented to June 11, 1928. 

18-19 George V, Chapter 28. — An Act to provide for a loan to the Halifax 
Harbour Commissioners; assented to June 11, 1928. 

18-19 George V, Chapter 42. — An Act to provide for a loan to the Quebec 
Harbour Commissioners; assented to June 11. 1928. 

A. JOHNSTON. 

Deputy Minister of Marine.. 



DOMINION OF CANADA 



SIXTY-FIRST 



ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



FISHERIES BRANCH 



Department of Marine and Fisheries 



FOR THE YEAR 



1927-28 




OTTAWA 

F. A. ACLAND 

PRINTER TO THE KING'S MOST EXCELLENT MAJESTY 

1928 



To His Excellency the Right Honourable Viscount Willingdon, G.C.S.I., 
G.C.M.G., G.C.I.E., G.B.E., Governor General and Commander in Chief 
of the Dominion of Canada. 

May It Plil\se Your Excellency: 

I have the honour to submit herewith, for the information of your Excel- 
lency and the ParHament of Canada, the Sixty-first Annual Report of the 
Fisheries Branch of the Department of Marine and Fisheries. 

I have the honour to be, 

Your Excellency's most obedient servant, 

P. J. ARTHUR CARDIN, 

Minister of Marine and Fisheries. 

Department of Marine and Fisheries, 
Ottawa, July, 1928. 



68937—15 



CONTENTS 



Page 
Deputj' Minister's Report covering — 

Review of the Fisheries of 1927 5 

Operation of the Fish Inspection Act 9 

The Inspection of Canneries and Canned Fish 10 

Imperial Economic Committee's Report on Marketing Canadian Fish 10 

Fisheries Intelligence Service 13 

Fishing Bountj' 13 

Fish Culture 14 

North American Committee on Fisheries Investigation 17 

International Fisheries Commission 18 

Marine Biological Board 20 

Prosecutions 21 

Oyster and Scallop Investigations 21 

APPENDICES 

1 . Report of Inspectors of Fisheries 22 

2. Report on Activities of ]Marine Biological Board 100 

3. Report on Oyster and Scallop Investigations 119 

4. Report of Fisheries Engineer on Fishwa^^s, etc 143 

5. Fisheries Expenditure and Revenue 152 

6. Entries of United States Fishing \'essels 1 64 

7. Summary of Licenses Issued 169 

8. Return of Prosecutions 172 

D. Expenditure and Revenue bj^ Provinces, 1867-1927 192 

30. Report of Mr. J. J. Cowie and Mr. G. R. Earl on their work with Imperial Economic 

Committee 204 

11. Report on the Fisheries of the McKenzie River Delta 209 



DEPUTY MINISTER'S REPORT 



To the Hon. P. J. A. Cardin, 

Minister of INIarine and Fisheries. 

Sir, — I have the honour to submit the Sixty-first Annual Report of the 
Fisheries Branch of the Department, which is for the fiscal 3'ear ended March 
31, 1928. 

The report deals with the following subjects: — 

Review of the Fisheries of 1927. 

Operation of the Fish Inspection Act. 

The Inspection of Canneries and Canned Fish. 

Imperial Economic Committee's Report on Marketing Canadian Fish. 

Fisheries Intelligence Service. 

Fishing Bounty. 

Fish Culture. 

North American Committee on Fisheries Investigation. 

International Fisheries Commission. 

Marine Biological Board. 

Prosecutions. 

Oyster and Scallop Investigations. 

Appendices to the report include the followuig: — 

Report of Inspectors of Fisheries. 

Report on Activities of Marine Biological Board. 

Report on Oyster and Scallop Investigations. 

Report of Fisheries Engineer on Fishways, etc. 

Fisheries Expenditure and Revenue. 

Entries of United States Fishing Vessels. 

Summary of Licenses Issued. 

Return of Prosecutions. 

Expenditure and Revenue by provinces, 1867-1927. 

Report of Mr. J. J. Cowie and Mr. G. R. Earl on their work ^^•ith 

Imperial Economic Committee. 
Report on the Fisheries of the McKenzie River Delta. 

Review of the Fisheries of 1927 

During the year under review the quantity of fish landed, both^sea and 
inland, was much less than in 1926, and the marketed value was considerably 
lower. The marketed value for the whole of Canada was $49,497,038, while 
for 1926 it was $56,360,633. 



6 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

The following table shows the marketed value by provinces for the whole 
of Canada, as compared with the two preceding years: — 



— 


1927 


1926 


1925 


Nova Scotia 


S 

10,783,631 

4,406,673 

1,367,807 

2,736,450 

3,670,229 

2,039,738 

503,609 

712,469 

23,264,342 

12,090 


$ 

12,505,922 

5,325,478 

1,358,934 

3,110,964 

3,152,193 

2,328,803 

444,288 

749,076 

27,367,109 

17,866 


$ 
10,213,779 


New Brunswick. ... 


4,798,589 


Prince Edward Island 


1,598,119 


Quebec 


3,044,919 


Ontario 


3,436,412 


Manitoba 


1,466,939 


Saskatchewan 


494,882 


Alberta 


458,504 




22,414,618 


Yukon Territory 


15,370 






Total 


49,497,038 


56,360,633 


47,942,131 







The province of Nova Scotia shows a decrease in value of a million and 
half dollars from the 1926 value but is a half million dollars ahead of that 
for 1925. Unfavourable weather conditions during 1927 were responsible for a 
large part of the decreased catch in this province, together with an over- 
production in the months of November and December of 1926, when unusually 
mild and favourable weather conditions aided the fishermen in landing large 
quantities of fish. The catch of cod and haddock was much lower and gave 
a decrease in value of $1,200,000 and ^270,000 respectively. 

In the province of New Brunswick, where the drop in value was nearly a 
million dollars, there were smaller catches of cod, pollock, herring, and lobsters. 
Notwithstanding a larger quantity of sardines landed, the value was less by 
some $170,000. 

The value of the fisheries of Prince Edward Island shows a slight increase 
over that of the previous year, due to higher prices obtained for certain kinds 
of fish, although the catches in most instances were about the same or slightly 
lower than in 1926. 

In the province of Quebec, sea fisheries district, there were decreases in 
the' catch of cod, herring, and lobsters, three of the chief kinds taken. The catch 
of salmon was slightly less, while a large increase in the catch of mackerel is 
recorded. 

The increase in the value for Ontario was due to larger catches of herring, 
trout, and tullibee. Although the catch of whitefish was slightlj^ less than in 
1926, a higher value was obtained. 

Notwithstanding that the quantity of some of the principal kinds of fish 
landed was greater, the value shows a decrease. This was owing to poor 
markets and low prices received especially for pickerel and tullibee, which con- 
stitutes a large part of the total production. 

The catch of whitefish in Saskatchewan shows an increase, with an increase 
of over $60,000 in value. There was also an increased catch of pickerel. 

In Alberta there was a large decrease in the catch and value of pickerel, 
an increase in the catch of pike but a drop in value, more than double the catch 
of trout, and a slight decrease in the catch of whitefish. 

The province of Saskatchewan is the only one of the three Prairie Provinces 
to show an increased value. This was due to increased catches of pickerel and 
whitefish. In the province of Manitoba there were larger quantities of pickerel 



FISHERIES BRANCH 7 

and tullibee landed but, owing to lower prices, there was a drop in the marketed 
value of each. Fewer whitefish were taken. In the province of Alberta the 
total value is less despite the fact that some kinds of fish show large increases 
in the catch. Trout shows an increase from 3,907 cwt. to 10,882 cwt. with a 
corresponding increase in value, while tullibee also shows an increase in catch 
and value. The catch of pike was considerably larger but the value somewhat 
less. 

The province of British Columbia shows a considerable decrease. A big 
drop in the catch of salmon and a smaller catch of halibut were mainly respon- 
sible for the decrease. A much larger quantity of herring and pilchards were 
taken than in 1926. 

ATLANTIC COAST 

Cod, Haddock, Hake, and Pollock. — The total quantities of these kinds of 
fish landed were 2,612,743 cwt., as compared with 3,429,024 cwt. in 1926. In 
each of the kinds of fish, in each of the provinces, with one or two exceptions, 
were decreased catches reported. The greatest falling off was in the catch of 
cod in Nova Scotia, which dropped from 1,858,944 cwt. in 1926 to 1,331,873 
cwt. in 1927. The decrease in the catch of pollock in New Brunswick is quite 
noticeable, the figures for the year under review and the previous one being 
7,693 cwt. and 38,271 cwt. respectively. Hake shows an increased catch in Nova 
Scotia of 27,000 cwt., there being 119,431 cwt. landed. Of the total of these 
kinds of fish landed, there were sold fresh and fresh fillets 334,175 cwt., or a 
decrease of 105,106 cwt. There were produced smoked and smoked fillets 
111,431 cwt., compared with 151,357 cwt. in 1926. 

The catch of the Lunenburg fleet was 227,590 quintals, or 115,140 quintals 
less. During the gale of August 24 this fleet suffered the loss of four vessels 
and their entire crews. The total number of vessels engaged in fishing during 
1927 was 83, or 9 fewer than fished in 1926. The prices received for the dried 
product, while slightly better than in the previous year, were still quite low. 

There were fourteen steam-trawlers operating out of Nova Scotia: seven 
from Canso and seven from Halifax. This number was an increase of two. 

Mackerel, Herring, and Sardines. — Some 1,270,158 cwt. of these fish were 
landed. In the previous year 1,531,399 cwt. were landed, or a decrease of 261,241 
cwt. during 1927. In Nova Scotia there were 50,000 cwt. less herrings taken, 
while the catch of mackerel was greater by nearly 5,000 cwt. Some 10,000 cwt. 
less of herring, only half the quantity of mackerel, and 6,000 Gwt. more sardines 
were taken in New Brunswick. The demand for sardines after the American 
canners commenced buying was good but the run of sardines somewhat light. 
In Prince Edward Island the catch of herring shows a decrease of some 12,000 
cwt., but owing to better prices the marketed value was only slightly less. The 
catch of mackerel was slightly more. The catch of herring was much lower in 
Quebec, while, on the other hand, a large increase of 48,000 cwt. of mackerel 
is noted. 

Other Sea Fish. — The catch of halibut was greater by over 3,500 cwt. A 
decrease of over 5,700 cwt. is noted in the quantity of swordfish taken. The 
catch of tomcod was 22,744 cwt. and of flounders 9,383 cwt. This is an increase 
in the former and a decrease in the latter. 

Shellfish. — The catch of lobsters was 316,831 cwt., which is a decrease of 
12,751 cwt. from the 1926 catch and 24,007 cwt. less than the 1925 catch. The 



8 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

catch by provinces and its disposal is given in the following table, together with 
a comparison for the year 1926: — 





Catch 


♦Marketed 
shell 


Canned 


1927 


cwt. 

179,673 
49,752 
62,800 
24,606 ' 


cwt. 

68,021 

16,162 

2,097 

1,197 


cases 
.55,771 


^ew Brunswick 


18,866 


Prince Edward Island. . 


27,896 




11,404 






Total . 


316,831 


87,477 


113,937 






1926 
Is ova Scotia. 


184,316 
59,611 
66,298 
29,358 


71,688 

15,861 

3,153 

847 


56,277 




24,041 




29,442 




13,759 






Total 


3.39,583 


91,549 


123.519 







*including lobster meat. 

There w^ere 19,462 barrels of oysters taken, which was slightly less than in 
1926. Some 43,293 barrels of clams were dug, or an increase of over 1,500 
barrels. The quantity of scallops taken shows a large increase, 38,635 barrels 
being landed, compared with 23.200 barrels during 1926. None of these shell- 
fish were landed in New Brunswick during the year, the quantity landed in 
Quebec was only one-third of that landed in 1926, while the landings in Nova 
Scotia were just about double. 

River Spawning Fish. — The quantity of salmon landed was 49,113 cwt., or 
3,682 cwt. less than in the previous year. A decreased catch was recorded for 
each of the Atlantic provinces. There was a decrease of 17,962 cwt. in the catch 
of smelts, only 72,519 cwt. being landed. 

Some 54,115 cwt. of alewives were landed in New Brunswick and Nova 
Scotia, or a decrease of over 17,000 cwt. This fishery depends chiefly on the 
market for the salted. As the market was bad during the year, little interest 
was taken bv the fishermen in this branch of the industrv. 



IXL.\ND FISHERIES 

The catch of whitefish was 185,664 cwt., compared with 190,644 c^^•t. in 
1926. The province of Ontario, where the largest catch of this species is made, 
recorded a catch of some 61,658 cvd., or a drop of 2,391 cwt. Manitoba came 
second with 49,114 cwt. landed, a drop of 5,008 cwt. Saskatchewan was third 
with 41,323 cwt. landed, an increase of 3,656 cwt. 

There were 140,019 cwt. of pickerel landed, or an increase of 13,933 cwt. 
Of the total, Manitoba contributed 99,813 cwt. which was an increase of 
12,562 cwt. 

The province of Ontario shows a catch of 31,173 cwt. of blue pickerel, a 
slight increase over the catch of the same kind in 1926. 

The catch of pike was 70,473 cwt.. which was a decrease of over 2.000 
cwt. from tiie previous year. Tiie province of Manitoba contributed some 
40,166 cwt. to the total catch. 

Some 58.099 cwt. of fresh water hei-ring or ciscoes were taken in the 
province of Ontario from the Great Lakes area. This was an increase of over 
14,000 cwt. as compared with 1926. 



FISHERIES BRANCH 



PACIFIC COAST 



The marketed value of the fisheries of the Pacific coast shows a decrease 
of $4,139,205. This is accounted for by much smaller catches of salmon and 
halibut. There were increased catches of herring and pilchards. 

Salmon. — The catch of salmon was 1,490,395 cwt., a decrease of 536,160 
cwt. The pack was much less, 1,361,977 cases compared with 2,065,190 in 
1926. Much of the decrease was due to extension of the close season and other 
measures for the protection of the salmon. The catch of sockeye while below 
the average was considered fairly satisfactory^ During the fall there was a 
large run of late sockeye salmon in the Fraser river similar to that which 
occurred in 1926. The catch of pinks shows a big decrease. Owing to intensive 
fishing for this species it was deemed necessary to take extra precautions such 
as extension of the weekly close season and early closing of the season, etc., to 
ensure sufficient numbers reaching the spawning areas. An average catch of 
cohoes was made while the catch of chums was somewhat less. 

Halibut. — The catch of halibut decreased by 14,563 cwt. to 300,532 cwt. It 
does not appear that the close season now in force has materially affected the 
catch and it would therefore seem that an extension of close season must be con- 
sidered or some alternative if the halibut is not to be depleted. 

Herring. — Tlie catch was 1,724,246 cwt., compared with 1,301,269 cwt. in 
1926. Of the catch over one million hundredweights of dry salted herring were 
produced for sale in the Orient. In the reduction works there were 170,450 
gallons of herring oil and 1,838 tons of herring meal produced. 

Pilchards. Some 1,368,582 cwt. of these fish were landed, which was nearly 
fifty per cent more than in the preceding year. Pilchards are canned to a small 
extent, over 58,000 cases being put up which was more than double the pack of 
the previous year. The greatest use for these fish, however, is in the manu- 
facture of meal and oil of which 2,673,876 gallons of the former and 12,169 tons 
of the latter were produced. The number of reduction establishments pro- 
ducing meal and oil from pilchards, herring and whales, was twenty-two and 
the value of their products (including the products of the whale factories) was 
$2,289,952, or nearly double that for 1926. 

Whales and Seals.— Two whaling stations were in operation during the 
vcar. The number of whales taken was 258 and the value of the products 
$241,488. This was a decrease from 1926. 

There were 1,476 fur seals taken by Indians under the Pelagic Sealing 
Treaty, compared with 2,824 in the preceding year. 

INSPECTION OF FISH 

Inspection of certain kinds of cured fish was carried on as usual under the 
provisions of the Fish Inspection Act. The Act requires packers to have con- 
tainers, as well as fish, in accordance with the standards laid down in the regu- 
lations, and empowers inspectors to examine such whenever and wherever it is 
necessary and convenient. 

During the year there were inspected on the Atlantic coast 38,058 packages 
of various kinds containing salted herring, mackerel, alewivcs and salmon. 
There were also inspected 33,598 boxes of smoked herring. Further, there 
were inspected 61,400 empty barrels before they passed into the hands of 
the packers. 

On the Pacific coast there were inspected 243,732 boxes of dry salted 
herring, each containing 400 pounds, before being exported to the Orient. 



10 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

STANDARDS OF SIZE AND QUALITY FOR SALTED COD, ETC. 

In the course of the year the department, after consultation with the trade, 
established by law standards of size and quality for dry and salted cod, had- 
dock, hake, cusk and pollock. 

This was done as a result of representations to the effect that there were 
no well defined standards on which sellers and buyers of these fish could base 
just and reasonable prices. The same price is usually paid for fish that are not 
well cured as for fish that are well cured; consequently fishermen who cure 
their own fish have no incentive to improve the quality of their cure. 

The standards thus established have been incorporated in the regulations 
to the Fish Inspection Act. The department's inspectors of fish curing and 
packing have been empowered to carry out such inspections as may be required. 
Inspection is not compulsory. The purpose simply is, for the present, to provide 
a means of guarding alike the interests of the fisherman and the dealer, when 
the former agrees to sell and the latter to buy dry or green salted fish in accord- 
ance with the established standards, at a price conditional upon the fish at the 
time of delivery being such as the standards require. Both seller and buyer in 
that event have an opportunity of requesting the nearest fish inspection oflEicer 
to inspect the fish in question and decide as to whether they are up to the 
standard agreed upon. 

Inspection of Canneries and Canned Fish 

The department's officers carried on the inspection of fish canneries of all 
kinds, the raw material to be used, the finished product and the labelling and 
marking of the cans during the year, as previously. 

There were in operation on the Atlantic coast 438 lobster canneries, 15 
clam canneries, and 10 other fish canneries, in which were canned sardines, 
salmon, haddock, cod, and mackerel. 

On the Pacific coast there were operated 77 salmon canneries, in some of 
which clams and pilchards were also canned. 

Through the efforts of the inspecting officers there is from year to year 
more and more attention being given by canners to maintaining sanitary can- 
ning places, ensuring a high-class product, and generally complying with the 
various requirements of the Meat and Canned Foods Act, and the regulations. 

Imperial Economic Committee on Marketing Canadian Fish 

The Imperial Economic Committee appointed by the Governments of the 
United Kingdom, the Dominions, India, and the Colonies and Protectorates, 
and acting under its terms of reference from the last Imperial Conference, has 
completed a comprehensive inquiry into the methods of marketing and preparing 
for market in Great Britain fish foods produced within the Empire. 

Canada was represented on the committee by Mr. J. J. Cowie, of the 
Department of Marine and Fisheries, and Mr. G. R. Earl, of Yarmouth, N.S., 
was associated with liim as expert advisor from Nova Scotia. 

The following is from the committee's report: — 
The committee confined its attention to those sea fisheries the products of which largely 
enter into the food of the people of Great Britain. A number of witnesses representing both 
producing and marketing interests were examined, while the committee had the advantage 
of consultation with experienced officials of the home and overseas Governments and of 
eminent scientists. 

Great Britain does not depend solely for its fish supplj' on catches by British fisher- 
men. There are three sources of supply, — 

(1) landings by British fi.shing vessels, 

(2) landings from foreign vessels arriving direct from the fishing grounds, and 

(3) shipments as cargo from Empire and foreign ports. 



FISHERIES BRANCH 11 

The landings of herring and mackerel are usually more than equal to the home demand. 
On the other hand the British landings of cod, haddock, and such like fish referred to in 
the report as whitefish, are not always sufiicient for the British demands. 

Since the war the total quantity of whitefish sold per year in Great Britain has increased 
by 500,000 cwts. At the same time the British landings have decreased by 750,000 cwts., 
while imports, mostly foreign, have increased by 1,300,000 cwts. The British industry com- 
plains of this increased foreign competition. 

The report goes on to say that if retail fish prices were in closer harmony 
with those of other foodstuffs and were whitefish ample and regular in supply 
and excellent in quality the demand would increase enormously. With a 10 per 
cent increase in the per capita consumption and a displacement of even one- 
half of the foreign imports there would be required British landings much in 
excess of any yet attained, while an unsatisfied demand to be met from other 
Empire sources would remain. 

It is pointed out in the report that the Canadian representatives disclaim 
any desire to further embarrass or damage the British industry, but rather, in 
so far as it is possible, to supplant foreign importations and to share in the 
future growth of the market. 

The opinion is fairly general that the North sea is being overfished and 
for some year British trawlers have been turning increasingly to more distant 
waters, consequently much of the fish that is landed is not in the best condition. 

It is the opinion that stability in wholesale prices is the key to reduction 
in retail prices and in increased consumption. Under existing conditions, fresh 
fish must be marketed immediately after landing; this causes alternate gluts 
and shortages. If supplies could be stored even for a few days without deteriora- 
tion the trade conditions would be revolutionized. 

The Canadian shipper of fresh fish meantime cannot possibly foretell the 
price in the British wholesale market. It is useless for him to send large and 
irregular supplies and market them quickly in the manner customary in the 
British industry — i.e., in ice; the result would be to break the market to the 
detriment of himself and the British trade. He, too, needs regularity and 
stability, and this can only be attained by sending the best quality suitably 
preserved, and marketing them gradually. 

The committee by this does not intend to convey the impression that prime 
fresh fish boxed in ice and shipped in refrigerated chambers from Canada cannot 
be landed in the British markets in good condition, but it does warn the trade 
against the hazard involved in that method of shipment. 

It is noted that development in sea fishing for whitefish in Great Britain 
has taken the form of increased use of the steam trawler, whereas in Canada 
fishing by hook and line is most favoured. It is further noted that fish taken 
by line is less liable to injury than that taken by steam trawler, and as many of 
the line vessels and boats land their fish on the day of catching it is brought to 
shore in prime condition. 

The committee's conclusions and recommendations, in so far as they con- 
cern Canada, may be summarized as follows:- — 

1. The demand in Great Britain is chiefly for fresh fish. 

2. The consumption of whitefish has increased while that of herring has 
decreased. 

3. Except for the requirements of a small export trade in salted cod, all the 
whitefish landed in Great Britain is consumed there. The demand is expand- 
ing, and with lower prices, better average quality, and more regular supplies is 
likely to expand furtlier. 

4. The increased demand has been met so far by increased foreign imports. 

5. British vessels have found it necessary to fish on more distant grounds. 
The fish from these grounds is of variable quality when landed, according to 
the length of time after capture, as present methods of preservation are ineffi- 
cient. 



12 MARIXE AND FISHERIES 

6. Better methods of preservation are required for fish, both before and 
after landing, to avoid wide fluctuations in price due to gluts or scarcity. 

7". The present excessive fiuctuations in price greatly increase the commer- 
cial risks of shipping fresh fish in ice from Canada and tend to discourage that 
branch of interimperial trade. 

8. Believing that the prime essential for all improvement of organization 
lies in the study and application of better methods of preservation at an 
economic cost, the committee's principal recommendation is that research be 
instituted for the purpose of improvmg methods of preserving fish from the 
time it has been caught until it reaches the consumer. 

9. This research should be based on a central station at a fishing port in 
Great Britain and a station in the Maritime Provinces of Canada. 

10. The Governments of Great Britain and Canada should encourage co- 
operation and co-relation between the two stations in order to cheapen costs 
and secure more rapid results. 

The report notes that the Canadian Government, recognizing that the 
development of an export trade in fish in prime condition depends on a satis- 
factory solution of the problem of preservation, has already established such a 
station at Halifax, Nova Scotia, where the methods of brine freezing fish are 
being tested and demonstrated. Some work of this nature has also been done 
in Great Britain at the Low Temperature Research Institute at Cambridge, 
but that institute suffers from, the disadvantage of having an inland location. 

11. Recent discoveries have drawn attention to the special value of cod 
liver oil as a source of vitamines, not only for medicinal purposes but for 
strengthening other foods deficient in this substance, and investigation is 
recommended into the causes of variation in the vitamine content of the oil 
and the methods of refining it so that the full vitamine content may be retained 
and the market objections to taste and odour eliminated. 

12. It is necessary for the economic development of the industry to exploit 
to the fullest extent the by-products. Whitefish meal has special value for 
feeding animals and poultiy. While there is a large market in Germany for 
fish meal, certain of the meat trades in Great Britain have opposed its use on 
the ground of its inducing taint. Repeated experiments at research stations, 
however, have demonstrated that there is no risk of taint, if the meal is used 
in the proportions and in the methods advocated by the English Ministry of 
Agriculture and Fisheries. The opening of an extended use of fish meal in 
Great Britain is very great and its clevelopmcnt would benefit both the live stock 
industry and the fishing industry. 

The committee believes a greater development of a trade from the fishing 
ports in fillets instead of whole fish is the line clearly indicated by economy, 
which would result in a greater beneficial use of by-products. 

With respect to salted and dried fish, the report states there is a market 
for cured or salted cod in the British West African Colonies which, if studied 
and suited, will probably increase. It is mainly supplied by Norway meantime. 

With respect to canned salmon, the committee states that in its report on 
meat issued two years ago, it pointed out that the compulsory marking of the 
country of origin on the cans would enable the British consumer to select 
Empire canned salmon in preference to foreign goods. As a result the British 
Merchandise Marks Act was amended in 1926 to give effect to this, and it is 
understood that the British Columbia producers are for the present watching 
its operation and the matter is left there, except to say that a high standard of 
qualitv must be maintained. 

Besides taking part in the formal inciuirics of the committee and assisting 
in drafting the report, tiie Canadian representatives made extended informal 
personal investigations amongst the trade in Great Britain and a report, of their 
findings will shortly be made public. 



FISHERIES BRANCH 



13 



Fisheries Intelligence Service 

Under this service there was carried on during the season of 1927:— 

1. The collection of monthly statistics of the sea fisheries, and the com- 
pilation of such in a summarized form for publication through the press each 
month. 

2. The publication of quarterly bulletin containing the statistics in detail. 
The bulletin is distributed to the trade and all directly concerned. The statistics 
are practically all collected by the regular fishery officers while performing 
th.eir other duties as such and at very little additional cost. 

3. The collection of information concerning supplies of bait day by day 
along certain stretches of the coast during the spring and summer months. The 
information is gathered by the officers of the department, who send it by tele- 
gram daily to certain ports where it is posted up for information of masters of 
fishing vessels and those looking for bait. 

Fishing Bounty 

Under the authority of "An Act to Encourage the Develoi)ment of the Sea 
Fisheries and the Building of Fishing Vessels," the sum of $160,000 is appro- 
priated annually by the Governor in Council. It is distributed under the name 
of fishing bounty, by the Department of Marine and Fisheries amongst fisher- 
men, and fishing vessel and boat owners on the Atlantic coast under regulations 
made from time to time by the Governor in Council. 

For the year 1927, payment was made on the following basis: — 

To owners of vessels entitled to receive bounty, $1 per registered ton, pay- 
ment to the owner of any one vessel not to exceed $80. 

To vessel fishermen entitled to receive bounty, $8 each. 

To owners of boats measuring not less than 12 feet keel, $1 per boat. 

To boat fishermen entitled to receive bounty, $6.60 each. 

There were 9,609 bounty claims paid. In the preceding year there were 
11,036 boimtv claims paid. 

The total amount paid was $158,375.80 allocated as follows: — 

To 543 vessels and their crew $ 44.482 50 

To 9,066 boats and their crew .fllS.giS 30 

FISHING BOUNTY EXPENDITrRE FOR 1927-28 



County 


Boats 


Men 


Amount 


Vessels 


Tons 


Avg. 
Tons 


Men 


Amount 


Total 
Amount 


Nova Scolia 

Annapolis 

Antigonish 

Cape Breton 


141 
130 
298 
2 
314 
535 
855 
2''3 
"37 
426 
13 
138 
336 
444 
218 
122 


• 

225 
171 
542 
3 
518 
852 
1,117 
463 

53 
513 

19 
244 
.583 
819 
328 
273 


$ cts. 

1,626 00 
1,2.54 60 
3,874 20 
21 80 
3,729 80 
6,158 20 
8,225 20 
3,195 80 

386 80 
3,810 80 

138 40 
1,748 40 
4,180 80 
5,848 40 
2,401 00 
1,923 80 


1 


15 


15 


5 


$ cts. 
55 00 


1,681 00 
1,254 60 


27 


430 


16 


108 


1,294 00 


5,108 20 
21 80 


Didbv 












3,729 80 


Guvsboro 


23 

68 

4 


.382 

1 , 036 

47 


17 
15 
11 


114 

284 
19 


1,294 00 

3,308 00 

199 00 


7,452 20 


Halifax 


11,533 20 


Inverness 


3,394 80 




386 80 


Lunenburg 

Pictou 


136 


7,4.54 


55 


1,881 


22,501 50 


26,312 30 
1.38 40 




14 

13 

20 

8 

8 


220 
182 
5.53 
115 

428 


15 
14 
28 
14 
53 


72 
41 

163 
35 

119 


796 00 
505 00 

1,8.57 00 
393 50 

1,380 00 


2,544 40 


Riflimond 

Sbelburne 

Viftoria 


4,085 80 
7,705 40 
2,794 .50 


Yarmouth 


3,303 80 


Total 


4,2.32 


6,723 


48,524 00 


322 


10,862 


34 


2,841 


33,583 00 


82,107 00 







14 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

FISHIXG BOUNTY EXPENDITURE FOR 1927-28— Concluded 



County 


Boats 


Men 


Amount 


Vessels 


Tons 


Avg. 
Tons 


Men 


Amount 


Total 
Amount 


New Brunswick 

Charlotte 

Gloucester 

Kent 


233 
312 

82 


397 
767 
144 

1 

8 

26 


$ cts. 

2,849 20 

5,. 366 20 

1,031 40 

5 60 

57 80 

189 60 


1 

198 
4 
5 

1 


12 
3,256 
42 
51 
10 


12 
16 
10 
10 
10 


2 

853 

9 

13 

3 


S cts 

27 00 

10,079 00 

114 00 

153 00 

34 00 


§ cts. 

2,876 20 

15,445 20 

1,145 40 


Northumberland 


158 60 


Restigouche 

St. John 


5 
18 


91 80 
189 60 
















Total 


650 


1,343 


9,499 80 


209 


3,371 


16 


880 


10,407 00 


19,906 80 






Prince Edward 
Island 

Kings 


257 
574 
133 


347 

1,091 

269 


2,. 537 20 
7,585 35 
1,889 40 








1 

1 
4 


7 50 
20 00 
56 00 


2,544 70 


Prince 


1 
2 


12 
24 


12 
12 


7,605 35 


Queens 


1,945 40 


Total 


964 


1,707 


12,011 95 


3 


36 


12 


6 


83 50 


12,095 45 


Quebec 

Bonaventure 

Gaspe 

Matane 


484 

2,108 

90 

540 


842 
4,212 

130 
1,004 


5,985 20 

29,846 85 

944 00 

7,101 50 


3 

6 


33 

84 


11 

14 


8 
26 


97 00 
292 00 


6,082 20 

30,138 85 

944 00 


Saguenay 












7,101 50 
















Total 


3,220 


6,188 


43,877 55 


9 


117 


13 


34 


389 00 


44,266 55 






Grand total . . 


9,066 


15,961 


113,913 30 


543 


14,386 


26 


3,761 


44,462 50 


158,375 80 



Fish Culture 

The more important fresh-water and anadromous food and game fishes, 
such as Atlantic salmon and speckled trout in the Maritime Provinces, whitefish 
and pickerel in the Prairie Provinces, and Pacific salmon and trout in British 
Columbia, were given first consideration in the fish cultural operations of the 
department during the calendar year 1927, but in response to a constantly 
increasing public demand greater attention was paid to game fish, and the dis- 
tribution of game trout was slightly better than ever before. 

Some progress was made in the development of a brood stock of trout at 
the St. John hatchery, New Brunswick, where nearly two and three-quarter 
million trout eggs were produced during the year. Increased facilities for 
retaining and feeding fry, so as to afford a longer season for distribution, were 
provided at several establishments where such de^5elopment was feasible, as 
the demand for assistance from areas that are beginning to feel the need of 
restocking is becoming more and more insistent. 

The total distribution was considerably less during 1927 than it was dur- 
ing the previous year, due to the fact that eight hatcheries in Ontario were trans- 
ferred to the provincial Department of Game and Fisheries in 1926, after the 
fry produced therein were disposed of, and were not operated by this department 
in 1927. The distribution from these eight hatcheries in 1926 was approximately 
four hundred and fifty-four million five hundred thousand, and, omitting the 
distribution from these establishments, the total output in 1927 was over twenty- 
seven million greater than in 1926. 

In addition to the distributions that were made from the hatcheries, thirty- 
four lakes and streams received allotments of fry or older fish from other bodies 
of water. This work was largely confined to the Prairie Provinces, where 
there are many districts that are not readily accessible to existing hatcheries. 



FISHERIES BRANCH 



15 



It involved the captm^e and transfer, in many instances for a considerable dis- 
tance, of thirty-four thousand nine hundred and twenty-six fish comprising 
seven different species. 

The seeding of remote and isolated waters (to which it is not feasible to 
transfer fry from existing hatcheries) was continued in British Columbia, and 
nine million seven hundred and forty-six thousand sockeye salmon eggs, col- 
lected in the Pemberton district below Hell's Gate on the Fraser and in the 
Babine district in the Skeena watershed, were planted in the one-time spawning 
beds of such important areas as Stuart, Francois, and Quesnel lakes in the Upper 
Fraser, above Hell's Gate. 

Examinations and inspections were continued in the different provinces, 
with a view to locating waters where trout might be obtained for hatchery pur- 
poses, and with a view to locating sites where the fish cultural service mJght be 
advantageously extended by the construction of new establishments in districts 
that are difficult to cover from existing hatcheries. 

As opportunity offered, the general inspection of waters throughout the 
comitry was continued by the officers and employees of the fish cultural and 
fishery services. 

The Canadian National Railway, Canadian Pacific Railway, Dominion 
Atlantic Railway, Fredericton and Grand Lake Coal and Railway Company 
and New Brunswick Coal and Railway, Esquimalt and Nanaimo Railway, 
Kettle Valley Railway, and the Cumberland Railway and Coal Company con- 
tinued their assistance and co-operation by furnishing free transportation for 
shipments of game fish and game fish eggs with their attendants. The ext.ent 
of this co-operation is indicated by the following summary: — 



Railway 


Total 
mileage 
on trip 
passes 


Number 

of 
passages 


Mileage 
Baggage car permit 


Number 
Cases or cans 


Num- 
ber 
of 
permits 




Full 


Empty 


Total 


Full 


Empty 


Total 


C.N.R 

C.P.R 

D.A.R 

F. & G.L.C.& R. Co. 

«fe N.B.C. & R 

E. & N. Ry 


25,317 

14,219 

2,740 

180 

1,186 

408 


235 
95 
26 

4 

21 

2 


12,473 
8,253 
1,370 

90 
666 
270 


11,624 
7,388 
1,370 

90 
605 
270 


24,097 

15,641 

2,740 

180 

1,271 

540 


991 
393 
136 

16 

76 
2 


974 
393 
136 

16 

69 

2 


1,965 

786 
272 

32 

145 

4 


213 

103 

26 

4 

24 


K.V. Ry 


4 








44,050 


383 


23,122 


21,347 


44,469 


1,614 


1,590 


3,204 


374 



Note. — Number of passages refers to transportation one way. A return trip counts as two passages. 
Number of permits refers to one-way passage for cases or cans, either by permit, special authority or free 
transportation without a permit form. 

The department participated with assortments of hatchery products and 
equipment in several exhibits for portraying natural resources. These exhibits 
were of considerable educational value and attracted great interest. 

Gratifying reports regarding the results that are apparent from the distri- 
bution of hatchery products continued to come in from all districts where fish 
cultural operations are carried on in a systematic way. 

Considerable expansion was made in the Fish Cultural Service in the prov- 
inces in which the fisheries are administered by the Dominion Government. 
Sites were selected for salmon and trout hatcheries in Antigonish and Yarmouth 
counties, N.S.; the pond facilities for fry and brood fish were largely extended 
at the St. John hatchery and a new salmon and trout hatchery was built on 
White Marsh Creek one mile from Florenceville, N.B.; a contract was awarded 
for a whitefish hatchery on Lesser Slave Lake, for a trout hatchery in the 
Waterton Lakes Park, Alberta, and a subsidiary hatchery was established in 



16 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



the Jasper National Park, Alberta; the Nelson hatchery was moved to larger 
and better quarters in the basement of the Armory and a sub-hatchery was 
established at Summerland, B.C. Detailed description appears in the Report 
of the Fisheries Engineer. 

At the close of 1927 there were in active operation, apart from the 
new establishments aibove mentioned, twenty-four main hatcheries, seven sub- 
sidiary hatcheries, four salmon retaining ponds, and several egg-collecting sta- 
tions. The output from these establishments for the calendar year 1927 was 
two hundred and ninety-five million two hundred and eighty-three thousand 
seven hundred and eighty-two, as shown by species in the following state- 
ment: — 

ST.\TEMENT. BY SPECIES, OF THE FISH AND FISH EGGS DISTRIBUTED FROM THE 
HATCHERIES DURING THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31. 1927 



Species 



Satwo so/ar— Atlantic salmon. . 

Sanno salar seaaj/o —Landlocked 
salmon 

Salnio jrirfej/s— Rainbow trout. . 

>lalmo darkii — Cutthroat tmnt 

Salmo rivularis — Steelhead sal- 
mon 

Salmo riiu}aris iamloops — Kani- 
loops trout 

Salmo tnitta leienensis — Loch 
leven trout 

Salmo fario — Brown trout 

Oncoihynchusnerka—Sockeyesa]- 
mon 

Ovcorlnmchustschawytscha-SpTing 
salmon 

Sahelirus fonlinalis — Speckled 
■ trout ■. • 

Coretionus cbipeiformis — White- 
fish. 



Cristivomer namaiicush — Salmor 

trout 

Stizoaledion 'itreum —Pickerel . . 



Green 
eggs 



2,290,000 



Eyed 



503.320 

3,400 
205,700 
151,840 

96,505 

1,084,000 

3,132 
18,684 

29,197,000 

755,000 

221.450 



32,840,031 



Fry 



5,916,403 



160,000 
1,153,310 



140,769 
920,520 



621,935 

65,729,113 

563,448 

697,025 

143,735,000 

207, 770 
17,765,000 



237,610.293 



Advanced 

fry 



5,652,000 



50,000 
32,000 



4,000 



608,000 



965,675 



,311,675 



Fingerlings 



8.199,970 



93,680 
83,259 



33,052 

4,658.665 

217,254 

1,931,177 



78 
15,225,142 



Yearling.s 

and r.lder 

fish 



200 
209 



188 



6,023 



Total 
dis- 
tribution 



147,280 

481.168 

1,305,150 

249,281 

2,604,520 

3,142 
673,682 

100,192,966 
1,535,702 
3, 821,. 350 

146,025,000 

207,848 
17.765,000 



295,283,782 



The following statement shows the numbers of fry of the different kinds 
that were distributed in the several provinces in which fish cultural operations 
are conducted by the Dominion (lovernment: — 



HATCHERY OUTPUT, BY PROVINCES, OF EGGS, FRY AND OLDER FISH 

DURING 1927 

Nova Scotia — 

Atlantic .salmon 7,293,700 

Speckled trout 1,347,404 

8,1)41.104 

New Brunswick — 

Atlantic salmon 11 , 790, 198 

Brown trout 101,747 

T.andlockod salmon 147,280 

Loclilcvcn trout 3, 142 

Rainbow trout 30, 202 

Salmon trout 78 

Speckled trout 1,. 556, 509 

13,629.156 

Prince Edward Island — 

Atlantic salmon 699,900 

Rainbow trout 2,259 

Si)ecklcd trout 503,496 

1,205,655 

Manitoba — 

Pickerel 12,835,000 

Whitefish 122.325,000 

135.1 (10 , 000 



FISHERIES BRANCH 17 

HATCHERY OUTPUT BY PROVINCES, ETC.— Conduced 

Saskatchewan— 

Pickerel 4,930,000 

Salmon trout ^?I'n^n 

Whitefish 21,410,000 

wnitensn... 26,547,770 

Alberta— . _ „ 

Cutthroat trout ^'^I'^'lfl 

Brown trout L-j'^n? 

Rainbow trout 24.i , 007 

Speckled trout o oon nm 

WViiti^fish 2,290,000 

Whitensn 4,129,685 

British Columbia— 

Atlantic salmon oon <in 

Cutthroat trout rm'ton 

Kamloops trout ' A-'^nn 

Rainbow trout ^_ TX^'A^^ 

Sockeve salmon 100, 192,966 

Speckled trout Hl'^m 

Spring salmon o'io'oqT 

Steelhead salmon /i\),^iii. 

■ 10o,970,412 

Total 295,283.782 

Full particulars regarding the extent and scope of this service appear in the 
Annual Report on Fish Culture for 1927. 

North American Committee on Fishery Investigations 

Two meetings of the North American Committee on Fishery Investigations 
have been held during the past year, one at Toronto, Ont., on October 19, 1927, 
and one at Boston, Mass., on June 2, 1928. 

The haddock fishery was given particular attention. Study of the 
total catch made on this side of the Atlantic reveals that there has been on 
the whole little change since as far back as the eighties of the last century^ 
though a slow increase since nineteen hundred is evident. This increase has 
been in the New England fishery. Where formerly haddock were pickled and 
dried, now they are sold fresh and smoked, as finnan baddies and fillets. The 
New England fisherv' has benefited by this change, while in Canada the develop- 
ment of the fresh and smoked haddock trade has scarcely made up for the pass- 
ing away of the trade in pickled and dried fish. There is no indication that 
the stock of haddock as a whole is in danger of exhaustion, but rather that 
increased catches could readily be made. However, the southern banks, where 
the New England fishery is intensively prosecuted, are, or soon will be, over- 
fished. The committee is urging prompt action in investigating this fishery 
thoroughly, so that measures for conservation may be devised and adopted 
before serious depletion occurs. 

The co-operative study of the mackerel, which has been in progress for 
several years past, has revealed the fact that breeding is particularly successful 
in certain years. 1921 and 1923 were such years and have furnished the bulk 
of the mackerel recently in American waters. Three important spawning 
grounds have been found, in which the floating eggs and iry abound during the 
summer season, (1) the southern shallow part of the gulf of St. Lawrence, (2) 
the southern part of the gulf of Maine off the Massachusetts coast, and (3) the 
coastal waters off New York and New Jersey. The migrations of the mackerel, 
a most fertile field for argument, are being studied by fastening tags to the fish. 
An entirely satisfactory tag has not yet been devised, but celluloid bands on 
the tails have been used extensively. These have shown that the mackerel that 
strike the coast near cape Cod in the spring, remain on the New England coast 
rather than pass northeastward to Nova Scotia. Those that strike near cape 
Sable, N.S., in late spring spread both eastward and westward along the coast, 

68927—2 



18 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

some remaining in the vicinity, some going north into the bay of Fundy, or 
westward to the New England coast, and others going eastward as far as Cape 
Breton. These migrations are accomplished by some of the fish at a rate of 
about twenty-five miles per day. Mackerel that come to the coast near Canso, 
at the eastern end of Nova Scotia, in part migrate around Cape Breton into the 
gulf of St. Lawrence to the coast of Prince Edward island, but none go westward. 
The evidence indicates that a series of schools strikes the various parts of the 
coast, and that these remain fairly distinct, but not completely so. Mixmg 
of the schools is somewhat greater during the winter, as recaptures of the fish 
in subsequent vears show greater spreading up and down the coast. 

Mr. Sette," under the Sub-Committee on Statistics, prepared a report on 
the cod fisheries of the American side of the North Atlantic, in which five 
countries. Newfoundland, France, Canada, United States, and Portugal, have 
participated. This report brings together the available statistics on this fishery 
so as to show its size, trend, and the relative importance of the fisheries of each 
participating count^^ The report, entitled "Statistics of the Catch of Cod Off 
the East Coast of North America to 1926," has been published. 

The study of the fisheries statistics of the various countries has revealed 
the need for having the weights of the fish uniformly taken on the basis of a 
particular condition of the fish, for example either ''round" or "gutted". Steps 
are being taken toward this end. 

Internationai. Fisheries Commission 

This commission was appointed under the provisions of the Treaty for 
the Protection of the Pacific Halibut between Canada and the United States, 
and is charged with making a thorough investigation into the life history of the 
Pacific halibut, as well as recommendations to the two Governments as to the 
regulation of the fishery which may seem desirable for its preservation and 
development. One of the provisions of the Treaty provides for an annual close 
season of three months — November 16 in each year to February 15 following, 
both days inclusive — but upon the recommendation of the commission this 
close season may be modified or suspended at any time after three such seasons. 
As the treaty became effective on November i, 1924, the third close season 
expired in February^ of this fiscal year, and as anticipated in my report of last 
year the commission, immediately following the termination of that close season 
proceeded to prepare its first report. The following extract from the report 
shows the extent and condition of the fishery, and the recommendations of the 
commission: — 

Fisheries for halibut are prosecuted in the North Pacific and the North Atlantic oceans, 
and yield about ninety millions of pounds annually. The Pacific halibut fisherj', which is 
covered by the terms of this convention, is the greatest in the world. The annual catch 
exceeds fiftj^ millions of pounds, which represents about sixty per cent of the world's catch. 
Of the remainder about thirty millions are credited to European countries and six millions 
to the Atlantic coast of this continent. The value of the Pacific halibut catch to the fisher- 
men is about seven million dollars annually, and it is consequently one of the most import- 
ant fisheries in North American waters. The Pacific halibut is, therefore, one of the most 
important species of food fishes indigenous to the waters of the North American continent. 
The halibut fishery banks of the eastern Pacific are shown in plates Nos. 1-3. The division 
into areas shown thereon is for statistical purposes and should not be confused with those 
referred to in the commission's recommendations, which will be submitted later on. 

The Pacific halibut fishery originated soon after the first railway communication was 
established between the two coasts of the United States. It is, therefore, comparatively 
young. It had its inception in 18S8 near cape Flattery, at the entrance to Juan de Fuca 
strait. The fishery expanded rapidly and by 1910 it had extended to grounds off cape 
Ommaney, Baranof island, six hundred miles to the north. Subsequent expansion has 
extended the fishery until it now covers about 1.800 miles of coast. Formerly as many fish 
were taken from the 600 miles stretch as are now procured from the entire area of 1,800 
miles. The banks on the eastern side of the gulf of Ala.ska, which yield spawning fish, were 



FISHERIES BRANCH 19 

finst exploited in 1913. In 1926 the larger boats made by far tlie greater part of their 
catches in the vicinity of Kodiak island, on the western, side of the gulf of Alaska, about 
1,200 miles beyond tKe original fishery. The catch on the older grounds south of cape 
Ommaney has decreased from a total in excess of fifty million pounds in 1910 to about 
twenty-one millions in 1926, and much greater effort was exerted in making the catch in 
the latter j-ear. It is evident that the present level of production has been maintained by 
extending fishing operations to new areas, as the catch on the older grounds decreased, and 
by increasing the intensity of the fishing effort. 

The amount of gear now used on the older banks is about two and one-half times the 
quantity formerly used, yet the present catch is onh^ about forty per cent of the former 
yield from these grounds. Under the stress of this great intensification of fishing effort the 
abundance of fish on the older banks has fallen enormously, to sixteen per cent of the 
abundance in 1906. Where in 1906 the catch per set of a unit of fishing year was nearly 
300 pounds, in 1926 it was below 50 pounds. Expressed in another way it required six units 
of gear to catch as many fish as one unit caught in 1906. The decline has gone on at an 
even rate and shows no tendency to slacken. Accompanying this fall in abundance there 
has been a decrease in the average size of the fish landed, and a great increase in the per- 
centage of undersized fish. For example between 1919 and 1926 the percentage of under- 
sized fish from the older banks increased from twenty to thirty per cent. 

The more recently exploited banks to the westward .show the same trend, the catch 
having fallen from 160 pounds per unit of gear in 1923 to 100 pounds in 1926, and was still 
lower in 1927, while at the same time there was an increase in the number of fish under 
eleven and three-quarter pounds. 

The rapidity of the decline is regarded as especiall}^ serious because of the very slow 
rate of the growth of the halibut, an adult being from twelve to twenty-five years, or over, 
in age. Hence the present decline has taken place within the life span of one halibut of 
ordinarily large size. As nearly all the fish which are being caught now were spawned eight 
or ten years ago, the abundance of the younger fish, which will annually be available for 
capture in the next ten years, has already been established. If these are greatly reduced in 
numbers, and the intensitj^ of the fishery is maintained, the outlook for a future stock of 
spawning fish sufficient to maintain the supply, presents a hopeless picture. In fact the 
commission's investigations indicate that relatively few mature halibut are now found on 
the older banks. 

These illustrations demonstrate beyond a doubt that the fisher^y is in a very serious 
condition, and that the banks cannot stand the intensity of fishing to which they are sub- 
jected. The commission is fully convinced that the conditions are so serious that no delay 
should be permitted in the adoption of additional conservation measures. In the light of 
the investigations made, such action is essential to the maintenance of the fishery. 

RECOMMENDATIONS 

It is recommended that power be given proper governmental authorities: — 

1. (a) To establish areas, within each of which, if deemed necessary for the preserva- 
tion of the fishery there, the total catch of halibut may be reduced by a predetermined per- 
centage annually, commencing not less than one year after the putting into force of thia 
recommendation, until the fishery therein shall reach a state of stability of yield. 

ib) To determine upon the amount of this percentage reduction, and to revise the same 
from time to time as may be found necessary', the intent being to restrain any increase in 
the amount of fishing within such area. 

2. To clo.se permanently to all fishing the two areas herewith defined, and known to be 
populated by .small immature halibut, and to close such other grounds as may be foimd by 
the commission to be populated bj' a similar class of fish. 

3. To prevent the use of any fishing gear deemed unduly destructive. 

4. To extend the present closed season by two weeks at its beginning, making the closure 
for all fishing in all areas from November 1 to February 15, both dates inclusive, and to 
facilitate future alterations in the length of close season. 

5. To license all vessels fishing for halibut in treaty waters, under such terms as are 
necessary for the purpose of the treaty, including statistical retvirns, and for clearance to 
regulated waters. 

The reasons for the above recommendations are clearly set out by the 
commissioners. The report has been printed and those interested may obtain 
copies thereof on application to the department. 

The recommendations of the commission are under the consideration of 
the two Governments. 

68927— 2i 



20 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

Marine Biological Board 

All four stations of the Board were in operation during the year. These 
are located at St. Andrews, N.B., Halifax, N.S., Nanaimo, B.C., and Prince 
Rupert, B.C. 

At St. Andrews and Nanaimo fundamental researches such as life-history, 
growth and food of fishes, etc., and at Halifax and Prince Rupert investigations 
connected with the methods of handling and preserving the products of the com- 
mercial fisheries are carried on. 

In the com'se of the year the staff of the board on the Atlantic coast con- 
ducted short scientific and practical courses of instruction for hatchery officers, 
cannery managers and fishermen, all of which were benficial and much appre- 
ciated. 

During the year an arrangement was come to by the Department, the 
board, and Dalhousie University of Halifax, N.S., whereby wdth the assistance 
of the department and the board the university has undertaken to establish a 
graduate course in fisheries. It is anticipated that the first stages of the course 
V7\\\ be started in the coming university year. 

The following were members of the board and its various committees during 
the year: — 

Dr. J. Playfair McMurrich, Chairman, Toronto, Ont. 

J. J. Cowie, Hon. Secretary-Treasurer, Ottawa, Ont. 

Dr. Philip Cox, Fredericton, N.B. 

Dr. C. J. Connolly, Antigonish, N.S. 

Dr. E. E. Prince, Ottawa, Ont. 

Very Rev. Canon Huard, Quebec, P.Q. 

Dr. A. H. Hutchinson, Vancouver, B.C. 

Dr. W. T. MacClement, Kingston, Ont. 

Professor J. N. Gowanlock, Halifax, N.S. 

Professor A. Willey, Montreal, P.Q. 

John Dybhavn, Prince Rupert, B.C. 

A. Handfield Whitman, Halifax, N.S. 

MEMBERS OF CENTRAL EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

Dr. J. P. McMurrich. J. J. Cowie. 

Dr. W. T. MacClement. Dr. E. E. Prince. 

Professor A. Willey. 

MEMBERS OF ATLANTIC SUB-EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

A. Handfield Whitman, Chairman. 

Professor Gowanlock. 

Dr. C. J. Connolly. 

Dr. A. G. Huntsman, Secretary. 

MEMBERS OF PACIFIC SUB-EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 

John Dybhavn, Chairman. 

Dr. A. H. Hutchinson. 

Dr. W. A. Clemens, Secretary. 

RESEARCH COMMITTEE 

Dr. A. G. Huntsman, Chairman. 

Dr. W. A. Clemens. 

Dr. A. H. Leim, 

Mr. J. A. Rodd. 

Dr. R. E. Foerstcr, Secretary. 

A detailed report on the work of the board's staff will be found at appendix 
No. 2 of this j)ublication. 



FISHERIES BRANCH 21 

Prosecutions 

The names of those against whom action was taken as a result of the viohi- 
tion of the Fisheries Act are being published in this report separately and will 
be found in appendix No. 8. 

Scallop and Oyster Investigations 

The following investigations were carried on by the department's naturalist 
during the season of 1927: — 

Scallop investigations in Mahone Bay, N.S.' 

Exploratory work on the coast of three Maritime Provinces in search of 
scallop beds. 

Examination of oyster beds in New Brunswick. 

Details of these investigations will be found in appendix No. 3. 

The loss of life of those engaged in the industry was very heavy, no less than 
four vessels and their entire crews being lost in one storm on the Atlantic coast. 
The total loss of life was one hundred and eleven, three of whom were drowned 
on the Pacific coast and the remainder on the Atlantic coast. 

Your obedient servant, 

A. JOHNSTON, 

Acting Deputy Minister of Fisheries. 



22 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

APPENDIX NO. 1 

REPORTS OF INSPECTORS OF FISHERIES 

REPORT OF CHIEF INSPECTOR WARD FISHER, PROVINCE OF 
NOVA SCOTIA, FOR 1927-28 

The value of the fisheries for this province for the year 1927 was 
$10,783,631. While this does not compare altogether favourably with the pre- 
vious year, it must be remembered that 1926 was a banner year with a total 
value amounting to $12,505,922. This latter value has not been exceeded since 
the years closely following the end of the war. In order to arrive at a better 
valuation other than 1926 we must go back to the year 1920, when prices were 
inflated and the total value amounted to $12,742,659. 

The value of the fisheries to the province of Nova Scotia for the past five 
3'^ears has been as follows: — 

1923 $ 8,448,385 

1924 8,777.251 

1925 10,213,779 

1926 12,505,922 

1927 '. ' ' ' ' '. . ! 10,783,631 

Weather conditions throughout the greater part of the year were unfavour- 
able for fishing. Rough, boisterous, and foggy weather prevailed. 

The fresh fish industry was in an unsatisfactory condition at the opening 
of the year. The unusually mild weather of November and December, 1926, 
resulted in large catches which the dealers were unable to dispose of, and as a 
consequence there was, at first, little demand for the catches of the shore fisher- 
men at a price that would give a living wage. It is gratifying, however, to report 
that the fresh fish trade is continually expanding, and that there is an increased 
demand particularly for finnan baddies and fillets. 

The catch of the chief commercial varieties shows a decrease in most 
instances as compared with the year before, with the exception of the mackerel, 
halibut, and scallop fisheries. 

COD 

The catch was 1,331.873 Qwt., with a landed value of $2,433,699 and a 
marketed value of $3,455,722, as compared with a catch of 1,858.944 cwt., 
having a landed value of $3,634,923 and a marketed value of $4,652,858 for 1926. 
The decrease in the catch as compared with the preceding year was 527,071 
cwt., the landed value $1,201,224, and the marketed value a decrease of 
$1,197,086. 

The Lunenburg fleet was a vital factor in the decrease shown in the cod 
fishery. In this connection it must be recalled that four of the Lunenburg 
vessels were lost in the gale of August 24 along with their crews of more than 
eighty men. The shore fishermen were also handicapped by unfavourable 
weather. 

THE LOBSTER FISHERY 

The total lobster catch for 1927 was 179,673 cwt., having a marketed value 
of $3,255,627, as compared with 184,316 cwt. and $3,386,416 for 1926. 



FISHERIES BRANCH 



23 



The total pack for 1927 was 55,771 cases, as compared with 56,277 cases. 
The total value of the pack was $1,727,105 for 1927, as compared with $1,753,150 
for 1926. 

The total marketed value for 1927 was $3,255,627, as compared with 
$3,386,416 for 1926. 

The following is the catch and pack by counties: — 





Catch 


Pack 




Cwts. 


Marketed 
value 


Cases 


Value 


Inverness 


14,590 

8,575 

12,111 

7,248 


$ 

192,704 

110,530 

186,948 

75,260 


5,926 
2,806 
5,965 
1,600 


$ 

177,678 
85,352 

180,133 
g9 4ig 


Richmond 


Cape Breton 


Victoria 








42,524 


565,442 


16,297 


505,581 


Halifax 


13,207 
20,364 
10,425 
14,002 
176 
4,812 


235,960 
352,859 
182,843 
273,427 
2,716 
64,146 


3,014 
6,844 
5,845 
7,629 
83 
1,914 


92,790 
213,708 
177,834 
099 991 


Guysboro 


Antigonish 


Pictou 


Colchester 


2,407 
56,196 


Cumberland 






62,986 


1,111,951 


25,329 


772,926 


Lunenburg 


3,724 

3,818 

21,708 

34,542 

9,683 

609 

79 


64,267 

58,528 

474,694 

7.30,247 

229,749 

19,554 

1,195 


590 

186 

5,277 

7,003 

1,089 


18,300 

6,324 

162,102 

227,254 

34,618 


Queens 


Shelburne 


Yarmouth 


Digby 


Annapolis 


Kings 














74,163 


1,520,234 


14,145 


448,598 



The marketing of the pack was not profitable. Prices were low and demand 
poor. Japanese crab meat was offered, especially in the European market at 
a very attractive price which greatly interfered with the success of the lobster 
packers. 

HADDOCK 

The landings of haddock amounted to 384,207 cwts., as compared with the 
previous year when 458,292 cwts., were taken. The landed value for the year 
was $660,669 and the marketed value $1,402,135, as compared with a landed 
value of $838,716 and a marketed value of $1,671,971 for 1926. The decrease 
in the landed value was $178,047 and the marketed value $269,836. 

THE MACKEREL FISHERY 

The mackerel fishery shows an increase in the catch, landed value and 
marketed value. During the year 72,306 cwts. were landed, as against 67,580 
cwts. in 1926. The landed value was $236,796 and the marketed value $338,851, 
as compared with a landed value of $173,049 and a marketed value of $285,961 
for the previous year. The increase in the marketed value registers $52,890. 

HERRING 

The landings of herring were less than in 1926 when the catch was 264,823 
cwts., as compared with a catch of 214,560 cwts. this year. Naturally the 
values also fell off. The marketed value this year was $482,458, as compared 
with $547,548 last year, a decrease of $65,090. 



24 MARINE AND FISHERIES 



HALIBUT 



The halibut fishery shows an increase in landings and values. This year 
the catch was 27,551 cwts., as against 23,725 cwts. in 1926. The increase in the 
landed value was $46,771 and the marketed value $86,959. ]\Iost of the months 
record this fishery as showing gains over the previous year. 



SALMON 

The salmon catch was 12,819 cwts.. having a marketed value of $233,189, 
as compared with 13,428 cwts. and $253,272 in 1926. 

SCALLOPS 

The scallop fishery especially in the Bay of Fundy district continues to 
expand and show a healthy growth. The outlook for this fishery is bright 
indeed. Many more new boats were engaged in this fishery this year than in 
any previous year, and it is confident^ expected that the output will steadily 
increase from year to year. This industry is only in its infancy in so far as 
Yarmouth, Digby and Annapolis counties are concerned, and the progress that 
has already been made is really remarkable. This year 37,607 barrels were 
landed, as compared with 19,918 barrels last year. The marketed value was 
$212,838, as against $138,472 for 1926, an increase of $74,366. 

SMELT 

The decrease in the smelt catch is largely attributed to the mild weather 
which prevailed during the early part of the smelt fishing season, 7,110 cwts. 
were taken while the catch last year was 10,981 cwts. The marketed value of 
the fishery naturally suffered, amounting to $124,653 this year, as compared 
with a value of $165,630 last year. 

The following reports by districts will be of interest, showing the local con- 
ditions with respect to catches and values: — 

District Xo. 1, Cape Bretox. — Inspector McLeod 

The outstanding features of the year, compared with 1926, are decreases 
in the quantities and values of cod, haddock, swordfish, lobsters, smelts, pollock 
and alewives, and increases in the quantities and values of mackerel, halibut, 
salmon, hake and cusk. 

Lobsters. — The catch of lobsters was 42,524 cwts., marketed value $565,- 
442, as compared with 42,874 cwts., marketed value $660,006 for 1926. 

The decrease in the catch is due to unfavourable weather conditions and 
drift ice which prevented operations at the opening of the season. These fish 
were very plentiful in the waters surrounding Isle Madame, where an increase 
of 2,017 cwts. is noted as compared with 1926. On account of the low prices 
offered for cod, haddock and mackerel, the fishermen of this district prosecuted 
the lobster fishing with the utmost vigour. 

The largest catches were landed at Mainadieu, Petit de Grat and Port 
Hood Island. 

Cod.— The catch was 139,096 cwts., having a marketed value of $290,882, 
as compared with 136,505 cwts. and $394,870 for 1926. 

A large increase in the catch is noted at the ports of North Sydney, Ingon- 
ish and Neil's harbour, where this branch of the industry was prosecuted 
intensely during the fall months when good prices prevailed. 

Haddock. — ^The total catch was 68,344 cwts., having a marketed value of 
$132,485, as compared with 76,428 cwts., and $250,569 for 1926. 



FISHERIES BRANCH 25 

Decreases of 8,084 cwts. in the catch, and $118,084 in marketed value are 
noted. The large falling off in the catch is due to the following reasons: (a) 
Rather than fish for the low prices offered the fishermen turned their attention 
to other kinds of work which they found more remunerative, (b) Only one 
trawler operating, as compared with four during 1926. (c) These fish were not 
as plentiful as in the previous year, and it is supposed that they passed by 
before the trap-nets were set in the spring. 

The largest catches were landed at Ingonish, Hawkesbury and Petit de 
Grat. 

Mackerel. — The catch was 29,832 cwts., having a marketed value of $122,- 
425, as compared with 20,473 cwts., valued at $84,623 for the preceding year, 
showing an increase of 9,359 cwts. in catch and $37,802 in marketed value. 

The largest landings were at L'Ardoise, Cheticamp and Louisburg. 

These fish were very plentiful during the spring at Ingonish, Neil's har- 
bour and Isle Madame; but on account of the low prices offered, the fishermen 
only operated in a half-hearted manner. Fine catches were landed at Mar- 
garee and cape Rouge during the fall. For some unaccountable reason the fall 
run of mackerel do not appear in the waters surrounding Port Hood island, 
where they used to strike in very plentifully eight or ten years ago. 

Halibut. — The catch was 4,772 cwts., having a marketed value of $92,194, 
as compared with 3,775 cwts., and $54,102 for the previous year, showing an 
increase of 997 cwts. in the catch and $38,092 in marketed value. 

The increase in the catch is due to more bankers landing at North Sydney, 
as well as an increase in the catch for Ingonish, owing to more fishemien having 
engaged in this branch of the industry. 

The largest landings were at North Sydney, Port Morien and Ingonish. 

Salmon (Commercial). — The total landed catch w^as 4,897 cwt., having a 
marketed value of $78,436, as compared with 4,648 cwt., valued at $76,720, for 
the preceding year, showing an increase of 249 cwt., in the catch and $1,716 in 
marketed value. 

These fish were unusually plentiful in the Mira river, and increases in the 
catch are noted in Grand river also. Salmon were fairly plentiful at Port Hood^ 
Margaree, Cheticamp and bay St. Lawrence. 

Salmon (Sport). — The number of anglers visiting the Margaree river is 
increasing from year to year. It is most gratifying to report an increase of 
379 salmon landed with the fly in the Margaree river, as compared with the 
previous year. Also, that these fish were of a larger size; one fish landed at 
Big Intervale, North East Margaree, weighed 52^ pounds. Fly fishing in the 
Margaree river was most satisfactory, except during a period from the middle 
of July to the middle of August when the water was very low, warm and clear. 
After the gale that occurred on the 24th of August, salmon ascended the 
Margaree river in enormous numbers, and most satisfactory catches were 
landed. 

In the history of the Margaree the catch with the fly was eclipsed only in 
the banner season of 1922, when 868 fish were landed. 

SiDordfish. — The total catch was 5,376 cwt., valued at $86,534, as compared 
with 6,594 cwt., valued at $114,112 for the preceding year, showing a decrease 
of 1,218 cwt, in catch, and $27,578 in marketed value. 

The decrease is due to scarcity and unfavourable weather conditions, as 
these fish will only remain on the surface during bright and calm weather. 
Increases arc noted at the ports of North Sydney and Ingonish, where more 
fishermen were engaged in this branch of the industry. Largest landings were 
at Louisburg, Glace Bay, and North Sydney, 



26 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

Herring. — The catch was 26,604 cwt., having a marketed value of $43,191 
as against 35,641 cwt., having a value of S83,005 showing a decrease of 9,037 
cwt. in the catch, and a decrease of $39,814 in marketed value. 

The increase in the catch is due to the spring herring being exceptionally- 
plentiful at isle Madame, North Sydney and St. Ann's, and the decrease in the 
values is caused by a great falling off in the catch of the July run, as compared 
with the previous year. 

Smelts. — The catch of smelts was 1,727 cwt., having a marketed value of 
$26,427 as compared with 2,687 cvrt. having a value of $34,958 for the preceding 
year, showing a decrease of 960 cwt., in the catch, and $8,531 in marketed value. 

The great falling off in the catch is due to scarcity, and mild weather pre- 
vailing at the opening of the season. 

Oysters. — The catch was 1,224 barrels, valued at $10,347, as compared 
with 1,280 barrels, valued at $9,502, for the preceding year, showing a decrease 
in the catch of 56 barrels and an increase of $845 in the marketed value. 

The largest catches were landed at Orangedale, River Dennys, and Little 
Narrows. 

Trout. — Compared with the preceding year trout were far more plentiful, 
and as usual, excellent catches were taken at Lake Ainslie, River Dennys, 
Barachois and Indian Brook, St. Ann's. A trout landed with the fly at the 
outlet of Barachois river, St. Ann's, weighed 6 pounds 4 ounces. Many trout 
weighing over 5 pounds were landed in several of the streams of this island. 

DISTRICT NO. 2. — COMPRISING THE COUNTIES OF HALIFAX, GUYSBORO, PICTOU, 
COLCHESTER, CUMBERLAND AND HANTS — INSPECTOR SUTHERLAND 

The catch as well as the landed and marketed values show marked decreases 
compared with 1926, but the values compare favourably with those of 1925, 
although the catch is the lowest since 1923. This is due to smaller landings of 
all the principal varieties, excepting lobsters, hake, soles, mackerel and albacore. 
Cod and haddock show heavy decreases of 145,805 cwt. and 56,724 cwt., respect- 
ively, due chiefly to smaller landings at Canso and Halifax by steam trawlers. 
Only one trawler operated the full year at Canso, and fish were not found to 
be plentiful offshore. Another important reason for the smaller catch during 
the summer and autumn months was the unusually rou<2;h weather which greatly 
hampered the inshore operations. The only important increases are those of 
lobsters 2,529 cwi;., soles 2,902 cwt., and albacore 686 cwt. 

Cod.— The total catch was 212,876 cwt., with a marketed value of $896,947 
as compared with 360,681 cwi:., with a marketed value of $1,269,989 for 1926, 
showing a decrease of 147,805 cwt. in the catch, and $373,042 in the marketed 
value. 

Decreased catches were general throughout but are more pronounced at 
Halifax and Canso. A succession of gales during the summer and early autumn 
greatly hampered inshore operations and the fishermen were disheartened by 
unusually low prices. These opened at 1 cent per pound ^s-itli only large fish 
wanted. " However, as the season advanced, prices improved until 2-| cents to 
3 cents were offered at the last of the season. 

Of the total catch, 100,865 cwt. were taken offshore as compared with 
227,698 cwt., taken offshore in 1926. 

Haddock. — The catch was 191,934 cwt.. having a marketed A-ahic of 
.S884.238, as compared with 249,719 cwt., liaving a market vahic of $1,007,035 
for 1926, showing a decrease of 57,785 cwt., with a corresponding decrease in 
the marketed value of $122,797. 



FISHERIES BRANCH 27 

Guysboro county east is mostly responsible for the decrease, where only 
53,619 cwi). were taken as compared with 1926 — 94,515 cwt. This is on account 
of only one trawler being operated in the summer and early autumn months. 
No haddock are taken by shore boats until November. 

Of the total catch, 173,363 cwt. were taken offshore, as compared with 
214,421 cwt. in the previous year. Prices to fishermen were about the same as 
for cod. 

Pollock. — The catch was 8,180 cwt., having a marketed value of $12,694, 
as compared with 19,401 cwt., having a marketed value of $36,997, showing a 
decrease of 11,221 cwt. in the catch and $24,303 in the" marketed value. 

The decline was most serious in Halifax county west and Guysboro county 
east, which is general for all line fish excepting hake during 1927. 

Of the total catch, 5,399 cwt. were taken offshore, whilst 14,850 cwt. were 
taken offshore in 1926. 

Prices to the fishermen were about 1 cent per pound, although for a period 
in the summer only 50 cents per cwi). was offered. 

Hake. — The catch was 5,391 cwt., having a marketed value of $12,955, as 
compared with 3,623 cwt., having a marketed value of $8,535 for 1926, an 
increase of 1,768 cwt. and $4,420 in marketed value. 

The increase is due to increased catches in Antigonish county, Halifax 
west, and Guysboro east. 

Offshore catch was 342 cwt. Prices landed, 75 cents per cwt. Market 
prices: dried $4, green salted $3, and smoked fillets 10 cents. 

Halibut. — The catch was 7,240 cwt., having a marketed value' of $146,871, 
compared with 8,039 cwt., having a marketed value of $164,462, a decrease in 
catch of 799 cwt. and value of $17,591. 

Smaller catches in Halifax west and Guysboro east account for the decrease. 
The offshore catch was 5,754 cwt., compared with 6,391 cwt. for 1926. 

Herring. — The catch was 54,609 cwt., having a marketed value of $146,784, 
compared with 68,984 cwt., having a marketed value of $136,298, a decrease of 
14,375 cwt. in the catch and an increase of $10,486 in marketed value. 

The catch of spring herring in Cumberland county north was a failure. 
Antigonish and Guysboro counties also show heavy declines, while in Halifax 
county west the catch increased 9,000 cwt. 

Mackerel. — The catch was 34,003 cwt., having a marketed value of $160,908, 
compared with 34,334 cwt., having a marketed value of $149,231. 

While the catch shows a decrease of 331 cwt., the marketed value shows 
an increase of $11,677. This is due to better prices offered to the fishermen 
during the late run of mackerel in October and November. 

Increased catches were taken in Guysboro County, while Halifax county 
is responsible for the decrease. During November fairly good catches were 
taken in Chedabucto bay and Halifax county west. Prices then were good and 
the fishermen did well. The fall run was unusually late; in fact, in Queensport 
Harbour all the nets were ashore and one fisherman who had been unable to 
take his nets ashore on account of sickness found a good catch when he was 
able to tend his gear, and the other fishermen soon had their nets out again. 

Prices landed: May, 4 cents ; June, 3 cents; July, 3 cents; August, 3 cents; 
September, 4 cents; October, 5 cents; and November, 6 cents per pound. 

Salmon. — The catch was 5,886 cwt., having a marketed value of $113,971, 
compared with 7,610 cwt., having a marketed value of $149,6£5, a decrease in 
the catch of 1,724 cwt. and marketed value $35,724. 



28 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

Halifax county west alone shows a decrease of 1,968 cwt., Guysboro county 
shows a considerable increase, while in Antigonish the increase was 1,000 cwt., 
and in Pictou county 200 cwt. This fishery is in a flourishing condition in these 
two counties, the marketed value for 1927 being about $65,000. 

Flounders, Skate, and SoZes.— Flounders and skate decreased 4,511 cvd. and 
7,722 cwt., while soles increased 7,264 cwt. These fish are almost entirely pro- 
duced offshore by steam trawlers. 

Catfish and Monk fish. —1,972 cwt. less catfish were taken, and no monk- 
fish for 1927, while 180 c^-t. were landed last year. The entire catch of these 
varieties is produced offshore. 

Albacore. — The catch was 1,575 cwt., with a marketed value of $15,750, 
compared with 889 cwt., having a marketed value of $8,890 for 1926. 

These fish were fairly plentiful during July in St. Margaret's bay, where 
the entire catch was taken. 

Sword fish.— The catch was 1,715 cwt., vnth a marketed value of $30,795, 
as compared with 6,176 cwt., with a marketed value of $90,694 for 1926, show- 
ing a decrease in catch of 4,461 cwt. and marketed value $59,899. 

Guysboro county is responsible for the decrease, particularly the eastern 
part, where the decline was 2,176 cwt. Prices for ground fish were low during 
the swordfish run, and fishermen generally lost a lot of time and went to great 
expense in endeavouring to capture swordfish. It is usually the case that fisher- 
men give up regular fishing when swordfish are on, and unless the fish are 
plentiful their efforts usually result in a loss. 

DISTRICT XO. 3. — COMPRISING THE COUNTIES OF LUNENBURG, QU^EENS, SHELBURNE, 
YARMOUTH, DIGBY, ANNAPOLIS, AND KINGS INSPECTOR MARSHALL 

Cod. — The greatest fall-off was in connection with the catch and value of 
the Lunenburg cod fishing fleet. This of course would have a tendency to 
decrease the quantity and the total value of the catch. 

Haddock. — The catch and value of haddock remains about the same as the 
last few years, showing a slight decrease from last year. 

Hake and Cusk. — This fishery shows an increase over last year and a con- 
siderable increase over previous years. 

Halibut. — The halibut fishery shows a large increase both in catch and 
value. 

Herring.— The catch of herring was 133,347 c\H., with a value of $276,047, 
as compared with a catch of 160,198 cwt. valued at $328,245 for 1926. The year 
1926 was one of the best years the herring fishermen have had for some time. 

Mackerel. — The mackerel fishery in so far as this district is concerned 
remains in a more or less depleted condition. 

Salmon. — The salmon fishery is gradually on the increase; 2,036 cwt. were 
taken with a value of $40,782, which compares very favourably with the catch 
and value for the last five years. 

Scallops. — During the year 1927, 37,579 barrels of scallops were taken in 
this district with a value of $212,698. This fishery is showing a steady and 
continued increase from year to year, especially in the Bay of Fundy district. 

THE LUNENBLT?G FLEET 

The total value of tlie season's catch was approximately $1,500,000 and 
the total catch was 227,590 quintals, or 115,140 quintals short of the previous 
year's catch. The schooner Gladys Mosher, Captain John Mosher, was the 
high liner of the fleet with 4,540 quintals. 



FISHERIES BRANCH 29 

The estimated monetary value of the shortage of the catch of the Lunen- 
burg fieet this year in comparison with last year is $300,000 and the shortage 
of last year from the year before was around $100,000. Therefore the loss to 
the industry in the past two years is about $400,000. 

These figures do not include the loss of vessels, etc., which for the past two 
years has been appalling. Four staunch vessels of the Lunenburg fleet were lost 
in the big gale of August 24. Their entire crews, numbering over eighty men, 
also perished. The vessels lost were the Uda R. Corkum, Captain Wilfred 
Andrews; Malaha, Captain Warren Knickle; Joyce M. Smith, Captain Edward 
Maxner; Clayton W. Walters, Captain Mars Selig. 

The cost of vessels and equipment together with running expenses was 
high, and therefore money was not readily obtainable, and the industry was 
not expanded as it should have otherwise been. 

The number of vessels engaged in fishing in 1927, including those lost, was 
eighty-three, nine less than in the previous year. Two new vessels were com- 
pleted to be added next year to the fleet, but then it must be remembered there 
were four vessels lost during 1927, so that the fleet in 1928 will no doubt be 
smaller than in 1927. Each year shows an increased number of Newfoundland 
men manning the Lunenburg fleet. One of the vessels lost this year, +he Joyce 
M. Smith, had with the exception of the captain and two men an entire crew 
of Newfoundland men. 

Fifty-eight vessels on the frozen bait trip landed 30,700 quintals; seventy 
vessels on the spring trip landed 60,390 quintals; and seventy-nine vessels on 
the summer trip landed 136,500 quintals. 

The prices received this year were slightly in advance of those received 
last year. In 1926 the fishermen received from $5.50 to $6 for their first two 
trips, and $5.50 for their summer trip. This year the frozen bait trip brought 
around $6.35 per quintal, the spring trip was sold at $5.80 to $6.40, and the 
summer catch around $7. 

BAIT AND ICE REPORTING SERVICE 

For the benefit of the fishermen of Nova Scotia and others immediately 
interested in the fishing industry it was decided to resume reporting, during the 
spring, ice eonditions and bait supplies at the Magdalen islands. The fishery 
officer at Grindstone, Magdalen islands, was instructed to forward a telegram 
once per week until bait appeared, after which to send one every day, except 
Sunday, until the end of the spring herring season. The information received 
was of particular value to those interested, especially at such fishing centres as 
Lunenburg, Riverport, and Canso. 

The first report was received on April 22, and dealt with ice conditions, as 
no herring had as yet appeared. Herring were reported on May 13, and from 
that time on reports were received regularly until the end of the spring run, 
around the second week in June. This service was much appreciated by the fleet 
engaged on the banks. 

The contents of the reports as received were posted prominently in the chief 
fishing centres and given publicity in the Halifax papers. 

THE STEAM TRAWLER 

Owing to the increased demand and expanding market for fresh fish, the 
steam trawler fleet was augmented by two vessels, viz., the Bonthorpe and the 
Sleaford. Both the Bonthorpe and the Sleaford came to the Maritime Fish Cor- 
poration, Ltd., and operated from Canso. The Bonthorpe was constructed at 
Collingwood, Canada, in 1927, and the Sleaford at Selby, England, during the 
same year. Each vessel operated from Nova Scotia for a period of approxi- 
mately three months. 



30 MARINE AXD FISHERIES 

Each year shows an increase in the number of steam trawlers employed 
from Nova Scotia ports. During 1926 eleven were in operation, while 1927 saw 
fourteen engaged. They were as follows: — 

Name of Vessel Port Operated From 

Offa Canso, N.S. 

Rayon D'Or Canso, N.S. 

Lemberg Halifax, N.S. 

Venosta Halifax, N.S. 

Good Hope Halifax, N.S. 

Loubyme Halifax, N.S. 

Lord Beaconsfield Canso, N.S. 

Lord Darling Canso, N.S. 

Lord Shaftesbury Canso, N.S. 

Viernoe Halifax, N.S. 

Willoughby Halifax, N.S. 

Bordhorpe Canso, N.S. 

Sleajord Canso, N.S. 

Cape Agulahus Halifax, N.S. 

HAIR SEAL MENACE 

The hair seals in this province have been in the past, and still are, very 
destructive to the commercial fisheries, especially the salmon and smelt fisheries. 
This matter has been of considerable concern to the department, and various 
means and ways of destroying the seals have been attempted without a great 
deal of success until the present year. 

Some years ago a bounty of $1 per seal was offered, but it was claimed 
that this amount w-as inadequate. The decision of the -department this year 
to pay a bounty of $3.50 for each hair seal destroyed has resulted in the destinrc- 
tion of a considerable number of the species, which has naturally had a bene- 
ficial effect on the commercial fisheries of the province. 

The new bounty went into operation in April, and up to the last of the 
present calendar year 2,754 seals have been turned in and their snouts delivered 
to officers of the department throughout the province. 

It is estimated that at the close of the fiscal year March 31, 1928, some 
3,300 seals will have been destroyed and turned in. 

The continuation of this bounty next year should result in the destruction 
of a considerably increased number of seals. 

SCHOOL OF IXSTRUCTIOX FOR INSPECTORS AND FISHERY OFFICERS 

A school of instruction for inspectors and fishery officers was conducted by 
the Biological Board of Canada at the Atlantic Experimental Station, Hali- 
fax, N.S., from February 14 to 26 inclusive. Three district inspectors of this 
province were in attendance as well as sixteen fishery overseers from Nova 
Scotia, together with a number of inspectors and overseers from the provinces 
of New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island. The various subjects taken up 
during the course aroused considerable interest and resulted in a very beuQ- 
ficial effect upon all those in attendance. Many subjects were dealt with and 
the time engaged was well spent. All the officers attending were alert, active 
and very much interested in the various phases of the industry covered by the 
lectures and classes of instruction. 

FISH COLLECTION SERVICE 

On that portion of the Guysboro county coast between Canso and Port 
Bickerton an experiment was tried out in the collection of fish by Government 
subsidized boats, which carried the fish to Canso for delivery to the dealers 
at a nominal rate of freight. 



FISHERIES BRANCH 31 

Two boats were first engaged but owing to rough weather and the difficulty 
of securing ice supplies, a third boat was later engaged to assist. These boats 
plied between Canso and Port Bickerton, calling at all points where fish were 
offered, carrying ice and bait from Canso to the fishermen and bringing their 
catches back to Canso. The service was highly satisfactory in spite of 
unusually rough and foggy weather, and the fishermen for the first time were 
able to dispose of their catches fresh for better cash prices. They were assured 
of a regular supply of bait and relieved of the work of splitting their catches 
which enabled them to remain longer on the fishing grounds. Later fishing 
was also encouraged which requires larger boats, these, the fishermen will prob- 
ably arrange for if the service is continued. 

A total of 2,832,325 pounds of fish were carried by the collection boats at 
a cost to the public which, apparently, quite justifies the continuation of the 
service. 

RIVER AND INLAND FISHERIES 

Sport fishing is a distinct asset to the province and is becoming more so 
as the influx of tourists steadily increases from year to year. Good catches 
of salmon and trout were taken by anglers throughout the whole province. 
The rainfall during the summer was exceptionally heavy and provided many 
periods of high water conditions which enabled salmon to ascend the numerous 
rivers and streams. 

Many salmon were taken on the fly on the various rivers and streams in 
Halifax and Guysboro counties. The St. Mary's river, Guysboro county, is 
an exceptionally good river and salmon sport fishermen are visiting it more 
and more every year. This year they were quite successful in their operations. 
Most of the rivers in the above counties flow through country which is unsuit- 
able for agriculture, and while some deforestation has taken place, the low 
temperature and volume of the streams have been maintained so that they 
make ideal salmon waters. 

Anglers for salmon were exceptionally successful in such rivers as the 
St. Mary's river, Guysboro county, the Margaree river in Inverness county, 
the Medway river and the Mersey river in Queens county, the Annapolis river, 
Annapolis county, and various other rivers and streams throughout the prov- 
ince. The record salmon taken by an angler was caught on the Margaree 
river and weighed 52^ pounds. 

Trout fishing was particularly good. In Cape Breton island as well as the 
mainland excellent catches were taken. A trout landed with the fly at the 
outlet of Barachois river, St. Ann's weighed six pounds four ounces. Nova 
Scotia should be and is, becoming a popular and prosperous sport fishing district. 

While the average visitor is contented with fishing for trout a great many 
visitors came to angle for salmon. 

A great deal of time and energy was expended in an effort to keep our rivers 
and streams free of obstructions, etc., in order that such fish as salmon and 
trout may readily ascend to their spawning grounds, as it is recognized by all 
interested that it is of vital concern to the province that these fisheries be 
kept up if wc are to hold the reputation which Nova Scotia possesses at present 
as a sporting country. Fishways were constructed in dams and various obstruc- 
tions removed from the rivers and streams. Both salmon and trout fry were 
planted in the various waters. 



32 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

UTILIZATION OF FISH WASTE MANUFACTURE OF BY-PRODUCTS 

During the year four licensed reduction plants were operated in Eastern 
Nova Scotia as shown below: — 
Fasterfat, Ltd., Halifax. 

C. W. Kendall Reduction Works and Fish Meal Plant, Halifax. 
Lucky Fish Meal Co., Halifax. 
Robinson Glue Co., Canso. 

Fasterfat, Ltd. installed a modern machine for the manufacture of fish meal 
and has been working steadily throughout the year. 

C. W. Kendall plant has been working part time on a smaller scale than 
Fasterfat. 

The Lucky Fish Meal Co. was formed in February, absorbing the Kendall 
plant but only operated a short time when it became disorganized and Mr. 
Kendall resumed his own operations. 

The Robinson Glue Co. operated as usual throughout the year. _ 
The following plants were also operated in Western Nova Scotia: — 
H. R. L. Bill, Lockeport, N.S. 
A. W. Dodd Co., Tiverton. 
A. W. Dodd Co., Westport. 
Liveri^ool Refiners, Liverpool (east side) . 
Roy Casey, Victoria Beach. 
Parkhurst Cod Liver Oil Corp., Tiverton. 
M. A. Nickerson, Clark's Harbour. 
George W. Wightmen, Lockeport. 
Lewis Canning Co., Annapolis. 

All of the above were engaged in the production of oil with the exception 
of the Lewis Canning Co. This plant was operated from a by-product stand- 
point for the purpose of grinding scallop and clam shells into chicken food. 

ROYAL COMMISSION ON FISHERIES 

A Royal Commission to investigate the fisheries of the Maritime Prov- 
inces and the Magdalen Islands was appointed by Order in Council in Sep- 
tember. This commission held meetings in Nova Scotia during the months of 
October, November and December. Sittings were held at Cheticamp, Port 
Hood, Canso, Isaac's Harbour, Arichat, St. Peters, Ingonish, North Sydney, 
Louisburg, Glace Bay, Mulgrave, Antigonish, Pictou. Pugwash, Halifax, Lunen- 
burg, Liverpool, Lockeport, Shelburne, Barrington Passage, Clark's Harbour, 
Yarmouth and Digby. 

The sittings were largely attended by the fishermen and others interested 
in the fishery industry. 

FISHERIES PATROL SERVICE 

Patrol boat Mildred McColl, Captain Williams. — The Fisheries Patrol 
Boat Mildred McColl was absent from the district during the great part of the 
fishing season on scallop investigation in Prince Edward Island and New 
Brunswick. Her absence resulted in an outbreak of illegal lobster fishing, 
particularly in Halifax county east. This section of the coast includes numerous 
islands and coves which provide good cover for illegal operations. Thet-c can 
only be properly protected by the constant attention of the patrol boat. 

Contract boat Lidu T was chartered to protect the lobster fishing boundary 
at Port Philip, Cumberland county, from August to October. The protection 
was only fairly satisfact<irv', but it will never be adequate until a regular boat 
is provided. 



FISHERIES BRANCH 33 

F.P. I, Captain Baker. — This boat kept up a continuous patrol throughout 
the season between Pubnico and the head of the Bay of Fundy and gave entire 
satisfaction in so far as it was possible for one boat to do so. This district is 
largely frequented by tourists during the summer months who in many cases 
encourage people to illegally fish for lobsters. The inspector for the district 
states he does not believe the parties carrying on such illegal fishing are our 
real fishermen but that they are farmers and men who are not dependent on 
that fishery for an existence. In practically every case where men were con- 
victed for illegal fishing they were not lobster fishermen but parties engaged in 
other lines of endeavour. Another boat should be put on in the Yarmouth dis- 
trict to assist in patrol work covered by F.P. I, as this district is altogether too 
large for one boat, if the fisheries are to receive adequate protection. 

FISHERIES CRUISER SERVICE 

The past year was a strenuous one for both C.G.S. Arras and C.G.S. 
Arleux. Both vessels were actively engaged throughout the year and both 
Captain Barkhouse of the Arras and Captain Cousins of the Arleux deserve 
commendation for the zeal and vigilance which characterized their work. 

The Arras was engaged during the summer months as a hospital ship with 
the fleet on the Grand Banks and during the remainder of the year was occupied 
in patrolling the coast and ice breaking. The Arleux performed extremely 
yaluable work throughout the year on fisheries patrol service and in assisting 
vessels in distress, breaking ice, etc. 

With regard to the work of the Arras as a hospital ship the medical ofiicer 
employed on the vessel reports as follows: — 

The total number of new cases treated was 223, an increase of 37 over the preceding 
year. 

The total number of calls upon the ship's medical officer for treatment, supplies and 
dressings were 312. 

A larger quantity of stock drugs was dispensed but not so much of the special medicines. 

The instruments were all oiled and placed in the sterilizer which with the remaining 
drugs and supplies were left in the care of the commander of the ship. 

I believe more and more the fishing fleet are regarding the government ships as an 
intimate and integral part of their equipment. They trust us more with regard to their 
catches, each j^ear increasing calls are being made upon our services and I can only emphasize 
again the advisability of sending a more suitable ship to the Grand Bank's service, a ship 
equipped with some form of hospital and surgical accommodation, a motor boat for getting 
quickly around the fleet in harbours, and facilities for exchanging courtesies between the 
government ships of foreign countries which we encounter in our work. 

A digest of the logs of these two vessels will reveal the nature of the work 
performed and show an outstanding record of efiiciency. 

Cruiser "Arras" — Captain Barkhouse 

The Arras commissioned at Yarmouth on April 1, 1927, was at that date 
undergoing her annual refitj the work being completed on April 20. 

April 20. Proceeded to sea cruising east, called at Shelbume and arrived 
at Liverpool the 21st. 

April 25. Left Liverpool cniising east and arriving at Halifax. 

April 26. Taking stores and painting ship. 

April 27. Proceeded to adjust ship's compasses. 

April 29. Left Halifax cruising west, called at Lunenburg, and arrived at 
Liverpool the 30th. 

I\Iay 2 and 3. Searching for drifting buoy off Little Hope and Roseway 
bank. 

May 4. Cruising west, arriving at Shelbume same day. 

68927—3 



34 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

May 5. Left Shelburne cruising east, calling at Lockeport and Lunenburg, 
arriving at Liverpool, May 6. 

May 7. Assisted the 4-mast schooner Joan Kielberg out over Liverpool 
Bar to sea. 

May 9. Assisted the 4-mast schooner Cashier to wharf at Brooklyn, then 
searched and found drifting bell buoy 18 miles off Liverpool. Towed buoy in 
and delivered to the C.G.S. Lady Laurier. 

May 10. Cruising east arriving at Lunenburg same day. 

May 11. Cruising west arriving at Liverpool. 

May 12. Assisted the 4-mast schooner Cashier from wharf at Brooklyn 
to McClearns wharf, Liverpool. 

May 13 to 16. At Liverpool. Dense fog on coast. 

May 17. Assisted the 3-mast schooner Cape LaHave out over Liverpool 
Bar to sea. 

May 18. Cruising west calling at Lockeport and arriving at Shelburne 
the 19th. 

May 20. Cruising east. Assisted the salt laden 3-mast schooner General 
Pau to sea from Sandy point. Arrived at Liverpool same day. 

May 21. Assisted the 4-mast schooner Cashier out over Liverpool Bar 
to sea. 

May 23. Proceeded on patrol duty. First American miackerel seiner arrived 
on coast, followed her to Liverpool. 

May 24 and 25. At Liverpool. Dense fog on coast. 

May 25. First mackerel taken in nets on coast. These were taken at Yar- 
mouth and Dover, N.S. 

May 26. Calibrating the Direction Finding Station at Yarmouth, N.S. 

May 28. Cruising east watching American mackerel seiners, arriving at 
Lunenburg the 30th with two mackerel seiners. 

June 1 and 2. With American seiners. Arrived at Liverpool, June 2. 

June 3. Cruising east, arrivino- at Halifax, June 4. 

June 5 and 6. At Halifax taking in stores and new chain cable. 

June 7. Cruising west calling at Lunenburg and Liverpool, arriving at 
Yarmouth, June 10. 

June 11. Cruising east calling at Shelburne, arriving at Liverpool the 12th. 

June 13. Hauled ship out on Marine Railway at Liverpool for overhaul 
underwater fittings and painting bottom. 

June 16. Launched ship off Marine Railway and to wharf at Liverpool, 

June 17. Cruising east, called at Lunenburg and arrived at Halifax on 
June 18. 

June 19 to 22. At Halifax taking stores and getting ready to proceed to 
Newfoundland waters with the Canadian fishing fleet. 

June 23, Cruising east towards banks. 

June 24. At North Sydney, Coaled ship and proceeded at midnight 
towards St. Pierre and Green banks, 

June 26. An-ived at Cape Broyle, Newfoundland, with part of the fishing 
fleet, to get in touch with the fleet on banks. 

June 27 to August 30. The ship was in close touch with the fishing fleet on 
banks and in harbours when seeking bait, giving medical treatment to all sick 
fishermen and taking very serious cases to hospital at St. John's for treatment. 
During the season we gave treatment to 223 men on the vessels. 

August 30. All fishing vessels were leaving for the western banks and 
towards home. We followed the fleet and arrived at North Sydney, 5.20 p.m. 
the 31st. 



FISHERIES BRANCH 35 

September 1. Proceeding towards Sable Island banks to search for four 
missing Lunenbm'g fishing vessels. Called at Canso and interviewed all fishing 
vessels sighted on banks and coast. 

September 10. Arrived at Liverpool and Lunenburg to interview fishing 
captains that had returned from Sable Island banks. 

September 12. Cruised towards Sable Island banks searching for missing 
fishing vessels. 

September 14. Found the Grenfel Mission yacht Maraval at sea 22 miles 
off Canso, towed her to Canso and gave her in charge of customs oflicer. 

September 16. Arrived at Lunenburg to embark six Lunenburg fishing 
captains and take them to Sable island to try and identify the wreckage found 
on island. 

September 17. Proceeded and arrived at SabU island 9 a.m. the 18th. 
The six captains landed and remained six hours searching over the beach and 
around shores on the island. At 3 p.m. captains returned and we proceeded 
towards Lunenburg. 

September 19. Arrived at Halifax to land sick lightkeeper from Sable 
island. Left Halifax and arrived at Lunenburg same day. 

September 20 to 22. At Lunenburg. Dense fog on coast and banks. 

September 23. Proceeded towards Sable Island banks searching for wreck- 
age. 

September 25. At 6.30 a.m. we found the Lunenburg schooner Uda R. 
Corkum sunk in 15 fathoms water on Middle bank. We pulled the topmast, 
main gaff and main boom and part of mainsail from the wreck and took into 
Lunenburg. 

September 27. Arrived at Lunenburg and gave wreckage in charge of the 
customs officer. 

September 28 and 29. At Bridgewater. 

September 30. Proceeded to assist schooner Manuata, ashore at Gaff point, 
mouth of LaHave river. 

October 1. Pulled schooner Manvata off rocks. Vessel filled with water 
and turned over on side. Towed her in river. 

October 2. At Livepool. 

October 3 and 4. At LaHave assisting with sunken schooner Manuata to 
get her out of channel clear of shipping. 

October 5 to 8. Cruising on western coast watching American mackerel 
seiners. Three seiners on our coast. 

October 9. Attended memorial service for lost fishermen at Lunenburg. 
Arrived at Liverpool same day. 

October 10 to 20. Ship at Liverpool blowing down and cleaning boiler and 
tanks. 

October 21. Proceeded cruising east towards North Bay and the Northum- 
berland Straits. Called at Lunenburg, Halifax, White Head, Port Hawkesbury, 
Souris, Prince Edward Island, arriving at Pictou October 29. 

October 31. Left Pictou cruising towards south coast of Nova Scotia. 
Called at Souris, Canso, White Head, arriving at Halifax, November 3. 

November 5. Cruising on western coast and at Liverpool, November 11. 

November 12. Proceeded on station and arrived at Lunenburg to help 
pull new fishing schooner from launchways where she had broken down 11.10 
p.m. Pulled schooner clear of launchways. 

November 13. Cruising on w^estern station. 

November 16. Found the American fishing schooner Virginia in distress 
off Little Hope and towed her to Liverpool for repairs. 

November 17. Cruising on station, calling at Lunenburg, Lockeport, and 
Shelburne. 

6S927— 3i 



36 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

November 23. Found mast showing 6 feet out of water and fast to sunken 
wreck off Alouton island. We pulled mast from wreck and towed to Liverpool 
and gave in charge of customs officer. 

November 24. Cruising on station. 

November 30. Assisted schooner Vivian P. Smith to wharf at Shelburne. 

December 2. Cruising on station. Found Shelburne fishing schooner Muir 
in distress with broken shaft and assisted her to Marine Railway at Liverpool. 

December 3. Cruising on western station. 

December 17. Towed schooner Hazel L. Myra out of mud to safe berth at 
West LaHave, then cleared ice from LaHave river up to Bridgewater and 
assisted three-mast schooner Harry McLellan out the river to safe anchorage 
off West LaHave. 

December 18. Assisted three-mast schooner Hazel L. Myra from LaHave 
to Lunenburg and arrived at Liverpool same day. 

December 19 and 20. Assisted local tugs to pull the American fishing 
schooner off Liverpool bar, but failed, and vessel wrecked. 

December 21. Cruising on station. Called at Lunenburg and assisted 
three-mast schooner Hazel L. Myra to Hahfax. Then arranged to take doctor 
to Sable island to attend sick lightkeeper. Doctor Byrne refused to go in Arras 
as the accommodation did not suit him. 

December 22. Cruising west towards LaHave river to clear ice and keep 
river open for shipping. 

December 23. Broke ice and assisted the American four-mast schooner 
Dustin G. Cressey down river to safe anchorage off LaHave. 

December 24. Cruising on station. 

December 25 and 26. At Liverpool. 

December 27. Cruising on western station, calling at Lunenburg, Liver- 
pool, and Shelburne. 

January 6. Assisted National Defence lighter Sapper from Shelburne to 
Halifax. 

January 7 to 9. At Halifax taking stores. 

January 10. Crusing on station between Halifax and Shelburne. 

January 12. Assisted fishing schooners Agnes McGlashen, Mona Maria, 
and Clara B. Creaser along the coast from Sambro to LaHave. 

January 13. Cruising on western station and arrived Halifax. 

January 16. Assisting fishing vessels. 

January 18. Assisting fishing schooners Hamona and Delaiuana from 
Sambro light to LaHave and Lunenburg. 

January 19. Breaking ice in LaHave river and assisting schooners Evelyn 
Wilkie and Kathleen Creaser into safe berth clear of ice. 

January 21. Breaking ice and clearing channel to Bridgewater and assisting 
four-mast schooner Joan Kielberg from wharf at Bridgewater down river through 
ice to safe berth off West LaHave. 

January 22. At Liverpool. 

January 23. Cruising east, arriving at Halifax same day. 

January 24. Proceeded, assisting fishing schooners Pauline Lhones and 
Democracy from Sambro to Lunenburg and Riverport. 

January 27. Arrived West LaHave. 

January 28. Pulled the schooners Golden West II and Village Queen off 
the mud banks at Parks Cove, where they had been driven on shore during the 
gale of the 25th. 

January 30. Cruising on station and searching for drifting light and bell 
buoy which had gone adrift from Brazil rock, 11.55 p.m. Found buoy 15 miles 
south by west from Little Hope. Took buoy in tow and arrived at Sandy point 



FISHERIES BRANCH 37 

5 a.m. Slst. We then started breaking ice and clearing ice from channel at 
Shelburne. 

February 1. Pro'ceeded breaking ice at Shelburne, found the can buoy off 
Sandy point light drifting to sea, towed it back to position, then proceeded 
breaking ice. 

February 2. Cruised east and arived at Riverport. Breaking ice and assist- 
ing fishing vessels at Riverport. 

February 3. Breaking ice at LaHave, Parks Cove, and Riverport. Cleared 
channel to Ritcey's wharf and released fishing steamer. 

Febuary 4. Breaking ice at Riverport, released schooners Mary Pauline 
and Audry Brown from ice to safe anchorage. 

February 5. Cruised to Mahone bay and started breaking ice to clear 
channel to shipyards at Mahone. 

February 6. Breaking ice at Mahone bay and Lunenburg. 

February 7. Breaking ice at Mahone, Lunenburg, and Riverport. We 
released four-mast schooner Joan Kielberg from ice to berth off Spectacle isiland 
clear of running ice, then cruised west, arriving at Shelburne February 8. 

February 9. Cruising east, called at Liverpool and arrived at Lunenburg 
the 10th. 

February 11. Cruised to Mahone ba}', cleared channel of ice and arrived 
at Liverpool same day. 

February 13. Cruised east, breaking ice at Riverport and Parks cove. 
Released schooner Versailles from ice and assisted her to Lunenburg. 

February 14. Cruised to Mahone bay, broke ice, cleared channel to ship- 
yards and returned to Lunenburg same day. 

February 15 and 16. At Lunenburg. 

February 17. Cruising vrest, calling at Liverpool and arriving at Shel- 
burne the 22nd. 

February 23. Pulled the stranded yacht Mic-Mac off ledge and to wharf 
clear of ice. 

February 24. Cruised east and anchored off LaHave river at night, waiting 
for high tide. 

February 25. Proceeded, breaking ice at Riverport, Parks cove, and 
LaHave, arriving at Liverpool same day. 

February 27. Cruised east, breaking ice at Riverport and Parks cove. 
Released fishing schooner Jennie Elizabeth from ice and assisted her to Lunen- 
burg. 

February 28. Cruised to shipyards, broke ice and cleared the channel so 
new fishing schooner could be launched, then proceeded to Riverport, breaking 
ice and clearing channel. Released fishing schooner Bertha Walters from ice 
and to LaHave. 

February 29. Proceeded breaking ice at Riverport. Released schooner 
Hamona from ice and to wharf at Riverport. Assisted fishing schooner to 
Lunenburg, then assisted schooner D. D. McKenzie from Lunenburg to ice 
channel. Mahone bay. Broke ice to wharf and shipyards and assisted McKenzie 
to Ernest wharf, Mahone. 

March 1. Proceeded breaking ice at Mahone, then cruised west to River- 
port, breaking ice and clearing channel. Released fishing schooners Mona Maria 
and Clara B. Creaser from ice and to wharf at Riverport. 

March 2. Breaking ice at Parks cove and Riverport. Released the fish- 
ing schooners Agnes G. Myra and Mark Grey from ice and to wharf at River- 
port. Released fishing schooner Hermada from ice at Parks cove and released 
fishing schooner Neva Belle from ice to wharf at Indian Point, then breaking 
ice at Mahone bay. 



38 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

March 3. Proceeded breaking ice Mahone. Towed schooner D. D. Mc- 
Kenzie out ice channel clear of running ice, then cruised to Parks cove break- 
ing ice. Released fishing schooner J. E. Conrad from ice to wharf at LaHave. 
Arrived at Liverpool same day. 

March 4 and 5. At Liverpool. Gales on coast. 

March 6. Proceeded, assisted schooner Cape Blomidon out Liverpool bay 
clear of ice, and to sea. Cruised east, breaking ice at Riverport and Parks) 
cove, arriving at Mahone bay same night. 

]\Iarch 7. Proceeded breaking ice at Mahone bay. Assisted schooner 
D. D. McKenzie to sea, then cruised to Riverport breaking ice and clearing 
channel so coastal steamer with frozen bait could get to Ritcey's wharf to 
supply fishing vessels. At LaHave at night. 

March 8. Proceeded breaking ice at Riverport. Released fishing schooners 
Mary Pauline and Pauline Lohnes and to wharf, then proceeded to Parks cove. 
Released fishing schooner Bernice Zinck from ice and assisted her to Lunen- 
burg. 

March 9. Proceeded to Indian Point breaking ice. Released schooner 
Neva Belle and assisted her to Lunenburg, then proceeded to Riverport, Parks 
cove and LaHave breaking ice. Released fishing schooner J. E. Conrad and 
assisted her to Lunenburg, then proceeded to Parks cove and LaHave. 

March 10. Proceeded to Riverport breaking ice. Released the fishing 
schooners Mark Grey, Mona Maria, Agnes G. Myra and Clara B. Creaser from 
wharf and out in harbour clear of ice. Released schooner Russel Zinck from 
ice, then proceeded to Mahone bay breaking ice and clearing channel. 

March IL Breaking ice at Mahone bay. 

March 12. Proceeded breaking ice at Mahone. Released fishing schooner 
A. J. Balfour from ice and assisted her to Lunenburg. 

March 13. At Lunenburg. 

March 14. Proceeded to Mahone bay breaking ice and clearing the channel 
to shipyards. 

March 15. Breaking ice. New pilot boat launched, then proceeded to 
Indian Point breaking ice and clearing channel, arriving at Lunenburg same 
night. 

March 16. Proceeded to East LaHave breaking ice and clearing channel 
to wharf, then breaking ice in LaHave river. 

March 17. Proceeded breaking ice and opening up LaHave river for 
shipping. Cleared channel to shipyards at Dayspring and channel to Bridge- 
water, then cruised west arriving at Liverpool same night. 

March 18, 19 and 20. At Liverpool. Heavy gales on coast. 

March 21. Proceeded to sea cruising towards Yarmouth for ship to lay 
up for repairs as per telegram received from department. Arrived at Yarmouth 
same night. 

March 22. Moored ship at Baker's wharf for refit. 

March 23. Inspectors O'Brien and Stevens on board going over the defects 
that require attention. 

March 24. Crew getting ship ready for repairs. 

The Lunenburg Grand Banks fishing fleet consisted of 68 sail, French 
fishing fleet 150 sail, Newfoundland fleet 27 sail, and Portuguese fleet 20 sail. 

Forty-two French beam trawlers, two Spanish trawlers and nine Canadian 
beam trawlers were sighted this year on the banks, that is, St. Pierre, Qucro 
and Middle Ground banks. We had no beam trawlers to contend with on the 
Grand banks this year. 

The Lunenburg fleet had only a fair catch this year. During the first part of 
August fish were very scarce on the Grand banks which caused quite a number 
of our vessels going west to the Sable island and Middle Ground banks. 



FISHERIES BRANCH 39 

We had no complaints of interference with our fleet by the beam trawlers, 
and very few reports of illegal fishing. 

During the year we had 16 American fishing vessels on the stations we 
were working on, these we boarded twenty-four times. 

During the year we steamed 15,293 miles and consumed 1,285 tons of coal. 

Cruiser " Arleux " — Captain Cousins 

April 1. Cruising westward towards Liverpool on patrol work. Fishing 
reported poor. 

April 2. Arrived at Shelburne. 

April 4. Proceeded to Yarmouth. Boarded several American lobster 
buyers. Local fishing vessels report fair catches being taken. 

April 5. Proceeded up Bay of Fundy to Digby. Passed large fleet of 
lobster fishing boats between Yarmouth and cape St. Mary's. Fishermen report 
fishing very good, between Gulliver's cove and Digby gut passed large fleet 
of scallop boats operating. Fishermen report good scallop fishing. 

April 11. Proceeding towards Browns bank to take up search for twelve 
men adrift in four dories from the American fishing schooner Commonwealth 
burned at sea. ^-'^'^I'Hliii 

April 12. Searching Browns and LaHave banks for missing fishermen. 
Spoke with several fishing vessels on banks. No trace of missing men in dories. 
Continued search until midnight when weather prevented any further search 
then proceeded towards coast. 

April 14, Arrived at Shelburne. 

April 15. Proceeded to Halifax. 

April 20. Proceeded to Lunenburg. 

April 21. jMoored ship at Lunenburg for annual repairs. 

June 10. Finished repairs. 

June 11. Proceeded to Halifax for bunker coal and supplies. 

June 17. Proceeded on patrol work, arriving at Lunenburg. 

June 19. Proceeded to LaHave banks in search of two missing fishermen 
from the Liverpool fishing schooner. 

June 20. Continued search towards cape Sable. 7.30 p.m. arrived at Shel- 
burne. Reported fishermen picked up and landed at Portland, Maine. 

June 24. Proceeded to Halifax for supplies. 

June 29. Arrived at Canso. 

July 1. At Canso taking part in Diamond Jubilee celebration. 

July 4. Arrived at Sheet harbour. 

July 5. Proceeded to Halifax. 

July 9. Proceeded to Lunenburg. 

July 12. Proceeded to Chester. 

July 13. Patrolling in Mahone bay in search of illegal lobster fishing. 

July 15. Patrolling in St. Margaret's bay, arriving at Halifax. 

July 18. Proceeded to sea, took crew off schooner Mary F. Anderson and 
towed derelict to Halifax. 

July 26. Patrolling off Halifax harbour in search of illegal lobster fishing. 

July 27. Proceeded to Chester. 

July 29. Arrived at Lunenburg. 

July 30. Proceeded to Liverpool. Fishing reported fair. 

August 2. Arrived at Shelburne. Local fishing boats taking herring. 

August 3. Proceeded to Yarmouth. Boarded the American fishing 
schooner Yankee. 

August 4. Calibrating the Yarmouth D. F. Station. 

August 5. Calibrating station. 



40 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

August 6. Proceeded to Bay of Fundy towards Digby. 

August 10. Located new scallop bed 14 miles N.N.W. from Point Prim, 
Digby. 

August 12. Proceeded to Yarmouth. 

August 13. Arrived at Shelburne. Boarded American fishing schooner 
Oretha F. Spinney. 

August 16. Patrolling 3 mile limit off Shelburne to prevent American 
fishing vessels from securing bait inside limits. Local fishing boats taking good 
catches of herring from nets, disposing their catches to the Shelburne cold 
storage. 

August 17. Patrolling off Shelburne. 

August 18. Proceeding towards Halifax for coal and supplies. 

August 20. Relieved lightship No. 24 off Halifax. 8 p.m. relieved by 
lightship and proceeded to Halifax. 

August 26. Arrived at Shelburne. 

August 27. Patrolling off Shelburne, boarded several American sword- 
fishermen at Shelburne. 

August 30. Patrolling in vicinity of Shelburne. 

September 1 to September 3. At Shelburne. Thick fog. Boarded several 
American fishing vessels. 

September 5. At Lockeport (Labour- Day) taking part in celebration. 

September 6. Proceeded to Sandy point, took schooner Joan Kielberg, 
which was damaged in gale August 24, in tow for LaHave river. 

September 7. Moored schooner at LaHave river, and proceeded to Lunen- 
burg. 

September 8. Cruising towards Halifax. 

September 13. Proceeded to St. Margaret's bay and Hubbards cove, and 
proceeded to Lunenburg. 

September 15. Proceeded in search of illegal lobster fishing. 

September ]6. Arrived at Shelburne. Boarded several American fishing 
vessels. 

September 17. Arrived at Halifax. 

September 19 to September 24. Cruising in vicinity of Halifax. 

September 26. Cruising towards St. Margaret's Bay and Hubbards Cove. 
Proceeded to Halifax. 

September 28. Arrived at Lunenburg. 

September 29. Proceeding towards Sable island to bring off the late light- 
keeper's family and sick man. 

September 30 to October 2. Off Sable island. Crew of life saving station 
made several attempts to launch surf boat, sea too rough. 

October 3. Proceeded for coal. Towed into Canso water logged schooner 
N. W. White. Proceeded towards Sable island. 

October 4. Arrived at Sable inland, took off Cleary family and sick man, 
proceeded towards Halifax. Strong S.W. gale. 

Ofto])er 5. Arrived at Halifax. 

October 6. Proceeded to St. Margaret's bay and Hubbards cove. 

October 7. Proceeded to S.W. island, assisting patrol boat Mildred McColl 
in locating position of fish trap. Proceeded to Lunenburg. 

October 9. At Lunenburg. Officers and crew attending memorial service 
for the fishermen lost during the gale of August 24th. 

October 10. Proceeded to Halifax and vicinity. 

Octol)er 15. Arrived at Lunenburg. 

October 17. Proceeded in search of illegal lobster fishing. 

October 18. Boarded American seiner Governor Foss, at Lunenburg. 

October 21. Arrived at Halifax, cleaning ship's boiler. 



FISHERIES BRANCH 41 

November 1. Proceeded to Lunenburg. 

November 2 and 3. Proceeded in search of illegal lobster fishing, proceed- 
ing to Lunenburg. 

November 8. Arrived at Shelbunie. 

November 9. Cruising towards Yarmouth. 

November 10. Calibrating Yarmouth D. F. Station. 

November IL Proceeding up Bay of Fundy towards Digby, passed large 
fleet of scallop boats operating between Gulliver's cove and Digby gut. Fisher- 
men report good scallop fishing when weather is favourable. Several new 
boats have been added to the fleet this season. Proceeded to Digby. 

November 12. Proceeded to sea, picked up motor boat with two men, 
broken down and drifting to sea. S.W. gale. Took boat in tow to Digby, Ship 
at Digby in protect^pn to scallop fleet, until lifeboat is in commission. 

November 19. Proceeding towards Yarmouth. 

November 20. Proceeded to Shelburne. 

November 21. Arrived at Halifax for coal and supplies. 

November 26. Proceeded to Sheet Harbour. 

November 27. Proceeding towards Canso to protect the winter fishing 
fleet. 

November 27 to Januarj^ 24. Protecting winter fishing fleets from Canso, 
Arichat and Petit de Grat, and assisting fishing boats with engine trouble. 
Fishermen report poor season's fishing owing to haddock being scarce, and rough 
weather. 

January 27. Proceeded towards Halifax. 

January 28. Relieved Sambro lightship, and proceeded to Halifax. 

February 2. Proceeded towards Lunenburg with new Lunenburg fishing 
schooner Sigrid Amanda in tow. 

February 4. Moored ship at railway wharf Lunenburg for annual refit. 

LOSS OF LIFE 

The loss of life of those actively engaged in the fishing industry of this 
province I deeply regret to have to report was appalling. In addition to the 
eighty-two men of the Lunenburg fleet, previously referred to, who lost their 
lives during the big gale of August 24, when four vessels of that fleet failed to 
return to port, a number of shore fishermen as follows were drowned while 
engaged in their precarious calling: — 

On April 24, R. Latter drowned at Herring cove, Halifax county. 

On August 24, Arthur Covey and his son Charles, of Indian harbour, 
drowned off Prospect, Halifax county. 

Two fishermen were drowned in Halifax county east. 

Three fishermen of Petit de Grat were drowned during the month of 
November. The schooner Virginia S lost one man on November 22, when Mr. 
Alexie Martell was washed overboard from a dory by a heaAy sea. On the 
28th, Messrs. Edward DeRoche and Willie Brown lost their lives when return- 
ing from the fishing grounds. A heai-y sea capsized their boat and although 
they clung to the bottom of the boat as long as possible and several of their 
friends attempted to save them they sank before they could be rescued. 

PROSECUTIONS 

In Apjjendix No. 8 will be found details of prosecutions for offences com- 
mitted against the Fisheries Act in this province. 



42 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

REPORT OF INSPECTOR J. F. C ALDER, DISTRICT No. 1, NEW BRUNS- 
WICK, FOR 1927-28 

District No. 1, New Brunswick, comprises the counties of Charlotte, St. 
John, Albert and the Bay of Fundy watershed of Westmorland county. 

The following statement shows the catches and values marketed for the 
past year: — 

Cod 19,331 cwts. Value S 58,247 



Haddock 32,735 

Hake 36,796 " 

Pollock 7,693 " 

Halibut 101 " 

Flounders 1,133 " 

Skate 157 " 

Herring 155,224 " 

Sardines 174, 640 bbls. 

Alewives 23, 000 cwts. 

Salmon 3,462 " 

Shad 1,698 " 

Smelts 194 " 

Mixed Fish 205 " 

Clams 24,493 bbls. 

Cockles 143 cwts. 

Green Dulse 2,870 " 

Lobsters 6, 735 " 

Winkles 520 " 



70,589 

41,610 

14,272 

1,912 

3,747 

431 

186,023 

1,046,250 

41,916 

66,492 

18,600 

1,903 

102 

96,599 

500 

7,010 

194,425 

1,231 



The total marketed value of the catch was $1,858,364, against $2,296,541 
for 1926, $1,859,003 for 1925 and $2,030,611 for 1924. 



COD 

The catch of cod was 19,331 cwt. against 37,674 cwt. for the previous year. 
Cod were not so plentiful during the past year as they were the previous one, 
the demand for the fish was very poor and the opportunity to sell did not always 
exist. These factors account for a considerable portion of the decrease in the 
catch. 

HADDOCK 

A large increase is to be noted in the quantity of haddock taken during the 
year — 32,735 c\vi;. against 19,061 cwt. for the previous year. The increase in 
the haddock catch is due to two causes: first, the lack of market and very low 
price being paid for hake, and the increased opportunity to sell haddock in a 
fresh condition, the Maritime Fish Company of Digby, N.S., taking regular 
cargoes from Wilson's Beach. 

HAKE 

The catch of hake was 36,796 cwt. against 34,120 cwt. for the previous 
year. The market conditions for these fish remain practically as they were 
during 1926. The average price paid during the past year for the round fish 
was 46 cents per cwt. This price was so low that very little energy was put 
into the fishery. 

POLLOCK 

A large decrease is to be noted in the pollock catch — 7.693 cwt. against 
38,271 cwt. for the previous year. This falling-off in the yield is due entirely 
to a scarcity of the fish. Pollock were very scarce along the whole Vtlantic 
seaboard. This was a serious blow to our fishermen, as slack-salted Quoddy 
pollock were generally in good demand, at fair prices. Of course, the pi ice paid 
this year, due to the scarcity of the supply, was very high. 



FISHERIES BRANCH A3 

HERKING 

There was a falling-off of about 50 per cent in the herring catch for the 
year as compared with the previous one — 155,224 cwt. in 1927 against 229,611 
cwt. in 1926. This was due, principally, to a great falling-off in the run of 
herring at Grand Manan. The limited supply, however, was really a blessing in 
disguise for all those who engage in the smoked herring industry at Grand 
Manan, as their smoke houses were filled with the pack of the previous year. 
Owing to the very light pack during the past year, they were enabled to dis- 
pose of the stock on hand at fair prices. 

SARDINES 

One hundred and seventy-four thousand six hundred and forty barrels were 
taken during the past year, against 171,637 barrels in 1926 — practically the 
same quantity in each year — but the available supply differed greatly during 
the two years in question. During 1926 thousands of hogsheads of sardines 
were actually turned out of the weirs, as there was no sale for them. The fac- 
tories on the American side actually closed down for the year by the middle of 
October. This year they kept open until the first of December. It is true that 
they did not open until July this year, but such was the case with most of them 
during 1926. Until July of the past year, Connors Bros. Ltd., was the only 
cannery that was open. Of course there were times when they could not take 
care of the entire supply, but the run was not very heavy and most of the fish 
were sold. After the American canneries opened up, the demand always exceeded 
the supply. The catch for the present year, therefore, really represents the 
available supply. The average price paid to the fishermen, $6.60 per hogshead, 
is not a fair value for the product, and the industry is being conducted, on the 
whole, with very little, if any, profit. For the greater part of the year, the 
canners acted as an actual combine in the purchase of sardine herring supplies, 
with all of them paying $5 per hogshead; but, during the latter part of the 
year, as the supply continued to be light and the buyers of lobster bait from 
Nova Scotia were procuring considerable quantities at the standing price, the 
canners started to raise it, with the result that, for a time, there was active 
competition among them in the purchase of herring at the weirs, and good 
prices were paid to the fishennen. The pack last year was comparatively light, 
all old goods are cleaned up and the past years pack is practically all disposed 
of also. Consequently, the canneries will all open in the spring, and it is to be 
sincerely hoped that there will be competition among them in the purchase of 
their supply of sardine herring, and that our fishermen will once again receive 
fair prices for the same. 

SALMON 

The salmon catch was 3,462 cwt. against 3,810 cwt. for the previous year 
— a slight falling-off. Taken on the whole, however, this fishery is well holding 
its own. 

ALEWIVES 

The Alewive catch was 23,000 cwt. against 34,000 cwt. for the previous 
year. A large portion of the alewive catch is salted, packed in barrels and 
exported to Haiti and other West Indian islands. There is very little demand 
for them at the present time, with the result that a considerable portion of the 
catch is yet on hand. The prospects for the successful prosecution of this 
branch, during the coming year, is not very encouraging. 

SHAD 

There was a large falling-off in the shad catch for the present year — 
1.698 cwt. against 3,384 cwt. for 1926. While the catch in the Bay of Fundy 



44 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



waters and St. John harbour was very light, at the same time, Overseer Barnes 
reports that a very large run of shad ascended the Petitcodiac river and suc- 
cessfully performed their function of propagation. It is to be hoped that the 
fishery will show the benefit of the same in the course of the next few years. 

LOBSTERS 

A slight increase is to be noted in the quantity of lobsters taken during the 
year — 6,735 cwt. against 6,130 cwt. for 1926. I really think the increase in 
the yield is due more to favourable weather conditions during the past fall, 
rather than to any increase in the run of lobsters. 

There is very little to note with regard to minor branches of the industry. 

It is very apparent that the lot of the fisherman, under present conditions, 
is not a happy one. The run of fish, taken on the whole, is fairly satisfactory, 
and the fishermen have provided themselves with necessary, up-to-date equip- 
ment for catching the same; but they are seriously handicapped by their 
inability to find a ready market for their products at paying prices. This is 
especially true of the summer months when the run of fish is the greatest and 
the weather is good. The urgent need of the line-fishermen is development of 
the fresh fish and mild-cured industries. The salt fish industry appears to be 
dying out. The fresh, mild-cured and canned industries are taking its place. 
Except in sardine canning, there has been very little development along these 
lines in this district. There is a fairly steady supply of practically all kinds 
of ground fish of the very best quality, but neither facilities, capital nor busi- 
ness organization for development along modern lines. It is to be sincerely 
hoped that some such development will materalize in the near future. 

There were 64 confiscations and 14 prosecutions during the year. In 
Appendix No. 8 will be found full details of the prosecutions for this district. 

REPORT OF INSPECTOR A. L. BARRY, DISTRICT NO. 2, 
NEW BRUNSWICK, FOR 1927-28 

District No. 2, New Brunswick, comprises the counties of Westmorland 
(Northumberland strait side only) , Kent, Northumberland (except the North- 
west and Southwest Miramichi) , Gloucester and Restigouche. 

The total marketed value of the catch for the past year was $2,504,560, as 
against a marketed value of $2,998,007 for 1926, a decrease of $473,281. Tlie 
following tables show the catch and marketed value for the vears 1926 and 
1927:— 





1927 


1926 




Quantity 


Value 


Quantity 


Value 


Lobsters 


43,017 cwt. 
45,990 " 
18,369 " 
117,442 " 
13,574 bbls. 
20,246 cwt. 
257,609 " 
8,704 bbls. 
9,271 cwt. 
7,950 " 
8,963 " 
1,099 " 
688 " 
55 " 


S 

760,628 

684,260 

331,112 

223,1.59 

100,576 

91,979 

193,. 593 

34,099 

30,303 

10,025 

18,692 

2,335 

6,5.30 

55 


53,481 cwt. 

59, ass " 

20,779 " 
100,890 " 

12,383 bbls. 

17,079 cwt. 
194,290 " 
9,445 bbls. 

19, ass cwt. 

17,717 " 
5,166 " 
1,996 " 
1,313 " 

50 " 
315 bbls. 

51 cwt. 
137 " 
426 " 
119 " 


921,856 


Smelts 


846,850 


Salmon . . . . . . . . 


320,322 


Cod 


386,273 


Oysters 


92,535 


Tomcods. .... 


61,242 


Herring 


201,756 


Clams and Quahaugs 


.35.644 


Mackerel 


65,188 


Alewives . . . . 


28,426 


Hake and cusk 


11,583 


Haddock 


3,800 


Shad 


9,071 


Flounders 


50 


Scallops 


708 


Mixed fish 


528 cwt. 

172 " 

482 " 

32 " 


528 
3,998 
9,3.38 

300 


51 


Trout 


2,040 


Bass 


6,590 


Eels 


894 







FISHERIES BRANCH 45 

L0BSTE21S 

Of the fisheries of this district the lobsters still hold first place in value 
although there was a decrease of 10,000 cwt. from the previous year. I would 
attribute a great deal of this decrease to the fact that there was better protec- 
tion against out of season fishing in the northern district where in past years 
considerable lobsters were taken and carried to the open season district to the 
south and included in the catch of the fall season. I look for a considerable 
falling off in the reported pack in the northern district this coming year. In 
past years, a considerable illegal fall pack was made in certain parts of the 
northern district and included in the spring pack for the following year but 
there was very little of this during the fall of 1927 owing mainly to better pro- 
tection, the low price of lobsters and the refusal of the larger dealers to buy 
any of this illegal stock. There were 125 lobster canneries in operation as 
against 129 in the previous year, a decrease of four. This decrease took place 
in the southern district and for some years past there has been a steady decrease 
in the number of canneries operating, as the operators cannot obtain enough 
lobsters to make packing profitable. Another reason is the ready market for 
the sale of lobsters for the live lobster trade which pays a better price for the 
larger lobster than the canneries can afford. 

SMELTS 

There was a decrease of 13,098 cwt. in the catch with a decrease in value 
of $162,590 from the previous year. This decrease may be partly accounted 
for by the fact that until after Christmas 1927 there was very little fishing 
owing to the lack of ice rather than to any noticeable decrease in the run of 
smelts. The fishermen sustained some severe losses in nets and gear owing to 
the ice moving out on two or three occasions after they had set their nets. 
Altogether about $10,000 worth of nets were destroyed. The quality of smelts 
was good, particularly in the fall of 1927, and a good average price was main- 
tained. 

For the past three or four years the fishermen of the Miramichi district 
have realized that the number of nets set to catch smelts is out of all proportion 
to the quantity of smelts taken, there being about 3,000 licenses issued on the 
Miramichi river and bay. Throughout the summer, at the request of the fish- 
ermen, some meetings were held at which they voted almost unanimously for 
an increase in the distance between nets. Commencing December 1, 1927, all 
nets in the Miramichi district were set 200 yards from each other up and down 
the river where previously they had fished as close as 100 yards. The results 
have proven quite satisfactory and saves the fisherman who has struck a good 
nm of smelts from being hemmed in too closely by other fishermen, as was 
the case previously. Better protection was given the smelts previous to the 
opening of the season with the result that there was very little illegal fishing 
done. 

Less gill-net fishing was carried on from October 15 to December 1 than 
ever before and the fishermen are beginning to realize that this is not a paying 
proposition, as the smelts command only about half the price that they do in 
the colder weather. Last year the fishermen of Buctouche bay and the tributary 
rivers asked to have gill-net fishing prohibited which request was granted by 
the department. 

SALMON 

There was a decrease of 2,410 cwt. from the previous year with an increase 
in value of $10,566. The decrease was general throughout the district among 
the trap-nets, although the catch by drift boats in Northumberland strait was 



46 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

about equal to the previous year. There was a considerable falling off in Bay 
Chaleur and Restigouche districts where all fishing is done with trap-nets. 
The decrease may be accounted for by the general fluctuations in fisheries from 
year to year. Nearty one million pounds were shipped frozen to England. The 
United States market also was always quite brisk and there was always a 
good demand for salmon the fishermen receiving from 10 cents to 12 cents per 
pound. 

COD 

There was a decrease in the cod fishery the catch being 43,448 c^i). and 
the value $163,114 less than the previous year. Altogether the cod fishermen 
had a hard year as the continued damp weather throughout the fishing season 
made it next to impossible to put up a well dried product with the result that 
the market value shows a considerable decrease. Owing to the poor price paid, 
many boats of the fishing fleet stayed in the harbour. The price paid for dried 
fish averaged $1 per cwt. less than the year before. The overseer in the Caraquet 
area reported that about 60 per cent of the fish were graded No. 2 quality. 

OYSTERS 

There was a increase of 1,191 barrels with an increase in value of $8,041 
over the previous year. Most of this increase was in the Miramichi Bay district 
where an increased catch of 1,075 barrels were taken. The increase was mainly 
due to the increased number of fishermen who came to the Miramichi from as 
far north as Caraquet and as far south as Buctouche. Last summer all dealers 
in my district were notified by letter from this office that a stricter check would 
be kept on the quality of oysters which were being bought from the fishermen. 
The overseers notified the fishermen that the size limit was to be more strictly 
adhered to. The inspector received many letters from the dealers saying that 
they were most ready to co-operate in putting on the market a better grade of 
oysters and the fishermen themselves were pleased when they received from 
$1.50 to $2 per barrel more for selected oysters than they had received the 
previous year. There is a wonderful opportunity for the development of the 
ovster fishery in this district and it is hoped that as a result of the meetings 
of the Royal Commission that some steps will be taken to improve the beds 
already in existence and develop new areas suitable for oyster culture. At the 
Commission sittings nearly all the oyster dealers asked for compulsory grading 
and standard packing of oysters. 

TOM CODS 

There was an increase of 3,167 cwt. with an increase in value of $30,737 
over the previous year. In February of last year there was very keen com- 
petition among the buyers of tomcods and as high as $2.25 per barrel was paid 
where previously this fishery brought only from $1 to $1.50 per barrel. This 
accounts for the increase in value. 

HERRING 

There was an increased catch of 63,319 cwt., but a decrease in value of 
$8,163. 

MACKEREL 

There was a decrease in catch of 9,817 cwt., with a proportionate decrease 
in value of $34,885. This was not due to any decrease in the run of fish. It is 
regretablc tliat more fishermen did not go into mackerel fishing last year as 
owing to the fact that the Gloucester fleet did not strike the schools there was 
a brisk demand in the United States for these fish. In 1926 and 1927 the dealers 



FISHERIES BRANCH 47 

in this district had large stocks on hand which they were barely able to get rid 
of, with the result that they made very little preparation for buying in 1927, 
and so missed a most favourable market. 

ALEWIVES 

There was a decrease of 9,767 cwt. with a decrease in value of $18,401. 

CLAMS AND QUAHAL'GS 

There was a decrease of 741 barrels and a decrease in value of $1,545. 
There are now two canneries for canning quahaugs in my district, where a couple 
of years ago there were none. This probably accounts for the increase in value, 
although no apparent reason can be given for the decreased catch. 

TROUT 

There was an increase in the reported commercial catch, also a great 
increase in the catch in angling waters. Anglers of the Miramichi and tribu- 
taries report that the trout fishing was the best for years. This they attribute 
to the better protection given by the department in the prevention of fishing 
for trout through the ice, considerable of which was done until two or three 
years ago, particularly in the Bartibogue and Tabusintae rivers. 

SCALLOPS 

No scallop licenses were issued for this district last year. Good beds are 
known to exist in bay Chaleur, but as the fishermen are not familiar with the 
methods of taking this splendid shell fish and as they are hard to fish on account 
of living in deep water very little attempt is made to take them. It is hoped 
the commission will recommend instructions to the fishermen in the methods of 
raking scallops. 

The other kinds of fish in my district are so unimportant that special men- 
tion need not be made of them. 

PROTECTION 

We had better protection on all kinds of fish last year than at any time 
during the past three years. The fishermen themselves seem to relize that in 
fishing illegally or countenancing it they are working against their own interests. 
Dealers, too, have awakened to the fact that the lobster fishery' was doomed 
unless energetic steps were taken to protect this. In last year's report I spoke 
of a meeting held in Moncton in February, 1927, as a result of which more 
co-operation was looked for between the dealers and the department's officers. 
This has proven to be the case. At that meeting the dealers bound themselves 
to buy no illegal lobsters either in a packed or green state, and so far as I know 
all who signed the agi'eement have lived up to it. It was particularly notice- 
able during the close season north of the Chockpish. Some parties were looking 
everywhere for cans with which to put up illegally caught lobsters. They could 
not get these from the large dealers as in years past, and this was one contribut- 
ing cause of the better conditions in the northern district last year. Only in one 
section of the northern district was any great attempt made to fish for lobsters 
in spite of preventive measures. This was in the district of Kent county, north 
of the Chockpish. Two additional patrol boats were put under the charge of 
the overseer there and with the result that nearly 5,000 lobster traps were taken 
up and the attempt to fish had finally to be abandoned by the fishermen, some 
of whom have no gear with which to start this year. It is regretable that all 
this gear must be destroyed, but under the circumstances nothing else can be 



48 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

done with it. If the traps were brought ashore they would certainly be stolen and 
put back into the water again. A number of prosecutions took place for breach 
of the lobster regulations, which had the result of slowing up the activities of 
the illegal fishermen. 

Fishing for salmon out of season has long been a favourite pastime on the 
Miramichi for years past, but last fall more energetic steps were taken to inter- 
fere with this traffic. Additional and better guardians were employed to assist 
the overseer and by keeping their boats on the go day and night, and by chang- 
ing the g-uardians, practically every net that was put in the water was seized, 
and it was admitted on all sides that very few salmon were shipped to the 
American market as in former years. 

The same patrol was used to protect the smelts before the opening date, 
December 1, with excellent results. 

As a result of the strict measures put in force more co-operation has come 
from the fishermen themselves, a greater number of whom fish out of season 
only because their neighbom's do. 

One necessity in this district is a fast sea-going motor launch available 
for any part of the district during the open water and this is being asked for, 
for this year. The last few years there has been a scarcity of salmon in the 
trap-nets of the Miramichi river. This scarcity has been laid to the drift-net 
fishermen, rather unfairly I think, as the charges are made without any real 
study of the facts. Of course there is no question that if drift-nets were not 
used more salmon would come up the river, but I believe there are other con- 
tributory causes, one of which has been the taking of so many spawn salmon 
during the fall of the year, in years past. 

However, as a result of an investigation carried out by the' department 
among the drifters and trap-net fishermen, restrictive measures will be put in 
force this year which it is hoped will remedy conditions somewhat. Drifting 
will cease on the 31st of July, one month earlier than in years past. The length 
and depth of their nets will be limited, which was not done before, and the 
trap-net fishermen in the river are to give up fifteen days at the end of this 
season. If, as a result, no increase in salmon is shown within a reasonable time 
jnore restrictions will probably have to be put on. 

I quite agree that in order to have a well-balanced situation more salmon 
must reach the angling pools in the spring and early summer, but I do not 
agree with those who agitate that to this end the drifters should cease fishing 
for two weeks in June, which is the only month in which their operations really 
pay. 

SEALS 

Throughout the summer there was a bounty of $3.50 paid on hair seal noses. 
In addition to the amount appropriated by the department for these bounties, 
the fishermen of the Miramichi held meetings and requested that the salmon 
license fees from the Miramichi be used for the destruction of seals at the mouth 
of the Miramichi. Altogether I paid out about $1,700, representing payment on 
nearly 500 seals. This would indicate the destruction of at least 1,000 seals, 
as only about 50 per cent of those actually killed are ever recovered. As a 
result there were fewer complaints about the seals last summer than for some 
years past, and it is hoped that the bounty will be continued. 

LOBSTER CANNERIES 

There is a steady improvement in the sanitary conditions and in the equip- 
ment used in the lobster canneries. Last summer one license was cancelled and 
the fee returned to the applicant as his cannery was not considered fit for use. 



FISHERIES BRANCH 49 

In another case the overseer was instructed to accept no application. In a 
number of others the owners were warned to carry out certain drastic measures 
for 1928, under penalty of being refused a license to pack. 

Throughout the year there were 63 prosecutions as against 17 of the year 
before. There were also 131 confiscations as against 54 of the previous year. 
Prosecutions were for offences as follows: — 

Breaches of lobster regulations 39 

" oyster " 4 

" salmon " 18 

" smelt " 2 

Total 63 

In appendix No. 8 will be found a list of those who were prosecuted in this 
district. 

Considerable interest was taken by the fishermen and dealers in the sittings 
of the Royal Commission on Fisheries and as a result there is a more optimistic 
feeling that much good will come of the hearings. The fishermen all spoke well 
of the liberty they were given in expressing their views and the sympathetic 
hearing they received. They were frank in mentioning their faults in the past 
and in this way the commissioners got a real insight into the abuses by the 
fishermen themselves as well as the handicaps with which they have to contend. 

REPORT OF INSPECTOR H. E. HARRISON, DISTRICT No. 3, PROV- 
INCE OF NEW BRUNSWICK, FOR 1927-28 

District No. 3, New Brunswick, comprises the counties of Kings, Queens, 
Sunbury, York, Carleton, Victoria, Madawaska and the tidal waters of the 
Northwest and Southwest Miramichi rivers in Northumberland county. 

Spring opened up a little earlier than it did in 1926; the St. John river being 
pretty well clear of ice by April 20. By April 23 the waters of this river 
reached a height of about fifteen feet above low level, but did not reach thd 
usual spring freshet level of about twenty feet above low level. The first gas- 
pereau of the season reached the Fredericton market April 20. The weather 
continued cold and cloudy, with many rain storms, and the rivers and streams 
kept at a fairly high pitch nearly all season, and the season was not considered a 
favourable one from the fishermen's point of view, but it was of advantage to the 
earlier runs of fish such as gaspereau, shad and salmon. In comparing sta- 
tistics for my district for the year 1927 with 1926 consideration must be given 
to the enlarged area in 1927. This added area comprises the tidal waters of the 
Northwest and Southwest Miramichi rivers and the tributaries entering them 
in that area — a considerable body of important water so far as the gaspereau, 
shad and salmon fisheries are concerned. 

The total weight and value of the fisheries in 1926, excluding the area 
above referred to, and the total weight and value in the whole area in 1927' 
were as follows: — 

_^ Marketed 

Year Cwt. value 

1926 2,936 .530,930 

1927 11,753 43,749 

an enlargement of 8,817 cwt. and $12,819 in value and the value of boats and 
gear added more than 100 per cent to the 1926 value. 

Appropriate efforts were made to give the added territory proper super- 
vision and I have no hesitation in saying that the local officer in that sub- 
district had proper respect shown in the matter of protection for the valuable 
fisheries. 

68927—4 



50 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

Taking the 1926 area, and comparing the total catch and value in the same 
area in 1927, I find that there was a reduced catch of 265 cwt. and a less value 
of $7,347, accounted for almost wholly in the smaller catches of bass and 
salmon. 

ALEWIVES 

Fewer alewives by 98 cwt. were taken in 1927 in the same area that I had 
in 1926, consequently the large catch shown below was mostly taken in the 
Northwest and Southwest Miramichi rivers. The figures are 

Year 

1926 

1927 



Cwt. 


Value 


758 


S2,274 


9,144 


13,432 



an increase of 8,386 cwt. and $11,158. 

In the St. John river area advices were to the effect that these fi.sh were 
very plentiful during the spring run but the market was very limited there- 
fore no particular effort was made to take more than were required for loc'al 
consumption. In the Miramichi rivers area, i.e., the tidal waters, the quantity 
was 8,484 cwt. while statistics show that 9,000 cwt. were taken in the same area 
in 1926. I regret to have to report that the market for this fish was not good, 
and the price was low, and many hundreds of barrels remained in the hands 
of the dealers throughout the summer, with little or no profit to either fisher- 
men or dealer. 

BASS 

Year Cwt. Value 

1926 220 $3,888 

1927 12 216 

The bass fishery was almost a complete failure in 1927. In the St. John 
river area the drop was 200 cwt. and in the Miramichi rivers area none were 
taken in 1927. So far as the St. John river is concerned my experience is that 
there is a good run of bass about every twelfth year, but I had hopes for some- 
thing more stable in the Miramichi area. 

EELS 
Year 

1926 

1927 

While the price of this fish, to the fishermen was practically the same in 
both years, and was very low, there was a considerable increase in the quantity 
taken. Had the price kept as it was in 1925 — 17 cents per pound — it is pos- 
sible that a much larger catch would have been taken in 1927, and the water 
rid to a greater extent of a pest. 

MULLETS 
Year 



Cwt. 


Value 


30 


S114 


125 


500 



1926. 
1927. 



Cwt. 


Value 


224 


$ 672 


255 


1,005 



This fish is used for baiting eel pots, to a considerable extent. There isi 
also a considerable market for it in certain centres of population. Another 
reason why it sems desirable to take as many as possible from the rivers is the 
fact that it is presumed that it is very destructive to the eggs of shad and gas- 
pereau, and possibly to the eggs of trout. A strange thing is the fact that trout 
and mullets appear to be great friends and very large fish of both species will 
lie together in considerable numbers in many clear water pools. 

PICKEREL 

Year Cwt. Value 

1926 368 $4,416 

1927 480 5,560 



FISHERIES BRANCH 



51 



The very substantial increase in the catch of this fish is satisfactory, the 
fish were of large size and the price continued fairly satisfactory to the fisher- 
men. It is a fishery that does not entail a large outlay for gear and it may be 
carried on the year round without the fishermen having to take much time from 
other work and it puts a few dollars into the pockets of the farmers living near 
waters where pickerel are fairly plentiful. 

SALMON 





Cwt. 


To 

fishermen 


As 
marketed 


1926 


552 

378 

633 

732 
255 


S 

13,800 
9,250 

13,075 
3,725 


$ 
13,800 


1927 


9,250 


1927 ; 


16.900 


1926 




1927 


7,650 







Note. — The first set of figures are for the district as it was in 1926, i.e., 
excluding the tidal waters of the Northwest and Southwest Miramichi rivers, 
and shows a decreased catch of 174 cwt. in 1927 and a value decrease of $4,550. 
The centre row of figures show the quantity and value in my present area. In 
this instance the St. John river fish is credited at 25 cents per pound and the 
Miramichi rivers fish at 15 cents per pound to the fishermen and 30 cents per 
pound to the dealers. The lower set of figures show the catch in the two 
Miramichi rivers — the same area, see Inpector Barry's report for 1926 — with a 
smaller catch of 477 cwt. in 1927. With regard to the St. John river I have no^ 
complaint to make. The water kept fairly high during the month of June and 
half of July and salmon evaded the gill nets on the lower part of the river 
but good catches were made higher up, in York and Carleton counties. While 
this fishery fell off greatly in the upper area during the balance of the netting 
season it improved in the lower area — Kings county — and, notwithstanding the 
many and bitter complaints regarding the lack of effort on the part of your 
ofiicers and guardians to enforce the law, and the great destruction of salmon by 
poachers, I think that I shall be able, before my report is concluded, to show 
that at least a fair proportion of salmon reached the angling and spawning 
waters. The fish were exceedingly well developed and very few grilse were 
taken in the nets. I anticipate that the development of hydro at Grand Falls 
which work will be completed sometime this year will affect the salmon fishery 
of the St. John river above Fredericton. The river will be kept at a higher 
level, probably, after the spring freshet subsides, and this may hurt some fishing 
stands and help others, and it is possible that it may spoil the angling altogether, 
or again it may develop other salmon pools. It will take a year or two to 
know what the result will be, and it will be interesting to waitch the matter. 
Coming to the Miramichi waters, it seems to me that there is real cause foT 
worry. The 1925 report gives the nets' catch as 992 cwt., the 1926 report as 
732 cwt. and the 1927 report as 235 cwt. for the tidal waters now under mv 
jurisdiction, with a similar decrease in the trap-nets district of Inspector Barry's 
district, I understand, while the drift-nets have taken a larger amount than in 
1926. As this matter has received some consideration by your department, 
and is being further considered by the Royal Fisheries Commission, it is 
hoped that a remedy for present conditions may be found. At the session of 
Commission referred to, I was extremely pleased to hear two trap-net fishermen, 
who were strangers to me, voluntarily recommended that the size of the mesh 

68927— 4i 



52 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

for trap-nets be made five and one-half inches, by law, instead of five inches as 
at present. As the department is well aware, I have for years advocated a 
six-inch mesh for salmon nets, of all descriptions, in all of our waters, and at 
a session of the commission in St. John a few days later Commissioner Robi- 
cliaud advised the commission that he is in favour of the six-inch mesh. Such, 
it appears to me, would permit a considerable number of fair sized fish — 6 to 
8 pounds — passing through the nets if the fish happened to strike them, and 
would in a measure appease the anglers in giving them more fish to have a tr>' 
at. It seems difficult to limit the number of nets allowed but I think that it 
would not be difficult to limit the length of them. Very few small fish are 
taken by the salmon nets in the St. John river but a very large number have 
been in years past> and up to the present, in the trap-nets in the Miramichi 
rivers and bay. It seems quite apparent that drastic action of some sort 
must soon be taken if the valuable salmon fishery of the Miramichi district 
is to be preserved, and a good deal may be done by the strict enforcement of 
even the present regulations. 

SHAD 

Year Cwt. Value 

1926 720 $4,320 

1927 674 4,044 

1927 1 , 017 5, 108 

1926 680 3,800 

1927 343 1 ,064 

Note. — The top figures are for my ddstrict as it was in 1926 (excluding 
the tidal waters of the Northwest and Southwest Miramichi rivers) and for the, 
same area in 1927. It will be observed that there was a slight decrease in 1927. 
The middle row gives the result in 1927 with the Miramichi district added and 
the lower set gives the result in the Northwest and Southwest Miramichi rivers 
alone in 1926 and the same in 1927, showing a 50 per cent decrease in the latter 
case, with only thirteen shad fishery' licenses issued in that area in 1926, as 
against seventy-nine in the same area in 1927. 

An analysis of the St. John river area shows that the Kennebecasis river, 
in Kings county, yielded 72 cwt. less than the previous year and that the 
Washademoak water, in Queens county, yielded 113 cwt. more and the St 
John river, in Queens county, yielded 96 cwt. less thian in 1926; a net loss 
of 55 cwt. in the two counties. The balance of the St. John river counties — 
Sunbury, York, Carleton and Victoria — do not figure strongly in the total; 
the gross catch there in 1927 being 46 cwt., which just equals the net losis in 
the St. John river area in 1927 as compared with 1926. As the four counties' — 
Sunbury, York. Carleton and Victoria — cover about 140 miles of the St. John 
river, it would appear that 46 cwt. of shad taken from that area would not 
tend to affect the shad fishery seriously, consequently if it desired to curtail this 
fishery further it would appear that the remedy needs to be applied in the 
counties of Kings and Queens, particularly on the two tributaries of the St. 
John. If a remedy is applied I would suggest that it take the form of issuing 
only one shad fishery license to a family and that the licensee be required to 
fish his or her own net, instead of allowing two licenses to a family, which may 
be fished by any person. The fishermen on the river contend that shad were 
not scarce, either in 1926 or 1927, but that water conditions were very unsuit- 
able both years; being too high for profitable fishing. On looking at the returns 
from the last shad area — just below Grand Falls — it would appear that a con- 
siderable quantity of shad reached there and were able to pass the nets below, 
and there were only three nets operated at Grand Falls. Coming to the Mira- 
michi rivers the 50 per cent loss would lappear to be a matter for serious 
confiideration, unless conditions were very abnormal in 1927. With a 600 per 



FISHERIES BRANCH 53 

cent increase in licenses issued and a d-ecrease of 50 per cent in the catch of 
shad it looks bad from any angle. The price at which a large percentage of 
the catch sells makes it a very cheap food, and I hope that the supply will not 
diminish. 

STURGEON 

Year Cwt. Value 

1926 57 $1 , 425 

1927 24 528 

This fishery, carried on by a few persons, is not very prosperous, and the 
price for the meat was not good in 1927. A considerable number of very small 
sturgeon are taken in other nets and are generally lost. Fishermen are warned 
to liberate the small fish alive but because of the great number of nets of all 
kinds it is quite impossible to know w-hat is done with a large percentage of 
small sturgeon. 

The total weight and marketed value of the commercial fisheries in this 
district, as the district was in 1926 and for the same area in 1927, and in the 
enlarged district in 1927, are as follows: — 

Year Cwt. Value 

1926 2,936 $30,930 

1927 2,671 23,583 

Enlarged District 
1927 11,753 43,749 

Equipment 

Value Value 

1926 $15,185 1927 $31,811 

DOMESTIC FISHERIES 

The quantity and value of the domestic fisheries in this district in the years 
1926 and 1927 were approximately as follows: — 

Cwt. Value Value 

1926 648 .113,120 Equipment $17,332 

1927 598 11,015 " 25,102 

The area was practically the same in both years, as I had the non-tidal 
water of the Miramichi rivers in 1926. 

Statistical records from the various subdistrict officers, show that there 
were 50 cwt. less in quantity and $2,105 less in value in 1927. 

Reports from the local officers and various anglers during the season were 
that trout fishing generally was quite satisfactory, and in the Miramichi dis- 
trict particularly good. The lessee of Cains river said that he never saw a 
better run of sea trout in that river, and there was a particularly good run in 
the Southwest Miramichi above Cains river, which is a tributary. The anglers 
are more anxious however to get salmon and grilse and do not fish trout as was 
the case before salmon angling became such a sport. There are thousands of 
persons in this district who do not live beside salmon waters, or who cannot 
afford to fit out for salmon angling, to whom trout fishing is the chief recrea- 
tion, and also for food at times, consequently the conservation of the present 
supply, and the propogation at the hatcheries and ponds by the department, to 
be later liberated in lakes and streams, is well worth while and should be, and 
no doubt is, appreciated by anglers. 

Salmon angling on the St. John river was only fair. In York county the 
water was too high during most of the season. In Carleton county the same 
condition prevailed but it did not affect the pools so much and angling was 
fairly satisfactory, while in Victoria county high water, presumably, spoilt 



54 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

such fishing. There is no question but that when the water is high salmon do 
not rest long in the various pools between Fredericton and Grand Falls, con- 
sequently it is much more difficult to take any. When the rivers are low the 
water is warm because of its sluggish movement therefore salmon will rest 
longer and in larger numbers in the cool spots, until the urge come upon them 
to move on towards the spawning areas on the Tobique and upper St. John, 
and it is while they are resting in these cooling spots that the anglers have their 
greatest success. The statement is often made by unthinking persons, or per- 
sons who do not know the facts, that, because salmon cannot be freely taken 
with the fly at all times, poachers are causing the trouble with nets. That may, 
and no doubt is a fact at times, but it is exceedingly .seldom that such is the 
fact in recent years. Time was when a great many salmon were illegally killed 
with nets and spears on the St. John river, but evidence cannot be produced, 
during recent years, to show that many salmon have been illegally killed with 
either net or spear in this water. Vague statements by irresponsible persons 
are not evidence. Only three times since the year 1902 has the net catch of 
salmon on the St. John river been less than it was in 1927. At the same time 
the salmon anglers of the Tobique river had the best season in history — 86 
cwt. taken with rod and line against 398 cwt. taken by all the salmon nets in 
the whole St. John river area — while angling on the St. John was not good. The 
superintendent of the Tobique Salmon Club informed me that never within his 
experience of thirty-five years on that river did he see so many salmon descend- 
ing the river after spawning as during the fall of 1927. Admittedly the con- 
tinuous fairly high water was favourable for the ascent but that fact does not 
detract from my statement that large numbers of salmon reached the upper 
waters, and proves the numerous statements of " salmon unable to get up river," 
" antiquated service," " illegal fishing going on without let or hindrance," " fish- 
ery officers and guardian doing nothing but drawing their pay," as untrue. 
Possibly if the Government of the province of New Brunswick would spend 
a small amount of money, seeing that practically all of the revenue from the 
fisheries of the province goes to it, in placing a man here and there to co-operate 
with your officers and guardians, the service would be improved. It might at 
least satisfy those who are now making iso much noise about the amount of 
illegal fishing taking place, and would give us a chance to check up on how 
badly your officers and guardians are falling down. 

On the Southwest Miramichi salmon angling was not considered good; 
more particularly after the middle of July. Before that date there was no par- 
ticular reason to complain, and here again the service provided by the depart- 
ment was not greatly to blame. I have been advised by a guide who spent the 
whole of the angling season on the river, in York county, that angling was good 
until the middle of July. Is it any wonder that angling was not very good dur- 
ing the whole season when we consider the fact of the very small catch of salmon 
in the trap nets and gill nets — a total of 255 cwt. in both the Northwest and 
Southwest rivers. The fact of the matter is salmon did not come into these 
rivers in large numbers in 1927, for what reason I do not know, but if angling 
was unsatisfactory it was not the fault of the officers and guardians. I am told 
by the same guide that never were there so many parties of anglers on tl^ie 
Southwest, in York county, as were there in 1927. Fishing parties followed one 
another continuously from the upper waters to Boiestown, besides the scores of 
anglers who spent from one to three weeks in specified areas. Two anglers 
from Boston, U.S.A., took nearly one hundred salmon and grilse in one small 
area — Burnt Hill pools — which is probably the best small area on the river. 
Hundreds of salmon and grilse ascended and remained in one small stream 
sixteen miles long — Rocky brook — in York county, in addition to numbers taken 
by anglers. Whether the great number and the great length of drift nets and 



FISHERIES BRANCH 



55 



trap nets, or the vast number of hair seals, or a combination of both, brought 
about the conditions of 1927, as they were, I am unable to say, but there is no 
question about that salmon were comparatively scarce in those waters. In 
every instance wherein violations have been reported to me, and evidence of 
value furnished, prosecution has followed, with the exceptions noted below. 



PROSECUTIONS 



There were twenty-seven informations laid against violators of the Act. In 
two instances informations were withdrawn because of the ages of the young 
offenders, but they were required to pay fairly heavy costs. One was with- 
drawn because of bad information, but was re-entered and a conviction made, 
and convictions were obtained in the other twenty-four cases, fines amounting 
to $275, being paid in twenty cases and fines amounting to $80, being sus- 
pended, pending future actions on the parts of the offenders, of which there 
were four. Details of these will be found in Appendix No. 8. 



SEIZURES AND CONFISCATIONS 



Seventy-nine seizures were made and the articles, consisting of one old 
Ford car, one canoe, nets, wire traps, spears and torches, etc., were confiscated 
and mostly destroyed; $82.10 worth of materials were sold and some stored for 
future sale — when the fisheries open in the spring of 1928. 



REPORT OF INSPECTOR S. T. GALLANT, PROVINCE OF PRINCE 
EDWARD ISLAND AND MAGDALEN ISLANDS FOR 1927-28 

Prince Edward Island 

The total marketed value of the fisheries of the province of Prince Edward 
Island for the year 1927 was $1,367,807, an increase of $8,873 over that of the 
year 1926. 

The following table is interesting as showing the comparison of the catch 
and marketed value for the year 1927 with that of the preceding year: — 



Kinds of fish 



1926 



Quantity 
caught 



Value 
marketed 



1927 



Quantity 
caught 



Value 
marketed 



Cod cwt. 

Haddock " 

Hake and cusk " 

Mackerel " 

Herring " 

Crabs " 

Alewives " 

Salmon " 

Smelts " 

Trout " 

Scallops gal. 

Caplin bbl. 

Eels cwt. 

Tomcod " 

Clams and quahaugs bbl. 

Oysters " 

Tongues and sounds cwt. 

Cod liver oil, medicinal gal. 

Cod oil " 

Lobsters cwt. 



49,823 
1,472 

13,803 
6,054 

63,930 



30 

.5,730 

66,298 



118,700 

3,065 

20,881 

20,653 

89,915 



360 


720 


164 


4,015 


15,390 


98,670 


111 


1,332 


157 


628 


192 


2,162 


2,331 


4,664 


867 


4,533 


5,161 


61,898 



45 

1,719 

926,718 



49,419 
1,168 

11,326 
6,455 

51,834 
135 



124 

14,936 

61 

192 

183 

131 

1,823 

1,174 

4,071 

68 



4,010 
62,800 



127,627 

3,787 

16,780 

28,255 

88,368 

360 



3,031 

179,232 

646 

240 

850 

1,358 

4,195 

5,760 

48,838 

1,360 



1,203 
855,917 



56 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

As the Royal Commission appointed to investigate all" phases of the 
fisheries have held three sittings in the province of Prince Edward Island, I 
shall refrain from making any recommendations, confining my remarks to the 
actual fishing operations for the past season. 

COD 

The season opened with poor prospects for marketing; the local market 
became quite active, however, and absorbed the bulk of the catch, good prices 
being obtained. 

The catch by sub-districts is as follows: — 

Cwt. 

West Prince county 7, 330 

East Prince county 696 

Queens county 34,632 

Kings county 6, 761 

HADDOCK 

The catch by sub-districts is as follows: — 

Cwt. 

Queens county 205 

Kings county 936 

HERRING 

On account of unfavourable ice conditions fishing began late in May; the 
catch, therefore, is a little below that of last year. A large percentage of the 
catch was placed in cold storage for fox feed, a development of this fisherv\ 
which enhances its value considerably. 

The catch by sub-districts is as follows: — 

Cwt. 

West Prince county 15, 925 

East Prince countj' 11, 263 

Queens county 8, 178 

Kings county 16,468 

LOBSTERS 

Our shores were surrounded with ice until the middle of May, and in some 
localities up to the 25th, which had a disastrous effect on this fisherv'. The ice 
moved off several times and some gear was set out, only to be destroyed, how- 
ever, on the return of the ice which occurred on two or three occasions. It is 
impossible to expect a normal catch under such conditions, but, should the 
weather be favourable for fishing this spring, we may no doubt look forward 
to a much increased catch. 

Japanese crabmeat is nov/ an established product and is offering keen com- 
petition to the canned lobster. As a result, lobster packers will have to 
endeavour to put up a first-class article in order to establish a preference for 
their produce among the consuming public, and compensate for the difference 
in the price of crabmeat, which, I understand, is about one-third less than that 
of canned lobster. If the buying public could be assured of the superior 
quality of canned lobster no doubt a much larger quantity could be sold at a 
reasonable figure. 

The catch by sub-districts is as follows: — 

Cwt. 

West Prince county 13,975 

East Prince county 10,411 

Queens county 13,067 

Kings county 25,347 



FISHERIES BRANCH 57 

OYSTERS 

East and West rivers with tributaries, Vernon, Orwell andi Seal rivers are 
all well stocked with small oysters so that the future of this fishery in the 
above-mentioned rivers is assured. The Richmond Bay areas are very slow 
to recover and it will be many years before they attain their former state of 
productiveness. The oysters shipped from this province to the upper Canadian 
markets were in good demand and fancy prices were secured throughout the 
season. 

SMELTS 

The smelt fishing season for gill-nets opened on the 15th day of October. 
The fish were scarce but of a good quality and sold at extremely high prices. 
The bag-net fishing season opened on December 1, and although the rivers did 
not freeze over before the end of the month, record catches were taken in the 
East river and at other points. 

The catch by counties follows: — 

Cwt. 

West Prince county 995 

East Prince county 5.328 

Queens county 8.066 

Kings county 547 

FISHERIES PROTECTION SERVICE 

We had six patrol boats in the service and with the aid of the overseers 
and guardians a great many attempts at illegal fishing were suppressed. There 
is no doulbt that the only means of preventing illegal fishing is by having a 
sufficient number of patrol boats employed, the captains of which must be men 
well qualified for the position: otherwise, the service is bound to suffer. 

Total number of confiscations for violations of the fisheries regulations 
during the season 1927 covering 100 seizures, 45. 

Total number of prosecutions during season 1927, 19. 

In Appendix No. 8 will be found full details of the prosecutions for this 
district. 

REM.\RKS 

The fishways built in 1925 at Laird's, Campbell's, Dixon's milldams, and 
at Vernon river, are proving a success and trout are ascending in large numbers 
to the proper spawning grounds. This will eventually increase the fishing in the 
above-mentioned streams and it is hoped that the department will see fit to 
construct more of these fishways in other streams that are equally importiant. 
Our streams are being fished continuously during the summer months by our 
own people and numerous tourist? and everything possible must be done for the 
propagation of these sport fish. Sportsmen from the other provinces are loud 
in their praises of the excellent trout fishing in this province, and if the supply 
is to be kept up every attention must be given to propagation. 

CAPITAL INVESTED 

The total capital invested was $1,117,473, which covers sail and row boats, 
gasoline boats, carrying smacks, gill-nets, trap and smelt nets, lierring nets, 
tubs of trawls, handlines, lobster traps, fishing piers and wharves, ice houses, 
small fish and smoke houses and fish canning and curing establishments. 

MAGDALEN ISLANDS 

Tiie total marketed value of the fisheries of the Magdalen Islands for the 
year 1927 was $722,105, an increase of $88,882 over that of the preceding year. 



58 



MARINE AND FISHERIES 



The following table gives a comparison of the catch and value of the year 
1927 and that of the year 1926:— 



Kinds of fish 



1926 



Quantity 
caught 



Value 
marketed 



1927 



Quantity 
caught 



Value 
marketed 



Cod cwt. 

Herring 

Mackerel 

Smelts 

Eels " 

Clams and quahaugs bbl. 

Lobsters cwt. 

Squid bbl. 

Tongues and sounds cwt. 

Hair seals no. 

Seal oil gal. 

Cod oil " 

Fish skins cwt. 

Fish fertilizer " 



38,892 

101,600 

17,595 

50 

30 

1,975 

25,799 

25 

40 

1,200 

3,500 

6,700 

200 

300 



87,010 

76,222 

66,035 

250 

240 

11,500 

373,313 

250 

280 

2,400 

1,750 

3,. 3.50 

500 

75 



38,894 

110,217 

61.885 

80 

50 

1,615 

20,463 



35 

50,357 

63,030 

6,340 

284 

480 



83,238 

69,535 

177,046 

240 

350 

9,690 

300,087 



245 

56,462 

21,314 

2,653 

639 

606 



COD 

There was little demand for cod, and, as a result, this fishery was not 
carried on to any great extent. The catch was about the same as last year but 
the price was somewhat lower. 

HERRING 

Herring made their first appearance on May 12 and were very plentiful. 
Very few vessels called for bait, and as the demand for smoked herring is poor, 
this fishery is not as remunerative to the fishermen as it was some years ago. 

LOBSTERS 

Lobster canneries began operations on May 19, but on account of very 
,blustery weather during the months of May and June, the catch was a little 
below that of last year, but the prices paid the fishermen were the same. 

MACKEREL 

Mackerel fishing with nets began on the 8th day of June and continued 
until the 20th, the largest catch in the history of the islands being landed, viz., 
16,876 barrels. It is impossible to properly handle these fish in such large 
quantities, and as a result a great many of them were of poor quality and a 
much lower price had to be accepted for them. 



SEALS 

The increase in the number of seals caught was 49,157. The catch 
amounted to 50,357 seals which is a record catch for the Magdalcns. 

REMARKS 

The arrival of the steamer Lovatt on the first day of May marked the 
opening of navigation to the Magdalen Islands. On her first trip from Pictou 
to the islands she encountered heavy fields of ice and was out for four days. 
Thi.s service is giving entire satisfaction so far as passengers and freight are 
concerned, and the captain and crew are very obliging and attentive to their 
duties. 

It is pleasing to know that the people of these islands will have communi- 
cation during the winter months with the outside world by means of the Air 
Service; this will doubtless be fully appreciated by them. 



FISHERIES BRANCH 



59 



REPORT OF INSPECTOR J. B. SKAPTASON, PROVINCE OF MANI- 
TOBA, FOR 1927-28 

There was an increase of nearly two million pounds over the banner year 
1926, which is accounted for by nearly 300 more men operating. 
The following are figures for the last five years: — 



Year 


Quantity 


Value 

to 

fishermen 


Value 

as 

marketed 


Number 

men 
employed 


1923 

1924 

1925 

1926 

1927 


cwt. 

154,090 
177.898 
191.329 
304, 143 
322,967 


$ 

739,321 

886,410 

1,061,331 

1,744,642 

1,423,100 


$ 

1,020,595 
1,232,563 
1,466,939 
2,328,803 
2,024,708 


2,530 

2,828 
3,390 
3,809 
4,095 







Increases are shown in catfish of 803 cwt.; pickerel, 12,562 cwt.; trout, 507 
cwt.; tullibee, 17,184 cwt. Decreases are recorded in goldeyes, 205 cwt.; perch, 
2,593 cwt.; pike, 3,301 cwt.; whitefish, 5,008 cwt.; sturgeon, 260 cwt. 

MAEKETS 

While our fishennen have produced approximately the same per man as in 
1926, their returns in many instances have been meagre owing to extremely 
weak markets. With an increased production of nearly two million pounds, the 
actual revenue to the fishermen of the province is, $321,542 less than 1926, and 
to the exporter and dealer, $304,095 les's. While all varieties excepting cat- 
fish, goldeyes and sturgeon were affected by the slump in prices, pickerel and 
tullibee fared worse than any others, dropping about two cents per pound. As 
these two varieties constitute over twenty million pounds, or nearly two-thirds 
of the total production, the serious effect to the whole industry can be readily 
calculated. 

The following are comparative prices as marketed, of the more important 
varieties, for the last five years: — 





1923 


1924 


1925 


1926 


1927 


Catfi.sh 

Goldeves 

Perch' 

Pickerel 


100 
50 
8-6 
8-4 
3-7 

47-3 
7-5 
5-2 
7-1 


IM 
4-4 

10-6 
8-5 
3-5 

500 

100 
3-6 
9-5 


10-6 
4-2 

11-2 

11-5 
40 

40-9 
9-0 
4-1 
9-5 


11-3 
40 
13-4 
10-3 
40 
51-6 
110 
5-9 
9-0 


12-3 
4-7 

10-9 
80 


Pike 

Sturgeon 

Trout 

Tullibee 


3-7 
53-9 
10-9 

40 


Whitefish 


8-5 






For total catch 


6-6 


6-9 


7-4 


7-6 


61 







It will be seen the price realized per pound is the lowest in five years. 

The Sub-District of The Pas, comprising all waters north of, and includ- 
ing the Big Saskatchewan river, but not the northern part of lake Winnipeg, has 
enjoyed a good season in all varieties of scale fish. The somewhat lower prices 



60 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

that obtained as compared with 1926, was fully offset by the increased yield. 
While there were more men operating, the catch per man was considerably 
higher than the previous year. The slump in price, which affected other dis- 
tricts very materially, was not nearly as injurious here, as pickerel and tullibee, 
in which the biggest drop was recorded, constitute a very small proportion of 
the production in this district. Moose, Cormorant and Herb lake, were the 
chief producers. 

Cormorant lake just about produced its limit of 75 tons by the end of the 
season, February 28, 1927, and Clearwater lake had produced its limit of 40 
tons by the end of January. About half the production was shipped fresh 
(green). 

Three new lakes which were fished in a small way were Armstrong. Part- 
ridge Crop and Pikwitonia. These are all small lakes out from Mile 214 of the 
Hudson Bay railway and the principal catches were whitefish and tullibee. The 
whitefish produced were of exceptionally good quality, mostly jumbos and large 
mediums. One license was issued for Reindeer lake, where the production con- 
sisted mostly of whitefish, trout and herring. The catch was almost entirely 
sold locally. 

So far this winter, Beaver lake appears to be the big producer, the limit of 
100 tons being taken by the end of December. It is expected the 40-ton limit 
for Clearwater lake will be reached early in January. 

Summer fishing for whitefish was carried on in a small way in Moose lake. 
The catch was good, but lack of ice and poor transportation facilities did not 
warrant extensive operations. 

STLTIGEON 

Sturgeon fishing on the Churchill was good, eleven licenses were issued, 
but the men operating were poorly equipped, and between them did not have an 
outfit of nets for more than five men. They produced 14,800 pounds of sturgeon, 
average dressed weight being fully 30 pounds. The first consignment consisting 
of 467 sturgeon were brought to The Pas before Christmas. The overseer reports 
these as the best samples of sturgeon, size and quality, that he has seen in that 
part of the country. 

Summer fishing for sturgeon on the Big Saskatchewan river and its lake 
expansions, may be termed a total failure during the past summer. Both Cedar 
and Cumberland lakes w^ere tried out for awhile, but only 2,000 pounds of the 
50,000 pound limit was taken. The Nelson river also was ver\' disappointing, 
only a little over 30,000 pounds were cauglit. It is felt that the restrictions 
placed on the sturgeon fishing by the new regulations were not made any too 
soon. 

The completion of the new railway under construction to the Flin Flon 
Mines, will bring a number of lakes much closer to railhead. Egg lake, the 
Cranberry lakes, Athapapuskow, Beaver and Cold lake, all good fishing waters, 
will be within easy hauling distance to the railway, and as this is expected to 
be c«mplc4ed within the next year, considerable impetus will be given the fishing 
industr>' of the district. 

The statistical returns for the fishing industry of The Pas district are 
given under one heading. It may be of interest to show here, the production 
bv lakes: — 



FISHERIES BRANCH 



61 



Lake 



Whites 


Pickerel 


Trout 


Mixed 


cwt. 

133 

332 

804 

30 

785 

1,021 

562 

1,213 

646 

2,. 389 

528 

86 

440 

85 

97 

2.38 

2 

202 


cwt. 


cwt. 


cwt. 
50 


182 
57 


170 
200 






90 
66 


8 
1.35 


449 

2 

577 




372 

86 

100 


728 
8 


374 










120 
20 

114 
44 




75 


67 


100 






38 







Men 



Armstrong 

Athapapuskow. . . 

Beaver 

Cedar 

Clearwater 

Cormorant 

Egg 

Herb 

Landing 

Moose 

Pelican 

Pikwitonia 

Partridge crop. . . 

Reindeer 

Setting 

Sturgeon 

Windy 

Wintering 



1 
5 
7 
3 

10 

13 
4 

13 
4 

32 
3 
1 
3 
1 
2 
4 
1 
1 



STURGEON FISHING 

Cwt. Men 

Churchill river 148 11 

Sturgeon lake 3 2 

Cedar lake 11 3 

Nelson river 320 44 

A great many of the men fishing in the district are only part time fisher- 
men; mining prospecting, and trapping being their chief occupations. 

Lake Winnipegosis has produced well during the year, there has been a 
slight increase in total catch. When it is considered the winter season was ten 
days shorter than that of 1926, and the summer fishing carried on under a 
limit, which w^as taken a week before the normal closing time, the increase in 
production is fully in proportion to the increased number of men operating. 
Below are figures for the last two years: — 





1926 


1927 




Whites 


Pickerel 


Other 
fish 


Men 


Whites 


Pickerel 


Other 
fish 


Men 


Summer 

Winter 


cwt. 

1,4.58 
6,879 


cwt. 

10,-5.56 
14, 673 


cwt. 

3,2.36 
24,670 


141 
348 


cwt. 

2,073 
5,114 


cwt. 

8,748 
16,644 


cwt. 

1,419 
27,596 


153 
396 








8,337 


25,229 


27,906 


489 


7, 187 


25.392 


29,015 


549 



Lake Dauphin shows a very marked increase over the 1926 production, 
with four less men operating. There is an increase from 875 cwt. to 2,313 cwt. 
The chief increase is in pickerel, of over one hundred thousand pounds, which 
increase took place mostly in the first two month(s of the present season, 
November and December, 1927, and can be ascribed to the high waters in the 
spring of 1927, allowing a good run of fish from lake Winnipegosis up the 
Mossy river. 

Lake Manitoba shows a slight decrease in production with two less fisher- 
men operating. The total catch is 7,398 cwt. less than 1926. 



62 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

The following are five years' figures: — 





1923 


1924 


1925 


1926 


1927 


Number of fishermen 


626 


779 


905 


1,128 


1,126 






Total production 


cwt. 
25,655 
41 


cwt. 
48,658 
62 


cwt. 
51,587 
57 


cwt. 
85,256 
76 


cwt. 
77, 858 


Catch per mfin 


69 







The decrease is in all varieties excepting whitefish, which shows an increase 
of 529 cwt. 

This lake is well ser^-ed by railways on both sides, and for that reason 
lends itself particularly well to the fresh fish industry, which is becoming more 
and more popular. Prices obtained by this method of marketing, are as a rule 
much higher than for frozen stock. The present winter however, has been a 
disappointment as regards prices for fresh fish. There appears to be some 
definite evidence of a combine by New York commission men to keep down 
prices, and this is the chief outlet for fresh fish from the province. 

Lake St. Martin shows a slight increase over last year in whitefish. 

Lake Winnipeg taken all through, this lake has had a most productive year. 
With 132 additional operators, the catch of all fish shows an increase of nearly 
two million pounds. 





1925 


1926 


1927 


All fish 


84,763 cwt. 

1,791 

§644,530 


141,726 cwt. 

1,828 

$1,104,003 


161,597 cwt. 




2,096 


Price marketed 


$1,065,828 







It will be seen that with approximately two million pounds increase in pro- 
duction over 1926, there is a depreciation in actual market value, of nearly 
forty thousand dollars. 

Whitefish shows a falling off both in winter and sunomer fishing of 9,000 
cwt. while nearly every other variety records a substantial increase. The great- 
est increases are in pickerel and tullibee, the former recording an increase of 
12,000 cwt. over 1926, and the latter 18.000 cwt. These however suffered the 
greatest slump in prices, an average of about 3 cents per pound as paid to 
fishermen. The tullibee market was very poor throughout the year, and those 
operating extensively, or almost entirely for tullibee, had a poor year in spite 
of the good catch. Over a million pounds was placed in cold storage locally, 
and in Winnipeg, and much of it did not move until late in the summer and 

fall. 

The summer whitefish season was rather a disappointment. With the limit 
of 3,000,000 pounds fully taken in 1926, a week before the season expired, there 
was general optimism for 1927. The catch was very disappointing however, 
and was nearly 700,000 pounds short of the limit. 

The following are five years' figures for the summer whitefish operations on 
lake Winnipeg: — 



1923 


1924 


1925 


1926 


1927 


cwt. 

15,238 


cwt. 
14.567 


cwt. 
23,330 


cwt. 
33,115 


cwt. 
25,679 



FISHERIES BRANCH 63 

It seems to be fairly generally thought that the decrease in the catch for 
this season should not cause any alarm. Unfavourable conditions prevailed; 
the season was late in starting, owing to ice, and was rather cold throughout, 
which usually keeps the fish from schooling. Indications towards the latter part 
of the season were for a marked improvement, and some very big individual 
catches were then made. 

The fall season was good, with increase in production of both pickerel and 
tullibee. The increase in the latter was of course due to the change in. the 
regulations allowing the use of tullibee nets from October 20 to the end of the 
season. The run of fish was not as heavy as the previous year, but legalizing 
the regular tullibee nets for this period compensated for it. 

The following are figures for the pickerel production during fall and sum- 
mer: — 

1925 1926 1927 

cwt. cwt. cwt. 

10,626 22,860 30,724 

Tullibee caught in fall operations: — 

1925 1926 1927 

cwt. cwt. cwt. 

3,404 16,620 19,475 



ANGLING 

There is a considerable increase in the number of angling licenses issued 
during the year: 554 as against 194 in 1926. This is no doubt due to the 
inauguration of the one-day dollar permit, and the patrol by a special guardian 
throughout the summer of the lakes along the southern Manitoba border. These 
lakes do not offer much in the way of variety to the angler, and really nothing 
in what may be termed as sport fish. Pike, and in some few instances pickerel 
and perch, are taken. Rock lake, lake Killarney, and Oak lake are the favourite 
hunting grounds of the North Dakota anglers. Of these lakes, Oak lake has been 
the best during the last two years. 

During the year there were fifty-four prosecutions in the province, for the 
following offences: — 

Fishing illegal mesh nets 24 

Fishing without permit or license 21 

Illegal possession 5 

Fishing in close season 3 

Sturgeon fishing in prohibited area 1 

54 

There were 244 confiscations during the same period. In all, 335 illegal 
nets have been confiscated. 

Fines collected, $311. 

Sales of confiscated articles, $1,120.05. 

In appendix No. 8 will be found full details of the prosecutions for this 
province, 

Mr. Wm. A. Found, Director of Fisheries, visited the province early in May, 
with a view to holding conferences with fishermen and dealers. Well-attended 
meetings were held at Selkirk, Winnipeg, and Winnipegosis. The fishery regu- 
lations were thoroughly reviewed at these meetings, and many valuable sugges- 
tions made for changes and amendments, which materially assisted in their 
revision and consolidation. 



64 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

REPORT OF INSPECTOR G. C. MacDONALD, PROVINCE OF 
SASKATCHEWAN, FOR 1927-28 

During the year there was a commercial production of 57,800 cwt. of fish, 
this being an increase of 1,085 cwt. over the previous year. The increases and 
decreases in the different species were: — 

Species Increase Decrease 

Whitefish 3, 656 

Pickerel 835 

Goldeyes 5 

Pike 623 

Trout 406 

Sturgeon 30 

Tullibee 689 

Mullets 492 

Mixed 1, 171 

4,496 3,411 



WHITEFISH 

The increase in production of wliitefish was Largely shown from Peter Pond 
and Churchill lakes, with a combined catch of 5,742 cwt.; lac la Ronge, 908 
cwt.; Dore lake, 1,758 cwi:.; Waterhen lake, 351 cwt.; Turtle lake, 460 cwt.; 
and Makwa lake district, 151 cwt., and was generally due to more yardage of 
nets. There was also an increase shown from lakes in the Qu'Appelle valley 
of 111 cwt., due to the advancing of the winter fishing season and more men 
operating. 

There was a decrease in whitefish production from Red Deer Lake district 
of 1,244 cwt., due to the waters in that area being now included in the National 
Park, where no fishing was carried on during the summer or December seasons. 
Jackfish lake decreased 336 cwt. due to the restrictions during the summer 
season. There was a decrease shown in the He a la Crosse district of 2,366 cwt. 
■yf whitefish. Of this araounit Kelly lake would account for 194 cwt., T\''here 
fewer nets were used; Churchill river, 50 cwt., where no fishing was carried on 
during December; Deep river decreased 237 cwt.; and He a la Crosse proper, 
1,855 cwt. Deep river is the connection between He a la Crosse lake and 
Churchill lake, the waters flowing from the latter. Near the outlet from 
Churchill lake is the connection between that lake and the east end of Peter 
Pond^ — locally called Little Buffalo lake. During the early part of December 
the run of fish in Deep river was from He a la Crosse lake to Churchill and 
Buffalo lakes, due largely to higher water levels. The production on the latter 
two lakes was unsually good, and it is claimed a large quantity of the whitefish 
taken were Jumbo whitefish and the same species as had been taken on He a 
la Crosse lake during previous years, with the result that the fishing on He a la 
Crosse lake was unusually poor during the present winter season. This migra- 
tion of whitefish has happened on previous occasions in the same area. 

There was also a decrease shown of 1,186 cwt. of whitefish on Long lake, 
when thirty-four fewer men operated. The decrease in the production may 
not only be due to fewer men operating but also to a large closed area against 
commercial fisliing, and the water level, being some 4 feet higher, had a groat 
effect on the migrating of whitefisli from the closed area to the deeper waters 
where fishing was allowed. 

There was a decrease shown of 406 cwt. of trout. This was due to no fish- 
ing being done on Kingsmere lake (Little Trout) or Crean lake, which have 
been taken within the National Park. The decrease of 30 cwt. of sturgeon 
was due t(j icviscd regulations prohibiting summer fishing for sturgeon. There 



FISHERIES BRANCH 65 

was a considerable decrease shown of the coarser species, which was largely due 
to the early freeze-up during November, allowing practically all fishing to be 
done in deeper waters during the opening of the winter season. 

GREEN FISH 

There were 2,171 cwt. of fish shipped during the winter season in a green 
condition, which w^as an increase of 852 cwt. over the previous year. Of this 
amount, 2,071 cwt. were whitefisli and 100 cwt. tuUibee. All of the above fish 
were shipped from Jackfish, Turtle, Makwa, and Waterhen lakes in the North 
Battleford district. 

MARKETS 

The total market value of the year's commercial production was $503,609. 
This was an increase in value over the previous year of $59,321 and was due 
partly to a larger production as well as an increase in the quantity of green fish 
shipped during the winter season. The markets during the closing of the 
1926-27 winter season became slightly over-supplied, resulting in a quantity of 
fish being stored, largely in the United States. At the opening of the 1927-28 
winter season the buyers were fairly keen and the season opened with a slight 
increase in price over the previous season. It is believed that the general limi- 
tations on production on all waters will be a big factor in regulating the markets, 
as the amount of fish available will be more definite than in previous years. 
The local markets appear to be well looked after, as one large fish company in 
particular speciahzes in local distribution of small and mixed shipments. 

EQUIPMETNT 

The total value of all equipment used during the year in connection with 
the commercial operations was $91,967, this being a decrease of $3,727 from 
the previous year. There was an increase shown of 580 gill nets valued at 
$9,501, and an increase of 2 ice houses on Dore lake. 

There was a decrease shown of 7 smoke houses valued at $4,350 all on 
Peter Pond lake where there are none shown for the year; a decrease of 2 piers, 
3 on Long lake, and an increase of 1 on Okemasis lake. There has been a 
decrease of 27 row boats, 1 on Jackfish lake and 20 on Turtle lake, 2 on 
Okemasis, 6 on Red Deer, and an increase of 1 on Pierce lake and 1 on Makwa 
lake. There was a decrease of 8 gasoline boats, 1 on Jackfish lake, 4 on 
Turtle lake, 3 on Okemasis lake. The above decreases were all due to less 
summer fishing in the various districts. 

CONDITIOX OF FISHERIES 

The general condition of the fisheries throughout the province might be 
considered as favourable, and a much wider interest is evident, especially 
throughout the northern portions of the province, due to some extent to the 
scarcity of fur-bearing animals, resulting in an increased number of the native 
population fishing. Very few new waters were opened up during the year, 
and outside of Pipestone lake the operations during the year were all on waters 
that had been fished for a considerable time. Fishing in He a la Crosse lake 
dropped off considerably during the month of December, and especially in 
whitefish production due to the migration to other waters. Dore lake, which 
has been a very large producing water, has improved considerably over the 
previous year. Fishing in the Waterhen lake dis-trict shows a slight improve- 
ment. Lac la Ronge. which is the largest lake operated, has had an average 
production. In Long lake, where the commercial operations have been gradu- 
ally restricted, the results were that neither the v.dntcr nor summer limit was 

68927—5 



66 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

reached. Three kkes, Kingsmere (Little Trout) , Crean and Red Deer, have 
been taken within the National Park during the year. Over fifty fishermen 
who had been operating on these waters during previous years producing a 
considerable quantity of whitefisih and trout have since discontinued fishing or 
moved to other waters throughout the province. Other waters are retaining 
their production at about normal. 

OBSEKVANCE OF REGULATIONS 

During the year there were 57 prosecutions and a conviction was secured 
in all cases, resulting in fines amounting to $277.50 being imposed with addi- 
tional court costs of $212.50, as follows: — 

Fishing during close season 21 

Fishing without a license 15 

Offering fish for sale under Dominion license 2 

Fishing with illegal apparatus 8 

Possession of fish during close season 8 

Failing to tag nets when in water 2 

Illegal possession of fish 1 

57 

There were also 42 confiscation® miade d^uring the year, as follows: — 

Illegal apparatus 16 

Illegally caught fish 18 

Legal apparatus 8 

42 

There were 17 sales of confiscated articles made during the veair, amount- 
ing to $229.19. 

In Appendix No. 8 will be found full details of the prosecutions for this 
province. 

FISHWAYS AND DAMS 

During the fall of 1926 some of the important fishways in dams in the 
southern portion of the province were inspected by the fisheries engineer. 
Amongst these were the fishways at Katepwe, Craven and Pasqua, and three 
on the Moose Jaw creek near Moose Jaw, and all of which required some minor 
alterations. No repairs have been carried out on any of these fishways during 
the year. The diam over the Red river at Red Wing was removed during the 
spring. The fishway in the Cowan river dam is in good condition, but the 
dam will probably require some repairs during the coming season. A new 
fishway was installed in the Gravelbourg dam on Wood river. Arrangements 
were under way to hiave fishways constructed in small dams on the various 
creeks in the Cj'press Hills area but owing to the very high waters during the 
entire summer season none of this work was undertaken. 

DOMESTIC 

There has been a production during the year under domestic net fishing of 
14,349 cwt. of fish, this being a decrease of 980 c\^'t. from the previous year. 
Whitefish decreased 950 cwt.; trout, 1 cwt.; pickerel, 4 cwt.; tullibce, 219 cwt.] 
mullets, 13 cwt.; and mixed fish, 85 cwt. Pike increased 274 cwt, and Golde\'es 
18 cwt. The average catch per license was 1,461 pounds as compared with 
1,611 pounds the previous year. 

ANGLING, 1927 

There was an estimated catch of fish by anglers during the year of 23,139 
cwt. This is a decrease of 3,776 c\\'l. from the preceding year. There has been 



FISHERIES BRANCH 67 

43,041 anglers reported, being a decrease of 1,873 from 1926. This decrease 
in catch and number of anglers is reported to be largely due to the unfavourable 
■weather conditions during the summer season. The average catch per angler 
was 54 pounds of fish, as compared with 60 pounds during 1926. 

EXAMINATION OF WATERS 

There were twenty-four waters examined during the year to determine their 
suitability for fish life. Of this number tAventy-one were reported to be suitable. 

It is gratifying to be able to rep^ort that as a result of the planting of cisico 
or lake herring in Quill lake during the spring of 1924, that about 20O pounds 
of this species was taken in nets during this year, and also that 300 pounds of 
whitefish were taken from the same lake. Although the first official planting 
of whitefish was made during April, 1926, it is presmned that accidentally 
whitefish fry got mixed with the cisco planted during 1924. 

The staff of fishery officers gave considerable assistance to the Fish Culture 
Branch officers during the j^ear. 

I regret to report that four of the older fishermen were drow^ned during the 
fall, and that none of their bodies have as yet been located. 

REPORT OF INSPECTOR R. T. RODD, PROVINCE OF ALBERTA, FOR 

1927-28 

The commercial catch shows a decrease in both quantity taken and value 
as marketed. Market conditions in the spring were poor and this accounts 
mostly for the decrease in both quantity and value. There was a practical 
cessation of fishing at Buffalo bay and Lesser Slave lakes, where an amount 
exceeding 500,000 pike and pickerel was obtained during the spring fishing of 
1926. Very stormy weather prevailed during August and September at Lesser 
Slave lake, many fishermen reporting the entire loss of equipment. 

INCREASES 

The most gratifying increase to be recorded for the past season is on lake 
Athabasca where the summer fishing for trout was the best on record. While 
close to 1,000,000 pounds of trout and whitefish was obtained, almost the entire 
amount was caught by one company, a second company starting operations too 
late to do much fishing. Reports were received that, owing to the heavy catches, 
it was necessary for the operators to stop fishing periodically as they were 
unable to handle the fish caught with the limited equipment on hand. 

In spite of the great distance from lake Athabasca to Chicago and other 
eastern points the shipments of trout and whitefish arrived at their destination 
in splendid condition. The trout are of an excellent quality, the flesh being pink 
and the fish of uniform size between 7 and 10 pounds, although specimens 
exceeding 40 pounds were caught. A small increase in the catch was reported 
for the Lac la Biche district and Moose lake for the summer season, and during 
the winter season at Pigeon, Lesser Slave, Sturgeon, Primrose and Cold lakes. 
Fishing in the latter lake was particularly good, the limit being obtained in 
sliglitly under one month's fishing. It is also noted that a large increase is 
shown in the Peter Pond lake district in Saskatchewan where there was more 
extensive fishing through commercial licenses being granted. Good fishing at 
Churchill lake obtained during the first part of the year. This district is in 
excellent shape and should last with the present limit for many years to come. 
This district shows an increase in the neighbourhood of half a million jiounds, 
chiefly of whitefish and pickerel. 

68927-5.^ 



68 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

DECREASES 

The heaviest decrease recorded is from Lesser Slave lake where the usual 
heavy spring fishing, as witnessed the year before, was seriously affected by the 
market conditions prevailing. It was reported that the market was glutted 
with coarse fish from the other western provinces, hence fishing in Lesser Slave 
lake was more or less at a standstill. I have no reason to believe that the lake 
is depleted, and without question the present safe limit should be easily obtained. 
Lac Ste. Anne and Wabamun show slight decreases, as well as Beaver lake 
which was heavily fished the year previous and showed up poorly during 1927. 
This lake is considered to be in a depleted condition. The winter operations 
show the lakes as producing fairly steady with the exception of Winnifred lake, 
which was also too heavily fished the previous winter. Winter prices were 
extremely good and market conditions generally excellent. 

MARKETS 

Spring prices, as already reported in so far as this province was concerned, 
were poor and it was almost impossible to dispose of jackfish at any price. 
The price for whitefish during the summer was fair and good in the fall. 
Athabasca trout are gaining an enviable reputation in the eastern markets and 
are standing the long haul from lake to market very well. Extension of this 
market may be expected, through larger operations now contemplted at lake 
Athabasca. It is expected that three companies will be operating on this lake 
for 1928. Three hundred thousand pounds of the trout caught were pan frozen 
and shipped after the season closed and were marketed very successfully. It 
is stated by one of the companies about to operate that a market was assured 
for their whole catch. Winter prices have been very good and the majority 
of fishermen and dealers are satisfied with their season's work. 

TRANSPORTATION 

There has been no great change in this feature over last year, with the 
exception of transportation from lake Athabasca to Waterways. The com- 
panies operating have invested heavily in equipment for catching and sending 
the fish to market in the best condition. Great care is being taken to see that 
the fish is properly iced and taken as swiftly as possible from the lake to the 
end of steel at Waterways, a distance of over 200 miles. Present developments 
comprise three new stern wheel boats, a new freezing plant at the lake, an ice- 
making plant at Waterways, and ammonia freezing plants on the barges con- 
veying the fish up the Athabasca river, as well as many buildings for the men 
and horses. The trail from Cheecham to Peter Pond lake was in good condition 
last year, there being plenty of snow to commence operations. The express 
companies co-operate well with the fish dealer? and every facility is being 
given by the railway companies to see that the fish arrive in the best possible 
condition. 

EQUIPMENT 

As has been previously explained, the Lesser Slave lake fishermen were 
heavy loosers both in nets and boats through the bad storms on that lake dur- 
ing the fall. Some loss was also felt in piers and wharves through ice move- 
ments in the spring. One Edmonton fish company has installed a large cold 
storage and freezing plant in Edmonton, using the Ottesen process, with a 
storage capacity of six cars. Two companies are desirous of building freezing 
plants on Peter Pond lake for summer fishing. Altogether there is a keen 
desire evident from all quarters of maintaining and, if possible, improving the 
standard of fish exported from Alberta. Cottages and boats were built at Cold 
lake to accommodate anglers and there is now ample room for all anglers at 
this most popular resort. 



FISHERIES BRANCH 69 

OBSERVATION OF THE REGULATIONS 

The number of prosecutions for the year 1927 was 73 and the number of 
confiscations 41. Full details of prosecutions will be found in appendix No. 8. 

Fishing in close season contra to Sec. 21 and 33 |5 

Fisiiing without licenses contra to Sec. 1 l-J 

Fishing with illegal mesh net contra to Sec. 17 and 11 11 

Pollution of streams contra to Par. 44 ■ ^ 

Fishing without angling permit contra to Sec. 32 (a) o 

Fishing in closed waters contra to Sec. 24: (c) ' 

Having undersized fish contra to Sec. 34 4 

Fishing with lights at night contra to Sec. 29 ^ 

Fishing with illegal apparatus contra to Sec. 11 1 

Obstructing creek contra to Sec. 12(1) 1 

Sell;ing fish under domestic license contra to Sec. 2 1 

Assisting angler to fish contra to Sec 32 (a j 1 

Total _]^ 

Much valued assistance was given by the undermentioned associations as 
well as by the sixty-two honorary guardians appointed for the purpose of 
assisting the overseers and guardians in their large territories:— 

1. Northern Alberta Fish and Game Protective Association. 

2. Coleman Rod and Gun Club. 

3. Claresholm Fish and Game Protective Association. 

4. Lethbridge Rod and Gun Club. 

5. Calgary Fish and Game Protective Association. 

6. McLeod Anglers' Association. 

7. Bellevue Fish and Game Association. 

8. Pincher Creek Anglers' Association. 

9. High River Angling Association. 

10. Cardston Fish and Game Association. 

IRRIGATION SYSTEMS 

Owdng to the heavy rain fall and continued wet weather throughout south- 
ern Alberta very little irrigation was required, in fact some of the small systems 
were never opened during the summer. No complaints have been received 
regarding destruction of fish. 

D.\MS AND FISH WAYS 

The fishway in the Canadian National Railway's dam at Burbank on the 
Blindman river was again taken out by the ice in the spring, owing to high 
water during the summer. This could not be repaired until late in the season, 
when a new fishway was installed. This was placed to one side of the spillway 
and where it is now protected from ice and high water by the wings of the dam. 

The fishway in the Canadian Pacific Railway dam in the Vermilion river 
at Hazeldine, Alta., has been completed and is in good condition. A new fishway 
was also erected in the Canadian National Railway dam in the Lobstick creek 
at Leslieville. Repairs were also made on the fishways in the Canadian National 
Railway dams in the Verimilion river at Vermilion and Vegreville. The ciam 
in Willow creek, owned by the town of Claresholm, was carried away in 
September by flood; this has allowed a great quantity of pike and suckers to 
ascend to the upper reaches of the creek. This dam was considered beneficial 
to the trout fishing, as it prevented the pike and suckers from ascending to that 
part of the stream frequented by trout. It will be rebuilt as soon as possible. 

The large dams on the Bow river at Bassano and Carseland owned by the 
Canadian Pacific Railway and Canada Land and Irrigation Company and the 
Eau Claire dam at Calgary, in my opinion have greatly benefitted the trout 
fishing in the Bow river and tributaries, as they have prevented innumerable 



70 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

quantities of pike and suckers from reaching the trout waters. This is especially 
so with regard to the first two named, as no trout are found below them, and 
that part of the river is infested with very large quantities of pike, suckers 
and ling. 

ANGLING 

Angling throughout the province was not so good as during 1926. This 
was not due to the streams being depleted but due to the continued wet weather 
through the greater part of the season, which kept most of the roads in an 
almost impassable condition and also kept the streams flooded and in a muddy 
condition. This was especially so in the southern part of the province. There 
were a few short periods when the roads were passable and the streams clear, 
when excellent catches were taken especially in the Highwood river. Good 
angling was also obtained in Willow creek and in the Old Man river and some 
of its tributaries when the water was clear. There was also an increase in the 
angling carried on at Cold lake for lake trout. The sale of angling permits was 
increased from 643 in 1926, to 926 this season, and the catch taken by anglers 
increased from 42,370 pounds to 54,735 pounds. The largest trout taken during 
this season was 40 pounds. The angling for pike, perch and pickerel in the 
lakes was good and especially so in Lac la Nonne where excellent catches were 
taken. 

EXAMINATION AND RESTOCKING OF LAKES 

Very few lakes were examined during the year with a view to stocking, 
only ten being examined by myself and staff. An attempt was made to stock 
a few lakes by transfer of adult fish by the st^fiC with the assistance of the 
parties interested in the lakes, but very little was accomplished owing to the 
bad condition of the roads. Those who agreed to supply the transportation 
refused to put their cars over the roads, therefore a number of fish already 
trapped for transfer had to be liberated and the work abandoned. 

A few facts regarding the stocking of waters with fry from the Banff 
hatchery might not be out of place. During October, 1919, Hybernia and 
Marjorie lakes in Jasper Park were stocked with rainbow trout fingerlings, 4,000 
being liberated in each. Until that time these lakes contained no fish of any 
kind. I have while at Jasper recently received numerous reports of very fine 
rainbow trout having been caught from Hybernia lake, some weighing up to 4 
pounds. 

Large rainbow have been seen in Marjorie lake during the spawning season, 
but it is claimed they are very difficult to catch. The fish will not take the 
artificial bait owing to the great amount of natural food in the lake. 

Loch Leven trout up to ten inches in length were taken in the Little Red 
Deer river this season, which is the result of stocking since 1924. Rainbow 
trout up to 3^ pounds were also taken in the Highwood river, the result of the 
stocking during the season 1919 and each year since. About 30 per cent of the 
catch from this stream is rainbow trout. These trout are now being taken from 
numerous other streams in southern Alberta where they have been liberated 
find where none were found previous to stocking from Banff hatchen,'. 

REPORT OF CHIEF INSPECTOR MAJOR J. A. MOTHERWELL, 
WESTERN FISHERIES DIVISION (BRITISH COLUMBIA) FOR 1927 

SALMON 

The calendar year of 1927 closed with a total pack of 1,361,977 cases of 
salmon, as against 2,065,190 cases in the previous year. The year of 1926 
produced the record pack of the province, but the comparison of these two years 



FISHERIES BRANCH 71 

is not a fair one when endeavouring to arrive at the condition generally of 
the salmon industry. The only fair comparison would be by taking the packs 
of the several varieties and comparing each with that of the brood year in each 
case. A very erroneous impression is created in the minds of the public by 
newspaper and other reports being published which do not make the correct 
comparison. 

The average pack of all varieties for the past five years was 1,641,381 
cases and had it not been considered necessary to greatly curtail fishing opera- 
tions during the year, undoubtedly the 1927 pack would have almost, if not quite, 
equalled the record one of 1926. 

The pack of sockeye amounted to 308,052 cases, compared with an average 
of 348,442 cases during the past five years. 

In the Naas river area the total was 11,986 cases, which is not at all good 
although this has never been a remarkably productive sockeye district. Con- 
sidering the fact that a considerable portion of the runs of sockeye heading 
for the Naas river run the gauntlet of the intensive fishing by traps and seines 
in southeastern Alaska, in addition to th'e gear on the Canadian side of the line, 
it is not considered surprising that the sockeye pack on the Naas is not being 
maintained. 

In the Skeena system the total in the case of sockeye was 83,988 cases, 
which, particularly in view of the extra measures taken in the way of closed 
periods, may be considered as quite satisfacory. There would appear to be no 
reason to anticipate that the supply of this variety in the Skeena system cannot 
be maintained. 

The Rivers and Smiths Inlet district produced a pack of 101,053 cases 
of sockeye, which is a very satisfactory showing. Owing to the large number 
of gillnet boats being fished it was necessary to enforce an additional nine hour 
close period during each week-end of fishing. 

The Fraser river again produced an unexpectedly large pack of sockeye, 
amounting to 57,085 cases. A considerable portion of this was due to the 
unusually late run similar to that which ascended the river in the late fall of 
1926. As the sockeye to the Fraser system are predominantly four year fish, 
a fair comparison of the pack would be with year 1923, when the total amounted 
to 29,423. However a more informative comparison would result from the 
inclusion of the catch in the Puget sound area. In 1923, the brood year, the pack 
of Puget sound and the Fraser river together was 76,825 cases and in 1927 it 
amounted to 153,428 cases, an increase of 100 per cent. 

The cohoe pack for the whole province amounted to 162,732 cases, as 
against an average for the past five years of 158,978 cases. 

The total pinks produced in the province amounted to 247,626 cases, com- 
pared with the average of the past six years of 524,413 cases. This shows a 
reduction of 80 per cent compared with the brood year of 1925, when the total 
was 445,400 cases. The shortage was practically all in the northeTn district. 
One suggestion as to the cause of the small runs is that after the eggs were 
hatched out in the brood year of 1925 the mortality in fry was unusually heavy, 
or that conditions at sea, between the time the fry left for the salt water and 
when they returned as mature fish, were such as to permit only a small per- 
centage to survive and return to the streams in which they were hatched. 
Another suggestion is that very intensive fishing in the areas to the north of 
the international boundary has resulted in reducing the quantity of pinks 
hatched in British Columbia streams. It has been demonstrated through tag- 
ging operations that pinks pass through the Alaskan waters on their way to 
the Naas and Skeena districts, and even areas farther south. 

The spawning conditions in the pink areas in the brood year of 1925 in the' 
north, and particularly in the Central area, were not considered entirely satis- 



72 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

factory, and in order that the toll during the year under review might not be 
such as to further deplete the supply of this variety, unusual precautions were 
taken by means of extensions of the weekly close seasons, an entire week's 
prohibition of fishing at the height of the run and early closing at the _ end_ of 
the season. These measures have undoubtedly produced good results, judging 
from the reports on the spawning areas — apart from the Central area — which 
have been received from the officers making annual inspections. Undoubtedly 
the pink situation will require to be well taken care of until it has recovered. 

In the Fraser river district the pack of pinks was greater than in the brood 
year by approximately 3,000 cases, due to an enormous run. 

Chums were very plentiful over most of the British Columbia coast during 
the year and the quantity taken amounted to 563,194 cases, compared with an 
average during the past five years of 567,741 cases. This total is eminently 
satisfactory, considering the fact that from two to three weeks of the best chum 
fishing at the height of the run was cut off, due to the unusual restrictions as 
a result of the enormous amount of fishing gear in the water. There is no doubt 
but that had not these unusual restrictions been put into force the pack of 
chums would have been a record one. 

The previous warning to the industry to tlie effect that continued fishing 
operations would result iri drastic conservation measures did not have the 
desired effect and each year the quantity of gear in the water has increased, 
and in addition the methods of operating purse-seines, for instance, have become 
much more efficacious. 

The salmon gill-net licenses have increased during the past four years 
53 per cent, salmon trolling 99 per cent, and salmon purse-seines 128 per cent. 
Obviously this keen and uneconomic scramble for the salmon, if permitted to 
continue unchecked, would in a very short time result in the serious depletion 
of the runs. Both the salmon fishermen and canners appear to have finally 
reached the conclusion that this unreasonable competition can only result in 
disaster, and there would appear to be good reason to expect that the coming 
year will see salmon-fishing operations conducted on a more economical and 
reasonable basis. 

The greatest difficulty, of course, is with the pink variety. The sockeye 
are being well taken care of and the cohoe and chums usually arrive at the 
spawning streams at a time when weather and water conditions are such as to 
permit a reasonable escapement. In the case of the pinks, however, the situation 
is much more difficult as they often arrive at the spawning streams in the hot- 
test and driest time of the year. If there is not sufficient water in the streams, 
the salmon play about outside and are an easy prey to seines, unless practically 
a day and night efficient patrol is provided at every pink spawning stream in 
the province. With the proposed new measures in the way of cutting off inlets 
and moving out of boundaries, much assistance will be given towards conser- 
vation, but there can never be any assurance that it will not be necessary'' on 
short notice to close all fishing for pinks or even any other variety for consider- 
able periods, in order to maintain the supply. 

HALIBUT 

The catch of halibut landed in British Columbia totalled 300,532 cwt. in 
1927, as against 315,095 cwt. in tiic previous vcar. Statement No. 7 gives the 
total from 1913 to 1927. 

It woulfl not appear that the close season of three months each year during 
the past three seasons has had the eftVct of materially reducing the (juantity 
landerl. 

Indications would seem to warrant the expectation that prices on the 
reopening of the season next spring will not be particularly attractive to the 



FISHERIES BRANCH 73 

fishermen. This is largely due to the fact that the stocks of frozen halibut 
have not been completely disposed of, and it is not likely that prices for the 
fresh article will be particularly satisfactory to the fishermen until the stocks 
of frozen halibut have been sold. 

It has been suggested that the reason for the large stocks of frozen halibut 
is that the market in the east has turned of recent years to the several varieties 
of filleted fish produced on the Atlantic coast. 

HERRING 

As will be seen by statement No. 8, a very large percentage of the herring 
caught is drysalted and shipped to the Orient, the principal market being in 
China. Ten thousand four hundred and sixty-six tons were used in reduction 
works plants. In the vicinity of 2,000 tons is frozen each year at Prince Rupert, 
Butedale, Vancouver, and Kildonan for the purpose of bait for the halibut 
fishing. A smaller quantity is used fresh for the purpose and a comparatively 
infinitesimal quantity finds its way to the fresh fish markets and the smoke 
houses. Although efforts have been made to build up a paying business in the 
canning and also the Scotch curing of this variety, it has not been found profit- 
able. 

The interesting statement No. 8 gives the records of the drysalt herring 
pack from 1918-27. The fluctuation is not necessarily due to lack of supply, 
but is largely caused by the unstable market conditions in China, due largely 
to the internal troubles of that country. The supply of raw product naturally 
has fluctuated from year to year, but there is no evidence that the runs of her- 
ring to the British Columbia coast are becoming depleted in any way. 

WHALING 

The two stations at Naden Harbour and Rose Harbour at the northern 
and southern extremities of the Queen Charlotte Island group were operated 
again this year, with a catch of 258 whales as against a total of 269 for the 
preceding year. 

Statement No. 10 covers the catch from 1918 to 1927. 

FUR SEAL SKINS 

Statement No. 11 shows a very large fluctuation in catches between the 
years 1912 and 1927. Prices naturally very materially influence the activities 
of the Indians, who are the only ones permitted under the Pelagic Sealing 
Treaty to take fur seal skins. During the last two years, for instance, the 
prices have averaged about $8 per skin to the Indians, and in view of such 
small returns, the weather conditions during the migration of the fur seals, and 
the profitable business of trollin'g for salmon, the catch last year fell off 50 
per cent. No doubt also the more efficient patrol which was available for the 
purpose of protecting the fur seals had something to do with keeping the total 
down. 

DESTRUCTION OF SEA LIONS 

On June 7, the C.G.S. Givenchy, equipped with a Lewis gun, long Ross 
rifles, .22 calibre rifles and .22 and .32 calibre automatic pistols (the smaller 
firearms being used primarily for the pups) and accompanied by Mr. W. E. 
Maiden, Secretary of the British Columibia Fishermen's Protective Association, 
an expert machine-gunner, left for the vicinity of the Virgin and Pearl rocks 
to again do what was possible during the pupping time of the sea lions to reduce 
their numbers. Considerable difficulty was again experienced owing to the heavy 
seas running, wliich made operations extremely difficult and hazardous, the 



74 



MARINE AXD FISHERIES 



rookeries being very low and exposed to the full sweep of the Pacific ocean. 
Undoubtedly the use of short Lee-Enfield rifles would be much more efficient, in 
that they are shorter and lighter and more convenient to handle, in comparison 
with the Ross variety. It has not been possible to date, however, to obtain the 
Lee-Enfield. 

The total number destroyed since the commencement of these operations 
is as follows: — 





1923 


1924 


1925 


1926 


1927 


Totals 


Virgin Rocks — 

Pups . . 


649 
1,111 

5 
120 


903 
1,333 

312 
158 


1,067 
1,520 

102 
138 


565 

877 

146 
368 


635 

858 

40 
130 


3 819 


Adults 


5 699 


Pearl Roclcs — 

Pups 


605 


Adults 


914 


Totals 


1.885 


2,706 


2,827 


1,956 


1,663 


11 037 







The officer commanding the expedition reports that yearlings and two-year- 
olds were found to be practically extinct, during the last hunt, which condition 
he attributes to the large numtber of pups killed during previous operations. He 
further states that the rocks were found to be practically monopolized by old sea 
lions of both sexes, but in numbers considerably less than in previous yeai^. 
Mr. Maiden states that he observed fresh fish bones on tbe Virgin rocks on the 
date of one raid, but that these were not present on the date of the previous 
one. This he feels to be evidence to show that the sea lions were feeding on 
fish, although it is understood that during the pupping season thes'e animals 
do not take food. 

A sample of sea lion blood was obtained and forwarded to the Biological 
Station. 

The fishermen in the vicinity again signified their approval of the hunting 
operations by means of gifts or cigars to the members of the crew. 



PATKOL SERVICE 

In view of the immense increase in the number of fishermen and the 
quantity of fishing gear operated during the year, particularly in the case of 
salmon, and the resultant keen competition, the difficulties of the patrol service 
were largely increased and it is felt that if proper measures are to be taken 
looking to the conservation of our salmon supply, particularly, several of the' 
present overseers' areas must be considerably reduced, and more of these 
permanent officers appointed. Each should be eciuipped with an efficient depart- 
mentally owned boat and these boats will require to be kept in commission a 
longer period each season in order that the overseers can give better attention 
to the immensely important problem involved in the inspection and care of the 
spawning grouncls. During the fishing season the duties in the way of protection 
and other relative matters consume all the time of the overseers, and it is only 
after the season is over that it is possible for them to undertake a really satis- 
factory inspection of the numerous salmon streams in each area. 

The insjpections by guardians and patrolmen are very often unsatisfactory 
owing to the far't that these officers are usually new men each year. Obviously 
their lack of experience and information with regard to conditions of previous 
years detracts very greatly from the value of their reports. The only hope we 
have of obtaining satisfactory information is by keeping the overseers and 
f?everal of the departmcntally owned patrol boats on duty for considerably 
longer periods. Even by that arrangement the inspections cannot be entirely 



FISHERIES BRANCH 75 

satisfactory due to the fact that one officer cannot hope to thoroughly examine 
all salmon streams in his district during the time the salmon are spawning. 
This task is physically impoissible. 

Fortunately some seaplane s;ervice was provided and although not sufficient, 
at the same time the moral effect of there being even one plane available to the 
administration cannot be over-estimated, but if the industry finds that only 
the limited service which can be expected from one plane is available, it will 
soon realize the limitations and a considerable portion of the value of the moral 
effect will be lost. As evidence of the efficacy of the air service in the way of 
fishery protection, I would refer to the resolution presented at a recent fisher- 
men's meeting in Prince Rupert to the effect that an adequate air service should 
be provided by the department for the protection of the fisheries, as the fisher- 
men themselves felt it to be the most effective arm of the service. 

The lowest possible minimum sei-vice consistent with reasonable results 
would be two planes capable of service at all times, which would obviously 
necessitate a third in reserve. Commencing with the opening of the fishing in 
the north, one plane is required with headquarters at Prince Rupert and another 
with headquarters in the vicinity of Swanson bay. Later one of these could 
probably be transferred to the Queen Charlotte island area and the other farther 
south to possibly Alert bay or Quathiaski cove. Much, of course, depends upon 
the class of aircraft used and it is necessary' to have eonsiderable speed, a 
high ceiling and the ability to withstand a certain amount of sea. 

The service provided during the pasit year was fifty flying hours to start 
with, which amount was later increased by 42 hours, 2 minutes, making a total 
of 92 hours, 2 minutes. The distance travelled was approximately 5,223 miles. 

The boat patrol service was taken care of by twenty-two Departmentally 
owned power boats, ninety chartered power boats and twelve row boats. The 
Malaspina during the season logged 18,958 miles and the Givenchy, 16,190. The 
latter boat was again used in connection with lifesaving on the west coast of 
Vancouver island with headquarters at Bamfield. 

One of the patrol boats ow^ned by the department, the F.P.L. Cloyah was 
destroyed as a result of an explosion in the engine room. The crew were 
fortunate in being able to make their escape in the tender, the engineer suffering 
severe bums about the face and hands. 

For the purpose of replacing worn out patrol boats, tenders were called 
for three fifty-two footers powered with sixty-five horse-power Thornycroft 
reduction geared gas engines. It is hoped that by using this variety of engine 
there will be much less vibration and that the noise of the ex'haust will not be 
such a handicap as in the case of the Diesel powder boats. In these cases the 
exhaust can be heard a very considerable distance and is a warning to those 
breaking the fisheries regulations and gives them an opportunity to escape. 
It is also expected that the greater cost of fuel for the reduction geared gasoline 
engines will be more than offset by the lower cost of replacements in engine 
parts. 

These three boats were designed and specifications prepared by Mr. J. W. 
Allen, Gas Engine Foreman, whose duties include looking after the annual over- 
haul and upkeep of the patrol boats, as well as seeing that the chartered boats 
give their proper performance. His knowledge is also utilized by other depart- 
ments of the Government. 

REGULATIONS 

As was expected the salmon fishing particularly during the year became . 
more intensive than ever in the past and this fact called for extraordinary 
measures to the end that a satisfactory supply of parent salmon might be per- 
mitted to reach the spawning grounds. 



76 MARINE AND FISHERIES 

It became necessary to increase weekly close seasons for sockeye fishing 
in the northern areas from forty-eight to a total of fifty-seven hours on the 
Skeena river for two week e'nds, and during the w^hole of the fishing season on 
Rivers and Smiths inlets. For the purpose of saving the run of pinks which 
showed evidence of being light, a special close period from August 26 to Septem- 
ber 4 was applied to all fishing gear, apart from salmon trolling in the whole 
of the province, with the exception of that area through which the salmon 
proceed in passing to the Fraser river spawning grounds. 

At the end of the season, in order- to save a reasonable quantity of chums 
and cohoes for the spawning areas, fishing in all of District No. 2 was finally 
stopped on September 23, with the exception of the Queen Charlotte Islands, 
where the date was set at October 7. These dates compare with October 15 
and October 22 respectively in the previous season, the time allowed for fishing 
being reduced in 1927 by approximately three weeks. 

In District No. 3 in addition to the special close period from August 26 to 
September 4, all fishing was closed